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Sample records for loop materials corrosion

  1. Molten Salt Heat Transport Loop: Materials Corrosion and Heat Transfer Phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Kumar Sridharan; Dr. Mark Anderson; Dr. Michael Corradini; Dr. Todd Allen; Luke Olson; James Ambrosek; Daniel Ludwig

    2008-07-09

    An experimental system for corrosion testing of candidate materials in molten FLiNaK salt at 850 degree C has been designed and constructed. While molten FLiNaK salt was the focus of this study, the system can be utilized for evaluation of materials in other molten salts that may be of interest in the future. Using this system, the corrosion performance of a number of code-certified alloys of interest to NGNP as well as the efficacy of Ni-electroplating have been investigated. The mechanisums underlying corrosion processes have been elucidated using scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of the materials after the corrosion tests, as well as by the post-corrosion analysis of the salts using inductively coupled plasma (ICP) and neutron activation analysis (NAA) techniques.

  2. Summary of corrosion loop test results for the Institut Laue-Langevin cladding material

    SciTech Connect

    Pawel, R.E.; Pawel, S.J.

    1995-02-01

    Corrosion testing of Grenoble Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL) reactor fuel cladding material is briefly summarized. The test specimen was fabricated from Al-Ni-Fe alloy (VDM-4194). Chemical analysis of this alloy compared well with the supplied composition report and average values for the ILL cladding and for a standard 6061 Al alloy. For the most direct comparison with the data base of oxidation results for 6061 Al, moderately aggressive thermal-hydraulic conditions and a coolant pH of 5 were chosen for this test. Further, in an attempt to induce spallation (again for comparison with behavior of 6061), the power to the test section was increased twice during the duration of the test while holding other control parameters as constant as possible. Results of destructive examination of the sample were compared with correlation calculations. In general, the product film growth rates correlated extremely well, indicating that the general growth behavior of the alloy closely follows that of 6061 Al for this range of thermal-hydraulic conditions. 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Corrosion of Ceramic Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opila, Elizabeth J.; Jacobson, Nathan S.

    1999-01-01

    Non-oxide ceramics are promising materials for a range of high temperature applications. Selected current and future applications are listed. In all such applications, the ceramics are exposed to high temperature gases. Therefore it is critical to understand the response of these materials to their environment. The variables to be considered here include both the type of ceramic and the environment to which it is exposed. Non-oxide ceramics include borides, nitrides, and carbides. Most high temperature corrosion environments contain oxygen and hence the emphasis of this chapter will be on oxidation processes.

  4. Corrosion resistant ceramic materials

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, Thomas D.

    1995-01-01

    Ceramic materials which exhibit stability in severely-corrosive environments having high alkali-metal activity, high sulfur/sulfide activity and/or molten halides at temperatures of 200.degree.-550.degree. C. or organic salt (including SO.sub.2 and SO.sub.2 Cl.sub.2) at temperatures of 25.degree.-200.degree. C. These sulfide ceramics form stoichiometric (single-phase) compounds with sulfides of Ca, Li, Na, K, Al, Mg, Si, Y, La, Ce, Ga, Ba, Zr and Sr and show melting-points that are sufficiently low and have excellent wettability with many metals (Fe, Ni, Mo) to easily form metal/ceramic seals. Ceramic compositions are also formulated to adequately match thermal expansion coefficient of adjacent metal components.

  5. Corrosion resistant ceramic materials

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, T.D.

    1996-07-23

    Ceramic materials are disclosed which exhibit stability in severely-corrosive environments having high alkali-metal activity, high sulfur/sulfide activity and/or molten halides at temperatures of 200--550 C or organic salt (including SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}) at temperatures of 25--200 C. These sulfide ceramics form stoichiometric (single-phase) compounds with sulfides of Ca, Li, Na, K, Al, Mg, Si, Y, La, Ce, Ga, Ba, Zr and Sr and show melting-points that are sufficiently low and have excellent wettability with many metals (Fe, Ni, Mo) to easily form metal/ceramic seals. Ceramic compositions are also formulated to adequately match thermal expansion coefficient of adjacent metal components. 1 fig.

  6. Corrosion resistant ceramic materials

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, Thomas D.

    1996-01-01

    Ceramic materials which exhibit stability in severely-corrosive environments having high alkali-metal activity, high sulfur/sulfide activity and/or molten halides at temperatures of 200.degree.-550.degree. C. or organic salt (including SO.sub.2 and SO.sub.2 Cl.sub.2) at temperatures of 25.degree.-200.degree. C. These sulfide ceramics form stoichiometric (single-phase) compounds with sulfides of Ca, Li, Na, K, Al, Mg, Si, Y, La, Ce, Ga, Ba, Zr and Sr and show melting-points that are sufficiently low and have excellent wettability with many metals (Fe, Ni, Mo) to easily form metal/ceramic seals. Ceramic compositions are also formulated to adequately match thermal expansion coefficient of adjacent metal components.

  7. DPC materials and corrosion environments.

    SciTech Connect

    Ilgen, Anastasia Gennadyevna; Bryan, Charles R.; Teich-McGoldrick, Stephanie; Hardin, Ernest; Clarity, J.

    2014-10-01

    After an exposition of the materials used in DPCs and the factors controlling material corrosion in disposal environments, a survey is given of the corrosion rates, mechanisms, and products for commonly used stainless steels. Research needs are then identified for predicting stability of DPC materials in disposal environments. Stainless steel corrosion rates may be low enough to sustain DPC basket structural integrity for performance periods of as long as 10,000 years, especially in reducing conditions. Uncertainties include basket component design, disposal environment conditions, and the in-package chemical environment including any localized effects from radiolysis. Prospective disposal overpack materials exist for most disposal environments, including both corrosion allowance and corrosion resistant materials. Whereas the behavior of corrosion allowance materials is understood for a wide range of corrosion environments, demonstrating corrosion resistance could be more technically challenging and require environment-specific testing. A preliminary screening of the existing inventory of DPCs and other types of canisters is described, according to the type of closure, whether they can be readily transported, and what types of materials are used in basket construction.

  8. Stress Corrosion of Ceramic Materials.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-10-01

    and Freiman [1982]). 33 LIP 11!ŕ *Concentration/Viscosity .. . (Kg - moles /m 3 /Pa-s) .. 10 - 4 - Butyl (Sat.) €"" E-Butyl (5%) Hexyl (Sat.) Amyl (Sat...of each charged atom, AG, is given by: AG = (Na e2/r)/( 1+C 2 ) (13) per mole of charge formed for each ion. Na is Avogadro’s constant, and e1 and e2...RE,*LuTION TEST ART N ATIO A L W AU O F S 1A 3 6I N 19- 3$ A STRESS CORROSION OF CERAMIC MATERIALS S.W. Freiman, B.R. Lawn and G.S. White, A.C

  9. Corrosion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slabaugh, W. H.

    1974-01-01

    Presents some materials for use in demonstration and experimentation of corrosion processes, including corrosion stimulation and inhibition. Indicates that basic concepts of electrochemistry, crystal structure, and kinetics can be extended to practical chemistry through corrosion explanation. (CC)

  10. Corrosion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slabaugh, W. H.

    1974-01-01

    Presents some materials for use in demonstration and experimentation of corrosion processes, including corrosion stimulation and inhibition. Indicates that basic concepts of electrochemistry, crystal structure, and kinetics can be extended to practical chemistry through corrosion explanation. (CC)

  11. Corrosion resistant materials in MCFC environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pigeaud, A.; Yuh, C. Y.; Singh, P.

    A 24-month effort in the development of a corrosion resistant hardware material for molten carbonate fuel cell (MFC) application is described. The objective was to identify an inexpensive alloy for MCFC current collector/bipolar plate application. For this, 310S was selected as the base alloy composition and La, Ce and Si were added to improve corrosion resistance. Eight candidate alloys, including 310S and 316L, were screened in MCFC anode and cathode atmospheres. The techniques used include isothermal corrosion, acoustic emission, thermal cycling corrosion, thermogravimetric analyses, electrical surface resistance, and dual atmosphere corrosion testing. Oxide scales formed were analyzed by standard metallographic techniques. The results indicate that COLT-25+ and Crutemp-25 alloys (both containing 25Cr-25Ni and balance Fe) have the best corrosion resistance in the MCFC environment. Rare earth additives, La and Ce, do not appear to improve isothermal or thermal cycling resistance. Silicon addition appears to improve thermal cycling but not isothermal corrosion resistance. High Mn content (approx. 18%) appears detrimental based on this limited investigation. Currently used 316L has the least corrosion resistance of all the alloys tested. Pressurized tests have shown that high pressure (10 atm) reduces corrosion rate in the anode atmosphere whereas it only slightly affects corrosion rate in the cathode atmosphere.

  12. Corrosion resistant storage container for radioactive material

    DOEpatents

    Schweitzer, Donald G.; Davis, Mary S.

    1990-01-01

    A corrosion resistant long-term storage container for isolating radioactive waste material in a repository. The container is formed of a plurality of sealed corrosion resistant canisters of different relative sizes, with the smaller canisters housed within the larger canisters, and with spacer means disposed between judxtaposed pairs of canisters to maintain a predetermined spacing between each of the canisters. The combination of the plural surfaces of the canisters and the associated spacer means is effective to make the container capable of resisting corrosion, and thereby of preventing waste material from leaking from the innermost canister into the ambient atmosphere.

  13. Corrosion resistant storage container for radioactive material

    DOEpatents

    Schweitzer, D.G.; Davis, M.S.

    1984-08-30

    A corrosion resistant long-term storage container for isolating high-level radioactive waste material in a repository is claimed. The container is formed of a plurality of sealed corrosion resistant canisters of different relative sizes, with the smaller canisters housed within the larger canisters, and with spacer means disposed between juxtaposed pairs of canisters to maintain a predetermined spacing between each of the canisters. The combination of the plural surfaces of the canisters and the associated spacer means is effective to make the container capable of resisting corrosion, and thereby of preventing waste material from leaking from the innermost canister into the ambient atmosphere.

  14. Aqueous Corrosion Rates for Waste Package Materials

    SciTech Connect

    S. Arthur

    2004-10-08

    The purpose of this analysis, as directed by ''Technical Work Plan for: Regulatory Integration Modeling and Analysis of the Waste Form and Waste Package'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171583]), is to compile applicable corrosion data from the literature (journal articles, engineering documents, materials handbooks, or standards, and national laboratory reports), evaluate the quality of these data, and use these to perform statistical analyses and distributions for aqueous corrosion rates of waste package materials. The purpose of this report is not to describe the performance of engineered barriers for the TSPA-LA. Instead, the analysis provides simple statistics on aqueous corrosion rates of steels and alloys. These rates are limited by various aqueous parameters such as temperature (up to 100 C), water type (i.e., fresh versus saline), and pH. Corrosion data of materials at pH extremes (below 4 and above 9) are not included in this analysis, as materials commonly display different corrosion behaviors under these conditions. The exception is highly corrosion-resistant materials (Inconel Alloys) for which rate data from corrosion tests at a pH of approximately 3 were included. The waste package materials investigated are those from the long and short 5-DHLW waste packages, 2-MCO/2-DHLW waste package, and the 21-PWR commercial waste package. This analysis also contains rate data for some of the materials present inside the fuel canisters for the following fuel types: U-Mo (Fermi U-10%Mo), MOX (FFTF), Thorium Carbide and Th/U Carbide (Fort Saint Vrain [FSVR]), Th/U Oxide (Shippingport LWBR), U-metal (N Reactor), Intact U-Oxide (Shippingport PWR, Commercial), aluminum-based, and U-Zr-H (TRIGA). Analysis of corrosion rates for Alloy 22, spent nuclear fuel, defense high level waste (DHLW) glass, and Titanium Grade 7 can be found in other analysis or model reports.

  15. Corrosion protective coating for metallic materials

    DOEpatents

    Buchheit, Rudolph G.; Martinez, Michael A.

    1998-01-01

    Corrosion protective coatings for metallic materials, particularly aluminum and aluminum alloys, produced with simple, low-cost equipment and materials other than toxic metals or metal salts, or metal cyanides. The metallic material is cleaned, degreased, and deoxidized, the surface is converted to a substantially alkaline condition, and the surface is chemically sealed with inorganic metal compounds.

  16. Corrosion protective coating for metallic materials

    DOEpatents

    Buchheit, R.G.; Martinez, M.A.

    1998-05-26

    Corrosion protective coatings for metallic materials, particularly aluminum and aluminum alloys, produced with simple, low-cost equipment and materials other than toxic metals or metal salts, or metal cyanides is disclosed. The metallic material is cleaned, degreased, and deoxidized, the surface is converted to a substantially alkaline condition, and the surface is chemically sealed with inorganic metal compounds. 1 fig.

  17. Corrosiveness testing of thermal insulating materials

    SciTech Connect

    Sheppard, K.; Weil, R.

    1984-08-01

    A study was conducted to provide the data to form the basis for a method to test the corrosiveness of various thermal insulating materials used in residential structures. The insulating materials tested included celluloses containing several different fire-retarding additives, glass fibers some of which had been intentionally made more corrosive, mineral wool and urea-formaldehyde (UF) foam. Experiments were conducted with steel, copper and aluminum coupons embedded in samples of the different insulating materials at 45/sup 0/C and 75% RH, both with and without a thermal gradient of 10/sup 0/C to cause condensation. When there was no temperature gradient, the corrosion rates of the three metals tested were negligible indicating that in the absence of condensation or a water leak there is little likelihood of corrosion in the insulating materials tested. Some field tests were conducted in attics in three locations. Steel, copper and aluminium coupons were placed in the attics in a way to enable condensation to occur. Several possible accelerated test procedures were investigated. Because of the widely differing physical properties of thermal insulating materials used in residences and because some insulations were not wetted so as to provide a continuous electrical path which is a necessity for the electrochemical methods, it became apparent that leachants had to be used. The justification for using leachants was that the test results showed that the corrosive electrolyte appears to be moisture containing soluble ingredients of the insulating materials. Two test methods involving leachants correlated sufficiently well with the condensation and attic tests and met most of the other test criteria to qualify as possible corrosiveness-test procedures.

  18. Hot corrosion of ceramic engine materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Dennis S.; Jacobson, Nathan S.; Smialek, James L.

    1988-01-01

    A number of commercially available SiC and Si3N4 materials were exposed to 1000 C in a high velocity, pressurized burner rig as a simulation of a turbine engine environment. Sodium impurities added to the burner flame resulted in molten Na2SO4 deposition, attack of the SiC and Si4N4 and formation of substantial Na2O-x(SiO2) corrosion product. Room temperature strength of the materials decreased. This was a result of the formation of corrosion pits in SiC, and grain boundary dissolution and pitting in Si3N4. Corrosion regimes for such Si-based ceramics have been predicted using thermodynamics and verified in rig tests of SiO2 coupons. Protective mullite coatings are being investigated as a solution to the corrosion problem for SiC and Si3N4. Limited corrosion occurred to cordierite (Mg2Al4Si5O18) but some cracking of the substrate occurred.

  19. Corrosion of barrier materials in seawater environments

    SciTech Connect

    Heiser, J.H.; Soo, P.

    1995-07-01

    A brief review has been carried out on the performance of barrier materials for low-level radioactive wastes in seawater environments. The environments include those for shallower coastal waters as well as the deep ocean (down to 3800 m). The review is mainly focused on metallic materials since they are the most common for seawater service and they have the largest data base. Information from the literature is usually pertinent to shallower coastal locations, but there is a valuable source of corrosion data obtained from several studies of metallic specimens exposed to ocean-bed conditions. In addition, the corrosion of carbon steel barriers has been evaluated for actual waste containers that were retrieved from previously-used disposal sites in the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. Of the metallic materials studied, carbon steel showed the least corrosion resistance. Failure by non-uniform attack in a typical waste container could occur in as little as 25 y in some ocean environments ` Penetration by local attack, such as pitting and crevice corrosion resistance was also observed for more expensive materials such as low-alloy steels, stainless steels, titanium alloys, zirconium alloys, copper alloys, nickel alloys, aluminum alloys, and lead alloys.

  20. Effervescent Cationic Film Forming Corrosion Inhibitor Material and Process.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-09-24

    corrosion 13 inhibitor material into the water to form a solution that coats 14 the exposed aluminum surfaces of the weapon with a cation film of 15 the corrosion inhibitor material. 14 OD~ ODV DATE:W

  1. Coal Ash Corrosion Resistant Materials Testing

    SciTech Connect

    D. K. McDonald; P. L. Daniel; D. J. DeVault

    2003-08-31

    In April 1999, three identical superheater test sections were installed into the Niles Unit No.1 for the purpose of testing and ranking the coal ash corrosion resistance of candidate superheater alloys. The Niles boiler burns high sulfur coal (3% to 3.5%) that has a reasonably high alkali content, thus the constituents necessary for coal ash corrosion are present in the ash. The test sections were controlled to operate with an average surface metal temperature from approximately 1060 F to 1210 F which was well within the temperature range over which coal ash corrosion occurs. Thus, this combination of aggressive environment and high temperature was appropriate for testing the performance of candidate corrosion-resistant tube materials. Analyses of the deposit and scale confirmed that the aggressive alkali-iron-trisulfate constituent was present at the metal surface and active in tube metal wastage. The test sections were constructed so that the response of twelve different candidate tube and/or coating materials could be studied. The plan was to remove and evaluate one of the three test sections at time intervals of 1 year, 3 years, and 5 years. This would permit an assessment of performance of the candidate materials as a function of time. This report provides the results of the evaluation of Test Section C, including the samples that remained in the Test Section for the full exposure period as well as those that were removed early. The analysis of Test Section C followed much the same protocol that was employed in the assessment of Test Section A. Again, the focus was on determining and documenting the relative corrosion rates of the candidate materials. The detailed results of the investigation are included in this report as a series of twelve appendices. Each appendix is devoted to the performance of one of the candidate alloys. The table below summarizes metal loss rate for the worst case sample of each of the candidate materials for both Test Sections A and C

  2. Corrosion of type 316L stainless steel in a mercury thermal convection loop

    SciTech Connect

    DiStefano, J.R.; Manneschmidt, E.T.; Pawel, S.J.

    1999-04-01

    Two thermal convection loops fabricated from 316L stainless steel containing mercury (Hg) and Hg with 1000 wppm gallium (Ga), respectively, were operated continuously for about 5000 h. In each case, the maximum loop temperature was constant at about 305 degrees C and the minimum temperature was constant at about 242 degrees C. Coupons in the hot leg of the Hg-loop developed a posous surface layer substantially depleted of nickel and chromium, which resulted in a transformation to ferrite. The coupon exposed at the top of the hot leg in the Hg-loop experienced the maximum degradation, exhibiting a surface layer extending an average of 9-10 mu m after almost 5000 h. Analysis of the corrosion rate data as a function of temperature (position) in the Hg-loop suggests wetting by the mer cury occurred only above about 255 degrees C and that the rate limiting step in the corrosion process above 255 degrees C is solute diffusion through the saturated liquid boundary layer adjacent to the corroding surface. The latter factor suggests that the corrosion of 316L stainless steel in a mercury loop may be velocity dependent. No wetting and no corrosion were observed on the coupons and wall specimens removed from the Hg/Ga loop after 5000 h of operation.

  3. Coal Ash Corrosion Resistant Materials Testing Program

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, D K

    2003-04-22

    The "Coal Ash Corrosion Resistant Materials Testing Program" is being conducted by The Babcock & Wilcox Company (B&W), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) at Reliant Energy's Niles plant in Niles, Ohio to provide full-scale, in-situ testing of recently developed boiler superheater materials. Fireside corrosion is a key issue for improving efficiency of new coal fired power plants and improving service life in existing plants. In November 1998, B&W began development of a system to permit testing of advanced tube materials at metal temperatures typical of advanced supercritical steam temperatures (1100°F and higher) in a boiler exhibiting coal ash corrosive conditions. Several materials producers including Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) contributed advanced materials to the project. In the spring of 1999 a system consisting of three identical sections, each containing multiple segments of twelve different materials, was installed. The sections are cooled by reheat steam, and are located just above the furnace entrance in Niles' Unit #1, a 110 MWe unit firing high sulfur Ohio coal. In November 2001 the first section was removed for thorough metallurgical evaluation after 33 months of operation. The second and third sections remain in service and the second is expected to be removed in the fall of 2003; the last is tentatively planned for the fall of 2004. This paper describes the program; its importance; the design, fabrication, installation and operation of the test system; materials utilized; experience to date; and results of the evaluation of the first section.

  4. PH and Electrochemical Responsive Materials for Corrosion Smart Coating Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Wenyan; Calle, Luz M.

    2008-01-01

    Corrosion is a costly issue for military operations and civil industries. While most corrosion initiates from localized corrosion form, such as pitting, failure directly caused by localized corrosion is the most dangerous kind, because it is difficult to anticipate and prevent, occurs very suddenly and can be catastrophic. One way of preventing these failures is with a coating that can detect and heal localized corrosion. pH and other electrochemical changes are often associated with localized corrosion, so it is expected that materials that are pH or otherwise electrochemical responsive can be used to detect and control corrosion. This paper will review various pH and electrochemical responsive materials and their potential applications in corrosion smart coatings. Current research results in this field will also be reported.

  5. Mass Transfer of Corrosion Products in the Nonisothermal Sodium Loop of a Fast Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varseev, E. V.; Alekseev, V. V.

    2014-11-01

    The mass transfer of the products of corrosion of the steel surface of the sodium loop of a fast nuclear power reactor was investigated for the purpose of optimization of its parameters. The problem of deposition of the corrosion products on the surface of the heat-exchange unit of the indicated loop was considered. Experimental data on the rate of accumulation of deposits in the channel of this unit and results of the dispersion analysis of the suspensions contained in the sodium coolant are presented.

  6. Materials corrosion and protection from first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Donald F.

    Materials erode under environmental stresses such as high temperature, high pressure, and mechanical shock/stress, but erosion is often exacerbated by chemical corrosion. In this dissertation, periodic density functional theory (DFT) is employed to simulate interfacial adhesion, absorption kinetics, bulk diffusion, and other material phenomena (e.g., hydrogen-enhanced decohesion and shock-induced phase changes) with the intention of understanding corrosion and subsequent failure processes and guiding the design of new protective coatings. This work examines corrosion and/or protection of materials ( i.e., Fe, Ni, W) with important applications: structural steel, gun tubes, high-pressure oil recovery vessels, jet engine turbine blades, and fusion reactor walls. We use DFT to model the pressure-induced, bcc-to-hcp phase transformation in Fe, in which a new low energy pathway is predicted exhibiting nonadiabatic behavior coupling magnetic and structural changes. Protection of steel is addressed in two aspects: interfacial adhesion of protective coatings and assessment of corrosion resistance provided by a surface alloy. First, the current chrome-coated steel system is examined where extremely strong adhesion is predicted at the Cr/Fe interface originating in strong spin correlations. A ceramic coating, SiC, is considered as a possible replacement for Cr. Strong adhesion is predicted, especially for C-Fe interfacial bonds. To assess corrosion resistance, we model ingress of two common corrosive elements, H and C, into two Fe alloys, FeAl and Fe3Si. Adsorption and absorption thermodynamics and kinetics, as well as bulk dissolution and diffusion are calculated in order to determine whether these two alloys can inhibit uptake of H and C. Relative to pure Fe, dissolved H and C are less stable in the alloys, as the dissolution enthalpy is predicted to be more endothermic. Overall, the energy barriers and rate constants for adsorbed H/C diffusing into Fe3Si subsurface layers

  7. Materials characterization center workshop on corrosion of engineered barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Merz, M.D.; Zima, G.E.; Jones, R.H.; Westerman, R.E.

    1981-03-01

    A workshop on corrosion test procedures for materials to be used as barriers in nuclear waste repositories was conducted August 19 and 20, 1980, at the Battelle Seattle Research Center. The purpose of the meeting was to obtain guidance for the Materials Characterization Center in preparing test procedures to be approved by the Materials Review Board. The workshop identified test procedures that address failure modes of uniform corrosion, pitting and crevice corrosion, stress corrosion, and hydrogen effects that can cause delayed failures. The principal areas that will require further consideration beyond current engineering practices involve the analyses of pitting, crevice corrosion, and stress corrosion, especially with respect to quantitative predictions of the lifetime of barriers. Special techniques involving accelerated corrosion testing for uniform attack will require development.

  8. CORROSION OF LEAD SHIELDING IN NUCLEAR MATERIALS PACKAGES

    SciTech Connect

    Subramanian, K; Kerry Dunn, K; Joseph Murphy, J

    2008-07-18

    Inspection of United States-Department of Energy (US-DOE) model 9975 nuclear materials shipping package revealed corrosion of the lead shielding that was induced by off-gas constituents from organic components in the package. Experiments were performed to determine the corrosion rate of lead when exposed to off-gas or degradation products of these organic materials. The results showed that the room temperature vulcanizing (RTV) sealant was the most corrosive organic species used in the construction of the packaging, followed by polyvinyl acetate (PVAc) glue. Fiberboard material, also used in the construction of the packaging induced corrosion to a much lesser extent than the PVAc glue and RTV sealant, and only in the presence of condensed water. The results indicated faster corrosion at temperatures higher than ambient and with condensed water. In light of these corrosion mechanisms, the lead shielding was sheathed in a stainless steel liner to mitigate against corrosion.

  9. Corrosion of alloy 718 in a mercury thermal convection loop

    SciTech Connect

    Pawel, S.J.; DiStefano, J.R.; Manneschmidt, E.T.

    1999-12-01

    Two thermal convection loops (TCLs) fabricated from annealed alloy 718 continuously circulated mercury (Hg) with 1000 wppm gallium (Ga), respectively, for about 5000 h, duplicating previous TCL tests for annealed 316L. In each case, the maximum loop temperature was 305C, the minimum temperature was 242C, and the Hg flow rate was approximately 1.2 m/min. Unlike the 316L exposed to Hg, which above about 260C exhibited a thin, porous surface layer depleted in Ni and Cr, the alloy 718 coupons revealed essentially no wetting and, therefore, no interaction with that Hg at any temperature. Alloy 718 coupons suspended in the loops revealed inconsequentially small weight changes, and both the coupons and loop tubing exhibited no detectable metallographic evidence of attack.

  10. Heavy Liquid Metal Corrosion of Structural Materials in Advanced Nuclear Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caro, M.; Woloshun, K.; Rubio, F.; Maloy, S. A.; Hosemann, P.

    2013-08-01

    Interest in advanced nuclear concepts using liquid metal coolant has increased in the past few years. Liquid metal coolants have been proposed for the next generation of small-sized nuclear reactors, which offer exceptional safety and reliability, sustainability, nonproliferation, and economic competitiveness. Heavy liquid metal coolants are investigated for advanced fast reactors that operate at high temperatures, reaching high efficiencies. Lead and lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) coolants are also proposed as coolants and targets of accelerator driven systems. High temperature, corrosive environment, high fast neutron flux, high fluence, and radiation damage, among other physical phenomena, challenge the integrity of materials in these advanced systems. Excellent compatibility with the liquid coolant is recognized as a key factor in the selection of structural materials for advanced concepts. In this article, we review materials requirements for heavy metal cooled systems with emphasis on lead and LBE materials corrosion properties. We describe experimental corrosion tests currently ongoing at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Development of Lead Alloy Technical Applications (DELTA) loop. DELTA is a facility designed to study the long-term corrosive effects of LBE on structural materials under relevant conditions of chemistry, flow, and temperature. The research studies will provide data of corrosion rates and corrosion mechanisms in selected steel exposed to high velocity (above 2 m/s) in flowing LBE at 500°C. Fundamental research studies will help support conceptual design efforts and further the development of heavy liquid metals technology.

  11. IMPACT OF NUCLEAR MATERIAL DISSOLUTION ON VESSEL CORROSION

    SciTech Connect

    Mickalonis, J.; Dunn, K.; Clifton, B.

    2012-10-01

    Different nuclear materials require different processing conditions. In order to maximize the dissolver vessel lifetime, corrosion testing was conducted for a range of chemistries and temperature used in fuel dissolution. Compositional ranges of elements regularly in the dissolver were evaluated for corrosion of 304L, the material of construction. Corrosion rates of AISI Type 304 stainless steel coupons, both welded and non-welded coupons, were calculated from measured weight losses and post-test concentrations of soluble Fe, Cr and Ni.

  12. Corrosion Testing of Brazed Space Station IATCS Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohlman, Matthew J.; Varisik, Jerry; Steele, John W.; Golden, Johnny L.; Boyce, William E.; Pedley, Michael D.

    2004-01-01

    Increased nickel concentrations in the IATCS coolant prompted a study of the corrosion rates of nickel-brazed heat exchangers in the system. The testing has shown that corrosion is occurring in a silicon-rich intermetallic phase in the braze filler of coldplates and heat exchangers as the result of a decrease in the coolant pH brought about by cabin carbon dioxide permeation through polymeric flexhoses. Similar corrosion is occurring in the EMU de-ionized water loop. Certain heat exchangers and coldplates have more silicon-rich phase because of their manufacturing method, and those units produce more nickel corrosion product. Silver biocide additions did not induce pitting corrosion at silver precipitate sites.

  13. Coal Ash Corrosion Resistant Materials Testing

    SciTech Connect

    D. K. McDonald; P. L. Daniel; D. J. DeVault

    2007-12-31

    In April 1999, three identical superheater test sections were installed into the Niles Unit No.1 for the purpose of testing and ranking the coal ash corrosion resistance of candidate superheater alloys. The Niles boiler burns high sulfur coal (3% to 3.5%) that has a moderate alkali content (0.2% sodium equivalents), thus the constituents necessary for coal ash corrosion are present in the ash. The test sections were controlled to operate with an average surface metal temperature from approximately 1060 F to 1210 F which was within the temperature range over which coal ash corrosion occurs. Thus, this combination of aggressive environment and high temperature was appropriate for testing the performance of candidate corrosion-resistant tube materials. Analyses of the deposit and scale confirmed that aggressive alkali sulfate constituents were present at the metal surface and active in tube metal wastage. The test sections were constructed so that the response of twelve different candidate tube and/or coating materials could be studied. The plan was to remove and evaluate one of the three test sections at time intervals of 1 year, 3 years, and 5 years. This would permit an assessment of performance of the candidate materials as a function of time. Test Section A was removed in November 2001 after about 24 months of service at the desired steam temperature set point, with about 15.5 months of exposure at full temperature. A progress report, issued in October 2002, was written to document the performance of the candidate alloys in that test section. The evaluation described the condition of each tube sample after exposure. It involved a determination of the rate of wall thickness loss for these samples. In cases where there was more than one sample of a candidate material in the test section, an assessment was made of the performance of the alloy as a function of temperature. Test Sections B and C were examined during the November 2001 outage, and it was decided that

  14. CORROSION OF LEAD SHIELDING IN NUCLEAR MATERIALS PACKAGES

    SciTech Connect

    Subramanian, K; Kerry Dunn, K

    2007-11-16

    Inspection of United States-Department of Energy (US-DOE) model 9975 nuclear materials shipping package revealed corrosion of the lead shielding induced by off-gas constituents from organic components in the package. Experiments were performed to determine the corrosion rate of lead when exposed to off-gas or degradation products of these organic materials. The results showed that the room temperature vulcanizing (RTV) sealant was the most corrosive organic species followed by the polyvinyl acetate (PVAc) glue. The fiberboard material induced corrosion to a much lesser extent than the PVAc glue and RTV, and only in the presence of condensed water. The results indicated faster corrosion at temperatures higher than ambient and with condensed water as expected. A corrosion rate of 0.05 mm/year measured for coupons exposed to the most aggressive conditions was recommended as a conservative estimate for use in package performance calculations.

  15. Method of preparing corrosion resistant composite materials

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, Thomas D.

    1993-01-01

    Method of manufacture of ceramic materials which require stability in severely-corrosive environment having high alkali-metal activity, high sulfur/sulfide activity and/or molten halides at temperatures of 200.degree.-550.degree. C. or organic salt (including SO.sub.2 and SO.sub.2 Cl.sub.2) at temperatures of 25.degree.-200.degree. C. These surfide ceramics form stoichiometric (single-phase) compounds with sulfides of Ca, Li, Na, K, Al, Mg, Si, Y, La, Ce, Ga, Ba, Zr and Sr and show melting-points that are sufficiently low and have excellent wettability with many metals (Fe, Ni, Mo) to easily form metal/ceramic seals. Ceramic compositions are also formulated to adequately match thermal expansion coefficient of adjacent metal components.

  16. Corrosion experiments and materials developed for the Japanese HLM systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurata, Yuji

    2011-08-01

    The static corrosion tests in lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) were conducted from 450 °C to 600 °C to understand corrosion behavior and develop corrosion resistant materials for heavy liquid metal systems. While increase of Cr content in steels enhances corrosion resistance in LBE, the effect approaches a constant value above 12 wt% of Cr. Corrosion depth in LBE increases with increasing temperature and corrosion attack becomes severe above 550 °C even under the condition of high oxygen concentration. Nickel dissolution and Pb-Bi penetration occur in 316SS and JPCA above 550 °C under the condition of high oxygen concentration. When oxygen concentration decreases below the level of Fe oxide formation, corrosion attack on these steels also becomes violent due to dissolution of various elements and grain boundary corrosion. Whereas additions of 1.5 wt% Si to T91 and 2.5 wt% Si to 316SS improve corrosion resistance, the effect is insufficient taking fluctuation of oxygen concentration in LBE into consideration. Furthermore, addition of 1.5 wt% Si to T91 causes rise in DBTT. A new coating method using Al, Ti and Fe powders produces corrosion resistant coating layers on 316SS. The coating layers containing 6-8 wt% Al exhibit good corrosion resistance at 550 °C for 3000 h in LBE containing 10 -6-10 -4 wt% of oxygen.

  17. Irradiation-Accelerated Corrosion of Reactor Core Materials. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Jiao, Zhujie; Was, Gary; Bartels, David

    2015-04-02

    This project aims to understand how radiation accelerates corrosion of reactor core materials. The combination of high temperature, chemically aggressive coolants, a high radiation flux and mechanical stress poses a major challenge for the life extension of current light water reactors, as well as the success of most all GenIV concepts. Of these four drivers, the combination of radiation and corrosion places the most severe demands on materials, for which an understanding of the fundamental science is simply absent. Only a few experiments have been conducted to understand how corrosion occurs under irradiation, yet the limited data indicates that the effect is large; irradiation causes order of magnitude increases in corrosion rates. Without a firm understanding of the mechanisms by which radiation and corrosion interact in film formation, growth, breakdown and repair, the extension of the current LWR fleet beyond 60 years and the success of advanced nuclear energy systems are questionable. The proposed work will address the process of irradiation-accelerated corrosion that is important to all current and advanced reactor designs, but remains very poorly understood. An improved understanding of the role of irradiation in the corrosion process will provide the community with the tools to develop predictive models for in-reactor corrosion, and to address specific, important forms of corrosion such as irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking.

  18. General and crevice corrosion study of the in-wall shielding materials for ITER vacuum vessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, K. S.; Pathak, H. A.; Dayal, R. K.; Bafna, V. K.; Kimihiro, Ioki; Barabash, V.

    2012-11-01

    Vacuum vessel In-Wall Shield (IWS) will be inserted between the inner and outer shells of the ITER vacuum vessel. The behaviour of IWS in the vacuum vessel especially concerning the susceptibility to crevice of shielding block assemblies could cause rapid and extensive corrosion attacks. Even galvanic corrosion may be due to different metals in same electrolyte. IWS blocks are not accessible until life of the machine after closing of vacuum vessel. Hence, it is necessary to study the susceptibility of IWS materials to general corrosion and crevice corrosion under operations of ITER vacuum vessel. Corrosion properties of IWS materials were studied by using (i) Immersion technique and (ii) Electro-chemical Polarization techniques. All the sample materials were subjected to a series of examinations before and after immersion test, like Loss/Gain weight measurement, SEM analysis, and Optical stereo microscopy, measurement of surface profile and hardness of materials. After immersion test, SS 304B4 and SS 304B7 showed slight weight gain which indicate oxide layer formation on the surface of coupons. The SS 430 material showed negligible weight loss which indicates mild general corrosion effect. On visual observation with SEM and Metallography, all material showed pitting corrosion attack. All sample materials were subjected to series of measurements like Open Circuit potential, Cyclic polarization, Pitting potential, protection potential, Critical anodic current and SEM examination. All materials show pitting loop in OC2 operating condition. However, its absence in OC1 operating condition clearly indicates the activity of chloride ion to penetrate oxide layer on the sample surface, at higher temperature. The critical pitting temperature of all samples remains between 100° and 200°C.

  19. T-111 Rankine system corrosion test loop, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, R. W.; Hoffman, E. E.; Smith, J. P.

    1975-01-01

    Results are given of a program whose objective was to determine the performance of refractory metal alloys in a two loop Rankine test system. The test system consisted of a circulating lithium circuit heated to 1230 C maximum transferring heat to a boiling potassium circuit with a 1170 C superheated vapor temperature. The results demonstrate the suitability of the selected refractory alloys to perform from a chemical compatibility standpoint.

  20. CORROSION ISSUES ASSOCIATED WITH AUSTENITIC STAINLESS STEEL COMPONENTS USED IN NUCLEAR MATERIALS EXTRACTION AND SEPARATION PROCESSES

    SciTech Connect

    Mickalonis, J.; Louthan, M.; Sindelar, R.

    2012-12-17

    This paper illustrated the magnitude of the systems, structures and components used at the Savannah River Site for nuclear materials extraction and separation processes. Corrosion issues, including stress corrosion cracking, pitting, crevice corrosion and other corrosion induced degradation processes are discussed and corrosion mitigation strategies such as a chloride exclusion program and corrosion release testing are also discussed.

  1. Humid-air and aqueous corrosion models for corrosion-allowance barrier material

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.H.; Atkins, J.E.; Andrews, R.W.

    1995-12-31

    Humid-air and aqueous general and pitting corrosion models (including their uncertainties) for the carbon steel outer containment barrier were developed using the corrosion data from literature for a suite of cast irons and carbon steels which have similar corrosion behaviors to the outer barrier material. The corrosion data include the potential effects of various chemical species present in the testing environments. The atmospheric corrosion data also embed any effects of cyclic wetting and drying and salts that may form on the corroding specimen surface. The humid-air and aqueous general corrosion models are consistent in that the predicted humid-air general corrosion rates at relative humidities between 85 and 100% RH are close to the predicted aqueous general corrosion rates. Using the expected values of the model parameters, the model predicts that aqueous pitting corrosion is the most likely failure mode for the carbon steel outer barrier, and an earliest failure (or initial pit penetration) of the 100-mm thick barrier may occur as early as about 500 years if it is exposed continuously to an aqueous condition at between 60 and 70{degrees}C.

  2. Corrosion performance of advanced structural materials in sodium.

    SciTech Connect

    Natesan, K.; Momozaki, Y.; Li, M.; Rink, D.L.

    2012-05-16

    This report gives a description of the activities in design, fabrication, construction, and assembling of a pumped sodium loop for the sodium compatibility studies on advanced structural materials. The work is the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) portion of the effort on the work project entitled, 'Sodium Compatibility of Advanced Fast Reactor Materials,' and is a part of Advanced Materials Development within the Reactor Campaign. The objective of this project is to develop information on sodium corrosion compatibility of advanced materials being considered for sodium reactor applications. This report gives the status of the sodium pumped loop at Argonne National Laboratory, the specimen details, and the technical approach to evaluate the sodium compatibility of advanced structural alloys. This report is a deliverable from ANL in FY2010 (M2GAN10SF050302) under the work package G-AN10SF0503 'Sodium Compatibility of Advanced Fast Reactor Materials.' Two reports were issued in 2009 (Natesan and Meimei Li 2009, Natesan et al. 2009) which examined the thermodynamic and kinetic factors involved in the purity of liquid sodium coolant for sodium reactor applications as well as the design specifications for the ANL pumped loop for testing advanced structural materials. Available information was presented on solubility of several metallic and nonmetallic elements along with a discussion of the possible mechanisms for the accumulation of impurities in sodium. That report concluded that the solubility of many metals in sodium is low (<1 part per million) in the temperature range of interest in sodium reactors and such trace amounts would not impact the mechanical integrity of structural materials and components. The earlier report also analyzed the solubility and transport mechanisms of nonmetallic elements such as oxygen, nitrogen, carbon, and hydrogen in laboratory sodium loops and in reactor systems such as Experimental Breeder Reactor-II, Fast Flux Test Facility, and

  3. Prediction of Corrosion of Advanced Materials and Fabricated Components

    SciTech Connect

    A. Anderko; G. Engelhardt; M.M. Lencka; M.A. Jakab; G. Tormoen; N. Sridhar

    2007-09-29

    The goal of this project is to provide materials engineers, chemical engineers and plant operators with a software tool that will enable them to predict localized corrosion of process equipment including fabricated components as well as base alloys. For design and revamp purposes, the software predicts the occurrence of localized corrosion as a function of environment chemistry and assists the user in selecting the optimum alloy for a given environment. For the operation of existing plants, the software enables the users to predict the remaining life of equipment and help in scheduling maintenance activities. This project combined fundamental understanding of mechanisms of corrosion with focused experimental results to predict the corrosion of advanced, base or fabricated, alloys in real-world environments encountered in the chemical industry. At the heart of this approach is the development of models that predict the fundamental parameters that control the occurrence of localized corrosion as a function of environmental conditions and alloy composition. The fundamental parameters that dictate the occurrence of localized corrosion are the corrosion and repassivation potentials. The program team, OLI Systems and Southwest Research Institute, has developed theoretical models for these parameters. These theoretical models have been applied to predict the occurrence of localized corrosion of base materials and heat-treated components in a variety of environments containing aggressive and non-aggressive species. As a result of this project, a comprehensive model has been established and extensively verified for predicting the occurrence of localized corrosion as a function of environment chemistry and temperature by calculating the corrosion and repassivation potentials.To support and calibrate the model, an experimental database has been developed to elucidate (1) the effects of various inhibiting species as well as aggressive species on localized corrosion of nickel

  4. Duct injection technology prototype development. Materials corrosion report, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Harper, S.L.

    1991-08-01

    This report describes a test program conducted to determine the corrosion rate of materials in the dry scrubber or duct injection systems. Four materials were evaluated: 1010 carbon steel, Corten, 317SS and Hastelloy C-276. The results show that acidic conditions result in higher corrosion rates than alkaline conditions for all the materials. The carbon steel, Corten and stainless steel show moderate to heavy pitting attack in the acidic environment. For the alkaline conditions, the corrosion rates of carbon steel and Corten were higher than the stainless steel or Hastelloy C-276. Also, the corrosion rate of abraded specimens were four time those of unabraded specimens in the flue gas. It is probable that areas of wall-wetting and plugging in the duct injection process will exhibit high rates of corrosion for the carbon steel, Corten, and stainless steel materials. General corrosion and pitting corrosion will predominate. Additionally, abraded duct areas will corrode at a significantly higher rate than unabraded duct materials. 6 refs., 11 figs., 7 tabs.

  5. Corrosion assessment of refractory materials for high temperature waste vitrification

    SciTech Connect

    Marra, J.C.; Congdon, J.W.; Kielpinski, A.L.

    1995-11-01

    A variety of vitrification technologies are being evaluated to immobilize radioactive and hazardous wastes following years of nuclear materials production throughout the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. The compositions and physical forms of these wastes are diverse ranging from inorganic sludges to organic liquids to heterogeneous debris. Melt and off-gas products can be very corrosive at the high temperatures required to melt many of these waste streams. Ensuring material durability is required to develop viable treatment processes. Corrosion testing of materials in some of the anticipated severe environments is an important aspect of the materials identification and selection process. Corrosion coupon tests on typical materials used in Joule heated melters were completed using glass compositions with high salt contents. The presence of chloride in the melts caused the most severe attack. In the metal alloys, oxidation was the predominant corrosion mechanism, while in the tested refractory material enhanced dissolution of the refractory into the glass was observed. Corrosion testing of numerous different refractory materials was performed in a plasma vitrification system using a surrogate heterogeneous debris waste. Extensive corrosion was observed in all tested materials.

  6. Corrosion properties of second-generation conductive materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groshart, E.

    1984-01-01

    Since the introduction of silver-filled epoxy adhesives and silver-filled nitrocellulose lacquer as RFI control materials, a number of new materials have been introduced. The resin carriers have been changed in an effort to make the materials more usable or more EPA acceptable and the fillers have been varied in an effort to make the materials less costly. The corrosion-related properties of second-generation materials were assessed, including adhesives, caulks, and greases. Aluminum 2024 was used as the only substrate material. Ten days of salt fog was used as the corrosive environment. If a noble material such as silver, nickel, or carbon is sandwiched with aluminum an increase in dc resistance results given enough time. If this is unsatisfactory electrically it should either not be used or have all corrosive environments excluded.

  7. Corrosion and mechanical behavior of materials for coal gasification applications

    SciTech Connect

    Natesan, K.

    1980-05-01

    A state-of-the-art review is presented on the corrosion and mechanical behavior of materials at elevated temperatures in coal-gasification environments. The gas atmosphere in coal-conversion processes are, in general, complex mixtures which contain sulfur-bearing components (H/sub 2/S, SO/sub 2/, and COS) as well as oxidants (CO/sub 2//CO and H/sub 2/O/H/sub 2/). The information developed over the last five years clearly shows sulfidation to be the major mode of material degradation in these environments. The corrosion behavior of structural materials in complex gas environments is examined to evaluate the interrelationships between gas chemistry, alloy chemistry, temperature, and pressure. Thermodynamic aspects of high-temperature corrosion processes that pertain to coal conversion are discussed, and kinetic data are used to compare the behavior of different commercial materials of interest. The influence of complex gas environments on the mechanical properties such as tensile, stress-rupture, and impact on selected alloys is presented. The data have been analyzed, wherever possible, to examine the role of environment on the property variation. The results from ongoing programs on char effects on corrosion and on alloy protection via coatings, cladding, and weld overlay are presented. Areas of additional research with particular emphasis on the development of a better understanding of corrosion processes in complex environments and on alloy design for improved corrosion resistance are discussed. 54 references, 65 figures, 24 tables.

  8. 49 CFR 177.839 - Class 8 (corrosive) materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Class 8 (corrosive) materials. 177.839 Section 177.839 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS CARRIAGE BY...

  9. 49 CFR 177.839 - Class 8 (corrosive) materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Class 8 (corrosive) materials. 177.839 Section 177.839 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS CARRIAGE BY...

  10. 49 CFR 177.839 - Class 8 (corrosive) materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Class 8 (corrosive) materials. 177.839 Section 177.839 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS CARRIAGE BY...

  11. 49 CFR 177.839 - Class 8 (corrosive) materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Class 8 (corrosive) materials. 177.839 Section 177.839 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS CARRIAGE BY...

  12. Corrosion Inhibition of Stress Corrosion Cracking and Localized Corrosion of Turbo-Expander Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bavarian, Behzad; Zhang, Jia; Reiner, Lisa

    Stress corrosion cracking of 7050 aluminum alloy in the turbo expander and steam/gas turbine industry can cause catastrophic failures, especially for turbo machinery systems performing in hostile, corrosive environments. Commercially available inhibitors were investigated for their effectiveness in reducing and controlling the corrosion susceptibility. Inhibitor effectiveness was confirmed with electrochemical corrosion techniques. Polarization resistance increased with concentration of corrosion inhibitor due to film formation and displacement of water molecules. Cyclic polarization behavior for samples in the 1.0% to 10.0% inhibitor concentration showed a shift in the passive film breakdown potential. The substantial increase in the passive range has positive consequences for neutralizing pitting and crevice corrosion cell chemistry. The strain to failure and tensile strength determined from slow strain rate studies for the aluminum alloy showed pronounced improvement resulting from the inhibitors ability to mitigate SCC. Additionally, the fractographic analysis showed a changed morphology with ductile overload as the primary failure mode instead of transgranular or intergranular cracking.

  13. Corrosion behavior of materials exposed to hypersaline geothermal brine

    SciTech Connect

    McCright, R.D.

    1980-11-20

    The corrosion rate and corrosion attack characteristics were determined for thirteen commercially available materials exposed in a geothermal production well for three months. The materials included carbon steels, Cr-Mo alloy steels, martensitic and ferritic stainless steels, high-nickel alloys, and titanium. The environment at the 1800 ft (600 m) depth of exposure was a single phase high salinity brine. The prevailing temperature was 260{sup 0}C and the prevailing pressure was 630 psi (4.0 MPa) during the exposure period. Results indicated that the carbon steels suffered intense generalized and localized corrosion. Addition of Cr and Mo to steels imparted significant improvement in the corrosion performance in this aggressive environment. Of the stainless steels tested, the most resistant were those containing a few percent molybdenum.

  14. Glass corrosion in the presence of iron-bearing materials and potential corrosion suppressors

    SciTech Connect

    Reiser, Joelle T.; Neill, Lindsay; Weaver, Jamie L.; Parruzot, Benjamin; Musa, Christopher; Neeway, James J.; Ryan, Joseph V.; Qafoku, Nikolla; Gin, Stephane; Wall, Nathalie

    2015-07-16

    A complete understanding of radioactive waste glass interactions with near-field materials is essential for appropriate nuclear waste repository performance assessment. In many geologic repository designs, Fe is present in both the natural environment and in the containers that will hold the waste glasses. In this paper we discuss investigations into the alteration of International Simple Glass (ISG) in the presence of Fe0 foil and hematite (Fe2O3). ISG alteration is more pronounced in the presence of Fe0 than with hematite. Additionally, minimal glass corrosion is observed for distances equal to 5 mm between Fe materials and ISG, but substantial glass corrosion is observed for systems exhibiting full contact between Fe0 material and ISG. Diatomaceous earth appears to be a better corrosion suppressant than silica when present with iron and ISG.

  15. A Novel Emulsion Flow Loop for Investigating the Corrosion of X65 Steel in Emulsions with H2S/CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rihan, Rihan; Zafar, Muhammad Nauman; Al-Hadhrami, Luai

    2016-07-01

    Corrosion resistance ( R P) of X65 steel was investigated in an oil-in-water emulsion containing H2S and CO2 at several oil concentrations and different flow regions using a novel emulsion flow loop. One working electrode was mounted in the flow developing region while the other one was mounted in a region where the flow is fully developed. The experimental results show that the addition of CO2 to an H2S containing emulsion decreases the corrosion rate. The R P in the flow developing region is less than that in the fully developed region and it increases with increasing oil concentration. This flow loop is a promising tool for investigating the R P of engineering materials in a simulated environment similar to that encountered in the petroleum industry.

  16. Biocompatibly Coated 304 Stainless Steel as Superior Corrosion-Resistant Implant Material to 316L Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Subir; Mandal, Chandranath

    2013-10-01

    Surface treatments of 304 stainless steel by electro-coating and passivating in few inorganic electrolytes were found to be very effective in drastically reducing the corrosion rate of the material in stimulated body fluid (SBF) by several orders in comparison to that of 316L steel, presently being used for orthopedic implants. Polarization studies of electrodeposited hydroxyl apatite coating on 304 steel showed remarkably improved corrosion current. Cyclic polarization of the material in SBF reflected the broadened passivity region, much lower passive current, and narrower hysteresis loops. Similar effects were also found through the formation of inorganic coatings by passivation in NaF, CaNO3, and calcium phosphate buffer solutions. Surface characterization by XRD showed the peaks of the respective coating crystals. The morphology of the coatings studied by SEM showed a flake-type structure for hydroxyapatite coating and fine spherical-subspherical particles for other coatings.

  17. 49 CFR 195.559 - What coating material may I use for external corrosion control?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... corrosion control? 195.559 Section 195.559 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation...) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE Corrosion Control § 195.559 What coating material may I use for external corrosion control? Coating material for external corrosion control...

  18. 49 CFR 195.559 - What coating material may I use for external corrosion control?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... corrosion control? 195.559 Section 195.559 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation...) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE Corrosion Control § 195.559 What coating material may I use for external corrosion control? Coating material for external corrosion control...

  19. 49 CFR 195.559 - What coating material may I use for external corrosion control?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... corrosion control? 195.559 Section 195.559 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation...) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE Corrosion Control § 195.559 What coating material may I use for external corrosion control? Coating material for external corrosion control...

  20. 49 CFR 195.559 - What coating material may I use for external corrosion control?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... corrosion control? 195.559 Section 195.559 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation...) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE Corrosion Control § 195.559 What coating material may I use for external corrosion control? Coating material for external corrosion control...

  1. 49 CFR 195.559 - What coating material may I use for external corrosion control?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... corrosion control? 195.559 Section 195.559 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation...) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE Corrosion Control § 195.559 What coating material may I use for external corrosion control? Coating material for external corrosion control...

  2. Materials studies for preventing corrosion in condensing environments

    SciTech Connect

    Kukacka, L.E.; Sugama, T. )

    1991-10-01

    The objective of this project is to determine the fundamental interfacial requirements for low-cost, organic and inorganic materials resistive to corrosion in condensing furnace exhausts. This research effort is being focused to provide information regarding corrosion resistance, heat transfer, material cost, fabrication method and cost, and product reliability since all are important in the final design and production of a heat exchanger. Results to date indicate that organic and inorganic-type polymer coating systems applied to low cost metals such as mild steel and aluminum provide good corrosion protection. The thermal stability of these polymers plus the identification of the interfacial requirements needed to utilize them with reactive filler materials should also make their use as bulk composites feasible.

  3. Electrochemical Corrosion Testing of Neutron Absorber Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Tedd Lister; Ron Mizia; Arnold Erickson; Tammy Trowbridge

    2007-05-01

    This report summarizes the results of crevice-corrosion tests for six alloys in solutions representative of ionic compositions inside the Yucca Mountain waste package should a breech occur. The alloys in these tests are Neutronit A978a (ingot metallurgy, hot rolled), Neutrosorb Plus 304B4 Grade Ab (powder metallurgy, hot rolled), Neutrosorb Plus 304B5 Grade Ab (powder metallurgy, hot rolled), Neutrosorb Plus 304B6 Grade Ab (powder metallurgy, hot rolled), Ni-Cr-Mo-Gd alloy2 (ingot metallurgy, hot rolled), and Alloy 22 (ingot metallurgy, hot rolled).

  4. Localized corrosion in materials for geothermal power

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, A.; Peterson, J.A.; Hehemann, R.F.; Troiano, A.R.

    1980-12-01

    Ten different commercially available steels were examined for general and localized corrosion in 14 different environmental conditions. The chloride concentration was varied from 1 to 24 percent. In general, the influence of chloride was minor and seemed slightly more agressive at 1 than at 5 or 24 percent. The brines were examined with and without saturated H/sub 2/S. Saturation with H/sub 2/S increased the general corrosion rate but appeared to reduce crevice attack in the acid solutions. Selected brines were examined in both acid and neutral conditions. As anticipated, a neutral brine with or without H/sub 2/S greatly reduced all forms of attack. Tests at 150/sup 0/C exhibited greater attack than at ambient. A relatively new alloy, Ni-Cu-Cb, consistently demonstrated good resistance to both general and localized attack. Typical economical N80 grade steels clearly demonstrated the strong dependence of localized attack on inclusion variables and offer great promise in the minimized and/or controlled inclusion condition. The Cr-Mo steels surprisingly did not look good at ambient but did exhibit substantial improvement at 150/sup 0/C. The laboratory tests gave higher weight loss values for similar steels recently tested in a well; although in neutral brines without saturated H/sub 2/S, the difference was not significantly larger.

  5. Corrosion of metallic materials in HTR-helium environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, L. W.

    1990-04-01

    The HTR core system has been successfully developed to provide helium coolant temperatures up to 1200 K giving the potential to exploit a wide variety of commercial applications. The present paper summarises the main corrosion effects found in HTR-helium environments, especially those which could change the mechanical properties of component materials. It is shown that corrosion phenomena derive from the presence of low concentrations of the impurities H 2O, CO, CH 4 and H 2 in the helium which can produce oxidation, decarburisation and carburisation depending on the relative and absolute partial pressures of the impurities and the temperature. Major corrosion effects can be avoided by control of the environment but the large heat to heat variations in behaviour found in materials exposed to nominally protective regimes at the higher temperatures of application requires further study.

  6. Development of the pipe-loop system for determining effectiveness of corrosion-control chemicals in potable water systems. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Prakash, T.M.; Scholze, R.J.; Neff, C.H.; Maloney, S.W.; Heath, M.

    1988-08-01

    In the Army's 12,000 miles of water lines, internal corrosion slowly destroys a large investment and creates significant problems for Army water-treatment-plant operators, who try to maintain the water quality at acceptable levels. Corrosion can be slowed using corrosion-inhibiting chemicals, but it is difficult to measure the extent of corrosion and the effectiveness of inhibitors without excavating actual pipes. This study surveyed corrosion-inhibiting water-quality control chemicals and methods for monitoring corrosion. With this knowledge, a pipe-loop system was developed and installed at Fort Bragg, NC and Fort Monroe, VA. It was shown to be effective in gathering data on corrosion rates. After a standard procedure has been established, this loop will allow a water-treatment-plant operator to monitor with ease the effectiveness of corrosion-inhibiting treatments.

  7. Investigation of corrosion and stress corrosion cracking in bolting materials on light water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Czajkowski, C.J.

    1985-01-01

    Laboratory experiments performed at BNL have shown that the concentration of boric acid to a moist paste at approximately the boiling point of water can produce corrosion rates of the order of several tenths of an inch per year on bolting and piping materials, which values are consistent with service experience. Other failure evaluation experience has shown that primary coolant/lubricant interaction may lead to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of steam generator manway studs. An investigation was also performed on eleven lubricants and their effects on A193 B7 and A540 B24 bolting materials. H/sub 2/S generation by the lubricants, coefficient of friction results and transgranular SCC of the bolting materials in steam are discussed. 13 refs.

  8. Corrosion Protection Provided by PV Module Packaging Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Jorgensen, G. J.; Kempe, M. D.; Terwilliger, K. M.; McMahon, T. J.

    2005-11-01

    The ability of glass/glass and glass/breathable backsheet constructions laminated with various encapsulant and/or edge seal materials to protect thin-film aluminum coatings deposited onto glass substrates was assessed. Although they provide the best moisture barrier available, glass/glass laminate constructions can trap harmful compounds that catalyze moisture-driven corrosion of the aluminum. Constructions with breathable backsheets allow higher rates of moisture ingress, but also allow egress of deleterious substances that can result in decreased corrosion.

  9. Corrosion in Supercritical carbon Dioxide: Materials, Environmental Purity, Surface Treatments, and Flow Issues

    SciTech Connect

    Sridharan, Kumar; Anderson, Mark

    2013-12-10

    separately to high purity CO{sub 2}. Task 3: Evaluation of surface treatments on the corrosion performance of alloys in supercritical CO{sub 2}: Surface treatments can be very beneficial in improving corrosion resistance. Shot peening and yttrium and aluminum surface treatments will be investigated. Shot peening refines the surface grain sizes and promotes protective Cr-oxide layer formation. Both yttrium and aluminum form highly stable oxide layers (Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}), which can get incorporated in the growing Fe-oxide layer to form an impervious complex oxide to enhance corrosion resistance. Task 4: Study of flow-assisted corrosion of select alloys in supercritical CO{sub 2} under a selected set of test conditions: To study the effects of flow-assisted corrosion, tests will be conducted in a supercritical CO{sub 2} flow loop. An existing facility used for supercritical water flow studies at the proposing university will be modified for use in this task. The system is capable of flow velocities up to 10 m/s and can operate at temperatures and pressures of up to 650°C and 20 MPa, respectively. All above tasks will be performed in conjunction with detailed materials characterization and analysis using scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS), x-ray diffraction (XRD), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) techniques, and weight change measurements. Inlet and outlet gas compositions will be monitored using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GCMS).

  10. Selection of Corrosion Resistant Materials for Nuclear Waste Repositories

    SciTech Connect

    R.B. Rebak

    2006-08-28

    Several countries are considering geological repositories to dispose of nuclear waste. The environment of most of the currently considered repositories will be reducing in nature, except for the repository in the US, which is going to be oxidizing. For the reducing repositories, alloys such as carbon steel, stainless steels and titanium are being evaluated. For the repository in the US, some of the most corrosion resistant commercially available alloys are being investigated. This paper presents a summary of the behavior of the different materials under consideration for the repositories and the current understanding of the degradation modes of the proposed alloys in ground water environments from the point of view of general corrosion, localized corrosion and environmentally assisted cracking.

