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Sample records for longitudinally polarized hadroproduction

  1. Bottomonia hadroproduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garret, J. L. Domenech; Sanchis-Lozano, M. A.

    2001-03-01

    We analyze Tevatron data of bottomonium hadroproduction in the framework of the colour-octet model (COM) implemented in the event generator PYTHIA [1] using CTEQ4L PDF taking into account initial-state radiation of gluons and Altarelli-Parisi evolution of final-state gluons. We obtain new values for the colour-octet matrix elements (Me's) relevant to this production process for the γ( nS) family (n=1,2,3), finding that 1S0(8) + 3P J(8) contributions are not needed in the fit. We show the different contributions to γ(1 S) production at Tevatron for P T > 8 GeV, comparing them with CDF data. Remarkably we find a quite small contribution (compatible with zero) from feeddown of χ bJ states produced through the colour-octet mechanism: γ(1 S) indirect production via χ bJ decays should be mainly ascribed to the colour-singlet model. Finally we extrapolate to LHC energies to predict γ( nS) production rates.

  2. Transverse force on transversely polarized quarks in longitudinally polarized nucleons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdallah, Manal; Burkardt, Matthias

    2016-11-01

    We study the semiclassical interpretation of the x3 and x4 moments of twist-3 parton distribution functions (PDFs). While no semiclassical interpretation for the higher moments of gT(x ) and e (x ) was found, the x3 moment of the chirally odd spin-dependent twist-3 PDF hL3(x ) can be related to the longitudinal gradient of the transverse force on transversely polarized quarks in longitudinally polarized nucleons in a deep-inelastic scattering experiment. We discuss how this result relates to the torque acting on a quark in the same experiment. This has further implications for comparisons between the Jaffe-Manohar and the Ji decompositions of the nucleon spin.

  3. FDCHQHP: A Fortran package for heavy quarkonium hadroproduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Lu-Ping; Wang, Jian-Xiong

    2014-11-01

    FDCHQHP is a Fortran package to calculate the transverse momentum (pt) distribution of yield and polarization for heavy quarkonium hadroproduction at next-to-leading-order (NLO) based on non-relativistic QCD(NRQCD) framework. It contains the complete color-singlet and color-octet intermediate states in present theoretical level, and is available to calculate different polarization parameters in different frames. As the LHC running now and in the future, it supplies a very useful tool to obtain theoretical prediction on the heavy quarkonium hadroproduction. Catalogue identifier: AETT_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AETT_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen’s University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 12020165 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 103178384 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran 77. Computer: Any computer with Linux operating system, Intel Fortran Compiler and MPI library. Operating system: Linux. Has the code been vectorized or parallelized?: Parallelized with MPI. Classification: 11.1. External routines: MPI Library Nature of problem: This package is for the calculation of the heavy quarkonium hadroproduction at NRQCD NLO. Solution method: The Fortran codes of this package are generated by the FDC system [1] automatically. Additional comments: It is better to run the package on supercomputers or multi-core computers. !!!!! The distribution file for this program is over 100 MB and therefore is not delivered directly when download or Email is requested. Instead a html file giving details of how the program can be obtained is sent. !!!!! Running time: For an independent sub-process, it may take several seconds to several hours depending on the number of sample points if one CPU core is used. For a complete prompt

  4. Enhanced lithographic resolution using longitudinal polarization state of light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van, My-Phung; Ushakova, Katsiaryna; Bastiaansen, Cees W. M.; Pereira, Silvania F.; Urbach, H. Paul; Broer, Dirk J.

    2015-10-01

    Laser direct-writing is an important technique for the fabrication of complex patterns. There is a continuous need for structures with increasingly small features, i.e., enhanced resolution. Focused radially polarized light is known to exhibit a narrow longitudinal polarization component. Here, a proof-of-concept is shown of enhanced resolution through polarization-selectivity by the selective recording of the longitudinal polarization component in a polarization-selective homeotropic and smectic B photoresist. The full-width-at-half-maximum (FWHM) of the fabricated spots in the polarization-selective resist is up to 56% smaller compared to the FWHM of the same spot in a photoresist that is not polarization-selective, which supports simulations that predict a theoretical maximum reduction of 62%.

  5. Longitudinal polarization of hyperons in the forward region in polarized pp collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Wei; Zhou Shanshan; Xu Qinghua

    2010-03-01

    We study the longitudinal polarization of hyperons and antihyperons at forward pseudorapidity, 2.5<{eta}<4, in singly polarized pp collisions at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider energies by using different parametrizations of the polarized parton densities and different models for the polarized fragmentation functions. The results show that the {Sigma}{sup +} polarization is able to distinguish different pictures on spin transfer in high energy fragmentation processes; and the polarization of {Lambda} and {Lambda} hyperons can provide sensitivity to the helicity distribution of strange sea quarks. The influence from beam remnant to hyperon polarization in the forward region is also discussed.

  6. Polarization-independent longitudinal multi-focusing metalens.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Guo, Zhongyi; Zhou, Keya; Sun, Yongxuan; Shen, Fei; Li, Yan; Qu, Shiliang; Liu, Shutian

    2015-11-16

    A novel multi-focusing metalens in the longitudinal direction has been proposed and investigated based on the equal optical path principle, which is independent on the incident polarizations and can be suitable for both of the linear and circular polarization incidences simultaneously. Here, three novel designing principles: partitioned mode, radial alternating mode and angular alternating mode, have been proposed firstly for constructing different types of the longitudinal multi-focusing metalenses. The performances of the designed metalenses based on the different designed methods have also been analyzed and investigated in detail, and the intensity ratio of the focusing spots can be tuned easily by modulating the numbers of the relative type of nanoantennas, which is significant for the micro-manipulating optics and the multi-imaging technology in the integrated optics.

  7. Longitudinal Polarization of {lambda} and {lambda}-bar Hyperons in Deep-Inelastic Scattering at COMPASS

    SciTech Connect

    Sapozhnikov, M. G.

    2007-06-13

    The longitudinal polarization of {lambda} and {lambda}-bar hyperons produced in deep-inelastic scattering of 160 GeV/c polarized positive muons is studied in the COMPASS (CERN NA58) experiment. Preliminary results on the longitudinal polarization of {lambda} and {lambda}-bar from data collected during the 2003 run are presented.

  8. Longitudinally polarized single-cycle terahertz pulses generated with high electric field strengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cliffe, M. J.; Graham, D. M.; Jamison, S. P.

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate the generation of single-cycle longitudinally polarized terahertz pulses with field amplitudes in excess of 11 kV/cm using the interferometric recombination of two linearly polarized terahertz beams. High field strength transversely polarized pulses were generated by optical rectification in a matched pair of magnesium-oxide doped stoichiometric lithium niobate (MgO:SLN) crystals with a reversal in the χ333 ( 2 ) orientation. The discontinuity in χ333 ( 2 ) produces a polarity flip in the transverse field; the longitudinal field produced as a consequence of the transverse field discontinuity was measured in the far-field. Both the spatial and temporal profiles of the measured longitudinally polarized terahertz radiation were consistent with the propagation of the transverse discontinuity.

  9. Fragmentation contributions to hadroproduction of prompt J /ψ , χc J, and ψ (2 S ) states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodwin, Geoffrey T.; Chao, Kuang-Ta; Chung, Hee Sok; Kim, U.-Rae; Lee, Jungil; Ma, Yan-Qing

    2016-02-01

    We compute fragmentation corrections to hadroproduction of the quarkonium states J /ψ , χc J, and ψ (2 S ) at leading power in mc2/pT2 , where mc is the charm-quark mass and pT is the quarkonium transverse momentum. The computation is carried out in the framework of nonrelativistic QCD. We include corrections to the parton-production cross sections through next-to-leading order in the strong coupling αs and corrections to the fragmentation functions through second order in αs. We also sum leading logarithms of pT2/mc2 to all orders in perturbation theory. We find that, when we combine these leading-power fragmentation corrections with fixed-order calculations through next-to-leading order in αs, we are able to obtain good fits for pT≥10 GeV to hadroproduction cross sections that were measured at the Tevatron and the LHC. Using values for the nonperturbative long-distance matrix elements that we extract from the cross-section fits, we make predictions for the polarizations of the quarkonium states. We obtain good agreement with measurements of the polarizations, with the exception of the CDF Run II measurement of the prompt J /ψ polarization, for which the agreement is only fair. In the predictions for the prompt-J /ψ cross sections and polarizations, we take into account feeddown from the χc J and ψ (2 S ) states.

  10. Creation of Sub-diffraction Longitudinally Polarized Spot by Focusing Radially Polarized Light with Binary Phase Lens.

    PubMed

    Yu, An-Ping; Chen, Gang; Zhang, Zhi-Hai; Wen, Zhong-Quan; Dai, Lu-Ru; Zhang, Kun; Jiang, Sen-Lin; Wu, Zhi-Xiang; Li, Yu-Yan; Wang, Chang-Tao; Luo, Xian-Gang

    2016-12-12

    The generation of a sub-diffraction longitudinally polarized spot is of great interest in various applications, such as optical tweezers, super-resolution microscopy, high-resolution Raman spectroscopy, and high-density optical data storage. Many theoretical investigations have been conducted into the tight focusing of a longitudinally polarized spot with high-numerical-aperture aplanatic lenses in combination with optical filters. Optical super-oscillation provides a new approach to focusing light beyond the diffraction limit. Here, we propose a planar binary phase lens and experimentally demonstrate the generation of a longitudinally polarized sub-diffraction focal spot by focusing radially polarized light. The lens has a numerical aperture of 0.93 and a long focal length of 200λ for wavelength λ = 632.8 nm, and the generated focal spot has a full-width-at-half-maximum of about 0.456λ, which is smaller than the diffraction limit, 0.54λ. A 5λ-long longitudinally polarized optical needle with sub-diffraction size is also observed near the designed focal point.

  11. Creation of Sub-diffraction Longitudinally Polarized Spot by Focusing Radially Polarized Light with Binary Phase Lens

    PubMed Central

    Yu, An-ping; Chen, Gang; Zhang, Zhi-hai; Wen, Zhong-quan; Dai, Lu-ru; Zhang, Kun; Jiang, Sen-lin; Wu, Zhi-xiang; Li, Yu-yan; Wang, Chang-tao; Luo, Xian-gang

    2016-01-01

    The generation of a sub-diffraction longitudinally polarized spot is of great interest in various applications, such as optical tweezers, super-resolution microscopy, high-resolution Raman spectroscopy, and high-density optical data storage. Many theoretical investigations have been conducted into the tight focusing of a longitudinally polarized spot with high-numerical-aperture aplanatic lenses in combination with optical filters. Optical super-oscillation provides a new approach to focusing light beyond the diffraction limit. Here, we propose a planar binary phase lens and experimentally demonstrate the generation of a longitudinally polarized sub-diffraction focal spot by focusing radially polarized light. The lens has a numerical aperture of 0.93 and a long focal length of 200λ for wavelength λ = 632.8 nm, and the generated focal spot has a full-width-at-half-maximum of about 0.456λ, which is smaller than the diffraction limit, 0.54λ. A 5λ-long longitudinally polarized optical needle with sub-diffraction size is also observed near the designed focal point. PMID:27941852

  12. Creation of Sub-diffraction Longitudinally Polarized Spot by Focusing Radially Polarized Light with Binary Phase Lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, An-Ping; Chen, Gang; Zhang, Zhi-Hai; Wen, Zhong-Quan; Dai, Lu-Ru; Zhang, Kun; Jiang, Sen-Lin; Wu, Zhi-Xiang; Li, Yu-Yan; Wang, Chang-Tao; Luo, Xian-Gang

    2016-12-01

    The generation of a sub-diffraction longitudinally polarized spot is of great interest in various applications, such as optical tweezers, super-resolution microscopy, high-resolution Raman spectroscopy, and high-density optical data storage. Many theoretical investigations have been conducted into the tight focusing of a longitudinally polarized spot with high-numerical-aperture aplanatic lenses in combination with optical filters. Optical super-oscillation provides a new approach to focusing light beyond the diffraction limit. Here, we propose a planar binary phase lens and experimentally demonstrate the generation of a longitudinally polarized sub-diffraction focal spot by focusing radially polarized light. The lens has a numerical aperture of 0.93 and a long focal length of 200λ for wavelength λ = 632.8 nm, and the generated focal spot has a full-width-at-half-maximum of about 0.456λ, which is smaller than the diffraction limit, 0.54λ. A 5λ-long longitudinally polarized optical needle with sub-diffraction size is also observed near the designed focal point.

  13. Search for effect of longitudinally polarized protons on optically active amino acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemmon, R. M.; Conzett, H. E.; Bonner, W. A.

    1981-01-01

    The influence of irradiation by longitudinally polarized protons on the differential decomposition of amino acid is investigated in a test of the Vester Ulbricht hypothesis that L-amino acids were produced in preference to the D isomers on the primitive earth due to the effects of parity violation in beta decay. Samples of DL-leucine were irradiated with protons of both positive and negative longitudinal polarization, then analyzed by gas chromatography. Despite advantages of higher polarization, lower velocity and higher ionization density of protons with respect to electrons, proton irradation is found to lead to no detectable asymmetries in DL-leucine degradation, even at 50% gross degradation.

  14. Quasi-Bessel beams with longitudinally varying polarization state generated by employing spectrum engineering.

    PubMed

    Li, Peng; Zhang, Yi; Liu, Sheng; Han, Lei; Cheng, Huachao; Yu, Fan; Zhao, Jianlin

    2016-10-15

    We report on the generation and control of quasi-Bessel beams having not only a uniform axial intensity but also a longitudinally varying polarization state. Based on the optimization routine of the spatial spectrum of the so-called Durnin ring, we generate quasi-Bessel beams possessing longitudinally variant axial intensity with linear or sinusoidal envelopes. By utilizing a Sagnac interferometer, we create and coaxially composite two orthogonally polarized beams with complementary axial intensities to form quasi-Bessel beams with uniform axial intensity but a longitudinally varying polarization state. Furthermore, we demonstrate the possibility and flexibility of manipulating the trajectory, speed, and period of polarization state transformation upon propagation. Our results may enable Bessel beams to be used in other applications including optical communications, material processing, and polarimetry.

  15. Recent Fermilab results on hadroproduction of heavy flavors

    SciTech Connect

    Garbincius, P.H.

    1993-08-01

    Recent results from various Fermilab experiments on the hadroproduction of states containing charm, bottom, and top quarks are discussed. These include observation of the spectra, lifetime, and production characteristics of charmonium, open charm states, and bottom particle production with both high energy fixed target and {bar p}-p collider facilities. The status of the search for the top quark by the Fermilab collider experiments is updated.

  16. On the Mechanisms of Heavy-Quarkonium Hadroproduction

    SciTech Connect

    Lansberg, J.P.

    2008-12-01

    We discuss the various mechanisms potentially at work in hadroproduction of heavy quarkonia in the light of computations of higher-order QCD corrections both in the Colour-Singlet (CS) and Colour-Octet (CO) channels and the inclusion of the contribution arising from the s-channel cut in the CS channel. We also discuss new observables meant to better discriminate between these different mechanisms.

  17. Single and double polarization asymmetries from deeply virtual π0 production with a longitudinally polarized proton target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Andrey; CLAS Collaboration

    2011-10-01

    Deeply virtual exclusive reactions such as π0 meson production with large γ virtuality Q2 offer an opportunity to explore the nucleon structure and access information about quark position and angular momentum distributionsin nucleon, as described in terms of the Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs). Cross-section measurements of π0 production recently have been carried out at Jefferson Lab in the DIS regime. Measurements of polarization observables provide additional information of the production mechanism due to interference effects. Preliminary results will be discussed on single and double polarization asymmetries from data recently obtained using the highly polarized CEBAF electron beam, a longitudinally polarized NH3 target, and the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) equipped with a high granularity electromagnetic calorimeter. The asymmetries are highly sensitive to the different kinematics covered in the measurement. Preliminary results for different Q2, xB and t ranges will be presented.

  18. Generation of High Efficiency Longitudinally Polarized Beam using High NA Lens Axicon and Dedicated Phase Filter

    SciTech Connect

    Rajesh, K. B.; Mohankumar, R.; Prathibajanet, C. Amala; Pillai, T. V. S.; Jaroszewicz, Z.

    2011-10-20

    We propose to use pure phase filter in combination with high NA lens axicon to achieve high efficient longitudinally polarized beam with a subwavelength spot size and large depth of focus using hyper geometric Gaussian beam. Using this system, the spot size is reduced to 0.392 {lambda} and the depth of focus is increased to 7 {lambda}. The efficiency of such system is found to be 87%. This high efficient longitudinally polarized beam generated by hyper geometric Gaussian beam is useful for most of the near-field optics applications.

  19. Scalar Aharonov-Bohm effect with longitudinally polarized neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Allman, B. E.; Lee, W.-T.; Motrunich, O. I.; Werner, S. A.

    1999-12-01

    In the scalar Aharonov-Bohm effect, a charged particle (electron) interacts with the scalar electrostatic potential U in the field-free (i.e., force-free) region inside an electrostatic cylinder (Faraday cage). Using a perfect single-crystal neutron interferometer we have performed a ''dual'' scalar Aharonov-Bohm experiment by subjecting polarized thermal neutrons to a pulsed magnetic field. The pulsed magnetic field was spatially uniform, precluding any force on the neutrons. Aligning the direction of the pulsed magnetic field to the neutron magnetic moment also rules out any classical torque acting to change the neutron polarization. The observed phase shift is purely quantum mechanical in origin. A detailed description of the experiment, performed at the University of Missouri Research Reactor, and its interpretation is given in this paper. (c) 1999 The American Physical Society.

  20. Spin effects in hadroproduction of charmed hadrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryłko, Robert

    1995-09-01

    We review the results on spin effects in the inclusive production of D*+(2010) and Λ+c based on the CERN NA32 data. The spin alignment parameter of D*+(2010) meson is measured to be η=0.10+0.12-0.11±0.01. The angular distribution of decay products in the Gottfried-Jackson frame is consistent with the quark model assignment for Λ+c spin. For Λ+cpT≳1.1 GeV/c, the product of the Λ+c transverse polarization and the kaon type asymmetry for Λ+c→pK-π+ is measured to be αKPΛc=-0.65+0.22-0.18 (anti-Basel). The Λ0 polarization in the same experiment is measured to be -0.28±0.09±0.02 (Basel), for Λ0 pT≳1 GeV/c.

  1. Modelling strong interactions and longitudinally polarized vector boson scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falkowski, Adam; Pokorski, Stefan; Roberts, J. P.

    2007-12-01

    We study scattering of the electroweak gauge bosons in 5D warped models. Within two different models we determine the precise manner in which the Higgs boson and the vector resonances ensure the unitarity of longitudinal vector boson scattering. We identify three separate scales that determine the dynamics of the scattering process in all cases. For a quite general background geometry of 5D, these scales can be linked to a simple functional of the warp factor. The models smoothly interpolate between a `composite' Higgs limit and a Higgsless limit. By holographic arguments, these models provide an effective description of vector boson scattering in 4D models with a strongly coupled electroweak breaking sector.

  2. Generation of longitudinally polarized terahertz pulses with field amplitudes exceeding 2 kV/cm

    SciTech Connect

    Cliffe, M. J. Rodak, A.; Graham, D. M.; Jamison, S. P.

    2014-11-10

    We demonstrate the generation of near-single cycle longitudinally polarized terahertz radiation using a large-area radially biased photoconductive antenna with a longitudinal field amplitude in excess of 2 kV/cm. The 76 mm diameter antenna was photo-excited by a 0.5 mJ amplified near-infrared femtosecond laser system and biased with a voltage of up to 100 kV applied over concentric electrodes. Amplitudes for both the transverse and longitudinal field components of the source were measured using a calibrated electro-optic detection scheme. By tightly focusing the radiation emitted from the photoconductive antenna, we obtained a maximum longitudinal field amplitude of 2.22 kV/cm with an applied bias field of 38.5 kV/cm.

  3. Circular polarization of the Fe XXV x-ray lines following collisional excitation by longitudinally polarized electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Inal, M.K. ); Zhang, H.L.; Sampson, D.H. )

    1992-09-01

    The circular polarization of x-ray lines emitted by heliumlike iron collisionally excited by a longitudinally polarized electron beam has been investigated theoretically. The required collision strengths for excitation of the different {ital n}=2 and 3 magnetic sublevels from the 1{ital s}{sup 2} ground level have been calculated by two different distorted-wave methods and compared with each other. The agreement is generally good. One of these methods is semirelativistic, and the other is fully relativistic with QED effects included in the atomic structure part of the calculations. A high degree of circular polarization is obtained for the magnetic dipole 1 {sup 1}{ital S}{sub 0--}2 {sup 3}{ital S}{sub 1} and quadrupole 1 {sup 1}{ital S}{sub 0--}2 {sup 3}{ital P}{sub 2} lines, while the intercombination line 1 {sup 1}{ital S}{sub 0--}2 {sup 3}{ital P}{sub 1} is found to be almost completely circularly polarized in the near-threshold region. In addition to being of intrinsic interest for atomic collision physics, the reported results might have useful applications in future diagnostics of high-temperature plasmas with a view to providing information on the possible polarization of suprathermal electron beams.

  4. Laser excitation of transversal and longitudinal polar modes in lithium niobate and tantalate crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorelik, Vladimir S.; Sidorov, Nikolay V.; Sverbil, Pavel P.; Vodchits, Alexander I.

    2016-11-01

    The excitation of longitudinal and transversal electromagnetic waves in lithium niobate and tantalate crystals is of interest for establish the conditions of coherent longitudinal and transversal waves generation in media and in vacuum. In this paper the results of laser excitation of transversal and longitudinal polar modes in these crystals are presented. We have measured spontaneous Raman spectra of lithium niobate and tantalate crystals in 0° (forward), 90°, and 180° (backward) scattering geometries. We have observed Raman peaks, related to fundamental transversal and longitudinal A1(Z) and E((X,Y) polar optical modes. In addition, there were pseudoscalar symmetry A2 peaks, forbidden by selection rules in Raman spectra for point group C3v. This was explained by reducing of the point group from C3v to C3 due to the presence of impurities in real crystals. Besides, the acoustic biphonon at low frequency has been observed. High intensity of spontaneous A1(Z)LO and A1(Z)TO Raman satellites gives the opportunity for generation of coherent longitudinal and transversal terahertz waves in lithium niobate and tantalate crystals with the help of Stimulated Raman Scattering under using high-power laser pumping. The presence of pseudoscalar and biphonons mode in low frequency region results in the strong interaction with fundamental soft mode and sharp central peak near the phase transition.

  5. Deeply virtual Compton scattering on longitudinally polarized protons and neutrons at CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Silvia Niccolai

    2012-04-01

    This paper focuses on a measurement of deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS) performed at Jefferson Lab using a nearly-6-GeV polarized electron beam, two longitudinally polarized (via DNP) solid targets of protons (NH{sub 3}) and deuterons (ND{sub 3}) and the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer. Here, preliminary results for target-spin asymmetries and double (beam-target) asymmetries for proton DVCS, as well as a very preliminary extraction of beam-spin asymmetry for neutron DVCS, are presented and linked to Generalized Parton Distributions.

  6. New preliminary results on the physics of charm hadroproduction subprocesses

    SciTech Connect

    Appel, J.A

    1994-10-01

    This paper reviews the results and physics of two contributed papers to ICHEP94. Both papers relate to charm meson hadroproduction at Fermilab fixed target energies. The first (from E769) addresses the total forward cross section for charm mesons (D{sup {plus_minus}} and D{sub s}{sup {plus_minus}}) produced by {pi}{sup {plus_minus}}, K{sup {plus_minus}}, and proton beams. The second paper (from E791) deals with the asymmetries in the differential cross sections for charged D mesons produced in the forward direction by {pi}{sup {minus}} beam. The physics most directly related to the results of the E769 paper are the gluon distributions in the incident hadrons as well as perturbative QCD calculations of charm quark production and the charm quark mass. The E791 results address the details of the hadronization process after production of the charm quarks.

  7. On effects of multiple gluons in J/ψ hadroproduction

    SciTech Connect

    Motyka, Leszek; Sadzikowski, Mariusz

    2015-04-10

    The three-gluon contribution to J/ψ hadroproduction is calculated within perturbative QCD in the k{sub T}-factorization framework. This mechanism involves double gluon density and enters at a non-leading twist, but it is enhanced at large energies due to large double gluon density at small x. We obtain results for differential p{sub T}-dependent cross-sections for all J/ψ polarisations. The rescattering contribution is found to provide a significant correction to the standard leading twist cross-section at the energies of the Tevatron or the LHC at moderate p{sub T}. We also discuss a possible contribution of the rescattering correction to the anti-shadowing effect for J/ψ production in proton - nucleus collisions.

  8. Hadroproduction experiments to constrain accelerator-based neutrino fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zambelli, Laura

    2017-09-01

    The precise knowledge of (anti-)neutrino fluxes is one of the largest limitation in accelerator-based neutrino experiments. The main limitations arise from the poorly known production properties of neutrino parents in hadron-nucleus interactions. Strategies used by neutrino experiment to constrain their fluxes using external hadroproduction data will be described and illustrated with an example of a tight collaboration between T2K and NA61/SHINE experiments. This enabled a reduction of the T2K neutrino flux uncertainty from ∼25% (without external constraints) down to ∼10%. On-going developments to further constrain the T2K (anti-)neutrino flux are discussed and recent results from NA61/SHINE are reviewed. As the next-generation long baseline experiments aim for a neutrino flux uncertainty at a level of a few percent, the future data-taking plans of NA61/SHINE are discussed.

  9. Measurement of Single and Double Spin Asymmetries in Deep Inelastic Pion Electroproduction with a Longitudinally Polarized Target

    SciTech Connect

    Avakian, H; Bosted, P; Elouadrhiri, L; Adhikari, K P; Aghasyan, M; Amaryan, M; Anghinolfi, M; Baghdasaryan, H; Ball, J; Battaglieri, M; Bedlinskiy, I; Biselli, A S; Branford, D; Briscoe, W J; Brooks, W; Carman, D S; Casey, L; Cole, P L; Collins, P; Crabb, D; Crede, V; D'Angelo, A; Daniel, A; Dashyan, N; DeVita, R; DeSanctis, E; Deur, A; Dey, B; Dhamija, S; Dickson, R; Djalali, C; Dodge, G; Doughty, D; Dupre, R; El Alaoui, A; Eugenio, P; Fegan, S; Fersch, M; Guler, N; Guo, L; Hafidi, K; Hakobyan, H; Hanretty, C; Hassall, N; Heddle, D; Hicks, K; Holtrop, M; Ilieva, Y; Ireland, D G; Isupov, E L; Jawalkar, S S; Jo, H S; Joo, K; Keller, D; Khandaker, M; Khetarpal,; Kim, W; Klein, A; Klein, F J; Konczykowski, P; Kubarovsky, V; Kuhn, S E; Kuleshov, S V; Kuznetsov, V; Livingston, K; Lu, H Y; Markov, N; Mayer, M; McAndrew, J; McCracken, M E; McKInnon, B; Meyer, C A; Mineeva, T; Mirazita, M; Mokeev, V; Moreno, B; Moriya, K; Morrison, B; Moutarde, H; Munevar, E; Nadel-Turonski, P; Nasseripour, R; Niccolai, S; Niculescu, G; Niculescu, I; Niroula, M R; Osipenko, M; Ostrovidov, A I; Paremuzyan, R; Park, K; Park, S; Pasyuk, E; Anefalos Pereira, S; Perrin, Y; Pisano, S; Pogorelko, O; Price, J W; Procureur, S; Prok, Protopopescu; Raue, B A; Ricco, G; Ripani, M; Rosner, G; Rossi, P; Sabatie, F; Saini, M S; Salamanca, J; Salgado, C; Schumacher, R A; Seder, E; Seraydaryan, H; Sharabian, Y G; Sober, D I; Sokhan, D; Stapanyan, S S; Stepanyan, S; Stoler, P; Strauch, S; Suleiman, R; Taiuti, M; Tedeschi, D J; Tkachenko, S; Ungaro, M; Vernarsky, B; Vineyard, M F; Voutier, E; Watts, D P; Weinstein, L B; Weygand, D P; Wood, M H; Zhang, J; Zhao, B; Zhao, Z W

    2010-12-01

    We report the first measurement of the transverse momentum dependence of double spin asymmetries in semi-inclusive production of pions in deep inelastic scattering off the longitudinally polarized proton. Data have been obtained using a polarized electron beam of 5.7 GeV with the CLAS detector at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab). A significant non-zero $\\sin2\\phi$ single spin asymmetry was also observed for the first time indicating strong spin-orbit correlations for transversely polarized quarks in the longitudinally polarized proton. The azimuthal modulations of single spin asymmetries have been measured over a wide kinematic range.

  10. ηc Hadroproduction at Large Hadron Collider Challenges NRQCD Factorization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butenschoen, Mathias; He, Zhi-Guo; Kniehl, Bernd A.

    2017-03-01

    We report on our analysis [1] of prompt ηc meson production, measured by the LHCb Collaboration at the Large Hadron Collider, within the framework of non-relativistic QCD (NRQCD) factorization up to the sub-leading order in both the QCD coupling constant αs and the relative velocity v of the bound heavy quarks. We thereby convert various sets of J/ψ and χc,J long-distance matrix elements (LDMEs), determined by different groups in J/ψ and χc,J yield and polarization fits, to ηc and hc production LDMEs making use of the NRQCD heavy quark spin symmetry. The resulting predictions for ηc hadroproduction in all cases greatly overshoot the LHCb data, while the color-singlet model contributions alone would indeed be sufficient. We investigate the consequences for the universality of the LDMEs, and show how the observed tensions remain in follow-up works by other groups.

  11. Persistent longitudinal variations in 8 years of CIPS/AIM polar mesospheric clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiao; Yue, Jia; Xu, Jiyao; Yuan, Wei; Russell, James M.; Hervig, M. E.; Nakamura, Takuji

    2016-07-01

    The Cloud Imaging and Particle Size (CIPS) instrument on the Aeronomy of Ice in the Mesosphere (AIM) satellite provides an opportunity to study the longitudinal variation in polar mesospheric cloud (PMC). We examined the longitudinal variation in PMC albedo using 8 years (2007-2014) of observations from the CIPS instrument. The results show that the PMC albedo in the Southern Hemisphere (SH), especially in the latitude band of 80°S-85°S, is persistently low ( 65% relative to the rest of the hemisphere) within 60°W to 150°W longitude. In the Northern Hemisphere (NH), however, PMC albedo is found to be relatively zonally asymmetry. Harmonic analyses show that the persistent longitudinal variation in the SH PMC albedo is due to zonal wave numbers 1 through 4 (WN1-WN4) processes with minima in the longitude range of 60°W-150°W. The influence of temperature and H2O on the longitudinal variation of the PMC albedo is discussed based on results obtained using a simple 0-D PMC model and temperature from the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) and the Sounding of the Atmosphere with Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) and H2O from MLS. The modeled region of low ice mass in the SH is generally consistent with that of low PMC albedo seen in CIPS. Tidal analyses using the SABER temperatures indicate that the nonmigrating semidiurnal tides with modes of S0, W1, and E1 might be the main drivers of the persistent longitudinal variations of PMC albedo in the SH. Nonmigrating tides are much weaker in the NH and consistent with the observed lack of longitudinal variability in PMC albedo.

  12. Longitudinal polarization of hyperon and antihyperon in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Shanshan; Chen Ye; Liang Zuotang; Xu Qinghua

    2009-05-01

    We make a detailed study of the longitudinal polarization of hyperons and antihyperons in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic lepton-nucleon scattering. We present the numerical results for spin transfer in quark fragmentation processes, and analyze the possible origins for a difference between the polarization for hyperon and that for the corresponding antihyperon. We present the results obtained in the case that there is no asymmetry between sea and antisea distribution in the nucleon as well as those obtained when such an asymmetry is taken into account. We compare the results with the available data such as those from COMPASS and make predictions for future experiments including those at even higher energies such as at eRHIC.

  13. Measurement of longitudinal spin asymmetries for weak boson production in polarized proton-proton collisions at RHIC.

    PubMed

    Adamczyk, L; Adkins, J K; Agakishiev, G; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Alekseev, I; Alford, J; Anson, C D; Aparin, A; Arkhipkin, D; Aschenauer, E C; Averichev, G S; Balewski, J; Banerjee, A; Beavis, D R; Bellwied, R; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bhattarai, P; Bichsel, H; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Bordyuzhin, I G; Borowski, W; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Brovko, S G; Bültmann, S; Bunzarov, I; Burton, T P; Butterworth, J; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Campbell, J M; Cebra, D; Cendejas, R; Cervantes, M C; Chaloupka, P; Chang, Z; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, J H; Chen, L; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Christie, W; Chwastowski, J; Codrington, M J M; Contin, G; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Cui, X; Das, S; Davila Leyva, A; De Silva, L C; Debbe, R R; Dedovich, T G; Deng, J; Derevschikov, A A; Derradi de Souza, R; Dhamija, S; di Ruzza, B; Didenko, L; Dilks, C; Ding, F; Djawotho, P; Dong, X; Drachenberg, J L; Draper, J E; Du, C M; Dunkelberger, L E; Dunlop, J C; Efimov, L G; Engelage, J; Engle, K S; Eppley, G; Eun, L; Evdokimov, O; Eyser, O; Fatemi, R; Fazio, S; Fedorisin, J; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flores, C E; Gagliardi, C A; Gangadharan, D R; Garand, D; Geurts, F; Gibson, A; Girard, M; Gliske, S; Greiner, L; Grosnick, D; Gunarathne, D S; Guo, Y; Gupta, A; Gupta, S; Guryn, W; Haag, B; Hamed, A; Han, L-X; Haque, R; Harris, J W; Heppelmann, S; Hirsch, A; Hoffmann, G W; Hofman, D J; Horvat, S; Huang, B; Huang, H Z; Huang, X; Huck, P; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Jacobs, W W; Jang, H; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kalinkin, D; Kang, K; Kauder, K; Ke, H W; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Kesich, A; Khan, Z H; Kikola, D P; Kisel, I; Kisiel, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Konzer, J; Koralt, I; Kosarzewski, L K; Kotchenda, L; Kraishan, A F; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kulakov, I; Kumar, L; Kycia, R A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Landry, K D; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, J H; LeVine, M J; Li, C; Li, W; Li, X; Li, X; Li, Y; Li, Z M; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Lomnitz, M; Longacre, R S; Luo, X; Ma, G L; Ma, Y G; Madagodagettige Don, D M M D; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Masui, H; Matis, H S; McDonald, D; McShane, T S; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mohanty, B; Mondal, M M; Morozov, D A; Mustafa, M K; Nandi, B K; Nasim, Md; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nigmatkulov, G; Nogach, L V; Noh, S Y; Novak, J; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Oh, K; Ohlson, A; Okorokov, V; Oldag, E W; Olvitt, D L; Pachr, M; Page, B S; Pal, S K; Pan, Y X; Pandit, Y; Panebratsev, Y; Pawlak, T; Pawlik, B; Pei, H; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Pile, P; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Poljak, N; Poniatowska, K; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Pruthi, N K; Przybycien, M; Pujahari, P R; Putschke, J; Qiu, H; Quintero, A; Ramachandran, S; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Riley, C K; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Ross, J F; Roy, A; Ruan, L; Rusnak, J; Rusnakova, O; Sahoo, N R; Sahu, P K; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sangaline, E; Sarkar, A; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmah, A M; Schmidke, W B; Schmitz, N; Seger, J; Seyboth, P; Shah, N; Shahaliev, E; Shanmuganathan, P V; Shao, M; Sharma, B; Shen, W Q; Shi, S S; Shou, Q Y; Sichtermann, E P; Singaraju, R N; Skoby, M J; Smirnov, D; Smirnov, N; Solanki, D; Sorensen, P; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, T D S; Stevens, J R; Stock, R; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Sumbera, M; Sun, X; Sun, X M; Sun, Y; Sun, Z; Surrow, B; Svirida, D N; Symons, T J M; Szelezniak, M A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tang, Z; Tarnowsky, T; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Tlusty, D; Tokarev, M; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tribedy, P; Trzeciak, B A; Tsai, O D; Turnau, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; van Nieuwenhuizen, G; Vandenbroucke, M; Vanfossen, J A; Varma, R; Vasconcelos, G M S; Vasiliev, A N; Vertesi, R; Videbæk, F; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Vossen, A; Wada, M; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, H; Wang, J S; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Wang, Y; Webb, G; Webb, J C; Westfall, G D; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wu, Y F; Xiao, Z; Xie, W; Xin, K; Xu, H; Xu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Q H; Xu, Y; Xu, Z; Yan, W; Yang, C; Yang, Y; Yang, Y; Ye, Z; Yepes, P; Yi, L; Yip, K; Yoo, I-K; Yu, N; Zawisza, Y; Zbroszczyk, H; Zha, W; Zhang, J B; Zhang, J L; Zhang, S; Zhang, X P; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, F; Zhao, J; Zhong, C; Zhu, X; Zhu, Y H; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zyzak, M

    2014-08-15

    We report measurements of single- and double-spin asymmetries for W^{±} and Z/γ^{*} boson production in longitudinally polarized p+p collisions at sqrt[s]=510  GeV by the STAR experiment at RHIC. The asymmetries for W^{±} were measured as a function of the decay lepton pseudorapidity, which provides a theoretically clean probe of the proton's polarized quark distributions at the scale of the W mass. The results are compared to theoretical predictions, constrained by polarized deep inelastic scattering measurements, and show a preference for a sizable, positive up antiquark polarization in the range 0.05

  14. Measurement of Longitudinal Spin Asymmetries for Weak Boson Production in Polarized Proton-Proton Collisions at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anson, C. D.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Averichev, G. S.; Balewski, J.; Banerjee, A.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Borowski, W.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A. V.; Brovko, S. G.; Bültmann, S.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Campbell, J. M.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, L.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Chwastowski, J.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Contin, G.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Cui, X.; Das, S.; Davila Leyva, A.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Derradi de Souza, R.; Dhamija, S.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Ding, F.; Djawotho, P.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Engelage, J.; Engle, K. S.; Eppley, G.; Eun, L.; Evdokimov, O.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Fedorisin, J.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Gliske, S.; Greiner, L.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, S.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hamed, A.; Han, L.-X.; Haque, R.; Harris, J. W.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Horvat, S.; Huang, B.; Huang, H. Z.; Huang, X.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jang, H.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kesich, A.; Khan, Z. H.; Kikola, D. P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Konzer, J.; Koralt, I.; Kosarzewski, L. K.; Kotchenda, L.; Kraishan, A. F.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, L.; Kycia, R. A.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, Z. M.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, X.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Madagodagettige Don, D. M. M. D.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Nogach, L. V.; Noh, S. Y.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Ohlson, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldag, E. W.; Olvitt, D. L.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Poniatowska, K.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Przybycien, M.; Pujahari, P. R.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Riley, C. K.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Ross, J. F.; Roy, A.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sangaline, E.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, B.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, D.; Smirnov, N.; Solanki, D.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stevens, J. R.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szelezniak, M. A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsai, O. D.; Turnau, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Vanfossen, J. A.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbæk, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Vossen, A.; Wada, M.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y. F.; Xiao, Z.; Xie, W.; Xin, K.; Xu, H.; Xu, J.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yan, W.; Yang, C.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Ye, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yu, N.; Zawisza, Y.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhao, F.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhu, X.; Zhu, Y. H.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zyzak, M.; STAR Collaboration

    2014-08-01

    We report measurements of single- and double-spin asymmetries for W± and Z/γ* boson production in longitudinally polarized p+p collisions at √s =510 GeV by the STAR experiment at RHIC. The asymmetries for W± were measured as a function of the decay lepton pseudorapidity, which provides a theoretically clean probe of the proton's polarized quark distributions at the scale of the W mass. The results are compared to theoretical predictions, constrained by polarized deep inelastic scattering measurements, and show a preference for a sizable, positive up antiquark polarization in the range 0.05

  15. Measurement of Single- and Double-Spin Asymmetries in Deep Inelastic Pion Electroproduction with a Longitudinally Polarized Target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avakian, H.; Bosted, P.; Burkert, V. D.; Elouadrhiri, L.; Adhikari, K. P.; Aghasyan, M.; Amaryan, M.; Anghinolfi, M.; Baghdasaryan, H.; Ball, J.; Battaglieri, M.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Biselli, A. S.; Branford, D.; Briscoe, W. J.; Brooks, W.; Carman, D. S.; Casey, L.; Cole, P. L.; Collins, P.; Crabb, D.; Crede, V.; D'Angelo, A.; Daniel, A.; Dashyan, N.; de Vita, R.; de Sanctis, E.; Deur, A.; Dey, B.; Dhamija, S.; Dickson, R.; Djalali, C.; Dodge, G.; Doughty, D.; Dupre, R.; El Alaoui, A.; Eugenio, P.; Fegan, S.; Fersch, R.; Forest, T. A.; Fradi, A.; Gabrielyan, M. Y.; Gavalian, G.; Gevorgyan, N.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Gohn, W.; Gothe, R. W.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guidal, M.; Guler, N.; Guo, L.; Hafidi, K.; Hakobyan, H.; Hanretty, C.; Hassall, N.; Heddle, D.; Hicks, K.; Holtrop, M.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Isupov, E. L.; Jawalkar, S. S.; Jo, H. S.; Joo, K.; Keller, D.; Khandaker, M.; Khetarpal, P.; Kim, W.; Klein, A.; Klein, F. J.; Konczykowski, P.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuhn, S. E.; Kuleshov, S. V.; Kuznetsov, V.; Livingston, K.; Lu, H. Y.; Markov, N.; Mayer, M.; Martinez, D.; McAndrew, J.; McCracken, M. E.; McKinnon, B.; Meyer, C. A.; Mineeva, T.; Mirazita, M.; Mokeev, V.; Moreno, B.; Moriya, K.; Morrison, B.; Moutarde, H.; Munevar, E.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Nasseripour, R.; Niccolai, S.; Niculescu, G.; Niculescu, I.; Niroula, M. R.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Paremuzyan, R.; Park, K.; Park, S.; Pasyuk, E.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Perrin, Y.; Pisano, S.; Pogorelko, O.; Price, J. W.; Procureur, S.; Prok, Y.; Protopopescu, D.; Raue, B. A.; Ricco, G.; Ripani, M.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Sabatié, F.; Saini, M. S.; Salamanca, J.; Salgado, C.; Schumacher, R. A.; Seder, E.; Seraydaryan, H.; Sharabian, Y. G.; Sober, D. I.; Sokhan, D.; Stepanyan, S. S.; Stepanyan, S.; Stoler, P.; Strauch, S.; Suleiman, R.; Taiuti, M.; Tedeschi, D. J.; Tkachenko, S.; Ungaro, M.; Vernarsky, B.; Vineyard, M. F.; Voutier, E.; Watts, D. P.; Weinstein, L. B.; Weygand, D. P.; Wood, M. H.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, B.; Zhao, Z. W.

    2010-12-01

    We report the first measurement of the transverse momentum dependence of double-spin asymmetries in semi-inclusive production of pions in deep-inelastic scattering off the longitudinally polarized proton. Data have been obtained using a polarized electron beam of 5.7 GeV with the CLAS detector at the Jefferson Lab (JLab). Modulations of single spin asymmetries over the azimuthal angle between lepton scattering and hadron production planes ϕ have been measured over a wide kinematic range in Bjorken x and virtual photon squared four-momentum Q2. A significant nonzero sin⁡2ϕ single spin asymmetry was observed for the first time indicating strong spin-orbit correlations for transversely polarized quarks in the longitudinally polarized proton.

  16. Chimera distribution amplitudes for the pion and the longitudinally polarized ρ-meson

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefanis, N. G.; Pimikov, A. V.

    2016-01-01

    Using QCD sum rules with nonlocal condensates, we show that the distribution amplitude of the longitudinally polarized ρ-meson may have a shorttailed platykurtic profile in close analogy to our recently proposed platykurtic distribution amplitude for the pion. Such a chimera distribution de facto amalgamates the broad unimodal profile of the distribution amplitude, obtained with a Dyson-Schwinger equations-based computational scheme, with the suppressed tails characterizing the bimodal distribution amplitudes derived from QCD sum rules with nonlocal condensates. We argue that pattern formation, emerging from the collective synchronization of coupled oscillators, can provide a single theoretical scaffolding to study unimodal and bimodal distribution amplitudes of light mesons without recourse to particular computational schemes and the reasons for them.

  17. On the longitudinal variability of the mean age of stratospheric air and the polar vortex preconditioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šácha, Petr; Añel, Juan; de la Torre, Laura; Pišoft, Petr; Kuchař, Aleš

    2017-04-01

    Using three-dimensional (3D) fields of the mean age of stratospheric air (AoA) from the Canadian Middle Atmosphere Model (CMAM) as a 3D transport diagnostic, we study a role of the spatiotemporal gravity wave activity distribution for the middle atmospheric circulation and longitudinal variability of the Brewer-Dobson circulation. Further we make use of the fact that AoA reflects the cumulative effect of transport processes and study its potential to act as a vortex preconditioning proxy with a possibility to enhance the predictability of polar vortex events. For this case we created composite analysis of sudden stratospheric warming events from the CMAM specific dynamics simulation and focus on the full 3D fields and AoA distribution anomalies. The dynamical origin of these anomalies is then analysed with respect to the anomalous planetary and gravity wave activity.

  18. Longitudinal elliptically polarized electromagnetic waves in off-diagonal magnetoelectric split-ring composites.

    PubMed

    Chui, S T; Wang, Weihua; Zhou, L; Lin, Z F

    2009-07-22

    We study the propagation of plane electromagnetic waves through different systems consisting of arrays of split rings of different orientations. Many extraordinary EM phenomena were discovered in such systems, contributed by the off-diagonal magnetoelectric susceptibilities. We find a mode such that the electric field becomes elliptically polarized with a component in the longitudinal direction (i.e. parallel to the wavevector). Even though the group velocity [Formula: see text] and the wavevector k are parallel, in the presence of damping, the Poynting vector does not just get 'broadened', but can possess a component perpendicular to the wavevector. The speed of light can be real even when the product ϵμ is negative. Other novel properties are explored.

  19. Role of longitudinally polarized W 's in slepton production and decay

    SciTech Connect

    Gunion, J.F.; Herrero, M.; Mendez, A.

    1988-05-01

    We demonstrate that WW fusion is possibly an important mechanism for slepton pair production if the slepton mass is larger than approx.300 GeV. In addition, we note that for a large range of M/sub l-italic-tilde/ the mass splitting between the l-italic-tilde and its SU(2)-doublet nu-tilde partner can be larger than m/sub W/ without violating limits on ..delta..rho, and that in this case the l-italic-tilde decay can easily be dominated by the two-body mode, l-italic-tilde..-->..Wnu-tilde. In both situations it is the longitudinal W polarizations that dominate. Finally, we remark on the possible importance of similar mechanisms in charged-Higgs-boson production and decay, and in squark production and decay

  20. Tau longitudinal polarization in B{yields}D{tau}{nu} and its role in the search for the charged Higgs boson

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Minoru; Watanabe, Ryoutaro

    2010-08-01

    We study the longitudinal polarization of the tau lepton in B{yields}D{tau}{nu} decay. After discussing possible sensitivities of {tau} decay modes to the {tau} polarization, we examine the effect of charged Higgs boson on the {tau} polarization in B{yields}D{tau}{nu}. We find a relation between the decay rate and the {tau} polarization, and clarify the role of the {tau} polarization measurement in the search for the charged Higgs boson.

  1. Longitudinal and transverse piezoelectric coefficients of lead zirconate titanate/vinylidene fluoride-trifluoroethylene composites with different polarization states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, R.; Kwok, K. W.; Chan, H. L. W.; Choy, C. L.

    2002-09-01

    Composite films comprising lead zirconate titanate (PZT) ceramic particles dispersed in a vinylidene fluoride-trifluoroethylene copolymer matrix have been prepared by compression molding. The ceramic and copolymer phases of the composite films are polarized separately, resulting in samples with three different polarization states: only the ceramic phase polarized, both phases polarized in the same direction, and two phases polarized in opposite directions. The effect of polarization state on the longitudinal and transverse piezoelectric coefficients (d33 and d31) of the composite film has been investigated as functions of ceramic volume fraction phic. When the ceramic and copolymer phases of a composite film are polarized in the same direction, their piezoelectric activities partially cancel each other, thereby giving almost zero piezoelectric activity at phi]c[approx0.4. On the other hand, when the phases of a composite film are polarized in opposite directions, their piezoelectric activities reinforce. However, depolarization of the ceramic phase is observed at high phic, leading to a decrease in the piezoelectric activity. The observed d33 and d31 values for the composite films agree well with theoretical predictions.

  2. NMR longitudinal relaxation enhancement in metal halides by heteronuclear polarization exchange during magic-angle spinning.

    PubMed

    Shmyreva, Anna A; Safdari, Majid; Furó, István; Dvinskikh, Sergey V

    2016-06-14

    Orders of magnitude decrease of (207)Pb and (199)Hg NMR longitudinal relaxation times T1 upon magic-angle-spinning (MAS) are observed and systematically investigated in solid lead and mercury halides MeX2 (Me = Pb, Hg and X = Cl, Br, I). In lead(ii) halides, the most dramatic decrease of T1 relative to that in a static sample is in PbI2, while it is smaller but still significant in PbBr2, and not detectable in PbCl2. The effect is magnetic-field dependent but independent of the spinning speed in the range 200-15 000 Hz. The observed relaxation enhancement is explained by laboratory-frame heteronuclear polarization exchange due to crossing between energy levels of spin-1/2 metal nuclei and adjacent quadrupolar-spin halogen nuclei. The enhancement effect is also present in lead-containing organometal halide perovskites. Our results demonstrate that in affected samples, it is the relaxation data recorded under non-spinning conditions that characterize the local properties at the metal sites. A practical advantage of fast relaxation at slow MAS is that spectral shapes with orientational chemical shift anisotropy information well retained can be acquired within a shorter experimental time.

  3. NMR longitudinal relaxation enhancement in metal halides by heteronuclear polarization exchange during magic-angle spinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shmyreva, Anna A.; Safdari, Majid; Furó, István; Dvinskikh, Sergey V.

    2016-06-01

    Orders of magnitude decrease of 207Pb and 199Hg NMR longitudinal relaxation times T1 upon magic-angle-spinning (MAS) are observed and systematically investigated in solid lead and mercury halides MeX2 (Me = Pb, Hg and X = Cl, Br, I). In lead(ii) halides, the most dramatic decrease of T1 relative to that in a static sample is in PbI2, while it is smaller but still significant in PbBr2, and not detectable in PbCl2. The effect is magnetic-field dependent but independent of the spinning speed in the range 200-15 000 Hz. The observed relaxation enhancement is explained by laboratory-frame heteronuclear polarization exchange due to crossing between energy levels of spin-1/2 metal nuclei and adjacent quadrupolar-spin halogen nuclei. The enhancement effect is also present in lead-containing organometal halide perovskites. Our results demonstrate that in affected samples, it is the relaxation data recorded under non-spinning conditions that characterize the local properties at the metal sites. A practical advantage of fast relaxation at slow MAS is that spectral shapes with orientational chemical shift anisotropy information well retained can be acquired within a shorter experimental time.

  4. Determination of the top-quark mass from hadro-production of single top-quarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekhin, S.; Moch, S.; Thier, S.

    2016-12-01

    We present a new determination of the top-quark mass mt based on the experimental data from the Tevatron and the LHC for single-top hadro-production. We use the inclusive cross sections of s- and t-channel top-quark production to extract mt and to minimize the dependence on the strong coupling constant and the gluon distribution in the proton compared to the hadro-production of top-quark pairs. As part of our analysis we compute the next-to-next-to-leading order approximation for the s-channel cross section in perturbative QCD based on the known soft-gluon corrections and implement it in the program HATHOR for the numerical evaluation of the hadronic cross section. Results for the top-quark mass are reported in the MS ‾ and in the on-shell renormalization scheme.

  5. /ital P/-odd asymmetry of the cross section for bremsstrahlung of longitudinally polarized electrons by nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Safin, M. Y.

    1988-12-01

    The differential cross section and the right--left asymmetry are calculated for bremsstrahlung of longitudinally polarized electrons by nuclei, with account taken of the interaction of weak neutral currents. It is shown that at electron energies /ital E//lt/200 MeV the asymmetry of bremsstrahlung by /sup 181/Ta and /sup 11/B nuclei does not exceed 2/center dot/10/sup /minus/9/.

  6. Longitudinal monitoring of demineralization peripheral to orthodontic brackets using cross polarization optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Nee, Alexander; Chan, Kenneth; Kang, Hobin; Staninec, Michal; Darling, Cynthia L; Fried, Daniel

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that cross-polarization optical coherence tomography (CP-OCT) can be used to longitudinally monitor demineralization peripheral to orthodontic brackets in an extended clinical study. A high-speed CP-OCT system was used to acquire 3D volumetric images of the area at the base of orthodontic brackets over a period of 12 months after placement. The reflectivity was measured at 3-month intervals for 12 months to determine if there was increased demineralization. Two teeth were monitored on 20 test subjects and the brackets were bonded using two types of adhesives. This was a randomized controlled clinical study with a split mouth design such that each subject served as his or her own control. On one side, the control premolar was bonded with a bonding agent (Adper Scotchbond from 3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN) and composite (Transbond XT from 3M Unitek, Monrovia, CA) that lacked fluoride. On the other side, the experimental premolar was bonded with a fluoride releasing glass ionomer cement (GC Fuji Ortho LC from GC America, Alsip, IL). There was a small but significant increase in the calculated lesion depth and integrated reflectivity over that depth (ΔR) for both adhesive types (p<0.0001) indicating increasing demineralization with time. There was no significant difference in the lesion depth (p=0.22) and ΔR (p=0.91) between the groups with the fluoride releasing glass ionomer cement and the conventional composite. CP-OCT was able to measure a significant increase in demineralization (p<0.0001) at the base of orthodontic brackets over a period of 12 months. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Longitudinal monitoring of demineralization peripheral to orthodontic brackets using cross polarization optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Nee, Alexander; Chan, Kenneth; Kang, Hobin; Staninec, Michal; Darling, Cynthia L.; Fried, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that cross-polarization optical coherence tomography (CP-OCT) can be used to longitudinally monitor demineralization peripheral to orthodontic brackets in an extended clinical study. Methods A high-speed CP-OCT system was used to acquire 3D volumetric images of the area at the base of orthodontic brackets over a period of 12-months after placement. The reflectivity was measured at 3-month intervals for 12-months to determine if there was increased demineralization. Two teeth were monitored on twenty test subjects and the brackets were bonded using two types of adhesives This was a randomized controlled clinical study with a split mouth design such that each subject served as his or her own control. On one side, the control premolar was bonded with a bonding agent (Adper Scotchbond from 3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN) and composite (Transbond XT from 3M Unitek, Monrovia, CA) that lacked fluoride. On the other side, the experimental premolar was bonded with a fluoride releasing glass ionomer cement (GC Fuji Ortho LC from GC America, Alsip, IL). Results There was a small but significant increase in the calculated lesion depth and integrated reflectivity over that depth (Δ R) for both adhesive types (p<0.0001) indicating increasing demineralization with time. There was no significant difference in the lesion depth (p=0.22) and Δ R (p=0.91) between the groups with the fluoride releasing glass ionomer cement and the conventional composite. Conclusions CP-OCT was able to measure a significant increase in demineralization (P<0.0001) at the base of orthodontic brackets over a period of 12-months. PMID:24561340

  8. Longitudinal polarization periodicity of unpolarized light passing through a double wedge depolarizer.

    PubMed

    de Sande, Juan Carlos G; Santarsiero, Massimo; Piquero, Gemma; Gori, Franco

    2012-12-03

    The polarization characteristics of unpolarized light passing through a double wedge depolarizer are studied. It is found that the degree of polarization of the radiation propagating after the depolarizer is uniform across transverse planes after the depolarizer, but it changes from one plane to another in a periodic way giving, at different distances, unpolarized, partially polarized, or even perfectly polarized light. An experiment is performed to confirm this result. Measured values of the Stokes parameters and of the degree of polarization are in complete agreement with the theoretical predictions.

  9. Target and double spin asymmetries of deeply virtual π0 production with a longitudinally polarized proton target and CLAS

    DOE PAGES

    Kim, A.; Avakian, H.; Burkert, V.; ...

