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Sample records for loschmidt time reversal

  1. From Loschmidt daemons to time-reversed waves.

    PubMed

    Fink, Mathias

    2016-06-13

    Time-reversal invariance can be exploited in wave physics to control wave propagation in complex media. Because time and space play a similar role in wave propagation, time-reversed waves can be obtained by manipulating spatial boundaries or by manipulating time boundaries. The two dual approaches will be discussed in this paper. The first approach uses 'time-reversal mirrors' with a wave manipulation along a spatial boundary sampled by a finite number of antennas. Related to this method, the role of the spatio-temporal degrees of freedom of the wavefield will be emphasized. In a second approach, waves are manipulated from a time boundary and we show that 'instantaneous time mirrors', mimicking the Loschmidt point of view, simultaneously acting in the entire space at once can also radiate time-reversed waves. PMID:27140968

  2. Loschmidt echo and time reversal in complex systems.

    PubMed

    Goussev, Arseni; Jalabert, Rodolfo A; Pastawski, Horacio M; Wisniacki, Diego A

    2016-06-13

    Echoes are ubiquitous phenomena in several branches of physics, ranging from acoustics, optics, condensed matter and cold atoms to geophysics. They are at the base of a number of very useful experimental techniques, such as nuclear magnetic resonance, photon echo and time-reversal mirrors. Particularly interesting physical effects are obtained when the echo studies are performed on complex systems, either classically chaotic, disordered or many-body. Consequently, the term Loschmidt echo has been coined to designate and quantify the revival occurring when an imperfect time-reversal procedure is applied to a complex quantum system, or equivalently to characterize the stability of quantum evolution in the presence of perturbations. Here, we present the articles which discuss the work that has shaped the field in the past few years. PMID:27140977

  3. Loschmidt echo and time reversal in complex systems.

    PubMed

    Goussev, Arseni; Jalabert, Rodolfo A; Pastawski, Horacio M; Wisniacki, Diego A

    2016-06-13

    Echoes are ubiquitous phenomena in several branches of physics, ranging from acoustics, optics, condensed matter and cold atoms to geophysics. They are at the base of a number of very useful experimental techniques, such as nuclear magnetic resonance, photon echo and time-reversal mirrors. Particularly interesting physical effects are obtained when the echo studies are performed on complex systems, either classically chaotic, disordered or many-body. Consequently, the term Loschmidt echo has been coined to designate and quantify the revival occurring when an imperfect time-reversal procedure is applied to a complex quantum system, or equivalently to characterize the stability of quantum evolution in the presence of perturbations. Here, we present the articles which discuss the work that has shaped the field in the past few years.

  4. Loschmidt echo and time reversal in complex systems

    PubMed Central

    Goussev, Arseni; Jalabert, Rodolfo A.; Pastawski, Horacio M.; Wisniacki, Diego A.

    2016-01-01

    Echoes are ubiquitous phenomena in several branches of physics, ranging from acoustics, optics, condensed matter and cold atoms to geophysics. They are at the base of a number of very useful experimental techniques, such as nuclear magnetic resonance, photon echo and time-reversal mirrors. Particularly interesting physical effects are obtained when the echo studies are performed on complex systems, either classically chaotic, disordered or many-body. Consequently, the term Loschmidt echo has been coined to designate and quantify the revival occurring when an imperfect time-reversal procedure is applied to a complex quantum system, or equivalently to characterize the stability of quantum evolution in the presence of perturbations. Here, we present the articles which discuss the work that has shaped the field in the past few years. PMID:27140977

  5. Loschmidt echo in many-spin systems: contrasting time scales of local and global measurements.

    PubMed

    Zangara, Pablo R; Bendersky, Denise; Levstein, Patricia R; Pastawski, Horacio M

    2016-06-13

    A local excitation in a quantum many-spin system evolves deterministically. A time-reversal procedure, involving the inversion of the signs of every energy and interaction, should produce the excitation revival. This idea, experimentally coined in nuclear magnetic resonance, embodies the concept of the Loschmidt echo (LE). While such an implementation involves a single spin autocorrelation M(1,1), i.e. a local LE, theoretical efforts have focused on the study of the recovery probability of a complete many-body state, referred to here as global or many-body LE MMB Here, we analyse the relation between these magnitudes, with regard to their characteristic time scales and their dependence on the number of spins N We show that the global LE can be understood, to some extent, as the simultaneous occurrence of N independent local LEs, i.e. MMB∼(M(1,1))(N/4) This extensive hypothesis is exact for very short times and confirmed numerically beyond such a regime. Furthermore, we discuss a general picture of the decay of M1,1 as a consequence of the interplay between the time scale that characterizes the reversible interactions (T(2)) and that of the perturbation (τ(Σ)). Our analysis suggests that the short-time decay, characterized by the time scale τ(Σ), is greatly enhanced by the complex processes that occur beyond T(2) This would ultimately lead to the experimentally observed T(3), which was found to be roughly independent of τ(Σ) but closely tied to T(2). PMID:27140970

  6. Loschmidt echo in many-spin systems: contrasting time scales of local and global measurements.

    PubMed

    Zangara, Pablo R; Bendersky, Denise; Levstein, Patricia R; Pastawski, Horacio M

    2016-06-13

    A local excitation in a quantum many-spin system evolves deterministically. A time-reversal procedure, involving the inversion of the signs of every energy and interaction, should produce the excitation revival. This idea, experimentally coined in nuclear magnetic resonance, embodies the concept of the Loschmidt echo (LE). While such an implementation involves a single spin autocorrelation M(1,1), i.e. a local LE, theoretical efforts have focused on the study of the recovery probability of a complete many-body state, referred to here as global or many-body LE MMB Here, we analyse the relation between these magnitudes, with regard to their characteristic time scales and their dependence on the number of spins N We show that the global LE can be understood, to some extent, as the simultaneous occurrence of N independent local LEs, i.e. MMB∼(M(1,1))(N/4) This extensive hypothesis is exact for very short times and confirmed numerically beyond such a regime. Furthermore, we discuss a general picture of the decay of M1,1 as a consequence of the interplay between the time scale that characterizes the reversible interactions (T(2)) and that of the perturbation (τ(Σ)). Our analysis suggests that the short-time decay, characterized by the time scale τ(Σ), is greatly enhanced by the complex processes that occur beyond T(2) This would ultimately lead to the experimentally observed T(3), which was found to be roughly independent of τ(Σ) but closely tied to T(2).

  7. Microscopic time-reversibility and macroscopic irreversibility: Still a paradox

    SciTech Connect

    Posch, H.A.; Dellago, Ch.; Hoover, W.G.; Kum, O. |

    1995-09-13

    Microscopic time reversibility and macroscopic irreversibility are a paradoxical combination. This was first observed by J. Loschmidt in 1876 and was explained, for conservative systems, by L. Boltzmann the following year. Both these features are also present in modern simulations of classic many-body systems in steady nonequilibrium states. We illustrate them here for the simplest possible models, a continuous one-dimensional model of field-driven diffusion, the so-called driven Lorentz gas or Galton Board, and an ergodic time reversible dissipative map.

  8. The two Loschmidt daemons and the origin of infidelity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastawski, Horacio M.; Danieli, Ernesto P.; Foa Torres, Luis F. F.

    2004-03-01

    In an open quantum system a local excitation spreads away. Producing a Loschmidt Echo (LE) requires the action of a mechanism called a Loschmidt daemon. An actual realization of one of such creatures, which we dubbed the hasty daemon, is an instantaneous action with global effect: the change in the sign of the Hamiltonian. The chaotic nature of a many-body dynamics produces a fragility to perturbations that degrades the fidelity of the evolution and limits the LE formation [1]. An alternative, the stubborn daemon, is inspired in the acoustic time reversal mirror [2] which through a persistent local action of reinjection of wave function amplitude can produce a backward propagation. Although its theoretical description is not yet fully developed, the procedure is known to be quite robust. We use the Keldysh formalism to prescribe the injection required for a perfect LE. We also use a semiclassical approximation to discuss why chaos in the underlying classical system favors the action of this stubborn daemon.[1] P. R. Levstein, et al. J. Chem. Phys.108, 2718 (1998);[2] A. Tourin, et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 87, 274301 (2001)

  9. Quantum Operation Time Reversal

    SciTech Connect

    Crooks, Gavin E.

    2008-03-25

    The dynamics of an open quantum system can be described by a quantum operation: A linear, complete positive map of operators. Here, I exhibit a compact expression for the time reversal of a quantum operation, which is closely analogous to the time reversal of a classical Markov transition matrix. Since open quantum dynamics are stochastic, and not, in general, deterministic, the time reversal is not, in general, an inversion of the dynamics. Rather, the system relaxes toward equilibrium in both the forward and reverse time directions. The probability of a quantum trajectory and the conjugate, time reversed trajectory are related by the heat exchanged with the environment.

  10. Loschmidt echo in one-dimensional interacting Bose gases

    SciTech Connect

    Lelas, K.; Seva, T.; Buljan, H.

    2011-12-15

    We explore Loschmidt echo in two regimes of one-dimensional interacting Bose gases: the strongly interacting Tonks-Girardeau (TG) regime, and the weakly interacting mean-field regime. We find that the Loschmidt echo of a TG gas decays as a Gaussian when small (random and time independent) perturbations are added to the Hamiltonian. The exponent is proportional to the number of particles and the magnitude of a small perturbation squared. In the mean-field regime the Loschmidt echo shows richer behavior: it decays faster for larger nonlinearity, and the decay becomes more abrupt as the nonlinearity increases; it can be very sensitive to the particular realization of the noise potential, especially for relatively small nonlinearities.

  11. Theory of Quantum Loschmidt Echoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prosen, T.; Seligman, T. H.; Žnidarič, M.

    In this paper we review our recent work on the theoretical approach to quantum Loschmidt echoes, i.e., various properties of the so-called echo dynamics -- the composition of forward and backward time evolutions generated by two slightly different Hamiltonians, such as the state autocorrelation function (fidelity) and the purity of a reduced density matrix traced over a subsystem (purity fidelity). Our main theoretical result is a linear response formalism, expressing the fidelity and purity fidelity in terms of integrated time autocorrelation function of the generator of the perturbation. Surprisingly, this relation predicts that the decay of fidelity is the slower the faster the decay of correlations. In particular for a static (time-independent) perturbation, and for non-ergodic and non-mixing dynamics where asymptotic decay of correlations is absent, a qualitatively different and faster decay of fidelity is predicted on a time scale ∝ 1/δ as opposed to mixing dynamics where the fidelity is found to decay exponentially on a time-scale ∝ 1/δ2, where δ is a strength of perturbation. A detailed discussion of a semi-classical regime of small effective values of Planck constant hbar is given where classical correlation functions can be used to predict quantum fidelity decay. Note that the correct and intuitively expected classical stability behavior is recovered in the classical limit hbarto 0, as the two limits δto 0 and hbarto 0 do not commute. The theoretical results are demonstrated numerically for two models, the quantized kicked top and the multi-level Jaynes Cummings model. Our method can for example be applied to the stability analysis of quantum computation and quantum information processing.

  12. Spreading of correlations and Loschmidt echo after quantum quenches of a Bose gas in the Aubry-André potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo Gullo, Nicola; Dell'Anna, Luca

    2015-12-01

    We study the spreading of density-density correlations and the Loschmidt echo, after different sudden quenches in an interacting one-dimensional Bose gas on a lattice, also in the presence of a superimposed aperiodic potential. We use a time dependent Bogoliubov approach to calculate the evolution of the correlation functions and employ the linked cluster expansion to derive the Loschmidt echo.

  13. Time reversal communication system

    DOEpatents

    Candy, James V.; Meyer, Alan W.

    2008-12-02

    A system of transmitting a signal through a channel medium comprises digitizing the signal, time-reversing the digitized signal, and transmitting the signal through the channel medium. The channel medium may be air, earth, water, tissue, metal, and/or non-metal.

  14. Transient Loschmidt echo in quenched Ising chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupo, Carla; Schiró, Marco

    2016-07-01

    We study the response to sudden local perturbations of highly excited quantum Ising spin chains. The key quantity encoding this response is the overlap between time-dependent wave functions, which we write as a transient Loschmidt Echo. Its asymptotics at long time differences contain crucial information about the structure of the highly excited nonequilibrium environment induced by the quench. We compute the echo perturbatively for a weak local quench but for arbitrarily large global quench, using a cumulant expansion. Our perturbative results suggest that the echo decays exponentially, rather than power law as in the low-energy orthogonality catastrophe, a further example of quench-induced decoherence already found in the case of quenched Luttinger liquids. The emerging decoherence scale is set by the strength of the local potential and the bulk excitation energy.

  15. Loschmidt echo for quantum metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macrı, Tommaso; Smerzi, Augusto; Pezzè, Luca

    2016-07-01

    We propose a versatile Loschmidt echo protocol to detect and quantify multiparticle entanglement. It allows us to extract the quantum Fisher information for arbitrary pure states, and finds direct application in quantum metrology. In particular, the protocol applies to states that are generally difficult to characterize, as non-Gaussian states, and states that are not symmetric under particle exchange. We focus on atomic systems, including trapped ions, polar molecules, and Rydberg atoms, where entanglement is generated dynamically via long-range interaction, and show that the protocol is stable against experimental detection errors.

  16. Loschmidt Echo in a System of Interacting Electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Manfredi, G.; Hervieux, P.-A.

    2006-11-10

    We study the Loschmidt echo for a system of electrons interacting through mean-field Coulomb forces. The electron gas is modeled by a self-consistent set of hydrodynamic equations. It is observed that the quantum fidelity drops abruptly after a time that is proportional to the logarithm of the perturbation amplitude. The fidelity drop is related to the breakdown of the symmetry properties of the wave function.

  17. Time Reversal Violation

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, H; /SLAC

    2009-01-27

    This talk briefly reviews three types of time-asymmetry in physics, which I classify as universal, macroscopic and microscopic. Most of the talk is focused on the latter, namely the violation of T-reversal invariance in particle physics theories. In sum tests of microscopic T-invariance, or observations of its violation, are limited by the fact that, while we can measure many processes, only in very few cases can we construct a matched pair of process and inverse process and observe it with sufficient sensitivity to make a test. In both the cases discussed here we can achieve an observable T violation making use of flavor tagging, and in the second case also using the quantum properties of an antisymmetric coherent state of two B mesons to construct a CP-tag. Both these tagging properties depend only on very general properties of the flavor and/or CP quantum numbers and so provide model independent tests for T-invariance violations. The microscopic laws of physics are very close to T-symmetric. There are small effects that give CP- and T-violating processes in three-generation-probing weak decays. Where a T-violating observable can be constructed we see the relationships between T-violation and CP-violation expected in a CPT conserving theory. These microscopic effects are unrelated to the 'arrow of time' that is defined by increasing entropy, or in the time direction defined by the expansion of our Universe.

  18. Experimental quantification of decoherence via the Loschmidt echo in a many spin system with scaled dipolar Hamiltonians

    SciTech Connect

    Buljubasich, Lisandro; Dente, Axel D.; Levstein, Patricia R.; Chattah, Ana K.; Pastawski, Horacio M.; Sánchez, Claudia M.

    2015-10-28

    We performed Loschmidt echo nuclear magnetic resonance experiments to study decoherence under a scaled dipolar Hamiltonian by means of a symmetrical time-reversal pulse sequence denominated Proportionally Refocused Loschmidt (PRL) echo. The many-spin system represented by the protons in polycrystalline adamantane evolves through two steps of evolution characterized by the secular part of the dipolar Hamiltonian, scaled down with a factor |k| and opposite signs. The scaling factor can be varied continuously from 0 to 1/2, giving access to a range of complexity in the dynamics. The experimental results for the Loschmidt echoes showed a spreading of the decay rates that correlate directly to the scaling factors |k|, giving evidence that the decoherence is partially governed by the coherent dynamics. The average Hamiltonian theory was applied to give an insight into the spin dynamics during the pulse sequence. The calculations were performed for every single radio frequency block in contrast to the most widely used form. The first order of the average Hamiltonian numerically computed for an 8-spin system showed decay rates that progressively decrease as the secular dipolar Hamiltonian becomes weaker. Notably, the first order Hamiltonian term neglected by conventional calculations yielded an explanation for the ordering of the experimental decoherence rates. However, there is a strong overall decoherence observed in the experiments which is not reflected by the theoretical results. The fact that the non-inverted terms do not account for this effect is a challenging topic. A number of experiments to further explore the relation of the complete Hamiltonian with this dominant decoherence rate are proposed.

  19. Experimental quantification of decoherence via the Loschmidt echo in a many spin system with scaled dipolar Hamiltonians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buljubasich, Lisandro; Sánchez, Claudia M.; Dente, Axel D.; Levstein, Patricia R.; Chattah, Ana K.; Pastawski, Horacio M.

    2015-10-01

    We performed Loschmidt echo nuclear magnetic resonance experiments to study decoherence under a scaled dipolar Hamiltonian by means of a symmetrical time-reversal pulse sequence denominated Proportionally Refocused Loschmidt (PRL) echo. The many-spin system represented by the protons in polycrystalline adamantane evolves through two steps of evolution characterized by the secular part of the dipolar Hamiltonian, scaled down with a factor |k| and opposite signs. The scaling factor can be varied continuously from 0 to 1/2, giving access to a range of complexity in the dynamics. The experimental results for the Loschmidt echoes showed a spreading of the decay rates that correlate directly to the scaling factors |k|, giving evidence that the decoherence is partially governed by the coherent dynamics. The average Hamiltonian theory was applied to give an insight into the spin dynamics during the pulse sequence. The calculations were performed for every single radio frequency block in contrast to the most widely used form. The first order of the average Hamiltonian numerically computed for an 8-spin system showed decay rates that progressively decrease as the secular dipolar Hamiltonian becomes weaker. Notably, the first order Hamiltonian term neglected by conventional calculations yielded an explanation for the ordering of the experimental decoherence rates. However, there is a strong overall decoherence observed in the experiments which is not reflected by the theoretical results. The fact that the non-inverted terms do not account for this effect is a challenging topic. A number of experiments to further explore the relation of the complete Hamiltonian with this dominant decoherence rate are proposed.

  20. Experimental quantification of decoherence via the Loschmidt echo in a many spin system with scaled dipolar Hamiltonians.

    PubMed

    Buljubasich, Lisandro; Sánchez, Claudia M; Dente, Axel D; Levstein, Patricia R; Chattah, Ana K; Pastawski, Horacio M

    2015-10-28

    We performed Loschmidt echo nuclear magnetic resonance experiments to study decoherence under a scaled dipolar Hamiltonian by means of a symmetrical time-reversal pulse sequence denominated Proportionally Refocused Loschmidt (PRL) echo. The many-spin system represented by the protons in polycrystalline adamantane evolves through two steps of evolution characterized by the secular part of the dipolar Hamiltonian, scaled down with a factor |k| and opposite signs. The scaling factor can be varied continuously from 0 to 1/2, giving access to a range of complexity in the dynamics. The experimental results for the Loschmidt echoes showed a spreading of the decay rates that correlate directly to the scaling factors |k|, giving evidence that the decoherence is partially governed by the coherent dynamics. The average Hamiltonian theory was applied to give an insight into the spin dynamics during the pulse sequence. The calculations were performed for every single radio frequency block in contrast to the most widely used form. The first order of the average Hamiltonian numerically computed for an 8-spin system showed decay rates that progressively decrease as the secular dipolar Hamiltonian becomes weaker. Notably, the first order Hamiltonian term neglected by conventional calculations yielded an explanation for the ordering of the experimental decoherence rates. However, there is a strong overall decoherence observed in the experiments which is not reflected by the theoretical results. The fact that the non-inverted terms do not account for this effect is a challenging topic. A number of experiments to further explore the relation of the complete Hamiltonian with this dominant decoherence rate are proposed.

  1. Time-Reversal Violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernabéu, José; Martínez-Vidal, Fernando

    2015-10-01

    The violation of CP symmetry between matter and antimatter in the neutral K and B meson systems is well established, with a high degree of consistency between all available experimental measurements and with the Standard Model of particle physics. On the basis of the up-to-now-unbroken CPT symmetry, the violation of CP symmetry strongly suggests that the behavior of these particles under weak interactions must also be asymmetric under time reversal T. Many searches for T violation have been performed and proposed using different observables and experimental approaches. These include T-odd observables, such as triple products in weak decays, and genuine observables, such as permanent electric dipole moments of nondegenerate stationary states and the breaking of the reciprocity relation. We discuss the conceptual basis of the required exchange of initial and final states with unstable particles, using quantum entanglement and the decay as a filtering measurement, for the case of neutral B and K mesons. Using this method, the BaBar experiment at SLAC has clearly observed T violation in B mesons.