  11. Selection of Corrosion Resistant Materials for Nuclear Waste Repositories

    SciTech Connect

    Rebak, R B

    2006-06-01

    Several countries are considering geological repositories to dispose of nuclear waste. The environment of most of the currently considered repositories will be reducing in nature, except for the repository in the US, which is going to be oxidizing. For the reducing repositories alloys such as carbon steel, stainless steels and titanium are being evaluated. For the repository in the US, some of the most corrosion resistant commercially available alloys are being investigated. This paper presents a summary of the behavior of the different materials under consideration for the repositories and the current understanding of the degradation modes of the proposed alloys in ground water environments from the point of view of general corrosion, localized corrosion and environmentally assisted cracking.

  12. Corrosion fatigue of high strength fastener materials in seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tipton, D. G.

    1983-12-01

    Environmental effects which significantly reduce the fatigue life of metals are discussed. Corrosion fatigue is a major concern in the engineering application of high strength fasteners in marine environments. The corrosion fatigue failure of an AISI 41L4O high strength steel blade to hub attachment bolt at the MOD-OA 200 kW wind turbine generator was investigated. The reduction of fatigue strength of AISI 41L4O in marine environments and to obtain similar corrosion fatigue data for candidate replacement materials was studied. The AISI 4140, PH 13-8Mo stainless steel, alloy 718 and alloy MP-35N were tested in axial fatigue at a frequency of 20 Hz in dry air and natural seawater. The fatigue data are fitted by regression equations to allow determination of fatigue strength for a given number of cycles to failure.

  13. Corrosion fatigue of high strength fastener materials in seawater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tipton, D. G.

    1983-01-01

    Environmental effects which significantly reduce the fatigue life of metals are discussed. Corrosion fatigue is a major concern in the engineering application of high strength fasteners in marine environments. The corrosion fatigue failure of an AISI 41L4O high strength steel blade to hub attachment bolt at the MOD-OA 200 kW wind turbine generator was investigated. The reduction of fatigue strength of AISI 41L4O in marine environments and to obtain similar corrosion fatigue data for candidate replacement materials was studied. The AISI 4140, PH 13-8Mo stainless steel, alloy 718 and alloy MP-35N were tested in axial fatigue at a frequency of 20 Hz in dry air and natural seawater. The fatigue data are fitted by regression equations to allow determination of fatigue strength for a given number of cycles to failure.

  14. High temperature corrosion of separator materials for MCFC

    SciTech Connect

    Yanagida, Masahiro; Tanimoto, Kazumi; Kojima, Toshikatsu

    1996-12-31

    The Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell (MCFC) is one of promising high efficiency power generation devices with low emission. Molten carbonate used for its electrolyte plays an important role in MCFC. It separates between anode and cathode gas environment and provides ionic conductivity on MCFC operation. Stainless steel is conventionally used as separator/current collector materials in MCFC cathode environment. As corrosion of the components of MCFC caused by the electrolyte proceeds with the electrolyte consumption, the corrosion in the MCFC is related to its performance and life. To understand and inhibit the corrosion in the MCFC is important to realize MCFC power generation system. We have studied the effect of alkaline earth carbonate addition into carbonate on corrosion of type 316L stainless steel. In this paper, we describe the effect of the temperature on corrosion behavior of type 316L stainless steel with carbonate mixture, (Li{sub 0.62}K{sub 0.38}){sub 2}CO{sub 3}, under the cathode environment in out-of-cell test.

  15. Stress corrosion cracking of candidate waste container materials

    SciTech Connect

    Maiya, P.S.; Soppet, W.K.; Park, J.Y.; Kassner, T.F.; Shack, W.J.; Diercks, D.R.

    1990-11-01

    Six alloys have been selected as candidate container materials for the storage of high-level nuclear waste at the proposed Yucca Mountain site in Nevada. These materials are Type 304L stainless steel (SS), Type 316L SS, Incology 825, P-deoxidized Cu, Cu-30%Ni, and Cu-7% Al. The present program has been initiated to determine whether any of these materials can survive for 300 years in the site environment without developing through-wall stress corrosion cracks, and to assess the relative resistance of these materials to stress corrosion cracking (SCC). A series of slow-strain-rate tests (SSRTs) in simulated Well J-13 water which is representative of the groundwater present at the Yucca Mountain site has been completed, and crack-growth-rate (CGR) tests are also being conducted under the same environmental conditions. 13 refs., 60 figs., 22 tabs.

  16. Corrosion behaviour of 316L stainless steel and anti-corrosion materials in a high acidified chloride solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Z. H.; Ge, H. H.; Lin, W. W.; Zong, Y. W.; Liu, S. J.; Shi, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    The corrosion behaviour of a type 316L (UNS S31603) stainless steel (SS) expansion joint in a simulated leaching solution of sediment on blast furnace gas pipeline in a power plant is investigated by using dynamic potential polarization curves, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), optical microscope, atomic force microscope (AFM) and Scan Kelvin Probe (SKP). Severe general corrosion accompanied by pitting corrosion occurs on the type 316L SS surface in this solution. As the immersion period increases, the charge transfer resistance Rct decreases, the dissolution rate accelerates, the surface roughness increases and the surface potential difference enhances significantly. Then eight corrosion-resistant materials are tested, the corrosion rates of type 254SMo SS, type 2507 SS and TA2 are relatively minor in the solution. The corrosion resistance properties of TA2 is most excellent, indicating it would be the superior material choice for blast furnace gas pipeline.

  17. Corrosion Behavior of Nuclear Waste Storage Canister Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, John

    The nature of interaction of mild steel nuclear waste storage containers with technetium ions is not fully known. Technetium is formed during nuclear processing and some of this technetium has leaked at the Hanford nuclear waste storage site in Washington State. It is often found as highly oxidized pertechnetate (TeO4-) anions at these storage sites which also happen to be highly alkaline and contain a significant amount of nitrate. Theoretically, pertechnetate anions can act as electron acceptors and interact with the mild steel containers and accelerate the oxidation (corrosion) of steel. It is of interest to identify if pertechnetate anions pose a corrosion hazard to the mild steel nuclear waste storage tanks, under the conditions of the storage sites, as that can accelerate the degradation of the tanks and lead to further contamination. In this thesis, the interaction of two relevant container materials, namely, steel alloys A285 and A537 with a technetium surrogate, rhenium was studied. Perrhenate was used as an analog for pertechnetate. As all isotopes of technetium are radioactive, rhenium was chosen as the experimental surrogate due to its chemical similarity to technetium. Electrochemical behavior was evaluated using potentiodynamic polarization tests, and the surface morphology was studied using optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Potentiodynamic polarization tests were conducted in 1.0M NaNO3 + 0.1M NaOH and 1.0M NaNO3 + 0.1M NaOH + 0.02M NaReO4. Tests were performed at three different temperatures, namely, (i) room temperature, (ii) 50°C and (iii) 80°C to study the effect of higher temperatures found in the storage sites. Corrosion current, corrosion potential, anodic and cathodic Tafel slopes, polarization resistance and corrosion rates were obtained from electrochemical testing and evaluated. Increasing temperatures was found to lead to increasing corrosion rates for all samples. The data also revealed increased corrosion from

  18. Modeling heat generation and flow in the Advanced Neutron Source Corrosion Test Loop specimen

    SciTech Connect

    Pawel, R.E.; Yarbrough, D.W.

    1988-01-01

    A finite difference computer code HEATING5 was used to model heat generation and flow in a typical experiment envisioned for the Advanced Neutron Source Corrosion Test Loop. The electrical resistivity and thermal conductivity of the test specimen were allowed to vary with local temperature, and the corrosion layer thickness was assigned along the length of the specimen in the manner predicted by the Griess Correlation. The computer solved the two-dimensional transport problem for a given total power dissipated in the specimen and stipulated coolant temperatures and water-side heat-transfer coefficients. The computed specimen temperatures were compared with those calculated on the basis of approximate analytical equations involving the total power dissipation and the assignment of the physical properties based on temperatures at single axial points on the specimen. The comparisons indicate that when temperature variations are large along the axis of the specimen, the variation in local heat flux should not be overlooked when using approximate equations or models. The approximate equations are most accurate near the center of the specimen where the heat flux remains closest to the average value, and in that region the calculated quantities agree closely with the results of the computer code. 4 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Water Vapor Corrosion in EBC Constituent Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kowalski, Benjamin; Fox, Dennis; Jacobson, Nathan S.

    2017-01-01

    Environmental Barrier Coating (EBC) materials are sought after to protect ceramic matrix composites (CMC) in high temperature turbine engines. CMCs are particularly susceptible to degradation from oxidation, Ca-Al-Mg-Silicate (CMAS), and water vapor during high temperature operation which necessitates the use of EBCs. However, the work presented here focuses on water vapor induced recession in EBC constituent materials. For example, in the presence of water vapor, silica will react to form Si(OH)4 (g) which will eventually corrode the material away. To investigate the recession rate in EBC constituent materials under high temperature water vapor conditions, thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) is employed. The degradation process can then be modeled through a simple boundary layer expression. Ultimately, comparisons are made between various single- and poly-crystalline materials (e.g. TiO2, SiO2) against those found in literature.

  20. Corrosion performance of materials in coal-combustion environments

    SciTech Connect

    Natesan, K.

    1993-04-01

    Reliability of components and long-term trouble-free performance of structural materials are essential for the acceptance of power-generating process that utilize coal as a feedstock- The combustion environments encompass a wide range of oxygen partial pressures, from excess-air conditions in conventional systems to air-deficient conditions in low-NO[sub x] systems. Apart from the environmental aspects of the effluent from coal combustion, one of the concerns from the systems standpoint is the aggressiveness of the combustion environment toward the boiler structural components such as waterwall tubes and steam superheaters. The corrosion tests in this program address the combined effect of sulfur and chlorine on the corrosion response of several ASME-coded and noncoded boiler materials exposed to air-deficient and excess-air combustion conditions. Thermodynamic calculations were made to evaluate the gas chemistries that will arise from combustion of coals. The results of such calculations, coupled with oxygen-sulfur-chlorine thermochemical diagrams, were used to select gas environments for the laboratory test program. Tests were conducted at 400 and 650[degrees]C to stimulate the waterwall and superheater environments, respectively, in pulverized-coal-fired boilers. Experimental results obtained thus far indicate that both sulfur and chlorine can accelerate corrosion of ferritic and austenitic alloys; in addition, the protective capacity of the oxide scale in resisting further corrosion seems to degrade in the presence of both sulfur and chlorine.

  1. Corrosion performance of materials in coal-combustion environments

    SciTech Connect

    Natesan, K.

    1993-04-01

    Reliability of components and long-term trouble-free performance of structural materials are essential for the acceptance of power-generating process that utilize coal as a feedstock- The combustion environments encompass a wide range of oxygen partial pressures, from excess-air conditions in conventional systems to air-deficient conditions in low-NO{sub x} systems. Apart from the environmental aspects of the effluent from coal combustion, one of the concerns from the systems standpoint is the aggressiveness of the combustion environment toward the boiler structural components such as waterwall tubes and steam superheaters. The corrosion tests in this program address the combined effect of sulfur and chlorine on the corrosion response of several ASME-coded and noncoded boiler materials exposed to air-deficient and excess-air combustion conditions. Thermodynamic calculations were made to evaluate the gas chemistries that will arise from combustion of coals. The results of such calculations, coupled with oxygen-sulfur-chlorine thermochemical diagrams, were used to select gas environments for the laboratory test program. Tests were conducted at 400 and 650{degrees}C to stimulate the waterwall and superheater environments, respectively, in pulverized-coal-fired boilers. Experimental results obtained thus far indicate that both sulfur and chlorine can accelerate corrosion of ferritic and austenitic alloys; in addition, the protective capacity of the oxide scale in resisting further corrosion seems to degrade in the presence of both sulfur and chlorine.

  2. Static Corrosion Test of Porous Iron Material with Polymer Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markušová-Bučková, Lucia; Oriňaková, Renáta; Oriňak, Andrej; Gorejová, Radka; Kupková, Miriam; Hrubovčáková, Monika; Baláž, Matej; Kováľ, Karol

    2016-12-01

    At present biodegradable implants received increased attention due to their use in various fields of medicine. This work is dedicated to testing of biodegradable materials which could be used as bone implants. The samples were prepared from the carbonyl iron powder by replication method and surface polymer film was produced through sol-gel process. Corrosion testing was carried out under static conditions during 12 weeks in Hank's solution. The quantity of corrosion products increased with prolonging time of static test as it can be concluded from the results of EDX analysis. The degradation of open cell materials with polyethylene glycol coating layer was faster compared to uncoated Fe sample. Also the mass losses were higher for samples with PEG coating. The polymer coating brought about the desired increase in degradation rate of porous iron material.

  3. Corrosion inhibiting composition for treating asbestos containing materials

    DOEpatents

    Hartman, J.R.

    1998-04-21

    A composition for transforming a chrysotile asbestos-containing material into a non-asbestos material is disclosed. The composition comprises water, at least about 30% by weight of an acid component, optionally a source of fluoride ions, and a corrosion inhibiting amount of thiourea, a lower alkylthiourea, a C{sub 8}{single_bond}C{sub 15} alkylpyridinium halide or mixtures. A method of transforming an asbestos-containing building material, while part of a building structure, into a non-asbestos material by using the present composition also is disclosed.

  4. Corrosion inhibiting composition for treating asbestos containing materials

    DOEpatents

    Hartman, Judithann Ruth

    1998-04-21

    A composition for transforming a chrysotile asbestos-containing material into a non-asbestos material is disclosed, wherein the composition comprises water, at least about 30% by weight of an acid component, optionally a source of fluoride ions, and a corrosion inhibiting amount of thiourea, a lower alkylthiourea, a C.sub.8 -C.sub.15 alkylpyridinium halide or mixtures thereof. A method of transforming an asbestos-containing building material, while part of a building structure, into a non-asbestos material by using the present composition also is disclosed.

  5. Corrosion inhibiting composition for treating asbestos containing materials

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, J.R.

    1998-04-21

    A composition for transforming a chrysotile asbestos-containing material into a non-asbestos material is disclosed. The composition comprises water, at least about 30% by weight of an acid component, optionally a source of fluoride ions, and a corrosion inhibiting amount of thiourea, a lower alkylthiourea, a C{sub 8}{single_bond}C{sub 15} alkylpyridinium halide or mixtures. A method of transforming an asbestos-containing building material, while part of a building structure, into a non-asbestos material by using the present composition also is disclosed.

  6. Corrosion reference for geothermal downhole materials selection

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, P.F. II, Smith, C.C.; Keeney, R.C.; Kirk, D.K.; Conover, M.F.

    1983-03-01

    Geothermal downhole conditions that may affect the performance and reliability of selected materials and components used in the drilling, completion, logging, and production of geothermal wells are reviewed. The results of specific research and development efforts aimed at improvement of materials and components for downhole contact with the hostile physicochemical conditions of the geothermal reservoir are discussed. Materials and components covered are tubular goods, stainless steels and non-ferrous metals for high-temperature downhole service, cements for high-temperature geothermal wells, high-temperature elastomers, drilling and completion tools, logging tools, and downhole pumps. (MHR)

  7. The aqueous corrosion behavior of technetium - Alloy and composite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Jarvinen, G.; Kolman, D.; Taylor, C.; Goff, G.; Cisneros, M.; Mausolf, E.; Poineau, F.; Koury, D.; Czerwinski, K.

    2013-07-01

    Metal waste forms are under study as possible disposal forms for technetium and other fission products. The alloying of Tc is desirable to reduce the melting point of the Tc-containing metal waste form and potentially improve its corrosion resistance. Technetium-nickel composites were made by mixing the two metal powders and pressing the mixture to make a pellet. The as-pressed composite materials were compared to sintered composites and alloys of identical composition in electrochemical corrosion tests. As-pressed samples were not robust enough for fine polishing and only a limited number of corrosion tests were performed. Alloys and composites with 10 wt% Tc appear to be more corrosion resistant at open circuit than the individual components based on linear polarization resistance and polarization data. The addition of 10 wt% Tc to Ni appears beneficial at open circuit, but detrimental upon anodic polarization. Qualitatively, the polarizations of 10 wt% Tc alloys and composites appear like crude addition of Tc plus Ni. The 1 wt% Tc alloys behave like pure Ni, but some effect of Tc is seen upon polarization. Cathodic polarization of Tc by Ni appears feasible based on open circuit potential measurements, however, zero resistance ammetry and solution measurements are necessary to confirm cathodic protection.

  8. Seawater Corrosion of Fasteners in Various Structural Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-04-01

    17 - 4PH stainless steel. The seven bolt materials were: 2024 aluminum, anodized ASTM grade 5 steel, 304 and 316 stainless steels, A286 stain- less...performed well in titanium structures. Use of MP35N, A286, and 304 stainless steel fasteners for constantly immersed 17 - 4PH stainless steel structures...would have been satisfactory only if sealant was not used and if protection had been provided to the 17 - 4PH to minimize crevice corrosion. Additional

  9. Reinforced concrete structural corrosion monitoring using Hi-Bi photonic crystal fibres in a fiber loop structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bravo, M.; McCague, C.; Fabian, M.; Jaroszewicz, L.; Mergo, P.; Lopez-Amo, M.; Grattan, K. T. V.; Sun, T.

    2014-05-01

    A novel sensing approach has been developed for in-situ corrosion monitoring of steel in reinforced concrete structures, using a fibre loop interferometer sensor system based on a Hi-Bi photonic crystal fibre (PCF). To do so an accurate fibre alignment procedure has been implemented in order to improve the performance of the sensor system embedded into the concrete structure when it is subjected to an accelerated corrosion test. The positive results obtained have confirmed the effectiveness of such a sensor system for applications in structural health monitoring.

  10. Corrosion of candidate container materials by Yucca Mountain bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Horn, J; Jones, D; Lian, T; Martin, S; Rivera, A

    1999-12-10

    Several candidate container materials have been studied in modified Yucca Mountain (YM) ground water in the presence or absence of YM bacteria. YM bacteria increased corrosion rates by 5-6 fold in UNS G10200 carbon steel, and nearly 100-fold in UNS NO4400 Ni-Cu alloy. YM bacteria caused microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) through de-alloying or Ni-depletion of Ni-Cu alloy as evidenced by scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) and inductively coupled plasma spectroscopy (ICP) analysis. MIC rates of more corrosion-resistant alloys such as UNS NO6022 Ni-Cr- MO-W alloy, UN's NO6625 Ni-Cr-Mo alloy, and UNS S30400 stainless steel were measured below 0.05 umyr, however YM bacteria affected depletion of Cr and Fe relative to Ni in these materials. The chemical change on the metal surface caused by depletion was characterized in anodic polarization behavior. The anodic polarization behavior of depleted Ni-based alloys was similar to that of pure Ni. Key words: MIC, container materials, YM bacteria, de-alloying, Ni-depletion, Cr-depletion, polarization resistance, anodic polarization,

  11. Seminole Electric FGD study reveals corrosion mechanisms, duct material performance

    SciTech Connect

    Wess, T.J.; Crum, J.R.; Shoemaker, L.E.

    1994-12-01

    This article describes how once the corrosion rates of the materials used in the construction of scrubbers are known, specifying for longevity becomes an easier task. To properly evaluate the corrosion resistance of the materials used to fabricate the ducts, dampers, structural supports and other elements of a particular system, a testing scheme that systematically exposes material samples to the many environments representing areas of varying corrosivity is ideal. Because the exact composition, pH, and temperature of liquids and vapors in these areas are usually not known, gathering and analyzing samples of these elements is a prudent part of a systems' evaluation. Field testing of this type was conducted at the Seminole Generating Station which consists of two 650-MW coal-fired electric generating units that typically burn western Kentucky and eastern Illinois sub-bituminous coal with a sulfur content up to 3% and a 0.2%--0.3% chloride content. The plant has a typical wet limestone FGD system that sprays a solution of crushed limestone downward in a vertical rubber-lined scrubber module against a rising flue gas flow stream. There are five parallel scrubber modules available and a direct chimney bypass line that is used only during start up or during emergency conditions. Specially-welded test panels containing four different alloys and two weld filler metals were used in the field tests.

  12. Materials and corrosion characterization using the confocal resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Tigges, C.P.; Sorensen, N.R.; Hietala, V.M.; Plut, T.A.

    1997-05-01

    Improved characterization and process control is important to many Sandia and DOE programs related to manufacturing. Many processes/structures are currently under-characterized including thin film growth, corrosion and semiconductor structures, such as implant profiles. A sensitive tool is required that is able to provide lateral and vertical imaging of the electromagnetic properties of a sample. The confocal resonator is able to characterize the surface and near-surface impedance of materials. This device may be applied to a broad range of applications including in situ evaluation of thin film processes, physical defect detection/characterization, the characterization of semiconductor devices and corrosion studies. In all of these cases, the technology should work as a real-time process diagnostic or as a feedback mechanism regarding the quality of a manufacturing process. This report summarizes the development and exploration of several diagnostic applications.

  13. Hysteresis loops revisited: An efficient method to analyze ferroic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbellini, Luca; Plathier, Julien; Lacroix, Christian; Harnagea, Catalin; Ménard, David; Pignolet, Alain

    2016-09-01

    Hysteresis loops characterize a wide variety of behaviors in fields ranging from physics and chemistry to economics and sociology. In particular, they represent the main characteristic of ferroic materials such as ferromagnetic and ferroelectric, which, in recent years, have attracted much interest due to their multifunctional properties. Although measuring such loops may not be experimentally complicated, extracting the intrinsic values of the characteristic parameters of the loop may prove difficult due to the different contributions to the measured hysteresis. In this paper, a simple technique is proposed to analyze hysteresis loops and to extract solely the contribution of the ferromagnetic or ferroelectric material. Such method consists in differentiating the measured loop, deconvoluting the different contributions and selectively integrating only the signals belonging to the ferroic response. A discussion of the limitations of the method is presented. Different measured ferromagnetic and ferroelectric hysteresis loops were also used to validate the technique. Comparison between experimental and reconstructed data demonstrated the precision and reliability of the technique. Moreover, application of such method allowed us to highlight properties of a Bi2FeCrO6 room temperature multiferroic thin film that were not previously observed.

  14. Corrosion-Resistant Container for Molten-Material Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, Theodore G.; McNaul, Eric

    2010-01-01

    In a carbothermal process, gaseous methane is passed over molten regolith, which is heated past its melting point to a temperature in excess of 1,625 C. At this temperature, materials in contact with the molten regolith (or regolith simulant) corrode and lose their structural properties. As a result, fabricating a crucible to hold the molten material and providing a method of contact heating have been problematic. Alternative containment approaches use a large crucible and limit the heat zone of the material being processed, which is inefficient because of volume and mass constraints. Alternative heating approaches use non-contact heating, such as by laser or concentrated solar energy, which can be inefficient in transferring heat and thus require higher power heat sources to accomplish processing. The innovation is a combination of materials, with a substrate material having high structural strength and stiffness and high-temperature capability, and a coating material with a high corrosion resistance and high-temperature capability. The material developed is a molybdenum substrate with an iridium coating. Creating the containment crucible or heater jacket using this material combination requires only that the molybdenum, which is easily processed by conventional methods such as milling, electric discharge machining, or forming and brazing, be fabricated into an appropriate shape, and that the iridium coating be applied to any surfaces that may come in contact with the corrosive molten material. In one engineering application, the molybdenum was fashioned into a container for a heat pipe. Since only the end of the heat pipe is used to heat the regolith, the container has a narrowing end with a nipple in which the heat pipe is snugly fit, and the external area of this nipple, which contacts the regolith to transfer heat into it, is coated with iridium. At the time of this reporting, no single material has been found that can perform the functions of this combination

  15. Effect of Mercury Velocity on Corrosion of Type 316L Stainless Steel in a Thermal Convection Loop

    SciTech Connect

    Pawel, SJ

    2001-03-23

    Two 316L thermal convection loops (TCLs) containing several types of 316L specimens circulated mercury continuously for 2000 h at a maximum temperature of 300 C. Each TCL was fitted with a venturi-shaped reduced section near the top of the hot leg for the purpose of locally increasing the Hg velocity. Results suggest that an increase in velocity from about 1.2 m/min (bulk flow) to about 5 mmin (reduced section) had no significant impact on compatibility of 316L with Hg. In addition, various surface treatments such as gold-plating, chemical etching, polishing, and steam cleaning resulted in little or no influence on compatibility of 316L with Hg when compared to nominal mill-annealed/surface-ground material. A sensitizing heat treatment also had little/no effect on compatibility of 316L with Hg for the bulk specimen, although intergranular attack was observed around the specimen holes in each case. It was determined that carburization of the hole area had occurred as a result of the specimen fabrication process potentially rendering the specimens susceptible to corrosion by Hg at these locations. To avoid sensitization-related compatibility issues for SNS components, selection of low carbon grades of stainless steel and control of the fabrication process is recommended.

  16. General corrosion, irradiation-corrosion, and environmental-mechanical evaluation of nuclear waste package structural barrier materials. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Westerman, R.E.; Pitman, S.G.; Nelson, J.L.

    1982-09-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory is studying the general corrosion, irradiation-corrosion, and environmentally enhanced crack propagation of five candidate materials in high-temperature aqueous environments simulating those expected in basalt and tuff repositories. The materials include three cast ferrous materials (ductile cast iron and two low-alloy Cr-Mo cast steels) and two titanium alloys, titanium Grade 2 (commercial purity) and Grade 12 (a Ti-Ni-Mo alloy). The general corrosion results are being obtained by autoclave exposure of specimens to slowly replenished simulated ground water flowing upward through a bed of the appropriate crushed rock (basalt or tuff), which is maintained at the desired test temperature (usually 250/sup 0/C). In addition, tests are being performed in deionized water. Metal penetration rates of iron-base alloys are being derived by stripping off the corrosion product film and weighing the specimen after the appropriate exposure time. The corrosion of titanium alloy specimens is being determined by weight gain methods. The irradiation-corrosion studies are similar to the general corrosion tests, except that the specimen-bearing autoclaves are held in a /sup 60/Co gamma radiation field at dose rates up to 2 x 10/sup 6/ rad/h. For evaluating the resistance of the candidate materials to environmentally enhanced crack propagation, three methods are being used: U-bend and fracture toughness specimens exposed in autoclaves; slow strain rate studies in repository-relevant environments to 300/sup 0/C; and fatigue crack growth rate studies at ambient pressure and 90/sup 0/C. The preliminary data suggest a 1-in. corrosion allowance for iron-base barrier elements intended for 1000-yr service in basalt or tuff repositories. No evidence has yet been found that titanium Grade 2 or Grade 12 is susceptible to environmentally induced crack propagation or, by extension, to stress corrosion cracking.

  17. Improved fracture toughness corrosion-resistant bearing material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bamberger, E. N.; Nahm, A. H.

    1986-01-01

    A development program was performed to establish whether a corrosion-resistant bearing material, such as a 14Cr steel, could be modified to allow carburization, thereby providing the excellent fracture toughness characteristics feasible with this process. The alloy selected for investigation was AMS 5749. Several modifications were made including the addition of a small amount of nickel for austenite stabilization. While some promising results were achieved, the primary objective of an acceptable combination of case hardness and microstructure was not attained. Because the high chromium content presents a serious problem in achieving a viable carburizing cycle, a number of experimental steels having lower chromium contents (8 to 12%) were produced in laboratory quantities and evaluated. The results were basically the same as those initially obtained with the modified AMS 5749. Corrosion tests were performed on AMS 5749, AISI M50, and 52100 bearing steels as well as some of the lower chromium steels. These tests showed that a reduced chromium level (10 to 12%) provided essentially the same corrosion protection as the 14Cr steels.

  18. Boric acid inhibition of steam generator materials corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Wootten, M.J.; Wolfe, C.R.; Hermer, R.E.

    1985-01-01

    In 1974, Westinghouse recommended a change from phosphate water chemistry control for nuclear steam generators to one in which no solids are intentionally added, called all volatile treatment (AVT). The reason for the recommended change in water chemistry control was the occurrence of phosphate thinning of the Alloy 600 heat transfer tubes in some operating plants. Since the change over to AVT, other types of corrosion from impurities in the water have been observed of the materials of construction of nuclear steam generators. Initially, several plants observed denting, which is caused by the corrosion of the carbon steel tube support plates. After 8 yr of usage as a denting inhibitor in nuclear plants, no detrimental effects have been identified as due to boric acid. It is believed that boric acid will inhibit denting-type corrosion and caustic attack of Alloy 600; however, it must be stressed that it is not a substitute for good chemistry practices and all levels and disciplines within the operating plant should recognize the importance of rigorous, long-term chemistry control.

  19. Materials corrosion in molten lithium fluoride-sodium fluoride-potassium fluoride eutectic salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Luke Christopher

    Static corrosion studies were undertaken to determine the compatibility of several candidate high temperature materials for a heat transfer loop in a molten alkali fluoride eutectic salt, LiF-NaF-KF: 46.5-11.5-42 mol % (commonly referred to as FLiNaK), as well as a molten chloride near eutectic salt, KCl-MgCl2: 68-32 mol %. Several high temperature alloys: Hastelloy-N, Hastelloy-X, Haynes-230, Inconel-617, and Incoloy-800H, Nb-1Zr, a nearly pure Ni alloy Ni-201, and a C/SiSiC ceramic were exposed to molten FLiNaK at 850°C for 500 h in sealed graphite crucibles under an argon cover gas. Corrosion occurred predominantly from dealloying of Cr from the Cr bearing alloys, an effect that was particularly pronounced at the grain boundaries. Corrosion was noted to occur from selective attack of the Si phase in the C/SiSiC ceramic. Alloy weight-loss/area due to molten fluoride salt exposure correlated with the initial Cr-content of the alloys, and was consistent with the Cr-content measured in the salts after corrosion tests. The alloys' weight-loss/area was also found to correlate to the concentration of carbon present in the nominally 20% Cr containing alloys, due to the formation of chromium carbide phases at the grain boundaries. The corrosion mechanisms for the chloride based salt were found to be similar to those observed in FLiNaK, but the chemical attack was found to be less aggressive. Sulfamate Ni electroplating and Mo plasma spraying of Fe-Ni-Cr alloy coupons was investigated to mitigate Cr dissolution. A chemical vapor deposited pyrolytic carbon and SiC coating was also investigated to protect the C/SiSiC composites. Results indicate that Ni-plating has the potential to provide protection against alloy corrosion in molten fluoride salts. Furthermore, the presence of a chromium-oxide interlayer at the interface of the Ni-plating and alloy substrate can further improve the efficacy of the Ni-plating. The pyrolytic carbon and SiC coating on the C/SiSiC composites

  20. Impact of corrosion test container material in molten fluorides

    DOE PAGES

    Olson, Luke C.; Fuentes, Roderick E.; Martinez-Rodriguez, Michael J.; ...

    2015-10-15

    The effects of crucible material choice on alloy corrosion rates in immersion tests in molten LiF–NaF–KF (46.5–11.5-42 mol. %) salt held at 850 °C for 500 hrs are described. Four crucible materials were studied. Molten salt exposures of Incoloy-800H in graphite, Ni, Incoloy-800H, and pyrolytic boron nitride (PyBN) crucibles all led to weight-loss in the Incoloy-800H coupons. Alloy weight loss was ~30 times higher in the graphite and Ni crucibles in comparison to the Incoloy-800H and PyBN crucibles. It is hypothesized galvanic coupling between the alloy coupons and crucible materials contributed to the higher corrosion rates. Alloy salt immersion inmore » graphite and Ni crucibles had similar weight-loss hypothesized to occur due to the rate limiting out diffusion of Cr in the alloys to the surface where it reacts with and dissolves into the molten salt, followed by the reduction of Cr from solution at the molten salt and graphite/Ni interfaces. As a result, both the graphite and the Ni crucibles provided sinks for the Cr, in the formation of a Ni–Cr alloy in the case of the Ni crucible, and Cr carbide in the case of the graphite crucible.« less

  1. Impact of corrosion test container material in molten fluorides

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, Luke C.; Fuentes, Roderick E.; Martinez-Rodriguez, Michael J.; Ambrosek, James W.; Sridharan, Kumar; Anderson, Mark H.; Garcia-Diaz, Brenda L.; Gray, Joshua; Allen, Todd R.

    2015-10-15

    The effects of crucible material choice on alloy corrosion rates in immersion tests in molten LiF–NaF–KF (46.5–11.5-42 mol. %) salt held at 850 °C for 500 hrs are described. Four crucible materials were studied. Molten salt exposures of Incoloy-800H in graphite, Ni, Incoloy-800H, and pyrolytic boron nitride (PyBN) crucibles all led to weight-loss in the Incoloy-800H coupons. Alloy weight loss was ~30 times higher in the graphite and Ni crucibles in comparison to the Incoloy-800H and PyBN crucibles. It is hypothesized galvanic coupling between the alloy coupons and crucible materials contributed to the higher corrosion rates. Alloy salt immersion in graphite and Ni crucibles had similar weight-loss hypothesized to occur due to the rate limiting out diffusion of Cr in the alloys to the surface where it reacts with and dissolves into the molten salt, followed by the reduction of Cr from solution at the molten salt and graphite/Ni interfaces. As a result, both the graphite and the Ni crucibles provided sinks for the Cr, in the formation of a Ni–Cr alloy in the case of the Ni crucible, and Cr carbide in the case of the graphite crucible.

  2. Demonstration and Validation of Stainless Steel Materials for Critical Above Grade Piping in Highly Corrosive Locations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-05-01

    ER D C/ CE RL T R- 17 -1 3 DoD Corrosion Prevention and Control Program Demonstration and Validation of Stainless Steel Materials for...ERDC/CERL TR-17-13 May 2017 Demonstration and Validation of Stainless Steel Materials for Critical Above-Grade Piping in Highly Corrosive...steel materials for fire- suppression water pipes at the Chimu-Wan tank farms on Okinawa Island, Japan, one of the most corrosive locations in the

  3. Cooperative spreading of localized corrosion on heterogeneous materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budiansky, Noah D.

    intergranular corrosion from pits when: (a) the material was sensitized, (b) ohmic potential drop occurred, and (c) solutions were aggressive enough to support intergranular corrosion on a series of sensitized AISI 304 and 304L stainless steels. It was found that the degree of sensitization dictates the spreading of intergranular corrosion by controlling the fraction of susceptible grain boundaries.

  4. Corrosion test on candidate waste package basket materials for the Yucca Mountain project

    SciTech Connect

    Van Konynenburg, R.A.; Curtis, P.G.

    1996-01-01

    A scoping corrosion test was performed on candidate waste package basket materials in order to assist in selecting materials for package design and to help in designing longer-term corrosion tests. The corrosion solution was buffered near pH4, was in contact with air, and contained chemical species expected to be produced by radiolysis. The test was conducted at 90 C for 96 hours. Samples included aluminum-, copper-, stainless steel-, and zirconium-based metallic materials and several ceramics, incorporating neutron absorber elements. Sample weight losses and solution chemical changes were measured. Both corrosion of the host materials and dissolution of the neutron absorber elements were studied.

  5. 49 CFR 173.154 - Exceptions for Class 8 (corrosive materials).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... constructed of materials that will not react dangerously with or be degraded by the corrosive material; or (2... vehicle or rail car in a bulk packaging constructed of materials that will not react dangerously with or...

  6. 49 CFR 173.154 - Exceptions for Class 8 (corrosive materials).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... constructed of materials that will not react dangerously with or be degraded by the corrosive material; or (2... vehicle or rail car in a bulk packaging constructed of materials that will not react dangerously with or...

  7. Hydrofluoric Acid Corrosion Study of High-Alloy Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Osborne, P.E.

    2002-09-11

    A corrosion study involving high-alloy materials and concentrated hydrofluoric acid (HF) was conducted in support of the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment Conversion Project (CP). The purpose of the test was to obtain a greater understanding of the corrosion rates of materials of construction currently used in the CP vs those of proposed replacement parts. Results of the study will help formulate a change-out schedule for CP parts. The CP will convert slightly less than 40 kg of {sup 233}U from a gas (UF{sub 6}) sorbed on sodium fluoride pellets to a more stable oxide (U{sub 3}O{sub 8}). One by-product of the conversion is the formation of concentrated HF. Six moles of highly corrosive HF are produced for each mole of UF{sub 6} converted. This acid is particularly corrosive to most metals, elastomers, and silica-containing materials. A common impurity found in {sup 233}U is {sup 232}U. This impurity isotope has several daughters that make the handling of the {sup 233}U difficult. Traps of {sup 233}U may have radiation fields of up to 400 R at contact, a situation that makes the process of changing valves or working on the CP more challenging. It is also for this reason that a comprehensive part change-out schedule must be established. Laboratory experiments involving the repeated transfer of HF through 1/2-in. metal tubing and valves have proven difficult due to the corrosivity of the HF upon contact with all wetted parts. Each batch of HF is approximately 1.5 L of 33 wt% HF and is transferred most often as a vapor under vacuum and at temperatures of up to 250 C. Materials used in the HF side of the CP include Hastelloy C-276 and Monel 400 tubing, Haynes 230 and alloy C-276 vessels, and alloy 400 valve bodies with Inconel (alloy 600) bellows. The chemical compositions of the metals discussed in this report are displayed in Table 1. Of particular concern are the almost 30 vendor-supplied UG valves that have the potential for exposure to HF. These valves have been

  8. Topological surface superconductivity in doped Weyl loop materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuxuan; Nandkishore, Rahul M.

    2017-02-01

    We study surface superconductivity involving the "drumhead" surface states of (doped) Weyl loop materials. The leading weak-coupling instability in the bulk is toward a chiral superconducting order, which fully gaps the Fermi surface. In this state the surface also becomes superconducting, with p +i p symmetry. We show that the surface SC state is "topological" as long as it is fully gapped, and the system traps Majorana modes wherever a vortex line enters or exits the bulk. In contrast to true two-dimensional p +i p superconductors, these Majorana zero modes arise even in the "strong pairing" regime where the chemical potential is entirely above/below the drumhead. We also consider conventional s -wave pairing, and show that in this case the surface hosts a flat band of charge neutral Majorana fermions, whose momentum range is given by the projection of the bulk Fermi surface. Weyl loop materials thus provide access to new forms of topological superconductivity.

  9. Corrosion investigation of two materials for implant supraconstructions coupled to a titanium implant.

    PubMed

    Ravnholt, G; Jensen, J

    1991-04-01

    The corrosion of two materials for implant supraconstructions, a carbon fiber/PMMA composite and a silver-palladium alloy, was investigated in vitro, the materials being galvanically coupled to a titanium implant. Corrosion current and pH of the electrolyte were monitored, and corrosion products were identified by powder X-ray diffraction. The carbon composite and the silver-palladium per se did not corrode, whereas a silver-palladium specimen brazed with the recommended brazing alloy corroded unmistakably, yielding copper-containing corrosion products. The action of local corrosion cells around the brazed joint is considered, and it is concluded that the two materials seem well suited for implant supraconstructions, provided that brazing the silver-palladium can be avoided. Considering the clinical relevance of the experimental model used, it is concluded that the model is likely to predict a lower corrosion susceptibility than the one found in vivo.

  10. Stress corrosion cracking of candidate waste container materials; Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.Y.; Maiya, P.S.; Soppet, W.K.; Diercks, D.R.; Shack, W.J.; Kassner, T.F.

    1992-06-01

    Six alloys have been selected as candidate container materials for the storage of high-level nuclear waste at the proposed Yucca mountain site in Nevada. These materials are Type 304L stainless steel (SS). Type 316L SS, Incoloy 825, phosphorus-deoxidized Cu, Cu-30%Ni, and Cu-7%Al. The present program has been initiated to determine whether any of these materials can survive for 300 years in the site environment without developing through-wall stress corrosion cracks. and to assess the relative resistance of these materials to stress corrosion cracking (SCC)- A series of slow-strain-rate tests (SSRTs) and fracture-mechanics crack-growth-rate (CGR) tests was performed at 93{degree}C and 1 atm of pressure in simulated J-13 well water. This water is representative, prior to the widespread availability of unsaturated-zone water, of the groundwater present at the Yucca Mountain site. Slow-strain-rate tests were conducted on 6.35-mm-diameter cylindrical specimens at strain rates of 10-{sup {minus}7} and 10{sup {minus}8} s{sup {minus}1} under crevice and noncrevice conditions. All tests were interrupted after nominal elongation strain of 1--4%. Scanning electron microscopy revealed some crack initiation in virtually all the materials, as well as weldments made from these materials. A stress- or strain-ratio cracking index ranks these materials, in order of increasing resistance to SCC, as follows: Type 304 SS < Type 316L SS < Incoloy 825 < Cu-30%Ni < Cu and Cu-7%Al. Fracture-mechanics CGR tests were conducted on 25.4-mm-thick compact tension specimens of Types 304L and 316L stainless steel (SS) and Incoloy 825. Crack-growth rates were measured under various load conditions: load ratios M of 0.5--1.0, frequencies of 10{sup {minus}3}-1 Hz, rise nines of 1--1000s, and peak stress intensities of 25--40 MPa{center_dot}m {sup l/2}.

  11. Evaluation of shuttle solid rocket booster case materials. Corrosion and stress corrosion susceptibility of several high temperature materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pionke, L. J.; Garland, K. C.

    1973-01-01

    Candidate alloys for the Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) case were tested under simulated service conditions to define subcritical flaw growth behavior under both sustained and cyclic loading conditions. The materials evaluated were D6AC and 18 Ni maraging steel, both heat treated to a nominal yield strength of 1380 MN/sq m (200 ksi). The sustained load tests were conducted by exposing precracked, stressed specimens of both alloys to alternate immersion in synthetic sea water. It was found that the corrosion and stress corrosion resistance of the 18 Ni maraging steel were superior to that of the D6AC steel under these test conditions. It was also found that austenitizing temperature had little influence on the threshold stress intensity of the D6AC. The cyclic tests were conducted by subjecting precracked surface-flawed specimens of both alloys to repeated load/thermal/environmental profiles which were selected to simulate the SRB missions. It was found that linear removal operations that involve heating to 589 K (600 F) cause a decrease in cyclic life of D6AC steel relative to those tests conducted with no thermal cycling.

  12. 49 CFR 195.581 - Which pipelines must I protect against atmospheric corrosion and what coating material may I use?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... corrosion and what coating material may I use? 195.581 Section 195.581 Transportation Other Regulations... Corrosion Control § 195.581 Which pipelines must I protect against atmospheric corrosion and what coating... the prevention of atmospheric corrosion. (c) Except portions of pipelines in offshore splash zones...

  13. 49 CFR 195.581 - Which pipelines must I protect against atmospheric corrosion and what coating material may I use?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... corrosion and what coating material may I use? 195.581 Section 195.581 Transportation Other Regulations... Corrosion Control § 195.581 Which pipelines must I protect against atmospheric corrosion and what coating... the prevention of atmospheric corrosion. (c) Except portions of pipelines in offshore splash zones...

  14. 49 CFR 195.581 - Which pipelines must I protect against atmospheric corrosion and what coating material may I use?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... corrosion and what coating material may I use? 195.581 Section 195.581 Transportation Other Regulations... Corrosion Control § 195.581 Which pipelines must I protect against atmospheric corrosion and what coating... the prevention of atmospheric corrosion. (c) Except portions of pipelines in offshore splash zones or...

  15. 49 CFR 195.581 - Which pipelines must I protect against atmospheric corrosion and what coating material may I use?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... corrosion and what coating material may I use? 195.581 Section 195.581 Transportation Other Regulations... Corrosion Control § 195.581 Which pipelines must I protect against atmospheric corrosion and what coating... the prevention of atmospheric corrosion. (c) Except portions of pipelines in offshore splash zones or...

  16. 49 CFR 195.581 - Which pipelines must I protect against atmospheric corrosion and what coating material may I use?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... corrosion and what coating material may I use? 195.581 Section 195.581 Transportation Other Regulations... Corrosion Control § 195.581 Which pipelines must I protect against atmospheric corrosion and what coating... the prevention of atmospheric corrosion. (c) Except portions of pipelines in offshore splash zones or...

  17. 49 CFR 173.154 - Exceptions for Class 8 (corrosive materials).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... packaging constructed of materials that will not react dangerously with or be degraded by the corrosive... motor vehicle or rail car in a bulk packaging constructed of materials that will not react dangerously...

  18. 49 CFR 173.154 - Exceptions for Class 8 (corrosive materials).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... packaging constructed of materials that will not react dangerously with or be degraded by the corrosive... motor vehicle or rail car in a bulk packaging constructed of materials that will not react dangerously...

  19. Corrosion issues in joining lightweight materials: A review of the latest achievements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montemor, M. F.

    2016-02-01

    Multimaterials assemblies and, in particular, assemblies made of lightweight components are of utmost relevance in many technical applications. These assemblies include multimetal, metal-polymer, metal-adhesive, and metal-composites combinations, among others. Presently, the transportation sector is looking for lighter materials that allow for reducing fuel consumption and the environmental footprint. Aluminum and magnesium alloys, as well as composites and polymers, are considered strategic for such purposes, and their joining in metal-metal or hybrid assemblies has been explored to develop lightweight components. These multimaterial assemblies are often exposed to aggressive environments in which moisture and aggressive species are present. Under these conditions corrosion phenomena are a major source of material failures. Depending on the nature of the metals and nonmetals and of the joining process, the mechanism and extent of corrosion can vary significantly. Thus, it is essential to understand the impact of corrosion in joined materials and to know which counter-measures can be adopted to mitigate corrosion events in the system of concern. This chapter aims at reviewing the latest results of studies focused in corrosion issues in the joining of lightweight materials. It describes the most common corrosion phenomena observed in joined materials, and it emphasizes corrosion issues in assemblies that combine different metals and that combine metals with nonmetals. Moreover, it overviews the state-of-the-art in corrosion protection strategies that can be applied and, finally, it overlooks the future trends.

  20. Characterization of corrosion resistant materials in low and high temperature HF environments

    SciTech Connect

    Crum, J.R.; Smith, G.D.; McNallan, M.J.; Hirnyj, S.

    1999-11-01

    A variety of hydrogen fluoride containing gases, hydrofluoric acid condensates and hydrofluoric acid aqueous solutions are encountered in petrochemical and chemical process applications. A special laboratory test system has been designed to develop stress corrosion cracking and general corrosion data for several nickel alloys in hydrogen fluoride and hydrofluoric acid environments at temperatures from 50 C to 450 C. Test results from this system and aqueous corrosion test results show Ni-Cu alloy 400 (UNS N04400) to be one of the best materials for high temperature applications and better than the ten other nickel base alloys examined in this study for resistance to general corrosion in aqueous hydrofluoric acid.

  1. Field corrosion testing and performance of cable shielding materials in soils

    SciTech Connect

    Haynes, G.; Baboian, R. )

    1989-09-01

    This article discusses the importance of corrosion resistance in cable-shielding materials, describes the mechanisms of shielding corrosion that occur in buried telephone cable, and evaluates the results of the six-year REA Horry Cooperative buried telephone cable corrosion test. In this study, both active and static cables were included. Withdrawals were made over a six-year period. These cables were evaluated for cable-shielding corrosion. Special attention was paid to the comparative behavior of active and static cables. Results indicate that steel shieldings are most susceptible to the effects of alternating current (AC) in active cables. Results of a wide range of shieldings are presented and evaluated.

  2. Materials corrosion and mitigation strategies for APT: End of year report, FY `96

    SciTech Connect

    Lillard, R.S.; Butt, D.P.

    1996-10-30

    The authors major accomplishment in FY96 was the design and fabrication of the corrosion probes to be used ``In Beam`` during the FY97 irradiation period to begin on February 1, 1997. Never before have corrosion rate measurements been made on-line in such a high radiation environment. To measure corrosion rate as a function of beam time, it is necessary to electrical isolate the corrosion electrode to be examined form the plumbing system. Conventionally, this is accomplished with glass seals. Here irradiation of the glass may cause it to become conductive, rendering the seal useless. To overcome this problem, the corrosion probes to be used in-beam at the spallation neutron cooling water loop at the LANSCE A6 target station were fabricated with ceramic inserts which act as electrical feed-throughs. The corrosion sample is joined to the ceramic by means of a compression seal. The corrosion samples are closed end cylinders, 0.5 inches diameter x 6.25 inch length, that are constructed from Stainless Steel 304L, Stainless Steel 316L, Inconel 718, Tungsten, HT-9, and Tantalum. Because of their specialized nature, InTa Corporation, of Santa Clara, CA was contracted to manufacture these problems. As of November 1, 1996 delivery of these probes has begun and the authors anticipate having all of the probes in hand by Nov. 25.

  3. Assessing microbiologically induced corrosion of waste package materials in the Yucca Mountain repository

    SciTech Connect

    Horn, J. M., LLNL

    1998-01-01

    The contribution of bacterial activities to corrosion of nuclear waste package materials must be determined to predict the adequacy of containment for a potential nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain (YM), NV. The program to evaluate potential microbially induced corrosion (MIC) of candidate waste container materials includes characterization of bacteria in the post-construction YM environment, determination of their required growth conditions and growth rates, quantitative assessment of the biochemical contribution to metal corrosion, and evaluation of overall MIC rates on candidate waste package materials.

  4. Effect of deposits on corrosion of materials exposed in the Coal-Fired Flow Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Natesan, K.

    1993-05-01

    Candidate heat exchanger materials tested in the Low Mass Flow train at the Coal-Fired Flow Facility (CFFF) at Tullahoma, TN. were analyzed to evaluate their corrosion performance. Tube specimens obtained at each foot of the 14-ft-long Unbend tubes were analyzed for corrosion-scale morphologies, scale thicknesses, and internal penetration depths. Results developed on 1500- and 2000- h exposed specimens were correlated with exposure temperature. In addition, deposit materials collected at several locations in the CFFF were analyzed in detail to characterize the chemical and physical properties of the deposits and their influence on corrosion performance of tube materials.

  5. Corrosion and strength of dental low-gold brazing materials.

    PubMed

    Bessing, C; Bergman, M; Sjögren, G

    1991-01-01

    Previous studies have shown the clinical feasibility of using three alternatives to dental casting gold alloys Type 3. In the present study brazed specimens of these alternatives were evaluated using a corrosion test and a tensile test according to a proposed ISO Standard (ISO/DIS 9333). Brazed specimens of a high-gold alloy were used as a reference. Furthermore, the microstructure of the brazed joints and the fracture surface characteristics were monitored. The present study revealed that none of the specimens exhibited any visual sign of chemical attack after suspension in the test solution for 7 days. The tensile strength testing resulted in stresses at fracture point that met the requirements of the proposed ISO Standard. All fractures were of the ductile type. Cohesive failures were seen in all specimens except in the reference alloy (JS C) specimens. No clear relationship between fracture surface appearance and tensile strength was found. Distinct demarcation lines between brazing and parent materials were seen. Based on the present results there seems to be no reason to reject the use of brazed constructions made of the alternative alloys Midas, Rajah, and Albacast.

  6. Corrosion-resistant iridium-platinum anode material for high polarization application in corrosive acids

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J.; Summers, L.; Lewis, P.

    1993-09-08

    The present invention relates to highly corrosion resistant components for use in an electrochemical cell. Specifically, these components are resistant to corrosion under very extreme conditions such as exposure to aqua regia in the presence of a constant current density of 100mA/m{sup 2}. The components are comprised of an iridium-platinum alloy that comprises less than 30% iridium. In a preferred embodiment of the present invention, the iridium-platinum alloy comprises 15-20% iridium. In another preferred embodiment of the present invention, the iridium-platinum alloy is deposited on the surface of an electrochemical cell component by magnetron sputtering. The present invention also relates to a method for conducting an electrochemical reaction in the presence of highly corrosive acids under a high degree of polarization wherein the electrochemical cell comprises a component, preferably the anode, containing an iridium-platinum alloy that comprises less than 30% iridium.

  7. Materials Evaluation. Part II. Development of Corrosion Inhibitors.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-09-01

    and Identify by block number) A borax -nitrite based inhibitor has been developed for incorporation into the Air Force Rinse Facility at MacDill Air...Block 20 inhibitors has been tested and a borax -nitrite based formulation developed which inhibits the corrosion of several ferrous and nonferrous...alternatives to chromates, one such alternative being a borax -nitrite based inhibitor. The value of borax nitrite as a corrosion inhibitor has long been

  8. Corrosion resistance of transition material clips for joining aluminum to steel

    SciTech Connect

    Haynes, G.

    1998-12-31

    Transition materials are clad metals that are designed to interface between dissimilar metals to reduce galvanic corrosion. This paper describes the use of steel clad aluminum clips which can be placed over aluminum sheet allowing it to be fastened to steel. Results of cyclic salt spray tests are presented. Thickness loss measurements were used to measure the reduction in galvanic corrosion provided by the transition material.

  9. Crevice Corrosion Behavior of Candidate Nuclear Waste Container Materials in Repository Environment

    SciTech Connect

    F. Hua; J. Sarver; W. Mohn

    2001-11-08

    Alloy 22 (UNS N06022) and Ti Grade 7 (UNS R52400) have been proposed as the corrosion resistant materials for fabricating the waste package outer barrier and the drip shield, respectively for the proposed nuclear waste repository Yucca Mountain Project. In this work, the susceptibility of welded and annealed Alloy 22 (N06022) and Ti Grade 7 (UNS R52400) to crevice corrosion was studied by the Multiple Crevice Assembly (ASTM G78) method combined with surface morphological observation after four and eight weeks of exposure to the Basic Saturated Water (BSW-12) in a temperature range from 60 to 105 C. The susceptibility of the materials to crevice corrosion was evaluated based on the appearance of crevice attack underneath the crevice formers and the weight loss data. The results showed that, after exposed to BSW-12 for four and eight weeks, no obvious crevice attack was observed on these materials. The descaled weight loss increased with the increase in temperature for all materials. The weight loss, however, is believed to be caused by general corrosion, rather than crevice corrosion. There was no significant difference between the annealed and welded materials either. On the other hand, to conclude that these materials are immune to crevice corrosion in BSW-12 will require longer term testing.

  10. ICP Materials Trends in Corrosion, Soiling and Air Pollution (1987–2014)

    PubMed Central

    Tidblad, Johan; Faller, Markus; de la Fuente, Daniel; Yates, Tim; Verney-Carron, Aurélie; Grøntoft, Terje; Hans, Ulrik

    2017-01-01

    Results from the international cooperative programme on effects on materials including historic and cultural monuments are presented from the period 1987–2014 and include pollution data (SO2, NO2, O3, HNO3 and PM10), corrosion data (carbon steel, weathering steel, zinc, copper, aluminium and limestone) and data on the soiling of modern glass for nineteen industrial, urban and rural test sites in Europe. Both one-year and four-year corrosion data are presented. Corrosion and pollution have decreased significantly and a shift in the magnitude is generally observed around 1997: from a sharp decrease to a more modest decrease or to a constant level without any decrease. SO2 levels, carbon steel and copper corrosion have decreased even after 1997, which is more pronounced in urban areas, while corrosion of the other materials shows no decrease after 1997, when looking at one-year values. When looking at four-year values, however, there is a significant decrease after 1997 for zinc, which is not evident when looking at the one-year values. This paper also presents results on corrosion kinetics by comparison of one- and four-year values. For carbon steel and copper, kinetics is relatively independent of sites while other materials, especially zinc, show substantial variation in kinetics for the first four years, which needs to be considered when producing new and possibly improved models for corrosion. PMID:28825611

  11. Localized corrosion in materials for geothermal power. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Troiano, A.R.; Hehemann, R.F.

    1982-04-01

    The influence of 16 different geothermally related environments on a number of potentially useful steels was examined for both general and localized corrosion and at ambient and 150/sup 0/C. Variation in chloride concentration of 1 to 20% generally demonstrated only minor aggressiveness in acidified solutions. In general, the presence of H/sub 2/S raised the corrosion rate. However, very low concentrations (10 ppM) indicated higher rates than in saturated brines. This is rationalized on the basis of the inability to develop a semi-protective film at the low H/sub 2/S concentration. The corrosion rate for the Cr-Mo steel was unexpectedly high at ambient, but improved substantially at 150/sup 0/C. The Ni-Cu-Nb steel consistently demonstrated excellent resistance in all environments, except the 10 ppM H/sub 2/S at ambient. At 150/sup 0/C there were no exceptions to its superior performance. Maximum pit depth studies, analyzed statistically, indicated that the Ni-Cu-Nb alloy was the most resistant to localized attack. A clean (low inclusions) Mn-C and a clean vacuum melted steel ranked well. A comparison of two almost identical Mn-C steels one clean and one dirty clearly indicated the deleterious influence of inclusions on the tendency for localized corrosion. The profiling of a protected section of a creviced or pitted sample helped to delineate the nebulous line of demarcation between general and localized corrosion in these low alloy steels.

  12. A study on the effect of magnetic field on the corrosion behavior of materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pondichery, Soundarya

    Corrosion causes deterioration of a material due to its environment. Corrosion control has been one of the biggest challenges in most industries since many years. There are various notable and unknown factors that influence the rate of corrosion of a certain material/environment system. Magnetic fields and their driven effects on an electrochemical system has been recently gained interest. Various magnetic field driven forces occurring in an electrolyte have been reported during an electrochemical reaction. Lorentz force driven convection in the electrolyte, known as MHD effect and paramagnetic gradient forces are reported to be the most effective. This research studies the effects of an external magnetic field on the electrochemical nature of materials in 3.5% NaCl solution. To understand and analyze magnetic field effects on a wide range of materials, both ferromagnetic and non-magnetic materials which are active, active-passive type are studied in near sea water solution i.e. 3.5% NaCl solution. Potentiodynamic polarization and corrosion potential vs time tests were carried out to study and analyze corrosion behavior in 3.5% NaCl solution. Corrosion tests results were obtained both with and without the influence of an external magnetic field of 0.75T. On comparing the electrochemical analysis results of both conditions in 3.5% NaCl solution, it clearly depicts the effect of an external magnetic field on the corrosion potential and corrosion rate. In the case of ferromagnetic materials like 416 SS and 1018 carbon steel, a cathodic shift of the corrosion potential and increase in the corrosion rate was observed. While for ferrous but non-magnetic and passivating material like 304 SS, no effect of the magnetic field was observed which can be attributed to its non-magnetic austenitic phase and highly stable oxide formation tendency. Also, no effect was observed on the non-ferrous alloys like Ti alloy (Ti6Al4V) and Zn due to not only because of diamagnetic nature of

  13. Assessment of material degradation due to corrosion-fatigue using a backscattered Rayleigh surface wave.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young H; Song, Sung-Jin; Bae, D H; Kwon, Sung-Duk

    2004-04-01

    Material degradation due to corrosion-fatigue was evaluated nondestructively using backscattered Rayleigh surface wave. A corrosion-fatigue test was carried out for the specimens made of thermo-mechanically controlled process steel in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution at 25 degrees C. The Backscattering profile, which is the amplitude variation of backscattered ultrasound according to the incident angle, of the specimens were measured in water at room temperature after the corrosion-fatigue test. The velocity of Rayleigh surface wave, determined from the incident angle at which the profile of the backscattered ultrasound became maximum, decreased for the specimen that had the large number of cycles to failure in the corrosion-fatigue test. This fact implies that the corrosion degradation occurred at specimen surface in this specific test is dominantly dependant on the time exposed to corrosion environment. The result observed in the present work demonstrates the high potential of backscattered Rayleigh surface wave as a tool for nondestructive evaluation of corrosion degradation of aged materials.

  14. Corrosion Mitigation and Materials Selection Guide for Military Construction in a Severely Corrosive Environment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-07-01

    TABLES 1 Tests and Chemical Control Limits for Maintaining a Properly Treated Low-Pressure Steam-Heating System 91 2 Copper Tube-to-Soil Potential Compared...of elements form a highly corrosive, severe desert environment. Soil Resistivity Using the soil box test method, some wet soil resistivities as low as...possible. If contact cannot be avoided, the dissimilar metals should be isolated electrically using proper gaskets or coatings. Metallic Fasteners

  15. Irradiation corrosion of waste package container materials in air/steam environment

    SciTech Connect

    Anantatmula, R.P.; Colburn, R.P.

