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Sample records for longitudinal practical measurement

  1. Financial austerity measures and their effects as perceived in daily practice by Italian nurses from 2010 to 2011: A longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Palese, Alvisa; Vianello, Chiara; Cassone, Andrea; Polonia, Marta; Bortoluzzi, Guido

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Most western economies have in recent years been experiencing one of the longest and deepest economic recessions since the Great Depression. During a recession health-care expenditures are often among the first to be cut. However, what is occurring in daily practice from the point of view of care has not been documented to date. Describing the cost containment interventions undertaken and their effects as perceived in daily practice by Italian nurses was the aim of the study. A longitudinal study design was adopted from 2010 to 2011 involving 1,001 nurses each year. In the 2-year period taken into consideration, participants reported a significant increase in the number of cost containment measures adopted by their health-care organisations. The effects of these cost containment measures have been perceived by nurses especially in terms of (1) increased stress levels, (2) increased number of patients with social problems, and (3) increased nursing workloads. In addition, greater difficulties in finding clinical placement for nursing students and fewer resources devoted to nursing professional development were reported, indicating that some cost containment measures will have long-term effects. The economic crisis seems to affect mainly the most vulnerable groups of society. Innovative solutions for the need to reduce the costs of National Health Services do not seem to emerge from the findings.

  2. Longitudinal measurement invariance of psychosocial measures in physical activity research: An application to adolescent data.

    PubMed

    Roesch, Scott C; Norman, Greg J; Merz, Erin L; Sallis, James F; Patrick, Kevin

    2013-04-01

    The current study served as a practical and substantive guide to establishing longitudinal measurement invariance of psychosocial measures commonly used in adolescent physical activity (PA) research. Psychosocial data on an initial sample of 878 adolescents (ages 11 - 15) recruited through primary care providers were provided at baseline, 6, 12, and 24 months. The target measures included family support, peer support, decisional balance (pros, cons), self-efficacy, and behavioral strategies. Five of the six psychosocial measures exhibited strict longitudinal measurement invariance, with the 6th measure (self-efficacy) exhibiting strong longitudinal measurement invariance. These findings support the equivalence of these measures across time, and provide the foundation to substantively interpret group differences and associations involving these measures and PA.

  3. Measurement Practice Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College and Career Readiness and Success Center, 2014

    2014-01-01

    This discussion guide is part of a larger practice guide designed to help state education agencies (SEAs) define measurement goals, select college and career readiness measures and indicators designed to support those goals, and use the data gathered with those measures and indicators to make informed decisions about college and career readiness…

  4. Teacher Instructional Practices and Language Minority Students: A Longitudinal Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Mido

    2008-01-01

    The author examined the long-term effects of teacher instructional grouping practices on the early mathematical achievement of language minority students from various ethnic groups. The study used 3 longitudinal models. In the 1st model, English language learners (ELLs) displayed lower math performance than did English-only students in the…

  5. The estimate and measurement of longitudinal wave intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruisen, Ming

    1996-08-01

    Quasi-longitudinal waves are one type of structural waves, which are important at high frequencies. This paper studies the estimate theory and measurement technique of quasi-longitudinal waves, analyzes the bias error due to the effect of bending waves. In a two-dimensional quasi-longitudinal wave field, the intensity vector is the sum of the effective intensity vector and the intensity variation vector. Its axial component is proportional to two imaginary parts of cross spectral densities and in the measurement, it is measured by a pair of two-transducer arrays. In a onedimensional quasi-longitudinal wave field, the intensity variation is zero, the intensity is proportional to only one imaginary part of a cross spectral density and it can be measured using a two-transducer array. If bending and quasi-longitudinal waves coexist and the contribution from bending waves cannot be eliminated or reduced to a certain extent, the measured quasi-longitudinal wave intensity will contain a large error. The results measured on the three-beam structure show that quasi-longitudinal wave intensity can be accurately measured using the intensity technique when bending waves are negligible in comparison with quasi-longitudinal waves.

  6. Evaluating Longitudinal Mathematics Achievement Growth: Modeling and Measurement Considerations for Assessing Academic Progress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shanley, Lina

    2016-01-01

    Accurately measuring and modeling academic achievement growth is critical to support educational policy and practice. Using a nationally representative longitudinal data set, this study compared various models of mathematics achievement growth on the basis of both practical utility and optimal statistical fit and explored relationships within and…

  7. 29. HAWSER DEVICE, DEVELOPED AT WES FOR MEASURING LONGITUDINAL AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. HAWSER DEVICE, DEVELOPED AT WES FOR MEASURING LONGITUDINAL AND TRANSVERSE STRESS OF BARGES IN CANAL LOCKS. - Waterways Experiment Station, Hydraulics Laboratory, Halls Ferry Road, 2 miles south of I-20, Vicksburg, Warren County, MS

  8. A compton backscattering polarimeter for measuring longitudinal electron polarization

    SciTech Connect

    I. Passchier; Douglas W. Higinbotham; N. Vodinas; N. Papadakis; Kees de Jager; Ricardo Alarcon; T. Bauer; J.F.J. van den Brand; D. Boersma; T. Botto; M. Bouwhuis; H.J. Bulten; L. van Buuren; Rolf Ent; D. Geurts; M. Ferro-Luzzi; M. Harvey; Peter Heimberg; Blaine Norum; H.R. Poolman; M. van der Putte; E. Six; J.J.M. Steijger; D. Szczerba; H. de Vries

    1997-08-01

    Compton backscattering polarimetry provides a fast measurement of the polarization of an electron beam in a storage ring. Since the method is non-destructive, the polarization of the electrons can be monitored during internal target experiments. At NIKHEF a Compton polarimeter has been constructed to measure the polarization of the longitudinally polarized electrons stored in the AmPS ring. First results obtained with the polarimeter, the first Compton polarimeter to measure the polarization of a stored longitudinally polarized electron beam, are presented in this paper.

  9. Exploring Intensive Longitudinal Measures of Student Engagement in Blended Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henrie, Curtis R.; Bodily, Robert; Manwaring, Kristine C.; Graham, Charles R.

    2015-01-01

    In this exploratory study we used an intensive longitudinal approach to measure student engagement in a blended educational technology course, collecting both self-report and observational data. The self-report measure included a simple survey of Likert-scale and open-ended questions given repeatedly during the semester. Observational data were…

  10. Procedure of measuring the longitudinal emittance of electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vladimirov, I. Yu

    2016-09-01

    The procedure of measuring the longitudinal emittance of electron beam generated by RF gun and reconstruction of its longitudinal phase portrait is proposed. Measuring system consists of vertical deflecting RF cavity, horizontal bending dipole and screen. The beam spot on the screen is used to reconstruct the longitudinal phase portrait. In the proposed procedure an electromagnetic field of the vertical deflecting RF cavity can be approximated by the TM110 mode of pillbox cavity. This approximation allows analytically solve the motion equations of the electron motion in the vertical deflecting RF cavity. The report contains description of the vertical deflecting RF cavity and the dipole, the formulae underlying the procedure and the results of numerical simulation.

  11. The Feeding Practices and Structure Questionnaire (FPSQ-28): A parsimonious version validated for longitudinal use from 2 to 5 years.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Elena; Williams, Kate E; Mallan, Kimberley M; Nicholson, Jan M; Daniels, Lynne A

    2016-05-01

    Prospective studies and intervention evaluations that examine change over time assume that measurement tools measure the same construct at each occasion. In the area of parent-child feeding practices, longitudinal measurement properties of the questionnaires used are rarely verified. To ascertain that measured change in feeding practices reflects true change rather than change in the assessment, structure, or conceptualisation of the constructs over time, this study examined longitudinal measurement invariance of the Feeding Practices and Structure Questionnaire (FPSQ) subscales (9 constructs; 40 items) across 3 time points. Mothers participating in the NOURISH trial reported their feeding practices when children were aged 2, 3.7, and 5 years (N = 404). Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA) within a structural equation modelling framework was used. Comparisons of initial cross-sectional models followed by longitudinal modelling of subscales, resulted in the removal of 12 items, including two redundant or poorly performing subscales. The resulting 28-item FPSQ-28 comprised 7 multi-item subscales: Reward for Behaviour, Reward for Eating, Persuasive Feeding, Overt Restriction, Covert Restriction, Structured Meal Setting and Structured Meal Timing. All subscales showed good fit over 3 time points and each displayed at least partial scalar (thresholds equal) longitudinal measurement invariance. We recommend the use of a separate single item indicator to assess the family meal setting. This is the first study to examine longitudinal measurement invariance in a feeding practices questionnaire. Invariance was established, indicating that the subscales of the shortened FPSQ-28 can be used with mothers to validly assess change in 7 feeding constructs in samples of children aged 2-5 years of age.

  12. Measurement of longitudinal electron diffusion in liquid argon

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Yichen; Tsang, Thomas; Thorn, Craig; ...

    2016-02-07

    In this paper, we report the measurement of longitudinal electron diffusion coefficients in liquid argon for electric fields between 100 and 2000 V/cm with a gold photocathode as a bright electron source. The measurement principle, apparatus, and data analysis are described. In the region between 100 and 350 V/cm, our results show a discrepancy with the previous measurement. In the region between 350 and 2000 V/cm, our results represent the world's best measurement. Over the entire measured electric field range, our results are systematically higher than the calculation of Atrazhev-Timoshkin. The quantum efficiency of the gold photocathode, the drift velocitymore » and longitudinal diffusion coefficients in gas argon are also presented.« less

  13. Measurement of longitudinal electron diffusion in liquid argon

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yichen; Tsang, Thomas; Thorn, Craig; Qian, Xin; Diwan, Milind; Joshi, Jyoti; Kettell, Steve; Morse, William; Rao, Triveni; Stewart, James; Tang, Wei; Viren, Brett

    2016-02-07

    In this paper, we report the measurement of longitudinal electron diffusion coefficients in liquid argon for electric fields between 100 and 2000 V/cm with a gold photocathode as a bright electron source. The measurement principle, apparatus, and data analysis are described. In the region between 100 and 350 V/cm, our results show a discrepancy with the previous measurement. In the region between 350 and 2000 V/cm, our results represent the world's best measurement. Over the entire measured electric field range, our results are systematically higher than the calculation of Atrazhev-Timoshkin. The quantum efficiency of the gold photocathode, the drift velocity and longitudinal diffusion coefficients in gas argon are also presented.

  14. Does a quality management system improve quality in primary care practices in Switzerland? A longitudinal study

    PubMed Central

    Goetz, Katja; Hess, Sigrid; Jossen, Marianne; Huber, Felix; Rosemann, Thomas; Brodowski, Marc; Künzi, Beat; Szecsenyi, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To examine the effectiveness of the quality management programme—European Practice Assessment—in primary care in Switzerland. Design Longitudinal study with three points of measurement. Setting Primary care practices in Switzerland. Participants In total, 45 of 91 primary care practices completed European Practice Assessment three times. Outcomes The interval between each assessment was around 36 months. A variance analyses for repeated measurements were performed for all 129 quality indicators from the domains: ‘infrastructure’, ‘information’, ‘finance’, and ‘quality and safety’ to examine changes over time. Results Significant improvements were found in three of four domains: ‘quality and safety’ (F=22.81, p<0.01), ‘information’ (F=27.901, p<0.01) and ‘finance’ (F=4.073, p<0.02). The 129 quality indicators showed a significant improvement within the three points of measurement (F=33.864, p<0.01). Conclusions The European Practice Assessment for primary care practices thus provides a functioning quality management programme, focusing on the sustainable improvement of structural and organisational aspects to promote high quality of primary care. The implementation of a quality management system which also includes a continuous improvement process would give added value to provide good care. PMID:25900466

  15. [The problem of repeated measurements. Longitudinal analysis in epidemiology].

    PubMed

    Sáez, M

    2001-01-01

    In longitudinal analyses subjects are repeatedly measured along time. They are mixed designs, characterised for their simultaneous consideration of two or more dimensions of analysis, in which time is one of the dimensions.Longitudinal analyses have important advantages with respect other designs. The most important is that they are more efficient, since they allow to distinguish between-individual and within-individual variation.Longitudinal analyses can be approached marginal and conditionally. Whereas the former allows to draw poblational, or average, inferences, the latter permits to draw individual inferences.The statistical models to use depend on the type of response variable. If the dependent variable is normally distributed one will use linear mixed models. When the response is a count one will use mixed Poisson regressions. Mixed binomial or multinomial logistic regressions should be used when the response would be categorical.

  16. A practical longitudinal model for evaluating growth in Gelbvieh cattle.

    PubMed

    Robbins, K R; Misztal, I; Bertrand, J K

    2005-01-01

    Genetic evaluation of growth in Gelbvieh beef cattle was examined by multiple-trait (MTM) and random regression (RRM) analysis. The data set comprised 541,108 animals with 1,120,086 records. Approximately 15% of the animals in the data set had at least one record measured outside of the accepted MTM age ranges for weaning weight (Wwt) and yearling weight (Ywt). Fourteen percent of Wwt records and 19% of Ywt records were measured outside the accepted ranges for MTM analysis, and thus were excluded from MTM evaluations. Two RRM evaluations were performed using cubic Legendre polynomials (RRML) and linear splines (RRMS) with three knots at 1, 205, and 365 d of age. Data Set 1 (d1) utilized all available records, whereas Data Set 2 (d2) included only records measured within MTM ranges (1 d, 160 to 250 d, and 320 to 410 d). The RRML models did not reach convergence until diagonalization was imposed. After diagonalization, it was found that all longitudinal models required fewer iterations to converge than the MTM. Correlations between the MTM, RRML-d2, and RRMS-d2 evaluations were >or=0.99 for all three traits, indicating that these models were equivalent when predicting breeding values from data within the MTM age ranges. Correlations between MTM, RRML-d1, and RRMS-d1 were >0.99 for Bwt and >0.95 for Wwt and Ywt. The lower correlations for Wwt and Ywt indicate that the added information does affect breeding value prediction. The RRM has the capability to incorporate records measured at all ages into genetic evaluations at a computing cost similar to the MTM.

  17. Measurement and simulation of the RHIC abort kicker longitudinal impedence

    SciTech Connect

    Abreu,N.P.; Hahn,H.; Choi, E.

    2009-09-01

    In face of the new upgrades for RHIC the longitudinal impedance of the machine plays an important role in setting the threshold for instabilities and the efficacy of some systems. In this paper we describe the measurement of the longitudinal impedance of the abort kicker for RHIC as well as computer simulations of the structure. The impedance measurement was done by the S{sub 21} wire method covering the frequency range from 9 kHz to 2.5 GHz. We observed a sharp resonance peak around 10 MHz and a broader peak around 20 MHz in both, the real and imaginary part, of the Z/n. These two peaks account for a maximum imaginary longitudinal impedance of j15 {Omega}, a value an order of magnitude larger than the estimated value of j0.2 {Omega}, which indicates that the kicker is one of the main sources of longitudinal impedance in the machine. A computer model was constructed for simulations in the CST MWS program. Results for the magnet input and the also the beam impedance are compared to the measurements. A more detail study of the system properties and possible changes to reduce the coupling impedance are presented.

  18. Recommended Practices in Thrust Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polk, James E.; Pancotti, Anthony; Haag, Thomas; King, Scott; Walker, Mitchell; Blakely, Joseph; Ziemer, John

    2013-01-01

    Accurate, direct measurement of thrust or impulse is one of the most critical elements of electric thruster characterization, and one of the most difficult measurements to make. The American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics has started an initiative to develop standards for many important measurement processes in electric propulsion, including thrust measurements. This paper summarizes recommended practices for the design, calibration, and operation of pendulum thrust stands, which are widely recognized as the best approach for measuring micro N- to mN-level thrust and micro Ns-level impulse bits. The fundamentals of pendulum thrust stand operation are reviewed, along with its implementation in hanging pendulum, inverted pendulum, and torsional balance configurations. Methods of calibration and recommendations for calibration processes are presented. Sources of error are identified and methods for data processing and uncertainty analysis are discussed. This review is intended to be the first step toward a recommended practices document to help the community produce high quality thrust measurements.

  19. Longitudinal measurement invariance, stability and change of anger and cynicism.

    PubMed

    Hakulinen, Christian; Jokela, Markus; Keltikangas-Järvinen, Liisa; Merjonen, Päivi; Raitakari, Olli T; Hintsanen, Mirka

    2014-06-01

    Anger and hostility are key concepts in behavioral medicine, but little is known about their stability over life course. A sample of 3,074 individuals from six age groups (aged 15-30 at the baseline) were selected from a population-based study to examine longitudinal measurement invariance, stability and change in anger and cynicism from early to middle adulthood over 15 years. Cynicism, a facet of hostility, and anger were measured 4 times in 1992, 1997, 2001 and 2007. Final longitudinal measurement invariance models achieved partial strict measurement invariance, indicating good measurement consistency over time. Rank-order stability of anger and cynicism was found to be moderate. Mean levels of anger and cynicism decreased over time, but in anger the decline was faster among women. The variance of anger and cynicism also increased over time, but in cynicism the rate of change was higher among men. Altogether, anger and cynicism show measurement invariance and moderate stability from early adulthood to middle adulthood.

  20. Correlating Function and Imaging Measures of the Medial Longitudinal Fasciculus

    PubMed Central

    Sakaie, Ken; Takahashi, Masaya; Remington, Gina; Wang, Xiaofeng; Conger, Amy; Conger, Darrel; Dimitrov, Ivan; Jones, Stephen; Frohman, Ashley; Frohman, Teresa; Sagiyama, Koji; Togao, Osamu

    2016-01-01

    Objective To test the validity of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) measures of tissue injury by examining such measures in a white matter structure with well-defined function, the medial longitudinal fasciculus (MLF). Injury to the MLF underlies internuclear ophthalmoparesis (INO). Methods 40 MS patients with chronic INO and 15 healthy controls were examined under an IRB-approved protocol. Tissue integrity of the MLF was characterized by DTI parameters: longitudinal diffusivity (LD), transverse diffusivity (TD), mean diffusivity (MD) and fractional anisotropy (FA). Severity of INO was quantified by infrared oculography to measure versional disconjugacy index (VDI). Results LD was significantly lower in patients than in controls in the medulla-pons region of the MLF (p < 0.03). FA was also lower in patients in the same region (p < 0.0004). LD of the medulla-pons region correlated with VDI (R = -0.28, p < 0.05) as did FA in the midbrain section (R = 0.31, p < 0.02). Conclusions This study demonstrates that DTI measures of brain tissue injury can detect injury to a functionally relevant white matter pathway, and that such measures correlate with clinically accepted evaluation indices for INO. The results validate DTI as a useful imaging measure of tissue integrity. PMID:26800522

  1. Simultaneous inference and bias analysis for longitudinal data with covariate measurement error and missing responses.

    PubMed

    Yi, G Y; Liu, W; Wu, Lang

    2011-03-01

    Longitudinal data arise frequently in medical studies and it is common practice to analyze such data with generalized linear mixed models. Such models enable us to account for various types of heterogeneity, including between- and within-subjects ones. Inferential procedures complicate dramatically when missing observations or measurement error arise. In the literature, there has been considerable interest in accommodating either incompleteness or covariate measurement error under random effects models. However, there is relatively little work concerning both features simultaneously. There is a need to fill up this gap as longitudinal data do often have both characteristics. In this article, our objectives are to study simultaneous impact of missingness and covariate measurement error on inferential procedures and to develop a valid method that is both computationally feasible and theoretically valid. Simulation studies are conducted to assess the performance of the proposed method, and a real example is analyzed with the proposed method.

  2. Brain atrophy associated with baseline and longitudinal measures of cognition

    PubMed Central

    Cardenas, V.A.; Chao, L.L.; Studholme, C.; Yaffe, K.; Miller, B.L.; Madison, C.; Buckley, S.T.; Mungas, D.; Schuff, N.; Weiner, M.W.

    2009-01-01

    The overall goal was to identify patterns of brain atrophy associated with cognitive impairment and future cognitive decline in non-demented elders. Seventy-one participants were studied with structural MRI and neuropsychological testing at baseline and 1 year follow-up. Deformation-based morphometry was used to examine the relationship between regional baseline brain tissue volume with baseline and longitudinal measures of delayed verbal memory, semantic memory, and executive function. Smaller right hippocampal and entorhinal cortex (ERC) volumes at baseline were associated with worse delayed verbal memory performance at baseline while smaller left ERC volume was associated with greater longitudinal decline. Smaller left superior temporal cortex at baseline was associated with worse semantic memory at baseline, while smaller left temporal white and gray matter volumes were associated with greater semantic memory decline. Increased CSF and smaller frontal lobe volumes were associated with impaired executive function at baseline and greater longitudinal executive decline. These findings suggest that baseline volumes of prefrontal and temporal regions may underlie continuing cognitive decline due to aging, pathology, or both in non-demented elderly individuals. PMID:19446370

  3. Impact of Curriculum on Understanding of Professional Practice: A Longitudinal Study of Students Commencing Dental Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kieser, Jules A.; Dall'Alba, Gloria; Livingstone, Vicki

    2009-01-01

    This longitudinal study examines changes in understanding of dental practice among a cohort of students in the early years of a dentistry programme. In their first two professional years, we identified five distinct understandings of dental practice that we have ordered from least to most comprehensive: "relieving pain or generally caring for…

  4. Evaluation of thermal gradients in longitudinal spin Seebeck effect measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sola, A.; Kuepferling, M.; Basso, V.; Pasquale, M.; Kikkawa, T.; Uchida, K.; Saitoh, E.

    2015-05-01

    In the framework of the longitudinal spin Seebeck effect (LSSE), we developed an experimental setup for the characterization of LSSE devices. This class of device consists in a layered structure formed by a substrate, a ferrimagnetic insulator (YIG) where the spin current is thermally generated, and a paramagnetic metal (Pt) for the detection of the spin current via the inverse spin-Hall effect. In this kind of experiments, the evaluation of a thermal gradient through the thin YIG layer is a crucial point. In this work, we perform an indirect determination of the thermal gradient through the measurement of the heat flux. We developed an experimental setup using Peltier cells that allow us to measure the heat flux through a given sample. In order to test the technique, a standard LSSE device produced at Tohoku University was measured. We find a spin Seebeck SSSE coefficient of 2.8 × 10 - 7 V K-1.

  5. The Role of Practice in Chess: A Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campitelli, Guillermo; Gobet, Fernand

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the role of practice in the acquisition of chess expertise by submitting a questionnaire to 104 players of different skill levels. Players had to report their chess rating, the number of hours of individual and group practice, their use of different learning resources and activities, and whether they had been trained by a coach.…

  6. Parenting Practices and Adolescent Sexual Behavior: A Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bersamin, Melina; Todd, Michael; Fisher, Deborah A.; Hill, Douglas L.; Grube, Joel W.; Walker, Samantha

    2008-01-01

    The effects of parental attitudes, practices, and television mediation on adolescent sexual behaviors were investigated in a study of adolescent sexuality and media (N = 887). Confirmatory factor analyses supported an eight-factor parenting model with television mediation factors as constructs distinct from general parenting practices. Logistic…

  7. Teachers developing exemplary inquiry practices: Three longitudinal case studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweetman, Sara Berry

    If students are to be successful in the ever-changing scientific world they need to be taught how to think critically, to manipulate materials, and to gather evidence to build knowledge. Most teachers fall short in providing students the inquiry instruction described in the Next Generation Science Frameworks (National Research Council, 2011). This study examined three elementary science teachers' processes as they developed inquiry practices over time. The Electronic Quality of Inquiry Protocol (EQUIP) was used to gather quantitative and qualitative evidence of the teachers' inquiry practices in terms of four factors, Curriculum, Instruction, Discourse, and Assessment. A chronological analysis was used to examine the teachers' professional development and curriculum experiences in relation to their teaching practices. The results showed that all three teachers did change their practice, although the changes varied among cases. For each case, multiple factors influenced the teacher's development. There was a strong positive correlation between the quality of the teachers' inquiry practices and the time spent in curriculum-contextualized professional development. This research indicates that when teachers are supported with curriculum and professional development over extended periods, they develop exemplary inquiry practices. Three recommendations are provided for those interested in implementing science education reform.

  8. Parenting practices and adolescent sexual behavior: A longitudinal study

    PubMed Central

    Bersamin, Melina; Todd, Michael; Fisher, Deborah A.; Hill, Douglas L.; Grube, Joel W.; Walker, Samantha

    2009-01-01

    The effects of parental attitudes, practices, and television mediation on adolescent sexual behaviors were investigated in a study of adolescent sexuality and media (N=887). Confirmatory factor analyses supported an eight-factor parenting model with television mediation factors as constructs distinct from general parenting practices. Logistic regressions indicated that adolescents reporting greater parental disapproval and limits on viewing at Wave 1 were less likely to initiate oral sex between Waves 1 and 2. Adolescents who reported more sexual communication with parents were more likely to initiate oral sex. Results for vaginal intercourse were similar to those for oral sex. Co-viewing was a significant negative predictor of initiation of sexual behavior. Parental attitudes and television mediation can delay potentially risky adolescent sexual behaviors. PMID:19750131

  9. A Longitudinal Study of Changes in Marketing Practices at Private Christian Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vander Schee, Brian A.

    2009-01-01

    This article presents the results of a longitudinal study investigating current marketing practices at selected church-related, private, four-year compared to those in place in 1997. The role that institutional selectivity plays in the use of marketing activities was also investigated. The researcher surveyed the admissions directors or enrollment…

  10. "Flat" versus "Weighted" Reimbursement Formulas: A Longitudinal Analysis of State-Wide Special Education Funding Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dempsey, Samuel; Fuchs, Douglas

    Tennessee data were analyzed longitudinally from 1979-80 to 1987-88 to compare statewide special education practice associated with two student-based formulas for funding disbursement: "flat" versus "weighted.""Flat" grants, used from 1979-80 to 1982-83, provided a fixed amount of funds per child, teacher, or…

  11. The Link between High-Impact Practices and Student Learning: Some Longitudinal Evidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilgo, Cindy A.; Ezell Sheets, Jessica K.; Pascarella, Ernest T.

    2015-01-01

    The current paper used data from the Wabash National Study of Liberal Arts Education--a longitudinal, pretest/posttest design--to estimate the effects of participation in the ten "high-impact" educational practices put forth and endorsed by the Association of American Colleges and Universities (AAC&U) on a variety of liberal arts…

  12. Preschool Home Literacy Practices and Children's Literacy Development: A Longitudinal Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hood, Michelle; Conlon, Elizabeth; Andrews, Glenda

    2008-01-01

    In this 3-year longitudinal study, the authors tested and extended M. Senechal and J. Le Fevre's (2002) model of the relationships between preschool home literacy practices and children's literacy and language development. Parent-child reading (Home Literacy Environment Questionnaire plus a children's Title Recognition Test) and parental teaching…

  13. Maternal Cultural Values and Parenting Practices: Longitudinal Associations with Chinese Adolescents' Aggression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shuster, Michael M.; Li, Yan; Shi, Junqi

    2012-01-01

    Interrelations among cultural values, parenting practices, and adolescent aggression were examined using longitudinal data collected from Chinese adolescents and their mothers. Adolescents' overt and relational aggression were assessed using peer nominations at Time 1 (7th grade) and Time 2 (9th grade). Mothers reported endorsement of cultural…

  14. Building a Constructivist Practice: A Longitudinal Study of Beginning History Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martell, Christopher C.

    2014-01-01

    This longitudinal interpretative case study examined the constructivist beliefs and related practices of four secondary history teachers from their teacher preparation through their first year in the classroom. The results of this study showed that issues of classroom control were major barriers for the implementation of constructivist-oriented…

  15. Change in University Teachers' Elearning Beliefs and Practices: A Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Karen M.

    2016-01-01

    Little longitudinal research has examined change in university teachers' elearning beliefs and practices after their initial experience with elearning. This study addresses this gap by focusing on six teachers who developed and implemented an elearning resource, and the changes they made to the resource and its implementation over two years. A…

  16. Evaluation of thermal gradients in longitudinal spin Seebeck effect measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Sola, A. Kuepferling, M.; Basso, V.; Pasquale, M.; Kikkawa, T.; Uchida, K.; Saitoh, E.

    2015-05-07

    In the framework of the longitudinal spin Seebeck effect (LSSE), we developed an experimental setup for the characterization of LSSE devices. This class of device consists in a layered structure formed by a substrate, a ferrimagnetic insulator (YIG) where the spin current is thermally generated, and a paramagnetic metal (Pt) for the detection of the spin current via the inverse spin-Hall effect. In this kind of experiments, the evaluation of a thermal gradient through the thin YIG layer is a crucial point. In this work, we perform an indirect determination of the thermal gradient through the measurement of the heat flux. We developed an experimental setup using Peltier cells that allow us to measure the heat flux through a given sample. In order to test the technique, a standard LSSE device produced at Tohoku University was measured. We find a spin Seebeck S{sub SSE} coefficient of 2.8×10{sup −7} V K{sup −1}.

  17. Measuring Mathematical Knowledge for Teaching: A Longitudinal Study Using Two Measures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Copur-Gencturk, Yasemin; Lubienski, Sarah T.

    2013-01-01

    This longitudinal study examines growth in teacher knowledge as measured by two popular assessments--Learning Mathematics for Teaching (LMT) and Diagnostic Teacher Assessments in Mathematics and Science (DTAMS). Using data collected from 24 teachers, we compare the extent to which each assessment captured teacher learning during a K-8 mathematics…

  18. Maternal cultural values and parenting practices: longitudinal associations with Chinese adolescents' aggression.

    PubMed

    Shuster, Michael M; Li, Yan; Shi, Junqi

    2012-04-01

    Interrelations among cultural values, parenting practices, and adolescent aggression were examined using longitudinal data collected from Chinese adolescents and their mothers. Adolescents' overt and relational aggression were assessed using peer nominations at Time 1 (7th grade) and Time 2 (9th grade). Mothers reported endorsement of cultural values (collectivism and social harmony) and parenting practices (psychological control and inductive reasoning) at Time 1. While controlling for Time 1 adolescent aggression, maternal collectivism and social harmony indirectly and longitudinally linked to adolescent aggression through maternal parenting practices. Specifically, maternal collectivism was positively related to inductive reasoning, which, in turn, negatively related to adolescent overt aggression at Time 2. Similarly, maternal social harmony negatively related to psychological control that positively predicted later adolescent relational aggression. Results of the present study shed light on mechanisms through which culture may indirectly influence adolescent aggression.

  19. Recent Measurement of Debuncher Longitudinal Beam Size During Stacking

    SciTech Connect

    Halling, Mike

    1992-02-18

    During the recent co11ider studies period there were a few time periods when 120 GeV beam was delivered with a slow repetition rate. This gave us a rare chance to study the effectiveness of additional cooling in the antiproton source. The measurements shown below were taken on 1/15/92. Although we have several FFT analyzers connected to the debuncher schottkey monitor we cannot readout the measured spectrum except with a TV camera. The following measurements, therefore, were taken with a spectrum analyzer. It is necessary to use a resolution bandwidth of 100 HZ to see the effectiveness of the momentum cooling system, and therefore the sweep time was 3 seconds. It took about 1 hour to complete the series of measurements. The main ring performance was up to it's normal standards during this time period, but it's performance can vary greatly from on minute to the next. The debuncher longitudinal schottkey spectra are shown in Figures 1-5 with different trigger times for the spectrum analyzer. These are shown using a scale linear in power, which should also be linear in particle density. There are two effects of momentum cooling that are apparent. (1) The momentum distribution after bunch rotation has very long non-gaussian tails, momentum cooling rapidly pushes these tails into the central peak. (2) The width of the central peak is gradually reduced, as is shown in Table I. The FWHM shown in TABLE I is at h=127, and the 95% dp/p is the full width in percent dp/p that contains 95% of the beam.

  20. Infant feeding practices in a South African birth cohort-A longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Budree, Shrish; Goddard, Elizabeth; Brittain, Kirsty; Cader, Shihaam; Myer, Landon; Zar, Heather J

    2016-10-02

    Childhood malnutrition is highly prevalent in low- and middle-income countries. The choices of complementary foods, which are important in infant nutrition, are poorly described in this setting. We investigated infant feeding practices in a South African birth cohort, the Drakenstein Child Health Study. Longitudinal feeding data were collected from March 2012 to March 2015. Feeding practices at birth, 6-10 and 14 weeks and 6, 9, and 12 months, were investigated using food frequency questionnaires. Anthropometry was measured at birth and 12 months. The quality of the diet was analyzed using the World Health Organization infant and young child feeding indicators. Regression models were used to explore associations between feeding and growth outcomes at 1 year. Exclusive breastfeeding for 6 months was low (13%), and 19% of infants were introduced to solid foods before 4 months. There was high daily consumption of processed meat (56%) and inappropriate foods such as fruit juice (82%), soft drinks (54%), and refined sugary foods (51%) at 1 year. Dietary diversity and consumption of iron rich foods were low at 6 months (5% and 3%, respectively) but higher by 12 months (75% and 78%). Longer duration of exclusive breastfeeding was associated with a lower height-for-age z-score at 1 year. Several dietary deficits and a rising trend in the consumption of inappropriate nutritionally poor foods were identified. These findings raise concern about poor dietary practices and the impact on child and long-term health.

  1. Reactivity in Rapidly Collected Hygiene and Toilet Spot Check Measurements: A Cautionary Note for Longitudinal Studies

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Benjamin F.; Khush, Ranjiv S.; Ramaswamy, Padmavathi; Rajkumar, Paramasivan; Durairaj, Natesan; Ramaprabha, Prabhakar; Balakrishnan, Kalpana; Colford Jr., John M.

    2015-01-01

    Discreet collection of spot check observations to measure household hygiene conditions is a common measurement technique in epidemiologic studies of hygiene in low-income countries. The objective of this study was to determine whether the collection of spot check observations in longitudinal studies could itself induce reactivity (i.e., change participant behavior). We analyzed data from a 12-month prospective cohort study in rural Tamil Nadu, India that was conducted in the absence of any hygiene or toilet promotion activities. Our data included hygiene and toilet spot checks from 10,427 household visits. We found substantial evidence of participant reactivity to spot check observations of hygiene practices that were easy to modify on short notice. For example, soap observed at the household's primary handwashing location increased from 49% at enrollment to 81% by the fourth visit and remained at or above 77% for the remainder of the study. PMID:25385856

  2. Measuring adolescents' exposure to victimization: The Environmental Risk (E-Risk) Longitudinal Twin Study.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Helen L; Caspi, Avshalom; Moffitt, Terrie E; Wertz, Jasmin; Gray, Rebecca; Newbury, Joanne; Ambler, Antony; Zavos, Helena; Danese, Andrea; Mill, Jonathan; Odgers, Candice L; Pariante, Carmine; Wong, Chloe C Y; Arseneault, Louise

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents multilevel findings on adolescents' victimization exposure from a large longitudinal cohort of twins. Data were obtained from the Environmental Risk (E-Risk) Longitudinal Twin Study, an epidemiological study of 2,232 children (1,116 twin pairs) followed to 18 years of age (with 93% retention). To assess adolescent victimization, we combined best practices in survey research on victimization with optimal approaches to measuring life stress and traumatic experiences, and introduce a reliable system for coding severity of victimization. One in three children experienced at least one type of severe victimization during adolescence (crime victimization, peer/sibling victimization, Internet/mobile phone victimization, sexual victimization, family violence, maltreatment, or neglect), and most types of victimization were more prevalent among children from low socioeconomic backgrounds. Exposure to multiple victimization types was common, as was revictimization; over half of those physically maltreated in childhood were also exposed to severe physical violence in adolescence. Biometric twin analyses revealed that environmental factors had the greatest influence on most types of victimization, while severe physical maltreatment from caregivers during adolescence was predominantly influenced by heritable factors. The findings from this study showcase how distinct levels of victimization measurement can be harmonized in large-scale studies of health and development.

  3. Measuring adolescents’ exposure to victimization: The Environmental Risk (E-Risk) Longitudinal Twin Study

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Helen L.; Caspi, Avshalom; Moffitt, Terrie E.; Wertz, Jasmin; Gray, Rebecca; Newbury, Joanne; Ambler, Antony; Zavos, Helena; Danese, Andrea; Mill, Jonathan; Odgers, Candice L.; Pariante, Carmine; Wong, Chloe C.; Arseneault, Louise

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents mutlilevel findings on adolescents’ victimization exposure from a large longitudinal cohort of twins. Data were obtained from the Environmental Risk (E-Risk) Longitudinal Twin Study, an epidemiological study of 2,232 children (1,116 twin pairs) followed to 18 years of age (with 93% retention). To assess adolescent victimization we combined best practices in survey research on victimization with optimal approaches to measuring life stress and traumatic experiences, and introduce a reliable system for coding severe victimization. One in three children experienced at least one type of severe victimization during adolescence (crime victimization, peer/sibling victimization, internet/mobile phone victimization, sexual victimization, family violence, maltreatment, or neglect), and most types of victimization were more prevalent amongst children from low socioeconomic backgrounds. Exposure to multiple victimization types was common, as was re-victimization; over half of those physically maltreated in childhood were also exposed to severe physical violence in adolescence. Biometric twin analyses revealed that environmental factors had the greatest influence on most types of victimization, while severe physical maltreatment from caregivers during adolescence was predominantly influenced by heritable factors. The findings from this study showcase how distinct levels of victimization measurement can be harmonized in large-scale studies of health and development. PMID:26535933

  4. Online Assessment, Measurement and Evaluation: Emerging Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, David, Ed.; Hricko, Mary, Ed.; Howell, Scott, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    "Online Assessment, Measurement and Evaluation: Emerging Practices" provides a view of the possibilities and challenges facing online educators and evaluators in the 21st Century. As technology evolves and online measurement and assessment follow, "Online Assessment, Measurement and Evaluation: Emerging Practices" uses…

  5. Executive Function in Early Childhood: Longitudinal Measurement Invariance and Developmental Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willoughby, Michael T.; Wirth, R. J.; Blair, Clancy B.

    2012-01-01

    This study tested the longitudinal measurement invariance and developmental changes of a newly developed battery of executive function (EF) tasks for use in early childhood. The battery was administered in the Family Life Project--a prospective longitudinal study (N = 1,292) of families who were oversampled from low-income and African American…

  6. Longitudinal measurement of physical activity following kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Dontje, M L; de Greef, M H G; Krijnen, W P; Corpeleijn, E; Kok, T; Bakker, S J L; Stolk, R P; van der Schans, C P

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this longitudinal observational study was to (i) examine the change of daily physical activity in 28 adult kidney transplant recipients over the first 12 months following transplantation; and (ii) to examine the change in metabolic characteristics and renal function. Accelerometer-based daily physical activity and metabolic- and clinical characteristics were measured at six wk (T1), three months (T2), six months (T3) and 12 months (T4) following transplantation. Linear mixed effect analyses showed an increase in steps/d (T1 = 6326 ± 2906; T4 = 7562 ± 3785; F = 3.52; p = 0.02), but one yr after transplantation only 25% achieved the recommended 10 000 steps/d. There was no significant increase in minutes per day spent on moderate-to-vigorous intensity physical activity (T1 = 80.4 ± 63.6; T4 = 93.2 ± 55.1; F = 1.71; p = 0.17). Body mass index increased over time (T1 = 25.4 ± 3.2; T4 = 27.2 ± 3.8; F = 12.62; p < 0.001), mainly due to an increase in fat percentage (T1 = 30.3 ± 8.0; T4 = 34.0 ± 7.9; F = 14.63; p < 0.001). There was no significant change in renal function (F = 0.17; p = 0.92). Although the recipients increased physical activity, the majority did not meet the recommended levels of physical activity after one yr. In addition to the weight gain, this may result in negative health consequences. Therefore, it is important to develop strategies to support kidney transplant recipients to comply with healthy lifestyle recommendations, including regular physical activity.

  7. Model selection for marginal regression analysis of longitudinal data with missing observations and covariate measurement error.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chung-Wei; Chen, Yi-Hau

    2015-10-01

    Missing observations and covariate measurement error commonly arise in longitudinal data. However, existing methods for model selection in marginal regression analysis of longitudinal data fail to address the potential bias resulting from these issues. To tackle this problem, we propose a new model selection criterion, the Generalized Longitudinal Information Criterion, which is based on an approximately unbiased estimator for the expected quadratic error of a considered marginal model accounting for both data missingness and covariate measurement error. The simulation results reveal that the proposed method performs quite well in the presence of missing data and covariate measurement error. On the contrary, the naive procedures without taking care of such complexity in data may perform quite poorly. The proposed method is applied to data from the Taiwan Longitudinal Study on Aging to assess the relationship of depression with health and social status in the elderly, accommodating measurement error in the covariate as well as missing observations.

  8. Rapid longitudinal relaxation measurement of hyperpolarized 129Xe by a highly sensitive atomic magnetometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yingying; Wang, Zhiguo; Jin, Shilong; Yuan, Jie; Zhao, Hongchang; Luo, Hui

    2017-02-01

    A fast and accurate determination of longitudinal relaxation time is put forward for hyperpolarized 129Xe. The theoretical framework for the method is developed. Measurement of the longitudinal relaxation time is by the determination of a close-loop response of 129Xe magnetization to the external magnetic fields and is implemented with a highly sensitive Rb magnetometer. The indirect measurement dramatically reduces the time consuming than the conventional inversion-recovery method and is more suitable for the samples with long longitudinal relaxation time.

  9. Vibration Measurement on Reticular Lamina and Basilar Membrane at Multiple Longitudinal Locations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Fangyi; Zha, Dingjun; Choudhury, Niloy; Fridberger, Anders; Nuttall, Alfred L.

    2011-11-01

    The longitudinal distribution of the organ of Corti vibration is important for both understanding the energy delivery and the timing of the cochlear amplification. Recent development on low coherence interferomtry technique allows measuring vibration inside the cochlea. The reticular lamina (RL) vibration spectrum demonstrates that RL vibration leads the basilar membrane (BM). This phase lead is consistent with the idea that the active process may lead the BM vibration. In this study, measurements on multiple longitudinal locations demonstrated similar phase lead. Results on this study suggests that there may be another longitudinal coupling mechanism inside the cochlea other than the traveling wave on BM.

  10. Temporal change in health-related quality of life: a longitudinal study in general practice 1999–2004

    PubMed Central

    Hazell, Michelle L; Morris, Julie A; Linehan, Mary F; Frank, Timothy L

    2009-01-01

    Background In order to assess and plan for changing healthcare needs, the lack of available information regarding temporal changes in the health-related quality of life of a population must be addressed. Aim This paper aims to describe such changes over 5 years in a general population. Design of study Longitudinal postal questionnaire study. Setting UK general practice. Method This was a longitudinal postal questionnaire study in two general practice populations, using the generic instrument EQ-5D to measure health-related quality of life. Individuals were included if they responded to three postal surveys in 1999, 2001, and 2004 and there were three consecutive values of EQ-5Dindex available between 1999 and 2004. Results A total of 2498 subjects were included in the study. After adjustment for potential confounders (including ageing), health-related quality of life declined significantly over the observation period. The change in EQ-5Dindex was from 0.79 to 0.74 and for EQ-5Dvas 76.8 to 73.3 (P for both trends <0.001). Conclusion Health-related quality of life deteriorated in these populations over 5 years. In an era of improvements in mortality, this has important implications for the use of health-related quality of life data in healthcare planning and resource allocation. PMID:19861028

  11. Measuring Practicing Clinicians’ Information Literacy

    PubMed Central

    Barboza, Katherine; Jensen, Ashley E.; Bennett, Katelyn J.; Sherman, Scott E.; Schwartz, Mark D.

    2017-01-01

    Summary Background As healthcare moves towards technology-driven population health management, clinicians must adopt complex digital platforms to access health information and document care. Objectives This study explored information literacy, a set of skills required to effectively navigate population health information systems, among primary care providers in one Veterans’ Affairs (VA) medical center. Methods Information literacy was assessed during an 8-month randomized trial that tested a population health (panel) management intervention. Providers were asked about their use and comfort with two VA digital tools for panel management at baseline, 16 weeks, and post-intervention. An 8-item scale (range 0-40) was used to measure information literacy (Cronbach’s a=0.84). Scores between study arms and provider types were compared using paired t-tests and ANOVAs. Associations between self-reported digital tool use and information literacy were measured via Pearson’s correlations. Results Providers showed moderate levels of information literacy (M= 27.4, SD 6.5). There were no significant differences in mean information literacy between physicians (M=26.4, SD 6.7) and nurses (M=30.5, SD 5.2, p=0.57 for difference), or between intervention (M=28.4, SD 6.5) and control groups (M=25.1, SD 6.2, p=0.12 for difference). Information literacy was correlated with higher rates of self-reported information system usage (r=0.547, p=0.001). Clinicians identified data access, accuracy, and interpretability as potential information literacy barriers. Conclusions While exploratory in nature, cautioning generalizability, the study suggests that measuring and improving clinicians’ information literacy may play a significant role in the implementation and use of digital information tools, as these tools are rapidly being deployed to enhance communication among care teams, improve health care outcomes, and reduce overall costs. PMID:28197620

  12. Cultural measures associated with risky sexual behaviors among Latino youth in Southern California: A longitudinal study

    PubMed Central

    Thing, James P.; Baezconde-Garbanati, Lourdes; Schwartz, Seth J.; Soto, Daniel W.; Unger, Jennifer B.

    2014-01-01

    Context Cultural variables have been associated with sexual risk behaviors among Latino youth, but findings across studies are inconsistent. Methods We analyzed data from a longitudinal study of Latino youth in Southern California followed from 2005–2012 to test whether cultural variables measured in high school were associated with sexual risk behaviors in emerging adulthood, and whether gender moderated these associations. We conducted logistic and ordinal regression analyses. Participants were 995 Latino youth. Results The cultural value of respect for parents was negatively associated with an earlier age at sexual debut (odds ratio, 0.8) and not using a condom at most recent sexual intercourse (0.8). U.S. cultural practices (a measure of acculturation) was positively associated with being sexually active (1.2), having concurrent sexual partners (1.5), and among males only, with a higher number of sexual partners (1.3). Second- and third- generation immigrant youth had lower odds of not using a condom at most recent sexual intercourse when compared to first-generation youth (0.6 and 0.5, respectively). Among females, a stronger endorsement of Latino cultural practices was associated with lower odds of more sexual partners (0.8). By contrast, among males, a stronger endorsement of Latino cultural practices was associated with higher odds of more sexual partners (1.4). Conclusions The cultural measures associated with Latino youth’s sexual behaviors differed across outcomes and by gender. Understanding how culture is related to the sexual behaviors of Latino youth may help inform the development of culturally-sensitive sexual health interventions. PMID:24786352

  13. Measurement of longitudinal displacement using lateral shearing cyclic path optical configuration setup and phase shifting interferometry.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Y Pavan; Chatterjee, Sanjib

    2011-04-01

    We present a technique for the measurement of longitudinal displacement using a lateral shearing cyclic path optical configuration (CPOC) setup and phase shifting interferometry. In the technique, a plane mirror mounted on a linear translation stage, placed slightly away from the focal plane of a lens, introduces a longitudinal focal shift to the incident focusing beam. The resulting spherical wavefront emerging from the lens is sheared into two orthogonally polarized beams using the CPOC setup. By applying polarization phase shifting interferometry (PPSI), the longitudinal focal shift of the beam focus is calculated by determining the slope of the optical path difference variation between the sheared beams. Similarly, the additional focal shift introduced due to longitudinal translation of the mirror, by an unknown amount, is determined using PPSI. Half of the difference between the two longitudinal focal shifts measured gives the longitudinal displacement of the mirror. The technique can be used for an extended range of distance measurement. The novelty of the technique is the introduction of CPOC for the distance measurement. The advantages of the technique compared to other related methods are discussed.

  14. Measurement of longitudinal displacement using lateral shearing cyclic path optical configuration setup and phase shifting interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Y. Pavan; Chatterjee, Sanjib

    2011-04-01

    We present a technique for the measurement of longitudinal displacement using a lateral shearing cyclic path optical configuration (CPOC) setup and phase shifting interferometry. In the technique, a plane mirror mounted on a linear translation stage, placed slightly away from the focal plane of a lens, introduces a longitudinal focal shift to the incident focusing beam. The resulting spherical wavefront emerging from the lens is sheared into two orthogonally polarized beams using the CPOC setup. By applying polarization phase shifting interferometry (PPSI), the longitudinal focal shift of the beam focus is calculated by determining the slope of the optical path difference variation between the sheared beams. Similarly, the additional focal shift introduced due to longitudinal translation of the mirror, by an unknown amount, is determined using PPSI. Half of the difference between the two longitudinal focal shifts measured gives the longitudinal displacement of the mirror. The technique can be used for an extended range of distance measurement. The novelty of the technique is the introduction of CPOC for the distance measurement. The advantages of the technique compared to other related methods are discussed.

  15. Are Parenting Practices Associated with the Development of Narcissism? Findings from a Longitudinal Study of Mexican-origin Youth.

    PubMed

    Wetzel, Eunike; Robins, Richard W

    2016-08-01

    Narcissism is an important and consequential aspect of personality, yet we know little about its developmental origins. Using data from a longitudinal study of 674 Mexican-origin families, we examined cross-lagged relations between parenting behaviors (warmth, hostility, monitoring) and narcissism (superiority, exploitativeness). Parental hostility at age 12 was associated with higher levels of exploitativeness at age 14, whereas parental monitoring at age 12 was associated with lower levels of exploitativeness at age 14. These effects replicated across three different parenting measures: child reports, spouse reports, and behavioral coding of parent-child interactions. None of the parenting dimensions was related to superiority, suggesting that parenting practices are more strongly related to the maladaptive than the adaptive component of narcissism.

  16. Application of longitudinal and transversal bioimpedance measurements in peritoneal dialysis at 50 kHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nescolarde, L.; Doñate, T.; Casañas, R.; Rosell-Ferrer, J.

    2010-04-01

    More relevant information of the fluid changes in peritoneal dialysis (PD) might be obtained with segmental bioimpedance measurements rather than whole-body measurement, who hidden information of body composition. Whole-body and segmental bioimpedance measurements were obtained using 5 configurations (whole-body or right-side (RS), longitudinal-leg (L-LEG), longitudinal-abdomen (L-AB), transversal-abdomen (T-AB), and transversal-leg (T-LEG)) in 20 patients: 15 males (56.5 ± 9.4 yr, 24.2 ± 4.2 kg/m2) and 5 females (58.4 ± 7.1 yr, 28.2 ± 5.9 kg/m2) in peritoneal dialysis (PD). The aim of this study is to analyze the relationship between whole-body, longitudinal-segmental (L-LEG and L-AB) and transversal-segmental (TAB and TLEG) bioimpedance measurement at 50 kHz, with clinical parameters of cardiovascular risk, dyslipidemia, nutrition and hydration. The Kolmogorov-Smirnov test was used for the normality test of all variables. Longitudinal bioimpedance parameters were normalized by the height of the patients. The Spearman correlation was used to analyze the correlation between bioimpedance and clinical parameters. The statistical significance was considered with P < 0.05. Transversal bioimpedance measurements have higher correlation with clinical parameters than longitudinal measurements.

  17. Selecting a linear mixed model for longitudinal data: repeated measures analysis of variance, covariance pattern model, and growth curve approaches.

    PubMed

    Liu, Siwei; Rovine, Michael J; Molenaar, Peter C M

    2012-03-01

    With increasing popularity, growth curve modeling is more and more often considered as the 1st choice for analyzing longitudinal data. Although the growth curve approach is often a good choice, other modeling strategies may more directly answer questions of interest. It is common to see researchers fit growth curve models without considering alterative modeling strategies. In this article we compare 3 approaches for analyzing longitudinal data: repeated measures analysis of variance, covariance pattern models, and growth curve models. As all are members of the general linear mixed model family, they represent somewhat different assumptions about the way individuals change. These assumptions result in different patterns of covariation among the residuals around the fixed effects. In this article, we first indicate the kinds of data that are appropriately modeled by each and use real data examples to demonstrate possible problems associated with the blanket selection of the growth curve model. We then present a simulation that indicates the utility of Akaike information criterion and Bayesian information criterion in the selection of a proper residual covariance structure. The results cast doubt on the popular practice of automatically using growth curve modeling for longitudinal data without comparing the fit of different models. Finally, we provide some practical advice for assessing mean changes in the presence of correlated data.

  18. Longitudinal evaluation of Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information Systems (PROMIS) measures in pediatric chronic pain

    PubMed Central

    Kashikar-Zuck, Susmita; Carle, Adam; Barnett, Kimberly; Goldschneider, Kenneth R.; Sherry, David D.; Mara, Constance A.; Cunningham, Natoshia; Farrell, Jennifer; Tress, Jenna; DeWitt, Esi Morgan

    2015-01-01

    The Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) initiative is a comprehensive strategy by the National Institutes of Health to support the development and validation of precise instruments to assess self-reported health domains across healthy and disease-specific populations. Much progress has been made in instrument development but there remains a gap in the validation of PROMIS measures for pediatric chronic pain. The purpose of this study was to investigate the construct validity and responsiveness to change of seven PROMIS domains for the assessment of children (ages 8-18) with chronic pain – Pain Interference, Fatigue, Anxiety, Depression, Mobility, Upper Extremity Function and Peer Relationships. PROMIS measures were administered at the initial visit and two follow-up visits at an outpatient chronic pain clinic (CPC; N=82) and at an intensive amplified pain day-treatment program (AMP; N= 63). Aim 1 examined construct validity of PROMIS measures by comparing them with corresponding “legacy” measures administered as part of usual care in the CPC sample. Aim 2 examined sensitivity to change in both CPC and AMP samples. Longitudinal growth models showed that PROMIS Pain Interference, Anxiety, Depression, Mobility, Upper Extremity and Peer Relationship measures and legacy instruments generally performed similarly with slightly steeper slopes of improvement in legacy measures. All seven PROMIS domains showed responsiveness to change. Results offered initial support for the validity of PROMIS measures in pediatric chronic pain. Further validation with larger and more diverse pediatric pain samples and additional legacy measures would broaden the scope of use of PROMIS in clinical research. PMID:26447704

  19. Longitudinal evaluation of patient-reported outcomes measurement information systems measures in pediatric chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Kashikar-Zuck, Susmita; Carle, Adam; Barnett, Kimberly; Goldschneider, Kenneth R; Sherry, David D; Mara, Constance A; Cunningham, Natoshia; Farrell, Jennifer; Tress, Jenna; DeWitt, Esi Morgan

    2016-02-01

    The Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) initiative is a comprehensive strategy by the National Institutes of Health to support the development and validation of precise instruments to assess self-reported health domains across healthy and disease-specific populations. Much progress has been made in instrument development, but there remains a gap in the validation of PROMIS measures for pediatric chronic pain. The purpose of this study was to investigate the construct validity and responsiveness to change of 7 PROMIS domains for the assessment of children (ages: 8-18) with chronic pain--Pain Interference, Fatigue, Anxiety, Depression, Mobility, Upper Extremity Function, and Peer Relationships. The PROMIS measures were administered at the initial visit and 2 follow-up visits at an outpatient chronic pain clinic (CPC; N = 82) and at an intensive amplified musculoskeletal pain day-treatment program (N = 63). Aim 1 examined construct validity of PROMIS measures by comparing them with corresponding "legacy" measures administered as part of usual care in the CPC sample. Aim 2 examined sensitivity to change in both CPC and amplified musculoskeletal pain samples. Longitudinal growth models showed that PROMIS' Pain Interference, Anxiety, Depression, Mobility, Upper Extremity, and Peer Relationship measures and legacy instruments generally performed similarly with slightly steeper slopes of improvement in legacy measures. All 7 PROMIS domains showed responsiveness to change. Results offered initial support for the validity of PROMIS measures in pediatric chronic pain. Further validation with larger and more diverse pediatric pain samples and additional legacy measures would broaden the scope of use of PROMIS in clinical research.

  20. Genetic linkage analysis of longitudinal hypertension phenotypes using three summary measures

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Shaoqi; Li, Lin; Li, Xia; Moser, Kathy L; Guo, Zheng; Shen, Gongqing; Cannata, Ruth; Zirzow, Erich; Topol, Eric J; Wang, Qing

    2003-01-01

    Background Longitudinal data often have multiple (repeated) measures recorded along a time trajectory. For example, the two cohorts from the Framingham Heart Study (GAW13 Problem 1) contain 21 and 5 repeated measures for hypertension phenotypes as well as epidemiological risk factors, respectively. Direct modelling of a large number of serially and biologically correlated traits in the context of linkage analysis can be prohibitively complex. Alternatively, we may consider using univariate transformation for linkage analysis of longitudinal repeated measures. Results We evaluated the utility of three conventional summary measures (mean, slope, and principal components) for genetic linkage analysis of longitudinal phenotypes by analyzing the chromosome 10 data of the Framingham Heart Study. Except for the temporal slope, all of the summary methods and the multivariate analysis identified the previously reported region, marker GATA64A09, for systolic blood pressure or high blood pressure. Further analysis revealed that this region may harbor gene(s) affecting human blood pressure at multiple stages of life. Conclusion We conclude that mean and principal components are feasible alternatives for genetic linkage analysis of longitudinal phenotypes, but the slope might have a separate genetic basis from that of the original longitudinal phenotypes. PMID:14975092

  1. A LONGITUDINAL ANALYSIS OF PARENTING PRACTICES, COUPLE SATISFACTION, AND CHILD BEHAVIOR PROBLEMS

    PubMed Central

    Linville, Deanna; Chronister, Krista; Dishion, Tom; Todahl, Jeff; Miller, John; Shaw, Daniel; Gardner, Francis; Wilson, Melvin

    2010-01-01

    This longitudinal study examined the relationship between couple relationship satisfaction, parenting practices, parent depression, and child problem behaviors. The study participants (n = 148) were part of a larger experimental study that examined the effectiveness of a brief family-centered intervention, the Family Check-Up model. Regression analysis results indicated that our proposed model accounted for 38% of the variance in child problem behavior at Time 2, with child problem behavior and couple relationship satisfaction at child age 2 years each accounting for a significant portion of the variance in child problem behavior at age 3. Couple relationship satisfaction directly predicted child behavior problems over time. Clinical and research implications are discussed. PMID:20433599

  2. Reproducibility of anthropometric measurements in children: a longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Leppik, Aire; Jürimäe, Toivo; Jürimäe, Jaak

    2004-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish the reproducibility of a series of anthropometric measures performed twice during one week during a three year period in boys and girls. The subjects of this investigation were 39 children (21 boys and 18 girls), 9-10 year of age at the beginning of the study. Children were measured three times with one year interval. Children were classified by Tanner stage 1-2 during the first measurements, stage 1-3 during the second measurements and stage 1-4 during the third measurements. Body height and weight were measured and BMI calculated. All anthropometric parameters were measured according to the protocol recommended by the International Society for the Advancement of Kinanthropometry (Norton & Olds 1996). Nine skinfolds, 13 girths, eight lengths and eight breadths/lengths were measured. The reproducibility of body height (r = 0.995-0.999), body weight (r = 0.990-0.999) and BMI (r = 0.969-0.999) was very high in boys and girls. The intraclass correlations (ICC), technical errors (TE) and coefficients of variation (CV) were quite different depending on the measurement site of the skinfold thickness. It was surprising that the ICCs were highest and TEs and CVs were lowest during the second year of the measurement. The computed ICC was high, and TE and CV values were quite similar and relatively low in girth, length and breadth/length measurements. It was concluded that the reproducibility of girths, lengths and breadths/lengths in children is very high and the reproducibility of skinfolds is high. Specifically, the reproducibility is very high immediately before puberty in boys and girls.

  3. Determination of longitudinal aerodynamic derivatives from steady-state measurement of an aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, V.

    1977-01-01

    A method for the estimation of aerodynamic derivatives from steady-state symmetric flight data is developed. The derivatives considered are the longitudinal static stability and control derivatives, damping derivatives due to tail, and the derivatives expressing the speed effect on the lift and pitching moment coefficients. The method is an extension of the well known theory of longitudinal static stability and control, and corresponding flight data interpretation. Measured data is assumed in the form of trim curves and lift vs angle of attack. The expressions for the derivative estimates are in the form of algebraic relationships containing known constants, and directly or indirectly measured quantities.

  4. Longitudinal-to-Transverse Mapping for Femtosecond Electron Bunch Length Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, Dao; Ding, Yuantao; /SLAC

    2010-08-25

    A longitudinal-to-transverse mapping technique is proposed to measure the length and temporal profile of ultrashort electron bunches. In this scheme a special chicane and a radio-frequency deflecting cavity are used to transform the beam's longitudinal distribution into angular distribution which is further converted to transverse distribution after a parallel-to-point imaging beam line. With this technique, the temporal profile of the electron beam is exactly mapped to the transverse profile. This makes it possible to measure ultrashort electron bunch length with a resolution well beyond 1 femtosecond.

  5. Delay interferometric single shot measurement of a petawatt-class laser longitudinal chromatism corrector.

    PubMed

    Rouyer, C; Blanchot, N; Neauport, J; Sauteret, C

    2007-03-05

    In this paper we present a self-referenced interferometric single-shot measurement technique that we use to evaluate the longitudinal chromatism compensation made by a diffractive lens corrector. A diffractive lens with a delay of 1 ps is qualified for a 60 mm beam aperture. This corrector was implemented on the Alisé Nd:glass power chain. We qualify the corrector and the Alisé power chain chromatism, demonstrating the potential of this measuring principle as well as the interest of diffractive lenses to correct longitudinal chromatism of petawatt-class lasers.

  6. Bayesian regression analysis of data with random effects covariates from nonlinear longitudinal measurements

    PubMed Central

    De la Cruz, Rolando; Meza, Cristian; Arribas-Gil, Ana; Carroll, Raymond J.

    2016-01-01

    Joint models for a wide class of response variables and longitudinal measurements consist on a mixed-effects model to fit longitudinal trajectories whose random effects enter as covariates in a generalized linear model for the primary response. They provide a useful way to assess association between these two kinds of data, which in clinical studies are often collected jointly on a series of individuals and may help understanding, for instance, the mechanisms of recovery of a certain disease or the efficacy of a given therapy. When a nonlinear mixed-effects model is used to fit the longitudinal trajectories, the existing estimation strategies based on likelihood approximations have been shown to exhibit some computational efficiency problems (De la Cruz et al., 2011). In this article we consider a Bayesian estimation procedure for the joint model with a nonlinear mixed-effects model for the longitudinal data and a generalized linear model for the primary response. The proposed prior structure allows for the implementation of an MCMC sampler. Moreover, we consider that the errors in the longitudinal model may be correlated. We apply our method to the analysis of hormone levels measured at the early stages of pregnancy that can be used to predict normal versus abnormal pregnancy outcomes. We also conduct a simulation study to assess the importance of modelling correlated errors and quantify the consequences of model misspecification. PMID:27274601

  7. Prescribed opioids in primary care: cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses of influence of patient and practice characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Foy, Robbie; Leaman, Ben; McCrorie, Carolyn; Petty, Duncan; House, Allan; Bennett, Michael; Carder, Paul; Faulkner, Simon; Glidewell, Liz; West, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To examine trends in opioid prescribing in primary care, identify patient and general practice characteristics associated with long-term and stronger opioid prescribing, and identify associations with changes in opioid prescribing. Design Trend, cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses of routinely recorded patient data. Setting 111 primary care practices in Leeds and Bradford, UK. Participants We observed 471 828 patient-years in which all patients represented had at least 1 opioid prescription between April 2005 and March 2012. A cross-sectional analysis included 99 847 patients prescribed opioids between April 2011 and March 2012. A longitudinal analysis included 49 065 patient-years between April 2008 and March 2012. We excluded patients with cancer or treated for substance misuse. Main outcome measures Long-term opioid prescribing (4 or more prescriptions within 12 months), stronger opioid prescribing and stepping up to or down from stronger opioids. Results Opioid prescribing in the adult population almost doubled for weaker opioids over 2005–2012 and rose over sixfold for stronger opioids. There was marked variation among general practices in the odds of patients stepping up to stronger opioids compared with those not stepping up (range 0.31–3.36), unexplained by practice-level variables. Stepping up to stronger opioids was most strongly associated with being underweight (adjusted OR 3.26, 1.49 to 7.17), increasing polypharmacy (4.15, 3.26 to 5.29 for 10 or more repeat prescriptions), increasing numbers of primary care appointments (3.04, 2.48 to 3.73 for over 12 appointments in the year) and referrals to specialist pain services (5.17, 4.37 to 6.12). Compared with women under 50 years, men under 50 were less likely to step down once prescribed stronger opioids (0.53, 0.37 to 0.75). Conclusions While clinicians should be alert to patients at risk of escalated opioid prescribing, much prescribing variation may be attributable to

  8. Boiling as household water treatment in Cambodia: a longitudinal study of boiling practice and microbiological effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Brown, Joseph; Sobsey, Mark D

    2012-09-01

    This paper focuses on the consistency of use and microbiological effectiveness of boiling as it is practiced in one study site in peri-urban Cambodia. We followed 60 randomly selected households in Kandal Province over 6 months to collect longitudinal data on water boiling practices and effectiveness in reducing Escherichia coli in household drinking water. Despite > 90% of households reporting that they used boiling as a means of drinking water treatment, an average of only 31% of households had boiled water on hand at follow-up visits, suggesting that actual use may be lower than self-reported use. We collected 369 matched untreated and boiled water samples. Mean reduction of E. coli was 98.5%; 162 samples (44%) of boiled samples were free of E. coli (< 1 colony-forming unit [cfu]/100 mL), and 270 samples (73%) had < 10 cfu/100 mL. Storing boiled water in a covered container was associated with safer product water than storage in an uncovered container.

  9. Longitudinal emittance measurements in the Booster and AGS during the 2014 RHIC gold run

    SciTech Connect

    Zeno, K.

    2014-08-18

    This note describes longitudinal emittance measurements that were made in the Booster and AGS during the 2014 RHIC Gold run. It also contains an overview of the longitudinal aspects of their setup during this run. Each bunch intended for RHIC is composed of beam from 4 Booster cycles, and there are two of them per AGS cycle. For each of the 8 Booster cycles required to produce the 2 bunches in the AGS, a beam pulse from EVIS is injected into the Booster and captured in four h=4 buckets. Then those bunches are accelerated to a porch where they are merged into 2 bunches and then into 1 bunch.

  10. Practical Considerations for Simultaneous LDV & PIV Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pothos, Stamatios; Boomsma, Aaron; Troolin, Dan

    2016-11-01

    Simultaneous LDV and PIV measurements are useful for validation experiments and when correlating high temporal resolution measurements with large structures of the flow. Performing simultaneous LDV and PIV measurements can be a challenging task due to the differences in temporal and spatial resolution of each technique, as well as requirements for adequate signal. Even so, simultaneous hot-wire and PIV measurements is even more difficult. Unlike hot-wire, LDV is a non-intrusive technique that is unaffected by PIV laser light-sheet heating. Furthermore, hot-wire measurements are adversely affected by seeding particles in the flow required for PIV. In the present study, we discuss several practical considerations for performing simultaneous LDV and PIV measurements. We completed two separate experiments, each with different seeding densities, flow velocities, and working fluids. With these data sets, we studied the effects of temporal and spatial interpolation, up/down sampling, PIV window size and overlap on the simultaneous signals.

  11. An Overview of Longitudinal Spin Structure Measurements from JLab

    SciTech Connect

    Sulkosky, Vincent A.

    2013-08-01

    Jefferson Lab is currently one of the facilities leading the investigation of the spin structure of the nucleon. Over the past 15 years, several high precision measurements have been completed, extending our knowledge of the polarized structure functions g{sub 1} and g{sub 2} down to Q{sup 2} = 0.02 GeV{sup 2}. In particular, the low-Q{sup 2} range ({<=} 0.1 GeV{sup 2}) from these data allows us to make a benchmark-check of Chiral Perturbation theory ({chi}PT). Previous results for the moments of the spin structure functions in this region have shown mixed agreement. For {Gamma}{sub 1}, the first moment of g{sub 1}, we find good consistency between data and theory. However, we have seen a surprisingly large discrepancy with {chi}PT calculations for the {delta}{sub LT} spin polarizability on the neutron, which is significantly less sensitive to the {Delta}-resonance contribution. These proceedings will discuss the recent experimental effort at low Q{sup 2} from Jefferson Lab, including a discussion of preliminary results on the neutron. The new results on the neutron still show a sizeable discrepancy between data and theory. However, new calculations show improved agreement with data for some observables. In addition, new proton data for g{sub 2} is also expected to help resolve the disagreement for {delta}{sub LT}.

