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Sample records for longitudinally polarized hadroproduction

  1. Relativistic corrections to J /ψ polarization in photo- and hadroproduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Zhi-Guo; Kniehl, Bernd A.

    2015-07-01

    We systematically calculate the relativistic corrections to the polarization variables of prompt J /ψ photoproduction and hadroproduction using the factorization formalism of nonrelativistic QCD. Specifically, we include the 3S1[1] and 3PJ[1] color-singlet and the 3S1[8] , 1S0[8], and 3PJ[8] color-octet channels as well as the effects due to the mixing between the 3S1[8] and 3D1[8] channels. We provide all the squared hard-scattering amplitudes in analytic form. Assuming the nonrelativistic-QCD long-distance matrix elements to satisfy the velocity scaling rules, we find the relativistic corrections to be appreciable, especially at small transverse momentum pT and large inelasticity z . The results obtained here and in our previous work on the unpolarized yield [Phys. Rev. D 90, 014045 (2014)] will help to render global analyses of prompt J /ψ production data more complete and hopefully to shed light on the J /ψ polarization puzzle.

  2. Longitudinal polarization of hyperons in the forward region in polarized pp collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Wei; Zhou Shanshan; Xu Qinghua

    2010-03-01

    We study the longitudinal polarization of hyperons and antihyperons at forward pseudorapidity, 2.5<{eta}<4, in singly polarized pp collisions at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider energies by using different parametrizations of the polarized parton densities and different models for the polarized fragmentation functions. The results show that the {Sigma}{sup +} polarization is able to distinguish different pictures on spin transfer in high energy fragmentation processes; and the polarization of {Lambda} and {Lambda} hyperons can provide sensitivity to the helicity distribution of strange sea quarks. The influence from beam remnant to hyperon polarization in the forward region is also discussed.

  3. FDCHQHP: A Fortran package for heavy quarkonium hadroproduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Lu-Ping; Wang, Jian-Xiong

    2014-11-01

    FDCHQHP is a Fortran package to calculate the transverse momentum (pt) distribution of yield and polarization for heavy quarkonium hadroproduction at next-to-leading-order (NLO) based on non-relativistic QCD(NRQCD) framework. It contains the complete color-singlet and color-octet intermediate states in present theoretical level, and is available to calculate different polarization parameters in different frames. As the LHC running now and in the future, it supplies a very useful tool to obtain theoretical prediction on the heavy quarkonium hadroproduction. Catalogue identifier: AETT_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AETT_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen’s University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 12020165 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 103178384 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran 77. Computer: Any computer with Linux operating system, Intel Fortran Compiler and MPI library. Operating system: Linux. Has the code been vectorized or parallelized?: Parallelized with MPI. Classification: 11.1. External routines: MPI Library Nature of problem: This package is for the calculation of the heavy quarkonium hadroproduction at NRQCD NLO. Solution method: The Fortran codes of this package are generated by the FDC system [1] automatically. Additional comments: It is better to run the package on supercomputers or multi-core computers. !!!!! The distribution file for this program is over 100 MB and therefore is not delivered directly when download or Email is requested. Instead a html file giving details of how the program can be obtained is sent. !!!!! Running time: For an independent sub-process, it may take several seconds to several hours depending on the number of sample points if one CPU core is used. For a complete prompt

  4. LONGITUDINAL GLUON POLARIZATION IN RHIC DOUBLE-SPIN ASYMMETRIES.

    SciTech Connect

    JAGER,B.; STRATMANN,M.; KRETZER,S.; VOGELSANG,W.

    2004-04-14

    The longitudinally polarized gluon density is probed sensitively in hard collisions of polarized protons under the condition that the dominant dynamics are perturbative and of leading twist origin. First data have recently been presented by PHENIX on the double-spin asymmetry A{sub LL}{sup {pi}} for {pi}{sup 0} production at moderate transverse momentum p {perpendicular} {approx_equal} 1 {divided_by} 4 GeV and central rapidity. By means of a systematic investigation of the relevant degrees of freedom we show that the perturbative QCD framework at leading power in p{perpendicular} produces an asymmetry that is basically positive definite in this kinematic range, i.e. A{sub LL}{sup {pi}} {approx}> {Omicron}(-10{sup -3}).

  5. Longitudinal Polarization of {lambda} and {lambda}-bar Hyperons in Deep-Inelastic Scattering at COMPASS

    SciTech Connect

    Sapozhnikov, M. G.

    2007-06-13

    The longitudinal polarization of {lambda} and {lambda}-bar hyperons produced in deep-inelastic scattering of 160 GeV/c polarized positive muons is studied in the COMPASS (CERN NA58) experiment. Preliminary results on the longitudinal polarization of {lambda} and {lambda}-bar from data collected during the 2003 run are presented.

  6. Experiments with longitudinally polarized electrons in a storage ring using a siberian snake

    PubMed

    Poolman; Boersma; Harvey; Higinbotham; Passchier; Six; Alarcon; van Amersfoort PW; Bauer; Boer Rookhuizen H; van Den Brand JF; van Buuren LD; Bulten; Ent; Ferro-Luzzi; Geurts; Heimberg; de Jager CW; Klimin; Koop; Kroes; van Der Laan J; Luijckx; Lysenko; Militsyn; Nesterenko

    2000-04-24

    We report on first measurements with polarized electrons stored in a medium-energy ring and with a polarized internal target. Polarized electrons were injected at 442 MeV (653 MeV), and a partial (full) Siberian snake was employed to preserve the polarization. Longitudinal polarization at the interaction point and polarization lifetime of the stored electrons were determined with laser backscattering. Spin observables were measured for electrodisintegration of polarized 3He, with simultaneous detection of scattered electrons, protons, neutrons, deuterons, and 3He nuclei, over a large phase space. PMID:11019223

  7. On the longitudinal polarization of non-paraxial electromagnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Herrero, R.; Mejías, P. M.; Manjavacas, A.

    2010-05-01

    Within the framework of the angular plane-wave spectrum of the electromagnetic field, the general form is given for the freely-propagating beams, exact solution of the Maxwell equations, that closely approach (in an algebraic sense) to a purely-longitudinal vectorial distribution at some transverse plane. In the rotationally symmetric case, such a field is written as the combination of radial and longitudinal components, whose propagation can be analysed independently. Several illustrative examples are also considered.

  8. Longitudinal versus polar wrinkling of core-shell fibers with anisotropic size mismatches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patrício, P.; Teixeira, P. I. C.; Trindade, A. C.; Godinho, M. H.

    2014-01-01

    We consider a fiber made of a soft elastic material, encased in a stiff elastic shell (core-shell geometry). If the core and shell dimensions are mismatched, e.g., because the core shrinks while the shell does not, but the two remain attached, then an elastic instability is triggered whereby wrinkles may appear on the shell. The wrinkle orientation may be longitudinal (along the fiber axis), polar (along the fiber perimeter), or a mixture of both, depending on the fiber's geometrical and material parameters. Here we investigate under what conditions longitudinal or polar wrinkling will occur.

  9. Relativistic corrections to prompt J/ψ photo- and hadroproduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Zhi-Guo; Kniehl, Bernd A.

    2014-07-01

    We systematically calculate the relativistic corrections to prompt J/ψ photoproduction and hadroproduction using the factorization formalism of nonrelativistic QCD. Specifically, we include the S31[1] and P3J[1] color-singlet and the S31[8], S10[8], and P3J[8] color-octet channels as well as the effects due to the mixing between the S31[8] and D31[8] channels. We provide all the squared hard-scattering amplitudes in analytic form. Assuming the nonrelativistic-QCD long-distance matrix elements to satisfy the velocity scaling rules, we find the relativistic corrections to be appreciable, except in the S31[1] color-singlet channel of hadroproduction. We also observe significant differences in the line shapes of the relativistic corrections between photoproduction and hadroproduction.

  10. Scalar Aharonov-Bohm effect with longitudinally polarized neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Allman, B. E.; Lee, W.-T.; Motrunich, O. I.; Werner, S. A.

    1999-12-01

    In the scalar Aharonov-Bohm effect, a charged particle (electron) interacts with the scalar electrostatic potential U in the field-free (i.e., force-free) region inside an electrostatic cylinder (Faraday cage). Using a perfect single-crystal neutron interferometer we have performed a ''dual'' scalar Aharonov-Bohm experiment by subjecting polarized thermal neutrons to a pulsed magnetic field. The pulsed magnetic field was spatially uniform, precluding any force on the neutrons. Aligning the direction of the pulsed magnetic field to the neutron magnetic moment also rules out any classical torque acting to change the neutron polarization. The observed phase shift is purely quantum mechanical in origin. A detailed description of the experiment, performed at the University of Missouri Research Reactor, and its interpretation is given in this paper. (c) 1999 The American Physical Society.

  11. Longitudinal field characterization of converging terahertz vortices with linear and circular polarizations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xinke; Shi, Jing; Sun, Wenfeng; Feng, Shengfei; Han, Peng; Ye, Jiasheng; Zhang, Yan

    2016-04-01

    Linearly and circularly polarized terahertz (THz) vortex beams are generated by adopting a THz quarter wave plate and spiral phase plates with topological charges 1 and 2. Taking advantage of a THz digital holographic imaging system, longitudinal components of THz vortices with different polarizations and topological charges are coherently measured and systemically analyzed in a focusing condition. The application potential of circularly polarized THz vortex beams in microscopy is experimentally demonstrated and the transformation between the spin angular momentums and orbital angular momentums of THz waves is also checked. Modified Richards-Wolf vector diffraction integration equations are applied to successfully simulate experimental phenomena. PMID:27137010

  12. Twist-3 effect from the longitudinally polarized proton for ALT in hadron production from pp collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koike, Yuji; Pitonyak, Daniel; Yoshida, Shinsuke

    2016-08-01

    We compute the contribution from the longitudinally polarized proton to the twist-3 double-spin asymmetry ALT in inclusive (light) hadron production from proton-proton collisions, i.e., p↑ p → → h X. We show that using the relevant QCD equation-of-motion relation and Lorentz invariance relation allows one to eliminate the twist-3 quark-gluon correlator (associated with the longitudinally polarized proton) in favor of one-variable twist-3 quark distributions and the (twist-2) transversity parton density. Including this result with the twist-3 pieces associated with the transversely polarized proton and unpolarized final-state hadron (which have already been calculated in the literature), we now have the complete leading-order cross section for this process.

  13. Generation of longitudinally polarized terahertz pulses with field amplitudes exceeding 2 kV/cm

    SciTech Connect

    Cliffe, M. J. Rodak, A.; Graham, D. M.; Jamison, S. P.

    2014-11-10

    We demonstrate the generation of near-single cycle longitudinally polarized terahertz radiation using a large-area radially biased photoconductive antenna with a longitudinal field amplitude in excess of 2 kV/cm. The 76 mm diameter antenna was photo-excited by a 0.5 mJ amplified near-infrared femtosecond laser system and biased with a voltage of up to 100 kV applied over concentric electrodes. Amplitudes for both the transverse and longitudinal field components of the source were measured using a calibrated electro-optic detection scheme. By tightly focusing the radiation emitted from the photoconductive antenna, we obtained a maximum longitudinal field amplitude of 2.22 kV/cm with an applied bias field of 38.5 kV/cm.

  14. Fragmentation contributions to hadroproduction of prompt J /ψ , χc J, and ψ (2 S ) states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodwin, Geoffrey T.; Chao, Kuang-Ta; Chung, Hee Sok; Kim, U.-Rae; Lee, Jungil; Ma, Yan-Qing

    2016-02-01

    We compute fragmentation corrections to hadroproduction of the quarkonium states J /ψ , χc J, and ψ (2 S ) at leading power in mc2/pT2 , where mc is the charm-quark mass and pT is the quarkonium transverse momentum. The computation is carried out in the framework of nonrelativistic QCD. We include corrections to the parton-production cross sections through next-to-leading order in the strong coupling αs and corrections to the fragmentation functions through second order in αs. We also sum leading logarithms of pT2/mc2 to all orders in perturbation theory. We find that, when we combine these leading-power fragmentation corrections with fixed-order calculations through next-to-leading order in αs, we are able to obtain good fits for pT≥10 GeV to hadroproduction cross sections that were measured at the Tevatron and the LHC. Using values for the nonperturbative long-distance matrix elements that we extract from the cross-section fits, we make predictions for the polarizations of the quarkonium states. We obtain good agreement with measurements of the polarizations, with the exception of the CDF Run II measurement of the prompt J /ψ polarization, for which the agreement is only fair. In the predictions for the prompt-J /ψ cross sections and polarizations, we take into account feeddown from the χc J and ψ (2 S ) states.

  15. Longitudinally Polarized Electrons in a Storage Ring below 1 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Passchier, I.; Boersma, D.J.; Harvey, M.; Higinbotham, D.W.; Poolman, H.R.; Six, E.; Alarcon, R.; van Amersfoort, P.W.; Bauer, Th.S.; Rookhuizen, H. Boer; van den Brand, J.F.J.; van Buuren, L.D.; Bulten, H.J.; Ent, R.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Geurts, D.; Heimberg, P.; de Jager, C.W.; Klimin, P.; Koop, I.; Kroes, F.; van der Laan, J.; Luijckx, G.; Lysenko, A.; Militsyn, B.; Nesterenko, I.; Noomen, J.; Norum, B.E.; van den Putte, M.J.J.; Shatunov, Yu.; Steijger, J.J.M.; Szczerba, D.; de Vries, H.

    2000-12-31

    The results of studies of the longitudinal electron polarization in the AmPS storage ring at NIKHEF are reported. The ring was operated using a partial Siberian snake at the first magic energy, and a full Siberian snake between 440 MeV and 720 MeV. The effect of high beam currents in the ring was investigated, and it was found that some of the electron polarization is lost if the beam current becomes larger than {approx}120 mA.

  16. Deeply virtual Compton scattering on longitudinally polarized protons and neutrons at CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Silvia Niccolai

    2012-04-01

    This paper focuses on a measurement of deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS) performed at Jefferson Lab using a nearly-6-GeV polarized electron beam, two longitudinally polarized (via DNP) solid targets of protons (NH{sub 3}) and deuterons (ND{sub 3}) and the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer. Here, preliminary results for target-spin asymmetries and double (beam-target) asymmetries for proton DVCS, as well as a very preliminary extraction of beam-spin asymmetry for neutron DVCS, are presented and linked to Generalized Parton Distributions.

  17. Measurement of Single and Double Spin Asymmetries in Deep Inelastic Pion Electroproduction with a Longitudinally Polarized Target

    SciTech Connect

    Avakian, H; Bosted, P; Elouadrhiri, L; Adhikari, K P; Aghasyan, M; Amaryan, M; Anghinolfi, M; Baghdasaryan, H; Ball, J; Battaglieri, M; Bedlinskiy, I; Biselli, A S; Branford, D; Briscoe, W J; Brooks, W; Carman, D S; Casey, L; Cole, P L; Collins, P; Crabb, D; Crede, V; D'Angelo, A; Daniel, A; Dashyan, N; DeVita, R; DeSanctis, E; Deur, A; Dey, B; Dhamija, S; Dickson, R; Djalali, C; Dodge, G; Doughty, D; Dupre, R; El Alaoui, A; Eugenio, P; Fegan, S; Fersch, M; Guler, N; Guo, L; Hafidi, K; Hakobyan, H; Hanretty, C; Hassall, N; Heddle, D; Hicks, K; Holtrop, M; Ilieva, Y; Ireland, D G; Isupov, E L; Jawalkar, S S; Jo, H S; Joo, K; Keller, D; Khandaker, M; Khetarpal,; Kim, W; Klein, A; Klein, F J; Konczykowski, P; Kubarovsky, V; Kuhn, S E; Kuleshov, S V; Kuznetsov, V; Livingston, K; Lu, H Y; Markov, N; Mayer, M; McAndrew, J; McCracken, M E; McKInnon, B; Meyer, C A; Mineeva, T; Mirazita, M; Mokeev, V; Moreno, B; Moriya, K; Morrison, B; Moutarde, H; Munevar, E; Nadel-Turonski, P; Nasseripour, R; Niccolai, S; Niculescu, G; Niculescu, I; Niroula, M R; Osipenko, M; Ostrovidov, A I; Paremuzyan, R; Park, K; Park, S; Pasyuk, E; Anefalos Pereira, S; Perrin, Y; Pisano, S; Pogorelko, O; Price, J W; Procureur, S; Prok, Protopopescu; Raue, B A; Ricco, G; Ripani, M; Rosner, G; Rossi, P; Sabatie, F; Saini, M S; Salamanca, J; Salgado, C; Schumacher, R A; Seder, E; Seraydaryan, H; Sharabian, Y G; Sober, D I; Sokhan, D; Stapanyan, S S; Stepanyan, S; Stoler, P; Strauch, S; Suleiman, R; Taiuti, M; Tedeschi, D J; Tkachenko, S; Ungaro, M; Vernarsky, B; Vineyard, M F; Voutier, E; Watts, D P; Weinstein, L B; Weygand, D P; Wood, M H; Zhang, J; Zhao, B; Zhao, Z W

    2010-12-01

    We report the first measurement of the transverse momentum dependence of double spin asymmetries in semi-inclusive production of pions in deep inelastic scattering off the longitudinally polarized proton. Data have been obtained using a polarized electron beam of 5.7 GeV with the CLAS detector at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab). A significant non-zero $\\sin2\\phi$ single spin asymmetry was also observed for the first time indicating strong spin-orbit correlations for transversely polarized quarks in the longitudinally polarized proton. The azimuthal modulations of single spin asymmetries have been measured over a wide kinematic range.

  18. On the Mechanisms of Heavy-Quarkonium Hadroproduction

    SciTech Connect

    Lansberg, J.P.

    2008-12-01

    We discuss the various mechanisms potentially at work in hadroproduction of heavy quarkonia in the light of computations of higher-order QCD corrections both in the Colour-Singlet (CS) and Colour-Octet (CO) channels and the inclusion of the contribution arising from the s-channel cut in the CS channel. We also discuss new observables meant to better discriminate between these different mechanisms.

  19. MEASUREMENTS OF LAMBA AND ANTI-LAMBDA POLARIZATION IN LONGITUDINALLY POLARIZED PROTON-PROTON COLLISIONS AT SQRT S(NN) = 200 GEV AT STAR.

    SciTech Connect

    XU, Q.

    2005-10-24

    Preliminary results for the longitudinal polarization of A and hyperons in longitudinally polarized proton-proton collisions at {radical}s = 200 GeV are presented. The {Lambda}({bar {Lambda}}) candidates are reconstructed at mid-rapidity (|{eta}| < 1) with the time projection chamber of the STAR experiment at RHIC, using 0.5 pb{sup -1} collected in 2003 and 2004 with beam polarizations of up to 45%. Their mean longitudinal momentum fraction x{sub F} is about 8 x 10{sup -3} and their mean transverse momentum p{sub T} is about 1.5 GeV. The analysis uses asymmetries of counts for different spin states of the colliding proton beams and does not require detailed knowledge of the detector acceptance. The preliminary {Lambda}({Lambda}) polarization values are consistent with zero within their statistical uncertainties of 0.05.

  20. Longitudinal polarization of hyperon and antihyperon in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Shanshan; Chen Ye; Liang Zuotang; Xu Qinghua

    2009-05-01

    We make a detailed study of the longitudinal polarization of hyperons and antihyperons in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic lepton-nucleon scattering. We present the numerical results for spin transfer in quark fragmentation processes, and analyze the possible origins for a difference between the polarization for hyperon and that for the corresponding antihyperon. We present the results obtained in the case that there is no asymmetry between sea and antisea distribution in the nucleon as well as those obtained when such an asymmetry is taken into account. We compare the results with the available data such as those from COMPASS and make predictions for future experiments including those at even higher energies such as at eRHIC.

  1. Measurement of longitudinal spin asymmetries for weak boson production in polarized proton-proton collisions at RHIC.

    PubMed

    Adamczyk, L; Adkins, J K; Agakishiev, G; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Alekseev, I; Alford, J; Anson, C D; Aparin, A; Arkhipkin, D; Aschenauer, E C; Averichev, G S; Balewski, J; Banerjee, A; Beavis, D R; Bellwied, R; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bhattarai, P; Bichsel, H; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Bordyuzhin, I G; Borowski, W; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Brovko, S G; Bültmann, S; Bunzarov, I; Burton, T P; Butterworth, J; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Campbell, J M; Cebra, D; Cendejas, R; Cervantes, M C; Chaloupka, P; Chang, Z; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, J H; Chen, L; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Christie, W; Chwastowski, J; Codrington, M J M; Contin, G; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Cui, X; Das, S; Davila Leyva, A; De Silva, L C; Debbe, R R; Dedovich, T G; Deng, J; Derevschikov, A A; Derradi de Souza, R; Dhamija, S; di Ruzza, B; Didenko, L; Dilks, C; Ding, F; Djawotho, P; Dong, X; Drachenberg, J L; Draper, J E; Du, C M; Dunkelberger, L E; Dunlop, J C; Efimov, L G; Engelage, J; Engle, K S; Eppley, G; Eun, L; Evdokimov, O; Eyser, O; Fatemi, R; Fazio, S; Fedorisin, J; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flores, C E; Gagliardi, C A; Gangadharan, D R; Garand, D; Geurts, F; Gibson, A; Girard, M; Gliske, S; Greiner, L; Grosnick, D; Gunarathne, D S; Guo, Y; Gupta, A; Gupta, S; Guryn, W; Haag, B; Hamed, A; Han, L-X; Haque, R; Harris, J W; Heppelmann, S; Hirsch, A; Hoffmann, G W; Hofman, D J; Horvat, S; Huang, B; Huang, H Z; Huang, X; Huck, P; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Jacobs, W W; Jang, H; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kalinkin, D; Kang, K; Kauder, K; Ke, H W; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Kesich, A; Khan, Z H; Kikola, D P; Kisel, I; Kisiel, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Konzer, J; Koralt, I; Kosarzewski, L K; Kotchenda, L; Kraishan, A F; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kulakov, I; Kumar, L; Kycia, R A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Landry, K D; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, J H; LeVine, M J; Li, C; Li, W; Li, X; Li, X; Li, Y; Li, Z M; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Lomnitz, M; Longacre, R S; Luo, X; Ma, G L; Ma, Y G; Madagodagettige Don, D M M D; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Masui, H; Matis, H S; McDonald, D; McShane, T S; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mohanty, B; Mondal, M M; Morozov, D A; Mustafa, M K; Nandi, B K; Nasim, Md; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nigmatkulov, G; Nogach, L V; Noh, S Y; Novak, J; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Oh, K; Ohlson, A; Okorokov, V; Oldag, E W; Olvitt, D L; Pachr, M; Page, B S; Pal, S K; Pan, Y X; Pandit, Y; Panebratsev, Y; Pawlak, T; Pawlik, B; Pei, H; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Pile, P; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Poljak, N; Poniatowska, K; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Pruthi, N K; Przybycien, M; Pujahari, P R; Putschke, J; Qiu, H; Quintero, A; Ramachandran, S; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Riley, C K; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Ross, J F; Roy, A; Ruan, L; Rusnak, J; Rusnakova, O; Sahoo, N R; Sahu, P K; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sangaline, E; Sarkar, A; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmah, A M; Schmidke, W B; Schmitz, N; Seger, J; Seyboth, P; Shah, N; Shahaliev, E; Shanmuganathan, P V; Shao, M; Sharma, B; Shen, W Q; Shi, S S; Shou, Q Y; Sichtermann, E P; Singaraju, R N; Skoby, M J; Smirnov, D; Smirnov, N; Solanki, D; Sorensen, P; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, T D S; Stevens, J R; Stock, R; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Sumbera, M; Sun, X; Sun, X M; Sun, Y; Sun, Z; Surrow, B; Svirida, D N; Symons, T J M; Szelezniak, M A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tang, Z; Tarnowsky, T; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Tlusty, D; Tokarev, M; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tribedy, P; Trzeciak, B A; Tsai, O D; Turnau, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; van Nieuwenhuizen, G; Vandenbroucke, M; Vanfossen, J A; Varma, R; Vasconcelos, G M S; Vasiliev, A N; Vertesi, R; Videbæk, F; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Vossen, A; Wada, M; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, H; Wang, J S; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Wang, Y; Webb, G; Webb, J C; Westfall, G D; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wu, Y F; Xiao, Z; Xie, W; Xin, K; Xu, H; Xu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Q H; Xu, Y; Xu, Z; Yan, W; Yang, C; Yang, Y; Yang, Y; Ye, Z; Yepes, P; Yi, L; Yip, K; Yoo, I-K; Yu, N; Zawisza, Y; Zbroszczyk, H; Zha, W; Zhang, J B; Zhang, J L; Zhang, S; Zhang, X P; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, F; Zhao, J; Zhong, C; Zhu, X; Zhu, Y H; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zyzak, M

    2014-08-15

    We report measurements of single- and double-spin asymmetries for W^{±} and Z/γ^{*} boson production in longitudinally polarized p+p collisions at sqrt[s]=510  GeV by the STAR experiment at RHIC. The asymmetries for W^{±} were measured as a function of the decay lepton pseudorapidity, which provides a theoretically clean probe of the proton's polarized quark distributions at the scale of the W mass. The results are compared to theoretical predictions, constrained by polarized deep inelastic scattering measurements, and show a preference for a sizable, positive up antiquark polarization in the range 0.05

  2. Recent results on W AL in longitudinally polarized p + p collisions at STAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jinlong; STAR Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    The production of W+/- bosons in longitudinally polarized p + p collisions is a powerful tool to study the spin-flavor structure of the proton, because the spin-dependent W roduction cross section Δσ = σ (p -> p) - σ (p <- p) is directly sensitive to the polarization of the quarks and anti-quarks in the proton. This contribution will report on the recent W measurements performed at the STAR experiment at RHIC. The STAR Electromagnetic Calorimeters are used to trigger on electrons and positrons from the weak decay of the W boson and to provide a measure of the lepton energy, while the STAR Time Projection Chamber allows for reconstruction of the lepton track and its charge sign. During 2012 running period, the STAR experiment had collected an integrated luminosity of 80 pb-1 at √{ s} = 510 GeV with an average beam polarization of 55%. Preliminary results for the single-spin asymmetry, AL = Δσ / (σ (p -> p) + σ (p <- p)), from the 2012 dataset will be presented, as well as projections for the recently completed 2013 running period.

  3. Polarization dependent extinction coefficients of superparamagnetic colloids in transverse and longitudinal configurations of magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, R. V.

    2013-05-01

    We review here, our work on the light scattering by ferrofluids and mixture of ferrofluids and other nonmagnetic suspensions subjected to an external static magnetic field. Detailed derivation of extinction coefficients of the systems when incident light is propagating along transverse and longitudinal direction of the field are carried out. In case of inclusion of anisotropic diamagnetic micron sized particles in a ferrofluids, effects of'magnetic holes' generated in the system on the extinction are discussed. The present work is analyzed in light of other similar investigations. It is shown that the study of polarization dependence of extinction coefficients in transverse field configuration is useful to arrive at an unambiguous conclusion regarding chain formation in a ferrofluid.

  4. Chimera distribution amplitudes for the pion and the longitudinally polarized ρ-meson

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefanis, N. G.; Pimikov, A. V.

    2016-01-01

    Using QCD sum rules with nonlocal condensates, we show that the distribution amplitude of the longitudinally polarized ρ-meson may have a shorttailed platykurtic profile in close analogy to our recently proposed platykurtic distribution amplitude for the pion. Such a chimera distribution de facto amalgamates the broad unimodal profile of the distribution amplitude, obtained with a Dyson-Schwinger equations-based computational scheme, with the suppressed tails characterizing the bimodal distribution amplitudes derived from QCD sum rules with nonlocal condensates. We argue that pattern formation, emerging from the collective synchronization of coupled oscillators, can provide a single theoretical scaffolding to study unimodal and bimodal distribution amplitudes of light mesons without recourse to particular computational schemes and the reasons for them.

  5. Longitudinal elliptically polarized electromagnetic waves in off-diagonal magnetoelectric split-ring composites.

    PubMed

    Chui, S T; Wang, Weihua; Zhou, L; Lin, Z F

    2009-07-22

    We study the propagation of plane electromagnetic waves through different systems consisting of arrays of split rings of different orientations. Many extraordinary EM phenomena were discovered in such systems, contributed by the off-diagonal magnetoelectric susceptibilities. We find a mode such that the electric field becomes elliptically polarized with a component in the longitudinal direction (i.e. parallel to the wavevector). Even though the group velocity [Formula: see text] and the wavevector k are parallel, in the presence of damping, the Poynting vector does not just get 'broadened', but can possess a component perpendicular to the wavevector. The speed of light can be real even when the product ϵμ is negative. Other novel properties are explored.

  6. On effects of multiple gluons in J/ψ hadroproduction

    SciTech Connect

    Motyka, Leszek; Sadzikowski, Mariusz

    2015-04-10

    The three-gluon contribution to J/ψ hadroproduction is calculated within perturbative QCD in the k{sub T}-factorization framework. This mechanism involves double gluon density and enters at a non-leading twist, but it is enhanced at large energies due to large double gluon density at small x. We obtain results for differential p{sub T}-dependent cross-sections for all J/ψ polarisations. The rescattering contribution is found to provide a significant correction to the standard leading twist cross-section at the energies of the Tevatron or the LHC at moderate p{sub T}. We also discuss a possible contribution of the rescattering correction to the anti-shadowing effect for J/ψ production in proton - nucleus collisions.

  7. Finite-mass effects on inclusive B-meson hadroproduction

    SciTech Connect

    Kniehl, Bernd A.; Kramer, Gustav; Schienbein, Ingo; Spiesberger, Hubert

    2008-01-01

    We calculate the transverse-momentum (p{sub T}) distribution for the inclusive hadroproduction of B mesons at intermediate values of p{sub T} at next-to-leading order (NLO) in a dedicated finite-mass scheme using realistic nonperturbative fragmentation functions that are obtained through a global fit to e{sup +}e{sup -} data from CERN LEP1 and SLAC SLC exploiting their universality and scaling violations. We find that finite-mass effects moderately enhance the cross section, by about 20% at p{sub T}=2m{sub b}, and rapidly fade out with increasing value of p{sub T}, so that the zero-mass prediction is reached. We also perform comparisons with recent pp data taken by the CDF Collaboration in run II at the Fermilab Tevatron and comment on the usefulness of the fixed-flavor-number scheme.

  8. Tau longitudinal polarization in B{yields}D{tau}{nu} and its role in the search for the charged Higgs boson

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Minoru; Watanabe, Ryoutaro

    2010-08-01

    We study the longitudinal polarization of the tau lepton in B{yields}D{tau}{nu} decay. After discussing possible sensitivities of {tau} decay modes to the {tau} polarization, we examine the effect of charged Higgs boson on the {tau} polarization in B{yields}D{tau}{nu}. We find a relation between the decay rate and the {tau} polarization, and clarify the role of the {tau} polarization measurement in the search for the charged Higgs boson.

  9. NMR longitudinal relaxation enhancement in metal halides by heteronuclear polarization exchange during magic-angle spinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shmyreva, Anna A.; Safdari, Majid; Furó, István; Dvinskikh, Sergey V.

    2016-06-01

    Orders of magnitude decrease of 207Pb and 199Hg NMR longitudinal relaxation times T1 upon magic-angle-spinning (MAS) are observed and systematically investigated in solid lead and mercury halides MeX2 (Me = Pb, Hg and X = Cl, Br, I). In lead(ii) halides, the most dramatic decrease of T1 relative to that in a static sample is in PbI2, while it is smaller but still significant in PbBr2, and not detectable in PbCl2. The effect is magnetic-field dependent but independent of the spinning speed in the range 200-15 000 Hz. The observed relaxation enhancement is explained by laboratory-frame heteronuclear polarization exchange due to crossing between energy levels of spin-1/2 metal nuclei and adjacent quadrupolar-spin halogen nuclei. The enhancement effect is also present in lead-containing organometal halide perovskites. Our results demonstrate that in affected samples, it is the relaxation data recorded under non-spinning conditions that characterize the local properties at the metal sites. A practical advantage of fast relaxation at slow MAS is that spectral shapes with orientational chemical shift anisotropy information well retained can be acquired within a shorter experimental time.

  10. NMR longitudinal relaxation enhancement in metal halides by heteronuclear polarization exchange during magic-angle spinning.

    PubMed

    Shmyreva, Anna A; Safdari, Majid; Furó, István; Dvinskikh, Sergey V

    2016-06-14

    Orders of magnitude decrease of (207)Pb and (199)Hg NMR longitudinal relaxation times T1 upon magic-angle-spinning (MAS) are observed and systematically investigated in solid lead and mercury halides MeX2 (Me = Pb, Hg and X = Cl, Br, I). In lead(ii) halides, the most dramatic decrease of T1 relative to that in a static sample is in PbI2, while it is smaller but still significant in PbBr2, and not detectable in PbCl2. The effect is magnetic-field dependent but independent of the spinning speed in the range 200-15 000 Hz. The observed relaxation enhancement is explained by laboratory-frame heteronuclear polarization exchange due to crossing between energy levels of spin-1/2 metal nuclei and adjacent quadrupolar-spin halogen nuclei. The enhancement effect is also present in lead-containing organometal halide perovskites. Our results demonstrate that in affected samples, it is the relaxation data recorded under non-spinning conditions that characterize the local properties at the metal sites. A practical advantage of fast relaxation at slow MAS is that spectral shapes with orientational chemical shift anisotropy information well retained can be acquired within a shorter experimental time.

  11. /ital P/-odd asymmetry of the cross section for bremsstrahlung of longitudinally polarized electrons by nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Safin, M. Y.

    1988-12-01

    The differential cross section and the right--left asymmetry are calculated for bremsstrahlung of longitudinally polarized electrons by nuclei, with account taken of the interaction of weak neutral currents. It is shown that at electron energies /ital E//lt/200 MeV the asymmetry of bremsstrahlung by /sup 181/Ta and /sup 11/B nuclei does not exceed 2/center dot/10/sup /minus/9/.

  12. Dominance of the Breit interaction in the cross section and circular polarization of x-ray radiation following longitudinally-polarized-electron-impact excitation of highly charged ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhan-Bin; Dong, Chen-Zhong; Jiang, Jun

    2014-08-01

    Longitudinally-polarized-electron-impact excitation cross sections from the ground state to the individual magnetic sublevels of the excited state 1s2s22p3/2(J = 2) of highly charged Be-like ions are calculated using a fully relativistic distorted-wave method. The contributions of the Breit interaction to the cross sections and circular polarizations of the 1s2s22p3/2(J = 2)→1s22s2(J = 0) magnetic quadrupole (M2) line for selected Be-like Ag43+, Ho63+, and Bi79+ ions are investigated systematically. It is found that the Breit interaction has a large effect and makes the cross sections increase, especially to the mf = -1 and -2 sublevels, the Breit interaction can modify the cross sections by several orders of magnitude. These dramatic influences also lead to a remarkable decrease in the circular polarization of subsequent x-ray radiation, the character of which becomes more and more evident with increasing incident energy and atomic number. And all these characteristics are very different from the conclusions for the linear polarization of radiation following the electron-impact process [S. Fritzsche, A. Surzhykov, and T. Stöhlker, Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 113001 (2009), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.103.113001; Z. W. Wu, J. Jiang, and C. Z. Dong, Phys. Rev. A 84, 032713 (2011), 10.1103/PhysRevA.84.032713].

  13. Polarization observables in the longitudinal basis for pseudo-scalar meson photoproduction using a density matrix approach

    SciTech Connect

    Biplab Dey, Michael E. McCracken, David G. Ireland, Curtis A. Meyer

    2011-05-01

    The complete expression for the intensity in pseudo-scalar meson photoproduction with a polarized beam, target, and recoil baryon is derived using a density matrix approach that offers great economy of notation. A Cartesian basis with spins for all particles quantized along a single direction, the longitudinal beam direction, is used for consistency and clarity in interpretation. A single spin-quantization axis for all particles enables the amplitudes to be written in a manifestly covariant fashion with simple relations to those of the well-known CGLN formalism. Possible sign discrepancies between theoretical amplitude-level expressions and experimentally measurable intensity profiles are dealt with carefully. Our motivation is to provide a coherent framework for coupled-channel partial-wave analysis of several meson photoproduction reactions, incorporating recently published and forthcoming polarization data from Jefferson Lab.

  14. Single and double spin asymmetries for deeply virtual Compton scattering measured with CLAS and a longitudinally polarized proton target

    SciTech Connect

    Pisano, S.; Biselli, A.; Niccolai, S.; Seder, E.; Guidal, M.; Mirazita, M.; Adhikari, K. P.; Adikaram, D.; Amaryan, M. J.; Anderson, M. D.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Avakian, H.; Ball, J.; Battaglieri, M.; Batourine, V.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Bosted, P.; Briscoe, B.; Brock, J.; Brooks, W. K.; Burkert, V. D.; Carlin, C.; Carman, D. S.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Charles, G.; Colaneri, L.; Cole, P. L.; Compton, N.; Contalbrigo, M.; Cortes, O.; Crabb, D. G.; Crede, V.; D' Angelo, A.; De Vita, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Deur, A.; Djalali, C.; Dupre, R.; Egiyan, H.; El Alaoui, A.; El Fassi, L.; Elouadrhiri, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fedotov, G.; Fegan, S.; Fersch, R.; Filippi, A.; Fleming, J. A.; Fradi, A.; Garillon, B.; Garcon, M.; Ghandilyan, Y.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Goetz, J. T.; Gohn, W.; Golovatch, E.; Gothe, R. W.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guo, L.; Hafidi, K.; Hanretty, C.; Hattawy, M.; Hicks, K.; Holtrop, M.; Hughes, S. M.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Jenkins, D.; Jiang, X.; Jo, H. S.; Joo, K.; Joosten, S.; Keith, C. D.; Keller, D.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; Klein, F. J.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuhn, S. E.; Lenisa, P.; Livingston, K.; Lu, H. Y.; MacCormick, M.; MacGregor, Ian J. D.; Mayer, M.; McKinnon, B.; Meekins, D. G.; Meyer, C. A.; Mokeev, V.; Montgomery, R. A.; Moody, C. I.; Munoz Camacho, C.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Park, K.; Phelps, W.; Phillips, J. J.; Pogorelko, O.; Price, J. W.; Procureur, S.; Prok, Y.; Puckett, A. J. R.; Ripani, M.; Rizzo, A.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Roy, P.; Sabatie, F.; Salgado, C.; Schott, D.; Schumacher, R. A.; Skorodumina, I.; Smith, G. D.; Sober, D. I.; Sokhan, D.; Sparveris, N.; Stepanyan, S.; Stoler, P.; Strauch, S.; Sytnik, V.; Tian, Ye; Tkachenko, S.; Turisini, M.; Ungaro, M.; Voutier, E.; Walford, N. K.; Watts, D. P.; Wei, X.; Weinstein, L. B.; Wood, M. H.; Zachariou, N.; Zana, L.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, Z. W.; Zonta, I.

    2015-03-19

    Single-beam, single-target, and double-spin asymmetries for hard exclusive photon production on the proton e→p→e'p'γ are presented. The data were taken at Jefferson Lab using the CLAS detector and a longitudinally polarized 14NH3 target. The three asymmetries were measured in 165 4-dimensional kinematic bins, covering the widest kinematic range ever explored simultaneously for beam and target-polarization observables in the valence quark region. The kinematic dependences of the obtained asymmetries are discussed and compared to the predictions of models of Generalized Parton Distributions. As a result, the measurement of three DVCS spin observables at the same kinematic points allows a quasi-model-independent extraction of the imaginary parts of the H and H~ Compton Form Factors, which give insight into the electric and axial charge distributions of valence quarks in the proton.

  15. Longitudinal Spin Transfer in Inclusive {lambda} and {lambda}-bar Production in Polarized Proton-proton Collisions at {radical}(s) =200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Qinghua

    2007-06-13

    This contribution reports on a proof-of-principle measurement of the longitudinal spin transfer DLL in inclusive {lambda} and {lambda}-bar production in polarized proton-proton collisions at a center of mass energy {radical}(s) = 200 GeV. The data sample consists of about 3 x 106 minimum bias events collected in the year 2005 by the STAR experiment at RHIC with proton beam polarizations of up to 50%. The {lambda}({lambda}-bar) candidates are reconstructed at mid-rapidity (|{eta}| < 1) using the STAR Time Projection Chamber via the dominant decay channel {lambda} {yields} p{pi}- ({lambda}-bar {yields} p-bar{pi}+). Their mean transverse momentum pT is about 1.3 GeV/c and longitudinal momentum fraction xF = 7.5 x 10-3. The longitudinal {lambda}({lambda}-bar) polarization is determined using a method in which the detector acceptance mostly cancels.

  16. Longitudinal fecal hormone analysis for monitoring reproductive activity in the female polar bear (Ursus maritimus).

    PubMed

    Stoops, M A; MacKinnon, K M; Roth, T L

    2012-12-01

    The objective was to identify suitable enzyme immunoassays to monitor gonadal and placental function in the female polar bear. Immunoreactive progesterone, progesterone metabolite (PdG), estrogen, and androgen metabolite (T) concentrations were measured in fecal samples collected over 24 mo from captive female bears (N = 20). Whereas fecal extracts produced displacement curves parallel to the standard curve for each respective steroid, T and PdG more accurately reflected reproductive events. Concentrations of fecal T increased (P < 0.05) during the breeding season, and brief spikes were associated with estrus and mating. A postovulatory increase in PdG was not always detected, but sustained baseline T after mating appeared consistent with ovulation. Parturient bears excreted higher PdG concentrations (P < 0.05) during expected time of embryo implantation in Fall, and a late gestational rise in fecal T occurred 30 days prepartum. Many nonparturient bears also had a PdG rise in the Fall, suggesting they experienced either pregnancy loss or a pseudopregnancy. Differentiating pregnant and pseudopregnant states was not achieved using fecal PdG alone, but when combined with fecal T, comprehensive diagnoses could be made. Nonparturient bears demonstrated elevated (P < 0.05) fecal T during summer months, whereas parturient bears did not. In summary, noninvasive hormone monitoring techniques were established for the female polar bear. Although this study was directed at facilitating management and breeding efforts of captive polar bears, the methods could be applied to studies of reproductive function in wild populations.

  17. Measurement of parity-violating spin asymmetries in W± production at midrapidity in longitudinally polarized p+p collisions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Adare, A.

    2016-03-23

    In this article, we present midrapidity measurements from the PHENIX experiment of large parity-violating single-spin asymmetries of high transverse momentum electrons and positrons from W±/Z decays, produced in longitudinally polarized p+p collisions at center of mass energies of √s=500 and 510 GeV. These asymmetries allow direct access to the antiquark polarized parton distribution functions due to the parity-violating nature of the W-boson coupling to quarks and antiquarks. The results presented are based on data collected in 2011, 2012, and 2013 with an integrated luminosity of 240 pb-1, which exceeds previous PHENIX published results by a factor of more than 27.more » In addition, these high Q2 data probe the parton structure of the proton at W mass scale and provide an important addition to our understanding of the antiquark parton helicity distribution functions at an intermediate Bjorken x value of roughly MW/√s=0.16.« less

  18. Azimuthal asymmetries of hadrons produced in muon SIDIS off longitudinally polarized deuterons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savin, I. A.

    2016-02-01

    The azimuthal asymmetries in the cross sections of charged-hadron production in the muon SIDIS reactions off the longitudinally polarised deuterons are determined using the COMPASS data of 2006 and combined data of 2002-2006. The asymmetries are presented as functions of the hadron azimuthal angle ϕ in two ways: first, for hadrons integrated over the kinematic variables and, second, as a function of one of the kinematic variables x, z or phT while integrating over two other. In each case asymmetries were fitted by functions included the ϕ-independent terms and terms amplitude of which are modulated with ø as predicted by the theory: sin ϕ, sin 2ϕ, sin 3ϕ and cos ϕ. Results for amplitudes are presented and discussed.

  19. Precision measurement of the longitudinal double-spin asymmetry for inclusive jet production in polarized proton collisions at √s = 200 GeV

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Adamczyk, L.

    2015-08-26

    We report a new measurement of the midrapidity inclusive jet longitudinal double-spin asymmetry, ALL, in polarized pp collisions at center-of-mass energy √s = 200 GeV. The STAR data place stringent constraints on polarized parton distribution functions extracted at next-to-leading order from global analyses of inclusive deep-inelastic scattering (DIS), semi-inclusive DIS, and RHIC pp data. Lastly, the measured asymmetries provide evidence at the 3σ level for positive gluon polarization in the Bjorken-x region x > 0.05 .

  20. Precision measurement of the longitudinal double-spin asymmetry for inclusive jet production in polarized proton collisions at √s = 200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Adamczyk, L.

    2015-08-26

    We report a new measurement of the midrapidity inclusive jet longitudinal double-spin asymmetry, ALL, in polarized pp collisions at center-of-mass energy √s = 200 GeV. The STAR data place stringent constraints on polarized parton distribution functions extracted at next-to-leading order from global analyses of inclusive deep-inelastic scattering (DIS), semi-inclusive DIS, and RHIC pp data. Lastly, the measured asymmetries provide evidence at the 3σ level for positive gluon polarization in the Bjorken-x region x > 0.05 .

  1. Longitudinal double-spin asymmetry and cross section for inclusive jet production in polarized proton collisions at square root of s = 200 GeV.

    PubMed

    Abelev, B I; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Amonett, J; Anderson, B D; Anderson, M; Arkhipkin, D; Averichev, G S; Bai, Y; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellingeri-Laurikainen, A; Bellwied, R; Benedosso, F; Bhardwaj, S; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bichsel, H; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Blyth, S-L; Bonner, B E; Botje, M; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Bravar, A; Burton, T P; Bystersky, M; Cadman, R V; Cai, X Z; Caines, H; Sánchez, M Calderón de la Barca; Castillo, J; Catu, O; Cebra, D; Chajecki, Z; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, J H; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Cosentino, M R; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Das, D; Das, S; Dash, S; Daugherity, M; de Moura, M M; Dedovich, T G; Dephillips, M; Derevschikov, A A; Didenko, L; Dietel, T; Djawotho, P; Dogra, S M; Dong, W J; Dong, X; Draper, J E; Du, F; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Mazumdar, M R Dutta; Eckardt, V; Edwards, W R; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Estienne, M; Fachini, P; Fatemi, R; Fedorisin, J; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fine, V; Fisyak, Y; Fu, J; Gagliardi, C A; Gaillard, L; Ganti, M S; Ghazikhanian, V; Ghosh, P; Gonzalez, J E; Gorbunov, Y G; Gos, H; Grebenyuk, O; Grosnick, D; Guertin, S M; Guimaraes, K S F F; Gupta, N; Gutierrez, T D; Haag, B; Hallman, T J; Hamed, A; Harris, J W; He, W; Heinz, M; Henry, T W; Hepplemann, S; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffman, A M; Hoffmann, G W; Horner, M J; Huang, H Z; Huang, S L; Hughes, E W; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Jakl, P; Jia, F; Jiang, H; Jones, P G; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kang, K; Kapitan, J; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Khodyrev, V Yu; Kim, B C; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Kislov, E M; Klein, S R; Kocoloski, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Kouchpil, V; Kowalik, K L; Kramer, M; Kravtsov, P; Kravtsov, V I; Krueger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kumar, A; Kuznetsov, A A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; LaPointe, S; Laue, F; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, C-H; Lehocka, S; LeVine, M J; Li, C; Li, Q; Li, Y; Lin, G; Lin, X; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, H; Liu, J; Liu, L; Liu, Z; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Long, H; Longacre, R S; Love, W A; Lu, Y; Ludlam, T; Lynn, D; Ma, G L; Ma, J G; Ma, Y G; Magestro, D; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Mangotra, L K; Manweiler, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Martin, L; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McClain, C J; McShane, T S; Melnick, Yu; Meschanin, A; Millane, J; Miller, M L; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mironov, C; Mischke, A; Mishra, D K; Mitchell, J; Mohanty, B; Molnar, L; Moore, C F; Morozov, D A; Munhoz, M G; Nandi, B K; Nattrass, C; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Netrakanti, P K; Nogach, L V; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Pachr, M; Pal, S K; Panebratsev, Y; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Peitzmann, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Phatak, S C; Picha, R; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Poljak, N; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potekhin, M; Potrebenikova, E; Potukuchi, B V K S; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Putschke, J; Rakness, G; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reinnarth, J; Relyea, D; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Ruan, L; Russcher, M J; Sahoo, R; Sakuma, T; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sarsour, M; Sazhin, P S; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Seger, J; Selyuzhenkov, I; Seyboth, P; Shabetai, A; Shahaliev, E; Shao, M; Sharma, M; Shen, W Q; Shimanskiy, S S; Sichtermann, E P; Simon, F; Singaraju, R N; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sood, G; Sorensen, P; Sowinski, J; Speltz, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stadnik, A; Stanislaus, T D S; Stock, R; Stolpovsky, A; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Suaide, A A P; Sugarbaker, E; Sumbera, M; Sun, Z; Surrow, B; Swanger, M; Symons, T J M; Szanto de Toledo, A; Tai, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tarnowsky, T; Thein, D; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Timoshenko, S; Tokarev, M; Trainor, T A; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tsai, O D; Ulery, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Buren, G Van; van der Kolk, N; van Leeuwen, M; Molen, A M Vander; Varma, R; Vasilevski, I M; Vasiliev, A N; Vernet, R; Vigdor, S E; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Voloshin, S A; Waggoner, W T; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, J S; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Watson, J W; Webb, J C; Westfall, G D; Wetzler, A; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wood, J; Wu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Q H; Xu, Z; Yepes, P; Yoo, I-K; Yurevich, V I; Zhan, W; Zhang, H; Zhang, W M; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, Y; Zhong, C; Zoulkarneev, R; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zubarev, A N; Zuo, J X

    2006-12-22

    We report a measurement of the longitudinal double-spin asymmetry A(LL) and the differential cross section for inclusive midrapidity jet production in polarized proton collisions at square root of s = 200 GeV. The cross section data cover transverse momenta 5 < pT < 50 GeV/c and agree with next-to-leading order perturbative QCD evaluations. The A(LL) data cover 5 < pT < 17 GeV/c and disfavor at 98% C.L. maximal positive gluon polarization in the polarized nucleon. PMID:17280342

  2. A Spin-Light Polarimeter for Multi-GeV Longitudinally Polarized Electron Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Mohanmurthy, Prajwal; Dutta, Dipangkar

    2014-02-01

    The physics program at the upgraded Jefferson Lab (JLab) and the physics program envisioned for the proposed electron-ion collider (EIC) include large efforts to search for interactions beyond the Standard Model (SM) using parity violation in electroweak interactions. These experiments require precision electron polarimetry with an uncertainty of < 0.5 %. The spin dependent Synchrotron radiation, called "spin-light," can be used to monitor the electron beam polarization. In this article we develop a conceptual design for a "spin-light" polarimeter that can be used at a high intensity, multi-GeV electron accelerator. We have also built a Geant4 based simulation for a prototype device and report some of the results from these simulations.

  3. Probing heavy quarkonium production mechnism: χc polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Hua-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    The necesscity of the color-octet mechanism in describing heavy quarkonium production is a longstanding puzzle. Compared to the yields of heavy quarkonium, its polarizations should be a sensitive observable to pin down the color-octet contributions. In this talk, I will focus on the χc polarization in hadroproduction processes, which may provide a unique test for the color-octet mechanism in nonrelativistic QCD.

  4. Second-Born-approximation corrections to the electroweak asymmetry of the cross section for elastic scattering of longitudinally polarized electrons by nuclei of finite size

    SciTech Connect

    Kerimov, B.K.; Safin, M.Y.

    1988-01-01

    Second-Born-approximation corrections to the cross section and right-left asymmetry are calculated for scattering of longitudinally polarized electrons by nuclei with arbitrary spin. Besides a purely electromagnetic contribution, the corrections contain an electroweak contribution resulting from interference between the Coulomb moments and the longitudinal and transverse dipole moments of the target nucleus. Simple expressions are obtained for the corrections by evaluating the angular parts of certain integrals in the logarithmic approximation. The behavior of the corrections is studied for the example /sup 11/B for incident-electron energies Eapprox. <200 MeV.

  5. Large-scale Observations of a Subauroral Polarization Stream by Midlatitude SuperDARN Radars: Instantaneous Longitudinal Velocity Variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clausen, L. B. N.; Baker, J. B. H.; Sazykin, S.; Ruohoniemi, J. M.; Greenwald, R. A.; Thomas, E. J.; Shepherd, S. G.; Talaat, E. R.; Bristow, W. A.; Zheng, Y.; Coster, A. J.

    2012-01-01

    We present simultaneous measurements of flow velocities inside a subauroral polarization stream (SAPS) made by six midlatitude high-frequency SuperDARN radars. The instantaneous observations cover three hours of universal time and six hours of magnetic local time (MLT). From velocity variations across the field-of-view of the radars we infer the local 2D flow direction at three different longitudes. We find that the local flow direction inside the SAPS channel is remarkably constant over the course of the event. The flow speed, however, shows significant temporal and spatial variations. After correcting for the radar look direction we are able to accurately determine the dependence of the SAPS velocity on magnetic local time. We find that the SAPS velocity variation with magnetic local time is best described by an exponential function. The average velocity at 00 MLT was 1.2 km/s and it decreased with a spatial e-folding scale of two hours of MLT toward the dawn sector. We speculate that the longitudinal distribution of pressure gradients in the ring current is responsible for this dependence and find these observations in good agreement with results from ring current models. Using TEC measurements we find that the high westward velocities of the SAPS are - as expected - located in a region of low TEC values, indicating low ionospheric conductivities.

  6. High-aperture binary axicons for the formation of the longitudinal electric field component on the optical axis for linear and circular polarizations of the illuminating beam

    SciTech Connect

    Khonina, S. N. Savelyev, D. A.

    2013-10-15

    Diffraction of uniformly polarized laser beams with vortex phase singularity is theoretically analyzed using the plane wave expansion. It is shown that for a high numerical aperture, an intense longitudinal electric field component is formed on the optical axis in this case. It is numerically demonstrated that an analogous effect is ensured for diffraction of a conventional Gaussian beam from asymmetric binary axicons. The field intensity on the optical axis can be varied either by rotating the optical element or by changing the direction of polarization of radiation.