    2017-02-22

    The target and double spin asymmetries of the exclusive pseudoscalar channelmore » $$\\vec e\\vec p\\to ep\\pi^0$$ were measured for the first time in the deep-inelastic regime using a longitudinally polarized 5.9 GeV electron beam and a longitudinally polarized proton target at Jefferson Lab with the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS). The data were collected over a large kinematic phase space and divided into 110 four-dimensional bins of $Q^2$, $$x_B$$, $-t$ and $$\\phi$$. Large values of asymmetry moments clearly indicate a substantial contribution to the polarized structure functions from transverse virtual photon amplitudes. The interpretation of experimental data in terms of generalized parton distributions (GPDs) provides the first insight on the chiral-odd GPDs $$\\tilde{H}_T$$ and $$E_T$$, and complement previous measurements of unpolarized structure functions sensitive to the GPDs $$H_T$$ and $$\\bar E_T$$. Finally, these data provide necessary constraints for chiral-odd GPD parametrizations and will strongly influence existing theoretical handbag models.« less

  10. Single and double spin asymmetries for deeply virtual Compton scattering measured with CLAS and a longitudinally polarized proton target

    SciTech Connect

    Pisano, S.; Biselli, A.; Niccolai, S.; Seder, E.; Guidal, M.; Mirazita, M.; Adhikari, K. P.; Adikaram, D.; Amaryan, M. J.; Anderson, M. D.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Avakian, H.; Ball, J.; Battaglieri, M.; Batourine, V.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Bosted, P.; Briscoe, B.; Brock, J.; Brooks, W. K.; Burkert, V. D.; Carlin, C.; Carman, D. S.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Charles, G.; Colaneri, L.; Cole, P. L.; Compton, N.; Contalbrigo, M.; Cortes, O.; Crabb, D. G.; Crede, V.; D' Angelo, A.; De Vita, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Deur, A.; Djalali, C.; Dupre, R.; Egiyan, H.; El Alaoui, A.; El Fassi, L.; Elouadrhiri, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fedotov, G.; Fegan, S.; Fersch, R.; Filippi, A.; Fleming, J. A.; Fradi, A.; Garillon, B.; Garcon, M.; Ghandilyan, Y.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Goetz, J. T.; Gohn, W.; Golovatch, E.; Gothe, R. W.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guo, L.; Hafidi, K.; Hanretty, C.; Hattawy, M.; Hicks, K.; Holtrop, M.; Hughes, S. M.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Jenkins, D.; Jiang, X.; Jo, H. S.; Joo, K.; Joosten, S.; Keith, C. D.; Keller, D.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; Klein, F. J.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuhn, S. E.; Lenisa, P.; Livingston, K.; Lu, H. Y.; MacCormick, M.; MacGregor, Ian J. D.; Mayer, M.; McKinnon, B.; Meekins, D. G.; Meyer, C. A.; Mokeev, V.; Montgomery, R. A.; Moody, C. I.; Munoz Camacho, C.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Park, K.; Phelps, W.; Phillips, J. J.; Pogorelko, O.; Price, J. W.; Procureur, S.; Prok, Y.; Puckett, A. J. R.; Ripani, M.; Rizzo, A.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Roy, P.; Sabatie, F.; Salgado, C.; Schott, D.; Schumacher, R. A.; Skorodumina, I.; Smith, G. D.; Sober, D. I.; Sokhan, D.; Sparveris, N.; Stepanyan, S.; Stoler, P.; Strauch, S.; Sytnik, V.; Tian, Ye; Tkachenko, S.; Turisini, M.; Ungaro, M.; Voutier, E.; Walford, N. K.; Watts, D. P.; Wei, X.; Weinstein, L. B.; Wood, M. H.; Zachariou, N.; Zana, L.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, Z. W.; Zonta, I.

    2015-03-19

    Single-beam, single-target, and double-spin asymmetries for hard exclusive photon production on the proton e→p→e'p'γ are presented. The data were taken at Jefferson Lab using the CLAS detector and a longitudinally polarized 14NH3 target. The three asymmetries were measured in 165 4-dimensional kinematic bins, covering the widest kinematic range ever explored simultaneously for beam and target-polarization observables in the valence quark region. The kinematic dependences of the obtained asymmetries are discussed and compared to the predictions of models of Generalized Parton Distributions. As a result, the measurement of three DVCS spin observables at the same kinematic points allows a quasi-model-independent extraction of the imaginary parts of the H and H~ Compton Form Factors, which give insight into the electric and axial charge distributions of valence quarks in the proton.

  11. Polarization observables in the longitudinal basis for pseudo-scalar meson photoproduction using a density matrix approach

    SciTech Connect

    Biplab Dey, Michael E. McCracken, David G. Ireland, Curtis A. Meyer

    2011-05-01

    The complete expression for the intensity in pseudo-scalar meson photoproduction with a polarized beam, target, and recoil baryon is derived using a density matrix approach that offers great economy of notation. A Cartesian basis with spins for all particles quantized along a single direction, the longitudinal beam direction, is used for consistency and clarity in interpretation. A single spin-quantization axis for all particles enables the amplitudes to be written in a manifestly covariant fashion with simple relations to those of the well-known CGLN formalism. Possible sign discrepancies between theoretical amplitude-level expressions and experimentally measurable intensity profiles are dealt with carefully. Our motivation is to provide a coherent framework for coupled-channel partial-wave analysis of several meson photoproduction reactions, incorporating recently published and forthcoming polarization data from Jefferson Lab.

  12. Polarization observables in the longitudinal basis for pseudo-scalar meson photoproduction using a density matrix approach

    SciTech Connect

    Dey, Biplab; Meyer, Curtis A.; McCracken, Michael E.; Ireland, David G.

    2011-05-15

    The complete expression for the intensity in pseudo-scalar meson photoproduction with a polarized beam, target, and recoil baryon is derived using a density matrix approach that offers great economy of notation. A Cartesian basis with spins for all particles quantized along a single direction, the longitudinal beam direction, is used for consistency and clarity in interpretation. A single spin-quantization axis for all particles enables the amplitudes to be written in a manifestly covariant fashion with simple relations to those of the well-known Chew-Goldberger-Low-Nambu formalism. Possible sign discrepancies between theoretical amplitude-level expressions and experimentally measurable intensity profiles are dealt with carefully. Our motivation is to provide a coherent framework for coupled-channel partial-wave analysis of several meson photoproduction reactions, incorporating recently published and forthcoming polarization data from Jefferson Lab.

  13. Measurement of parity-violating spin asymmetries in W± production at midrapidity in longitudinally polarized p +p collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adare, A.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Akimoto, R.; Alexander, J.; Alfred, M.; Aoki, K.; Apadula, N.; Aramaki, Y.; Asano, H.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Atomssa, E. T.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Bai, X.; Bandara, N. S.; Bannier, B.; Barish, K. N.; Bassalleck, B.; Bathe, S.; Baublis, V.; Baumann, C.; Baumgart, S.; Bazilevsky, A.; Beaumier, M.; Beckman, S.; Belmont, R.; Berdnikov, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Black, D.; Blau, D. S.; Bok, J. S.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Bryslawskyj, J.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Butsyk, S.; Campbell, S.; Chen, C.-H.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choi, J. B.; Choi, S.; Choudhury, R. K.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chvala, O.; Cianciolo, V.; Citron, Z.; Cole, B. A.; Connors, M.; Cronin, N.; Crossette, N.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Dairaku, S.; Danley, T. W.; Datta, A.; Daugherity, M. S.; David, G.; Deblasio, K.; Dehmelt, K.; Denisov, A.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Dietzsch, O.; Ding, L.; Dion, A.; Diss, P. B.; Do, J. H.; Donadelli, M.; D'Orazio, L.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; Edwards, S.; Efremenko, Y. V.; Engelmore, T.; Enokizono, A.; En'yo, H.; Esumi, S.; Eyser, K. O.; Fadem, B.; Feege, N.; Fields, D. E.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fukao, Y.; Fusayasu, T.; Gainey, K.; Gal, C.; Gallus, P.; Garg, P.; Garishvili, A.; Garishvili, I.; Ge, H.; Giordano, F.; Glenn, A.; Gong, X.; Gonin, M.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gu, Y.; Gunji, T.; Guragain, H.; Hachiya, T.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamilton, H. F.; Han, S. Y.; Hanks, J.; Hasegawa, S.; Haseler, T. O. S.; Hashimoto, K.; Hayano, R.; Hayashi, S.; He, X.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hester, T.; Hill, J. C.; Hollis, R. S.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Horaguchi, T.; Hoshino, T.; Hotvedt, N.; Huang, J.; Huang, S.; Ichihara, T.; Iinuma, H.; Ikeda, Y.; Imai, K.; Imazu, Y.; Imrek, J.; Inaba, M.; Iordanova, A.; Isenhower, D.; Isinhue, A.; Ivanishchev, D.; Jacak, B. V.; Javani, M.; Jeon, S. J.; Jezghani, M.; Jia, J.; Jiang, X.; Johnson, B. M.; Joo, E.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Jumper, D. S.; Kamin, J.; Kanda, S.; Kang, B. H.; Kang, J. H.; Kang, J. S.; Kapustinsky, J.; Karatsu, K.; Kawall, D.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Kempel, T.; Key, J. A.; Khachatryan, V.; Khandai, P. K.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kihara, K.; Kijima, K. M.; Kim, B. I.; Kim, C.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E.-J.; Kim, G. W.; Kim, H.-J.; Kim, M.; Kim, Y.-J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimelman, B.; Kinney, E.; Kistenev, E.; Kitamura, R.; Klatsky, J.; Kleinjan, D.; Kline, P.; Koblesky, T.; Kofarago, M.; Komkov, B.; Koster, J.; Kotchetkov, D.; Kotov, D.; Krizek, F.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G. S.; Lacey, R.; Lai, Y. S.; Lajoie, J. G.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, G. H.; Lee, J.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, S.; Lee, S. H.; Lee, S. R.; Leitch, M. J.; Leite, M. A. L.; Leitgab, M.; Lewis, B.; Li, X.; Lim, S. H.; Linden Levy, L. A.; Liu, M. X.; Lynch, D.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Makek, M.; Manion, A.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; Maruyama, T.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; McGlinchey, D.; McKinney, C.; Meles, A.; Mendoza, M.; Meredith, B.; Miake, Y.; Mibe, T.; Midori, J.; Mignerey, A. C.; Miller, A. J.; Milov, A.; Mishra, D. K.; Mitchell, J. T.; Miyasaka, S.; Mizuno, S.; Mohanty, A. K.; Mohapatra, S.; Montuenga, P.; Moon, H. J.; Moon, T.; Morrison, D. P.; Moskowitz, M.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Murakami, T.; Murata, J.; Mwai, A.; Nagae, T.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagashima, K.; Nagle, J. L.; Nagy, M. I.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakagomi, H.; Nakamiya, Y.; Nakamura, K. R.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, K.; Nattrass, C.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Nihashi, M.; Niida, T.; Nishimura, S.; Nouicer, R.; Novák, T.; Novitzky, N.; Nukariya, A.; Nyanin, A. S.; Obayashi, H.; O'Brien, E.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Oide, H.; Okada, K.; Orjuela Koop, J. D.; Osborn, J. D.; Oskarsson, A.; Ozaki, H.; Ozawa, K.; Pak, R.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, I. H.; Park, J. S.; Park, S.; Park, S. K.; Pate, S. F.; Patel, L.; Patel, M.; Pei, H.; Peng, J.-C.; Perepelitsa, D. V.; Perera, G. D. N.; Peressounko, D. Yu.; Perry, J.; Petti, R.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pinson, R.; Pisani, R. P.; Purschke, M. L.; Qu, H.; Rak, J.; Ramson, B. J.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Reynolds, D.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Richardson, E.; Rinn, T.; Riveli, N.; Roach, D.; Roche, G.; Rolnick, S. D.; Rosati, M.; Rowan, Z.; Rubin, J. G.; Ryu, M. S.; Sahlmueller, B.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sako, H.; Samsonov, V.; Sarsour, M.; Sato, S.; Sawada, S.; Schaefer, B.; Schmoll, B. K.; Sedgwick, K.; Seele, J.; Seidl, R.; Sekiguchi, Y.; Sen, A.; Seto, R.; Sett, P.; Sexton, A.; Sharma, D.; Shaver, A.; Shein, I.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Shoji, K.; Shukla, P.; Sickles, A.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Sim, K. S.; Singh, B. K.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Skolnik, M.; Slunečka, M.; Snowball, M.; Solano, S.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Sourikova, I. V.; Stankus, P. W.; Steinberg, P.; Stenlund, E.; Stepanov, M.; Ster, A.; Stoll, S. P.; Stone, M. R.; Sugitate, T.; Sukhanov, A.; Sumita, T.; Sun, J.; Sziklai, J.; Takagui, E. M.; Takahara, A.; Taketani, A.; Tanaka, Y.; Taneja, S.; Tanida, K.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Tarafdar, S.; Taranenko, A.; Tennant, E.; Tieulent, R.; Timilsina, A.; Todoroki, T.; Tomášek, M.; Torii, H.; Towell, C. L.; Towell, M.; Towell, R.; Towell, R. S.; Tserruya, I.; Tsuchimoto, Y.; Vale, C.; van Hecke, H. W.; Vargyas, M.; Vazquez-Zambrano, E.; Veicht, A.; Velkovska, J.; Vértesi, R.; Virius, M.; Voas, B.; Vrba, V.; Vznuzdaev, E.; Wang, X. R.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, K.; Watanabe, Y.; Watanabe, Y. S.; Wei, F.; Whitaker, S.; White, A. S.; White, S. N.; Winter, D.; Wolin, S.; Woody, C. L.; Wysocki, M.; Xia, B.; Xue, L.; Yalcin, S.; Yamaguchi, Y. L.; Yanovich, A.; Ying, J.; Yokkaichi, S.; Yoo, J. H.; Yoon, I.; You, Z.; Younus, I.; Yu, H.; Yushmanov, I. E.; Zajc, W. A.; Zelenski, A.; Zhou, S.; Zou, L.; Phenix Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    We present midrapidity measurements from the PHENIX experiment of large parity-violating single-spin asymmetries of high transverse momentum electrons and positrons from W±/Z decays, produced in longitudinally polarized p +p collisions at center of mass energies of √{s }=500 and 510 GeV. These asymmetries allow direct access to the antiquark polarized parton distribution functions due to the parity-violating nature of the W -boson coupling to quarks and antiquarks. The results presented are based on data collected in 2011, 2012, and 2013 with an integrated luminosity of 240 pb-1 , which exceeds previous PHENIX published results by a factor of more than 27. These high Q2 data probe the parton structure of the proton at W mass scale and provide an important addition to our understanding of the antiquark parton helicity distribution functions at an intermediate Bjorken x value of roughly MW/√{s }=0.16 .

  14. Polarization observables in the longitudinal basis for pseudo-scalar meson photoproduction using a density matrix approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Biplab; McCracken, Michael E.; Ireland, David G.; Meyer, Curtis A.

    2011-05-01

    The complete expression for the intensity in pseudo-scalar meson photoproduction with a polarized beam, target, and recoil baryon is derived using a density matrix approach that offers great economy of notation. A Cartesian basis with spins for all particles quantized along a single direction, the longitudinal beam direction, is used for consistency and clarity in interpretation. A single spin-quantization axis for all particles enables the amplitudes to be written in a manifestly covariant fashion with simple relations to those of the well-known Chew-Goldberger-Low-Nambu formalism. Possible sign discrepancies between theoretical amplitude-level expressions and experimentally measurable intensity profiles are dealt with carefully. Our motivation is to provide a coherent framework for coupled-channel partial-wave analysis of several meson photoproduction reactions, incorporating recently published and forthcoming polarization data from Jefferson Lab.

  15. Probing heavy quarkonium production mechnism: χc polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Hua-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    The necesscity of the color-octet mechanism in describing heavy quarkonium production is a longstanding puzzle. Compared to the yields of heavy quarkonium, its polarizations should be a sensitive observable to pin down the color-octet contributions. In this talk, I will focus on the χc polarization in hadroproduction processes, which may provide a unique test for the color-octet mechanism in nonrelativistic QCD.

  16. Probing heavy quarkonium production mechnism: χ{sub c} polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, Hua-Sheng

    2016-01-22

    The necesscity of the color-octet mechanism in describing heavy quarkonium production is a longstanding puzzle. Compared to the yields of heavy quarkonium, its polarizations should be a sensitive observable to pin down the color-octet contributions. In this talk, I will focus on the χ{sub c} polarization in hadroproduction processes, which may provide a unique test for the color-octet mechanism in nonrelativistic QCD.

  17. Diffractive hadroproduction of W{sup {+-}} and Z{sup 0} bosons at high energies

    SciTech Connect

    Ducati, M. B. Gay; Machado, M. M.; Machado, M. V. T.

    2008-10-13

    An analysis of W{sup {+-}} and Z{sup 0} hard diffractive hadroproduction at high energies is presented obtained using the simple assumption of Regge factorization and considering the recent diffractive parton density functions extracted by the H1 Collaboration at DESY-HERA. The corresponding multiple Pomeron exchange corrections to the single Pomeron one is considered by taking into account by a gap survival probability factor. It is shown that the ratio of diffractive to nondiffractive boson production is in good agreement with the Tevatron data. Estimations which are relevant for the incoming measurements at the LHC are discussed.

  18. Diffractive hadroproduction of W{sup {+-}} and Z{sup 0} bosons at high energies

    SciTech Connect

    Gay Ducati, M. B.; Machado, M. M.; Machado, M. V. T.

    2007-06-01

    Results from a phenomenological analysis of W and Z hard diffractive hadroproduction at high energies are reported. Using the Regge factorization approach, we consider the recent diffractive parton density functions extracted by the H1 Collaboration at DESY-HERA. In addition, we take into account multiple Pomeron exchange corrections considering a gap survival probability factor. It is found that the ratio of diffractive to nondiffractive boson production is in good agreement with the CDF and D0 data. We make predictions which could be compared to future measurements at the LHC.

  19. Magnetic domain imaging of nano-magnetic films using magnetic force microscopy with polar and longitudinally magnetized tips.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sy-Hann; Chang, Yu-Hsiang; Su, Chiung-Wu; Tsay, Jyh-Shen

    2016-10-01

    Perpendicular or parallel magnetic fields are used to magnetize the tips used in magnetic force microscopy (MFM). In this process, perpendicular or parallel magnetic dipole moments are produced on the tip plane, thus leading to the formation of polar magnetized tips (PM-tips) or longitudinally magnetized tips (LM-tips), respectively. The resolution of an MFM image of a magneto-optic disk is used for calibration of these tips, and the saturated magnetic fields of the PM- and LM-tips are found to be 2720 Oe and 680 Oe, respectively. Because both tips can simultaneously magnetize the sample during the scanning process when measuring a Co thin film, clear MFM images are captured, which enable the identification of magnetizable regions and the distribution of the magnetic domains on the sample surface. These results will be useful for improving the manufacturing processes required for soft nano-magnetic film production.

  20. Measurement of parity-violating spin asymmetries in W± production at midrapidity in longitudinally polarized p+p collisions

    DOE PAGES

    Adare, A.

    2016-03-23

    In this article, we present midrapidity measurements from the PHENIX experiment of large parity-violating single-spin asymmetries of high transverse momentum electrons and positrons from W±/Z decays, produced in longitudinally polarized p+p collisions at center of mass energies of √s=500 and 510 GeV. These asymmetries allow direct access to the antiquark polarized parton distribution functions due to the parity-violating nature of the W-boson coupling to quarks and antiquarks. The results presented are based on data collected in 2011, 2012, and 2013 with an integrated luminosity of 240 pb-1, which exceeds previous PHENIX published results by a factor of more than 27.more » In addition, these high Q2 data probe the parton structure of the proton at W mass scale and provide an important addition to our understanding of the antiquark parton helicity distribution functions at an intermediate Bjorken x value of roughly MW/√s=0.16.« less

  1. Precision Measurement of the Longitudinal Double-Spin Asymmetry for Inclusive Jet Production in Polarized Proton Collisions at sqrt[s]=200  GeV.

    PubMed

    Adamczyk, L; Adkins, J K; Agakishiev, G; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Alekseev, I; Alford, J; Anson, C D; Aparin, A; Arkhipkin, D; Aschenauer, E C; Averichev, G S; Banerjee, A; Beavis, D R; Bellwied, R; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bhattarai, P; Bichsel, H; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Bordyuzhin, I G; Borowski, W; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Brovko, S G; Bültmann, S; Bunzarov, I; Burton, T P; Butterworth, J; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Campbell, J M; Cebra, D; Cendejas, R; Cervantes, M C; Chaloupka, P; Chang, Z; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, J H; Chen, L; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Christie, W; Chwastowski, J; Codrington, M J M; Contin, G; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Cudd, A B; Cui, X; Das, S; Davila Leyva, A; De Silva, L C; Debbe, R R; Dedovich, T G; Deng, J; Derevschikov, A A; Derradi de Souza, R; Dhamija, S; di Ruzza, B; Didenko, L; Dilks, C; Ding, F; Djawotho, P; Dong, X; Drachenberg, J L; Draper, J E; Du, C M; Dunkelberger, L E; Dunlop, J C; Efimov, L G; Engelage, J; Engle, K S; Eppley, G; Eun, L; Evdokimov, O; Eyser, O; Fatemi, R; Fazio, S; Fedorisin, J; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flores, C E; Gagliardi, C A; Gangadharan, D R; Garand, D; Geurts, F; Gibson, A; Girard, M; Gliske, S; Greiner, L; Grosnick, D; Gunarathne, D S; Guo, Y; Gupta, A; Gupta, S; Guryn, W; Haag, B; Hamed, A; Han, L-X; Haque, R; Harris, J W; Heppelmann, S; Hirsch, A; Hoffmann, G W; Hofman, D J; Horvat, S; Huang, B; Huang, H Z; Huang, X; Huck, P; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Jacobs, W W; Jang, H; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kalinkin, D; Kang, K; Kauder, K; Ke, H W; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Kesich, A; Khan, Z H; Kikola, D P; Kisel, I; Kisiel, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Konzer, J; Koralt, I; Kosarzewski, L K; Kotchenda, L; Kraishan, A F; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kulakov, I; Kumar, L; Kycia, R A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Landry, K D; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, J H; LeVine, M J; Li, C; Li, W; Li, X; Li, X; Li, Y; Li, Z M; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Lomnitz, M; Longacre, R S; Luo, X; Ma, G L; Ma, Y G; Madagodagettige Don, D M M D; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Masui, H; Matis, H S; McDonald, D; McShane, T S; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mohanty, B; Mondal, M M; Morozov, D A; Mustafa, M K; Nandi, B K; Nasim, Md; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nigmatkulov, G; Nogach, L V; Noh, S Y; Novak, J; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Oh, K; Ohlson, A; Okorokov, V; Oldag, E W; Olvitt, D L; Pachr, M; Page, B S; Pal, S K; Pan, Y X; Pandit, Y; Panebratsev, Y; Pawlak, T; Pawlik, B; Pei, H; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Pile, P; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Poljak, N; Poniatowska, K; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Pruthi, N K; Przybycien, M; Pujahari, P R; Putschke, J; Qiu, H; Quintero, A; Ramachandran, S; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Riley, C K; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Ross, J F; Roy, A; Ruan, L; Rusnak, J; Rusnakova, O; Sahoo, N R; Sahu, P K; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sangaline, E; Sarkar, A; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmah, A M; Schmidke, W B; Schmitz, N; Seger, J; Seyboth, P; Shah, N; Shahaliev, E; Shanmuganathan, P V; Shao, M; Sharma, B; Shen, W Q; Shi, S S; Shou, Q Y; Sichtermann, E P; Singaraju, R N; Skoby, M J; Smirnov, D; Smirnov, N; Solanki, D; Sorensen, P; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, T D S; Stevens, J R; Stock, R; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Sumbera, M; Sun, X; Sun, X M; Sun, Y; Sun, Z; Surrow, B; Svirida, D N; Symons, T J M; Szelezniak, M A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tang, Z; Tarnowsky, T; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Tlusty, D; Tokarev, M; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tribedy, P; Trzeciak, B A; Tsai, O D; Turnau, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; van Nieuwenhuizen, G; Vandenbroucke, M; Vanfossen, J A; Varma, R; Vasconcelos, G M S; Vasiliev, A N; Vertesi, R; Videbæk, F; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Vossen, A; Wada, M; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, H; Wang, J S; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Wang, Y; Webb, G; Webb, J C; Westfall, G D; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wu, Y F; Xiao, Z; Xie, W; Xin, K; Xu, H; Xu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Q H; Xu, Y; Xu, Z; Yan, W; Yang, C; Yang, Y; Yang, Y; Ye, Z; Yepes, P; Yi, L; Yip, K; Yoo, I-K; Yu, N; Zawisza, Y; Zbroszczyk, H; Zha, W; Zhang, J B; Zhang, J L; Zhang, S; Zhang, X P; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, F; Zhao, J; Zhong, C; Zhu, X; Zhu, Y H; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zyzak, M

    2015-08-28

    We report a new measurement of the midrapidity inclusive jet longitudinal double-spin asymmetry, A_{LL}, in polarized pp collisions at center-of-mass energy sqrt[s]=200  GeV. The STAR data place stringent constraints on polarized parton distribution functions extracted at next-to-leading order from global analyses of inclusive deep-inelastic scattering (DIS), semi-inclusive DIS, and RHIC pp data. The measured asymmetries provide evidence at the 3σ level for positive gluon polarization in the Bjorken-x region x>0.05.

  2. Precision measurement of the longitudinal double-spin asymmetry for inclusive jet production in polarized proton collisions at √s = 200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Adamczyk, L.

    2015-08-26

    We report a new measurement of the midrapidity inclusive jet longitudinal double-spin asymmetry, ALL, in polarized pp collisions at center-of-mass energy √s = 200 GeV. The STAR data place stringent constraints on polarized parton distribution functions extracted at next-to-leading order from global analyses of inclusive deep-inelastic scattering (DIS), semi-inclusive DIS, and RHIC pp data. Lastly, the measured asymmetries provide evidence at the 3σ level for positive gluon polarization in the Bjorken-x region x > 0.05 .

  3. Precision measurement of the longitudinal double-spin asymmetry for inclusive jet production in polarized proton collisions at √s = 200 GeV

    DOE PAGES

    Adamczyk, L.

    2015-08-26

    We report a new measurement of the midrapidity inclusive jet longitudinal double-spin asymmetry, ALL, in polarized pp collisions at center-of-mass energy √s = 200 GeV. The STAR data place stringent constraints on polarized parton distribution functions extracted at next-to-leading order from global analyses of inclusive deep-inelastic scattering (DIS), semi-inclusive DIS, and RHIC pp data. Lastly, the measured asymmetries provide evidence at the 3σ level for positive gluon polarization in the Bjorken-x region x > 0.05 .

  4. Precision Measurement of the Longitudinal Double-Spin Asymmetry for Inclusive Jet Production in Polarized Proton Collisions at √{s }=200 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anson, C. D.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Averichev, G. S.; Banerjee, A.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Borowski, W.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A. V.; Brovko, S. G.; Bültmann, S.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Campbell, J. M.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, L.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Chwastowski, J.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Contin, G.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Cudd, A. B.; Cui, X.; Das, S.; Davila Leyva, A.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Derradi de Souza, R.; Dhamija, S.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Ding, F.; Djawotho, P.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Engelage, J.; Engle, K. S.; Eppley, G.; Eun, L.; Evdokimov, O.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Fedorisin, J.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Gliske, S.; Greiner, L.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, S.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hamed, A.; Han, L.-X.; Haque, R.; Harris, J. W.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Horvat, S.; Huang, B.; Huang, H. Z.; Huang, X.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jang, H.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kesich, A.; Khan, Z. H.; Kikola, D. P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Konzer, J.; Koralt, I.; Kosarzewski, L. K.; Kotchenda, L.; Kraishan, A. F.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, L.; Kycia, R. A.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, Z. M.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, X.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Madagodagettige Don, D. M. M. D.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Nogach, L. V.; Noh, S. Y.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Ohlson, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldag, E. W.; Olvitt, D. L.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Poniatowska, K.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Przybycien, M.; Pujahari, P. R.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Riley, C. K.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Ross, J. F.; Roy, A.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sangaline, E.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, B.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, D.; Smirnov, N.; Solanki, D.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stevens, J. R.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szelezniak, M. A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsai, O. D.; Turnau, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Vanfossen, J. A.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbæk, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Vossen, A.; Wada, M.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y. F.; Xiao, Z.; Xie, W.; Xin, K.; Xu, H.; Xu, J.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yan, W.; Yang, C.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Ye, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yu, N.; Zawisza, Y.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhao, F.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhu, X.; Zhu, Y. H.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zyzak, M.; STAR Collaboration

    2015-08-01

    We report a new measurement of the midrapidity inclusive jet longitudinal double-spin asymmetry, AL L, in polarized p p collisions at center-of-mass energy √{s }=200 GeV . The STAR data place stringent constraints on polarized parton distribution functions extracted at next-to-leading order from global analyses of inclusive deep-inelastic scattering (DIS), semi-inclusive DIS, and RHIC p p data. The measured asymmetries provide evidence at the 3 σ level for positive gluon polarization in the Bjorken-x region x >0.05 .

  5. Longitudinal double-spin asymmetry and cross section for inclusive jet production in polarized proton collisions at square root of s = 200 GeV.

    PubMed

    Abelev, B I; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Amonett, J; Anderson, B D; Anderson, M; Arkhipkin, D; Averichev, G S; Bai, Y; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellingeri-Laurikainen, A; Bellwied, R; Benedosso, F; Bhardwaj, S; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bichsel, H; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Blyth, S-L; Bonner, B E; Botje, M; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Bravar, A; Burton, T P; Bystersky, M; Cadman, R V; Cai, X Z; Caines, H; Sánchez, M Calderón de la Barca; Castillo, J; Catu, O; Cebra, D; Chajecki, Z; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, J H; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Cosentino, M R; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Das, D; Das, S; Dash, S; Daugherity, M; de Moura, M M; Dedovich, T G; Dephillips, M; Derevschikov, A A; Didenko, L; Dietel, T; Djawotho, P; Dogra, S M; Dong, W J; Dong, X; Draper, J E; Du, F; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Mazumdar, M R Dutta; Eckardt, V; Edwards, W R; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Estienne, M; Fachini, P; Fatemi, R; Fedorisin, J; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fine, V; Fisyak, Y; Fu, J; Gagliardi, C A; Gaillard, L; Ganti, M S; Ghazikhanian, V; Ghosh, P; Gonzalez, J E; Gorbunov, Y G; Gos, H; Grebenyuk, O; Grosnick, D; Guertin, S M; Guimaraes, K S F F; Gupta, N; Gutierrez, T D; Haag, B; Hallman, T J; Hamed, A; Harris, J W; He, W; Heinz, M; Henry, T W; Hepplemann, S; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffman, A M; Hoffmann, G W; Horner, M J; Huang, H Z; Huang, S L; Hughes, E W; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Jakl, P; Jia, F; Jiang, H; Jones, P G; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kang, K; Kapitan, J; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Khodyrev, V Yu; Kim, B C; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Kislov, E M; Klein, S R; Kocoloski, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Kouchpil, V; Kowalik, K L; Kramer, M; Kravtsov, P; Kravtsov, V I; Krueger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kumar, A; Kuznetsov, A A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; LaPointe, S; Laue, F; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, C-H; Lehocka, S; LeVine, M J; Li, C; Li, Q; Li, Y; Lin, G; Lin, X; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, H; Liu, J; Liu, L; Liu, Z; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Long, H; Longacre, R S; Love, W A; Lu, Y; Ludlam, T; Lynn, D; Ma, G L; Ma, J G; Ma, Y G; Magestro, D; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Mangotra, L K; Manweiler, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Martin, L; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McClain, C J; McShane, T S; Melnick, Yu; Meschanin, A; Millane, J; Miller, M L; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mironov, C; Mischke, A; Mishra, D K; Mitchell, J; Mohanty, B; Molnar, L; Moore, C F; Morozov, D A; Munhoz, M G; Nandi, B K; Nattrass, C; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Netrakanti, P K; Nogach, L V; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Pachr, M; Pal, S K; Panebratsev, Y; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Peitzmann, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Phatak, S C; Picha, R; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Poljak, N; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potekhin, M; Potrebenikova, E; Potukuchi, B V K S; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Putschke, J; Rakness, G; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reinnarth, J; Relyea, D; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Ruan, L; Russcher, M J; Sahoo, R; Sakuma, T; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sarsour, M; Sazhin, P S; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Seger, J; Selyuzhenkov, I; Seyboth, P; Shabetai, A; Shahaliev, E; Shao, M; Sharma, M; Shen, W Q; Shimanskiy, S S; Sichtermann, E P; Simon, F; Singaraju, R N; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sood, G; Sorensen, P; Sowinski, J; Speltz, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stadnik, A; Stanislaus, T D S; Stock, R; Stolpovsky, A; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Suaide, A A P; Sugarbaker, E; Sumbera, M; Sun, Z; Surrow, B; Swanger, M; Symons, T J M; Szanto de Toledo, A; Tai, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tarnowsky, T; Thein, D; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Timoshenko, S; Tokarev, M; Trainor, T A; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tsai, O D; Ulery, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Buren, G Van; van der Kolk, N; van Leeuwen, M; Molen, A M Vander; Varma, R; Vasilevski, I M; Vasiliev, A N; Vernet, R; Vigdor, S E; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Voloshin, S A; Waggoner, W T; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, J S; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Watson, J W; Webb, J C; Westfall, G D; Wetzler, A; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wood, J; Wu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Q H; Xu, Z; Yepes, P; Yoo, I-K; Yurevich, V I; Zhan, W; Zhang, H; Zhang, W M; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, Y; Zhong, C; Zoulkarneev, R; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zubarev, A N; Zuo, J X

    2006-12-22

    We report a measurement of the longitudinal double-spin asymmetry A(LL) and the differential cross section for inclusive midrapidity jet production in polarized proton collisions at square root of s = 200 GeV. The cross section data cover transverse momenta 5 < pT < 50 GeV/c and agree with next-to-leading order perturbative QCD evaluations. The A(LL) data cover 5 < pT < 17 GeV/c and disfavor at 98% C.L. maximal positive gluon polarization in the polarized nucleon.

  6. Complete Nonrelativistic-QCD Prediction for Prompt Double J /ψ Hadroproduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Zhi-Guo; Kniehl, Bernd A.

    2015-07-01

    We perform a complete study of prompt double J /ψ hadroproduction at leading order in the nonrelativistic-QCD factorization framework by including all possible pairings of the c c ¯ Fock states 1S0[8] , 3S1[1,8] , and 3PJ[1,8] with J =0 ,1 ,2 . We find that the 1S0[8] and 3PJ[8] channels of J /ψ and ψ' production and the 3PJ[1] and 3S1[8] channels of χc J production, which have been overlooked so far, greatly dominate at large invariant masses and rapidity separations of the J /ψ pair, and that their inclusion nearly fills the large gap between previous incomplete predictions within the color-singlet model and the recent measurement by the CMS Collaboration at the CERN LHC, leaving room for next-to-leading-order corrections of typical size.

  7. Longitudinal fecal hormone analysis for monitoring reproductive activity in the female polar bear (Ursus maritimus).

    PubMed

    Stoops, M A; MacKinnon, K M; Roth, T L

    2012-12-01

    The objective was to identify suitable enzyme immunoassays to monitor gonadal and placental function in the female polar bear. Immunoreactive progesterone, progesterone metabolite (PdG), estrogen, and androgen metabolite (T) concentrations were measured in fecal samples collected over 24 mo from captive female bears (N = 20). Whereas fecal extracts produced displacement curves parallel to the standard curve for each respective steroid, T and PdG more accurately reflected reproductive events. Concentrations of fecal T increased (P < 0.05) during the breeding season, and brief spikes were associated with estrus and mating. A postovulatory increase in PdG was not always detected, but sustained baseline T after mating appeared consistent with ovulation. Parturient bears excreted higher PdG concentrations (P < 0.05) during expected time of embryo implantation in Fall, and a late gestational rise in fecal T occurred 30 days prepartum. Many nonparturient bears also had a PdG rise in the Fall, suggesting they experienced either pregnancy loss or a pseudopregnancy. Differentiating pregnant and pseudopregnant states was not achieved using fecal PdG alone, but when combined with fecal T, comprehensive diagnoses could be made. Nonparturient bears demonstrated elevated (P < 0.05) fecal T during summer months, whereas parturient bears did not. In summary, noninvasive hormone monitoring techniques were established for the female polar bear. Although this study was directed at facilitating management and breeding efforts of captive polar bears, the methods could be applied to studies of reproductive function in wild populations. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. DVCS with longitudinally polarized target using CLAS at 6 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Biselli, Angela

    2009-08-04

    Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS) is one of the simplest processes that can be described in terms of Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs). The target single-spin asymmetry (target SSA) in the reaction ep-vector{yields}ep{gamma} is directly proportional to the imaginary part of the DVCS amplitude, and gives access to a combination of GPDs namely H-tilde, H, and E. This asymmetry will be measured in a dedicated experiment at Jefferson Lab using the CEBAF 6-GeV polarized electron beam, a polarized solid-state {sup 14}NH{sub 3} target, and the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) together with the Inner Calorimeter (IC). The expected asymmetry from leading-order calculations is in the range of 20% to 40%, depending on the kinematics and on the GPD model used. The DVCS amplitude will be mapped out in the Q{sup 2} region from 1 to 4 GeV{sup 2}, x{sub B} from 0.15 to 0.55 and -t from 0.1 to 2 GeV{sup 2} providing new constraints on the GPDs.

  9. DVCS with longitudinally polarized target using CLAS at 6 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Angela Biselli

    2009-08-01

    Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS) is one of the simplest processes that can be described in terms of Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs). The target single-spin asymmetry (target SSA) in the reaction $e\\vec{p} \\rightarrow e p \\gamma$ is directly proportional to the imaginary part of the DVCS amplitude, and gives access to a combination of GPDs namely $\\tilde H$, $H$, and $E$. This asymmetry will be measured in a dedicated experiment at Jefferson Lab using the CEBAF 6-GeV polarized electron beam, a polarized solid-state ${}^{14}NH_3$ target, and the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) together with the Inner Calorimeter (IC). The expected asymmetry from leading-order calculations is in the range of 20\\% to 40\\%, depending on the kinematics and on the GPD model used. The DVCS amplitude will be mapped out in the $Q^2$ region from 1 to 4 GeV${}^2$, $x_B$ from 0.15 to 0.55 and $-t$ from 0.1 to 2 GeV${}^2$ providing new constraints on the GPDs.

  10. Longitudinal, 3D Imaging of Collagen Remodeling in Murine Hypertrophic Scars In Vivo Using Polarization-Sensitive Optical Frequency Domain Imaging.

    PubMed

    Lo, William C Y; Villiger, Martin; Golberg, Alexander; Broelsch, G Felix; Khan, Saiqa; Lian, Christine G; Austen, William G; Yarmush, Martin; Bouma, Brett E

    2016-01-01

    Hypertrophic scars (HTS), frequently seen after traumatic injuries and surgery, remain a major clinical challenge because of the limited success of existing therapies. A significant obstacle to understanding HTS etiology is the lack of tools to monitor scar remodeling longitudinally and noninvasively. We present an in vivo, label-free technique using polarization-sensitive optical frequency domain imaging for the 3D, longitudinal assessment of collagen remodeling in murine HTS. In this study, HTS was induced with a mechanical tension device for 4-10 days on incisional wounds and imaged up to 1 month after device removal; an excisional HTS model was also imaged at 6 months after injury to investigate deeper and more mature scars. We showed that local retardation and degree of polarization provide a robust signature for HTS. Compared with normal skin with heterogeneous local retardation and low degree of polarization, HTS was characterized by an initially low local retardation, which increased as collagen fibers remodeled, and a persistently high degree of polarization. This study demonstrates that polarization-sensitive optical frequency domain imaging offers a powerful tool to gain significant biological insights into HTS remodeling by enabling longitudinal assessment of collagen in vivo, which is critical to elucidating HTS etiology and developing more effective HTS therapies.

  11. A Spin-Light Polarimeter for Multi-GeV Longitudinally Polarized Electron Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Mohanmurthy, Prajwal; Dutta, Dipangkar

    2014-02-01

    The physics program at the upgraded Jefferson Lab (JLab) and the physics program envisioned for the proposed electron-ion collider (EIC) include large efforts to search for interactions beyond the Standard Model (SM) using parity violation in electroweak interactions. These experiments require precision electron polarimetry with an uncertainty of < 0.5 %. The spin dependent Synchrotron radiation, called "spin-light," can be used to monitor the electron beam polarization. In this article we develop a conceptual design for a "spin-light" polarimeter that can be used at a high intensity, multi-GeV electron accelerator. We have also built a Geant4 based simulation for a prototype device and report some of the results from these simulations.

  12. Second-Born-approximation corrections to the electroweak asymmetry of the cross section for elastic scattering of longitudinally polarized electrons by nuclei of finite size

    SciTech Connect

    Kerimov, B.K.; Safin, M.Y.

    1988-01-01

    Second-Born-approximation corrections to the cross section and right-left asymmetry are calculated for scattering of longitudinally polarized electrons by nuclei with arbitrary spin. Besides a purely electromagnetic contribution, the corrections contain an electroweak contribution resulting from interference between the Coulomb moments and the longitudinal and transverse dipole moments of the target nucleus. Simple expressions are obtained for the corrections by evaluating the angular parts of certain integrals in the logarithmic approximation. The behavior of the corrections is studied for the example /sup 11/B for incident-electron energies Eapprox. <200 MeV.

  13. Switchable single-longitudinal-mode dual-wavelength erbium-doped fiber laser based on one polarization-maintaining fiber Bragg grating incorporating saturable absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Suchun; Xu, Ou; Lu, Shaohua; Chen, Ming; Jian, Shuisheng

    2009-08-01

    Switchable single-longitudinal-mode (SLM) dual-wavelength erbium-doped fiber laser at room temperature is demonstrated. One fiber Bragg grating (FBG) directly written in a polarization-maintaining and photosensitive erbiumdoped fiber (PMPEDF) as the wavelength-selective component is used in a linear laser cavity. Due to the polarization hole burning (PHB) enhanced by the polarization-maintaining fiber Bragg grating (PMFBG), the laser can be designed to operate in stable dual-wavelength or wavelength-switching modes with a wavelength spacing of 0.202 nm by adjusting a polarization controller (PC). The stable SLM operation is guaranteed by a saturable absorber (SA). The optical signal-tonoise ratio (OSNR) of the laser is over 40 dB. The amplitude variation in nearly one and half an hour is less than 0.5 dB for both wavelengths.

  14. Suppressing longitudinal double-layer oscillations by using elliptically polarized laser pulses in the hole-boring radiation pressure acceleration regime

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Dong; Yan, X. Q.; Zheng, C. Y.; Zhou, C. T.; He, X. T.; Yu, M. Y.

    2013-02-15

    It is shown that well collimated mono-energetic ion beams with a large particle number can be generated in the hole-boring radiation pressure acceleration regime by using an elliptically polarized laser pulse with appropriate theoretically determined laser polarization ratio. Due to the J Multiplication-Sign B effect, the double-layer charge separation region is imbued with hot electrons that prevent ion pileup, thus suppressing the double-layer oscillations. The proposed mechanism is well confirmed by Particle-in-Cell simulations, and after suppressing the longitudinal double-layer oscillations, the ion beams driven by the elliptically polarized lasers own much better energy spectrum than those by circularly polarized lasers.

  15. Large-scale Observations of a Subauroral Polarization Stream by Midlatitude SuperDARN Radars: Instantaneous Longitudinal Velocity Variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clausen, L. B. N.; Baker, J. B. H.; Sazykin, S.; Ruohoniemi, J. M.; Greenwald, R. A.; Thomas, E. J.; Shepherd, S. G.; Talaat, E. R.; Bristow, W. A.; Zheng, Y.; Coster, A. J.

    2012-01-01

    We present simultaneous measurements of flow velocities inside a subauroral polarization stream (SAPS) made by six midlatitude high-frequency SuperDARN radars. The instantaneous observations cover three hours of universal time and six hours of magnetic local time (MLT). From velocity variations across the field-of-view of the radars we infer the local 2D flow direction at three different longitudes. We find that the local flow direction inside the SAPS channel is remarkably constant over the course of the event. The flow speed, however, shows significant temporal and spatial variations. After correcting for the radar look direction we are able to accurately determine the dependence of the SAPS velocity on magnetic local time. We find that the SAPS velocity variation with magnetic local time is best described by an exponential function. The average velocity at 00 MLT was 1.2 km/s and it decreased with a spatial e-folding scale of two hours of MLT toward the dawn sector. We speculate that the longitudinal distribution of pressure gradients in the ring current is responsible for this dependence and find these observations in good agreement with results from ring current models. Using TEC measurements we find that the high westward velocities of the SAPS are - as expected - located in a region of low TEC values, indicating low ionospheric conductivities.

  16. Application of the principle of maximum conformality to the hadroproduction of the Higgs boson at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Sheng-Quan; Wu, Xing-Gang; Brodsky, Stanley J.; Mojaza, Matin

    2016-09-09

    We present improved perturbative QCD (pQCD) predictions for Higgs boson hadroproduction at the LHC by applying the principle of maximum conformality (PMC), a procedure which resums the pQCD series using the renormalization group (RG), thereby eliminating the dependence of the predictions on the choice of the renormalization scheme while minimizing sensitivity to the initial choice of the renormalization scale. In previous pQCD predictions for Higgs boson hadroproduction, it has been conventional to assume that the renormalization scale μ r of the QCD coupling α s ( μ r ) is the Higgs mass and then to vary this choice over the range 1 / 2 m H < μ r < 2 m H in order to estimate the theory uncertainty. However, this error estimate is only sensitive to the nonconformal β terms in the pQCD series, and thus it fails to correctly estimate the theory uncertainty in cases where a pQCD series has large higher-order contributions, as is the case for Higgs boson hadroproduction. Furthermore, this ad hoc choice of scale and range gives pQCD predictions which depend on the renormalization scheme being used, in contradiction to basic RG principles. In contrast, after applying the PMC, we obtain next-to-next-to-leading-order RG resummed pQCD predictions for Higgs boson hadroproduction which are renormalization-scheme independent and have minimal sensitivity to the choice of the initial renormalization scale. Taking m H = 125 GeV , the PMC predictions for the p p → H X Higgs inclusive hadroproduction cross sections for various LHC center-of-mass energies are σ Incl | 7 TeV = 21.2 1 + 1.36 - 1.32 pb , σ Incl | 8 TeV = 27.3 7 + 1.65 - 1.59 pb , and σ Incl | 13 TeV = 65.7 2 + 3.46 - 3.0 pb . We also predict the fiducial cross section σ fid ( p p → H → γ γ ) : σ fid | 7 TeV = 30.1 + 2.3 - 2.2 fb , σ fid | 8 TeV = 38.3 + 2.9 - 2.8 fb , and σ fid | 13 TeV = 85.8 + 5.7 - 5.3 fb . The error limits in these predictions include the small residual high

  17. Leading and next-to-leading order gluon polarization in the nucleon and longitudinal double spin asymmetries from open charm muoproduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adolph, C.; Alekseev, M. G.; Alexakhin, V. Yu.; Alexandrov, Yu.; Alexeev, G. D.; Amoroso, A.; Antonov, A. A.; Austregesilo, A.; Badełek, B.; Balestra, F.; Barth, J.; Baum, G.; Bedfer, Y.; Berlin, A.; Bernhard, J.; Bertini, R.; Bettinelli, M.; Bicker, K.; Bieling, J.; Birsa, R.; Bisplinghoff, J.; Bordalo, P.; Bradamante, F.; Braun, C.; Bravar, A.; Bressan, A.; Büchele, M.; Burtin, E.; Capozza, L.; Chiosso, M.; Chung, S. U.; Cicuttin, A.; Crespo, M. L.; Dalla Torre, S.; Das, S.; Dasgupta, S. S.; Dasgupta, S.; Denisov, O. Yu.; Dhara, L.; Donskov, S. V.; Doshita, N.; Duic, V.; Dünnweber, W.; Dziewiecki, M.; Efremov, A.; Elia, C.; Eversheim, P. D.; Eyrich, W.; Faessler, M.; Ferrero, A.; Filin, A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M., Jr.; Fischer, H.; Franco, C.; du Fresne von Hohenesche, N.; Friedrich, J. M.; Frolov, V.; Garfagnini, R.; Gautheron, F.; Gavrichtchouk, O. P.; Gerassimov, S.; Geyer, R.; Giorgi, M.; Gnesi, I.; Gobbo, B.; Goertz, S.; Grabmüller, S.; Grasso, A.; Grube, B.; Gushterski, R.; Guskov, A.; Guthörl, T.; Haas, F.; von Harrach, D.; Heinsius, F. H.; Herrmann, F.; Heß, C.; Hinterberger, F.; Horikawa, N.; Höppner, Ch.; d'Hose, N.; Huber, S.; Ishimoto, S.; Ivanov, O.; Ivanshin, Yu.; Iwata, T.; Jahn, R.; Jary, V.; Jasinski, P.; Joosten, R.; Kabuß, E.; Kang, D.; Ketzer, B.; Khaustov, G. V.; Khokhlov, Yu. A.; Kisselev, Yu.; Klein, F.; Klimaszewski, K.; Koblitz, S.; Koivuniemi, J. H.; Kolosov, V. N.; Kondo, K.; Königsmann, K.; Konorov, I.; Konstantinov, V. F.; Korzenev, A.; Kotzinian, A. M.; Kouznetsov, O.; Krämer, M.; Kroumchtein, Z. V.; Kunne, F.; Kurek, K.; Lauser, L.; Lednev, A. A.; Lehmann, A.; Levorato, S.; Lichtenstadt, J.; Liska, T.; Maggiora, A.; Magnon, A.; Makke, N.; Mallot, G. K.; Mann, A.; Marchand, C.; Martin, A.; Marzec, J.; Matsuda, T.; Meshcheryakov, G.; Meyer, W.; Michigami, T.; Mikhailov, Yu. V.; Morreale, A.; Mutter, A.; Nagaytsev, A.; Nagel, T.; Nerling, F.; Neubert, S.; Neyret, D.; Nikolaenko, V. I.; Nowak, W.-D.; Nunes, A. S.; Olshevsky, A. G.; Ostrick, M.; Padee, A.; Panknin, R.; Panzieri, D.; Parsamyan, B.; Paul, S.; Perevalova, E.; Pesaro, G.; Peshekhonov, D. V.; Piragino, G.; Platchkov, S.; Pochodzalla, J.; Polak, J.; Polyakov, V. A.; Pretz, J.; Quaresma, M.; Quintans, C.; Rajotte, J.-F.; Ramos, S.; Rapatsky, V.; Reicherz, G.; Rocco, E.; Rondio, E.; Rossiyskaya, N. S.; Ryabchikov, D. I.; Samoylenko, V. D.; Sandacz, A.; Sapozhnikov, M. G.; Sarkar, S.; Savin, I. A.; Sbrizzai, G.; Schiavon, P.; Schill, C.; Schlüter, T.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, K.; Schmitt, L.; Schmïden, H.; Schönning, K.; Schopferer, S.; Schott, M.; Shevchenko, O. Yu.; Silva, L.; Sinha, L.; Sissakian, A. N.; Slunecka, M.; Smirnov, G. I.; Sosio, S.; Sozzi, F.; Srnka, A.; Steiger, L.; Stolarski, M.; Sulc, M.; Sulej, R.; Suzuki, H.; Sznajder, P.; Takekawa, S.; Ter Wolbeek, J.; Tessaro, S.; Tessarotto, F.; Tkatchev, L. G.; Uhl, S.; Uman, I.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Virius, M.; Vlassov, N. V.; Wang, L.; Weisrock, T.; Wilfert, M.; Windmolders, R.; Wiślicki, W.; Wollny, H.; Zaremba, K.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zemlyanichkina, E.; Ziembicki, M.; Zhuravlev, N.; Zvyagin, A.

    2013-03-01

    The gluon polarization in the nucleon was measured using open charm production by scattering 160GeV/c polarized muons off longitudinally polarized protons or deuterons. The data were taken by the COMPASS Collaboration between 2002 and 2007. A detailed account is given of the analysis method that includes the application of neural networks. Several decay channels of D0 mesons are investigated. Longitudinal spin asymmetries of the D meson production cross sections are extracted in bins of D0 transverse momentum and energy. At leading order QCD accuracy, the average gluon polarization is determined as ⟨Δg/g⟩LO=-0.06±0.21(stat.)±0.08(syst.) at the scale ⟨μ2⟩≈13(GeV/c)2 and an average gluon momentum fraction ⟨x⟩≈0.11. The average gluon polarization is also obtained at next-to-leading order QCD accuracy as ⟨Δg/g⟩ NLO=-0.13±0.15(stat.)±0.15(syst.) at the scale ⟨μ2⟩≈13(GeV/c)2 and ⟨x⟩≈0.20.

  18. High-aperture binary axicons for the formation of the longitudinal electric field component on the optical axis for linear and circular polarizations of the illuminating beam

    SciTech Connect

    Khonina, S. N. Savelyev, D. A.

    2013-10-15

    Diffraction of uniformly polarized laser beams with vortex phase singularity is theoretically analyzed using the plane wave expansion. It is shown that for a high numerical aperture, an intense longitudinal electric field component is formed on the optical axis in this case. It is numerically demonstrated that an analogous effect is ensured for diffraction of a conventional Gaussian beam from asymmetric binary axicons. The field intensity on the optical axis can be varied either by rotating the optical element or by changing the direction of polarization of radiation.

  19. Longitudinal double-spin asymmetry and cross section for inclusivejet production in polarized proton collisions at sqrt(s) = 200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Abelev, B.I.; Adams, J.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett,J.; Anderson, B.D.; Anderson, M.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G.S.; Bai,Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L.S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V.V.; Bellingeri-Laurikainen, A.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A.K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L.C.; Blyth, S.-L.; Bonner, B.E.; Botje, M.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A.V.; Bravar, A.; Bystersky, M.; Cadman, R.V.; Cai,X.Z.; Caines, H.; Calderon de la Barca Sanchez, M.; Castillo, J.; Catu,O.; Cebra, D.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen,H.F.; Chen, J.H.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J.P.; Cormier, T.M.; Cosentino, M.R.; Cramer, J.G.; Crawford,H.J.; Das, D.; Das, S.; Daugherity, M.; de Moura, M.M.; Dedovich, T.G.; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Djawotho,P.; Dogra, S.M.; Dong, W.J.; Dong, X.; Draper, J.E.; Du, F.; Dunin, V.B.; Dunlop, J.C.; Dutta Mazumdar, M.R.; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, W.R.; Efimov,L.G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch,E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C.A.; Gaillard, L.; Ganti,M.S.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, J.S.; Gorbunov, Y.G.; Gos,H.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, S.M.; Guimaraes, K.S.F.F.; Guo,Y.; Gupta, N.; Gutierrez, T.D.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T.J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J.W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T.W.; Hepplemann, S.; Hippolyte,B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A.M.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Horner, M.J.; Huang, H.Z.; Huang, S.L.; Hughes, E.W.; Humanic, T.J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs,P.; Jacobs, W.W.; Jakl, P.; Jia, F.; Jiang, H.; Jones, P.G.; Judd, E.G.; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khodyrev, V.Yu.; Kim, B.C.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kislov, E.M.; Klein,S.R.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D.D.; et al.

    2006-08-10

    We report a measurement of the longitudinal double-spinasymmetry A_LL and the differential cross section for inclusivemidrapidity jet production in polarized proton collisions at sqrt(s)=200GeV. The cross section data cover transverse momenta 5polarization in the polarizednucleon.

  20. Longitudinal Spin Transfer to Lambda and Anti-Lambda Hyperons Produced in Polarized Proton-Proton Collisions at Center of Mass Energy = 200 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cendejas, Ramon

    Studies on the spin structure of the proton have been an active area of research; after the EMC experiment and subsequent experiments found that only about 30% of the total proton spin is carried by quark spins. The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is the world's first and only polarized proton collider. The Solenoidal Tracker At RHIC (STAR) has full azimuthal acceptance and is ideally suited to advance studies of the proton spin. The longitudinal spin transfer, DLL, of lambda and anti-lambda hyperons in longitudinally polarized proton-proton collisions is sensitive to quark and anti-quark polarization in the polarized proton; as well as to polarized fragmentation; and has been proposed as a possible probe of (anti-)strange quark polarization. The STAR collaboration has previously reported an initial proof-of-concept measurement of DLL of lambda and anti-lambda hyperons from a data sample obtained at sqr(s)=200 GeV in 2005. The data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 2 pb- with 50% beam polarization. Considerably larger data samples corresponding to 6.5 pb- and 25 pb- with beam polarizations of 57% at sqr(s)=200 GeV were obtained in 2006 and 2009 using an upgraded instrument. Improvements were made on the analysis procedure to reduce background contribution to the lambda + anti-lambda measurements. These new measurements of DLL form the main topic of this dissertation. The sample of hyperons residing within a jet that triggered the experiment are classified as near-side hyperons, and are analyzed separately from an away-side sample that has similar precision. In addition to DLL, the double longitudinal spin asymmetry, A LL, for the production of lambda and anti-lambda hyperons has been extracted. The dependences of DLL on pseudo-rapidity, pT , and the fragmentation ratio, z, are studied. The stated DLL from lambda and anti-lambda each disfavor one of the published model predictions for DLL for a combined lambda and anti-lambda sample, and are

  1. Complete Nonrelativistic-QCD Prediction for Prompt Double J/ψ Hadroproduction.

    PubMed

    He, Zhi-Guo; Kniehl, Bernd A

    2015-07-10

    We perform a complete study of prompt double J/ψ hadroproduction at leading order in the nonrelativistic-QCD factorization framework by including all possible pairings of the cc̅ Fock states (1)S(0)([8]), (3)S(1)([1,8]), and (3)P(J)([1,8]) with J=0,1,2. We find that the (1)S(0)([8]) and (3)P(J)([8]) channels of J/ψ and ψ'} production and the (3)P(J)([1]) and (3)S(1)([8]) channels of χ(cJ) production, which have been overlooked so far, greatly dominate at large invariant masses and rapidity separations of the J/ψ pair, and that their inclusion nearly fills the large gap between previous incomplete predictions within the color-singlet model and the recent measurement by the CMS Collaboration at the CERN LHC, leaving room for next-to-leading-order corrections of typical size.

  2. Measurement of the parity-violating longitudinal single-spin asymmetry for W+- boson production in polarized proton-proton collisions at sqrt s = 500 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Aggarwal, M.M.; Dunlop, J.; et al.

    2011-02-11

    We report the first measurement of the parity-violating single-spin asymmetries for midrapidity decay positrons and electrons from W{sup +} and W{sup -} boson production in longitudinally polarized proton-proton collisions at {radical}s = 500 GeV by the STAR experiment at RHIC. The measured asymmetries, A{sub L}{sup W+} = -0.27 {+-} 0.10(stat.) {+-} 0.02(syst.) {+-} 0.03(norm.) and A{sub L}{sup W-} = 0.14 {+-} 0.19(stat.) {+-} 0.02(syst.) {+-} 0.01(norm.), are consistent with theory predictions, which are large and of opposite sign. These predictions are based on polarized quark and antiquark distribution functions constrained by polarized deep-inelastic scattering measurements.

  3. Comparing identified and statistically significant lipids and polar metabolites in 15-year old serum and dried blood spot samples for longitudinal studies.