  12. Practical and statistical issues in missing data for longitudinal patient-reported outcomes.

    PubMed

    Bell, Melanie L; Fairclough, Diane L

    2014-10-01

    Patient-reported outcomes are increasingly used in health research, including randomized controlled trials and observational studies. However, the validity of results in longitudinal studies can crucially hinge on the handling of missing data. This paper considers the issues of missing data at each stage of research. Practical strategies for minimizing missingness through careful study design and conduct are given. Statistical approaches that are commonly used, but should be avoided, are discussed, including how these methods can yield biased and misleading results. Methods that are valid for data which are missing at random are outlined, including maximum likelihood methods, multiple imputation and extensions to generalized estimating equations: weighted generalized estimating equations, generalized estimating equations with multiple imputation, and doubly robust generalized estimating equations. Finally, we discuss the importance of sensitivity analyses, including the role of missing not at random models, such as pattern mixture, selection, and shared parameter models. We demonstrate many of these concepts with data from a randomized controlled clinical trial on renal cancer patients, and show that the results are dependent on missingness assumptions and the statistical approach.

  13. A general joint model for longitudinal measurements and competing risks survival data with heterogeneous random effects

    PubMed Central

    Li, Gang; Elashoff, Robert M.; Pan, Jianxin

    2011-01-01

    This article studies a general joint model for longitudinal measurements and competing risks survival data. The model consists of a linear mixed effects sub-model for the longitudinal outcome, a proportional cause-specific hazards frailty sub-model for the competing risks survival data, and a regression sub-model for the variance–covariance matrix of the multivariate latent random effects based on a modified Cholesky decomposition. The model provides a useful approach to adjust for non-ignorable missing data due to dropout for the longitudinal outcome, enables analysis of the survival outcome with informative censoring and intermittently measured time-dependent covariates, as well as joint analysis of the longitudinal and survival outcomes. Unlike previously studied joint models, our model allows for heterogeneous random covariance matrices. It also offers a framework to assess the homogeneous covariance assumption of existing joint models. A Bayesian MCMC procedure is developed for parameter estimation and inference. Its performances and frequentist properties are investigated using simulations. A real data example is used to illustrate the usefulness of the approach. PMID:20549344

  14. Longitudinal stratified liquid crystal structures to enable practical spatial light modulators in the terahertz regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tareki, Abubaker M.; Kim, Wonkyu; Guo, Junpeng; Lindquist, Robert G.

    2016-09-01

    Electro-optic (EO) modulation of the amplitude and phase of electromagnetic waves using liquid crystals (LCs) is commonplace in the optical and infrared regions. This effort has led to commercially available components used in spectral filtering, polarization management, beam steering, transmitters, displays, etc. However, electro-optic techniques have had limited success in the terahertz (THz) region due to several practical design challenges. The growth in applications has led to an interest in the development of a spatial light modulator (SLM) for the terahertz region. In the visible region, the most common SLMs use electro-optic materials such as liquid crystals to spatially modulate a beam. However, this approach to achieve a practical SLM in the terahertz regime has been difficult. The primary barrier for components is the long interaction lengths required to modulate a THz wave. Since the EO modulation depth is directly proportional to the multiplication of the change of permittivity and the ratio of interaction length over wavelength, THz systems with wavelengths ranging from 150 μm to 1mm pose a challenge. To overcome this barrier, longitudinal stratified sub-wavelength liquid crystal structures have been engineered and fabricated. The stratified structures introduce the challenge in the selection and design of the electrodes. By using multiple layers the tunable films can be maintained at manageable thicknesses (25 to 200 μm). The reduced individual film thickness will significantly improve the requisite drive voltage and response time. However, the layered structure with multiple conducting layers adds considerable challenges to the design of the transparent electrode. Both simulation and experimental data will be presented.

  15. Use of Missing Data Methods in Longitudinal Studies: The Persistence of Bad Practices in Developmental Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jelicic, Helena; Phelps, Erin; Lerner, Richard M.

    2009-01-01

    Developmental science rests on describing, explaining, and optimizing intraindividual changes and, hence, empirically requires longitudinal research. Problems of missing data arise in most longitudinal studies, thus creating challenges for interpreting the substance and structure of intraindividual change. Using a sample of reports of longitudinal…

  16. Measuring the Parenting Practices of Custodial Grandmothers

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Gregory C.; Merchant, William; Hayslip, Bert; Hancock, Gregory R.; Strieder, Frederick; Montoro-Rodriguez, Julian

    2015-01-01

    Despite increased interest in parenting among custodial grandmothers (CGM), there is scant research on assessing their parenting practices. With CGMs as informants we examined the factor structure for five self-report scales developed as measures of parental nurturance and discipline with birth parents, and then tested for measurement invariance by grandchildren’s age (4 – <7 versus ≥7 – 12). We also examined concurrent validity for these scales according to the Family Stress Model. Data were from 343 CGMs (M = 58.45, SD = 8.22) enrolled in a randomized clinical trial caring for grandchildren (GC) aged 4 to 12 (M = 7.81, SD = 2.56). Discipline was assessed by three scales from the Parental Behavior Inventory (Consistency, Effective, and Punitive). Nurturance was assessed by the Positive Affect Index and the Supportive Engaged Behavior scale of the Parenting Practice Interview. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) revealed that these scales were best represented as five distinct yet covarying factors (RMSEA = .055; SRMR = .07). Follow-up CFAs within each GC age group supported this model, with only few changes suggested by the corresponding diagnostic tests. A model with these changes was then examined for measurement invariance by CG age group, with complete measurement invariance found and all items loading onto their respective factors significantly. The five scales also correlated as expected with indices of CGM psychological distress and GC adjustment. We conclude that the scales examined here can be used meaningfully with CGM as respondents. PMID:26594101

  17. BOOK REVIEW: Practical Density Measurement and Hydrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, S. V.

    2003-01-01

    Density determinations are very important not only for science and production but also in everyday life, since very often a product is sold by mass but the content of the package is measured by volume (or vice versa) so that the density is needed to convert the values. In production processes the density serves as a measure of mixing ratios and other properties. In science, the determination of Avogadro's constant using silicon single crystals and the potential replacement of the kilogram prototype boost density determination to an extremely low relative uncertainty of 10-7 or less. The book by S V Gupta explains in detail the foundations of any density measurement, namely the volume determination of solid artefacts in terms of the SI base unit of length and the density of water and mercury. Both the history and the actual state of science are reported. For practical density measurements, these chapters contain very useful formulae and tables. Water is treated in detail since it is most widely used as a standard not only for density determination but also to gravimetrically calibrate the capacity of volumetric glassware. Two thirds of the book are devoted to the practical density measurement of solids and liquids, mainly using classical instruments like pycnometers and hydrometers. Methods using free flotation of samples in a liquid without suspension are especially useful for small samples. Also, density determinations of powders and granular or porous samples are explained. Unfortunately, modern density meters of the oscillation type are dealt with in only a few pages. The book is clearly written and easy to understand. It contains a lot of evaluations of formulae that for practical measurements are represented in detailed tables. Methods and measurement procedures are described in detail, including also the calculation of uncertainty. Listings of the advantages and disadvantages of the different methods are very helpful. S V Gupta has written a book that will be

  18. Microwave measurements of energy lost to longitudinal modes by single electron bunches traversing periodic structures

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.W.; Loew, G.A.; Weaver, J.N.; Wilson, P.B.

    1981-10-01

    In the design of future linear colliders, it will be important to minimize the loss of beam energy due to the excitation of higher-order modes in the accelerator structure by single bunches of electrons or positrons. This loss is not only detrimental in itself but also gives rise to energy spectrum widening and transverse emittance growth. Microwave measurements made on disk-loaded and alternating-spoke structures to determine the loss to the longitudinal modes are described. In these measurements the Gaussian bunch is simulated by a current pulse of the same shape transmitted through the structure on an axial center conductor. Results to date are presented for the total longitudinal loss parameter per period K in volts per picocoulomb.

  19. Longitudinal beam-transfer-function measurements at the SLC damping rings

    SciTech Connect

    Minty, M.G.; Zimmermann, F.

    1997-05-01

    A longitudinal single-bunch instability in the damping rings at the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) is thought to contribute to pulse-to-pulse orbit variations in downstream accelerator sections. To better understand this instability, the authors measured the beam phase and bunch length under harmonic modulations of the rf phase and rf voltage. For small phase-modulations the measured response can be explained by interaction of the beam with the cavity fundamental mode. For larger excitations, they observed bifurcation and hysteresis effects. The response to an rf voltage modulation revealed two peaks near the quadrupole-mode frequency, one of which appears to be related to the longitudinal instability. In this paper they present the experimental results.

  20. Longitudinal impedance measurement of an RK-TBA induction accelerating gap

    SciTech Connect

    Eylon, S.; Henestroza, E.; Kim, J.-S.; Houck, T.L.; Westenskow, G.A.; Yu, S.S.

    1997-05-01

    Induction accelerating gap designs are being studied for Relativistic Klystron Two-Beam Accelerator (RK-TBA) applications. The accelerating gap has to satisfy the following major requirements: hold-off of the applied accelerating voltage pulse, low transverse impedance to limit beam breakup, low longitudinal impedance at the beam-modulation frequency to minimize power loss. Various gap geometries, materials and novel insulating techniques were explored to optimize the gap design. We report on the experimental effort to evaluate the rf properties of the accelerating gaps in a simple pillbox cavity structure. The experimental cavity setup was designed using the AMOS, MAFIA and URMEL numerical codes. Longitudinal impedance measurements above beam-tube cut-off frequency using a single-wire measuring system are presented.

  1. Measurement of the beam longitudinal profile in a storage ring bynon-linear laser mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Beche, J.-F.; Byrd, J.; De Santis, S.; Denes, P.; Placidi, M.; Turner, W.; Zolotorev, M.

    2004-05-03

    We report on the development of a new technique for the measurement of the longitudinal beam profile in storage rings. This technique, which has been successfully demonstrated at the Advanced Light Source, mixes the synchrotron radiation with the light from a mode-locked solid state laser oscillator in a non-linear crystal. The up-converted radiation is then detected with a photomultiplier and processed to extract, store, and display the required information. The available choices of laser repetition frequency, pulse width, and phase modulation give a wide range of options for matching the bunch configuration of a particular storage ring. Besides the dynamic measurement of the longitudinal profile of each bunch, the instrument can monitor the evolution of the bunch tails, the presence of untrapped particles and their diffusion into nominally empty RF buckets (''ghostbunches'').

  2. THz wiggler applied for measurements of electron bunch longitudinal structure in FEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syresin, E.; Kostromin, S.; Krasilnikov, M.; Makarov, R.; Morozov, N.; Petrov, D.

    2015-01-01

    The infrared undulator manufactured at JINR and installed at FLASH in 2007 is used for longitudinal bunch shape measurements in the range of several tenths of a micrometer. The presented electromagnetic wiggler is intended for generating a narrow-band THz radiation to measure the longitudinal electron bunch structure in FELs with an electron energy of several tens of MeV. This is a planar electromagnetic device with six regular periods, each 30 cm long. The K parameter is varied in the range 0.5-7.12 corresponding to the range B = 0.025-0.356 T of the peak field on the axis. The wiggler is simulated for 19.8 MeV/ c corresponding to the possible FEL option at PITZ. The wavelength range is 126 μm - 5.1 mm for this electron beam momentum. The 3D Opera simulations of the THz wiggler are discussed. A new PITZ photocathode laser system is proposed for the optimized performance of the high-brightness electron beam. The main goal is a production of 3D ellipsoidal electron bunches with homogeneous charge density. The electromagnetic wiggler is supposed to be used for measuring the longitudinal shape of these electron bunches.

  3. Studies of longitudinal profile of electron bunches and impedance measurements at Indus-2 synchrotron radiation source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garg, Akash Deep; Yadav, S.; Kumar, Mukesh; Shrivastava, B. B.; Karnewar, A. K.; Ojha, A.; Puntambekar, T. A.

    2016-04-01

    Indus-2 is a 3rd generation synchrotron radiation source at the Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology (RRCAT) in India. We study the longitudinal profile of electrons in Indus-2 by using dual sweep synchroscan streak camera at visible diagnostic beamline. In this paper, the longitudinal profiles of electron bunch are analyzed by filling beam current in a single bunch mode. These studies are carried at injection energy (550 MeV) and at ramped beam energy (2.5 GeV). The effects of the wakefield generated interactions between the circulating electrons and the surrounding vacuum chamber are analyzed in terms of measured effects on longitudinal beam distribution. The impedance of the storage ring is obtained by fitting the solutions of Haissinski equation to the measured bunch lengthening with different impedance models. The impedance of storage ring obtained by a series R+L impedance model indicates a resistance (R) of 1350±125 Ω, an inductance (L) of 180±25 nH and broadband impedance of 2.69 Ω. These results are also compared with the values obtained from measured synchronous phase advancing and scaling laws. These studies are very useful in better understanding and control of the electromagnetic interactions.

  4. Discharge rate measurements for Micromegas detectors in the presence of a longitudinal magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    B. Moreno, S. Aune, J. Ball, G. Charles, A. Giganon, P. Konczykowski, C. Lahonde-Hamdoun, H. Moutarde, S. Procureur, F. Sabatie

    2011-10-01

    We present first discharge rate measurements for Micromegas detectors in the presence of a high longitudinal magnetic field in the GeV kinematical region. Measurements were performed by using two Micromegas detectors and a photon beam impinging a CH{sub 2} target in the Hall B of the Jefferson Laboratory. One detector was equipped with an additional GEM foil, and a reduction of the discharge probability by two orders of magnitude compared to the stand-alone Micromegas was observed. The detectors were p laced in the FROST solenoid providing a longitudinal magnetic field up to 5T. It allowed for precise measurements of the discharge probability dependence with a diffusion-reducing magnetic field. Between 0 and 5T, the discharge probability increased by a factor of 10 for polar angles between 19{degrees} and 34{degrees}. A GEANT4-based simulation developed for sparking rate calculation was calibrated against these data in order to predict the sparking rate in a high longitudinal magnetic field environment. This simulati on is then used to investigate the possible use of Micromegas in the Forward Vertex Tracker (FVT) of the future CLAS12 spectrometer. In the case of the FVT a sparking rate of 1Hz per detector was obtained at the anticipated CLAS12 luminosity.

  5. Knowledge, Attitudes and Practices Related to Visceral Leishmaniasis in Rural Communities of Amhara State: A Longitudinal Study in Northwest Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    López-Perea, Noemí; Sordo, Luis; Gadisa, Endalamaw; Cruz, Israel; Hailu, Tsegaye; Moreno, Javier; Aseffa, Abraham; Cañavate, Carmen; Custodio, Estefanía

    2014-01-01

    Background In the northwest of Ethiopia, at the South Gondar region, there was a visceral leishmaniasis (VL) outbreak in 2005, making the disease a public health concern for the regional health authorities ever since. The knowledge on how the population perceives the disease is essential in order to propose successful control strategies. Methodology/Principal findings Two surveys on VL knowledge, attitudes and practices were conducted at the beginning (May 2009) and at the end (February 2011) of a VL longitudinal study carried out in rural communities of Libo Kemkem and Fogera, two districts of the Amhara Regional State. Results showed that VL global knowledge was very low in the area, and that it improved substantially in the period studied. Specifically, from 2009 to 2011, the frequency of proper knowledge regarding VL signs and symptoms increased from 47% to 71% (p<0.0001), knowledge of VL causes increased from 8% to 25% (p<0.0001), and knowledge on VL protection measures from 16% to 55% (p<0.0001). Moreover, the improvement observed in VL knowledge was more marked among the families with no previous history of VL case. Finally, in 2011 more than 90% of the households owned at least an impregnated bed net and had been sprayed, and attitudes towards these and other protective measures were very positive (over 94% acceptance for all of them). Conclusions/Significance In 2009 the level of knowledge regarding VL was very low among the rural population of this area, although it improved substantially in the study period, probably due to the contribution of many actors in the area. VL patients and relatives should be appropriately informed and trained as they may act as successful health community agents. VL risk behavioural patterns are subject to change as attitudes towards protective measures were very positive overall. PMID:24743328

  6. Use of missing data methods in longitudinal studies: the persistence of bad practices in developmental psychology.

    PubMed

    Jelicić, Helena; Phelps, Erin; Lerner, Richard M

    2009-07-01

    Developmental science rests on describing, explaining, and optimizing intraindividual changes and, hence, empirically requires longitudinal research. Problems of missing data arise in most longitudinal studies, thus creating challenges for interpreting the substance and structure of intraindividual change. Using a sample of reports of longitudinal studies obtained from three flagship developmental journals-Child Development, Developmental Psychology, and Journal of Research on Adolescence-we examined the number of longitudinal studies reporting missing data and the missing data techniques used. Of the 100 longitudinal studies sampled, 57 either reported having missing data or had discrepancies in sample sizes reported for different analyses. The majority of these studies (82%) used missing data techniques that are statistically problematic (either listwise deletion or pairwise deletion) and not among the methods recommended by statisticians (i.e., the direct maximum likelihood method and the multiple imputation method). Implications of these results for developmental theory and application, and the need for understanding the consequences of using statistically inappropriate missing data techniques with actual longitudinal data sets, are discussed.

  7. Modelling of the measured longitudinal piezoelectric coefficient of single ceramic fibres with annular electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pientschke, Christoph; Steinhausen, Ralf; Kern, Sabine; Beige, Horst

    2011-05-01

    A method for the measurement of the longitudinal piezoelectric coefficient d33 of single ceramic fibres with diameters 100-500 µm was recently developed. The voltage was applied using annular electrodes and the resulting displacement was measured by a capacitive method. In this paper, a number of calculations regarding the field distribution and the resulting piezoelectric displacement are presented for a typical lead zirconate titanate (PZT) ceramic. Provided that the fibres are ideally poled in the longitudinal direction, they can be modelled using the finite element method taking into account linear constitutive equations. The deviation of the measured and the actual d33 was modelled for a broad range of heights and diameters of the fibres and different electrode dimensions. The electric field distribution was analysed for typical examples and the influence of the mechanical stress on the measured d33 was studied. For sufficiently long and thin fibres the field distribution of the electric field is quite uniform and the d33 can be measured with high accuracy. Moreover, it was shown that for such fibres the measured piezoelectric coefficient d33 is determined by no other material parameter of the ceramics. The found trends of preferable geometries for the measurement can apparently be transferred to other piezoceramics.

  8. Bayesian nonparametric regression analysis of data with random effects covariates from longitudinal measurements.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Duchwan; Li, Erning; Mallick, Bani K

    2011-06-01

    We consider nonparametric regression analysis in a generalized linear model (GLM) framework for data with covariates that are the subject-specific random effects of longitudinal measurements. The usual assumption that the effects of the longitudinal covariate processes are linear in the GLM may be unrealistic and if this happens it can cast doubt on the inference of observed covariate effects. Allowing the regression functions to be unknown, we propose to apply Bayesian nonparametric methods including cubic smoothing splines or P-splines for the possible nonlinearity and use an additive model in this complex setting. To improve computational efficiency, we propose the use of data-augmentation schemes. The approach allows flexible covariance structures for the random effects and within-subject measurement errors of the longitudinal processes. The posterior model space is explored through a Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampler. The proposed methods are illustrated and compared to other approaches, the "naive" approach and the regression calibration, via simulations and by an application that investigates the relationship between obesity in adulthood and childhood growth curves.

  9. Stress Measurements in Shock-Loaded PBX 9501 with Embedded Longitudinal and Lateral Piezoresistive Ytterbium Gauges

    SciTech Connect

    D.E. Hooks

    2004-12-15

    A series of light gas gun impact experiments were performed with piezoresistive ytterbium (Yb) gauges in longitudinal and lateral orientations embedded in the plastic bonded explosive PBX 9501. These experiments were performed to evaluate the feasibility of using this method to measure lateral stresses and shear strength dynamically in PBX 9501. Ytterbium was chosen as a gauge material based on its high piezoresistance changes at low stress levels. Experiments were performed at longitudinal impact stresses of approximately 0.6 GPa, which is above the yield point of Yb, near the dynamic yield point of PBX 9501, at a level that is comparable with other impact data, and relevant to several multidimensional safety tests. Results show that PBX 9501 does maintain strength throughout compression. Because of poor reproducibility observed in the experiments presented, it appears unlikely that stress extraction from these gauge results would yield an estimate of shear strength at this impact stress with acceptable error.

  10. Measurements of fuselage skin strains and displacements near a longitudinal lap joint in a pressurized aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Edward P.; Britt, Vicki O.

    1991-01-01

    Strains and displacements in a small area near a longitudinal lap joint in the fuselage skin of a B737 aircraft were measured during a pressurization cycle to a differential pressure of 6.2 psi while the aircraft was on the ground. It was found that hoop strains were higher than longitudinal strains at each location; membrane strains in the unreinforced skin were higher than in the joint; membrane strains in the hoop direction, as well as radial displacements, tended to be highest at the mid-bay location between skin reinforcements; significant bending in the hoop direction occurred in the joint and in the skin near the joint, and the bending was unsymmetrically distributed about the stringer at the middle of the joint; and radial displacements were unsymmetrically distributed across the lap joint. The interpretation of the strain gage data for locations on the bonded and riveted lap joint assumed that the joint did not contain disbonded areas.

  11. Measuring Knowledge Integration Learning of Energy Topics: A two-year longitudinal study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ou Lydia; Ryoo, Kihyun; Linn, Marcia C.; Sato, Elissa; Svihla, Vanessa

    2015-05-01

    Although researchers call for inquiry learning in science, science assessments rarely capture the impact of inquiry instruction. This paper reports on the development and validation of assessments designed to measure middle-school students' progress in gaining integrated understanding of energy while studying an inquiry-oriented curriculum. The assessment development was guided by the knowledge integration framework. Over 2 years of implementation, more than 4,000 students from 4 schools participated in the study, including a cross-sectional and a longitudinal cohort. Results from item response modeling analyses revealed that: (a) the assessments demonstrated satisfactory psychometric properties in terms of reliability and validity; (b) both the cross-sectional and longitudinal cohorts made progress on integrating their understanding energy concepts; and (c) among many factors (e.g. gender, grade, school, and home language) associated with students' science performance, unit implementation was the strongest predictor.

  12. Measuring (subglacial) bedform orientation, length, and longitudinal asymmetry – Method assessment

    PubMed Central

    Brennand, Tracy A.

    2017-01-01

    Geospatial analysis software provides a range of tools that can be used to measure landform morphometry. Often, a metric can be computed with different techniques that may give different results. This study is an assessment of 5 different methods for measuring longitudinal, or streamlined, subglacial bedform morphometry: orientation, length and longitudinal asymmetry, all of which require defining a longitudinal axis. The methods use the standard deviational ellipse (not previously applied in this context), the longest straight line fitting inside the bedform footprint (2 approaches), the minimum-size footprint-bounding rectangle, and Euler’s approximation. We assess how well these methods replicate morphometric data derived from a manually mapped (visually interpreted) longitudinal axis, which, though subjective, is the most typically used reference. A dataset of 100 subglacial bedforms covering the size and shape range of those in the Puget Lowland, Washington, USA is used. For bedforms with elongation > 5, deviations from the reference values are negligible for all methods but Euler’s approximation (length). For bedforms with elongation < 5, most methods had small mean absolute error (MAE) and median absolute deviation (MAD) for all morphometrics and thus can be confidently used to characterize the central tendencies of their distributions. However, some methods are better than others. The least precise methods are the ones based on the longest straight line and Euler’s approximation; using these for statistical dispersion analysis is discouraged. Because the standard deviational ellipse method is relatively shape invariant and closely replicates the reference values, it is the recommended method. Speculatively, this study may also apply to negative-relief, and fluvial and aeolian bedforms. PMID:28319132

  13. A mixture of hierarchical joint models for longitudinal data with heterogeneity, non-normality, missingness, and covariate measurement error.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yangxin; Yan, Chunning; Yin, Ping; Lu, Meixia

    2016-01-01

    Longitudinal data arise frequently in medical studies and it is a common practice to analyze such complex data with nonlinear mixed-effects (NLME) models. However, the following four issues may be critical in longitudinal data analysis. (i) A homogeneous population assumption for models may be unrealistically obscuring important features of between-subject and within-subject variations; (ii) normality assumption for model errors may not always give robust and reliable results, in particular, if the data exhibit skewness; (iii) the responses may be missing and the missingness may be nonignorable; and (iv) some covariates of interest may often be measured with substantial errors. When carrying out statistical inference in such settings, it is important to account for the effects of these data features; otherwise, erroneous or even misleading results may be produced. Inferential procedures can be complicated dramatically when these four data features arise. In this article, the Bayesian joint modeling approach based on a finite mixture of NLME joint models with skew distributions is developed to study simultaneous impact of these four data features, allowing estimates of both model parameters and class membership probabilities at population and individual levels. A real data example is analyzed to demonstrate the proposed methodologies, and to compare various scenarios-based potential models with different specifications of distributions.

  14. Clinicians’ Perceptions of Implementation Extensiveness of 100% Tobacco Free Practices: A Longitudinal Study of New York State1

    PubMed Central

    de Tormes Eby, Lillian Turner; Laschober, Tanja C.

    2013-01-01

    In 2008, New York State required substance use disorder treatment organizations to be 100% tobacco-free. This longitudinal study examined clinicians’ perceptions of the implementation extensiveness of the tobacco-free practices approximately 10–12 months (Time 1) and 20–24 months (Time 2) post regulation and investigated whether clinicians’ commitment to change and use of provided resources at Time 1 predicts perceptions of implementation extensiveness at Time 2. Clinicians (N = 287) noted a mean implementation of 5.60 patient practices (0–10 scale), 2.33 visitor practices (0–8 scale), and 6.66 employee practices (0–12 scale) at Time 1. At Time 2, clinicians perceived a mean implementation of 5.95 patient practices (no increase from Time 1), 2.89 visitor practices (increase from Time 1), and 7.12 employee practices (no increase from Time 1). Commitment to change and use of resources positively predicted perceived implementation extensiveness of visitor and employee practices. The use of resources positively predicted implementation for patient practices. PMID:23430285

  15. Reliability of Fiber Tracking Measurements in Diffusion Tensor Imaging for Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    Danielian, Laura E.; Iwata, Nobue K.; Thomasson, David M.; Floeter, Mary Kay

    2009-01-01

    The statistical reliability of diffusion property measurements was evaluated in ten healthy subjects using deterministic fiber tracking to localize tracts affected in motor neuron disease: corticospinal tract (CST), uncinate fasciculus (UNC), and the corpus callosum in its entirety (CC), and its genu (GE), motor (CCM), and splenium (SP) fibers separately. Measurements of fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD), axial diffusivity (λ1), transverse diffusivity (λ⊥), and volume of voxels containing fibers (VV) were obtained within each tract. To assess intra-rater and inter-rater reliability, two raters carried out fiber tracking five times on each scan. Scan-rescan and longitudinal reliability were assessed in a subset of four subjects who had six scans, with two sets of three scans separated by one year. The statistical reliability of repeated measurements was evaluated using intra-class correlation coefficients (ICC) and coefficients of variation (CV). Spatial agreement of tract shape was assessed using the kappa (κ) statistic. Results Repeated same-scan fiber tracking evaluations showed good geometric alignment (intra-rater κ > 0.90, inter-rater κ > 0.76) and reliable diffusion property measurements (intra-rater ICC > 0.92, inter-rater ICC > 0.77). FA, MD, and λ⊥ were highly reliable with repeated scans on different days, up to a year apart (ICC > 0.8). VV also exhibited good reliability, but with higher CVs. We were unable to demonstrate reproducibility of λ1. Longitudinal reliability after one year was improved by averaging measurements from multiple scans at each timepoint. Fiber tracking provides a reliable tool for the longitudinal evaluation of white matter diffusion properties. PMID:19744567

  16. Practical guide for validated memristance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Nan; Shuai, Yao; Luo, Wenbo; Mayr, Christian; Schüffny, René; Schmidt, Oliver G.; Schmidt, Heidemarie

    2013-02-01

    Chua [IEEE Trans. Circuit Theory 18, 507-519 (1971), 10.1109/TCT.1971.1083337] predicted rather simple charge-flux curves for active and passive memristors (short for memory resistors) and presented active memristor circuit realizations already in the 1970 s. The first passive memristor has been presented in 2008 [D. B. Strukov, G. S. Snider, and D. R. Williams, Nature (London) 453, 80-83 (2008), 10.1038/nature06932]. Typically, memristors are traced in complicated hysteretic current-voltage curves. Therefore, the true essence of many new memristive devices has not been discovered so far. Here, we give a practical guide on how to use normalized charge-flux curves for the prediction of hysteretic current-voltage characteristics of memristors. In the case of memristive BiFeO3 thin film capacitor structures, the normalized charge-flux curves superimpose for different numbers of measurement points Ns and a different measurement time per measurement point Ts. Such normalized charge-flux curves can be used for the prediction of current-voltage characteristics for input signals with arbitrarily chosen Ns and Ts.

  17. Concordance correlation coefficients estimated by generalized estimating equations and variance components for longitudinal repeated measurements.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Miao-Yu

    2017-04-15

    The concordance correlation coefficient (CCC) is a commonly accepted measure of agreement between two observers for continuous responses. This paper proposes a generalized estimating equations (GEE) approach allowing dependency between repeated measurements over time to assess intra-agreement for each observer and inter- and total agreement among multiple observers simultaneously. Furthermore, the indices of intra-, inter-, and total agreement through variance components (VC) from an extended three-way linear mixed model (LMM) are also developed with consideration of the correlation structure of longitudinal repeated measurements. Simulation studies are conducted to compare the performance of the GEE and VC approaches for repeated measurements from longitudinal data. An application of optometric conformity study is used for illustration. In conclusion, the GEE approach allowing flexibility in model assumptions and correlation structures of repeated measurements gives satisfactory results with small mean square errors and nominal 95% coverage rates for large data sets, and when the assumption of the relationship between variances and covariances for the extended three-way LMM holds, the VC approach performs outstandingly well for all sample sizes. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Longitudinal measurement and hierarchical classification framework for the prediction of Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Meiyan; Yang, Wei; Feng, Qianjin; Chen, Wufan; Weiner, Michael W.; Aisen, Paul; Petersen, Ronald; Jack, Clifford R.; Jagust, William; Trojanowki, John Q.; Toga, Arthur W.; Beckett, Laurel; Green, Robert C.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Morris, John; Shaw, Leslie M.; Kaye, Jeffrey; Quinn, Joseph; Silbert, Lisa; Lind, Betty; Carter, Raina; Dolen, Sara; Schneider, Lon S.; Pawluczyk, Sonia; Beccera, Mauricio; Teodoro, Liberty; Spann, Bryan M.; Brewer, James; Vanderswag, Helen; Fleisher, Adam; Heidebrink, Judith L.; Lord, Joanne L.; Mason, Sara S.; Albers, Colleen S.; Knopman, David; Johnson, Kris; Doody, Rachelle S.; Villanueva-Meyer, Javier; Chowdhury, Munir; Rountree, Susan; Dang, Mimi; Stern, Yaakov; Honig, Lawrence S.; Bell, Karen L.; Ances, Beau; Morris, John C.; Carroll, Maria; Creech, Mary L.; Franklin, Erin; Mintun, Mark A.; Schneider, Stacy; Oliver, Angela; Marson, Daniel; Griffith, Randall; Clark, David; Geldmacher, David; Brockington, John; Roberson, Erik; Love, Marissa Natelson; Grossman, Hillel; Mitsis, Effie; Shah, Raj C.; deToledo-Morrell, Leyla; Duara, Ranjan; Varon, Daniel; Greig, Maria T.; Roberts, Peggy; Albert, Marilyn; Onyike, Chiadi; D’Agostino, Daniel; Kielb, Stephanie; Galvin, James E.; Cerbone, Brittany; Michel, Christina A.; Pogorelec, Dana M.; Rusinek, Henry; de Leon, Mony J.; Glodzik, Lidia; De Santi, Susan; Doraiswamy, P. Murali; Petrella, Jeffrey R.; Borges-Neto, Salvador; Wong, Terence Z.; Coleman, Edward; Smith, Charles D.; Jicha, Greg; Hardy, Peter; Sinha, Partha; Oates, Elizabeth; Conrad, Gary; Porsteinsson, Anton P.; Goldstein, Bonnie S.; Martin, Kim; Makino, Kelly M.; Ismail, M. Saleem; Brand, Connie; Mulnard, Ruth A.; Thai, Gaby; Mc-Adams-Ortiz, Catherine; Womack, Kyle; Mathews, Dana; Quiceno, Mary; Levey, Allan I.; Lah, James J.; Cellar, Janet S.; Burns, Jeffrey M.; Swerdlow, Russell H.; Brooks, William M.; Apostolova, Liana; Tingus, Kathleen; Woo, Ellen; Silverman, Daniel H. S.; Lu, Po H.; Bartzokis, George; Graff-Radford, Neill R.; Parfitt, Francine; Kendall, Tracy; Johnson, Heather; Farlow, Martin R.; Hake, Ann Marie; Matthews, Brandy R.; Brosch, Jared R.; Herring, Scott; Hunt, Cynthia; van Dyck, Christopher H.; Carson, Richard E.; MacAvoy, Martha G.; Varma, Pradeep; Chertkow, Howard; Bergman, Howard; Hosein, Chris; Black, Sandra; Stefanovic, Bojana; Caldwell, Curtis; Hsiung, Ging-Yuek Robin; Feldman, Howard; Mudge, Benita; Assaly, Michele; Finger, Elizabeth; Pasternack, Stephen; Rachisky, Irina; Trost, Dick; Kertesz, Andrew; Bernick, Charles; Munic, Donna; Mesulam, Marek Marsel; Lipowski, Kristine; Weintraub, Sandra; Bonakdarpour, Borna; Kerwin, Diana; Wu, Chuang-Kuo; Johnson, Nancy; Sadowsky, Carl; Villena, Teresa; Turner, Raymond Scott; Johnson, Kathleen; Reynolds, Brigid; Sperling, Reisa A.; Johnson, Keith A.; Marshall, Gad; Yesavage, Jerome; Taylor, Joy L.; Lane, Barton; Rosen, Allyson; Tinklenberg, Jared; Sabbagh, Marwan N.; Belden, Christine M.; Jacobson, Sandra A.; Sirrel, Sherye A.; Kowall, Neil; Killiany, Ronald; Budson, Andrew E.; Norbash, Alexander; Johnson, Patricia Lynn; Obisesan, Thomas O.; Wolday, Saba; Allard, Joanne; Lerner, Alan; Ogrocki, Paula; Tatsuoka, Curtis; Fatica, Parianne; Fletcher, Evan; Maillard, Pauline; Olichney, John; DeCarli, Charles; Carmichael, Owen; Kittur, Smita; Borrie, Michael; Lee, T-Y; Bartha, Rob; Johnson, Sterling; Asthana, Sanjay; Carlsson, Cynthia M.; Potkin, Steven G.; Preda, Adrian; Nguyen, Dana; Tariot, Pierre; Burke, Anna; Trncic, Nadira; Fleisher, Adam; Reeder, Stephanie; Bates, Vernice; Capote, Horacio; Rainka, Michelle; Scharre, Douglas W.; Kataki, Maria; Adeli, Anahita; Zimmerman, Earl A.; Celmins, Dzintra; Brown, Alice D.; Pearlson, Godfrey D.; Blank, Karen; Anderson, Karen; Flashman, Laura A.; Seltzer, Marc; Hynes, Mary L.; Santulli, Robert B.; Sink, Kaycee M.; Gordineer, Leslie; Williamson, Jeff D.; Garg, Pradeep; Watkins, Franklin; Ott, Brian R.; Querfurth, Henry; Tremont, Geoffrey; Salloway, Stephen; Malloy, Paul; Correia, Stephen; Rosen, Howard J.; Miller, Bruce L.; Perry, David; Mintzer, Jacobo; Spicer, Kenneth; Bachman, David; Pomara, Nunzio; Hernando, Raymundo; Sarrael, Antero; Relkin, Norman; Chaing, Gloria; Lin, Michael; Ravdin, Lisa; Smith, Amanda; Raj, Balebail Ashok; Fargher, Kristin

    2017-01-01

    Accurate prediction of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is important for the early diagnosis and treatment of this condition. Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is an early stage of AD. Therefore, patients with MCI who are at high risk of fully developing AD should be identified to accurately predict AD. However, the relationship between brain images and AD is difficult to construct because of the complex characteristics of neuroimaging data. To address this problem, we present a longitudinal measurement of MCI brain images and a hierarchical classification method for AD prediction. Longitudinal images obtained from individuals with MCI were investigated to acquire important information on the longitudinal changes, which can be used to classify MCI subjects as either MCI conversion (MCIc) or MCI non-conversion (MCInc) individuals. Moreover, a hierarchical framework was introduced to the classifier to manage high feature dimensionality issues and incorporate spatial information for improving the prediction accuracy. The proposed method was evaluated using 131 patients with MCI (70 MCIc and 61 MCInc) based on MRI scans taken at different time points. Results showed that the proposed method achieved 79.4% accuracy for the classification of MCIc versus MCInc, thereby demonstrating very promising performance for AD prediction. PMID:28079104

  19. Longitudinal measurement and hierarchical classification framework for the prediction of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Huang, Meiyan; Yang, Wei; Feng, Qianjin; Chen, Wufan

    2017-01-12

    Accurate prediction of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is important for the early diagnosis and treatment of this condition. Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is an early stage of AD. Therefore, patients with MCI who are at high risk of fully developing AD should be identified to accurately predict AD. However, the relationship between brain images and AD is difficult to construct because of the complex characteristics of neuroimaging data. To address this problem, we present a longitudinal measurement of MCI brain images and a hierarchical classification method for AD prediction. Longitudinal images obtained from individuals with MCI were investigated to acquire important information on the longitudinal changes, which can be used to classify MCI subjects as either MCI conversion (MCIc) or MCI non-conversion (MCInc) individuals. Moreover, a hierarchical framework was introduced to the classifier to manage high feature dimensionality issues and incorporate spatial information for improving the prediction accuracy. The proposed method was evaluated using 131 patients with MCI (70 MCIc and 61 MCInc) based on MRI scans taken at different time points. Results showed that the proposed method achieved 79.4% accuracy for the classification of MCIc versus MCInc, thereby demonstrating very promising performance for AD prediction.

  20. Quantitative muscle strength assessment in duchenne muscular dystrophy: longitudinal study and correlation with functional measures

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to perform a longitudinal assessment using Quantitative Muscle Testing (QMT) in a cohort of ambulant boys affected by Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and to correlate the results of QMT with functional measures. This study is to date the most thorough long-term evaluation of QMT in a cohort of DMD patients correlated with other measures, such as the North Star Ambulatory Assessment (NSAA) or thee 6-min walk test (6MWT). Methods This is a single centre, prospective, non-randomised, study assessing QMT using the Kin Com® 125 machine in a study cohort of 28 ambulant DMD boys, aged 5 to 12 years. This cohort was assessed longitudinally over a 12 months period of time with 3 monthly assessments for QMT and with assessment of functional abilities, using the NSAA and the 6MWT at baseline and at 12 months only. QMT was also used in a control group of 13 healthy age-matched boys examined at baseline and at 12 months. Results There was an increase in QMT over 12 months in boys below the age of 7.5 years while in boys above the age of 7.5 years, QMT showed a significant decrease. All the average one-year changes were significantly different than those experienced by healthy controls. We also found a good correlation between quantitative tests and the other measures that was more obvious in the stronger children. Conclusion Our longitudinal data using QMT in a cohort of DMD patients suggest that this could be used as an additional tool to monitor changes, providing additional information on segmental strength. PMID:22974002

  1. Linking Perceived Discrimination to Longitudinal Changes in African American Mothers' Parenting Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brody, Gene H.; Chen, Yi-Fu; Kogan, Steven M.; Murry, Velma McBride; Logan, Patricia; Luo, Zupei

    2008-01-01

    This longitudinal study was designed to test hypotheses, derived from a stress proliferation framework, regarding the association between perceived racial discrimination and changes in parenting among African American mothers in the rural South. A sample of 139 mothers and their children were interviewed 3 times at 1-year intervals. Mothers…

  2. Minimizing Respondent Attrition in Longitudinal Research: Practical Implications from a Cohort Study of Adolescent Drinking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boys, Annabel; Marsden, John; Stillwell, Garry; Hatchings, Kevin; Griffiths, Paul; Farrell, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the methods used to maximize retention in a longitudinal study of adolescent drinking. Strategies to minimize attrition included the collection of detailed contact information, incentives for participation, postcard and telephone reminders and telephone interviews. Ninety-six percent of the original sample completed the first follow-up…

  3. Executive function in early childhood: longitudinal measurement invariance and developmental change.

    PubMed

    Willoughby, Michael T; Wirth, R J; Blair, Clancy B

    2012-06-01

    This study tested the longitudinal measurement invariance and developmental changes of a newly developed battery of executive function (EF) tasks for use in early childhood. The battery was administered in the Family Life Project-a prospective longitudinal study (N = 1,292) of families who were oversampled from low-income and African American families at the birth of a new child-at assessments conducted when the child was 3, 4, and 5 years old. All 6 individual EF tasks exhibited strong measurement invariance over time. The EF battery, which was derived from the 6 individual tasks, exhibited partial strong invariance over time. Second-order latent growth curve models revealed individual differences in the levels but not rates of change in latent EF ability. The functional form of change was nonlinear; 60% of the total change in EF ability that was observed between the 3- and 5-year assessments occurred between the Year 3 and Year 4 assessments. Results are discussed with respect to the importance of establishing scalable measures of EF ability prior to investigating experiences that predict or are predicted by changes in EF during early childhood.

  4. Longitudinal and transversal bioimpedance measurements in addition to diagnosis of heart failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribas, N.; Nescolarde, L.; Domingo, M.; Gastelurrutia, P.; Bayés-Genis, A.; Rosell-Ferrer, J.

    2010-04-01

    Heart Failure (HF) is a clinical syndrome characterised by signs of systemic and pulmonary fluid retention, shortness of breath and/or fatigue. There is a lack of reliable indicators of disease state. Benefits and applicability of non-invasive bioimpedance measurement in the hydration state of soft tissues have been validated, fundamentally, in dialysis patients. Four impedance configurations (2 longitudinal and 2 transversal) were analyzed in 48 HF patients (M=28, F=20) classified according to a clinical disease severity score (CDSS) derived from the Framingham criteria: CDSS<=2 (G1: M = 23, F = 14) and CDSS>2 (G2: M = 5, F = 6). The aim of this study is to analyze longitudinal and transversal bioimpedance measurement at 50 kHz, in addition to clinical diagnosis parameters of heart failure, including: clinical disease severity score (CDSS) and a biomarker concentrations (NT-proBNP). The Kolmogorov-Smirnov test was used for the normality test of all variables. The CDSS, NTproBNP and impedance parameters between groups (G1 and G2) were compared by mean of Mann Withney U-test. The statistical significance was considered with P < 0.05. Whole-body impedance measured was analyzed using RXc graph.

  5. Repeatability and Minimal Detectable Change in Longitudinal Median Nerve Excursion Measures During Upper Limb Neurodynamic Techniques in a Mixed Population: A Pilot Study Using Musculoskeletal Ultrasound Imaging.

    PubMed

    Paquette, Philippe; Lamontagne, Martin; Higgins, Johanne; Gagnon, Dany H

    2015-07-01

    This study determined test-retest reliability and minimum detectable change in longitudinal median nerve excursion during upper limb neurodynamic tests (ULNTs). Seven participants with unilateral or bilateral carpal tunnel syndrome and 11 healthy participants were randomly tested with two ULNTs (i.e., tensioner and slider). Each ULNT was performed three times each at 45° and 90° of shoulder abduction on two separate visits. Video sequences of median nerve excursion, recorded by a physical therapist using ultrasound imaging, were quantified using computer software. The generalizability theory, encompassing a G-Study and a D-study, measured the dependability coefficient (Φ) along with standard error of measurement (SEM) accuracy and allowed various testing protocols to be proposed. The highest reliability (Φ = 0.84) and lowest minimal measurement error (SEM = 0.58 mm) of the longitudinal median nerve excursion were reached during the ULNT-slider performed with 45° of shoulder abduction and when measures obtained from three different image sequences recorded during a single visit were averaged. It is recommended that longitudinal median nerve excursion measures computed from three separate image sequences recorded during a single visit be averaged in clinical practice. Ideally, adding a second visit (six image sequences) is also suggested in research protocols.

  6. Universal ultrasonic goniometer for Rayleigh and surface skimming longitudinal wave dispersion measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, M.; Küttner, M.; Köhler, B.; Bamberg, J.; Baron, H.-U.

    2012-05-01

    There are several approaches for determining the Rayleigh wave dispersion of surface treated materials. Most of them are based either on ultrasonic probes in contact technique or on laser excitation or detection of ultrasound. Disadvantages of these methods for in-service use are coupling problems (contact methods) and very high device costs (laser based methods). The paper presents an immersion technique trying to avoid the disadvantages of the previous approaches for practical use. The High precision Ultrasound Goniometer (HUGO) allows to vary both: the sound beam angles and the distance between the excitation and detection sound beams. Thus, the Rayleigh wave velocity and its dispersion can be determined by two independent methods: by the drop in the reflexion coefficient at the Rayleigh angle and by change in travel time for a given change in travel distance. The dispersion can also be determined for surface skimming longitudinal waves. The application for stress determination in surface treated aero-engine materials is discussed.

  7. Methods and Measures: Growth Mixture Modeling--A Method for Identifying Differences in Longitudinal Change among Unobserved Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ram, Nilam; Grimm, Kevin J.

    2009-01-01

    Growth mixture modeling (GMM) is a method for identifying multiple unobserved sub-populations, describing longitudinal change within each unobserved sub-population, and examining differences in change among unobserved sub-populations. We provide a practical primer that may be useful for researchers beginning to incorporate GMM analysis into their…

  8. 38 CFR 21.4275 - Practical training courses; measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ....C. 3688(b); Pub. L. 99-576) (b) Nursing courses. (1) Courses for the objective of registered nurse or registered professional nurse will be measured on the basis of credit hours or clock hours of... practical nurse, practical trained nurse, or licensed practical nurse will be measured on credit hours...

  9. 38 CFR 21.7674 - Measurement of practical training courses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    .... (1) Courses for the objective of registered nurse or registered professional nurse will be measured...) Courses offered by institutions of higher learning which lead to the objective of practical nurse, practical trained nurse, or licensed practical nurse will be measured on credit hours or clock hours...

  10. A Longitudinal Study of Teaching Practice and Early Career Decisions: A Cautionary Tale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cochran-Smith, Marilyn; McQuillan, Patrick; Mitchell, Kara; Terrell, Dianna Gahlsdorf; Barnatt, Joan; D'Souza, Lisa; Jong, Cindy; Shakman, Karen; Lam, Karen; Gleeson, Ann Marie

    2012-01-01

    Although the turnover rate among beginning teachers has been a major concern for some time, most studies do not link teacher retention with teaching practice. In contrast, this study looks specifically at career decisions coupled with practice. Guided by a view of teaching as social and cultural practice, the study used multiple qualitative data…

  11. Anthropometric measurements and dental caries in children: a systematic review of longitudinal studies.

    PubMed

    Li, Ling-Wei; Wong, Hai Ming; Peng, Si-Min; McGrath, Colman P

    2015-01-01

    There is growing interest in the association between anthropometric measurements and dental caries in childhood over time (life-course studies). The aim of this review was to identify and systematically review the evidence of the association between anthropometric measurements and dental caries in childhood over time. PubMed, Institute for Scientific Information (ISI) Web of Knowledge, the Cochrane Library, and 6 other databases were searched to identify effective articles. A systematic approach involving critical appraisal was conducted to examine the relation between anthropometric measurements and dental caries in preschool- and school-aged populations from longitudinal studies. An initial search identified 1338 studies, with 59 potentially effective studies (κ = 0.82) and 17 effective studies (κ = 0.88). The quality of reporting among the studies ranged from 19.5 to 30.0 according to the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) criteria. Among the effective studies, 2 studies in which caries was used to predict anthropometric measurements consistently found an inverse association and 15 studies in which anthropometric measurements were used to predict caries were inconsistent, with results appearing to be influenced by nonuniformity of assessments, setting, and procedure of measurements; age and ethnicity of participants; and confounders of dental caries. In conclusion, among >1000 studies identified, 17 informed this systematic review. The quality of reporting of these studies varied considerably. Evidence of the association between anthropometric measurements and dental caries is conflicting and remains inconclusive.

  12. Anthropometric Measurements and Dental Caries in Children: A Systematic Review of Longitudinal Studies123

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ling-Wei; Wong, Hai Ming; Peng, Si-Min; McGrath, Colman P

    2015-01-01

    There is growing interest in the association between anthropometric measurements and dental caries in childhood over time (life-course studies). The aim of this review was to identify and systematically review the evidence of the association between anthropometric measurements and dental caries in childhood over time. PubMed, Institute for Scientific Information (ISI) Web of Knowledge, the Cochrane Library, and 6 other databases were searched to identify effective articles. A systematic approach involving critical appraisal was conducted to examine the relation between anthropometric measurements and dental caries in preschool- and school-aged populations from longitudinal studies. An initial search identified 1338 studies, with 59 potentially effective studies (κ = 0.82) and 17 effective studies (κ = 0.88). The quality of reporting among the studies ranged from 19.5 to 30.0 according to the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) criteria. Among the effective studies, 2 studies in which caries was used to predict anthropometric measurements consistently found an inverse association and 15 studies in which anthropometric measurements were used to predict caries were inconsistent, with results appearing to be influenced by nonuniformity of assessments, setting, and procedure of measurements; age and ethnicity of participants; and confounders of dental caries. In conclusion, among >1000 studies identified, 17 informed this systematic review. The quality of reporting of these studies varied considerably. Evidence of the association between anthropometric measurements and dental caries is conflicting and remains inconclusive. PMID:25593143

  13. Longitudinal association of anthropometric measures of adiposity with cardiometabolic risk factors in postmenopausal women

    PubMed Central

    Kabat, Geoffrey C.; Heo, Moonseong; Van Horn, Linda V.; Kazlauskaite, Rasa; Getaneh, Asqual; Ard, Jamy; Vitolins, Mara Z.; Waring, Molly E.; Zaslavsky, Oleg; Smoller, Sylvia Wassertheil; Rohan, Thomas E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Some studies suggest that anthropometric measures of abdominal obesity may be superior to body mass index for the prediction of cardiometabolic risk factors; however, most studies have been cross-sectional. Our aim was to prospectively examine the association of change in body mass index (BMI), waist-hip ratio (WHR), waist circumference (WC), and waist circumference-height ratio (WCHtR) with change in markers of cardiometabolic risk in a population of postmenopausal women. Methods We used a subsample of participants in the Women’s Health Initiative aged 50 to 79 at entry with available fasting blood samples and anthropometric measurements obtained at multiple time points over 12.8 years of follow-up (N = 2,672). The blood samples were used to measure blood glucose, insulin, total cholesterol, LDL-C, HDL-C, and triglycerides at baseline, and at years 1, 3, and 6. We conducted mixed-effects linear regression analyses to examine associations at baseline and longitudinal associations between change in anthropometric measures and change in cardiometabolic risk factors, adjusting for covariates. Results In longitudinal analyses, change in BMI, WC, and WCHtR robustly predicted change in cardiometabolic risk, whereas change in WHR did not. The strongest associations were seen for change in triglycerides, glucose, and HDL-C (inverse association). Conclusion Increase in BMI, WC, and WCHtR strongly predicted increases in serum triglycerides and glucose, and reduced HDL-C. WC and WCHtR were superior to BMI in predicting serum glucose, HDL-C, and triglycerides. WCHtR was superior to WC only in predicting serum glucose. BMI, WC, and WCHtR were all superior to WHR. PMID:25453348

  14. Reliability of neuroanatomical measurements in a multisite longitudinal study of youth at risk for psychosis.

    PubMed

    Cannon, Tyrone D; Sun, Frank; McEwen, Sarah Jacobson; Papademetris, Xenophon; He, George; van Erp, Theo G M; Jacobson, Aron; Bearden, Carrie E; Walker, Elaine; Hu, Xiaoping; Zhou, Lei; Seidman, Larry J; Thermenos, Heidi W; Cornblatt, Barbara; Olvet, Doreen M; Perkins, Diana; Belger, Aysenil; Cadenhead, Kristin; Tsuang, Ming; Mirzakhanian, Heline; Addington, Jean; Frayne, Richard; Woods, Scott W; McGlashan, Thomas H; Constable, R Todd; Qiu, Maolin; Mathalon, Daniel H; Thompson, Paul; Toga, Arthur W

    2014-05-01

    Multisite longitudinal neuroimaging designs are used to identify differential brain structural change associated with onset or progression of disease. The reliability of neuroanatomical measurements over time and across sites is a crucial aspect of power in such studies. Prior work has found that while within-site reliabilities of neuroanatomical measurements are excellent, between-site reliability is generally more modest. Factors that may increase between-site reliability include standardization of scanner platform and sequence parameters and correction for between-scanner variations in gradient nonlinearities. Factors that may improve both between- and within-site reliability include use of registration algorithms that account for individual differences in cortical patterning and shape. In this study 8 healthy volunteers were scanned twice on successive days at 8 sites participating in the North American Prodrome Longitudinal Study (NAPLS). All sites employed 3 Tesla scanners and standardized acquisition parameters. Site accounted for 2 to 30% of the total variance in neuroanatomical measurements. However, site-related variations were trivial (<1%) among sites using the same scanner model and 12-channel coil or when correcting for between-scanner differences in gradient nonlinearity and scaling. Adjusting for individual differences in sulcal-gyral geometries yielded measurements with greater reliabilities than those obtained using an automated approach. Neuroimaging can be performed across multiple sites at the same level of reliability as at a single site, achieving within- and between-site reliabilities of 0.95 or greater for gray matter density in the majority of voxels in the prefrontal and temporal cortical surfaces as well as for the volumes of most subcortical structures.

  15. Measurement and relevance of personality characteristics in persons with dementia: a longitudinal perspective.

    PubMed

    Twigg, Prudence; Burgener, Sandy C; Popovich, Ann

    2007-01-01

    Studies of personality and outcomes in persons with dementia (PWD) have focused primarily on disease stages or change from premorbid personality following diagnosis. Data from a longitudinal study of 96 caregiver/PWD dyads was used to evaluate psychometric properties of two personality measures: one rated by proxies, the other by PWD. Proxy ratings indicate change in strength of personality traits across disease stages; self-ratings were stable, excepting decreased extroversion. Items detracting from reliability of some subscales reflected disease-related changes in PWD rather than true shifts in personality. Findings support importance of collecting both proxy and self-ratings of personality, examining individual items contributing to low reliability, and evaluating change in personality within the context of expected changes inherent in dementia.

  16. Family-Based Association Tests with Longitudinal Measurements: Handling Missing Data

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Xiao; Laird, Nan

    2009-01-01

    Several family-based approaches have been previously proposed to enhance the power for testing genetic association when the traits are measured longitudinally or repeatedly. In this paper, we show that some of these FBAT approaches can be easily extended to accommodate incomplete data and remain unbiased tests. We also show that because of the nature of FBAT approaches, we can impute the missing phenotypes without biasing our tests and achieve higher power. We propose two imputation techniques based on E-M algorithm and the conditional mean model, respectively. Through simulation studies, these two imputation techniques are shown to have correct false positive rate and generally achieve higher power than complete case analysis or simple mean-imputation. Application of these approaches for testing an association between Body Mass Index and a previously reported candidate SNP confirms our results. PMID:19365136

  17. Family-Based Association Tests with longitudinal measurements: handling missing data.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xiao; Laird, Nan

    2009-01-01

    Several family-based approaches have been previously proposed to enhance the power for testing genetic association when the traits are measured longitudinally or repeatedly. In this paper, we show that some of these FBAT approaches can be easily extended to accommodate incomplete data and remain unbiased tests. We also show that because of the nature of FBAT approaches, we can impute the missing phenotypes without biasing our tests and achieve higher power. We propose two imputation techniques based on E-M algorithm and the conditional mean model, respectively. Through simulation studies, these two imputation techniques are shown to have correct false positive rate and generally achieve higher power than complete case analysis or simple mean-imputation. Application of these approaches for testing an association between Body Mass Index and a previously reported candidate SNP confirms our results.

  18. A Longitudinal Analysis of Adolescent Smoking: Using Smoking Status to Differentiate the Influence of Body Weight Measures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hong, Traci; Johnson, Carolyn

    2013-01-01

    Background: Previous research has reported mixed results on the association between body weight measures (ie, perception of weight and weight loss goal) and cigarette smoking prevalence--and how these associations vary by sex and race. This longitudinal study assessed the relationship between these 2 body weight measures and smoking prevalence by…

  19. Modeling Life-Span Growth Curves of Cognition Using Longitudinal Data with Multiple Samples and Changing Scales of Measurement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McArdle, John J.; Grimm, Kevin J.; Hamagami, Fumiaki; Bowles, Ryan P.; Meredith, William

    2009-01-01

    The authors use multiple-sample longitudinal data from different test batteries to examine propositions about changes in constructs over the life span. The data come from 3 classic studies on intellectual abilities in which, in combination, 441 persons were repeatedly measured as many as 16 times over 70 years. They measured cognitive constructs…

  20. Causal inference in longitudinal comparative effectiveness studies with repeated measures of a continuous intermediate variable.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chen-Pin; Jo, Booil; Brown, C Hendricks

    2014-09-10

    We propose a principal stratification approach to assess causal effects in nonrandomized longitudinal comparative effectiveness studies with a binary endpoint outcome and repeated measures of a continuous intermediate variable. Our method is an extension of the principal stratification approach originally proposed for the longitudinal randomized study "Prevention of Suicide in Primary Care Elderly: Collaborative Trial" to assess the treatment effect on the continuous Hamilton depression score adjusting for the heterogeneity of repeatedly measured binary compliance status. Our motivation for this work comes from a comparison of the effect of two glucose-lowering medications on a clinical cohort of patients with type 2 diabetes. Here, we consider a causal inference problem assessing how well the two medications work relative to one another on two binary endpoint outcomes: cardiovascular disease-related hospitalization and all-cause mortality. Clinically, these glucose-lowering medications can have differential effects on the intermediate outcome, glucose level over time. Ultimately, we want to compare medication effects on the endpoint outcomes among individuals in the same glucose trajectory stratum while accounting for the heterogeneity in baseline covariates (i.e., to obtain 'principal effects' on the endpoint outcomes). The proposed method involves a three-step model estimation procedure. Step 1 identifies principal strata associated with the intermediate variable using hybrid growth mixture modeling analyses. Step 2 obtains the stratum membership using the pseudoclass technique and derives propensity scores for treatment assignment. Step 3 obtains the stratum-specific treatment effect on the endpoint outcome weighted by inverse propensity probabilities derived from Step 2.

  1. Heritability of calcaneal quantitative ultrasound measures in healthy adults from the Fels Longitudinal Study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Miryoung; Czerwinski, Stefan A; Choh, Audrey C; Towne, Bradford; Demerath, Ellen W; Chumlea, Wm Cameron; Sun, Shumei S; Siervogel, Roger M

    2004-11-01

    Quantitative ultrasound (QUS) measurements of bone have been reported to predict osteoporotic fracture risk in postmenopausal women and older men. Although many studies have examined the heritability of bone mineral density (BMD), few studies have estimated the heritability of calcaneal QUS phenotypes. In the present study, we examined the genetic regulation of calcaneal QUS parameters in individuals from nuclear and extended families. The study population includes 260 men and 295 women aged 18-91 years (mean+/-SD: 46+/-16 years) who belong to 111 pedigrees in the Fels Longitudinal Study. Three measures of calcaneal structure were collected from both the right and left heel using the Sahara bone sonometer. These measures included broadband ultrasound attenuation (BUA), speed of sound (SOS), and the quantitative ultrasound index (QUI). We used a variance components based maximum likelihood method to estimate the heritability of QUS parameters while simultaneously adjusting for covariate effects. Additionally, we used bivariate extensions of these methods to calculate additive genetic and random environmental correlations among QUS measures. All phenotypes demonstrated statistically significant heritabilities (P<0.0000001). Heritabilities in the right heel (h2+/-SE) were h2=0.59+/-0.10 for BUA, h2=0.73+/-0.09 for SOS, and h2=0.72+/-0.09 for QUI. Similarly, heritabilities for the left heel were h2=0.52+/-0.10, h2=0.75+/-0.10, and h2=0.70+/0.10, respectively. There was evidence for significant genetic and environmental correlations among these six QUS measures. Combinations of QUS measures in the right and left heel demonstrated genetic correlations of 0.94-0.99 and all were significantly different from one indicating at least a partially unique genetic architecture for each of these measures. This study demonstrates that QUS measures of the calcaneus among healthy men and women are heritable, and there are large shared additive genetic effects among all of the traits

  2. Measurement of Single and Double Spin Asymmetries in Deep Inelastic Pion Electroproduction with a Longitudinally Polarized Target

    SciTech Connect

    Avakian, H; Bosted, P; Elouadrhiri, L; Adhikari, K P; Aghasyan, M; Amaryan, M; Anghinolfi, M; Baghdasaryan, H; Ball, J; Battaglieri, M; Bedlinskiy, I; Biselli, A S; Branford, D; Briscoe, W J; Brooks, W; Carman, D S; Casey, L; Cole, P L; Collins, P; Crabb, D; Crede, V; D'Angelo, A; Daniel, A; Dashyan, N; DeVita, R; DeSanctis, E; Deur, A; Dey, B; Dhamija, S; Dickson, R; Djalali, C; Dodge, G; Doughty, D; Dupre, R; El Alaoui, A; Eugenio, P; Fegan, S; Fersch, M; Guler, N; Guo, L; Hafidi, K; Hakobyan, H; Hanretty, C; Hassall, N; Heddle, D; Hicks, K; Holtrop, M; Ilieva, Y; Ireland, D G; Isupov, E L; Jawalkar, S S; Jo, H S; Joo, K; Keller, D; Khandaker, M; Khetarpal,; Kim, W; Klein, A; Klein, F J; Konczykowski, P; Kubarovsky, V; Kuhn, S E; Kuleshov, S V; Kuznetsov, V; Livingston, K; Lu, H Y; Markov, N; Mayer, M; McAndrew, J; McCracken, M E; McKInnon, B; Meyer, C A; Mineeva, T; Mirazita, M; Mokeev, V; Moreno, B; Moriya, K; Morrison, B; Moutarde, H; Munevar, E; Nadel-Turonski, P; Nasseripour, R; Niccolai, S; Niculescu, G; Niculescu, I; Niroula, M R; Osipenko, M; Ostrovidov, A I; Paremuzyan, R; Park, K; Park, S; Pasyuk, E; Anefalos Pereira, S; Perrin, Y; Pisano, S; Pogorelko, O; Price, J W; Procureur, S; Prok, Protopopescu; Raue, B A; Ricco, G; Ripani, M; Rosner, G; Rossi, P; Sabatie, F; Saini, M S; Salamanca, J; Salgado, C; Schumacher, R A; Seder, E; Seraydaryan, H; Sharabian, Y G; Sober, D I; Sokhan, D; Stapanyan, S S; Stepanyan, S; Stoler, P; Strauch, S; Suleiman, R; Taiuti, M; Tedeschi, D J; Tkachenko, S; Ungaro, M; Vernarsky, B; Vineyard, M F; Voutier, E; Watts, D P; Weinstein, L B; Weygand, D P; Wood, M H; Zhang, J; Zhao, B; Zhao, Z W

    2010-12-01

    We report the first measurement of the transverse momentum dependence of double spin asymmetries in semi-inclusive production of pions in deep inelastic scattering off the longitudinally polarized proton. Data have been obtained using a polarized electron beam of 5.7 GeV with the CLAS detector at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab). A significant non-zero $\\sin2\\phi$ single spin asymmetry was also observed for the first time indicating strong spin-orbit correlations for transversely polarized quarks in the longitudinally polarized proton. The azimuthal modulations of single spin asymmetries have been measured over a wide kinematic range.

  3. Measuring Changes in the Economics of Medical Practice.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Christopher; Rich, Eugene; DesRoches, Catherine; Reschovsky, James; Kogan, Rachel

    2015-08-01

    For the latter third of the twentieth century, researchers have estimated production and cost functions for physician practices. Today, those attempting to measure the inputs and outputs of physician practice must account for many recent changes in models of care delivery. In this paper, we review practice inputs and outputs as typically described in research on the economics of medical practice, and consider the implications of the changing organization of medical practice and nature of physician work. This evolving environment has created conceptual challenges in what are the appropriate measures of output from physician work, as well as what inputs should be measured. Likewise, the increasing complexity of physician practice organizations has introduced challenges to finding the appropriate data sources for measuring these constructs. Both these conceptual and data challenges pose measurement issues that must be overcome to study the economics of modern medical practice. Despite these challenges, there are several promising initiatives involving data sharing at the organizational level that could provide a starting point for developing the needed new data sources and metrics for physician inputs and outputs. However, additional efforts will be required to establish data collection approaches and measurements applicable to smaller and single specialty practices. Overcoming these measurement and data challenges will be key to supporting policy-relevant research on the changing economics of medical practice.

  4. Measurements of longitudinal gamma ray distribution using a multichannel fiber-optic Cerenkov radiation sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, S. H.; Jeon, D.; Kim, J. S.; Jang, J. S.; Jang, K. W.; Yoo, W. J.; Moon, J. H.; Park, B. G.; Kim, S.; Lee, B.

    2014-11-01

    Cerenkov radiation occurs when charged particles are moving faster than the speed of light in a transparent dielectric medium. In optical fibers, Cerenkov radiation can also be generated due to the fiber’s dielectric components. Accordingly, the radiation-induced light signals can be obtained using the optical fibers without any scintillating material. In this study, we fabricated a multichannel, fiber-optic Cerenkov radiation sensor (FOCRS) system using silica optical fibers (SOFs), plastic optical fibers (POFs), an optical spectrometer, multi-anode photomultiplier tubes (MA-PMTs) and a scanning system to measure the light intensities of Cerenkov radiation induced by gamma rays. To evaluate the fading effects in optical fibers, the spectra of Cerenkov radiation generated in the SOFs and POFs were measured based on the irradiation time by using an optical spectrometer. In addition, we measured the longitudinal distribution of gamma rays emitted from the cylindrical type Co-60 source by using MA-PMTs. The result was also compared with the distribution of the electron flux calculated by using the Monte Carlo N-particle transport code (MCNPX).

  5. Measuring Service Quality: From Theory into Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calvert, Philip J.

    1997-01-01

    Academic library managers need a multimethod, objective, valid tool for measuring service quality. Examines three research studies in the measurement of service quality in Australian and New Zealand academic libraries: the Hernon and Altman Study; Hernon and Calvert Study; and the University of Waikato (Hamilton, New Zealand) Survey, a two-stage…

  6. 38 CFR 21.7674 - Measurement of practical training courses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... on the basis of credit hours or clock hours of attendance, whichever is appropriate. The clock hours..., practical trained nurse, or licensed practical nurse will be measured on credit hours or clock hours of... of § 21.7720(b)(9) will be measured on a clock-hour basis as provided in § 21.7672. However,...

  7. 38 CFR 21.7674 - Measurement of practical training courses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... on the basis of credit hours or clock hours of attendance, whichever is appropriate. The clock hours..., practical trained nurse, or licensed practical nurse will be measured on credit hours or clock hours of... of § 21.7720(b)(9) will be measured on a clock-hour basis as provided in § 21.7672. However,...

  8. 38 CFR 21.7674 - Measurement of practical training courses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... on the basis of credit hours or clock hours of attendance, whichever is appropriate. The clock hours..., practical trained nurse, or licensed practical nurse will be measured on credit hours or clock hours of... of § 21.7720(b)(9) will be measured on a clock-hour basis as provided in § 21.7672. However,...

  9. 38 CFR 21.7674 - Measurement of practical training courses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... on the basis of credit hours or clock hours of attendance, whichever is appropriate. The clock hours..., practical trained nurse, or licensed practical nurse will be measured on credit hours or clock hours of... of § 21.7720(b)(9) will be measured on a clock-hour basis as provided in § 21.7672. However,...

  10. Parental Strain, Mental Health Problems, and Parenting Practices: A Longitudinal Study.

    PubMed

    Borre, Alicia; Kliewer, Wendy

    2014-10-01

    Although poor parenting practices place youth living in under resourced communities at heightened risk for adjustment difficulties, less is known about what influences parenting practices in those communities. The present study examines prospective linkages between three latent constructs: parental strain, mental health problems and parenting practices. Parental victimization by community violence and life stressors were indicative of parental strain; depressive, anxious, and hostile symptoms were indicators of parental mental health; and parental knowledge of their child's activities and child disclosure were indicators of parenting practices. Interviews were conducted annually for 3 waves with 316 female caregivers (92% African American) parenting youth in low-income inner-city communities. Structural equation modeling revealed that parental strain, assessed at Wave 1, predicted changes in mental health problems one year later, which in turn predicted parenting practices at Wave 3. These results suggest that parental strain can compromise a caregiver's ability to parent effectively by impacting their mental health. Opportunities for intervention include helping caregivers process trauma and mental health problems associated with parental strain.

