Science.gov

Sample records for loop system driven

  1. Fluctuation loops in noise-driven linear dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanta, Akhil; Neu, John C.; Teitsworth, Stephen

    2017-03-01

    Understanding the spatiotemporal structure of most probable fluctuation pathways to rarely occurring states is a central problem in the study of noise-driven, nonequilibrium dynamical systems. When the underlying system does not possess detailed balance, the optimal fluctuation pathway to a particular state and relaxation pathway from that state may combine to form a looplike structure in the system phase space called a fluctuation loop. Here, fluctuation loops are studied in a linear circuit model consisting of coupled R C elements, where each element is driven by its own independent noise source. Using a stochastic Hamiltonian approach, we determine the optimal fluctuation pathways, and analytically construct corresponding fluctuation loops. To quantitatively characterize fluctuation loops, we study the time-dependent area tensor that is swept out by individual stochastic trajectories in the system phase space. At long times, the area tensor scales linearly with time, with a coefficient that precisely vanishes when the system satisfies detailed balance.

  2. Model-Driven Safety Analysis of Closed-Loop Medical Systems.

    PubMed

    Pajic, Miroslav; Mangharam, Rahul; Sokolsky, Oleg; Arney, David; Goldman, Julian; Lee, Insup

    2012-10-26

    In modern hospitals, patients are treated using a wide array of medical devices that are increasingly interacting with each other over the network, thus offering a perfect example of a cyber-physical system. We study the safety of a medical device system for the physiologic closed-loop control of drug infusion. The main contribution of the paper is the verification approach for the safety properties of closed-loop medical device systems. We demonstrate, using a case study, that the approach can be applied to a system of clinical importance. Our method combines simulation-based analysis of a detailed model of the system that contains continuous patient dynamics with model checking of a more abstract timed automata model. We show that the relationship between the two models preserves the crucial aspect of the timing behavior that ensures the conservativeness of the safety analysis. We also describe system design that can provide open-loop safety under network failure.

  3. Closed-loop suppression of chaos in nonlinear driven oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguirre, L. A.; Billings, S. A.

    1995-05-01

    This paper discusses the suppression of chaos in nonlinear driven oscillators via the addition of a periodic perturbation. Given a system originally undergoing chaotic motions, it is desired that such a system be driven to some periodic orbit. This can be achieved by the addition of a weak periodic signal to the oscillator input. This is usually accomplished in open loop, but this procedure presents some difficulties which are discussed in the paper. To ensure that this is attained despite uncertainties and possible disturbances on the system, a procedure is suggested to perform control in closed loop. In addition, it is illustrated how a model, estimated from input/output data, can be used in the design. Numerical examples which use the Duffing-Ueda and modified van der Pol oscillators are included to illustrate some of the properties of the new approach.

  4. Energy Release in Driven Twisted Coronal Loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bareford, M. R.; Gordovskyy, M.; Browning, P. K.; Hood, A. W.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate magnetic reconnection in twisted magnetic fluxtubes, representing coronal loops. The main goal is to establish the influence of the field geometry and various thermodynamic effects on the stability of twisted fluxtubes and on the size and distribution of heated regions. In particular, we aim to investigate to what extent the earlier idealised models, based on the initially cylindrically symmetric fluxtubes, are different from more realistic models, including the large-scale curvature, atmospheric stratification, thermal conduction and other effects. In addition, we compare the roles of Ohmic heating and shock heating in energy conversion during magnetic reconnection in twisted loops. The models with straight fluxtubes show similar distribution of heated plasma during the reconnection: it initially forms a helical shape, which subsequently becomes very fragmented. The heating in these models is rather uniformly distributed along fluxtubes. At the same time, the hot plasma regions in curved loops are asymmetric and concentrated close to the loop tops. Large-scale curvature has a destabilising influence: less twist is needed for instability. Footpoint convergence normally delays the instability slightly, although in some cases, converging fluxtubes can be less stable. Finally, introducing a stratified atmosphere gives rise to decaying wave propagation, which has a destabilising effect.

  5. Estimation of the current driven by residual loop voltage in LHCD plasma on EAST Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X. M.; Yu, L. M.; Wan, B. N.; Xue, E. B.; Fang, Y.; Shi, K. Y.; EAST Team

    2016-02-01

    The lower hybrid wave current drive (LHCD) is one of the efficient methods of driving the non-inductive current required for Tokamak operating in steady-state. Residual loop voltage exists in Tokamak when the non-inductive current is not fully driven. Residual loop voltage also accelerates the fast electrons generated by the lower hybrid wave (LHW), which can drive extra current and combine with the current driven by the LHW. It is generally difficult to separate these two different components of driven current in the experiment. In this paper, the currents driven by LHCD and residual loop voltage are separated directly by solving the Fokker-Plank equation numerically. The fraction of the current driven by residual loop voltage compared to the current driven by LHW is evaluated on the experimental advanced superconducting tokamak (EAST). The current driven by residual loop voltage is several percent of the currents driven by the LHCD when the residual loop voltage is small, but it increases with the residual loop voltage up to 25% when the residual loop voltage is about 2 V. The hot electrical conductivity is deduced from the net current driven by the residual loop voltage. Its distribution profile is related to the fast electron distribution driven by LHW.

  6. System Driven Workarounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, Linda; Wichner, David; Jakey, Abegael Marie

    2013-01-01

    The Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS) in a partnership between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), participating carriers, and labor organizations. It is designed to improve the National Airspace System by collecting and studying reports detailing unsafe conditions and events in the aviation industry. Employees are able to report safety issues or concerns with confidentiality and without fear of discipline. Safety reports highlighting system driven workarounds for the aviation community highlight the human workaround for the complex aviation system.

  7. The phage‐driven microbial loop in petroleum bioremediation

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Eugene; Bittan‐Banin, Gili; Sharon, Gil; Shon, Avital; Hershko, Galit; Levy, Itzik; Ron, Eliora Z.

    2010-01-01

    Summary During the drilling process and transport of crude oil, water mixes with the petroleum. At oil terminals, the water settles to the bottom of storage tanks. This drainage water is contaminated with emulsified oil and water‐soluble hydrocarbons and must be treated before it can be released into the environment. In this study, we tested the efficiency of a continuous flow, two‐stage bioreactor for treating drainage water from an Israeli oil terminal. The bioreactor removed all of the ammonia, 93% of the sulfide and converted 90% of the total organic carbon (TOC) into carbon dioxide. SYBR Gold staining indicated that reactor 1 contained 1.7 × 108 bacteria and 3.7 × 108 phages per millilitre, and reactor 2 contained 1.3 × 108 bacteria and 1.7 × 109 phages per millilitre. The unexpectedly high mineralization of TOC and high concentration of phage in reactor 2 support the concept of a phage‐driven microbial loop in the bioremediation of the drainage water. In general, application of this concept in bioremediation of contaminated water has the potential to increase the efficiency of processes. PMID:21255344

  8. The phage-driven microbial loop in petroleum bioremediation.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Eugene; Bittan-Banin, Gili; Sharon, Gil; Shon, Avital; Hershko, Galit; Levy, Itzik; Ron, Eliora Z

    2010-07-01

    During the drilling process and transport of crude oil, water mixes with the petroleum. At oil terminals, the water settles to the bottom of storage tanks. This drainage water is contaminated with emulsified oil and water-soluble hydrocarbons and must be treated before it can be released into the environment. In this study, we tested the efficiency of a continuous flow, two-stage bioreactor for treating drainage water from an Israeli oil terminal. The bioreactor removed all of the ammonia, 93% of the sulfide and converted 90% of the total organic carbon (TOC) into carbon dioxide. SYBR Gold staining indicated that reactor 1 contained 1.7 × 10(8) bacteria and 3.7 × 10(8) phages per millilitre, and reactor 2 contained 1.3 × 10(8) bacteria and 1.7 × 10(9) phages per millilitre. The unexpectedly high mineralization of TOC and high concentration of phage in reactor 2 support the concept of a phage-driven microbial loop in the bioremediation of the drainage water. In general, application of this concept in bioremediation of contaminated water has the potential to increase the efficiency of processes.

  9. Self-driven cooling loop for a large superconducting magnet in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mord, A. J.; Snyder, H. A.

    1992-01-01

    Pressurized cooling loops in which superfluid helium circulation is driven by the heat being removed have been previously demonstrated in laboratory tests. A simpler and lighter version which eliminates a heat exchanger by mixing the returning fluid directly with the superfluid helium bath was analyzed. A carefully designed flow restriction must be used to prevent boiling in this low-pressure system. A candidate design for Astromag is shown that can keep the magnet below 2.0 K during magnet charging. This gives a greater margin against accidental quench than approaches that allow the coolant to warm above the lambda point. A detailed analysis of one candidate design is presented.

  10. Hydrogen-bond driven loop-closure kinetics in unfolded polypeptide chains

    SciTech Connect

    Daidone, Isabella; Neuweiler, H; Doose, S; Sauer, M; Smith, Jeremy C

    2010-12-01

    Characterization of the length dependence of end-to-end loop-closure kinetics in unfolded polypeptide chains provides an understanding of early steps in protein folding. Here, loop-closure in poly-glycine-serine peptides is investigated by combining single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy with molecular dynamics simulation. For chains containing more than 10 peptide bonds loop-closing rate constants on the 20-100 nanosecond time range exhibit a power-law length dependence. However, this scaling breaks down for shorter peptides, which exhibit slower kinetics arising from a perturbation induced by the dye reporter system used in the experimental setup. The loop-closure kinetics in the longer peptides is found to be determined by the formation of intra-peptide hydrogen bonds and transient beta-sheet structure, that accelerate the search for contacts among residues distant in sequence relative to the case of a polypeptide chain in which hydrogen bonds cannot form. Hydrogen-bond-driven polypeptide-chain collapse in unfolded peptides under physiological conditions found here is not only consistent with hierarchical models of protein folding, that highlights the importance of secondary structure formation early in the folding process, but is also shown to speed up the search for productive folding events.

  11. Multilane driven diffusive systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curatolo, A. I.; Evans, M. R.; Kafri, Y.; Tailleur, J.

    2016-03-01

    We consider networks made of parallel lanes along which particles hop according to driven diffusive dynamics. The particles also hop transversely from lane to lane, hence indirectly coupling their longitudinal dynamics. We present a general method for constructing the phase diagram of these systems which reveals that in many cases their physics reduce to that of single-lane systems. The reduction to an effective single-lane description legitimizes, for instance, the use of a single TASEP to model the hopping of molecular motors along the many tracks of a single microtubule. Then, we show how, in quasi-2D settings, new phenomena emerge due to the presence of non-zero transverse currents, leading, for instance, to strong ‘shear localization’ along the network.

  12. External Tank CIL Closed Loop Verification System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartley, Eugene A., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    Lockheed Martin was requested to develop a closed loop CIL system following the Challenger accident. The system that was developed has proven to be very robust with minimal problems since implementation, having zero escapes in the last 7 years (27 External Tanks). We are currently investigating expansion of the CIL Closed Loop system to include "MI" CILs.

  13. Open loop distribution system design

    SciTech Connect

    Glamocanin, V. ); Filipovic, V. . Elektrotechnicki fakulet)

    1993-10-01

    The ability to supply consumers of an urban area, with minimum interruption during a feeder segment or substation transformer outage, is assured by a uniform cable size of the feeder segments along the entire loop. Based on the criterion of the uniform cable size, a loop configuration is obtained first by minimizing the installation costs, and then an open loop solution is found by minimizing the power losses. Heuristic rules are proposed and used to obtain an initial solution, as well as to improve current solutions.

  14. Simple system for locating ground loops.

    PubMed

    Bellan, P M

    2007-06-01

    A simple low-cost system for rapid identification of the cables causing ground loops in complex instrumentation configurations is described. The system consists of an exciter module that generates a 100 kHz ground loop current and a detector module that determines which cable conducts this test current. Both the exciter and detector are magnetically coupled to the ground circuit so there is no physical contact to the instrumentation system under test.

  15. A double-loop tracking system.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuen, J. H.

    1972-01-01

    A nonlinear analysis which can be used to assess certain statistical characteristics of double-loop tracking systems is presented. It takes into account the mutual coupling effects of the loops in the system. Two approaches are taken to obtain steady-state probability density functions (pdf's) of the system phase errors. From these pdf's, important system performance statistics, e.g., the phase-error variances, can be calculated, thus illustrating the application and usefulness of the analysis. The analysis is applied to a satellite transponder as an example.

  16. Similarity Metrics for Closed Loop Dynamic Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whorton, Mark S.; Yang, Lee C.; Bedrossian, Naz; Hall, Robert A.

    2008-01-01

    To what extent and in what ways can two closed-loop dynamic systems be said to be "similar?" This question arises in a wide range of dynamic systems modeling and control system design applications. For example, bounds on error models are fundamental to the controller optimization with modern control design methods. Metrics such as the structured singular value are direct measures of the degree to which properties such as stability or performance are maintained in the presence of specified uncertainties or variations in the plant model. Similarly, controls-related areas such as system identification, model reduction, and experimental model validation employ measures of similarity between multiple realizations of a dynamic system. Each area has its tools and approaches, with each tool more or less suited for one application or the other. Similarity in the context of closed-loop model validation via flight test is subtly different from error measures in the typical controls oriented application. Whereas similarity in a robust control context relates to plant variation and the attendant affect on stability and performance, in this context similarity metrics are sought that assess the relevance of a dynamic system test for the purpose of validating the stability and performance of a "similar" dynamic system. Similarity in the context of system identification is much more relevant than are robust control analogies in that errors between one dynamic system (the test article) and another (the nominal "design" model) are sought for the purpose of bounding the validity of a model for control design and analysis. Yet system identification typically involves open-loop plant models which are independent of the control system (with the exception of limited developments in closed-loop system identification which is nonetheless focused on obtaining open-loop plant models from closed-loop data). Moreover the objectives of system identification are not the same as a flight test and

  17. Partial Tuning of Dynamical Controllers by Data-Driven Loop-Shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeki, Masami; Sugitani, Yosuke

    In this paper, a data-driven design method that gives a desirable loop-shape is proposed for a single input plant. This method is applicable to the tuning of a static feedback gain and also that of the output matrix of a dynamical controller by using a transient response of the plant. Constraints on the feedback gain are derived from the maximum sensitivity and complementary sensitivity conditions based on the unfalsified control idea. A solution is obtained by solving a linear matrix inequality, where the integral gain of the loop transfer function is maximized subject to the constraints. Usefulness is demonstrated by two numerical examples.

  18. Charge-driven feedback loop in the resonance fluorescence of a single quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merkel, B.; Kurzmann, A.; Schulze, J.-H.; Strittmatter, A.; Geller, M.; Lorke, A.

    2017-03-01

    We demonstrate a feedback loop that manifests itself in a strong hysteresis and bistability of the exciton resonance fluorescence signal. Field ionization of photogenerated quantum dot excitons leads to the formation of a charged interface layer that drags the emission line along over a frequency range of more than 30 GHz . These measurements are well described by a rate equation model. With a time-resolved resonance fluorescence measurement we determined the buildup times for the hole gas in the orders of milliseconds. This internal charge-driven feedback loop could be used to reduce the spectral wandering in the emission spectra of single self-assembled quantum dots.

  19. Fluid-loop reaction system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lurie, Boris J. (Inventor); Schier, J. Alan (Inventor); Iskenderian, Theodore C. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    An improved fluid actuating system for imparting motion to a body such as a spacecraft is disclosed. The fluid actuating system consists of a fluid mass that may be controllably accelerated through at least one fluid path whereby an opposite acceleration is experienced by the spacecraft. For full control of the spacecraft's orientation, the system would include a plurality of fluid paths. The fluid paths may be circular or irregular, and the fluid paths may be located on the interior or exterior of the spacecraft.

  20. Closed loop electrostatic levitation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhim, W. K.; Saffren, M. M.; Elleman, D. D. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    An electrostatic levitation system is described, which can closely control the position of objects of appreciable size. A plurality of electrodes surround the desired position of an electrostatically charged object, the position of the objects is monitored, and the voltages applied to the electrodes are varied to hold the object at a desired position. In one system, the object is suspended above a plate-like electrode which has a concave upper face to urge the object toward the vertical axis of the curved plate. An upper electrode that is also curved can be positioned above the object, to assure curvature of the field at any height above the lower plate. In another system, four spherical electrodes are positioned at the points of a tetrahedron, and the voltages applied to the electrodes are varied in accordance with the object position as detected by two sensors.

  1. Closed Loop System Identification with Genetic Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whorton, Mark S.

    2004-01-01

    High performance control design for a flexible space structure is challenging since high fidelity plant models are di.cult to obtain a priori. Uncertainty in the control design models typically require a very robust, low performance control design which must be tuned on-orbit to achieve the required performance. Closed loop system identi.cation is often required to obtain a multivariable open loop plant model based on closed-loop response data. In order to provide an accurate initial plant model to guarantee convergence for standard local optimization methods, this paper presents a global parameter optimization method using genetic algorithms. A minimal representation of the state space dynamics is employed to mitigate the non-uniqueness and over-parameterization of general state space realizations. This control-relevant system identi.cation procedure stresses the joint nature of the system identi.cation and control design problem by seeking to obtain a model that minimizes the di.erence between the predicted and actual closed-loop performance.

  2. A closed-loop pump-driven wire-guided flow jet for ultrafast spectroscopy of liquid samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picchiotti, Alessandra; Prokhorenko, Valentyn I.; Miller, R. J. Dwayne

    2015-09-01

    We describe the design and provide the results of the full characterization of a closed-loop pump-driven wire-guided flow jet system. The jet has excellent optical quality with a wide range of liquids spanning from alcohol to water based solutions, including phosphate buffers used for biological samples. The thickness of the jet film varies depending on the flow rate between 90 μm and 370 μm. The liquid film is very stable, and its thickness varies only by 0.76% under optimal conditions. Measured transmitted signal reveals a long term optical stability (hours) with a RMS of 0.8%, less than the overall noise of the spectroscopy setup used in our experiments. The closed loop nature of the overall jet design has been optimized for the study of precious biological samples, in limited volumes, to remove window contributions from spectroscopic observables. This feature is particularly important for femtosecond studies in the UV range.

  3. Impulsive magnetic pulsations and electrojets in the loop footpoint driven by the fast reconnection jet

    SciTech Connect

    Ugai, M.

    2009-11-15

    It is well known that magnetic pulsations of long periods impulsively occur in accordance with the sudden onset of geomagnetic substorms and drastic enhancement of electrojets in the ionosphere. On the basis of the spontaneous fast reconnection model, the present paper examines the physical mechanism by which both magnetic pulsations and strong electrojets are impulsively driven by the fast (Alfvenic) reconnection jet. When a large-scale plasmoid [or traveling compression region (TCR)], directly caused by the fast reconnection jet, collides with the magnetic loop footpoint, strong electrojets are impulsively driven in a finite extent in the loop footpoint in accordance with the evolution of the current wedge and the generator current circuit. Simultaneously, magnetohydrodynamic (Alfven) waves, accompanied by the TCR, are reflected from the electrojet layer, leading to impulsive magnetic pulsations ahead of the loop footpoint because of the interaction (or resonance) between the reflected waves and the waves traveling toward the footpoint. The pulsations propagate outward in all directions from the source region of the wave reflection, and the pulsation periods are typically estimated to be of several tens of seconds.

  4. Multiple Flow Loop SCADA System Implemented on the Production Prototype Loop

    SciTech Connect

    Baily, Scott A.; Dalmas, Dale Allen; Wheat, Robert Mitchell; Woloshun, Keith Albert; Dale, Gregory E.

    2015-11-16

    The following report covers FY 15 activities to develop supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) system for the Northstar Moly99 production prototype gas flow loop. The goal of this effort is to expand the existing system to include a second flow loop with a larger production-sized blower. Besides testing the larger blower, this system will demonstrate the scalability of our solution to multiple flow loops.

  5. Protocols for configuring computation loops on a distributed multiprocessor system

    SciTech Connect

    Woei Lin; Chuan-lin Wu

    1983-01-01

    Protocols for configuring computation loops in a multiprocessing system are examined. Processing nodes are connected by a reconfigurable communication subnet using a multistage interconnection network. Configuration protocols are presented in terms of distributed algorithms such that processing nodes are configured in loop topologies. The configurability of loop topologies is first investigated. It is verified that the communication subnet can emulate loop distributed systems. It is also proven that multiple loops of various lengths can be configured in the distributed network. The technique demonstrated for configuring loop topologies can be used to configure other computation topologies. 6 references.

  6. KINETIC ALFVEN WAVE INSTABILITY DRIVEN BY FIELD-ALIGNED CURRENTS IN SOLAR CORONAL LOOPS

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, L.; Wu, D. J. E-mail: djwu@pmo.ac.cn

    2012-08-01

    Magneto-plasma loops, which trace closed solar magnetic field lines, are the primary structural elements of the solar corona. Kinetic Alfven wave (KAW) can play an important role in inhomogeneous heating of these magneto-plasma structures in the corona. By the use of a low-frequency kinetic dispersion equation, which is presented in this paper and is valid in a finite-{beta} plasma with Q < {beta} < 1 plasma (where {beta} is the kinetic to magnetic pressure ratio and Q = m{sub e} /m{sub i} is the mass ratio of electrons to ions), KAW instability driven by a field-aligned current in the current-carrying loops in the solar corona is investigated. The results show that the KAW instability can occur in wave number regimes 0 < k{sub z} < k{sup c}{sub z} and 0 < k < k{sup c} , and that the critical wave numbers k{sup c}{sub z} and k{sup c} and the growth rate both considerably increase as the drift velocity V{sub D} of the current-carrying electrons increases in the loops. In particular, for typical parameters of the current-carrying loops in the solar corona this instability mechanism results in a high growth rate of KAWs, {omega}{sub i} {approx} 0.01-0.1{omega}{sub ci} {approx} 10{sup 3}-10{sup 4} s{sup -1}. The results are of importance in understanding the physics of the electric current dissipation and plasma heating of the current-carrying loops in the solar corona.

  7. Closed-loop active optical system control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparks, T. E.

    1980-01-01

    A control system, based on a real-time lateral shear interferometer has been developed for use in control during thermal tests and static error compensation experiments. The minicomputer which controls the interferometer and provides its service functions also controls the active system, thereby giving flexibility to the algorithm. The minicomputer system contains 288 K bytes of memory and 15 M bytes of disk storage. The interferometer system employed is composed of the measuring head and its support electronics, a video display on which wavefront contour maps are generated, and a DECwriter operator console. The versatility provided by the use of a general purpose interferometer system allows for interactive control of the closed-loop process. Various arithmetic capabilities such as the addition of wavefronts, division by a constant, and fitting of wavefront data with Zernike polynomials, allow for measurements to be averaged and for removal of alignment errors before correction is performed.

  8. Causal Loop Analysis of coastal geomorphological systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payo, Andres; Hall, Jim W.; French, Jon; Sutherland, James; van Maanen, Barend; Nicholls, Robert J.; Reeve, Dominic E.

    2016-03-01

    As geomorphologists embrace ever more sophisticated theoretical frameworks that shift from simple notions of evolution towards single steady equilibria to recognise the possibility of multiple response pathways and outcomes, morphodynamic modellers are facing the problem of how to keep track of an ever-greater number of system feedbacks. Within coastal geomorphology, capturing these feedbacks is critically important, especially as the focus of activity shifts from reductionist models founded on sediment transport fundamentals to more synthesist ones intended to resolve emergent behaviours at decadal to centennial scales. This paper addresses the challenge of mapping the feedback structure of processes controlling geomorphic system behaviour with reference to illustrative applications of Causal Loop Analysis at two study cases: (1) the erosion-accretion behaviour of graded (mixed) sediment beds, and (2) the local alongshore sediment fluxes of sand-rich shorelines. These case study examples are chosen on account of their central role in the quantitative modelling of geomorphological futures and as they illustrate different types of causation. Causal loop diagrams, a form of directed graph, are used to distil the feedback structure to reveal, in advance of more quantitative modelling, multi-response pathways and multiple outcomes. In the case of graded sediment bed, up to three different outcomes (no response, and two disequilibrium states) can be derived from a simple qualitative stability analysis. For the sand-rich local shoreline behaviour case, two fundamentally different responses of the shoreline (diffusive and anti-diffusive), triggered by small changes of the shoreline cross-shore position, can be inferred purely through analysis of the causal pathways. Explicit depiction of feedback-structure diagrams is beneficial when developing numerical models to explore coastal morphological futures. By explicitly mapping the feedbacks included and neglected within a

  9. Monitoring Digital Closed-Loop Feedback Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, Richard; Kleyner, Igor

    2011-01-01

    A technique of monitoring digital closed-loop feedback systems has been conceived. The basic idea is to obtain information on the performances of closed-loop feedback circuits in such systems to aid in the determination of the functionality and integrity of the circuits and of performance margins. The need for this technique arises as follows: Some modern digital systems include feedback circuits that enable other circuits to perform with precision and are tolerant of changes in environment and the device s parameters. For example, in a precision timing circuit, it is desirable to make the circuit insensitive to variability as a result of the manufacture of circuit components and to the effects of temperature, voltage, radiation, and aging. However, such a design can also result in masking the indications of damaged and/or deteriorating components. The present technique incorporates test circuitry and associated engineering-telemetry circuitry into an embedded system to monitor the closed-loop feedback circuits, using spare gates that are often available in field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs). This technique enables a test engineer to determine the amount of performance margin in the system, detect out of family circuit performance, and determine one or more trend(s) in the performance of the system. In one system to which the technique has been applied, an ultra-stable oscillator is used as a reference for internal adjustment of 12 time-to-digital converters (TDCs). The feedback circuit produces a pulse-width-modulated signal that is fed as a control input into an amplifier, which controls the circuit s operating voltage. If the circuit s gates are determined to be operating too slowly or rapidly when their timing is compared with that of the reference signal, then the pulse width increases or decreases, respectively, thereby commanding the amplifier to increase or reduce, respectively, its output level, and "adjust" the speed of the circuits. The nominal

  10. Cycle-averaged dynamics of a periodically driven, closed-loop circulation model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heldt, T.; Chang, J. L.; Chen, J. J. S.; Verghese, G. C.; Mark, R. G.

    2005-01-01

    Time-varying elastance models have been used extensively in the past to simulate the pulsatile nature of cardiovascular waveforms. Frequently, however, one is interested in dynamics that occur over longer time scales, in which case a detailed simulation of each cardiac contraction becomes computationally burdensome. In this paper, we apply circuit-averaging techniques to a periodically driven, closed-loop, three-compartment recirculation model. The resultant cycle-averaged model is linear and time invariant, and greatly reduces the computational burden. It is also amenable to systematic order reduction methods that lead to further efficiencies. Despite its simplicity, the averaged model captures the dynamics relevant to the representation of a range of cardiovascular reflex mechanisms. c2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Disorder-driven hysteresis-loop criticality in Co/CoO-films.

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, A.; Inomata, A.; Jiang, J. S.; Pearson, J. E.; Bader, S. D.

    2000-11-01

    The effect of magnetic disorder on the magnetization reversal process in thin Co/CoO-films has been investigated. The antiferromagnetic CoO layer allows a reversible tuning of the magnetic disorder by simple temperature variation. For temperatures above a critical temperature T{sub c}, we observe a discontinuous magnetization reversal, whereas smooth magnetization loops occur for T < T{sub c}. Our measurements establish the existence of a disorder-driven critical point in the non-equilibrium phase diagram. In addition, we observe scaling behavior in the vicinity of the critical point and determine the critical exponents to {beta} = 0.022 {+-} 0.006 and {beta}{delta} = 0.30 {+-} 0.03.

  12. TRANSVERSE OSCILLATIONS OF A LONGITUDINALLY STRATIFIED CORONAL LOOP SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Fathalian, N.; Safari, H. E-mail: safari@znu.ac.i

    2010-11-20

    Collective transverse coronal loop oscillations seem to be detected in observational studies. In this regard, Luna et al. modeled the collective kink-like normal modes of several cylindrical loop systems using the T-matrix theory. This paper investigates the effects of longitudinal density stratification along the loop axis on the collective kink-like modes of the system of coronal loops. The coronal loop system is modeled as cylinders of parallel flux tubes, with two ends of each loop at the dense photosphere. The flux tubes are considered as uniform magnetic fields, with stratified density along the loop axis which changes discontinuously at the lateral surface of each cylinder. The MHD equations are reduced to solve a set of two coupled dispersion relations for frequencies and wavenumbers, in the presence of a stratification parameter. The fundamental and first overtone frequencies and longitudinal wavenumbers are computed. The previous results are verified for an unstratified coronal loop system. Finally, we conclude that an increased longitudinal density stratification parameter will result in an increase of the frequencies. The frequency ratios, first overtones to fundamentals, are very sensitive functions of the density scale height parameter. Therefore, stratification should be included in dynamics of coronal loop systems. For unstratified coronal loop systems, these ratios are the same as monoloop ones.

  13. Semantic-driven Parallelization of Loops Operating on User-defined Containers

    SciTech Connect

    Quinlan, D; Schordan, M; Yi, Q; de Supinski, B R

    2003-07-09

    The authors describe ROSE, a C++ infrastructure for source-to-source translation, that provides an interface for programmers to easily write their own translators for optimizing user-defined high-level abstractions. Utilizing the semantics of these high-level abstractions, they demonstrate the automatic parallelization of loops that iterate over user-defined containers that have interfaces similar to the lists, vectors and sets in the Standard Template Library (STL). The parallelization is realized in two phases. First, they insert OpenMP directives into a serial program, driven by the recognition of the high-level abstractions, containers, that are thread-safe. Then, they translate the OpenMP directives into library routines that explicitly create and manage parallelism. By providing an interface for the programmer to classify the semantics of their abstractions, they are able to automatically parallelize operations on containers, such as linked-lists, without resorting to complex loop dependence analysis techniques. The approach is consistent with general goals within telescoping languages.

  14. Optimal protocols for slowly driven quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zulkowski, Patrick R.; DeWeese, Michael R.

    2015-09-01

    The design of efficient quantum information processing will rely on optimal nonequilibrium transitions of driven quantum systems. Building on a recently developed geometric framework for computing optimal protocols for classical systems driven in finite time, we construct a general framework for optimizing the average information entropy for driven quantum systems. Geodesics on the parameter manifold endowed with a positive semidefinite metric correspond to protocols that minimize the average information entropy production in finite time. We use this framework to explicitly compute the optimal entropy production for a simple two-state quantum system coupled to a heat bath of bosonic oscillators, which has applications to quantum annealing.

  15. Control and optimization system and method for chemical looping processes

    DOEpatents

    Lou, Xinsheng; Joshi, Abhinaya; Lei, Hao

    2015-02-17

    A control system for optimizing a chemical loop system includes one or more sensors for measuring one or more parameters in a chemical loop. The sensors are disposed on or in a conduit positioned in the chemical loop. The sensors generate one or more data signals representative of an amount of solids in the conduit. The control system includes a data acquisition system in communication with the sensors and a controller in communication with the data acquisition system. The data acquisition system receives the data signals and the controller generates the control signals. The controller is in communication with one or more valves positioned in the chemical loop. The valves are configured to regulate a flow of the solids through the chemical loop.

  16. Control and optimization system and method for chemical looping processes

    DOEpatents

    Lou, Xinsheng; Joshi, Abhinaya; Lei, Hao

    2014-06-24

    A control system for optimizing a chemical loop system includes one or more sensors for measuring one or more parameters in a chemical loop. The sensors are disposed on or in a conduit positioned in the chemical loop. The sensors generate one or more data signals representative of an amount of solids in the conduit. The control system includes a data acquisition system in communication with the sensors and a controller in communication with the data acquisition system. The data acquisition system receives the data signals and the controller generates the control signals. The controller is in communication with one or more valves positioned in the chemical loop. The valves are configured to regulate a flow of the solids through the chemical loop.

  17. Chemical Looping Combustion Reactions and Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sarofim, Adel; Lighty, JoAnn; Smith, Philip; Whitty, Kevin; Eyring, Edward; Sahir, Asad; Alvarez, Milo; Hradisky, Michael; Clayton, Chris; Konya, Gabor; Baracki, Richard; Kelly, Kerry

    2014-03-01

    , they performed a sensitivity analysis for velocity, height and polydispersity and compared results against literature data for experimental studies of CLC beds with no reaction. Finally, they present an optimization space using simple non-reactive configurations. In Subtask 5.3, through a series of experimental studies, behavior of a variety of oxygen carriers with different loadings and manufacturing techniques was evaluated under both oxidizing and reducing conditions. The influences of temperature, degree of carrier conversion and thermodynamic driving force resulting from the difference between equilibrium and system O{sub 2} partial pressures were evaluated through several experimental campaigns, and generalized models accounting for these influences were developed to describe oxidation and oxygen release. Conversion of three solid fuels with widely ranging reactivities was studied in a small fluidized bed system, and all but the least reactive fuel (petcoke) were rapidly converted by oxygen liberated from the CLOU carrier. Attrition propensity of a variety of carriers was also studied, and the carriers produced by freeze granulation or impregnation of preformed substrates displayed the lowest rates of attrition. Subtask 5.4 focused on gathering kinetic data for a copper-based oxygen carrier to assist with modeling of a functioning chemical looping reactor. The kinetics team was also responsible for the development and analysis of supported copper oxygen carrier material.

  18. Dynamics of closed-loop systems containing flexible bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tadikonda, Sivakumar S. K.; Singh, Ramendra P.

    1991-01-01

    An important characteristic of flexible multibody systems containing closed-loop topologies is that the component modes used to describe individual bodies will no longer be independent because of loop closure constraints. Thus, the issue of component modal selection becomes even more complicated. In addition, the foreshortening effect that has been studied extensively in the literature in the context of open-loop topologies will also be present in these constraint equations. Simulation results presented demonstrate the effects of modal selection and foreshortening on the dynamic response of closed-loop flexible systems.

  19. Chemical Looping Combustion Reactions and Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sarofim, Adel; Lighty, JoAnn; Smith, Philip; Whitty, Kevin; Eyring, Edward; Sahir, Asad; Alvarez, Milo; Hradisky, Michael; Clayton, Chris; Konya, Gabor; Baracki, Richard; Kelly, Kerry

    2011-07-01

    Chemical Looping Combustion (CLC) is one promising fuel-combustion technology, which can facilitate economic CO2 capture in coal-fired power plants. It employs the oxidation/reduction characteristics of a metal, or oxygen carrier, and its oxide, the oxidizing gas (typically air) and the fuel source may be kept separate. This work focused on two classes of oxygen carrier, one that merely undergoes a change in oxidation state, such as Fe3O4/Fe2O3 and one that is converted from its higher to its lower oxidation state by the release of oxygen on heating, i.e., CuO/Cu2O. This topical report discusses the results of four complementary efforts: (1) the development of process and economic models to optimize important design considerations, such as oxygen carrier circulation rate, temperature, residence time; (2) the development of high-performance simulation capabilities for fluidized beds and the collection, parameter identification, and preliminary verification/uncertainty quantification (3) the exploration of operating characteristics in the laboratory-scale bubbling bed reactor, with a focus on the oxygen carrier performance, including reactivity, oxygen carrying capacity, attrition resistance, resistance to deactivation, cost and availability (4) the identification of mechanisms and rates for the copper, cuprous oxide, and cupric oxide system using thermogravimetric analysis.

  20. Quasi-Periodically Driven Quantum Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdeny, Albert; Puig, Joaquim; Mintert, Florian

    2016-10-01

    Floquet theory provides rigorous foundations for the theory of periodically driven quantum systems. In the case of non-periodic driving, however, the situation is not so well understood. Here, we provide a critical review of the theoretical framework developed for quasi-periodically driven quantum systems. Although the theoretical footing is still under development, we argue that quasi-periodically driven quantum systems can be treated with generalisations of Floquet theory in suitable parameter regimes. Moreover, we provide a generalisation of the Floquet-Magnus expansion and argue that quasi-periodic driving offers a promising route for quantum simulations.

  1. New superconducting cyclotron driven scanning proton therapy systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Hans-Udo; Baumgarten, Christian; Geisler, Andreas; Heese, Jürgen; Hobl, Achim; Krischel, Detlef; Schillo, Michael; Schmidt, Stefan; Timmer, Jan

    2005-12-01

    Since one and a half decades ACCEL is investing in development and engineering of state of the art particle-therapy systems. A new medical superconducting 250 MeV proton cyclotron with special focus on the present and future beam requirements of fast scanning treatment systems has been designed. The first new ACCEL medical proton cyclotron is under commissioning at PSI for their PROSCAN proton therapy facility having undergone successful factory tests especially of the closed loop cryomagnetic system. The second cyclotron is part of ACCEL's integrated proton therapy system for Europe's first clinical center, RPTC in Munich. The cyclotron, the energy selection system, the beamline as well as the four gantries and patient positioners have been installed. The scanning system and major parts of the control software have already been tested. We will report on the concept of ACCEL's superconducting cyclotron driven scanning proton therapy systems and the current status of the commissioning work at PSI and RPTC.

  2. A novel technique of using a thyristor driven pump as the final control element and flow indicator of a flow control loop.

    PubMed

    Bera, S C; Mandal, N; Sarkar, R

    2011-07-01

    In the present paper, design of a flow control loop using a thyristor driven pump as final control element has been described. In this technique, the load current of a thyristor driven pump motor has been utilized as a mass flow sensing parameter of a fluid passing through a pipeline. This thyristor driven pump has been utilized as a final control element of a flow control loop and the speed of the pump has been selected as the manipulated variable. The non-linearity between the thyristor input signal and pump output has been eliminated by using a modified PID control technique with inverse derivative control action. Thus without using any conventional flow meter and control valve only the thyristor driven pump has been utilized both as the final control element and flow indicating device by using the proposed technique. The whole system has been designed, fabricated and tested by using tap water as the flowing liquid through a pipe line. The experimental results along with the theoretical analysis are compared and reported in the paper.

  3. Spacecraft Closed Loop Three-Axis Momentum Unloading System.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    reaction wheel speed information, wheel speed threshold and geomagnetic latitude information and controls magnetic dipoles that will create a spacecraft torque and desaturate reaction wheels in a closed loop system. (Author)

  4. Triple loop heat exchanger for an absorption refrigeration system

    DOEpatents

    Reimann, Robert C.

    1984-01-01

    A triple loop heat exchanger for an absorption refrigeration system is disclosed. The triple loop heat exchanger comprises portions of a strong solution line for conducting relatively hot, strong solution from a generator to a solution heat exchanger of the absorption refrigeration system, conduit means for conducting relatively cool, weak solution from the solution heat exchanger to the generator, and a bypass system for conducting strong solution from the generator around the strong solution line and around the solution heat exchanger to an absorber of the refrigeration system when strong solution builds up in the generator to an undesirable level. The strong solution line and the conduit means are in heat exchange relationship with each other in the triple loop heat exchanger so that, during normal operation of the refrigeration system, heat is exchanged between the relatively hot, strong solution flowing through the strong solution line and the relatively cool, weak solution flowing through the conduit means. Also, the strong solution line and the bypass system are in heat exchange relationship in the triple loop heat exchanger so that if the normal flow path of relatively hot, strong solution flowing from the generator to an absorber is blocked, then this relatively, hot strong solution which will then be flowing through the bypass system in the triple loop heat exchanger, is brought into heat exchange relationship with any strong solution which may have solidified in the strong solution line in the triple loop heat exchanger to thereby aid in desolidifying any such solidified strong solution.

  5. Canonical DNA Repair Pathways Influence R-Loop-Driven Genome Instability.

    PubMed

    Stirling, Peter C; Hieter, Philip

    2016-07-22

    DNA repair defects create cancer predisposition in humans by fostering a higher rate of mutations. While DNA repair is quite well characterized, recent studies have identified previously unrecognized relationships between DNA repair and R-loop-mediated genome instability. R-loops are three-stranded nucleic acid structures in which RNA binds to genomic DNA to displace a loop of single-stranded DNA. Mutations in homologous recombination, nucleotide excision repair, crosslink repair, and DNA damage checkpoints have all now been linked to formation and function of transcription-coupled R-loops. This perspective will summarize recent literature linking DNA repair to R-loop-mediated genomic instability and discuss how R-loops may contribute to mutagenesis in DNA-repair-deficient cancers.

  6. Development of closed loop roll control for magnetic balance systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Covert, E. E.; Haldeman, C. W.; Ramohalli, G.; Way, P.

    1982-01-01

    This research was undertaken with the goal of demonstrating closed loop control of the roll degree of freedom on the NASA prototype magnetic suspension and balance system at the MIT Aerophysics Laboratory, thus, showing feasibility for a roll control system for any large magnetic balance system which might be built in the future. During the research under this grant, study was directed toward the several areas of torque generation, position sensing, model construction and control system design. These effects were then integrated to produce successful closed loop operation of the analogue roll control system. This experience indicated the desirability of microprocessor control for the angular degrees of freedom.

  7. Tendon Driven Finger Actuation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ihrke, Chris A. (Inventor); Reich, David M. (Inventor); Bridgwater, Lyndon (Inventor); Linn, Douglas Martin (Inventor); Askew, Scott R. (Inventor); Diftler, Myron A. (Inventor); Platt, Robert (Inventor); Hargrave, Brian (Inventor); Valvo, Michael C. (Inventor); Abdallah, Muhammad E. (Inventor); Permenter, Frank Noble (Inventor); Mehling, Joshua S. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A humanoid robot includes a robotic hand having at least one finger. An actuation system for the robotic finger includes an actuator assembly which is supported by the robot and is spaced apart from the finger. A tendon extends from the actuator assembly to the at least one finger and ends in a tendon terminator. The actuator assembly is operable to actuate the tendon to move the tendon terminator and, thus, the finger.

  8. Topological effects in chiral symmetric driven systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Derek Y. H.; Gong, Jiangbin

    2014-11-01

    Recent years have seen a strong interest in topological effects within periodically driven systems. In this work, we explore topological effects in two closely related 2-dimensional driven systems described by Floquet operators possessing chiral symmetry (CS). Our numerical and analytical results suggest the following. First, the CS is associated with the existence of the anomalous counterpropagating (ACP) modes reported recently. Specifically, we show that a particular form of CS protects the ACP modes crossing the quasienergy band gap at ±π . We also find that these modes are only present along selected boundaries, suggesting that they are a weak topological effect. Second, we find that CS can give rise to protected 0 and π quasienergy modes, and that the number of these modes may increase without bound as we tune up certain system parameters. Like the ACP modes, these 0 and π modes also appear only along selected boundaries and thus appear to be a weak topological effect. This work represents a detailed study of weak topological effects in periodically driven systems. Our findings add to the still-growing knowledge on driven topological systems.

  9. Line Loss Minimization of Loop Distribution Systems Using UPFC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayed, Mahmoud A.; Inayoshi, Nobuyuki; Takeshita, Takaharu; Ueda, Fukashi

    This paper presents an elaborated mathematical analysis of the line loss minimum conditions of loop distribution systems. In order to achieve these conditions, the Unified Power Flow Controller (UPFC), a typical Flexible AC Transmission Systems (FACTS) device that is capable of instantaneous control of transmission and distribution power flow, is used. For minimizing the total line loss of the loop distribution system, the authors propose two control schemes, the Line Inductance Compensation control and the Line Voltage Compensation control. These control schemes can be applied for controlling the UPFC in the loop distribution system according to the line parameters. The effectiveness of the proposed control schemes has been verified experimentally using a laboratory prototype in a 200V, 6kVA system.

  10. Coronal loops as self-organized critical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López Fuentes, M. C.; Klimchuk, J. A.

    We developed a numerical model that explains the evolution of coronal loops observed with GOES-SXI (see Lopez Fuentes, Klimchuk and Mandrini, ApJ, 2006, in press) in terms of Self-organized Critical Systems (SOC). We are inspired by the idea originally proposed by Parker (1988, ApJ, 330, 474), that coronal loops are made of elemental magnetic strands that wrap around each other due to photospheric convection. In our code the magnetic strength between neighbor strands increase until a threshold is reach and strands reconnect, releasing energy and heating the plasma. The number and intensity of these release events increase and a critical steady-state is reached. At some point, the photospheric dispersion makes the ``feeding'' mechanism inefficient and the loop decays. We model the plasma response and we obtain synthetic light curves that qualitatively reproduce the observed loop evolution.

  11. Effect of axial displacement of loops on the appearance of breakdown in a spiral explosion-driven magnetic generator

    SciTech Connect

    Zharinov, E.I.; Chernyshev, V.K.; Mikhailov, O.D.

    1985-07-01

    The authors study the effect of an axial displacement of the loops under the action of pondermotive forces of the magnetic field in a spiral explosion-driven magnetic generator (EMG). EMGs are being increasingly used in physical experiments as sources of powerful pulses of electromagnetic energies. Among the existing EMGs, one of the most promising and structurally simplest generators, which enables amplification of the initial energy by hundreds of times, are the high-inductance multisectional generators of the spiral type. In the course of the explosive experiments performed here with EMG, it was established that the displacement of the loops leads to the appearance of electrical breakdown in the working volume of the EMG and lowers the magnitude of the final current.

  12. The Instability and Non-existence of Multi-stranded Loops When Driven by Transverse Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magyar, N.; Van Doorsselaere, T.

    2016-06-01

    In recent years, omni-present transverse waves have been observed in all layers of the solar atmosphere. Coronal loops are often modeled as a collection of individual strands in order to explain their thermal behavior and appearance. We perform three-dimensional (3D) ideal magnetohydrodynamics simulations to study the effect of a continuous small amplitude transverse footpoint driving on the internal structure of a coronal loop composed of strands. The output is also converted into synthetic images, corresponding to the AIA 171 and 193 Å passbands, using FoMo. We show that the multi-stranded loop ceases to exist in the traditional sense of the word, because the plasma is efficiently mixed perpendicularly to the magnetic field, with the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability acting as the main mechanism. The final product of our simulation is a mixed loop with density structures on a large range of scales, resembling a power-law. Thus, multi-stranded loops are unstable to driving by transverse waves, and this raises strong doubts on the usability and applicability of coronal loop models consisting of independent strands.

  13. The instability and non-existence of multi-stranded loops, when driven by transverse waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Doorsselaere, Tom; Magyar, Norbert

    2016-05-01

    In recent years, omni-present transverse waves have been observed in all layers of the solar atmosphere. Coronal loops are often modeled as a collection of individual strands, in order to explain their thermal behaviour and appearance. We perform 3D ideal MHD simulations to study the effect of a continuous small amplitude transverse footpoint driving on the internal structure of a coronal loop composed of strands. The output is also converted to synthetic images, corresponding to the AIA 171Å and 193Å passbands, using FoMo. We show that the multi-stranded loop ceases to exist in the traditional sense of the word, because the plasma is efficiently mixed perpendicularly to the magnetic field, with the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability acting as the main mechanism. The final product of our simulation is mixed loop with density structures on a large range of scales, resembling a power-law. Thus, multi-stranded loops are unstable to driving by transverse waves, and this raises a strong doubt on the usability and applicability of coronal loop models consisting of independent strands.

  14. OBSERVATIONAL SIGNATURES OF CORONAL LOOP HEATING AND COOLING DRIVEN BY FOOTPOINT SHUFFLING

    SciTech Connect

    Dahlburg, R. B.; Taylor, B. D.; Einaudi, G.; Ugarte-Urra, I.; Warren, H. P.; Rappazzo, A. F.; Velli, M.

    2016-01-20

    The evolution of a coronal loop is studied by means of numerical simulations of the fully compressible three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic equations using the HYPERION code. The footpoints of the loop magnetic field are advected by random motions. As a consequence, the magnetic field in the loop is energized and develops turbulent nonlinear dynamics characterized by the continuous formation and dissipation of field-aligned current sheets: energy is deposited at small scales where heating occurs. Dissipation is nonuniformly distributed so that only a fraction of the coronal mass and volume gets heated at any time. Temperature and density are highly structured at scales that, in the solar corona, remain observationally unresolved: the plasma of our simulated loop is multithermal, where highly dynamical hotter and cooler plasma strands are scattered throughout the loop at sub-observational scales. Numerical simulations of coronal loops of 50,000 km length and axial magnetic field intensities ranging from 0.01 to 0.04 T are presented. To connect these simulations to observations, we use the computed number densities and temperatures to synthesize the intensities expected in emission lines typically observed with the Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer on Hinode. These intensities are used to compute differential emission measure distributions using the Monte Carlo Markov Chain code, which are very similar to those derived from observations of solar active regions. We conclude that coronal heating is found to be strongly intermittent in space and time, with only small portions of the coronal loop being heated: in fact, at any given time, most of the corona is cooling down.

  15. Accelerating Science Driven System Design With RAMP

    SciTech Connect

    Wawrzynek, John

    2015-05-01

    Researchers from UC Berkeley, in collaboration with the Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, are engaged in developing an Infrastructure for Synthesis with Integrated Simulation (ISIS). The ISIS Project was a cooperative effort for “application-driven hardware design” that engages application scientists in the early parts of the hardware design process for future generation supercomputing systems. This project served to foster development of computing systems that are better tuned to the application requirements of demanding scientific applications and result in more cost-effective and efficient HPC system designs. In order to overcome long conventional design-cycle times, we leveraged reconfigurable devices to aid in the design of high-efficiency systems, including conventional multi- and many-core systems. The resulting system emulation/prototyping environment, in conjunction with the appropriate intermediate abstractions, provided both a convenient user programming experience and retained flexibility, and thus efficiency, of a reconfigurable platform. We initially targeted the Berkeley RAMP system (Research Accelerator for Multiple Processors) as that hardware emulation environment to facilitate and ultimately accelerate the iterative process of science-driven system design. Our goal was to develop and demonstrate a design methodology for domain-optimized computer system architectures. The tangible outcome is a methodology and tools for rapid prototyping and design-space exploration, leading to highly optimized and efficient HPC systems.

  16. Phase shielding soliton in parametrically driven systems.

    PubMed

    Clerc, Marcel G; Garcia-Ñustes, Mónica A; Zárate, Yair; Coulibaly, Saliya

    2013-05-01

    Parametrically driven extended systems exhibit dissipative localized states. Analytical solutions of these states are characterized by a uniform phase and a bell-shaped modulus. Recently, a type of dissipative localized state with a nonuniform phase structure has been reported: the phase shielding solitons. Using the parametrically driven and damped nonlinear Schrödinger equation, we investigate the main properties of this kind of solution in one and two dimensions and develop an analytical description for its structure and dynamics. Numerical simulations are consistent with our analytical results, showing good agreement. A numerical exploration conducted in an anisotropic ferromagnetic system in one and two dimensions indicates the presence of phase shielding solitons. The structure of these dissipative solitons is well described also by our analytical results. The presence of corrective higher-order terms is relevant in the description of the observed phase dynamical behavior.

  17. Odd-frequency Superconductivity in Driven Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triola, Christopher; Balatsky, Alexander

    We show that Berezinskii's classification of the symmetries of Cooper pair amplitudes in terms of parity under transformations that invert spin, space, time, and orbital degrees of freedom holds for driven systems even in the absence of translation invariance. We then discuss the conditions under which pair amplitudes which are odd in frequency can emerge in driven systems. Considering a model Hamiltonian for a superconductor coupled to an external driving potential, we investigate the influence of the drive on the anomalous Green's function, density of states, and spectral function. We find that the anomalous Green's function develops odd in frequency component in the presence of an external drive. Furthermore we investigate how these odd-frequency terms are related to satellite features in the density of states and spectral function. Supported by US DOE BES E 304.

  18. Flowmeter for pressure-driven chromatography systems

    DOEpatents

    Paul, Phillip H.; Arnold, Don W.

    2003-01-01

    A flowmeter for accurately measuring the flowrate of fluids in high pressure chromatography systems. The flowmeter is a porous bed of a material, the porous bed having a porosity in the range of about 0.1 to 0.6 and a pore size in the range of about 50 nm to 1 .mu.m, disposed between a high pressure pumping means and a chromatography column. The flowmeter is provided with pressure measuring means at both the inlet and outlet of the porous bed for measuring the pressure drop through the porous bed. This flowmeter system provides not only the ability to measure accurately flowrates in the range of .mu.L/min to nL/min but also to provide a signal that can be used for a servo loop or feedback control system for high pressure pumping systems.

  19. Flowmeter for pressure-driven chromatography systems

    DOEpatents

    Paul, Phillip H.; Arnold, Don W.

    2002-01-01

    A flowmeter for accurately measuring the flowrate of fluids in high pressure chromatography systems. The flowmeter is a porous bed of a material, the porous bed having a porosity in the range of about 0.1 to 0.6 and a pore size in the range of about 50 nm to 1 .mu.m, disposed between a high pressure pumping means and a chromatography column. The flowmeter is provided with pressure measuring means at both the inlet and outlet of the porous bed for measuring the pressure drop through the porous bed. This flowmeter system provides not only the ability to measure accurately flowrates in the range of .mu.L/min to nL/min but also to provide a signal that can be used for a servo loop or feedback control system for high pressure pumping systems.

  20. 46 CFR 169.623 - Power-driven steering systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Power-driven steering systems. 169.623 Section 169.623... Machinery and Electrical Steering Systems § 169.623 Power-driven steering systems. (a) Power-driven steering... system must automatically resume operation after an electric power outage. (b) Control of...

  1. System design description for GCFR-core flow test loop

    SciTech Connect

    Huntley, W.R.; Grindell, A.G.

    1980-12-01

    The Core Flow Test Loop is a high-pressure, high-temperature, out-of-reactor helium circulation system that is being constructed to permit detailed study of the thermomechanical and thermal performance at prototypic steady-state and transient operating conditions of simulated segments of core assemblies for a GCFR Demonstration Plant, as designed by General Atomic Company. It will also permit the expermental verification of predictive analytical models of the GCFR core assemblies needed to reduce operational and safety uncertainties of the GCFR. Full-sized blanket assemblies and segments of fuel rod and control rod fuel assemblies will be simulated with test bundles of electrically powered fuel rod or blanket rod simulators. The loop will provide the steady-state and margin test requirements of bundle power and heat removal, and of helium coolant flow rate, pressure, and temperature for test bundles having up to 91 rods; these requirements set the maximum power, coolant helium flow, and thermal requirements for the loop. However, the size of the test vessel that contains the test bundles will be determined by the bundles that simulate a full-sized GCFR blanket assembly. The loop will also provide for power and coolant transients to simulate transient operation of GCFR core assemblies, including the capability for rapid helium depressurization to simulate the depressurization class of GCFR accidents. In addition, the loop can be used as an out-of-reactor test bed for characterizing in-reactor test bundle configurations.

  2. Closed-Loop System Removes Contaminants From Inert Gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Pramod K.

    1995-01-01

    Concentration of oxygen in this closed-loop system kept low by use of heated catalytic sorbent bed in cartridge. Proposed to keep concentration of water vapor low by use of predried zeolite sorbent bed in another cartridge, and to remove particles smaller than 0.1 micrometer by use of porous metal filters. In specific application, chamber is one in which semiconducting materials processed. By virtue of closed-loop operation, limited supply of inert gas adequate to provide atmosphere for industrial processing of semiconductors.

  3. Design validation and performance of closed loop gas recirculation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalmani, S. D.; Joshi, A. V.; Majumder, G.; Mondal, N. K.; Shinde, R. R.

    2016-11-01

    A pilot experimental set up of the India Based Neutrino Observatory's ICAL detector has been operational for the last 4 years at TIFR, Mumbai. Twelve glass RPC detectors of size 2 × 2 m2, with a gas gap of 2 mm are under test in a closed loop gas recirculation system. These RPCs are continuously purged individually, with a gas mixture of R134a (C2H2F4), isobutane (iC4H10) and sulphur hexafluoride (SF6) at a steady rate of 360 ml/h to maintain about one volume change a day. To economize gas mixture consumption and to reduce the effluents from being released into the atmosphere, a closed loop system has been designed, fabricated and installed at TIFR. The pressure and flow rate in the loop is controlled by mass flow controllers and pressure transmitters. The performance and integrity of RPCs in the pilot experimental set up is being monitored to assess the effect of periodic fluctuation and transients in atmospheric pressure and temperature, room pressure variation, flow pulsations, uniformity of gas distribution and power failures. The capability of closed loop gas recirculation system to respond to these changes is also studied. The conclusions from the above experiment are presented. The validations of the first design considerations and subsequent modifications have provided improved guidelines for the future design of the engineering module gas system.

  4. Structured Robust Loop shaping control for HIMAT System Using PSO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaitwanidvilai, Somyot; Jangwanitlert, Anuwat; Parnichkun, Manukid

    2009-01-01

    Robust loop shaping control is a feasible method for designing a robust controller; however, the controller designed by this method is complicated and difficult to implement practically. To overcome this problem, in this paper, a new design technique of a fixed-structure robust loop shaping controller for a highly maneuverable airplane, HIMAT, is proposed. The performance and robust stability conditions of the designed system satisfying H∞ loop shaping control are formulated as the objective function in the optimization problem. Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) technique is adopted to solve this problem and to achieve the control parameters of the proposed controller. Simulation results demonstrate that the proposed approach is numerically efficient and leads to performance comparable to that of the other method.

  5. Closed-Loop Life Support Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, John W.

    2003-01-01

    Contents include the following: 1. Advanced life support requirements document-high level: (a) high level requirements and standards, (b) advanced life support requirements documents-air, food, water. 2. Example technologies that satisfy requrements: air system-carbon dioxide removal. 3. Air-sabatter. 4. International Space Station water treatment subsystem.5. Direct osmotic concentrator. 6. Mass, volume and power estimates.

  6. Closed-loop autonomous docking system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dabney, Richard W. (Inventor); Howard, Richard T. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    An autonomous docking system is provided which produces commands for the steering and propulsion system of a chase vehicle used in the docking of that chase vehicle with a target vehicle. The docking system comprises a passive optical target affixed to the target vehicle and comprising three reflective areas including a central area mounted on a short post, and tracking sensor and process controller apparatus carried by the chase vehicle. The latter apparatus comprises a laser diode array for illuminating the target so as to cause light to be reflected from the reflective areas of the target; a sensor for detecting the light reflected from the target and for producing an electrical output signal in accordance with an image of the reflected light; a signal processor for processing the electrical output signal in accordance with an image of the reflected light; a signal processor for processing the electrical output signal and for producing, based thereon, output signals relating to the relative range, roll, pitch, yaw, azimuth, and elevation of the chase and target vehicles; and a docking process controller, responsive to the output signals produced by the signal processor, for producing command signals for controlling the steering and propulsion system of the chase vehicle.

  7. Energy-beam-driven rapid fabrication system

    DOEpatents

    Keicher, David M.; Atwood, Clinton L.; Greene, Donald L.; Griffith, Michelle L.; Harwell, Lane D.; Jeantette, Francisco P.; Romero, Joseph A.; Schanwald, Lee P.; Schmale, David T.

    2002-01-01

    An energy beam driven rapid fabrication system, in which an energy beam strikes a growth surface to form a molten puddle thereon. Feed powder is then injected into the molten puddle from a converging flow of feed powder. A portion of the feed powder becomes incorporated into the molten puddle, forcing some of the puddle contents to freeze on the growth surface, thereby adding an additional layer of material. By scanning the energy beam and the converging flow of feed powder across the growth surface, complex three-dimensional shapes can be formed, ready or nearly ready for use. Nearly any class of material can be fabricated using this system.

  8. Numerical Analysis of Combined Well and Open-Closed Loops Geothermal (CWG) Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Yu-Chul

    2016-04-01

    Open-loop geothermal heat pump (GHP) system and closed-loop heat pump systems have been used in Korea to reduce emission of greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide (CO2). The GHP systems have the pros and cons, for example, the open-loop GHP system is good energy-efficient and the closed-loop GHP system requires minimum maintenance costs. The open-loop GHP system can be used practically only with large amount of groundwater supply. The closed-loop GHP system can be used with high costs of initial installation. The performance and efficiency of the GHP system depend on the characteristics of the GHP system itself in addition to the geologic conditions. To overcome the cons of open-loop or closed-loop GHP system, the combined well and open-closed loops geothermal (CWG) system was designed. The open-loop GHP system is surrounded with closed-loop GHP systems in the CWG system. The geothermal energy in closed-loop GHP systems is supplied by the groundwater pumped by the open-loop GHP system. In this study, 2 different types of the CWG systems (small aperture hybrid CWG system and large aperture CWG system) are estimated using numerical simulation models in the aspect of energy efficiency. This work was supported by the New & Renewable Energy Core Technology Program of the Korea Institute of Energy Technology Evaluation and Planning (KETEP), granted financial resource from the Ministry of Trade, Industry & Energy, Republic of Korea. (No.20153030111120).

  9. Albumin dialysis in artificial liver support systems: open-loop or closed-loop dialysis mode?

    PubMed

    Pei, Yingying; Sun, Yize; Sun, Sijie; Gao, Dayong; Ding, Weiping

    2015-01-01

    In artificial liver support systems, the open-loop albumin dialysis mode (OLM) is usually used to remove protein-bound toxins from the blood of patients with liver failure. However, there is still interest in the closed-loop albumin dialysis mode (CLM) because this mode may enable not only the regeneration and reuse of albumin but also the miniaturization of artificial liver systems. In this article, we compared the two modes under a fixed amount of albumin in dialysate experimentally and theoretically. The results show that according to the detoxification efficiency in the 3 hour dialysis for removing albumin-bound bilirubin, CLM is better than OLM. The usage efficiency of albumin in CLM is also higher. Moreover, the advantage of CLM is more significant when the concentration of bilirubin in blood is lower. Under a given amount of albumin in dialysate, if the concentration of bilirubin in blood is high, one may further increase the performance of CLM by means of increasing the flow rate of the albumin dialysate or using the highly concentrated albumin dialysate.