    PubMed

    Kyle, Jennifer E; Casey, Cameron P; Stratton, Kelly G; Zink, Erika M; Kim, Young-Mo; Zheng, Xueyun; Monroe, Matthew E; Weitz, Karl K; Bloodsworth, Kent J; Orton, Daniel J; Ibrahim, Yehia M; Moore, Ronald J; Lee, Christine G; Pedersen, Catherine; Orwoll, Eric; Smith, Richard D; Burnum-Johnson, Kristin E; Baker, Erin S

    2017-03-15

    The use of dried blood spots (DBS) has many advantages over traditional plasma and serum samples such as the smaller blood volume required, storage at room temperature, and ability to sample in remote locations. However, understanding the robustness of different analytes in DBS samples is essential, especially in older samples collected for longitudinal studies. Here we analyzed the stability of polar metabolites and lipids in DBS samples collected in 2000-2001 and stored at room temperature. The identified and statistically significant molecules were then compared to matched serum samples stored at -80°C to determine if the DBS samples could be effectively used in a longitudinal study following metabolic disease. A total of 400 polar metabolites and lipids were identified in the serum and DBS samples using gas chromatograph/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), liquid chromatography (LC)/MS, and LC/ion mobility spectrometry-MS (LC/IMS-MS). The identified polar metabolites overlapped well between the sample types, though only one statistically significant metabolite was conserved in a case-control study of older diabetic males with low amounts of high-density lipoproteins and high body mass indices, triacylglycerides and glucose levels when compared to non-diabetic patients with normal levels, indicating that degradation in the DBS samples affects polar metabolite quantitation. Differences in the lipid identifications indicated that some oxidation occurs in the DBS samples. However, 36 statistically significant lipids correlated in both sample types. The difference in the number of statistically significant polar metabolites and lipids indicated that the lipids did not degrade to as great of a degree as the polar metabolites in the DBS samples and lipid quantitation was still possible. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Longitudinal, 3D Imaging of Collagen Remodeling in Murine Hypertrophic Scars In Vivo using Polarization-sensitive Optical Frequency Domain Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lo, William C. Y.; Villiger, Martin; Golberg, Alexander; Broelsch, G. Felix; Khan, Saiqa; Lian, Christine G.; Austen, William G.; Yarmush, Martin; Bouma, Brett E.

    2016-01-01

    Hypertrophic scars (HTS), frequently seen after traumatic injuries and surgery, remain a major clinical challenge due to the limited success of existing therapies. A significant obstacle to understanding HTS etiology is the lack of tools to monitor scar remodeling longitudinally and non-invasively. We present an in vivo, label-free technique using polarization-sensitive optical frequency domain imaging (PS-OFDI) for the 3D, longitudinal assessment of collagen remodeling in murine HTS. In this study, HTS was induced with a mechanical tension device for 4 to 10 days on incisional wounds and imaged up to one month after device removal; an excisional HTS model was also imaged at 6 months after injury to investigate deeper and more mature scars. We showed that local retardation (LR) and degree of polarization (DOP) provide a robust signature for HTS. Compared to normal skin with heterogeneous LR and low DOP, HTS was characterized by an initially low LR, which increased as collagen fibers remodeled, and a persistently high DOP. This study demonstrates that PS-OFDI offers a powerful tool to gain significant biological insights into HTS remodeling by enabling longitudinal assessment of collagen in vivo, which is critical to elucidating HTS etiology and developing more effective HTS therapies. PMID:26763427

  5. Measurements of double-helicity asymmetries in inclusive J /ψ production in longitudinally polarized p +p collisions at √{s }=510 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adare, A.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Akimoto, R.; Alfred, M.; Apadula, N.; Aramaki, Y.; Asano, H.; Atomssa, E. T.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Bandara, N. S.; Bannier, B.; Barish, K. N.; Bathe, S.; Bazilevsky, A.; Beaumier, M.; Beckman, S.; Belmont, R.; Berdnikov, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Black, D.; Blau, D. S.; Bok, J. S.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Bryslawskyj, J.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Campbell, S.; Chen, C.-H.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choi, J. B.; Chujo, T.; Citron, Z.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Danley, T. W.; Datta, A.; Daugherity, M. S.; David, G.; Deblasio, K.; Dehmelt, K.; Denisov, A.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Ding, L.; Dion, A.; Diss, P. B.; Do, J. H.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; Enokizono, A.; En'yo, H.; Esumi, S.; Fadem, B.; Feege, N.; Fields, D. E.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fokin, S. L.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Gal, C.; Gallus, P.; Garg, P.; Ge, H.; Giordano, F.; Glenn, A.; Goto, Y.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gu, Y.; Gunji, T.; Guragain, H.; Hachiya, T.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamilton, H. F.; Han, S. Y.; Hanks, J.; Hasegawa, S.; Haseler, T. O. S.; Hashimoto, K.; He, X.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hill, J. C.; Hollis, R. S.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Hoshino, T.; Hotvedt, N.; Huang, J.; Huang, S.; Ikeda, Y.; Imai, K.; Imazu, Y.; Inaba, M.; Iordanova, A.; Isenhower, D.; Ivanishchev, D.; Jacak, B. V.; Jeon, S. J.; Jezghani, M.; Jia, J.; Jiang, X.; Johnson, B. M.; Joo, E.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Jumper, D. S.; Kanda, S.; Kang, J. H.; Kang, J. S.; Kawall, D.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Key, J. A.; Khachatryan, V.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kihara, K.; Kim, C.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E.-J.; Kim, G. W.; Kim, H.-J.; Kim, M.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimelman, B.; Kistenev, E.; Kitamura, R.; Klatsky, J.; Kleinjan, D.; Kline, P.; Koblesky, T.; Kofarago, M.; Komkov, B.; Koster, J.; Kotov, D.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kwon, Y.; Lacey, R.; Lajoie, J. G.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, S.; Lee, S. H.; Leitch, M. J.; Leitgab, M.; Li, X.; Lim, S. H.; Liu, M. X.; Lynch, D.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Makek, M.; Manion, A.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; McGlinchey, D.; McKinney, C.; Meles, A.; Mendoza, M.; Meredith, B.; Miake, Y.; Mignerey, A. C.; Miller, A. J.; Milov, A.; Mishra, D. K.; Mitchell, J. T.; Miyasaka, S.; Mizuno, S.; Mohanty, A. K.; Montuenga, P.; Moon, T.; Morrison, D. P.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Murakami, T.; Murata, J.; Mwai, A.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagashima, K.; Nagle, J. L.; Nagy, M. I.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakagomi, H.; Nakano, K.; Nattrass, C.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Nihashi, M.; Niida, T.; Nishimura, S.; Nouicer, R.; Novák, T.; Novitzky, N.; Nyanin, A. S.; O'Brien, E.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Orjuela Koop, J. D.; Osborn, J. D.; Oskarsson, A.; Ozawa, K.; Pak, R.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, J. S.; Park, S.; Pate, S. F.; Patel, L.; Patel, M.; Peng, J.-C.; Perepelitsa, D. V.; Perera, G. D. N.; Peressounko, D. Yu.; Perry, J.; Petti, R.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pinson, R.; Pisani, R. P.; Purschke, M. L.; Rak, J.; Ramson, B. J.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Reynolds, D.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Rinn, T.; Riveli, N.; Roach, D.; Rolnick, S. D.; Rosati, M.; Rowan, Z.; Rubin, J. G.; Sahlmueller, B.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sako, H.; Samsonov, V.; Sarsour, M.; Sato, S.; Sawada, S.; Schaefer, B.; Schmoll, B. K.; Sedgwick, K.; Seele, J.; Seidl, R.; Sen, A.; Seto, R.; Sett, P.; Sexton, A.; Sharma, D.; Shein, I.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Shukla, P.; Sickles, A.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Singh, B. K.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Slunečka, M.; Snowball, M.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Sourikova, I. V.; Stankus, P. W.; Stepanov, M.; Stoll, S. P.; Sugitate, T.; Sukhanov, A.; Sumita, T.; Sun, J.; Sziklai, J.; Takahara, A.; Taketani, A.; Tanida, K.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Tarafdar, S.; Taranenko, A.; Tieulent, R.; Timilsina, A.; Todoroki, T.; Tomášek, M.; Torii, H.; Towell, C. L.; Towell, M.; Towell, R.; Towell, R. S.; Tserruya, I.; van Hecke, H. W.; Vargyas, M.; Velkovska, J.; Virius, M.; Vrba, V.; Vznuzdaev, E.; Wang, X. R.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, Y.; Watanabe, Y. S.; Wei, F.; Whitaker, S.; White, A. S.; Wolin, S.; Woody, C. L.; Wysocki, M.; Xia, B.; Xue, L.; Yalcin, S.; Yamaguchi, Y. L.; Yanovich, A.; Yoo, J. H.; Yoon, I.; Younus, I.; Yu, H.; Yushmanov, I. E.; Zajc, W. A.; Zelenski, A.; Zhou, S.; Zou, L.; Phenix Collaboration

    2016-12-01

    We report the double-helicity asymmetry, ALL J /ψ, in inclusive J /ψ production at forward rapidity as a function of transverse momentum pT and rapidity |y |. The data analyzed were taken during √{s }=510 GeV longitudinally polarized p +p collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider in the 2013 run using the PHENIX detector. At this collision energy, J /ψ particles are predominantly produced through gluon-gluon scatterings, thus ALL J /ψ is sensitive to the gluon polarization inside the proton. We measured ALL J /ψ by detecting the decay daughter muon pairs μ+μ- within the PHENIX muon spectrometers in the rapidity range 1.2 <|y |<2.2 . In this kinematic range, we measured the ALL J /ψ to be 0.012 ±0.010 (stat) ±0.003 (syst). The ALL J /ψ can be expressed to be proportional to the product of the gluon polarization distributions at two distinct ranges of Bjorken x : one at moderate range x ≈5 ×10-2 where recent data of jet and π0 double helicity spin asymmetries have shown evidence for significant gluon polarization, and the other one covering the poorly known small-x region x ≈2 ×10-3. Thus our new results could be used to further constrain the gluon polarization for x <5 ×10-2.

  6. Measurements of double-helicity asymmetries in inclusive J/ψ production in longitudinally polarized p+p collisions at s=510 GeV

    DOE PAGES

    Adare, A.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; ...

    2016-12-29

    We report the double-helicity asymmetry, AJ/ψLL, in inclusive J/ψ production at forward rapidity as a function of transverse momentum pT and rapidity |y|. The data analyzed were taken during √s = 510 GeV longitudinally polarized p + p collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider in the 2013 run using the PHENIX detector. At this collision energy, J/ψ particles are predominantly produced through gluon-gluon scatterings, thus AJ/ψLL is sensitive to the gluon polarization inside the proton. We measured AJ/ψLL by detecting the decay daughter muon pairs μ+μ– within the PHENIX muon spectrometers in the rapidity range 1.2 < |y| polarization distributions at two distinct ranges of Bjorken x: one at moderate range x ≈ 5 × 10–2 where recent data of jet and π0 double helicity spin asymmetries have shown evidence for significant gluon polarization, and the other one covering the poorly known small-x region x ≈ 2 × 10–3. Furthermore, our new results could be used to further constrain the gluon polarization for x < 5 × 10–2.« less

  7. Longitudinal Spin Transfer to Lambda and Lambda bar Hyperons in Polarized Proton-Proton Collisions at sqrt s = 200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    STAR Collaboration; Abelev, Betty

    2010-07-05

    The longitudinal spin transfer, D{sub LL}, from high energy polarized protons to {Lambda} and {bar {Lambda}} hypersons has been measured for the first time in proton-proton collisions at {radical}s = 200 GeV with the STAR detector at RHIC. The measurements cover pseudorapidity, {eta}, in the range |{eta}| < 1.2 and transverse momenta, p{sub T}, up to 4 GeV/c. The longitudinal spin transfer is found to be D{sub LL} = -0.03{+-}0.13(stat){+-}0.04(syst) for inclusive {Lambda} and D{sub LL} = -0.12{+-}0.08(stat){+-}0.03(syst) for inclusive {bar {Lambda}} hyperons with <{eta}> = 0.5 and = 3.7 GeV/c. The dependence on {eta} and p{sub T} is presented.

  8. CP asymmetries with longitudinal and transverse beam polarizations in neutralino production and decay into the Z0 boson at the ILC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartl, Alfred; Hohenwarter-Sodek, Karl; Kernreiter, Thomas; Kittel, Olaf

    2007-09-01

    We study neutralino production at the linear collider with the subsequent two-body decays tilde chi0i → tilde chi0nZ0 and Z0 → ell bar-ell, with ell = e, μ, τ, or Z0 → qbar q with q = c, b. We show that transverse electron and positron beam polarizations allow the definition of unique CP observables. These are azimuthal asymmetries in the distributions of the final leptons or quarks. We calculate these CP asymmetries and the cross sections in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model with complex higgsino and gaugino parameters μ and M1. For final quark pairs, we find CP asymmetries as large as 30%. We discuss the significances for observing the CP asymmetries at the International Linear Collider (ILC). Finally we compare the CP asymmetries with those asymmetries which require unpolarized and/or longitudinally polarized beams only.

  9. Measurement of the cross section and longitudinal double-spin asymmetry for dijet production in polarized pp collisions at s=200 GeV

    DOE PAGES

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; ...

    2017-04-28

    We report the first measurement of the longitudinal double-spin asymmetry ALL for mid-rapidity dijet production in polarized pp collisions at a center-of-mass energy ofmore » $$\\sqrt{s}$$ = 200 GeV. The dijet cross section was measured and is shown to be consistent with next-to-leading order (NLO) perturbative QCD predictions. ALL results are presented for two distinct topologies, defined by the jet pseudorapidities, and are compared to predictions from several recent NLO global analyses. Lastly, the measured asymmetries, the first such correlation measurements, support those analyses that find positive gluon polarization at the level of roughly 0.2 over the region of Bjorken-x > 0.05.« less

  10. Measurement of the cross section and longitudinal double-spin asymmetry for dijet production in polarized p p collisions at √{s }=200 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Alekseev, I.; Anderson, D. M.; Aoyama, R.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Ashraf, M. U.; Attri, A.; Averichev, G. S.; Bai, X.; Bairathi, V.; Barish, K.; Behera, A.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Bouchet, J.; Brandenburg, J. D.; Brandin, A. V.; Brown, D.; Bunzarov, I.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Campbell, J. M.; Cebra, D.; Chakaberia, I.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chankova-Bunzarova, N.; Chatterjee, A.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, X.; Chen, J. H.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Christie, W.; Contin, G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, S.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Elsey, N.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Esha, R.; Esumi, S.; Evdokimov, O.; Ewigleben, J.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Federic, P.; Federicova, P.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, Z.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Fujita, J.; Fulek, L.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, S.; Gupta, A.; Guryn, W.; Hamad, A. I.; Hamed, A.; Harlenderova, A.; Harris, J. W.; He, L.; Heppelmann, S.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Horvat, S.; Huang, T.; Huang, B.; Huang, H. Z.; Huang, X.; Humanic, T. J.; Huo, P.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jentsch, A.; Jia, J.; Jiang, K.; Jowzaee, S.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kapukchyan, D.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khan, Z.; Kikoła, D. P.; Kim, C.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Kochenda, L.; Kocmanek, M.; Kollegger, T.; Kosarzewski, L. K.; Kraishan, A. F.; Krauth, L.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kulathunga, N.; Kumar, L.; Kvapil, J.; Kwasizur, J. H.; Lacey, R.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; Li, W.; Li, C.; Li, Y.; Li, X.; Lidrych, J.; Lin, T.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, H.; Liu, F.; Liu, Y.; Liu, P.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, X.; Luo, S.; Ma, R.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, L.; Ma, Y. G.; Magdy, N.; Majka, R.; Mallick, D.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Matis, H. S.; Meehan, K.; Mei, J. C.; Miller, Z. W.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mishra, D.; Mizuno, S.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nie, M.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Niida, T.; Nogach, L. V.; Nonaka, T.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Okorokov, V. A.; Olvitt, D.; Page, B. S.; Pak, R.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Pile, P.; Pluta, J.; Poniatowska, K.; Porter, J.; Posik, M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Przybycien, M.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Ray, R. L.; Reed, R.; Rehbein, M. J.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Roth, J. D.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Saur, M.; Schambach, J.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Schweid, B. R.; Seger, J.; Sergeeva, M.; Seto, R.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, A.; Sharma, M. K.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, S. S.; Shi, Z.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Sikora, R.; Simko, M.; Singha, S.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Smirnov, D.; Solyst, W.; Song, L.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sugiura, T.; Sumbera, M.; Summa, B.; Sun, X.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Taranenko, A.; Tarnowsky, T.; Tawfik, A.; Thäder, J.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Todoroki, T.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Tripathy, S. K.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsai, O. D.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Upsal, I.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Videbæk, F.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Vossen, A.; Wang, G.; Wang, Y.; Wang, F.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Wen, L.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y.; Xiao, Z. G.; Xie, W.; Xie, G.; Xu, Y. F.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, N.; Xu, Z.; Xu, J.; Yang, Y.; Yang, S.; Yang, C.; Yang, Q.; Ye, Z.; Ye, Z.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yu, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhu, Z.; Zhu, X.; Zyzak, M.; STAR Collaboration

    2017-04-01

    We report the first measurement of the longitudinal double-spin asymmetry AL L for midrapidity dijet production in polarized p p collisions at a center-of-mass energy of √{s }=200 GeV . The dijet cross section was measured and is shown to be consistent with next-to-leading order (NLO) perturbative QCD predictions. AL L results are presented for two distinct topologies, defined by the jet pseudorapidities, and are compared to predictions from several recent NLO global analyses. The measured asymmetries, the first such correlation measurements, support those analyses that find positive gluon polarization at the level of roughly 0.2 over the region of Bjorken-x >0.05 .

  11. Stable single-polarization single-longitudinal-mode linear cavity erbium-doped fiber laser based on structured chirped fiber Bragg grating.

    PubMed

    Yin, Bin; Liu, Zhibo; Feng, Suchun; Bai, Yunlong; Li, Haisu; Jian, Shuisheng

    2015-01-01

    A novel linear cavity erbium-doped fiber (EDF) laser based on a structured chirped fiber Bragg grating (CFBG) filter is proposed for stable single-polarization (SP) single-longitudinal-mode (SLM) operation. For the first time, to the best of our knowledge, a structured CFBG filter with an ultranarrow transmission band which is generated by tapering directly on CFBG is used to select the laser longitudinal mode. The SLM operation is obtained by using the structured CFBG together with an unpumped EDF acting as a saturable absorber. The fluctuations of the laser peak power and center wavelength are less than 0.07 dB and 1 pm in 1 h, respectively. The stable SP operation is achieved by using the inline broadband polarizer. The measured 20 dB laser linewidth is about 27.7 kHz, which indicates the laser linewidth is approximately 1.39 kHz FWHM.

  12. Measurement of high-Q2 neutral current deep inelastic e+p scattering cross sections with a longitudinally polarized positron beam at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Aggarwal, R.; Antonelli, S.; Antonioli, P.; Antonov, A.; Arneodo, M.; Arslan, O.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Bachynska, O.; Bamberger, A.; Barakbaev, A. N.; Barbagli, G.; Bari, G.; Barreiro, F.; Bartosik, N.; Bartsch, D.; Basile, M.; Behnke, O.; Behr, J.; Behrens, U.; Bellagamba, L.; Bertolin, A.; Bhadra, S.; Bindi, M.; Blohm, C.; Bokhonov, V.; Bołd, T.; Bondarenko, K.; Boos, E. G.; Borras, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bot, D.; Brock, I.; Brownson, E.; Brugnera, R.; Brümmer, N.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Brzozowska, B.; Bussey, P. J.; Bylsma, B.; Caldwell, A.; Capua, M.; Carlin, R.; Catterall, C. D.; Chekanov, S.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Contin, A.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Coppola, N.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Costa, M.; D'Agostini, G.; Dal Corso, F.; del Peso, J.; Dementiev, R. K.; De Pasquale, S.; Derrick, M.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Dobur, D.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Dolinska, G.; Doyle, A. T.; Drugakov, V.; Durkin, L. S.; Dusini, S.; Eisenberg, Y.; Ermolov, P. F.; Eskreys, A.; Fang, S.; Fazio, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrero, M. I.; Figiel, J.; Foster, B.; Gach, G.; Galas, A.; Gallo, E.; Garfagnini, A.; Geiser, A.; Gialas, I.; Gizhko, A.; Gladilin, L. K.; Gladkov, D.; Glasman, C.; Gogota, O.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Göttlicher, P.; Grabowska-Bołd, I.; Grebenyuk, J.; Gregor, I.; Grigorescu, G.; Grzelak, G.; Gueta, O.; Guzik, M.; Gwenlan, C.; Haas, T.; Hain, W.; Hamatsu, R.; Hart, J. C.; Hartmann, H.; Hartner, G.; Hilger, E.; Hochman, D.; Hori, R.; Hüttmann, A.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ingbir, R.; Ishitsuka, M.; Jakob, H.-P.; Januschek, F.; Jones, T. W.; Jüngst, M.; Kadenko, I.; Kahle, B.; Kananov, S.; Kanno, T.; Karshon, U.; Karstens, F.; Katkov, I. I.; Kaur, M.; Kaur, P.; Keramidas, A.; Khein, L. A.; Kim, J. Y.; Kisielewska, D.; Kitamura, S.; Klanner, R.; Klein, U.; Koffeman, E.; Kondrashova, N.; Kononenko, O.; Kooijman, P.; Korol, Ie.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kotański, A.; Kötz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Lee, A.; Levchenko, B. B.; Levy, A.; Libov, V.; Limentani, S.; Ling, T. Y.; Lisovyi, M.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lohmann, W.; Löhr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Long, K. R.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Maeda, J.; Magill, S.; Makarenko, I.; Malka, J.; Mankel, R.; Margotti, A.; Marini, G.; Martin, J. F.; Mastroberardino, A.; Mattingly, M. C. K.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Miglioranzi, S.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Monaco, V.; Montanari, A.; Morris, J. D.; Mujkic, K.; Musgrave, B.; Nagano, K.; Namsoo, T.; Nania, R.; Nigro, A.; Ning, Y.; Nobe, T.; Notz, D.; Nowak, R. J.; Nuncio-Quiroz, A. E.; Oh, B. Y.; Okazaki, N.; Olkiewicz, K.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Papageorgiu, K.; Parenti, A.; Paul, E.; Pawlak, J. M.; Pawlik, B.; Pelfer, P. G.; Pellegrino, A.; Perlański, W.; Perrey, H.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Pluciński, P.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Polini, A.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Przybycień, M.; Raval, A.; Reeder, D. D.; Reisert, B.; Ren, Z.; Repond, J.; Ri, Y. D.; Robertson, A.; Roloff, P.; Rubinsky, I.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Samson, U.; Sartorelli, G.; Savin, A. A.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenstedt, S.; Schleper, P.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schneekloth, U.; Schönberg, V.; Schörner-Sadenius, T.; Schwartz, J.; Sciulli, F.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shehzadi, R.; Shimizu, S.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Słomiński, W.; Smith, W. H.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Son, D.; Sosnovtsev, V.; Spiridonov, A.; Stadie, H.; Stanco, L.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stern, A.; Stewart, T. P.; Stifutkin, A.; Stopa, P.; Suchkov, S.; Susinno, G.; Suszycki, L.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Tapper, A. D.; Tassi, E.; Terrón, J.; Theedt, T.; Tiecke, H.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomaszewska, J.; Trusov, V.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Turkot, O.; Tymieniecka, T.; Vázquez, M.; Verbytskyi, A.; Viazlo, O.; Vlasov, N. N.; Walczak, R.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Whitmore, J. J.; Wichmann, K.; Wiggers, L.; Wing, M.; Wlasenko, M.; Wolf, G.; Wolfe, H.; Wrona, K.; Yagües-Molina, A. G.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yoshida, R.; Youngman, C.; Zabiegalov, O.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Zawiejski, L.; Zenaiev, O.; Zeuner, W.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zhmak, N.; Zichichi, A.; Zolkapli, Z.; Zotkin, D. S.

    2013-03-01

    Measurements of neutral current cross sections for deep inelastic scattering in e+p collisions at HERA with a longitudinally polarized positron beam are presented. The single-differential cross-sections dσ/dQ2, dσ/dx and dσ/dy and the reduced cross section σ˜ are measured in the kinematic region Q2>185GeV2 and y<0.9, where Q2 is the four-momentum transfer squared, x the Bjorken scaling variable and y the inelasticity of the interaction. The measurements are performed separately for positively and negatively polarized positron beams. The measurements are based on an integrated luminosity of 135.5pb-1 collected with the ZEUS detector in 2006 and 2007 at a center-of-mass energy of 318 GeV. The structure functions F˜3 and F3γZ are determined by combining the e+p results presented in this paper with previously published e-p neutral current results. The asymmetry parameter A+ is used to demonstrate the parity violation predicted in electroweak interactions. The measurements are well described by the predictions of the Standard Model.

  13. Enhancing the electron acceleration by a circularly polarized laser interaction with a cone-target with an external longitudinal magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, J. X.; Cao, L. H.; Pan, K. Q.; Xiao, C. Z.; Wu, D.; He, X. T.

    2017-03-01

    The propagation of left-hand (LH-) and right-hand (RH-) circularly polarized (CP) lasers and the accompanying generation of fast electrons in a magnetized cone-target with pre-formed plasmas are investigated. In this work, the strength of external magnetic field is comparable to that of the incident laser. Theoretical analyses indicate that the cut-off density of LH-CP laser is larger than that without an external magnetic field. When the external magnetic field normalized by the laser magnetic field is larger than the relativistic factor, the RH-CP laser will keep on propagating till the laser energy is depleted. The theoretical predictions are confirmed by two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. Simulation results show that in the presence of external longitudinal magnetic field, the energies and yields of fast electrons are greatly enhanced for RH-CP laser. Besides, the coupling efficiency of laser energy to energetic electrons for RH-CP laser is much higher than that for LH-CP laser and without external magnetic field. Furthermore, detailed simulation results perform an enhancement of the incident laser absorption with increasing external magnetic field.

  14. Double-Spin Asymmetry in Neutral Pion Production at Intermediate Pseudorapidity in Longitudinally Polarized p + p Collisions in the STAR Detector at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Adam; STAR Collaboration Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    One of the outstanding problems in nuclear physics is to explain the helicity of the proton in terms of its constituents. It has long been known that the helicity of the quarks is insufficient, initially a puzzling result. In recent years it has become clear that the gluon plays an important role, but the uncertainty on the contribution from low x gluons in particular has remained large. The STAR and PHENIX detectors at RHIC have been critical in illuminating the role of the gluon. STAR published an analysis of neutral pions in the intermediate pseudorapidity Endcap Electromagnetic Calorimeter (EEMC, 1.09 < η < 2.00) using a dataset from 2006 at √{ s} = 200 GeV that was complimentary to results using jets and pions at mid-rapidity and at forward pseudorapidites. Our present analysis extends that earlier EEMC result using a much larger dataset in the EEMC at √{ s} = 510 GeV, extending the reach of the analysis to lower gluon x. We will present the status of this analysis of the double-spin asymmetry in neutral pion production in longitudinally polarized p + p collisions in the STAR detector at RHIC (π0 ALL), and discuss prospects for the future.

  15. Complete next-to-leading-order study on the yield and polarization of Υ(1S,2S,3S) at the Tevatron and LHC.

    PubMed

    Gong, Bin; Wan, Lu-Ping; Wang, Jian-Xiong; Zhang, Hong-Fei

    2014-01-24

    Based on the nonrelativistic QCD factorization scheme, we present the first complete next-to-leading-order study on the yield and polarization of Υ(1S,2S,3S) hadroproduction. By using the color-octet long-distance matrix elements obtained from fits of the experimental measurements on Υ yield and polarization at the Tevatron and LHC, our results can explain the measurements on the yield very well, and for the polarizations of Υ(1S,2S,3S), they are in (good, good, bad) agreement with recent CMS measurement, but still have some distance from the CDF measurement.

  16. Switchable single-longitudinal-mode dual-wavelength erbium-doped fiber ring laser based on one polarization-maintaining fiber Bragg grating incorporating saturable absorber and feedback fiber loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Suchun; Xu, Ou; Lu, Shaohua; Ning, Tigang; Jian, Shuisheng

    2009-06-01

    Switchable single-longitudinal-mode (SLM) dual-wavelength erbium-doped fiber ring laser based on one polarization-maintaining fiber Bragg grating (PMFBG) is demonstrated. Due to the enhancement of the polarization hole burning (PHB) by the PMFBG, the laser can be designed to operate in stable dual-wavelength or wavelength-switching modes with a wavelength spacing of 0.336 nm at room temperature by adjusting a polarization controller (PC). The stable SLM operation is guaranteed by a compound-ring cavity and a saturable absorber (SA). The optical signal-to-noise ratio (OSNR) is over 45 dB. The amplitude variation in nearly one and half an hour is less than 0.2 dB.

  17. Measurement of the Parity-Violating Longitudinal Single-Spin Asymmetry for W{sup {+-}} Boson Production in Polarized Proton-Proton Collisions at {radical}(s)=500 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Aggarwal, M. M.; Bhati, A. K.; Pruthi, N. K.; Ahammed, Z.; Dong, X.; Grebenyuk, O.; Hjort, E.; Jacobs, P.; Kikola, D. P.; Kiryluk, J.; Klein, S. R.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; Naglis, M.; Odyniec, G.; Olson, D.; Ploskon, M. A.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Powell, C. B.; Ritter, H. G.

    2011-02-11

    We report the first measurement of the parity-violating single-spin asymmetries for midrapidity decay positrons and electrons from W{sup +} and W{sup -} boson production in longitudinally polarized proton-proton collisions at {radical}(s)=500 GeV by the STAR experiment at RHIC. The measured asymmetries, A{sub L}{sup W+}=-0.27{+-}0.10(stat.){+-}0.02(syst.){+-}0.03(norm.) and A{sub L}{sup W-}=0.14{+-}0.19(stat.){+-}0.02(syst.){+-}0.01(norm.), are consistent with theory predictions, which are large and of opposite sign. These predictions are based on polarized quark and antiquark distribution functions constrained by polarized deep-inelastic scattering measurements.

  18. Measurement of the parity-violating longitudinal single-spin asymmetry for W{sup {+-}} boson production in polarized proton-proton collisions at {radical}(s) = 500 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Igo, G.

    2011-07-15

    We report the first measurement of the parity violating single-spin asymmetries for midrapidity decay positrons and electrons from W{sup +} and W{sup -} boson production in longitudinally polarized proton-proton collisions at {radical}(s) = 500 GeV by the STAR experiment at RHIC. The measured asymmetries, A{sub L}{sup W+} = -0.27{+-}0.10(stat.){+-}0.02(syst.){+-}0.03(norm.) and A{sub L}{sup W-} 0.14{+-}0.19(stat.){+-}0.02(syst.){+-}0.01(norm.), are consistent with theory predictions, which are large and of opposite sign. These predictions are based on polarized quark and antiquark distribution functions constrained by polarized DIS measurements.

  19. Polarization effects. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Courant, E.

    1981-01-01

    The use of polarized proton beams in ISABELLE is important for several general reasons: (1) With a single longitudinally polarized proton beam, effects involving parity violation can be identified and hence processes involving weak interactions can be separated from those involving strong and electromagnetic interactions. (2) Spin effects are important in the strong interactions and can be useful for testing QCD. The technique for obtaining polarized proton beams in ISABELLE appears promising, particularly in view of the present development of a polarized proton beam for the AGS. Projections for the luminosity in ISABELLE for collisions of polarized protons - one or both beams polarized with longitudinal or transverse polarization - range from 1/100 to 1 times the luminosity for unpolarized protons.

  20. Polarization phenomena in quantum chromodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1994-12-01

    The author discusses a number of interrelated hadronic spin effects which test fundamental features of perturbative and nonperturbative QCD. For example, the anomalous magnetic moment of the proton and the axial coupling g{sub A} on the nucleon are shown to be related to each other for fixed proton radius, independent of the form of the underlying three-quark relativistic quark wavefunction. The renormalization scale and scheme ambiguities for the radiative corrections to the Bjorken sum rule for the polarized structure functions can be eliminated by using commensurate scale relations with other observables. Other examples include (a) new constraints on the shape and normalization of the polarized quark and gluon structure functions of the proton at large and small x{sub bj}; (b) consequences of the principle of hadron retention in high x{sub F} inclusive reactions; (c) applications of hadron helicity conservation to high momentum transfer exclusive reactions; and (d) the dependence of nuclear structure functions and shadowing on virtual photon polarization. The author also discusses the implications of a number of measurements which are in striking conflict with leading-twist perturbative QCD predictions, such as the extraordinarily large spin correlation A{sub NN} observed in large angle proton-proton scattering, the anomalously large {rho}{pi} branching ratio of the J/{psi}, and the rapidly changing polarization dependence of both J/{psi} and continuum lepton pair hadroproduction observed at large x{sub F}. The azimuthal angular dependence of the Drell-Yan process is shown to be highly sensitive to the projectile distribution amplitude, the fundamental valence light-cone wavefunction of the hadron.

  1. Measurement of Longitudinal Single-Spin Asymmetries at Forward Rapidity for W Boson Production in Polarized proton+proton Collisions at √ s =510 GeV at STAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna, Amani; STAR Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The production of W- (+) bosons in polarized proton collisions provides an ideal tool to study the spin-flavor structure of the proton sea quark distributions profiting from the parity violating nature of weak interactions. W- (+) bosons are produced in u + d (d + u) annihilation and can be detected through their leptonic decay mode. The STAR experiment has the ability to detect charged leptons e- (+) at mid and forward rapidity regions. In this analysis we focus on the forward region (1 < η < 2). The analysis status of the measurement of the longitudinal single-spin asymmetries at forward rapidity for W boson production will be presented based on a data sample collected in 2013 corresponding to an integrated luminosity 250 pb-1 with an average beam polarization 54%.

  2. Measurement of the parity-violating longitudinal single-spin asymmetry AL for W - (+) boson production in polarized proton collisions at √{ s} = 510 GeV at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surrow, Bernd; STAR Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    The STAR experiment at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory is carrying out a spin physics program in high-energy polarized proton collisions to gain a deeper insight into the spin structure and dynamics of the proton. The collision of polarized protons at √{ s} = 500GeV opened a new era of spin-flavor structure studies using the production of W - (+) bosons which are primarily produced in u + d (d + u) collisions. The STAR experiment is well equipped to measure W - (+) ->e- +νe (e+ +νe) in longitudinally polarized proton collisions. The published STAR AL results (combination of 2011 and 2012 data) have been used by two global analyses groups suggesting a significant impact in constraining the helicity distributions of anti- u and anti- d quarks. In 2013, the STAR experiment collected a data set at √{ s} = 510 GeV with a factor of three larger figure of merit based on a total integrated luminosity of 300 pb-1 and an average beam polarization of 54 % . We will report on the status of the STAR 2013 W AL analysis along with future plans.

  3. Rich eight-branch spectrum of the oblique propagating longitudinal waves in partially spin-polarized electron-positron-ion plasmas.

    PubMed

    Andreev, Pavel A; Iqbal, Z

    2016-03-01

    We consider the separate spin evolution of electrons and positrons in electron-positron and electron-positron-ion plasmas. We consider the oblique propagating longitudinal waves in these systems. Working in a regime of high-density n(0) ∼ 10(27) cm(-3) and high-magnetic-field B(0)=10(10) G, we report the presence of the spin-electron acoustic waves and their dispersion dependencies. In electron-positron plasmas, similarly to the electron-ion plasmas, we find one spin-electron acoustic wave (SEAW) at the propagation parallel or perpendicular to the external field and two spin-electron acoustic waves at the oblique propagation. At the parallel or perpendicular propagation of the longitudinal waves in electron-positron-ion plasmas, we find four branches: the Langmuir wave, the positron-acoustic wave, and a pair of waves having spin nature, they are the SEAW and the wave discovered in this paper, called the spin-electron-positron acoustic wave (SEPAW). At the oblique propagation we find eight longitudinal waves: the Langmuir wave, the Trivelpiece--Gould wave, a pair of positron-acoustic waves, a pair of SEAWs, and a pair of SEPAWs. Thus, for the first time, we report the existence of the second positron-acoustic wave existing at the oblique propagation and the existence of SEPAWs.

  4. Polarization for prompt J/ψ and ψ(2s) production at the Tevatron and LHC.

    PubMed

    Gong, Bin; Wan, Lu-Ping; Wang, Jian-Xiong; Zhang, Hong-Fei

    2013-01-25

    With nonrelativistic QCD factorization, we present the first complete next-to-leading order study on the polarization of prompt J/ψ hadroproduction by including feeddown from χ(c)((3)P(J)(1),(3)S(1)(8)) and ψ(2s) which turn out to be very important parts. By using the color-octet long-distance matrix elements obtained from a combined fit of the measurements at the Tevatron and LHC for J/ψ, ψ(2s) and χ(c), the prompt J/ψ polarization predictions are presented, and the results are in agreement with the CDF run I data (except two points), but in conflict with the CDF run II data, while they are close to the ALICE data (inclusive J/ψ). The measurements at the LHC are expected to clarify the situation.

  5. Polarization at the SLC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moffeit, Kenneth C.

    1989-05-01

    The Stanford Linear Collider was designed to accommodate polarized electron beams. Longitudinally polarized electrons colliding with unpolarized positrons at a center of mass energy near the Z0 mass can be used as novel and sensitive probes of the electroweak process. A gallium arsenide based photon emission source will provide a beam of longitudinally polarized electrons of about 45 percent polarization. A system of bend magnets and a superconducting solenoid will be used to rotate the spins so that the polarization is preserved while the 1.21 GeV electrons are stored in the damping ring. Another set of bend magnets and two superconducting solenoids orient the spin vectors so that longitudinal polarization of the electrons is achieved at the collision point with the unpolarized positrons. A system to monitor the polarization based on Mo/ller and Compton scattering will be used. Nearly all major components have been fabricated and tested. Subsystems of the source and polarimeters have been installed, and studies are in progress. The installation and commissioning of the entire system will take place during available machine shutdown periods as the commissioning of SLC progresses.

  6. Support of hadroproduction of bottom using the 800 GeV/c primary proton beam at the Fermilab tevatron. Final performance report, June 14, 1988--May 14, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Judd, D.J.

    1992-05-14

    The High Energy Physics (HEP) group at Prairie View A&M University is a collaborator with Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab), and the universities listed below. The purpose of this collaboration is to contribute to the understanding of heavy quark hadroproduction. Our efforts began in the early 1980`s at Fermilab with the study of the charmonium states, J/{psi} and {chi}, (DE-FG-86ER-40297) and presently with the continued studies of the charmonium system and direct photon production (Fermilab experiment E705) and new studies on bottom production (Fermilab experiment E771) in the High Intensity Laboratory (Proton-West Area) of Fermilab. The Prairie View group will, as a part of their task, be directly responsible for a major part of the PWC system upgrade by developing the electronics for the readouts of the PWC pad chambers. Six in all, these chambers, are a part of new multilevel triggering scheme and represents a departure from the triggering methodology of the previous trigger processors in earlier experiments. The Prairie View group is also involved with the Bottom Collider Detector (BCD) Collaboration which is proposing to study bottom production at the Fermilab Collider and at the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC).

  7. Transversely polarized source cladding for an optical fiber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egalon, Claudio Oliveira (Inventor); Rogowski, Robert S. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    An optical fiber comprising a fiber core having a longitudinal symmetry axis is provided. An active cladding surrounds a portion of the fiber core and comprises light-producing sources which emit light in response to chemical or light excitation. The cladding sources are oriented transversely with respect to the longitudinal axis of the fiber core. This polarization results in a superior power efficiency compared to active cladding sources that are randomly polarized or longitudinally polarized parallel with the longitudinal symmetry axis.

  8. Generation of an ultralong pure longitudinal magnetization needle with high axial homogeneity using an azimuthally polarized beam modulated by pure multi-zone plate phase filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Weichao; Nie, Zhongquan; Zhang, Xueru; Wang, Yuxiao; Song, Yinglin

    2017-08-01

    Based on the vector diffraction theory and the inverse Faraday effect in the magneto-optic film, light-induced magnetization distributions, for a high numerical aperture focusing configuration with an azimuthally polarized beam modulated by an optimized pure multi-zone plate phase filter, are investigated. By making use of the compeletely destructive interference of its inter circle with the π phase shift between adjacent sub-annuli, and the capability to extend the constructive interference in the propagating direction through its narrow outer annulus modulated by three misplaced helical phases, an ultralong (107λ ) magnetization needle with both transverse super-resolution (0.37λ ) and uniform axial field strength is achieved in the focal region. The perfect magnetization needle and the accessible method give a guide for ultrahigh density magnetic storage, fabricating magnetic lattices for spin wave operation, as well as atomic trapping.

  9. GUIDE FOR POLARIZED NEUTRONS

    DOEpatents

    Sailor, V.L.; Aichroth, R.W.

    1962-12-01

    The plane of polarization of a beam of polarized neutrons is changed by this invention, and the plane can be flipped back and forth quicitly in two directions in a trouble-free manner. The invention comprises a guide having a plurality of oppositely directed magnets forming a gap for the neutron beam and the gaps are spaced longitudinally in a spiral along the beam at small stepped angles. When it is desired to flip the plane of polarization the magnets are suitably rotated to change the direction of the spiral of the gaps. (AEC)

  10. J/ψ polarization at the Tevatron and the LHC: nonrelativistic-QCD factorization at the crossroads.

    PubMed

    Butenschoen, Mathias; Kniehl, Bernd A

    2012-04-27

    We study the polarization observables of J/ψ hadroproduction at next-to-leading order within the factorization formalism of nonrelativistic quantum chromodynamics. We complete the present knowledge of the relativistic corrections by also providing the contribution due to the intermediate (3)P(J)([8]) color-octet states at this order, which turns out to be quite significant. Exploiting the color-octet long-distance matrix elements previously extracted through a global fit to experimental data of unpolarized J/ψ production, we provide theoretical predictions in the helicity and Collins-Soper frames and compare them with data taken by CDF at Fermilab Tevatron I and II and by ALICE at CERN LHC. The notorious CDF J/ψ polarization anomaly familiar from leading-order analyses persists at the quantum level, while the situation looks promising for the LHC, which is bound to bring final clarification.

  11. Polarization in SuperB

    SciTech Connect

    Wienands, Ulrich; Nosochkov, Yuri; Sullivan, Michael; Wittmer, Walter; Barber, Desmond; Biagini, Maria; Raimondi, Pantaleo; Koop, Ivan; Nikitin, Sergei; Sinyatkin, Sergey; /Novosibirsk, IYF

    2012-06-21

    SuperB, the 2nd-generation B-Factory with a luminosity of 10{sup 36}/cm{sup 2}/s proposed for LNF, is being designed from the start to be capable of providing a spin-polarized electron beam in the low-energy ring (LER) with longitudinal polarization at the interaction point. Due to the high luminosity at moderate beam current the beam lifetime is short (a few minutes), and a polarized injector will be used. Spin rotators have been designed and the equilibrium polarization evaluated. It will be shown that an average polarization of about 70% can be expected.

  12. Survey of top quark polarization at a polarized linear e{sup +}e{sup -} collider

    SciTech Connect

    Groote, S.; Koerner, J. G.; Melic, B.; Prelovsek, S.

    2011-03-01

    We discuss in detail top quark polarization in above-threshold (tt) production at a polarized linear e{sup +}e{sup -} collider. We pay particular attention to the minimization and maximization of the polarization of the top quark by tuning the longitudinal polarization of the e{sup +} and e{sup -} beams. The polarization of the top quark is calculated in full next-to-leading order QCD. We also discuss the beam polarization dependence of the longitudinal spin-spin correlations of the top and antitop quark spins.

  13. Polarized electron beams at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Moffeit, K.C.

    1992-11-01

    SLAC has successfully accelerated high energy polarized electrons for the Stanford Linear Collider and fixed polarized nuclear target experiments. The polarized electron beams at SLAC use a gallium arsenide (GaAlAs for E-142) photon emission source to provide the beam of polarized electrons with polarization of approximately 28% (41% for E-142). While the beam emittance is reduced in the damping ring for SLC operation a system of bend magnets and superconducting solenoids preserve and orient the spin direction for maximum longitudinal polarization at the collision point. The electron polarization is monitored with a Compton scattering polarimeter, and was typically 22% at the e[plus]e[minus] collision point for the 1992 run. Improvements are discussed to increase the source polarization and to reduce the depolarization effects between the source and the collision point.

  14. Polarized electron beams at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Moffeit, K.C.

    1992-11-01

    SLAC has successfully accelerated high energy polarized electrons for the Stanford Linear Collider and fixed polarized nuclear target experiments. The polarized electron beams at SLAC use a gallium arsenide (GaAlAs for E-142) photon emission source to provide the beam of polarized electrons with polarization of approximately 28% (41% for E-142). While the beam emittance is reduced in the damping ring for SLC operation a system of bend magnets and superconducting solenoids preserve and orient the spin direction for maximum longitudinal polarization at the collision point. The electron polarization is monitored with a Compton scattering polarimeter, and was typically 22% at the e{plus}e{minus} collision point for the 1992 run. Improvements are discussed to increase the source polarization and to reduce the depolarization effects between the source and the collision point.

  15. POLARIZED PROTON COLLISIONS AT RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    BAI, M.; AHRENS, L.; ALEKSEEV, I.G.; ALESSI, J.; ET AL.

    2005-05-16

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider provides not only collisions of ions but also collisions of polarized protons. In a circular accelerator, the polarization of polarized proton beam can be partially or fully lost when a spin depolarizing resonance is encountered. To preserve the beam polarization during acceleration, two full Siberian snakes were employed in RHIC. In 2002, polarized proton beams were first accelerated to 100 GeV and collided in RHIC. Beams were brought into collisions with longitudinal polarization at the experiments STAR and PHENIX by using spin rotators. Optimizing polarization transmission efficiency and improving luminosity performance are significant challenges. Currently, the luminosity lifetime in RHIC is limited by the beam-beam effect. The current state of RHIC polarized proton program, including its dedicated physics run in 2005 and efforts to optimize luminosity production in beam-beam limited conditions are reported.

  16. Circularly polarized Hankel vortices.

    PubMed

    Kotlyar, Victor V; Kovalev, Alexey A

    2017-04-03

    We discuss vector Hankel beams with circular polarization. These beams appear as a generalization of a spherical wave with an embedded optical vortex with topological charge n. Explicit analytical relations to describe all six projections of the E- and H-field are derived. The relations are shown to satisfy Maxwell's equations. Hankel beams with clockwise and anticlockwise circular polarization are shown to have peculiar features while propagating in free space. Relations for the Poynting vector projections and the angular momentum in the far field are also obtained. It is shown that a Hankel beam with clockwise circular polarization has radial divergence (ratio between the radial and longitudinal projections of the Poynting vector) similar to that of the spherical wave, while the beam with the anticlockwise circular polarization has greater radial dependence. At n = 0, the circularly polarized Hankel beam has non-zero spin angular momentum. At n = 1, power flow of the Hankel beam with anticlockwise polarization consists of two parts: right-handed helical flow near the optical axis and left-handed helical flow in periphery. At n ≥2, power flow is directed along the right-handed helix regardless of the direction of the circular polarization. Power flow along the optical axis is the same for the Hankel beams of both circular polarizations, if they have the same topological charge.

  17. RHIC Polarized proton operation

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, H.; Ahrens, L.; Alekseev, I.G.; Aschenauer, E.; Atoian, G.; Bai, M.; Bazilevsky, A.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J.M.; Brown, K.A.; Bruno, D.; Connolly, R.; Dion, A.; D'Ottavio, T.; Drees, K.A.; Fischer, W.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J.W.; Gu, X.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Hoff, L.; Hulsart, R.L.; Laster, J.; Liu, C.; Luo, Y.; MacKay, W.W.; Makdisi, Y.; Marr, G.J.; Marusic, A.; Meot, F.; Mernick, K.; Michnoff, R,; Minty, M.; Montag, C.; Morris, J.; Nemesure, S.; Poblaguev, A.; Ptitsyn, V.; Ranjibar, V.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Roser, T.; J.; Severino, F.; Schmidke, B.; Schoefer, V.; Severino, F.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, K.; Steski, D.; Svirida, D.; Tepikian, S.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J. Wang, G.; Wilinski, M.; Yip, K.; Zaltsman, A.; Zelenski, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

    2011-03-28

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) operation as the polarized proton collider presents unique challenges since both luminosity(L) and spin polarization(P) are important. With longitudinally polarized beams at the experiments, the figure of merit is LP{sup 4}. A lot of upgrades and modifications have been made since last polarized proton operation. A 9 MHz rf system is installed to improve longitudinal match at injection and to increase luminosity. The beam dump was upgraded to increase bunch intensity. A vertical survey of RHIC was performed before the run to get better magnet alignment. The orbit control is also improved this year. Additional efforts are put in to improve source polarization and AGS polarization transfer efficiency. To preserve polarization on the ramp, a new working point is chosen such that the vertical tune is near a third order resonance. The overview of the changes and the operation results are presented in this paper. Siberian snakes are essential tools to preserve polarization when accelerating polarized beams to higher energy. At the same time, the higher order resonances still can cause polarization loss. As seen in RHIC, the betatron tune has to be carefully set and maintained on the ramp and during the store to avoid polarization loss. In addition, the orbit control is also critical to preserve polarization. The higher polarization during this run comes from several improvements over last run. First we have a much better orbit on the ramp. The orbit feedback brings down the vertical rms orbit error to 0.1mm, much better than the 0.5mm last run. With correct BPM offset and vertical realignment, this rms orbit error is indeed small. Second, the jump quads in the AGS improved input polarization for RHIC. Third, the vertical tune was pushed further away from 7/10 snake resonance. The tune feedback maintained the tune at the desired value through the ramp. To calibrate the analyzing power of RHIC polarimeters at any energy above

  18. Polarized cells, polar actions.

    PubMed

    Maddock, J R; Alley, M R; Shapiro, L

    1993-11-01

    The recognition of polar bacterial organization is just emerging. The examples of polar localization given here are from a variety of bacterial species and concern a disparate array of cellular functions. A number of well-characterized instances of polar localization of bacterial proteins, including the chemoreceptor complex in both C. crescentus and E. coli, the maltose-binding protein in E. coli, the B. japonicum surface attachment proteins, and the actin tail of L. monocytogenes within a mammalian cell, involve proteins or protein complexes that facilitate bacterial interaction with the environment, either the extracellular milieux or that within a plant or mammalian host. The significance of this observation remains unclear. Polarity in bacteria poses many problems, including the necessity for a mechanism for asymmetrically distributing proteins as well as a mechanism by which polar localization is maintained. Large structures, such as a flagellum, are anchored at the pole by means of the basal body that traverses the peptidoglycan wall. But for proteins and small complexes, whether in the periplasm or the membrane, one must invoke a mechanism that prevents the diffusion of these proteins away from the cell pole. Perhaps the periplasmic proteins are retained at the pole by the presence of the periseptal annulus (35). The constraining features for membrane components are not known. For large aggregates, such as the clusters of MCP, CheA, and CheW complexes, perhaps the size of the aggregate alone prevents displacement. In most cases of cellular asymmetry, bacteria are able to discriminate between the new pole and the old pole and to utilize this information for localization specificity. The maturation of new pole to old pole appears to be a common theme as well. Given numerous examples reported thus far, we propose that bacterial polarity displays specific rules and is a more general phenomenon than has been previously recognized.

  19. Baryon spectroscopy with polarization observables from CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Strauch, Steffen

    2016-08-01

    Meson photoproduction is an important tool in the study of baryon resonances. The spectrum of broad and overlapping nucleon excitations can be greatly clarified by use of polarization observables. The N* program at Jefferson Lab with the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) includes experimental studies with linearly and circularly polarized tagged photon beams, longitudinally and transversely polarized nucleon targets, and recoil polarizations. An overview of these experimental studies and recent results will be given.

  20. Physics with polarized beams in e+e/sup -/ colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Prescott, C.Y.

    1983-05-01

    The spin structure of the standard model of electroweak interactions is described, with emphasis on the relevance to polarized beam phenomena. The polarization dependence of the cross section, charge asymmetries, and examples of experimental measurements using longitudinal polarization are given. Longitudinal beam polarization is discussed in some detail, including electroweak radiative corrections. Applications to testing the standard model and looking beyond for additional gauge bosons are considered.

  1. Polarization measurement through combination polarizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Yunfeng; Li, Linjun; He, Zhelong; Liu, Yanwei; Ma, Cheng; Shi, Guang; Liu, Lu

    2014-02-01

    Polarization measurement approaches only using polarizer and grating is present. The combination polarizers consists of two polarizers: one is γ degree with the X axis; the other is along the Y axis. Binary grating is covered by the combination polarizers, and based on Fraunhofer diffraction, the diffraction intensity formula is deduced. The polarization state of incident light can be gotten by fitting the diffraction pattern with the deduced formula. Compared with the traditional polarization measurement method, this measurement only uses polarizer and grating, therefore, it can be applied to measure a wide wavelength range without replacing device in theory.

  2. PEPPo: Using a Polarized Electron Beam to Produce Polarized Positrons

    SciTech Connect

    Adeyemi, Adeleke H.

    2015-09-01

    Polarized positron beams have been identified as either an essential or a significant ingredient for the experimental program of both the present and next generation of lepton accelerators (JLab, Super KEK B, ILC, CLIC). An experiment demonstrating a new method for producing polarized positrons has been performed at the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility at Jefferson Lab. The PEPPo (Polarized Electrons for Polarized Positrons) concept relies on the production of polarized e⁻/e⁺ pairs from the bremsstrahlung radiation of a longitudinally polarized electron beam interacting within a high-Z conversion target. PEPPo demonstrated the effective transfer of spin-polarization of an 8.2 MeV/c polarized (P~85%) electron beam to positrons produced in varying thickness tungsten production targets, and collected and measured in the range of 3.1 to 6.2 MeV/c. In comparison to other methods this technique reveals a new pathway for producing either high-energy or thermal polarized positron beams using a relatively low polarized electron beam energy (~10MeV) .This presentation will describe the PEPPo concept, the motivations of the experiment and high positron polarization achieved.

  3. Polarized proton collider at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseev, I.; Allgower, C.; Bai, M.; Batygin, Y.; Bozano, L.; Brown, K.; Bunce, G.; Cameron, P.; Courant, E.; Erin, S.; Escallier, J.; Fischer, W.; Gupta, R.; Hatanaka, K.; Huang, H.; Imai, K.; Ishihara, M.; Jain, A.; Lehrach, A.; Kanavets, V.; Katayama, T.; Kawaguchi, T.; Kelly, E.; Kurita, K.; Lee, S. Y.; Luccio, A.; MacKay, W. W.; Mahler, G.; Makdisi, Y.; Mariam, F.; McGahern, W.; Morgan, G.; Muratore, J.; Okamura, M.; Peggs, S.; Pilat, F.; Ptitsin, V.; Ratner, L.; Roser, T.; Saito, N.; Satoh, H.; Shatunov, Y.; Spinka, H.; Syphers, M.; Tepikian, S.; Tominaka, T.; Tsoupas, N.; Underwood, D.; Vasiliev, A.; Wanderer, P.; Willen, E.; Wu, H.; Yokosawa, A.; Zelenski, A. N.

    2003-03-01

    In addition to heavy ion collisions (RHIC Design Manual, Brookhaven National Laboratory), RHIC will also collide intense beams of polarized protons (I. Alekseev, et al., Design Manual Polarized Proton Collider at RHIC, Brookhaven National Laboratory, 1998 [2]), reaching transverse energies where the protons scatter as beams of polarized quarks and gluons. The study of high energy polarized protons beams has been a long term part of the program at BNL with the development of polarized beams in the Booster and AGS rings for fixed target experiments. We have extended this capability to the RHIC machine. In this paper we describe the design and methods for achieving collisions of both longitudinal and transverse polarized protons in RHIC at energies up to s=500 GeV.

  4. Recoil-Proton Polarization in High-Energy Deuteron Photodisintegration with Circularly Polarized Photons

    SciTech Connect

    X. Jiang; J. Arrington; F. Benmokhtar; A. Camsonne; J. P. Chen; S. Choi; E. Chudakov; F. Cusanno; A. Deur; D. Dutta; F. Garibaldi; D. Gaskell; O. Gayou; R. Gilman; C. Glashauser; D. Hamilton; O. Hansen; D. W. Higinbotham; R. J. Holt; C. W. de Jager; M. K. Jones; L. J. Kaufman; E. R. Kinney; K. Kramer; L. Lagamba; R. de Leo; J. Lerose; D. Lhuillier; R. Lindgren; N. Liyanage; K. McCormick; Z.-E. Meziani; R. Michaels; B. Moffit; P. Monaghan; S. Nanda; K. D. Paschke; C. F. Perdrisat; V. Punjabi; I. A. Qattan; R. D. Ransome; P. E. Reimer; B. Reitz; A. Saha; E. C. Schulte; R. Sheyor; K. Slifer; P. Solvignon; V. Sulkosky; G. M. Urciuoli; E. Voutier; K. Wang; K. Wijesooriya; B. Wojtsekhowski; and L. Zhu

    2007-05-01

    We measured the angular dependence of the three recoil-proton polarization components in two-body photodisintegration of the deuteron at a photon energy of 2 GeV. These new data provide a benchmark for calculations based on quantum chromodynamics. Two of the five existing models have made predictions of polarization observables. Both explain the longitudinal polarization transfer satisfactorily. Transverse polarizations are not well described, but suggest isovector dominance.

  5. Recoil-Proton Polarization in High-Energy Deuteron Photodisintegration with Circularly Polarized Photons

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, X.; Benmokhtar, F.; Glashauser, C.; McCormick, K.; Ransome, R. D.; Arrington, J.; Holt, R. J.; Reimer, P. E.; Schulte, E. C.; Wijesooriya, K.; Camsonne, A.

    2007-05-04

    We measured the angular dependence of the three recoil-proton polarization components in two-body photodisintegration of the deuteron at a photon energy of 2 GeV. These new data provide a benchmark for calculations based on quantum chromodynamics. Two of the five existing models have made predictions of polarization observables. Both explain the longitudinal polarization transfer satisfactorily. Transverse polarizations are not well described, but suggest isovector dominance.