  7. Longitudinal double-spin asymmetry and cross section for inclusivejet production in polarized proton collisions at sqrt(s) = 200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Abelev, B.I.; Adams, J.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett,J.; Anderson, B.D.; Anderson, M.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G.S.; Bai,Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L.S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V.V.; Bellingeri-Laurikainen, A.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A.K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L.C.; Blyth, S.-L.; Bonner, B.E.; Botje, M.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A.V.; Bravar, A.; Bystersky, M.; Cadman, R.V.; Cai,X.Z.; Caines, H.; Calderon de la Barca Sanchez, M.; Castillo, J.; Catu,O.; Cebra, D.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen,H.F.; Chen, J.H.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J.P.; Cormier, T.M.; Cosentino, M.R.; Cramer, J.G.; Crawford,H.J.; Das, D.; Das, S.; Daugherity, M.; de Moura, M.M.; Dedovich, T.G.; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Djawotho,P.; Dogra, S.M.; Dong, W.J.; Dong, X.; Draper, J.E.; Du, F.; Dunin, V.B.; Dunlop, J.C.; Dutta Mazumdar, M.R.; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, W.R.; Efimov,L.G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch,E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C.A.; Gaillard, L.; Ganti,M.S.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, J.S.; Gorbunov, Y.G.; Gos,H.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, S.M.; Guimaraes, K.S.F.F.; Guo,Y.; Gupta, N.; Gutierrez, T.D.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T.J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J.W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T.W.; Hepplemann, S.; Hippolyte,B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A.M.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Horner, M.J.; Huang, H.Z.; Huang, S.L.; Hughes, E.W.; Humanic, T.J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs,P.; Jacobs, W.W.; Jakl, P.; Jia, F.; Jiang, H.; Jones, P.G.; Judd, E.G.; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khodyrev, V.Yu.; Kim, B.C.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kislov, E.M.; Klein,S.R.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D.D.; et al.

    2006-08-10

    We report a measurement of the longitudinal double-spinasymmetry A_LL and the differential cross section for inclusivemidrapidity jet production in polarized proton collisions at sqrt(s)=200GeV. The cross section data cover transverse momenta 5polarization in the polarizednucleon.

  8. Diffractive hadroproduction of W{sup {+-}} and Z{sup 0} bosons at high energies

    SciTech Connect

    Ducati, M. B. Gay; Machado, M. M.; Machado, M. V. T.

    2008-10-13

    An analysis of W{sup {+-}} and Z{sup 0} hard diffractive hadroproduction at high energies is presented obtained using the simple assumption of Regge factorization and considering the recent diffractive parton density functions extracted by the H1 Collaboration at DESY-HERA. The corresponding multiple Pomeron exchange corrections to the single Pomeron one is considered by taking into account by a gap survival probability factor. It is shown that the ratio of diffractive to nondiffractive boson production is in good agreement with the Tevatron data. Estimations which are relevant for the incoming measurements at the LHC are discussed.

  9. Diffractive hadroproduction of W{sup {+-}} and Z{sup 0} bosons at high energies

    SciTech Connect

    Gay Ducati, M. B.; Machado, M. M.; Machado, M. V. T.

    2007-06-01

    Results from a phenomenological analysis of W and Z hard diffractive hadroproduction at high energies are reported. Using the Regge factorization approach, we consider the recent diffractive parton density functions extracted by the H1 Collaboration at DESY-HERA. In addition, we take into account multiple Pomeron exchange corrections considering a gap survival probability factor. It is found that the ratio of diffractive to nondiffractive boson production is in good agreement with the CDF and D0 data. We make predictions which could be compared to future measurements at the LHC.

  10. Longitudinal spin transfer in inclusive Lambda and Lambda barproduct ion in polarized proton-proton collisions at sqrt s = 200GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Qinghua; STAR Collaboration

    2006-10-01

    This contribution reports on a proof-of-principle measurement of the longitudinal spin transfer D{sub LL} in inclusive {Lambda} and {Lambda} production in polarized proton-proton collisions at a center of mass energy {radical}s = 200 GeV. The data sample consists of about 3 x 10{sup 6} minimum bias events collected in the year 2005 by the STAR experiment at RHIC with proton beam polarizations of up to 50%. The {Lambda}({bar {Lambda}}) candidates are reconstructed at mid-rapidity (|{eta}| < 1) using the STAR Time Projection Chamber via the dominant decay channel {Lambda} {yields} p{pi}{sup -} ({Lambda} {yields} {bar p}{pi}{sup +}). Their mean transverse momentum p{sub T} is about 1.3 GeV/c and longitudinal momentum fraction x{sub F} = 7.5 x 10{sup -3}. The longitudinal {Lambda}({bar {Lambda}}) polarization is determined using a method in which the detector acceptance mostly cancels.

  11. Flavin mononucleotide biomolecular laser: longitudinal mode structure, polarization, and temporal characteristics as probes of local chemical environment.

    PubMed

    Rivera, José A; Eden, J Gary

    2016-05-16

    A detailed characterization of the flavin mononucleotide (FMN) biomolecular laser, optically pumped in a stable resonator, is reported here. Photoexcitation of the molecule at 355 nm results in lasing over the ~566.5-573.5 nm spectral region, and the threshold pump energy density is measured to be 110 ± 10 µJ/mm2 for a 10 mM FMN/water solution. Over twenty longitudinal modes are observed when the cavity length L and the energy pump fluence Ep are 375 µm and 300 µJ/mm2, respectively. Partial substitution of glycerol for water as the solvent results in a factor of four reduction in the threshold pump energy fluence (to < 30 µJ/mm2) and a quadrupling of the slope efficiency. This effect is attributed to the O2 - mediated photoconversion of FMN molecules in the triplet state to the singlet species. For pump intensities a factor of 2.5 above threshold, the laser pulse width is ~2 ns FWHM, and the output intensity decays exponentially with a photon lifetime of 1.7 ns. The addition of glycerol to a FMN/water solution also suppresses s-polarized emission (yielding P = 0.78 ± 0.08), presumably as a result of the inhibition of FMN rotational diffusion. The sensitivity of the spectral and optical properties of this and other biomolecular lasers to the chemical environment underscores the value of coherent emission as a biochemical or biomedical diagnostic tool, particularly insofar as molecule-molecule interactions are concerned. PMID:27409906

  12. Hadron spectroscopy in photo- and hadroproduction at COMPASS

    SciTech Connect

    Friedrich, J. M.

    2006-07-11

    COMPASS at CERN uses a 160 GeV/c muon beam on a polarized 6LiD target to measure spin-dependent nucleon structure functions. In addition, these high-statistics data on photoproduction offer information on hadron spectroscopy. We present results on the search for the {phi}(1860) pentaquark which had been observed by the NA49 experiment at CERN.COMPASS has also taken a first data sample using a pion beam, aiming to improve the pion polarisability measurement via scattering off a photon in the Coulomb field of a heavy nucleus, as well as meson spectroscopy in the diffractive scattering regime. First spectra of the ongoing analysis are presented.

  13. Longitudinal, 3D Imaging of Collagen Remodeling in Murine Hypertrophic Scars In Vivo using Polarization-sensitive Optical Frequency Domain Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lo, William C. Y.; Villiger, Martin; Golberg, Alexander; Broelsch, G. Felix; Khan, Saiqa; Lian, Christine G.; Austen, William G.; Yarmush, Martin; Bouma, Brett E.

    2016-01-01

    Hypertrophic scars (HTS), frequently seen after traumatic injuries and surgery, remain a major clinical challenge due to the limited success of existing therapies. A significant obstacle to understanding HTS etiology is the lack of tools to monitor scar remodeling longitudinally and non-invasively. We present an in vivo, label-free technique using polarization-sensitive optical frequency domain imaging (PS-OFDI) for the 3D, longitudinal assessment of collagen remodeling in murine HTS. In this study, HTS was induced with a mechanical tension device for 4 to 10 days on incisional wounds and imaged up to one month after device removal; an excisional HTS model was also imaged at 6 months after injury to investigate deeper and more mature scars. We showed that local retardation (LR) and degree of polarization (DOP) provide a robust signature for HTS. Compared to normal skin with heterogeneous LR and low DOP, HTS was characterized by an initially low LR, which increased as collagen fibers remodeled, and a persistently high DOP. This study demonstrates that PS-OFDI offers a powerful tool to gain significant biological insights into HTS remodeling by enabling longitudinal assessment of collagen in vivo, which is critical to elucidating HTS etiology and developing more effective HTS therapies. PMID:26763427

  14. Complete Nonrelativistic-QCD Prediction for Prompt Double J /ψ Hadroproduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Zhi-Guo; Kniehl, Bernd A.

    2015-07-01

    We perform a complete study of prompt double J /ψ hadroproduction at leading order in the nonrelativistic-QCD factorization framework by including all possible pairings of the c c ¯ Fock states 1S0[8] , 3S1[1,8] , and 3PJ[1,8] with J =0 ,1 ,2 . We find that the 1S0[8] and 3PJ[8] channels of J /ψ and ψ' production and the 3PJ[1] and 3S1[8] channels of χc J production, which have been overlooked so far, greatly dominate at large invariant masses and rapidity separations of the J /ψ pair, and that their inclusion nearly fills the large gap between previous incomplete predictions within the color-singlet model and the recent measurement by the CMS Collaboration at the CERN LHC, leaving room for next-to-leading-order corrections of typical size.

  15. Hadroproduction of t-anti-t pair with two isolated photons with PowHel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kardos, A.; Trócsányi, Z.

    2015-08-01

    We simulate the hadroproduction of a t t bar pair in association with two isolated hard photons at 13 TeV LHC using the PowHel package. We use the generated events, stored according to the Les-Houches event format, to make predictions for differential distributions formally at the next-to-leading order (NLO) accuracy. We present predictions at the hadron level employing the cone-type isolation of the photons used by experiments. We also compare the kinematic distributions to the same distributions obtained in the t t bar H final state when the Higgs-boson decays into a photon pair, to which the process discussed here is an irreducible background.

  16. Differentiating between and Synthesizing Quantitative, Qualitative, and Longitudinal Research on Polarized School Cultures: A Comment on Van Houtte (2006)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abraham, John

    2007-01-01

    Van Houtte provides a valuable large-sample quantitative analysis of differentiation and polarization processes between and within school cultures in Belgium. Such research across 34 secondary schools provides greater confidence that the findings in the ethnographic tradition for the differentiation-polarization theory are not due to…

  17. Complete Nonrelativistic-QCD Prediction for Prompt Double J/ψ Hadroproduction.

    PubMed

    He, Zhi-Guo; Kniehl, Bernd A

    2015-07-10

    We perform a complete study of prompt double J/ψ hadroproduction at leading order in the nonrelativistic-QCD factorization framework by including all possible pairings of the cc̅ Fock states (1)S(0)([8]), (3)S(1)([1,8]), and (3)P(J)([1,8]) with J=0,1,2. We find that the (1)S(0)([8]) and (3)P(J)([8]) channels of J/ψ and ψ'} production and the (3)P(J)([1]) and (3)S(1)([8]) channels of χ(cJ) production, which have been overlooked so far, greatly dominate at large invariant masses and rapidity separations of the J/ψ pair, and that their inclusion nearly fills the large gap between previous incomplete predictions within the color-singlet model and the recent measurement by the CMS Collaboration at the CERN LHC, leaving room for next-to-leading-order corrections of typical size.

  18. Polarization properties of linearly polarized parabolic scaling Bessel beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Mengwen; Zhao, Daomu

    2016-10-01

    The intensity profiles for the dominant polarization, cross polarization, and longitudinal components of modified parabolic scaling Bessel beams with linear polarization are investigated theoretically. The transverse intensity distributions of the three electric components are intimately connected to the topological charge. In particular, the intensity patterns of the cross polarization and longitudinal components near the apodization plane reflect the sign of the topological charge.

  19. Measurement of longitudinal-transverse, transverse- transverse, and longitudinal-transverse' response functions in the quasi-elastic deuterium(polarized electron, electron'proton) reaction at 200 (MeV/c) missing momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soong, Shiao-Bin

    We report in this thesis the simultaneous measurement of the longitudinal-transverse response functions, fLT and fLT' , and the transverse-transverse response function fTT of the deuteron. The quasi- elastic H2(e->, e'p)n experiment reported here was conducted at the MIT/Bates Linear Accelerator Center in February, 1997. The experiment was carried out with a 40% polarized, 800 MeV electron beam. The measurement took place in the Bates South Hall using the One Hundred Inch Proton Spectrometer (OHIPS) as the electron spectrometer. It was placed at an angle of 37.27° and the energy transfer, ω, was set for quasi-elastic kinematics with the square of the four-momentum transfer, Q 2, equal to -0.22(GeV/c) 2 . Three out-of- plane proton spectrometers (OOPS) were positioned at fcmpq = (0°, 90°, 180°), respectively, for a given qlabpq of 23.5°. This allowed the simultaneous measurement of fLT,fTT and fLT' at a central missing momentum of ~200 (MeV/ c). The measured asymmetries, cross sections and response functions are compared with different theoretical models. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, Rm. 14- 0551, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307. Ph. 617-253-5668; Fax 617-253-1690.)

  20. On the cos ⁡ϕh asymmetry in electroproduction of pions in double longitudinally polarized process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Wenjuan; Wang, Xiaoyu; Du, Xiaozhen; Lu, Zhun; Ma, Bo-Qiang

    2016-01-01

    We study the cos ⁡ϕh azimuthal asymmetry in double polarized semi-inclusive pion production by considering the twist-3 effects directly from a quark-quark correlator. In particular, we evaluate the role of the transverse momentum dependent distributions eL (x, kT2) and gL⊥ (x, kT2) on the asymmetry. Using two different sets of spectator model results for these distributions, we predict the cos ⁡ϕh asymmetry of π+, π-, and π0 at the kinematic configuration available at CLAS, HERMES. Our estimate shows that the asymmetries for charged and neutral pions are sizable and could be accessed by CLAS and HERMES. We also calculate the asymmetries for charged hadrons at the kinematics of COMPASS and compare them with the experimental data. We find that the asymmetry at COMPASS in our model is small which is consistent with the COMPASS data. We also find that gL⊥ gives the dominant contribution to the cos ⁡ϕh asymmetry, while the contribution of eL is almost negligible.

  1. Measurement of the parity-violating longitudinal single-spin asymmetry for W± boson production in polarized proton-proton collisions at sqrt[s] = 500 GeV.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Alakhverdyants, A V; Alekseev, I; Alford, J; Anderson, B D; Anson, C D; Arkhipkin, D; Averichev, G S; Balewski, J; Beavis, D R; Bellwied, R; Betancourt, M J; Betts, R R; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bichsel, H; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Biritz, B; Bland, L C; Borowski, W; Bouchet, J; Braidot, E; Brandin, A V; Bridgeman, A; Brovko, S G; Bruna, E; Bueltmann, S; Bunzarov, I; Burton, T P; Cai, X Z; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Cebra, D; Cendejas, R; Cervantes, M C; Chajecki, Z; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, J H; Chen, J Y; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Choi, K E; Christie, W; Chung, P; Codrington, M J M; Corliss, R; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Dash, S; Davila Leyva, A; De Silva, L C; Debbe, R R; Dedovich, T G; Derevschikov, A A; Derradi de Souza, R; Didenko, L; Djawotho, P; Dogra, S M; Dong, X; Drachenberg, J L; Draper, J E; Dunlop, J C; Dutta Mazumdar, M R; Efimov, L G; Elnimr, M; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Estienne, M; Eun, L; Evdokimov, O; Fatemi, R; Fedorisin, J; Fersch, R G; Finch, E; Fine, V; Fisyak, Y; Gagliardi, C A; Gangadharan, D R; Ganti, M S; Geromitsos, A; Geurts, F; Ghosh, P; Gorbunov, Y N; Gordon, A; Grebenyuk, O; Grosnick, D; Guertin, S M; Gupta, A; Guryn, W; Haag, B; Hamed, A; Han, L-X; Harris, J W; Hays-Wehle, J P; Heinz, M; Heppelmann, S; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffmann, G W; Hofman, D J; Huang, B; Huang, H Z; Humanic, T J; Huo, L; Igo, G; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Jena, C; Jin, F; Joseph, J; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kang, K; Kapitan, J; Kauder, K; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Kettler, D; Kikola, D P; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Kizka, V; Klein, S R; Knospe, A G; Kocoloski, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Konzer, J; Koralt, I; Koroleva, L; Korsch, W; Kotchenda, L; Kouchpil, V; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Krus, M; Kumar, L; Kurnadi, P; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; LaPointe, S; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, C-H; Lee, J H; Leight, W; LeVine, M J; Li, C; Li, L; Li, N; Li, W; Li, X; Li, X; Li, Y; Li, Z M; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, H; Liu, J; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Longacre, R S; Love, W A; Lu, Y; Lukashov, E V; Luo, X; Ma, G L; Ma, Y G; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Mall, O I; Mangotra, L K; Manweiler, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Masui, H; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McDonald, D; McShane, T S; Meschanin, A; Milner, R; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mischke, A; Mitrovski, M K; Mohanty, B; Mondal, M M; Morozov, B; Morozov, D A; Munhoz, M G; Naglis, M; Nandi, B K; Nayak, T K; Netrakanti, P K; Ng, M J; Nogach, L V; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Ohlson, A; Okorokov, V; Oldag, E W; Olson, D; Pachr, M; Page, B S; Pal, S K; Pandit, Y; Panebratsev, Y; Pawlak, T; Peitzmann, T; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Phatak, S C; Pile, P; Planinic, M; Ploskon, M A; Pluta, J; Plyku, D; Poljak, N; Poskanzer, A M; Potukuchi, B V K S; Powell, C B; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Pruthi, N K; Pujahari, P R; Putschke, J; Qiu, H; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Redwine, R; Reed, R; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Ruan, L; Sakai, S; Sakrejda, I; Sakuma, T; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sangaline, E; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmah, A M; Schmitz, N; Schuster, T R; Seele, J; Seger, J; Selyuzhenkov, I; Seyboth, P; Shahaliev, E; Shao, M; Sharma, M; Shi, S S; Sichtermann, E P; Simon, F; Singaraju, R N; Skoby, M J; Smirnov, N; Sorensen, P; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, T D S; Staszak, D; Stevens, J R; Stock, R; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Suaide, A A P; Suarez, M C; Subba, N L; Sumbera, M; Sun, X M; Sun, Y; Sun, Z; Surrow, B; Svirida, D N; Symons, T J M; Szanto de Toledo, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tang, Z; Tarini, L H; Tarnowsky, T; Thein, D; Thomas, J H; Tian, J; Timmins, A R; Timoshenko, S; Tlusty, D; Tokarev, M; Trainor, T A; Tram, V N; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tsai, O D; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; van Leeuwen, M; van Nieuwenhuizen, G; Vanfossen, J A; Varma, R; Vasconcelos, G M S; Vasiliev, A N; Videbæk, F; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Voloshin, S A; Wada, M; Walker, M; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, H; Wang, J S; Wang, Q; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Webb, G; Webb, J C; Westfall, G D; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wu, Y F; Xie, W; Xu, H; Xu, N; Xu, Q H; Xu, W; Xu, Y; Xu, Z; Xue, L; Yang, Y; Yepes, P; Yip, K; Yoo, I-K; Yue, Q; Zawisza, M; Zbroszczyk, H; Zhan, W; Zhang, J B; Zhang, S; Zhang, W M; Zhang, X P; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, J; Zhong, C; Zhou, W; Zhu, X; Zhu, Y H; Zoulkarneev, R; Zoulkarneeva, Y

    2011-02-11

    We report the first measurement of the parity-violating single-spin asymmetries for midrapidity decay positrons and electrons from W+ and W- boson production in longitudinally polarized proton-proton collisions at sqrt[s] = 500 GeV by the STAR experiment at RHIC. The measured asymmetries, A(L)(W+) = -0.27 ± 0.10(stat.) ± 0.02(syst.) ± 0.03(norm.) and A(L)(W-) = 0.14 ± 0.19(stat.) ± 0.02(syst.) ± 0.01(norm.), are consistent with theory predictions, which are large and of opposite sign. These predictions are based on polarized quark and antiquark distribution functions constrained by polarized deep-inelastic scattering measurements. PMID:21405460

  2. Nuclear Polarization of H{sub 2} Molecules formed from Polarized Atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Wise, T.; Balewski, J.T.; Daehnick, W.W.; Doskow, J.; Friesel, D.; Haeberli, W.; Kolster,H.; Lorentz, B.; Meyer, H.O.; Pancella, P.V.; Pollock, R.E.; Przewoski, B.v.; Quin, P.A.; Rathmann, F.; Rinckel, T.; Saha, Swapan K.; Schwartz, B.; Wellinghausen, A.

    2000-12-31

    A planned experiment to measure the nuclear polarization of H{sub 2} molecules formed by recombination of polarized H atoms is described. Polarization will be measured with a longitudinally polarized 200-MeV proton beam and a longitudinally polarized storage cell gas target at the IUCF cooler ring.

  3. Complete next-to-leading-order study on the yield and polarization of Υ(1S,2S,3S) at the Tevatron and LHC.

    PubMed

    Gong, Bin; Wan, Lu-Ping; Wang, Jian-Xiong; Zhang, Hong-Fei

    2014-01-24

    Based on the nonrelativistic QCD factorization scheme, we present the first complete next-to-leading-order study on the yield and polarization of Υ(1S,2S,3S) hadroproduction. By using the color-octet long-distance matrix elements obtained from fits of the experimental measurements on Υ yield and polarization at the Tevatron and LHC, our results can explain the measurements on the yield very well, and for the polarizations of Υ(1S,2S,3S), they are in (good, good, bad) agreement with recent CMS measurement, but still have some distance from the CDF measurement.

  4. Rich eight-branch spectrum of the oblique propagating longitudinal waves in partially spin-polarized electron-positron-ion plasmas.

    PubMed

    Andreev, Pavel A; Iqbal, Z

    2016-03-01

    We consider the separate spin evolution of electrons and positrons in electron-positron and electron-positron-ion plasmas. We consider the oblique propagating longitudinal waves in these systems. Working in a regime of high-density n(0) ∼ 10(27) cm(-3) and high-magnetic-field B(0)=10(10) G, we report the presence of the spin-electron acoustic waves and their dispersion dependencies. In electron-positron plasmas, similarly to the electron-ion plasmas, we find one spin-electron acoustic wave (SEAW) at the propagation parallel or perpendicular to the external field and two spin-electron acoustic waves at the oblique propagation. At the parallel or perpendicular propagation of the longitudinal waves in electron-positron-ion plasmas, we find four branches: the Langmuir wave, the positron-acoustic wave, and a pair of waves having spin nature, they are the SEAW and the wave discovered in this paper, called the spin-electron-positron acoustic wave (SEPAW). At the oblique propagation we find eight longitudinal waves: the Langmuir wave, the Trivelpiece--Gould wave, a pair of positron-acoustic waves, a pair of SEAWs, and a pair of SEPAWs. Thus, for the first time, we report the existence of the second positron-acoustic wave existing at the oblique propagation and the existence of SEPAWs.

  5. Polarization phenomena in quantum chromodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1994-03-01

    The author discusses a number of interrelated hadronic spin effects which test fundamental features of perturbative and non-perturbative QCD. For example, the anomalous magnetic moment of the proton and the axial coupling g{sub A} on the nucleon are shown to be related to each other for fixed proton radius, independent of the form of the underlying three-quark relativistic quark wavefunction. The renormalization scale and scheme ambiguities for the radiative corrections to the Bjorken sum rule for the polarized structure functions can be eliminated by using commensurate scale relations with other observables. Other examples include (a) new constraints on the shape and normalization of the polarized quark and gluon structure functions of the proton at large and small x{sub bj}; (b) consequences of the principle of hadron helicity retention in high x{sub F} inclusive reactions; (c) applications of hadron helicity conservation to high momentum transfer exclusive reactions; and (d) the dependence of nuclear structure functions and shadowing on virtual photon polarization. He also discusses the implications of a number of measurements which are in striking conflict with leading-twist perturbative QCD predictions, such as the extraordinarily large spin correlation A{sub NN} observed in large angle proton-proton scattering, the anomalously large {rho}{pi} branching ratio of the J/{psi}, and the rapidly changing polarization dependence of both J/{psi} and continuum lepton pair hadroproduction observed at large x{sub F}. The azimuthal angular dependence of the Drell-Yan process is shown to be highly sensitive to the projectile distribution amplitude, the fundamental valence light-cone wavefunction of the hadron.

  6. Transversely polarized source cladding for an optical fiber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egalon, Claudio Oliveira (Inventor); Rogowski, Robert S. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    An optical fiber comprising a fiber core having a longitudinal symmetry axis is provided. An active cladding surrounds a portion of the fiber core and comprises light-producing sources which emit light in response to chemical or light excitation. The cladding sources are oriented transversely with respect to the longitudinal axis of the fiber core. This polarization results in a superior power efficiency compared to active cladding sources that are randomly polarized or longitudinally polarized parallel with the longitudinal symmetry axis.

  7. Polarization at the SLC

    SciTech Connect

    Moffeit, K.C.

    1988-10-01

    The Stanford Linear collider was designed to accommodate polarized electron beams. Longitudinally polarized electrons colliding with unpolarized positrons at a center of mass energy near the Z/sup 0/ mass can be used as novel and sensitive probes of the electroweak process. A gallium arsenide based photon emission source will provide a beam of longitudinally polarized electrons of about 45 percent polarization. A system of bend magnets and a superconducting solenoid will be used to rotate the spins so that the polarization is preserved while the 1.21 GeV electrons are stored in the damping ring. Another set of bend magnets and two superconducting solenoids orient the spin vectors so that longitudinal polarization of the electrons is achieved at the collision point with the unpolarized positrons. A system to monitor the polarization based on Moller and Compton scattering will be used. Nearly all major components have been fabricated and tested. Subsystems of the source and polarimeters have been installed, and studies are in progress. The installation and commissioning of the entire system will take place during available machine shutdown periods as the commissioning of SLC progresses. 8 refs., 16 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Polarization at the SLC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moffeit, Kenneth C.

    1989-05-01

    The Stanford Linear Collider was designed to accommodate polarized electron beams. Longitudinally polarized electrons colliding with unpolarized positrons at a center of mass energy near the Z0 mass can be used as novel and sensitive probes of the electroweak process. A gallium arsenide based photon emission source will provide a beam of longitudinally polarized electrons of about 45 percent polarization. A system of bend magnets and a superconducting solenoid will be used to rotate the spins so that the polarization is preserved while the 1.21 GeV electrons are stored in the damping ring. Another set of bend magnets and two superconducting solenoids orient the spin vectors so that longitudinal polarization of the electrons is achieved at the collision point with the unpolarized positrons. A system to monitor the polarization based on Mo/ller and Compton scattering will be used. Nearly all major components have been fabricated and tested. Subsystems of the source and polarimeters have been installed, and studies are in progress. The installation and commissioning of the entire system will take place during available machine shutdown periods as the commissioning of SLC progresses.

  9. Gluon polarization in the proton: Constraints at low x from the measurement of the double longitudinal spin asymmetry for forward-rapidity hadrons with the PHENIX detector at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKinney, Cameron Palmer

    In the 1980s, polarized deep inelastic lepton-nucleon scattering experiments revealed that only about a third of the proton's spin of ½ h is carried by the quarks and antiquarks, leaving physicists with the puzzle of how to account for the remaining spin. As gluons carry roughly 50% of the proton's momentum, it seemed most logical to look to the gluon spin as another significant contributor. However, lepton-nucleon scattering experiments only access the gluon helicity distribution, Delta g, through effects on the quark distributions via scaling violations. Constraining Deltag through scaling violations requires experiments that together cover a large range of Q 2. Such experiments had been carried out with unpolarized beams, leaving g(x) (the unpolarized gluon distribution) relatively well-known, but the polarized experiments have only thus far provided weak constraints on Deltag in a limited momentum fraction range. With the commissioning in 2000 of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, the first polarized proton-proton (pp) collider, and the first polarized pp running in 2002, the gluon distributions could be accessed directly by studying quark-gluon and gluon-gluon interactions. In 2009, data from measurements of double longitudinal spin asymmetries, ALL, at the STAR and PHENIX experiments through 2006 were included in a QCD global analysis performed by Daniel de Florian, Rodolfo Sassot, Marco Stratmann, and Werner Vogelsang (DSSV), yielding the first direct constraints on the gluon helicity. The DSSV group found that the contribution of the gluon spin to the proton spin was consistent with zero, but the data provided by PHENIX and STAR was all at mid-rapidity, meaning Delta g was constrained by data only a range in x from 0.05 to 0.2, leaving out helicity contributions from the huge number of low- x gluons. A more recent analysis by DSSV from 2014 including RHIC data through 2009 for the first time points to significant gluon polarization at intermediate

  10. Polarization for prompt J/ψ and ψ(2s) production at the Tevatron and LHC.

    PubMed

    Gong, Bin; Wan, Lu-Ping; Wang, Jian-Xiong; Zhang, Hong-Fei

    2013-01-25

    With nonrelativistic QCD factorization, we present the first complete next-to-leading order study on the polarization of prompt J/ψ hadroproduction by including feeddown from χ(c)((3)P(J)(1),(3)S(1)(8)) and ψ(2s) which turn out to be very important parts. By using the color-octet long-distance matrix elements obtained from a combined fit of the measurements at the Tevatron and LHC for J/ψ, ψ(2s) and χ(c), the prompt J/ψ polarization predictions are presented, and the results are in agreement with the CDF run I data (except two points), but in conflict with the CDF run II data, while they are close to the ALICE data (inclusive J/ψ). The measurements at the LHC are expected to clarify the situation.

  11. Polarization for Prompt J/ψ and ψ(2s) Production at the Tevatron and LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Bin; Wan, Lu-Ping; Wang, Jian-Xiong; Zhang, Hong-Fei

    2013-01-01

    With nonrelativistic QCD factorization, we present the first complete next-to-leading order study on the polarization of prompt J/ψ hadroproduction by including feeddown from χc(PJ13,S183) and ψ(2s) which turn out to be very important parts. By using the color-octet long-distance matrix elements obtained from a combined fit of the measurements at the Tevatron and LHC for J/ψ, ψ(2s) and χc, the prompt J/ψ polarization predictions are presented, and the results are in agreement with the CDF run I data (except two points), but in conflict with the CDF run II data, while they are close to the ALICE data (inclusive J/ψ). The measurements at the LHC are expected to clarify the situation.

  12. GUIDE FOR POLARIZED NEUTRONS

    DOEpatents

    Sailor, V.L.; Aichroth, R.W.

    1962-12-01

    The plane of polarization of a beam of polarized neutrons is changed by this invention, and the plane can be flipped back and forth quicitly in two directions in a trouble-free manner. The invention comprises a guide having a plurality of oppositely directed magnets forming a gap for the neutron beam and the gaps are spaced longitudinally in a spiral along the beam at small stepped angles. When it is desired to flip the plane of polarization the magnets are suitably rotated to change the direction of the spiral of the gaps. (AEC)

  13. Polarized proton beams in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Zelenski, A.

    2010-10-04

    The polarized beam for RHIC is produced in the optically-pumped polarized H{sup -} ion source and then accelerated in Linac to 200 MeV for strip-injection to Booster and further accelerated 24.3 GeV in AGS for injection in RHIC. In 2009 Run polarized protons was successfully accelerated to 250 GeV beam energy. The beam polarization of about 60% at 100 GeV beam energy and 36-42% at 250 GeV beam energy was measured with the H-jet and p-Carbon CNI polarimeters. The gluon contribution to the proton spin was studied in collisions of longitudinally polarized proton beams at 100 x 100 GeV. At 250 x 250 GeV an intermediate boson W production with the longitudinally polarized beams was studied for the first time.

  14. POLARIZED PROTON COLLISIONS AT RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    BAI, M.; AHRENS, L.; ALEKSEEV, I.G.; ALESSI, J.; ET AL.

    2005-05-16

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider provides not only collisions of ions but also collisions of polarized protons. In a circular accelerator, the polarization of polarized proton beam can be partially or fully lost when a spin depolarizing resonance is encountered. To preserve the beam polarization during acceleration, two full Siberian snakes were employed in RHIC. In 2002, polarized proton beams were first accelerated to 100 GeV and collided in RHIC. Beams were brought into collisions with longitudinal polarization at the experiments STAR and PHENIX by using spin rotators. Optimizing polarization transmission efficiency and improving luminosity performance are significant challenges. Currently, the luminosity lifetime in RHIC is limited by the beam-beam effect. The current state of RHIC polarized proton program, including its dedicated physics run in 2005 and efforts to optimize luminosity production in beam-beam limited conditions are reported.

  15. J/ψ polarization at the Tevatron and the LHC: nonrelativistic-QCD factorization at the crossroads.

    PubMed

    Butenschoen, Mathias; Kniehl, Bernd A

    2012-04-27

    We study the polarization observables of J/ψ hadroproduction at next-to-leading order within the factorization formalism of nonrelativistic quantum chromodynamics. We complete the present knowledge of the relativistic corrections by also providing the contribution due to the intermediate (3)P(J)([8]) color-octet states at this order, which turns out to be quite significant. Exploiting the color-octet long-distance matrix elements previously extracted through a global fit to experimental data of unpolarized J/ψ production, we provide theoretical predictions in the helicity and Collins-Soper frames and compare them with data taken by CDF at Fermilab Tevatron I and II and by ALICE at CERN LHC. The notorious CDF J/ψ polarization anomaly familiar from leading-order analyses persists at the quantum level, while the situation looks promising for the LHC, which is bound to bring final clarification.

  16. Measurement of the neutron magnetic form factor from inclusive quasielastic scattering of polarized electrons from polarized [sup 3]He

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, H.; Arrington, J.; Beise, E.J.; Bray, B.; Carr, R.W.; Filippone, B.W.; Lung, A.; McKeown, R.D.; Mueller, B.; Pitt, M.L. ); Jones, C.E. ); DeSchepper, D.; Dodson, G.; Dow, K.; Ent, R.; Farkhondeh, M.; Hansen, J.; Korsch, W.; Kramer, L.H.; Lee, K.; Makins, N.; Milner, R.G.; Tieger, D.R.; Welch, T.P. ); Candell, E.; Napolitano, J.; Wojtsekhowski, B.B.; Tripp, C. ); Lorenzon, W. )

    1994-08-01

    We report a measurement of the asymmetry in spin-dependent quasielastic scattering of longitudinally polarized electrons from a polarized [sup 3]He target. The neutron magnetic form factor [ital G][sup [ital n

  17. RHIC Polarized proton operation

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, H.; Ahrens, L.; Alekseev, I.G.; Aschenauer, E.; Atoian, G.; Bai, M.; Bazilevsky, A.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J.M.; Brown, K.A.; Bruno, D.; Connolly, R.; Dion, A.; D'Ottavio, T.; Drees, K.A.; Fischer, W.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J.W.; Gu, X.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Hoff, L.; Hulsart, R.L.; Laster, J.; Liu, C.; Luo, Y.; MacKay, W.W.; Makdisi, Y.; Marr, G.J.; Marusic, A.; Meot, F.; Mernick, K.; Michnoff, R,; Minty, M.; Montag, C.; Morris, J.; Nemesure, S.; Poblaguev, A.; Ptitsyn, V.; Ranjibar, V.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Roser, T.; J.; Severino, F.; Schmidke, B.; Schoefer, V.; Severino, F.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, K.; Steski, D.; Svirida, D.; Tepikian, S.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J. Wang, G.; Wilinski, M.; Yip, K.; Zaltsman, A.; Zelenski, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

    2011-03-28

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) operation as the polarized proton collider presents unique challenges since both luminosity(L) and spin polarization(P) are important. With longitudinally polarized beams at the experiments, the figure of merit is LP{sup 4}. A lot of upgrades and modifications have been made since last polarized proton operation. A 9 MHz rf system is installed to improve longitudinal match at injection and to increase luminosity. The beam dump was upgraded to increase bunch intensity. A vertical survey of RHIC was performed before the run to get better magnet alignment. The orbit control is also improved this year. Additional efforts are put in to improve source polarization and AGS polarization transfer efficiency. To preserve polarization on the ramp, a new working point is chosen such that the vertical tune is near a third order resonance. The overview of the changes and the operation results are presented in this paper. Siberian snakes are essential tools to preserve polarization when accelerating polarized beams to higher energy. At the same time, the higher order resonances still can cause polarization loss. As seen in RHIC, the betatron tune has to be carefully set and maintained on the ramp and during the store to avoid polarization loss. In addition, the orbit control is also critical to preserve polarization. The higher polarization during this run comes from several improvements over last run. First we have a much better orbit on the ramp. The orbit feedback brings down the vertical rms orbit error to 0.1mm, much better than the 0.5mm last run. With correct BPM offset and vertical realignment, this rms orbit error is indeed small. Second, the jump quads in the AGS improved input polarization for RHIC. Third, the vertical tune was pushed further away from 7/10 snake resonance. The tune feedback maintained the tune at the desired value through the ramp. To calibrate the analyzing power of RHIC polarimeters at any energy above

  18. PEPPo: Using a Polarized Electron Beam to Produce Polarized Positrons

    SciTech Connect

    Adeyemi, Adeleke H.

    2015-09-01

    Polarized positron beams have been identified as either an essential or a significant ingredient for the experimental program of both the present and next generation of lepton accelerators (JLab, Super KEK B, ILC, CLIC). An experiment demonstrating a new method for producing polarized positrons has been performed at the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility at Jefferson Lab. The PEPPo (Polarized Electrons for Polarized Positrons) concept relies on the production of polarized e⁻/e⁺ pairs from the bremsstrahlung radiation of a longitudinally polarized electron beam interacting within a high-Z conversion target. PEPPo demonstrated the effective transfer of spin-polarization of an 8.2 MeV/c polarized (P~85%) electron beam to positrons produced in varying thickness tungsten production targets, and collected and measured in the range of 3.1 to 6.2 MeV/c. In comparison to other methods this technique reveals a new pathway for producing either high-energy or thermal polarized positron beams using a relatively low polarized electron beam energy (~10MeV) .This presentation will describe the PEPPo concept, the motivations of the experiment and high positron polarization achieved.

  19. Recoil-Proton Polarization in High-Energy Deuteron Photodisintegration with Circularly Polarized Photons

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, X.; Benmokhtar, F.; Glashauser, C.; McCormick, K.; Ransome, R. D.; Arrington, J.; Holt, R. J.; Reimer, P. E.; Schulte, E. C.; Wijesooriya, K.; Camsonne, A.

    2007-05-04

    We measured the angular dependence of the three recoil-proton polarization components in two-body photodisintegration of the deuteron at a photon energy of 2 GeV. These new data provide a benchmark for calculations based on quantum chromodynamics. Two of the five existing models have made predictions of polarization observables. Both explain the longitudinal polarization transfer satisfactorily. Transverse polarizations are not well described, but suggest isovector dominance.

  20. Recoil-Proton Polarization in High-Energy Deuteron Photodisintegration with Circularly Polarized Photons

    SciTech Connect

    X. Jiang; J. Arrington; F. Benmokhtar; A. Camsonne; J. P. Chen; S. Choi; E. Chudakov; F. Cusanno; A. Deur; D. Dutta; F. Garibaldi; D. Gaskell; O. Gayou; R. Gilman; C. Glashauser; D. Hamilton; O. Hansen; D. W. Higinbotham; R. J. Holt; C. W. de Jager; M. K. Jones; L. J. Kaufman; E. R. Kinney; K. Kramer; L. Lagamba; R. de Leo; J. Lerose; D. Lhuillier; R. Lindgren; N. Liyanage; K. McCormick; Z.-E. Meziani; R. Michaels; B. Moffit; P. Monaghan; S. Nanda; K. D. Paschke; C. F. Perdrisat; V. Punjabi; I. A. Qattan; R. D. Ransome; P. E. Reimer; B. Reitz; A. Saha; E. C. Schulte; R. Sheyor; K. Slifer; P. Solvignon; V. Sulkosky; G. M. Urciuoli; E. Voutier; K. Wang; K. Wijesooriya; B. Wojtsekhowski; and L. Zhu

    2007-05-01

    We measured the angular dependence of the three recoil-proton polarization components in two-body photodisintegration of the deuteron at a photon energy of 2 GeV. These new data provide a benchmark for calculations based on quantum chromodynamics. Two of the five existing models have made predictions of polarization observables. Both explain the longitudinal polarization transfer satisfactorily. Transverse polarizations are not well described, but suggest isovector dominance.

  1. Ion polarization in the MEIC figure-8 ion collider ring

    SciTech Connect

    V.S. Morozov, Ya.S. Derbenev, Y. Zhang, P. Chevtsov, A.M. Kondratenko, M.A. Kondratenko, Yu.N. Filatov

    2012-07-01

    The nuclear physics program envisaged at the Medium-energy Electron-Ion Collider (MEIC) currently being developed at the Jefferson Lab calls for collisions of 3-11 GeV/c longitudinally polarized electrons and 20-100 GeV/c, in equivalent proton momentum, longitudinally/ transversely polarized protons/ deuterons/ light ions. We present a scheme that provides the required ion polarization arrangement in the MEIC's ion collider ring.

  2. Baryon Spectroscopy with Polarization Observables from CLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strauch, Steffen

    2016-06-01

    The spectrum of nucleon excitations is dominated by broad and overlapping resonances. Polarization observables in photoproduction reactions are key in the study of these excitations. They give indispensable constraints to partial-wave analyses and help clarify the spectrum. A series of polarized photoproduction experiments have been performed at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility with the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer. These measurements include data with linearly and circularly polarized tagged-photon beams, longitudinally and transversely polarized proton and deuterium targets, and recoil polarizations through the observation of the weak decay of hyperons. An overview of these studies and recent results will be given.

  3. Baryon Spectroscopy with Polarization Observables from CLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strauch, Steffen

    2016-10-01

    The spectrum of nucleon excitations is dominated by broad and overlapping resonances. Polarization observables in photoproduction reactions are key in the study of these excitations. They give indispensable constraints to partial-wave analyses and help clarify the spectrum. A series of polarized photoproduction experiments have been performed at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility with the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer. These measurements include data with linearly and circularly polarized tagged-photon beams, longitudinally and transversely polarized proton and deuterium targets, and recoil polarizations through the observation of the weak decay of hyperons. An overview of these studies and recent results will be given.

  4. LAMBDA Polarization with a Transversely Polarized Proton Target at the COMPASS Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Negrini, Teresa

    2009-08-04

    The transverse polarization of LAMBDA and LAMBDA-bar hyperons is investigated at the COMPASS experiment at CERN. In 2007 a 160 GeV/c longitudinally polarized muon beam and a transversely polarized NH{sub 3} target were employed to study events in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering. Preliminary results for the LAMBDA and LAMBDA-bar polarizations extracted from this new data set are presented as a function of x{sub Bj} and z. The polarizations of LAMBDA and LAMBDA-bar are compatible with zero within their error bars and no dependence on x{sub Bj} or z is observed.

  5. Polarization developments

    SciTech Connect

    Prescott, C.Y.

    1993-07-01

    Recent developments in laser-driven photoemission sources of polarized electrons have made prospects for highly polarized electron beams in a future linear collider very promising. This talk discusses the experiences with the SLC polarized electron source, the recent progress with research into gallium arsenide and strained gallium arsenide as a photocathode material, and the suitability of these cathode materials for a future linear collider based on the parameters of the several linear collider designs that exist.

  6. Measurement of transverse {lambda} and {lambda}-bar polarization at COMPASS

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrero, A.

    2007-06-13

    New data on hyperon polarization in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering have been collected by the COMPASS collaboration at CERN during the years 2002-2004, using a beam of longitudinally polarized muons of 160 GeV/c and a 6LiD target that can be polarized both longitudinally and transversely. The various combinations of beam and target polarizations allow for the study of a wide variety of hyperon polarization effects. Here we present preliminary results on the transverse polarization of {lambda} and {lambda}-bar produced both with unpolarized and transversely polarized deuteron targets.

  7. Neuronal polarization.

    PubMed

    Takano, Tetsuya; Xu, Chundi; Funahashi, Yasuhiro; Namba, Takashi; Kaibuchi, Kozo

    2015-06-15

    Neurons are highly polarized cells with structurally and functionally distinct processes called axons and dendrites. This polarization underlies the directional flow of information in the central nervous system, so the establishment and maintenance of neuronal polarization is crucial for correct development and function. Great progress in our understanding of how neurons establish their polarity has been made through the use of cultured hippocampal neurons, while recent technological advances have enabled in vivo analysis of axon specification and elongation. This short review and accompanying poster highlight recent advances in this fascinating field, with an emphasis on the signaling mechanisms underlying axon and dendrite specification in vitro and in vivo.

  8. Polar Bear

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Amstrup, S.D.; ,; Lentfer, J.W.

    1988-01-01

    Polar bears are long-lived, late-maturing carnivores that have relatively low rates of reproduction and natural mortality. Their populations are susceptible to disturbance from human activities, such as the exploration and development of mineral resources or hunting. Polar bear populations have been an important renewable resource available to coastal communities throughout the Arctic for thousands of years.

  9. Semicircular Rashba arc spin polarizer

    SciTech Connect

    Bin Siu, Zhuo; Jalil, Mansoor B. A.; Ghee Tan, Seng

    2014-05-07

    In this work, we study the generation of spin polarized currents using curved arcs of finite widths, in which the Rashba spin orbit interaction (RSOI) is present. Compared to the 1-dimensional RSOI arcs with zero widths studied previously, the finite width presents charge carriers with another degree of freedom along the transverse width of the arc, in addition to the longitudinal degree of freedom along the circumference of the arc. The asymmetry in the transverse direction due to the difference in the inner and outer radii of the arc breaks the antisymmetry of the longitudinal spin z current in a straight RSOI segment. This property can be exploited to generate spin z polarized current output from the RSOI arc by a spin unpolarized current input. The sign of the spin current can be manipulated by varying the arc dimensions.

  10. Polarized rainbow.

    PubMed

    Können, G P; de Boer, J H

    1979-06-15

    The Airy theory of the rainbow is extended to polarized light. For both polarization directions a simple analytic expression is obtained for the intensity distribution as a function of the scattering angle in terms of the Airy function and its derivative. This approach is valid at least down to droplet diameters of 0.3 mm in visible light. The degree of polarization of the rainbow is less than expected from geometrical optics; it increases with droplet size. For a droplet diameter >1 mm the locations of the supernumerary rainbows are equal for both polarization directions, but for a diameter <1 mm the supernumerary rainbows of the weaker polarization component are located between those in the strong component. PMID:20212586

  11. Determination of the linear polarization of the Hall-B tagged photon beam at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    A.A. Sabintsev, K. Livingston

    2011-10-01

    The JLab CLAS g9a/FROST experiments are double polarization measurements that have accumulated photo-production data using linearly polarized, tagged photons incident on a longitudinally polarized, frozen spin butanol target. The analysis of the resulting coherent peaks was used to determine the photon polarization, which is in agreement with phenomenological calculations.

  12. Determination of the Linear Polarization of the Hall-B Tagged Photon Beam at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Sabintsev, A. A.; Livingston, K.

    2011-10-24

    The JLab CLAS g9a/FROST experiments are double polarization measurements that have accumulated photo-production data using linearly polarized, tagged photons incident on a longitudinally polarized, frozen spin butanol target. The analysis of the resulting coherent peaks was used to determine the photon polarization, which is in agreement with phenomenological calculations.

  13. Polarization methods for diode laser excitation of solid state lasers

    DOEpatents

    Holtom, Gary R.

    2008-11-25

    A mode-locked laser employs a coupled-polarization scheme for efficient longitudinal pumping by reshaped laser diode bars. One or more dielectric polarizers are configured to reflect a pumping wavelength having a first polarization and to reflect a lasing wavelength having a second polarization. A Yb-doped gain medium can be used that absorbs light having a first polarization and emits light having a second polarization. Using such pumping with laser cavity dispersion control, pulse durations of less than 100 fs can be achieved.

  14. Polarizing cues.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Stephen P

    2012-01-01

    People categorize themselves and others, creating ingroup and outgroup distinctions. In American politics, parties constitute the in- and outgroups, and party leaders hold sway in articulating party positions. A party leader's endorsement of a policy can be persuasive, inducing co-partisans to take the same position. In contrast, a party leader's endorsement may polarize opinion, inducing out-party identifiers to take a contrary position. Using survey experiments from the 2008 presidential election, I examine whether in- and out-party candidate cues—John McCain and Barack Obama—affected partisan opinion. The results indicate that in-party leader cues do not persuade but that out-party leader cues polarize. This finding holds in an experiment featuring President Bush in which his endorsement did not persuade Republicans but it polarized Democrats. Lastly, I compare the effect of party leader cues to party label cues. The results suggest that politicians, not parties, function as polarizing cues. PMID:22400143

  15. Longitudinal impedance of RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J. M.; Mernick, K.

    2015-05-03

    The longitudinal impedance of the two RHIC rings has been measured using the effect of potential well distortion on longitudinal Schottky measurements. For the blue RHIC ring Im(Z/n) = 1.5±0.2Ω. For the yellow ring Im(Z/n) = 5.4±1Ω.

  16. Longitudinal Multistage Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pohl, Steffi

    2013-01-01

    This article introduces longitudinal multistage testing (lMST), a special form of multistage testing (MST), as a method for adaptive testing in longitudinal large-scale studies. In lMST designs, test forms of different difficulty levels are used, whereas the values on a pretest determine the routing to these test forms. Since lMST allows for…

  17. Polarization Considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waluschka, Eugene

    1998-01-01

    As light passes through a optical system the reflections and refractions will in general change the polarization state of the light. If we assume that all of the materials in the thin film coatings and substrate are isotropic and homogeneous then calculating the amount of "instrumental" polarization is a relatively straight forward task. In the following sections we will present a of the steps required to perform a 'polarization ray trace' calculation for a single ray and monochromatic and hence polarized light. The thin film portion of the calculation is also shown. The reason for explicitly showing the thin film equations is that there are sign conventions imposed on the boundary value equations by the orientation and handedness of the various coordinate frames which are attached to the geometric rays. The attenuation of light through a optical system, is relatively simple, and requires at the very least a lens (average) reflectivity or transmissivity. Determining the polarization sensitivity of a optical system is still relatively straight forward requiring at least a knowledge of the behavior of the "s" and "p" components at each interface for the chief ray. Determining the thin film induced aberrations of a optical system are somewhat more demanding. Questions about the arithmetic sign of the phase factors and how this relates to the overall "OPD" of a ray are ubiquitous. Many rays are required to construct a wavefront. Thin film codes which modify the OPD's of rays are a requirement for this last mentioned computation. This requires a consistent scheme of coordinate frames and sign conventions and is probably the most demanding task of a polarization ray trace. Only the electric field will used in the discussion. This is not a restriction as the Stokes parameters are functions of the electric field. The following does not attempt to explain, but only to present all of the required concepts and formulas.

  18. Numerical calculation of the ion polarization in MEIC

    SciTech Connect

    Derbenev, Yaroslav; Lin, Fanglei; Morozov, Vasiliy; Zhang, Yuhong; Kondratenko, Anatoliy M.; Kondratenko, M. A.; Filatov, Yury N.

    2015-09-01

    Ion polarization in the Medium-energy Electron-Ion Collider (MEIC) is controlled by means of universal 3D spin rotators designed on the basis of "weak" solenoids. We use numerical calculations to demonstrate that the 3D rotators have negligible effect on the orbital properties of the ring. We present calculations of the polarization dynamics along the collider's orbit for both longitudinal and transverse polarization directions at a beam interaction point. We calculate the degree of depolarization due to the longitudinal and transverse beam emittances in case when the zero-integer spin resonance is compensated.

  19. Longitudinal Magnification Drawing Mistake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabal, Héctor; Cap, Nelly; Trivi, Marcelo

    2004-01-01

    Lateral magnification in image formation by positive lenses, mirrors, and dioptrics is usually appropriately developed in most optics textbooks.1-9 However, the image of a three-dimensional object occupies a three-dimensional region of space. The optical system affects both the transverse and the longitudinal dimensions of the object and, in general, does it in different ways. The magnification in the direction of the optical axis (the longitudinal magnification) is seldom treated. In several texts, the concept of longitudinal magnification is not even considered. Symmetrical objects (such as arrows) are used and their images appear laterally inverted. It is not shown how a longitudinally nonsymmetric object is imaged. One of the few books where this subject is well treated is in the textbook by Hecht.10 We have repeatedly verified in our classes that there is some confusion related to this subject. Students tend to believe that the image is longitudinally symmetric with respect to the lens optic center. Some prestigious texts commit the same mistake. In addition, a very nice optics book,11 a catalogue of optical hardware,12 a worldwide scientific magazine,13 a paper in an optics journal,14 and a Spanish encyclopedia,15 for example, have also been found to contain this error in drawing the image of a three-dimensional object formed by a positive lens. In this paper we suggest that the teaching of longitudinal magnification should be done with some care and we include a figure showing a properly drawn image.

  20. Propagation features of beams with axially symmetric polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesterov, A. V.; Niziev, V. G.

    2001-04-01

    The general solution of the wave equation for axially symmetric polarized (ASP) beams consists of two independent solutions: an azimuthally polarized beam and a beam with longitudinal and radial field components. The maximum of the longitudinal field is at the beam axis where the transverse component is equal to zero. While the longitudinal component is maximum in the waist it does not contribute to beam divergence here, and therefore the wavefront of ASP-beams is flat in the focal plane. The ASP-beams are free from polarization aberrations, which are inherent for linearly polarized beams passing through a lens with large annular apertures, and these beams are prospective for experiments on obtaining `diffraction-free' beams. The formulae and their electromagnetic field analysis in the case of sharp focusing of ASP-beams in the Debye approximation are presented.

  1. Longitudinal variations of the equatorial electojet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shume, Esayas

    We have utilized a three dimensional electrostatic potential model to explain the longitudinal variations of the equatorial electrojet. The model runs were constrained by net H component magnetic field measurements from three equatorial stations, namely, Huancayo (Peru) 12.05 S, 284.67 E; Addis Ababa (Ethiopia) 9.8 N, 38.8 E; Tirunelveli (India) 8.42 N, 77.48 E. The model runs were done in an iterative fashion until the computed and measured H component magnetic field values come into a close agreement. The physical mechanisms for the longitudinal variations of the equatorial electrojet were inferred by comparing and contrasting the resulting computed vertical polarization electric field (which drives the equatorial electrojet), and zonal current density profiles for the three stations mentioned above.

  2. Cell polarity

    PubMed Central

    Romereim, Sarah M

    2011-01-01

    Despite extensive genetic analysis of the dynamic multi-phase process that transforms a small population of lateral plate mesoderm into the mature limb skeleton, the mechanisms by which signaling pathways regulate cellular behaviors to generate morphogenetic forces are not known. Recently, a series of papers have offered the intriguing possibility that regulated cell polarity fine-tunes the morphogenetic process via orienting cell axes, division planes and cell movements. Wnt5a-mediated non-canonical signaling, which may include planar cell polarity, has emerged as a common thread in the otherwise distinct signaling networks that regulate morphogenesis in each phase of limb development. These findings position the limb as a key model to elucidate how global tissue patterning pathways direct local differences in cell behavior that, in turn, generate growth and form. PMID:22064549

  3. Polar Diving

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    3 July 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows layers exposed by erosion in a trough within the north polar residual cap of Mars, diving beneath a younger covering of polar materials. The layers have, since the Mariner 9 mission in 1972, been interpreted to be composed of a combination of dust and ice in unknown proportions. In this scene, a layer of solid carbon dioxide, which was deposited during the previous autumn and winter, blankets the trough as well as the adjacent terrain. Throughout northern spring, the carbon dioxide will be removed; by summer, the layers will be frost-free.