    1991-11-01

    A set of corrosion tests of the candidate waste container materials for the Basalt Waste Isolation Project (BWIP) was conducted in a moist air environment simulating the repository preclosure condition. The tests were performed over a four-month period with air, saturated with moisture at 50{degree}C, passing through test chambers holding specimens at 150{degree}C and 250{degree}C. The test materials included A27 cast carbon steel, A387 ferritic steel, oxygen-free copper and cupronickel 90-10. Each material was tested both with and without basalt/bentonite packing material adjacent to the specimens. For each combination of material, temperature and packing condition, tests were conducted at 10,000 R/hr and 100 R/hr radiation levels. All four materials tested at 250{degree}C showed corrosion rates as much as an order of magnitude higher in the high radiation field when compared with similar tests without irradiation. Typically, the corrosion rates were lower at the lower dose rates, but were significantly higher at 100 R/hr compared to the case without radiation. At 150{degree}C only pure copper showed enhanced corrosion due to gamma radiation. The presence of packing material adjacent to the specimens had no consistent effect on corrosion rate at either temperature.

  16. Scoping corrosion tests on candidate waste package basket materials for the Yucca Mountain project

    SciTech Connect

    Konynenburg, R.A. van; Curtis, P.G.; Summers, T.S.E.

    1998-03-01

    A scoping corrosion test was performed on candidate waste package basket materials. The corrosion medium was a pH-buffered solution of chemical species expected to be produced by radiolysis. The test was conducted at 90 C for 96 hours. Samples included aluminum-, copper-, stainless steel- and zirconium-based metallic materials and several ceramics, incorporating neutron-absorbing elements. Sample weight losses and solution chemical changes were measured. Both corrosion of the host materials and dissolution of the neutron-absorbing elements were studied. The ceramics and the zirconium-based materials underwent only minor corrosion. The stainless steel-based materials performed well except for a welded sample. The aluminum- and copper-based materials exhibited the highest corrosion rates. Boron dissolution depends on its chemical form. Boron oxide and many metal borides dissolve readily in acidic solutions while high-chromium borides and boron carbide, though thermodynamically unstable, exhibit little dissolution in short times. The results of solution chemical analyses were consistent with this. Gadolinium did not dissolve significantly from monazite, and hafnium showed little dissolution from a variety of host materials, in keeping with its low solubility.

  17. Scoping corrosion tests on candidate waste package basket materials for the Yucca Mountain Project

    SciTech Connect

    Van Konynenburg, R.A.; Curits, P.C.; Summers, T.S.E.

    1998-03-01

    A scoping corrosion test was performed on candidate waste package basket materials. The corrosion medium was a pH-buffered solution of chemical species expected to be produced by radiolysis. The test was conducted at 90{degrees}C for 96 hours. Samples included aluminum-, copper-, stainless steel-, and zirconium-based metallic materials and several ceramics, incorporating neutron-absorbing elements. Sample weight losses and solution chemical changes were measured. Both corrosion of the host materials and dissolution of the neutron- absorbing elements were studied. The ceramics and the zirconium-based materials underwent only minor corrosion. the stainless steel-based materials performed well except for a welded sample. The aluminum- and copper-based materials exhibited the highest corrosion rates. Boron dissolution depends on it chemical form. Boron oxide and many metal borides dissolve readily in acidic solutions while high- chromium borides and boron carbide, though thermodynamically unstable, exhibit little dissolution in short times. the results of solution chemical analyses were consistent with this. Gadolinium did not dissolve significantly from monazite, and hafnium showed little dissolution from a variety of host materials, in keeping with its low solubility.

  18. Corrosion behavior of copper-base materials in a gamma-irradiated environment; Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Yunker, W.H.

    1990-09-01

    Specimens of three copper-base materials were corrosion tested with gamma radiation exposure dose rates in the range of 1.9 {times} 10{sup 3} R/h to 4.9 {times} 10{sup 5} R/h. Materials used were pure copper, 7% aluminum bronze and 30% copper-nickel. Exposures were performed in moist air at 95{degree}C and 150{degree}C and liquid Well J-13 water at 95{degree}C, for periods of up to 16 months. Specimens were monitored for uniform weight loss, stress-induced corrosion and crevice corrosion. Specimen surfaces were examined visually at 10X magnification as well as by Auger Electron Spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction and metallography. Corrosion was not severe in any of the cases. In general, the pure copper was corroded most uniformly while the copper-nickel was the least reproducibly corroded. 11 refs, 40 figs., 15 tabs.

  19. CORROSION EVALUATION OF SHIELDING MATERIALS FOR DIRECT BURIAL TELEPHONE CABLES,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Buried telephone cables used in the Rural Electrification Administration ( REA ) Program have, since the initial installation, incorporated a copper...shield because of its high conductivity and excellent corrosion resistance in most underground environments. To meet this demand REA has set up a

  20. Effervescent Cationic Film Forming Corrosion Inhibitor Material and Process.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-10-15

    1000 ppm in the volume of aliminum surface of a weapon in a launch tube on a seawater that floods the weapon tube. submarine with a corrosion inhibitor film, comprising: 20 * * * * * 25 30 35 40 45 50 55 a. 60 65

  1. Integrated Corrosion Facility for long-term testing of candidate materials for high-level radioactive waste containment

    SciTech Connect

    Estill, J.C.; Dalder, E.N.C.; Gdowski, G.E.; McCright, R.D.

    1994-10-01

    A long-term-testing facility, the Integrated Corrosion Facility (I.C.F.), is being developed to investigate the corrosion behavior of candidate construction materials for high-level-radioactive waste packages for the potential repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Corrosion phenomena will be characterized in environments considered possible under various scenarios of water contact with the waste packages. The testing of the materials will be conducted both in the liquid and high humidity vapor phases at 60 and 90{degrees}C. Three classes of materials with different degrees of corrosion resistance will be investigated in order to encompass the various design configurations of waste packages. The facility is expected to be in operation for a minimum of five years, and operation could be extended to longer times if warranted. A sufficient number of specimens will be emplaced in the test environments so that some can be removed and characterized periodically. The corrosion phenomena to be characterized are general, localized, galvanic, and stress corrosion cracking. The long-term data obtained from this study will be used in corrosion mechanism modeling, performance assessment, and waste package design. Three classes of materials are under consideration. The corrosion resistant materials are high-nickel alloys and titanium alloys; the corrosion allowance materials are low-alloy and carbon steels; and the intermediate corrosion resistant materials are copper-nickel alloys.

  2. Corrosion Assessment of Candidate Materials for the SHINE Subcritical Assembly Vessel and Components FY15 Report

    SciTech Connect

    Pawel, Steven J.

    2016-01-01

    In the previous report of this series, a literature review was performed to assess the potential for substantial corrosion issues associated with the proposed SHINE process conditions to produce 99Mo. Following the initial review, substantial laboratory corrosion testing was performed emphasizing immersion and vapor-phase exposure of candidate alloys in a wide variety of solution chemistries and temperatures representative of potential exposure conditions. Stress corrosion cracking was not identified in any of the exposures up to 10 days at 80°C and 10 additional days at 93°C. Mechanical properties and specimen fracture face features resulting from slow-strain rate tests further supported a lack of sensitivity of these alloys to stress corrosion cracking. Fluid velocity was found not to be an important variable (0 to ~3 m/s) in the corrosion of candidate alloys at room temperature and 50°C. Uranium in solution was not found to adversely influence potential erosion-corrosion. Potentially intense radiolysis conditions slightly accelerated the general corrosion of candidate alloys, but no materials were observed to exhibit an annualized rate above 10 μm/y.

  3. Type-II nodal loops: Theory and material realization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Si; Yu, Zhi-Ming; Liu, Ying; Guan, Shan; Wang, Shan-Shan; Zhang, Xiaoming; Yao, Yugui; Yang, Shengyuan A.

    2017-08-01

    A nodal loop appears when two bands, typically one electronlike and one holelike, are crossing each other linearly along a one-dimensional manifold in reciprocal space. Here, we propose a type of nodal loop which emerges from the crossing between two bands which are both electronlike (or holelike) along a certain direction. Close to any point on such a loop (dubbed as a type-II nodal loop), the linear spectrum is strongly tilted and tipped over along one transverse direction, leading to marked differences in magnetic, optical, and transport responses compared with conventional (type-I) nodal loops. We show that the compound K4P3 is an example that hosts a pair of type-II nodal loops close to the Fermi level. Each loop traverses the whole Brillouin zone, and hence can only be annihilated in a pair when symmetry is preserved. The symmetry and topological protections of the loops as well as the associated surface states are discussed.

  4. Potential Biogenic Corrosion of Alloy 22, A Candidate Nuclear Waste Packaging Materials, Under Simulated Repository Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Horn, J.M.; Martin, S.I.; Rivera, A.J.; Bedrossian, P.J.; Lian, T.

    2000-01-12

    The U.S. Department of Energy has been charged with assessing the suitability of a geologic nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain (YM), NV. Microorganisms, both those endogenous to the repository site and those introduced as a result of construction and operational activities, may contribute to the corrosion of metal nuclear waste packaging and thereby decrease their useful lifetime as barrier materials. Evaluation of potential Microbiological Influenced Corrosion (MIC) on candidate waste package materials was undertaken reactor systems incorporating the primary elements of the repository: YM rock (either non-sterile or presterilized), material coupons, and a continual feed of simulated YM groundwater. Periodically, both aqueous reactor efflux and material coupons were analyzed for chemical and surfacial characterization. Alloy 22 coupons exposed for a year at room temperature in reactors containing non-sterile YM rock demonstrated accretion of chromium oxide and silaceous scales, with what appear to be underlying areas of corrosion.

  5. Allergy and corrosion of dental materials in patients with oral lichen planus.

    PubMed

    Lundström, I M

    1984-02-01

    Patients with histologically verified oral lichen planus (OLP) were studied regarding allergic reactions to substances in dental materials, presence of clinical corrosion orally and factors influencing corrosion, such as mixed gold and amalgam therapy, non-precious pin-constructions or complete dentures. The material consisted of 48 OLP patients (33 female, 15 male) and the results were compared with those of a control group (40 patients) and/or general population samples. When patch tested, 39% of the OLP patients reacted to one or more components in dental materials. Reaction to mercury was most common, being noted in 26%. Clinical signs of corrosion were significantly more frequent in the OLP group (72%) than in the control cases (28%). Patients with atrophic-erosive OLP exhibited a significantly higher frequency of corrosion (83%) than those with reticular type (46%). Mixed gold and amalgam therapy and screwposts were equally present in both the OLP and control group and the frequency of complete dentures corresponded to that reported for general populations. A change of dental materials in 8 patients with positive patch tests led to marked oral improvement in 6 cases, 2 of which became completely cured. The frequencies recorded for allergic reactions and corrosion as well as the result of treatment indicate that substances in dental materials may be of significance in cases of OLP.

  6. Materials of construction and corrosion history for a low-level radioactive waste incinerator

    SciTech Connect

    Koenig, R.A. )

    1989-01-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory has been operating a production-scale incineration system since 1976. Following the completion of initial testing, the system was modified over time to accept low and high caloric value liquids and slurries. Combustion testing of difficult waste forms continues for the DOE, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the Army, the Navy, and private companies. Anticipation of the wide range of feed compositions prompted a selection of system materials processing satisfactory corrosion resistance. This paper presents these design considerations, the system construction materials. Description of corrosion incidents, and planned materials tests to guide future construction.

  7. The Stress Corrosion Performance Research of Three Kinds of Commonly Used Pipe Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yayun; Zhang, Yiliang; Jia, Xiaoliang

    The corrosion of pipe is most common problem for oil and gas industry. In this article, three kinds of tubes will be analyzed in terms of their resistance against stress corrosion. They are respectively N80 / 1, N80/ Q and P110. The loading method chosen in this test is constant tensile stress loading. In the test, samples will be separated in different groups, gradually loaded under specific levels and then soaked in H2S saturated solution. What can get from this test is threshold value of stress corrosion and stress-life curve, which can be used for evaluating the stress corrosion property of materials, as well as giving guidance for practical engineering.

  8. Relationship of the hydrogen embrittlement of constructional materials in corrosion fatigue to loading asymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Marichev, V.A.; Shipilov, S.A.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to investigate the influence of loading asymmetry on the tendency of construction materials toward hydrogen embrittlement in corrosion fatigue. The influence of cathodic polarization on the kinetics of crack growth in corrosion fatigue of SP-33oh high-speed steel (32Kh3NMFA) and VMD 10 magnesium alloy was investigated. The tests were made at room temperature in corrosive solutions of CrO/sub 3/ and Na/sub 2/B/sub 4/O/sub 7/ for the SP-33oh steel and of Cr/sub 3/ and NaOH for the VMD 10 alloy. Relationships were determined for the critical range of stress intensity factors to loading asymmetry. It was established that the leading role of hydrogen embrittlement in the development of corrosion fatigue cracks does not eliminate the possibility of other mechanisms of crack growth.

  9. Corrosion susceptibility study of candidate pin materials for ALTC (Active Lithium/Thionyl Chloride) batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bovard, Francine S.; Cieslak, Wendy R.

    1987-09-01

    The corrosion susceptibilities of eight alternate battery pin material candidates for ALTC (Active Lithium/Thionyl Chloride) batteries in 1.5M LiAlCl4/SOCl2 electrolyte have been investigated using ampule exposure and electrochemical tests. The thermal expansion coefficients of these candidate materials are expected to match Sandia-developed Li-corrosion resistant glasses. The corrosion resistances of the candidate materials, which included three stainless steels (15-5 PH, 17-4 PH, and 446), three Fe-Ni glass sealing alloys (Kovar, Alloy 52, and Niromet 426), a Ni-based alloy (Hastelloy B-2) and a zirconium-based alloy (Zircaloy), were compared to the reference materials Ni and 316L SS. All of the candidate materials showed some evidence of corrosion and, therefore, did not perform as well as the reference materials. The Hastelloy B-2 and Zircaloy are clearly unacceptable materials for this application. Of the remaining alternate materials, the 446 SS and Alloy 52 are the most promising candidates.

  10. Materials studies for preventing corrosion in condensing environments. Annual report, October 1990--September 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Kukacka, L.E.; Sugama, T.

    1991-10-01

    The objective of this project is to determine the fundamental interfacial requirements for low-cost, organic and inorganic materials resistive to corrosion in condensing furnace exhausts. This research effort is being focused to provide information regarding corrosion resistance, heat transfer, material cost, fabrication method and cost, and product reliability since all are important in the final design and production of a heat exchanger. Results to date indicate that organic and inorganic-type polymer coating systems applied to low cost metals such as mild steel and aluminum provide good corrosion protection. The thermal stability of these polymers plus the identification of the interfacial requirements needed to utilize them with reactive filler materials should also make their use as bulk composites feasible.

  11. Control loops diagram supplement. Revision 1 (Engineering Materials)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    Drawings of end-to-end connections for a majority of the field instruments at the Barstow Solar Pilot Plant are presented. Interfaces for the individual control loops are defined. Reference DOE/SF/10499-T158.

  12. Assessment of Corrosion, Fretting, and Material Loss of Retrieved Modular Total Knee Arthroplasties.

    PubMed

    Martin, Audrey J; Seagers, Kirsten A; Van Citters, Douglas W

    2017-07-01

    Modular junctions in total hip arthroplasties have been associated with fretting, corrosion, and debris release. The purpose of this study is to analyze damage severity in total knee arthroplasties of a single design by qualitative visual assessment and quantitative material loss measurements to evaluate implant performance and patient impact via material loss. Twenty-two modular knee retrievals of the same manufacturer were identified from an institutional review board-approved database. Junction designs included tapers with an axial screw and tapers with a radial screw. Constructs consisted of 2 metal alloys: CoCr and Ti6Al4V. Components were qualitatively scored and quantitatively measured for corrosion and fretting. Negative values represent adhered material. Statistical differences were analyzed using sign tests. Correlations were tested with a Spearman rank order test (P < .05). The median volumetric material loss and the maximum linear depth for the total population were -0.23 mm(3) and 5.84 μm, respectively. CoCr components in mixed metal junctions had higher maximum linear depth (P = .007) than corresponding Ti components. Fretting scores of Ti6Al4V alloy components in mixed metal junctions were statistically higher than the remaining groups. Taper angle did not correlate with material loss. Results suggest that CoCr components in mixed metal junctions are more vulnerable to corrosion than other components, suggesting preferential corrosion when interfacing with Ti6Al4V. Overall, although corrosion was noted in this series, material loss was low, and none were revised for clinical metal-related reaction. This suggests the clinical impact from corrosion in total knee arthroplasty is low. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Role of synergy between wear and corrosion in degradation of materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azzi, Marwan

    Tribocorrosion is a term used to describe the material degradation due to the combination of electrochemical and tribological processes. Due to a synergetic effect, the material loss can be larger than the sum of the losses due to wear and corrosion acting separately. In this thesis, the synergy of wear and corrosion was investigated for different types of material, namely the Ti-6Al-4V alloy, the SS316L stainless steel coated with a thin film of Diamond Like Carbon (DLC), and the SS301 stainless steel coated with a thin film of chromium silicon nitride (CrSiN). A tribocorrosion apparatus was designed and constructed to conduct wear experiments in corrosive media. Sliding ball-on-plate configuration was used in this design, where the contact between the ball and the specimen is totally immersed in the test electrolyte. The specimen was connected to a potentiostat to control its electrochemical parameters, namely the potential and the current. Electrochemical techniques were used to control the kinetics of corrosion reactions, and therefore it was possible to assess separately the role of corrosion and wear in the total degradation of material, and to evaluate the synergy between them. For Ti-6Al-4V, it was found that the corrosion and tribocorrosion depend strongly on the structure of the material. The alpha-equiaxed microstructure with fine dispersed beta-phase exhibited the best corrosion resistance. The corrosion resistance was found to decrease when the basal plane was preferentially aligned parallel to the surface, which is attributed to a low resistance to charge transfer in the oxide films formed on this plane. On the other hand, when wear and corrosion were involved simultaneously, the oxide layer protecting the substrate against dissolution was mechanically destroyed leading to a high corrosion rate. It was found that the hardness was the most important factor determining the tribocorrosion behavior of the Ti-6Al-4V alloy; samples with high hardness

  14. Quantitative assessment of microbiological contributions to corrosion of candidate nuclear waste-package materials

    SciTech Connect

    Horn, J.; Jones, D.; Lian, T.; Martin, S.

    1998-10-30

    The U.S. Department of Energy is contributing to the design of a potential nuclear-waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. A system to predict the contribution of Yucca Mountain (YM) bacteria to overall corrosion rates of candidate waste-package (WP) materials was designed and implemented. DC linear polarization resistance techniques were applied to candidate material coupons that had been inoculated with a mixture of YM-derived bacteria with potentially corrosive activities or left sterile. Inoculated bacteria caused a 5- to 6-fold increase in corrosion rate of carbon steel C1020 (to approximately 7Ð8mm/yr) and an almost 100-fold increase in corrosion rate of Alloy 400 (to approximately 1mm/yr). Microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) rates on more resistant materials (CRMs: Alloy 625, Type 304 Stainless Steel, and Alloy C22) were on the order of hundredths of micrometers per year (mm/yr). Bulk chemical and surfacial end-point analyses of spent media and coupon surfaces showed preferential dissolution of nickel from Alloy 400 coupons and depletion of chromium from CRMs after incubation with YM bacteria. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) also showed greater damage to the Alloy 400 surface than that indicated by electrochemical detection methods.

  15. Corrosion Resistant Magnesium-Based Materials for Naval Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-04-01

    Bayerite A120 3*3H 20 on aging. This corrosion product is observed in copious quantities on exfoliated sheets. A14C3 formed during consolidation at the...absorption, no outgas by- products ’, and high temperature capab lity. 1 ’This combination of advantages leaves little doubt why considerable eftorts have...presence of combustion products . The dominant film anion after weathering is SCO 3 2-found in th., )-m 3 Mg CO3 • Mg ;)H) 2 e 3 H2 0 (hvdromagnesite) or

  16. Corrosion of materials and scaling in low-salinity East Mesa geothermal brines

    SciTech Connect

    McCawley, F.X.; Cramer, S.D.; Riley, W.D.; Carter, J.P.; Needham, P.B. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Field corrosion studies were conducted at the East Mesa Known Geothermal Resources Area (KGRA) in the Imperial Valley, Calif., to determine the optimum materials of construction for use in geothermal mineral energy resource recovery plants. These studies included characterization of geothermal environments and in situ corrosion testing. The corrosion resistance of 10 alloys exposed to 5 brine and steam process environments was evaluated using the low-salinity, high-temperature brine from geothermal well Mesa 6-1. Of these alloys, Hastelloy C-276, Hastelloy S, Inconel 625, titanium-2 nickel, and 316 L stainless steel had excellent resistance to corrosion in all of the process environments; E-Brite 26-1 and 430 stainless steel had fair resistance. Although general corrosion rates for 4130 steel and 1020 carbon steel were substantially higher than those of the other iron-base alloys, these two alloys could prove useful in low-salinity process environments because of their low cost. Aluminum alloy 5005 was the least corrosion resistant alloys and pitted severely. Scales formed on all of the alloys in every process environment. Calcite, aragonite, and an amorphous silicate were the major components of the scales.

  17. High temperature corrosion of advanced ceramic materials for hot-gas filters and heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Kupp, E.R.; Trubelja, M.F.; Spear, K.E.; Tressler, R.E.

    1995-08-01

    Experimental corrosion studies of hot gas filter materials and heat exchanger materials in oxidizing combustion environments have been initiated. Filter materials from 3M Co. and DuPont Lanxide Composites Inc. are being tested over a range of temperatures, times and gas flows. It has been demonstrated that morphological and phase changes due to corrosive effects occur after exposure of the 3M material to a combustion environment for as little as 25 hours at 800{degrees}C. The study of heat exchanger materials has focused on enhancing the corrosion resistance of DuPont Lanxide Dimox{trademark} composite tubes by adding chromium to its surfaces by (1) heat treatments in a Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} powder bed, or (2) infiltrating surface porosity with molten chromium nitrate. Each process is followed by a surface homogenization at 1500{degrees}C. The powder bed method has been most successful, producing continuous Cr-rich layers with thicknesses ranging from 20 to 250 {mu}m. As-received and Cr-modified DuPont Lanxide Dimox{trademark} samples will be reacted with commonly encountered coal-ash slags to determine the Cr effects on corrosion resistance.

  18. Boric acid corrosion of light water reactor pressure vessel head materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.-H.; Chopra, O. K.; Natesan, K.; Shack, W. J.; Cullen, Jr.; W. H.; Energy Technology; USNRC

    2005-01-01

    This work presents experimental data on electrochemical potential and corrosion rates for the materials found in the reactor pressure vessel head and control rod drive mechanism (CRDM) nozzles in boric acid solutions of varying concentrations at temperatures of 95-316 C. Tests were conducted in (a) high-temperature, high-pressure aqueous solutions with a range of boric acid concentrations, (b) high-temperature (150-316 C)H-B-Osolutions at ambient pressure, in wet and dry conditions, and (c) low-temperature (95 C) saturated, aqueous, boric acid solutions. These correspond to the following situations: (a) low leakage through the nozzle and nozzle/head annulus plugged, (b) low leakage through the nozzle and nozzle/head annulus open, and (c) significant cooling due to high leakage and nozzle/head annulus open. The results showed significant corrosion only for the low-alloy steel and no corrosion for Alloy 600 or 308 stainless steel cladding. Also, corrosion rates were significant in saturated boric acid solutions, and no material loss was observed in H-B-O solution in the absence of moisture. The results are compared with the existing corrosion/wastage data in the literature.

  19. Iron-Based Amorphous Metals: High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Material Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farmer, Joseph; Choi, Jor-Shan; Saw, Cheng; Haslam, Jeffrey; Day, Dan; Hailey, Phillip; Lian, Tiangan; Rebak, Raul; Perepezko, John; Payer, Joe; Branagan, Daniel; Beardsley, Brad; D'Amato, Andy; Aprigliano, Lou

    2009-06-01

    An overview of the High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Materials (HPCRM) Program, which was cosponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Defense Sciences Office (DSO) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Civilian and Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), is discussed. Programmatic investigations have included a broad range of topics: alloy design and composition, materials synthesis, thermal stability, corrosion resistance, environmental cracking, mechanical properties, damage tolerance, radiation effects, and important potential applications. Amorphous alloys identified as SAM2X5 (Fe49.7Cr17.7Mn1.9Mo7.4W1.6B15.2C3.8Si2.4) and SAM1651 (Fe48Mo14Cr15Y2C15B6) have been produced as meltspun ribbons (MSRs), dropcast ingots, and thermal-spray coatings. Chromium (Cr), molybdenum (Mo), and tungsten (W) additions provided corrosion resistance, while boron (B) enabled glass formation. Earlier electrochemical studies of MSRs and ingots of these amorphous alloys demonstrated outstanding passive film stability. More recently, thermal-spray coatings of these amorphous alloys have been made and subjected to long-term salt-fog and immersion tests; good corrosion resistance has been observed during salt-fog testing. Corrosion rates were measured in situ with linear polarization, while the open-circuit corrosion potentials (OCPs) were simultaneously monitored; reasonably good performance was observed. The sensitivity of these measurements to electrolyte composition and temperature was determined. The high boron content of this particular amorphous metal makes this amorphous alloy an effective neutron absorber and suitable for criticality-control applications. In general, the corrosion resistance of such iron-based amorphous metals is maintained at operating temperatures up to the glass transition temperature. These materials are much harder than conventional stainless steel and Ni-based materials, and are proving to have excellent wear

  20. Iron-Based Amorphous Metals:The High Performance Corrosion Resistant Materials(HPCRM) Program

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J

    2007-07-09

    An overview of the High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Materials (HPCRM) Program, which was co-sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Defense Sciences Office (DSO) and the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Civilian and Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), is discussed. Programmatic investigations have included a broad range of topics: alloy design and composition; materials synthesis; thermal stability; corrosion resistance; environmental cracking; mechanical properties; damage tolerance; radiation effects; and important potential applications. Amorphous alloys identified as SAM2X5 (Fe{sub 49.7}Cr{sub 17.7}Mn{sub 1.9}Mo{sub 7.4}W{sub 1.6}B{sub 15.2}C{sub 3.8}Si{sub 2.4}) and SAM1651 (Fe{sub 48}Mo{sub 14}Cr{sub 15}Y{sub 2}C{sub 15}B{sub 6}) have been produced as melt-spun ribbons, drop-cast ingots and thermal-spray coatings. Chromium (Cr), molybdenum (Mo) and tungsten (W) additions provided corrosion resistance, while boron (B) enabled glass formation. Earlier electrochemical studies of melt-spun ribbons and ingots of these amorphous alloys demonstrated outstanding passive film stability. More recently thermal-spray coatings of these amorphous alloys have been made and subjected to long-term salt-fog and immersion tests. Good corrosion resistance has been observed during salt-fog testing. Corrosion rates were measured in situ with linear polarization, while simultaneously monitoring the open-circuit corrosion potentials. Reasonably good performance was observed. The sensitivity of these measurements to electrolyte composition and temperature was determined. The high boron content of this particular amorphous metal makes this amorphous alloy an effective neutron absorber, and suitable for criticality control applications. In general, the corrosion resistance of such iron-based amorphous metals is maintained at operating temperatures up to the glass transition temperature. These materials are much harder than conventional

  1. Iron-Based Amorphous-Metals: High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Material (HPCRM) Development

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J C; Choi, J S; Saw, C; Haslam, J; Day, D; Hailey, P; Lian, T; Rebak, R; Perepezko, J; Payer, J; Branagan, D; Beardsley, B; D'Amato, A; Aprigliano, L

    2008-01-09

    An overview of the High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Materials (HPCRM) Program, which was co-sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Defense Sciences Office (DSO) and the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Civilian and Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), is discussed. Programmatic investigations have included a broad range of topics: alloy design and composition; materials synthesis; thermal stability; corrosion resistance; environmental cracking; mechanical properties; damage tolerance; radiation effects; and important potential applications. Amorphous alloys identified as SAM2X5 (Fe{sub 49.7}Cr{sub 17.7}Mn{sub 1.9}Mo{sub 7.4}W{sub 1.6}B{sub 15.2}C{sub 3.8}Si{sub 2.4}) and SAM1651 (Fe{sub 48}Mo{sub 14}Cr{sub 15}Y{sub 2}C{sub 15}B{sub 6}) have been produced as melt-spun ribbons, drop-cast ingots and thermal-spray coatings. Chromium (Cr), molybdenum (Mo) and tungsten (W) additions provided corrosion resistance, while boron (B) enabled glass formation. Earlier electrochemical studies of melt-spun ribbons and ingots of these amorphous alloys demonstrated outstanding passive film stability. More recently thermal-spray coatings of these amorphous alloys have been made and subjected to long-term salt-fog and immersion tests. Good corrosion resistance has been observed during salt-fog testing. Corrosion rates were measured in situ with linear polarization, while simultaneously monitoring the open-circuit corrosion potentials. Reasonably good performance was observed. The sensitivity of these measurements to electrolyte composition and temperature was determined. The high boron content of this particular amorphous metal makes this amorphous alloy an effective neutron absorber, and suitable for criticality control applications. In general, the corrosion resistance of such iron-based amorphous metals is maintained at operating temperatures up to the glass transition temperature. These materials are much harder than conventional

  2. High temperature corrosion of advanced ceramic materials for hot gas filters and heat exchangers. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kupp, E.R.; Trubelja, K.E.; Spear, K.E.; Tressler, R.E.

    1995-08-01

    Experimental corrosion studies of hot gas filter materials and heat exchanger materials in oxidizing combustion environments have been initiated. Filter materials from 3M Co. and DuPont Lanxide Composites Inc. are being tested over a range of temperatures, times and gas flows. It has been demonstrated that morphological and phase changes due to corrosive effects occur after exposure of these materials to a simulated coal combustion environment for relatively short periods of time (10-50 hours). Heat exchanger tubes from DuPont Lanxide Composite Inc. were cut and infiltrated with Cr by heating in a Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} powder bed. This resulted in continuous Cr-rich layers with thicknesses ranging from 20 to 250 {mu}m. The Cr-free and the Cr-infiltrated specimens were reacted with the molten Illinois No. 6 slag for 2 and 20 h at 1260{degrees}C, and the reaction layers examined with SEM and EDX. In the Cr-free specimens, the segregation of Fe and the precipitation of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} were detected near the liquid/gas interface, but no evidence of corrosion was present. In the Cr-infiltrate specimens, corrosion was evident, since a rearrangement and segregation of the Cr-rich grains occurred toward the surface of the molten slag. In addition, evidence of the diffusion of major quantities of Fe was observed from the liquid slag into the Cr-rich layer formed by infiltration.

  3. Corrosion Behavior of Bi2Te3-Based Thermoelectric Materials Fabricated by Melting Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohri, Hitoshi; Yagasaki, Takayoshi

    2017-05-01

    Bi2Te3-based compounds are used practically as thermoelectric cooling materials. Bi2Te3-Sb2Te3 or Bi2Te3-Bi2Se3 pseudobinary system compounds are usually applied as p- or n-type material, respectively. Atmospheric water may condense on the surface of thermoelectric materials constituting Peltier modules, depending on their operating environment. Very few studies on the corrosion resistance of Bi2Te3-based compounds have been reported in literature. Moreover, the detailed corrosion behavior of Bi2Te3-based compounds remains unclear. In this study, the corrosion behavior of cleavage planes of Bi2Te3-based compounds fabricated by a melting method has been investigated. Bi2Te3, Sb2Te3, and Bi2Se3 were prepared by the vertical Bridgman method, respectively. Their electrochemical properties evaluated at room temperature by cyclic voltammetry in a standard three-electrode cell with naturally aerated 0.6 mass% or 3.0 mass% NaCl solution as working electrolyte. The c-planes of Bi2Te3 and Sb2Te3 exhibited similar corrosion potential. The corrosion potential of c-plane of Bi2Se3 was more cathodic compared with that of the telluride. The passive current density of the Bi2Te3-based compounds was single or double digit lower than that of stainless steel. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results for the electrolyte after testing indicated the possibility that a corrosion product diffuses to the environment including NaCl for Sb2Te3 and Bi2Se3.

  4. Corrosion Behavior of Bi2Te3-Based Thermoelectric Materials Fabricated by Melting Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohri, Hitoshi; Yagasaki, Takayoshi

    2016-11-01

    Bi2Te3-based compounds are used practically as thermoelectric cooling materials. Bi2Te3-Sb2Te3 or Bi2Te3-Bi2Se3 pseudobinary system compounds are usually applied as p- or n-type material, respectively. Atmospheric water may condense on the surface of thermoelectric materials constituting Peltier modules, depending on their operating environment. Very few studies on the corrosion resistance of Bi2Te3-based compounds have been reported in literature. Moreover, the detailed corrosion behavior of Bi2Te3-based compounds remains unclear. In this study, the corrosion behavior of cleavage planes of Bi2Te3-based compounds fabricated by a melting method has been investigated. Bi2Te3, Sb2Te3, and Bi2Se3 were prepared by the vertical Bridgman method, respectively. Their electrochemical properties evaluated at room temperature by cyclic voltammetry in a standard three-electrode cell with naturally aerated 0.6 mass% or 3.0 mass% NaCl solution as working electrolyte. The c-planes of Bi2Te3 and Sb2Te3 exhibited similar corrosion potential. The corrosion potential of c-plane of Bi2Se3 was more cathodic compared with that of the telluride. The passive current density of the Bi2Te3-based compounds was single or double digit lower than that of stainless steel. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results for the electrolyte after testing indicated the possibility that a corrosion product diffuses to the environment including NaCl for Sb2Te3 and Bi2Se3.

  5. In-pile irradiation research at NRI Rez for corrosion and material testing

    SciTech Connect

    Kysela, J.

    1995-09-01

    Experimental test facility enabling exposition of materials to radiation environment is described. The facility enables research on behavior of materials and water chemistry of PWRs and BWRs. High pressure water loop RVS-3 is operated in LVR-15 test research reactor. The loop was designed as a universal facility providing wide experimental possibilities. Loop is designed for 16.7 MPa pressure, 334 C temperature, 10 t/hour water flow rate and 1.10{sup 14}cm{sup {minus}2}{center_dot}s{sup {minus}1} neutron flux. Water chemistry used corresponds the PWRs with boric acid and pH control by potassium/lithium, hydrogen control by gas or ammonia. BWR loop is designed for investigation of structural materials and Water chemistry in conditions of boiling water power reactors.

  6. Influence of carbon and nitrogen impurities on the corrosion of structural materials in a flowing-lithium environment

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O.K.; Hull, A.B.

    1988-01-01

    Chemical interactions involving nonmetallic elements play a dominant role in the corrosion behavior of ferrous and vanadium base alloys in lithium. Metallographic evaluations of the surface morphology and compositional changes of lithium-exposed ferrous and vanadium alloys are presented. Data on the corrosion behavior of several ferritic, austenitic, and vanadium-based structural materials in flowing lithium are reviewed and the effects of nonmetallic elements on corrosion are discussed. 11 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Corrosion fatigue of high strength fastener materials in seawater. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Tipton, D.G.

    1983-12-01

    Environmental effects can significantly reduce the fatigue life of metals. As such, corrosion fatigue is a major concern in the engineering application of high strength fasteners in marine environments. The corrosion fatigue failure of an AISI 41L40 high strength steel blade-to-hub attachment bolt at the MOD-0A 200 kW wind turbine generator in Oahu, Hawaii prompted the current test program. Tests were undertaken to confirm the dramatic reduction of fatigue strength of AISI 41L40 in marine environments and to obtain similar corrosion fatigue data for candidate replacement materials. AISI 41L40, AISI 4140, PH 13-8Mo stainless steel, alloy 718 and alloy MP-35N were tested in axial fatigue at a frequency of 20 Hz in dry air and natural seawater. The fatigue data were fitted by regression equations to allow determination of fatigue strength for a given number of cycles to failure.

  8. Long term laboratory corrosion monitoring of calcine bin set materials exposed to zirconia calcine

    SciTech Connect

    Dirk, W.J.

    1994-06-01

    Corrosion testing of Type 1025 carbon steel, 405, 304, 304L, 316L, and 347 stainless steels, and 6061-T6 aluminum were conducted in synthetic zirconia calcine to model long term corrosion performance of bin set material. Testing was conducted over a period of 17 years. The existing calcine bin set {number_sign}1 is constructed of Type 405 stainless steel, 2 through 4 are constructed of Type 304 stainless steel and 5 through 7 are constructed of Type 304L stainless steel. The highest rate observed for Type 304L stainless steel was 8.1 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} inches per month. This would equal a wall thickness loss of about 5 mils after 500 years of storage. Currently, the established schedule for removal of corrosion test coupons from the calcine storage bins is at the end of the 10th, 100th, 250th, and 450th year of solid storage service. Very low corrosion rates and metal oxide data determined from the long term laboratory test, in conjunction with corrosion rates from the coupon assessment of the second bin set, indicate this schedule should be revised from 10 years to 50 years for the first assessment.

  9. Surface, corrosion and biocompatibility aspects of Nitinol as an implant material.

    PubMed

    Shabalovskaya, Svetlana A

    2002-01-01

    The present review surveys studies on physical-chemical properties and biological response of living tissues to NiTi (Nitinol) carried out recently, aiming at an understanding of the place of this material among the implant alloys in use. Advantages of shape memory and superelasticity are analyzed in respect to functionality of implants in the body. Various approaches to surface treatment, sterilization procedures, and resulting surface conditions are analyzed. A review of corrosion studies conducted both on wrought and as-cast alloys using potentiodynamic and potentiostatic techniques in various corrosive media and in actual body fluids is also given. The parameters of localized and galvanic corrosion are presented. The corrosion behavior is analyzed with respect to alloy composition, phase state, surface treatment, and strain and compared to that of conventional implant alloys. Biocompatibility of porous Nitinol, Ni release and its effect on living cells are analyzed based on understanding of the surface conditions and corrosion behavior. Additionally, the paper offers a brief overview of the comparative toxicity of metals, components of commonly used medical alloys, indicating that the biocompatibility profile of Nitinol is conducive to present in vivo applications.

  10. Laboratory studies on corrosion of materials for fluidized bed combustion applications

    SciTech Connect

    Natesan, K.

    1990-10-01

    An extensive corrosion test program was conducted at Argonne National Laboratory to evaluate the corrosion performance of metallic structural materials in environments that simulate both steady-state and off-normal exposure conditions anticipated in fluidized bed combustion (FBC) systems. This report discusses the possible roles of key parameters, such as sorbent and gas chemistries, metal temperature, gas cycling conditions, and alloy pretreatment, in the corrosion process. Data on scale thickness and intergranular penetration depth are presented for several alloys as a function of the chemistry of the exposure environment, deposit chemistry, and exposure time. Test results were obtained to compare the corrosion behavior of materials in the presence of reagent grade sorbent compounds and spent-bed materials from bubbling- and circulating-fluid-bed systems. Finally, the laboratory test results were compared with metal wastage information developed over the years in several fluidized bed test facilities. Metallic alloys chosen for the tests were carbon steel, Fe-2 1/4Cr-1Mo and Fe-9Cr-1Mo ferritic steels. Types 304 and 310 stainless steel, and Incoloy 800. 26 refs., 61 figs., 8 tabs.

  11. Silicon nitride: A ceramic material with outstanding resistance to thermal shock and corrosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huebner, K. H.; Saure, F.

    1983-01-01

    The known physical, mechanical and chemical properties of reaction-sintered silicon nitride are summarized. This material deserves interest especially because of its unusually good resistance to thermal shock and corrosion at high temperatures. Two types are distinguished: reaction-sintered (porous) and hot-pressed (dense) Si3N4. Only the reaction-sintered material which is being produced today in large scale as crucibles, pipes, nozzles and tiles is considered.

  12. Corrosion reference for geothermal downhole materials selection: Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, Peter F.

    1982-10-08

    A consolidated reference of materials for downhole equipment used in geothermal energy exploitation is nearing completion. The reference is a summary of recent developments in the areas of tubular goods materials, highly alloyed metals, high temperature cements, high temperature elastomers, drilling and completion tools, logging tools, and downwell pumps. A brief overview is presented in this paper.

  13. Workshop session on pros and cons for different target materials/corrosion and corrosion control

    SciTech Connect

    Takeda, Y.; Mansur, L.K.; Dai, Y.; DiStefano, J.R.

    1996-06-01

    Two of the originally planned workshop sessions, indicated by the titles on each side of the {open_quotes}/{close_quotes} in the above title were combined. The session was structured into four areas in which target material attributes were considered: nuclear properties; physical properties; compatibility; and liquid metal engineering/safety. Short presentations were either volunteered by participants or requested by the session organizers to help establish a background and stimulate discussion. G. Bauer, J. Takeda, T. Gabriel and S. Wender covered the first two areas; J. DiStefano, Y. Dai and Y. Orlov made presentations in the third area. O. Lielausis and R. Dressler spoke on the fourth area. L.K. Mansur served as moderator for the combined session. Although there was much discussion and some differences of opinion, the overall recommendations, considering all available factors, as distilled by this session`s organizers, are as follows. Choose Hg as the prime candidate target material to which most resources should be devoted. A strong alternate candidate is considered to exist in Pb-Bi eutectic. Other candidate materials such as Pb, Pb-Mg eutectic and Bi are weaker choices for various reasons, with Bi being the weakest.

  14. Characterisation of secondary products of uranium-aluminium material test reactor fuel element corrosion in repository-relevant brine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazeina, L.; Curtius, H.; Fachinger, J.; Odoj, R.

    2003-11-01

    Corrosion experiments with non-irradiated uranium-aluminium fuel elements were performed in MgCl 2-rich brine. Distribution analysis of corroded material showed that about 90% of the initially available metallic U and Al precipitated. Investigations of these secondary corrosion products provided that one component is a Mg-Al-Cl-hydrotalcite.

  15. Characterization of deposits and effect of deposits on corrosion of materials for MHD balance-of-plant applications

    SciTech Connect

    Natesan, K.

    1993-12-01

    Candidate heat exchanger materials tested in the Low Mass Flow Train at the Coal-Fired Flow Facility (CFFF) at Tullahoma, TN, were analyzed to evaluate their corrosion performances. Tube specimens obtained at each foot of the 14-ft-long U-bend tubes were analyzed for corrosion-scale morphologies, scale thicknesses, and internal penetration depths. Results developed on 1,500- and 2,000-h exposed specimens were correlated with exposure temperature. In addition, deposit materials collected at several locations in the CFFF were analyzed in detail to characterize the chemical and physical properties of the deposits and their influence on corrosion performance of tube materials.

  16. Localized corrosion and stress corrosion cracking of candidate materials for high-level radioactive waste disposal containers in the US: A literature review

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J.C.; McCright, R.D.

    1988-11-04

    Container materials may undergo any of several modes of degradation in this environment, including: undesirable phase transformations due to lack of phase stability; atmospheric oxidation; general aqueous corrosion; pitting; crevice corrosion; intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC); and transgranular stress corrosion cracking (TGSCC). This paper is an analysis of data from the literature relevant to the pitting, crevice corrosion, and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of these alloys. Though all three austenitic candidates have demonstrated pitting and crevice corrosion in chloride-containing environments, Alloy 825 has the greatest resistance to these forms of localized attack. Both types 304L and 316L stainless steels are susceptible to SCC in acidic chloride media. In contrast, SCC has not been documented for Alloy 825 under comparable conditions. Gamma irradiation has been found to enhance SCC of Types 304 and 304L stainless steels, but it has no detectable effect on the resistance of Alloy 825 to SCC. Furthermore, while microbiologically induced corrosion effects have been observed for 300-series stainless steels, nickel-based alloys such as Alloy 825 seem to be immune to such problems. Of the copper-based alloys, CDA 715 has the best overall resistance to localized attack. Its resistance to pitting is comparable to that of CDA 613 and superior to that of CDA 102. Observed rates of dealloying in CDA 715 are less than those observed in CDA 613 by orders of magnitude. The resistance of CDA 715 to SCC in tarnishing ammonical environments is comparable to that of CDA 102 and superior to that of CDA 613. Its resistance to SCC in nontarnishing ammonical environments is comparable to that of CDA 613 and superior to that of CDA 102. 22 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  17. Corrosion of structural materials by lead-based reactor coolants.

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham, D. P.; Leibowitz, L.; Maroni, V. A.; McDeavitt, S. M.; Raraz, A. G.

    2000-11-16

    Advanced nuclear reactor design has, in recent years, focused increasingly on the use of heavy-liquid-metal coolants, such as lead and lead-bismuth eutectic. Similarly, programs on accelerator-based transmutation systems have also considered the use of such coolants. Russian experience with heavy-metal coolants for nuclear reactors has lent credence to the validity of this approach. Of significant concern is the compatibility of structural materials with these coolants. We have used a thermal convection-based test method to allow exposure of candidate materials to molten lead and lead-bismuth flowing under a temperature gradient. The gradient was deemed essential in evaluating the behavior of the test materials in that should preferential dissolution of components of the test material occur we would expect dissolution in the hotter regions and deposition in the colder regions, thus promoting material transport. Results from the interactions of a Si-rich mild steel alloy, AISI S5, and a ferritic-martensitic stainless steel, HT-9, with the molten lead-bismuth are presented.

  18. Evaluation by the Double Loop Electrochemical Potentiokinetic Reactivation Test of Aged Ferritic Stainless Steel Intergranular Corrosion Susceptibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidhom, H.; Amadou, T.; Braham, C.

    2010-12-01

    An experimental design method was used to determine the effect of factors that significantly affect the response of the double loop-electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation (DL-EPR) test in controlling the susceptibility to intergranular corrosion (IGC) of UNS S43000 (AISI 430) ferritic stainless steel. The test response is expressed in terms of the reactivation/activation current ratio ( I r / I a pct). Test results analysed by the analysis of variance (ANOVA) method show that the molarity of the H2SO4 electrolyte and the potential scanning rate have a more significant effect on the DL-EPR test response than the temperature and the depassivator agent concentration. On the basis of these results, a study was conducted in order to determine the optimal operating conditions of the test as a nondestructive technique for evaluating IGC resistance of ferritic stainless steel components. Three different heat treatments are considered in this study: solution annealing (nonsensitized), aging during 3 hours at 773 K (500 °C) (slightly sensitized), and aging during 2 hours at 873 K (600 °C) (highly sensitized). The aim is to find the operating conditions that simultaneously ensure the selectivity of the attack (intergranular and chromium depleted zone) and are able to detect the effect of low dechromization. It is found that a potential scanning rate of 2.5 mV/s in an electrolyte composed of H2SO4 3 M solution without depassivator, at a temperature around 293 K (20 °C), is the optimal operating condition for the DL-EPR test. Using this condition, it is possible to assess the degree of sensitization (DOS) to the IGC of products manufactured in ferritic stainless steels rapidly, reliably, and quantitatively. A time-temperature-start of sensitization (TTS) diagram for the UNS S43000 (France Inox, Villepinte, France) stainless steel was obtained with acceptable accuracy by this method when the IGC sensitization criterion was set to I r / I a > 1 pct. This diagram is in

  19. Engineered Materials Characterization Report for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project, Volume 3, Revision 1, Corrosion Data and Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    McCright, R D

    1998-04-01

    The Engineered Materials Characterization Report (EMCR) serves as a source of information on the properties of materials proposed as elements in the engineered barrier system (EBS) for the Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository. Volume 3 covered the corrosion data and modeling efforts. The present report is a revision to Volume 3 and updates information on the corrosion (and other degradation modes) behavior of candidate materials for the various components of the EBS. It also includes work on the performance modeling of these materials. Work is reported on metallic barriers, basket materials, packing/backfill/invert materials, and non-metallic materials.

  20. Coated silicon comprising material for protection against environmental corrosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hazel, Brian Thomas (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    In accordance with an embodiment of the invention, an article is disclosed. The article comprises a gas turbine engine component substrate comprising a silicon material; and an environmental barrier coating overlying the substrate, wherein the environmental barrier coating comprises cerium oxide, and the cerium oxide reduces formation of silicate glass on the substrate upon exposure to corrodant sulfates.

  1. Application of a passive electrochemical noise technique to localized corrosion of candidate radioactive waste container materials

    SciTech Connect

    Korzan, M.A.

    1994-05-01

    One of the key engineered barriers in the design of the proposed Yucca Mountain repository is the waste canister that encapsulates the spent fuel elements. Current candidate metals for the canisters to be emplaced at Yucca Mountain include cast iron, carbon steel, Incoloy 825 and titanium code-12. This project was designed to evaluate passive electrochemical noise techniques for measuring pitting and corrosion characteristics of candidate materials under prototypical repository conditions. Experimental techniques were also developed and optimized for measurements in a radiation environment. These techniques provide a new method for understanding material response to environmental effects (i.e., gamma radiation, temperature, solution chemistry) through the measurement of electrochemical noise generated during the corrosion of the metal surface. In addition, because of the passive nature of the measurement the technique could offer a means of in-situ monitoring of barrier performance.

  2. Stress corrosion cracking tests on high-level-waste container materials in simulated tuff repository environments

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham, T.; Jain, H.; Soo, P.

    1986-06-01

    Types 304L, 316L, and 321 austenitic stainless steel and Incoloy 825 are being considered as candidate container materials for emplacing high-level waste in a tuff repository. The stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of these materials under simulated tuff repository conditions was evaluated by using the notched C-ring method. The tests were conducted in boiling synthetic groundwater as well as in the steam/air phase above the boiling solutions. All specimens were in contact with crushed Topopah Spring tuff. The investigation showed that microcracks are frequently observed after testing as a result of stress corrosion cracking or intergranular attack. Results showing changes in water chemistry during test are also presented.

  3. Hot corrosion behavior of magnesia-stabilized ceramic material in a lithium molten salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Soo-Haeng; Kim, Sung-Wook; Kim, Dae-Young; Lee, Jong-Hyeon; Hur, Jin-Mok

    2017-07-01

    The isothermal and cyclic corrosion behaviors of magnesia-stabilized zirconia in a LiCl-Li2O molten salt were investigated at 650 °C in an argon atmosphere. The weights of as-received and corroded specimens were measured and the microstructures, morphologies, and chemical compositions were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. For processes where Li is formed at the cathode during electrolysis, the corrosion rate was about five times higher than those of isothermal and thermal cycling processes. During isothermal tests, the corrosion product Li2ZrO3 was formed after 216 h. During thermal cycling, Li2ZrO3 was not detected until after the completion of 14 cycles. There was no evidence of cracks, pores, or spallation on the corroded surfaces, except when Li was formed. We demonstrate that magnesia-stabilized zirconia is beneficial for increasing the hot corrosion resistance of structural materials subjected to high temperature molten salts containing Li2O.

  4. The stress corrosion resistance and the cryogenic temperature mechanical properties of annealed Nitronic 60 bar material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montano, J. W. L.

    1977-01-01

    Ambient and cryogenic temperature mechanical properties and the ambient temperature stress corrosion properties of annealed, straightened, and centerless ground Nitronic 60 stainless steel alloy bar material are presented. The mechanical properties of longitudinal specimens were evaluated at test temperatures from ambient to liquid hydrogen. The tensile test data indicated increasing strength with decreasing temperature to -196 C. Below liquid nitrogen temperature the smooth tensile and notched tensile strengths decreased slightly while the elongation and reduction of area decreased drastically. The Charpy V-notched impact energy decreased steadily with decreasing test temperature. Stress corrosion tests were performed on longitudinal tensile specimens and transverse C-ring specimens exposed to: alternate immersion in a 3.5% NaCl bath; humidity cabinet; and a 5% salt spray atmosphere. The longitudinal tensile specimens experienced no corrosive attack. Approximately 3/4 of the transverse C-rings exposed to alternate immersion and to salt spray experienced a pitting attack on the top and bottom ends. Additional stress corrosion tests were performed on transverse tensile specimens. No failures occurred in the 90% stressed specimens exposed for 90 days in the alternate immersion and salt spray environments

  5. Revealing Nanoscale Passivation and Corrosion Mechanisms of Reactive Battery Materials in Gas Environments.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuzhang; Li, Yanbin; Sun, Yongming; Butz, Benjamin; Yan, Kai; Koh, Ai Leen; Zhao, Jie; Pei, Allen; Cui, Yi

    2017-08-09

    Lithium (Li) metal is a high-capacity anode material (3860 mAh g(-1)) that can enable high-energy batteries for electric vehicles and grid-storage applications. However, Li metal is highly reactive and repeatedly consumed when exposed to liquid electrolyte (during battery operation) or the ambient environment (throughout battery manufacturing). Studying these corrosion reactions on the nanoscale is especially difficult due to the high chemical reactivity of both Li metal and its surface corrosion films. Here, we directly generate pure Li metal inside an environmental transmission electron microscope (TEM), revealing the nanoscale passivation and corrosion process of Li metal in oxygen (O2), nitrogen (N2), and water vapor (H2O). We find that while dry O2 and N2 (99.9999 vol %) form uniform passivation layers on Li, trace water vapor (∼1 mol %) disrupts this passivation and forms a porous film on Li metal that allows gas to penetrate and continuously react with Li. To exploit the self-passivating behavior of Li in dry conditions, we introduce a simple dry-N2 pretreatment of Li metal to form a protective layer of Li nitride prior to battery assembly. The fast ionic conductivity and stable interface of Li nitride results in improved battery performance with dendrite-free cycling and low voltage hysteresis. Our work reveals the detailed process of Li metal passivation/corrosion and demonstrates how this mechanistic insight can guide engineering solutions for Li metal batteries.

  6. Microbial Activities' Influence on Three Kinds of Metal Material Corrosion Behaviors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xia; Chen, Haiyan; Chen, Pimao; Qing, Chuangxing; Li, Huanyuan

    2017-05-01

    The corrosion behaviors of copper, 6063 aluminum alloy, and Q235 steel were investigated by open-circuit potential (OCP), anodic polarization curve analysis, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Scanning electron microscopy revealed that a small number of translucent rod-shaped bacterial colonies on the copper surface of copper, whereas plenty of rod-shaped microbes colony were detected on the surface of 6063 aluminum material. Moreover, rod-shaped bacteria and mold colonies attached to the surface of Q235 steel. The decrease in the OCP of copper, 6063 aluminum alloy, and Q235 steel led to higher corrosion tendency. EIS analysis showed that bacteria can reduce the value of AC impedance of copper, the polarization resistance, and the surface resistance, thereby accelerating corrosion. Moreover, the polarization resistance of aluminum alloy in bacterial seawater is lower than that in non-bacterial seawater, indicating the existence of bacteria accelerated the corrosion of 6063 aluminum alloy. The adherence of microbes on Q235 steel surface accelerated the dissolution of the surface layer, and then the passive film is replaced by incompact biofilm layer. Q235 steel corrodes faster under the influence of bacteria because the polarization resistance in bacterial seawater is much lower than that in non-bacterial seawater.

  7. Internal Corrosion and Deposition Control

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter reviews the current knowledge of the science of corrosion control and control of scaling in drinking water systems. Topics covered include: types of corrosion; physical, microbial and chemical factors influencing corrosion; corrosion of specific materials; direct ...

  8. Internal Corrosion and Deposition Control

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter reviews the current knowledge of the science of corrosion control and control of scaling in drinking water systems. Topics covered include: types of corrosion; physical, microbial and chemical factors influencing corrosion; corrosion of specific materials; direct ...

  9. Hot corrosion of ceramic-coating materials for industrial/utility gas turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Barkalow, R.H.

    1981-01-01

    Furnace hot corrosion tests of yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) and other candidate ceramic coating materials were run under combinations of temperature, salt deposits, and gaseous environments know to cause severe hot corrosion of state-of-the-art metallic coatings for industrial/utility gas turbines. Specimens were free-standing ceramic coupons and ceramic-coated IN 792. X-ray fluorescence and diffraction data on free-standing YSZ coupons showed surface yttrium loss and cubic-to-monoclinic transformation as a result of exposure to liquid salt and SO/sub 3/. Greater destabilization was observed at the lower of two test temperatures (704 and 982/sup 0/C), and destabilization increased with increasing SO/sub 3/ pressure and V-containing salt deposits. The data suggest that hot corrosion of YSZ can occur by a type of acidic dissolution of Y/sub 2/O/sub 3/ from the ZrO/sub 2/ solid solution. In spite of the greater surface destabilization at 704/sup 0/C, the bond coat and substrate of YSZ-coated IN 792 were not attacked at 704/sup 0/C but severely corroded at 982/sup 0/C. These results show that degradation of ceramic-coated metallic components can be more strongly influenced by the porosity of the microstructure and fluidity of the liquid salt than by the chemical stability of the ceramic coating material in the reactive environment. Other ceramic materials (SiO/sub 2/, Si/sub 3/N/sub 4/, ZrSiO/sub 2/, and mullite), concurrently exposed to the same conditions which produced significant destabilization of YSZ, showed no evidence of reaction at 704/sup 0/C but noticeable corrosion at 982/sup 0/C. Also, the high temperature corrosion was greater in air than in SO/sub 3/-containing gases. These trends suggest that hot corrosion of the silicon-containing ceramics was basic in nature, and such materials have potential for good resistance to chemical decomposition under the acidic conditions characteristics of industrial/utility gas turbines.

  10. Corrosion protection

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Donald W.; Wagh, Arun S.

    2003-05-27

    There has been invented a chemically bonded phosphate corrosion protection material and process for application of the corrosion protection material for corrosion prevention. A slurry of iron oxide and phosphoric acid is used to contact a warm surface of iron, steel or other metal to be treated. In the presence of ferrous ions from the iron, steel or other metal, the slurry reacts to form iron phosphates which form grains chemically bonded onto the surface of the steel.

  11. Assessment of Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion Potential in the International Space Station Internal Active Thermal Control System Heat Exchanger Materials: A 6-Momths Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roman, Monsi C.; Macuch, Patrick; McKrell, Thomas; VanDerSchijff, Ockert J.; Mitchell, Ralph

    2005-01-01

    The fluid in the Internal Active Thermal Control System (IATCS) of the International Space Station (ISS) is water based. The fluid in the ISS Laboratory Module and Node 1 initially contained a mix of water, phosphate (corrosion control), borate (pH buffer), and silver sulfate (Ag2SO4) (microbial control) at a pH of 9.5+/-0.5. Over time, the chemistry of the fluid changed. Fluid changes included a pH drop from 9.5 to 8.3 due to diffusion of carbon dioxide (CO2) through Teflon(reistered Trademark) (DuPont) hoses, increases in dissolved nickel (Ni) levels, deposition of silver (Ag) to metal surfaces, and precipitation of the phosphate (PO4) as nickel phosphate (NiPO4). The drop in pH and unavailability of a antimicrobial has provided an environment conducive to microbial growth. Microbial levels in the fluid have increased from >10 colony-forming units (CFUs)/100 ml to 10(exp 6) CFUs/100 ml. The heat exchangers in the IATCS loops are considered the weakest point in the loop because of the material thickness (=7 mil). It is made of a Ni-based braze filler/CRES 347. Results of a preliminary test performed at Hamilton Sundstrand indicated the possibility of pitting on this material at locations where Ag deposits were found. Later, tests have confirmed that chemical corrosion of the materials is a concern for this system. Accumulation of micro-organisms on surfaces (biofilm) can also result in material degradation and can amplify the damage caused by the chemical corrosion, known as microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC). This paper will discuss the results of a 6-mo test performed to characterize and quantify the damage from microbial accumulation on the surface of the ISS/ATCS heat exchanger materials. The test was designed to quantify the damage to the materials under worst-case conditions with and without micro-organisms present at pH 8.3 and 9.5.