  6. Note on polarization of electron beam.

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Z. J.; Energy Technology

    1997-01-01

    Based on the classical theory of electrodynamics, we show the feasibility of using superconductors to realize transversal and longitudinal polarizations of electron beams. The results can in principle be used with beams of positron and/or other particles with magnetic moments without major modifications. We briefly discuss applications of polarized electron beams in physical sciences and technology.

  7. Baryon spectroscopy with polarization observables from CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Strauch, Steffen

    2016-11-01

    The spectrum of nucleon excitations is dominated by broad and overlapping resonances. Polarization observables in photoproduction reactions are key in the study of these excitations. They give indispensable constraints to partial-wave analyses and help clarify the spectrum. A series of polarized photoproduction experiments have been performed at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility with the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS). These measurements include data with linearly and circularly polarized tagged-photon beams, longitudinally and transversely polarized proton and deuterium targets, and recoil polarizations through the observation of the weak decay of hyperons. An overview of these studies and recent results will be given.

  8. Baryon Spectroscopy with Polarization Observables from CLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strauch, Steffen

    2016-10-01

    The spectrum of nucleon excitations is dominated by broad and overlapping resonances. Polarization observables in photoproduction reactions are key in the study of these excitations. They give indispensable constraints to partial-wave analyses and help clarify the spectrum. A series of polarized photoproduction experiments have been performed at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility with the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer. These measurements include data with linearly and circularly polarized tagged-photon beams, longitudinally and transversely polarized proton and deuterium targets, and recoil polarizations through the observation of the weak decay of hyperons. An overview of these studies and recent results will be given.

  9. Ion polarization in the MEIC figure-8 ion collider ring

    SciTech Connect

    V.S. Morozov, Ya.S. Derbenev, Y. Zhang, P. Chevtsov, A.M. Kondratenko, M.A. Kondratenko, Yu.N. Filatov

    2012-07-01

    The nuclear physics program envisaged at the Medium-energy Electron-Ion Collider (MEIC) currently being developed at the Jefferson Lab calls for collisions of 3-11 GeV/c longitudinally polarized electrons and 20-100 GeV/c, in equivalent proton momentum, longitudinally/ transversely polarized protons/ deuterons/ light ions. We present a scheme that provides the required ion polarization arrangement in the MEIC's ion collider ring.

  10. BCVEGPY2.0: An upgraded version of the generator BCVEGPY with the addition of hadroproduction of the P-wave B states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chao-Hsi; Wang, Jian-Xiong; Wu, Xing-Gang

    2006-02-01

    The generator BCVEGPY is upgraded by improving some of its features and by adding the hadroproduction of the P-wave excited B states (denoted by BcJ,L=1∗ or by hB_c and χB_c). In order to make the generator more efficient, we manipulate the amplitude as compact as possible with special effort. The correctness of the program is tested by various checks. We denote it as BCVEGPY2.0. As for the added part of the P-wave production, only the dominant gluon-gluon fusion mechanism ( gg→BcJ,L=1∗+c¯+b) is taken into account. Moreover, in the program, not only the ability to compute the contributions from the color-singlet components ( to the P-wave production but also the ability to compute the contributions from the color-octet components ( are available. With BCVEGPY2.0 the contributions from the two 'color components' to the production of each of the P-wave states may be computed separately by an option, furthermore, besides individually the event samples of the S-wave and P-wave ( cb¯)-heavy-quarkonium in various correct (realistic) mixtures can be generated by relevant options too. Program summaryTitle of program: BCVEGPY Version: 2.0 (December, 2004) Catalogue identifier: ADWQ Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADWQ Program obtained from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Reference to original program: ADTJ (BCVEGPY1.0) Reference in CPC: Comput. Phys. Comm. 159 (2004) 192 Does the new version supersede the old program: yes Computer: Any computer with FORTRAN 77 or 90 compiler. The program has been tested on HP-SC45 Sigma-X parallel computer, Linux PCs and Windows PCs with Visual Fortran Operating systems: UNIX, Linux and Windows Programming language used: FORTRAN 77/90 Memory required to execute with typical data: About 2.0 MB No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 124 297 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1 137 177 Distribution format: tar.g2 Nature of

  11. Measurements of double-helicity asymmetries in inclusive J/ψ production in longitudinally polarized p+p collisions at s=510 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Adare, A.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Akimoto, R.; Alfred, M.; Apadula, N.; Aramaki, Y.; Asano, H.; Atomssa, E. T.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Bandara, N. S.; Bannier, B.; Barish, K. N.; Bathe, S.; Bazilevsky, A.; Beaumier, M.; Beckman, S.; Belmont, R.; Berdnikov, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Black, D.; Blau, D. S.; Bok, J. S.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Bryslawskyj, J.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Campbell, S.; Chen, C. -H.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choi, J. B.; Chujo, T.; Citron, Z.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Danley, T. W.; Datta, A.; Daugherity, M. S.; David, G.; DeBlasio, K.; Dehmelt, K.; Denisov, A.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Ding, L.; Dion, A.; Diss, P. B.; Do, J. H.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; Enokizono, A.; En’yo, H.; Esumi, S.; Fadem, B.; Feege, N.; Fields, D. E.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fokin, S. L.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Gal, C.; Gallus, P.; Garg, P.; Ge, H.; Giordano, F.; Glenn, A.; Goto, Y.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gu, Y.; Gunji, T.; Guragain, H.; Hachiya, T.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamilton, H. F.; Han, S. Y.; Hanks, J.; Hasegawa, S.; Haseler, T. O. S.; Hashimoto, K.; He, X.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hill, J. C.; Hollis, R. S.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Hoshino, T.; Hotvedt, N.; Huang, J.; Huang, S.; Ikeda, Y.; Imai, K.; Imazu, Y.; Inaba, M.; Iordanova, A.; Isenhower, D.; Ivanishchev, D.; Jacak, B. V.; Jeon, S. J.; Jezghani, M.; Jia, J.; Jiang, X.; Johnson, B. M.; Joo, E.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Jumper, D. S.; Kanda, S.; Kang, J. H.; Kang, J. S.; Kawall, D.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Key, J. A.; Khachatryan, V.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kihara, K.; Kim, C.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E. -J.; Kim, G. W.; Kim, H. -J.; Kim, M.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimelman, B.; Kistenev, E.; Kitamura, R.; Klatsky, J.; Kleinjan, D.; Kline, P.; Koblesky, T.; Kofarago, M.; Komkov, B.; Koster, J.; Kotov, D.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kwon, Y.; Lacey, R.; Lajoie, J. G.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, S.; Lee, S. H.; Leitch, M. J.; Leitgab, M.; Li, X.; Lim, S. H.; Liu, M. X.; Lynch, D.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Makek, M.; Manion, A.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; McGlinchey, D.; McKinney, C.; Meles, A.; Mendoza, M.; Meredith, B.; Miake, Y.; Mignerey, A. C.; Miller, A. J.; Milov, A.; Mishra, D. K.; Mitchell, J. T.; Miyasaka, S.; Mizuno, S.; Mohanty, A. K.; Montuenga, P.; Moon, T.; Morrison, D. P.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Murakami, T.; Murata, J.; Mwai, A.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagashima, K.; Nagle, J. L.; Nagy, M. I.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakagomi, H.; Nakano, K.; Nattrass, C.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Nihashi, M.; Niida, T.; Nishimura, S.; Nouicer, R.; Novák, T.; Novitzky, N.; Nyanin, A. S.; O’Brien, E.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Orjuela Koop, J. D.; Osborn, J. D.; Oskarsson, A.; Ozawa, K.; Pak, R.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, J. S.; Park, S.; Pate, S. F.; Patel, L.; Patel, M.; Peng, J. -C.; Perepelitsa, D. V.; Perera, G. D. N.; Peressounko, D. Yu.; Perry, J.; Petti, R.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pinson, R.; Pisani, R. P.; Purschke, M. L.; Rak, J.; Ramson, B. J.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Reynolds, D.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Rinn, T.; Riveli, N.; Roach, D.; Rolnick, S. D.; Rosati, M.; Rowan, Z.; Rubin, J. G.; Sahlmueller, B.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sako, H.; Samsonov, V.; Sarsour, M.; Sato, S.; Sawada, S.; Schaefer, B.; Schmoll, B. K.; Sedgwick, K.; Seele, J.; Seidl, R.; Sen, A.; Seto, R.; Sett, P.; Sexton, A.; Sharma, D.; Shein, I.; Shibata, T. -A.; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Shukla, P.; Sickles, A.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Singh, B. K.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Slunečka, M.; Snowball, M.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Sourikova, I. V.; Stankus, P. W.; Stepanov, M.; Stoll, S. P.; Sugitate, T.; Sukhanov, A.; Sumita, T.; Sun, J.; Sziklai, J.; Takahara, A.; Taketani, A.; Tanida, K.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Tarafdar, S.; Taranenko, A.; Tieulent, R.; Timilsina, A.; Todoroki, T.; Tomášek, M.; Torii, H.; Towell, C. L.; Towell, M.; Towell, R.; Towell, R. S.; Tserruya, I.; van Hecke, H. W.; Vargyas, M.; Velkovska, J.; Virius, M.; Vrba, V.; Vznuzdaev, E.; Wang, X. R.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, Y.; Watanabe, Y. S.; Wei, F.; Whitaker, S.; White, A. S.; Wolin, S.; Woody, C. L.; Wysocki, M.; Xia, B.; Xue, L.; Yalcin, S.; Yamaguchi, Y. L.; Yanovich, A.; Yoo, J. H.; Yoon, I.; Younus, I.; Yu, H.; Yushmanov, I. E.; Zajc, W. A.; Zelenski, A.; Zhou, S.; Zou, L.

    2016-12-29

    We report the double-helicity asymmetry, AJ/ψLL, in inclusive J/ψ production at forward rapidity as a function of transverse momentum pT and rapidity |y|. The data analyzed were taken during √s = 510 GeV longitudinally polarized p + p collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider in the 2013 run using the PHENIX detector. At this collision energy, J/ψ particles are predominantly produced through gluon-gluon scatterings, thus AJ/ψLL is sensitive to the gluon polarization inside the proton. We measured AJ/ψLL by detecting the decay daughter muon pairs μ+μ within the PHENIX muon spectrometers in the rapidity range 1.2 < |y| < 2.2. In this kinematic range, we measured the AJ/ψLL to be 0.012 ± 0.010 (stat) ±0.003 (syst). The AJ/ψLL can be expressed to be proportional to the product of the gluon polarization distributions at two distinct ranges of Bjorken x: one at moderate range x ≈ 5 × 10–2 where recent data of jet and π0 double helicity spin asymmetries have shown evidence for significant gluon polarization, and the other one covering the poorly known small-x region x ≈ 2 × 10–3. Furthermore, our new results could be used to further constrain the gluon polarization for x < 5 × 10–2.

  12. Polarization Aberrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcguire, James P., Jr.; Chipman, Russell A.

    1990-01-01

    The analysis of the polarization characteristics displayed by optical systems can be divided into two categories: geometrical and physical. Geometrical analysis calculates the change in polarization of a wavefront between pupils in an optical instrument. Physical analysis propagates the polarized fields wherever the geometrical analysis is not valid, i.e., near the edges of stops, near images, in anisotropic media, etc. Polarization aberration theory provides a starting point for geometrical design and facilitates subsequent optimization. The polarization aberrations described arise from differences in the transmitted (or reflected) amplitudes and phases at interfaces. The polarization aberration matrix (PAM) is calculated for isotropic rotationally symmetric systems through fourth order and includes the interface phase, amplitude, linear diattenuation, and linear retardance aberrations. The exponential form of Jones matrices used are discussed. The PAM in Jones matrix is introduced. The exact calculation of polarization aberrations through polarization ray tracing is described. The report is divided into three sections: I. Rotationally Symmetric Optical Systems; II. Tilted and Decentered Optical Systems; and Polarization Analysis of LIDARs.

  13. Polar Bear

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Amstrup, S.D.; ,; Lentfer, J.W.

    1988-01-01

    Polar bears are long-lived, late-maturing carnivores that have relatively low rates of reproduction and natural mortality. Their populations are susceptible to disturbance from human activities, such as the exploration and development of mineral resources or hunting. Polar bear populations have been an important renewable resource available to coastal communities throughout the Arctic for thousands of years.

  14. LAMBDA Polarization with a Transversely Polarized Proton Target at the COMPASS Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Negrini, Teresa

    2009-08-04

    The transverse polarization of LAMBDA and LAMBDA-bar hyperons is investigated at the COMPASS experiment at CERN. In 2007 a 160 GeV/c longitudinally polarized muon beam and a transversely polarized NH{sub 3} target were employed to study events in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering. Preliminary results for the LAMBDA and LAMBDA-bar polarizations extracted from this new data set are presented as a function of x{sub Bj} and z. The polarizations of LAMBDA and LAMBDA-bar are compatible with zero within their error bars and no dependence on x{sub Bj} or z is observed.

  15. Macrophage Polarization.

    PubMed

    Murray, Peter J

    2017-02-10

    Macrophage polarization refers to how macrophages have been activated at a given point in space and time. Polarization is not fixed, as macrophages are sufficiently plastic to integrate multiple signals, such as those from microbes, damaged tissues, and the normal tissue environment. Three broad pathways control polarization: epigenetic and cell survival pathways that prolong or shorten macrophage development and viability, the tissue microenvironment, and extrinsic factors, such as microbial products and cytokines released in inflammation. A plethora of advances have provided a framework for rationally purifying, describing, and manipulating macrophage polarization. Here, I assess the current state of knowledge about macrophage polarization and enumerate the major questions about how activated macrophages regulate the physiology of normal and damaged tissues.

  16. Measurement of transverse {lambda} and {lambda}-bar polarization at COMPASS

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrero, A.

    2007-06-13

    New data on hyperon polarization in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering have been collected by the COMPASS collaboration at CERN during the years 2002-2004, using a beam of longitudinally polarized muons of 160 GeV/c and a 6LiD target that can be polarized both longitudinally and transversely. The various combinations of beam and target polarizations allow for the study of a wide variety of hyperon polarization effects. Here we present preliminary results on the transverse polarization of {lambda} and {lambda}-bar produced both with unpolarized and transversely polarized deuteron targets.

  17. Polar Bears

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Amstrup, Steven C.; Douglas, David C.; Reynolds, Patricia E.; Rhode, E.B.

    2002-01-01

    Polar bears (Ursus maritimus) are hunted throughout most of their range. In addition to hunting polar bears of the Beaufort Sea region are exposed to mineral and petroleum extraction and related human activities such as shipping road-building, and seismic testing (Stirling 1990).Little was known at the start of this project about how polar bears move about in their environment, and although it was understood that many bears travel across political borders, the boundaries of populations had not been delineated (Amstrup 1986, Amstrup et al. 1986, Amstrup and DeMaster 1988, Garner et al. 1994, Amstrup 1995, Amstrup et al. 1995, Amstrup 2000).As human populations increase and demands for polar bears and other arctic resources escalate, managers must know the sizes and distributions of the polar bear populations. Resource managers also need reliable estimates of breeding rates, reproductive intervals, litter sizes, and survival of young and adults.Our objectives for this research were 1) to determine the seasonal and annual movements of polar bears in the Beaufort Sea, 2) to define the boundaries of the population(s) using this region, 3) to determine the size and status of the Beaufort Sea polar bear population, and 4) to establish reproduction and survival rates (Amstrup 2000).

  18. Polar Glaciology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robin, G. D.

    1984-01-01

    Two fields of research on polar ice sheets are likely to be of dominant interest during the 1990s. These are: the role of polar ice sheets in the hydrological cycle ocean-atmosphere-ice sheets-oceans, especially in relation to climate change; and the study and interpretation of material in deep ice cores to provide improved knowledge of past climates and of the varying levels of atmospheric constituents such as CO2, NOx, SO2, aerosols, etc., over the past 200,000 years. Both topics require a better knowledge of ice dynamics. Many of the studies that should be undertaken in polar regions by Earth Observing System require similar instruments and techniques to those used elsewhere over oceans and inland surfaces. However to study polar regions two special requirements need to be met: Earth Observing System satellite(s) need to be in a sufficiently high inclination orbit to cover most of the polar regions. Instruments must also be adapted, often by relatively limited changes, to give satisfactory data over polar ice. The observational requirements for polar ice sheets in the 1990s are summarized.

  19. Polarizations of gravitational waves in f (R ) gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Dicong; Gong, Yungui; Hou, Shaoqi; Liu, Yunqi

    2017-05-01

    We point out that there are only three polarizations for gravitational waves in f (R ) gravity, and the polarization due to the massive scalar mode is a mix of the pure longitudinal and transverse breathing polarization. The classification of the six polarizations by the Newman-Penrose quantities is based on weak, plane and null gravitational waves, so it is not applicable to the massive mode.

  20. Semicircular Rashba arc spin polarizer

    SciTech Connect

    Bin Siu, Zhuo; Jalil, Mansoor B. A.; Ghee Tan, Seng

    2014-05-07

    In this work, we study the generation of spin polarized currents using curved arcs of finite widths, in which the Rashba spin orbit interaction (RSOI) is present. Compared to the 1-dimensional RSOI arcs with zero widths studied previously, the finite width presents charge carriers with another degree of freedom along the transverse width of the arc, in addition to the longitudinal degree of freedom along the circumference of the arc. The asymmetry in the transverse direction due to the difference in the inner and outer radii of the arc breaks the antisymmetry of the longitudinal spin z current in a straight RSOI segment. This property can be exploited to generate spin z polarized current output from the RSOI arc by a spin unpolarized current input. The sign of the spin current can be manipulated by varying the arc dimensions.

  1. Polar Plumage

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-05-08

    This Mars MOC image shows dunes in the north polar region of Mars covered by a layer of carbon dioxide frost that accumulated during the winter in 2005. Dark spots indicate areas where frost has begun to sublime away

  2. Polar Dunes

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-09-27

    By high summer, the extensive dune fields of the north polar region are completely defrosted and the number and variety of dunes are readily visible. This image was captured by NASA Mars Odyssey on August 31, 2010.

  3. Polar Cone

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-07-10

    This MOC image shows a cone-shaped hill, perhaps a remnant of a material that was once more laterally extensive across the area, on a textured plain in the Hyperboreus Labyrinthus region in the north polar region of Mars

  4. Polarizing cues.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Stephen P

    2012-01-01

    People categorize themselves and others, creating ingroup and outgroup distinctions. In American politics, parties constitute the in- and outgroups, and party leaders hold sway in articulating party positions. A party leader's endorsement of a policy can be persuasive, inducing co-partisans to take the same position. In contrast, a party leader's endorsement may polarize opinion, inducing out-party identifiers to take a contrary position. Using survey experiments from the 2008 presidential election, I examine whether in- and out-party candidate cues—John McCain and Barack Obama—affected partisan opinion. The results indicate that in-party leader cues do not persuade but that out-party leader cues polarize. This finding holds in an experiment featuring President Bush in which his endorsement did not persuade Republicans but it polarized Democrats. Lastly, I compare the effect of party leader cues to party label cues. The results suggest that politicians, not parties, function as polarizing cues.

  5. Polar Clouds

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-02-27

    With the changing of seasons comes changes in weather. This image from NASA 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft shows clouds in the north polar region. The surface is just barely visible in part of the image.

  6. Determination of the Linear Polarization of the Hall-B Tagged Photon Beam at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Sabintsev, A. A.; Livingston, K.

    2011-10-24

    The JLab CLAS g9a/FROST experiments are double polarization measurements that have accumulated photo-production data using linearly polarized, tagged photons incident on a longitudinally polarized, frozen spin butanol target. The analysis of the resulting coherent peaks was used to determine the photon polarization, which is in agreement with phenomenological calculations.

  7. Determination of the linear polarization of the Hall-B tagged photon beam at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    A.A. Sabintsev, K. Livingston

    2011-10-01

    The JLab CLAS g9a/FROST experiments are double polarization measurements that have accumulated photo-production data using linearly polarized, tagged photons incident on a longitudinally polarized, frozen spin butanol target. The analysis of the resulting coherent peaks was used to determine the photon polarization, which is in agreement with phenomenological calculations.

  8. Polarization methods for diode laser excitation of solid state lasers

    DOEpatents

    Holtom, Gary R.

    2008-11-25

    A mode-locked laser employs a coupled-polarization scheme for efficient longitudinal pumping by reshaped laser diode bars. One or more dielectric polarizers are configured to reflect a pumping wavelength having a first polarization and to reflect a lasing wavelength having a second polarization. A Yb-doped gain medium can be used that absorbs light having a first polarization and emits light having a second polarization. Using such pumping with laser cavity dispersion control, pulse durations of less than 100 fs can be achieved.

  9. Measurement of parity-violating spin asymmetries in W± production at midrapidity in longitudinally polarized p+p collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Adare, A.

    2016-03-23

    In this article, we present midrapidity measurements from the PHENIX experiment of large parity-violating single-spin asymmetries of high transverse momentum electrons and positrons from W±/Z decays, produced in longitudinally polarized p+p collisions at center of mass energies of √s=500 and 510 GeV. These asymmetries allow direct access to the antiquark polarized parton distribution functions due to the parity-violating nature of the W-boson coupling to quarks and antiquarks. The results presented are based on data collected in 2011, 2012, and 2013 with an integrated luminosity of 240 pb-1, which exceeds previous PHENIX published results by a factor of more than 27. In addition, these high Q2 data probe the parton structure of the proton at W mass scale and provide an important addition to our understanding of the antiquark parton helicity distribution functions at an intermediate Bjorken x value of roughly MW/√s=0.16.

  10. Hepatocyte Polarity

    PubMed Central

    Treyer, Aleksandr; Müsch, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Hepatocytes, like other epithelia, are situated at the interface between the organism’s exterior and the underlying internal milieu and organize the vectorial exchange of macromolecules between these two spaces. To mediate this function, epithelial cells, including hepatocytes, are polarized with distinct luminal domains that are separated by tight junctions from lateral domains engaged in cell-cell adhesion and from basal domains that interact with the underlying extracellular matrix. Despite these universal principles, hepatocytes distinguish themselves from other nonstriated epithelia by their multipolar organization. Each hepatocyte participates in multiple, narrow lumina, the bile canaliculi, and has multiple basal surfaces that face the endothelial lining. Hepatocytes also differ in the mechanism of luminal protein trafficking from other epithelia studied. They lack polarized protein secretion to the luminal domain and target single-spanning and glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored bile canalicular membrane proteins via transcytosis from the basolateral domain. We compare this unique hepatic polarity phenotype with that of the more common columnar epithelial organization and review our current knowledge of the signaling mechanisms and the organization of polarized protein trafficking that govern the establishment and maintenance of hepatic polarity. The serine/threonine kinase LKB1, which is activated by the bile acid taurocholate and, in turn, activates adenosine monophosphate kinase-related kinases including AMPK1/2 and Par1 paralogues has emerged as a key determinant of hepatic polarity. We propose that the absence of a hepatocyte basal lamina and differences in cell-cell adhesion signaling that determine the positioning of tight junctions are two crucial determinants for the distinct hepatic and columnar polarity phenotypes. PMID:23720287

  11. Measurement of the ratio of the proton's electric to magnetic form factors by recoil polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Mark K. Jones; Hall A Collaboration

    1999-03-01

    The longitudinal and transverse polarizations of the outgoing proton were measured for the reaction {sup 1}H(e,e' p) at four-momentum transfer squared of 0.5 to 3.5 GeV{sup 2}. The ratio of the electric to magnetic form factors of the proton is proportional to the ratio of the transverse to longitudinal polarizations.

  12. Polarized Campuses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parr, Susan Resneck

    1991-01-01

    On college campuses, the climate is polarized because of intolerance and discrimination, censorship, factionalism, and anger among students and faculty. As a result, the campus is in danger of becoming dominated by political issues and discouraging the exchange of ideas characteristic of a true liberal arts education. (MSE)

  13. Polar Stratigraphy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    These three images were taken on three different orbits over the north polar cap in April 1999. Each shows a different part of the same ice-free trough. The left and right images are separated by a distance of more than 100 kilometers (62 miles). Note the similar layers in each image.

  14. Polar Dune

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-07-01

    A large sand sheet with surface dune forms is located on the floor of this crater near the south pole. The polar cap rests against the southern part of the sand sheet. The dune appears bright in this daytime 2001 Mars Odyssey THEMIS IR image.

  15. Cell polarity

    PubMed Central

    Romereim, Sarah M

    2011-01-01

    Despite extensive genetic analysis of the dynamic multi-phase process that transforms a small population of lateral plate mesoderm into the mature limb skeleton, the mechanisms by which signaling pathways regulate cellular behaviors to generate morphogenetic forces are not known. Recently, a series of papers have offered the intriguing possibility that regulated cell polarity fine-tunes the morphogenetic process via orienting cell axes, division planes and cell movements. Wnt5a-mediated non-canonical signaling, which may include planar cell polarity, has emerged as a common thread in the otherwise distinct signaling networks that regulate morphogenesis in each phase of limb development. These findings position the limb as a key model to elucidate how global tissue patterning pathways direct local differences in cell behavior that, in turn, generate growth and form. PMID:22064549

  16. Polar Diving

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    3 July 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows layers exposed by erosion in a trough within the north polar residual cap of Mars, diving beneath a younger covering of polar materials. The layers have, since the Mariner 9 mission in 1972, been interpreted to be composed of a combination of dust and ice in unknown proportions. In this scene, a layer of solid carbon dioxide, which was deposited during the previous autumn and winter, blankets the trough as well as the adjacent terrain. Throughout northern spring, the carbon dioxide will be removed; by summer, the layers will be frost-free.

    Location near: 81.4oN, 352.2oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Northern Spring

  17. Polar Diving

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    3 July 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows layers exposed by erosion in a trough within the north polar residual cap of Mars, diving beneath a younger covering of polar materials. The layers have, since the Mariner 9 mission in 1972, been interpreted to be composed of a combination of dust and ice in unknown proportions. In this scene, a layer of solid carbon dioxide, which was deposited during the previous autumn and winter, blankets the trough as well as the adjacent terrain. Throughout northern spring, the carbon dioxide will be removed; by summer, the layers will be frost-free.

    Location near: 81.4oN, 352.2oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Northern Spring

  18. Polar Textures

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-06-08

    This VIS image of the south pole was taken at the end of summer. Frost will soon start to form as the season transitions into fall. Fall in the southern hemisphere means spring in the northern, so the north polar cap is just starting to thaw. Orbit Number: 67893 Latitude: -87.0251 Longitude: 275.679 Instrument: VIS Captured: 2017-04-04 06:19 https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21679

  19. Numerical calculation of the ion polarization in MEIC

    SciTech Connect

    Derbenev, Yaroslav; Lin, Fanglei; Morozov, Vasiliy; Zhang, Yuhong; Kondratenko, Anatoliy M.; Kondratenko, M. A.; Filatov, Yury N.

    2015-09-01

    Ion polarization in the Medium-energy Electron-Ion Collider (MEIC) is controlled by means of universal 3D spin rotators designed on the basis of "weak" solenoids. We use numerical calculations to demonstrate that the 3D rotators have negligible effect on the orbital properties of the ring. We present calculations of the polarization dynamics along the collider's orbit for both longitudinal and transverse polarization directions at a beam interaction point. We calculate the degree of depolarization due to the longitudinal and transverse beam emittances in case when the zero-integer spin resonance is compensated.

  20. Polar Landforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    10 August 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows eroded remnants of carbon dioxide ice in the south polar residual cap of Mars. The scarps that outline each small mesa have retreated about 3 meters (10 feet) per Mars year since MGS began orbiting the red planet in 1997.

    Location near: 87.0oS, 31.9oW Image width: width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Spring

  1. Polar ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, S.; Grose, W. L.; Jones, R. L.; Mccormick, M. P.; Molina, Mario J.; Oneill, A.; Poole, L. R.; Shine, K. P.; Plumb, R. A.; Pope, V.

    1990-01-01

    The observation and interpretation of a large, unexpected ozone depletion over Antarctica has changed the international scientific view of stratospheric chemistry. The observations which show the veracity, seasonal nature, and vertical structure of the Antarctic ozone hole are presented. Evidence for Arctic and midlatitude ozone loss is also discussed. The chemical theory for Antarctic ozone depletion centers around the occurrence of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) in Antarctic winter and spring; the climatology and radiative properties of these clouds are presented. Lab studies of the physical properties of PSCs and the chemical processes that subsequently influence ozone depletion are discussed. Observations and interpretation of the chemical composition of the Antarctic stratosphere are described. It is shown that the observed, greatly enhanced abundances of chlorine monoxide in the lower stratosphere are sufficient to explain much if not all of the ozone decrease. The dynamic meteorology of both polar regions is given, interannual and interhemispheric variations in dynamical processes are outlined, and their likely roles in ozone loss are discussed.

  2. Polar Terrains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA03577 Polar Terrains

    The region surrounding the South Polar Cap contains many different terrain types. This image shows both etched terrain and a region of 'mounds'.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 75S, Longitude 286.5E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  3. Polar Textures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA03638 Polar Textures

    This image illustrates the variety of textures that appear in the south polar region during late summer.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 80.5S, Longitude 57.9E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  4. Polar Barchans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    20 July 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows dark, barchan sand dunes of the north polar region of Mars. Barchan dunes are simple, rounded forms with two horns that extend downwind. Inequalities in local wind patterns may result in one horn being extended farther than the other, as is the case for several dunes in this image. The image also shows several barchans may merge to form a long dune ridge. The horns and attendant slip faces on these dunes indicate wind transport of sand from the upper left toward the lower right. The image is located near 77.6oN, 103.6oW. The picture covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) wide; sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower left.

  5. Polar Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA03581 Polar Layers

    This image shows just one example of the bright and dark markings that appear during summer time. The marks are related to the polar layers. If you happen to see a wild-eyed guy sticking his tongue out at you, you'll know why this image qualifies for the old 'art' category of THEMIS releases.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 80.6S, Longitude 34.1E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  6. Longitudinal terahertz wave generation from an air plasma filament induced by a femtosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minami, Yasuo; Kurihara, Takayuki; Yamaguchi, Keita; Nakajima, Makoto; Suemoto, Tohru

    2013-04-01

    We have generated and detected a longitudinally polarized (Z-polarized) terahertz (THz) wave by focusing a conically propagating THz beam generated from a plasma filament induced by a femtosecond laser pulse. In the experiment, we observed a radially polarized field in a collimated region and Z-polarized field at focus in the time domain. The maximum value of the Z-polarized THz electric field reached 1.0 kV/cm. It was also quantitatively discussed about the Z-polarized field and the radial field at the focal point. We expect this technique to find application in THz time domain spectroscopy.

  7. Polarization in astronomical spectra - Theoretical evidence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fymat, A. L.

    1974-01-01

    Theoretical evidence for the existence and behavior of polarization in astronomical spectra is provided. The theory for the study of spectral multiple scattering of arbitrarily polarized light is first developed, and the detailed and integrated spectropolarimetry of a planetary atmosphere is then studied for cases in which the spectra are formed in the presence of either very small nonspherical particles (Rayleigh-Cabannes scattering) or large polydisperse spherical particles (Mie scattering). It is shown in both cases that polarization is indeed present; it increases with the line strength but decreases afterwards as the line becomes very strong and tends to saturation. A polarization reversal is also predicted during latitudinal (pole-to-equator) scan and possibly also during longitudinal (terminator-to-limb) scan of the planet. The reversal happened at all phase angles considered. Our companion article (Forbes and Fymat) will provide observational substantiation to these theoretical predictions.

  8. Image scanning microscopy with radially polarized light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Yun; Zhang, Yunhai; Wei, Tongda; Huang, Wei; Shi, Yaqin

    2017-03-01

    In order to improve the resolution of image scanning microscopy, we present a method based on image scanning microscopy and radially polarized light. According to the theory of image scanning microscopy, we get the effective point spread function of image scanning microscopy with the longitudinal component of radially polarized light and a 1 AU detection area, and obtain imaging results of the analyzed samples using this method. Results show that the resolution can be enhanced by 7% compared with that in image scanning microscopy with circularly polarized light, and is 1.54-fold higher than that in confocal microscopy with a pinhole of 1 AU. Additionally, the peak intensity of ISM is 1.54-fold higher than that of a confocal microscopy with a pinhole of 1 AU. In conclusion, the combination of the image scanning microscopy and the radially polarized light could improve the resolution, and it could realize high-resolution and high SNR imaging at the same time.

  9. Longitudinal impedance of RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J. M.; Mernick, K.

    2015-05-03

    The longitudinal impedance of the two RHIC rings has been measured using the effect of potential well distortion on longitudinal Schottky measurements. For the blue RHIC ring Im(Z/n) = 1.5±0.2Ω. For the yellow ring Im(Z/n) = 5.4±1Ω.

  10. Longitudinal Multistage Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pohl, Steffi

    2013-01-01

    This article introduces longitudinal multistage testing (lMST), a special form of multistage testing (MST), as a method for adaptive testing in longitudinal large-scale studies. In lMST designs, test forms of different difficulty levels are used, whereas the values on a pretest determine the routing to these test forms. Since lMST allows for…

  11. Longitudinal Stability Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Blaskiewicz,M.

    2009-01-02

    Coupled bunch longitudinal stability in the presence of high frequency impedances is considered. A frequency domain technique is developed and compared with simulations. The frequency domain technique allows for absolute stability tests and is applied to the problem of longitudinal stability in RHIC with the new 56 MHz RF system.

  12. Energy dependence of hadron polarization in e+e-→h X at high energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kai-bao; Yang, Wei-hua; Zhou, Ya-jin; Liang, Zuo-tang

    2017-02-01

    The longitudinal polarization of a hyperon in e+e- annihilation at high energies depends on the longitudinal polarization of the quark produced at the e+e- annihilation vertex, whereas the spin alignment of vector mesons is independent of it. They exhibit very different energy dependences. We use the longitudinal polarization of the Lambda hyperon and the spin alignment of K* as representative examples to present numerical results of energy dependences and demonstrate such distinct differences. We present the results at the leading twist with perturbative QCD evolutions of fragmentation functions at the leading order.

  13. Proton Form Factor Measurements Using Polarization Method: Beyond Born Approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Pentchev, Lubomir

    2008-10-13

    Significant theoretical and experimental efforts have been made over the past 7 years aiming to explain the discrepancy between the proton form factor ratio data obtained at JLab using the polarization method and the previous Rosenbluth measurements. Preliminary results from the first high precision polarization experiment dedicated to study effects beyond Born approximation will be presented. The ratio of the transferred polarization components and, separately, the longitudinal polarization in ep elastic scattering have been measured at a fixed Q{sup 2} of 2.5 GeV{sup 2} over a wide kinematic range. The two quantities impose constraints on the real part of the ep elastic amplitudes.

  14. Status of Proton Polarization in Rhic and AGS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackay, W. W.; Bai, M.; Huang, H.; Ahrens, L.; Alekseev, I. G.; Bravar, A.; Brown, K.; Bunce, G.; Calaga, R.; Courant, E. D.; Drees, A.; Fischer, W.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J. W.; Gupta, R.; Igo, G.; Iriso, U.; Jinnouchi, O.; Kurita, K.; Luccio, A. U.; Luo, Y.; Makdisi, Y.; Marr, G.; Montag, C.; Nass, A.; Okada, H.; Okamura, M.; Pilat, F.; Ptitsyn, V.; Roser, T.; Saito, N.; Satogata, T.; Spinka, H.; Stephenson, E. J.; Svirida, D. N.; Takano, J.; Tepikian, S.; Tomas, R.; Tsoupas, N.; Underwood, D.; Whitten, C.; Wood, J.; Zeijts, J. Van; Zelenski, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S. Y.

    2005-08-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) has collided protons with both transverse and longitudinal polarization at a centre-of-mass energy of 200 GeV. Future running will extend this to 500 GeV. This paper describes the methods used to accelerate and manipulate polarized proton beams in RHIC and its injectors. Special techniques include the use of a partial Siberian snake and an AC dipole in the AGS. In RHIC we use superconducting helical Siberian snakes for acceleration, and eight superconducting helical rotators for independent control of polarization directions at two interaction regions. The present status and future plans for the polarized proton program will be reviewed.

  15. The polarization properties of a tilted polarizer.

    PubMed

    Korger, Jan; Kolb, Tobias; Banzer, Peter; Aiello, Andrea; Wittmann, Christoffer; Marquardt, Christoph; Leuchs, Gerd

    2013-11-04

    Polarizers are key components in optical science and technology. Thus, understanding the action of a polarizer beyond oversimplifying approximations is crucial. In this work, we study the interaction of a polarizing interface with an obliquely incident wave experimentally. To this end, a set of Mueller matrices is acquired employing a novel procedure robust against experimental imperfections. We connect our observation to a geometric model, useful to predict the effect of polarizers on complex light fields.

  16. Polarization in Scattering

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    we refer to the linear polarization as parallel if the polarization vector is in the scattering plane or perpendicular if the polarization vector is...obvious that the different polarization states can all be represented as linear combinations of any of the independent pairs of polarization states...J.C. (1976) “Improvement of underwater visibility by reduction of backscatter with a circular polarization technique, Applied Optics, 6, 321-330

  17. Polarized internal target apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Holt, R.J.

    1984-10-10

    A polarized internal target apparatus with a polarized gas target of improved polarization and density (achieved by mixing target gas atoms with a small amount of alkali metal gas atoms, and passing a high intensity polarized light source into the mixture to cause the alkali metal gas atoms to become polarized which interact in spin exchange collisions with target gas atoms yielding polarized target gas atoms) is described.

  18. Polarized internal target apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Holt, Roy J.

    1986-01-01

    A polarized internal target apparatus with a polarized gas target of improved polarization and density achieved by mixing target gas atoms with a small amount of alkali metal gas atoms, and passing a high intensity polarized light source into the mixture to cause the alkali metal gas atoms to become polarized which interact in spin exchange collisions with target gas atoms yielding polarized target gas atoms.

  19. Recoil-proton polarization in high-energy deuteron photodisintegration with circularly plarized photons.

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, X.; Arrington, J.; Benmokhtar, F.; Camsonne, A.; Chen, J. P.; Holt, R. J.; Qattan, I. A.; Reimer, P. E.; Schulte, E. C.; Wijesooriya, K.; Physics; Rutgers Univ.; Univ. Blaise Pascal; Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

    2007-05-01

    We measured the angular dependence of the three recoil-proton polarization components in two-body photodisintegration of the deuteron at a photon energy of 2 GeV. These new data provide a benchmark for calculations based on quantum chromodynamics. Two of the five existing models have made predictions of polarization observables. Both explain the longitudinal polarization transfer satisfactorily. Transverse polarizations are not well described, but suggest isovector dominance.

  20. Undulator-based production of polarized positrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, G.; Barley, J.; Batygin, Y.; Berridge, S.; Bharadwaj, V.; Bower, G.; Bugg, W.; Decker, F.-J.; Dollan, R.; Efremenko, Y.; Flöttmann, K.; Gharibyan, V.; Hast, C.; Iverson, R.; Kolanoski, H.; Kovermann, J. W.; Laihem, K.; Lohse, T.; McDonald, K. T.; Mikhailichenko, A. A.; Moortgat-Pick, G. A.; Pahl, P.; Pitthan, R.; Pöschl, R.; Reinherz-Aronis, E.; Riemann, S.; Schälicke, A.; Schüler, K. P.; Schweizer, T.; Scott, D.; Sheppard, J. C.; Stahl, A.; Szalata, Z.; Walz, D. R.; Weidemann, A.

    2009-11-01

    Full exploitation of the physics potential of a future International Linear Collider will require the use of polarized electron and positron beams. Experiment E166 at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) has demonstrated a scheme in which an electron beam passes through a helical undulator to generate photons (whose first-harmonic spectrum extended to 7.9 MeV) with circular polarization, which are then converted in a thin target to generate longitudinally polarized positrons and electrons. The experiment was carried out with a 1-m-long, 400-period, pulsed helical undulator in the Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB) operated at 46.6 GeV. Measurements of the positron polarization have been performed at five positron energies from 4.5 to 7.5 MeV. In addition, the electron polarization has been determined at 6.7 MeV, and the effect of operating the undulator with a ferrofluid was also investigated. To compare the measurements with expectations, detailed simulations were made with an upgraded version of G EANT4 that includes the dominant polarization-dependent interactions of electrons, positrons, and photons with matter. The measurements agree with calculations, corresponding to 80% polarization for positrons near 6 MeV and 90% for electrons near 7 MeV.

  1. Broadband graphene polarizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Qiaoliang; Zhang, Han; Wang, Bing; Ni, Zhenhua; Lim, Candy Haley Yi Xuan; Wang, Yu; Tang, Ding Yuan; Loh, Kian Ping

    2011-07-01

    Conventional polarizers can be classified into three main modes of operation: sheet polarizer using anisotropic absorption media, prism polarizer by refraction and Brewster-angle polarizer by reflection. These polarizing components are not easily integrated with photonic circuits. The in-line fibre polarizer, which relies on polarization-selective coupling between the evanescent field and birefringent crystal or metal, is a promising alternative because of its compatibility with most fibre-optic systems. Here, we demonstrate the operation of a broadband fibre polarizer based on graphene, an ultrathin two-dimensional carbon material. The out-coupled light in the telecommunication band shows a strong s-polarization effect with an extinction ratio of 27 dB. Unlike polarizers made from thin metal film, a graphene polarizer can support transverse-electric-mode surface wave propagation due to its linear dispersion of Dirac electrons.

  2. Polar Color

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 3 May 2004 This nighttime visible color image was collected on January 1, 2003 during the Northern Summer season near the North Polar Troughs.

    This daytime visible color image was collected on September 4, 2002 during the Northern Spring season in Vastitas Borealis. The THEMIS VIS camera is capable of capturing color images of the martian surface using its five different color filters. In this mode of operation, the spatial resolution and coverage of the image must be reduced to accommodate the additional data volume produced from the use of multiple filters. To make a color image, three of the five filter images (each in grayscale) are selected. Each is contrast enhanced and then converted to a red, green, or blue intensity image. These three images are then combined to produce a full color, single image. Because the THEMIS color filters don't span the full range of colors seen by the human eye, a color THEMIS image does not represent true color. Also, because each single-filter image is contrast enhanced before inclusion in the three-color image, the apparent color variation of the scene is exaggerated. Nevertheless, the color variation that does appear is representative of some change in color, however subtle, in the actual scene. Note that the long edges of THEMIS color images typically contain color artifacts that do not represent surface variation.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 79, Longitude 346 East (14 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with

  3. Possibilities of new data in hadroproduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raja, Rajendran

    2007-03-01

    We describe experiments that can produce data that is of relevance to hadronic shower simulation. In particular we describe the possibilities to dramatically improve the quality of the data available for improving hadronic shower simulators made possible with the upgraded Main Injector Particle production Experiment (MIPP). We describe the status of MIPP which has to date acquired. 18 million events of particle interactions using (5 GeV/c-120 GeV/c) π±,K± and p± beams on various targets and the plans to upgrade the data acquisition speed of MIPP to make it run 100 times faster.

  4. The complete NLO corrections to dijet hadroproduction

    DOE PAGES

    Frederix, R.; Frixione, S.; Hirschi, V.; ...

    2017-04-12

    We study the production of jets in hadronic collisions, by computing all contributions proportional to αSnαm, with n + m = 2 and n + m = 3. These correspond to leading and next-to-leading order results, respectively, for single-inclusive and dijet observables in a perturbative expansion that includes both QCD and electroweak effects. We discuss issues relevant to the definition of hadronic jets in the context of electroweak corrections, and present sample phenomenological predictions for the 13-TeV LHC. We find that both the leading and next-to-leading order contributions largely respect the relative hierarchy established by the respective coupling-constant combinations.

  5. Hadroproduction of heavy quarkonia at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Berezhnoy, A. V.; Likhoded, A. K.; Luchinsky, A. V. Poslavsky, S. V.

    2015-05-15

    The production of heavy quarkonia at the LHC is considered. It is shown that, in the case of the inclusive production of χ{sub cJ}P-wave charmonia, existing experimental data can be described upon taking into account next-to-leading corrections, a dominant contribution coming from color-singlet states. For the case of B{sub c}-meson production, it is shown that, at experimentally accessible values of the transverse momentum, power-law corrections to the cross section make a significant contribution, with the result that the cross-section ratio σ(B{sub c})/σ(B) develops a p{sub T} dependence not observed in the fragmentation regime. The case of double vector-charmonium production is also considered.

  6. Longitudinal variations of the equatorial electojet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shume, Esayas

    We have utilized a three dimensional electrostatic potential model to explain the longitudinal variations of the equatorial electrojet. The model runs were constrained by net H component magnetic field measurements from three equatorial stations, namely, Huancayo (Peru) 12.05 S, 284.67 E; Addis Ababa (Ethiopia) 9.8 N, 38.8 E; Tirunelveli (India) 8.42 N, 77.48 E. The model runs were done in an iterative fashion until the computed and measured H component magnetic field values come into a close agreement. The physical mechanisms for the longitudinal variations of the equatorial electrojet were inferred by comparing and contrasting the resulting computed vertical polarization electric field (which drives the equatorial electrojet), and zonal current density profiles for the three stations mentioned above.

  7. Polarized Light in Astronomy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, D. J.

    1983-01-01

    The application of very sensitive electronic detecting devices during the last decade has revolutionized and revitalized the study of polarization in celestial objects. The nature of polarization, how polaroids work, interstellar polarization, dichroic filters, polarization by scattering, and modern polarimetry are among the topics discussed. (JN)

  8. Perceiving polarization with the naked eye: characterization of human polarization sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Temple, Shelby E.; McGregor, Juliette E.; Miles, Camilla; Graham, Laura; Miller, Josie; Buck, Jordan; Scott-Samuel, Nicholas E.; Roberts, Nicholas W.

    2015-01-01

    Like many animals, humans are sensitive to the polarization of light. We can detect the angle of polarization using an entoptic phenomenon called Haidinger's brushes, which is mediated by dichroic carotenoids in the macula lutea. While previous studies have characterized the spectral sensitivity of Haidinger's brushes, other aspects remain unexplored. We developed a novel methodology for presenting gratings in polarization-only contrast at varying degrees of polarization in order to measure the lower limits of human polarized light detection. Participants were, on average, able to perform the task down to a threshold of 56%, with some able to go as low as 23%. This makes humans the most sensitive vertebrate tested to date. Additionally, we quantified a nonlinear relationship between presented and perceived polarization angle when an observer is presented with a rotatable polarized light field. This result confirms a previous theoretical prediction of how uniaxial corneal birefringence impacts the perception of Haidinger's brushes. The rotational dynamics of Haidinger's brushes were then used to calculate corneal retardance. We suggest that psychophysical experiments, based upon the perception of polarized light, are amenable to the production of affordable technologies for self-assessment and longitudinal monitoring of visual dysfunctions such as age-related macular degeneration. PMID:26136441

  9. Perceiving polarization with the naked eye: characterization of human polarization sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Temple, Shelby E; McGregor, Juliette E; Miles, Camilla; Graham, Laura; Miller, Josie; Buck, Jordan; Scott-Samuel, Nicholas E; Roberts, Nicholas W

    2015-07-22

    Like many animals, humans are sensitive to the polarization of light. We can detect the angle of polarization using an entoptic phenomenon called Haidinger's brushes, which is mediated by dichroic carotenoids in the macula lutea. While previous studies have characterized the spectral sensitivity of Haidinger's brushes, other aspects remain unexplored. We developed a novel methodology for presenting gratings in polarization-only contrast at varying degrees of polarization in order to measure the lower limits of human polarized light detection. Participants were, on average, able to perform the task down to a threshold of 56%, with some able to go as low as 23%. This makes humans the most sensitive vertebrate tested to date. Additionally, we quantified a nonlinear relationship between presented and perceived polarization angle when an observer is presented with a rotatable polarized light field. This result confirms a previous theoretical prediction of how uniaxial corneal birefringence impacts the perception of Haidinger's brushes. The rotational dynamics of Haidinger's brushes were then used to calculate corneal retardance.We suggest that psychophysical experiments, based upon the perception of polarized light, are amenable to the production of affordable technologies for self-assessment and longitudinal monitoring of visual dysfunctions such as age-related macular degeneration.

  10. Longitudinal Magnification Drawing Mistake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabal, Héctor; Cap, Nelly; Trivi, Marcelo

    2004-01-01

    Lateral magnification in image formation by positive lenses, mirrors, and dioptrics is usually appropriately developed in most optics textbooks.1-9 However, the image of a three-dimensional object occupies a three-dimensional region of space. The optical system affects both the transverse and the longitudinal dimensions of the object and, in general, does it in different ways. The magnification in the direction of the optical axis (the longitudinal magnification) is seldom treated. In several texts, the concept of longitudinal magnification is not even considered. Symmetrical objects (such as arrows) are used and their images appear laterally inverted. It is not shown how a longitudinally nonsymmetric object is imaged. One of the few books where this subject is well treated is in the textbook by Hecht.10 We have repeatedly verified in our classes that there is some confusion related to this subject. Students tend to believe that the image is longitudinally symmetric with respect to the lens optic center. Some prestigious texts commit the same mistake. In addition, a very nice optics book,11 a catalogue of optical hardware,12 a worldwide scientific magazine,13 a paper in an optics journal,14 and a Spanish encyclopedia,15 for example, have also been found to contain this error in drawing the image of a three-dimensional object formed by a positive lens. In this paper we suggest that the teaching of longitudinal magnification should be done with some care and we include a figure showing a properly drawn image.

  11. Polarized maser growth

    SciTech Connect

    Melrose, D.B.; Judge, A.C.

    2004-11-01

    A polarized maser is assumed to operate in an anisotropic medium with natural modes polarized differently to the maser. It is shown that when the spatial growth rate and the generalized Faraday rotation rate are comparable, the polarization of the growing radiation is different from those of the maser and medium. In particular, for a lineary polarized maser operating in a medium with linearly polarized natural modes, the growing radiation is partially circularly polarized. This provides a previously unrecognized source of circular polarization that may be relevant to pulsar radio emission.

  12. Polarized electron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Prepost, R.

    1994-12-01

    The fundamentals of polarized electron sources are described with particular application to the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The SLAC polarized electron source is based on the principle of polarized photoemission from Gallium Arsenide. Recent developments using epitaxially grown, strained Gallium Arsenide cathodes have made it possible to obtain electron polarization significantly in excess of the conventional 50% polarization limit. The basic principles for Gallium and Arsenide polarized photoemitters are reviewed, and the extension of the basic technique to strained cathode structures is described. Results from laboratory measurements of strained photocathodes as well as operational results from the SLAC polarized source are presented.

  13. Cup waveguide antenna with integrated polarizer and OMT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acosta, Roberto J. (Inventor); Kory, Carol (Inventor); Lambert, Kevin M. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A cup waveguide antenna with integrated polarizer and OMT for simultaneously communicating left and right hand circularly polarized electromagnetic waves is adjustable to obtain efficient propagation and reception of electromagnetic waves. The antenna includes a circular waveguide having an orthomode transducer utilizing first and second pins longitudinally spaced apart and oriented orthogonally with respect to each other. Six radially-oriented adjustable polarizer screws extend from the exterior to the interior of the waveguide. A septum intermediate the first and second pins is aligned with the first pin. Adjustment of the polarizer screws enables maximized propagation of and/or response to left hand circularly polarized electromagnetic waves by the first pin while simultaneously enabling maximized propagation of and/or response to right hand circularly polarized electromagnetic waves by the second pin.

  14. New design of longitudinal ultrasonic vibrator for wire drawing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yuancai; Yuan, Jiangbo; Liu, Shen; Shan, Xiaobiao

    2017-04-01

    This paper presents a quarter-wave longitudinal vibrator which is applied to ultrasonic assisted wire drawing. The characteristic of this vibrator is only driven by an axially polarized sandwich PZT stack, which converts electrical energy into mechanical vibration energy. The transducer and horn were designed at the same side of the nodal section to achieve greater vibration at the front of the horn. The four-terminal network method was used to design the vibrator. The finite element method (FEM) was adopted to verify the above design and used for the further analysis about the vibration performances of this vibrator. The numberial caculation results match well with the simulation results. The simulation indicates that the resonance frequency of the longitudinal vibration is about 19.6188 kHz and the amplitude of longitudinal vibration at the end of the horn is about 11.48 μm. The present work provides a new longitudinal vibrator for ultrasonic wire drawing.

  15. The role of the plasma sheet in the formation of high-latitude electric fields and longitudinal currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kropotkin, A. P.

    1980-12-01

    A mathematical model is developed which makes it possible to assess the influence of the polarization of the plasma sheet on the electric fields and longitudinal currents in the high-latitude ionosphere at the boundary of the polar cap and the auroral zone. Some results are presented on the discontinuity of the electric field in the transition between the polar cap and the auroral zone, on the magnetospheric dynamo, and on the inhomogeneity of the electric field in the polar cap.

  16. Observation of in plane magnetization reversal using polarization dependent magneto-optic Kerr effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohldag, H.; Weber, N. B.; Hillebrecht, F. U.; Kisker, E.

    2002-02-01

    We present an experimental setup for in plane two axis magnetometry using the polarization dependent magneto-optic Kerr effect (MOKE). A conventional setup to measure longitudinal MOKE with crossed polarizers is extended by a Faraday cell to compensate for the rotation of the polarization vector caused by a magnetized sample. The shape of the hysteresis loops measured on thin FeNi alloy films depends strongly on the angle between the optical axis of the analyzer and the plane of incidence. We derive expressions for the compensation angle which allow for extraction of vectorial magnetic information from loops detected with oblique polarization. For a small deviation from pure s or p polarization the transverse magnetization is found to be proportional to the difference between the loop obtained with oblique polarization and the one obtained with pure s or p polarization. Thus the complete in plane reversal process split up into longitudinal and transverse components can be observed.

  17. Polarization-balanced beamsplitter

    DOEpatents

    Decker, Derek E.

    1998-01-01

    A beamsplitter assembly that includes several beamsplitter cubes arranged to define a plurality of polarization-balanced light paths. Each polarization-balanced light path contains one or more balanced pairs of light paths, where each balanced pair of light paths includes either two transmission light paths with orthogonal polarization effects or two reflection light paths with orthogonal polarization effects. The orthogonal pairing of said transmission and reflection light paths cancels polarization effects otherwise caused by beamsplitting.

  18. Polarization-balanced beamsplitter

    DOEpatents

    Decker, D.E.

    1998-02-17

    A beamsplitter assembly is disclosed that includes several beamsplitter cubes arranged to define a plurality of polarization-balanced light paths. Each polarization-balanced light path contains one or more balanced pairs of light paths, where each balanced pair of light paths includes either two transmission light paths with orthogonal polarization effects or two reflection light paths with orthogonal polarization effects. The orthogonal pairing of said transmission and reflection light paths cancels polarization effects otherwise caused by beamsplitting. 10 figs.

  19. Crossed elliptical polarization undulator

    SciTech Connect

    Sasaki, Shigemi

    1997-05-01

    The first switching of polarization direction is possible by installing two identical helical undulators in series in a same straight section in a storage ring. By setting each undulator in a circular polarization mode in opposite handedness, one can obtain linearly polarized radiation with any required polarization direction depending on the modulator setting between two undulators. This scheme can be used without any major degradation of polarization degree in any low energy low emittance storage ring.

  20. Optical transmission through a polarization preserving single mode optical fiber at two Ar(+) laser wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tedjojuwono, Ken K.; Hunter, William W., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    The transmission characteristics of two Ar(+) laser wavelengths through a twenty meter Panda type Polarization Preserving Single Mode Optical Fiber (PPSMOF) were measured. The measurements were done with both single and multi-longitudinal mode radiation. In the single longitudinal mode case, a degrading Stimulated Brillouin Scattering (SBS) is observed as a backward scattering loss. By choosing an optimum coupling system and manipulating the input polarization, the threshold of the SBS onset can be raised and the transmission efficiency can be increased.

  1. Nuclear polarization in hydrogenlike 20882Pb81+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haga, Akihiro; Horikawa, Yataro; Tanaka, Yasutoshi

    2002-05-01

    We calculate nuclear-polarization energy shifts for the hydrogenlike 20882Pb81+. The retarded transverse part as well as the longitudinal part is taken into account as the electromagnetic interaction between an electron and the nucleus. With a finite charge distribution for the nuclear ground state and the random-phase approximation to describe the nuclear excitations, we obtain nuclear-polarization energy of the 1s1/2 state as -38.2 (-37.0) meV in the Feynman (Coulomb) gauge. For the 2s1/2, 2p1/2, and 2p3/2 states, they are -6.7 (-6.4), -0.2 (-0.2), and +0.0 (+0.0) meV, respectively. The transverse contribution is small in comparison with the longitudinal nuclear-polarization correction. It is about 12% both for the 1s1/2 and 2s1/2 states. The seagull term in the two-photon exchange diagrams is also shown to be quite important to obtain the gauge-invariant nuclear-polarization energies.

  2. Faraday polarization fluctuations of satellite beacon signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, M. C.; Klobuchar, J. A.

    1988-01-01

    The anisotropic effects of random density irregularities in causing Faraday polarization fluctuations of VHF radio signals are examined, taking both rod-like and sheet-like irregularities into consideration. It is found that the variance of Faraday polarization fluctuations depends on the ratio of perpendicular to parallel correlation lengths. The anisotropic effect of rod-like ionospheric irregularities are shown to be most appreciable for longitudinal propagation. The anisotropic effect of sheet-like ionospheric irregularities, however, is not strongly dependent on the radio propagation angle. During transionospheric propagation at large angles with respect to the geomagnetic field, sheet-like irregularities may cause greater Faraday polarization fluctuations than rod-like irregularities.