    Location near: 81.4oN, 352.2oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Northern Spring

  4. Polar Summer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    30 December 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows eroding mesas of frozen carbon dioxide in the martian south polar residual cap. During the summer season, the scarps that bound each pit and mesa in the south polar region become dark as carbon dioxide sublimes away. The darkening might result from the roughening of the surfaces from which ice is subliming, or from the concentration of trace amounts of dust on these slopes, or both.

    Location near: 84.7oS, 48.2oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Summer

  5. Observation of B{sub s}{sup 0{yields}}D{sub s}*{sup -{pi}+} and B{sub s}{sup 0{yields}}D{sub s}{sup (*)-{rho}+} and Measurement of the B{sub s}{sup 0{yields}}D{sub s}*{sup -{rho}+} Longitudinal Polarization Fraction

    SciTech Connect

    Louvot, R.; Schneider, O.; Bay, A.; Vervink, K.; Aushev, T.; Arinstein, K.; Bondar, A.; Eidelman, S.; Poluektov, A.; Shebalin, V.; Zyukova, O.; Bakich, A. M.; McOnie, S.; Varvell, K. E.; Yabsley, B. D.; Balagura, V.; Danilov, M.; Pakhlov, P.; Pakhlova, G.; Barberio, E.

    2010-06-11

    First observations of the B{sub s}{sup 0{yields}}D{sub s}*{sup -{pi}+}, B{sub s}{sup 0{yields}}D{sub s}{sup -{rho}+} and B{sub s}{sup 0{yields}}D{sub s}*{sup -{rho}+} decays are reported together with measurements of their branching fractions: B(B{sub s}{sup 0{yields}}D{sub s}*{sup -{pi}+})=[2.4{sub -0.4}{sup +0.5}(stat){+-}0.3(syst){+-} 0.4(f{sub s})]x10{sup -3}, B(B{sub s}{sup 0{yields}}D{sub s}{sup -{rho}+})=[8.5{sub -1.2}{sup +1.3}(stat){+-}1.1(syst){+-}1.3(f{sub s})]x10{sup -3} and B(B{sub s}{sup 0{yields}}D{sub s}*{sup -{rho}+})=[11.9{sub -2.0}{sup +2.2}(stat){+-}1.7(syst){+-}1.8(f{sub s})]x10{sup -3} (f{sub s}=N{sub B{sub s}{sup (*)}B{sub s}{sup (*)}/N{sub bb}}). From helicity-angle distributions, we measured the longitudinal polarization fraction in B{sub s}{sup 0{yields}}D{sub s}*{sup -{rho}+} decays to be f{sub L}(B{sub s}{sup 0{yields}}D{sub s}*{sup -{rho}+})=1.05{sub -0.10}{sup +0.08}(stat){sub -0.04}{sup +0.03}(syst). These results are based on a 23.6 fb{sup -1} data sample collected at the {Upsilon}(5S) resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB e{sup +}e{sup -} collider.

  6. Heavy Quarkonium Production and Polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Zhong-Bo; Qiu, Jian-Wei; Sterman, George

    2012-03-01

    We present a perturbative QCD factorization formalism for the production of heavy quarkonia of large transverse momentum pT at collider energies, which includes both the leading-power (LP) and next-to-leading-power (NLP) contributions to the cross section in the mQ2/pT2 expansion for heavy quark mass mQ. We estimate fragmentation functions in the nonrelativistic QCD formalism and reproduce the bulk of the large enhancement found in explicit next-to-leading-order calculations in the color-singlet model. Heavy quarkonia produced from NLP channels prefer longitudinal polarization.

  7. Polar Landforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    10 August 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows eroded remnants of carbon dioxide ice in the south polar residual cap of Mars. The scarps that outline each small mesa have retreated about 3 meters (10 feet) per Mars year since MGS began orbiting the red planet in 1997.

    Location near: 87.0oS, 31.9oW Image width: width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Spring

  8. Polar Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    12 August 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a slope upon which are exposed some of the layered materials that underlie the south polar cap of Mars. The layers are generally considered to be sediments--perhaps dust--that may have been cemented by water ice.

    Location near: 84.1oS, 343.9oW Image width: width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Spring

  9. Polar Markings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA02155 Polar Markings

    These bright and dark markings occurred near the end of summer in the south polar region. The dark material is likely dust that has been freed of frost cover.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -76.3N, Longitude 84.9E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  10. Polar Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA02153 Polar Layers

    This image of the south polar region shows layered material. It is not known if the layers are formed yearly or if they form over the period of 10s to 100s of years or more.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -80.3N, Longitude 296.2E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  11. Polar Ridges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA03662 Polar Ridges

    This ridge system is located in the south polar region.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -81.7N, Longitude 296.5E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  12. Polar Textures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA03638 Polar Textures

    This image illustrates the variety of textures that appear in the south polar region during late summer.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 80.5S, Longitude 57.9E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  13. Polar ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, S.; Grose, W. L.; Jones, R. L.; Mccormick, M. P.; Molina, Mario J.; Oneill, A.; Poole, L. R.; Shine, K. P.; Plumb, R. A.; Pope, V.

    1990-01-01

    The observation and interpretation of a large, unexpected ozone depletion over Antarctica has changed the international scientific view of stratospheric chemistry. The observations which show the veracity, seasonal nature, and vertical structure of the Antarctic ozone hole are presented. Evidence for Arctic and midlatitude ozone loss is also discussed. The chemical theory for Antarctic ozone depletion centers around the occurrence of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) in Antarctic winter and spring; the climatology and radiative properties of these clouds are presented. Lab studies of the physical properties of PSCs and the chemical processes that subsequently influence ozone depletion are discussed. Observations and interpretation of the chemical composition of the Antarctic stratosphere are described. It is shown that the observed, greatly enhanced abundances of chlorine monoxide in the lower stratosphere are sufficient to explain much if not all of the ozone decrease. The dynamic meteorology of both polar regions is given, interannual and interhemispheric variations in dynamical processes are outlined, and their likely roles in ozone loss are discussed.

  14. Polar Terrains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA03577 Polar Terrains

    The region surrounding the South Polar Cap contains many different terrain types. This image shows both etched terrain and a region of 'mounds'.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 75S, Longitude 286.5E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  15. Longitudinal discharge laser electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Warner, B.E.; Miller, J.L.; Ault, E.R.

    1994-08-23

    The improved longitudinal discharge laser electrode with IR baffle includes an electrode made up of washers spaced along the laser axis in order to form inter-washer spaces for hollow cathode discharge to take place and for IR radiation to be trapped. Additional IR baffles can be placed between the electrode ann the window. 2 figs.

  16. Longitudinal discharge laser baffles

    DOEpatents

    Warner, B.E.; Ault, E.R.

    1994-06-07

    The IR baffles placed between the window and the electrode of a longitudinal discharge laser improve laser performance by intercepting off-axis IR radiation from the laser and in doing so reduce window heating and subsequent optical distortion of the laser beam. 1 fig.

  17. Longitudinal discharge laser baffles

    DOEpatents

    Warner, Bruce E.; Ault, Earl R.

    1994-01-01

    The IR baffles placed between the window and the electrode of a longitudinal discharge laser improve laser performance by intercepting off-axis IR radiation from the laser and in doing so reduce window heating and subsequent optical distortion of the laser beam.

  18. Longitudinal discharge laser electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Warner, Bruce E.; Miller, John L.; Ault, Earl R.

    1994-01-01

    The improved longitudinal discharge laser electrode with IR baffle includes an electrode made up of washers spaced along the laser axis in order to form inter-washer spaces for hollow cathode discharge to take place and for IR radiation to be trapped. Additional IR baffles can be placed between the electrode ann the window.

  19. LONGITUDINAL SOLUTIONS IN RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    BLASKIEWICZ,M.BRENNAN,J.M.FISCHER,W.CAMERON,P.WEI,J.LUQUE,A.SCHAMEL,H.

    2003-05-12

    Stable, coherent, longitudinal oscillations have been observed in the RHIC accelerator. Within the context of perturbation theory, the beam parameters and machine impedance suggest these oscillations should be Landau damped. When nonlinear effects are included, long lived, stable oscillations become possible for low intensity beams. Simulations and theory are compared with data.

  20. Polar Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA03581 Polar Layers

    This image shows just one example of the bright and dark markings that appear during summer time. The marks are related to the polar layers. If you happen to see a wild-eyed guy sticking his tongue out at you, you'll know why this image qualifies for the old 'art' category of THEMIS releases.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 80.6S, Longitude 34.1E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  1. Nucleon Spin Structure: Longitudinal and Transverse

    SciTech Connect

    Jian-Ping Chen

    2011-02-01

    Inclusive Deep-Inelastic Scattering (DIS) experiments have provided us with the most extensive information on the unpolarized and longitudinal polarized parton (quark and gluon) distributions in the nucleon. It has becoming clear that transverse spin and transverse momentum dependent distributions (TMDs) study are crucial for a more complete understanding of the nucleon structure and the dynamics of the strong interaction. The transverse spin structure and the TMDs are the subject of increasingly intense theoretical and experimental study recently. With a high luminosity electron beam facility, JLab has played a major role in the worldwide effort to study both the longitudinal and transverse spin structure. Highlights of recent results will be presented. With 12-GeV energy upgrade, JLab will provide the most precise measurements in the valence quark region to close a chapter in longitudinal spin study. JLab will also perform a multi-dimensional mapping of the transverse spin structure and TMDs in the valence quark region through Semi-Inclusive DIS (SIDIS) experiments, providing a 3-d partonic picture of the nucleon in momentum space and extracting the u and d quark tensor charges of the nucleon. The precision mapping of TMDs will also allow a detailed study of the quark orbital motion and its dynamics.

  2. Proton Form Factor Measurements Using Polarization Method: Beyond Born Approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Pentchev, Lubomir

    2008-10-13

    Significant theoretical and experimental efforts have been made over the past 7 years aiming to explain the discrepancy between the proton form factor ratio data obtained at JLab using the polarization method and the previous Rosenbluth measurements. Preliminary results from the first high precision polarization experiment dedicated to study effects beyond Born approximation will be presented. The ratio of the transferred polarization components and, separately, the longitudinal polarization in ep elastic scattering have been measured at a fixed Q{sup 2} of 2.5 GeV{sup 2} over a wide kinematic range. The two quantities impose constraints on the real part of the ep elastic amplitudes.

  3. Experimental Demonstration of Longitudinal Magnification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Razpet, Nada; Susman, Katarina; Cepic, Mojca

    2009-01-01

    We describe an experiment which enables the observation of longitudinal magnification for the real image of a three-dimensional (3D) object formed by a converging lens. The experiment also shows the absence of longitudinal inversion. Possible reasons for misconceptions with respect to real images and longitudinal inversions are discussed and a…

  4. Recoil-proton polarization in high-energy deuteron photodisintegration with circularly plarized photons.

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, X.; Arrington, J.; Benmokhtar, F.; Camsonne, A.; Chen, J. P.; Holt, R. J.; Qattan, I. A.; Reimer, P. E.; Schulte, E. C.; Wijesooriya, K.; Physics; Rutgers Univ.; Univ. Blaise Pascal; Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

    2007-05-01

    We measured the angular dependence of the three recoil-proton polarization components in two-body photodisintegration of the deuteron at a photon energy of 2 GeV. These new data provide a benchmark for calculations based on quantum chromodynamics. Two of the five existing models have made predictions of polarization observables. Both explain the longitudinal polarization transfer satisfactorily. Transverse polarizations are not well described, but suggest isovector dominance.

  5. Angular dependence of recoil proton polarization in high-energy \\gamma d \\to p n

    SciTech Connect

    X. Jiang; J. Arrington; F. Benmokhtar; A. Camsonne; J.P. Chen; S. Choi; E. Chudakov; F. Cusanno; A. Deur; D. Dutta; F. Garibaldi; D. Gaskell; O. Gayou; R. Gilman; C. Glashauser; D. Hamilton; O. Hansen; D.W. Higinbotham; R.J. Holt; C.W. de Jager; M.K. Jones; L.J. Kaufman; E.R. Kinney; K. Kramer; L. Lagamba; R. de Leo; J. Lerose; D. Lhuillier; R. Lindgren; N. Liyanage; K. McCormick; Z.-E. Meziani; R. Michaels; B. Moffit; P. Monaghan; S. Nanda; K.D. Paschke; C.F. Perdrisat; V. Punjabi; I.A. Qattan; R.D. Ransome; P.E. Reimer; B. Reitz; A. Saha; E.C. Schulte; R. Sheyor; K. Slifer; P. Solvignon; V. Sulkosky; G.M. Urciuoli; E. Voutier; K. Wang; K. Wijesooriya; B. Wojtsekhowski; L. Zhu

    2007-02-26

    We measured the angular dependence of the three recoil proton polarization components in two-body photodisintegration of the deuteron at a photon energy of 2 GeV. These new data provide a benchmark for calculations based on quantum chromodynamics. Two of the five existing models have made predictions of polarization observables. Both explain the longitudinal polarization transfer satisfactorily.. Transverse polarizations are not well described, but suggest isovector dominance.

  6. Muon cooling: longitudinal compression.

    PubMed

    Bao, Yu; Antognini, Aldo; Bertl, Wilhelm; Hildebrandt, Malte; Khaw, Kim Siang; Kirch, Klaus; Papa, Angela; Petitjean, Claude; Piegsa, Florian M; Ritt, Stefan; Sedlak, Kamil; Stoykov, Alexey; Taqqu, David

    2014-06-01

    A 10  MeV/c positive muon beam was stopped in helium gas of a few mbar in a magnetic field of 5 T. The muon "swarm" has been efficiently compressed from a length of 16 cm down to a few mm along the magnetic field axis (longitudinal compression) using electrostatic fields. The simulation reproduces the low energy interactions of slow muons in helium gas. Phase space compression occurs on the order of microseconds, compatible with the muon lifetime of 2  μs. This paves the way for the preparation of a high-quality low-energy muon beam, with an increase in phase space density relative to a standard surface muon beam of 10^{7}. The achievable phase space compression by using only the longitudinal stage presented here is of the order of 10^{4}.

  7. Muon Cooling: Longitudinal Compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Yu; Antognini, Aldo; Bertl, Wilhelm; Hildebrandt, Malte; Khaw, Kim Siang; Kirch, Klaus; Papa, Angela; Petitjean, Claude; Piegsa, Florian M.; Ritt, Stefan; Sedlak, Kamil; Stoykov, Alexey; Taqqu, David

    2014-06-01

    A 10 MeV/c positive muon beam was stopped in helium gas of a few mbar in a magnetic field of 5 T. The muon "swarm" has been efficiently compressed from a length of 16 cm down to a few mm along the magnetic field axis (longitudinal compression) using electrostatic fields. The simulation reproduces the low energy interactions of slow muons in helium gas. Phase space compression occurs on the order of microseconds, compatible with the muon lifetime of 2 μs. This paves the way for the preparation of a high-quality low-energy muon beam, with an increase in phase space density relative to a standard surface muon beam of 107. The achievable phase space compression by using only the longitudinal stage presented here is of the order of 104.

  8. Cross-polarized excitons in carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Kilina, Svetlana; Tretiak, Sergei; Doorn, Stephen K; Luo, Zhengtang; Papadimitrakopoulos, Fotios; Piryatinski, Andrei; Saxena, Avadh; Bishop, Alan R

    2008-05-13

    Polarization of low-lying excitonic bands in finite-size semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) is studied by using quantum-chemical methodologies. Our calculations elucidate properties of cross-polarized excitons, which lead to the transverse optical absorption of nanotubes and presumably couple to intermediate-frequency modes recently observed in resonance Raman excitation spectroscopy. We identify up to 12 distinct excitonic transitions below the second fundamental band associated with the E(22) van Hove singularity. Calculations for several chiral SWNTs distinguish the optically active "bright" excitonic band polarized parallel to the tube axis and several optically "weak" cross-polarized excitons. The rest are optically (near) forbidden "dark" transitions. An analysis of the transition density matrices related to excitonic bands provides detailed information about delocalization of excitonic wavefunction along the tube. Utilization of the natural helical coordinate system accounting for the tube chirality allows one to disentangle longitudinal and circumferential components. The distribution of the transition density matrix along a tube axis is similar for all excitons. However, four parallel-polarized excitons associated with the E(11) transition are more localized along the circumference of a tube, compared with others related to the E(12) and E(21) cross-polarized transitions. Calculated splitting between optically active parallel- and cross-polarized transitions increases with tube diameter, which compares well with experimental spectroscopic data. PMID:18463293

  9. Cross-polarized excitons in carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Kilina, Svetlana; Tretiak, Sergei; Doorn, Stephen K.; Luo, Zhengtang; Papadimitrakopoulos, Fotios; Piryatinski, Andrei; Saxena, Avadh; Bishop, Alan R.

    2008-01-01

    Polarization of low-lying excitonic bands in finite-size semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) is studied by using quantum-chemical methodologies. Our calculations elucidate properties of cross-polarized excitons, which lead to the transverse optical absorption of nanotubes and presumably couple to intermediate-frequency modes recently observed in resonance Raman excitation spectroscopy. We identify up to 12 distinct excitonic transitions below the second fundamental band associated with the E22 van Hove singularity. Calculations for several chiral SWNTs distinguish the optically active “bright” excitonic band polarized parallel to the tube axis and several optically “weak” cross-polarized excitons. The rest are optically (near) forbidden “dark” transitions. An analysis of the transition density matrices related to excitonic bands provides detailed information about delocalization of excitonic wavefunction along the tube. Utilization of the natural helical coordinate system accounting for the tube chirality allows one to disentangle longitudinal and circumferential components. The distribution of the transition density matrix along a tube axis is similar for all excitons. However, four parallel-polarized excitons associated with the E11 transition are more localized along the circumference of a tube, compared with others related to the E12 and E21 cross-polarized transitions. Calculated splitting between optically active parallel- and cross-polarized transitions increases with tube diameter, which compares well with experimental spectroscopic data. PMID:18463293

  10. Optical transmission through a polarization preserving single mode optical fiber at two Ar(+) laser wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tedjojuwono, Ken K.; Hunter, William W., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    The transmission characteristics of two Ar(+) laser wavelengths through a twenty meter Panda type Polarization Preserving Single Mode Optical Fiber (PPSMOF) were measured. The measurements were done with both single and multi-longitudinal mode radiation. In the single longitudinal mode case, a degrading Stimulated Brillouin Scattering (SBS) is observed as a backward scattering loss. By choosing an optimum coupling system and manipulating the input polarization, the threshold of the SBS onset can be raised and the transmission efficiency can be increased.

  11. Internal spin structure of the proton from high energy polarized e-p scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, V.W.; Baum, G.; Bergstroem, M.R.

    1981-02-01

    A review is given of experimental knowledge of the spin dependent structure functions of the proton, which is based on inclusive high energy scattering of longitudinal polarized electrons by longitudinally polarized protons in both the deep inelastic and resonance regions, and includes preliminary results from our most recent SLAC experiment. Implications for scaling, sum rules, models of proton structure, and the hyperfine structure interval in hydrogen are given. Possible future directions of research are indicated.

  12. Polarized internal target apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Holt, Roy J.

    1986-01-01

    A polarized internal target apparatus with a polarized gas target of improved polarization and density achieved by mixing target gas atoms with a small amount of alkali metal gas atoms, and passing a high intensity polarized light source into the mixture to cause the alkali metal gas atoms to become polarized which interact in spin exchange collisions with target gas atoms yielding polarized target gas atoms.

  13. Polarized internal target apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Holt, R.J.

    1984-10-10

    A polarized internal target apparatus with a polarized gas target of improved polarization and density (achieved by mixing target gas atoms with a small amount of alkali metal gas atoms, and passing a high intensity polarized light source into the mixture to cause the alkali metal gas atoms to become polarized which interact in spin exchange collisions with target gas atoms yielding polarized target gas atoms) is described.

  14. Perceiving polarization with the naked eye: characterization of human polarization sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Temple, Shelby E; McGregor, Juliette E; Miles, Camilla; Graham, Laura; Miller, Josie; Buck, Jordan; Scott-Samuel, Nicholas E; Roberts, Nicholas W

    2015-07-22

    Like many animals, humans are sensitive to the polarization of light. We can detect the angle of polarization using an entoptic phenomenon called Haidinger's brushes, which is mediated by dichroic carotenoids in the macula lutea. While previous studies have characterized the spectral sensitivity of Haidinger's brushes, other aspects remain unexplored. We developed a novel methodology for presenting gratings in polarization-only contrast at varying degrees of polarization in order to measure the lower limits of human polarized light detection. Participants were, on average, able to perform the task down to a threshold of 56%, with some able to go as low as 23%. This makes humans the most sensitive vertebrate tested to date. Additionally, we quantified a nonlinear relationship between presented and perceived polarization angle when an observer is presented with a rotatable polarized light field. This result confirms a previous theoretical prediction of how uniaxial corneal birefringence impacts the perception of Haidinger's brushes. The rotational dynamics of Haidinger's brushes were then used to calculate corneal retardance.We suggest that psychophysical experiments, based upon the perception of polarized light, are amenable to the production of affordable technologies for self-assessment and longitudinal monitoring of visual dysfunctions such as age-related macular degeneration.

  15. Perceiving polarization with the naked eye: characterization of human polarization sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Temple, Shelby E; McGregor, Juliette E; Miles, Camilla; Graham, Laura; Miller, Josie; Buck, Jordan; Scott-Samuel, Nicholas E; Roberts, Nicholas W

    2015-07-22

    Like many animals, humans are sensitive to the polarization of light. We can detect the angle of polarization using an entoptic phenomenon called Haidinger's brushes, which is mediated by dichroic carotenoids in the macula lutea. While previous studies have characterized the spectral sensitivity of Haidinger's brushes, other aspects remain unexplored. We developed a novel methodology for presenting gratings in polarization-only contrast at varying degrees of polarization in order to measure the lower limits of human polarized light detection. Participants were, on average, able to perform the task down to a threshold of 56%, with some able to go as low as 23%. This makes humans the most sensitive vertebrate tested to date. Additionally, we quantified a nonlinear relationship between presented and perceived polarization angle when an observer is presented with a rotatable polarized light field. This result confirms a previous theoretical prediction of how uniaxial corneal birefringence impacts the perception of Haidinger's brushes. The rotational dynamics of Haidinger's brushes were then used to calculate corneal retardance.We suggest that psychophysical experiments, based upon the perception of polarized light, are amenable to the production of affordable technologies for self-assessment and longitudinal monitoring of visual dysfunctions such as age-related macular degeneration. PMID:26136441

  16. Perceiving polarization with the naked eye: characterization of human polarization sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Temple, Shelby E.; McGregor, Juliette E.; Miles, Camilla; Graham, Laura; Miller, Josie; Buck, Jordan; Scott-Samuel, Nicholas E.; Roberts, Nicholas W.

    2015-01-01

    Like many animals, humans are sensitive to the polarization of light. We can detect the angle of polarization using an entoptic phenomenon called Haidinger's brushes, which is mediated by dichroic carotenoids in the macula lutea. While previous studies have characterized the spectral sensitivity of Haidinger's brushes, other aspects remain unexplored. We developed a novel methodology for presenting gratings in polarization-only contrast at varying degrees of polarization in order to measure the lower limits of human polarized light detection. Participants were, on average, able to perform the task down to a threshold of 56%, with some able to go as low as 23%. This makes humans the most sensitive vertebrate tested to date. Additionally, we quantified a nonlinear relationship between presented and perceived polarization angle when an observer is presented with a rotatable polarized light field. This result confirms a previous theoretical prediction of how uniaxial corneal birefringence impacts the perception of Haidinger's brushes. The rotational dynamics of Haidinger's brushes were then used to calculate corneal retardance. We suggest that psychophysical experiments, based upon the perception of polarized light, are amenable to the production of affordable technologies for self-assessment and longitudinal monitoring of visual dysfunctions such as age-related macular degeneration. PMID:26136441

  17. Polar Color

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 3 May 2004 This nighttime visible color image was collected on January 1, 2003 during the Northern Summer season near the North Polar Troughs.

    This daytime visible color image was collected on September 4, 2002 during the Northern Spring season in Vastitas Borealis. The THEMIS VIS camera is capable of capturing color images of the martian surface using its five different color filters. In this mode of operation, the spatial resolution and coverage of the image must be reduced to accommodate the additional data volume produced from the use of multiple filters. To make a color image, three of the five filter images (each in grayscale) are selected. Each is contrast enhanced and then converted to a red, green, or blue intensity image. These three images are then combined to produce a full color, single image. Because the THEMIS color filters don't span the full range of colors seen by the human eye, a color THEMIS image does not represent true color. Also, because each single-filter image is contrast enhanced before inclusion in the three-color image, the apparent color variation of the scene is exaggerated. Nevertheless, the color variation that does appear is representative of some change in color, however subtle, in the actual scene. Note that the long edges of THEMIS color images typically contain color artifacts that do not represent surface variation.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 79, Longitude 346 East (14 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with

  18. Cup waveguide antenna with integrated polarizer and OMT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acosta, Roberto J. (Inventor); Kory, Carol (Inventor); Lambert, Kevin M. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A cup waveguide antenna with integrated polarizer and OMT for simultaneously communicating left and right hand circularly polarized electromagnetic waves is adjustable to obtain efficient propagation and reception of electromagnetic waves. The antenna includes a circular waveguide having an orthomode transducer utilizing first and second pins longitudinally spaced apart and oriented orthogonally with respect to each other. Six radially-oriented adjustable polarizer screws extend from the exterior to the interior of the waveguide. A septum intermediate the first and second pins is aligned with the first pin. Adjustment of the polarizer screws enables maximized propagation of and/or response to left hand circularly polarized electromagnetic waves by the first pin while simultaneously enabling maximized propagation of and/or response to right hand circularly polarized electromagnetic waves by the second pin.

  19. Modeling nonstationary longitudinal data.

    PubMed

    Núñez-Antón, V; Zimmerman, D L

    2000-09-01

    An important theme of longitudinal data analysis in the past two decades has been the development and use of explicit parametric models for the data's variance-covariance structure. A variety of these models have been proposed, of which most are second-order stationary. A few are flexible enough to accommodate nonstationarity, i.e., nonconstant variances and/or correlations that are not a function solely of elapsed time between measurements. We review five nonstationary models that we regard as most useful: (1) the unstructured covariance model, (2) unstructured antedependence models, (3) structured antedependence models, (4) autoregressive integrated moving average and similar models, and (5) random coefficients models. We evaluate the relative strengths and limitations of each model, emphasizing when it is inappropriate or unlikely to be useful. We present three examples to illustrate the fitting and comparison of the models and to demonstrate that nonstationary longitudinal data can be modeled effectively and, in some cases, quite parsimoniously. In these examples, the antedependence models generally prove to be superior and the random coefficients models prove to be inferior. We conclude that antedependence models should be given much greater consideration than they have historically received.

  20. Faraday polarization fluctuations of satellite beacon signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, M. C.; Klobuchar, J. A.

    1988-01-01

    The anisotropic effects of random density irregularities in causing Faraday polarization fluctuations of VHF radio signals are examined, taking both rod-like and sheet-like irregularities into consideration. It is found that the variance of Faraday polarization fluctuations depends on the ratio of perpendicular to parallel correlation lengths. The anisotropic effect of rod-like ionospheric irregularities are shown to be most appreciable for longitudinal propagation. The anisotropic effect of sheet-like ionospheric irregularities, however, is not strongly dependent on the radio propagation angle. During transionospheric propagation at large angles with respect to the geomagnetic field, sheet-like irregularities may cause greater Faraday polarization fluctuations than rod-like irregularities.

  1. Focal spot analysis of radially polarized femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Wenchao; Hu, Wenhua; Qi, Junli; Wang, Weiming; Liao, Jiali; Yi, Wenjun; Jia, Hui; Li, Xiujian

    2014-09-01

    When radially polarized light beams focus through high numerical-aperture lens, there will be a very strong longitudinal component of the light field near the focus. And, under the condition of certain system parameters, they can shape a spot which is over the focusing spot of the diffraction limit, which are the superiorities that linearly polarized light and circularly polarized light do not have. Besides, what we have found in the experiment is that radially polarized femtosecond laser pulses own the same superiorities, which provides the basis for using the focusing characteristics of radially polarized light beams under the condition of shorter and more powerful laser pulses. So far, although people have studied a lot on radially polarized light beams, this kind of light beams' focusing characters are rarely researched. What is worse, most research of its focusing characters still stays in the stage of theoretical simulation,and it seems that none of people have really studied it by the way of experiments. This article is precisely based on this. On the basis of predecessors' a lot of theoretical research, the article pays more attention on analyzing radially polarized light beams' focusing character through experiments. What's more, the article, based on femtosecond laser pulses, compares the differences of the focusing nature among linearly polarized light, circularly polarized light and radially polarized light. And it gets the conclusion that radially polarized femtosecond laser pulses have better focusing character in longitudinal light field, confirming the feasibility that radially polarized light beams can be used in the fields of pulling, catching, and accelerating particles, metal cutting and high-density storage.

  2. Linearly polarized fiber amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Kliner, Dahv A.; Koplow, Jeffery P.

    2004-11-30

    Optically pumped rare-earth-doped polarizing fibers exhibit significantly higher gain for one linear polarization state than for the orthogonal state. Such a fiber can be used to construct a single-polarization fiber laser, amplifier, or amplified-spontaneous-emission (ASE) source without the need for additional optical components to obtain stable, linearly polarized operation.

  3. Nondiffracting transversally polarized beam.

    PubMed

    Yuan, G H; Wei, S B; Yuan, X-C

    2011-09-01

    Generation of a nondiffracting transversally polarized beam by means of transmitting an azimuthally polarized beam through a multibelt spiral phase hologram and then highly focusing by a high-NA lens is presented. A relatively long depth of focus (∼4.84λ) of the electric field with only radial and azimuthal components is achieved. The polarization of the wavefront near the focal plane is analyzed in detail by calculating the Stokes polarization parameters. It is found that the polarization is spatially varying and entirely transversally polarized, and the polarization singularity disappears at the beam center, which makes the central bright channel possible. PMID:21886250

  4. Crossed elliptical polarization undulator

    SciTech Connect

    Sasaki, Shigemi

    1997-05-01

    The first switching of polarization direction is possible by installing two identical helical undulators in series in a same straight section in a storage ring. By setting each undulator in a circular polarization mode in opposite handedness, one can obtain linearly polarized radiation with any required polarization direction depending on the modulator setting between two undulators. This scheme can be used without any major degradation of polarization degree in any low energy low emittance storage ring.

  5. Polarization-balanced beamsplitter

    DOEpatents

    Decker, D.E.

    1998-02-17

    A beamsplitter assembly is disclosed that includes several beamsplitter cubes arranged to define a plurality of polarization-balanced light paths. Each polarization-balanced light path contains one or more balanced pairs of light paths, where each balanced pair of light paths includes either two transmission light paths with orthogonal polarization effects or two reflection light paths with orthogonal polarization effects. The orthogonal pairing of said transmission and reflection light paths cancels polarization effects otherwise caused by beamsplitting. 10 figs.

  6. Polarization-balanced beamsplitter

    DOEpatents

    Decker, Derek E.

    1998-01-01

    A beamsplitter assembly that includes several beamsplitter cubes arranged to define a plurality of polarization-balanced light paths. Each polarization-balanced light path contains one or more balanced pairs of light paths, where each balanced pair of light paths includes either two transmission light paths with orthogonal polarization effects or two reflection light paths with orthogonal polarization effects. The orthogonal pairing of said transmission and reflection light paths cancels polarization effects otherwise caused by beamsplitting.

  7. Longitudinal and transverse magnetic field program procedure and detailed specification for Sigma 5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, C. K.

    1980-01-01

    A computer program and procedure for plotting the contour of the data transferred from the Marshall Space Flight Center solar magnetography is presented. The plotted data then can be easily compared with solar data from other sources, such as the Solar Maximum Mission. From the data file for circular polarization the longitudinal program plots the contours for filtered longitudinal plot and intensity plot by choosing the positive and negative contour levels, intensity levels, and also X,Y plotting ranges which need to be used. In a similar manner the transverse program generates the transverse contour plot, azimuth plot, and intensity plot from the linear polarization data files.

  8. Longitudinal Stern-Gerlach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higinbotham, Douglas

    2006-11-01

    In 1922 Otto Stern and Walther Gerlach split a beam of silver atoms using a transverse gradient field. This experiment, which lead to the understanding that electrons have intrinsic spin, oddly enough does not work for free electrons due to the interplay between the Lorentz force and Heisenberg uncertainly principle. Recent calculations, Phys. Rev. Lett. 79 (1997) 4517 and Phys. Rev. Lett. 86 (2001) 4508, have shown that a dismissed idea of L. Brillouin from 1928 to use a longitudinal gradient field to minimize the effect of the Lorentz force may in fact be possible. The history of the Stern-Gerlach device will be presented along with the revived ideas for separating a beam of free electrons into its two spin states.

  9. Digital Longitudinal Tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimkus, Daniel Steven

    1985-12-01

    The purpose of this dissertation was to investigate the clinical utility of digital longitudinal tomosynthesis in radiology. By acquiring a finite group of digital images during a longitudinal tomographic exposure, and processing these images, tomographic planes, other than the fulcrum plane, can be reconstructed. This process is now termed "tomosynthesis". A prototype system utilizing this technique was developed. Both phantom and patient studies were done with this system. The phantom studies were evaluated by subjective, visual criterion and by quantitative analysis of edge sharpness and noise in the reconstructions. Two groups of patients and one volunteer were studied. The first patient group consisted of 8 patients undergoing intravenous urography (IVU). These patients had digital tomography and film tomography of the abdomen. The second patient group consisted of 4 patients with lung cancer admitted to the hospital for laser resection of endobronchial tumor. These patients had mediastinal digital tomograms to evaluate the trachea and mainstem bronchi. The knee of one volunteer was imaged by film tomography and digital tomography. The results of the phantom studies showed that the digital reconstructions accurately produced images of the desired planes. The edge sharpness of the reconstructions approached that of the acquired images. Adequate reconstructions were achieved with as few as 5 images acquired during the exposure, with the quality of the reconstructions improving as the number of images acquired increased. The IVU patients' digital studies had less contrast and spatial resolution than the film tomograms. The single renal lesion visible on the film tomograms was also visible in the digital images. The digital mediastinal studies were felt by several radiologists to be superior to a standard chest xray in evaluating the airways. The digital images of the volunteer's knee showed many of the same anatomic features as the film tomogram, but the digital

  10. Observation of Polarized Positrons from an Undulator-Based Source

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, G; Barley, J.; Batygin, Y.; Berridge, S.; Bharadwaj, V.; Bower, G.; Bugg, W.; Decker, F.-J.; Dollan, R.; Efremenko, Y.; Gharibyan, V.; Hast, C.; Iverson, R.; Kolanoski, H.; Kovermann, J.; Laihem, K.; Lohse, T.; McDonald, K.T.; Mikhailichenko, A.A.; Moortgat-Pick, G.A.; Pahl, P.; /Tel Aviv U. /Cornell U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC /Tennessee U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /DESY /Yerevan Phys. Inst. /Aachen, Tech. Hochsch. /DESY, Zeuthen /Princeton U. /Durham U. /Daresbury

    2008-03-06

    An experiment (E166) at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) has demonstrated a scheme in which a multi-GeV electron beam passed through a helical undulator to generate multi-MeV, circularly polarized photons which were then converted in a thin target to produce positrons (and electrons) with longitudinal polarization above 80% at 6 MeV. The results are in agreement with Geant4 simulations that include the dominant polarization-dependent interactions of electrons, positrons and photons in matter.

  11. Polarization Transfer in Proton Compton Scattering at High Momentum Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, D.J.; Annand, J.R.M.; Mamyan, V.H.; Aniol, K.A.; Margaziotis, D.J.; Bertin, P.Y.; Camsonne, A.; Laveissiere, G.; Bosted, P.; Paschke, K.; Calarco, J.R.; Chang, G.C.; Horn, T.; Savvinov, N.; Chang, T.-H.; Danagoulian, A.; Nathan, A.M.; Roedelbronn, M.; Chen, J.-P.

    2005-06-24

    Compton scattering from the proton was investigated at s=6.9 GeV{sup 2} and t=-4.0 GeV{sup 2} via polarization transfer from circularly polarized incident photons. The longitudinal and transverse components of the recoil proton polarization were measured. The results are in disagreement with a prediction of perturbative QCD based on a two-gluon exchange mechanism, but agree well with a prediction based on a reaction mechanism in which the photon interacts with a single quark carrying the spin of the proton.

  12. Anti-Hyperon polarization in high energy pp collisions withpolarized beams

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Ye; Liang, Zuo-tang; Sichtermann, Ernst; Xu, Qing-hua; Zhou, Shan-shan

    2007-11-20

    We study the longitudinal polarization of the {bar {Sigma}}{sup -}, {bar {Sigma}}{sup +}, {bar {Xi}}{sup 0} and {bar {Xi}}{sup +} anti-hyperons in polarized high energy pp collisions at large transverse momenta, extending a recent study for the {bar {Lambda}} antihyperon. We make predictions by using different parameterizations of the polarized parton densities and models for the polarized fragmentation functions. Similar to the {bar {Lambda}} polarization, the {bar {Xi}}{sup 0} and {bar {Xi}}{sup +} polarizations are found to be sensitive to the polarized anti-strange sea, {Delta}{bar s}(x), in the nucleon. The {bar {Sigma}}{sup -} and {bar {Sigma}}{sup +} polarizations show sensitivity to the light sea quark polarizations, {Delta}{bar u}(x) and {Delta}{bar d}(x), and their asymmetry.

  13. Generation of longitudinal vibrations in piano strings: From physics to sound synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bank, Balázs; Sujbert, László

    2005-04-01

    Longitudinal vibration of piano strings greatly contributes to the distinctive character of low piano notes. In this paper a simplified modal model is developed, which describes the generation of phantom partials and longitudinal free modes jointly. The model is based on the simplification that the coupling from the transverse vibration to the longitudinal polarization is unidirectional. The modal formulation makes it possible to predict the prominent components of longitudinal vibration as a function of transverse modal frequencies. This provides a qualitative insight into the generation of longitudinal vibration, while the model is still capable of explaining the empirical results of earlier works. The semi-quantitative agreement with measurement results implies that the main source of phantom partials is the transverse to longitudinal coupling, while the string termination and the longitudinal to transverse coupling have only small influence. The results suggest that the longitudinal component of the tone can be treated as a quasi-harmonic spectrum with formantlike peaks at the longitudinal modal frequencies. The model is further simplified and applied for the real-time synthesis of piano sound with convincing sonic results. .

  14. Generation of longitudinal vibrations in piano strings: from physics to sound synthesis.

    PubMed

    Bank, Balázs; Sujbert, László

    2005-04-01

    Longitudinal vibration of piano strings greatly contributes to the distinctive character of low piano notes. In this paper a simplified modal model is developed, which describes the generation of phantom partials and longitudinal free modes jointly. The model is based on the simplification that the coupling from the transverse vibration to the longitudinal polarization is unidirectional. The modal formulation makes it possible to predict the prominent components of longitudinal vibration as a function of transverse modal frequencies. This provides a qualitative insight into the generation of longitudinal vibration, while the model is still capable of explaining the empirical results of earlier works. The semi-quantitative agreement with measurement results implies that the main source of phantom partials is the transverse to longitudinal coupling, while the string termination and the longitudinal to transverse coupling have only small influence. The results suggest that the longitudinal component of the tone can be treated as a quasi-harmonic spectrum with formantlike peaks at the longitudinal modal frequencies. The model is further simplified and applied for the real-time synthesis of piano sound with convincing sonic results. PMID:15898667

  15. Linear Polarization Measurements of Chromospheric Emission Lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheeley, N. R., Jr.; Keller, C. U.

    2003-01-01

    We have used the Zurich Imaging Stokes Polarimeter (ZIMPOL I) with the McMath-Pierce 1.5 m main telescope on Kitt Peak to obtain linear polarization measurements of the off-limb chromosphere with a sensitivity better than 1 x 10(exp -5). We found that the off-disk observations require a combination of good seeing (to show the emission lines) and a clean heliostat (to avoid contamination by scattered light from the Sun's disk). When these conditions were met, we obtained the following principal results: 1. Sometimes self-reversed emission lines of neutral and singly ionized metals showed linear polarization caused by the transverse Zeeman effect or by instrumental cross talk from the longitudinal Zeeman effect in chromospheric magnetic fields. Otherwise, these lines tended to depolarize the scattered continuum radiation by amounts that ranged up to 0.2%. 2. Lines previously known to show scattering polarization just inside the limb (such as the Na I lambda5889 D2 and the He I lambda5876 D3 lines) showed even more polarization above the Sun's limb, with values approaching 0.7%. 3. The O I triplet at lambda7772, lambda7774, and lambda7775 showed a range of polarizations. The lambda7775 line, whose maximum intrinsic polarizability, P(sub max), is less than 1%, revealed mainly Zeeman contributions from chromospheric magnetic fields. However, the more sensitive lambda7772 (P(sub max) = 19%) and lambda7774 (P(sub max) = 29%) lines had relatively strong scattering polarizations of approximately 0.3% in addition to their Zeeman polarizations. At times of good seeing, the polarization spectra resolve into fine structures that seem to be chromospheric spicules.

  16. Large Spin-Valley Polarization in Monolayer MoTe2 on Top of EuO(111).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qingyun; Yang, Shengyuan A; Mi, Wenbo; Cheng, Yingchun; Schwingenschlögl, Udo

    2016-02-01

    The electronic properties of monolayer MoTe2 on top of EuO(111) are studied by first-principles calculations. Strong spin polarization is induced in MoTe2 , which results in a large valley polarization. In a longitudinal electric field this will result in a valley and spin-polarized charge Hall effect. The direction of the Hall current as well as the valley and spin polarizations can be tuned by an external magnetic field. PMID:26639918

  17. Polarized Electron Source Developments

    SciTech Connect

    Charles K. Sinclair

    1990-02-23

    Presently, only two methods of producing beams of polarized electrons for injection into linear accelerators are in use. Each of these methods uses optical pumping by circularly polarized light to produce electron polarization. In one case, electron polarization is established in metastable helium atoms, while in the other case, the polarized electrons are produced in the conduction band of appropriate semiconductors. The polarized electrons are liberated from the helium metastable by chemi-ionization, and from the semiconductors by lowering the work function at the surface of the material. Developments with each of these sources since the 1988 Spin Physics Conference are reviewed, and the prospects for further improvements discussed.

  18. Longitudinal coherence properties of light waves propagating through a birefringent fiber.

    PubMed

    Tsubokawa, M; Shibata, N; Higashi, T; Seikai, S

    1987-05-01

    Longitudinal coherence properties of the waves propagating through a birefringent fiber are investigated theoretically and experimentally. Significant loss due to the polarization-dispersion slope is observed clearly for the interference between the two orthogonally polarized HE(11) modes. The results obtained experimentally reflect the theoretical predictions well for both the modulus of the degree of coherence and its curve shape versus the optical path difference in the wavelength region from 816 to 1540 nm.

  19. Helical Dipole Magnets for Polarized Protons in RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syphers, M.; Courant, E.; Fischer, W.; Luccio, A.; Mariam, F.; Peggs, S.; Pilat, F.; Roser, T.; Tepikian, S.; Tsoupas, N.; Willen, E.; Katayama, T.; Hatanaka, K.; Kawaguchi, T.; Okamura, M.; Tominaka, T.; Wu, H.; Ptitsin, V.; Shatunov, Y.

    1997-05-01

    The Brookhaven Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) will be able to support experiments using polarized proton beams. Siberian Snakes are used to maintain polarization in this high energy superconducting collider. To make efficient use of available space while taking advantage of high field superconducting magnets, 4 Tesla helical dipole magnets will be used. These magnets generate a central dipole field in which the field direction rotates through 360^circ about the longitudinal axis over the length of the device. An arrangement of four such magnets can produce the desired change in the spin direction while keeping the proton orbit outside of the ``Snake'' unaltered. Similar magnet arrangements will be used to produce longitudinal polarization at the two major interaction points in RHIC. The basic requirements and layout of these magnets are described, as well as tolerances on field quality and integrated field strengths. First results of tests of prototype helical magnets will be discussed.

  20. Milliarcsecond polarization structure of the superluminal quasar 3C 273

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, David H.; Kollgaard, Ronald I.; Brown, Leslie F.; Gabuzda, Denise C.; Wardle, John F. C.

    1990-09-01

    A 2 x 10 marcsec-resolution determination is presented for the total intensity and linear polarization structures of the superluminal quasar 3C 273 at 5 GHz. Substantial polarized flux was detected from several superluminal components of the jet, whose fractional polarization increased symmetrically with distance from the core; the most distant component is highly polarized and exhibits a highly ordered magnetic field. Within a few marcsec of the core, the inferred magnetic field orientation varies rapidly with position along the jet. The primarily longitudinal magnetic field orientation is concluded to become established within 20 marcsec of the core. A highly disorganized magnetic field is the most plausible explanation for the low degree of polarization in the innermost regions of the jet.

  1. Undulator-Based Production of Polarized Photons

    SciTech Connect

    Professor Kirk McDonald

    2008-05-29

    "Project Title: Undulator-Based Production of Polarized Photons" DOE Contract Number: FG02-04ER41355 Principal Investigator: Prof. Kirk McDonald Period of Performance: 09/10/2004 thru 08/31/2006 This award was to fund Princeton's activity on SLAC experiment E166, "Undulator-Based Production of Polarized Positrons" which was performed at SLAC during June and September 2005. Princeton U. fabricated a magnetic spectrometer for this experiment, and participated in the commissioning, operation, and analysis of the experiment, for which Prof. McDonald was a co-spokesperson. The experiment demonstrated that an intense positron beam with 80% longitudinal polarization could be generated by conversion of MeVenergy circularly polarized photons in a thin target, which photons were generated by passage of high-energy electrons through a helical undulator. This technique has since been adopted as the baseline for the polarized positron source of the proposed International Linear Collider. Results of the experiment have been published in Physical Review Letters, vol 100, p 210801 (2008) [see attached .pdf file], and a longer paper is in preparation.

  2. A Translational Polarization Rotator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuss, David T.; Wollack, Edward J.; Pisano, Giampaolo; Ackiss, Sheridan; U-Yen, Kongpop; Ng, Ming wah

    2012-01-01

    We explore a free-space polarization modulator in which a variable phase introduction between right- and left-handed circular polarization components is used to rotate the linear polarization of the outgoing beam relative to that of the incoming beam. In this device, the polarization states are separated by a circular polarizer that consists of a quarter-wave plate in combination with a wire grid. A movable mirror is positioned behind and parallel to the circular polarizer. As the polarizer-mirror distance is separated, an incident liear polarization will be rotated through an angle that is proportional to the introduced phase delay. We demonstrate a prototype device that modulates Stokes Q and U over a 20% bandwidth.

  3. Polarization at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, M.

    1995-01-01

    A highly polarized electron beam is a key feature. for the Current physics program at SLAC. An electron beam polarization of 80% can now be routinely achieved for typically 5000 hours of machine operation per year. Two main Physics programs utilize the polarized beam. Fixed target experiments in End Station A study the collision of polarized electrons with polarized nuclear targets to elucidate the spin structure of the nucleon and to provide an important test of QCD. Using the SLAC Linear Collider, collisions of polarized electrons with unpolarized positrons allow precise measurements of parity violation in the Z-fermion couplings and provide a very precise measurement of tile weak mixing angle. This paper discusses polarized beam operation at SLAC, and gives an overview of the polarized physics program.

  4. Polarized Light Corridor Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, G. R.

    1990-01-01

    Eleven demonstrations of light polarization are presented. Each includes a brief description of the apparatus and the effect demonstrated. Illustrated are strain patterns, reflection, scattering, the Faraday Effect, interference, double refraction, the polarizing microscope, and optical activity. (CW)

  5. Graphing Polar Curves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawes, Jonathan F.

    2013-01-01

    Graphing polar curves typically involves a combination of three traditional techniques, all of which can be time-consuming and tedious. However, an alternative method--graphing the polar function on a rectangular plane--simplifies graphing, increases student understanding of the polar coordinate system, and reinforces graphing techniques learned…

  6. Polarity at Many Levels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flannery, Maura C.

    2004-01-01

    An attempt is made to find how polarity arises and is maintained, which is a central issue in development. It is a fundamental attribute of living things and cellular polarity is also important in the development of multicellular organisms and controversial new work indicates that polarization in mammals may occur much earlier than previously…

  7. Polarization feedback laser stabilization

    DOEpatents

    Esherick, Peter; Owyoung, Adelbert

    1988-01-01

    A system for locking two Nd:YAG laser oscillators includes an optical path for feeding the output of one laser into the other with different polarizations. Elliptical polarization is incorporated into the optical path so that the change in polarization that occurs when the frequencies coincide may be detected to provide a feedback signal to control one laser relative to the other.

  8. Bumblebees Learn Polarization Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Foster, James J.; Sharkey, Camilla R.; Gaworska, Alicia V.A.; Roberts, Nicholas W.; Whitney, Heather M.; Partridge, Julian C.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Foraging insect pollinators such as bees must find and identify flowers in a complex visual environment. Bees use skylight polarization patterns for navigation [1–3], a capacity mediated by the polarization-sensitive dorsal rim area (DRA) of their eye [4, 5]. While other insects use polarization sensitivity to identify appropriate habitats [6], oviposition sites, and food sources [7], to date no nonnavigational functions of polarization vision have been identified in bees. Here we investigated the ability of bumblebees (Bombus terrestris) to learn polarization patterns on artificial “flowers” in order to obtain a food reward. We show that foraging bumblebees can learn to discriminate between two differently polarized targets, but only when the target artificial “flower” is viewed from below. A context for these results is provided by polarization imaging of bee-pollinated flowers, revealing the potential for polarization patterns in real flowers. Bees may therefore have the ability to use polarization vision, possibly mediated by their polarization-sensitive DRA, both for navigation and to learn polarization patterns on flowers, the latter being the first nonnavigational function for bee polarization vision to be identified. PMID:24909321

  9. Calculation of polarization effects

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, A.W.

    1983-09-01

    Basically there are two areas of accelerator applications that involve beam polarization. One is the acceleration of a polarized beam (most likely a proton beam) in a synchrotron. Another concerns polarized beams in an electron storage ring. In both areas, numerical techniques have been very useful.

  10. Polar Ozone Workshop. Abstracts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aikin, Arthur C.

    1988-01-01

    Results of the proceedings of the Polar Ozone Workshop held in Snowmass, CO, on May 9 to 13, 1988 are given. Topics covered include ozone depletion, ozonometry, polar meteorology, polar stratospheric clouds, remote sensing of trace gases, atmospheric chemistry and dynamical simulations.

  11. Hybrid polarity SAR architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raney, R. Keith

    2009-05-01

    A space-based synthetic aperture radar (SAR) designed to provide quantitative information on a global scale implies severe requirements to maximize coverage and to sustain reliable operational calibration. These requirements are best served by the hybrid-polarity architecture, in which the radar transmits in circular polarization, and receives on two orthogonal linear polarizations, coherently, retaining their relative phase. This paper summarizes key attributes of hybrid-polarity dual- and quadrature-polarized SARs, reviews the associated advantages, formalizes conditions under which the signal-to-noise ratio is conserved, and describes the evolution of this architecture from first principles.

  12. Charm hadroproduction results from Fermilab E-400

    SciTech Connect

    Coteus, P.; Binkley, M.; Bossi, F.; Butler, J.; Cumalat, J.P.; DiCorato, M.; Diesburg, M.; Enagonio, J.; Filaseta, J.; Frabetti, P.L.

    1987-09-01

    Results are presented from Fermilab E-400 on the production of charmed baryons and mesons at a mean energy of 640 GeV. We show evidence for the charm-strange baryon, ..xi../sub c//sup +/, and present our measurements of its mass, width, lifetime, cross section and relative branching fractions, and the A, x/sub f/, p/sub t/, and particle/antiparticle dependence of the state. We show evidence for both the ..sigma../sub c//sup 2 +/ and ..sigma../sub c//sup 0/, and present measurements of three mass differences, ..sigma../sub c//sup 2 +/ - ..sigma../sub c//sup 0/, ..sigma../sub c//sup 0/ - ..lambda../sub c//sup +/, and ..sigma../sub c//sup 2 +/ - ..lambda../sub c//sup +/. Measurements of the A dependence and particle/antiparticle ratios for ..sigma../sub c/ production are also presented. We show preliminary results on the ratio of two decay modes of the D/sup 0/, D/sup 0/ ..-->.. K/sup +/K/sup -/ and D/sup 0/ ..-->.. K/sub 0/anti K/sub 0/. The latter mode has not been previously observed. 8 refs., 10 figs.

  13. Hadroproduction of heavy quarkonia at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Berezhnoy, A. V.; Likhoded, A. K.; Luchinsky, A. V. Poslavsky, S. V.

    2015-05-15

    The production of heavy quarkonia at the LHC is considered. It is shown that, in the case of the inclusive production of χ{sub cJ}P-wave charmonia, existing experimental data can be described upon taking into account next-to-leading corrections, a dominant contribution coming from color-singlet states. For the case of B{sub c}-meson production, it is shown that, at experimentally accessible values of the transverse momentum, power-law corrections to the cross section make a significant contribution, with the result that the cross-section ratio σ(B{sub c})/σ(B) develops a p{sub T} dependence not observed in the fragmentation regime. The case of double vector-charmonium production is also considered.

  14. Polarization in remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egan, Walter G.

    1992-12-01

    A review of the experimental and theoretical aspects of optical polarization is presented with definitions of the observed polarization characteristics and relationship to the Stokes parameters. A typical terrestrial soil polarization curve is characterized and related to the current theoretical knowledge. This polarization relationship is extended to cover planetary surfaces, such as the Moon, and Mars and terrestrial surfaces composed of farm areas and water surfaces. Instrumentation for imaging and non-imaging polarimetry are described including the use of focal plane arrays. Recent Space Shuttle polarimetric observations of the region around the Island of Hawaii and New Madrid, Missouri are described, as well as concurrent cloud and haze observations. Polarization is a sensitive indicator of cloud particle size distributions, soil texture, farm crops, sea state and atmospheric aerosols and haze. Cloud particle size distributions are uniquely characterized by polarization, and this cannot be achieved with photometry. An extensive bibliography of polarization in remote sensing is appended.

  15. Polarity inversion in polar-nonpolar-polar heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Cho, S; Youn, S J; Kim, Y; DiVenere, A; Wong, G K; Freeman, A J; Ketterson, J B

    2001-09-17

    We have observed an epilayer-thickness-dependent polarity inversion for the growth of CdTe on Sb(Bi)/CdTe(111)B. For films with Sb(Bi) thicknesses of less than 40 A (15 A), the CdTe layer shows a B (Te-terminated) face, but it switches to an A (Cd-terminated) face for thicker layers. On the other hand, a CdTe layer grown on Bi(Sb)/CdTe(111)A always shows the A face regardless of Sb or Bi layer thicknesses. In order to address the observations we have performed ab initio calculations, which suggest that the polarity of a polar material on a nonpolar one results from the binding energy difference between the two possible surface configurations.