  10. T-111 Rankine system corrosion test loop, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, R. W.; Hoffman, E. E.; Smith, J. P.

    1975-01-01

    Results are given of a program whose objective was to determine the performance of refractory metal alloys in a two loop Rankine test system. The test system consisted of a circulating lithium circuit heated to 1230 C maximum transferring heat to a boiling potassium circuit with a 1170 C superheated vapor temperature. The results demonstrate the suitability of the selected refractory alloys to perform from a chemical compatibility standpoint.

  11. Feedback Control Systems Loop Shaping Design with Practical Considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopsakis, George

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes loop shaping control design in feedback control systems, primarily from a practical stand point that considers design specifications. Classical feedback control design theory, for linear systems where the plant transfer function is known, has been around for a long time. But it s still a challenge of how to translate the theory into practical and methodical design techniques that simultaneously satisfy a variety of performance requirements such as transient response, stability, and disturbance attenuation while taking into account the capabilities of the plant and its actuation system. This paper briefly addresses some relevant theory, first in layman s terms, so that it becomes easily understood and then it embarks into a practical and systematic design approach incorporating loop shaping design coupled with lead-lag control compensation design. The emphasis is in generating simple but rather powerful design techniques that will allow even designers with a layman s knowledge in controls to develop effective feedback control designs.

  12. Model driven laboratory information management systems.

    PubMed

    Li, Hao; Gennari, John H; Brinkley, James F

    2006-01-01

    Scientists in small research labs need more robust tools than spreadsheets to manage their data. However, no suitable laboratory information management systems (LIMS) are readily available; they are either too costly or too complex. We have therefore developed Seedpod, a model driven LIMS that allows users to create an integrated model of a LIMS without programming. Seedpod then automati-cally produces a relational database from the model, and dynamically generates a web-based graphical user interface. Our goal is to make LIMS easier to use by decreasing development time and cost, thereby allowing researchers to focus on producing and collecting data.

  13. Odd-frequency superconductivity in driven systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triola, Christopher; Balatsky, Alexander V.

    2016-09-01

    We show that Berezinskii's classification of the symmetries of Cooper pair amplitudes holds for driven systems even in the absence of translation invariance. We then consider a model Hamiltonian for a superconductor coupled to an external driving potential and, treating the drive as a perturbation, we investigate the corrections to the anomalous Green's function, density of states, and spectral function. We find that in the presence of an external drive the anomalous Green's function develops terms that are odd in frequency and that the same mechanism responsible for these odd-frequency terms generates additional features in the density of states and spectral function.

  14. Variational functions in driven open quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakob, Matthias; Stenholm, Stig

    2003-03-01

    We consider the Lindblad-type master equation of an open system. We address the question how to construct a functional of the quantum state which displays a monotonic behavior in time. This thus defines uniquely the direction of time in the system. As the generator of time evolution is not a Hermitian operator, the theory requires the considerations of right and left eigenstates. In this paper we assume them to form two complete bases, which allows us to construct the desired quantity. This can be interpreted as a generalized entropy functional. We show how the construction is carried out in the general case, and we illustrate the theory by solving the case of an externally driven and damped two-level system. The treatment is related to earlier work in the field, and its possible relation to time inversion is discussed.

  15. Thermalization of field driven quantum systems

    PubMed Central

    Fotso, H.; Mikelsons, K.; Freericks, J. K.

    2014-01-01

    There is much interest in how quantum systems thermalize after a sudden change, because unitary evolution should preclude thermalization. The eigenstate thermalization hypothesis resolves this because all observables for quantum states in a small energy window have essentially the same value; it is violated for integrable systems due to the infinite number of conserved quantities. Here, we show that when a system is driven by a DC electric field there are five generic behaviors: (i) monotonic or (ii) oscillatory approach to an infinite-temperature steady state; (iii) monotonic or (iv) oscillatory approach to a nonthermal steady state; or (v) evolution to an oscillatory state. Examining the Hubbard model (which thermalizes under a quench) and the Falicov-Kimball model (which does not), we find both exhibit scenarios (i–iv), while only Hubbard shows scenario (v). This shows richer behavior than in interaction quenches and integrability in the absence of a field plays no role. PMID:24736404

  16. Regulative Loops, Step Loops and Task Loops

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VanLehn, Kurt

    2016-01-01

    This commentary suggests a generalization of the conception of the behavior of tutoring systems, which the target article characterized as having an outer loop that was executed once per task and an inner loop that was executed once per step of the task. A more general conception sees these two loops as instances of regulative loops, which…

  17. Closed-Loop and Robust Control of Quantum Systems

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lin-Cheng

    2013-01-01

    For most practical quantum control systems, it is important and difficult to attain robustness and reliability due to unavoidable uncertainties in the system dynamics or models. Three kinds of typical approaches (e.g., closed-loop learning control, feedback control, and robust control) have been proved to be effective to solve these problems. This work presents a self-contained survey on the closed-loop and robust control of quantum systems, as well as a brief introduction to a selection of basic theories and methods in this research area, to provide interested readers with a general idea for further studies. In the area of closed-loop learning control of quantum systems, we survey and introduce such learning control methods as gradient-based methods, genetic algorithms (GA), and reinforcement learning (RL) methods from a unified point of view of exploring the quantum control landscapes. For the feedback control approach, the paper surveys three control strategies including Lyapunov control, measurement-based control, and coherent-feedback control. Then such topics in the field of quantum robust control as H∞ control, sliding mode control, quantum risk-sensitive control, and quantum ensemble control are reviewed. The paper concludes with a perspective of future research directions that are likely to attract more attention. PMID:23997680

  18. Unified computational method for design of fluid loop systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furukawa, Masao

    1991-12-01

    Various kinds of empirical formulas of Nusselt numbers, fanning friction factors, and pressure loss coefficients were collected and reviewed with the object of constructing a common basis of design calculations of pumped fluid loop systems. The practical expressions obtained after numerical modifications are listed in tables with identification numbers corresponding to configurations of the flow passages. Design procedure of a cold plate and of a space radiator are clearly shown in a series of mathematical relations coupled with a number of detailed expressions which are put in the tables in order of numerical computations. Weight estimate models and several pump characteristics are given in the tables as a result of data regression. A unified computational method based upon the above procedure is presented for preliminary design analyses of a fluid loop system consisting of cold plates, plane radiators, mechanical pumps, valves, and so on.

  19. Closed-loop, non-linear feedback control simulations of beam-driven field-reversed configurations (FRCs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rath, N.; Onofri, M.; Barnes, D.; Romero, J.; the TAE Team

    2015-11-01

    The C-2U device has recently demonstrated sustainment of an advanced, beam-driven FRC over time scales longer than the characteristic times for confinement, fast ion slow-down, and wall current decay. In anticipation of further advances in plasma lifetime, we are developing feedback control techniques for major FRC parameters and resistive instabilities. The LamyRidge code solves the time-dependent extended MHD equations in axisymmetric geometry. In the Q2D code, LamyRidge is combined with a 3-D kinetic code that tracks fast ions and runs in parallel with LamyRidge. Periodically, the background fields in the kinetic code are updated from the MHD simulation and the averaged fast particle distribution is integrated into the fluid equations. Recently, we have added the capability to run Q2D simulations as subordinate processes in Simulink, giving us the ability to run non-linear, closed-loop simulations using control algorithms developed in Simulink. The same Simulink models can be exported to real-time targets (CPU or FPGA) to perform feedback control in experiments. We present closed-loop simulations of beam-driven FRCs under magnetically-actuated feedback control. Results for positionally unstable FRCs are compared with the predictions of a linearized rigid-plasma model. Plasmas predicted to be passively stabilized by the linear model are found to exhibit Alfvenic growth in several cases. Feedback gains predicted to be stabilizing in the linear model are generally found to be insufficient in non-linear simulations, and vice versa. Control of separatrix geometry is demonstrated.

  20. Closed-loop air cooling system for a turbine engine

    DOEpatents

    North, William Edward

    2000-01-01

    Method and apparatus are disclosed for providing a closed-loop air cooling system for a turbine engine. The method and apparatus provide for bleeding pressurized air from a gas turbine engine compressor for use in cooling the turbine components. The compressed air is cascaded through the various stages of the turbine. At each stage a portion of the compressed air is returned to the compressor where useful work is recovered.

  1. System and method of designing models in a feedback loop

    DOEpatents

    Gosink, Luke C.; Pulsipher, Trenton C.; Sego, Landon H.

    2017-02-14

    A method and system for designing models is disclosed. The method includes selecting a plurality of models for modeling a common event of interest. The method further includes aggregating the results of the models and analyzing each model compared to the aggregate result to obtain comparative information. The method also includes providing the information back to the plurality of models to design more accurate models through a feedback loop.

  2. Periodically driven three-level systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenmoe, M. B.; Fai, L. C.

    2016-09-01

    We study the dynamics of a three-level system (ThLS) sinusoidally driven in both longitudinal and transverse directions and in the presence of a uniaxial anisotropy D entering the generic Hamiltonian through the zero-energy splitting term D (Sz)2 where Sz is the projection of the spin vector along the quantization direction. As a consequence of the addition of this term, the order of the symmetry group of the Hamiltonian is increased by a unit and we observe a sequence of cascaded SU(3) Landau-Zener-Stückelberg-Majorana (LZSM) interferometers. The study is carried out by analytically and numerically calculating the probabilities of nonadiabatic and adiabatic evolutions. For nonadiabatic evolutions, two main approximations based on the weak and strong driving limits are discussed by comparing the characteristic frequency of the longitudinal drive with the amplitudes of driven fields. For each of the cases discussed, our analytical results quite well reproduce the gross temporal profile of the exact numerical probabilities. This allows us to check the range of validity of analytical results and confirm our assumptions. For adiabatic evolutions, a general theory is constructed allowing for the description of adiabatic passages in arbitrary ThLSs in which direct transitions between states with extremal spin projections are forbidden. A compact formula for adiabatic evolutions is derived and numerically tested for some illustrative cases. Interference patterns demonstrating multiple LZSM transitions are reported. Applications of our results to the nitrogen vacancy center in diamond are discussed.

  3. A large coronal loop in the Algol system.

    PubMed

    Peterson, W M; Mutel, R L; Güdel, M; Goss, W M

    2010-01-14

    The close binary Algol system contains a radio-bright KIV subgiant star in a very close (0.062 astronomical units) and rapid (2.86 day) orbit with a main sequence B8 star. Because the rotation periods of the two stars are tidally locked to the orbital period, the rapid rotation drives a magnetic dynamo. A large body of evidence points to the existence of an extended, complex coronal magnetosphere originating at the cooler K subgiant. The detailed morphology of the subgiant's corona and its possible interaction with its companion are unknown, though theory predicts that the coronal plasma should be confined in a magnetic loop structure, as seen on the Sun. Here we report multi-epoch radio imaging of the Algol system, in which we see a large, persistent coronal loop approximately one subgiant diameter in height, whose base is straddling the subgiant and whose apex is oriented towards the B8 star. This suggests that a persistent asymmetric magnetic field structure is aligned between the two stars. The loop is larger than anticipated theoretically, but the size may be the result of a magnetic interaction between the two stars.

  4. Wilson loops in string duals of walking and flavored systems

    SciTech Connect

    Nunez, Carlos; Piai, Maurizio; Rago, Antonio

    2010-04-15

    We consider the vacuum expectation value of Wilson loop operators by studying the behavior of string probes in solutions of type-IIB string theory generated by N{sub c} D5-branes wrapped on an S{sup 2} internal manifold. In particular, we focus on solutions to the background equations that are dual to field theories with a walking gauge coupling as well as for flavored systems. We present in detail our walking solution and emphasize various general aspects of the procedure to study Wilson loops using string duals. We discuss the special features that the strings show when probing the region associated with the walking of the field-theory coupling.

  5. Environmental impacts of open loop geothermal system on groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Koo-Sang; Park, Youngyun; Yun, Sang Woong; Lee, Jin-Yong

    2013-04-01

    Application of renewable energies such as sunlight, wind, rain, tides, waves and geothermal heat has gradually increased to reduce emission of CO2 which is supplied from combustion of fossil fuel. The geothermal energy of various renewable energies has benefit to be used to cooling and heating systems and has good energy efficiency compared with other renewable energies. However, open loop system of geothermal heat pump system has possibility that various environmental problems are induced because the system directly uses groundwater to exchange heat. This study was performed to collect data from many documents such as papers and reports and to summarize environmental impacts for application of open loop system. The environmental impacts are classified into change of hydrogeological factors such as water temperature, redox condition, EC, change of microbial species, well contamination and depletion of groundwater. The change of hydrogeological factors can induce new geological processes such as dissolution and precipitation of some minerals. For examples, increase of water temperature can change pH and Eh. These variations can change saturation index of some minerals. Therefore, dissolution and precipitation of some minerals such as quartz and carbonate species and compounds including Fe and Mn can induce a collapse and a clogging of well. The well contamination and depletion of groundwater can reduce available groundwater resources. These environmental impacts will be different in each region because hydrogeological properties and scale, operation period and kind of the system. Therefore, appropriate responses will be considered for each environmental impact. Also, sufficient study will be conducted to reduce the environmental impacts and to improve geothermal energy efficiency during the period that a open loop system is operated. This work was supported by the Energy Efficiency and Resources of the Korea Institute of Energy Technology Evaluation and Planning

  6. Advanced Hybrid Spacesuit Concept Featuring Integrated Open Loop and Closed Loop Ventilation Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniel, Brian A.; Fitzpatrick, Garret R.; Gohmert, Dustin M.; Ybarra, Rick M.; Dub, Mark O.

    2013-01-01

    A document discusses the design and prototype of an advanced spacesuit concept that integrates the capability to function seamlessly with multiple ventilation system approaches. Traditionally, spacesuits are designed to operate both dependently and independently of a host vehicle environment control and life support system (ECLSS). Spacesuits that operate independent of vehicle-provided ECLSS services must do so with equipment selfcontained within or on the spacesuit. Suits that are dependent on vehicle-provided consumables must remain physically connected to and integrated with the vehicle to operate properly. This innovation is the design and prototype of a hybrid spacesuit approach that configures the spacesuit to seamlessly interface and integrate with either type of vehicular systems, while still maintaining the ability to function completely independent of the vehicle. An existing Advanced Crew Escape Suit (ACES) was utilized as the platform from which to develop the innovation. The ACES was retrofitted with selected components and one-off items to achieve the objective. The ventilation system concept was developed and prototyped/retrofitted to an existing ACES. Components were selected to provide suit connectors, hoses/umbilicals, internal breathing system ducting/ conduits, etc. The concept utilizes a lowpressure- drop, high-flow ventilation system that serves as a conduit from the vehicle supply into the suit, up through a neck seal, into the breathing helmet cavity, back down through the neck seal, out of the suit, and returned to the vehicle. The concept also utilizes a modified demand-based breathing system configured to function seamlessly with the low-pressure-drop closed-loop ventilation system.

  7. Driven topological systems in the classical limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, Callum W.; Öhberg, Patrik; Valiente, Manuel

    2017-03-01

    Periodically driven quantum systems can exhibit topologically nontrivial behavior, even when their quasienergy bands have zero Chern numbers. Much work has been conducted on noninteracting quantum-mechanical models where this kind of behavior is present. However, the inclusion of interactions in out-of-equilibrium quantum systems can prove to be quite challenging. On the other hand, the classical counterpart of hard-core interactions can be simulated efficiently via constrained random walks. The noninteracting model, proposed by Rudner et al. [Phys. Rev. X 3, 031005 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevX.3.031005], has a special point for which the system is equivalent to a classical random walk. We consider the classical counterpart of this model, which is exact at a special point even when hard-core interactions are present, and show how these quantitatively affect the edge currents in a strip geometry. We find that the interacting classical system is well described by a mean-field theory. Using this we simulate the dynamics of the classical system, which show that the interactions play the role of Markovian, or time-dependent disorder. By comparing the evolution of classical and quantum edge currents in small lattices, we find regimes where the classical limit considered gives good insight into the quantum problem.

  8. System having unmodulated flux locked loop for measuring magnetic fields

    DOEpatents

    Ganther, Jr., Kenneth R.; Snapp, Lowell D.

    2006-08-15

    A system (10) for measuring magnetic fields, wherein the system (10) comprises an unmodulated or direct-feedback flux locked loop (12) connected by first and second unbalanced RF coaxial transmission lines (16a, 16b) to a superconducting quantum interference device (14). The FLL (12) operates for the most part in a room-temperature or non-cryogenic environment, while the SQUID (14) operates in a cryogenic environment, with the first and second lines (16a, 16b) extending between these two operating environments.

  9. Integrated Evaluation of Closed Loop Air Revitalization System Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murdock, K.

    2010-01-01

    NASA s vision and mission statements include an emphasis on human exploration of space, which requires environmental control and life support technologies. This Contractor Report (CR) describes the development and evaluation of an Air Revitalization System, modeling and simulation of the components, and integrated hardware testing with the goal of better understanding the inherent capabilities and limitations of this closed loop system. Major components integrated and tested included a 4-Bed Modular Sieve, Mechanical Compressor Engineering Development Unit, Temperature Swing Adsorption Compressor, and a Sabatier Engineering and Development Unit. The requisite methodolgy and technical results are contained in this CR.

  10. Kinetic parameters for source driven systems

    SciTech Connect

    Dulla, S.; Ravetto, P.; Carta, M.; D'Angelo, A.

    2006-07-01

    The definition of the characteristic kinetic parameters of a subcritical source-driven system constitutes an interesting problem in reactor physics with important consequences for practical applications. Consistent and physically meaningful values of the parameters allow to obtain accurate results from kinetic simulation tools and to correctly interpret kinetic experiments. For subcritical systems a preliminary problem arises for the adoption of a suitable weighting function to be used in the projection procedure to derive a point model. The present work illustrates a consistent factorization-projection procedure which leads to the definition of the kinetic parameters in a straightforward manner. The reactivity term is introduced coherently with the generalized perturbation theory applied to the source multiplication factor ks, which is thus given a physical role in the kinetic model. The effective prompt lifetime is introduced on the assumption that a neutron generation can be initiated by both the fission process and the source emission. Results are presented for simplified configurations to fully comprehend the physical features and for a more complicated highly decoupled system treated in transport theory. (authors)

  11. Nucleation in periodically driven electrochemical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smelyanskiy, V. N.; Dykman, M. I.; Rabitz, H.; Vugmeister, B. E.; Bernasek, S. L.; Bocarsly, A. B.

    1999-06-01

    We calculate both the exponent and the prefactor in the nucleation rate of a periodically driven system. Nucleation dynamics is described by the Fokker-Planck equation for the probability distribution of the nuclei over their size. This distribution is found using the concept of the most probable (optimal) nucleation path. The results apply in a broad range of driving force amplitudes, from weak to moderately strong forces where the nucleation rate is changed exponentially strongly, and also in the broad range of the driving frequencies, from low-frequency driving, where the system follows the force adiabatically, to high-frequency nonadiabatic driving. For strong driving forces, the time dependence of the nucleation rate changes from strongly nonsinusoidal to a weak with the increasing frequency of driving. The response of the nucleation rate to the driving force is described in terms of logarithmic susceptibility (LS), which can be obtained from the optimal nucleation path in the absence of the driving. LS is a smooth function of frequency, and therefore even a driving force with comparatively high frequency can change the modulation rate exponentially strongly. LS and the Faraday current are calculated for simple models of electrochemical systems, where the ac driving is produced by modulation of the electrode potential. We also suggest how to find LS from measurements of the average nucleation rate.

  12. Transcription-Driven Twin Supercoiling of a DNA Loop: A Brownian Dynamics Study

    SciTech Connect

    Mielke, S P; Fink, W H; Krishnan, K; Gronbech-Jensen, N; Benham, C J

    2004-06-30

    The torque generated by RNA polymerase as it tracks along double-stranded DNA can potentially induce long-range structural deformations integral to mechanisms of biological significance in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. In this report, we introduce a dynamic computer model for investigating this phenomenon. Duplex DNA is represented as a chain of hydrodynamic bends interacting through elastic potentials. The chain, linear when relaxed, is looped to form two open but topologically constrained subdomains. This permits the dynamic introduction of torsional stress via a centrally applied torque. We simulate by Brownian dynamics the 100 {micro}s response of a 477-basepair B-DNA template to the localized torque generated by the prokaryotic transcription ensemble. Following a sharp rise at early times, the distributed twist assumes a nearly constant value in both subdomains, and a succession of supercoiling deformations occurs as superhelical stress is increasingly partitioned to writhe. The magnitude of writhe surpasses that of twist before also leveling off when the structure reaches mechanical equilibrium with the torsional load. Superhelicity is simultaneously right-handed in one subdomain and left-handed in the other. The properties of the chain at the onset of writhing agree well with predictions from theory, and the generated stress is ample for driving secondary structural transitions in physiological DNA. These results suggest that the torsional stress generated by transcription can significantly deform the DNA template over short times. This highlights the potential of transcription and other tracking processes to play a central role in gene regulation, and prompts further investigation of dynamically-generated supercoiling.

  13. Optical Closed-Loop Propulsion Control System Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poppel, Gary L.

    1998-01-01

    The overall objective of this program was to design and fabricate the components required for optical closed-loop control of a F404-400 turbofan engine, by building on the experience of the NASA Fiber Optic Control System Integration (FOCSI) program. Evaluating the performance of fiber optic technology at the component and system levels will result in helping to validate its use on aircraft engines. This report includes descriptions of three test plans. The EOI Acceptance Test is designed to demonstrate satisfactory functionality of the EOI, primarily fail-safe throughput of the F404 sensor signals in the normal mode, and validation, switching, and output of the five analog sensor signals as generated from validated optical sensor inputs, in the optical mode. The EOI System Test is designed to demonstrate acceptable F404 ECU functionality as interfaced with the EOI, making use of a production ECU test stand. The Optical Control Engine Test Request describes planned hardware installation, optical signal calibrations, data system coordination, test procedures, and data signal comparisons for an engine test demonstration of the optical closed-loop control.

  14. Closed-Loop Control for Sonic Fatigue Testing Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizzi, Stephen A.; Bossaert, Guido

    2001-01-01

    This article documents recent improvements to the acoustic control system of the Thermal Acoustic Fatigue Apparatus (TAFA), a progressive wave tube test facility at the NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA. A brief summary of past acoustic performance is first given to serve as a basis of comparison with the new performance data using a multiple-input, closed-loop, narrow-band controller. Performance data in the form of test section acoustic power spectral densities and coherence are presented for a variety of input spectra including uniform, band-limited random and an expendable launch vehicle payload bay environment.

  15. Closed loop air cooling system for combustion turbines

    DOEpatents

    Huber, David John; Briesch, Michael Scot

    1998-01-01

    Convective cooling of turbine hot parts using a closed loop system is disclosed. Preferably, the present invention is applied to cooling the hot parts of combustion turbine power plants, and the cooling provided permits an increase in the inlet temperature and the concomitant benefits of increased efficiency and output. In preferred embodiments, methods and apparatus are disclosed wherein air is removed from the combustion turbine compressor and delivered to passages internal to one or more of a combustor and turbine hot parts. The air cools the combustor and turbine hot parts via convection and heat is transferred through the surfaces of the combustor and turbine hot parts.

  16. Closed loop air cooling system for combustion turbines

    DOEpatents

    Huber, D.J.; Briesch, M.S.

    1998-07-21

    Convective cooling of turbine hot parts using a closed loop system is disclosed. Preferably, the present invention is applied to cooling the hot parts of combustion turbine power plants, and the cooling provided permits an increase in the inlet temperature and the concomitant benefits of increased efficiency and output. In preferred embodiments, methods and apparatus are disclosed wherein air is removed from the combustion turbine compressor and delivered to passages internal to one or more of a combustor and turbine hot parts. The air cools the combustor and turbine hot parts via convection and heat is transferred through the surfaces of the combustor and turbine hot parts. 1 fig.

  17. MULTIOBJECTIVE OPTIMIZATION POWER GENERATION SYSTEMS INVOLVING CHEMICAL LOOPING COMBUSTION

    SciTech Connect

    Juan M. Salazar; Urmila M. Diwekar; Stephen E. Zitney

    2009-01-01

    Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) system using coal gasification is an important approach for future energy options. This work focuses on understading the system operation and optimizing it in the presence of uncertain operating conditions using ASPEN Plus and CAPE-OPEN compliant stochastic simulation and multiobjective optimization capabilities developed by Vishwamitra Research Institute. The feasible operating surface for the IGCC system is generated and deterministic multiobjective optimization is performed. Since the feasible operating space is highly non-convex, heuristics based techniques that do not require gradient information are used to generate the Pareto surface. Accurate CFD models are simultaneously developed for the gasifier and chemical looping combustion system to characterize and quantify the process uncertainty in the ASPEN model.

  18. Optimal switching policy for performance enhancement of distributed parameter systems based on event-driven control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Wen-Ying; Cui, Bao-Tong; Lou, Xu-Yang; Li, Wen

    2014-07-01

    This paper aims to improve the performance of a class of distributed parameter systems for the optimal switching of actuators and controllers based on event-driven control. It is assumed that in the available multiple actuators, only one actuator can receive the control signal and be activated over an unfixed time interval, and the other actuators keep dormant. After incorporating a state observer into the event generator, the event-driven control loop and the minimum inter-event time are ultimately bounded. Based on the event-driven state feedback control, the time intervals of unfixed length can be obtained. The optimal switching policy is based on finite horizon linear quadratic optimal control at the beginning of each time subinterval. A simulation example demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed policy.

  19. Practical Loop-Shaping Design of Feedback Control Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopasakis, George

    2010-01-01

    An improved methodology for designing feedback control systems has been developed based on systematically shaping the loop gain of the system to meet performance requirements such as stability margins, disturbance attenuation, and transient response, while taking into account the actuation system limitations such as actuation rates and range. Loop-shaping for controls design is not new, but past techniques do not directly address how to systematically design the controller to maximize its performance. As a result, classical feedback control systems are designed predominantly using ad hoc control design approaches such as proportional integral derivative (PID), normally satisfied when a workable solution is achieved, without a good understanding of how to maximize the effectiveness of the control design in terms of competing performance requirements, in relation to the limitations of the plant design. The conception of this improved methodology was motivated by challenges in designing control systems of the types needed for supersonic propulsion. But the methodology is generally applicable to any classical control-system design where the transfer function of the plant is known or can be evaluated. In the case of a supersonic aerospace vehicle, a major challenge is to design the system to attenuate anticipated external and internal disturbances, using such actuators as fuel injectors and valves, bypass doors, and ramps, all of which are subject to limitations in actuator response, rates, and ranges. Also, for supersonic vehicles, with long slim type of structures, coupling between the engine and the structural dynamics can produce undesirable effects that could adversely affect vehicle stability and ride quality. In order to design distributed controls that can suppress these potential adverse effects, within the full capabilities of the actuation system, it is important to employ a systematic control design methodology such as this that can maximize the

  20. Chemical Looping Combustion System-Fuel Reactor Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Gamwo, I.K.; Jung, J.; Anderson, R.R.; Soong, Y.

    2007-04-01

    Chemical looping combustion (CLC) is a process in which an oxygen carrier is used for fuel combustion instead of air or pure oxygen as shown in the figure below. The combustion is split into air and fuel reactors where the oxidation of the oxygen carrier and the reduction of the oxidized metal occur respectively. The CLC system provides a sequestration-ready CO2 stream with no additional energy required for separation. This major advantage places combustion looping at the leading edge of a possible shift in strict control of CO2 emissions from power plants. Research in this novel technology has been focused in three distinct areas: techno-economic evaluations, integration of the system into power plant concepts, and experimental development of oxygen carrier metals such as Fe, Ni, Mn, Cu, and Ca. Our recent thorough literature review shows that multiphase fluid dynamics modeling for CLC is not available in the open literature. Here, we have modified the MFIX code to model fluid dynamic in the fuel reactor. A computer generated movie of our simulation shows bubble behavior consistent with experimental observations.

  1. Load System of Segmental T-Loops for Canine Retraction

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Zeyang; Chen, Jie; Jiang, Feifei; Li, Shuning; Viecilli, Rodrigo F; Liu, Sean Y.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The orthodontic load system, especially the ideal moment-to-force ratios (M/F), is the commonly used design parameter of segmental T-loops for canine retraction. However, the load system, including M/F, may be affected by the changes in canine angulations and interbracket distance (IBD). Here, we hypothesize that clinical changes in canine position and angulation during canine retraction will significantly affect the load system delivered to the tooth. Methods The load systems of two T-loop groups, one for translation (TR) and the other for controlled tipping (CT), from nine bilateral canine retraction patients were made to the targeted values obtained from finite element analyses and validated. Each loop was tested on the corresponding maxillary dental cast obtained in the clinic. The casts were made before and after each treatment interval so that both initial and residual load systems could be obtained. The pre- and post-treatment IBDs were recorded for calculating IBD changes. Results As the IBDs decreased, the averaged retraction-force-drop per IBD reduction was 36 cN/mm, a 30% drop per 1 mm IBD decrease. The averaged anti-tipping-moment-drops per IBD reductions were 0.02 N-mm/mm for CT and 1.4 N-mm/mm for TR, ~0.6 % and 17% drop per 1 mm IBD decrease, respectively. Consequently, the average M/F increases per 1 mm IBD reduction were 1.24 mm/mm for CT and 6.34 mm/mm for TR. There was significant residual load left, which could continue to move the tooth if the patient missed the scheduled appointment. Conclusions Clinical changes in canine position and angulation during canine retraction significantly affect the load system. The initial planned M/F needs to be lower to reach the expected average ideal value. Patients should be required to follow the office visit schedule closely to avoid negative effects due to significant M/F increases with time. PMID:24075663

  2. A LabVIEW model incorporating an open-loop arterial impedance and a closed-loop circulatory system.

    PubMed

    Cole, R T; Lucas, C L; Cascio, W E; Johnson, T A

    2005-11-01

    While numerous computer models exist for the circulatory system, many are limited in scope, contain unwanted features or incorporate complex components specific to unique experimental situations. Our purpose was to develop a basic, yet multifaceted, computer model of the left heart and systemic circulation in LabVIEW having universal appeal without sacrificing crucial physiologic features. The program we developed employs Windkessel-type impedance models in several open-loop configurations and a closed-loop model coupling a lumped impedance and ventricular pressure source. The open-loop impedance models demonstrate afterload effects on arbitrary aortic pressure/flow inputs. The closed-loop model catalogs the major circulatory waveforms with changes in afterload, preload, and left heart properties. Our model provides an avenue for expanding the use of the ventricular equations through closed-loop coupling that includes a basic coronary circuit. Tested values used for the afterload components and the effects of afterload parameter changes on various waveforms are consistent with published data. We conclude that this model offers the ability to alter several circulatory factors and digitally catalog the most salient features of the pressure/flow waveforms employing a user-friendly platform. These features make the model a useful instructional tool for students as well as a simple experimental tool for cardiovascular research.

  3. Phase-locked loops. [in analog and digital circuits communication system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, S. C.

    1975-01-01

    An attempt to systematically outline the work done in the area of phase-locked loops which are now used in modern communication system design is presented. The analog phase-locked loops are well documented in several books but discrete, analog-digital, and digital phase-locked loop work is scattered. Apart from discussing the various analysis, design, and application aspects of phase-locked loops, a number of references are given in the bibliography.

  4. Closed Loop Software Control of the MIDEX Power System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castell, Karen; Hernandez-Pellerano, Amri; Wismer, Margaret

    1998-01-01

    The Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP) is a follow-on to the Differential Microwave Radiometer (DMR) instrument on the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) spacecraft. The design and analysis of the MAP attitude control system (ACS) have been refined since work previously reported. The full spacecraft and instrument flexible model was developed in NASTRAN, and the resulting flexible modes were plotted and reduced with the Modal Significance Analysis Package (MSAP). The reduced-order model was used to perform the linear stability analysis for each control mode, the results of which are presented in this paper. Although MAP is going to a relatively disturbance-free Lissajous orbit around the Earth-Sun L2 Lagrange point, a detailed disturbance-torque analysis is required because there are only a small number of opportunities for momentum unloading each year. Environmental torques, including solar pressure at L2, and aerodynamic and gravity gradient during phasing-loop orbits, were calculated and simulated. A simple model of fuel slosh was derived to model its effect on the motion of the spacecraft. In addition, a thruster mode linear impulse controller was developed to meet the accuracy requirements of the phasing loop burns. A dynamic attitude error limiter was added to improve the performance of the ACS during large attitude slews. The result of this analysis is a stable ACS subsystem that meets all of the mission's requirements.

  5. Event-Driven Control for Networked Control Systems With Quantization and Markov Packet Losses.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hongjiu; Xu, Yang; Zhang, Jinhui

    2016-05-23

    In this paper, event-driven is used in a networked control system (NCS) which is subjected to the effect of quantization and packet losses. A discrete event-detector is used to monitor specific events in the NCS. Both an arbitrary region quantizer and Markov jump packet losses are also considered for the NCS. Based on zoom strategy and Lyapunov theory, a complete proof is given to guarantee mean square stability of the closed-loop system. Stabilization of the NCS is ensured by designing a feedback controller. Lastly, an inverted pendulum model is given to show the advantages and effectiveness of the proposed results.

  6. Lunar base extension program and closed loop life support systems.

    PubMed

    Nitta, K; Ohya, H

    1991-01-01

    Much of papers describing the Lunar Base Construction have been already published. Lunar Base has been considered to be one of the very useful facilities to conduct the excellent scientific program in near future and also to develop the lunar resources such as 3He and oxygen in order to expand the human activities in space. The scale of lunar base and the construction methods to be adopted should be determined based upon the utilization program to be conducted after the initiation of outpost habitation. In order to construct lunar base, it needs to transport lunar base elements such as habitat modules, experiment modules and so on having 20-30 tons weight and to install, connect and activate on lunar surface. The development of transportation system such as OTV enabling to transport over 30 ton payload weight from earth to moon seems to be very difficult in near future, and it seems reasonable to transport three elements per year as described in many papers already published. Therefore, the initial habitat outpost would not have enough volume to produce foods and has to have ECLS system similar to that of space station already going to be developed. After 2-3 years from the initiation of habitation, the addition of food production facilities could be started to expand the habitability of lunar base and finally the complete closed loop life support system could be installed after spending 6-7 years. This paper describes ECLS technologies to be used in the initial habitat outpost and design philosophy of the closed loop technologies to be utilized in the final stage.

  7. Lunar base extension program and closed loop life support systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitta, Keiji; Ohya, Haruhiko

    Much of papers describing the Lunar Base Construction have been already published. Lunar Base has been considered to be one of the very useful facilities to conduct the excellent scientific program in near future and also to develop the lunar resources such as 3He and oxygen in order to expand the human activities in space. The scale of lunar base and the construction methods to be adopted should be determined based upon the utilization program to be conducted after the initiation of outpost habitation. In order to construct lunar base, it needs to transport lunar base elements such as habitat modules, experiment modules and so on having 20-30 tons weight and to install, connect and activate on lunar surface. The development of transportation system such as OTV enabling to transport over 30 ton payload weight from earth to moon seems to be very difficult in near future, and it seems reasonable to transport three elements per year as described in many papers already published. /1/. Therefore, the initial habitat outpost would not have enough volume to produce foods and has to have ECLS system similar to that of space station already going to be developed. After 2-3 years from the initiation of habitation, the addition of food production facilities could be started to expand the habitability of lunar base and finally the complete closed loop life support system could be installed after spending 6-7 years. This paper describes ECLS technologies to be used in the initial habitat outpost and design philosophy of the closed loop technologies to be utilized in the final stage.

  8. A closed-loop model of the respiratory system: focus on hypercapnia and active expiration.

    PubMed

    Molkov, Yaroslav I; Shevtsova, Natalia A; Park, Choongseok; Ben-Tal, Alona; Smith, Jeffrey C; Rubin, Jonathan E; Rybak, Ilya A

    2014-01-01

    Breathing is a vital process providing the exchange of gases between the lungs and atmosphere. During quiet breathing, pumping air from the lungs is mostly performed by contraction of the diaphragm during inspiration, and muscle contraction during expiration does not play a significant role in ventilation. In contrast, during intense exercise or severe hypercapnia forced or active expiration occurs in which the abdominal "expiratory" muscles become actively involved in breathing. The mechanisms of this transition remain unknown. To study these mechanisms, we developed a computational model of the closed-loop respiratory system that describes the brainstem respiratory network controlling the pulmonary subsystem representing lung biomechanics and gas (O2 and CO2) exchange and transport. The lung subsystem provides two types of feedback to the neural subsystem: a mechanical one from pulmonary stretch receptors and a chemical one from central chemoreceptors. The neural component of the model simulates the respiratory network that includes several interacting respiratory neuron types within the Bötzinger and pre-Bötzinger complexes, as well as the retrotrapezoid nucleus/parafacial respiratory group (RTN/pFRG) representing the central chemoreception module targeted by chemical feedback. The RTN/pFRG compartment contains an independent neural generator that is activated at an increased CO2 level and controls the abdominal motor output. The lung volume is controlled by two pumps, a major one driven by the diaphragm and an additional one activated by abdominal muscles and involved in active expiration. The model represents the first attempt to model the transition from quiet breathing to breathing with active expiration. The model suggests that the closed-loop respiratory control system switches to active expiration via a quantal acceleration of expiratory activity, when increases in breathing rate and phrenic amplitude no longer provide sufficient ventilation. The model

  9. Smart active pilot-in-the-loop systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Segun

    1995-04-01

    Representation of on-orbit microgravity environment in a 1-g environment is a continuing problem in space engineering analysis, procedures development and crew training. A way of adequately depicting weightlessness in the performance of on-orbit tasks is by a realistic (or real-time) computer based representation that provides the look, touch, and feel of on-orbit operation. This paper describes how a facility, the Systems Engineering Simulator at the Johnson Space Center, is utilizing recent advances in computer processing power and multi- processing capability to intelligently represent all systems, sub-systems and environmental elements associated with space flight operations. It first describes the computer hardware and interconnection between processors; the computer software responsible for task scheduling, health monitoring, sub-system and environment representation; control room and crew station. It then describes, the mathematical models that represent the dynamics of contact between the Mir and the Space Shuttle during the upcoming US and Russian Shuttle/Mir space mission. Results are presented comparing the response of the smart, active pilot-in-the-loop system to non-time critical CRAY model. A final example of how these systems are utilized is given in the development that supported the highly successful Hubble Space Telescope repair mission.

  10. Downlink Training Techniques for FDD Massive MIMO Systems: Open-Loop and Closed-Loop Training With Memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Junil; Love, David J.; Bidigare, Patrick

    2014-10-01

    The concept of deploying a large number of antennas at the base station, often called massive multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO), has drawn considerable interest because of its potential ability to revolutionize current wireless communication systems. Most literature on massive MIMO systems assumes time division duplexing (TDD), although frequency division duplexing (FDD) dominates current cellular systems. Due to the large number of transmit antennas at the base station, currently standardized approaches would require a large percentage of the precious downlink and uplink resources in FDD massive MIMO be used for training signal transmissions and channel state information (CSI) feedback. To reduce the overhead of the downlink training phase, we propose practical open-loop and closed-loop training frameworks in this paper. We assume the base station and the user share a common set of training signals in advance. In open-loop training, the base station transmits training signals in a round-robin manner, and the user successively estimates the current channel using long-term channel statistics such as temporal and spatial correlations and previous channel estimates. In closed-loop training, the user feeds back the best training signal to be sent in the future based on channel prediction and the previously received training signals. With a small amount of feedback from the user to the base station, closed-loop training offers better performance in the data communication phase, especially when the signal-to-noise ratio is low, the number of transmit antennas is large, or prior channel estimates are not accurate at the beginning of the communication setup, all of which would be mostly beneficial for massive MIMO systems.

  11. Maximized Gust Loads of a Closed-Loop, Nonlinear Aeroelastic System Using Nonlinear Systems Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silva, Walter A.

    1999-01-01

    The problem of computing the maximized gust load for a nonlinear, closed-loop aeroelastic aircraft is discusses. The Volterra theory of nonlinear systems is applied in order to define a linearized system that provides a bounds on the response of the nonlinear system of interest. The method is applied to a simplified model of an Airbus A310.

  12. Towards the use of Structural Loop Analysis to Study System Behaviour of Socio-Ecological Systems.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abram, Joseph; Dyke, James

    2016-04-01

    Maintaining socio-ecological systems in desirable states is key to developing a growing economy, alleviating poverty and achieving a sustainable future. While the driving forces of an environmental system are often well known, the dynamics impacting these drivers can be hidden within a tangled structure of causal chains and feedback loops. A lack of understanding of a system's dynamic structure and its influence on a system's behaviour can cause unforeseen side-effects during model scenario testing and policy implementation. Structural Loop analysis of socio-ecological system models identifies dominant feedback structures during times of behavioural shift, allowing the user to monitor key influential drivers during model simulation. This work carries out Loop Eigenvalue Elasticity Analysis (LEEA) on three system dynamic models, exploring tipping points in lake systems undergoing eutrophication. The purpose is to explore the potential benefits and limitations of the technique in the field of socio-ecology. The LEEA technique shows promise for socio-ecological systems which undergo regime shifts or express oscillatory trends, but shows limited usefulness with large models. The results of this work highlight changes in feedback loop dominance, years prior to eutrophic tipping events in lake systems. LEEA could be used as an early warning signal to impending system changes, complementary to other known early warning signals. This approach could improve our understanding during critical times of a system's behaviour, changing how we approach model analysis and the way scenario testing and policy implementation are addressed in socio-ecological system models.

  13. Phase-locked loops. [analog, hybrid, discrete and digital systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, S. C.

    1974-01-01

    The basic analysis and design procedures are described for the realization of analog phase-locked loops (APLL), hybrid phase-locked loops (HPLL), discrete phase-locked loops, and digital phase-locked loops (DPLL). Basic configurations are diagrammed, and performance curves are given. A discrete communications model is derived and developed. The use of the APLL as an optimum angle demodulator and the Kalman-Bucy approach to APLL design are discussed. The literature in the area of phase-locked loops is reviewed, and an extensive bibliography is given. Although the design of APLLs is fairly well documented, work on discrete, hybrid, and digital PLLs is scattered, and more will have to be done in the future to pinpoint the formal design of DPLLs.

  14. Bifurcations and Stability of Nondegenerated Homoclinic Loops for Higher Dimensional Systems

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Yinlai; Li, Feng; Xu, Han; Li, Jing; Zhang, Liqun; Ding, Benyan

    2013-01-01

    By using the foundational solutions of the linear variational equation of the unperturbed system along the homoclinic orbit as the local current coordinates system of the system in the small neighborhood of the homoclinic orbit, we discuss the bifurcation problems of nondegenerated homoclinic loops. Under the nonresonant condition, existence, uniqueness, and incoexistence of 1-homoclinic loop and 1-periodic orbit, the inexistence of k-homoclinic loop and k-periodic orbit is obtained. Under the resonant condition, we study the existence of 1-homoclinic loop, 1-periodic orbit, 2-fold 1-periodic orbit, and two 1-periodic orbits; the coexistence of 1-homoclinic loop and 1-periodic orbit. Moreover, we give the corresponding existence fields and bifurcation surfaces. At last, we study the stability of the homoclinic loop for the two cases of non-resonant and resonant, and we obtain the corresponding criterions. PMID:24369487

  15. Bifurcations and stability of nondegenerated homoclinic loops for higher dimensional systems.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yinlai; Li, Feng; Xu, Han; Li, Jing; Zhang, Liqun; Ding, Benyan

    2013-01-01

    By using the foundational solutions of the linear variational equation of the unperturbed system along the homoclinic orbit as the local current coordinates system of the system in the small neighborhood of the homoclinic orbit, we discuss the bifurcation problems of nondegenerated homoclinic loops. Under the nonresonant condition, existence, uniqueness, and incoexistence of 1-homoclinic loop and 1-periodic orbit, the inexistence of k-homoclinic loop and k-periodic orbit is obtained. Under the resonant condition, we study the existence of 1-homoclinic loop, 1-periodic orbit, 2-fold 1-periodic orbit, and two 1-periodic orbits; the coexistence of 1-homoclinic loop and 1-periodic orbit. Moreover, we give the corresponding existence fields and bifurcation surfaces. At last, we study the stability of the homoclinic loop for the two cases of non-resonant and resonant, and we obtain the corresponding criterions.

  16. A closed-loop neurobotic system for fine touch sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bologna, L. L.; Pinoteau, J.; Passot, J.-B.; Garrido, J. A.; Vogel, J.; Ros Vidal, E.; Arleo, A.

    2013-08-01

    Objective. Fine touch sensing relies on peripheral-to-central neurotransmission of somesthetic percepts, as well as on active motion policies shaping tactile exploration. This paper presents a novel neuroengineering framework for robotic applications based on the multistage processing of fine tactile information in the closed action-perception loop. Approach. The integrated system modules focus on (i) neural coding principles of spatiotemporal spiking patterns at the periphery of the somatosensory pathway, (ii) probabilistic decoding mechanisms mediating cortical-like tactile recognition and (iii) decision-making and low-level motor adaptation underlying active touch sensing. We probed the resulting neural architecture through a Braille reading task. Main results. Our results on the peripheral encoding of primary contact features are consistent with experimental data on human slow-adapting type I mechanoreceptors. They also suggest second-order processing by cuneate neurons may resolve perceptual ambiguities, contributing to a fast and highly performing online discrimination of Braille inputs by a downstream probabilistic decoder. The implemented multilevel adaptive control provides robustness to motion inaccuracy, while making the number of finger accelerations covariate with Braille character complexity. The resulting modulation of fingertip kinematics is coherent with that observed in human Braille readers. Significance. This work provides a basis for the design and implementation of modular neuromimetic systems for fine touch discrimination in robotics.

  17. Linear motor drive system for continuous-path closed-loop position control of an object

    DOEpatents

    Barkman, William E.

    1980-01-01

    A precision numerical controlled servo-positioning system is provided for continuous closed-loop position control of a machine slide or platform driven by a linear-induction motor. The system utilizes filtered velocity feedback to provide system stability required to operate with a system gain of 100 inches/minute/0.001 inch of following error. The filtered velocity feedback signal is derived from the position output signals of a laser interferometer utilized to monitor the movement of the slide. Air-bearing slides mounted to a stable support are utilized to minimize friction and small irregularities in the slideway which would tend to introduce positioning errors. A microprocessor is programmed to read command and feedback information and converts this information into the system following error signal. This error signal is summed with the negative filtered velocity feedback signal at the input of a servo amplifier whose output serves as the drive power signal to the linear motor position control coil.

  18. Miniature Loop Heat Pipe (MLHP) Thermal Management System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jentung

    2004-01-01

    The MLHP Thermal Management System consists of a loop heat pipe (LHP) with multiple evaporators and condensers, thermal electrical coolers, and deployable radiators coated with variable emittance coatings (VECs). All components are miniaturized. It retains all the performance characteristics of state-of-the-art LHPs and offers additional advantages to enhance the functionality, versatility, and reliability of the system, including flexible locations of instruments and radiators, a single interface temperature for multiple instruments, cooling the on instruments and warming the off instruments simultaneously, improving. start-up success, maintaining a constant LHP operating temperature over a wide range of instrument powers, effecting automatic thermal switching and thermal diode actions, and reducing supplemental heater powers. It can fully achieve low mass, low power and compactness necessary for future small spacecraft. Potential applications of the MLHP thermal technology for future missions include: 1) Magnetospheric Constellation; 2) Solar Sentinels; 3) Mars Science Laboratory; 4) Mars Scouts; 5) Mars Telecom Orbiter; 6) Space Interferometry Mission; 7) Laser Interferometer Space Antenna; 8) Jupiter Icy Moon Orbiter; 9) Terrestrial Planet Finder; 10) Single Aperture Far-Infrared Observatory, and 11) Exploration Missions. The MLHP Thermal Management System combines the operating features of a variable conductance heat pipe, a thermal switch, a thermal diode, and a state-of-the-art LHP into a single integrated thermal system. It offers many advantages over conventional thermal control techniques, and can be a technology enabler for future space missions. Successful flight validation will bring the benefits of MLHP technology to the small satellite arena and will have cross-cutting applications to both Space Science and Earth Science Enterprises.

  19. Teleparallel loop quantum cosmology in a system of intersecting branes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sepehri, Alireza; Pradhan, Anirudh; Beesham, Aroonkumar; de Haro, Jaume

    2016-09-01

    Recently, some authors have removed the big bang singularity in teleparallel Loop Quantum Cosmology (LQC) and have shown that the universe may undergo a number of oscillations. We investigate the origin of this type of teleparallel theory in a system of intersecting branes in M-theory in which the angle between them changes with time. This system is constructed by two intersecting anti-D8-branes, one compacted D4-brane and a D3-brane. These branes are built by joining M0-branes which develop in decaying fundamental strings. The compacted D4-brane is located between two intersecting anti-D8 branes and glues to one of them. Our universe is located on the D3 brane which wraps around the D4 brane from one end and sticks to one of the anti-D8 branes from the other one. In this system, there are three types of fields, corresponding to compacted D4 branes, intersecting branes and D3-branes. These fields interact with each other and make the angle between branes oscillate. By decreasing this angle, the intersecting anti-D8 branes approach each other, the D4 brane rolls, the D3 brane wraps around the D4 brane, and the universe contracts. By separating the intersecting branes and increasing the angle, the D4 brane rolls in the opposite direction, the D3 brane separates from it and the expansion branch begins. Also, the interaction between branes in this system gives us the exact form of the relevant Lagrangian for teleparallel LQC.

  20. Molten Salt Test Loop (MSTL) system customer interface document.

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, David Dennis; Kolb, William J.; Briggs, Ronald D.

    2013-09-01

    The National Solar Thermal Test Facility at Sandia National Laboratories has a unique test capability called the Molten Salt Test Loop (MSTL) system. MSTL is a test capability that allows customers and researchers to test components in flowing, molten nitrate salt. The components tested can range from materials samples, to individual components such as flex hoses, ball joints, and valves, up to full solar collecting systems such as central receiver panels, parabolic troughs, or linear Fresnel systems. MSTL provides realistic conditions similar to a portion of a concentrating solar power facility. The facility currently uses 60/40 nitrate %E2%80%9Csolar salt%E2%80%9D and can circulate the salt at pressure up to 40 bar (600psi), temperature to 585%C2%B0C, and flow rate of 44-50kg/s(400-600GPM) depending on temperature. The purpose of this document is to provide a basis for customers to evaluate the applicability to their testing needs, and to provide an outline of expectations for conducting testing on MSTL. The document can serve as the basis for testing agreements including Work for Others (WFO) and Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADA). While this document provides the basis for these agreements and describes some of the requirements for testing using MSTL and on the site at Sandia, the document is not sufficient by itself as a test agreement. The document, however, does provide customers with a uniform set of information to begin the test planning process.

  1. Simulation of open-loop plasma vertical movement response in the Damavand tokamak using closed-loop subspace system identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darestani Farahani, N.; Abbasi Davani, F.

    2016-02-01

    The formulation of a multi-input single-output closed-loop subspace method for system identification has been employed for the purpose of obtaining control-relevant model of the open loop response for plasma vertical movement in the Damavand tokamak. Such a model is particularly well suited for the robust controller design. The method described in this paper is a kind of worst-case identification technique, aiming to minimize the error between the identified model and the true plant. The accuracy of the estimation of the plant dynamics has been tested by different experiments. The fitness of the identified model around the defined operating point has been more than 90%, and compared to the physical-based model, it has better root mean squared error (RMSE) measure of the goodness of fitting.

  2. Traveling pulse on a periodic background in parametrically driven systems.

    PubMed

    León, Alejandro O; Clerc, Marcel G; Coulibaly, Saliya

    2015-05-01

    Macroscopic systems with dissipation and time-modulated injection of energy, parametrically driven systems, can self-organize into localized states and/or patterns. We investigate a pulse that travels over a one-dimensional pattern in parametrically driven systems. Based on a minimal prototype model, we show that the pulses emerge through a subcritical Andronov-Hopf bifurcation of the underlying pattern. We describe a simple physical system, a magnetic wire forced with a transverse oscillatory magnetic field, which displays these traveling pulses.

  3. Code regenerative clean-up loop transponder for a mu-type ranging system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurd, W. J. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A loop transponder for regenerating the code of a mu type ranging system is disclosed. It includes a phase locked loop, a code generator, and a loop detector. The function of the phase locked loop is to provide phase lock between a received component wk of the range signal and a replica rafter wk of the received component, provided by the code generator. The code generator also provides a replica of the next component rafter w(w+1). The loop detector responds to wk rafler wk and rafter w(k+1) to determine when the next component w(k+1) is received and controls the code generator to supply w(k+1) to the phase locked loop and to generate a replica rafter w(k+2) of the next component.

  4. Quantifying a Systems Map: Network Analysis of a Childhood Obesity Causal Loop Diagram

    PubMed Central

    Johnstone, Michael; Creighton, Doug; de la Haye, Kayla; Allender, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Causal loop diagrams developed by groups capture a shared understanding of complex problems and provide a visual tool to guide interventions. This paper explores the application of network analytic methods as a new way to gain quantitative insight into the structure of an obesity causal loop diagram to inform intervention design. Identification of the structural features of causal loop diagrams is likely to provide new insights into the emergent properties of complex systems and analysing central drivers has the potential to identify leverage points. The results found the structure of the obesity causal loop diagram to resemble commonly observed empirical networks known for efficient spread of information. Known drivers of obesity were found to be the most central variables along with others unique to obesity prevention in the community. While causal loop diagrams are often specific to single communities, the analytic methods provide means to contrast and compare multiple causal loop diagrams for complex problems. PMID:27788224

  5. Stochastic Optimal Regulation of Nonlinear Networked Control Systems by Using Event-Driven Adaptive Dynamic Programming.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Avimanyu; Jagannathan, Sarangapani

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, an event-driven stochastic adaptive dynamic programming (ADP)-based technique is introduced for nonlinear systems with a communication network within its feedback loop. A near optimal control policy is designed using an actor-critic framework and ADP with event sampled state vector. First, the system dynamics are approximated by using a novel neural network (NN) identifier with event sampled state vector. The optimal control policy is generated via an actor NN by using the NN identifier and value function approximated by a critic NN through ADP. The stochastic NN identifier, actor, and critic NN weights are tuned at the event sampled instants leading to aperiodic weight tuning laws. Above all, an adaptive event sampling condition based on estimated NN weights is designed by using the Lyapunov technique to ensure ultimate boundedness of all the closed-loop signals along with the approximation accuracy. The net result is event-driven stochastic ADP technique that can significantly reduce the computation and network transmissions. Finally, the analytical design is substantiated with simulation results.

  6. A Novel Controller for Model with Combined LFC and AVR Loops of Single Area Power System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Monika; Srivastava, Smriti; Gupta, J. R. P.

    2016-03-01

    In this study, a novel controller is designed to study low frequency oscillations for load frequency control (LFC) and voltage control of a single area power system. For more accuracy in dynamic and steady state responses, mutual effects between LFC and automatic voltage regulation (AVR) loops are investigated in a combined simulink model of LFC and AVR loops. The effectiveness of the proposed controller is first simulated on model with LFC loop alone. The proposed controller is a hybrid of neural network and fast traversal filters. The proposed hybrid controller requires less number of samples for training of weights, thus making the system fast. To study the coupling effects of AVR and LFC loops, dynamic performance of a complete system model for low frequency oscillation studies comprising of mechanical and electrical loops is done with the proposed controller.

  7. A Moral Experience Feedback Loop: Modeling a System of Moral Self-Cultivation in Everyday Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherblom, Stephen A.

    2015-01-01

    This "systems thinking" model illustrates a common feedback loop by which people engage the moral world and continually reshape their moral sensibility. The model highlights seven processes that collectively form this feedback loop: beginning with (1) one's current moral sensibility which shapes processes of (2) perception, (3)…

  8. Data-driven optimization of dynamic reconfigurable systems of systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, Conrad S.; Eddy, John P.

    2010-11-01

    This report documents the results of a Strategic Partnership (aka University Collaboration) LDRD program between Sandia National Laboratories and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champagne. The project is titled 'Data-Driven Optimization of Dynamic Reconfigurable Systems of Systems' and was conducted during FY 2009 and FY 2010. The purpose of this study was to determine and implement ways to incorporate real-time data mining and information discovery into existing Systems of Systems (SoS) modeling capabilities. Current SoS modeling is typically conducted in an iterative manner in which replications are carried out in order to quantify variation in the simulation results. The expense of many replications for large simulations, especially when considering the need for optimization, sensitivity analysis, and uncertainty quantification, can be prohibitive. In addition, extracting useful information from the resulting large datasets is a challenging task. This work demonstrates methods of identifying trends and other forms of information in datasets that can be used on a wide range of applications such as quantifying the strength of various inputs on outputs, identifying the sources of variation in the simulation, and potentially steering an optimization process for improved efficiency.

  9. Entropic contributions in Langevin equations for anisotropic driven systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de los Santos, Francisco; Garrido, Pedro L.; Muñoz, Miguel A.

    2001-07-01

    We report on analytical results for a series of anisotropic driven systems in the context of a recently proposed Langevin equation approach. In a recent paper (P.L. Garrido et al., Phys. Rev. E 61 (2000) R4683) we have pointed out that entropic contributions, over-looked in previous works, are crucial in order to obtain suitable Langevin descriptions of driven lattice gases. Here, we present a more detailed derivation and justification of the entropic term for the standard driven lattice gas, and also we extend the improved approach to other anisotropic driven systems, namely: (i) the randomly driven lattice gas, (ii) the two-temperature model and, (iii) the bi-layer lattice gas. It is shown that the two-temperature model and the lattice gas driven either by a random field or by an uniform infinite one are members of the same universality class. When the drive is uniform and finite the ‘standard’ theory is recovered. A Langevin equation describing the phenomenology of the bi-layer lattice gas is also presented.

  10. Heating and dynamics of two flare loop systems observed by AIA and EIS

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y.; Ding, M. D.; Qiu, J.

    2014-02-01

    We investigate heating and evolution of flare loops in a C4.7 two-ribbon flare on 2011 February 13. From Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) imaging observations, we can identify two sets of loops. Hinode/EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) spectroscopic observations reveal blueshifts at the feet of both sets of loops. The evolution and dynamics of the two sets are quite different. The first set of loops exhibits blueshifts for about 25 minutes followed by redshifts, while the second set shows stronger blueshifts, which are maintained for about one hour. The UV 1600 observation by AIA also shows that the feet of the second set of loops brighten twice. These suggest that continuous heating may be present in the second set of loops. We use spatially resolved UV light curves to infer heating rates in the few tens of individual loops comprising the two loop systems. With these heating rates, we then compute plasma evolution in these loops with the 'enthalpy-based thermal evolution of loops' model. The results show that, for the first set of loops, the synthetic EUV light curves from the model compare favorably with the observed light curves in six AIA channels and eight EIS spectral lines, and the computed mean enthalpy flow velocities also agree with the Doppler shift measurements by EIS. For the second set of loops modeled with twice-heating, there are some discrepancies between modeled and observed EUV light curves in low-temperature bands, and the model does not fully produce the prolonged blueshift signatures as observed. We discuss possible causes for the discrepancies.

  11. Closed-Loop Control of Chemical Injection Rate for a Direct Nozzle Injection System.

    PubMed

    Cai, Xiang; Walgenbach, Martin; Doerpmond, Malte; Schulze Lammers, Peter; Sun, Yurui

    2016-01-20

    To realize site-specific and variable-rate application of agricultural pesticides, accurately metering and controlling the chemical injection rate is necessary. This study presents a prototype of a direct nozzle injection system (DNIS) by which chemical concentration transport lag was greatly reduced. In this system, a rapid-reacting solenoid valve (RRV) was utilized for injecting chemicals, driven by a pulse-width modulation (PWM) signal at 100 Hz, so with varying pulse width the chemical injection rate could be adjusted. Meanwhile, a closed-loop control strategy, proportional-integral-derivative (PID) method, was applied for metering and stabilizing the chemical injection rate. In order to measure chemical flow rates and input them into the controller as a feedback in real-time, a thermodynamic flowmeter that was independent of chemical viscosity was used. Laboratory tests were conducted to assess the performance of DNIS and PID control strategy. Due to the nonlinear input-output characteristics of the RRV, a two-phase PID control process obtained better effects as compared with single PID control strategy. Test results also indicated that the set-point chemical flow rate could be achieved within less than 4 s, and the output stability was improved compared to the case without control strategy.