  12. Electrochemical synthesis and characterisation of hybrid materials polypyrrole/dodecatungstophosphate as protective agents against steel corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonastre Cano, Jose Antonio

    The losses caused by the effect of the corrosion are of the order of 2-3,5% of the GDP of the developed countries or developing only in direct costs, losses in structures or products. This figure doubles by the indirect costs, losses of productivity or demands for delays. Beside the possible losses of human lives, any intent leaded to the decrease of the corrosion in rusty metals is a commendable objective from the point of view of the protection of the environment. Building industry employing reinforced concrete is able to project some structural elements (pillars, wrought, beam, etc.) in principle free of corrosion, assuring during many years the useful life of the work in service. However, the reinforced concrete would be' a perfect solution if the indefinite permanency of the passive state of the steel could be guaranteed. Indeed, although the steel is protected against corrosion due to basic pH which provides the cement, the severe action of saline media or the effect of CO2 can diminish this protection conditions beginning the corrosion in steel elements. Type-p doped conducting polymers, as polypyrrole, are firm candidates to protect carbon steel providing galvanic protection by stabilising the passive layer of Fe oxides initially grown. Doping the polymeric matrix with polioxometalates, concretely phosphotungstate PW12O403-, is a very interesting hypothesis due to their oxidising effect, improving the anodic protection by the hybrid material electrosynthesised on carbon steel substrate. First in the present work, a new method was developed by cyclic voltammetry in LiClO4 + acetonitrile medium in order to diminish the unavoidable oxidation of carbon steel when the electrosyntesis of the hybrid material polypyrrole/PW12O403- is carrying out. The beginning potential of polypyrrole polymerisation is about 0.8 V (vs. Ag/AgCl), a positive potential where oxidation of Fe substrate is high, not allowing the electrodeposition of the hybrid material. On the other

  13. Development of Improved Accelerated Corrosion Qualification Test Methodology for Aerospace Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-11-01

    Coating Degradation Mechanisms Aluminum Aluminum Organic Coating 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 1. Mechanical defect (pitting) 2. Coating delamination... ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Air Force Research Laboratory,Materials and Manufacturing Directorate,AFRL Corrosion IPT (AFRL/RXSS),Wright Pattereson...AFB,OH,45433 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 10. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S ACRONYM(S) 11

  14. The Influence of Marine Microfouling on the Corrosion Behaviour of Passive Materials and Copper Alloys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-02

    PASSIVE MATERIALS AND COPPER ALLOYS Brenda J. Littlea, Jason S. Lee b and Richard I. Rayc aNaval Research Laboratory, Code 7303, 228-688-5494, blittle...not mean that the copper - based alloys are immune to microbial colonization and microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC). It does mean, however...that only those organisms with a high tolerance for copper are likely to have a substantial effect. Most of the reported cases of MIC of copper alloys

  15. Solid particle erosion and erosion-corrosion of materials

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, A.V.

    1995-12-31

    Because of the extraordinary increase in the material wastage caused by erosion type mechanisms in the energy production and utilization systems, this book will provide the vital information needed to understand and measure this deterioration. With findings from both field and laboratory situations, this reference guide will help identify the various mechanisms that cause wastage and how to measure it under different operating conditions. There is also considerable metallographic evidence of erosion behavior that correlates with material wastage data to provide a clearer picture of the active wear mechanisms. This book will especially benefit those engineers responsible for the design or operation of power plants such as coal gasifiers, fluid bed combustors, pulverized coal boilers, combined cycle power plants, gas turbine and diesel engines, steam turbines, and any other type of device that uses fluid flows with small, solid particles.

  16. Corrosion performance of materials for advanced combustion systems

    SciTech Connect

    Natesan, K.; Yanez-Herrero, M.; Fornasieri, C.

    1993-12-01

    Conceptual designs of advanced combustion systems that utilize coal as a feedstock require high-temperature furnaces and heat transfer surfaces capable of operating at more elevated temperatures than those prevalent in current coal-fired power plants. The combination of elevated temperatures and hostile combustion environments necessitates development/application of advanced ceramic materials in these designs. This report characterizes the chemistry of coal-fired combustion environments over the wide temperature range that is of interest in these systems and discusses preliminary experimental results on several materials (alumina, Hexoloy, SiC/SiC, SiC/Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}/Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}, ZIRCONIA, INCONEL 677 and 617) with potential for application in these systems.

  17. Development of the Pipe Loop System for Determining Effectiveness of Corrosion Control Chemicals in Potable Water Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-08-01

    control for calcium carbonate precipitation, inorganic phosphates, and sodium silicates. The extent to which these inhibitors provide corrosion...complexes which can also precipitate to form protective coatings. Sodium Silicates Sodium silicates have been used in water systems as corrosion...inhibitors for over 50 years. They exist in dry form ("water glass") or in liquid solutions. In solution they exist in varying proportions of sodium oxide

  18. Fatigue and corrosion fatigue of beryllium-copper spring materials

    SciTech Connect

    Bagheri, R.; Miller, G.A. )

    1993-03-01

    Fine gage, 0.006-in. d(0.15-mm) thick, beryllium-copper (Be-Cu) spring materials with tensile strength in the range of 70 to 145 ksi were subjected to cyclic loading in air and salt water environments. Plain and notched (center hole) hour glass specimens were subjected to sinusoidal loading with R = (minimum/maximum) stress = 0.1 at cyclic frequencies of 50 Hz in air and 1 Hz in salt water. Fatigue life was typically from 10[sup 4] to 10[sup 6] cycles with crack initiation as the dominant fatigue process. The excellence fatigue performance of Be-Cu alloys in salt water is well-known, however, current findings demonstrate 10 to 37% reduction in fatigue strength of unnotched specimens in this environment for a life of 3 x 10[sup 5] cycles. This strength degradation is attributed to the use of a lower cyclic frequency for present than for previous tests, i.e., 1 versus about 20 Hz. There was no effect of salt water on crack initiation in notched specimens. The ratios of the fatigue strengths, namely (cold-rolled/annealed) and (aged/annealed), for plain and notched specimens tested in air, decreased from 2 to about 1.4 as fatigue life increased from 10[sup 4] to 10[sup 6] cycles. This effect is attributed to cyclic hardening of the annealed material. The fatigue stress concentration factor, K[sub f] = (plain/notched) fatigue strength, increased by about 30% as fatigue cycles increased from 10[sup 4] to 10[sup 6]. The ranking of K[sub f] values of the various material conditions from highest to lowest was: cold-rolled, aged, and annealed.

  19. Materials by Design - Computational Alloy Design for Corrosion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-01

    MSC Fatigue Modeling Approach ABAQUS cyclic loading simulations Microstructure: •partially debonded NMP ( Al2 O3 ), intact NMP ( Al2 O3 ), or pore...ΔTt, Δt Material Property Allowables Prediction iSIGHT Monte Carlo Estimate P(σ) Qualification Testing H-BayesCalc P r o p e r t y Mean value +3σ...3σ 3 10 AMS Specification MIL-HBK 5 “A”- Allowables AIM Predictions P r o p e r t y p. 24 ASETSDefense 2011: Sustainable Surface Engineering for

  20. Corrosion of materials and scaling in low-salinity East Mesa geothermal brines. Report of investigations/1981

    SciTech Connect

    McCawley, F.X.; Cramer, S.D.; Riley, W.D.; Carter, J.P.; Needham, P.B. Jr

    1980-01-01

    The Bureau of Mines, in pursuing its goal of extending the life span of strategic materials, conducted field corrosion studies at the East Mesa Known Geothermal Resources Area (KGRA) in the Imperial Valley, Calif., to determine the optimum materials of construction for use in geothermal mineral energy resource recovery plants. These studies included characterization of geothermal environments and in situ corrosion testing. The corrosion resistance of 10 alloys exposed to 5 brine and steam process environments was evaluated using the low-salinity, high-temperature brine from geothermal well Mesa 6-1.

  1. An electrochemical evaluation of new materials and methods for corrosion protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kus, Esra

    An electrochemical evaluation of various electrode/electrolyte systems was performed by means of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and other techniques. Each chapter in this thesis presents an individual project with a specific objective which serves an ultimate goal of finding better materials and methods of corrosion protection. An overview of new environmentally friendly and cost effective materials and corrosion protection methods is given in Chapter 1. The protective properties of non-toxic, environmentally friendly polymer coatings, which were developed in the purpose of minimizing biofouling and providing corrosion protection on steel, were investigated and discussed in Chapter 2. The corrosion resistance of steel panels coated with crosslinked siloxanes was evaluated using EIS. Differences in protective properties of the coatings were observed due to differences in the degree of fluorination, the way the films were cured and also the degree of crosslinking. In Chapter 3, a comparison of the corrosion behavior of nanocrystalline (NC) Al 5083 with that of the conventional alloy was made in order to determine what differences if any could be attributed to the NC microstructure. Pit growth rates decreased with time for both materials based on the analysis of the impedance spectra as a function of time. NC samples were resistant to intergranular corrosion whereas conventional Al 5083 was not. The concept of the bacterial battery is presented in Chapter 4. A galvanic cell with Cu and Al 2024 and an electrolyte containing Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 in a growth medium was prepared. A control cell, which did not contain the bacteria, was also tested. For the cell with MR-1 the maximum power values increased continuously with time, whereas in the control cell the maximum power output was obtained in the first day of exposure. The objective of the study presented in Chapter 5 was to examine the interaction of MR-1 with different metal surfaces in order to

  2. Integration of calcium and chemical looping combustion using composite CaO/CuO-based materials.

    PubMed

    Manovic, Vasilije; Anthony, Edward J

    2011-12-15

    Calcium looping cycles (CaL) and chemical looping combustion (CLC) are two new, developing technologies for reduction of CO(2) emissions from plants using fossil fuels for energy production, which are being intensively examined. Calcium looping is a two-stage process, which includes oxy-fuel combustion for sorbent regeneration, i.e., generation of a concentrated CO(2) stream. This paper discuss the development of composite materials which can use copper(II)-oxide (CuO) as an oxygen carrier to provide oxygen for the sorbent regeneration stage of calcium looping. In other words, the work presented here involves integration of calcium looping and chemical looping into a new class of postcombustion CO(2) capture processes designated as integrated CaL and CLC (CaL-CLC or Ca-Cu looping cycles) using composite pellets containing lime (CaO) and CuO together with the addition of calcium aluminate cement as a binder. Their activity was tested in a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) during calcination/reduction/oxidation/carbonation cycles. The calcination/reduction typically was performed in methane (CH(4)), and the oxidation/carbonation stage was carried out using a gas mixture containing both CO(2) and O(2). It was confirmed that the material synthesized is suitable for the proposed cycles; with the very favorable finding that reduction/oxidation of the oxygen carrier is complete. Various schemes for the Ca-Cu looping process have been explored here that would be compatible with these new composite materials, along with some different possibilities for flow directions among carbonator, calciner, and air reactor.

  3. Studies of Corrosion Resistant Materials Being Considered for High-Level Nuclear Waste Containment in Yucca Mountain Relevant Environments

    SciTech Connect

    McCright, R.D.; Ilevbare, G.; Estill, J.; Rebak, R.

    2001-12-09

    Containment of spent nuclear fuel and vitrified forms of high level nuclear waste require use of materials that are highly corrosion resistant to all of the anticipated environmental scenarios that can occur in a geological repository. Ni-Cr-Mo Alloy 22 (UNS N60622) is proposed for the corrosion resistant outer barrier of a two-layer waste package container at the potential repository site at Yucca Mountain. A range of water compositions that may contact the outer barrier is under consideration, and a testing program is underway to characterize the forms of corrosion and to quantify the corrosion rates. Results from the testing support models for long term prediction of the performance of the container. Results obtained to date indicate a very low general corrosion rate for Alloy 22 and very high resistance to all forms of localized and environmentally assisted cracking in environments tested to date.

  4. Corrosion and materials selection report update non-proprietary version. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Agrawal, P.D.

    1984-06-01

    The revised Baseline design (dated 22 October, 1982) used most of the available information with regard to the corrosion, erosion and materials of construction. This information was collected through various programs conducted at the major coal liquefaction pilot plants, e.g. SRC-1 and SRC-2, H-Coal and EDS, and at various research laboratories. The selection of materials of construction was also based on certain basic assumptions with regard to the plant life and life of each type of equipment. Other selection criteria included various process considerations and economics. In cases where no data on corrosion and erosion was available, past experience, licensors' knowhow and engineering judgement, were utilized in the selection process. Beyond the date of publication of the revised Baseline document, additional data from various pilot plants and lab programs has been made available. On account of continuous review being performed by DOE and their subcontractors and consultants, a number of comments were forwarded to ICRC. These comments and latest developmental programs suggested several improvements in the design. This report consists of the following major sections: A discussion on corrosion/erosion related research and pilot plant programs; the materials selection criterion, including plant and equipment life, and various process considerations, are discussed in detail; copies of the materials diagrams from the Revised Baseline are attached; ICRC response to unresolved materials-related comments is included in the Appendix A; areas of concern and data gaps, with regard to the materials of construction are identified; and recommended areas of future research and development programs are listed.

  5. In situ corrosion studies on candidate container materials for the underground disposal of high level radioactive waste in Boom Clay

    SciTech Connect

    Kursten, B.; Iseghem, P. Van

    1999-07-01

    SCK{center{underscore}dot}CEN has developed in the early 1980's, with the support of NIRAS/ONDRAF and EC, an extensive in situ corrosion program to evaluate the long-term corrosion behavior of various candidate container materials for the disposal of conditioned high-level radioactive waste and spent fuel. The in situ corrosion experiments were performed in the underground research facility, HADES, situated in the Boom Clay formation at a depth of 225 meters below ground level. These experiments place the samples either in direct contact with clay (type I), in a humid clay atmosphere (type 2), or in a concrete saturated clay atmosphere (type 3). During the period 1985--1994, twelve in situ corrosion experiments were installed in the underground laboratory. The exploitation of these experiments ended in 1996. All samples were recuperated and analyzed. The purpose of this paper is to summarize and discuss the results from the type 1 corrosion experiments (samples in direct contact with Boom Clay). Surface analyses tend to indicate that the so-called corrosion-resistant materials, e.g. stainless steels, Ni- and Ti-alloys, remain intact after exposure to Boom Clay between 16 and 170 C, whereas carbon steel presents significant pitting corrosion. Carbon steel seems to be unsuitable for the Belgian repository concept (pits up to 240{micro}m deep are detected after direct exposure to the argillaceous environment for 2 years at 90 C). The stainless steels look very promising candidate container materials.

  6. Simultaneous sound velocity and thickness measurement by the ultrasonic pitch-catch method for corrosion-layer-forming polymeric materials.

    PubMed

    Kusano, Masahiro; Takizawa, Shota; Sakai, Tetsuya; Arao, Yoshihiko; Kubouchi, Masatoshi

    2017-08-10

    Since thermosetting resins have excellent resistance to chemicals, fiber reinforced plastics composed of such resins and reinforcement fibers are widely used as construction materials for equipment in chemical plants. Such equipment is usually used for several decades under severe corrosive conditions so that failure due to degradation may result. One of the degradation behaviors in thermosetting resins under chemical solutions is "corrosion-layer-forming" degradation. In this type of degradation, surface resins in contact with a solution corrode, and some of them remain asa corrosion layer on the pristine part. It is difficult to precisely measure the thickness of the pristine part of such degradation type materials by conventional pulse-echo ultrasonic testing, because the sound velocity depends on the degree of corrosion of the polymeric material. In addition, the ultrasonic reflection interface between the pristine part and the corrosion layer is obscure. Thus, we propose a pitch-catch method using a pair of normal and angle probes to measure four parameters: the thicknesses of the pristine part and the corrosion layer, and their respective sound velocities. The validity of the proposed method was confirmed by measuring a two-layer sample and a sample including corroded parts. The results demonstrate that the pitch-catch method can successfully measure the four parameters and evaluate the residual thickness of the pristine part in the corrosion-layer-forming sample. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Humid air corrosion of YMP waste package candidate material

    SciTech Connect

    Gdowski, G.E.

    1998-01-01

    The Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project is evaluating candidate materials for high level nuclear waste containers (Waste Packages) for a potential deep geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The potential repository is located above the water table in the unsaturated zone. The rock contains nominally 10% by volume water and gas pressure in the emplacement drifts of the repository is expected to remain near the ambient atmospheric pressure. The heat generated by the radioactive decay of the waste will raise the temperature of the waste packages and the surrounding rock. Waste Package temperatures above the ambient boiling point of water are anticipated for the waste emplacement scenarios. Because the repository emplacement drifts are expected to remain at the ambient atmospheric pressure, the maximum relative humidity obtainable decreases above the boiling point of water. Temperatures of the Waste Packages and the surrounding rock are expected to reach maximum temperature within 100`s of years and then gradually decrease with time. Episodic liquid water contact with the WPs is also expected; this will result in the deposition of salts and mineral scale.

  8. Corrosion Behavior Of Potential Structural Materials For Use In Nitrate Salts Based Solar Thermal Power Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summers, Kodi

    The increasing global demand for electricity is straining current resources of fossil fuels and placing increased pressure on the environment. The implementation of alternative sources of energy is paramount to satisfying global electricity demand while reducing reliance on fossil fuels and lessen the impact on the environment. Concentrated solar power (CSP) plants have the ability to harness solar energy at an efficiency not yet achieved by other technologies designed to convert solar energy to electricity. The problem of intermittency in power production seen with other renewable technologies can be virtually eliminated with the use of molten salt as a heat transfer fluid in CSP plants. Commercial and economic success of CSP plants requires operating at maximum efficiency and capacity which requires high temperature and material reliability. This study investigates the corrosion behavior of structural alloys and electrochemical testing in molten nitrate salts at three temperatures common to CSP plants. Corrosion behavior was evaluated using gravimetric and inductively-coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) analysis. Surface morphology was studied using scanning electron microscopy. Surface oxide structure and chemistry was characterized using X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Electrochemical behavior of candidate structural alloys Alloy 4130, austenitic stainless steel 316, and super-austenitic Incoloy 800H was evaluated using potentiodynamic polarization characteristics. It was observed that electrochemical evaluation of these candidate materials correlates well with the corrosion behavior observed from gravimetric and ICP-OES analysis. This study identifies that all three alloys exhibited acceptable corrosion in 300°C molten salt while elevated salt temperatures require the more corrosion resistant alloys, stainless steel 316 and 800H. Characterization of the sample

  9. Prediction of Corrosion Resistance of Some Dental Metallic Materials with an Adaptive Regression Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chelariu, Romeu; Suditu, Gabriel Dan; Mareci, Daniel; Bolat, Georgiana; Cimpoesu, Nicanor; Leon, Florin; Curteanu, Silvia

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the electrochemical behavior of some dental metallic materials in artificial saliva for different pH (5.6 and 3.4), NaF content (500 ppm, 1000 ppm, and 2000 ppm), and with albumin protein addition (0.6 wt.%) for pH 3.4. The corrosion resistance of the alloys was quantitatively evaluated by polarization resistance, estimated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy method. An adaptive k-nearest-neighbor regression method was applied for evaluating the corrosion resistance of the alloys by simulation, depending on the operation conditions. The predictions provided by the model are useful for experimental practice, as they can replace or, at least, help to plan the experiments. The accurate results obtained prove that the developed model is reliable and efficient.

  10. Corrosion and degradation of test materials in the U-GAS coal-gasification pilot plant

    SciTech Connect

    Yurkewycz, R.; Firestone, R.F.

    1982-10-01

    Corrosion monitoring of materials was conducted in the operating environment of the IGT U-GAS coal gasification pilot plant between 1977 and 1982. Metal and refractory specimens were exposed in the fluid bed gasifier in the freeboard section. Metal coupons were also exposed in two test locations in the product gas scrubber and venturi collection tank. Exposure times (coal feed to gasifier) were 264 h, 392 h, and 981 h. The corrosion performance of most alloys in the first exposure compared to the second and third in the U-GAS gasifier freeborad section was quite different. The more aggressive conditions produced during the first-exposure period are attributed to processing of unwashed high-sulfur coals in the steam-air gasification mode. Of the group of alloys evaluated, alloy 6B showed acceptable corrosion performance in all three exposures. Although their performance was poor in the first period, alloys N155 and IN-671 showed marked improvement in corrosion resistance during the second and third exposure periods. The same was true of cobalt-base alloy 188 which was the best performing alloy in the second and third exposures. Pack-aluminized alloys IN-800 and Type 310 showed acceptable performance. Conditions at the coupon location in the product gas scrubber (off-gas) were extremely aggressive to a range of materials exposed except titanium 50A. In the product-gas scrubber sludge tank and venturi collection tank, only carbon steel A515 showed significant attack; in some cases Types 410 and 430 incurred only mild pitting attack. Exposure in the gasifier freeboard had no significant effect on refractory specimens.

  11. Fabrication of autoclavable bacteriologic loops for handling Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from recycled materials in a resource poor setting.

    PubMed

    Ochang, Ernest Afu

    2013-01-01

    In resource limited settings, the appropriation of scarce resources during research efforts can be daunting. Sourcing for disposable plastic bacteriological loops for manipulating M. tuberculosis had been eating into the research budget. In an attempt to reduce cost, an alternative and more cost effective way of obtaining autoclavable bacteriologic inoculation loops from used materials in the laboratory was employed. Autoclave resistant loops were prepared from polypropylene automatic pipette tips and platinum wires from electric stoves. The loop volume, when desired, was calculated using a simple mathematical equation after several passes in weighted water. Laboratories in resource poor settings could also save on inoculating loops by adopting such pragmatic approaches using recycled materials.

  12. Aircraft Corrosion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-08-01

    materials still under development which look promising for the future. Classical corrosion control involves attacking the problem from three standpoints...effective- ness CONTROL BOX MECHANICAL AND Intermittent operation and faulty frequency ELECTRICAL TUNING LINKAGE selection. AND MOTOR CONTACTS WATER TRAPS...F.Fink 7 CORROSION CONTROL MEASURES FOR MILITARY AIRCRAFT - PRESENT UK REQUIREMENTS AND FUTURE DEVELOPMENTS by V.C.R.McLoughlin 8 CORROSION PREVENTION

  13. Controlled Chemistry Helium High Temperature Materials Test Loop

    SciTech Connect

    Richard N. WRight

    2005-08-01

    A system to test aging and environmental effects in flowing helium with impurity content representative of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) has been designed and assembled. The system will be used to expose microstructure analysis coupons and mechanical test specimens for up to 5,000 hours in helium containing potentially oxidizing or carburizing impurities controlled to parts per million levels. Impurity levels in the flowing helium are controlled through a feedback mechanism based on gas chromatography measurements of the gas chemistry at the inlet and exit from a high temperature retort containing the test materials. Initial testing will focus on determining the nature and extent of combined aging and environmental effects on microstructure and elevated temperature mechanical properties of alloys proposed for structural applications in the NGNP, including Inconel 617 and Haynes 230.

  14. Material Data Representation of Hysteresis Loops for Hastelloy X Using Artificial Neural Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alam, Javed; Berke, Laszlo; Murthy, Pappu L. N.

    1993-01-01

    The artificial neural network (ANN) model proposed by Rumelhart, Hinton, and Williams is applied to develop a functional approximation of material data in the form of hysteresis loops from a nickel-base superalloy, Hastelloy X. Several different ANN configurations are used to model hysteresis loops at different cycles for this alloy. The ANN models were successful in reproducing the hysteresis loops used for its training. However, because of sharp bends at the two ends of hysteresis loops, a drift occurs at the corners of the loops where loading changes to unloading and vice versa (the sharp bends occurred when the stress-strain curves were reproduced by adding stress increments to the preceding values of the stresses). Therefore, it is possible only to reproduce half of the loading path. The generalization capability of the network was tested by using additional data for two other hysteresis loops at different cycles. The results were in good agreement. Also, the use of ANN led to a data compression ratio of approximately 22:1.

  15. Corrosion- and irradiation-induced porosity changes of a nuclear graphitic material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoinkis, E.; Eatherly, W. P.; Krautwasser, P.; Robens, E.

    1986-11-01

    In pristine specimens of a nuclear grade graphitic material the volume of accessible pores with diameters <0.1 μm is much smaller (0.9 mm 3 g -1) than the total accessible pore volume (82 mm 3 g -1) but the former increased with corrosion much more than the latter (36 and 160 mm 3 g -1, respectively, at a burn-off = 5 wt%). The specimens were oxidized by CO 2 at 900°C. Independent of burn-off the most frequent pore diameter is ˜2 nm, as was determined from N 2 adsorption isotherms at 77 K. Corrosion leads also to a pronounced increase in pores in the range 2-5 nm and in the apparent BET surface area from 0.6 m 2 g -1 (pristine) to 39 m 2 g -1 (burn-off = 5 wt%). The analysis of small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) curves revealed that at the beginning of corrosion the existing 1 nm pores are enlarged. Additional micropores are developed with further burn-off. A neutron fluence of 5 × 10m 21 cm -2 EDN (equivalent to about 7 dpa) at 950°C caused a marked increase in the volume of pores with 2.5 nm diameter. From a comparison of the SAXS results with the data obtained by xylene impregnation and N 2 adsorption it was concluded that most of the pores generated by irradiation are accessible to gases.

  16. Engineered materials characterization report, volume 3 - corrosion data and modeling update for viability assessments

    SciTech Connect

    McCright, R D

    1998-06-30

    This Engineered Materials Characterization Report (EMCR), Volume 3, discusses in considerable detail the work of the past 18 months on testing the candidate materials proposed for the waste-package (WP) container and on modeling the performance of those materials in the Yucca Mountain (YM) repository setting This report was prepared as an update of information and serves as one of the supporting documents to the Viability Assessment (VA) of the Yucca Mountain Project. Previous versions of the EMCR have provided a history and background of container-materials selection and evaluation (Volume I), a compilation of physical and mechanical properties for the WP design effort (Volume 2), and corrosion-test data and performance-modeling activities (Volume 3). Because the information in Volumes 1 and 2 is still largely current, those volumes are not being revised. As new information becomes available in the testing and modeling efforts, Volume 3 is periodically updated to include that information.

  17. Stress Corrosion Cracking of Ferritic Materials for Fossil Power Generation Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Pawel, Steven J; Siefert, John A.

    2014-01-01

    Creep strength enhanced ferritic (CSEF) steels Grades 23, 24, 91, and 92 have been widely implemented in the fossil fired industry for over two decades. The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of these materials with respect to mainstay Cr-Mo steels (such as Grades 11, 12 and 22) has not been properly assessed, particularly in consideration of recent reported issues of SCC in CSEF steels. This report details the results of Jones test exposures of a wide range of materials (Grades 11, 22, 23, 24, and 92), material conditions (as-received, improper heat treatments, normalized, weldments) and environments (salt fog; tube cleaning environments including decreasing, scale removal, and passivation; and high temperature water) to compare the susceptibility to cracking of these steels. In the as-received (normalized and tempered) condition, none of these materials are susceptible to SCC in the environments examined. However, in the hardened condition, certain combinations of environment and alloy reveal substantial SCC susceptibility.

  18. Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) Based Corrosion Monitoring Sensors. Part 2: Application and Testing of the Coating Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-22

    3837, Houston, Texas , USA, March 13-17, 2011. [4] Y. Wang, K. J. Loh, J. P. Lynch and K. H. Law: Proc. “The International Conference on Smart ...Radio frequency identification (RFID) based corrosion monitoring sensors : Part II Application and testing of the coating materials Youliang He1...email: yohe@nrcan.gc.ca Keywords: Corrosion monitoring; Wireless sensor ; RFID; Electromagnetic interference; Coating. Abstract Cost-effective

  19. Effect of Pressure on the Corrosion of Materials in High Temperature Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, W.; Woo, O. T.; Guzonas, D.; Li, J.; Huang, X.; Sanchez, R.; Bibby, C. D.

    One of the major challenges for the Canadian Gen IV Super-Critical Water-cooled Reactor (SCWR) concept is the selection of fuel cladding materials. The Canadian SCWR concept will operate at a core outlet temperature of 625 °C and 25 MPa of pressure with peak cladding temperature reaching as high as 800 °C. Corrosion resistance is an important factor for material selection. Austenitic stainless steels that contain Cr contents greater than 18 wt.% are generally considered to provide adequate corrosion resistance. In this work, the pressure dependence of the corrosion of austenitic stainless steel 310 containing 24 wt% Cr is assessed at 625 °C for exposures of 1000 hours to evaluate the suitability of superheated steam as a surrogate for supercritical water at 25 MPa. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) revealed that 310 exposed to different pressure conditions at 625 °C. (i.e., 0.1, 8 and 29 MPa) had generally the same type of the oxide structure, i.e., a Cr-rich oxide with the spinel structure on outer surface adjacent to the water phase. The material exposed at 8 and 29 MPa had a double layer oxide structure, with the outer oxide layer having a much larger grain size, while the samples exposed at 0.1 MPa showed only a single spinel-phase oxide layer. Cr-depleted recrystallized austenite grains were found underneath the spinel phase oxide. The adjacent large-grained austenite substrate had M23C6 carbides in the grain interior. The implications of these results are discussed.

  20. Corrosion and corrosion prevention in gas turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mom, A. J. A.; Kolkman, H. J.

    1985-01-01

    The conditions governing the corrosion behavior in gas turbines are surveyed. Factors such as temperature, relative humidity, the presence of sulfur and nitrogen dioxide, and fuel quality are discussed. Electromechanical corrosion at relatively low temperature in compressors; oxidation; and hot corrosion (sulfidation) at high temperature in turbines are considered. Corrosion prevention by washing and rinsing, fueld additives, and corrosion resistant materials and coatings are reviewed.

  1. Corrosion on Fatigue and Fatigue Crack Growth in Aircraft Structural Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-06-01

    fatigue initiated by stress corrosion cracking and thus is not directly relevant o this work except that conceptually iL has similarities. The other paper...34 Corrosion Fatigue Initiated by Stress Corrosion Cracking ", personal coi’iuni cation. 12. II. Kitagaw,.:a, T. Fugita, K. Miyazawa, "Sniall Randomly...a result, extensive research on corrosion fatigue has led to the traditional model which superimposes the stress corrosion cracking phenomenon upon

  2. On the corrosion and soiling effects on materials by air pollution in Athens, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzanis, C.; Varotsos, C.; Christodoulakis, J.; Tidblad, J.; Ferm, M.; Ionescu, A.; Lefevre, R.-A.; Theodorakopoulou, K.; Kreislova, K.

    2011-12-01

    In the frame of the European project, entitled MULTI-ASSESS, specimens of structural metals, glass, stone and concrete materials were exposed to air pollution at a station, which was installed for this purpose on a building, located in the centre of Athens. The main purpose of this project was to determine the corrosion and soiling effects of air pollution on materials. A set of the specimens was exposed in a position that was sheltered from rain and partly from wind, and another set was exposed in unsheltered positions on the roof of the above said building. In addition, other specimens were exposed at different heights on the same building, in order to investigate for the first time the corrosion and soiling effects on various materials as a function of height. For the determination of these effects, chemical analysis of the specimens was performed and basic parameters as the weight change, the layer thickness and the optical properties were calculated. Finally, the results obtained are discussed and their plausible interpretation is attempted.

  3. On the corrosion and soiling effects on materials by air pollution in Athens, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzanis, C.; Varotsos, C.; Christodoulakis, J.; Tidblad, J.; Ferm, M.; Ionescu, A.; Lefevre, R.-A.; Theodorakopoulou, K.; Kreislova, K.

    2010-12-01

    In the frame of the European project, entitled MULTI-ASSESS, specimens of structural metals, glass, stone and concrete materials were exposed to air pollution at a station, which was installed for this purpose on a building, located in the centre of Athens. The main purpose of this project was to determine the corrosion and soiling effects of air pollution on materials. A set of the specimens was exposed in a position that was sheltered from rain and partly from wind, and another set was exposed in unsheltered positions on the roof of the above said building. In addition, other specimens were exposed at different heights on the same building, in order to investigate for the first time the corrosion and soiling effects on various materials as a function of height. For the determination of these effects, chemical analysis of the specimens was performed and basic parameters as the weight change, the layer thickness and the optical properties were calculated. Finally, the results obtained are discussed and their plausible interpretation is attempted.

  4. Stability and corrosion testing of a high temperature phase change material for CSP applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ming; Bell, Stuart; Tay, Steven; Will, Geoffrey; Saman, Wasim; Bruno, Frank

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents the stability and corrosion testing results of a candidate high temperature phase change material (PCM) for potential use in concentrating solar power applications. The investigated PCM is a eutectic mixture of NaCl and Na2CO3 and both are low cost materials. This PCM has a melting temperature of 635 °C and a relatively high latent heat of fusion of 308.1 J/g. The testing was performed by means of an electric furnace subjected to 150 melt-freeze cycles between 600 °C and 650 °C. The results showed that this PCM candidate has no obvious decomposition up to 650 °C after 150 cycles and stainless steel 316 potentially can be used as the containment material under the minimized oxygen atmosphere.

  5. Measurable and Influential Parameters That Influence Corrosion Performance Differences between Multiwall Carbon Nanotube Coating Material Combinations and Model Parent Material Combinations Derived from Epoxy-Amine Matrix Materials.

    PubMed

    Curtzwiler, Greg W; Williams, Eric B; Maples, Austin L; Wand, Steven W; Rawlins, James W

    2017-02-22

    Protective coatings are often erroneously thought of as perfect environmental barriers for metal substrates; however, a host of corrosion inducing environmental contaminants permeate through defect-free coatings. Carbon nanotubes are high aspect ratio nanofillers with unique mechanical, electrical, and polymer interaction properties with well-established yet, for practical reasons, often unrealized potential. The research objective was to quantify and understand the influential effects and relationships between low concentration levels of multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) dispersed into epoxy-amine matrix materials and the different water hydrogen bonding interactions on corrosion rates of steel substrates. We hypothesize that when water directly hydrogen bonds with polymer, substrate and/or MWCNTS, the localized water's capacity to transfer environmental contaminants through the coating, i.e., to and from the substrate, diminishes due to a reduced potential to contribute to the formation of water hydration shells and therefore aid in diminishing the corrosion rate. We measured the absolute pre-exposure water content, and monitored to delineate between the ratio and shifting ratio of in situ free versus bound water hydrogen bonding interactions at the coating/air interface using ATR-FTIR spectroscopy in a 5% NaCl fog environment in an attempt to correlate these differences with experimental corrosion rates. Free water content was reduced from ∼20% to <1% of the total water concentration when 1.0 wt % MWCNTs was dispersed into the parent polymer network. Concurrently, the bound water content was measured to shift from ∼2% to >80% with the same MWCNT concentration. The MWCNT bound water resulted in 25% less corrosion for the same steel substrates albeit the measured water vapor diffusivity was the same for each material combination evaluated. Interestingly, the measured pre-exposure bound water content was predictive of which material would corrode slowest and

  6. Study of materials to resist corrosion in condensing gas-fired furnaces. Final report Oct 79-Dec 81

    SciTech Connect

    Lahtvee, T.; Schaus, O.O.

    1982-02-01

    Based on a thorough review of background information on the performance of materials in condensing gas-fired heat exchangers and similar corrosive environments, candidate materials were examined on test equipment built to provide the varying corrosive conditions encountered in actual gas-fired condensing system heat exchangers. The 32 different materials tested in a one month screening test included: mild, low alloy, galvanized, solder coated steel, porcelain, epoxy, teflon and nylon coated and alonized mild steel; austenitic, ferritic, low interstitial Ti stabilized ferritic, and high alloy stainless steels; aluminum alloys, anodized and porcelain coated aluminum; copper and cupronickel alloys, solder coated copper; and titanium.

  7. Corrosion and environmental-mechanical characterization of iron-base nuclear waste package structural barrier materials. Annual report, FY 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Westerman, R.E.; Haberman, J.H.; Pitman, S.G.; Pulsipher, B.A.; Sigalla, L.A.

    1986-03-01

    Disposal of high-level nuclear waste in deep underground repositories may require the development of waste packages that will keep the radioisotopes contained for up to 1000 y. A number of iron-base materials are being considered for the structural barrier members of waste packages. Their uniform and nonuniform (pitting and intergranular) corrosion behavior and their resistance to stress-corrosion cracking in aqueous environments relevant to salt media are under study at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The purpose of the work is to provide data for a materials degradation model that can ultimately be used to predict the effective lifetime of a waste package overpack in the actual repository environment. The corrosion behavior of the candidate materials was investigated in simulated intrusion brine (essentially NaCl) in flowing autoclave tests at 150/sup 0/C, and in combinations of intrusion/inclusion (high-Mg) brine environments in moist salt tests, also at 150/sup 0/C. Studies utilizing a /sup 60/Co irradiation facility were performed to determine the corrosion resistance of the candidate materials to products of brine radiolysis at dose rates of 2 x 10/sup 3/ and 1 x 10/sup 5/ rad/h and a temperature of 150/sup 0/C. These irradiation-corrosion tests were ''overtests,'' as the irradiation intensities employed were 10 to 1000 times as high as those expected at the surface of a thick-walled waste package. With the exception of the high general corrosion rates found in the tests using moist salt containing high-Mg brines, the ferrous materials exhibited a degree of corrosion resistance that indicates a potentially satisfactory application to waste package structural barrier members in a salt repository environment.

  8. Formation of Al2O3/FeAl coatings on a 9Cr-1Mo steel, and corrosion evaluation in flowing Pb-17Li loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majumdar, Sanjib; Paul, Bhaskar; Chakraborty, Poulami; Kishor, Jugal; Kain, Vivekanand; Dey, Gautam Kumar

    2017-04-01

    Iron aluminide coating layers were formed on a ferritic martensitic grade 9Cr-1Mo (P 91) steel using pack aluminizing process. The formation of different aluminide compositions such as orthorhombic-Fe2Al5, B2-FeAl and A2-Fe(Al) on the pack chemistry and heat treatment conditions have been established. About 4-6 μm thick Al2O3 scale was formed on the FeAl phase by controlled heat treatment. The corrosion tests were conducted using both the FeAl and Al2O3/FeAl coated specimens in an electro-magnetic pump driven Pb-17Li Loop at 500 °C for 5000 h maintaining a flow velocity of 1.5 m/s. The detailed characterization studies using scanning electron microscopy, back-scattered electron imaging and energy dispersive spectrometry revealed no deterioration of the coating layers after the corrosion tests. Self-healing oxides were formed at the cracks generated in the aluminide layers during thermal cycling and protected the base alloy (steel) from any kind of elemental dissolution or microstructural degradation.

  9. Measurement of elastic resisting forces of intraocular haptic loops of varying geometrical designs and material composition.

    PubMed

    Guthoff, R; Abramo, F; Draeger, J; Chumbley, L

    1990-09-01

    The relationship between experimentally induced intraocular lens (IOL) haptic deformation and resulting elastic haptic counter-resisting forces measured by electronic dynamometry was examined for 34 different IOL haptics of varying material composition and geometrical designs. Poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and polypropylene loops of similar geometry did not fundamentally differ from one another, although lenses of differing geometry behaved differently. Unlike PMMA and polypropylene loops, soft haptics of poly-HEMA and silicone rubber demonstrated a larger elastic resistance force to the same degree of deformation. This was based upon design characteristics of the lenses and not upon intrinsic properties of the materials, which would have produced the opposite result. By comparative analysis of these dynamometer measurements and considerations of the lens design and elastic properties (including memory) of the component materials, we can calculate the stresses upon the zonular and capsular bag structures during and after IOL implantation.

  10. Corrosion Behavior and Strength of Dissimilar Bonding Material between Ti and Mg Alloys Fabricated by Spark Plasma Sintering

    PubMed Central

    Pripanapong, Patchara; Kariya, Shota; Luangvaranunt, Tachai; Umeda, Junko; Tsutsumi, Seiichiro; Takahashi, Makoto; Kondoh, Katsuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Ti and solution treated Mg alloys such as AZ31B (ST), AZ61 (ST), AZ80 (ST) and AZ91 (ST) were successfully bonded at 475 °C by spark plasma sintering, which is a promising new method in welding field. The formation of Ti3Al intermetallic compound was found to be an important factor in controlling the bonding strength and galvanic corrosion resistance of dissimilar materials. The maximum bonding strength and bonding efficiency at 193 MPa and 96% were obtained from Ti/AZ91 (ST), in which a thick and uniform nano-level Ti3Al layer was observed. This sample also shows the highest galvanic corrosion resistance with a measured galvanic width and depth of 281 and 19 µm, respectively. The corrosion resistance of the matrix on Mg alloy side was controlled by its Al content. AZ91 (ST) exhibited the highest corrosion resistance considered from its corrode surface after corrosion test in Kroll’s etchant. The effect of Al content in Mg alloy on bonding strength and corrosion behavior of Ti/Mg alloy (ST) dissimilar materials is discussed in this work. PMID:28773788

  11. Crack Initiation Life of Materials Under Combined Pitting Corrosion and Cyclic Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sriraman, M. R.; Pidaparti, R. M.

    2010-02-01

    Pitting corrosion triggered damage is responsible for the degradation of many metallic materials affecting structural integrity. As pitting and crack initiation processes govern the overall life of such structures and components, particularly at nominal cyclic stresses, there is a need to develop simple models to estimate crack initiation life of materials. This paper presents a simple deterministic model that considers the effect of cyclic stressing under pitting corrosion conditions. The developed model is validated on an aluminum alloy 2024-T3, and 12% Cr stainless steel used in aircraft and steam turbines, respectively. The predicted critical pit depth values are in fair agreement with the limited experimental data available in the literature. The model indicates that at high stresses, the crack initiation can occur very rapidly even from relatively small pits. The crack initiation life predictions when compared with the available experimental data, suggest a probable stress-level dependency with regard to the form and extent of the influence of cyclic stresses on pit growth and subsequent crack formation.

  12. Corrosion sensor

    DOEpatents

    Glass, R.S.; Clarke, W.L. Jr.; Ciarlo, D.R.

    1994-04-26

    A corrosion sensor array is described incorporating individual elements for measuring various elements and ions, such as chloride, sulfide, copper, hydrogen (pH), etc. and elements for evaluating the instantaneous corrosion properties of structural materials. The exact combination and number of elements measured or monitored would depend upon the environmental conditions and materials used which are subject to corrosive effects. Such a corrosion monitoring system embedded in or mounted on a structure exposed to the environment would serve as an early warning system for the onset of severe corrosion problems for the structure, thus providing a safety factor as well as economic factors. The sensor array is accessed to an electronics/computational system, which provides a means for data collection and analysis. 7 figures.

  13. Corrosion sensor

    DOEpatents

    Glass, Robert S.; Clarke, Jr., Willis L.; Ciarlo, Dino R.

    1994-01-01

    A corrosion sensor array incorporating individual elements for measuring various elements and ions, such as chloride, sulfide, copper, hydrogen (pH), etc. and elements for evaluating the instantaneous corrosion properties of structural materials. The exact combination and number of elements measured or monitored would depend upon the environmental conditions and materials used which are subject to corrosive effects. Such a corrosion monitoring system embedded in or mounted on a structure exposed to the environment would serve as an early warning system for the onset of severe corrosion problems for the structure, thus providing a safety factor as well as economic factors. The sensor array is accessed to an electronics/computational system, which provides a means for data collection and analysis.

  14. On the origin of dislocation loops in irradiated materials: A point of view from silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claverie, Alain; Cherkashin, Nikolay

    2016-05-01

    Numerous dislocation loops are often observed in irradiated and nuclear materials, affecting many physical properties. The understanding of their origin and of their growth mechanism remains unclear rendering all modeling efforts elusive. In this paper, we remind the knowledge which has been gained during the last 20 years on the formation and growth of extrinsic dislocations loops in irradiated/implanted silicon. From the compilation of a large number of experimental results, a unified picture describing the thermal evolution of interstitial defects, from the di-interstitial stable at room temperature, to ;magic-size; clusters then to rod-like defects and finally to large dislocation loops of two types has emerged. All these defects grow by Ostwald ripening, i.e. by interchanging the interstitial atoms they are composed of, and transform from one to the other driven by the resulting reduction of the defect formation energy. A model has been proposed and is now integrated into process simulators which quantitatively describes the thermal evolution of all these defects, based on pertinent formation energies. The influence of the proximity of free surfaces or other recombining interfaces can be integrated, allowing simulating the possible dissolution of defects. It is suggested that, beyond silicon, the same type of scenario may take place in many materials. Dislocation loops are just one, easily detectable among many, type of defects which forms during the growth of self-interstitials. They do not nucleate but result from the growth and transformation of smaller defects.

  15. Experimental investigation of solid by-product as sensible heat storage material: Characterization and corrosion study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega-Fernández, Iñigo; Faik, Abdessamad; Mani, Karthik; Rodriguez-Aseguinolaza, Javier; D'Aguanno, Bruno

    2016-05-01

    The experimental investigation of water cooled electrical arc furnace (EAF) slag used as filler material in the storage tank for sensible heat storage application was demonstrated in this study. The physicochemical and thermal properties of the tested slags were characterized by using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microcopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and laser flash analysis, respectively. In addition, the chemical compatibility between slags and molten nitrate salt (60 wt. % NaNO3 and 40 wt. % KNO3) was investigated at 565 °C for 500 hrs. The obtained results were clearly demonstrated that the slags showed a good corrosion resistance in direct contact with molten salt at elevated temperature. The present study was clearly indicated that a low-cost filler material used in the storage tank can significantly reduce the overall required quantities of the relatively higher cost molten salt and consequently reduce the overall cost of the electricity production.

  16. Energy and environmental research emphasizing low-rank coal: Task 6.1. Corrosion of advanced structural materials

    SciTech Connect

    Nowok, J.W.; Strobel, T.M.; Bieber, J.A.; Hurley, J.P.

    1995-04-01

    In order to increase national energy self-sufficiency for the near future, energy systems will be required to fire low-grade fuels and use more efficient energy cycles than those available today. The steam cycle used at present is limited to a maximum steam temperature of 550{degrees}C and thus a conversion efficiency of 35%. To boost efficiency significantly, much higher working fluid temperatures are required, compelling subsystems to operate at much higher temperatures and, therefore, in much more corrosive environments than those currently used. Problems of special concern are corrosion and fatigue of direct-fired turbine blades, corrosion and blinding of hot-gas cleanup filters, catastrophic failure of high-temperature heat exchangers, and spalling and dissolution of refractory materials. The extreme conditions will require the use of advanced structural materials such as high-temperature ceramics for the construction of the subsystems. Unfortunately, little is known of the performance of these materials in actual coal combustion environments. Although some corrosion testing has been performed in the past, most has been done by groups experimenting with ash or slag stimulants composed of only one or two simple compounds. For this project performed at the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC), actual coal ash and slag will be used in simulated combustion conditions so that more realistic determinations of the mechanisms of corrosion can be made. The work includes three main research areas focusing on two fossil energy subsystems: high-temperature heat exchangers and hot-gas cleanup filters. The first area involves developing existing abilities in thermodynamic equilibrium calculations to determine the most appropriate corroding agents to include in the tests; the second area involves coal slag corrosion of high temperature heat exchangers; and the third, lower-temperature ash and gas corrosion hot-gas cleanup filters.

  17. High temperature corrosion of advanced ceramic materials for hot gas filters. Topical report for part 1 of high temperature corrosion of advanced ceramic materials for hot gas filters and heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Spear, K.E.; Crossland, C.E.; Shelleman, D.L.; Tressler, R.E.

    1997-12-11

    This program consists of two separate research areas. Part 1, for which this report is written, studied the high temperature corrosion of advanced ceramic hot gas filters, while Part 2 studied the long-term durability of ceramic heat exchangers to coal combustion environments. The objectives of Part 1 were to select two candidate ceramic filter materials for flow-through hot corrosion studies and subsequent corrosion and mechanical properties characterization. In addition, a thermodynamic database was developed so that thermochemical modeling studies could be performed to simulate operating conditions of laboratory reactors and existing coal combustion power plants, and to predict the reactions of new filter materials with coal combustion environments. The latter would make it possible to gain insight into problems that could develop during actual operation of filters in coal combustion power plants so that potential problems could be addressed before they arise.

  18. Evaluation of Corrosion of Aluminum Based Reactor Fuel Cladding Materials During Dry Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Peacock, H.B. Jr.

    1999-10-21

    This report provides an evaluation of the corrosion behavior of aluminum cladding alloys and aluminum-uranium alloys at conditions relevant to dry storage. The details of the corrosion program are described and the results to date are discussed.

  19. Engineering Analysis of Intermediate Loop and Process Heat Exchanger Requirements to Include Configuration Analysis and Materials Needs

    SciTech Connect

    T.M. Lillo; R.L. Williamson; T.R. Reed; C.B. Davis; D.M. Ginosar

    2005-09-01

    The need to locate advanced hydrogen production facilities a finite distance away from a nuclear power source necessitates the need for an intermediate heat transport loop (IHTL). This IHTL must not only efficiently transport energy over distances up to 500 meters but must also be capable of operating at high temperatures (>850oC) for many years. High temperature, long term operation raises concerns of material strength, creep resistance and general material stability (corrosion resistance). IHTL design is currently in the initial stages. Many questions remain to be answered before intelligent design can begin. The report begins to look at some of the issues surrounding the main components of an IHTL. Specifically, a stress analysis of a compact heat exchanger design under expected operating conditions is reported. Also the results of a thermal analysis performed on two ITHL pipe configurations for different heat transport fluids are presented. The configurations consist of separate hot supply and cold return legs as well as annular design in which the hot fluid is carried in an inner pipe and the cold return fluids travels in the opposite direction in the annular space around the hot pipe. The effects of insulation configurations on pipe configuration performance are also reported. Finally, a simple analysis of two different process heat exchanger designs, one a tube in shell type and the other a compact or microchannel reactor are evaluated in light of catalyst requirements. Important insights into the critical areas of research and development are gained from these analyses, guiding the direction of future areas of research.

  20. Material transport via the emission of shear loops during void growth: A molecular dynamics study

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Yi; Chen, Zengtao

    2016-06-14

    The growth of a nanovoid in single-crystal copper has been studied via molecular dynamics (MD) method. The objective is to build the correlation between material transport pattern and dislocation structures. MD results are examined by characterizing the material transport via the “relative displacement” of atoms, where the homogenous elastic deformation has been excluded. Through this novel approach, we are able to illustrate the feasibility of void growth induced by shear loops/curves. At a smaller scale, the formation and emission of shear loops/curves contribute to the local mass transport. At a larger scale, a new mechanism of void growth via frustum-like dislocation structure is revealed. A phenomenological description of void growth via frustum-like dislocation structure is also proposed.

  1. Corrosion resistance and behavior of construction materials exposed to dilute sulfuric acid at elevated temperatures under static conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, D.T.

    1994-10-01

    Laboratory investigation has been undertaken to determine the electrochemical behavior and corrosion resistance of various construction materials in a simulated hydrolysis environment (5 wt % sulfuric acid) at temperatures ranging from 90 to 220C. Tests were performed in an autoclave-type electrochemical cell. The corrosion behavior of the test materials was determined using computer-controlled DC potentiodynamic polarization. Corrosion rates of the test materials were determined using AC impedance techniques. Among the stainless steels tested, only alloy N08026 (Carpenter 20Mo-6) performed satisfactory up to a temperature of 100C. The alloy passivated spontaneously in the environment and corroded at a rate of less than 2 mpy. None of the stainless steels tested could be used at 120{degrees}C or above. A number of nickel-based alloys tested had good corrosion resistance up to 100C, but their corrosion rate exceeded 2 mpy at higher temperatures. Zirconium alloys were satisfactory up to 180C. Only tantalum and a tantalum-niobium alloy were satisfactory up to 220C.

  2. Corrosion aspects of Ni-Cr-Fe based and Ni-Cu based steam generator tube materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, R. S.

    2009-09-01

    This paper reviews corrosion related issues of Ni-Cr-Fe based (in a general sense) and Ni-Cu based steam generator tube materials for nuclear power plants those have been dealt with for last more than four decades along with some updated information on corrosion research. The materials include austenitic stainless steels (SSs), Alloy 600, Monel 400, Alloy 800 and Alloy 690. Compatibility related issues of these alloys are briefly discussed along with the alloy chemistry and microstructure. For austenitic SSs, stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behaviour in high temperature aqueous environments is discussed. For Alloy 600, intergranular cracking in high temperature water including hydrogen-induced intergranular cracking is highlighted along with the interactions of material in various environments. In case of Monel 400, intergranular corrosion and pitting corrosion at ambient temperature and SCC behaviour at elevated temperature are briefly described. For Alloy 800, the discussion covers SCC behaviour, surface characterization and microstructural aspects of pitting, whereas hydrogen-related issues are also highlighted for Alloy 690.

  3. Materials Characterization Center state-of-the-art report on corrosion data pertaining to metallic barriers for nuclear-waste repositories

    SciTech Connect

    Merz, M.D.

    1982-10-01

    A compilation of published corrosion data on metals that have been suggested as canisters and overpack materials is presented. The data were categorized according to the solutions used in testing and divided into two parts: high-ionic strength solutions (such as seawater and brine) and low-ionic-strength waters (such as basalt and tuff waters). This distinction was made primarily because of the general difference in aggressiveness of these solutions with respect to general corrosion. A considerable amount of data indicated that titanium alloys have acceptably low uniform corrosion rates in anticipated repository sites; the other possible corrosion failure modes for titanium alloys, such as stress corrosion cracking and delayed failure due to hydrogen, have not been sufficiently studied to make any similar conclusions about lifetime with respect to these particular degradation processes. Other data suggested that iron-base alloys are sufficiently resistant to corrosion in basalt and tuff waters, although the effects of radiation and radiation combined with elevated temperature have not been reported in enough detail to conclusively qualify iron-base alloys for any particular barrier thickness in regard to uniform corrosion rate. The effect of overpack size on corrosion rate has been given little attention. A review of long-term underground data indicated that temperature and accessibility to oxygen were too different for deep geologic repositories to make the underground corrosion data directly applicable. However, the characteristics of corrosion attack, statistical treatment of data, and kinetics of corrosion showed that corrosion proceeds in a systematic and predictable way.

  4. Surface Chemistry and Structural Effects in the Stress Corrosion of Glass and Ceramic Materials.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-03-31

    stress corrosion susceptibility, chemical effects during crack growth and the static fatigue limit. After a general discussion of chemical effects in...106 * CHAPTER V. Stress Corrosion of Sodium-Aluminosilicate Glasses: A Comparison of Small and Large Cracks ............. 123... crack growth behavior. It leads naturally to the conclusion that the composition dependence of the stress corrosion susceptibility is due to

  5. Effect of Pressures on the Corrosion Behaviours of Materials at 625°C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, W.; Huang, X.; Li, J.; Woo, O. T.; Sanchez, R.; Bibby, C. D.

    2017-02-01

    The corrosion behaviors of austenitic stainless steels (SS) 310, 304 and Ni- and Fe-based A-286 exposed to 0.1 MPa, 8 MPa and 29 MPa at 625°C for 1000 h were investigated. These represent exposure to superheated steam, subcritical and supercritical water (SCW) at 625°C, respectively. As SS 310 showed the smallest weight change, the oxide cross-sections made from 310 samples were examined by transmission electron microscopy. The results revealed a single-layer oxide at 0.1 MPa and dual-layer oxides at 8 MPa and 29 MPa, followed by a Cr-depleted region into the austenite substrate. The compositions of the inner oxides at 8 MPa and 29 MPa are Cr-rich and largely similar to those of the single-layer oxides at 0.1 MPa exposure. These results suggest that corrosion testing in superheated steam may be a suitable surrogate for scoping tests of materials under SCW conditions at >650°C.

  6. Effect of Pressures on the Corrosion Behaviours of Materials at 625°C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, W.; Huang, X.; Li, J.; Woo, O. T.; Sanchez, R.; Bibby, C. D.

    2016-11-01

    The corrosion behaviors of austenitic stainless steels (SS) 310, 304 and Ni- and Fe-based A-286 exposed to 0.1 MPa, 8 MPa and 29 MPa at 625°C for 1000 h were investigated. These represent exposure to superheated steam, subcritical and supercritical water (SCW) at 625°C, respectively. As SS 310 showed the smallest weight change, the oxide cross-sections made from 310 samples were examined by transmission electron microscopy. The results revealed a single-layer oxide at 0.1 MPa and dual-layer oxides at 8 MPa and 29 MPa, followed by a Cr-depleted region into the austenite substrate. The compositions of the inner oxides at 8 MPa and 29 MPa are Cr-rich and largely similar to those of the single-layer oxides at 0.1 MPa exposure. These results suggest that corrosion testing in superheated steam may be a suitable surrogate for scoping tests of materials under SCW conditions at >650°C.

  7. Selection of corrosion-resistant materials for use in molten nitrate salts

    SciTech Connect

    Tortorelli, P.F.; Bishop, P.S.; DiStefano, J.R.

    1989-10-01

    Investigations of the corrosion of various metals, alloys, and ceramics in high-temperature nitrate salt melts revealed that relatively few materials have acceptable compatibility in a 650{degrees}C, NaNO{sub 3}(-KNO{sub 3})-Na{sub 2}O{sub 2} environment that was chemically characteristic of the MOLTOX{trademark} chemical air separation process. Corrosion in these systems was controlled by the stabilities of the salt and solid-state surface oxides (whether they were ore-existing or formed upon exposure), the salt's oxide ion activity (strongly influenced by Na{sub 2}O{sub 2} additions), and the physical condition of the solid surfaces. In general, refractory/reactive metals and alloys (with the exception of zirconium and hafnium), cobalt, nickel, NiMo, TiAl, austenitic steel, and Ni-Cr-Fe alloys were found to corrode quite readily because of rapid oxidation and/or dissolution in the salt. 22 refs., 29 figs., 5 tabs.

  8. Characteristics of iron corrosion scales and water quality variations in drinking water distribution systems of different pipe materials.

    PubMed

    Li, Manjie; Liu, Zhaowei; Chen, Yongcan; Hai, Yang

    2016-12-01

    Interaction between old, corroded iron pipe surfaces and bulk water is crucial to the water quality protection in drinking water distribution systems (WDS). Iron released from corrosion products will deteriorate water quality and lead to red water. This study attempted to understand the effects of pipe materials on corrosion scale characteristics and water quality variations in WDS. A more than 20-year-old hybrid pipe section assembled of unlined cast iron pipe (UCIP) and galvanized iron pipe (GIP) was selected to investigate physico-chemical characteristics of corrosion scales and their effects on water quality variations. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS), Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) and X-ray Diffraction (XRD) were used to analyze micromorphology and chemical composition of corrosion scales. In bench testing, water quality parameters, such as pH, dissolved oxygen (DO), oxidation reduction potential (ORP), alkalinity, conductivity, turbidity, color, Fe(2+), Fe(3+) and Zn(2+), were determined. Scale analysis and bench-scale testing results demonstrated a significant effect of pipe materials on scale characteristics and thereby water quality variations in WDS. Characteristics of corrosion scales sampled from different pipe segments show obvious differences, both in physical and chemical aspects. Corrosion scales were found highly amorphous. Thanks to the protection of zinc coatings, GIP system was identified as the best water quality stability, in spite of high zinc release potential. It is deduced that the complicated composition of corrosion scales and structural break by the weld result in the diminished water quality stability in HP system. Measurement results showed that iron is released mainly in ferric particulate form.

  9. Yucca Mountain project canister material corrosion studies as applied to the electrometallurgical treatment metallic waste form

    SciTech Connect

    Keiser, D.D.

    1996-11-01

    Yucca Mountain, Nevada is currently being evaluated as a potential site for a geologic repository. As part of the repository assessment activities, candidate materials are being tested for possible use as construction materials for waste package containers. A large portion of this testing effort is focused on determining the long range corrosion properties, in a Yucca Mountain environment, for those materials being considered. Along similar lines, Argonne National Laboratory is testing a metallic alloy waste form that also is scheduled for disposal in a geologic repository, like Yucca Mountain. Due to the fact that Argonne`s waste form will require performance testing for an environment similar to what Yucca Mountain canister materials will require, this report was constructed to focus on the types of tests that have been conducted on candidate Yucca Mountain canister materials along with some of the results from these tests. Additionally, this report will discuss testing of Argonne`s metal waste form in light of the Yucca Mountain activities.

  10. Investigating inhibition of microbes inducing microbiologically-influenced-corrosion by Tectona grandis based Fe-nanoparticle material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okeniyi, Joshua Olusegun; Omotosho, Olugbenga Adeshola; Inyang, Michael Anietie; Okeniyi, Elizabeth Toyin; Nwaokorie, Ikechi Thaddeus; Adidi, Emmanuel Amanogho; Owoeye, Taiwo Felicia; Nwakudu, Kelechukwu Chinedu; Akinlabu, Deborah Kehinde; Gabriel, Olanrewaju Oyewale; Taiwo, Olugbenga Samson; Awotoye, Olufisayo Adebola

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, inhibition of microbes inducing microbiologically-influenced-corrosion (MIC) of metals by Tectona grandis based Fe (iron) Nanoparticle material was investigated. For this, extract was obtained from the leaf of Tectona grandis and this was employed as precursor for synthesizing the Fe-nanoparticle material. From this, the synthesized plant extract based nanoparticle material was characterized using scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM+EDS) instrument. The developed Fe bio-nanoparticle material was then employed for sensitivity and/or resistance study application against different strains of microbes that are known to induce microbiologically-influenced-corrosion, in metallic materials, and for this, microbial growth inhibition effect was compared with that from a commercial antibiotic employed as control. Results showed that the Tectona grandis based Fe-nanoparticle exhibited good inhibition effects on the growth of many of the MIC inducing microbes investigated. Sensitivity measures of zone of inhibition against the growth of MIC inducing microbial strains either outperformed or compares well with that obtained from the commercial antibiotic control, in the study. These results indicate positive prospect on the suitability of Fe bio-nanoparticle for corrosion inhibition applications for the protection of metals against microbiological corrosion influencing environment.