  16. Polarization transfer in inelastic scattering and pionic models of the EMC effect

    SciTech Connect

    Carey, T.A.; Jones, K.W.; McClelland, J.B.; Moss, J.M.; Rees, L.B.; Tanaka, N.; Bacher, A.D.

    1985-01-01

    The aim of the experiment reported was to make a precise test of the enhanced pion field model in a medium-energy scattering experiment. The quantity probed is the spin-longitudinal response function, a measure of the nuclear pion density which is used explicitly in the pion-excess models of the EMC effect. The point of reference used is deuterium. The spin-dependent response functions for heavy targets and /sup 2/H are compared using identical experimental techniques. The technique of complete polarization transfer is used to separate the spin-longitudinal and spin-transverse response in the continuum. The experiment consisted of precise determinations of the polarization transfer coefficients for 500 MeV protons inelastically scattered from Pb, Ca, and /sup 2/H. The experiment utilized longitudinal, sideways, and normal polarized beams in conjunction with final polarization analysis from the focal-plane polarimeter of the high-resolution spectrometer. Quantities constructed from these data are the longitudinal and transverse spin-flip probabilities. Calculations were performed of the ratio of longitudinal to transverse response functions and of the EMC effect with the same model. No evidence was found for collectivity in the isovector spin-longitudinal response function. 10 refs. (LEW)

  17. Recent COMPASS results on the gluon polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Quintans, Catarina

    2009-03-23

    The spin structure of the nucleon is studied in the COMPASS experiment at CERN/SPS, from the collisions of 160 GeV polarized muon beam with a {sup 6}LiD target. The data collected from 2002 to 2006 provide an accurate measurement of longitudinal double spin cross-section asymmetries. The latest results on the gluon polarization, accessed from two independent analyses of photon-gluon fusion selected events, are presented. The study of the open-charm production allows to extract the gluon polarization (in LO QCD) from the measurement of the asymmetry, the value obtained being {delta}g/g -0.49{+-}0.27(stat){+-}0.11(syst), at an average x{sub g} 0.11{sub -0.05}{sup +0.11} and a scale <{mu}{sup 2}> = 13(GeV/c){sup 2}. An alternative and independent way to study the gluon polarization, by studying the high transverse momentum hadron pairs produced, leads to a value {delta}g/g 0.08{+-}0.10(stat){+-}0.05(syst), at x{sub g}{sup a{nu}} 0.082{sub -0.027}{sup +0.041} and <{mu}{sup 2}> = 3(GeV/c){sup 2}.

  18. [Review] Polarization and Polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trippe, Sascha

    2014-02-01

    Polarization is a basic property of light and is fundamentally linked to the internal geometry of a source of radiation. Polarimetry complements photometric, spectroscopic, and imaging analyses of sources of radiation and has made possible multiple astrophysical discoveries. In this article I review (i) the physical basics of polarization: electromagnetic waves, photons, and parameterizations; (ii) astrophysical sources of polarization: scattering, synchrotron radiation, active media, and the Zeeman, Goldreich-Kylafis, and Hanle effects, as well as interactions between polarization and matter (like birefringence, Faraday rotation, or the Chandrasekhar-Fermi effect); (iii) observational methodology: on-sky geometry, influence of atmosphere and instrumental polarization, polarization statistics, and observational techniques for radio, optical, and X/γ wavelengths; and (iv) science cases for astronomical polarimetry: solar and stellar physics, planetary system bodies, interstellar matter, astrobiology, astronomical masers, pulsars, galactic magnetic fields, gamma-ray bursts, active galactic nuclei, and cosmic microwave background radiation.

  19. Automatic Bayesian polarity determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pugh, D. J.; White, R. S.; Christie, P. A. F.

    2016-07-01

    The polarity of the first motion of a seismic signal from an earthquake is an important constraint in earthquake source inversion. Microseismic events often have low signal-to-noise ratios, which may lead to difficulties estimating the correct first-motion polarities of the arrivals. This paper describes a probabilistic approach to polarity picking that can be both automated and combined with manual picking. This approach includes a quantitative estimate of the uncertainty of the polarity, improving calculation of the polarity probability density function for source inversion. It is sufficiently fast to be incorporated into an automatic processing workflow. When used in source inversion, the results are consistent with those from manual observations. In some cases, they produce a clearer constraint on the range of high-probability source mechanisms, and are better constrained than source mechanisms determined using a uniform probability of an incorrect polarity pick.

  20. Longitudinal Double Spin Asymmetry in Inclusive Jet Production atSTAR

    SciTech Connect

    Kowalik, Katarzyna; STAR Collaboration

    2006-08-15

    This contribution reports on the first measurement of the longitudinal double-spin asymmetry A{sub LL} for the inclusive production of jets in polarized proton-proton collisions at {radical}s = 200 GeV. The data were collected with STAR at RHIC in the years 2003 and 2004, and correspond to a sampled integrated luminosity of 0.3 pb{sup -1} with beam polarizations up to 45%. The results on A{sub LL} cover jet transverse momenta 5 < p{sub T} < 17 GeV/c and agree with perturbative QCD evaluations based on deep-inelastic scattering parametrizations for the gluon polarization in the proton. The results disfavor large positive gluon polarization in the polarized proton.

  1. Polarization feedback laser stabilization

    DOEpatents

    Esherick, P.; Owyoung, A.

    1987-09-28

    A system for locking two Nd:YAG laser oscillators includes an optical path for feeding the output of one laser into the other with different polarizations. Elliptical polarization is incorporated into the optical path so that the change in polarization that occurs when the frequencies coincide may be detected to provide a feedback signal to control one laser relative to the other. 4 figs.

  2. Polarization at SLC

    SciTech Connect

    Swartz, M.L.

    1988-07-01

    The SLAC Linear Collider has been designed to readily accommodate polarized electron beams. Considerable effort has been made to implement a polarized source, a spin rotation system, and a system to monitor the beam polarization. Nearly all major components have been fabricated. At the current time, several source and polarimeter components have been installed. The installation and commissioning of the entire system will take place during available machine shutdown periods as the commissioning of SLC progresses. It is expected that a beam polarization of 45% will be achieved with no loss in luminosity. 13 refs., 15 figs.

  3. Polarized negative ions

    SciTech Connect

    Haeberli, W.

    1981-04-01

    This paper presents a survey of methods, commonly in use or under development, to produce beams of polarized negative ions for injection into accelerators. A short summary recalls how the hyperfine interaction is used to obtain nuclear polarization in beams of atoms. Atomic-beam sources for light ions are discussed. If the best presently known techniques are incorporated in all stages of the source, polarized H/sup -/ and D/sup -/ beams in excess of 10 ..mu..A can probably be achieved. Production of polarized ions from fast (keV) beams of polarized atoms is treated separately for atoms in the H(25) excited state (Lamb-Shift source) and atoms in the H(1S) ground state. The negative ion beam from Lamb-Shift sources has reached a plateau just above 1 ..mu..A, but this beam current is adequate for many applications and the somewhat lower beam current is compensated by other desirable characteristics. Sources using fast polarized ground state atoms are in a stage of intense development. The next sections summarize production of polarized heavy ions by the atomic beam method, which is well established, and by optical pumping, which has recently been demonstrated to yield very large nuclear polarization. A short discussion of proposed ion sources for polarized /sup 3/He/sup -/ ions is followed by some concluding remarks.

  4. Multiple photon Monte Carlo simulation for polarized Mo/ller scattering with Yennie-Fraustchi-Suura exponentiation at high energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jadach, S.; Ward, B. F. L.

    1996-07-01

    We present the theoretical basis and sample Monte Carlo data for the YFS exponentiated O(α) calculation of polarized Mo/ller scattering at c.m.s. energies large compared to 2me. Both longitudinal and transverse polarizations are discussed. Possible applications to Mo/ller polarimetry at the SLD are thus illustrated.

  5. Longitudinal dynamics in storage rings

    SciTech Connect

    Colton, E.P.

    1986-01-01

    The single-particle equations of motion are derived for charged particles in a storage ring. Longitudinal space charge is included in the potential assuming an infinitely conducting circular beam pipe with a distributed inductance. The framework uses Hamilton's equations with the canonical variables phi and W. The Twiss parameters for longitudinal motion are also defined for the small amplitude synchrotron oscillations. The space-charge Hamiltonian is calculated for both parabolic bunches and ''matched'' bunches. A brief analysis including second-harmonic rf contributions is also given. The final sections supply calculations of dynamical quantities and particle simulations with the space-charge effects neglected.

  6. Longitudinal instability of the forearm.

    PubMed

    Phadnis, J; Watts, A C

    2016-10-01

    The Essex Lopresti lesion is a rare triad of injury to the radial head, interosseous membrane of the forearm and distal radio-ulnar joint, which results in longitudinal instability of the radius. If unrecognized this leads to chronic pain and disability which is difficult to salvage. Early recognition and appropriate treatment is therefore desirable to prevent long-term problems. The aim of this article is to review the pathoanatomy of longitudinal radius instability and use the existing literature and authors' experience to provide recommendations for recognition and treatment of acute and chronic forearm instability, including description of the author's technique for interosseous membrane reconstruction. PMID:27628434

  7. Cryogenic polarized target facility. Final report, July 1, 1980-September 30, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Gould, C.R.; Haase, D.G.

    1984-01-01

    We have constructed at the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory a cryogenic polarized target facility for the brute force nuclear orientation of bulk metallic samples. The target facility was developed in conjunction with a polarized neutron beam facility at TUNL and is presently being used to study spin-spin effects in total neutron cross sections for polarized neutrons incident on polarized nuclei. The goals of the program have been to demonstrate the feasibility of using present cryogenic technology to produce different polarized targets, and to perform initial measurements of spin-spin cross sections. A 16.2 cm/sup 3/ sample of /sup 27/Al has been cooled to 11.3 mK in a magnetic field of 6.9 T, giving a target polarization of 36%. Preliminary measurements with 46% longitudinally polarized neutrons of energy 14 MeV have yielded a spin-spin cross section of 130 +- 60 mb (< 250 mb to two standard deviations).

  8. Status of the Upsilon Polarization Measurement at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Ranjan, Niharika; /Purdue U.

    2011-10-01

    The angular distributions of {Upsilon}(1S) {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} decays are analyzed using a sample of {Upsilon}(1S) mesons in 2.9 fb{sup -1} of data collected at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The results of the one-dimensional angular analysis suggest that {Upsilon}(1S) may be longitudinal polarized at high transverse momentum. This observation is largely inconsistent with NRQCD prediction that predicts transverse polarization at high p{sub T}.

  9. Our Polar Past

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clary, Renee; Wandersee, James

    2009-01-01

    The study of polar exploration is fascinating and offers students insights into the history, culture, and politics that affect the developing sciences at the farthest ends of Earth. Therefore, the authors think there is value in incorporating polar exploration accounts within modern science classrooms, and so they conducted research to test their…

  10. The Polar Insulation Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urban-Rich, Juanita

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author developed an activity called "The Polar Insulation Investigation." This activity builds on students' natural interest in "things polar" and introduces them to animal adaptations in a unique way. The aim of the exploration is to determine the role of animal coverings (e.g., blubber, fur, and feathers) and to see which is…

  11. Polar Science Is Cool!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weeks, Sophie

    2012-01-01

    Children are fascinated by the fact that polar scientists do research in extremely cold and dangerous places. In the Arctic they might be viewed as lunch by a polar bear. In the Antarctic, they could lose toes and fingers to frostbite and the wind is so fast it can rip skin off. They camp on ice in continuous daylight, weeks from any form of…

  12. Nomenclature of polarized light - Elliptical polarization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, D.

    1974-01-01

    Alternative handedness and sign conventions for relating the orientation of elliptical polarization are discussed. The discussion proceeds under two headings: (1) snapshot picture, where the emphasis for the convention is contained in the concept of handedness; and (2) angular momentum consideration, where the emphasis for the convention is strongly associated with mathematical convention and the sign of the fourth Stokes parameter.

  13. Manipulating photoinduced voltage in metasurface with circularly polarized light.

    PubMed

    Bai, Qiang

    2015-02-23

    Recently, the concept of metasurface has provided one an unprecedented opportunity and ability to control the light in the deep subwavelength scale. However, so far most efforts are devoted to exploiting the novel scattering properties and applications of metasurface in optics. Here, I theoretically and numerically demonstrate that longitudinal and transverse photoinduced voltages can be simultaneously realized in the proposed metasurface utilizing the magnetic resonance under the normal incidence of circularly polarized light, which may extend the concept and functionality of metasurface into the electronics and may provide a potential scheme to realize a nanoscale tunable voltage source through a nanophotonic roadmap. The signs of longitudinal and transverse photoin-duced voltages can be manipulated by tuning the resonant frequency and the handedness of circularly polarized light, respectively. Analytical formulae of photoinduced voltage are presented based on the theory of symmetry of field. This work may bridge nanophotonics and electronics, expands the capability of metasurface and has many potential applications. PMID:25836566

  14. Polarization and polarization fatigue in ferroelectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Xiaofeng

    This thesis addresses some fundamental issues in ferroelectricity and its applications through a computational and experimental effort. It focuses on a variety of perovskite-type ferroelectric oxides and investigates the physical basis for spontaneous polarization, domain wall dynamics, and texture development in thin film applications. The dipole-dipole interactions between ionic species in perovskite-type materials have been calculated to determine the local field and the lattice instability. Different ferroelectric and anti-ferroelectric polarization transitions can be realized by taking into account the structure distortion of the parent perovskites. We find the local field is enhanced by short range disorder and its nature varies from disorder to disorder, causing polarization transitions in non-(100) directions. The molecular field theory has also been extended to layered perovskites, which favors in-plane polarization over c-polarization. These theoretical predictions are in agreement with the experimental observations of various perovskites and layered perovskites in both single crystal and thin film forms. Domain switching in PZT has been studied by probing the frequency dependency of polarization hysteresis. A picture of thermally activated domain wall movement is established from the frequency spectra of coercive field. The field dependence of domain wall bulging and the nature of the binding between pinning obstacles and the walls are inferred from such a study. Consistent with this picture, polarization fatigue can be defined as a process of increasing the resistance from pinning defects to domain wall motion. The chemical species that act as pinning defects have been identified through model experiments that control carrier injection, electrode interfaces, and film compositions. Based on these observations, a methodology is proposed to evaluate and predict the fatigue damage of both PZT and layered perovskite thin films. Processing of layered

  15. Parallel Polarization State Generation

    PubMed Central

    She, Alan; Capasso, Federico

    2016-01-01

    The control of polarization, an essential property of light, is of wide scientific and technological interest. The general problem of generating arbitrary time-varying states of polarization (SOP) has always been mathematically formulated by a series of linear transformations, i.e. a product of matrices, imposing a serial architecture. Here we show a parallel architecture described by a sum of matrices. The theory is experimentally demonstrated by modulating spatially-separated polarization components of a laser using a digital micromirror device that are subsequently beam combined. This method greatly expands the parameter space for engineering devices that control polarization. Consequently, performance characteristics, such as speed, stability, and spectral range, are entirely dictated by the technologies of optical intensity modulation, including absorption, reflection, emission, and scattering. This opens up important prospects for polarization state generation (PSG) with unique performance characteristics with applications in spectroscopic ellipsometry, spectropolarimetry, communications, imaging, and security. PMID:27184813

  16. Parallel Polarization State Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    She, Alan; Capasso, Federico

    2016-05-01

    The control of polarization, an essential property of light, is of wide scientific and technological interest. The general problem of generating arbitrary time-varying states of polarization (SOP) has always been mathematically formulated by a series of linear transformations, i.e. a product of matrices, imposing a serial architecture. Here we show a parallel architecture described by a sum of matrices. The theory is experimentally demonstrated by modulating spatially-separated polarization components of a laser using a digital micromirror device that are subsequently beam combined. This method greatly expands the parameter space for engineering devices that control polarization. Consequently, performance characteristics, such as speed, stability, and spectral range, are entirely dictated by the technologies of optical intensity modulation, including absorption, reflection, emission, and scattering. This opens up important prospects for polarization state generation (PSG) with unique performance characteristics with applications in spectroscopic ellipsometry, spectropolarimetry, communications, imaging, and security.

  17. Polarization of clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goloub, Philippe; Herman, Maurice; Parol, Frederic

    1995-12-01

    This paper reports the main results concerning polarization by clouds derived from POLDER (polarization and directionality of earth's reflectances) airborne version. These results tend to confirm the high information content in the polarization (phase, altimetry). The preliminary results of EUCREX'94 (European Cloud Radiation Experiment) evidenced the drastically different polarized signatures for ice crystals and water droplets. Here we report systematic and statistically significative observations over the whole EUCREX data set. The results show that the cirrus exhibit their own signature. Preliminary observations performed during CLEOPATRA'91 (Cloud Experiment Ober Pfaffenhofen And Transport) and EUCREX'94 campaigns have shown the feasibility of cloud altimetry using spectral information (443 nm and 865 nm) of the polarized light over liquid water droplets clouds. Altimetry technique has been generalized on ASTEX-SOFIA'92 and EUCREX'94 data sets. All these results are presented and discussed in this paper.

  18. Longitudinally-vibrating surgical microelectrode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldstein, C.; Crawford, D.; Kawabus, E. W.

    1977-01-01

    Microelectrode attached to cone of loudspeaker imparting longitudinal vibrations, penetrates relatively tough tissue of arterial walls easier and with more precise depth control because dimpling is eliminated. Vibrating microelectrode has been successfully used to make accurate oxygen-content measurements in arterial walls.

  19. Longitudinal Studies of Spelling Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Nick

    Noting that proposed models of literacy development suggest that reading and writing mutually influence and grow from each other, this paper summarizes aspects of stage theories of literacy development and an integrative model, and considers how the model fared in empirical longitudinal tests. The paper begins with a summary of the modal aspects…

  20. Measurement of the neutron magnetic form factor from inclusive quasielastic scattering of polarized electrons from polarized {sup 3}He

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, H.; Arrington, J.; Beise, E.J.; Bray, B.; Carr, R.W.; Filippone, B.W.; Lung, A.; McKeown, R.D.; Mueller, B.; Pitt, M.L.; Jones, C.E.; DeSchepper, D.; Dodson, G.; Dow, K.; Ent, R.; Farkhondeh, M.; Hansen, J.; Korsch, W.; Kramer, L.H.; Lee, K.; Makins, N.; Milner, R.G.; Tieger, D.R.; Welch, T.P.; Candell, E.; Napolitano, J.; Wojtsekhowski, B.B.; Tripp, C.; Lorenzon, W.

    1995-07-10

    We report a measurement of the asymmetry in spin-dependent quasielastic scattering of longitudinally polarized electrons from a polarized {sup 3}He target. The neutron magnetic form factor {ital G}{sup {ital n}}{sub {ital M}} has been extracted from the measured asymmetry based on recent PWIA calculations using spin-dependent spectral functions. This experiment represents the first measurement of the neutron magnetic form factor using spin-dependent electron scattering. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  1. Measurement of the neutron magnetic form factor from inclusive quasielastic scattering of polarized electrons from polarized {sup 3}He

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, H.; Arrington, J.; Beise, E.J.; Bray, B.; Carr, R.W.; Filippone, B.W.; Lung, A.; McKeown, R.D.; Mueller, B.; Pitt, M.L.; Jones, C.E.; DeSchepper, D.; Dodson, G.; Dow, K.; Ent, R.; Farkhondeh, M.; Hansen, J.; Korsch, W.; Kramer, L.H.; Lee, K.; Makins, N.; Milner, R.G.; Tieger, D.R.; Welch, T.P.; Candell, E.; Napolitano, J.; Wojtsekhowski, B.B.; Tripp, C.; Lorenzon, W.

    1995-05-10

    We report a measurement of the asymmetry in spin-dependent quasielastic scattering of longitudinally polarized electrons from a polarized {sup 3}He target. The neutron magnetic form factor {ital G}{sup {ital n}}{sub {ital M}} has been extracted from the measured asymmetry based on recent PWIA calculations using spin-dependent spectral functions. This work represents the first measurement of {ital G}{sup {ital n}}{sub {ital M}} using spin-dependent electron scattering. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  2. Measurements of spin observables in pseudo-scalar meson photo-production using polarized neutrons in solid HD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kageya, T.

    2014-01-01

    A measurement of psuedo-scalar meson photo production from longitudinally polarized solid HD has been carried out with the CLAS at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jlab) with circularly and linearly polarized photon beams. Its aim is to measure a complete set of spin observables for the neutron simultaneously from the same experiment. As a polarized neutron, deutron in HD was used. Preliminary asymmetries are shown for the π- channel.

  3. Preservation and control of the proton and deuteron polarizations in the proposed electron-ion collider at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Kondratenko, Anatoliy; Derbenev, Yaroslav S.; Filatov, Yury; Lin, Fanglei; Morozov, Vasiliy; Kondratenko, M. A.; Zhang, Yuhong

    2014-01-01

    We propose a scheme of preserving the proton and deuteron beam polarizations during acceleration and storage in the proposed electron-ion collider at Jefferson Lab. This scheme allows one to provide both the longitudinal and transverse polarization orientations of the proton and deuteron beams at the interaction points of the figure-8 ion collider ring. We discuss questions of matching the polarization direction at all stages of the beam transport including the pre-booster, large booster and ion collider ring.

  4. Measurements of spin observables in pseudo-scalar meson photo-production using polarized neutrons in solid HD

    SciTech Connect

    Kageya, Tsuneo

    2014-01-01

    A measurement of psuedo-scalar meson photo production from longitudinally polarized solid HD has been carried out with the CLAS at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jlab) with circularly and linearly polarized photon beams. Its aim is to measure a complete set of spin observables for the neutron simultaneously from the same experiment. As a polarized neutron, deutron in HD was used. Preliminary asymmetries are shown for the {pi}{sup -} channel.

  5. Electromechanical properties of stripe-electroded tangentially polarized piezoelectric flexural bars.

    PubMed

    Sarangapani, Sairajan; Brown, David A

    2013-05-01

    Piezoelectric bar transducers are commonly used for generating low frequency flexural mode vibrations. The paper calculates the electromechanical properties including the effective electromechanical coupling coefficient of the stripe-electroded tangentially polarized bar transducer vibrating in flexure under the simply supported boundary condition. A numerical analysis is used to model the curved electric field lines. Calculations take into account the internal energies due to the contributions of the transverse and longitudinal piezoelectric effects and the modal strain distribution in the bar. Results are presented as functions of distance between the electrodes and thickness of elements and are compared with traditional bimorph designs employing either transverse or longitudinal polarization.

  6. QCD corrections to polarization of J/{psi} and {upsilon} at Fermilab Tevatron and CERN LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Gong Bin; Wang Jianxiong

    2008-10-01

    In this work, we present more details of the calculation on the next-to-leading-order (NLO) QCD corrections to polarization of direct J/{psi} production via color singlet at the Tevatron and LHC, together with the results for {upsilon} for the first time. Our results show that the J/{psi} polarization status drastically changes from transverse polarization dominant at leading order into longitudinal polarization dominant in the whole range of the transverse momentum p{sub t} of J/{psi} when the NLO corrections are counted. For {upsilon} production, the p{sub t} distribution of the polarization status behaves almost the same as that for J/{psi} except that the NLO result is transverse polarization at small p{sub t} range. Although the theoretical evaluation predicts a larger longitudinal polarization than the measured value at the Tevatron, it may provide a solution towards the previous large discrepancy for J/{psi} and {upsilon} polarization between theoretical prediction and experimental measurement, and suggests that the next important step is to calculate the NLO corrections to hadronproduction of color-octet state J/{psi}{sup (8)} and {upsilon}{sup (8)}. Our calculations are performed in two ways: namely, we do and do not analytically sum over the polarizations, and then check them with each other.

  7. Interplanetary magnetic sector polarity inferred from polar geomagnetic field observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friis-Christensen, E.; Lassen, K.; Wilcox, J. M.; Gonzalez, W.; Colburn, D. S.

    1971-01-01

    In order to infer the interplanetary sector polarity from polar geomagnetic field diurnal variations, measurements were carried out at Godhavn and Thule (Denmark) Geomagnetic Observatories. The inferred interplanetary sector polarity was compared with the polarity observed at the same time by Explorer 33 and 35 magnetometers. It is shown that the polarity (toward or away from the sun) of the interplanetary magnetic field can be reliably inferred from observations of the polar cap geomagnetic fields.

  8. Neutron Polarizers Based on Polarized 3He

    SciTech Connect

    William M. Snow

    2005-05-01

    The goal of this work, which is a collaborative effort between Indiana University, NIST, and Hamilton College, is to extend the technique of polarized neutron scattering into new domains by the development and application of polarized 3He-based neutron spin filters. After the IPNS experiment which measured Zeeman sp[litting in surface scattered neutrons using a polarized 3He cell as a polarization analyzer transporterd by car from Bloomington to Chicago, the Indiana work focused on technical developments to improve the 3He polarization of the Indiana compression system. The compression system was rebuilt with a new valve system which allows gas trapped in the dead volume of the compressors at the end of the piston stroke to be exhausted and conducted back to the optical pumping cell where it can be repolarized. We also incorporated a new intermediate storage volume made at NIST from 1720 glass which will reduce polarization losses between the compressors. Furthermore, we improved the stability of the 1083 nm laser by cooling the LMA rod. We achieved 60% 3he polarization in the optical pumping cell and 87% preservation of the polarization during compression. In parallel we built a magnetically-shielded transport solenoid for use on neutron scattering instruments such as POSY which achieves a fractional field uniformity of better than 10-3 per cm. The field was mapped using an automated 3D field mapping system for in-situ measurement of magnetic field gradients Diluted magnetic semiconductors offer many exciting opportunities for investigation of spintronic effects in solids and are certain to be one of the most active areas of condensed matter physics over then next several years. These materials can act as efficient spin injectors for devices that make use of spin-dependent transport phenomena. We just (late July 2002) finished a neutron reflectivity experiment at NIST on a GaMnAs trilayer film. This material is a ferromagnetic semiconductor which is of interest

  9. Planetary Wave Influence on Wintertime OH Meinel Longitudinal Variation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winick, J. R.; Picard, R. H.; Wintersteiner, P. P.; Mlynczak, M. G.; Russell, J. M.; Gordley, L.

    2009-05-01

    We report on very unusual conditions in the upper mesosphere during the boreal winters of 2004 and 2006. Unusually bright OH volume emissions, as measured by TIMED/SABER, occurred in the region north of 60N. These emissions also occurred at unusually low altitudes, while at the same time very high temperatures characterized the upper mesosphere. These large perturbations allowed us to see more clearly longitudinal spatial and temporal variations that were present in the emissions. The affected areas varied in size and location on time scales of a few days and had a distinct planetary-wave wave-1 structure. We present data demonstrating the variability in the emissions and temperatures throughout the polar region and the correlations among them, and we contrast their behavior with that in normal years. The underlying cause of the correlations and longitudinal structure appears to be greatly enhanced downwelling in the upper mesosphere, which in turn was produced by unusual dynamical conditions in the lower atmosphere, consisting of stratospheric warmings and perturbations of wave structures within the polar vortex.

  10. RHIC Performance with Polarized Protons in Run-6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ptitsyn, V.; Ahrens, L.; Bai, M.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Bravar, S.; Brown, K. A.; Brennan, J. M.; Bruno, D.; Bunce, G.; Calaga, R.; Cameron, P.; Connolly, R.; DeLong, J.; D'Ottavio, T.; Drees, A.; Fedotov, A.; Fischer, W.; Ganetis, G.; Hahn, H.; Hayes, T.; Hseuh, H.-C.; Huang, H.; Ingrassia, P.; Kayran, D.; Kewisch, J.; Lee, R.; Litvinenko, V. N.; Luo, Y.; MacKay, W. W.; Makdisi, Y.; Malitsky, N.; Marr, G.; Marusic, A.; Michnoff, R.; Montag, C.; Morris, J.; Pilat, F.; Pile, P.; Roser, T.; Russo, T.; Sandberg, J.; Satogata, T.; Schultheiss, C.; Tepikian, S.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J.; Zaltsman, A.; Zeno, K.; Zelenski, A.; Zhang, S. Y.

    2007-06-01

    The RHIC polarized proton run (Run-6) in 2006 started on February 1 and continued for 21 weeks. The Run-6 included the machine operation at different beam energies and with different orientation of beam polarization at the collision points. The machine operation at 100GeV and 31.2 GeV provided physics data of polarized proton collisions to the STAR, PHENIX and BRAHMS experiments. Record levels of the luminosity (up to 3.5ṡ1031 cm-2 s-1 peak) and proton beam polarization (up to 65%) were achieved during the 100GeV operation. The beam polarization was preserved during the acceleration by using Siberian Snakes, based on helical magnets. The polarization orientation at STAR and PHENIX experiments was controlled with helical spin rotators. During different stages of the run the physics data were provided with longitudinal, vertical and horizontal orientations of the beam polarization at the collision points. Total luminosity integrals of 45 pb-1 at 100 GeV and 0.35 pb-1 at 31.2 GeV were delivered to the experiments.

  11. Compton Polarization with Nustar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotti, Simone; Natalucci, Lorenzo; Harrison, Fiona A.; Madsen, Kristin; Perri, Matteo; Puccetti, Simonetta

    In this study we assess the NuSTAR capabilities to detect polarized signals in the Compton regime, through the use of Monte Carlo simulations and comparison with observational data. Both NuSTAR focal plane detectors are equipped with high resolution pixilated CZT arrays, sensitive in the energy range 2.5-80 keV. These units have intrinsic polarization capabilities due to their high quality factor, very low background and scattering angles of ~90°, which is ideal for incident photon energies below 100 keV. However the sensitivity is limited by the very low efficiency of the CZT for Compton interactions and by intrinsic readout systematics, such as charge sharing between pixels. An additional source of degradation is the incompleteness of double events information in the science telemetry. We estimated the Minimum Detectable Polarization of cosmic sources as a function of intensity, and the results obtained were validated through the comparison with the first actual data from the Crab Nebula and Cygnus X-1. We also evaluated the count rate and the background expected for polarization measurements, comparing our estimates with the data measured in flight. Our simulations reproduce well the actual NuSTAR data, showing that the focal plane detectors should be able to detect polarization from highly polarized sources like the Crab and other potential bright sources, dominated by synchrotron and/or SSC emission. The background for polarization measurements was found to be negligible.

  12. Polarization Control of VCSELs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostermann, Johannes Michael; Michalzik, Rainer

    In most types of VCSELs, the light output polarization is inherently unstable. While, in case of single-mode oscillation, the emitted light is mainly linearly polarized, its orientation is not well defined. This is because both the resonator and the gain medium are quasi isotropic in the plane of the active layers. Since a stable polarization is required for almost all sensing and some datacom applications, extensive and in-depth investigations have been undertaken during the last twenty years in order to stabilize the polarization of VCSELs without affecting their favorable operation parameters. Polarization control of VCSELs can be achieved by introducing a polarization-dependent gain, an asymmetric resonator, or mirrors with a polarization-dependent reflectivity. It has turned out that the last approach is most promising. It can be realized by incorporating a shallow surface grating in the upper mirror of a top-emitting VCSEL. Several million grating VCSELs are in reliable operation meanwhile, mainly in optical computer mice.

  13. 14 CFR 23.145 - Longitudinal control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Longitudinal control. 23.145 Section 23.145... Maneuverability § 23.145 Longitudinal control. (a) With the airplane as nearly as possible in trim at 1.3 VS1, it... multiengine airplanes, without the use of the primary longitudinal control system. (2) For...

  14. Polarized noble gas MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Brookeman, James R.; Mugler, John P. III; Lange, Eduard E. de; Knight-Scott, Jack; Maier, Therese; Bogorad, Paul; Driehuys, Bastiaan; Cates, Gordon; Happer, William; Daniel, Thomas M.; Truwit, Jonathon D.

    1998-01-20

    The development of convenient methods to polarize liter quantities of the noble gases helium-3 and xenon-129 has provided the opportunity for a new MRI method to visualize the internal air spaces of the human lung. These spaces are usually poorly seen with hydrogen-based MRI, because of the limited water content of the lung and the low thermal polarization of the water protons achieved in conventional magnets. In addition, xenon, which has a relatively high solubility and a sufficiently persistent polarization level in blood and biological tissue, offers the prospect of providing perfusion images of the lung, brain and other organs.

  15. North Polar Dunes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    23 January 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows dark sand dunes in the north polar region of Mars. Surrounding much of the north polar ice cap are fields of sand dunes. In this case, the strongest winds responsible for the dunes blew off the polar cap (not seen here), from the north-northwest (upper left).

    Location near: 76.5oN, 63.7oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Northern Summer

  16. Coupled Plasmon Phonon Dynamics in GaP: an indirect gap polar semiconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rustagi, Avinash; Thatcher, Evan M.; Stanton, Christopher J.; Ishioka, Kunie; Brixius, Kristina; Hofer, Ulrich; Petek, Hrvoje

    Transient Depletion Field Screening (TDFS) is the dominant mechanism behind coupled plasmon-phonon oscillations in polar semiconductors for above gap photoexcitation. Here the surface field distorting the polar lattice is screened by photoexcited plasma initiating coupled oscillations. These oscillations modify the optical property of the material and are observed in reflectivity measurements. We model these oscillations via a set of coupled differential equations in electronic polarization and lattice polarization. We consider the effects of lateral inhomogeneity and diffusion of photoexcited carriers which is crucial to understand the experimental results. The spectrum shows an LO(Longitudinal Optical) phonon peak alongside a LOPC(Longitudinal Optical Plasmon Coupled) peak. Lateral inhomogeneity accounts for the beating phenomenon between these frequencies. Supported by NSF through Grants DMR-1311849 and DMR-1311845.

  17. Longitudinal Modes along Thin Piezoelectric Waveguides for Liquid Sensing Applications

    PubMed Central

    Caliendo, Cinzia

    2015-01-01

    The propagation of longitudinally polarized acoustic modes along thin piezoelectric plates (BN, ZnO, InN, AlN and GaN) is theoretically studied, aiming at the design of high frequency electroacoustic devices suitable for work in liquid environments. The investigation of the acoustic field profile across the plate revealed the presence of longitudinally polarized Lamb modes, travelling at velocities close to that of the longitudinal bulk acoustic wave propagating in the same direction. Such waves are suitable for the implementation of high-frequency, low-loss electroacoustic devices operating in liquid environments. The time-averaged power flow density, the phase velocity and the electroacoustic coupling coefficient K2 dispersion curves were studied, for the first (S0) and four higher order (S1, S2, S3, S4) symmetrical modes for different electrical boundary conditions. Two electroacoustic coupling configurations were investigated, based on interdigitated transducers, with or without a metal floating electrode at the opposite plate surface. Enhanced performances, such as a K2 as high as 8.5% and a phase velocity as high as 16,700 m/s, were demostrated for the ZnO- and BN-based waveguides, as an example. The relative velocity changes, and the inertial and viscous sensitivities of the first symmetric and anti-symmetric mode, S0 and A0, propagating along thin plates bordered by a viscous liquid were derived using the perturbation approach. The present study highlights the feasibility of the piezoelectric waveguides to the development of high-frequency, integrated-circuits compatible electroacoustic devices suitable for working in liquid environment. PMID:26043174

  18. Influence of ferroelectric polarization on magnetic anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mardana, A.; Ducharme, S.; Adenwalla, S.

    2010-03-01

    Thin film heterostructures of transition metal ferromagnets (FM) and polymer ferroelectrics (FE) are investigated to look for changes in the magnetic anisotropy of the FM layer that occur on switching the FE polarization (with an ensuing change in the electric field direction).[1] Samples of [Glass/ Pd (50 nm)/Co wedge (0.9-2.6nm)/ferroelectric P(VDF-TrFE) (53 nm)/Al (30nm)] are deposited via sputtering or evaporation for the metallic layers and via Langmuir-Schaefer deposition for the polymer ferroelectric. [2] Magnetic and FE properties have been characterized using the Magneto-Optical Kerr Effect (MOKE) and the pyroelectric effect. Polar and longitudinal MOKE loops are measured across the Co wedge for both positive and negative FE polarization and the difference in the two MOKE loops is ascribed to the changes in the magnetic anisotropy of the FM layer. [3] These changes are most apparent in the region where the Co undergoes a transition from in-plane to out-of-plane anisotropy. This research is supported by the NSF MRSEC through Grant No. DMR- 0820521 1. Chun-Gang Duan et al, Appl. Phys. Lett. 92, 122905 (2008) 2. A. V. Bune, et al, Nature (London) 391, 874 (1998) 3. P. F. Carcia, J.Appl. Phys. 63, 5066 (1988)

  19. The Importance of Longitudinal Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knezek, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    It has been eight years since the AAS Council unanimously endorsed the document, known as "Equity Now: The Pasadena Recommendations for Gender Equality in Astronomy," in January 2005. This document was the main product of the conference entitled “Women in Astronomy II: Ten Years After” (WIA II), held in June 2003 in Pasadena, CA. One of the key recommendations represented in that document was the need for a longitudinal study of astronomers. It was recognized that in order to understand our own field, how it is evolving, and the impact on individuals, we need to track people over time. I will discuss the fundamental questions that led to the recommendation, and set the stage for the current (ongoing) longitudinal study.

  20. LONGITUDINAL LASER WIRE AT SNS

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksandrov, Alexander V; Liu, Yun; Zhukov, Alexander P

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a longitudinal H- beam profile scanner that utilizes laser light to detach convoy electrons and an MCP to collect and measure these electrons. The scanner is located in MEBT with H- energy of 2.5MeV and an RF frequency 402.5MHz. The picosecond pulsed laser runs at 80.5MHz in sync with the accelerator RF. The laser beam is delivered to the beam line through a 30m optical fiber. The pulse width after the fiber transmission measures about 10ps. Scanning the laser phase effectively allows measurements to move along ion bunch longitudinal position. We are able to reliably measure production beam bunch length with this method. The biggest problem we have encountered is background signal from electrons being stripped by vacuum. Several techniques of signal detection are discussed.

  1. Polar Environmental Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagler, R. G.; Schulteis, A. C.

    1979-01-01

    The present and projected benefits of the polar regions were reviewed and then translated into information needs in order to support the array of polar activities anticipated. These needs included measurement sensitivities for polar environmental data (ice/snow, atmosphere, and ocean data for integrated support) and the processing and delivery requirements which determine the effectiveness of environmental services. An assessment was made of how well electromagnetic signals can be converted into polar environmental information. The array of sensor developments in process or proposed were also evaluated as to the spectral diversity, aperture sizes, and swathing capabilities available to provide these measurements from spacecraft, aircraft, or in situ platforms. Global coverage and local coverage densification options were studied in terms of alternative spacecraft trajectories and aircraft flight paths.

  2. Mercury's South Polar Region

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation shows 89 wide-angle camera (WAC) images of Mercury’s south polar region acquired by the Mercury Dual Imaging System (MDIS) over one complete Mercury solar day (176 Earth days). Thi...

  3. Measurements of Spin Observables in Pseudoscalar-Meson Photoproduction Using Polarized Neutrons in Solid HD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kageya, Tsuneo

    2014-01-01

    Psuedo-scalar meson photo production measurements have been carried out with longitudinally-polarized neutrons using the circularly and linearly polarized photon beams and the CLAS at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jlab). The experiment aims to obtain a complete set of spin observables on an efficient neutron target. Preliminary E asymmetries for the exclusive reaction, γ + n(p) → π- + p(p), selecting quasi free neutron kinematics are discussed.

  4. Spin physics experiments at NICA-SPD with polarized proton and deuteron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savin, I.; Efremov, A.; Pshekhonov, D.; Kovalenko, A.; Teryaev, O.; Shevchenko, O.; Nagajcev, A.; Guskov, A.; Kukhtin, V.; Toplilin, N.

    2016-08-01

    This is a brief description of suggested measurements of asymmetries of the Drell-Yan (DY) pair production in collisions of non-polarized, longitudinally and transversally polarized protons and deuterons which provide an access to all leading-twist collinear and TMD PDFs of quarks and anti-quarks in nucleons. Other spin effects in hadronic and heavy-ion collisions may be also studied constituing the spin physics program at NICA.

  5. EDITORIAL: Polarization Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turunen, Jari; Friesem, Asher A.; Friberg, Ari T.

    2004-03-01

    This special issue on Polarization Optics contains one review article and 23 research papers, many of which are based on presentations at the International Commission for Optics Topical Meeting on Polarization Optics, held in Polvijärvi, Finland, between 30 June and 3 July 2003. While this issue should not in any sense be considered as a `proceedings' of this meeting, the possibility of submitting papers to it was widely advertised during the meeting, which was attended by a large fraction of prominent scientists in the field of polarization optics. Thus the quality of papers in this special issue is high. In announcing both the meeting and this special issue, we emphasized that the concept of `polarization optics' should be understood in a wide sense. In fact, all contributions dealing with the vectorial nature of light were welcome. As a result, the papers included here cover a wide range of different aspects of linear and nonlinear polarization optics. Both theoretical and experimental features are discussed. We are pleased to see that the conference and this special issue both reflect the wide diversity of important and novel polarization phenomena in optics. The papers in this special issue, and other recently published works, demonstrate that even though polarization is a fundamental property of electromagnetic fields, interest in it is rapidly increasing. The fundamental relations between partial coherence and partial polarization are currently under vigorous research in electromagnetic coherence theory. In diffractive optics it has been found that the exploitation of the vectorial nature of light can be of great benefit. Fabrication of sophisticated, spatially variable polarization-control elements is becoming possible with the aid of nanolithography. Polarization singularities and the interplay of bulk properties and topology in nanoscale systems have created much enthusiasm. In nonlinear optics, the second harmonic waves generated on reflection and

  6. Parameterized Linear Longitudinal Airship Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulczycki, Eric; Elfes, Alberto; Bayard, David; Quadrelli, Marco; Johnson, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    A parameterized linear mathematical model of the longitudinal dynamics of an airship is undergoing development. This model is intended to be used in designing control systems for future airships that would operate in the atmospheres of Earth and remote planets. Heretofore, the development of linearized models of the longitudinal dynamics of airships has been costly in that it has been necessary to perform extensive flight testing and to use system-identification techniques to construct models that fit the flight-test data. The present model is a generic one that can be relatively easily specialized to approximate the dynamics of specific airships at specific operating points, without need for further system identification, and with significantly less flight testing. The approach taken in the present development is to merge the linearized dynamical equations of an airship with techniques for estimation of aircraft stability derivatives, and to thereby make it possible to construct a linearized dynamical model of the longitudinal dynamics of a specific airship from geometric and aerodynamic data pertaining to that airship. (It is also planned to develop a model of the lateral dynamics by use of the same methods.) All of the aerodynamic data needed to construct the model of a specific airship can be obtained from wind-tunnel testing and computational fluid dynamics

  7. Polar Warming Drivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDunn, T. L.; Bougher, S. W.; Mischna, M. A.; Murphy, J. R.

    2012-12-01

    Polar warming is a dynamically induced temperature enhancement over mid-to-high latitudes that results in a reversed (poleward) meridional temperature gradient. This phenomenon was recently characterized over the 40-90 km altitude region [1] based on nearly three martian years of Mars Climate Sounder observations [2, 3]. Here we investigate which forcing mechanisms affect the magnitude and distribution of the observed polar warming by conducting simulations with the Mars Weather Research and Forecasting General Circulation Model [4, 5]. We present simulations confirming the influence topography [6] and dust loading [e.g., 7] have upon polar warming. We then present simulations illustrating the modulating influence gravity wave momentum deposition exerts upon polar warming, consistent with previous modeling studies [e.g., 8]. The results of this investigation suggest the magnitude and distribution of polar warming in the martian middle atmosphere is modified by gravity wave activity and that the characteristics of the gravity waves that most significantly affect polar warming vary with season. References: [1] McDunn, et al., 2012 (JGR), [2]Kleinböhl, et al., 2009 (JGR), [3] Kleinböhl, et al., 2011 (JQSRT), [4] Richardson, et al., 2007 (JGR), [5] Mischna, et al., 2011 (Planet. Space Sci.), [6] Richardson and Wilson, 2002 (Nature), [7] Haberle, et al., 1982 (Icarus), [8] Barnes, 1990 (JGR).

  8. Polarization Imaging Apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zou, Yingyin K.; Chen, Qiushui

    2010-01-01

    A polarization imaging apparatus has shown promise as a prototype of instruments for medical imaging with contrast greater than that achievable by use of non-polarized light. The underlying principles of design and operation are derived from observations that light interacts with tissue ultrastructures that affect reflectance, scattering, absorption, and polarization of light. The apparatus utilizes high-speed electro-optical components for generating light properties and acquiring polarization images through aligned polarizers. These components include phase retarders made of OptoCeramic (registered TradeMark) material - a ceramic that has a high electro-optical coefficient. The apparatus includes a computer running a program that implements a novel algorithm for controlling the phase retarders, capturing image data, and computing the Stokes polarization images. Potential applications include imaging of superficial cancers and other skin lesions, early detection of diseased cells, and microscopic analysis of tissues. The high imaging speed of this apparatus could be beneficial for observing live cells or tissues, and could enable rapid identification of moving targets in astronomy and national defense. The apparatus could also be used as an analysis tool in material research and industrial processing.

  9. Structure and dynamics of the polar vortex in the Earth's core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreenivasan, Binod; Jones, Chris A.

    2005-10-01

    Observations of the Earth's magnetic field suggest that there are anticyclonic polar vortices in the core (Olson and Aurnou, 1999; Hulot et al., 2002). Some geodynamo simulations have also shown the existence of an anticyclonic flow in the polar region of the Earth's outer core. The polar vortices are investigated using a spherical convection-driven dynamo model. In a fully three-dimensional model where no longitudinal symmetry is imposed, we find that the polar vortex core is offset from the pole itself by approximately 10° from the axis of rotation. It is therefore non-axisymmetric, and can drift considerably in longitude during a magnetic diffusion time. We also find that the strong polar vortex depends crucially on the magnetic field in the core. The simulation results are compared with the polar core flow reconstructed from secular variation observations.

  10. J / ψ polarization in p + p collisions at √{ s} = 200 GeV in STAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anson, C. D.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Averichev, G. S.; Balewski, J.; Banerjee, A.; Barnovska, Z.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Borowski, W.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A. V.; Brovko, S. G.; Bültmann, S.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, L.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Chwastowski, J.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Corliss, R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Cui, X.; Das, S.; Davila Leyva, A.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Derradi de Souza, R.; Dhamija, S.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Ding, F.; Djawotho, P.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Engelage, J.; Engle, K. S.; Eppley, G.; Eun, L.; Evdokimov, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Fedorisin, J.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Gliske, S.; Grosnick, D.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, S.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hajkova, O.; Hamed, A.; Han, L.-X.; Haque, R.; Harris, J. W.; Hays-Wehle, J. P.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Horvat, S.; Huang, B.; Huang, H. Z.; Huang, X.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jang, H.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kesich, A.; Khan, Z. H.; Kikola, D. P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Konzer, J.; Koralt, I.; Korsch, W.; Kotchenda, L.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, L.; Kycia, R. A.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; Leight, W.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, Z. M.; Lima, L. M.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, X.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Madagodagettige Don, D. M. M. D.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nogach, L. V.; Noh, S. Y.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Ohlson, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldag, E. W.; Oliveira, R. A. N.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Plyku, D.; Poljak, N.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Przybycien, M.; Pujahari, P. R.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Riley, C. K.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Ross, J. F.; Roy, A.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandacz, A.; Sandweiss, J.; Sangaline, E.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, B.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, D.; Smirnov, N.; Solanki, D.; Sorensen, P.; deSouza, U. G.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stevens, J. R.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsai, O. D.; Turnau, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vanfossen, J. A.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbæk, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Vossen, A.; Wada, M.; Walker, M.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y. F.; Xiao, Z.; Xie, W.; Xin, K.; Xu, H.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yan, W.; Yang, C.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Ye, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Zawisza, Y.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhao, F.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhu, X.; Zhu, Y. H.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zyzak, M.

    2014-12-01

    We report on a polarization measurement of inclusive J / ψ mesons in the di-electron decay channel at mid-rapidity at 2 polarization measurement should help to distinguish between different models of the J / ψ production mechanism since they predict different pT dependences of the J / ψ polarization. In this analysis, J / ψ polarization is studied in the helicity frame. The polarization parameter λθ measured at RHIC becomes smaller towards high pT, indicating more longitudinal J / ψ polarization as pT increases. The result is compared with predictions of presently available models.

  11. Investigation of Near-Field Imaging Characteristics of Radial Polarization for Application to Optical Data Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Wan-Chin; Park, No-Cheol; Yoon, Yong-Joong; Choi, Hyun; Park, Young-Pil

    2007-07-01

    Radially polarized incident light can generate a more confined longitudinal electric field on a focal plane in near-field (NF) optics than focusing circularly polarized light. Using this phenomenon, it is feasible to reduce beam spot size on storage media to increase the areal density of optical data storage. A radially polarized beam generates a beam spot which is 20% more confined on the 1st surface of medium than that of circularly polarized light. However, the peak intensity of total electric field sharply decreases and its transverse component is much more dominant inside the media stack. This confirms that radially polarized optics can be a candidate not for an NF recording system but for an NF read-only memory (ROM) system. Potentially, the results could be useful to understand the effect of radial and circular polarizations inside and outside medium for various applications of NF optics.

  12. Rectilinear lattices of polarization vortices with various spatial polarization distributions.

    PubMed

    Fu, Shiyao; Zhang, Shikun; Wang, Tonglu; Gao, Chunqing

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we propose a type of rectilinear lattices of polarization vortices, each spot in which has mutually independent, and controllable spatial polarization distributions. The lattices are generated by two holograms under special design. In the experiment, the holograms are encoded on two spatial light modulators, and the results fit very well with theory. Our scheme makes it possible to generate multiple polarization vortices with various polarization distributions simultaneously, for instance, radially and azimuthally polarized beams, and can be used in the domains as polarization-based data transmission system, optical manufacture, polarization detection and so on. PMID:27505812

  13. Polarized nuclear target based on parahydrogen induced polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budker, D.; Ledbetter, M. P.; Appelt, S.; Bouchard, L. S.; Wojtsekhowski, B.

    2012-12-01

    We discuss a novel concept of a polarized nuclear target for accelerator fixed-target scattering experiments, which is based on parahydrogen induced polarization (PHIP). One may be able to reach a 33% free-proton polarization in the ethane molecule. The potential advantages of such a target include operation at zero magnetic field, fast (˜100 Hz) polarization oscillation (akin to polarization reversal), and operation with large intensity of an electron beam.

  14. Polarized nuclear target based on parahydrogen induced polarization

    SciTech Connect

    D. Budker, M.P. Ledbetter, S. Appelt, L.S. Bouchard, B. Wojtsekhowski

    2012-12-01

    We discuss a novel concept of a polarized nuclear target for accelerator fixed-target scattering experiments, which is based on parahydrogen induced polarization (PHIP). One may be able to reach a 33% free-proton polarization in the ethane molecule. The potential advantages of such a target include operation at zero magnetic field, fast ({approx}100 HZ) polarization oscillation (akin to polarization reversal), and operation with large intensity of an electron beam.

  15. Polar low dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, M.T.; Farrell, B.F. )

    1992-12-15

    Polar lows are intense subsynoptic-scale cyclones that form over high-latitude oceans in association with deep cumulus convection and strong ambient baroclinicity. Recent observations indicate that polar lows are generally initiated by a nonaxisymmetric interaction between a surface disturbance and an upper-level mobile trough. Extant theories of polar low formation preclude study of such a process since they either constrain their models to be axisymmetric, or do not explicitly account for his transient interaction. In this work the physics of interacting upper- and lower-level potential vorticity structures is studied as an initial-value problem using a three-dimensional nonlinear geostrophic momentum model that incorporates moist processes and includes strong baroclinic dynamics. Model results illustrate the rapid formation of an intense small-scale cyclone whose structure is consistent with observations of mature polar lows. A conceptual model of polar low development is proposed. In the first stage of development, called induced self-development, a mobile upper trough initiates a rapid low-level spinup due to the enhanced omega response in a conditionally neutral baroclinic atmosphere. A secondary development follows, called diabatic destabilization, that is associated with the production of low-level potential vorticity by diabatic processes. Diabatic destabilization represents a simple mechanism for maintaining the intensity of polar lows until they reach land. In exceptional instances of negligible upper-level forcing, the latter may also describe the gradual intensification of small-scale cyclones in regions of sustained neutrality and surface baroclinicity. Ideas regarding polar low equilibration and prospects for a unified theory of arctic and midlatitude cyclones are discussed. 75 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Measurements of Direct Photon Double Longitudinal Spin Asymmetry at Large Rapidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourgeois, Paul

    2008-10-01

    Direct photon production in polarized p-p collisions is expected to be the cleanest measurement of the gluon polarization. Current measurements using inclusive pion production, in the PHENIX central arms, suggest a small contribution from the gluons to the proton spin in the presently accessible Bjorken x range xBj>10-2. The addition of the Nose Cone Calorimeter (NCC) in the large rapidity 1<η<3 will allow PHENIX to access xBj˜10-3. In this talk I will present the prospects of measuring direct photon double longitudinal spin asymmetry ALL employing the NCC.

  17. Sequential Polarity-Reversing Circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labaw, Clayton C.

    1994-01-01

    Proposed circuit reverses polarity of electric power supplied to bidirectional dc motor, reversible electro-mechanical actuator, or other device operating in direction depending on polarity. Circuit reverses polarity each time power turned on, without need for additional polarity-reversing or direction signals and circuitry to process them.

  18. Time reversal invariance in polarized neutron decay

    SciTech Connect

    Wasserman, E.G.

    1994-03-01

    An experiment to measure the time reversal invariance violating (T-violating) triple correlation (D) in the decay of free polarized neutrons has been developed. The detector design incorporates a detector geometry that provides a significant improvement in the sensitivity over that used in the most sensitive of previous experiments. A prototype detector was tested in measurements with a cold neutron beam. Data resulting from the tests are presented. A detailed calculation of systematic effects has been performed and new diagnostic techniques that allow these effects to be measured have been developed. As the result of this work, a new experiment is under way that will improve the sensitivity to D to 3 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} or better. With higher neutron flux a statistical sensitivity of the order 3 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} is ultimately expected. The decay of free polarized neutrons (n {yields} p + e + {bar v}{sub e}) is used to search for T-violation by measuring the triple correlation of the neutron spin polarization, and the electron and proton momenta ({sigma}{sub n} {center_dot} p{sub p} {times} p{sub e}). This correlation changes sign under reversal of the motion. Since final state effects in neutron decay are small, a nonzero coefficient, D, of this correlation indicates the violation of time reversal invariance. D is measured by comparing the numbers of coincidences in electron and proton detectors arranged symmetrically about a longitudinally polarized neutron beam. Particular care must be taken to eliminate residual asymmetries in the detectors or beam as these can lead to significant false effects. The Standard Model predicts negligible T-violating effects in neutron decay. Extensions to the Standard Model include new interactions some of which include CP-violating components. Some of these make first order contributions to D.