  3. Metasurface polarization splitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slovick, Brian A.; Zhou, You; Yu, Zhi Gang; Kravchenko, Ivan I.; Briggs, Dayrl P.; Moitra, Parikshit; Krishnamurthy, Srini; Valentine, Jason

    2017-03-01

    Polarization beam splitters, devices that separate the two orthogonal polarizations of light into different propagation directions, are among the most ubiquitous optical elements. However, traditionally polarization splitters rely on bulky optical materials, while emerging optoelectronic and photonic circuits require compact, chip-scale polarization splitters. Here, we show that a rectangular lattice of cylindrical silicon Mie resonators functions as a polarization splitter, efficiently reflecting one polarization while transmitting the other. We show that the polarization splitting arises from the anisotropic permittivity and permeability of the metasurface due to the twofold rotational symmetry of the rectangular unit cell. The high polarization efficiency, low loss and low profile make these metasurface polarization splitters ideally suited for monolithic integration with optoelectronic and photonic circuits. This article is part of the themed issue 'New horizons for nanophotonics'.

  4. Metasurface polarization splitter.

    PubMed

    Slovick, Brian A; Zhou, You; Yu, Zhi Gang; Kravchenko, Ivan I; Briggs, Dayrl P; Moitra, Parikshit; Krishnamurthy, Srini; Valentine, Jason

    2017-03-28

    Polarization beam splitters, devices that separate the two orthogonal polarizations of light into different propagation directions, are among the most ubiquitous optical elements. However, traditionally polarization splitters rely on bulky optical materials, while emerging optoelectronic and photonic circuits require compact, chip-scale polarization splitters. Here, we show that a rectangular lattice of cylindrical silicon Mie resonators functions as a polarization splitter, efficiently reflecting one polarization while transmitting the other. We show that the polarization splitting arises from the anisotropic permittivity and permeability of the metasurface due to the twofold rotational symmetry of the rectangular unit cell. The high polarization efficiency, low loss and low profile make these metasurface polarization splitters ideally suited for monolithic integration with optoelectronic and photonic circuits.This article is part of the themed issue 'New horizons for nanophotonics'.

  5. Metasurface polarization splitter

    DOE PAGES

    Slovick, Brian A.; Zhou, You; Yu, Zhi Gang; ...

    2017-02-20

    Polarization beam splitters, devices that separate the two orthogonal polarizations of light into different propagation directions, are among the most ubiquitous optical elements. However, traditionally polarization splitters rely on bulky optical materials, while emerging optoelectronic and photonic circuits require compact, chip-scale polarization splitters. Here, we show that a rectangular lattice of cylindrical silicon Mie resonators functions as a polarization splitter, efficiently reflecting one polarization while transmitting the other. We show that the polarization splitting arises from the anisotropic permittivity and permeability of the metasurface due to the twofold rotational symmetry of the rectangular unit cell. Lastly, the high polarization efficiency,more » low loss and low profile make these metasurface polarization splitters ideally suited for monolithic integration with optoelectronic and photonic circuits.« less

  6. New measurements of longitudinal spin asymmetries in pion electroproduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosted, Peter; CLAS Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    We present new preliminary results for the longitudinal beam, target, and beam-target spin asymmetries in exclusive electro-production of charged and neutral pions. The measurements cover a wide range of four-momentum transfer squared (up to 4 GeV2), and invariant final mass W (up to 2.4 GeV). The results come from two experiments using the CLAS instrument in Hall B at Jefferson Lab. The first experiment used 1.6, 2.4, 4.2, and 5.7 GeV longitudinally polarized electrons with scattering angles ranging from 10 to 45 degrees. The second experiment used 6 GeV electrons scattering at angles form 16 to 45 degrees. Both experiments used a longitudinally polarized NH3 target for π+ and π0 production from polarized protons, and an ND3 target for π- production from polarized neutrons. The preliminary results indicate the possible presence of baryon resonance excitations at relatively high masses (W > 1 . 6 GeV). The status of a simple empirical fit to the results will be presented. It is hoped that the new results will be used in global unitary isobar fits in order to improve the knowledge of baryon resonance structure.

  7. Longitudinal magnetoresistance of potassium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huberman, M. L.

    1987-06-01

    Recently, Zhu and Overhauser showed that the Hall coefficient of potassium is anisotropic, depending on the angle between the applied magnetic field and the charge-density wave. It follows that the Hall coefficient of a polydomain sample is inhomogeneous. By means of effective-medium theory, the magnetoresistance of a domain structure has been evaluated. It is shown that both the longitudinal and transverse magnetoresistance increase with increasing field. The Kohler slope depends on the domain distribution. For a random distribution, the longitudinal and transverse Kohler slopes are about (1/2)% and 1(1/2)%, respectively.

  8. Longitudinal Functional Data Analysis.

    PubMed

    Park, So Young; Staicu, Ana-Maria

    We consider dependent functional data that are correlated because of a longitudinal-based design: each subject is observed at repeated times and at each time a functional observation (curve) is recorded. We propose a novel parsimonious modeling framework for repeatedly observed functional observations that allows to extract low dimensional features. The proposed methodology accounts for the longitudinal design, is designed to study the dynamic behavior of the underlying process, allows prediction of full future trajectory, and is computationally fast. Theoretical properties of this framework are studied and numerical investigations confirm excellent behavior in finite samples. The proposed method is motivated by and applied to a diffusion tensor imaging study of multiple sclerosis.

  9. Gravitational torque on the inner core and decadal polar motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumberry, Mathieu

    2008-03-01

    A decadal polar motion with an amplitude of approximately 25 milliarcsecs (mas) is observed over the last century, a motion known as the Markowitz wobble. The origin of this motion remains unknown. In this paper, we investigate the possibility that a time-dependent axial misalignment between the density structures of the inner core and mantle can explain this signal. The longitudinal displacement of the inner core density structure leads to a change in the global moment of inertia of the Earth. In addition, as a result of the density misalignment, a gravitational equatorial torque leads to a tilt of the oblate geometric figure of the inner core, causing a further change in the global moment of inertia. To conserve angular momentum, an adjustment of the rotation vector must occur, leading to a polar motion. We develop theoretical expressions for the change in the moment of inertia and the gravitational torque in terms of the angle of longitudinal misalignment and the density structure of the mantle. A model to compute the polar motion in response to time-dependent axial inner core rotations is also presented. We show that the polar motion produced by this mechanism can be polarized about a longitudinal axis and is expected to have decadal periodicities, two general characteristics of the Markowitz wobble. The amplitude of the polar motion depends primarily on the Y12 spherical harmonic component of mantle density, on the longitudinal misalignment between the inner core and mantle, and on the bulk viscosity of the inner core. We establish constraints on the first two of these quantities from considerations of the axial component of this gravitational torque and from observed changes in length of day. These constraints suggest that the maximum polar motion from this mechanism is smaller than 1 mas, and too small to explain the Markowitz wobble.

  10. Linear Polarization Measurements of Chromospheric Emission Lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheeley, N. R., Jr.; Keller, C. U.

    2003-01-01

    We have used the Zurich Imaging Stokes Polarimeter (ZIMPOL I) with the McMath-Pierce 1.5 m main telescope on Kitt Peak to obtain linear polarization measurements of the off-limb chromosphere with a sensitivity better than 1 x 10(exp -5). We found that the off-disk observations require a combination of good seeing (to show the emission lines) and a clean heliostat (to avoid contamination by scattered light from the Sun's disk). When these conditions were met, we obtained the following principal results: 1. Sometimes self-reversed emission lines of neutral and singly ionized metals showed linear polarization caused by the transverse Zeeman effect or by instrumental cross talk from the longitudinal Zeeman effect in chromospheric magnetic fields. Otherwise, these lines tended to depolarize the scattered continuum radiation by amounts that ranged up to 0.2%. 2. Lines previously known to show scattering polarization just inside the limb (such as the Na I lambda5889 D2 and the He I lambda5876 D3 lines) showed even more polarization above the Sun's limb, with values approaching 0.7%. 3. The O I triplet at lambda7772, lambda7774, and lambda7775 showed a range of polarizations. The lambda7775 line, whose maximum intrinsic polarizability, P(sub max), is less than 1%, revealed mainly Zeeman contributions from chromospheric magnetic fields. However, the more sensitive lambda7772 (P(sub max) = 19%) and lambda7774 (P(sub max) = 29%) lines had relatively strong scattering polarizations of approximately 0.3% in addition to their Zeeman polarizations. At times of good seeing, the polarization spectra resolve into fine structures that seem to be chromospheric spicules.

  11. Linear Polarization Measurements of Chromospheric Emission Lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheeley, N. R., Jr.; Keller, C. U.

    2003-01-01

    We have used the Zurich Imaging Stokes Polarimeter (ZIMPOL I) with the McMath-Pierce 1.5 m main telescope on Kitt Peak to obtain linear polarization measurements of the off-limb chromosphere with a sensitivity better than 1 x 10(exp -5). We found that the off-disk observations require a combination of good seeing (to show the emission lines) and a clean heliostat (to avoid contamination by scattered light from the Sun's disk). When these conditions were met, we obtained the following principal results: 1. Sometimes self-reversed emission lines of neutral and singly ionized metals showed linear polarization caused by the transverse Zeeman effect or by instrumental cross talk from the longitudinal Zeeman effect in chromospheric magnetic fields. Otherwise, these lines tended to depolarize the scattered continuum radiation by amounts that ranged up to 0.2%. 2. Lines previously known to show scattering polarization just inside the limb (such as the Na I lambda5889 D2 and the He I lambda5876 D3 lines) showed even more polarization above the Sun's limb, with values approaching 0.7%. 3. The O I triplet at lambda7772, lambda7774, and lambda7775 showed a range of polarizations. The lambda7775 line, whose maximum intrinsic polarizability, P(sub max), is less than 1%, revealed mainly Zeeman contributions from chromospheric magnetic fields. However, the more sensitive lambda7772 (P(sub max) = 19%) and lambda7774 (P(sub max) = 29%) lines had relatively strong scattering polarizations of approximately 0.3% in addition to their Zeeman polarizations. At times of good seeing, the polarization spectra resolve into fine structures that seem to be chromospheric spicules.

  12. The Clic Electron and Positron Polarized Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinolfi, L.

    2011-01-01

    The CLIC polarized electron source is based on a DC gun where the photocathode is illuminated by a laser beam. Each micro-bunch has a charge of 6 × 109 e-, a width of 100 ps and a repetition rate of 2 GHz. A peak current of 10 A in the micro-bunch is a challenge for the surface charge limit of the photo-cathode. Two options are feasible to generate the 2 GHz e- bunch train: 100 ps micro-bunches can be extracted from the photo-cathode either by a 2 GHz laser system or by generating a macro-bunch using a ~200 ns laser pulse and a subsequent RF bunching system to produce the appropriate micro-bunch structure. Recent results obtained by SLAC, for the latter case, are presented. The polarized positron source is based on a positron production scheme in which polarized photons are produced by a laser Compton scattering process. The resulting circularly-polarized gamma photons are sent onto a target, producing pairs of longitudinally polarized electrons and positrons. The Compton backscattering process occurs either in a Compton ring, where a 1 GeV electron beam interacts with circularly-polarized photons in an optical resonator or in a 1.8 GeV Compton Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) or in a 6 GeV Linac with several optical cavities. The undulator scheme is also studied. The nominal CLIC e+ bunch population is 6.7 × 109 particles per bunch at 200 MeV. The tradeoff between e+ yield and level of polarization is an important topic. The overall scheme for both polarized electron and positron beams is described.

  13. Observation of Polarized Positrons from an Undulator-Based Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, G.; Barley, J.; Batygin, Y.; Berridge, S.; Bharadwaj, V.; Bower, G.; Bugg, W.; Decker, F.-J.; Dollan, R.; Efremenko, Y.; Gharibyan, V.; Hast, C.; Iverson, R.; Kolanoski, H.; Kovermann, J.; Laihem, K.; Lohse, T.; McDonald, K. T.; Mikhailichenko, A. A.; Moortgat-Pick, G. A.; Pahl, P.; Pitthan, R.; Pöschl, R.; Reinherz-Aronis, E.; Riemann, S.; Schälicke, A.; Schüler, K. P.; Schweizer, T.; Scott, D.; Sheppard, J. C.; Stahl, A.; Szalata, Z. M.; Walz, D.; Weidemann, A. W.

    2008-05-01

    An experiment (E166) at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center has demonstrated a scheme in which a multi-GeV electron beam passed through a helical undulator to generate multi-MeV, circularly polarized photons which were then converted in a thin target to produce positrons (and electrons) with longitudinal polarization above 80% at 6 MeV. The results are in agreement with Geant4 simulations that include the dominant polarization-dependent interactions of electrons, positrons, and photons in matter.

  14. Observation of polarized positrons from an undulator-based source.

    PubMed

    Alexander, G; Barley, J; Batygin, Y; Berridge, S; Bharadwaj, V; Bower, G; Bugg, W; Decker, F-J; Dollan, R; Efremenko, Y; Gharibyan, V; Hast, C; Iverson, R; Kolanoski, H; Kovermann, J; Laihem, K; Lohse, T; McDonald, K T; Mikhailichenko, A A; Moortgat-Pick, G A; Pahl, P; Pitthan, R; Pöschl, R; Reinherz-Aronis, E; Riemann, S; Schälicke, A; Schüler, K P; Schweizer, T; Scott, D; Sheppard, J C; Stahl, A; Szalata, Z M; Walz, D; Weidemann, A W

    2008-05-30

    An experiment (E166) at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center has demonstrated a scheme in which a multi-GeV electron beam passed through a helical undulator to generate multi-MeV, circularly polarized photons which were then converted in a thin target to produce positrons (and electrons) with longitudinal polarization above 80% at 6 MeV. The results are in agreement with GEANT4 simulations that include the dominant polarization-dependent interactions of electrons, positrons, and photons in matter.

  15. Polarization Transfer in Proton Compton Scattering at High Momentum Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, D.J.; Annand, J.R.M.; Mamyan, V.H.; Aniol, K.A.; Margaziotis, D.J.; Bertin, P.Y.; Camsonne, A.; Laveissiere, G.; Bosted, P.; Paschke, K.; Calarco, J.R.; Chang, G.C.; Horn, T.; Savvinov, N.; Chang, T.-H.; Danagoulian, A.; Nathan, A.M.; Roedelbronn, M.; Chen, J.-P.

    2005-06-24

    Compton scattering from the proton was investigated at s=6.9 GeV{sup 2} and t=-4.0 GeV{sup 2} via polarization transfer from circularly polarized incident photons. The longitudinal and transverse components of the recoil proton polarization were measured. The results are in disagreement with a prediction of perturbative QCD based on a two-gluon exchange mechanism, but agree well with a prediction based on a reaction mechanism in which the photon interacts with a single quark carrying the spin of the proton.

  16. Observation of Polarized Positrons from an Undulator-Based Source

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, G; Barley, J.; Batygin, Y.; Berridge, S.; Bharadwaj, V.; Bower, G.; Bugg, W.; Decker, F.-J.; Dollan, R.; Efremenko, Y.; Gharibyan, V.; Hast, C.; Iverson, R.; Kolanoski, H.; Kovermann, J.; Laihem, K.; Lohse, T.; McDonald, K.T.; Mikhailichenko, A.A.; Moortgat-Pick, G.A.; Pahl, P.; /Tel Aviv U. /Cornell U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC /Tennessee U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /DESY /Yerevan Phys. Inst. /Aachen, Tech. Hochsch. /DESY, Zeuthen /Princeton U. /Durham U. /Daresbury

    2008-03-06

    An experiment (E166) at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) has demonstrated a scheme in which a multi-GeV electron beam passed through a helical undulator to generate multi-MeV, circularly polarized photons which were then converted in a thin target to produce positrons (and electrons) with longitudinal polarization above 80% at 6 MeV. The results are in agreement with Geant4 simulations that include the dominant polarization-dependent interactions of electrons, positrons and photons in matter.

  17. Status and future plans of polarized beams at COSY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorentz, B.; Gebel, R.; Lehrach, A.; Maier, R.; Prasuhn, D.; Stockhorst, H.

    2011-05-01

    In this paper we report on the present status and future plans of polarized beams in the COSY synchrotron ring. COSY is a synchrotron ring in the momentum range from 295 to 3700 MeV/c. Polarized deuterons and protons are routinely delivered to experiments over the whole momentum range. No depolarization occurs during the acceleration of deuterons in COSY. For polarized protons many depolarizing resonances are crossed without polarization loss. At imperfection resonances, vertical steerer magnets are used to increase the resonance strength, leading to a complete polarization reversal. At intrinsic resonances a fast tune jump quadrupole is used to quickly cross the resonances without loss of polarization. Typical proton polarizations are close to 0.8 below 2.1 GeV/c and about 0.6 for higher momenta. During recent operation an induced depolarizing resonance was used for accurate determination of the relative momentum spread dp/p of the stored beam yielding an accuracy of better than 10-4. For spin filter studies of the PAX collaboration a low beta target section was installed in 2009 and was successfully put into operation early 2010. An upgrade of the EDDA polarimeter electronics and data acquisition system is underway to ensure continued availability of the polarimeter, which is essential for the polarized proton operation of COSY. In the near future it is planned to install a Siberian snake solenoid of 4.5 Tm to be able to provide in addition to vertically polarized protons, longitudinal polarization as well. This solenoid will allow the preparation of a longitudinally polarized beam up to a kinetic energy of 500 MeV.

  18. Polarized Light Corridor Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, G. R.

    1990-01-01

    Eleven demonstrations of light polarization are presented. Each includes a brief description of the apparatus and the effect demonstrated. Illustrated are strain patterns, reflection, scattering, the Faraday Effect, interference, double refraction, the polarizing microscope, and optical activity. (CW)

  19. A Translational Polarization Rotator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuss, David T.; Wollack, Edward J.; Pisano, Giampaolo; Ackiss, Sheridan; U-Yen, Kongpop; Ng, Ming wah

    2012-01-01

    We explore a free-space polarization modulator in which a variable phase introduction between right- and left-handed circular polarization components is used to rotate the linear polarization of the outgoing beam relative to that of the incoming beam. In this device, the polarization states are separated by a circular polarizer that consists of a quarter-wave plate in combination with a wire grid. A movable mirror is positioned behind and parallel to the circular polarizer. As the polarizer-mirror distance is separated, an incident liear polarization will be rotated through an angle that is proportional to the introduced phase delay. We demonstrate a prototype device that modulates Stokes Q and U over a 20% bandwidth.

  20. Polarized Light Corridor Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, G. R.

    1990-01-01

    Eleven demonstrations of light polarization are presented. Each includes a brief description of the apparatus and the effect demonstrated. Illustrated are strain patterns, reflection, scattering, the Faraday Effect, interference, double refraction, the polarizing microscope, and optical activity. (CW)

  1. North Polar Scarp

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-05-09

    This image from NASA 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft shows the scarp face of the north polar cap near Abalos Mensa. The top part of the image is the polar cap. This image was collected during northern hemisphere summer.

  2. Polarization at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, M.

    1995-01-01

    A highly polarized electron beam is a key feature. for the Current physics program at SLAC. An electron beam polarization of 80% can now be routinely achieved for typically 5000 hours of machine operation per year. Two main Physics programs utilize the polarized beam. Fixed target experiments in End Station A study the collision of polarized electrons with polarized nuclear targets to elucidate the spin structure of the nucleon and to provide an important test of QCD. Using the SLAC Linear Collider, collisions of polarized electrons with unpolarized positrons allow precise measurements of parity violation in the Z-fermion couplings and provide a very precise measurement of tile weak mixing angle. This paper discusses polarized beam operation at SLAC, and gives an overview of the polarized physics program.

  3. Overview of the PHENIX Longitudinal and Transverse Spin Physics Program

    SciTech Connect

    Sarsour, Murad

    2011-07-15

    The PHENIX experiment uses polarized p+p collisions at RHIC to explore the spin structure of the proton. The p+p collisions, while complementary to deep inelastic lepton scattering experiments, offer distinct advantages for the determination of the helicity preferences of gluons, the flavor-dependence of sea antiquark polarizations, and parton transverse motion or spin orientation preferences inside polarized protons. The PHENIX experiment has been measuring the double longitudinal spin asymmetry of several inclusive probes to understand the gluon polarization in the allowed kinematic range. In addition, PHENIX experiment also has been studying the single spin asymmetries with a variety of final state particles in different kinematic regimes to shed light on the transverse spin structure. A brief overview is given of results to date and planned future directions.

  4. The E166 experiment: Development of an undulator-based polarized positron source for the international linear collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovermann, J.; Stahl, A.; Mikhailichenko, A. A.; Scott, D.; Moortgat-Pick, G. A.; Gharibyan, V.; Pahl, P.; Põschl, R.; Schüler, K. P.; Laihem, K.; Riemann, S.; Schälicke, A.; Dollan, R.; Kolanoski, H.; Lohse, T.; Schweizer, T.; McDonald, K. T.; Batygin, Y.; Bharadwaj, V.; Bower, G.; Decker, F.-J.; Hast, C.; Iverson, R.; Sheppard, J. C.; Szalata, Z.; Walz, D.; Weidemann, A.; Alexander, G.; Reinherz-Aronis, E.; Berridge, S.; Bugg, W.; Efrimenko, Y.

    2007-12-01

    A longitudinal polarized positron beam is foreseen for the international linear collider (ILC). A proof-of-principle experiment has been performed in the final focus test beam at SLAC to demonstrate the production of polarized positrons for implementation at the ILC. The E166 experiment uses a 1 m long helical undulator in a 46.6 GeV electron beam to produce a few MeV photons with a high degree of circular polarization. These photons are then converted in a thin target to generate longitudinally polarized e^+ and e^-. The positron polarization is measured using a Compton transmission polarimeter. The data analysis has shown asymmetries in the expected vicinity of 3.4% and ˜1% for photons and positrons respectively and the expected positron longitudinal polarization is covering a range from 50% to 90%.

  5. Focal and optical trapping behaviors of radially polarized vortex beam with broken axial symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Man, Zhongsheng; Du, Luping; Zhang, Yuquan; Min, Changjun; Fu, Shenggui; Yuan, Xiaocong

    2017-06-01

    We explore a radially polarized vortex beam with broken axial symmetry under tight focusing conditions. The beam's three mutually orthogonal polarization components (radial, azimuthal, and longitudinal) are all rotated by an angle of π/2 with respect to the input field in the focal plane. We validate this effect experimentally. Finally, we prove that this effect can be used to transport nanoparticles.

  6. Perspectives for Polarized Antiprotons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenisa, Paolo

    In the framework of the FAIR project the PAX Collaboration has suggested new experiments using polarized protons and antiprotons. In order to provide polarized antiprotons, the proposed mechanisms for the production of a polarized stored have to be investigated. To this aim a series of experiments have already been started with protons at the COSY ring. Additional experiment have to be foreseen at AD ring with antiprotons to define to working parameters of a dedicated Antiproton Polarizer Ring.

  7. Nucleon Spin Structure: Longitudinal and Transverse

    SciTech Connect

    Jian-Ping Chen

    2011-02-01

    Inclusive Deep-Inelastic Scattering (DIS) experiments have provided us with the most extensive information on the unpolarized and longitudinal polarized parton (quark and gluon) distributions in the nucleon. It has becoming clear that transverse spin and transverse momentum dependent distributions (TMDs) study are crucial for a more complete understanding of the nucleon structure and the dynamics of the strong interaction. The transverse spin structure and the TMDs are the subject of increasingly intense theoretical and experimental study recently. With a high luminosity electron beam facility, JLab has played a major role in the worldwide effort to study both the longitudinal and transverse spin structure. Highlights of recent results will be presented. With 12-GeV energy upgrade, JLab will provide the most precise measurements in the valence quark region to close a chapter in longitudinal spin study. JLab will also perform a multi-dimensional mapping of the transverse spin structure and TMDs in the valence quark region through Semi-Inclusive DIS (SIDIS) experiments, providing a 3-d partonic picture of the nucleon in momentum space and extracting the u and d quark tensor charges of the nucleon. The precision mapping of TMDs will also allow a detailed study of the quark orbital motion and its dynamics.

  8. GATB LONGITUDINAL MATURATION STUDY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DROEGE, ROBERT C.

    THIS ARTICLE DESCRIBES RESULTS OF THE FIRST IN A SERIES OF THREE LARGE-SCALE LONGITUDINAL STUDIES CONDUCTED BY THE U.S. EMPLOYMENT SERVICE TO INCREASE THE USEFULNESS OF THE GENERAL APTITUDE TEST BATTERY (GATB) FOR COUNSELING HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS. THE FINAL SAMPLE CONSISTED OF 26,708 HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS. ALL WERE TESTED WITH THE GATB IN 1958, AND…

  9. Longitudinal discharge laser baffles

    DOEpatents

    Warner, B.E.; Ault, E.R.

    1994-06-07

    The IR baffles placed between the window and the electrode of a longitudinal discharge laser improve laser performance by intercepting off-axis IR radiation from the laser and in doing so reduce window heating and subsequent optical distortion of the laser beam. 1 fig.

  10. Longitudinal discharge laser electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Warner, B.E.; Miller, J.L.; Ault, E.R.

    1994-08-23

    The improved longitudinal discharge laser electrode with IR baffle includes an electrode made up of washers spaced along the laser axis in order to form inter-washer spaces for hollow cathode discharge to take place and for IR radiation to be trapped. Additional IR baffles can be placed between the electrode ann the window. 2 figs.

  11. Longitudinal discharge laser baffles

    DOEpatents

    Warner, Bruce E.; Ault, Earl R.

    1994-01-01

    The IR baffles placed between the window and the electrode of a longitudinal discharge laser improve laser performance by intercepting off-axis IR radiation from the laser and in doing so reduce window heating and subsequent optical distortion of the laser beam.

  12. Longitudinal discharge laser electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Warner, Bruce E.; Miller, John L.; Ault, Earl R.

    1994-01-01

    The improved longitudinal discharge laser electrode with IR baffle includes an electrode made up of washers spaced along the laser axis in order to form inter-washer spaces for hollow cathode discharge to take place and for IR radiation to be trapped. Additional IR baffles can be placed between the electrode ann the window.

  13. Playing with Polarizers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hecht, Jeff

    1991-01-01

    Discussed is how polarized sunglasses block glare, help spot subtle differences in surfaces, and give a clearer view under water. Information on unpolarized and polarized light is provided. The reasons causing glare to occur and how polarizers decrease glare are discussed. (KR)

  14. Polarization feedback laser stabilization

    DOEpatents

    Esherick, Peter; Owyoung, Adelbert

    1988-01-01

    A system for locking two Nd:YAG laser oscillators includes an optical path for feeding the output of one laser into the other with different polarizations. Elliptical polarization is incorporated into the optical path so that the change in polarization that occurs when the frequencies coincide may be detected to provide a feedback signal to control one laser relative to the other.

  15. Enhanced Polar System (EPS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    0603432F Project Name 644052 Polar Satellite Communications (Sunk) Air Force 3600 05 0605432F Project Name 657105 Polar Satellite ...provides continuous protected communication (low probability of interception and detection) over the north polar region using two communications ...payloads on classified host satellites in highly elliptical Molniya orbits. EPS is composed of four segments: the eXtended Data Rate (XDR) Payload

  16. Progovac on Polarity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horn, Laurence R.; Lee, Young-Suk

    1995-01-01

    This article presents an analysis and review of Ljiljana Progovac's "Negative and Positive Polarity: A Binding Approach" (1994). It concludes that by pushing a syntactic analysis of polarity to, if not beyond, its limits, Progovac has focused attention on the work that remains for any approach to polarity to resolve. Contains 59…

  17. Polarity at Many Levels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flannery, Maura C.

    2004-01-01

    An attempt is made to find how polarity arises and is maintained, which is a central issue in development. It is a fundamental attribute of living things and cellular polarity is also important in the development of multicellular organisms and controversial new work indicates that polarization in mammals may occur much earlier than previously…

  18. Graphing Polar Curves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawes, Jonathan F.

    2013-01-01

    Graphing polar curves typically involves a combination of three traditional techniques, all of which can be time-consuming and tedious. However, an alternative method--graphing the polar function on a rectangular plane--simplifies graphing, increases student understanding of the polar coordinate system, and reinforces graphing techniques learned…

  19. Physics with Polarized Nuclei.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, William J.; Clegg, Thomas B.

    1979-01-01

    Discusses recent advances in polarization techniques, specifically those dealing with polarization of atomic nuclei, and how polarized beams and targets are produced. These techniques have greatly increased the scope of possible studies, and provided the tools for testing fundamental symmetries and the spin dependence of nuclear forces. (GA)

  20. Polar Ozone Workshop. Abstracts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aikin, Arthur C.

    1988-01-01

    Results of the proceedings of the Polar Ozone Workshop held in Snowmass, CO, on May 9 to 13, 1988 are given. Topics covered include ozone depletion, ozonometry, polar meteorology, polar stratospheric clouds, remote sensing of trace gases, atmospheric chemistry and dynamical simulations.

  1. Partial polarizer filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Title, A. M. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A birefringent filter module comprises, in seriatum. (1) an entrance polarizer, (2) a first birefringent crystal responsive to optical energy exiting the entrance polarizer, (3) a partial polarizer responsive to optical energy exiting the first polarizer, (4) a second birefringent crystal responsive to optical energy exiting the partial polarizer, and (5) an exit polarizer. The first and second birefringent crystals have fast axes disposed + or -45 deg from the high transmitivity direction of the partial polarizer. Preferably, the second crystal has a length 1/2 that of the first crystal and the high transmitivity direction of the partial polarizer is nine times as great as the low transmitivity direction. To provide tuning, the polarizations of the energy entering the first crystal and leaving the second crystal are varied by either rotating the entrance and exit polarizers, or by sandwiching the entrance and exit polarizers between pairs of half wave plates that are rotated relative to the polarizers. A plurality of the filter modules may be cascaded.

  2. Playing with Polarizers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hecht, Jeff

    1991-01-01

    Discussed is how polarized sunglasses block glare, help spot subtle differences in surfaces, and give a clearer view under water. Information on unpolarized and polarized light is provided. The reasons causing glare to occur and how polarizers decrease glare are discussed. (KR)

  3. Silicon Raman polarizer.

    PubMed

    Kozlov, Victor V; Wabnitz, Stefan

    2012-02-15

    We theoretically investigate the polarization properties of Raman amplifiers based on silicon-on-insulator waveguides, and show that it is possible to realize a waveguide Raman polarizer. The Raman polarizer is a special type of Raman amplifier with the property of producing an amplified and highly repolarized beam when it is fed by a relatively weak and unpolarized signal.

  4. Calculation of polarization effects

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, A.W.

    1983-09-01

    Basically there are two areas of accelerator applications that involve beam polarization. One is the acceleration of a polarized beam (most likely a proton beam) in a synchrotron. Another concerns polarized beams in an electron storage ring. In both areas, numerical techniques have been very useful.

  5. Polarity at Many Levels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flannery, Maura C.

    2004-01-01

    An attempt is made to find how polarity arises and is maintained, which is a central issue in development. It is a fundamental attribute of living things and cellular polarity is also important in the development of multicellular organisms and controversial new work indicates that polarization in mammals may occur much earlier than previously…

  6. Longitudinally graded optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evert, A.; James, A.; Hawkins, T.; Foy, P.; Dong, L.; Stolen, R.; Ballato, J.; Dragic, P.; Rice, R.

    2013-03-01

    Described herein, for the first time to the best of our knowledge, are results on optical fibers possessing significant compositional gradations along its length due to longitudinal control of the core glass composition. More specifically, MCVD-derived germanosilicate fibers were fabricated that exhibited a gradient of up to about 0.55 weight % GeO2 per meter. These gradients are about 1900 times greater than previously reported fibers possessing longitudinal changes in composition. The refractive index difference is shown to change by about 0.001, representing a numerical aperture change of about 10%, over a fiber length of less than 20 m. The lowest attenuation measured from the present longitudinally-graded fiber (LGF) was 82 dB/km at a wavelength of 1550 nm, though this is shown to result from extrinsic process-induced factors and could be reduced with further optimization. The stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) spectrum from the LGF exhibited a 4.4 dB increase in the spectral width, and thus reduction in Brillouin gain, relative to a standard commercial single mode fiber, over a fiber length of only 17 m. The method employed is very straight-forward and provides for a wide variety of longitudinal refractive index and acoustic velocity profiles, as well as core shapes, which could be especially valuable for SBS suppression in high-energy laser systems. Next generation analogs, with longitudinally-graded compositional profiles that are very reasonable to fabricate, are shown computationally to be more effective at suppressing SBS than present alternatives, such as externally-applied temperature or strain gradients.

  7. Large Spin-Valley Polarization in Monolayer MoTe2 on Top of EuO(111).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qingyun; Yang, Shengyuan A; Mi, Wenbo; Cheng, Yingchun; Schwingenschlögl, Udo

    2016-02-03

    The electronic properties of monolayer MoTe2 on top of EuO(111) are studied by first-principles calculations. Strong spin polarization is induced in MoTe2 , which results in a large valley polarization. In a longitudinal electric field this will result in a valley and spin-polarized charge Hall effect. The direction of the Hall current as well as the valley and spin polarizations can be tuned by an external magnetic field.

  8. Undulator-Based Production of Polarized Photons

    SciTech Connect

    Professor Kirk McDonald

    2008-05-29

    "Project Title: Undulator-Based Production of Polarized Photons" DOE Contract Number: FG02-04ER41355 Principal Investigator: Prof. Kirk McDonald Period of Performance: 09/10/2004 thru 08/31/2006 This award was to fund Princeton's activity on SLAC experiment E166, "Undulator-Based Production of Polarized Positrons" which was performed at SLAC during June and September 2005. Princeton U. fabricated a magnetic spectrometer for this experiment, and participated in the commissioning, operation, and analysis of the experiment, for which Prof. McDonald was a co-spokesperson. The experiment demonstrated that an intense positron beam with 80% longitudinal polarization could be generated by conversion of MeVenergy circularly polarized photons in a thin target, which photons were generated by passage of high-energy electrons through a helical undulator. This technique has since been adopted as the baseline for the polarized positron source of the proposed International Linear Collider. Results of the experiment have been published in Physical Review Letters, vol 100, p 210801 (2008) [see attached .pdf file], and a longer paper is in preparation.

  9. Polarization Observable E in the p(,)n Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strauch, Steffen

    2010-02-01

    The main objective of the FROST experiment at Jefferson Lab is the study of baryon resonances. The polarization observable E for the reaction γp ->&+circ;n has been measured as part of this program. A circularly polarized tagged photon beam with energies from 0.35 to 2.35 GeV was incident on a longitudinally polarized frozen-spin butanol target. The final-state pions were detected with the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer. The extracted polarization data agree fairly well with present SAID and MAID partial-wave analyses at low photon energies. In most of the covered energy range, however, significant deviations are observed. These discrepancies underline the crucial importance of polarization observables to further constrain these analyses. )

  10. Helical Dipole Magnets for Polarized Protons in RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syphers, M.; Courant, E.; Fischer, W.; Luccio, A.; Mariam, F.; Peggs, S.; Pilat, F.; Roser, T.; Tepikian, S.; Tsoupas, N.; Willen, E.; Katayama, T.; Hatanaka, K.; Kawaguchi, T.; Okamura, M.; Tominaka, T.; Wu, H.; Ptitsin, V.; Shatunov, Y.

    1997-05-01

    The Brookhaven Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) will be able to support experiments using polarized proton beams. Siberian Snakes are used to maintain polarization in this high energy superconducting collider. To make efficient use of available space while taking advantage of high field superconducting magnets, 4 Tesla helical dipole magnets will be used. These magnets generate a central dipole field in which the field direction rotates through 360^circ about the longitudinal axis over the length of the device. An arrangement of four such magnets can produce the desired change in the spin direction while keeping the proton orbit outside of the ``Snake'' unaltered. Similar magnet arrangements will be used to produce longitudinal polarization at the two major interaction points in RHIC. The basic requirements and layout of these magnets are described, as well as tolerances on field quality and integrated field strengths. First results of tests of prototype helical magnets will be discussed.

  11. Experimental Demonstration of Longitudinal Magnification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Razpet, Nada; Susman, Katarina; Cepic, Mojca

    2009-01-01

    We describe an experiment which enables the observation of longitudinal magnification for the real image of a three-dimensional (3D) object formed by a converging lens. The experiment also shows the absence of longitudinal inversion. Possible reasons for misconceptions with respect to real images and longitudinal inversions are discussed and a…

  12. Experimental Demonstration of Longitudinal Magnification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Razpet, Nada; Susman, Katarina; Cepic, Mojca

    2009-01-01

    We describe an experiment which enables the observation of longitudinal magnification for the real image of a three-dimensional (3D) object formed by a converging lens. The experiment also shows the absence of longitudinal inversion. Possible reasons for misconceptions with respect to real images and longitudinal inversions are discussed and a…

  13. The Physics of Polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landi Degl'Innocenti, Egidio

    2015-10-01

    The introductory lecture that has been delivered at this Symposium is a condensed version of an extended course held by the author at the XII Canary Island Winter School from November 13 to November 21, 2000. The full series of lectures can be found in Landi Degl'Innocenti (2002). The original reference is organized in 20 Sections that are here itemized: 1. Introduction, 2. Description of polarized radiation, 3. Polarization and optical devices: Jones calculus and Muller matrices, 4. The Fresnel equations, 5. Dichroism and anomalous dispersion, 6. Polarization in everyday life, 7. Polarization due to radiating charges, 8. The linear antenna, 9. Thomson scattering, 10. Rayleigh scattering, 11. A digression on Mie scattering, 12. Bremsstrahlung radiation, 13. Cyclotron radiation, 14. Synchrotron radiation, 15. Polarization in spectral lines, 16. Density matrix and atomic polarization, 17. Radiative transfer and statistical equilibrium equations, 18. The amplification condition in polarized radiative transfer, and 19. Coupling radiative transfer and statistical equilibrium equations.

  14. Circular Polarization in AGNs: Polarity and Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aller, M. F.; Aller, H. D.; Plotkin, R. M.

    2005-12-01

    Circular polarization (Stokes V) observations potentially provide information on the nature and origin of the underlying magnetic fields in AGNs. We have been systematically monitoring a group of sources with detectable circular polarization (V>0.1 percent, a level set by the instrumental polarization of our system) in all 4 Stokes parameters at 8.0 and 4.8 GHz since 2000, and also at 14.5 GHz since November 2003, with the University of Michigan prime focus paraboloid antenna. These data are compared with historical observations obtained with the same instrument at 8.0 and 4.8 GHz extending back to 1978. Specific goals are to study the temporal spectral behavior of Stokes V and its relation to variability in total flux and linear polarization, and to investigate the question of polarity stability on decade-long time scales using data obtained with the same instrumentation and at the same frequencies. The data are consistent with linear-to-circular mode conversion in partially opaque regions of the source. We find examples of polarity changes with time at one or more frequencies associated with outbursts in total flux and linear polarization, and polarity differences within the 3 frequencies at a single epoch in one case, 3C 279. Such behavior argues against the notion that the sign of Stokes V is a simple tracer of the net flow of magnetic energy from the central engine to the jet or an indicator of the direction of rotation of the spinning central black hole/accretion disk via the winding up of the initial seed magnetic field. This work was supported in part by NSF grant AST-0307629 and by funds from the University of Michigan.

  15. A longitudinal component in massive gravitational waves arising from a bimetric theory of gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corda, Christian

    2007-10-01

    After a brief review of the work of de Paula, Miranda and Marinho on massive gravitational waves arising from a bimetric theory of gravity, in this paper it is shown that the presence of the mass generates a longitudinal component in a particular polarization of the wave. The effect of this polarization on test masses is performed using the geodesic deviation. At the end of this paper the detectability of this particular polarization is also discussed, showing that its angular dependence could, in principle, discriminate such polarization with respect to the ones of general relativity, will present or future detectors achieve a high sensitivity.

  16. Hyperpolarization of nitrogen-15 nuclei by cross polarization and dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milani, Jonas; Vuichoud, Basile; Bornet, Aurélien; Melzi, Roberto; Jannin, Sami; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey

    2017-01-01

    Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) is often achieved by the direct transfer of polarization from electrons to nuclei such as 13C, induced by microwave saturation of the wings of narrow EPR lines of radicals like trityl. In the indirect approach on the other hand, DNP is used to transfer the polarization from the electrons of radicals such as nitroxides that have broad EPR lines to nuclear spins I = 1H, followed by cross-polarization (CP) from I = 1H to S = 13C or other nuclei with low gyromagnetic ratios. This approach is particularly attractive for S = 15N, since direct DNP yields modest polarizations P(15N) < 4% with build-up times that can be as long as τDNP(15N) > 2 h. In this paper, we show that CP from 1H to 15N at 1.2 K can yield P(15N) = 25% with τCP-DNP(15N) = 10-15 min. After rapid dissolution and transfer to a solution-state NMR spectrometer, a polarization P(15N) = 20% was observed at 300 K. The longitudinal relaxation times in solution can be as long as T1(15N) > 800 s in favorable cases.

  17. Device For Viewing Polarized Light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noever, David A.

    1995-01-01

    Technique for detection of polarized light based on observation of scene through two stacked polarizing disks. No need to rotate polarizers to create flicker indicative of polarization. Implemented by relatively simple, lightweight apparatus. Polarization seen as bow-tie rainbow pattern. Advantageous for detecting polarization in variety of meteorological, geological, astronomical, and related applications.

  18. Longitudinally Graded Optical Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evert, Alexander George

    Described herein, for the first time to the best of our knowledge, are optical fibers possessing significant compositional gradations along their length due to longitudinal control of the core glass composition. More specifically, MCVD-derived germanosilicate fibers were fabricated that exhibited a gradient of up to about 0.55 weight percent GeO2 per meter. These gradients are about 1900 times greater than previously reported for fibers possessing longitudinal changes in composition. The refractive index difference is shown to change by about 0.001, representing a numerical aperture change of about 10%, over a fiber length of less than 20 m. The lowest attenuation measured from the present longitudinally-graded fiber (LGF) was 82 dB/km at a wavelength of 1550 nm, though this is shown to result from extrinsic process-induced factors and could be reduced with further optimization. The stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) spectrum from the LGF exhibited a 4.4 dB increase in the spectral width, and thus reduction in Brillouin gain, relative to a standard commercial single mode fiber, over a fiber length of only 17 m. Fibers with longitudinally uniform (i.e., not gradient) refractive index profiles but differing chemical compositions among various core layers were also fabricated to determine acoustic effects of the core slug method. The refractive index of the resulting preform varies by about +/- 0.00013 from the average. Upon core drilling, it was found that the core slugs had been drilled off-center from the parent preform, resulting in semi-circular core cross sections that were unable to guide light. As a result, optical analysis could not be conducted. Chemical composition data was obtained, however, and is described herein. A third fiber produced was actively doped with ytterbium (Yb3 ) and fabricated similarly to the previous fibers. The preforms were doped via the solution doping method with a solution of 0.015 M Yb 3 derived from ytterbium chloride

  19. Muon cooling: longitudinal compression.

    PubMed

    Bao, Yu; Antognini, Aldo; Bertl, Wilhelm; Hildebrandt, Malte; Khaw, Kim Siang; Kirch, Klaus; Papa, Angela; Petitjean, Claude; Piegsa, Florian M; Ritt, Stefan; Sedlak, Kamil; Stoykov, Alexey; Taqqu, David

    2014-06-06

    A 10  MeV/c positive muon beam was stopped in helium gas of a few mbar in a magnetic field of 5 T. The muon "swarm" has been efficiently compressed from a length of 16 cm down to a few mm along the magnetic field axis (longitudinal compression) using electrostatic fields. The simulation reproduces the low energy interactions of slow muons in helium gas. Phase space compression occurs on the order of microseconds, compatible with the muon lifetime of 2  μs. This paves the way for the preparation of a high-quality low-energy muon beam, with an increase in phase space density relative to a standard surface muon beam of 10^{7}. The achievable phase space compression by using only the longitudinal stage presented here is of the order of 10^{4}.

  20. Three-dimensional orientation-unlimited polarization encryption by a single optically configured vectorial beam

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiangping; Lan, Tzu-Hsiang; Tien, Chung-Hao; Gu, Min

    2012-01-01

    The interplay between light polarization and matter is the basis of many fundamental physical processes and applications. However, the electromagnetic wave nature of light in free space sets a fundamental limit on the three-dimensional polarization orientation of a light beam. Although a high numerical aperture objective can be used to bend the wavefront of a radially polarized beam to generate the longitudinal polarization state in the focal volume, the arbitrary three-dimensional polarization orientation of a beam has not been achieved yet. Here we present a novel technique for generating arbitrary three-dimensional polarization orientation by a single optically configured vectorial beam. As a consequence, by applying this technique to gold nanorods, orientation-unlimited polarization encryption with ultra-security is demonstrated. These results represent a new landmark of the orientation-unlimited three-dimensional polarization control of the light–matter interaction. PMID:22893122

  1. Polarized Solid State Target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutz, Hartmut; Goertz, Stefan; Meyer, Werner

    2017-01-01

    The polarized solid state target is an indispensable experimental tool to study single and double polarization observables at low intensity particle beams like tagged photons. It was one of the major components of the Crystal-Barrel experiment at ELSA. Besides the operation of the 'CB frozen spin target' within the experimental program of the Crystal-Barrel collaboration both collaborative groups of the D1 project, the polarized target group of the Ruhr Universität Bochum and the Bonn polarized target group, have made significant developments in the field of polarized targets within the CRC16. The Bonn polarized target group has focused its work on the development of technically challenging polarized solid target systems towards the so called '4π continuous mode polarized target' to operate them in combination with 4π-particle detection systems. In parallel, the Bochum group has developed various highly polarized deuterated target materials and high precision NMR-systems, in the meantime used for polarization experiments at CERN, JLAB and MAMI, too.

  2. Statistical Polarization Mode Dispersion/Polarization Dependent Loss Emulator for Polarization Division Multiplexing Transmission Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perlicki, Krzysztof

    2010-03-01

    A low-cost statistical polarization mode dispersion/polarization dependent loss emulator is presented in this article. The emulator was constructed by concatenating 15 highly birefringence optical-fiber segments and randomly varying the mode coupling between them by rotating the polarization state. The impact of polarization effects on polarization division multiplexing transmission quality was measured. The designed polarization mode dispersion/polarization dependent loss emulator was applied to mimic the polarization effects of real optical-fiber links.

  3. Asymmetric chemical reactions by polarized quantum beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Jun-Ichi; Kobayashi, Kensei

    One of the most attractive hypothesis for the origin of homochirality in terrestrial bio-organic compounds (L-amino acid and D-sugar dominant) is nominated as "Cosmic Scenario"; a chiral impulse from asymmetric excitation sources in space triggered asymmetric reactions on the surfaces of such space materials as meteorites or interstellar dusts prior to the existence of terrestrial life. 1) Effective asymmetric excitation sources in space are proposed as polarized quantum beams, such as circularly polarized light and spin polarized electrons. Circularly polarized light is emitted as synchrotron radiation from tightly captured electrons by intense magnetic field around neutron stars. In this case, either left-or right-handed polarized light can be observed depending on the direction of observation. On the other hand, spin polarized electrons is emitted as beta-ray in beta decay from radioactive nuclei or neutron fireballs in supernova explosion. 2) The spin of beta-ray electrons is longitudinally polarized due to parity non-conservation in the weak interaction. The helicity (the the projection of the spin onto the direction of kinetic momentum) of beta-ray electrons is universally negative (left-handed). For the purpose of verifying the asymmetric structure emergence in bio-organic compounds by polarized quantum beams, we are now carrying out laboratory simulations using circularly polarized light from synchrotron radiation facility or spin polarized electron beam from beta-ray radiation source. 3,4) The target samples are solid film or aqueous solution of racemic amino acids. 1) K.Kobayashi, K.Kaneko, J.Takahashi, Y.Takano, in Astrobiology: from simple molecules to primitive life; Ed. V.Basiuk; American Scientific Publisher: Valencia, 2008. 2) G.A.Gusev, T.Saito, V.A.Tsarev, A.V.Uryson, Origins Life Evol. Biosphere. 37, 259 (2007). 3) J.Takahashi, H.Shinojima, M.Seyama, Y.Ueno, T.Kaneko, K.Kobayashi, H.Mita, M.Adachi, M.Hosaka, M.Katoh, Int. J. Mol. Sci. 10, 3044

  4. [Review] Polarization and Polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trippe, Sascha

    2014-02-01

    Polarization is a basic property of light and is fundamentally linked to the internal geometry of a source of radiation. Polarimetry complements photometric, spectroscopic, and imaging analyses of sources of radiation and has made possible multiple astrophysical discoveries. In this article I review (i) the physical basics of polarization: electromagnetic waves, photons, and parameterizations; (ii) astrophysical sources of polarization: scattering, synchrotron radiation, active media, and the Zeeman, Goldreich-Kylafis, and Hanle effects, as well as interactions between polarization and matter (like birefringence, Faraday rotation, or the Chandrasekhar-Fermi effect); (iii) observational methodology: on-sky geometry, influence of atmosphere and instrumental polarization, polarization statistics, and observational techniques for radio, optical, and X/γ wavelengths; and (iv) science cases for astronomical polarimetry: solar and stellar physics, planetary system bodies, interstellar matter, astrobiology, astronomical masers, pulsars, galactic magnetic fields, gamma-ray bursts, active galactic nuclei, and cosmic microwave background radiation.

  5. Automatic Bayesian polarity determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pugh, D. J.; White, R. S.; Christie, P. A. F.

    2016-07-01

    The polarity of the first motion of a seismic signal from an earthquake is an important constraint in earthquake source inversion. Microseismic events often have low signal-to-noise ratios, which may lead to difficulties estimating the correct first-motion polarities of the arrivals. This paper describes a probabilistic approach to polarity picking that can be both automated and combined with manual picking. This approach includes a quantitative estimate of the uncertainty of the polarity, improving calculation of the polarity probability density function for source inversion. It is sufficiently fast to be incorporated into an automatic processing workflow. When used in source inversion, the results are consistent with those from manual observations. In some cases, they produce a clearer constraint on the range of high-probability source mechanisms, and are better constrained than source mechanisms determined using a uniform probability of an incorrect polarity pick.

  6. A dual polarized antenna system using a meanderline polarizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burger, H. A.

    1978-01-01

    Certain applications of synthetic aperture radars (e.g., aerial crop surveying) require transmission on one linear polarization and reception on two orthogonal linear polarizations for adequate characterization of the surface. To meet this requirement at minimum cost, it was desirable to use two identically polarized shaped beam antennas and to change the polarization of one of them by a polarization conversion plate. The plate was realized as a four-layer meanderline polarizer designed to convert horizontal polarization to vertical.

  7. A dual polarized antenna system using a meanderline polarizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burger, H. A.

    1978-01-01

    Certain applications of synthetic aperture radars require transmitting on one linear polarization and receiving on two orthogonal linear polarizations for adequate characterization of the surface. To meet the current need at minimum cost, it was desirable to use two identical horizontally polarized shaped beam antennas and to change the polarization of one of them by a polarization conversion plate. The plate was realized as a four-layer meanderline polarizer designed to convert horizontal polarization to vertical.

  8. Polarization feedback laser stabilization

    DOEpatents

    Esherick, P.; Owyoung, A.

    1987-09-28

    A system for locking two Nd:YAG laser oscillators includes an optical path for feeding the output of one laser into the other with different polarizations. Elliptical polarization is incorporated into the optical path so that the change in polarization that occurs when the frequencies coincide may be detected to provide a feedback signal to control one laser relative to the other. 4 figs.

  9. Polar Cap Patch Dynamics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-25

    illustrate the concept with a sample model -run incorporating representative data. Title 12: Space weather challenges of the polar cap ionosphere ...located at Oslo and Ny-Ålesund. The primary objective has been to obtain a better understanding solar wind impacts on the polar ionosphere which are of...made no inventions, and Section 8 lists the core UiO personnel during this project. 15. SUBJECT TERMS EOARD, ionosphere (polar

  10. Polarization at SLC

    SciTech Connect

    Swartz, M.L.

    1988-07-01

    The SLAC Linear Collider has been designed to readily accommodate polarized electron beams. Considerable effort has been made to implement a polarized source, a spin rotation system, and a system to monitor the beam polarization. Nearly all major components have been fabricated. At the current time, several source and polarimeter components have been installed. The installation and commissioning of the entire system will take place during available machine shutdown periods as the commissioning of SLC progresses. It is expected that a beam polarization of 45% will be achieved with no loss in luminosity. 13 refs., 15 figs.

  11. Polarized negative ions

    SciTech Connect

    Haeberli, W.

    1981-04-01

    This paper presents a survey of methods, commonly in use or under development, to produce beams of polarized negative ions for injection into accelerators. A short summary recalls how the hyperfine interaction is used to obtain nuclear polarization in beams of atoms. Atomic-beam sources for light ions are discussed. If the best presently known techniques are incorporated in all stages of the source, polarized H/sup -/ and D/sup -/ beams in excess of 10 ..mu..A can probably be achieved. Production of polarized ions from fast (keV) beams of polarized atoms is treated separately for atoms in the H(25) excited state (Lamb-Shift source) and atoms in the H(1S) ground state. The negative ion beam from Lamb-Shift sources has reached a plateau just above 1 ..mu..A, but this beam current is adequate for many applications and the somewhat lower beam current is compensated by other desirable characteristics. Sources using fast polarized ground state atoms are in a stage of intense development. The next sections summarize production of polarized heavy ions by the atomic beam method, which is well established, and by optical pumping, which has recently been demonstrated to yield very large nuclear polarization. A short discussion of proposed ion sources for polarized /sup 3/He/sup -/ ions is followed by some concluding remarks.

  12. Dust-polarization Maps and Interstellar Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldwell, Robert R.; Hirata, Chris; Kamionkowski, Marc

    2017-04-01

    Perhaps the most intriguing result of Planck’s dust-polarization measurements is the observation that the power in the E-mode polarization is twice that in the B mode, as opposed to pre-Planck expectations of roughly equal dust powers in the E and B modes. Here we show how the E- and B-mode powers depend on the detailed properties of the fluctuations in the magnetized interstellar medium (ISM). These fluctuations can be decomposed into slow, fast, and Alfvén magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves, which comprise a complete basis that can be used to describe linear fluctuations of a magnetized fluid. They can alternatively be decomposed in terms of one longitudinal and two transverse components of a fluid-displacement field. The intensity (T) and E- and B-mode amplitudes induced by each of the three types of waves, in both decompositions, are then calculated. To illustrate how these tools can be applied, we consider a toy model of the ISM in which dust traces a single component of plasma, and obtain the EE/BB ratio and TE correlation for several ansatzes for the power in slow/fast/Alfvén waves and in longitudinal/transverse waves. Although our model may be too simplistic to properly describe the nonlinear structure of interstellar magnetic fields, we find that the observed EE/BB ratio (and its scale invariance) and positive TE correlation—as well as the observed power-law index for the angular spectrum of these fluctuations—are not easily accommodated in terms of simple MHD turbulence prescriptions for the expected powers in slow, fast, and Alfvén waves. We speculate that the ˜0.1-30 pc length scales probed by these dust-polarization measurements are not described by MHD turbulence, but rather probe the large-scale physics that drives ISM turbulence. We find that a slightly anisotropic spectrum of random fluid displacements produces {EE}/{BB}≃ 2 and a positive TE cross-correlation. Furthermore, we find that large EE/BB and positive TE are due primarily to

  13. Longitudinal and transverse magnetic field program procedure and detailed specification for Sigma 5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, C. K.

    1980-01-01

    A computer program and procedure for plotting the contour of the data transferred from the Marshall Space Flight Center solar magnetography is presented. The plotted data then can be easily compared with solar data from other sources, such as the Solar Maximum Mission. From the data file for circular polarization the longitudinal program plots the contours for filtered longitudinal plot and intensity plot by choosing the positive and negative contour levels, intensity levels, and also X,Y plotting ranges which need to be used. In a similar manner the transverse program generates the transverse contour plot, azimuth plot, and intensity plot from the linear polarization data files.

  14. Recent COMPASS results on the gluon polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Quintans, Catarina

    2009-03-23

    The spin structure of the nucleon is studied in the COMPASS experiment at CERN/SPS, from the collisions of 160 GeV polarized muon beam with a {sup 6}LiD target. The data collected from 2002 to 2006 provide an accurate measurement of longitudinal double spin cross-section asymmetries. The latest results on the gluon polarization, accessed from two independent analyses of photon-gluon fusion selected events, are presented. The study of the open-charm production allows to extract the gluon polarization (in LO QCD) from the measurement of the asymmetry, the value obtained being {delta}g/g -0.49{+-}0.27(stat){+-}0.11(syst), at an average x{sub g} 0.11{sub -0.05}{sup +0.11} and a scale <{mu}{sup 2}> = 13(GeV/c){sup 2}. An alternative and independent way to study the gluon polarization, by studying the high transverse momentum hadron pairs produced, leads to a value {delta}g/g 0.08{+-}0.10(stat){+-}0.05(syst), at x{sub g}{sup a{nu}} 0.082{sub -0.027}{sup +0.041} and <{mu}{sup 2}> = 3(GeV/c){sup 2}.

  15. High-frequency waves in plasma formed as a result of tunnel ionization of atoms by circularly polarized radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vagin, K. Yu.; Mamontova, T. V.; Uryupin, S. A.

    2017-08-01

    New dependencies of frequency and damping decrement of high-frequency longitudinal waves on the wave vector in photoionized plasma formed by tunnel ionization of atoms in the field of circularly polarized radiation are found. Weakly damped longitudinal waves with a frequency much higher than the electron Langmuir frequency are predicted.

  16. Polarization of prompt J /ψ and ϒ (1 S ) production in the color evaporation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Vincent; Vogt, Ramona

    2017-09-01

    We calculate the polarization of prompt J /ψ and ϒ (1 S ) production using the color evaporation model at leading order. We present the polarization parameter λϑ as a function of center-of-mass energy and rapidity in p +p collisions. We also compare the xF dependence to experimental results in p +Cu and π +W collisions and predict the xF dependence in p +Pb collisions at fixed-target energies. At energies far above the Q Q ¯ production threshold, we find the prompt J /ψ and ϒ (1 S ) production to be longitudinally polarized with λϑJ /ψ=-0.5 1-0.16+0.05 and λϑϒ (1 S )=-0.6 9-0.02+0.03 . Both prompt J /ψ and prompt ϒ (1 S ) are also longitudinally polarized at central rapidity, becoming transversely polarized at the most forward rapidities.