  2. Dynamical phase transitions and Loschmidt echo in the infinite-range XY model.

    PubMed

    Žunkovič, Bojan; Silva, Alessandro; Fabrizio, Michele

    2016-06-13

    We compare two different notions of dynamical phase transitions in closed quantum systems. The first is identified through the time-averaged value of the equilibrium-order parameter, whereas the second corresponds to non-analyticities in the time behaviour of the Loschmidt echo. By exactly solving the dynamics of the infinite-range XY model, we show that in this model non-analyticities of the Loschmidt echo are not connected to standard dynamical phase transitions and are not robust against quantum fluctuations. Furthermore, we show that the existence of either of the two dynamical transitions is not necessarily connected to the equilibrium quantum phase transition.

  3. Dynamical phase transitions and Loschmidt echo in the infinite-range XY model.

    PubMed

    Žunkovič, Bojan; Silva, Alessandro; Fabrizio, Michele

    2016-06-13

    We compare two different notions of dynamical phase transitions in closed quantum systems. The first is identified through the time-averaged value of the equilibrium-order parameter, whereas the second corresponds to non-analyticities in the time behaviour of the Loschmidt echo. By exactly solving the dynamics of the infinite-range XY model, we show that in this model non-analyticities of the Loschmidt echo are not connected to standard dynamical phase transitions and are not robust against quantum fluctuations. Furthermore, we show that the existence of either of the two dynamical transitions is not necessarily connected to the equilibrium quantum phase transition. PMID:27140975

  4. Origin of the exponential decay of the Loschmidt echo in integrable systems.

    PubMed

    Dubertrand, Rémy; Goussev, Arseni

    2014-02-01

    We address the time decay of the Loschmidt echo, measuring the sensitivity of quantum dynamics to small Hamiltonian perturbations, in one-dimensional integrable systems. Using a semiclassical analysis, we show that the Loschmidt echo may exhibit a well-pronounced regime of exponential decay, similar to the one typically observed in quantum systems whose dynamics is chaotic in the classical limit. We derive an explicit formula for the exponential decay rate in terms of the spectral properties of the unperturbed and perturbed Hamilton operators and the initial state. In particular, we show that the decay rate, unlike in the case of the chaotic dynamics, is directly proportional to the strength of the Hamiltonian perturbation. Finally, we compare our analytical predictions against the results of a numerical computation of the Loschmidt echo for a quantum particle moving inside a one-dimensional box with Dirichlet-Robin boundary conditions, and find the two in good agreement.

  5. Lanczos iterated time-reversal.

    PubMed

    Oberai, Assad A; Feijóo, Gonzalo R; Barbone, Paul E

    2009-02-01

    A new iterative time-reversal algorithm capable of identifying and focusing on multiple scatterers in a relatively small number of iterations is developed. It is recognized that the traditional iterated time-reversal method is based on utilizing power iterations to determine the dominant eigenpairs of the time-reversal operator. The convergence properties of these iterations are known to be suboptimal. Motivated by this, a new method based on Lanczos iterations is developed. In several illustrative examples it is demonstrated that for the same number of transmitted and received signals, the Lanczos iterations based approach is substantially more accurate. PMID:19206835

  6. Application of Iterative Time-Reversal for Electromagnetic Wave Focusing in a Wave Chaotic System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taddese, Biniyam; Antonsen, Thomas; Ott, Edward; Anlage, Steven

    2011-03-01

    Time-reversal mirrors exploit the time-reversal invariance of the wave equation to achieve spatial and temporal focusing, and they have been shown to be very effective sensors of perturbations to wave chaotic systems. The sensing technique is based on a classical analogue of the Loschmidt echo. However, dissipation results in an imperfect focusing, hence we created a sensing technique employing exponential amplification to overcome this limitation [1,2]. We now apply the technique of iterative time-reversal, which had been demonstrated in a dissipative acoustic system, to an electromagnetic time-reversal mirror, and experimentally demonstrate improved temporal focusing. We also use a numerical model of a network of transmission lines to demonstrate improved focusing by the iterative technique for various degrees and statistical distributions of loss in the system. The application of the iterative technique to improve the performance and practicality of our sensor is explored. This work is supported by an ONR MURI Grant No. N000140710734, AFOSR Grant No. FA95501010106, and the Maryland CNAM.

  7. Dynamics and timing of reversals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valet, J.-P.; Fournier, A.

    2012-04-01

    Information provided by records of geomagnetic reversals from lava sequences is constrained by irregular volcanic activity. We show that, despite different resolution, the ten most detailed volcanic records match surprisingly well and display the same dynamical characteristics after tuning to a common eruption rate. We thus infer that the reversal process has remained unchanged over the past 180Ma with the same time constants and duration. The reversing field is characterized by 3 successive episodes, a precursory event, a 180° polarity switch and a rebound. The first and third phases depict a large amplitude directional change which, by comparison with the archeological record, is estimated to last between 2 and 2.5 kyr. The transit between the two polarities does not exceed 1ka and is thus too fast for being properly recorded by most sediments. Similar results are obtained after reducing the directional clusters that are present at different periods in each record. These features and time constants are compatible with models that do not require any mantle control on reversals processes, which is also supported by the absence of preferred longitude of the pole. Lastly, based on the chronology of the successive reversal phases, the eruption rates are found to be at least twice larger for hot spots (<1flow/100yr) than for large flood basaltic provinces.

  8. Time reversal of water waves.

    PubMed

    Przadka, A; Feat, S; Petitjeans, P; Pagneux, V; Maurel, A; Fink, M

    2012-08-10

    We present time reversal experiments demonstrating refocusing of gravity-capillary waves in a water tank cavity. Owing to the reverberating effect of the cavity, only a few channels are sufficient to reconstruct the surface wave at the point source, even if the absorption is not negligible. Space-time-resolved measurements of the waves during the refocusing allow us to quantitatively demonstrate that the quality of the refocusing increases linearly with the number of reemitting channels. Numerical simulations corresponding to water waves at larger scales, with negligible damping, indicate the possibility of very high quality refocusing.

  9. Exploring chaos in the Dicke model using ground-state fidelity and Loschmidt echo.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Utso; Dasgupta, Sayak; Dutta, Amit

    2014-08-01

    We study the quantum critical behavior of the Dicke Hamiltonian with finite number of atoms and explore the signature of quantum chaos using measures like the ground-state fidelity and the Loschmidt echo and the time-averaged Loschmidt echo. We show that these quantities clearly point to the classically chaotic nature of the system in the superradiant (SR) phase. While the ground-state fidelity shows aperiodic oscillations as a function of the coupling strength, the echo shows aperiodic oscillations in time and decays rapidly when the system is in the SR phase. We clearly demonstrate how the time-averaged value of the echo already incorporates the information about the ground-state fidelity and stays much less than unity, indicating the classically chaotic nature of the model in the SR phase.

  10. Remote Whispering Applying Time Reversal

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Brian Eric

    2015-07-16

    The purpose of this project was to explore the use of time reversal technologies as a means for communication to a targeted individual or location. The idea is to have the privacy of whispering in one’s ear, but to do this remotely from loudspeakers not located near the target. Applications of this work include communicating with hostages and survivors in rescue operations, communicating imaging and operational conditions in deep drilling operations, monitoring storage of spent nuclear fuel in storage casks without wires, or clandestine activities requiring signaling between specific points. This technology provides a solution in any application where wires and radio communications are not possible or not desired. It also may be configured to self calibrate on a regular basis to adjust for changing conditions. These communications allow two people to converse with one another in real time, converse in an inaudible frequency range or medium (i.e. using ultrasonic frequencies and/or sending vibrations through a structure), or send information for a system to interpret (even allowing remote control of a system using sound). The time reversal process allows one to focus energy to a specific location in space and to send a clean transmission of a selected signal only to that location. In order for the time reversal process to work, a calibration signal must be obtained. This signal may be obtained experimentally using an impulsive sound, a known chirp signal, or other known signals. It may also be determined from a numerical model of a known environment in which the focusing is desired or from passive listening over time to ambient noise.

  11. Three component vibrational time reversal communication

    DOE PAGES

    Anderson, Brian E.; Ulrich, Timothy J.; Ten Cate, James A.

    2015-01-01

    Time reversal provides an optimal prefilter matched signal to apply to a communication signal before signal transmission. Time reversal allows compensation for wave speed dispersion and can function well in reverberant environments. Time reversal can be used to focus elastic energy to each of the three components of motion independently. A pipe encased in concrete was used to demonstrate the ability to conduct communications of information using three component time reversal. Furthermore, the ability of time reversal to compensate for multi-path distortion (overcoming reverberation) will be demonstrated and the rate of signal communication will be presented. [The U.S. Department ofmore » Energy, through the LANL/LDRD Program, is gratefully acknowledged for supporting this work.]« less

  12. Three component vibrational time reversal communication

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Brian E.; Ulrich, Timothy J.; Ten Cate, James A.

    2015-01-01

    Time reversal provides an optimal prefilter matched signal to apply to a communication signal before signal transmission. Time reversal allows compensation for wave speed dispersion and can function well in reverberant environments. Time reversal can be used to focus elastic energy to each of the three components of motion independently. A pipe encased in concrete was used to demonstrate the ability to conduct communications of information using three component time reversal. Furthermore, the ability of time reversal to compensate for multi-path distortion (overcoming reverberation) will be demonstrated and the rate of signal communication will be presented. [The U.S. Department of Energy, through the LANL/LDRD Program, is gratefully acknowledged for supporting this work.

  13. Time-reversed, flow-reversed ballistics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Zernow, L.; Chapyak, E. J.; Scheffler, D. R.

    2001-01-01

    Two-dimensional simulations of planar sheet jet formation are studied to examine the hydrodynamic issues involved when simulations are carried out in the inverse direction, that is, with reversed time and flow. Both a realistic copper equation of state and a shockless equation of state were used. These studies are an initial step in evaluating this technique as a ballistics design tool.

  14. Time reversibility in the quantum frame

    SciTech Connect

    Masot-Conde, Fátima

    2014-12-04

    Classic Mechanics and Electromagnetism, conventionally taken as time-reversible, share the same concept of motion (either of mass or charge) as the basis of the time reversibility in their own fields. This paper focuses on the relationship between mobile geometry and motion reversibility. The goal is to extrapolate the conclusions to the quantum frame, where matter and radiation behave just as elementary mobiles. The possibility that the asymmetry of Time (Time’s arrow) is an effect of a fundamental quantum asymmetry of elementary particles, turns out to be a consequence of the discussion.

  15. Time reversals of irreversible quantum maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aurell, Erik; Zakrzewski, Jakub; Życzkowski, Karol

    2015-09-01

    We propose an alternative notion of time reversal in open quantum systems as represented by linear quantum operations, and a related generalization of classical entropy production in the environment. This functional is the ratio of the probability to observe a transition between two states under the forward and the time reversed dynamics, and leads, as in the classical case, to fluctuation relations as tautological identities. As in classical dynamics in contact with a heat bath, time reversal is not unique, and we discuss several possibilities. For any bistochastic map its dual map preserves the trace and describes a legitimate dynamics reversed in time, in that case the entropy production in the environment vanishes. For a generic stochastic map we construct a simple quantum operation which can be interpreted as a time reversal. For instance, the decaying channel, which sends the excited state into the ground state with a certain probability, can be reversed into the channel transforming the ground state into the excited state with the same probability.

  16. Time reversal and holography with spacetime transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacot, Vincent; Labousse, Matthieu; Eddi, Antonin; Fink, Mathias; Fort, Emmanuel

    2016-10-01

    Wave control is usually performed by spatially engineering the properties of a medium. Because time and space play similar roles in wave propagation, manipulating time boundaries provides a complementary approach. Here, we experimentally demonstrate the relevance of this concept by introducing instantaneous time mirrors. We show with water waves that a sudden change of the effective gravity generates time-reversed waves that refocus at the source. We generalize this concept for all kinds of waves, introducing a universal framework which explains the effect of any time disruption on wave propagation. We show that sudden changes of the medium properties generate instant wave sources that emerge instantaneously from the entire space at the time disruption. The time-reversed waves originate from these `Cauchy sources’, which are the counterpart of Huygens virtual sources on a time boundary. It allows us to revisit the holographic method and introduce a new approach for wave control.

  17. Time reversal signal processing for communication.

    SciTech Connect

    Young, Derek P.; Jacklin, Neil; Punnoose, Ratish J.; Counsil, David T.

    2011-09-01

    Time-reversal is a wave focusing technique that makes use of the reciprocity of wireless propagation channels. It works particularly well in a cluttered environment with associated multipath reflection. This technique uses the multipath in the environment to increase focusing ability. Time-reversal can also be used to null signals, either to reduce unintentional interference or to prevent eavesdropping. It does not require controlled geometric placement of the transmit antennas. Unlike existing techniques it can work without line-of-sight. We have explored the performance of time-reversal focusing in a variety of simulated environments. We have also developed new algorithms to simultaneously focus at a location while nulling at an eavesdropper location. We have experimentally verified these techniques in a realistic cluttered environment.

  18. Time reversal communication with a mobile source.

    PubMed

    Song, H C

    2013-10-01

    Broadband underwater acoustic communication signals undergo either a compression or dilation in the presence of relative motion between a source and a receiver. Consequently, underwater acoustic communications with a mobile source/receiver require Doppler compensation through resampling. However, resampling may not be necessary when a channel-estimate-based time reversal approach is applied with frequent channel updates. Using experimental data (20-30 kHz), it is demonstrated that the performance of time reversal communication without resampling is similar to the case with resampling, along with the benefit of a modest computational saving. PMID:24116398

  19. Investigation of Finite Sources through Time Reversal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kremers, Simon; Brietzke, Gilbert; Igel, Heiner; Larmat, Carene; Fichtner, Andreas; Johnson, Paul A.; Huang, Lianjie

    2010-05-01

    Under certain conditions time reversal is a promising method to determine earthquake source characteristics without any a-priori information (except the earth model and the data). It consists of injecting flipped-in-time records from seismic stations within the model to create an approximate reverse movie of wave propagation from which the location of the hypocenter and other information might be inferred. In this study, the backward propagation is performed numerically using a parallel cartesian spectral element code. Initial tests using point source moment tensors serve as control for the adaptability of the used wave propagation algorithm. After that we investigated the potential of time reversal to recover finite source characteristics (e.g., size of ruptured area, rupture velocity etc.). We used synthetic data from the SPICE kinematic source inversion blind test initiated to investigate the performance of current kinematic source inversion approaches (http://www.spice-rtn.org/library/valid). The synthetic data set attempts to reproduce the 2000 Tottori earthquake with 33 records close to the fault. We discuss the influence of various assumptions made on the source (e.g., origin time, hypocenter, fault location, etc.), adjoint source weighting (e.g., correct for epicentral distance) and structure (uncertainty in the velocity model) on the results of the time reversal process. We give an overview about the quality of focussing of the different wavefield properties (i.e., displacements, strains, rotations, energies). Additionally, the potential to recover source properties of multiple point sources at the same time is discussed.

  20. Time-forward speech intelligibility in time-reversed rooms

    PubMed Central

    Longworth-Reed, Laricia; Brandewie, Eugene; Zahorik, Pavel

    2009-01-01

    The effects of time-reversed room acoustics on word recognition abilities were examined using virtual auditory space techniques, which allowed for temporal manipulation of the room acoustics independent of the speech source signals. Two acoustical conditions were tested: one in which room acoustics were simulated in a realistic time-forward fashion and one in which the room acoustics were reversed in time, causing reverberation and acoustic reflections to precede the direct-path energy. Significant decreases in speech intelligibility—from 89% on average to less than 25%—were observed between the time-forward and time-reversed rooms. This result is not predictable using standard methods for estimating speech intelligibility based on the modulation transfer function of the room. It may instead be due to increased degradation of onset information in the speech signals when room acoustics are time-reversed. PMID:19173377

  1. Investigation of Finite Sources through Time Reversal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kremers, S.; Brietzke, G.; Igel, H.; Larmat, C.; Fichtner, A.; Johnson, P. A.; Huang, L.

    2008-12-01

    Under certain conditions time reversal is a promising method to determine earthquake source characteristics without any a-priori information (except the earth model and the data). It consists of injecting flipped-in-time records from seismic stations within the model to create an approximate reverse movie of wave propagation from which the location of the source point and other information might be inferred. In this study, the backward propagation is performed numerically using a spectral element code. We investigate the potential of time reversal to recover finite source characteristics (e.g., size of ruptured area, location of asperities, rupture velocity etc.). We use synthetic data from the SPICE kinematic source inversion blind test initiated to investigate the performance of current kinematic source inversion approaches (http://www.spice- rtn.org/library/valid). The synthetic data set attempts to reproduce the 2000 Tottori earthquake with 33 records close to the fault. We discuss the influence of relaxing the ignorance to prior source information (e.g., origin time, hypocenter, fault location, etc.) on the results of the time reversal process.

  2. Time Reversal Experiments in Chaotic Cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Bo; Ott, Edwart; Antonsen, Thomas; Anlage, Steven

    2013-03-01

    Wave focusing through a strongly scattering medium has been an intriguing topic in the fields of optics, acoustics and electromagnetics. By introducing the time reversal technique, prior knowledge about each transmission channel is no longer needed since the step of sending waves through the medium measures this information. Many approaches have been explored to achieve better focusing quality, which is influenced by several factors, such as the propagation loss. We present two methods to conduct time reversal experiments in ray-chaotic billiards or cavities. The first method uses a ray-tracing algorithm to calculate orbit information from knowledge of the cavity geometry. We then use this information to generate a synthetic signal, which is then sent into the cavity as if it's the time reversed signal in the traditional time-reversal scheme. This method tries to obtain channel information numerically but has limited accuracy due to the chaotic properties of the cavity. Another method is to utilize the transmission scattering parameter, obtained from the time domain response of the cavity between two ports. We amplify the time-reversed signal for each frequency channel in proportion to the loss it experiences during the transmission. The experimental results show that the amplitude of side lobes around the reconstructed signal is reduced significantly and the correlation between the reconstruction and the initial signal is improved from 0.8 to 0.98 in a low-mode density cavity. This work is funded by the ONR/Maryland AppEl Center, the AFOSR, and Center for Nanophysics and Advanced Materials (CNAM).

  3. Time-reversal asymmetry in financial systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, X. F.; Chen, T. T.; Zheng, B.

    2013-11-01

    We investigate the large-fluctuation dynamics in financial markets, based on the minute-to-minute and daily data of the Chinese Indices and the German DAX. The dynamic relaxation both before and after the large fluctuations is characterized by a power law, and the exponents p± usually vary with the strength of the large fluctuations. The large-fluctuation dynamics is time-reversal symmetric at the time scale in minutes, while asymmetric at the daily time scale. Careful analysis reveals that the time-reversal asymmetry is mainly induced by external forces. It is also the external forces which drive the financial system to a non-stationary state. Different characteristics of the Chinese and German stock markets are uncovered.

  4. Time reversal communication over doubly spread channels.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Wen-Jun; Jiang, Xue

    2012-11-01

    Conventional time reversal can mitigate multipath delay dispersion by temporal focusing. But it is not applicable to time-varying channels with a Doppler spread. Although recently time reversal communication has been adapted to time-variant channels, the modified technique requires frequent channel updates to track channel variations and cannot handle large Doppler spread, which means that it cannot achieve frequency focusing. In this paper, two time reversal receivers for underwater acoustic communications over doubly spread channels are proposed. The proposed approach, which can be interpreted as time-frequency channel matching, is based on the channel spreading function rather than impulse response adopted by the existing techniques; this leads to much less frequent channel updates. Unlike existing methods that only correct a single Doppler shift, the proposed approach uses a rake-like structure to compensate for multiple Doppler shifts and hence can eliminate severe Doppler spread induced by temporal channel variations. Simulation results verify the effectiveness of the proposed approach, indicating that it can simultaneously counteract delay and Doppler spreads, achieving both temporal and frequency focusing.

  5. Time Reversal Acoustic in a flowing medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luong, Trung Dung; Arora, Manish; Hies, Thomas; Ohl, Claus-Dieter; Claus-Dieter Ohl grou Team; DHI Water; Environment (S) Pte. Ltd. Collaboration

    2013-11-01

    We explore the effect of flow on time reversal acoustics (TRA). Traditionally, TRA has been studied in static conditions, while a motion of the medium is expected to degrade the spatio-temporal focussing of the sound pulse. Here, we study the effect of the flow with a TRA system at 1MHz. A controlled flow is added between the emitter and receiver. Additional, a metallic plate is utilized to increases the numerical aperture of the emitting transducer. The impulse response of the non-flowing system, is recorded and time reversed. Then, the response of the hydrophone is recorded in presence and absence of the flow. It is found that the time reversed signal focuses on at the hydrophone in both the cases. In the absence of flow, the focus signal is observed to be shifted in the time domain. Furthermore, there is a drop in the peak-to-peak value of the focus signal in the presence of flow. For a flow rate of 3 cm/s (Re ~ 1000), a distinct shift in the time domain and a reduction of the peak is obtained. The results will be discussed and compared with numerical simulation of TRA under flow conditions.