  11. Parental Strain, Mental Health Problems, and Parenting Practices: A Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    Borre, Alicia; Kliewer, Wendy

    2014-01-01

    Although poor parenting practices place youth living in under resourced communities at heightened risk for adjustment difficulties, less is known about what influences parenting practices in those communities. The present study examines prospective linkages between three latent constructs: parental strain, mental health problems and parenting practices. Parental victimization by community violence and life stressors were indicative of parental strain; depressive, anxious, and hostile symptoms were indicators of parental mental health; and parental knowledge of their child's activities and child disclosure were indicators of parenting practices. Interviews were conducted annually for 3 waves with 316 female caregivers (92% African American) parenting youth in low-income inner-city communities. Structural equation modeling revealed that parental strain, assessed at Wave 1, predicted changes in mental health problems one year later, which in turn predicted parenting practices at Wave 3. These results suggest that parental strain can compromise a caregiver's ability to parent effectively by impacting their mental health. Opportunities for intervention include helping caregivers process trauma and mental health problems associated with parental strain. PMID:24976666

  12. Longitudinal measurement of chromatic dispersion along an optical fiber transmission system with a new correction factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasi, Madiha; Imran Baig, Mirza; Shafique Shaikh, Muhammad

    2013-12-01

    At present existence OTDR based techniques have become a standard practice for measuring chromatic dispersion distribution along an optical fiber transmission link. A constructive measurement technique has been offered in this paper, in which a four wavelength bidirectional optical time domain reflectometer (OTDR) has been used to compute the chromatic dispersion allocation beside an optical fiber transmission system. To improve the correction factor a novel formulation has been developed, which leads to an enhanced and defined measurement. The investigational outcomes obtained are in good harmony.

  13. On the Longitudinal Morphology of Zonal Irregularity Drift Measured using Networks of GPS Scintillation Monitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrano, C. S.; Groves, K. M.; Valladares, C. E.; Delay, S. H.

    2014-12-01

    A complete characterization of field-aligned ionospheric irregularities responsible for the scintillation of satellite signals includes not only their spectral properties (power spectral strength, spectral index, anisotropy ratio, and outer-scale) but also their horizontal drift velocity. From a system impacts perspective, the horizontal drift velocity is important in that it dictates the rate of signal fading and also, to an extent, the level of phase fluctuations encountered by the receiver. From a physics perspective, studying the longitudinal morphology of zonal irregularity may lead to an improved understanding of the F region dynamo and regional electrodynamics at low latitudes. The irregularity drift at low latitudes is predominantly zonal and is most commonly measured by cross-correlating observations of satellite signals made by a pair of closely-spaced antennas. The AFRL-SCINDA network operates a small number of VHF spaced-antenna systems at low latitude stations for this purpose. A far greater number of GPS scintillation monitors are operated by AFRL-SCINDA (25-30) and the Low Latitude Ionospheric Sensor Network (35-50), but the receivers are situated too far apart to monitor the drift using cross-correlation techniques. In this paper, we present an alternative approach that leverages the weak scatter scintillation theory (Rino, Radio Sci., 1979) to infer the zonal irregularity drift from single-station GPS measurements of S4, sigma-phi, and the propagation geometry alone. Unlike the spaced-receiver technique, this technique requires assumptions for the height of the scattering layer (which introduces a bias in the drift estimates) and the spectral index of the irregularities (which affects the spread of the drift estimates about the mean). Nevertheless, theory and experiment show that the ratio of sigma-phi to S4 is less sensitive to these parameters than it is to the zonal drift, and hence the zonal drift can be estimated with reasonable accuracy. In

  14. Practical application of in situ aerosol measurement

    SciTech Connect

    O`Hern, T.J.; Rader, D.J.

    1993-09-01

    The use of in situ, real-time measurement techniques permits the characterization of airborne droplets and particles under conditions where traditional sampling methods can fail. For example, sampling method rely on the ability to sample and transport particles without biasing the properties of interest, and often are not applicable in harsh environment. Although in situ methods offer unique opportunities in these cases, these techniques introduce new concerns and must be used carefully if accurate measurement are to be made. Several in situ measurement techniques are reviewed here. As the field is rapidly evolving, the discussion is limited to those techniques which: (1) are commercially available, (2) provide real-time output, (3) measure the aerosol size distribution. Discussion is divided between single particle counters (which provide a flux-based or temporal measurement) and ensemble techniques (which provide a concentration-based or spatial measurement). Specific techniques discussed include phase Doppler, Mie scattering, and Fraunhofer diffraction, and commercial instruments based on these techniques.

  15. Parental feeding practices and child weight status in Mexican American families: A longitudinal analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Parental feeding practices are thought to influence children's weight status, through children's eating behavior and nutritional intake. However, because most studies have been cross-sectional, the direction of influence is unclear. Moreover, although obesity rates are high among Latino children, fe...

  16. Low-Income Mothers' Food Practices with Young Children: A Qualitative Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harden, Jeni; Dickson, Adele

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Young children living in socioeconomically deprived areas of Scotland have an increased risk of becoming overweight or obese. To enhance understanding of the wider contexts within which family food practices are developed, this study examined the experiences of low-income mothers with young children. Design: Qualitative longitudinal…

  17. Measurement of the longitudinal spin structure of the proton by COMPASS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korzenev, A.; Compass Collaboration

    2010-01-01

    The inclusive A and hadron double-spin asymmetries Apπ+, Apπ-, ApK+, ApK- measured at COMPASS (CERN SPS) in deep-inelastic scattering of a polarized muon beam off a polarized NH 3 solid target are presented. The results have been obtained with the full statistics collected in 2007 for the longitudinal target polarization. Proton asymmetries have been combined with published deuteron ones. An evaluation of the non-singlet spin-dependent structure function g1NS(x,Q) and its first moment, which confirms the validity of the Bjorken sum-rule, is presented. A LO evaluation of polarized quark densities is also presented. The use of the proton data allows to perform a full flavor separation and to extract individual helicity densities of u, d, u¯, d¯ and s quarks. All sea quark densities are found to be compatible with zero in the full range of the measurements.

  18. Longitudinal detection of ferromagnetic resonance using x-ray transmission measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Boero, G.; Rusponi, S.; Kavich, J.; Rizzini, A. Lodi; Piamonteze, C.; Nolting, F.; Tieg, C.; Thiele, J.-U.; Gambardella, P.

    2009-12-15

    We describe a setup for the x-ray detection of ferromagnetic resonance in the longitudinal geometry using element-specific transmission measurements. Thin magnetic film samples are placed in a static magnetic field collinear with the propagation direction of a polarized soft x-ray beam and driven to ferromagnetic resonance by a continuous wave microwave magnetic field perpendicular to it. The transmitted photon flux is measured both as a function of the x-ray photon energy and as a function of the applied static magnetic field. We report experiments performed on a 15 nm film of doped Permalloy (Ni{sub 73}Fe{sub 18}Gd{sub 7}Co{sub 2}) at the L{sub 3}/L{sub 2}-edges of Fe, Co, and Ni. The achieved ferromagnetic resonance sensitivity is about 0.1 monolayers/{radical}(Hz). The obtained results are interpreted in the framework of a conductivity tensor based formalism. The factors limiting the sensitivity as well as different approaches for the x-ray detection of ferromagnetic resonance are discussed.

  19. Longitudinal detection of ferromagnetic resonance using x-ray transmission measurements.

    PubMed

    Boero, G; Rusponi, S; Kavich, J; Rizzini, A Lodi; Piamonteze, C; Nolting, F; Tieg, C; Thiele, J-U; Gambardella, P

    2009-12-01

    We describe a setup for the x-ray detection of ferromagnetic resonance in the longitudinal geometry using element-specific transmission measurements. Thin magnetic film samples are placed in a static magnetic field collinear with the propagation direction of a polarized soft x-ray beam and driven to ferromagnetic resonance by a continuous wave microwave magnetic field perpendicular to it. The transmitted photon flux is measured both as a function of the x-ray photon energy and as a function of the applied static magnetic field. We report experiments performed on a 15 nm film of doped Permalloy (Ni(73)Fe(18)Gd(7)Co(2)) at the L(3)/L(2)-edges of Fe, Co, and Ni. The achieved ferromagnetic resonance sensitivity is about 0.1 monolayers/square root(Hz). The obtained results are interpreted in the framework of a conductivity tensor based formalism. The factors limiting the sensitivity as well as different approaches for the x-ray detection of ferromagnetic resonance are discussed.

  20. TIME-DEPENDENT PHASE SPACE MEASUREMENTS OF THE LONGITUDINALLY COMPRESSING BEAM IN NDCX-I

    SciTech Connect

    LBNL; Lidia, S.M.; Bazouin, G.; Seidl, P.A.

    2011-03-15

    The Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCXI) generates high intensity ion beams to explore Warm Dense Matter physics. A {approx}150 kV, {approx}500 ns modulating voltage pulse is applied to a {approx}300 kV, 5-10 {mu}s, 25 mA K+ ion beam across a single induction gap. The velocity modulated beam compresses longitudinally during ballistic transport along a space charge neutralizing plasma transport line, resulting in {approx}3A peak current with {approx}2-3 ns pulse durations (FWHM) at the target plane. Transverse final focusing is accomplished with a {approx}8 T, 10 cm long pulsed solenoid magnet. Time-dependent electrostatic focusing in the induction gap, and chromatic aberrations in the final focus optics limit the peak fluenceat the target plane for the compressed beam pulse. We report on time-dependent phase space measurements of the compressed pulse in the ballistic transport beamline, and measurement of the time-dependent radial impulses derived from the interaction of the beam and the induction gap voltage. We present results of start-to-end simulations to benchmark the experiments. Fast correction strategies are discussed with application to both NDCX-I and the soon to be commissioned NDCX-II accelerators.

  1. [Body temperature measurement in daily practice].

    PubMed

    Sermet-Gaudelus, I; Chadelat, I; Lenoir, G

    2005-08-01

    The use of rectal mercury thermometer has long been the standard method for measurement of body temperature. The restriction of mercury use since 1996 has led to development of other devices. The liquid crystal strip thermometer held against the forehead has a low sensitivity. The single-use chemical thermometer measures oral temperature. Its accuracy must be evaluated. Infrared ear thermometers are routinely used because it is convenient and fast to use. However, numerous studies have shown that it does not show sufficient correlation with rectal temperature, leading to the risk to miss cases of true fever. Rectal temperature remains the gold standard in case of fever. Rectal temperature measurement with an electronic device is well correlated with the glass mercury standard. Galistan thermometer accuracy must be evaluated because of sterilization of the whole device, which is not the case for the electronic thermometer. A pediatric study is necessary to evaluate the performance of this device in comparison with the electronic thermometer.

  2. Software Assurance Measurement -- State of the Practice

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-11-01

    Report 3 1.4 Intended Audience 3 1.5 Scope 4 1.6 Constraints 5 2 Definition of Terms 6 2.1 What Is Software Assurance? 6 2.2 What Is Software...22 5 Current Relevant Software Assurance Measures 23 5.1 Common Assurance Metrics 23 5.2 Direct and Indirect Measures of Software Performance 23...visible. Previously, the only way to describe the life cycle of a software product was in management terms, such as “a $ 5 million development,” or “a

  3. Measuring Teacher Efficacy to Implement Inclusive Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharma, Umesh; Loreman, Tim; Forlin, Chris

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop an instrument to measure perceived teacher efficacy to teach in inclusive classrooms. An 18-item scale was developed on a sample of 607 pre-service teachers selected from four countries (Canada, Australia, Hong Kong and India). Factor analysis of responses from the sample revealed three factors: efficacy in…

  4. Impact of College-Administered Quality Practice Assessments: A Longitudinal Evaluation of Repeat Peer Assessments of Continuing Competence in Physiotherapists

    PubMed Central

    O'Donovan, Mary Jane; Campbell, Fiona

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: The College of Physiotherapists of Ontario (CPO) developed its peer practice assessment (PA) process under statutory requirements for quality assurance. Each year, a small percentage of physiotherapists, most selected at random, undergo PA. To shed light on continuing competence, we report outcomes from physiotherapists who have had two PAs. Methods: Records were extracted for physiotherapists with two unrelated PAs. Demographic features, peer assessors' scores, and consequent outcome decisions were examined. Outcomes were examined cross-sectionally (vs. other PAs in the same time period) and longitudinally (within cohort). Results: Between 2004 and 2012, 117 Ontario physiotherapists underwent two unrelated PAs, typically 5–7 years apart. This cohort was representative of Ontario physiotherapists in terms of sex ratios, education, and years in practice. At the first PA (PA1), this cohort's outcomes were similar to those of other physiotherapists; at the second PA (PA2), they were better than others undergoing PA1 in the same period (p=0.02). The cohort's outcomes were better at PA2 than at PA1 (p<0.001). Conclusions: Physiotherapists are likely to meet professional standards in a repeat PA 5–7 years after an initial one. Additional research is required to identify risk factors for not meeting standards. The findings provide empirical evidence to guide ongoing development of the CPO's quality management program. PMID:25931670

  5. Maternal feeding styles and food parenting practices as predictors of longitudinal changes in weight status in Hispanic preschoolers from low-income families

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The aim was to investigate the influence of feeding styles and food parenting practices on low-income children's weight status over time. Participants were 129 Latina parents and their Head Start children participating in a longitudinal study. Children were assessed at baseline (4 to 5 years old) an...

  6. Underlying Factors of Family Literacy Practices as Antecedents of Reading Achievement: A Longitudinal, Factorial, Multiple Regression Study Using ECLS-K Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Stacey Jonell

    2011-01-01

    The study had twofold purposes. The first one is to establish the underlying structure of family literacy practices at the different grade levels kindergarten, first, third, fifth, and eighth, for children who were followed in the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Kindergarten Class of 1998-1999 (ECLS-K). The second purpose is to investigate the…

  7. Measurement of the longitudinal and circumferential muscular activity associated with peristalsis using a single fibre grating array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkwright, J. W.; Blenman, N. G.; Underhill, I. D.; Maunder, S. A.; Spencer, N. J.; Costa, M.; Brooks, S. J.; Szczesniak, M. M.; Dinning, P. G.

    2010-09-01

    Diagnostic catheters based on fibre Bragg gratings (FBG's) are proving to be highly effective for measurement of the muscular activity associated with peristalsis in the human gut. The primary muscular contractions that generate peristalsis are circumferential in nature; however, it has long been known that there is also a component of longitudinal contractility present, acting in harmony with the circumferential component to improve the overall efficiency of material movement. To date, there have been relatively few reports on the measurement or inference of longitudinal contractions in humans and all have been limited to detection at a single location only. This is due to the lack of a viable recording technique suitable for real-time in-vivo measurement of this type of activity over extended lengths of the gut. We report the detection of longitudinal motion in lengths of excised mammalian colon using an FBG technique that should be viable for similar detection in humans. The longitudinal sensors have been combined with our previously reported FBG pressure sensing elements to form a composite catheter that allows the relative phase between the two components to be detected. The catheter output has been validated using digital video mapping in an ex-vivo animal preparation using lengths of rabbit ileum.

  8. Longitudinal hemodynamic measurements in swine heart failure using a fully implantable telemetry system.

    PubMed

    Choy, Jenny S; Zhang, Zhen-Du; Pitsillides, Koullis; Sosa, Margo; Kassab, Ghassan S

    2014-01-01

    Chronic monitoring of heart rate, blood pressure, and flow in conscious free-roaming large animals can offer considerable opportunity to understand the progression of cardiovascular diseases and can test new diagnostics and therapeutics. The objective of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of chronic, simultaneous measurement of several hemodynamic parameters (left ventricular pressure, systemic pressure, blood flow velocity, and heart rate) using a totally implantable multichannel telemetry system in swine heart failure models. Two solid-state blood pressure sensors were inserted in the left ventricle and the descending aorta for pressure measurements. Two Doppler probes were placed around the left anterior descending (LAD) and the brachiocephalic arteries for blood flow velocity measurements. Electrocardiographic (ECG) electrodes were attached to the surface of the left ventricle to monitor heart rate. The telemeter body was implanted in the right side of the abdomen under the skin for approximately 4 to 6 weeks. The animals were subjected to various heart failure models, including volume overload (A-V fistula, n = 3), pressure overload (aortic banding, n = 2) and dilated cardiomyopathy (pacing-induced tachycardia, n = 3). Longitudinal changes in hemodynamics were monitored during the progression of the disease. In the pacing-induced tachycardia animals, the systemic blood pressure progressively decreased within the first 2 weeks and returned to baseline levels thereafter. In the aortic banding animals, the pressure progressively increased during the development of the disease. The pressure in the A-V fistula animals only showed a small increase during the first week and remained stable thereafter. The results demonstrated the ability of this telemetry system of long-term, simultaneous monitoring of blood flow, pressure and heart rate in heart failure models, which may offer significant utility for understanding cardiovascular disease progression and

  9. Longitudinal Hemodynamic Measurements in Swine Heart Failure Using a Fully Implantable Telemetry System

    PubMed Central

    Choy, Jenny S.; Zhang, Zhen-Du; Pitsillides, Koullis; Sosa, Margo; Kassab, Ghassan S.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic monitoring of heart rate, blood pressure, and flow in conscious free-roaming large animals can offer considerable opportunity to understand the progression of cardiovascular diseases and can test new diagnostics and therapeutics. The objective of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of chronic, simultaneous measurement of several hemodynamic parameters (left ventricular pressure, systemic pressure, blood flow velocity, and heart rate) using a totally implantable multichannel telemetry system in swine heart failure models. Two solid-state blood pressure sensors were inserted in the left ventricle and the descending aorta for pressure measurements. Two Doppler probes were placed around the left anterior descending (LAD) and the brachiocephalic arteries for blood flow velocity measurements. Electrocardiographic (ECG) electrodes were attached to the surface of the left ventricle to monitor heart rate. The telemeter body was implanted in the right side of the abdomen under the skin for approximately 4 to 6 weeks. The animals were subjected to various heart failure models, including volume overload (A-V fistula, n = 3), pressure overload (aortic banding, n = 2) and dilated cardiomyopathy (pacing-induced tachycardia, n = 3). Longitudinal changes in hemodynamics were monitored during the progression of the disease. In the pacing-induced tachycardia animals, the systemic blood pressure progressively decreased within the first 2 weeks and returned to baseline levels thereafter. In the aortic banding animals, the pressure progressively increased during the development of the disease. The pressure in the A-V fistula animals only showed a small increase during the first week and remained stable thereafter. The results demonstrated the ability of this telemetry system of long-term, simultaneous monitoring of blood flow, pressure and heart rate in heart failure models, which may offer significant utility for understanding cardiovascular disease

  10. Adaptive quantification and longitudinal analysis of pulmonary emphysema with a hidden Markov measure field model.

    PubMed

    Hame, Yrjo; Angelini, Elsa D; Hoffman, Eric A; Barr, R Graham; Laine, Andrew F

    2014-07-01

    The extent of pulmonary emphysema is commonly estimated from CT scans by computing the proportional area of voxels below a predefined attenuation threshold. However, the reliability of this approach is limited by several factors that affect the CT intensity distributions in the lung. This work presents a novel method for emphysema quantification, based on parametric modeling of intensity distributions and a hidden Markov measure field model to segment emphysematous regions. The framework adapts to the characteristics of an image to ensure a robust quantification of emphysema under varying CT imaging protocols, and differences in parenchymal intensity distributions due to factors such as inspiration level. Compared to standard approaches, the presented model involves a larger number of parameters, most of which can be estimated from data, to handle the variability encountered in lung CT scans. The method was applied on a longitudinal data set with 87 subjects and a total of 365 scans acquired with varying imaging protocols. The resulting emphysema estimates had very high intra-subject correlation values. By reducing sensitivity to changes in imaging protocol, the method provides a more robust estimate than standard approaches. The generated emphysema delineations promise advantages for regional analysis of emphysema extent and progression.

  11. Maternal Feeding Styles and Food Parenting Practices as Predictors of Longitudinal Changes in Weight Status in Hispanic Preschoolers from Low-Income Families

    PubMed Central

    O'Connor, Teresia M.; Orlet Fisher, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The aim was to investigate the influence of feeding styles and food parenting practices on low-income children's weight status over time. Method. Participants were 129 Latina parents and their Head Start children participating in a longitudinal study. Children were assessed at baseline (4 to 5 years old) and again eighteen months later. At each time point, parents completed questionnaires and height and weight measures were taken on the child. Results. The indulgent feeding style (parent-report at baseline) was associated with increased child BMI z-score eighteen months later compared to other feeding styles. Authoritative, authoritarian, and uninvolved feeding styles were not significantly associated with increased child BMI z-score. Child BMI z-score at Time 1 (strongest) and maternal acculturation were positive predictors of child BMI z-score at Time 2. Maternal use of restriction positively predicted and maternal monitoring negatively predicted Time 2 BMI z-score, but only when accounting for feeding styles. Conclusion. This is the first study to investigate the impact of feeding styles on child weight status over time. Results suggest that indulgent feeding predicts later increases in children's weight status. The interplay between feeding styles and food parenting practices in influencing child weight status needs to be further explored. PMID:27429801

  12. Maternal Feeding Styles and Food Parenting Practices as Predictors of Longitudinal Changes in Weight Status in Hispanic Preschoolers from Low-Income Families.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Sheryl O; Power, Thomas G; O'Connor, Teresia M; Orlet Fisher, Jennifer; Chen, Tzu-An

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The aim was to investigate the influence of feeding styles and food parenting practices on low-income children's weight status over time. Method. Participants were 129 Latina parents and their Head Start children participating in a longitudinal study. Children were assessed at baseline (4 to 5 years old) and again eighteen months later. At each time point, parents completed questionnaires and height and weight measures were taken on the child. Results. The indulgent feeding style (parent-report at baseline) was associated with increased child BMI z-score eighteen months later compared to other feeding styles. Authoritative, authoritarian, and uninvolved feeding styles were not significantly associated with increased child BMI z-score. Child BMI z-score at Time 1 (strongest) and maternal acculturation were positive predictors of child BMI z-score at Time 2. Maternal use of restriction positively predicted and maternal monitoring negatively predicted Time 2 BMI z-score, but only when accounting for feeding styles. Conclusion. This is the first study to investigate the impact of feeding styles on child weight status over time. Results suggest that indulgent feeding predicts later increases in children's weight status. The interplay between feeding styles and food parenting practices in influencing child weight status needs to be further explored.

  13. Theory and practice of manual blood pressure measurement.

    PubMed

    Cork, Alison

    This article outlines the process of taking a manual blood pressure measurement. The author suggests that it is a skill that nursing students should be using in clinical practice rather than relying on automated monitors.

  14. Measures of the Effects of Agricultural Practices on Ecosystem Services

    SciTech Connect

    Dale, Virginia H; Polasky, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    Agriculture produces more than just crops. Agricultural practices have environmental impacts that affect a wide range of ecosystem services, including water quality, pollination, nutrient cycling, soil retention, carbon sequestration, and biodiversity conservation. In turn, ecosystem services affect agricultural productivity. Understanding the contribution of various agricultural practices to the range of ecosystem services would help inform choices about the most beneficial agricultural practices. To accomplish this, however, we must overcome a big challenge in measuring the impact of alternative agricultural practices on ecosystem services and of ecosystem services on agricultural production.

  15. a Measurement of the Longitudinal-Transverse Interference Structure Function from the Deuterium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIlvain, Thomas Robert

    This thesis describes the results of a deuterium electrodisintegration experiment performed at the Bates Linear Accelerator Center. We scattered electrons from deuterium nuclei in a CD_2 target, detecting the scattered electron and the ejected proton in coincidence. By measuring the D(e,e'p) cross section at two different angles of proton emission, with fixed values of the energy transfer, omega ~ 109 MeV, and momentum transfer, q ~ 400 MeV/c, we extracted the longitudinal-transverse interference structure function, R_{LT }. R_{LT} is one of the four structure functions that contribute to the unpolarized coincidence cross section. We performed the experiment in the Bates North Hall using the Energy Loss Spectrometer System (ELSSY) to detect electrons and the prototype Out-Of-Plane Spectrometer (OOPS) to detect protons. Electrons of incident energies 576 MeV were scattered at angles of 44^circ. Protons were detected in non-parallel kinematics at angles of -64.7^circ (theta_{pq } ~ 11^circ 'right' of vec q) and -42.9^ circ (theta_{pq} ~ 11^circ 'left' of vec q). In order to maximize the statistical precision of the measurements, the cross sections and the structure function are averaged over a region of 81 to 106 MeV/c in missing momentum, p_{m}. We compared the data to several calculations done by H. Arenhoevel. The most interesting physics was seen in the observable A_phi, the left-right asymmetry or difference/sum of the cross sections. A_phi was the only measured observable with minimal theoretical uncertainty. Thus, the theory-data comparison using A_phi was the most telling. A_phi was measured with statistical and systematic uncertainties of 12.8% and 10.8%, respectively. At this level of precision, it was concluded that the data showed a preference for the Arenhoevel relativistic full calculation over his non -relativistic full calculation. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, Rm. 14-0551, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307. Ph. 617 -253-5668; Fax 617-253-1690.).

  16. Measuring Cultural Socialization Attitudes and Behaviors of Mexican-Origin Mothers With Young Children: A Longitudinal Investigation.

    PubMed

    Derlan, Chelsea L; Umaña-Taylor, Adriana J; Toomey, Russell B; Jahromi, Laudan B; Updegraff, Kimberly A

    2016-07-01

    We describe the development and psychometric testing of the Cultural Socialization Behaviors Measure (CSBM) and the Cultural Socialization Attitudes Measure (CSAM). The CSBM assesses cultural socialization behaviors that parents use with young children, and the CSAM assesses the attitudes that parents have regarding the importance of socializing their young children about their culture. Both measures demonstrated strong reliability, validity, and cross-language equivalence (i.e., Spanish and English) among a sample of 204 Mexican-origin young mothers (Mage = 20.94 years, SD = 1.01) with 4-year-old children. In addition, the measures demonstrated longitudinal equivalence when children were 4 and 5 years of age.

  17. Measuring student engagement in science classrooms: An investigation of the contextual factors and longitudinal outcomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spicer, Justina Judy

    This dissertation includes three separate but related studies that examine the different dimensions of student experiences in science using data from two different datasets: the High School Longitudinal Study of 2009 (HSLS:09), and a dataset constructed using the Experience Sampling Method (ESM). This mixed-dataset approach provides a unique perspective on student engagement and the contexts in which it exists. Engagement is operationalized across the three studies using aspects of flow theory to evaluate how the challenges in science classes are experienced at the student level. The data provides information on a student's skill-level and efficacy during the challenge, as well as their interest level and persistence. The data additionally track how situations contribute to optimal learning moments, along with longitudinal attitudes and behaviors towards science. In the first part of this study, the construct of optimal moments is explored using in the moment data from the ESM dataset. Several different measures of engagement are tested and validated to uncover relationships between various affective states and optimal learning experiences with a focus on science classrooms. Additional analyses include investigating the links between in the moment engagement (situational), and cross-situational (stable) measures of engagement in science. The second part of this dissertation analyzes the ESM data in greater depth by examining how engagement varies across students and their contextual environment. The contextual characteristics associated with higher engagement levels are evaluated to see if these conditions hold across different types of students. Chapter three more thoroughly analyzes what contributes to students persisting through challenging learning moments, and the variation in levels of effort put forth when facing difficulty while learning in science. In chapter four, this dissertation explores additional outcomes associated with student engagement in science

  18. Practice patterns of ophthalmologists administering intravitreal injections in Europe: a longitudinal survey

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Kui; Sultan, Marla B; Zhou, Duo; Tressler, Charles S; Mo, Jingping

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study was performed to understand the practice patterns of ophthalmologists administering intravitreal (IVT) injections in Europe after the procedure became routine. Methods As part of a prospective, multinational, non-interventional cohort study in 13 countries in Europe between 2006 and 2012, ophthalmologists completed the Baseline Questionnaire and the Follow-up Questionnaire 1 year after baseline. Results and discussion Of the 125 ophthalmologists who participated in the study, 113 (90.4%) completed the Baseline Questionnaire. Most of these ophthalmologists were medical retina specialists (43.0%). The median number of IVT injections that the ophthalmologists performed per month during the year prior to completing the Baseline Questionnaire was 20.0. The majority of the ophthalmologists had performed their last IVT injection prior to completing the questionnaire in an operating room or theater (68.4%). When performing IVT injections, a majority of the ophthalmologists reported applying povidone–iodine (90.4%) before IVT injections and topical antibiotics right after IVT injections (89.5%). In addition, 81.6% of the ophthalmologists reported using a sterile adhesive eye drape and 80.7% reported using an eyelid speculum. In all, 95 ophthalmologists (76%) completed the Follow-up Questionnaire. The median number of IVT injections performed per month during the year prior to completing the Follow-up Questionnaire by these ophthalmologists was increased to 35. The results of the Follow-up Questionnaire on administering IVT injections were similar to those of the Baseline Questionnaire. A majority of the ophthalmologists reported applying povidone–iodine (87.4%) before IVT injections, topical antibiotics right after IVT injections (89.5%), and an eyelid speculum (85.3%). Conclusion The results of this study indicated a good adherence to all aspects of the guidelines on IVT injections. It seemed that ophthalmologists were more experienced in IVT

  19. Projected Impact of the ICD-10-CM/PCS Conversion on Longitudinal Data and the Joint Commission Core Measures

    PubMed Central

    Fenton, Susan H.; Benigni, Mary Sue

    2014-01-01

    The transition from ICD-9-CM to ICD-10-CM/PCS is expected to result in longitudinal data discontinuities, as occurred with cause-of-death in 1999. The General Equivalence Maps (GEMs), while useful for suggesting potential maps do not provide guidance regarding the frequency of any matches. Longitudinal data comparisons can only be reliable if they use comparability ratios or factors which have been calculated using records coded in both classification systems. This study utilized 3,969 de-identified dually coded records to examine raw comparability ratios, as well as the comparability ratios between the Joint Commission Core Measures. The raw comparability factor results range from 16.216 for Nicotine dependence, unspecified, uncomplicated to 118.009 for Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, unspecified. The Joint Commission Core Measure comparability factor results range from 27.15 for Acute Respiratory Failure to 130.16 for Acute Myocardial Infarction. These results indicate significant differences in comparability between ICD-9-CM and ICD-10-CM code assignment, including when the codes are used for external reporting such as the Joint Commission Core Measures. To prevent errors in decision-making and reporting, all stakeholders relying on longitudinal data for measure reporting and other purposes should investigate the impact of the conversion on their data. PMID:25214824

  20. Projected impact of the ICD-10-CM/PCS conversion on longitudinal data and the Joint Commission Core Measures.

    PubMed

    Fenton, Susan H; Benigni, Mary Sue

    2014-01-01

    The transition from ICD-9-CM to ICD-10-CM/PCS is expected to result in longitudinal data discontinuities, as occurred with cause-of-death in 1999. The General Equivalence Maps (GEMs), while useful for suggesting potential maps do not provide guidance regarding the frequency of any matches. Longitudinal data comparisons can only be reliable if they use comparability ratios or factors which have been calculated using records coded in both classification systems. This study utilized 3,969 de-identified dually coded records to examine raw comparability ratios, as well as the comparability ratios between the Joint Commission Core Measures. The raw comparability factor results range from 16.216 for Nicotine dependence, unspecified, uncomplicated to 118.009 for Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, unspecified. The Joint Commission Core Measure comparability factor results range from 27.15 for Acute Respiratory Failure to 130.16 for Acute Myocardial Infarction. These results indicate significant differences in comparability between ICD-9-CM and ICD-10-CM code assignment, including when the codes are used for external reporting such as the Joint Commission Core Measures. To prevent errors in decision-making and reporting, all stakeholders relying on longitudinal data for measure reporting and other purposes should investigate the impact of the conversion on their data.

  1. Alternative Measures of Teacher Performance. Policy-to-Practice Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potemski, Amy; Baral, Mahua; Meyer, Cassandra

    2011-01-01

    This Policy-to-Practice Brief introduces five current examples of measures of teacher performance. The goal is to assist regional comprehensive centers and state education agencies in building local capacity to incorporate the use of alternative measures of teacher performance into the overhaul of state evaluation systems--especially in states…

  2. An Empirical Study of Reporting Practices Concerning Measurement Validity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hogan, Thomas P.; Agnello, Jessica

    2004-01-01

    This study investigates the current research practice concerning reporting measurement validity evidence based on a sample of 696 research reports listed in the American Psychological Association's Directory of Unpublished Experimental Mental Measures. Only 55% of the reports included any type of validity evidence. This was a substantially lower…

  3. Longitudinal Double-Spin Asymmetry Measurements in p+p and Their Limitation by Systematic Uncertainty in Relative Luminosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manion, Andrew

    2012-03-01

    We present longitudinal double-spin asymmetries ALL in neutral 0̂ production in the PHENIX detector at RHIC. This measurement has been shown to constrain the gluon spin contribution to the proton, δG. We will also discuss the main systematic uncertainty, which originates from the relative luminosity of the different spin states in RHIC, and new ways to possibly understand the source of this uncertainty.

  4. Measurement of longitudinal spin asymmetries for weak boson production in polarized proton-proton collisions at RHIC.

    PubMed

    Adamczyk, L; Adkins, J K; Agakishiev, G; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Alekseev, I; Alford, J; Anson, C D; Aparin, A; Arkhipkin, D; Aschenauer, E C; Averichev, G S; Balewski, J; Banerjee, A; Beavis, D R; Bellwied, R; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bhattarai, P; Bichsel, H; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Bordyuzhin, I G; Borowski, W; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Brovko, S G; Bültmann, S; Bunzarov, I; Burton, T P; Butterworth, J; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Campbell, J M; Cebra, D; Cendejas, R; Cervantes, M C; Chaloupka, P; Chang, Z; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, J H; Chen, L; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Christie, W; Chwastowski, J; Codrington, M J M; Contin, G; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Cui, X; Das, S; Davila Leyva, A; De Silva, L C; Debbe, R R; Dedovich, T G; Deng, J; Derevschikov, A A; Derradi de Souza, R; Dhamija, S; di Ruzza, B; Didenko, L; Dilks, C; Ding, F; Djawotho, P; Dong, X; Drachenberg, J L; Draper, J E; Du, C M; Dunkelberger, L E; Dunlop, J C; Efimov, L G; Engelage, J; Engle, K S; Eppley, G; Eun, L; Evdokimov, O; Eyser, O; Fatemi, R; Fazio, S; Fedorisin, J; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flores, C E; Gagliardi, C A; Gangadharan, D R; Garand, D; Geurts, F; Gibson, A; Girard, M; Gliske, S; Greiner, L; Grosnick, D; Gunarathne, D S; Guo, Y; Gupta, A; Gupta, S; Guryn, W; Haag, B; Hamed, A; Han, L-X; Haque, R; Harris, J W; Heppelmann, S; Hirsch, A; Hoffmann, G W; Hofman, D J; Horvat, S; Huang, B; Huang, H Z; Huang, X; Huck, P; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Jacobs, W W; Jang, H; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kalinkin, D; Kang, K; Kauder, K; Ke, H W; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Kesich, A; Khan, Z H; Kikola, D P; Kisel, I; Kisiel, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Konzer, J; Koralt, I; Kosarzewski, L K; Kotchenda, L; Kraishan, A F; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kulakov, I; Kumar, L; Kycia, R A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Landry, K D; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, J H; LeVine, M J; Li, C; Li, W; Li, X; Li, X; Li, Y; Li, Z M; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Lomnitz, M; Longacre, R S; Luo, X; Ma, G L; Ma, Y G; Madagodagettige Don, D M M D; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Masui, H; Matis, H S; McDonald, D; McShane, T S; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mohanty, B; Mondal, M M; Morozov, D A; Mustafa, M K; Nandi, B K; Nasim, Md; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nigmatkulov, G; Nogach, L V; Noh, S Y; Novak, J; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Oh, K; Ohlson, A; Okorokov, V; Oldag, E W; Olvitt, D L; Pachr, M; Page, B S; Pal, S K; Pan, Y X; Pandit, Y; Panebratsev, Y; Pawlak, T; Pawlik, B; Pei, H; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Pile, P; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Poljak, N; Poniatowska, K; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Pruthi, N K; Przybycien, M; Pujahari, P R; Putschke, J; Qiu, H; Quintero, A; Ramachandran, S; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Riley, C K; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Ross, J F; Roy, A; Ruan, L; Rusnak, J; Rusnakova, O; Sahoo, N R; Sahu, P K; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sangaline, E; Sarkar, A; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmah, A M; Schmidke, W B; Schmitz, N; Seger, J; Seyboth, P; Shah, N; Shahaliev, E; Shanmuganathan, P V; Shao, M; Sharma, B; Shen, W Q; Shi, S S; Shou, Q Y; Sichtermann, E P; Singaraju, R N; Skoby, M J; Smirnov, D; Smirnov, N; Solanki, D; Sorensen, P; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, T D S; Stevens, J R; Stock, R; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Sumbera, M; Sun, X; Sun, X M; Sun, Y; Sun, Z; Surrow, B; Svirida, D N; Symons, T J M; Szelezniak, M A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tang, Z; Tarnowsky, T; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Tlusty, D; Tokarev, M; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tribedy, P; Trzeciak, B A; Tsai, O D; Turnau, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; van Nieuwenhuizen, G; Vandenbroucke, M; Vanfossen, J A; Varma, R; Vasconcelos, G M S; Vasiliev, A N; Vertesi, R; Videbæk, F; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Vossen, A; Wada, M; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, H; Wang, J S; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Wang, Y; Webb, G; Webb, J C; Westfall, G D; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wu, Y F; Xiao, Z; Xie, W; Xin, K; Xu, H; Xu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Q H; Xu, Y; Xu, Z; Yan, W; Yang, C; Yang, Y; Yang, Y; Ye, Z; Yepes, P; Yi, L; Yip, K; Yoo, I-K; Yu, N; Zawisza, Y; Zbroszczyk, H; Zha, W; Zhang, J B; Zhang, J L; Zhang, S; Zhang, X P; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, F; Zhao, J; Zhong, C; Zhu, X; Zhu, Y H; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zyzak, M

    2014-08-15

    We report measurements of single- and double-spin asymmetries for W^{±} and Z/γ^{*} boson production in longitudinally polarized p+p collisions at sqrt[s]=510  GeV by the STAR experiment at RHIC. The asymmetries for W^{±} were measured as a function of the decay lepton pseudorapidity, which provides a theoretically clean probe of the proton's polarized quark distributions at the scale of the W mass. The results are compared to theoretical predictions, constrained by polarized deep inelastic scattering measurements, and show a preference for a sizable, positive up antiquark polarization in the range 0.05

  5. Measurement of Longitudinal Spin Asymmetries for Weak Boson Production in Polarized Proton-Proton Collisions at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anson, C. D.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Averichev, G. S.; Balewski, J.; Banerjee, A.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Borowski, W.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A. V.; Brovko, S. G.; Bültmann, S.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Campbell, J. M.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, L.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Chwastowski, J.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Contin, G.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Cui, X.; Das, S.; Davila Leyva, A.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Derradi de Souza, R.; Dhamija, S.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Ding, F.; Djawotho, P.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Engelage, J.; Engle, K. S.; Eppley, G.; Eun, L.; Evdokimov, O.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Fedorisin, J.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Gliske, S.; Greiner, L.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, S.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hamed, A.; Han, L.-X.; Haque, R.; Harris, J. W.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Horvat, S.; Huang, B.; Huang, H. Z.; Huang, X.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jang, H.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kesich, A.; Khan, Z. H.; Kikola, D. P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Konzer, J.; Koralt, I.; Kosarzewski, L. K.; Kotchenda, L.; Kraishan, A. F.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, L.; Kycia, R. A.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, Z. M.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, X.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Madagodagettige Don, D. M. M. D.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Nogach, L. V.; Noh, S. Y.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Ohlson, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldag, E. W.; Olvitt, D. L.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Poniatowska, K.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Przybycien, M.; Pujahari, P. R.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Riley, C. K.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Ross, J. F.; Roy, A.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sangaline, E.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, B.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, D.; Smirnov, N.; Solanki, D.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stevens, J. R.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szelezniak, M. A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsai, O. D.; Turnau, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Vanfossen, J. A.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbæk, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Vossen, A.; Wada, M.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y. F.; Xiao, Z.; Xie, W.; Xin, K.; Xu, H.; Xu, J.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yan, W.; Yang, C.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Ye, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yu, N.; Zawisza, Y.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhao, F.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhu, X.; Zhu, Y. H.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zyzak, M.; STAR Collaboration

    2014-08-01

    We report measurements of single- and double-spin asymmetries for W± and Z/γ* boson production in longitudinally polarized p+p collisions at √s =510 GeV by the STAR experiment at RHIC. The asymmetries for W± were measured as a function of the decay lepton pseudorapidity, which provides a theoretically clean probe of the proton's polarized quark distributions at the scale of the W mass. The results are compared to theoretical predictions, constrained by polarized deep inelastic scattering measurements, and show a preference for a sizable, positive up antiquark polarization in the range 0.05

  6. Measuring Nursing Practice Models using Multi-Attribute Utility theory.

    PubMed

    Brennan, P F; Anthony, M K

    2000-10-01

    Nursing Practice Models (NPMs) represent the structural and contextual features that exist within any group practice of nursing. Currently, measurement of NPMs relies on costly and nonreproducible global judgments by experts. Quantitative measurement techniques are needed to provide a useful evaluation of nursing practice. Guided by Multi-Attribute Utility theory (MAU theory), an expert panel identified 24 factors representative of N PMs. The factors became elements in a computational index that, when summed, assigns a score to a given nursing unit reflecting the extent to which that unit's nursing practice model achieves the nursing professional ideal. Initial validation of the index and its elements consisted of comparing assessments of 40 nursing units generated by the index with a global evaluation provided by each of the expert panelists who proposed the model factors. Pearson correlations between the index-generated scores and the global assigned scores provided evidence supporting the preliminary validation of the index.

  7. Constructing a Measure for Longitudinal Medical Achievement Studies by the Rasch Model One-Step Equating.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shen, Linjun

    As part of a longitudinal study of the growth of general medical knowledge among osteopathic medical students, a simple, convenient, and accurate vertical equating method was developed for constructing a scale for medical achievement. It was believed that Parts 1, 2, and 3 of the National Board of Osteopathic Medical Examiners' (NBOME) examination…

  8. Emotional Intelligence throughout Portuguese Secondary School: A Longitudinal Study Comparing Performance and Self-Report Measures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costa, Ana; Faria, Luísa

    2016-01-01

    This study examines the developmental trajectories of ability and trait emotional intelligence (EI) in the Portuguese secondary school. Within a three-wave longitudinal design, 395 students (M[subscript age] = 15.4; SD = 0.74) completed both the Emotional Skills and Competence Questionnaire (ESCQ) and the Vocabulary of Emotions Test (VET). Results…

  9. Longitudinal Assessment of Student Learning: Simplistic Measures Aren't Enough

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beyer, Catharine Hoffman; Gillmore, Gerald M.

    2007-01-01

    In an attempt to capture the diverse experience of undergraduates at the University of Washington (UW), the authors designed and conducted the University of Washington's Study of Undergraduate Learning (UW SOUL), a longitudinal study that tracked 304 students (about five percent of the entering freshman and transfer class) through their…

  10. Longitudinal NMR parameter measurements of Japanese pear fruit during the growing process using a mobile magnetic resonance imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geya, Yuto; Kimura, Takeshi; Fujisaki, Hirotaka; Terada, Yasuhiko; Kose, Katsumi; Haishi, Tomoyuki; Gemma, Hiroshi; Sekozawa, Yoshihiko

    2013-01-01

    Longitudinal nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) parameter measurements of Japanese pear fruit (Pyrus pyrifolia Nakai, Kosui) were performed using an electrically mobile magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system with a 0.2 T and 16 cm gap permanent magnet. To measure the relaxation times and apparent diffusion coefficients of the pear fruit in relation to their weight, seven pear fruits were harvested almost every week during the cell enlargement period and measured in a research orchard. To evaluate the in situ relaxation times, six pear fruits were longitudinally measured for about two months during the same period. The measurements for the harvested samples showed good agreement with the in situ measurements. From the measurements of the harvested samples, it is clear that the relaxation rates of the pear fruits linearly change with the inverse of the linear dimension of the fruits, demonstrating that the relaxation mechanism is a surface relaxation. We therefore conclude that the mobile MRI system is a useful device for measuring the NMR parameters of outdoor living plants.

  11. Measuring Adherence to Practice Guidelines for the Management of Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Milchak, Jessica L.; Carter, Barry L.; Ardery, Gail; James, Paul A.

    2006-01-01

    Adherence to practice guidelines is frequently used as a measure of quality of care. Numerous studies have evaluated physician adherence to hypertension guidelines by prescription data, physician survey data, or medical record review. However, most have methodological limitations that might underestimate physician adherence. Accurate and meaningful characterization of adherence rests on evaluation of varied components of hypertension care, use of explicit validated performance measures, incorporation of implicit and explicit review, and linkage of process measures to blood pressure outcomes. PMID:15381676

  12. Practical relevance of standardized disk and drive measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerger, Scott A.

    1999-11-01

    Literally hundreds of parameters have been specified for measuring Compact Disc (CD) and Digital Video Disc (DVD) characteristics but virtually none for drive performance. For the hundreds of optical disc characteristics, there are many differing methods for measuring each one. After having chosen the 'best' methods for measuring the disc characteristics and conducting the measurements, conformance to the industry specifications (de-facto standards) must be judged. The practical relevance of the relationships between disc parameters, measurement methods, and drive performance must be understood and managed such that the value experienced by the customer is preserved.

  13. Experimental Measurements of Longitudinal and Transverse Dispersion in Miscible Fluids with a High Viscosity and Density Contrast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alkindi, A.; Bijeljic, B.; Muggeridge, A.

    2008-12-01

    Diffusion and advective dispersion may have a significant influence on the mixing between miscible fluids during displacement processes in porous media. This is particularly important when intimate mixing may result in important changes to the fluid behaviour. For example in oil recovery, mixing between injected and connate water will tend to reduce the efficiency of low salinity water injection. On the other hand recovery may be increased if injected gas mixes with high viscosity oil increasing its mobility. Most experimental data for longitudinal and transverse dispersion have been obtained using fluid pairs with very similar viscosities and densities. The traditional description (Perkins and Johnston, 1963) suggests that longitudinal dispersion decreases as mobility ratio increases. It also suggests that gravity will tend to reduce transverse dispersion. We provide experimental measurements of longitudinal (KL) and transverse (KT) dispersion at low Reynolds number as a function of Peclet number for the first contact miscible ethanol- glycerol fluid system flowing in a porous media formed from glass beads. These fluids have a high viscosity ratio of over 1000 and a significant density difference of 470 kg m-3. We show that both KL and KT are similar to values measured for a water-brine system but that KT is reduced when the less dense ethanol is flowing above the denser glycerol.

  14. Practical measures of integrated information for time-series data.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Adam B; Seth, Anil K

    2011-01-20

    A recent measure of 'integrated information', Φ(DM), quantifies the extent to which a system generates more information than the sum of its parts as it transitions between states, possibly reflecting levels of consciousness generated by neural systems. However, Φ(DM) is defined only for discrete Markov systems, which are unusual in biology; as a result, Φ(DM) can rarely be measured in practice. Here, we describe two new measures, Φ(E) and Φ(AR), that overcome these limitations and are easy to apply to time-series data. We use simulations to demonstrate the in-practice applicability of our measures, and to explore their properties. Our results provide new opportunities for examining information integration in real and model systems and carry implications for relations between integrated information, consciousness, and other neurocognitive processes. However, our findings pose challenges for theories that ascribe physical meaning to the measured quantities.

  15. Variable Selection and Inference Procedures for Marginal Analysis of Longitudinal Data with Missing Observations and Covariate Measurement Error

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Grace Y.; Tan, Xianming; Li, Runze

    2015-01-01

    Summary In contrast to extensive attention on model selection for univariate data, research on model selection for longitudinal data remains largely unexplored. This is particularly the case when data are subject to missingness and measurement error. To address this important problem, we propose marginal methods that simultaneously carry out model selection and estimation for longitudinal data with missing responses and error-prone covariates. Our method have several appealing features: the applicability is broad because the methods are developed for a unified framework with marginal generalized linear models; model assumptions are minimal in that no full distribution is required for the response process and the distribution of the mismeasured covariates is left unspecified; and the implementation is straightforward. To justify the proposed methods, we provide both theoretical properties and numerical assessments. PMID:26877582

  16. Parenting Practices and Perceived Social Support: Longitudinal Relations with the Social Competence of Mexican-origin Children.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Zoe E; Conger, Rand D; Robins, Richard W; Widaman, Keith F

    2015-11-01

    Social bonds and supportive relationships are widely recognized as being indispensable to healthy psychological functioning and well-being. Social support is a psychological resource that is expected to also contribute positively to parenting practices. The present study longitudinally examined the relations between mothers' (N = 674) and fathers' (N = 430) perceived social support and parenting behaviors, and their relations with children's social competence during early adolescence in Mexican-origin single and two-parent families. Our constructs of interest (warm parenting, monitoring, perceived social support, and children's social competence) were significantly correlated at T1, and demonstrated significant stability across time for both parental models. Parental warmth (as reported by the child, and opposite parent) and parental monitoring (self-reported by mothers and fathers) were correlated and also showed bidirectional associations across time. Parental monitoring at T2 positively predicted change in children's social competence at T3 (controlling for T1 social competence) for mothers. Parental warmth at T2 positively predicted change in children's social competence at T3 (controlling for T1 social competence) for fathers. For mothers, the indirect effect of social support at T1 on children's social competence at T3 via parental monitoring at T2 (and controlling for prior levels) was significant. Findings suggest that maternal perceived social support contributes to children's social competence due to its positive relation to maternal monitoring. Results may also suggest that mothers' and fathers' parenting behaviors differentially relate to children's social competence in Latino families, although additional work focused on comparing parenting behaviors in two-parent families is needed.

  17. Parenting Practices and Perceived Social Support: Longitudinal Relations with the Social Competence of Mexican-origin Children

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Zoe E.; Conger, Rand D.; Robins, Richard W.; Widaman, Keith F.

    2015-01-01

    Social bonds and supportive relationships are widely recognized as being indispensable to healthy psychological functioning and well-being. Social support is a psychological resource that is expected to also contribute positively to parenting practices. The present study longitudinally examined the relations between mothers’ (N = 674) and fathers’ (N = 430) perceived social support and parenting behaviors, and their relations with children’s social competence during early adolescence in Mexican-origin single and two-parent families. Our constructs of interest (warm parenting, monitoring, perceived social support, and children’s social competence) were significantly correlated at T1, and demonstrated significant stability across time for both parental models. Parental warmth (as reported by the child, and opposite parent) and parental monitoring (self-reported by mothers and fathers) were correlated and also showed bidirectional associations across time. Parental monitoring at T2 positively predicted change in children’s social competence at T3 (controlling for T1 social competence) for mothers. Parental warmth at T2 positively predicted change in children’s social competence at T3 (controlling for T1 social competence) for fathers. For mothers, the indirect effect of social support at T1 on children’s social competence at T3 via parental monitoring at T2 (and controlling for prior levels) was significant. Findings suggest that maternal perceived social support contributes to children’s social competence due to its positive relation to maternal monitoring. Results may also suggest that mothers’ and fathers’ parenting behaviors differentially relate to children’s social competence in Latino families, although additional work focused on comparing parenting behaviors in two-parent families is needed. PMID:26751039

  18. Procedural Fidelity: An Analysis of Measurement and Reporting Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ledford, Jennifer R.; Wolery, Mark

    2013-01-01

    A systematic analysis was conducted of measurement and reporting practices related to procedural fidelity in single-case research for the past 30 years. Previous reviews of fidelity primarily reported whether fidelity data were collected by authors; these reviews reported that collection was variable, but low across journals and over time. Results…

  19. Measuring Attitudes toward Acceptable and Unacceptable Parenting Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Budd, Karen S.; Behling, Steven; Li, Yan; Parikshak, Sangeeta; Gershenson, Rachel A.; Feuer, Rachel; Danko, Christina M.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the properties of a new rating instrument, the Parenting Questionnaire (PQ), designed to measure attitudes about acceptable and unacceptable parenting practices. In Study 1, subject matter experts representing culturally diverse psychologists, parents, and college students were consulted to identify 110 items receiving high…

  20. Assessing the Practical Equivalence of Conversions when Measurement Conditions Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Jinghua; Dorans, Neil J.

    2012-01-01

    At times, the same set of test questions is administered under different measurement conditions that might affect the psychometric properties of the test scores enough to warrant different score conversions for the different conditions. We propose a procedure for assessing the practical equivalence of conversions developed for the same set of test…

  1. Measurements of the Neutron Longitudinal Spin Asymmetry A1n and Flavor Decomposition in the Valence Quark Region

    SciTech Connect

    Flay, David J.

    2014-08-01

    The current data for the nucleon-virtual photon longitudinal spin asymmetry A1 on the proton and neutron have shown that the ratio of the polarized-to-unpolarized down-quarkparton distribution functions,Dd=d, tends towards -1/2 at large x, in disagreement with the perturbative QCD prediction that Dd/d approaches 1 but more in line with constituent quark models. As a part of experiment E06-014 in Hall A of Jefferson Lab, double-spin asymmetries were measured in the scattering of a longitudinally polarized electron beam of energies 4.74 and 5.89 GeV from a longitudinally and transversely polarized 3He target in the deep inelastic scattering and resonance region, allowing for the extraction of the neutron asymmetry An1 and the ratios Dd/d and Du/u. We will discuss our analysis of the data and present results for A1 and g1/F1 on both 3He and the neutron, and the resulting quark ratios for the up and down quarks in the kinematic range of 0.2

  2. Accounting for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Symptom Severity With Pre- and Posttrauma Measures: A Longitudinal Study of Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Ogle, Christin M.; Rubin, David C.; Siegler, Ilene C.

    2015-01-01

    Using data from a longitudinal study of community-dwelling older adults, we analyzed the most extensive set of known correlates of PTSD symptoms obtained from a single sample to examine the measures’ independent and combined utility in accounting for PTSD symptom severity. Fifteen measures identified as PTSD risk factors in published meta-analyses and 12 theoretically and empirically supported individual difference and health-related measures were included. Individual difference measures assessed after the trauma, including insecure attachment and factors related to the current trauma memory, such as self-rated severity, event centrality, frequency of involuntary recall, and physical reactions to the memory, accounted for symptom severity better than measures of pre-trauma factors. In an analysis restricted to prospective measures assessed before the trauma, the total variance explained decreased from 56% to 16%. Results support a model of PTSD in which characteristics of the current trauma memory promote the development and maintenance of PTSD symptoms. PMID:27004143

  3. Longitudinal measurements of MRI-T2 in boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy: effects of age and disease progression.

    PubMed

    Willcocks, R J; Arpan, I A; Forbes, S C; Lott, D J; Senesac, C R; Senesac, E; Deol, J; Triplett, W T; Baligand, C; Daniels, M J; Sweeney, H L; Walter, G A; Vandenborne, K

    2014-05-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is characterized by an increased muscle damage and progressive replacement of muscle by noncontractile tissue. Both of these pathological changes can lengthen the MRI transverse proton relaxation time (T2). The current study measured longitudinal changes in T2 and its distribution in the lower leg of 16 boys with DMD (5-13years, 15 ambulatory) and 15 healthy controls (5-13years). These muscles were chosen to allow extended longitudinal monitoring, due to their slow progression compared with proximal muscles in DMD. In the soleus muscle of boys with DMD, T2 and the percentage of pixels with an elevated T2 (⩾2SD above control mean T2) increased significantly over 1year and 2years, while the width of the T2 histogram increased over 2years. Changes in soleus T2 variables were significantly greater in 9-13years old compared with 5-8years old boys with DMD. Significant correlations between the change in all soleus T2 variables over 2years and the change in functional measures over 2years were found. MRI measurement of muscle T2 in boys with DMD is sensitive to disease progression and shows promise as a clinical outcome measure.

  4. Expected estimating equations for missing data, measurement error, and misclassification, with application to longitudinal nonignorable missing data.

    PubMed

    Wang, C Y; Huang, Yijian; Chao, Edward C; Jeffcoat, Marjorie K

    2008-03-01

    Missing data, measurement error, and misclassification are three important problems in many research fields, such as epidemiological studies. It is well known that missing data and measurement error in covariates may lead to biased estimation. Misclassification may be considered as a special type of measurement error, for categorical data. Nevertheless, we treat misclassification as a different problem from measurement error because statistical models for them are different. Indeed, in the literature, methods for these three problems were generally proposed separately given that statistical modeling for them are very different. The problem is more challenging in a longitudinal study with nonignorable missing data. In this article, we consider estimation in generalized linear models under these three incomplete data models. We propose a general approach based on expected estimating equations (EEEs) to solve these three incomplete data problems in a unified fashion. This EEE approach can be easily implemented and its asymptotic covariance can be obtained by sandwich estimation. Intensive simulation studies are performed under various incomplete data settings. The proposed method is applied to a longitudinal study of oral bone density in relation to body bone density.

  5. Best practices for measuring students' attitudes toward learning science.

    PubMed

    Lovelace, Matthew; Brickman, Peggy

    2013-01-01

    Science educators often characterize the degree to which tests measure different facets of college students' learning, such as knowing, applying, and problem solving. A casual survey of scholarship of teaching and learning research studies reveals that many educators also measure how students' attitudes influence their learning. Students' science attitudes refer to their positive or negative feelings and predispositions to learn science. Science educators use attitude measures, in conjunction with learning measures, to inform the conclusions they draw about the efficacy of their instructional interventions. The measurement of students' attitudes poses similar but distinct challenges as compared with measurement of learning, such as determining validity and reliability of instruments and selecting appropriate methods for conducting statistical analyses. In this review, we will describe techniques commonly used to quantify students' attitudes toward science. We will also discuss best practices for the analysis and interpretation of attitude data.

  6. Best Practices for Measuring Students’ Attitudes toward Learning Science

    PubMed Central

    Lovelace, Matthew; Brickman, Peggy

    2013-01-01

    Science educators often characterize the degree to which tests measure different facets of college students’ learning, such as knowing, applying, and problem solving. A casual survey of scholarship of teaching and learning research studies reveals that many educators also measure how students’ attitudes influence their learning. Students’ science attitudes refer to their positive or negative feelings and predispositions to learn science. Science educators use attitude measures, in conjunction with learning measures, to inform the conclusions they draw about the efficacy of their instructional interventions. The measurement of students’ attitudes poses similar but distinct challenges as compared with measurement of learning, such as determining validity and reliability of instruments and selecting appropriate methods for conducting statistical analyses. In this review, we will describe techniques commonly used to quantify students’ attitudes toward science. We will also discuss best practices for the analysis and interpretation of attitude data. PMID:24297288

  7. Measurements and Analysis of Longitudinal HOM Driven Coupled Bunch Modes in PEP-II Rings

    SciTech Connect

    Mastorides, T; Rivetta, C.; Fox, J.D.; Winkle, D.Van; /SLAC

    2008-07-07

    The growth rates of the longitudinal higher-order impedance-driven beam modes have greatly increased since the initial PEP-II design and commissioning. This increase is attributed to the addition of 6 1.2MW RF stations with 8 accelerating cavities in the HER and 2 1.2MW RF stations with 4 accelerating cavities in the LER, which allowed operations at twice the design current and almost four times the luminosity. As a result, the damping requirements for the longitudinal feedback have greatly increased since the design, and the feedback filters and control schemes have evolved during PEP-II operations. In this paper, growth and damping rate data for the higher-order mode (HOM) driven coupled-bunch modes are presented from various PEP-II runs and are compared with historical estimates during commissioning. The effect of noise in the feedback processing channel is also studied. Both the stability and performance limits of the system are analyzed.

  8. A generalized longitudinal mixture IRT model for measuring differential growth in learning environments.

    PubMed

    Kadengye, Damazo T; Ceulemans, Eva; Van den Noortgate, Wim

    2014-09-01

    This article describes a generalized longitudinal mixture item response theory (IRT) model that allows for detecting latent group differences in item response data obtained from electronic learning (e-learning) environments or other learning environments that result in large numbers of items. The described model can be viewed as a combination of a longitudinal Rasch model, a mixture Rasch model, and a random-item IRT model, and it includes some features of the explanatory IRT modeling framework. The model assumes the possible presence of latent classes in item response patterns, due to initial person-level differences before learning takes place, to latent class-specific learning trajectories, or to a combination of both. Moreover, it allows for differential item functioning over the classes. A Bayesian model estimation procedure is described, and the results of a simulation study are presented that indicate that the parameters are recovered well, particularly for conditions with large item sample sizes. The model is also illustrated with an empirical sample data set from a Web-based e-learning environment.

  9. Longitudinal intensity oscillations in coronal loops observed with TRACE I. Overview of Measured Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Moortel, I.; Ireland, J.; Walsh, R. W.; Hood, A. W.

    2002-09-01

    In this paper we aim to give a comprehensive overview of geometric and physical properties of longitudinal oscillations in large coronal loops. The 38 examples of propagating disturbances were obtained from the analysis of high cadence, 171 Å TRACE data (JOP 83 and JOP 144). The majority of these outward propagating oscillations are found in the footpoints of large diffuse coronal loop structures, close to active regions. The disturbances travel outward with a propagation speed of the order of v≈122±43 km s-1. The variations in intensity are estimated to be roughly 4.1±1.5% of the background loop brightness. The propagating disturbances are found to be damped very quickly and are typically only detected in the first 8.9±4.4 Mm along the loop. Using a wavelet analysis, periods of the order of 282±93 s are found and the energy flux was estimated as 342±126 erg cm-2 s-1. We found highly filamentary behavior in the lower part of the coronal loops and showed that the intensity oscillations can be present for several consecutive hours, with a more or less constant period. It is evident that the longitudinal oscillations are a widespread, regularly occurring coronal phenomena. A companion paper is devoted to the interpretation and discussion of the results.

  10. Measurement of longitudinal and transverse spin relaxation rates using the ground-state Hanle effect

    SciTech Connect

    Castagna, N.; Weis, A.

    2011-11-15

    We present a theoretical and experimental study of the resonant circularly-polarized-light-induced Hanle effect in the ground state of Cs vapor atoms in a paraffin-coated cell. The effect manifests itself as a narrow resonance (centered at B=0) in the dependence of the optical transmission coefficient of the vapor on the magnitude of an external magnetic field B(vector sign). We develop a theoretical model that yields an algebraic expression for the shape of these resonances for arbitrary field orientations and arbitrary angular momenta of the states coupled by the exciting light, provided that the light power is kept sufficiently small. An experimental procedure for assessing the range of validity of the model is given. Experiments were carried out on the laser-driven Cs D{sub 1} transition both in longitudinal and transverse field geometries, and the observed line shapes of the corresponding bright and dark resonances give an excellent confirmation of the model predictions. The method is applied for determining the intrinsic longitudinal and transverse relaxation rates of the vector magnetization in the vapor and their dependence on light power.

  11. Factorial Validity of the Decisional Involvement Scale as a Measure of Content and Context of Nursing Practice.

    PubMed

    Yurek, Leo A; Havens, Donna S; Hays, Spencer; Hughes, Linda C

    2015-10-01

    Decisional involvement is widely recognized as an essential component of a professional nursing practice environment. In recent years, researchers have added to the conceptualization of nurses' role in decision-making to differentiate between the content and context of nursing practice. Yet, instruments that clearly distinguish between these two dimensions of practice are lacking. The purpose of this study was to examine the factorial validity of the Decisional Involvement Scale (DIS) as a measure of both the content and context of nursing practice. This secondary analysis was conducted using data from a longitudinal action research project to improve the quality of nursing practice and patient care in six hospitals (N = 1,034) in medically underserved counties of Pennsylvania. A cross-sectional analysis of baseline data from the parent study was used to compare the factor structure of two models (one nested within the other) using confirmatory factor analysis. Although a comparison of the two models indicated that the addition of second-order factors for the content and context of nursing practice improved model fit, neither model provided optimal fit to the data. Additional model-generating research is needed to develop the DIS as a valid measure of decisional involvement for both the content and context of nursing practice.

  12. Semi-spontaneous oral text production: measurements in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Lind, Marianne; Kristoffersen, Kristian Emil; Moen, Inger; Simonsen, Hanne Gram

    2009-12-01

    Functionally relevant assessment of the language production of speakers with aphasia should include assessment of connected speech production. Despite the ecological validity of everyday conversations, more controlled and monological types of texts may be easier to obtain and analyse in clinical practice. This article discusses some simple measurements for the analysis of semi-spontaneous oral text production by speakers with aphasia. Specifically, the measurements are related to the production of verbs and nouns, and the realization of different sentence types. The proposed measurements should be clinically relevant, easily applicable, and linguistically meaningful. The measurements have been applied to oral descriptions of the 'Cookie Theft' picture by eight monolingual Norwegian speakers, four with an anomic type of aphasia and four without any type of language impairment. Despite individual differences in both the clinical and the non-clinical group, most of the measurements seem to distinguish between speakers with and without aphasia.

  13. Longitudinal Effects of MRI-Measured Hepatic Steatosis on Biomarkers of Glucose Homeostasis and Hepatic Apoptosis in Obese Youth

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Grace; Giannini, Cosimo; Pierpont, Bridget; Feldstein, Ariel E.; Santoro, Nicola; Kursawe, Romy; Shaw, Melissa; Duran, Elvira; Goldberg, Rachel; Dziura, James; Caprio, Sonia

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE We used fast-gradient magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to determine the longitudinal associations between the hepatic fat content (HFF), glucose homeostasis, and a biomarker of hepatocellular apoptosis in obese youth. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Baseline and longitudinal liver and abdominal MRI were performed with an oral glucose tolerance test in 76 obese youth followed for an average of 1.9 years. Cytokeratin-18 (CK-18) was measured at baseline and follow-up as a biomarker of hepatic apoptosis. The relationship between baseline HFF and metabolic parameters and circulating levels of CK-18 at follow-up were assessed using a bivariate correlation. RESULTS At baseline, 38% had hepatic steatosis based on %HFF ≥5.5% with alterations in indices of insulin sensitivity and secretion. At follow-up, BMI increased in both groups and baseline %HFF correlated strongly with the follow-up %HFF (r = 0.81, P < 0.001). Over time, markers of insulin sensitivity and 2-h glucose improved significantly in the group without fatty liver, in contrast with the persistence of the insulin resistance and associated correlates in the fatty liver group. Baseline HFF correlated with 2-h glucose (r = 0.38, P = 0.001), whole-body insulin sensitivity (r = −0.405, P = 0.001), adiponectin (r = −0.44, P < 0.001), CK-18 levels, (r = 0.63, P < 0.001), and disposition index (r = −0.272, P = 0.021) at follow-up. In a multivariate analysis, we showed that baseline HFF is an independent predictor of 2-h glucose and whole-body insulin sensitivity. CONCLUSIONS In obese youth, the phenotype of MRI-measured hepatic steatosis is persistent. Baseline HFF strongly modulates longitudinally 2-h blood glucose, biomarkers of insulin resistance, and hepatocellular apoptosis. PMID:22933439

  14. A Monte Carlo Power Analysis of Traditional Repeated Measures and Hierarchical Multivariate Linear Models in Longitudinal Data Analysis.

    PubMed

    Fang, Hua; Brooks, Gordon P; Rizzo, Maria L; Espy, Kimberly A; Barcikowski, Robert S

    2008-01-01

    The power properties of traditional repeated measures and hierarchical linear models have not been clearly determined in the balanced design for longitudinal studies in the current literature. A Monte Carlo power analysis of traditional repeated measures and hierarchical multivariate linear models are presented under three variance-covariance structures. Results suggest that traditional repeated measures have higher power than hierarchical linear models for main effects, but lower power for interaction effects. Significant power differences are also exhibited when power is compared across different covariance structures. Results also supplement more comprehensive empirical indexes for estimating model precision via bootstrap estimates and the approximate power for both main effects and interaction tests under standard model assumptions.