  19. Martian polar vortices: Comparison of reanalyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waugh, D. W.; Toigo, A. D.; Guzewich, S. D.; Greybush, S. J.; Wilson, R. J.; Montabone, L.

    2016-09-01

    The structure and evolution of the Martian polar vortices is examined using two recently available reanalysis systems: version 1.0 of the Mars Analysis Correction Data Assimilation (MACDA) and a preliminary version of the Ensemble Mars Atmosphere Reanalysis System (EMARS). There is quantitative agreement between the reanalyses in the lower atmosphere, where Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) data are assimilated, but there are differences at higher altitudes reflecting differences in the free-running general circulation model simulations used in the two reanalyses. The reanalyses show similar potential vorticity (PV) structure of the vortices: There is near-uniform small PV equatorward of the core of the westerly jet, steep meridional PV gradients on the polar side of the jet core, and a maximum of PV located off of the pole. In maps of 30 sol mean PV, there is a near-continuous elliptical ring of high PV with roughly constant shape and longitudinal orientation from fall to spring. However, the shape and orientation of the vortex varies on daily time scales, and there is not a continuous ring of PV but rather a series of smaller scale coherent regions of high PV. The PV structure of the Martian polar vortices is, as has been reported before, very different from that of Earth's stratospheric polar vortices, but there are similarities with Earth's tropospheric vortices which also occur at the edge of the Hadley Cell, and have near-uniform small PV equatorward of the jet, and a large increase of PV poleward of the jet due to increased stratification.

  20. Polar low monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobylev, Leonid; Zabolotskikh, Elizaveta; Mitnik, Leonid

    2010-05-01

    Polar lows are intense mesoscale atmospheric low pressure weather systems, developing poleward of the main baroclinic zone and associated with high surface wind speeds. Small size and short lifetime, sparse in-situ observations in the regions of their development complicate polar low study. Our knowledge of polar lows and mesocyclones has come almost entirely during the period of satellite remote sensing since, by virtue of their small horizontal scale, it was rarely possible to analyse these lows on conventional weather charts using only the data from the synoptic observing network. However, the effects of intense polar lows have been felt by coastal communities and seafarers since the earliest times. These weather systems are thought to be responsible for the loss of many small vessels over the centuries, although the nature of the storms was not understood and their arrival could not be predicted. The actuality of the polar low research is stipulated by their high destructive power: they are a threat to such businesses as oil and gas exploration, fisheries and shipping. They could worsen because of global warming: a shrinking of sea ice around the North Pole, which thawed to its record minimum in the summer of 2007, is likely to give rise to more powerful storms that form only over open water and can cause hurricane-strength winds. Therefore, study of polar lows, their timely detection, tracking and forecasting represents a challenge for today meteorology. Satellite passive microwave data, starting from Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I) onboard Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) satellite, remain invaluable source of regularly available remotely sensed data to study polar lows. The sounding in this spectral range has several advantages in comparison with observations in visible and infrared ranges and Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data: independence on day time and clouds, regularity and high temporal resolution in Polar Regions. Satellite

  1. Polarization twist in perovskite ferrielectrics

    PubMed Central

    Kitanaka, Yuuki; Hirano, Kiyotaka; Ogino, Motohiro; Noguchi, Yuji; Miyayama, Masaru; Moriyoshi, Chikako; Kuroiwa, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Because the functions of polar materials are governed primarily by their polarization response to external stimuli, the majority of studies have focused on controlling polar lattice distortions. In some perovskite oxides, polar distortions coexist with nonpolar tilts and rotations of oxygen octahedra. The interplay between nonpolar and polar instabilities appears to play a crucial role, raising the question of how to design materials by exploiting their coupling. Here, we introduce the concept of ‘polarization twist’, which offers enhanced control over piezoelectric responses in polar materials. Our experimental and theoretical studies provide direct evidence that a ferrielectric perovskite exhibits a large piezoelectric response because of extended polar distortion, accompanied by nonpolar octahedral rotations, as if twisted polarization relaxes under electric fields. The concept underlying the polarization twist opens new possibilities for developing alternative materials in bulk and thin-film forms. PMID:27586824

  2. Polarization twist in perovskite ferrielectrics.

    PubMed

    Kitanaka, Yuuki; Hirano, Kiyotaka; Ogino, Motohiro; Noguchi, Yuji; Miyayama, Masaru; Moriyoshi, Chikako; Kuroiwa, Yoshihiro

    2016-09-02

    Because the functions of polar materials are governed primarily by their polarization response to external stimuli, the majority of studies have focused on controlling polar lattice distortions. In some perovskite oxides, polar distortions coexist with nonpolar tilts and rotations of oxygen octahedra. The interplay between nonpolar and polar instabilities appears to play a crucial role, raising the question of how to design materials by exploiting their coupling. Here, we introduce the concept of 'polarization twist', which offers enhanced control over piezoelectric responses in polar materials. Our experimental and theoretical studies provide direct evidence that a ferrielectric perovskite exhibits a large piezoelectric response because of extended polar distortion, accompanied by nonpolar octahedral rotations, as if twisted polarization relaxes under electric fields. The concept underlying the polarization twist opens new possibilities for developing alternative materials in bulk and thin-film forms.

  3. Polarization twist in perovskite ferrielectrics.

    PubMed

    Kitanaka, Yuuki; Hirano, Kiyotaka; Ogino, Motohiro; Noguchi, Yuji; Miyayama, Masaru; Moriyoshi, Chikako; Kuroiwa, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Because the functions of polar materials are governed primarily by their polarization response to external stimuli, the majority of studies have focused on controlling polar lattice distortions. In some perovskite oxides, polar distortions coexist with nonpolar tilts and rotations of oxygen octahedra. The interplay between nonpolar and polar instabilities appears to play a crucial role, raising the question of how to design materials by exploiting their coupling. Here, we introduce the concept of 'polarization twist', which offers enhanced control over piezoelectric responses in polar materials. Our experimental and theoretical studies provide direct evidence that a ferrielectric perovskite exhibits a large piezoelectric response because of extended polar distortion, accompanied by nonpolar octahedral rotations, as if twisted polarization relaxes under electric fields. The concept underlying the polarization twist opens new possibilities for developing alternative materials in bulk and thin-film forms. PMID:27586824

  4. Transverse and longitudinal angular momenta of light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bliokh, Konstantin Y.; Nori, Franco

    2015-08-01

    We review basic physics and novel types of optical angular momentum. We start with a theoretical overview of momentum and angular momentum properties of generic optical fields, and discuss methods for their experimental measurements. In particular, we describe the well-known longitudinal (i.e., aligned with the mean momentum) spin and orbital angular momenta in polarized vortex beams. Then, we focus on the transverse (i.e., orthogonal to the mean momentum) spin and orbital angular momenta, which were recently actively discussed in theory and observed in experiments. First, the recently-discovered transverse spin angular momenta appear in various structured fields: evanescent waves, interference fields, and focused beams. We show that there are several kinds of transverse spin angular momentum, which differ strongly in their origins and physical properties. We describe extraordinary features of the transverse optical spins and overview recent experiments. In particular, the helicity-independent transverse spin inherent in edge evanescent waves offers robust spin-direction coupling at optical interfaces (the quantum spin Hall effect of light). Second, we overview the transverse orbital angular momenta of light, which can be both extrinsic and intrinsic. These two types of the transverse orbital angular momentum are produced by spatial shifts of the optical beams (e.g., in the spin Hall effect of light) and their Lorentz boosts, respectively. Our review is underpinned by a unified theory of the angular momentum of light based on the canonical momentum and spin densities, which avoids complications associated with the separation of spin and orbital angular momenta in the Poynting picture. It allows us to construct a comprehensive classification of all known optical angular momenta based on their key parameters and main physical properties.

  5. A Compact Polarization Imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Karl E.; Rust, David M.; Chen, Hua

    1995-01-01

    A new type of image detector has been designed to analyze the polarization of light simultaneously at all picture elements (pixels) in a scene. The Integrated Dual Imaging Detector (IDID) consists of a polarizing beamsplitter bonded to a custom-designed charge-coupled device with signal-analysis circuitry, all integrated on a silicon chip. The IDID should simplify the design and operation of imaging polarimeters and spectroscopic imagers used, for example, in atmospheric and solar research. Other applications include environmental monitoring and robot vision. Innovations in the IDID include two interleaved 512 x 1024 pixel imaging arrays (one for each polarization plane), large dynamic range (well depth of 10(exp 6) electrons per pixel), simultaneous readout and display of both images at 10(exp 6) pixels per second, and on-chip analog signal processing to produce polarization maps in real time. When used with a lithium niobate Fabry-Perot etalon or other color filter that can encode spectral information as polarization, the IDID can reveal tiny differences between simultaneous images at two wavelengths.

  6. POLARBEAR CMB Polarization Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishino, H.; Ade, P.; Akiba, Y.; Anthony, A.; Arnold, K.; Barron, D.; Boettger, D.; Borrill, J.; Chapmann, S.; Chinone, Y.; Dobbs, M. A.; Errard, J.; Fabbian, G.; Feng, C.; Flanigan, D.; Fuller, G.; Ghribi, A.; Grainger, W.; Halverson, N.; Hasegawa, M.; Hattori, K.; Hazumi, M.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Howard, J.; Hyland, P.; Inoue, Y.; Jaffe, A.; Jaehnig, G.; Kaneko, Y.; Katayama, N.; Keating, B.; Kermish, Z.; Kimura, N.; Kisner, T.; Lee, A. T.; Le Jeune, M.; Linder, E.; Lungu, M.; Matsuda, F.; Matsumura, T.; Miller, N. J.; Morii, H.; Moyerman, S.; Myers, M. J.; O'Brient, R.; Okamura, T.; Paar, H.; Peloton, J.; Quealy, E.; Reichardt, C. L.; Richards, P. L.; Ross, C.; Shimizu, A.; Shimon, M.; Shimmin, C.; Sholl, M.; Siritanasak, P.; Spieler, H.; Stebor, N.; Steinbach, B.; Stompor, R.; Suzuki, A.; Suzuki, J.; Tanaka, K.; Tomaru, T.; Tucker, C.; Yadav, A.; Zahn, O.

    POLARBEAR is a ground-based experiment in the Atacama desert in hile, measuring the polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation. One of the science goals of POLARBEAR is to detect the B-mode polarization pattern of the CMB produced by primordial gravitational waves from the epoch of inflation. The detection of the B-mode polarization provides strong evidence for inflationary cosmological models. POLARBEAR is expected to reach a sensitivity to the tensor-to-scalar ratio r = 0.025 at 95% confidence level, using the data from two years of observation. With a beam size of 3.5 arcminutes, POLARBEAR is also sensitive to B-mode polarization signals at small-angular scales produced by weak gravitational lensing of large-scale structure. POLARBEAR is expected to provide a constraint on the sum of neutrino masses because of their effect on the large-scale structure. POLARBEAR was deployed in late 2011 and started observing in early 2012 at 150 GHz with an array of 1,274 polarization sensitive antenna-coupled Transition Edge Sensor (TES) bolometers. The current status of the POLARBEAR experiment is reported.

  7. Polarized protons at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Makdisi, Y.

    1992-10-01

    The approval for construction of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) provides a potential opportunity to collide polarized proton beams at energies up to 500 GeV in the center of mass and high luminosities approaching 2 {times} 10{sup 32}/cm{sup 2}/sec. This capability is enhanced by the fact that the AGS has already accelerated polarized protons and relies on the newly completed Accumulator/Booster for providing the required polarized proton intensity and a system of spin rotators (Siberian snakes) to retain the polarization. The RHIC Spin Collaboration was formed and submitted a Letter of Intent to construct this polarized collider capability and utilize its physics opportunities. In this presentation, I will discuss the plans to upgrade the AGS, the proposed layout of the RHIC siberian snakes, and timetables. The physics focus is the measurement of the spin dependent parton distributions with such accessible probes including high p(t) jets, direct photons, and Drell Yan. The attainable sensitivities and the progress that has been reached in defining the detector requirements will be outlined.

  8. Polarized protons at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Makdisi, Y.

    1992-01-01

    The approval for construction of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) provides a potential opportunity to collide polarized proton beams at energies up to 500 GeV in the center of mass and high luminosities approaching 2 {times} 10{sup 32}/cm{sup 2}/sec. This capability is enhanced by the fact that the AGS has already accelerated polarized protons and relies on the newly completed Accumulator/Booster for providing the required polarized proton intensity and a system of spin rotators (Siberian snakes) to retain the polarization. The RHIC Spin Collaboration was formed and submitted a Letter of Intent to construct this polarized collider capability and utilize its physics opportunities. In this presentation, I will discuss the plans to upgrade the AGS, the proposed layout of the RHIC siberian snakes, and timetables. The physics focus is the measurement of the spin dependent parton distributions with such accessible probes including high p(t) jets, direct photons, and Drell Yan. The attainable sensitivities and the progress that has been reached in defining the detector requirements will be outlined.

  9. Artificial polarization components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cescato, L.; Gluch, Ekkehard; Stork, Wilhelm; Streibl, Norbert

    1990-07-01

    High frequency surface relief structures are optically anisotropic and show interesting polarisation properties 1 . These properties can be used to produce polarizations components such as wave plates polarizers. polarizing beamsplitters etc. Our experimental results show that even gratings with relatively low spatial frequency ( periods A ) exhibit a strong phase retardation and can be used as quarter-wave plates. k INTRODUC11ON The artificial birefringence exhibited by ultrahigh frequency gratings of dielectric materials can be used to produce various polarization components2 . Such components have applications in integrated optics as well as in free space optics. In order to produce the high spatial frequencies complex processes such as electron-beam lithography and reactive ion etching are needed. We show in this paper that sinusoidal holographic gratings in photoresist exhibit also a strong phase ret even at relatively long periods. L EXPERIMENTAL MEASUREMENTS To obtain the phase retardation of a lower frequency ( period A ) grating a simple setup as used by Enger and 2 can be applied. In our case however there are three measurements necessary to obtain the phase retardation because transmission of the two perpendicularly polarized beams is different from each other. I GRATING PRODUCTION grating 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 period (pmj 0. 74 0. 74 0. 61 0. 54 0. 46 0. 32 0. 54 0. 54 0. 54 ne (sec) 60

  10. Polarization analysis of optical systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chipman, Russell A.

    1989-01-01

    For most optical systems it is typically assumed that the transmitted wavefront has uniform (or Gaussian) amplitude and constant polarization state. This is the default assumption of geometrical optics. This paper considers methods suitable for analyzing systems for which this assumption is not valid. Such methods of polarization analysis include polarization ray tracing and polarization aberration theory. Definitions of the basic classes of polarization phenomena and a review of the Jones calculus are included to form a basis for the discussion.

  11. Longitudinal and transverse pyroelectric effects in a chiral ferroelectric liquid crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Yablonskii, S. V. Bondarchuk, V. V.; Soto-Bustamante, E. A.; Romero-Hasler, P. N.; Ozaki, M.; Yoshino, K.

    2015-04-15

    In this study, we compare the results of experimental investigations of longitudinal and transverse pyroelectric effects in a chiral ferroelectric crystal. In a transverse geometry, we studied freely suspended liquid-crystal films. In both geometries, samples exhibited bistability, demonstrating stable pyroelectric signals of different polarities at zero voltage. It is shown that a bistable cell based on a freely suspended film requires 40 times less energy expenditures as compared to the conventional sandwich-type cell.

  12. Magnetospheric polar cap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akasofu, S. I.; Kan, J. R.

    Mount Denali (McKinley), the Alaska Range, and countless glaciers welcomed all 86 participants of the Chapman Conference on the Magnetospheric Polar Cap, which was held on the University of Alaska, Fairbanks campus (UAF), on August 6-9, 1984. The magnetospheric polar cap is the highest latitude region of the earth which is surrounded by the ring of auroras (the auroral oval). This particular region of the earth has become a focus of magnetospheric physicists during the last several years. This is because a number of upper atmospheric phenomena in the polar cap are found to be crucial in understanding the solar wind—magnetosphere interaction. The conference was opened by J. G. Roederer, who was followed by the UAF Chancellor, P. J. O'Rourke, who officially welcomed the participants.

  13. A lunar polar expedition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dowling, Richard; Staehle, Robert L.; Svitek, Tomas

    1992-01-01

    Advanced exploration and development in harsh environments require mastery of basic human survival skill. Expeditions into the lethal climates of Earth's polar regions offer useful lessons for tommorrow's lunar pioneers. In Arctic and Antarctic exploration, 'wintering over' was a crucial milestone. The ability to establish a supply base and survive months of polar cold and darkness made extensive travel and exploration possible. Because of the possibility of near-constant solar illumination, the lunar polar regions, unlike Earth's may offer the most hospitable site for habitation. The World Space Foundation is examining a scenario for establishing a five-person expeditionary team on the lunar north pole for one year. This paper is a status report on a point design addressing site selection, transportation, power, and life support requirements.

  14. Polarized electron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Clendenin, J.E.

    1995-05-01

    Polarized electron sources for high energy accelerators took a significant step forward with the introduction of a new laser-driven photocathode source for the SLC in 1992. With an electron beam polarization of >80% and with {approximately}99% uptime during continuous operation, this source is a key factor in the success of the current SLC high-energy physics program. The SLC source performance is used to illustrate both the capabilities and the limitations of solid-state sources. The beam requirements for future colliders are similar to that of the SLC with the addition in most cases of multiple-bunch operation. A design for the next generation accelerator source that can improve the operational characteristics and at least minimize some of the inherent limitations of present sources is presented. Finally, the possibilities for producing highly polarized electron beams for high-duty-factor accelerators are discussed.

  15. South Polar Scarps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-438, 31 July 2003

    The terrain of the south polar residual ice cap, made up mostly of frozen carbon dioxide, has come to be known by many as 'swiss cheese terrain,' because many areas of the cap resemble slices of swiss cheese. However, not all of the south polar cap looks like a tasty lunch food. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a series of curving scarps formed by erosion and sublimation of carbon dioxide from the south polar cap. This area is located near 86.3oS, 51.2oW. The image is illuminated by sunlight from the upper left; the area is about 1.5 km (0.9 mi) wide.

  16. North Polar Cap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    7 September 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a 1.4 m/pixel (5 ft/pixel) view of a typical martian north polar ice cap texture. The surface is pitted and rough at the scale of several meters. The north polar residual cap of Mars consists mainly of water ice, while the south polar residual cap is mostly carbon dioxide. This picture is located near 85.2oN, 283.2oW. The image covers an area approximately 1 km wide by 1.4 km high (0.62 by 0.87 miles). Sunlight illuminates this scene from the lower left.

  17. North Polar Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    3 December 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows an exposure of finely-detailed layers in the martian north polar region. The polar ice cap, which is made up of frozen water (whereas the south polar cap is mostly frozen carbon dioxide), is underlain by a thick sequence of layers. Some have speculated that these layers may record the history of changes in martian climate during the past few hundreds of millions of years. This picture is located near 86.0oN, 30.2oW, and covers an area approximately 3 km (1.9 mi) across. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower left.

  18. Diurnal polar motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclure, P.

    1973-01-01

    An analytical theory is developed to describe diurnal polar motion in the earth which arises as a forced response due to lunisolar torques and tidal deformation. Doodson's expansion of the tide generating potential is used to represent the lunisolar torques. Both the magnitudes and the rates of change of perturbations in the earth's inertia tensor are included in the dynamical equations for the polar motion so as to account for rotational and tidal deformation. It is found that in a deformable earth with Love's number k = 0.29, the angular momentum vector departs by as much as 20 cm from the rotation axis rather than remaining within 1 or 2 cm as it would in a rigid earth. This 20 cm separation is significant in the interpretation of submeter polar motion observations because it necessitates an additional coordinate transformation in order to remove what would otherwise be a 20 cm error source in the conversion between inertial and terrestrial reference systems.

  19. POLARIZED NEUTRONS IN RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    COURANT,E.D.

    1998-04-27

    There does not appear to be any obvious way to accelerate neutrons, polarized or otherwise, to high energies by themselves. To investigate the behavior of polarized neutrons the authors therefore have to obtain them by accelerating them as components of heavier nuclei, and then sorting out the contribution of the neutrons in the analysis of the reactions produced by the heavy ion beams. The best neutron carriers for this purpose are probably {sup 3}He nuclei and deuterons. A polarized deuteron is primarily a combination of a proton and a neutron with their spins pointing in the same direction; in the {sup 3}He nucleus the spins of the two protons are opposite and the net spin (and magnetic moment) is almost the same as that of a free neutron. Polarized ions other than protons may be accelerated, stored and collided in a ring such as RHIC provided the techniques proposed for polarized proton operation can be adapted (or replaced by other strategies) for these ions. To accelerate polarized particles in a ring, one must make provisions for overcoming the depolarizing resonances that occur at certain energies. These resonances arise when the spin tune (ratio of spin precession frequency to orbit frequency) resonates with a component present in the horizontal field. The horizontal field oscillates with the vertical motion of the particles (due to vertical focusing); its frequency spectrum is dominated by the vertical oscillation frequency and its modulation by the periodic structure of the accelerator ring. In addition, the magnet imperfections that distort the closed orbit vertically contain all integral Fourier harmonics of the orbit frequency.

  20. Femtosecond polarization pulse shaping.

    PubMed

    Brixner, T; Gerber, G

    2001-04-15

    We report computer-controlled femtosecond polarization pulse shaping where intensity, momentary frequency, and light polarization are varied as functions of time. For the first time to our knowledge, a pulse shaper is used to modulate the degree of ellipticity as well as the orientation of the elliptical principal axes within a single laser pulse by use of a 256-pixel two-layer liquid-crystal display inside a zero-dispersion compressor. Interferometric stability of the setup is not required. Complete pulse characterization is achieved by dual-channel spectral interferometry. This technology has a large range of applications, especially in the field of quantum control.

  1. Microwave Frequency Polarizers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ha, Vien The; Mirel, Paul; Kogut, Alan J.

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the fabrication and analysis of microwave frequency polarizing grids. The grids are designed to measure polarization from the cosmic microwave background. It is effective in the range of 500 to 1500 micron wavelength. It is cryogenic compatible and highly robust to high load impacts. Each grid is fabricated using an array of different assembly processes which vary in the types of tension mechanisms to the shape and size of the grids. We provide a comprehensive study on the analysis of the grids' wire heights, diameters, and spacing.

  2. Polarization encoded color camera.

    PubMed

    Schonbrun, Ethan; Möller, Guðfríður; Di Caprio, Giuseppe

    2014-03-15

    Digital cameras would be colorblind if they did not have pixelated color filters integrated into their image sensors. Integration of conventional fixed filters, however, comes at the expense of an inability to modify the camera's spectral properties. Instead, we demonstrate a micropolarizer-based camera that can reconfigure its spectral response. Color is encoded into a linear polarization state by a chiral dispersive element and then read out in a single exposure. The polarization encoded color camera is capable of capturing three-color images at wavelengths spanning the visible to the near infrared. PMID:24690806

  3. Linking ultracold polar molecules.

    PubMed

    Avdeenkov, A V; Bohn, John L

    2003-01-31

    We predict that pairs of polar molecules can be weakly bound together in an ultracold environment, provided that a dc electric field is present. The field that links the molecules together also strongly influences the basic properties of the resulting dimer, such as its binding energy and predissociation lifetime. Because of their long-range character, these dimers will be useful in disentangling cold collision dynamics of polar molecules. As an example, we estimate the microwave photoassociation yield for OH-OH cold collisions.

  4. Physics with Polarized Antiprotons

    SciTech Connect

    Lenisa, Paolo

    2008-04-30

    Polarized antiprotons will provide access to a wealth of double- (and single-) spin observables, thereby opening a window to physics uniquely accessible with the HESR at FAIR. This include a first direct measurement of the transversity distribution of the valence quarks in the proton and a first measurement of the moduli and phase of the time-like electric and magnetic form factors G{sub E,M} of the proton. Additional applications of a polarized antiproton beam can be forseen in hadron spectroscopy, and nucleon-antinucleon scattering.

  5. South Polar Variety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    28 July 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a view of linear troughs and mesas formed in the frozen carbon dioxide of the martian south polar residual cap. This image, obtained in May 2005, is a reminder that not all of the south polar cap landscapes resemble 'swiss cheese.'

    Location near: 86.7oS, 24.8oW Image width: width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Spring

  6. Polar Ozone Losses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Paul A.; Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Since the discovery of the Antarctic ozone hole, a great deal of attention has been focused on the polar regions to both identify the chemistry and physics of the large losses, and to provide an understanding of the future of polar ozone. In this review talk, I will discuss the secular trends of ozone in both the Antarctic and Arctic regions, and I will review some of the principal research results of the last few years. In particular, I will emphasize some of the results from the SOLVE-THESEO 2000 campaign that occurred over the course of the winter of 1999-2000.

  7. North Polar Dust Storm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-334, 18 April 2003

    This composite of Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) wide angle daily global images shows a north polar dust storm on March 7, 2003. Similar late summer storms occurred nearly every day from late February well into April 2003; these were also seen in late summer in 1999 and 2001. The white features at the top of the image are the water ice surfaces of the north polar residual cap. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower left.

  8. North Polar Layer Exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    20 November 2004 Both the north and south polar ice caps overlie a thick accumulation of layered material. For more than three decades, these deposits have been assumed to consist of a mixture of dust and ice. This October 2004 Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows some of the north polar layers exposed on a slope located near 79.1oN, 348.4oW. The image covers an area approximately 3 km (1.9 mi) wide. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower left.

  9. North Polar Scarp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    3 March 2004 The north polar cap of Mars overlies a series of layered materials. The upper-most layers are light-toned and may include ice and perhaps dust. The lower layers may be less icy and contain some amount of dark sand. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows an exposure of north polar layers located near 83.9oN, 237.9oW. This view covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi) wide and is illuminated by sunlight from the lower left.

  10. South Polar Cap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    8 December 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows landforms created by sublimation processes on the south polar residual cap of Mars. The bulk of the ice in the south polar residual cap is frozen carbon dioxide.

    Location near: 86.6oS, 342.2oW Image width: width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Summer

  11. Femtosecond polarization pulse shaping.

    PubMed

    Brixner, T; Gerber, G

    2001-04-15

    We report computer-controlled femtosecond polarization pulse shaping where intensity, momentary frequency, and light polarization are varied as functions of time. For the first time to our knowledge, a pulse shaper is used to modulate the degree of ellipticity as well as the orientation of the elliptical principal axes within a single laser pulse by use of a 256-pixel two-layer liquid-crystal display inside a zero-dispersion compressor. Interferometric stability of the setup is not required. Complete pulse characterization is achieved by dual-channel spectral interferometry. This technology has a large range of applications, especially in the field of quantum control. PMID:18040384

  12. Generalized hyperboloid structures of polarization singularities in Laguerre-Gaussian vector fields

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, T. H.; Chen, Y. F.; Huang, K. F.

    2007-12-15

    We present the propagation-dependent polarization vector fields by use of an isotropic microchip laser with the longitudinal-transverse coupling and the entanglement of the polarization states. With the coherent superposition of orthogonal circularly polarized vortex modes which are made up of two Laguerre-Gaussian modes with different order, the experimental three-dimensional vector fields can be reconstructed analytically. From the theoretical analyses, the generalized structures of singularities such as V points, C lines, and L surfaces can be clearly demonstrated. Importantly, the projections of C lines on the transverse plane are found to form the intriguing petal structures.

  13. Wavelength-dependent longitudinal polarizability of gold nanorod on optical torques.

    PubMed

    Liaw, Jiunn-Woei; Lo, Wei-Jiun; Kuo, Mao-Kuen

    2014-05-01

    This study theoretically investigates the wavelength-dependent longitudinal polarizability of a gold nanorod (GNR) irradiated by a polarized laser beam. The resultant optical torque in terms of the Maxwell stress tensor was analyzed quantitatively using the multiple multipole method. Our results indicate that the real part of the longitudinal polarizability of GNR can be either positive or negative, leading to the parallel or perpendicular modes, respectively. For the parallel and perpendicular modes, the long axis of GNR is rotated to align parallel and perpendicular, respectively, to the polarization direction of the illuminating light. The turning point between these two modes, depending on the aspect ratio (AR) and the size of GNR, nearly coincides with the longitudinal surface plasmon resonance (LSPR). The perpendicular mode ranges from the transverse SPR to LSPR, and the range of the parallel mode is broadband from LSPR to the near infrared regime. Owing to that a larger optical torque and less plasmonic heating are of concern, an efficiency of optical torque is defined to evaluate the performance of different wavelengths. Analysis results indicate that lasers with wavelength in the perpendicular mode are applicable to rotate and align a GNR of a higher AR. For example, the laser of 785 nm (the perpendicular mode) is superior to that of 1064 nm (the parallel mode, off-resonant from LSPR of 955 nm) for rotating a GNR of AR = 4 and radius 20 nm with an orientation of 45° with respect to the laser polarization.

  14. Dynamic nuclear polarization enhancement of protons and vanadium-51 in the presence of pH-dependent vanadyl radicals.

    PubMed

    Perez Linde, Angel J; Carnevale, Diego; Miéville, Pascal; Sienkiewicz, Andrzej; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey

    2015-02-01

    We report applications of dynamic nuclear polarization to enhance proton and vanadium-51 polarization of vanadyl sulfate samples doped with TOTAPOL under magic angle spinning conditions. The electron paramagnetic resonance response stemming from the paramagnetic (51)V species was monitored as a function of pH, which can be adjusted to improve the enhancement of the proton polarization. By means of cross-polarization from the proton bath, (51)V spins could be hyperpolarized. Enhancement factors, build-up times, and longitudinal relaxation times T1((1)H) and T1((51)V) were investigated as a function of pH.

  15. Longitudinal study of fingerprint recognition

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Soweon; Jain, Anil K.

    2015-01-01

    Human identification by fingerprints is based on the fundamental premise that ridge patterns from distinct fingers are different (uniqueness) and a fingerprint pattern does not change over time (persistence). Although the uniqueness of fingerprints has been investigated by developing statistical models to estimate the probability of error in comparing two random samples of fingerprints, the persistence of fingerprints has remained a general belief based on only a few case studies. In this study, fingerprint match (similarity) scores are analyzed by multilevel statistical models with covariates such as time interval between two fingerprints in comparison, subject’s age, and fingerprint image quality. Longitudinal fingerprint records of 15,597 subjects are sampled from an operational fingerprint database such that each individual has at least five 10-print records over a minimum time span of 5 y. In regard to the persistence of fingerprints, the longitudinal analysis on a single (right index) finger demonstrates that (i) genuine match scores tend to significantly decrease when time interval between two fingerprints in comparison increases, whereas the change in impostor match scores is negligible; and (ii) fingerprint recognition accuracy at operational settings, nevertheless, tends to be stable as the time interval increases up to 12 y, the maximum time span in the dataset. However, the uncertainty of temporal stability of fingerprint recognition accuracy becomes substantially large if either of the two fingerprints being compared is of poor quality. The conclusions drawn from 10-finger fusion analysis coincide with the conclusions from single-finger analysis. PMID:26124106

  16. Longitudinal study of fingerprint recognition.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Soweon; Jain, Anil K

    2015-07-14

    Human identification by fingerprints is based on the fundamental premise that ridge patterns from distinct fingers are different (uniqueness) and a fingerprint pattern does not change over time (persistence). Although the uniqueness of fingerprints has been investigated by developing statistical models to estimate the probability of error in comparing two random samples of fingerprints, the persistence of fingerprints has remained a general belief based on only a few case studies. In this study, fingerprint match (similarity) scores are analyzed by multilevel statistical models with covariates such as time interval between two fingerprints in comparison, subject's age, and fingerprint image quality. Longitudinal fingerprint records of 15,597 subjects are sampled from an operational fingerprint database such that each individual has at least five 10-print records over a minimum time span of 5 y. In regard to the persistence of fingerprints, the longitudinal analysis on a single (right index) finger demonstrates that (i) genuine match scores tend to significantly decrease when time interval between two fingerprints in comparison increases, whereas the change in impostor match scores is negligible; and (ii) fingerprint recognition accuracy at operational settings, nevertheless, tends to be stable as the time interval increases up to 12 y, the maximum time span in the dataset. However, the uncertainty of temporal stability of fingerprint recognition accuracy becomes substantially large if either of the two fingerprints being compared is of poor quality. The conclusions drawn from 10-finger fusion analysis coincide with the conclusions from single-finger analysis.

  17. Surface plasmon induced polarization filter of the gold-coated photonic crystal fiber with a liquid core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Linghong; Zheng, Yi; Hou, Lantian; Zheng, Kai; Peng, Jiying

    2015-06-01

    A new gold-coated photonic crystal fiber (PCF) which can achieve a specific wavelength filter has been proposed. The polarization filter characteristics of the PCF based on the finite element method are investigated. Numerical results show that moving the two gold-coated holes toward the central core in longitudinal direction and filling pure water in the central defected air-hole can effectively enhance polarization extinction ratio around the resonance wavelength. The resonance strength in y-polarized case is far stronger than that in x-polarized case, the peak loss of the PCF with different coating thickness in y polarization can reach 536.25 dB/cm and 412.91 dB/cm at the communication wavelength of 1.55 μm and 1.31 μm, respectively, while the losses are very low in x polarization. This is beneficial for the study and application in many polarization filter devices.

  18. Phase-Controlled Polarization Modulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuss, D. T.; Wollack, E. J.; Novak, G.; Moseley, S. H.; Pisano, G.; Krejny, M.; U-Yen, K.

    2012-01-01

    We report technology development of millimeter/submillimeter polarization modulators that operate by introducing a a variable, controlled phase delay between two orthogonal polarization states. The variable-delay polarization modulator (VPM) operates via the introduction of a variable phase delay between two linear orthogonal polarization states, resulting in a variable mapping of a single linear polarization into a combination of that Stokes parameter and circular (Stokes V) polarization. Characterization of a prototype VPM is presented at 350 and 3000 microns. We also describe a modulator in which a variable phase delay is introduced between right- and left- circular polarization states. In this architecture, linear polarization is fully modulated. Each of these devices consists of a polarization diplexer parallel to and in front of a movable mirror. Modulation involves sub-wavelength translations of the mirror that change the magnitude of the phase delay.

  19. Optical neutron polarizers

    SciTech Connect

    Hayter, J.B.

    1990-01-01

    A neutron wave will be refracted by an appropriately varying potential. Optical neutron polarizers use spatially varying, spin- dependent potentials to refract neutrons of opposite spin states into different directions, so that an unpolarized beam will be split into two beams of complementary polarization by such a device. This paper will concentrate on two methods of producing spin-dependent potentials which are particularly well-suited to polarizing cold neutron beams, namely thin-film structures and field-gradient techniques. Thin-film optical devices, such as supermirror multilayer structures, are usually designed to deviate only one spin-state, so that they offer the possibility of making insertion (transmission) polarizers. Very good supermirrors may now be designed and fabricated, but it is not always straightforward to design mirror-based devices which are useful in real (divergent beam) applications, and some practical configurations will be discussed. Field-gradient devices, which are usually based on multipolar magnets, have tended to be too expensive for general use, but this may change with new developments in superconductivity. Dipolar and hexapolar configurations will be considered, with emphasis on the focusing characteristics of the latter. 21 refs., 7 figs.

  20. Titan Polar Landscape Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Jeffrey M.

    2016-01-01

    With the ongoing Cassini-era observations and studies of Titan it is clear that the intensity and distribution of surface processes (particularly fluvial erosion by methane and Aeolian transport) has changed through time. Currently however, alternate hypotheses substantially differ among specific scenarios with respect to the effects of atmospheric evolution, seasonal changes, and endogenic processes. We have studied the evolution of Titan's polar region through a combination of analysis of imaging, elevation data, and geomorphic mapping, spatially explicit simulations of landform evolution, and quantitative comparison of the simulated landscapes with corresponding Titan morphology. We have quantitatively evaluated alternate scenarios for the landform evolution of Titan's polar terrain. The investigations have been guided by recent geomorphic mapping and topographic characterization of the polar regions that are used to frame hypotheses of process interactions, which have been evaluated using simulation modeling. Topographic information about Titan's polar region is be based on SAR-Topography and altimetry archived on PDS, SAR-based stereo radar-grammetry, radar-sounding lake depth measurements, and superposition relationships between geomorphologic map units, which we will use to create a generalized topographic map.

  1. Optical polarizer material

    DOEpatents

    Ebbers, Christopher A.

    1999-01-01

    Several crystals have been identified which can be grown using standard single crystals growth techniques and which have a high birefringence. The identified crystals include Li.sub.2 CO.sub.3, LiNaCO.sub.3, LiKCO.sub.3, LiRbCO.sub.3 and LiCsCO.sub.3. The condition of high birefringence leads to their application as optical polarizer materials. In one embodiment of the invention, the crystal has the chemical formula LiK.sub.(1-w-x-y) Na.sub.(1-w-x-z) Rb.sub.(1-w-y-z) Cs.sub.(1-x-y-z) CO.sub.3, where w+x+y+z=1. In another embodiment, the crystalline material may be selected from a an alkali metal carbonate and a double salt of alkali metal carbonates, where the polarizer has a Wollaston configuration, a Glan-Thompson configuration or a Glan-Taylor configuration. A method of making an LiNaCO.sub.3 optical polarizer is described. A similar method is shown for making an LiKCO.sub.3 optical polarizer.

  2. Optical polarizer material

    DOEpatents

    Ebbers, C.A.

    1999-08-31

    Several crystals have been identified which can be grown using standard single crystals growth techniques and which have a high birefringence. The identified crystals include Li.sub.2 CO.sub.3, LiNaCO.sub.3, LiKCO.sub.3, LiRbCO.sub.3 and LiCsCO.sub.3. The condition of high birefringence leads to their application as optical polarizer materials. In one embodiment of the invention, the crystal has the chemical formula LiK.sub.(1-w-x-y) Na.sub.(1-w-x-z) Rb.sub.(1-w-y-z) Cs.sub.(1-x-y-z) CO.sub.3, where w+x+y+z=1. In another embodiment, the crystalline material may be selected from a an alkali metal carbonate and a double salt of alkali metal carbonates, where the polarizer has a Wollaston configuration, a Glan-Thompson configuration or a Glan-Taylor configuration. A method of making an LiNaCO.sub.3 optical polarizer is described. A similar method is shown for making an LiKCO.sub.3 optical polarizer.

  3. Variable polarity arc welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayless, E. O., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Technological advances generate within themselves dissatisfactions that lead to further advances in a process. A series of advances in welding technology which culminated in the Variable Polarity Plasma Arc (VPPA) Welding Process and an advance instituted to overcome the latest dissatisfactions with the process: automated VPPA welding are described briefly.

  4. Anodic Polarization Curves Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Yue; Drew, Michael G. B.; Liu, Ying; Liu, Lin

    2013-01-01

    An experiment published in this "Journal" has been revisited and it is found that the curve pattern of the anodic polarization curve for iron repeats itself successively when the potential scan is repeated. It is surprising that this observation has not been reported previously in the literature because it immediately brings into…

  5. North Polar Ice Cap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    North polar ice cap of Mars, as seen during mid summer in the northern hemisphere. The reddish areas consist of eolian dust, bright white areas consist of a mixture of water ice and dust, and the dark blue areas consist of sand dunes forming a huge 'collar' around the polar ice cap. (The colors have been enhanced with a decorrelation stretch to better show the color variability.) Shown here is an oblique view of the polar region, as seen with the Viking 1 spacecraft orbiting Mars over latitude 39 degrees north. The spiral bands consist of valleys which form by a combination of the Coriolis forces, wind erosion, and differential sublimation and condensation. In high-resolution images the polar caps are seen to consist of thick sequences of layered deposits, suggesting that cyclical climate changes have occurred on Mars. Cyclical climate changes are readily explained by quasi-periodic changes in the amount and distribution of solar heating resulting from perturbations in orbital and axial elements. Variations in the Earth's orbit have also been linked to the terrestrial climate changes during the ice ages.

  6. Titan's Polar Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flasar, F. M.; Achterberg, R. K.; Schinder, P. J.

    2015-12-01

    Cassini CIRS and Radio-Occultation measurements obtained in 2004-2015 have tracked the evolution of temperatures and winds in Titan's polar atmosphere, as the winter season shifted from the northern hemisphere to the southern. The dissolution of the strong circumpolar vortex initially seen in the northern hemisphere has been gradual. There is no evidence of the rapid distortion and disruption forced by planetary waves that can occur on Earth. Indeed, neither Cassini experiment has identified any thermal signature attributable to planetary-scale waves. The south-polar region has turned wintry fairly abruptly: temperature and zonal wind maps from CIRS data show that the 1-mbar temperatures at high southern latitudes in late autumn are already much colder than those at the corresponding latitudes in the north in midwinter, when the first extensive polar measurements were obtained. The south-polar region now has a strong circumpolar vortex, with maximum stratospheric winds occurring near 60° S, in contrast to the northern hemisphere in winter, where the polar vortex was much broader, extending to 20°-30° N. Potential vorticity maps now indicate steep meridional gradients at high southern latitudes, implying a barrier to efficient mixing between the polar region and lower latitudes. Radio-occultations have higher vertical resolution than CIRS, and they have recently probed latitudes as high as 65° in both hemispheres (latitudes closer to the pole are precluded because of the geometry of Earth occultations and the season). Above 80 km at these latitudes, where the radiative damping times are small enough that temperatures have large seasonal variations, the stratosphere in the north has warmed, and it has become much colder in the south. The abrupt transition region with negative vertical temperature gradient between 80 and 100 km, which was seen at high northern latitudes in winter, has weakened, but it is still visible. In the south, one can see the early stage of

  7. Lunar Polar Coring Lander

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angell, David; Bealmear, David; Benarroche, Patrice; Henry, Alan; Hudson, Raymond; Rivellini, Tommaso; Tolmachoff, Alex

    1990-01-01

    Plans to build a lunar base are presently being studied with a number of considerations. One of the most important considerations is qualifying the presence of water on the Moon. The existence of water on the Moon implies that future lunar settlements may be able to use this resource to produce things such as drinking water and rocket fuel. Due to the very high cost of transporting these materials to the Moon, in situ production could save billions of dollars in operating costs of the lunar base. Scientists have suggested that the polar regions of the Moon may contain some amounts of water ice in the regolith. Six possible mission scenarios are suggested which would allow lunar polar soil samples to be collected for analysis. The options presented are: remote sensing satellite, two unmanned robotic lunar coring missions (one is a sample return and one is a data return only), two combined manned and robotic polar coring missions, and one fully manned core retrieval mission. One of the combined manned and robotic missions has been singled out for detailed analysis. This mission proposes sending at least three unmanned robotic landers to the lunar pole to take core samples as deep as 15 meters. Upon successful completion of the coring operations, a manned mission would be sent to retrieve the samples and perform extensive experiments of the polar region. Man's first step in returning to the Moon is recommended to investigate the issue of lunar polar water. The potential benefits of lunar water more than warrant sending either astronauts, robots or both to the Moon before any permanent facility is constructed.

  8. Interplanetary magnetic sector polarity inferred from polar geomagnetic field observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eriss-Christensen, E.; Lassen, K.; Wilcox, J. M.; Gonzalez, W.; Colburn, D. S.

    1971-01-01

    With the use of a prediction technique it is shown that the polarity (toward or away from the sun) of the interplanetary magnetic field can be reliably inferred from observations of the polar geomagnetic field.

  9. Longitudinal target-spin asymmetries for deeply virtual Compton scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Seder, E.; Biselli, A.; Pisano, S.; Niccolai, S.; Smith, G. D.; Joo, K.; Adhikari, K.; Amaryan, M. J.; Anderson, M. D.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Avakian, H.; Battaglieri, M.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Bono, J.; Boiarinov, S.; Bosted, P.; Briscoe, W.; Brock, J.; Brooks, W. K.; Bültmann, S.; Burkert, V. D.; Carman, D. S.; Carlin, C.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Charles, G.; Colaneri, L.; Cole, P. L.; Contalbrigo, M.; Crabb, D.; Crede, V.; D’Angelo, A.; Dashyan, N.; De Vita, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Deur, A.; Djalali, C.; Doughty, D.; Dupre, R.; El Fassi, L.; Elouadrhiri, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fedotov, G.; Fegan, S.; Filippi, A.; Fleming, J. A.; Fradi, A.; Garillon, B.; Garçon, M.; Gevorgyan, N.; Ghandilyan, Y.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Goetz, J. T.; Gohn, W.; Gothe, R. W.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guegan, B.; Guidal, M.; Guo, L.; Hafidi, K.; Hakobyan, H.; Hanretty, C.; Harrison, N.; Hattawy, M.; Hirlinger Saylor, N.; Holtrop, M.; Hughes, S. M.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Isupov, E. L.; Jo, H. S.; Joosten, S.; Keith, C. D.; Keller, D.; Khachatryan, G.; Khandaker, M.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; Klein, A.; Klein, F. J.; Koirala, S.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuhn, S. E.; Lenisa, P.; Livingston, K.; Lu, H. Y.; MacGregor, I. J. D.; Markov, N.; Mayer, M.; McKinnon, B.; Meekins, D. G.; Mineeva, T.; Mirazita, M.; Mokeev, V.; Montgomery, R.; Moody, C. I.; Moutarde, H.; Movsisyan, A.; Munoz Camacho, C.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Niculescu, I.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Paolone, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Park, K.; Park, S.; Pasyuk, E.; Peng, P.; Phelps, W.; Pogorelko, O.; Price, J. W.; Prok, Y.; Protopopescu, D.; Puckett, A. J. R.; Ripani, M.; Rizzo, A.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Roy, P.; Sabatié, F.; Salgado, C.; Schott, D.; Schumacher, R. A.; Senderovich, I.; Simonyan, A.; Skorodumina, I.; Sokhan, D.; Sparveris, N.; Stepanyan, S.; Stoler, P.; Strakovsky, I. I.; Strauch, S.; Sytnik, V.; Taiuti, M.; Tang, W.; Tian, Y.; Ungaro, M.; Voskanyan, H.; Voutier, E.; Walford, N. K.; Watts, D. P.; Wei, X.; Weinstein, L. B.; Wood, M. H.; Zachariou, N.; Zana, L.; Zhang, J.; Zonta, I.

    2015-01-22

    A measurement of the electroproduction of photons off protons in the deeply inelastic regime was performed at Jefferson Lab using a nearly 6-GeV electron beam, a longitudinally polarized proton target and the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer. Target-spin asymmetries for ep → e'p'y events, which arise from the interference of the deeply virtual Compton scattering and the Bethe-Heitler processes, were extracted over the widest kinematics in Q2, xB, t and Φ, for 166 four-dimensional bins. In the framework of Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs), at leading twist the t dependence of these asymmetries provides insight on the spatial distribution of the axial charge of the proton, which appears to be concentrated in its center. In conclusion, these results bring important and necessary constraints for the existing parametrizations of chiral-even GPDs.

  10. Longitudinal target-spin asymmetries for deeply virtual Compton scattering

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Seder, E.; Biselli, A.; Pisano, S.; Niccolai, S.; Smith, G. D.; Joo, K.; Adhikari, K.; Amaryan, M. J.; Anderson, M. D.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; et al

    2015-01-22

    A measurement of the electroproduction of photons off protons in the deeply inelastic regime was performed at Jefferson Lab using a nearly 6-GeV electron beam, a longitudinally polarized proton target and the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer. Target-spin asymmetries for ep → e'p'y events, which arise from the interference of the deeply virtual Compton scattering and the Bethe-Heitler processes, were extracted over the widest kinematics in Q2, xB, t and Φ, for 166 four-dimensional bins. In the framework of Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs), at leading twist the t dependence of these asymmetries provides insight on the spatial distribution of the axialmore » charge of the proton, which appears to be concentrated in its center. In conclusion, these results bring important and necessary constraints for the existing parametrizations of chiral-even GPDs.« less

  11. Enhanced polarization by the coherent heterophase interface between polar and non-polar phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Gi-Yeop; Sung, Kil-Dong; Rhyim, Youngmok; Yoon, Seog-Young; Kim, Min-Soo; Jeong, Soon-Jong; Kim, Kwang-Ho; Ryu, Jungho; Kim, Sung-Dae; Choi, Si-Young

    2016-03-01

    A piezoelectric composite containing the ferroelectric polar (Bi(Na0.8K0.2)0.5TiO3: f-BNKT) and the non-polar (0.94Bi(Na0.75K0.25)0.5TiO3-0.06BiAlO3: BNKT-BA) phases exhibits synergetic properties which combine the beneficial aspects of each phase, i.e., the high saturated polarization (Ps) of the polar phase and the low coercive field (Ec) of the non-polar phase. To understand the origin of such a fruitful outcome from this type of polar/non-polar heterophase structure, comprehensive studies are conducted, including transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and finite element method (FEM) analyses. The TEM results show that the polar/non-polar composite has a core/shell structure in which the polar phase (core) is surrounded by a non-polar phase (shell). In situ electrical biasing TEM experiments visualize that the ferroelectric domains in the polar core are aligned even under an electric field of ~1 kV mm-1, which is much lower than its intrinsic coercive field (~3 kV mm-1). From the FEM analyses, we can find that the enhanced polarization of the polar phase is promoted by an additional internal field at the phase boundary which originates from the preferential polarization of the relaxor-like non-polar phase. From the present study, we conclude that the coherent interface between polar and non-polar phases is a key factor for understanding the enhanced piezoelectric properties of the composite.A piezoelectric composite containing the ferroelectric polar (Bi(Na0.8K0.2)0.5TiO3: f-BNKT) and the non-polar (0.94Bi(Na0.75K0.25)0.5TiO3-0.06BiAlO3: BNKT-BA) phases exhibits synergetic properties which combine the beneficial aspects of each phase, i.e., the high saturated polarization (Ps) of the polar phase and the low coercive field (Ec) of the non-polar phase. To understand the origin of such a fruitful outcome from this type of polar/non-polar heterophase structure, comprehensive studies are conducted, including transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and finite element

  12. Global Geospace Science/Polar Plasma Laboratory: POLAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The Global Geospace Science (GGS) Project is discussed as part of the International Solar-Terrestrial Physics (ISTP) Science Initiative. The objectives of Polar Plasma Laboratory (POLAR), one of the two spacecraft to be used by the Project to fill critical gaps in the scientific understanding of solar and plasma physics, are outlined. POLAR Laboratory is described, along with POLAR instrumentation, support subsystems, and orbits. Launch vehicle and injection into orbit are also addressed.

  13. Photoproduction of ω mesons off nuclei and impact of polarization on the meson-nucleon interaction

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chudakov, Eugene A.; Gevorkyan, Sergey; Somov, Alexander

    2016-01-25

    We consider photoproduction of ω mesons off complex nuclei to study interactions of transversely and longitudinally polarized vector mesons with nucleons. Whereas the total cross section for interactions of the transversely polarized vector mesons with nucleons σT = σ(VTN) can be obtained from coherent photoproduction, measurements of vector meson photoproduction in the incoherent region provide a unique opportunity to extract the not-yet-measured total cross section for longitudinally polarized mesons σL = σ(VLN). The predictions for the latter strongly depend on the theoretical approaches. Furthermore, this work is stimulated by the construction of the new experiment GlueX at Jefferson Lab, designedmore » to study the photoproduction of mesons in a large beam energy range up to 12 GeV.« less

  14. Azimuthal asymmetries in single polarized proton-proton Drell-Yan processes

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Zhun; Ma Boqiang; Zhu Jiacai

    2011-10-01

    We study the azimuthal asymmetries in proton-proton Drell-Yan processes with one incident proton being transversely or longitudinally polarized. We consider particularly the asymmetries contributed by the leading-twist chiral-odd quark distributions. We analyze the asymmetries with sin(2{phi}+{phi}{sub S}) and sin(2{phi}-{phi}{sub S}) modulations in transverse single polarized p{sup {up_arrow}p} Drell-Yan and sin2{phi} asymmetries in longitudinal single polarized p{sup {yields}p} Drell-Yan at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex, E906 (Fermi Lab), and the Nuclotron-based Ion Collider Facility (Joint Institute for Nuclear Research). We show that the measurements of the asymmetries in those facilities can provide valuable information of the chiral-odd structure of the nucleon both in the valence and sea regions.

  15. Radiative corrections to polarization observables in elastic electron-deuteron scattering in leptonic variables

    SciTech Connect

    Gakh, G. I.; Konchatnij, M. I. Merenkov, N. P.

    2012-08-15

    The model-independent QED radiative corrections to polarization observables in elastic scattering of unpolarized and longitudinally polarized electron beams by a deuteron target are calculated in leptonic variables. The experimental setup when the deuteron target is arbitrarily polarized is considered and the procedure for applying the derived results to the vector or tensor polarization of the recoil deuteron is discussed. The calculation is based on taking all essential Feynman diagrams into account, which results in the form of the Drell-Yan representation for the cross section, and the use of the covariant parameterization of the deuteron polarization state. Numerical estimates of the radiative corrections are given in the case where event selection allows undetected particles (photons and electron-positron pairs) and the restriction on the lost invariant mass is used.

  16. Exceptional polarization structures near the C-lines in diffracted near fields.

    PubMed

    Yu, Renlong; Xin, Yu; Zhao, Qi; Shao, Yanming; Chen, Yanru

    2015-08-01

    We study the polarization structures in the vicinity of C-lines in the near fields diffracted from a pair of small holes. We find that, when the incident light is circularly polarized, both the true C-lines and the structures near them are controlled only by the longitudinal component. Furthermore, we find that all the existing singular lines of circular polarization have the winding number ±1, which is very different than the usual numbers ±1/2, and the structure of major axes of the polarization ellipses surrounding these lines are shown to form structures different than the Möbius strip type. All these features prove to be stable upon small changes of shapes or positions of the apertures. However, C-lines with a unit winding number split into two C-lines of half-winding numbers when the incident light is elliptically polarized light. PMID:26367290

  17. The E166 experiment: Development of an Undulator-Based Polarized Positron Source for the International Linear Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Kovermann, J.; Stahl, A.; Mikhailichenko, A.A.; Scott, D.; Moortgat-Pick, G.A.; Gharibyan, V.; Pahl, P.; Poschl, R.; Schuler, K.P.; Laihem, K.; Riemann, S.; Schalicke, A.; Dollan, R.; Kolanoski, H.; Lohse, T.; Schweizer, T.; McDonald, K.T.; Batygin, Y.; Bharadwaj, V.; Bower, G.; Decker, F.J.; /SLAC /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U.