  12. Closed-Loop Control of Chemical Injection Rate for a Direct Nozzle Injection System

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Xiang; Walgenbach, Martin; Doerpmond, Malte; Schulze Lammers, Peter; Sun, Yurui

    2016-01-01

    To realize site-specific and variable-rate application of agricultural pesticides, accurately metering and controlling the chemical injection rate is necessary. This study presents a prototype of a direct nozzle injection system (DNIS) by which chemical concentration transport lag was greatly reduced. In this system, a rapid-reacting solenoid valve (RRV) was utilized for injecting chemicals, driven by a pulse-width modulation (PWM) signal at 100 Hz, so with varying pulse width the chemical injection rate could be adjusted. Meanwhile, a closed-loop control strategy, proportional-integral-derivative (PID) method, was applied for metering and stabilizing the chemical injection rate. In order to measure chemical flow rates and input them into the controller as a feedback in real-time, a thermodynamic flowmeter that was independent of chemical viscosity was used. Laboratory tests were conducted to assess the performance of DNIS and PID control strategy. Due to the nonlinear input–output characteristics of the RRV, a two-phase PID control process obtained better effects as compared with single PID control strategy. Test results also indicated that the set-point chemical flow rate could be achieved within less than 4 s, and the output stability was improved compared to the case without control strategy. PMID:26805833

  13. Attrition Rate of Oxygen Carriers in Chemical Looping Combustion Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feilen, Harry Martin

    This project developed an evaluation methodology for determining, accurately and rapidly, the attrition resistance of oxygen carrier materials used in chemical looping technologies. Existing test protocols, to evaluate attrition resistance of granular materials, are conducted under non-reactive and ambient temperature conditions. They do not accurately reflect the actual behavior under the unique process conditions of chemical looping, including high temperatures and cyclic operation between oxidizing and reducing atmospheres. This project developed a test method and equipment that represented a significant improvement over existing protocols. Experimental results obtained from this project have shown that hematite exhibits different modes of attrition, including both due to mechanical stresses and due to structural changes in the particles due to chemical reaction at high temperature. The test methodology has also proven effective in providing reactivity changes of the material with continued use, a property, which in addition to attrition, determines material life. Consumption/replacement cost due to attrition or loss of reactivity is a critical factor in the economic application of the chemical looping technology. This test method will allow rapid evaluation of a wide range of materials that are best suited for this technology. The most important anticipated public benefit of this project is the acceleration of the development of chemical looping technology for lowering greenhouse gas emissions from fossil fuel combustion.

  14. Bidirectional neural interface: Closed-loop feedback control for hybrid neural systems.

    PubMed

    Chou, Zane; Lim, Jeffrey; Brown, Sophie; Keller, Melissa; Bugbee, Joseph; Broccard, Frédéric D; Khraiche, Massoud L; Silva, Gabriel A; Cauwenberghs, Gert

    2015-01-01

    Closed-loop neural prostheses enable bidirectional communication between the biological and artificial components of a hybrid system. However, a major challenge in this field is the limited understanding of how these components, the two separate neural networks, interact with each other. In this paper, we propose an in vitro model of a closed-loop system that allows for easy experimental testing and modification of both biological and artificial network parameters. The interface closes the system loop in real time by stimulating each network based on recorded activity of the other network, within preset parameters. As a proof of concept we demonstrate that the bidirectional interface is able to establish and control network properties, such as synchrony, in a hybrid system of two neural networks more significantly more effectively than the same system without the interface or with unidirectional alternatives. This success holds promise for the application of closed-loop systems in neural prostheses, brain-machine interfaces, and drug testing.

  15. Implementing Audio Digital Feedback Loop Using the National Instruments RIO System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, G.; Byrd, J. M.

    2006-11-01

    Development of system for high precision RF distribution and laser synchronization at Berkeley Lab has been ongoing for several years. Successful operation of these systems requires multiple audio bandwidth feedback loops running at relatively high gains. Stable operation of the feedback loops requires careful design of the feedback transfer function. To allow for flexible and compact implementation, we have developed digital feedback loops on the National Instruments Reconfigurable Input/Output (RIO) platform. This platform uses an FPGA and multiple I/Os that can provide eight parallel channels running different filters. We present the design and preliminary experimental results of this system.

  16. Phase locked loop synchronization for direct detection optical PPM communication systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. C.; Gardner, C. S.

    1985-01-01

    Receiver timing synchronization of an optical pulse position modulation (PPM) communication system can be achieved using a phase locked loop (PLL) if the photodetector output is properly processed. The synchronization performance is shown to improve with increasing signal power and decreasing loop bandwidth. Bit error rate (BER) of the PLL synchronized PPM system is analyzed and compared to that for the perfectly synchronized system. It is shown that the increase in signal power needed to compensate for the imperfect synchronization is small (less than 0.1 dB) for loop bandwidths less than 0.1% of the slot frequency.

  17. Spin-orbit interaction driven collective electron-hole excitations in a noncentrosymmetric nodal loop Weyl semimetal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Kyo-Hoon; Lee, Kwan-Woo; Pickett, Warren E.

    2015-09-01

    NbP is one member of a new class of nodal loop semimetals characterized by the cooperative effects of spin-orbit coupling (SOC) and a lack of inversion center. Here transport and spectroscopic properties of NbP are evaluated using density functional theory methods. SOC together with the lack of inversion symmetry splits degeneracies, giving rise to "Russian doll nested" Fermi surfaces containing 4 ×10-4 electron (hole) carriers/f.u. Due to the modest SOC strength in Nb, the Fermi surfaces map out the Weyl nodal loops. Calculated structure around T*≈100 K in transport properties reproduces well the observed transport behavior only when SOC is included, attesting to the precision of the (delicate) calculations and the stoichiometry of the samples. Low-energy collective electron-hole excitations (plasmons) in the 20-60 meV range result from the nodal loop splitting.

  18. Portable database driven control system for SPEAR

    SciTech Connect

    Howry, S.; Gromme, T.; King, A.; Sullenberger, M.

    1985-04-01

    The new computer control system software for SPEAR is presented as a transfer from the PEP system. Features of the target ring (SPEAR) such as symmetries, magnet groupings, etc., are all contained in a design file which is read by both people and computer. People use it as documentation; a program reads it to generate the database structure, which becomes the center of communication for all the software. Geometric information, such as element positions and lengths, and CAMAC I/O routing information is entered into the database as it is developed. Since application processes refer only to the database and since they do so only in generic terms, almost all of this software (representing more then fifteen man years) is transferred with few changes. Operator console menus (touchpanels) are also transferred with only superficial changes for the same reasons. The system is modular: the CAMAC I/O software is all in one process; the menu control software is a process; the ring optics model and the orbit model are separate processes, each of which runs concurrently with about 15 others in the multiprogramming environment of the VAX/VMS operating system. 10 refs., 1 fig.

  19. HERCULES: A Pattern Driven Code Transformation System

    SciTech Connect

    Kartsaklis, Christos; Hernandez, Oscar R; Hsu, Chung-Hsing; Ilsche, Thomas; Joubert, Wayne; Graham, Richard L

    2012-01-01

    New parallel computers are emerging, but developing efficient scientific code for them remains difficult. A scientist must manage not only the science-domain complexity but also the performance-optimization complexity. HERCULES is a code transformation system designed to help the scientist to separate the two concerns, which improves code maintenance, and facilitates performance optimization. The system combines three technologies, code patterns, transformation scripts and compiler plugins, to provide the scientist with an environment to quickly implement code transformations that suit his needs. Unlike existing code optimization tools, HERCULES is unique in its focus on user-level accessibility. In this paper we discuss the design, implementation and an initial evaluation of HERCULES.

  20. Spontaneous rotation in a driven mechanical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, T. J.

    2016-06-01

    We show that a mass free to circulate around a shaken pivot point exhibits resonance-like effects and large amplitude dynamics even though there is no natural frequency in the system, simply through driving under geometrical constraint. We find that synchronization between force and mass occurs over a wide range of forcing amplitudes and frequencies, even when the forcing axis is dynamically, and randomly, changed. Above a critical driving amplitude the mass will spontaneously rotate, with a fractal boundary dividing clockwise and anti-clockwise rotations. We show that this has significant implications for energy harvesting, with large output power over a wide frequency range. We examine also the effect of driving symmetry on the resultant dynamics, and show that if the shaking is circular the motion becomes constrained, whereas for anharmonic rectilinear shaking the dynamics may become chaotic, with the system mimicking that of the kicked rotor.

  1. Onsager Coefficients in Periodically Driven Systems.

    PubMed

    Proesmans, Karel; Van den Broeck, Christian

    2015-08-28

    We evaluate the Onsager matrix for a system under time-periodic driving by considering all its Fourier components. By application of the second law, we prove that all the fluxes converge to zero in the limit of zero dissipation. Reversible efficiency can never be reached at finite power. The implication for an Onsager matrix, describing reduced fluxes, is that its determinant has to vanish. In the particular case of only two fluxes, the corresponding Onsager matrix becomes symmetric.

  2. Application-driven design of auralization systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Begault, Durand R.

    2004-05-01

    Acoustical environmental simulation (auralization) involves rendering a binaural signal that articulates simultaneously the positional information of a sound source and the source's acoustic and vibratory interaction with its environmental context. This places significant challenges on both the modeling and rendering components of such a system. Overcoming real-time limitations of processors can be accomplished by implementing rendering limits based on auditory threshold data for both early reflections and late reverberant energy. However, final assessment of system quality is dependent on the specific task or goal of the simulation. The use of auralization in accomplishing a telerobotic task requires head tracking and low latency, while environmental cues such as obstacles with acoustic reflections can be simplified and exaggerated beyond veridical representation. Contrasting this is the task of assessing speech intelligibility of an emergency public address system, or the quality of a space for musical performance, requiring a more accurate level of simulation of acoustical materials and sound-source characteristics. Modeling accuracy is complicated by such factors as the level of variance in the absorptive and diffusive properties of materials in terms of their real-world application. Assessment of auralization quality must therefore involve a best estimate of significant factors for a particular application.

  3. Lambertson magnet with shortened loop for nuclotron injection and extraction systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfeev, A. V.; Butenko, A. V.; Volkov, V. I.; Vorozhtsov, S. B.; Goncharov, I. N.; Donets, D. E.; Kozlov, O. S.; Mikhailov, V. A.; Monchinsky, V. A.; Novikov, S. A.; Sidorin, A. O.; Smirnov, A. V.; Smirnov, V. L.; Romanov, S. V.

    2016-12-01

    Systems of beam injection from the Booster and fast beam extraction for injection into the collider will be developed in order for the Nuclotron to operate in the framework of the NICA accelerator complex. All systems are based on the Lambertson magnets. The shortened superconducting loop is used for compensating scattered fields in the circulating beam chamber. The finite weld resistance (on an order of several nΩ) results in gradual current storage in the loop, which influences the beam upon injection. To eliminate this effect, a heater for converting the loop into the normal conducting state in the pause between cycles is applied.

  4. A Triple-Loop Inductive Power Transmission System for Biomedical Applications.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byunghun; Kiani, Mehdi; Ghovanloo, Maysam

    2016-02-01

    A triple-loop wireless power transmission (WPT) system equipped with closed-loop global power control, adaptive transmitter (Tx) resonance compensation (TRC), and automatic receiver (Rx) resonance tuning (ART) is presented. This system not only opposes coupling and load variations but also compensates for changes in the environment surrounding the inductive link to enhance power transfer efficiency (PTE) in applications such as implantable medical devices (IMDs). The Tx was built around a commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) radio-frequency identification (RFID) reader, operating at 13.56 MHz. A local Tx loop finds the optimal capacitance in parallel with the Tx coil by adjusting a varactor. A global power control loop maintains the received power at a desired level in the presence of changes in coupling distance, coil misalignments, and loading. Moreover, a local Rx loop is implemented inside a power management integrated circuit (PMIC) to avoid PTE degradation due to the Rx coil surrounding environment and process variations. The PMIC was fabricated in a 0.35- μm 4M2P standard CMOS process with 2.54 mm(2) active area. Measurement results show that the proposed triple-loop system improves the overall PTE by up to 10.5% and 4.7% compared to a similar open- and single closed-loop system, respectively, at nominal coil distance of 2 cm. The added TRC and ART loops contribute 2.3% and 1.4% to the overall PTE of 13.5%, respectively. This is the first WPT system to include three loops to dynamically compensate for environment and circuit variations and improve the overall power efficiency all the way from the driver output in Tx to the load in Rx.

  5. Waste heat driven absorption refrigeration process and system

    DOEpatents

    Wilkinson, William H.

    1982-01-01

    Absorption cycle refrigeration processes and systems are provided which are driven by the sensible waste heat available from industrial processes and other sources. Systems are disclosed which provide a chilled water output which can be used for comfort conditioning or the like which utilize heat from sensible waste heat sources at temperatures of less than 170.degree. F. Countercurrent flow equipment is also provided to increase the efficiency of the systems and increase the utilization of available heat.

  6. Design of biomass management systems and components for closed loop life support systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The goal of the EGM 4000/1 Design class was to investigate a Biomass Management System (BMS) and design, fabricate, and test components for biomass management in a closed-loop life support system (CLLSS). The designs explored were to contribute to the development of NASA's Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) at Kennedy Space Center. Designs included a sectored plant growth unit, a container and transfer mechanism, and an air curtain system for fugitive particle control. The work performed by the class members is summarized.

  7. Loran digital phase-locked loop and RF front-end system error analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccall, D. L.

    1979-01-01

    An analysis of the system performance of the digital phase locked loops (DPLL) and RF front end that are implemented in the MINI-L4 Loran receiver is presented. Three of the four experiments deal with the performance of the digital phase locked loops. The other experiment deals with the RF front end and DPLL system error which arise in the front end due to poor signal to noise ratios. The ability of the DPLLs to track the offsets is studied.

  8. Human-in-the-loop Control of Multi-agent Aerial Systems Under Intermittent Communication

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-08

    standard Kinect sensor. Through interpretation of human poses and motion, we are able to map the human moves into manipulator pose control inputs. This...AFRL-AFOSR-UK-TR-2015-0031 Human -in-the-loop Control of Multi-agent Aerial Systems Under Intermittent Communication Stjepan...Report 3. DATES COVERED (From – To) 27 March 2013 – 31 March 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Human -in-the-loop Control of Multi-agent Aerial Systems

  9. Development and Implementation of a Design Metric for Systems Containing Long-Term Fluid Loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steele, John W.

    2016-01-01

    John Steele, a chemist and technical fellow from United Technologies Corporation, provided a water quality module to assist engineers and scientists with a metric tool to evaluate risks associated with the design of space systems with fluid loops. This design metric is a methodical, quantitative, lessons-learned based means to evaluate the robustness of a long-term fluid loop system design. The tool was developed by a cross-section of engineering disciplines who had decades of experience and problem resolution.

  10. Butterfly Floquet Spectrum in Driven SU(2) Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Jiao; Gong Jiangbin

    2009-06-19

    The Floquet spectrum of a class of driven SU(2) systems is shown to display a butterfly pattern with multifractal properties. The level crossing between Floquet states of the same parity or different parities is studied. The results are relevant to studies of fractal statistics, quantum chaos, coherent destruction of tunneling, and the validity of mean-field descriptions of Bose-Einstein condensates.

  11. Experimental investigation of an explosive-driven pulse power system

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, T.J.; Hanson, D.L.; Cnare, E.C.

    1983-01-01

    The results obtained in the test of a pulse-power system composed of an explosively driven compressed magnetic-field current generator driving an explosive opening switch and a 20 nH inductive load are presented. It is shown that microsecond risetime, multimegampere current pulses can be produced by this technique.

  12. Identifying Data-Driven Instructional Systems. Research to Practice Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawrence, K. S.

    2016-01-01

    The study summarized in this research to practice brief, "Creating data-driven instructional systems in school: The new instructional leadership," Halverson, R., Grigg, J., Pritchett, R., & Thomas, C. (2015), "Journal of School Leadership," 25. 447-481, investigated whether student outcome improvements were linked to the…

  13. Precision medicine driven by cancer systems biology.

    PubMed

    Filipp, Fabian V

    2017-03-07

    Molecular insights from genome and systems biology are influencing how cancer is diagnosed and treated. We critically evaluate big data challenges in precision medicine. The melanoma research community has identified distinct subtypes involving chronic sun-induced damage and the mitogen-activated protein kinase driver pathway. In addition, despite low mutation burden, non-genomic mitogen-activated protein kinase melanoma drivers are found in membrane receptors, metabolism, or epigenetic signaling with the ability to bypass central mitogen-activated protein kinase molecules and activating a similar program of mitogenic effectors. Mutation hotspots, structural modeling, UV signature, and genomic as well as non-genomic mechanisms of disease initiation and progression are taken into consideration to identify resistance mutations and novel drug targets. A comprehensive precision medicine profile of a malignant melanoma patient illustrates future rational drug targeting strategies. Network analysis emphasizes an important role of epigenetic and metabolic master regulators in oncogenesis. Co-occurrence of driver mutations in signaling, metabolic, and epigenetic factors highlights how cumulative alterations of our genomes and epigenomes progressively lead to uncontrolled cell proliferation. Precision insights have the ability to identify independent molecular pathways suitable for drug targeting. Synergistic treatment combinations of orthogonal modalities including immunotherapy, mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitors, epigenetic inhibitors, and metabolic inhibitors have the potential to overcome immune evasion, side effects, and drug resistance.

  14. Developing an EEG-based on-line closed-loop lapse detection and mitigation system

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu-Te; Huang, Kuan-Chih; Wei, Chun-Shu; Huang, Teng-Yi; Ko, Li-Wei; Lin, Chin-Teng; Cheng, Chung-Kuan; Jung, Tzyy-Ping

    2014-01-01

    In America, 60% of adults reported that they have driven a motor vehicle while feeling drowsy, and at least 15–20% of fatal car accidents are fatigue-related. This study translates previous laboratory-oriented neurophysiological research to design, develop, and test an On-line Closed-loop Lapse Detection and Mitigation (OCLDM) System featuring a mobile wireless dry-sensor EEG headgear and a cell-phone based real-time EEG processing platform. Eleven subjects participated in an event-related lane-keeping task, in which they were instructed to manipulate a randomly deviated, fixed-speed cruising car on a 4-lane highway. This was simulated in a 1st person view with an 8-screen and 8-projector immersive virtual-reality environment. When the subjects experienced lapses or failed to respond to events during the experiment, auditory warning was delivered to rectify the performance decrements. However, the arousing auditory signals were not always effective. The EEG spectra exhibited statistically significant differences between effective and ineffective arousing signals, suggesting that EEG spectra could be used as a countermeasure of the efficacy of arousing signals. In this on-line pilot study, the proposed OCLDM System was able to continuously detect EEG signatures of fatigue, deliver arousing warning to subjects suffering momentary cognitive lapses, and assess the efficacy of the warning in near real-time to rectify cognitive lapses. The on-line testing results of the OCLDM System validated the efficacy of the arousing signals in improving subjects' response times to the subsequent lane-departure events. This study may lead to a practical on-line lapse detection and mitigation system in real-world environments. PMID:25352773

  15. Deep sounding TEM investigation method based on a modified fixed central-loop system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Guo-qiang; Bai, Chao-ying; Yan, Shu; Greenhalgh, Stewart; Li, Mei-fang; Zhou, Nan-nan

    2012-01-01

    The central-loop TEM technology has been widely used in mineral exploration, engineering and environmental investigations and assorted geologic studies. For easy and efficient working conditions, a square (or rectangular) loop is generally employed instead of a circular one. Any position within the inner one ninth of the central part of the loop is often designated as the central survey location (within which the field is assumed to be uniform), and referred to as a modified central-loop configuration. However, the deduced field parameters at such non-central positions when calculated by a central-loop formula result in decreased accuracy and possibly erroneous interpretation. A large-fixed loop offers the advantage of being able to determine the induced potential at any point inside or outside the loop. In this study we provide the formula for the large-fixed loop and receiver positions within the modified central-loop system and solve the problem. Specifically, we compute the electromagnetic response of any field point by using an electric dipole integration method. The full time-domain apparent resistivity values are then extracted by using an iterative method. Both theoretical modeling and real data examples indicate that such a configuration not only improves the accuracy for the TEM survey, but also enlarges the exploration depth, due to a large loop used in the deployment. The method is used for locating the water enriched areas in coal mines in Yangquan region of Shanxi province and in Bin County of Shaanxi province, China. The interpreted results are tested by later drilling, which confirmed our combined method to be a reliable and efficient method for deep sounding.

  16. Measuring the magnetic field of a trans-equatorial loop system using coronal seismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, David; Perez-Suarez, David; Valori, Gherardo

    2016-05-01

    First observed by SOHO/EIT, "EIT waves" are strongly associated with the initial evolution of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and after almost 20 years of investigation a consensus is being reached which interprets them as freely-propagating waves produced by the rapid expansion of a CME in the low corona. An "EIT wave" was observed on 6 July 2012 to erupt from active region AR11514 into a particularly structured corona that included multiple adjacent active regions as well as an adjacent trans-equatorial loop system anchored at the boundary of a nearby coronal hole. The eruption was well observed by SDO/AIA and CoMP, allowing the effects of the "EIT wave" on the trans-equatorial loop system to be studied in detail. In particular, it was possible to characterise the oscillation of the loop system using Doppler velocity measurements from CoMP. These Doppler measurements were used to estimate the magnetic field strength of the trans-equatorial loop system via coronal seismology. It was then possible to compare these inferred magnetic field values with extrapolated magnetic field values derived using a Potential Field Source Surface extrapolation as well as the direct measurements of magnetic field provided by CoMP. These results show that the magnetic field strength of loop systems in the solar corona may be estimated using loop seismology.

  17. Many-body energy localization transition in periodically driven systems

    SciTech Connect

    D’Alessio, Luca; Polkovnikov, Anatoli

    2013-06-15

    According to the second law of thermodynamics the total entropy of a system is increased during almost any dynamical process. The positivity of the specific heat implies that the entropy increase is associated with heating. This is generally true both at the single particle level, like in the Fermi acceleration mechanism of charged particles reflected by magnetic mirrors, and for complex systems in everyday devices. Notable exceptions are known in noninteracting systems of particles moving in periodic potentials. Here the phenomenon of dynamical localization can prevent heating beyond certain threshold. The dynamical localization is known to occur both at classical (Fermi–Ulam model) and at quantum levels (kicked rotor). However, it was believed that driven ergodic systems will always heat without bound. Here, on the contrary, we report strong evidence of dynamical localization transition in both classical and quantum periodically driven ergodic systems in the thermodynamic limit. This phenomenon is reminiscent of many-body localization in energy space. -- Highlights: •A dynamical localization transition in periodically driven ergodic systems is found. •This phenomenon is reminiscent of many-body localization in energy space. •Our results are valid for classical and quantum systems in the thermodynamic limit. •At critical frequency, the short time expansion for the evolution operator breaks down. •The transition is associated to a divergent time scale.

  18. Optimal pipe size design for looped irrigation water supply system using harmony search: Saemangeum project area.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Do Guen; Lee, Ho Min; Sadollah, Ali; Kim, Joong Hoon

    2015-01-01

    Water supply systems are mainly classified into branched and looped network systems. The main difference between these two systems is that, in a branched network system, the flow within each pipe is a known value, whereas in a looped network system, the flow in each pipe is considered an unknown value. Therefore, an analysis of a looped network system is a more complex task. This study aims to develop a technique for estimating the optimal pipe diameter for a looped agricultural irrigation water supply system using a harmony search algorithm, which is an optimization technique. This study mainly serves two purposes. The first is to develop an algorithm and a program for estimating a cost-effective pipe diameter for agricultural irrigation water supply systems using optimization techniques. The second is to validate the developed program by applying the proposed optimized cost-effective pipe diameter to an actual study region (Saemangeum project area, zone 6). The results suggest that the optimal design program, which applies an optimization theory and enhances user convenience, can be effectively applied for the real systems of a looped agricultural irrigation water supply.

  19. Optimal Pipe Size Design for Looped Irrigation Water Supply System Using Harmony Search: Saemangeum Project Area

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ho Min; Sadollah, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Water supply systems are mainly classified into branched and looped network systems. The main difference between these two systems is that, in a branched network system, the flow within each pipe is a known value, whereas in a looped network system, the flow in each pipe is considered an unknown value. Therefore, an analysis of a looped network system is a more complex task. This study aims to develop a technique for estimating the optimal pipe diameter for a looped agricultural irrigation water supply system using a harmony search algorithm, which is an optimization technique. This study mainly serves two purposes. The first is to develop an algorithm and a program for estimating a cost-effective pipe diameter for agricultural irrigation water supply systems using optimization techniques. The second is to validate the developed program by applying the proposed optimized cost-effective pipe diameter to an actual study region (Saemangeum project area, zone 6). The results suggest that the optimal design program, which applies an optimization theory and enhances user convenience, can be effectively applied for the real systems of a looped agricultural irrigation water supply. PMID:25874252

  20. Competition between shock and turbulent heating in coronal loop system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Takuma

    2016-11-01

    2.5-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations are performed with high spatial resolution in order to distinguish between competing models of the coronal heating problem. A single coronal loop powered by Alfvén waves excited in the photosphere is the target of this study. The coronal structure is reproduced in our simulations as a natural consequence of the transportation and dissipation of Alfvén waves. Further, the coronal structure is maintained as the spatial resolution is changed from 25 to 3 km, although the temperature at the loop top increases with the spatial resolution. The heating mechanisms change gradually across the magnetic canopy at a height of 4 Mm. Below the magnetic canopy, both the shock and the MHD turbulence are dominant heating processes. Above the magnetic canopy, the shock heating rate reduces to less than 10 per cent of the total heating rate while the MHD turbulence provides significant energy to balance the radiative cooling and thermal conduction loss or gain. The importance of compressibility shown in this study would significantly impact on the prospects of successful MHD turbulence theory in the solar chromosphere.

  1. A Model-Driven Development Method for Management Information Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuno, Tomoki; Matsumoto, Keinosuke; Mori, Naoki

    Traditionally, a Management Information System (MIS) has been developed without using formal methods. By the informal methods, the MIS is developed on its lifecycle without having any models. It causes many problems such as lack of the reliability of system design specifications. In order to overcome these problems, a model theory approach was proposed. The approach is based on an idea that a system can be modeled by automata and set theory. However, it is very difficult to generate automata of the system to be developed right from the start. On the other hand, there is a model-driven development method that can flexibly correspond to changes of business logics or implementing technologies. In the model-driven development, a system is modeled using a modeling language such as UML. This paper proposes a new development method for management information systems applying the model-driven development method to a component of the model theory approach. The experiment has shown that a reduced amount of efforts is more than 30% of all the efforts.

  2. Automated control of hierarchical systems using value-driven methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pugh, George E.; Burke, Thomas E.

    1990-01-01

    An introduction is given to the Value-driven methodology, which has been successfully applied to solve a variety of difficult decision, control, and optimization problems. Many real-world decision processes (e.g., those encountered in scheduling, allocation, and command and control) involve a hierarchy of complex planning considerations. For such problems it is virtually impossible to define a fixed set of rules that will operate satisfactorily over the full range of probable contingencies. Decision Science Applications' value-driven methodology offers a systematic way of automating the intuitive, common-sense approach used by human planners. The inherent responsiveness of value-driven systems to user-controlled priorities makes them particularly suitable for semi-automated applications in which the user must remain in command of the systems operation. Three examples of the practical application of the approach in the automation of hierarchical decision processes are discussed: the TAC Brawler air-to-air combat simulation is a four-level computerized hierarchy; the autonomous underwater vehicle mission planning system is a three-level control system; and the Space Station Freedom electrical power control and scheduling system is designed as a two-level hierarchy. The methodology is compared with rule-based systems and with other more widely-known optimization techniques.

  3. Improving dynamic performances of PWM-driven servo-pneumatic systems via a novel pneumatic circuit.

    PubMed

    Taghizadeh, Mostafa; Ghaffari, Ali; Najafi, Farid

    2009-10-01

    In this paper, the effect of pneumatic circuit design on the input-output behavior of PWM-driven servo-pneumatic systems is investigated and their control performances are improved using linear controllers instead of complex and costly nonlinear ones. Generally, servo-pneumatic systems are well known for their nonlinear behavior. However, PWM-driven servo-pneumatic systems have the advantage of flexibility in the design of pneumatic circuits which affects the input-output linearity of the whole system. A simple pneumatic circuit with only one fast switching valve is designed which leads to a quasi-linear input-output relation. The quasi-linear behavior of the proposed circuit is verified both experimentally and by simulations. Closed loop position control experiments are then carried out using linear P- and PD-controllers. Since the output position is noisy and cannot be directly differentiated, a Kalman filter is designed to estimate the velocity of the cylinder. Highly improved tracking performances are obtained using these linear controllers, compared to previous works with nonlinear controllers.

  4. A Review of Control Strategies in Closed-Loop Neuroprosthetic Systems

    PubMed Central

    Wright, James; Macefield, Vaughan G.; van Schaik, André; Tapson, Jonathan C.

    2016-01-01

    It has been widely recognized that closed-loop neuroprosthetic systems achieve more favorable outcomes for users then equivalent open-loop devices. Improved performance of tasks, better usability, and greater embodiment have all been reported in systems utilizing some form of feedback. However, the interdisciplinary work on neuroprosthetic systems can lead to miscommunication due to similarities in well-established nomenclature in different fields. Here we present a review of control strategies in existing experimental, investigational and clinical neuroprosthetic systems in order to establish a baseline and promote a common understanding of different feedback modes and closed-loop controllers. The first section provides a brief discussion of feedback control and control theory. The second section reviews the control strategies of recent Brain Machine Interfaces, neuromodulatory implants, neuroprosthetic systems, and assistive neurorobotic devices. The final section examines the different approaches to feedback in current neuroprosthetic and neurorobotic systems. PMID:27462202

  5. A Reconnection-driven Model of the Hard X-Ray Loop-top Source from Flare 2004-Feb-26

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longcope, Dana; Qiu, Jiong; Brewer, Jasmine

    2016-12-01

    A compact X-class flare on 2004 February 26 showed a concentrated source of hard X-rays at the tops of the flare’s loops. This was analyzed in previous work and interpreted as plasma heated and compressed by slow magnetosonic shocks (SMSs) generated during post-reconnection retraction of the flux. That work used analytic expressions from a thin flux tube (TFT) model, which neglected many potentially important factors such as thermal conduction and chromospheric evaporation. Here we use a numerical solution of the TFT equations to produce a more comprehensive and accurate model of the same flare, including those effects previously omitted. These simulations corroborate the prior hypothesis that slow-mode shocks persist well after the retraction has ended, thus producing a compact, loop-top source instead of an elongated jet, as steady reconnection models predict. Thermal conduction leads to densities higher than analytic estimates had predicted, and evaporation enhances the density still higher, but at lower temperatures. X-ray light curves and spectra are synthesized by convolving the results from a single TFT simulation with the rate at which flux is reconnected, as measured through motion of flare ribbons, for example. These agree well with light curves observed by RHESSI and GOES and spectra from RHESSI. An image created from a superposition of TFT model runs resembles one produced from RHESSI observations. This suggests that the HXR loop-top source, at least the one observed in this flare, could be the result of SMSs produced in fast reconnection models like Petschek’s.

  6. A digital wireless system for closed-loop inhibition of nociceptive signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Chao; Yang, Xiaofei; Wang, Yang; Hagains, Christopher E.; Li, Ai-Ling; Peng, Yuan B.; Chiao, J.-C.

    2012-10-01

    Neurostimulation of the spinal cord or brain has been used to inhibit nociceptive signals in pain management applications. Nevertheless, most of the current neurostimulation models are based on open-loop system designs. There is a lack of closed-loop systems for neurostimulation in research with small freely-moving animals and in future clinical applications. Based on our previously developed analog wireless system for closed-loop neurostimulation, a digital wireless system with real-time feedback between recorder and stimulator modules has been developed to achieve multi-channel communication. The wireless system includes a wearable recording module, a wearable stimulation module and a transceiver connected to a computer for real-time and off-line data processing, display and storage. To validate our system, wide dynamic range neurons in the spinal cord dorsal horn have been recorded from anesthetized rats in response to graded mechanical stimuli (brush, pressure and pinch) applied in the hind paw. The identified nociceptive signals were used to automatically trigger electrical stimulation at the periaqueductal gray in real time to inhibit their own activities by the closed-loop design. Our digital wireless closed-loop system has provided a simplified and efficient method for further study of pain processing in freely-moving animals and potential clinical application in patients. Groups 1, 2 and 3 contributed equally to this project.

  7. Dynamic steady state of periodically driven quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yudin, V. I.; Taichenachev, A. V.; Basalaev, M. Yu.

    2016-01-01

    Using the density matrix formalism, we prove the existence of the periodic steady state for an arbitrary periodically driven system described by linear dynamic equations. This state has the same period as the modulated external influence, and it is realized as an asymptotic solution (t →+∞ ) due to relaxation processes. The presented derivation simultaneously contains a simple and effective computational algorithm (without using either the Floquet or Fourier formalisms), which automatically guarantees a full account of all frequency components. As a particular example, for three-level Λ system we calculate the line shape and field-induced shift of the dark resonance formed by the field with a periodically modulated phase. Also we have analytically solved a basic theoretical problem of the direct frequency comb spectroscopy, when the two-level system is driven by the periodic sequence of rectangular pulses. In this case, the radical dependence of the spectroscopy line shape on pulse area is found. Moreover, the existence of quasiforbidden spectroscopic zones, in which the Ramsey fringes are significantly reduced, is predicted. Our results have a wide area of applications in laser physics, spectroscopy, atomic clocks, and magnetometry. Also they can be useful for any area of quantum physics where periodically driven systems are considered.

  8. Disturbance rejection performance analyses of closed loop control systems by reference to disturbance ratio.

    PubMed

    Alagoz, Baris Baykant; Deniz, Furkan Nur; Keles, Cemal; Tan, Nusret

    2015-03-01

    This study investigates disturbance rejection capacity of closed loop control systems by means of reference to disturbance ratio (RDR). The RDR analysis calculates the ratio of reference signal energy to disturbance signal energy at the system output and provides a quantitative evaluation of disturbance rejection performance of control systems on the bases of communication channel limitations. Essentially, RDR provides a straightforward analytical method for the comparison and improvement of implicit disturbance rejection capacity of closed loop control systems. Theoretical analyses demonstrate us that RDR of the negative feedback closed loop control systems are determined by energy spectral density of controller transfer function. In this manner, authors derived design criteria for specifications of disturbance rejection performances of PID and fractional order PID (FOPID) controller structures. RDR spectra are calculated for investigation of frequency dependence of disturbance rejection capacity and spectral RDR analyses are carried out for PID and FOPID controllers. For the validation of theoretical results, simulation examples are presented.

  9. Voltage Regulation and Line Loss Minimization of Loop Distribution Systems Using UPFC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayed, Mahmoud A.; Takeshita, Takaharu

    This paper presents a new method for achieving line loss minimization and voltage regulation in the loop distribution systems, simultaneously. First, mathematical analysis of the line loss minimum conditions in the loop distribution systems is presented. Then, load voltage regulation is applied in the loop distribution system under line loss minimum condition. Reference angle of the desired load voltage is the main factor that can be used to minimize total line loss during load voltage control. In order to achieve these two objectives simultaneously, the UPFC (unified power flow controller), a typical FACTS (flexible AC transmission systems) device, that is capable of instantaneous control of transmission and distribution power flow, is used. Also, the UPFC control scheme to regulate the load voltage under line loss minimization is presented. The effectiveness of the proposed control scheme has been verified experimentally using laboratory prototype in a 200V, 6kVA system.

  10. Energy Exchange in Driven Open Quantum Systems at Strong Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrega, Matteo; Solinas, Paolo; Sassetti, Maura; Weiss, Ulrich

    2016-06-01

    The time-dependent energy transfer in a driven quantum system strongly coupled to a heat bath is studied within an influence functional approach. Exact formal expressions for the statistics of energy dissipation into the different channels are derived. The general method is applied to the driven dissipative two-state system. It is shown that the energy flows obey a balance relation, and that, for strong coupling, the interaction may constitute the major dissipative channel. Results in analytic form are presented for the particular value K =1/2 of strong Ohmic dissipation. The energy flows show interesting behaviors including driving-induced coherences and quantum stochastic resonances. It is found that the general characteristics persists for K near 1/2 .

  11. Theory of many-body localization in periodically driven systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abanin, Dmitry A.; De Roeck, Wojciech; Huveneers, François

    2016-09-01

    We present a theory of periodically driven, many-body localized (MBL) systems. We argue that MBL persists under periodic driving at high enough driving frequency: The Floquet operator (evolution operator over one driving period) can be represented as an exponential of an effective time-independent Hamiltonian, which is a sum of quasi-local terms and is itself fully MBL. We derive this result by constructing a sequence of canonical transformations to remove the time-dependence from the original Hamiltonian. When the driving evolves smoothly in time, the theory can be sharpened by estimating the probability of adiabatic Landau-Zener transitions at many-body level crossings. In all cases, we argue that there is delocalization at sufficiently low frequency. We propose a phase diagram of driven MBL systems.

  12. Electrically Driven General Systems for UAV’s

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-01

    systems are discussed in this paper. First the Barracuda M-05 UAV Demonstrator and second the 270 VDC More Electric Aircraft project launched by the...German Federal Office of Defense Technology and Procurement (BWB). 3.1 Barracuda M-05 The Barracuda M-05 is a company founded unmanned...test flight. Figure 4 showed a picture of the first flight. Figure 4: Barracuda M-05 First Flight With respect to electrically driven

  13. Entanglement replication in driven dissipative many-body systems.

    PubMed

    Zippilli, S; Paternostro, M; Adesso, G; Illuminati, F

    2013-01-25

    We study the dissipative dynamics of two independent arrays of many-body systems, locally driven by a common entangled field. We show that in the steady state the entanglement of the driving field is reproduced in an arbitrarily large series of inter-array entangled pairs over all distances. Local nonclassical driving thus realizes a scale-free entanglement replication and long-distance entanglement distribution mechanism that has immediate bearing on the implementation of quantum communication networks.

  14. Flaming 2 π kinks in parametrically driven systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berrios-Caro, E.; Clerc, M. G.; Leon, A. O.

    2016-11-01

    Macroscopic extended systems with dissipation and injection of energy can exhibit particlelike solutions. Dissipative kinks with an oscillatory cloak and a family of localized states that connect uniform symmetric states in a magnetic wire forced with a transversal oscillatory magnetic field and in a parametrically driven damped pendula chain are studied. The oscillatory cloak is composed of evanescent waves emitted at the kink position and generated by a resonant mechanism. These waves mediate the kink interaction and generate a family of localized states.

  15. Flaming 2π kinks in parametrically driven systems.

    PubMed

    Berrios-Caro, E; Clerc, M G; Leon, A O

    2016-11-01

    Macroscopic extended systems with dissipation and injection of energy can exhibit particlelike solutions. Dissipative kinks with an oscillatory cloak and a family of localized states that connect uniform symmetric states in a magnetic wire forced with a transversal oscillatory magnetic field and in a parametrically driven damped pendula chain are studied. The oscillatory cloak is composed of evanescent waves emitted at the kink position and generated by a resonant mechanism. These waves mediate the kink interaction and generate a family of localized states.

  16. ORION Environmental Control and Life Support Systems Suit Loop and Pressure Control Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckhardt, Brad; Conger, Bruce; Stambaugh, Imelda C.

    2015-01-01

    Under NASA's ORION Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) Project at Johnson Space Center's (JSC), the Crew and Thermal Systems Division has developed performance models of the air system using Thermal Desktop/FloCAD. The Thermal Desktop model includes an Air Revitalization System (ARS Loop), a Suit Loop, a Cabin Loop, and Pressure Control System (PCS) for supplying make-up gas (N2 and O2) to the Cabin and Suit Loop. The ARS and PCS are designed to maintain air quality at acceptable O2, CO2 and humidity levels as well as internal pressures in the vehicle Cabin and during suited operations. This effort required development of a suite of Thermal Desktop Orion ECLSS models to address the need for various simulation capabilities regarding ECLSS performance. An initial highly detailed model of the ARS Loop was developed in order to simulate rapid pressure transients (water hammer effects) within the ARS Loop caused by events such as cycling of the Pressurized Swing Adsorption (PSA) Beds and required high temporal resolution (small time steps) in the model during simulation. A second ECLSS model was developed to simulate events which occur over longer periods of time (over 30 minutes) where O2, CO2 and humidity levels, as well as internal pressures needed to be monitored in the cabin and for suited operations. Stand-alone models of the PCS and the Negative Pressure relief Valve (NPRV) were developed to study thermal effects within the PCS during emergency scenarios (Cabin Leak) and cabin pressurization during vehicle re-entry into Earth's atmosphere. Results from the Orion ECLSS models were used during Orion Delta-PDR (July, 2014) to address Key Design Requirements (KDR's) for Suit Loop operations for multiple mission scenarios.

  17. Keldysh field theory for driven open quantum systems.

    PubMed

    Sieberer, L M; Buchhold, M; Diehl, S

    2016-09-01

    Recent experimental developments in diverse areas-ranging from cold atomic gases to light-driven semiconductors to microcavity arrays-move systems into the focus which are located on the interface of quantum optics, many-body physics and statistical mechanics. They share in common that coherent and driven-dissipative quantum dynamics occur on an equal footing, creating genuine non-equilibrium scenarios without immediate counterpart in equilibrium condensed matter physics. This concerns both their non-thermal stationary states and their many-body time evolution. It is a challenge to theory to identify novel instances of universal emergent macroscopic phenomena, which are tied unambiguously and in an observable way to the microscopic drive conditions. In this review, we discuss some recent results in this direction. Moreover, we provide a systematic introduction to the open system Keldysh functional integral approach, which is the proper technical tool to accomplish a merger of quantum optics and many-body physics, and leverages the power of modern quantum field theory to driven open quantum systems.

  18. Keldysh field theory for driven open quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sieberer, L. M.; Buchhold, M.; Diehl, S.

    2016-09-01

    Recent experimental developments in diverse areas—ranging from cold atomic gases to light-driven semiconductors to microcavity arrays—move systems into the focus which are located on the interface of quantum optics, many-body physics and statistical mechanics. They share in common that coherent and driven-dissipative quantum dynamics occur on an equal footing, creating genuine non-equilibrium scenarios without immediate counterpart in equilibrium condensed matter physics. This concerns both their non-thermal stationary states and their many-body time evolution. It is a challenge to theory to identify novel instances of universal emergent macroscopic phenomena, which are tied unambiguously and in an observable way to the microscopic drive conditions. In this review, we discuss some recent results in this direction. Moreover, we provide a systematic introduction to the open system Keldysh functional integral approach, which is the proper technical tool to accomplish a merger of quantum optics and many-body physics, and leverages the power of modern quantum field theory to driven open quantum systems.

  19. Data-Driven H∞ Control for Nonlinear Distributed Parameter Systems.

    PubMed

    Luo, Biao; Huang, Tingwen; Wu, Huai-Ning; Yang, Xiong

    2015-11-01

    The data-driven H∞ control problem of nonlinear distributed parameter systems is considered in this paper. An off-policy learning method is developed to learn the H∞ control policy from real system data rather than the mathematical model. First, Karhunen-Loève decomposition is used to compute the empirical eigenfunctions, which are then employed to derive a reduced-order model (ROM) of slow subsystem based on the singular perturbation theory. The H∞ control problem is reformulated based on the ROM, which can be transformed to solve the Hamilton-Jacobi-Isaacs (HJI) equation, theoretically. To learn the solution of the HJI equation from real system data, a data-driven off-policy learning approach is proposed based on the simultaneous policy update algorithm and its convergence is proved. For implementation purpose, a neural network (NN)- based action-critic structure is developed, where a critic NN and two action NNs are employed to approximate the value function, control, and disturbance policies, respectively. Subsequently, a least-square NN weight-tuning rule is derived with the method of weighted residuals. Finally, the developed data-driven off-policy learning approach is applied to a nonlinear diffusion-reaction process, and the obtained results demonstrate its effectiveness.

  20. Design of biomass management systems and components for closed loop life support systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nevill, Gale E., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    The design of a biomass management system (BMS) for use in a closed loop support system is presented by University of Florida students as the culmination of two design courses. The report is divided into two appendixes, each presenting the results of one of the design courses. The first appendix discusses the preliminary design of the biomass management system and is subdivided into five subsystems: (1) planting and harvesting, (2) food management, (3) resource recovery, (4) refurbishing, and (5) transport. Each subsystem is investigated for possible solutions to problems, and recommendations and conclusions for an integrated BMS are discussed. The second appendix discusses the specific design of components for the BMS and is divided into three sections: (1) a sectored plant growth unit with support systems, (2) a container and receiving mechanism, and (3) an air curtain system for fugitive particle control. In this section components are designed, fabricated, and tested.

  1. Closed-loop Robots Driven by Short-Term Synaptic Plasticity: Emergent Explorative vs. Limit-Cycle Locomotion.

    PubMed

    Martin, Laura; Sándor, Bulcsú; Gros, Claudius

    2016-01-01

    We examine the hypothesis, that short-term synaptic plasticity (STSP) may generate self-organized motor patterns. We simulated sphere-shaped autonomous robots, within the LPZRobots simulation package, containing three weights moving along orthogonal internal rods. The position of a weight is controlled by a single neuron receiving excitatory input from the sensor, measuring its actual position, and inhibitory inputs from the other two neurons. The inhibitory connections are transiently plastic, following physiologically inspired STSP-rules. We find that a wide palette of motion patterns are generated through the interaction of STSP, robot, and environment (closed-loop configuration), including various forward meandering and circular motions, together with chaotic trajectories. The observed locomotion is robust with respect to additional interactions with obstacles. In the chaotic phase the robot is seemingly engaged in actively exploring its environment. We believe that our results constitute a concept of proof that transient synaptic plasticity, as described by STSP, may potentially be important for the generation of motor commands and for the emergence of complex locomotion patterns, adapting seamlessly also to unexpected environmental feedback. We observe spontaneous and collision induced mode switchings, finding in addition, that locomotion may follow transiently limit cycles which are otherwise unstable. Regular locomotion corresponds to stable limit cycles in the sensorimotor loop, which may be characterized in turn by arbitrary angles of propagation. This degeneracy is, in our analysis, one of the drivings for the chaotic wandering observed for selected parameter settings, which is induced by the smooth diffusion of the angle of propagation.

  2. Closed-loop Robots Driven by Short-Term Synaptic Plasticity: Emergent Explorative vs. Limit-Cycle Locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Laura; Sándor, Bulcsú; Gros, Claudius

    2016-01-01

    We examine the hypothesis, that short-term synaptic plasticity (STSP) may generate self-organized motor patterns. We simulated sphere-shaped autonomous robots, within the LPZRobots simulation package, containing three weights moving along orthogonal internal rods. The position of a weight is controlled by a single neuron receiving excitatory input from the sensor, measuring its actual position, and inhibitory inputs from the other two neurons. The inhibitory connections are transiently plastic, following physiologically inspired STSP-rules. We find that a wide palette of motion patterns are generated through the interaction of STSP, robot, and environment (closed-loop configuration), including various forward meandering and circular motions, together with chaotic trajectories. The observed locomotion is robust with respect to additional interactions with obstacles. In the chaotic phase the robot is seemingly engaged in actively exploring its environment. We believe that our results constitute a concept of proof that transient synaptic plasticity, as described by STSP, may potentially be important for the generation of motor commands and for the emergence of complex locomotion patterns, adapting seamlessly also to unexpected environmental feedback. We observe spontaneous and collision induced mode switchings, finding in addition, that locomotion may follow transiently limit cycles which are otherwise unstable. Regular locomotion corresponds to stable limit cycles in the sensorimotor loop, which may be characterized in turn by arbitrary angles of propagation. This degeneracy is, in our analysis, one of the drivings for the chaotic wandering observed for selected parameter settings, which is induced by the smooth diffusion of the angle of propagation. PMID:27803661

  3. An explosively driven high-power microwave pulsed power system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsayed, M. A.; Neuber, A. A.; Dickens, J. C.; Walter, J. W.; Kristiansen, M.; Altgilbers, L. L.

    2012-02-01

    The increased popularity of high power microwave systems and the various sources to drive them is the motivation behind the work to be presented. A stand-alone, self-contained explosively driven high power microwave pulsed power system has been designed, built, and tested at Texas Tech University's Center for Pulsed Power and Power Electronics. The system integrates four different sub-units that are composed of a battery driven prime power source utilizing capacitive energy storage, a dual stage helical flux compression generator as the main energy amplification device, an integrated power conditioning system with inductive energy storage including a fast opening electro-explosive switch, and a triode reflex geometry virtual cathode oscillator as the microwave radiating source. This system has displayed a measured electrical source power level of over 5 GW and peak radiated microwaves of about 200 MW. It is contained within a 15 cm diameter housing and measures 2 m in length, giving a housing volume of slightly less than 39 l. The system and its sub-components have been extensively studied, both as integrated and individual units, to further expand on components behavior and operation physics. This report will serve as a detailed design overview of each of the four subcomponents and provide detailed analysis of the overall system performance and benchmarks.

  4. Integrated systems for pulsed-power driven inertial fusion energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuneo, M. E.; Slutz, S. A.; Stygar, W. A.; Herrmann, M. C.; Sinars, D. B.; McBride, R. D.; Vesey, R. A.; Sefkow, A. B.; Mazarakis, M. G.; Vandevender, J. P.; Waisman, E. M.; Hansen, D. L.; Owen, A. C.; Jones, J. F.; Romero, J. A.; McKenney, J.

    2011-10-01

    Pulsed power fusion concepts integrate: (i) directly-magnetically-driven fusion targets that absorb large energies (10 MJ), (ii) efficient, rep-rated driver modules, (iii) compact, scalable, integrated driver architectures, (iv) driver-to-target coupling techniques with standoff and driver protection, and (v) long lifetime fusion chambers shielded by vaporizing blankets and thick liquid walls. Large fusion yields (3-30 GJ) and low rep-rates (0.1-1 Hz) may be an attractive path for IFE. Experiments on the ZR facility are validating physics issues for magnetically driven targets. Scientific breakeven (fusion energy = fuel energy) may be possible in the next few years. Plans for system development and integration will be discussed. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  5. A phrase-driven grammar system for interactive data visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang Yun; Neumann, Ulrich

    2008-01-01

    A Phrase-Driven Grammar System (PDGS) is a novel GUI for facilitating the visualization of data. The PDGS integrates data source applications and external visualization tools into its framework and functions as a middle-layer application to coordinate their operations. It allows users to formulate data query and visualization descriptions by selecting graphical icons in a menu or on a map. To specify data query and visualization intuitively and efficiently, we designed Graphical User Interface and a natural-language-like grammar, Phrase-Driven Grammar (PDG). The formulation of PDG data query and visualization descriptions is a constrained natural-language phrase building process. PDG phrases produce graphical visualizations of the data query, allowing users to interactively explore meaningful data relationships, trends, and exceptions.

  6. Data-driven visibility enhancement using multi-camera system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Di; Dai, Qionghai

    2010-04-01

    In bad weather conditions, with the presence of haze, fog or smoke, atmospheric particles attenuate the direct irradiance from the scene and scatter light to form airlight. Thus, visibility is decreased and may endanger important applications, such as outdoor surveillance or visual navigation for landing and taking off aircrafts. This paper proposes a novel method for visibility enhancement in bad weather conditions based on multi-view camera system. The main advantage of this method lies in the ability to solve ambiguities caused by texture-less, lack of color and contrast, while where most existing methods fail. The proposed system consists of two main components. First is a data-driven approach to extract template priors that are matched with current capturing dynamic scene images. A fixed multi-camera system is utilized to record dynamic scene appearances under different illuminations, in different time, seasons and weather conditions to construct the database which is explored to extract template models containing only static background objects and obtain corresponding scene structures in a data-driven manner. Second is dehazing based on current dynamic scene depth updated by fusing template depth with real-time multi-view stereo matching depth in foreground object regions. The proposed system achieves real-time and robust performances through combinations of data-driven prior extraction and dynamic scene depth optimization. Moreover, estimated weather condition parameters and the real-time reconstructed dynamic scene model are both useful byproducts. We believe that the proposed system is the first to dehaze based on multi-view camera system. An application based on airport surveillance demonstrates its effectiveness.

  7. A study on phase-noise reduction method in phase-locked loop systems.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Keiji

    2003-09-01

    Experimental studies are carried out on phase noise and the correlation coefficient between the phase and average current noises of voltage-controlled oscillator in phased-locked loop (PLL) systems. The precise phase stabilization technique is discussed, and new methods to reduce the phase noise are described in PLL systems, using the correlation.

  8. Optimization of the open-loop liquid crystal adaptive optics retinal imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Ningning; Li, Chao; Xia, Mingliang; Li, Dayu; Qi, Yue; Xuan, Li

    2012-02-01

    An open-loop adaptive optics (AO) system for retinal imaging was constructed using a liquid crystal spatial light modulator (LC-SLM) as the wavefront compensator. Due to the dispersion of the LC-SLM, there was only one illumination source for both aberration detection and retinal imaging in this system. To increase the field of view (FOV) for retinal imaging, a modified mechanical shutter was integrated into the illumination channel to control the size of the illumination spot on the fundus. The AO loop was operated in a pulsing mode, and the fundus was illuminated twice by two laser impulses in a single AO correction loop. As a result, the FOV for retinal imaging was increased to 1.7-deg without compromising the aberration detection accuracy. The correction precision of the open-loop AO system was evaluated in a closed-loop configuration; the residual error is approximately 0.0909λ (root-mean-square, RMS), and the Strehl ratio ranges to 0.7217. Two subjects with differing rates of myopia (-3D and -5D) were tested. High-resolution images of capillaries and photoreceptors were obtained.

  9. Optimization of the open-loop liquid crystal adaptive optics retinal imaging system.

    PubMed

    Kong, Ningning; Li, Chao; Xia, Mingliang; Li, Dayu; Qi, Yue; Xuan, Li

    2012-02-01

    An open-loop adaptive optics (AO) system for retinal imaging was constructed using a liquid crystal spatial light modulator (LC-SLM) as the wavefront compensator. Due to the dispersion of the LC-SLM, there was only one illumination source for both aberration detection and retinal imaging in this system. To increase the field of view (FOV) for retinal imaging, a modified mechanical shutter was integrated into the illumination channel to control the size of the illumination spot on the fundus. The AO loop was operated in a pulsing mode, and the fundus was illuminated twice by two laser impulses in a single AO correction loop. As a result, the FOV for retinal imaging was increased to 1.7-deg without compromising the aberration detection accuracy. The correction precision of the open-loop AO system was evaluated in a closed-loop configuration; the residual error is approximately 0.0909λ (root-mean-square, RMS), and the Strehl ratio ranges to 0.7217. Two subjects with differing rates of myopia (-3D and -5D) were tested. High-resolution images of capillaries and photoreceptors were obtained.

  10. Open-loop versus closed-loop control of MEMS devices: choices and issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borovic, B.; Liu, A. Q.; Popa, D.; Cai, H.; Lewis, F. L.

    2005-10-01

    From a controls point of view, micro electromechanical systems (MEMS) can be driven in an open-loop and closed-loop fashion. Commonly, these devices are driven open-loop by applying simple input signals. If these input signals become more complex by being derived from the system dynamics, we call such control techniques pre-shaped open-loop driving. The ultimate step for improving precision and speed of response is the introduction of feedback, e.g. closed-loop control. Unlike macro mechanical systems, where the implementation of the feedback is relatively simple, in the MEMS case the feedback design is quite problematic, due to the limited availability of sensor data, the presence of sensor dynamics and noise, and the typically fast actuator dynamics. Furthermore, a performance comparison between open-loop and closed-loop control strategies has not been properly explored for MEMS devices. The purpose of this paper is to present experimental results obtained using both open- and closed-loop strategies and to address the comparative issues of driving and control for MEMS devices. An optical MEMS switching device is used for this study. Based on these experimental results, as well as computer simulations, we point out advantages and disadvantages of the different control strategies, address the problems that distinguish MEMS driving systems from their macro counterparts, and discuss criteria to choose a suitable control driving strategy.

  11. Simulator for an Accelerator-Driven Subcritical Fissile Solution System

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, Steven Karl; Day, Christy M.; Determan, John C.

    2015-09-14

    LANL has developed a process to generate a progressive family of system models for a fissile solution system. This family includes a dynamic system simulation comprised of coupled nonlinear differential equations describing the time evolution of the system. Neutron kinetics, radiolytic gas generation and transport, and core thermal hydraulics are included in the DSS. Extensions to explicit operation of cooling loops and radiolytic gas handling are embedded in these systems as is a stability model. The DSS may then be converted to an implementation in Visual Studio to provide a design team the ability to rapidly estimate system performance impacts from a variety of design decisions. This provides a method to assist in optimization of the system design. Once design has been generated in some detail the C++ version of the system model may then be implemented in a LabVIEW user interface to evaluate operator controls and instrumentation and operator recognition and response to off-normal events. Taken as a set of system models the DSS, Visual Studio, and LabVIEW progression provides a comprehensive set of design support tools.

  12. A coupled phase-locked loops system for carrier tracking improvement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divsalar, D.; Yuen, J. H.

    1982-01-01

    A system that couples several phase-locked loops to improve carrier tracking performance is considered. It coherently combines the received carrier signals at geographically separated ground antennas to increase the total effective aperture. The received carrier's phases are automatically aligned to enhance the received carrier signal-to-noise ratio. The system's tracking performance is assessed in terms of rms phase jitter. It is shown that the phase-locked loop in the first receiver, where the carrier arraying is performed, tracks the received carrier phase using the received carrier power from all receivers.

  13. Hanford Tank Farms Waste Feed Flow Loop Phase VI: PulseEcho System Performance Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Denslow, Kayte M.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Adkins, Harold E.; Jenks, Jeromy WJ; Hopkins, Derek F.

    2012-11-21

    This document presents the visual and ultrasonic PulseEcho critical velocity test results obtained from the System Performance test campaign that was completed in September 2012 with the Remote Sampler Demonstration (RSD)/Waste Feed Flow Loop cold-test platform located at the Monarch test facility in Pasco, Washington. This report is intended to complement and accompany the report that will be developed by WRPS on the design of the System Performance simulant matrix, the analysis of the slurry test sample concentration and particle size distribution (PSD) data, and the design and construction of the RSD/Waste Feed Flow Loop cold-test platform.

  14. Floating Loop System For Cooling Integrated Motors And Inverters Using Hot Liquid Refrigerant

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, John S [Oak Ridge, TN; Ayers, Curtis W [Kingston, TN; Coomer, Chester [Knoxville, TN; Marlino, Laura D [Oak Ridge, TN

    2006-02-07

    A floating loop vehicle component cooling and air-conditioning system having at least one compressor for compressing cool vapor refrigerant into hot vapor refrigerant; at least one condenser for condensing the hot vapor refrigerant into hot liquid refrigerant by exchanging heat with outdoor air; at least one floating loop component cooling device for evaporating the hot liquid refrigerant into hot vapor refrigerant; at least one expansion device for expanding the hot liquid refrigerant into cool liquid refrigerant; at least one air conditioning evaporator for evaporating the cool liquid refrigerant into cool vapor refrigerant by exchanging heat with indoor air; and piping for interconnecting components of the cooling and air conditioning system.

  15. Traffic and related self-driven many-particle systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helbing, Dirk

    2001-10-01

    Since the subject of traffic dynamics has captured the interest of physicists, many surprising effects have been revealed and explained. Some of the questions now understood are the following: Why are vehicles sometimes stopped by ``phantom traffic jams'' even though drivers all like to drive fast? What are the mechanisms behind stop-and-go traffic? Why are there several different kinds of congestion, and how are they related? Why do most traffic jams occur considerably before the road capacity is reached? Can a temporary reduction in the volume of traffic cause a lasting traffic jam? Under which conditions can speed limits speed up traffic? Why do pedestrians moving in opposite directions normally organize into lanes, while similar systems ``freeze by heating''? All of these questions have been answered by applying and extending methods from statistical physics and nonlinear dynamics to self-driven many-particle systems. This article considers the empirical data and then reviews the main approaches to modeling pedestrian and vehicle traffic. These include microscopic (particle-based), mesoscopic (gas-kinetic), and macroscopic (fluid-dynamic) models. Attention is also paid to the formulation of a micro-macro link, to aspects of universality, and to other unifying concepts, such as a general modeling framework for self-driven many-particle systems, including spin systems. While the primary focus is upon vehicle and pedestrian traffic, applications to biological or socio-economic systems such as bacterial colonies, flocks of birds, panics, and stock market dynamics are touched upon as well.

  16. Study on introduction of SN transition type FCL into looped distribution system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kameda, Hideyuki; Uemura, Satoshi; Ichinose, Ataru

    2012-11-01

    A large amount of distributed generations such as PV will be introduced into the future Japanese distribution systems. Although distribution systems are presently operated under radial configuration and are terminated with loads, the connection of the distributed generations may cause some problems such as the occurrence of reverse power, the sensitivity decrease of the protection relays, and the voltage rise at the ends. It is assumed that a distribution system is looped in a large city to aim at the improvement of the service reliability under the situation mentioned above. However, a countermeasure against the increase of short-circuit current may be necessary in a looped system. We think that the installation of the SN transition type superconducting fault current limiter (FCL) is effective as a measure against the increase of short-circuit capacity, so we have proposed an effective arrangement of the FCLs into a radial distribution system and the method of setting the parameters. In this paper, a new introduction of FCLs is proposed, that is the way to clear a short-circuit fault within a looped system by the protection relay and the loop switch (LS). To achieve this purpose, the FCL needs to reduce the current through the LS below the rated current of the LS. And we propose the best arrangement to achieve the purpose, and the method of setting the parameters of a SN transition type FCL. Our proposal may bring the flexibility of composing any system configuration.