  17. Random distributed feedback Raman fiber laser with polarized pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, H.; Wang, Z. N.; Churkin, D. V.; Vatnik, I. D.; Fan, M. Q.; Rao, Y. J.

    2015-01-01

    In this letter, the polarization properties of a random fiber laser operating via Raman gain and random distributed feedback owing to Rayleigh scattering are investigated for the first time. Using polarized pump, the partially polarized generation is obtained with a generation spectrum exhibiting discrete narrow spectral features contrary to the smooth spectrum observed for the depolarized pump. The threshold, output power, degree of polarization and the state of polarization (SOP) of the lasing can be significantly influenced by the SOP of the pump. Fine narrow spectral components are also sensitive to the SOP of the pump wave. Furthermore, we found that random lasing’s longitudinal power distributions are different in the case of polarized and depolarized pumping that results in considerable reduction of the generation slope efficiency for the polarized radiation. Our results indicate that polarization effects play an important role on the performance of the random fiber laser. This work improves the understanding of the physics of random lasing in fibers and makes a step forward towards the establishment of the vector model of random fiber lasers.

  18. Variable linear polarization from an X-ray undulator.

    PubMed

    Young, A T; Arenholz, E; Marks, S; Schlueter, R; Steier, C; Padmore, H A; Hitchcock, A P; Castner, D G

    2002-07-01

    A new X-ray undulator has been designed and constructed which produces linearly polarized X-rays in which the plane of polarization can be oriented to a user selectable angle, from horizontal to vertical. Based on the Apple-II elliptically polarizing undulator (EPU), the undulator rotates the angle of the linear polarization by a simple longitudinal motion of the undulator magnets. Combined with the circular and elliptical polarization capabilities of the EPU operating in the standard mode, this new undulator produces soft X-ray radiation with versatile polarization control. This paper describes the magnetic structure of the device and presents an analysis of the magnetic field with varying undulator parameters. The variable linear polarization capability is then exhibited by measuring the X-ray absorption spectrum of an oriented polytetrafluoroethylene thin film. This experiment, which measures the linear dichroism of the sample at two peaks near the C 1s absorption edge, demonstrates the continuous polarization rotation capabilities of the undulator.

  19. Polar Cap and Polar Cap Boundary Phenomena

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-25

    On the relationship between thin Birkeland current arcs and reversed flow channels in the winter cusp/cleft ionosphere Moen J., Y. Rinne, H...C. Carlson, K. Oksavik, R. Fujii, H. Opgenoorth Abstract: In this paper we study reversed flow events (RFEs) that seem regulated by Birkeland...current arcs in the winter cusp ionosphere above Svalbard. An RFE is a longitudinally elongated, 100–200 km wide channel, in which the flow direction is

  20. Polarized Light: Three Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goehmann, Ruth; Welty, Scott

    1984-01-01

    Describes three demonstrations used in the Chicago Museum of Science and Industry polarized light show. The procedures employed are suitable for the classroom by using smaller polarizers and an overhead projector. Topic areas include properties of cellophane tape, nondisappearing arrows, and rope through a picket fence. (JN)

  1. The Polar Insulation Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urban-Rich, Juanita

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author developed an activity called "The Polar Insulation Investigation." This activity builds on students' natural interest in "things polar" and introduces them to animal adaptations in a unique way. The aim of the exploration is to determine the role of animal coverings (e.g., blubber, fur, and feathers) and to see which is…

  2. Polar Science Is Cool!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weeks, Sophie

    2012-01-01

    Children are fascinated by the fact that polar scientists do research in extremely cold and dangerous places. In the Arctic they might be viewed as lunch by a polar bear. In the Antarctic, they could lose toes and fingers to frostbite and the wind is so fast it can rip skin off. They camp on ice in continuous daylight, weeks from any form of…

  3. The Polar Insulation Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urban-Rich, Juanita

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author developed an activity called "The Polar Insulation Investigation." This activity builds on students' natural interest in "things polar" and introduces them to animal adaptations in a unique way. The aim of the exploration is to determine the role of animal coverings (e.g., blubber, fur, and feathers) and to see which is…

  4. Our Polar Past

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clary, Renee; Wandersee, James

    2009-01-01

    The study of polar exploration is fascinating and offers students insights into the history, culture, and politics that affect the developing sciences at the farthest ends of Earth. Therefore, the authors think there is value in incorporating polar exploration accounts within modern science classrooms, and so they conducted research to test their…

  5. Polarization Radar Processing Technology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-10-01

    Oi"C FILE ( J qII RADC-TR-89-144 In-House Report October 1989 AD-A215 242 POLARIZATION RADAR PROCESSING TECHNOLOGY Kenneth C. Stiefvater, Russell D...NO. NO. NO. ACCESSION NO. 62702F 4506 11 58 11. TITLE (Include Security Classification) POLARIZATION RADAR PROCESSING TECHNOLOGY 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S

  6. Polarization of barcode readers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiley, Daniel J.

    1998-02-01

    In high-quality barcode readers, specular reflection from shiny barcodes is blocked by using a polarized scan laser and a crossed polarizer in front of the detector. When complex scanning geometries are required, the polarization properties of the mirrors in the system can become a limiting factor in system performance. Polarization raytracing allows systems such as barcode readers, LIDAR systems, and other polarization-critical system to be accurately characterized. Polarization raytracing often requires the use of local, ray-based coordinate system for expressing rays' polarization states, yet the choice of coordinate system can have important implications on system analysis. An example is presented in which specular reflection is controlled in a barcode reader by using reflection-enhanced coatings on only one of the four set of the mirrors in the system. The coordinate system used to express rays' polarization states in the example system provides useful lessons for other systems. The other analytical methods used in this example can be applied to a variety of scanning systems.

  7. Polar Science Is Cool!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weeks, Sophie

    2012-01-01

    Children are fascinated by the fact that polar scientists do research in extremely cold and dangerous places. In the Arctic they might be viewed as lunch by a polar bear. In the Antarctic, they could lose toes and fingers to frostbite and the wind is so fast it can rip skin off. They camp on ice in continuous daylight, weeks from any form of…

  8. Our Polar Past

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clary, Renee; Wandersee, James

    2009-01-01

    The study of polar exploration is fascinating and offers students insights into the history, culture, and politics that affect the developing sciences at the farthest ends of Earth. Therefore, the authors think there is value in incorporating polar exploration accounts within modern science classrooms, and so they conducted research to test their…

  9. Fusion of Polarized Deuterons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, H. M.; Fick, D.

    1984-06-01

    The nuclear physics aspects of the d-d reactions initiated by low-energy polarized deuterons are discussed. It is shown that the use of polarized deuterons does not suppress the fusion of deuterons with deuterons and hence does not suppress neutron production. Therefore a recently proposed "neutron-free" d-3He fusion reactor is unlikely to work.

  10. Polarized Light: Three Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goehmann, Ruth; Welty, Scott

    1984-01-01

    Describes three demonstrations used in the Chicago Museum of Science and Industry polarized light show. The procedures employed are suitable for the classroom by using smaller polarizers and an overhead projector. Topic areas include properties of cellophane tape, nondisappearing arrows, and rope through a picket fence. (JN)

  11. Generalized mosaicing: polarization panorama.

    PubMed

    Schechner, Yoav Y; Nayar, Shree K

    2005-04-01

    We present an approach to image the polarization state of object points in a wide field of view, while enhancing the radiometric dynamic range of maging systems by generalizing image mosaicing. The approach is biologically-inspired, as it emulates spatially varying polarization sensitivity of some animals. In our method, a spatially varying polarization and attenuation filter is rigidly attached to a camera. As the system moves, it senses each scene point multiple times, each time filtering it through a different filter polarizing angle, polarizance, and transmittance. Polarization is an additional dimension of the generalized mosaicing paradigm, which has recently yielded high dynamic range images and multispectral images in a wide field of view using other kinds of filters. The image acquisition is as easy as in traditional image mosaics. The computational algorithm can easily handle nonideal polarization filters (partial polarizers), variable exposures, and saturation in a single framework. The resulting mosaic represents the polarization state at each scene point. Using data acquired by this method, we demonstrate attenuation and enhancement of specular reflections and semireflection separation in an image mosaic.

  12. Solid polarized targets

    SciTech Connect

    Crabb, D.G.

    1994-10-26

    Polarized targets using the method of dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) are in use in many laboratories. The method of DNP is reviewed briefly and the technical developments presented at recent meetings are discussed. The operation of target systems at SLAC and CERN are presented as examples. The emergence of frozen HD as a possible target is discussed.

  13. Nomenclature of polarized light - Elliptical polarization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, D.

    1974-01-01

    Alternative handedness and sign conventions for relating the orientation of elliptical polarization are discussed. The discussion proceeds under two headings: (1) snapshot picture, where the emphasis for the convention is contained in the concept of handedness; and (2) angular momentum consideration, where the emphasis for the convention is strongly associated with mathematical convention and the sign of the fourth Stokes parameter.

  14. Nomenclature of polarized light - Elliptical polarization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, D.

    1974-01-01

    Alternative handedness and sign conventions for relating the orientation of elliptical polarization are discussed. The discussion proceeds under two headings: (1) snapshot picture, where the emphasis for the convention is contained in the concept of handedness; and (2) angular momentum consideration, where the emphasis for the convention is strongly associated with mathematical convention and the sign of the fourth Stokes parameter.

  15. Nuclear Structure Observable with Polarized Target and Polarized Real Photon Beam at Mainz Microtron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paudyal, Dilli

    2016-09-01

    The nucleon polarizabilities are fundamental structure observables, like the nucleon mass or charge. While the electric (αE 1) and magnetic (βM 1) scalar polarizabilities of the nucleon have been measured, little effort has been made to extract the spin dependent polarizabilities. These nucleon polarizabilities, γE1E1 ,γM1M1 ,γM1E2 and γE1M2 describe the spin response of a proton to electric and magnetic dipole and quadrupole interactions. We plan to extract them using polarized photon beam and polarized target at the MAMI tagged photon facility in Mainz, Germany. This requires precise measurement of the double polarization observable ∑2 z which is sensitive to these polarizabilities. The ∑2 z is measured via a circularly polarized photon beam on a longitudinally polarized butanol target in the resonance region (E = 250 - 310 MeV). Together with constraints from αE 1 and βM 1, the forward spin polarizability (γ0) , and QCD based models, should allow us to extract all four spin polarizabilities. This presentation will be focused on the preliminary experimental results for the measurement of ∑2 z at different energies and angles. Supported by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC).

  16. Parallel Polarization State Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    She, Alan; Capasso, Federico

    2016-05-01

    The control of polarization, an essential property of light, is of wide scientific and technological interest. The general problem of generating arbitrary time-varying states of polarization (SOP) has always been mathematically formulated by a series of linear transformations, i.e. a product of matrices, imposing a serial architecture. Here we show a parallel architecture described by a sum of matrices. The theory is experimentally demonstrated by modulating spatially-separated polarization components of a laser using a digital micromirror device that are subsequently beam combined. This method greatly expands the parameter space for engineering devices that control polarization. Consequently, performance characteristics, such as speed, stability, and spectral range, are entirely dictated by the technologies of optical intensity modulation, including absorption, reflection, emission, and scattering. This opens up important prospects for polarization state generation (PSG) with unique performance characteristics with applications in spectroscopic ellipsometry, spectropolarimetry, communications, imaging, and security.

  17. Parallel Polarization State Generation.

    PubMed

    She, Alan; Capasso, Federico

    2016-05-17

    The control of polarization, an essential property of light, is of wide scientific and technological interest. The general problem of generating arbitrary time-varying states of polarization (SOP) has always been mathematically formulated by a series of linear transformations, i.e. a product of matrices, imposing a serial architecture. Here we show a parallel architecture described by a sum of matrices. The theory is experimentally demonstrated by modulating spatially-separated polarization components of a laser using a digital micromirror device that are subsequently beam combined. This method greatly expands the parameter space for engineering devices that control polarization. Consequently, performance characteristics, such as speed, stability, and spectral range, are entirely dictated by the technologies of optical intensity modulation, including absorption, reflection, emission, and scattering. This opens up important prospects for polarization state generation (PSG) with unique performance characteristics with applications in spectroscopic ellipsometry, spectropolarimetry, communications, imaging, and security.

  18. Polarization of clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goloub, Philippe; Herman, Maurice; Parol, Frederic

    1995-12-01

    This paper reports the main results concerning polarization by clouds derived from POLDER (polarization and directionality of earth's reflectances) airborne version. These results tend to confirm the high information content in the polarization (phase, altimetry). The preliminary results of EUCREX'94 (European Cloud Radiation Experiment) evidenced the drastically different polarized signatures for ice crystals and water droplets. Here we report systematic and statistically significative observations over the whole EUCREX data set. The results show that the cirrus exhibit their own signature. Preliminary observations performed during CLEOPATRA'91 (Cloud Experiment Ober Pfaffenhofen And Transport) and EUCREX'94 campaigns have shown the feasibility of cloud altimetry using spectral information (443 nm and 865 nm) of the polarized light over liquid water droplets clouds. Altimetry technique has been generalized on ASTEX-SOFIA'92 and EUCREX'94 data sets. All these results are presented and discussed in this paper.

  19. Parallel Polarization State Generation

    PubMed Central

    She, Alan; Capasso, Federico

    2016-01-01

    The control of polarization, an essential property of light, is of wide scientific and technological interest. The general problem of generating arbitrary time-varying states of polarization (SOP) has always been mathematically formulated by a series of linear transformations, i.e. a product of matrices, imposing a serial architecture. Here we show a parallel architecture described by a sum of matrices. The theory is experimentally demonstrated by modulating spatially-separated polarization components of a laser using a digital micromirror device that are subsequently beam combined. This method greatly expands the parameter space for engineering devices that control polarization. Consequently, performance characteristics, such as speed, stability, and spectral range, are entirely dictated by the technologies of optical intensity modulation, including absorption, reflection, emission, and scattering. This opens up important prospects for polarization state generation (PSG) with unique performance characteristics with applications in spectroscopic ellipsometry, spectropolarimetry, communications, imaging, and security. PMID:27184813

  20. Cell polarity: mechanochemical patterning.

    PubMed

    Goehring, Nathan W; Grill, Stephan W

    2013-02-01

    Nearly every cell type exhibits some form of polarity, yet the molecular mechanisms vary widely. Here we examine what we term 'chemical systems' where cell polarization arises through biochemical interactions in signaling pathways, 'mechanical systems' where cells polarize due to forces, stresses and transport, and 'mechanochemical systems' where polarization results from interplay between mechanics and chemical signaling. To reveal potentially unifying principles, we discuss mathematical conceptualizations of several prototypical examples. We suggest that the concept of local activation and global inhibition - originally developed to explain spatial patterning in reaction-diffusion systems - provides a framework for understanding many cases of cell polarity. Importantly, we find that the core ingredients in this framework - symmetry breaking, self-amplifying feedback, and long-range inhibition - involve processes that can be chemical, mechanical, or even mechanochemical in nature.

  1. A Large, Longitudinal Dune

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-02-11

    Taken in late southern spring and when Mars is near perihelion (closest distance to the Sun), this image shows the effects of dry ice sublimation on a longitudinal dune in the far Southern hemisphere. The bright patches on the dune are still covered in frost, and the dark regions are frost-free. Longitudinal dunes form when the wind switches between two common directions*. Based on the direction of this dune's long crest and the orientation of the smaller ripples, it appears the wind blows from the east and from the northwest. However, it would require taking multiple HiRISE images of this location over time and noticing movement before we could say this definitively. The broad base of this dune may indicate that dune sand has spilled out from areas once covered in ice. During the next Martian Southern hemisphere winter (about half a Mars year or one Earth year from when this image was taken), this dune will again be covered in frost and possibly solid carbon dioxide ice, unable to blow in the wind until the volatiles begin to sublimate in the spring. *These are ripples indicating a wind out of the north/northwest. The scene is 250 m across. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA19293

  2. Modeling nonstationary longitudinal data.

    PubMed

    Núñez-Antón, V; Zimmerman, D L

    2000-09-01

    An important theme of longitudinal data analysis in the past two decades has been the development and use of explicit parametric models for the data's variance-covariance structure. A variety of these models have been proposed, of which most are second-order stationary. A few are flexible enough to accommodate nonstationarity, i.e., nonconstant variances and/or correlations that are not a function solely of elapsed time between measurements. We review five nonstationary models that we regard as most useful: (1) the unstructured covariance model, (2) unstructured antedependence models, (3) structured antedependence models, (4) autoregressive integrated moving average and similar models, and (5) random coefficients models. We evaluate the relative strengths and limitations of each model, emphasizing when it is inappropriate or unlikely to be useful. We present three examples to illustrate the fitting and comparison of the models and to demonstrate that nonstationary longitudinal data can be modeled effectively and, in some cases, quite parsimoniously. In these examples, the antedependence models generally prove to be superior and the random coefficients models prove to be inferior. We conclude that antedependence models should be given much greater consideration than they have historically received.

  3. Generation of longitudinal vibrations in piano strings: From physics to sound synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bank, Balázs; Sujbert, László

    2005-04-01

    Longitudinal vibration of piano strings greatly contributes to the distinctive character of low piano notes. In this paper a simplified modal model is developed, which describes the generation of phantom partials and longitudinal free modes jointly. The model is based on the simplification that the coupling from the transverse vibration to the longitudinal polarization is unidirectional. The modal formulation makes it possible to predict the prominent components of longitudinal vibration as a function of transverse modal frequencies. This provides a qualitative insight into the generation of longitudinal vibration, while the model is still capable of explaining the empirical results of earlier works. The semi-quantitative agreement with measurement results implies that the main source of phantom partials is the transverse to longitudinal coupling, while the string termination and the longitudinal to transverse coupling have only small influence. The results suggest that the longitudinal component of the tone can be treated as a quasi-harmonic spectrum with formantlike peaks at the longitudinal modal frequencies. The model is further simplified and applied for the real-time synthesis of piano sound with convincing sonic results. .

  4. Polarization exchange of optical eigenmode pair in twisted-nematic Fabry-Pérot resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunyakov, Vladimir A.; Timofeev, Ivan V.; Krakhalev, Mikhail N.; Zyryanov, Victor Ya.

    2017-08-01

    The polarization exchange effect in a twisted-nematic Fabry-Pérot resonator is experimentally confirmed in the regimes of both uniform and electric-field-deformed twisted structures. The polarization of output light in the transmission peaks is shown to be linear rather than elliptical. The polarization deflection from the nematic director grows from 0∘ to 90∘ angle and exchanges the longitudinal and transverse directions. Untwisting of a nematic by a voltage leads to the rotation of the polarization plane of light passing through the resonator. The polarization exchange effect allows using the investigated resonator as a spectral-selective linear polarizer with the voltage-controlled rotation of the polarization plane.

  5. Three-dimensional polarization marked multiple-QR code encryption by optimizing a single vectorial beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chao; Shen, Xueju; Hua, Binbin; Wang, Zhisong

    2015-10-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of three dimensional (3D) polarization multiplexing by optimizing a single vectorial beam using a multiple-signal window multiple-plane (MSW-MP) phase retrieval algorithm. Original messages represented with multiple quick response (QR) codes are first partitioned into a series of subblocks. Then, each subblock is marked with a specific polarization state and randomly distributed in 3D space with both longitudinal and transversal adjustable freedoms. A generalized 3D polarization mapping protocol is established to generate a 3D polarization key. Finally, multiple-QR code is encrypted into one phase only mask and one polarization only mask based on the modified Gerchberg-Saxton (GS) algorithm. We take the polarization mask as the cyphertext and the phase only mask as additional dimension of key. Only when both the phase key and 3D polarization key are correct, original messages can be recovered. We verify our proposal with both simulation and experiment evidences.

  6. Interplanetary magnetic sector polarity inferred from polar geomagnetic field observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friis-Christensen, E.; Lassen, K.; Wilcox, J. M.; Gonzalez, W.; Colburn, D. S.

    1971-01-01

    In order to infer the interplanetary sector polarity from polar geomagnetic field diurnal variations, measurements were carried out at Godhavn and Thule (Denmark) Geomagnetic Observatories. The inferred interplanetary sector polarity was compared with the polarity observed at the same time by Explorer 33 and 35 magnetometers. It is shown that the polarity (toward or away from the sun) of the interplanetary magnetic field can be reliably inferred from observations of the polar cap geomagnetic fields.

  7. Neutron Polarizers Based on Polarized 3He

    SciTech Connect

    William M. Snow

    2005-05-01

    The goal of this work, which is a collaborative effort between Indiana University, NIST, and Hamilton College, is to extend the technique of polarized neutron scattering into new domains by the development and application of polarized 3He-based neutron spin filters. After the IPNS experiment which measured Zeeman sp[litting in surface scattered neutrons using a polarized 3He cell as a polarization analyzer transporterd by car from Bloomington to Chicago, the Indiana work focused on technical developments to improve the 3He polarization of the Indiana compression system. The compression system was rebuilt with a new valve system which allows gas trapped in the dead volume of the compressors at the end of the piston stroke to be exhausted and conducted back to the optical pumping cell where it can be repolarized. We also incorporated a new intermediate storage volume made at NIST from 1720 glass which will reduce polarization losses between the compressors. Furthermore, we improved the stability of the 1083 nm laser by cooling the LMA rod. We achieved 60% 3he polarization in the optical pumping cell and 87% preservation of the polarization during compression. In parallel we built a magnetically-shielded transport solenoid for use on neutron scattering instruments such as POSY which achieves a fractional field uniformity of better than 10-3 per cm. The field was mapped using an automated 3D field mapping system for in-situ measurement of magnetic field gradients Diluted magnetic semiconductors offer many exciting opportunities for investigation of spintronic effects in solids and are certain to be one of the most active areas of condensed matter physics over then next several years. These materials can act as efficient spin injectors for devices that make use of spin-dependent transport phenomena. We just (late July 2002) finished a neutron reflectivity experiment at NIST on a GaMnAs trilayer film. This material is a ferromagnetic semiconductor which is of interest

  8. Multiple photon Monte Carlo simulation for polarized Mo/ller scattering with Yennie-Fraustchi-Suura exponentiation at high energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jadach, S.; Ward, B. F. L.

    1996-07-01

    We present the theoretical basis and sample Monte Carlo data for the YFS exponentiated O(α) calculation of polarized Mo/ller scattering at c.m.s. energies large compared to 2me. Both longitudinal and transverse polarizations are discussed. Possible applications to Mo/ller polarimetry at the SLD are thus illustrated.

  9. Compton Polarization with Nustar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotti, Simone; Natalucci, Lorenzo; Harrison, Fiona A.; Madsen, Kristin; Perri, Matteo; Puccetti, Simonetta

    In this study we assess the NuSTAR capabilities to detect polarized signals in the Compton regime, through the use of Monte Carlo simulations and comparison with observational data. Both NuSTAR focal plane detectors are equipped with high resolution pixilated CZT arrays, sensitive in the energy range 2.5-80 keV. These units have intrinsic polarization capabilities due to their high quality factor, very low background and scattering angles of ~90°, which is ideal for incident photon energies below 100 keV. However the sensitivity is limited by the very low efficiency of the CZT for Compton interactions and by intrinsic readout systematics, such as charge sharing between pixels. An additional source of degradation is the incompleteness of double events information in the science telemetry. We estimated the Minimum Detectable Polarization of cosmic sources as a function of intensity, and the results obtained were validated through the comparison with the first actual data from the Crab Nebula and Cygnus X-1. We also evaluated the count rate and the background expected for polarization measurements, comparing our estimates with the data measured in flight. Our simulations reproduce well the actual NuSTAR data, showing that the focal plane detectors should be able to detect polarization from highly polarized sources like the Crab and other potential bright sources, dominated by synchrotron and/or SSC emission. The background for polarization measurements was found to be negligible.

  10. Animated Displays IV: Linear Polarization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chagnon, Paul

    1993-01-01

    Describes several demonstrations that can be easily reproduced to help students understand optical polarization. Displays and supplement text include polarization by reflection; polarization by scattering; liquid crystals; optical activity; calcite; birefringent plastics; retardation plates; photoelasticity; and the "Optical Barber…

  11. Animated Displays IV: Linear Polarization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chagnon, Paul

    1993-01-01

    Describes several demonstrations that can be easily reproduced to help students understand optical polarization. Displays and supplement text include polarization by reflection; polarization by scattering; liquid crystals; optical activity; calcite; birefringent plastics; retardation plates; photoelasticity; and the "Optical Barber…

  12. Proton Elastic Form Factor Ratio: the JLab Polarization Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Charles Perdrisat; Vina Punjabi

    2003-07-30

    The ratio of the electric and magnetic proton form factors, G{sub Ep}/G{sub Mp}, has been obtained in two Hall A experiments, from measurements of the longitudinal and transverse polarization of the recoil proton, P{sub l} and P{sub t}, respectively, in the elastic scattering of polarized electrons, {rvec e}p {yields} e{rvec p}. Together these experiments cover the Q{sup 2}-range 0.5 to 5.6 GeV{sup 2}. A new experiment is currently being prepared, to extend the Q{sup 2}-range to 9 GeV{sup 2} in Hall C.

  13. Status of the Upsilon Polarization Measurement at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Ranjan, Niharika; /Purdue U.

    2011-10-01

    The angular distributions of {Upsilon}(1S) {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} decays are analyzed using a sample of {Upsilon}(1S) mesons in 2.9 fb{sup -1} of data collected at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The results of the one-dimensional angular analysis suggest that {Upsilon}(1S) may be longitudinal polarized at high transverse momentum. This observation is largely inconsistent with NRQCD prediction that predicts transverse polarization at high p{sub T}.

  14. Longitudinal Stern-Gerlach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higinbotham, Douglas

    2006-11-01

    In 1922 Otto Stern and Walther Gerlach split a beam of silver atoms using a transverse gradient field. This experiment, which lead to the understanding that electrons have intrinsic spin, oddly enough does not work for free electrons due to the interplay between the Lorentz force and Heisenberg uncertainly principle. Recent calculations, Phys. Rev. Lett. 79 (1997) 4517 and Phys. Rev. Lett. 86 (2001) 4508, have shown that a dismissed idea of L. Brillouin from 1928 to use a longitudinal gradient field to minimize the effect of the Lorentz force may in fact be possible. The history of the Stern-Gerlach device will be presented along with the revived ideas for separating a beam of free electrons into its two spin states.

  15. Polar Code Validation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-09-30

    Unclassified 2a SECURITY CLASSiF-ICATiON AUTHORIT’Y 3 DIStRIBUTION AVAILABILITY OF REPORT N,A Approved for public release; 2o DECLASSIFICAIiON DOWNGRADING SCH DI...SUMMARY OF POLAR ACHIEVEMENTS ..... .......... 3 3 . POLAR CODE PHYSICAL MODELS ..... ............. 5 3.1 PL-ASMA Su ^"ru5 I1LS SH A...11 Structure of the Bipolar Plasma Sheath Generated by SPEAR I ... ...... 1 3 The POLAR Code Wake Model: Comparison with in Situ Observations . . 23

  16. Digital Longitudinal Tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimkus, Daniel Steven

    1985-12-01

    The purpose of this dissertation was to investigate the clinical utility of digital longitudinal tomosynthesis in radiology. By acquiring a finite group of digital images during a longitudinal tomographic exposure, and processing these images, tomographic planes, other than the fulcrum plane, can be reconstructed. This process is now termed "tomosynthesis". A prototype system utilizing this technique was developed. Both phantom and patient studies were done with this system. The phantom studies were evaluated by subjective, visual criterion and by quantitative analysis of edge sharpness and noise in the reconstructions. Two groups of patients and one volunteer were studied. The first patient group consisted of 8 patients undergoing intravenous urography (IVU). These patients had digital tomography and film tomography of the abdomen. The second patient group consisted of 4 patients with lung cancer admitted to the hospital for laser resection of endobronchial tumor. These patients had mediastinal digital tomograms to evaluate the trachea and mainstem bronchi. The knee of one volunteer was imaged by film tomography and digital tomography. The results of the phantom studies showed that the digital reconstructions accurately produced images of the desired planes. The edge sharpness of the reconstructions approached that of the acquired images. Adequate reconstructions were achieved with as few as 5 images acquired during the exposure, with the quality of the reconstructions improving as the number of images acquired increased. The IVU patients' digital studies had less contrast and spatial resolution than the film tomograms. The single renal lesion visible on the film tomograms was also visible in the digital images. The digital mediastinal studies were felt by several radiologists to be superior to a standard chest xray in evaluating the airways. The digital images of the volunteer's knee showed many of the same anatomic features as the film tomogram, but the digital

  17. Longitudinal space charge amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneidmiller, E. A.; Yurkov, M. V.

    2013-05-01

    Longitudinal space charge (LSC) driven microbunching instability in electron beam formation systems of X-ray FELs is a recently discovered effect hampering beam instrumentation and FEL operation. The instability was observed in different facilities in infrared and visible wavelength ranges. In this paper we propose to use such an instability for generation of vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) and X-ray radiation. A typical longitudinal space charge amplifier (LSCA) consists of few amplification cascades (drift space plus chicane) with a short undulator behind the last cascade. If the amplifier starts up from the shot noise, the amplified density modulation has a wide band, on the order of unity. The bandwidth of the radiation within the central cone is given by inverse number of undulator periods. A wavelength compression could be an attractive option for LSCA since the process is broadband, and a high compression stability is not required. LSCA can be used as a cheap addition to the existing or planned short-wavelength FELs. In particular, it can produce the second color for a pump-probe experiment. It is also possible to generate attosecond pulses in the VUV and X-ray regimes. Some user experiments can profit from a relatively large bandwidth of the radiation, and this is easy to obtain in LSCA scheme. Finally, since the amplification mechanism is broadband and robust, LSCA can be an interesting alternative to self-amplified spontaneous emission free electron laser (SASE FEL) in the case of using laser-plasma accelerators as drivers of light sources.

  18. Polarization insensitive imaging through polarization gratings.

    PubMed

    Nersisyan, Sarik R; Tabiryan, Nelson V; Hoke, Landa; Steeves, Diane M; Kimball, Brian R

    2009-02-02

    Liquid crystal polarization gratings exhibit high diffraction efficiency (approximately 100%) in thin material layers comparable to the radiation wavelength. We demonstrate that they can be combined for polarization-insensitive imaging and optical switching applications. A pair of closely spaced, parallel oriented, cycloidal polarization gratings is capable of canceling the diffractive property of an individual grating. As a result, the phase of the beam is not distorted, and holographic images can be formed through them. An anti-parallel arrangement results in a broader effective diffraction band and doubles the diffraction angle. Broadband diffraction spanning from 480 nm to beyond 900 nm wavelengths has been obtained for a pair of gratings with 500 nm and 633 nm peak diffraction wavelengths. Liquid crystal polymer cycloidal gratings were used in the study showing 98% diffraction efficiency over a large area, and allowed for the use of laser beams expanded to 25 mm. The characteristics of combined cycloidal gratings were tested with laser beams at both UV and red wavelengths.

  19. Determination of the linear polarization for pseudo-scalar meson photoproduction experiments in Hall-B at JLab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabintsev, Arthur

    2010-02-01

    The JLab CLAS g9a experiments are double polarization measurements that have accumulated photoproduction data using a linearly polarized, tagged photons incident on a longitudinally polarized, frozen spin butanol target (FROST). Linearly polarized photons were produced via coherent bremsstrahlung from an electron beam incident on an oriented diamond crystal.footnotetextU. Timm, Fortschritte der Physik, 17, 765 (1969). The analysis of the resulting coherent peaks was used to determine photon polarization which agree with phenomenological calculations.footnotetextA. Natter, et al., Nuc. Inst Meth B 211, 465 (2003). )

  20. General lossless spatial polarization transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sit, Alicia; Giner, Lambert; Karimi, Ebrahim; Lundeen, Jeff S.

    2017-09-01

    Liquid crystals allow for the real-time control of the polarization of light. We describe and provide some experimental examples of the types of general polarization transformations, including universal polarization transformations, that can be accomplished with liquid crystals in tandem with fixed waveplates. Implementing these transformations with an array of liquid crystals, e.g. a spatial light modulator, allows for the manipulation of the polarization across a beam’s transverse plane. We outline applications of such general spatial polarization transformations in the generation of exotic types of vector polarized beams, a polarization magnifier, and the correction of polarization aberrations in light fields.

  1. Accurate measurement of the residual birefringence in VECSEL: Towards understanding of the polarization behavior under spin-polarized pumping.

    PubMed

    Frougier, Julien; Baili, Ghaya; Sagnes, Isabelle; Dolfi, Daniel; George, Jean-Marie; Alouini, Mehdi

    2015-04-20

    In this paper we report birefringence measurements of an optically pumped (100)-oriented InGaAs/GaAsP multiple quantum well (MQWs) Vertical External Cavity Surface Emitting Laser (VECSEL) in oscillating conditions. The proposed technique relies on the measurement in the microwave domain of the beatnote between the oscillating mode and the amplified spontaneous emission of the cross-polarized non-lasing field lying in the following longitudinal mode. This technique is shown to offer extremely high sensitivity and accuracy enabling to track the amount of residual birefringence according to the laser operation conditions. The experience fits within the broader framework of polarization selection in spin-injected lasers.

  2. Unbiased determination of polarized parton distributions and their uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, Richard D.; Forte, Stefano; Guffanti, Alberto; Nocera, Emanuele R.; Ridolfi, Giovanni; Rojo, Juan

    2013-09-01

    We present a determination of a set of polarized parton distributions (PDFs) of the nucleon, at next-to-leading order, from a global set of longitudinally polarized deep-inelastic scattering data: NNPDFpol1.0. The determination is based on the NNPDF methodology: a Monte Carlo approach, with neural networks used as unbiased interpolants, previously applied to the determination of unpolarized parton distributions, and designed to provide a faithful and statistically sound representation of PDF uncertainties. We present our dataset, its statistical features, and its Monte Carlo representation. We summarize the technique used to solve the polarized evolution equations and its benchmarking, and the method used to compute physical observables. We review the NNPDF methodology for parametrization and fitting of neural networks, the algorithm used to determine the optimal fit, and its adaptation to the polarized case. We finally present our set of polarized parton distributions. We discuss its statistical properties, test for its stability upon various modifications of the fitting procedure, and compare it to other recent polarized parton sets, and in particular obtain predictions for polarized first moments of PDFs based on it. We find that the uncertainties on the gluon, and to a lesser extent the strange PDF, were substantially underestimated in previous determinations.

  3. Polarization Effects with Pendulums.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Bruce H.

    1982-01-01

    Describes an apparatus used to demonstrate effects observed with polarized light. The apparatus employs two pendulums attached to threads crossing orthogonally over an overhead projector. Several demonstrations using the apparatus are provided. (Author/JN)

  4. Dark Polar Dunes

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-09-01

    This MOC image shows dunes in the martian north polar region. The dunes are composed of dark, coarse sand. The white areas around the dunes are the last remaining areas of seasonal carbon dioxide frost cover

  5. South Polar Autumn

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-04-22

    This MOC image shows a portion of the south polar residual cap; darkened edges of the pits and mesas are evidence of the removal, by sublimation, of frozen carbon dioxide during the recent martian summer

  6. Polar Environmental Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagler, R. G.; Schulteis, A. C.

    1979-01-01

    The present and projected benefits of the polar regions were reviewed and then translated into information needs in order to support the array of polar activities anticipated. These needs included measurement sensitivities for polar environmental data (ice/snow, atmosphere, and ocean data for integrated support) and the processing and delivery requirements which determine the effectiveness of environmental services. An assessment was made of how well electromagnetic signals can be converted into polar environmental information. The array of sensor developments in process or proposed were also evaluated as to the spectral diversity, aperture sizes, and swathing capabilities available to provide these measurements from spacecraft, aircraft, or in situ platforms. Global coverage and local coverage densification options were studied in terms of alternative spacecraft trajectories and aircraft flight paths.

  7. South Polar Designs

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-04-29

    This MOC image shows an undulating scene in the south polar region of Mars. Small, elevated mesas of smooth, relatively homogeneous-appearing material are separated by low-lying regions that are speckled and darkened in some local areas

  8. Colorful Polar Layered Deposits

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-03-23

    The North Polar layered deposits provide a record of recent climate changes on Mars as seen by NASA Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft. Color variations between layers are due to differences in composition of the dust.

  9. Invariants of polarization transformations.

    PubMed

    Sadjadi, Firooz A

    2007-05-20

    The use of polarization-sensitive sensors is being explored in a variety of applications. Polarization diversity has been shown to improve the performance of the automatic target detection and recognition in a significant way. However, it also brings out the problems associated with processing and storing more data and the problem of polarization distortion during transmission. We present a technique for extracting attributes that are invariant under polarization transformations. The polarimetric signatures are represented in terms of the components of the Stokes vectors. Invariant algebra is then used to extract a set of signature-related attributes that are invariant under linear transformation of the Stokes vectors. Experimental results using polarimetric infrared signatures of a number of manmade and natural objects undergoing systematic linear transformations support the invariancy of these attributes.

  10. South Polar Textures

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-10-07

    While yesterday image showed a texture of oval depressions swiss cheese, this image from NASA 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft shows a linear surface texture of the south polar cap. This texture is described as looking like a thumbprint.

  11. Mercury's South Polar Region

    NASA Image and Video Library

    This animation shows 89 wide-angle camera (WAC) images of Mercury’s south polar region acquired by the Mercury Dual Imaging System (MDIS) over one complete Mercury solar day (176 Earth days). Thi...

  12. South Polar Clouds

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-04-06

    Polar surface winds can reach high velocities. These winds can cause clouds to form when the winds flow into troughs and become chaotic. This image from NASA Mars Odyssey shows trough clouds as linear bands.

  13. More Polar Dunes

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-07-11

    This image from NASA 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft shows more north polar dunes. If you compare multiple dune images, you will see that the dunes can take different forms and cover different amounts of the plains.

  14. Interferometric polarization control

    SciTech Connect

    Chuss, David T.; Wollack, Edward J.; Moseley, S. Harvey; Novak, Giles

    2006-07-20

    We develop the Jones and Mueller matrices for structures that allow control of the path length difference between two linear orthogonal polarizations and consider the effect of placing multiple devices in series. Specifically, we find that full polarization modulation (measurement of Stokes Q, U, and V) can be achieved by placing two such modulators in series if the relative angles of the beam-splitting grids with respect to the analyzer orientation are appropriately chosen. Such a device has several potential advantages over a spinning wave plate modulator for measuring astronomical polarization in the far infrared through millimeter: (i) The use of small, linear motions eliminates the need for cryogenic rotational bearings; (ii) the phase flexibility allows measurement of circular as well as linear polarization; and (iii) this architecture allows for both multiwavelength and broadband modulation. We also present initial laboratory results.

  15. Interferometric polarization control.

    PubMed

    Chuss, David T; Wollack, Edward J; Moseley, S Harvey; Novak, Giles

    2006-07-20

    We develop the Jones and Mueller matrices for structures that allow control of the path length difference between two linear orthogonal polarizations and consider the effect of placing multiple devices in series. Specifically, we find that full polarization modulation (measurement of Stokes Q, U, and V) can be achieved by placing two such modulators in series if the relative angles of the beam-splitting grids with respect to the analyzer orientation are appropriately chosen. Such a device has several potential advantages over a spinning wave plate modulator for measuring astronomical polarization in the far infrared through millimeter: (i) The use of small, linear motions eliminates the need for cryogenic rotational bearings; (ii) the phase flexibility allows measurement of circular as well as linear polarization; and (iii) this architecture allows for both multiwavelength and broadband modulation. We also present initial laboratory results.

  16. EDITORIAL: Polarization Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turunen, Jari; Friesem, Asher A.; Friberg, Ari T.

    2004-03-01

    This special issue on Polarization Optics contains one review article and 23 research papers, many of which are based on presentations at the International Commission for Optics Topical Meeting on Polarization Optics, held in Polvijärvi, Finland, between 30 June and 3 July 2003. While this issue should not in any sense be considered as a `proceedings' of this meeting, the possibility of submitting papers to it was widely advertised during the meeting, which was attended by a large fraction of prominent scientists in the field of polarization optics. Thus the quality of papers in this special issue is high. In announcing both the meeting and this special issue, we emphasized that the concept of `polarization optics' should be understood in a wide sense. In fact, all contributions dealing with the vectorial nature of light were welcome. As a result, the papers included here cover a wide range of different aspects of linear and nonlinear polarization optics. Both theoretical and experimental features are discussed. We are pleased to see that the conference and this special issue both reflect the wide diversity of important and novel polarization phenomena in optics. The papers in this special issue, and other recently published works, demonstrate that even though polarization is a fundamental property of electromagnetic fields, interest in it is rapidly increasing. The fundamental relations between partial coherence and partial polarization are currently under vigorous research in electromagnetic coherence theory. In diffractive optics it has been found that the exploitation of the vectorial nature of light can be of great benefit. Fabrication of sophisticated, spatially variable polarization-control elements is becoming possible with the aid of nanolithography. Polarization singularities and the interplay of bulk properties and topology in nanoscale systems have created much enthusiasm. In nonlinear optics, the second harmonic waves generated on reflection and

  17. Polarization Imaging Apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zou, Yingyin K.; Chen, Qiushui

    2010-01-01

    A polarization imaging apparatus has shown promise as a prototype of instruments for medical imaging with contrast greater than that achievable by use of non-polarized light. The underlying principles of design and operation are derived from observations that light interacts with tissue ultrastructures that affect reflectance, scattering, absorption, and polarization of light. The apparatus utilizes high-speed electro-optical components for generating light properties and acquiring polarization images through aligned polarizers. These components include phase retarders made of OptoCeramic (registered TradeMark) material - a ceramic that has a high electro-optical coefficient. The apparatus includes a computer running a program that implements a novel algorithm for controlling the phase retarders, capturing image data, and computing the Stokes polarization images. Potential applications include imaging of superficial cancers and other skin lesions, early detection of diseased cells, and microscopic analysis of tissues. The high imaging speed of this apparatus could be beneficial for observing live cells or tissues, and could enable rapid identification of moving targets in astronomy and national defense. The apparatus could also be used as an analysis tool in material research and industrial processing.

  18. Polar Warming Drivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDunn, T. L.; Bougher, S. W.; Mischna, M. A.; Murphy, J. R.

    2012-12-01

    Polar warming is a dynamically induced temperature enhancement over mid-to-high latitudes that results in a reversed (poleward) meridional temperature gradient. This phenomenon was recently characterized over the 40-90 km altitude region [1] based on nearly three martian years of Mars Climate Sounder observations [2, 3]. Here we investigate which forcing mechanisms affect the magnitude and distribution of the observed polar warming by conducting simulations with the Mars Weather Research and Forecasting General Circulation Model [4, 5]. We present simulations confirming the influence topography [6] and dust loading [e.g., 7] have upon polar warming. We then present simulations illustrating the modulating influence gravity wave momentum deposition exerts upon polar warming, consistent with previous modeling studies [e.g., 8]. The results of this investigation suggest the magnitude and distribution of polar warming in the martian middle atmosphere is modified by gravity wave activity and that the characteristics of the gravity waves that most significantly affect polar warming vary with season. References: [1] McDunn, et al., 2012 (JGR), [2]Kleinböhl, et al., 2009 (JGR), [3] Kleinböhl, et al., 2011 (JQSRT), [4] Richardson, et al., 2007 (JGR), [5] Mischna, et al., 2011 (Planet. Space Sci.), [6] Richardson and Wilson, 2002 (Nature), [7] Haberle, et al., 1982 (Icarus), [8] Barnes, 1990 (JGR).

  19. Active polarization descattering.

    PubMed

    Treibitz, Tali; Schechner, Yoav Y

    2009-03-01

    Vision in scattering media is important but challenging. Images suffer from poor visibility due to backscattering and attenuation. Most prior methods for scene recovery use active illumination scanners (structured and gated), which can be slow and cumbersome, while natural illumination is inapplicable to dark environments. The current paper addresses the need for a non-scanning recovery method, that uses active scene irradiance. We study the formation of images under widefield artificial illumination. Based on the formation model, the paper presents an approach for recovering the object signal. It also yields rough information about the 3D scene structure. The approach can work with compact, simple hardware, having active widefield, polychromatic polarized illumination. The camera is fitted with a polarization analyzer. Two frames of the scene are taken, with different states of the analyzer or polarizer. A recovery algorithm follows the acquisition. It allows both the backscatter and the object reflection to be partially polarized. It thus unifies and generalizes prior polarization-based methods, which had assumed exclusive polarization of either of these components. The approach is limited to an effective range, due to image noise and illumination falloff. Thus, the limits and noise sensitivity are analyzed. We demonstrate the approach in underwater field experiments.

  20. Polarized neutrons in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Courant, E.D.

    1998-04-20

    There does not appear to be any obvious way to accelerate neutrons, polarized or otherwise, to high energies by themselves. To investigate the behavior of polarized neutrons the authors therefore have to obtain them by accelerating them as components of heavier nuclei, and then sorting out the contribution of the neutrons in the analysis of the reactions produced by the heavy ion beams. The best neutron carriers for this purpose are probably {sup 3}He nuclei and deuterons. A polarized deuteron is primarily a combination of a proton and a neutron with their spins pointing in the same direction; in the {sup 3}He nucleus the spins of the two protons are opposite and the net spin (and magnetic moment) is almost the same as that of a free neutron. Polarized ions other than protons may be accelerated, stored and collided in a ring such as RHIC provided the techniques proposed for polarized proton operation can be adapted (or replaced by other strategies) for these ions. This paper discusses techniques for accelerating polarized {sup 3}He nuclei and deuterons.

  1. AGS polarized proton project

    SciTech Connect

    Halama, H.J.

    1983-01-01

    At the end of this year, polarized H/sup -/ beam will be injected into the AGS, where it will be stripped and subsequently accelerated to 26 GeV/c. 20 keV polarized H/sup -/ are produced in an ion source working at ground potential by colliding polarized H/sup 0/ with cesium beams and 12 ..mu..A of H/sup -/ have already been achieved in 0.5 ms pulses. 20 keV beam is transported to an RFQ linac where it is accelerated to 750 keV. 750 keV LEBT line matches the RFQ output emittance to the acceptance of the existing 200 MeV linac to reach the desired AGS injection energy. The degree of polarization will depend critically on how well we can cross some 30 depolarizing resonances in the AGS. They can be divided into two types: (1) intrinsic resonances due to natural periodicity of the AGS will be crossed in less than one revolution (approx. 2 ..mu..s) by a fast tune jump generated by 12 fast quadrupoles and their modulators, and (2) imperfection resonances due to magnet misalignment will be minimized by generating harmonic correction using 96 existing dipole magnets. In addition, all existing AGS multipoles will be programmed to tailor the tune and chromaticity during the acceleration to further facilitate resonance crossing. In order to insure rapid tune up and commissioning of polarized beams, four independent polarimeters will be used to measure polarization.

  2. Longitudinal polarizability and enhancement factor of a tapered optical gold nanoantenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazizov, A. R.; Kharintsev, S. S.; Salakhov, M. Kh

    2016-05-01

    This work focuses on the mechanism of electric field enhancement near a tapered optical antenna and the calculation of a complex field enhancement factor as a function of tip material, its curvature radius and cone angle. In this paper, an analytical model of longitudinal polarizability, taking into account retardation and dynamic polarization effects, is developed for evaluating the field enhancement factor.

  3. Influence of ferroelectric polarization on magnetic anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mardana, A.; Ducharme, S.; Adenwalla, S.

    2010-03-01

    Thin film heterostructures of transition metal ferromagnets (FM) and polymer ferroelectrics (FE) are investigated to look for changes in the magnetic anisotropy of the FM layer that occur on switching the FE polarization (with an ensuing change in the electric field direction).[1] Samples of [Glass/ Pd (50 nm)/Co wedge (0.9-2.6nm)/ferroelectric P(VDF-TrFE) (53 nm)/Al (30nm)] are deposited via sputtering or evaporation for the metallic layers and via Langmuir-Schaefer deposition for the polymer ferroelectric. [2] Magnetic and FE properties have been characterized using the Magneto-Optical Kerr Effect (MOKE) and the pyroelectric effect. Polar and longitudinal MOKE loops are measured across the Co wedge for both positive and negative FE polarization and the difference in the two MOKE loops is ascribed to the changes in the magnetic anisotropy of the FM layer. [3] These changes are most apparent in the region where the Co undergoes a transition from in-plane to out-of-plane anisotropy. This research is supported by the NSF MRSEC through Grant No. DMR- 0820521 1. Chun-Gang Duan et al, Appl. Phys. Lett. 92, 122905 (2008) 2. A. V. Bune, et al, Nature (London) 391, 874 (1998) 3. P. F. Carcia, J.Appl. Phys. 63, 5066 (1988)

  4. Polarized Light Microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frandsen, Athela F.

    2016-01-01

    Polarized light microscopy (PLM) is a technique which employs the use of polarizing filters to obtain substantial optical property information about the material which is being observed. This information can be combined with other microscopy techniques to confirm or elucidate the identity of an unknown material, determine whether a particular contaminant is present (as with asbestos analysis), or to provide important information that can be used to refine a manufacturing or chemical process. PLM was the major microscopy technique in use for identification of materials for nearly a century since its introduction in 1834 by William Fox Talbot, as other techniques such as SEM (Scanning Electron Microscopy), FTIR (Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy), XPD (X-ray Powder Diffraction), and TEM (Transmission Electron Microscopy) had not yet been developed. Today, it is still the only technique approved by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for asbestos analysis, and is often the technique first applied for identification of unknown materials. PLM uses different configurations in order to determine different material properties. With each configuration additional clues can be gathered, leading to a conclusion of material identity. With no polarizing filter, the microscope can be used just as a stereo optical microscope, and view qualities such as morphology, size, and number of phases. With a single polarizing filter (single polars), additional properties can be established, such as pleochroism, individual refractive indices, and dispersion staining. With two polarizing filters (crossed polars), even more can be deduced: isotropy vs. anisotropy, extinction angle, birefringence/degree of birefringence, sign of elongation, and anomalous polarization colors, among others. With the use of PLM many of these properties can be determined in a matter of seconds, even for those who are not highly trained. McCrone, a leader in the field of polarized light microscopy, often

  5. Electromechanical properties of stripe-electroded tangentially polarized piezoelectric flexural bars.

    PubMed

    Sarangapani, Sairajan; Brown, David A

    2013-05-01

    Piezoelectric bar transducers are commonly used for generating low frequency flexural mode vibrations. The paper calculates the electromechanical properties including the effective electromechanical coupling coefficient of the stripe-electroded tangentially polarized bar transducer vibrating in flexure under the simply supported boundary condition. A numerical analysis is used to model the curved electric field lines. Calculations take into account the internal energies due to the contributions of the transverse and longitudinal piezoelectric effects and the modal strain distribution in the bar. Results are presented as functions of distance between the electrodes and thickness of elements and are compared with traditional bimorph designs employing either transverse or longitudinal polarization.

  6. [Polar and non polar notations of refraction].

    PubMed

    Touzeau, O; Gaujoux, T; Costantini, E; Borderie, V; Laroche, L

    2010-01-01

    Refraction can be expressed by four polar notations which correspond to four different combinations of spherical or cylindrical lenses. Conventional expressions of refraction (plus and minus cylinder notation) are described by sphere, cylinder, and axis. In the plus cylinder notation, the axis visualizes the most powerful meridian. The axis usually corresponds to the bow tie axis in curvature maps. Plus cylinder notation is also valuable for all relaxing procedures (i.e., selective suture ablation, arcuate keratotomy, etc.). In the cross-cylinder notation, two orthogonal cylinders can describe (without the sphere component) the actual refraction of both the principal meridians. This notation must be made before performing the vertex calculation. Using an association of a Jackson cross-cylinder and a spherical equivalent, refraction can be broken down into two pure components: astigmatism and sphere. All polar notations of refraction may perfectly characterize a single refraction but are not suitable for statistical analysis, which requires nonpolar expression. After doubling the axis, a rectangular projection breaks down the Jackson cross-cylinder, which has a polar axis, into two Jackson cross-cylinders on the 0 degrees /90 degrees and 45 degrees /135 degrees axis. This procedure results in the loss of the directional nature of the data. Refraction can be written in a nonpolar notation by three rectangular coordinates (x,y,z), which can also represent the spherocylinder by one point in a dioptric space. These three independent (orthogonal) variables have a concrete optical significance: a spherical component, a direct/inverse (WTR/ATR) component, and an oblique component of the astigmatism. Finally, nonpolar notations are useful for statistical analysis and graphical representation of refraction.

  7. Polarized nuclear target based on parahydrogen induced polarization

    SciTech Connect

    D. Budker, M.P. Ledbetter, S. Appelt, L.S. Bouchard, B. Wojtsekhowski

    2012-12-01

    We discuss a novel concept of a polarized nuclear target for accelerator fixed-target scattering experiments, which is based on parahydrogen induced polarization (PHIP). One may be able to reach a 33% free-proton polarization in the ethane molecule. The potential advantages of such a target include operation at zero magnetic field, fast ({approx}100 HZ) polarization oscillation (akin to polarization reversal), and operation with large intensity of an electron beam.

  8. When measured spin polarization is not spin polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowben, P. A.; Wu, Ning; Binek, Christian

    2011-05-01

    Spin polarization is an unusually ambiguous scientific idiom and, as such, is rarely well defined. A given experimental methodology may allow one to quantify a spin polarization but only in its particular context. As one might expect, these ambiguities sometimes give rise to inappropriate interpretations when comparing the spin polarizations determined through different methods. The spin polarization of CrO2 and Cr2O3 illustrate some of the complications which hinders comparisons of spin polarization values.

  9. When measured spin polarization is not spin polarization.

    PubMed

    Dowben, P A; Wu, Ning; Binek, Christian

    2011-05-04

    Spin polarization is an unusually ambiguous scientific idiom and, as such, is rarely well defined. A given experimental methodology may allow one to quantify a spin polarization but only in its particular context. As one might expect, these ambiguities sometimes give rise to inappropriate interpretations when comparing the spin polarizations determined through different methods. The spin polarization of CrO(2) and Cr(2)O(3) illustrate some of the complications which hinders comparisons of spin polarization values.

  10. Polar low dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, M.T.; Farrell, B.F. )

    1992-12-15

    Polar lows are intense subsynoptic-scale cyclones that form over high-latitude oceans in association with deep cumulus convection and strong ambient baroclinicity. Recent observations indicate that polar lows are generally initiated by a nonaxisymmetric interaction between a surface disturbance and an upper-level mobile trough. Extant theories of polar low formation preclude study of such a process since they either constrain their models to be axisymmetric, or do not explicitly account for his transient interaction. In this work the physics of interacting upper- and lower-level potential vorticity structures is studied as an initial-value problem using a three-dimensional nonlinear geostrophic momentum model that incorporates moist processes and includes strong baroclinic dynamics. Model results illustrate the rapid formation of an intense small-scale cyclone whose structure is consistent with observations of mature polar lows. A conceptual model of polar low development is proposed. In the first stage of development, called induced self-development, a mobile upper trough initiates a rapid low-level spinup due to the enhanced omega response in a conditionally neutral baroclinic atmosphere. A secondary development follows, called diabatic destabilization, that is associated with the production of low-level potential vorticity by diabatic processes. Diabatic destabilization represents a simple mechanism for maintaining the intensity of polar lows until they reach land. In exceptional instances of negligible upper-level forcing, the latter may also describe the gradual intensification of small-scale cyclones in regions of sustained neutrality and surface baroclinicity. Ideas regarding polar low equilibration and prospects for a unified theory of arctic and midlatitude cyclones are discussed. 75 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Sequential Polarity-Reversing Circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labaw, Clayton C.

    1994-01-01

    Proposed circuit reverses polarity of electric power supplied to bidirectional dc motor, reversible electro-mechanical actuator, or other device operating in direction depending on polarity. Circuit reverses polarity each time power turned on, without need for additional polarity-reversing or direction signals and circuitry to process them.

  12. Sequential Polarity-Reversing Circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labaw, Clayton C.

    1994-01-01

    Proposed circuit reverses polarity of electric power supplied to bidirectional dc motor, reversible electro-mechanical actuator, or other device operating in direction depending on polarity. Circuit reverses polarity each time power turned on, without need for additional polarity-reversing or direction signals and circuitry to process them.

  13. Spin-polarized Auger electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merz, H.; Semke, J.

    1990-12-01

    The spin polarization of Auger electrons will be discussed within the standard two-step model of the Auger emission process for different situations: target polarized, projectile polarized, targe and projectile unpolarized. In these three cases different interaction mechanisms are responsible for the polarization of the emitted Auger electrons. The present theoretical and experimental situation will be reviewed.

  14. Longitudinal Double Spin Asymmetry in Inclusive Jet Production atSTAR

    SciTech Connect

    Kowalik, Katarzyna; STAR Collaboration

    2006-08-15

    This contribution reports on the first measurement of the longitudinal double-spin asymmetry A{sub LL} for the inclusive production of jets in polarized proton-proton collisions at {radical}s = 200 GeV. The data were collected with STAR at RHIC in the years 2003 and 2004, and correspond to a sampled integrated luminosity of 0.3 pb{sup -1} with beam polarizations up to 45%. The results on A{sub LL} cover jet transverse momenta 5 < p{sub T} < 17 GeV/c and agree with perturbative QCD evaluations based on deep-inelastic scattering parametrizations for the gluon polarization in the proton. The results disfavor large positive gluon polarization in the polarized proton.

  15. Polarized Electrons at Jefferson Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, C.K.

    1997-12-31

    The CEBAF accelerator at Jefferson laboratory can deliver CW electron beams to three experimental halls simultaneously. A large fraction of the approved scientific program at the lab requires polarized electron beams. Many of these experiments, both polarized and unpolarized, require high average beam current as well. Since all electrons delivered to the experimental halls originate from the same cathode, delivery of polarized beam to a single hall requires using the polarized source to deliver beam to all experiments in simultaneous operation. The polarized source effort at Jefferson Lab is directed at obtaining very long polarized source operational lifetimes at high average current and beam polarization; at developing the capability to deliver all electrons leaving the polarized source to the experimental halls; and at delivering polarized beam to multiple experimental halls simultaneously.initial operational experience with the polarized source will be presented.