  11. Letdown valve material performance against corrosion and erosion in brown coal liquefaction process

    SciTech Connect

    Komatsu, N.; Makino, E.; Tamura, M.

    1999-07-01

    Severe erosion occurred on the trim of letdown valves used as pressure reduction in brown coal direct liquefaction 50t/d pilot plant. Corrosion which is caused by elution of cobalt as binder is recognized on the eroded trim made by tungsten carbide (WC). A little erosion and no corrosion are recognized on the trim made by tungsten carbide containing a bit of chromium. The elution of cobalt seems to be caused by the acid corrosion because cobalt has no corrosive resistance against acid and the erosion of tungsten carbide is concluded to be corrosive wear. Therefore, the addition of chromium which takes a role to strengthen electrochemically cobalt bonding phase is effective to provide tungsten carbide with corrosive resistant behavior against acid corrosive circumstance under brown coal liquefaction process.

  12. Corrosion of current-collector materials in Li-ion cells

    SciTech Connect

    Braithwaite, J.; Nagasubramanian, G.; Gonzales, A.; Lucero, S.; Cieslak, W.

    1996-12-01

    The primary current-collector materials being used in lithium-ion cells are susceptible to environmental degradation: aluminum to pitting corrosion and copper to environmentally assisted cracking. Pitting occurs at the highly oxidizing potentials associated with the positive-electrode charge condition. However, the pitting mechanism is more complex than that typically observed in aqueous systems in that the pits are filled with a mixed metal/oxide product and exist as mounds or nodules on the surface. Electrochemical impedance was shown to be an effective analytical tool for quantification and verification of visual observations and trends. Two fluorocarbon-based coatings were shown to improve the resistance of Al to localized pitting. Finally, environmental cracking of copper can occur at or near the lithium potential and only if specific metallurgical conditions exist (work hardening and large grain size).

  13. NiTi Alloys: New Materials that enable Shockproof, Corrosion Immune Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DellaCorte, Christopher

    2017-01-01

    Though steel is the dominant material of choice for mechanical components (bearings and gears) it has intrinsic limitations related to corrosion and plastic deformation. In contrast, dimensionally stable nickel-rich Ni-Ti alloys, such as Nitinol 60, are intrinsically rustproof and can withstand high contact loads without damage (denting). Over the last decade, focused RD to exploit these alloys for new applications has revealed the science behind NiTi's remarkable properties. In this presentation, the state-of-the-art of nickel-rich NiTi alloys will be introduced along with a discussion of how NASA is adopting this new technology inside the space station water recycling system as a pathfinder for more down-to-earth tribological challenges.

  14. Iron-Based Amorphous-Metals: High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Materials (HPCRM) Development Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J C; Choi, J; Saw, C; Haslem, J; Day, D; Hailey, P; Lian, T; Rebak, R; Perepezko, J; Payer, J; Branagan, D; Beardsley, B; D'Amato, A; Aprigliano, L

    2009-03-16

    An overview of the High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Materials (HPCRM) Program, which was co-sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Defense Sciences Office (DSO) and the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Civilian and Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), is discussed. Programmatic investigations have included a broad range of topics: alloy design and composition; materials synthesis; thermal stability; corrosion resistance; environmental cracking; mechanical properties; damage tolerance; radiation effects; and important potential applications. Amorphous alloys identified as SAM2X5 (Fe{sub 49.7}Cr{sub 17.7}Mn{sub 1.9}Mo{sub 7.4}W{sub 1.6}B{sub 15.2}C{sub 3.8}Si{sub 2.4}) and SAM1651 (Fe{sub 48}Mo{sub 14}Cr{sub 15}Y{sub 2}C{sub 15}B{sub 6}) have been produced as melt-spun ribbons, drop-cast ingots and thermal-spray coatings. Chromium (Cr), molybdenum (Mo) and tungsten (W) additions provided corrosion resistance, while boron (B) enabled glass formation. Earlier electrochemical studies of melt-spun ribbons and ingots of these amorphous alloys demonstrated outstanding passive film stability. More recently thermal-spray coatings of these amorphous alloys have been made and subjected to long-term salt-fog and immersion tests. Good corrosion resistance has been observed during salt-fog testing. Corrosion rates were measured in situ with linear polarization, while simultaneously monitoring the open-circuit corrosion potentials. Reasonably good performance was observed. The sensitivity of these measurements to electrolyte composition and temperature was determined. The high boron content of this particular amorphous metal make this amorphous alloy an effective neutron absorber, and suitable for criticality control applications. In general, the corrosion resistance of these iron-based amorphous metals is maintained at operating temperatures up to the glass transition temperature. These materials are much harder than conventional

  15. Aircraft Materials, Processes, Cleaning and Corrosion Control (Course Outline), Aviation Mechanics 1 (Power and Frame): 9073.01.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dade County Public Schools, Miami, FL.

    This document presents an outline for a 135-hour course designed to familiarize the beginning student with the basic concepts common to aircraft materials and processes, together with the requirements of proper cleaning and corrosion control as outlined by the Federal Aviation Agency. The aviation airframe and powerplant maintenance technician is…

  16. Silicon carbide as an oxidation-resistant high-temperature material. 1: Oxidation and heat corrosion behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlichting, J.

    1981-01-01

    The oxidation and corrosion behavior of SiC (in the form of a SiC powder) and hot-pressed and reaction-bound material were studied. The excellent stability of SiC in an oxidizing atmosphere is due to the development of protective SiO2 coatings. Any changes in these protective layers (e.g., due to impurities, reaction with corrosive media, high porosity of SiC, etc.) lead in most cases to increased rates of oxidation and thus restrict the field of SiC application.

  17. Erosion/corrosion of turbine airfoil materials in the high-velocity effluent of a pressurized fluidized coal combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zellars, G. R.; Rowe, A. P.; Lowell, C. E.

    1978-01-01

    Four candidate turbine airfoil superalloys were exposed to the effluent of a pressurized fluidized bed with a solids loading of 2 to 4 g/scm for up to 100 hours at two gas velocities, 150 and 270 m/sec, and two temperatures, 730 deg and 795 C. Under these conditions, both erosion and corrosion occurred. The damaged specimens were examined by cross-section measurements, scanning electron and light microscopy, and X-ray analysis to evaluate the effects of temperature, velocity, particle loading, and alloy material. Results indicate that for a given solids loading the extent of erosion is primarily dependent on gas velocity. Corrosion occurred only at the higher temperature. There was little difference in the erosion/corrosion damage to the four alloys tested under these severe conditions.

  18. Coating Layer and Corrosion Protection Characteristics in Sea Water with Various Thermal Spray Coating Materials for STS304

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seong-Jong; Woo, Yong-Bin

    We investigated the optimal method of application and the anticorrosive abilities of Zn, Al, and Zn + 15%Al spray coatings in protecting stainless steel 304 (STS304) in sea water. If a defect such as porosity or an oxide layer, causes STS304 to be exposed to sea water, and the thermal spray coating material will act as the cathode and anode, respectively. The Tafel experiments revealed that Al-coated specimens among applied coating methods had the lowest corrosion current densities. As the corrosion potential decreases with increasing corrosion current density, we estimated the characteristics and lifetime of the protective thermal spray coating layer in the galvanic cell formed by the thermal spray coating layer and STS304.

  19. Materials corrosion in molten LiF-NaF-KF eutectic salt under different reduction-oxidation conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Sellers, R. S.; Cheng, W. J.; Anderson, M. H.; Sridharan, K.; Wang, C. J.; Allen, T. R.

    2012-07-01

    Molten fluoride salts such as FLiNaK (LiF-NaF-KF: 46.5-11.5-42 mol %) have been proposed for use as secondary reactor coolants, media for transfer of high temperature process heat from nuclear reactors to chemical plants, and for concentrated solar power thermal energy storage. In molten fluoride salts, passive oxide films are chemically unstable, and corrosion is driven largely by the thermodynamically driven dissolution of alloying elements into the molten salt environment. Two alloys, Hastelloy{sup R} N and 316L stainless steel were exposed to molten FLiNaK salt in a 316L stainless steel crucible under argon cover gas for 1000 hours at 850 deg. C. Graphite was present in some of the crucibles with the goal of studying corrosion behavior of relevant reactor material combinations. In addition, a technique to reduce alloy corrosion through modification of the reduction-oxidation state was tested by the inclusion of zirconium to the system. Corrosion of 316L stainless steel was noted to occur primarily through surface depletion of chromium, an effect that was enhanced by the presence of graphite. Hastelloy{sup R} N experienced weight gain through electrochemical plating of corrosion products derived from the 316L stainless steel crucible. In the presence of zirconium, both alloys gained weight through plating of zirconium and as a result formed intermetallic layers. (authors)

  20. High temperature corrosion of advanced ceramic materials for hot gas filters and heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Crossland, C.E.; Shelleman, D.L.; Spear, K.E.

    1996-08-01

    A vertical flow-through furnace has been built to study the effect of corrosion on the morphology and mechanical properties of ceramic hot gas filters. Sections of 3M Type 203 and DuPont Lanxide SiC-SiC filter tubes were sealed at one end and suspended in the furnace while being subjected to a simulated coal combustion environment at 870{degrees}C. X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy is used to identify phase and morphology changes due to corrosion while burst testing determines the loss of mechanical strength after exposure to the combustion gases. Additionally, a thermodynamic database of gaseous silicon compounds is currently being established so that calculations can be made to predict important products of the reaction of the environment with the ceramics. These thermodynamic calculations provide useful information concerning the regimes where the ceramic may be degraded by material vaporization. To verify the durability and predict lifetime performance of ceramic heat exchangers in coal combustion environments, long-term exposure testing of stressed (internally pressurized) tubes must be performed in actual coal combustion environments. The authors have designed a system that will internally pressurize 2 inch OD by 48 inch long ceramic heat exchanger tubes to a maximum pressure of 200 psi while exposing the outer surface of the tubes to coal combustion gas at the Combustion and Environmental Research Facility (CERF) at the Pittsburgh Energy and Technology Center. Water-cooled, internal o-ring pressure seals were designed to accommodate the existing 6 inch by 6 inch access panels of the CERF. Tubes will be exposed for up to a maximum of 500 hours at temperatures of 2500 and 2600{degrees}F with an internal pressure of 200 psi. If the tubes survive, their retained strength will be measured using the high temperature tube burst test facility at Penn State University. Fractographic analysis will be performed to identify the failure source(s) for the tubes.

  1. Preparations and properties of anti-corrosion additives of water-soluble metal working fluids for aluminum alloy materials.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Shoji

    2008-01-01

    This short review describes various types of anti-corrosion additives of water-soluble metal working fluids for aluminum alloy materials. It is concerned with synthetic additives classified according to their functional groups; silicone compounds, carboxylic acids and dibasic acids, esters, Diels-Alder adducts, various polymers, nitrogen compounds, phosphoric esters, phosphonic acids, and others. Testing methods for water-soluble metal working fluids for aluminum alloy materials are described for a practical application in a laboratory.

  2. Mechanical properties, deformation mechanism and origin of corrosion of electrodeposited nanocrystalline materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Indranil

    The mechanisms of deformation and fracture evolution in fully dense bulk Ni specimens as a function of its grain size, micro to nanocrystalline (nc) were determined from results of uniaxial tensile tests. Transmission electron micrographs of fractured gauge sections indicated that the deformation mechanism in specimens having an average grain size of 20 nm to be generally dictated by nanovoid formation at grain boundaries (GBs), collective motion of grains, grain rotation, and some twinning. With increase in the grain size the primary mechanism of fracture changed to twinning deformation and some dislocation activity, subsequently to a complete dislocation accommodated deformation in microcrystalline specimens. Bulk electrodeposited (ED) nc-Ni having an average grain size of 100 nm was selected as a model material to investigate salient mechanical properties/physical attributes because of its important attributes. First, it was observed to have better stability as compared to its finer grained counterparts; second, it had a grain size in the transition region between nanocrystalline and ultrafine grained (UFG) materials. The effect of strain rate on strength and ductility, corresponding strain rate sensitivity and activation volume were determined from uniaxial tensile tests and strain jump tests conducted selectively at 393 and 413 K. Results indicated that while there is an increase in strength with increasing strain rate at a constant temperature, ductility followed a negative correlation with increasing strain rate. It is clear that strengthening materials through grain refinement often results in reduced ductility necessitating means to augment their elongation to failure. An approach to simultaneously enhance both strength and ductility by engineering its grains through introduction of annealing twins and increasing the volume fraction of coherent low sigma boundaries was invented. Corrosion resistance has been demonstrated to be significantly superior in

  3. Novel methods and self-reinforced composite materials for assessment and prevention of mechanically assisted corrosion in modular implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouellette, Eric S.

    Novel methods for assessing the electrochemical and micromechanical performance of modular tapers were evaluated, and self-reinforced composite materials were developed for their potential to prevent the onset of mechanically assisted corrosion in modular taper devices. A study of the seating and taper locking mechanics of modular taper samples was conducted, and the effect on taper engagement strength of seating load, loading rate, taper moisture, and taper design/material combination was studied. The load-displacement behavior was captured during seating, and the subsequent pull off load was correlated to seating displacement, seating energy, and seating load. The primary factor affecting taper engagement strength was seating load, and loading rate and design/material factors did not have a significant impact on the quality of the taper engagement. Next, the effect of variation of 7 different design, material, and surgical factors on the fretting corrosion and micromechanical behavior during incremental cyclic fretting corrosion testing was examined using a design of experiments matrix. Seating load and head offset length were the most influential factors affecting fretting corrosion, with low seating loads and high head offsets giving rise to increased currents during sequentially incremented cyclic loads. Poly(ether ether ketone) (PEEK) fibers were produced, and the effects of varying draw down ratio, molecular weight, and post-spinning treatment on the structural and mechanical properties of the fibers were studied. Highly drawn fibers showed the highest increase in molecular orientation and mechanical properties. PEEK fibers were then utilized in the design and fabrication of self-reinforced composite PEEK (SRC-PEEK) thin film composites, and self-reinforced composite ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (SRC-PE) produced from Spectra fiber was also introduced. Pin on disk studies were employed to understand the potential of both of these SRC materials to

  4. Corrosion investigations on zircaloy-4 and titanium dissolver materials for MOX fuel dissolution in concentrated nitric acid containing fluoride ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayaraj, J.; Krishnaveni, P.; Krishna, D. Nanda Gopala; Mallika, C.; Mudali, U. Kamachi

    2016-05-01

    Aqueous reprocessing of plutonium-rich mixed oxide fuels require fluoride as a dissolution catalyst in boiling nitric acid for an effective dissolution of the spent fuel. High corrosion rates were obtained for the candidate dissolver materials zircaloy-4 (Zr-4) and commercial pure titanium (CP-Ti grade 2) in boiling 11.5 M HNO3 + 0.05 M NaF. Complexing the fluoride ions either with Al(NO3)3 or ZrO(NO3)2 aided in decreasing the corrosion rates of Zr-4 and CP-Ti. From the obtained corrosion rates it is concluded that CP-Ti is a better dissolver material than Zr-4 for extended service life in boiling 11.5 M HNO3 + 0.05 M NaF, when complexed with 0.15 M ZrO(NO3)2. XPS analysis confirmed the presence of TiO2 and absence of fluoride on the surface of CP-Ti samples, indicating that effective complexation had occurred in solution leading to passivation of the metal and imparting high corrosion resistance.

  5. Study of materials to resist corrosion in condensing gas fired furnaces. Annual report Oct 79-Oct 80

    SciTech Connect

    Lahtvee, T.; Khoo, S.W.; Schaus, O.O.

    1981-02-01

    Based on a thorough review of background information on the performance of materials in condensing gas-fired furnace heat exchangers and in similar corrosive environments, candidate materials were selected and tested on one of two identical test rigs built to provide the varying corrosive conditions encountered in an actual gas-fired condensing system heat exchanger. The 32 different materials tested in a one month screening test included: mild, low alloy, galvanized, solder coated and CaCO3 dipped galvanized steel, porcelain, epoxy, teflon and nylon coated and alonized mild steel; austenitic, ferritic, low interstitial Ti stabilized ferritic, and high alloy stainless steels; aluminum alloy anodized and porcelain coated aluminum; copper and cupronickel alloys, solder coated copper; and titanium.

  6. Corrosion Assessment of Candidate Materials for the SHINE Subcritical Assembly Vessel and Components FY14 Report

    SciTech Connect

    Pawel, Steven J.

    2014-10-01

    Laboratory corrosion testing of candidate alloys—including Zr-4 and Zr-2.5Nb representing the target solution vessel, and 316L, 2304, 304L, and 17-4 PH stainless steels representing process piping and balance-of-plant components—was performed in support of the proposed SHINE process to produce 99Mo from low-enriched uranium. The test solutions used depleted uranyl sulfate in various concentrations and incorporated a range of temperatures, excess sulfuric acid concentrations, nitric acid additions (to simulate radiolysis product generation), and iodine additions. Testing involved static immersion of coupons in solution and in the vapor above the solution, and was extended to include planned-interval tests to examine details associated with stainless steel corrosion in environments containing iodine species. A large number of galvanic tests featuring couples between a stainless steel and a zirconium-based alloy were performed, and limited vibratory horn testing was incorporated to explore potential erosion/corrosion features of compatibility. In all cases, corrosion of the zirconium alloys was observed to be minimal, with corrosion rates based on weight loss calculated to be less than 0.1 mil/year with no change in surface roughness. The resulting passive film appeared to be ZrO2 with variations in thickness that influence apparent coloration (toward light brown for thicker films). Galvanic coupling with various stainless steels in selected exposures had no discernable effect on appearance, surface roughness, or corrosion rate. Erosion/corrosion behavior was the same for zirconium alloys in uranyl sulfate solutions and in sodium sulfate solutions adjusted to a similar pH, suggesting there was no negative effect of uranium resulting from fluid dynamic conditions aggressive to the passive film. Corrosion of the candidate stainless steels was similarly modest across the entire range of exposures. However, some sensitivity to corrosion of the stainless steels was

  7. Fighting Corrosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Reinforced concrete structures such as bridges, parking decks, and balconies are designed to have a service life of over 50 years. All too often, however, many structures fall short of this goal, requiring expensive repairs and protection work earlier than anticipated. The corrosion of reinforced steel within the concrete infrastructure is a major cause for this premature deterioration. Such corrosion is a particularly dangerous problem for the facilities at NASA s Kennedy Space Center. Located near the Atlantic Ocean in Florida, Kennedy is based in one of the most corrosive-prone areas in the world. In order to protect its launch support structures, highways, pipelines, and other steel-reinforced concrete structures, Kennedy engineers developed the Galvanic Liquid Applied Coating System. The system utilizes an inorganic coating material that slows or stops the corrosion of reinforced steel members inside concrete structures. Early tests determined that the coating meets the criteria of the National Association of Corrosion Engineers for complete protection of steel rebar embedded in concrete. Testing is being continued at the Kennedy's Materials Science Beach Corrosion Test Site.

  8. Stress Corrosion Cracking of the Drip Shield, the Waste Package Outer Barrier, and the Stainless Steel Structural Material

    SciTech Connect

    G. Gordon

    2004-10-13

    Stress corrosion cracking is one of the most common corrosion-related causes for premature breach of metal structural components. Stress corrosion cracking is the initiation and propagation of cracks in structural components due to three factors that must be present simultaneously: metallurgical susceptibility, critical environment, and static (or sustained) tensile stresses. This report was prepared according to ''Technical Work Plan for: Regulatory Integration Modeling and Analysis of the Waste Form and Waste Package'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171583]). The purpose of this report is to provide an evaluation of the potential for stress corrosion cracking of the engineered barrier system components (i.e., the drip shield, waste package outer barrier, and waste package stainless steel inner structural cylinder) under exposure conditions consistent with the repository during the regulatory period of 10,000 years after permanent closure. For the drip shield and waste package outer barrier, the critical environment is conservatively taken as any aqueous environment contacting the metal surfaces. Appendix B of this report describes the development of the SCC-relevant seismic crack density model (SCDM). The consequence of a stress corrosion cracking breach of the drip shield, the waste package outer barrier, or the stainless steel inner structural cylinder material is the initiation and propagation of tight, sometimes branching, cracks that might be induced by the combination of an aggressive environment and various tensile stresses that can develop in the drip shields or the waste packages. The Stainless Steel Type 316 inner structural cylinder of the waste package is excluded from the stress corrosion cracking evaluation because the Total System Performance Assessment for License Application (TSPA-LA) does not take credit for the inner cylinder. This document provides a detailed description of the process-level models that can be applied to assess the performance of Alloy 22

  9. Electrochemical studies on the stability and corrosion resistance of titanium-based implant materials.

    PubMed

    Aziz-Kerrzo, M; Conroy, K G; Fenelon, A M; Farrell, S T; Breslin, C B

    2001-06-01

    The corrosion susceptibility of Ti, Ti-6A1-4V and Ti-45Ni was studied in a buffered saline solution using anodic polarisation and electrochemical impedance measurements. Pitting potentials as low as + 250 mV(SCE) were recorded for Ti-45Ni and once initiated pits continued to propagate at potentials as low as -150 mV(SCE). It was possible to increase the pitting potential of Ti-45Ni to values greater than +800 mV(SCE) using a H2O2 surface treatment procedure; however, this surface modification process had no beneficial effect on the rate of pit repassivation. Impedance spectra, recorded under open-circuit conditions, were modelled using a dual oxide film model; a porous outer layer and an inner barrier oxide layer. The nature of this porous outer layer was found to depend on the nature of the electrode material and the presence of phosphate anions in the saline-buffered solution. The porous layers formed on Ti-45Ni and Ti-6Al-4V in the presence of phosphate anions had low resistances typically between 10 and 70 ohm cm2. Much higher porous layer resistances were recorded for Ti and also for Ti-45Ni and Ti-6Al-4V in the absence of the phosphate anions.

  10. The thin electrolyte layer approach to corrosion testing of dental materials--characterization of the technique.

    PubMed

    Ledvina, M; Rigney, E D

    1998-12-01

    An innovative technique for corrosion testing of metallic dental materials is introduced. The thin electrolyte layer technique (TET) simulates the physical characteristics of the oral environment by employing a still, thin layer of an electrolyte, in contrast to bulk electrolyte techniques (BET) which utilize relatively large quantities of fluid. Limiting current density tests on a platinum electrode revealed a lower surface oxygen content for TET. Borate buffer (pH 6.8) was employed as an electrolyte. The effect of lower oxygen content in TET on passivation and polarization characteristics of 316L SS in 0.9% saline was investigated. The results revealed differences in the polarization resistance and open circuit potential development with time, as well as in anodic and cathodic polarization behavior. Lower O2 concentration in TET was attributed to different electrolyte convection characteristics under both testing conditions. Additionally, use of the TET resulted in better data reproducibility. Overall, this investigation led to a deeper understanding of the electrochemical processes inherent in thin electrolytes such as those found in the oral environment.

  11. DOE-DARPA High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Materials (HPCRM), Annual HPCRM Team Meeting & Technical Review

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J; Brown, B; Bayles, B; Lemieux, T; Choi, J; Ajdelsztajn, L; Dannenberg, J; Lavernia, E; Schoenung, J; Branagan, D; Blue, C; Peter, B; Beardsley, B; Graeve, O; Aprigliano, L; Yang, N; Perepezko, J; Hildal, K; Kaufman, L; Lewandowski, J; Perepezko, J; Hildal, K; Kaufman, L; Lewandowski, J; Boudreau, J

    2007-09-21

    The overall goal is to develop high-performance corrosion-resistant iron-based amorphous-metal coatings for prolonged trouble-free use in very aggressive environments: seawater & hot geothermal brines. The specific technical objectives are: (1) Synthesize Fe-based amorphous-metal coating with corrosion resistance comparable/superior to Ni-based Alloy C-22; (2) Establish processing parameter windows for applying and controlling coating attributes (porosity, density, bonding); (3) Assess possible cost savings through substitution of Fe-based material for more expensive Ni-based Alloy C-22; (4) Demonstrate practical fabrication processes; (5) Produce quality materials and data with complete traceability for nuclear applications; and (6) Develop, validate and calibrate computational models to enable life prediction and process design.

  12. Automated Corrosion Detection Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-01

    color. 14. ABSTRACT An evaluation of several hidden corrosion-detection technologies was performed using a probability of detection ( POD ) method for...for improved corrosion management maintenance philosophies. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Corrosion, NDE, probability of detection ( POD ), KC-135, material loss...Size ...............................30 11 POD Curve

  13. Specific corrosion product on interior surface of a bronze wine vessel with loop-handle and its growth mechanism, Shang Dynasty, China

    SciTech Connect

    Li Yang; Bao Zhirong; Wu Taotao; Jiang, Junchun; Chen Guantao; Pan Chunxu

    2012-06-15

    In this paper, a kind of specific stalactitic product was found on the interior surface of a covered bronze wine vessel with loop-handle (Chinese name is you), which was fabricated in Shang Dynasty (1700 B.C.-1100 B.C.) and now is collected in Xiaogan Museum, Hubei province of China. The microstructures of the product were characterized systematically by using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscope, X-ray diffraction, and Raman microscopy. The experimental results revealed that the product belonged to a kind of malachite with high purity and high crystallinity. The growth of the product was considered to be a possible reason that the vessel was overly airtight within a museum display cabinet besides a lid of the vessel, which made the excess of H{sub 2}O and CO{sub 2} gas concentrations inside the vessel during long-term storage. This corrosion product is very harmful to bronze cultural relics, because of a large amount of copper consumption from the matrix which will reduce its life. The growth mechanism of the specific stalactitic product and the suggestions for preservation of the similar bronze relics in museum were proposed. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The stalactitic product was the high purity and good crystallinity malachite. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Its growth was related to the excess of H{sub 2}O and CO{sub 2} gas concentrations in museum. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It is harmful to the bronzes, because copper will be consumed from the matrix. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The suggestions for preservation of the similar bronzes in museum were proposed.

  14. Sample environment for in situ synchrotron corrosion studies of materials in extreme environments

    DOE PAGES

    Elbakhshwan, Mohamed S.; Gill, Simerjeet K.; Motta, Arthur T.; ...

    2016-10-25

    A new in situ sample environment has been designed and developed to study the interfacial interactions of nuclear cladding alloys with high temperature steam. The sample environment is particularly optimized for synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies for in situ structural analysis. The sample environment is highly corrosion resistant and can be readily adapted for steam environments. The in situ sample environment design complies with G2 ASTM standards for studying corrosion in zirconium and its alloys and offers remote temperature and pressure monitoring during the in situ data collection. The use of the in situ sample environment is exemplified by monitoringmore » the oxidation of metallic zirconium during exposure to steam at 350°C. Finally, the in situ sample environment provides a powerful tool for fundamental understanding of corrosion mechanisms by elucidating the substoichiometric oxide phases formed during early stages of corrosion, which can provide a better understanding the oxidation process.« less

  15. Sample environment for in situ synchrotron corrosion studies of materials in extreme environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elbakhshwan, Mohamed S.; Gill, Simerjeet K.; Motta, Arthur T.; Weidner, Randy; Anderson, Thomas; Ecker, Lynne E.

    2016-10-01

    A new in situ sample environment has been designed and developed to study the interfacial interactions of nuclear cladding alloys with high temperature steam. The sample environment is particularly optimized for synchrotron X-ray diffraction studies for in situ structural analysis. The sample environment is highly corrosion resistant and can be readily adapted for steam environments. The in situ sample environment design complies with G2 ASTM standards for studying corrosion in zirconium and its alloys and offers remote temperature and pressure monitoring during the in situ data collection. The use of the in situ sample environment is exemplified by monitoring the oxidation of metallic zirconium during exposure to steam at 350 °C. The in situ sample environment provides a powerful tool for fundamental understanding of corrosion mechanisms by elucidating the substoichiometric oxide phases formed during the early stages of corrosion, which can provide a better understanding of the oxidation process.

  16. EVIDENCE OF CORROSIVE GAS FORMED BY RADIOLYSIS OF CHLORIDE SALTS IN PLUTONIUM-BEARING MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, K.; Louthan, M.

    2010-02-01

    Corrosion and pitting have been observed in headspace regions of stainless steel containers enclosing plutonium oxide/salt mixtures. These observations are consistent with the formation of a corrosive gas, probably HCl, and transport of that gas to the headspace regions of sealed containers. The NH{sub 4}Cl films found on the walls of the sealed containers is also indicative of the presence of HCl gas. Radiolysis of hydrated alkaline earth salts is the probable source of HCl.

  17. Localized corrosion studies on materials proposed for a safety-grade sodium-to- air decay-heat removal system for fast breeder reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamachi Mudali, U.; Khatak, H. S.; Dayal, R. K.; Gnanamoorthy, J. B.

    1993-02-01

    The present investigation was carried out to assess the localized corrosion resistance of materials proposed for the construction of the safety-grade sodium-to-air decay-heat removal system for fast breeder reactors. The materials, such as Alloy 800,9Cr-lMo steel, and type 316LN stainless steel, in different microstructural conditions were assessed for pitting and stress-corrosion cracking resistances in a chloride medium. The results indicated that 9Cr-lMo steel in the normalized and tempered condition can be considered for the above application from the standpoint of corrosion resistance.

  18. Localized corrosion studies on materials proposed for a safety-grade sodium-to-air decay-heat removal system for fast breeder reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Mudali, U.K.; Khatak, H.S.; Dayal, R.K.; Gnanamoorthy, J.B. )

    1993-02-01

    The present investigation was carried out to assess the localized corrosion resistance of materials proposed for the construction of the safety-grade sodium-to-air decay-heat removal system for fast breeder reactors. The materials, such as Alloy 800, 9Cr-1 Mo steel, and type 316LN stainless steel, in different microstructural conditions were assessed for pitting and stress-corrosion cracking resistances in a chloride medium. The results indicated that 9Cr-1Mo steel in the normalized and tempered condition can be considered for the above application from the standpoint of corrosion resistance.

  19. Development of Advanced Wear and Corrosion Resistant Systems Through Laser Surface Alloying and Materials Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    R. P. Martukanitz and S. Babu

    2007-05-03

    Laser surfacing in the form of cladding, alloying, and modifications are gaining widespread use because of its ability to provide high deposition rates, low thermal distortion, and refined microstructure due to high solidification rates. Because of these advantages, laser surface alloying is considered a prime candidate for producing ultra-hard coatings through the establishment or in situ formation of composite structures. Therefore, a program was conducted by the Applied Research Laboratory, Pennsylvania State University and Oak Ridge National Laboratory to develop the scientific and engineering basis for performing laser-based surface modifications involving the addition of hard particles, such as carbides, borides, and nitrides, within a metallic matrix for improved wear, fatigue, creep, and corrosion resistance. This has involved the development of advanced laser processing and simulation techniques, along with the refinement and application of these techniques for predicting and selecting materials and processing parameters for the creation of new surfaces having improved properties over current coating technologies. This program has also resulted in the formulation of process and material simulation tools capable of examining the potential for the formation and retention of composite coatings and deposits produced using laser processing techniques, as well as positive laboratory demonstrations in producing these coatings. In conjunction with the process simulation techniques, the application of computational thermodynamic and kinetic models to design laser surface alloying materials was demonstrated and resulted in a vast improvement in the formulation of materials used for producing composite coatings. The methodology was used to identify materials and to selectively modify microstructures for increasing hardness of deposits produced by the laser surface alloying process. Computational thermodynamic calculations indicated that it was possible to induce the

  20. A compact square loop patch antenna on high dielectric ceramic-PTFE composite material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullah, M. Habib; Islam, M. T.

    2013-10-01

    Design and prototyping of a low profile, compact square loop microstrip line fed miniature patch antenna on 1.9 mm thick ceramic-polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) high dielectric composite material substrate is presented in this paper. The measured -10 dB return loss bandwidths of the antenna are 300 MHz (0.75-1.05 GHz) and 800 MHz (2.4-3.2 GHz) with 3.4 dBi, 8.86 dBi and 7.42 dBi at 900 MHz, 2.5 GHz and 3.0 GHz, respectively. The measured symmetric and almost stable radiation pattern makes the proposed antenna suitable for RFID, GSM, ZIGBEE, WBAN, LR-WPAN etc. integrated mobile devices.

  1. Variable frequency pulsed phase-locked loop method for measuring material nonlinearity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yost, William T.; Cantrell, John H.

    1992-01-01

    The design of a pressure vessel with an isothermal volume to measure changes in the natural velocities of material continuously over a wide temperature range is reported. Highly sensitive pulsed phase-locked loop technology is used to measure the natural velocity of fatigued aluminum 2024-T4 as a function of pressure at different temperatures. Second derivative variations with respect to pressure and temperature are found to exhibit order-of-magnitude changes at a gauge pressure near 950 kPa at room temperature. This indicates a significant change in certain combinations of second-order and higher-order elastic constants at relatively low pressures. Fractional frequency change as a function of applied pressure for aluminum 2024-T4 with fatigue damage is illustrated.

  2. Materials Testing for an Accelerator-Driven Subcritical Molten Salt Fission System: A look at the Materials Science of Molten Salt Corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sooby, Elizabeth; Balachandran, Shreyas; Foley, David; Hartwig, Karl; McIntyre, Peter; Phongikaroon, Supathorn; Pogue, Nathaniel; Simpson, Michael; Tripathy, Prabhat

    2011-10-01

    For an accelerator-driven subcritical molten salt fission core to survive its 50+ year fuel life, the primary vessel, heat exchanger, and various internal components must be made of materials that resist corrosion and radiation damage in a high-temperature environment, (500-800 C). An experimental study of the corrosion behavior of candidate metals in contact with molten salt is being conducted at the Center for Advanced Energy Studies. Initial experiments have been run on Nb, Ta, Ni, two zirconium alloys, Hastelloy-N, and a series of steel alloys to form a base line for corrosion in both chloride and bromide salt. Metal coupons were immersed in LiCl-KCl or LiBr-KBr at 700 C in an inert-atmosphere. Salt samples were extracted on a time schedule over a 24-hr period. The samples were analyzed using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry to determine concentrations of metals from corrosion. Preliminary results will be presented.

  3. [Corrosion behaviour, metal release and biocompatibility of implant materials coated by TiO2-sol gel chemistry].

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, B; Kokott, A; Shafranska, O; Detsch, R; Winter, S; Eisenbarth, E; Peters, K; Breme, J; Kirkpatrick, C J; Ziegler, G

    2005-10-01

    Alloys based on titanium or cobalt have been used as implant materials for decades with good success. Because of their natural oxide layer these alloys reveal good corrosion behaviour. In contact with physiological solution metal release takes place, which can cause inflammation. Coatings can improve the corrosion behaviour. In this study Ti6Al4V and Co28Cr6Mo alloys, which are frequently used as implant materials, were tested. Polished discs of these alloys and polished discs, which were coated with TiO2-layers by sol-gel chemistry, were compared regarding their corrosion behaviour and metal ion releasing. The releasing of Al, V, Ti, Co, Cr and Mo was quantified by ICP-MS analysis. The TiO2-coating reduced the release of all ions except of the Al-ion. Both alloys showed a deviating kinetic of ion releasing. In addition, cell response (cell vitality, cell proliferation, endothelial marker CD31 and actin allocation) of osteoblasts and endothelial cells were investigated.

  4. Galvanic Corrosion Initiatives

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-12-01

    tested to indfiqte whether the galvanic corrosion which developed was cosmetic or if it had an effect on ’the mechanical properties wthe * material. fly...properties of each material were determined. The resulting data distinguished the developed corrosion as either being cosmetic or having " " an effect on the...corrosion that occurs is not just cosmetic , but instead has an effect on the mechanical properties of the material. While a galvanic couple may be safe in one

  5. An investigation on corrosion protection of chromium nitride coated Fe-Cr alloy as a bipolar plate material for proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, T. J.; Zhang, B.; Li, J.; He, Y. X.; Lin, F.

    2014-12-01

    The corrosion properties of chromium nitride (CrN) coating are investigated to assess the potential use of this material as a bipolar plate for proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). Conductive metallic ceramic CrN layers are firstly deposited onto Fe-Cr alloy using a multi-arc ion plating technique to increase the corrosion resistance of the base alloy. Electrochemical measurements indicate that the corrosion resistance of the substrate alloy is greatly enhanced by the CrN coating. The free corrosion potential of the substrate is increased by more than 50 mV. Furthermore, a decrease in three orders of magnitude of corrosive current density for the CrN-coated alloy is observed compared to the as-received Fe-Cr alloy. Long-term immersion tests show that the CrN layer is highly stable and effectively acts as a barrier to inhibit permeation of corrosive species. On the contrary, corrosion of the Fe-Cr alloy is rather severe without the protection of CrN coating due to the active dissolution. Finally, the corresponding electrochemical impedance models are proposed to elucidate the corrosion process of the CrN/Fe-Cr alloy submerged in a simulated PEMFCs environment.

  6. Materials corrosion of high temperature alloys immersed in 600C binary nitrate salt.

    SciTech Connect

    Kruizenga, Alan Michael; Gill, David Dennis; LaFord, Marianne Elizabeth

    2013-03-01

    Thirteen high temperature alloys were immersion tested in a 60/40 binary nitrate salt. Samples were interval tested up to 3000 hours at 600ÀC with air as the ullage gas. Chemical analysis of the molten salt indicated lower nitrite concentrations present in the salt, as predicted by the equilibrium equation. Corrosion rates were generally low for all alloys. Corrosion products were identified using x-ray diffraction and electron microprobe analysis. Fe-Cr based alloys tended to form mixtures of sodium and iron oxides, while Fe-Ni/Cr alloys had similar corrosion products plus oxides of nickel and chromium. Nickel based alloys primarily formed NiO, with chromium oxides near the oxide/base alloy interface. In625 exhibited similar corrosion performance in relation to previous tests, lending confidence in comparisons between past and present experiments. HA230 exhibited internal oxidation that consisted of a nickel/chromium oxide. Alloys with significant aluminum alloying tended to exhibit superior performance, due formation of a thin alumina layer. Soluble corrosion products of chromium, molybdenum, and tungsten were also formed and are thought to be a significant factor in alloy performance.

  7. Pretreatment applied engineering, corrosion assessment for tank materials: 1995 final report

    SciTech Connect

    Maclean, G.T., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-08-09

    For sludge washing to be conducted in existing Hanford carbon steel tanks, there must be an assurance that the tanks will be safe from failure by pitting, stress-corrosion cracking or other failure processes when the corrosion inhibitors present in the waste are diluted during the sludge washing operation. Testing has been conducted previously to define safe operating regimes in concentrated waste environments and moderately dilute waste environments. Due to identification of unsafe operating regimes for moderately dilute waste environments, testing was conducted in more dilute environments to adequately capture the range of possible chemistries during sludge washing operations.Additionally, a small scoping study was performed to identify the corrosion effects of high levels of chloride in the waste environments. Six month exposure coupon tests, slow strain rate tests, and potentiodynamic scans have been completed on a statistically designed test matrix of twenty-four tests.Stress- corrosion cracking was not found for the specimens in the static tests or the slow strain rate tests. Pitting and crevice corrosion was found for many of the solutions, but primarily in the vapor phase. Water line attack at the vapor space/solution interface was common for the range of solutions tested. Gross general attack was found for the specimens exposed to the vapor space of the high chloride solutions.

  8. The corrosion of materials in water irradiated by 800 MeV protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lillard, R. S.; Pile, D. L.; Butt, D. P.

    2000-02-01

    A method for measuring the real-time corrosion rates for Alloy 718, stainless steels (SS) 304L and 316L nuclear grade (NG), aluminum alloys 5052 (Al5052) and 6061 (Al6061), copper (Cu), tantalum (Ta), and tungsten (W) in two separate water systems that were irradiated by 800 MeV protons is presented. The first water system was fabricated entirely of 304 SS, thoroughly cleaned before operation, and employed hydrogen water chemistry (HWC) to mitigate the formation of some of the radiolysis products. The samples were adequately shielded from the irradiation cavity such that only the effects of water chemistry were investigated. Over the course of that irradiation period the corrosion rates for 304L SS, 316L-NG SS, Alloy 718, and Ta were less than 0.12 μm/yr. For Al6061 and Al5052, the corrosion rates were of the order of 0.50-2.0 μm/yr. The corrosion rate of W was relatively high between 5.0 and 30 μm/yr. The second water system, fabricated from copper piping and steel components, was not cleaned prior to operation, and employed no HWC. In comparison to the other system, the corrosion rates in the copper/steel system were 1-3 orders of magnitude higher. These results are discussed in terms of water radiolysis and water impurity levels.

  9. High Temperature Steam Electrolysis Materials Degradation: Preliminary Results of Corrosion Tests on Ceramatec Electrolysis Cell Components

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Demkowicz; Prateek Sachdev; Kevin DeWall; Pavel Medvedev

    2007-06-01

    Corrosion tests were performed on stainless steel and nickel alloy coupons in H2O/H2 mixtures and dry air to simulate conditions experienced in high temperature steam electrolysis systems. The stainless steel coupons were tested bare and with one of three different proprietary coatings applied. Specimens were corroded at 850°C for 500 h with weight gain data recorded at periodic intervals. Post-test characterization of the samples included surface and cross-section scanning electron microscopy, grazing incidence x-ray diffraction, and area-specific resistance measurements. The uncoated nickel alloy outperformed the ferritic stainless steel under all test conditions based on weight gain data. Parabolic rate constants for corrosion of these two uncoated alloys were consistent with values presented in the literature under similar conditions. The steel coatings reduced corrosion rates in H2O/H2 mixtures by as much as 50% compared to the untreated steel, but in most cases showed negligible corrosion improvement in air. The use of a rare-earth-based coating on stainless steel did not result in a significantly different area specific resistance values after corrosion compared to the untreated alloy. Characterization of the samples is still in progress and the findings will be revised when the complete data set is available.

  10. Refractory Materials for Flame Deflector Protection System Corrosion Control: Flame Deflector Protection System Life Cycle Cost Analysis Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Luz Marina; Hintze, Paul E.; Parlier, Christopher R.; Coffman, Brekke E.; Kolody, Mark R.; Curran, Jerome P.; Trejo, David; Reinschmidt, Ken; Kim, Hyung-Jin

    2009-01-01

    A 20-year life cycle cost analysis was performed to compare the operational life cycle cost, processing/turnaround timelines, and operations manpower inspection/repair/refurbishment requirements for corrosion protection of the Kennedy Space Center launch pad flame deflector associated with the existing cast-in-place materials and a newer advanced refractory ceramic material. The analysis compared the estimated costs of(1) continuing to use of the current refractory material without any changes; (2) completely reconstructing the flame trench using the current refractory material; and (3) completely reconstructing the flame trench with a new high-performance refractory material. Cost estimates were based on an analysis of the amount of damage that occurs after each launch and an estimate of the average repair cost. Alternative 3 was found to save $32M compared to alternative 1 and $17M compared to alternative 2 over a 20-year life cycle.

  11. Fundamental Studies of the Role of Grain Boundaries on Uniform Corrosion of Advanced Nuclear Reactor Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Taheri, Mitra; Motta, Arthur; Marquis, Emmanuelle

    2016-05-20

    The main objective of this proposal is to develop fundamental understanding of the role of grain boundaries in stable oxide growth. To understand the process of oxide layer destabilization, it is necessary to observe the early stages of corrosion. During conventional studies in which a sample is exposed and examined after removal from the autoclave, the destabilization process will normally have already taken place, and is only examined post facto. To capture the instants of oxide destabilization, it is necessary to observe it in situ; however, significant questions always arise as to the influence of the corrosion geometry and conditions on the corrosion process. Thus, a combination of post facto examinations and in situ studies is proposed, which also combines state-of-the-art characterization techniques to derive a complete understanding of the destabilization process and the role of grain boundaries.

  12. Stress Corrosion Evaluation of Various Metallic Materials for the International Space Station Water Recycling System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torres, P. D.

    2015-01-01

    A stress corrosion evaluation was performed on Inconel 625, Hastelloy C276, titanium commercially pure (TiCP), Ti-6Al-4V, Ti-6Al-4V extra low interstitial, and Cronidur 30 steel as a consequence of a change in formulation of the pretreatment for processing the urine in the International Space Station Environmental Control and Life Support System Urine Processing Assembly from a sulfuric acid-based to a phosphoric acid-based solution. The first five listed were found resistant to stress corrosion in the pretreatment and brine. However, some of the Cronidur 30 specimens experienced reduction in load-carrying ability.

  13. ECLSS Universal Waste Management System (UWMS) Metal Materials Compatibility Study- Electrochemical and Crevice Corrosion Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, R. E.

    2017-01-01

    Electrochemical and crevice corrosion laboratory test results are presented for three noble metal candidates with possible application on the Universal Waste Management System (UWMS) in support of the Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) aboard the International Space Station (ISS). The three metal candidates, which included Inconel 625, Hastelloy C276 and Titanium 6Al-4V, were evaluated in two solutions representative of the acidic pretreatment formulations utilized during processing of waste liquids within the ECLSS. Final test results and data analysis indicated that the passive layer on all three metals provides excellent corrosion protection in both solutions under standard test conditions.

  14. The stress corrosion resistance and the cryogenic temperature mechanical properties of hot rolled Nitronic 32 bar material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montano, J. W. L.

    1977-01-01

    The ambient and cryogenic temperature mechanical properties and the ambient temperature stress corrosion properties of hot rolled and centerless ground Nitronic 32 stainless steel bar material are presented. The mechanical properties of longitudinal specimens were evaluated at test temperatures from ambient to liquid hydrogen. The tensile test data indicated increasing smooth tensile strength with decreasing temperature to liquid hydrogen temperature. However, below -200 F (-129.0 C) the notched tensile strength decreased slightly and below -320 F (-196.0 C) the decrease was significant. The elongation and reduction of area decreased drastically at temperatures below -200 F (-129.0 C). The Charpy V-notched impact energy decreased steadily with decreasing test temperature. Stress corrosion tests were performed on longitudinal tensile specimens stressed to 0, 75, and 90 percent of the 0.2 percent yield strength and on transverse 'C'-ring specimens stressed to 75 and 90 percent of the yield strength and exposed to: alternate immersion in a 3.5 percent NaCl bath, humidity cabinet environment, and a 5 percent salt spray atmosphere. The longitudinal tensile specimens experienced no corrosive attack; however, the 'C'-rings exposed to the alternate immersion and to the salt spray experienced some shallow etching and pitting, respectively. Small cracks appeared in two of the 'C'-rings after one month exposure to the salt spray.

  15. Impact of phase stability on the corrosion behavior of the austenitic candidate materials for NNWSI [Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Bullen, D.B.; Gdowski, G.E.; McCright, R.D.

    1987-10-01

    The Nuclear Waste Management Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is responsible for the development of the waste package design to meet the Nuclear Regulatory Commission licensing requirements for the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) Project. The metallic container component of the waste package is required to assist in providing substantially complete containment of the waste for a period of up to 1000 years. Long term phase stability of the austenitic candidate materials (304L and 316L stainless steels and alloy 825) over this time period at moderate temperatures (100-250{sup 0}C) can impact the mechanical and corrosion behavior of the metal barrier. A review of the technical literature with respect to phase stability of 304L, 316L and 825 is presented. The impact of martensitic transformations, carbide precipitation and intermediate ({sigma}, chi, and eta) phase formation on the mechanical properties and corrosion behavior of these alloys at repository relevant conditions is discussed. The effect of sensitization on intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of each alloy is also addressed. A summary of the impact of phase stability on the degradation of each alloy in the proposed repository environment is included. 32 refs., 6 figs.

  16. Al-MoSi2 Composite Materials: Analysis of Microstructure, Sliding Wear, Solid Particle Erosion, and Aqueous Corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gousia, V.; Tsioukis, A.; Lekatou, A.; Karantzalis, A. E.

    2016-08-01

    In this effort, AMCs reinforced with new intermetallic phases, were produced through casting and compared as far as their microstructure, sliding wear, solid particle erosion, and aqueous corrosion response. Casting was selected as a production method based on the concept: (a) ease-to-handle and low cost production route and (b) optimum homogeneity of the reinforcing phase distribution. The MoSi2 phase was produced through vacuum arc melting and the resulting drops were milled for 30 h to produce fine powder, the characteristics of which were ascertained through SEM-EDS and XRD analysis. MoSi2 was used as precursor source for the final reinforcing phase. The powder material was incorporated in molten Al1050 alloy to additions of 2, 5 and 10 vol.% respectively. Extensive reactivity between the molten Al and the MoSi2 particles was observed, leading to the formation of new reinforcing phases mainly of the Al-Mo system. In all cases, a uniform particle distribution was observed, mainly characterized by isolated intermetallic phases and few intermetallic phase clusters. Sliding wear showed a beneficial action of the reinforcing phase on the wear of the composites. Surface oxidation, plastic deformation, crack formation, and debris abrasive action were the main degradation features. The results of solid particle erosion showed that the mechanism is different as the impact angle and the vol.% change. Regarding the corrosion, the analysis revealed localized corrosion effects. The composite behavior was not altered significantly compared to that of the monolithic matrix.

  17. Sol-gel composite coatings as anti-corrosion barrier for structural materials of lead-bismuth eutectic cooled fast reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasada, Ryuta; Dou, Peng

    2013-09-01

    In order to protect the structural components of lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) cooled fast breeder reactors (FBRs) from liquid metal corrosion, advanced aluminum-yttrium nano- and micro-composite coatings were developed using an improved sol-gel process, which includes dipping specimens in a Y-added sol-gel solution dispersed with ultrafine α-Al2O3 powders prepared by mechanical milling. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and field emission electron probe microprobe analyzer (FE-EPMA) analyses revealed that the coatings are composed of alumina with high density. Accelerated corrosion tests were conducted on coated specimens in liquid LBE at 650 °C under dynamic conditions. After the corrosion tests, no cracking, spallation, erosion and liquid metal (e.g., lead) penetration occurred to the coatings, indicating that the coatings possess an enhanced dynamic LBE corrosion resistance. The superior LBE corrosion resistance is due to the presence of the nano-structured composite particles integrated into the coatings and the addition of trace amount of yttrium. Severe erosion and penetration of liquid Pb occurred to the Al2O3 nano- and micro-composite coatings. After the corrosion tests, no cracking, spallation, erosion and liquid metal (e.g., lead) penetration occurred to the newly-developed aluminum-yttrium nano- and micro-composite coatings, indicating that the coatings possess an enhanced dynamic LBE corrosion resistance. Therefore we can conclude that the coatings possess an enhanced dynamic LBE corrosion resistance under the experimental conditions chosen here. It is a way to protect the structural materials of LBE cooled FBRs from liquid metal corrosion. The much improved corrosion resistance of aluminum-yttrium nano- and micro-composite coatings, relative to Al2O3 nano- and micro-composite coatings, is due to the much higher density and the significantly superior high temperature strength resulting from using of finer Al2O3 seeding particles and adding trace

  18. MaTrace: tracing the fate of materials over time and across products in open-loop recycling.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Shinichiro; Kondo, Yasushi; Kagawa, Shigemi; Matsubae, Kazuyo; Nakajima, Kenichi; Nagasaka, Tetsuya

    2014-07-01

    Even for metals, open-loop recycling is more common than closed-loop recycling due, among other factors, to the degradation of quality in the end-of-life (EoL) phase. Open-loop recycling is subject to loss of functionality of original materials, dissipation in forms that are difficult to recover, and recovered metals might need dilution with primary metals to meet quality requirements. Sustainable management of metal resources calls for the minimization of these losses. Imperative to this is quantitative tracking of the fate of materials across different stages, products, and losses. A new input-output analysis (IO) based model of dynamic material flow analysis (MFA) is presented that can trace the fate of materials over time and across products in open-loop recycling taking explicit consideration of losses and the quality of scrap into account. Application to car steel recovered from EoL vehicles (ELV) showed that after 50 years around 80% of the steel is used in products, mostly buildings and civil engineering (infrastructure), with the rest mostly resided in unrecovered obsolete infrastructure and refinery losses. Sensitivity analysis was conducted to evaluate the effects of changes in product lifespan, and the quality of scrap.

  19. Research into processes of production of hydrides of materials containing rare-earth metals and their corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sofronov, V. L.; Kartashov, E. Y.; Molokov, P. B.; Zhiganov, A. N.; Kalaev, M. E.

    2017-01-01

    Production of permanent magnets on basis of rare earth elements (REE) is implemented by means of powder metallurgy, therefore a technologically important operation is the multistage mechanical crushing of materials to the extent of domains. The promising technique of crushing of magnetic materials is their consistent hydrogenation-dehydrogenation that allows obtaining nano-dispersed powders which are stable enough in air. Hydrogenation apparatuses, as opposed to conventional grinding machines, do not comprise motion works and their producing capacity is much higher. Hydrogenation process does not require any additional preparation of materials and it excludes undermilling and overmilling as well as material oxidation. The paper presents the results of investigation on the temperature effect on the hydrogenation process of Nd-Fe alloys. The study results on the corrosion stability of ligature hydrides under various conditions are also given. Kinetic parameters of the hydrogenation process of ligatures are determined. The phase composition of corrosion products is detected. Guidelines on hydride powder storage are given.

  20. Retrieval analysis of different orthodontic brackets: the applicability of electron microprobe techniques for determining material heterogeneities and corrosive potential

    PubMed Central

    HOLST, Alexandra Ioana; HOLST, Stefan; HIRSCHFELDER, Ursula; von SECKENDORFF, Volker

    2012-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to investigate the applicability of micro-analytical methods with high spatial resolution to the characterization of the composition and corrosion behavior of two bracket systems. Material and methods The surfaces of six nickel-free brackets and six nickel-containing brackets were examined for signs of corrosion and qualitative surface analysis using an electron probe microanalyzer (EPMA), prior to bonding to patient's tooth surfaces and four months after clinical use. The surfaces were characterized qualitatively by secondary electron (SE) images and back scattered electron (BSE) images in both compositional and topographical mode. Qualitative and quantitative wavelength-dispersive analyses were performed for different elements, and by utilizing qualitative analysis the relative concentration of selected elements was mapped two-dimensionally. The absolute concentration of the elements was determined in specially prepared brackets by quantitative analysis using pure element standards for calibration and calculating correction-factors (ZAF). Results Clear differences were observed between the different bracket types. The nickel-containing stainless steel brackets consist of two separate pieces joined by a brazing alloy. Compositional analysis revealed two different alloy compositions, and reaction zones on both sides of the brazing alloy. The nickel-free bracket was a single piece with only slight variation in element concentration, but had a significantly rougher surface. After clinical use, no corrosive phenomena were detectable with the methods applied. Traces of intraoral wear at the contact areas between the bracket slot and the arch wire were verified. Conclusion Electron probe microanalysis is a valuable tool for the characterization of element distribution and quantitative analysis for corrosion studies. PMID:23032212

  1. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THE CORROSION OF DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM MATERIALS, AND OXIDANT AND REDOX POTENTIAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Scale build-up, corrosion rate, and metal release associated with drinking water distribution system pipes have been suggested to relate to the oxidant type and concentration. Conversely, different distribution system metals may exert different oxidant demands. The impact of ox...

  2. In vitro corrosion properties and cytocompatibility of Fe-Ga alloys as potential biodegradable metallic materials.

    PubMed

    Wang, Henan; Zheng, Yang; Liu, Jinghua; Jiang, Chengbao; Li, Yan

    2017-02-01

    The in vitro biodegradable properties and cytocompatibility of Fe-Ga alloys including Fe81Ga19, (Fe81Ga19)98B2 and (Fe81Ga19)99.5(TaC)0.5, and pure Fe were investigated for biomedical applications. The microstructure of the alloys was characterized using X-ray diffraction spectroscopy and optical microscopy. The results showed that A2 and D03 phases were detected for the three types of Fe-Ga alloys, and additional Fe2B and TaC phases were found in the (Fe81Ga19)98B2 and (Fe81Ga19)99.5(TaC)0.5 alloys, respectively. The corrosion rates of the Fe-Ga alloys were higher than that of pure Fe, as demonstrated by both potentiodynamic polarization measurements and immersion tests in simulated body fluid. The alloying element Ga lowered the corrosion potential of the Fe matrix and made it more susceptible to corrosion. Severe pitting corrosion developed on the surface of the Fe81Ga19 alloy after the addition of ternary B or TaC due to the multi-phase microstructures. The MC3T3-E1 cells exhibited good adhesion and proliferation behavior on the surfaces of the Fe-Ga alloys after culture for 4h and 24h.

  3. Means of quantifying material loss due to corrosion damage using thermographic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajic, Nikolas

    1998-03-01

    A method base don an inverse solution of the 1D heat conduction equation is applied to the general problem of estimating the local thickness of a structure form measurements of its thermal response to a flash excitation. Results are presented which demonstrate the efficacy of the method when applied to specimens with simulated corrosion damage.

  4. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THE CORROSION OF DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM MATERIALS, AND OXIDANT AND REDOX POTENTIAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Scale build-up, corrosion rate, and metal release associated with drinking water distribution system pipes have been suggested to relate to the oxidant type and concentration. Conversely, different distribution system metals may exert different oxidant demands. The impact of ox...

  5. [Lead pollution of drinking water in lower Saxony from corrosion of pipe materials].

    PubMed

    Zietz, B P; Lass, J; Dunkelberg, H; Suchenwirth, R

    2009-05-01

    The corrosion of drinking water pipe materials can release different elements into tap water. Especially important in this context is the heavy metal lead, which mainly leaches from the peripheral water distribution system. Lead is known to have numerous adverse effects especially to infants and children. The aim of this project was to assess the present state of drinking water contamination with lead in Lower Saxony and to promote the replacement of lead pipes. For this purpose a project was initiated comprising three parts. Firstly, a free examination of drinking water was offered in cooperation with local public health departments for private households with young women and families with children living in buildings constructed before 1974. Participants were asked to collect a cold tap water sample in their household after nocturnal stagnation and to complete a questionnaire. The collected samples were analysed by atomic absorption spectrometry for their lead concentration. Secondly, data from local public health departments on results of lead measurements, especially in buildings for the public, were collected and analysed. Finally, a working group 'lead replacement' consisting of representatives of all relevant parties (e.g., tenant and landlord associations, handicraft, building and health administration) was initiated. In the project in total 2,901 tap water samples from households were collected between the years 2005 and 2007. Of these, 7.5% had lead concentrations exceeding 10 microg/L (recommended limit of the World Health Organisation) and 3.3% had concentrations above the limit of the German drinking water ordinance (25 microg/L). There were remarkable regional differences in the frequency of tap water contamination. Multi-family houses were more frequently affected than single and double family houses. Additional data were collected in a preceding study in southern Lower Saxony. Of the 1 434 stagnation samples, 3.1% had lead concentrations greater

  6. Structure and mechanical properties of the three-layer material based on a vanadium alloy and corrosion-resistant steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikulin, S. A.; Rozhnov, A. B.; Nechaikina, T. A.; Rogachev, S. O.; Zavodchikov, S. Yu.; Khatkevich, V. M.

    2014-10-01

    The quality of three-layer pipes has been studied; they are manufactured by hot pressing of a three-layer assembly of tubular billets followed by forging and cold rolling. The operating core is made from a V-4Ti-4Cr alloy. The protective claddings are made from corrosion-resistant steels of two grades, 08Kh17T and 20Kh13. The results of investigation into the structure and microhardness of the junction zone of steel and the vanadium alloy, which includes a contact zone and a transition diffusion layer, are reported. The 08Kh17T steel is shown to be a preferred cladding material.

  7. Effect of amino-modified silica nanoparticles on the corrosion protection properties of epoxy resin-silica hybrid materials.