    2011-11-14

    A longitudinal polarized positron beam is foreseen for the international linear collider (ILC). A proof-of-principle experiment has been performed in the final focus test beam at SLAC to demonstrate the production of polarized positrons for implementation at the ILC. The E166 experiment uses a 1 m long helical undulator in a 46.6 GeV electron beam to produce a few MeV photons with a high degree of circular polarization. These photons are then converted in a thin target to generate longitudinally polarized e{sup +} and e{sup -}. The positron polarization is measured using a Compton transmission polarimeter. The data analysis has shown asymmetries in the expected vicinity of 3.4% and {approx}1% for photons and positrons respectively and the expected positron longitudinal polarization is covering a range from 50% to 90%. The full exploitation of the physics potential of an international linear collider (ILC) will require the development of polarized positron beams. Having both e{sup +} and e{sup -} beams polarized will provide new insight into structures of couplings and thus give access to physics beyond the standard model [1]. The concept for a polarized positron source is based on circularly polarized photon sources. These photons are then converted to longitudinally polarized e{sup +} and e{sup -} pairs. While in an experiment at KEK [1a], Compton backscattering is used [2], the E166 experiment uses a helical undulator to produce polarized photons. An undulator-based positron source for the ILC has been proposed in [3,4]. The proposed scheme for an ILC positron source is illustrated in figure 1. In this scheme, a 150 GeV electron beam passes through a 120 m long helical undulator to produce an intense photon beam with a high degree of circular polarization. These photons are converted in a thin target to e{sup +} e{sup -} pairs. The polarized positrons are then collected, pre-accelerated to the damping ring and injected to the main linac. The E166 experiment is

  18. Transverse-longitudinal integrated resonator

    DOEpatents

    Hutchinson, Donald P [Knoxville, TN; Simpson, Marcus L [Knoxville, TN; Simpson, John T [Knoxville, TN

    2003-03-11

    A transverse-longitudinal integrated optical resonator (TLIR) is disclosed which includes a waveguide, a first and a second subwavelength resonant grating in the waveguide, and at least one photonic band gap resonant structure (PBG) in the waveguide. The PBG is positioned between the first and second subwavelength resonant gratings. An electro-optic waveguide material may be used to permit tuning the TLIR and to permit the TLIR to perform signal modulation and switching. The TLIR may be positioned on a bulk substrate die with one or more electronic and optical devices and may be communicably connected to the same. A method for fabricating a TLIR including fabricating a broadband reflective grating is disclosed. A method for tuning the TLIR's transmission resonance wavelength is also disclosed.

  19. Longitudinal vortices beneath breaking waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nepf, H. M.; Cowen, E. A.; Kimmel, S. J.; Monismith, S. G.

    1995-08-01

    The formation of longitudinal vortices has been observed in a wavy channel flow and appears to be linked to spilling breaking and/or to vertical vorticity generated by a wave instability at the wave maker. Both conditions were present when the wave slope, ak exceeded 0.25. The wave instability produced velocity jets beneath and just downstream of the plunger that could provide the initial perturbation for the CL2 instability mechanism (Faller and Caponi, 1978). The breaker activity could also contribute to the CL2 production mechanism by eliminating the negative, stabilizing shear observed within the wave maker wake and by providing seed perturbations to the vorticity field. As the cells evolved downstream, they were maintained through interaction with the bottom boundary layer. When the vortices were present, both vertical mixing and turbulent kinetic energy were enhanced. Despite some differences in scale these results suggest that Langmuir circulation may produce similar changes in the mixed layer.

  20. Electron Scattering Experiments with Polarized Hydrogen/Deuterium Internal Targets

    SciTech Connect

    van Buuren, L.D.; 97-01 Collaboration

    2000-12-31

    A high-density polarized hydrogen/deuterium internal gas target is presented. The target is based on a setup previously used in electron scattering experiments with tensor-polarized deuterium. To increase the target thickness, new state-of-the-art permanent sextupole magnets and a more powerful pumping system were installed together with a longer (60 cm) and colder ({approximately}70 K) cylindrical storage cell. Electro-nuclear spin observables were measured by scattering longitudinally polarized electrons stored in the AmPS ring (NIFHEF) from the target gas. The product of electron beam and target polarization was determined from the known e{prime}p (quasi) elastic asymmetries. A target thickness of 1.1 {times} 10{sup 14} atoms/cm{sup 2} was achieved which with typical beam currents of 110 mA corresponds to a luminosity of about 7.5 {times} 10{sup 31} cm{sup {minus}2}s{sup {minus}1}. Target and beam polarizations up to 0.7 and 0.65, respectively, were obtained.

  1. Longitudinal functional principal component modeling via Stochastic Approximation Monte Carlo

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Josue G.; Liang, Faming; Zhou, Lan; Carroll, Raymond J.

    2010-01-01

    The authors consider the analysis of hierarchical longitudinal functional data based upon a functional principal components approach. In contrast to standard frequentist approaches to selecting the number of principal components, the authors do model averaging using a Bayesian formulation. A relatively straightforward reversible jump Markov Chain Monte Carlo formulation has poor mixing properties and in simulated data often becomes trapped at the wrong number of principal components. In order to overcome this, the authors show how to apply Stochastic Approximation Monte Carlo (SAMC) to this problem, a method that has the potential to explore the entire space and does not become trapped in local extrema. The combination of reversible jump methods and SAMC in hierarchical longitudinal functional data is simplified by a polar coordinate representation of the principal components. The approach is easy to implement and does well in simulated data in determining the distribution of the number of principal components, and in terms of its frequentist estimation properties. Empirical applications are also presented. PMID:20689648

  2. Titan's Winter Polar Vortex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flasar, F.M.; Achterberg, R.K.; Schinder, P.J.

    2008-01-01

    Titan's atmosphere has provided an interesting study in contrasts and similarities with Earth's. While both have N$_2$ as the dominant constituent and comparable surface pressures $\\sim1$ bar, Titan's next most abundant molecule is CH$_4$, not O$_2$, and the dissociative breakup of CH$_4$ and N$_2$ by sunlight and electron impact leads to a suite of hydrocarbons and nitriles, and ultimately the photochemical smog that enshrouds the moon. In addition, with a 15.95-day period, Titan is a slow rotator compared to Earth. While the mean zonal terrestrial winds are geostrophic, Titan's are mostly cyclostrophic, whipping around the moon in as little as 1 day. Despite the different dynamical regime, Titan's winter stratosphere exhibits several characteristics that should be familiar to terrestrial meteorologists. The cold winter pole near the 1 -mbar level is circumscribed by strong winds (up to 190 m/s) that act as a barrier to mixing with airmasses at lower latitudes. There is evidence of enhancement of several organic species over the winter pole, indicating subsidence. The adiabatic heating associated with this subsidence gives rise to a warm anomaly at the 0.01-mbar level, raising the stratopause two scale heights above its location at equatorial latitudes. Condensate ices have been detected in Titan's lower stratosphere within the winter polar vortex from infrared spectra. Although not always unambiguously identified, their spatial distribution exhibits a sharp gradient, decreasing precipitously across the vortex away from the winter pole. The interesting question of whether there is important heterogeneous chemistry occurring within the polar vortex, analogous to that occurring in the terrestrial polar stratospheric clouds in the ozone holes, has not been addressed. The breakup of Titan's winter polar vortex has not yet been observed. On Earth, the polar vortex is nonlinearly disrupted by interaction with large-amplitude planetary waves. Large-scale waves have not

  3. Modeling a Longitudinal Relational Research Data Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olsen, Michelle D. Hunt

    2010-01-01

    A study was conducted to propose a research-based model for a longitudinal data research system that addressed recommendations from a synthesis of literature related to: (1) needs reported by the U.S. Department of Education, (2) the twelve mandatory elements that define federally approved state longitudinal data systems (SLDS), (3) the…

  4. Vergence instabilities and the longitudinal horopter.

    PubMed

    Reading, R W

    1986-01-01

    The method of averaging was applied to the results of repeated measures of the longitudinal horopter for four subjects classified as binocularly normal and one anisometropic amblyope. The results produced a refined horopter locus and suggested that the so-called Vieth-Mueller circle is an adequate describer of the empirical longitudinal horopter, except in those cases involving uncorrected aniseikonia.

  5. Fears in Czech Adolescents: A Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michalcáková, Radka; Lacinová, Lenka; Kyjonková, Hana; Bouša, Ondrej; Jelínek, Martin

    2013-01-01

    The present study investigates developmental patterns of fear in adolescence. It is based on longitudinal data collected as a part of the European Longitudinal Study of Pregnancy and Childhood (ELSPAC) project. A total of 186 Czech adolescents (43% girls) were assessed repeatedly at the age of 11, 13, and 15 years. The free-response method was…

  6. Analytical polarization calculations beyond SLIM

    SciTech Connect

    Barber, D.P. , Notkestrasse, 85, 2000 Hamburg 52, Federal Republic of Germany )

    1989-05-05

    A comparison is made between the theories of Bell and Leinaas and of Derbenev and Kondratenko for the spin polarization in electron storage rings. A calculation of polarization in HERA using the program SMILE of Mane is presented.

  7. Polarity of the Amphibian Egg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malacinski, G. M.

    1983-01-01

    Amphibian egg polarity and the mechanism which generates the polarity is addressed. Of particular concern is the question of whether the activation rotation which responds to gravity is a prerequisite for normal development.

  8. Defining the Polar Field Reversal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Upton, Lisa; Hathaway, David H.

    2013-01-01

    The polar fields on the Sun are directly related to solar cycle variability. Recently there has been interest in studying an important characteristic of the polar fields: the timing of the polar field reversals. However this characteristic has been poorly defined, mostly due to the limitations of early observations. In the past, the reversals have been calculated by averaging the flux above some latitude (i.e. 55deg or 75deg). Alternatively, the reversal could be defined by the time in which the previous polarity is completely canceled and replaced by the new polarity at 90de, precisely at the pole. We will use a surface flux transport model to illustrate the differences in the timing of the polar field reversal based on each of these definitions and propose standardization in the definition of the polar field reversal. The ability to predict the timing of the polar field reversal using a surface flux transport model will also be discussed.

  9. Polar basal melting on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clifford, Stephen M.

    1987-01-01

    The thermal requirements and implications of polar basal melting on Mars are discussed in detail. The composition, geology, origin, and evolution of the Martian polar terrains are summarized. Thermal calculations and flow calculations of the basal melt are discussed. The significance of the basal melting for the origin of major polar reentrants, the storage of an ancient Martian ice sheet, the mass balance of the polar terrain, and basal melting at temperate latitudes is examined.

  10. Polarization of a Helium-Neon Laser.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Edwin R.

    1996-01-01

    Describes an experiment that involves measuring the intensity of laser light passed by a linear polarizer. Discusses polarization effects, orthogonal polarizations, instrumentation, and further experiments. (JRH)

  11. Nonlinear Accelerator with Transverse Motion Integrable in Normalized Polar Coordinates

    SciTech Connect

    Nagaitsev, S.; Kharkov, Y.; Morozov, I.A.; Zolkin, T.V.; /Chicago U.

    2012-05-01

    Several families of nonlinear accelerator lattices with integrable transverse motion were suggested recently. One of the requirements for the existence of two analytic invariants is a special longitudinal coordinate dependence of fields. This paper presents the particle motion analysis when a problem becomes integrable in the normalized polar coordinates. This case is distinguished from the others: it yields an exact analytical solution and has a uniform longitudinal coordinate dependence of the fields (since the corresponding nonlinear potential is invariant under the transformation from the Cartesian to the normalized coordinates). A number of interesting features are revealed: while the frequency of radial oscillations is independent of the amplitude, the spread of angular frequencies in a beam is absolute. A corresponding spread of frequencies of oscillations in the Cartesian coordinates is evaluated via the simulation of transverse Schottky noise.

  12. Polarization perception device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitehead, Victor S. (Inventor); Coulson, Kinsel L. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A polarization perception device comprises a base and a polarizing filter having opposite broad sides and a centerline perpendicular thereto. The filter is mounted on the base for relative rotation and with a major portion of the area of the filter substantially unobstructed on either side. A motor on the base automatically moves the filter angularly about its centerline at a speed slow enough to permit changes in light transmission by virtue of such movement to be perceived as light-dark pulses by a human observer, but fast enough so that the light phase of each such pulse occurs prior to fading of the light phase image of the preceding pulse from the observer's retina. In addition to an observer viewing a scene in real time through the filter while it is so angularly moved, or instead of such observation, the scene can be photographed, filmed or taped by a camera whose lens is positioned behind the filter.

  13. Common Magnets, Unexpected Polarities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Mark

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, I discuss a "misconception" in magnetism so simple and pervasive as to be typically unnoticed. That magnets have poles might be considered one of the more straightforward notions in introductory physics. However, the magnets common to students' experiences are likely different from those presented in educational contexts. This leads students, in my experience, to frequently and erroneously attribute magnetic poles based on geometric associations rather than actual observed behavior. This polarity discrepancy can provide teachers the opportunity to engage students in authentic inquiry about objects in their daily experiences. I've found that investigation of the magnetic polarities of common magnets provides a productive context for students in which to develop valuable and authentic scientific inquiry practices.

  14. Polar Magnetic Field Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Christopher T.; Hoffman, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    At this writing we have received all the CDROMs for the grant period. We have completed generating our timing tables past September 20, 2001. The calibration of the instrument has been checked for the entire mission up to the end of December 2000 and the key parameters provided to the project until the end of December 2000. These data are available to other experimenters over the web at http://www-ssc.igpp.ucla.edu/forms/polar/. High resolution spun data, 8 samples per see, have been created up to November, 2000 and have been made available to the community over the world wide web. This is a new data set that was a major effort this year. Our near term plans are to continue to provide key parameter data to the Polar project with the highest possible speed and to continue to reduce all high resolution magnetometer data and provide these data to the scientific community over the web.

  15. Circularly polarized microstrip antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lo, Y. T.; Engst, B.; Lee, R. Q. H.

    1985-01-01

    A simple microstrip antenna can be made to radiate EM waves of any polarization, in particular, the circular polarization (CP) without any phasing network and power divider. A simple and accurate theory for this family of antennas was developed. However, the CP bandwidth, (CPBW) the bandwidth in which the axial ratio (AR) is less than a certain specified value, is very small. Most of the experimental designs were made for a feed placed along the diagonal of the patch. It is shown that there are practically infinitely many possible designs with different feed location. The speculation that other designs might give a wider bandwidth is clarified and an effective method for broadening the bandwidth is shown.

  16. Galactic Diffuse Polarized Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carretti, Ettore

    2011-12-01

    Diffuse polarized emission by synchrotron is a key tool to investigate magnetic fields in the Milky Way, particularly the ordered component of the large scale structure. Key observables are the synchrotron emission itself and the RM is by Faraday rotation. In this paper the main properties of the radio polarized diffuse emission and its use to investigate magnetic fields will be reviewed along with our current understanding of the galactic magnetic field and the data sets available. We will then focus on the future perspective discussing RM-synthesis - the new powerful instrument devised to unlock the information encoded in such an emission - and the surveys currently in progress like S-PASS and GMIMS.

  17. The polar bear phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Maw, P.K. ); Lane, M.T.

    1990-02-01

    Results from measuring the thermal profile of polar bear pelts, reflectiveness of the pelts, and total thermal conversion data lead to the conclusion that the pelts from an ultra-efficient thermal diode for solar-thermal conversion. The transfer of the thermal energy from the surface of the fur to the skin where it is absorbed cannot be thermal, and therefore must be radiative. This process must have an efficiency of better than 90:0090 percent to account for measured values. The radiative transfer process is not known at present. To understand it, a detailed knowledge of the microscopic parameters of the pelts must be obtained. This is the current thrust of the polar solar research. If the process can be understood and synthesized,it will provide a major breakthrough in the area of solar-thermal energy conversion.

  18. North Polar Ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    25 December 2004 For 25 December, the MOC team thought that a visit to a north polar site would be timely. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows, at about 1.5 meters per pixel (5 feet per pixel) resolution, a view of the north polar ice cap of Mars. That the material includes water ice has been known since the mid-1970s, when Viking orbiter observations confirmed that the cap gives off water vapor in the summertime, as the ice is subliming away. The surface shown here, observed by MOC during northern summer in November 2004, is pitted and somewhat grooved. Dark material on pit floors might be trapped, windblown dust. The picture covers an area about 1 km (0.62 mi) across, and is located near 86.8oN, 293.1oW. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower left.

  19. North Polar Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    13 January 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a slope on which layered materials are exposed by erosion in the north polar region of Mars. Wind streaks are also evident in this summertime scene. The layers that make up the material beneath the ice of the north polar residual cap are typically considered to be a mixture of some amount of dust and ice, but the proportions of these constituents are not known.

    Location near: 82.6oN, 298.1oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Northern Summer

  20. Summer South Polar Cap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    13 April 2004 The martian south polar residual ice cap is composed mainly of frozen carbon dioxide. Each summer, a little bit of this carbon dioxide sublimes away. Pits grow larger, and mesas get smaller, as this process continues from year to year. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a view of a small portion of the south polar cap as it appeared in mid-summer in January 2004. The dark areas may be places where the frozen carbon dioxide contains impurities, such as dust, or places where sublimation of ice has roughened the surface so that it appears darker because of small shadows cast by irregularities in the roughened surface. The image is located near 86.9oS, 7.6oW. The image covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) across. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the upper left.

  1. Polarization Perception Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitehead, Victor S. (Inventor); Coulson, Kinsell L. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A polarization perception device comprises a base and a polarizing filter having opposite broad sides and a centerline perpendicular thereto. The filter is mounted on the base for relative rotation and with a major portion of the area of the filter substantially unobstructed on either side. A motor on the base automatically moves the filter angularly about its centerline at a speed slow enough to permit changes in light transmission by virtue of such movement to be perceived as light-dark pulses by a human observer, but fast enough so that the light phase of each such pulse occurs prior to fading of the light phase image of the preceding pulse from the observer's retina. In addition to an observer viewing a scene in real time through the filter while it is so angularly moved, or instead of such observation, the scene can be photographed, filmed or taped by a camera whose lens is positioned behind the filter.

  2. North Polar Features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    28 November 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows banded terrain of the north polar region of Mars. The bands are exposures of layered material, possibly composed of dust and ice. The dark, rounded to elliptical mounds in this image might be the locations of ancient sand dunes that were completely buried in the north polar layered material. In more recent times, these mounds have been exhumed from within the layered material. Alternatively, the dark features are not ancient, exhumed dunes, but perhaps the remnants of a dark layer of material that once covered the entire area shown in the image. These features are located near 79.9oN, 31.4oW. The image covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) wide. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower left.

  3. Undulator Production of Polarized Positrons

    SciTech Connect

    William M. Bugg

    2008-08-27

    E-166 at SLAC has demonstrated the feasibilty of production of polarized positrons for the International Linear Collider using a helical undulator to produce polarized photons which are converted in a thin target to polarized positrons. The success of the experim ent has resulted in the choice of this technique for the baseline design of ILC.

  4. Alternating-Polarity Arc Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwinghamer, R. J.

    1987-01-01

    Brief reversing polarity of welding current greatly improves quality of welds. NASA technical memorandum recounts progress in art of variable-polarity plasma-arc (VPPA) welding, with emphasis on welding of aluminum-alloy tanks. VPPA welders offer important advantages over conventional single-polarity gas/tungsten arc welders.

  5. Animated Displays IV: Linear Polarization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chagnon, Paul

    1993-01-01

    Describes several demonstrations that can be easily reproduced to help students understand optical polarization. Displays and supplement text include polarization by reflection; polarization by scattering; liquid crystals; optical activity; calcite; birefringent plastics; retardation plates; photoelasticity; and the "Optical Barber Pole." Contains…

  6. LSTGEE: longitudinal analysis of neuroimaging data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yimei; Zhu, Hongtu; Chen, Yasheng; An, Hongyu; Gilmore, John; Lin, Weili; Shen, Dinggang

    2009-02-01

    Longitudinal imaging studies are essential to understanding the neural development of neuropsychiatric disorders, substance use disorders, and normal brain. Using appropriate image processing and statistical tools to analyze the imaging, behavioral, and clinical data is critical for optimally exploring and interpreting the findings from those imaging studies. However, the existing imaging processing and statistical methods for analyzing imaging longitudinal measures are primarily developed for cross-sectional neuroimaging studies. The simple use of these cross-sectional tools to longitudinal imaging studies will significantly decrease the statistical power of longitudinal studies in detecting subtle changes of imaging measures and the causal role of time-dependent covariate in disease process. The main objective of this paper is to develop longitudinal statistics toolbox, called LSTGEE, for the analysis of neuroimaging data from longitudinal studies. We develop generalized estimating equations for jointly modeling imaging measures with behavioral and clinical variables from longitudinal studies. We develop a test procedure based on a score test statistic and a resampling method to test linear hypotheses of unknown parameters, such as associations between brain structure and function and covariates of interest, such as IQ, age, gene, diagnostic groups, and severity of disease. We demonstrate the application of our statistical methods to the detection of the changes of the fractional anisotropy across time in a longitudinal neonate study. Particularly, our results demonstrate that the use of longitudinal statistics can dramatically increase the statistical power in detecting the changes of neuroimaging measures. The proposed approach can be applied to longitudinal data with multiple outcomes and accommodate incomplete and unbalanced data, i.e., subjects with different number of measurements.

  7. Advanced Strained-Superlattice Photocathodes for Polarized Electron Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Aaron Moy

    2005-01-31

    Polarized electrons have been essential for high-energy parity-violating experiments and measurements of the nucleon spin structure. The availability of a polarized electron beam was crucial to the success of the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) in achieving a precise measurement of the electroweak mixing angle, and polarized electron beams will be required for all future linear colliders. Polarized electrons are readily produced by GaAs photocathode sources. When a circularly polarized laser beam tuned to the bandgap minimum is directed to the negative-electron-affinity (NEA) surface of a GaAs crystal, longitudinally polarized electrons are emitted into vacuum. The electron polarization is easily reversed by reversing the laser polarization. The important properties of these photocathodes for accelerator applications are: degree of polarization of the extracted beam; ability to extract sufficient charge to meet accelerator pulse-structure requirements; efficiency and stability of operation; and absence of any asymmetries in the beam properties (charge, position, energy, etc.) upon polarization reversal. The performance of GaAs photocathodes has improved significantly since they were first introduced in 1978 [1]. The theoretical maximum polarization of 50% for natural GaAs was first exceeded in 1991 using the lattice mismatch of a thin InGaAs layer epitaxially grown over a GaAs substrate to generate a strain in the former that broke the natural degeneracy between the heavy- and light-hole valence bands [2]. Polarizations as high as 78% were produced for the SLC from photocathodes based on a thin GaAs epilayer grown on GaAsP [3,4]. After 10 years of experience with many cathode samples at several laboratories [5], the maximum polarization using the GaAs/GaAsP single strained-layer cathode remained limited to 80%, while the quantum efficiency (QE) for a 100-nm epilayer is only 0.3% or less. Two factors were known to limit the polarization of these cathodes: (1) the

  8. Polarization induced doped transistor

    DOEpatents

    Xing, Huili; Jena, Debdeep; Nomoto, Kazuki; Song, Bo; Zhu, Mingda; Hu, Zongyang

    2016-06-07

    A nitride-based field effect transistor (FET) comprises a compositionally graded and polarization induced doped p-layer underlying at least one gate contact and a compositionally graded and doped n-channel underlying a source contact. The n-channel is converted from the p-layer to the n-channel by ion implantation, a buffer underlies the doped p-layer and the n-channel, and a drain underlies the buffer.

  9. North Polar Layers, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    This view shows the basal layers of Mars' north polar layered deposits. The floor of Chasma Boreale is at the bottom of the image. This is a sub-image of a larger view imaged by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter on Oct. 1, 2006. The resolution is 64 centimeters (25 inches) per pixel, and the scene is 568 meters (621 yards) wide.

  10. South Polar Terrain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    19 July 2004 This full-resolution (1.5 meters, 5 feet, per pixel) Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows mesa tops and depressions formed in layered carbon dioxide ice in the south polar residual cap. The image is located near 87.0oS, 341.9oW, and covers an area about 1.5 km (0.9 mi) wide. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the upper left.

  11. North Polar Sand Dunes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-417, 10 July 2003

    The martian north polar ice cap is surrounded by fields of dark, windblown sand dunes. This March 2003 Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows dunes near 76.5oN, 264.7oW. The steep dune slip faces indicate wind transport of sand from the lower left toward the upper right. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower left.

  12. Martian polar geological studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutts, J. A. J.

    1977-01-01

    Multiple arcs of rugged mountains and adjacent plains on the surface of Mars were examined. These features, located in the southern polar region were photographed by Mariner 9. Comparisons are made with characteristics of a lunar basin and mare; Mare imbrium in particular. The martian feature is interpreted to have originated in the same way as its lunar analog- by volcanic flooding of a large impact basin. Key data and methodology leading to this conclusion are cited.

  13. South Polar Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    2 July 2004 Beneath the ice caps of both martian poles lies extensive deposits of layered material. Whether the material includes ice is unknown. In the north polar region, some of the layers contain dark sand, others may consist of dust cemented by ice. The south polar layers are a little bit more challenging to understand. In most places, they have been covered by thin mantles of debris that mask the true nature of the layered material. This is the case, even in the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shown here. South polar layers were eroded to provide this spectacular view, but later the materials were almost uniformly covered with a material that, when the image is viewed at full resolution (click on image, above), has become cracked. This picture is located near 82.0oS, 72.4oW, and covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) wide. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the upper left.

  14. Synchrotron polarization in blazars

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Haocheng; Böttcher, Markus; Chen, Xuhui

    2014-07-01

    We present a detailed analysis of time- and energy-dependent synchrotron polarization signatures in a shock-in-jet model for γ-ray blazars. Our calculations employ a full three-dimensional radiation transfer code, assuming a helical magnetic field throughout the jet. The code considers synchrotron emission from an ordered magnetic field, and takes into account all light-travel-time and other relevant geometric effects, while the relevant synchrotron self-Compton and external Compton effects are handled with the two-dimensional Monte-Carlo/Fokker-Planck (MCFP) code. We consider several possible mechanisms through which a relativistic shock propagating through the jet may affect the jet plasma to produce a synchrotron and high-energy flare. Most plausibly, the shock is expected to lead to a compression of the magnetic field, increasing the toroidal field component and thereby changing the direction of the magnetic field in the region affected by the shock. We find that such a scenario leads to correlated synchrotron + synchrotron-self-Compton flaring, associated with substantial variability in the synchrotron polarization percentage and position angle. Most importantly, this scenario naturally explains large polarization angle rotations by ≳ 180°, as observed in connection with γ-ray flares in several blazars, without the need for bent or helical jet trajectories or other nonaxisymmetric jet features.

  15. Pliocene geomagnetic polarity epochs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dalrymple, G.B.; Cox, A.; Doell, Richard R.; Gromme, C.S.

    1967-01-01

    A paleomagnetic and K-Ar dating study of 44 upper Miocene and Pliocene volcanic units from the western United States suggests that the frequency of reversals of the earth's magnetic field during Pliocene time may have been comparable with that of the last 3.6 m.y. Although the data are too limited to permit the formal naming of any new polarity epochs or events, four polarity transitions have been identified: the W10 R/N boundary at 3.7 ?? 0.1 m.y., the A12 N/R boundary at 4.9 ?? 0.1 m.y., the W32 N/R boundary at 9.0 ?? 0.2m.y., and the W36 R/N boundary at 10.8 ?? 0.3 - 1.0 m.y. The loss of absolute resolution of K-Ar dating in older rocks indicates that the use of well defined stratigraphic successions to identify and date polarity transitions will be important in the study of Pliocene and older reversals. ?? 1967.

  16. Measurement of W Boson Polarization in Top Quark Decay

    SciTech Connect

    Vickey, Trevor Neil

    2004-01-01

    A measurement of the polarization of the W boson from top quark decay is an excellent test of the V-A form of the charged-current weak interaction in the standard model. Since the longitudinal W boson is intimately related to the electroweak symmetry breaking mechanism, and the standard model gives a specific prediction for the fraction of longitudinal W bosons from top decays, it is of particular interest for study. This thesis presents a measurement of W boson polarization in top quark decays through an analysis of the cosθ* distribution in the lepton-plus-jets channel of t$\\bar{t}$ candidate events from p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV. This measurement uses an integrated luminosity of ~ 162 pb-1 of data collected with the CDF Run II detector, resulting in 31 t$\\bar{t}$ candidate events with at least one identified b jet. Using a binned likelihood fit to the cosθ* distribution from the t$\\bar{t}$ candidate events found in this sample, the fraction of W bosons with longitudinal polarization is determined to be F0 = 0.99$+0.29\\atop{-0.35}$stat.) ± 0.19(syst.), F0 > 0.33 @ 95% CL. This result is consistent with the standard model prediction, given a top quark mass of 174.3 GeV/c2, of F0 = 0.701 ± 0.012.

  17. Hybrid-Polarity SAR Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raney, R. K.; Freeman, A.

    2009-04-01

    A space-based synthetic aperture radar (SAR) designed to provide quantitative information on a global scale implies severe requirements to maximize coverage and to sustain reliable operational calibration. These requirements are best served by the hybrid-polarity architecture, in which the radar transmits in circular polarization, and receives on two orthogonal linear polarizations, coherently, retaining their relative phase. This paper reviews those advantages,summarizes key attributes of hybrid-polarity dual- and quadrature-polarized SARs including conditions under which the signal-to-noise ratio is conserved, and describes the evolution of this architecture from first principles.

  18. Measurements Of Spin Observables In Pseudoscalar-Meson Photo-Production Using Polarized Neutrons In Solid HD

    SciTech Connect

    Kageya, Tsuneo

    2014-01-01

    Psuedo-scalar meson photo production measurements have been carried out with longitudinally-polarized neutrons using the circularly and linearly polarized photon beams and the CLAS at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jlab). The experiment aims to obtain a complete set of spin observables on an efficient neutron target. Preliminary E asymmetries for the exclusive reaction, gamma + n(p)--> pi- + p(p), selecting quasi free neutron kinematics are discussed.

  19. Measurements of Spin Observables in Single Pion Photo-Production from Polarized Quasi-Free Neutrons in Solid HD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kageya, Tsuneo

    Abstract Psuedo-scalar meson photo production measurements have been carried out with longitudinally-polarized neutrons using the circularly and linearly polarized photon beams and the CLAS at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jlab). The experiment aims to obtain a complete set of spin observables on an effective neutron target using D in HD. Preliminary E and Σ asymmetries for the exclusive reaction, γ + n(p) → π- + p(p), are discussed.

  20. Bayesian response adaptive randomization using longitudinal outcomes.

    PubMed

    Hatayama, Tomoyoshi; Morita, Satoshi; Sakamaki, Kentaro

    2015-01-01

    The response adaptive randomization (RAR) method is used to increase the number of patients assigned to more efficacious treatment arms in clinical trials. In many trials evaluating longitudinal patient outcomes, RAR methods based only on the final measurement may not benefit significantly from RAR because of its delayed initiation. We propose a Bayesian RAR method to improve RAR performance by accounting for longitudinal patient outcomes (longitudinal RAR). We use a Bayesian linear mixed effects model to analyze longitudinal continuous patient outcomes for calculating a patient allocation probability. In addition, we aim to mitigate the loss of statistical power because of large patient allocation imbalances by embedding adjusters into the patient allocation probability calculation. Using extensive simulation we compared the operating characteristics of our proposed longitudinal RAR method with those of the RAR method based only on the final measurement and with an equal randomization method. Simulation results showed that our proposed longitudinal RAR method assigned more patients to the presumably superior treatment arm compared with the other two methods. In addition, the embedded adjuster effectively worked to prevent extreme patient allocation imbalances. However, our proposed method may not function adequately when the treatment effect difference is moderate or less, and still needs to be modified to deal with unexpectedly large departures from the presumed longitudinal data model.

  1. Sensitivity of VIIRS Polarization Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waluschka, Eugene

    2010-01-01

    The design of an optical system typically involves a sensitivity analysis where the various lens parameters, such as lens spacing and curvatures, to name two parameters, are (slightly) varied to see what, if any, effect this has on the performance and to establish manufacturing tolerances. A sinular analysis was performed for the VIIRS instruments polarization measurements to see how real world departures from perfectly linearly polarized light entering VIIRS effects the polarization measurement. The methodology and a few of the results of this polarization sensitivity analysis are presented and applied to the construction of a single polarizer which will cover the VIIRS VIS/NIR spectral range. Keywords: VIIRS, polarization, ray, trace; polarizers, Bolder Vision, MOXTEK

  2. Generalized top-spin analysis and new physics in e+e- collisions with beam polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ananthanarayan, B.; Lahiri, Jayita; Patra, Monalisa; Rindani, Saurabh D.

    2012-12-01

    A generalized top-spin analysis proposed some time ago in the context of the standard model and subsequently studied in varying contexts is now applied primarily to the case of e+e-→tt¯ with transversely polarized beams. This extends our recent work with new physics couplings of scalar (S) and tensor (T) types. We carry out a comprehensive analysis assuming only the electron beam to be transversely polarized, which is sufficient to probe these interactions, and also eliminates any azimuthal angular dependence due to the standard model or new physics of the vector (V) and axial-vector (A) type interactions. We then consider new physics of the general four-Fermi type of V and A type with both beams transversely polarized and discuss implications with longitudinal polarization as well. The generalized spin bases are all investigated in the presence of either longitudinal or transverse beam polarization to look for appreciable deviation from the SM prediction in case of the new physics. 90% confidence level limits are obtained on the interactions for the generalized spin bases with realistic integrated luminosity. In order to achieve this we present a general discussion based on helicity amplitudes and derive a general transformation matrix that enables us to treat the spin basis. We find that beamline basis combined with transverse polarization provides an excellent window of opportunity both for S, T and V, A new physics, followed by the off-diagonal basis. The helicity basis is shown to be the best in case of longitudinal polarization to look for new physics effects due to V and A.

  3. Direct longitudinal laser acceleration of electrons in free space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbajo, Sergio; Nanni, Emilio A.; Wong, Liang Jie; Moriena, Gustavo; Keathley, Phillip D.; Laurent, Guillaume; Miller, R. J. Dwayne; Kärtner, Franz X.

    2016-02-01

    pulses and soft-x-ray pulses from optical undulators, J. Phys. B 47, 015601 (2014)] avoiding the need of a medium or guiding structure entirely to achieve strong longitudinal energy transfer. Here we present the first observation of direct longitudinal laser acceleration of nonrelativistic electrons that undergo highly directional multi-GeV /m accelerating gradients. This demonstration opens a new frontier for direct laser-driven particle acceleration capable of creating well collimated and relativistic attosecond electron bunches [C. Varin and M. Piché, Relativistic attosecond electron pulses from a free-space laser-acceleration scheme, Phys. Rev. E 74, 045602 (2006)] and x-ray pulses [A. Sell and F. X. Kärtner, Attosecond electron bunches accelerated and compressed by radially polarized laser pulses and soft-x-ray pulses from optical undulators, J. Phys. B 47, 015601 (2014)].

  4. Longitudinal oscillation of launch vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaser, R. F.

    1973-01-01

    During powered flight a vehicle may develop longitudinal self-excited oscillations, so-called oscillations, of its structure. The energy supplying the vibration is tapped from the thrust by the activity of the system itself; that is, oscillation of the structure causes oscillation of the propellant system, especially of the pumps. In this way an oscillating thrust can be created that, by a feedback loop, may sustain the structural oscillation under certain circumstances. Two special features of the system proved to be essential for creation of instability. One is the effect of the inherent time interval that the thrust oscillation is lagging behind the structural oscillation. The other is the decreased of system mass caused by the exhausting of gas. The latter feature may cause an initially stable system to become unstable. To examine the stability of the system, a single mass-spring model, which is the result of a one-term Galerkin approach to the equation of motion, has been considered. The Nyquist stability criterion leads to a stability graph that shows the stability conditions in terms of the system parameter and also demonstrates the significance of time lag, feedback magnitude, and loss of mass. An important conclusion can be drawn from the analysis: large relative displacements of the pump-engine masses favor instability. This is also confirmed by flight measurements.

  5. Longitudinal Variations in Jupiter's Winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon-Miller, Amy A.; Gierasch, P. J.; Tierney, G.

    2010-01-01

    Long-term studies of Jupiter's zonal wind field revealed temporal variations on the order of 20 to 40 m/s at many latitudes, greater than the typical data uncertainties of 1 to 10 m/s. No definitive periodicities were evident, however, though some latitudinally-confined signals did appear at periods relevant to the Quasi- Quadrennial Oscillation (Simon-Miller & Gierasch, Icarus, in press). As the QQO appears, from vertical temperature profiles, to propagate downward, it is unclear why a signal is not more obvious, unless other processes dominate over possibly weaker forcing from the QQO. An additional complication is that zonal wind profiles represent an average over some particular set of longitudes for an image pair and most data sets do not offer global wind coverage. Lien avoiding known features, such as the large anticyclonic vortices especially prevalent in the south, there can be distinct variations in longitude. We present results on the full wind field from Voyager and Cassini data, showing apparent longitudinal variations of up to 60 m/s or more. These are particularly obvious near disruptions such as the South Equatorial Disturbance, even when the feature itself is not clearly visible. These two dates represent very different states of the planet for comparison: Voyagers 1 & 2 flew by Jupiter shortly after a global upheaval, while many regions were in a disturbed state, while the Cassini view is typical of a more quiescent period present during much of the 1990s and early 2000s.

  6. Modeling Disease Progression with Longitudinal Markers.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Lurdes Y T; Etzioni, Ruth; Morrell, Christopher; Müller, Peter

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we propose a Bayesian natural history model for disease progression based on the joint modeling of longitudinal biomarker levels, age at clinical detection of disease and disease status at diagnosis. We establish a link between the longitudinal responses and the natural history of the disease by using an underlying latent disease process which describes the onset of the disease and models the transition to an advanced stage of the disease as dependent on the biomarker levels. We apply our model to the data from the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging on prostate specific antigen (PSA) to investigate the natural history of prostate cancer. PMID:24453387

  7. Longitudinal dynamics and tomography in the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Stogin, J.; Sen, T.; Moore, R. S.

    2012-01-10

    Motivated by the desire to understand the longitudinal effects of beam-beam forces, we study the longitudinal dynamics of protons and anti-protons at injection and top energy in the Tevatron. Multi-turn data of the longitudinal profiles are captured to reveal information about frequencies of oscillation, and changes in the bunch distributions. Tomographic reconstruction is used to create phase space maps which are subsequently used to find the momentum distributions. Changes in these distributions for both proton and anti-proton beams are also followed through the operational cycle. We report too on the details of interesting dynamics and some unexpected findings.

  8. South Polar Scene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    5 February 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a portion of the south polar residual cap. Sunlight illuminates this scene from the upper left, thus the somewhat kidney bean-shaped features are pits, not mounds. These pits and their neighboring polygonal cracks are formed in a material composed mostly of carbon dioxide ice. The image is located near 87.0oS, 5.7oW, and covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi) wide.

  9. South Polar Polygons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    4 July 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a polgyon-cracked surface, into which deep, somewhat kidney-bean-shaped pits have formed. These are landscapes of the martian south polar residual cap. This view was captured during May 2005.

    Location near: 86.9oS, 5.1oW Image width: 1.5 km (0.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season Southern Spring

  10. Italian Polar Metadata System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longo, S.; Nativi, S.; Leone, C.; Migliorini, S.; Mazari Villanova, L.

    2012-04-01

    Italian Polar Metadata System C.Leone, S.Longo, S.Migliorini, L.Mazari Villanova, S. Nativi The Italian Antarctic Research Programme (PNRA) is a government initiative funding and coordinating scientific research activities in polar regions. PNRA manages two scientific Stations in Antarctica - Concordia (Dome C), jointly operated with the French Polar Institute "Paul Emile Victor", and Mario Zucchelli (Terra Nova Bay, Southern Victoria Land). In addition National Research Council of Italy (CNR) manages one scientific Station in the Arctic Circle (Ny-Alesund-Svalbard Islands), named Dirigibile Italia. PNRA started in 1985 with the first Italian Expedition in Antarctica. Since then each research group has collected data regarding biology and medicine, geodetic observatory, geophysics, geology, glaciology, physics and atmospheric chemistry, earth-sun relationships and astrophysics, oceanography and marine environment, chemistry contamination, law and geographic science, technology, multi and inter disciplinary researches, autonomously with different formats. In 2010 the Italian Ministry of Research assigned the scientific coordination of the Programme to CNR, which is in charge of the management and sharing of the scientific results carried out in the framework of the PNRA. Therefore, CNR is establishing a new distributed cyber(e)-infrastructure to collect, manage, publish and share polar research results. This is a service-based infrastructure building on Web technologies to implement resources (i.e. data, services and documents) discovery, access and visualization; in addition, semantic-enabled functionalities will be provided. The architecture applies the "System of Systems" principles to build incrementally on the existing systems by supplementing but not supplanting their mandates and governance arrangements. This allows to keep the existing capacities as autonomous as possible. This cyber(e)-infrastructure implements multi-disciplinary interoperability following

  11. North Polar Ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image illustrates very well the detailed, pitted nature of the north polar residual ice cap. As water ice sublimes away a little bit each summer, dark-floored pits have formed, trapping dust and other debris.

    Location near: 85.1oN, 284.6oW 200 m scale bar = 219 yards Illumination from: lower left Season: Northern Summer

  12. South Polar Erosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    24 June 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows the results of erosion acting upon a layer of material in the south polar region of Mars. The elliptical pit in the lower left corner of the image was once buried beneath this eroding layer, as well. The processes that eroded the material, and the composition of the material, are unknown. The image is located near 80.7oS, 300.9oW, and covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) wide. Sunlight illuminates this scene from the top.

  13. South Polar Depression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    14 August 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a circular depression and a suite of eroding mesas of carbon dioxide. These features occur in the south polar residual cap of Mars. The eroding carbon dioxide creates landforms reminiscent of 'Swiss cheese.' The circular feature might indicate the location of a filled, buried impact crater.

    Location near: 86.8oS, 111.0oW Image width: width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Spring

  14. 'Endurance' Untouched (polar)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This navigation camera mosaic, created from images taken by NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity on sols 115 and 116 (May 21 and 22, 2004) provides a dramatic view of 'Endurance Crater.' The rover engineering team carefully plotted the safest path into the football field-sized crater, eventually easing the rover down the slopes around sol 130 (June 12, 2004). To the upper left of the crater sits the rover's protective heatshield, which sheltered Opportunity as it passed through the martian atmosphere. The 360-degree view is presented in a polar projection, with geometric and radiometric seam correction.

  15. Polar Direct Drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skupsky, S.

    2003-10-01

    Direct drive offers the potential of higher target gain on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) than x-ray drive: The initial direct-drive target design had a 1-D gain of 45 and consisted primarily of a pure cryogenic DT shell. Using the expected levels of target and laser nonuniformities for the NIF, two-dimensional (2-D) hydrodynamic simulations predicted target gains around 30.(P.W. McKenty et al.), Phys. Plasmas 8, 2315 (2001). More-recent designs have shown that higher target gains could be obtained by replacing a portion of the DT shell with ``wetted'' CH foam and by using adiabat shaping: (1) Higher-Z material (C) in the foam increases laser absorption by about 40% (from 60% absorption to 85%).(S. Skupsky et al.), in Inertial Fusion Sciences and Applications 2001, edited by K. Tanaka et al. (Elsevier, Paris, 2002), p. 240. (2) Adiabat shaping allows the main portion of the fuel to be placed on a lower adiabat without compromising target stability.(V.N. Goncharov et al.), Phys. Plasmas 10, 1906 (2003). These direct-drive concepts can be tested on the NIF, long before that facility is converted to a direct-drive (spherically symmetric) irradiation configuration. Using the NIF x-ray-drive beam configuration, some of the near-polar beams could be pointed to better illuminate the target's equator. These more-oblique, equatorial beams will have lower absorption and reduced drive efficiency than the polar beams. One strategy to compensate for the difference in polar and equatorial drive is to reduce the irradiation at the poles and employ different pulse shapes to accommodate the time-dependent variations in drive and absorption. This concept of polar direct drive (PDD) has been studied using the 2-D hydrocode DRACO to determine the requirements for achieving ignition and moderate target gain for the NIF. Experiments on the OMEGA laser will examine the effects of oblique irradiation on target drive. Results of simulations for different direct-drive target designs

  16. Longitudinal wavevector- and frequency-dependent dielectric constant of the TIP4P water model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omelyan, Igor P.

    A computer adapted theory for self-consistent calculations of the wavevector- and frequencydependent dielectric constant for interaction site models of polar systems is proposed. A longitudinal component of the dielectric constant is evaluated for the TIP4P water model over a very wide scale of wavenumbers and frequencies using molecular dynamics simulations. It is shown that values for the dielectric permittivity, calculated within the exact interaction site description, differ in a characteristic way from those obtained by the point dipole approximation which is usually used in computer experiment. It is shown also that the libration oscillations, existing in the shape of longitudinal time-dependent polarization fluctuations at small and intermediate wavevector values, vanish for larger wavenumbers. A comparison between the wavevector and frequency behaviour of the dielectric constant for the TIP4P water model and the Stockmayer model is made. The static screening of external charges and damping of longitudinal electric excitations in water are considered as well. A special investigation is devoted to the time dependence of dielectric quantities in the free motion regime.

  17. Polarized light interaction with tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuchin, Valery V.

    2016-07-01

    This tutorial-review introduces the fundamentals of polarized light interaction with biological tissues and presents some of the recent key polarization optical methods that have made possible the quantitative studies essential for biomedical diagnostics. Tissue structures and the corresponding models showing linear and circular birefringence, dichroism, and chirality are analyzed. As the basis for a quantitative description of the interaction of polarized light with tissues, the theory of polarization transfer in a random medium is used. This theory employs the modified transfer equation for Stokes parameters to predict the polarization properties of single- and multiple-scattered optical fields. The near-order of scatterers in tissues is accounted for to provide an adequate description of tissue polarization properties. Biomedical diagnostic techniques based on polarized light detection, including polarization imaging and spectroscopy, amplitude and intensity light scattering matrix measurements, and polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography are described. Examples of biomedical applications of these techniques for early diagnostics of cataracts, detection of precancer, and prediction of skin disease are presented. The substantial reduction of light scattering multiplicity at tissue optical clearing that leads to a lesser influence of scattering on the measured intrinsic polarization properties of the tissue and allows for more precise quantification of these properties is demonstrated.

  18. SCATTERING POLARIZATION IN SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Štěpán, Jiří; Heinzel, Petr

    2013-11-20

    There is ongoing debate about the origin and even the very existence of a high degree of linear polarization of some chromospheric spectral lines observed in solar flares. The standard explanation of these measurements is in terms of the impact polarization caused by non-thermal proton and/or electron beams. In this work, we study the possible role of resonance line polarization due to radiation anisotropy in the inhomogeneous medium of the flare ribbons. We consider a simple two-dimensional model of the flaring chromosphere and we self-consistently solve the non-LTE problem taking into account the role of resonant scattering polarization and of the Hanle effect. Our calculations show that the horizontal plasma inhomogeneities at the boundary of the flare ribbons can lead to a significant radiation anisotropy in the line formation region and, consequently, to a fractional linear polarization of the emergent radiation of the order of several percent. Neglecting the effects of impact polarization, our model can provide a clue for resolving some of the common observational findings, namely: (1) why a high degree of polarization appears mainly at the edges of the flare ribbons; (2) why polarization can also be observed during the gradual phase of a flare; and (3) why polarization is mostly radial or tangential. We conclude that radiation transfer in realistic multi-dimensional models of solar flares needs to be considered as an essential ingredient for understanding the observed spectral line polarization.

  19. Tissue morphodynamics: Translating planar polarity cues into polarized cell behaviors.

    PubMed

    Devenport, Danelle

    2016-07-01

    The ability of cells to collectively orient and align their behaviors is essential in multicellular organisms for unidirectional cilia beating, collective cell movements, oriented cell divisions, and asymmetric cell fate specification. The planar cell polarity pathway coordinates a vast and diverse array of collective cell behaviors by intersecting with downstream pathways that regulate cytoskeletal dynamics and intercellular signaling. How the planar polarity pathway translates directional cues to produce polarized cell behaviors is the focus of this review.

  20. Polar Rain Gradients and Field-Aligned Polar Cap Potentials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fairfield, D. H.; Wing, S.; Newell, P. T.; Ruohoniemi, J. M.; Gosling, J. T.; Skoug, R. M.

    2008-01-01

    ACE SWEPAM measurements of solar wind field-aligned electrons have been compared with simultaneous measurements of polar rain electrons precipitating over the polar cap and detected by DMSP spacecraft. Such comparisons allow investigation of cross-polarcap gradients in the intensity of otherwise-steady polar rain. The generally good agreement of the distribution functions, f, from the two data sources confirms that direct entry of solar electrons along open field lines is indeed the cause of polar rain. The agreement between the data sets is typically best on the side of the polar cap with most intense polar rain but the DMSP f's in less intense regions can be brought into agreement with ACE measurements by shifting all energies by a fixed amounts that range from tens to several hundred eV. In most cases these shifts are positive which implies that field-aligned potentials of these amounts exist on polar cap field lines which tend to retard the entry of electrons and produce the observed gradients. These retarding potentials undoubtedly appear in order to prevent the entry of low-energy electrons and maintain charge quasi-neutrality that would otherwise be violated since most tailward flowing magnetosheath ions are unable to follow polar rain electrons down to the polar cap. In more limited regions near the boundary of the polar cap there is sometimes evidence for field-aligned potentials of the opposite sign that accelerate polar rain electrons. A solar electron burst is also studied and it is concluded that electrons from such bursts can enter the magnetotail and precipitate in the same manner as polar rain.

  1. Experiments with Fermilab polarized proton and polarized antiproton beams

    SciTech Connect

    Yokosawa, A.

    1990-01-01

    We summarize activities concerning the Fermilab polarized beams. They include a brief description of the polarized-beam facility, measurements of beam polarization by polarimeters, asymmetry measurements in the {pi}{degree} production at high p{sub {perpendicular}} and in the {Lambda} ({Sigma}{degree}), {pi}{sup {plus minus}}, {pi}{degree} production at large x{sub F}, and {Delta}{sigma}{sub L}(pp, {bar p}p) measurements. 18 refs.

  2. The Lighthouse Program: A Longitudinal Research Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaRose, Barbara

    1986-01-01

    Longitudinal data are presented from the Lighthouse Program for gifted students which features cluster grouping and a quota identification systems to ensure proportionate inclusion of minority students. (Author/CL)

  3. Conversion of sunflower multiband radiometer polarization measurements to polarization parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biehl, Larry L.

    1995-01-01

    The data processing analysis and conversion of polarization measurements to polarization parameters from the Sunflower multiband radiometer is presented in this final report. Included is: (1) the actual data analysis; (2) the comparison of the averaging techniques and the percent polarization derived from the original and averaged I, Q, U parameters; (3) the polarizer angles used in conversion; (4) the Matlab files; (5) the relative ground size, field of view location, and view zenith angles, and (6) the summary of all the sky data for all dates.

  4. Polar Magnetic Field Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C. T.

    1999-01-01

    This grant covers the initial data reduction and analysis of the magnetic field measurements of the Polar spacecraft. At this writing data for the first three years of the mission have been processed and deposited in the key parameter database. These data are also available in a variety of time resolutions and coordinate systems via a webserver at UCLA that provides both plots and digital data. The flight software has twice been reprogrammed: once to remove a glitch in the data where there were rare collisions between commands in the central processing unit and once to provide burst mode data at 100 samples per second on a regular basis. The instrument continues to function as described in the instrument paper (1.1 in the bibliography attached below). The early observations were compared with observations on the same field lines at lower altitude. The polar magnetic measurements also proved to be most useful for testing the accuracy of MHD models. WE also made important contributions to study of waves and turbulence.

  5. Polarization imaging apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zou, Yingyin Kevin (Inventor); Chen, Qiushui (Inventor); Zhao, Hongzhi (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A polarization imaging apparatus measures the Stokes image of a sample. The apparatus consists of an optical lens set 11, a linear polarizer 14 with its optical axis 18, a first variable phase retarder 12 with its optical axis 16 aligned 22.5.degree. to axis 18, a second variable phase retarder 13 with its optical axis 17 aligned 45.degree. to axis 18, a imaging sensor 15 for sensing the intensity images of the sample, a controller 101 and a computer 102. Two variable phase retarders 12 and 13 were controlled independently by a computer 102 through a controller unit 101 which generates a sequential of voltages to control the phase retardations of VPRs 12 and 13. A set of four intensity images, I.sub.0, I.sub.1, I.sub.2 and I.sub.3 of the sample were captured by imaging sensor 15 when the phase retardations of VPRs 12 and 13 were set at (0,0), (.pi.,0), (.pi.,.pi.) and (.pi./2,.pi.), respectively Then four Stokes components of a Stokes image, S.sub.0, S.sub.1, S.sub.2 and S.sub.3 were calculated using the four intensity images.

  6. Polar drive on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radha, P. B.; Marshall, F. J.; Boehly, T. R.; Collins, T. J. B.; Craxton, R. S.; Edgell, D.; Epstein, R.; Frenje, J.; Goncharov, V. N.; Marozas, J. A.; McCrory, R. L.; McKenty, P. W.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Petrasso, R. D.; Sangster, T. C.; Shvydky, A.; Skupsky, S.

    2013-11-01

    High-convergence polar-drive experiments are being conducted on OMEGA [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commum. 133, 495 (1997)] using triple-picket laser pulses. The goal of OMEGA experiments is to validate modeling of oblique laser deposition, heat conduction in the presence of nonradial thermal gradients in the corona, and implosion energetics in the presence of laser-plasma interactions such as crossed-beam energy transfer. Simulated shock velocities near the equator, where the beams are obliquely incident, are within 5% of experimentally inferred values in warm plastic shells, well within the required accuracy for ignition. High, near-one-dimensional areal density is obtained in warm-plastic-shell implosions. Simulated backlit images of the compressing core are in good agreement with measured images. Outstanding questions that will be addressed in the future relate to the role of cross-beam transfer in polar drive irradiation and increasing the energy coupled into the target by decreasing beam obliquity.

  7. Polar ice melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvert, Jack G.

    Shrinking polar ice caps may be causing the earth's sea level to rise and its days to lengthen. ‘Rising mean sea level is a significant indication of global climate change,’ R. Etkins and E. Epstein report, pointing out that global sea levels have risen slightly more than one-tenth of an inch each year, on the average, since 1940, for a total of nearly 5 inches (Science, 215, 287-289, 1982). This is triple the rate of rise measured during the preceding half century, from 1890 to 1940.Etkins and Epstein estimate that more than 10,000 cubic miles of polar ice, most of it presumably from Antarctic ice sheets, must have melted in the past 40 years. They calculate that transfer of this great mass to the equivalent of a thin layer of water spread over the world's oceans also would tend to reduce the speed of the earth's rotation. This would lengthen each day by about one-thousandth of a second, they say, accounting for about three-fourths of the actual increase in the length of the day observed by scientists over the past 40 years.