  15. Reliability measures of functional magnetic resonance imaging in a longitudinal evaluation of mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Zanto, Theodore P; Pa, Judy; Gazzaley, Adam

    2014-01-01

    As the aging population grows, it has become increasingly important to carefully characterize amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI), a preclinical stage of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a valuable tool for monitoring disease progression in selectively vulnerable brain regions associated with AD neuropathology. However, the reliability of fMRI data in longitudinal studies of older adults with aMCI is largely unexplored. To address this, aMCI participants completed two visual working tasks, a Delayed-Recognition task and a One-Back task, on three separate scanning sessions over a three-month period. Test-retest reliability of the fMRI blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) activity was assessed using an intraclass correlation (ICC) analysis approach. Results indicated that brain regions engaged during the task displayed greater reliability across sessions compared to regions that were not utilized by the task. During task-engagement, differential reliability scores were observed across the brain such that the frontal lobe, medial temporal lobe, and subcortical structures exhibited fair to moderate reliability (ICC=0.3-0.6), while temporal, parietal, and occipital regions exhibited moderate to good reliability (ICC=0.4-0.7). Additionally, reliability across brain regions was more stable when three fMRI sessions were used in the ICC calculation relative to two fMRI sessions. In conclusion, the fMRI BOLD signal is reliable across scanning sessions in this population and thus a useful tool for tracking longitudinal change in observational and interventional studies in aMCI.

  16. Rapid and Progressive Regional Brain Atrophy in CLN6 Batten Disease Affected Sheep Measured with Longitudinal Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Sawiak, Stephen J.; Perumal, Sunthara Rajan; Rudiger, Skye R.; Matthews, Loren; Mitchell, Nadia L.; McLaughlan, Clive J.; Bawden, C. Simon; Palmer, David N.; Kuchel, Timothy; Morton, A. Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Variant late-infantile Batten disease is a neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis caused by mutations in CLN6. It is a recessive genetic lysosomal storage disease characterised by progressive neurodegeneration. It starts insidiously and leads to blindness, epilepsy and dementia in affected children. Sheep that are homozygous for a natural mutation in CLN6 have an ovine form of Batten disease Here, we used in vivo magnetic resonance imaging to track brain changes in 4 unaffected carriers and 6 affected Batten disease sheep. We scanned each sheep 4 times, between 17 and 22 months of age. Cortical atrophy in all sheep was pronounced at the baseline scan in all affected Batten disease sheep. Significant atrophy was also present in other brain regions (caudate, putamen and amygdala). Atrophy continued measurably in all of these regions during the study. Longitudinal MRI in sheep was sensitive enough to measure significant volume changes over the relatively short study period, even in the cortex, where nearly 40% of volume was already lost at the start of the study. Thus longitudinal MRI could be used to study the dynamics of progression of neurodegenerative changes in sheep models of Batten disease, as well as to assess therapeutic efficacy. PMID:26161747

  17. Single and double spin asymmetries for deeply virtual Compton scattering measured with CLAS and a longitudinally polarized proton target

    SciTech Connect

    Pisano, S.; Biselli, A.; Niccolai, S.; Seder, E.; Guidal, M.; Mirazita, M.; Adhikari, K. P.; Adikaram, D.; Amaryan, M. J.; Anderson, M. D.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Avakian, H.; Ball, J.; Battaglieri, M.; Batourine, V.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Bosted, P.; Briscoe, B.; Brock, J.; Brooks, W. K.; Burkert, V. D.; Carlin, C.; Carman, D. S.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Charles, G.; Colaneri, L.; Cole, P. L.; Compton, N.; Contalbrigo, M.; Cortes, O.; Crabb, D. G.; Crede, V.; D' Angelo, A.; De Vita, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Deur, A.; Djalali, C.; Dupre, R.; Egiyan, H.; El Alaoui, A.; El Fassi, L.; Elouadrhiri, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fedotov, G.; Fegan, S.; Fersch, R.; Filippi, A.; Fleming, J. A.; Fradi, A.; Garillon, B.; Garcon, M.; Ghandilyan, Y.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Goetz, J. T.; Gohn, W.; Golovatch, E.; Gothe, R. W.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guo, L.; Hafidi, K.; Hanretty, C.; Hattawy, M.; Hicks, K.; Holtrop, M.; Hughes, S. M.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Jenkins, D.; Jiang, X.; Jo, H. S.; Joo, K.; Joosten, S.; Keith, C. D.; Keller, D.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; Klein, F. J.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuhn, S. E.; Lenisa, P.; Livingston, K.; Lu, H. Y.; MacCormick, M.; MacGregor, Ian J. D.; Mayer, M.; McKinnon, B.; Meekins, D. G.; Meyer, C. A.; Mokeev, V.; Montgomery, R. A.; Moody, C. I.; Munoz Camacho, C.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Park, K.; Phelps, W.; Phillips, J. J.; Pogorelko, O.; Price, J. W.; Procureur, S.; Prok, Y.; Puckett, A. J. R.; Ripani, M.; Rizzo, A.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Roy, P.; Sabatie, F.; Salgado, C.; Schott, D.; Schumacher, R. A.; Skorodumina, I.; Smith, G. D.; Sober, D. I.; Sokhan, D.; Sparveris, N.; Stepanyan, S.; Stoler, P.; Strauch, S.; Sytnik, V.; Tian, Ye; Tkachenko, S.; Turisini, M.; Ungaro, M.; Voutier, E.; Walford, N. K.; Watts, D. P.; Wei, X.; Weinstein, L. B.; Wood, M. H.; Zachariou, N.; Zana, L.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, Z. W.; Zonta, I.

    2015-03-19

    Single-beam, single-target, and double-spin asymmetries for hard exclusive photon production on the proton e→p→e'p'γ are presented. The data were taken at Jefferson Lab using the CLAS detector and a longitudinally polarized 14NH3 target. The three asymmetries were measured in 165 4-dimensional kinematic bins, covering the widest kinematic range ever explored simultaneously for beam and target-polarization observables in the valence quark region. The kinematic dependences of the obtained asymmetries are discussed and compared to the predictions of models of Generalized Parton Distributions. As a result, the measurement of three DVCS spin observables at the same kinematic points allows a quasi-model-independent extraction of the imaginary parts of the H and H~ Compton Form Factors, which give insight into the electric and axial charge distributions of valence quarks in the proton.

  18. Longitudinal impedance of RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J. M.; Mernick, K.

    2015-05-03

    The longitudinal impedance of the two RHIC rings has been measured using the effect of potential well distortion on longitudinal Schottky measurements. For the blue RHIC ring Im(Z/n) = 1.5±0.2Ω. For the yellow ring Im(Z/n) = 5.4±1Ω.

  19. Serial Liver Stiffness Measurements and Monitoring of Liver-Transplanted Patients in a Real-Life Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Rinaldi, Luca; Valente, Giovanna; Piai, Guido

    2016-01-01

    Background Liver transplanted patients need close surveillance for early signs of graft disease. Objectives Transient elastography can safely be repeated over time, offering serial liver stiffness measurement values. Serial stiffness measurements were compared to single baseline stiffness measurements in predicting the appearance of liver-related clinical events and guiding subsequent clinical decisions. Methods One hundred and sixty liver transplanted patients were observed for three years in our real-life practice. Results Liver stiffness measurements were stable in 75% of patients, decreased in 4% of patients, and increased in 21% of patients. The pattern of increased stiffness measurements was associated with both HCV-RNA positive status and the presence of an active biliary complication of liver transplantation and was more predictive of a clinically significant event resulting from any disease of the transplanted liver when compared to a stable pattern or to a single liver stiffness measurement. The procedures that were consequently performed were often diagnostic for unexpected situations, both in HCV-RNA positive and HCV-RNA negative patients. Conclusions The pattern of longitudinally increased liver stiffness measurements efficiently supported clinical decisions for individualized management strategies. Repeated transient elastography in real-life clinical practice appears to have a practical role in monitoring liver transplanted patients. PMID:28123442

  20. Individual differences in children's global motion sensitivity correlate with TBSS-based measures of the superior longitudinal fasciculus.

    PubMed

    Braddick, Oliver; Atkinson, Janette; Akshoomoff, Natacha; Newman, Erik; Curley, Lauren B; Gonzalez, Marybel Robledo; Brown, Timothy; Dale, Anders; Jernigan, Terry

    2016-12-16

    Reduced global motion sensitivity, relative to global static form sensitivity, has been found in children with many neurodevelopmental disorders, leading to the "dorsal stream vulnerability" hypothesis (Braddick et al., 2003). Individual differences in typically developing children's global motion thresholds have been shown to be associated with variations in specific parietal cortical areas (Braddick et al., 2016). Here, in 125 children aged 5-12years, we relate individual differences in global motion and form coherence thresholds to fractional anisotropy (FA) in the superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF), a major fibre tract communicating between parietal lobe and anterior cortical areas. We find a positive correlation between FA of the right SLF and individual children's sensitivity to global motion coherence, while FA of the left SLF shows a negative correlation. Further analysis of parietal cortical area data shows that this is also asymmetrical, showing a stronger association with global motion sensitivity in the left hemisphere. None of these associations hold for an analogous measure of global form sensitivity. We conclude that a complex pattern of structural asymmetry, including the parietal lobe and the superior longitudinal fasciculus, is specifically linked to the development of sensitivity to global visual motion. This pattern suggests that individual differences in motion sensitivity are primarily linked to parietal brain areas interacting with frontal systems in making decisions on integrated motion signals, rather than in the extra-striate visual areas that perform the initial integration. The basis of motion processing deficits in neurodevelopmental disorders may depend on these same structures.

  1. Reference intervals, longitudinal analyses, and index of individuality of commonly measured laboratory variables in captive bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus).

    PubMed

    Jones, Michael P; Arheart, Kristopher L; Cray, Carolyn

    2014-06-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine reference intervals, perform longitudinal analyses, and determine the index of individuality (IoI) of 8 hematologic, and 13 biochemical and electrophoretic variables for a group of captive bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus). Reference intervals were determined from blood samples collected during annual wellness examinations for 41 eagles (23 male and 18 female) with ages ranging between 6 and 43 years (18.7 +/- 7.4, mean +/- SD) at the time of sample collection. Longitudinal analyses and IoI were determined for measured hematologic, biochemical, and protein electrophoretic variables, both individually and as a group, for a subset of 16 eagles (10 male and 6 female) during a 12-year period. This smaller group of eagles ranged in age between 2 and 20 years at the start of the study period, and between 14 and 32 years (21.9 +/- 5.0, mean +/- SD) at the end of the study period. Significant increases with age within the group of 16 eagles were observed only for red blood cells, percent heterophils, total protein, and beta-globulin protein fraction, while albumin:globulin decreased significantly with age. A low IoI (> or = 1.4) was determined for all hematologic and biochemical variables except gamma globulins, which had high IoI (< or = 0.6) for 3 individuals within the subset of 16.

  2. Longitudinal measures of cholinergic forebrain atrophy in the transition from healthy aging to Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Grothe, Michel; Heinsen, Helmut; Teipel, Stefan

    2013-04-01

    Recent evidence from cross-sectional in vivo imaging studies suggests that atrophy of the cholinergic basal forebrain (BF) in Alzheimer's disease (AD) can be distinguished from normal age-related degeneration even at predementia stages of the disease. Longitudinal study designs are needed to specify the dynamics of BF degeneration in the transition from normal aging to AD. We applied recently developed techniques for in vivo volumetry of the BF to serial magnetic resonance imaging scans of 82 initially healthy elderly individuals (60-93 years) and 50 patients with very mild AD (Clinical Dementia Rating score = 0.5) that were clinically followed over an average of 3 ± 1.5 years. BF atrophy rates were found to be significantly higher than rates of global brain shrinkage even in cognitively stable healthy elderly individuals. Compared with healthy control subjects, very mild AD patients showed reduced BF volumes at baseline and increased volume loss over time. Atrophy of the BF was more pronounced in progressive patients compared with those that remained stable. The cholinergic BF undergoes disproportionate degeneration in the aging process, which is further increased by the presence of AD.

  3. Assessing patient reported outcome measures: A practical guide for gastroenterologists

    PubMed Central

    Hutchings, Hayley A; Williams, John G

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal illnesses cause physical, emotional and social impact on patients. Patient reported outcome measures (PROMs) are increasingly used in clinical decision-making, clinical research and approval of new therapies. In the last decade, there has been a rapid increase in the number of PROMs in gastroenterology and, therefore, the choice between which of these PROMs to use can be difficult. Not all PROM instruments currently used in research and clinical practice in gastroenterology have gone through a rigorous development methodology. New drugs and therapies will not have access to the market if the PROMs used in their clinical trials are not validated according to the guidelines of the international agencies. Therefore, it is important to know the required properties of PROMs when choosing or evaluating a drug or a clinical intervention. This paper reviews the current literature on how to assess the validity and reliability of PROMs. It summarises the required properties into a practical guide for gastroenterologists to use in assessing an instrument for use in clinical practice or research. PMID:25452841

  4. Measurement of parity-violating spin asymmetries in W± production at midrapidity in longitudinally polarized p +p collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adare, A.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Akimoto, R.; Alexander, J.; Alfred, M.; Aoki, K.; Apadula, N.; Aramaki, Y.; Asano, H.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Atomssa, E. T.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Bai, X.; Bandara, N. S.; Bannier, B.; Barish, K. N.; Bassalleck, B.; Bathe, S.; Baublis, V.; Baumann, C.; Baumgart, S.; Bazilevsky, A.; Beaumier, M.; Beckman, S.; Belmont, R.; Berdnikov, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Black, D.; Blau, D. S.; Bok, J. S.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Bryslawskyj, J.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Butsyk, S.; Campbell, S.; Chen, C.-H.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choi, J. B.; Choi, S.; Choudhury, R. K.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chvala, O.; Cianciolo, V.; Citron, Z.; Cole, B. A.; Connors, M.; Cronin, N.; Crossette, N.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Dairaku, S.; Danley, T. W.; Datta, A.; Daugherity, M. S.; David, G.; Deblasio, K.; Dehmelt, K.; Denisov, A.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Dietzsch, O.; Ding, L.; Dion, A.; Diss, P. B.; Do, J. H.; Donadelli, M.; D'Orazio, L.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; Edwards, S.; Efremenko, Y. V.; Engelmore, T.; Enokizono, A.; En'yo, H.; Esumi, S.; Eyser, K. O.; Fadem, B.; Feege, N.; Fields, D. E.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fukao, Y.; Fusayasu, T.; Gainey, K.; Gal, C.; Gallus, P.; Garg, P.; Garishvili, A.; Garishvili, I.; Ge, H.; Giordano, F.; Glenn, A.; Gong, X.; Gonin, M.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gu, Y.; Gunji, T.; Guragain, H.; Hachiya, T.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamilton, H. F.; Han, S. Y.; Hanks, J.; Hasegawa, S.; Haseler, T. O. S.; Hashimoto, K.; Hayano, R.; Hayashi, S.; He, X.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hester, T.; Hill, J. C.; Hollis, R. S.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Horaguchi, T.; Hoshino, T.; Hotvedt, N.; Huang, J.; Huang, S.; Ichihara, T.; Iinuma, H.; Ikeda, Y.; Imai, K.; Imazu, Y.; Imrek, J.; Inaba, M.; Iordanova, A.; Isenhower, D.; Isinhue, A.; Ivanishchev, D.; Jacak, B. V.; Javani, M.; Jeon, S. J.; Jezghani, M.; Jia, J.; Jiang, X.; Johnson, B. M.; Joo, E.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Jumper, D. S.; Kamin, J.; Kanda, S.; Kang, B. H.; Kang, J. H.; Kang, J. S.; Kapustinsky, J.; Karatsu, K.; Kawall, D.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Kempel, T.; Key, J. A.; Khachatryan, V.; Khandai, P. K.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kihara, K.; Kijima, K. M.; Kim, B. I.; Kim, C.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E.-J.; Kim, G. W.; Kim, H.-J.; Kim, M.; Kim, Y.-J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimelman, B.; Kinney, E.; Kistenev, E.; Kitamura, R.; Klatsky, J.; Kleinjan, D.; Kline, P.; Koblesky, T.; Kofarago, M.; Komkov, B.; Koster, J.; Kotchetkov, D.; Kotov, D.; Krizek, F.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G. S.; Lacey, R.; Lai, Y. S.; Lajoie, J. G.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, G. H.; Lee, J.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, S.; Lee, S. H.; Lee, S. R.; Leitch, M. J.; Leite, M. A. L.; Leitgab, M.; Lewis, B.; Li, X.; Lim, S. H.; Linden Levy, L. A.; Liu, M. X.; Lynch, D.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Makek, M.; Manion, A.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; Maruyama, T.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; McGlinchey, D.; McKinney, C.; Meles, A.; Mendoza, M.; Meredith, B.; Miake, Y.; Mibe, T.; Midori, J.; Mignerey, A. C.; Miller, A. J.; Milov, A.; Mishra, D. K.; Mitchell, J. T.; Miyasaka, S.; Mizuno, S.; Mohanty, A. K.; Mohapatra, S.; Montuenga, P.; Moon, H. J.; Moon, T.; Morrison, D. P.; Moskowitz, M.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Murakami, T.; Murata, J.; Mwai, A.; Nagae, T.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagashima, K.; Nagle, J. L.; Nagy, M. I.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakagomi, H.; Nakamiya, Y.; Nakamura, K. R.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, K.; Nattrass, C.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Nihashi, M.; Niida, T.; Nishimura, S.; Nouicer, R.; Novák, T.; Novitzky, N.; Nukariya, A.; Nyanin, A. S.; Obayashi, H.; O'Brien, E.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Oide, H.; Okada, K.; Orjuela Koop, J. D.; Osborn, J. D.; Oskarsson, A.; Ozaki, H.; Ozawa, K.; Pak, R.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, I. H.; Park, J. S.; Park, S.; Park, S. K.; Pate, S. F.; Patel, L.; Patel, M.; Pei, H.; Peng, J.-C.; Perepelitsa, D. V.; Perera, G. D. N.; Peressounko, D. Yu.; Perry, J.; Petti, R.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pinson, R.; Pisani, R. P.; Purschke, M. L.; Qu, H.; Rak, J.; Ramson, B. J.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Reynolds, D.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Richardson, E.; Rinn, T.; Riveli, N.; Roach, D.; Roche, G.; Rolnick, S. D.; Rosati, M.; Rowan, Z.; Rubin, J. G.; Ryu, M. S.; Sahlmueller, B.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sako, H.; Samsonov, V.; Sarsour, M.; Sato, S.; Sawada, S.; Schaefer, B.; Schmoll, B. K.; Sedgwick, K.; Seele, J.; Seidl, R.; Sekiguchi, Y.; Sen, A.; Seto, R.; Sett, P.; Sexton, A.; Sharma, D.; Shaver, A.; Shein, I.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Shoji, K.; Shukla, P.; Sickles, A.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Sim, K. S.; Singh, B. K.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Skolnik, M.; Slunečka, M.; Snowball, M.; Solano, S.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Sourikova, I. V.; Stankus, P. W.; Steinberg, P.; Stenlund, E.; Stepanov, M.; Ster, A.; Stoll, S. P.; Stone, M. R.; Sugitate, T.; Sukhanov, A.; Sumita, T.; Sun, J.; Sziklai, J.; Takagui, E. M.; Takahara, A.; Taketani, A.; Tanaka, Y.; Taneja, S.; Tanida, K.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Tarafdar, S.; Taranenko, A.; Tennant, E.; Tieulent, R.; Timilsina, A.; Todoroki, T.; Tomášek, M.; Torii, H.; Towell, C. L.; Towell, M.; Towell, R.; Towell, R. S.; Tserruya, I.; Tsuchimoto, Y.; Vale, C.; van Hecke, H. W.; Vargyas, M.; Vazquez-Zambrano, E.; Veicht, A.; Velkovska, J.; Vértesi, R.; Virius, M.; Voas, B.; Vrba, V.; Vznuzdaev, E.; Wang, X. R.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, K.; Watanabe, Y.; Watanabe, Y. S.; Wei, F.; Whitaker, S.; White, A. S.; White, S. N.; Winter, D.; Wolin, S.; Woody, C. L.; Wysocki, M.; Xia, B.; Xue, L.; Yalcin, S.; Yamaguchi, Y. L.; Yanovich, A.; Ying, J.; Yokkaichi, S.; Yoo, J. H.; Yoon, I.; You, Z.; Younus, I.; Yu, H.; Yushmanov, I. E.; Zajc, W. A.; Zelenski, A.; Zhou, S.; Zou, L.; Phenix Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    We present midrapidity measurements from the PHENIX experiment of large parity-violating single-spin asymmetries of high transverse momentum electrons and positrons from W±/Z decays, produced in longitudinally polarized p +p collisions at center of mass energies of √{s }=500 and 510 GeV. These asymmetries allow direct access to the antiquark polarized parton distribution functions due to the parity-violating nature of the W -boson coupling to quarks and antiquarks. The results presented are based on data collected in 2011, 2012, and 2013 with an integrated luminosity of 240 pb-1 , which exceeds previous PHENIX published results by a factor of more than 27. These high Q2 data probe the parton structure of the proton at W mass scale and provide an important addition to our understanding of the antiquark parton helicity distribution functions at an intermediate Bjorken x value of roughly MW/√{s }=0.16 .

  5. Are There Linguistic Markers of Suicidal Writing That Can Predict the Course of Treatment? A Repeated Measures Longitudinal Analysis.

    PubMed

    Brancu, Mira; Jobes, David; Wagner, Barry M; Greene, Jeffrey A; Fratto, Timothy A

    2016-07-02

    The purpose of this pilot study was to predict resolution of suicidal ideation and risk over the course of therapy among suicidal outpatients (N = 144) using a novel method for analyzing Self- verses Relationally oriented qualitative written responses to the Suicide Status Form (SSF). A content analysis software program was used to extract word counts and a repeated measures longitudinal design was implemented to assess improvement over time. Patients with primarily Relationally focused word counts were more likely to have a quicker suicide risk resolution than those with more Self-focused word counts (6-7 sessions versus 17-18 sessions). Implications of these data are discussed, including the potential for enhancing treatment outcomes using this method with individuals entering treatment.

  6. Practical aspects of measuring intracellular calcium signals with fluorescent indicators.

    PubMed

    Kao, Joseph P Y; Li, Gong; Auston, Darryl A

    2010-01-01

    The use of fluorescent indicators for monitoring calcium (Ca(2+)) signals and for measuring Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]) in living cells is described. The following topics are covered in detail: (1) ratiometric and nonratiometric fluorescent indicators and the principles underlying their use, (2) techniques for loading Ca(2+) indicators and Ca(2+) buffers into living cells, (3) calibration of indicator fluorescence intensity measurements to yield values of intracellular [Ca(2+)], (4) analysis of nonratiometric fluorescence intensity data and caveats relating to their interpretation, (5) techniques for manipulating intracellular and extracellular [Ca(2+)], and (6) the use of fluorescent indicators to monitor Ca(2+) signals in mitochondria. The chapter aims to present these fundamental topics in a manner that is practically useful and intuitively accessible. The origins of key mathematical equations used in the article are outlined in two appendices.

  7. Practical and simple circuitry for the measurement of small capacitance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, D. Y.; Wu, J. D.; Chang, Y. J.; Wu, J. S.

    2007-01-01

    Practical and cost-effective circuitry with high sensitivity has been developed to measure a small capacitance using current compensation method. The circuitry uses an electronic switch to periodically connect or separate the capacitor under test (Cx) from a reference capacitor (Cr). When Cx is connected in parallel with Cr the total capacitance becomes Cx+Cr. On the other hand, as Cx is separated from Cr, the total capacitance is only Cr. This periodic change of the capacitance generates a periodic square-wave output with an amplitude in proportion to the capacitance of Cx. A high sensitivity of ΔV /ΔC=202.2mV/pF has been achieved, making the circuitry a powerful tool in measuring small capacitances. Three applications have been performed to present its capability: (a) displacement, (b) height of liquid, and (c) angle of tilt. The experimental results demonstrate the performance of the circuitry.

  8. Factor Structure and Measurement Invariance of a 10-Item Decisional Balance Scale: Longitudinal and Subgroup Examination within an Adult Diabetic Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pickering, Michael A.; Plotnikoff, Ronald C.

    2009-01-01

    This study explores the longitudinal and subgroup measurement properties of a 10-item, physical activity decisional balance scale, previously published by Plotnikoff, Blanchard, Hotz, and Rhodes (2001), within a diabetic sample of Canadian adults. Results indicated that a three-factor measurement model consistently improved model fit compared to…

  9. Codifference as a practical tool to measure interdependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyłomańska, Agnieszka; Chechkin, Aleksei; Gajda, Janusz; Sokolov, Igor M.

    2015-03-01

    Correlation and spectral analysis represent the standard tools to study interdependence in statistical data. However, for the stochastic processes with heavy-tailed distributions such that the variance diverges, these tools are inadequate. The heavy-tailed processes are ubiquitous in nature and finance. We here discuss codifference as a convenient measure to study statistical interdependence, and we aim to give a short introductory review of its properties. By taking different known stochastic processes as generic examples, we present explicit formulas for their codifferences. We show that for the Gaussian processes codifference is equivalent to covariance. For processes with finite variance these two measures behave similarly with time. For the processes with infinite variance the covariance does not exist, however, the codifference is relevant. We demonstrate the practical importance of the codifference by extracting this function from simulated as well as real data taken from turbulent plasma of fusion device and financial market. We conclude that the codifference serves as a convenient practical tool to study interdependence for stochastic processes with both infinite and finite variances as well.

  10. Establishing Measurement Equivalence and Invariance in Longitudinal Data With Item Response Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meade, Adam W.; Lautenschlager, Gary J.; Hecht, Janet E.

    2005-01-01

    If measurement invariance does not hold over 2 or more measurement occasions, differences in observed scores are not directly interpretable. Golembiewski, Billingsley, and Yeager (1976) identified 2 types of psychometric differences over time as beta change and gamma change. Gamma change is a fundamental change in thinking about the nature of a…

  11. Fiber Longitudinal Measurements for Predicting White Speck Contents of Dyed Cotton Fabrics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fiber Image Analysis System (FIAS) was developed to provide an automatic method for measuring cotton maturity from fiber snippets or cross-sections . An uncombed cotton bundle is chopped and sprayed on a microscopic slide. The snippets are imaged sequentially on an microscope and measured with custo...

  12. Collection of a Lifetime: A Practical Approach to Developing a Longitudinal Collection of Women’s Healthcare Biological Samples

    PubMed Central

    Santillan, Mark K.; Leslie, Kimberly K.; Hamilton, Wendy S.; Boese, Brenda J.; Ahuja, Monika; Hunter, Stephen K.; Santillan, Donna A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The objective is to develop a biorepository of samples that represent all stages of a women’s life. Importantly, our goal is to collect longitudinal physical specimens as well as the associated short and long-term clinical information. Study Design The Women’s Health Tissue Repository was established to encompass four tissue banks: Well Women Tissue Bank, Reproductive Endocrinology & Infertility Tissue Bank, Maternal Fetal Tissue Bank, and the long-established Gynecologic Malignancies Tissue Bank. Based on their health status, women being seen in Women’s Health at the University of Iowa are recruited to contribute samples and grant access to their electronic medical record to the biorepository. Samples are coded, processed, and stored for use by investigators. Results The Maternal Fetal Tissue Bank was the first expansion of our department’s biobanking efforts. Approximately 75% of the women approached consent to participate in the Maternal Fetal Tissue Bank. Enrollment has steadily increased. Samples have been used for over 20 projects in the first 3 years and are critical to 7 funded grants and 3 patent applications. Conclusion Patient samples with corresponding clinical data are initially important to women’s health research. Our model demonstrates that many research projects by faculty, fellows, and residents have benefited from the existence of the Women’s Health Tissue Repository. While challenging to achieve, longitudinal sampling allows for the greatest opportunity to study normal and pathological changes throughout all phases of a women’s life, including pregnancy. This bank facilitates and accelerates the development of novel research, technologies, and possible therapeutic options in women’s health. The establishment of more longitudinal biorepositories based on our model would enhance women’s health research. PMID:24965987

  13. Practical considerations for measuring hydrogen concentrations in groundwater

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chapelle, F.H.; Vroblesky, D.A.; Woodward, J.C.; Lovley, D.R.

    1997-01-01

    Several practical considerations for measuring concentrations of dissolved molecular hydrogen (H2) in groundwater including 1 sampling methods 2 pumping methods and (3) effects of well casing materials were evaluated. Three different sampling methodologies (a downhole sampler, a gas- stripping method, and a diffusion sampler) were compared. The downhole sampler and gas-stripping methods gave similar results when applied to the same wells, the other hand, appeared to The diffusion sampler, on overestimate H2 concentrations relative to the downhole sampler. Of these methods, the gas-stripping method is better suited to field conditions because it is faster (~ 30 min for a single analysis as opposed to 2 h for the downhole sampler or 8 h for the diffusion sampler), the analysis is easier (less sample manipulation is required), and the data computations are more straightforward (H2 concentrations need not be corrected for water sample volume). Measurement of H2 using the gas-stripping method can be affected by different pumping equipment. Peristaltic, piston, and bladder pumps all gave similar results when applied to water produced from the same well. It was observed, however, that peristaltic-pumped water (which draws water under a negative pressure) enhanced the gas-stripping process and equilibrated slightly faster than either piston or bladder pumps (which push water under a positive pressure). A direct current(dc) electrically driven submersible pump was observed to produce H2 and was not suitable for measuring H2 in groundwater. Measurements from two field sites indicate that iron or steel well casings, produce H2, which masks H2 concentrations in groundwater. PVC-cased wells or wells cased with other materials that do not produce H2 are necessary for measuring H2 concentrations in groundwater.Several practical considerations for measuring concentrations of dissolved molecular hydrogen in groundwater including sampling methods, pumping methods, and effects of

  14. The Role of Sleep Disturbances in the Longitudinal Relationship Between Psychosocial Working Conditions, Measured by Work Demands and Support, and Depression

    PubMed Central

    Magnusson Hanson, Linda L.; Chungkham, Holendro Singh; Åkerstedt, Torbjörn; Westerlund, Hugo

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: Because work demands and lack of social support seem to be prospectively linked to sleep problems, and sleep problems are linked to depression, sleep problems may play a role in the relationship between these work characteristics and depressive symptoms. In order to shed more light on this relationship, the current study investigated whether disturbed sleep is a mediator in the longitudinal relationships between work demands, social support, and depression. Design: Longitudinal cohort study with repeated survey measures on four occasions. Setting: Swedish workforce. Participants: 2,017 working participants from the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health in 2006, 2008, 2010, and 2012. Measurements and results: Work demands (four items) and social support (six items) were assessed with the Demand Control Questionnaire, disturbed sleep (four items) with the Karolinska Sleep Questionnaire, and depressive symptoms with a brief subscale (six items) from the Symptom Checklist. Autoregressive longitudinal mediation models using structural equation modeling were tested. The work characteristics, and disturbed sleep, were found to be separately associated with depressive symptoms in subsequent waves. However, only demands were found to be longitudinally related to subsequent disturbed sleep. The longitudinal autoregressive models supported a weak mediating role of disturbed sleep in the relationship between demands and depressive symptoms (standardized beta 0.008, P < 0.001), but not between support and depressive symptoms. Conclusions: These results indicate that higher demands at work might cause an increase in depressive symptoms, in part, by increasing disturbed sleep, although the mediated effect was relatively small compared to the total effect. Citation: Magnusson Hanson LL, Chungkham HS, Åkerstedt T, Westerlund H. The role of sleep disturbances in the longitudinal relationship between psychosocial working conditions, measured by work

  15. Measurement of the longitudinal, transverse, and longitudinal-transverse structure functions in the {sup 2}H({ital e},{ital e}{prime}{ital p}){ital n} reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, D.; McIlvain, T.; Alarcon, R.; Beck, R.; Bertozzi, W.; Bhushan, V.; Boeglin, W.; Chen, J.P.; Dale, D.; Dodson, G.; Dolfini, S.; Dow, K.; Dzengeleski, J.; Epstein, M.B.; Farkhondeh, M.; Gilad, S.; Goergen, J.; Holtrop, M.; Joo, K.; Kelsey, J.; Kim, W.; Laszewski, R.; Lourie, R.; Mandeville, J.; Margaziotis, D.; Martinez, D.; Miskimen, R.; Papanicolas, C.N.; Penn, S.; Sapp, W.; Sarty, A.J.; Tieger, D.; Tschalaer, C.; Turchinetz, W.; Warren, G.; Weinstein, L.; Williamson, S. |||||

    1996-03-01

    We have separated the longitudinal ({ital f}{sub 00}), transverse ({ital f}{sub 11}), and longitudinal-transverse interference ({ital f}{sub 01}) structure functions in the {sup 2}H({ital e},{ital e}{prime}{ital p}){ital n} reaction at {ital q}{searrow}{parallel}{approx_equal} 400 MeV/{ital c} and {omega}{approx_equal}110 MeV. A nonrelativistic calculation which includes effects due to final state interactions, meson exchange currents, and isobar configurations agrees with the measured {ital f}{sub 11} and {ital f}{sub 01} but overpredicts {ital f}{sub 00} by 25{percent} (2{sigma}). The data are also compared to the results of previous structure function measurements. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  16. Challenges in longitudinal measurements with HR-pQCT: evaluation of a 3D registration method to improve bone microarchitecture and strength measurement reproducibility.

    PubMed

    Ellouz, Rafaa; Chapurlat, Roland; van Rietbergen, Bert; Christen, Patrik; Pialat, Jean-Baptiste; Boutroy, Stephanie

    2014-06-01

    Definition of identical regions between repeated computed tomography (CT) scans is a key factor to monitor changes in bone microarchitecture. In longitudinal studies, accurate determination of the volume of interest (VOI), using three dimensional (3D) registration may improve precision. Therefore, the aim of our study was to investigate the short-term reproducibility of bone geometry, density, microstructure and biomechanical parameters assessed by HR-pQCT and micro-finite element (μFE) derived analyses, using the cross-sectional area (CSA) registration method in comparison with the use of 3D registration, to find overlapping regions between scans. Fifteen healthy individuals (aged 21-47 years) underwent 3 separate scans at the distal radius and tibia, within a one-month interval. Reproducibility was assessed after double contouring the cortical compartment and after applying three different methods to determine the common region between repeated scans: (i) the VOI was determined with no registration, i.e., on 110 slices, (ii) the VOI was determined after CSA-based registration, and (iii) the VOI was determined after 3D registration. Both pre- and post-registration short-term reproducibility for each subject was determined. With no registration, CVrms of geometry parameters ranged from 0.5 to 3.7%, showing a slight variation in the CSA between scans. When the CSA registration method was employed, the variability of geometry (CVrms<1.8%) and density parameters (CVrms<1.8%), was better than that obtained without registration. By removing the effect of repositioning, the 3D registration further improved the reproducibility of cortical bone measurements compared to other methods. Indeed, significant improvements were found for cortical geometry and microstructure measurements (CVrms ranged from 0.4% to 10.7% at both sites; p<0.05), whereas the impact on trabecular bone measurements was restricted to its geometry parameter. The repositioning error was significantly

  17. Longitudinal Study of a Novel, Performance-based Measure of Daily Function

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-01

    to use performance based instruments, such as the UCSD Performance-based Skills Assessment (UPSA), in Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) or mild...have functional impairments, and healthy age matched controls on the UPSA, as well as measures of cognition (e.g., episodic memory, semantic memory...the severity of decline in this measure over time, the relationship of decline to cognitive changes in order to determine the validity of the UPSA

  18. Variability in baseline laboratory measurements of the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil).

    PubMed

    Ladwig, R; Vigo, A; Fedeli, L M G; Chambless, L E; Bensenor, I; Schmidt, M I; Vidigal, P G; Castilhos, C D; Duncan, B B

    2016-08-01

    Multi-center epidemiological studies must ascertain that their measurements are accurate and reliable. For laboratory measurements, reliability can be assessed through investigation of reproducibility of measurements in the same individual. In this paper, we present results from the quality control analysis of the baseline laboratory measurements from the ELSA-Brasil study. The study enrolled 15,105 civil servants at 6 research centers in 3 regions of Brazil between 2008-2010, with multiple biochemical analytes being measured at a central laboratory. Quality control was ascertained through standard laboratory evaluation of intra- and inter-assay variability and test-retest analysis in a subset of randomly chosen participants. An additional sample of urine or blood was collected from these participants, and these samples were handled in the same manner as the original ones, locally and at the central laboratory. Reliability was assessed with the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), estimated through a random effects model. Coefficients of variation (CV) and Bland-Altman plots were additionally used to assess measurement variability. Laboratory intra and inter-assay CVs varied from 0.86% to 7.77%. From test-retest analyses, the ICCs were high for the majority of the analytes. Notably lower ICCs were observed for serum sodium (ICC=0.50; 95%CI=0.31-0.65) and serum potassium (ICC=0.73; 95%CI=0.60-0.83), due to the small biological range of these analytes. The CVs ranged from 1 to 14%. The Bland-Altman plots confirmed these results. The quality control analyses showed that the collection, processing and measurement protocols utilized in the ELSA-Brasil produced reliable biochemical measurements.

  19. Variability in baseline laboratory measurements of the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil)

    PubMed Central

    Ladwig, R.; Vigo, A.; Fedeli, L.M.G.; Chambless, L.E.; Bensenor, I.; Schmidt, M.I.; Vidigal, P.G.; Castilhos, C.D.; Duncan, B.B.

    2016-01-01

    Multi-center epidemiological studies must ascertain that their measurements are accurate and reliable. For laboratory measurements, reliability can be assessed through investigation of reproducibility of measurements in the same individual. In this paper, we present results from the quality control analysis of the baseline laboratory measurements from the ELSA-Brasil study. The study enrolled 15,105 civil servants at 6 research centers in 3 regions of Brazil between 2008–2010, with multiple biochemical analytes being measured at a central laboratory. Quality control was ascertained through standard laboratory evaluation of intra- and inter-assay variability and test-retest analysis in a subset of randomly chosen participants. An additional sample of urine or blood was collected from these participants, and these samples were handled in the same manner as the original ones, locally and at the central laboratory. Reliability was assessed with the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), estimated through a random effects model. Coefficients of variation (CV) and Bland-Altman plots were additionally used to assess measurement variability. Laboratory intra and inter-assay CVs varied from 0.86% to 7.77%. From test-retest analyses, the ICCs were high for the majority of the analytes. Notably lower ICCs were observed for serum sodium (ICC=0.50; 95%CI=0.31–0.65) and serum potassium (ICC=0.73; 95%CI=0.60–0.83), due to the small biological range of these analytes. The CVs ranged from 1 to 14%. The Bland-Altman plots confirmed these results. The quality control analyses showed that the collection, processing and measurement protocols utilized in the ELSA-Brasil produced reliable biochemical measurements. PMID:27533768

  20. An electrical load measurements dataset of United Kingdom households from a two-year longitudinal study

    PubMed Central

    Murray, David; Stankovic, Lina; Stankovic, Vladimir

    2017-01-01

    Smart meter roll-outs provide easy access to granular meter measurements, enabling advanced energy services, ranging from demand response measures, tailored energy feedback and smart home/building automation. To design such services, train and validate models, access to data that resembles what is expected of smart meters, collected in a real-world setting, is necessary. The REFIT electrical load measurements dataset described in this paper includes whole house aggregate loads and nine individual appliance measurements at 8-second intervals per house, collected continuously over a period of two years from 20 houses. During monitoring, the occupants were conducting their usual routines. At the time of publishing, the dataset has the largest number of houses monitored in the United Kingdom at less than 1-minute intervals over a period greater than one year. The dataset comprises 1,194,958,790 readings, that represent over 250,000 monitored appliance uses. The data is accessible in an easy-to-use comma-separated format, is time-stamped and cleaned to remove invalid measurements, correctly label appliance data and fill in small gaps of missing data. PMID:28055033

  1. Longitudinal Transient Elastography Measurements Used in Follow-up for Patients with Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Van Biervliet, Stephanie; Verdievel, Hugo; Vande Velde, Saskia; De Bruyne, Ruth; De Looze, Danny; Verhelst, Xavier; Geerts, Anja; Robberecht, Eddy; Van Vlierberghe, Hans

    2016-04-01

    Cystic fibrosis-related liver disease (CFLD) is diagnosed using a combination of criteria. Transient elastography (TE), an ultrasonographic method to evaluate liver stiffness, can differentiate patients with and without liver disease. This retrospective study (2007-2013) aimed to detect developing CFLD using consequent TE measurements. All cystic fibrosis patients with TE measurements between 2007 and 2013 (n = 150, median age 17 (9-24) y) were included, of which 118 had a median of three (range, 2-4) measurements with an interval of 1 (1-2) y. Twenty (14%) had CFLD at the first TE measurement; five (3%) developed CFLD during follow-up. The median TE value in CFLD was 14 kPa (8.7-32.2) compared with 5.3 (4.9-5.7) in cystic fibrosis patients without liver disease (CFnoLD; p = 0.0001). In CFnoLD, TE was correlated with age (p = 0.031). A TE result >6.8 kPa had a sensitivity of 91.5% and a specificity of 91.7% in predicting CFLD, according to the receiver operating characteristics analysis. It also has a positive predictive value of 88.6% and a negative predictive value of 86.9%, increasing to 91.7% and 98%, respectively, in patients at risk (<14 y) for developing CFLD. Patients with developing CFLD had progressively increasing consecutive TE measurements.

  2. An electrical load measurements dataset of United Kingdom households from a two-year longitudinal study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, David; Stankovic, Lina; Stankovic, Vladimir

    2017-01-01

    Smart meter roll-outs provide easy access to granular meter measurements, enabling advanced energy services, ranging from demand response measures, tailored energy feedback and smart home/building automation. To design such services, train and validate models, access to data that resembles what is expected of smart meters, collected in a real-world setting, is necessary. The REFIT electrical load measurements dataset described in this paper includes whole house aggregate loads and nine individual appliance measurements at 8-second intervals per house, collected continuously over a period of two years from 20 houses. During monitoring, the occupants were conducting their usual routines. At the time of publishing, the dataset has the largest number of houses monitored in the United Kingdom at less than 1-minute intervals over a period greater than one year. The dataset comprises 1,194,958,790 readings, that represent over 250,000 monitored appliance uses. The data is accessible in an easy-to-use comma-separated format, is time-stamped and cleaned to remove invalid measurements, correctly label appliance data and fill in small gaps of missing data.

  3. Increasing the sensitivity of NMR diffusion measurements by paramagnetic longitudinal relaxation enhancement, with application to ribosome–nascent chain complexes

    PubMed Central

    Cassaignau, Anaïs M. E.; Cabrita, Lisa D.

    2016-01-01

    The translational diffusion of macromolecules can be examined non-invasively by stimulated echo (STE) NMR experiments to accurately determine their molecular sizes. These measurements can be important probes of intermolecular interactions and protein folding and unfolding, and are crucial in monitoring the integrity of large macromolecular assemblies such as ribosome–nascent chain complexes (RNCs). However, NMR studies of these complexes can be severely constrained by their slow tumbling, low solubility (with maximum concentrations of up to 10 μM), and short lifetimes resulting in weak signal, and therefore continuing improvements in experimental sensitivity are essential. Here we explore the use of the paramagnetic longitudinal relaxation enhancement (PLRE) agent NiDO2A on the sensitivity of 15N XSTE and SORDID heteronuclear STE experiments, which can be used to monitor the integrity of these unstable complexes. We exploit the dependence of the PLRE effect on the gyromagnetic ratio and electronic relaxation time to accelerate recovery of 1H magnetization without adversely affecting storage on Nz during diffusion delays or introducing significant transverse relaxation line broadening. By applying the longitudinal relaxation-optimized SORDID pulse sequence together with NiDO2A to 70S Escherichia coli ribosomes and RNCs, NMR diffusion sensitivity enhancements of up to 4.5-fold relative to XSTE are achieved, alongside ~1.9-fold improvements in two-dimensional NMR sensitivity, without compromising the sample integrity. We anticipate these results will significantly advance the use of NMR to probe dynamic regions of ribosomes and other large, unstable macromolecular assemblies. PMID:26253948

  4. Why use automated office blood pressure measurements in clinical practice?

    PubMed

    Andreadis, Emmanuel A; Angelopoulos, Epameinondas T; Agaliotis, Gerasimos D; Tsakanikas, Athanasios P; Mousoulis, George P

    2011-09-01

    Automated office blood pressure (AOBP) measurement with the patient resting alone in a quiet examining room can eliminate the white-coat effect associated with conventional readings taken by manual sphygmomanometer. The key to reducing the white-coat response appears to be multiple blood pressure (BP) readings taken in a non-observer office setting, thus eliminating any interaction that could provoke an office-induced increase in BP. Furthermore, AOBP readings have shown a higher correlation with the mean awake ambulatory BP compared with BP readings recorded in routine clinical practice. Although there is a paucity of studies connecting AOBP with organ damage, AOBP values were recently found to be equally associated with left ventricular mass index as those of ambulatory BP. This concludes that in contrast to routine manual office BP, AOBP readings compare favourably with 24-hour ambulatory BP measurements in the appraisal of cardiac remodelling and, as such, could be complementary to ambulatory readings in a way similar to home BP measurements.

  5. Longitudinal Study of a Novel, Performance-based Measure of Everyday Functional Competence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-01

    transitional stage between CNS health and Alzheimer’s disease (AD); it is thought to be an important locus for intervention, since both cognitive impairment...for this discrepancy might be that the measures commonly used to rate function were designed to assess disability in various stages of AD and so

  6. Longitudinal Approaches to Stages of Change Measurement: Effects on Cognitive and Behavioral Physical Activity Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Philip D.; Martin, Andrew J.; Martinez, Carissa; Marsh, Herbert W.; Jackson, Susan

    2010-01-01

    The transition from school to further education and work is one of immense change that impacts physical activity attitudes and engagement in adulthood. The Stages of Change (SOC) model, which resides under the transtheoretical framework, has been proposed as one way to measure and evaluate physical activity uptake and maintenance. The current…

  7. Measuring Knowledge Integration Learning of Energy Topics: A Two-Year Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Ou Lydia; Ryoo, Kihyun; Linn, Marcia C.; Sato, Elissa; Svihla, Vanessa

    2015-01-01

    Although researchers call for inquiry learning in science, science assessments rarely capture the impact of inquiry instruction. This paper reports on the development and validation of assessments designed to measure middle-school students' progress in gaining integrated understanding of energy while studying an inquiry-oriented curriculum. The…

  8. Measuring Meaningful Learning in the Undergraduate General Chemistry and Organic Chemistry Laboratories: A Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galloway, Kelli R.; Bretz, Stacey Lowery

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how students learn in the undergraduate chemistry teaching laboratory is an essential component to developing evidence-based laboratory curricula. The Meaningful Learning in the Laboratory Instrument (MLLI) was developed to measure students' cognitive and affective expectations and experiences for learning in the chemistry…

  9. Longitudinal Prediction of Child Outcomes from Differing Measures of Parenting in a Low-Income Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaslow, Martha J.; Weinfield, Nancy S.; Gallagher, Megan; Hair, Elizabeth C.; Ogawa, John R.; Egeland, Byron; Tabors, Patton O.; De Temple, Jeanne M.

    2006-01-01

    This study examined predictions from preschool parenting measures to middle childhood cognitive and socioemotional child outcomes to explore whether parenting assessment methodologies that require more time, training, and expense yield better predictions of child outcomes than less intensive methodologies. Mother-child dyads (N=278) in low-income…

  10. Measuring parent food practices: a systematic review of existing measures and examination of instruments.

    PubMed

    Vaughn, Amber E; Tabak, Rachel G; Bryant, Maria J; Ward, Dianne S

    2013-05-20

    During the last decade, there has been a rapid increase in development of instruments to measure parent food practices. Because these instruments often measure different constructs, or define common constructs differently, an evaluation of these instruments is needed. A systematic review of the literature was conducted to identify existing measures of parent food practices and to assess the quality of their development. The initial search used terms capturing home environment, parenting behaviors, feeding practices and eating behaviors, and was performed in October of 2009 using PubMed/Medline, PsychInfo, Web of knowledge (ISI), and ERIC, and updated in July of 2012. A review of titles and abstracts was used to narrow results, after which full articles were retrieved and reviewed. Only articles describing development of measures of parenting food practices designed for families with children 2-12 years old were retained for the current review. For each article, two reviewers extracted data and appraised the quality of processes used for instrument development and evaluation. The initial search yielded 28,378 unique titles; review of titles and abstracts narrowed the pool to 1,352 articles; from which 57 unique instruments were identified. The review update yielded 1,772 new titles from which14 additional instruments were identified. The extraction and appraisal process found that 49% of instruments clearly identified and defined concepts to be measured, and 46% used theory to guide instrument development. Most instruments (80%) had some reliability testing, with internal consistency being the most common (79%). Test-retest or inter-rater reliability was reported for less than half the instruments. Some form of validity evidence was reported for 84% of instruments. Construct validity was most commonly presented (86%), usually with analysis of associations with child diet or weight/BMI. While many measures of food parenting practices have emerged, particularly in

  11. Measuring parent food practices: a systematic review of existing measures and examination of instruments

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    During the last decade, there has been a rapid increase in development of instruments to measure parent food practices. Because these instruments often measure different constructs, or define common constructs differently, an evaluation of these instruments is needed. A systematic review of the literature was conducted to identify existing measures of parent food practices and to assess the quality of their development. The initial search used terms capturing home environment, parenting behaviors, feeding practices and eating behaviors, and was performed in October of 2009 using PubMed/Medline, PsychInfo, Web of knowledge (ISI), and ERIC, and updated in July of 2012. A review of titles and abstracts was used to narrow results, after which full articles were retrieved and reviewed. Only articles describing development of measures of parenting food practices designed for families with children 2-12 years old were retained for the current review. For each article, two reviewers extracted data and appraised the quality of processes used for instrument development and evaluation. The initial search yielded 28,378 unique titles; review of titles and abstracts narrowed the pool to 1,352 articles; from which 57 unique instruments were identified. The review update yielded 1,772 new titles from which14 additional instruments were identified. The extraction and appraisal process found that 49% of instruments clearly identified and defined concepts to be measured, and 46% used theory to guide instrument development. Most instruments (80%) had some reliability testing, with internal consistency being the most common (79%). Test-retest or inter-rater reliability was reported for less than half the instruments. Some form of validity evidence was reported for 84% of instruments. Construct validity was most commonly presented (86%), usually with analysis of associations with child diet or weight/BMI. While many measures of food parenting practices have emerged, particularly in

  12. Accuracy and repeatability of Roentgen stereophotogrammetric analysis (RSA) for measuring knee laxity in longitudinal studies.

    PubMed

    Fleming, B C; Peura, G D; Abate, J A; Beynnon, B D

    2001-10-01

    Roentgen stereophotogrammetric analysis (RSA) can be used to assess temporal changes in anterior-posterior (A-P) knee laxity. However, the accuracy and precision of RSA is dependent on many factors and should be independently evaluated for a particular application. The objective of this study was to evaluate the use of RSA for measuring A-P knee laxity. The specific aims were to assess the variation or "noise" inherent to RSA, to determine the reproducibility of RSA for repeated A-P laxity testing, and to assess the accuracy of these measurements. Two experiments were performed. The first experiment utilized three rigid models of the tibiofemoral joint to assess the noise and to compare digitization errors of two independent examiners. No differences were found in the kinematic outputs of the RSA due to examiner, repeated trials, or the model used. In a second experiment, A-P laxity values between the A-P shear load limits of +/-60 N of five cadaver goat knees were measured to assess the error associated with repeated testing. The RSA laxity values were also compared to those obtained from a custom designed linkage system. The mean A-P laxity values with the knee 30 degrees, 60 degrees, and 90 degrees of flexion for the ACL-intact goat knee (+/-95% confidence interval) were 0.8 (+/-0.25), 0.9 (+/-0.29), and 0.4 (+/-0.22) mm, respectively. In the ACL-deficient knee, the A-P laxity values increased by an order of magnitude to 8.8 (+/-1.39), 7.6 (+/-1.32), and 3.1 (+/-1.20)mm, respectively. No significant differences were found between the A-P laxity values measured by RSA and the independent measurement technique. A highly significant linear relationship (r(2)=0.83) was also found between these techniques. This study suggests that the RSA method is an accurate and precise means to measure A-P knee laxity for repeated testing over time.

  13. Development and Validation of Army Selection and Classification Measures. Project A. Longitudinal Research Database Plan

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-12-01

    sound, and economical measures of these additional aspects of performance are not currently available. In addition to valid predictions of performance...Project A and the data to be acquired from existing Army files must be organized and stored in such a way that they are simple and economical to access...Census) data files containing information on local geographic or economic conditions. A1HOMADD STATE/COUNTY CODE OF HOME ADDRESS AIHOMZIP HOME ZIP

  14. The Impact of Social Media on Dissemination and Implementation of Clinical Practice Guidelines: A Longitudinal Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Gronseth, Gary; Dubinsky, Richard; Penfold-Murray, Rebecca; Cox, Julie; Bever Jr, Christopher; Martins, Yolanda; Rheaume, Carol; Shouse, Denise; Getchius, Thomas SD

    2015-01-01

    Background Evidence-based clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) are statements that provide recommendations to optimize patient care for a specific clinical problem or question. Merely reading a guideline rarely leads to implementation of recommendations. The American Academy of Neurology (AAN) has a formal process of guideline development and dissemination. The last few years have seen a burgeoning of social media such as Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn, and newer methods of dissemination such as podcasts and webinars. The role of these media in guideline dissemination has not been studied. Systematic evaluation of dissemination methods and comparison of the effectiveness of newer methods with traditional methods is not available. It is also not known whether specific dissemination methods may be more effectively targeted to specific audiences. Objective Our aim was to (1) develop an innovative dissemination strategy by adding social media-based dissemination methods to traditional methods for the AAN clinical practice guidelines “Complementary and alternative medicine in multiple sclerosis” (“CAM in MS”) and (2) evaluate whether the addition of social media outreach improves awareness of the CPG and knowledge of CPG recommendations, and affects implementation of those recommendations. Methods Outcomes were measured by four surveys in each of the two target populations: patients and physicians/clinicians (“physicians”). The primary outcome was the difference in participants’ intent to discuss use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) with their physicians or patients, respectively, after novel dissemination, as compared with that after traditional dissemination. Secondary outcomes were changes in awareness of the CPG, knowledge of CPG content, and behavior regarding CAM use in multiple sclerosis (MS). Results Response rates were 25.08% (622/2480) for physicians and 43.5% (348/800) for patients. Awareness of the CPG increased after traditional

  15. Automated cross-sectional and longitudinal hippocampal volume measurement in mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Kelvin K.; Barnes, Josephine; Ridgway, Gerard R.; Bartlett, Jonathan W.; Clarkson, Matthew J.; Macdonald, Kate; Schuff, Norbert; Fox, Nick C.; Ourselin, Sebastien

    2010-01-01

    Volume and change in volume of the hippocampus are both important markers of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Delineation of the structure on MRI is time-consuming and therefore reliable automated methods are required. We describe an improvement (multiple-atlas propagation and segmentation (MAPS)) to our template library-based segmentation technique. The improved technique uses non-linear registration of the best-matched templates from our manually-segmented library to generate multiple segmentations and combines them using the simultaneous truth and performance level estimation (STAPLE) algorithm. Change in volume over 12 months (MAPS-HBSI) was measured by applying the boundary shift integral using MAPS regions. Methods were developed and validated against manual measures using subsets from Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI). The best method was applied to 682 ADNI subjects, at baseline and 12-month follow-up, enabling assessment of volumes and atrophy rates in control, mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and AD groups, and within MCI subgroups classified by subsequent clinical outcome. We compared our measures with those generated by SNT (Surgical Navigation Technologies) available from ADNI. The accuracy of our volumes was one of the highest reported (mean(SD) Jaccard Index 0.80(0.04) (N=30)). Both MAPS baseline volume and MAPS-HBSI atrophy rate distinguished between control, MCI and AD groups. Comparing MCI subgroups (reverters, stable and converters): volumes were lower and rates higher in converters compared with stable and reverter groups (p≤0.03). MAPS-HBSI required the lowest sample sizes (68 subjects) for a hypothetical trial. In conclusion, the MAPS and MAPS-HBSI methods give accurate and reliable volumes and atrophy rates across the clinical spectrum from healthy aging to AD. PMID:20230901

  16. Development and Evaluation of Laser Doppler Techniques for Measurements of Flexural and Longitudinal Structural Intensity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-10-01

    investigation they excited a ribbed plate with broadband random noise with the intent of measuring intensity. This was freely suspended by a bungee ...kHz. This is certainly true down to a CNR value of 42 dB. At 37 dB, however, the 1 kHz noise value jumps by roughly the same amount as was undergone by...demodulated output when the input FM signal has phase ramps and phase jumps caused by speckle transverse motion and speckle "boiling." PLL response may

  17. A method for eliminating Faraday rotation in cryostat windows in longitudinal magneto-optical Kerr effect measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Polewko-Klim, A. Uba, S.; Uba, L.

    2014-07-15

    A solution to the problem of disturbing effect of the background Faraday rotation in the cryostat windows on longitudinal magneto-optical Kerr effect (LMOKE) measured under vacuum conditions and/or at low temperatures is proposed. The method for eliminating the influence of Faraday rotation in cryostat windows is based on special arrangement of additional mirrors placed on sample holder. In this arrangement, the orientation of the cryostat window is perpendicular to the light beam direction and parallel to an external magnetic field generated by the H-frame electromagnet. The operation of the LMOKE magnetometer with the special sample holder based on polarization modulation technique with a photo-elastic modulator is theoretically analyzed with the use of Jones matrices, and formulas for evaluating of the actual Kerr rotation and ellipticity of the sample are derived. The feasibility of the method and good performance of the magnetometer is experimentally demonstrated for the LMOKE effect measured in Fe/Au multilayer structures. The influence of imperfect alignment of the magnetometer setup on the Kerr angles, as derived theoretically through the analytic model and verified experimentally, is examined and discussed.

  18. A method for eliminating Faraday rotation in cryostat windows in longitudinal magneto-optical Kerr effect measurements.

    PubMed

    Polewko-Klim, A; Uba, S; Uba, L

    2014-07-01

    A solution to the problem of disturbing effect of the background Faraday rotation in the cryostat windows on longitudinal magneto-optical Kerr effect (LMOKE) measured under vacuum conditions and/or at low temperatures is proposed. The method for eliminating the influence of Faraday rotation in cryostat windows is based on special arrangement of additional mirrors placed on sample holder. In this arrangement, the orientation of the cryostat window is perpendicular to the light beam direction and parallel to an external magnetic field generated by the H-frame electromagnet. The operation of the LMOKE magnetometer with the special sample holder based on polarization modulation technique with a photo-elastic modulator is theoretically analyzed with the use of Jones matrices, and formulas for evaluating of the actual Kerr rotation and ellipticity of the sample are derived. The feasibility of the method and good performance of the magnetometer is experimentally demonstrated for the LMOKE effect measured in Fe/Au multilayer structures. The influence of imperfect alignment of the magnetometer setup on the Kerr angles, as derived theoretically through the analytic model and verified experimentally, is examined and discussed.

  19. CROSS-SECTIONAL AND LONGITUDINAL MEASUREMENTS OF NEIGHBORHOOD EXPERIENCE AND THEIR EFFECTS ON CHILDREN*

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Margot I.; Mare, Robert D.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the abundance of research on neighborhoods’ effects on children, most studies of neighborhood effects are cross-sectional, rendering them unable to depict the dynamic nature of social life, and obscuring important aspects of community processes and outcomes. This study uses residential histories from the Los Angeles Family and Neighborhood Survey and the Child Development Supplement of the Panel Study of Income Dynamics to explore two questions: 1) How much do residential mobility and neighborhood change contribute to the overall socioeconomic variation in children’s neighborhoods? 2) Does measuring community factors at more than one point in time matter for the conclusions that we draw from research on “neighborhood effects” on children’s behavioral, cognitive and health-related well-being? Residential mobility plays a non-trivial role over the period of childhood in determining children’s exposure to neighborhoods of different economic types. However, quantitative estimates of neighborhood effects that allow neighborhood characteristics to vary through residential mobility and neighborhood change do not depict a strikingly different picture from cross-sectional estimates. Children do not experience enough variation in their local surroundings to produce meaningful differences between static and dynamic measurements of neighborhoods. We also uncover interesting regional and race/ethnic differences in neighborhood dynamics and neighborhood effects. PMID:25197150

  20. Simultaneous measurement of longitudinal and lateral piezoelectric strain coefficients using digital image correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malakooti, Mohammad H.; Sodano, Henry A.

    2013-04-01

    Here, Digital image correlation (DIC) is demonstrated to be an accurate tool for the noncontact, non-destructive and rapid characterization of the converse piezoelectric effect in bulk and thin films. The out-of-plane (d33) and in-plane (d31) piezoelectric strain coupling coefficients of PZT- 5H wafers are measured simultaneously by imaging the wafer's cross section under free mechanical boundary conditions. The large piezoresponse at switching domains and nonlinear behavior of PZT-5H are visualized in strain-electric field butterfly loops. The results show DIC as a simple advantageous technique to use for the characterization of piezoelectric materials under the influence of any field and physical constraints.

  1. Pre- and Postnatal Polychlorinated Biphenyl Concentrations and Longitudinal Measures of Thymus Volume in Infants

    PubMed Central

    Sonneborn, Dean; Palkovicova, Lubica; Kocan, Anton; Drobna, Beata; Trnovec, Tomas; Hertz-Picciotto, Irva

    2012-01-01

    Background: Previously, we reported an association between higher maternal polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) concentrations and smaller thymus volume in newborns in a birth cohort residing in eastern Slovakia. Objective: In the present report we address whether thymus volume at later ages is influenced by prenatal and early postnatal PCB exposure. Methods: At the time of delivery, 1,134 mother–infant pairs were enrolled. Maternal and 6- and 16-month infant blood samples were collected and analyzed for 15 PCB congeners. Thymus volume was measured in infants shortly after birth and at ages 6 and 16 months using ultrasonography. Results: Higher maternal PCB concentration was associated with reduced thymus volume at birth [a 0.21 SD reduction in thymus volume for an increase in total maternal PCB concentration from the 10th to the 90th percentile; 95% confidence interval (CI): –0.37, –0.05], whereas maternal PCB concentration was not predictive of 6- and 16-month thymus volume. Six-month infant PCB concentration was associated with a 0.40 SD decrease in 6-month thymus volume (95% CI: –0.76, –0.04). There was also some suggestion that thymus volume at 16 months was positively associated with concurrent infant PCB concentration. Conclusions: The potential adverse effects of in utero PCB exposure on thymic development may extend beyond the neonatal period. Results from this highly exposed cohort provide suggestive evidence that postnatal PCB concentrations may be influential, but a smaller set of 6-month PCB measurements limited statistical power at that time point. Implications regarding impaired immunologic maturation or long-term clinical implications remain to be determined. PMID:22275729

  2. Changes in Veterinary Students' Attitudes Toward the Rural Environment and Rural Veterinary Practice: A Longitudinal Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Hashizume, Cary T; Woloschuk, Wayne; Hecker, Kent G

    2015-01-01

    There is a paucity of research regarding veterinary students' attitudes toward the rural environment and rural veterinary practice and how these attitudes might change over the course of a veterinary medicine program that includes rural clinical experience. Using a 23-item questionnaire, attitudes toward rural lifestyle, rural work-life balance, opportunities for career and skill development in rural veterinary practice, and inter-professional teamwork in the rural environment were assessed at the beginning and completion of a four-year veterinary medicine program. Eighty-six students (74.4% female) were included in this Canadian study over a six-year period. Thirty-one participants (36.1%) were rural students. Overall, students' attitudes toward the rural lifestyle, rural work-life balance, and inter-professional teamwork in rural veterinary practice all significantly decreased (p<.001) over the course of the program. As compared to urban students, rural students had significantly higher rural lifestyle scores at both the beginning (p<.001) and end (p<.01) of the veterinary medicine program. A less positive attitude toward living and working in a rural environment could influence students to exclude rural veterinary practice as a career choice. Rural clinical experiences designed to sustain or increase veterinary student interest in rural practice may not be sufficient to support positive rural attitudes. Given the demand for rural veterinary services in developed countries, the implications of this study may extend beyond Canada.

  3. The World Health Organization Fetal Growth Charts: A Multinational Longitudinal Study of Ultrasound Biometric Measurements and Estimated Fetal Weight

    PubMed Central

    Carroli, Guillermo; Widmer, Mariana; Neerup Jensen, Lisa; Giordano, Daniel; Abdel Aleem, Hany; Talegawkar, Sameera A.; Benachi, Alexandra; Diemert, Anke; Tshefu Kitoto, Antoinette; Thinkhamrop, Jadsada; Lumbiganon, Pisake; Tabor, Ann; Kriplani, Alka; Gonzalez Perez, Rogelio; Hecher, Kurt; Hanson, Mark A.; Gülmezoglu, A. Metin; Platt, Lawrence D.

    2017-01-01

    Background Perinatal mortality and morbidity continue to be major global health challenges strongly associated with prematurity and reduced fetal growth, an issue of further interest given the mounting evidence that fetal growth in general is linked to degrees of risk of common noncommunicable diseases in adulthood. Against this background, WHO made it a high priority to provide the present fetal growth charts for estimated fetal weight (EFW) and common ultrasound biometric measurements intended for worldwide use. Methods and Findings We conducted a multinational prospective observational longitudinal study of fetal growth in low-risk singleton pregnancies of women of high or middle socioeconomic status and without known environmental constraints on fetal growth. Centers in ten countries (Argentina, Brazil, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Denmark, Egypt, France, Germany, India, Norway, and Thailand) recruited participants who had reliable information on last menstrual period and gestational age confirmed by crown–rump length measured at 8–13 wk of gestation. Participants had anthropometric and nutritional assessments and seven scheduled ultrasound examinations during pregnancy. Fifty-two participants withdrew consent, and 1,387 participated in the study. At study entry, median maternal age was 28 y (interquartile range [IQR] 25–31), median height was 162 cm (IQR 157–168), median weight was 61 kg (IQR 55–68), 58% of the women were nulliparous, and median daily caloric intake was 1,840 cal (IQR 1,487–2,222). The median pregnancy duration was 39 wk (IQR 38–40) although there were significant differences between countries, the largest difference being 12 d (95% CI 8–16). The median birthweight was 3,300 g (IQR 2,980–3,615). There were differences in birthweight between countries, e.g., India had significantly smaller neonates than the other countries, even after adjusting for gestational age. Thirty-one women had a miscarriage, and three fetuses had

  4. Measurement of R = {sigma}{sub L}/{sigma}{sub T} and the Separated Longitudinal and Transverse Structure Functions in the Nucleon Resonance Region

    SciTech Connect

    Yongguang Liang; Michael Christy; Abdellah Ahmidouch; Christopher Armstrong; John Arrington; Arshak Asaturyan; Steven Avery; O. Baker; Douglas Beck; Henk Blok; C.W. Bochna; Werner Boeglin; Peter Bosted; Maurice Bouwhuis; Herbert Breuer; Daniel Brown; Antje Bruell; Roger Carlini; Jinseok Cha; Nicholas Chant; Anthony Cochran; Leon Cole; Samuel Danagoulian; Donal Day; James Dunne; Dipangkar Dutta; Rolf Ent; Howard Fenker; B. Fox; Liping Gan; Haiyan Gao; Kenneth Garrow; David Gaskell; Ashot Gasparian; Don Geesaman; Ronald Gilman; Paul Gueye; Mark Harvey; Roy Holt; Xiaodong Jiang; Mark Jones; Cynthia Keppel; Edward Kinney; Wolfgang Lorenzon; Allison Lung; David Mack; Pete Markowitz; J.W. Martin; Kevin McIlhany; Daniella Mckee; David Meekins; M.A. Miller; Richard Milner; Joseph Mitchell; Hamlet Mkrtchyan; Robert Mueller; Alan Nathan; Gabriel Niculescu; Maria-Ioana Niculescu; Thomas O'neill; Vassilios Papavassiliou; Stephen Pate; Rodney Piercey; David Potterveld; Ronald Ransome; Joerg Reinhold; E. Rollinde; Oscar Rondon-Aramayo; Philip Roos; Adam Sarty; Reyad Sawafta; Elaine Schulte; Edwin Segbefia; C. Smith; Samuel Stepanyan; Steffen Strauch; Vardan Tadevosyan; Liguang Tang; Raphael Tieulent; Vladas Tvaskis; Alicia Uzzle; William Vulcan; Stephen Wood; Feng Xiong; Lulin Yuan; Markus Zeier; Benedikt Zihlmann; Vitaliy Ziskin

    2004-10-01

    We report on a detailed study of longitudinal strength in the nucleon resonance region, presenting new results from inclusive electron-proton cross sections measured at Jefferson Lab Hall C in the four-momentum transfer range 0.2 < Q{sup 2} < 5.5 GeV{sup 2}. The data have been used to accurately perform over 170 Rosenbluth-type longitudinal/transverse separations. The precision R = {sigma}{sub L}/{sigma}{sub T} data are presented here, along with the first separate values of the inelastic structure functions F{sub 1} and F{sub L} in this regime. The resonance longitudinal component is found to be significant. With the new data, quark-hadron duality is observed above Q{sup 2} = 1 GeV{sup 2} in the separated structure functions independently.