    PubMed

    Chang, Kung-Chin; Lin, Hui-Fen; Lin, Chang-Yu; Kuo, Tai-Hung; Huang, Hsin-Hua; Hsu, Sheng-Chieh; Yeh, Jui-Ming; Yang, Jen-Chang; Yu, Yuan-Hsiang

    2008-06-01

    In this paper, a series of organic-inorganic hybrid materials consisting of epoxy resin frameworks and dispersed nanoparticles of amino-modified silica (AMS) were successfully prepared. First of all, the AMS nanoparticles were synthesized by carrying out the conventional acid-catalyzed sol-gel reactions of tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) in the presence of (3-aminopropyl)-trimethoxysilane (APTES) molecules. The as-prepared AMS nanoparticles were then characterized by FTIR, 13C-NMR and 29Si-NMR spectroscopy. Subsequently, a series of hybrid materials were prepared by performing in-situ thermal ring-opening polymerization reactions of epoxy resin in the presence of as-prepared AMS nanoparticles and raw silica (RS) particles. The as-prepared epoxy-silica hybrid materials with AMS nanoparticles were found to show better dispersion capability than that of RS particles existed in hybrid materials based on the morphological observation of transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The hybrid materials containing AMS nanoparticles in the form of coating on cold-rolled steel (CRS) were found to be much superior in corrosion protection over those of hybrid materials with RS particles when tested by a series of electrochemical measurements of potentiodynamic and impedance spectroscopy in 5 wt% aqueous NaCI electrolyte. The increase of corrosion protection effect of hybrid coatings may have probably resulted from the enhancement of the adhesion strength of the hybrid coatings on CRS coupons, which may be attributed to the formation of Fe-O-Si covalent bond at the interface of coating/CRS system based on the FTIR-RAS (reflection absorption spectroscopy) studies. The better dispersion capability of AMS nanoparticles in hybrid materials were found to lead more effectively enhanced molecular barrier property, mechanical strength, surface hydrophobicity and optical clarity as compared to that of RS particles, in the form of coating and membrane, based on the measurements of molecular

  8. Stress corrosion resistant fasteners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roach, T. A.

    1985-01-01

    A family of high performance aerospace fasteners made from corrosion resistant alloys for use in applications where corrosion and stress-corrosion cracking are of major concern are discussed. The materials discussed are mainly A-286, Inconel 718, MP35N and MP159. Most of the fasteners utilize cold worked and aged materials to achieve the desired properties. The fasteners are unique in that they provide a combination of high strength and immunity to stress corrosion cracking not previously attainable. A discussion of fastener stress corrosion failures is presented including a review of the history and a description of the mechanism. Case histories are presented to illustrate the problems which can arise when material selection is made without proper regard for the environmental conditions. Mechanical properties and chemical compositions are included for the fasteners discussed. Several aspects of the application of high performance corrosion resistant fasteners are discussed including galvanic compatibility and torque-tension relationships.

  9. Comparisons of a Constrained Least Squares Model versus Human-in-the-Loop for Spectral Unmixing to Determine Material Type of GEO Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abercromby, Kira J.; Rapp, Jason; Bedard, Donald; Seitzer, Patrick; Cardona, Tommaso; Cowardin, Heather; Barker, Ed; Lederer, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Constrained Linear Least Squares model is generally more accurate than the "human-in-the-loop". However, "human-in-the-loop" can remove materials that make no sense. The speed of the model in determining a "first cut" at the material ID makes it a viable option for spectral unmixing of debris objects.

  10. Retardation of surface corrosion of biodegradable magnesium-based materials by aluminum ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Guosong; Xu, Ruizhen; Feng, Kai; Wu, Shuilin; Wu, Zhengwei; Sun, Guangyong; Zheng, Gang; Li, Guangyao; Chu, Paul K.

    2012-07-01

    Aluminum ion implantation is employed to modify pure Mg as well as AZ31 and AZ91 magnesium alloys and their surface degradation behavior in simulated body fluids is studied. Polarization tests performed in conjunction with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) reveal that the surface corrosion resistance after Al ion implantation is improved appreciably. This enhancement can be attributed to the formation of a gradient surface structure with a gradual transition from an Al-rich oxide layer to Al-rich metal layer. Compared to the high Al-content magnesium alloy (AZ91), a larger reduction in the degradation rate is achieved from pure magnesium and AZ31. Our results reveal that the surface corrosion resistance of Mg alloys with no or low Al content can be improved by Al ion implantation.

  11. Material Corrosion and Plate-Out Test of Types 304L and 316L Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Zapp, P.E.

    2001-02-06

    Corrosion and plate-out tests were performed on 304L and 316L stainless steel in pretreated Envelope B and Envelope C solutions. Flat coupons of the two stainless steels were exposed to 100 degrees C liquid and to 74 degrees C and 88 degrees C vapor above the solutions for 61 days. No significant corrosion was observed either by weight-loss measurements or by microscopic examination. Most coupons had small weight gains due to plate-out of solids, which remained to some extent even after 24-hour immersion in 1 N nitric acid at room temperature. Plate-out was more significant in the Envelope B coupons, with film thickness from less than 0.001 in. to 0.003-inches.

  12. Screening of candidate corrosion resistant materials for coal combustion environments -- Volume 4. Final report, January 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Boss, D.E.

    1997-12-31

    The development of a silicon carbide heat exchanger is a critical step in the development of the Externally-Fired Combined Cycle (EFCC) power system. SiC is the only material that provides the necessary combination of resistance to creep, thermal shock, and oxidation. While the SiC structural materials provide the thermomechanical and thermophysical properties needed for an efficient system, the mechanical properties of the SiC tubes are severely degraded through corrosion by the coal combustion products. To obtain the necessary service life of thousands of hours at temperature, a protective coating is needed that is stable with both the SiC tube and the coal combustion products, resists erosion from the particle laden gas stream, is thermal-shock resistant, adheres to SiC during repeated thermal shocks (start-up, process upsets, shut-down), and allows the EFCC system to be cost competitive. The candidate protective materials identified in a previous effort were screened for their stability to the EFCC combustion environment. Bulk samples of each of the eleven candidate materials were prepared, and exposed to coal slag for 100 hours at 1,370 C under flowing air. After exposure the samples were mounted, polished, and examined via x-ray diffraction, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. In general, the alumina-based materials behaved well, with comparable corrosion depths in all five samples. Magnesium chromite formed a series of reaction products with the slag, which included an alumina-rich region. These reaction products may act as a diffusion barrier to slow further reaction between the magnesium chromite and the slag and prove to be a protective coating. As for the other materials; calcium titanate failed catastrophically, the CS-50 exhibited extension microstructural and compositional changes, and zirconium titanate, barium zironate, and yttrium chromite all showed evidence of dissolution with the slag.

  13. Modeling of liquid-metal corrosion/deposition in a fusion reactor blanket

    SciTech Connect

    Malang, S.; Smith, D.L.

    1984-04-01

    A model has been developed for the investigation of the liquid-metal corrosion and the corrosion product transport in a liquid-metal-cooled fusion reactor blanket. The model describes the two-dimensional transport of wall material in the liquid-metal flow and is based on the following assumptions: (1) parallel flow in a straight circular tube; (2) transport of wall material perpendicular to the flow direction by diffusion and turbulent exchange; in flow direction by the flow motion only; (3) magnetic field causes uniform velocity profile with thin boundary layer and suppresses turbulent mass exchange; and (4) liquid metal at the interface is saturated with wall material. A computer code based on this model has been used to analyze the corrosion of ferritic steel by lithium lead and the deposition of wall material in the cooler part of a loop. Three cases have been investigated: (1) ANL forced convection corrosion experiment (without magnetic field); (2) corrosion in the MARS liquid-metal-cooled blanket (with magnetic field); and (3) deposition of wall material in the corrosion product cleanup system of the MARS blanket loop.

  14. The influence of inhibitor Na2CrO4 and NaNO3 on corrosion and micro structure on AISI 348 steel material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samosir, Rahmad; Budiarto; Simanjuntak, Sutan L. M. H.

    2017-09-01

    The influence of inhibitor Na2CrO4 and NaNO3 on corrotion and microstructure on AISI 348 steel material have been carried out. A series of corrosion tests were conducted with polarization and potentiodynamic and microstructure resistance methods on AISI steel 348 for secondary cooling pipes at steam power plants. This research was carried out in demineralized water at room temperature (25°C) using Na2CrO4 and NaNO3 inhibitors whose concentration varied between 0-150 ppm for corrosion rate inhibitors. Observations of microstructures were performed using optical microscopy and SEM. The corrosion test showed that in the NaNO3 inhibitor solution, the highest corrosion rate was 0.05 mpy at 15 ppm and the lowest corrosion rate was 0.0058 mpy at 30 ppm, and the highest tail was 174.89 mV at 75 ppm and the lowest tail 103, 04 mV at concentration 0 ppm. While in Na2CrO4 inhibitor solution obtained the highest corrosion rate 0,0606 mpy at concentration 75 ppm and lowest corrosion rate 0,0197 mpy at concentration 15 ppm, and highest tail 264 mV at concentration 30 ppm and lowest tail -128 mV at concentration 75 ppm from Inhibitor Na2CrO4. The optimum concentration of NaNO3 was 30 ppm with an efficiency of 72.1%, and the optimum concentration of Na2CrO4 was 150 ppm with an efficiency of 1.9%. The result of microstructure observation showed that on the surface of the sample was formed a protective film of oxide, and on corrosion of AISI 348 steel corrosion of well form.

  15. High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Materials: Iron-Based Amorphous-Metal Thermal-Spray Coatings: SAM HPCRM Program ? FY04 Annual Report ? Rev. 0 - DARPA DSO & DOE OCRWM Co-Sponsored Advanced Materials Program

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J; Haslam, J; Wong, F; Ji, S; Day, S; Branagan, D; Marshall, M; Meacham, B; Buffa, E; Blue, C; Rivard, J; Beardsley, M; Buffa, E; Blue, C; Rivard, J; Beardsley, M; Weaver, D; Aprigliano, L; Kohler, L; Bayles, R; Lemieux, E; Wolejsza, T; Martin, F; Yang, N; Lucadamo, G; Perepezko, J; Hildal, K; Kaufman, L; Heuer, A; Ernst, F; Michal, G; Kahn, H; Lavernia, E

    2007-09-19

    The multi-institutional High Performance Corrosion Resistant Materials (HPCRM) Team is cosponsored by the Defense Advanced Projects Agency (DARPA) Defense Science Office (DSO) and the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), and has developed new corrosion-resistant, iron-based amorphous metals that can be applied as coatings with advanced thermal spray technology. Two compositions have corrosion resistance superior to wrought nickel-based Alloy C-22 (UNS No. N06022) in very aggressive environments, including concentrated calcium-chloride brines at elevated temperature. Corrosion costs the Department of Defense billions of dollars every year, with an immense quantity of material in various structures undergoing corrosion. For example, in addition to fluid and seawater piping, ballast tanks, and propulsions systems, approximately 345 million square feet of structure aboard naval ships and crafts require costly corrosion control measures. The use of advanced corrosion-resistant materials to prevent the continuous degradation of this massive surface area would be extremely beneficial. The Fe-based corrosion-resistant, amorphous-metal coatings under development may prove of importance for applications on ships. Such coatings could be used as an 'integral drip shield' on spent fuel containers, as well as protective coatings that could be applied over welds, thereby preventing exposure to environments that might cause stress corrosion cracking. In the future, such new high-performance iron-based materials could be substituted for more-expensive nickel-based alloys, thereby enabling a reduction in the $58-billion life cycle cost for the long-term storage of the Nation's spent nuclear fuel by tens of percent.

  16. Corrosion Embrittlement of Duralumin III Effect of the Previous Treatment of Sheet Material on the Susceptibility to This Type of Corrosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rawdon, Henry S

    1928-01-01

    As a result of testing, it was determined that control of the rate of quenching and the avoidance of accelerated aging by heating are the only means of modifying duralumin itself so as to minimize the intercrystalline form of corrosive attack. It is so simple a means that it should be adopted even though it may not completely prevent, but only reduce, this form of corrosive attack. By so doing, the need for protection of the surface is less urgent.

  17. Effects of hydrazine and pH on the corrosion of copper-alloy materials in AVT environments with oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Lorentz, D.G.

    1982-12-01

    The impact of pH and hydrazine on release rates of CDA-706 (Cu/Ni:90/10) and CDA-443-ADM (admiralty brass) was studied at typical plant conditions. Data from these tests could be used to approximate the extent of corrosion transport. Tests on CDA-706 were performed at 274 and 375/sup 0/F. Tests on CDA-443-ADM were conducted at 193/sup 0/F. The CDA-706 tests indicated that release rates increased with temperature and decreased with pH under the test conditions studied. The CDA-443-ADM tests displayed a parabolic shaped release rate curve with a minimum at about pH 9.05. A comparison between the two oxygen test values revealed that the higher oxygen tests resulted in the higher release rates for both of the feedwater materials. Likewise, test conditions with less than stoichiometric hydrazine values resulted in higher release rates as compared to test points with excess hydrazine. Due to the high release rates form both CDA-706 and CDA-443-ADM, these feedwater materials are not recommended for future use in feedwater heaters when there is concern for corrosion product transport. 25 figures, 10 tables.

  18. An aqueous, polymer-based redox-flow battery using non-corrosive, safe, and low-cost materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janoschka, Tobias; Martin, Norbert; Martin, Udo; Friebe, Christian; Morgenstern, Sabine; Hiller, Hannes; Hager, Martin D.; Schubert, Ulrich S.

    2015-11-01

    For renewable energy sources such as solar, wind, and hydroelectric to be effectively used in the grid of the future, flexible and scalable energy-storage solutions are necessary to mitigate output fluctuations. Redox-flow batteries (RFBs) were first built in the 1940s and are considered a promising large-scale energy-storage technology. A limited number of redox-active materials--mainly metal salts, corrosive halogens, and low-molar-mass organic compounds--have been investigated as active materials, and only a few membrane materials, such as Nafion, have been considered for RFBs. However, for systems that are intended for both domestic and large-scale use, safety and cost must be taken into account as well as energy density and capacity, particularly regarding long-term access to metal resources, which places limits on the lithium-ion-based and vanadium-based RFB development. Here we describe an affordable, safe, and scalable battery system, which uses organic polymers as the charge-storage material in combination with inexpensive dialysis membranes, which separate the anode and the cathode by the retention of the non-metallic, active (macro-molecular) species, and an aqueous sodium chloride solution as the electrolyte. This water- and polymer-based RFB has an energy density of 10 watt hours per litre, current densities of up to 100 milliamperes per square centimetre, and stable long-term cycling capability. The polymer-based RFB we present uses an environmentally benign sodium chloride solution and cheap, commercially available filter membranes instead of highly corrosive acid electrolytes and expensive membrane materials.

  19. An aqueous, polymer-based redox-flow battery using non-corrosive, safe, and low-cost materials.

    PubMed

    Janoschka, Tobias; Martin, Norbert; Martin, Udo; Friebe, Christian; Morgenstern, Sabine; Hiller, Hannes; Hager, Martin D; Schubert, Ulrich S

    2015-11-05

    For renewable energy sources such as solar, wind, and hydroelectric to be effectively used in the grid of the future, flexible and scalable energy-storage solutions are necessary to mitigate output fluctuations. Redox-flow batteries (RFBs) were first built in the 1940s and are considered a promising large-scale energy-storage technology. A limited number of redox-active materials--mainly metal salts, corrosive halogens, and low-molar-mass organic compounds--have been investigated as active materials, and only a few membrane materials, such as Nafion, have been considered for RFBs. However, for systems that are intended for both domestic and large-scale use, safety and cost must be taken into account as well as energy density and capacity, particularly regarding long-term access to metal resources, which places limits on the lithium-ion-based and vanadium-based RFB development. Here we describe an affordable, safe, and scalable battery system, which uses organic polymers as the charge-storage material in combination with inexpensive dialysis membranes, which separate the anode and the cathode by the retention of the non-metallic, active (macro-molecular) species, and an aqueous sodium chloride solution as the electrolyte. This water- and polymer-based RFB has an energy density of 10 watt hours per litre, current densities of up to 100 milliamperes per square centimetre, and stable long-term cycling capability. The polymer-based RFB we present uses an environmentally benign sodium chloride solution and cheap, commercially available filter membranes instead of highly corrosive acid electrolytes and expensive membrane materials.

  20. Effect of Surface Condition and Heat Treatment on Corrosion of Type 316L Stainless Steel in a Mercury Thermal Convection Loop

    SciTech Connect

    Pawel, S.J.

    2000-10-17

    Two thermal convection loops (TCLs) fabricated from 316L stainless steel and containing mercury and a variety of 316L coupons representing variable surface conditions and heat treatments have been operated continuously for 2000 h. Surface conditions included surface ground, polished, gold-coated, chemically etched, bombarded with Fe to simulate radiation damage, and oxidized. Heat treatments included solution treated, welded, and sensitized. In addition, a nitrogen doped 316L material, termed 316LN, was also examined in the solution treated condition. Duplicate TCLs were operated in this experiment--both were operated with a 305 C peak temperature, a 65 C temperature gradient, and mercury velocity of 1.2 m/min--but only one included a 36 h soak in Hg at 310 C just prior to operation to encourage wetting. Results indicate that the soak in Hg at 310 C had no lasting effect on wetting or compatibility with Hg. Further, based on examination of post-test wetting and coupon weight loss, only the gold-coated surfaces revealed significant interaction with Hg. In areas wetted significantly by Hg, the extreme surface of the stainless steel (ca 10 {micro}m) was depleted in Ni and Cr compared to the bulk composition.

  1. Effect of Surface Condition and Heat Treatment on Corrosion of Type 316L Stainless Steel in a Mercury Thermal Convection Loop

    SciTech Connect

    Pawel, S J

    2001-09-25

    Two thermal convection loops (TCLs) fabricated from 316L stainless steel and containing mercury and a variety of 316L coupons representing variable surface conditions and heat treatments have been operated continuously for 2000 h. Surface conditions included surface ground, polished, gold-coated, chemically etched, bombarded with Fe to simulate radiation damage, and oxidized. Heat treatments included solution treated, welded, and sensitized. In addition, a nitrogen doped 316L material, termed 316LN, was also examined in the solution treated condition. Duplicate TCLs were operated in this experiment--both were operated with a 305 C peak temperature, a 65 C temperature gradient, and mercury velocity of 1.2 m/min--but only one included a 36 h soak in Hg at 310 C just prior to operation to encourage wetting. Results indicate that the soak in Hg at 310 C had no lasting effect on wetting or compatibility with Hg. Further, based on examination of post-test wetting and coupon weight loss, only the gold-coated surfaces revealed significant interaction with Hg. In areas wetted significantly by Hg, the extreme surface of the stainless steel (ca 10 {micro}m) was depleted in Ni and Cr compared to the bulk composition.

  2. Effects of surface condition on the corrosion of candidate structural materials in a simulated HTGR-GT environment

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, L.D.

    1980-02-01

    A simulated high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) helium environment was used to study the effects of surface finish conditions on the subsequent elevated-temperature corrosion behavior of key candidate structural materials. The environment contained helium with 500 ..mu..atm H/sub 2//50 ..mu..atm CO/50 ..mu..atm CH/sub 4//<0.5 ..mu..atm H/sub 2/O at 900/sup 0/C with total test exposure durations of 3000 hours. Specimens with lapped, grit-blasted, pickled, and preoxidized surface conditions were studied. Materials tested included two cast superalloys, IN 100 and IN 713LC; one centrifugally cast high-temperature alloy, HK 40 one oxice-dispersion-strengthened alloy, Inconel MA 754; and three wrought high-temperature alloys, Hastelloy Alloy X, Inconel Alloy 617, and Alloy 800H.

  3. Coprecipitated, copper-based, alumina-stabilized materials for carbon dioxide capture by chemical looping combustion.

    PubMed

    Imtiaz, Qasim; Kierzkowska, Agnieszka Marta; Müller, Christoph Rüdiger

    2012-08-01

    Chemical looping combustion (CLC) has emerged as a carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) process to produce a pure stream of CO(2) at very low costs when compared with alternative CCS technologies, such as scrubbing with amines. From a thermodynamic point of view, copper oxide is arguably the most promising candidate for the oxygen carrier owing to its exothermic reduction and oxidation reactions and high oxygen-carrying capacity. However, the low melting point of pure copper of only 1085 °C has so far prohibited the synthesis of copper-rich oxygen carriers. This paper is concerned with the development of copper-based and Al(2)O(3)-stabilized oxygen carriers that contain a high mass fraction of CuO, namely, 82.4 wt %. The oxygen carriers were synthesized by using a coprecipitation technique. The synthesized oxygen carriers were characterized in detail with regards to their morphological properties, chemical composition, and surface topography. It was found that both the precipitating agent and the pH at which the precipitation was performed strongly influenced the structure and chemical composition of the oxygen carriers. In addition, XRD analysis confirmed that, for the majority of the precipitation conditions investigated, CuO reacted with Al(2)O(3) to form fully reducible CuAl(2)O(4). The redox characteristics of the synthesized materials were evaluated at 800 °C by using methane as the fuel and air for reoxidation. It was found that the oxygen-carrying capacity of the synthesized oxygen carriers was strongly influenced by both the precipitating agent and the pH at which the precipitation was performed; however, all oxygen carriers tested showed a stable cyclic oxygen-carrying capacity. The oxygen carriers synthesized at pH 5.5 using NaOH or Na(2)CO(3) as the precipitating agents were the best oxygen carriers synthesized owing to their high and stable oxygen transfer and uncoupling capacities. The excellent redox characteristics of the best oxygen carrier

  4. Research Opportunities in Corrosion Science for Long-Term Prediction of Materials Performance: A Report of the DOE Workshop on “Corrosion Issues of Relevance to the Yucca Mountain Waste Repository”.

    SciTech Connect

    Payer, Joe H.; Scully, John R.

    2003-07-29

    The report summarizes the findings of a U.S. Department of Energy workshop on “Corrosion Issues of Relevance to the Yucca Mountain Waste Repository”. The workshop was held on July 29-30, 2003 in Bethesda, MD, and was co-sponsored by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences and Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management. The workshop focus was corrosion science relevant to long-term prediction of materials performance in hostile environments, with special focus on relevance to the permanent disposal of nuclear waste at the Yucca Mountain Repository. The culmination of the workshop is this report that identifies both generic and Yucca Mountain Project-specific research opportunities in basic and applied topic areas. The research opportunities would be realized well after the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s initial construction-authorization licensing process. At the workshop, twenty-three invited scientists deliberated on basic and applied science opportunities in corrosion science relevant to long-term prediction of damage accumulation by corrosive processes that affect materials performance.

  5. Effects of Heat Treatment on Bio-Corrosion Properties of Mg-Zn-xMn (x= 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 wt.%) Alloys as Biodegradable Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wonseok; Yoon, Young-Ok; Kim, Shae K.; Lim, Hyun Kyu; Kim, Do Hyang

    Mg alloys have unique characteristics such as high specific strength, low density, high corrosion rate, etc., as functional as well as structural materials. Mg-Zn alloys have good biocompatibility because Mg and Zn are abundant nutritional elements in the human's body. However, Mg alloys with multi-phase cause galvanic corrosion by corrosion potential differences among constituent phases. Therefore, the application of Mg alloys on bio-material parts are limited.

  6. Surface characterization of artificial corrosion layers on copper alloy reference materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantinides, I.; Adriaens, A.; Adams, F.

    2002-04-01

    This paper describes the surface characterization of artificial patina layers on five different copper alloys. The chemical composition of the examined bronzes covers the major families of archaeological copper alloys from antiquity until the Roman period. The patina layers of the five samples were formed under identical conditions by electrochemical means. Light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray micro analysis (SEM-EDX) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) were used to describe the main properties of the patina layers. The results were interpreted and classified according to an existing corrosion model for copper alloys.

  7. An in Vitro Corrosion Study of Two Implant Materials Using Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy and Potentiodynamic Polarization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-01

    reference contains the potential versus pH ( Pourbaix ) diagrams for various metals. These diagrams provide the thermodynamics of corrosion in terms of...forming on the CP-Ti and TiO 3ŖH20 forming on the TI-6Al- 4V. Pourbaix diagrams can be used to provide insight into the formation and stability of the...behaves similarly to pure titanium. The Pourbaix diagrams given in Figures 46a and 46b suggest that the oxidation which occurred on the polished and

  8. Corrosion/Deterioration of Fuel Tank Materials Wetted in Methanolic Electrolytes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-12-15

    IRFE5. A a a 9.593 ’DECFIi-L E a 1.8 2 "- € AT’L BERA c a 0.671 V/DEC It!1TAL E a -1.2 V ,- lE torr w -9.729 V It. IT L DELAY a 60 SEC VISO! a -0.515...the entire test period. The cell was connected to the measurement instrument with polarity assuming.the aluminum electrode to be anodic. Thus the...correlates with the change in polarity of the galvanic corrosion current at 400 hours (Figure 12). The measurements of Figure 12 indicate a saturating

  9. Galvanic coupling between D6AC steel, 6061-T6 aluminum, Inconel 718 and graphite-epoxy composite material: Corrosion occurrence and prevention

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danford, M. D.; Higgins, R. H.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of galvanic coupling between D6AC steel, 6061-T6 aluminum, Inconel 718, and graphite-epoxy composite material (G/E) in 3.5% NaCl were studied. Measurements of corrosion potentials, galvanic currents and corrosion rates of the bare metals using weight-loss methods served to establish the need for corrosion protection in cases where D6AC steel and 6061-T6 aluminum are galvanically coupled to G/E in salt water while Inconel 718 was shown to be compatible with G/E. Six tests were made to study corrosion protective methods for eliminating galvanic corrosion in the cases of D6AC steel and 6061-T6 aluminum coupled to G/E. These results indicate that, when the G/E is completely coated with paint or a paint/polyurethane resin combination, satisfactory protection of the D6AC steel is achieved with either a coat of zinc-rich primer or a primer/topcoat combination. Likewise, satisfactory corrosion protection of the aluminum is achieved by coating it with an epoxy coating system.

  10. Processing and Evaluation of Next Generation Oxygen Carrier Materials for Chemical Looping Combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamedi Rad, Mina

    This study follows two methods to achieve a modified CaMnO 3-delta structure with higher oxygen capacity and stability. The first method is replacement of manganese with iron as a cheaper alternative and the second method is size effect investigations of A-site dopants on CaMn 0.9Fe0.1O3-delta and its oxygen capacity and stability. Solid state reaction followed by mechanical extrusion is used as the preparation method. All synthesized perovskites are characterized by TGA and XRD analyses. The samples of highest oxygen capacity and stability are further characterized by SEM and BET analyses. Oxygen uncoupling behavior and reactivity of these samples are also examined using a fluidized bed reactor performing Chemical Looping Combustion. The temperature effect is also investigated during chemical looping process at temperatures of 800, 850, 900 and 950 °C. In the first method, since calcium could not be incorporated in the structure, strontium is used as the A-site cation. SrFeO3-delta has shown to be more stable than CaMnO3-delta. However, because of low oxygen capacity, it is doped on the A-site (La and Ba) and B-site (Al, Ti, Mn, Co) by 10 mol% (Sr0.9La0.1FeO3-delta, Sr0.9Ba0.1FeO3-delta, SrFe0.9Al 0.1O3-delta, SrFe0.9Ti0.1O3-delta , SrFe0.9Mn0.1O3-delta, SrFe 0.9Co0.1O3-delta). Results reveal that manganese doped structure (SrFe0.9Mn0.1O3-delta) has the highest oxygen capacity. Adding more manganese to the structure increases the oxygen capacity even further. The best iron-based structure has 30 mol% manganese, doped on the B-site, having 28% mass change in an inert atmosphere (SrFe0.7Mn0.3O3-delta, SFM73) and high stability. Results of conducted experiments in second method demonstrated that Strontium doped perovskite (Ca0.9Sr0.1Mn0.9Fe 0.1O3-delta, CS91MF91) is the best synthesized oxygen carrier among all synthesized manganese and iron-based perovskites. This material shows excellent oxygen uptake and release (1.78 wt. %) and high stability. The reactivity and

  11. Material Balance Based Modeling of BLSS with Matlab/Simulink. The MEliSSA Loop Case in Steady-State Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poughon, L.; Farges-Haddani, B.; Gros, J. B.; Du, C. G.

    Solving material balances in Biological Life Support Systems BLSS affords mass flow rates and chemical elements C H O N S P etc in all parts of these very intricate and complex systems this helps defining and optimizing the performance of the entire recycling loop in terms of closedness and necessary flow inputs The complete MELiSSA loop was modeled using MatLab Simulink and a mass balance simulator for the loop was released In order to build the complete MELiSSA loop material balance simulator with Matlab Simulink it was necessary 1- To establish steady-state models on the basis of mass-balances and elements-balances for each compartment and each subsystem of the loop for biological processes in the MELiSSA compartments within the loop stoichiometric equations including biomass were derived 2- To develop for each compartments and subsystems the associated Matlab Simulink S-blocks in which models are included 3- To assemble the different S-blocks of the loop flowchart giving as a result the flow rates in the entire recycling loop The simulation parameters are easily managed using the graphical dialog boxes The simulator is used to test the behavior of the loop in different operating conditions typically by varying the composition of the food produced in the loop

  12. FY05 HPCRM Annual Report: High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Iron-Based Amorphous Metal Coatings Evaluation of Corrosion Reistance FY05 HPCRM Annual Report # Rev. 1DOE-DARPA Co-Sponsored Advanced Materials Program

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J C; Haslam, J J; Day, S D

    2007-09-19

    New corrosion-resistant, iron-based amorphous metals have been identified from published data or developed through combinatorial synthesis, and tested to determine their relative corrosion resistance. Many of these materials can be applied as coatings with advanced thermal spray technology. Two compositions have corrosion resistance superior to wrought nickel-based Alloy C-22 (UNS No. N06022) in some very aggressive environments, including concentrated calcium-chloride brines at elevated temperature. Two Fe-based amorphous metal formulations have been found that appear to have corrosion resistance comparable to, or better than that of Ni-based Alloy C-22, based on breakdown potential and corrosion rate. Both Cr and Mo provide corrosion resistance, B enables glass formation, and Y lowers critical cooling rate (CCR). SAM1651 has yttrium added, and has a nominal critical cooling rate of only 80 Kelvin per second, while SAM2X7 (similar to SAM2X5) has no yttrium, and a relatively high critical cooling rate of 610 Kelvin per second. Both amorphous metal formulations have strengths and weaknesses. SAM1651 (yttrium added) has a low critical cooling rate (CCR), which enables it to be rendered as a completely amorphous thermal spray coating. Unfortunately, it is relatively difficult to atomize, with powders being irregular in shape. This causes the powder to be difficult to pneumatically convey during thermal spray deposition. Gas atomized SAM1651 powder has required cryogenic milling to eliminate irregularities that make flow difficult. SAM2X5 (no yttrium) has a high critical cooling rate, which has caused problems associated with devitrification. SAM2X5 can be gas atomized to produce spherical powders of SAM2X5, which enable more facile thermal spray deposition. The reference material, nickel-based Alloy C-22, is an outstanding corrosion-resistant engineering material. Even so, crevice corrosion has been observed with C-22 in hot sodium chloride environments without buffer

  13. Effect of intergranular surface attack on the fatigue and corrosion properties of AM-355 CRT material

    SciTech Connect

    Bhansali, K.J.; Liu, G.; Grendahl, S.M.; Champagne, V.K.; Pepi, M.S.

    1998-12-31

    A dynamic part, consisting of a stack of laminates, failed in the field after an unexpectedly short life. Failure analysis showed that a multitude of fatigue cracks originated from a combination of corrosion and fretting. Recent changes in the production process of the laminates resulted in the presence of an intergranular (IG) morphology on the surface. Due to the criticality of this part`s application, a better understanding of the influence of varying degrees of IG attack on fatigue properties was pursued. Coupon specimens were machined from actual components with different surface IG conditions and were subjected to fatigue testing. Results showed a direct relationship between the number of cycles to failure and the severity of surface IG attack. Potentiodynamic polarization measurements indicated that a sample with IG attack had a lower breakdown potential and an unstable passivation behavior as compared to that without an IG attack. The detrimental effects of surface IG attack on the crack initiation process, endurance limit and corrosion resistance is discussed in terms of the stress concentration and breakdown of the passivation layer.

  14. Inspection indications, stress corrosion cracks and repair of process piping in nuclear materials production reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Louthan, M.R. Jr.; West, S.L.; Nelson, D.Z.

    1991-01-01

    Ultrasonic inspection of Schedule 40 Type 304 stainless steel piping in the process water system of the Savannah River Site reactors has provided indications of discontinuities in less than 10% of the weld heat affected zones. Pipe sections containing significant indications are replaced with Type 304L components. Post removal metallurgical evaluation showed that the indications resulted from stress corrosion cracking in weld heat-affected zones and that the overall weld quality was excellent. The evaluation also revealed weld fusion zone discontinuities such as incomplete penetration, incomplete fusion, inclusions, underfill at weld roots and hot cracks. Service induced extension of these discontinuities was generally not significant although stress corrosion cracking in one weld fusion zone was noted. One set of UT indications was caused by metallurgical discontinuities at the fusion boundary of an extra weld. This extra weld, not apparent on the outer pipe surface, was slightly overlapping and approximately parallel to the weld being inspected. This extra weld was made during a pipe repair, probably associated with initial construction processes. The two nearly parallel welds made accurate assessment of the UT signal difficult. The implications of these observations to the inspection and repair of process water systems of nuclear reactors is discussed.

  15. Inspection indications, stress corrosion cracks and repair of process piping in nuclear materials production reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Louthan, M.R. Jr.; West, S.L.; Nelson, D.Z.

    1991-12-31

    Ultrasonic inspection of Schedule 40 Type 304 stainless steel piping in the process water system of the Savannah River Site reactors has provided indications of discontinuities in less than 10% of the weld heat affected zones. Pipe sections containing significant indications are replaced with Type 304L components. Post removal metallurgical evaluation showed that the indications resulted from stress corrosion cracking in weld heat-affected zones and that the overall weld quality was excellent. The evaluation also revealed weld fusion zone discontinuities such as incomplete penetration, incomplete fusion, inclusions, underfill at weld roots and hot cracks. Service induced extension of these discontinuities was generally not significant although stress corrosion cracking in one weld fusion zone was noted. One set of UT indications was caused by metallurgical discontinuities at the fusion boundary of an extra weld. This extra weld, not apparent on the outer pipe surface, was slightly overlapping and approximately parallel to the weld being inspected. This extra weld was made during a pipe repair, probably associated with initial construction processes. The two nearly parallel welds made accurate assessment of the UT signal difficult. The implications of these observations to the inspection and repair of process water systems of nuclear reactors is discussed.

  16. Influence of pipe material and surfaces on sulfide related odor and corrosion in sewers.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Asbjørn Haaning; Vollertsen, Jes; Jensen, Henriette Stokbro; Wium-Andersen, Tove; Hvitved-Jacobsen, Thorkild

    2008-09-01

    Hydrogen sulfide oxidation on sewer pipe surfaces was investigated in a pilot scale experimental setup. The experiments were aimed at replicating conditions in a gravity sewer located immediately downstream of a force main where sulfide related concrete corrosion and odor is often observed. During the experiments, hydrogen sulfide gas was injected intermittently into the headspace of partially filled concrete and plastic (PVC and HDPE) sewer pipes in concentrations of approximately 1,000 ppm(v). Between each injection, the hydrogen sulfide concentration was monitored while it decreased because of adsorption and subsequent oxidation on the pipe surfaces. The experiments showed that the rate of hydrogen sulfide oxidation was approximately two orders of magnitude faster on the concrete pipe surfaces than on the plastic pipe surfaces. Removal of the layer of reaction (corrosion) products from the concrete pipes was found to reduce the rate of hydrogen sulfide oxidation significantly. However, the rate of sulfide oxidation was restored to its background level within 10-20 days. A similar treatment had no observable effect on hydrogen sulfide removal in the plastic pipe reactors. The experimental results were used to model hydrogen sulfide oxidation under field conditions. This showed that the gas-phase hydrogen sulfide concentration in concrete sewers would typically amount to a few percent of the equilibrium concentration calculated from Henry's law. In the plastic pipe sewers, significantly higher concentrations were predicted because of the slower adsorption and oxidation kinetics on such surfaces.

  17. Potentiodynamic Corrosion Testing.

    PubMed

    Munir, Selin; Pelletier, Matthew H; Walsh, William R

    2016-09-04

    Different metallic materials have different polarization characteristics as dictated by the open circuit potential, breakdown potential, and passivation potential of the material. The detection of these electrochemical parameters identifies the corrosion factors of a material. A reliable and well-functioning corrosion system is required to achieve this. Corrosion of the samples was achieved via a potentiodynamic polarization technique employing a three-electrode configuration, consisting of reference, counter, and working electrodes. Prior to commencement a baseline potential is obtained. Following the stabilization of the corrosion potential (Ecorr), the applied potential is ramped at a slow rate in the positive direction relative to the reference electrode. The working electrode was a stainless steel screw. The reference electrode was a standard Ag/AgCl. The counter electrode used was a platinum mesh. Having a reliable and well-functioning in vitro corrosion system to test biomaterials provides an in-expensive technique that allows for the systematic characterization of the material by determining the breakdown potential, to further understand the material's response to corrosion. The goal of the protocol is to set up and run an in vitro potentiodynamic corrosion system to analyze pitting corrosion for small metallic medical devices.

  18. Corrosion and fatigue of surgical implants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lisagor, W. B.

    1975-01-01

    Implants for the treatment of femoral fractures, mechanisms leading to the failure or degradation of such structures, and current perspectives on surgical implants are discussed. Under the first heading, general usage, materials and procedures, environmental conditions, and laboratory analyses of implants after service are considered. Corrosion, crevice corrosion, stress corrosion cracking, intergranular corrosion, pitting corrosion, fatigue, and corrosion fatigue are the principal degradation mechanisms described. The need for improvement in the reliability of implants is emphasized.

  19. Corrosion and fatigue of surgical implants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lisagor, W. B.

    1975-01-01

    Implants for the treatment of femoral fractures, mechanisms leading to the failure or degradation of such structures, and current perspectives on surgical implants are discussed. Under the first heading, general usage, materials and procedures, environmental conditions, and laboratory analyses of implants after service are considered. Corrosion, crevice corrosion, stress corrosion cracking, intergranular corrosion, pitting corrosion, fatigue, and corrosion fatigue are the principal degradation mechanisms described. The need for improvement in the reliability of implants is emphasized.

  20. Experimental and theoretical studies of parameters that influence corrosion of Zircaloy-4

    SciTech Connect

    Billot, P.; Robin, J.C.; Giordano, A.; Peybernes, J.; Thomazet, J.; Amanrich, H.

    1994-12-31

    Waterside corrosion of Zircaloy cladding in pressurized water reactors (PWRs) is largely dependent upon the operating parameters and microstructure of the zirconium alloys. The impact of these parameters on the corrosion kinetics of Zircaloys is investigated on the basis of empirical data and experiences that can be interpreted using existing corrosion models. The influence of thermo-hydraulic data, heat flux, local boiling conditions, and of the growing oxide films has been studied from corrosion tests performed in static autoclaves or in out-of-pile loops. These parametric investigations are described as well as the models that were developed. The impact of microstructure is studied from the comparison of the corrosion behavior of different Zircaloy-4 specimens corroded in out-of-pile tests. In particular, a poor corrosion resistance of an experimental Zircaloy-4 material is analyzed as a function of the microstructure close to the metal/oxide interface. The impact of the alloy composition and primary coolant chemistry on the corrosion kinetics of Zircaloy-4 is modeled empirically or uses a mechanistic approach that proposes a series of chemical equations with a mathematical representation of the kinetics. These proposed models are then used to investigate the corrosion behavior of Zircaloy-4 cladding in 17 by 17 plants for rods irradiated at high burnups. Higher PWR operating cycles, core average coolant temperature, power, and elevated primary coolant lithium concentrations (3.5 to 4 ppm) are then simulated and discussed in terms of Zircaloy corrosion resistance considerations.

  1. Acoustic emission monitoring of tensile testing of corroded and un-corroded clad aluminum 2024-T3 and characterization of effects of corrosion on AE source events and material tensile properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okafor, A. Chukwujekwu; Natarajan, Shridhar

    2014-02-01

    Corrosion damage affects structural integrity and deteriorates material properties of aluminum alloys in aircraft structures. Acoustic Emission (AE) is an effective nondestructive evaluation (NDE) technique for monitoring such damages and predicting failure in large structures of an aircraft. For successful interpretation of data from AE monitoring, sources of AE and factors affecting it need to be identified. This paper presents results of AE monitoring of tensile testing of corroded and un-corroded clad Aluminum 2024-T3 test specimens, and characterization of the effects of strain-rate and corrosion damage on material tensile properties and AE source events. Effect of corrosion was studied by inducing corrosion in the test specimens by accelerated corrosion testing in a Q-Fog accelerated corrosion chamber for 12 weeks. Eight (8) masked dog-bone shaped specimens were placed in the accelerated corrosion chamber at the beginning of the test. Two (2) dog-bone shaped specimens were removed from the corrosion chamber after exposure time of 3, 6, 9, and 12 weeks respectively, and subjected to tension testing till specimen failure along with AE monitoring, as well as two (2) reference samples not exposed to corrosion. Material tensile properties (yield strength, ultimate tensile strength, toughness, and elongation) obtained from tension test and AE parameters obtained from AE monitoring were analyzed and characterized. AE parameters increase with increase in exposure period of the specimens in the corrosive environment. Aluminum 2024-T3 is an acoustically silent material during tensile deformation without any damage. Acoustic emission events increase with increase of corrosion damage and with increase in strain rate above a certain value. Thus AE is suitable for structural health monitoring of corrosion damage. Ultimate tensile strength, toughness and elongation values decrease with increase of exposure period in corrosion chamber.

  2. Handbook of corrosion data

    SciTech Connect

    Craig, D.

    1989-01-01

    Each listing includes a general description of the environment, a comment on the corrosion characteristics of various alloys in the environment, a bibliography of recent articles specific to the environment, tables consolidating and comparing corrosion rates at temperatures and concentrations for various alloys, and finally, graphical information. Also included are summaries on the general corrosion characteristics of major metals and alloys. This separate section of the book considers each material group; such as, aluminum, stainless steel, zinc, etc. Additional tables are presented to give the corrosion characteristics of various alloys in hundreds of environments.

  3. Experimental and numerical investigation on cladding of corrosion-erosion resistant materials by a high power direct diode laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farahmand, Parisa

    In oil and gas industry, soil particles, crude oil, natural gas, particle-laden liquids, and seawater can carry various highly aggressive elements, which accelerate the material degradation of component surfaces by combination of slurry erosion, corrosion, and wear mechanisms. This material degradation results into the loss of mechanical properties such as strength, ductility, and impact strength; leading to detachment, delamination, cracking, and ultimately premature failure of components. Since the failure of high valued equipment needs considerable cost and time to be repaired or replaced, minimizing the tribological failure of equipment under aggressive environment has been gaining increased interest. It is widely recognized that effective management of degradation mechanisms will contribute towards the optimization of maintenance, monitoring, and inspection costs. The hardfacing techniques have been widely used to enhance the resistance of surfaces against degradation mechanisms. Applying a surface coating improves wear and corrosion resistance and ensures reliability and long-term performance of coated parts. A protective layer or barrier on the components avoids the direct mechanical and chemical contacts of tool surfaces with process media and will reduce the material loss and ultimately its failure. Laser cladding as an advanced hardfacing technique has been widely used for industrial applications in order to develop a protective coating with desired material properties. During the laser cladding, coating material is fused into the base material by means of a laser beam in order to rebuild a damaged part's surface or to enhance its surface function. In the hardfacing techniques such as atmospheric plasma spraying (APS), high velocity oxygen-fuel (HVOF), and laser cladding, mixing of coating materials with underneath surface has to be minimized in order to utilize the properties of the coating material most effectively. In this regard, laser cladding offers

  4. Corrosion, microstructure, and metallography

    SciTech Connect

    Northwood, D.O.; White, W.E.; Vander Voort, G.F.

    1985-01-01

    Of the forty-one papers presented, nearly half of them deal with microstructural aspects of corrosion, corrosion control and corrosion failure analysis. They describe various analytical approaches for studying corrosion and for diagnosing corrosion failure mechanisms. Details include microstructural features of corrosion on a wide range of materials or coatings and in environments ranging from within the human body to outer space. Another series of papers handles microstructure-property relationships and contains reports on hydrogen embrittlement of AISI 316 stainless steel, shell and detail cracking in railroad rails, and the precipitation of martensitic Fe-Ni-W alloys. A third grouping looks at microstructure-fracture relationships. Coverage of advancements in metal-lographic techniques includes the use of microcomputers, applied techniques of inplace analysis, and use of the Tandem Van de Graff accelerator facility.

  5. Study of the effects of gaseous environments on the hot corrosion of superalloy materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smeggil, J. G.; Bornstein, N. S.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of the gaseous corrodent NaCl on the high temperature oxidation and sodium sulfate induced hot corrosion behavior of alumina formers, chromia formers, and the superalloy B-1900 was examined. Isothermal experiments were conducted at 900 C and 1050 C in air in the presence and absence of NaCl vapors. Microstructural changes in oxide morphology and increased rates of oxidation were observed when NaCl(g) was present. It is hypothesized that the accelerated rates of oxidation are the result of removal of aluminum from the scale substrate interface and the weakening of the scale substrate bonds. The aluminum removed was redeposited on the surfaces in the form of alumina whiskers. For the superalloy B-1900, alumina whiskers are also formed, and the alloy oxidizes at catastrophic rates. In the case of Ni-25Cr alloy, NaCl vapors interact with the scale depleting it of chromium.

  6. Effect of Cerium Doped on the Poly(3-(Trimethoxysilyl)propyl methacrylate) Characteristic as Corrosion Protection Material of Carbon Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rochmah, D. N.; Syakir, N.; Susilawati, T.; Suryaningsih, S.; Fitrilawati

    2017-05-01

    The hybrid polymer precursor was synthesized from monomer of 3-(trimethoxysilyl) propyl methacrylate (TMSPMA) using sol-gel method and doped with inhibitor of Cerium Nitrate Hexahydrate with a concentration of 0.2%. The synthesized material was coated on a carbon steel surface by solution casting technique and followed by a photopolymerisation process. Corrosion tests were performed by using Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) in 3.5% NaCl at the critical temperature of 75°C. Result of EIS data and their fitting analysis using an equivalent circuit model shows that a coating of poly(TMSPMA)-Cerium on the surface of carbon steel form a layer of protection and caused increasing of impedance value significantly. The impedance is higher compared to the carbon steel that coated with poly(TMSPMA) only.

  7. Hardface coating systems and methods for metal alloys and other materials for wear and corrosion resistant applications

    DOEpatents

    Seals, Roland D.

    2015-08-18

    The present disclosure relates generally to hardface coating systems and methods for metal alloys and other materials for wear and corrosion resistant applications. More specifically, the present disclosure relates to hardface coatings that include a network of titanium monoboride (TiB) needles or whiskers in a matrix, which are formed from titanium (Ti) and titanium diboride (TiB.sub.2) precursors by reactions enabled by the inherent energy provided by the process heat associated with coating deposition and, optionally, coating post-heat treatment. These hardface coatings are pyrophoric, thereby generating further reaction energy internally, and may be applied in a functionally graded manner. The hardface coatings may be deposited in the presence of a number of fluxing agents, beta stabilizers, densification aids, diffusional aids, and multimode particle size distributions to further enhance their performance characteristics.

  8. The algorithm for determination of necessary characteristics of backfill materials used for grounding resistances of grounding loops reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trifunović, Jovan

    2012-12-01

    Various backfill materials are used with the aim to reduce grounding resistance of grounding systems to the desired values. The algorithm for determination of a proper combination of features a backfill material needs to possess in order to successfully perform this task is developed and presented. It is based on the numerical analysis of the results obtained with finite-element method modelling of the considered grounding system, surrounding soil, backfill material and imperfect contact. As an example, the developed algorithm is applied on two grounding loops (one conventional and the other backfilled with bentonite suspension) embedded in a two-layer soil. The results obtained with the application of the proposed algorithm can be used as guidance for the researchers who are looking for new suitable low cost backfill materials.

  9. Testing and prediction of erosion-corrosion for corrosion resistant alloys used in the oil and gas production industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rincon, Hernan E.

    The corrosion behavior of CRAs has been thoroughly investigated and documented in the public literature by many researchers; however, little work has been done to investigate erosion-corrosion of such alloys. When sand particles are entrained in the flow, the degradation mechanism is different from that observed for sand-free corrosive environment. There is a need in the oil and gas industry to define safe service limits for utilization of such materials. The effects of flow conditions, sand rate, pH and temperature on the erosion-corrosion of CRAs were widely studied. An extensive experimental work was conducted using scratch tests and flow loop tests using several experimental techniques. At high erosivity conditions, a synergistic effect between erosion and corrosion was observed. Under the high sand rate conditions tested, erosivity is severe enough to damage the passive layer protecting the CRA thereby enhancing the corrosion rate. In most cases there is likely a competition between the rates of protective film removal due to mechanical erosion and protective film healing. Synergism occurs for each of the three alloys examined (13Cr and Super13Cr and 22Cr); however, the degree of synergism is quite different for the three alloys and may not be significant for 22Cr for field conditions where erosivities are typically much lower that those occurring in the small bore loop used in this research. Predictions of the corrosion component of erosion-corrosion based on scratch test data compared reasonably well to test results from flow loops for the three CRAs at high erosivity conditions. Second order behavior appears to be an appropriate and useful model for representing the repassivation process of CRAs. A framework for a procedure to predict penetration rates for erosion-corrosion conditions was developed based on the second order model behavior observed for the re-healing process of the passive film of CRAs and on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations

  10. Damping measurements of laminated composite materials and aluminum using the hysteresis loop method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramovich, H.; Govich, D.; Grunwald, A.

    2015-10-01

    The damping characteristics of composite laminates made of Hexply 8552 AGP 280-5H (fabric), used for structural elements in aeronautical vehicles, have been investigated in depth using the hysteresis loop method and compared to the results for aluminum specimens (2024 T351). It was found that the loss factor, η, obtained by the hysteresis loop method is linearly dependent only on the applied excitation frequency and is independent of the preloading and the stress amplitudes. For the test specimens used in the present tests series, it was found that the damping of the aluminum specimens is higher than the composite ones for longitudinal direction damping, while for bending vibrations the laminates exhibited higher damping values.

  11. Shadow corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramasubramanian, N.

    2004-07-01

    An electrochemical mechanism, based on energetically favored complimentary reduction and oxidation reactions, operating in conjunction with radiolysis is proposed for explaining the shadow corrosion phenomenon observed under BWR conditions. The electrochemical reaction on platinum and nickel alloys (Inconel and X-750) is the oxidation of H 2O 2 to produce a localized enhancement in the concentrations of HO 2 and O 2. Energy level of the conduction band of ZrO 2 matches well with that for the reduction of HO 2 and O 2 regenerating H 2O 2. This reduction of the powerful oxidants, stimulates electron emission in ZrO 2 which then is balanced by increased oxidation of zirconium to generate additional electrons and hence also anion vacancies. A coupling between Zircaloy and platinum or nickel alloy is provided by H + transport, the source for initiating shadow corrosion, to Zircaloy-2 (Zircaloy-2 negative relative to platinum or the nickel alloy) in the gap between the materials. An enhanced localized corrosion of Zircaloy-2 occurs, its incidence dependent upon the transport of HO 2, O 2, H + and H 2O 2 in the coolant in the gap.

  12. Formation of a nano-pattering NiTi surface with Ni-depleted superficial layer to promote corrosion resistance and endothelial cell-material interaction.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Tingting; Li, Yan; Xia, Yun; Venkatraman, Subbu S; Xiang, Yan; Zhao, Xinqing

    2013-01-01

    Zirconium ion implantation was performed on NiTi alloy to suppress Ni ion release as well as to improve corrosion resistance and cell-material interaction. A thicker Ni-depleted nano-scale composite layer formed after Zr implantation and the corrosion resistance was evidently increased in aspects of increased E(br) - E(corr) (difference between corrosion potential and breakdown potential) and decreased corrosion current density. 2.5/2 NiTi sample possessed the highest E(br) - E(corr), more than 500 mV higher than that of untreated NiTi, suggesting a significant improvement on pitting corrosion resistance. Ni ion release rate of Zr-NiTi was decreased due to the depletion of Ni in the superficial surface layer and the diffusion resistance effect of the ZrO(2)/TiO(2) nano-film. Increased surface wettability induced by increased surface roughness was obtained after Zr implantation. Zr-NiTi samples were found to be favorable to endothelial cells (ECs) proliferation, especially after 5 and 7 days culture.

  13. Study of the effects of interleakage of ammonia and seawater on corrosion and scaling of candidate materials for OTEC heat exchngers. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Grimes, W D; Schrieber, C F; Manning, J A

    1980-07-01

    Assessment has been made on the effect of small concentrations of ammonia in seawater and varying concentrations of seawater in anhydrous ammonia upon corrosion and scaling of candidate OTEC heat exchanger materials - A1-5052, Alclad 3003, copper alloys 706, 715 and 722, AL-6X stainless steel and CP titanium. Results are presented. AL-6X stainless steel and CP titanium showed exceptional corrosion resistance to all test environments. Alclad alloy 3003 showed satisfactory performance in seawater and seawater plus ammonia environments. Only minimal pitting was observed and this was limited to the sacrificial cladding in seawater plus ammonia only. Cladding alloy 7072 showed unacceptable corrosion resistance in anhydrous ammonia containing low seawater concentrations. Al-5052 tubes showed unsatisfactory corrosion behavior in the presence of seawater flow with ammonia interleakage. Copper alloys considered showed unacceptable corrosion resistance in all seawater environments containing ammonia. Low pressure differentials between seawater and anhydrous ammonia in the tube testing unit resulted in scaling and moderately efficient plug seal formation at the artificial leak sites of the tubes. It is recommended that Alclad 3003, CP titanium and AL-6X stainless steel tubes be assessed for suitability in the presence of probable OTEC cleaning systems.

  14. Development of Spray Coating Methods and Materials to Replace Aluminum Cladding of Aging Aircraft for Corrosion Protection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    Replace FA9550-06-C-0113 Aluminum Cladding of Aging Aircraft for Corrosion Protection 5b. GRANTNUMBER [AF STTR Phase I Final Technical Report] 5c. PROGRAM...development of glassy coatings is limited by non-availability of aluminum based BMG powder feedstock for spraying. 15. SUBJECT TERMS STTR Report Corrosion ... aluminum cladding of aging aircraft for corrosion protection ABSTRACT The objective of this AF STTR Phase I work was to develop spray coating methods and new

  15. General corrosion properties of modified PNC1520 austenitic stainless steel in supercritical water as a fuel cladding candidate material for supercritical water reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakazono, Y.; Iwai, T.; Abe, H.

    2010-03-01

    The Super-Critical Water-cooled Reactor (SCWR) has been designed and investigated because of its high thermal efficiency and plant simplification. There are some advantages including the use of a single phase coolant with high enthalpy but there are numerous potential problems, particularly with materials. As the operating temperature of supercritical water reactor will be between 280°C and 620°C with a pressure of 25MPa, the selection of materials is difficult and important. Austenitic stainless steels were selected for possible use in supercritical water systems because of their corrosion resistance and radiation resistance. The PNC1520 austenitic stainless steel developed by Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) as a nuclear fuel cladding material for a Na-cooled fast breeder reactor. The corrosion data of PNC1520 in supercritical water (SCW) is required but does not exist. The purpose of the present study is to research the corrosion properties for PNC1520 austenitic stainless steel in supercritical water. The supercritical water corrosion test was performed for the standard PNC1520 (1520S) and the Ti-additional type of PNC1520 (1520Ti) by using a supercritical water autoclave. Corrosion tests on the austenitic 1520S and 1520Ti steels in supercritical water were performed at 400, 500 and 600°C with exposures up to 1000h. The amount of weight gain, weight loss and weight of scale were evaluated after the corrosion test in supercritical water for both austenitic steels. After 1000h corrosion test performed, the weight gains of both austenitic stainless steels were less than 2 g/m2 at 400°C and 500°C . But both weight gain and weight loss of 1520Ti were larger than those of 1520S at 600°C . By increasing the temperature to 600°C, the surface of 1520Ti was covered with magnetite formed in supercritical water and dissolution of the steel alloying elements has been observed. In view of corrosion, 1520S may have larger possibility than 1520Ti to adopt a

  16. Surface effects of corrosive media on hardness, friction, and wear of materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.; Rengstorff, G. W. P.; Ishigaki, H.

    1985-01-01

    Hardness, friction, and wear experiments were conducted with magnesium oxide exposed to various corrosive media and also with elemental iron and nickel exposed to water and NaOH. Chlorides such as MgCl2 and sodium containing films were formed on cleaved magnesium oxide surfaces. The MgCl2 films softened the magnesium oxide surfaces and caused high friction and great deformation. Hardness was strongly influenced by the pH value of the HCl-containing solution. The lower the pH, the lower the microhardness. Neither the pH value of nor the immersion time in NaOH containing, NaCl containing, and HNO3 containing solutions influenced the microhardness of magnesium oxide. NaOH formed a protective and low friction film on iron surfaces. The coefficient of friction and the wear for iron were low at concentrations of NaOH higher than 0.01 N. An increase in NaOH concentration resulted in a decrease in the concentration of ferric oxide on the iron surface. It took less NaOH to form a protective, low friction film on nickel than on iron.

  17. 49 CFR 172.442 - CORROSIVE label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS TABLE, SPECIAL... SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.442 CORROSIVE label. (a) Except for size and color, the CORROSIVE label...

  18. 49 CFR 172.442 - CORROSIVE label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS TABLE, SPECIAL... SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.442 CORROSIVE label. (a) Except for size and color, the CORROSIVE label...

  19. 49 CFR 172.442 - CORROSIVE label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS TABLE, SPECIAL... SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.442 CORROSIVE label. (a) Except for size and color, the CORROSIVE label...

  20. Review of recent developments in the field of magnesium corrosion: Recent developments in Mg corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Atrens, Andrej; Song, Guang -Ling; Liu, Ming; Shi, Zhiming; Cao, Fuyong; Dargusch, Matthew S.

    2015-01-07

    This paper provides a review of recent developments in the field of Mg corrosion and puts those into context. This includes considerations of corrosion manifestations, material influences, surface treatment, anodization, coatings, inhibition, biodegradable medical applications, stress corrosion cracking, flammability, corrosion mechanisms for HP Mg, critical evaluation of corrosion mechanisms, and concluding remarks. There has been much research recently, and much research continues in this area. In conclusion, this is expected to produce significantly better, more-corrosion-resistant Mg alloys.

  1. Corrosion cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Goel, V.S.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a conference on alloy corrosion cracking. Topics considered at the conference included the effect of niobium addition on intergranular stress corrosion cracking, corrosion-fatigue cracking in fossil-fueled-boilers, fracture toughness, fracture modes, hydrogen-induced thresholds, electrochemical and hydrogen permeation studies, the effect of seawater on fatigue crack propagation of wells for offshore structures, the corrosion fatigue of carbon steels in seawater, and stress corrosion cracking and the mechanical strength of alloy 600.

  2. 60NiTi Intermetallic Material Evaluation for Lightweight and Corrosion Resistant Spherical Sliding Bearings for Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DellaCorte, Christopher; Jefferson, Michael

    2015-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center and the Kamatics subsidiary of the Kaman Corporation conducted the experimental evaluation of spherical sliding bearings made with 60NiTi inner races. The goal of the project was to assess the feasibility of manufacturing lightweight, corrosion resistant bearings utilizing 60NiTi for aerospace and industrial applications. NASA produced the bearings in collaboration with Abbott Ball Corporation and Kamatics fabricated bearing assemblies utilizing their standard reinforced polymer liner material. The assembled bearings were tested in oscillatory motion at a load of 4.54kN (10,000 lb), according to the requirements of the plain bearing specification SAE AS81820. Several test bearings were exposed to hydraulic fluid or aircraft deicing fluid prior to and during testing. The results show that the 60NiTi bearings exhibit tribological performance comparable to conventional stainless steel (440C) bearings. Further, exposure of 60NiTi bearings to the contaminant fluids had no apparent performance effect. It is concluded that 60NiTi is a feasible bearing material for aerospace and industrial spherical bearing applications.