  6. Time reversal invariance in polarized neutron decay

    SciTech Connect

    Wasserman, E.G.

    1994-03-01

    An experiment to measure the time reversal invariance violating (T-violating) triple correlation (D) in the decay of free polarized neutrons has been developed. The detector design incorporates a detector geometry that provides a significant improvement in the sensitivity over that used in the most sensitive of previous experiments. A prototype detector was tested in measurements with a cold neutron beam. Data resulting from the tests are presented. A detailed calculation of systematic effects has been performed and new diagnostic techniques that allow these effects to be measured have been developed. As the result of this work, a new experiment is under way that will improve the sensitivity to D to 3 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} or better. With higher neutron flux a statistical sensitivity of the order 3 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} is ultimately expected. The decay of free polarized neutrons (n {yields} p + e + {bar v}{sub e}) is used to search for T-violation by measuring the triple correlation of the neutron spin polarization, and the electron and proton momenta ({sigma}{sub n} {center_dot} p{sub p} {times} p{sub e}). This correlation changes sign under reversal of the motion. Since final state effects in neutron decay are small, a nonzero coefficient, D, of this correlation indicates the violation of time reversal invariance. D is measured by comparing the numbers of coincidences in electron and proton detectors arranged symmetrically about a longitudinally polarized neutron beam. Particular care must be taken to eliminate residual asymmetries in the detectors or beam as these can lead to significant false effects. The Standard Model predicts negligible T-violating effects in neutron decay. Extensions to the Standard Model include new interactions some of which include CP-violating components. Some of these make first order contributions to D.

  7. Momentum-Space Entanglement and Loschmidt Echo in Luttinger Liquids after a Quantum Quench.

    PubMed

    Dóra, Balázs; Lundgren, Rex; Selover, Mark; Pollmann, Frank

    2016-07-01

    Luttinger liquids (LLs) arise by coupling left- and right-moving particles through interactions in one dimension. This most natural partitioning of LLs is investigated by the momentum-space entanglement after a quantum quench using analytical and numerical methods. We show that the momentum-space entanglement spectrum of a LL possesses many universal features both in equilibrium and after a quantum quench. The largest entanglement eigenvalue is identical to the Loschmidt echo, i.e., the overlap of the disentangled and final wave functions of the system. The second largest eigenvalue is the overlap of the first excited state of the disentangled system with zero total momentum and the final wave function. The entanglement gap is universal both in equilibrium and after a quantum quench. The momentum-space entanglement entropy is always extensive and saturates fast to a time independent value after the quench, in sharp contrast to a spatial bipartitioning.

  8. Momentum-Space Entanglement and Loschmidt Echo in Luttinger Liquids after a Quantum Quench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dóra, Balázs; Lundgren, Rex; Selover, Mark; Pollmann, Frank

    2016-07-01

    Luttinger liquids (LLs) arise by coupling left- and right-moving particles through interactions in one dimension. This most natural partitioning of LLs is investigated by the momentum-space entanglement after a quantum quench using analytical and numerical methods. We show that the momentum-space entanglement spectrum of a LL possesses many universal features both in equilibrium and after a quantum quench. The largest entanglement eigenvalue is identical to the Loschmidt echo, i.e., the overlap of the disentangled and final wave functions of the system. The second largest eigenvalue is the overlap of the first excited state of the disentangled system with zero total momentum and the final wave function. The entanglement gap is universal both in equilibrium and after a quantum quench. The momentum-space entanglement entropy is always extensive and saturates fast to a time independent value after the quench, in sharp contrast to a spatial bipartitioning.

  9. Momentum-Space Entanglement and Loschmidt Echo in Luttinger Liquids after a Quantum Quench.

    PubMed

    Dóra, Balázs; Lundgren, Rex; Selover, Mark; Pollmann, Frank

    2016-07-01

    Luttinger liquids (LLs) arise by coupling left- and right-moving particles through interactions in one dimension. This most natural partitioning of LLs is investigated by the momentum-space entanglement after a quantum quench using analytical and numerical methods. We show that the momentum-space entanglement spectrum of a LL possesses many universal features both in equilibrium and after a quantum quench. The largest entanglement eigenvalue is identical to the Loschmidt echo, i.e., the overlap of the disentangled and final wave functions of the system. The second largest eigenvalue is the overlap of the first excited state of the disentangled system with zero total momentum and the final wave function. The entanglement gap is universal both in equilibrium and after a quantum quench. The momentum-space entanglement entropy is always extensive and saturates fast to a time independent value after the quench, in sharp contrast to a spatial bipartitioning. PMID:27419554

  10. Time Reversal in Solids (Linear and Nonlinear Elasticity): Multimedia Resources in Time Reversal

    DOE Data Explorer

    Dynamic nonlinear elastic behavior, nonequilibrium dynamics, first observed as a curiosity in earth materials has now been observed in a great variety of solids. The primary manifestations of the behavior are characteristic wave distortion, and slow dynamics, a recovery process to equilibrium that takes place linearly with the logarithm of time, over hours to days after a wave disturbance. The link between the diverse materials that exhibit nonequilibrium dynamics appears to be the presence of soft regions, thought to be 'damage' at many scales, ranging from order 10-9 m to 10-1 m at least. The regions of soft matter may be distributed as in a rock sample, or isolated, as in a sample with a single crack [LANLhttp://www.lanl.gov/orgs/ees/ees11/geophysics/nonlinear/nonlinear.shtml]. The Geophysics Group (EES-11) at Los Alamos National Laboratory has posted two or more multimedia items under each of the titles below to demonstrate aspects of their work: 1) Source Reconstruction Using Time Reversal; 2) Robustness and Efficiency of Time Reversal Acoustics in Solid Media; 3) Audio Example of Time Reversal - Speech Privacy; 4) Crack Imagining with Time Reversal - Experimental Results; 5) Time Reversal of the 2004 (M9.0) Sumatra Earthquake.

  11. Time-reversal violation in beta decay

    SciTech Connect

    Herczeg, P.

    2003-01-01

    At present there is no unambigous direct evidence for time-reversal (T) violation in the fundamental interactions. But T-violation is intimately connected with CP-violation by the CPT theorem. A stringent bound on possible violation of CPT invariance comes from the properties of K{sup 0} - {bar K}{sup 0} mixing [I]. In the following we shall assume that CPT violating interactions, if present, can be neglected, and use the terms 'T-violation' and 'CP-violation' interchangably.

  12. Reverse-Time Migration Based Optical Imaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhiyong; Ding, Hao; Lu, Guijin; Bi, Xiaohong

    2016-01-01

    We theoretically demonstrated a new optical imaging technique based on reverse-time migration (RTM) for reconstructing optical structures in homogeneous media for the first time. RTM is a powerful wave-equation-based method to reconstruct the image of the structure by modeling the wave propagation inside the media with both forward modeling and reverse-time extrapolation. While RTM is commonly used with acoustic seismic waves, this paper represents the first effort to develop optical RTM imaging method for biomedical research. To refine the image quality, we further developed new methods to suppress the low-wavenumber artifact (LWA). When compared with the conventional means for LWA suppression such as Laplacian filtering, illumination normalization, and the ratio method, our new derivative-based and power-image methods are able to significantly reduce LWA, resulting in high-quality reconstructed images with sufficient contrasts and spatial resolutions for structure identification. The optical RTM imaging technique may provide a new platform for non-invasive optical imaging of structures in deep layers of tissues for biomedical applications. PMID:26292337

  13. Reverse-Time Migration Based Optical Imaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhiyong; Ding, Hao; Lu, Guijin; Bi, Xiaohong

    2016-01-01

    We theoretically demonstrated a new optical imaging technique based on reverse-time migration (RTM) for reconstructing optical structures in homogeneous media for the first time. RTM is a powerful wave-equation-based method to reconstruct the image of the structure by modeling the wave propagation inside the media with both forward modeling and reverse-time extrapolation. While RTM is commonly used with acoustic seismic waves, this paper represents the first effort to develop optical RTM imaging method for biomedical research. To refine the image quality, we further developed new methods to suppress the low-wavenumber artifact (LWA). When compared with the conventional means for LWA suppression such as Laplacian filtering, illumination normalization, and the ratio method, our new derivative-based and power-image methods are able to significantly reduce LWA, resulting in high-quality reconstructed images with sufficient contrasts and spatial resolutions for structure identification. The optical RTM imaging technique may provide a new platform for non-invasive optical imaging of structures in deep layers of tissues for biomedical applications.

  14. Nematic electroconvection under time-reversed excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietschmann, Dirk; John, Thomas; Stannarius, Ralf

    2010-10-01

    We study nematic electrohydrodynamic convection (EHC) under excitation with superimposed harmonic wave forms. Within the standard model for EHC, a time reversal of the excitation does not affect threshold voltages and pattern wavelengths obtained in a linear stability analysis. This was confirmed in experiments with superimposed square waves [Heuer , Phys. Rev. E 78, 036218 (2008)10.1103/PhysRevE.78.036218]. We show here that this symmetry with respect to time reversal of the excitation breaks down close to the transition from the conduction regime to the dielectric regime. The EHC standard model without flexoelectric terms fails to predict quantitatively correct threshold curves and wavelengths in a certain parameter range below the transition. This is an indication that a more elaborate description of the EHC mechanism is necessary in this range. We suggest that the weak electrolyte model has to be employed for a correct description. This is in accordance with observations of traveling rolls and of localized structures at onset of the convection in earlier experiments described in literature.

  15. Quantum dynamics of excitations and decoherence in many-spin systems detected with Loschmidt echoes: its relation to their spreading through the Hilbert space.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, C M; Levstein, P R; Buljubasich, L; Pastawski, H M; Chattah, A K

    2016-06-13

    In this work, we overview time-reversal nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments in many-spin systems evolving under the dipolar Hamiltonian. The Loschmidt echo (LE) in NMR is the signal of excitations which, after evolving with a forward Hamiltonian, is recovered by means of a backward evolution. The presence of non-diagonal terms in the non-equilibrium density matrix of the many-body state is directly monitored experimentally by encoding the multiple quantum coherences. This enables a spin counting procedure, giving information on the spreading of an excitation through the Hilbert space and the formation of clusters of correlated spins. Two samples representing different spin systems with coupled networks were used in the experiments. Protons in polycrystalline ferrocene correspond to an 'infinite' network. By contrast, the liquid crystal N-(4-methoxybenzylidene)-4-butylaniline in the nematic mesophase represents a finite proton system with a hierarchical set of couplings. A close connection was established between the LE decay and the spin counting measurements, confirming the hypothesis that the complexity of the system is driven by the coherent dynamics.

  16. Quantum dynamics of excitations and decoherence in many-spin systems detected with Loschmidt echoes: its relation to their spreading through the Hilbert space.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, C M; Levstein, P R; Buljubasich, L; Pastawski, H M; Chattah, A K

    2016-06-13

    In this work, we overview time-reversal nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments in many-spin systems evolving under the dipolar Hamiltonian. The Loschmidt echo (LE) in NMR is the signal of excitations which, after evolving with a forward Hamiltonian, is recovered by means of a backward evolution. The presence of non-diagonal terms in the non-equilibrium density matrix of the many-body state is directly monitored experimentally by encoding the multiple quantum coherences. This enables a spin counting procedure, giving information on the spreading of an excitation through the Hilbert space and the formation of clusters of correlated spins. Two samples representing different spin systems with coupled networks were used in the experiments. Protons in polycrystalline ferrocene correspond to an 'infinite' network. By contrast, the liquid crystal N-(4-methoxybenzylidene)-4-butylaniline in the nematic mesophase represents a finite proton system with a hierarchical set of couplings. A close connection was established between the LE decay and the spin counting measurements, confirming the hypothesis that the complexity of the system is driven by the coherent dynamics. PMID:27140972

  17. Direct observation of time reversal violation

    SciTech Connect

    Bernabeu, J.

    2013-06-12

    A direct evidence for Time Reversal Violation (TRV) means an experiment that, considered by itself, clearly shows TRV independent of, and unconnected to, the results for CP Violation. No existing result before the recent BABAR experiment with entangled neutral B mesons had demonstrated TRV in this sense. There is a unique opportunity for a search of TRV with unstable particles thanks to the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) Entanglement between the two neutral mesons in B, and PHI, Factories. The two quantum effects of the first decay as a filtering measurement and the transfer of information to the still living partner allow performing a genuine TRV asymmetry with the exchange of 'in' and 'out' states. With four independent TRV asymmetries, BABAR observes a large deviation of T-invariance with a statistical significance of 14 standard deviations, far more than needed to declare the result as a discovery. This is the first direct observation of TRV in the time evolution of any system.

  18. Degraded Time-Frequency Acuity to Time-Reversed Notes

    PubMed Central

    Oppenheim, Jacob N.; Isakov, Pavel; Magnasco, Marcelo O.

    2013-01-01

    Time-reversal symmetry breaking is a key feature of many classes of natural sounds, originating in the physics of sound production. While attention has been paid to the response of the auditory system to “natural stimuli,” very few psychophysical tests have been performed. We conduct psychophysical measurements of time-frequency acuity for stylized representations of “natural”-like notes (sharp attack, long decay) and the time-reversed versions of these notes (long attack, sharp decay). Our results demonstrate significantly greater precision, arising from enhanced temporal acuity, for such sounds over their time-reversed versions, without a corresponding decrease in frequency acuity. These data inveigh against models of auditory processing that include tradeoffs between temporal and frequency acuity, at least in the range of notes tested and suggest the existence of statistical priors for notes with a sharp-attack and a long-decay. We are additionally able to calculate a minimal theoretical bound on the sophistication of the nonlinearities in auditory processing. We find that among the best studied classes of nonlinear time-frequency representations, only matching pursuit, spectral derivatives, and reassigned spectrograms are able to satisfy this criterion. PMID:23799012

  19. Time Reversal Invariant Topologically Insulating Circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Ningyuan; Sommer, Ariel; Schuster, David; Simon, Jonathan

    2014-03-01

    With the discovery of the quantum hall effect and topological insulators, there has been an outpouring of ideas to harness topologically knotted band-structures in the design of state-of-the art, disorder-insensitive materials. From studies of exotic quantum many- body phenomena to applications in spintronics and quantum information processing, topological materials are poised to revolutionize the condensed matter frontier. Here we demonstrate, for the first time, a circuit that behaves as a time-reversal invariant topological insulator for RF photons. In this meta-material, composed of capacitively coupled high-Q inductors, we observe a gapped density of states consistent with a modified Hofstadter spectrum at a flux per plaquette of phi=pi/2. In-situ probes further reveal time-resolved, spin-dependent edge-transport. We leverage the unique flexibility of our materials to investigate, for the first time, features of topological insulators on manifolds such as the Mobius strip. This new approach elucidates the fundamental ingredients essential to topologically active materials, whilst providing a powerful laboratory to study topological physics and a promising route to topological quantum science.

  20. Theory of the time reversal cavity for electromagnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Carminati, R; Pierrat, R; de Rosny, J; Fink, M

    2007-11-01

    We derive a general expression of the electric dyadic Green function in a time-reversal cavity, based on vector diffraction theory in the frequency domain. Our theory gives a rigorous framework to time-reversal experiments using electromagnetic waves and suggests a methodology to design structures generating subwavelength focusing after time reversal.

  1. Time reversal violation for entangled neutral mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Bernabeu, J.

    2014-07-23

    A direct evidence for Time Reversal Violation (TRV) means an experiment that, considered by itself, clearly shows TRV independent of, and unconnected to, the results for CP Violation. No existing result before the recent BABAR experiment with entangled neutral B mesons had demonstrated TRV in this sense. There is a unique solution for the test of TRV with unstable particles thanks to the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) Entanglement between the two neutral mesons in B, and φ, Factories. The two quantum effects of the decays as filtering measurements of the meson states and the transfer of information of the first decay to the still living partner allow performing a genuine TRV asymmetry with the exchange of “in” and “out” states. With four independent TRV asymmetries, BABAR observes a large deviation of T-invariance with a statistical significance of 14 standard deviations, far more than needed to declare the result as a discovery. This is the first direct observation of TRV in the time evolution of any system. The perspectives for future additional studies of TRV are discussed.

  2. Some Factors Affecting Time Reversal Signal Reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prevorovsky, Z.; Kober, J.

    Time reversal (TR) ultrasonic signal processing is now broadly used in a variety of applications, and also in NDE/NDT field. TR processing is used e.g. for S/N ratio enhancement, reciprocal transducer calibration, location, identification, and reconstruction of unknown sources, etc. TR procedure in con-junction with nonlinear elastic wave spectroscopy NEWS is also useful for sensitive detection of defects (nonlinearity presence). To enlarge possibilities of acoustic emission (AE) method, we proposed the use of TR signal reconstruction ability for detected AE signals transfer from a structure with AE source onto a similar remote model of the structure (real or numerical), which allows easier source analysis under laboratory conditions. Though the TR signal reconstruction is robust regarding the system variations, some small differences and changes influence space-time TR focus and reconstruction quality. Experiments were performed on metallic parts of both simple and complicated geometry to examine effects of small changes of temperature or configuration (body shape, dimensions, transducers placement, etc.) on TR reconstruction quality. Results of experiments are discussed in this paper. Considering mathematical similarity between TR and Coda Wave Interferometry (CWI), prediction of signal reconstruction quality was possible using only the direct propagation. The results show how some factors like temperature or stress changes may deteriorate the TR reconstruction quality. It is also shown that sometimes the reconstruction quality is not enhanced using longer TR signal (S/N ratio may decrease).

  3. Dynamics of Loschmidt echoes and fidelity decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorin, Thomas; Prosen, Tomaž; Seligman, Thomas H.; Žnidarič, Marko

    2006-11-01

    Fidelity serves as a benchmark for the reliability in quantum information processes, and has recently attracted much interest as a measure of the susceptibility of dynamics to perturbations. A rich variety of regimes for fidelity decay have emerged. The purpose of the present review is to describe these regimes, to give the theory that supports them, and to show some important applications and experiments. While we mention several approaches we use time correlation functions as a backbone for the discussion. Vanicek's uniform approach to semiclassics and random matrix theory provides important alternatives or complementary aspects. Other methods will be mentioned as we go along. Recent experiments in micro-wave cavities and in elastodynamic systems as well as suggestions for experiments in quantum optics shall be discussed.

  4. Prospects for a new account of time reversal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Daniel

    2015-02-01

    In this paper I draw the distinction between intuitive and theory-relative accounts of the time reversal symmetry and identify problems with each. I then propose an alternative to these two types of accounts that steers a middle course between them and minimizes each account's problems. This new account of time reversal requires that, when dealing with sets of physical theories that satisfy certain constraints, we determine all of the discrete symmetries of the physical laws we are interested in and look for involutions that leave spatial coordinates unaffected and that act consistently across our physical laws. This new account of time reversal has the interesting feature that it makes the nature of the time reversal symmetry an empirical feature of the world without requiring us to assume that any particular physical theory is time reversal invariant from the start. Finally, I provide an analysis of several toy cases that reveals differences between my new account of time reversal and its competitors.

  5. Nonlinear time reversal in a wave chaotic system.

    PubMed

    Frazier, Matthew; Taddese, Biniyam; Antonsen, Thomas; Anlage, Steven M

    2013-02-01

    Exploiting the time-reversal invariance and reciprocal properties of the lossless wave equation enables elegantly simple solutions to complex wave-scattering problems and is embodied in the time-reversal mirror. Here we demonstrate the implementation of an electromagnetic time-reversal mirror in a wave chaotic system containing a discrete nonlinearity. We demonstrate that the time-reversed nonlinear excitations reconstruct exclusively upon the source of the nonlinearity. As an example of its utility, we demonstrate a new form of secure communication and point out other applications.

  6. Time-reversed wave mixing in nonlinear optics.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yuanlin; Ren, Huaijin; Wan, Wenjie; Chen, Xianfeng

    2013-11-19

    Time-reversal symmetry is important to optics. Optical processes can run in a forward or backward direction through time when such symmetry is preserved. In linear optics, a time-reversed process of laser emission can enable total absorption of coherent light fields inside an optical cavity of loss by time-reversing the original gain medium. Nonlinearity, however, can often destroy such symmetry in nonlinear optics, making it difficult to study time-reversal symmetry with nonlinear optical wave mixings. Here we demonstrate time-reversed wave mixings for optical second harmonic generation (SHG) and optical parametric amplification (OPA) by exploring this well-known but underappreciated symmetry in nonlinear optics. This allows us to observe the annihilation of coherent beams. Our study offers new avenues for flexible control in nonlinear optics and has potential applications in efficient wavelength conversion, all-optical computing.