  5. Adaptive Quantification and Longitudinal Analysis of Pulmonary Emphysema with a Hidden Markov Measure Field Model

    PubMed Central

    Häme, Yrjö; Angelini, Elsa D.; Hoffman, Eric A.; Barr, R. Graham; Laine, Andrew F.

    2014-01-01

    The extent of pulmonary emphysema is commonly estimated from CT images by computing the proportional area of voxels below a predefined attenuation threshold. However, the reliability of this approach is limited by several factors that affect the CT intensity distributions in the lung. This work presents a novel method for emphysema quantification, based on parametric modeling of intensity distributions in the lung and a hidden Markov measure field model to segment emphysematous regions. The framework adapts to the characteristics of an image to ensure a robust quantification of emphysema under varying CT imaging protocols and differences in parenchymal intensity distributions due to factors such as inspiration level. Compared to standard approaches, the present model involves a larger number of parameters, most of which can be estimated from data, to handle the variability encountered in lung CT scans. The method was used to quantify emphysema on a cohort of 87 subjects, with repeated CT scans acquired over a time period of 8 years using different imaging protocols. The scans were acquired approximately annually, and the data set included a total of 365 scans. The results show that the emphysema estimates produced by the proposed method have very high intra-subject correlation values. By reducing sensitivity to changes in imaging protocol, the method provides a more robust estimate than standard approaches. In addition, the generated emphysema delineations promise great advantages for regional analysis of emphysema extent and progression, possibly advancing disease subtyping. PMID:24759984

  6. Graphic Methods for Interpreting Longitudinal Dyadic Patterns From Repeated-Measures Actor-Partner Interdependence Models.

    PubMed

    Perry, Nicholas S; Baucom, Katherine J W; Bourne, Stacia; Butner, Jonathan; Crenshaw, Alexander O; Hogan, Jasara N; Imel, Zac E; Wiltshire, Travis J; Baucom, Brian R W

    2017-02-27

    Researchers commonly use repeated-measures actor-partner interdependence models (RM-APIM) to understand how romantic partners change in relation to one another over time. However, traditional interpretations of the results of these models do not fully or correctly capture the dyadic temporal patterns estimated in RM-APIM. Interpretation of results from these models largely focuses on the meaning of single-parameter estimates in isolation from all the others. However, considering individual coefficients separately impedes the understanding of how these associations combine to produce an interdependent pattern that emerges over time. Additionally, positive within-person, or actor, effects are commonly misinterpreted as indicating growth from one time point to the next when they actually represent decline. We suggest that change-as-outcome RM-APIMs and vector field diagrams (VFDs) can be used to improve the understanding and presentation of dyadic patterns of association described by standard RM-APIMs. The current article briefly reviews the conceptual foundations of RM-APIMs, demonstrates how change-as-outcome RM-APIMs and VFDs can aid interpretation of standard RM-APIMs, and provides a tutorial in making VFDs using multilevel modeling. (PsycINFO Database Record

  7. Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Measurement in Renal Transplantation: A Prospective, Longitudinal Study With Protocol Biopsies.

    PubMed

    Lee, Juhan; Oh, Young Taik; Joo, Dong Jin; Ma, Bo Gyoung; Lee, A-lan; Lee, Jae Geun; Song, Seung Hwan; Kim, Seung Up; Jung, Dae Chul; Chung, Yong Eun; Kim, Yu Seun

    2015-09-01

    Interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy (IF/TA) is a common cause of kidney allograft loss. Several noninvasive techniques developed to assess tissue fibrosis are widely used to examine the liver. However, relatively few studies have investigated the use of elastographic methods to assess transplanted kidneys. The aim of this study was to explore the clinical implications of the acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) technique in renal transplant patients. A total of 91 patients who underwent living donor renal transplantation between September 2010 and January 2013 were included in this prospective study. Shear wave velocity (SWV) was measured by ARFI at baseline and predetermined time points (1 week and 6 and 12 months after transplantation). Protocol biopsies were performed at 12 months. Instead of reflecting IF/TA, SWVs were found to be related to time elapsed after transplantation. Mean SWV increased continuously during the first postoperative year (P < 0.001). In addition, mixed model analysis showed no correlation existed between SWV and serum creatinine (r = -0.2426, P = 0.0771). There was also no evidence of a relationship between IF/TA and serum creatinine (odds ratio [OR] = 1.220, P = 0.7648). Furthermore, SWV temporal patterns were dependent on the kidney weight to body weight ratio (KW/BW). In patients with a KW/BW < 3.5 g/kg, mean SWV continuously increased for 12 months, whereas it decreased after 6 months in those with a KW/BW ≥ 3.5 g/kg.No significant correlation was observed between SWV and IF/TA or renal dysfunction. However, SWV was found to be related to the time after transplantation. Renal hemodynamics influenced by KW/BW might impact SWV values.

  8. Healthcare improvement as planned system change or complex responsive processes? a longitudinal case study in general practice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Interest in how to implement evidence-based practices into routine health care has never been greater. Primary care faces challenges in managing the increasing burden of chronic disease in an ageing population. Reliable prescriptions for translating knowledge into practice, however, remain elusive, despite intense research and publication activity. This study seeks to explore this dilemma in general practice by challenging the current way of thinking about healthcare improvement and asking what can be learned by looking at change through a complexity lens. Methods This paper reports the local level of an embedded case study of organisational change for better chronic illness care over more than a decade. We used interviews, document review and direct observation to explore how improved chronic illness care developed in one practice. This formed a critical case to compare, using pattern matching logic, to the common prescription for local implementation of best evidence and a rival explanation drawn from complexity sciences interpreted through modern sociology and psychology. Results The practice changed continuously over more than a decade to deliver better chronic illness care in line with research findings and policy initiatives – re-designing care processes, developing community linkages, supporting patient self-management, using guidelines and clinical information systems, and integrating nurses into the practice team. None of these improvements was designed and implemented according to an explicit plan in response to a documented gap in chronic disease care. The process that led to high quality chronic illness care exhibited clear complexity elements of co-evolution, non-linearity, self-organisation, emergence and edge of chaos dynamics in a network of agents and relationships where a stable yet evolving way of organizing emerged from local level communicative interaction, power relating and values based choices. Conclusions The current discourse

  9. Longitudinal Inter-Comparison of Modeled and Measured West Greenland Ice Sheet Meltwater Runoff Losses (2004-2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moustafa, S.; Rennermalm, A. K.; Tedesco, M.; Mote, T. L.; Koenig, L.; Smith, L. C.; Hagedorn, B.; Overeem, I.; Sletten, R. S.; Mikkelsen, A. B.; Hasholt, B.; Hall, D. K.

    2015-12-01

    Increased surface meltwater runoff, that exits the Greenland ice sheet (GrIS) margin via supra-, en-, and sub-glacial drainage networks into fjords, pro-glacial lakes and rivers, accounts for half or more of total mass loss. Despite its importance, modeled meltwater runoff fluxes are poorly constrained, primarily due to a lack of direct in situ observations. Here, we present the first ever longitudinal (north-south) inter-comparison of a multi-year dataset (2004-2014) of discharge for four drainage basins - Watson, Akuliarusiarsuup Kuua, Naujat Kuat, and North Rivers - along West Greenland. These in situ hydrologic measurements are compared with modeled runoff output from Modèle Atmosphérique Régional (MAR) regional climate model, and the performance of the model is examined. An analysis of the relationship between modeled and actual ice sheet runoff patterns is assessed, and provides insight into the model's ability to capture inter-annual and intra-annual variability, spatiotemporal patterns, and extreme melt events. This study's findings will inform future development and parameterization of ice sheet surface mass balance models.

  10. A Preference Based Measure of Complementary Feeding Quality: Application to the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children

    PubMed Central

    Mittinty, Murthy N.; Golley, Rebecca K.; Smithers, Lisa G.; Brazionis, Laima; Lynch, John W.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the development of the Complementary Feeding Utility Index (CFUI), a composite index aimed to measure adherence to infant feeding guidelines. Through an axiomatic characterization this paper shows the advantages in using the CFUI are the following: it avoids the use of arbitrary cut-offs, and by converting observed diet preferences into utilities, summing the score is meaningful. In addition, as the CFUI is designed to be scored continuously, it allows the transition from intake of beneficial foods (in low quantities) and intake of detrimental foods (in high quantities) to be more subtle. The paper first describes the rationale being the development of the CFUI and then elaborates on the methodology used to develop the CFUI, including the process of selecting the components. The methodology is applied to data collected from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children to show the advantages of the CFUI over traditional diet index approaches. Unlike traditional approaches, the distribution of the CFUI does not peak towards mean value but distributes evenly towards the tails of the distribution. PMID:24155886

  11. Measurement of parity-violating spin asymmetries in W± production at midrapidity in longitudinally polarized p+p collisions

    DOE PAGES

    Adare, A.

    2016-03-23

    In this article, we present midrapidity measurements from the PHENIX experiment of large parity-violating single-spin asymmetries of high transverse momentum electrons and positrons from W±/Z decays, produced in longitudinally polarized p+p collisions at center of mass energies of √s=500 and 510 GeV. These asymmetries allow direct access to the antiquark polarized parton distribution functions due to the parity-violating nature of the W-boson coupling to quarks and antiquarks. The results presented are based on data collected in 2011, 2012, and 2013 with an integrated luminosity of 240 pb-1, which exceeds previous PHENIX published results by a factor of more than 27.more » In addition, these high Q2 data probe the parton structure of the proton at W mass scale and provide an important addition to our understanding of the antiquark parton helicity distribution functions at an intermediate Bjorken x value of roughly MW/√s=0.16.« less

  12. Measurement of Longitudinal β-Amyloid Change with 18F-Florbetapir PET and Standardized Uptake Value Ratios

    PubMed Central

    Landau, Susan M.; Fero, Allison; Baker, Suzanne L.; Koeppe, Robert; Mintun, Mark; Chen, Kewei; Reiman, Eric M.; Jagust, William J.

    2017-01-01

    The accurate measurement of β-amyloid (Aβ) change using amyloid PET imaging is important for Alzheimer disease research and clinical trials but poses several unique challenges. In particular, reference region measurement instability may lead to spurious changes in cortical regions of interest. To optimize our ability to measure 18F-florbetapir longitudinal change, we evaluated several candidate regions of interest and their influence on cortical florbetapir change over a 2-y period in participants from the Alzheimer Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI). Methods We examined the agreement in cortical florbetapir change detected using 6 candidate reference regions (cerebellar gray matter, whole cerebellum, brain stem/pons, eroded subcortical white matter [WM], and 2 additional combinations of these regions) in 520 ADNI subjects. We used concurrent cerebrospinal fluid Aβ1–42 measurements to identify subgroups of ADNI subjects expected to remain stable over follow-up (stable Aβ group; n = 14) and subjects expected to increase (increasing Aβ group; n = 91). We then evaluated reference regions according to whether cortical change was minimal in the stable Aβ group and cortical retention increased in the increasing Aβ group. Results There was poor agreement across reference regions in the amount of cortical change observed across all 520 ADNI subjects. Within the stable Aβ group, however, cortical florbetapir change was 1%–2% across all reference regions, indicating high consistency. In the increasing Aβ group, cortical increases were significant with all reference regions. Reference regions containing WM (as opposed to cerebellum or pons) enabled detection of cortical change that was more physiologically plausible and more likely to increase over time. Conclusion Reference region selection has an important influence on the detection of florbetapir change. Compared with cerebellum or pons alone, reference regions that included subcortical WM resulted in

  13. Longitudinal measures of perfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) in serum of Gullah African Americans in South Carolina: 2003–2013

    PubMed Central

    Gribble, Matthew O.; Bartell, Scott M.; Kannan, Kurunthachalam; Wu, Qian; Fair, Patricia A.; Kamen, Diane L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Charleston Harbor has elevated concentrations of PFAS in dolphins, but local human exposure data are limited. Objectives We sought to describe PFAS serum concentrations’ temporal trends among Gullah African American residents of coastal South Carolina. Methods Longitudinal measures of PFAS in blood serum from a Gullah clinical sample, without lupus, were examined using spaghetti plots and visit-to-visit change scores (e.g., differences in concentrations between visits) among the 68 participants with repeated measures available. We also modeled population-level trends among the 71 participants with any data using proportionate percentile models, accounting for clustering through robust standard errors. In a post-hoc analysis we examined heterogeneity of temporal trends by age through mixed-effects models for the log-transformed PFAS compounds. Results Population concentrations of PFOS dropped approximately 9 (95% CI: 8, 10) percent each year over 2003–2013. This was concordant with individual PFOS trajectories (median PFOS change score −21.7 ng/g wet weight, interquartile range of PFOS change scores: −32.8, −14.9) and reports for other populations over this time period. Several other compounds including PFOA, PFHxS, and PFuNDA also showed a population-level decrease. However, examination of individual trajectories suggested substantial heterogeneity. Post-hoc analyses indicated that PFAS trajectories were heterogeneous by age. Conclusions Many PFAS compounds are decreasing in a sample of Gullah African Americans from coastal South Carolina. There may be age differences in the elimination kinetics of PFASs. The possible role of age as a modifier of PFAS serum trends merits further research. PMID:25819541

  14. The Effectiveness of Software Project Management Practices: A Quantitative Measurement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-01

    management than most 6 professional managers expect ( Fairley , 2009). There are, in fact, very few Software Project Management Maturity Models (SPMMM) in...work activities and tasks that utilizes resources to achieve specified objectives within a prescribed time frame ( Fairley , 2009). Software Project...coordinating and leading, and managing risk factors for a software project ( Fairley , 2009). 11 Best Practices: Best practices are reusable

  15. Impact of air pollution on pulmonary function and respiratory symptoms in children. Longitudinal repeated-measures study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Salamanca, Mexico occupied fourth place nationally in contaminating emissions. The aim of the study was to determine the impact of air pollution on the frequency of pulmonary function alterations and respiratory symptoms in school-age children in a longitudinal repeated-measures study. Methods We recruited a cohort of 464 children from 6 to 14 years of age, from two schools differing in distance from the major stationary air pollution sources. Spirometry, respiratory symptoms and air pollutants (O3, SO2, NO, NO2, NOx, PM10,) were obtained for each season. Mixed models for continuous variables and multilevel logistic regression for respiratory symptoms were fitted taking into account seasonal variations in health effects according to air pollution levels. Results Abnormalities in lung function and frequency of respiratory symptoms were higher in the school closer to major stationary air pollution sources than in the distant school. However, in winter differences on health disappeared. The principal alteration in lung function was the obstructive type, which frequency was greater in those students with greater exposure (10.4% vs. 5.3%; OR = 1.95, 95% CI 1.0-3.7), followed by the mixed pattern also more frequent in the same students (4.1% vs. 0.9%; OR = 4.69, 95% CI, 1.0-21.1). PM10 levels were the most consistent factor with a negative relationship with FVC, FEV1 and PEF but with a positive relationship with FEV1/FVC coefficient according to its change per 3-month period. Conclusions Students from the school closer to major stationary air pollution sources had in general more respiratory symptoms than those from the distant school. However, in winter air pollution was generalized in this city and differences in health disappeared. PM10 levels were the most consistent factor related to pulmonary function according, to its change per 3-month period. PMID:21106102

  16. Impact of college-administered quality practice assessments: a longitudinal evaluation of repeat peer assessments of continuing competence in physiotherapists.

    PubMed

    Norman, Kathleen E; O'Donovan, Mary Jane; Campbell, Fiona

    2015-01-01

    Objet: L'Ordre des physiothérapeutes de l'Ontario (OPO) a élaboré son processus d'évaluation de la pratique par les pairs en vertu d'exigences réglementaires relatives à l'assurance de la qualité. Chaque année, un petit pourcentage de physiothérapeutes, pour la plupart sélectionnés au hasard, font l'objet d'une évaluation de la pratique. Afin de jeter la lumière sur le maintien des compétences, nous rendons compte des résultats des physiothérapeutes qui ont subi deux évaluations de la pratique. Méthodes: On a extrait les dossiers des physiothérapeutes ayant subi deux évaluations de la pratique non connexes. On a ensuite examiné les caractéristiques démographiques, les notes des pairs-évaluateurs et les décisions qui en ont découlé. Les résultats ont fait l'objet d'un examen transversal (comparaison avec d'autres évaluations de la pratique effectuées au cours de la même période) et d'un examen longitudinal (dans la cohorte). Résultats: Entre 2004 et 2012, 117 physiothérapeutes de l'Ontario ont subi deux évaluations de la pratique non connexes, habituellement à un intervalle de 5 à 7 ans. Cette cohorte était représentative des physiothérapeutes de l'Ontario pour ce qui est des rapports de masculinité, des études et des années de pratique. À la première évaluation de la pratique, les résultats de cette cohorte étaient semblables à ceux des autres physiothérapeutes; à la deuxième évaluation, ils étaient meilleurs que les résultats des autres physiothérapeutes ayant subi une première évaluation de la pratique au cours de la même période (p=0,02). Les résultats de la cohorte étaient meilleurs à la deuxième évaluation de la pratique qu'à la première (p<0,001). Conclusions: Les physiothérapeutes sont susceptibles de répondre aux normes professionnelles à l'occasion d'une deuxième évaluation de la pratique effectuée 5 à 7 ans après la première évaluation. Des recherches supplémentaires s

  17. Longitudinal changes in objectively measured sedentary behaviour and their relationship with adiposity in children and adolescents: systematic review and evidence appraisal.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, C; Reilly, J J; Huang, W Y

    2014-10-01

    This review aimed to determine longitudinal changes in objectively measured overall sedentary behaviour, and to examine their associations with adiposity in children and adolescents. A search for longitudinal studies was performed using several electronic databases. Of 161 potentially eligible papers, 10 for change in sedentary behaviour and 3 for longitudinal associations with change in adiposity were included. Weighted mean increase in daily sedentary behaviour per year was 5.7% for boys and 5.8% for girls. Only one paper included preschool children, and it showed a decrease in sedentary behaviour. Nine studies were from Western countries. Null associations were reported between sedentary behaviour and adiposity in two studies, the other found that increases in sedentary behaviour were associated with increases in adiposity, but only in those with body mass index above the 50th percentile. There was consistent evidence that sedentary behaviour increases with age in school-age children and adolescents, by approximately 30 min extra daily sedentary behaviour per year. There was little evidence on the influence of changes in sedentary behaviour on changes in adiposity. There is a need for more longitudinal research, for more evidence from outside the Western world, and for more studies that examine 'dose-response' associations between changes in sedentary behaviour and changes in adiposity.

  18. A Longitudinal Study of State Strategies and Policies to Accelerate Evidence-Based Practices in the Context of Systems Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Rieckmann, Traci; Abraham, Amanda; Zwick, Janet; Rasplica, Caitlin; McCarty, Dennis

    2015-01-01

    Objective To profile state agency efforts to promote implementation of three evidence-based practices (EBPs): screening and brief intervention (SBIRT), psychosocial interventions, and medication-assisted treatment (MAT). Data Sources/Study Setting Primary data collected from representatives of 50 states and the District of Columbia’s Single State Authorities from 2007 to 2009. Study Design/Data Collection The study used mixed methods, in-depth, semistructured interviews and quantitative surveys. Interviews assessed state and provider strategies to accelerate implementation of EBPs. Principal Findings Statewide implementation of psychosocial interventions and MAT increased significantly over 3 years. In the first two assessments, states that contracted directly with providers were more likely to link use of EBPs to reimbursement, and states with indirect contract, through counties and other entities, increased recommendations, and some requirements for provision of specific EBPs. The number of states using legislation as a policy lever to promote EBPs was unchanged. Conclusions Health care reform and implementation of parity in coverage increases access to treatment for alcohol and drug use. Science-based substance abuse treatment will become even more crucial as payers seek consistent quality of care. This study provides baseline data on service delivery, contracting, and financing as state agencies and treatment providers prepare for implementation of the Affordable Care Act. PMID:25532616

  19. Measuring prescribing practices in a state mental hospital system.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, K; Allison, J; Hartig, P

    1979-07-01

    To determine the degree to which Nebraska's three state mental hospitals complied with recognized guidelines for prescription of psychotropic medications, a study was made for 1326 drug orders issued over a five-year period. The prescribing practices in the hospital were then reviewed in relation to the guidelines in areas of polypharmacy, daily dose frequency, time of day, use of p.r.n. orders, drug form, dosages for children and the elderly, dosages during acute and stabilized stages of illness, and brand versus generic names. The study highlighted areas of progress in drug use practices and identified areas for improvement.

  20. Optimizing PiB-PET SUVR change-over-time measurement by a large-scale analysis of longitudinal reliability, plausibility, separability, and correlation with MMSE.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Christopher G; Senjem, Matthew L; Gunter, Jeffrey L; Tosakulwong, Nirubol; Weigand, Stephen D; Kemp, Bradley J; Spychalla, Anthony J; Vemuri, Prashanthi; Petersen, Ronald C; Lowe, Val J; Jack, Clifford R

    2017-01-01

    Quantitative measurements of change in β-amyloid load from Positron Emission Tomography (PET) images play a critical role in clinical trials and longitudinal observational studies of Alzheimer's disease. These measurements are strongly affected by methodological differences between implementations, including choice of reference region and use of partial volume correction, but there is a lack of consensus for an optimal method. Previous works have examined some relevant variables under varying criteria, but interactions between them prevent choosing a method via combined meta-analysis. In this work, we present a thorough comparison of methods to measure change in β-amyloid over time using Pittsburgh Compound B (PiB) PET imaging.

  1. Measuring Data Use Beliefs and Practices in Early Education Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stein, Amanda; Connors, Maia C.

    2016-01-01

    Educare is a network of enhanced Early Head Start (EHS)/Head Start (HS) (birth to age 5) programs that implement innovative Research-Program Partnerships (RPPs) to engage researchers, program leaders, staff, and at times, other stakeholders in a collaborative approach to supporting data use practices for decision-making and continuous quality…

  2. Measuring Effectiveness in Transfer Practices for Adult Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dougherty, B. Christopher

    2009-01-01

    The Research to Practice (RTP) column in "The Journal of Continuing Higher Education" has recently focused on evaluation methods that continuing education (CE) units can utilize, reports on surveys of CE practitioners, and recommendations for research on dynamics that impact CE programs and the students enrolling in them. In this article, the…

  3. Semi-Spontaneous Oral Text Production: Measurements in Clinical Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lind, Marianne; Kristoffersen, Kristian Emil; Moen, Inger; Simonsen, Hanne Gram

    2009-01-01

    Functionally relevant assessment of the language production of speakers with aphasia should include assessment of connected speech production. Despite the ecological validity of everyday conversations, more controlled and monological types of texts may be easier to obtain and analyse in clinical practice. This article discusses some simple…

  4. A Proposed Conceptual Model to Measure Unwarranted Practice Variation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-05-03

    process was considered a part of the quality equation (ASQ, 2006). Walter Shewart and his concept of Statistical Quality Control created a focus in...planning perspectives of the AMEDD’s operations. Part of this initiative focused on the works of Wennberg and medical practice variation as a...the Institute of Medicine published its treatise on the state of U.S. healthcare quality, Crossing the Quality Chasm. The second document of a two part

  5. Practical management measures for patients with recurrent herpes labialis.

    PubMed

    St Pierre, S A; Bartlett, B L; Schlosser, B J

    2009-01-01

    Recurrent herpes labialis (RHL) is a common condition associated with the formation of vesicles around the mouth, often preceded by prodromal symptoms including tingling and burning. Treatment is targeted toward individual episodes, but in severe cases, suppressive therapy may be indicated. At present, no cure exists for this troublesome condition. The purpose of this article is to serve as a practical guide in the management of RHL by summarizing current treatments and discussing potential new therapies.

  6. Longitudinal development of muons in large air showers studies from the arrival time distributions measured at 900m above sea level

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kakimoto, F.; Tsuchimoto, I.; Enoki, T.; Suga, K.; Nishi, K.

    1985-01-01

    The arrival time distributions of muons with energies above 1.0GeV and 0.5GeV have been measured in the Akeno air-shower array to study the longitudinal development of muons in air showers with primary energies in the range 10 to the 17th power to 10 to the 18th power ev. The average rise times of muons with energies above 1.0GeV at large core distances are consistent with those expected from very high multiplicity models and, on the contrary, with those expected from the low multiplicity models at small core distances. This implies that the longitudinal development at atmospheric depth smaller than 500 cm square is very fast and that at larger atmospheric depths is rather slow.

  7. Identifying best practice through benchmarking and outcome measurement.

    PubMed

    Lanier, Lynne

    2004-01-01

    Collecting and analyzing various types of data are essential to identifying areas for improvement. Data collection and analysis are routinely performed in hospitals and are even required by some regulatory agencies. Realization of the full benefits, which may be achieved through collection and analysis of data, should be actively pursued to prevent a meaningless exercise in paperwork. Internal historical comparison of data may be helpful but does not achieve the ultimate goal of identifying external benchmarks in order to determine best practice. External benchmarks provide a means of comparison with similar facilities, allowing the identification of processes needing improvement. The specialty of ophthalmology presents unique practice situations that are not comparable with other specialties, making it imperative to benchmark against other facilities where quick surgical case time, efficient surgical turnover times, low infection rates, and cost containment are essential and standard operations. Important data to benchmark include efficiency data, financial data, and quality or patient outcome data. After identifying facilities that excel in certain aspects of performance, it is necessary to analyze how their procedures help them achieve these favorable results. Careful data collection and analysis lead to improved practice and patient care.

  8. Redefining perioperative advanced practice. Scope of practice: measuring impact and sustainability.

    PubMed

    Radford, Mark; Abbassi, Ann; Williamson, Alastair; Johnston, Paul

    2003-12-01

    There are increasing demands placed upon the modern NHS, particularly in emergency care. In combating these demands, new approaches to practice will form an overall strategy for improving care delivered to patients. This is the second in a series by authors from the Good Hope Hospital NHS Trust and explains their experience of developing an innovative approach to the management of surgical emergencies through the specialist nurse role in anaesthesia and emergency surgery. It examines the scope of practice, clinical and operational impact of the role, and future developments.

  9. Interactive computer program for optimal designs of longitudinal cohort studies.

    PubMed

    Tekle, Fetene B; Tan, Frans E S; Berger, Martijn P F

    2009-05-01

    Many large scale longitudinal cohort studies have been carried out or are ongoing in different fields of science. Such studies need a careful planning to obtain the desired quality of results with the available resources. In the past, a number of researches have been performed on optimal designs for longitudinal studies. However, there was no computer program yet available to help researchers to plan their longitudinal cohort design in an optimal way. A new interactive computer program for the optimization of designs of longitudinal cohort studies is therefore presented. The computer program helps users to identify the optimal cohort design with an optimal number of repeated measurements per subject and an optimal allocations of time points within a given study period. Further, users can compute the loss in relative efficiencies of any other alternative design compared to the optimal one. The computer program is described and illustrated using a practical example.

  10. Precision measurement of the longitudinal double-spin asymmetry for inclusive jet production in polarized proton collisions at √s = 200 GeV

    DOE PAGES

    Adamczyk, L.

    2015-08-26

    We report a new measurement of the midrapidity inclusive jet longitudinal double-spin asymmetry, ALL, in polarized pp collisions at center-of-mass energy √s = 200 GeV. The STAR data place stringent constraints on polarized parton distribution functions extracted at next-to-leading order from global analyses of inclusive deep-inelastic scattering (DIS), semi-inclusive DIS, and RHIC pp data. Lastly, the measured asymmetries provide evidence at the 3σ level for positive gluon polarization in the Bjorken-x region x > 0.05 .

  11. Precision measurement of the longitudinal double-spin asymmetry for inclusive jet production in polarized proton collisions at √s = 200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Adamczyk, L.

    2015-08-26

    We report a new measurement of the midrapidity inclusive jet longitudinal double-spin asymmetry, ALL, in polarized pp collisions at center-of-mass energy √s = 200 GeV. The STAR data place stringent constraints on polarized parton distribution functions extracted at next-to-leading order from global analyses of inclusive deep-inelastic scattering (DIS), semi-inclusive DIS, and RHIC pp data. Lastly, the measured asymmetries provide evidence at the 3σ level for positive gluon polarization in the Bjorken-x region x > 0.05 .

  12. Precision Measurement of the Longitudinal Double-Spin Asymmetry for Inclusive Jet Production in Polarized Proton Collisions at √{s }=200 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anson, C. D.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Averichev, G. S.; Banerjee, A.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Borowski, W.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A. V.; Brovko, S. G.; Bültmann, S.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Campbell, J. M.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, L.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Chwastowski, J.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Contin, G.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Cudd, A. B.; Cui, X.; Das, S.; Davila Leyva, A.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Derradi de Souza, R.; Dhamija, S.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Ding, F.; Djawotho, P.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Engelage, J.; Engle, K. S.; Eppley, G.; Eun, L.; Evdokimov, O.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Fedorisin, J.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Gliske, S.; Greiner, L.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, S.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hamed, A.; Han, L.-X.; Haque, R.; Harris, J. W.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Horvat, S.; Huang, B.; Huang, H. Z.; Huang, X.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jang, H.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kesich, A.; Khan, Z. H.; Kikola, D. P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Konzer, J.; Koralt, I.; Kosarzewski, L. K.; Kotchenda, L.; Kraishan, A. F.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, L.; Kycia, R. A.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, Z. M.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, X.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Madagodagettige Don, D. M. M. D.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Nogach, L. V.; Noh, S. Y.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Ohlson, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldag, E. W.; Olvitt, D. L.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Poniatowska, K.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Przybycien, M.; Pujahari, P. R.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Riley, C. K.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Ross, J. F.; Roy, A.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sangaline, E.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, B.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, D.; Smirnov, N.; Solanki, D.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stevens, J. R.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szelezniak, M. A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsai, O. D.; Turnau, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Vanfossen, J. A.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbæk, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Vossen, A.; Wada, M.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y. F.; Xiao, Z.; Xie, W.; Xin, K.; Xu, H.; Xu, J.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yan, W.; Yang, C.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Ye, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yu, N.; Zawisza, Y.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhao, F.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhu, X.; Zhu, Y. H.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zyzak, M.; STAR Collaboration

    2015-08-01

    We report a new measurement of the midrapidity inclusive jet longitudinal double-spin asymmetry, AL L, in polarized p p collisions at center-of-mass energy √{s }=200 GeV . The STAR data place stringent constraints on polarized parton distribution functions extracted at next-to-leading order from global analyses of inclusive deep-inelastic scattering (DIS), semi-inclusive DIS, and RHIC p p data. The measured asymmetries provide evidence at the 3 σ level for positive gluon polarization in the Bjorken-x region x >0.05 .

  13. Measuring Executive Dysfunction Longitudinally and in Relation to Genetic Burden, Brain Volumetrics, and Depression in Prodromal Huntington Disease

    PubMed Central

    Papp, Kathryn V.; Snyder, Peter J.; Mills, James A.; Duff, Kevin; Westervelt, Holly J.; Long, Jeffrey D.; Lourens, Spencer; Paulsen, Jane S.

    2013-01-01

    Executive dysfunction (ED) is a characteristic of Huntington disease (HD), but its severity and progression is less understood in the prodromal phase, e.g., before gross motor abnormalities. We examined planning and problem-solving abilities using the Towers Task in HD mutation-positive individuals without motor symptoms (n = 781) and controls (n = 212). Participants with greater disease progression (determined using mutation size and current age) performed more slowly and with less accuracy on the Towers Task. Performance accuracy was negatively related to striatal volume while both accuracy and working memory were negatively related to frontal white matter volume. Disease progression at baseline was not associated with longitudinal performance over 4 years. Whereas the baseline findings indicate that ED becomes more prevalent with greater disease progression in prodromal HD and can be quantified using the Towers task, the absence of notable longitudinal findings indicates that the Towers Task exhibits limited sensitivity to cognitive decline in this population. PMID:23246934

  14. Some Better Practices for Measuring Racial and Ethnic Identity Constructs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helms, Janet E.

    2007-01-01

    Racial and ethnic identity (REI) measures are in danger of becoming conceptually meaningless because of evaluators' insistence that they conform to measurement models intended to assess unidimensional constructs, rather than the multidimensional constructs necessary to capture the complexity of internalized racial or cultural socialization. Some…

  15. Practical Measurement and Productive Persistence: Strategies for Using Digital Learning System Data to Drive Improvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krumm, Andrew E.; Beattie, Rachel; Takahashi, Sola; D'Angelo, Cynthia; Feng, Mingyu; Cheng, Britte

    2016-01-01

    This paper outlines the development of practical measures of productive persistence using digital learning system data. Practical measurement refers to data collection and analysis approaches originating from improvement science; productive persistence refers to the combination of academic and social mindsets as well as learning behaviours that…

  16. The Longitudinal Force Measurement of CWR Tracks with Hetero-Cladding FBG Sensors: A Proof of Concept

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Li-Yang; Zhang, Meng; Xie, Kaize; Zhang, Xinpu; Wang, Ping; Yan, Lianshan

    2016-01-01

    A new method has been proposed to accurately determine longitudinal additional force in continuous welded rail (CWR) on bridges via hetero-cladding fiber Bragg grating (HC-FBG) sensors. The HC-FBG sensor consists of two FBGs written in the same type of fiber but with different cladding diameters. The HC-FBGs have the same temperature sensitivity but different strain sensitivity because of the different areas of the cross section. The differential strain coefficient is defined as the relative wavelength differences of two FBGs with the change of applied longitudinal force. In the verification experiment in the lab, the HC-FBGs were attached on a section of rail model of which the material property is the same as that of rail on line. The temperature and differential strain sensitivity were calibrated using a universal testing machine. As shown by the test results, the linearity between the relative wavelength difference and the longitudinal additional force is greater than 0.9999. The differential strain sensitivity is 4.85 × 10−6/N. Moreover, the relative wavelength difference is not affected by the temperature change. Compared to the theoretical results, the accumulated error is controlled within 5.0%. PMID:27999355

  17. Surface-NMR measurements of the longitudinal relaxation time T1 in a homogeneous sandy aquifer in Skive, Denmark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walbrecker, J.; Behroozmand, A.

    2011-12-01

    Efficient groundwater management requires reliable means of characterizing shallow groundwater aquifers. One key parameter in this respect is hydraulic conductivity. Surface nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a geophysical exploration technique that can potentially provide this type of information in a noninvasive, cost-effective way. The technique is based on measuring the precession of nuclear spins of protons in groundwater molecules. It involves large loop antennas deployed on Earth's surface to generate electromagnetic pulses tuned to specifically excite and detect groundwater proton spins. Naturally, the excited state of spins is transitory - once excited, spins relax back to their equilibrium state. This relaxation process is strongly influenced by the spin environment, which, in the case of groundwater, is defined by the aquifer. By employing empirical relations, changes in relaxation behavior can be used to identify changes in aquifer hydraulic conductivity, making the NMR relaxation signal a very important piece of information. Particularly, efforts are made to record the longitudinal relaxation parameter T1, because it is known from laboratory studies that it often reliably correlates with hydraulic conductivity, even in the presence of magnetic species. In surface NMR, T1 data are collected by recording the NMR signal amplitude following two sequential excitation pulses as a function of the delay time τ between the two pulses. In conventional acquisition, the two pulses have a mutual phase shift of π. Based on theoretical arguments it was recently shown that T1 times acquired according to this conventional surface-NMR scheme are systematically biased. It was proposed that the bias can be minimized by cycling the phase of the two pulses between π and zero in subsequent double-pulse experiments, and subtracting the resulting signal amplitudes (phase-cycled pseudosaturation recovery scheme, pcPSR). We present the first surface-NMR T1 data set recorded

  18. Beta fields and measurement practices at DOE facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swinth, K. L.; Rathbun, L. A.; Brackenbush, L. W.

    1985-09-01

    As part of a larger program, the beta measurement problem at DOE facilities was assessed through the use of a questionnaire and field visits to selected facilities. At 35% the facilities beta-emitting radionuclides can contribute enough to the radiation exposures that they must be considered in establishing protection requirements. Measurements were made in several facilities using scintillators, a surface barrier detector plus various dosimeters and survey instruments. Beta dose rates of several hundred mrad/hr were not unusual and beta:gamma ratios of greater than 30:1 were frequently observed. The agreement between the various measurement techniques was frequently unacceptable.

  19. Observations, measurements and best practices for monitoring hydraulic redistribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, T. W.; Liang, X.

    2011-12-01

    Hydraulic redistribution (HR) is a biogeophysical phenomenon where plant roots move water through the soil column from areas of high soil moisture content to areas of low soil moisture content. The impacts of this process on the hydrologic cycle at the regional scale are beginning to be studied through the use of numerical modeling. The extent of plant species which exhibit HR, the magnitude of water redistributed and the conditions under which it occurs are still unknown. Therefore models must rely on some general assumptions to account for this process. More information is needed to understand how to correctly account for HR in land surface models. The ideal method is through direct measurement and observation. HR has been studied through a variety of mediums, e.g. deuterium footprints, soil moisture patterns and sap flow measurements. All three methods capture the moisture fluctuations within the soil layers via measurements of deuterium concentration, volumetric soil moisture content and root sap flow direction. The problem with deuterium labeling is that it does not allow for the persistent long term measurements over natural wetting and drying periods without additional irrigation. Sap flow measurements, despite having the ability to measure specific plant individuals' water dynamics, requires difficult access to the plant's root system which can be complex and difficult to sample. Soil moisture measurements can be made on a variety of sensor types and the installation is much less intensive. This study examines soil moisture measurements as a means for monitoring HR. Field observations in different regions of the United States utilizing different soil moisture sensor types (capacitance and reflectometer) are shown to exhibit similar diurnal soil moisture patterns common to the HR phenomenon. These observations are then compared and contrasted to model simulation results.

  20. Automating Performance Measures and Clinical Practice Guidelines: Differences and Complementarities

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Samson W.; Martins, Susana; Oshiro, Connie; Yuen, Kaeli; Wang, Dan; Robinson, Amy; Ashcraft, Michael; Heidenreich, Paul A.; Goldstein, Mary K.

    2016-01-01

    Through close analysis of two pairs of systems that implement the automated evaluation of performance measures (PMs) and guideline-based clinical decision support (CDS), we contrast differences in their knowledge encoding and necessary changes to a CDS system that provides management recommendations for patients failing performance measures. We trace the sources of differences to the implementation environments and goals of PMs and CDS. PMID:28269917

  1. Measures to step up practical use of scientific work discussed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodzhimatov, V.

    1983-10-01

    To achieve significant acceleration of scientific-technical progress and bring all sectors of the economy to the most advanced frontiers of science and technology was proposed as one of the paramount tasks of our time. Much was done by scientists of Uzbekistan for the development of the multisectorial economy of the republic and for the creation of progressive technology in industry, capital construction, and in agriculture, especially in cotton production. Every year scientific organizations complete and turn over for practical use more than 33 different development projects with an economic impact of more than 600 million rubles. Thanks to their introduction, technical equipmentation has grown, technological processes were improved, the volume of production has increased, and the quality of output has improved.

  2. Theory and practice for measuring health care quality

    PubMed Central

    Berwick, Donald M.; Knapp, Marian Gilbert

    1987-01-01

    As competition, cost control, and new modes of delivery emerge in health care, there is a need to reexamine both the traditional definitions of health care quality and the methods by which it is measured. Industries other than health care have much to teach regarding the methods for obtaining, analyzing, and displaying data; techniques for problem identification, problem solving, and reassessment; and ideas about organizational factors that produce a high quality product or service. The Quality-of-Care Measurement Department at the Harvard Community Health Plan has built a program that draws from a distinguished health care quality assurance tradition and incorporates techniques that have been successful in other industries. PMID:10312319

  3. MEASUREMENT OF HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY DISTRIBUTIONS: A MANUAL OF PRACTICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ability of hydrologists to perform field measurements of aquifer hydraulic properties must be enhanced in order to significantly improve the capacity to solve groundwater contamination problems at Superfund and other sites. The primary purpose of this manual is to provide ne...

  4. Using Assessment to Improve Practice: New Developments and Measures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geron, Scott Miyake; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Theme issue contains 18 articles on (1) clients' role in assessment of the elderly in long-term care; (2) choosing assessment measures (physical, cognitive, quality-of-life, well-being, social support, multidimensional, culturally appropriate); and (3) making assessments useful (including using technology, assessment by telephone, and clinical…

  5. ePortfolio as a Measure of Reflective Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parkes, Kelly A.; Dredger, Katie S.; Hicks, David

    2013-01-01

    This instructional article outlines the qualities of effective ePortfolios and how reflection and student growth is measured. Student exemplars and assessment rubrics show how, despite changing tools and evolving standards, sustained collaboration and student coaching yields reflective practitioners in content areas and in technological knowledge.…

  6. 38 CFR 21.4275 - Practical training courses; measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... or registered professional nurse will be measured on the basis of credit hours or clock hours of attendance, whichever is appropriate. The clock hours of attendance may include academic class time, clinical... clock hours of attendance per week whichever is appropriate. (c) Medical and dental specialty...

  7. 38 CFR 21.4275 - Practical training courses; measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... or registered professional nurse will be measured on the basis of credit hours or clock hours of attendance, whichever is appropriate. The clock hours of attendance may include academic class time, clinical... clock hours of attendance per week whichever is appropriate. (c) Medical and dental specialty...

  8. 38 CFR 21.4275 - Practical training courses; measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... or registered professional nurse will be measured on the basis of credit hours or clock hours of attendance, whichever is appropriate. The clock hours of attendance may include academic class time, clinical... clock hours of attendance per week whichever is appropriate. (c) Medical and dental specialty...

  9. 38 CFR 21.4275 - Practical training courses; measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... or registered professional nurse will be measured on the basis of credit hours or clock hours of attendance, whichever is appropriate. The clock hours of attendance may include academic class time, clinical... clock hours of attendance per week whichever is appropriate. (c) Medical and dental specialty...

  10. Putting Measurement First: Understanding "Grit" in Educational Policy and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Non-cognitive dispositions have recently become psychological constructs of interest in the education, economics, philosophy, sociology, and psychology literature. In this article, I draw the distinction between property-first and measurement-first approaches to understanding the meaning of a particular non-cognitive disposition theoretical term,…

  11. BOOK REVIEW: Evaluating the Measurement Uncertainty: Fundamentals and practical guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lira, Ignacio

    2003-08-01

    Evaluating the Measurement Uncertainty is a book written for anyone who makes and reports measurements. It attempts to fill the gaps in the ISO Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement, or the GUM, and does a pretty thorough job. The GUM was written with the intent of being applicable by all metrologists, from the shop floor to the National Metrology Institute laboratory; however, the GUM has often been criticized for its lack of user-friendliness because it is primarily filled with statements, but with little explanation. Evaluating the Measurement Uncertainty gives lots of explanations. It is well written and makes use of many good figures and numerical examples. Also important, this book is written by a metrologist from a National Metrology Institute, and therefore up-to-date ISO rules, style conventions and definitions are correctly used and supported throughout. The author sticks very closely to the GUM in topical theme and with frequent reference, so readers who have not read GUM cover-to-cover may feel as if they are missing something. The first chapter consists of a reprinted lecture by T J Quinn, Director of the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM), on the role of metrology in today's world. It is an interesting and informative essay that clearly outlines the importance of metrology in our modern society, and why accurate measurement capability, and by definition uncertainty evaluation, should be so important. Particularly interesting is the section on the need for accuracy rather than simply reproducibility. Evaluating the Measurement Uncertainty then begins at the beginning, with basic concepts and definitions. The third chapter carefully introduces the concept of standard uncertainty and includes many derivations and discussion of probability density functions. The author also touches on Monte Carlo methods, calibration correction quantities, acceptance intervals or guardbanding, and many other interesting cases. The book goes

  12. Measuring solar reflectance Part II: Review of practical methods

    SciTech Connect

    Levinson, Ronnen; Akbari, Hashem; Berdahl, Paul

    2010-05-14

    A companion article explored how solar reflectance varies with surface orientation and solar position, and found that clear sky air mass 1 global horizontal (AM1GH) solar reflectance is a preferred quantity for estimating solar heat gain. In this study we show that AM1GH solar reflectance R{sub g,0} can be accurately measured with a pyranometer, a solar spectrophotometer, or an updated edition of the Solar Spectrum Reflectometer (version 6). Of primary concern are errors that result from variations in the spectral and angular distributions of incident sunlight. Neglecting shadow, background and instrument errors, the conventional pyranometer technique can measure R{sub g,0} to within 0.01 for surface slopes up to 5:12 [23{sup o}], and to within 0.02 for surface slopes up to 12:12 [45{sup o}]. An alternative pyranometer method minimizes shadow errors and can be used to measure R{sub g,0} of a surface as small as 1 m in diameter. The accuracy with which it can measure R{sub g,0} is otherwise comparable to that of the conventional pyranometer technique. A solar spectrophotometer can be used to determine R*{sub g,0}, a solar reflectance computed by averaging solar spectral reflectance weighted with AM1GH solar spectral irradiance. Neglecting instrument errors, R*{sub g,0} matches R{sub g,0} to within 0.006. The air mass 1.5 solar reflectance measured with version 5 of the Solar Spectrum Reflectometer can differ from R*{sub g,0} by as much as 0.08, but the AM1GH output of version 6 of this instrument matches R*{sub g,0} to within about 0.01.

  13. Hospital process orientation from an operations management perspective: development of a measurement tool and practical testing in three ophthalmic practices

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Although research interest in hospital process orientation (HPO) is growing, the development of a measurement tool to assess process orientation (PO) has not been very successful yet. To view a hospital as a series of processes organized around patients with a similar demand seems to be an attractive proposition, but it is hard to operationalize this idea in a measurement tool that can actually measure the level of PO. This research contributes to HPO from an operations management (OM) perspective by addressing the alignment, integration and coordination of activities within patient care processes. The objective of this study was to develop and practically test a new measurement tool for assessing the degree of PO within hospitals using existing tools. Methods Through a literature search we identified a number of constructs to measure PO in hospital settings. These constructs were further operationalized, using an OM perspective. Based on five dimensions of an existing questionnaire a new HPO-measurement tool was developed to measure the degree of PO within hospitals on the basis of respondents’ perception. The HPO-measurement tool was pre-tested in a non-participating hospital and discussed with experts in a focus group. The multicentre exploratory case study was conducted in the ophthalmic practices of three different types of Dutch hospitals. In total 26 employees from three disciplines participated. After filling in the questionnaire an interview was held with each participant to check the validity and the reliability of the measurement tool. Results The application of the HPO-measurement tool, analysis of the scores and interviews with the participants resulted in the possibility to identify differences of PO performance and the areas of improvement – from a PO point of view – within each hospital. The result of refinement of the items of the measurement tool after practical testing is a set of 41 items to assess the degree of PO from an OM

  14. The psychiatric advanced practice nurse with prescriptive authority: role development, practice issues, and outcomes measurement.

    PubMed

    Cornwell, C; Chiverton, P

    1997-04-01

    Within the rapidly changing health care system, there is an increased need for professionals who can provide cost-effective primary health care for mentally ill patients. This article discusses the role of the Psychiatric Advanced Practice Nurse (APN) with Prescriptive Authority as a cost-effective, high-quality component of comprehensive mental health care delivery. Historical aspects of the development of the Nurse Practitioner (NP) role are discussed, as well as issues specific to the role in psychiatric nursing. The implementation of this role at Rochester is described, followed by recommendations for studying the impact of the psychiatric NP on care delivery, including process and outcome variables.

  15. Practical uncertainty reduction and quantification in shock physics measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Akin, M. C.; Nguyen, J. H.

    2015-04-20

    We report the development of a simple error analysis sampling method for identifying intersections and inflection points to reduce total uncertainty in experimental data. This technique was used to reduce uncertainties in sound speed measurements by 80% over conventional methods. Here, we focused on its impact on a previously published set of Mo sound speed data and possible implications for phase transition and geophysical studies. However, this technique's application can be extended to a wide range of experimental data.

  16. A practical new way to measure kidney fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Peti-Peterdi, János

    2016-11-01

    Proper histological measurement of kidney fibrosis is essentially important in both clinical pathology and basic research using animal models of chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, standard histology techniques and their blind evaluation are cumbersome. Ranjit et al. applied an advanced optical microscopy technique for hassle-free, unbiased, and highly sensitive characterization of kidney fibrosis and tested it in a classic model of chronic kidney disease in mice. This commentary emphasizes the advantages and future promise of this new approach.

  17. Work engagement: a practical measure for workplace health promotion?

    PubMed

    Torp, S; Grimsmo, A; Hagen, S; Duran, A; Gudbergsson, S B

    2013-09-01

    The objectives of this study were to investigate whether psychological job demands, personal control and social support affect the negative health measure of depression differently than the positive measure of work engagement and to investigate whether work engagement mediates the effects of job demands and resources on the level of depression. We discuss the implications of using engagement as an outcome measure in workplace health promotion. We performed a cross-sectional questionnaire study among a general working population in Norway (n = 605). In the multivariate analysis, high psychological job demands as well as high control and social support correlated significantly with high work engagement. High demands as well as low control and social support correlated significantly with high levels of depression. When we included engagement as an independent variable together with demands, control and social support in the multivariate analysis, the positive correlation between demands and depression remained as well as the significant correlations between the level of depression and control and social support became non-significant. This indicates that engagement mediates the effects of control and social support on the level of depression. Encouraging enterprises to improve engagement in addition to focusing on preventing diseases may be worthwhile in workplace health promotion. Promoting engagement may have more positive organizational effects than a more traditional disease prevention focus, because engagement is contagious and closely related to good work performance and motivation.

  18. Measuring quality of life: a new and practical survey instrument.

    PubMed

    Greenley, J R; Greenberg, J S; Brown, R

    1997-05-01

    Despite increasing recognition of the importance of measuring the quality of life (QOL) of people with severe mental illness, such assessments are seldom carried out because of the lack of an efficient, easy-to-use, and valid measurement instrument. To facilitate the gathering of QOL information from clients in evaluation, program improvement, or other efforts, the authors present a new short (24-item) self-administered questionnaire called the Quality of Life Questionnaire (QLQ). The questionnaire assesses subjective QOL in seven areas. Evidence for the reliability and validity of the QLQ is based on data gathered from 971 clients with serious mental illness who were receiving publicly funded mental health services at the time of the study. The results of a confirmatory factor analysis using a random split-half procedure indicated that a seven-factor solution fit the data well. Scores on the QLQ also correlated significantly with the client's functioning and satisfaction with services, providing support for the validity of the QLQ. The advantages of the QLQ over existing measures include low-cost administration and some superior psychometric properties.

  19. Comparison of Quality Oncology Practice Initiative (QOPI) Measure Adherence Between Oncology Fellows, Advanced Practice Providers, and Attending Physicians.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jason; Zhang, Tian; Shah, Radhika; Kamal, Arif H; Kelley, Michael J

    2015-12-01

    Quality improvement measures are uniformly applied to all oncology providers, regardless of their roles. Little is known about differences in adherence to these measures between oncology fellows, advance practice providers (APP), and attending physicians. We investigated conformance across Quality Oncology Practice Initiative (QOPI) measures for oncology fellows, advance practice providers, and attending physicians at the Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Center (DVAMC). Using data collected from the Spring 2012 and 2013 QOPI cycles, we abstracted charts of patients and separated them based on their primary provider. Descriptive statistics and the chi-square test were calculated for each QOPI measure between fellows, advanced practice providers (APPs), and attending physicians. A total of 169 patients were reviewed. Of these, 31 patients had a fellow, 39 had an APP, and 99 had an attending as their primary oncology provider. Fellows and attending physicians performed similarly on 90 of 94 QOPI metrics. High-performing metrics included several core QOPI measures including documenting consent for chemotherapy, recommending adjuvant chemotherapy when appropriate, and prescribing serotonin antagonists when prescribing emetogenic chemotherapies. Low-performing metrics included documentation of treatment summary and taking action to address problems with emotional well-being by the second office visit. Attendings documented the plan for oral chemotherapy more often (92 vs. 63%, P=0.049). However, after the chart audit, we found that fellows actually documented the plan for oral chemotherapy 88% of the time (p=0.73). APPs and attendings performed similarly on 88 of 90 QOPI measures. The quality of oncology care tends to be similar between attendings and fellows overall; some of the significant differences do not remain significant after a second manual chart review, highlighting that the use of manual data collection for QOPI analysis is an imperfect system, and there may

  20. Development of an evidence-based clinical practice guideline on linear growth measurement of children.

    PubMed

    Foote, Jan M; Brady, Linda H; Burke, Amber L; Cook, Jennifer S; Dutcher, Mary E; Gradoville, Kathleen M; Groos, Jennifer A; Kinkade, Kimberly M; Meeks, Reylon A; Mohr, Pamela J; Schultheis, Debra S; Walker, Brenda S; Phillips, Kirk T

    2011-08-01

    Growth is an important indicator of child health; however, measurements are frequently inaccurate and unreliable. This article reviews the literature on linear growth measurement error and describes methods used to develop and evaluate an evidence-based clinical practice guideline on the measurement of recumbent length and stature of infants, children, and adolescents. Systematic methods were used to identify evidence to answer clinical questions about growth measurement. A multidisciplinary team critically appraised and synthesized the evidence to develop clinical practice recommendations using an evidence-based practice rating scheme. The guideline was prospectively evaluated through internal and external reviews and a pilot study to ensure its validity and reliability. Adoption of the clinical practice guideline can improve the accuracy and reliability of growth measurement data.

  1. Laser safety: practical measures and latest legislative requirements.

    PubMed

    Mary, Simon

    2011-09-01

    Lasers are used for a wide range of applications in operating departments and all persons working in a laser environment are required to understand the safety issues involved. This article details the various hazards associated with laser use and the management structure, procedures and control measures that should be implemented to ensure the health and safety of staff and patients. Recommendations are made in the context of the latest guidance and legislative requirements with reference to common issues that may arise in the workplace.

  2. Measurement of LiNbO3 Rectangular Plate Under Large Vibration Velocity of the First Longitudinal and Second Flexural Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, Hideki; Iwase, Masashi; Hirose, Seiji; Aoyagi, Manabu; Takano, Takehiro; Tomikawa, Yoshiro

    2008-05-01

    We have studied a miniature ultrasonic motor using a piezoelectric single-crystal LiNbO3. The crystal vibrator retains superior characteristics even when the vibrational velocity is large. On the other hand, a vibrator using a resonance mode shows no signs of an operating limit and fractures itself when the vibrational velocity exceeds the limit. Such behavior causes a problem in controlling the achievement of a large output power from the motor. Therefore we must investigate the vibrational characteristics at a high vibration level and at the fracture limit. In this study, the samples were examined for their vibrational characteristics at a high driving level and at the fracture limit. First, the characteristics of the resonance vibration of the first longitudinal and second flexural modes in an X128°-rotated Y-cut rectangular plate were measured. Second, to evaluate the difference caused by the cut angle of the X-rotation, the characteristics for the first longitudinal mode of X128°-, X135°-, X140°- and X155°-rotated Y-plates were measured; additionally, for each rotation-angle plate, we measured the characteristics of the rectangular plates whose longer side was directed along the x- or z‧-axis. In this paper, we describe the experimental results for the high-power characteristics and the fracture limits.

  3. Parental feeding practices in Mexican American families: Initial test of an expanded measure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although obesity rates are high among Latino children, relatively few studies of parental feeding practices have examined Latino families as a separate group. Culturally-based approaches to measurement development can begin to identify parental feeding practices in specific cultural groups. This stu...

  4. Grading Practice as Valid Measures of Academic Achievement of Secondary Schools Students for National Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiekem, Enwefa

    2015-01-01

    Assigning grades is probably the most important measurement decision that classroom teachers makes. When teachers are provided with some measurement instruction, they still use subjective value judgments when assigning grades to students. This paper therefore, examines the grading practice as valid measures of academic achievement in secondary…

  5. Modeling the longitudinal latent effect of pregabalin on self-reported changes in sleep disturbances in outpatients with generalized anxiety disorder managed in routine clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, Miguel A; Álvarez, Enrique; Carrasco, Jose L; Olivares, José M; Pérez, María; Rejas, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Background Anxiety disorders are among the most common psychiatric illnesses, with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) being one of the most common. Sleep disturbances are highly prevalent in GAD patients. While treatment with pregabalin has been found to be associated with significant improvement in GAD-related sleep disturbance across many controlled clinical trials, mediational analysis has suggested that a substantial portion of this effect could be the result of a direct effect of pregabalin. Thus, the objective of this study was to model the longitudinal latent effect of pregabalin or usual care (UC) therapies on changes in sleep in outpatients with GAD under routine clinical practice. Methods Male and female GAD outpatients, aged 18 years or above, from a 6-month prospective noninterventional trial were analyzed. Direct and indirect effects of either pregabalin or UC changes in anxiety symptoms (assessed with Hamilton Anxiety Scale) and sleep disturbances (assessed with Medical Outcomes Study-Sleep Scale [MOS-S]) were estimated by a conditional latent curve model applying structural equation modeling. Results A total of 1,546 pregabalin-naïve patients were analyzed, 984 receiving pregabalin and 562 UC. Both symptoms of anxiety and sleep disturbances were significantly improved in both groups, with higher mean (95% confidence interval) score reductions in subjects receiving pregabalin: −15.9 (−15.2; −16.6) vs −14.5 (−13.5; −15.5), P=0.027, in Hamilton Anxiety Scale; and −29.7 (−28.1; −31.3) vs −24.0 (−21.6; −26.4), P<0.001, in MOS-S. The conditional latent curve model showed that the pregabalin effect on sleep disturbances was significant (γ =−3.99, P<0.001), after discounting the effect on reduction in anxiety symptoms. A mediation model showed that 70% of the direct effect of pregabalin on sleep remained after discounting the mediated effect of anxiety improvement. Conclusion A substantial proportion of the incremental

  6. Parenting Practices at 24 to 47 Months and IQ at Age 8: Effect-Measure Modification by Infant Temperament.

    PubMed

    Chong, Shiau Yun; Chittleborough, Catherine R; Gregory, Tess; Mittinty, Murthy N; Lynch, John W; Smithers, Lisa G

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive development might be influenced by parenting practices and child temperament. We examined whether the associations between parental warmth, control and intelligence quotient (IQ) may be heightened among children in difficult temperament. Participants were from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (n = 7,044). Temperament at 6 months was measured using the Revised Infant Temperament Questionnaire and classified into 'easy' and 'difficult'. Parental warmth and control was measured at 24 to 47 months and both were classified into 2 groups using latent class analyses. IQ was measured at 8 years using the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children and dichotomized (<85 and ≥85) for analyzing effect-measure modification by temperament. Linear regression adjusted for multiple confounders and temperament showed lower parental warmth was weakly associated with lower IQ score [β = -0.52 (95% CI 1.26, 0.21)], and higher parental control was associated with lower IQ score [β = -2.21 (-2.95, -1.48)]. Stratification by temperament showed no increased risk of having low IQ in temperamentally difficult children [risk ratio (RR) = 0.97 95% CI 0.65, 1.45)] but an increased risk among temperamentally easy children (RR = 1.12 95% CI 0.95, 1.32) when parental warmth was low. There was also no increased risk of having low IQ in temperamentally difficult children (RR = 1.02 95% CI 0.69, 1.53) but there was an increased risk among temperamentally easy children (RR = 1.30 95% CI 1.11, 1.53) when parental control was high. For both parental warmth and control, there was some evidence of negative effect-measure modification by temperament on the risk-difference scale and the risk-ratio scale. It may be more appropriate to provide parenting interventions as a universal program rather than targeting children with difficult temperament.

  7. Recommended Practice for Pressure Measurements and Calculation of Effective Pumping Speeds During Electric Propulsion Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dankanich, John W.; Walker, Mitchell; Swiatek, Michael W.; Yim, John T.

    2013-01-01

    The electric propulsion community has been implored to establish and implement a set of universally applicable test standards during the research, development, and qualification of electric propulsion systems. Variability between facility-to-facility and more importantly ground-to-flight performance can result in large margins in application or aversion to mission infusion. Performance measurements and life testing under appropriate conditions can be costly and lengthy. Measurement practices must be consistent, accurate, and repeatable. Additionally, the measurements must be universally transportable across facilities throughout the development, qualification, spacecraft integration, and on-orbit performance. A recommended practice for making pressure measurements, pressure diagnostics, and calculating effective pumping speeds with justification is presented.

  8. Brain Tumor Therapy-Induced Changes in Normal-Appearing Brainstem Measured With Longitudinal Diffusion Tensor Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Hua Chiaho; Merchant, Thomas E.; Gajjar, Amar; Broniscer, Alberto; Zhang, Yong; Li Yimei; Glenn, George R.; Kun, Larry E.; Ogg, Robert J.

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To characterize therapy-induced changes in normal-appearing brainstems of childhood brain tumor patients by serial diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Methods and Materials: We analyzed 109 DTI studies from 20 brain tumor patients, aged 4 to 23 years, with normal-appearing brainstems included in the treatment fields. Those with medulloblastomas, supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumors, and atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumors (n = 10) received postoperative craniospinal irradiation (23.4-39.6 Gy) and a cumulative dose of 55.8 Gy to the primary site, followed by four cycles of high-dose chemotherapy. Patients with high-grade gliomas (n = 10) received erlotinib during and after irradiation (54-59.4 Gy). Parametric maps of fractional anisotropy (FA) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) were computed and spatially registered to three-dimensional radiation dose data. Volumes of interest included corticospinal tracts, medial lemnisci, and the pons. Serving as an age-related benchmark for comparison, 37 DTI studies from 20 healthy volunteers, aged 6 to 25 years, were included in the analysis. Results: The median DTI follow-up time was 3.5 years (range, 1.6-5.0 years). The median mean dose to the pons was 56 Gy (range, 7-59 Gy). Three patterns were seen in longitudinal FA and apparent diffusion coefficient changes: (1) a stable or normal developing time trend, (2) initial deviation from normal with subsequent recovery, and (3) progressive deviation without evidence of complete recovery. The maximal decline in FA often occurred 1.5 to 3.5 years after the start of radiation therapy. A full recovery time trend could be observed within 4 years. Patients with incomplete recovery often had a larger decline in FA within the first year. Radiation dose alone did not predict long-term recovery patterns. Conclusions: Variations existed among individual patients after therapy in longitudinal evolution of brainstem white matter injury and recovery. Early response in

  9. Flip-angle profile of slice-selective excitation and the measurement of the MR longitudinal relaxation time with steady-state magnetization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Jung-Jiin

    2015-08-01

    In MRI, the flip angle (FA) of slice-selective excitation is not uniform across the slice-thickness dimension. This work investigates the effect of the non-uniform FA profile on the accuracy of a commonly-used method for the measurement, in which the T1 value, i.e., the longitudinal relaxation time, is determined from the steady-state signals of an equally-spaced RF pulse train. By using the numerical solutions of the Bloch equation, it is shown that, because of the non-uniform FA profile, the outcome of the T1 measurement depends significantly on T1 of the specimen and on the FA and the inter-pulse spacing τ of the pulse train. A new method to restore the accuracy of the T1 measurement is described. Different from the existing approaches, the new method also removes the FA profile effect for the measurement of the FA, which is normally a part of the T1 measurement. In addition, the new method does not involve theoretical modeling, approximation, or modification to the underlying principle of the T1 measurement. An imaging experiment is performed, which shows that the new method can remove the FA-, the τ-, and the T1-dependence and produce T1 measurements in excellent agreement with the ones obtained from a gold standard method (the inversion-recovery method).

  10. Flight Measurements to Determine Effect of a Spring-Loaded Tab on Longitudinal Stability of an Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Paul A.; Reeder, John P.

    1946-01-01

    In conjunction with a program of research on the general problem of stability of airplanes in the climbing condition, tests have been made of a spring-loaded tb which. is referred to as a ?springy tab,? installed on the elevator of a low-wing scout bomber. The tab was arranged to deflect upward with decrease in speed which caused an increase in the pull force required to trim at low speeds and thereby increased the stick-free static longitudinal stability of the airplane. It was found that the springy tab would increase the stick-free stability in all flight conditions, would reduce the danger of inadvertent stalling because of the definite pull force required to stall the airplane with power on, would reduce the effect of center-of-gravity position on stick-free static stability, and would have little effect on the elevator stick forces in accelerated f11ght. Another advantage of the springy tab is that it might be used to provide almost any desired variation of elevator stick force with speed by adjusting the tab hinge-moment characteristics and the variation of spring moment with tab deflection. Unlike the bungee and the bobweight, the springy tab would provide stick-free static stability without requiring a pull force to hold the stick back while taxying. A device similar to the springy tab may be used on the rudder or ailerons to eliminate undesirable trim-force variations with speed.

  11. Perinatal effects on in vivo measures of human brain serotonin synthesis in adulthood: a 27-year longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Booij, Linda; Benkelfat, Chawki; Leyton, Marco; Vitaro, Frank; Gravel, Paul; Lévesque, Mélissa L; Arseneault, Louise; Diksic, Mirko; Tremblay, Richard E

    2012-06-01

    There is an increasing evidence that prenatal and early postnatal stressors have life long impacts on physical and mental health problems. Animal studies have shown that this could include enduring changes to brain serotonin neurotransmission. In the present study, we tested whether perinatal adversity in humans has a long-term impact on brain serotonin neurotransmission in adulthood. Twenty-six healthy males, recruited from a 27-year longitudinal study, underwent a positron emission tomography scan with the tracer alpha-[¹¹C]methyl-L-tryptophan (¹¹C-AMT), as an index of serotonin synthesis capacity. The trapping constant is taken as a proxy for the regional 5-HT synthesis. Birth complications, especially a delivery where the fetus showed signs of physiological distress, predicted lower ¹¹C-AMT trapping in the hippocampus and medial orbitofrontal cortex. Lower ¹¹C-AMT trapping in the medial orbitofrontal cortex was also predicted by maternal smoking and lower birth weight. There were no effects of childhood or recent adversity. This is the first human study reporting associations between perinatal adversity and adult ¹¹C-AMT trapping in the hippocampus and medial orbitofrontal cortex. The associations suggest that limbic serotonin pathways may be particularly vulnerable to environmental challenges during the period when they undergo the most prominent neurodevelopmental changes. In combination with other risk factors, perinatal stressors may contribute to increased vulnerability for psychiatric disorders in which serotonin plays a major role.

  12. Association between children's exposure to a violent event and objectively and subjectively measured sleep characteristics: a pilot longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Spilsbury, James C; Babineau, Denise C; Frame, Jennifer; Juhas, Kimberly; Rork, Kristine

    2014-10-01

    Although sleep disturbances are commonly reported among children exposed to violence, objective evidence of such disturbances is rare. This longitudinal, home-based study assessed the effects of a known community- or family-violence incident on both actigraphy-derived and subjectively reported sleep outcomes of an ethnically mixed, urban sample of children aged 8-16 years. We hypothesized that increased event severity (child physical assault, witnessed homicide) would be associated with lower sleep duration and poorer sleep quality both at baseline and at 3-month follow-up. Covariate-adjusted analyses based on a generalized estimating equations approach showed that children physically assaulted during the event showed lower sleep duration and sleep efficiency and greater wake after sleep onset than those not physically assaulted. Physically assaulted children were more likely to have a later bedtime than non-assaulted children, but this difference decreased at 3 months. Children witnessing a homicide showed greater wake after sleep onset at baseline and reported greater sleep problems than those witnessing a non-homicide event, but these differences decreased at 3 months. They were also somewhat more likely to have greater nightly variation in sleep duration. Collectively, results suggest that violence exposure influences children's sleep, but that specific dimensions of sleep may exhibit different susceptibility to different characteristics of violence, especially over time.