  3. Stress Corrosion Cracking of the Drip Shield, The Waste Package Outer Barrier and the Stainless Steel Structural Material

    SciTech Connect

    C. Stephen

    2000-04-17

    One of the potential failure modes of the drip shield (DS), the waste package (WP) outer barrier, and the stainless structural material is the initiation and propagation of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) induced by the WP environment and various types of stresses that can develop in the DSs or the WPs. For the current design of the DS and WP, however, the DS will be excluded from the SCC evaluation because stresses that are relevant to SCC are insignificant in the DS. The major sources of stresses in the DS are loadings due to backfill and earthquakes. These stresses will not induce SCC because the stress caused by backfill is generally compressive stress and the stress caused by earthquakes is temporary in nature. The 316NG stainless steel inner barrier of the WP will also be excluded from the SCC evaluation because the SCC performance assessment will not take credit from the inner barrier. Therefore, the purpose of this document is to provide a detailed description of the process-level models that can be applied to assess the performance of the material (i.e., Alloy 22) used for the WP outer barrier subjected to the effects of SCC. As already mentioned in the development plan for the WP PMR (CRWMS M and O 1999e), this Analyses and Models Report (AMR) is to serve as a feed to the Waste Package Degradation (WPD) Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) and Process Model Report (PMR).

  4. Structural, mechanical and magnetic properties studies on high-energy Kr-ion irradiated Fe3O4 material (main corrosion layer of Fe-based alloys)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jianrong; Wang, Zhiguang; Zhang, Hongpeng; Song, Peng; Chang, Hailong; Cui, Minghuan; Pang, Lilong; Zhu, Yabin; Li, Fashen

    2014-12-01

    The Fe-based (T91 and RAFM) alloys are considered as the promising candidate structural materials for DEMO and the first fusion power plant, and these two kinds of steels suffered more serious corrosion attack at 450 °C in liquid PbBi metal. So in order to further clarify the applicability of Fe-based structural materials in nuclear facilities, we should study not only the alloys itself but also its corrosion layers; and in order to simplify the discussion and clarify the irradiation effects of the different corrosion layer, we abstract the Fe3O4 (main corrosion layer of Fe-based alloys) to study the structural, micro-mechanical and magnetic properties under 2.03 GeV Kr-ion irradiation. The initial crystallographic structure of the Fe3O4 remains unaffected after irradiation at low damage levels, but as the Kr-ion fluence increases and the defects accumulate, the macroscopic magnetic properties (Ms, Hc, etc.) and micro-mechanical properties (nano-hardness and Young's modulus) are sensitive to high-energy Kr-ion irradiation and exhibit excruciating uniform changing regularities with varying fluences (firstly increases, then decreases). And these magnetism, hardening and softening phenomena can be interpreted very well by the effects related to the stress and defects (the production, accumulation and free) induced by high-energy ions irradiation.

  5. 49 CFR 173.154 - Exceptions for Class 8 (corrosive materials).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... subchapter when transported by motor vehicle or rail car in a packaging constructed of materials that will... any other requirements of this subchapter when transported by motor vehicle or rail car in a...

  6. Sustainable Materials Replacement for Prevention of Corrosion at Fort Lewis, WA

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-08-01

    instead using recovered plywood panels from an onsite deconstruction project. The panels were used instead as deck material beneath steel cladding. ERDC...inch (psi) carbon steel sheet coated with an aluminum-zinc alloy. The Galvalume material is coated with Kynar 500, a polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF...roofs. The company uses sheet steel goods with 23% post-consumer and 7.3% post-industrial recycled content. Figure 6 shows an example of the standing

  7. Effects of Thermal Aging on Material Properties, Stress Corrosion Cracking, and Fracture Toughness of AISI 316L Weld Metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucas, Timothy; Forsström, Antti; Saukkonen, Tapio; Ballinger, Ronald; Hänninen, Hannu

    2016-08-01

    Thermal aging and consequent embrittlement of materials are ongoing issues in cast stainless steels, as well as duplex, and high-Cr ferritic stainless steels. Spinodal decomposition is largely responsible for the well-known "748 K (475 °C) embrittlement" that results in drastic reductions in ductility and toughness in these materials. This process is also operative in welds of either cast or wrought stainless steels where δ-ferrite is present. While the embrittlement can occur after several hundred hours of aging at 748 K (475 °C), the process is also operative at lower temperatures, at the 561 K (288 °C) operating temperature of a boiling water reactor (BWR), for example, where ductility reductions have been observed after several tens of thousands of hours of exposure. An experimental program was carried out in order to understand how spinodal decomposition may affect changes in material properties in Type 316L BWR piping weld metals. The study included material characterization, nanoindentation hardness, double-loop electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation (DL-EPR), Charpy-V, tensile, SCC crack growth, and in situ fracture toughness testing as a function of δ-ferrite content, aging time, and temperature. SCC crack growth rates of Type 316L stainless steel weld metal under simulated BWR conditions showed an approximate 2 times increase in crack growth rate over that of the unaged as-welded material. In situ fracture toughness measurements indicate that environmental exposure can result in a reduction of toughness by up to 40 pct over the corresponding at-temperature air-tested values. Material characterization results suggest that spinodal decomposition is responsible for the degradation of material properties measured in air, and that degradation of the in situ properties may be a result of hydrogen absorbed during exposure to the high-temperature water environment.

  8. Corrosion testing using isotopes

    DOEpatents

    Hohorst, Frederick A.

    1995-12-05

    A method for determining the corrosion behavior of a material with respect to a medium in contact with the material by: implanting a substantially chemically inert gas in a matrix so that corrosion experienced by the material causes the inert gas to enter the medium; placing the medium in contact with the material; and measuring the amount of inert gas which enters the medium. A test sample of a material whose resistance to corrosion by a medium is to be tested, composed of: a body of the material, which body has a surface to be contacted by the medium; and a substantially chemically inert gas implanted into the body to a depth below the surface. A test sample of a material whose resistance to corrosion by a medium is to be tested, composed of: a substrate of material which is easily corroded by the medium, the substrate having a surface; a substantially chemically inert gas implanted into the substrate; and a sheet of the material whose resistance to corrosion is to be tested, the sheet being disposed against the surface of the substrate and having a defined thickness.

  9. Corrosion testing using isotopes

    DOEpatents

    Hohorst, F.A.

    1995-12-05

    A method is described for determining the corrosion behavior of a material with respect to a medium in contact with the material by: implanting a substantially chemically inert gas in a matrix so that corrosion experienced by the material causes the inert gas to enter the medium; placing the medium in contact with the material; and measuring the amount of inert gas which enters the medium. A test sample of a material whose resistance to corrosion by a medium is to be tested is described composed of: a body of the material, which body has a surface to be contacted by the medium; and a substantially chemically inert gas implanted into the body to a depth below the surface. A test sample of a material whose resistance to corrosion by a medium is to be tested is described composed of: a substrate of material which is easily corroded by the medium, the substrate having a surface; a substantially chemically inert gas implanted into the substrate; and a sheet of the material whose resistance to corrosion is to be tested, the sheet being disposed against the surface of the substrate and having a defined thickness. 3 figs.

  10. Biological induced corrosion of materials II: New test methods and experiences from mir station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klintworth, R.; Reher, H. J.; Viktorov, A. N.; Bohle, D.

    1999-09-01

    During previous long-term manned missions, more than 100 species of microorganisms have been identified on surfaces of materials (bacteria and fungi). Among them were potentially pathogenic ones (saprophytes) which are capable of active growth on artificial substrates, as well as technophilic bacteria and fungi causing damages (destruction and degradation) to various materials (metals and polymers), resulting in failures and disruptions in the functioning of equipment and hardware. Aboard a space vehicle some microclimatic parameters are optimal for microorganism growth: the atmospheric fluid condensate with its specific composition, chemical and/or antropogenic contaminants (human metobolic products, etc.) all are stimulating factors for the development of bacteria and mould fungi on materials of the interior and equipment of an orbital station during its operational phase(s). Especially Russian long-term missions (SALJUT, MIR) have demonstrated that uncontrolled interactions of microorganisms with materials will ultimately lead to the appearence of technological and medical risks, significantly influencing safety and reliability characteristics of individual as well as whole systems and/ or subsystems. For a first conclusion, it could be summarized, that countermeasures and anti-strategies focussing on Microbial Contamination Management (MCM) for the International Space Station (ISS, next long-term manned mission) at least require a new materials test approach. Our respective concept includes a combined age-ing/biocorrosion test sequence. It is represented here, as well as current status of MCM program, e.g. continuous monitoring (microbiological analyses), long-term disinfection, frequent cleaning methods, mathematical modeling of ISS, etc.

  11. Electrochemical corrosion studies of container materials in repository-relevant environments

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, A.K.; Henshall, G.A.; McCright, R.D.

    1995-12-12

    The Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) of the United States Department of Energy (USDOE) is evaluating Yucca Mountain in southern Nevada to determine its suitability as a site for a mined geologic disposal system for the disposal of spent fuel and high-level nuclear waste. Framatome Cogema Fuels (FCF), as a part of the Management and Operating (M&O) team in support of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YAD), is responsible for designing and developing the waste package for this potential repository. As part of this effort, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), also a member of the M&O team is responsible for testing materials and developing models for the materials to be used in the waste package. Based on a literature review of the anticipated degradation modes that may occur under the repository-relevant environmental conditions, LLNL has identified a large number of engineering materials for the various components of the waste package. One step in evaluating the performance of these materials is to conduct preliminary tests under these repository-relevant environmental conditions. This report is aimed at presenting the results of scoping electrochemical cyclic potentiodynamic polarization (CPP) experiments using nine candidate waste package container materials in various environments.

  12. High temperature corrosion of engineering alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, G.Y.

    1990-01-01

    This book describes a treatment of all forms of high temperature corrosion problems encountered in industry, especially gas turbine and aerospace; heat treating; mineral and metallurgical processing; ceramic, electronic and glass manufacturing; automotive; pulp and paper; waste incineration; fossil fuel power generation; coal gasification; and nuclear. Materials problems discussed include those due to oxidation, carburization and metal dusting, nitridation, halogen corrosion, sulfidation, ash/salt deposit corrosion, molten salt corrosion, and molten metal corrosion.

  13. Corrosion Mitigation Strategies - an Introduction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-05

    Control Technology – Cathodic protection – Corrosion inhibitors – Combination of methods • Balance cost and other factors Candidate Materials - Metals...Technology -UV, ozone,solvents,oxygen • Concrete -acids, chlorides, sulfates • Vitreous Materials-solvents • Corrosion Control • Waterproofing • Weather...Tar Enamel Leaders in Corrosion Control Technology – Tape – Concrete (Weight) Coating • Make metal to be protected act as a cathode • Application of

  14. Corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coatings

    DOEpatents

    Choi, Jor-Shan [El Cerrito, CA; Farmer, Joseph C [Tracy, CA; Lee, Chuck K [Hayward, CA; Walker, Jeffrey [Gaithersburg, MD; Russell, Paige [Las Vegas, NV; Kirkwood, Jon [Saint Leonard, MD; Yang, Nancy [Lafayette, CA; Champagne, Victor [Oxford, PA

    2012-05-29

    A method of forming a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising the steps of spray or deposition or sputtering or welding processing to form a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material. Also a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material.

  15. Corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coatings

    DOEpatents

    Choi, Jor-Shan; Farmer, Joseph C; Lee, Chuck K; Walker, Jeffrey; Russell, Paige; Kirkwood, Jon; Yang, Nancy; Champagne, Victor

    2013-11-12

    A method of forming a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising the steps of spray or deposition or sputtering or welding processing to form a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material. Also a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material.

  16. Corrosion of stainless steel, 2. edition

    SciTech Connect

    Sedriks, A.J.

    1996-10-01

    The book describes corrosion characteristics in all the major and minor groups of stainless steels, namely, in austenitic, ferritic, martensitic, duplex, and precipitation hardenable steels. Several chapters are spent on those special forms of corrosion that are investigated in the great detail in stainless steels, namely, pitting corrosion, crevice corrosion, and stress corrosion cracking. The influences of thermal treatment (heat affected zone cases), composition, and microstructure on corrosion are given good coverage. Corrosive environments include high temperature oxidation, sulfidation as well as acids, alkalis, various different petroleum plant environments, and even human body fluids (stainless steels are commonly used prosthetic materials).

  17. Biological induced corrosion of materials II: new test methods and experiences from MIR station.

    PubMed

    Klintworth, R; Reher, H J; Viktorov, A N; Bohle, D

    1999-01-01

    During previous long-term manned missions, more than 100 species of microorganisms have been identified on surfaces of materials (bacteria and fungi). Among them were potentially pathogenic ones (saprophytes) which are capable of active growth on artificial substrates, as well as technophilic bacteria and fungi causing damages (destruction and degradation) to various materials (metals and polymers), resulting in failures and disruptions in the functioning of equipment and hardware. Aboard a space vehicle some microclimatic parameters are optimal for microorganism growth: the atmospheric fluid condensate with its specific composition, chemical and/or anthropogenic contaminants (human metabolic products, etc.) all are stimulating factors for the development of bacteria and mould fungi on materials of the interior and equipment of an orbital station during its operational phase(s). Especially Russian long-term missions (SALYUT, MIR) [correction of SALJUT] have demonstrated that uncontrolled interactions of microorganisms with materials will ultimately lead to the appearance of technological and medical risks, significantly influencing safety and reliability characteristics of individual as well as whole systems and/or subsystems. For a first conclusion, it could be summarized, that countermeasures and anti-strategies focusing on Microbial Contamination Management (MCM) for the International Space Station (ISS, next long-term manned mission) at least require a new materials test approach. Our respective concept includes a combined aging/biocorrosion test sequence. It is represented here, as well as current status of MCM program, e.g. continuous monitoring (microbiological analyses), long-term disinfection, frequent cleaning methods, mathematical modeling of ISS, etc.

  18. Materials problems in fluidized-bed combustion systems: high-temperature erosion-corrosion by high-velocity (200ms/s) particles

    SciTech Connect

    Barkalow, R.H.; Goebel, J.A.; Pettit, F.S.

    1980-05-01

    The response of nickel- and cobalt base superalloys, aluminide coatings for these alloys, and Si/sub 3/N/sub 4/ to erosion-oxidation and erosion-hot corrosion conditions has been studied at 871/sup 0/C (1600/sup 0/F) in a high velocity gas stream 200 m/sec (656 ft/sec). The experiments were performed in a dynamic combustor (burner rig) operated on aircraft-grade jet fuel and compressed air. Erosive conditions were achieved by injecting abrasive powder into the burner rig. Alumina powders with average particle sizes of 20, 2.5, and 0.3 ..mu..m MgO were used as abrasive media. In the erosion-oxidation experiments, Si/sub 3/N/sub 4/ was much more resistant to degradation than all the metallic systems. For all the metallic systems it was found that: with 20 ..mu..m Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ particles, material loss occurred because of mechanical erosion; with 2 ..mu..m Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ particles, the materials degradation involved an interaction between oxidation and erosion such that the formation of Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ scales inhibited erosion; deposition of 0.3 ..mu..m Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ particles occurred on specimens and these particles did not establish an erosive component; and the magnitude of the erosive component increased as the hardness of the abrasive increased. Silicon nitride was much more resistant than the metallic systems in the erosion-hot corrosion test; erosion-hot corrosion using 2 ..mu..m Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ occurred at rates greater than the sum of the rates of erosion and hot corrosion acting independent of one another; the interaction between hot corrosion and erosion was not affected by the particle hardness; and deposition of 0.3 ..mu..m Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ during hot corrosion caused the degradation rates to decrease. The erosion-oxidation behavior of the metallic systems was consistent with the theory for ductile erosion. The synergism between erosion and hot corrosion occurs because each process establishes conditions that accelerate the other.

  19. Materials and Electronic Equipment Corrosion Tests in Some U.S. Navy Geothermal Environments.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-03-01

    Naval Air Station (NAS), Fallon, Nev. At the Coso Goethermal Area, five different metallic and nonmetallic materials in tubular shapes were tested...LO3AE, Dave Holmes (1) Technical Library (1) 2 Naval Energy & Environmental Support Activity, Port Hueneme Code 11011 (1) Code liA (1) I Naval...of Energy , San Francisco Operations, Oakland, CA . Crawford) 1 General Services Administration, Public Building Service ( Energy Conservation Division

  20. Mechanical properties of isolated loops of nylon leader material, polyethylene cord, and polyethylene tape and mechanical properties of those materials secured to cadaveric canine femurs via lateral femoral fabellae, toggles placed through bone tunnels, or bone anchors.

    PubMed

    Choate, Christina J; Pozzi, Antonio; Lewis, Daniel D; Hudson, Caleb C; Conrad, Bryan P

    2012-10-01

    To determine mechanical properties of various prosthetic materials secured to cadaveric canine femurs via various methods and to compare results with those for isolated loops of prosthetic material. 80 femurs obtained from cadavers of skeletally mature large-breed dogs. 10 femoral constructs in each of 8 groups (single circumfabellar loop of polyethylene cord, double loop of polyethylene tape secured via a bone anchor [BAPT], single or double circumfabellar loops of nylon leader material [CNL] or polyethylene tape [CPT], or single or double loops of polyethylene tape secured via a toggle placed through a bone tunnel [BTPT]) and 10 isolated loops of prosthetic material in each corresponding configuration were tested. Stress relaxation, creep, elongation, load at 3 mm of displacement, stiffness, and peak load at failure were determined. 5 single CNL constructs failed before completion of testing. Double CNL and single circumfabellar polyethylene cord constructs had the lowest loads at 3 mm of displacement. Single and double CPT constructs had the highest stiffness. Double BTPT and CPT constructs had the highest peak loads at failure. Double BTPT, double CPT, and BAPT constructs were mechanically superior on the basis of lower creep and stress relaxation and higher stiffness and load at 3 mm of displacement versus other constructs. Stiffness of femoral constructs was 28% to 69% that of corresponding isolated prosthetic loops. Double BTPT, double CPT, and BAPT constructs were mechanically superior to other constucts. Mechanical properties and methods of anchorage and securing of free ends of prostheses contributed to mechanical properties of constructs.

  1. Materials Reliability Program Resistance to Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracking of Alloys 690, 52, and 152 in Pressurized Water Reactors (MRP-111)

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, H.; Fyfitch, S.; Scott, P.; Foucault, M.; Kilian, R.; Winters, M.

    2004-03-01

    Over the last thirty years, stress corrosion cracking in PWR primary water (PWSCC) has been observed in numerous Alloy 600 component items and associated welds, sometimes after relatively long incubation times. Repairs and replacements have generally utilized wrought Alloy 690 material and its compatible weld metals (Alloy 152 and Alloy 52), which have been shown to be very highly resistant to PWSCC in laboratory experiments and have been free from cracking in operating reactors over periods already up to nearly 15 years. It is nevertheless prudent for the PWR industry to attempt to quantify the longevity of these materials with respect to aging degradation by corrosion in order to provide a sound technical basis for the development of future inspection requirements for repaired or replaced component items. This document first reviews numerous laboratory tests, conducted over the last two decades, that were performed with wrought Alloy 690 and Alloy 52 or Alloy 152 weld materials under various test conditions pertinent to corrosion resistance in PWR environments. The main focus of the present review is on PWSCC, but secondary-side conditions are also briefly considered.

  2. Sample environment for in situ synchrotron corrosion studies of materials in extreme environments

    SciTech Connect

    Elbakhshwan, Mohamed S.; Gill, Simerjeet K.; Motta, Arthur T.; Weidner, Randy; Anderson, Thomas; Ecker, Lynne E.

    2016-10-25

    A new in situ sample environment has been designed and developed to study the interfacial interactions of nuclear cladding alloys with high temperature steam. The sample environment is particularly optimized for synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies for in situ structural analysis. The sample environment is highly corrosion resistant and can be readily adapted for steam environments. The in situ sample environment design complies with G2 ASTM standards for studying corrosion in zirconium and its alloys and offers remote temperature and pressure monitoring during the in situ data collection. The use of the in situ sample environment is exemplified by monitoring the oxidation of metallic zirconium during exposure to steam at 350°C. Finally, the in situ sample environment provides a powerful tool for fundamental understanding of corrosion mechanisms by elucidating the substoichiometric oxide phases formed during early stages of corrosion, which can provide a better understanding the oxidation process.

  3. Refractory Materials for Flame Deflector Protection System Corrosion Control: Refractory Ceramics Literature Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Luz Marina; Hintze, Paul E.; Parlier, Christopher R.; Curran, Jerome P.; Kolody, Mark; Perusich, Stephen; Whitten, Mary C.; Trejo, David; Zidek, Jason; Sampson, Jeffrey W.; Coffman, Brekke E.

    2009-01-01

    Ceramics can be defmed as a material consisting of hard brittle properties produced from inorganic and nonmetallic minerals made by firing at high temperatures. These materials are compounds between metallic and nonmetallic elements and are either totally ionic, or predominately ionic but having some covalent character. This definition allows for a large range of materials, not all applicable to refractory applications. As this report is focused on potential ceramic materials for high temperature, aggressive exposure applications, the ceramics reviewed as part of this report will focus on refractory ceramics specifically designed and used for these applications. Ceramic materials consist of a wide variety of products. Callister (2000) 1 characterized ceramic materials into six classifications: glasses, clay products, refractories, cements, abrasives, and advanced ceramics. Figure 1 shows this classification system. This review will focus mainly on refractory ceramics and cements as in general, the other classifications are neither applicable nor economical for use in large structures such as the flame trench. Although much work has been done in advanced ceramics over the past decade or so, these materials are likely cost prohibitive and would have to be fabricated off-site, transported to the NASA facilities, and installed, which make these even less feasible. Although the authors reviewed the literature on advanced ceramic refractories 2 center dot 3 center dot 4 center dot 5 center dot 6 center dot 7 center dot 8 center dot 9 center dot 10 center dot 11 center dot 12 after the review it was concluded that these materials should not be ' the focus of this report. A review is in progress on materials and systems for prefabricated refractory ceramic panels, but this review is focusing more on typical refractory materials for prefabricated systems, which could make the system more economically feasible. Refractory ceramics are used for a wide variety of applications

  4. Corrosion-Resistant Materials for Water and Wastewater Treatment Plants at Fort Bragg

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    sections in the following UFGS: • UFGS 0997040 C-200 Coal Tar Epoxy Polyamide Paint • UFGS 08120 Aluminum Doors and Frames • UFGS 08165A Sliding Metal...journal section (Appendix 2). Nitrile or buna-N rubber seals are used more than all the other elastomers combined, since nitrile is the most versatile...material and is not as likely to fail as do most other rub- ber gaskets and seals due to the natural breakdown of the elastomeric mo- lecular bond of

  5. Environmental Degradation of Materials: Surface Chemistry Related to Stress Corrosion Cracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarz, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    Parallel experiments have been performed in order to develop a comprehensive model for stress cracking (SCC) in structural materials. The central objective is to determine the relationship between the activity and selectivity of the microstructure of structural materials to their dissolution kinetics and experimentally measured SCC kinetics. Zinc was chosen as a prototype metal system. The SCC behavior of two oriented single-crystal disks of zinc in a chromic oxide/sodium sulfate solution (Palmerton solution) were determined. It was found that: (1) the dissolution rate is strongly (hkil)-dependent and proportional to the exposure time in the aggressive environment; and (2) a specific slip system is selectively active to dissolution under applied stress and this slip line controls crack initiation and propagation. As a precursor to potential microgrvity experiments, electrophoretic mobility measurements of zinc particles were obtained in solutions of sodium sulfate (0.0033 M) with concentrations of dissolved oxygen from 2 to 8 ppm. The equilibrium distribution of exposed oriented planes as well as their correlation will determine the particle mobility.

  6. Environmental Degradation of Materials: Surface Chemistry Related to Stress Corrosion Cracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarz, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    Parallel experiments have been performed in order to develop a comprehensive model for stress cracking (SCC) in structural materials. The central objective is to determine the relationship between the activity and selectivity of the microstructure of structural materials to their dissolution kinetics and experimentally measured SCC kinetics. Zinc was chosen as a prototype metal system. The SCC behavior of two oriented single-crystal disks of zinc in a chromic oxide/sodium sulfate solution (Palmerton solution) were determined. It was found that: (1) the dissolution rate is strongly (hkil)-dependent and proportional to the exposure time in the aggressive environment; and (2) a specific slip system is selectively active to dissolution under applied stress and this slip line controls crack initiation and propagation. As a precursor to potential microgrvity experiments, electrophoretic mobility measurements of zinc particles were obtained in solutions of sodium sulfate (0.0033 M) with concentrations of dissolved oxygen from 2 to 8 ppm. The equilibrium distribution of exposed oriented planes as well as their correlation will determine the particle mobility.

  7. Fretting crevice corrosion of stainless steel stem-CoCr femoral head connections: comparisons of materials, initial moisture, and offset length.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Jeremy L; Mehta, Manav; Pinder, Bryan

    2009-01-01

    Modular tapers continue to be used in a wide variety of orthopedic implants. In this study, stainless steel (ASTM F-1568) femoral hip stems combined with Co-Cr-Mo alloy heads (SS/CoCr) were tested in an in vitro fretting corrosion test set-up to assess the propensity for mechanically assisted corrosion. Three different aspects of the modular design were evaluated in this study: (1) material combination compared to CoCr/CoCr, (2) wet versus dry assembly for SS/CoCr couples, and (3) 0- and 6-mm head offset for SS/CoCr couples. Fretting corrosion tests over a range of cyclic loads up to 3300 N were performed, and continuous cyclic loading at 3300 N for 1 M cycles were performed on each group (n = 5). Fretting micromotion was measured as a function of cyclic load on select couples to detect the nature and extent of motion present. The results showed that SS/CoCr couples were more susceptible to fretting corrosion than CoCr/CoCr couples, that dry assembly does not prevent fretting corrosion from taking place but raises the onset load, and that 6-mm offset heads had higher visual evidence of fretting damage but showed mixed statistical results in terms of onset loads and OCP shifts and currents compared to the 0-mm offset samples. Current and voltage excursions over 1 million cycles tended to diminish towards their unloaded control levels but did not fully recover until cyclic loading ceased. Micromotion measurements indicated fretting motions in the range of 10-25 microm where 0-mm heads tended to piston on the trunion, while 6 mm heads tended to rock. (c) 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Corrosion of aluminum and aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, J.R.

    1999-01-01

    This new handbook presents comprehensive coverage of the corrosion behavior of aluminum and aluminum alloys, with emphasis on practical information about how to select and process these materials in order to prevent corrosion attack. Described are the characteristics of these materials and the influences of composition, mechanical working, heat treatment, joining methods, microstructure, and environmental variables on their corrosion.

  9. NDE evaluation of the intergranular corrosion susceptibility of a 2205 duplex stainless steel using thermoelectric power and double loop electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, N.; Carreón, H.; Ruiz, A.

    2013-01-01

    There is a need for a nondestructive technique to assess rapidly and with confidence the degree of sensitization (DOS) in duplex stainless steel (DSS). In this investigation, we present the use of thermoelectric power (TEP) measurements as nondestructive method for the determination of DOS in isothermally aged 2205 DSS at 700°C for different aging times. The DOS of the aged samples was first established by performing the double loop electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation (DL-EPR) test. The microstructural evolution was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Experimental results indicate that TEP coefficient is sensitive to gradual microstructural changes produced by thermal aging and can be used to monitor IGC sensitization of 2205 duplex stainless steel.

  10. The Effect of Material Removal on the Corrosion Resistance and Biocompatibility of Nitinol Laser-Cut and Wire-Form Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decker, Jennifer Fino; Trépanier, Christine; Vien, Lot; Pelton, Alan R.

    2011-07-01

    Laser cutting and wire forming are two of the most commonly used processes in the manufacture of Nitinol medical devices. This study explores how varying the amount of material removed during the final surface treatment steps affects the corrosion resistance of Z-type stents that have either been laser-cut from tube or shape set from wire. All parts were subjected to a typical heat treatment process necessary to achieve an Austenite finish (Af) temperature of 25 ± 5 °C, and were subsequently post-processed with an electrochemical passivation process. The total weight loss during post-processing was recorded and the process adjusted to create groups with less than 5%, less than 10%, and less than 25% amounts of weight loss. The parts were then crimped to 6 mm and allowed to expand back to their original diameter. The corrosion test results showed that on average both groups of Z-stents experienced an increase in the corrosion breakdown potential and a decrease in the standard deviation with increasing amounts of material removal. In addition, less material removal is required from the wire-form Z-stents as compared to the laser-cut Z-stents to achieve high corrosion resistance. Finally, 7 day nickel ion release tests performed on the wire-formed Z-stents showed a dramatic decrease from 0.0132 mg of nickel leached per day for the low weight loss group to approximately 0.001 mg/day for the medium and high weight loss groups.

  11. Refractory Materials for Flame Deflector Protection System Corrosion Control: Coatings Systems Literature Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Luz M.; Hintze, Paul E.; Parlier, Christopher R.; Sampson, Jeffrey W.; Coffman, Brekke E.; Coffman, Brekke E.; Curran, Jerome P.; Kolody, Mark R.; Whitten, Mary; Perisich, Steven; hide

    2009-01-01

    When space vehicles are launched, extreme heat, exhaust, and chemicals are produced and these form a very aggressive exposure environment at the launch complex. The facilities in the launch complex are exposed to this aggressive environment. The vehicle exhaust directly impacts the flame deflectors, making these systems very susceptible to high wear and potential failure. A project was formulated to develop or identify new materials or systems such that the wear and/or damage to the flame deflector system, as a result of the severe environmental exposure conditions during launches, can be mitigated. This report provides a survey of potential protective coatings for the refractory concrete lining on the steel base structure on the flame deflectors at Kennedy Space Center (KSC).

  12. Highly Efficient Oxygen-Storage Material with Intrinsic Coke Resistance for Chemical Looping Combustion-Based CO2 Capture.

    PubMed

    Imtiaz, Qasim; Kurlov, Alexey; Rupp, Jennifer Lilia Marguerite; Müller, Christoph Rüdiger

    2015-06-22

    Chemical looping combustion (CLC) and chemical looping with oxygen uncoupling (CLOU) are emerging thermochemical CO2 capture cycles that allow the capture of CO2 with a small energy penalty. Here, the development of suitable oxygen carrier materials is a key aspect to transfer these promising concepts to practical installations. CuO is an attractive material for CLC and CLOU because of its high oxygen-storage capacity (20 wt %), fast reaction kinetics, and high equilibrium partial pressure of oxygen at typical operating temperatures (850-1000 °C). However, despite its promising characteristics, its low Tammann temperature requires the development of new strategies to phase-stabilize CuO-based oxygen carriers. In this work, we report a strategy based on stabilization by co-precipitated ceria (CeO2-x ), which allowed us to increase the oxygen capacity, coke resistance, and redox stability of CuO-based oxygen carriers substantially. The performance of the new oxygen carriers was evaluated in detail and compared to the current state-of-the-art materials, that is, Al2 O3 -stabilized CuO with similar CuO loadings. We also demonstrate that the higher intrinsic oxygen uptake, release, and mobility in CeO2-x -stabilized CuO leads to a three times higher carbon deposition resistance compared to that of Al2 O3 -stabilized CuO. Moreover, we report a high cyclic stability without phase intermixing for CeO2-x -supported CuO. This was accompanied by a lower reduction temperature compared to state-of-the-art Al2 O3 -supported CuO. As a result of its high resistance towards carbon deposition and fast oxygen uncoupling kinetics, CeO2-x -stabilized CuO is identified as a very promising material for CLC- and CLOU-based CO2 capture architectures. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Fatigue in the Presence of Corrosion (Fatigue sous corrosion)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-03-01

    examines the embrittlement of high strength steels from corrosion, the loss in elongation and energy density was because of hydrogen absorption. This...1996. R.F. Heheman (eds.), Hydrogen [23] G.N. Haidemenopoulos, N. Hassiotis, Embrittlement and Stress G. Papapolymerou and Corrosion Cracking, Materials...corrosion fatigue hydrogen embrittlement because the diffusion cracks take over, the propagating flaw is a of Hydrogen would be at saturation. On the hybrid

  14. Considerations on the performance and fabrication of candidate materials for the Yucca Mountain repository waste packages highly corrosion resistant nickel-base and titanium-base alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Dalder, E; Goldberg, A

    1995-11-30

    Among the metallurgical factors that affect the performance of a material in a given environment are alloy composition, alloy segregation, depletion of alloying elements, non-uniform microstructures, precipitation leading to an increase in susceptibility to corrosion as well as decreases in ductility, residual plastic deformation, and residual stresses. Precipitation often occurs preferentially at grain boundaries, causing depletion of critical elements in regions adjacent to these boundaries. Continuous grain-boundary precipitates can lead to drops in ductility and toughness. The presence of non-metallic inclusions, if excessive and/or segregated, can also cause embrittlement. Segregation of alloying elements can result in localized galvanic action. Depletion of alloying elements as well as segregation can result in reductions in the concentrations of critical elements below those necessary to resist localized corrosion. Segregation and alloy depletion can also facilitate precipitation that could lead to embrittlement.

  15. Welding of a corrosion-resistant composite material based on VT14 titanium alloy obtained using an electron beam emitted into the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golkovski, M. G.; Samoylenko, V. V.; Polyakov, I. A.; Lenivtseva, O. G.; Chakin, I. K.; Komarov, P. N.; Ruktuev, A. A.

    2017-01-01

    The study investigates the possibility of inert gas arc welding of a double layer composite material on a titanium base with an anti-corrosive layer obtained by fused deposition of a powder mix containing tantalum and niobium over a titanium base using an electron beam emitted into the atmosphere. Butt welding and fillet welding options were tested with two types of edge preparation. Welds were subjected to a metallographic examination including a structural study and an analysis of the chemical and phase composition of the welds. A conclusion was made regarding the possibility of using welding for manufacturing of items from the investigated composite material.

  16. Regulative Loops, Step Loops and Task Loops

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VanLehn, Kurt

    2016-01-01

    This commentary suggests a generalization of the conception of the behavior of tutoring systems, which the target article characterized as having an outer loop that was executed once per task and an inner loop that was executed once per step of the task. A more general conception sees these two loops as instances of regulative loops, which…

  17. Regulative Loops, Step Loops and Task Loops

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VanLehn, Kurt

    2016-01-01

    This commentary suggests a generalization of the conception of the behavior of tutoring systems, which the target article characterized as having an outer loop that was executed once per task and an inner loop that was executed once per step of the task. A more general conception sees these two loops as instances of regulative loops, which…

  18. DEPOSITION TANK CORROSION TESTING FOR ENHANCED CHEMICAL CLEANING POST OXALIC ACID DESTRUCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Mickalonis, J.

    2011-08-29

    An Enhanced Chemical Cleaning (ECC) process is being developed to aid in the high level waste tank closure at the Savannah River Site. The ECC process uses an advanced oxidation process (AOP) to destroy the oxalic acid that is used to remove residual sludge from a waste tank prior to closure. The AOP process treats the dissolved sludge with ozone to decompose the oxalic acid through reactions with hydroxyl radicals. The effluent from this oxalic acid decomposition is to be sent to a Type III waste tank and may be corrosive to these tanks. As part of the hazardous simulant testing that was conducted at the ECC vendor location, corrosion testing was conducted to determine the general corrosion rate for the deposition tank and to assess the susceptibility to localized corrosion, especially pitting. Both of these factors impact the calculation of hydrogen gas generation and the structural integrity of the tanks, which are considered safety class functions. The testing consisted of immersion and electrochemical testing of A537 carbon steel, the material of construction of Type III tanks, and 304L stainless steel, the material of construction for transfer piping. Tests were conducted in solutions removed from the destruction loop of the prototype ECC set up. Hazardous simulants, which were manufactured at SRNL, were used as representative sludges for F-area and H-area waste tanks. Oxalic acid concentrations of 1 and 2.5% were used to dissolve the sludge as a feed to the ECC process. Test solutions included the uninhibited effluent, as well as the effluent treated for corrosion control. The corrosion control options included mixing with an inhibited supernate and the addition of hydroxide. Evaporation of the uninhibited effluent was also tested since it may have a positive impact on reducing corrosion. All corrosion testing was conducted at 50 C. The uninhibited effluent was found to increase the corrosion rate by an order of magnitude from less than 1 mil per year (mpy

  19. A study of gas contaminants and interaction with materials in RPC closed loop systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colafranceschi, S.; Aurilio, R.; Benussi, L.; Bianco, S.; Passamonti, L.; Piccolo, D.; Pierluigi, D.; Russo, A.; Ferrini, M.; Greci, T.; Saviano, G.; Vendittozzi, C.; Abbrescia, M.; Calabria, C.; Colaleo, A.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, M.; Nuzzo, S.; Pugliese, G.; Verwilligen, P.; Sharma, A.

    2013-03-01

    Resistive Plate Counters (RPC) detectors at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) experiments use gas recirculation systems to cope with large gas mixture volumes and costs. In this paper a long-term systematic study about gas purifiers, gas contaminants and detector performance is discussed. The study aims at measuring the lifetime of purifiers with new and used cartridge material along with contaminants release in the gas system. During the data-taking the response of several RPC double-gap detectors was monitored in order to characterize the correlation between dark currents, filter status and gas contaminants.

  20. Accelerated Stress-Corrosion Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Test procedures for accelerated stress-corrosion testing of high-strength aluminum alloys faster and provide more quantitative information than traditional pass/fail tests. Method uses data from tests on specimen sets exposed to corrosive environment at several levels of applied static tensile stress for selected exposure times then subsequently tensile tested to failure. Method potentially applicable to other degrading phenomena (such as fatigue, corrosion fatigue, fretting, wear, and creep) that promote development and growth of cracklike flaws within material.

  1. Accelerated Stress-Corrosion Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Test procedures for accelerated stress-corrosion testing of high-strength aluminum alloys faster and provide more quantitative information than traditional pass/fail tests. Method uses data from tests on specimen sets exposed to corrosive environment at several levels of applied static tensile stress for selected exposure times then subsequently tensile tested to failure. Method potentially applicable to other degrading phenomena (such as fatigue, corrosion fatigue, fretting, wear, and creep) that promote development and growth of cracklike flaws within material.

  2. 46 CFR 111.01-11 - Corrosion-resistant parts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Corrosion-resistant parts. 111.01-11 Section 111.01-11...-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS General § 111.01-11 Corrosion-resistant parts. Each enclosure and part of electric equipment that can be damaged by corrosion must be made of corrosion-resistant materials or of materials...

  3. 46 CFR 111.01-11 - Corrosion-resistant parts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Corrosion-resistant parts. 111.01-11 Section 111.01-11...-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS General § 111.01-11 Corrosion-resistant parts. Each enclosure and part of electric equipment that can be damaged by corrosion must be made of corrosion-resistant materials or of materials...

  4. Mobile evaporator corrosion test results

    SciTech Connect

    Rozeveld, A.; Chamberlain, D.B.

    1997-05-01

    Laboratory corrosion tests were conducted on eight candidates to select a durable and cost-effective alloy for use in mobile evaporators to process radioactive waste solutions. Based on an extensive literature survey of corrosion data, three stainless steel alloys (304L, 316L, AL-6XN), four nickel-based alloys (825, 625, 690, G-30), and titanium were selected for testing. The corrosion tests included vapor phase, liquid junction (interface), liquid immersion, and crevice corrosion tests on plain and welded samples of candidate materials. Tests were conducted at 80{degrees}C for 45 days in two different test solutions: a nitric acid solution. to simulate evaporator conditions during the processing of the cesium ion-exchange eluant and a highly alkaline sodium hydroxide solution to simulate the composition of Tank 241-AW-101 during evaporation. All of the alloys exhibited excellent corrosion resistance in the alkaline test solution. Corrosion rates were very low and localized corrosion was not observed. Results from the nitric acid tests showed that only 316L stainless steel did not meet our performance criteria. The 316L welded interface and crevice specimens had rates of 22.2 mpy and 21.8 mpy, respectively, which exceeds the maximum corrosion rate of 20 mpy. The other welded samples had about the same corrosion resistance as the plain samples. None of the welded samples showed preferential weld or heat-affected zone (HAZ) attack. Vapor corrosion was negligible for all alloys. All of the alloys except 316L exhibited either {open_quotes}satisfactory{close_quotes} (2-20 mpy) or {open_quotes}excellent{close_quotes} (<2 mpy) corrosion resistance as defined by National Association of Corrosion Engineers. However, many of the alloys experienced intergranular corrosion in the nitric acid test solution, which could indicate a susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in this environment.

  5. Magnesium alloys and graphite wastes encapsulated in cementitious materials: Reduction of galvanic corrosion using alkali hydroxide activated blast furnace slag.

    PubMed

    Chartier, D; Muzeau, B; Stefan, L; Sanchez-Canet, J; Monguillon, C

    2017-03-15

    Magnesium alloys and graphite from spent nuclear fuel have been stored together in La Hague plant. The packaging of these wastes is under consideration. These wastes could be mixed in a grout composed of industrially available cement (Portland, calcium aluminate…). Within the alkaline pore solution of these matrixes, magnesium alloys are imperfectly protected by a layer of Brucite resulting in a slow corrosion releasing hydrogen. As the production of this gas must be considered for the storage safety, and the quality of wasteform, it is important to select a cement matrix capable of lowering the corrosion kinetics. Many types of calcium based cements have been tested and most of them have caused strong hydrogen production when magnesium alloys and graphite are conditioned together because of galvanic corrosion. Exceptions are binders based on alkali hydroxide activated ground granulated blast furnace slag (BFS) which are presented in this article.

  6. Improvement of corrosion resistance and antibacterial effect of NiTi orthopedic materials by chitosan and gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Rasha A.; Fadl-allah, Sahar A.; El-Bagoury, Nader; El-Rab, Sanaa M. F. Gad

    2014-02-01

    Biocomposite consists of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and a natural polymer as Chitosan (CS) was electrodeposited over NiTi alloy to improve biocompatibility, biostability, surface corrosion resistance and antibacterial effect for orthopedic implantation. The forming process and surface morphology of this biocomposite coats over NiTi alloy were studied. The results showed that the nm-scale gold particles were embedded in the composite forming compact, thick and smooth coat. Elemental analysis revealed significant less Ni ion release from the coated NiTi alloy compared with the uncoated one by 20 fold. Furthermore, the electrochemical corrosion measurements indicated that AuNPs/CS composite coat was effective for improving corrosion resistance in different immersion times and at all pH values, which suggests that the coated NiTi alloys have potential for orthopedic applications. Additionally, the efficiencies of the biocomposite coats for inhibiting bacterial growth indicate high antibacterial effect.

  7. Electrochemical, Polarization, and Crevice Corrosion Testing of Nitinol 60, A Supplement to the ECLSS Sustaining Materials Compatibility Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, R. E.

    2016-01-01

    In earlier trials, electrochemical test results were presented for six noble metals evaluated in test solutions representative of waste liquids processed in the Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Subsequently, a seventh metal, Nitinol 60, was added for evaluation and subjected to the same test routines, data analysis, and theoretical methodologies. The previous six test metals included three titanium grades, (commercially pure, 6Al-4V alloy and 6Al-4V low interstitial alloy), two nickel-chromium alloys (Inconel(RegisteredTrademark) 625 and Hastelloy(RegisteredTrademark) C276), and one high-tier stainless steel (Cronidur(RegisteredTrademark) 30). The three titanium alloys gave the best results of all the metals, indicating superior corrosive nobility and galvanic protection properties. For this current effort, the results have clearly shown that Nitinol 60 is almost as noble as titanium, being very corrosion-resistant and galvanically compatible with the other six metals electrochemically and during long-term exposure. is also quite noble as it is very corrosion resistant and galvanically compatible with the other six metals from both an electrochemical perspective and long-term crevice corrosion scenario. This was clearly demonstrated utilizing the same techniques for linear, Tafel and cyclic polarization, and galvanic coupling of the metal candidate as was done for the previous study. The high nobility and low corrosion susceptibility for Nitinol 60 appear to be intermediate to the nickel/chromium alloys and the titanium metals with indications that are more reflective of the titanium metals in terms of general corrosion and pitting behavior.

  8. NAVAIR Corrosion Overview

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-01

    Cleaning Efficiency • Hydrogen Embrittlement •Corrosion Testing •Storage Stability (1 & 2 year extended) •Pump Bottles, 5 gal pail, 55 gal drum 20...Technology - Materials Protection Advanced Polymers and Composites  NDI Functional materials IN-SERVICE ENGINEERING/PRODUCTION SUPPORT • FRC/ISSC Engineering

  9. Corrosion and degradation of test materials in the Mountain Fuel Resources 30 ton/day coal gasification Process Development Unit

    SciTech Connect

    Yurkewycz, R.

    1985-01-31

    One period of in-plant exposure (lower section of gasifier and steam superheater) of candidate alloys for gasification applications was completed in the Mountain Fuel Resources, Inc. (MFR) Process Development Unit (PDU). During this brief period of exposure (294 h gasifying coal), temperatures at the test sites were 140/sup 0/F (60/sup 0/C) at the lower section of the gasifier and ranged from 350/sup 0/ to 500/sup 0/F (177/sup 0/ to 260/sup 0/C) during steady-state periods in the steam superheater but were sometimes <300/sup 0/F (149/sup 0/C). These lower temperatures, encountered during process upsets, were in many cases lower than the dew point of the product gas. Operating pressures were 300 psi (2.1 MPa) in the gasifier and ranged from 50 to 200 psig (0.4 to 1.4 MPa gauge) in the superheater. Fouling of heat exchanger surfaces was also reported. At the lower section of the gasifier, A515 carbon steel, aluminized carbon steel, 2 1/4Cr-1Mo, 1 1/4Cr-1Mo, 9Cr-1Mo, and 410 SS suffered from heavy corrosion and they cannot be considered for use in this system. Types 304 SS and 316 SS showed acceptable general corrosion resistance, but they suffered from pitting. Incoloy 800 was the only one of the alloys tested that exhibited excellent resistance to overall corrosion and pitting. In the steam superheater, high alloy steels Type 310, 26-1, 18-2, and Type 304 incurred the least amount of corrosion damage; corrosion rates were <10 mpy (0.25 mm/y). Alloy Incoloy 800 performed nominally at 21 mpy (0.53 mm/y). The remaining alloys 1 1/4Cr-1/2Mo, 2 1/4Cr-1Mo, Type 410, 253MA and 9Cr-1Mo(Mod.) experienced unacceptable localized corrosion losses; corrosion rates were >150 mpy (3.81 mm/y). Pack-aluminized carbon steel A515 showed no evidence of diffusion zone penetration and was acceptable in corrosion performance. 14 refs., 9 figs., 7 tabs.

  10. Corrosion `98: 53. annual conference and exposition, proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-31

    This conference was divided into the following sections: Corrosion in Gas Treating; Problems and Solutions in Commercial Building Water Systems; Green Corrosion/Scale Inhibitors; Atmospheric Corrosion; AIRPOL Update/98; Rubber Lining--Answers to Many Problems; Interference Problems; Environmental Assisted Cracking: Fundamental Research and Industrial Applications; Corrosion in Nuclear Systems; New Developments in Scale and Deposit Control; Corrosion and Corrosion Protection in the Transportation Industries; What`s All the Noise About--Electrochemical That Is; Refining Industry Corrosion; Corrosion Problems in Military Hardware: Case Histories, Fixes and Lessons Learned; Cathodic Protection Test Methods and Instrumentation for Underground and On-grade Pipelines and Tanks; Recent Developments in Volatile Corrosion Inhibitors; Corrosion in Supercritical Fluids; Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion; Advances in Understanding and Controlling CO{sub 2} Corrosion; Managing Corrosion with Plastics; Material Developments for Use in Exploration and Production Environments; Corrosion in Cold Regions; The Effect of Downsizing and Outsourcing on Cooling System Monitoring and Control Practices; New Developments in Mechanical and Chemical Industrial Cleaning; Mineral Scale Deposit Control in Oilfield Related Operations; Biocides in Cooling Water; Corrosion and Corrosion Control of Reinforced Concrete Structures; Materials Performance for Fossil Energy Conversion Systems; Marine corrosion; Thermal Spray--Coating and Corrosion Control; Flow Effects on Corrosion in Oil and Gas Production; Corrosion Measurement Technologies; Internal Pipeline Monitoring--Corrosion Monitoring, Intelligent Pigging and Leak Detection; Cathodic Protection in Natural Waters; Corrosion in Radioactive Liquid Waste Systems; On-line Hydrogen Permeation Monitoring Equipment and Techniques, State of the Art; Water Reuse and Recovery; Performance of Materials in High Temperature Environments; Advances in Motor

  11. Atmospheric corrosion of lithium electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, C.J.

    1981-10-01

    Atmospheric corrosion of lithium during lithium-cell assembly and the dry storage of cells prior to electrolyte fill has been found to initiate lithium corrosion pits and to form corrosion products. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) was used to investigate lithium pitting and the white floccullent corrosion products. Electron Spectroscopy for Chemical Analysis (ESCA) and Auger spectroscopy in combination with X-ray diffraction were used to characterize lithium surfaces. Lithium surfaces with corrosion products were found to be high in carbonate content indicating the presence of lithium carbonate. Lithium electrodes dry stored in unfilled batteries were found to contain high concentration of lithium flouride a possible corrosion product from gaseous materials from the carbon monofluoride cathode. Future investigations of the corrosion phenomena will emphasize the effect of the corrosion products on the electrolyte and ultimate battery performance. The need to protect lithium electrodes from atmospheric exposure is commonly recognized to minimize corrosion induced by reaction with water, oxygen, carbon dioxide or nitrogen (1). Manufacturing facilities customarily limit the relative humidity to less than two percent. Electrodes that have been manufactured for use in lithium cells are typically stored in dry-argon containers. In spite of these precautions, lithium has been found to corrode over a long time period due to residual gases or slow diffusion of the same into storage containers. The purpose of this investigation was to determine the nature of the lithium corrosion.

  12. In vitro and in vivo corrosion, cytocompatibility and mechanical properties of biodegradable Mg-Y-Ca-Zr alloys as implant materials.

    PubMed

    Chou, Da-Tren; Hong, Daeho; Saha, Partha; Ferrero, Jordan; Lee, Boeun; Tan, Zongqing; Dong, Zhongyun; Kumta, Prashant N

    2013-11-01

    This study introduces a class of biodegradable Mg-Y-Ca-Zr alloys novel to biological applications and presents evaluations for orthopedic and craniofacial implant applications. Mg-Y-Ca-Zr alloys were processed using conventional melting and casting techniques. The effects of increasing Y content from 1 to 4 wt.% as well as the effects of T4 solution treatment were assessed. Basic material phase characterization was conducted using X-ray diffraction, optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Compressive and tensile tests allowed for the comparison of mechanical properties of the as-cast and T4-treated Mg-Y-Ca-Zr alloys to pure Mg and as-drawn AZ31. Potentiodynamic polarization tests and mass loss immersion tests were used to evaluate the corrosion behavior of the alloys. In vitro cytocompatibility tests on MC3T3-E1 pre-osteoblast cells were also conducted. Finally, alloy pellets were implanted into murine subcutaneous tissue to observe in vivo corrosion as well as local host response through H&E staining. SEM/EDS analysis showed that secondary phase intermetallics rich in yttrium were observed along the grain boundaries, with the T4 solution treatment diffusing the secondary phases into the matrix while increasing the grain size. The alloys demonstrated marked improvement in mechanical properties over pure Mg. Increasing the Y content contributed to improved corrosion resistance, while solution-treated alloys resulted in lower strength and compressive strain compared to as-cast alloys. The Mg-Y-Ca-Zr alloys demonstrated excellent in vitro cytocompatibility and normal in vivo host response. The mechanical, corrosion and biological evaluations performed in this study demonstrated that Mg-Y-Ca-Zr alloys, especially with the 4 wt.% Y content, would perform well as orthopedic and craniofacial implant biomaterials. Copyright © 2013 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Corrosion inhibitors from expired drugs.

    PubMed

    Vaszilcsin, Nicolae; Ordodi, Valentin; Borza, Alexandra

    2012-07-15

    This paper presents a method of expired or unused drugs valorization as corrosion inhibitors for metals in various media. Cyclic voltammograms were drawn on platinum in order to assess the stability of pharmaceutically active substances from drugs at the metal-corrosive environment interface. Tafel slope method was used to determine corrosion rates of steel in the absence and presence of inhibitors. Expired Carbamazepine and Paracetamol tablets were used to obtain corrosion inhibitors. For the former, the corrosion inhibition of carbon steel in 0.1 mol L(-1) sulfuric acid solution was about 90%, whereas for the latter, the corrosion inhibition efficiency of the same material in the 0.25 mol L(-1) acetic acid-0.25 mol L(-1) sodium acetate buffer solution was about 85%.

  14. INTERNAL CORROSION AND DEPOSITION CONTROL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Corrosion is one of the most important problems in the drinking water industry. It can affect public health, public acceptance of a water supply, and the cost of providing safe water. Deterioration of materials resulting from corrosion can necessitate huge yearly expenditures o...

  15. INTERNAL CORROSION AND DEPOSITION CONTROL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Corrosion is one of the most important problems in the drinking water industry. It can affect public health, public acceptance of a water supply, and the cost of providing safe water. Deterioration of materials resulting from corrosion can necessitate huge yearly expenditures o...

  16. Corrosion-Resistant Ball Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zdankiewicz, E. M.; Linaburg, E. L.; Lytle, L. J.

    1990-01-01

    Self-lubricating bearing system withstands highly corrosive environment of wastewater-recycling unit. New bearings contain cobalt-based-alloy balls and races, graphite/polyimide polymer ball cages, and single integral polytetrafluoroethylene seals on wet sides. Materials and design prevent corrosion by acids and provide lubrication.

  17. Corrosivity Of Pyrolysis Oils

    SciTech Connect

    Keiser, James R; Bestor, Michael A; Lewis Sr, Samuel Arthur; Storey, John Morse

    2011-01-01

    Pyrolysis oils from several sources have been analyzed and used in corrosion studies which have consisted of exposing corrosion coupons and stress corrosion cracking U-bend samples. The chemical analyses have identified the carboxylic acid compounds as well as the other organic components which are primarily aromatic hydrocarbons. The corrosion studies have shown that raw pyrolysis oil is very corrosive to carbon steel and other alloys with relatively low chromium content. Stress corrosion cracking samples of carbon steel and several low alloy steels developed through-wall cracks after a few hundred hours of exposure at 50 C. Thermochemical processing of biomass can produce solid, liquid and/or gaseous products depending on the temperature and exposure time used for processing. The liquid product, known as pyrolysis oil or bio-oil, as produced contains a significant amount of oxygen, primarily as components of water, carboxylic acids, phenols, ketones and aldehydes. As a result of these constituents, these oils are generally quite acidic with a Total Acid Number (TAN) that can be around 100. Because of this acidity, bio-oil is reported to be corrosive to many common structural materials. Despite this corrosive nature, these oils have the potential to replace some imported petroleum. If the more acidic components can be removed from this bio-oil, it is expected that the oil could be blended with crude oil and then processed in existing petroleum refineries. The refinery products could be transported using customary routes - pipelines, barges, tanker trucks and rail cars - without a need for modification of existing hardware or construction of new infrastructure components - a feature not shared by ethanol.

  18. Design, Construction and Testing of an In-Pile Loop for PWR (Pressurized Water Reactor) Simulation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-06-01

    corrosion resistance in a steam environment. For this reason zircaloy - 2 is used 109 as the primary cladding material in Boiling Water Reactors (BWR...Unfortunately, zircaloy - 2 was found to have a high affinity for monoatomic hydrogen, which formed an intermetallic compound of zirconium-hydride. The...built, the Loop duplicates the core and Steam Generator fluid surface film differential temperatures , bulk fluid temperatures , and wall fluid shear

  19. METC ceramic corrosion/erosion studies: turbine-material screening tests in high-temperature, low-Btu, coal-derived-gas combustion products

    SciTech Connect

    Nakaishi, C.V.; Waltermire, D.M.; Hawkins, L.W.; Jarrett, T.L.

    1982-05-01

    The Morgantown Energy Technology Center, through its Ceramics Corrosion/Erosion Studies, has participated in the United States Department of Energy's High-Temperature Turbine Technology Program, Ceramic Technology Readiness. The program's overall objective is to advance the turbine firing temperature to a range of 2600/sup 0/ to 3000/sup 0/F (1700 to 1922K) with a reasonable service life using coal or coal-derived fuel. The Ceramics Corrosion/Erosion Studies' major objective was to conduct a screening test for several ceramic materials to assess their probability of survival in turbine applications. The materials were exposed to combustion products from low heating value coal-derived gas and air at several high temperatures and velocities. The combustion product composition and temperatures simulated actual environment that may be found in stationary power generating gas turbines except for the pressure levels. The results of approximately 1000 hours of accumulative exposure time of material at the specific test conditions are presented in this report.

  20. Corrosion-resistant sulfur concretes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBee, W. C.; Sullivan, T. A.; Jong, B. W.

    1983-04-01

    Sulfur concretes have been developed by the Bureau of Mines as construction materials with physical and mechanical properties that suit them for use in acid and salt corrosive environments where conventional concretes fail. Mixture design methods were established for preparing sulfur concretes using different types of aggregates and recently developed mixed-modified sulfur cements. Bench-scale testing of the sulfur concretes has shown their potential value. Corrosion resistance, strength, and durability of sulfur concrete are superior to those of conventional materials. Field in situ evaluation tests of the sulfur concretes as replacement for conventional concrete materials are in progress in corrosive areas of 24 commercial chemical, fertilizer, and metallurgical plants.

  1. Corrosion Engineering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Charles V.

    A description is provided for a Corrosion and Corrosion Control course offered in the Continuing Engineering Education Program at the General Motors Institute (GMI). GMI is a small cooperative engineering school of approximately 2,000 students who alternate between six-week periods of academic study and six weeks of related work experience in…

  2. Fireside Corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, Gordon

    2011-07-14

    Oxy-fuel fireside research goals are: (1) determine the effect of oxyfuel combustion on fireside corrosion - flue gas recycle choice, staged combustion ramifications; and (2) develop methods to use chromia solubility in ash as an ash corrosivity measurement - synthetic ashes at first, then boiler and burner rig ashes.

  3. Application of nano-sized TiO2 as an inhibitor of stress corrosion cracking in the steam generator tube materials.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung Mo; Lee, Eun Hee; Kim, Uh Chul; Choi, Byung Seon

    2010-01-01

    Several chemicals were studied to suppress the damage due to a stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of the steam generator (SG) tubes in nuclear power plants. SCC tests were carried out to investigate the performance of TiO2 on several types of SG tube materials. The SCC tests were conducted by using an m-RUB specimen in a 10% NaOH solution at a temperature of 315 degrees C. The test with the addition of TiO2 showed a decrease in the SCC rate for the SG tubing materials. In order to improve the inhibition property in a crevice of TiO2, a sonochemical technique was applied to reduce the size of the TiO2 particle. From the SCC tests with the RUB specimen, the SG tube materials showed an enhanced cracking resistance with the addition of nano-sized TiO2 and the surface property was also changed.

  4. Analyses of containment structures with corrosion damage

    SciTech Connect

    Cherry, J.L.

    1996-12-31

    Corrosion damage to a nuclear power plant containment structure can degrade the pressure capacity of the vessel. For the low-carbon, low- strength steels used in containments, the effect of corrosion on material properties is discussed. Strain-to-failure tests, in uniaxial tension, have been performed on corroded material samples. Results were used to select strain-based failure criteria for corroded steel. Using the ABAQUS finite element analysis code, the capacity of a typical PWR Ice Condenser containment with corrosion damage has been studied. Multiple analyses were performed with the locations of the corrosion the containment, and the amount of corrosion varied in each analysis.

  5. Corrosivity and leaching behavior of controlled low-strength material (CLSM) made using bottom ash and quarry dust.

    PubMed

    Naganathan, Sivakumar; Razak, Hashim Abdul; Hamid, Siti Nadzriah Abdul

    2013-10-15

    This paper reports the corrosivity and leaching behavior of CLSM made using two different industrial wastes i.e. bottom ash from an incineration facility and quarry dust. The leachate samples were derived from fresh and hardened CLSM mixtures, and studied for leaching and electrical resistivity. The release of various contaminants and the consequent environmental impact caused by the contaminants were studied by the measurement of contaminants in the bleed, in the leachate at 28 days, and on the leachate derived from crushed block and whole block leaching done over a period of 126 days. Results indicated that the CLSM mixtures are non corrosive; diffusion was the leaching mechanism; and the contaminants were found to be moderate to low mobility.

  6. Retrieval analysis of different orthodontic brackets: the applicability of electron microprobe techniques for determining material heterogeneities and corrosive potential.