  17. Data-Driven Assistance Functions for Industrial Automation Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Windmann, Stefan; Niggemann, Oliver

    2015-11-01

    The increasing amount of data in industrial automation systems overburdens the user in process control and diagnosis tasks. One possibility to cope with these challenges consists of using smart assistance systems that automatically monitor and optimize processes. This article deals with aspects of data-driven assistance systems such as assistance functions, process models and data acquisition. The paper describes novel approaches for self-diagnosis and self-optimization, and shows how these assistance functions can be integrated in different industrial environments. The considered assistance functions are based on process models that are automatically learned from process data. Fault detection and isolation is based on the comparison of observations of the real system with predictions obtained by application of the process models. The process models are further employed for energy efficiency optimization of industrial processes. Experimental results are presented for fault detection and energy efficiency optimization of a drive system.

  18. Driven Open Quantum Systems and Floquet Stroboscopic Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Restrepo, S.; Cerrillo, J.; Bastidas, V. M.; Angelakis, D. G.; Brandes, T.

    2016-12-01

    We provide an analytic solution to the problem of system-bath dynamics under the effect of high-frequency driving that has applications in a large class of settings, such as driven-dissipative many-body systems. Our method relies on discrete symmetries of the system-bath Hamiltonian and provides the time evolution operator of the full system, including bath degrees of freedom, without weak-coupling or Markovian assumptions. An interpretation of the solution in terms of the stroboscopic evolution of a family of observables under the influence of an effective static Hamiltonian is proposed, which constitutes a flexible simulation procedure of nontrivial Hamiltonians. We instantiate the result with the study of the spin-boson model with time-dependent tunneling amplitude. We analyze the class of Hamiltonians that may be stroboscopically accessed for this example and illustrate the dynamics of system and bath degrees of freedom.

  19. RiverHeath: Neighborhood Loop Geothermal Exchange System

    SciTech Connect

    Geall, Mark

    2016-07-11

    The goal of the RiverHeath project is to develop a geothermal exchange system at lower capital infrastructure cost than current geothermal exchange systems. The RiverHeath system features an innovative design that incorporates use of the adjacent river through river-based heat exchange plates. The flowing water provides a tremendous amount of heat transfer. As a result, the installation cost of this geothermal exchange system is lower than more traditional vertical bore systems. Many urban areas are located along rivers and other waterways. RiverHeath will serve as a template for other projects adjacent to the water.

  20. Advances in Optimizing Weather Driven Electric Power Systems.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clack, C.; MacDonald, A. E.; Alexander, A.; Dunbar, A. D.; Xie, Y.; Wilczak, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    The importance of weather-driven renewable energies for the United States (and global) energy portfolio is growing. The main perceived problems with weather-driven renewable energies are their intermittent nature, low power density, and high costs. The National Energy with Weather System Simulator (NEWS) is a mathematical optimization tool that allows the construction of weather-driven energy sources that will work in harmony with the needs of the system. For example, it will match the electric load, reduce variability, decrease costs, and abate carbon emissions. One important test run included existing US carbon-free power sources, natural gas power when needed, and a High Voltage Direct Current power transmission network. This study shows that the costs and carbon emissions from an optimally designed national system decrease with geographic size. It shows that with achievable estimates of wind and solar generation costs, that the US could decrease its carbon emissions by up to 80% by the early 2030s, without an increase in electric costs. The key requirement would be a 48 state network of HVDC transmission, creating a national market for electricity not possible in the current AC grid. These results were found without the need for storage. Further, we tested the effect of changing natural gas fuel prices on the optimal configuration of the national electric power system. Another test that was carried out was an extension to global regions. The extension study shows that the same properties found in the US study extend to the most populous regions of the planet. The extra test is a simplified version of the US study, and is where much more research can be carried out. We compare our results to other model results.

  1. Vision Systems with the Human in the Loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauckhage, Christian; Hanheide, Marc; Wrede, Sebastian; Käster, Thomas; Pfeiffer, Michael; Sagerer, Gerhard

    2005-12-01

    The emerging cognitive vision paradigm deals with vision systems that apply machine learning and automatic reasoning in order to learn from what they perceive. Cognitive vision systems can rate the relevance and consistency of newly acquired knowledge, they can adapt to their environment and thus will exhibit high robustness. This contribution presents vision systems that aim at flexibility and robustness. One is tailored for content-based image retrieval, the others are cognitive vision systems that constitute prototypes of visual active memories which evaluate, gather, and integrate contextual knowledge for visual analysis. All three systems are designed to interact with human users. After we will have discussed adaptive content-based image retrieval and object and action recognition in an office environment, the issue of assessing cognitive systems will be raised. Experiences from psychologically evaluated human-machine interactions will be reported and the promising potential of psychologically-based usability experiments will be stressed.

  2. Cushing Syndrome Due to ACTH-Secreting Pheochromocytoma, Aggravated by Glucocorticoid-Driven Positive-Feedback Loop

    PubMed Central

    Sakuma, Ikki; Higuchi, Seiichiro; Fujimoto, Masanori; Takiguchi, Tomoko; Nakayama, Akitoshi; Tamura, Ai; Kohno, Takashi; Komai, Eri; Shiga, Akina; Nagano, Hidekazu; Hashimoto, Naoko; Suzuki, Sawako; Mayama, Takafumi; Koide, Hisashi; Ono, Katsuhiko; Sasano, Hironobu; Tatsuno, Ichiro; Yokote, Koutaro

    2016-01-01

    Context: Pheochromocytoma is a catecholamine-producing tumor that originates from adrenal chromaffin cells and is capable of secreting various hormones, including ACTH. Case Description: A 56-year-old female presented with Cushingoid appearance and diabetic ketoacidosis. Endocrinological examinations demonstrated ectopic ACTH production with hypercortisolemia and excess urinary cortisol accompanied by elevated plasma and urine catecholamines. Computed tomography revealed a large left adrenal tumor with bilateral adrenal enlargement. Metaiodobenzylguanidine scintigraphy revealed abnormal accumulation in the tumor, which was eventually diagnosed as pheochromocytoma with ectopic ACTH secretion with subsequent manifestation of Cushing's syndrome. Ectopic ACTH secretion and catecholamine production were blocked by metyrapone treatment, whereas dexamethasone paradoxically increased ACTH secretion. Left adrenalectomy resulted in complete remission of Cushing's syndrome and pheochromocytoma. In Vitro Studies: Immunohistological analysis revealed that the tumor contained two functionally distinct chromaffin-like cell types. The majority of tumor cells stained positive for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), whereas a minor population of ACTH-positive tumor cells was negative for TH. Furthermore, gene expression and in vitro functional analyses using primary tumor tissue cultures demonstrated that dexamethasone facilitated ACTH as well as catecholamine secretion with parallel induction of proopiomelanocortin (POMC), TH, and phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase mRNA, supporting a glucocorticoid-dependent positive-feedback loop of ACTH secretion in vivo. DNA methylation analysis revealed that the POMC promoter of this tumor, particularly the E2F binding site, was hypomethylated. Conclusion: We present a case of ectopic ACTH syndrome associated with pheochromocytoma. ACTH up-regulation with paradoxical response to glucocorticoid, possibly through the hypomethylation of the POMC

  3. Integrative Systems Biology for Data Driven Knowledge Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Greene, Casey S.; Troyanskaya, Olga G.

    2015-01-01

    Integrative systems biology is an approach that brings together diverse high throughput experiments and databases to gain new insights into biological processes or systems at molecular through physiological levels. These approaches rely on diverse high-throughput experimental techniques that generate heterogeneous data by assaying varying aspects of complex biological processes. Computational approaches are necessary to provide an integrative view of these experimental results and enable data-driven knowledge discovery. Hypotheses generated from these approaches can direct definitive molecular experiments in a cost effective manner. Using integrative systems biology approaches, we can leverage existing biological knowledge and large-scale data to improve our understanding of yet unknown components of a system of interest and how its malfunction leads to disease. PMID:21044756

  4. Driven harmonic oscillator as a quantum simulator for open systems

    SciTech Connect

    Piilo, Jyrki; Maniscalco, Sabrina

    2006-09-15

    We show theoretically how a driven harmonic oscillator can be used as a quantum simulator for the non-Markovian damped harmonic oscillator. In the general framework, our results demonstrate the possibility to use a closed system as a simulator for open quantum systems. The quantum simulator is based on sets of controlled drives of the closed harmonic oscillator with appropriately tailored electric field pulses. The non-Markovian dynamics of the damped harmonic oscillator is obtained by using the information about the spectral density of the open system when averaging over the drives of the closed oscillator. We consider single trapped ions as a specific physical implementation of the simulator, and we show how the simulator approach reveals physical insight into the open system dynamics, e.g., the characteristic quantum mechanical non-Markovian oscillatory behavior of the energy of the damped oscillator, usually obtained by the non-Lindblad-type master equation, can have a simple semiclassical interpretation.

  5. Fluctuations of work in nearly adiabatically driven open quantum systems.

    PubMed

    Suomela, S; Salmilehto, J; Savenko, I G; Ala-Nissila, T; Möttönen, M

    2015-02-01

    We extend the quantum jump method to nearly adiabatically driven open quantum systems in a way that allows for an accurate account of the external driving in the system-environment interaction. Using this framework, we construct the corresponding trajectory-dependent work performed on the system and derive the integral fluctuation theorem and the Jarzynski equality for nearly adiabatic driving. We show that such identities hold as long as the stochastic dynamics and work variable are consistently defined. We numerically study the emerging work statistics for a two-level quantum system and find that the conventional diabatic approximation is unable to capture some prominent features arising from driving, such as the continuity of the probability density of work. Our results reveal the necessity of using accurate expressions for the drive-dressed heat exchange in future experiments probing jump time distributions.

  6. Shifting the closed-loop spectrum in the optimal linear quadratic regulator problem for hereditary systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, J. S.; Rosen, I. G.

    1987-01-01

    In the optimal linear quadratic regulator problem for finite dimensional systems, the method known as an alpha-shift can be used to produce a closed-loop system whose spectrum lies to the left of some specified vertical line; that is, a closed-loop system with a prescribed degree of stability. This paper treats the extension of the alpha-shift to hereditary systems. As infinite dimensions, the shift can be accomplished by adding alpha times the identity to the open-loop semigroup generator and then solving an optimal regulator problem. However, this approach does not work with a new approximation scheme for hereditary control problems recently developed by Kappel and Salamon. Since this scheme is among the best to date for the numerical solution of the linear regulator problem for hereditary systems, an alternative method for shifting the closed-loop spectrum is needed. An alpha-shift technique that can be used with the Kappel-Salamon approximation scheme is developed. Both the continuous-time and discrete-time problems are considered. A numerical example which demonstrates the feasibility of the method is included.

  7. Shifting the closed-loop spectrum in the optimal linear quadratic regulator problem for hereditary systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, J. S.; Rosen, I. G.

    1985-01-01

    In the optimal linear quadratic regulator problem for finite dimensional systems, the method known as an alpha-shift can be used to produce a closed-loop system whose spectrum lies to the left of some specified vertical line; that is, a closed-loop system with a prescribed degree of stability. This paper treats the extension of the alpha-shift to hereditary systems. As infinite dimensions, the shift can be accomplished by adding alpha times the identity to the open-loop semigroup generator and then solving an optimal regulator problem. However, this approach does not work with a new approximation scheme for hereditary control problems recently developed by Kappel and Salamon. Since this scheme is among the best to date for the numerical solution of the linear regulator problem for hereditary systems, an alternative method for shifting the closed-loop spectrum is needed. An alpha-shift technique that can be used with the Kappel-Salamon approximation scheme is developed. Both the continuous-time and discrete-time problems are considered. A numerical example which demonstrates the feasibility of the method is included.

  8. Simple PID parameter tuning method based on outputs of the closed loop system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jianda; Zhu, Zhiqiang; Jiang, Ziya; He, Yuqing

    2016-05-01

    Most of the existing PID parameters tuning methods are only effective with pre-known accurate system models, which often require some strict identification experiments and thus infeasible for many complicated systems. Actually, in most practical engineering applications, it is desirable for the PID tuning scheme to be directly based on the input-output response of the closed-loop system. Thus, a new parameter tuning scheme for PID controllers without explicit mathematical model is developed in this paper. The paper begins with a new frequency domain properties analysis of the PID controller. After that, the definition of characteristic frequency for the PID controller is given in order to study the mathematical relationship between the PID parameters and the open-loop frequency properties of the controlled system. Then, the concepts of M-field and θ-field are introduced, which are then used to explain how the PID control parameters influence the closed-loop frequency-magnitude property and its time responses. Subsequently, the new PID parameter tuning scheme, i.e., a group of tuning rules, is proposed based on the preceding analysis. Finally, both simulations and experiments are conducted, and the results verify the feasibility and validity of the proposed methods. This research proposes a PID parameter tuning method based on outputs of the closed loop system.

  9. Nuclear data needs for accelerator-driven transmutation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Arthur, E.D.; Wilson, W.B.; Young, P.G.

    1994-07-01

    The possibilities of several new technologies based on use of intense, medium-energy proton accelerators are being investigated at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The potential new areas include destruction of long-lived components of nuclear waste, plutonium burning, energy production, and production of tritium. The design, assessment, and safety analysis of potential facilities involves the understanding of complex combinations of nuclear processes, which in turn places new requirements on nuclear data that transcend the traditional needs of the fission and fusion reactor communities. In this paper an assessment of the nuclear data needs for systems currently being considered in the Los Alamos Accelerator-Driven Transmutation Technologies program is given.

  10. Coherent long-range thermoelectrics in nonadiabatic driven quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallego-Marcos, F.; Platero, G.

    2017-02-01

    We investigate direct energy and heat transfer between two distant sites of a triple quantum dot connected to reservoirs, where one of the edge dots is driven by an ac-gate voltage. We theoretically propose how to implement heat and cooling engines mediated by long-range photoassisted transport. Additionally, we propose a simple setup to heat up coherently the two reservoirs symmetrically and a mechanism to store energy in the closed system. The present proposals can be experimentally implemented and easily controlled by tuning the external parameters.

  11. Data driven uncertainty evaluation for complex engineered system design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Boyuan; Huang, Shuangxi; Fan, Wenhui; Xiao, Tianyuan; Humann, James; Lai, Yuyang; Jin, Yan

    2016-09-01

    Complex engineered systems are often difficult to analyze and design due to the tangled interdependencies among their subsystems and components. Conventional design methods often need exact modeling or accurate structure decomposition, which limits their practical application. The rapid expansion of data makes utilizing data to guide and improve system design indispensable in practical engineering. In this paper, a data driven uncertainty evaluation approach is proposed to support the design of complex engineered systems. The core of the approach is a data-mining based uncertainty evaluation method that predicts the uncertainty level of a specific system design by means of analyzing association relations along different system attributes and synthesizing the information entropy of the covered attribute areas, and a quantitative measure of system uncertainty can be obtained accordingly. Monte Carlo simulation is introduced to get the uncertainty extrema, and the possible data distributions under different situations is discussed in detail. The uncertainty values can be normalized using the simulation results and the values can be used to evaluate different system designs. A prototype system is established, and two case studies have been carried out. The case of an inverted pendulum system validates the effectiveness of the proposed method, and the case of an oil sump design shows the practicability when two or more design plans need to be compared. This research can be used to evaluate the uncertainty of complex engineered systems completely relying on data, and is ideally suited for plan selection and performance analysis in system design.

  12. Demonstration of Standard HVAC Single-Loop Digital Control Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-01

    System Thermodynamics (BLAST) computer study was done on the building and had determined that the HVAC systems, if operating according to the original...300 720 1(X) 4 Office 450 250 1(0 4 Lbry N 120 250 10 4 Lbry 110 250 10 4 EW Lnge 270 210 50 4 Total 2750 3130 5 Xray 1 90 185 25 5 Xray 2 150 160 25 5... Xray 200 140 25 5 Total 440 485 127 APPENDIX E: Kuhn Dental Clinic-Control System Retrofit Agenda of Training Class 1. SCOPE OF CONTRACT: PURPOSE: TO

  13. Decoherence and Relaxation in Driven Circuit QED Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Andre, Stephan; Brosco, Valentina; Schoen, Gerd; Fedorov, Arkady; Shnirman, Alexander

    2008-11-07

    Recent experiments on quantum state engineering with superconducting circuits realized concepts originally introduced in the field of quantum optics. Motivated by one such experiment we investigate a Josephson qubit coupled to a slow LC oscillator with frequency much lower than the qubit's energy splitting. The qubit is ac-driven to perform Rabi oscillations, and the Rabi frequency is tuned to resonance with the oscillator. The properties of this driven circuit QED system depend strongly on relaxation and decoherence effects in the qubit. We investigate both one-photon and two-photon qubit-oscillator coupling, the latter being dominant at the symmetry point of the qubit. When the qubit driving frequency is blue detuned, we find that the system exhibits lasing behavior; for red detuning the qubit cools the oscillator. Similar behavior is expected in an accessible range of parameters for a Josephson qubit coupled to a nano-mechanical oscillator. In a different parameter regime, furthering the analogies between superconducting and quantum optical systems, we investigate Sisyphus damping, which is the key element of the Sisyphus cooling protocol, as well as its exact opposite, Sisyphus amplification.

  14. In situ conversion process utilizing a closed loop heating system

    DOEpatents

    Sandberg, Chester Ledlie; Fowler, Thomas David; Vinegar, Harold J.; Schoeber, Willen Jan Antoon Henri

    2009-08-18

    An in situ conversion system for producing hydrocarbons from a subsurface formation is described. The system includes a plurality of u-shaped wellbores in the formation. Piping is positioned in at least two of the u-shaped wellbores. A fluid circulation system is coupled to the piping. The fluid circulation system is configured to circulate hot heat transfer fluid through at least a portion of the piping to form at least one heated portion of the formation. An electrical power supply is configured to provide electrical current to at least a portion of the piping located below an overburden in the formation to resistively heat at least a portion of the piping. Heat transfers from the piping to the formation.

  15. Closed-Loop System Analysis Using Lyapunov Stability Theory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-01

    Sarachik, P.E., "Stability of Circuits with Randomly Time-Varying Parameters", IEEE Transactions on Circuit Theory, pp. 260-270, May 1959. 19. Bhatia...Rinehart, and Winston, 1970. 33. Chen, C., and Desoer , C., "Simplified Conditions for Controllability and Observability of Linear Time- Invari-ant...Dynamical Systems", Circuits Systems and Signal Processing, pp. 171-202, 1982. v 100. Mitchell, R.R., "Sample Stability of Second-Order S Stochastic

  16. A motor-driven ventricular assist device controlled with an optical encoder system.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, T; Hayashi, K; Yamane, H

    1993-01-01

    An electric motor-driven ventricular assist device has been developed for long-term use inside the body. The system is composed of a pusher-plate-type blood pump and an actuator consisting of an electrical motor and a ball screw. Cyclic change of the direction of motor rotation makes a back-and-forth axial movement of the ball screw shaft. The shaft, which is detached from the pump diaphragm, pushes the diaphragm via a pusher plate to eject blood during systole; blood is sucked by the diaphragm resilience during diastole. Using the output signals from a newly designed, incremental-type, miniature optical rotary encoder mounted inside the actuator, the input voltage of the motor is optimally controlled referring to the phase difference between the current position of the moving rotor and the electrical reference signal of the rotation generated by a microprocessor-based controller. In vitro performance tests indicated that the system fulfills required specifications. The maximum efficiency was 11%, which was about twice as high as that obtained with the previous open-loop prototype system. In the air, the surface temperature of the actuator elevated to 20 degrees C above the room temperature. An acute in vivo test showed its feasibility as a left ventricular assist device. Analysis of the energy loss in each component of the system indicated that redesign and precise assembly of the mechanical parts could increase the system efficiency.

  17. Model-Driven Development of Control System Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy Chaudhuri, S.; Ahuja, A. L.; Natarajan, S.; Vin, H.

    2009-09-01

    The control software for large real-time systems such as radio-telescopes is generally developed from scratch on a customized basis. The cost and effort involved may be reduced by the use of existing frameworks, components and tools, however the conceptualization, design synthesis and realization of the system still requires a massive and complex engineering process. In this paper, we discuss the design of a model-driven framework that generates much of the control and monitoring software automatically based on higher-level specifications. The design of our framework is guided by the observation that for any system, independent of its specific purpose and elements, the control software performs the same set of functions: communicate, verify, coordinate and issue commands to various sub-systems (actuators); and collect, process, transmit, visualize and archive data produced by sub-systems (sensors). The machine control problem is formulated as a recursive hierarchical composition of control nodes, each of which achieves its function by coordinating its subsystems. Control software for each node is generated from specifications of its control logic, data acquisition and processing, and events detection and handling. We developed a prototype implementation of the concept for fusion reactor control, and validated its generality by reconfiguring the prototype to control the antennas of a radio-telescope. This data-driven approach to machine control software development has the promise to not only simplify initial system software development, but greatly reduce the time and effort for maintenance and evolution of the software over the system lifetime.

  18. Consistency in experiments on multistable driven delay systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver, Neus; Larger, Laurent; Fischer, Ingo

    2016-10-01

    We investigate the consistency properties in the responses of a nonlinear delay optoelectronic intensity oscillator subject to different drives, in particular, harmonic and self-generated waveforms. This system, an implementation of the Ikeda oscillator, is operating in a closed-loop configuration, exhibiting its autonomous dynamics while the drive signals are additionally introduced. Applying the same drive multiple times, we compare the dynamical responses of the optoelectronic oscillator and quantify the degree of consistency among them via their correlation. Our results show that consistency is not restricted to conditions close to the first Hopf bifurcation but can be found in a broad range of dynamical regimes, even in the presence of multistability. Finally, we discuss the dependence of consistency on the nature of the drive signal.

  19. Testing of a controller for a hybrid capillary pumped loop thermal control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schweickart, Russell; Ottenstein, Laura; Cullimore, Brent; Egan, Curtis; Wolf, Dave

    1989-01-01

    A controller for a series hybrid capillary pumped loop (CPL) system that requires no moving parts does not resrict fluid flow has been tested and has demonstrated improved performance characteristics over a plain CPL system and simple hybrid CPL systems. These include heat load sharing, phase separation, self-regulated flow control and distribution, all independent of most system pressure drop. In addition, the controlled system demonstrated a greater heat transport capability than the simple CPL system but without the large fluid inventory requirement of the hybrid systems. A description of the testing is presented along with data that show the advantages of the system.

  20. Use of an open-loop system to increase physical activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of an open-loop system that reinforces physical activity with TV watching to increase children’s physical activity. Non-overweight, sedentary boys and girls (8-12 y) were randomized to a group that received feedback of activity counts + reinforcement for physic...

  1. Hardware-in-the-loop testing of wireless systems in realistic environments.

    SciTech Connect

    Burkholder, R. J. (Ohio State University ElectroScience Laboratory); Mariano, Robert J.; Gupta, I. J. (Ohio State University ElectroScience Laboratory); Schniter, P. (Ohio State University ElectroScience Laboratory)

    2006-06-01

    This document describes an approach for testing of wireless systems in realistic environments that include intentional as well as unintentional radio frequency interference. In the approach, signal generators along with radio channel simulators are used to carry out hardware-in-the-loop testing. The channel parameters are obtained independently via channel sounding measurements and/or EM simulations.

  2. Data-driven system to predict academic grades and dropout.

    PubMed

    Rovira, Sergi; Puertas, Eloi; Igual, Laura

    2017-01-01

    Nowadays, the role of a tutor is more important than ever to prevent students dropout and improve their academic performance. This work proposes a data-driven system to extract relevant information hidden in the student academic data and, thus, help tutors to offer their pupils a more proactive personal guidance. In particular, our system, based on machine learning techniques, makes predictions of dropout intention and courses grades of students, as well as personalized course recommendations. Moreover, we present different visualizations which help in the interpretation of the results. In the experimental validation, we show that the system obtains promising results with data from the degree studies in Law, Computer Science and Mathematics of the Universitat de Barcelona.

  3. Design of Stirling-driven vapor-compression system

    SciTech Connect

    Kagawa, N.

    1998-07-01

    Stirling engines have many unique advantages including higher thermal efficiencies, preferable exhaust gas characteristics, multi-fuel usage, and low noise and vibration. On the other hand, heat pump systems are very attractive for space heating and cooling and industrial usage because of their potential to save energy. Especially, there are many environmental merits of Stirling-driven vapor-compression (SDVC) systems. This paper introduces a design method for the SDVC based on reliable mathematical methods for Stirling and Rankine cycles with reliable thermophysical information for refrigerants. The model treats a kinematic Stirling engine and a scroll compressor coupled by a belt. Some experimental coefficients are used to formulate the SDVC items. The obtained results show the performance behavior of the SDVC in detail. The measured performance of the actual system agrees with the calculated results. Furthermore, the calculated results indicate attractive SDVC performance using alternative refrigerants.

  4. Recommender Systems on the Web: A Model-Driven Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojas, Gonzalo; Domínguez, Francisco; Salvatori, Stefano

    Recommendation techniques have been increasingly incorporated in e-commerce applications, supporting clients in identifying those items that best fit their needs. Unfortunately, little effort has been made to integrate these techniques into methodological proposals of Web development, discouraging the adoption of engineering approaches to face the complexity of recommender systems. This paper introduces a proposal to develop Web-based recommender systems from a model-driven perspective, specifying the elements of recommendation algorithms from a high abstraction level. Adopting the item-to-item approach, this proposal adopts the conceptual models of an existing Web development process to represent the preferences of users for different items, the similarity between obtained from different algorithms, and the selection and ordering of the recommended items according to a predicted rating value. Along with systematizing the development of these systems, this approach permits to evaluate different algorithms with minor changes at conceptual level, simplifying their mapping to final implementations.

  5. Data-driven system to predict academic grades and dropout

    PubMed Central

    Rovira, Sergi; Puertas, Eloi

    2017-01-01

    Nowadays, the role of a tutor is more important than ever to prevent students dropout and improve their academic performance. This work proposes a data-driven system to extract relevant information hidden in the student academic data and, thus, help tutors to offer their pupils a more proactive personal guidance. In particular, our system, based on machine learning techniques, makes predictions of dropout intention and courses grades of students, as well as personalized course recommendations. Moreover, we present different visualizations which help in the interpretation of the results. In the experimental validation, we show that the system obtains promising results with data from the degree studies in Law, Computer Science and Mathematics of the Universitat de Barcelona. PMID:28196078

  6. Plug nozzles: The ultimate customer driven propulsion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aukerman, Carl A.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a study applying the plug cluster nozzle concept to the propulsion system for a typical lunar excursion vehicle. Primary attention for the design criteria is given to user defined factors such as reliability, low volume, and ease of propulsion system development. Total thrust and specific impulse are held constant in the study while other parameters are explored to minimize the design chamber pressure. A brief history of the plug nozzle concept is included to point out the advanced level of technology of the concept and the feasibility of exploiting the variables considered in this study. The plug cluster concept looks very promising as a candidate for consideration for the ultimate customer driven propulsion system.

  7. Fluctuation theorem in driven nonthermal systems with quenched disorder

    SciTech Connect

    Reichhardt, Charles; Reichhardt, C J; Drocco, J A

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate that the fluctuation theorem of Evans and Searles can be used to characterize the class of dynamics that arises in nonthermal systems of collectively interacting particles driven over random quenched disorder. By observing the frequency of entropy-destroying trajectories, we show that there are specific dynamical regimes near depinning in which this theorem holds. Hence the fluctuation theorem can be used to characterize a significantly wider class of non-equilibrium systems than previously considered. We discuss how the fluctuation theorem could be tested in specific systems where noisy dynamics appear at the transition from a pinned to a moving phase such as in vortices in type-II superconductors, magnetic domain walls, and dislocation dynamics.

  8. Driven spin systems as quantum thermodynamic machines: Fundamental limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henrich, Markus J.; Mahler, Günter; Michel, Mathias

    2007-05-01

    We show that coupled two-level systems like qubits studied in quantum-information processing can be used as a thermodynamic machine. At least three qubits or spins are necessary and they must be arranged in a chain. The system is interfaced between two split baths and the working spin in the middle is externally driven. The machine performs Carnot-type cycles and is able to work as a heat pump or engine depending on the temperature difference of the baths, ΔT , and the energy difference in the spin system, ΔE . It can be shown that the efficiency is a function of ΔT and ΔE .

  9. Electrical engineering and nontechnical design variables of multiple inductive loop systems for auditoriums.

    PubMed

    Alterovitz, Gil

    2004-01-01

    This research analyzed both engineering and nontechnical issues involved in the use of Induction Loop Amplification (ILA) devices in auditoriums or large gathering places for hard-of-hearing individuals. A variety of parameters need to be taken into account to determine an optimal shape/configuration for the ILA device. In many cases, an optimal configuration is different from those proposed for classroom use (Ross, 1969; Hodgson, 1986; Clevenger, 1992). Experimental results were obtained for a double-loop configuration in such a setting (a university gymnasium/auditorium in this case). The results demonstrate that a double-loop configuration is a viable possibility for auditorium use. Several variables using this configuration were examined, and experimentation was done. Various implications, including consequent nontechnical issues specific to this application, are discussed as well. Technical and nontechnical aspects of the ILA configuration need to be examined together when designing an optimal system.

  10. Development of emergent processing loops as a system of systems concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gainey, James C., Jr.; Blasch, Erik P.

    1999-03-01

    This paper describes an engineering approach toward implementing the current neuroscientific understanding of how the primate brain fuses, or integrates, 'information' in the decision-making process. We describe a System of Systems (SoS) design for improving the overall performance, capabilities, operational robustness, and user confidence in Identification (ID) systems and show how it could be applied to biometrics security. We use the Physio-associative temporal sensor integration algorithm (PATSIA) which is motivated by observed functions and interactions of the thalamus, hippocampus, and cortical structures in the brain. PATSIA utilizes signal theory mathematics to model how the human efficiently perceives and uses information from the environment. The hybrid architecture implements a possible SoS-level description of the Joint Directors of US Laboratories for Fusion Working Group's functional description involving 5 levels of fusion and their associated definitions. This SoS architecture propose dynamic sensor and knowledge-source integration by implementing multiple Emergent Processing Loops for predicting, feature extracting, matching, and Searching both static and dynamic database like MSTAR's PEMS loops. Biologically, this effort demonstrates these objectives by modeling similar processes from the eyes, ears, and somatosensory channels, through the thalamus, and to the cortices as appropriate while using the hippocampus for short-term memory search and storage as necessary. The particular approach demonstrated incorporates commercially available speaker verification and face recognition software and hardware to collect data and extract features to the PATSIA. The PATSIA maximizes the confidence levels for target identification or verification in dynamic situations using a belief filter. The proof of concept described here is easily adaptable and scaleable to other military and nonmilitary sensor fusion applications.

  11. Human in the Loop Integrated Life Support Systems Ground Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henninger, Donald L.; Marmolejo, Jose A.; Seaman, Calvin H.

    2012-01-01

    Human exploration missions beyond low earth orbit will be long duration with abort scenarios of days to months. This necessitates provisioning the crew with all the things they will need to sustain themselves while carrying out mission objectives. Systems engineering and integration is critical to the point where extensive integrated testing of life support systems on the ground is required to identify and mitigate risks. Ground test facilities (human-rated altitude chambers) at the Johnson Space Center are being readied to integrate all the systems for a mission along with a human test crew. The relevant environment will include deep space habitat human accommodations, sealed atmosphere capable of 14.7 to 8 psi total pressure and 21 to 32% oxygen concentration, life support systems (food, air, and water), communications, crew accommodations, medical, EVA, tools, etc. Testing periods will approximate those of the expected missions (such as a near Earth asteroid, Earth-Moon L2 or L1, the moon, Mars). This type of integrated testing is needed for research and technology development as well as later during the mission design, development, test, and evaluation (DDT&E) phases of an approved program. Testing will evolve to be carried out at the mission level fly the mission on the ground . Mission testing will also serve to inform the public and provide the opportunity for active participation by international, industrial and academic partners.

  12. Data driven CAN node reliability assessment for manufacturing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Leiming; Yuan, Yong; Lei, Yong

    2017-01-01

    The reliability of the Controller Area Network(CAN) is critical to the performance and safety of the system. However, direct bus-off time assessment tools are lacking in practice due to inaccessibility of the node information and the complexity of the node interactions upon errors. In order to measure the mean time to bus-off(MTTB) of all the nodes, a novel data driven node bus-off time assessment method for CAN network is proposed by directly using network error information. First, the corresponding network error event sequence for each node is constructed using multiple-layer network error information. Then, the generalized zero inflated Poisson process(GZIP) model is established for each node based on the error event sequence. Finally, the stochastic model is constructed to predict the MTTB of the node. The accelerated case studies with different error injection rates are conducted on a laboratory network to demonstrate the proposed method, where the network errors are generated by a computer controlled error injection system. Experiment results show that the MTTB of nodes predicted by the proposed method agree well with observations in the case studies. The proposed data driven node time to bus-off assessment method for CAN networks can successfully predict the MTTB of nodes by directly using network error event data.

  13. A Novel Open-Loop Tracking Strategy for Photovoltaic Systems

    PubMed Central

    Alexandru, Cătălin

    2013-01-01

    This paper approaches a dual-axis equatorial tracking system that is used to increase the photovoltaic efficiency by maximizing the degree of use of the solar radiation. The innovative aspect in the solar tracker design consists in considering the tracking mechanism as a perturbation for the DC motors. The goal is to control the DC motors, which are perturbed with the motor torques whose computation is based on the dynamic model of the mechanical structure on which external forces act. The daily and elevation angles of the PV module represent the input parameters in the mechanical device, while the outputs transmitted to the controller are the motor torques. The controller tuning is approached by a parametric optimization process, using design of experiments and response surface methodology techniques, in a multiple regression. The simulation and experimental results demonstrate the operational performance of the tracking system. PMID:24327803

  14. A novel open-loop tracking strategy for photovoltaic systems.

    PubMed

    Alexandru, Cătălin

    2013-01-01

    This paper approaches a dual-axis equatorial tracking system that is used to increase the photovoltaic efficiency by maximizing the degree of use of the solar radiation. The innovative aspect in the solar tracker design consists in considering the tracking mechanism as a perturbation for the DC motors. The goal is to control the DC motors, which are perturbed with the motor torques whose computation is based on the dynamic model of the mechanical structure on which external forces act. The daily and elevation angles of the PV module represent the input parameters in the mechanical device, while the outputs transmitted to the controller are the motor torques. The controller tuning is approached by a parametric optimization process, using design of experiments and response surface methodology techniques, in a multiple regression. The simulation and experimental results demonstrate the operational performance of the tracking system.

  15. Research developing closed loop roll control for magnetic balance systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Covert, E. E.; Haldeman, C. W.

    1981-01-01

    Computer inputs were interfaced to the magnetic balance outputs to provide computer position control and data acquisition. The use of parameter identification of a means of determining dynamic characteristics was investigated. The thyraton and motor generator power supplies for the pitch and yaw degrees of freedom were repaired. Topics covered include: choice of a method for handling dynamic system data; applications to the magnetic balance; the computer interface; and wind tunnel tests, results, and error analysis.

  16. A Trnsys simulation of a solar-driven ejector air conditioning system with an integrated PCM cold storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allouche, Yosr; Varga, Szabolcs; Bouden, Chiheb; Oliveira, Armando

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, the development of a TRNSYS model, for the simulation of a solar driven ejector cooling system with an integrated PCM cold storage is presented. The simulations were carried out with the aim of satisfying the cooling needs of a 140 m3 space during the summer season in Tunis, Tunisia. The system is composed of three main subsystems, which include: a solar loop, an ejector cycle and a PCM cold storage tank. The latter is connected to the air-conditioned space. The influence of applying cold storage on the system performance was investigated. It was found that the system COP increased compared to a system without cold storage. An optimal storage volume of 1000 l was identified resulting in the highest cooling COP and highest indoor comfort (95% of the time with a room temperature below 26°C). The maximum COP and solar thermal ratio (STR) were 0.193 and 0.097, respectively.

  17. Data-driven modeling, control and tools for cyber-physical energy systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behl, Madhur

    Energy systems are experiencing a gradual but substantial change in moving away from being non-interactive and manually-controlled systems to utilizing tight integration of both cyber (computation, communications, and control) and physical representations guided by first principles based models, at all scales and levels. Furthermore, peak power reduction programs like demand response (DR) are becoming increasingly important as the volatility on the grid continues to increase due to regulation, integration of renewables and extreme weather conditions. In order to shield themselves from the risk of price volatility, end-user electricity consumers must monitor electricity prices and be flexible in the ways they choose to use electricity. This requires the use of control-oriented predictive models of an energy system's dynamics and energy consumption. Such models are needed for understanding and improving the overall energy efficiency and operating costs. However, learning dynamical models using grey/white box approaches is very cost and time prohibitive since it often requires significant financial investments in retrofitting the system with several sensors and hiring domain experts for building the model. We present the use of data-driven methods for making model capture easy and efficient for cyber-physical energy systems. We develop Model-IQ, a methodology for analysis of uncertainty propagation for building inverse modeling and controls. Given a grey-box model structure and real input data from a temporary set of sensors, Model-IQ evaluates the effect of the uncertainty propagation from sensor data to model accuracy and to closed-loop control performance. We also developed a statistical method to quantify the bias in the sensor measurement and to determine near optimal sensor placement and density for accurate data collection for model training and control. Using a real building test-bed, we show how performing an uncertainty analysis can reveal trends about

  18. Hardware-in-the-loop tow missile system simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Waldman, G.S.; Wootton, J.R.; Hobson, G.L.; Holder, D.L.

    1993-07-06

    A missile system simulator is described for use in training people for target acquisition, missile launch, and missile guidance under simulated battlefield conditions comprising: simulating means for producing a digital signal representing a simulated battlefield environment including at least one target movable therewithin, the simulating means generating an infrared map representing the field-of-view and the target; interface means for converting said digital signals to an infrared image; missile system hardware including the missile acquisition, tracking, and guidance portions thereof, said hardware sensing the infrared image to determine the location of the target in a field-of-view; and, image means for generating an infrared image of a missile launched at the target and guided thereto, the image means imposing the missile image onto the field-of-view for the missile hardware to acquire the image of the missile in addition to that of the target, and to generate guidance signals to guide the missile image to the target image, wherein the interfacing means is responsive to a guidance signal from the hardware to simulate, in real-time, the response of the missile to the guidance signal, the image means including a blackbody, laser means for irradiating the blackbody to heat it to a temperature at which it emits infrared radiation, and optic means for integrating the radiant image produced by heating the blackbody into the infrared map.

  19. Classification of topological phases in periodically driven interacting systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Else, Dominic V.; Nayak, Chetan

    2016-05-01

    We consider topological phases in periodically driven (Floquet) systems exhibiting many-body localization, protected by a symmetry G . We argue for a general correspondence between such phases and topological phases of undriven systems protected by symmetry Z ⋊G where the additional Z accounts for the discrete time-translation symmetry. Thus, for example, the bosonic phases in d spatial dimensions without intrinsic topological order [symmetry-protected topological (SPT) phases] are classified by the cohomology group Hd +1[Z ⋊G ,U (1 ) ] . For unitary symmetries, we interpret the additional resulting Floquet phases in terms of the lower-dimensional SPT phases that are pumped to the boundary during one time step. These results also imply the existence of novel symmetry-enriched topological (SET) orders protected solely by the periodicity of the drive.

  20. An AC drive system for a battery driven moped

    SciTech Connect

    Nandi, S.; Saha, S.; Sharon, M.; Sundersingh, V.P.

    1995-12-31

    A petrol driven moped is converted to an electric one by replacing the petrol engine by a three phase 1.5 HR, AC squirrel cage induction motor drive system. The motor voltage rating selected is 200 V to keep the DC boost voltage level to a reasonable value.f the power source used is a high energy density, 24 V, 110 Ah, Ni-Zn battery. A modified indirect current controlled step-up chopper as well as a standard push-pull DC-DC boost converter is studied for the boost scheme. A simple three phase quasi-square wave inverter is designed along with suitable protection for driving the motor. Successful trial test of the system has been conducted at the laboratory.

  1. Distributed monitoring system for electric-motor-driven compressors

    SciTech Connect

    Castleberry, K.N.

    1996-01-01

    Personnel in the Instrumentation and Controls Division at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, in association with the United States Enrichment corporation (USEC), the Navy, and various Department of Energy sponsors, have been involved in the development and application of motor-current signature analysis (CSA) for several years. In that time CSA has proven to not only be useful for manually applied periodic monitoring of electrically driven equipment but it has also been demonstrated to be well suited for dedicated monitoring systems in industrial settings. Recent work has resulted in the development and installation of a system that can monitor up to 640 motor and compressor stages for various aerodynamic conditions in the gas compressors and electrical problems in the drive motors. This report describes a demonstration of that technology installed on 80 stages at each of the two USEC uranium enrichment plants.

  2. Androgynous, Reconfigurable Closed Loop Feedback Controlled Low Impact Docking System With Load Sensing Electromagnetic Capture Ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, James L. (Inventor); Carroll, Monty B. (Inventor); Morales, Ray H. (Inventor); Le, Thang D. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    The present invention relates to a fully androgynous, reconfigurable closed loop feedback controlled low impact docking system with load sensing electromagnetic capture ring. The docking system of the present invention preferably comprises two Docking- assemblies, each docking assembly comprising a load sensing ring having an outer face, one of more electromagnets, one or more load cells coupled to said load sensing ring. The docking assembly further comprises a plurality of actuator arms coupled to said load sensing ring and capable of dynamically adjusting the orientation of said load sensing ring and a reconfigurable closed loop control system capable of analyzing signals originating from said plurality of load cells and of outputting real time control for each of the actuators. The docking assembly of the present invention incorporates an active load sensing system to automatically dynamically adjust the load sensing ring during capture instead of requiring significant force to push and realign the ring.

  3. Self-organization in a driven dissipative plasma system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaikh, Dastgeer; Dasgupta, B.; Hu, Q.; Zank, G. P.

    2010-02-01

    We perform a fully self-consistent three-dimensional numerical simulation for a compressible, dissipative magnetoplasma driven by large-scale perturbations, that contain a fairly broad spectrum of characteristic modes, ranging from largest scales to intermediate scales and down to the smallest scales, where the energy of the system is dissipated by collisional (ohmic) and viscous dissipations. Additionally, our simulation includes nonlinear interactions amongst a wide range of fluctuations that are initialized with random spectral amplitudes, leading to the cascade of spectral energy in the inertial range spectrum, and takes into account large-scale as well as small-scale perturbations that may have been induced by the background plasma fluctuations, as well as the non-adiabatic exchange of energy leading to the migration of energy from the energy-containing modes or randomly injected energy driven by perturbations and further dissipated by the smaller scales. Besides demonstrating the comparative decays of the total energy and the dissipation rate of the energy, our results show the existence of a perpendicular component of the current, thus clearly confirming that the self-organized state is non-force free.

  4. Testing of the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) Prototype Loop Heat Pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglas, Donya; Ku, Jentung; Kaya, Tarik

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes the testing of the prototype loop heat pipe (LHP) for the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS). The primary objective of the test program was to verify the loop's heat transport and temperature control capabilities under conditions pertinent to GLAS applications. Specifically, the LHP had to demonstrate a heat transport capability of 100 W, with the operating temperature maintained within +/-2K while the condenser sink was subjected to a temperature change between 273K and 283K. Test results showed that this loop heat pipe was more than capable of transporting the required heat load and that the operating temperature could be maintained within +/-2K. However, this particular integrated evaporator-compensation chamber design resulted in an exchange of energy between the two that affected the overall operation of the system. One effect was the high temperature the LHP was required to reach before nucleation would begin due to inability to control liquid distribution during ground testing. Another effect was that the loop had a low power start-up limitation of approximately 25 W. These Issues may be a concern for other applications, although it is not expected that they will cause problems for GLAS under micro-gravity conditions.

  5. A closed loop wireless power transmission system using a commercial RFID transceiver for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Kiani, Mehdi; Ghovanloo, Maysam

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a standalone closed loop wireless power transmission system that is built around a commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) radio frequency identification (RFID) transceiver (MLX90121) operating at 13.56 MHz. It can be used for inductively powering implantable biomedical devices in a closed loop fashion. Any changes in the distance and misalignment between transmitter and receiver coils in near-field wireless power transmission can cause a significant change in the received power, which can cause either malfunction or excessive heat dissipation. RFID transceivers are often used open loop. However, their back telemetry capability can be utilized to stabilize the received voltage on the implant. Our measurements showed that the delivered power to the transponder was maintained at 1.48 mW over a range of 6 to 12 cm, while the transmitter power consumption changed from 0.3 W to 1.21 W. The closed loop system can also oppose voltage variations as a result of sudden changes in load current.

  6. Low-temperature plasma technology as part of a closed-loop resource management system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hetland, Melanie D.; Rindt, John R.; Jones, Frank A.; Sauer, Randal S.

    1990-01-01

    The results of this testing indicate that the agitated low-temperature plasma reactor system successfully converted carbon, hydrogen, and nitrogen into gaseous products at residence times that were about ten times shorter than those achieved by stationary processing. The inorganic matrix present was virtually unchanged by the processing technique. It was concluded that this processing technique is feasible for use as part of a close-looped processing resource management system.

  7. Limit Cycle Bifurcations for Piecewise Smooth Hamiltonian Systems with a Generalized Eye-Figure Loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jihua; Zhao, Liqin

    This paper deals with the limit cycle bifurcations for piecewise smooth Hamiltonian systems. By using the first order Melnikov function of piecewise near-Hamiltonian systems given in [Liu & Han, 2010], we give a lower bound and an upper bound of the number of limit cycles that bifurcate from the period annulus between the center and the generalized eye-figure loop up to the first order of Melnikov function.

  8. Regularization of chaos by noise in electrically driven nanowire systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hessari, Peyman; Do, Younghae; Lai, Ying-Cheng; Chae, Junseok; Park, Cheol Woo; Lee, GyuWon

    2014-04-01

    The electrically driven nanowire systems are of great importance to nanoscience and engineering. Due to strong nonlinearity, chaos can arise, but in many applications it is desirable to suppress chaos. The intrinsically high-dimensional nature of the system prevents application of the conventional method of controlling chaos. Remarkably, we find that the phenomenon of coherence resonance, which has been well documented but for low-dimensional chaotic systems, can occur in the nanowire system that mathematically is described by two coupled nonlinear partial differential equations, subject to periodic driving and noise. Especially, we find that, when the nanowire is in either the weakly chaotic or the extensively chaotic regime, an optimal level of noise can significantly enhance the regularity of the oscillations. This result is robust because it holds regardless of whether noise is white or colored, and of whether the stochastic drivings in the two independent directions transverse to the nanowire are correlated or independent of each other. Noise can thus regularize chaotic oscillations through the mechanism of coherence resonance in the nanowire system. More generally, we posit that noise can provide a practical way to harness chaos in nanoscale systems.

  9. Three tritium systems test assembly (TSTA) off-loop experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Talcott, C.L.; Anderson, J.L.; Carlson, R.V.; Coffin, D.O.; Walthers, C.R.; Hamerdinger, D.; Binning, K.; Trujillo, R.D.; Moya, J.S.; Hayashi, T.; Okuno, K.; Yamanishi, T.

    1993-11-01

    This report contains the results from three different experiments. Experiment one was initiated to establish the possibility of using a soft elastomer in ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) applications. Used in this application, the sealing material is anticipated to be in tritium at pressures in the range of 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} torr for many years. Here two O-ring valve seals each of Viton-A, Buna-N, and EDPM were exposed to 1, 40, or 400 torr of tritium while being cycled open and closed approximately 11,500 times in 192 days. EDPM is the least susceptible to damage from the tritium. Both Buna-N and Viton-A showed deterioration following the first cycling at 400 torr. Using commercially available materials, the Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA) designed and built a Portable Water Removal (PWR) Unit to reduce tritium oxide emissions during glovebox breaches. The PWR removes 99.9% of all tritium and saves between 0.7 and 3.5 curies of tritium oxide from being stacked during each of the five tests. Finally, a series of tests are done to determine whether the presence of SF{sub 6} changes the ability of palladium and platinum to catalyze the T{sub 2}-O{sub 2} reaction to form T{sub 2}O. No deterioration of the catalytic activity is observed. This is important because the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) requires information about the effect of SF{sub 6}, an electrical insulator, on the catalytic behavior of Pt and Pd in a T{sub 2} environment. This information is necessary for the accident analysis in the Safety Analysis Report for TFTR. This study is done using an apparatus supplied to TSTA by TFTR.

  10. Artificial Pancreas Device Systems for the Closed-Loop Control of Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Trevitt, Sara; Simpson, Sue; Wood, Annette

    2015-01-01

    Background: Closed-loop artificial pancreas device (APD) systems are externally worn medical devices that are being developed to enable people with type 1 diabetes to regulate their blood glucose levels in a more automated way. The innovative concept of this emerging technology is that hands-free, continuous, glycemic control can be achieved by using digital communication technology and advanced computer algorithms. Methods: A horizon scanning review of this field was conducted using online sources of intelligence to identify systems in development. The systems were classified into subtypes according to their level of automation, the hormonal and glycemic control approaches used, and their research setting. Results: Eighteen closed-loop APD systems were identified. All were being tested in clinical trials prior to potential commercialization. Six were being studied in the home setting, 5 in outpatient settings, and 7 in inpatient settings. It is estimated that 2 systems may become commercially available in the EU by the end of 2016, 1 during 2017, and 2 more in 2018. Conclusions: There are around 18 closed-loop APD systems progressing through early stages of clinical development. Only a few of these are currently in phase 3 trials and in settings that replicate real life. PMID:26589628

  11. Statistics of the dissipated energy in driven diffusive systems.

    PubMed

    Lasanta, A; Hurtado, Pablo I; Prados, A

    2016-03-01

    Understanding the physics of non-equilibrium systems remains one of the major open questions in statistical physics. This problem can be partially handled by investigating macroscopic fluctuations of key magnitudes that characterise the non-equilibrium behaviour of the system of interest; their statistics, associated structures and microscopic origin. During the last years, some new general and powerful methods have appeared to delve into fluctuating behaviour that have drastically changed the way to address this problem in the realm of diffusive systems: macroscopic fluctuation theory (MFT) and a set of advanced computational techniques that make it possible to measure the probability of rare events. Notwithstanding, a satisfactory theory is still lacking in a particular case of intrinsically non-equilibrium systems, namely those in which energy is not conserved but dissipated continuously in the bulk of the system (e.g. granular media). In this work, we put forward the dissipated energy as a relevant quantity in this case and analyse in a pedagogical way its fluctuations, by making use of a suitable generalisation of macroscopic fluctuation theory to driven dissipative media.

  12. An error criterion for determining sampling rates in closed-loop control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brecher, S. M.

    1972-01-01

    The determination of an error criterion which will give a sampling rate for adequate performance of linear, time-invariant closed-loop, discrete-data control systems was studied. The proper modelling of the closed-loop control system for characterization of the error behavior, and the determination of an absolute error definition for performance of the two commonly used holding devices are discussed. The definition of an adequate relative error criterion as a function of the sampling rate and the parameters characterizing the system is established along with the determination of sampling rates. The validity of the expressions for the sampling interval was confirmed by computer simulations. Their application solves the problem of making a first choice in the selection of sampling rates.

  13. Radiological Hazard of Spallation Products in Accelerator-Driven System

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, M.; Stankovskii, A.; Artisyuk, V.; Korovin, Yu.; Shmelev, A.; Titarenko, Yu.

    2002-09-15

    The central issue underlying this paper is related to elucidating the hazard of radioactive spallation products that might be an important factor affecting the design option of accelerator-driven systems (ADSs). Hazard analysis based on the concept of Annual Limit on Intake identifies alpha-emitting isotopes of rare earths (REs) (dysprosium, gadolinium, and samarium) as the dominant contributors to the overall toxicity of traditional (W, Pb, Pb-Bi) targets. The matter is addressed from several points of view: code validation to simulate their yields, choice of material for the neutron producing targets, and challenging the beam type. The paper quantitatively determines the domain in which the toxicity of REs exceeds that of polonium activation products broadly discussed now in connection with advertising lead-bismuth technology for the needs of ADSs.

  14. Flyer Velocity Characteristics of the Laser-Driven Miniflyer System

    SciTech Connect

    Gehr, R.J.; Harper, R.W.; Robbins, D.L.; Rupp, T.D.; Sheffield, S.A.; Stahl, D.B.

    1999-07-01

    The laser-driven MiniFlyer system is used to launch a small, thin flyer plate for impact on a target. Consequently, it is an indirect drive technique that de-couples the shock from the laser beam profile. The flyer velocity can be controlled by adjustment of the laser energy. The upper limits on the flyer velocity involve the ability of the substrate window to transmit the laser light without absorbing, reflecting, etc.; i.e., a maximum amount of laser energy is directly converted into kinetic energy of the flyer plate. We have investigated the use of sapphire, quartz, and BK-7 glass as substrate windows. In the past, a particular type of sapphire has been used for nearly all MiniFlyer experiments. Results of this study in terms of the performance of these window materials, based on flyer velocity, are discussed.

  15. High gain driven right leg circuit for dry electrode systems.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, Federico N; Spinelli, Enrique

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents an improved driven right leg (DRL) circuit compensation together with a practical implementation. The proposed design allows to increase common mode voltage attenuation compared with the widely used dominant pole compensation while maintaining the same proven stability margin and design criteria, and requiring only a modification of its passive feedback network. A sample implementation of the proposed DRL was obtained estimating the values of interference model parameters for a dry electrode measurement system. A dominant pole compensated DRL with the same stability margin was also implemented in order to experimentally validate the proposed design against this established alternative. Measurements were conducted under both controlled and uncontrolled interference conditions. The proposed compensation experimentally demonstrated achieving a better reduction of power line harmonics, with a peak comparative improvement of around 18  dB at 50  Hz.

  16. Linear Response Theory for Thermally Driven Quantum Open Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakšić, V.; Ogata, Y.; Pillet, C.-A.

    2006-05-01

    This note is a continuation of our recent paper [V. Jakšić Y. Ogata, and C.-A. Pillet, The Green-Kubo formula and Onsager reciprocity relations in quantum statistical mechanics. Commun. Math. Phys. in press.] where we have proven the Green-Kubo formula and the Onsager reciprocity relations for heat fluxes in thermally driven quantum open systems. In this note we extend the derivation of the Green-Kubo formula to heat and charge fluxes and discuss some other generalizations of the model and results of [V. Jakšić Y. Ogata and C.-A. Pillet, The Green-Kubo formula and Onsager reciprocity relations in quantum statistical mechanics. Commun. Math. Phys. in press.].

  17. Intelligent fuzzy controller for event-driven real time systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grantner, Janos; Patyra, Marek; Stachowicz, Marian S.

    1992-01-01

    Most of the known linguistic models are essentially static, that is, time is not a parameter in describing the behavior of the object's model. In this paper we show a model for synchronous finite state machines based on fuzzy logic. Such finite state machines can be used to build both event-driven, time-varying, rule-based systems and the control unit section of a fuzzy logic computer. The architecture of a pipelined intelligent fuzzy controller is presented, and the linguistic model is represented by an overall fuzzy relation stored in a single rule memory. A VLSI integrated circuit implementation of the fuzzy controller is suggested. At a clock rate of 30 MHz, the controller can perform 3 MFLIPS on multi-dimensional fuzzy data.

  18. Conformal Invariance in Driven Diffusive Systems at High Currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karevski, D.; Schütz, G. M.

    2017-01-01

    We consider space-time correlations in driven diffusive systems which undergo a fluctuation into a regime with an atypically large current or dynamical activity. For a single conserved mass we show that the spatiotemporal density correlations in one space dimension are fully determined by conformal field theory with central charge c =1 , corresponding to a ballistic universality class with dynamical exponent z =1 . The full phase diagram for general atypical behavior exhibits the conformally invariant regime and, for atypically low current or activity, a region of phase separation. The phase transition line between these two regimes corresponds to typical behavior and the dynamics belongs to the Kardar-Parisi-Zhang universality class with dynamical exponent z =3 /2 , except for a diffusive point with z =2 . The exact universal dynamical structure function is obtained in explicit form from the one-dimensional asymmetric simple exclusion process with periodic and open boundaries in the limit of maximal current.

  19. Fast flux locked loop

    DOEpatents

    Ganther, Jr., Kenneth R.; Snapp, Lowell D.

    2002-09-10

    A flux locked loop for providing an electrical feedback signal, the flux locked loop employing radio-frequency components and technology to extend the flux modulation frequency and tracking loop bandwidth. The flux locked loop of the present invention has particularly useful application in read-out electronics for DC SQUID magnetic measurement systems, in which case the electrical signal output by the flux locked loop represents an unknown magnetic flux applied to the DC SQUID.

  20. Behavioral analysis of differential Hebbian learning in closed-loop systems.

    PubMed

    Kulvicius, Tomas; Kolodziejski, Christoph; Tamosiunaite, Minija; Porr, Bernd; Wörgötter, Florentin

    2010-10-01

    Understanding closed loop behavioral systems is a non-trivial problem, especially when they change during learning. Descriptions of closed loop systems in terms of information theory date back to the 1950s, however, there have been only a few attempts which take into account learning, mostly measuring information of inputs. In this study we analyze a specific type of closed loop system by looking at the input as well as the output space. For this, we investigate simulated agents that perform differential Hebbian learning (STDP). In the first part we show that analytical solutions can be found for the temporal development of such systems for relatively simple cases. In the second part of this study we try to answer the following question: How can we predict which system from a given class would be the best for a particular scenario? This question is addressed using energy, input/output ratio and entropy measures and investigating their development during learning. This way we can show that within well-specified scenarios there are indeed agents which are optimal with respect to their structure and adaptive properties.

  1. A Humidity-Driven Prediction System for Influenza Outbreaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thrastarson, H. T.; Teixeira, J.

    2015-12-01

    Recent studies have highlighted the role of absolute (or specific) humidity conditions as a leading explanation for the seasonal behavior of influenza outbreaks in temperate regions. If the timing and intensity of seasonal influenza outbreaks can be forecast, this would be of great value for public health response efforts. We have developed and implemented a SIRS (Susceptible-Infectious-Recovered-Susceptible) type numerical prediction system that is driven by specific humidity to predict influenza outbreaks. For the humidity, we have explored using both satellite data from the AIRS (Atmospheric Infrared Sounder) instrument as well as ERA-Interim re-analysis data. We discuss the development, testing, sensitivities and limitations of the prediction system and show results for influenza outbreaks in the United States during the years 2010-2014 (modeled in retrospect). Comparisons are made with other existing prediction systems and available data for influenza outbreaks from Google Flu Trends and the CDC (Center for Disease Control), and the incorporation of these datasets into the forecasting system is discussed.

  2. Development of an implantable motor-driven assist pump system.

    PubMed

    Mitamura, Y; Okamoto, E; Hirano, A; Mikami, T

    1990-02-01

    A motor-driven artificial pump and its transcutaneous energy transmission (TET) system have been developed. The artificial pump consists of a high-speed dc brushless motor driving a ball screw and magnetic coupling mechanism between the blood pump and ball screw. The ball screw transfers high-speed rotary motion into low-speed rectilinear motion by a single component. Magnetic coupling enables active blood filling without applying an excess negative pressure to the pump. The transcutaneous transformer is formed from a pair of concave/convex ferrite cores. This design minimizes lateral motion of the external core. Information on motor voltage is transmitted through the skin by infrared pulses. The motor voltage is regulated by controlling the duty ratio of the square pulse supplied to the primary coil. Pump flow of 5.6 l/min was obtained with a mean outlet pressure of 100 mmHg at a drive rate of 100 bpm under preload of 15 mmHg. The performance of synchronous pumping has been very satisfactory. Continuous pumping was maintained by the backup battery in the case of interruption of TET. 24 W were transmitted by TET system with 78 percent of efficiency. Temperature rise of the internal core was 0.2 C. The developed system is promising as an implantable assist pump system.

  3. Critical quasienergy states in driven many-body systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastidas Valencia, Victor Manuel; Engelhardt, Georg; Perez-Fernandez, Pedro; Vogl, Malte; Brandes, Tobias

    2015-03-01

    A quantum phase transition (QPT) is characterized by non-analyticities of ground-state properties at the critical points. Recently it has been shown that quantum criticality emerges also in excited states of the system, which is referred to as an excited-state quantum phase transition (ESQPT). This kind of quantum criticality is intimately related to a level clustering at critical energies, which results in a logarithmic singularity in the density of states. Most of the previous studies on quantum criticality in excited states have been focused on time independent systems. Here we study spectral singularities that appear in periodically-driven many-body systems and show how the external control allows one to engineer geometrical features of the quasienergy landscape. In particular, we study singularities in the quasienergy spectrum of a fully-connected network consisting of two-level systems with time-dependent interactions. We discuss the characteristic signatures of these singularities in observables like the magnetization, which should be measurable with current technology. The authors gratefully acknowledge financial support by the DFG via grants BRA 1528/7, BRA 1528/8, SFB 910 (V.M.B., T.B.), the Spanish Ministerio de Ciencia e Innovacion (Grants No. FIS2011-28738-C02-01) and Junta de Andalucia (Grants No. FQM160).

  4. Design, economic and system considerations of large wind-driven generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorgensen, G. E.; Lotker, M.; Meier, R. C.; Brierley, D.