  13. The Longitudinal Impact of a Universal School-Based Social-Emotional and Literacy Intervention on Classroom Climate and Teacher Processes and Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Joshua L.; Jones, Stephanie M.; Aber, J. Lawrence

    2010-01-01

    This presentation capitalizes on a three-year, longitudinal, school-randomized trial of the 4Rs Program, a comprehensive, school-based social-emotional and literacy program for elementary schools, to test intervention induced changes in features of classroom climate and key dimensions of teacher affective and pedagogical processes and practices…

  14. Measuring practical knowledge among prospective and current teachers of deaf and hard of hearing students.

    PubMed

    Marlatt, E A

    2001-10-01

    Research on teaching and teacher research has a long history. However, in the field of the education of deaf and hard of hearing students, this research is limited. The study addresses one particular area of research on teaching and teacher research: practical knowledge of teachers of deaf and hard of hearing students. Practical knowledge is defined as how educators think about their classroom practice. By means of a survey designed and tested by the researcher, four hierarchical groups (beginning education students, graduating education students, novice teachers, and experienced teachers) in the education of deaf and hard of hearing students were surveyed on their practical knowledge. Practical knowledge codified as images, rules of practice, and practical principles. Results were measured to demonstrate for categories and characteristics of practical knowledge storage among prospective and current teachers of deaf and hard of hearing students. The instrument was designed as an assessment tool to measure aspects of this knowledge, apply it to levels of pedagogical expertise, and expand research in this area.

  15. Longitudinally Jointed Edge-Wise Compression HoneyComb Composite Sandwich Coupon Testing And Fe Analysis: Three Methods of Strain Measurement, And Comparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrokh, Babak; Rahim, Nur Aida Abul; Segal, Ken; Fan, Terry; Jones, Justin; Hodges, Ken; Mashni, Noah; Garg, Naman; Sang, Alex

    2013-01-01

    Three distinct strain measurement methods (i.e., foil resistance strain gages, fiber optic strain sensors, and a three-dimensional digital image photogrammetry that gives full field strain and displacement measurements) were implemented to measure strains on the back and front surfaces of a longitudinally jointed curved test article subjected to edge-wise compression testing, at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, according to ASTM C364. The pre-test finite element analysis (FEA) was conducted to assess ultimate failure load and predict strain distribution pattern throughout the test coupon. The predicted strain pattern contours were then utilized as guidelines for installing the strain measurement instrumentations. The foil resistance strain gages and fiber optic strain sensors were bonded on the specimen at locations with nearly the same analytically predicted strain values, and as close as possible to each other, so that, comparisons between the measured strains by strain gages and fiber optic sensors, as well as the three-dimensional digital image photogrammetric system are relevant. The test article was loaded to failure (at 167 kN), at the compressive strain value of 10,000 micro epsilon. As a part of this study, the validity of the measured strains by fiber optic sensors is examined against the foil resistance strain gages and the three-dimensional digital image photogrammetric data, and comprehensive comparisons are made with FEA predictions.

  16. Measuring the Quality of Inclusive Practices: Findings from the Inclusive Classroom Profile Pilot

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soukakou, Elena P.; Winton, Pam J.; West, Tracey A.; Sideris, John H.; Rucker, Lia M.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the reliability and validity of the Inclusive Classroom Profile (ICP), an observation measure designed to assess the quality of classroom practices in inclusive preschool programs. The measure was field tested in 51 inclusive classrooms. Results confirmed and extended previous research findings, providing…

  17. Measurement Invariance of an Instrument Assessing Sustainability of School-Based Universal Behavior Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mercer, Sterett H.; McIntosh, Kent; Strickland-Cohen, M. Kathleen; Horner, Robert H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of the study was to examine the extent to which the School-wide Universal Behavior Sustainability Index: School Teams (SUBSIST; McIntosh, Doolittle, Vincent, Horner, & Ervin, 2009), a measure of school and district contextual factors that promote the sustainability of school practices, demonstrated measurement invariance…

  18. The Development of a Practical and Reliable Assessment Measure for Atopic Dermatitis (ADAM).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charman, Denise; Varigos, George; Horne, David J. de L.; Oberklaid, Frank

    1999-01-01

    A study was conducted in Australia to develop a reliable, valid, and practical measure of atopic dermatitis. The test development process and validity evaluation with two doctors and 51 patients are discussed. Results suggest that operational definitions of the scales need to be defined more clearly. The measure satisfies assumptions for a partial…

  19. Geriatric medicine fellowship programs: a national study from the Association of Directors of Geriatric Academic Programs' Longitudinal Study of Training and Practice in Geriatric Medicine.

    PubMed

    Warshaw, Gregg A; Bragg, Elizabeth J; Shaull, Ruth W; Goldenhar, Linda M; Lindsell, Christopher J

    2003-07-01

    This report documents the development and growth of geriatric medicine fellowship training in the United States through 2002. A cross-sectional survey of geriatric medicine fellowship programs was conducted in the fall 2001. All allopathic (119) and osteopathic (7) accredited geriatric medicine fellowship-training programs in the United States were involved. Data were collected using self-administered mailed and Web-based survey instruments. Longitudinal data from the American Medical Association (AMA) and the Association of American Medical Colleges' (AAMC) National Graduate Medical Education (GME) Census, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME), and the American Osteopathic Association (AOA) were also analyzed. The survey instrument was designed to gather data about faculty, fellows, program curricula, and program directors (PDs). In addition, annual AMA/AAMC data from 1991 to the present was compiled to examine trends in the number of fellowship programs and the number of fellows. The overall survey response rate was 76% (96 of 126 PDs). Most (54%) of the PDs had been in their current position 4 or more years (range: <1-20 years), and 59% of PDs reported that they had completed formal geriatric medicine fellowship training. The number of fellowship programs and the number of fellows entering programs has slowly increased over the past decade. During 2001-02, 338 fellows were training in allopathic programs and seven in osteopathic programs (all years of training). Forty-six percent (n = 44) of responding programs offered only 1-year fellowship-training experiences. PDs reported that application rates for fellowship positions were stable during the academic years (AYs) 1999-2002, with the median number of applications per first year position available in AY 2000-01 being 10 (range: 1-77). In 2001-02, data from the AMA/AAMC National GME Census indicated a fill rate for first-year geriatric medicine fellowship positions of 69% (259 first

  20. Measurement of high-Q2 neutral current deep inelastic e+p scattering cross sections with a longitudinally polarized positron beam at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Aggarwal, R.; Antonelli, S.; Antonioli, P.; Antonov, A.; Arneodo, M.; Arslan, O.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Bachynska, O.; Bamberger, A.; Barakbaev, A. N.; Barbagli, G.; Bari, G.; Barreiro, F.; Bartosik, N.; Bartsch, D.; Basile, M.; Behnke, O.; Behr, J.; Behrens, U.; Bellagamba, L.; Bertolin, A.; Bhadra, S.; Bindi, M.; Blohm, C.; Bokhonov, V.; Bołd, T.; Bondarenko, K.; Boos, E. G.; Borras, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bot, D.; Brock, I.; Brownson, E.; Brugnera, R.; Brümmer, N.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Brzozowska, B.; Bussey, P. J.; Bylsma, B.; Caldwell, A.; Capua, M.; Carlin, R.; Catterall, C. D.; Chekanov, S.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Contin, A.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Coppola, N.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Costa, M.; D'Agostini, G.; Dal Corso, F.; del Peso, J.; Dementiev, R. K.; De Pasquale, S.; Derrick, M.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Dobur, D.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Dolinska, G.; Doyle, A. T.; Drugakov, V.; Durkin, L. S.; Dusini, S.; Eisenberg, Y.; Ermolov, P. F.; Eskreys, A.; Fang, S.; Fazio, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrero, M. I.; Figiel, J.; Foster, B.; Gach, G.; Galas, A.; Gallo, E.; Garfagnini, A.; Geiser, A.; Gialas, I.; Gizhko, A.; Gladilin, L. K.; Gladkov, D.; Glasman, C.; Gogota, O.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Göttlicher, P.; Grabowska-Bołd, I.; Grebenyuk, J.; Gregor, I.; Grigorescu, G.; Grzelak, G.; Gueta, O.; Guzik, M.; Gwenlan, C.; Haas, T.; Hain, W.; Hamatsu, R.; Hart, J. C.; Hartmann, H.; Hartner, G.; Hilger, E.; Hochman, D.; Hori, R.; Hüttmann, A.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ingbir, R.; Ishitsuka, M.; Jakob, H.-P.; Januschek, F.; Jones, T. W.; Jüngst, M.; Kadenko, I.; Kahle, B.; Kananov, S.; Kanno, T.; Karshon, U.; Karstens, F.; Katkov, I. I.; Kaur, M.; Kaur, P.; Keramidas, A.; Khein, L. A.; Kim, J. Y.; Kisielewska, D.; Kitamura, S.; Klanner, R.; Klein, U.; Koffeman, E.; Kondrashova, N.; Kononenko, O.; Kooijman, P.; Korol, Ie.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kotański, A.; Kötz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Lee, A.; Levchenko, B. B.; Levy, A.; Libov, V.; Limentani, S.; Ling, T. Y.; Lisovyi, M.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lohmann, W.; Löhr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Long, K. R.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Maeda, J.; Magill, S.; Makarenko, I.; Malka, J.; Mankel, R.; Margotti, A.; Marini, G.; Martin, J. F.; Mastroberardino, A.; Mattingly, M. C. K.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Miglioranzi, S.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Monaco, V.; Montanari, A.; Morris, J. D.; Mujkic, K.; Musgrave, B.; Nagano, K.; Namsoo, T.; Nania, R.; Nigro, A.; Ning, Y.; Nobe, T.; Notz, D.; Nowak, R. J.; Nuncio-Quiroz, A. E.; Oh, B. Y.; Okazaki, N.; Olkiewicz, K.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Papageorgiu, K.; Parenti, A.; Paul, E.; Pawlak, J. M.; Pawlik, B.; Pelfer, P. G.; Pellegrino, A.; Perlański, W.; Perrey, H.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Pluciński, P.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Polini, A.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Przybycień, M.; Raval, A.; Reeder, D. D.; Reisert, B.; Ren, Z.; Repond, J.; Ri, Y. D.; Robertson, A.; Roloff, P.; Rubinsky, I.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Samson, U.; Sartorelli, G.; Savin, A. A.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenstedt, S.; Schleper, P.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schneekloth, U.; Schönberg, V.; Schörner-Sadenius, T.; Schwartz, J.; Sciulli, F.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shehzadi, R.; Shimizu, S.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Słomiński, W.; Smith, W. H.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Son, D.; Sosnovtsev, V.; Spiridonov, A.; Stadie, H.; Stanco, L.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stern, A.; Stewart, T. P.; Stifutkin, A.; Stopa, P.; Suchkov, S.; Susinno, G.; Suszycki, L.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Tapper, A. D.; Tassi, E.; Terrón, J.; Theedt, T.; Tiecke, H.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomaszewska, J.; Trusov, V.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Turkot, O.; Tymieniecka, T.; Vázquez, M.; Verbytskyi, A.; Viazlo, O.; Vlasov, N. N.; Walczak, R.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Whitmore, J. J.; Wichmann, K.; Wiggers, L.; Wing, M.; Wlasenko, M.; Wolf, G.; Wolfe, H.; Wrona, K.; Yagües-Molina, A. G.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yoshida, R.; Youngman, C.; Zabiegalov, O.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Zawiejski, L.; Zenaiev, O.; Zeuner, W.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zhmak, N.; Zichichi, A.; Zolkapli, Z.; Zotkin, D. S.

    2013-03-01

    Measurements of neutral current cross sections for deep inelastic scattering in e+p collisions at HERA with a longitudinally polarized positron beam are presented. The single-differential cross-sections dσ/dQ2, dσ/dx and dσ/dy and the reduced cross section σ˜ are measured in the kinematic region Q2>185GeV2 and y<0.9, where Q2 is the four-momentum transfer squared, x the Bjorken scaling variable and y the inelasticity of the interaction. The measurements are performed separately for positively and negatively polarized positron beams. The measurements are based on an integrated luminosity of 135.5pb-1 collected with the ZEUS detector in 2006 and 2007 at a center-of-mass energy of 318 GeV. The structure functions F˜3 and F3γZ are determined by combining the e+p results presented in this paper with previously published e-p neutral current results. The asymmetry parameter A+ is used to demonstrate the parity violation predicted in electroweak interactions. The measurements are well described by the predictions of the Standard Model.

  1. Measurement of longitudinal and transverse cross sections in the 3He(e,e'pi+)3H reaction at W=1.6 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    D. Gaskell; A. Ahmidouch; P. Ambrozewicz; H. Anklin; J. Arrington; K. Assamagan; S. Avery; K. Bailey; O. K. Baker; S. Beedoe; B. Beise; H. Breuer; D. S. Brown; R. Carlini; J. Cha; N. Chant; A. Cowley; S. Danagoulian; D. De Schepper; J. Dunne; D. Dutta; R. Ent; L. Gan; A. Gasparian; D. F. Geesaman; R. Gilman; C. Glashausser; P. Gueye; M. Harvey; O. Hashimoto; W. Hinton; G. Hofman; C. Jackson; H. E. Jackson; C. Keppel; E. Kinney; D. Koltenuk; A. Lung; D. Mack; D. McKee; J. Mitchell; H. Mkrtchyan; B. Mueller; G. Niculescu; I. Niculescu; T. G. O'Neill; V. Papavassiliou; D. Potterveld; J. Reinhold; P. Roos; R. Sawafta; R. Segel; S. Stepanyan; V. Tadevosyan; T. Takahashi; L. Tang; B. Terburg; D. Van Westrum; J. Volmer; T. P. Welch; S. Wood; L. Yuan; B. Zeidman; B. Zihlmann

    2001-12-21

    The coherent 3He(e,e{pi}+)3H reaction was measured at Q2 = 0.4 (GeV/c)2 and W = 1.6 GeV for two values of the virtual photon polarization, {epsilon}, allowing the separation of longitudinal and transverse cross sections. The results from the coherent process on 3He were compared to H(e,e{pi}+)n data taken at the same kinematics. This marks the first direct comparison of these processes. At these kinematics (p{pi} = 1.1 GeV/c), pion rescattering from the spectator nucleons in the 3He(e,e{pi}+)3H process is expected to be small, simplifying the comparison to {pi}+ production from the free proton.

  2. Detection of DC currents and resistance measurements in longitudinal spin Seebeck effect experiments on Pt/YIG and Pt/NFO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, Daniel; Kuschel, Timo; Meyer, Sibylle; Goennenwein, Sebastian T. B.; Shen, Liming; Gupta, Arunava; Schmalhorst, Jan-Michael; Reiss, Günter

    2016-05-01

    In this work we investigated thin films of the ferrimagnetic insulators Y 3Fe5O12 and NiFe2O4 capped with thin Pt layers in terms of the longitudinal spin Seebeck effect (LSSE). The electric response detected in the Pt layer under an out-of-plane temperature gradient can be interpreted as a pure spin current converted into a charge current via the inverse spin Hall effect. Typically, the transverse voltage is the quantity investigated in LSSE measurements (in the range of μV). Here, we present the directly detected DC current (in the range of nA) as an alternative quantity. Furthermore, we investigate the resistance of the Pt layer in the LSSE configuration. We found an influence of the test current on the resistance. The typical shape of the LSSE curve varies for increasing test currents.

  3. Changing patterns in the humoral immune response to malaria before, during, and after the application of control measures: a longitudinal study in the West African savanna*

    PubMed Central

    Brögger, R. Cornille; Mathews, H. M.; Storey, J.; Ashkar, T. S.; Brögger, S.; Molineaux, L.

    1978-01-01

    A longitudinal seroimmunological investigation of malaria was performed as part of the WHO research project conducted in the northern part of Nigeria from 1970 to 1975. The project included a preintervention phase, an intervention phase with application of malaria control measures (spraying of residual insecticide and mass drug administration), and a postintervention phase. Serological observations were made on the total population of eight villages consisting of approximately 3000 persons. Six immunological parameters were studied, namely, the serum levels of IgG and IgM, the number of bands of precipitation for Plasmodium falciparum in the double diffusion (Ouchterlony) test, the titres of antibodies for P. falciparum and P. malariae in the indirect fluorescent antibody (IFA) test, and the titres of agglutinating antibodies for P. falciparum by the indirect (passive) haemagglutination (IHA) test. The serological results were used to evaluate the impact on the humoral immune response of different levels of parasitaemia resulting, in the unprotected population, from natural factors such as seasons and ageing and in the protected population, from human intervention through the application of control measures and their interruption. The linkage by computer processing of the longitudinal data allowed analysis of the relationship between the results of a serological test in the same person at different surveys, and analysis of correlation between serological results and the concurrent parasitological findings. The correlation between parasitaemia and the results of the different serological tests at the same survey in the same person were also examined and analysed in terms of sensitivity and specificity of the tests. PMID:365386

  4. Advancing performance measurement in oncology: quality oncology practice initiative participation and quality outcomes.

    PubMed

    Campion, Francis X; Larson, Leanne R; Kadlubek, Pamela J; Earle, Craig C; Neuss, Michael N

    2011-05-01

    The American health care system, including the cancer care system, is under pressure to improve patient outcomes and lower the cost of care. Government payers have articulated an interest in partnering with the private sector to create learning communities to measure quality and improve the value of health care. In 2006, the American Society for Clinical Oncology (ASCO) unveiled the Quality Oncology Practice Initiative (QOPI), which has become a key component of the measurement system to promote quality cancer care. QOPI is a physician-led, voluntary, practice-based, quality-improvement program, using performance measurement and benchmarking among oncology practices across the United States. Since its inception, ASCO's QOPI has grown steadily to include 973 practices as of November 2010. One key area that QOPI has addressed is end-of-life care. During the most recent data collection cycle in the Fall of 2010, those practices completing multiple data collection cycles had better performance on care of pain compared with sites participating for the first time (62.61% v 46.89%). Similarly, repeat QOPI participants demonstrated meaningfully better performance than their peers in the rate of documenting discussions of hospice and palliative care (62.42% v 54.65%) and higher rates of hospice enrollment. QOPI demonstrates how a strong performance measurement program can lead to improved quality and value of care for patients.

  5. Residual Stress Measurement and Calibration for A7N01 Aluminum Alloy Welded Joints by Using Longitudinal Critically Refracted ( LCR) Wave Transmission Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Qimeng; Chen, Jia; Gou, Guoqing; Chen, Hui; Li, Peng; Gao, W.

    2016-10-01

    Residual stress measurement and control are highly important for the safety of structures of high-speed trains, which is critical for the structure design. The longitudinal critically refracted wave technology is the most widely used method in measuring residual stress with ultrasonic method, but its accuracy is strongly related to the test parameters, namely the flight time at the free-stress condition ( t 0), stress coefficient ( K), and initial stress (σ0) of the measured materials. The difference of microstructure in the weld zone, heat affected zone, and base metal (BM) results in the divergence of experimental parameters. However, the majority of researchers use the BM parameters to determine the residual stress in other zones and ignore the initial stress (σ0) in calibration samples. Therefore, the measured residual stress in different zones is often high in errors and may result in the miscalculation of the safe design of important structures. A serious problem in the ultrasonic estimation of residual stresses requires separation between the microstructure and the acoustoelastic effects. In this paper, the effects of initial stress and microstructure on stress coefficient K and flight time t 0 at free-stress conditions have been studied. The residual stress with or without different corrections was investigated. The results indicated that the residual stresses obtained with correction are more accurate for structure design.

  6. Longitudinally Jointed Edge-wise Compression Honeycomb Composite Sandwich Coupon Testing and FE Analysis: Three Methods of Strain Measurement, and Comparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrokh, Babak; AbdulRahim, Nur Aida; Segal, Ken; Fan, Terry; Jones, Justin; Hodges, Ken; Mashni, Noah; Garg, Naman; Sang, Alex; Gifford, Dawn; Froggatt, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Three means (i.e., typical foil strain gages, fiber optic sensors, and a digital image correlation (DIC) system) were implemented to measure strains on the back and front surfaces of a longitudinally jointed curved test article subjected to edge-wise compression testing, at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, according to ASTM C364. The Pre-test finite element analysis (FEA) was conducted to assess ultimate failure load and predict strain distribution pattern throughout the test coupon. The predicted strain pattern contours were then utilized as guidelines for installing the strain measurement instrumentations. The strain gages and fiber optic sensors were bonded on the specimen at locations with nearly the same strain values, as close as possible to each other, so that, comparisons between the measured strains by strain gages and fiber optic sensors, as well as the DIC system are justified. The test article was loaded to failure (at approximately 38 kips), at the strain value of approximately 10,000mu epsilon As a part of this study, the validity of the measured strains by fiber optic sensors is examined against the strain gage and DIC data, and also will be compared with FEA predictions.

  7. Practical resolution requirements of measurement instruments for precise characterization of autostereoscopic 3D displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boher, Pierre; Leroux, Thierry; Collomb-Patton, Véronique; Bignon, Thibault

    2014-03-01

    Different ways to evaluate the optical performances of auto-stereoscopic 3D displays are reviewed. Special attention is paid to the crosstalk measurements that can be performed by measuring, either the precise angular emission at one or few locations on the display surface, or the full display surface emission from very specific locations in front of the display. Using measurements made in the two ways with different instruments on different auto-stereoscopic displays, we show that measurement instruments need to match the resolution of the human eye to obtain reliable results in both cases. Practical requirements in terms of angular resolution for viewing angle measurement instruments and in terms of spatial resolution for imaging instruments are derived and verified on practical examples.

  8. Feedback from Outcome Measures and Treatment Effectiveness, Treatment Efficiency, and Collaborative Practice: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Gondek, Dawid; Edbrooke-Childs, Julian; Fink, Elian; Deighton, Jessica; Wolpert, Miranda

    2016-05-01

    Due to recent increases in the use of feedback from outcome measures in mental health settings, we systematically reviewed evidence regarding the impact of feedback from outcome measures on treatment effectiveness, treatment efficiency, and collaborative practice. In over half of 32 studies reviewed, the feedback condition had significantly higher levels of treatment effectiveness on at least one treatment outcome variable. Feedback was particularly effective for not-on-track patients or when it was provided to both clinicians and patients. The findings for treatment efficiency and collaborative practice were less consistent. Given the heterogeneity of studies, more research is needed to determine when and for whom feedback is most effective.

  9. Relationship Between Longitudinal Measures of Renal Function and Onset of Dementia Among a Community Cohort of Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    O’Hare, Ann M.; Walker, Rod; Haneuse, Sebastian; Crane, Paul K.; McCormick, Wayne C.; Bowen, James D.; Larson, Eric B.

    2012-01-01

    Background Prior studies have described a higher incidence of dementia or worsening cognitive function in patients with lower levels of kidney function at a single point in time. Objectives To evaluate the association between dynamic measures of renal function ascertained over time with onset of dementia. Design prospective community cohort study. Setting and Participants 2,968 adults aged 65 and older followed for the development of dementia over a median of 6.0 years (interquartile range 3.1–10.1 years). Measurements Time varying measures of renal function were constructed based on a total of 49,340 serum creatinine measurements and included: the average level of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), eGFR trajectory and variability in eGFR around this trajectory over 5-year exposure windows. The association between these three eGFR exposure measures and risk of dementia was estimated using a Cox regression model adjusted for other patient characteristics. In sensitivity analyses, we also adjusted for time-varying measures of urine protein by dipstick. Results Patients with lower levels of eGFR had a higher incidence of dementia but this did not reach statistical significance in adjusted analyses (omnibus p value=0.14). There were trends toward a higher adjusted incidence of dementia in patients with positive eGFR trajectories (omnibus p value=0.07) and greater variability in eGFR (omnibus p value=0.04) over time. The results of sensitivity analyses, including those in which we included time-varying measures of proteinuria, were consistent with those of the primary analysis. Conclusion Among a community cohort of older adults followed for a median of 6 years, we did not find strong associations between measures of kidney disease severity and progression and incident dementia. PMID:23231548

  10. a Review on Legal Traceability of Gnss Measurements in the Malaysian Cadastral Practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, J.; Shariff, N. S.; Omar, K. M.; Din, A. H. M.; Amin, Z. M.

    2016-09-01

    As the dependency on Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) in surveying has been growing over the years, the need for legal traceability of GNSS measurements has become a significant matter. In Malaysia, with the advent of the Malaysia Real-time Kinematic Network (MyRTKnet), GNSS surveying has revolutionised land survey and mapping. Correspondingly, the Department of Survey and Mapping Malaysia (DSMM) amended and published standard regulations and guidelines concerning cadastral survey, i.e., Cadastral Survey Regulations 2009, to include GNSS measurements. However, these regulations and guidelines has not comprehensively incorporated legal traceability of GNSS measurements; which is a prerequisite for cadastral surveys as it requires reliable and conclusive evidence for issues such as boundary disputes. The first objective of this paper is to review and discuss the legal traceability of GNSS measurements. Secondly, it will highlight the current practice and issues, i.e., with regard to legal traceability, within the present Malaysian cadastral regulation and guidelines, in relation to the prevalently adopted Network RTK (N-RTK) technique, GNSS instrument calibrations, and reference stations' accuracy. Lastly, a rudimentary best practice guideline for GNSS surveying in cadastral survey for Malaysia is proposed. It is expected that this paper will contribute to the implementation of a best practice guideline, which is inclusive of legal traceability of GNSS measurements, for the Malaysian cadastral practice.

  11. New measures for new roles: defining and measuring the current practices of health sciences librarians

    PubMed Central

    Scherrer, Carol S.; Jacobson, Susan

    2002-01-01

    The roles of academic health sciences librarians are continually evolving as librarians initiate new programs and services in response to developments in computer technology and user demands. However, statistics currently collected by libraries do not accurately reflect or measure these new roles. It is essential for librarians to document, measure, and evaluate these new activities to continue to meet the needs of users and to ensure the viability of their professional role. To determine what new measures should be compiled, the authors examined current statistics, user demands, professional literature, and current activities of librarians as reported in abstracts of poster sessions at Medical Library Association annual meetings. Three new categories of services to be measured are proposed. The first, consultation, groups activities such as quality filtering and individual point-of-need instruction. The second, outreach, includes activities such as working as liaisons, participating in grand rounds or morning report, and providing continuing education. The third area, Web authoring, encompasses activities such as designing Web pages, creating online tutorials, and developing new products. Adding these three measures to those already being collected will provide a more accurate and complete depiction of the services offered by academic health sciences librarians. PMID:11999174

  12. How Is Science Being Taught? Measuring Evidence-Based Teaching Practices across Undergraduate Science Departments

    PubMed Central

    Drinkwater, Michael J.; Matthews, Kelly E.; Seiler, Jacob

    2017-01-01

    While there is a wealth of research evidencing the benefits of active-learning approaches, the extent to which these teaching practices are adopted in the sciences is not well known. The aim of this study is to establish an evidential baseline of teaching practices across a bachelor of science degree program at a large research-intensive Australian university. Our purpose is to contribute to knowledge on the adoption levels of evidence-based teaching practices by faculty within a science degree program and inform our science curriculum review in practical terms. We used the Teaching Practices Inventory (TPI) to measure the use of evidence-based teaching approaches in 129 courses (units of study) across 13 departments. We compared the results with those from a Canadian institution to identify areas in need of improvement at our institution. We applied a regression analysis to the data and found that the adoption of evidence-based teaching practices differs by discipline and is higher in first-year classes at our institution. The study demonstrates that the TPI can be used in different institutional contexts and provides data that can inform practice and policy. PMID:28232589

  13. How Is Science Being Taught? Measuring Evidence-Based Teaching Practices across Undergraduate Science Departments.

    PubMed

    Drinkwater, Michael J; Matthews, Kelly E; Seiler, Jacob

    2017-01-01

    While there is a wealth of research evidencing the benefits of active-learning approaches, the extent to which these teaching practices are adopted in the sciences is not well known. The aim of this study is to establish an evidential baseline of teaching practices across a bachelor of science degree program at a large research-intensive Australian university. Our purpose is to contribute to knowledge on the adoption levels of evidence-based teaching practices by faculty within a science degree program and inform our science curriculum review in practical terms. We used the Teaching Practices Inventory (TPI) to measure the use of evidence-based teaching approaches in 129 courses (units of study) across 13 departments. We compared the results with those from a Canadian institution to identify areas in need of improvement at our institution. We applied a regression analysis to the data and found that the adoption of evidence-based teaching practices differs by discipline and is higher in first-year classes at our institution. The study demonstrates that the TPI can be used in different institutional contexts and provides data that can inform practice and policy.

  14. Measuring Youths’ Perceptions of Counseling Impact: Description, Psychometric Evaluation, and Longitudinal Examination of the Youth Counseling Impact Scale v.2

    PubMed Central

    Kearns, Marcia A.; Athay, M. Michele; Riemer, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    The Youth Counseling Impact Scale (YCIS) is an empirically validated treatment progress measure that assesses youths’ perceptions of the short term effectiveness of therapy. Since its initial publication, the original 10-item measure has been shortened to ease measurement burden and revised to include a question about a youth’s insight into his or her strengths. The current study describes the development of the revised YCIS (v.2) and evaluates its psychometric properties. Additionally, this study examines whether the YCIS (v.2) total score or subscale scores change over time and investigates whether there are gender or age differences for youths’ perceptions of the impact of therapy. Results found the revised version obtained comparable information to that of the original measure, and that the revised version retained the factor structure of the original model with one primary general factor of Counseling Impact and two secondary factors (Insight and Change). Results also suggested that while the YCIS (v.2) total score and Change subscale score did not change linearly over the course of treatment, the Insight subscale score showed a small but significant linear increase over time. No significant differences in YCIS scores based on youth age or gender were found. The implication of these findings, the clinical and empirical utility of this measure, and its limitations are discussed. PMID:22407563

  15. Quality Nutrition Care: Measuring Hospital Staff’s Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices

    PubMed Central

    Laur, Celia; Marcus, Hannah; Ray, Sumantra; Keller, Heather

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the knowledge, attitudes, and practices (KAP) of hospital staff is needed to improve care activities that support the detection/prevention/treatment of malnutrition, yet quality measures are lacking. The purpose was to develop (study 1) and assess the administration and discriminative potential (study 2) of using such a KAP measure in acute care. In study 1, a 27-question KAP questionnaire was developed, face validated (n = 5), and tested for reliability (n = 35). Kappa and Intraclass Correlation (ICC) were determined. In study 2, the questionnaire was sent to staff at five diverse hospitals (n = 189). Administration challenges were noted and analyses completed to determine differences across sites, professions, and years of practice. Study 1 results demonstrate that the knowledge/attitude (KA) and the practice (P) subscales are reliable (KA: ICC = 0.69 95% CI 0.45–0.84, F = 5.54, p < 0.0001; P: ICC = 0.84 95% CI 0.68−0.92, F = 11.12, p < 0.0001). Completion rate of individual questions in study 2 was high and suggestions to improve administration were identified. The KAP mean score was 93.6/128 (range 51–124) with higher scores indicating more knowledge, better attitudes and positive practices. Profession and years of practice were associated with KAP scores. The KAP questionnaire is a valid and reliable measure that can be used in needs assessments to inform improvements to nutrition care in hospital. PMID:27775604

  16. Measuring Dimensions of Coalition Functioning for Effective and Participatory Community Practice

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, Valerie B.; Oesterle, Sabrina; Abbott, Robert D.; Arthur, Michael W.; Hawkins, J. David

    2013-01-01

    Social work has a long history of community practice, but community practice models have been understudied. An important first step in conducting such studies is the establishment of psychometrically sound measures that are relevant for evaluations of community practice. In this article, data are used from a community-randomized trial of Communities That Care, a coalition-based model of community practice shown to be effective at transforming communities and changing rates of problem behavior in youths. Coalition functioning is reported by coalition members in 12 communities across intervention implementation phases. A four-dimensional model of coalition functioning (goal-directedness, efficiency, opportunities for participation, and cohesion) was confirmed using factor analysis, and the dimensions were found to be invariant across time. One test of validity of these dimensions is conducted by correlating coalition members' ratings of coalition functioning with those of external observers. PMID:24778545

  17. Longitudinal 3-week tracking of blood glucose concentration from thermo-optical response measurements on human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Shu-jen; Kantor, Stan; Hanna, Charles; Shain, Eric; Hohs, Ronald; Khalil, Omar S.

    2006-08-01

    We designed a dual-sensor instrument for measuring optical signals from the arms of human volunteers. The instrument had two temperature-controlled localized reflectance optical probes. Each probe had one illumination fiber and four detection fibers at different source-detector distances. The two probes were maintained at 30 °C. Thirty seconds after contact with the skin one was heated and the other was cooled at the same rate. The effect of heating and cooling on the signal was measured and correlated with blood glucose concentration. The measurements were performed 3 to 5 times a day for each volunteer over the span of three weeks. The data points from the first two weeks were used to establish a calibration model for each volunteer, which was used to predict glucose values from the third week optical data. Successftil calibration was possible for two of the three volunteers.

  18. Simultaneous inference for longitudinal data with detection limits and covariates measured with errors, with application to AIDS studies.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lang

    2004-06-15

    In AIDS studies such as HIV viral dynamics, statistical inference is often complicated because the viral load measurements may be subject to left censoring due to a detection limit and time-varying covariates such as CD4 counts may be measured with substantial errors. Mixed-effects models are often used to model the response and the covariate processes in these studies. We propose a unified approach which addresses the censoring and measurement errors simultaneously. We estimate the model parameters by a Monte-Carlo EM algorithm via the Gibbs sampler. A simulation study is conducted to compare the proposed method with the usual two-step method and a naive method. We find that the proposed method produces approximately unbiased estimates with more reliable standard errors. A real data set from an AIDS study is analysed using the proposed method.

  19. The Role of Measurement Quality on Practical Guidelines for Assessing Measurement and Structural Invariance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kang, Yoonjeong; McNeish, Daniel M.; Hancock, Gregory R.

    2016-01-01

    Although differences in goodness-of-fit indices (?GOFs) have been advocated for assessing measurement invariance, studies that advanced recommended differential cutoffs for adjudicating invariance actually utilized a very limited range of values representing the quality of indicator variables (i.e., magnitude of loadings). Because quality of…

  20. Blood markers of fatty acids and vitamin D, cardiovascular measures, body mass index, and physical activity relate to longitudinal cortical thinning in normal aging.

    PubMed

    Walhovd, Kristine B; Storsve, Andreas B; Westlye, Lars T; Drevon, Christian A; Fjell, Anders M

    2014-05-01

    We hypothesized that higher levels of omega-3 fatty acids, vitamin D, and physical activity relate to cortical sparing, whereas higher levels of cholesterol, systolic blood pressure, and body mass index (BMI) relate to increased atrophy in the adult lifespan. Longitudinal measures of cortical thickness were derived from magnetic resonance imaging scans acquired (mean interval 3.6 years) from 203 healthy persons aged 23-87 years. At follow-up, measures of BMI, blood pressure, and physical activity were obtained. Blood levels of docosahexaenoic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid, vitamin D, and cholesterol were measured in a subsample (n = 92). Effects were tested in cortical surface-based analyses, with sex, age, follow-up interval, and the interactions between each included as covariates. Higher levels of docosahexaenoic acid, vitamin D, and physical activity related to cortical sparing. Higher cholesterol and BMI related to increased cortical thinning. Effects were independent, did not interact with age, and the cholesterol effect was restricted to males. Eicosapentaenoic acid and blood pressure showed no effects. The observed effects show promise for potential factors to reduce cortical atrophy in normal aging.

  1. Correspondence between Physiological and Self-Report Measures of Emotion Dysregulation: A Longitudinal Investigation of Youth with and without Psychopathology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vasilev, Christina A.; Crowell, Sheila E.; Beauchaine, Theodore P.; Mead, Hilary K.; Gatzke-Kopp, Lisa M.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Several theoretical perspectives suggest that emotion dysregulation is a predisposing risk factor for many psychiatric disorders. Yet despite a rapidly evolving literature, difficulties with emotion regulation (ER) are often measured inconsistently across studies, with little regard to whether different approaches capture the same…

  2. Measuring Social Return on Investment for Community Schools: A Practical Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez, Laura; Hayes, Cheryl D.; Silloway, Torey

    2013-01-01

    Social return on investment (SROI) analysis offers a practical new approach for measuring and communicating the value of outcomes achieved by programs that provide social, health, and educational services to children and their families. This guide highlights the key steps in conducting SROI research, issues in data-gathering and analysis, as well…

  3. Designing Chemistry Practice Exams for Enhanced Benefits: An Instrument for Comparing Performance and Mental Effort Measures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knaus, Karen J.; Murphy, Kristen L.; Holme, Thomas A.

    2009-01-01

    The design and use of a chemistry practice exam instrument that includes a measure for student mental effort is described in this paper. Use of such an instrument can beneficial to chemistry students and chemistry educators as well as chemical education researchers from both a content and cognitive science perspective. The method for calculating…

  4. Measuring Job Content: Skills, Technology, and Management Practices. Discussion Paper No. 1357-08

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Handel, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    The conceptualization and measurement of key job characteristics has not changed greatly for most social scientists since the Dictionary of Occupational Titles and Quality of Employment surveys were created, despite their recognized limitations. However, debates over the roles of job skill requirements, technology, and new management practices in…

  5. Developing and Validating Field Measurement Scales for Absorptive Capacity and Experienced Community of Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cadiz, David; Sawyer, John E.; Griffith, Terri L.

    2009-01-01

    Research on knowledge transfer in organizations has been hampered by the lack of tools yielding valid scores for studying critical constructs in concert. The authors developed survey measures of absorptive capacity (the ability to transform new knowledge into usable knowledge) and experienced community of practice (the extent to which a person is…

  6. Use of an Innovation Component Configuration Map to Measure Technology Integration Practices of Higher Education Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Javeri, Manisha; Persichitte, Kay

    2004-01-01

    This presentation will focus on the use of a custom developed Innovation Component Configuration Map (ICCM) to measure technology integration practices of faculty in Schools, Colleges, and Departments of Education (SCDEs). This study investigated the relationship between the level of technology integration fidelity (high, moderate or low) by SCDE…

  7. Measuring Parenting Practices among Parents of Elementary School-Age Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Randolph, Karen A.; Radey, Melissa

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: The objective of this study is to establish the factor structure of the Alabama Parenting Questionnaire (APQ), an instrument designed to measure parenting practices among parents of elementary school children. Methods: Exploratory (EFA) and confirmatory factor analytic (CFA) procedures are used to validate the APQ with 790 parents of…

  8. Numbers of Bilingual Children in Speech and Language Therapy: Theory and Practice of Measuring Their Representation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winter, Kirsten

    2001-01-01

    Explores concepts behind measuring representation of bilingual children in speech and language therapy (SLT), with relevance to other services, and discusses practicalities.Interviews were conducted with speech and language therapists or their managers in nine SLT departments. Findings showed that SLTs' and managers perceptions of the linguistic…

  9. Effect Size Indices for Analyses of Measurement Equivalence: Understanding the Practical Importance of Differences between Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nye, Christopher D.; Drasgow, Fritz

    2011-01-01

    Because of the practical, theoretical, and legal implications of differential item functioning (DIF) for organizational assessments, studies of measurement equivalence are a necessary first step before scores can be compared across individuals from different groups. However, commonly recommended criteria for evaluating results from these analyses…

  10. Developing Common Measures in Evaluation Capacity Building: An Iterative Science and Practice Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Labin, Susan N.

    2014-01-01

    A fundamental reason for doing evaluation capacity building (ECB) is to improve program outcomes. Developing common measures of outcomes and the activities, processes, and factors that lead to these outcomes is an important step in moving the science and the practice of ECB forward. This article identifies a number of existing ECB measurement…

  11. A Dataset for Education-Related Majors' Performance Measures with Pre/Post-Video Game Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novak, Elena; Tassell, Janet Lynne

    2015-01-01

    This dataset includes a series of 30 education-related majors' performance measures before and after they completed a 10-hour video game practice in a computer lab. The goal of the experimental study was to examine the effects of action video gaming on students' mathematics performance and mathematics anxiety as mediated by the effect of attention…

  12. Assessing the Utility of a Daily Log for Measuring Principal Leadership Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camburn, Eric M.; Spillane, James P.; Sebastian, James

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This study examines the feasibility and utility of a daily log for measuring principal leadership practice. Setting and Sample: The study was conducted in an urban district with approximately 50 principals. Approach: The log was assessed against two criteria: (a) Is it feasible to induce strong cooperation and high response rates among…

  13. The Practical Implementation of Non-Contacting Laser Strain Measurements Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yunis, Isam; Quinn, roger D.; Kadambi, Jaikrishnan R.

    2000-01-01

    Measurement of stress and strain in rotating turbomachinery is critical to many industries. The search for a non-contacting, non-interfering, non-degrading measurement system is on going and extensive. While several methods seem promising in theory, implementation has proven troublesome. This work uncovers and quantifies these implementation issues in the context of a laser measurement system. Both a Laser Doppler Velocimeter system and a displacement laser system are utilized. It is found that the key issues are signal to noise ratio, rigid body compensation, measurement location, and conversion of intermittent measurements to a continuous signal. Accounting for these factors leads to successful measurements. These results should lead to better ideas and more practical solutions to the non-contacting, non-degrading, non-interfering strain measurement system problem.

  14. Bloch-Siegert B1-Mapping Improves Accuracy and Precision of Longitudinal Relaxation Measurements in the Breast at 3 T.

    PubMed

    Whisenant, Jennifer G; Dortch, Richard D; Grissom, William; Kang, Hakmook; Arlinghaus, Lori R; Yankeelov, Thomas E

    2016-12-01

    Variable flip angle (VFA) sequences are a popular method of calculating T1 values, which are required in a quantitative analysis of dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). B1 inhomogeneities are substantial in the breast at 3 T, and these errors negatively impact the accuracy of the VFA approach, thus leading to large errors in the DCE-MRI parameters that could limit clinical adoption of the technique. This study evaluated the ability of Bloch-Siegert B1 mapping to improve the accuracy and precision of VFA-derived T1 measurements in the breast. Test-retest MRI sessions were performed on 16 women with no history of breast disease. T1 was calculated using the VFA sequence, and B1 field variations were measured using the Bloch-Siegert methodology. As a gold standard, inversion recovery (IR) measurements of T1 were performed. Fibroglandular tissue and adipose tissue from each breast were segmented using the IR images, and the mean T1 was calculated for each tissue. Accuracy was evaluated by percent error (%err). Reproducibility was assessed via the 95% confidence interval (CI) of the mean difference and repeatability coefficient (r). After B1 correction, %err significantly (P < .001) decreased from 17% to 8.6%, and the 95% CI and r decreased from ±94 to ±38 milliseconds and from 276 to 111 milliseconds, respectively. Similar accuracy and reproducibility results were observed in the adipose tissue of the right breast and in both tissues of the left breast. Our data show that Bloch-Siegert B1 mapping improves accuracy and precision of VFA-derived T1 measurements in the breast.

  15. In-plane ultrasonic velocity measurement of longitudinal and shear waves in the machine direction with transducers in rotating wheels

    DOEpatents

    Hall, Maclin S.; Jackson, Theodore G.; Knerr, Christopher

    1998-02-17

    An improved system for measuring the velocity of ultrasonic signals within the plane of moving web-like materials, such as paper, paperboard and the like. In addition to velocity measurements of ultrasonic signals in the plane of the web in the MD and CD, one embodiment of the system in accordance with the present invention is also adapted to provide on-line indication of the polar specific stiffness of the moving web. In another embodiment of the invention, the velocity of ultrasonic signals in the plane of the web are measured by way of a plurality of ultrasonic transducers carried by synchronously driven wheels or cylinders, thus eliminating undue transducer wear due to any speed differences between the transducers and the web. In order to provide relatively constant contact force between the transducers and the webs, the transducers are mounted in a sensor housings which include a spring for biasing the transducer radially outwardly. The sensor housings are adapted to be easily and conveniently mounted to the carrier to provide a relatively constant contact force between the transducers and the moving web.

  16. In-plane ultrasonic velocity measurement of longitudinal and shear waves in the machine direction with transducers in rotating wheels

    DOEpatents

    Hall, M.S.; Jackson, T.G.; Knerr, C.

    1998-02-17

    An improved system for measuring the velocity of ultrasonic signals within the plane of moving web-like materials, such as paper, paperboard and the like. In addition to velocity measurements of ultrasonic signals in the plane of the web in the MD and CD, one embodiment of the system in accordance with the present invention is also adapted to provide on-line indication of the polar specific stiffness of the moving web. In another embodiment of the invention, the velocity of ultrasonic signals in the plane of the web are measured by way of a plurality of ultrasonic transducers carried by synchronously driven wheels or cylinders, thus eliminating undue transducer wear due to any speed differences between the transducers and the web. In order to provide relatively constant contact force between the transducers and the webs, the transducers are mounted in a sensor housings which include a spring for biasing the transducer radially outwardly. The sensor housings are adapted to be easily and conveniently mounted to the carrier to provide a relatively constant contact force between the transducers and the moving web. 37 figs.

  17. AAN Epilepsy Quality Measures in clinical practice: a survey of neurologists.

    PubMed

    Wasade, Vibhangini S; Spanaki, Marianna; Iyengar, Revathi; Barkley, Gregory L; Schultz, Lonni

    2012-08-01

    Epilepsy Quality Measures (EQM) were developed by the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) to convey standardization and eliminate gaps and variations in the delivery of epilepsy care (Fountain et al., 2011 [1]). The aim of this study was to identify adherence to these measures and other emerging practice standards in epilepsy care. A 15-item survey was mailed to neurologists in Michigan, USA, inquiring about their practice patterns in relation to EQM. One hundred thirteen of the 792 surveyed Michigan Neurologists responded (14%). The majority (83% to 94%) addressed seizure type and frequency, reviewed EEG and MRI, and provided pregnancy counseling to women of childbearing potential. Our survey identified gaps in practice patterns such as counseling about antiepileptic drug (AED) side effects and knowledge about referral for surgical therapy of intractable epilepsy. Statistical significance in the responses on the AAN EQM was noted in relation to number of years in practice, number of epilepsy patients seen, and additional fellowship training in epilepsy. Practice patterns assessment in relation to other comorbidities revealed that although bone health and sudden unexplained death in epilepsy are addressed mainly in patients at risk, depression is infrequently discussed. The findings in this study indicate that additional educational efforts are needed to increase awareness and to improve quality of epilepsy care at various points of health care delivery.

  18. Image, measure, figure: a critical discourse analysis of nursing practices that develop children.

    PubMed

    Einboden, Rochelle; Rudge, Trudy; Varcoe, Colleen

    2013-07-01

    Motivated by discourses that link early child development and health, nurses engage in seemingly benign surveillance of children. These practices are based on knowledge claims and technologies of developmental science, which remain anchored in assumptions of the child body as an incomplete form with a universal developmental trajectory and inherent potentiality. This paper engages in a critical discursive analysis, drawing on Donna Haraway's conceptualizations of technoscience and figuration. Using a contemporary developmental screening tool from nursing practice, this analysis traces the effects of this tool through production, transformation, distribution, and consumption. It reveals how the techniques of imaging, abstraction, and measurement collide to fix the open, transformative child body in a figuration of the developing child. This analysis also demonstrates how technobiopower infuses nurses' understandings of children and structures developmentally appropriate expectations for children, parents, and nurses. Furthermore, it describes how practices that claim to facilitate healthy child development may inversely deprive children of agency and foster the production of normal or ideal children. An alternative ontological perspective is offered as a challenge to the individualism of developmental models and other dominant ideologies of development, as well as practices associated with these ideologies. In summary, this analysis argues that nurses must pay closer attention to how technobiopower infuses practices that monitor and promote child development. Fostering a critical understanding of the harmful implications of these practices is warranted and offers the space to conceive of human development in alternate and exciting ways.

  19. Longitudinal measures of cognition in the Ts65Dn mouse: Refining windows and defining modalities for therapeutic intervention in Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Olmos-Serrano, J Luis; Tyler, William A; Cabral, Howard J; Haydar, Tarik F

    2016-05-01

    Mouse models have provided insights into adult changes in learning and memory in Down syndrome, but an in-depth assessment of how these abnormalities develop over time has never been conducted. To address this shortcoming, we conducted a longitudinal behavioral study from birth until late adulthood in the Ts65Dn mouse model to measure the emergence and continuity of learning and memory deficits in individuals with a broad array of tests. Our results demonstrate for the first time that the pace at which neonatal and perinatal milestones are acquired is correlated with later cognitive performance as an adult. In addition, we find that life-long behavioral indexing stratifies mice within each genotype. Our expanded assessment reveals that diminished cognitive flexibility, as measured by reversal learning, is the most robust learning and memory impairment in both young and old Ts65Dn mice. Moreover, we find that reversal learning degrades with age and is therefore a useful biomarker for studying age-related decline in cognitive ability. Altogether, our results indicate that preclinical studies aiming to restore cognitive function in Ts65Dn should target both neonatal milestones and reversal learning in adulthood. Here we provide the quantitative framework for this type of approach.

  20. Insulin Resistance Is Associated With Reduced Mitochondrial Oxidative Capacity Measured by 31P-Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy in Participants Without Diabetes From the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging.

    PubMed

    Fabbri, Elisa; Chia, Chee W; Spencer, Richard G; Fishbein, Kenneth W; Reiter, David A; Cameron, Donnie; Zane, Ariel C; Moore, Zenobia A; Gonzalez-Freire, Marta; Zoli, Marco; Studenski, Stephanie A; Kalyani, Rita R; Egan, Josephine M; Ferrucci, Luigi

    2017-01-01

    Whether individuals with insulin resistance (IR) but without criteria for diabetes exhibit reduced mitochondrial oxidative capacity is unclear; addressing this question could guide research for new therapeutics. We investigated 248 participants without diabetes from the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging (BLSA) to determine whether impaired mitochondrial capacity is associated with prediabetes, IR, and duration and severity of hyperglycemia exposure. Mitochondrial capacity was assessed as the postexercise phosphocreatine recovery time constant (τPCr) by (31)P-magnetic resonance spectroscopy, with higher τPCr values reflecting reduced capacity. Prediabetes was defined using the American Diabetes Association criteria from fasting and 2-h glucose measurements. IR and sensitivity were calculated using HOMA-IR and Matsuda indices. The duration and severity of hyperglycemia exposure were estimated as the number of years from prediabetes onset and the average oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) 2-h glucose measurement over previous BLSA visits. Covariates included age, sex, body composition, physical activity, and other confounders. Higher likelihood of prediabetes, higher HOMA-IR, and lower Matsuda index were associated with longer τPCr. Among 205 participants with previous OGTT data, greater severity and longer duration of hyperglycemia were independently associated with longer τPC In conclusion, in individuals without diabetes a more impaired mitochondrial capacity is associated with greater IR and a higher likelihood of prediabetes.

  1. Measurements of double-helicity asymmetries in inclusive J /ψ production in longitudinally polarized p +p collisions at √{s }=510 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adare, A.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Akimoto, R.; Alfred, M.; Apadula, N.; Aramaki, Y.; Asano, H.; Atomssa, E. T.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Bandara, N. S.; Bannier, B.; Barish, K. N.; Bathe, S.; Bazilevsky, A.; Beaumier, M.; Beckman, S.; Belmont, R.; Berdnikov, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Black, D.; Blau, D. S.; Bok, J. S.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Bryslawskyj, J.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Campbell, S.; Chen, C.-H.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choi, J. B.; Chujo, T.; Citron, Z.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Danley, T. W.; Datta, A.; Daugherity, M. S.; David, G.; Deblasio, K.; Dehmelt, K.; Denisov, A.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Ding, L.; Dion, A.; Diss, P. B.; Do, J. H.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; Enokizono, A.; En'yo, H.; Esumi, S.; Fadem, B.; Feege, N.; Fields, D. E.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fokin, S. L.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Gal, C.; Gallus, P.; Garg, P.; Ge, H.; Giordano, F.; Glenn, A.; Goto, Y.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gu, Y.; Gunji, T.; Guragain, H.; Hachiya, T.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamilton, H. F.; Han, S. Y.; Hanks, J.; Hasegawa, S.; Haseler, T. O. S.; Hashimoto, K.; He, X.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hill, J. C.; Hollis, R. S.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Hoshino, T.; Hotvedt, N.; Huang, J.; Huang, S.; Ikeda, Y.; Imai, K.; Imazu, Y.; Inaba, M.; Iordanova, A.; Isenhower, D.; Ivanishchev, D.; Jacak, B. V.; Jeon, S. J.; Jezghani, M.; Jia, J.; Jiang, X.; Johnson, B. M.; Joo, E.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Jumper, D. S.; Kanda, S.; Kang, J. H.; Kang, J. S.; Kawall, D.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Key, J. A.; Khachatryan, V.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kihara, K.; Kim, C.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E.-J.; Kim, G. W.; Kim, H.-J.; Kim, M.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimelman, B.; Kistenev, E.; Kitamura, R.; Klatsky, J.; Kleinjan, D.; Kline, P.; Koblesky, T.; Kofarago, M.; Komkov, B.; Koster, J.; Kotov, D.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kwon, Y.; Lacey, R.; Lajoie, J. G.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, S.; Lee, S. H.; Leitch, M. J.; Leitgab, M.; Li, X.; Lim, S. H.; Liu, M. X.; Lynch, D.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Makek, M.; Manion, A.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; McGlinchey, D.; McKinney, C.; Meles, A.; Mendoza, M.; Meredith, B.; Miake, Y.; Mignerey, A. C.; Miller, A. J.; Milov, A.; Mishra, D. K.; Mitchell, J. T.; Miyasaka, S.; Mizuno, S.; Mohanty, A. K.; Montuenga, P.; Moon, T.; Morrison, D. P.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Murakami, T.; Murata, J.; Mwai, A.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagashima, K.; Nagle, J. L.; Nagy, M. I.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakagomi, H.; Nakano, K.; Nattrass, C.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Nihashi, M.; Niida, T.; Nishimura, S.; Nouicer, R.; Novák, T.; Novitzky, N.; Nyanin, A. S.; O'Brien, E.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Orjuela Koop, J. D.; Osborn, J. D.; Oskarsson, A.; Ozawa, K.; Pak, R.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, J. S.; Park, S.; Pate, S. F.; Patel, L.; Patel, M.; Peng, J.-C.; Perepelitsa, D. V.; Perera, G. D. N.; Peressounko, D. Yu.; Perry, J.; Petti, R.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pinson, R.; Pisani, R. P.; Purschke, M. L.; Rak, J.; Ramson, B. J.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Reynolds, D.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Rinn, T.; Riveli, N.; Roach, D.; Rolnick, S. D.; Rosati, M.; Rowan, Z.; Rubin, J. G.; Sahlmueller, B.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sako, H.; Samsonov, V.; Sarsour, M.; Sato, S.; Sawada, S.; Schaefer, B.; Schmoll, B. K.; Sedgwick, K.; Seele, J.; Seidl, R.; Sen, A.; Seto, R.; Sett, P.; Sexton, A.; Sharma, D.; Shein, I.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Shukla, P.; Sickles, A.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Singh, B. K.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Slunečka, M.; Snowball, M.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Sourikova, I. V.; Stankus, P. W.; Stepanov, M.; Stoll, S. P.; Sugitate, T.; Sukhanov, A.; Sumita, T.; Sun, J.; Sziklai, J.; Takahara, A.; Taketani, A.; Tanida, K.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Tarafdar, S.; Taranenko, A.; Tieulent, R.; Timilsina, A.; Todoroki, T.; Tomášek, M.; Torii, H.; Towell, C. L.; Towell, M.; Towell, R.; Towell, R. S.; Tserruya, I.; van Hecke, H. W.; Vargyas, M.; Velkovska, J.; Virius, M.; Vrba, V.; Vznuzdaev, E.; Wang, X. R.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, Y.; Watanabe, Y. S.; Wei, F.; Whitaker, S.; White, A. S.; Wolin, S.; Woody, C. L.; Wysocki, M.; Xia, B.; Xue, L.; Yalcin, S.; Yamaguchi, Y. L.; Yanovich, A.; Yoo, J. H.; Yoon, I.; Younus, I.; Yu, H.; Yushmanov, I. E.; Zajc, W. A.; Zelenski, A.; Zhou, S.; Zou, L.; Phenix Collaboration

    2016-12-01

    We report the double-helicity asymmetry, ALL J /ψ, in inclusive J /ψ production at forward rapidity as a function of transverse momentum pT and rapidity |y |. The data analyzed were taken during √{s }=510 GeV longitudinally polarized p +p collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider in the 2013 run using the PHENIX detector. At this collision energy, J /ψ particles are predominantly produced through gluon-gluon scatterings, thus ALL J /ψ is sensitive to the gluon polarization inside the proton. We measured ALL J /ψ by detecting the decay daughter muon pairs μ+μ- within the PHENIX muon spectrometers in the rapidity range 1.2 <|y |<2.2 . In this kinematic range, we measured the ALL J /ψ to be 0.012 ±0.010 (stat) ±0.003 (syst). The ALL J /ψ can be expressed to be proportional to the product of the gluon polarization distributions at two distinct ranges of Bjorken x : one at moderate range x ≈5 ×10-2 where recent data of jet and π0 double helicity spin asymmetries have shown evidence for significant gluon polarization, and the other one covering the poorly known small-x region x ≈2 ×10-3. Thus our new results could be used to further constrain the gluon polarization for x <5 ×10-2.

  2. Predicting Future Reading Problems Based on Pre-reading Auditory Measures: A Longitudinal Study of Children with a Familial Risk of Dyslexia

    PubMed Central

    Law, Jeremy M.; Vandermosten, Maaike; Ghesquière, Pol; Wouters, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: This longitudinal study examines measures of temporal auditory processing in pre-reading children with a family risk of dyslexia. Specifically, it attempts to ascertain whether pre-reading auditory processing, speech perception, and phonological awareness (PA) reliably predict later literacy achievement. Additionally, this study retrospectively examines the presence of pre-reading auditory processing, speech perception, and PA impairments in children later found to be literacy impaired. Method: Forty-four pre-reading children with and without a family risk of dyslexia were assessed at three time points (kindergarten, first, and second grade). Auditory processing measures of rise time (RT) discrimination and frequency modulation (FM) along with speech perception, PA, and various literacy tasks were assessed. Results: Kindergarten RT uniquely contributed to growth in literacy in grades one and two, even after controlling for letter knowledge and PA. Highly significant concurrent and predictive correlations were observed with kindergarten RT significantly predicting first grade PA. Retrospective analysis demonstrated atypical performance in RT and PA at all three time points in children who later developed literacy impairments. Conclusions: Although significant, kindergarten auditory processing contributions to later literacy growth lack the power to be considered as a single-cause predictor; thus results support temporal processing deficits' contribution within a multiple deficit model of dyslexia. PMID:28223953

  3. Distinguishing State Variability From Trait Change in Longitudinal Data: The Role of Measurement (Non)Invariance in Latent State-Trait Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Geiser, Christian; Keller, Brian T.; Lockhart, Ginger; Eid, Michael; Cole, David A.; Koch, Tobias

    2014-01-01

    Researchers analyzing longitudinal data often want to find out whether the process they study is characterized by (1) short-term state variability, (2) long-term trait change, or (3) a combination of state variability and trait change. Classical latent state-trait (LST) models are designed to measure reversible state variability around a fixed set-point or trait, whereas latent growth curve (LGC) models focus on long-lasting and often irreversible trait changes. In the present paper, we contrast LST and LGC models from the perspective of measurement invariance (MI) testing. We show that establishing a pure state-variability process requires (a) the inclusion of a mean structure and (b) establishing strong factorial invariance in LST analyses. Analytical derivations and simulations demonstrate that LST models with non-invariant parameters can mask the fact that a trait-change or hybrid process has generated the data. Furthermore, the inappropriate application of LST models to trait change or hybrid data can lead to bias in the estimates of consistency and occasion-specificity, which are typically of key interest in LST analyses. Four tips for the proper application of LST models are provided. PMID:24652650

  4. An official American thoracic society workshop report: developing performance measures from clinical practice guidelines.

    PubMed

    Kahn, Jeremy M; Gould, Michael K; Krishnan, Jerry A; Wilson, Kevin C; Au, David H; Cooke, Colin R; Douglas, Ivor S; Feemster, Laura C; Mularski, Richard A; Slatore, Christopher G; Wiener, Renda Soylemez

    2014-05-01

    Many health care performance measures are either not based on high-quality clinical evidence or not tightly linked to patient-centered outcomes, limiting their usefulness in quality improvement. In this report we summarize the proceedings of an American Thoracic Society workshop convened to address this problem by reviewing current approaches to performance measure development and creating a framework for developing high-quality performance measures by basing them directly on recommendations from well-constructed clinical practice guidelines. Workshop participants concluded that ideally performance measures addressing care processes should be linked to clinical practice guidelines that explicitly rate the quality of evidence and the strength of recommendations, such as the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) process. Under this framework, process-based performance measures would only be developed from strong recommendations based on high- or moderate-quality evidence. This approach would help ensure that clinical processes specified in performance measures are both of clear benefit to patients and supported by strong evidence. Although this approach may result in fewer performance measures, it would substantially increase the likelihood that quality-improvement programs based on these measures actually improve patient care.

  5. Indicators of Club Management Practices and Biological Measurements of Patrons’ Drug and Alcohol Use

    PubMed Central

    Byrnes, Hilary F.; Miller, Brenda A.; Johnson, Mark B.; Voas, Robert B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Electronic Music Dance Events in nightclubs attract patrons with heavy alcohol/drug use. Public health concerns are raised from risks related to these behaviors. Practices associated with increased risk in these club settings need to be identified. Objectives The relationship between club management practices and biological measures of patrons’ alcohol/drug use is examined. Methods Observational data from 25 events across 6 urban clubs were integrated with survey data (N=738 patrons, 42.8% female) from patrons exiting these events, 2010–2012. Five indicators of club management practices were examined using mixed model regressions: club security, bar crowding, safety signs, serving intoxicated patrons, and isolation. Results Analyses revealed that serving intoxicated patrons and safety signs were related to less substance use. Specifically, serving intoxicated patrons was related to heavy alcohol and drug use at exit, while safety signs were marginally related to less exit drug use. Conclusions/Importance Findings indicate observable measures in nightclubs provide important indicators for alcohol/drug use, suggesting practices to target. Study strengths include the use of biological measures of substance use on a relatively large scale. Limitations and future directions are discussed. PMID:24832721

  6. Self-reported practice, confidence, and knowledge about palliative care of nurses in a Japanese Regional Cancer Center: longitudinal study after 1-year activity of palliative care team.

    PubMed

    Morita, Tatsuya; Fujimoto, Koji; Imura, Chizuru; Nanba, Miki; Fukumoto, Naoko; Itoh, Tomoko

    2006-01-01

    Knowledge and skill deficits about palliative care in medical professionals are among the most common barriers to quality palliative care. This study in a Japanese regional cancer center was conducted to clarify nurses' self-reported practices, confidence, and knowledge, and the changes in these parameters after the 1-year educational and clinical activity of a palliative care team. Questionnaires were distributed to 134 nurses before and after a palliative care team conducted 6-topic educational programs and clinical consultation activity throughout the year. The nurses were asked to report their practices, confidence, and knowledge about palliative care in 5 fields (pain, dyspnea, delirium, communication, and dying-phase). In some areas of palliative care, hospital nurses did not adhere to recommended practices, had knowledge deficits, and were not generally confident with palliative care practices. However, daily palliative care team activities, including educational programs and clinical consultation service, could improve their practice and knowledge levels.

  7. Quality Measure Performance in Small Practices Before and After Electronic Health Record Adoption

    PubMed Central

    McCullough, Colleen M.; Wang, Jason J.; Parsons, Amanda S.; Shih, Sarah C.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: To date, little research has been published on the impact that the transition from paper-based record keeping to the use of electronic health records (EHR) has on performance on clinical quality measures. This study examines whether small, independent medical practices improved in their performance on nine clinical quality measures soon after adopting EHRs. Methods: Data abstracted by manual review of paper and electronic charts for 6,007 patients across 35 small, primary care practices were used to calculate rates of nine clinical quality measures two years before and up to two years after EHR adoption. Results: For seven measures, population-level performance rates did not change before EHR adoption. Rates of antithrombotic therapy and smoking status recorded increased soon after EHR adoption; increases in blood pressure control occurred later. Rates of hemoglobin A1c testing, BMI recorded, and cholesterol testing decreased before rebounding; smoking cessation intervention, hemoglobin A1c control and cholesterol control did not significantly change. Discussion: The effect of EHR adoption on performance on clinical quality measures is mixed. To improve performance, practices may need to develop new workflows and adapt to different documentation methods after EHR adoption. Conclusions: In the short term, EHRs may facilitate documentation of information needed for improving the delivery of clinical preventive services. Policies and incentive programs intended to drive improvement should include in their timelines consideration of the complexity of clinical tasks and documentation needed to capture performance on measures when developing timelines, and should also include assistance with workflow redesign to fully integrate EHRs into medical practice. PMID:25848635

  8. Change and Stability in Active and Passive Social Influence Dynamics during Natural Drinking Events: A Longitudinal Measurement-Burst Study.

    PubMed

    Cullum, Jerry; O'Grady, Megan; Armeli, Stephen; Tennen, Howard

    2012-01-01

    We examined the link between social norms and active social influences occurring during natural social drinking contexts. Across 4 yearly measurement-bursts, college students (N = 523) reported daily for 30-day periods on drinking norms, drinking offers, how many drinks they accepted, and personal drinking levels during social drinking events. In contexts where drinking norms were higher, students were more likely to both receive and comply with drinking offers. These acute social influences were highly stable throughout college, but affected men and women differently across time: Women received more drinking offers than men, especially at the beginning of college and when norms were higher, but men complied with more drinking offers per occasion. These effects were not attributable to between-person differences in social drinking motives or drinking levels, nor to within-person patterns of situation-selection. The present work suggests that context-specific drinking norms catalyze active social influence attempts, and further promote compliance drinking.

  9. Irreversibility Line, Hall Effect, and Longitudinal Resistivity Measurements on Cobalt-Doped Yttrium BARIUM(2) COPPER(3) OXYGEN(7-DELTA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neiman, Regina Lynn

    1995-01-01

    We have developed a procedure for growing high -quality single crystals of YBa_2(Cu _{1-x}Co _{x})_3O _{7-delta}. By high-pressure oxygen annealing, we produced single crystals having transition temperatures, T_{c}, comparable with those of polycrystalline samples of the same cobalt concentration. We have investigated the effect of cobalt on T _{c} and the DC irreversibility line. As seen previously, we found that the dependence of T_{c} on the concentration of cobalt changes at the orthorhombic -to-tetragonal phase transition. We also found that the DC irreversibility line changes functional form at approximately 2.5% to 3% cobalt substitution, where the orthorhombic -to-tetragonal phase transition occurs. We have measured the in-plane Hall effect and the in-plane resistivity of cobalt-doped YBa_2 Cu_3O_{7 -delta} single-crystal samples. The sign-reversal in the Hall effect below T_ {c} disappears at approximately the orthorhombic-to-tetragonal phase transition. The resistivities were converted into conductivities to investigate the field dependence of the Hall effect. The Hall conductivity, sigma_{xy}, is the sum of two terms, C_1/H and C_2H, where C_1 and C_2 are field-independent but temperature-dependent. The temperature dependences of C_1 and C_2 were qualitatively unaffected by cobalt-doping. From our measurements, it appears that the orthorhombic -to-tetragonal phase transition is important in the behavior of cobalt-doped Y?BCO samples. In order to explain the effect of cobalt on YBCO, it seems that more emphasis should be put on understanding what happens when the sample changes phase from orthorhombic to tetragonal.

  10. [Do you measure gait speed in your daily clinical practice? A review].

    PubMed

    Inzitari, Marco; Calle, Alicia; Esteve, Anna; Casas, Álvaro; Torrents, Núria; Martínez, Nicolás

    Gait speed (GS), measured at usual pace, is an easy, quick, reliable, non-expensive and informative measurement. With a standard chronometer, like those that currently found in mobile phones, and with two marks on the floor, trained health professionals obtain a more objective and quick measurement compared with many geriatric scales used in daily practice. GS is one of the pillars of the frailty phenotype, and is closely related to sarcopenia. It is a powerful marker of falls incidence, disability and death, mostly useful in the screening of older adults that live in the community. In recent years, the evidence is reinforcing the usefulness of GS in acute care and post-surgical patients. Its use in patients with cognitive impairment is suggested, due to the strong link between cognitive and physical function. Although GS meets the criteria for a good geriatric screening tool, it is not much used in clinical practice. Why? This review has different aims: (i)disentangling the relationship between GS and frailty; (ii)reviewing the protocols to measure GS and the reference values; (iii)reviewing the evidence in different clinical groups (older adults with frailty, with cognitive impairment, with cancer or other pathologies), and in different settings (community, acute care, rehabilitation), and (iv)speculating about the reasons for its poor use in clinical practice and about the gaps to be filled.