  7. Convergence Property of Time Reversal Waves under Noisy Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimura, Takuya; Ochi, Hiroshi

    2004-05-01

    We have studied on the convergence property of time reversal waves (which are equal to phase conjugate waves) in the ocean, particularly in time domain with various configurations of time reversal array (TRA) through simulations and tank experiments. In this paper, the property of time reversal waves under noisy environment is discussed. Simulations were carried out with various sound velocity profiles using the Pekeris solution of the normal mode method and the parabolic equation (PE) method, and tank experiments were also conducted to compare with the simulation results. Results revealed the following. Time reversal waves even at very low signal noise to ratio (SNR) can converge and send the desired signal to the focus at high SNR. The focusing effect of time reversal waves is higher when the horizontal range is extended. If the sound velocity profile is different, the focusing effects are not considerably affected.

  8. Nonlinear time reversal of classical waves: experiment and model.

    PubMed

    Frazier, Matthew; Taddese, Biniyam; Xiao, Bo; Antonsen, Thomas; Ott, Edward; Anlage, Steven M

    2013-12-01

    We consider time reversal of electromagnetic waves in a closed, wave-chaotic system containing a discrete, passive, harmonic-generating nonlinearity. An experimental system is constructed as a time-reversal mirror, in which excitations generated by the nonlinearity are gathered, time-reversed, transmitted, and directed exclusively to the location of the nonlinearity. Here we show that such nonlinear objects can be purely passive (as opposed to the active nonlinearities used in previous work), and we develop a higher data rate exclusive communication system based on nonlinear time reversal. A model of the experimental system is developed, using a star-graph network of transmission lines, with one of the lines terminated by a model diode. The model simulates time reversal of linear and nonlinear signals, demonstrates features seen in the experimental system, and supports our interpretation of the experimental results.

  9. Frequency response of the Loschmidt echo decay in an open driven nonlinear oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shi-Hui; Yan, Zhan-Yuan

    2015-11-01

    The decay of the Loschmidt echo and its relation to the frequency response of the underlying classical dynamics are investigated in an open Duffing system by means of the Wigner function. The initial Wigner function of the system is Gaussian and centered at a phase point (x 0, p 0). For different (x 0, p 0), significant peaks are observed in the frequency response curves of the Loschmidt echo decay during the evolution of the Wigner function. Furthermore, there is good correspondence between the frequency response curves of the Loschmidt echo decay and the underlying classical dynamics. This can be attributed to the increase of the fringes of the Wigner function by the external driving force, which can be revealed by the frequency response of the underlying classical dynamics.

  10. Time Reversal of Seismic Waves and the Great Sumatra Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montagner, J.; Larmat, C.; Fink, M.; Capdeville, Y.; Clevede, E.; Tourin, A.

    2005-12-01

    The occurrence of the disastrous Sumatra-Andaman earthquake on dec. 26, 2004 makes it necessary to develop innovative techniques for studying the complex spatio-temporal rupture mechanism of this giant earthquake. We present here the first application of time-reversal to seismic data. This concept was previously successfully applied for acoustic waves in many fields such as medical imaging, oceanography and non destructive testing. Time-reversal experiments are using the time reversal invariance and the spatial reciprocity of the wave equation. Their primary goal is the refocusing of energy at the location and the time of an acoustic source by time-reversing the recorded signals. As in acoustics, seismic waves are also potentially reversible. In order to achieve a time reversal experiment within the three-dimensional Earth, we take advantage of the increasing power of numerical methods (such as spectral elements methods), which enable to simulate more and more accurately the propagation of seismic waves in heterogeneous media. In addition, at very long period (longer than 200s), the available earth models are sufficiently good to enable the backpropagation of 3-component seismic waves of real data. For the first time, we have performed several synthetic and real data time-reversal experiments for seismic waves by a purely numerical technique. The seismograms of the FDSN Global network used as an active network, seismic waves are backpropagated by numerical calculation in reversed time. The time reversal technique is applied to real data at very long period (T>200s). For a point source,the coordinates of the earthquake and the strike of the fault plane are correctly retrieved, and the focusing in space and time is sharp. When time-reversing seismic data of the recent Great Sumatra- Andaman earthquake (Dec 26, 2004, Magnitude 9.3), in spite of the large extension of the source in space and time, it is shown that we still refocus at the location and time of the

  11. Method for distinguishing multiple targets using time-reversal acoustics

    DOEpatents

    Berryman, James G.

    2004-06-29

    A method for distinguishing multiple targets using time-reversal acoustics. Time-reversal acoustics uses an iterative process to determine the optimum signal for locating a strongly reflecting target in a cluttered environment. An acoustic array sends a signal into a medium, and then receives the returned/reflected signal. This returned/reflected signal is then time-reversed and sent back into the medium again, and again, until the signal being sent and received is no longer changing. At that point, the array has isolated the largest eigenvalue/eigenvector combination and has effectively determined the location of a single target in the medium (the one that is most strongly reflecting). After the largest eigenvalue/eigenvector combination has been determined, to determine the location of other targets, instead of sending back the same signals, the method sends back these time reversed signals, but half of them will also be reversed in sign. There are various possibilities for choosing which half to do sign reversal. The most obvious choice is to reverse every other one in a linear array, or as in a checkerboard pattern in 2D. Then, a new send/receive, send-time reversed/receive iteration can proceed. Often, the first iteration in this sequence will be close to the desired signal from a second target. In some cases, orthogonalization procedures must be implemented to assure the returned signals are in fact orthogonal to the first eigenvector found.

  12. Reducing current reversal time in electric motor control

    SciTech Connect

    Bredemann, Michael V

    2014-11-04

    The time required to reverse current flow in an electric motor is reduced by exploiting inductive current that persists in the motor when power is temporarily removed. Energy associated with this inductive current is used to initiate reverse current flow in the motor.

  13. Three-dimensional time reversal communications in elastic media

    DOE PAGES

    Anderson, Brian E.; Ulrich, Timothy J.; Le Bas, Pierre-Yves; Ten Cate, James A.

    2016-02-23

    Our letter presents a series of vibrational communication experiments, using time reversal, conducted on a set of cast iron pipes. Time reversal has been used to provide robust, private, and clean communications in many underwater acoustic applications. Also, the use of time reversal to communicate along sections of pipes and through a wall is demonstrated here in order to overcome the complications of dispersion and multiple scattering. These demonstrations utilize a single source transducer and a single sensor, a triaxial accelerometer, enabling multiple channels of simultaneous communication streams to a single location.

  14. Faraday Waves under Time-Reversed Excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietschmann, Dirk; Stannarius, Ralf; Wagner, Christian; John, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    Do parametrically driven systems distinguish periodic excitations that are time mirrors of each other? Faraday waves in a Newtonian fluid are studied under excitation with superimposed harmonic wave forms. We demonstrate that the threshold parameters for the stability of the ground state are insensitive to a time inversion of the driving function. This is a peculiarity of some dynamic systems. The Faraday system shares this property with standard electroconvection in nematic liquid crystals [J. Heuer , Phys. Rev. E 78, 036218 (2008)PLEEE81539-3755]. In general, time inversion of the excitation affects the asymptotic stability of a parametrically driven system, even when it is described by linear ordinary differential equations. Obviously, the observed symmetry has to be attributed to the particular structure of the underlying differential equation system. The pattern selection of the Faraday waves above threshold, on the other hand, discriminates between time-mirrored excitation functions.

  15. Simulation of Time-Reversal Processing for Electromagnetic Communication

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, G J; Poggio, A J

    2003-07-25

    Time-reversal processing was simulated for several possible electromagnetic communication channels, including random point scatterers, large plates and a conducting cavity. Communication was from a single transmitting antenna to a receiving array. The effectiveness of time-reversal processing was compared for a single receiver and the array. The aim of these simulations was to determine a communication environment that would give an interesting level of multipath interference and that can be constructed in a laboratory.

  16. Time reversal processing for source location in an urban environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, Donald G.; Liu, Lanbo; Moran, Mark L.

    2005-08-01

    A simulation study is conducted to demonstrate in principle that time reversal processing can be used to locate sound sources in an outdoor urban area with many buildings. Acoustic pulse propagation in this environment is simulated using a two-dimensional finite difference time domain (FDTD) computation. Using the simulated time traces from only a few sensors and back propagating them with the FDTD model, the sound energy refocuses in the vicinity of the true source location. This time reversal numerical experiment confirms that using information acquired only at non-line-of-sight locations is sufficient to obtain accurate source locations in a complex urban terrain.

  17. Photonic topological insulator with broken time-reversal symmetry.

    PubMed

    He, Cheng; Sun, Xiao-Chen; Liu, Xiao-Ping; Lu, Ming-Hui; Chen, Yulin; Feng, Liang; Chen, Yan-Feng

    2016-05-01

    A topological insulator is a material with an insulating interior but time-reversal symmetry-protected conducting edge states. Since its prediction and discovery almost a decade ago, such a symmetry-protected topological phase has been explored beyond electronic systems in the realm of photonics. Electrons are spin-1/2 particles, whereas photons are spin-1 particles. The distinct spin difference between these two kinds of particles means that their corresponding symmetry is fundamentally different. It is well understood that an electronic topological insulator is protected by the electron's spin-1/2 (fermionic) time-reversal symmetry [Formula: see text] However, the same protection does not exist under normal circumstances for a photonic topological insulator, due to photon's spin-1 (bosonic) time-reversal symmetry [Formula: see text] In this work, we report a design of photonic topological insulator using the Tellegen magnetoelectric coupling as the photonic pseudospin orbit interaction for left and right circularly polarized helical spin states. The Tellegen magnetoelectric coupling breaks bosonic time-reversal symmetry but instead gives rise to a conserved artificial fermionic-like-pseudo time-reversal symmetry, Tp ([Formula: see text]), due to the electromagnetic duality. Surprisingly, we find that, in this system, the helical edge states are, in fact, protected by this fermionic-like pseudo time-reversal symmetry Tp rather than by the bosonic time-reversal symmetry Tb This remarkable finding is expected to pave a new path to understanding the symmetry protection mechanism for topological phases of other fundamental particles and to searching for novel implementations for topological insulators.

  18. Photonic topological insulator with broken time-reversal symmetry

    PubMed Central

    He, Cheng; Sun, Xiao-Chen; Liu, Xiao-Ping; Lu, Ming-Hui; Chen, Yulin; Feng, Liang; Chen, Yan-Feng

    2016-01-01

    A topological insulator is a material with an insulating interior but time-reversal symmetry-protected conducting edge states. Since its prediction and discovery almost a decade ago, such a symmetry-protected topological phase has been explored beyond electronic systems in the realm of photonics. Electrons are spin-1/2 particles, whereas photons are spin-1 particles. The distinct spin difference between these two kinds of particles means that their corresponding symmetry is fundamentally different. It is well understood that an electronic topological insulator is protected by the electron’s spin-1/2 (fermionic) time-reversal symmetry Tf2=−1. However, the same protection does not exist under normal circumstances for a photonic topological insulator, due to photon’s spin-1 (bosonic) time-reversal symmetry Tb2=1. In this work, we report a design of photonic topological insulator using the Tellegen magnetoelectric coupling as the photonic pseudospin orbit interaction for left and right circularly polarized helical spin states. The Tellegen magnetoelectric coupling breaks bosonic time-reversal symmetry but instead gives rise to a conserved artificial fermionic-like-pseudo time-reversal symmetry, Tp (Tp2=−1), due to the electromagnetic duality. Surprisingly, we find that, in this system, the helical edge states are, in fact, protected by this fermionic-like pseudo time-reversal symmetry Tp rather than by the bosonic time-reversal symmetry Tb. This remarkable finding is expected to pave a new path to understanding the symmetry protection mechanism for topological phases of other fundamental particles and to searching for novel implementations for topological insulators. PMID:27092005

  19. Photonic topological insulator with broken time-reversal symmetry.

    PubMed

    He, Cheng; Sun, Xiao-Chen; Liu, Xiao-Ping; Lu, Ming-Hui; Chen, Yulin; Feng, Liang; Chen, Yan-Feng

    2016-05-01

    A topological insulator is a material with an insulating interior but time-reversal symmetry-protected conducting edge states. Since its prediction and discovery almost a decade ago, such a symmetry-protected topological phase has been explored beyond electronic systems in the realm of photonics. Electrons are spin-1/2 particles, whereas photons are spin-1 particles. The distinct spin difference between these two kinds of particles means that their corresponding symmetry is fundamentally different. It is well understood that an electronic topological insulator is protected by the electron's spin-1/2 (fermionic) time-reversal symmetry [Formula: see text] However, the same protection does not exist under normal circumstances for a photonic topological insulator, due to photon's spin-1 (bosonic) time-reversal symmetry [Formula: see text] In this work, we report a design of photonic topological insulator using the Tellegen magnetoelectric coupling as the photonic pseudospin orbit interaction for left and right circularly polarized helical spin states. The Tellegen magnetoelectric coupling breaks bosonic time-reversal symmetry but instead gives rise to a conserved artificial fermionic-like-pseudo time-reversal symmetry, Tp ([Formula: see text]), due to the electromagnetic duality. Surprisingly, we find that, in this system, the helical edge states are, in fact, protected by this fermionic-like pseudo time-reversal symmetry Tp rather than by the bosonic time-reversal symmetry Tb This remarkable finding is expected to pave a new path to understanding the symmetry protection mechanism for topological phases of other fundamental particles and to searching for novel implementations for topological insulators. PMID:27092005

  20. Sound focusing in rooms: the time-reversal approach.

    PubMed

    Yon, Sylvain; Tanter, Mickael; Fink, Mathias

    2003-03-01

    New perspectives in audible range acoustics, such as virtual sound space creation and active noise control, rely on the ability of the rendering system to recreate precisely a desired sound field. This ability to control sound in a given volume of a room is directly linked to the capacity to focus acoustical energy both in space and time. However, sound focusing in rooms remains a complicated problem, essentially because of the multiple reflections on obstacles and walls occurring during propagation. In this paper, the technique of time-reversal focusing, well known in ultrasound, is experimentally applied to audible range acoustics. Compared to classical focusing techniques such as delay law focusing, time reversal appears to considerably improve quality of both temporal and spatial focusing. This so-called super-resolution phenomenon is due to the ability of time reversal to take into account all of the different sound paths between the emitting antenna and the focal point, thus creating an adaptive spatial and temporal matched filter for the considered propagation medium. Experiments emphasize the strong robustness of time-reversal focusing towards small modifications in the medium, such as people in motion or temperature variations. Sound focusing through walls using the time-reversal approach is also experimentally demonstrated. PMID:12656388

  1. Multiple focusing with adaptive time-reversal mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J. S.; Shin, K. C.

    2004-02-01

    Recently, adaptivity was introduced to time-reversal mirror to steer the nulls, and referred to as an adaptive time-reversal mirror (ATRM) [J. S. Kim, H. C. Song, and W. A. Kuperman, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 109, 1817-1825 (2001)]. In this study, ATRM is extended to simultaneous multiple focusing in an ocean waveguide. The multiple focusing is achieved by imposing a set of constraints in the formulation to find the weight vectors. The algorithm is applied to the long-range underwater acoustic communication to show, via simulation, that the simultaneous pulse compression at multiple receiving locations is achieved.

  2. Time-Reversal Test for Stochastic Quantum Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowling, Mark R.; Drummond, Peter D.; Davis, Matthew J.; Deuar, Piotr

    2005-04-01

    The calculation of quantum dynamics is currently a central issue in theoretical physics, with diverse applications ranging from ultracold atomic Bose-Einstein condensates to condensed matter, biology, and even astrophysics. Here we demonstrate a conceptually simple method of determining the regime of validity of stochastic simulations of unitary quantum dynamics by employing a time-reversal test. We apply this test to a simulation of the evolution of a quantum anharmonic oscillator with up to 6.022×1023 (Avogadro’s number) of particles. This system is realizable as a Bose-Einstein condensate in an optical lattice, for which the time-reversal procedure could be implemented experimentally.

  3. Energy current imaging method for time reversal in elastic media

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Brian E; Ulrich, Timothy J; Le Bas, Pierre - Yves A; Larmat, Carene; Johnson, Paul A; Guyer, Robert A; Griffa, Michele

    2009-01-01

    An energy current imaging method is presented for use in locating sources of wave energy during the back propagation stage of the time reversal process. During the back propagation phase of an ideal time reversal experiment, wave energy coalesces from all angles of incidence to recreate the source event; after the recreation, wave energy diverges in every direction. An energy current imaging method based on this convergence/divergence behavior has been developed. The energy current imaging method yields a smaller spatial distribution for source reconstruction than is possible with traditional energy imaging methods.

  4. Time-reversal of nonlinear waves: Applicability and limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ducrozet, G.; Fink, M.; Chabchoub, A.

    2016-09-01

    Time-reversal (TR) refocusing of waves is one of the fundamental principles in wave physics. Using the TR approach, time-reversal mirrors can physically create a time-reversed wave that exactly refocus back, in space and time, to its original source regardless of the complexity of the medium as if time were going backward. Laboratory experiments have proved that this approach can be applied not only in acoustics and electromagnetism, but also in the field of linear and nonlinear water waves. Studying the range of validity and limitations of the TR approach may determine and quantify its range of applicability in hydrodynamics. In this context, we report a numerical study of hydrodynamic time-reversal using a unidirectional numerical wave tank, implemented by the nonlinear high-order spectral method, known to accurately model the physical processes at play, beyond physical laboratory restrictions. The applicability of the TR approach is assessed over a variety of hydrodynamic localized and pulsating structures' configurations, pointing out the importance of high-order dispersive and particularly nonlinear effects in the refocusing of hydrodynamic stationary envelope solitons and breathers. We expect that the results may motivate similar experiments in other nonlinear dispersive media and encourage several applications with particular emphasis on the field of ocean engineering.

  5. Linear and Nonlinear Time Reverse Acoustics in Geomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutin, A.; Johnson, P. A.; Tencate, J.

    2004-12-01

    Linear and Nonlinear Time Reverse Acoustics in Geomaterials P. A. Johnson, A.Sutin and J. TenCate Time Reversal Acoustics (TRA) is one of the most interesting topics to have emerged in modern acoustics in the last 40 years. Much of the seminal research in this area has been carried out by the group at the Laboratoire Ondes et Acoustique at the University of Paris 7, who have demonstrated the ability and robustness of TRA (using Time Reversal Mirrors) to provide spatial control and focusing of an ultrasonic beam (e.g. Fink, 1999). The ability to obtain highly focused signals with TRA has numerous applications, including lithotripsy, ultrasonic brain surgery, nondestructive evaluation and underwater acoustic communication. Notably, the study of time reversal in solids and in the earth is still relatively new. The problem is fundamentally different from the purely acoustic one due to the excitation and propagation of both compressional (bulk) and shear waves as well as the scattering and potentially high dissipation of the medium. We conducted series of TRA experiments in different solids using direct-coupled transducers on solids in tandem with a large bandwidth laser vibrometer detector. A typical time reversal experiment was carried out using the following steps (Sutin et al. 2004a). Laboratory experiments were conducted in different geomaterials of different shapes and sizes, including Carrera marble, granite and Berea sandstone. We observed that, in spite of potentially huge numbers of wave conversions (e.g., compressional to shear, shear to compressional, compressional/shear to surface waves, etc.) for each reflection at each free surface, time reversal still provides significant spatial and temporal focusing in these different geophysical materials. The typical size of the focal area is approximately equivalent to the shear wavelength and the focal area, but becomes larger with increasing wave attenuation (Sutin et al. 2004a; Delsanto et al., 2003)). The TR

  6. Time reversal and charge echo in an electron gas.

    PubMed

    Creswick, Richard J

    2004-09-01

    Apart from subtle violations of CP symmetry by the weak interactions, the basic laws of physics are time-reversal invariant. Nevertheless, in the macroscopic world, time has a very definite direction, or arrow. Given that the dynamics of a closed system are time-reversal invariant, the arrow of time is introduced through boundary or initial conditions. In this Letter it is argued that if the Hamiltonian for a system, H, has the property THT(-1)=-H for a unitary transformation T, then the system can, in principle, be made to evolve backward in time. The prototype of this sort of behavior is the spin echo. Calculations for a single-band tight-binding model suggest that it may be possible to observe the electronic counterpart, or charge echo.