    1976-01-01

    The increased search for alternative energy sources has lead to renewed interest and studies of large wind-driven generators. This paper presents the results and considerations of such an investigation. The paper emphasizes the concept selection of wind-driven generators, system optimization, control system design, safety aspects, economic viability on electric utility systems and potential electric system interfacing problems.

  5. Operational Characteristics of an Accelerator Driven Fissile Solution System

    SciTech Connect

    Kimpland, Robert Herbert

    2016-11-28

    Operational characteristics represent the set of responses that a nuclear system exhibits during normal operation. Operators rely on this behavior to assess the status of the system and to predict the consequences of off-normal events. These characteristics largely refer to the relationship between power and system operating conditions. The static and dynamic behavior of a chain-reacting system, operating at sufficient power, is primarily governed by reactivity effects. The science of reactor physics has identified and evaluated a number of such effects, including Doppler broadening and shifts in the thermal neutron spectrum. Often these reactivity effects are quantified in the form of feedback coefficients that serve as coupling coefficients relating the neutron population and the physical mechanisms that drive reactivity effects, such as fissile material temperature and density changes. The operational characteristics of such nuclear systems usually manifest themselves when perturbations between system power (neutron population) and system operating conditions arise. Successful operation of such systems require the establishment of steady equilibrium conditions. However, prior to obtaining the desired equilibrium (steady-state) conditions, an approach from zero-power (startup) must occur. This operational regime may possess certain limiting system conditions that must be maintained to achieve effective startup. Once steady-state is achieved, a key characteristic of this operational regime is the level of stability that the system possesses. Finally, a third operational regime, shutdown, may also possess limiting conditions of operation that must be maintained. This report documents the operational characteristics of a “generic” Accelerator Driven Fissile Solution (ADFS) system during the various operational regimes of startup, steady-state operation, and shutdown. Typical time-dependent behavior for each operational regime will be illustrated, and key system

  6. Evaluation of a closed loop inductive power transmission system on an awake behaving animal subject.

    PubMed

    Kiani, Mehdi; Kwon, Ki Yong; Zhang, Fei; Oweiss, Karim; Ghovanloo, Maysam

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents in vivo experimental results for a closed loop wireless power transmission system to implantable devices on an awake behaving animal subject. In this system, wireless power transmission takes place across an inductive link, controlled by a commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) radio frequency identification (RFID) transceiver (TRF7960) operating at 13.56 MHz. Induced voltage on the implantable secondary coil is rectified, digitized by a 10-bit analog to digital converter, and transmitted back to the primary via back telemetry. Transmitter (Tx) and receiver (Rx) circuitry were mounted on the back of an adult rat with a nominal distance of ~7 mm between their coils. Our experiments showed that the closed loop system was able to maintain the Rx supply voltage at the designated 3.8 V despite changes in the coils' relative distance and alignment due to animal movements. The Tx power consumption changed between 410 ~ 560 mW in order to deliver 27 mW to the receiver. The open loop system, on the other hand, showed undesired changes in the Rx supply voltage while the Tx power consumption was constant at 660 mW.

  7. Closed-Loop Control System for Friction Stir Welding Retractable Pin Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey; Romine, Peter L.; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    NASA invention disclosure, NASA Case No. MFS-31413, entitled "System for Controlling the Stirring Pin of a Friction Stir Welding Apparatus", (Patent Pending) authored by Jeff Ding, Dr Peter Romine and Pete Oelgoetz, addresses the precision control of the friction stir welding process. The closed-loop control system automatically adjusts the spinning welding pin, real-time, to maintain a precise penetration ligament (i.e., distance between pin-tip and weld panel backside surface). A specific pin length can be maintained while welding constant thickness or tapered material thickness weld panels. The closed-loop control system provides operator data and information relative to the exact position of the welding pin inside the weld joint. This paper presents the closed-loop RPT control system that operates using the auto-feedback of force signals sensed by the tip and shoulder of the welding pin. Significance: The FSW process can be successfully used in a production environment only if there is a method or technique that informs the FSW operator the precise location of the welding pin inside the weld joint. This is essential for applications in aerospace, automotive, pressure vessel, commercial aircraft and other industries.

  8. Potential and benefits of closed loop ECLS systems on the ISS.

    PubMed

    Raatschen, W; Preiss, H

    2001-01-01

    To close open loops for long manned missions in space is a big challenge for aeronautic engineers throughout the world. The paper's focus is on the oxygen reclamation from carbon dioxide within a space habitat. A brief description of the function principle of a fixed alkaline electrolyzer, a solid amine carbon dioxide concentrator and a Sabatier reactor is given. By combining these devices to an air revitalization system the technical and economical benefits are explained. Astrium's Air Revitalization System (ARES) as a potential future part of the International Space Station's Environmental Control and Life Support System would close the oxygen loop. The amount of oxygen, needed for an ISS crew of seven astronauts could be provided by ARES. The upload of almost 1500 kg of water annually for oxygen generation through the onboard electrolyzer would be reduced by more than 1000 kg, resulting in savings of more than 30M$ per year. Additionally, the payload capacity of supply flights would be increased by this amount of mass. Further possibilities are addressed to combine ECLS mass flows with those of the power, propulsion and attitude control systems. Such closed loop approaches will contribute to ease long time missions (e. g. Mars, Moon) from a cost and logistic point of view. The hardware realization of Astrium's space-sized operating ARES is shown and test results of continuous and intermittent closed chamber tests are presented.

  9. Design and implementation of sensor systems for control of a closed-loop life support system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alnwick, Leslie; Clark, Amy; Debs, Patricia; Franczek, Chris; Good, Tom; Rodrigues, Pedro

    1989-01-01

    The sensing and controlling needs for a Closed-Loop Life Support System (CLLSS) were investigated. The sensing needs were identified in five particular areas and the requirements were defined for workable sensors. The specific areas of interest were atmosphere and temperature, nutrient delivery, plant health, plant propagation and support, and solids processing. The investigation of atmosphere and temperature control focused on the temperature distribution within the growth chamber as well as the possibility for sensing other parameters such as gas concentration, pressure, and humidity. The sensing needs were studied for monitoring the solution level in a porous membrane material along with the requirements for measuring the mass flow rate in the delivery system. The causes and symptoms of plant disease were examined and the various techniques for sensing these health indicators were explored. The study of sensing needs for plant propagation and support focused on monitoring seed viability and measuring seed moisture content as well as defining the requirements for drying and storing the seeds. The areas of harvesting, food processing, and resource recycling, were covered with a main focus on the sensing possibilities for regulating the recycling process.

  10. Two-level systems driven by large-amplitude fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nori, F.; Ashhab, S.; Johansson, J. R.; Zagoskin, A. M.

    2009-03-01

    We analyze the dynamics of a two-level system subject to driving by large-amplitude external fields, focusing on the resonance properties in the case of driving around the region of avoided level crossing. In particular, we consider three main questions that characterize resonance dynamics: (1) the resonance condition, (2) the frequency of the resulting oscillations on resonance, and (3) the width of the resonance. We identify the regions of validity of different approximations. In a large region of the parameter space, we use a geometric picture in order to obtain both a simple understanding of the dynamics and quantitative results. The geometric approach is obtained by dividing the evolution into discrete time steps, with each time step described by either a phase shift on the basis states or a coherent mixing process corresponding to a Landau-Zener crossing. We compare the results of the geometric picture with those of a rotating wave approximation. We also comment briefly on the prospects of employing strong driving as a useful tool to manipulate two-level systems. S. Ashhab, J.R. Johansson, A.M. Zagoskin, F. Nori, Two-level systems driven by large-amplitude fields, Phys. Rev. A 75, 063414 (2007). S. Ashhab et al, unpublished.

  11. A servo-control system for open- and closed-loop blood pressure regulation.

    PubMed

    Nafz, B; Persson, P B; Ehmke, H; Kirchheim, H R

    1992-02-01

    An electropneumatic servo-control system is described that can reduce and control arterial blood pressure in experimental animals. The device has been proved useful in the analysis of pressure-dependent physiological processes and allows the following two modes of operation: 1) a conventional open-loop setting that will reduce arterial pressure to a preselected set point and 2) a closed-loop mode that enables an adjustment to a dynamic pressure set point (i.e., the controlled pressure is reduced to a constant value below a reference pressure). A pneumatic servo-control mechanism was chosen to provide minimal control latency. The accuracy of the system under physiological conditions is well within +/- 1 mmHg. The device can be useful in a number of studies demanding a precise regulation of local arterial pressure, such as experiments on blood flow autoregulation, arterial baroreceptor reflexes, and all experiments involving the study of pressure-dependent excretory and incretory functions of the kidney. The closed-loop setting is useful for studying physiological feedback systems.

  12. Recurrent cerebellar loops simplify adaptive control of redundant and nonlinear motor systems.

    PubMed

    Porrill, John; Dean, Paul

    2007-01-01

    We have described elsewhere an adaptive filter model of cerebellar learning in which the cerebellar microcircuit acts to decorrelate motor commands from their sensory consequences (Dean, Porrill, & Stone, 2002). Learning stability required the cerebellar microcircuit to be embedded in a recurrent loop, and this has been shown to lead to a simple and modular adaptive control architecture when applied to the linearized 3D vestibular ocular reflex (Porrill, Dean, & Stone, 2004). Here we investigate the properties of recurrent loop connectivity in the case of redundant and nonlinear motor systems and illustrate them using the example of kinematic control of a simulated two-joint robot arm. We demonstrate that (1) the learning rule does not require unavailable motor error signals or complex neural reference structures to estimate such signals (i.e., it solves the motor error problem) and (2) control of redundant systems is not subject to the nonconvexity problem in which incorrect average motor commands are learned for end-effector positions that can be accessed in more than one arm configuration. These properties suggest a central functional role for the closed cerebellar loops, which have been shown to be ubiquitous in motor systems (e.g., Kelly & Strick, 2003).

  13. A dimensionally-heterogeneous closed-loop model for the cardiovascular system and its applications.

    PubMed

    Blanco, P J; Feijóo, R A

    2013-05-01

    In the present work a computational model of the entire cardiovascular system is developed using heterogeneous mathematical representations. This model integrates different levels of detail for the blood circulation. The arterial tree is described by a one dimensional model in order to simulate the wave propagation phenomena that take place at the larger arterial vessels. The inflow and outflow locations of this 1D model are coupled with lumped parameter descriptions of the remainder part of the circulatory system, closing the loop. The four cardiac valves are considered using a valve model which allows for stenoses and regurgitation phenomena. In addition, full 3D geometrical models of arterial districts are embedded in this closed-loop circuit to model the local blood flow in specific vessels. This kind of detailed closed-loop network for the cardiovascular system allows hemodynamics analyses of patient-specific arterial district, delivering naturally the appropriate boundary conditions for different cardiovascular scenarios. An example of application involving the effect of aortic insufficiency on the local hemodynamics of a cerebral aneurism is provided as a motivation to reproduce, through numerical simulation, the hemodynamic environment in patients suffering from infective endocarditis and mycotic aneurisms. The need for incorporating homeostatic control mechanisms is also discussed in view of the large sensitivity observed in the results, noting that this kind of integrative modeling allows such incorporation.

  14. Osmotic Ballasts Enhance Faradaic Efficiency in Closed-Loop, Membrane-Based Energy Systems.

    PubMed

    Kingsbury, Ryan S; Coronell, Orlando

    2017-02-07

    Aqueous processes for energy storage and conversion based on reverse electrodialysis (RED) require a significant concentration difference across ion exchange membranes, creating both an electrochemical potential and an osmotic pressure difference. In closed-loop RED, which we recently demonstrated as a new means of energy storage, the transport of water by osmosis has a very significant negative impact on the faradaic efficiency of the system. In this work, we use neutral, nonpermeating solutes as "osmotic ballasts" in a closed-loop concentration battery based on RED. We present experimental results comparing two proof-of-concept ballast molecules, and show that the ballasts reduce, eliminate, or reverse the net transport of water through the membranes when cycling the battery. By mitigating osmosis, faradaic and round-trip energy efficiency are more than doubled, from 18% to 50%, and 7% to 15%, respectively in this nonoptimized system. However, the presence of the ballasts has a slightly negative impact on the open circuit voltage. Our results suggest that balancing osmotic pressure using noncharged solutes is a promising approach for significantly reducing faradaic energy losses in closed-loop RED systems.

  15. Modified function projective synchronization of hyperchaotic systems through Open-Plus-Closed-Loop coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudheer, K. Sebastian; Sabir, M.

    2010-04-01

    Recently introduced modified function projective synchronization (MFPS) in which chaotic systems synchronize up to a scaling function matrix has important applications in secure communications. We design coupling function for unidirectional coupling in identical and mismatched hyperchaotic oscillators to realize MFPS through Open-Plus-Closed-Loop (OPCL) coupling method. The arbitrary scaling function matrix elements are properly chosen such that we can produce function projective synchronization, synchronization, anti-synchronization and amplitude death on desired states of the response system simultaneously. Numerical simulations on identical hyperchaotic Rossler and mismatched hyperchaotic Lu system are presented to verify the effectiveness of the proposed scheme. A secure communication scheme based on MFPS is also presented.

  16. Analysis of Intelligent Transportation Systems Using Model-Driven Simulations.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Isabel, Alberto; Fuentes-Fernández, Rubén

    2015-06-15

    Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITSs) integrate information, sensor, control, and communication technologies to provide transport related services. Their users range from everyday commuters to policy makers and urban planners. Given the complexity of these systems and their environment, their study in real settings is frequently unfeasible. Simulations help to address this problem, but present their own issues: there can be unintended mistakes in the transition from models to code; their platforms frequently bias modeling; and it is difficult to compare works that use different models and tools. In order to overcome these problems, this paper proposes a framework for a model-driven development of these simulations. It is based on a specific modeling language that supports the integrated specification of the multiple facets of an ITS: people, their vehicles, and the external environment; and a network of sensors and actuators conveniently arranged and distributed that operates over them. The framework works with a model editor to generate specifications compliant with that language, and a code generator to produce code from them using platform specifications. There are also guidelines to help researchers in the application of this infrastructure. A case study on advanced management of traffic lights with cameras illustrates its use.

  17. Analysis of Intelligent Transportation Systems Using Model-Driven Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Isabel, Alberto; Fuentes-Fernández, Rubén

    2015-01-01

    Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITSs) integrate information, sensor, control, and communication technologies to provide transport related services. Their users range from everyday commuters to policy makers and urban planners. Given the complexity of these systems and their environment, their study in real settings is frequently unfeasible. Simulations help to address this problem, but present their own issues: there can be unintended mistakes in the transition from models to code; their platforms frequently bias modeling; and it is difficult to compare works that use different models and tools. In order to overcome these problems, this paper proposes a framework for a model-driven development of these simulations. It is based on a specific modeling language that supports the integrated specification of the multiple facets of an ITS: people, their vehicles, and the external environment; and a network of sensors and actuators conveniently arranged and distributed that operates over them. The framework works with a model editor to generate specifications compliant with that language, and a code generator to produce code from them using platform specifications. There are also guidelines to help researchers in the application of this infrastructure. A case study on advanced management of traffic lights with cameras illustrates its use. PMID:26083232

  18. Record-breaking avalanches in driven threshold systems.

    PubMed

    Shcherbakov, Robert; Davidsen, Jörn; Tiampo, Kristy F

    2013-05-01

    Record-breaking avalanches generated by the dynamics of several driven nonlinear threshold models are studied. Such systems are characterized by intermittent behavior, where a slow buildup of energy is punctuated by an abrupt release of energy through avalanche events, which usually follow scale-invariant statistics. From the simulations of these systems it is possible to extract sequences of record-breaking avalanches, where each subsequent record-breaking event is larger in magnitude than all previous events. In the present work, several cellular automata are analyzed, among them the sandpile model, the Manna model, the Olami-Feder-Christensen (OFC) model, and the forest-fire model to investigate the record-breaking statistics of model avalanches that exhibit temporal and spatial correlations. Several statistical measures of record-breaking events are derived analytically and confirmed through numerical simulations. The statistics of record-breaking avalanches for the four models are compared to those of record-breaking events extracted from the sequences of independent and identically distributed (i.i.d.) random variables. It is found that the statistics of record-breaking avalanches for the above cellular automata exhibit behavior different from that observed for i.i.d. random variables, which in turn can be used to characterize complex spatiotemporal dynamics. The most pronounced deviations are observed in the case of the OFC model with a strong dependence on the conservation parameter of the model. This indicates that avalanches in the OFC model are not independent and exhibit spatiotemporal correlations.

  19. Cardiac looping may be driven by compressive loads resulting from unequal growth of the heart and pericardial cavity. Observations on a physical simulation model

    PubMed Central

    Bayraktar, Meriç; Männer, Jörg

    2014-01-01

    The transformation of the straight embryonic heart tube into a helically wound loop is named cardiac looping. Such looping is regarded as an essential process in cardiac morphogenesis since it brings the building blocks of the developing heart into an approximation of their definitive topographical relationships. During the past two decades, a large number of genes have been identified which play important roles in cardiac looping. However, how genetic information is physically translated into the dynamic form changes of the looping heart is still poorly understood. The oldest hypothesis of cardiac looping mechanics attributes the form changes of the heart loop (ventral bending → simple helical coiling → complex helical coiling) to compressive loads resulting from growth differences between the heart and the pericardial cavity. In the present study, we have tested the physical plausibility of this hypothesis, which we call the growth-induced buckling hypothesis, for the first time. Using a physical simulation model, we show that growth-induced buckling of a straight elastic rod within the confined space of a hemispherical cavity can generate the same sequence of form changes as observed in the looping embryonic heart. Our simulation experiments have furthermore shown that, under bilaterally symmetric conditions, growth-induced buckling generates left- and right-handed helices (D-/L-loops) in a 1:1 ratio, while even subtle left- or rightward displacements of the caudal end of the elastic rod at the pre-buckling state are sufficient to direct the buckling process toward the generation of only D- or L-loops, respectively. Our data are discussed with respect to observations made in biological “models.” We conclude that compressive loads resulting from unequal growth of the heart and pericardial cavity play important roles in cardiac looping. Asymmetric positioning of the venous heart pole may direct these forces toward a biased generation of D- or L-loops. PMID

  20. Benchmarking Model Variants in Development of a Hardware-in-the-Loop Simulation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aretskin-Hariton, Eliot D.; Zinnecker, Alicia M.; Kratz, Jonathan L.; Culley, Dennis E.; Thomas, George L.

    2016-01-01

    Distributed engine control architecture presents a significant increase in complexity over traditional implementations when viewed from the perspective of system simulation and hardware design and test. Even if the overall function of the control scheme remains the same, the hardware implementation can have a significant effect on the overall system performance due to differences in the creation and flow of data between control elements. A Hardware-in-the-Loop (HIL) simulation system is under development at NASA Glenn Research Center that enables the exploration of these hardware dependent issues. The system is based on, but not limited to, the Commercial Modular Aero-Propulsion System Simulation 40k (C-MAPSS40k). This paper describes the step-by-step conversion from the self-contained baseline model to the hardware in the loop model, and the validation of each step. As the control model hardware fidelity was improved during HIL system development, benchmarking simulations were performed to verify that engine system performance characteristics remained the same. The results demonstrate the goal of the effort; the new HIL configurations have similar functionality and performance compared to the baseline C-MAPSS40k system.

  1. Closing the Loop with Sensors in Commercial Building Systems: Applying Lessons from Automotive Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantese, Joseph

    2011-08-01

    Automotive systems have evolved extensively over the past 50 years, providing a fully integrated system of sub-systems that work in concert for optimal vehicle level closed loop control. In this talk we look at several automotive sub-systems: stability and control, safety and security, emissions and comfort, diagnostics and maintenance, infotainment and communications; with an eye toward understanding their technology drivers and associated value propositions. Conversely, we examine how commercial building systems currently are represented as a collection of sub-systems that often work independently of each other for local optimization, often relying upon open loop control systems developed and installed decades ago. Reasoning primarily by analogy we explore opportunities for energy and efficiency, comfort and environment, and safety/security; asking whether there is sufficient value associated with a new class of building sensors and how those technologies might be brought to bear in improving performance. Finally, we examine the fundamental architecture of detection systems built upon sensing elements, with the aim of understanding trade-offs between: detection, false alarm rate, power, and cost.

  2. OBSERVATIONS OF LINEAR POLARIZATION IN A SOLAR CORONAL LOOP PROMINENCE SYSTEM OBSERVED NEAR 6173 Å

    SciTech Connect

    Saint-Hilaire, Pascal; Martínez Oliveros, Juan-Carlos; Hudson, Hugh S.; Krucker, Säm; Bain, Hazel; Schou, Jesper; Couvidat, Sébastien

    2014-05-10

    White-light observations by the Solar Dynamics Observatory's Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager of a loop-prominence system occurring in the aftermath of an X-class flare on 2013 May 13 near the eastern solar limb show a linearly polarized component, reaching up to ∼20% at an altitude of ∼33 Mm, about the maximum amount expected if the emission were due solely to Thomson scattering of photospheric light by the coronal material. The mass associated with the polarized component was 8.2 × 10{sup 14} g. At 15 Mm altitude, the brightest part of the loop was 3(±0.5)% linearly polarized, only about 20% of that expected from pure Thomson scattering, indicating the presence of an additional unpolarized component at wavelengths near Fe I (617.33 nm). We estimate the free electron density of the white-light loop system to possibly be as high as 1.8 × 10{sup 12} cm{sup –3}.

  3. Study on rejection characteristic of current loop to the base disturbance of optical communication system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Yao; Deng, Chao; Liu, Qiong; Cao, Zheng

    2016-10-01

    As laser has narrow transmitting beam and small divergence angle, the LOS (Line of Sight) stabilization of optical communication system is a primary precondition of laser communication links. Compound axis control is usually adopted in LOS stabilization of optical communication system, in which coarse tracking and fine tracking are included. Rejection against high frequency disturbance mainly depends on fine tracking LOS stabilization platform. Limited by different factors such as mechanical characteristic of the stabilization platform and bandwidth/noise of the sensor, the control bandwidth of LOS stabilization platform is restricted so that effective rejection of high frequency disturbance cannot be achieved as it mainly depends on the isolation characteristic of the platform itself. It is proposed by this paper that current loop may reject the effect of back-EMF. By adopting the method of electric control, high frequency isolation characteristic of the platform can be improved. The improvement effect is similar to increasing passive vibration reduction devices. Adopting the double closed loop control structure of velocity and current with the combining of the rejection effect of back-EMF caused by current loop is equivalent to reducing back-EMF coefficient, which can enhance the isolation ability of the LOS stabilization platform to high frequency disturbance.

  4. Development and calibration of a MFM-based system for local hysteresis loops measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coïsson, M.; Barrera, G.; Celegato, F.; Tiberto, P.

    2016-10-01

    A measurement technique derived from a field-dependent magnetic force microscope (MFM) is presented for the measurement of local hysteresis loops on patterned micrometric and sub-micrometric magnetic structures. The technique exploits the synchronisation of the applied field variations with the end-of-line signal of the microscope, while keeping the slow scan axis disabled. In this way, a single MFM image contains the whole field evolution of the magnetisation processes in the sample along a user-defined profile. An analysis procedure is presented for the subsequent determination of local hysteresis loops on magnetic dots. The system has been calibrated for what concerns the applied field values. No significant artifacts induced in the measurements by the applied field have been observed up to applied fields of ≈ 1000 Oe.

  5. System dynamics research of remanufacturing closed-loop supply chain dominated by the third party.

    PubMed

    Miao, Shidi; Wang, Tengfei; Chen, Deyun

    2017-01-01

    With the rapid development of the electronic information industry in recent years, electronic products are being updated faster and faster, and e-waste recycling has become a common problem around the world. Firstly, this article contrasts recycling at home and abroad using the predicament of Midea Corp. Based on a closed-loop supply chain with the system dynamics method, a model is constructed and simulated. In this model, the collection point coverage rate is introduced to adjust the e-waste recycling rate dynamically. Aiming at a recycling mode dominated by the third party of the closed-loop supply chain, the article mainly discusses the impact on the sales rate and market share of the recycling model by third-party enterprises and compares the total revenue of all supply chains. Simulation results show that the model is more effective and optimal than the traditional recycling model.

  6. OPIC: Ontology-driven Patient Information Capturing system for epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Satya S; Zhao, Meng; Luo, Lingyun; Bozorgi, Alireza; Gupta, Deepak; Lhatoo, Samden D; Zhang, Guo-Qiang

    2012-01-01

    The widespread use of paper or document-based forms for capturing patient information in various clinical settings, for example in epilepsy centers, is a critical barrier for large-scale, multi-center research studies that require interoperable, consistent, and error-free data collection. This challenge can be addressed by a web-accessible and flexible patient data capture system that is supported by a common terminological system to facilitate data re-usability, sharing, and integration. We present OPIC, an Ontology-driven Patient Information Capture (OPIC) system that uses a domain-specific epilepsy and seizure ontology (EpSO) to (1) support structured entry of multi-modal epilepsy data, (2) proactively ensure quality of data through use of ontology terms in drop-down menus, and (3) identify and index clinically relevant ontology terms in free-text fields to improve accuracy of subsequent analytical queries (e.g. cohort identification). EpSO, modeled using the Web Ontology Language (OWL), conforms to the recommendations of the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) classification and terminological commission. OPIC has been developed using agile software engineering methodology for rapid development cycles in close collaboration with domain expert and end users. We report the result from the initial deployment of OPIC at the University Hospitals Case Medical Center (UH CMC) epilepsy monitoring unit (EMU) as part of the NIH-funded project on Sudden Unexpected Death in Epilepsy (SUDEP). Preliminary user evaluation shows that OPIC has achieved its design objectives to be an intuitive patient information capturing system that also reduces the potential for data entry errors and variability in use of epilepsy terms.

  7. MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SEISMOLOGY OF A CORONAL LOOP SYSTEM BY THE FIRST TWO MODES OF STANDING KINK WAVES

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Y.; Hao, Q.; Cheng, X.; Chen, P. F.; Ding, M. D.; Erdélyi, R.; Srivastava, A. K.; Dwivedi, B. N.

    2015-02-01

    We report the observation of the first two harmonics of the horizontally polarized kink waves excited in a coronal loop system lying southeast of AR 11719 on 2013 April 11. The detected periods of the fundamental mode (P {sub 1}), its first overtone (P {sub 2}) in the northern half, and that in the southern one are 530.2 ± 13.3, 300.4 ± 27.7, and 334.7 ± 22.1 s, respectively. The periods of the first overtone in the two halves are the same considering uncertainties in the measurement. We estimate the average electron density, temperature, and length of the loop system as (5.1 ± 0.8) × 10{sup 8} cm{sup –3}, 0.65 ± 0.06 MK, and 203.8 ± 13.8 Mm, respectively. As a zeroth-order estimation, the magnetic field strength, B = 8.2 ± 1.0 G, derived by the coronal seismology using the fundamental kink mode matches with that derived by a potential field model. The extrapolation model also shows the asymmetric and nonuniform distribution of the magnetic field along the coronal loop. Using the amplitude profile distributions of both the fundamental mode and its first overtone, we observe that the antinode positions of both the fundamental mode and its first overtone shift toward the weak field region along the coronal loop. The results indicate that the density stratification and the temperature difference effects are larger than the magnetic field variation effect on the period ratio. On the other hand, the magnetic field variation has a greater effect on the eigenfunction of the first overtone than the density stratification does for this case.

  8. Simulation Environment to Evaluate Closed-Loop Insulin Delivery Systems in Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Wilinska, Malgorzata E.; Chassin, Ludovic J.; Acerini, Carlo L.; Allen, Janet M.; Dunger, David B.; Hovorka, Roman

    2010-01-01

    Background Closed-loop insulin delivery systems linking subcutaneous insulin infusion to real-time continuous glucose monitoring need to be evaluated in humans, but progress can be accelerated with the use of in silico testing. We present a simulation environment designed to support the development and testing of closed-loop insulin delivery systems in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Methods The principal components of the simulation environment include a mathematical model of glucose regulation representing a virtual population with T1DM, the glucose measurement model, and the insulin delivery model. The simulation environment is highly flexible. The user can specify an experimental protocol, define a population of virtual subjects, choose glucose measurement and insulin delivery models, and specify outcome measures. The environment provides graphical as well as numerical outputs to enable a comprehensive analysis of in silico study results. The simulation environment is validated by comparing its predictions against a clinical study evaluating overnight closed-loop insulin delivery in young people with T1DM using a model predictive controller. Results The simulation model of glucose regulation is described, and population values of 18 synthetic subjects are provided. The validation study demonstrated that the simulation environment was able to reproduce the population results of the clinical study conducted in young people with T1DM. Conclusions Closed-loop trials in humans should be preceded and concurrently guided by highly efficient and resource-saving computer-based simulations. We demonstrate validity of population-based predictions obtained with our simulation environment. PMID:20167177

  9. Evaluating the Performance of a Novel Embedded Closed-loop System

    PubMed Central

    Leelarathna, Lalantha; Thabit, Hood; Allen, Janet M.; Nodale, Marianna; Wilinska, Malgorzata E.; Powell, Kevin; Lane, Stephen; Evans, Mark L.

    2014-01-01

    The objective was to assess the reliability of a novel automated closed-loop glucose control system developed within the AP@home consortium in adults with type 1 diabetes. Eight adults with type 1 diabetes on insulin pump therapy (3 men; ages 40.5 ± 14.3 years; HbA1c 8.2 ± 0.8%) participated in an open-label, single-center, single-arm, 12-hour overnight study performed at the clinical research facility. A standardized evening meal (80 g CHO) accompanied by prandial insulin boluses were given at 19:00 followed by an optional snack of 15 g at 22:00 without insulin bolus. Automated closed-loop glucose control was started at 19:00 and continued until 07:00 the next day. Basal insulin delivery (Accu-Chek Spirit, Roche) was automatically adjusted by Cambridge model predictive control algorithm, running on a purpose-built embedded device, based on real-time continuous glucose monitor readings (Dexcom G4 Platinum). Closed-loop system was operational as intended over 99% of the time. Overnight plasma glucose levels (22:00 to 07:00) were within the target range (3.9 to 8.0 mmol/l) for 75.4% (37.5, 92.9) of the time without any time spent in hypoglycemia (<3.9 mmol/l). Mean overnight glucose was 7.8 ± 1.3 mmol/l. For the entire 12-hour closed-loop period (19:00 until 07:00) plasma glucose levels were within the target range (3.9 to 10.0 mmol/l) for 84.4% (63.3, 100) of time. There were no adverse events noted during the trial. We observed a high degree of reliability of the automated closed-loop system. The time spent in target glucose level overnight was comparable to results of previously published studies. Further developments to miniaturize the system for home studies are warranted. PMID:24876577

  10. Efficient Computation of Closed-loop Frequency Response for Large Order Flexible Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maghami, Peiman G.; Giesy, Daniel P.

    1997-01-01

    An efficient and robust computational scheme is given for the calculation of the frequency response function of a large order, flexible system implemented with a linear, time invariant control system. Advantage is taken of the highly structured sparsity of the system matrix of the plant based on a model of the structure using normal mode coordinates. The computational time per frequency point of the new computational scheme is a linear function of system size, a significant improvement over traditional, full-matrix techniques whose computational times per frequency point range from quadratic to cubic functions of system size. This permits the practical frequency domain analysis of systems of much larger order than by traditional, full-matrix techniques. Formulations are given for both open and closed loop loop systems. Numerical examples are presented showing the advantages of the present formulation over traditional approaches, both in speed and in accuracy. Using a model with 703 structural modes, a speed-up of almost two orders of magnitude was observed while accuracy improved by up to 5 decimal places.

  11. Effect of ambient pressure variation on closed loop gas system for India based Neutrino Observatory (INO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satyanarayana, B.; Majumder, G.; Mondal, N. K.; Kalmani, S. D.; Shinde, R. R.; Joshi, A.

    2014-10-01

    Pilot unit of a closed loop gas mixing and distribution system for the INO project was designed and is being operated with 1.8meters × 1.9meters RPCs for about two years. A number of studies on controlling the flow and optimisation of the gas mixture through the RPC stack were carried out during this period. The gas system essentially measures and attempts to maintain absolute pressure inside the RPC gas volume. During typical Mumbai monsoon seasons, the barometric pressure changes rather rapidly, due to which the gas system fails to maintain the set differential pressure between the ambience and the RPC gas volume. As the safety bubblers on the RPC gas input lines are set to work on fixed pressure differentials, the ambient pressure changes lead to either venting out and thus wasting gas through safety bubblers or over pressuring the RPCs gas volume and thus degrading its performance. The above problem also leads to gas mixture contamination through minute leaks in gas gap. The problem stated above was solved by including the ambient barometric pressure as an input parameter in the closed loop. Using this, it is now possible to maintain any set differential pressure between the ambience and RPC gas volumes between 0 to 20mm of water column, thus always ensuring a positive pressure inside the RPC gas volume with respect to the ambience. This has resulted in improved performance of the gas system by maintaining the constant gas flow and reducing the gas toping up frequency. In this paper, we will highlight the design features and improvements of the closed loop gas system. We will present some of the performance studies and considerations for scaling up the system to be used with the engineering module and then followed by Iron Calorimeter detector (ICAL), which is designed to deploy about 30,000 RPCs of 1.8meters × 1.9 meters in area.

  12. Ultraintense Laser-Driven Relativistic Hydrodynamics for Plane Symmetric Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talamo, James

    We consider the relativistic hydrodynamics of a plane symmetric, charged fluid system driven by an ultra-violent, ultra-intense laser. The resulting particle motion will be relativistic due to the strength of the laser. The fluid will accelerate violently with respect to an observer in the laboratory, so although the arena for the evolution is a smooth Minkowski spacetime, methods of general relativity will be invoked. Many systems in relativity can be cast into field theories, and we first extend the variational formulation of special relativity to laser-matter interactions. From this, a full set of four Euler equations arise that govern the hydrodynamics of a general 4-dimensional laser-matter system. The plane symmetry, however, naturally gives rise to two Killing vectors. This allows for a 2+2 reduction process to be used to analyze the system. This will allow for a reformulation of the 4-dimensional system of interacting particles as a 2-dimensional system of interacting plasma sheets. The transverse particle motion is shown to produce a change in the "effective mass" of the plasma sheets, which allows one to consider the sheets as a single entity. To achieve this, we first give the details of this 2+2 formalism and show how it can be used to write the underlying space time as a product of a base manifold and transverse Euclidean planes. We then establish a natural isomorphism between the geometrical objects (vectors, covectors, and tensors) on these manifolds. By examining the effects of this procedure in the LAB and comoving coordinate systems, we establish a coordinate transformation between them. Finally, we apply the results of the 2+2 split to the 4-dimensional Euler equations, which admit two constants of motion. This allows for us to define a plasma sheet as an equivalence class of particles whose spacetime positions differ only longitudinally and define a sheet proper time. Furthermore, the notion of particle thermodynamics can be, and is, generalized

  13. Research on the man in the loop control system of the robot arm based on gesture control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Lifeng; Peng, Jinbao

    2017-03-01

    The Man in the loop control system of the robot arm based on gesture control research complex real-world environment, which requires the operator to continuously control and adjust the remote manipulator, as the background, completes the specific mission human in the loop entire system as the research object. This paper puts forward a kind of robot arm control system of Man in the loop based on gesture control, by robot arm control system based on gesture control and Virtual reality scene feedback to enhance immersion and integration of operator, to make operator really become a part of the whole control loop. This paper expounds how to construct a man in the loop control system of the robot arm based on gesture control. The system is a complex system of human computer cooperative control, but also people in the loop control problem areas. The new system solves the problems that the traditional method has no immersion feeling and the operation lever is unnatural, the adjustment time is long, and the data glove mode wears uncomfortable and the price is expensive.

  14. Solar flares and avalanches in driven dissipative systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Edward T.; Hamilton, Russell J.; Mctiernan, J. M.; Bromund, Kenneth R.

    1993-01-01

    The contention of Lu and Hamilton (1991) that the energy release process in solar flares can be understood as avalanches of many small reconnection events is further developed. The dynamics of the complex magnetized plasma of solar active regions is modeled with a simple driven dissipative system, consisting of a vector field with local instabilities that cause rapid diffusion of the field. It is argued that the avalanches in this model are analogous to solar flares. The distributions of avalanches in this model are compared with the solar flare frequency distributions obtained from ISEE 3/ICE satellite observations. Quantitative agreement is found with the energy, peak luminosity, and duration distributions over four orders of magnitude in flare energy, from the largest flares down to the completeness limit of the observations. It is predicted that the power-law solar flare frequency distributions will be found to continue downward with the same logarithmic slopes to an energy of about 3 x 10 exp 25 ergs and duration of about 0.3 s, with deviations from power-law behavior below these values.

  15. Cosine edge modes in a periodically driven quantum system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satija, Indubala I.; Zhao, Erhai

    2016-12-01

    Time-periodic (Floquet) topological phases of matter exhibit bulk-edge relationships that are more complex than static topological insulators and superconductors. Finding the edge modes unique to driven systems usually requires numerics. Here we present a minimal two-band model of Floquet topological insulators and semimetals in two dimensions where all the bulk and edge properties can be obtained analytically. It is based on the extended Harper model of quantum Hall effect at flux one-half. We show that periodical driving gives rise to a series of phases characterized by a pair of integers. The model has a most striking feature: the spectrum of the edge modes is always given by a single cosine function, ω (ky) ∝cosky where ky is the wave number along the edge, as if it is freely dispersing and completely decoupled from the bulk. The cosine mode is robust against the change in driving parameters. It also persists in the semimetallic phases with Dirac points.

  16. Magnetically driven microrobotic system for cancer cell manipulation.

    PubMed

    Lucarini, G; Iacovacci, V; Ricotti, L; Comisso, N; Dario, P; Menciassi, A

    2015-08-01

    Lab-on-a-chip applications, such as single cell manipulation and targeted delivery of chemicals, could greatly benefit from mobile untethered microdevices able to move in fluidic environments by using magnetic fields. In this paper a magnetically driven microrobotic system enabling the controlled locomotion of objects placed at the air/liquid interface is proposed and exploited for cell manipulation. In particular authors report the design, fabrication and testing of a polymeric thin film-based magnetic microrobot (called "FilmBot") used as a support for navigating cancer cells. By finely controlling magnetic film locomotion, it is possible to navigate the cells by exploiting their adhesion to the film without affecting their integrity. Preliminary in vitro tests demonstrated that the magnetic thin film is able to act as substrate for T24 bladder cancer cells without affecting their viability and that film locomotion can be magnetically controlled (with a magnetic field and a gradient of 6 mT and 0.6 T/m, respectively) along specific directions, with a mean speed of about 3 mm/s.

  17. Disposition of Nuclear Waste Using Subcritical Accelerator-Driven Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Doolen, G.D.; Venneri, F.; Li, N.; Williamson, M.A.; Houts, M.; Lawrence, G.

    1998-06-27

    ATW destroys virtually all the plutonium and higher actinides without reprocessing the spent fuel in a way that could lead to weapons material diversion. An ATW facility consists of three major elements: (1) a high-power proton linear accelerator; (2) a pyrochemical spent fuel treatment i waste cleanup system; (3) a liquid lead-bismuth cooled burner that produces and utilizes an intense source-driven neutron flux for transmutation in a heterogeneous (solid fuel) core. The concept is the result of many years of development at LANL as well as other major international research centers. Once demonstrated and developed, ATW could be an essential part of a global non-proliferation strategy for countries that could build up large quantities of plutonium from their commercial reactor waste. ATW technology, initially proposed in the US, has received wide and rapidly increasing attention abroad, especially in Europe and the Far East with major programs now being planned, organized and tided. Substantial convergence presently exists on the technology choices among the programs, opening the possibility of a strong and effective international collaboration on the phased development of the ATW technology.

  18. Fuzzy PID controller combines with closed-loop optimal fuzzy reasoning for pitch control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yezi; Xiao, Cheng; Sun, Jinhao

    2013-03-01

    PID and fuzzy PID controller are applied into the pitch control system. PID control has simple principle and its parameters setting are rather easy. Fuzzy control need not to establish the mathematical of the control system and has strong robustness. The advantages of fuzzy PID control are simple, easy in setting parameters and strong robustness. Fuzzy PID controller combines with closed-loop optimal fuzzy reasoning (COFR), which can effectively improve the robustness, when the robustness is special requirement. MATLAB software is used for simulations, results display that fuzzy PID controller which combines with COFR has better performances than PID controller when errors exist.

  19. Pumped Fluid Loop Heat Rejection and Recovery Systems for Thermal Control of the Mars Science Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhandari, Pradeep; Birur, Gajanana; Prina, Mauro; Ramirez, Brenda; Paris, Anthony; Novak, Keith; Pauken, Michael

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the heat rejection and heat recovery system for thermal control of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL). The MSL mission will use mechanically pumped fluid loop based architecture for thermal control of the spacecraft and rover. The architecture is designed to harness waste heat from an Multi Mission Radioisotope Thermo-electric Generator (MMRTG) during Mars surface operations for thermal control during cold conditions and also reject heat during the cruise aspect of the mission. There are several test that are being conducted that will insure the safety of this concept. This architecture can be used during any future interplanetary missions utilizing radioisotope power systems for power generation.

  20. Nonlinear analysis of a closed-loop tractor-semitrailer vehicle system with time delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhaoheng; Hu, Kun; Chung, Kwok-wai

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, a nonlinear analysis is performed on a closed-loop system of articulated heavy vehicles with driver steering control. The nonlinearity arises from the nonlinear cubic tire force model. An integration method is employed to derive an analytical periodic solution of the system in the neighbourhood of the critical speed. The results show that excellent accuracy can be achieved for the calculation of periodic solutions arising from Hopf bifurcation of the vehicle motion. A criterion is obtained for detecting the Bautin bifurcation which separates branches of supercritical and subcritical Hopf bifurcations. The integration method is compared to the incremental harmonic balance method in both supercritical and subcritical scenarios.

  1. Enhanced Performance Controller Design for Stochastic Systems by Adding Extra State Estimation onto the Existing Closed Loop Control

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Yuyang; Zhang, Qichun; Wang, Hong

    2016-08-30

    To enhance the performance of the tracking property , this paper presents a novel control algorithm for a class of linear dynamic stochastic systems with unmeasurable states, where the performance enhancement loop is established based on Kalman filter. Without changing the existing closed loop with the PI controller, the compensative controller is designed to minimize the variances of the tracking errors using the estimated states and the propagation of state variances. Moreover, the stability of the closed-loop systems has been analyzed in the mean-square sense. A simulated example is included to show the effectiveness of the presented control algorithm, where encouraging results have been obtained.

  2. Event-Driven Random-Access-Windowing CCD Imaging System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monacos, Steve; Portillo, Angel; Ortiz, Gerardo; Alexander, James; Lam, Raymond; Liu, William

    2004-01-01

    A charge-coupled-device (CCD) based high-speed imaging system, called a realtime, event-driven (RARE) camera, is undergoing development. This camera is capable of readout from multiple subwindows [also known as regions of interest (ROIs)] within the CCD field of view. Both the sizes and the locations of the ROIs can be controlled in real time and can be changed at the camera frame rate. The predecessor of this camera was described in High-Frame-Rate CCD Camera Having Subwindow Capability (NPO- 30564) NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 26, No. 12 (December 2002), page 26. The architecture of the prior camera requires tight coupling between camera control logic and an external host computer that provides commands for camera operation and processes pixels from the camera. This tight coupling limits the attainable frame rate and functionality of the camera. The design of the present camera loosens this coupling to increase the achievable frame rate and functionality. From a host computer perspective, the readout operation in the prior camera was defined on a per-line basis; in this camera, it is defined on a per-ROI basis. In addition, the camera includes internal timing circuitry. This combination of features enables real-time, event-driven operation for adaptive control of the camera. Hence, this camera is well suited for applications requiring autonomous control of multiple ROIs to track multiple targets moving throughout the CCD field of view. Additionally, by eliminating the need for control intervention by the host computer during the pixel readout, the present design reduces ROI-readout times to attain higher frame rates. This camera (see figure) includes an imager card consisting of a commercial CCD imager and two signal-processor chips. The imager card converts transistor/ transistor-logic (TTL)-level signals from a field programmable gate array (FPGA) controller card. These signals are transmitted to the imager card via a low-voltage differential signaling (LVDS) cable

  3. Multi-loop Control System Design for Biodiesel Process using Waste Cooking Oil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patle, Dipesh S.; Z, Ahmad; Rangaiah, G. P.

    2015-06-01

    Biodiesel is one of the promising liquid fuels for future due to its advantages such as renewability and eco-friendliness. This manuscript describes the development of a multi-loop control system design for a comprehensive biodiesel process using waste cooking oil. Method for controlled variable-manipulated variable (CV-MV) pairings are vital for the stable, effective and economical operation of the process. Liquid recycles, product quality requirements and effective inventory control pose tough challenges to the safe operation of the biodiesel process. A simple and easy to apply effective RGA method [Xiong Q, Cai W J and He M J 2005 A practical loop pairing criterion for multivariable processes Journal of Process Control vol. 15 pp 741-747.] is applied to determine CV-MV pairings i.e. control configuration design for the bioprocess. This method uses steady state gain as well as bandwidth information of the process open loop transfer function to determine input-output pairings.

  4. Economics of spray-dryer FGD system: the two-stage open-loop processes

    SciTech Connect

    Burnett, T.A.; O'Brien, W.E.

    1981-06-01

    Preliminary economics of the Rockwell International Corporation - Wheelabrator Frye, Inc., (RI/WF) two-stage open-loop flue gas desulfurization (FGD) process were determined for both lime and soda ash absorbents. This two-stage open-loop process is a throwaway system in which the alkali raw material (as a solution or slurry) is sprayed into the flue gas stream, dried by the latent heat in the hot flue gas, and collected as dry particulate matter in a baghouse. The fly ash is also collected in the baghouse as an inherent part of the process. An economic evaluation of a limestone slurry FGD process with an electrostatic precipitator (ESP) for particulate matter removal was included for comparison. The basis was a 500-MW power plant burning 3.5% sulfur, 16% ash coal with 90% SO/sub 2/ removal and 0.1 lb/MBtu particulate matter emission. The economic evaluations were made using both TVA and Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) economic premises. Cost differences between the two-stage open-loop lime and soda ash versions are largely the result of different waste disposal and raw material costs. Both RI/WF versions are more economical than limestone in most process elements except raw material costs. Cost differences between the TVA- and EPRI-based estimates are the result of different methods of estimating indirect costs, levelizing operating costs, and different raw material costs.

  5. A phase-lock-loop-based control system for suppressing periodic vibration in smart structural systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Algrain, Marcelo; Hardt, Steve; Ehlers, Douglas

    1997-02-01

    This paper presents a simple, effective and economical system capable of suppressing periodic vibration (external or self-induced) affecting a structure or payload. The approach used integrates piezoelectric materials/actuators, sensors and low-cost electronics in a novel way. The key innovation is the use of phase-lock loops (PLLs) and switch-capacitor filters (SCFs) for the on-line identification, tracking and control of periodic vibration. This method concentrates its control action at those frequencies where periodic vibration is detected. Among the advantages of this approach are the following: it is conceptually simple, easily expandable and modular; the controller does not rely on a model of the structure and it only needs some approximate notion of the frequency range where the periodic disturbances are expected to occur; it is robust and can be operated at high gain without loss of stability; it is not significantly affected by the presence of random vibration or sensor noise and it can be implemented with inexpensive electronics. The effectiveness of this new approach was experimentally evaluated using a test unit consisting of a simple structure, accelerometers and Terfenol-D actuators. The structure was excited by driving one of the actuators with sinusoidal and random signals. The resulting periodic disturbances were measured using the accelerometers. The acceleration signals were passed though a bank of PLLs and associated SCFs to detect the fundamental frequency and harmonics. This information was used to drive another actuator that rejected the original disturbances, and attenuation levels as high as 30 dB were achieved.

  6. Closed-loop Habitation Air Revitalization Model for Regenerative Life Support Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, Maxwell M.

    1991-01-01

    The primary function of any life support system is to keep the crew alive by providing breathable air, potable water, edible food, and for disposal of waste. In a well-balanced or regenerative life support system, the various components are each using what is available and producing what is needed by other components so that there will always be enough chemicals in the form in which they are needed. Humans are not just users, but also one of the participating parts of the system. If a system could continuously recycle the original chemicals, this would make it virtually a Closed-loop Habitation (CH). Some difficulties in trying to create a miniature version of a CH are briefly discussed. In a miniature CH, a minimal structure must be provided and the difference must be made up by artificial parts such as physicochemical systems that perform the conversions that the Earth can achieve naturally. To study the interactions of these parts, a computer model was designed that simulates a miniature CH with emphasis on the air revitalization part. It is called the Closed-loop Habitation Air Revitalization Model (CHARM).

  7. Hybrid suboptimal control of multi-rate multi-loop sampled-data systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shieh, Leang S.; Chen, Gwangchywan; Tsai, Jason S. H.

    1992-01-01

    A hybrid state-space controller is developed for suboptimal digital control of multirate multiloop multivariable continuous-time systems. First, an LQR is designed for a continuous-time subsystem which has a large bandwidth and is connnected in the inner loop of the overall system. The designed LQR would optimally place the eigenvalues of a closed-loop subsystem in the common region of an open sector bounded by sector angles + or - pi/2k for k = 2 or 3 from the negative real axis and the left-hand side of a vertical line on the negative real axis in the s-plane. Then, the developed continuous-time state-feedback gain is converted into an equivalent fast-rate discrete-time state-feedback gain via a digital redesign technique (Tsai et al. 1989, Shieh et al. 1990) reviewed here. A real state reconstructor is redeveloped utilizing the fast-rate input-output data of the system of interest. The design procedure of multiloop multivariable systems using multirate samplers is shown, and a terminal homing missile system example is used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  8. Experimental investigation of static ice refrigeration air conditioning system driven by distributed photovoltaic energy system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Y. F.; Li, M.; Luo, X.; Wang, Y. F.; Yu, Q. F.; Hassanien, R. H. E.

    2016-08-01

    The static ice refrigeration air conditioning system (SIRACS) driven by distributed photovoltaic energy system (DPES) was proposed and the test experiment have been investigated in this paper. Results revealed that system energy utilization efficiency is low because energy losses were high in ice making process of ice slide maker. So the immersed evaporator and co-integrated exchanger were suggested in system structure optimization analysis and the system COP was improved nearly 40%. At the same time, we have researched that ice thickness and ice super-cooled temperature changed along with time and the relationship between system COP and ice thickness was obtained.

  9. Adaptable Single Active Loop Thermal Control System (TCS) for Future Space Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mudawar, Issam; Lee, Seunghyun; Hasan, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    This presentation will examine the development of a thermal control system (TCS) for future space missions utilizing a single active cooling loop. The system architecture enables the TCS to be reconfigured during the various mission phases to respond, not only to varying heat load, but to heat rejection temperature as well. The system will consist of an accumulator, pump, cold plates (evaporators), condenser radiator, and compressor, in addition to control, bypass and throttling valves. For cold environments, the heat will be rejected by radiation, during which the compressor will be bypassed, reducing the system to a simple pumped loop that, depending on heat load, can operate in either a single-phase liquid mode or two-phase mode. For warmer environments, the pump will be bypassed, enabling the TCS to operate as a heat pump. This presentation will focus on recent findings concerning two-phase flow regimes, pressure drop, and heat transfer coefficient trends in the cabin and avionics micro-channel heat exchangers when using the heat pump mode. Also discussed will be practical implications of using micro-channel evaporators for the heat pump.

  10. Application of Burnable Absorbers in an Accelerator-Driven System

    SciTech Connect

    Wallenius, Jan; Tucek, Kamil; Carlsson, Johan; Gudowski, Waclaw

    2001-01-15

    The application of burnable absorbers (BAs) to minimize power peaking, reactivity loss, and capture-to-fission probabilities in an accelerator-driven waste transmutation system has been investigated. Boron-10-enriched B{sub 4}C absorber rods were introduced into a lead-bismuth-cooled core fueled with transuranic (TRU) discharges from light water reactors to achieve the smallest possible power peakings at beginning-of-life (BOL) subcriticality level of 0.97. Detailed Monte Carlo simulations show that a radial power peaking equal to 1.2 at BOL is attainable using a four-zone differentiation in BA content. Using a newly written Monte Carlo burnup code, reactivity losses were calculated to be 640 pcm per percent TRU burnup for unrecycled TRU discharges. Comparing to corresponding values in BA-free cores, BA introduction diminishes reactivity losses in TRU-fueled subcritical cores by {approx}20%. Radial power peaking after 300 days of operation at 1200-MW thermal power was <1.75 at a subcriticality level of {approx}0.92, which appears to be acceptable, with respect to limitations in cladding and fuel temperatures. In addition, the use of BAs yields significantly higher fission-to-capture probabilities in even-neutron-number nuclides. Fission-to-absorption probability ratio for {sup 241}Am equal to 0.33 was achieved in the configuration studied. Hence, production of the strong alpha-emitter {sup 242}Cm is reduced, leading to smaller fuel-swelling rates and pin pressurization. Disadvantages following BA introduction, such as increase of void worth and decrease of Doppler feedback in conjunction with small values of {beta}{sub eff}, need to be addressed by detailed studies of subcritical core dynamics.

  11. A unified double-loop multi-scale control strategy for NMP integrating-unstable systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seer, Qiu Han; Nandong, Jobrun

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents a new control strategy which unifies the direct and indirect multi-scale control schemes via a double-loop control structure. This unified control strategy is proposed for controlling a class of highly nonminimum-phase processes having both integrating and unstable modes. This type of systems is often encountered in fed-batch fermentation processes which are very difficult to stabilize via most of the existing well-established control strategies. A systematic design procedure is provided where its applicability is demonstrated via a numerical example.

  12. Gas powered, closed loop power system and process for using same

    SciTech Connect

    Cardone, J.T.; Dill, J.M.; Shatz, K.J.

    1982-06-08

    This invention relates to a gas powered, closed loop power generating system which generates power substantially as a result of the flow of gas through its power generating means. Gas flows through the power generating means because of a pressure drop caused by dissolving the gas in a solvent medium on the exit side of the power generating means. The solution is then separated into the solvent medium, and the gas. The gas pressure is raised and it is then fed back into the power generating means while the separated solvent medium is recycled to redissolve more exiting gas. A process for generating power is also disclosed.

  13. Open-loop characteristics of magnetic suspension systems using electromagnets mounted in a planar array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groom, Nelson J.; Britcher, Colin P.

    1992-01-01

    The open-loop characteristics of a Large-Gap Magnetic Suspension System (LGMSS) were studied and numerical results are presented. The LGMSS considered provides five-degree-of-freedom control. The suspended element is a cylinder that contains a core composed of permanent magnet material. The magnetic actuators are air core electromagnets mounted in a planar array. Configurations utilizing five, six, seven, and eight electromagnets were investigated and all configurations were found to be controllable from coil currents and observable from suspended element positions. Results indicate that increasing the number of coils has an insignificant effect on mode shapes and frequencies.

  14. Decision support for hemodynamic management: from graphical displays to closed loop systems.

    PubMed

    Michard, Frederic

    2013-10-01

    The way hemodynamic therapies are delivered today in anesthesia and critical care is suboptimal. Hemodynamic variables are not always understood correctly and used properly. The adoption of hemodynamic goal-directed strategies, known to be clinically useful, is poor. Ensuring therapies are delivered effectively is the goal of decision support tools and closed loop systems. Graphical displays (metaphor screens) may help clinicians to better capture and integrate the multivariable hemodynamic information. This may result in faster and more accurate diagnosis and therapeutic decisions. Graphical displays (target screens) have the potential to increase adherence to goal-directed strategies and ultimately improve patients' outcomes, but this remains to be confirmed by prospective studies. Closed loop systems are the ultimate solution to ensure therapies are delivered. However, most therapeutic decisions cannot be based on a limited number of output variables. Therefore, one should focus on the development of systems designed to relieve clinicians from very simple and repetitive tasks. Whether intraoperative goal-directed fluid therapy may be one of these tasks remains to be evaluated.

  15. Cryogenic Phase-Locking Loop System Based on SIS Tunnel Junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khudchenko, A. V.; Koshelets, V. P.; Kalashnikov, K. V.

    An ultra-wideband cryogenic phase-locking loop (CPLL) system is a new cryogenic device. The CPLL is intended for phase-locking of a Flux-Flow Oscillator (FFO) in a Superconducting Integrated Receiver (SIR) but can be used for any cryogenic terahertz oscillator. The key element of the CPLL is Cryogenic Phase Detector (CPD), a recently proposed new superconducting element. The CPD is an innovative implementation of superconductor-insulator-superconductor (SIS) tunnel junction. All components of the CPLL reside inside a cryostat at 4.2 K, with the loop length of about 50 cm and the total loop delay 5.5 ns. Such a small delay results in CPLL synchronization bandwidth as wide as 40 MHz and allows phase-locking of more than 60% of the power emitted by the FFO even for FFO linewidth of about 10 MHz. This percentage of phase-locked power three times exceeds that achieved with conventional room-temperature PLLs. Such an improvement enables reducing the FFO phase noise and extending the SIR operation range.Another new approach to the FFO phase-locking has been proposed and experimentally verified. The FFO has been synchronized by a cryogenic harmonic phase detector (CHPD) based on the SIS junction. The CHPD operates simultaneously as the harmonic mixer (HM) and phase detector. We have studied the HM based on the SIS junction theoretically; in particular we calculated 3D dependences of the HM output signal power versus the bias voltage and the LO power. Results of the calculations have been compared with experimental measurements. Good qualitative and quantitative correspondence has been achieved. The FFO phase-locking by the CHPD has been demonstrated. Such a PLL system is expected to be extra wideband. This concept is very promising for building of the multi-pixel SIR array.

  16. Conceptualization and validation of an open-source closed-loop deep brain stimulation system in rat

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hemmings; Ghekiere, Hartwin; Beeckmans, Dorien; Tambuyzer, Tim; van Kuyck, Kris; Aerts, Jean-Marie; Nuttin, Bart

    2015-01-01

    Conventional deep brain stimulation (DBS) applies constant electrical stimulation to specific brain regions to treat neurological disorders. Closed-loop DBS with real-time feedback is gaining attention in recent years, after proved more effective than conventional DBS in terms of pathological symptom control clinically. Here we demonstrate the conceptualization and validation of a closed-loop DBS system using open-source hardware. We used hippocampal theta oscillations as system input, and electrical stimulation in the mesencephalic reticular formation (mRt) as controller output. It is well documented that hippocampal theta oscillations are highly related to locomotion, while electrical stimulation in the mRt induces freezing. We used an Arduino open-source microcontroller between input and output sources. This allowed us to use hippocampal local field potentials (LFPs) to steer electrical stimulation in the mRt. Our results showed that closed-loop DBS significantly suppressed locomotion compared to no stimulation, and required on average only 56% of the stimulation used in open-loop DBS to reach similar effects. The main advantages of open-source hardware include wide selection and availability, high customizability, and affordability. Our open-source closed-loop DBS system is effective, and warrants further research using open-source hardware for closed-loop neuromodulation. PMID:25897892

  17. Conceptualization and validation of an open-source closed-loop deep brain stimulation system in rat.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hemmings; Ghekiere, Hartwin; Beeckmans, Dorien; Tambuyzer, Tim; van Kuyck, Kris; Aerts, Jean-Marie; Nuttin, Bart

    2015-04-21

    Conventional deep brain stimulation (DBS) applies constant electrical stimulation to specific brain regions to treat neurological disorders. Closed-loop DBS with real-time feedback is gaining attention in recent years, after proved more effective than conventional DBS in terms of pathological symptom control clinically. Here we demonstrate the conceptualization and validation of a closed-loop DBS system using open-source hardware. We used hippocampal theta oscillations as system input, and electrical stimulation in the mesencephalic reticular formation (mRt) as controller output. It is well documented that hippocampal theta oscillations are highly related to locomotion, while electrical stimulation in the mRt induces freezing. We used an Arduino open-source microcontroller between input and output sources. This allowed us to use hippocampal local field potentials (LFPs) to steer electrical stimulation in the mRt. Our results showed that closed-loop DBS significantly suppressed locomotion compared to no stimulation, and required on average only 56% of the stimulation used in open-loop DBS to reach similar effects. The main advantages of open-source hardware include wide selection and availability, high customizability, and affordability. Our open-source closed-loop DBS system is effective, and warrants further research using open-source hardware for closed-loop neuromodulation.

  18. Chaotic transition in a three-coupled phase-locked loop system.

    PubMed

    Tsuruda, Hidekatsu; Shirahama, Hiroyuki; Fukushima, Kazuhiro; Nagadome, Masakazu; Inoue, Masayoshi

    2001-06-01

    The chaotic transition is observed in a three-coupled phase-locked loop (PLL) system in both experiments and numerical simulations. In this system, three PLL oscillators are connected with the periodic boundary condition. Intermittency is found in partially synchronized phase, in which two of three oscillators synchronize with each other and form a pair, and the chaotic transition occurs due to the recombination of synchronized pairs so that different pair is re-formed. In this phase, on-off intermittency is also observed and statistical analyses are carried out for on-off intermittent time series. This intermittency is considered as a hybrid type of intermittency with both on-off intermittency and intermittency due to the recombination of synchronized pairs present in the same time series. We also show the chaotic transition phenomena in a three-coupled logistic map system. (c) 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  19. Computer program for single input-output, single-loop feedback systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Additional work is reported on a completely automatic computer program for the design of single input/output, single loop feedback systems with parameter uncertainly, to satisfy time domain bounds on the system response to step commands and disturbances. The inputs to the program are basically the specified time-domain response bounds, the form of the constrained plant transfer function and the ranges of the uncertain parameters of the plant. The program output consists of the transfer functions of the two free compensation networks, in the form of the coefficients of the numerator and denominator polynomials, and the data on the prescribed bounds and the extremes actually obtained for the system response to commands and disturbances.