  11. Hand bone densitometry in rheumatoid arthritis, a five year longitudinal study: an outcome measure and a prognostic marker

    PubMed Central

    Deodhar, A; Brabyn, J; Pande, I; Scott, D; Woolf, A

    2003-01-01

    Methods: Tender and swollen joints in hands and body, HAQ score, Larsen score on hand radiographs, serum CRP, and hand BMC measurement by DXA were studied every six months for five years in 40 patients with early RA. At the final visit, patients completed the SF-36 and Duruoz hand function questionnaires. Results: All patients completed two years and 29 completed five years' follow up. Hand BMC worsened over the first three years (percentage loss from baseline: mean (SD) -5.5 (7.2), -7.5 (8.4), -9.8 (9.4)) and stabilised over last two years (–9.9 (8.8), -10 (7.8)). Baseline disease activity and function correlated with hand BMC loss at five years (swollen joints in hands: r=-0.38, p=0.043; swollen joints in body: r=-0.47, p=0.01; HAQ: r=-0.52, p=0.004). Percentage change in hand BMC over five years correlated with SF-36 physical function (r=0.61, p<0.01), hand function (r=-0.64, p<0.01), HAQ score (r=-0.63, p<0.01) at five years. Relative risk of bad hand functional outcome at five years was significantly higher for patients with hand BMC loss of ⩾1.17 g (smallest detectable difference) than for patients with less bone loss within the first six months (OR=6.9, 95% CI 1.3 to 34.5, p<0.02). Conclusion: Early loss of hand BMC in patients with RA is a composite marker of disease activity and functional status and can predict poor functional outcome. PMID:12860734

  12. Measuring the influence of professional nursing practice on global hospital performance in an organizational context.

    PubMed

    Fasoli, Dijon R

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure the influence of professional nursing practice (PNP) on global hospital performance (GHP). Evidence links PNP and positive outcomes for patients and nurses, however, little is known about PNP influence on GHP measures used for patient decision-making and hospital management resource allocation decisions. A quantitative study using multiple regression analysis to predict a composite measure of GHP was conducted. Two survey instruments measuring perspectives of the PNP environment were completed by 1815 (31.3%) Registered Nurses (RN) and 28 (100%) Senior Nurse Executives (SNE) at 28 northeastern US hospitals. Secondary data provided organizational attributes. The degree of PNP was consistently reported by RNs and SNEs. When regressed with organizational factors, PNP was not a significant predictor of GHP. Better GHP was associated with lower lengths of stay, lower profitability, less admission growth, and non-health system affiliation. Further research is needed to define a nursing-sensitive GHP measure.

  13. Rapid, accurate, and non-invasive measurement of zebrafish axial length and other eye dimensions using SD-OCT allows longitudinal analysis of myopia and emmetropization.

    PubMed

    Collery, Ross F; Veth, Kerry N; Dubis, Adam M; Carroll, Joseph; Link, Brian A

    2014-01-01

    Refractive errors in vision can be caused by aberrant axial length of the eye, irregular corneal shape, or lens abnormalities. Causes of eye length overgrowth include multiple genetic loci, and visual parameters. We evaluate zebrafish as a potential animal model for studies of the genetic, cellular, and signaling basis of emmetropization and myopia. Axial length and other eye dimensions of zebrafish were measured using spectral domain-optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). We used ocular lens and body metrics to normalize and compare eye size and relative refractive error (difference between observed retinal radial length and controls) in wild-type and lrp2 zebrafish. Zebrafish were dark-reared to assess effects of visual deprivation on eye size. Two relative measurements, ocular axial length to body length and axial length to lens diameter, were found to accurately normalize comparisons of eye sizes between different sized fish (R2=0.9548, R2=0.9921). Ray-traced focal lengths of wild-type zebrafish lenses were equal to their retinal radii, while lrp2 eyes had longer retinal radii than focal lengths. Both genetic mutation (lrp2) and environmental manipulation (dark-rearing) caused elongated eye axes. lrp2 mutants had relative refractive errors of -0.327 compared to wild-types, and dark-reared wild-type fish had relative refractive errors of -0.132 compared to light-reared siblings. Therefore, zebrafish eye anatomy (axial length, lens radius, retinal radius) can be rapidly and accurately measured by SD-OCT, facilitating longitudinal studies of regulated eye growth and emmetropization. Specifically, genes homologous to human myopia candidates may be modified, inactivated or overexpressed in zebrafish, and myopia-sensitizing conditions used to probe gene-environment interactions. Our studies provide foundation for such investigations into genetic contributions that control eye size and impact refractive errors.

  14. Measuring Science Instructional Practice: A Survey Tool for the Age of NGSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, Kathryn N.; Lee, Christine S.; DiStefano, Rachelle; O'Connor, Dawn; Seitz, Jeffery C.

    2016-03-01

    Ambitious efforts are taking place to implement a new vision for science education in the United States, in both Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS)-adopted states and those states creating their own, often related, standards. In-service and pre-service teacher educators are involved in supporting teacher shifts in practice toward the new standards. With these efforts, it will be important to document shifts in science instruction toward the goals of NGSS and broader science education reform. Survey instruments are often used to capture instructional practices; however, existing surveys primarily measure inquiry based on previous definitions and standards and with a few exceptions, disregard key instructional practices considered outside the scope of inquiry. A comprehensive survey and a clearly defined set of items do not exist. Moreover, items specific to the NGSS Science and Engineering practices have not yet been tested. To address this need, we developed and validated a Science Instructional Practices survey instrument that is appropriate for NGSS and other related science standards. Survey construction was based on a literature review establishing key areas of science instruction, followed by a systematic process for identifying and creating items. Instrument validity and reliability were then tested through a procedure that included cognitive interviews, expert review, exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis (using independent samples), and analysis of criterion validity. Based on these analyses, final subscales include: Instigating an Investigation, Data Collection and Analysis, Critique, Explanation and Argumentation, Modeling, Traditional Instruction, Prior Knowledge, Science Communication, and Discourse.

  15. Measuring nursing informatics competencies of practicing nurses in Korea: Nursing Informatics Competencies Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Chung, Seon Yoon; Staggers, Nancy

    2014-12-01

    Informatics competencies are a necessity for contemporary nurses. However, few researchers have investigated informatics competencies for practicing nurses. A full set of Informatics competencies, an instrument to measure these competencies, and potential influencing factors have yet to be identified for practicing nurses. The Nursing Informatics Competencies Questionnaire was designed, tested for psychometrics, and used to measure beginning and experienced levels of practice. A pilot study using 54 nurses ensured item comprehension and clarity. Internal consistency and face and content validity were established. A cross-sectional survey was then conducted on 230 nurses in Seoul, Korea, to determine construct validity, describe a complete set of informatics competencies, and explore possible influencing factors on existing informatics competencies. Principal components analysis, descriptive statistics, and multiple regression were used for data analysis. Principal components analysis gives support for the Nursing Informatics Competencies Questionnaire construct validity. Survey results indicate that involvement in a managerial position and self-directed informatics-related education may be more influential for improving informatics competencies, whereas general clinical experience and workplace settings are not. This study provides a foundation for understanding how informatics competencies might be integrated throughout nurses' work lives and how to develop appropriate strategies to support nurses in their informatics practice in clinical settings.

  16. Practice Innovation for Care Integration, Opioid Management, and Quality Measurement in Family Medicine.

    PubMed

    Neale, Anne Victoria; Bowman, Marjorie A; Seehusen, Dean A

    Ringing in the new year 2017! This may finally be the year of real practice improvement after many false starts. Research into practice transformation has informed both local work and national policy. Human factors and payment structures are key. And payment structures depend on how quality is measured. Large gaps between practicing physician recommendations for the most important quality measures and those currently imposed externally are exposed in this issue. Also see information on in-practice social work consultations and their outcomes and recommendations from innovators in integrated care, and for chronic opioid therapy management based on visits to many family medicine offices. Visit entropy is negative for hospital readmissions. Another article reaffirms the importance of family physicians in rural obstetrics, including Cesarean deliveries. Two articles address changing Latino health care access. New Mexico's innovative health extension agent implementation now includes research in ways that benefit all. And a glass half-full: the growth in the diversity of family medicine faculty is above average, but is not occurring as quickly as in the general population.

  17. Measuring Connectivity in Linear Multivariate Processes: Definitions, Interpretation, and Practical Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Faes, Luca; Erla, Silvia; Nollo, Giandomenico

    2012-01-01

    This tutorial paper introduces a common framework for the evaluation of widely used frequency-domain measures of coupling (coherence, partial coherence) and causality (directed coherence, partial directed coherence) from the parametric representation of linear multivariate (MV) processes. After providing a comprehensive time-domain definition of the various forms of connectivity observed in MV processes, we particularize them to MV autoregressive (MVAR) processes and derive the corresponding frequency-domain measures. Then, we discuss the theoretical interpretation of these MVAR-based connectivity measures, showing that each of them reflects a specific time-domain connectivity definition and how this results in the description of peculiar aspects of the information transfer in MV processes. Furthermore, issues related to the practical utilization of these measures on real-time series are pointed out, including MVAR model estimation and significance assessment. Finally, limitations and pitfalls arising from model mis-specification are discussed, indicating possible solutions and providing practical recommendations for a safe computation of the connectivity measures. An example of estimation of the presented measures from multiple EEG signals recorded during a combined visuomotor task is also reported, showing how evaluation of coupling and causality in the frequency domain may help describing specific neurophysiological mechanisms. PMID:22666300

  18. Accuracy of self-reported versus measured weight over adolescence and young adulthood: findings from the national longitudinal study of adolescent health, 1996-2008.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Philippa; Sastry, Narayan; Duffy, Denise; Ailshire, Jennifer

    2014-07-15

    Many studies rely on self-reports to capture population trends and trajectories in weight gain over adulthood, but the validity of self-reports is often considered a limitation. The purpose of this work was to examine long-term trajectories of self-reporting bias in a national sample of American youth. With 3 waves of data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (1996-2008), we used growth curve models to examine self-reporting bias in trajectories of weight gain across adolescence and early adulthood (ages 13-32 years). We investigated whether self-reporting bias is constant over time, or whether adolescents become more accurate in reporting their weight as they move into young adulthood, and we examined differences in self-reporting bias by sex, race/ethnicity, and attained education. Adolescent girls underreported their weight by 0.86 kg on average, and this rate of underreporting increased over early adulthood. In contrast, we found no evidence that boys underreported their weight either in adolescence or over the early adult years. For young men, self-reports of weight were unbiased estimates of measured weight among all racial/ethnic and educational subpopulations over adolescence and early adulthood.

  19. Longitudinal Stability Characteristics of a 1/40-Scale Model of a Proposed Configuration of the XF-91 Airplane Measured by the Wing-Flow Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crane, Harold L.; Beckhardt, Arnold R.

    1948-01-01

    This report presents the results of an investigation in the transonic speed range of the longitudinal stability characteristics of a proposed configuration for the Republic XF-91 airplane. The tests covered a Mach number range of 0.55 to 1.05 and a Reynolds number range from 400,000 to 1,375,000. Lift, pitching-moment, and rolling-moment characteristics of the half model and the hinge moments on the all-moving tail were measured. The downwash factor delta x epsilon / delta x alpha at the tail was determined from the pitching-moment data. A calculation of the elevator deflection and stick force required for trim was also made. It was found that the variation of force and moment coefficients was linear through the test angle-of-attack range of -1 deg to 8 deg at any Mach number; that the stability increased markedly at Mach numbers above 0.85; that the effectiveness of the tail in producing pitching moments decreased about one-third with increasing Mach numbers and that the value of the downwash factor, delta x epsilon / delta x alpha, at the tail decreased from about 0.35 at a Mach number of 0.85 to about zero at a Mach number near 0.95 and became slightly negative at higher Mach numbers. The calculated values of stick force per g and elevator deflection per g, assuming no aerodynamic balance, increased rapidly above a Mach number of 0.85.

  20. Measurements of the Longitudinal Stability and Control and Stalling Characteristics of a North American P-51H Airplane (AAF No. 4-64164)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraft, Christopher C., Jr.; Reeder, J. P.

    1948-01-01

    Flight tests have been made to determine the longitudinal stability and control and stalling characteristics of a North American P-51H airplane. The results indicate that the airplane has satisfactory longitudinal stability in all the flight conditions tested at normal loadings up to 25,000 feet altitude. At Mach numbers above 0.7, the elevator push force required for longitudinal trim decreased somewhat because of compressibility effects. The elevator stick force per g in accelerated turns at the forward center-of-gravity position of 24 percent mean aerodynamic chord above 250 miles per hour was in excess of the required limits at both 5,000 and 25,OOO feet altitude. The longitudinal-trim-force changes due to flaps and power were small, but the rudder-trim-force change with power change was high. The stalling characteristics in all the conditions tested were satisfactory.

  1. A comparative analysis of the dissemination of best practice measures for key populations.

    PubMed

    Lundy, Jennifer; Santangelo, Jennifer; Rogers, Patrick; Kuehn, Lynn; Christensen, Sharon; Bournique, Judy; Mekhjian, Hagop; Kamal, Jyoti

    2008-11-06

    In collaboration with the department of Quality and Operations Improvement, Clinical Applications and the Information Warehouse, we have leveraged available Information Warehouse data to build a Best Practice Compliance Measurement Dashboard. This tool combines information from our operating room charting system, our order entry system and coding information from the patient billing and management system to provide 'previous day', data on a patients current course of treatment.

  2. How to Measure Motivational Interviewing Fidelity in Randomized Controlled Trials: Practical Recommendations.

    PubMed

    Jelsma, Judith G M; Mertens, Vera-Christina; Forsberg, Lisa; Forsberg, Lars

    2015-07-01

    Many randomized controlled trials in which motivational interviewing (MI) is a key intervention make no provision for the assessment of treatment fidelity. This methodological shortcoming makes it impossible to distinguish between high- and low-quality MI interventions, and, consequently, to know whether MI provision has contributed to any intervention effects. This article makes some practical recommendations for the collection, selection, coding and reporting of MI fidelity data, as measured using the Motivational Interviewing Treatment Integrity Code. We hope that researchers will consider these recommendations and include MI fidelity measures in future studies.

  3. Outcome measures in neurological physical therapy practice: part II. A patient-centered process.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Jane E; Andrews, A Williams; Lanzino, Desiree; Perron, Aimee E; Peron, Aimee; Potter, Kirsten A

    2011-06-01

    Physical therapists working in neurological practice must make choices about which standardized outcome measures are most appropriate for each patient. Significant time constraints in the clinic limit the number of measures that one can reasonably administer. Therapists must choose measures that will provide results that guide the selection of appropriate interventions and are likely to show clinically meaningful change. Therefore, therapists must be able to compare the merits of available measures to identify those that are most relevant for each patient and setting. This article describes a process for selecting outcome measures and illustrates the use of that process with a patient who has had a stroke. The link between selecting objective outcome measures and tracking patient progress is emphasized. Comparisons are made between 2 motor function measures (the Fugl-Meyer Assessment [FMA] of Physical Performance vs the Stroke Rehabilitation Assessment of Movement), and 2 balance measures (Berg Balance Scale vs the Activities-specific Balance Confidence Scale). The use of objective outcome measures allows therapists to quantify information that previously had been described in subjective terms. This allows the tracking of progress, and the comparison of effectiveness and costs across interventions, settings, providers, and patient characteristics.

  4. Longitudinal regression analysis of spatial-temporal growth patterns of geometrical diffusion measures in early postnatal brain development with diffusion tensor imaging.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yasheng; An, Hongyu; Zhu, Hongtu; Jewells, Valerie; Armao, Diane; Shen, Dinggang; Gilmore, John H; Lin, Weili

    2011-10-15

    Although diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) has provided substantial insights into early brain development, most DTI studies based on fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) may not capitalize on the information derived from the three principal diffusivities (e.g. eigenvalues). In this study, we explored the spatial and temporal evolution of white matter structures during early brain development using two geometrical diffusion measures, namely, linear (Cl) and planar (Cp) diffusion anisotropies, from 71 longitudinal datasets acquired from 29 healthy, full-term pediatric subjects. The growth trajectories were estimated with generalized estimating equations (GEE) using linear fitting with logarithm of age (days). The presence of the white matter structures in Cl and Cp was observed in neonates, suggesting that both the cylindrical and fanning or crossing structures in various white matter regions may already have been formed at birth. Moreover, we found that both Cl and Cp evolved in a temporally nonlinear and spatially inhomogeneous manner. The growth velocities of Cl in central white matter were significantly higher when compared to peripheral, or more laterally located, white matter: central growth velocity Cl=0.0465±0.0273/log(days), versus peripheral growth velocity Cl=0.0198±0.0127/log(days), p<10⁻⁶. In contrast, the growth velocities of Cp in central white matter were significantly lower than that in peripheral white matter: central growth velocity Cp=0.0014±0.0058/log(days), versus peripheral growth velocity Cp=0.0289±0.0101/log(days), p<10⁻⁶. Depending on the underlying white matter site which is analyzed, our findings suggest that ongoing physiologic and microstructural changes in the developing brain may exert different effects on the temporal evolution of these two geometrical diffusion measures. Thus, future studies utilizing DTI with correlative histological analysis in the study of early brain development are warranted.

  5. Sex-specific associations of low birth weight with adult-onset diabetes and measures of glucose homeostasis: Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health

    PubMed Central

    Yarmolinsky, James; Mueller, Noel T; Duncan, Bruce B; Chor, Dóra; Bensenor, Isabela M; Griep, Rosane H; Appel, Lawrence J; Barreto, Sandhi M; Schmidt, Maria Inês

    2016-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests sex differences in the early origins of adult metabolic disease, but this has been little investigated in developing countries. We investigated sex-specific associations between low birth weight (LBW; <2.5 kg) and adult-onset diabetes in 12,525 participants from the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil). Diabetes was defined by self-reported information and laboratory measurements. In confounder-adjusted analyses, LBW (vs. 2.5–4 kg) was associated with higher prevalence of diabetes in women (Prevalence Ratio (PR) 1.54, 95% CI: 1.32–1.79), not in men (PR 1.06, 95% CI: 0.91–1.25; Pheterogeneity = 0.003). The association was stronger among participants with maternal diabetes (PR 1.60, 95% CI: 1.35–1.91), than those without (PR 1.15, 95% CI: 0.99–1.32; Pheterogeneity = 0.03). When jointly stratified by sex and maternal diabetes, the association was observed for women with (PR 1.77, 95% CI: 1.37–2.29) and without (PR 1.45, 95% CI: 1.20–1.75) maternal diabetes. In contrast, in men, LBW was associated with diabetes in participants with maternal diabetes (PR 1.45, 95% CI: 1.15–1.83), but not in those without (PR 0.92, 95% CI: 0.74–1.14). These sex-specific findings extended to continuous measures of glucose homeostasis. LBW was associated with higher diabetes prevalence in Brazilian women, and in men with maternal diabetes, suggesting sex-specific intrauterine effects on adult metabolic health. PMID:27845438

  6. Knowledge Translation from Research to Clinical Practice: Measuring Participation of Children with Disabilities.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Yunwha; Law, Mary; DeMatteo, Carol; Stratford, Paul; Kim, Hwan

    2016-10-01

    This knowledge translation project was conducted to increase occupational therapy practitioners' awareness of the importance of measuring participation of children with disabilities. The Knowledge to Action process framework (KTA framework) guided knowledge translation via a web-based seminar (webinar) to practitioners working with children and educators teaching in occupational therapy programs in South Korea. Two hundred and seventy six views of the webinar were recorded within a month and 15 practitioners and 13 educators completed the online evaluation survey. The participants indicated that the webinar helped them understand the participation concept and its associated measures and raised awareness of practitioners' current use of measurement and intervention that do not focus on participation of children with disabilities. This project led practitioners and educators to realize the importance of measuring participation of children with disabilities and contributes to inform the importance of knowledge translation science to facilitate the evidence-based practice.

  7. Knowledge, Attitude and Practice among Dental Practitioners Pertaining to Preventive Measures in Paediatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sahu, Amitkumar; Kambalimath, Halaswamy V; Panchakshari, Bharath Kashetty; Jain, Manish

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Prevention at primary level is of great value in Paediatric Dentistry. Since use of preventive measures can prevent future complications, dental professionals share an important responsibility toward early screening, prompt referral and treatment and this knowledge must transfer into the practice of dentistry. Aim To evaluate Knowledge, Attitude and Practice (KAP) among dental practitioners in Bhopal city (central part of India) pertaining to sealants, topical fluorides usage and orthodontic consideration in paediatric patients. Materials and Methods A descriptive cross-sectional survey was conducted using a 20-item self-administered, closed ended, structured questionnaire. A total of 200 available private dental practitioners of Bhopal city made up the sampling frame of study. Results Out of 200 practicing dentists, 147 participated with response rate of 73.5% in which 69.4% were males and 30.6% were females. A total of 83% dentists were less than 35 years of age, while 17% were equal to or more than 35 years of age. Qualification distribution revealed 67.3% dental graduate and 32.6% dental specialist. A highly significant difference in knowledge in relation to age was observed. The mean±SD were found for Knowledge as 8.46±1.82, Attitude as 2.65±0.780, and Practice as 1.66±1.57. Statistically significant correlations were found between attitude and practice (r=0.58, p<0.001). Conclusion Dentists in Bhopal city have vast knowledge towards preventive dentistry. The attitude is highly commendable but underutilized in practice, which needs to be improved. PMID:28209009

  8. [Practices and effects of different measures for blood pressure control in hypertension patients in Beijing, 2014].

    PubMed

    Li, H; Dong, Z; Ma, A J; Dong, J; Fang, K; Xie, C; Qi, K; Xie, J; Zhou, Y; Zhao, Y

    2016-09-10

    Objective: To understand the practices and effects of different measures for blood pressure control in hypertension patients. Methods: Patients who have known hypertension from the subjects of "2014 Beijing adult (aged 18-79 years) chronic diseases and risk factors survey" were selected. The choices of different hypertension control measures, the relationship between the measures and demographic characteristics of hypertension patients, and the effects of different control measures were analyzed. Results: A total of 2 229 known hypertension patients were included, the analysis was conducted through a questionnaire survey. Those who answered "never taking any measures" , "taking medication according to doctor's instructions" and "taking medication when blood pressure rose" accounted for 7.0%, 79.8% and 8.3%, respectively. Those who had "diet control" , "physical exercises" and "blood pressure monitoring" accounted for 22.4%, 23.7% and 22.1%, respectively. In terms of "taking medicine according to doctor's instructions" , women (84.3%), those aged ≥60 years (87.6%), those living in urban area (81.5%), those living alone (83.8%), and Beijing local residents (82.3%) had higher compliance rates. As for "diet control" , women (24.4%), those aged ≥60 years (25.8%) and those with educational level of college or above (29.5%) had better practices. In terms of "physical exercise" , those aged ≥60 years (27.9%), those living in urban area (25.3%), those with educational level of college or above (32.5%) had better practice. Women (24.2%) and those aged ≥60 years (28.4%) had higher "blood pressure monitoring" rate. More men (9.7%), those aged 18-44 years (14.7%), those with educational level of high school (9.3%), the unmarried (18.2%), and non-Beijing local residents (14.7%) answered "never taking any measure" , and in terms of "taking medication when blood pressure rose" , non-Beijing local residents (12.8%) had higher rate. In the field survey, more patients who

  9. Towards a practical Johnson noise thermometer for long-term measurements in harsh environments

    SciTech Connect

    Greenen, Adam; Pearce, Jonathan; Cruickshank, David; Bramley, Paul

    2015-07-01

    The impact of mechanical and chemical changes in conventional sensors such as thermocouples and resistance thermometers can be avoided by instead using temperature sensors based on fundamental thermometry. A prime example of this is Johnson noise thermometry, which is based on measurement of the fluctuations in the voltage of a resistor arising from thermal motion of charge carriers - i.e. the 'Johnson noise'. A Johnson noise thermometer never needs calibration and is insensitive to the condition of the sensor material. It is therefore ideally suited to long-term temperature measurements in harsh environments, such as nuclear reactor coolant circuits, in-pile measurements, nuclear waste management and storage, and severe accident monitoring. There have been a number of previous attempts to develop a Johnson noise thermometer for the nuclear industry, but none have reached commercial exploitation because of technical problems in practical implementation. The main challenge is to extract the tiny Johnson noise signal from ambient electrical noise influences, both from the internal amplification electronics, and from external electrical noise sources. Recent advances in electronics technology and digital signal processing techniques have opened up new possibilities for developing a viable, practical Johnson noise thermometer. We describe a project funded by the UK Technology Strategy Board (now Innovate UK) 'Developing the nuclear supply chain' call, currently underway, to develop a practical Johnson noise thermometer that makes use of innovative electronics for ultralow noise amplification and signal processing. The new electronics technology has the potential to help overcome the problems encountered with previous attempts at constructing a practical Johnson noise thermometer. An outline of the new developments is presented, together with an overview of the current status of the project. (authors)

  10. Tooth wear and the role of salivary measures in general practice patients

    PubMed Central

    Rothen, Marilynn; Scott, JoAnna; Cunha-Cruz, Joana

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The goal of this study was to investigate the association between tooth wear and salivary measures in a random sample of patients from practices of dentist members of a practice-based research network. Materials and methods Patients completed a questionnaire on oral self-care, health, dietary habits, medications, and socio-demographic variables. Six salivary characteristics (consistency, resting salivary flow, resting salivary pH, stimulated salivary flow, stimulated salivary pH, and buffering capacity) were measured, and a dental examination included categorizing patients according to the dentist’s judgment of the degree of tooth wear (i.e., none/minimal, some, or severe/extreme). Bivariate and multinomial logistic regression models were used to relate salivary characteristics and other factors to the outcome of tooth wear. Results Data are reported from 1,323 patients (age range 16–97 years) from 61 practices. Patient age, gender, number of teeth, and perception of dry mouth were associated with tooth wear, but salivary and dietary factors were either weakly or not related. Conclusions The findings of this cross-sectional assessment suggest that using these salivary tests and dietary assessments in real-life clinical settings is unlikely to be useful in assessing tooth wear risk. Suggestions are offered about risk assessment for tooth wear. Clinical relevance Assessing a dental patient’s risk of tooth wear using salivary measures and dietary assessments as described is not recommended for general dental practice until stronger evidence exists indicating its utility. PMID:24647789

  11. An Overview of Longitudinal Data Analysis Methods for Neurological Research

    PubMed Central

    Locascio, Joseph J.; Atri, Alireza

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide a concise, broad and readily accessible overview of longitudinal data analysis methods, aimed to be a practical guide for clinical investigators in neurology. In general, we advise that older, traditional methods, including (1) simple regression of the dependent variable on a time measure, (2) analyzing a single summary subject level number that indexes changes for each subject and (3) a general linear model approach with a fixed-subject effect, should be reserved for quick, simple or preliminary analyses. We advocate the general use of mixed-random and fixed-effect regression models for analyses of most longitudinal clinical studies. Under restrictive situations or to provide validation, we recommend: (1) repeated-measure analysis of covariance (ANCOVA), (2) ANCOVA for two time points, (3) generalized estimating equations and (4) latent growth curve/structural equation models. PMID:22203825

  12. Citizenship Education Longitudinal Study: Second Cross-Sectional Survey, 2004. Listening to Young People: Citizenship Education in England. Research Report RR626

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cleaver, Elizabeth; Ireland, Eleanor; Kerr, David; Lopes, Joana

    2006-01-01

    The Citizenship Education Longitudinal Study, conducted by the National Foundation for Education Research (NFER) on behalf of the Department for Education and Skills (DfES), aims to identify, measure and evaluate the extent to which effective practice in citizenship education develops in schools so that such practice can be promoted widely. The…

  13. Deconvolution-Based CT and MR Brain Perfusion Measurement: Theoretical Model Revisited and Practical Implementation Details.

    PubMed

    Fieselmann, Andreas; Kowarschik, Markus; Ganguly, Arundhuti; Hornegger, Joachim; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2011-01-01

    Deconvolution-based analysis of CT and MR brain perfusion data is widely used in clinical practice and it is still a topic of ongoing research activities. In this paper, we present a comprehensive derivation and explanation of the underlying physiological model for intravascular tracer systems. We also discuss practical details that are needed to properly implement algorithms for perfusion analysis. Our description of the practical computer implementation is focused on the most frequently employed algebraic deconvolution methods based on the singular value decomposition. In particular, we further discuss the need for regularization in order to obtain physiologically reasonable results. We include an overview of relevant preprocessing steps and provide numerous references to the literature. We cover both CT and MR brain perfusion imaging in this paper because they share many common aspects. The combination of both the theoretical as well as the practical aspects of perfusion analysis explicitly emphasizes the simplifications to the underlying physiological model that are necessary in order to apply it to measured data acquired with current CT and MR scanners.

  14. Sustainable Farming Practices: Ghanaian Farmers' Perception of Erosion and Their Use of Conservation Measures.

    PubMed

    Veihe

    2000-04-01

    / Soil erosion in Africa has been in the limelight over the last two decades with researchers and policy-makers calling for sustainable farming practices. This is often based on the assumption that farmers have a poor perception and little knowledge about soil erosion and conservation measures and completely ignores the realities of the Africanenvironment and the socioeconomic constraints farmers are faced with. This paper investigates the way farmers in northern Ghana perceive soil erosion and their rationality when it comes to their choice of conservation measures, and the question is asked whether the existing farming practices can be considered sustainable. Based on this study it appears that farmers have a clear perception of the problem and adopt a wide range of conservation measures, depending on the availability of stones and grasses, possible side effects associated with using these measures, as well as the time spent on establishing and maintaining them. This study shows that when trying to find solutions to soil erosion problems, both the physical and socioeconomic realities of the environment have to be considered.

  15. SU-E-T-257: Output Constancy: Reducing Measurement Variations in a Large Practice Group

    SciTech Connect

    Hedrick, K; Fitzgerald, T; Miller, R

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To standardize output constancy check procedures in a large medical physics practice group covering multiple sites, in order to identify and reduce small systematic errors caused by differences in equipment and the procedures of multiple physicists. Methods: A standardized machine output constancy check for both photons and electrons was instituted within the practice group in 2010. After conducting annual TG-51 measurements in water and adjusting the linac to deliver 1.00 cGy/MU at Dmax, an acrylic phantom (comparable at all sites) and PTW farmer ion chamber are used to obtain monthly output constancy reference readings. From the collected charge reading, measurements of air pressure and temperature, and chamber Ndw and Pelec, a value we call the Kacrylic factor is determined, relating the chamber reading in acrylic to the dose in water with standard set-up conditions. This procedure easily allows for multiple equipment combinations to be used at any site. The Kacrylic factors and output results from all sites and machines are logged monthly in a central database and used to monitor trends in calibration and output. Results: The practice group consists of 19 sites, currently with 34 Varian and 8 Elekta linacs (24 Varian and 5 Elekta linacs in 2010). Over the past three years, the standard deviation of Kacrylic factors measured on all machines decreased by 20% for photons and high energy electrons as systematic errors were found and reduced. Low energy electrons showed very little change in the distribution of Kacrylic values. Small errors in linac beam data were found by investigating outlier Kacrylic values. Conclusion: While the use of acrylic phantoms introduces an additional source of error through small differences in depth and effective depth, the new standardized procedure eliminates potential sources of error from using many different phantoms and results in more consistent output constancy measurements.

  16. Measuring sports injuries on the pitch: a guide to use in practice.

    PubMed

    Hespanhol Junior, Luiz C; Barboza, Saulo D; van Mechelen, Willem; Verhagen, Evert

    2015-09-01

    Sports participation is a major ally for the promotion of physical activity. However, sports injuries are important adverse effects of sports participation and should be monitored in sports populations. The purpose of this paper is to review the basic concepts of injury monitoring and discuss the implementation of these concepts in practice. The aspects discussed are: (1) sports injury definition; (2) classification of sports injuries; (3) population at risk, prevalence, and incidence; (4) severity measures; (5) economic costs; (6) systems developed to monitor sports injuries; and (7) online technology. Only with reliable monitoring systems applied in a continuous and long-term manner will it be possible to identify the burden of injuries, to identify the possible cases at an early stage, to implement early interventions, and to generate data for sports injury prevention. The implementation of sports injuries monitoring systems in practice is strongly recommended.

  17. Measuring sports injuries on the pitch: a guide to use in practice.

    PubMed

    Hespanhol Junior, Luiz C; Barboza, Saulo D; van Mechelen, Willem; Verhagen, Evert

    2015-01-01

    Sports participation is a major ally for the promotion of physical activity. However, sports injuries are important adverse effects of sports participation and should be monitored in sports populations. The purpose of this paper is to review the basic concepts of injury monitoring and discuss the implementation of these concepts in practice. The aspects discussed are: (1) sports injury definition; (2) classification of sports injuries; (3) population at risk, prevalence, and incidence; (4) severity measures; (5) economic costs; (6) systems developed to monitor sports injuries; and (7) online technology. Only with reliable monitoring systems applied in a continuous and long-term manner will it be possible to identify the burden of injuries, to identify the possible cases at an early stage, to implement early interventions, and to generate data for sports injury prevention. The implementation of sports injuries monitoring systems in practice is strongly recommended.

  18. An evaluation of a new instrument to measure organisational safety culture values and practices.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Cabrera, D; Hernández-Fernaud, E; Isla-Díaz, R

    2007-11-01

    The main aim of this research is to evaluate a safety culture measuring instrument centred upon relevant organisational values and practices related to the safety management system. Seven dimensions that reflect underlying safety meanings are proposed. A second objective is to explore the four cultural orientations in the field of safety arising from the competing values framework. The study sample consisted of 299 participants from five companies in different sectors. The results show six dimensions of organisational values and practices and different company profiles in the organisations studied. The four cultural orientations proposed by the competing values framework are not confirmed. Nevertheless, a coexistence of diverse cultural orientations or paradoxes in the companies is observed.

  19. Measuring sports injuries on the pitch: a guide to use in practice

    PubMed Central

    Hespanhol, Luiz C.; Barboza, Saulo D.; van Mechelen, Willem; Verhagen, Evert

    2015-01-01

    Sports participation is a major ally for the promotion of physical activity. However, sports injuries are important adverse effects of sports participation and should be monitored in sports populations. The purpose of this paper is to review the basic concepts of injury monitoring and discuss the implementation of these concepts in practice. The aspects discussed are: (1) sports injury definition; (2) classification of sports injuries; (3) population at risk, prevalence, and incidence; (4) severity measures; (5) economic costs; (6) systems developed to monitor sports injuries; and (7) online technology. Only with reliable monitoring systems applied in a continuous and long-term manner will it be possible to identify the burden of injuries, to identify the possible cases at an early stage, to implement early interventions, and to generate data for sports injury prevention. The implementation of sports injuries monitoring systems in practice is strongly recommended. PMID:26537807

  20. A Practitioner's Instrument for Measuring Secondary Mathematics Teachers' Beliefs Surrounding Learner-Centered Classroom Practice.

    PubMed

    Lischka, Alyson E; Garner, Mary

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present the development and validation of a Mathematics Teaching Pedagogical and Discourse Beliefs Instrument (MTPDBI), a 20 item partial-credit survey designed and analyzed using Rasch measurement theory. Items on the MTPDBI address beliefs about the nature of mathematics, teaching and learning mathematics, and classroom discourse practices. A Rasch partial credit model (Masters, 1982) was estimated from the pilot study data. Results show that item separation reliability is .96 and person separation reliability is .71. Other analyses indicate the instrument is a viable measure of secondary teachers' beliefs about reform-oriented mathematics teaching and learning. This instrument is proposed as a useful measure of teacher beliefs for those working with pre-service and in-service teacher development.

  1. Best practice methods to apply to measurement of resting metabolic rate in adults: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Compher, Charlene; Frankenfield, David; Keim, Nancy; Roth-Yousey, Lori

    2006-06-01

    Several factors may alter apparent resting metabolic rate (RMR) during measurement with indirect calorimetry. Likewise, numerous indirect calorimetry measurement protocols have been developed over the years, and the methodology employed could influence test results. As part of a larger project to determine the role of indirect calorimetry in clinical practice, a systematic review of the literature was undertaken to determine the ideal subject condition and test methodology for obtaining reliable measurement of RMR with indirect calorimetry. Food, ethanol, caffeine, and nicotine affect RMR for a variable number of hours after consumption; therefore, intake of these items must be controlled before measurement. Activities of daily living increase metabolic rate, but a short rest (< or =20 minutes) before testing is sufficient for the effect to dissipate. Moderate or vigorous physical activity has a longer carryover effect and therefore must be controlled in the hours before a measurement of RMR is attempted. Limited data were found regarding ideal ambient conditions for RMR testing. Measurement duration of 10 minutes with the first 5 minutes deleted and the remaining 5 minutes having a coefficient of variation <10% gave accurate readings of RMR. Individuals preparing for RMR measurement via indirect calorimetry should refrain from eating, consuming ethanol and nicotine, smoking, and engaging in physical activity for varying times before measurement. The test site should be physically comfortable and the individual should have 10 to 20 minutes to rest before measurement commences. A 10-minute test duration with the first 5 minutes discarded and the remaining 5 minutes having a coefficient of variation of <10% will give an accurate measure of RMR.

  2. Technology transfer from biomedical research to clinical practice: measuring innovation performance.

    PubMed

    Balas, E Andrew; Elkin, Peter L

    2013-12-01

    Studies documented 17 years of transfer time from clinical trials to practice of care. Launched in 2002, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) translational research initiative needs to develop metrics for impact assessment. A recent White House report highlighted that research and development productivity is declining as a result of increased research spending while the new drugs output is flat. The goal of this study was to develop an expanded model of research-based innovation and performance thresholds of transfer from research to practice. Models for transfer of research to practice have been collected and reviewed. Subsequently, innovation pathways have been specified based on common characteristics. An integrated, intellectual property transfer model is described. The central but often disregarded role of research innovation disclosure is highlighted. Measures of research transfer and milestones of progress have been identified based on the Association of University Technology Managers 2012 performance reports. Numeric milestones of technology transfer are recommended at threshold (top 50%), target (top 25%), and stretch goal (top 10%) performance levels. Transfer measures and corresponding target levels include research spending to disclosure (<$1.88 million), disclosure to patents (>0.81), patents to start-up (>0.1), patents to licenses (>2.25), and average per license income (>$48,000). Several limitations of measurement are described. Academic institutions should take strategic steps to bring innovation to the center of scholarly discussions. Research on research, particularly on pathways to disclosures, is needed to improve R&D productivity. Researchers should be informed about the technology transfer performance of their institution and regulations should better support innovators.

  3. Making the decoy-state measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution practically useful

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yi-Heng; Yu, Zong-Wen; Wang, Xiang-Bin

    2016-04-01

    The relatively low key rate seems to be the major barrier to its practical use for the decoy-state measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution (MDI-QKD). We present a four-intensity protocol for the decoy-state MDI-QKD that hugely raises the key rate, especially in the case in which the total data size is not large. Also, calculations show that our method makes it possible for secure private communication with fresh keys generated from MDI-QKD with a delay time of only a few seconds.

  4. Regression Splines with Longitudinal Data

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In many clinical trial studies, patients are observed and/or measured on multiple occasions. To account for the longitudinal nature of the data, a mixed model analysis implemented using SAS PROC MIXED is commonly used. It is typical to make comparisons between dose or treatment groups, possibly cont...

  5. Field Measurements at River and Tidal Current Sites for Hydrokinetic Energy Development: Best Practices Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Neary, Vincent S; Gunawan, Budi

    2011-09-01

    In this report, existing data collection techniques and protocols for characterizing open channel flows are reviewed and refined to further address the needs of the MHK industry. The report provides an overview of the hydrodynamics of river and tidal channels, and the working principles of modern acoustic instrumentation, including best practices in remote sensing methods that can be applied to hydrokinetic energy site characterization. Emphasis is placed upon acoustic Doppler velocimeter (ADV) and acoustic-Doppler current profiler (ADCP) instruments, as these represent the most practical and economical tools for use in the MHK industry. Incorporating the best practices as found in the literature, including the parameters to be measured, the instruments to be deployed, the instrument deployment strategy, and data post-processing techniques. The data collected from this procedure aims to inform the hydro-mechanical design of MHK systems with respect to energy generation and structural loading, as well as provide reference hydrodynamics for environmental impact studies. The standard metrics and protocols defined herein can be utilized to guide field experiments with MHK systems.

  6. Replacing manual sphygmomanometers with automated blood pressure measurement in routine clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Myers, Martin G

    2014-01-01

    1. Conventional manual measurement of blood pressure (BP) in clinical practice is no longer considered to be the best method for evaluating a patient's BP status. Home BP and 24 h ambulatory BP monitoring are now recommended for the diagnosis and management of hypertension.  2. Recent studies provide an alternative to conventional office BP, namely automated office (AO) BP, which involves multiple BP readings taken with a fully automated device with the patient resting quietly alone. Automated office BP is preferable to routine manual office BP in that it exhibits improved accuracy and a stronger relationship to both ambulatory BP and target organ damage. 3. Having the patient alone eliminates conversation between the patient and the observer, a cause of 'white coat hypertension'. The use of an automated device improves accuracy, reduces digit preference, minimizes observer bias and facilitates the recording of multiple BP readings.  4. Comparative BP data obtained in clinical studies in both research settings and routine community practice support the use of a cut-off point of 135/85 mmHg for defining hypertension using AOBP, which is the same cut-off point currently recommended for awake ambulatory BP and home BP. 5. Reduction of the white coat response using AOBP should reduce the need to monitor patients with ambulatory BP and home BP after initiation of antihypertensive therapy. There is now sufficient evidence to consider replacing manual office BP with AOBP in routine clinical practice.

  7. A controlled statistical study to assess measurement variability as a function of test object position and configuration for automated surveillance in a multicenter longitudinal COPD study (SPIROMICS)

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Junfeng; Wang, Chao; Chan, Kung-Sik; Jin, Dakai; Saha, Punam K.; Sieren, Jered P.; Barr, R. G.; Han, MeiLan K.; Kazerooni, Ella; Cooper, Christopher B.; Couper, David; Hoffman, Eric A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: A test object (phantom) is an important tool to evaluate comparability and stability of CT scanners used in multicenter and longitudinal studies. However, there are many sources of error that can interfere with the test object-derived quantitative measurements. Here the authors investigated three major possible sources of operator error in the use of a test object employed to assess pulmonary density-related as well as airway-related metrics. Methods: Two kinds of experiments were carried out to assess measurement variability caused by imperfect scanning status. The first one consisted of three experiments. A COPDGene test object was scanned using a dual source multidetector computed tomographic scanner (Siemens Somatom Flash) with the Subpopulations and Intermediate Outcome Measures in COPD Study (SPIROMICS) inspiration protocol (120 kV, 110 mAs, pitch = 1, slice thickness = 0.75 mm, slice spacing = 0.5 mm) to evaluate the effects of tilt angle, water bottle offset, and air bubble size. After analysis of these results, a guideline was reached in order to achieve more reliable results for this test object. Next the authors applied the above findings to 2272 test object scans collected over 4 years as part of the SPIROMICS study. The authors compared changes of the data consistency before and after excluding the scans that failed to pass the guideline. Results: This study established the following limits for the test object: tilt index ≤0.3, water bottle offset limits of [−6.6 mm, 7.4 mm], and no air bubble within the water bottle, where tilt index is a measure incorporating two tilt angles around x- and y-axis. With 95% confidence, the density measurement variation for all five interested materials in the test object (acrylic, water, lung, inside air, and outside air) resulting from all three error sources can be limited to ±0.9 HU (summed in quadrature), when all the requirements are satisfied. The authors applied these criteria to 2272 SPIROMICS

  8. Knowledge, Attitude, and Practices Toward Blood Pressure Measurement at Home Among Japanese Nurses.

    PubMed

    Ishikuro, Mami; Ubeda, Sergio Ramón Gutiérrez; Obara, Taku; Watanabe, Ikue; Metoki, Hirohito; Kikuya, Masahiro; Kuriyama, Shinichi; Maruyama, Ryoko; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Imai, Yutaka

    2016-04-01

    The self-measurement of blood pressure (BP) at home is useful in predicting the level of target organ damage and in managing hypertension. Nurses are essential practitioners for managing hypertension; however, it is unclear whether they have adequate knowledge of home BP management. This study assessed the knowledge, attitudes, and practices of home BP measurement among Japanese nurses. A questionnaire regarding home BP measurement was distributed among nurses and collected by mail. A total of 6,002 (61.8%) responses were eligible for the study. The proportion of participants who correctly recognized the reference values for clinic BP and home BP was 9.9% and 2.8%. Midwives and those working for the government had the highest proportion of correct responses of reference values among all nursing subgroups. Participants who thought that home BP gave the most important BP information were 62.7%. About 60% of the participants who recommended home BP measurement to hypertensive patients preferred to recommend an upper-arm cuff device. Our findings suggested that more knowledge of home BP measurement among nurses is warranted.

  9. Measuring protein dynamics in live cells: protocols and practical considerations for fluorescence fluctuation microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Youker, Robert T.; Teng, Haibing

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Quantitative analysis of protein complex stoichiometries and mobilities are critical for elucidating the mechanisms that regulate cellular pathways. Fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy (FFS) techniques can measure protein dynamics, such as diffusion coefficients and formation of complexes, with extraordinary precision and sensitivity. Complete calibration and characterization of the microscope instrument is necessary in order to avoid artifacts during data acquisition and to capitalize on the full capabilities of FFS techniques. We provide an overview of the theory behind FFS techniques, discuss calibration procedures, provide protocols, and give practical considerations for performing FFS experiments. One important parameter recovered from FFS measurements is the relative molecular brightness that can correlate with oligomerization. Three methods for measuring molecular brightness (fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, photon-counting histogram, and number and brightness analysis) recover similar values when measuring samples under ideal conditions in vitro. However, examples are given illustrating that these different methods used for calculating molecular brightness of fluorescent molecules in cells are not always equivalent. Methods relying on spot measurements are more prone to bleaching and movement artifacts that can lead to underestimation of brightness values. We advocate for the use of multiple FFS techniques to study molecular brightnesses to overcome and compliment limitations of individual techniques. PMID:25260867

  10. A practical method of serial bedside measurement of cerebral blood flow and metabolism during neurointensive care.

    PubMed Central

    Sharples, P M; Stuart, A G; Aynsley-Green, A; Heaviside, D; Pay, D A; McGann, A; Crawford, P J; Harpin, R; Eyre, J A

    1991-01-01

    Acute encephalopathy is a major cause of death and neurological handicap in children. The principle aims of treatment are to provide adequate cerebral blood flow for the brain's metabolic needs and to prevent intracranial pressure rising above the level at which brain herniation occurs. Rational management requires an understanding of the pathophysiological changes in cerebral blood flow and metabolism which occur. The paucity of data on this subject reflects the perceived difficulty of measuring cerebral blood flow and cerebral metabolism in children. A modification of the Kety Schmidt technique of measuring cerebral blood flow and cerebral metabolism is described. This modification makes it possible to perform serial bedside measurements in children receiving intensive care. This method was used to perform 348 measurements in 58 children. The method was reproducible and no significant complications were encountered. The results indicated that appreciable changes in cerebral blood flow and metabolism could occur in individual patients over time, emphasising the importance of serial measurements. This technique may provide a practical means of monitoring cerebral blood flow and metabolism in very sick children receiving neurointensive care and evaluating the efficacy of treatment. PMID:1755648

  11. Measuring oral sensitivity in clinical practice: a quick and reliable behavioural method.

    PubMed

    Dovey, Terence M; Aldridge, Victoria K; Martin, Clarissa I

    2013-12-01

    This article aims to offer a behavioural assessment strategy for oral sensitivity that can be readily applied in the clinical setting. Four children, ranging in age and with a variety of developmental and medical problems, were used as test cases for a task analysis of tolerance to touch probes in and around the mouth. In all cases, the assessment was sensitive to weekly measures of an intervention for oral sensitivity over a 3-week period. Employing an inexpensive, direct, specific to the individual, replicable, reliable, and effective measure for a specific sensory problem would fit better with the edicts of evidence-based practice. The current method offered the initial evidence towards this goal.

  12. A practical E-PERM (electret passive environmental radon monitor) system for indoor 222Rn measurement.

    PubMed

    Kotrappa, P; Dempsey, J C; Ramsey, R W; Stieff, L R

    1990-04-01

    The technical and scientific basis for the measurement of indoor 222Rn concentration using an E-PERM (Electret passive environmental radon monitor) has been described in our earlier work. The purpose of this paper is to describe further development of a practical and convenient system that can be used routinely for indoor 222Rn measurement. The ion chamber is now made of electrically conducting plastic to minimize the response from natural gamma radiation. A spring-loaded shutter method is used to cover and uncover the electret from outside the chamber. The electret voltage reader has been modified to improve the accuracy and the ease in operation. The calibration, performance, error analysis, and lower limits of detection for these standardized versions of E-PERMs are also described.

  13. Effect size indices for analyses of measurement equivalence: understanding the practical importance of differences between groups.

    PubMed

    Nye, Christopher D; Drasgow, Fritz

    2011-09-01

    Because of the practical, theoretical, and legal implications of differential item functioning (DIF) for organizational assessments, studies of measurement equivalence are a necessary first step before scores can be compared across individuals from different groups. However, commonly recommended criteria for evaluating results from these analyses have several important limitations. The present study proposes an effect size index for confirmatory factor analytic (CFA) studies of measurement equivalence to address 1 of these limitations. The application of this index is illustrated with personality data from American English, Greek, and Chinese samples. Results showed a range of nonequivalence across these samples, and these differences were linked to the observed effects of DIF on the outcomes of the assessment (i.e., group-level mean differences and adverse impact).

  14. LSTGEE: longitudinal analysis of neuroimaging data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yimei; Zhu, Hongtu; Chen, Yasheng; An, Hongyu; Gilmore, John; Lin, Weili; Shen, Dinggang

    2009-02-01

    Longitudinal imaging studies are essential to understanding the neural development of neuropsychiatric disorders, substance use disorders, and normal brain. Using appropriate image processing and statistical tools to analyze the imaging, behavioral, and clinical data is critical for optimally exploring and interpreting the findings from those imaging studies. However, the existing imaging processing and statistical methods for analyzing imaging longitudinal measures are primarily developed for cross-sectional neuroimaging studies. The simple use of these cross-sectional tools to longitudinal imaging studies will significantly decrease the statistical power of longitudinal studies in detecting subtle changes of imaging measures and the causal role of time-dependent covariate in disease process. The main objective of this paper is to develop longitudinal statistics toolbox, called LSTGEE, for the analysis of neuroimaging data from longitudinal studies. We develop generalized estimating equations for jointly modeling imaging measures with behavioral and clinical variables from longitudinal studies. We develop a test procedure based on a score test statistic and a resampling method to test linear hypotheses of unknown parameters, such as associations between brain structure and function and covariates of interest, such as IQ, age, gene, diagnostic groups, and severity of disease. We demonstrate the application of our statistical methods to the detection of the changes of the fractional anisotropy across time in a longitudinal neonate study. Particularly, our results demonstrate that the use of longitudinal statistics can dramatically increase the statistical power in detecting the changes of neuroimaging measures. The proposed approach can be applied to longitudinal data with multiple outcomes and accommodate incomplete and unbalanced data, i.e., subjects with different number of measurements.

  15. International standards for symphysis-fundal height based on serial measurements from the Fetal Growth Longitudinal Study of the INTERGROWTH-21st Project: prospective cohort study in eight countries

    PubMed Central

    Ohuma, Eric O; Gravett, Michael G; Hirst, Jane; da Silveira, Mariangela F; Lambert, Ann; Carvalho, Maria; Jaffer, Yasmin A; Altman, Douglas G; Noble, Julia A; Bertino, Enrico; Purwar, Manorama; Pang, Ruyan; Cheikh Ismail, Leila; Victora, Cesar; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A; Kennedy, Stephen H; Villar, José

    2016-01-01

    Objective To create international symphysis-fundal height standards derived from pregnancies of healthy women with good maternal and perinatal outcomes. Design Prospective longitudinal observational study. Setting Eight geographically diverse urban regions in Brazil, China, India, Italy, Kenya, Oman, United Kingdom, and United States. Participants Healthy, well nourished pregnant women enrolled into the Fetal Growth Longitudinal Study component of the INTERGROWTH-21st Project at 9-14 weeks’ gestation, and followed up until birth. Main outcome measures Symphysis-fundal height was measured every five weeks from 14 weeks’ gestation until birth using standardised methods and dedicated research staff who were blinded to the symphysis-fundal height measurements by turning the tape measure so that numbers were not visible during examination. The best fitting curve was selected using second degree fractional polynomials and further modelled in a multilevel framework to account for the longitudinal design of the study. Results Of 13 108 women screened in the first trimester, 4607 (35.1%) met the study entry criteria. Of the eligible women, 4321 (93.8%) had pregnancies without major complications and delivered live singletons without congenital malformations. The median number of symphysis-fundal height measurements was 5.0 (range 1-7); 3976 (92.0%) women had four or more measurements. Symphysis-fundal height measurements increased almost linearly with gestational age; data were used to determine fitted 3rd, 50th, and 97th centile curves, which showed excellent agreement with observed values. Conclusions This study presents international standards to measure symphysis-fundal height as a first level screening tool for fetal growth disturbances. PMID:27821614

  16. Reporting unit size and measurement uncertainty: current Australian practice in clinical chemistry and haematology.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Robert C; Badrick, Tony

    2015-08-01

    In this study we aimed to compare the reporting unit size used by Australian laboratories for routine chemistry and haematology tests to the unit size used by learned authorities and in standard laboratory textbooks and to the justified unit size based on measurement uncertainty (MU) estimates from quality assurance program data. MU was determined from Royal College of Pathologists of Australasia (RCPA) - Australasian Association of Clinical Biochemists (AACB) and RCPA Haematology Quality Assurance Program survey reports. The reporting unit size implicitly suggested in authoritative textbooks, the RCPA Manual, and the General Serum Chemistry program itself was noted. We also used published data on Australian laboratory practices.The best performing laboratories could justify their chemistry unit size for 55% of analytes while comparable figures for the 50% and 90% laboratories were 14% and 8%, respectively. Reporting unit size was justifiable for all laboratories for red cell count, >50% for haemoglobin but only the top 10% for haematocrit. Few, if any, could justify their mean cell volume (MCV) and mean cell haemoglobin concentration (MCHC) reporting unit sizes.The reporting unit size used by many laboratories is not justified by present analytical performance. Using MU estimates to determine the reporting interval for quantitative laboratory results ensures reporting practices match local analytical performance and recognises the inherent error of the measurement process.

  17. Modeling nonstationary longitudinal data.

    PubMed

    Núñez-Antón, V; Zimmerman, D L

    2000-09-01

    An important theme of longitudinal data analysis in the past two decades has been the development and use of explicit parametric models for the data's variance-covariance structure. A variety of these models have been proposed, of which most are second-order stationary. A few are flexible enough to accommodate nonstationarity, i.e., nonconstant variances and/or correlations that are not a function solely of elapsed time between measurements. We review five nonstationary models that we regard as most useful: (1) the unstructured covariance model, (2) unstructured antedependence models, (3) structured antedependence models, (4) autoregressive integrated moving average and similar models, and (5) random coefficients models. We evaluate the relative strengths and limitations of each model, emphasizing when it is inappropriate or unlikely to be useful. We present three examples to illustrate the fitting and comparison of the models and to demonstrate that nonstationary longitudinal data can be modeled effectively and, in some cases, quite parsimoniously. In these examples, the antedependence models generally prove to be superior and the random coefficients models prove to be inferior. We conclude that antedependence models should be given much greater consideration than they have historically received.

  18. How do family physicians measure blood pressure in routine clinical practice?

    PubMed Central

    Kaczorowski, Janusz; Myers, Martin G.; Gelfer, Mark; Dawes, Martin; Mang, Eric J.; Berg, Angelique; Grande, Claudio Del; Kljujic, Dragan

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objective To describe the techniques currently used by family physicians in Canada to measure blood pressure (BP) for screening for, diagnosing, and treating hypertension. Design A Web-based cross-sectional survey distributed by e-mail. Setting Stratified random sample of family physicians in Canada. Participants Family physician members of the College of Family Physicians of Canada with valid e-mail addresses. Main outcome measures Physicians’ self-reported routine methods for recording BP in their practices to screen for, diagnose, and manage hypertension. Results A total of 774 valid responses were received, for a response rate of 16.2%. Respondents were similar to nonrespondents except for underrepresentation of male physicians. Of 769 respondents, 417 (54.2%) indicated that they used manual office BP measurement with a mercury or aneroid device and stethoscope as the routine method to screen patients for high BP, while 42.9% (330 of 769) reported using automated office BP (AOBP) measurement. The method most frequently used to make a diagnosis of hypertension was AOBP measurement (31.1%, 240 of 771), followed by home BP measurement (22.4%, 173 of 771) and manual office BP measurement (21.4%, 165 of 771). Ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM) was used for diagnosis by 14.4% (111 of 771) of respondents. The most frequently reported method for ongoing management was home BP monitoring (68.7%, 528 of 769), followed by manual office BP measurement (63.6%, 489 of 769) and AOBP measurement (59.2%, 455 of 769). More than three-quarters (77.8%, 598 of 769) of respondents indicated that ABPM was readily available for their patients. Conclusion Canadian family physicians exhibit overall high use of electronic devices for BP measurement, However, more efforts are needed to encourage practitioners to follow current Canadian guidelines, which advocate the use of AOBP measurement for hypertension screening, ABPM and home BP measurement for making a diagnosis, and both

  19. Longitudinal magnetization loss in twisted multifilamentary Bi2223 tape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amemiya, N.; Rabbers, J.-J.; Krooshoop, B. E.; ten Haken, B.; ten Kate, H.; Ayai, N.; Hayashi, K.

    2002-08-01

    Multifilamentary Bi2223 tapes are exposed to the longitudinal magnetic field as well as the transverse one in some electrical power apparatuses such as multilayer power transmission cables. Here, we define the longitudinal and transverse magnetic fields as the field components parallel and perpendicular to the tape axis, respectively. If the filament-bundle is twisted, it can couple to the AC longitudinal magnetic field to generate the longitudinal magnetization loss. Furthermore, the AC transport current flowing spirally in the twisted filament-bundle possibly influences the longitudinal magnetization. The longitudinal magnetization loss was measured in a twisted multifilamentary Bi2223 tape exposed to longitudinal magnetic field and carrying the transport current. The measured longitudinal magnetization loss in the twisted tape exposed to the longitudinal magnetic field is larger than that in another untwisted tape. Supplying the AC transport current changes the longitudinal magnetization loss in the twisted tape exposed to the AC longitudinal magnetic field. The influence of the transport current depends on the phase relation between the longitudinal magnetic field and the transport current. If their phase difference is 0°, the longitudinal magnetization loss decreases remarkably with increasing amplitude of the transport current. It means that the change in the current distribution due to the transport current results in the decrease in the power flow from the magnet power supply. But, a preliminary measurement of the transport loss shows that the total loss increases with increasing transport current.

  20. A Comparison of the Long-Term Learning Effects of Comprehensive and Topic-Specific Practice Set Assignments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fatemi, Darius; Marley, Robert; Marquis, Linda M.

    2015-01-01

    The authors examined the long-term learning effects of two different practice set assignment approaches on business students' long-term learning: a comprehensive, multiple-period practice set and a topic-specific practice set. Student learning was measured longitudinally across semesters. The authors found evidence that students using a…

  1. A measurement of. Delta. sigma. sub L (np), the difference between neutron-proton total cross sections in pure longitudinal spin states

    SciTech Connect

    Beddo, M.E.

    1990-10-01

    A measurement off {Delta}{sigma}{sub L}(np), the difference between neutron-proton total cross sections in pure longitudinal spin states, is described. The results will help determine the isospin-zero (I = 0) scattering amplitudes, which are not well known above laboratory energies of 500 MeV, whereas the isospin-one (I = 1) amplitudes are fairly well-determined to 1 GeV. Data points were taken at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) at Los Alamos, New Mexico, for five neutron beam energies: 484, 568, 634,720 and 788 MeV; they are the first in this energy range. Polarized neutrons were produced by charge-exchange of polarized protons on a liquid deuterium target (LD{sub 2}). Large-volume neutron counters detected the neutrons that passed through a polarized proton target. The counters subtended a range of solid angles large enough to allow extrapolation of the scattered neutrons to 0{degree}. Two modifications to the LAMPF accelerator system which were made for this work are described. They included a beam buncher,'' which modified the normal rf-time structure of the proton beam and allowed for the selection of peak-energy neutrons by time-of-flight means, and a computerized beam steering program, which reduced systematic effects due to beam motion at the LD{sub 2} target. The experimental values of {Delta}{sigma}{sub L}(np) are found to be consistent with other np data, including preliminary data from SIN and Saclay, but not with some results from Argonne which used a polarized proton beam and a polarized deuteron target. The I = 0 component was extracted from {Delta}{sigma}{sub L}(np) using existing pp data (I = 1), with the unexpected result that {Delta}{sigma}{sub L}(I = 0) was found to be essentially identical in shape to {Delta}{sigma}{sub L}(I = 1). The significance of this is not yet understood.

  2. Single Agent Antihypertensive Therapy and Orthostatic Blood Pressure Behaviour in Older Adults Using Beat-to-Beat Measurements: The Irish Longitudinal Study on Ageing

    PubMed Central

    Canney, Mark; O’Connell, Matthew D. L.; Murphy, Catriona M.; O’Leary, Neil; Little, Mark A.; O’Seaghdha, Conall M.; Kenny, Rose Anne

    2016-01-01

    Background Impaired blood pressure (BP) stabilisation after standing, defined using beat-to-beat measurements, has been shown to predict important health outcomes. We aimed to define the relationship between individual classes of antihypertensive agent and BP stabilisation among hypertensive older adults. Methods Cross-sectional analysis from The Irish Longitudinal Study on Ageing, a cohort study of Irish adults aged 50 years and over. Beat-to-beat BP was recorded in participants undergoing an active stand test. We defined grade 1 hypertension according to European Society of Cardiology criteria (systolic BP [SBP] 140-159mmHg ± diastolic BP [DBP] 90-99mmHg). Outcomes were: (i) initial orthostatic hypotension (IOH) (SBP drop ≥40mmHg ± DBP drop ≥20mmHg within 15 seconds [s] of standing accompanied by symptoms); (ii) sustained OH (SBP drop ≥20mmHg ± DBP drop ≥10mmHg from 60 to 110s inclusive); (iii) impaired BP stabilisation (SBP drop ≥20mmHg ± DBP drop ≥10mmHg at any 10s interval during the test). Outcomes were assessed using multivariable-adjusted logistic regression. Results A total of 536 hypertensive participants were receiving monotherapy with a renin-angiotensin-aldosterone-system inhibitor (n = 317, 59.1%), beta-blocker (n = 89, 16.6%), calcium channel blocker (n = 89, 16.6%) or diuretic (n = 41, 7.6%). A further 783 untreated participants met criteria for grade 1 hypertension. Beta-blockers were associated with increased odds of initial OH (OR 2.05, 95% CI 1.31–3.21) and sustained OH (OR 3.36, 95% CI 1.87–6.03) versus untreated grade 1 hypertension. Multivariable adjustment did not attenuate the results. Impaired BP stabilisation was evident at 20s (OR 2.59, 95% CI 1.58–4.25) and persisted at 110s (OR 2.90, 95% CI 1.64–5.11). No association was found between the other agents and any study outcome. Conclusion Beta-blocker monotherapy was associated with a >2-fold increased odds of initial OH and a >3-fold increased odds of sustained OH

  3. Noise and measurement errors in a practical two-state quantum bit commitment protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loura, Ricardo; Almeida, Álvaro J.; André, Paulo S.; Pinto, Armando N.; Mateus, Paulo; Paunković, Nikola

    2014-05-01

    We present a two-state practical quantum bit commitment protocol, the security of which is based on the current technological limitations, namely the nonexistence of either stable long-term quantum memories or nondemolition measurements. For an optical realization of the protocol, we model the errors, which occur due to the noise and equipment (source, fibers, and detectors) imperfections, accumulated during emission, transmission, and measurement of photons. The optical part is modeled as a combination of a depolarizing channel (white noise), unitary evolution (e.g., systematic rotation of the polarization axis of photons), and two other basis-dependent channels, namely the phase- and bit-flip channels. We analyze quantitatively the effects of noise using two common information-theoretic measures of probability distribution distinguishability: the fidelity and the relative entropy. In particular, we discuss the optimal cheating strategy and show that it is always advantageous for a cheating agent to add some amount of white noise—the particular effect not being present in standard quantum security protocols. We also analyze the protocol's security when the use of (im)perfect nondemolition measurements and noisy or bounded quantum memories is allowed. Finally, we discuss errors occurring due to a finite detector efficiency, dark counts, and imperfect single-photon sources, and we show that the effects are the same as those of standard quantum cryptography.

  4. Measuring psoriatic disease in clinical practice. An expert opinion position paper.

    PubMed

    Lubrano, Ennio; Cantini, Fabrizio; Costanzo, Antonio; Girolomoni, Giampiero; Prignano, Francesca; Olivieri, Ignazio; Scarpa, Raffaele; Spadaro, Antonio; Atzeni, Fabiola; Narcisi, Alessandra; Ricceri, Federica; Sarzi-Puttini, Piercarlo

    2015-10-01

    Psoriasis is a common, immune-mediated chronic inflammatory disease with a primary involvement of skin and joints, affecting approximately 2% of the population worldwide. Up to one third of patients with psoriasis are diagnosed with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Psoriasis and PsA are heterogeneous diseases whose severity depends on a number of clinical factors, such as areas affected and pattern of involvement, and are associated with a range of comorbid diseases and risk factors, including obesity, metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular disease and liver disease. Thus measuring the severity of psoriatic disease needs to take into account the multidimensional aspects of the disease. Subjective measures including the impairment in quality of life or in daily living activities as well as the presence of cardio-metabolic comorbidities, are important for the outcome and add further levels of complexity that, to a certain extent, need to be assessed. Because of the wide range of comorbid conditions associated with psoriasis, comprehensive screening and treatment must be implemented for a most effective managing of psoriasis patients. A joint dermatologist-rheumatologist roundtable discussion was convened to share evidence on the real-life use of methods for measuring psoriasis severity comprehensively. Our objective was to provide an expert position on which clinical variables are to be taken into account when considering patients affected by psoriasis and/or PsA globally and on the assessment tools more suitable for measuring disease activity and/or severity in clinical practice.

  5. Practical issues in ultrashort-laser-pulse measurement using frequency-resolved optical gating

    SciTech Connect

    DeLong, K.W.; Fittinghoff, D.N.; Trebino, R.

    1996-07-01

    The authors explore several practical experimental issues in measuring ultrashort laser pulses using the technique of frequency-resolved optical gating (FROG). They present a simple method for checking the consistency of experimentally measured FROG data with the independently measured spectrum and autocorrelation of the pulse. This method is a powerful way of discovering systematic errors in FROG experiments. They show how to determine the optimum sampling rate for FROG and show that this satisfies the Nyquist criterion for the laser pulse. They explore the low- and high-power limits to FROG and determine that femtojoule operation should be possible, while the effects of self-phase modulation limit the highest signal efficiency in FROG to 1%. They also show quantitatively that the temporal blurring due to a finite-thickness medium in single-shot geometries does not strongly limit the FROG technique. They explore the limiting time-bandwidth values that can be represented on a FROG trace of a given size. Finally, they report on a new measure of the FROG error that improves convergence in the presence of noise.

  6. LONGITUDINAL LASER WIRE AT SNS

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksandrov, Alexander V; Liu, Yun; Zhukov, Alexander P

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a longitudinal H- beam profile scanner that utilizes laser light to detach convoy electrons and an MCP to collect and measure these electrons. The scanner is located in MEBT with H- energy of 2.5MeV and an RF frequency 402.5MHz. The picosecond pulsed laser runs at 80.5MHz in sync with the accelerator RF. The laser beam is delivered to the beam line through a 30m optical fiber. The pulse width after the fiber transmission measures about 10ps. Scanning the laser phase effectively allows measurements to move along ion bunch longitudinal position. We are able to reliably measure production beam bunch length with this method. The biggest problem we have encountered is background signal from electrons being stripped by vacuum. Several techniques of signal detection are discussed.

  7. Measuring Energy Metabolism in the Mouse – Theoretical, Practical, and Analytical Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Speakman, John R.