  8. Digital Longitudinal Tomography Using Backprojection.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kampp, Thomas Dalton

    1987-09-01

    Conventional tomography allows a single section to be demonstrated on film with a single sweep of an x -ray tube. Each sweep of the x-ray tube exposes the patient to approximately one rad of radiation dose. This tomographic method has been extended by using a backprojection method to allow six degrees of freedom in the selection of the plane to be synthesized. As many planes as desired can be retrospectively tomosynthesized from a single sweep of the apparatus. This can greatly reduce the dose to the patient as well as eliminate patient motion artifacts that would occur with individually acquired slices using the traditional analogue film method. A linear tomographic table was modified by the addition of a digital imaging chain so that a set of projection images could be acquired with each sweep of the apparatus. The digital images were manipulated by a computer to tomosynthesize retrospectively any desired plane. This advanced tomographic system would complement CT which cannot yet match the resolution of this system for longitudinal studies. Various special phantoms were imaged in order to provide data which were used to determine the operating characteristics of this particular system. The characteristics measured are the system gray level response, sampling density, modulation transfer function, small area contrast, detection limits, signal-to-noise ratio, noise Wiener spectrum, and slice thickness. This laboratory piece of equipment could significantly detect approximately 1.7% contrast with a 1 mm pixel size. The MTF values and limiting resolution were approximately one -third of what can be obtained with current CT scanners. The system performed precisely as the computer simulations indicated. The dynamic range of the display is less than that of the image. Windowing of the final image can increase displayed contrast up to the limits imposed by noise. This is an improvement compared to film. With current state -of-the-art equipment, a little engineering and

  9. 14 CFR 23.145 - Longitudinal control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Longitudinal control. 23.145 Section 23.145... Maneuverability § 23.145 Longitudinal control. (a) With the airplane as nearly as possible in trim at 1.3 VS1, it... application of single-handed control forces exceeding those specified in § 23.143(c). The trimming...

  10. Marital assortment and phenotypic convergence: longitudinal evidence.

    PubMed

    Caspi, A; Herbener, E S

    1993-01-01

    This study provides a direct test of whether the observed similarity of spouses is due to initial assortment rather than to convergence of phenotypes. With data from three well-known longitudinal studies, phenotypic convergence is examined using both variable- and person-centered analyses. The longitudinal evidence does not support the hypothesis that couples increasingly resemble each other with time. Spouse correlations most likely reflect initial assortment at marriage and not the convergence of phenotypes.

  11. Overcoming Polarization Aberrations In Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Eric W.

    1988-06-01

    A long-standing problem in polarized light microscopy has been the inability, due to polarization aberrations, to achieve simultaneously high spatial resolution and high contrast. The rotation of the plane of polarization at oblique interfaces between crossed polars causes the pupil function to resemble a dark cross rather than being uniformly dark. Likewise, the point spread function has the visual appearance of a four-leaf clover rather than the ideal Airy disk, and is also space-variant. Images formed with these systems are severely degraded. In this paper the theory of polarization aberrations is applied to the analysis of three solutions to this problem: Reducing the system aperture to block troublesome high-aperture rays; the AVEC-POL method, in which high bias compensation introduces counterbalancing aberrations; and the polarization rectifier, an optical element designed to introduce equal and opposite rotations of the electric vector.

  12. Polarized Electrons for Linear Colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clendenin, J. E.; Brachmann, A.; Garwin, E. L.; Kirby, R. E.; Luh, D.-A.; Maruyama, T.; Prescott, C. Y.; Sheppard, J. C.; Turner, J.; Prepost, R.

    2005-08-01

    Future electron-positron linear colliders require a highly polarized electron beam with a pulse structure that depends primarily on whether the acceleration utilizes warm or superconducting RF structures. The International Linear Collider (ILC) will use cold structures for the main linac. It is shown that a DC-biased polarized photoelectron source such as successfully used for the SLC can meet the charge requirements for the ILC micropulse with a polarization approaching 90%.

  13. Polarized neutrons and their applications

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, R.; Endoh, Y.; Felcher, G.; Majkrzak, C.; Mezei, F.; Pynn, R.; Shirane, G.

    1985-01-01

    The role of polarized neutrons in the study of magnetic and nonmagnetic materials is discussed. magnetic structure, spin density, nuclear magnetism and spin dynamics are listed as magnetic properties which may be accessed by polarized neutrons. Low dimensional magnets, disordered magnetic systems, surface magnetism are discussed as well as topography and depolarization. Polarization techniques are discussed for both study state and pulsed modes. 4 refs. (WRF)

  14. Polarized Electrons for Linear Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Clendenin, J.

    2004-11-19

    Future electron-positron linear colliders require a highly polarized electron beam with a pulse structure that depends primarily on whether the acceleration utilizes warm or superconducting rf structures. The International Linear Collider (ILC) will use cold structures for the main linac. It is shown that a dc-biased polarized photoelectron source such as successfully used for the SLC can meet the charge requirements for the ILC micropulse with a polarization approaching 90%.

  15. Electron-correlation effects on the static longitudinal polarizability of polymeric chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Champagne, Benoît; Mosley, David H.; Vrac̆ko, Marjan; André, Jean-Marie

    1995-07-01

    Ab initio calculations of the static longitudinal polarizability of molecular hydrogen model chains have been performed at different levels of approximation to investigate the effects of including electron correlation. Unlike uncoupled and coupled Hartree-Fock calculations for which a split-valence atomic basis set already provides suitable longitudinal polarizability estimates, the techniques of the Mo/ller-Plesset partitioning leading to successive electron corrections, namely, MP2, MP3, and MP4, and the coupled-cluster ansatz including all double excitations, all single and double excitations, and all single and double excitations as well as a perturbational estimate of the connected triple excitations require at least additional polarization functions and a triple-ζ-type basis set in order to give suitable polarizability values. It has also been shown that including electron correlation decreases the longitudinal polarizability values and that the electron correlation effects are overemphasized when using a too small basis set. Within the Mo/ller-Plesset treatment of electron correlation, the relative importance of the different orders and the different classes of substitutions used in the intermediate states has been investigated. The double substitutions present the largest electron correlation correction to the coupled Hartree-Fock longitudinal polarizabilities per unit cell. If the atomic basis set is sufficiently extended, the third-order contribution is dominant.

  16. Measurement of the Gluon Polarization {delta}g/g from Open Charm at COMPASS

    SciTech Connect

    Kunne, Fabienne

    2009-08-04

    We have measured the gluon polarization in the nucleon by detecting charm production via D{sup 0} meson decay to charged K and {pi} in polarized muon scattering off a longitudinally polarized deuteron target. The dominant process for charm production is the photon gluon fusion into a charm anti-charm quark pair. By using all deuteron statistics from COMPASS accumulated between 2002 and 2006, we extract double spin asymmetries in bins of the transverse momentum and the energy of the D{sup 0} meson and we perform a leading order analysis of the data to extract the gluon polarization <{delta}g/g> = -0.49{+-}0.27(stat){+-}0.11(syst) at a Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) scale {mu}{sup 2} = 13 GeV{sup 2} and at a gluon momentum fraction = 0.11.

  17. Polarization-sensitive photocurrent in the resistive Ag/Pd films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saushin, A. S.; Zonov, R. G.; Mikheev, K. G.; Shamshetdinov, R. R.; Mikheev, G. M.

    2016-08-01

    We report on the observation of helicity dependent photocurrent of the 20 μm thick silver-palladium (Ag/Pd) films manufactured by the thick-film technology. The transverse photocurrent is observed at oblique incidence of laser radiation with different wavelengths in the spectral range of 266 - 2100 nm. At the wavelength range of 532 - 2100 nm the polarity of the transverse photocurrent is positive (negative) for the left- (right-) circular polarized beam. We show that action of high temperature on the films in vacuum results in the decrease of longitudinal photocurrent due to the reduction of PdO content. The photon drag effect is suggested to be the origin of the polarization-sensitive photocurrent in the Ag/Pd films. The obtained results show that the Ag/Pd resistive films may be of interest for polarization- sensitive measurements.

  18. Molecular density functional theory of water including density-polarization coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeanmairet, Guillaume; Levy, Nicolas; Levesque, Maximilien; Borgis, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    We present a three-dimensional molecular density functional theory of water derived from first-principles that relies on the particle’s density and multipolar polarization density and includes the density-polarization coupling. This brings two main benefits: (i) scalar density and vectorial multipolar polarization density fields are much more tractable and give more physical insight than the full position and orientation densities, and (ii) it includes the full density-polarization coupling of water, that is known to be non-vanishing but has never been taken into account. Furthermore, the theory requires only the partial charge distribution of a water molecule and three measurable bulk properties, namely the structure factor and the Fourier components of the longitudinal and transverse dielectric susceptibilities.

  19. Polar Cap Plasma and Convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, Heather A.; Craven, Paul D.; Comfort, Richard H.; Chandler, Michael O.; Moore, Thomas E.; Ruohoniemi, J. M.

    1998-01-01

    This presentation will describe the character of the polar cap plasma in 10% AGU Spring 1998 particular the convection velocities at the perigee (about 1.8 Re) and apogee( about 8.9 Re) of Polar in relationship to Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) and solar wind parameters. This plasma is thought to be due to several sources; the polar wind, cleft ion fountain, and auroral outflow. The plasma in the polar cap tends to be mostly field-aligned. At any given point in the polar cap, this plasma could be from a different regions since convection of magnetic field lines can transport this material. it is quite difficult to study such a phenomena with single point measurements. Current knowledge of the polar cap plasma obtained by in situ measurements will be presented along with recent results from the Polar mission. This study also examines the direct electrical coupling between the magnetosphere and ionosphere by comparing convection velocities measured by the Thermal Ion Dynamics Experiment (TIDE) and Magnetic Field Experiment (MFE) instruments in magnetosphere and measurements of the ionosphere by ground-based radars. At times such a comparison is difficult because the Polar satellite at apogee spends a large amount of time in the polar cap which is a region that is not coverage well by the current SuperDam coherent radars. This is impart due to the lack of irregularities that returns the radar signal.

  20. Neptune may have polar rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrovolskis, A. R.; Steiman-Cameron, T. Y.; Borderies, N. J.

    1989-08-01

    Perturbations from Neptune's highly inclined satellite Triton can maintain rings passing nearly over Neptune's poles. These hypothetical polar rings are nearly perpendicular to Triton's orbit as well, and lie within several degrees of the plane of Voyager II's trajectory through the Neptunian system. Polar rings can coexist with equatorial rings at different radii. A randomly oriented torus of debris around Neptune has a probability of several percent to settle into a polar ring. Voyager II stands a significant chance of encountering a polar ring.

  1. Optimizing dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bornet, Aurélien; Jannin, Sami

    2016-03-01

    This article is a short review of some of our recent developments in dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (d-DNP). We present the basic principles of d-DNP, and motivate our choice to step away from conventional approaches. We then introduce a modified d-DNP recipe that can be summed up as follows: Using broad line polarizing agents to efficiently polarize 1H spins. Increasing the magnetic field to 6.7 T and above. Applying microwave frequency modulation. Applying 1H-13C cross polarization. Transferring hyperpolarized solution through a magnetic tunnel.

  2. Polarization signals in mantis shrimps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cronin, Thomas W.; Chiou, Tsyr-Huei; Caldwell, Roy L.; Roberts, Nicholas; Marshall, Justin

    2009-08-01

    While color signals are well known as a form of animal communication, a number of animals communicate using signals based on patterns of polarized light reflected from specialized body parts or structures. Mantis shrimps, a group of marine crustaceans, have evolved a great diversity of such signals, several of which are based on photonic structures. These include resonant scattering devices, structures based on layered dichroic molecules, and structures that use birefringent layers to produce circular polarization. Such biological polarizers operate in different spectral regions ranging from the near-UV to medium wavelengths of visible light. In addition to the structures that are specialized for signal production, the eyes of many species of mantis shrimp are adapted to detect linearly polarized light in the ultraviolet and in the green, using specialized sets of photoreceptors with oriented, dichroic visual pigments. Finally, a few mantis shrimp species produce biophotonic retarders within their photoreceptors that permit the detection of circularly polarized light and are thus the only animals known to sense this form of polarization. Mantis shrimps use polarized light in species-specific signals related to mating and territorial defense, and their means of manipulating light's polarization can inspire designs for artificial polarizers and achromatic retarders.

  3. Organelle positioning and cell polarity.

    PubMed

    Bornens, Michel

    2008-11-01

    In spite of conspicuous differences in their polarized architecture, swimming unicellular eukaryotes and migrating cells from metazoa display a conserved hierarchical interlocking of the main cellular compartments, in which the microtubule network has a dominant role. A microtubule array can organize the distribution of endomembranes owing to a cell-wide and polarized extension around a unique nucleus-associated structure. The nucleus-associated structure in animal cells contains a highly conserved organelle, the centriole or basal body. This organelle has a defined polarity that can be transmitted to the cell. Its conservative mode of duplication seems to be a core mechanism for the transmission of polarities through cell division.

  4. Polarized tritium target development

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, C.E.; Fedchak, J.A.; Kowalczyk, R.S.

    1995-08-01

    Work began on the development of a completely sealed polarized tritium target for experiments at CEBAF. Because of the similarities between optical pumping of tritium and hydrogen, all prototype work is done with hydrogen. We constructed a test station for filling glassware with hydrogen, where we can dissociate molecular hydrogen and monitor the purity of the gas. A simple two-cell glass system was constructed, consisting of a region in which the molecular hydrogen is dissociated with an RF discharge and a region where the atoms can be optically pumped. So far, a clean discharge was obtained in the glassware. With this system, we plan to investigate ways to eliminate the discharge from the optical pumping region and test the quality of the discharge once the pumping cell is coated with drifilm.

  5. Polar Cap Pits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    17 August 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows kidney bean-shaped pits, and other pits, formed by erosion in a landscape of frozen carbon dioxide. This images shows one of about a dozen different patterns that are common in various locations across the martian south polar residual cap, an area that has been receiving intense scrutiny by the MGS MOC this year, because it is visible on every orbit and in daylight for most of 2005.

    Location near: 86.9oS, 6.9oW Image width: width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Spring

  6. South Polar Artwork

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-456, 18 August 2003

    Nature has created some interesting artwork on the south polar residual cap of Mars. This July 2003 Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows an example. The patterns in this picture are formed by erosion and sublimation of multiple layers of frozen carbon dioxide. The artwork is ephemeral and changing with each passing summer. By the end of the coming southern summer, the scarps in this area will have retreated an average of 3 meters (3.3 yards); some of the smaller buttes and ridges will have vanished. This picture covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi) wide and is located near 86.6oS, 358.2oW. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the upper left.

  7. Interferometric Polarization Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuss, David T. (Inventor); Wollack, Edward J. (Inventor); Moseley, Samuel H. (Inventor); Novak, Giles A. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A signal conditioning module provides a polarimeter capability in a photometric system. The module may include multiple variable delay polarization modulators. Each modulator may include an input port, and a first arm formed to include a first reflector and first rooftop mirror arranged in opposed relationship. The first reflector may direct an input radiation signal to the first rooftop mirror. Each modulator also may include an output port and a second arm formed to include a second reflector and second rooftop mirror arranged in opposed relationship. The second reflector can guide a signal from the second rooftop mirror towards the output port to provide an output radiation signal. A beamsplitting grid may be placed between the first reflector and the first rooftop mirror, and also between the second reflector and the second rooftop mirror. A translation apparatus can provide adjustment relative to optical path length vis-a-vis the first arm, the second arm and the grid.

  8. Reversed-polarity regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, F.

    1982-01-01

    It is found by a statistical study of 58 reversed-polarity regions (RPRs) covering the 11-year period 1969-1979 that RPRs (1) have a lifespan comparable to normal active regions, (2) do not show a tendency to rotate toward a more normal alignment, and (3) have stable configurations that do not suggest stress due to their anomalous magnetic alignment. As in normal regions, RPR magnetic complexity is found to be the primary factor in flare productivity. Weak-field RPRs produce no flares, and regions with complex spots produce more flares than regions with non-complex spots by a factor of five. The main difference between RPRs and normal regions lies in complex spot frequency, with less that 17% of normal active regions having such spots and fewer than 1.8% having long-lived complex ones, while 41% of RPRs have complex spots and 24% have long-lived complex spots.

  9. Imaging with polarized neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, Martin; Manke, Ingo; Kardjilov, Nikolay; Hilger, André; Strobl, Markus; Banhart, John

    2009-04-01

    Neutrons have zero net electrical charge and can thus penetrate deeply into matter, but their intrinsic magnetic moment makes them highly sensitive to magnetic fields. These properties have been combined with radiographic (2D) and tomographic (3D) imaging methods to provide a unique technique to probe macroscopic magnetic phenomena both within and around bulk matter. Based on the spin-rotation of a polarized neutron beam as it passes through a magnetic field, this method allows the direct, real-space visualization of magnetic field distributions. It has been used to investigate the Meissner effect in a type I (Pb) and a type II (YBCO) superconductor, flux trapping in a type I (Pb) superconductor, and the electromagnetic field associated with a direct current flowing in a solenoid. The latter results have been compared to predictions calculated using the Biot-Savart law and have been found to agree well.

  10. Polar research from satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Robert H.

    1991-01-01

    In the polar regions and climate change section, the topics of ocean/atmosphere heat transfer, trace gases, surface albedo, and response to climate warming are discussed. The satellite instruments section is divided into three parts. Part one is about basic principles and covers, choice of frequencies, algorithms, orbits, and remote sensing techniques. Part two is about passive sensors and covers microwave radiometers, medium-resolution visible and infrared sensors, advanced very high resolution radiometers, optical line scanners, earth radiation budget experiment, coastal zone color scanner, high-resolution imagers, and atmospheric sounding. Part three is about active sensors and covers synthetic aperture radar, radar altimeters, scatterometers, and lidar. There is also a next decade section that is followed by a summary and recommendations section.

  11. South Polar Landforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    8 February 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows an area adjacent to the south polar residual cap that hosts several intricate fracture networks. Each network consists of multiple fractures radiating from a central location. Their origin is not understood -- some investigators have speculated that these are sites of release of carbon dioxide from beneath the ground, but this explanation seems inadequate to explain all attributes of the features. MOC images have shown that these features have not been changing from year to year during the course of the MGS mission.

    Location near: 87.1oS, 234.1oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Summer

  12. Frosty North Polar Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-349, 3 May 2003

    This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image is a springtime view of frost-covered layers revealed by an eroded scarp in the martian north polar cap. The layers are thought to consist of a mixture of dust, ice, and possibly sand. Some layers are known to be a source for dark sand that occurs in nearby dunes. During the summer, this surface would be considerably darker because most of the bright frost sublimes away during the spring season. The picture covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) wide near 85.2oN, 4.4oW. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower left.

  13. South Polar Ice Cap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-337, 21 April 2003

    This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows the 'swiss cheese' pattern of frozen carbon dioxide on the south polar residual cap. Observation of these materials over two Mars years has revealed that the scarps that bound the mesas and small buttes are retreating-the carbon dioxide ice is subliming away-at a rate of about 3 meters (3 yards) per Mars year in some places. The picture covers an area about 900 m (about 900 yards) wide near 87.1oS, 93.7oW. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the upper left.

  14. South Polar 'Poodle'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-422, 15 July 2003

    Have you ever stared up at the clouds in the sky and seen the shapes of animals, people, or objects? Sometimes when the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) team is looking at newly-returned pictures from Mars, the same thing happens. This is a picture of pits and scarps in the frozen south polar carbon dioxide ice cap. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the upper right. At the bottom of the picture is a feature that resembles a long, thin poodle; its head faces to the left, the tail to the right. This picture is located near 86.9oS, 55.8oW.

  15. Interferometric polarization control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wollack, Edward J. (Inventor); Moseley, Samuel H. (Inventor); Novak, Giles A. (Inventor); Chuss, David T. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A signal conditioning module provides a polarimeter capability in a photometric system. The module may include multiple variable delay polarization modulators. Each modulator may include an input port, and a first arm formed to include a first reflector and first rooftop mirror arranged in opposed relationship. The first reflector may direct an input radiation signal to the first rooftop mirror. Each modulator also may include an output port and a second arm formed to include a second reflector and second rooftop mirror arranged in opposed relationship. The second reflector can guide a signal from the second rooftop mirror towards the output port to provide an output radiation signal. A beamsplitting grid may be placed between the first reflector and the first rooftop mirror, and also between the second reflector and the second rooftop mirror. A translation apparatus can provide adjustment relative to optical path length vis-a-vis the first arm, the second arm and the grid.

  16. Antiproton beam polarizer using a dense polarized target

    SciTech Connect

    Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan

    2011-05-01

    We describe considerations regarding the spin filtering method for the antiproton beam. The proposed investigation of the double polarization cross section for antiproton to nucleon interaction is outlined. It will use a single path of the antiproton beam through a dense polarized target, e.g. 3He or CH2, followed by a polarimeter.

  17. Magnetic-field-assisted atomic polarization spectroscopy of 4 He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Sheng; Wang, Haidong; Wu, Teng; Peng, Xiang; Guo, Hong; Cream Team

    2016-05-01

    Atomic polarization spectroscopy (PS) is a high resolution sub-Doppler atomic spectroscopic technique with free modulation. It is always desirable to obtain a PS signal with zero background as it can provide a more preferable laser frequency stabilization performance. There are many factors that can affect the PS signal background, i.e., the laser power, the laser polarization and the magnetic field. Here, we demonstrate a method for observing and analyzing the effects on the PS signal of 4 He under different magnetic fields. At the beginning, under nearly zero magnetic field, the large asymmetrical PS signal background has been observed and cannot be eliminated by only optically adjusting. Then, we find that the PS signal profile can be changed and controlled by varying the magnetic field with transverse or longitudinal direction and different intensity. The optimized PS signal with symmetrical dispersive profile and zero background is obtained when the magnetic field is chosen and controlled in the transverse direction and more than 20000nT intensity. Similar phenomenon cannot be observed under the longitudinal magnetic field. A theoretical model is also presented, which explains and agrees well with our experimental results.

  18. Cretaceous polar climates

    SciTech Connect

    Ziegler, A.M.; Horrell, M.A.; Lottes, A.L.; Gierlowski, T.C.

    1988-02-01

    The Cretaceous, like most Phanerozoic periods, was characterized by ice-free poles. Some still argue that the glaciers and sea ice were there, and that the tillites, etc, have been eroded or remain undiscovered. However, diverse floras, dense forests, and coal-forming cypress swamps, and dinosaurs, crocodilians, and lungfish are known from areas that were certainly at 75/degree/-80/degree/ north and south paleolatitude in the Cretaceous, implying that the coastal basins did not experience hard freezes. No deep marine connections to the North Pole existed in the Cretaceous, so oceanic polar heat transport can be discounted. However, the five north-south trending epeiric or rift-related seaways that connected or nearly connected the Tethys to the Arctic would have dampened the seasonal temperature cycle, bring maritime climates deep into the North American and Eurasian continents and, more importantly, would have served as an energy source and channel for winter storms, much as the Gulf Stream does today. Cyclones have a natural tendency to move poleward, because of the increase in the Coriolis Parameter, and they transport both sensible and latent heat. The coastal regions of the relatively warm polar ocean in the Cretaceous would have received continuous precipitation during the winter because cyclones would be entering from as many as five directions. Coastal rainfall would also have been abundant in the summer but for a different reason; the land-sea temperature profile would reverse, with the warm land surface drawing in moisture, while clear ice-free conditions over the ocean would allow for solar warming.

  19. Cretaceous polar climates

    SciTech Connect

    Ziegler, A.M.; Horrell, M.A.; Lottes, A.L.; Gierlowski, T.C.

    1988-01-01

    The Cretaceous, like most Phanerozooic periods, was characterized by ice-free poles. Some still argue that the glacier and sea ice were there, and that the tillites, etc, have been eroded or remain undiscovered. However, diverse floras, dense forests, coal-forming cypress swamps, and dinosaurs, crocodilians, and lungfish are known from areas that were certainly at 75/sup 0/-80/sup 0/ north and south paleolatitude in the Cretaceous, implying that the coastal basins did not experience hard freezes. No deep marine connections to the North Pole existed in the Cretaceous, so oceanic polar heat transport can be discounted. However, the five north-south trending epeiric or rift-related seaways that connected or nearly connected the Tethys to the Arctic would have dampened the seasonal temperature cycle, bringing maritime climates deep into the North American and Eurasian continents and, more importantly, would have served as an energy source and channel for winter storms, much as the Gulf Stream does today. Cyclones have a natural tendency to move poleward, because of the increase in the Coriolis Paramteter, and they transport both sensible and latent heat. The coastal regions of the relatively warm polar ocean in the Cretaceous would have received continuous precipitation during the winter because cyclones would be entering from as many as five directions. Coastal rainfall would also have been abundant in the summer but for a different reason; the land-sea temperature profile would reverse, with the warm land surface drawing in moisture, while clear ice-free conditions over the ocean would allow for solar warming.

  20. Longitudinal assessment of treatment effects on pulmonary ventilation using 1H/3He MRI multivariate templates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tustison, Nicholas J.; Contrella, Benjamin; Altes, Talissa A.; Avants, Brian B.; de Lange, Eduard E.; Mugler, John P.

    2013-03-01

    The utitlity of pulmonary functional imaging techniques, such as hyperpolarized 3He MRI, has encouraged their inclusion in research studies for longitudinal assessment of disease progression and the study of treatment effects. We present methodology for performing voxelwise statistical analysis of ventilation maps derived from hyper­ polarized 3He MRI which incorporates multivariate template construction using simultaneous acquisition of IH and 3He images. Additional processing steps include intensity normalization, bias correction, 4-D longitudinal segmentation, and generation of expected ventilation maps prior to voxelwise regression analysis. Analysis is demonstrated on a cohort of eight individuals with diagnosed cystic fibrosis (CF) undergoing treatment imaged five times every two weeks with a prescribed treatment schedule.

  1. Polarization effects in radiative decay of a polarized τ lepton

    SciTech Connect

    Gakh, G. I.; Konchatnij, M. I. Korchin, A. Yu.; Merenkov, N. P.

    2015-02-15

    The polarization effects in the one-meson radiative decay of a polarized τ lepton, τ → π{sup −}γν{sub τ}, are investigated. The inner bremsstrahlung and structural amplitudes are taken into account. The asymmetry of the differential decay width caused by the τ-lepton polarization and the Stokes parameters of the emitted photon itself are calculated depending on the polarization of the decaying τ lepton. These physical quantities are estimated numerically for an arbitrary direction of the τ lepton polarization 3-vector in the rest frame. The vector and axial-vector form factors describing the structure-dependent part of the decay amplitude are determined using the chiral effective theory with resonances (RχT)

  2. Circularly Polarized MHOHG with Bichromatic Circularly Polarized Laser Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandrauk, Andre D.; Mauger, Francois; Uzer, Turgay

    2016-05-01

    Circularly polarized MHOHG-Molecular High Order Harmonic Generation is shown to occur efficiently with intense ultrashort bichromatic circularly polarized pulses due to frequent electron-parent -ion recollision with co-or counter-rotating incident circular pulses as predicted in 1995. We show in this context that molecules offer a very robust and efficient frameworkfor the production of circularly polarized harmonics for the generation of single circularly polarized ``attosecond'' pulses. The efficiency of such new MHOHG is shown to depend on the compatibility of the symmetry of the molecular medium with the net electric field generated by the combination of the laser pulses.Using a time-dependent symmetry analysis with concrete examples such as H 2 + vs H 3 + we show how all the features(harmonic order and ∧ polarization) of MHOHG can be explained and predicted.

  3. Dynamic nuclear polarization of 17O: direct polarization.

    PubMed

    Michaelis, Vladimir K; Corzilius, Björn; Smith, Albert A; Griffin, Robert G

    2013-12-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization of (17)O was studied using four different polarizing agents: the biradical TOTAPOL and the monoradicals trityl and SA-BDPA, as well as a mixture of the latter two. Field profiles, DNP mechanisms, and enhancements were measured to better understand and optimize directly polarizing this low-gamma quadrupolar nucleus using both mono- and biradical polarizing agents. Enhancements were recorded at <88 K and were >100 using the trityl (OX063) radical and <10 with the other polarizing agents. The >10,000-fold savings in acquisition time enabled a series of biologically relevant small molecules to be studied with small sample sizes and the measurement of various quadrupolar parameters. The results are discussed with comparison to room temperature studies and GIPAW quantum chemical calculations. These experimental results illustrate the strength of high field DNP and the importance of radical selection for studying low-gamma nuclei.

  4. Portable imaging polarized light analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shashar, Nadav; Cronin, Thomas W.; Johnson, George; Wolff, Lawrence B.

    1995-06-01

    Many animals, both marine and terrestrial, are sensitive to the orientation of the e-vector of partially linearly polarized light (PLPL). This sensitivity is used for navigation, spatial orientation, and detection of large bodies of water. However, it is not clear what other information animals may receive from polarized light. Natural light fields, both in the sky and underwater, are known to be partially polarized. Additionally, natural objects reflect light that is polarized at specific orientations. Sensors capable of measuring the characteristics of PLPL, namely partial polarization and orientation, throughout an image are not yet available. By placing 2 twisted nematic liquid crystals (TNLCs) and a fixed polarizing filter in series in front of a video camera, and by controlling the angles of rotation of the orientation of polarization produced by the TNLCs, we are able to fully analyze PLPL throughout a full image on a single pixel basis. As a recording device we use a small camcorder. The sensor can be operated autonomously, with the images analyzed at a later stage, or it can be connected (in a future phase) via a frame grabber to a personal computer which analyzes the information online. The analyzed image can be presented as a false color image, where hue represents orientation of polarization and saturation represents partial polarization. Field measurements confirm that PLPL is a characteristic distributed both under water and on land. Marine background light is strongly horizontally polarized. Light reflected from leaves is polarized mainly according to their spatial orientation. Differences between PLPL reflected from objects or animals and their background can be used to enhance contrast and break color camouflage. Our sensor presents a new approach for answering questions related to the ecology of vision and is a new tool for remote sensing.

  5. Undulator Background in the Final Focus Test Beam Experiment with Polarized Positrons

    SciTech Connect

    Batygin, Yuri K.; /SLAC

    2006-09-21

    In the proposed E-166 experiment at SLAC, 50 GeV electrons pass through a helical undulator, and produce circularly polarized photons, which interact with a tungsten target and generate longitudinally polarized positrons. The background is an important issue for an experiment under consideration. To address this issue, simulations were performed with the code GEANT3 to model the production of secondary particles from high-energy electrons hitting an undulator. The energy density of photons generated at the target has been analyzed. Results of the simulations are presented and discussed.

  6. The polar wind: Recent observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yau, Andrew W.; Abe, Takumi; Peterson, W. K.

    2007-11-01

    The polar wind is an ambipolar outflow of thermal plasma from the high-latitude ionosphere to the magnetosphere, and it primarily consists of H+, He+ and O+ ions and electrons. Statistical and episodic studies based primarily on ion composition observations on the ISIS-2, DE-1, Akebono and Polar satellites over the past four decades have confirmed the existence of the polar wind. These observations spanned the altitude range from 1000 to ˜50,500 km, and revealed several important features in the polar wind that are unexpected from “classical” polar wind theories. These include the day night asymmetry in polar wind velocity, which is 1.5 2.0 times larger on the dayside; appreciable O+ flow at high altitudes, where the velocity at 5000 10,000 km is of 1 4 km/s; and significant electron temperature anisotropy in the sunlit polar wind, in which the upward-to-downward electron temperature ratio is 1.5 2. These features are attributable to a number of “non-classical” polar wind ion acceleration mechanisms resulting from strong ionospheric convection, enhanced electron and ion temperatures, and escaping atmospheric photoelectrons. The observed polar wind has an averaged ion temperature of ˜0.2 0.3 eV, and a rate of ion velocity increase with altitude that correlates strongly with electron temperature and is greatest at low altitudes (<4000 km for H+). The rate of velocity increase below 4000 km is larger at solar minimum than at solar maximum. Above 4000 km, the reverse is the case. This suggests that the dominant polar wind ion acceleration process may be different at low and high altitudes, respectively. At a given altitude, the polar wind velocity is highly variable, and is on average largest for H+ and smallest for O+. Near solar maximum, H+, He+, and O+ ions typically reach a velocity of 1 km/s near 2000, 3000, and 6000 km, respectively, and velocities of 12, 7, and 4 km/s, respectively, at 10,000 km altitude. Near solar minimum, the velocity of all three

  7. Create a Polarized Light Show.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conrad, William H.

    1992-01-01

    Presents a lesson that introduces students to polarized light using a problem-solving approach. After illustrating the concept using a slinky and poster board with a vertical slot, students solve the problem of creating a polarized light show using Polya's problem-solving methods. (MDH)

  8. Polarization in Meson Production Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Knutson, L.D.

    2000-12-31

    A comprehensive formalism for describing polarization observables in meson production reactions is presented. Particular attention is given to the complications that arise when the final state contains three particles. A general formula for the partial wave expansion of the polarization observables is presented, and a number of applications of the formalism are discussed.

  9. Climate Drives Polar Bear Origins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In their provocative analysis of northern bears (“Nuclear genomic sequences reveal that polar bears are an old and distinct bear lineage,” Reports, 20 April, p. 344), F. Hailer et al. use independent nuclear loci to show that polar bears originated during the middle Pleistocene, rather than during t...

  10. Geomorphology of Triton's polar materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Croft, Steven K.

    1993-01-01

    One of Triton's most debated puzzles is the nature, distribution, and transport of its atmospheric volatiles. The full potential of constraints provided by detailed observations of the morphology and distribution of the polar deposits has not been realized. The objective of this study is characterization of the morphology, distribution, stratigraphy, and geologic setting of Triton's polar materials.

  11. Polarization Imaging and Insect Vision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Adam S.; Ohmann, Paul R.; Leininger, Nick E.; Kavanaugh, James A.

    2010-01-01

    For several years we have included discussions about insect vision in the optics units of our introductory physics courses. This topic is a natural extension of demonstrations involving Brewster's reflection and Rayleigh scattering of polarized light because many insects heavily rely on optical polarization for navigation and communication.…

  12. Polarization correlations of Dirac particles

    SciTech Connect

    Caban, Pawel; Dziegielewska, Agnieszka; Karmazyn, Anna; Okrasa, Malgorzata

    2010-03-15

    We calculate the polarization correlation function in the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen-type experiments with relativistic spin-1/2 particles. This function depends monotonically on the particle momenta. Moreover, we also show that the polarization correlation function violates the Clauser-Horn-Shimony-Holt inequality and the degree of this violation can depend on the particle momenta and the motion of observers.

  13. Coupled spin and charge collective excitations in a spin polarized electron gas

    SciTech Connect

    Marinescu, D.C.; Quinn, J.J.; Yi, K.S.

    1997-08-12

    The charge and longitudinal spin responses induced in a spin polarized quantum well by a weak electromagnetic field are investigated within the framework of the linear response theory. The authors evaluate the excitation frequencies for the intra- and inter-subband transitions of the collective charge and longitudinal spin density oscillations including many-body corrections beyond the random phase approximation through the spin dependent local field factors, G{sub {sigma}}{sup {+-}} (q,{omega}). An equation-of-motion method was used to obtain these corrections in the limit of long wavelengths, and the results are given in terms of the equilibrium pair correlation function. The finite degree of spin polarization is shown to introduce coupling between the charge and spin density modes, in contrast with the result for an unpolarized system.

  14. The Quest for Spinning Glue in High-Energy Polarized Proton-Proton Collisions at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Surrow, Bernd

    2007-10-26

    The STAR experiment at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is carrying out a spin physics program colliding transverse or longitudinal polarized proton beams at {radical}(s) = 200-500 GeV to gain a deeper insight into the spin structure and dynamics of the proton. These studies provide fundamental tests of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD).One of the main objectives of the STAR spin physics program is the determination of the polarized gluon distribution function through a measurement of the longitudinal double-spin asymmetry, A{sub LL}, for various processes. Recent results will be shown on the measurement of A{sub LL} for inclusive jet production, neutral pion production and charged pion production at {radical}(s) = 200 GeV.

  15. Apparatus for checking the direction of polarization of shear-wave ultrasonic transducers

    DOEpatents

    Karplus, H.H.B.; Forster, G.A.

    An apparatus for checking the direction of polarization of shear-wave ultrasonic transducers comprises a first planar surface for mounting the shear-wave transducer, a second planar surface inclined at a predetermined angle to the first surface to generate longitudinal waves by mode conversion, and a third planar surface disposed at a second predetermined angle to the first for mounting a longitudinal-wave ultransonic transducer. In an alternate embodiment, two second planar surfaces at the predetermined angle are placed at an angle to each other. The magnitude of the shear wave is a function of the angle between the direction of polarization of the transducer and the mode-conversion surface.

  16. Apparatus for checking the direction of polarization of shear-wave ultrasonic transducers

    DOEpatents

    Karplus, Henry H. B.

    1980-01-01

    An apparatus for checking the direction of polarization of shear-wave ultrasonic transducers comprises a first planar surface for mounting the shear-wave transducer, a second planar surface inclined at a predetermined angle to the first surface to generate longitudinal waves by mode conversion, and a third planar surface disposed at a second predetermined angle to the first for mounting a longitudinal-wave ultrasonic transducer. In an alternate embodiment, two second planar surfaces at the predetermined angle are placed at an angle to each other. The magnitude of the shear wave is a function of the angle between the direction of polarization of the transducer and the mode-conversion surface.

  17. Measurements of the Neutron Longitudinal Spin Asymmetry A1n and Flavor Decomposition in the Valence Quark Region

    SciTech Connect

    Flay, David J.

    2014-08-01

    The current data for the nucleon-virtual photon longitudinal spin asymmetry A1 on the proton and neutron have shown that the ratio of the polarized-to-unpolarized down-quarkparton distribution functions,Dd=d, tends towards -1/2 at large x, in disagreement with the perturbative QCD prediction that Dd/d approaches 1 but more in line with constituent quark models. As a part of experiment E06-014 in Hall A of Jefferson Lab, double-spin asymmetries were measured in the scattering of a longitudinally polarized electron beam of energies 4.74 and 5.89 GeV from a longitudinally and transversely polarized 3He target in the deep inelastic scattering and resonance region, allowing for the extraction of the neutron asymmetry An1 and the ratios Dd/d and Du/u. We will discuss our analysis of the data and present results for A1 and g1/F1 on both 3He and the neutron, and the resulting quark ratios for the up and down quarks in the kinematic range of 0.2

  18. Joint multiple imputation for longitudinal outcomes and clinical events that truncate longitudinal follow-up.

    PubMed

    Hu, Bo; Li, Liang; Greene, Tom

    2016-07-30

    Longitudinal cohort studies often collect both repeated measurements of longitudinal outcomes and times to clinical events whose occurrence precludes further longitudinal measurements. Although joint modeling of the clinical events and the longitudinal data can be used to provide valid statistical inference for target estimands in certain contexts, the application of joint models in medical literature is currently rather restricted because of the complexity of the joint models and the intensive computation involved. We propose a multiple imputation approach to jointly impute missing data of both the longitudinal and clinical event outcomes. With complete imputed datasets, analysts are then able to use simple and transparent statistical methods and standard statistical software to perform various analyses without dealing with the complications of missing data and joint modeling. We show that the proposed multiple imputation approach is flexible and easy to implement in practice. Numerical results are also provided to demonstrate its performance. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Longitudinal stability in multiharmonic standing wave linacs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carver, L. R.; Jones, R. M.; Jiang, Y.; Hirshfield, J. L.

    2016-09-01

    Accelerating cavities that excite multiple modes at integer harmonics of the fundamental frequency have the potential to be used to suppress the onset of rf breakdown and reduce the pulsed surface heating at high accelerating gradients. Understanding the effect of an additional harmonic cavity mode on the longitudinal beam dynamics is important to their development and use. A Hamiltonian that describes the longitudinal motion of a particle as it traverses a chain of multiharmonic cavities has been derived and is applied to the case of a second harmonic cavity. The Hamiltonian is based upon formalisms found in literature for the fundamental harmonic and is extended to include different longitudinal field distributions and harmonic frequencies. The study initially explores the longitudinal motion for moderate accelerating gradients with high-β protons, as this will allow fundamental properties of the stable region (acceptance and shape of the rf bucket) to be determined. High accelerating gradients are also investigated but the focus will be on phase stability throughout. This work concludes by considering the longitudinal dynamics of a modified European Spallation Source accelerator, comprised of multiharmonic cavities that has specifications broadly consistent with the accelerator.

  20. Response-adaptive regression for longitudinal data.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shuang; Müller, Hans-Georg

    2011-09-01

    We propose a response-adaptive model for functional linear regression, which is adapted to sparsely sampled longitudinal responses. Our method aims at predicting response trajectories and models the regression relationship by directly conditioning the sparse and irregular observations of the response on the predictor, which can be of scalar, vector, or functional type. This obliterates the need to model the response trajectories, a task that is challenging for sparse longitudinal data and was previously required for functional regression implementations for longitudinal data. The proposed approach turns out to be superior compared to previous functional regression approaches in terms of prediction error. It encompasses a variety of regression settings that are relevant for the functional modeling of longitudinal data in the life sciences. The improved prediction of response trajectories with the proposed response-adaptive approach is illustrated for a longitudinal study of Kiwi weight growth and by an analysis of the dynamic relationship between viral load and CD4 cell counts observed in AIDS clinical trials. PMID:21133880

  1. Scattering Polarization in the Chromosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, C. U.; Sheeley, N. R., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    Scattering polarization from the photosphere observed close to the solar limb has recently become of interest to study turbulent magnetic fields, abundances, and radiative transfer effects. We extend these studies by measuring the scattering polarization off the limb, i.e. in the chromosphere. However, instrumental effects are much more pronounced and more complicated than those affecting on-disk measurements. In particular, scattered light from the telescope mirrors leads to a new type of instrumental polarization that we describe in detail. The differences between the linearly polarized spectra on the disk and off the limb are often very substantial. Here we show the profiles of HeI D(sub 3), the OI triplet at 777 nm, and the Nal D lines. The change in the latter is in reasonable agreement with the recent modeling efforts of atomic polarization in the lower level by Landi Degl'Innocenti (1998).

  2. Generalized expression for polarization density

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Lu; Hahm, T. S.

    2009-06-15

    A general polarization density which consists of classical and neoclassical parts is systematically derived via modern gyrokinetics and bounce kinetics by employing a phase-space Lagrangian Lie-transform perturbation method. The origins of polarization density are further elucidated. Extending the work on neoclassical polarization for long wavelength compared to ion banana width [M. N. Rosenbluth and F. L. Hinton, Phys. Rev. Lett. 80, 724 (1998)], an analytical formula for the generalized neoclassical polarization including both finite-banana-width and finite-Larmor-radius effects for arbitrary radial wavelength in comparison to banana width and gyroradius is derived. In additional to the contribution from trapped particles, the contribution of passing particles to the neoclassical polarization is also explicitly calculated. The generalized analytic expression agrees very well with the previous numerical results for a wide range of radial wavelength.

  3. Multispectral polarized scene projector (MPSP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Haiping; Wei, Hong; Guo, Lei; Wang, Shenggang; Li, Le; Lippert, Jack R.; Serati, Steve; Gupta, Neelam; Carlen, Frank R.

    2011-06-01

    This newly developed prototype Multispectral Polarized Scene Projector (MPSP), configured for the short wave infrared (SWIR) regime, can be used for the test & evaluation (T&E) of spectro-polarimetric imaging sensors. The MPSP system generates both static and video images (up to 200 Hz) with 512×512 spatial resolution with active spatial, spectral, and polarization modulation with controlled bandwidth. It projects input SWIR radiant intensity scenes from stored memory with user selectable wavelength (850-1650 nm) and bandwidth (12-100 nm), as well as polarization states (six different states) controllable on a pixel by pixel basis. The system consists of one spectrally tunable liquid crystal filter with variable bandpass, and multiple liquid crystal on silicon (LCoS) spatial light modulators (SLMs) for intensity control and polarization modulation. In addition to the spectro-polarimetric sensor test, the instrument also simulates polarized multispectral images of military scenes/targets for hardware-in-the loop (HIL) testing.

  4. Narrowband polarization in maritime imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, Gary; Schoonmaker, Jon; Dirbas, Joe; Davies, Adam; Petrosyuk, Irina; Podobna, Yulia; Contarino, Mike

    2007-04-01

    Narrow band polarization imagery of the sea surface was collected over water from the Coronado Bay Bridge in San Diego, CA. The MANTIS (Multi-mission Adaptive Narrowband Imaging Sensor) system was configured to simultaneously collect four linearly polarized images at 0°, 45°, 90°, and 135° polarization angles respectively. All images were collected using a 550 nm filter with a 40 nm band pass. Images were made while scanning over the maximum range of elevation and azimuthal angles possible from the 70 meter high bridge platform. Methodology and results are presented. Representative results are given including derived Stokes parameters and Degree of Polarization for reflected light for an elevation scan at a fixed azimuth together with examples of polarization and Stokes parameter imagery.

  5. Saturn's elusive nightside polar arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radioti, A.; Grodent, D.; Gérard, J.-C.; Milan, S. E.; Fear, R. C.; Jackman, C. M.; Bonfond, B.; Pryor, W.

    2014-09-01

    Nightside polar arcs are some of the most puzzling auroral emissions at Earth. They are features which extend from the nightside auroral oval into the open magnetic field line region (polar cap), and they represent optical signatures of magnetotail dynamics. Here we report the first observation of an arc at Saturn, which is attached at the nightside main oval and extends into the polar cap region, resembling a terrestrial transpolar arc. We show that Earth-like polar arcs can exceptionally occur in a fast rotational and internally influenced magnetosphere such as Saturn's. Finally, we discuss the possibility that the polar arc at Saturn is related to tail reconnection and we address the role of solar wind in the magnetotail dynamics at Saturn.

  6. Generalized Expression for Polarization Density

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Wang and T.S. Hahm

    2009-04-23

    A general polarization density which consists of classical and neoclassical parts is system-atically derived via modern gyrokinetics and bounce-kinetics by employing a phase-space Lagrangian Lie-transform perturbation method. The origins of polarization density are further elucidated. Extending the work on neoclassical polarization for long wavelength compared to ion banana width [M. N. Rosenbluth and F. L. Hinton, Phys. Rev. Lett. 80, 724 (1998)], an analytical formula for the generalized neoclassical polarization including both finite-banana-width (FBW) and finite-Larmor-radius (FLR) effects for arbitrary radial wavelength in comparison to banana width and gyroradius is derived. In additional to the contribution from trapped particles, the contribution of passing particles to the neoclassical polarization is also explicitly calculated. Our analytic expression agrees very well with the previous numerical results for a wide range of radial wavelength.

  7. U.S. polar icebreakers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brigham, Lawson W.

    1984-04-01

    An interagency study of the nation's polar ice-breaking requirements through the end of the century was recently completed. The Polar Icebreaker Requirements Study (PIRS) Group presented fleet size alternatives and recommended that the Icebreaker User Council define the capabilities required for new icebreakers. The User Council consists of representatives from the U.S. Navy, National Science Foundation, the Maritime Administration, and the U.S. Coast Guard.Polar icebreakers are needed for three basic purposes: (1) resupply of Antarctic and Greenland stations, (2) logistical support of polar operations, and (3) scientific research. One of the PIRS recommendations was that any new icebreaker designs should enhance science support while meeting the requirements for escort and logistics. The U.S. Coast Guard will soon begin the preliminary design for a new class of polar icebreakers.

  8. E166: Polarized Positrons & Polarimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Schuler, K.Peter; /DESY

    2011-12-06

    A proof-of-principle experiment has been carried out in the Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB) at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) to demonstrate production of polarized positrons in a manner suitable for implementation at the International Linear Collider (ILC). A helical undulator of 2.54 mm period and 1 -m length produced circularly polarized photons with a first harmonic endpoint energy of 8 MeV when traversed by a 46.6 GeV electron beam. The polarized photons were converted to polarized positrons in a 0.2-radiation-length tungsten target. The polarization of these positrons was measured using a Compton transmission polarimeter to have peak value in excess of 80%.

  9. Jupiter Polar Winds Movie

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Bands of eastward and westward winds on Jupiter appear as concentric rotating circles in this movie composed of Cassini spacecraft images that have been re-projected as if the viewer were looking down at Jupiter's north pole and the planet were flattened.

    The sequence covers 70 days, from October 1 to December 9, 2000. Cassini's narrow-angle camera captured the images of Jupiter's atmosphere in the near-infrared region of the spectrum.

    What is surprising in this view is the coherent nature of the high-latitude flows, despite the very chaotic, mottled and non-banded appearance of the planet's polar regions. This is the first extended movie sequence to show the coherence and longevity of winds near the pole and the features blown around the planet by them.

    There are thousands of spots, each an active storm similar to the size to the largest of storms on Earth. Large terrestrial storms usually last only a week before they dissolve and are replaced by other storms. But many of the Jovian storms seen here, while occasionally changing latitude or merging with each other, persist for the entire 70 days. Until now, the lifetime of the high-latitude features was unknown. Their longevity is a mystery of Jovian weather.

    Cassini collected images of Jupiter for months before and after it passed the planet on December 30, 2000. Six or more images of the planet in each of several spectral filters were taken at evenly spaced intervals over the course of Jupiter's 10-hour rotation period. The entire sequence was repeated generally every other Jupiter rotation, yielding views of every sector of the planet at least once every 20 hours.

    The images used for the movie shown here were taken every 20 hours through a filter centered at a wavelength of 756 nanometers, where there are almost no absorptions in the planet's atmosphere. The images covering each rotation were mosaiced together to form a cylindrical map extending from 75 degrees north to 75 degrees south in

  10. Airborne Laser Polar Nephelometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grams, Gerald W.

    1973-01-01

    A polar nephelometer has been developed at NCAR to measure the angular variation of the intensity of light scattered by air molecules and particles. The system has been designed for airborne measurements using outside air ducted through a 5-cm diameter airflow tube; the sample volume is that which is common to the intersection of a collimated source beam and the detector field of view within the airflow tube. The source is a linearly polarized helium-neon laser beam. The optical system defines a collimated field-of-view (0.5deg half-angle) through a series of diaphragms located behind a I72-mm focal length objective lens. A photomultiplier tube is located immediately behind an aperture in the focal plane of the objective lens. The laser beam is mechanically chopped (on-off) at a rate of 5 Hz; a two-channel pulse counter, synchronized to the laser output, measures the photomultiplier pulse rate with the light beam both on and off. The difference in these measured pulse rates is directly proportional to the intensity of the scattered light from the volume common to the intersection of the laser beam and the detector field-of-view. Measurements can be made at scattering angles from 15deg to 165deg with reference to the direction of propagation of the light beam. Intermediate angles are obtained by selecting the angular increments desired between these extreme angles (any multiple of 0.1deg can be selected for the angular increment; 5deg is used in normal operation). Pulses provided by digital circuits control a stepping motor which sequentially rotates the detector by pre-selected angular increments. The synchronous photon-counting system automatically begins measurement of the scattered-light intensity immediately after the rotation to a new angle has been completed. The instrument has been flown on the NASA Convair 990 airborne laboratory to obtain data on the complex index of refraction of atmospheric aerosols. A particle impaction device is operated simultaneously

  11. Impact of longitudinal fields on second harmonic generation in lithium niobate nanopillars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baghban, Mohammad Amin; Gallo, Katia

    2016-09-01

    An optimized focused ion beam process is used to fabricate micrometer-long LiNbO3 nanopillars with diameters varying between 150 and 325 nm. Polarimetric mappings of second harmonic generation from a wavelength of 850 nm demonstrate the ability to modify the polarization features of the nonlinear response through a fine adjustment of the pillar size. The effect is ascribed to the non-negligible contribution of the longitudinal fields associated with sub-wavelength light confinement in the LiNbO3 nanopillars. The results also highlight the importance of a fine control over the nanopillar size in order to effectively engineer their nonlinear response.

  12. Lunar true polar wander inferred from polar hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Siegler, M A; Miller, R S; Keane, J T; Laneuville, M; Paige, D A; Matsuyama, I; Lawrence, D J; Crotts, A; Poston, M J

    2016-03-24

    The earliest dynamic and thermal history of the Moon is not well understood. The hydrogen content of deposits near the lunar poles may yield insight into this history, because these deposits (which are probably composed of water ice) survive only if they remain in permanent shadow. If the orientation of the Moon has changed, then the locations of the shadowed regions will also have changed. The polar hydrogen deposits have been mapped by orbiting neutron spectrometers, and their observed spatial distribution does not match the expected distribution of water ice inferred from present-day lunar temperatures. This finding is in contrast to the distribution of volatiles observed in similar thermal environments at Mercury's poles. Here we show that polar hydrogen preserves evidence that the spin axis of the Moon has shifted: the hydrogen deposits are antipodal and displaced equally from each pole along opposite longitudes. From the direction and magnitude of the inferred reorientation, and from analysis of the moments of inertia of the Moon, we hypothesize that this change in the spin axis, known as true polar wander, was caused by a low-density thermal anomaly beneath the Procellarum region. Radiogenic heating within this region resulted in the bulk of lunar mare volcanism and altered the density structure of the Moon, changing its moments of inertia. This resulted in true polar wander consistent with the observed remnant polar hydrogen. This thermal anomaly still exists and, in part, controls the current orientation of the Moon. The Procellarum region was most geologically active early in lunar history, which implies that polar wander initiated billions of years ago and that a large portion of the measured polar hydrogen is ancient, recording early delivery of water to the inner Solar System. Our hypothesis provides an explanation for the antipodal distribution of lunar polar hydrogen, and connects polar volatiles to the geologic and geophysical evolution of the Moon

  13. A LOW GAMMA_T INJECTION LATTICE FOR POLARIZED PROTONS IN RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    MONTAG,C.

    2007-06-25

    Polarized protons are injected into the Relativistic Heavy Jon Collider (RHIC) just above transition energy. When installation of a cold partial Siberian snake in the AGS required lowering the injection energy by {Delta}{gamma} = 0.56, the transition energy in RHIC had to be lowered accordingly to ensure proper longitudinal matching. This paper presents lattice modifications implemented to lower the transition energy by {Delta}{gamma}{sub t} = 0.8.

  14. A liquid crystal tunable polarization filters for polarization imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Dong-Feng; Winker, Bruce; Wen, Bing; Mansell, John; Zachery, Karen; Taber, Donald; Chang, Tallis; Choi, Sung; Ma, Jian; Wang, Xiaomin; Sage, Keith

    2008-08-01

    We report a new familiy of polarimetric imaging cameras based on tunable liquid crystal components. Our camera designs use a dual frequency liquid crystal tunable filter that rotates the polarization of incoming light, in front of a single linear polarizer. The unique features of this approach include fast switching speed, high transmission throughput, no mechanical moving parts, broad bandwidth, high contrast ratio, wide viewing angle, and compact/monolithic architecture. This paper discusses these tunable liquid crystal polarimetric imaging camera architectures (time division, amplitude division), the benefits of our design, the analysis of laboratory and field data, and the applicability of polarization signatures in imaging.

  15. Entanglement from longitudinal and scalar photons

    SciTech Connect

    Franson, J. D

    2011-09-15

    The covariant quantization of the electromagnetic field in the Lorentz gauge gives rise to longitudinal and scalar photons in addition to the usual transverse photons. It is shown here that the exchange of longitudinal and scalar photons can produce entanglement between two distant atoms or harmonic oscillators. The form of the entangled states produced in this way is very different from that obtained in the Coulomb gauge, where the longitudinal and scalar photons do not exist. A generalized gauge transformation is used to show that all physically observable effects are the same in the two gauges, despite the differences in the form of the entangled states. An approach of this kind may be useful for a covariant description of the dynamics of quantum information processing.