  20. Phase error statistics of a phase-locked loop synchronized direct detection optical PPM communication system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Natarajan, Suresh; Gardner, C. S.

    1987-01-01

    Receiver timing synchronization of an optical Pulse-Position Modulation (PPM) communication system can be achieved using a phased-locked loop (PLL), provided the photodetector output is suitably processed. The magnitude of the PLL phase error is a good indicator of the timing error at the receiver decoder. The statistics of the phase error are investigated while varying several key system parameters such as PPM order, signal and background strengths, and PPL bandwidth. A practical optical communication system utilizing a laser diode transmitter and an avalanche photodiode in the receiver is described, and the sampled phase error data are presented. A linear regression analysis is applied to the data to obtain estimates of the relational constants involving the phase error variance and incident signal power.

  1. Stabilization loop of a two axes gimbal system using self-tuning PID type fuzzy controller.

    PubMed

    Abdo, Maher Mahmoud; Vali, Ahmad Reza; Toloei, Ali Reza; Arvan, Mohammad Reza

    2014-03-01

    The application of inertial stabilization system is to stabilize the sensor's line of sight toward a target by isolating the sensor from the disturbances induced by the operating environment. The aim of this paper is to present two axes gimbal system. The gimbals torque relationships are derived using Lagrange equation considering the base angular motion and dynamic mass unbalance. The stabilization loops are constructed with cross coupling unit utilizing proposed fuzzy PID type controller. The overall control system is simulated and validated using MATLAB. Then, the performance of proposed controller is evaluated comparing with conventional PI controller in terms of transient response analysis and quantitative study of error analysis. The simulation results obtained in different conditions prove the efficiency of the proposed fuzzy controller which offers a better response than the classical one, and improves further the transient and steady-state performance.

  2. Precision Closed-Loop Orbital Maneuvering System Design and Performance for the Magnetospheric Multiscale Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chai, Dean J.; Queen, Steven Z.; Placanica, Samuel J.

    2015-01-01

    NASAs Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission successfully launched on March 13,2015 (UTC) consists of four identically instrumented spin-stabilized observatories that function as a constellation to study magnetic reconnection in space. The need to maintain sufficiently accurate spatial and temporal formation resolution of the observatories must be balanced against the logistical constraints of executing overly-frequent maneuvers on a small fleet of spacecraft. These two considerations make for an extremely challenging maneuver design problem. This paper focuses on the design elements of a 6-DOF spacecraft attitude control and maneuvering system capable of delivering the high-precision adjustments required by the constellation designers specifically, the design, implementation, and on-orbit performance of the closed-loop formation-class maneuvers that include initialization, maintenance, and re-sizing. The maneuvering control system flown on MMS utilizes a micro-gravity resolution accelerometer sampled at a high rate in order to achieve closed-loop velocity tracking of an inertial target with arc-minute directional and millimeter-per second magnitude accuracy. This paper summarizes the techniques used for correcting bias drift, sensor-head offsets, and centripetal aliasing in the acceleration measurements. It also discusses the on-board pre-maneuver calibration and compensation algorithms as well as the implementation of the post-maneuver attitude adjustments.

  3. Use of an open-loop system to increase physical activity.

    PubMed

    Roemmich, James N; Lobarinas, Christina L; Barkley, Jacob E; White, Tressa M; Paluch, Rocco; Epstein, Leonard H

    2012-08-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of an open-loop system that reinforces physical activity with TV watching to increase children's physical activity. Nonoverweight, sedentary boys and girls (8-12 y) were randomized to a group that received feedback of activity counts + reinforcement for physical activity by providing access to television (F+R, n = 20); or to feedback, no reinforcement (Feedback, n = 20) or no feedback, no reinforcement control (Control, n = 21) groups. Children wore an accelerometer with a count display for 4-months with a 1-year follow-up. F+R reduced TV by 68 min/day and TV time was lower than the Feedback (p < .005) and Control (p < .002) groups. TV time of F+R remained 31 min lower (p < .02) than baseline at 1-year. F+R had a 44% increase in physical activity, which was greater than the feedback (p < .04) and control (p < .01) groups. An open-loop system decreases TV viewing and increases physical activity of children for 4-months. TV of the F+R group remained lower at 12 months, suggesting a reduction in screen-time habits.

  4. Voice loops as coordination aids in space shuttle mission control.

    PubMed

    Patterson, E S; Watts-Perotti, J; Woods, D D

    1999-01-01

    Voice loops, an auditory groupware technology, are essential coordination support tools for experienced practitioners in domains such as air traffic management, aircraft carrier operations and space shuttle mission control. They support synchronous communication on multiple channels among groups of people who are spatially distributed. In this paper, we suggest reasons for why the voice loop system is a successful medium for supporting coordination in space shuttle mission control based on over 130 hours of direct observation. Voice loops allow practitioners to listen in on relevant communications without disrupting their own activities or the activities of others. In addition, the voice loop system is structured around the mission control organization, and therefore directly supports the demands of the domain. By understanding how voice loops meet the particular demands of the mission control environment, insight can be gained for the design of groupware tools to support cooperative activity in other event-driven domains.

  5. Voice loops as coordination aids in space shuttle mission control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, E. S.; Watts-Perotti, J.; Woods, D. D.

    1999-01-01

    Voice loops, an auditory groupware technology, are essential coordination support tools for experienced practitioners in domains such as air traffic management, aircraft carrier operations and space shuttle mission control. They support synchronous communication on multiple channels among groups of people who are spatially distributed. In this paper, we suggest reasons for why the voice loop system is a successful medium for supporting coordination in space shuttle mission control based on over 130 hours of direct observation. Voice loops allow practitioners to listen in on relevant communications without disrupting their own activities or the activities of others. In addition, the voice loop system is structured around the mission control organization, and therefore directly supports the demands of the domain. By understanding how voice loops meet the particular demands of the mission control environment, insight can be gained for the design of groupware tools to support cooperative activity in other event-driven domains.

  6. Exponential decay of spatial correlation in driven diffusive system: A universal feature of macroscopic homogeneous state

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Qing-Yi; Jiang, Rui; Hu, Mao-Bin; Jia, Bin; Wang, Wen-Xu

    2016-01-01

    Driven diffusive systems have been a paradigm for modelling many physical, chemical, and biological transport processes. In the systems, spatial correlation plays an important role in the emergence of a variety of nonequilibrium phenomena and exhibits rich features such as pronounced oscillations. However, the lack of analytical results of spatial correlation precludes us from fully understanding the effect of spatial correlation on the dynamics of the system. Here we offer precise analytical predictions of the spatial correlation in a typical driven diffusive system, namely facilitated asymmetric exclusion process. We find theoretically that the correlation between two sites decays exponentially as their distance increases, which is in good agreement with numerical simulations. Furthermore, we find the exponential decay is a universal property of macroscopic homogeneous state in a broad class of 1D driven diffusive systems. Our findings deepen the understanding of many nonequilibrium phenomena resulting from spatial correlation in driven diffusive systems. PMID:26804770

  7. Exponential decay of spatial correlation in driven diffusive system: A universal feature of macroscopic homogeneous state.

    PubMed

    Hao, Qing-Yi; Jiang, Rui; Hu, Mao-Bin; Jia, Bin; Wang, Wen-Xu

    2016-01-25

    Driven diffusive systems have been a paradigm for modelling many physical, chemical, and biological transport processes. In the systems, spatial correlation plays an important role in the emergence of a variety of nonequilibrium phenomena and exhibits rich features such as pronounced oscillations. However, the lack of analytical results of spatial correlation precludes us from fully understanding the effect of spatial correlation on the dynamics of the system. Here we offer precise analytical predictions of the spatial correlation in a typical driven diffusive system, namely facilitated asymmetric exclusion process. We find theoretically that the correlation between two sites decays exponentially as their distance increases, which is in good agreement with numerical simulations. Furthermore, we find the exponential decay is a universal property of macroscopic homogeneous state in a broad class of 1D driven diffusive systems. Our findings deepen the understanding of many nonequilibrium phenomena resulting from spatial correlation in driven diffusive systems.

  8. Optimal energy-splitting method for an open-loop liquid crystal adaptive optics system.

    PubMed

    Cao, Zhaoliang; Mu, Quanquan; Hu, Lifa; Liu, Yonggang; Peng, Zenghui; Yang, Qingyun; Meng, Haoran; Yao, Lishuang; Xuan, Li

    2012-08-13

    A waveband-splitting method is proposed for open-loop liquid crystal adaptive optics systems (LC AOSs). The proposed method extends the working waveband, splits energy flexibly, and improves detection capability. Simulated analysis is performed for a waveband in the range of 350 nm to 950 nm. The results show that the optimal energy split is 7:3 for the wavefront sensor (WFS) and for the imaging camera with the waveband split into 350 nm to 700 nm and 700 nm to 950 nm, respectively. A validation experiment is conducted by measuring the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the WFS and the imaging camera. The results indicate that for the waveband-splitting method, the SNR of WFS is approximately equal to that of the imaging camera with a variation in the intensity. On the other hand, the SNR of the WFS is significantly different from that of the imaging camera for the polarized beam splitter energy splitting scheme. Therefore, the waveband-splitting method is more suitable for an open-loop LC AOS. An adaptive correction experiment is also performed on a 1.2-meter telescope. A star with a visual magnitude of 4.45 is observed and corrected and an angular resolution ability of 0.31″ is achieved. A double star with a combined visual magnitude of 4.3 is observed as well, and its two components are resolved after correction. The results indicate that the proposed method can significantly improve the detection capability of an open-loop LC AOS.

  9. Research and implementation of a special signal source of open-loop testing system of resonant microsensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Shangchun; Wang, Yijun

    2006-11-01

    As a core component for open-loop characteristics testing system of micro-sensor, quality of signal source influences the integer performances of testing system directly. The method to generate special signal of open-loop testing system of resonant micro-sensor are discussed in this paper, and a method of direct digital frequency synthesize (DDS) to develop the special signal source of the testing system is proposed. A designation approach based on DSP and FPGA in the realization of DDS is advocated. Finally a simulation is made using the MATLAB. The principle of DDS is also introduced.

  10. Buckle Driven Delamination in Thin Hard Film Compliant Substrate Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moody, N. R.; Reedy, E. D.; Corona, E.; Adams, D. P.; Kennedy, M. S.; Cordill, M. J.; Bahr, D. F.

    2010-06-01

    Deformation and fracture of thin films on compliant substrates are key factors constraining the performance of emerging flexible substrate devices. [1-3] These systems often contain layers of thin polymer, ceramic and metallic films and stretchable interconnects where differing properties induce high normal and shear stresses. [4] As long as the films remain bonded to the substrates, they may deform far beyond their freestanding form. Once debonded, substrate constraint disappears leading to film failure. [3] Experimentally it is very difficult to measure properties in these systems at sub-micron and nanoscales. Theoretically it is very difficult to determine the contributions from the films, interfaces, and substrates. As a result our understanding of deformation and fracture behavior in compliant substrate systems is limited. This motivated a study of buckle driven delamination of thin hard tungsten films on pure PMMA substrates. The films were sputter deposited to thicknesses of 100 nm, 200 nm, and 400 nm with a residual compressive stress of 1.7 GPa. An aluminum oxide interlayer was added on several samples to alter interfacial composition. Buckles formed spontaneously on the PMMA substrates following film deposition. On films without the aluminum oxide interlayer, an extensive network of small telephone cord buckles formed following deposition, interspersed with regions of larger telephone cord buckles. (Figure 1) On films with an aluminum oxide interlayer, telephone cord buckles formed creating a uniform widely spaced pattern. Through-substrate optical observations revealed matching buckle patterns along the film-substrate interface indicating that delamination occurred for large and small buckles with and without an interlayer. The coexistence of large and small buckles on the same substrate led to two distinct behaviors as shown in Figure 2 where normalized buckle heights are plotted against normalized film stress. The behaviors deviate significantly from

  11. Development of spin coater with close loop control system using ATMega8535 microcontroller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratama, Iqbal; Mindara, Jajat Yuda; Maulana, Dwindra W.; Panatarani, C.; Joni, I. Made

    2016-02-01

    Spin coater usually applied in preparation of a thin layer in industrial coatings and advanced material functionalization in various applications. This paper reports the development of spin coater with a closed loop control system using ATMega8535 microcontroller. The thickness of the thin film layer depend on the rotation of spin coater in which usually controlled by open-loop type. In long-term utilization of the spin coater, the performance of the motor usually degraded and caused the speed of the rotation is no longer accurate. Therefore to resolve the drawback, a close-loop system is applied in currently developed spin coater. The speed range of the spin coater was designed in between 450-6000 rpm, equipped with user interface through push button and LCD display. The rotary encoder transducer was applied to sense the speed of the dc motor. The pulse width modulation (PWM) method is applied to control the speed of the dc motor. The performance of the control system were evaluated based on the applied voltage to the PWM driver (L298) versus speed of the motor and also the rise time, overshoot, and settling time of the control system. The result shows that in the setting of low speed (450 rpm), the settling time is very fast about 12 seconds and very high overshoot about 225 rpm, contrary for the high speed (5550 rpm) the setting time is 71 seconds and very low overshot about 30 rpm. In addition, to evaluate the stability of the mechanical system, the spin coater was tested to prepare a ZnO thin film in various speed of rotations and at various concentrations of the solution, i.e. 10 wt.% and 15 wt.%. It is concluded that the spin coater can be utilized for thin film coating after pass the maximum of the settling time (71 seconds). The currently developed spin coater produce a film with common characteristics of the spin coater where thicker film was obtained when higher concentration was used and thinner the film was obtained when higher speed of the rotation

  12. Closed-Loop Neuromorphic Benchmarks

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Terrence C.; DeWolf, Travis; Kleinhans, Ashley; Eliasmith, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Evaluating the effectiveness and performance of neuromorphic hardware is difficult. It is even more difficult when the task of interest is a closed-loop task; that is, a task where the output from the neuromorphic hardware affects some environment, which then in turn affects the hardware's future input. However, closed-loop situations are one of the primary potential uses of neuromorphic hardware. To address this, we present a methodology for generating closed-loop benchmarks that makes use of a hybrid of real physical embodiment and a type of “minimal” simulation. Minimal simulation has been shown to lead to robust real-world performance, while still maintaining the practical advantages of simulation, such as making it easy for the same benchmark to be used by many researchers. This method is flexible enough to allow researchers to explicitly modify the benchmarks to identify specific task domains where particular hardware excels. To demonstrate the method, we present a set of novel benchmarks that focus on motor control for an arbitrary system with unknown external forces. Using these benchmarks, we show that an error-driven learning rule can consistently improve motor control performance across a randomly generated family of closed-loop simulations, even when there are up to 15 interacting joints to be controlled. PMID:26696820

  13. Storm Time Global Thermosphere: A Driven-Dissipative Thermodynamic System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-11

    and the Dst index wax and wane Observed responses of Eu, and T, to £vsdriving suggest that the storm time thermosphere evolves and a driven-but...2004], present drag models use the ap index as a driver and underestimate observed storm time density increases by >100%. [6] 2. While crossing the...Earth’s center to the magnetopause along the dawn or dusk meridian. [9] 5. During main and early recovery phases of storms the Dst index tracked p

  14. Safe and Ecological Refluxing with a Closed-Loop Air Cooling System.

    PubMed

    Böhmdorfer, Stefan; Eilenberger, Gottfried; Zweckmair, Thomas; Sumerskii, Ivan; Potthast, Antje; Rosenau, Thomas

    2017-01-20

    Off-the-shelf computer cooling hardware was used to construct a closed-loop air cooling system (CLACS) that is distinguished by scalability, low energy, and no tap water consumption. Constructed to be generally used with laboratory condensers, the system was tested with several common low and high boiling solvents and showed a condensation performance equivalent to conventional tap water cooling. Reaction yields were therefore unaffected. Also, long-lasting Soxhlet extractions showed no performance loss relative to conventional cooling. Optionally, the device can be assembled from low-voltage components and be powered from a battery, rendering it independent of the main power. Both investment and running costs are minimal, allowing a lab-wide adoption and elimination of the two major drawbacks of commonly employed tap water cooling: waste of drinking water and the risk of flooding.

  15. Closed Loop, DM Diversity-based, Wavefront Correction Algorithm for High Contrast Imaging Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Give'on, Amir; Belikov, Ruslan; Shaklan, Stuart; Kasdin, Jeremy

    2007-01-01

    High contrast imaging from space relies on coronagraphs to limit diffraction and a wavefront control systems to compensate for imperfections in both the telescope optics and the coronagraph. The extreme contrast required (up to 10(exp -10) for terrestrial planets) puts severe requirements on the wavefront control system, as the achievable contrast is limited by the quality of the wavefront. This paper presents a general closed loop correction algorithm for high contrast imaging coronagraphs by minimizing the energy in a predefined region in the image where terrestrial planets could be found. The estimation part of the algorithm reconstructs the complex field in the image plane using phase diversity caused by the deformable mirror. This method has been shown to achieve faster and better correction than classical speckle nulling.

  16. An Efficient Solution Method for Multibody Systems with Loops Using Multiple Processors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghosh, Tushar K.; Nguyen, Luong A.; Quiocho, Leslie J.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a multibody dynamics algorithm formulated for parallel implementation on multiprocessor computing platforms using the divide-and-conquer approach. The system of interest is a general topology of rigid and elastic articulated bodies with or without loops. The algorithm divides the multibody system into a number of smaller sets of bodies in chain or tree structures, called "branches" at convenient joints called "connection points", and uses an Order-N (O (N)) approach to formulate the dynamics of each branch in terms of the unknown spatial connection forces. The equations of motion for the branches, leaving the connection forces as unknowns, are implemented in separate processors in parallel for computational efficiency, and the equations for all the unknown connection forces are synthesized and solved in one or several processors. The performances of two implementations of this divide-and-conquer algorithm in multiple processors are compared with an existing method implemented on a single processor.

  17. Constant current loop impedance measuring system that is immune to the effects of parasitic impedances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Karl F. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A constant current loop measuring system is provided for measuring a characteristic of an environment. The system comprises a first impedance positionable in the environment, a second impedance coupled in series with said first impedance and a parasitic impedance electrically coupled to the first and second impedances. A current generating device, electrically coupled in series with the first and second impedances, provides a constant current through the first and second impedances to produce first and second voltages across the first and second impedances, respectively, and a parasitic voltage across the parasitic impedance. A high impedance voltage measuring device measures a voltage difference between the first and second voltages independent of the parasitic voltage to produce a characteristic voltage representative of the characteristic of the environment.

  18. A Novel Real-Time DNA Detection System for Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakugawa, Koji; Yamada, Kenji; Maeda, Hiroshi; Takashiba, Shougo

    We developed a novel real-time DNA detection system for loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) method. Our prototype was composed of a thermostatic chamber, a hole slide glass, LED and a web camera. The reaction mixture was injected into the slide glass hole and the LAMP reaction was carried out at 63°C for 2 hours. To observe the DNA amplification, we monitored the fluorescence intensity of SYBR Green I that was excited by the blue LED. The captured BMP images were analyzed by NIH Image J software. The DNA amplification and amplification monitoring experiment was successful. Furthermore, quantitative accuracy was evaluated based on real-time PCR. The reaction time correlates well with the DNA concentration. These results indicate the successful development of a novel real-time DNA detection system for LAMP method.

  19. Bellows-Type Accumulators for Liquid Metal Loops of Space Reactor Power Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tournier, Jean-Michel; El-Genk, Mohamed S.

    2006-01-01

    In many space nuclear power systems, the primary and/or secondary loops use liquid metal working fluids, and require accumulators to accommodate the change in the liquid metal volume and maintain sufficient subcooling to avoid boiling. This paper developed redundant and light-weight bellows-type accumulators with and without a mechanical spring, and compared the operating condition and mass of the accumulators for different types of liquid metal working fluids and operating temperatures: potassium, NaK-78, sodium and lithium loops of a total capacity of 50 liters and nominal operating temperatures of 840 K, 860 K, 950 K and 1340 K, respectively. The effects of using a mechanical spring and different structural materials on the design, operation and mass of the accumulators are also investigated. The structure materials considered include SS-316, Hastelloy-X, C-103 and Mo-14Re. The accumulator without a mechanical spring weighs 23 kg and 40 kg for a coolant subcooling of 50 K and 100 K, respectively, following a loss of the fill gas. The addition of a mechanical spring comes with a mass penalty, in favor of higher redundancy and maintaining a higher liquid metal subcooling.

  20. Bellows-Type Accumulators for Liquid Metal Loops of Space Reactor Power Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Tournier, Jean-Michel; El-Genk, Mohamed S.

    2006-01-20

    In many space nuclear power systems, the primary and/or secondary loops use liquid metal working fluids, and require accumulators to accommodate the change in the liquid metal volume and maintain sufficient subcooling to avoid boiling. This paper developed redundant and light-weight bellows-type accumulators with and without a mechanical spring, and compared the operating condition and mass of the accumulators for different types of liquid metal working fluids and operating temperatures: potassium, NaK-78, sodium and lithium loops of a total capacity of 50 liters and nominal operating temperatures of 840 K, 860 K, 950 K and 1340 K, respectively. The effects of using a mechanical spring and different structural materials on the design, operation and mass of the accumulators are also investigated. The structure materials considered include SS-316, Hastelloy-X, C-103 and Mo-14Re. The accumulator without a mechanical spring weighs 23 kg and 40 kg for a coolant subcooling of 50 K and 100 K, respectively, following a loss of the fill gas. The addition of a mechanical spring comes with a mass penalty, in favor of higher redundancy and maintaining a higher liquid metal subcooling.

  1. Spatiotemporal dynamics of a digital phase-locked loop based coupled map lattice system

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, Tanmoy Paul, Bishwajit; Sarkar, B. C.

    2014-03-15

    We explore the spatiotemporal dynamics of a coupled map lattice (CML) system, which is realized with a one dimensional array of locally coupled digital phase-locked loops (DPLLs). DPLL is a nonlinear feedback-controlled system widely used as an important building block of electronic communication systems. We derive the phase-error equation of the spatially extended system of coupled DPLLs, which resembles a form of the equation of a CML system. We carry out stability analysis for the synchronized homogeneous solutions using the circulant matrix formalism. It is shown through extensive numerical simulations that with the variation of nonlinearity parameter and coupling strength the system shows transitions among several generic features of spatiotemporal dynamics, viz., synchronized fixed point solution, frozen random pattern, pattern selection, spatiotemporal intermittency, and fully developed spatiotemporal chaos. We quantify the spatiotemporal dynamics using quantitative measures like average quadratic deviation and spatial correlation function. We emphasize that instead of using an idealized model of CML, which is usually employed to observe the spatiotemporal behaviors, we consider a real world physical system and establish the existence of spatiotemporal chaos and other patterns in this system. We also discuss the importance of the present study in engineering application like removal of clock-skew in parallel processors.

  2. Spatiotemporal dynamics of a digital phase-locked loop based coupled map lattice system.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Tanmoy; Paul, Bishwajit; Sarkar, B C

    2014-03-01

    We explore the spatiotemporal dynamics of a coupled map lattice (CML) system, which is realized with a one dimensional array of locally coupled digital phase-locked loops (DPLLs). DPLL is a nonlinear feedback-controlled system widely used as an important building block of electronic communication systems. We derive the phase-error equation of the spatially extended system of coupled DPLLs, which resembles a form of the equation of a CML system. We carry out stability analysis for the synchronized homogeneous solutions using the circulant matrix formalism. It is shown through extensive numerical simulations that with the variation of nonlinearity parameter and coupling strength the system shows transitions among several generic features of spatiotemporal dynamics, viz., synchronized fixed point solution, frozen random pattern, pattern selection, spatiotemporal intermittency, and fully developed spatiotemporal chaos. We quantify the spatiotemporal dynamics using quantitative measures like average quadratic deviation and spatial correlation function. We emphasize that instead of using an idealized model of CML, which is usually employed to observe the spatiotemporal behaviors, we consider a real world physical system and establish the existence of spatiotemporal chaos and other patterns in this system. We also discuss the importance of the present study in engineering application like removal of clock-skew in parallel processors.

  3. Evaluation of a novel artificial pancreas: closed loop glycemic control system with continuous blood glucose monitoring.

    PubMed

    Tsukamoto, Yuuki; Kinoshita, Yoshihiko; Kitagawa, Hiroyuki; Munekage, Masaya; Munekage, Eri; Takezaki, Yuka; Yatabe, Tomoaki; Yamashita, Koichi; Yamazaki, Rie; Okabayashi, Takehiro; Tarumi, Masatoshi; Kobayashi, Masaki; Mishina, Suguru; Hanazaki, Kazuhiro

    2013-04-01

    A closed-loop glycemic control system using an artificial pancreas has been applied with many clinical benefits in Japan since 1987. To update this system incorporating user-friendly features, we developed a novel artificial pancreas (STG-55). The purpose of this study was to evaluate STG-55 for device usability, performance of blood glucose measurement, glycemic control characteristics in vivo in animal experiments, and evaluate its clinical feasibility. There are several features for usability improvement based on the design concepts, such as compactness, display monitor, batteries, guidance function, and reduction of the preparation time. All animal study data were compared with a clinically available artificial pancreas system in Japan (control device: STG-22). We examined correlations of both blood glucose levels between two groups (STG-55 vs. control) using Clarke's error grid analysis, and also compared mean glucose infusion rate (GIR) during glucose clamp. The results showed strong correlation in blood glucose concentrations (Pearson's product-moment correlation coefficient: 0.97; n = 1636). Clarke's error grid analysis showed that 98.4% of the data fell in Zones A and B, which represent clinically accurate or benign errors, respectively. The difference in mean GIRs was less than 0.2 mg/kg/min, which was considered not significant. Clinical feasibility study demonstrated sufficient glycemic control maintaining target glucose range between 80 and 110 (mg/dL), and between 140 and 160 without any hypoglycemia. In conclusion, STG-55 was a clinically acceptable artificial pancreas with improved interface and usability. A closed-loop glycemic control system with STG-55 would be a useful tool for surgical and critical patients in intensive care units, as well as diabetic patients.

  4. Control of voice coil motor nanoscanners for an atomic force microscopy system using a loop shaping technique.

    PubMed

    Youm, Woosub; Jung, Jongkyu; Lee, Sungq; Park, Kyihwan

    2008-01-01

    The voice coil motor nanoscanner has the advantages of large working range, easy control, and low cost compared to the conventional lead zirconate titanate driven nanoscanner. However, it has a small damping problem which causes mechanical vibration. The mechanical vibration reduces the accuracy as well as servobandwidth, which deteoriates the atomic force microscopy (AFM) image of the samples. In order to solve the vibration problem, the loop shaping technique [for vertical (z)] and input prefilter [for lateral (xy)] are applied. Experimental results of the proposed techniques are presented for vertical (z) and lateral (xy) scanner. Finally, the AFM images are provided to investigate its effect.

  5. Event-driven management algorithm of an Engineering documents circulation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzenkov, V.; Zebzeev, A.; Gromakov, E.

    2015-04-01

    Development methodology of an engineering documents circulation system in the design company is reviewed. Discrete event-driven automatic models using description algorithms of project management is offered. Petri net use for dynamic design of projects is offered.

  6. Loop quantization

    SciTech Connect

    Nicolau, A.

    1988-10-01

    Loop unwinding is a known technique for reducing loop overhead, exposing parallelism, and increasing the efficiency of pipelining. Traditional loop unwinding is limited to the innermost loop in a group of nested loops and the amount of unwinding either is fixed or must be specified by the user, on a case by case basis. In this paper the authors present a general technique for automatically unwinding multiply nested loops, explain its advantages over other transformation techniques, and illustrate its practical effectiveness. Lopp Quantization could be beneficial by itself or coupled with other loop transformations.

  7. Coupled dual loop absorption heat pump

    DOEpatents

    Sarkisian, Paul H.; Reimann, Robert C.; Biermann, Wendell J.

    1985-01-01

    A coupled dual loop absorption system which utilizes two separate complete loops. Each individual loop operates at three temperatures and two pressures. This low temperature loop absorber and condenser are thermally coupled to the high temperature loop evaporator, and the high temperature loop condenser and absorber are thermally coupled to the low temperature generator.

  8. Investigation of the closed-loop control of a pneumatic conveying system using tomographic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deloughry, Richard; Pickup, Elaine

    2001-02-01

    The subject of pneumatic conveying of solids is a complex one. The flow regime present in a conveying system is dependent upon: the size and shape of the particles to be conveyed, the geometry and orientation of the conveying pipe, the relative densities of the solid and the conveying air. The variable parameters present are the velocity of the conveying air and the solids mass flow rate. The variation of these two factors dictates the presence of either dilute or dense phase flow. At Manchester Metropolitan University a pneumatic conveying system transporting polyethylene nibs, was used to investigate the implementation of a Proportional and Integral control system using a tomographic imaging system in the feedback loop. The aim of the investigative work was to achieve control of the air velocity and solids loading factor for the conveying system to maintain dilute phase flow at a prescribed level. The solids material conveyed was sensed using a PC based electrical tomographic imaging system and this was used to control the air velocity in the conveying system.

  9. Closed loop control of a pneumatic conveying system using tomographic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deloughry, Richard; Pickup, Elaine; Ponnapalli, Prasad

    2001-07-01

    The subject of pneumatic conveying of solids is a complex one. The flow regime present in a conveying system is dependent upon: the size and shape of the particles to be conveyed, the geometry and orientation of the conveying pipe, the relative densities of the solid and the conveying air. The variable parameters present are the velocity of the conveying air and the solids mass flow rate. The variation of these two factors dictates the presence of either dilute or dense phase flow. At Manchester Metropolitan University a pneumatic conveying system, transporting polyethylene nibs, was used to investigate the implementation of a proportional and integral control system using a tomographic imaging system in the feedback loop. The aim of the investigative work was to achieve control of the air velocity and solids loading factor for the conveying system to maintain dilute phase flow at a prescribed dune level. The solids material conveyed was sensed using a PC based electrical tomographic imaging system and this was used to control the air velocity in the conveying system.

  10. A Self-regulatory System of Interlinked Signaling Feedback Loops Controls Mouse Limb Patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benazet, Jean-Denis; Bischofberger, Mirko; Tiecke, Eva; Gonalves, Alexandre; Martin, James F.; Zuniga, Aime; Naef, Felix; Zeller, Rolf

    Developmental pathways need to be robust against environmental and genetic variation to enable reliable morphogenesis. Here, we take a systems biology approach to explain how robustness is achieved in the developing mouse limb, a classical model of organogenesis. By combining quantitative genetics with computational modeling we established a computational model of multiple interlocked feedback modules, involving sonic hedgehog (SHH) morphogen, fibroblast growth factor (FGFs) signaling, bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) and its antagonist GREM1. Earlier modeling work had emphasized the versatile kinetic characteristics of interlocked feedback loops operating at different time scales. Here we develop and then validate a similar computational model to show how BMP4 first initiates and SHH then propagates feedback in the network through differential transcriptional regulation of Grem1 to control digit specification. This switch occurs by linking a fast BMP4/GREM1 module to a slower SHH/GREM1/FGF feedback loop. Simulated gene expression profiles modeled normal limb development as well those of single-gene knockouts. Sensitivity analysis showed how the model was robust and insensitive to variability in parameters. A surprising prediction of the model was that an early Bmp4 signal is essential to kick-start Grem1 expression and the digit specification system. We experimentally validated the prediction using inducible alleles and showed that early, but not late, removal of Bmp4 dramatically disrupted limb development. Sensitivity analysis showed how robustness emerges from this circuitry. This study shows how modeling and computation can help us understand how self-regulatory signaling networks achieve robust regulation of limb development, by exploiting interconnectivity among the three signaling pathways. We expect that similar computational analyses will shed light on the origins of robustness in other developmental systems, and I will discuss some recent examples from

  11. Multi-Purpose Thermal Hydraulic Loop: Advanced Reactor Technology Integral System Test (ARTIST) Facility for Support of Advanced Reactor Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    James E. O'Brien; Piyush Sabharwall; SuJong Yoon

    2001-11-01

    Effective and robust high temperature heat transfer systems are fundamental to the successful deployment of advanced reactors for both power generation and non-electric applications. Plant designs often include an intermediate heat transfer loop (IHTL) with heat exchangers at either end to deliver thermal energy to the application while providing isolation of the primary reactor system. In order to address technical feasibility concerns and challenges a new high-temperature multi-fluid, multi-loop test facility “Advanced Reactor Technology Integral System Test facility” (ARTIST) is under development at the Idaho National Laboratory. The facility will include three flow loops: high-temperature helium, molten salt, and steam/water. Details of some of the design aspects and challenges of this facility, which is currently in the conceptual design phase, are discussed

  12. An Improved Design for Air Removal from Aerospace Fluid Loop Coolant Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritchie, Stephen M. C.; Holladay, Jon B.; Holt, J. Mike; Clark, Dallas W.

    2003-01-01

    Aerospace applications with requirements for large capacity heat removal (launch vehicles, platforms, payloads, etc.) typically utilize a liquid coolant fluid as a transport media to increase efficiency and flexibility in the vehicle design. An issue with these systems however, is susceptibility to the presence of noncondensable gas (NCG) or air. The presence of air in a coolant loop can have numerous negative consequences, including loss of centrifugal pump prime, interference with sensor readings, inhibition of heat transfer, and coolant blockage to remote systems. Hardware ground processing to remove this air is also cumbersome and time consuming which continuously drives recurring costs. Current systems for maintaining the system free of air are tailored and have demonstrated only moderate success. An obvious solution to these problems is the development and advancement of a passive gas removal device, or gas trap, that would be installed in the flight cooling system simplifying the initial coolant fill procedure and also maintaining the system during operations. The proposed device would utilize commercially available membranes thus increasing reliability and reducing cost while also addressing both current and anticipated applications. In addition, it maintains current pressure drop, water loss, and size restrictions while increasing tolerance for pressure increases due to gas build-up in the trap.

  13. Recovery Act: Cedarville School District Retrofit of Heating and Cooling Systems with Geothermal Heat Pumps and Ground Source Water Loops

    SciTech Connect

    Jarrell, Mark

    2013-09-30

    Cedarville School District retrofitted the heating and cooling systems in three campus areas (High School, Middle School, and Upper Elementary School) with geothermal heat pumps and ground source water loops, as a demonstration project for the effective implementation of geothermal heat pump systems and other energy efficiency and air quality improvements.

  14. Closed loop regeneration system for generating mechanical energy and the method therefor

    SciTech Connect

    Hanrahan, R.J.; Gupta, A.K.

    1989-01-17

    A closed loop regeneration system is described for generating mechanical and thermal energy comprising: means for combining molecular chlorine and hydrogen to form hydrogen chloride at high temperatures and pressure; means receiving the hydrogen chloride from the combining means for generating mechanical power; means for extracting thermal energy from the hydrogen chloride; means for converting the hydrogen chloride to molecular hydrogen and chlorine; the converting means comprising a first reactor containing copper and cuprous chloride; means for passing the hydrogen chloride over the copper and cuprous chloride at a temperature of at least about 100/sup 0/C to thereby generate cuprous chloride, cupric chloride and molecular hydrogen; a second reactor containing cuprous chloride and cupric chloride; means for conveying the thermal energy from the extracting means to the second reactor to thereby generate copper, cuprous chloride and molecular chlorine; and means for conveying the generated molecular chlorine and hydrogen to the combining means.

  15. Investigation of creep by use of closed loop servo-hydraulic test system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, H. C.; Yao, J. C.

    1981-01-01

    Creep tests were conducted by means of a closed loop servo-controlled materials test system. These tests are different from the conventional creep tests in that the strain history prior to creep may be carefully monitored. Tests were performed for aluminum alloy 6061-0 at 150 C and monitored by a PDP 11/04 minicomputer at a preset constant plastic-strain rate prehistory. The results show that the plastic-strain rate prior to creep plays a significant role in creep behavior. The endochronic theory of viscoplasticity was applied to describe the observed creep curves. The concepts of intrinsic time and strain rate sensitivity function are employed and modified according to the present observation.

  16. Design of PID controllers in double feedback loops for SISO systems with set-point filters.

    PubMed

    Vijayan, V; Panda, Rames C

    2012-07-01

    A PID controller is widely used to control industrial processes that are mostly open loop stable or unstable. Selection of proper feedback structure and controller tuning helps to improve the performance of the loop. In this paper a double-feedback loop/method is used to achieve stability and better performance of the process. The internal feedback is used for stabilizing the process and the outer loop is used for good setpoint tracking. An internal model controller (IMC) based PID method is used for tuning the outer loop controller. Autotuning based on relay feedback or the Ziegler-Nichols method can be used for tuning an inner loop controller. A tuning parameter (λ) that is used to tune IMC-PID is used as a time constant of a setpoint filter that is used for reducing the peak overshoot. The method has been tested successfully on many low order processes.

  17. Event-driven contrastive divergence for spiking neuromorphic systems

    PubMed Central

    Neftci, Emre; Das, Srinjoy; Pedroni, Bruno; Kreutz-Delgado, Kenneth; Cauwenberghs, Gert

    2014-01-01

    Restricted Boltzmann Machines (RBMs) and Deep Belief Networks have been demonstrated to perform efficiently in a variety of applications, such as dimensionality reduction, feature learning, and classification. Their implementation on neuromorphic hardware platforms emulating large-scale networks of spiking neurons can have significant advantages from the perspectives of scalability, power dissipation and real-time interfacing with the environment. However, the traditional RBM architecture and the commonly used training algorithm known as Contrastive Divergence (CD) are based on discrete updates and exact arithmetics which do not directly map onto a dynamical neural substrate. Here, we present an event-driven variation of CD to train a RBM constructed with Integrate & Fire (I&F) neurons, that is constrained by the limitations of existing and near future neuromorphic hardware platforms. Our strategy is based on neural sampling, which allows us to synthesize a spiking neural network that samples from a target Boltzmann distribution. The recurrent activity of the network replaces the discrete steps of the CD algorithm, while Spike Time Dependent Plasticity (STDP) carries out the weight updates in an online, asynchronous fashion. We demonstrate our approach by training an RBM composed of leaky I&F neurons with STDP synapses to learn a generative model of the MNIST hand-written digit dataset, and by testing it in recognition, generation and cue integration tasks. Our results contribute to a machine learning-driven approach for synthesizing networks of spiking neurons capable of carrying out practical, high-level functionality. PMID:24574952

  18. Numerical simulation of nonlinear dynamical systems driven by commutative noise

    SciTech Connect

    Carbonell, F. Biscay, R.J.; Jimenez, J.C.; Cruz, H. de la

    2007-10-01

    The local linearization (LL) approach has become an effective technique for the numerical integration of ordinary, random and stochastic differential equations. One of the reasons for this success is that the LL method achieves a convenient trade-off between numerical stability and computational cost. Besides, the LL method reproduces well the dynamics of nonlinear equations for which other classical methods fail. However, in the stochastic case, most of the reported works has been focused in Stochastic Differential Equations (SDE) driven by additive noise. This limits the applicability of the LL method since there is a number of interesting dynamics observed in equations with multiplicative noise. On the other hand, recent results show that commutative noise SDEs can be transformed into a random differential equation (RDE) by means of a random diffeomorfism (conjugacy). This paper takes advantages of such conjugacy property and the LL approach for defining a LL scheme for SDEs driven by commutative noise. The performance of the proposed method is illustrated by means of numerical simulations.

  19. Event-driven contrastive divergence for spiking neuromorphic systems.

    PubMed

    Neftci, Emre; Das, Srinjoy; Pedroni, Bruno; Kreutz-Delgado, Kenneth; Cauwenberghs, Gert

    2013-01-01

    Restricted Boltzmann Machines (RBMs) and Deep Belief Networks have been demonstrated to perform efficiently in a variety of applications, such as dimensionality reduction, feature learning, and classification. Their implementation on neuromorphic hardware platforms emulating large-scale networks of spiking neurons can have significant advantages from the perspectives of scalability, power dissipation and real-time interfacing with the environment. However, the traditional RBM architecture and the commonly used training algorithm known as Contrastive Divergence (CD) are based on discrete updates and exact arithmetics which do not directly map onto a dynamical neural substrate. Here, we present an event-driven variation of CD to train a RBM constructed with Integrate & Fire (I&F) neurons, that is constrained by the limitations of existing and near future neuromorphic hardware platforms. Our strategy is based on neural sampling, which allows us to synthesize a spiking neural network that samples from a target Boltzmann distribution. The recurrent activity of the network replaces the discrete steps of the CD algorithm, while Spike Time Dependent Plasticity (STDP) carries out the weight updates in an online, asynchronous fashion. We demonstrate our approach by training an RBM composed of leaky I&F neurons with STDP synapses to learn a generative model of the MNIST hand-written digit dataset, and by testing it in recognition, generation and cue integration tasks. Our results contribute to a machine learning-driven approach for synthesizing networks of spiking neurons capable of carrying out practical, high-level functionality.

  20. Gradiometer Using Middle Loops as Sensing Elements in a Low-Field SQUID MRI System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penanen, Konstantin; Hahn, Inseob; Ho Eom, Byeong

    2009-01-01

    A new gradiometer scheme uses middle loops as sensing elements in lowfield superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This design of a second order gradiometer increases its sensitivity and makes it more uniform, compared to the conventional side loop sensing scheme with a comparable matching SQUID. The space between the two middle loops becomes the imaging volume with the enclosing cryostat built accordingly.

  1. Quantum memory effects in noninteracting cold-atom systems: Hysteresis loop and lattice transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chien, Chihchun; Metcalf, Mekena; Lai, Chenyen

    2016-05-01

    Memory effects are observable in magnetization, rechargeable batteries, and many systems exhibiting history-dependent states. Quantum memory effects are observable, for instance, in atomic superfluids. A counter-intuitive question is whether quantum memory effects can exist in noninteracting systems. Here we present two examples of cold-atom systems demonstrating memory effects in noninteracting systems. The first example is a ring-shaped potential loaded with noninteracting fermions. An artificial vector potential drives a current and with a tunable dissipative background, the current lags behind the driving and exhibits hysteresis loops. The dissipative energy can be controlled by the coupling between the fermions and the background. In the second example, cold atoms loaded in a tunable optical lattice transformed from the triangular to the kagome geometry. The kagome lattice supports a flat-band consisting of degenerate localized states. Quantum memory effects are observable after a lattice transformation as the steady-state density depends on the rate of the transformation. The versatility of memory effects in cold-atom systems promises novel applications in atomtronics.

  2. Dynamic response analysis of closed-loop control system for random intelligent truss structure under random forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Wei; Chen, Jianjun; Zhou, Yabin; Cui, Mingtao

    2004-07-01

    Considering the randomness of structural damping, physical parameters of structural materials, geometric dimensions of active bars and passive bars, applied loads and control forces simultaneously, the problems of dynamic response analysis of closed-loop control system based on probability for the random intelligent truss structures are studied in this paper. The computational expressions of numerical characteristics of structural dynamic response of closed-loop control system are derived by means of the mode superposition method. Through the engineering examples, the influences of the randomness of them on structural dynamic response are inspected and some significant conclusions are obtained.

  3. Driven diffusive systems with mutually interactive Langmuir kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuijk, H. D.; Rens, R.; Vahabi, M.; MacKintosh, F. C.; Sharma, A.

    2015-03-01

    We investigate the simple one-dimensional driven model, the totally asymmetric exclusion process, coupled to mutually interactive Langmuir kinetics. This model is motivated by recent studies on clustering of motor proteins on microtubules. In the proposed model, the attachment and detachment rates of a particle are modified depending upon the occupancy of neighboring sites. We first obtain continuum mean-field equations and in certain limiting cases obtain analytic solutions. We show how mutual interactions increase (decrease) the effects of boundaries on the phase behavior of the model. We perform Monte Carlo simulations and demonstrate that our analytical approximations are in good agreement with the numerics over a wide range of model parameters. We present phase diagrams over a selective range of parameters.

  4. Experimental Neutron Source Facility Based on Accelerator Driven System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gohar, Yousry

    2010-06-01

    An experimental neutron source facility has been developed for producing medical isotopes, training young nuclear professionals, providing capability for performing reactor physics, material research, and basic science experiments. It uses a driven subcritical assembly with an electron accelerator. The neutrons driving the subcritical assembly were generated from the electron interactions with a target assembly. Tungsten or uranium target material is used for the neutron production through photonuclear reactions. The neutron source intensity, spectrum, and spatial distribution have been studied to maximize the neutron yield and satisfy different engineering requirements. The subcritical assembly is designed to obtain the highest possible neutron flux intensity with a subcriticality of 0.98. Low enrichment uranium is used for the fuel material because it enhances the neutron source performance. Safety, reliability, and environmental considerations are included in the facility conceptual design. Horizontal neutron channels are incorporated for performing basic research including cold neutron source. This paper describes the conceptual design and summarizes some of the related analyses.

  5. Real-time high speed generator system emulation with hardware-in-the-loop application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroupe, Nicholas

    The emerging emphasis and benefits of distributed generation on smaller scale networks has prompted much attention and focus to research in this field. Much of the research that has grown in distributed generation has also stimulated the development of simulation software and techniques. Testing and verification of these distributed power networks is a complex task and real hardware testing is often desired. This is where simulation methods such as hardware-in-the-loop become important in which an actual hardware unit can be interfaced with a software simulated environment to verify proper functionality. In this thesis, a simulation technique is taken one step further by utilizing a hardware-in-the-loop technique to emulate the output voltage of a generator system interfaced to a scaled hardware distributed power system for testing. The purpose of this thesis is to demonstrate a new method of testing a virtually simulated generation system supplying a scaled distributed power system in hardware. This task is performed by using the Non-Linear Loads Test Bed developed by the Energy Conversion and Integration Thrust at the Center for Advanced Power Systems. This test bed consists of a series of real hardware developed converters consistent with the Navy's All-Electric-Ship proposed power system to perform various tests on controls and stability under the expected non-linear load environment of the Navy weaponry. This test bed can also explore other distributed power system research topics and serves as a flexible hardware unit for a variety of tests. In this thesis, the test bed will be utilized to perform and validate this newly developed method of generator system emulation. In this thesis, the dynamics of a high speed permanent magnet generator directly coupled with a micro turbine are virtually simulated on an FPGA in real-time. The calculated output stator voltage will then serve as a reference for a controllable three phase inverter at the input of the test bed

  6. Examining System-Wide Impacts of Solar PV Control Systems with a Power Hardware-in-the-Loop Platform

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Tess L.; Fuller, Jason C.; Schneider, Kevin P.; Palmintier, Bryan; Lundstrom, Blake; Chakraborty, Sudipta

    2014-10-11

    High penetration levels of distributed solar PV power generation can lead to adverse power quality impacts such as excessive voltage rise, voltage flicker, and reactive power values that result in unacceptable voltage levels. Advanced inverter control schemes have been proposed that have the potential to mitigate many power quality concerns. However, closed-loop control may lead to unintended behavior in deployed systems as complex interactions can occur between numerous operating devices. In order to enable the study of the performance of advanced control schemes in a detailed distribution system environment, a Hardware-in-the-Loop (HIL) platform has been developed. In the HIL system, GridLAB-D, a distribution system simulation tool, runs in real-time mode at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and supplies power system parameters at a point of common coupling to hardware located at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). Hardware inverters interact with grid and PV simulators emulating an operational distribution system and power output from the inverters is measured and sent to PNNL to update the real-time distribution system simulation. The platform is described and initial test cases are presented. The platform is used to study the system-wide impacts and the interactions of controls applied to inverters that are integrated into a simulation of the IEEE 8500-node test feeder, with inverters in either constant power factor control or active volt/VAR control. We demonstrate that this HIL platform is well-suited to the study of advanced inverter controls and their impacts on the power quality of a distribution feeder. Additionally, the results from HIL are used to validate GridLAB-D simulations of advanced inverter controls.

  7. Examining System-Wide Impacts of Solar PV Control Systems with a Power Hardware-in-the-Loop Platform

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Tess L.; Fuller, Jason C.; Schneider, Kevin P.; Palmintier, Bryan; Lundstrom, Blake; Chakraborty, Sudipta

    2014-06-08

    High penetration levels of distributed solar PV power generation can lead to adverse power quality impacts, such as excessive voltage rise, voltage flicker, and reactive power values that result in unacceptable voltage levels. Advanced inverter control schemes have been developed that have the potential to mitigate many power quality concerns. However, local closed-loop control may lead to unintended behavior in deployed systems as complex interactions can occur between numerous operating devices. To enable the study of the performance of advanced control schemes in a detailed distribution system environment, a test platform has been developed that integrates Power Hardware-in-the-Loop (PHIL) with concurrent time-series electric distribution system simulation. In the test platform, GridLAB-D, a distribution system simulation tool, runs a detailed simulation of a distribution feeder in real-time mode at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and supplies power system parameters at a point of common coupling. At the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), a hardware inverter interacts with grid and PV simulators emulating an operational distribution system. Power output from the inverters is measured and sent to PNNL to update the real-time distribution system simulation. The platform is described and initial test cases are presented. The platform is used to study the system-wide impacts and the interactions of inverter control modes—constant power factor and active Volt/VAr control—when integrated into a simulated IEEE 8500-node test feeder. We demonstrate that this platform is well-suited to the study of advanced inverter controls and their impacts on the power quality of a distribution feeder. Additionally, results are used to validate GridLAB-D simulations of advanced inverter controls.

  8. Radiolytic Gas-Driven Cryovolcanism in the Outer Solar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, John F.; Cooper, Paul D.; Sittler, Edward C.; Sturner, Steven J.; Rymer, Abigail M.; Hill, Matthew E.

    2007-01-01

    Water ices in surface crusts of Europa, Enceladus, Saturn's main rings, and Kuiper Belt Objects can become heavily oxidized from radiolytic chemical alteration of near-surface water ice by space environment irradiation. Oxidant accumulations and gas production are manifested in part through observed H2O2 on Europa. tentatively also on Enceladus, and found elsewhere in gaseous or condensed phases at moons and rings of Jupiter and Saturn. On subsequent chemical contact in sub-surface environments with significant concentrations of primordially abundant reductants such as NH3 and CH4, oxidants of radiolytic origin can react exothermically to power gas-driven cryovolcanism. The gas-piston effect enormously amplifies the mass flow output in the case of gas formation at basal thermal margins of incompressible fluid reservoirs. Surface irradiation, H2O2 production, NH3 oxidation, and resultant heat, gas, and gas-driven mass flow rates are computed in the fluid reservoir case for selected bodies. At Enceladus the oxidant power inputs are comparable to limits on nonthermal kinetic power for the south polar plumes. Total heat output and plume gas abundance may be accounted for at Enceladus if plume activity is cyclic in high and low "Old Faithful" phases, so that oxidants can accumulate during low activity phases. Interior upwelling of primordially abundant NH3 and CH4 hydrates is assumed to resupply the reductant fuels. Much lower irradiation fluxes on Kuiper Belt Objects require correspondingly larger times for accumulation of oxidants to produce comparable resurfacing, but brightness and surface composition of some objects suggest that such activity may be ongoing.

  9. Customer interface document for the Molten Salt Test Loop (MSTL) system.

    SciTech Connect

    Pettit, Kathleen; Kolb, William J.; Gill, David Dennis; Briggs, Ronald D.

    2012-03-01

    The National Solar Thermal Test Facility at Sandia National Laboratories has a unique test capability called the Molten Salt Test Loop (MSTL) system. MSTL is a test capability that allows customers and researchers to test components in flowing, molten nitrate salt. The components tested can range from materials samples, to individual components such as flex hoses, ball joints, and valves, up to full solar collecting systems such as central receiver panels, parabolic troughs, or linear Fresnel systems. MSTL provides realistic conditions similar to a portion of a concentrating solar power facility. The facility currently uses 60/40 nitrate 'solar salt' and can circulate the salt at pressure up to 600psi, temperature to 585 C, and flow rate of 400-600GPM depending on temperature. The purpose of this document is to provide a basis for customers to evaluate the applicability to their testing needs, and to provide an outline of expectations for conducting testing on MSTL. The document can serve as the basis for testing agreements including Work for Others (WFO) and Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADA). While this document provides the basis for these agreements and describes some of the requirements for testing using MSTL and on the site at Sandia, the document is not sufficient by itself as a test agreement. The document, however, does provide customers with a uniform set of information to begin the test planning process.

  10. Performance evaluation of a second-generation elastic loop mobility system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melzer, K. J.; Swanson, G. D.

    1974-01-01

    Tests were conducted to evaluate the mobility performance of a second-generation Elastic Loop Mobility System (ELMS II). Performance on level test lanes and slopes of lunar soil simulant (LSS) and obstacle-surmounting and crevasse-crossing capabilities were investigated. In addition, internal losses and contact pressure distributions were evaluated. To evaluate the soft-soil performance, two basic soil conditions were tested: loose (LSS1) and dense (LSS5). These conditions embrace the spectrum of soil strengths tested during recent studies for NASA related to the mobility performance of the LRV. Data indicated that for the tested range of the various performance parameters, performance was independent of unit load (contact pressure) and ELMS II drum angular velocity, but was influenced by soil strength and ELMS pitch mode. Power requirements were smaller at a given system output for dense soil than for loose soil. The total system output in terms of pull developed or slope-climbing capability was larger for the ELMS II operating in restrained-pitch mode than in free-pitch mode.

  11. Adaptive Correlation Space Adjusted Open-Loop Tracking Approach for Vehicle Positioning with Global Navigation Satellite System in Urban Areas.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Hang; Li, Jian; Zhang, Lei; Long, Teng

    2015-08-28

    For vehicle positioning with Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) in urban areas, open-loop tracking shows better performance because of its high sensitivity and superior robustness against multipath. However, no previous study has focused on the effects of the code search grid size on the code phase measurement accuracy of open-loop tracking. Traditional open-loop tracking methods are performed by the batch correlators with fixed correlation space. The code search grid size, which is the correlation space, is a constant empirical value and the code phase measuring accuracy will be largely degraded due to the improper grid size, especially when the signal carrier-to-noise density ratio (C/N₀) varies. In this study, the Adaptive Correlation Space Adjusted Open-Loop Tracking Approach (ACSA-OLTA) is proposed to improve the code phase measurement dependent pseudo range accuracy. In ACSA-OLTA, the correlation space is adjusted according to the signal C/N₀. The novel Equivalent Weighted Pseudo Range Error (EWPRE) is raised to obtain the optimal code search grid sizes for different C/N₀. The code phase measuring errors of different measurement calculation methods are analyzed for the first time. The measurement calculation strategy of ACSA-OLTA is derived from the analysis to further improve the accuracy but reduce the correlator consumption. Performance simulation and real tests confirm that the pseudo range and positioning accuracy of ASCA-OLTA are better than the traditional open-loop tracking methods in the usual scenarios of urban area.

  12. The Effects of Closed-Loop Medical Devices on the Autonomy and Accountability of Persons and Systems.

    PubMed

    Kellmeyer, Philipp; Cochrane, Thomas; Müller, Oliver; Mitchell, Christine; Ball, Tonio; Fins, Joseph J; Biller-Andorno, Nikola

    2016-10-01

    Closed-loop medical devices such as brain-computer interfaces are an emerging and rapidly advancing neurotechnology. The target patients for brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) are often severely paralyzed, and thus particularly vulnerable in terms of personal autonomy, decisionmaking capacity, and agency. Here we analyze the effects of closed-loop medical devices on the autonomy and accountability of both persons (as patients or research participants) and neurotechnological closed-loop medical systems. We show that although BCIs can strengthen patient autonomy by preserving or restoring communicative abilities and/or motor control, closed-loop devices may also create challenges for moral and legal accountability. We advocate the development of a comprehensive ethical and legal framework to address the challenges of emerging closed-loop neurotechnologies like BCIs and stress the centrality of informed consent and refusal as a means to foster accountability. We propose the creation of an international neuroethics task force with members from medical neuroscience, neuroengineering, computer science, medical law, and medical ethics, as well as representatives of patient advocacy groups and the public.

  13. Air-Cooled Design of a Temperature-Swing Adsorption Compressor for Closed-Loop Air Revitalization Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulloth, Lila M.; Affleck, Dave L.; Rosen, Micha; LeVan, M. Douglas; Wang, Yuan; Cavalcante, Celio L.

    2004-01-01

    The air revitalization system of the International Space Station (ISS) operates in an open loop mode and relies on the resupply of oxygen and other consumables from earth for the life support of astronauts. A compressor is required for delivering the carbon dioxide from a removal assembly to a reduction unit to recover oxygen and thereby closing the air-loop. We have a developed a temperature-swing adsorption compressor (TSAC) for performing these tasks that is energy efficient, quiet, and has no rapidly moving parts. This paper discusses the mechanical design and the results of thermal model validation tests of a TSAC that uses air as the cooling medium.

  14. Multi-loop control strategy of a solid oxide fuel cell and micro gas turbine hybrid system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiao-Juan; Zhu, Xin-Jian

    2011-10-01

    Solid oxide fuel cell and micro gas turbine (SOFC/MGT) hybrid system is a promising distributed power technology. In order to ensure the system safe operation as well as long lifetime of the fuel cell, an effective control manner is expected to regulate the temperature and fuel utilization at the desired level, and track the desired power output. Thus, a multi-loop control strategy for the hybrid system is investigated in this paper. A mathematical model for the SOFC/MGT hybrid system is built firstly. Based on the mathematical model, control cycles are introduced and their design is discussed. Part load operation condition is employed to investigate the control strategies for the system. The dynamic modeling and control implementation are realized in the MATLAB/SIMULINK environment, and the simulation results show that it is feasible to build the multi-loop control methods for the SOFC/MGT hybrid system with regard to load disturbances.

  15. Digital compensation techniques for the effects of time lag in closed-loop simulation using the 6 DOF motion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, R.

    1982-01-01

    Efforts are continued to develop digital filter compensation schemes for the correction of momentum gains observed in the closed loop simulation of the docking of two satellites using the 6 DOF motion system. Several filters that work well for small delays ( .100ms) and a non-preloaded probe are discussed.

  16. Analysis of laser energy characteristics of laser guided weapons based on the hardware-in-the-loop simulation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yawen; Cui, Xiaohong; Wang, Qianqian; Tong, Qiujie; Cui, Xutai; Li, Chenyu; Zhang, Le; Peng, Zhong

    2016-11-01

    The hardware-in-the-loop simulation system, which provides a precise, controllable and repeatable test conditions, is an important part of the development of the semi-active laser (SAL) guided weapons. In this paper, laser energy chain characteristics were studied, which provides a theoretical foundation for the SAL guidance technology and the hardware-in-the-loop simulation system. Firstly, a simplified equation was proposed to adjust the radar equation according to the principles of the hardware-in-the-loop simulation system. Secondly, a theoretical model and calculation method were given about the energy chain characteristics based on the hardware-in-the-loop simulation system. We then studied the reflection characteristics of target and the distance between the missile and target with major factors such as the weather factors. Finally, the accuracy of modeling was verified by experiment as the values measured experimentally generally follow the theoretical results from the model. And experimental results revealed that ratio of attenuation of the laser energy exhibited a non-linear change vs. pulse number, which were in accord with the actual condition.

  17. Disposition of nuclear waste using subcritical accelerator-driven systems

    SciTech Connect

    Venneri, F.; Li, N.; Williamson, M.; Houts, M.; Lawrence, G.

    1998-12-31

    Spent fuel from nuclear power plants contains large quantities of Pu, other actinides, and fission products (FP). This creates challenges for permanent disposal because of the long half-lives of some isotopes and the potential for diversion of the fissile material. Two issues of concern for the US repository concept are: (1) long-term radiological risk peaking tens-of-thousands of years in the future; and (2) short-term thermal loading (decay heat) that limits capacity. An accelerator-driven neutron source can destroy actinides through fission, and can convert long-lived fission products to shorter-lived or stable isotopes. Studies over the past decade have established that accelerator transmutation of waste (ATW) can have a major beneficial impact on the nuclear waste problem. Specifically, the ATW concept the authors are evaluating: (1) destroys over 99.9% of the actinides; (2) destroys over 99.9% of the Tc and I; (3) separates Sr-90 and Cs-137; (4) separates uranium from the spent fuel; (5) produces electric power.