  16. Polarization twist in perovskite ferrielectrics

    PubMed Central

    Kitanaka, Yuuki; Hirano, Kiyotaka; Ogino, Motohiro; Noguchi, Yuji; Miyayama, Masaru; Moriyoshi, Chikako; Kuroiwa, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Because the functions of polar materials are governed primarily by their polarization response to external stimuli, the majority of studies have focused on controlling polar lattice distortions. In some perovskite oxides, polar distortions coexist with nonpolar tilts and rotations of oxygen octahedra. The interplay between nonpolar and polar instabilities appears to play a crucial role, raising the question of how to design materials by exploiting their coupling. Here, we introduce the concept of ‘polarization twist’, which offers enhanced control over piezoelectric responses in polar materials. Our experimental and theoretical studies provide direct evidence that a ferrielectric perovskite exhibits a large piezoelectric response because of extended polar distortion, accompanied by nonpolar octahedral rotations, as if twisted polarization relaxes under electric fields. The concept underlying the polarization twist opens new possibilities for developing alternative materials in bulk and thin-film forms. PMID:27586824

  17. Polar low monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobylev, Leonid; Zabolotskikh, Elizaveta; Mitnik, Leonid

    2010-05-01

    Polar lows are intense mesoscale atmospheric low pressure weather systems, developing poleward of the main baroclinic zone and associated with high surface wind speeds. Small size and short lifetime, sparse in-situ observations in the regions of their development complicate polar low study. Our knowledge of polar lows and mesocyclones has come almost entirely during the period of satellite remote sensing since, by virtue of their small horizontal scale, it was rarely possible to analyse these lows on conventional weather charts using only the data from the synoptic observing network. However, the effects of intense polar lows have been felt by coastal communities and seafarers since the earliest times. These weather systems are thought to be responsible for the loss of many small vessels over the centuries, although the nature of the storms was not understood and their arrival could not be predicted. The actuality of the polar low research is stipulated by their high destructive power: they are a threat to such businesses as oil and gas exploration, fisheries and shipping. They could worsen because of global warming: a shrinking of sea ice around the North Pole, which thawed to its record minimum in the summer of 2007, is likely to give rise to more powerful storms that form only over open water and can cause hurricane-strength winds. Therefore, study of polar lows, their timely detection, tracking and forecasting represents a challenge for today meteorology. Satellite passive microwave data, starting from Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I) onboard Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) satellite, remain invaluable source of regularly available remotely sensed data to study polar lows. The sounding in this spectral range has several advantages in comparison with observations in visible and infrared ranges and Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data: independence on day time and clouds, regularity and high temporal resolution in Polar Regions. Satellite

  18. Artificial polarization components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cescato, L.; Gluch, Ekkehard; Stork, Wilhelm; Streibl, Norbert

    1990-07-01

    High frequency surface relief structures are optically anisotropic and show interesting polarisation properties 1 . These properties can be used to produce polarizations components such as wave plates polarizers. polarizing beamsplitters etc. Our experimental results show that even gratings with relatively low spatial frequency ( periods A ) exhibit a strong phase retardation and can be used as quarter-wave plates. k INTRODUC11ON The artificial birefringence exhibited by ultrahigh frequency gratings of dielectric materials can be used to produce various polarization components2 . Such components have applications in integrated optics as well as in free space optics. In order to produce the high spatial frequencies complex processes such as electron-beam lithography and reactive ion etching are needed. We show in this paper that sinusoidal holographic gratings in photoresist exhibit also a strong phase ret even at relatively long periods. L EXPERIMENTAL MEASUREMENTS To obtain the phase retardation of a lower frequency ( period A ) grating a simple setup as used by Enger and 2 can be applied. In our case however there are three measurements necessary to obtain the phase retardation because transmission of the two perpendicularly polarized beams is different from each other. I GRATING PRODUCTION grating 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 period (pmj 0. 74 0. 74 0. 61 0. 54 0. 46 0. 32 0. 54 0. 54 0. 54 ne (sec) 60

  19. A Compact Polarization Imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Karl E.; Rust, David M.; Chen, Hua

    1995-01-01

    A new type of image detector has been designed to analyze the polarization of light simultaneously at all picture elements (pixels) in a scene. The Integrated Dual Imaging Detector (IDID) consists of a polarizing beamsplitter bonded to a custom-designed charge-coupled device with signal-analysis circuitry, all integrated on a silicon chip. The IDID should simplify the design and operation of imaging polarimeters and spectroscopic imagers used, for example, in atmospheric and solar research. Other applications include environmental monitoring and robot vision. Innovations in the IDID include two interleaved 512 x 1024 pixel imaging arrays (one for each polarization plane), large dynamic range (well depth of 10(exp 6) electrons per pixel), simultaneous readout and display of both images at 10(exp 6) pixels per second, and on-chip analog signal processing to produce polarization maps in real time. When used with a lithium niobate Fabry-Perot etalon or other color filter that can encode spectral information as polarization, the IDID can reveal tiny differences between simultaneous images at two wavelengths.

  20. Polarized protons at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Makdisi, Y.

    1992-01-01

    The approval for construction of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) provides a potential opportunity to collide polarized proton beams at energies up to 500 GeV in the center of mass and high luminosities approaching 2 {times} 10{sup 32}/cm{sup 2}/sec. This capability is enhanced by the fact that the AGS has already accelerated polarized protons and relies on the newly completed Accumulator/Booster for providing the required polarized proton intensity and a system of spin rotators (Siberian snakes) to retain the polarization. The RHIC Spin Collaboration was formed and submitted a Letter of Intent to construct this polarized collider capability and utilize its physics opportunities. In this presentation, I will discuss the plans to upgrade the AGS, the proposed layout of the RHIC siberian snakes, and timetables. The physics focus is the measurement of the spin dependent parton distributions with such accessible probes including high p(t) jets, direct photons, and Drell Yan. The attainable sensitivities and the progress that has been reached in defining the detector requirements will be outlined.

  1. Polarized protons at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Makdisi, Y.

    1992-10-01

    The approval for construction of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) provides a potential opportunity to collide polarized proton beams at energies up to 500 GeV in the center of mass and high luminosities approaching 2 {times} 10{sup 32}/cm{sup 2}/sec. This capability is enhanced by the fact that the AGS has already accelerated polarized protons and relies on the newly completed Accumulator/Booster for providing the required polarized proton intensity and a system of spin rotators (Siberian snakes) to retain the polarization. The RHIC Spin Collaboration was formed and submitted a Letter of Intent to construct this polarized collider capability and utilize its physics opportunities. In this presentation, I will discuss the plans to upgrade the AGS, the proposed layout of the RHIC siberian snakes, and timetables. The physics focus is the measurement of the spin dependent parton distributions with such accessible probes including high p(t) jets, direct photons, and Drell Yan. The attainable sensitivities and the progress that has been reached in defining the detector requirements will be outlined.

  2. Waves in polar lows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orimolade, A. P.; Furevik, B. R.; Noer, G.; Gudmestad, O. T.; Samelson, R. M.

    2016-08-01

    In a rather stationary fetch, one would not expect large waves in polar low situations. However, the picture changes when one considers a moving fetch. The significant wave heights that may be associated with the recorded polar lows on the Norwegian continental shelf from December 1999 to October 2015 are estimated using a one-dimensional parametric wave model. A comparison of the measured and the forecasted significant wave heights in two recent polar low cases in the Barents Sea is presented. The estimated significant wave heights show that the values could have been up to and above 9 m. The forecasted significant wave heights considerably underestimated the measured significant wave heights in the two recent polar low cases that are considered. Furthermore, a generalization of the fetch-limited wave equation in polar lows is proposed, which allows the wind field to vary in space and time, and is shown to give results that are consistent with the one-dimensional parametric model.

  3. Polarization swings in blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyutikov, Maxim; Kravchenko, Evgeniya V.

    2017-06-01

    We present a model of blazar variability that can both reproduce smooth large polarization angle swings and at the same time allow for the seemingly random behaviour of synchrotron fluxes, polarization fraction and, occasionally, π/2 polarization jumps. We associate the blazar flaring activity with a jet carrying helical magnetic fields and propagating along a variable direction (and possibly with a changing bulk Lorentz factor). The model predicts that for various jet trajectories (i) electric vector position angle (EVPA) can experience large smooth temporal variations, while at the same time polarization fraction (Π) can be highly variable; (ii) Π ∼ 0 near sudden EVPA jumps of 90°, but can also remain constant for large, smoother EVPA swings; (iii) the total angle of EVPA rotation can be arbitrarily large; and (iv) intensity I is usually maximal at points of fastest EVPA changes, but can have a minimum. Thus, even for a regular, deterministic motion of a steadily emitting jet, the observed properties can vary in a non-monotonic and/or seemingly stochastic way. Intrinsic fluctuations of the emissivity will further complicate the intensity profiles, but are expected to preserve the polarization structure.

  4. Spin-orbit interaction of light and diffraction of polarized beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekshaev, Aleksandr Ya

    2017-08-01

    The edge diffraction of a homogeneously polarized light beam is studied theoretically based on the paraxial optics and Fresnel-Kirchhoff approximation, and the dependence of the diffracted beam pattern of the incident beam polarization is predicted. If the incident beam is circularly polarized, the trajectory of the diffracted beam center of gravity exhibits a small angular deviation from the geometrically expected direction. The deviation is parallel to the screen edge and reverses the sign with the polarization handedness; it is explicitly calculated for the case of a Gaussian incident beam with a plane wavefront. This effect is a manifestation of the spin-orbit interaction of light and can be interpreted as a revelation of the internal spin energy flow immanent in circularly polarized beams. It also exposes the vortex character of the weak longitudinal field component associated with the circularly polarized incident beam.

  5. J / ψ polarization in p + p collisions at √{ s} = 200 GeV in STAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anson, C. D.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Averichev, G. S.; Balewski, J.; Banerjee, A.; Barnovska, Z.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Borowski, W.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A. V.; Brovko, S. G.; Bültmann, S.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, L.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Chwastowski, J.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Corliss, R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Cui, X.; Das, S.; Davila Leyva, A.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Derradi de Souza, R.; Dhamija, S.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Ding, F.; Djawotho, P.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Engelage, J.; Engle, K. S.; Eppley, G.; Eun, L.; Evdokimov, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Fedorisin, J.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Gliske, S.; Grosnick, D.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, S.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hajkova, O.; Hamed, A.; Han, L.-X.; Haque, R.; Harris, J. W.; Hays-Wehle, J. P.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Horvat, S.; Huang, B.; Huang, H. Z.; Huang, X.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jang, H.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kesich, A.; Khan, Z. H.; Kikola, D. P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Konzer, J.; Koralt, I.; Korsch, W.; Kotchenda, L.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, L.; Kycia, R. A.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; Leight, W.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, Z. M.; Lima, L. M.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, X.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Madagodagettige Don, D. M. M. D.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nogach, L. V.; Noh, S. Y.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Ohlson, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldag, E. W.; Oliveira, R. A. N.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Plyku, D.; Poljak, N.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Przybycien, M.; Pujahari, P. R.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Riley, C. K.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Ross, J. F.; Roy, A.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandacz, A.; Sandweiss, J.; Sangaline, E.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, B.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, D.; Smirnov, N.; Solanki, D.; Sorensen, P.; deSouza, U. G.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stevens, J. R.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsai, O. D.; Turnau, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vanfossen, J. A.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbæk, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Vossen, A.; Wada, M.; Walker, M.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y. F.; Xiao, Z.; Xie, W.; Xin, K.; Xu, H.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yan, W.; Yang, C.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Ye, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Zawisza, Y.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhao, F.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhu, X.; Zhu, Y. H.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zyzak, M.

    2014-12-01

    We report on a polarization measurement of inclusive J / ψ mesons in the di-electron decay channel at mid-rapidity at 2 polarization measurement should help to distinguish between different models of the J / ψ production mechanism since they predict different pT dependences of the J / ψ polarization. In this analysis, J / ψ polarization is studied in the helicity frame. The polarization parameter λθ measured at RHIC becomes smaller towards high pT, indicating more longitudinal J / ψ polarization as pT increases. The result is compared with predictions of presently available models.

  6. Helical Undulator Based Production of Polarized Positrons and Status of the E166 Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laihem, K.

    2005-08-01

    This paper describes the status of the E166 experiment. The experiment is dedicated to test the helical-undulator-based polarized positron source for the international linear collider. The physics motivation for having both electrons and positrons polarized in collision is crucial and a demonstration experiment for the undulator-based production of polarized positrons is summarized. The E166 experiment uses a 1 meter long helical undulator in the 50 GeV Final Focus Test Beam at SLAC to provide MeV photons with circular polarization. These photons are then converted in a thin (0.5 radiation length X0) target into positrons (and electrons) with about 50% degree of longitudinal polarization. In this experiment, the polarization of both photons and positrons is measured simultaneously using photon transmission polarimetry.

  7. Generation of a beam of fast electrons by tightly focusing a radially polarized ultrashort laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Payeur, S.; Fourmaux, S.; Schmidt, B. E.; MacLean, J. P.; Tchervenkov, C.; Legare, F.; Kieffer, J. C.; Piche, M.

    2012-07-23

    The generation of an electron beam through longitudinal field acceleration from a tightly focused radially polarized (TM{sub 01}) laser mode is reported. The longitudinal field is generated by focusing a TM{sub 01} few-cycle laser pulse (1.8 {mu}m, 550 {mu}J, 15 fs) with a high numerical aperture parabola. The created longitudinal field in the focal region is intense enough to ionize atoms and accelerate electrons to 23 keV of energy from a low density oxygen gas. The characteristics of the electron beam are presented.

  8. Aspects of four-jet production in polarized proton-proton collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraser, S. P.; Fraser, S. T.; Robinett, R. W.

    1995-06-01

    We examine the intrinsic spin dependence of the dominant gg-->gggg subprocess contribution to four-jet production in polarized proton-proton collisions using helicity amplitude techniques. We find that the partonic level, longitudinal spin-spin asymmetry a^LL is intrinsically large in the kinematic regions probed in experiments detecting four isolated jets. Such events may provide another qualitative or semiquantitative test of the spin structure of QCD in planned polarized pp collisions at BNL RHIC.

  9. Spin physics experiments at NICA-SPD with polarized proton and deuteron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savin, I.; Efremov, A.; Pshekhonov, D.; Kovalenko, A.; Teryaev, O.; Shevchenko, O.; Nagajcev, A.; Guskov, A.; Kukhtin, V.; Toplilin, N.

    2016-08-01

    This is a brief description of suggested measurements of asymmetries of the Drell-Yan (DY) pair production in collisions of non-polarized, longitudinally and transversally polarized protons and deuterons which provide an access to all leading-twist collinear and TMD PDFs of quarks and anti-quarks in nucleons. Other spin effects in hadronic and heavy-ion collisions may be also studied constituing the spin physics program at NICA.

  10. Current status of longitudinal stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donlan, Charles J

    1948-01-01

    The problems of static and dynamic longitudinal stability both at high speeds and at low speeds are discussed and data are presented which indicate recent progress made in the solution of these problems.

  11. TESLA-N: Polarized electron-nucleon scattering at TESLA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellinghaus, Frank; Aschenauer, E. C.; Tesla-N Study-Group

    2001-06-01

    Measurements of polarized e-N scattering can be realized at the TESLA linear collider facility with projected luminosities that are about two orders of magnitude higher than those expected of other experiments at comparable energies. Longitudinally polarized electrons, accelerated as a small fraction of the total current in the e+ arm of TESLA, can be directed onto a solid state target that may be longitudinally or transversely polarized. A large variety of polarized parton distribution and fragmentation functions can be determined with unprecedented accuracy, many of them for the first time. A main goal of the experiment is the precise measurement of the x- and Q2-dependence of the unknown transversity distributions that will provide us with the full information on the nucleon's quark spin structure as relevant for high energy processes. The additional possibilities of using unpolarized targets and of experiments with a real photon beam turn TESLA-N into a versatile next-generation facility at the intersection of particle and nuclear physics. .

  12. Polarization imaging detection technology research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Mo-gen; Wang, Feng; Xu, Guo-ming; Yuan, Hong-wu

    2013-09-01

    In this paper we analyse the polarization imaging theory and the commonly process of the polarization imaging detection. Based on this, we summarize our many years' research work especially in the mechanism, technology and system of the polarization imaging detection technology. Combined with the up-to-date development at home and abroad, this paper discusses many theory and technological problems of polarization imaging detection in detail from the view of the object polarization characteristics, key problem and key technology of polarization imaging detection, polarization imaging detection system and application, etc. The theory and technological problems include object all direction polarization characteristic retrieving, the optical electronic machinery integration designing of the polarization imaging detection system, the high precision polarization information analysis and the polarization image fast processing. Moreover, we point out the possible application direction of the polarization imaging detection technology both in martial and civilian fields. We also summarize the possible future development trend of the polarization imaging detection technology in the field of high spectrum polarization imaging. This paper can provide evident reference and guidance to promote the research and development of the polarization imaging detection technology.

  13. Polarized Light from Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    These images taken through the wide angle camera near closest approach in the deep near-infrared methane band, combined with filters which sense electromagnetic radiation of orthogonal polarization, show that the light from the poles is polarized. That is, the poles appear bright in one image, and dark in the other. Polarized light is most readily scattered by aerosols. These images indicate that the aerosol particles at Jupiter's poles are small and likely consist of aggregates of even smaller particles, whereas the particles at the equator and covering the Great Red Spot are larger. Images like these will allow scientists to ascertain the distribution, size and shape of aerosols, and consequently, the distribution of heat, in Jupiter's atmosphere.

  14. North Polar Cap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    7 September 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a 1.4 m/pixel (5 ft/pixel) view of a typical martian north polar ice cap texture. The surface is pitted and rough at the scale of several meters. The north polar residual cap of Mars consists mainly of water ice, while the south polar residual cap is mostly carbon dioxide. This picture is located near 85.2oN, 283.2oW. The image covers an area approximately 1 km wide by 1.4 km high (0.62 by 0.87 miles). Sunlight illuminates this scene from the lower left.

  15. [Polar body diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Montag, M; van der Ven, K; van der Ven, H

    2009-01-01

    Polar body diagnosis (PBD) is a diagnostic method for the indirect genetic analysis of oocytes. Polar bodies are by-products of the meiotic cell cycle which have no influence on further embryo development. The biopsy of polar bodies can be accomplished either by zona drilling or laser drilling within a very short time period. The paternal contribution to the genetic constitution of the developing embryo cannot be diagnosed by PBD. The major application of PBD is the detection of maternally derived chromosomal aneuploidies and translocations in oocytes. For these indications, PBD may offer a viable alternative to blastomere biopsy as the embryo's integrity remains unaffected in contrast to preimplantation genetic diagnosis by blastomere biopsy. The fast development in the field of molecular diagnostics will also influence PBD and probably allow a more general diagnosis in the future.

  16. North Polar Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    3 December 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows an exposure of finely-detailed layers in the martian north polar region. The polar ice cap, which is made up of frozen water (whereas the south polar cap is mostly frozen carbon dioxide), is underlain by a thick sequence of layers. Some have speculated that these layers may record the history of changes in martian climate during the past few hundreds of millions of years. This picture is located near 86.0oN, 30.2oW, and covers an area approximately 3 km (1.9 mi) across. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower left.

  17. Depolarization in polarizing supermirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klauser, Christine; Bigault, Thierry; Böni, Peter; Courtois, Pierre; Devishvili, Anton; Rebrova, Nataliya; Schneider, Michael; Soldner, Torsten

    2016-12-01

    We present data on depolarizing effects in polarizing mirrors. At typical magnetizing field strengths used in polarizing devices, depolarizations rise up to the percent level in the specular region and are shown to be successfully suppressed to 10-4 when increasing the magnetizing field. We show evidence linking a part of this depolarization to lateral correlation of the magnetization fluctuations in the ferromagnetic layers. Effects of the supermirror factor (m), wavelength and incidence angle are studied. The findings are applied to a crossed supermirror geometry and we report a neutron beam polarization of 99.97(1)% for a beam of wavelength λ = 5.3 Å, Δλ/λ = 0.1 (FWHM).

  18. North Polar Slope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    21 December 2004 Slopes in the north polar region of Mars exhibit outcroppings of layered material. No one knows the composition of the layers, but the uppermost layers of are thought to be a mixture of dust and ice in some proportion. Lower layers in the north polar region are thought to include sand. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a late northern spring view of a slope on which are exposed some of the upper layers in the north polar region. Bright surfaces in this image are covered by frost. The image is located near 81.5oN, 340.6oW. The picture covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) wide. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower left.

  19. A lunar polar expedition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dowling, Richard; Staehle, Robert L.; Svitek, Tomas

    1992-01-01

    Advanced exploration and development in harsh environments require mastery of basic human survival skill. Expeditions into the lethal climates of Earth's polar regions offer useful lessons for tommorrow's lunar pioneers. In Arctic and Antarctic exploration, 'wintering over' was a crucial milestone. The ability to establish a supply base and survive months of polar cold and darkness made extensive travel and exploration possible. Because of the possibility of near-constant solar illumination, the lunar polar regions, unlike Earth's may offer the most hospitable site for habitation. The World Space Foundation is examining a scenario for establishing a five-person expeditionary team on the lunar north pole for one year. This paper is a status report on a point design addressing site selection, transportation, power, and life support requirements.

  20. Diurnal polar motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclure, P.

    1973-01-01

    An analytical theory is developed to describe diurnal polar motion in the earth which arises as a forced response due to lunisolar torques and tidal deformation. Doodson's expansion of the tide generating potential is used to represent the lunisolar torques. Both the magnitudes and the rates of change of perturbations in the earth's inertia tensor are included in the dynamical equations for the polar motion so as to account for rotational and tidal deformation. It is found that in a deformable earth with Love's number k = 0.29, the angular momentum vector departs by as much as 20 cm from the rotation axis rather than remaining within 1 or 2 cm as it would in a rigid earth. This 20 cm separation is significant in the interpretation of submeter polar motion observations because it necessitates an additional coordinate transformation in order to remove what would otherwise be a 20 cm error source in the conversion between inertial and terrestrial reference systems.

  1. South Polar Scarps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-438, 31 July 2003

    The terrain of the south polar residual ice cap, made up mostly of frozen carbon dioxide, has come to be known by many as 'swiss cheese terrain,' because many areas of the cap resemble slices of swiss cheese. However, not all of the south polar cap looks like a tasty lunch food. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a series of curving scarps formed by erosion and sublimation of carbon dioxide from the south polar cap. This area is located near 86.3oS, 51.2oW. The image is illuminated by sunlight from the upper left; the area is about 1.5 km (0.9 mi) wide.

  2. North Polar Cap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    7 September 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a 1.4 m/pixel (5 ft/pixel) view of a typical martian north polar ice cap texture. The surface is pitted and rough at the scale of several meters. The north polar residual cap of Mars consists mainly of water ice, while the south polar residual cap is mostly carbon dioxide. This picture is located near 85.2oN, 283.2oW. The image covers an area approximately 1 km wide by 1.4 km high (0.62 by 0.87 miles). Sunlight illuminates this scene from the lower left.

  3. Magnetospheric polar cap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akasofu, S. I.; Kan, J. R.

    Mount Denali (McKinley), the Alaska Range, and countless glaciers welcomed all 86 participants of the Chapman Conference on the Magnetospheric Polar Cap, which was held on the University of Alaska, Fairbanks campus (UAF), on August 6-9, 1984. The magnetospheric polar cap is the highest latitude region of the earth which is surrounded by the ring of auroras (the auroral oval). This particular region of the earth has become a focus of magnetospheric physicists during the last several years. This is because a number of upper atmospheric phenomena in the polar cap are found to be crucial in understanding the solar wind—magnetosphere interaction. The conference was opened by J. G. Roederer, who was followed by the UAF Chancellor, P. J. O'Rourke, who officially welcomed the participants.

  4. Spring polar ozone behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aikin, Arthur C.

    1992-01-01

    Understanding of the springtime behavior of polar stratospheric ozone as of mid 1990 is summarized. Heterogeneous reactions on polar stratospheric clouds as hypothesis for ozone loss are considered and a simplified description of the behavior of Antarctic ozone in winter and spring is given. Evidence that the situation is more complicated than described by the theory is produced. Many unresolved scientific issues remain and some of the most important problems are identified. Ozone changes each spring since 1979 have clearly established for the first time that man made chlorine compounds influence stratospheric ozone. Long before important advances in satellite and in situ investigations, it was Dobson's decision to place a total ozone measuring spectrometer at Halley Bay in Antarctica during the International Geophysical Year and subsequent continuous monitoring which led to the discovery that ozone was being destroyed each spring by chlorine processed by polar stratospheric clouds.

  5. South Polar Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-516, 17 October 2003

    This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows eroded, stair-stepped layers in the south polar region of Mars. These layers have been considered, for the past three decades, to consist of a mixture of dust and ice. The Mars Polar Lander (MPL) mission was designed to test this hypothesis. However, sadly, MPL was lost during descent in December 1999. This exposure of south polar layered material is located near 86.3oS, 187.7oW. The image covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi) wide and is illuminated by sunlight from the upper left.

  6. POLARIZED NEUTRONS IN RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    COURANT,E.D.

    1998-04-27

    There does not appear to be any obvious way to accelerate neutrons, polarized or otherwise, to high energies by themselves. To investigate the behavior of polarized neutrons the authors therefore have to obtain them by accelerating them as components of heavier nuclei, and then sorting out the contribution of the neutrons in the analysis of the reactions produced by the heavy ion beams. The best neutron carriers for this purpose are probably {sup 3}He nuclei and deuterons. A polarized deuteron is primarily a combination of a proton and a neutron with their spins pointing in the same direction; in the {sup 3}He nucleus the spins of the two protons are opposite and the net spin (and magnetic moment) is almost the same as that of a free neutron. Polarized ions other than protons may be accelerated, stored and collided in a ring such as RHIC provided the techniques proposed for polarized proton operation can be adapted (or replaced by other strategies) for these ions. To accelerate polarized particles in a ring, one must make provisions for overcoming the depolarizing resonances that occur at certain energies. These resonances arise when the spin tune (ratio of spin precession frequency to orbit frequency) resonates with a component present in the horizontal field. The horizontal field oscillates with the vertical motion of the particles (due to vertical focusing); its frequency spectrum is dominated by the vertical oscillation frequency and its modulation by the periodic structure of the accelerator ring. In addition, the magnet imperfections that distort the closed orbit vertically contain all integral Fourier harmonics of the orbit frequency.

  7. Modeling Gravitational Waves to Test GR Dispersion and Polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tso, Rhondale; Chen, Yanbei; Isi, Maximilliano

    2017-01-01

    Given continued observation runs from the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory Scientific Collaboration, further gravitational wave (GW) events will provide added constraints on beyond-general relativity (b-GR) theories. One approach, independent of the GW generation mechanism at the source, is to look at modification to the GW dispersion and propagation, which can accumulate over vast distances. Generic modification of GW propagation can also, in certain b-GR theories, impact the polarization content of GWs. To this end, a comprehensive approach to testing the dispersion and polarization content is developed by modeling anisotropic deformations to the waveforms' phase, along with birefringence effects and corollary consequences for b-GR polarizations, i.e., breathing, vector, and longitudinal modes. Such an approach can be mapped to specific theories like Lorentz violation, amplitude birefringence in Chern-Simons, and provide hints at additional theories to be included. An overview of data analysis routines to be implemented will also be discussed.

  8. Precise polarization measurements via detection of compton scattered electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Tvaskis, Vladas; Dutta, Dipangkar; Gaskell, David J.; Narayan, Amrendra

    2014-01-01

    The Qweak experiment at Jefferson Lab aims to make a 4% measurement of the parity-violating asymmetry in elastic scattering at very low Q{sup 2} of a longitudinally polarized electron beam off a proton target. One of the dominant experimental systematic uncertainties in Qweak will result from determining the beam polarization. A new Compton polarimeter was installed in the fall of 2010 to provide a non-invasive and continuous monitoring of the electron beam polarization in Hall C at Jefferson Lab. The Compton-scattered electrons are detected in four planes of diamond micro-strip detectors. We have achieved the design goals of <1% statistical uncertainty per hour and expect to achieve <1% systematic uncertainty.

  9. Martian Polar Vortices: Comparison of Reanalyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waugh, D. W.; Toigo, A. D.; Guzewich, S. D.; Greybush, S. J.; Wilson, R. J.; Montabone, L.

    2016-01-01

    The structure and evolution of the Martian polar vortices is examined using two recently available reanalysis systems: version 1.0 of the Mars Analysis Correction Data Assimilation (MACDA) and a preliminary version of the Ensemble Mars Atmosphere Reanalysis System (EMARS). There is quantitative agreement between the reanalyses in the lower atmosphere, where Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) data are assimilated, but there are differences at higher altitudes reflecting differences in the free-running general circulation model simulations used in the two reanalyses. The reanalyses show similar potential vorticity (PV) structure of the vortices: There is near-uniform small PV equatorward of the core of the westerly jet, steep meridional PV gradients on the polar side of the jet core, and a maximum of PV located off of the pole. In maps of 30 sol mean PV, there is a near-continuous elliptical ring of high PV with roughly constant shape and longitudinal orientation from fall to spring. However, the shape and orientation of the vortex varies on daily time scales, and there is not a continuous ring of PV but rather a series of smaller scale coherent regions of high PV. The PV structure of the Martian polar vortices is, as has been reported before, very different from that of Earth's stratospheric polar vortices, but there are similarities with Earth's tropospheric vortices which also occur at the edge of the Hadley Cell, and have near-uniform small PV equatorward of the jet, and a large increase of PV poleward of the jet due to increased stratification.

  10. Martian polar vortices: Comparison of reanalyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waugh, D. W.; Toigo, A. D.; Guzewich, S. D.; Greybush, S. J.; Wilson, R. J.; Montabone, L.

    2016-09-01

    The structure and evolution of the Martian polar vortices is examined using two recently available reanalysis systems: version 1.0 of the Mars Analysis Correction Data Assimilation (MACDA) and a preliminary version of the Ensemble Mars Atmosphere Reanalysis System (EMARS). There is quantitative agreement between the reanalyses in the lower atmosphere, where Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) data are assimilated, but there are differences at higher altitudes reflecting differences in the free-running general circulation model simulations used in the two reanalyses. The reanalyses show similar potential vorticity (PV) structure of the vortices: There is near-uniform small PV equatorward of the core of the westerly jet, steep meridional PV gradients on the polar side of the jet core, and a maximum of PV located off of the pole. In maps of 30 sol mean PV, there is a near-continuous elliptical ring of high PV with roughly constant shape and longitudinal orientation from fall to spring. However, the shape and orientation of the vortex varies on daily time scales, and there is not a continuous ring of PV but rather a series of smaller scale coherent regions of high PV. The PV structure of the Martian polar vortices is, as has been reported before, very different from that of Earth's stratospheric polar vortices, but there are similarities with Earth's tropospheric vortices which also occur at the edge of the Hadley Cell, and have near-uniform small PV equatorward of the jet, and a large increase of PV poleward of the jet due to increased stratification.

  11. Time reversal invariance in polarized neutron decay

    SciTech Connect

    Wasserman, Eric G.

    1994-03-01

    An experiment to measure the time reversal invariance violating (T-violating) triple correlation (D) in the decay of free polarized neutrons has been developed. The detector design incorporates a detector geometry that provides a significant improvement in the sensitivity over that used in the most sensitive of previous experiments. A prototype detector was tested in measurements with a cold neutron beam. Data resulting from the tests are presented. A detailed calculation of systematic effects has been performed and new diagnostic techniques that allow these effects to be measured have been developed. As the result of this work, a new experiment is under way that will improve the sensitivity to D to 3 x 10-4 or better. With higher neutron flux a statistical sensitivity of the order 3 x 10-5 is ultimately expected. The decay of free polarized neutrons (n → p + e + $\\bar{v}$e) is used to search for T-violation by measuring the triple correlation of the neutron spin polarization, and the electron and proton momenta (σn • pp x pe). This correlation changes sign under reversal of the motion. Since final state effects in neutron decay are small, a nonzero coefficient, D, of this correlation indicates the violation of time reversal invariance. D is measured by comparing the numbers of coincidences in electron and proton detectors arranged symmetrically about a longitudinally polarized neutron beam. Particular care must be taken to eliminate residual asymmetries in the detectors or beam as these can lead to significant false effects. The Standard Model predicts negligible T-violating effects in neutron decay. Extensions to the Standard Model include new interactions some of which include CP-violating components. Some of these make first order contributions to D.

  12. Martian Polar Vortices: Comparison of Reanalyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waugh, D. W.; Toigo, A. D.; Guzewich, S. D.; Greybush, S. J.; Wilson, R. J.; Montabone, L.

    2016-01-01

    The structure and evolution of the Martian polar vortices is examined using two recently available reanalysis systems: version 1.0 of the Mars Analysis Correction Data Assimilation (MACDA) and a preliminary version of the Ensemble Mars Atmosphere Reanalysis System (EMARS). There is quantitative agreement between the reanalyses in the lower atmosphere, where Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) data are assimilated, but there are differences at higher altitudes reflecting differences in the free-running general circulation model simulations used in the two reanalyses. The reanalyses show similar potential vorticity (PV) structure of the vortices: There is near-uniform small PV equatorward of the core of the westerly jet, steep meridional PV gradients on the polar side of the jet core, and a maximum of PV located off of the pole. In maps of 30 sol mean PV, there is a near-continuous elliptical ring of high PV with roughly constant shape and longitudinal orientation from fall to spring. However, the shape and orientation of the vortex varies on daily time scales, and there is not a continuous ring of PV but rather a series of smaller scale coherent regions of high PV. The PV structure of the Martian polar vortices is, as has been reported before, very different from that of Earth's stratospheric polar vortices, but there are similarities with Earth's tropospheric vortices which also occur at the edge of the Hadley Cell, and have near-uniform small PV equatorward of the jet, and a large increase of PV poleward of the jet due to increased stratification.

  13. Dark Polar Dunes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    20 January 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image, acquired during northern summer in December 2004, shows dark, windblown sand dunes in the north polar region of Mars. A vast sea of sand dunes nearly surrounds the north polar cap. These landforms are located near 80.3oN, 144.1oW. Light-toned features in the image are exposures of the substrate that underlies the dune field. The image covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) wide and is illuminated by sunlight from the lower left.

  14. North Polar Scarp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    3 March 2004 The north polar cap of Mars overlies a series of layered materials. The upper-most layers are light-toned and may include ice and perhaps dust. The lower layers may be less icy and contain some amount of dark sand. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows an exposure of north polar layers located near 83.9oN, 237.9oW. This view covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi) wide and is illuminated by sunlight from the lower left.

  15. Dark Polar Dunes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    20 January 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image, acquired during northern summer in December 2004, shows dark, windblown sand dunes in the north polar region of Mars. A vast sea of sand dunes nearly surrounds the north polar cap. These landforms are located near 80.3oN, 144.1oW. Light-toned features in the image are exposures of the substrate that underlies the dune field. The image covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) wide and is illuminated by sunlight from the lower left.

  16. North Polar Layer Exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    20 November 2004 Both the north and south polar ice caps overlie a thick accumulation of layered material. For more than three decades, these deposits have been assumed to consist of a mixture of dust and ice. This October 2004 Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows some of the north polar layers exposed on a slope located near 79.1oN, 348.4oW. The image covers an area approximately 3 km (1.9 mi) wide. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower left.

  17. Internal polarized targets

    SciTech Connect

    Kinney, E.R.; Coulter, K.; Gilman, R.; Holt, R.J.; Kowalczyk, R.S.; Napolitano, J.; Potterveld, D.H.; Young, L. ); Mishnev, S.I.; Nikolenko, D.M.; Popov, S.G.; Rachek, I.A.; Temnykh, A.B.; Toporkov, D.K.; Tsentalovich, E.P.; Wojtsekhowski, B.B. . Inst. Yadernoj Fiziki)

    1989-01-01

    Internal polarized targets offer a number of advantages over external targets. After a brief review of the basic motivation and principles behind internal polarized targets, the technical aspects of the atomic storage cell will be discussed in particular. Sources of depolarization and the means by which their effects can be ameliorated will be described, especially depolarization by the intense magnetic fields arising from the circulating particle beam. The experience of the Argonne Novosibirsk collaboration with the use of a storage cell in a 2 GeV electron storage ring will be the focus of this technical discussion. 17 refs., 11 figs.

  18. Polarization encoded color camera.

    PubMed

    Schonbrun, Ethan; Möller, Guðfríður; Di Caprio, Giuseppe

    2014-03-15

    Digital cameras would be colorblind if they did not have pixelated color filters integrated into their image sensors. Integration of conventional fixed filters, however, comes at the expense of an inability to modify the camera's spectral properties. Instead, we demonstrate a micropolarizer-based camera that can reconfigure its spectral response. Color is encoded into a linear polarization state by a chiral dispersive element and then read out in a single exposure. The polarization encoded color camera is capable of capturing three-color images at wavelengths spanning the visible to the near infrared.

  19. South Polar Cap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    8 December 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows landforms created by sublimation processes on the south polar residual cap of Mars. The bulk of the ice in the south polar residual cap is frozen carbon dioxide.

    Location near: 86.6oS, 342.2oW Image width: width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Summer

  20. Microwave Frequency Polarizers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ha, Vien The; Mirel, Paul; Kogut, Alan J.

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the fabrication and analysis of microwave frequency polarizing grids. The grids are designed to measure polarization from the cosmic microwave background. It is effective in the range of 500 to 1500 micron wavelength. It is cryogenic compatible and highly robust to high load impacts. Each grid is fabricated using an array of different assembly processes which vary in the types of tension mechanisms to the shape and size of the grids. We provide a comprehensive study on the analysis of the grids' wire heights, diameters, and spacing.

  1. South Polar Cap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    8 December 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows landforms created by sublimation processes on the south polar residual cap of Mars. The bulk of the ice in the south polar residual cap is frozen carbon dioxide.

    Location near: 86.6oS, 342.2oW Image width: width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Summer

  2. New compact neutron polarizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krist, Th; Kennedy, S. J.; Hicks, T. J.; Mezei, F.

    A new type of a neutron polarizing bender was developed in co-operation with BENSC and ANSTO. It is based upon bent thin silicon wafers coated on one side with SiFeCo polarizing supermirrors and on the other side with Gd. Initial tests at BENSC in a 300 Oe magnetic field yielded a transmission of spin-up neutrons of about 55% over an angle range of 0.75° and flipping ratios > 30. Subsequent tests at ANSTO at 1200 Oe yielded a transmission of 48% with a flipping ratio > 45.

  3. Polar Ozone Losses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Paul A.; Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Since the discovery of the Antarctic ozone hole, a great deal of attention has been focused on the polar regions to both identify the chemistry and physics of the large losses, and to provide an understanding of the future of polar ozone. In this review talk, I will discuss the secular trends of ozone in both the Antarctic and Arctic regions, and I will review some of the principal research results of the last few years. In particular, I will emphasize some of the results from the SOLVE-THESEO 2000 campaign that occurred over the course of the winter of 1999-2000.

  4. Polarized electron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, C.

    1994-10-26

    Recent developments of strained layer and multilayer semiconductor photocathodes permit reasonably reliable delivery of low average current electron beams with beam polarization of 80 percent or greater. Work is in progress at several laboratories to improve the quantum efficiency of these photocathodes, permitting operation at higher average beam current as required by facilities such as CEBAF. Developments which so promise to improve the operational reliability and {open_quotes}up time{close_quotes} from such cathodes are also underway. The most recent operational experience with these polarized sources win be reviewed, and the improvements likely from the developmental work will be discussed.

  5. Isotropically polarized speckle patterns.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Mikolaj K; Aizpurua, Javier; Zambrana-Puyalto, Xavier; Vidal, Xavier; Molina-Terriza, Gabriel; Sáenz, Juan José

    2015-03-20

    The polarization of the light scattered by an optically dense and random solution of dielectric nanoparticles shows peculiar properties when the scatterers exhibit strong electric and magnetic polarizabilities. While the distribution of the scattering intensity in these systems shows the typical irregular speckle patterns, the helicity of the incident light can be fully conserved when the electric and magnetic polarizabilities of the scatterers are equal. We show that the multiple scattering of helical beams by a random dispersion of "dual" dipolar nanospheres leads to a speckle pattern exhibiting a perfect isotropic constant polarization, a situation that could be useful in coherent control of light as well as in lasing in random media.

  6. Left posteroseptal Mahaim fiber associated with marked longitudinal dissociation.

    PubMed

    Tada, H; Nogami, A; Naito, S; Oshima, S; Taniguchi, K; Kutsumi, Y

    1999-11-01

    We report a patient who underwent radiofrequency catheter ablation of a left posteroseptal atrioventricular (AV) Mahaim fiber with a marked longitudinal dissociation. During atrial pacing, Wenckebach-type atrioventricular block over the accessory pathway was observed with progressive preexcitation and no change in polarity of the delta waves. The AV conduction curve was discontinuous, with a distinct "jump-up" in local AV conduction time of 84 ms. The earliest ventricular activation was recorded from the posteroseptal portion of the mitral annulus, and the unipolar electrogram from a distal electrode had a high, steep deflection with uniphasic QS-like activity with 62 ms of local AV conduction time.

  7. Phase-Controlled Polarization Modulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuss, D. T.; Wollack, E. J.; Novak, G.; Moseley, S. H.; Pisano, G.; Krejny, M.; U-Yen, K.

    2012-01-01

    We report technology development of millimeter/submillimeter polarization modulators that operate by introducing a a variable, controlled phase delay between two orthogonal polarization states. The variable-delay polarization modulator (VPM) operates via the introduction of a variable phase delay between two linear orthogonal polarization states, resulting in a variable mapping of a single linear polarization into a combination of that Stokes parameter and circular (Stokes V) polarization. Characterization of a prototype VPM is presented at 350 and 3000 microns. We also describe a modulator in which a variable phase delay is introduced between right- and left- circular polarization states. In this architecture, linear polarization is fully modulated. Each of these devices consists of a polarization diplexer parallel to and in front of a movable mirror. Modulation involves sub-wavelength translations of the mirror that change the magnitude of the phase delay.

  8. Synchrotron Radiation, Polarization, Devices and New Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couprie, Marie-Emmanuelle; Valléau, Mathieu

    Synchrotron radiation is emitted by accelerated relativistic charged particles. In accelerators, it is produced when the particle trajectory is subjected to a magnetic field, either in bending magnets or in specific insertion devices (undulators or wigglers) made of an alternated succession of magnets, allowing the number of curvatures to be increased and the radiation to be reinforced. Synchrotron radiation, tunable from infra-red to x-rays, has a low divergence and small size source, and it can provide different types of polarization. It produces radiation pulses, whose duration results from that of the electron bunch from which they are generated. The repetition rate also depends on the accelerator type: high (typically MHz for storage rings, kHz for superconducting linear accelerators) and 10 to 100 Hz (for normal conducting linear accelerators). Longitudinally coherent radiation can also be generatedf or long bunches with respect to the emitted wavelength or thanks to the Free Electron Laser process.

  9. Optical polarizer material

    DOEpatents

    Ebbers, Christopher A.

    1999-01-01

    Several crystals have been identified which can be grown using standard single crystals growth techniques and which have a high birefringence. The identified crystals include Li.sub.2 CO.sub.3, LiNaCO.sub.3, LiKCO.sub.3, LiRbCO.sub.3 and LiCsCO.sub.3. The condition of high birefringence leads to their application as optical polarizer materials. In one embodiment of the invention, the crystal has the chemical formula LiK.sub.(1-w-x-y) Na.sub.(1-w-x-z) Rb.sub.(1-w-y-z) Cs.sub.(1-x-y-z) CO.sub.3, where w+x+y+z=1. In another embodiment, the crystalline material may be selected from a an alkali metal carbonate and a double salt of alkali metal carbonates, where the polarizer has a Wollaston configuration, a Glan-Thompson configuration or a Glan-Taylor configuration. A method of making an LiNaCO.sub.3 optical polarizer is described. A similar method is shown for making an LiKCO.sub.3 optical polarizer.

  10. Optical polarizer material

    DOEpatents

    Ebbers, C.A.

    1999-08-31

    Several crystals have been identified which can be grown using standard single crystals growth techniques and which have a high birefringence. The identified crystals include Li.sub.2 CO.sub.3, LiNaCO.sub.3, LiKCO.sub.3, LiRbCO.sub.3 and LiCsCO.sub.3. The condition of high birefringence leads to their application as optical polarizer materials. In one embodiment of the invention, the crystal has the chemical formula LiK.sub.(1-w-x-y) Na.sub.(1-w-x-z) Rb.sub.(1-w-y-z) Cs.sub.(1-x-y-z) CO.sub.3, where w+x+y+z=1. In another embodiment, the crystalline material may be selected from a an alkali metal carbonate and a double salt of alkali metal carbonates, where the polarizer has a Wollaston configuration, a Glan-Thompson configuration or a Glan-Taylor configuration. A method of making an LiNaCO.sub.3 optical polarizer is described. A similar method is shown for making an LiKCO.sub.3 optical polarizer.

  11. Variable polarity arc welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayless, E. O., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Technological advances generate within themselves dissatisfactions that lead to further advances in a process. A series of advances in welding technology which culminated in the Variable Polarity Plasma Arc (VPPA) Welding Process and an advance instituted to overcome the latest dissatisfactions with the process: automated VPPA welding are described briefly.

  12. North Polar Ice Cap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    North polar ice cap of Mars, as seen during mid summer in the northern hemisphere. The reddish areas consist of eolian dust, bright white areas consist of a mixture of water ice and dust, and the dark blue areas consist of sand dunes forming a huge 'collar' around the polar ice cap. (The colors have been enhanced with a decorrelation stretch to better show the color variability.) Shown here is an oblique view of the polar region, as seen with the Viking 1 spacecraft orbiting Mars over latitude 39 degrees north. The spiral bands consist of valleys which form by a combination of the Coriolis forces, wind erosion, and differential sublimation and condensation. In high-resolution images the polar caps are seen to consist of thick sequences of layered deposits, suggesting that cyclical climate changes have occurred on Mars. Cyclical climate changes are readily explained by quasi-periodic changes in the amount and distribution of solar heating resulting from perturbations in orbital and axial elements. Variations in the Earth's orbit have also been linked to the terrestrial climate changes during the ice ages.

  13. Macrophage activation and polarization.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Fernando Oneissi; Sica, Antonio; Mantovani, Alberto; Locati, Massimo

    2008-01-01

    Macrophages are widely distributed immune system cells that play an indispensable role in homeostasis and defense. They can be phenotypically polarized by the microenvironment to mount specific functional programs. Polarized macrophages can be broadly classified in two main groups: classically activated macrophages (or M1), whose prototypical activating stimuli are IFNgamma and LPS, and alternatively activated macrophages (or M2), further subdivided in M2a (after exposure to IL-4 or IL-13), M2b (immune complexes in combination with IL-1beta or LPS) and M2c (IL-10, TGFbeta or glucocorticoids). M1 exhibit potent microbicidal properties and promote strong IL-12-mediated Th1 responses, whilst M2 support Th2-associated effector functions. Beyond infection M2 polarized macrophages play a role in resolution of inflammation through high endocytic clearance capacities and trophic factor synthesis, accompanied by reduced pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion. Similar functions are also exerted by tumor-associated macrophages (TAM), which also display an alternative-like activation phenotype and play a detrimental pro-tumoral role. Here we review the main functions of polarized macrophages and discuss the perspectives of this field.

  14. North Polar Layers

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-02-28

    The North Polar layered deposits are a 3-kilometer thick stack of dusty water ice layers that are about 1000 kilometers across. The layers record information about climate stretching back a few million years into Martian history. In many locations erosion has created scarps and troughs that expose this layering. The tan colored layers are the dusty water ice of the polar layered deposits; however a section of bluish layers are is visible below them. These bluish layers contain sand-sized rock fragments that likely formed a large polar dunefield before the overlying dusty ice was deposited. The lack of a polar ice cap in this past epoch attests to the variability of the Martian climate, which undergoes larger changes over time than that of the Earth. The map is projected here at a scale of 50 centimeters (19.6 inches) per pixel. [The original image scale is 63.6 centimeters (25 inches) per pixel (with 2 x 2 binning); objects on the order of 191 centimeters (75.2 inches) across are resolved.] North is up. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21465

  15. Neptune South Polar Region

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-07-25

    This image of Neptune south polar region was obtained by NASA Voyager on Aug. 23, 1989. The smallest cloud features are 45 kilometers 28 miles in diameter. The image shows the discovery of shadows in Neptune atmosphere, shadows cast onto a deep cl

  16. Anodic Polarization Curves Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Yue; Drew, Michael G. B.; Liu, Ying; Liu, Lin

    2013-01-01

    An experiment published in this "Journal" has been revisited and it is found that the curve pattern of the anodic polarization curve for iron repeats itself successively when the potential scan is repeated. It is surprising that this observation has not been reported previously in the literature because it immediately brings into…

  17. South Polar Texture

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-08-26

    This VIS image of the south polar cap shows a surface with hundreds of circular depressions. This texture similar in appearance to swiss cheese. Orbit Number: 64535 Latitude: -86.8715 Longitude: 354.786 Instrument: VIS Captured: 2016-07-01 14:50 http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA20974

  18. The polarized EMC effect

    SciTech Connect

    W. Bentz; I. C. Cloet; A. W. Thomas

    2007-02-01

    We calculate both the spin independent and spin dependent nuclear structure functions in an effective quark theory. The nucleon is described as a composite quark-diquark state, and the nucleus is treated in the mean field approximation. We predict a sizable polarized EMC effect, which could be confirmed in future experiments.

  19. Titan Polar Landscape Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Jeffrey M.

    2016-01-01

    With the ongoing Cassini-era observations and studies of Titan it is clear that the intensity and distribution of surface processes (particularly fluvial erosion by methane and Aeolian transport) has changed through time. Currently however, alternate hypotheses substantially differ among specific scenarios with respect to the effects of atmospheric evolution, seasonal changes, and endogenic processes. We have studied the evolution of Titan's polar region through a combination of analysis of imaging, elevation data, and geomorphic mapping, spatially explicit simulations of landform evolution, and quantitative comparison of the simulated landscapes with corresponding Titan morphology. We have quantitatively evaluated alternate scenarios for the landform evolution of Titan's polar terrain. The investigations have been guided by recent geomorphic mapping and topographic characterization of the polar regions that are used to frame hypotheses of process interactions, which have been evaluated using simulation modeling. Topographic information about Titan's polar region is be based on SAR-Topography and altimetry archived on PDS, SAR-based stereo radar-grammetry, radar-sounding lake depth measurements, and superposition relationships between geomorphologic map units, which we will use to create a generalized topographic map.

  20. Classical Demonstration of Polarization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauman, Robert P.; Moore, Dennis R.

    1980-01-01

    Presents a classical demonstration of polarization for high school students. The initial state of this model, which demonstrates the important concepts of the optical and quantum problems, was developed during the 1973 summer program on lecture demonstration at the U.S. Naval Academy. (HM)

  1. Static longitudinal dielectric function of model molecular fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raineri, Fernando O.; Resat, Haluk; Friedman, Harold L.

    1992-02-01

    The static longitudinal dielectric function ɛL(k) is calculated for several polar interaction site model (ISM) fluids for comparison with related models having arbitrary short-range interactions and a set of one or more lower-order multipole moments at the centers (ΩM models). The requisite averages over the ISM fluids are calculated by the extended reference interaction site method (XRISM) using site-site hypernetted chain (HNC)-like closures modified to reproduce the correct long-range behavior of the site-site pair correlation functions. They are compared with averages over the ΩM models under the RHNC theory taken from the literature or calculated under the mean spherical approximation. We find for fluids of strong enough polarity that ɛL(k) is negative over a finite range of k, the low end being in agreement with recent computer simulation studies of both ISM and ΩM polar fluids. However, we confirm that the expected large-k behavior ɛL(k)=1 governs the ISMs, but not the ΩM models. Based on an adaptation of the color charge-color field techniques of molecular dynamics, we develop the concept of the color longitudinal dielectric function; it provides useful information about the role of the spatial extent of the molecular charge distribution on the behavior of ɛL(k). The ISM fluids we have analyzed include dipolar dumbbells over a wide range of bond length and polarity as well as realistic interaction site models for water and methanol. For the methanol model, we compare our ɛL(k) with recent computer simulation results and find substantial agreement.

  2. Interplanetary magnetic sector polarity inferred from polar geomagnetic field observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eriss-Christensen, E.; Lassen, K.; Wilcox, J. M.; Gonzalez, W.; Colburn, D. S.

    1971-01-01

    With the use of a prediction technique it is shown that the polarity (toward or away from the sun) of the interplanetary magnetic field can be reliably inferred from observations of the polar geomagnetic field.

  3. Lunar Polar Coring Lander

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angell, David; Bealmear, David; Benarroche, Patrice; Henry, Alan; Hudson, Raymond; Rivellini, Tommaso; Tolmachoff, Alex

    1990-01-01

    Plans to build a lunar base are presently being studied with a number of considerations. One of the most important considerations is qualifying the presence of water on the Moon. The existence of water on the Moon implies that future lunar settlements may be able to use this resource to produce things such as drinking water and rocket fuel. Due to the very high cost of transporting these materials to the Moon, in situ production could save billions of dollars in operating costs of the lunar base. Scientists have suggested that the polar regions of the Moon may contain some amounts of water ice in the regolith. Six possible mission scenarios are suggested which would allow lunar polar soil samples to be collected for analysis. The options presented are: remote sensing satellite, two unmanned robotic lunar coring missions (one is a sample return and one is a data return only), two combined manned and robotic polar coring missions, and one fully manned core retrieval mission. One of the combined manned and robotic missions has been singled out for detailed analysis. This mission proposes sending at least three unmanned robotic landers to the lunar pole to take core samples as deep as 15 meters. Upon successful completion of the coring operations, a manned mission would be sent to retrieve the samples and perform extensive experiments of the polar region. Man's first step in returning to the Moon is recommended to investigate the issue of lunar polar water. The potential benefits of lunar water more than warrant sending either astronauts, robots or both to the Moon before any permanent facility is constructed.

  4. Global Geospace Science/Polar Plasma Laboratory: POLAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The Global Geospace Science (GGS) Project is discussed as part of the International Solar-Terrestrial Physics (ISTP) Science Initiative. The objectives of Polar Plasma Laboratory (POLAR), one of the two spacecraft to be used by the Project to fill critical gaps in the scientific understanding of solar and plasma physics, are outlined. POLAR Laboratory is described, along with POLAR instrumentation, support subsystems, and orbits. Launch vehicle and injection into orbit are also addressed.

  5. Generalized hyperboloid structures of polarization singularities in Laguerre-Gaussian vector fields

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, T. H.; Chen, Y. F.; Huang, K. F.

    2007-12-15

    We present the propagation-dependent polarization vector fields by use of an isotropic microchip laser with the longitudinal-transverse coupling and the entanglement of the polarization states. With the coherent superposition of orthogonal circularly polarized vortex modes which are made up of two Laguerre-Gaussian modes with different order, the experimental three-dimensional vector fields can be reconstructed analytically. From the theoretical analyses, the generalized structures of singularities such as V points, C lines, and L surfaces can be clearly demonstrated. Importantly, the projections of C lines on the transverse plane are found to form the intriguing petal structures.

  6. Polarization dependence and independence of near-field enhancement through a subwavelength circle hole.

    PubMed

    Li, Zu-Bin; Zhou, Wen-Yuan; Kong, Xiang-Tian; Tian, Jian-Guo

    2010-03-15

    By setting a metal rod or tooth-type structures in a single subwavelength hole, its near-field can be strongly enhanced. The near-field enhancement has strong polarization dependence when the structure in hole is twofold symmetric. Only the polarization along the longitudinal side of the metal rod or tooth-type structure can lead to strongest enhancement, which is attributed to the resonance of the localized surface plasmon. However, if the structure in hole is fourfold symmetric, the near-field enhancement is free from the polarization.

  7. Cell Polarity Signaling in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhenbiao

    2009-01-01

    Cell polarization is intimately linked to plant development, growth, and responses to the environment. Major advances have been made in our understanding of the signaling pathways and networks that regulate cell polarity in plants owing to recent studies on several model systems, e.g., tip growth in pollen tubes, cell morphogenesis in the leaf epidermis, and polar localization of PINs. From these studies we have learned that plant cells use conserved mechanisms such as Rho family GTPases to integrate both plant-specific and conserved polarity cues and to coordinate the cytoskeketon dynamics/reorganization and vesicular trafficking required for polarity establishment and maintenance. This review focuses upon signaling mechanisms for cell polarity formation in Arabidopsis, with an emphasis on Rho GTPase signaling in polarized cell growth and how these mechanisms compare with those for cell polarity signaling in yeast and animal systems. PMID:18837672

  8. Polarity of the Amphibian Egg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malacinski, G. M.

    1983-01-01

    Amphibian egg polarity and the mechanism which generates the polarity is addressed. Of particular concern is the question of whether the activation rotation which responds to gravity is a prerequisite for normal development.

  9. High Power Polarized Positron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailichenko, Alexander

    2009-09-01

    We discuss the basics of polarized positron production by low energy polarized electrons. Efficiency of conversion ˜0.1-1% might be interesting for the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) and the International Linear Collider (ILC).

  10. Analytical polarization calculations beyond SLIM

    SciTech Connect

    Barber, D.P. , Notkestrasse, 85, 2000 Hamburg 52, Federal Republic of Germany )

    1989-05-05

    A comparison is made between the theories of Bell and Leinaas and of Derbenev and Kondratenko for the spin polarization in electron storage rings. A calculation of polarization in HERA using the program SMILE of Mane is presented.

  11. Polarized metrology systems (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Rongguang

    2017-06-01

    Polarization is a unique property of light, providing a number of advantages in optical metrology. In this talk, I will discuss principles and experimental results of polarization techniques in fringe project metrology and interferometric measurement.