  7. Adaptive spatial combining for passive time-reversed communications.

    PubMed

    Gomes, João; Silva, António; Jesus, Sérgio

    2008-08-01

    Passive time reversal has aroused considerable interest in underwater communications as a computationally inexpensive means of mitigating the intersymbol interference introduced by the channel using a receiver array. In this paper the basic technique is extended by adaptively weighting sensor contributions to partially compensate for degraded focusing due to mismatch between the assumed and actual medium impulse responses. Two algorithms are proposed, one of which restores constructive interference between sensors, and the other one minimizes the output residual as in widely used equalization schemes. These are compared with plain time reversal and variants that employ postequalization and channel tracking. They are shown to improve the residual error and temporal stability of basic time reversal with very little added complexity. Results are presented for data collected in a passive time-reversal experiment that was conducted during the MREA'04 sea trial. In that experiment a single acoustic projector generated a 24-PSK (phase-shift keyed) stream at 200400 baud, modulated at 3.6 kHz, and received at a range of about 2 km on a sparse vertical array with eight hydrophones. The data were found to exhibit significant Doppler scaling, and a resampling-based preprocessing method is also proposed here to compensate for that scaling.

  8. Time reversal invariance violation in neutron-deuteron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Young-Ho; Gudkov, Vladimir; Lazauskas, Rimantas

    2011-06-15

    Time reversal invariance-violating (TRIV) effects in low-energy elastic neutron-deuteron scattering are calculated using meson exchange and EFT-type TRIV potentials in a distorted-wave Born approximation with realistic hadronic strong interaction wave functions, obtained by solving the three-body Faddeev equations in configuration space. The relation between TRIV and parity-violating observables is discussed.

  9. NDE of composite structures using microwave time reversal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Saptarshi; Tamburrino, Antonello; Udpa, Lalita; Udpa, Satish

    2016-02-01

    Composite materials are being increasingly used to replace metals, partially or completely, in aerospace, shipping and automotive industries because of their light weight, corrosion resistance, and mechanical strength. Integrity of these materials may be compromised during manufacturing or due to impact damage during usage, resulting in defects such as porosity, delamination, cracks and disbonds. Microwave NDE techniques have the ability to propagate through composite materials, without suffering much attenuation. The scattered fields depend on the dielectric properties of the medium, and hence provide information about the structural integrity of these materials. Time Reversal focusing is based on the fact that when a wave solution is reversed in time and back propagated it refocuses back at the source. This paper presents a model based parametric study of time reversal principles with microwave data in composite materials. A two dimensional FDTD model is developed to implement the forward and time reversed electromagnetic wave propagation in a test geometry comprising metal-composite structures. Simulation results demonstrate the feasibility of this approach to detect and characterize different defects.

  10. Acoustic imaging with time reversal methods: From medicine to NDT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fink, Mathias

    2015-03-01

    This talk will present an overview of the research conducted on ultrasonic time-reversal methods applied to biomedical imaging and to non-destructive testing. We will first describe iterative time-reversal techniques that allow both focusing ultrasonic waves on reflectors in tissues (kidney stones, micro-calcifications, contrast agents) or on flaws in solid materials. We will also show that time-reversal focusing does not need the presence of bright reflectors but it can be achieved only from the speckle noise generated by random distributions of non-resolved scatterers. We will describe the applications of this concept to correct distortions and aberrations in ultrasonic imaging and in NDT. In the second part of the talk we will describe the concept of time-reversal processors to get ultrafast ultrasonic images with typical frame rates of order of 10.000 F/s. It is the field of ultrafast ultrasonic imaging that has plenty medical applications and can be of great interest in NDT. We will describe some applications in the biomedical domain: Quantitative Elasticity imaging of tissues by following shear wave propagation to improve cancer detection and Ultrafast Doppler imaging that allows ultrasonic functional imaging.

  11. Wave-Based Turing Machine: Time Reversal and Information Erasing.

    PubMed

    Perrard, S; Fort, E; Couder, Y

    2016-08-26

    The investigation of dynamical systems has revealed a deep-rooted difference between waves and objects regarding temporal reversibility and particlelike objects. In nondissipative chaos, the dynamic of waves always remains time reversible, unlike that of particles. Here, we explore the dynamics of a wave-particle entity. It consists in a drop bouncing on a vibrated liquid bath, self-propelled and piloted by the surface waves it generates. This walker, in which there is an information exchange between the particle and the wave, can be analyzed in terms of a Turing machine with waves as the information repository. The experiments reveal that in this system, the drop can read information backwards while erasing it. The drop can thus backtrack on its previous trajectory. A transient temporal reversibility, restricted to the drop motion, is obtained in spite of the system being both dissipative and chaotic.

  12. Wave-Based Turing Machine: Time Reversal and Information Erasing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrard, S.; Fort, E.; Couder, Y.

    2016-08-01

    The investigation of dynamical systems has revealed a deep-rooted difference between waves and objects regarding temporal reversibility and particlelike objects. In nondissipative chaos, the dynamic of waves always remains time reversible, unlike that of particles. Here, we explore the dynamics of a wave-particle entity. It consists in a drop bouncing on a vibrated liquid bath, self-propelled and piloted by the surface waves it generates. This walker, in which there is an information exchange between the particle and the wave, can be analyzed in terms of a Turing machine with waves as the information repository. The experiments reveal that in this system, the drop can read information backwards while erasing it. The drop can thus backtrack on its previous trajectory. A transient temporal reversibility, restricted to the drop motion, is obtained in spite of the system being both dissipative and chaotic.

  13. Wave-Based Turing Machine: Time Reversal and Information Erasing.

    PubMed

    Perrard, S; Fort, E; Couder, Y

    2016-08-26

    The investigation of dynamical systems has revealed a deep-rooted difference between waves and objects regarding temporal reversibility and particlelike objects. In nondissipative chaos, the dynamic of waves always remains time reversible, unlike that of particles. Here, we explore the dynamics of a wave-particle entity. It consists in a drop bouncing on a vibrated liquid bath, self-propelled and piloted by the surface waves it generates. This walker, in which there is an information exchange between the particle and the wave, can be analyzed in terms of a Turing machine with waves as the information repository. The experiments reveal that in this system, the drop can read information backwards while erasing it. The drop can thus backtrack on its previous trajectory. A transient temporal reversibility, restricted to the drop motion, is obtained in spite of the system being both dissipative and chaotic. PMID:27610859

  14. Quantum state transfer by time reversal in the continuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longhi, S.

    2016-03-01

    A method for high-fidelity quantum state transfer in a quantum network coupled to a continuum, based on time reversal in the continuum after decay, is theoretically suggested. Provided that the energy spectrum of the network is symmetric around a reference energy and symmetric energy states are coupled the same way to the common continuum, ideal perfect state transfer can be obtained after time reversal. In particular, it is shown that in a linear tight-binding chain a quantum state can be transformed into its mirror image with respect to the center of the chain after a controllable time. As compared to a quantum mirror image based on coherent transport in a static chain with properly tailored inhomogeneous hopping rates, our method does not require hopping rate engineering and is less sensitive to disorder for long transfer times.

  15. Real-time video codec using reversible wavelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Gen Dow; Chiang, David J.; Huang, Yi-En; Cheng, Allen

    2003-04-01

    This paper describes the hardware implementation of a real-time video codec using reversible Wavelets. The TechSoft (TS) real-time video system employs the Wavelet differencing for the inter-frame compression based on the independent Embedded Block Coding with Optimized Truncation (EBCOT) of the embedded bit stream. This high performance scalable image compression using EBCOT has been selected as part of the ISO new image compression standard, JPEG2000. The TS real-time video system can process up to 30 frames per second (fps) of the DVD format. In addition, audio signals are also processed by the same design for the cost reduction. Reversible Wavelets are used not only for the cost reduction, but also for the lossless applications. Design and implementation issues of the TS real-time video system are discussed.

  16. Time reversal and the spatio-temporal matched filter

    SciTech Connect

    Lehman, S K; Poggio, A J; Kallman, J S; Meyer, A W; Candy, J V

    2004-03-08

    It is known that focusing of an acoustic field by a time-reversal mirror (TRM) is equivalent to a spatio-temporal matched filter under conditions where the Green's function of the field satisfies reciprocity and is time invariant, i.e. the Green's function is independent of the choice of time origin. In this letter, it is shown that both reciprocity and time invariance can be replaced by a more general constraint on the Green's function that allows a TRM to implement the spatio-temporal matched filter even when conditions are time varying.

  17. Nonlinear acoustic time reversal imaging using the scaling subtraction method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalerandi, M.; Gliozzi, A. S.; Bruno, C. L. E.; Van Den Abeele, K.

    2008-11-01

    Lab experiments have shown that the imaging of nonlinear scatterers using time reversal acoustics can be a very promising tool for early stage damage detection. The potential applications are however limited by the need for an extremely accurate acquisition system. In order to let nonlinear features emerge from the background noise it is necessary to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio as much as possible. A comprehensive analysis to determine the nonlinear components in a recorded time signal, an alternative to those usually adopted (e.g. fast Fourier), is proposed here. The method is based on the nonlinear physical properties of the solution of the wave equation and takes advantage of the deficient system response scalability with the excitation amplitude. In this contribution, we outline the adopted procedure and apply it to a nonlinear time reversal imaging simulation to highlight the advantages with respect to traditional imaging based on a fast Fourier analysis of the recorded signals.

  18. Time-reversal MUSIC imaging of extended targets.

    PubMed

    Marengo, Edwin A; Gruber, Fred K; Simonetti, Francesco

    2007-08-01

    This paper develops, within a general framework that is applicable to rather arbitrary electromagnetic and acoustic remote sensing systems, a theory of time-reversal "MUltiple Signal Classification" (MUSIC)-based imaging of extended (nonpoint-like) scatterers (targets). The general analysis applies to arbitrary remote sensing geometry and sheds light onto how the singular system of the scattering matrix relates to the geometrical and propagation characteristics of the entire transmitter-target-receiver system and how to use this effect for imaging. All the developments are derived within exact scattering theory which includes multiple scattering effects. The derived time-reversal MUSIC methods include both interior sampling, as well as exterior sampling (or enclosure) approaches. For presentation simplicity, particular attention is given to the time-harmonic case where the informational wave modes employed for target interrogation are purely spatial, but the corresponding generalization to broadband fields is also given. This paper includes computer simulations illustrating the derived theory and algorithms.

  19. Broadband performance of time-reversing arrays in shallow water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabra, Karim Ghazi

    Active acoustic time reversal is the process of recording the signal from a remote source with a transducer array, and then replaying the signal in a time-reversed fashion to retro-direct the replayed sound back to the remote source to form a retrofocus, in an unknown environment. Time-Reversing Arrays (TRAs) perform well in the absence of acoustic absorption losses and temporal changes in the environment when there is sufficient array aperture and high signal-to-noise ratio. Future active sonar and underwater communication systems for use in unknown shallow ocean waters may be developed from the automatic spatial and temporal focusing properties of TRAs. The performance of TRAs can be determined by four criteria: the size, the longevity and the field amplitude of the array's retrofocus, as well as the correlation of the retrofocus signal with a time-reversed version of the original signal. Four issues related to TRAs performance are investigated in this thesis: (i) the impact of noise, (ii) the influence of array and source motion, (iii) the effects of oceanic currents, and (iv) the effectiveness of blind deconvolution of the original signal via artificial time-reversal. Noise influences TRA performance twice because the array both listens and transmits. Degradation of TRA's performance caused by noise in the acoustic environment is investigated through an analytical formulation that can be reduced to an algebraic relationship for a simple noise model. Numerical experiments that illustrate this effort are also shown. Another limitation of TRA performance is the Doppler effect induced by the dynamic source-array configuration or the moving medium. Normal modes and parabolic equation simulations illustrate these influences for various oceanic waveguides and array geometry. Finally a novel blind deconvolution technique, artificial time-reversal (ATR), is developed for providing an estimate of an unknown source signal propagating in an unknown shallow oceanic

  20. Broadband performance of a moving time reversing array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabra, Karim G.; Dowling, David R.

    2003-09-01

    Acoustic time reversal exploits reciprocity between sources and receivers to generate backward propagating waves that automatically focus at their point of origin. In underwater acoustics, an array of transducers that can both transmit and receive, referred to as a time reversing array (TRA) or time reversal mirror (TRM), generates the back-propagating waves. Such arrays have been shown to spatially and temporally focus sound in unknown complicated multipath environments, and are therefore of interest for active sonar and underwater communication applications. Although stationary vertical linear TRAs have been favored in prior studies, practical applications of acoustic time reversal in underwater environments are likely to involve towed, tilted, horizontal, or bottom-mounted arrays. In particular, array motion introduces Doppler effects and eliminates source-receiver reciprocity, two factors that potentially impact the automatic focusing capability of TRAs. This paper presents the results from a theoretical and computational investigation into how array motion and orientation influence TRA retrofocusing in the shallow ocean. Here, the TRA tow speed is assumed constant, and the array is assumed to be straight and linear (vertical, horizontal, or tilted). And, for simplicity, the TRA is assumed to respond to a stationary point source emitting a broadband pulse. When a TRA moves, the retrofocus is predicted to shift in the direction of array motion due to the translation of the array between its reception and broadcast times. In addition, the performance of a towed horizontal TRA is predicted to degrade more rapidly with towing speed than that of an equivalent (but clearly idealized) towed vertical array because of range-dependent Doppler phase differences that do not influence the vertical array. However, short tilted arrays may approach vertical array performance and appear to be a potentially versatile compromise for implementing TRA concepts in active sonar or

  1. Broadband performance of a moving time reversing array.

    PubMed

    Sabra, Karim G; Dowling, David R

    2003-09-01

    Acoustic time reversal exploits reciprocity between sources and receivers to generate backward propagating waves that automatically focus at their point of origin. In underwater acoustics, an array of transducers that can both transmit and receive, referred to as a time reversing array (TRA) or time reversal mirror (TRM), generates the back-propagating waves. Such arrays have been shown to spatially and temporally focus sound in unknown complicated multipath environments, and are therefore of interest for active sonar and underwater communication applications. Although stationary vertical linear TRAs have been favored in prior studies, practical applications of acoustic time reversal in underwater environments are likely to involve towed, tilted, horizontal, or bottom-mounted arrays. In particular, array motion introduces Doppler effects and eliminates source-receiver reciprocity, two factors that potentially impact the automatic focusing capability of TRAs. This paper presents the results from a theoretical and computational investigation into how array motion and orientation influence TRA retrofocusing in the shallow ocean. Here, the TRA tow speed is assumed constant, and the array is assumed to be straight and linear (vertical, horizontal, or tilted). And, for simplicity, the TRA is assumed to respond to a stationary point source emitting a broadband pulse. When a TRA moves, the retrofocus is predicted to shift in the direction of array motion due to the translation of the array between its reception and broadcast times. In addition, the performance of a towed horizontal TRA is predicted to degrade more rapidly with towing speed than that of an equivalent (but clearly idealized) towed vertical array because of range-dependent Doppler phase differences that do not influence the vertical array. However, short tilted arrays may approach vertical array performance and appear to be a potentially versatile compromise for implementing TRA concepts in active sonar or

  2. Breaking time reversal in a simple smooth chaotic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomsovic, Steven; Ullmo, Denis; Nagano, Tatsuro

    2003-06-01

    Within random matrix theory, the statistics of the eigensolutions depend fundamentally on the presence (or absence) of time reversal symmetry. Accepting the Bohigas-Giannoni-Schmit conjecture, this statement extends to quantum systems with chaotic classical analogs. For practical reasons, much of the supporting numerical studies of symmetry breaking have been done with billiards or maps, and little with simple, smooth systems. There are two main difficulties in attempting to break time reversal invariance in a continuous time system with a smooth potential. The first is avoiding false time reversal breaking. The second is locating a parameter regime in which the symmetry breaking is strong enough to transform the fluctuation properties fully to the broken symmetry case, and yet remain weak enough so as not to regularize the dynamics sufficiently that the system is no longer chaotic. We give an example of a system of two coupled quartic oscillators whose energy level statistics closely match with those of the Gaussian unitary ensemble, and which possesses only a minor proportion of regular motion in its phase space.

  3. A digital matched filter for reverse time chaos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, J. Phillip; Beal, Aubrey N.; Dean, Robert N.; Hamilton, Michael C.

    2016-07-01

    The use of reverse time chaos allows the realization of hardware chaotic systems that can operate at speeds equivalent to existing state of the art while requiring significantly less complex circuitry. Matched filter decoding is possible for the reverse time system since it exhibits a closed form solution formed partially by a linear basis pulse. Coefficients have been calculated and are used to realize the matched filter digitally as a finite impulse response filter. Numerical simulations confirm that this correctly implements a matched filter that can be used for detection of the chaotic signal. In addition, the direct form of the filter has been implemented in hardware description language and demonstrates performance in agreement with numerical results.

  4. Time-reversal-invariant Z4 fractional Josephson effect.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fan; Kane, C L

    2014-07-18

    We study the Josephson junction mediated by the quantum spin Hall edge states and show that electron-electron interactions lead to a dissipationless fractional Josephson effect in the presence of time-reversal symmetry. Surprisingly, the periodicity is 8π, corresponding to a Josephson frequency eV/2ℏ. We estimate the magnitude of interaction-induced many-body level splitting responsible for this effect and argue that it can be measured by using tunneling spectroscopy. For strong interactions we show that the Josephson effect is associated with the weak tunneling of charge e/2 quasiparticles between the superconductors. Our theory describes a fourfold ground state degeneracy that is similar to that of coupled "fractional" Majorana modes but is protected by time-reversal symmetry.

  5. Search for time reversal invariance violation in neutron transmission

    DOE PAGES

    Bowman, J. David; Gudkov, Vladimir

    2014-12-29

    Time reversal invariance violating (TRIV) effects in neutron transmission through a nuclear target are discussed. Here, we demonstrate the existence of a class of experiments that are free from false asymmetries. We discuss the enhancement of TRIV effects for neutron energies corresponding to p-wave resonances in the compound nuclear system. Finaly, we analyze a model experiment and show that such tests can have a discovery potential of 102-104 compared to current limits.

  6. Search for time reversal invariance violation in neutron transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, J. David; Gudkov, Vladimir

    2014-12-29

    Time reversal invariance violating (TRIV) effects in neutron transmission through a nuclear target are discussed. Here, we demonstrate the existence of a class of experiments that are free from false asymmetries. We discuss the enhancement of TRIV effects for neutron energies corresponding to p-wave resonances in the compound nuclear system. Finaly, we analyze a model experiment and show that such tests can have a discovery potential of 102-104 compared to current limits.

  7. Time reversal in photoacoustic tomography and levitation in a cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palamodov, V. P.

    2014-12-01

    A class of photoacoustic acquisition geometries in {{{R}}n} is considered such that the spherical mean transform admits an exact filtered back projection reconstruction formula. The reconstruction is interpreted as a time reversion mirror that reproduces exactly an arbitrary source distribution in the cavity. A series of examples of non-uniqueness of the inverse potential problem is constructed based on the same geometrical technique.

  8. Broadband time-reversing array retrofocusing in noisy environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabra, Karim G.; Khosla, Sunny R.; Dowling, David R.

    2002-02-01

    Acoustic time reversal is a promising technique for spatial and temporal focusing of sound in unknown environments. Acoustic time reversal can be implemented with an array of transducers that listens to a remote sound source and then transmits a time-reversed version of what was heard. In a noisy environment, the performance of such a time-reversing array (TRA) will be degraded because the array will receive and transmit noise, and the intended signal may be masked by ambient noise at the retrofocus location. This article presents formal results for the signal-to-noise ratio at the intended focus (SNRf) for TRAs that receive and send finite-duration broadband signals in noisy environments. When the noise is homogeneous and uncorrelated, and a broadcast power limitation sets the TRA's electronic amplification, the formal results can be simplified to an algebraic formula that includes the characteristics of the signal, the remote source, the TRA, and the noisy environment. Here, SNRf is found to be proportional to the product of the signal bandwidth and the duration of the signal pulse after propagation through the environment. Using parabolic-equation propagation simulations, the formal results for SNRf are illustrated for a shallow water environment at source-array ranges of 1 to 40 km and bandwidths from several tens of Hz to more than 500 Hz for a signal center frequency of 500 Hz. Shallow-water TRA noise rejection is predicted to be superior to that possible in free space because TRAs successfully exploit multipath-propagation.

  9. Tests of time reversal invariance via transmission experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Conzett, H.E.

    1989-06-01

    The existing formalism used to describe spin observables in neutron transmission experiments is found to be inadequate. A suitable formalism is developed, through which time-reversal violating (and parity non-conserving) forward scattering amplitudes are identified, along with their corresponding spin observables. It is noted that new and more precise tests of T-symmetry are provided in transmission experiments and that such investigations are applicable more generally in nuclear and particle physics.

  10. ``Ultrasonic stars'' for time reversal focusing using induced cavitation bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pernot, Mathieu; Montaldo, Gabriel; Tanter, Mickael; Fink, Mathias

    2006-05-01

    Time reversal focusing with ultrasonic arrays is a way to focus waves through heterogeneous media. It requires a reference signal either sent by a small active source embedded in the medium or backscattered by a strong scatterer acting as a passive source. The potential of this method in ultrasonic medical imaging was already envisioned for aberration corrections. However, in many practical situations it is not possible to insert an active source in the medium or to rely on the presence of a unique strong scaterrer at focus in order to generate the reference signal. In analogy with the field of adaptive optics in astronomy, we propose here to create artificial ``ultrasonic stars'' in the body. The trick consists in creating cavitation bubbles inside the medium using one part of the ultrasonic probe. The bubble cavitation generates a spherical wave that propagates through medium heterogeneities to a time reversal array and is used as a reference signal for the time reversal method. This novel method is here experimentally validated for aberrations corrections in tissue mimicking phantoms.