    PubMed

    Holst, Alexandra Ioana; Holst, Stefan; Hirschfelder, Ursula; Seckendorff, Volker Von

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the applicability of micro-analytical methods with high spatial resolution to the characterization of the composition and corrosion behavior of two bracket systems. The surfaces of six nickel-free brackets and six nickel-containing brackets were examined for signs of corrosion and qualitative surface analysis using an electron probe microanalyzer (EPMA), prior to bonding to patient's tooth surfaces and four months after clinical use. The surfaces were characterized qualitatively by secondary electron (SE) images and back scattered electron (BSE) images in both compositional and topographical mode. Qualitative and quantitative wavelength-dispersive analyses were performed for different elements, and by utilizing qualitative analysis the relative concentration of selected elements was mapped two-dimensionally. The absolute concentration of the elements was determined in specially prepared brackets by quantitative analysis using pure element standards for calibration and calculating correction-factors (ZAF). Clear differences were observed between the different bracket types. The nickel-containing stainless steel brackets consist of two separate pieces joined by a brazing alloy. Compositional analysis revealed two different alloy compositions, and reaction zones on both sides of the brazing alloy. The nickel-free bracket was a single piece with only slight variation in element concentration, but had a significantly rougher surface. After clinical use, no corrosive phenomena were detectable with the methods applied. Traces of intraoral wear at the contact areas between the bracket slot and the arch wire were verified. Electron probe microanalysis is a valuable tool for the characterization of element distribution and quantitative analysis for corrosion studies.

  7. Loop quantization

    SciTech Connect

    Nicolau, A.

    1988-10-01

    Loop unwinding is a known technique for reducing loop overhead, exposing parallelism, and increasing the efficiency of pipelining. Traditional loop unwinding is limited to the innermost loop in a group of nested loops and the amount of unwinding either is fixed or must be specified by the user, on a case by case basis. In this paper the authors present a general technique for automatically unwinding multiply nested loops, explain its advantages over other transformation techniques, and illustrate its practical effectiveness. Lopp Quantization could be beneficial by itself or coupled with other loop transformations.

  8. Microstructure and corrosion behavior of laser surface-treated AZ31B Mg bio-implant material.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tso-Chang; Ho, Yee-Hsien; Joshi, Sameehan S; Rajamure, Ravi S; Dahotre, Narendra B

    2017-03-02

    Although magnesium and magnesium alloys are considered biocompatible and biodegradable, they suffer from poor corrosion performance in the human body environment. In light of this, surface modification via rapid surface melting of AZ31B Mg alloy using a continuous-wave Nd:YAG laser was conducted. Laser processing was performed with laser energy ranging from 1.06 to 3.18 J/mm(2). The corrosion behavior in simulated body fluid of laser surface-treated and untreated AZ31B Mg alloy samples was evaluated using electrochemical technique. The effect of laser surface treatment on phase and microstructure evolution was evaluated using X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Microstructure examination revealed grain refinement as well as formation and uniform distribution of Mg17Al12 phase along the grain boundary for laser surface-treated samples. Evolution of such unique microstructure during laser surface treatment indicated enhancement in the corrosion resistance of laser surface-treated samples compared to untreated alloy.

  9. Aircraft Integral Fuel Tank Corrosion Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    sensor is formed by two concentric metallic electrodes, separated by an insulator material , between which an electric current circulates when a given... materials are used to make the mentioned current, proportional to the concentration of corrosive contaminants in the water and to the amount of microbial...contamination level, detected in the respective fuel tank. REFERENCES 1. C. B. Ward. Corrosion resulting from corrosion fuel tank contamination. Materials

  10. 46 CFR 154.412 - Cargo tank corrosion allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cargo tank corrosion allowance. 154.412 Section 154.412... Containment Systems § 154.412 Cargo tank corrosion allowance. A cargo tank must be designed with a corrosion...) carries a cargo that corrodes the tank material. Note: Corrosion allowance for independent tank type C...

  11. 49 CFR 193.2627 - Atmospheric corrosion control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Atmospheric corrosion control. 193.2627 Section... LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 193.2627 Atmospheric corrosion... atmospheric corrosion by— (a) Material that has been designed and selected to resist the corrosive...

  12. 46 CFR 154.412 - Cargo tank corrosion allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Cargo tank corrosion allowance. 154.412 Section 154.412... Containment Systems § 154.412 Cargo tank corrosion allowance. A cargo tank must be designed with a corrosion...) carries a cargo that corrodes the tank material. Note: Corrosion allowance for independent tank type C...

  13. 49 CFR 193.2627 - Atmospheric corrosion control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Atmospheric corrosion control. 193.2627 Section... LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 193.2627 Atmospheric corrosion... atmospheric corrosion by— (a) Material that has been designed and selected to resist the corrosive...

  14. 46 CFR 111.01-11 - Corrosion-resistant parts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Corrosion-resistant parts. 111.01-11 Section 111.01-11...-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS General § 111.01-11 Corrosion-resistant parts. Each enclosure and part of electric equipment that can be damaged by corrosion must be made of corrosion-resistant materials or of...

  15. 46 CFR 111.01-11 - Corrosion-resistant parts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Corrosion-resistant parts. 111.01-11 Section 111.01-11...-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS General § 111.01-11 Corrosion-resistant parts. Each enclosure and part of electric equipment that can be damaged by corrosion must be made of corrosion-resistant materials or of...

  16. 46 CFR 154.412 - Cargo tank corrosion allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Cargo tank corrosion allowance. 154.412 Section 154.412... Containment Systems § 154.412 Cargo tank corrosion allowance. A cargo tank must be designed with a corrosion...) carries a cargo that corrodes the tank material. Note: Corrosion allowance for independent tank type C is...

  17. 49 CFR 193.2627 - Atmospheric corrosion control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Atmospheric corrosion control. 193.2627 Section... LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 193.2627 Atmospheric corrosion... atmospheric corrosion by— (a) Material that has been designed and selected to resist the corrosive atmosphere...

  18. 46 CFR 154.412 - Cargo tank corrosion allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Cargo tank corrosion allowance. 154.412 Section 154.412... Containment Systems § 154.412 Cargo tank corrosion allowance. A cargo tank must be designed with a corrosion...) carries a cargo that corrodes the tank material. Note: Corrosion allowance for independent tank type C is...

  19. 49 CFR 193.2627 - Atmospheric corrosion control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Atmospheric corrosion control. 193.2627 Section... LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 193.2627 Atmospheric corrosion... atmospheric corrosion by— (a) Material that has been designed and selected to resist the corrosive atmosphere...

  20. 46 CFR 154.412 - Cargo tank corrosion allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Cargo tank corrosion allowance. 154.412 Section 154.412... Containment Systems § 154.412 Cargo tank corrosion allowance. A cargo tank must be designed with a corrosion...) carries a cargo that corrodes the tank material. Note: Corrosion allowance for independent tank type C is...

  1. 49 CFR 193.2627 - Atmospheric corrosion control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Atmospheric corrosion control. 193.2627 Section... LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 193.2627 Atmospheric corrosion... atmospheric corrosion by— (a) Material that has been designed and selected to resist the corrosive atmosphere...

  2. Comparison of corrosion behavior of EUROFER and CLAM steels in flowing Pb-15.7Li

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konys, J.; Krauss, W.; Zhu, Z.; Huang, Q.

    2014-12-01

    Ferritic martensitic steels are envisaged to be applied as structural materials in HCLL blanket systems. Their compatibility with the liquid breeder, which is in direct contact with the structural alloy, will be essential for reliable and safe operation of the designed blankets. Formerly performed corrosion tests of RAFM steels in PICOLO loop of KIT were mainly done at high flow velocities, e.g., 0.22 m/s and delivered severe attack with material loss rates above 400 μm/yr at 823 K. Meanwhile, flow velocities for corrosion testing have been reduced into the "cm range" to be near fusion relevant conditions. Among the international ITER-partners, many varieties of RAFM steels have been developed and manufactured within the last decade, e.g., the so-called Chinese Low Activation Martensitic steel (CLAM). In this paper, the long term corrosion behavior of EUROFER and CLAM steel in flowing Pb-15.7Li will be presented at a flow velocity of about 0.10 m/s and compared with earlier obtained results of RAFM steels exposed at other operation parameters of PICOLO loop. The observed corrosion attack is near 220 μm/yr and fits well to predictions made by MATLIM-modeling for low flow velocities in the turbulent flow regime.

  3. Corrosion and corrosivity monitoring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braunling, Russ; Dietrich, Paul

    2005-05-01

    Honeywell International has developed and flight-tested a Corrosion and Corrosivity Monitoring System (C2MS). The C2MS detects galvanic corrosion in the main gearbox feet fasteners of helicopters. In addition, it monitors the environmental conditions inside the main floorboard compartment to determine the need for structural maintenance. The C2MS sensor on a main gearbox feet fastener sends a small electrical signal through the fastener and housing to measure the conductivity of the assembly. The measured conductivity value is used to determine if galvanic corrosion is present in the fastener assembly. The floorboard compartment sensors use a surrogate metal coupon to measure the corrosivity of the environment. The information from this sensor is used to recommend an extension to the calendar-based maintenance schedule. Fleet-wide information can be gathered by the system. The C2MS uses two Data Collection Units (DCUs) to store the corrosion data: one for the main gearbox feet fasteners and one for the main floorboard compartment. The DCU design addresses the issues of long battery life for the C2MS (greater than 2 years) and compactness. The data from the DCUs is collected by a personal digital assistant and downloaded to a personal computer where the corrosion algorithms reside. The personal computer display provides the location(s) of galvanic corrosion in the main gearbox feet fasteners as well as the recommended date for floorboard compartment maintenance. This paper discusses the methodology used to develop the C2MS software and hardware, presents the principles of the galvanic corrosion detection algorithm, and gives the laboratory and flight test results that document system performance in detecting galvanic corrosion (detection and false alarm rate). The paper also discusses the benefits of environmental sensors for providing a maintenance scheduling date.

  4. Corrosion of nickel-base alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Scarberry, R.C.

    1985-01-01

    The volume consists of three tutorial lectures and 18 contributed papers. The three tutorial lectures provide state-of-the-art background on the physical metallurgy of nickel-base alloys as it relates to corrosion. Also featured are the mechanisms and applications of these alloys and an insight into the corrosion testing techniques. The three tutorial lecture papers will help acquaint newcomers to this family of alloys with a thorough overview. The contributed papers are categorized into four major topics: general corrosion, stress corrosion cracking, fatigue and localized corrosion. Each topic is key-noted by one invited lecture followed by several contributed papers. The papers in the general corrosion section are wide ranging and cover the aspects of material selection, development of galvanic series in corrosive environments, corrosion resistance characteristics, hydrogen permeation and hydrogen embrittlement of nickel and some nickel-base alloys.

  5. Long-term corrosion studies

    SciTech Connect

    Gdowski, G.

    1998-05-29

    The scope of this activity is to assess the long-term corrosion properties of metallic materials under consideration for fabricating waste package containers. Three classes of metals are to be assessed: corrosion resistant, intermediate corrosion resistant, and corrosion allowance. Corrosion properties to be evaluated are general, pitting and crevice corrosion, stress-corrosion cracking, and galvanic corrosion. The performance of these materials will be investigated under conditions that are considered relevant to the potential emplacement site. Testing in four aqueous solutions, and vapor phases above them, and at two temperatures are planned for this activity. (The environmental conditions, test metals, and matrix are described in detail in Section 3.0.) The purpose and objective of this activity is to obtain the kinetic and mechanistic information on degradation of metallic alloys currently being considered for waste package containers. This information will be used to provide assistance to (1) waste package design (metal barrier selection) (E-20-90 to E-20-92), (2) waste package performance assessment activities (SIP-PA-2), (3) model development (E-20-75 to E-20-89). and (4) repository license application.

  6. Tungsten - Tungsten Trioxide Electrodes for the Long-term Monitoring of Corrosion Processes in Highly Alkaline Media and Concrete-based Materials.

    PubMed

    Kolar, Mitja; Doliška, Aleš; Svegl, Franc; Kalcher, Kurt

    2010-12-01

    The determination of pH in highly alkaline solutions and concrete materials is extremely important for monitoring or predicting the corrosion processes of reinforced concrete structures and to follow the hydration process of Portland cement, fly-ash, micro silica and other materials used in concrete manufacturing. The corrosion of reinforced concrete structures and the hydration of pozzolanic materials are long-term processes, which means, that appropriate durable, and resilient pH electrodes are needed, for direct implantation regarding solid concrete bodies. The purpose of this work was to characterise the potentiometric and surface properties of tungsten electrodes after exposure to extreme alkaline solutions. The tungsten wire surface was activated at 800 °C for 30 min within an oxygen flow. The formation of homogenous and compact multiple layers of WO3 crystals was observed using X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. X-ray diffraction of those tungsten electrodes exposed to saturated calcium hydroxide solution or the pore-water of cement-based materials during 10 months, indicated partly dissolved WO3. Two new compounds appeared on the electrodes surfaces; pure tungsten and CaWO4. The presence of tungsten was affecting any potentiometric response in acidic pH region (2-5) but in pH 5-12 region the response still remained linear with a slope of 42 ± 2 mV/pH unit. The W/WO3 electrode was suitable for the long-term monitoring of corrosion processes in concrete-based materials according to the pH changes as it has stable and repeatable responses to alkaline solutions (pH > 12). All the tested interferring ions had no significant influence on electrode potential. The W/WO3 electrode is simple, robust, inexpensive, and temperature resistant and can be applied in potentiometric titrations as well as in batch and flow-injection analysis. The prepared electrode is a highly promising pH sensor for the monitoring of pH changes in highly alkaline capillary

  7. Superheater Corrosion In Biomass Boilers: Today's Science and Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, William

    2011-12-01

    This report broadens a previous review of published literature on corrosion of recovery boiler superheater tube materials to consider the performance of candidate materials at temperatures near the deposit melting temperature in advanced boilers firing coal, wood-based fuels, and waste materials as well as in gas turbine environments. Discussions of corrosion mechanisms focus on the reactions in fly ash deposits and combustion gases that can give corrosive materials access to the surface of a superheater tube. Setting the steam temperature of a biomass boiler is a compromise between wasting fuel energy, risking pluggage that will shut the unit down, and creating conditions that will cause rapid corrosion on the superheater tubes and replacement expenses. The most important corrosive species in biomass superheater corrosion are chlorine compounds and the most corrosion resistant alloys are typically FeCrNi alloys containing 20-28% Cr. Although most of these materials contain many other additional additions, there is no coherent theory of the alloying required to resist the combination of high temperature salt deposits and flue gases that are found in biomass boiler superheaters that may cause degradation of superheater tubes. After depletion of chromium by chromate formation or chromic acid volatilization exceeds a critical amount, the protective scale gives way to a thick layer of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} over an unprotective (FeCrNi){sub 3}O{sub 4} spinel. This oxide is not protective and can be penetrated by chlorine species that cause further acceleration of the corrosion rate by a mechanism called active oxidation. Active oxidation, cited as the cause of most biomass superheater corrosion under chloride ash deposits, does not occur in the absence of these alkali salts when the chloride is present as HCl gas. Although a deposit is more corrosive at temperatures where it is molten than at temperatures where it is frozen, increasing superheater tube temperatures through

  8. Conceptual Design of Forced Convection Molten Salt Heat Transfer Testing Loop

    SciTech Connect

    Manohar S. Sohal; Piyush Sabharwall; Pattrick Calderoni; Alan K. Wertsching; S. Brandon Grover

    2010-09-01

    This report develops a proposal to design and construct a forced convection test loop. A detailed test plan will then be conducted to obtain data on heat transfer, thermodynamic, and corrosion characteristics of the molten salts and fluid-solid interaction. In particular, this report outlines an experimental research and development test plan. The most important initial requirement for heat transfer test of molten salt systems is the establishment of reference coolant materials to use in the experiments. An earlier report produced within the same project highlighted how thermophysical properties of the materials that directly impact the heat transfer behavior are strongly correlated to the composition and impurities concentration of the melt. It is therefore essential to establish laboratory techniques that can measure the melt composition, and to develop purification methods that would allow the production of large quantities of coolant with the desired purity. A companion report describes the options available to reach such objectives. In particular, that report outlines an experimental research and development test plan that would include following steps: •Molten Salts: The candidate molten salts for investigation will be selected. •Materials of Construction: Materials of construction for the test loop, heat exchangers, and fluid-solid corrosion tests in the test loop will also be selected. •Scaling Analysis: Scaling analysis to design the test loop will be performed. •Test Plan: A comprehensive test plan to include all the tests that are being planned in the short and long term time frame will be developed. •Design the Test Loop: The forced convection test loop will be designed including extensive mechanical design, instrument selection, data acquisition system, safety requirements, and related precautionary measures. •Fabricate the Test Loop. •Perform the Tests. •Uncertainty Analysis: As a part of the data collection, uncertainty analysis will

  9. Operation Experience of LBE Loop: HELIOS

    SciTech Connect

    Seung Ho, Jeong; Chi Bum, Bahn; Seung Hee, Chang; Young Jin, Oh; Won Chang, Nam; Kyung Ha, Ryu; Hyo On, Nam; Jun, Lim; Tai Hyun, Lee; Seung Gi, Lee; Na Young, Lee; Il Soon, Hwang

    2006-07-01

    An LBE (lead-bismuth eutectic) coolant loop, named as HELIOS (Heavy Eutectic liquid metal Loop for Investigation of Operability and Safety of PEACER), has been designed by thermal-hydraulic scaling of the PEACER-300MW{sub e} (Proliferation-resistant, Environment-friendly, Accident-tolerant, Continuable and Economical Reactor). HELIOS is consisted of an electrically-heated core at its bottom and a heat exchanger at its top with their mean elevation difference of 8 meter, closely matching with that of PEACER. Natural circulation experiment and material test are principal goals of HELIOS operation. About 2 metric ton of LBE is circulated by a centrifugal pump at a rate up to 76 liter/min through HELIOS having a total 12 meter height. A material test bypass was installed to perform LBE corrosion experiments in continuous operation conditions at temperature and flow velocity higher than nominal values. During the initial start-up test, there was an accidental cooling water leak into LBE at around 250 deg C, but without any consequences. A small LBE leak occurred through a crack in a bellows for connecting storage tank to the main loop, apparently due to excessive stress arisen from faulty installation, however, there was no significant safety hazard or chemical reaction with environment. Many practical difficulties arouse with sensors for pressure measurement, level control in sump pump tank. LBE loop operation experiences are summarized herein. Upon the sensor calibrations, HELIOS will be utilized to examine the materials durability and natural circulation capability of PEACER-300. (authors)

  10. Corrosion-resistant coating development

    SciTech Connect

    Stinton, D.P.; Kupp, D.M.; Martin, R.L.

    1997-12-01

    SiC-based heat exchangers have been identified as the prime candidate material for use as heat exchangers in advanced combined cycle power plants. Unfortunately, hot corrosion of the SiC-based materials created by alkali metal salts present in the combustion gases dictates the need for corrosion-resistant coatings. The well-documented corrosion resistance of CS-50 combined with its low (and tailorable) coefficient of thermal expansion and low modulus makes CS-50 an ideal candidate for this application. Coatings produced by gelcasting and traditional particulate processing have been evaluated.

  11. Surface mechanical properties, corrosion resistance, and cytocompatibility of nitrogen plasma-implanted nickel-titanium alloys: a comparative study with commonly used medical grade materials.

    PubMed

    Yeung, K W K; Poon, R W Y; Chu, P K; Chung, C Y; Liu, X Y; Lu, W W; Chan, D; Chan, S C W; Luk, K D K; Cheung, K M C

    2007-08-01

    Stainless steel and titanium alloys are the most common metallic orthopedic materials. Recently, nickel-titanium (NiTi) shape memory alloys have attracted much attention due to their shape memory effect and super-elasticity. However, this alloy consists of equal amounts of nickel and titanium, and nickel is a well known sensitizer to cause allergy or other deleterious effects in living tissues. Nickel ion leaching is correspondingly worse if the surface corrosion resistance deteriorates. We have therefore modified the NiTi surface by nitrogen plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII). The surface chemistry and corrosion resistance of the implanted samples were studied and compared with those of the untreated NiTi alloys, stainless steel, and Ti-6Al-4V alloy serving as controls. Immersion tests were carried out to investigate the extent of nickel leaching under simulated human body conditions and cytocompatibility tests were conducted using enhanced green fluorescent protein mice osteoblasts. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results reveal that a thin titanium nitride (TiN) layer with higher hardness is formed on the surface after nitrogen PIII. The corrosion resistance of the implanted sample is also superior to that of the untreated NiTi and stainless steel and comparable to that of titanium alloy. The release of nickel ions is significantly reduced compared with the untreated NiTi. The sample with surface TiN exhibits the highest amount of cell proliferation whereas stainless steel fares the worst. Compared with coatings, the plasma-implanted structure does not delaminate as easily and nitrogen PIII is a viable way to improve the properties of NiTi orthopedic implants.

  12. Corrosion of graphite composites in phosphoric acid fuel cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christner, L. G.; Dhar, H. P.; Farooque, M.; Kush, A. K.

    1986-01-01

    Polymers, polymer-graphite composites and different carbon materials are being considered for many of the fuel cell stack components. Exposure to concentrated phosphoric acid in the fuel cell environment and to high anodic potential results in corrosion. Relative corrosion rates of these materials, failure modes, plausible mechanisms of corrosion and methods for improvement of these materials are investigated.

  13. Corrosion of graphite composites in phosphoric acid fuel cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christner, L. G.; Dhar, H. P.; Farooque, M.; Kush, A. K.

    1986-01-01

    Polymers, polymer-graphite composites and different carbon materials are being considered for many of the fuel cell stack components. Exposure to concentrated phosphoric acid in the fuel cell environment and to high anodic potential results in corrosion. Relative corrosion rates of these materials, failure modes, plausible mechanisms of corrosion and methods for improvement of these materials are investigated.

  14. Storage corrosion of materials and equipment: Temperature-humidity and aerochemical regimes indoors and in the open air

    SciTech Connect

    Strekalov, P.V.

    1994-07-01

    The following storage factors are considered: (1) the temperature-humidity complex (THC) in the open air at representative sites with cold, moderate, and subtropical humid climate; (2) the temperature and humidity differences between the open air and an atmospheric of semiclosed spaces; (3) the THC inside storage-spaces in a humid tropical climate; (4) the concentration of SO{sub 2} and Cl{sup -} in the open air and in different storage-spaces; (5) the categories of corrosivity of the atmosphere and methods for its evaluation indoors and outdoors.

  15. Microgalvanic Aspects of the Seawater Corrosion of Marine Materials in the Presence of Hypochlorite Ion Fouling Inhibitor.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-12-01

    diagrams --------------------------------- 270-272 E-4-E-7 Pourbaix diagrams ------------------------------ 273-277 E-8 Experimentally measured corrosion...formation of copper(III). Pourbaix [49] has calculated a potential-pH diagram including the compounds copper(III) ion and CuO 2 - The simple experiment...Figure E-4. Pourbaix diagram for the system copper-water. (b) Cu(OH) 2 not considered. 274 -2 -1 0 1 -2_ 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 162, 1,4

  16. Study made of procedures for externally loading and corrosion testing stress corrosion specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, T. S.

    1967-01-01

    Study was initiated to determine methods or test specimens for evaluating stress corrosion cracking characteristics of common structural materials. It was found that the methods of externally loading and corrosion testing were reliable in yielding reproducible results for stress corrosion evaluation.

  17. Mitigation of Corrosion on Magnesium Alloy by Predesigned Surface Corrosion

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xuming; Wu, Guosong; Peng, Xiang; Li, Limin; Feng, Hongqing; Gao, Biao; Huo, Kaifu; Chu, Paul K.

    2015-01-01

    Rapid corrosion of magnesium alloys is undesirable in structural and biomedical applications and a general way to control corrosion is to form a surface barrier layer isolating the bulk materials from the external environment. Herein, based on the insights gained from the anticorrosion behavior of corrosion products, a special way to mitigate aqueous corrosion is described. The concept is based on pre-corrosion by a hydrothermal treatment of Al-enriched Mg alloys in water. A uniform surface composed of an inner compact layer and top Mg-Al layered double hydroxide (LDH) microsheet is produced on a large area using a one-step process and excellent corrosion resistance is achieved in saline solutions. Moreover, inspired by the super-hydrophobic phenomenon in nature such as the lotus leaves effect, the orientation of the top microsheet layer is tailored by adjusting the hydrothermal temperature, time, and pH to produce a water-repellent surface after modification with fluorinated silane. As a result of the trapped air pockets in the microstructure, the super-hydrophobic surface with the Cassie state shows better corrosion resistance in the immersion tests. The results reveal an economical and environmentally friendly means to control and use the pre-corrosion products on magnesium alloys. PMID:26615896

  18. Mitigation of Corrosion on Magnesium Alloy by Predesigned Surface Corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuming; Wu, Guosong; Peng, Xiang; Li, Limin; Feng, Hongqing; Gao, Biao; Huo, Kaifu; Chu, Paul K.

    2015-11-01

    Rapid corrosion of magnesium alloys is undesirable in structural and biomedical applications and a general way to control corrosion is to form a surface barrier layer isolating the bulk materials from the external environment. Herein, based on the insights gained from the anticorrosion behavior of corrosion products, a special way to mitigate aqueous corrosion is described. The concept is based on pre-corrosion by a hydrothermal treatment of Al-enriched Mg alloys in water. A uniform surface composed of an inner compact layer and top Mg-Al layered double hydroxide (LDH) microsheet is produced on a large area using a one-step process and excellent corrosion resistance is achieved in saline solutions. Moreover, inspired by the super-hydrophobic phenomenon in nature such as the lotus leaves effect, the orientation of the top microsheet layer is tailored by adjusting the hydrothermal temperature, time, and pH to produce a water-repellent surface after modification with fluorinated silane. As a result of the trapped air pockets in the microstructure, the super-hydrophobic surface with the Cassie state shows better corrosion resistance in the immersion tests. The results reveal an economical and environmentally friendly means to control and use the pre-corrosion products on magnesium alloys.

  19. Corrosion and stress corrosion cracking in supercritical water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Was, G. S.; Ampornrat, P.; Gupta, G.; Teysseyre, S.; West, E. A.; Allen, T. R.; Sridharan, K.; Tan, L.; Chen, Y.; Ren, X.; Pister, C.

    2007-09-01

    Supercritical water (SCW) has attracted increasing attention since SCW boiler power plants were implemented to increase the efficiency of fossil-based power plants. The SCW reactor (SCWR) design has been selected as one of the Generation IV reactor concepts because of its higher thermal efficiency and plant simplification as compared to current light water reactors (LWRs). Reactor operating conditions call for a core coolant temperature between 280 °C and 620 °C at a pressure of 25 MPa and maximum expected neutron damage levels to any replaceable or permanent core component of 15 dpa (thermal reactor design) and 100 dpa (fast reactor design). Irradiation-induced changes in microstructure (swelling, radiation-induced segregation (RIS), hardening, phase stability) and mechanical properties (strength, thermal and irradiation-induced creep, fatigue) are also major concerns. Throughout the core, corrosion, stress corrosion cracking, and the effect of irradiation on these degradation modes are critical issues. This paper reviews the current understanding of the response of candidate materials for SCWR systems, focusing on the corrosion and stress corrosion cracking response, and highlights the design trade-offs associated with certain alloy systems. Ferritic-martensitic steels generally have the best resistance to stress corrosion cracking, but suffer from the worst oxidation. Austenitic stainless steels and Ni-base alloys have better oxidation resistance but are more susceptible to stress corrosion cracking. The promise of grain boundary engineering and surface modification in addressing corrosion and stress corrosion cracking performance is discussed.

  20. Mitigation of Corrosion on Magnesium Alloy by Predesigned Surface Corrosion.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuming; Wu, Guosong; Peng, Xiang; Li, Limin; Feng, Hongqing; Gao, Biao; Huo, Kaifu; Chu, Paul K

    2015-11-30

    Rapid corrosion of magnesium alloys is undesirable in structural and biomedical applications and a general way to control corrosion is to form a surface barrier layer isolating the bulk materials from the external environment. Herein, based on the insights gained from the anticorrosion behavior of corrosion products, a special way to mitigate aqueous corrosion is described. The concept is based on pre-corrosion by a hydrothermal treatment of Al-enriched Mg alloys in water. A uniform surface composed of an inner compact layer and top Mg-Al layered double hydroxide (LDH) microsheet is produced on a large area using a one-step process and excellent corrosion resistance is achieved in saline solutions. Moreover, inspired by the super-hydrophobic phenomenon in nature such as the lotus leaves effect, the orientation of the top microsheet layer is tailored by adjusting the hydrothermal temperature, time, and pH to produce a water-repellent surface after modification with fluorinated silane. As a result of the trapped air pockets in the microstructure, the super-hydrophobic surface with the Cassie state shows better corrosion resistance in the immersion tests. The results reveal an economical and environmentally friendly means to control and use the pre-corrosion products on magnesium alloys.

  1. Addendum to material selection guidelines for geothermal energy-utilization systems. Part I. Extension of the field experience data base. Part II. Proceedings of the geothermal engineering and materials (GEM) program conference (San Diego, CA, 6-8 October 1982)

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, C.S.; Ellis, P.F. II

    1983-05-01

    The extension of the field experience data base includes the following: key corrosive species, updated field experiences, corrosion of secondary loop components or geothermal binary power plants, and suitability of conventional water-source heat pump evaporator materials for geothermal heat pump service. Twenty-four conference papers are included. Three were abstracted previously for EDB. Separate abstracts were prepared for twenty-one. (MHR)

  2. Stress Corrosion Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Advanced testing of structural materials was developed by Lewis Research Center and Langley Research Center working with the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM). Under contract, Aluminum Company of America (Alcoa) conducted a study for evaluating stress corrosion cracking, and recommended the "breaking load" method which determines fracture strengths as well as measuring environmental degradation. Alcoa and Langley plan to submit the procedure to ASTM as a new testing method.

  3. Microclimate Corrosion Effects in Coastal Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, G.R.; Covino, B.S. Jr.; Bullard, S.J.; Cramer, S.D.

    1996-03-24

    The Albany Research Center is conducting atmospheric corrosion research in coastal environments to improve the performance of materials in the Nation's infrastructure. The corrosion of bare metals, and of painted, thermal-sprayed, and galvanized steels are presented for one-year exposures at sites located on bridges and utility poles along the Oregon coast. The effects of microclimates (for example distance from the ocean, high wind zones, and salt-fog prone regions) are examined in conjunction with sample orientation and sheltered/unsheltered comparisons. An atmospheric corrosion model examines the growth and dissolution of corrosion product layers to arrive at a steady-state thickness and corrosion rate.

  4. AGARD Corrosion Handbook. Volume 2. Aircraft Corrosion Control Documents: A Descriptive Catalogue

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-03-01

    A. Aluminum Alloys 2 B. Steels 4 C. Magnesium 6 D. Titanium 8 E. Corrosion Resistant Steels 10 F . Other Metals 12 II. Corrosion Mechanisms 14 A...Steels 30 D. Titanium 32 E. Magnesium 34 F ; Other Metals and Materials (Radomes, etc.) 36 V. Corrosion Prevention 38 A. Corrosion Control Plan 38...there are many sub-tier specifications. Specification MIL- F -7179 is used by all the U.S. services for finishing aircraft. MIL-S-5002 covers inorganic

  5. Alkylaniline/formaldehyde oligomers as corrosion inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Bacskai, R.; Schroeder, A.H.

    1988-10-25

    This patent describes a method of inhibiting corrosion of a corrodible metal material in or around a well through which a corrosive fluid is produced, which comprises contacting the metal material with an effective amount of a corrosion inhibitor composition comprising the reaction product obtained by the acid-catalyzed oligomerization of: (A) an alkylaniline having from 4 to 30 carbon atoms in the alkyl substituent, and (B) formaldehyde.

  6. Atmospheric corrosion of metals in industrial city environment

    PubMed Central

    Kusmierek, Elzbieta; Chrzescijanska, Ewa

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheric corrosion is a significant problem given destruction of various materials, especially metals. The corrosion investigation in the industrial city environment was carried out during one year exposure. Corrosion potential was determined using the potentiometric method. The highest effect of corrosion processes was observed during the winter season due to increased air pollution. Corrosion of samples pre-treated in tannic acid before the exposure was more difficult compared with the samples without pretreatment. The corrosion products determined with the SEM/EDS method prove that the most corrosive pollutants present in the industrial city air are SO2, CO2, chlorides and dust. PMID:26217736

  7. The dual role of microbes in corrosion.

    PubMed

    Kip, Nardy; van Veen, Johannes A

    2015-03-01

    Corrosion is the result of a series of chemical, physical and (micro) biological processes leading to the deterioration of materials such as steel and stone. It is a world-wide problem with great societal and economic consequences. Current corrosion control strategies based on chemically produced products are under increasing pressure of stringent environmental regulations. Furthermore, they are rather inefficient. Therefore, there is an urgent need for environmentally friendly and sustainable corrosion control strategies. The mechanisms of microbially influenced corrosion and microbially influenced corrosion inhibition are not completely understood, because they cannot be linked to a single biochemical reaction or specific microbial species or groups. Corrosion is influenced by the complex processes of different microorganisms performing different electrochemical reactions and secreting proteins and metabolites that can have secondary effects. Information on the identity and role of microbial communities that are related to corrosion and corrosion inhibition in different materials and in different environments is scarce. As some microorganisms are able to both cause and inhibit corrosion, we pay particular interest to their potential role as corrosion-controlling agents. We show interesting interfaces in which scientists from different disciplines such as microbiology, engineering and art conservation can collaborate to find solutions to the problems caused by corrosion.

  8. The dual role of microbes in corrosion

    PubMed Central

    Kip, Nardy; van Veen, Johannes A

    2015-01-01

    Corrosion is the result of a series of chemical, physical and (micro) biological processes leading to the deterioration of materials such as steel and stone. It is a world-wide problem with great societal and economic consequences. Current corrosion control strategies based on chemically produced products are under increasing pressure of stringent environmental regulations. Furthermore, they are rather inefficient. Therefore, there is an urgent need for environmentally friendly and sustainable corrosion control strategies. The mechanisms of microbially influenced corrosion and microbially influenced corrosion inhibition are not completely understood, because they cannot be linked to a single biochemical reaction or specific microbial species or groups. Corrosion is influenced by the complex processes of different microorganisms performing different electrochemical reactions and secreting proteins and metabolites that can have secondary effects. Information on the identity and role of microbial communities that are related to corrosion and corrosion inhibition in different materials and in different environments is scarce. As some microorganisms are able to both cause and inhibit corrosion, we pay particular interest to their potential role as corrosion-controlling agents. We show interesting interfaces in which scientists from different disciplines such as microbiology, engineering and art conservation can collaborate to find solutions to the problems caused by corrosion. PMID:25259571

  9. Radiation effects on corrosion of zirconium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, A.B. Jr.

    1989-06-01

    From the wide use of zirconium alloys as components in nuclear reactors, has come clear evidence that reactor radiation is a major corrosion parameter. The evidence emerges from comparisons of zirconium alloy corrosion behavior in different reactor types, for example, BWRs versus PWRs and in corresponding reactor loop chemistries; also, oxidation rates differ with location along components such as fuel rods and reactor pressure tubes. In most respects, oxidation effects on power reactor components are paralleled by oxidation behavior on specimens exposed to radiation in reactor loops.

  10. General Corrosion and Localized Corrosion of Waste Package Outer Barrier

    SciTech Connect

    K.G. Mon

    2004-10-01

    The waste package design for the License Application is a double-wall waste package underneath a protective drip shield (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168489]; BSC 2004 [DIRS 169480]). The purpose and scope of this model report is to document models for general and localized corrosion of the waste package outer barrier (WPOB) to be used in evaluating waste package performance. The WPOB is constructed of Alloy 22 (UNS N06022), a highly corrosion-resistant nickel-based alloy. The inner vessel of the waste package is constructed of Stainless Steel Type 316 (UNS S31600). Before it fails, the Alloy 22 WPOB protects the Stainless Steel Type 316 inner vessel from exposure to the external environment and any significant degradation. The Stainless Steel Type 316 inner vessel provides structural stability to the thinner Alloy 22 WPOB. Although the waste package inner vessel would also provide some performance for waste containment and potentially decrease the rate of radionuclide transport after WPOB breach before it fails, the potential performance of the inner vessel is far less than that of the more corrosion-resistant Alloy 22 WPOB. For this reason, the corrosion performance of the waste package inner vessel is conservatively ignored in this report and the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA). Treatment of seismic and igneous events and their consequences on waste package outer barrier performance are not specifically discussed in this report, although the general and localized corrosion models developed in this report are suitable for use in these scenarios. The localized corrosion processes considered in this report are pitting corrosion and crevice corrosion. Stress corrosion cracking is discussed in ''Stress Corrosion Cracking of the Drip Shield, the Waste Package Outer Barrier, and the Stainless Steel Structural Material'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169985]).

  11. Mechanism of corrosion of structural materials in contact with coal chars in coal gasifier atmospheres. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Douglass, D.L.; Bhide, V.S.; Vineberg, E.

    1980-05-01

    Six alloys, 310 stainless steel, Hastelloy X, Inconel 671, Incoloy 800, Haynes 188, and FeCrAlY (GE1541 and MA956), were corroded in two chars at 1600 and 1800/sup 0/F. The chars, FMC and Husky, contained 2.7 and 0.9% sulfur, respectively. Various parameters were investigated, including char size, cover gas, char quantity, char replenishment period, gas composition, and the use of coatings. The corrosion process was strictly sulfidation when the char was replenished every 24 hours or less. The kinetics of reaction were nearly linear with time. The reaction resulted in thick external sulfide scales with extensive internal sulfidation in the substrate. The kinetics and reaction-product morphologies suggested that diffusion through the sulfide scale played a minor role and that an interfacial reaction was the rate-controlling step. A mathematical model was developed which supported this hypothesis. The reaction rates showed a relatively minor role on alloy composition, depending upon whether the alloys were tested singularly or in combination with others. Inconel 671, the best alloy in CGA environments, consistently corroded the most rapidly of the chromia-former types regardless of char sulfur content or of the temperature. Type 310 stainless was marginally better than Inconel 671. Incoloy 800 was intermediate, whereas, Haynes 188 and Hastelloy X exhibited the best corrosion resistance. The FeCrAlY alloys reacted very rapidly in the absence of preoxidation treatments. All alloys corroded in char at least 1000 times more rapidly than in the CGA (MPC-ITTRI) environment. None of the alloys will be acceptable for use in contact with char unless coatings are applied.

  12. Controlling stress corrosion cracking in mechanism components of ground support equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majid, W. A.

    1988-01-01

    The selection of materials for mechanism components used in ground support equipment so that failures resulting from stress corrosion cracking will be prevented is described. A general criteria to be used in designing for resistance to stress corrosion cracking is also provided. Stress corrosion can be defined as combined action of sustained tensile stress and corrosion to cause premature failure of materials. Various aluminum, steels, nickel, titanium and copper alloys, and tempers and corrosive environment are evaluated for stress corrosion cracking.

  13. Corrosion resistance and electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation testing of some iron-base hardfacing alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Cockeram, B.V.

    1999-11-01

    Hardfacing alloys are weld deposited on a base material to provide a wear resistant surface. Commercially available iron-base hardfacing alloys are being evaluated for replacement of cobalt-base alloys to reduce nuclear plant activation levels. Corrosion testing was used to evaluate the corrosion resistance of several iron-base hardfacing alloys in highly oxygenated environments. The corrosion test results indicate that iron-base hardfacing alloys in the as-deposited condition have acceptable corrosion resistance when the chromium to carbon ratio is greater than 4. Tristelle 5183, with a high niobium (stabilizer) content, did not follow this trend due to precipitation of niobium-rich carbides instead of chromium-rich carbides. This result indicates that iron-base hardfacing alloys containing high stabilizer contents may possess good corrosion resistance with Cr:C < 4. NOREM 02, NOREM 01, and NoCo-M2 hardfacing alloys had acceptable corrosion resistance in the as-deposited and 885 C/4 hour heat treated condition, but rusting from sensitization was observed in the 621 C/6 hour heat treated condition. The feasibility of using an Electrochemical Potentiokinetic Reactivation (EPR) test method, such as used for stainless steel, to detect sensitization in iron-base hardfacing alloys was evaluated. A single loop-EPR method was found to provide a more consistent measurement of sensitization than a double loop-EPR method. The high carbon content that is needed for a wear resistant hardfacing alloy produces a high volume fraction of chromium-rich carbides that are attacked during EPR testing. This results in inherently lower sensitivity for detection of a sensitized iron-base hardfacing alloy than stainless steel using conventional EPR test methods.

  14. 49 CFR 172.558 - CORROSIVE placard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS TABLE, SPECIAL... SECURITY PLANS Placarding § 172.558 CORROSIVE placard. (a) Except for size and color, the CORROSIVE placard must be as follows: ER29SE00.002 (b) In addition to complying with § 172.519, the background color...

  15. 49 CFR 172.558 - CORROSIVE placard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS TABLE, SPECIAL... SECURITY PLANS Placarding § 172.558 CORROSIVE placard. (a) Except for size and color, the CORROSIVE placard must be as follows: ER29SE00.002 (b) In addition to complying with § 172.519, the background color...

  16. 49 CFR 172.558 - CORROSIVE placard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS TABLE, SPECIAL... SECURITY PLANS Placarding § 172.558 CORROSIVE placard. (a) Except for size and color, the CORROSIVE placard must be as follows: ER29SE00.002 (b) In addition to complying with § 172.519, the background color...

  17. 49 CFR 193.2304 - Corrosion control overview.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Corrosion control overview. 193.2304 Section 193... GAS FACILITIES: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Construction § 193.2304 Corrosion control overview. (a... materials specifications from a corrosion control viewpoint and determines that the materials involved...

  18. 49 CFR 193.2304 - Corrosion control overview.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Corrosion control overview. 193.2304 Section 193... GAS FACILITIES: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Construction § 193.2304 Corrosion control overview. (a... materials specifications from a corrosion control viewpoint and determines that the materials involved will...

  19. 49 CFR 193.2304 - Corrosion control overview.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Corrosion control overview. 193.2304 Section 193... GAS FACILITIES: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Construction § 193.2304 Corrosion control overview. (a... materials specifications from a corrosion control viewpoint and determines that the materials involved will...

  20. 49 CFR 193.2304 - Corrosion control overview.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Corrosion control overview. 193.2304 Section 193... GAS FACILITIES: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Construction § 193.2304 Corrosion control overview. (a... materials specifications from a corrosion control viewpoint and determines that the materials involved will...

  1. 49 CFR 193.2304 - Corrosion control overview.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Corrosion control overview. 193.2304 Section 193... GAS FACILITIES: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Construction § 193.2304 Corrosion control overview. (a... materials specifications from a corrosion control viewpoint and determines that the materials involved will...

  2. The Effect of Some Water-Displacing Corrosion Preventives on Corrosion of Aluminium Alloys 7075-T651 and 2024-T6,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-08-01

    AIR 82/138 4. Title 5. Security 6. No. Pages THE EFFECT OF SOME WATER- DISPLACING a. document 8 CORROSION PREVENTIVES ON CORROSION Unclassifiedb. title...LABORATORIES MELBOURNE, VICTORIA MATERIALS REPORT 115 THE EFFECT OF SOME WATER- DISPLACING CORROSION PREVENTIVES ON CORROSION OF ALUMINIUM ALLOYS 7075-T651 AND... DISPLACING CORROSION PREVENTIVES ON CORROSION OF ALUMINIUM ALLOYS 7075-T651 AND 2024-T6 by L. WILSON and R. S. G. DEVEREUX SUMMARY The effectiveness

  3. Inhibition of slug front corrosion in multiphase flow conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H.J.; Jepson, W.P.

    1998-12-31

    Corrosion at the slug front at the bottom of a pipeline is identified as one of the worst cases of corrosion occurring in the pipeline which carries unprocessed multiphase production with a high level of CO{sub 2} gas. One objective of the study in recommending a subsea completion to shore was to determine if commercial corrosion inhibitors can control this type of corrosion using carbon steel pipeline. Thus, inhibitors which showed excellent performance in the lab using the Rotating Cylinder Electrode system (RCE) were further evaluated to confirm their performance in a flow loop simulating the test conditions predicted from the flow modeling for the proposed pipeline. The performance profile of two commercial inhibitors were determined in a 4 in. flow loop at 7O C, 100 psig CO{sub 2} partial pressure in corrosive brines with or without ethylene glycol and/or light hydrocarbon. Results showed that the carbon steel pipeline could be adequately protected at low temperature using a commercial corrosion inhibitor to meet the designed life of the pipeline. Ethylene glycol, which is used in the pipeline to prevent hydrate formation, reduces the corrosivity of the brine and gives no effect on inhibitor performance under the slug flow conditions. A good agreement in inhibitor performance was observed between the flow loop and the RCE testing. The uninhibited corrosion rate of the test brine in this study is in good agreement with the predicted value using deWaard and Williams correlation for CO{sub 2} corrosion.

  4. Corrosion Control Anniston Army Depot

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-09

    parts. • Anodize, Chrome, and Black Oxide (et.al.) • Substrate Prep and CARC paint. Stowage • Climate controlled storage (limited). • Weather...resistant (rain, uv) stowage . • Right Material – Right Time In Process Actions Bldgs 129 and 114 • Installation of new cleaning technologies for small... Rack Dehydration Prep Area CARC Application Flash-Off Oven De-mask and Anti- Corrosion App. Planned Future Actions Survey • Perform a corrosion survey

  5. In-Situ X-ray Spectroscopic Studies of the Fundamental Chemistry of Pb and Pb-Bi Corrosion Processes at High Temperatures: Development and Assessment of Composite Corrosion Resistant Materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Carlo Segre

    2009-12-30

    Over the course of this project, we have a number of accomplishments. The following list is presented as a summary statement for the project. Specific details from previous Quarterly Reports are given. (1) We established that it is possible to use EXAFS to study the interface layer between a material and the liquid Pb overlayer. We have discovered that molybdenum grows a selflimiting oxide layer which does not spall even at the highest temperatures studied. There have been 2 publications resulting from these studies. (2) We have fabricated a high temperature environmental chamber capable of extending the Pb overlayer studies by varying the incident x-ray beam angle to perform depth profiling of the Pb layer. This chamber will continue to be available to nuclear materials program researchers who wish to use the MRCAT beam line. (3) We have developed a collaboration with researchers at the Paul Scherrer Institute to study corrosion layers on zircalloy. One publication has resulted from this collaboration and another is in progress. (4) We have developed a collaboration with Prof. G.R. Odette of UCSB in which we studied the local structure of Ti and Y in nanoclusters found in oxygen dispersion strengthened steels. There are two publications in progress form this collaboration and we have extended the project to anomalous small angle x-ray scattering as well as EXAFS. (5) We have promoted the use of EXAFS for the study of nuclear materials to the community over the past 4 years and we have begun to see an increase in demand for EXAFS from the community at the MRCAT beam line. (6) This grant was instrumental in nucleating interest in establishing a new Collaborative Access Team at the Advanced Photon Source, the Nuclear and Radiological Research CAT (NRR-CAT). The co-PI (Jeff Terry) is the lead investigator on this project and it has been approved by the APS Scientific Advisory Committee for further planning. The status of the NRR-CAT project is being discussed in a

  6. Environmentally Friendly Corrosion Preventative Compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Luz Marina; Montgomery, Eliza; Kolody, Mark; Curran, Jerry; Back, Teddy; Balles, Angela

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the Ground Systems Development and Operations Program Environmentally Friendly Corrosion Protective Coatings and Corrosion Preventive Compounds (CPCs) project is to identify, test, and develop qualification criteria for the use of environmentally friendly corrosion protective coatings and CPCs for flight hardware and ground support equipment. This document is the Final Report for Phase I evaluations, which included physical property, corrosion resistance, and NASA spaceport environment compatibility testing and analysis of fifteen CPC types. The CPCs consisted of ten different oily film CPCs and five different wax or grease CPC types. Physical property testing encompassed measuring various properties of the bulk CPCs, while corrosion resistance testing directly measured the ability of each CPC material to protect various metals against corrosion. The NASA spaceport environment compatibility testing included common tests required by NASA-STD-6001, "Flammability, Odor, Offgassing, and Compatibility Requirements and Test Procedures for Materials in Environments that Support Combustion". At the end of Phase I, CPC materials were down-selected for inclusion in the next test phases. This final report includes all data and analysis of results obtained by following the experimental test plan that was developed as part of the project. Highlights of the results are summarized by test criteria type.

  7. The Stress Corrosion Resistance and the Cryogenic Temperature Mechanical Behavior of 18-3 Mn (Nitronic 33) Stainless Steel Parent and Welded Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montano, J. W.

    1976-01-01

    The ambient and cryogenic temperature mechanical properties and the ambient temperature stress corrosion results of 18-3 Mn (Nitronic 33)stainless steel, longitudinal and transverse, as received and as welded (TIG) material specimens manufactured from 0.063 inch thick sheet material, were described. The tensile test results indicate an increase in ultimate tensile and yield strengths with decreasing temperature. The elongation remained fairly constant to -200 F, but below that temperature the elongation decreased to less than 6.0% at liquid hydrogen temperature. The notched tensile strength (NTS) for the parent metal increased with decreasing temperature to liquid nitrogen temperature. Below -320 F the NTS decreased rapidly. The notched/unnotched (N/U) tensile ratio of the parent material specimens remained above 0.9 from ambient to -200 F, and decreased to approximately 0.65 and 0.62, respectively, for the longitudinal and transverse directions at liquid hydrogen temperature. After 180 days of testing, only those specimens exposed to the salt spray indicated pitting and some degradation of mechanical properties.

  8. High temperature corrosion of cold worked YUS409D bellows of bellow-sealed valve in LBE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mustari1, A. P. A.; Irwanto1, D.; Takahashi, M.

    2017-01-01

    Lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) loop test is highly contributes to the lead-alloy-cooled fast breeder reactor (LFR) and accelerator driven system (ADS) research and development by providing comprehensive results of both corrosion and erosion phenomenon. Bellows-sealed valve is a crucial part in the LBE loop test apparatus, due to its capability of preventing corrosion on valve spring, thus improves the operation time of the system. LBE is very corrosive to stainless steel by formation of oxide layer or elemental dissolution, e.g. Ni. Thus, new type of bellows for bellows-sealed valve made of nickel free material, i.e. YUS409D, is proposed to be used in the LBE. Bellows material undergo heat treatments for mechanical improvement including cold working and annealing. The thickness reduction by the heat treatments is about 90% of initial condition. Corrosion behavior of the bellows has been studied in stagnant LBE at 500 and 600 °C for 500 hours. The oxygen concentration was controlled at about 10‑7 wt%. Typical oxide layers were developed on the surface. Oxidation rate was sharply increased at 600°C.

  9. Large lithium loop experience

    SciTech Connect

    Kolowith, R.; Owen, T.J.; Berg, J.D.; Atwood, J.M.

    1981-10-01

    An engineering design and operating experience of a large, isothermal, lithium-coolant test loop are presented. This liquid metal coolant loop is called the Experimental Lithium System (ELS) and has operated safely and reliably for over 6500 hours through September 1981. The loop is used for full-scale testing of components for the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) Facility. Main system parameters include coolant temperatures to 430/sup 0/C and flow to 0.038 m/sup 3//s (600 gal/min). Performance of the main pump, vacuum system, and control system is discussed. Unique test capabilities of the ELS are also discussed.

  10. CORROSION INHIBITION

    DOEpatents

    Cartledge, G.H.

    1958-06-01

    The protection of ferrous metsls from the corrosive action of aqueous solutions is accomplished by the incorporation of small amounts of certain additive agents into the aqueous solutions. The method comprises providing a small concentration of technetium, in the form of pertechnetate ion, dissolved in the solution.

  11. The wire material and cross-section effect on double delta closing loops regarding load and spring rate magnitude: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, M do A

    1999-03-01

    The mechanical behavior of orthodontics closing loops, with three different wire materials (stainless steel, cobalt-chromium and titanium-molybdenum) and with different cross-sections and a double delta design, was studied in tension tests. The springs were stress-relieved, except the titanium-molybdenum wires. There were 72 sample springs, divided into 33 stainless steel, 26 cobalt-chromium and 13 titanium-molybdenum, activated at 0.5 mm intervals, from neutral position to 3.0 mm. It was hypothesized that loads, after spring activation, and spring rate, are dependent on cross-section, wire material, and activation. The analysis of variance and the Tukey-Kramer test were applied to verify the differences between all coupled averages of the loads. Regression analysis was also used to verify if closing loops behavior was in accordance with Hooke's law and to obtain the spring rate. The results show that the loads are dependent on activation, cross-section, and wire material. Titanium-molybdenum 0.017 x 0.025 inch (Ormco) springs showed the smallest loads and the best spring rate. (beta = 84.9 g/mm)

  12. Underground corrosion control

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    Corrosion of underground metallic structures continues to be a crucial concern within society and the engineering community. Costs associated with corrosion losses are staggering. Indirect costs associated with environmental damage as well as loss of public confidence has in many cases out-stripped direct costs for facility repair and replacement. NACE Group Committee T-10, responsible for the study and advancement of technology necessary for engineering solutions for underground corrosion problems, is divided into five key unit committees as follows: cathodic protection; interference problems; electric power and communications; protective coating systems; and internal corrosion of pipelines. The papers presented in this publication reflect the most recent developments in field practice in all five areas. Cathodic protection criteria, protection of pipelines, tanks and pilings, test methods, transit systems investigations, power and communication cables, and compliance with regulations are addressed. Interference testing, refinery problems, methods of safely mitigating the effects of induced AC on pipelines, and experience with alternate engineering materials such as prestressed concrete cylinder pipe and ductile iron pipe are included. All 37 papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  13. Varietal Loops

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-09-15

    A series of active regions stretched along the right side of the sun exhibited a wide variety of loops cascading above them (Sept. 12-14, 2016). The active region near the center has tightly coiled loops, while the region rotating over the right edge has some elongated and some very stretched loops above it. The loops are actually charged particles spiraling along magnetic field lines, observed here in a wavelength of extreme ultraviolet light. Near the middle of the video the Earth quickly passes in front of a portion of the sun as viewed by SDO. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA16997

  14. Corrosion consultant expert system

    SciTech Connect

    Mo, Y.L.

    1994-12-31

    The development and use of an expert system to recommend coatings for flue gas desulfurization (FGD) plant is described. The system ranks coatings by their material properties, experimental test and plant performance scores when the component to be coated and its working environment are specified. The user interface, the inference engine, the knowledge base and the implementation of the expert system are presented with comments on its suitability and application for corrosion consultations.

  15. Fabrication of recyclable and durable superhydrophobic materials with wear/corrosion-resistance properties from kaolin and polyvinylchloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Mengnan; Liu, Shanshan; He, Jinmei; Feng, Juan; Yao, Yali; Ma, Xuerui; Hou, Lingang; Liu, Xiangrong

    2017-07-01

    In this study, mechanically stable and recyclable superhydrophobic materials were prepared from polyvinylchloride (PVC) and kaolin nanoparticles modified by stearic acid using a simple and low-cost drop-coating. The obtained materials displayed liquid-repellent toward water and several other liquids of daily life (such as orange juice, coffee, milk, coca cola and ink). These superhydrophobic materials showed remarkable robustness against sandpaper abrasion, UV-irradiation and ultrasonication test, while retaining its superhydrophobicity even after 60 abrasion cycles loaded of 500 g with sandpaper, 7 days UV-irradiation or 120 min ultrasonication test. The excellent durability against complex conditions was attributed to the hierarchical structure and strong interfacial adhesion of the materials. More significantly, the materials used in the coating could be recycled and reconstructed without losing its superhydrophobicity. The current superhydrophobic materials tolerate rigorous environment, opening a new avenue to a variety of practical applications.

  16. CORROSION RESISTANT JACKETED METAL BODY

    DOEpatents

    Brugmann, E.W.

    1958-08-26

    Jacketed metal bodies of the type used as fuel elements for nuclear reactors, which contain an internal elongated body of fissionable material jacketed in a corrosion resistant metal are described. The ends of the internal bodies are provided with screw threads having a tapered outer end. The jacket material overlaps the ends and extends into the tapered section of the screw threaded opening. Screw caps with a mating tapered section are screwed into the ends of the body to compress the jacket material in the tapered sections to provtde an effective seal against corrosive gases and liquids.

  17. The oxidation and corrosion of ODS alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowell, Carl E.; Barrett, Charles A.

    1990-01-01

    The oxidation and hot corrosion of high temperature oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys are reviewed. The environmental resistance of such alloys are classified by oxide growth rate, oxide volatility, oxide spalling, and hot corrosion limitations. Also discussed are environmentally resistant coatings for ODS materials. It is concluded that ODS NiCrAl and FeCrAl alloys are highly oxidation and corrosion resistant and can probably be used uncoated.

  18. General Corrosion and Localized Corrosion of the Drip Shield

    SciTech Connect

    F. Hua

    2004-09-16

    The repository design includes a drip shield (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168489]) that provides protection for the waste package both as a barrier to seepage water contact and a physical barrier to potential rockfall. The purpose of the process-level models developed in this report is to model dry oxidation, general corrosion, and localized corrosion of the drip shield plate material, which is made of Ti Grade 7. This document is prepared according to ''Technical Work Plan For: Regulatory Integration Modeling and Analysis of the Waste Form and Waste Package'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171583]). The models developed in this report are used by the waste package degradation analyses for TSPA-LA and serve as a basis to determine the performance of the drip shield. The drip shield may suffer from other forms of failure such as the hydrogen induced cracking (HIC) or stress corrosion cracking (SCC), or both. Stress corrosion cracking of the drip shield material is discussed in ''Stress Corrosion Cracking of the Drip Shield, the Waste Package Outer Barrier, and the Stainless Steel Structural Material'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169985]). Hydrogen induced cracking of the drip shield material is discussed in ''Hydrogen Induced Cracking of Drip Shield'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169847]).

  19. 60NiTi Intermetallic Material Evaluation for Lightweight and Corrosion Resistant Spherical Sliding Bearings for Aerospace Applications, Report on NASA-Kamatics SAA3-1288

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dellacorte, Christopher; Jefferson, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Under NASA Space Act Agreement (SAA3-1288), NASA Glenn Research Center and the Kamatics subsidiary of the Kaman Corporation conducted the experimental evaluation of spherical sliding bearings made with 60NiTi inner races. The goal of the project was to assess the feasibility of manufacturing lightweight, corrosion resistant bearings utilizing 60NiTi for aerospace and industrial applications. NASA produced the bearings in collaboration with Abbott Ball Corporation and Kamatics fabricated bearing assemblies utilizing their standard reinforced polymer liner material. The assembled bearings were tested in oscillatory motion at a load of 4.54 kN (10,000 lb), according to the requirements of the plain bearing specification SAE AS81820. Several test bearings were exposed to hydraulic fluid or aircraft deicing fluid prior to and during testing. The results show that the 60NiTi bearings exhibit tribological performance comparable to conventional stainless steel (440C) bearings. Further, exposure of 60NiTi bearings to the contaminant fluids had no apparent performance effect. It is concluded that 60NiTi is a feasible bearing material for aerospace and industrial spherical bearing applications.

  20. Improvements of anti-corrosion and mechanical properties of NiTi orthopedic materials by acetylene, nitrogen and oxygen plasma immersion ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poon, Ray W. Y.; Ho, Joan P. Y.; Liu, Xuanyong; Chung, C. Y.; Chu, Paul K.; Yeung, Kelvin W. K.; Lu, William W.; Cheung, Kenneth M. C.

    2005-08-01

    Nickel-titanium shape memory alloys (NiTi) are useful materials in orthopedics and orthodontics due to their unique super-elasticity and shape memory effects. However, the problem associated with the release of harmful Ni ions to human tissues and fluids has been raising safety concern. Hence, it is necessary to produce a surface barrier to impede the out-diffusion of Ni ions from the materials. We have conducted acetylene, nitrogen and oxygen plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) into NiTi alloys in an attempt to improve the surface properties. All the implanted and annealed samples surfaces exhibit outstanding corrosion and Ni out-diffusion resistance. Besides, the implanted layers are mechanically stronger than the substrate underneath. XPS analyses disclose that the layer formed by C2H2 PIII is composed of mainly TiCx with increasing Ti to C concentration ratios towards the bulk. The nitrogen PIII layer is observed to be TiN, whereas the oxygen PIII layer is composed of oxides of Ti4+, Ti3+ and Ti2+.