  12. North Polar Cap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    This week we will be looking at five examples of laminar wind flow on the north polar cap. On Earth, gravity-driven south polar cap winds are termed 'catabatic' winds. Catabatic winds begin over the smooth expanse of the cap interior due to temperature differences between the atmosphere and the surface. Once begun, the winds sweep outward along the surface of the polar cap toward the sea. As the polar surface slopes down toward sealevel, the wind speeds increase. Catabatic wind speeds in the Antartic can reach several hundreds of miles per hour.

    In the images of the Martian north polar cap we can see these same type of winds. Notice the streamers of dust moving downslope over the darker trough sides, these streamers show the laminar flow regime coming off the cap. Within the trough we see turbulent clouds of dust, kicked up at the trough base as the winds slow down and enter a chaotic flow regime.

    The horizontal lines in these images are due to framelet overlap and lighting conditions over the bright polar cap.

    Image information:VIS instrument. Latitude 86.5, longitude 57.4 East (302.6 West). 40 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is

  13. North Polar Cap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    This week we will be looking at five examples of laminar wind flow on the north polar cap. On Earth, gravity-driven south polar cap winds are termed 'catabatic' winds. Catabatic winds begin over the smooth expanse of the cap interior due to temperature differences between the atmosphere and the surface. Once begun, the winds sweep outward along the surface of the polar cap toward the sea. As the polar surface slopes down toward sealevel, the wind speeds increase. Catabatic wind speeds in the Antartic can reach several hundreds of miles per hour.

    In the images of the Martian north polar cap we can see these same type of winds. Notice the streamers of dust moving downslope over the darker trough sides, these streamers show the laminar flow regime coming off the cap. Within the trough we see turbulent clouds of dust, kicked up at the trough base as the winds slow down and enter a chaotic flow regime.

    The horizontal lines in these images are due to framelet overlap and lighting conditions over the bright polar cap.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 86.5, Longitude 64.5 East (295.5 West). 40 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation

  14. North Polar Cap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    This week we will be looking at five examples of laminar wind flow on the north polar cap. On Earth, gravity-driven south polar cap winds are termed 'catabatic' winds. Catabatic winds begin over the smooth expanse of the cap interior due to temperature differences between the atmosphere and the surface. Once begun, the winds sweep outward along the surface of the polar cap toward the sea. As the polar surface slopes down toward sealevel, the wind speeds increase. Catabatic wind speeds in the Antartic can reach several hundreds of miles per hour.

    In the images of the Martian north polar cap we can see these same type of winds. Notice the streamers of dust moving downslope over the darker trough sides, these streamers show the laminar flow regime coming off the cap. Within the trough we see turbulent clouds of dust, kicked up at the trough base as the winds slow down and enter a chaotic flow regime.

    The horizontal lines in these images are due to framelet overlap and lighting conditions over the bright polar cap.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 84.2, Longitude 57.4 East (302.6 West). 40 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation

  15. North Polar Cap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    This week we will be looking at five examples of laminar wind flow on the north polar cap. On Earth, gravity-driven south polar cap winds are termed 'catabatic' winds. Catabatic winds begin over the smooth expanse of the cap interior due to temperature differences between the atmosphere and the surface. Once begun, the winds sweep outward along the surface of the polar cap toward the sea. As the polar surface slopes down toward sealevel, the wind speeds increase. Catabatic wind speeds in the Antartic can reach several hundreds of miles per hour.

    In the images of the Martian north polar cap we can see these same type of winds. Notice the streamers of dust moving downslope over the darker trough sides, these streamers show the laminar flow regime coming off the cap. Within the trough we see turbulent clouds of dust, kicked up at the trough base as the winds slow down and enter a chaotic flow regime.

    The horizontal lines in these images are due to framelet overlap and lighting conditions over the bright polar cap.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 84.3, Longitude 314.4 East (45.6 West). 40 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation

  16. North Polar Cap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    This week we will be looking at five examples of laminar wind flow on the north polar cap. On Earth, gravity-driven south polar cap winds are termed 'catabatic' winds. Catabatic winds begin over the smooth expanse of the cap interior due to temperature differences between the atmosphere and the surface. Once begun, the winds sweep outward along the surface of the polar cap toward the sea. As the polar surface slopes down toward sealevel, the wind speeds increase. Catabatic wind speeds in the Antartic can reach several hundreds of miles per hour.

    In the images of the Martian north polar cap we can see these same type of winds. Notice the streamers of dust moving downslope over the darker trough sides, these streamers show the laminar flow regime coming off the cap. Within the trough we see turbulent clouds of dust, kicked up at the trough base as the winds slow down and enter a chaotic flow regime.

    The horizontal lines in these images are due to framelet overlap and lighting conditions over the bright polar cap.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 86.5, Longitude 64.5 East (295.5 West). 40 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation

  17. North Polar Cap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    This week we will be looking at five examples of laminar wind flow on the north polar cap. On Earth, gravity-driven south polar cap winds are termed 'catabatic' winds. Catabatic winds begin over the smooth expanse of the cap interior due to temperature differences between the atmosphere and the surface. Once begun, the winds sweep outward along the surface of the polar cap toward the sea. As the polar surface slopes down toward sealevel, the wind speeds increase. Catabatic wind speeds in the Antartic can reach several hundreds of miles per hour.

    In the images of the Martian north polar cap we can see these same type of winds. Notice the streamers of dust moving downslope over the darker trough sides, these streamers show the laminar flow regime coming off the cap. Within the trough we see turbulent clouds of dust, kicked up at the trough base as the winds slow down and enter a chaotic flow regime.

    The horizontal lines in these images are due to framelet overlap and lighting conditions over the bright polar cap.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 84.3, Longitude 314.4 East (45.6 West). 40 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation

  18. North Polar Cap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    This week we will be looking at five examples of laminar wind flow on the north polar cap. On Earth, gravity-driven south polar cap winds are termed 'catabatic' winds. Catabatic winds begin over the smooth expanse of the cap interior due to temperature differences between the atmosphere and the surface. Once begun, the winds sweep outward along the surface of the polar cap toward the sea. As the polar surface slopes down toward sealevel, the wind speeds increase. Catabatic wind speeds in the Antartic can reach several hundreds of miles per hour.

    In the images of the Martian north polar cap we can see these same type of winds. Notice the streamers of dust moving downslope over the darker trough sides, these streamers show the laminar flow regime coming off the cap. Within the trough we see turbulent clouds of dust, kicked up at the trough base as the winds slow down and enter a chaotic flow regime.

    The horizontal lines in these images are due to framelet overlap and lighting conditions over the bright polar cap.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 84.2, Longitude 57.4 East (302.6 West). 40 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation

  19. North Polar Cap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    This week we will be looking at five examples of laminar wind flow on the north polar cap. On Earth, gravity-driven south polar cap winds are termed 'catabatic' winds. Catabatic winds begin over the smooth expanse of the cap interior due to temperature differences between the atmosphere and the surface. Once begun, the winds sweep outward along the surface of the polar cap toward the sea. As the polar surface slopes down toward sealevel, the wind speeds increase. Catabatic wind speeds in the Antartic can reach several hundreds of miles per hour.

    In the images of the Martian north polar cap we can see these same type of winds. Notice the streamers of dust moving downslope over the darker trough sides, these streamers show the laminar flow regime coming off the cap. Within the trough we see turbulent clouds of dust, kicked up at the trough base as the winds slow down and enter a chaotic flow regime.

    The horizontal lines in these images are due to framelet overlap and lighting conditions over the bright polar cap.

    Image information:VIS instrument. Latitude 86.5, longitude 57.4 East (302.6 West). 40 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is

  20. Titan's Winter Polar Vortex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flasar, F.M.; Achterberg, R.K.; Schinder, P.J.

    2008-01-01

    Titan's atmosphere has provided an interesting study in contrasts and similarities with Earth's. While both have N$_2$ as the dominant constituent and comparable surface pressures $\\sim1$ bar, Titan's next most abundant molecule is CH$_4$, not O$_2$, and the dissociative breakup of CH$_4$ and N$_2$ by sunlight and electron impact leads to a suite of hydrocarbons and nitriles, and ultimately the photochemical smog that enshrouds the moon. In addition, with a 15.95-day period, Titan is a slow rotator compared to Earth. While the mean zonal terrestrial winds are geostrophic, Titan's are mostly cyclostrophic, whipping around the moon in as little as 1 day. Despite the different dynamical regime, Titan's winter stratosphere exhibits several characteristics that should be familiar to terrestrial meteorologists. The cold winter pole near the 1 -mbar level is circumscribed by strong winds (up to 190 m/s) that act as a barrier to mixing with airmasses at lower latitudes. There is evidence of enhancement of several organic species over the winter pole, indicating subsidence. The adiabatic heating associated with this subsidence gives rise to a warm anomaly at the 0.01-mbar level, raising the stratopause two scale heights above its location at equatorial latitudes. Condensate ices have been detected in Titan's lower stratosphere within the winter polar vortex from infrared spectra. Although not always unambiguously identified, their spatial distribution exhibits a sharp gradient, decreasing precipitously across the vortex away from the winter pole. The interesting question of whether there is important heterogeneous chemistry occurring within the polar vortex, analogous to that occurring in the terrestrial polar stratospheric clouds in the ozone holes, has not been addressed. The breakup of Titan's winter polar vortex has not yet been observed. On Earth, the polar vortex is nonlinearly disrupted by interaction with large-amplitude planetary waves. Large-scale waves have not

  1. Polarization of a Helium-Neon Laser.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Edwin R.

    1996-01-01

    Describes an experiment that involves measuring the intensity of laser light passed by a linear polarizer. Discusses polarization effects, orthogonal polarizations, instrumentation, and further experiments. (JRH)

  2. Polarization of a Helium-Neon Laser.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Edwin R.

    1996-01-01

    Describes an experiment that involves measuring the intensity of laser light passed by a linear polarizer. Discusses polarization effects, orthogonal polarizations, instrumentation, and further experiments. (JRH)

  3. Spatial environment of polar-ring galaxies from the SDSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savchenko, S. S.; Reshetnikov, V. P.

    2017-03-01

    Based on SDSS data, we have considered the spatial environment of galaxies with extended polar rings. We used two approaches: estimating the projected distance to the nearest companion and counting the number of companions as a function of the distance to the galaxy. Both approaches have shown that the spatial environment of polar-ring galaxies on scales of hundreds of kiloparsecs is, on average, less dense than that of galaxies without polar structures. Apparently, one of the main causes of this effect is that the polar structures in a denser environment are destroyed more often during encounters and mergers with other galaxies.

  4. Polarized and non-polarized leaf reflectances of Coleus blumei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, Lois; Daughtry, C. S. T.; Vanderbilt, V. C.

    1987-01-01

    A polarization photometer has been used to measure the reflectance of three variegated portions of Coleus blumei, Benth. in five wavelength bands of the visible and near-infrared spectrum. The polarized component of the reflectance factor was found to be independent of wavelength, indicating that the polarized reflectance arises from the leaf surface. It is suggested that differences in the polarized component result from variations in surface features. The nonpolarized component of the reflectance factor is shown to be related to the internal leaf structure. The variation of the degree of polarization with wavelength was found to be greatest in the regions of the spectrum where absorption occurs.

  5. Longitudinal dynamics in storage rings

    SciTech Connect

    Colton, E.P.

    1986-01-01

    The single-particle equations of motion are derived for charged particles in a storage ring. Longitudinal space charge is included in the potential assuming an infinitely conducting circular beam pipe with a distributed inductance. The framework uses Hamilton's equations with the canonical variables phi and W. The Twiss parameters for longitudinal motion are also defined for the small amplitude synchrotron oscillations. The space-charge Hamiltonian is calculated for both parabolic bunches and ''matched'' bunches. A brief analysis including second-harmonic rf contributions is also given. The final sections supply calculations of dynamical quantities and particle simulations with the space-charge effects neglected.

  6. Longitudinal motion in circular accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, F.T.

    1985-01-01

    A general description is given of the longitudinal motion of an idealized synchronous particle, exactly in step with the radiofrequency field of a circular accelerator, and a domain in phase and energy, called a bucket, around this particle within which particles are focused around the synchronous particle. This general picture is then made more precise and quantitative. The equations of longitudinal motion and their solutions and the resulting motion are discussed, followed by applications and amplication of the theory. 7 refs., 8 figs. (LEW)

  7. Polar Magnetic Field Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Christopher T.; Hoffman, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    At this writing we have received all the CDROMs for the grant period. We have completed generating our timing tables past September 20, 2001. The calibration of the instrument has been checked for the entire mission up to the end of December 2000 and the key parameters provided to the project until the end of December 2000. These data are available to other experimenters over the web at http://www-ssc.igpp.ucla.edu/forms/polar/. High resolution spun data, 8 samples per see, have been created up to November, 2000 and have been made available to the community over the world wide web. This is a new data set that was a major effort this year. Our near term plans are to continue to provide key parameter data to the Polar project with the highest possible speed and to continue to reduce all high resolution magnetometer data and provide these data to the scientific community over the web.

  8. The polar bear phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Maw, P.K. ); Lane, M.T.

    1990-02-01

    Results from measuring the thermal profile of polar bear pelts, reflectiveness of the pelts, and total thermal conversion data lead to the conclusion that the pelts from an ultra-efficient thermal diode for solar-thermal conversion. The transfer of the thermal energy from the surface of the fur to the skin where it is absorbed cannot be thermal, and therefore must be radiative. This process must have an efficiency of better than 90:0090 percent to account for measured values. The radiative transfer process is not known at present. To understand it, a detailed knowledge of the microscopic parameters of the pelts must be obtained. This is the current thrust of the polar solar research. If the process can be understood and synthesized,it will provide a major breakthrough in the area of solar-thermal energy conversion.

  9. South Polar Details

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-09-22

    22 September 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows details among some of the eroded layer outcrops of the martian south polar region. Much of the south polar region of Mars is covered by a thick unit of layered material. For decades, the layers have been assumed to consist of a mixture of dust and ice, but it is equally possible that the materials are sedimentary rocks. This image was captured during southern spring, at a time when some of the surface was still covered by seasonal carbon dioxide (CO2) frost. Location near: 86.5°S, 116.6°W Image width: width: ~3 km (~1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Spring http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA06344

  10. North Polar Ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    25 December 2004 For 25 December, the MOC team thought that a visit to a north polar site would be timely. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows, at about 1.5 meters per pixel (5 feet per pixel) resolution, a view of the north polar ice cap of Mars. That the material includes water ice has been known since the mid-1970s, when Viking orbiter observations confirmed that the cap gives off water vapor in the summertime, as the ice is subliming away. The surface shown here, observed by MOC during northern summer in November 2004, is pitted and somewhat grooved. Dark material on pit floors might be trapped, windblown dust. The picture covers an area about 1 km (0.62 mi) across, and is located near 86.8oN, 293.1oW. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower left.

  11. Summer South Polar Cap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    13 April 2004 The martian south polar residual ice cap is composed mainly of frozen carbon dioxide. Each summer, a little bit of this carbon dioxide sublimes away. Pits grow larger, and mesas get smaller, as this process continues from year to year. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a view of a small portion of the south polar cap as it appeared in mid-summer in January 2004. The dark areas may be places where the frozen carbon dioxide contains impurities, such as dust, or places where sublimation of ice has roughened the surface so that it appears darker because of small shadows cast by irregularities in the roughened surface. The image is located near 86.9oS, 7.6oW. The image covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) across. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the upper left.

  12. Polarization Perception Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitehead, Victor S. (Inventor); Coulson, Kinsell L. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A polarization perception device comprises a base and a polarizing filter having opposite broad sides and a centerline perpendicular thereto. The filter is mounted on the base for relative rotation and with a major portion of the area of the filter substantially unobstructed on either side. A motor on the base automatically moves the filter angularly about its centerline at a speed slow enough to permit changes in light transmission by virtue of such movement to be perceived as light-dark pulses by a human observer, but fast enough so that the light phase of each such pulse occurs prior to fading of the light phase image of the preceding pulse from the observer's retina. In addition to an observer viewing a scene in real time through the filter while it is so angularly moved, or instead of such observation, the scene can be photographed, filmed or taped by a camera whose lens is positioned behind the filter.

  13. Polarization perception device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitehead, Victor S. (Inventor); Coulson, Kinsel L. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A polarization perception device comprises a base and a polarizing filter having opposite broad sides and a centerline perpendicular thereto. The filter is mounted on the base for relative rotation and with a major portion of the area of the filter substantially unobstructed on either side. A motor on the base automatically moves the filter angularly about its centerline at a speed slow enough to permit changes in light transmission by virtue of such movement to be perceived as light-dark pulses by a human observer, but fast enough so that the light phase of each such pulse occurs prior to fading of the light phase image of the preceding pulse from the observer's retina. In addition to an observer viewing a scene in real time through the filter while it is so angularly moved, or instead of such observation, the scene can be photographed, filmed or taped by a camera whose lens is positioned behind the filter.

  14. North Polar Features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    28 November 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows banded terrain of the north polar region of Mars. The bands are exposures of layered material, possibly composed of dust and ice. The dark, rounded to elliptical mounds in this image might be the locations of ancient sand dunes that were completely buried in the north polar layered material. In more recent times, these mounds have been exhumed from within the layered material. Alternatively, the dark features are not ancient, exhumed dunes, but perhaps the remnants of a dark layer of material that once covered the entire area shown in the image. These features are located near 79.9oN, 31.4oW. The image covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) wide. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower left.

  15. Multibaseline Polarization Coherence Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cloude, S.

    2007-03-01

    In this paper we consider a multibaseline formulation of polarization coherence tomography (PCT). We first summarise the main concepts behind PCT, which combines interferometric coherence with SAR polarimetric imaging to generate 3-D images of penetrable volume scattering. We then extend the published work in this area by considering a 6th order Legendre polynomial expansion of coherence. This then permits consideration of up to three baselines in the tomographic reconstruction process. We then apply the technique to broad-band anechoic chamber data from the EMSL for a maize sample. We use this to demonstrate several important features of the polarization and frequency dependence of backscatter. Finally we briefly consider the calibration and numerical stability issues required for a future spaceborne implementation of the technique.

  16. Polar vortex dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcintyre, Michael

    1988-01-01

    Recent work with high resolution, one-layer numerical models of fluid flows resembling those in the real stratosphere has suggested that: (1) the interiors of strong cyclonic vortices like the Antarctic polar vortex may be almost completely isolated laterally from their surroundings - perhaps even completely isolated, under some circumstances; (2) by contrast, material near the edge of such and isolated region can easily be eroded (or mixed one-sidedly) into the surrounding region; and (3) the erosion characteristically produces extremely steep gradients in isentropic distributions of potential vorticity (PV) and of other tracers, possibly down to horizontal length scales of a few kilometers only. Such length scales may occur both at the edge of the main polar vortex and in smaller features outside it, such as thin filamentary structures, produced by the erosion process.

  17. Perspectives for polarized antiprotons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenisa, Paolo

    Polarized antiprotons would open a new window in hadron physics providing access to a wealth of single and double spin observables in proton-antiproton interactions. The PAX Collaboration aims to perform the first ever measurement of the spin-dependence of the proton-antiproton cross section at the AD ring at CERN. The spin-dependence of the cross section could in principle be exploited by the spin-filtering technique for the production of a polarized antiproton beam. As a preparatory phase to the experimentation at AD, the PAX Collaboration has initiated a series of dedicated studies with protons at the COSY-ring in Juelich (Germany), aimed at the commissioning of the experimental apparatus and confirmation of the predictions for spin-filtering with protons.

  18. Perspectives for polarized antiprotons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenisa, Paolo

    2012-12-01

    Polarized antiprotons would open a new window in hadron physics providing access to a wealth of single and double spin observables in proton-antiproton interactions. The PAX Collaboration aims to perform the first ever measurement of the spin-dependence of the proton-antiproton cross section at the AD ring at CERN. The spin-dependence of the cross section could in principle be exploited by the spin-filtering technique for the production of a polarized antiproton beam. As a preparatory phase to the experimentation at AD, the PAX Collaboration has initiated a series of dedicated studies with protons at the COSY-ring in Juelich (Germany), aimed at the commissioning of the experimental apparatus and confirmation of the predictions for spin-filtering with protons.

  19. Polarization losses in reflector antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safak, M.; Yazgan, E.

    1985-08-01

    Various definitions for polarization-loss efficiency of Cassegrainian and front-fed reflectors are compared. The effects of flare angle, feed taper and the feed pattern asymmetry on the polarization-loss efficiency are investigated. The definitions based on aperture fields are shown to be inadequate and far fields must be used for calculating the polarization losses.

  20. Alternating-Polarity Arc Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwinghamer, R. J.

    1987-01-01

    Brief reversing polarity of welding current greatly improves quality of welds. NASA technical memorandum recounts progress in art of variable-polarity plasma-arc (VPPA) welding, with emphasis on welding of aluminum-alloy tanks. VPPA welders offer important advantages over conventional single-polarity gas/tungsten arc welders.

  1. Undulator Production of Polarized Positrons

    SciTech Connect

    William M. Bugg

    2008-08-27

    E-166 at SLAC has demonstrated the feasibilty of production of polarized positrons for the International Linear Collider using a helical undulator to produce polarized photons which are converted in a thin target to polarized positrons. The success of the experim ent has resulted in the choice of this technique for the baseline design of ILC.

  2. Unique photoreceptor arrangements in a fish with polarized light discrimination.

    PubMed

    Novales Flamarique, Iñigo

    2011-03-01

    In contrast to other vertebrates, some anchovies have cone photoreceptors with longitudinally oriented outer segment lamellae. These photoreceptors are axially dichroic (i.e., they are sensitive to the polarization of axially incident light) and form the basis of a polarization detection system in the northern anchovy, Engraulis mordax. Whether other cone types exist in the retina of this animal, and whether multiple cone opsins are expressed in the retinas of anchovies, is unknown. Likewise, a detailed examination of photoreceptor ultrastructure in nondichroic photoreceptors has not been carried out despite its importance to understand visual specializations within the retina and its use in the formulation of models to explain cellular structure. Here, I combined light and electron microscopy with immunohistochemical studies of opsin expression to infer mechanisms of lamellar formation and to evaluate the potential for color vision in the northern anchovy retina. Morphological observations revealed three cone formations: 1) continuous rows made up of alternating long and short (bilobed) cones with longitudinally oriented lamellae that are orthogonal between cone types; 2) continuous rows of alternating long and short cones in which only the short cones have longitudinally oriented lamellae; and 3) rows of triple cones with transversely oriented lamellae, each triple cone consisting of two lateral cones flanking a small central cone. Ultrastructure investigations supported two models of outer segment formation resulting in the longitudinally oriented lamellae of long and short cones. In the case of the long cone, lateral compression of the outer segment, potentially via the formation of guanine platelet stacks in neighboring pigment epithelium cells, results in a shape transformation from conical to cunate and a tilt from transverse to longitudinal lamellae. In the case of the short (bilobed) cone, membrane invaginations from the connecting ciliary structure grow

  3. Martian polar geological studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutts, J. A. J.

    1977-01-01

    Multiple arcs of rugged mountains and adjacent plains on the surface of Mars were examined. These features, located in the southern polar region were photographed by Mariner 9. Comparisons are made with characteristics of a lunar basin and mare; Mare imbrium in particular. The martian feature is interpreted to have originated in the same way as its lunar analog- by volcanic flooding of a large impact basin. Key data and methodology leading to this conclusion are cited.

  4. 'Endurance' All Around (Polar)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This 360-degree view of the terrain surrounding NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity was taken on the rover's 171st sol on Mars (July 17, 2004). It was assembled from images taken by the rover's navigation camera at a position referred to as 'site 33.' Opportunity had driven 11 meters (36 feet) into 'Endurance Crater.' The 360-degree view is a polar projection with geometrical seam correction.

  5. Hilly Surroundings (polar)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This 360-degree view shows the terrain surrounding NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit on the rover's 189th sol on Mars (July 15, 2004). It was assembled from images taken by the rover's navigation camera at a position referred to as Site 72, which is at the base of the 'West Spur' portion of the 'Columbia Hills.' The view is presented in a polar projection with geometrical seam correction.

  6. Polarized advanced fuel reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Kulsrud, R.M.

    1987-07-01

    The d-/sup 3/He reaction has the same spin dependence as the d-t reaction. It produces no neutrons, so that if the d-d reactivity could be reduced, it would lead to a neutron-lean reactor. The current understanding of the possible suppression of the d-d reactivity by spin polarization is discussed. The question as to whether a suppression is possible is still unresolved. Other advanced fuel reactions are briefly discussed. 11 refs.

  7. Polarization induced doped transistor

    SciTech Connect

    Xing, Huili; Jena, Debdeep; Nomoto, Kazuki; Song, Bo; Zhu, Mingda; Hu, Zongyang

    2016-06-07

    A nitride-based field effect transistor (FET) comprises a compositionally graded and polarization induced doped p-layer underlying at least one gate contact and a compositionally graded and doped n-channel underlying a source contact. The n-channel is converted from the p-layer to the n-channel by ion implantation, a buffer underlies the doped p-layer and the n-channel, and a drain underlies the buffer.

  8. South Polar Cap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    17 March 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows mesas and pits formed by sublimation of carbon dioxide of the south polar cap.

    Location near: 85.8oS, 351.5oW Image width: 2 km (1.2 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Summer

  9. Planetary Wave Influence on Wintertime OH Meinel Longitudinal Variation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winick, J. R.; Picard, R. H.; Wintersteiner, P. P.; Mlynczak, M. G.; Russell, J. M.; Gordley, L.

    2009-05-01

    We report on very unusual conditions in the upper mesosphere during the boreal winters of 2004 and 2006. Unusually bright OH volume emissions, as measured by TIMED/SABER, occurred in the region north of 60N. These emissions also occurred at unusually low altitudes, while at the same time very high temperatures characterized the upper mesosphere. These large perturbations allowed us to see more clearly longitudinal spatial and temporal variations that were present in the emissions. The affected areas varied in size and location on time scales of a few days and had a distinct planetary-wave wave-1 structure. We present data demonstrating the variability in the emissions and temperatures throughout the polar region and the correlations among them, and we contrast their behavior with that in normal years. The underlying cause of the correlations and longitudinal structure appears to be greatly enhanced downwelling in the upper mesosphere, which in turn was produced by unusual dynamical conditions in the lower atmosphere, consisting of stratospheric warmings and perturbations of wave structures within the polar vortex.

  10. Frosty North Polar Dunes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    10 January 2004 While it is summer in Gusev Crater, where the Mars Exploration Rover, Spirit, is operating, it is winter in the martian northern hemisphere. Just this week, the north polar dune fields began to emerge into sunlight after months of frigid darkness. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) view of frost-covered north polar dunes was acquired on 8 January 2004. The steepest slopes on the dunes--their slipfaces--point toward the upper right (northeast), indicating that the dominant winds responsible for their formation came from the opposite direction (lower left, southwest). Sunlight illuminates these dunes from the lower left, which may seem surprising because the brightest slopes on the dunes face the lower right. The brighter slopes are a frost phenomenon; most likely, these are areas with thicker frost deposits. In summer, the dunes would not have frost and would appear much darker than their surroundings. This early view of north polar dunes in winter is located near 75.8oN, 266.3oW. This view covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi) wide.

  11. Defrosting South Polar Slope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-467, 29 August 2003

    Today, August 29, 2003, Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) completes its 20,000th orbit since the start of the mapping phase of the mission in March 1999. Each of the 20,000 nearly-polar, nearly-circular orbits around the planet takes about 2 hours. The spacecraft passes over each martian polar region twelve times a day. This July 2003 MGS Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows defrosting gullies and mass movement (landslide) features in the south polar region. This is a springtime view; all of the carbon dioxide and water ice that accumulated on the ground during the previous winter is subliming away. The different physical properties of the ground beneath the frost lead to differences in the length of time that a particular surface retains frost as spring progresses. Here, the areas that still have the most frost are the bright features associated with gullies and landslide deposits. These deposits may contain more sand than their surrounding terrain--we know from images of martian sand dunes that frost tends to linger a bit later in the spring on a sandy surface. This image is located near 70.7oS, 358.2oW. The slope bearing gullies and landslide materials is facing toward the bottom/lower right. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower right. This image covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi) wide.

  12. Triton South Polar Terrain

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1996-09-26

    This image from NASA's Voyager 2 of the south polar terrain of Triton, taken on Aug. 25, 1989 reveals about 50 dark plumes or 'wind streaks' on the icy surface. The plumes originate at very dark spots generally a few miles in diameter and some are more than 100 miles long. The spots which clearly mark the source of the dark material may be vents where gas has erupted from beneath the surface and carried dark particles into Triton's nitrogen atmosphere. Southwesterly winds then transported the erupted particles, which formed gradually thinning deposits to the northeast of most vents. It is possible that the eruptions have been driven by seasonal heating of very shallow subsurface deposits of volatiles, and the winds transporting particles similarly may be seasonal winds. The polar terrain, upon which the dark streaks have been deposited, is a region of bright materials mottled with irregular, somewhat dark patches. The pattern of irregular patches suggests that they may correspond to lag deposits of moderately dark material that cap the bright ice over the polar terrain. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA00059

  13. Recoil polarization measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinkmann, Kai-Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Polarization observables in photon-induced meson production off nucleons have long been recognized to hold the promise of a detailed understanding of the excited states in the excitation spectrum of the nucleon. Photon beam and proton target polarization are routinely used at the ELSA facility in the Crystal Barrel/TAPS experiment and have yielded a wealth of data on contributing partial waves and nucleon resonances. A detector study on how to complement these ongoing studies by recoil polarization measurements that offer an orthogonal approach with otherwise unmeasurable observables in the field of non-strange meson photoproduction has been performed. Building on experience with silicon detectors operated in the photon beamline environment, first possible layouts of Si detector telescopes for recoil protons were developed. Various geometries, e.g. Archimedean spiral design of annular sensors, sector shapes and rectangular sensors were studied and have been used during test measurements. A prototype for the recoil polarimeter was built and subjected to performance tests in protonproton scattering at the COSY-accelerator in Jülich.

  14. Synchrotron Polarization in Blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haocheng; Chen, Xuhui; Böttcher, Markus

    2014-07-01

    We present a detailed analysis of time- and energy-dependent synchrotron polarization signatures in a shock-in-jet model for γ-ray blazars. Our calculations employ a full three-dimensional radiation transfer code, assuming a helical magnetic field throughout the jet. The code considers synchrotron emission from an ordered magnetic field, and takes into account all light-travel-time and other relevant geometric effects, while the relevant synchrotron self-Compton and external Compton effects are handled with the two-dimensional Monte-Carlo/Fokker-Planck (MCFP) code. We consider several possible mechanisms through which a relativistic shock propagating through the jet may affect the jet plasma to produce a synchrotron and high-energy flare. Most plausibly, the shock is expected to lead to a compression of the magnetic field, increasing the toroidal field component and thereby changing the direction of the magnetic field in the region affected by the shock. We find that such a scenario leads to correlated synchrotron + synchrotron-self-Compton flaring, associated with substantial variability in the synchrotron polarization percentage and position angle. Most importantly, this scenario naturally explains large polarization angle rotations by >~ 180°, as observed in connection with γ-ray flares in several blazars, without the need for bent or helical jet trajectories or other nonaxisymmetric jet features.

  15. Understanding ultracold polar molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Julienne, Paul

    2009-05-01

    The successful production of a dense sample of ultracold ground state KRb polar molecules [1] opens the door to a new era of research with dipolar gases and lattices of such species. This feat was achieved by first associating a K and a Rb atom to make a weakly bound Feshbach molecule and then coherently transferring the population to the ground vibrational level of the molecule. This talk focuses on theoretical issues associated with making and using ultracold polar molecules, using KRb as an example [2]. Full understanding of this species and the processes by which it is made requires taking advantage of accurate molecular potentials [3], ab initio calculations [4], and the properties of the long-range potential. A highly accurate model is available for KRb for all bound states below the ground state separated atom limit and could be constructed for other species. The next step is to develop an understanding of the interactions between polar molecules, and their control in the ultracold domain. Understanding long-range interactions and threshold resonances will be crucial for future work. [1] K.-K. Ni, et al, Science 322, 231(2008). [2] P. S. Julienne, arXiv:0812:1233. [3] Pashov et al., Phys. Rev. A76, 022511 (2007). [4] S. Kotochigova, et al., arXiv:0901.1486.

  16. Polarized radiation diagnostics of stellar magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathys, Gautier

    The main techniques used to diagnose magnetic fields in stars from polarimetric observations are presented. First, a summary of the physics of spectral line formation in the presence of a magnetic field is given. Departures from the simple case of linear Zeeman effect are briefly considered: partial Paschen-Back effect, contribution of hyperfine structure, and combined Stark and Zeeman effects. Important approximate solutions of the equation of transfer of polarized light in spectral lines are introduced. The procedure for disk-integration of emergent Stokes profiles, which is central to stellar magnetic field studies, is described, with special attention to the treatment of stellar rotation. This formalism is used to discuss the determination of the mean longitudinal magnetic field (through the photographic technique and through Balmer line photopolarimetry). This is done within the specific framework of Ap stars, which, with their unique large-scale organized magnetic fields, are an ideal laboratory for studies of stellar magnetism. Special attention is paid to those Ap stars whose magnetically split line components are resolved in high-dispersion Stokes I spectra, and to the determination of their mean magnetic field modulus. Various techniques of exploitation of the information contained in polarized spectral line profiles are reviewed: the moment technique (in particular, the determination of the crossover and of the mean quadratic field), Zeeman-Doppler imaging, and least-squares deconvolution. The prospects that these methods open for linear polarization studies are sketched. The way in which linear polarization diagnostics complement their Stokes I and V counterparts is emphasized by consideration of the results of broad band linear polarization measurements. Illustrations of the use of various diagnostics to derive properties of the magnetic fields of Ap stars are given. This is used to show the interest of deriving more physically realistic models of the

  17. Pickup coil optimization for polarized 3He system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, X. Q.; Zheng, H.; Sun, G. A.; Gong, J.; Ren, Y.; Liu, L. J.; Gao, P. L.; Wang, W. Z.; Yan, H.

    2017-07-01

    Not only can polarized 3He gas work as neutron spin filters (NSF) but also search for spin-dependent new interactions beyond the standard model. For both cases, the relative polarization of the spin polarized noble gas needs to be measured precisely. Various NMR techniques are applied practically to monitor the 3He cell's polarization. In this work, we tried to optimize the pickup coil for the spin exchange optical pump (SEOP) based 3He system. By optimizing the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), we found that the coil should be wound by thin wire for a higher number of turns. The optimized sizes of the pickup coils depend on the detailed configurations. For a spherical 3He cell with radius a, we found the optimized coil radius is √{5}(a+d), where d is the coil to cell surface distance. For a cylindrical 3He cell with height h, for the configurations where the coils were placed either along or perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the target cell, we derived the optimized sizes for the specific configurations. We believe these results are practically useful for designing pickup coils of polarized 3He systems.

  18. Double-polarization observable G in neutral-pion photoproduction off the proton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiel, A.; Eberhardt, H.; Lang, M.; Afzal, F.; Anisovich, A. V.; Bantes, B.; Bayadilov, D.; Beck, R.; Bichow, M.; Brinkmann, K.-T.; Böse, S.; Crede, V.; Dieterle, M.; Dutz, H.; Elsner, D.; Ewald, R.; Fornet-Ponse, K.; Friedrich, St.; Frommberger, F.; Funke, Ch.; Goertz, St.; Gottschall, M.; Gridnev, A.; Grüner, M.; Gutz, E.; Hammann, D.; Hammann, Ch.; Hannappel, J.; Hartmann, J.; Hillert, W.; Hoffmeister, Ph.; Honisch, Ch.; Jude, T.; Kaiser, D.; Kalinowsky, H.; Kalischewski, F.; Kammer, S.; Keshelashvili, I.; Klassen, P.; Kleber, V.; Klein, F.; Klempt, E.; Koop, K.; Krusche, B.; Kube, M.; Lopatin, I.; Mahlberg, Ph.; Makonyi, K.; Metag, V.; Meyer, W.; Müller, J.; Müllers, J.; Nanova, M.; Nikonov, V.; Piontek, D.; Reeve, S.; Reicherz, G.; Runkel, S.; Sarantsev, A.; Schmidt, Ch.; Schmieden, H.; Seifen, T.; Sokhoyan, V.; Spieker, K.; Thoma, U.; Urban, M.; van Pee, H.; Walther, D.; Wendel, Ch.; Wilson, A.; Winnebeck, A.; Witthauer, L.

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports on a measurement of the double-polarization observable G in π^0 photoproduction off the proton using the CBELSA/TAPS experiment at the ELSA accelerator in Bonn. The observable G is determined from reactions of linearly polarized photons with longitudinally polarized protons. The polarized photons are produced by bremsstrahlung off a diamond radiator of well-defined orientation. A frozen spin butanol target provides the polarized protons. The data cover the photon energy range from 617 to 1325 MeV and a wide angular range. The experimental results for G are compared to predictions by the Bonn-Gatchina (BnGa), Jülich-Bonn (JüBo), MAID and SAID partial wave analyses. Implications of the new data for the pion photoproduction multipoles are discussed.

  19. A method for measuring the spin polarization of 129Xe by using an atomic magnetometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Linlin; Zhou, Binquan; Lei, Guanqun; Wu, Wenfeng; Zhai, Yueyang; Wang, Zhuo; Fang, Jiancheng

    2017-08-01

    We propose a method for the precise determination of nuclear spin polarization, based on the atomic magnetometers, which employs the effective magnetic field produced by the spin polarization of 129Xe nuclei. This effective magnetic field can be estimated by measuring the initial induced voltage of the Free Induction Decay (FID) signal of the 129Xe nuclei, which is based on the calibration coefficient between the transverse magnetic field and the output voltage signal of the atomic magnetometer, by using an off-resonant transverse driven magnetic field. Compared with the method based on measuring the longitudinal relaxation time of the 129Xe nuclei and the spin polarization of alkali-metal atoms, our method can directly measure the nuclear spin polarization, without being affected by inaccuracies in the measurement of the spin polarization of alkali-metal atoms.

  20. Polarization studies of strained GaAs photocathodes at the SLAC Gun Test Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Saez, P.; Alley, R.; Clendenin, J.; Frisch, J.; Kirby, R.; Mair, R.; Maruyama, T.; Miller, R.; Mulhollan, G.; Prescott, C.

    1995-08-01

    The SLAC Gun Test Laboratory apparatus, the first two meters of which is a replica of the SLAC injector, is used to study the production of intense, highly-polarized electron beams required for the Stanford Linear Collider and future linear colliders. The facility has been upgraded with a Mott polarimeter in order to characterize the electron polarization from photocathodes operating in a DC gun. In particular, SLAC utilizes p-type, biaxially strained GaAs photocathodes which have produced longitudinal electron polarizations greater than 80% while yielding pulses of 5 A/sq cm at an operating voltage of 120 kV. Among the experiments performed include studying the influences of the active layer thickness, temperature, quantum efficiency and cessation on the polarization. The results might help to develop strained photocathodes with higher polarization.

  1. The H and D Polarized Target for Spin-Filtering Measurements at COSY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciullo, Giuseppe; Statera, Marco; Lenisa, Paolo; Nass, Alexander; Tagliente, Giuseppe

    2016-04-01

    In the main frame of the PAX (Polarized Antiproton eXperiments) collaboration, which engaged the challenging purpose of polarizing antiproton beams, the possibility to have H or D polarized targets requires a daily switchable source and its diagnostics: mainly change is a dual cavity tunable for H and D. The commissioning of PAX has been fullfilled, for the transverse case, on the COSY (COoler SYnchrotron) proton ring, achieving milestones on spin-dependent cross-section measurements. Now the longitudinal case could provide sensitive polarization results. An H or D source allows the exploration of the spin-filtering process with a deuterium polarized target, and opens new chances for testing Time Reversal Invariance at COSY (TRIC).

  2. Advanced Strained-Superlattice Photocathodes for Polarized Electron Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Aaron Moy

    2005-01-31

    Polarized electrons have been essential for high-energy parity-violating experiments and measurements of the nucleon spin structure. The availability of a polarized electron beam was crucial to the success of the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) in achieving a precise measurement of the electroweak mixing angle, and polarized electron beams will be required for all future linear colliders. Polarized electrons are readily produced by GaAs photocathode sources. When a circularly polarized laser beam tuned to the bandgap minimum is directed to the negative-electron-affinity (NEA) surface of a GaAs crystal, longitudinally polarized electrons are emitted into vacuum. The electron polarization is easily reversed by reversing the laser polarization. The important properties of these photocathodes for accelerator applications are: degree of polarization of the extracted beam; ability to extract sufficient charge to meet accelerator pulse-structure requirements; efficiency and stability of operation; and absence of any asymmetries in the beam properties (charge, position, energy, etc.) upon polarization reversal. The performance of GaAs photocathodes has improved significantly since they were first introduced in 1978 [1]. The theoretical maximum polarization of 50% for natural GaAs was first exceeded in 1991 using the lattice mismatch of a thin InGaAs layer epitaxially grown over a GaAs substrate to generate a strain in the former that broke the natural degeneracy between the heavy- and light-hole valence bands [2]. Polarizations as high as 78% were produced for the SLC from photocathodes based on a thin GaAs epilayer grown on GaAsP [3,4]. After 10 years of experience with many cathode samples at several laboratories [5], the maximum polarization using the GaAs/GaAsP single strained-layer cathode remained limited to 80%, while the quantum efficiency (QE) for a 100-nm epilayer is only 0.3% or less. Two factors were known to limit the polarization of these cathodes: (1) the

  3. Polarization of metastable 129Xe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Tian; Morgan, Steven; Jau, Yuan-Yu; Happer, William

    2008-05-01

    We have measured atomic polarization of metastable 129Xe in a pyrex cell by optical pumping, while metastability exchange optical pumping of 3He is routinely done. The atomic polarization of metastable Xe is on the order of 10%. Metastable xenon is created by electrodeless rf discharge. The hyperfine transition of metastable 129Xe is observed by microwave excitation. Atomic polarization can be demonstrated by comparison of the intensities of the transitions between different Zeeman sublevels, while pumping a specific optical transition of metastable Xe with circularly polarized light. This work offers insight into attempts to polarize 129Xe nuclei by metastability exchange optical pumping.

  4. Towards Polarized Antiprotons at FAIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathmann, Frank

    2007-06-01

    Understanding the interplay of the nuclear interaction with polarized protons and the electromagnetic interaction with polarized electrons in polarized atoms is crucial to progress towards the PAX goal to eventually produce stored polarized antiproton beams at FAIR. Presently, there exist two competing theoretical scenarios: one with substantial spin filtering of (anti)protons by atomic electrons, and a second one suggesting a self-cancellation of the electron contribution to spin filtering. After a brief review of the PAX physics case for polarized antiprotons at FAIR, a detailed discussion of future investigations, including spin-filtering experiments at COSY-Jülich and at the AD of CERN is presented.

  5. The E166 experiment: Development of an Undulator-Based Polarized Positron Source for the International Linear Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Kovermann, J.; Stahl, A.; Mikhailichenko, A.A.; Scott, D.; Moortgat-Pick, G.A.; Gharibyan, V.; Pahl, P.; Poschl, R.; Schuler, K.P.; Laihem, K.; Riemann, S.; Schalicke, A.; Dollan, R.; Kolanoski, H.; Lohse, T.; Schweizer, T.; McDonald, K.T.; Batygin, Y.; Bharadwaj, V.; Bower, G.; Decker, F.J.; /SLAC /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U.

    2011-11-14

    A longitudinal polarized positron beam is foreseen for the international linear collider (ILC). A proof-of-principle experiment has been performed in the final focus test beam at SLAC to demonstrate the production of polarized positrons for implementation at the ILC. The E166 experiment uses a 1 m long helical undulator in a 46.6 GeV electron beam to produce a few MeV photons with a high degree of circular polarization. These photons are then converted in a thin target to generate longitudinally polarized e{sup +} and e{sup -}. The positron polarization is measured using a Compton transmission polarimeter. The data analysis has shown asymmetries in the expected vicinity of 3.4% and {approx}1% for photons and positrons respectively and the expected positron longitudinal polarization is covering a range from 50% to 90%. The full exploitation of the physics potential of an international linear collider (ILC) will require the development of polarized positron beams. Having both e{sup +} and e{sup -} beams polarized will provide new insight into structures of couplings and thus give access to physics beyond the standard model [1]. The concept for a polarized positron source is based on circularly polarized photon sources. These photons are then converted to longitudinally polarized e{sup +} and e{sup -} pairs. While in an experiment at KEK [1a], Compton backscattering is used [2], the E166 experiment uses a helical undulator to produce polarized photons. An undulator-based positron source for the ILC has been proposed in [3,4]. The proposed scheme for an ILC positron source is illustrated in figure 1. In this scheme, a 150 GeV electron beam passes through a 120 m long helical undulator to produce an intense photon beam with a high degree of circular polarization. These photons are converted in a thin target to e{sup +} e{sup -} pairs. The polarized positrons are then collected, pre-accelerated to the damping ring and injected to the main linac. The E166 experiment is

  6. Polarization bandgaps and fluid-like elasticity in fully solid elastic metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Guancong; Fu, Caixing; Wang, Guanghao; Del Hougne, Philipp; Christensen, Johan; Lai, Yun; Sheng, Ping

    2016-11-01

    Elastic waves exhibit rich polarization characteristics absent in acoustic and electromagnetic waves. By designing a solid elastic metamaterial based on three-dimensional anisotropic locally resonant units, here we experimentally demonstrate polarization bandgaps together with exotic properties such as `fluid-like' elasticity. We construct elastic rods with unusual vibrational properties, which we denote as `meta-rods'. By measuring the vibrational responses under flexural, longitudinal and torsional excitations, we find that each vibration mode can be selectively suppressed. In particular, we observe in a finite frequency regime that all flexural vibrations are forbidden, whereas longitudinal vibration is allowed--a unique property of fluids. In another case, the torsional vibration can be suppressed significantly. The experimental results are well interpreted by band structure analysis, as well as effective media with indefinite mass density and negative moment of inertia. Our work opens an approach to efficiently separate and control elastic waves of different polarizations in fully solid structures.

  7. Polarization bandgaps and fluid-like elasticity in fully solid elastic metamaterials

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Guancong; Fu, Caixing; Wang, Guanghao; del Hougne, Philipp; Christensen, Johan; Lai, Yun; Sheng, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Elastic waves exhibit rich polarization characteristics absent in acoustic and electromagnetic waves. By designing a solid elastic metamaterial based on three-dimensional anisotropic locally resonant units, here we experimentally demonstrate polarization bandgaps together with exotic properties such as ‘fluid-like' elasticity. We construct elastic rods with unusual vibrational properties, which we denote as ‘meta-rods'. By measuring the vibrational responses under flexural, longitudinal and torsional excitations, we find that each vibration mode can be selectively suppressed. In particular, we observe in a finite frequency regime that all flexural vibrations are forbidden, whereas longitudinal vibration is allowed—a unique property of fluids. In another case, the torsional vibration can be suppressed significantly. The experimental results are well interpreted by band structure analysis, as well as effective media with indefinite mass density and negative moment of inertia. Our work opens an approach to efficiently separate and control elastic waves of different polarizations in fully solid structures. PMID:27869197

  8. Photoproduction of ω mesons off nuclei and impact of polarization on the meson-nucleon interaction

    DOE PAGES

    Chudakov, Eugene A.; Gevorkyan, Sergey; Somov, Alexander

    2016-01-25

    We consider photoproduction of ω mesons off complex nuclei to study interactions of transversely and longitudinally polarized vector mesons with nucleons. Whereas the total cross section for interactions of the transversely polarized vector mesons with nucleons σT = σ(VTN) can be obtained from coherent photoproduction, measurements of vector meson photoproduction in the incoherent region provide a unique opportunity to extract the not-yet-measured total cross section for longitudinally polarized mesons σL = σ(VLN). The predictions for the latter strongly depend on the theoretical approaches. Furthermore, this work is stimulated by the construction of the new experiment GlueX at Jefferson Lab, designedmore » to study the photoproduction of mesons in a large beam energy range up to 12 GeV.« less

  9. Hemorrhagic Longitudinally Extensive Transverse Myelitis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chris Y; Riangwiwat, Tanawan; Nakamoto, Beau K

    2016-01-01

    Longitudinally extensive transverse myelitis (LETM) may be associated with viral triggers, including both infections and vaccinations. We present a case of a healthy immunocompetent 33-year-old woman who developed a hemorrhagic LETM 2 weeks after seasonal influenza vaccination. Hemorrhagic LETM has not to our knowledge been reported after influenza vaccination. It may represent a forme fruste variant of acute hemorrhagic leukoencephalitis.

  10. Longitudinal Studies of Spelling Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Nick

    Noting that proposed models of literacy development suggest that reading and writing mutually influence and grow from each other, this paper summarizes aspects of stage theories of literacy development and an integrative model, and considers how the model fared in empirical longitudinal tests. The paper begins with a summary of the modal aspects…

  11. Students dance longitudinal standing waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, Michael J.

    2017-05-01

    A demonstration is presented that involves students dancing longitudinal standing waves. The resulting kinaesthetic experience and visualization both contribute towards an understanding of the natural modes of vibrations in open and closed pipes. A video of this fun classroom activity is provided (http://mjtruiz.com/ped/dance/).

  12. Regression Splines with Longitudinal Data

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In many clinical trial studies, patients are observed and/or measured on multiple occasions. To account for the longitudinal nature of the data, a mixed model analysis implemented using SAS PROC MIXED is commonly used. It is typical to make comparisons between dose or treatment groups, possibly cont...

  13. Longitudinal modes along thin piezoelectric waveguides for liquid sensing applications.

    PubMed

    Caliendo, Cinzia

    2015-06-02

    The propagation of longitudinally polarized acoustic modes along thin piezoelectric plates (BN, ZnO, InN, AlN and GaN) is theoretically studied, aiming at the design of high frequency electroacoustic devices suitable for work in liquid environments. The investigation of the acoustic field profile across the plate revealed the presence of longitudinally polarized Lamb modes, travelling at velocities close to that of the longitudinal bulk acoustic wave propagating in the same direction. Such waves are suitable for the implementation of high-frequency, low-loss electroacoustic devices operating in liquid environments. The time-averaged power flow density, the phase velocity and the electroacoustic coupling coefficient K2 dispersion curves were studied, for the first (S0) and four higher order (S1, S2, S3, S4) symmetrical modes for different electrical boundary conditions. Two electroacoustic coupling configurations were investigated, based on interdigitated transducers, with or without a metal floating electrode at the opposite plate surface. Enhanced performances, such as a K2 as high as 8.5% and a phase velocity as high as 16,700 m/s, were demostrated for the ZnO- and BN-based waveguides, as an example. The relative velocity changes, and the inertial and viscous sensitivities of the first symmetric and anti-symmetric mode, S0 and A0, propagating along thin plates bordered by a viscous liquid were derived using the perturbation approach. The present study highlights the feasibility of the piezoelectric waveguides to the development of high-frequency, integrated-circuits compatible electroacoustic devices suitable for working in liquid environment.

  14. Longitudinal Modes along Thin Piezoelectric Waveguides for Liquid Sensing Applications

    PubMed Central

    Caliendo, Cinzia

    2015-01-01

    The propagation of longitudinally polarized acoustic modes along thin piezoelectric plates (BN, ZnO, InN, AlN and GaN) is theoretically studied, aiming at the design of high frequency electroacoustic devices suitable for work in liquid environments. The investigation of the acoustic field profile across the plate revealed the presence of longitudinally polarized Lamb modes, travelling at velocities close to that of the longitudinal bulk acoustic wave propagating in the same direction. Such waves are suitable for the implementation of high-frequency, low-loss electroacoustic devices operating in liquid environments. The time-averaged power flow density, the phase velocity and the electroacoustic coupling coefficient K2 dispersion curves were studied, for the first (S0) and four higher order (S1, S2, S3, S4) symmetrical modes for different electrical boundary conditions. Two electroacoustic coupling configurations were investigated, based on interdigitated transducers, with or without a metal floating electrode at the opposite plate surface. Enhanced performances, such as a K2 as high as 8.5% and a phase velocity as high as 16,700 m/s, were demostrated for the ZnO- and BN-based waveguides, as an example. The relative velocity changes, and the inertial and viscous sensitivities of the first symmetric and anti-symmetric mode, S0 and A0, propagating along thin plates bordered by a viscous liquid were derived using the perturbation approach. The present study highlights the feasibility of the piezoelectric waveguides to the development of high-frequency, integrated-circuits compatible electroacoustic devices suitable for working in liquid environment. PMID:26043174

  15. Spectral and polarization characteristics of the nonspherically decaying radiation generated by polarization currents with superluminally rotating distribution patterns.

    PubMed

    Ardavan, Houshang; Ardavan, Arzhang; Singleton, John

    2004-05-01

    We present a theoretical study of the emission from a superluminal polarization current whose distribution pattern rotates (with an angular frequency omega) and oscillates (with a frequency Omega) at the same time and that comprises both poloidal and toroidal components. This type of polarization current is found in recent practical machines designed to investigate superluminal emission. We find that the superluminal motion of the distribution pattern of the emitting current generates localized electromagnetic waves that do not decay spherically, i.e., that do not have an intensity diminishing as RP(-2) with the distance RP from their source. The nonspherical decay of the focused wave packets that are emitted by the polarization currents does not contravene conservation of energy: The constructive interference of the constituent waves of such propagating caustics takes place within different solid angles on spheres of different radii (RP) centered on the source. For a polarization current whose longitudinal distribution (over an azimuthal interval of length 2pi) consists of m cycles of a sinusoidal wave train, the nonspherically decaying part of the emitted radiation contains the frequencies Omega +/- momega; i.e., it contains only the frequencies involved in the creation and implementation of the source. This is in contrast to recent studies of the spherically decaying emission, which was shown to contain much higher frequencies. The polarization of the emitted radiation is found to be linear for most configurations of the source.

  16. Optimization of polarization lidar structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramochkin, Alexander I.; Kaul, Bruno V.; Tikhomirov, Alexander A.

    1999-11-01

    The problems of the polarization lidar transceiver optimization are considered. The basic features and the optimization criteria of lidar polarization units are presented and the comparative analysis of polarization units is fulfilled. We have analyzed optical arrangements of the transmitter to form the desired polarization state of sounding radiation. We have also considered various types of lidar receiving systems: (1) one-channel, providing measurement of Stocks parameters at a successive change of position of polarization analyzers in the lidar receiver, and (2) multichannel, where each channel has a lens, an analyzer, and a photodetector. In the latter case measurements of Stocks parameters are carried out simultaneously. The optimization criteria of the polarization lidar considering the atmospheric state are determined with the purpose to decrease the number of polarization devices needed.

  17. Sensitivity of VIIRS Polarization Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waluschka, Eugene

    2010-01-01

    The design of an optical system typically involves a sensitivity analysis where the various lens parameters, such as lens spacing and curvatures, to name two parameters, are (slightly) varied to see what, if any, effect this has on the performance and to establish manufacturing tolerances. A sinular analysis was performed for the VIIRS instruments polarization measurements to see how real world departures from perfectly linearly polarized light entering VIIRS effects the polarization measurement. The methodology and a few of the results of this polarization sensitivity analysis are presented and applied to the construction of a single polarizer which will cover the VIIRS VIS/NIR spectral range. Keywords: VIIRS, polarization, ray, trace; polarizers, Bolder Vision, MOXTEK

  18. Polarization and fiber nonlinearities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Qiang

    This thesis is devoted to a thorough investigation of various nonlinear phenomena in optical fibers over a variety of length, time, and power scales. It presents a unified theoretical description of fiber nonlinearities, their applications, existing problems, and possible solutions, particularly focusing on the polarization dependence of nonlinearities. The thesis begins with an investigation of quantum-correlated photon pair generation in the extremely low-power regime, and fundamental quantum noise properties of dual-pump parametric amplfiers in the very high gain regime. It then focuses on two experimental demonstrations of applications based on four-wave mixing: an ultrafast all-optical switching scheme with the capability of multi-band wavelength casting, and a subpicosecond parametric oscillator with broadband tunability. The thesis next deals with the theoretical and experimental investigation of a novel phenomenon of vector soliton fission during supercontinuum generation in a tapered fiber in the femtosecond regime. The vectorial nature of Raman scattering is discussed next. In particular, I propose a vector form of the Raman response function to descibe accurately the Raman-related phenomena during ultrashort pulse propagation inside optical fibers. The thesis also presents a unified theory to describe nonlinearities in long fibers with random birefringence and polarization-mode dispersion. It focuses on the statistical nature of the interactions between random polarization-mode disperion and various nonlinear effects like stimulated Raman scattering, cross-phase modulation, four-wave mixing, and self-phase modulation. In particular, I quantify their impacts on various nonlinear photonic functionalities such as Raman amplification, nonlinear optical switching, parametric amplfication, wavelength conversion, soliton stability, etc.

  19. Nonlinear Accelerator with Transverse Motion Integrable in Normalized Polar Coordinates

    SciTech Connect

    Nagaitsev, S.; Kharkov, Y.; Morozov, I.A.; Zolkin, T.V.; /Chicago U.

    2012-05-01

    Several families of nonlinear accelerator lattices with integrable transverse motion were suggested recently. One of the requirements for the existence of two analytic invariants is a special longitudinal coordinate dependence of fields. This paper presents the particle motion analysis when a problem becomes integrable in the normalized polar coordinates. This case is distinguished from the others: it yields an exact analytical solution and has a uniform longitudinal coordinate dependence of the fields (since the corresponding nonlinear potential is invariant under the transformation from the Cartesian to the normalized coordinates). A number of interesting features are revealed: while the frequency of radial oscillations is independent of the amplitude, the spread of angular frequencies in a beam is absolute. A corresponding spread of frequencies of oscillations in the Cartesian coordinates is evaluated via the simulation of transverse Schottky noise.

  20. South Polar Scene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    19 January 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a mid-summer scene in the south polar region of the red planet. The light-toned surface is covered with seasonal frost that, later in the season, would have sublimed away.

    Location near: 86.8oS, 322.8oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Summer