    2012-01-01

    The mouse is one of the most important model organisms for understanding human genetic function and disease. This includes characterization of the factors that influence energy expenditure and dysregulation of energy balance leading to obesity and its sequelae. Measuring energy metabolism in the mouse presents a challenge because the animals are small, and in this respect it presents similar challenges to measuring energy demands in many other species of small mammal. This paper considers some theoretical, practical, and analytical considerations to be considered when measuring energy expenditure in mice. Theoretically total daily energy expenditure is comprised of several different components: basal or resting expenditure, physical activity, thermoregulation, and the thermic effect of food. Energy expenditure in mice is normally measured using open flow indirect calorimetry apparatus. Two types of system are available – one of which involves a single small Spartan chamber linked to a single analyzer, which is ideal for measuring the individual components of energy demand. The other type of system involves a large chamber which mimics the home cage environment and is generally configured with several chambers/analyzer. These latter systems are ideal for measuring total daily energy expenditure but at present do not allow accurate decomposition of the total expenditure into its components. The greatest analytical challenge for mouse expenditure data is how to account for body size differences between individuals. This has been a matter of some discussion for at least 120 years. The statistically most appropriate approach is to use analysis of covariance with individual aspects of body composition as independent predictors. PMID:23504620

  8. Measuring energy metabolism in the mouse - theoretical, practical, and analytical considerations.

    PubMed

    Speakman, John R

    2013-01-01

    The mouse is one of the most important model organisms for understanding human genetic function and disease. This includes characterization of the factors that influence energy expenditure and dysregulation of energy balance leading to obesity and its sequelae. Measuring energy metabolism in the mouse presents a challenge because the animals are small, and in this respect it presents similar challenges to measuring energy demands in many other species of small mammal. This paper considers some theoretical, practical, and analytical considerations to be considered when measuring energy expenditure in mice. Theoretically total daily energy expenditure is comprised of several different components: basal or resting expenditure, physical activity, thermoregulation, and the thermic effect of food. Energy expenditure in mice is normally measured using open flow indirect calorimetry apparatus. Two types of system are available - one of which involves a single small Spartan chamber linked to a single analyzer, which is ideal for measuring the individual components of energy demand. The other type of system involves a large chamber which mimics the home cage environment and is generally configured with several chambers/analyzer. These latter systems are ideal for measuring total daily energy expenditure but at present do not allow accurate decomposition of the total expenditure into its components. The greatest analytical challenge for mouse expenditure data is how to account for body size differences between individuals. This has been a matter of some discussion for at least 120 years. The statistically most appropriate approach is to use analysis of covariance with individual aspects of body composition as independent predictors.

  9. Longitudinal Multitrait-Multimethod Models for Developmental Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grimm, Kevin J.; Pianta, Robert C.; Konold, Timothy

    2009-01-01

    Multitrait-multimethod (MTMM) confirmatory factor models were combined with longitudinal structural equation models to examine trait and method stability over time. A longitudinal correlated-trait correlated-method (CT-CM) model allowed for the study of trait and method variance in observed scores over time. Longitudinal measurement invariance was…

  10. A practical technique for measuring human biofluid conductivity using high gain-frequency characteristics.

    PubMed

    Al-Nabulsi, Jamal I; Aloquili, Osama; Ausheva, Vektoria; Yuldashev, Zafar M

    2011-11-01

    Currently, the study of ion composition and performance in human biofluids plays an important role in biomedical engineering research and technology. This field may become universal for human diagnostics; it allows early detection of different diseases in humans by measuring changes in ion behaviour in human biofluids. Practical experiments were conducted to analyse the liquid composite electrolyte conductivity in an alternating electric current field. These experiments allow the contribution of separate types of ions to the overall conductivity to be estimated. The method of estimating the concentration of active ions contained in biofluids is also introduced; it illustrates the possibility of performing qualitative and quantitative analysis over a wide range of concentrations and compositions. The authors present a procedure to determine the concentration of active liquid ions based on conductivity gain-frequency characteristic curve tracing. The experimental results validate the practical use of the proposed method. The results of this research are promising, and further investigation is required to further improve the method.

  11. Practical strategies for identifying groundwater discharges into sediment and surface water with fiber optic temperature measurement.

    PubMed

    Selker, John; Selker, Frank; Huff, Julie; Short, Russ; Edwards, Deborah; Nicholson, Peter; Chin, Arthur

    2014-07-01

    Identifying or ruling out groundwater discharges into sediment and surface waters is often critical for evaluating impacts and for planning remedial actions. Information about subsurface structure and groundwater can be helpful, but imperfect information, heterogeneous materials, and the likelihood of preferential pathways make it difficult to locate seeps without direct seep monitoring. We present the practical application of a method that uses fiber optic temperature measurement to provide high-resolution, sensitive, and dynamic monitoring of seepage from sediments over large areas: distributed temperature sensing to identify groundwater discharge (DTSID). First, we introduce a stochastic Monte Carlo method for designing DTSID installation based on site characteristics and the required probability of detecting particular size seeps. We then present practical methods for analysing DTSID results to prioritize locations for further investigation used at three industrial locations. Summer conditions generally presented greater difficulty in the method due to stronger environmentally-driven temperature fluctuations and thermal stratification of surface water. Tidal fluctuations were shown to be helpful in seepage detection at some locations by creating a dynamic temperature pattern that likely reflects changing seepage with varying water levels. At locations with suitable conditions for the application of DTSID, it can provide unique information regarding likely seep locations, enhancing an integrated site investigation.

  12. Updated scar management practical guidelines: non-invasive and invasive measures.

    PubMed

    Monstrey, Stan; Middelkoop, Esther; Vranckx, Jan Jeroen; Bassetto, Franco; Ziegler, Ulrich E; Meaume, Sylvie; Téot, Luc

    2014-08-01

    Hypertrophic scars and keloids can be aesthetically displeasing and lead to severe psychosocial impairment. Many invasive and non-invasive options are available for the plastic (and any other) surgeon both to prevent and to treat abnormal scar formation. Recently, an updated set of practical evidence-based guidelines for the management of hypertrophic scars and keloids was developed by an international group of 24 experts from a wide range of specialities. An initial set of strategies to minimize the risk of scar formation is applicable to all types of scars and is indicated before, during and immediately after surgery. In addition to optimal surgical management, this includes measures to reduce skin tension, and to provide taping, hydration and ultraviolet (UV) protection of the early scar tissue. Silicone sheeting or gel is universally considered as the first-line prophylactic and treatment option for hypertrophic scars and keloids. The efficacy and safety of this gold-standard, non-invasive therapy has been demonstrated in many clinical studies. Other (more specialized) scar treatment options are available for high-risk patients and/or scars. Pressure garments may be indicated for more widespread scarring, especially after burns. At a later stage, more invasive or surgical procedures may be necessary for the correction of permanent unaesthetic scars and can be combined with adjuvant measures to achieve optimal outcomes. The choice of scar management measures for a particular patient should be based on the newly updated evidence-based recommendations taking individual patient and wound characteristics into consideration.

  13. Using Project Performance to Measure Effectiveness of Quality Management System Maintenance and Practices in Construction Industry

    PubMed Central

    Leong, Tiong Kung; Ariff, Mohd. Shoki Md.

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposed seven existing and new performance indicators to measure the effectiveness of quality management system (QMS) maintenance and practices in construction industry. This research is carried out with a questionnaire based on QMS variables which are extracted from literature review and project performance indicators which are established from project management's theory. Data collected was analyzed using correlation and regression analysis. The findings indicate that client satisfaction and time variance have positive and significant relationship with QMS while other project performance indicators do not show significant results. Further studies can use the same project performance indicators to study the effectiveness of QMS in different sampling area to improve the generalizability of the findings. PMID:24701182

  14. Measuring Provider Attitudes Toward Evidence-Based Practice: Consideration of Organizational Context and Individual Differences

    PubMed Central

    Aarons, Gregory A.

    2006-01-01

    Mental health provider attitudes toward adoption of innovation in general, and toward evidence-based practice (EBP) in particular, are important in considering how best to disseminate and implement EBPs. This article first explores the role of attitudes in acceptance of innovation and proposes a model of organizational and individual factors that may affect or be affected by attitudes toward adoption of EBP. Next, a recently developed measure of mental health provider attitudes toward adoption of EBP is presented along with a summary of preliminary reliability and validity findings. Attitudes toward adoption of EBP are then discussed in regard to provider individual differences and the context of mental health services. Finally, potential applications of attitude research to adoption of EBP are discussed. PMID:15694785

  15. Using project performance to measure effectiveness of quality management system maintenance and practices in construction industry.

    PubMed

    Leong, Tiong Kung; Zakuan, Norhayati; Mat Saman, Muhamad Zameri; Ariff, Mohd Shoki Md; Tan, Choy Soon

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposed seven existing and new performance indicators to measure the effectiveness of quality management system (QMS) maintenance and practices in construction industry. This research is carried out with a questionnaire based on QMS variables which are extracted from literature review and project performance indicators which are established from project management's theory. Data collected was analyzed using correlation and regression analysis. The findings indicate that client satisfaction and time variance have positive and significant relationship with QMS while other project performance indicators do not show significant results. Further studies can use the same project performance indicators to study the effectiveness of QMS in different sampling area to improve the generalizability of the findings.

  16. A Measure of Person-Centered Practices in Assisted Living: The PC-PAL

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, Sheryl; Allen, Josh; Cohen, Lauren W.; Pinkowitz, Jackie; Reed, David; Coffey, Walter O.; Reed, Peter; Lepore, Michael; Sloane, Philip D.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Develop self-administered questionnaires of person-centeredness for completion by residents and staff in assisted living (AL), in response to concerns that AL is not person-centered; also, demonstrated person-centeredness is necessary for Medicaid support as a home and community-based services provider. Design Community-based participatory research partnership between a research team, a consortium of 11 stakeholder organizations, and others. Methods included literature review, item generation and reduction, cognitive testing, field testing, exploratory factor analysis, and convergent and discriminant validity testing. Setting Cognitive testing conducted in two AL residences and field testing conducted in 19 diverse, stratified AL residences in six states. Participants Eight residents and staff participated in cognitive testing, and 228 residents and 123 staff participated in field testing. Measurements Feasibility and psychometric testing of draft questionnaires that included 75 items (resident version) and 102 items (staff version), with parallel items on both versions as appropriate. Results The final resident questionnaire included 49 items and four factors: well-being and belonging, individualized care and services, social connectedness, and atmosphere. The staff questionnaire included 62 items and five factors: workforce practices, social connectedness, individualized care and services, atmosphere, and caregiver-resident relationships. Staff scored person-centeredness higher than did residents, reflecting their different perspectives. Conclusion The Person-Centered Practices in Assisted Living (PC-PAL) questionnaires measure person-centeredness from the perspectives of residents and staff, meaning that they reflect the concepts and items considered to be important to these key stakeholders. Use of these instruments to describe, assess, quantify, assure, and ultimately improve person-centeredness in AL is feasible and appropriate for all AL settings

  17. Rasch Validation of a Measure of Reform-Oriented Science Teaching Practices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Hye Sun

    2016-06-01

    Growing evidence from recent curriculum documents and previous research suggests that reform-oriented science teaching practices promote students' conceptual understanding, levels of achievement, and motivation to learn, especially when students are actively engaged in constructing their ideas through scientific inquiries. However, it is difficult to identify to what extent science teachers engage students in reform-oriented teaching practices (RTPs) in their science classrooms. In order to exactly diagnose the current status of science teachers' implementation of the RTPs, a valid and reliable instrument tool is needed. The principles of validity and reliability are fundamental cornerstones in developing a robust measurement tool. As such, this study was motivated by the desire to point out the limitations of the existing statistical and psychometric analyses and to further examine the validation of the RTP survey instrument. This paper thus aims at calibrating the items of the RTPs for science teachers using the Rasch model. The survey instrument scale was adapted from the 2012 National Survey of Science and Mathematics Education (NSSME) data. A total of 3701 science teachers from 1403 schools from across the USA participated in the NSSME survey. After calibrating the RTP items and persons on the same scale, the RTP instrument well represented the population of US science teachers. Model-data fit determined by Infit and Outfit statistics was within an appropriate range (0.5-1.5), supporting the unidimensional structure of the RTPs. The ordered category thresholds and the probability of the thresholds showed that the five-point rating scale functioned well. The results of this study support the use of the RTP measure from the 2012 NSSME in assessing usage of RTPs.

  18. Extending acoustic data measured with small-scale supersonic model jets to practical aircraft exhaust jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Ching-Wen

    2010-06-01

    extrapolated to represent the expected noise levels at different noise monitoring locations of practical interest. With the emergence of more powerful fighter aircraft, supersonic jet noise reduction devices are being intensely researched. Small-scale measurements are a crucial step in evaluating the potential of noise reduction concepts at an early stage in the design process. With this in mind, the present thesis provides an acoustic assessment methodology for small-scale military-style nozzles with chevrons. Comparisons are made between the present measurements and those made by NASA at moderate-scale. The effect of chevrons on supersonic jets was investigated, highlighting the crucial role of the jet operating conditions on the effects of chevrons on the jet flow and the subsequent acoustic benefits. A small-scale heat simulated jet is investigated in the over-expanded condition and shows no substantial noise reduction from the chevrons. This is contrary to moderate-scale measurements. The discrepancy is attributed to a Reynolds number low enough to sustain an annular laminar boundary layer in the nozzle that separates in the over-expanded flow condition. These results are important in assessing the limitations of small-scale measurements in this particular jet noise reduction method. Lastly, to successfully present the results from the acoustic measurements of small-scale jets with high quality, a newly developed PSU free-field response was empirically derived to match the specific orientation and grid cap geometry of the microphones. Application to measured data gives encouraging results validating the capability of the method to produce superior accuracy in measurements even at the highest response frequencies of the microphones.

  19. Long-term effect of intensive lifestyle intervention on cardiovascular risk factors in patients with diabetes in real-world clinical practice: a 5-year longitudinal study

    PubMed Central

    Hamdy, Osama; Mottalib, Adham; Morsi, Amr; El-Sayed, Nuha; Goebel-Fabbri, Ann; Arathuzik, Gillian; Shahar, Jacqueline; Kirpitch, Amanda; Zrebiec, John

    2017-01-01

    Objective We evaluated long-term impact of sustained weight loss versus weight regain on cardiovascular risk factors in real-world clinical practice. Methods We evaluated 129 obese patients with diabetes enrolled in Weight Achievement and Intensive Treatment (Why WAIT) program, a 12-week clinical model of intensive lifestyle intervention. After 1 year, we divided participants into group A, who maintained <7% weight loss (47.3%) and group B (52.7%), who maintained ≥7% weight loss. We continued to follow them for a total of 5 years. Results The total cohort lost 23.8 lbs (−9.7%) at 12 weeks and maintained −16.2 lbs (−6.4%) at 5 years (p<0.001). Group A maintained −8.4 lbs (−3.5%) and group B maintained −23.1 lbs (−9.0%) at 5 years. In group A, A1C decreased from 7.5±1.3% to 6.7±0.9% at 12 weeks but increased to 7.7±1.4% at 1 year and 8.0±1.9% at 5 years. In group B, A1C decreased from 7.4±1.2% to 6.4±0.9% at 12 weeks and rose to 6.8±1.2% at 1 year and 7.3±1.5% at 5 years. Despite weight regain, group A maintained improvement in low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol and high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol with worsening of serum triglycerides and no change in blood pressure (BP). Group B maintained improvement in lipid profile for 5 years and had significantly lower BP for 18 months. Conclusions Weight reduction in patients with diabetes can be maintained for 5 years and is predicted by patients’ ability to maintain ≥7% weight loss at 1 year. A1C and triglycerides deteriorate with weight regain, while other lipid improvements are maintained. Sustained weight loss is associated with significantly lower A1C for 5 years and lowers BP for 18 months. Trial registration number NCT01937845. PMID:28090332

  20. Array measurements adapted to the number of available sensors: Theoretical and practical approach for ESAC method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galiana-Merino, J. J.; Rosa-Cintas, S.; Rosa-Herranz, J.; Garrido, J.; Peláez, J. A.; Martino, S.; Delgado, J.

    2016-05-01

    Array measurements of ambient noise have become a useful technique to estimate the surface wave dispersion curves and subsequently the subsurface elastic parameters that characterize the studied soil. One of the logistical handicaps associated with this kind of measurements is the requirement of several stations recording at the same time, which limits their applicability in the case of research groups without enough infrastructure resources. In this paper, we describe the theoretical basis of the ESAC method and we deduce how the number of stations needed to implement any array layout can be reduced to only two stations. In this way, we propose a new methodology to implement an N stations array layout by using only M stations (M < N), which will be recording in different positions of the original prearranged N stations geometry at different times. We also provide some practical guidelines to implement the proposed approach and we show different examples where the obtained results confirm the theoretical foundations. Thus, the study carried out reflects that we can use a minimum of 2 stations to deploy any array layout originally designed for higher number of sensors.

  1. Partnership and measurement: the promise, practice and theory of a successful health social networking strategy.

    PubMed

    Montague, Terrence; Nemis-White, Joanna; Cochrane, Bonnie; Meisner, Janice; Trasler, Tessa

    2013-01-01

    Patient health management (PHM) was launched as a promising paradigm to close care gaps, the inequities between usual and best care, for whole patient populations. PHM's core premise was that interventions of multidisciplinary, community-oriented partnerships that used repeated measurement and feedback of provider practices, clinical and economic outcomes and general communication of relevant health knowledge to all stakeholders would continuously make things better. This article reviews the evolution of PHM from its genesis in a series of casual hospital-based networks to its maturation in a province-wide, community-focused, clustered-lattice social network that facilitated the improved clinical and cost-efficient care and outcomes of whole patient populations. The factors underlying PHM's clinical and cost efficacy, specifically its patient-centric social networking structures and integral measurement and knowledge translation processes, offer continuing promise to optimally manage the care of our increasingly aged patient populations, with their high burden of chronic diseases and disproportionately large care gaps. In an era when patients are demanding and leading change, and governments are struggling fiscally, PHM's clinical efficacy and cost-efficiency are especially resonant. Things can be better.

  2. Practical quantum private query with better performance in resisting joint-measurement attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Chun-Yan; Wang, Tian-Yin; Gao, Fei

    2016-04-01

    As a kind of practical protocol, quantum-key-distribution (QKD)-based quantum private queries (QPQs) have drawn lots of attention. However, joint-measurement (JM) attack poses a noticeable threat to the database security in such protocols. That is, by JM attack a malicious user can illegally elicit many more items from the database than the average amount an honest one can obtain. Taking Jacobi et al.'s protocol as an example, by JM attack a malicious user can obtain as many as 500 bits, instead of the expected 2.44 bits, from a 104-bit database in one query. It is a noticeable security flaw in theory, and would also arise in application with the development of quantum memories. To solve this problem, we propose a QPQ protocol based on a two-way QKD scheme, which behaves much better in resisting JM attack. Concretely, the user Alice cannot get more database items by conducting JM attack on the qubits because she has to send them back to Bob (the database holder) before knowing which of them should be jointly measured. Furthermore, JM attack by both Alice and Bob would be detected with certain probability, which is quite different from previous protocols. Moreover, our protocol retains the good characters of QKD-based QPQs, e.g., it is loss tolerant and robust against quantum memory attack.

  3. Measuring mental health and wellbeing outcomes for children and adolescents to inform practice and policy: a review of child self-report measures.

    PubMed

    Deighton, Jessica; Croudace, Tim; Fonagy, Peter; Brown, Jeb; Patalay, Praveetha; Wolpert, Miranda

    2014-01-01

    There is a growing appetite for mental health and wellbeing outcome measures that can inform clinical practice at individual and service levels, including use for local and national benchmarking. Despite a varied literature on child mental health and wellbeing outcome measures that focus on psychometric properties alone, no reviews exist that appraise the availability of psychometric evidence and suitability for use in routine practice in child and adolescent mental health services (CAMHS) including key implementation issues. This paper aimed to present the findings of the first review that evaluates existing broadband measures of mental health and wellbeing outcomes in terms of these criteria. The following steps were implemented in order to select measures suitable for use in routine practice: literature database searches, consultation with stakeholders, application of inclusion and exclusion criteria, secondary searches and filtering. Subsequently, detailed reviews of the retained measures' psychometric properties and implementation features were carried out. 11 measures were identified as having potential for use in routine practice and meeting most of the key criteria: 1) Achenbach System of Empirically Based Assessment, 2) Beck Youth Inventories, 3) Behavior Assessment System for Children, 4) Behavioral and Emotional Rating Scale, 5) Child Health Questionnaire, 6) Child Symptom Inventories, 7) Health of the National Outcome Scale for Children and Adolescents, 8) Kidscreen, 9) Pediatric Symptom Checklist, 10) Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire, 11) Youth Outcome Questionnaire. However, all existing measures identified had limitations as well as strengths. Furthermore, none had sufficient psychometric evidence available to demonstrate that they could reliably measure both severity and change over time in key groups. The review suggests a way of rigorously evaluating the growing number of broadband self-report mental health outcome measures against

  4. Development of an Instrument to Measure Students' Attitudes towards Piano Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Umuzdas, Mehmet Serkan

    2015-01-01

    Practicing the piano is a systematic part of the instrument-learning process. It contains all development practices from the analysis of the work to the improvement of performance. Students usually practice the piano as a preparation for performing in courses, exams, or on stage and they do it individually. The mentality which emerges during the…

  5. Office blood pressure measurement practices among community health providers (medical and paramedical) in northern district of India

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Bishav; Aslam, Naved; Ralhan, Upma; Sharma, Sarit; Gupta, Naveen; Singh, Vivudh Pratap; Takkar, Shibba; Wander, G.S.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Hypertension is directly responsible for 57% of all stroke deaths and 24% of all coronary heart disease deaths in India. Appropriate blood pressure measurement techniques are the cornerstone of clinical acumen. Despite the clear guidelines on BP measurement technique, there seems to be large inter-observer variations. Aim & methods A prospective, observational study was done to assess the knowledge and to study the current practices of office BP measurement among the 400 medical and paramedical staff working in various hospitals of a northern district of India. A single observer under the supervision of investigators observed all the participants and a proforma was filled based on AHA guidelines. After observing BP measurement technique scoring was done (≤8 question correct = inaccurate practices, >9 questions correct = accurate practices). Similarly, the knowledge was assessed by giving a pretested questionnaire. Results 5.85 % of the medical staff had excellent knowledge and 80% of the doctors and 62% of the paramedical staff had good knowledge about BPM. Only 1.47% (3 doctors) and 0.5% (1 nurse) had accurate practices. There was no correlation between knowledge and practices. Conclusions We conclude that the right technique and knowledge of blood pressure measurement among community health providers is inadequate and warrants further interventions to improve. PMID:25173197

  6. Longitudinal bulk acoustic mass sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Hales, J. H.; Teva, J.; Boisen, A.; Davis, Z. J.

    2009-07-20

    A polycrystalline silicon longitudinal bulk acoustic cantilever is fabricated and operated in air at 51 MHz. A mass sensitivity of 100 Hz/fg (1 fg=10{sup -15} g) is obtained from the preliminary experiments where a minute mass is deposited on the device by means of focused ion beam. The total noise in the currently applied measurement system allows for a minimum detectable mass of 0.5 fg in air.

  7. Longitudinal bulk acoustic mass sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hales, J. H.; Teva, J.; Boisen, A.; Davis, Z. J.

    2009-07-01

    A polycrystalline silicon longitudinal bulk acoustic cantilever is fabricated and operated in air at 51 MHz. A mass sensitivity of 100 Hz/fg (1 fg=10-15 g) is obtained from the preliminary experiments where a minute mass is deposited on the device by means of focused ion beam. The total noise in the currently applied measurement system allows for a minimum detectable mass of 0.5 fg in air.

  8. Longitudinal Multistage Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pohl, Steffi

    2013-01-01

    This article introduces longitudinal multistage testing (lMST), a special form of multistage testing (MST), as a method for adaptive testing in longitudinal large-scale studies. In lMST designs, test forms of different difficulty levels are used, whereas the values on a pretest determine the routing to these test forms. Since lMST allows for…

  9. Longitudinal Stability Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Blaskiewicz,M.

    2009-01-02

    Coupled bunch longitudinal stability in the presence of high frequency impedances is considered. A frequency domain technique is developed and compared with simulations. The frequency domain technique allows for absolute stability tests and is applied to the problem of longitudinal stability in RHIC with the new 56 MHz RF system.

  10. Semi-automatic handling of meteorological ground measurements using WeatherProg: prospects and practical implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langella, Giuliano; Basile, Angelo; Bonfante, Antonello; De Mascellis, Roberto; Manna, Piero; Terribile, Fabio

    2016-04-01

    WeatherProg is a computer program for the semi-automatic handling of data measured at ground stations within a climatic network. The program performs a set of tasks ranging from gathering raw point-based sensors measurements to the production of digital climatic maps. Originally the program was developed as the baseline asynchronous engine for the weather records management within the SOILCONSWEB Project (LIFE08 ENV/IT/000408), in which daily and hourly data where used to run water balance in the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum or pest simulation models. WeatherProg can be configured to automatically perform the following main operations: 1) data retrieval; 2) data decoding and ingestion into a database (e.g. SQL based); 3) data checking to recognize missing and anomalous values (using a set of differently combined checks including logical, climatological, spatial, temporal and persistence checks); 4) infilling of data flagged as missing or anomalous (deterministic or statistical methods); 5) spatial interpolation based on alternative/comparative methods such as inverse distance weighting, iterative regression kriging, and a weighted least squares regression (based on physiography), using an approach similar to PRISM. 6) data ingestion into a geodatabase (e.g. PostgreSQL+PostGIS or rasdaman). There is an increasing demand for digital climatic maps both for research and development (there is a gap between the major of scientific modelling approaches that requires digital climate maps and the gauged measurements) and for practical applications (e.g. the need to improve the management of weather records which in turn raises the support provided to farmers). The demand is particularly burdensome considering the requirement to handle climatic data at the daily (e.g. in the soil hydrological modelling) or even at the hourly time step (e.g. risk modelling in phytopathology). The key advantage of WeatherProg is the ability to perform all the required operations and

  11. Decoupling control in velocity-varying four-wheel steering vehicles with H∞ performance by longitudinal velocity and yaw rate feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Mingxing; Jia, Yingmin

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, decoupling control with H∞ performance for four-wheel steering (4WS) vehicles under varying longitudinal velocity is studied. A novel control scheme for a nonlinear model of three states, respectively, the longitudinal and lateral velocities, and yaw rate, is proposed to address this issue. The scheme is composed of two varying-parameter controllers designing problems for both longitudinal and lateral systems with coupling performance. Varying parameters of both these controllers depend only on longitudinal velocity. Controlled by these controllers, the longitudinal system is decoupled with lateral velocity and yaw rate, and the lateral system is input-output decoupling with H∞ performance. In addition, feedback signals are the longitudinal velocity and yaw rate, hence observations or measurements of lateral velocity are not necessary. Simulations show that vehicles controlled by our scheme are input-output diagonal decoupling and execute very well while longitudinal velocity varies in a large range, coupling appears between longitudinal and lateral systems, and external disturbances do exist. In summary, this control scheme can improve handling characteristics, safety and comfort proved from theory to practice in this paper.

  12. Effects of air pollution on human health and practical measures for prevention in Iran.

    PubMed

    Ghorani-Azam, Adel; Riahi-Zanjani, Bamdad; Balali-Mood, Mahdi

    2016-01-01

    Air pollution is a major concern of new civilized world, which has a serious toxicological impact on human health and the environment. It has a number of different emission sources, but motor vehicles and industrial processes contribute the major part of air pollution. According to the World Health Organization, six major air pollutants include particle pollution, ground-level ozone, carbon monoxide, sulfur oxides, nitrogen oxides, and lead. Long and short term exposure to air suspended toxicants has a different toxicological impact on human including respiratory and cardiovascular diseases, neuropsychiatric complications, the eyes irritation, skin diseases, and long-term chronic diseases such as cancer. Several reports have revealed the direct association between exposure to the poor air quality and increasing rate of morbidity and mortality mostly due to cardiovascular and respiratory diseases. Air pollution is considered as the major environmental risk factor in the incidence and progression of some diseases such as asthma, lung cancer, ventricular hypertrophy, Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, psychological complications, autism, retinopathy, fetal growth, and low birth weight. In this review article, we aimed to discuss toxicology of major air pollutants, sources of emission, and their impact on human health. We have also proposed practical measures to reduce air pollution in Iran.

  13. Measuring treatment effects on dual-task performance: a framework for research and clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Plummer, Prudence; Eskes, Gail

    2015-01-01

    The relevance of dual-task walking to everyday ambulation is widely acknowledged, and numerous studies have demonstrated that dual-task interference can significantly impact recovery of functional walking in people with neurological disorders. The magnitude and direction of dual-task interference is influenced by the interaction between the two tasks, including how individuals spontaneously prioritize their attention. Therefore, to accurately interpret and characterize dual-task interference and identify changes over time, it is imperative to evaluate single and dual-task performance in both tasks, as well as the tasks relative to each other. Yet, reciprocal dual-task effects (DTE) are frequently ignored. The purpose of this perspective paper is to present a framework for measuring treatment effects on dual-task interference, specifically taking into account the interactions between the two tasks and how this can provide information on whether overall dual-task capacity has improved or a different attentional strategy has been adopted. In discussing the clinical implications of using this framework, we provide specific examples of using this method and provide some explicit recommendations for research and clinical practice. PMID:25972801

  14. A practical approach for quantifying acoustic emission signals using diffuse field measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholey, Jonathan J.; Wilcox, Paul D.

    2009-03-01

    Acoustic Emission (AE) testing is capable of detecting a wide range of defects using a relatively sparse sensor array and as a result is a candidate structural health monitoring technology. The widespread application of the technology is restricted by a lack of predictive modelling capability and quantitative source characteristic information. Most AE tests are conducted on small coupons where source characteristics are estimated using the early arriving part of the AE signal. The early arriving part of an AE signal, and therefore the source characteristics, are dependent on the source location, source orientation and specimen geometry making them unsuitable for use in predictive models. The work in this paper is concerned with making source characterisation measurements based on the diffuse field of an AE signal. A practical approach for calibrating the diffuse field amplitude is proposed and is demonstrated on AE signals from electrochemically accelerated corrosion of a 316L stainless steel plate. The diffuse field amplitude of several AE events is calculated and reported as an equivalent absolute force. The low signal to noise ratio and high attenuation of elastic wave energy are found to reduce the accuracy of the results.

  15. Effects of air pollution on human health and practical measures for prevention in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Ghorani-Azam, Adel; Riahi-Zanjani, Bamdad; Balali-Mood, Mahdi

    2016-01-01

    Air pollution is a major concern of new civilized world, which has a serious toxicological impact on human health and the environment. It has a number of different emission sources, but motor vehicles and industrial processes contribute the major part of air pollution. According to the World Health Organization, six major air pollutants include particle pollution, ground-level ozone, carbon monoxide, sulfur oxides, nitrogen oxides, and lead. Long and short term exposure to air suspended toxicants has a different toxicological impact on human including respiratory and cardiovascular diseases, neuropsychiatric complications, the eyes irritation, skin diseases, and long-term chronic diseases such as cancer. Several reports have revealed the direct association between exposure to the poor air quality and increasing rate of morbidity and mortality mostly due to cardiovascular and respiratory diseases. Air pollution is considered as the major environmental risk factor in the incidence and progression of some diseases such as asthma, lung cancer, ventricular hypertrophy, Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, psychological complications, autism, retinopathy, fetal growth, and low birth weight. In this review article, we aimed to discuss toxicology of major air pollutants, sources of emission, and their impact on human health. We have also proposed practical measures to reduce air pollution in Iran. PMID:27904610

  16. Measuring the prevalence of questionable research practices with incentives for truth telling.

    PubMed

    John, Leslie K; Loewenstein, George; Prelec, Drazen

    2012-05-01

    Cases of clear scientific misconduct have received significant media attention recently, but less flagrantly questionable research practices may be more prevalent and, ultimately, more damaging to the academic enterprise. Using an anonymous elicitation format supplemented by incentives for honest reporting, we surveyed over 2,000 psychologists about their involvement in questionable research practices. The impact of truth-telling incentives on self-admissions of questionable research practices was positive, and this impact was greater for practices that respondents judged to be less defensible. Combining three different estimation methods, we found that the percentage of respondents who have engaged in questionable practices was surprisingly high. This finding suggests that some questionable practices may constitute the prevailing research norm.

  17. Development and reliability testing of a survey: measuring trusting and deference behaviors in microethical nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Krautscheid, Lorretta C; Britton, Justin; Craig, Carol

    2015-01-01

    Novice post-licensure nurses are frequently exposed to microethical nursing practice problems during their first 24 months of formative practice. Often, novice nurses trust the advice of experienced nurse coworkers, deferring to such advice even when they know the advice contradicts evidence-based practice. This study revealed the prevalence of deference behaviors and associated rationale. Study findings emphasize the importance of incorporating conflict management, effective communication techniques, ethical frameworks, and EBP standards within pre- and post-licensure education.

  18. Measurement of the parity-violating longitudinal single-spin asymmetry for W{sup {+-}} boson production in polarized proton-proton collisions at {radical}(s) = 500 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Igo, G.

    2011-07-15

    We report the first measurement of the parity violating single-spin asymmetries for midrapidity decay positrons and electrons from W{sup +} and W{sup -} boson production in longitudinally polarized proton-proton collisions at {radical}(s) = 500 GeV by the STAR experiment at RHIC. The measured asymmetries, A{sub L}{sup W+} = -0.27{+-}0.10(stat.){+-}0.02(syst.){+-}0.03(norm.) and A{sub L}{sup W-} 0.14{+-}0.19(stat.){+-}0.02(syst.){+-}0.01(norm.), are consistent with theory predictions, which are large and of opposite sign. These predictions are based on polarized quark and antiquark distribution functions constrained by polarized DIS measurements.

  19. Practice and applications of 17-O-excess measurements of water using novel laser spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennis, K. J.; Steig, E. J.; Vasileios, G.; Schauer, A. J.; Schoenemann, S. W.; Hoffnagle, J.

    2014-12-01

    17O-excess, defined as the deviation from the Global Meteoric Water Line (GMWL) in a plot of ln(δ18O+1) vs. ln(δ17O+1), is an evolving tool for understanding the modern water cycle and reconstructing past climate regimes. Because of competing effects between equilibrium and kinetic fractionation small variations in 17O-excess can be used, for example, to (i) infer changes in temperature and sea ice across glacial-interglacial cycles in Antarctica (Schoenemann et al., 2014), (ii) study the role of rain re-evaporation during convective events thereby improving the incorporation of isotopes into GCMs (Landais et al., 2010), and (iii) assess the role of stratospheric water vapor intrusions at high altitudes or in polar regions (Winkler et al., 2013). In natural waters, variability in 17O-excess is very small (on the order of tens of per meg, where 1 per meg is 0.001‰). Until recently, only measurements made via Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry (IRMS) could achieve the required precision, following time-consuming front-end chemistry that converted H2O into O2 for analysis of m/z+ 32, 33 and 34. Recent improvements in laser-based spectroscopy, e.g., Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy (CRDS), are enabling quicker and easier measurement of 17O-excess in water (Steig et al., 2013; 2014). The Picarro L2140-i is certified with a precision of ≤ 0.015‰; however implementation of best practices can result in an achievable precision of ≤ 0.008‰, thereby demonstrating comparable performance to IRMS. We will review our recommendations for achieving high-precision measurements of 17O-excess on the Picarro L2140-i, including how to calibrate the system, the frequency of standards analysis, the number of replicate injections and vials required, and approaches to dealing with sample-to-sample memory. We will also compare the external accuracy achieved by three distinct Picarro L2140-i analyzers for multiple waters with distinct isotopic composition.

  20. Measurements in Flight of the Longitudinal-Stability Characteristics of a Republic YF-84A Airplane (Army Serial No. 45-59488) at High Subsonic Mach Numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Howard L.; Cooper, George E.

    1948-01-01

    A brief investigation was made of the longitudinal-stability characteristics of a YF-84A airplane (Army Serial No. 45-79488). The airplane developed a pitching-up tendency at approximately 0.80 Mach number which necessitated large push forces and down-elevator deflections for further increases in speed. In steady turns at 35,000 feet with the center of gravity at 28.3 percent mean aerodynamic chord for normal accelerations up to the maximum test value, the control-force gradients were excessive at Mach numbers over 0.78. Airplane buffeting did not present a serious problem in accelerated or unaccelerated flight at 15,000 and 35,000 feet up to the maximum test Mach number of 0.84. It is believed that excessive control force would be the limiting factor in attaining speeds in excess of 0.84 Mach number, especially at altitudes below 35,000 feet.

  1. Measuring outcomes in orthopaedics: implementation of an outcomes program in an outpatient orthopaedic practice.

    PubMed

    Rodts, Mary F; Glanzman, Renée; Gray, Adam; Johnson, Randal; Viellieu, Dennis; Hachem, Fadi

    2014-01-01

    With increased demand to provide quality care for patients, orthopaedic practices will need to develop ways to efficiently collect and manage data to support the care that they provide. An outcomes management program must be efficient and consistent to provide good data. This article describes the implementation of an outcomes program at one large private orthopaedic practice within an academic medical setting.

  2. Longitudinal Studies of Attitude Change: Issues and Methods

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-04-01

    relative contributions of variables which are presently influencing attitudes from historical variables. Conversely a longitudinal method can be used to...different training techniques. Neidt and Meredith (1966) used a longitudinal method to determine the changes in attitudes of a single group of Air... longitudinal method is viewed as the most promising for measurement of change. With the increasing improvement in unobtrusive measures (e.g., Webb

  3. The use of EORTC measures in daily clinical practice-A synopsis of a newly developed manual.

    PubMed

    Wintner, Lisa M; Sztankay, Monika; Aaronson, Neil; Bottomley, Andrew; Giesinger, Johannes M; Groenvold, Mogens; Petersen, Morten Aa; van de Poll-Franse, Lonneke; Velikova, Galina; Verdonck-de Leeuw, Irma; Holzner, Bernhard

    2016-11-01

    Cancer has increasingly become a chronic condition and the routine collection of patient-reported outcomes (PROs) like quality of life is widely recommended for clinical practice. Nonetheless, the successful implementation of PROs is still a major challenge, although common barriers to and facilitators of their beneficial use are well known. To support health care professionals and other stakeholders in the implementation of the EORTC PRO measures, the EORTC Quality of Life Group provides guidance on issues considered important for their use in daily clinical practice. Herein, we present an outline of the newly developed "'Manual for the use of EORTC measures in daily clinical practice", covering the following issues: * a rationale for using EORTC measures in routine care *selection of EORTC measures, timing of assessments, scoring and presentation of results * aspects of a strategic implementation * electronic data assessment and telemonitoring, and * further use of EORTC measures and ethical considerations. Next to an extensive overview of currently available literature, the manual specifically focuses on knowledge about EORTC measures to give evidence-based recommendations whenever possible and to encourage readers and end-users of EORTC measures to contribute to further needed high-quality research. The manual will be accessible on the EORTC Quality of Life Group website's homepage and will be periodically updated to take into account any new knowledge due to medical, technical, regulatory and scientific advances.

  4. Measuring Child Engagement in Inclusive Early Childhood Settings: Implications for Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kishida, Yuriko; Kemp, Coral

    2006-01-01

    Child engagement can be used as a child outcome measure, a measure of program quality and a guide for programming decisions. Measures of engagement cited in the literature are examined and features of those measures are described. Based on the gaps identified in the existing measures, the characteristics of a measure of engagement with the…

  5. Using theory and evidence to drive measurement of patient, nurse and organizational outcomes of professional nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Jeffs, Lianne; Sidani, Souraya; Rose, Donald; Espin, Sherry; Smith, Orla; Martin, Kirsten; Byer, Charlie; Fu, Kaiyan; Ferris, Ella

    2013-04-01

    An evolving body of literature suggests that the implementation of evidence based clinical and professional guidelines and strategies can improve patient care. However, gaps exist in our understanding of the effect of implementation of guidelines on outcomes, particularly patient outcomes. To address this gap, a measurement framework was developed to assess the impact of an organization-wide implementation of two nursing-centric best-practice guidelines on patient, nurse and organizational level outcomes. From an implementation standpoint, we anticipate that our data will show improvements in the following: (i) patient satisfaction scores and safety outcomes; (ii) nurses ability to value and engage in evidence based practice; and (iii) organizational support for evidence-informed nursing care that results in quality patient outcomes. Our measurement framework and multifaceted methodological approach outlined in this paper might serve as a blueprint for other organizations in their efforts to evaluate the impacts associated with implementation of clinical and professional guidelines and best practices.

  6. Personality types of family practice residents as measured by the Myers-Briggs type indicator.

    PubMed

    Harris, D L; Ebbert, P

    1985-01-01

    This study was initiated to test the hypothesis that individuals currently choosing family practice as a career are likely to have different personality types than those who previously pursued general practice. Incoming residents to the University of Utah Family Practice Residency Program were compared to a group of private primary care physicians serving rural areas. Personality types were determined by administering the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator to both groups. Results showed that the current resident group differed significantly from the primary care physician group and that the residents' personality types were similar to personality types of faculty in other studies. This raises the concern that many family practice residents may not choose to practice in underserved areas. Further studies need to follow personality types through medical school and residency training and into practice to help determine which prospective physicians are likely to choose a primary care career and a rural practice. This information may be useful in health manpower planning and in examining admissions policies of medical schools and residencies.

  7. The Development and Initial Validation of Social Cognitive Career Theory Instruments to Measure Choice of Medical Specialty and Practice Location

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Mary E.; Creed, Peter A.; Searle, Judy

    2009-01-01

    Social cognitive career theory served as the basis for the instrument development for scales assessing self-efficacy, outcome expectations, and goals to predict medical career choice. Lent and Brown's conceptualization of social cognitive constructs guided the development of items to measure choice of medical specialty and practice location. Study…

  8. Modifying the System for Observing Fitness Instruction Time to Measure Teacher Practices Related to Physical Activity Promotion: SOFIT+

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weaver, R. Glenn; Webster, Collin A.; Erwin, Heather; Beighle, Aaron; Beets, Michael W.; Choukroun, Hadrien; Kaysing, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    The System for Observing Fitness Instruction Time (SOFIT) is commonly used to measure variables related to physical activity during physical education (PE). However, SOFIT does not yield detailed information about teacher practices related to children's moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA). This study describes the modification of SOFIT…

  9. Measuring Ultraviolet Radiation Underwater: A Practical Application of the Beer-Lambert-Bouguer Law for High School Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schouten, Peter; Parisi, Alfio; Downs, Nathan

    2009-01-01

    The measurement of solar UV under water is not a simple process. In the underwater environment the difficulty of obtaining useable data is greatly amplified due to the optically complicated and at times unpredictable nature of water itself. The following practical exercise designed for use in the Year 11 and Year 12 Physics classroom aims to…

  10. Theoretical and practical knowledge of Nursing professionals on indirect blood pressure measurement at a coronary care unit

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Juliana Pereira; Veiga, Eugenia Velludo; Ferreira, Paulo Alexandre Camargo; Martins, José Carlos Amado; Daniel, Ana Carolina Queiroz Godoy; Oliveira, Amanda dos Santos; da Silva, Patrícia Costa dos Santos

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine and to analyze the theoretical and practical knowledge of Nursing professionals on indirect blood pressure measurement. Methods This cross-sectional study included 31 professionals of a coronary care unit (86% of the Nursing staff in the unit). Of these, 38.7% of professionals were nurses and 61.3% nurse technicians. A validated questionnaire was used to theoretical evaluation and for practice assessment the auscultatory technique was applied in a simulation environment, under a non-participant observation. Results To the theoretical knowledge of the stages of preparation of patient and environment, 12.9% mentioned 5-minute of rest, 48.4% checked calibration, and 29.0% chose adequate cuff width. A total of 64.5% of professionals avoided rounding values, and 22.6% mentioned the 6-month deadline period for the equipment calibration. On average, in practice assessment, 65% of the steps were followed. Lacks in knowledge were primary concerning lack of checking the device calibration and stethoscope, measurement of arm circumference to choose the cuff size, and the record of arm used in blood pressure measurement. Conclusion Knowledge was poor and had disparities between theory and practice with evidence of steps taken without proper awareness and lack of consideration of important knowledge during implementation of blood pressure measurement. Educational and operational interventions should be applied systematically with institutional involvement to ensure safe care with reliable values. PMID:25295455

  11. Reliability and Validity of a Questionnaire to Measure Consumer Knowledge regarding Safe Practices to Prevent Microbiological Contamination in Restaurants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uggioni, Paula Lazzarin; Salay, Elisabette

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to develop a validated and reliable questionnaire to measure consumer knowledge regarding safe practices to prevent microbiological contamination in restaurants and commercial kitchens. Methods: Non-probabilistic samples of individuals were interviewed in the city of Campinas, Brazil. Questionnaire items…

  12. Measuring Teacher Self-Report on Classroom Practices: Construct Validity and Reliability of the Classroom Strategies Scale-Teacher Form

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reddy, Linda A.; Dudek, Christopher M.; Fabiano, Gregory A.; Peters, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    This article presents information about the construct validity and reliability of a new teacher self-report measure of classroom instructional and behavioral practices (the Classroom Strategies Scales-Teacher Form; CSS-T). The theoretical underpinnings and empirical basis for the instructional and behavioral management scales are presented.…

  13. Measuring Exposure to Health Messages in Community-Based Intervention Studies: A Systematic Review of Current Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Daniel S.; Rooney, Megan P.; Wray, Ricardo J.; Kreuter, Matthew W.

    2009-01-01

    Accurately measuring exposure is critical to all intervention studies. The present review examines the extent to which best practices in exposure assessment are adhered to in community-based prevention and education studies. A systematic literature review was conducted examining community-based studies testing communication interventions,…

  14. Historical View of the Influences of Measurement and Writing Theories on the Practice of Writing Assessment in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behizadeh, Nadia; Engelhard, George, Jr.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the interactions among measurement theories, writing theories, and writing assessments in the United States from an historical perspective. The assessment of writing provides a useful framework for examining how theories influence, and in some cases fail to influence actual practice. Two research traditions…

  15. Health-related quality of life measured by the UW-QoL--reference values from a general dental practice.

    PubMed

    Rogers, S N; O'donnell, J P; Williams-Hewitt, S; Christensen, J C; Lowe, D

    2006-03-01

    The objective of this study was to obtain age and sex-specific reference values for the University of Washington head and neck cancer questionnaire version 4 (UW-QoLv4) and to compare this with patients with oral and oropharyngeal cancer. Cross-sectional reference data was collected from 372 patients in six local general dental practices, 349 of whom presented for routine appointments. Quota sampling was used to collect data for similar numbers of patients by gender by four age bands (40-49, 50-59, 60-69, 70-79 yr). The longitudinal sample consisted of 450 consecutive patients undergoing primary surgery for previously untreated oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma presenting to the Regional Maxillofacial Unit Liverpool, between the years 1995 and 2002. At baseline the key differences were anxiety, pain, swallowing, chewing, and mood. At 1yr there were big differences in all domains with deterioration in the oral cancer group. The difference was least notable in pain, shoulder, mood and anxiety. Reference data from a non-cancer population is very important when considering UW-QoL domains as an outcome parameter in clinical trials and also when discussing health-related quality of life outcomes with patients and their families.

  16. Impacts of Good Practices on Cognitive Development, Learning Orientations, and Graduate Degree Plans during the First Year of College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cruce, Ty M.; Wolniak, Gregory C.; Seifert, Tricia A.; Pascarella, Ernest T.

    2006-01-01

    This study estimated separately the unique effects of three dimensions of good practice and the global effects of a composite measure of good practices on the cognitive development, orientations to learning, and educational aspirations of students during their first year of college. Analyses of longitudinal data from a representative sample of…

  17. Understanding CMMI Measurement Capabilities & Impact on Performance: Results from the 2007 SEI State of the Measurement Practice Survey

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-14

    Measurement in the Organization ML1&DK ML2 ML3 ML4&5 N = 151 N = 84 N = 59 N = 71 Gamma = .73 p < .0001 30% 28% 34% 8% 8% 2% 70% 22% 75% 3% 1...2007 © 2007 Carnegie Mellon University Interpreting the results: The Respondents’ Measurement Roles ML1&DK ML2 ML3 ML4&5 N = 151 N = 84 N = 59 N = 70...Goldenson, 14 November 2007 © 2007 Carnegie Mellon University How Measurement Work is Staffed ML1&DK ML2 ML3 ML4&5 N = 78 N = 60 N = 58 N = 60 p < .006

  18. A tool to measure whether business management capacity in general practice impacts on the quality of chronic illness care.

    PubMed

    Holton, Christine H; Proudfoot, Judith G; Jayasinghe, Upali W; Grimm, Jane; Bubner, Tanya K; Winstanley, Julie; Harris, Mark F; Beilby, Justin J

    2010-11-01

    Our aim was to develop a tool to identify specific features of the business and financial management of practices that facilitate better quality care for chronic illness in primary care. Domains of management were identified, resulting in the development of a structured interview tool that was administered in 97 primary care practices in Australia. Interview items were screened and subjected to factor analysis, subscales identified and the overall model fit determined. The instrument's validity was assessed against another measure of quality of care. Analysis provided a four-factor solution containing 21 items, which explained 42.5% of the variance in the total scores. The factors related to administrative processes, human resources, marketing analysis and business development. All scores increased significantly with practice size. The business development subscale and total score were higher for rural practices. There was a significant correlation between the business development subscale and quality of care. The indicators of business and financial management in the final tool appear to be useful predictors of the quality of care. The instrument may help inform policy regarding the structure of general practice and implementation of a systems approach to chronic illness care. It can provide information to practices about areas for further development.

  19. Longitudinal in vivo evaluation of bone regeneration by combined measurement of multi-pinhole SPECT and micro-CT for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Lienemann, Philipp S; Metzger, Stéphanie; Kiveliö, Anna-Sofia; Blanc, Alain; Papageorgiou, Panagiota; Astolfo, Alberto; Pinzer, Bernd R; Cinelli, Paolo; Weber, Franz E; Schibli, Roger; Béhé, Martin; Ehrbar, Martin

    2015-05-19

    Over the last decades, great strides were made in the development of novel implants for the treatment of bone defects. The increasing versatility and complexity of these implant designs request for concurrent advances in means to assess in vivo the course of induced bone formation in preclinical models. Since its discovery, micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) has excelled as powerful high-resolution technique for non-invasive assessment of newly formed bone tissue. However, micro-CT fails to provide spatiotemporal information on biological processes ongoing during bone regeneration. Conversely, due to the versatile applicability and cost-effectiveness, single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) would be an ideal technique for assessing such biological processes with high sensitivity and for nuclear imaging comparably high resolution (<1 mm). Herein, we employ modular designed poly(ethylene glycol)-based hydrogels that release bone morphogenetic protein to guide the healing of critical sized calvarial bone defects. By combined in vivo longitudinal multi-pinhole SPECT and micro-CT evaluations we determine the spatiotemporal course of bone formation and remodeling within this synthetic hydrogel implant. End point evaluations by high resolution micro-CT and histological evaluation confirm the value of this approach to follow and optimize bone-inducing biomaterials.

  20. Longitudinal in vivo evaluation of bone regeneration by combined measurement of multi-pinhole SPECT and micro-CT for tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lienemann, Philipp S.; Metzger, Stéphanie; Kiveliö, Anna-Sofia; Blanc, Alain; Papageorgiou, Panagiota; Astolfo, Alberto; Pinzer, Bernd R.; Cinelli, Paolo; Weber, Franz E.; Schibli, Roger; Béhé, Martin; Ehrbar, Martin

    2015-05-01

    Over the last decades, great strides were made in the development of novel implants for the treatment of bone defects. The increasing versatility and complexity of these implant designs request for concurrent advances in means to assess in vivo the course of induced bone formation in preclinical models. Since its discovery, micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) has excelled as powerful high-resolution technique for non-invasive assessment of newly formed bone tissue. However, micro-CT fails to provide spatiotemporal information on biological processes ongoing during bone regeneration. Conversely, due to the versatile applicability and cost-effectiveness, single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) would be an ideal technique for assessing such biological processes with high sensitivity and for nuclear imaging comparably high resolution (<1 mm). Herein, we employ modular designed poly(ethylene glycol)-based hydrogels that release bone morphogenetic protein to guide the healing of critical sized calvarial bone defects. By combined in vivo longitudinal multi-pinhole SPECT and micro-CT evaluations we determine the spatiotemporal course of bone formation and remodeling within this synthetic hydrogel implant. End point evaluations by high resolution micro-CT and histological evaluation confirm the value of this approach to follow and optimize bone-inducing biomaterials.

  1. Association Between Children’s Exposure to a Violent Event and Objectively and Subjectively Measured Sleep Characteristics: A Pilot Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    Spilsbury, James C.; Babineau, Denise C.; Frame, Jennifer; Juhas, Kimberly; Rork, Kristine

    2014-01-01

    Summary Although sleep disturbances are commonly reported among children exposed to violence, objective evidence of such disturbances is rare. This longitudinal, home-based study assessed the effects of a known community- or family-violence incident on both actigraphy-derived and subjectively-reported sleep outcomes of an ethnically-mixed, urban sample of children ages 8–16 years. We hypothesized that increased event severity (child physical assault, witnessed homicide) would be associated with lower sleep duration and poorer sleep quality both at baseline and at three-month follow-up. Covariate-adjusted analyses based on a Generalized Estimating Equations approach showed that children physically assaulted during the event showed lower sleep duration and sleep efficiency and greater wake after sleep onset than those not physically assaulted. Physically-assaulted children were more likely to have a later bedtime than non-assaulted children, but this difference decreased at three months. Children witnessing a homicide showed greater wake after sleep onset at baseline and reported greater sleep problems than those witnessing a non-homicide event, but these differences decreased at three months. They were also somewhat more likely to have greater nightly variation in sleep duration. Collectively, results suggest that violence exposure influences children’s sleep, but that specific dimensions of sleep may exhibit different susceptibility to different characteristics of violence, especially over time. PMID:24841836

  2. Survivor-Defined Practice in Domestic Violence Work: Measure Development and Preliminary Evidence of Link to Empowerment.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Lisa A; Thomas, Kristie; Cattaneo, Lauren Bennett; Heimel, Deborah; Woulfe, Julie; Chong, Siu Kwan

    2016-01-01

    Survivor-defined practice, characterized by an emphasis on client choice, partnership, and sensitivity to the unique needs, contexts, and coping strategies of individual survivors, is an aspirational goal of the domestic violence (DV) movement, assumed to be a key contributor to empowerment and other positive outcomes among survivors. Despite its central role in DV program philosophy, training, and practice, however, our ability to assess its presence and its presumed link to well-being has been hampered by the absence of a way to measure it from survivors' perspectives. As part of a larger university-community collaboration, this study had two aims: (a) to develop a measure of survivor-defined practice from the perspective of participants, and (b) to assess its relationship to safety-related empowerment after controlling for other contributors to survivor well-being (e.g., financial stability and social support). Results supported the reliability and validity of the Survivor-Defined Practice Scale (SDPS), a nine-item measure that assesses participants' perception of the degree to which their advocates help them achieve goals they set for themselves, facilitate a spirit of partnership, and show sensitivity to their individual needs and styles. The items combined to form one factor indicating that the three theoretical aspects of survivor-defined practice may be different manifestations of one underlying construct. Results also support the hypothesized link between survivor-defined practice and safety-related empowerment. The SDPS offers DV programs a mechanism for process evaluation that is rigorous and rooted in the feminist empowerment philosophy that so many programs espouse.

  3. [Reliability of blood pressure measurements; comparison of an electronic meter and a mercury manometer in family practice].

    PubMed

    van Doorn, B A; van der Does, E; Lubsen, J; Rijsterborgh, H

    1990-08-25

    The Riva-Rocci indirect method of measuring the blood pressure carries a number of sources of error. A report is presented of a study of the serviceability of an electronic blood pressure meter as compared with the conventional mercury manometer. Seventy-six paired measurements were carried out in patients selected at random using an electronic blood pressure meter and a mercury manometer meeting all Health Council requirements. The systematic error and the incidental error in both measuring procedures were compared. The differences found were so slight as to be negligible in practice. It is concluded that the electronic blood pressure meter in practice constitutes an acceptable substitute for the conventional mercury manometer.

  4. System for unconstrained ECG measurement on a toilet seat using capacitive coupled electrodes : the efficacy and practicality.

    PubMed

    Baek, Hyun Jae; Kim, Jung Soo; Kim, Ko Keun; Park, Kwang Suk

    2008-01-01

    Home healthcare is a common matter of concern to modern people. For the successful home healthcare, unconstrained bio-signal monitoring is important. Previously, unconstrained lavatory typed ECG measurement system was developed. It is enough to measure subject's ECG signal non-intrusively, but not practical because of moist environment of toilet. In this study, capacitive coupled electrode was employed for overcome above disadvantages. ECG was obtained by capacitive coupled electrode and compared with ECGs obtained from conventional Ag/AgCl electrode. Possible motion artifacts were investigated. Experimental results showed that toilet based capacitive coupled ECG signal was measured successfully.

  5. Cross-Level Measurement Invariance in School and Classroom Environment Surveys: Implications for Policy and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schweig, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Measures of classroom and school environments are central to policy efforts that assess school and teacher quality. These measures are often formed by aggregating individual survey responses to form group-level measures, and assume an invariant measurement model holds across the individual and group levels. This article explores the tenability of…

  6. Postural changes in dental hygienists. Four-year longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Barry, R M; Woodall, W R; Mahan, J M

    1992-01-01

    Numerous surveys identify the occurrence of musculoskeletal complaints as a concern in dentistry. However, no longitudinal data exist to indicate whether postural changes occur as a result of practicing dental hygiene. The purpose of this preliminary, four-year longitudinal study was to investigate whether any postural changes developed during the hygienists' clinical education and/or during subsequent dental hygiene practice after one and/or two years. It was anticipated that the awkward positions and intense physical demands placed on hygienists might initiate musculoskeletal problems, but that no postural changes would occur over this short period of time. Nine of 10 dental hygienists in the graduating class of 1987 were surveyed for existing musculoskeletal complaints, and the subjects were photographed for a measurement of postural change. Responses from participants indicated an increase in musculoskeletal-related complaints in each of the six areas investigated. The photographic findings indicated that one of the nine hygienists showed an increase in forward head posture, a postural change.

  7. Best practices for repeated measures ANOVAs of ERP data: Reference, regional channels, and robust ANOVAs.

    PubMed

    Dien, Joseph

    2017-01-01

    Analysis of variance (ANOVA) is a fundamental procedure for event-related potential (ERP) research and yet there is very little guidance for best practices. It is important for the field to develop evidence-based best practices: 1) to minimize the Type II error rate by maximizing statistical power, 2) to minimize the Type I error rate by reducing the latitude for varying procedures, and 3) to identify areas for further methodological improvements. While generic treatments of ANOVA methodology are available, ERP datasets have many unique characteristics that must be considered. In the present report, a novelty oddball dataset was utilized as a test case to determine whether three aspects of ANOVA procedures as applied to ERPs make a real-world difference: the effects of reference site, regional channels, and robust ANOVAs. Recommendations are provided for best practices in each of these areas.

  8. Leveraging Electronic Health Care Record Information to Measure Pressure Ulcer Risk in Veterans With Spinal Cord Injury: A Longitudinal Study Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Thomason, Susan S; Sabharwal, Sunil; Finch, Dezon K; McCart, James; Toyinbo, Peter; Bouayad, Lina; Matheny, Michael E; Gobbel, Glenn T; Powell-Cope, Gail

    2017-01-01

    Background Pressure ulcers (PrUs) are a frequent, serious, and costly complication for veterans with spinal cord injury (SCI). The health care team should periodically identify PrU risk, although there is no tool in the literature that has been found to be reliable, valid, and sensitive enough to assess risk in this vulnerable population. Objective The immediate goal is to develop a risk assessment model that validly estimates the probability of developing a PrU. The long-term goal is to assist veterans with SCI and their providers in preventing PrUs through an automated system of risk assessment integrated into the veteran’s electronic health record (EHR). Methods This 5-year longitudinal, retrospective, cohort study targets 12,344 veterans with SCI who were cared for in the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) in fiscal year (FY) 2009 and had no record of a PrU in the prior 12 months. Potential risk factors identified in the literature were reviewed by an expert panel that prioritized factors and determined if these were found in structured data or unstructured form in narrative clinical notes for FY 2009-2013. These data are from the VHA enterprise Corporate Data Warehouse that is derived from the EHR structured (ie, coded in database/table) or narrative (ie, text in clinical notes) data for FY 2009-2013. Results This study is ongoing and final results are expected in 2017. Thus far, the expert panel reviewed the initial list of risk factors extracted from the literature; the panel recommended additions and omissions and provided insights about the format in which the documentation of the risk factors might exist in the EHR. This list was then iteratively refined through review and discussed with individual experts in the field. The cohort for the study was then identified, and all structured, unstructured, and semistructured data were extracted. Annotation schemas were developed, samples of documents were extracted, and annotations are ongoing. Operational

  9. Different outcomes for different health measures in immigrants: evidence from a longitudinal analysis of the National Population Health Survey (1994-2006).

    PubMed

    Setia, Maninder Singh; Quesnel-Vallee, Amelie; Abrahamowicz, Michal; Tousignant, Pierre; Lynch, John

    2012-02-01

    The response of immigrants to new societies is dynamic. There may be an initial period of happiness followed by peaks of stressful periods. These reactions along with socio-economic changes are likely to influence their health, which may start converging towards the average health of the host population. We used a longitudinal analysis to assess the differences in health outcomes (mental health and self-rated health), separately in men and women, in Canadian born and immigrants over a 12-year period (and the associated socio-economic factors). We used random effects logistic regression models for evaluation of these health outcomes in 3,081 men and 4,187 women from the National Population Health Survey (1994/95 to 2006/07). After adjusting for all the covariates, non-white immigrants were less likely to have severe psychological distress compared with the Canadian born individuals [odds ratio (OR) Men: 0.49, 95% confidence intervals (CI) 0.24-1.00, Women-OR: 0.54; 95% CI: 0.32-0.92]. Immigrant women (white and non-white) were more likely to rate their health as poor through this 12-year period than the Canadian born women (White-OR: 1.64, 95% CI: 1.17-2.64; Non-white-OR: 1.82, 95% CI: 1.01-3.28). Immigrants in the lowest income adequacy category reported higher psychological distress and poorer health than those in the highest income categories. We did not find any significant differences in the mental health and self-rated health of Canadian men and white male immigrants throughout this 12-year period. Though, non-white immigrant women were less likely to have severe psychological distress through this 12 year period, they were the ones most likely to rate their health as poor.

  10. Longitudinal changes in structural abnormalities using MDCT in COPD: do the CT measurements of airway wall thickness and small pulmonary vessels change in parallel with emphysematous progression?

    PubMed Central

    Takayanagi, Shin; Kawata, Naoko; Tada, Yuji; Ikari, Jun; Matsuura, Yukiko; Matsuoka, Shin; Matsushita, Shoichiro; Yanagawa, Noriyuki; Kasahara, Yasunori; Tatsumi, Koichiro

    2017-01-01

    Background Recent advances in multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) facilitate acquiring important clinical information for managing patients with COPD. MDCT can detect the loss of lung tissue associated with emphysema as a low-attenuation area (LAA) and the thickness of airways as the wall area percentage (WA%). The percentage of small pulmonary vessels <5 mm2 (% cross-sectional area [CSA] <5) has been recently recognized as a parameter for expressing pulmonary perfusion. We aimed to analyze the longitudinal changes in structural abnormalities using these CT parameters and analyze the effect of exacerbation and smoking cessation on structural changes in COPD patients. Methods We performed pulmonary function tests (PFTs), an MDCT, and a COPD assessment test (CAT) in 58 patients with COPD at the time of their enrollment at the hospital and 2 years later. We analyzed the change in clinical parameters including CT indices and examined the effect of exacerbations and smoking cessation on the structural changes. Results The CAT score and forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) did not significantly change during the follow-up period. The parameters of emphysematous changes significantly increased. On the other hand, the WA% at the distal airways significantly decreased or tended to decrease, and the %CSA <5 slightly but significantly increased over the same period, especially in ex-smokers. The parameters of emphysematous change were greater in patients with exacerbations and continued to progress even after smoking cessation. In contrast, the WA% and %CSA <5 did not change in proportion to emphysema progression. Conclusion The WA% at the distal bronchi and the %CSA <5 did not change in parallel with parameters of LAA over the same period. We propose that airway disease and vascular remodeling may be reversible to some extent by smoking cessation and appropriate treatment. Optimal management may have a greater effect on pulmonary vascularity and airway disease

  11. Conquering Mnemonophobia, with Help from Three Practical Measures of Memory and Application

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carney, Russell N.; Levin, Joel R.

    2008-01-01

    Recent articles in "Teaching of Psychology" have endorsed the classroom use of various mnemonic techniques. Yet a degree of mnemonophobia (i.e., fear of using mnemonics) may persist in the minds of some "ToP" readers due to various lingering misconceptions. In this regard, we conducted 3 practical experiments with college students using the…

  12. Knowledge and Practice of Nursing Staff towards Infection Control Measures in the Palestinian Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fashafsheh, Imad; Ayed, Ahmad; Eqtait, Faeda; Harazneh, Lubna

    2015-01-01

    Health care professionals are constantly exposed to microorganisms. Many of which can cause serious or even lethal infections. Nurses in particular are often exposed to various infections during the course of carrying out their nursing activities. Therefore nurses should have sound knowledge and strict adherence to infection control practice. Aim…

  13. Using Video to Examine Formative Assessment Practices as Measures of Expertise for Mathematics and Science Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gotwals, Amelia Wenk; Philhower, Joanne; Cisterna, Dante; Bennett, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Formative assessment practices, including eliciting a broad range of student ideas, noticing the nuances in students' ideas, using these ideas to guide instruction, and promoting student self-regulation of learning are key components of expert teaching. Given the inherent dialogical nature of formative assessment in the classroom, video can…

  14. Rasch Validation of a Measure of Reform-Oriented Science Teaching Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    You, Hye Sun

    2016-01-01

    Growing evidence from recent curriculum documents and previous research suggests that reform-oriented science teaching practices promote students' conceptual understanding, levels of achievement, and motivation to learn, especially when students are actively engaged in constructing their ideas through scientific inquiries. However, it is difficult…

  15. Measuring Practices of Teaching for Social Justice in Elementary Mathematics Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reagan, Emilie Mitescu; Pedulla, Joseph J.; Jong, Cindy; Cannady, Mac; Cochran-Smith, Marilyn

    2011-01-01

    This study used the Teaching for Social Justice Observation Scale (TSJOS) of the Reformed Teaching Observation Protocol-Plus (RTOP+) to examine the extent to which twenty-two novice elementary teachers implemented practices related to teaching for social justice in their mathematics instruction. In addition, this study sought to examine the extent…

  16. Measuring Science Instructional Practice: A Survey Tool for the Age of NGSS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, Kathryn N.; Lee, Christine S.; DiStefano, Rachelle; O'Connor, Dawn; Seitz, Jeffery C.

    2016-01-01

    Ambitious efforts are taking place to implement a new vision for science education in the United States, in both Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS)-adopted states and those states creating their own, often related, standards. In-service and pre-service teacher educators are involved in supporting teacher shifts in practice toward the new…

  17. The Assessment of ITT Standard One, "Professional Values and Practice": Measuring Performance, or What?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, Jennifer

    2007-01-01

    The paper considers data in one Higher Education Institution (HEI) from written reports and from interviews with trainee teachers and their teachers charged with the assessment of one training standard for secondary Initial Teacher Training in England: "Professional Values and Practice." It explores the extent to which four elements of…

  18. Measurement of Longitudinal Single-Spin Asymmetries at Forward Rapidity for W Boson Production in Polarized proton+proton Collisions at √ s =510 GeV at STAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna, Amani; STAR Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The production of W- (+) bosons in polarized proton collisions provides an ideal tool to study the spin-flavor structure of the proton sea quark distributions profiting from the parity violating nature of weak interactions. W- (+) bosons are produced in u + d (d + u) annihilation and can be detected through their leptonic decay mode. The STAR experiment has the ability to detect charged leptons e- (+) at mid and forward rapidity regions. In this analysis we focus on the forward region (1 < η < 2). The analysis status of the measurement of the longitudinal single-spin asymmetries at forward rapidity for W boson production will be presented based on a data sample collected in 2013 corresponding to an integrated luminosity 250 pb-1 with an average beam polarization 54%.

  19. Measuring up: A Simple Lesson That Engages Students in Scientific Practices and Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Capps, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    A well-known lesson taught by many upper-elementary and early-middle-school teachers at the beginning of the school year asks students to compare how arm span relates to height. Students measure their height and arm span and compare their measurements to those of their classmates. This lesson gets students measuring, graphing, and practicing…

  20. A Practical Solution to Optimizing the Reliability of Teaching Observation Measures under Budget Constraints

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, J. Patrick; Liu, Xiang; Mashburn, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    Researchers often use generalizability theory to estimate relative error variance and reliability in teaching observation measures. They also use it to plan future studies and design the best possible measurement procedures. However, designing the best possible measurement procedure comes at a cost, and researchers must stay within their budget…