  16. Internal polarization limits coronagraph contrast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breckinridge, James Bernard; Lam, Wai Sze T.; Chipman, Russell A.

    2015-08-01

    The performance of exoplanet imaging coronagraphs is limited by internal polarization. The point spread function (PSF) of these systems is determined by the details of the opto-mechanical layout selected to package the system and by the highly reflective metal thin films needed to maintain high optical system transmittance. To obtain the high contrast levels needed for terrestrial exoplanet science requires a comprehensive understanding of the vector electromagnetic wave from the source through the system. The literature contains many studies of polarization transmissivity of telescopes and instruments for the purpose of photo-polarimetry. Here we report for the first time the effects of polarization on high-performance image quality.We modeled a typical 2.4-meter Cassegrain telescope system with one 90-degree fold mirror and analyzed the system for polarization aberrations.We find: 1. The image plane irradiance distribution is the linear superposition of four PSF images: One for each of the two orthogonal polarizations and one for each of two cross-product polarization terms. 2. The PSF image is brighter by 9% for one polarization component compared to its orthogonal state. 3. The image of the PSF for orthogonal components are shifted across the focal plane with respect to each other, causing the PSF image for astronomical sources (polarized or unpolarized) to become slightly elongated (elliptical) with a centroid separation of about 0.6 masec. 4. The orthogonally polarized components of unpolarized sources contain different wavefront aberrations, which are separated by approximately 32 milliwaves. This implies that a wavefront correction system cannot optimally correct the aberrations for all polarizations simultaneously. 5. The polarization aberrations couple small parts (~1E-5) of each polarization component of the light into the orthogonal polarization to create highly distorted secondary, or “ghost” PSF image.. The radius of the spatial extent of the 90

  17. Polarized light scattering from individual semiconductor nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jian

    This thesis addresses the light scattering, particularly Raman and Rayleigh scattering from quasi one dimensional semiconductor nanowires, such as Zn1-xMnxS and GaP nanowires. Many of the results stem from measurements of individual wires. Four original works are presented in the thesis: (1) The growth of diluted magnetic semiconductor (DMS) Zn1-xMnxS (0≤x<0.6) nanowires using a three-zone furnace and two solid sources is reported (Chapter 2.4). The vibrational properties of the DMS nanowires with different Zn/Mn ratios were studied by correlating their Raman scattering spectra with the composition and structure measured by x-Ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (XEDS) and selected area electron diffraction (SAD). We find that the transverse optical (TO) phonon band disappears at the lowest Mn concentrations, while the longitudinal optical (LO) phonon band position was found insensitive to x. Three additional Raman bands were observed between the ZnS q=0 TO and LO phonons when Mn atoms were present in the nanowires (Chapter 5); (2) Polarized Raman scattering on individual crystalline GaP nanowires with diameters 40 individual crystalline GaP nanowires with diameters 40polarized scattering intensity function I(theta) ˜ cos4theta where theta is the angle between nanowire axis and the incident laser polarization. For larger diameter (70polarized Rayleigh back-scattering studies are

  18. Compact waveguide circular polarizer

    DOEpatents

    Tantawi, Sami G.

    2016-08-16

    A multi-port waveguide is provided having a rectangular waveguide that includes a Y-shape structure with first top arm having a first rectangular waveguide port, a second top arm with second rectangular waveguide port, and a base arm with a third rectangular waveguide port for supporting a TE.sub.10 mode and a TE.sub.20 mode, where the end of the third rectangular waveguide port includes rounded edges that are parallel to a z-axis of the waveguide, a circular waveguide having a circular waveguide port for supporting a left hand and a right hand circular polarization TE.sub.11 mode and is coupled to a base arm broad wall, and a matching feature disposed on the base arm broad wall opposite of the circular waveguide for terminating the third rectangular waveguide port, where the first rectangular waveguide port, the second rectangular waveguide port and the circular waveguide port are capable of supporting 4-modes of operation.

  19. Polarization transfer NMR imaging

    DOEpatents

    Sillerud, Laurel O.; van Hulsteyn, David B.

    1990-01-01

    A nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) image is obtained with spatial information modulated by chemical information. The modulation is obtained through polarization transfer from a first element representing the desired chemical, or functional, information, which is covalently bonded and spin-spin coupled with a second element effective to provide the imaging data. First and second rf pulses are provided at first and second frequencies for exciting the imaging and functional elements, with imaging gradients applied therebetween to spatially separate the nuclei response for imaging. The second rf pulse is applied at a time after the first pulse which is the inverse of the spin coupling constant to select the transfer element nuclei which are spin coupled to the functional element nuclei for imaging. In a particular application, compounds such as glucose, lactate, or lactose, can be labeled with .sup.13 C and metabolic processes involving the compounds can be imaged with the sensitivity of .sup.1 H and the selectivity of .sup.13 C.

  20. Building Power Between Polarities

    PubMed Central

    Ventres, William B.

    2016-01-01

    In this article, I introduce the concept of the space-in-between. This space-in-between is born of the realization that, between the expression of any two polarities (across dimensions such as emotion, thought, geography, and ideology), there exists a philosophical construct useful for framing thinking about practice, research, and managerial relationships in the health professions. Out of this construct emerge practical considerations useful for structuring the conduct of meaningful interpersonal and intercultural interactions. I describe how the idea of a space-in-between developed out of my medical practice, grew as a result of my experiences in international environments. and has found fulfillment in my ongoing work. I explore the application of a space-in-between in public health, medical anthropology, medical ethics, and global health. I review how, as a result of incorporating this space in their daily work, clinicians, educators, researchers, and managers can grow as leaders by sharing the presence that arises from the space-in-between them and the people in the communities they serve. PMID:26531880

  1. Neptune's south polar region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    This image of Neptune's south polar region was obtained by the NASA Voyager narrow-angle camera on Aug. 23, 1989, when it was at a distance of 25 million kilometers (1.6 million miles). The smallest cloud features are 45 kilometers (28 miles) in diameter. The image shows the discovery of shadows in Neptune's atmosphere, shadows cast onto a deep cloud bank by small elevated clouds. Located at about 68 degrees south latitude, they are the first cloud shadows ever seen by the Voyager on any planet. The dark regions adjacent to the small bright clouds are believed to be shadows, because they are on the side of the cloud that is opposite to the incoming sunlight and because they lengthen in places where the sun lies closer to the horizon. Estimates of the height of these discrete clouds above the underlying cloud bank can be obtained by careful analysis of this data. The Voyager Mission is conducted by JPL for NASA's Office of Space Science and Applications.

  2. The Color Dipole Picture and the Ratio of the Longitudinal to the Transverse Photoabsorption Cross Section

    SciTech Connect

    Schildknecht, Dieter

    2009-03-23

    The transverse size of qq-bar fluctuations of a longitudinally polarized photon is reduced relative to the transverse size of qq-bar fluctuations of a transversely polarized photon. This implies a model-independent prediction of the ratio R(W{sup 2},Q{sup 2}){identical_to}{sigma}{sub L}/{sigma}{sub T} = 0.375, or, equivalently, F{sub L}/F{sub 2} = 0.27, for x congruent with Q{sup 2}/W{sup 2}<<1 and Q{sup 2} sufficiently large, while R(W{sup 2},Q{sup 2}) 0.50, if this effect is ignored. Experimental data from HERA confirm the transverse-size reduction.

  3. Thermodynamic properties of anisotropic spin ladder in a longitudinal magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezania, H.

    2015-08-01

    We address thermodynamic properties of quasi-one dimensional two leg antiferromagnetic ladder in the presence of magnetic field. A generalized bond operator formalism is used to transform the spin model to a hard core bosonic gas. We have implemented Green's function approach to obtain the temperature dependence of spin excitation spectrum in field induced spin polarized phase. The results show energy gap that vanishes at critical magnetic field for fixed values of temperatures. We have also found the temperature dependence of the specific heat and magnetization component in the magnetic field direction for various magnetic field strengths and anisotropies in the Heisenberg interactions on both leg and rung couplings. At low temperatures, the specific heat is found to be monotonically increasing with temperature for magnetic fields in the spin polarized phase region. Furthermore we studied the temperature dependence of the longitudinal magnetization for different magnetic field and anisotropy parameters.

  4. Polarization-dependent photocurrent in MoS2 phototransistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiu; Yu, Wentao; Chu, Saisai; Yang, Hong; Shi, Kebin; Gong, Qihuang

    2015-03-01

    Monolayer or few-layer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) has attracted increasing interests in studying light-induced electronic effect due to its prominent photo-responsivity at visible spectral range, fast photo-switching rate and high channel mobility. However, the atomically thin layers make the interaction between light and matter much weaker than that in bulk state, hampering its application in two-dimensional material optoelectronics. One of recent efforts was to utilize resonantly enhanced localized surface plasmon for boosting light-matter interaction in MoS2 thin layer phototransistor. Randomly deposited metallic nano-particles were previously reported to modify surface of a back-gated MoS2 transistor for increasing light absorption cross-section of the phototransistor. Wavelength-dependent photocurrent enhancement was observed. In this paper, we report on a back-gated multilayer MoS2 field-effect-transistor (FET), whose surface is decorated with oriented gold nanobar array, of which the size of a single nanobar is 60nm:60nm:120nm. With these oriented nanostructures, photocurrent of the MoS2 FET could be successfully manipulated by a linear polarized incident 633nm laser, which fell into the resonance band of nanobar structure. We find that the drain-source current follows cos2θ relationship with respect to the incident polarization angle. We attribute the polarization modulation effect to the localized enhancement nature of gold nanobar layer, where the plasmon enhancement occurs only when the polarization of incident laser parallels to the longitudinal axis of nanobars and when the incident wavelength matches the resonance absorption of nanobars simultaneously. Our results indicate a promising application of polarization-dependent plasmonic manipulation in two-dimension semiconductor materials and devices.

  5. ELECTRON POLARIZATION IN THE MEDIUM-ENERGY ELECTRON-ION COLLIDER AT JLAB

    SciTech Connect

    Fanglei Lin, Yaroslav Derbenev, Vasiliy Morozov, Yuhong Zhang, Desmond Barber

    2012-07-01

    A key feature of the Medium-energy Electron-Ion Collider (MEIC) at Jefferson Lab is high polarization (over 80%) of the electron beam at all collision points for the particle physics program. The equilibrium electron polarization is arranged to be vertical in the arcs of the figure-8 collider ring of the MEIC and anti-parallel to the arc dipole magnetic fields, in order to take advantage of the preservation of polarization by the Sokolov-Ternov (S-T) effect. Longitudinal polarization is achieved at collision points by utilizing energy-independent universal spin rotators each of which consists of a set of solenoids and dipoles placed at the end of an arc. The equilibrium beam polarization and its lifetime depend on competition between the S-T effect and radiative depolarization. The latter must be suppressed by spin matching. This paper reports on investigations of polarization in the MEIC electron collider ring and a preliminary estimate of beam polarization from calculations using the code SLICK.

  6. Measurement of displacement and distance with a polarization phase shifting folded Twyman Green interferometer.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Sanjib; Kumar, Y Pavan

    2015-11-20

    A Sagnac interferometer (SI), consisting of a polarization beam splitter (PBS), along with two equally spaced plane mirrors that are inclined at 45° to each other, is transformed into a folded Twyman Green interferometer (TGI) by placing a mirrored parallel plate (MPP) into the hypotenuse arm of the SI. The converging input beam produced by a telescope objective (TO) is split into reflected (s-polarized) and transmitted (p-polarized) components by the PBS. The p- and s-polarized focal spots are made to fall on the mirrored end surfaces of the parallel plate (PP). The retroreflected p- and s-polarized beams become collimated after passing through the TO. A linear shift of the PP in either (longitudinal) direction alters the positions of the p- and s-polarized focal spots and results in a set of converging and diverging spherical wavefronts that interfere to form concentric circular fringes. We applied polarization phase-shifting interferometry to obtain the optical path difference (OPD) variation of the interference field. The displacement is calculated from the OPD variation. A validation experiment has been carried out by introducing known shifts to the PP. The setup can be used for displacement as well as distance measurement. PMID:26836546

  7. Transient junction anisotropies orient annular cell polarization in the Drosophila airway tubes.

    PubMed

    Hosono, Chie; Matsuda, Ryo; Adryan, Boris; Samakovlis, Christos

    2015-12-01

    In contrast to planes, three-dimensional (3D) structures such as tubes are physically anisotropic. Tubular organs exhibit a striking orientation of landmarks according to the physical anisotropy of the 3D shape, in addition to planar cell polarization. However, the influence of 3D tissue topography on the constituting cells remains underexplored. Here, we identify a regulatory network polarizing cellular biochemistry according to the physical anisotropy of the 3D tube geometry (tube cell polarization) by a genome-wide, tissue-specific RNAi screen. During Drosophila airway remodelling, each apical cellular junction is equipotent to establish perpendicular actomyosin cables, irrespective of the longitudinal or transverse tube axis. A dynamic transverse enrichment of atypical protein kinase C (aPKC) shifts the balance and transiently targets activated small GTPase RhoA, myosin phosphorylation and Rab11 vesicle trafficking to longitudinal junctions. We propose that the PAR complex translates tube physical anisotropy into longitudinal junctional anisotropy, where cell-cell communication aligns the contractile cytoskeleton of neighbouring cells.

  8. Longitudinal coupling effect in microfiber Bragg gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ping; Zhang, Jihua; Wang, Guanghui; Jiang, Meng; Ping Shum, Perry; Zhang, Xinliang

    2012-10-01

    We theoretically present longitudinal coupling effect (LCE) in air-cladding microfiber Bragg gratings (MFBGs). Distinct from conventional weakly-guiding optical fibers, large longitudinal electric field (Ez) exists in wavelength-scale microfibers. Due to LCE, MFBG reflectivity can be reduced by more than 30% within the band-gap and the full width at half maximum (FWHM) is obviously narrowed. This theoretical analytical work is instructive to precisely design and fabricate MFBGs that are promising in the areas of optical sensing and nanophotonics.

  9. Longitudinal stent deformation during coronary bifurcation stenting.

    PubMed

    Vijayvergiya, Rajesh; Sharma, Prafull; Gupta, Ankush; Goyal, Praveg; Panda, Prashant

    2016-03-01

    A distortion of implanted coronary stent along its longitudinal axis during coronary intervention is known as longitudinal stent deformation (LSD). LSD is frequently seen with newer drug eluting stents (DES), specifically with PROMUS Element stent. It is usually caused by impact of guide catheter tip, or following passage of catheters like balloon catheter, IVUS catheter, guideliner, etc. We hereby report a case of LSD during coronary bifurcation lesion intervention, using two-stents technique. Patient had acute stent thrombosis as a complication of LSD, which was successfully managed. PMID:26811144

  10. Cilia organize ependymal planar polarity

    PubMed Central

    Mirzadeh, Zaman; Han, Young-Goo; Soriano-Navarro, Mario; García-Verdugo, Jose Manuel; Alvarez-Buylla, Arturo

    2010-01-01

    Multi-ciliated epithelial cells, called ependymal cells, line the ventricles in the adult brain. Most ependymal cells are born prenatally and are derived from radial glia. Ependymal cells have a remarkable planar polarization that determines orientation of ciliary beating and propulsion of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Disruption of ependymal ciliary beating, by injury or disease, results in aberrant CSF circulation and hydrocephalus, a common disorder of the central nervous system. Very little is known about the mechanisms guiding ependymal planar polarity and whether this organization is acquired during ependymal cell development or is already present in radial glia. Here we show that basal bodies in ependymal cells in the lateral ventricle walls of adult mice are polarized in two ways: i) rotational; angle of individual basal bodies with respect to their long axis and ii) translational; the position of basal bodies on the apical surface of the cell. Conditional ablation of motile cilia disrupted rotational orientation, but translational polarity was largely preserved. In contrast, translational polarity was dramatically affected when radial glial primary cilia were ablated earlier in development. Remarkably, radial glia in the embryo have a translational polarity that predicts the orientation of mature ependymal cells. These results suggest that ependymal planar cell polarity is a multi-step process initially organized by primary cilia in radial glia and then refined by motile cilia in ependymal cells. PMID:20164345

  11. Hinode observations of polar fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuneta, Saku

    The Sun's polar magnetic fields are the direct extension of the global poloidal field, which serves as seed fields for the toroidal fields forming active regions and sunspots. The polar regions are also the source of fast solar wind, and are the final destination of pole-ward meridional flows. We present spectro-polarimetric maps of the vector magnetic fields in the polar region of the Sun that are unprecedented in terms of high spatial resolution, large field of view, and polarimetric precision. These observations were carried out with the Solar Optical Telescope aboard Hinode. More than 100 canopy-like vertical magnetic structures as strong as 1-1.2 kG are scattered in heliographic latitude of 70-90o . They all have the same polarity, consistent with the global polar fields. The temporal-spatial evolution of these kG patches, which are crucial to understanding of their origin, will be reported. In addition to the vertical fields, the polar region appears to be covered with ubiquitous horizontal fields. Chromospheric observations with Hinode indicate that substantial amount of the horizontal fields reach chromosphere. Our observations describe the magnetic landscape of this poorly known region of the solar atmosphere. The polar regions are the source of the fast solar wind channelled along unipolar coronal-hole magnetic fields. We conjecture that the fast solar wind emanates only from the vertical flux tubes (canopies), which also seem to serve as efficient chimneys for Alfven waves to accelerate the solar wind.

  12. Polarization transmission at RHIC, numerical simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Meot F.; Bai, M.; Liu, C.; Minty, M.; Ranjbar, V.

    2012-05-20

    Typical tracking simulations regarding the transmission of the polarization in the proton-proton collider RHIC are discussed. They participate in general studies aimed at understanding and improving polarization performances during polarized proton-proton runs.

  13. Spectral degree of polarization uniformity for polarization-sensitive OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann, Bernhard; Zotter, Stefan; Pircher, Michael; Götzinger, Erich; Rauscher, Sabine; Glösmann, Martin; Lammer, Jan; Schmidt-Erfurth, Ursula; Gröger, Marion; Hitzenberger, Christoph K.

    2015-12-01

    Depolarization of light can be measured by polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) and has been used to improve tissue discrimination as well as segmentation of pigmented structures. Most approaches to depolarization assessment for PS-OCT - such as the degree of polarization uniformity (DOPU) - rely on measuring the uniformity of polarization states using spatial evaluation kernels. In this article, we present a different approach which exploits the spectral dimension. We introduce the spectral DOPU for the pixelwise analysis of polarization state variations between sub-bands of the broadband light source spectrum. Alongside a comparison with conventional spatial and temporal DOPU algorithms, we demonstrate imaging in the healthy human retina, and apply the technique for contrasting hard exudates in diabetic retinopathy and investigating the pigment epithelium of the rat iris.

  14. Observables for polarized neutrons transmitted through polarized targets

    SciTech Connect

    Hnizdo, V. )

    1994-11-01

    A general and concise formalism is presented for the identification and evaluation of observables, including those that would indicate parity-conservation and/or time-reversal violation by the neutron-nucleus interaction, of experiments on the transmission of polarized neutrons through polarized nuclear targets. Statistical tensors are used for the description of the polarization states of the projectile and target, and the neutron-nucleus total cross section is decomposed into partial cross sections so that each corresponds to different ranks of the projectile and target statistical tensors and to a specific transfer of the orbital angular momentum. Each such partial cross section is associated with a correlation factor'' of particular parity-conservation and time-reversal symmetries, and is measurable by polarizing the projectile and target in states in which the statistical tensors have specific geometries, suggested by the simple geometric properties of the correlation factors.

  15. Polarization and charge limit studies of strained GaAs photocathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Saez, P.J.

    1997-03-01

    This thesis presents studies on the polarization and charge limit behavior of electron beams produced by strained GaAs photocathodes. These photocathodes are the source of high-intensity, high-polarization electron beams used for a variety of high-energy physics experiments at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. Recent developments on P-type, biaxially-strained GaAs photocathodes have produced longitudinal polarization in excess of 80% while yielding beam intensities of {approximately} 2.5 A/cm{sup 2} at an operating voltage of 120 kV. The SLAC Gun Test Laboratory, which has a replica of the SLAC injector, was upgraded with a Mott polarimeter to study the polarization properties of photocathodes operating in a high-voltage DC gun. Both the maximum beam polarization and the maximum charge obtainable from these photocathodes have shown a strong dependence on the wavelength of illumination, on the doping concentration, and on the negative electron affinity levels. The experiments performed for this thesis included studying the effects of temperature, cesiation, quantum efficiency, and laser intensity on the polarization of high-intensity beams. It was found that, although low temperatures have been shown to reduce the spin relaxation rate in bulk semiconductors, they don`t have a large impact on the polarization of thin photocathodes. It seems that the short active region in thin photocathodes does not allow spin relaxation mechanisms enough time to cause depolarization. Previous observations that lower QE areas on the photocathode yield higher polarization beams were confirmed. In addition, high-intensity, small-area laser pulses were shown to produce lower polarization beams. Based on these results, together with some findings in the existing literature, a new proposal for a high-intensity, high-polarization photocathode is given. It is hoped that the results of this thesis will promote further investigation on the properties of GaAs photocathodes.

  16. What Can We Learn From Longitudinal Studies of Adult Development?

    PubMed Central

    Schaie, K. Warner

    2005-01-01

    This article distinguishes between normal and pathological aging, provides an interdisciplinary context, and then considers a sample case of cognitive aging. Developmental influences on cognition include the physiological infrastructure, genetic predispositions, and environmental influences. Different types of longitudinal studies are distinguished, and contrasting findings of cross-sectional and longitudinal are examined in the sample case of the Seattle Longitudinal Study. Also considered is the longitudinal context for intervention studies and the role of longitudinal family studies in assessing rate of aging and generational differences in rates of aging. Finally, attention is given to the role of longitudinal studies in the early detection of risk for dementia in advanced age. PMID:16467912

  17. Remote Sensing in Polarized Light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitehead, Victor S.; Coulson, Kinsell L.

    1988-01-01

    Preliminary analysis of polarized images of earth collected by hand-held cameras on Shuttle Missions 51A, 51G, 51I, and 61A indicate that information of the earth's surface and atmosphere exists in those data. To ensure that follow-on research in polarization is focused upon and that the experiments are properly designed to address specific questions, 26 scientists with past experience and interest in polarization observations met at the Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center on November 3 to 5, 1987. This conference report summarizes the discussions and provides the recommendations of the group for follow-on research.

  18. Thermodynamics of polarized relativistic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovtun, Pavel

    2016-07-01

    We give the free energy of equilibrium relativistic matter subject to external gravitational and electromagnetic fields, to one-derivative order in the gradients of the external fields. The free energy allows for a straightforward derivation of bound currents and bound momenta in equilibrium. At leading order, the energy-momentum tensor admits a simple expression in terms of the polarization tensor. Beyond the leading order, electric and magnetic polarization vectors are intrinsically ambiguous. The physical effects of polarization, such as the correlation between the magneto-vortically induced surface charge and the electro-vortically induced surface current, are not ambiguous.

  19. Birefringent-fiber polarization coupler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youngquist, R. C.; Brooks, J. L.; Shaw, H. J.

    1983-12-01

    Periodically stressing a birefringent fiber once per beat length can cause coherent coupling to occur between polarization modes. Such a birefringent-fiber polarization coupler is described here. More than 30 dB of power transfer between polarizations has been achieved. The device has been used as the output coupler of an in-line Mach-Zehnder interferometer, and better than 25-dB on/off extinction has been measured. The device is wavelength selective and can be used as a multiplexer or as a notch filter. A notch of 9-nm full width at half-maximum has been achieved with a 60-period comb structure.

  20. Polar cap formation on Ganymede

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaya, E. J.; Pilcher, C. B.

    1984-01-01

    It is argued that Ganymede's polar caps are the remnants of a more extensive covering of water ice that formed during a period in which the satellite was geologically active. It is inferred that the initial thickness of this covering was a significant fraction of the gardening depth since the covering formed. This suggests an initial thickness of at least a few meters over heavily cratered regions such as the south polar grooved terrain. The absence of similar polar caps on Callisto apparently reflects the absence of comparable geologic activity in the history of this satellite.

  1. Spin-manipulating polarized deuterons

    SciTech Connect

    Morozov, V S; Krisch, A D; Leonova, M A; Raymond, R S; Sivers, D W; Wong, V K; Hinterberger, F; Kondratenko, A M; Stephenson, E J

    2011-03-01

    Spin dynamics of polarized deuteron beams near depolarization resonances, including a new polarization preservation concept based on specially-designed multiple resonance crossings, has been tested in a series of experiments in the COSY synchrotron. Intricate spin dynamics with sophisticated pre-programmed patterns as well as effects of multiple crossings of a resonance were studied both theoretically and experimentally with excellent agreement. Possible applications of these results to preserve, manipulate and spin-flip polarized beams in synchrotrons and storage rings are discussed.

  2. PolarHub: A Global Hub for Polar Data Discovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, W.

    2014-12-01

    This paper reports the outcome of a NSF project in developing a large-scale web crawler PolarHub to discover automatically the distributed polar dataset in the format of OGC web services (OWS) in the cyberspace. PolarHub is a machine robot; its goal is to visit as many webpages as possible to find those containing information about polar OWS, extract this information and store it into the backend data repository. This is a very challenging task given huge data volume of webpages on the Web. Three unique features was introduced in PolarHub to make it distinctive from earlier crawler solutions: (1) a multi-task, multi-user, multi-thread support to the crawling tasks; (2) an extensive use of thread pool and Data Access Object (DAO) design patterns to separate persistent data storage and business logic to achieve high extendibility of the crawler tool; (3) a pattern-matching based customizable crawling algorithm to support discovery of multi-type geospatial web services; and (4) a universal and portable client-server communication mechanism combining a server-push and client pull strategies for enhanced asynchronous processing. A series of experiments were conducted to identify the impact of crawling parameters to the overall system performance. The geographical distribution pattern of all PolarHub identified services is also demonstrated. We expect this work to make a major contribution to the field of geospatial information retrieval and geospatial interoperability, to bridge the gap between data provider and data consumer, and to accelerate polar science by enhancing the accessibility and reusability of adequate polar data.

  3. Measurement of the polarization of the upsilon(1S) and upsilon(2S) states in pp collisions at square root[s]=1.96 TeV.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Aguilo, E; Ahn, S H; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Anastasoaie, M; Ancu, L S; Andeen, T; Anderson, S; Andrieu, B; Anzelc, M S; Aoki, M; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Arthaud, M; Askew, A; Asman, B; Jesus, A C S Assis; Atramentov, O; Avila, C; Badaud, F; Baden, A; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, P; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Barfuss, A-F; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Beale, S; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Bellavance, A; Benitez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Biscarat, C; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Bloch, D; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Bolton, T A; Boos, E E; Borissov, G; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Bunichev, V; Burdin, S; Burke, S; Burnett, T H; Buszello, C P; Butler, J M; Calfayan, P; Calvet, S; Cammin, J; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Charles, F; Cheu, E; Chevallier, F; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christofek, L; Christoudias, T; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clutter, J; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; da Motta, H; Das, A; Davies, G; De, K; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; De Oliveira Martins, C; Degenhardt, J D; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Dominguez, A; Dong, H; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Gallas, E; Garcia, C; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geist, W; Gelé, D; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Gollub, N; Gómez, B; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, F; Guo, J; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, L; Harder, K; Harel, A; Hauptman, J M; Hauser, R; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hoeth, H; Hohlfeld, M; Hong, S J; Hossain, S; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hubacek, Z; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jakobs, K; Jarvis, C; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Kajfasz, E; Kalk, J M; Karmanov, D; Kasper, P A; Katsanos, I; Kau, D; Kaushik, V; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y M; Khatidze, D; Kim, T J; Kirby, M H; Kirsch, M; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Konrath, J-P; Kozelov, A V; Kraus, J; Krop, D; Kuhl, T; Kumar, A; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kuzmin, V A; Kvita, J; Lacroix, F; Lam, D; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lebrun, P; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lellouch, J; Leveque, J; Li, J; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lietti, S M; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Luna, R; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Mackin, D; Madaras, R J; Mättig, P; Magass, C; Magerkurth, A; Mal, P K; Malbouisson, H B; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mao, H S; Maravin, Y; Martin, B; McCarthy, R; Melnitchouk, A; Mendoza, L; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Millet, T; Mitrevski, J; Mommsen, R K; Mondal, N K; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulhearn, M; Mundal, O; Mundim, L; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Nilsen, H; Nogima, H; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; O'Dell, V; O'Neil, D C; Obrant, G; Ochando, C; Onoprienko, D; Oshima, N; Osman, N; Osta, J; Otec, R; Otero Y Garzón, G J; Owen, M; Padley, P; Pangilinan, M; Parashar, N; Park, S-J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Pawloski, G; Penning, B; Perfilov, M; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Pétroff, P; Petteni, M; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pol, M-E; Polozov, P; Pope, B G; Popov, A V; Potter, C; Prado da Silva, W L; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rakitine, A; Rangel, M S; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Renkel, P; Reucroft, S; Rich, P; Rieger, J; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Robinson, S; Rodrigues, R F; Rominsky, M; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Safronov, G; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Sanghi, B; Santoro, A; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schliephake, T; Schwanenberger, C; Schwartzman, A; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shivpuri, R K; Siccardi, V; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Steele, J; Stolin, V; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strandberg, S; Strang, M A; Strauss, E; Strauss, M; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Svoisky, P; Sznajder, A; Tamburello, P; Tanasijczuk, A; Taylor, W; Temple, J; Tiller, B; Tissandier, F; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Toole, T; Torchiani, I; Trefzger, T; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Tuts, P M; Unalan, R; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Vachon, B; van den Berg, P J; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vasilyev, I A; Vaupel, M; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Villeneuve-Seguier, F; Vint, P; Vokac, P; Von Toerne, E; Voutilainen, M; Wagner, R; Wahl, H D; Wang, L; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, G; Weber, M; Welty-Rieger, L; Wenger, A; Wermes, N; Wetstein, M; White, A; Wicke, D; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wobisch, M; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yan, M; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, J; Zeitnitz, C; Zhao, T; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zieminski, A; Zivkovic, L; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G

    2008-10-31

    We present a study of the polarization of the Upsilon(1S) and Upsilon(2S) states using a 1.3 fb;{-1} data sample collected by the D0 experiment in 2002-2006 during run II of the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. We measure the polarization parameter alpha=(sigma_{T}-2sigma_{L})/(sigma_{T}+2sigma_{L}), where sigma_{T} and sigma_{L} are the transversely and longitudinally polarized components of the production cross section, as a function of the transverse momentum (p_{T};{Upsilon}) for the Upsilon(1S) and Upsilon(2S). Significant p_{T};{Upsilon}-dependent longitudinal polarization is observed for the Upsilon(1S). A comparison with theoretical models is presented. PMID:18999821

  4. North Polar Cliff

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    This full HiRISE image shows a cliff-face that has been eroded into the ice-rich polar layered deposits at the head of the large canyon, Chasma Boreale. In a similar way to layers in the Earth's ice caps, these Martian layers are thought to record variations in climate, which makes them very interesting to scientists. This particular cliff-face is several hundred meters high and the layers exposed here are the deepest (and so the oldest) in the polar layered deposits. The lower layers exposed in this scarp appear to be rich in dark sand, and erosion of these layers has produced the sand dunes that cover sections of this cliff-face. A close examination of the layers in the center of the image shows they have curved shapes and intersect each other. Scientists call this cross-bedding and it may indicate that these sandy layers were laid down as a large dunefield before being buried. At the bottom of the image, the floor of Chasma Boreale in this area appears to have been swept clean of sandy material. There is a complex history of erosion and deposition of material at this location. On the right of the image one can see a smooth material that covers the lower layers and which must have been deposited after the main cliff face was initially eroded. Closer to the center of the image, this smooth mantling material is in turn being eroded away to once again expose the layers beneath it.

    Image PSP_001334_2645 was taken by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft on November 8, 2006. The complete image is centered at 84.4 degrees latitude, 343.5 degrees East longitude. The range to the target site was 317.4 km (198.4 miles). At this distance the image scale ranges from 31.8 cm/pixel (with 1 x 1 binning) to 63.5 cm/pixel (with 2 x 2 binning). The image shown here has been map-projected to 25 cm/pixel. The image was taken at a local Mars time of 1:38 PM and the scene is illuminated from the

  5. Cross-polarization for dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization.

    PubMed

    Batel, Michael; Däpp, Alexander; Hunkeler, Andreas; Meier, Beat H; Kozerke, Sebastian; Ernst, Matthias

    2014-10-21

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) in combination with subsequent dissolution of the sample allows the detection of low-γ nuclei in the solution state with a signal gain of up to tens of thousand times compared to experiments starting from Boltzmann conditions. The long polarization build-up times of typically more than one hour are a drawback of this technique. The combination of dissolution DNP with cross-polarization (CP) in the solid state was shown to have the potential to overcome this disadvantage. In this article we discuss the cross-polarization step under dissolution DNP conditions in more detail. We show that adiabatic half-passage pulses allow us to enhance the CP efficiency in power-limited DNP probes. As a low-power alternative to Hartmann-Hahn CP we also demonstrate the applicability of frequency-swept de- and re-magnetization pulses for polarization transfer via dipolar order. We investigate the implications and restrictions of the common solid-state DNP mechanisms to the DNP-CP technique and apply a spin-thermodynamic model based on the thermal-mixing mechanism. The model allows us to investigate the dynamics of the polarization levels in a system with two nuclear Zeeman reservoirs and explains the enhanced DNP efficiency upon solvent deuteration within a spin-thermodynamic picture. PMID:25182534

  6. The Polaris-M ray tracing program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chipman, Russell A.; Lam, Wai Sze T.

    2015-09-01

    An optical design program, Polaris-M, developed at the University of Arizona incorporates many advanced polarization analysis features. At the core of the program is a three-dimensional polarization ray tracing structure used to characterize polarization effects occurring at interfaces and upon propagation through isotropic and anisotropic materials. Reflection and refraction at uniaxial, biaxial, and optically active interfaces are handled rigorously, as well as anisotropic grating structures. By analyzing multiple polarized wavefront components individually, one can study the complicated effects of multiple anisotropic optical elements at the image. Wavefronts can be expanded into polarization aberration terms. Polarized diffraction image formation and polarization dependent optical transfer functions are included.

  7. Characterization of commercial sheet polarizer material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, Dennis H.; Jones, Douglas G.

    2006-05-01

    Sheet polarizers were invented by Land in the 1920s. The fabrication of the type of sheet polarizers we use today, i.e. H-sheet polarizers, was described in the basic H-sheet patent issued in 1948. Single polarizer transmittance, and parallel pair and crossed pair transmittance are typically quoted for these polarizers. In this paper we describe spectropolarimetric measurement results for a variety of commercial sheet polarizer and sheet retarder materials. The measurements cover the nominal spectral region for the polarization elements but also describe performance well beyond the advertised range. Mueller matrices for the elements were measured, and diattenuation and retardance for both polarizers and retarders are presented.

  8. [Posterior longitudinal ligament ossification: case report].

    PubMed

    Tella, Oswaldo Inácio de; Herculano, Marco Antonio; Paiva Neto, Manoel Antonio; Faedo Neto, Atílio; Crosera, João Francisco

    2006-03-01

    Posterior longitudinal ligament ossification of cervical spine is a rare condition among caucasians. A 42 years old japanese patient with progressive walking difficulty was diagnosed with this pathology by CT scan and MRI and treated surgically by an anterior approach with arthrodesis. Pathophysiology, racial prevalence, clinical picture, radiological characteristics and surgical approaches options are revised.

  9. Longitudinal emittance measurements at REX-ISOLDE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraser, M. A.; Zocca, F.; Jones, R. M.; Pasini, M.; Posocco, P. A.; Voulot, D.; Wenander, F.

    2012-01-01

    We report on measurements of the longitudinal emittance at the Radioactive ion beam EXperiment (REX) at ISOLDE, CERN. The rms longitudinal emittance was measured as 0.34±0.08 π ns keV/u at the output of the RFQ and as 0.36±0.04 π ns keV/ u in front of the third 7-gap split-ring resonator (7G3) using the three-gradient technique; systematic errors are not included but are estimated at approximately 10%. The 86% emittance was measured a factor of approximately 4.4 times larger than the rms emittance at 1.48±0.2 and 1.55±0.12 π ns keV/ u at the RFQ and 7G3, respectively. The REX switchyard magnet was used as a spectrometer to analyse the energy spread of the beam as it was manipulated by varying the voltage of the rebuncher (ReB) and 7G3 cavities operating at non-accelerating phases. The transfer matrix for a multi-gap bunching cavity is derived and suitably truncated to allow for the accurate reconstruction of the beam parameters from measurement. The technique for measuring the energy spread was rigorously simulated and validated. A silicon detector, in its development phase, was also exploited to measure the longitudinal beam properties. The measured longitudinal emittance is compatible with the acceptance of the HIE-ISOLDE superconducting linac upgrade.

  10. Mother-Child Interactions: A Longitudinal Microanalysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Velleman, Shelley L.

    This longitudinal pilot study, which extends Veneziano's (1987) work on phonetically and semantically contingent maternal response types, compared, microanalytically and globally, maternal response types and mother-child dyadic interactions of normally developing and Down syndrome children. Participants were three normally developing infants, five…

  11. Are Sibling Relationships Protective? A Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gass, Krista; Jenkins, Jennifer; Dunn, Judy

    2007-01-01

    Background: Although the protective effects of familial and parental support have been studied extensively in the child psychopathology literature, few studies have explored the protective quality of positive sibling relationships. Methods: A two-wave longitudinal design was used to examine the protective effect of positive sibling relationships…

  12. 14 CFR 25.145 - Longitudinal control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Longitudinal control. 25.145 Section 25.145... control. (a) It must be possible, at any point between the trim speed prescribed in § 25.103(b)(6) and..., no change in trim control, or exertion of more than 50 pounds control force (representative of...

  13. Longitudinal studies based on vital registration records.

    PubMed

    Fox, A J

    1989-01-01

    We describe here the increased use of routine vital event and census records to construct national follow-up and longitudinal studies. The strengths and weaknesses of these studies are discussed and examples given of their use in research into relationships between employment and mortality and socio-economic differences in mortality. PMID:2626588

  14. Religion and Aging in a Longitudinal Panel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blazer, Dan; Palmore, Erdman

    1976-01-01

    Analysis of religious activities and attitudes in a longitudinal panel of 272 community residents showed there were several significant and substantial correlations between religion and happiness, feelings of usefulness, and adjustment; these correlations also tended to be stronger for older persons and tended to increase over time. (Author)

  15. Biomechanics of Distance Running: A Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Richard C.; Gregor, Robert J.

    1976-01-01

    Training for distance running over a long period produces meaningful changes in the running mechanics of experienced runners, as revealed in this longitudinal study of the biomechanical components of stride length, stride rate, stride time, and support and nonsupport time. (MB)

  16. NLS Handbook, 2005. National Longitudinal Surveys

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2006

    2006-01-01

    The National Longitudinal Surveys (NLS), sponsored by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), are a set of surveys designed to gather information at multiple points in time on the labor market experiences of groups of men and women. Each of the cohorts has been selected to represent all people living in the United States at the initial…

  17. Longitudinal photosynthetic gradient in crust lichens' thalli.

    PubMed

    Wu, Li; Zhang, Gaoke; Lan, Shubin; Zhang, Delu; Hu, Chunxiang

    2014-05-01

    In order to evaluate the self-shading protection for inner photobionts, the photosynthetic activities of three crust lichens were detected using Microscope-Imaging-PAM. The false color images showed that longitudinal photosynthetic gradient was found in both the green algal lichen Placidium sp. and the cyanolichen Peltula sp. In longitudinal direction, all the four chlorophyll fluorescence parameters Fv/Fm, Yield, qP, and rETR gradually decreased with depth in the thalli of both of these two lichens. In Placidium sp., qN values decreased with depth, whereas an opposite trend was found in Peltula sp. However, no such photosynthetic heterogeneity was found in the thalli of Collema sp. in longitudinal direction. Microscope observation showed that photobiont cells are compactly arranged in Placidium sp. and Peltula sp. while loosely distributed in Collema sp. It was considered that the longitudinal photosynthetic heterogeneity was ascribed to the result of gradual decrease of incidence caused by the compact arrangement of photobiont cells in the thalli. The results indicate a good protection from the self-shading for the inner photobionts against high radiation in crust lichens.

  18. Emotion Regulation and Childhood Aggression: Longitudinal Associations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roll, Judith; Koglin, Ute; Petermann, Franz

    2012-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that emotion dysregulation is associated with psychopathology. This paper provides a review of recent longitudinal studies that investigate the relationship between emotion regulation and aggressive behavior in childhood age. While there is substantial evidence for assuming a close relation of emotion regulation and…

  19. Design and Implementation Issues in Longitudinal Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ludlow, Larry H.; Pedulla, Joseph; Reagan, Emile Mitescu; Enterline, Sarah; Cannady, Mac; Chappe, Stephanie

    2011-01-01

    To meet demands for accountability, most schools and departments of education at institutions of higher education (IHEs) gather information on their current students and graduates. This paper describes issues to consider when designing a longitudinal data collection and management system, drawing on seven years' experience developing such a…

  20. Psychodynamic Psychotherapy: A Quantitative, Longitudinal Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roseborough, David J.; McLeod, Jeffrey T.; Bradshaw, William H.

    2012-01-01

    This effectiveness study examined the course of treatment longitudinally and outcomes associated with psychodynamic psychotherapy for a sample of 1,050 people undertaking this treatment in a community setting, over the course of 4 years, at 3-month intervals, using the Outcome Questionnaire (OQ)-45.2. The authors used multilevel modeling to look…

  1. Managing Organizational Commitment: Insights from Longitudinal Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrow, Paula C.

    2011-01-01

    This article summarizes what is known about the "active" management of affective organizational commitment (AOC) through a review of 58 studies employing longitudinal research designs. The review yields six broad categories of antecedents that have empirically demonstrated effects on AOC: socialization practices, organizational changes, human…

  2. Empirical data on longitudinal dispersion in rivers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nordin, Carl F.; Sabol, George V.

    1974-01-01

    Empirical data on longitudinal dispersion process in rivers are compiled from published and unpublished sources. Fifty-one sets of data, covering flows from about 30 cubic feet per second to 241,000 cubic feet per second (0.85 to 6,820 cubic meters per second), are analyzed graphically.

  3. Investigating Ceiling Effects in Longitudinal Data Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Lijuan; Zhang, Zhiyong; McArdle, John J.; Salthouse, Timothy A.

    2008-01-01

    Score limitation at the top of a scale is commonly termed "ceiling effect." Ceiling effects can lead to serious artifactual parameter estimates in most data analysis. This study examines the consequences of ceiling effects in longitudinal data analysis and investigates several methods of dealing with ceiling effects through Monte Carlo simulations…

  4. Collaborative Knowledge-Building: A Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Qing

    2009-01-01

    The focus of this paper is on knowledge-building in a technology-supported learning environment in higher education through a longitudinal study of a graduate course from 2003 to 2007. The primary question is: how do learning conditions designed into a graduate course contribute to collaborative knowledge building? In particular, two major…

  5. 14 CFR 25.145 - Longitudinal control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Longitudinal control. 25.145 Section 25.145 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight Controllability and Maneuverability § 25.145...

  6. Longitudinal Predictors of High School Completion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barry, Melissa; Reschly, Amy L.

    2012-01-01

    This longitudinal study examined predictors of dropout assessed in elementary school. Student demographic data, achievement, attendance, and ratings of behavior from the Behavior Assessment System for Children were used to predict dropout and completion. Two models, which varied on student sex and race, predicted dropout at rates ranging from 75%…

  7. Teaching Technology Longitudinally to Virtual Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Lynley

    2010-01-01

    Children of Generation Y are entering our schooling system. These children have always known instant communication and the internet. They possess basic skills in using technology, but they still need to develop a deeper understanding of technology. Teaching longitudinally will increase the learner's confidence and develop a deeper understanding.…

  8. The polarized SRF gun experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Kewisch,J.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Rao, T.; Burrill, A.; Pate, D.; Todd, R.; Wang, E.; Bluem, H.; Holmes, D.; Shultheiss, T.

    2008-10-01

    An experiment is under way to prove the feasibility of a super-conducting RF gun for the production of polarized electrons. We report on the progress of the experiment and on simulations predicting the possibility of success.

  9. Hydrological excitation of polar motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nastula, Y.; Kolaczek, B.

    2006-08-01

    Hydrological excitation of the polar motion (HAM) were computed from the available recently hydrological data series (NCEP, ECMWF, CPC water storage and LaD World simulations of global continental water) and compared. Time variable seasonal spectra of these hydrological excitation functions and of the geodetic excitation function of polar motion computed from the polar motion COMB03 data were compared showing big differences in their temporal characteristics and the necessity of the further improvement of the HAM models. Seasonal oscillations of the global geophysical excitation functions (AAM + OAM + HAM) and their time variations were compared also. These hydrological excitation functions do not close the budget of the global geophysical excitation function of polar motion.

  10. Polar Cap Formation on Ganymede

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilcher, C. B.; Shaya, E. J.

    1985-01-01

    Since thermal migration is not an effective mechanism for water transport in the polar regions at the Galilean satellites, some other process must be responsible for the formation of Ganymede's polar caps. It is proposed that Ganymede's polar caps are the optical manifestation of a process that began with the distribution of an ice sheet over the surface of Ganymede. The combined processes of impact gardening and thermal migration led, in regions at latitudes less than 40 to 45 deg., to the burial of some fraction of this ice, the migration of some to the polar caps margins, and a depletion of free ice in the optical surface. At higher latitudes, no process was effective in removing ice from the optical surface, so the remanants of the sheet are visible today.

  11. Anodic Concentration Polarization in SOFCs

    SciTech Connect

    Williford, Rick E.; Chick, Lawrence A.; Maupin, Gary D.; Simner, Steve P.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.; Wachsman, ED, et al

    2003-08-01

    Concentration polarization is important because it determines the maximum power output of a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) at high fuel utilization. Anodic concentration polarization occurs when the demand for reactants exceeds the capacity of the porous ceramic anode to supply them by gas diffusion mechanisms. High tortuosities (bulk diffusion resistances) are often assumed to explain this behavior. However, recent experiments show that anodic concentration polarization originates in the immediate vicinity of the reactive triple phase boundary (TPB) sites near the anode/electrolyte interface. A model is proposed to describe how concentration polarization is controlled by two localized phenomena: competitive adsorption of reactants in areas adjacent to the reactive TPB sites, followed by relatively slow surface diffusion to the reactive sites. Results suggest that future SOFC design improvements should focus on optimization of the reactive area, adsorption, and surface diffusion at the anode/electrolyte interface.

  12. Polarization from an orbiting spot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dovčiak, Michal; Karas, Vladimír; Matt, Giorgio

    2007-04-01

    The polarization from a spot orbiting around Schwarzschild and extreme Kerr black holes is studied. We assume different models of local polarization. Firstly, as a toy model we set local polarization vector either normal to the disc plane, or we assume strictly azimuthal direction. Then we examine more realistic situation with a spot arising due to the emission from the primary source above the disc. We employ either Rayleigh single scattering or Compton multiple scattering approximations. Overall flux, degree and angle of polarization integrated over the whole orbit as well as their time dependence during the spot revolution are examined as functions of the observer's inclination angle. The gravitational and Doppler shifts, lensing effect as well as time delays are taken into account.

  13. Circularly-Polarized Microstrip Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanton, P. H.

    1985-01-01

    Microstrip construction compact for mobile applications. Circularly polarized microstrip antenna made of concentric cylindrical layers of conductive and dielectric materials. Coaxial cable feedlines connected to horizontal and vertical subelements from inside. Vertical subelement acts as ground for horizontal subelement.

  14. Polarization insensitive all-optical wavelength conversion of polarization multiplexed signals using co-polarized pumps.

    PubMed

    Anthur, Aravind P; Zhou, Rui; O'Duill, Sean; Walsh, Anthony J; Martin, Eamonn; Venkitesh, Deepa; Barry, Liam P

    2016-05-30

    We study and experimentally validate the vector theory of four-wave mixing (FWM) in semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOA). We use the vector theory of FWM to design a polarization insensitive all-optical wavelength converter, suitable for advanced modulation formats, using non-degenerate FWM in SOAs and parallelly polarized pumps. We demonstrate the wavelength conversion of polarization-multiplexed (PM)-QPSK, PM-16QAM and a Nyquist WDM super-channel modulated with PM-QPSK signals at a baud rate of 12.5 GBaud, with total data rates of 50 Gbps, 100 Gbps and 200 Gbps respectively. PMID:27410100

  15. Polarization measurement analysis. III. Analysis of the polarization angle dispersion function with high precision polarization data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alina, D.; Montier, L.; Ristorcelli, I.; Bernard, J.-P.; Levrier, F.; Abdikamalov, E.

    2016-10-01

    High precision polarization measurements, such as those from the Planck satellite, open new opportunities for the study of the magnetic field structure as traced by polarimetric measurements of the interstellar dust emission. The polarization parameters suffer from bias in the presence of measurement noise. It is critical to take into account all the information available in the data in order to accurately derive these parameters. In our previous work, we studied the bias on polarization fraction and angle, various estimators of these quantities, and their associated uncertainties. The goal of this paper is to characterize the bias on the polarization angle dispersion function that is used to study the spatial coherence of the polarization angle. We characterize for the first time the bias on the conventional estimator of the polarization angle dispersion function and show that it can be positive or negative depending on the true value. Monte Carlo simulations were performed to explore the impact of the noise properties of the polarization data, as well as the impact of the distribution of the true polarization angles on the bias. We show that in the case where the ellipticity of the noise in (Q,U) varies by less than 10%, one can use simplified, diagonal approximation of the noise covariance matrix. In other cases, the shape of the noise covariance matrix should be taken into account in the estimation of the polarization angle dispersion function. We also study new estimators such as the dichotomic and the polynomial estimators. Though the dichotomic estimator cannot be directly used to estimate the polarization angle dispersion function, we show that, on the one hand, it can serve as an indicator of the accuracy of the conventional estimator and, on the other hand, it can be used for deriving the polynomial estimator. We propose a method for determining the upper limit of the bias on the conventional estimator of the polarization angle dispersion function. The

  16. Polarized lepton-nucleon scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, E.

    1994-02-01

    Deep inelastic polarized lepton-nucleon scattering is reviewed in three lectures. The first lecture covers the polarized deep inelastic scattering formalism and foundational theoretical work. The second lecture describes the nucleon spin structure function experiments that have been performed up through 1993. The third lecture discusses implication of the results and future experiments aimed at high-precision measurements of the nucleon spin structure functions.

  17. Valley-spin polarization in the magneto-optical response of silicene and other similar 2D crystals.

    PubMed

    Tabert, C J; Nicol, E J

    2013-05-10

    We calculate the magneto-optical conductivity and electronic density of states for silicene, the silicon equivalent of graphene, and similar crystals such as germanene. In the presence of a perpendicular magnetic field and electric field gating, we note that four spin- and valley-polarized levels can be seen in the density of states, and transitions between these levels lead to similarly polarized absorption lines in the longitudinal, transverse Hall, and circularly polarized dynamic conductivity. While previous spin and valley polarization predicted for the conductivity is only present in the response to circularly polarized light, we show that distinct spin and valley polarization can also be seen in the longitudinal magneto-optical conductivity at experimentally attainable energies. The frequency of the absorption lines may be tuned by the electric and magnetic field to onset in a range varying from THz to the infrared. This potential to isolate charge carriers of definite spin and valley label may make silicene a promising candidate for spin- and valleytronic devices.

  18. The Changing Polar Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucey, P. G.; Hurley, D.

    2015-12-01

    The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) and LCROSS have provided an avalanche of new data regarding the lunar poles: LCROSS directly detected water vapor and other volatiles in its impact plume; LRO LAMP has detected surface frost using UV ratios; LEND has refined understanding of the distribution of hydrogen; LOLA and LAMP have showed that the spectral properties of permanently shadowed regions (PSR) are anomalous and may be due to unusual surface texture or altered space weathering; Diviner shows both where the coldest portions of the poles exist, and its quantitative results show where temperatures are low enough to preserve water ice at depth, well outside the PSRs. Yet while we are data rich, our understanding of the lunar poles is maddeningly poor. Our poverty of understanding is made even more baffling by the MESSENGER results from Mercury. At Mercury's poles the distribution of volatiles is dictated by temperature: where subsurface temperatures inferred from topography are consistent with long term preservation of water ice, radar anomalies indicating thick ice are present; where surface temperatures are consistent with preservation of surface frost, high reflectance anomalies indicating surface frost are revealed by laser reflectance. The distribution of water ice on Mercury is well understood. In contrast, temperature is only a weak indicator of the presence of volatiles at the lunar poles; there is little ability to predict the location and abundance of hydrogen or water. The difference may in the age of the volatile deposits on the two planets. Turn the clock forward a few billion years on Mercury and the deposits may appear more lunar. Surface lag deposits may have long ago succumbed to impact gardening, as has much of the shallow buried ice. Ice retained could be patchy, and confined to the coldest places that may tend to preserve it more effectively, even when finely comminuted. Lunar polar volatiles, a possible relic of an ancient, Mercury

  19. Polar Cap Colors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 12 May 2004 This daytime visible color image was collected on June 6, 2003 during the Southern Spring season near the South Polar Cap Edge.

    The THEMIS VIS camera is capable of capturing color images of the martian surface using its five different color filters. In this mode of operation, the spatial resolution and coverage of the image must be reduced to accommodate the additional data volume produced from the use of multiple filters. To make a color image, three of the five filter images (each in grayscale) are selected. Each is contrast enhanced and then converted to a red, green, or blue intensity image. These three images are then combined to produce a full color, single image. Because the THEMIS color filters don't span the full range of colors seen by the human eye, a color THEMIS image does not represent true color. Also, because each single-filter image is contrast enhanced before inclusion in the three-color image, the apparent color variation of the scene is exaggerated. Nevertheless, the color variation that does appear is representative of some change in color, however subtle, in the actual scene. Note that the long edges of THEMIS color images typically contain color artifacts that do not represent surface variation.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -77.8, Longitude 195 East (165 West). 38 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA

  20. South Polar Cap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 8 March 2004

    The Odyssey spacecraft has completed a full Mars year of observations of the red planet. For the next several weeks the Image of the Day will look back over this first mars year. It will focus on four themes: 1) the poles - with the seasonal changes seen in the retreat and expansion of the caps; 2) craters - with a variety of morphologies relating to impact materials and later alteration, both infilling and exhumation; 3) channels - the clues to liquid surface flow; and 4) volcanic flow features. While some images have helped answer questions about the history of Mars, many have raised new questions that are still being investigated as Odyssey continues collecting data as it orbits Mars.

    This image was collected March 5, 2002 during the southern summer season. Layering in the South polar cap interior is readily visible and may indicate yearly ice/dust deposition.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -86.6, Longitude 156.8 East (203.2 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the