  11. Prolonged and tunable residence time using reversible covalent kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Bradshaw, J. Michael; McFarland, Jesse M.; Paavilainen, Ville O.; Bisconte, Angelina; Tam, Danny; Phan, Vernon T.; Romanov, Sergei; Finkle, David; Shu, Jin; Patel, Vaishali; Ton, Tony; Li, Xiaoyan; Loughhead, David G.; Nunn, Philip A.; Karr, Dane E.; Gerritsen, Mary E.; Funk, Jens Oliver; Owens, Timothy D.; Verner, Erik; Brameld, Ken A.; Hill, Ronald J.; Goldstein, David M.; Taunton, Jack

    2015-01-01

    Drugs with prolonged, on-target residence time often show superior efficacy, yet general strategies for optimizing drug-target residence time are lacking. Here, we demonstrate progress toward this elusive goal by targeting a noncatalytic cysteine in Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) with reversible covalent inhibitors. Utilizing an inverted orientation of the cysteine-reactive cyanoacrylamide electrophile, we identified potent and selective BTK inhibitors that demonstrate biochemical residence times spanning from minutes to 7 days. An inverted cyanoacrylamide with prolonged residence time in vivo remained bound to BTK more than 18 hours after clearance from the circulation. The inverted cyanoacrylamide strategy was further utilized to discover fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) kinase inhibitors with residence times of several days, demonstrating generalizability of the approach. Targeting noncatalytic cysteines with inverted cyanoacrylamides may serve as a broadly applicable platform that facilitates “residence time by design”, the ability to modulate and improve the duration of target engagement in vivo. PMID:26006010

  12. Ultrafast relaxation rates and reversal time in disordered ferrimagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suarez, O. J.; Nieves, P.; Laroze, D.; Altbir, D.; Chubykalo-Fesenko, O.

    2015-10-01

    In response to ultrafast laser pulses, single-phase metals have been classified as "fast" (with magnetization quenching on the time scale of the order of 100 fs and recovery in the time scale of several picoseconds and below) and "slow" (with longer characteristic time scales). Disordered ferrimagnetic alloys consisting of a combination of "fast" transition (TM) and "slow" rare-earth (RE) metals have been shown to exhibit an ultrafast all-optical switching mediated by the heat mechanism. The behavior of the characteristic time scales of coupled alloys is more complicated and is influenced by many parameters such as the intersublattice exchange, doping (RE) concentration, and the temperature. Here, the longitudinal relaxation times of each sublattice are analyzed within the Landau-Lifshitz-Bloch framework. We show that for moderate intersublattice coupling strength both materials slow down as a function of slow (RE) material concentration. For larger coupling, the fast (TM) material may become faster, while the slow (RE) one is still slower. These conclusions may have important implications in the switching time of disordered ferrimagnets such as GdFeCo with partial clustering. Using atomistic modeling, we show that in the moderately coupled case, the reversal would start in the Gd-rich region, while the situation may be reversed if the coupling strength is larger.

  13. Breaking time reversal symmetry in a circuit topological insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owens, Clai; Jia, Ningyuan; Sommer, Ariel; Schuster, David; Simon, Jonathan

    2014-05-01

    Materials exhibiting knotted band-structures provide a unique window on interplay between topology and quantum mechanics under well-controlled conditions. The main difficulty is engineering a strong background gauge field for the electrically neutral ``particles'' that comprise such materials. In cold atom systems, the leading candidates include Raman couplings, lattice modulation, and optical flux lattices; however no scalable approach has yet been demonstrated. Meta-materials have seen substantial success, both in coupled optical waveguides, and circuit networks. Here we describe progress towards time reversal breaking in a circuit, to split up- and down- spin Chern bands. This work is essential for studies of fractional quantum hall physics, where spin-flip collisions effectively reverse the magnetic field and destroy the many-body state. We present the design of a 1D transmission line that breaks time reversal symmetry via periodic capacitance modulation. We extend this approach to a 2D geometry, realizing a Floquet topological insulator with an isolated ground Chern-band. These tools are compatible with circuit quantum electrodynamics techniques, and thus provide an exciting route to studies of topologically ordered phases of matter.

  14. Statistical Stability and Time-Reversal Imgaing in Random Media

    SciTech Connect

    Berryman, J; Borcea, L; Papanicolaou, G; Tsogka, C

    2002-02-05

    Localization of targets imbedded in a heterogeneous background medium is a common problem in seismic, ultrasonic, and electromagnetic imaging problems. The best imaging techniques make direct use of the eigenfunctions and eigenvalues of the array response matrix, as recent work on time-reversal acoustics has shown. Of the various imaging functionals studied, one that is representative of a preferred class is a time-domain generalization of MUSIC (MUltiple Signal Classification), which is a well-known linear subspace method normally applied only in the frequency domain. Since statistical stability is not characteristic of the frequency domain, a transform back to the time domain after first diagonalizing the array data in the frequency domain takes optimum advantage of both the time-domain stability and the frequency-domain orthogonality of the relevant eigenfunctions.

  15. Reverse time migration with source wavefield reconstruction strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bo, Feng; Huazhong, Wang

    2012-02-01

    The reverse time migration (RTM) imaging condition requires that the source and receiver wavefields must be correlated at the same time. The source wavefield can be fully reconstructed backward in time if proper initial conditions and boundary values are chosen. In this paper, we present a method that can approximately reconstruct the source wavefield backward in time. At the price of losing spatial accuracy near the boundaries, the total amount of data storage can be significantly reduced. We compare two strategies for source wavefield reconstruction with both the constant-density acoustic wave equation and the pseudo-acoustic wave equation in transversely isotropic media. We also give a theoretical comparison of data storage and computation cost between the backpropagation strategies and the optimal checkpointing scheme. Numerical experiments show that the approximate source wavefield reconstruction scheme is feasible for RTM in terms of data storage and computation cost.

  16. Experimental implementation of reverse time migration for nondestructive evaluation applications.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Brian E; Griffa, Michele; Bas, Pierre-Yves Le; Ulrich, Timothy J; Johnson, Paul A

    2011-01-01

    Reverse time migration (RTM) is a commonly employed imaging technique in seismic applications (e.g., to image reservoirs of oil). Its standard implementation cannot account for multiple scattering/reverberation. For this reason it has not yet found application in nondestructive evaluation (NDE). This paper applies RTM imaging to NDE applications in bounded samples, where reverberation is always present. This paper presents a fully experimental implementation of RTM, whereas in seismic applications, only part of the procedure is done experimentally. A modified RTM imaging condition is able to localize scatterers and locations of disbonding. Experiments are conducted on aluminum samples with controlled scatterers.

  17. Probing material nonlinearity at various depths by time reversal mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Payan, C.; Ulrich, T. J.; Le Bas, P. Y.; Remillieux, M. C.; Griffa, M.; Schuetz, P.; Saleh, T. A.

    2014-04-07

    In this Letter, the time reversal mirror is used to focus elastic energy at a prescribed location and to analyze the amplitude dependence of the focus signal, thus providing the nonlinearity of the medium. By varying the frequency content of the focused waveforms, the technique can be used to probe the surface, by penetrating to a depth defined by the wavelength of the focused waves. The validity of this concept is shown in the presence of gradual and distributed damage in concrete by comparing actual results with a reference nonlinear measurement and X ray tomography images.

  18. Electric Dipole States and Time Reversal Violation in Nuclei.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auerbach, N.

    2016-06-01

    The nuclear Schiff moment is essential in the mechanism that induces a parity and time reversal violation in the atom. In this presentation we explore theoretically the properties and systematics of the isoscalar dipole in nuclei with the emphasis on the low-energy strength and the inverse energy weighted sum which determines the Schiff moment. We also study the influence of the isovector dipole strength distribution on the Schiff moment. The influence of a large neutron excess in nuclei is examined. The centroid energies of the isoscalar giant resonance (ISGDR) and the overtone of the isovector giant dipole resonance (OIVGDR) are given for a range of nuclei.

  19. Time-Reversal Acoustics and Maximum-Entropy Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Berryman, J G

    2001-08-22

    Target location is a common problem in acoustical imaging using either passive or active data inversion. Time-reversal methods in acoustics have the important characteristic that they provide a means of determining the eigenfunctions and eigenvalues of the scattering operator for either of these problems. Each eigenfunction may often be approximately associated with an individual scatterer. The resulting decoupling of the scattered field from a collection of targets is a very useful aid to localizing the targets, and suggests a number of imaging and localization algorithms. Two of these are linear subspace methods and maximum-entropy imaging.

  20. Ergodic time-reversible chaos for Gibbs' canonical oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoover, William Graham; Sprott, Julien Clinton; Patra, Puneet Kumar

    2015-12-01

    Nosé's pioneering 1984 work inspired a variety of time-reversible deterministic thermostats. Though several groups have developed successful doubly-thermostated models, single-thermostat models have failed to generate Gibbs' canonical distribution for the one-dimensional harmonic oscillator. A 2001 doubly-thermostated model, claimed to be ergodic, has a singly-thermostated version. Though neither of these models is ergodic this work has suggested a successful route toward singly-thermostated ergodicity. We illustrate both ergodicity and its lack for these models using phase-space cross sections and Lyapunov instability as diagnostic tools.

  1. Topological invariants in Fermi systems with time-reversal invariance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avron, J. E.; Sadun, L.; Segert, J.; Simon, B.

    1988-09-01

    We discuss topological invariants for Fermi systems that have time-reversal invariance. The TKN2 integers (first Chern numbers) are replaced by second Chern numbers, and Berry's phase becomes a unit quaternion, or equivalently an element of SU(2). The canonical example playing much the same role as spin (1/2 in a magnetic field is spin (3/2 in a quadrupole electric field. In particular, the associated bundles are nontrivial and have +/-1 second Chern number. The connection that governs the adiabatic evolution coincides with the symmetric SU(2) Yang-Mills instanton.

  2. Effect of double local quenches on the Loschmidt echo and entanglement entropy of a one-dimensional quantum system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajak, Atanu; Divakaran, Uma

    2016-04-01

    We study the effect of two simultaneous local quenches on the evolution of the Loschmidt echo (LE) and entanglement entropy (EE) of a one dimensional transverse Ising model. In this work, one of the local quenches involves the connection of two spin-1/2 chains at a certain time and the other corresponds to a sudden change in the magnitude of the transverse field at a given site in one of the spin chains. We numerically calculate the dynamics associated with the LE and the EE as a result of such double quenches, and discuss the various timescales involved in this problem using the picture of quasiparticles (QPs) generated as a result of such quenches. We perform a detailed analysis of the probability of QPs produced at the two sites and the nature of the QPs in various phases, and obtain interesting results. More specifically, we find partial reflection of these QPs at the defect center or the site of h-quench, resulting in new timescales which have never been reported before.

  3. Time reversal invariance and the arrow of time in classical electrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Rohrlich, Fritz

    2005-11-01

    Time reversal invariance, T, is well known to hold in quantum electrodynamics. However, it has caused difficulties in classical electrodynamics (CED). These are shown to be conceptual misunderstandings. When corrected: (1) the classical equations of motion of a charge are T invariant despite the explicit occurrence of retarded fields in the equations of motion. (2) Advanced fields violate causality and occur neither in nature nor in the CED that describes it. (3) The nonexistence of advanced fields in nature implies an "arrow of time" for electromagnetic radiation: radiation emission is an overall dissipative phenomenon. This electromagnetic "arrow of time" does not contradict time reversal invariance.

  4. Applications of Time-Reversal Processing for Planetary Surface Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barton, Richard J.

    2007-01-01

    Due to the power constraints imposed on wireless sensor and communication networks deployed on a planetary surface during exploration, energy efficient transfer of data becomes a critical issue. In situations where groups of nodes within a network are located in relatively close proximity, cooperative communication techniques can be utilized to improve the range, data rate, power efficiency, and lifetime of the network. In particular, if the point-to-point communication channels on the network are well modeled as frequency non-selective, distributed or cooperative beamforming can employed. For frequency-selective channels, beamforming itself is not generally appropriate, but a natural generalization of it, time-reversal communication (TRC), can still be effective. Time-reversal processing has been proposed and studied previously for other applications, including acoustical imaging, electromagnetic imaging, underwater acoustic communication, and wireless communication channels. In this paper, we study both the theoretical advantages and the experimental performance of cooperative TRC for wireless communication on planetary surfaces. We give a brief introduction to TRC and present several scenarios where TRC could be profitably employed during planetary exploration. We also present simulation results illustrating the performance of cooperative TRC employed in a complex multipath environment and discuss the optimality of cooperative TRC for data aggregation in wireless sensor networks

  5. Signatures of time reversal symmetry breaking in multiband superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiti, Saurabh

    Multiband superconductors serve as natural host to several possible gound states that compete with each other. At the boundaries of such competing phases, the system usually compromises and settles for `mixed' phases that can show intriguing properties like co-existence of magnetism and superconductiivty or even co-existence of different superconducting phases. The latter is particularly interesting as it can lead to non-magnetic ground states that spontaneously break Time-Reversal symmetry. While the experimental verification of such states has proved to been challenging, the theoretical investigations have provided exciting new insights into the nature of the ground state and its excitations all of which have experimental consequences of some sort. These include extrinsic properties like spontaneous currents around impurity sites, and intrinsic properties in the form of collective excitations. These collective modes bear a unique signature and should provide clear evidence for time reversal symmetry broken state. While the results are general, in light of recent Raman scattering experiments, its direct relevance to extremely hole doped Ba(1-x)K(FeAs)2 will be presented where a strong competition of s-wave and d-wave ground state is expected.

  6. Ultrasound breast imaging using frequency domain reverse time migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, O.; Zuberi, M. A. H.; Pratt, R. G.; Duric, N.

    2016-04-01

    Conventional ultrasonography reconstruction techniques, such as B-mode, are based on a simple wave propagation model derived from a high frequency approximation. Therefore, to minimize model mismatch, the central frequency of the input pulse is typically chosen between 3 and 15 megahertz. Despite the increase in theoretical resolution, operating at higher frequencies comes at the cost of lower signal-to-noise ratio. This ultimately degrades the image contrast and overall quality at higher imaging depths. To address this issue, we investigate a reflection imaging technique, known as reverse time migration, which uses a more accurate propagation model for reconstruction. We present preliminary simulation results as well as physical phantom image reconstructions obtained using data acquired with a breast imaging ultrasound tomography prototype. The original reconstructions are filtered to remove low-wavenumber artifacts that arise due to the inclusion of the direct arrivals. We demonstrate the advantage of using an accurate sound speed model in the reverse time migration process. We also explain how the increase in computational complexity can be mitigated using a frequency domain approach and a parallel computing platform.

  7. Reversible DNA methylation regulates seasonal photoperiodic time measurement

    PubMed Central

    Stevenson, Tyler J.; Prendergast, Brian J.

    2013-01-01

    In seasonally breeding vertebrates, changes in day length induce categorically distinct behavioral and reproductive phenotypes via thyroid hormone-dependent mechanisms. Winter photoperiods inhibit reproductive neuroendocrine function but cannot sustain this inhibition beyond 6 mo, ensuring vernal reproductive recrudescence. This genomic plasticity suggests a role for epigenetics in the establishment of seasonal reproductive phenotypes. Here, we report that DNA methylation of the proximal promoter for the type III deiodinase (dio3) gene in the hamster hypothalamus is reversible and critical for photoperiodic time measurement. Short photoperiods and winter-like melatonin inhibited hypothalamic DNA methyltransferase expression and reduced dio3 promoter DNA methylation, which up-regulated dio3 expression and induced gonadal regression. Hypermethylation attenuated reproductive responses to short photoperiods. Vernal refractoriness to short photoperiods reestablished summer-like methylation of the dio3 promoter, dio3 expression, and reproductive competence, revealing a dynamic and reversible mechanism of DNA methylation in the mammalian brain that plays a central role in physiological orientation in time. PMID:24067648

  8. Radiation force produced by time reversal acoustic focusing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarvazyan, Armen; Sutin, Alexander

    2003-10-01

    An ultrasonic induced radiation force is an efficient tool for remote probing of internal anatomical structures and evaluating tissue viscoelastic properties, which are closely related to tissue functional state and abnormalities. Time Reversal Acoustic Focusing System (TRA FS) can provide efficient ultrasound focusing in highly inhomogeneous media. Furthermore, numerous reflections from boundaries, which distort focusing in conventional ultrasound focusing systems and are viewed as a significant technical hurdle, lead to an improvement of the focusing ability of the TRA system. In this work the TRA FS field structure and radiation force in a transcranial phantom were investigated. A simple TRA FS comprising a plane piezoceramic transducer attached to an external resonator such as an aluminum block was acoustically coupled to the tested transcranial phantom. A custom-designed compact electronic unit for TRA FS provided receiving, digitizing, storing, time reversing and transmitting of acoustic signals in a wide frequency range from 0.01 to 10 MHz. The radiation force produced by ultrasonic pulses was investigated as a function of the transmitted ultrasound temporal parameters. The simplest TRA FS provided focusing of 500 kHz ultrasound pulses and the generation of a radiation force with an efficacy hardly achievable using conventional sophisticated phased array transmitters. [Work supported by NIH.

  9. Strain-induced time-reversal odd superconductivity in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juricic, Vladimir; Roy, Bitan

    2014-03-01

    I will discuss the possibility of realizing a time-reversal-symmetry breaking superconducting state that exhibits an f + is pairing symmetry in strained graphene. Although the underlying attractive interactions need to be sufficiently strong and comparable in pristine graphene to support such pairing state, I will argue that strain can be conducive for its formation even for weak interactions. I will show that quantum-critical behavior near the transition is controlled by a fermionic multicritical point, characterized by various critical exponents computed in the framework of an ɛ-expansion near four spacetime dimensions. I will then discuss the scaling of the superconducting gap with the strain-induced axial pseudo-magnetic field. Furthermore, a vortex in this mixed superconducting state hosts a pair of Majorana fermions supporting a quartet of insulating and superconducting orders, among which quantum spin Hall topological insulator. Finally, I will mention some experimental signatures of this f + is time-reversal odd superconductor. These findings suggest that strained graphene could provide a platform for the realization of exotic superconducting states of Dirac fermions. VJ is supported by the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO).

  10. Topological Field Theory of Time-Reversal Invariant Insulators

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, Xiao-Liang; Hughes, Taylor; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2010-03-19

    We show that the fundamental time reversal invariant (TRI) insulator exists in 4 + 1 dimensions, where the effective field theory is described by the 4 + 1 dimensional Chern-Simons theory and the topological properties of the electronic structure is classified by the second Chern number. These topological properties are the natural generalizations of the time reversal breaking (TRB) quantum Hall insulator in 2 + 1 dimensions. The TRI quantum spin Hall insulator in 2 + 1 dimensions and the topological insulator in 3 + 1 dimension can be obtained as descendants from the fundamental TRI insulator in 4 + 1 dimensions through a dimensional reduction procedure. The effective topological field theory, and the Z{sub 2} topological classification for the TRI insulators in 2+1 and 3+1 dimensions are naturally obtained from this procedure. All physically measurable topological response functions of the TRI insulators are completely described by the effective topological field theory. Our effective topological field theory predicts a number of novel and measurable phenomena, the most striking of which is the topological magneto-electric effect, where an electric field generates a magnetic field in the same direction, with an universal constant of proportionality quantized in odd multiples of the fine structure constant {alpha} = e{sup 2}/hc. Finally, we present a general classification of all topological insulators in various dimensions, and describe them in terms of a unified topological Chern-Simons field theory in phase space.

  11. Time reversal invariance - a test in free neutron decay

    SciTech Connect

    Lising, Laura J.

    1999-05-18

    Time reversal invariance violation plays only a small role in the Standard Model, and the existence of a T-violating effect above the predicted level would be an indication of new physics. A sensitive probe of this symmetry in the weak interaction is the measurement of the T-violating ''D''-correlation in the decay of free neutrons. The triple-correlation D{sigma}{sub n}{center_dot}p{sub e} x p{sub v} involves three kinematic variables, the neutron spin, electron momentu, and neutrino (or proton) momentum, and changes sign under time reversal. This experiment detects the decay products of a polarized cold neutron beam with an octagonal array of scintillation and solid-state detectors. Data from first run at NIST's Cold Neutron Research Facility give a D-coefficient of -0.1 {+-} 1.3(stat.) {+-} 0.7(syst) x 10{sup -3}. This measurement has the greatest bearing on extensions to the Standard model that incorporate leptoquarks, although exotic fermion and lift-right symmetric models also allow a D as large as the present limit.