  18. Enzyme catalyzed electricity-driven water softening system.

    PubMed

    Arugula, Mary A; Brastad, Kristen S; Minteer, Shelley D; He, Zhen

    2012-12-10

    Hardness in water, which is caused by divalent cations such as calcium and magnesium ions, presents a major water quality problem. Because hard water must be softened before use in residential applications, there is great interest in the saltless water softening process because, unlike ion exchange softeners, it does not introduce additional ions into water. In this study, a saltless hardness removal driven by bioelectrochemical energy produced through enzymatic oxidation of glucose was proposed and investigated. Glucose dehydrogenase was coated on a carbon electrode to catalyze glucose oxidation in the presence of NAD⁺ as a cofactor/mediator and methylene green as an electrocatalyst. The results showed that electricity generation stimulated hardness removal compared with non-electricity conditions. The enzymatic water softener worked upon a 6h batch operation per day for eight days, and achieved an average hardness removal of 46% at a high initial concentration of 800 mg/L as CaCO₃. More hardness was removed at a lower initial concentration. For instance, at 200mg/L as CaCO₃ the enzymatic water softener removed 76.4±4.6% of total hardness. The presence of magnesium ions decreased hardness removal because of its larger hydrated radius than calcium ions. The enzymatic water softener removed 70-80% of total hardness from three actual hard water samples. These results demonstrated a proof-of-concept that enzyme catalyzed electricity generation can be used to soften hard water.

  19. Design and Benchmarking of a Network-In-the-Loop Simulation for Use in a Hardware-In-the-Loop System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aretskin-Hariton, Eliot D.; Thomas, George Lindsey; Culley, Dennis E.; Kratz, Jonathan L.

    2017-01-01

    Distributed engine control (DEC) systems alter aircraft engine design constraints be- cause of fundamental differences in the input and output communication between DEC and centralized control architectures. The change in the way communication is implemented may create new optimum engine-aircraft configurations. This paper continues the exploration of digital network communication by demonstrating a Network-In-the-Loop simulation at the NASA Glenn Research Center. This simulation incorporates a real-time network protocol, the Engine Area Distributed Interconnect Network Lite (EADIN Lite), with the Commercial Modular Aero-Propulsion System Simulation 40k (C-MAPSS40k) software. The objective of this study is to assess digital control network impact to the control system. Performance is evaluated relative to a truth model for large transient maneuvers and a typical flight profile for commercial aircraft. Results show that a decrease in network bandwidth from 250 Kbps (sampling all sensors every time step) to 40 Kbps, resulted in very small differences in control system performance.

  20. Microcomputer-based artificial vision support system for real-time image processing for camera-driven visual prostheses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fink, Wolfgang; You, Cindy X.; Tarbell, Mark A.

    2010-01-01

    It is difficult to predict exactly what blind subjects with camera-driven visual prostheses (e.g., retinal implants) can perceive. Thus, it is prudent to offer them a wide variety of image processing filters and the capability to engage these filters repeatedly in any user-defined order to enhance their visual perception. To attain true portability, we employ a commercial off-the-shelf battery-powered general purpose Linux microprocessor platform to create the microcomputer-based artificial vision support system (μAVS2) for real-time image processing. Truly standalone, μAVS2 is smaller than a deck of playing cards, lightweight, fast, and equipped with USB, RS-232 and Ethernet interfaces. Image processing filters on μAVS2 operate in a user-defined linear sequential-loop fashion, resulting in vastly reduced memory and CPU requirements during execution. μAVS2 imports raw video frames from a USB or IP camera, performs image processing, and issues the processed data over an outbound Internet TCP/IP or RS-232 connection to the visual prosthesis system. Hence, μAVS2 affords users of current and future visual prostheses independent mobility and the capability to customize the visual perception generated. Additionally, μAVS2 can easily be reconfigured for other prosthetic systems. Testing of μAVS2 with actual retinal implant carriers is envisioned in the near future.

  1. Microcomputer-based artificial vision support system for real-time image processing for camera-driven visual prostheses.

    PubMed

    Fink, Wolfgang; You, Cindy X; Tarbell, Mark A

    2010-01-01

    It is difficult to predict exactly what blind subjects with camera-driven visual prostheses (e.g., retinal implants) can perceive. Thus, it is prudent to offer them a wide variety of image processing filters and the capability to engage these filters repeatedly in any user-defined order to enhance their visual perception. To attain true portability, we employ a commercial off-the-shelf battery-powered general purpose Linux microprocessor platform to create the microcomputer-based artificial vision support system (microAVS(2)) for real-time image processing. Truly standalone, microAVS(2) is smaller than a deck of playing cards, lightweight, fast, and equipped with USB, RS-232 and Ethernet interfaces. Image processing filters on microAVS(2) operate in a user-defined linear sequential-loop fashion, resulting in vastly reduced memory and CPU requirements during execution. MiccroAVS(2) imports raw video frames from a USB or IP camera, performs image processing, and issues the processed data over an outbound Internet TCP/IP or RS-232 connection to the visual prosthesis system. Hence, microAVS(2) affords users of current and future visual prostheses independent mobility and the capability to customize the visual perception generated. Additionally, microAVS(2) can easily be reconfigured for other prosthetic systems. Testing of microAVS(2) with actual retinal implant carriers is envisioned in the near future.

  2. Using Pyrolysis and its Bioproducts to Help Close the Loop in Sustainable Life Support Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCoy, LaShelle E.

    2012-01-01

    The next step in human exploration of space is beyond low Earth orbit and possibly to sites such as the Moon and Mars. Resupply of critical life support components for missions such as these are difficult or impossible. Life support processes for closing the loop of water, oxygen and carbon have to be identified .. Currently, there are many technologies proposed for terrestrial missions for waste, water, air processing and the creation of consumables. There are a variety of different approaches, but few address all of these issues simultaneously. One candidate is pyrolysis; a method where waste streams can be heated in the absence of oxygen to undergo a thermochemical conversion producing a series of bioproducts. Bioproducts like biochar made from non-edible biomass and human solid waste can possibly provide valuable benefits such as waste reduction, regolith fertilization for increased food production, and become a consumable for water processing and air revitalization systems. Syngas containing hydrogen, carbon monoxide and cbon dioxide, can be converted to methane and dimethyl ether to create propellants. Bio-oils can be utilized as a heating fuel or fed to bioreactors that utilize oil-eating microbes. Issues such as carbon sequestration and subsequent carbon balance of the closed system and identifying ideal process methods to achieve the highest quality products, whilst being energy friendly, will also be addressed.

  3. System identification of closed-loop cardiovascular control: effects of posture and autonomic blockade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullen, T. J.; Appel, M. L.; Mukkamala, R.; Mathias, J. M.; Cohen, R. J.

    1997-01-01

    We applied system identification to the analysis of fluctuations in heart rate (HR), arterial blood pressure (ABP), and instantaneous lung volume (ILV) to characterize quantitatively the physiological mechanisms responsible for the couplings between these variables. We characterized two autonomically mediated coupling mechanisms [the heart rate baroreflex (HR baroreflex) and respiratory sinus arrhythmia (ILV-HR)] and two mechanically mediated coupling mechanisms [the blood pressure wavelet generated with each cardiac contraction (circulatory mechanics) and the direct mechanical effects of respiration on blood pressure (ILV-->ABP)]. We evaluated the method in humans studied in the supine and standing postures under control conditions and under conditions of beta-sympathetic and parasympathetic pharmacological blockades. Combined beta-sympathetic and parasympathetic blockade abolished the autonomically mediated couplings while preserving the mechanically mediated coupling. Selective autonomic blockade and postural changes also altered the couplings in a manner consistent with known physiological mechanisms. System identification is an "inverse-modeling" technique that provides a means for creating a closed-loop model of cardiovascular regulation for an individual subject without altering the underlying physiological control mechanisms.

  4. Carbon dioxide removal system for closed loop atmosphere revitalization, candidate sorbents screening and test results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattox, E. M.; Knox, J. C.; Bardot, D. M.

    2013-05-01

    Due to the difficulty and expense it costs to resupply manned-spacecraft habitats, a goal is to create a closed loop atmosphere revitalization system, in which precious commodities such as oxygen, carbon dioxide, and water are continuously recycled. Our aim is to test other sorbents for their capacity for future spacecraft missions, such as on the Orion spacecraft, or possibly lunar or Mars mission habitats to see if they would be better than the zeolite sorbents on the 4-bed molecular sieve. Some of the materials being tested are currently used for other industry applications. Studying these sorbents for their specific spacecraft application is different from that for applications on earth because in space, there are certain power, mass, and volume limitations that are not as critical on Earth. In manned-spaceflight missions, the sorbents are exposed to a much lower volume fraction of CO2 (0.6% volume CO2) than on Earth. LiLSX was tested for its CO2 capacity in an atmosphere like that of the ISS. Breakthrough tests were run to establish the capacities of these materials at a partial pressure of CO2 that is seen on the ISS. This paper discusses experimental results from benchmark materials, such as results previously obtained from tests on Grade 522, and the forementioned candidate materials for the Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) system.

  5. Structure of force networks in tapped particulate systems of disks and pentagons. I. Clusters and loops.

    PubMed

    Pugnaloni, Luis A; Carlevaro, C Manuel; Kramár, M; Mischaikow, K; Kondic, L

    2016-06-01

    The force network of a granular assembly, defined by the contact network and the corresponding contact forces, carries valuable information about the state of the packing. Simple analysis of these networks based on the distribution of force strengths is rather insensitive to the changes in preparation protocols or to the types of particles. In this and the companion paper [Kondic et al., Phys. Rev. E 93, 062903 (2016)10.1103/PhysRevE.93.062903], we consider two-dimensional simulations of tapped systems built from frictional disks and pentagons, and study the structure of the force networks of granular packings by considering network's topology as force thresholds are varied. We show that the number of clusters and loops observed in the force networks as a function of the force threshold are markedly different for disks and pentagons if the tangential contact forces are considered, whereas they are surprisingly similar for the network defined by the normal forces. In particular, the results indicate that, overall, the force network is more heterogeneous for disks than for pentagons. Such differences in network properties are expected to lead to different macroscale response of the considered systems, despite the fact that averaged measures (such as force probability density function) do not show any obvious differences. Additionally, we show that the states obtained by tapping with different intensities that display similar packing fraction are difficult to distinguish based on simple topological invariants.

  6. An evaluation of pressure and flow measurement in the Molten Salt Test Loop (MSTL) system.

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, David Dennis; Kolb, William J.; Briggs, Ronald J.

    2013-07-01

    The National Solar Thermal Test Facility at Sandia National Laboratories has a unique test capability called the Molten Salt Test Loop (MSTL) system. MSTL allows customers and researchers to test components in flowing, molten nitrate salt at plant-like conditions for pressure, flow, and temperature. An important need in thermal storage systems that utilize molten salts is for accurate flow and pressure measurement at temperatures above 535ÀC. Currently available flow and pressure instrumentation for molten salt is limited to 535ÀC and even at this temperature the pressure measurement appears to have significant variability. It is the design practice in current Concentrating Solar Power plants to measure flow and pressure on the cold side of the process or in dead-legs where the salt can cool, but this practice wont be possible for high temperature salt systems. For this effort, a set of tests was conducted to evaluate the use of the pressure sensors for flow measurement across a device of known flow coefficient Cv. To perform this task, the pressure sensors performance was evaluated and was found to be lacking. The pressure indicators are severely affected by ambient conditions and were indicating pressure changes of nearly 200psi when there was no flow or pressure in the system. Several iterations of performance improvement were undertaken and the pressure changes were reduced to less than 15psi. The results of these pressure improvements were then tested for use as flow measurement. It was found that even with improved pressure sensors, this is not a reliable method of flow measurement. The need for improved flow and pressure measurement at high temperatures remains and will need to be solved before it will be possible to move to high temperature thermal storage systems with molten salts.

  7. Industrial process driven system requirements for PSII applications

    SciTech Connect

    Munson, C.P.

    1997-10-01

    Plasma Source Ion Implantation (PSII) is a room temperature, plasma-based surface enhancement technology which is being commercialized through the efforts of a group of companies. A number of issues are critical to the successful design and operation of a commercial PSII system. These include overall vacuum system design, plasma source requirements and plasma-target interaction considerations, pulsed, high voltage sub-system (typically referred to as modulator) requirements, and target requirements and limitations. Critical system components are outlined and overall system design will be briefly covered.

  8. Application of nonlinear time series models to driven systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, N.F. Jr.

    1990-01-01

    In our laboratory we have been engaged in an effort to model nonlinear systems using time series methods. Our objectives have been, first, to understand how the time series response of a nonlinear system unfolds as a function of the underlying state variables, second, to model the evolution of the state variables, and finally, to predict nonlinear system responses. We hope to address the relationship between model parameters and system parameters in the near future. Control of nonlinear systems based on experimentally derived parameters is also a planned topic of future research. 28 refs., 15 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Exact free energy functional for a driven diffusive open stationary nonequilibrium system.

    PubMed

    Derrida, B; Lebowitz, J L; Speer, E R

    2002-07-15

    We obtain the exact probability exp[-LF([rho(x)])] of finding a macroscopic density profile rho(x) in the stationary nonequilibrium state of an open driven diffusive system, when the size of the system L-->infinity. F, which plays the role of a nonequilibrium free energy, has a very different structure from that found in the purely diffusive case. As there, F is nonlocal, but the shocks and dynamic phase transitions of the driven system are reflected in nonconvexity of F, in discontinuities in its second derivatives, and in non-Gaussian fluctuations in the steady state.

  10. Continuous Energy Improvement in Motor Driven Systems - A Guidebook for Industry

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert A. McCoy and John G. Douglass

    2014-02-01

    This guidebook provides a step-by-step approach to developing a motor system energy-improvement action plan. An action plan includes which motors should be repaired or replaced with higher efficiency models, recommendations on maintaining a spares inventory, and discussion of improvements in maintenance practices. The guidebook is the successor to DOE’s 1997 Energy Management for Motor Driven Systems. It builds on its predecessor publication by including topics such as power transmission systems and matching driven equipment to process requirements in addition to motors.

  11. Exact Free Energy Functional for a Driven Diffusive Open Stationary Nonequilibrium System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derrida, B.; Lebowitz, J. L.; Speer, E. R.

    2002-06-01

    We obtain the exact probability exp[-LF({ρ(x)})] of finding a macroscopic density profile ρ(x) in the stationary nonequilibrium state of an open driven diffusive system, when the size of the system L-->∞. F, which plays the role of a nonequilibrium free energy, has a very different structure from that found in the purely diffusive case. As there, F is nonlocal, but the shocks and dynamic phase transitions of the driven system are reflected in nonconvexity of F, in discontinuities in its second derivatives, and in non-Gaussian fluctuations in the steady state.

  12. Real-Time Monitoring and Prediction of the Pilot Vehicle System (PVS) Closed-Loop Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Tanmay Kumar

    Understanding human control behavior is an important step for improving the safety of future aircraft. Considerable resources are invested during the design phase of an aircraft to ensure that the aircraft has desirable handling qualities. However, human pilots exhibit a wide range of control behaviors that are a function of external stimulus, aircraft dynamics, and human psychological properties (such as workload, stress factor, confidence, and sense of urgency factor). This variability is difficult to address comprehensively during the design phase and may lead to undesirable pilot-aircraft interaction, such as pilot-induced oscillations (PIO). This creates the need to keep track of human pilot performance in real-time to monitor the pilot vehicle system (PVS) stability. This work focused on studying human pilot behavior for the longitudinal axis of a remotely controlled research aircraft and using human-in-the-loop (HuIL) simulations to obtain information about the human controlled system (HCS) stability. The work in this dissertation is divided into two main parts: PIO analysis and human control model parameters estimation. To replicate different flight conditions, this study included time delay and elevator rate limiting phenomena, typical of actuator dynamics during the experiments. To study human control behavior, this study employed the McRuer model for single-input single-output manual compensatory tasks. McRuer model is a lead-lag controller with time delay which has been shown to adequately model manual compensatory tasks. This dissertation presents a novel technique to estimate McRuer model parameters in real-time and associated validation using HuIL simulations to correctly predict HCS stability. The McRuer model parameters were estimated in real-time using a Kalman filter approach. The estimated parameters were then used to analyze the stability of the closed-loop HCS and verify them against the experimental data. Therefore, the main contribution of

  13. Alteration of the flexible loop in 1-deoxy-D-xylulose-5-phosphate reductoisomerase boosts enthalpy-driven inhibition by fosmidomycin.

    PubMed

    Kholodar, Svetlana A; Tombline, Gregory; Liu, Juan; Tan, Zhesen; Allen, C Leigh; Gulick, Andrew M; Murkin, Andrew S

    2014-06-03

    1-Deoxy-d-xylulose-5-phosphate reductoisomerase (DXR), which catalyzes the first committed step in the 2-C-methyl-d-erythritol 4-phosphate pathway of isoprenoid biosynthesis used by Mycobacterium tuberculosis and other infectious microorganisms, is absent in humans and therefore an attractive drug target. Fosmidomycin is a nanomolar inhibitor of DXR, but despite great efforts, few analogues with comparable potency have been developed. DXR contains a strictly conserved residue, Trp203, within a flexible loop that closes over and interacts with the bound inhibitor. We report that while mutation to Ala or Gly abolishes activity, mutation to Phe and Tyr only modestly impacts kcat and Km. Moreover, pre-steady-state kinetics and primary deuterium kinetic isotope effects indicate that while turnover is largely limited by product release for the wild-type enzyme, chemistry is significantly more rate-limiting for W203F and W203Y. Surprisingly, these mutants are more sensitive to inhibition by fosmidomycin, resulting in Km/Ki ratios up to 19-fold higher than that of wild-type DXR. In agreement, isothermal titration calorimetry revealed that fosmidomycin binds up to 11-fold more tightly to these mutants. Most strikingly, mutation strongly tips the entropy-enthalpy balance of total binding energy from 50% to 75% and 91% enthalpy in W203F and W203Y, respectively. X-ray crystal structures suggest that these enthalpy differences may be linked to differences in hydrogen bond interactions involving a water network connecting fosmidomycin's phosphonate group to the protein. These results confirm the importance of the flexible loop, in particular Trp203, in ligand binding and suggest that improved inhibitor affinity may be obtained against the wild-type protein by introducing interactions with this loop and/or the surrounding structured water network.

  14. Model-Driven Test Generation of Distributed Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Easwaran, Arvind; Hall, Brendan; Schweiker, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    This report describes a novel test generation technique for distributed systems. Utilizing formal models and formal verification tools, spe cifically the Symbolic Analysis Laboratory (SAL) tool-suite from SRI, we present techniques to generate concurrent test vectors for distrib uted systems. These are initially explored within an informal test validation context and later extended to achieve full MC/DC coverage of the TTEthernet protocol operating within a system-centric context.

  15. A smart telerobotic system driven by monocular vision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Defigueiredo, R. J. P.; Maccato, A.; Wlczek, P.; Denney, B.; Scheerer, J.

    1994-01-01

    A robotic system that accepts autonomously generated motion and control commands is described. The system provides images from the monocular vision of a camera mounted on a robot's end effector, eliminating the need for traditional guidance targets that must be predetermined and specifically identified. The telerobotic vision system presents different views of the targeted object relative to the camera, based on a single camera image and knowledge of the target's solid geometry.

  16. Battery-driven miniature LDA system with semiconductor laser diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damp, S.

    1988-06-01

    A one-component miniature system with dimensions of 11 by 4 by 4 cubic centimeters for laser-Doppler anemometry (LDA) is described. As power supply a 12V battery or any other source with the capability to drive a current up to 200mA can be used. The system contains the whole electronics to drive the used laser diode is a safe way. The electronics to amplify and buffer the LDA-signal which is received by a PIN-diode is included. The output of the system can directly fit a filterbank for example. Possible applications in rough environments are mentioned. Measurements show the reliability of the system.

  17. Successful hardware-in-the-loop support of the Longbow/HELLFIRE modular missile system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Jerry A.; Larson, Gerald A.; Terry, John E.

    2000-07-01

    The Air-to-Ground Missiles Systems (AGMS) Project Management Office (PMO) chose to invest in hardware-in-the-loop (HWIL) simulation as an integral part of their Longbow/HELLFIRE (Helicopter Launched, Fire-and-Forget) Modular Missile System program throughout the development and production phases. This investment has resulted in two HWIL simulations, developed by the U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Command (AMCOM) Missile Research Development and Engineering Center, that have had unprecedented success in program support from the early development through production phases. The Millimeter Simulation System 1 (MSS-1) facility is capable of edge-of- the-envelope performance analysis and verification using high- fidelity target, background, and countermeasures signature modeling. The System Test/Acceptance Facility (STAF), developed in partnership with Redstone Technical Test Center, tests full-up missiles for production lot acceptance. Between these two facilities, HWIL simulation is responsible for pre- flight confidence testing of missile hardware and software, software independent verification and validation (IV&V) testing, comprehensive performance evaluation, component verification, production lot acceptance, and data gathering for the shelf life extension program. One payoff of the MSS-1 HWIL investment has been an extremely effective flight test program with MSS-1 receiving credit for saving three flight tests and documenting over 40 failure modes. With the advent of the Performance Based Specification, the MSS-1 has become involved in continuous verification of high level specifications since contractor controlled, low-level specifications are subject to change. The STAF has saved 8 million annually through providing a non-destructive lot acceptance-testing paradigm, and further benefited the production phase by discovering three production problems. This paper will highlight the innovative uses of HWIL simulation as utilized in the Longbow/HELLFIRE program and

  18. A Fuzzy Inference System for Closed-Loop Deep Brain Stimulation in Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Camara, Carmen; Warwick, Kevin; Bruña, Ricardo; Aziz, Tipu; del Pozo, Francisco; Maestú, Fernando

    2015-11-01

    Parkinsons disease is a complex neurodegenerative disorder for which patients present many symptoms, tremor being the main one. In advanced stages of the disease, Deep Brain Stimulation is a generalized therapy which can significantly improve the motor symptoms. However despite its beneficial effects on treating the symptomatology, the technique can be improved. One of its main limitations is that the parameters are fixed, and the stimulation is provided uninterruptedly, not taking into account any fluctuation in the patients state. A closed-loop system which provides stimulation by demand would adjust the stimulation to the variations in the state of the patient, stimulating only when it is necessary. It would not only perform a more intelligent stimulation, capable of adapting to the changes in real time, but also extending the devices battery life, thereby avoiding surgical interventions. In this work we design a tool that learns to recognize the principal symptom of Parkinsons disease and particularly the tremor. The goal of the designed system is to detect the moments the patient is suffering from a tremor episode and consequently to decide whether stimulation is needed or not. For that, local field potentials were recorded in the subthalamic nucleus of ten Parkinsonian patients, who were diagnosed with tremor-dominant Parkinsons disease and who underwent surgery for the implantation of a neurostimulator. Electromyographic activity in the forearm was simultaneously recorded, and the relation between both signals was evaluated using two different synchronization measures. The results of evaluating the synchronization indexes on each moment represent the inputs to the designed system. Finally, a fuzzy inference system was applied with the goal of identifying tremor episodes. Results are favourable, reaching accuracies of higher 98.7% in 70% of the patients.

  19. Osteoclasts and CD8 T cells form a negative feedback loop that contributes to homeostasis of both the skeletal and immune systems.

    PubMed

    Buchwald, Zachary S; Aurora, Rajeev

    2013-01-01

    There are a number of dynamic regulatory loops that maintain homeostasis of the immune and skeletal systems. In this review, we highlight a number of these regulatory interactions that contribute to maintaining homeostasis. In addition, we review data on a negative regulatory feedback loop between osteoclasts and CD8 T cells that contributes to homeostasis of both the skeletal and immune systems.

  20. Towards Ontology-Driven Information Systems: Guidelines to the Creation of New Methodologies to Build Ontologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soares, Andrey

    2009-01-01

    This research targeted the area of Ontology-Driven Information Systems, where ontology plays a central role both at development time and at run time of Information Systems (IS). In particular, the research focused on the process of building domain ontologies for IS modeling. The motivation behind the research was the fact that researchers have…

  1. Microcontroller-driven fluid-injection system for atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kasas, S; Alonso, L; Jacquet, P; Adamcik, J; Haeberli, C; Dietler, G

    2010-01-01

    We present a programmable microcontroller-driven injection system for the exchange of imaging medium during atomic force microscopy. Using this low-noise system, high-resolution imaging can be performed during this process of injection without disturbance. This latter circumstance was exemplified by the online imaging of conformational changes in DNA molecules during the injection of anticancer drug into the fluid chamber.

  2. A Closed-Loop Anesthetic Delivery System for Real-Time Control of Burst Suppression

    PubMed Central

    Liberman, Max Y.; Ching, ShiNung; Chemali, Jessica; Brown, Emery N.

    2013-01-01

    Objective There is growing interest in using closed-loop anesthetic delivery (CLAD) systems to automate control of brain states (sedation, unconsciousness and antinociception) in patients receiving anesthesia care. The accuracy and reliability of these systems can be improved by using as control signals electroencephalogram (EEG) markers for which the neurophysiological links to the anesthetic-induced brain states are well established. Burst suppression, in which bursts of electrical activity alternate with periods of quiescence or suppression, is a well-known, readily discernible EEG marker of profound brain inactivation and unconsciousness. This pattern is commonly maintained when anesthetics are administered to produce a medically-induced coma for cerebral protection in patients suffering from brain injuries or to arrest brain activity in patients having uncontrollable seizures. Although the coma may be required for several hours or days, drug infusion rates are managed inefficiently by manual adjustment. Our objective is to design a CLAD system for burst suppression control to automate management of medically-induced coma. Approach We establish a CLAD system to control burst suppression consisting of: a two-dimensional linear system model relating the anesthetic brain level to the EEG dynamics; a new control signal, the burst suppression probability (BSP) defining the instantaneous probability of suppression; the BSP filter, a state-space algorithm to estimate the BSP from EEG recordings; a proportional-integral controller; and a system identification procedure to estimate the model and controller parameters. Main Results We demonstrate reliable performance of our system in simulation studies of burst suppression control using both propofol and etomidate in rodent experiments based on Vijn and Sneyd, and in human experiments based on the Schnider pharmacokinetic model for propofol. Using propofol, we further demonstrate that our control system reliably tracks

  3. A closed-loop anesthetic delivery system for real-time control of burst suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liberman, Max Y.; Ching, ShiNung; Chemali, Jessica; Brown, Emery N.

    2013-08-01

    Objective. There is growing interest in using closed-loop anesthetic delivery (CLAD) systems to automate control of brain states (sedation, unconsciousness and antinociception) in patients receiving anesthesia care. The accuracy and reliability of these systems can be improved by using as control signals electroencephalogram (EEG) markers for which the neurophysiological links to the anesthetic-induced brain states are well established. Burst suppression, in which bursts of electrical activity alternate with periods of quiescence or suppression, is a well-known, readily discernible EEG marker of profound brain inactivation and unconsciousness. This pattern is commonly maintained when anesthetics are administered to produce a medically-induced coma for cerebral protection in patients suffering from brain injuries or to arrest brain activity in patients having uncontrollable seizures. Although the coma may be required for several hours or days, drug infusion rates are managed inefficiently by manual adjustment. Our objective is to design a CLAD system for burst suppression control to automate management of medically-induced coma. Approach. We establish a CLAD system to control burst suppression consisting of: a two-dimensional linear system model relating the anesthetic brain level to the EEG dynamics; a new control signal, the burst suppression probability (BSP) defining the instantaneous probability of suppression; the BSP filter, a state-space algorithm to estimate the BSP from EEG recordings; a proportional-integral controller; and a system identification procedure to estimate the model and controller parameters. Main results. We demonstrate reliable performance of our system in simulation studies of burst suppression control using both propofol and etomidate in rodent experiments based on Vijn and Sneyd, and in human experiments based on the Schnider pharmacokinetic model for propofol. Using propofol, we further demonstrate that our control system reliably

  4. Operability driven space system concept with high leverage technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, Henry H.

    1997-01-01

    One of the common objectives of future launch and space transfer systems is to achieve low-cost and effective operational capability by automating processes from pre-launch to the end of mission. Hierarchical and integrated mission management, system management, autonomous GN&C, and integrated micro-nano avionics technologies are critical to extend or revitalize the exploitation of space. Essential to space transfer, orbital systems, Earth-To-Orbit (ETO), commercial and military aviation, and planetary systems are these high leverage hardware and software technologies. This paper covers the driving issues, goals, and requirements definition supported with typical concepts and utilization of multi-use technologies. The approach and method results in a practical system architecture and lower level design concepts.

  5. Probabilistic density function method for nonlinear dynamical systems driven by colored noise

    SciTech Connect

    Barajas-Solano, David A.; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.

    2016-05-01

    We present a probability density function (PDF) method for a system of nonlinear stochastic ordinary differential equations driven by colored noise. The method provides an integro-differential equation for the temporal evolution of the joint PDF of the system's state, which we close by means of a modified Large-Eddy-Diffusivity-type closure. Additionally, we introduce the generalized local linearization (LL) approximation for deriving a computable PDF equation in the form of the second-order partial differential equation (PDE). We demonstrate the proposed closure and localization accurately describe the dynamics of the PDF in phase space for systems driven by noise with arbitrary auto-correlation time. We apply the proposed PDF method to the analysis of a set of Kramers equations driven by exponentially auto-correlated Gaussian colored noise to study the dynamics and stability of a power grid.

  6. Hamiltonian-Driven Adaptive Dynamic Programming for Continuous Nonlinear Dynamical Systems.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yongliang; Wunsch, Donald; Yin, Yixin

    2017-02-01

    This paper presents a Hamiltonian-driven framework of adaptive dynamic programming (ADP) for continuous time nonlinear systems, which consists of evaluation of an admissible control, comparison between two different admissible policies with respect to the corresponding the performance function, and the performance improvement of an admissible control. It is showed that the Hamiltonian can serve as the temporal difference for continuous-time systems. In the Hamiltonian-driven ADP, the critic network is trained to output the value gradient. Then, the inner product between the critic and the system dynamics produces the value derivative. Under some conditions, the minimization of the Hamiltonian functional is equivalent to the value function approximation. An iterative algorithm starting from an arbitrary admissible control is presented for the optimal control approximation with its convergence proof. The implementation is accomplished by a neural network approximation. Two simulation studies demonstrate the effectiveness of Hamiltonian-driven ADP.

  7. Observation-Driven Configuration of Complex Software Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sage, Aled

    2010-06-01

    The ever-increasing complexity of software systems makes them hard to comprehend, predict and tune due to emergent properties and non-deterministic behaviour. Complexity arises from the size of software systems and the wide variety of possible operating environments: the increasing choice of platforms and communication policies leads to ever more complex performance characteristics. In addition, software systems exhibit different behaviour under different workloads. Many software systems are designed to be configurable so that policies can be chosen to meet the needs of various stakeholders. For complex software systems it can be difficult to accurately predict the effects of a change and to know which configuration is most appropriate. This thesis demonstrates that it is useful to run automated experiments that measure a selection of system configurations. Experiments can find configurations that meet the stakeholders' needs, find interesting behavioural characteristics, and help produce predictive models of the system's behaviour. The design and use of ACT (Automated Configuration Tool) for running such experiments is described, in combination a number of search strategies for deciding on the configurations to measure. Design Of Experiments (DOE) is discussed, with emphasis on Taguchi Methods. These statistical methods have been used extensively in manufacturing, but have not previously been used for configuring software systems. The novel contribution here is an industrial case study, applying the combination of ACT and Taguchi Methods to DC-Directory, a product from Data Connection Ltd (DCL). The case study investigated the applicability of Taguchi Methods for configuring complex software systems. Taguchi Methods were found to be useful for modelling and configuring DC- Directory, making them a valuable addition to the techniques available to system administrators and developers.

  8. Q-factor enhancement for self-actuated self-sensing piezoelectric MEMS resonators applying a lock-in driven feedback loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucera, M.; Manzaneque, T.; Sánchez-Rojas, J. L.; Bittner, A.; Schmid, U.

    2013-08-01

    This paper presents a robust Q-control approach based on an all-electrical feedback loop enhancing the quality factor of a resonant microstructure by using the self-sensing capability of a piezoelectric thin film actuator made of aluminium nitride. A lock-in amplifier is used to extract the feedback signal which is proportional to the piezoelectric current. The measured real part is used to replace the originally low-quality and noisy feedback signal to modulate the driving voltage of the piezoelectric thin-film actuator. Since the lock-in amplifier reduces the noise in the feedback signal substantially, the proposed enhancement loop avoids the disadvantage of a constant signal-to-noise ratio, which an analogue feedback circuit usually suffers from. The quality factor was increased from the intrinsic value of 1766 to a maximum of 34 840 in air. These promising results facilitate precise measurements for self-actuated and self-sensing MEMS cantilevers even when operated in static viscous media.

  9. Development and hardware-in-the-loop test of a guidance, navigation and control system for on-orbit servicing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benninghoff, Heike; Rems, Florian; Boge, Toralf

    2014-09-01

    The rendezvous phase is one of the most important phases in future orbital servicing missions. To ensure a safe approach to a non-cooperative target satellite, a guidance, navigation and control system which uses measurements from optical sensors like cameras was designed and developed. During ground-based rendezvous, stability problems induced by delayed position measurements can be compensated by using a specially adapted navigation filter. Within the VIBANASS (VIsion BAsed NAvigation Sensor System) test campaign, hardware-in-the-loop tests on the terrestrial, robotic based facility EPOS 2.0 were performed to test and verify the developed guidance, navigation and control algorithms using real sensor measurements. We could demonstrate several safe rendezvous test cases in a closed loop mode integrating the VIBANASS camera system and the developed guidance, navigation and control system to a dynamic rendezvous simulation.

  10. Combustion driven ammonia generation strategies for passive ammonia SCR system

    DOEpatents

    Toner, Joel G.; Narayanaswamy, Kushal; Szekely, Jr., Gerald A.; Najt, Paul M.

    2016-12-06

    A method for controlling ammonia generation in an exhaust gas feedstream output from an internal combustion engine equipped with an exhaust aftertreatment system including a first aftertreatment device includes executing an ammonia generation cycle to generate ammonia on the first aftertreatment device. A desired air-fuel ratio output from the engine and entering the exhaust aftertreatment system conducive for generating ammonia on the first aftertreatment device is determined. Operation of a selected combination of a plurality of cylinders of the engine is selectively altered to achieve the desired air-fuel ratio entering the exhaust aftertreatment system.

  11. Closed-Loop Evaluation of an Integrated Failure Identification and Fault Tolerant Control System for a Transport Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shin, Jong-Yeob; Belcastro, Christine; Khong, thuan

    2006-01-01

    Formal robustness analysis of aircraft control upset prevention and recovery systems could play an important role in their validation and ultimate certification. Such systems developed for failure detection, identification, and reconfiguration, as well as upset recovery, need to be evaluated over broad regions of the flight envelope or under extreme flight conditions, and should include various sources of uncertainty. To apply formal robustness analysis, formulation of linear fractional transformation (LFT) models of complex parameter-dependent systems is required, which represent system uncertainty due to parameter uncertainty and actuator faults. This paper describes a detailed LFT model formulation procedure from the nonlinear model of a transport aircraft by using a preliminary LFT modeling software tool developed at the NASA Langley Research Center, which utilizes a matrix-based computational approach. The closed-loop system is evaluated over the entire flight envelope based on the generated LFT model which can cover nonlinear dynamics. The robustness analysis results of the closed-loop fault tolerant control system of a transport aircraft are presented. A reliable flight envelope (safe flight regime) is also calculated from the robust performance analysis results, over which the closed-loop system can achieve the desired performance of command tracking and failure detection.

  12. Phase-Locked Loop Noise Reduction via Phase Detector Implementation for Single-Phase Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Thacker, Timothy; Boroyevich, Dushan; Burgos, Rolando; Wang, Fei

    2011-01-01

    A crucial component of grid-connected converters is the phase-locked loop (PLL) control subsystem that tracks the grid voltage's frequency and phase angle. Therefore, accurate fast-responding PLLs for control and protection purposes are required to provide these measurements. This paper proposes a novel feedback mechanism for single-phase PLL phase detectors using the estimated phase angle. Ripple noise appearing in the estimated frequency, most commonly the second harmonic under phase-lock conditions, is reduced or eliminated without the use of low-pass filters, which can cause delays to occur and limits the overall performance of the PLL response to dynamic changes in the system. The proposed method has the capability to eliminate the noise ripple entirely and, under extreme line distortion conditions, can reduce the ripple by at least half. Other modifications implemented through frequency feedback are shown to decrease the settling time of the PLL up to 50%. Mathematical analyses with the simulated and experimental results are provided to confirm the validity of the proposed methods.

  13. Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) Loop Heat Pipes: An Eventual First Year On-Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grob, E.; Baker, C.; McCarthy, T.

    2004-01-01

    Goddard Space Flight Center's Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) is the sole scientific instrument on the Ice, Cloud and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) that was launched on January 12, 2003 from Vandenberg AFB. A thermal control architecture based on propylene Loop Heat Pipe technology was developed to provide selectable/stable temperature control for the lasers and other electronics over the widely varying mission environment. Following a nominal LHP and instrument start-up, the mission was interrupted with the failure of the first laser after only 36 days of operation. During the 5-month failure investigation, the two GLAS LHPs and the electronics operated nominally, using heaters as a substitute for the laser heat load. Just prior to resuming the mission, following a seasonal spacecraft yaw maneuver, one of the LHPs deprimed and created a thermal runaway condition that resulted in an emergency shutdown of the GLAS instrument. This paper presents details of the LHP anomaly, the resulting investigation and recovery, along with on-orbit flight data during these critical events.

  14. Thermal Vacuum/Balance Test Results of Swift BAT with Loop Heat Pipe Thermal System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Michael K.

    2004-01-01

    The Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) Detector Array is thermally well coupled to eight constant conductance heat pipes (CCHPs) embedded in the Detector Array Plate PAP), and two loop heat pipes (LHPs) transport heat from the CCHPs to a radiator. The CCHPs have ammonia as the working fluid and the LHPs have propylene as the working fluid. Precision heater controllers, which have adjustable set points in flight, are used to control the LHP compensation chamber and Detector Array xA1 ASIC temperatures. The radiator has AZ-Tek's AZW-LA-II low solar absorptance white paint as the thermal coating, and is located on the anti-sun side of the spacecraft. A thermal balance (T/B) test on the BAT was successfully completed. It validated that the thermal design satisfies the temperature requirements of the BAT in the flight thermal environments. Instrument level and observatory level thermal vacuum (TN) cycling tests of the BAT Detector Array by using the LHP thermal system were successfully completed. This paper presents the results of the T/B test and T N cycling tests.

  15. SWIFT BAT Loop Heat Pipe Thermal System Characteristics and Ground/Flight Operation Procedure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Michael K.

    2003-01-01

    The SWIFT Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) Detector Array has a total power dissipation of 208 W. To meet the stringent temperature gradient and thermal stability requirements in the normal operational mode, and heater power budget in both the normal operational and safehold modes, the Detector Array is thermally well coupled to eight constant conductance heat pipes (CCHPs) embedded in the Detector Array Plate (DAP), and two loop heat pipes (LHPs) transport heat fiom the CCHPs to a radiator. The CCHPs have ammonia as the working fluid and the LHPs have propylene as the working fluid. Precision heater controllers, which have adjustable set points in flight, are used to control the LHP compensation chamber and Detector Array XA1 ASIC temperatures. The radiator has the AZ-Tek AZW-LA-II low-alpha white paint as the thermal coating and is located on the anti-sun side of the spacecraft. This paper presents the characteristics, ground operation and flight operation procedures of the LHP thermal system.

  16. System identification of closed-loop cardiovascular control mechanisms: diabetic autonomic neuropathy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukkamala, R.; Mathias, J. M.; Mullen, T. J.; Cohen, R. J.; Freeman, R.

    1999-01-01

    We applied cardiovascular system identification (CSI) to characterize closed-loop cardiovascular regulation in patients with diabetic autonomic neuropathy (DAN). The CSI method quantitatively analyzes beat-to-beat fluctuations in noninvasively measured heart rate, arterial blood pressure (ABP), and instantaneous lung volume (ILV) to characterize four physiological coupling mechanisms, two of which are autonomically mediated (the heart rate baroreflex and the coupling of respiration, measured in terms of ILV, to heart rate) and two of which are mechanically mediated (the coupling of ventricular contraction to the generation of the ABP wavelet and the coupling of respiration to ABP). We studied 37 control and 60 diabetic subjects who were classified as having minimal, moderate, or severe DAN on the basis of standard autonomic tests. The autonomically mediated couplings progressively decreased with increasing severity of DAN, whereas the mechanically mediated couplings were essentially unchanged. CSI identified differences between the minimal DAN and control groups, which were indistinguishable based on the standard autonomic tests. CSI may provide a powerful tool for assessing DAN.

  17. A fiber Bragg grating demodulation system using high-birefringence fiber loop mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Shuyang; He, Chuan; Bai, Dong-mei

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) demodulation system based on high-birefringence fiber loop mirror (Hi-Bi FLM) is proposed and demonstrated. The approximate linear edge of the transmittance of the Hi-Bi FLM, which is a sinusoidal function of wavelength, is used to interrogate the sensing FBGs. The relationship between the wavelength period of the transmittance of the Hi-Bi FLM and the length of Hi-Bi fiber is studied and the results shows that the linear range of Hi-Bi FLM is in Inverse proportion to the length of the Hi-Bi fiber. To get wider linear range, the length of the Hi-Bi fiber must be shorter and it is limited by the fiber fusing technic. Two sections of Hi-Bi fiber is orthogonal fused and its effect is equal to one segment of fiber whose length is equal to the difference of that of the two section of fibers. Using this method, a Hi-Bi FLM with a wide linear range of 20nm is made and used to demodulate FBG sensing signal. The demodulator has advantages of all-fiber design, low price and high speed.

  18. Electron versus proton accelerator driven sub-critical system performance using TRIGA reactors at power

    SciTech Connect

    Carta, M.; Burgio, N.; D'Angelo, A.; Santagata, A.; Petrovich, C.; Schikorr, M.; Beller, D.; Felice, L. S.; Imel, G.; Salvatores, M.

    2006-07-01

    This paper provides a comparison of the performance of an electron accelerator-driven experiment, under discussion within the Reactor Accelerator Coupling Experiments (RACE) Project, being conducted within the U.S. Dept. of Energy's Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI), and of the proton-driven experiment TRADE (TRIGA Accelerator Driven Experiment) originally planned at ENEA-Casaccia in Italy. Both experiments foresee the coupling to sub-critical TRIGA core configurations, and are aimed to investigate the relevant kinetic and dynamic accelerator-driven systems (ADS) core behavior characteristics in the presence of thermal reactivity feedback effects. TRADE was based on the coupling of an upgraded proton cyclotron, producing neutrons via spallation reactions on a tantalum (Ta) target, with the core driven at a maximum power around 200 kW. RACE is based on the coupling of an Electron Linac accelerator, producing neutrons via photoneutron reactions on a tungsten-copper (W-Cu) or uranium (U) target, with the core driven at a maximum power around 50 kW. The paper is focused on analysis of expected dynamic power response of the RACE core following reactivity and/or source transients. TRADE and RACE target-core power coupling coefficients are compared and discussed. (authors)

  19. 46 CFR 169.623 - Power-driven steering systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... necessary ancillary device (motor, pump, valve, etc.); (2) A pilot light to indicate operation of each power... and overload of electric motors. (c) Overcurrent protection for steering system electric circuits...

  20. 46 CFR 169.623 - Power-driven steering systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... necessary ancillary device (motor, pump, valve, etc.); (2) A pilot light to indicate operation of each power... and overload of electric motors. (c) Overcurrent protection for steering system electric circuits...

  1. 46 CFR 169.623 - Power-driven steering systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... necessary ancillary device (motor, pump, valve, etc.); (2) A pilot light to indicate operation of each power... and overload of electric motors. (c) Overcurrent protection for steering system electric circuits...

  2. 46 CFR 169.623 - Power-driven steering systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... necessary ancillary device (motor, pump, valve, etc.); (2) A pilot light to indicate operation of each power... and overload of electric motors. (c) Overcurrent protection for steering system electric circuits...

  3. Periodically driven ergodic and many-body localized quantum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ponte, Pedro; Chandran, Anushya; Papić, Z.; Abanin, Dmitry A.

    2015-02-15

    We study dynamics of isolated quantum many-body systems whose Hamiltonian is switched between two different operators periodically in time. The eigenvalue problem of the associated Floquet operator maps onto an effective hopping problem. Using the effective model, we establish conditions on the spectral properties of the two Hamiltonians for the system to localize in energy space. We find that ergodic systems always delocalize in energy space and heat up to infinite temperature, for both local and global driving. In contrast, many-body localized systems with quenched disorder remain localized at finite energy. We support our conclusions by numerical simulations of disordered spin chains. We argue that our results hold for general driving protocols, and discuss their experimental implications.

  4. Optical response in a laser-driven quantum pseudodot system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilic, D. Gul; Sakiroglu, S.; Ungan, F.; Yesilgul, U.; Kasapoglu, E.; Sari, H.; Sokmen, I.

    2017-03-01

    We investigate theoretically the intense laser-induced optical absorption coefficients and refractive index changes in a two-dimensional quantum pseudodot system under an uniform magnetic field. The effects of non-resonant, monochromatic intense laser field upon the system are treated within the framework of high-frequency Floquet approach in which the system is supposed to be governed by a laser-dressed potential. Linear and nonlinear absorption coefficients and relative changes in the refractive index are obtained by means of the compact-density matrix approach and iterative method. The results of numerical calculations for a typical GaAs quantum dot reveal that the optical response depends strongly on the magnitude of external magnetic field and characteristic parameters of the confinement potential. Moreover, we have demonstrated that the intense laser field modifies the confinement and thereby causes remarkable changes in the linear and nonlinear optical properties of the system.

  5. Test Requirements and Conceptual Design for a Potassium Test Loop to Support an Advanced Potassium Rankine Cycle Power Conversion Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Yoder, JR.G.L.

    2006-03-08

    Parameters for continuing the design and specification of an experimental potassium test loop are identified in this report. Design and construction of a potassium test loop is part of the Phase II effort of the project ''Technology Development Program for an Advanced Potassium Rankine Power Conversion System''. This program is supported by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Design features for the potassium test loop and its instrumentation system, specific test articles, and engineered barriers for ensuring worker safety and protection of the environment are described along with safety and environmental protection requirements to be used during the design process. Information presented in the first portion of this report formed the basis to initiate the design phase of the program; however, the report is a living document that can be changed as necessary during the design process, reflecting modifications as additional design details are developed. Some portions of the report have parameters identified as ''to be determined'' (TBD), reflecting the early stage of the overall process. In cases where specific design values are presently unknown, the report attempts to document the quantities that remain to be defined in order to complete the design of the potassium test loop and supporting equipment.

  6. Automated stopped-in-dual-loop flow analysis system for catalytic determination of vanadium in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Teshima, Norio; Kuno, Masami; Ueda, Minoru; Ueda, Hisashi; Ohno, Shinsuke; Sakai, Tadao

    2009-07-15

    An automated stopped-in-dual-loop flow analysis (SIDL-FA) system is proposed for the determination of vanadium in drinking water. The chemistry is based on the vanadium-catalyzed oxidation reaction of p-anisidine by bromate in the presence of Tiron as an activator to produce a dye (lambda(max)=510 nm). A SIDL-FA system basically consists of a selection valve, three pumps (one is for delivering of standard/sample, and others are for reagents), two six-way injection valves, a spectrophotometric detector and a data acquisition device. A 100-microL coiled loop around a heated device is fitted onto each six-way injection valve. A well-mixed solution containing reagents and standard/sample is loaded into the first loop on a six-way valve, and then the same solution is loaded into the second loop on another six-way valve. The solutions are isolated by switching these two six-way valves, so that the catalytic reaction can be promoted. The net waste can be zero in this stage, because all pumps are turned off. Then each resulting solution is dispensed to the detector with suitable time lag. A touchscreen controller is developed to automatically carry out the original SIDL-FA protocol. The proposed SIDL-FA method allows vanadium to be quantified in the range of 0.1-2 microg L(-1) and is applied to the determination of vanadium in drinking water samples.

  7. The Impact of an Open Loop Geothermal System with Multiple Wells on Groundwater Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Susanto, S.

    2015-12-01

    As the demand of groundwater as a source of energy has increased in recent years, the Upper Carbonate Aquifer beneath the City of Winnipeg is heavily utilized for cooling and heating. Majority open loop systems discharge thermal wastewater into the aquifer and increase the groundwater temperature. A numerical model was developed to study the impact of a geothermal system with multiple wells located in the Tuxedo area on groundwater temperature. Analysis was performed using SEAWAT with GUI Visual MODFLOW. Surface elevation, model boundary and wells locations were developed using ArcGIS. The model was run in steady state flow for static water level calibration and in transient mode for calibration using data of a pumping test. Preliminary investigation with three years simulation predicts a 600 m by 660 m area of temperature increase. Groundwater temperature in production wells will increase 0.5°C within 2 years and 1°C within 3 years. Factors that influence the temperature changes and its distribution in the groundwater are production flow rate, recharge flow rate, groundwater flow, return water distribution into recharge wells, distance between production wells and recharge wells, spacing between recharge wells, and layout of geothermal pumping wells. The simulated and observed temperature increase is mainly caused by higher production rate for cooling than for heating. The result from this study will strongly contribute knowledge in the development of a 3D numerical model of the Upper Carbonate Aquifer beneath the City of Winnipeg to investigate the impact of geothermal systems to the groundwater temperature.

  8. A clinician-driven home care delivery system.

    PubMed

    August, D A; Faubion, W C; Ryan, M L; Haggerty, R H; Wesley, J R

    1993-12-01

    The financial, entrepreneurial, administrative, and legal forces acting within the home care arena make it difficult for clinicians to develop and operate home care initiatives within an academic setting. HomeMed is a clinician-initiated and -directed home care delivery system wholly owned by the University of Michigan. The advantages of a clinician-directed system include: Assurance that clinical and patient-based factors are the primary determinants of strategic and procedural decisions; Responsiveness of the system to clinician needs; Maintenance of an important role for the referring physician in home care; Economical clinical research by facilitation of protocol therapy in ambulatory and home settings; Reduction of lengths of hospital stays through clinician initiatives; Incorporation of outcome analysis and other research programs into the mission of the system; Clinician commitment to success of the system; and Clinician input on revenue use. Potential disadvantages of a clinician-based system include: Entrepreneurial, financial, and legal naivete; Disconnection from institutional administrative and data management resources; and Inadequate clinician interest and commitment. The University of Michigan HomeMed experience demonstrates a model of clinician-initiated and -directed home care delivery that has been innovative, profitable, and clinically excellent, has engendered broad physician, nurse, pharmacist, and social worker enthusiasm, and has supported individual investigator clinical protocols as well as broad outcomes research initiatives. It is concluded that a clinician-initiated and -directed home care program is feasible and effective, and in some settings may be optimal.

  9. Robust control of a class of chaotic and hyperchaotic driven systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mkaouar, Hanéne; Boubaker, Olfa

    2017-01-01

    This paper proposes new conditions which are sufficient for robust control of a class of chaotic and hyperchaotic driven systems. The drive-driven systems are characterized by non-identical uncertain complex dynamics where complexities are mainly introduced by the switching nature of their vector fields. The controller design is achieved using linear matrix inequalities (LMIs) and the so-called S-procedure and then validated using two numerical examples. To illustrate the robustness of the proposed approach, a comparative study is also established with regard to a related approach.

  10. COLD TEST LOOP INTEGRATED TEST LOOP RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham, TJ

    2003-10-22

    A testing facility (Cold Test Loop) was constructed and operated to demonstrate the efficacy of the Accelerated Waste Retrieval (AWR) Project's planned sluicing approach to the remediation of Silos 1 and 2 at the Fernald Environmental Management Project near Cincinnati, Ohio. The two silos contain almost 10,000 tons of radium-bearing low-level waste, which consists primarily of solids of raffinates from processing performed on ores from the Democratic Republic of Congo (commonly referred to as ''Belgium Congo ores'') for the recovery of uranium. These silos are 80 ft in diameter, 36 ft high to the center of the dome, and 26.75 ft to the top of the vertical side walls. The test facility contained two test systems, each designed for a specific purpose. The first system, the Integrated Test Loop (ITL), a near-full-scale plant including the actual equipment to be installed at the Fernald Site, was designed to demonstrate the sluicing operation and confirm the selection of a slurry pump, the optimal sluicing nozzle operation, and the preliminary design material balance. The second system, the Component Test Loop (CTL), was designed to evaluate many of the key individual components of the waste retrieval system over an extended run. The major results of the initial testing performed during July and August 2002 confirmed that the AWR approach to sluicing was feasible. The ITL testing confirmed the following: (1) The selected slurry pump (Hazleton 3-20 type SHW) performed well and is suitable for AWR application. However, the pump's motor should be upgraded to a 200-hp model and be driven by a 150-hp variable-frequency drive (VFD). A 200-hp VFD is not much more expensive and would allow the pump to operate at full speed. (2) The best nozzle performance was achieved by using 15/16-in. nozzles operated alternately. This configuration appeared to most effectively mine the surrogate. (3) The Solartron densitometer, which was tested as an alternative mass flow measurement

  11. Simulation of the MELiSSA closed loop system as a tool to define its integration strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poughon, L.; Farges, B.; Dussap, C. G.; Godia, F.; Lasseur, C.

    2009-12-01

    Inspired by a terrestrial ecosystem, Micro-Ecological Life Support System Alternative (MELiSSA) is a project focused on a closed-loop life support system intended for future long-term manned missions (Moon and Mars bases). Started by the ESA in 1989, this 5-compartment concept has evolved through a mechanistic engineering approach designed to acquire both theoretical and technical knowledge. In its current state of development, the project can now start to demonstrate the MELiSSA loop concept at pilot scale. Thus, an integration strategy for a MELiSSA Pilot Plant (MPP) has been defined, describing the different test phases and connections between compartments. The integration steps are due to be started in 2008 and completed with a complete operational loop in 2015. The ultimate objective is to achieve a closed liquid and gas loop fulfiling 100% of oxygen requirements and at least 20% of food requirements for one-man. Although the integration logic could start with the most advanced processes in terms of knowledge and hardware development, this logic needs to be expanded to encompass a high-level simulation policy. This simulation exercise will make it possible to run effective demonstrations of each independent process, followed by progressive coupling with other processes in operational conditions mirroring as far as possible the final configuration. The theoretical approach described in this paper is based on mass balance models of each MELiSSA compartment which are used to simulate each integration step and the complete MPP loop itself. These simulations will help identify criticalities in each integration step and check consistency between objectives, flows, recycling efficiencies and sizing of the pilot reactors. An MPP scenario compatible with current knowledge on the operation of the pilot reactors was investigated, and the theoretical performances of the system were compared against the objectives assigned to the MPP. This scenario makes it possible to

  12. A closed-loop automatic control system for high-intensity acoustic test systems.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slusser, R. A.

    1973-01-01

    Description of an automatic control system for high-intensity acoustic tests in reverberation chambers. Working in 14 one-third-octave bands from 50 to 1000 Hz, the desired sound pressure levels are set into the memory in the control system before the test. The control system then increases the sound pressure level in the reverberation chamber gradually in each of the one-third-octave bands until the level set in the memory is reached. This level is then maintained for the duration of the test. Additional features of the system are overtest protection, the capability of 'holding' the spectrum at any time, and the presence of a total test timer.

  13. Patterning in systems driven by nonlocal external forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luneville, L.; Mallick, K.; Pontikis, V.; Simeone, D.

    2016-11-01

    This work focuses on systems displaying domain patterns resulting from competing external and internal dynamics. To this end, we introduce a Lyapunov functional capable of describing the steady states of systems subject to external forces, by adding nonlocal terms to the Landau Ginzburg free energy of the system. Thereby, we extend the existing methodology treating long-range order interactions, to the case of external nonlocal forces. By studying the quadratic term of this Lyapunov functional, we compute the phase diagram in the temperature versus external field and we determine all possible modulated phases (domain patterns) as a function of the external forces and the temperature. Finally, we investigate patterning in chemical reactive mixtures and binary mixtures under irradiation, and we show that the last case opens the path toward micro-structural engineering of materials.

  14. Patterning in systems driven by nonlocal external forces.

    PubMed

    Luneville, L; Mallick, K; Pontikis, V; Simeone, D

    2016-11-01

    This work focuses on systems displaying domain patterns resulting from competing external and internal dynamics. To this end, we introduce a Lyapunov functional capable of describing the steady states of systems subject to external forces, by adding nonlocal terms to the Landau Ginzburg free energy of the system. Thereby, we extend the existing methodology treating long-range order interactions, to the case of external nonlocal forces. By studying the quadratic term of this Lyapunov functional, we compute the phase diagram in the temperature versus external field and we determine all possible modulated phases (domain patterns) as a function of the external forces and the temperature. Finally, we investigate patterning in chemical reactive mixtures and binary mixtures under irradiation, and we show that the last case opens the path toward micro-structural engineering of materials.

  15. Mission-driven evaluation of imaging system quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kattnig, Alain Philippe; Ferhani, Ouamar; Primot, Jéro‸Me

    2001-12-01

    Image-quality criteria are usually intended to achieve the best possible image at a given sampling rate, which is ill-suited to applications where the detection of well-defined geometric and radiometric properties of scenes or objects are paramount. The quality criterion developed here for designing observation systems is based on properties of the objects to be viewed. It is thus an object-oriented imaging quality criterion rather than an image-oriented one. We also propose to go beyond optimization and calibrate a numerical scale that can be used to rate the quality of the service delivered by any observation system.

  16. Becoming customer-driven: one health system's story.

    PubMed

    Bagnell, A

    1998-01-01

    Market research was done by Crozer-Keystone Health System to better understand the new health care consumer. The information will assist in developing, promoting, and delivering products and services of maximum value to current and prospective consumers. The system is responding by bundling and delivering products and services around consumer-based dimensions, developing new and better ways to improve customer convenience, access, and service. Operationalizing these initiatives for change involves building an information infrastructure of extensive content and customer databases, using new technologies to customize communications and ultimately service components.

  17. Entropy Production in Nonlinear, Thermally Driven Hamiltonian Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckmann, Jean-Pierre; Pillet, Claude-Alain; Rey-Bellet, Luc

    1999-04-01

    We consider a finite chain of nonlinear oscillators coupled at its ends to two infinite heat baths which are at different temperatures. Using our earlier results about the existence of a stationary state, we show rigorously that for arbitrary temperature differences and arbitrary couplings, such a system has a unique stationary state. (This extends our earlier results for small temperature differences.) In all these cases, any initial state will converge (at an unknown rate) to the stationary state. We show that this stationary state continually produces entropy. The rate of entropy production is strictly negative when the temperatures are unequal and is proportional to the mean energy flux through the system

  18. Forecast and virtual weather driven plant disease risk modeling system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We describe a system in use and development that leverages public weather station data, several spatialized weather forecast types, leaf wetness estimation, generic plant disease models, and online statistical evaluation. Convergent technological developments in all these areas allow, with funding f...

  19. OASIS-V: A Data-Base Driven CAI System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dever, Michael K.; Spencer, Judson

    1979-01-01

    The system consists of a single program with data bases containing the material to be displayed. Editing, loading, and other support programs were written to transfer the burden of material and maintenance tasks from the user to the computer. (Author/IRT)

  20. Generating a fractal butterfly Floquet spectrum in a class of driven SU(2) systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Jiao; Gong Jiangbin

    2010-02-15

    A scheme for generating a fractal butterfly Floquet spectrum, first proposed by Wang and Gong [Phys. Rev. A 77, 031405(R) (2008)], is extended to driven SU(2) systems such as a driven two-mode Bose-Einstein condensate. A class of driven systems without a link with the Harper-model context is shown to have an intriguing butterfly Floquet spectrum. The found butterfly spectrum shows remarkable deviations from the known Hofstadter's butterfly. In addition, the level crossings between Floquet states of the same parity and between Floquet states of different parities are studied and highlighted. The results are relevant to studies of fractal statistics, quantum chaos, and coherent destruction of tunneling, as well as the validity of mean-field descriptions of Bose-Einstein condensates.

  1. Companion-driven dynamics in hot Jupiter systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngo, Henry; Batygin, Konstantin; Knutson, Heather A.; Lewis, Nikole K.; de Wit, Julien

    2015-08-01

    Hot Jupiters are giant planets found on orbits that lie in close proximity to their host stars. In this region, the process of tidal dissipation is believed to be generally efficient, and should act to circularize planetary orbits on timescales much shorter than the inferred ages of the observed stars. However, at time of writing, one in six known hot Jupiters have eccentricities inconsistent with zero at the three sigma level and about one in twelve have eccentricities greater than 0.2. This discrepancy hints at the existence of a dynamical mechanism that acts to maintain hot Jupiter eccentricities in face of tidal dissipation for extended periods of time. Our recent radial velocity (RV) and direct imaging surveys find that 70% of hot Jupiter systems are expected to host a distant planetary or stellar mass companion. In this work, we examine whether dynamical interactions with these long period companions could be responsible for the excited hot Jupiter eccentricities. Specifically, we consider the one of the most eccentric known hot Jupiter systems, HAT-P-2, as a case study. The inner planet in this system has a mass approximately ten times that of Jupiter, a semi-major axis of 0.07 AU, and an orbital eccentricity of 0.5. Long-term radial velocity monitoring has revealed the presence of an even more massive outer companion located beyond 4 AU with a partially constrained orbit. We examine different dynamical scenarios for this system in order to determine whether or not this outer companion might be responsible for the inner planet's unusually large orbital eccentricity, and make predictions for the short-term orbital evolution of the system.

  2. Attentional and non-attentional systems in the maintenance of verbal information in working memory: the executive and phonological loops.