  12. Application of Time Reversed Acoustics for Seismic Source Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, R.; Toksöz, M.

    2005-05-01

    Traditionally an earthquake is located and the source mechanism is determined by using P and S phases. This uses only a limited portion of the information contained in a seismogram. A large part of the information carried by the waveform is not used. In this study we investigate the applicability of the Time Reversed Acoustics (TRA) technique, and thus the whole waveform of the recorded signal, for earthquake locations and source characterization. The basic concept involved in TRA is the fundamental symmetry of time reversal invariance. Injecting the recorded signal, with time running backwards, can focus the wave field to the source. TRA has emerged as an important technique in acoustics with applications to medicine, underwater sound, and many other disciplines. Numerical simulations show that the TRA technique can successfully locate a seismic source inside a layered earth model and can also recover the source time function. Finite difference modeling results show that TRA can determine the fault dip, rupture direction, and rupture length. The method is especially advantageous when data are available only from a sparse station network. Full seismograms contain source information from both waves radiated along the source-station ray path and from waves that radiated in all other directions but scattered toward the receivers. Application of the TRA technique to seismic source characterization requires the Green's function, which can be obtained in two ways. If the earth structure is known then the Green's function can be calculated numerically. To improve the efficiency, the method of constructing a medium response library is developed. This improves computation time significantly. The second approach uses small events (e.g., aftershocks) as an empirical Green's function. The performance of the TRA technique is demonstrated with data from real earthquakes.

  13. Frequency-swept time-reversed ultrasonically encoded optical focusing

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Yuta; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-01-01

    A technique to rapidly scan an optical focus inside a turbid medium is attractive for various biomedical applications. Time-reversed ultrasonically encoded (TRUE) optical focusing has previously demonstrated light focusing into a turbid medium, using both analog and digital devices. Although the digital implementation can generate a focus with high energy, it has been time consuming to scan the TRUE focus inside a sample. Here, by sweeping the frequencies of both ultrasound and light, we demonstrate a multiplex recording of ultrasonically encoded wavefronts, accelerating the generation of multiple TRUE foci. Using this technique, we obtained a 2-D image of a fluorescent target centered inside a turbid sample having a thickness of 2.4 transport mean free paths. PMID:25425744

  14. Reverse time migration in tilted transversely isotropic media

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Linbing; Rector III, James W.; Hoversten, G. Michael

    2004-07-01

    This paper presents a reverse time migration (RTM) method for the migration of shot records in tilted transversely isotropic (TTI) media. It is based on the tilted TI acoustic wave equation that was derived from the dispersion relation. The RTM is a full depth migration allowing for velocity to vary laterally as well as vertically and has no dip limitations. The wave equation is solved by a tenth-order finite difference scheme. Using 2D numerical models, we demonstrate that ignoring the tilt angle will introduce both lateral and vertical shifts in imaging. The shifts can be larger than 0.5 wavelength in the vertical direction and 1.5 wavelength in the lateral direction.

  15. Magnetotelluric inversion via reverse time migration algorithm of seismic data

    SciTech Connect

    Ha, Taeyoung . E-mail: tyha@math.snu.ac.kr; Shin, Changsoo . E-mail: css@model.snu.ac.kr

    2007-07-01

    We propose a new algorithm for two-dimensional magnetotelluric (MT) inversion. Our algorithm is an MT inversion based on the steepest descent method, borrowed from the backpropagation technique of seismic inversion or reverse time migration, introduced in the middle 1980s by Lailly and Tarantola. The steepest descent direction can be calculated efficiently by using the symmetry of numerical Green's function derived from a mixed finite element method proposed by Nedelec for Maxwell's equation, without calculating the Jacobian matrix explicitly. We construct three different objective functions by taking the logarithm of the complex apparent resistivity as introduced in the recent waveform inversion algorithm by Shin and Min. These objective functions can be naturally separated into amplitude inversion, phase inversion and simultaneous inversion. We demonstrate our algorithm by showing three inversion results for synthetic data.

  16. Topological Anderson insulators in systems without time-reversal symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Ying; Avishai, Y.; Wang, X. R.

    2016-06-01

    Occurrence of the topological Anderson insulator (TAI) in a HgTe quantum well suggests that when time-reversal symmetry (TRS) is maintained, the pertinent topological phase transition, marked by re-entrant 2 e2/h quantized conductance contributed by helical edge states, is driven by disorder. Here we show that when TRS is broken, the physics of the TAI becomes even richer. The pattern of longitudinal conductance and nonequilibrium local current distribution displays novel TAI phases characterized by nonzero Chern numbers, indicating the occurrence of multiple chiral edge modes. Tuning either disorder or Fermi energy (in both topologically trivial and nontrivial phases), drives transitions between these distinct TAI phases, characterized by jumps of the quantized conductance from 0 to e2/h and from e2/h to 2 e2/h . An effective medium theory based on the Born approximation yields an accurate description of different TAI phases in parameter space.

  17. Time reversal and charge conjugation in an embedding quantum simulator

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiang; Shen, Yangchao; Zhang, Junhua; Casanova, Jorge; Lamata, Lucas; Solano, Enrique; Yung, Man-Hong; Zhang, Jing-Ning; Kim, Kihwan

    2015-01-01

    A quantum simulator is an important device that may soon outperform current classical computations. A basic arithmetic operation, the complex conjugate, however, is considered to be impossible to be implemented in such a quantum system due to the linear character of quantum mechanics. Here, we present the experimental quantum simulation of such an unphysical operation beyond the regime of unitary and dissipative evolutions through the embedding of a quantum dynamics in the electronic multilevels of a 171Yb+ ion. We perform time reversal and charge conjugation, which are paradigmatic examples of antiunitary symmetry operators, in the evolution of a Majorana equation without the tomographic knowledge of the evolving state. Thus, these operations can be applied regardless of the system size. Our approach offers the possibility to add unphysical operations to the toolbox of quantum simulation, and provides a route to efficiently compute otherwise intractable quantities, such as entanglement monotones. PMID:26239028

  18. Time reversal and charge conjugation in an embedding quantum simulator.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiang; Shen, Yangchao; Zhang, Junhua; Casanova, Jorge; Lamata, Lucas; Solano, Enrique; Yung, Man-Hong; Zhang, Jing-Ning; Kim, Kihwan

    2015-01-01

    A quantum simulator is an important device that may soon outperform current classical computations. A basic arithmetic operation, the complex conjugate, however, is considered to be impossible to be implemented in such a quantum system due to the linear character of quantum mechanics. Here, we present the experimental quantum simulation of such an unphysical operation beyond the regime of unitary and dissipative evolutions through the embedding of a quantum dynamics in the electronic multilevels of a (171)Yb(+) ion. We perform time reversal and charge conjugation, which are paradigmatic examples of antiunitary symmetry operators, in the evolution of a Majorana equation without the tomographic knowledge of the evolving state. Thus, these operations can be applied regardless of the system size. Our approach offers the possibility to add unphysical operations to the toolbox of quantum simulation, and provides a route to efficiently compute otherwise intractable quantities, such as entanglement monotones. PMID:26239028

  19. Phase reversal technique decreases cortical stimulation time during motor mapping.

    PubMed

    Simon, Mirela V; Sheth, Sameer A; Eckhardt, Christine A; Kilbride, Ronan D; Braver, Diana; Williams, Ziv; Curry, William; Cahill, Dan; Eskandar, Emad N

    2014-06-01

    Neurophysiologic mapping of the primary motor cortex (PMC) is commonly used in supratentorial surgery. Electrical cortical stimulation is guided by anatomic landmarks towards the precentral gyrus, with recording of the triggered primary motor responses (TPMR) in the contralateral hemibody. Thus, factors such as distortion of the pericentral anatomy, small surgical fields, brain shifts and miscalibrated neuronavigational systems may lengthen the process and result in unnecessary stimulations, increasing the probability of triggering seizures. We hypothesized that central sulcus localization via the median somatosensory evoked potentials phase reversal technique (MSSEP PRT) accurately guides the surgeon, resulting in prompt identification of the PMC with minimal electrical stimulation. Multivariate Cox regression was used to study the impact of MSSEP PRT on time spent performing electrical cortical stimulation to TPMR. The analysis was adjusted for presence of increased cortical excitability, high motor thresholds, lesions close to PMC and fMRI data, in 100 consecutive standardized motor mapping procedures for brain tumor resection and epilepsy surgery. Phase reversal and change morphology of the recorded somatosensory evoked potentials quadrupled (hazard ratio [HR] 4.13, p<0.0001) and doubled (HR 2.14, p=0.02) the rate of obtaining TPMR, respectively. A 1mA increase in motor threshold decreased the rate by 9% (HR 0.91, p=0.0002). Afterdischarges triggered before TPMR and lesions in close proximity to PMC decreased the rate of TPMR by 76% (HR 0.23, p<0.0001) and 48% (HR 0.52, p=0.04), respectively. Informative PRT decreases stimulation time. Afterdischarges triggered before TPMR, high motor thresholds and lesions close to the PMC increase it. PMID:24679940

  20. Time reversal acousto-seismic method for land mine detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutin, Alexander; Johnson, Paul; TenCate, James; Sarvazyan, Armen

    2005-06-01

    We present the general concept and results of a pilot study on land mine detection based on the application of Time Reverse Acoustics (TRA). Applying TRA is extremely effective at focusing seismic waves in time and space, significantly improving detection capabilities using both linear and nonlinear wave methods. The feasibility of the system was explored in the laboratory and in small scale field experiments. The system included a multi-channel TRA electronic unit developed at Artann, five speakers for seismic-wave excitation and noncontact (laser vibrometer) or contact (accelerometer) devices for measurements of the surface vibration. Experiments demonstrated the high focusing ability of the TRA system. We observed excitation of highly focused seismic waves in an area with dimensions of the order of one wavelength. In the presence of a buried mock mine, the method led to an increase in the surface vibration amplitude and to significant nonlinear distortion of the TRA focused signal. Localization via TRA depends on the frequency of excitation, the depth of the buried mine, and the form and size of a mine mock. The nonlinear acoustic effect-higher harmonic generation-provides higher contrast for the mock-mine signal-response than for the surrounding medium. We also successfully tested an inversion method of the nonlinear TRA measurements earlier developed for medical ultrasound applications.

  1. Land mine detection by time reversal acousto-seismic method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutin, Alexander; Sarvazyan, Armen; Johnson, Paul; Tencate, James

    2001-05-01

    We present a concept and results of a pilot study on land mine detection based on the use of time reversal acoustics (TRA). TRA provides a possibility of highly effective concentrating of seismic wave energy in time and space in complex heterogeneous media. TRA focusing of seismic waves on a land mine increases the detection abilities of conventional linear and nonlinear acousto-seismic methods. Such factors as medium inhomogeneities, presence of reflecting boundaries, which could critically limit conventional acoustic approaches, do not affect TRA based method. The TRA mine detection system comprises several air borne or seismic sources and a noncontact (laser vibrometer) device for remote measurements of the surface vibration. The TRA system focuses a seismic wave at a surface point where the vibration is measured. The focusing point is scanned across the search area. The amplitude and frequency dependence of the signal from the seismic wave focusing point and nonlinear acoustic effects are analyzed to assess probability of the mine presence. Preliminary experiments confirmed high focusing ability of the TRA seismo-acoustic system in complex conditions (a laboratory tank with sand) and demonstrated a significant increase in the surface vibration in the presence of mine imitator. [Work supported by DoD grant.

  2. The time dependence of reversed archeomagnetic flux patches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terra-Nova, Filipe; Amit, Hagay; Hartmann, Gelvam A.; Trindade, Ricardo I. F.

    2015-02-01

    Archeomagnetic field models may provide important insights to the geodynamo. Here we investigate the existence and mobility of reversed flux patches (RFPs) in an archeomagnetic field model. We introduce topological algorithms to define, identify, and track RFPs. In addition, we explore the relations between RFPs and dipole changes and apply robustness tests to the RFPs. In contrast to previous definitions, patches that reside on the geographic equator are adequately identified based on our RFPs definition. Most RFPs exhibit a westward drift and migrate toward higher latitudes. Undulations of the magnetic equator and RFPs oppose the axial dipole moment (ADM). Filtered models show a tracking behavior similar to the nonfiltered model, and surprisingly new RFPs occasionally emerge. The advection and diffusion of RFPs have worked in unison to yield the decrease of the ADM at recent times. The absence of RFPs in the period 550-1440 A.D. is related to a low in intermediate degrees of the geomagnetic power spectrum. We thus hypothesize that the RFPs are strongly dependent on intermediate spherical harmonic degrees 4 and above.

  3. Time Reversal Acoustic Communication Using Filtered Multitone Modulation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lin; Chen, Baowei; Li, Haisen; Zhou, Tian; Li, Ruo

    2015-01-01

    The multipath spread in underwater acoustic channels is severe and, therefore, when the symbol rate of the time reversal (TR) acoustic communication using single-carrier (SC) modulation is high, the large intersymbol interference (ISI) span caused by multipath reduces the performance of the TR process and needs to be removed using the long adaptive equalizer as the post-processor. In this paper, a TR acoustic communication method using filtered multitone (FMT) modulation is proposed in order to reduce the residual ISI in the processed signal using TR. In the proposed method, FMT modulation is exploited to modulate information symbols onto separate subcarriers with high spectral containment and TR technique, as well as adaptive equalization is adopted at the receiver to suppress ISI and noise. The performance of the proposed method is assessed through simulation and real data from a trial in an experimental pool. The proposed method was compared with the TR acoustic communication using SC modulation with the same spectral efficiency. Results demonstrate that the proposed method can improve the performance of the TR process and reduce the computational complexity of adaptive equalization for post-process.

  4. Time Reversal Acoustic Communication Using Filtered Multitone Modulation

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Lin; Chen, Baowei; Li, Haisen; Zhou, Tian; Li, Ruo

    2015-01-01

    The multipath spread in underwater acoustic channels is severe and, therefore, when the symbol rate of the time reversal (TR) acoustic communication using single-carrier (SC) modulation is high, the large intersymbol interference (ISI) span caused by multipath reduces the performance of the TR process and needs to be removed using the long adaptive equalizer as the post-processor. In this paper, a TR acoustic communication method using filtered multitone (FMT) modulation is proposed in order to reduce the residual ISI in the processed signal using TR. In the proposed method, FMT modulation is exploited to modulate information symbols onto separate subcarriers with high spectral containment and TR technique, as well as adaptive equalization is adopted at the receiver to suppress ISI and noise. The performance of the proposed method is assessed through simulation and real data from a trial in an experimental pool. The proposed method was compared with the TR acoustic communication using SC modulation with the same spectral efficiency. Results demonstrate that the proposed method can improve the performance of the TR process and reduce the computational complexity of adaptive equalization for post-process. PMID:26393586

  5. Application of time reversal acoustics focusing for nonlinear imaging ms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarvazyan, Armen; Sutin, Alexander

    2001-05-01

    Time reversal acoustic (TRA) focusing of ultrasound appears to be an effective tool for nonlinear imaging in industrial and medical applications because of its ability to efficiently concentrate ultrasonic energy (close to diffraction limit) in heterogeneous media. In this study, we used two TRA systems to focus ultrasonic beams with different frequencies in coinciding focal points, thus causing the generation of ultrasonic waves with combination frequencies. Measurements of the intensity of these combination frequency waves provide information on the nonlinear parameter of medium in the focal region. Synchronized stirring of two TRA focused beams enables obtaining 3-D acoustic nonlinearity images of the object. Each of the TRA systems employed an aluminum resonator with piezotransducers glued to its facet. One of the free facets of each resonator was submerged into a water tank and served as a virtual phased array capable of ultrasound focusing and beam steering. To mimic a medium with spatially varying acoustical nonlinearity a simplest model such as a microbubble column in water was used. Microbubbles were generated by electrolysis of water using a needle electrode. An order of magnitude increase of the sum frequency component was observed when the ultrasound beams were focused in the area with bubbles.

  6. Broadband time reversed acoustic focusing and steering system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutin, Alexander; Sarvazyan, Armen; Montaldo, Gabriel; Palacio, Delphine; Bercoff, Jeremy; Tanter, Mickael; Fink, Mathias

    2001-05-01

    We present results of experimental testing and theoretical modeling of a time reversal acoustic (TRA) focusing system based on a multifaceted aluminum resonator with 15 piezoceramic transducers glued to the resonator facets. One of the facets of the resonator, a pentagon with characteristic dimension of about 30 mm, was submerged into a water tank and served as a virtual phased array which provided ultrasound focusing and beam steering in a wide frequency band (0.7-3 MHz). Ultrasonic pulses with different carrier frequencies and various complex waveforms were focused; the focal length was varied in the range of 10-55 mm and the focused beam was steered in a range of angles of +/-60 deg. The amplitude of the signal in the focal region reached 40 MPa. A theoretical model was based on an assumption that the radiating part of the resonator works as a phase conjugation screen for a spherical wave radiated from the focal point. Theoretical dependencies of the field structure on the position of the focus point and ultrasound frequency are in a good agreement with experimental results. TRA based focusing of ultrasound has numerous applications in medical diagnostics, surgery and therapy. [Work supported by NIH grant.

  7. Advantages of time reversal acoustic focusing system in biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutin, Alexander; Sarvazyan, Armen

    2005-09-01

    The development and biomedical applications of time reversal acoustics (TRA) systems for focusing and manipulating ultrasound beams are reviewed. The TRA focusing system (TRA FS) is capable to deliver ultrasound energy to the chosen region in highly inhomogeneous medium (including soft tissues and bones) with focusing efficacy hardly achievable using conventional phased array transmitters. TRA FS is able to focus and stir ultrasound beams in a 3-D volume using just a few piezoceramic transducers glued to the facets an aluminum block. Another advantage of TRA FS is its ability to produce pulses with arbitrary waveforms in a wide frequency band. A custom-designed compact multichannel TRA system operating in a wide frequency range from 0.01 to 10 MHz has been developed. Measurements of TRA field structure were conducted in a large variety of inhomogeneous tissue phantoms and ex vivo bones and soft tissues. Principles of TRA focusing optimization based on acoustical properties of the resonator material, parameters of the sonicated medium, and the coupling of the TRA resonator with the medium were developed and applied in the tested TRA systems. [Work was supported by NIH.

  8. Time-Reversal Symmetric U (1 ) Quantum Spin Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chong; Senthil, T.

    2016-01-01

    We study possible quantum U (1 ) spin liquids in three dimensions with time-reversal symmetry. We find a total of seven families of such U (1 ) spin liquids, distinguished by the properties of their emergent electric or magnetic charges. We show how these spin liquids are related to each other. Two of these classes admit nontrivial protected surface states which we describe. We show how to access all of the seven spin liquids through slave particle (parton) constructions. We also provide intuitive loop gas descriptions of their ground-state wave functions. One of these phases is the "topological Mott insulator," conventionally described as a topological insulator of an emergent fermionic "spinon." We show that this phase admits a remarkable dual description as a topological insulator of emergent fermionic magnetic monopoles. This results in a new (possibly natural) surface phase for the topological Mott insulator and a new slave particle construction. We describe some of the continuous quantum phase transitions between the different U (1 ) spin liquids. Each of these seven families of states admits a finer distinction in terms of their surface properties, which we determine by combining these spin liquids with symmetry-protected topological phases. We discuss lessons for materials such as pyrochlore quantum spin ices which may harbor a U (1 ) spin liquid. We suggest the topological Mott insulator as a possible ground state in some range of parameters for the quantum spin ice Hamiltonian.

  9. The time dependence of reversed archeomagnetic flux patches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terra-Nova, Filipe; Amit, Hagay; Hartmann, Gelvam A.; Trindade, Ricardo I. F.

    2016-04-01

    Archeomagnetic field models may provide important insights to the geodynamo. Here we investigate the existence and mobility of reversed flux patches (RFPs) in archeomagnetic field model CALS3k.4b of Korte and Constable (2011; PEPI, 188, 247-259). We introduce topological algorithms to define, identify and track RPFs. In addition, we explore the relations between RFPs and dipole changes, and apply robustness tests to the RFPs. In contrast to previous definitions, patches that reside on the geographic equator are adequately identified based on our RFPs definition that takes the magnetic equator as a reference. Most RFPs exhibit a westward drift and migrate towards higher latitudes. Undulations of the magnetic equator and RFPs oppose the axial dipole moment (ADM). Filtered models show a tracking behaviour similar to the non-filtered model, and surprisingly new RFPs occasionally emerge. The advection and diffusion of RFPs have worked in unison to yield the decrease of the ADM at recent times. The absence of RFPs in the period 550-1440 AD is related to a low in intermediate degrees of the geomagnetic power spectrum. We thus hypothesize that the RFPs are strongly dependent on intermediate spherical harmonic degrees 4 and above. Comparison of tracking of RFPs among various archeomagnetic field models was also performed and gives more complex results.