    PubMed

    Camos, Valérie; Barrouillet, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Working memory is the structure devoted to the maintenance of information at short term during concurrent processing activities. In this respect, the question regarding the nature of the mechanisms and systems fulfilling this maintenance function is of particular importance and has received various responses in the recent past. In the time-based resource-sharing (TBRS) model, we suggest that only two systems sustain the maintenance of information at the short term, counteracting the deleterious effect of temporal decay and interference. A non-attentional mechanism of verbal rehearsal, similar to the one described by Baddeley in the phonological loop model, uses language processes to reactivate phonological memory traces. Besides this domain-specific mechanism, an executive loop allows the reconstruction of memory traces through an attention-based mechanism of refreshing. The present paper reviews evidence of the involvement of these two independent systems in the maintenance of verbal memory items.

  3. Microwave life detector for buried victims using neutrodyning loop based system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahar J., Bel Hadj

    2009-07-01

    This paper describes a new design of an electromagnetic life detector for the detection of buried victims. The principle of the microwave life sensor is based on the detection of the modulated part of a scattered wave which is generated by the breathing activity of the victim. Those movements generate a spectral component located in the low frequency range, which for most of the cases, is located in a spectrum extending from 0.18 Hz to 0.34 Hz. The detection process requires high sensitivity with respect to breathing movements and, simultaneously, a relative insensitivity for other non-modulated or modulated parasitic signals. Developed microwave system, generating a frequency adjustable between 500 MHz and 1 GHz, is based on a neutrodyning loop required to cancel any non-modulated background and reflected signals in order to get better receiver sensitivity without introducing supplementary distortions on the received signal. Life signal is considered practically periodic that facilitates the extraction of this spectral component using several processing techniques, such as adaptive filtering and correlation permitting to ameliorate the detection range to be more than 15 m in low-loss medium. Detection range is a fundamental parameter for a microwave life detector. A range around 1 m doesn't have a large interest for this application. To attain a range more than 15 m, while guaranteeing professional performances, the technology has to optimize the system parameters as well as the involved signal processing for the purpose of overcoming the presence of obstacles, attenuation, and noise perturbation. This constitutes the main contribution of the present work. Experimental measurements have confirmed the potentiality of this microwave technique for life detector with best space covering detection.

  4. RBAC Driven Least Privilege Architecture For Control Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hull, Julie; Markham, Mark

    2014-01-25

    The concept of role based access control (RBAC) within the IT environment has been studied by researchers and was supported by NIST (circa 1992). This earlier work highlighted the benefits of RBAC which include reduced administrative workload and policies which are easier to analyze and apply. The goals of this research were to expand the application of RBAC in the following ways. • Apply RBAC to the control systems environment: The typical RBAC model within the IT environment is used to control a user’s access to files. Within the control system environment files are replaced with measurement (e.g., temperature) and control (e.g. valve) points organized as a hierarchy of control assets (e.g. a boiler, compressor, refinery unit). Control points have parameters (e.g., high alarm limit, set point, etc.) associated with them. The RBAC model is extended to support access to points and their parameters based upon roles while at the same time allowing permissions for the points to be defined at the asset level or point level directly. In addition, centralized policy administration with distributed access enforcement mechanisms was developed to support the distributed architecture of distributed control systems and SCADA. • Extend the RBAC model to include access control for software and devices: The established RBAC approach is to assign users to roles. This work extends that notion by first breaking the control system down into three layers 1) users, 2) software and 3) devices. An RBAC model is then created for each of these three layers. The result is that RBAC can be used to define machine-to-machine policy enforced via the IP security (IPsec) protocol. This highlights the potential to use RBAC for machine-to-machine connectivity within the internet of things. • Enable dynamic policy based upon the operating mode of the system: The IT environment is generally static with respect to policy. However, large cyber physical systems such as industrial controls have

  5. Measurable Control System Security through Ideal Driven Technical Metrics

    SciTech Connect

    Miles McQueen; Wayne Boyer; Sean McBride; Marie Farrar; Zachary Tudor

    2008-01-01

    The Department of Homeland Security National Cyber Security Division supported development of a small set of security ideals as a framework to establish measurable control systems security. Based on these ideals, a draft set of proposed technical metrics was developed to allow control systems owner-operators to track improvements or degradations in their individual control systems security posture. The technical metrics development effort included review and evaluation of over thirty metrics-related documents. On the bases of complexity, ambiguity, or misleading and distorting effects the metrics identified during the reviews were determined to be weaker than necessary to aid defense against the myriad threats posed by cyber-terrorism to human safety, as well as to economic prosperity. Using the results of our metrics review and the set of security ideals as a starting point for metrics development, we identified thirteen potential technical metrics - with at least one metric supporting each ideal. Two case study applications of the ideals and thirteen metrics to control systems were then performed to establish potential difficulties in applying both the ideals and the metrics. The case studies resulted in no changes to the ideals, and only a few deletions and refinements to the thirteen potential metrics. This led to a final proposed set of ten core technical metrics. To further validate the security ideals, the modifications made to the original thirteen potential metrics, and the final proposed set of ten core metrics, seven separate control systems security assessments performed over the past three years were reviewed for findings and recommended mitigations. These findings and mitigations were then mapped to the security ideals and metrics to assess gaps in their coverage. The mappings indicated that there are no gaps in the security ideals and that the ten core technical metrics provide significant coverage of standard security issues with 87% coverage. Based

  6. A closed-loop automatic control system for high-intensity acoustic test systems.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slusser, R. A.

    1973-01-01

    Sound at sound pressure levels in the range from 130 to 160 dB is used in the investigation. Random noise is passed through a series of parallel filters, generally 1/3-octave wide. A basic automatic system is investigated because of preadjustment inaccuracies and high costs found in a study of a typical manually controlled acoustic testing system. The unit described has been successfully used in automatic acoustic tests in connection with the spacecraft tests for the Mariner 1971 program.

  7. Hemodynamically Driven Vein Graft Remodeling: A Systems Biology Approach

    PubMed Central

    Berceli, Scott A.; Tran-Son-Tay, Roger; Garbey, Marc; Jiang, Zhihua

    2011-01-01

    Despite intense investigation over several decades to understand the mechanisms of vein graft failure, few therapeutic modalities have emerged. Emphasis using standard reductionist approaches has been focused on cataloging the components involved in the early events following vein graft implantation, but limited insight has been gained in understanding the dynamic interaction of these components. We propose that the application of systems theory offers the opportunity for significant advances in this area. Focused on modeling the dynamic relationships that define living organisms, systems biology provides the necessary tools to further our understanding of the complex series of overlapping biologic events on surgical implantation of the vein graft. Through the use of ordinary differential equation and agent-based modeling techniques, we present our ongoing efforts to define the nonlinear interactions between hemodynamics and vascular adaptation. PMID:19426605

  8. Delay-driven irregular spatiotemporal patterns in a plankton system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Canrong; Zhang, Lai

    2013-07-01

    An inhomogeneous distribution of species density over physical space is a widely observed scenario in plankton systems. Understanding the mechanisms resulting in these spatial patterns is a central topic in plankton ecology. In this paper we explore the impact of time delay on spatiotemporal patterns in a prey-predator plankton system. We find that time delay can trigger the emergence of irregular spatial patterns via a Hopf bifurcation. Moreover, a phase transition from a regular spiral pattern to an irregular one was observed and the latter gradually replaced the former and persisted indefinitely. The characteristic length of the emergent spatial pattern is consistent with the scale of plankton patterns observed in field studies.

  9. Delay-driven irregular spatiotemporal patterns in a plankton system.

    PubMed

    Tian, Canrong; Zhang, Lai

    2013-07-01

    An inhomogeneous distribution of species density over physical space is a widely observed scenario in plankton systems. Understanding the mechanisms resulting in these spatial patterns is a central topic in plankton ecology. In this paper we explore the impact of time delay on spatiotemporal patterns in a prey-predator plankton system. We find that time delay can trigger the emergence of irregular spatial patterns via a Hopf bifurcation. Moreover, a phase transition from a regular spiral pattern to an irregular one was observed and the latter gradually replaced the former and persisted indefinitely. The characteristic length of the emergent spatial pattern is consistent with the scale of plankton patterns observed in field studies.

  10. A closed-loop dynamic simulation-based design method for articulated heavy vehicles with active trailer steering systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manjurul Islam, Md.; Ding, Xuejun; He, Yuping

    2012-05-01

    This paper presents a closed-loop dynamic simulation-based design method for articulated heavy vehicles (AHVs) with active trailer steering (ATS) systems. AHVs have poor manoeuvrability at low speeds and exhibit low lateral stability at high speeds. From the design point of view, there exists a trade-off relationship between AHVs' manoeuvrability and stability. For example, fewer articulation points and longer wheelbases will improve high-speed lateral stability, but they will degrade low-speed manoeuvrability. To tackle this conflicting design problem, a systematic method is proposed for the design of AHVs with ATS systems. In order to evaluate vehicle performance measures under a well-defined testing manoeuvre, a driver model is introduced and it 'drivers' the vehicle model to follow a prescribed route at a given speed. Considering the interactions between the mechanical trailer and the ATS system, the proposed design method simultaneously optimises the active design variables of the controllers and passive design variables of the trailer in a single design loop (SDL). Through the design optimisation of an ATS system for an AHV with a truck and a drawbar trailer combination, this SDL method is compared against a published two design loop method. The benchmark investigation shows that the former can determine better trade-off design solutions than those derived by the latter. This SDL method provides an effective approach to automatically implement the design synthesis of AHVs with ATS systems.

  11. Modeling the Thermosphere as a Driven-Dissipative Thermodynamic System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    which dissipates the excess energy once the driver is lessened. This type of system is described by a differential equation of the same form as that...the solar wind caused by high-speed streams ( HSS ) result in low levels of geomagnetic activity and can therefore impact the thermosphere via... HSS , coronal holes (Temmer, et al., 2007). Similarly Lei et al., 2008, found a 9-day periodic variation in neutral density observations from the

  12. Closed-Loop System Identification Experience for Flight Control Law and Flying Qualities Evaluation of a High Performance Fighter Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Patrick C.

    1996-01-01

    This paper highlights some of the results and issues associated with estimating models to evaluate control law design methods and design criteria for advanced high performance aircraft. Experimental fighter aircraft such as the NASA-High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV) have the capability to maneuver at very high angles of attack where nonlinear aerodynamics often predominate. HARV is an experimental F/A-18, configured with thrust vectoring and conformal actuated nose strakes. Identifying closed-loop models for this type of aircraft can be made difficult by nonlinearities and high order characteristics of the system. In this paper, only lateral-directional axes are considered since the lateral-directional control law was specifically designed to produce classical airplane responses normally expected with low-order, rigid-body systems. Evaluation of the control design methodology was made using low-order equivalent systems determined from flight and simulation. This allowed comparison of the closed-loop rigid-body dynamics achieved in flight with that designed in simulation. In flight, the On Board Excitation System was used to apply optimal inputs to lateral stick and pedals at five angles at attack : 5, 20, 30, 45, and 60 degrees. Data analysis and closed-loop model identification were done using frequency domain maximum likelihood. The structure of identified models was a linear state-space model reflecting classical 4th-order airplane dynamics. Input time delays associated with the high-order controller and aircraft system were accounted for in data preprocessing. A comparison of flight estimated models with small perturbation linear design models highlighted nonlinearities in the system and indicated that the closed-loop rigid-body dynamics were sensitive to input amplitudes at 20 and 30 degrees angle of attack.

  13. Closed-Loop System Identification Experience for Flight Control Law and Flying Qualities Evaluation of a High Performance Fighter Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Patrick C.

    1999-01-01

    This paper highlights some of the results and issues associated with estimating models to evaluate control law design methods and design criteria for advanced high performance aircraft. Experimental fighter aircraft such as the NASA High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV) have the capability to maneuver at very high angles of attack where nonlinear aerodynamics often predominate. HARV is an experimental F/A-18, configured with thrust vectoring and conformal actuated nose strakes. Identifying closed-loop models for this type of aircraft can be made difficult by nonlinearities and high-order characteristics of the system. In this paper only lateral-directional axes are considered since the lateral-directional control law was specifically designed to produce classical airplane responses normally expected with low-order, rigid-body systems. Evaluation of the control design methodology was made using low-order equivalent systems determined from flight and simulation. This allowed comparison of the closed-loop rigid-body dynamics achieved in flight with that designed in simulation. In flight, the On Board Excitation System was used to apply optimal inputs to lateral stick and pedals at five angles of attack: 5, 20, 30, 45, and 60 degrees. Data analysis and closed-loop model identification were done using frequency domain maximum likelihood. The structure of the identified models was a linear state-space model reflecting classical 4th-order airplane dynamics. Input time delays associated with the high-order controller and aircraft system were accounted for in data preprocessing. A comparison of flight estimated models with small perturbation linear design models highlighted nonlinearities in the system and indicated that the estimated closed-loop rigid-body dynamics were sensitive to input amplitudes at 20 and 30 degrees angle of attack.

  14. Systems biology driven software design for the research enterprise

    PubMed Central

    Boyle, John; Cavnor, Christopher; Killcoyne, Sarah; Shmulevich, Ilya

    2008-01-01

    Background In systems biology, and many other areas of research, there is a need for the interoperability of tools and data sources that were not originally designed to be integrated. Due to the interdisciplinary nature of systems biology, and its association with high throughput experimental platforms, there is an additional need to continually integrate new technologies. As scientists work in isolated groups, integration with other groups is rarely a consideration when building the required software tools. Results We illustrate an approach, through the discussion of a purpose built software architecture, which allows disparate groups to reuse tools and access data sources in a common manner. The architecture allows for: the rapid development of distributed applications; interoperability, so it can be used by a wide variety of developers and computational biologists; development using standard tools, so that it is easy to maintain and does not require a large development effort; extensibility, so that new technologies and data types can be incorporated; and non intrusive development, insofar as researchers need not to adhere to a pre-existing object model. Conclusion By using a relatively simple integration strategy, based upon a common identity system and dynamically discovered interoperable services, a light-weight software architecture can become the focal point through which scientists can both get access to and analyse the plethora of experimentally derived data. PMID:18578887

  15. A generic task-driven multi-agent telemedicine system.

    PubMed

    Nageba, Ebrahim; Fayn, Jocelyne; Rubel, Paul

    2007-01-01

    Pervasive Telemedicine is an emerging research discipline, which focuses on the development and the application of ubiquitous computing technology for healthcare purposes. However, the current telemedicine systems lack to be self adaptable to handle different types of data such as vital biosignals, images, video and textual data. In addition, they do not use the full capabilities of the computing devices on which they run. Unfortunately, the existing telemedicine systems do not pay enough attention to the quality level of their offered services nor offer adequate resources management for meeting bandwidth and end-to-end communication delays. In this paper we propose an information and communication architecture of a generic telemedicine system based on a knowledge base and intelligent agents interacting each with the other in a synergetic way to perform several medical tasks for a high level of quality of service (QoS). The medical assistance to skiers and high mountains resorts residents will be used in particular as an example of applicability scenario and models personalization.

  16. Effects of interactions on periodically driven dynamically localized systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwala, Adhip; Sen, Diptiman

    2017-01-01

    It is known that there are lattice models in which noninteracting particles get dynamically localized when periodic δ -function kicks are applied with a particular strength. We use both numerical and analytical methods to study the effects of interactions in three different models in one dimension. The systems we have considered include spinless fermions with interactions between nearest-neighbor sites, the Hubbard model of spin-1/2 fermions, and the Bose-Hubbard model with on-site interactions. We derive effective Floquet Hamiltonians up to second order in the time period of kicking. Using these we show that interactions can give rise to a variety of interesting results such as two-body bound states in all three models and dispersionless few-particle bound states with more than two particles for spinless fermions and bosons. We substantiate these results by exact diagonalization and stroboscopic time evolution of systems with a few particles. We derive a pseudo-spin-1/2 limit of the Bose-Hubbard system in the thermodynamic limit and show that a special case of this has an exponentially large number of degenerate eigenstates of the effective Hamiltonian. Finally, we study the effect of changing the strength of the δ -function kicks slightly away from perfect dynamical localization; we find that a single particle remains dynamically localized for a long time after which it moves ballistically.

  17. Maximum Principle for General Controlled Systems Driven by Fractional Brownian Motions

    SciTech Connect

    Han Yuecai; Hu Yaozhong; Song Jian

    2013-04-15

    We obtain a maximum principle for stochastic control problem of general controlled stochastic differential systems driven by fractional Brownian motions (of Hurst parameter H>1/2). This maximum principle specifies a system of equations that the optimal control must satisfy (necessary condition for the optimal control). This system of equations consists of a backward stochastic differential equation driven by both fractional Brownian motions and the corresponding underlying standard Brownian motions. In addition to this backward equation, the maximum principle also involves the Malliavin derivatives. Our approach is to use conditioning and Malliavin calculus. To arrive at our maximum principle we need to develop some new results of stochastic analysis of the controlled systems driven by fractional Brownian motions via fractional calculus. Our approach of conditioning and Malliavin calculus is also applied to classical system driven by standard Brownian motions while the controller has only partial information. As a straightforward consequence, the classical maximum principle is also deduced in this more natural and simpler way.

  18. Experimental study of cryogenic liquid turbine expander with closed-loop liquefied nitrogen system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ke; Sun, Jinju; Song, Peng

    2015-04-01

    A cryogenic liquid turbine expander is developed as a replacement for traditional Joule-Thomson valves used in the cryogenic systems for the purpose of energy saving. An experimental study was conducted to evaluate the performance of the turbine expander and is the subject of this paper. The test rig comprises a closed-loop liquefied nitrogen system, cryogenic liquid turbine expander unit, and its auxiliary and measuring systems. The test operating parameters of the turbine expander are determined on the basis of flow similarity rules. Pre-cooling of the liquid nitrogen system is first performed, and then the tests are conducted at different flow rates and speed ratios. The turbine expander flow rate, inlet and outlet pressure and temperature, rotational speed and shaft torque were measured. Experimental results and their uncertainties were analyzed and discussed. The following are demonstrated: (1) For both test cases, turbine expander peak isentropic efficiency is respectively 78.8% and 68.4% obtained at 89.6% and 92% of the design flow rate. The large uncertainties in isentropic efficiency are caused by the large enthalpy variations subjected to small measurement uncertainties in temperature and pressure. (2) Total efficiency and hydraulic efficiency of the turbine expander are obtained. They are essentially the same, since both include flow-related effects and also bearing losses. Comparisons of total efficiency and hydraulic efficiency were used to justify measurement uncertainties of different quantities, since the former involves the measured mass flow rate and enthalpy drop (being dependant on inlet and outlet temperature and pressure), while the latter involves the actual shaft power, volume flow rate, and inlet and outlet pressure. (3) Losses in flow passages and the shaft-bearing system have been inferred based on the measured turbine expander total efficiency, isentropic efficiency, and mechanical efficiency, which are respectively 57.6-74.8%, 62

  19. Development and Testing of a Temperature-swing Adsorption Compressor for Carbon Dioxide in Closed-loop Air Revitalization Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulloth, Lila M.; Rosen, Micha; Affleck, David; LeVan, M. Douglas; Wang, Yuan

    2005-01-01

    The air revitalization system of the International Space Station (ISS) operates in an open loop mode and relies on the resupply of oxygen and other consumables from earth for the life support of astronauts. A compressor is required for delivering the carbon dioxide from a removal assembly to a reduction unit to recover oxygen and thereby dosing the air-loop. We have developed a temperature-swing adsorption compressor (TSAC) that is energy efficient, quiet, and has no rapidly moving parts for performing these tasks. The TSAC is a solid-state compressor that has the capability to remove CO2 from a low- pressure source, and subsequently store, compress, and deliver at a higher pressure as required by a processor. The TSAC is an ideal interface device for CO2 removal and reduction units in the air revitalization loop of a spacecraft for oxygen recovery. This paper discusses the design and testing of a TSAC for carbon dioxide that has application in the ISS and future spacecraft for closing the air revitalization loop.

  20. Closed-loop optical stimulation and recording system with GPU-based real-time spike sorting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ling; Nguyen, Thoa; Cabral, Henrique; Gysbrechts, Barbara; Battaglia, Francesco; Bartic, Carmen

    2014-05-01

    Closed-loop brain computer interfaces are rapidly progressing due to their applications in fundamental neuroscience and prosthetics. For optogenetic experiments, the integration of optical stimulation and electrophysiological recordings is emerging as an imperative engineering research topic. Optical stimulation does not only bring the advantage of cell-type selectivity, but also provides an alternative solution to the electrical stimulation-induced artifacts, a challenge in closedloop architectures. A closed-loop system must identify the neuronal signals in real-time such that a strategy is selected immediately (within a few milliseconds) for delivering stimulation patterns. Real-time spike sorting poses important challenges especially when a large number of recording channels are involved. Here we present a prototype allowing simultaneous optical stimulation and electro-physiological recordings in a closed-loop manner. The prototype was implemented with online spike detection and classification capabilities for selective cell stimulation. Real-time spike sorting was achieved by computations with a high speed, low cost graphic processing unit (GPU). We have successfully demonstrated the closed-loop operation, i.e. optical stimulation in vivo based on spike detection from 8 tetrodes (32 channels). The performance of GPU computation in spike sorting for different channel numbers and signal lengths was also investigated.

  1. Data-driven systems and system-driven data: the story of the Flanders Heritage Inventory (1995-2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Daele, K.; Meganck, L.; Mortier, S.

    2015-08-01

    Over the past 20 years, heritage inventories in Flanders (Belgium) have evolved from printed books to digital inventories. It is obvious that a system that publishes a digital inventory needs to adapt to the user requirements. But, after years of working with a digital inventory system, it has become apparent that not only has the system been developed to the users needs, but also that user practice and the resulting data have been shaped by the system. Thinking about domain models and thesauri influenced our thinking about our methodology of surveying. Seeing our data projected on a common basemap led us to realise how intertwined and interdependent different types of heritage can be. The need for structured metadata has impressed upon us the need for good quality data, guaranteed by data entry standards, validation tools, and a strict editing workflow. Just as the researchers have transitioned from seeing their respective inventories as being significantly different to actually seeing the similarities between them, the information specialists have come to the realisation that there are synergies that can be achieved with other systems, both within and outside of our organisation. Deploying our inventories on the web has also changed how we communicate with the general public. Newer channels such as email and social media have enabled a more interactive way of communicating. But throughout the years, one constant has remained. While we do not expect the systems to live on, we do want the data in them to be available to future generations.

  2. Nonlinear response of driven systems in weak turbulence theory

    SciTech Connect

    Berk, H.L.; Breizman, B.N.; Fitzpatrick, J.; Pekker, M.S.; Wong, H.V.; Wong, K.L.

    1995-11-01

    A method is presented for predicting the saturation levels and particle transport in weakly unstable systems where there are a discrete number of modes. Conditions are established for either steady state or pulsating responses when several modes are excited for cases where there is and there is not resonance overlap. The conditions for achieving different levels of saturation are discussed. Depending on details, the saturation level can be quite low, where only a small fraction of the available free energy is released to waves, or the saturation level can be quite high, with almost a complete conversion of free energy to wave energy coupled with rapid transport.

  3. Boundary driven open quantum many-body systems

    SciTech Connect

    Prosen, Tomaž

    2014-01-08

    In this lecture course I outline a simple paradigm of non-eqjuilibrium quantum statistical physics, namely we shall study quantum lattice systems with local, Hamiltonian (conservative) interactions which are coupled to the environment via incoherent processes only at the system's boundaries. This is arguably the simplest nontrivial context where one can study far from equilibrium steady states and their transport properties. We shall formulate the problem in terms of a many-body Markovian master equation (the so-called Lindblad equation, and some of its extensions, e.g. the Redfield eqaution). The lecture course consists of two main parts: Firstly, and most extensively we shall present canonical Liouville-space many-body formalism, the so-called 'third quantization' and show how it can be implemented to solve bi-linear open many-particle problems, the key peradigmatic examples being the XY spin 1/2 chains or quasi-free bosonic (or harmonic) chains. Secondly, we shall outline several recent approaches on how to approach exactly solvable open quantum interacting many-body problems, such as anisotropic Heisenberg ((XXZ) spin chain or fermionic Hubbard chain.

  4. Antimatter Driven P-B11 Fusion Propulsion System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kammash, Terry; Martin, James; Godfroy, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    One of the major advantages of using P-B11 fusion fuel is that the reaction produces only charged particles in the form of three alpha particles and no neutrons. A fusion concept that lends itself to this fuel cycle is the Magnetically Insulated Inertial Confinement Fusion (MICF) reactor whose distinct advantage lies in the very strong magnetic field that is created when an incident particle (or laser) beam strikes the inner wall of the target pellet. This field serves to thermally insulate the hot plasma from the metal wall thereby allowing thc plasma to burn for a long time and produce a large energy magnification. If used as a propulsion device, we propose using antiprotons to drive the system which we show to be capable of producing very large specific impulse and thrust. By way of validating the confinement propenies of MICF we will address a proposed experiment in which pellets coated with P-B11 fuel at the appropriate ratio will be zapped by a beam of antiprotons that enter the target through a hole. Calculations showing the density and temperature of the generated plasma along with the strength of the magnetic field and other properties of the system will be presented and discussed.

  5. Two-level systems driven by large-amplitude fields

    SciTech Connect

    Ashhab, S.; Johansson, J. R.; Zagoskin, A. M.; Nori, Franco

    2007-06-15

    We analyze the dynamics of a two-level system subject to driving by large-amplitude external fields, focusing on the resonance properties in the case of driving around the region of avoided level crossing. In particular, we consider three main questions that characterize resonance dynamics: (1) the resonance condition (2) the frequency of the resulting oscillations on resonance, and (3) the width of the resonance. We identify the regions of validity of different approximations. In a large region of the parameter space, we use a geometric picture in order to obtain both a simple understanding of the dynamics and quantitative results. The geometric approach is obtained by dividing the evolution into discrete time steps, with each time step described by either a phase shift on the basis states or a coherent mixing process corresponding to a Landau-Zener crossing. We compare the results of the geometric picture with those of a rotating wave approximation. We also comment briefly on the prospects of employing strong driving as a useful tool to manipulate two-level systems.

  6. A bioreactor system for the nitrogen loop in a controlled ecological life support system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saulmon, M. M.; Reardon, K. F.; Sadeh, W. Z.

    1996-01-01

    As space missions become longer in duration, the need to recycle waste into useful compounds rises dramatically. This problem can be addressed by the development of Controlled Ecological Life Support Systems (CELSS) (i.e., Engineered Closed/ Controlled Eco-Systems (ECCES)), consisting of human and plant modules. One of the waste streams leaving the human module is urine. In addition to the reclamation of water from urine, recovery of the nitrogen is important because it is an esssential nutrient for the plant module. A 3-step biological process for the recycling of nitrogenous waste (urea) is proposed. A packed-bed bioreactor system for this purpose was modeled, and the issues of reaction step segregation, reactor type and volume, support particle size, and pressure drop were addressed. Based on minimization of volume, a bioreactor system consisting of a plug flow immobilized urease reactor, a completely mixed flow immobilized cell reactor to convert ammonia to nitrite, and a plug flow immobilized cell reactor to produce nitrate from nitrite is recommended. It is apparent that this 3-step bioprocess meets the requirements for space applications.

  7. A bioreactor system for the nitrogen loop in a Controlled Ecological Life Support System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saulmon, M. M.; Reardon, K. F.; Sadeh, W. Z.

    1996-01-01

    As space missions become longer in duration, the need to recycle waste into useful compounds rises dramatically. This problem can be addressed by the development of Controlled Ecological Life Support Systems (CELSS) (i.e., Engineered Closed/Controlled Eco-Systems (ECCES)), consisting of human and plant modules. One of the waste streams leaving the human module is urine. In addition to the reclamation of water from urine, recovery of the nitrogen is important because it is an essential nutrient for the plant module. A 3-step biological process for the recycling of nitrogenous waste (urea) is proposed. A packed-bed bioreactor system for this purpose was modeled, and the issues of reaction step segregation, reactor type and volume, support particle size, and pressure drop were addressed. Based on minimization of volume, a bioreactor system consisting of a plug flow immobilized urease reactor, a completely mixed flow immobilized cell reactor to convert ammonia to nitrite, and a plug flow immobilized cell reactor to produce nitrate from nitrite is recommended. It is apparent that this 3-step bioprocess meets the requirements for space applications.

  8. A system of counteracting feedback loops regulates Cdc42p activity during spontaneous cell polarization.

    PubMed

    Ozbudak, Ertugrul M; Becskei, Attila; van Oudenaarden, Alexander

    2005-10-01

    Cellular polarization is often a response to distinct extracellular or intracellular cues, such as nutrient gradients or cortical landmarks. However, in the absence of such cues, some cells can still select a polarization axis at random. Positive feedback loops promoting localized activation of the GTPase Cdc42p are central to this process in budding yeast. Here, we explore spontaneous polarization during bud site selection in mutant yeast cells that lack functional landmarks. We find that these cells do not select a single random polarization axis, but continuously change this axis during the G1 phase of the cell cycle. This is reflected in traveling waves of activated Cdc42p which randomly explore the cell periphery. Our integrated computational and in vivo analyses of these waves reveal a negative feedback loop that competes with the aforementioned positive feedback loops to regulate Cdc42p activity and confer dynamic responsiveness on the robust initiation of cell polarization.

  9. Challenge-Driven Attention: Interacting Frontal and Brainstem Systems

    PubMed Central

    Raizada, Rajeev D. S.; Poldrack, Russell A.

    2007-01-01

    The world is an unpredictable place, presenting challenges that fluctuate from moment to moment. However, the neural systems for responding to such challenges are far from fully understood. Using fMRI, we studied an audiovisual task in which the trials' difficulty and onset times varied unpredictably. Two regions were found to increase their activation for challenging trials, with their activities strongly correlated: right frontal cortex and the brainstem. The frontal area matched regions found in previous human studies of cognitive control, and activated in a graded manner with increasing task difficulty. The brainstem responded only to the most difficult trials, showing a phasic activity pattern paralleling locus coeruleus recordings in monkeys. These results reveal a bridge between animal and human studies, and suggest interacting roles for the brainstem and right frontal cortex: the brainstem may signal that an attentional challenge is occurring, while right frontal cortex allocates cognitive resources in response. PMID:18958217

  10. Generation of squeezing in a driven many-body system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hebbe Madhusudhana, Bharath; Boguslawski, Matthew; Anquez, Martin; Robbins, Bryce; Barrios, Maryrose; Hoang, Thai; Chapman, Michael

    2016-05-01

    In a spin-1 Bose-Einstein condensate, the non-linear spin-dependent collisional interactions can create entanglement and squeezing. Typically, the condensate is initialized at an unstable fixed point of the phase space, and subsequent free evolution under a time-independent Hamiltonian creates the squeezed state. Alternatively, it is possible to generate squeezing by driving the system localized at a stable fixed point. Here, we demonstrate that periodic modulation of the Hamiltonian can generate highly squeezed states. Our measurements show -5 dB of squeezing, limited by the detection, but calculations indicate that a theoretical potential of -20 dB of squeezing. We discuss the advantages of this method compared with the typical techniques.

  11. Dynamical Symmetry Breaking and Phase Transitions in Driven Diffusive Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, Yongjoo; Kafri, Yariv; Lecomte, Vivien

    2017-01-01

    We study the probability distribution of a current flowing through a diffusive system connected to a pair of reservoirs at its two ends. Sufficient conditions for the occurrence of a host of possible phase transitions both in and out of equilibrium are derived. These transitions manifest themselves as singularities in the large deviation function, resulting in enhanced current fluctuations. Microscopic models which implement each of the scenarios are presented, with possible experimental realizations. Depending on the model, the singularity is associated either with a particle-hole symmetry breaking, which leads to a continuous transition, or in the absence of the symmetry with a first-order phase transition. An exact Landau theory which captures the different singular behaviors is derived.

  12. Colloquium: Homochirality: Symmetry breaking in systems driven far from equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Yukio; Hyuga, Hiroyuki

    2013-04-01

    Subsequent to the discovery of chirality of organic molecules by Pasteur, living organisms have been found to utilize biomolecules of only one handedness. The origin of this homochirality in life still remains unknown. It is believed that homochirality is attained in two stages: the initial creation of a chirality bias and its subsequent amplification to pure chirality. In the last two decades, two novel experiments have established the second stage in different fields: Soai and co-workers achieved the amplification of enantiomeric excess in the production of chiral organic molecules, and Viedma obtained homochirality in the solution growth of sodium chlorate crystals. These experiments are explained by a theory with a nonlinear evolution equation for the chiral order parameter; nonlinear processes in reactions or in crystal growth induce enantiomeric excess amplification, and the recycling of achiral elements ensures homochirality. Recycling drives the system to a state far from equilibrium with a free energy higher than that of the equilibrium state.

  13. Broadband EM radiation amplification by means of a monochromatically driven two-level system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soldatov, Andrey V.

    2017-02-01

    It is shown that a two-level quantum system possessing dipole moment operator with permanent non-equal diagonal matrix elements and driven by external semiclassical monochromatic high-frequency electromagnetic (EM) (laser) field can amplify EM radiation waves of much lower frequency.

  14. Laser frequency down-conversion by means of a monochromatically driven two-level system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soldatov, Andrey V.

    2016-09-01

    Conditions are found under which a simple two-level quantum system possessing dipole moment operator with permanent non-equal diagonal matrix elements and driven by external semiclassical monochromatic high-frequency EM (laser) field can radiate continuously at much lower frequency. Possible ways to experimental observation and practical implementation of the predicted effect for a wide range of applications are discussed.

  15. Legislation for a Demand-Driven System. Go8 Backgrounder 22

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Group of Eight (NJ1), 2011

    2011-01-01

    One of several important pieces of higher education legislation in Parliament in 2011 is the "Higher Education Support Act Amendment ("Demand-Driven System and Other Measures") Bill". As its title makes clear, this Bill is intended to bring into effect the Government's commitment (announced in March 2009) to uncap the supply of…

  16. Quantum-classical correspondence principles for locally nonequilibrium driven systems.

    PubMed

    Smith, Eric

    2008-02-01

    Many of the core concepts and (especially field-theoretic) tools of statistical mechanics have developed within the context of thermodynamic equilibrium, where state variables are all taken to be charges, meaning that their values are inherently preserved under reversal of the direction of time. A principle concern of nonequilibrium statistical mechanics is to understand the emergence and stability of currents, quantities whose values change sign under time reversal. Whereas the correspondence between classical charge-valued state variables and their underlying statistical or quantum ensembles is quite well understood, the study of currents away from equilibrium has been more fragmentary, with classical descriptions relying on the asymmetric auxiliary-field formalism of Martin, Siggia, and Rose (and often restricted to the Markovian assumption of Doi and Peliti), while quantum descriptions employ a symmetric two-field formalism introduced by Schwinger and further clarified by Keldysh. In this paper we demonstrate that for quantum ensembles in which superposition is not violated by very strong conditions of decoherence, there is a large natural generalization of the principles and tools of equilibrium, which not only admits but requires the introduction of current-valued state variables. For these systems, not only do Martin-Siggia-Rose (MSR) and Schwinger-Keldysh (SK) field methods both exist, in some cases they provide inequivalent classical and quantum descriptions of identical ensembles. With these systems for examples, we can both study the correspondence between classical and quantum descriptions of currents, and also clarify the nature of the mapping between the structurally homologous but interpretationally different MSR and SK formalisms.

  17. Effective Hamiltonians, prethermalization, and slow energy absorption in periodically driven many-body systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abanin, Dmitry A.; De Roeck, Wojciech; Ho, Wen Wei; Huveneers, François

    2017-01-01

    We establish some general dynamical properties of quantum many-body systems that are subject to a high-frequency periodic driving. We prove that such systems have a quasiconserved extensive quantity H*, which plays the role of an effective static Hamiltonian. The dynamics of the system (e.g., evolution of any local observable) is well approximated by the evolution with the Hamiltonian H* up to time τ*, which is exponentially large in the driving frequency. We further show that the energy absorption rate is exponentially small in the driving frequency. In cases where H* is ergodic, the driven system prethermalizes to a thermal state described by H* at intermediate times t ≲τ* , eventually heating up to an infinite-temperature state after times t ˜τ* . Our results indicate that rapidly driven many-body systems generically exhibit prethermalization and very slow heating. We briefly discuss implications for experiments which realize topological states by periodic driving.

  18. Temperature Profile of the Solution Vessel of an Accelerator-Driven Subcritical Fissile Solution System

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, Steven Karl; Determan, John C.

    2015-09-14

    Dynamic System Simulation (DSS) models of fissile solution systems have been developed and verified against a variety of historical configurations. DSS techniques have been applied specifically to subcritical accelerator-driven systems using fissile solution fuels of uranium. Initial DSS models were developed in DESIRE, a specialized simulation scripting language. In order to tailor the DSS models to specifically meet needs of system designers they were converted to a Visual Studio implementation, and one of these subsequently to National Instrument’s LabVIEW for human factors engineering and operator training. Specific operational characteristics of subcritical accelerator-driven systems have been examined using a DSS model tailored to this particular class using fissile fuel.

  19. System identification of dynamic closed-loop control of total peripheral resistance by arterial and cardiopulmonary baroreceptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolai Aljuri, A.; Bursac, Nenad; Marini, Robert; Cohen, Richard J.

    2001-08-01

    Prolonged exposure to microgravity in space flight missions (days) impairs the mechanisms responsible for defense of arterial blood pressure (ABP) and cardiac output (CO) against orthostatic stress in the post-flight period. The mechanisms responsible for the observed orthostatic intolerance are not yet completely understood. Additionally, effective counter measures to attenuate this pathophysiological response are not available. The aim of this study was to investigate the ability of our proposed system identification method to predict closed-loop dynamic changes in TPR induced by changes in mean arterial pressure (MAP) and right atrial pressure (RAP). For this purpose we designed and employed a novel experimental animal model for the examination of arterial and cardiopulmonary baroreceptors in the dynamic closed-loop control of total peripheral resistance (TPR), and applied system identification to the analysis of beat-to-beat fluctuations in the measured signals.

  20. Modeling and Compensation Design for a Power Hardware-in-the-Loop Simulation of an AC Distribution System

    SciTech Connect

    Ainsworth, Nathan; Hariri, Ali; Prabakar, Kumaraguru; Pratt, Annabelle; Baggu, Murali

    2016-11-21

    Power hardware-in-the-loop (PHIL) simulation, where actual hardware under text is coupled with a real-time digital model in closed loop, is a powerful tool for analyzing new methods of control for emerging distributed power systems. However, without careful design and compensation of the interface between the simulated and actual systems, PHIL simulations may exhibit instability and modeling inaccuracies. This paper addresses issues that arise in the PHIL simulation of a hardware battery inverter interfaced with a simulated distribution feeder. Both the stability and accuracy issues are modeled and characterized, and a methodology for design of PHIL interface compensation to ensure stability and accuracy is presented. The stability and accuracy of the resulting compensated PHIL simulation is then shown by experiment.

  1. Closed-loop control of a 2-D mems micromirror with sidewall electrodes for a laser scanning microscope system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hui; Chen, Albert; Jie Sun, Wei; Sun, Zhen Dong; Yeow, John TW

    2016-01-01

    This article presents the development and implementation of a robust nonlinear control scheme for a 2-D micromirror-based laser scanning microscope system. The presented control scheme, built around sliding mode control approach and augmented an adaptive algorithm, is proposed to improve the tracking accuracy in presence of cross-axis effect. The closed-loop controlled imaging system is developed through integrating a 2-D micromirror with sidewall electrodes (SW), a laser source, NI field-programmable gate array (FPGA) hardware, the optics, position sensing detector (PSD) and photo detector (PD). The experimental results demonstrated that the proposed scheme is able to achieve accurate tracking of a reference triangular signal. Compared with open-loop control, the scanning performance is significantly improved, and a better 2-D image is obtained using the micromirror with the proposed scheme.

  2. System identification of dynamic closed-loop control of total peripheral resistance by arterial and cardiopulmonary baroreceptors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aljuri, A. N.; Bursac, N.; Marini, R.; Cohen, R. J.

    2001-01-01

    Prolonged exposure to microgravity in space flight missions (days) impairs the mechanisms responsible for defense of arterial blood pressure (ABP) and cardiac output (CO) against orthostatic stress in the post-flight period. The mechanisms responsible for the observed orthostatic intolerance are not yet completely understood. Additionally, effective counter measures to attenuate this pathophysiological response are not available. The aim of this study was to investigate the ability of our proposed system identification method to predict closed-loop dynamic changes in TPR induced by changes in mean arterial pressure (MAP) and right atrial pressure (RAP). For this purpose we designed and employed a novel experimental animal model for the examination of arterial and cardiopulmonary baroreceptors in the dynamic closed-loop control of total peripheral resistance (TPR), and applied system identification to the analysis of beat-to-beat fluctuations in the measured signals. Grant numbers: NAG5-4989. c 2001. Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Density functional theory study on activity of α-Fe 2O 3 in chemical-looping combustion system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Changqing; Sheng, Shuhui; Qin, Wu; Lu, Qiang; Zhao, Ying; Wang, Xiaoqiang; Zhang, Junjiao

    2011-08-01

    The dominant growth planes (0 0 0 1) and (1 1 0 2) have been used to investigate the activity of the natural α-Fe 2O 3 in chemical-looping combustion system based on density functional theory (DFT) calculations. In the chemical-looping combustion system, CO is selected as the probe fuel gas to detect the activities of the different surfaces. CO interacts stronger to Fe 2O 3 (1 1 0 2) than Fe 2O 3 (0 0 0 1). CO can be oxidized into CO 2 species directly on Fe 2O 3 (1 1 0 2) rather than Fe 2O 3 (0 0 0 1). The formation of CO 2 accompanying with a transformation from hematite to magnetite acted as the key step for the reduction process of hematite.

  4. Flow characteristics of continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices in a novel open-loop system.

    PubMed

    Stanfield, J Ryan; Selzman, Craig H; Pardyjak, Eric R; Bamberg, Stacy

    2012-01-01

    Fluid-pumping technology is a mature engineering subject area with a well-documented knowledge base. However, the pump design optimization techniques accepted in industry are geared toward steady-state constant-flow conditions. In contrast, the implantation of a continuous-flow pump to aid the output of the human left ventricle subjects the device to perpetual variation. This study measures pressure-flow performance characteristics for both axial- and centrifugal continuous-flow rotary blood pumps across a wide range of pressure differential values under uniform conditions by means of a novel open-loop flow system. The axial-flow devices show lower hydraulic efficiency. All pumps yield best efficiency point at a head to flow coefficient ratio of approximately 1.7. The open-loop flow system accounts for the dynamic changes associated with human heart physiology and allows for more precise characterization of existing heart pumps and those in development.

  5. High Power Cyclotrons for Accelerator Driven System (ADS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calabretta, Luciano

    2012-03-01

    We present an accelerator module based on a injector cyclotron and a Superconducting Ring Cyclotron (SRC) able to accelerate H2+ molecules. H2+ molecules are extracted from the SRC stripping the binding electron by a thin carbon foil. The SRC will be able to deliver proton beam with maximum energy of 800 MeV and a maximum power of 8 MW. This module is forecasted for the DAEdALUS (Decay At rest Experiment for δcp At Laboratory for Underground Science) experiment, which is a neutrino experiment proposed by groups of MIT and Columbia University. Extensive beam dynamics studies have been carrying out in the last two years and proved the feasibility of the design. The use of H2+ molecules beam has three main advantages: 1) it reduces the space charge effects, 2) because of stripping extraction, it simplifies the extraction process w.r.t. single turn extraction and 3) we can extract more than one beam out of one SRC. A suitable upgraded version of the cyclotron module able to deliver up to 10MW beam is proposed to drive ADS. The accelerator system which is presented, consists of having three accelerators modules. Each SRC is equipped with two extraction systems delivering two beams each one with a power up to 5 MW. Each accelerator module, feeds both the two reactors at the same time. The three accelerators modules assure to maintain continuity in functioning of the two reactors. In normal operation, all the three accelerators module will deliver 6.6 MW each one, just in case one of the three accelerator module will be off, due to a fault or maintenance, the other two modules are pushed at maximum power of 10 MW. The superconducting magnetic sector of the SRC, as well as the normal conducting sector of the injector cyclotron, is calculated with the TOSCA module of OPERA3D. Here the main features of the injector cyclotron, of the SRC and the beam dynamic along the cyclotrons are presented.

  6. Adaptive Correlation Space Adjusted Open-Loop Tracking Approach for Vehicle Positioning with Global Navigation Satellite System in Urban Areas

    PubMed Central

    Ruan, Hang; Li, Jian; Zhang, Lei; Long, Teng

    2015-01-01

    For vehicle positioning with Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) in urban areas, open-loop tracking shows better performance because of its high sensitivity and superior robustness against multipath. However, no previous study has focused on the effects of the code search grid size on the code phase measurement accuracy of open-loop tracking. Traditional open-loop tracking methods are performed by the batch correlators with fixed correlation space. The code search grid size, which is the correlation space, is a constant empirical value and the code phase measuring accuracy will be largely degraded due to the improper grid size, especially when the signal carrier-to-noise density ratio (C/N0) varies. In this study, the Adaptive Correlation Space Adjusted Open-Loop Tracking Approach (ACSA-OLTA) is proposed to improve the code phase measurement dependent pseudo range accuracy. In ACSA-OLTA, the correlation space is adjusted according to the signal C/N0. The novel Equivalent Weighted Pseudo Range Error (EWPRE) is raised to obtain the optimal code search grid sizes for different C/N0. The code phase measuring errors of different measurement calculation methods are analyzed for the first time. The measurement calculation strategy of ACSA-OLTA is derived from the analysis to further improve the accuracy but reduce the correlator consumption. Performance simulation and real tests confirm that the pseudo range and positioning accuracy of ASCA-OLTA are better than the traditional open-loop tracking methods in the usual scenarios of urban area. PMID:26343683

  7. Magnetic viscosity: outbursts and outflows in accretion driven systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meintjes, P. J.; Breedt, E.

    In this paper magnetic viscosity is investigated in magnetized accretion discs. It will be shown that the effective coupling between the magnetic field of a slow-rotator and an accretion disc, can be a very effective mechanism to drive episodes of high mass accretion onto the surface of a compact object. Outside the corotation radius, angular momentum is effectively transferred outwards through a propeller-type process from the magnetospheric field and magnetic bubbles that are formed as a result of a Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, which can result in a centrifugal barrier and accumulation of disc matter outside the corotation radius which will become unstable at some point, triggering enhanced inward mass advection as a result of a magneto-gravitational instability. This may lead to periods of enhanced mass accretion and associated disc brightening, which may explain the dwarf novae phenomenon in certain disc accreting cataclysmic variables. This may be accompanied by mass outflows from the disc and possible non-thermal emission. The description of magnetic viscosity presented in this paper will rely on the values of two constants, i.e. the Hartmann and Reynolds numbers of the magnetized disc plasma. For both these numbers above unity, magnetic stresses in the disc can play a very important role in the kinematics of the plasma in disc accreting systems.

  8. Computational Fluid Dynamics of Acoustically Driven Bubble Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glosser, Connor; Lie, Jie; Dault, Daniel; Balasubramaniam, Shanker; Piermarocchi, Carlo

    2014-03-01

    The development of modalities for precise, targeted drug delivery has become increasingly important in medical care in recent years. Assemblages of microbubbles steered by acoustic pressure fields present one potential vehicle for such delivery. Modeling the collective response of multi-bubble systems to an intense, externally applied ultrasound field requires accurately capturing acoustic interactions between bubbles and the externally applied field, and their effect on the evolution of bubble kinetics. In this work, we present a methodology for multiphysics simulation based on an efficient transient boundary integral equation (TBIE) coupled with molecular dynamics (MD) to compute trajectories of multiple acoustically interacting bubbles in an ideal fluid under pulsed acoustic excitation. For arbitrary configurations of spherical bubbles, the TBIE solver self-consistently models transient surface pressure distributions at bubble-fluid interfaces due to acoustic interactions and relative potential flows induced by bubble motion. Forces derived from the resulting pressure distributions act as driving terms in the MD update at each timestep. The resulting method efficiently and accurately captures individual bubble dynamics for clouds containing up to hundreds of bubbles.

  9. Piezoelectric vibration-driven locomotion systems - Exploiting resonance and bistable dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Hongbin; Wang, K. W.

    2017-03-01

    While a piezoelectric-based vibration-driven system is an excellent candidate for actuating small-size crawling-type locomotion robots, it has the major drawback of limited stroke output that would severely constraint the system's locomotion performance. In this paper, to advance the state of the art, we propose two novel designs of piezoelectric vibration-driven locomotion systems. The first utilizes the resonant amplification concept, and the second explores the design of a bistable device. While these two ideas have been explored for piezoelectric actuation amplification in general, they have never been exploited for crawling-type robotic locomotion. Numerical analyses on both systems reveal that resonance and bistability can substantially increase the systems' average locomotion speed. Moreover, this research shows that with bistability, the system is able to output high average locomotion speed in a wider frequency band, possess multiple locomotion modes, and achieve fast switches among them. Through proof-of-concept prototypes, the predicted locomotion performance improvements brought by resonance and bistability are verified. Finally, the basin stability is evaluated to systematically describe the occurring probability of certain locomotion behavior of the bistable system, which would provide useful guideline to the design and control of bistable vibration-driven locomotion systems.

  10. Inhibition of a type III secretion system by the deletion of a short loop in one of its membrane proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Meshcheryakov, Vladimir A.; Kitao, Akio; Matsunami, Hideyuki; Samatey, Fadel A.

    2013-05-01

    Crystal structures of the cytoplasmic domain of FlhB from S. typhimurium and A. aeolicus were solved at 2.45 and 2.55 Å resolution, respectively. The deletion of a short loop in the cytoplasmic domain of Salmonella FlhB completely abolishes secretion by the type III secretion system. A molecular-dynamics simulation shows that the deletion of the loop affects the flexibility of a linker between the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of FlhB. The membrane protein FlhB is a highly conserved component of the flagellar secretion system. It is composed of an N-terminal transmembrane domain and a C-terminal cytoplasmic domain (FlhB{sub C}). Here, the crystal structures of FlhB{sub C} from Salmonella typhimurium and Aquifex aeolicus are described at 2.45 and 2.55 Å resolution, respectively. These flagellar FlhB{sub C} structures are similar to those of paralogues from the needle type III secretion system, with the major difference being in a linker that connects the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of FlhB. It was found that deletion of a short flexible loop in a globular part of Salmonella FlhB{sub C} leads to complete inhibition of secretion by the flagellar secretion system. Molecular-dynamics calculations demonstrate that the linker region is the most flexible part of FlhB{sub C} and that the deletion of the loop reduces this flexibility. These results are in good agreement with previous studies showing the importance of the linker in the function of FlhB and provide new insight into the relationship between the different parts of the FlhB{sub C} molecule.

  11. Effects of Transient Power Extraction on an Integrated Hardware-in-the-Loop Aircraft/Propulsion/Power System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-11-01

    time steps on the order of milliseconds), a thermal management model (on the order of seconds or minutes), and a flight mission controller (on the...order of hours). In this scenario, getting meaningful flight mission controller data would require the generator model to execute for hours of...its autopilot flight controller are used. A generator is used as the hardware component in the loop for the system-level studies. The next section

  12. A closed-loop biorefining system to convert organic residues into fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Rui

    This project delivers an energy positive and water neutral, closed-loop biorefining system that converts organic wastes into renewable energy and reduces the overall impacts on the environment. The research consisted of three major stages: The first stage of this project was conducted in an anaerobic co-digestion system. Effects of the ratio of dairy manure-to-food waste as well as operating temperature were tested on the performance of the co-digestion system. Results illustrated an increase in biogas productivity with the increase of supplemental food waste; fiber analysis revealed similar chemical composition (cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin) of final solid digestate regardless their different initial feedstock blends and digestion conditions. The molecular genetic analyses demonstrated that anaerobic methanogenic microorganisms were able to adjust their community assemblage to maximize biogas production and produce homogenized solid digestate. The second stage utilized electrocoagulation (EC) pretreated liquid digestate from previous stage to culture freshwater algae. Kinetics study showed a similar maximum growth rate (0.201-0.207 g TS day-1) in both 2x and 5x dilutions of EC solution; however, the algal growth was inhibited in original EC solution (1x), possibly due to the high ammonia-to-phosphate ratio. Algal community assemblage changed drastically in different dilutions of EC solution after a 9-day culture. The following semi-continuous culture in 2x and 5x EC media established steady biomass productivities and nitrogen removal rates; in addition, both conditions illustrated a phenomenon of phosphorus luxury uptake. Biomass composition analyses showed that algae cultured in medium containing higher nitrogen (2x EC medium) accumulated more protein but less carbohydrate and lipid than the 5x EC medium. The last stage involved hydrolyzing the algal biomass cultured in anaerobic digestion effluent and analyzing the effects of the neutralized algal

  13. Guaranteed robust stability of the closed-loop systems for digital controller implementations via orthogonal hermitian transform.

    PubMed

    Ko, Hsien-Ju; Yu, Wen-Shyong

    2004-08-01

    In this paper, an approach for robust stability analysis of a digital closed-loop system for digital controller implementations subject to finite word length (FWL) effects is proposed. Uncertainties caused by the roundoff and computational errors subject to FWL effects are expressed in function of mantissa bit number when the mode of floating-point arithmetic is used in the process. Then, based on the Small Gain Theorem and the Bellman-Grownwall Lemma, a sufficient stability criterion for the digital closed-loop system is derived. The eigenvalue sensitivity of the closed-loop system is developed in terms of mixed matrix-2/Frobenius norms. Then, by minimizing this eigenvalue sensitivity and using orthogonal Hermitian transform as well, an optimal similarity transformation can be obtained. By substituting this optimal transformation into the stability criterion, a minimum mantissa bit number used for implementing the stabilizing digital controllers can be determined. The main contributions are that this approach provides an analytical closed-form solution for obtaining the optimal transformation and, in addition to the stability criterion, leads to the implementation of the stabilizing controllers with a lower mantissa bit number when using this optimal one. Finally, detailed numerical design processes and simulation results are used to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed scheme.

  14. Possible use of spin-vortex-induced loop currents as qubits: A numerical simulation for two-qubit system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakaura, Hikaru; Koizumi, Hiroyasu

    2016-02-01

    We propose new qubits; they are nano-sized persistent loop currents called, the spin-vortex-induced loop currents (SVILCs), predicted to exist in hole doped cuprate superconductors in one of the proposed mechanisms of the cuprate superconductivity. In the SVILC theory for the cuprate superconductivity, the superconducting state arises when the network of SVILCs generates a macroscopic current as a collection of the loop currents. The predicted SVILC has a number of properties that are suitable for qubits: each SVILC is characterized by topological winding number, thus, expected to be robust against environmental perturbations; because of the smallness of their size, they can be assembled into a large qubit-number system in a small space. Energy levels of different current patterns of the SVILC system are split by an external inhomogeneous magnetic field, and they are used as qubit states. The quantum gate control is achieved by the Rabi oscillation using electric dipole transitions. We have calculated the transition dipole moments between different SVILC qubit states. Some of the calculated values are relatively large, around 10-30 C m. We have also performed a numerical simulation for the Glover's search algorithm using the two-qubit SVILC system. The search completes in a nanosecond order using the electromagnetic field with electric field amplitude 105 V/m. The present results indicate the quantum gate control capability of the SVILC qubits, and suggest the potentiality to satisfy DiVincenzo's criteria for quantum computers.

  15. Storm-driven pesticide dynamics in a catchment system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Rebecca; Freer, Jim; Michaelides, Katerina; Hurley, Steven; Howden, Nicholas; Bull, Ian

    2013-04-01

    hydrograph peaks indicating pesticides are moved directly from hillslopes to the fluvial environment by surface runoff. During storm events, individual pesticide concentrations in streams were found to be greater than 2 µg µl-1 in the dissolved phase. Depending on the compound chemical properties, some pesticides can also be transported adsorbed to sediments. Together, these processes generate elevated concentrations of pesticide in surface water systems and cause contamination by transport and deposition of pesticides in the lower reaches of the catchment.

  16. A new costing model in hospital management: time-driven activity-based costing system.

    PubMed

    Öker, Figen; Özyapıcı, Hasan

    2013-01-01

    Traditional cost systems cause cost distortions because they cannot meet the requirements of today's businesses. Therefore, a new and more effective cost system is needed. Consequently, time-driven activity-based costing system has emerged. The unit cost of supplying capacity and the time needed to perform an activity are the only 2 factors considered by the system. Furthermore, this system determines unused capacity by considering practical capacity. The purpose of this article is to emphasize the efficiency of the time-driven activity-based costing system and to display how it can be applied in a health care institution. A case study was conducted in a private hospital in Cyprus. Interviews and direct observations were used to collect the data. The case study revealed that the cost of unused capacity is allocated to both open and laparoscopic (closed) surgeries. Thus, by using the time-driven activity-based costing system, managers should eliminate the cost of unused capacity so as to obtain better results. Based on the results of the study, hospital management is better able to understand the costs of different surgeries. In addition, managers can easily notice the cost of unused capacity and decide how many employees to be dismissed or directed to other productive areas.

  17. Antenna servo control system characterization: Rate loop analysis for 34-m antenna at DSS 15

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nickerson, J. A.; Cox, D. G.; Smith, H. K.; Engel, J. H.; Ahlstrom, H. G.

    1986-01-01

    The elevation and azimuth servo rate loops at the 34-m High Efficiency Deep Space Station 15 (DSS 15) are described. Time and frequency response performance criteria were measured. The results are compared to theoretically deduced performance criteria. Unexpected anomalies in the frequency response are observed and identified.

  18. Early On-Orbit Operation of the Loop Heat Pipe System on the Swift BAT Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ottenstein, Laura; Ku, Jentung; Choi, Mike; Feenan, Dave

    2005-01-01

    The Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) is one of three instruments on the Swift satellite. Two Loop Heat Pipes (LHP's), one at either side of the BAT's Detector Array Plate (DAP), transfer heat to a common radiator for rejection to space. This viewgraph presentation provides information on LHP design for the BAT, and the performance of the LHPs in orbit.

  19. Simulation of the MELiSSA closed loop system as a tool to define its integration strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poughon, Laurent; Farges, Berangere; Dussap, Claude-Gilles; Godia, Francesc; Lasseur, Christophe

    Inspired from a terrestrial ecosystem, MELiSSA (Micro Ecological Life Support System Alternative) is a project of closed life support system future long-term manned missions (Moon and Mars bases). Started on ESA in 1989, this 5 compartments concept has evolved following a mechanistic engineering approach for acquiring both theoretical and technical knowledge. In its current state of development the project can now start to demonstrate the MELiSSA loop concept at a pilot scale. Thus an integration strategy for a MELiSSA Pilot Plant (MPP) was defined, describing the different phases for tests and connections between compartments. The integration steps should be started in 2008 and be completed with a complete operational loop in 2015, which final objective is to achieve a closed liquid and gas loop with 100 Although the integration logic could start with the most advanced processes in terms of knowledge and hardware development, this logic needs to be completed by high politic of simulation. Thanks to this simulation exercise, the effective demonstrations of each independent process and its progressive coupling with others will be performed in operational conditions as close as possible to the final configuration. The theoretical approach described in this paper is based on mass balance models of each of the MELiSSA biological compartments which are used to simulate each integration step and the complete MPP loop itself. These simulations will help to identify criticalities of each integration steps and to check the consistencies between objectives, flows, recycling efficiencies and sizing of the pilot reactors. A MPP scenario compatible with the current knowledge of the operation of the pilot reactors was investigated and the theoretical performances of the system compared to the objectives of the MPP. From this scenario the most important milestone steps in the integration are highlighted and their behaviour can be simulated.

  20. Design of a Closed-Loop, Bidirectional Brain Machine Interface System With Energy Efficient Neural Feature Extraction and PID Control.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xilin; Zhang, Milin; Richardson, Andrew G; Lucas, Timothy H; Van der Spiegel, Jan

    2016-12-16

    This paper presents a bidirectional brain machine interface (BMI) microsystem designed for closed-loop neuroscience research, especially experiments in freely behaving animals. The system-on-chip (SoC) consists of 16-channel neural recording front-ends, neural feature extraction units, 16-channel programmable neural stimulator back-ends, in-channel programmable closed-loop controllers, global analog-digital converters (ADC), and peripheral circuits. The proposed neural feature extraction units includes 1) an ultra low-power neural energy extraction unit enabling a 64-step natural logarithmic domain frequency tuning, and 2) a current-mode action potential (AP) detection unit with time-amplitude window discriminator. A programmable proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller has been integrated in each channel enabling a various of closed-loop operations. The implemented ADCs include a 10-bit voltage-mode successive approximation register (SAR) ADC for the digitization of the neural feature outputs and/or local field potential (LFP) outputs, and an 8-bit current-mode SAR ADC for the digitization of the action potential outputs. The multi-mode stimulator can be programmed to perform monopolar or bipolar, symmetrical or asymmetrical charge balanced stimulation with a maximum current of 4 mA in an arbitrary channel configuration. The chip has been fabricated in 0.18 μ m CMOS technology, occupying a silicon area of 3.7 mm (2). The chip dissipates 56 μW/ch on average. General purpose low-power microcontroller with Bluetooth module are integrated in the system to provide wireless link and SoC configuration. Methods, circuit techniques and system topology proposed in this work can be used in a wide range of relevant neurophysiology research, especially closed-loop BMI experiments.