  10. Reversals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center on Educational Media and Materials for the Handicapped, Columbus, OH.

    Selected from the National Instructional Materials Information System (NIMIS)--a computer based on-line interactive retrieval system on special education materials--the bibliography covers nine materials for remediating reversals in handicapped students at the early childhood and elementary levels. Entries are presented in order of NIMIS accession…

  11. Time Reversal Signal Processing in Communications - A Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, A W; Candy, J V; Poggio, A J

    2002-01-30

    A typical communications channel is subjected to a variety of signal distortions, including multipath, that corrupt the information being transmitted and reduce the effective channel capacity. The mitigation of the multipath interference component is an ongoing concern for communication systems operating in complex environments such as might be experienced inside buildings, urban environments, and hilly or heavily wooded areas. Communications between mobile units and distributed sensors, so important to national security, are dependent upon flawless conveyance of information in complex environments. The reduction of this multipath corruption necessitates better channel equalization, i.e., the removal of channel distortion to extract the transmitted information. But, the current state of the art in channel equalization either requires a priori knowledge of the channel or the use of a known training sequence and adaptive filtering. If the ''assumed'' model within the equalization processor does not at least capture the dominant characteristics of the channel, then the received information may still be highly distorted and possibly useless. Also, the processing required for classical equalization is demanding in computational resources. To remedy this situation, many techniques have been investigated to replace classical equalization. Such a technique, the subject of this feasibility study, is Time Reversal Signal Processing (TRSP). Multipath is particularly insidious and a major factor in the deterioration of communication channels. Unlike most other characteristics that corrupt a communications channel, the detrimental effects of multipath cannot be overcome by merely increasing the transmitted power. Although the power in a signal diminishes as a function of the distance between the transmitter and receiver, multipath further degrades a signal by creating destructive interference that results in a loss of received power in a very localized area, a loss often

  12. Prestack reverse time migration for tilted transversely isotropic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Seonghyung; Hien, Doan Huy

    2013-04-01

    According to having interest in unconventional resource plays, anisotropy problem is naturally considered as an important step for improving the seismic image quality. Although it is well known prestack depth migration for the seismic reflection data is currently one of the powerful tools for imaging complex geological structures, it may lead to migration error without considering anisotropy. Asymptotic analysis of wave propagation in transversely isotropic (TI) media yields a dispersion relation of couple P- and SV wave modes that can be converted to a fourth order scalar partial differential equation (PDE). By setting the shear wave velocity equal zero, the fourth order PDE, called an acoustic wave equation for TI media, can be reduced to couple of second order PDE systems and we try to solve the second order PDE by the finite difference method (FDM). The result of this P wavefield simulation is kinematically similar to elastic and anisotropic wavefield simulation. We develop prestack depth migration algorithm for tilted transversely isotropic media using reverse time migration method (RTM). RTM is a method for imaging the subsurface using inner product of source wavefield extrapolation in forward and receiver wavefield extrapolation in backward. We show the subsurface image in TTI media using the inner product of partial derivative wavefield with respect to physical parameters and observation data. Since the partial derivative wavefields with respect to the physical parameters require extremely huge computing time, so we implemented the imaging condition by zero lag crosscorrelation of virtual source and back propagating wavefield instead of partial derivative wavefields. The virtual source is calculated directly by solving anisotropic acoustic wave equation, the back propagating wavefield on the other hand is calculated by the shot gather used as the source function in the anisotropic acoustic wave equation. According to the numerical model test for a simple

  13. Least-squares reverse-time migration of Cranfield VSP data for monitoring CO2 injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    TAN, S.; Huang, L.

    2012-12-01

    Cost-effective monitoring for carbon utilization and sequestration requires high-resolution imaging with a minimal amount of data. Least-squares reverse-time migration is a promising imaging method for this purpose. We apply least-squares reverse-time migration to a portion of the 3D vertical seismic profile data acquired at the Cranfield enhanced oil recovery field in Mississippi for monitoring CO2 injection. Conventional reverse-time migration of limited data suffers from significant image artifacts and a poor image resolution. Lease-squares reverse-time migration can reduce image artifacts and improves the image resolution. We demonstrate the significant improvements of least-squares reverse-time migration by comparing its migration images of the Cranfield VSP data with that obtained using the conventional reverse-time migration.

  14. Propagation of time-reversed Lamb waves in bovine cortical bone in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kang Il; Yoon, Suk Wang

    2015-01-01

    The present study aims to investigate the propagation of time-reversed Lamb waves in bovine cortical bone in vitro. The time-reversed Lamb waves were successfully launched at 200 kHz in 18 bovine tibiae through a time reversal process of Lamb waves. The group velocities of the time-reversed Lamb waves in the bovine tibiae were measured using the axial transmission technique. They showed a significant correlation with the cortical thickness and tended to follow the theoretical group velocity of the lowest order antisymmetrical Lamb wave fairly well, consistent with the behavior of the slow guided wave in long cortical bones.

  15. Entropy of seismic electric signals: Analysis in natural time under time reversal

    SciTech Connect

    Varotsos, P.A.; Skordas, E.S.; Sarlis, N.V.; Lazaridou, M.S.; Tanaka, H.K.

    2006-03-15

    Electric signals have been recently recorded at the Earth's surface with amplitudes appreciably larger than those hitherto reported. Their entropy in natural time is smaller than that of a 'uniform' distribution. The same holds for their entropy upon time reversal. Such a behavior, which is also found by numerical simulations in fractional Brownian motion time series and in an on-off intermittency model, stems from infinitely ranged long range temporal correlations and hence these signals are probably seismic electric signal activities (critical dynamics). This classification is strikingly confirmed since three strong nearby earthquakes occurred (which is an extremely unusual fact) after the original submission of the present paper. The entropy fluctuations are found to increase upon approaching bursting, which is reminiscent of the behavior identifying sudden cardiac death individuals when analyzing their electrocardiograms.

  16. Time-Reversal MUSIC Imaging with Time-Domain Gating Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Heedong; Ogawa, Yasutaka; Nishimura, Toshihiko; Ohgane, Takeo

    A time-reversal (TR) approach with multiple signal classification (MUSIC) provides super-resolution for detection and localization using multistatic data collected from an array antenna system. The theory of TR-MUSIC assumes that the number of antenna elements is greater than that of scatterers (targets). Furthermore, it requires many sets of frequency-domain data (snapshots) in seriously noisy environments. Unfortunately, these conditions are not practical for real environments due to the restriction of a reasonable antenna structure as well as limited measurement time. We propose an approach that treats both noise reduction and relaxation of the transceiver restriction by using a time-domain gating technique accompanied with the Fourier transform before applying the TR-MUSIC imaging algorithm. Instead of utilizing the conventional multistatic data matrix (MDM), we employ a modified MDM obtained from the gating technique. The resulting imaging functions yield more reliable images with only a few snapshots regardless of the limitation of the antenna arrays.

  17. Basic Research on Time-Reversal Waves in Deep Ocean for Long Acoustic Communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimura, Takuya; Watanabe, Yoshitaka; Ochi, Hiroshi

    2005-06-01

    We have studied the focusing property of time-reversal waves and its application to acoustic communication in shallow water. In this study, this focusing property in the deep ocean and its application to long horizontal acoustic communication are discussed. The results are as follows. Even if a time-reversal array (TRA) does not expand from the sea surface to the seabed, time-reversal signals converge, and the focusing property is not significantly affected by the depths of the focus and TRA. Then, it is revealed that by using time reversal, it is possible to enssure communication channel over a long range, through the simulation. In phase modulation, time reversal can demodulate almost only by itself, while in amplitude and phase modulation, an adaptive filter to compensates further.

  18. Electric Dipole Moments in Radioactive Nuclei, Tests of Time Reversal Symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Auerbach, N.

    2010-11-24

    The research of radioactive nuclei opens new possibilities to study fundamental symmetries, such as time reversal and reflection symmetry. Such nuclei often provide conditions to check in an optimal way certain symmetries and the violation of such symmetries. We will discuss the possibility of obtaining improved limits on violation of time reversal symmetry using pear shaped radioactive nuclei. An effective method to test time reversal invariance in the non-strange sector is to measure parity and time reversal violating (T-P-odd) electromagnetic moments, (such as the static electric dipole moment). Parity and time reversal violating components in the nuclear force may produce P-T-odd moments in nuclei which in turn induce such moments in atoms. We will discuss the possibility that in some reflection asymmetric, heavy nuclei (which are radioactive) these moments are enhanced by several orders of magnitude. Present and future experiments, which will test this idea, will be mentioned.

  19. Fast time-reversible algorithms for molecular dynamics of rigid-body systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajima, Yasuhiro; Hiyama, Miyabi; Ogata, Shuji; Kobayashi, Ryo; Tamura, Tomoyuki

    2012-06-01

    In this paper, we present time-reversible simulation algorithms for rigid bodies in the quaternion representation. By advancing a time-reversible algorithm [Y. Kajima, M. Hiyama, S. Ogata, and T. Tamura, J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 80, 114002 (2011), 10.1143/JPSJ.80.114002] that requires iterations in calculating the angular velocity at each time step, we propose two kinds of iteration-free fast time-reversible algorithms. They are easily implemented in codes. The codes are compared with that of existing algorithms through demonstrative simulation of a nanometer-sized water droplet to find their stability of the total energy and computation speeds.

  20. Fast time-reversible algorithms for molecular dynamics of rigid-body systems.

    PubMed

    Kajima, Yasuhiro; Hiyama, Miyabi; Ogata, Shuji; Kobayashi, Ryo; Tamura, Tomoyuki

    2012-06-21

    In this paper, we present time-reversible simulation algorithms for rigid bodies in the quaternion representation. By advancing a time-reversible algorithm [Y. Kajima, M. Hiyama, S. Ogata, and T. Tamura, J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 80, 114002 (2011)] that requires iterations in calculating the angular velocity at each time step, we propose two kinds of iteration-free fast time-reversible algorithms. They are easily implemented in codes. The codes are compared with that of existing algorithms through demonstrative simulation of a nanometer-sized water droplet to find their stability of the total energy and computation speeds. PMID:22779579

  1. Health monitoring of bolted joints using the time reversal method and piezoelectric transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Wang; Shaopeng, Liu; Junhua, Shao; Yourong, Li

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, the time reversal method based on piezoelectric active sensing is investigated for health monitoring of bolted joints. Experiments are conducted on bolted joints to study the relationship between the time reversal focused signal peak amplitudes and the bolt preload. Two piezoelectric patches are bonded on two different sides of a bolted joint. Any one of the piezoelectric patches can be used as an actuator to generate an ultrasonic wave, and the other one can be used as a sensor to detect the propagated wave. With the time reversal method, the received response signal is reversed in the time domain and then is re-emitted as an excitation signal to acquire the time reversal focused signals. The experimental results show that the time reversal focused signal peak amplitudes increase with the increasing bolt preload until reaching saturation, and when the bolt preload increases to a certain value, the focused signal peak amplitudes will remain unchanged. Experiments show that the surface roughness of the bolted joint impacts the saturation value. A higher surface roughness value corresponds to a higher saturation value. In addition, the proposed method has a high signal to noise ratio benefiting from the time reversal method time and space focusing ability.

  2. Compensatory plasticity in the olfactory epithelium: age, timing, and reversibility

    PubMed Central

    Barber, Casey N.

    2015-01-01

    Like other biological systems, olfaction responds “homeostatically” to enduring change in the stimulus environment. This adaptive mechanism, referred to as compensatory plasticity, has been studied almost exclusively in developing animals. Thus it is unknown if this phenomenon is limited to ontogenesis and irreversible, characteristics common to some other forms of plasticity. Here we explore the effects of odor deprivation on the adult mouse olfactory epithelium (OE) using nasal plugs to eliminate nasal airflow unilaterally. Plugs were in place for 2–6 wk after which electroolfactograms (EOGs) were recorded from the occluded and open sides of the nasal cavity. Mean EOG amplitudes were significantly greater on the occluded than on the open side. The duration of plugging did not affect the results, suggesting that maximal compensation occurs within 2 wk or less. The magnitude of the EOG difference between the open and occluded side in plugged mice was comparable to adults that had undergone surgical naris occlusion as neonates. When plugs were removed after 4 wk followed by 2 wk of recovery, mean EOG amplitudes were not significantly different between the always-open and previously plugged sides of the nasal cavity suggesting that this form of plasticity is reversible. Taken together, these results suggest that compensatory plasticity is a constitutive mechanism of olfactory receptor neurons that allows these cells to recalibrate their stimulus-response relationship to fit the statistics of their current odor environment. PMID:26269548

  3. The criterion for time symmetry of probabilistic theories and the reversibility of quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holster, A. T.

    2003-10-01

    Physicists routinely claim that the fundamental laws of physics are 'time symmetric' or 'time reversal invariant' or 'reversible'. In particular, it is claimed that the theory of quantum mechanics is time symmetric. But it is shown in this paper that the orthodox analysis suffers from a fatal conceptual error, because the logical criterion for judging the time symmetry of probabilistic theories has been incorrectly formulated. The correct criterion requires symmetry between future-directed laws and past-directed laws. This criterion is formulated and proved in detail. The orthodox claim that quantum mechanics is reversible is re-evaluated. The property demonstrated in the orthodox analysis is shown to be quite distinct from time reversal invariance. The view of Satosi Watanabe that quantum mechanics is time asymmetric is verified, as well as his view that this feature does not merely show a de facto or 'contingent' asymmetry, as commonly supposed, but implies a genuine failure of time reversal invariance of the laws of quantum mechanics. The laws of quantum mechanics would be incompatible with a time-reversed version of our universe.

  4. Time reversibility from visibility graphs of nonstationary processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacasa, Lucas; Flanagan, Ryan

    2015-08-01

    Visibility algorithms are a family of methods to map time series into networks, with the aim of describing the structure of time series and their underlying dynamical properties in graph-theoretical terms. Here we explore some properties of both natural and horizontal visibility graphs associated to several nonstationary processes, and we pay particular attention to their capacity to assess time irreversibility. Nonstationary signals are (infinitely) irreversible by definition (independently of whether the process is Markovian or producing entropy at a positive rate), and thus the link between entropy production and time series irreversibility has only been explored in nonequilibrium stationary states. Here we show that the visibility formalism naturally induces a new working definition of time irreversibility, which allows us to quantify several degrees of irreversibility for stationary and nonstationary series, yielding finite values that can be used to efficiently assess the presence of memory and off-equilibrium dynamics in nonstationary processes without the need to differentiate or detrend them. We provide rigorous results complemented by extensive numerical simulations on several classes of stochastic processes.

  5. First Experiment Result of Time-Reversal Communication in Deep Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimura, Takuya; Ochi, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Yoshitaka

    2007-07-01

    We have researched time-reversal (phase-conjugate) acoustic technology for long horizontal communication by simulations, and have proposed a method of combining time reversal and the use of an adaptive equalizer to realize communication even with a sparse time-reversal array and the communication with a moving underwater vehicle. An experiment in a real sea was executed in Suruga-bay at a frequency of 500 Hz at a distance of 10 km, and its results are described in this paper. In the trial, the projector oonlyn the array side malfunctioned. Thus only a passive time-reversal communication experiment was performed. It was confirmed that communication could be achieved using only 10 elements of the array by the proposed method at a water depth of 1,100 m.

  6. Time Reversed Electromagnetics as a Novel Method for Wireless Power Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Challa, Anu; Anlage, Steven M.; Tesla Team

    Taking advantage of ray-chaotic enclosures, time reversal has been shown to securely transmit information via short-wavelength waves between two points, yielding noise at all other sites. In this presentation, we propose a method to adapt the signal-focusing technique to electromagnetic signals in order to transmit energy to portable devices. Relying only on the time-reversal invariance properties of waves, the technique is unencumbered by the inversely-proportional-to-distance path loss or precise orientation requirements of its predecessors, making it attractive for power transfer applications. We inject a short microwave pulse into a complex, wave-chaotic chamber and collect the resulting long time-domain signal at a designated transceiver. The signal is then time reversed and emitted from the collection site, collapsing as a time-reversed replica of the initial pulse at the injection site. When amplified, this reconstruction is robust, as measured through metrics of peak-to-peak voltage and energy transfer ratio. We experimentally demonstrate that time reversed collapse can be made on a moving target, and propose a way to selectively target devices through nonlinear time-reversal. University of Maryland Gemstone Team TESLA: Frank Cangialosi, Anu Challa, Tim Furman, Tyler Grover, Patrick Healey, Ben Philip, Brett Potter, Scott Roman, Andrew Simon, Liangcheng Tao, Alex Tabatabai.

  7. Reverse time migration: A seismic processing application on the connection machine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fiebrich, Rolf-Dieter

    1987-01-01

    The implementation of a reverse time migration algorithm on the Connection Machine, a massively parallel computer is described. Essential architectural features of this machine as well as programming concepts are presented. The data structures and parallel operations for the implementation of the reverse time migration algorithm are described. The algorithm matches the Connection Machine architecture closely and executes almost at the peak performance of this machine.

  8. Mechanism, time-reversal symmetry, and topology of superconductivity in noncentrosymmetric systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheurer, M. S.

    2016-05-01

    We analyze the possible interaction-induced superconducting instabilities in noncentrosymmetric systems based on symmetries of the normal state. It is proven that pure electron-phonon coupling will always lead to a fully gapped superconductor that does not break time-reversal symmetry and is topologically trivial. We show that topologically nontrivial behavior can be induced by magnetic doping without gapping out the resulting Kramers pair of Majorana edge modes. In the case of superconductivity arising from the particle-hole fluctuations associated with a competing instability, the properties of the condensate crucially depend on the time-reversal behavior of the order parameter of the competing instability. When the order parameter preserves time-reversal symmetry, we obtain exactly the same properties as in the case of phonons. If it is odd under time reversal, the Cooper channel of the interaction will be fully repulsive leading to sign changes of the gap and making spontaneous time-reversal-symmetry breaking possible. To discuss topological properties, we focus on fully gapped time-reversal-symmetric superconductors and derive constraints on possible pairing states that yield necessary conditions for the emergence of topologically nontrivial superconductivity. These conditions might serve as a tool in the search for topological superconductors. We also discuss implications for oxide heterostructures and single-layer FeSe.

  9. Fluctuations, under time reversal, of the natural time and the entropy distinguish similar looking electric signals of different dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Varotsos, P. A.; Sarlis, N. V.; Skordas, E. S.; Lazaridou, M. S.

    2008-01-01

    We show that the scale dependence of the fluctuations of the natural time itself under time reversal provides a useful tool for the discrimination of seismic electric signals (critical dynamics) from noises emitted from man-made sources, as well as for the determination of the scaling exponent. We present recent data of electric signals detected at the Earth's surface, which confirm that the value of the entropy in natural time as well as its value under time reversal are smaller than that of the entropy of a 'uniform' distribution.

  10. An experimental feasibility study of pipeline corrosion pit detection using a piezoceramic time reversal mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Guofeng; Kong, Qingzhao; Wu, Fanghong; Ruan, Jiabiao; Song, Gangbing

    2016-03-01

    Corrosion pits on pipelines lead to the formation of small holes, which cause further pipeline damage and even catastrophic consequences. Since many pipelines are located underground, the detection of corrosion pits on pipelines in real time is still an engineering challenge. In this paper, an experimental feasibility study on pipeline corrosion pit detection using the time reversal technique with a piezoceramic transducer as a time reversal mirror was investigated. A specimen of steel pipeline section was fabricated with an artificially drilled hole, which was to mimic a corrosion pit. By gradually increasing the depth of the hole, the evolution of the corrosion pit on the pipeline was simulated and studied. Two piezoceramic transducers were employed to generate a stress wave to propagate along the pipeline and to detect the propagated stress wave. With both the properties of sensing and actuating functions, a piezoceramic transducer was used as a time reversal mirror, which first detected the propagated stress wave signal and then sent ‘back’ the time-reversed signal as a propagating stress wave. With the inherent auto-focusing property of the time reversal technique, the detected time-reversed stress wave had a distinct focused peak. A corrosion pit on a pipeline, as a structural defect, reduces the energy of the focused signal received by the piezoceramic sensor and the attenuation ratio of the focused signal depends strongly on the degree of corrosion depth. Experimental results show that the amplitudes of the focused signal peak decrease with the increase of corrosion pit depth and we can use the peak amplitude of the focused signal to determine the state of pipeline corrosion. The time reversal based method proposed in this paper shows the potential to quantitatively monitor the damage degree of corrosion pits on pipelines in real time.

  11. Retrieving the Green's function of attenuating heterogeneous media by time-reversal modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, T.

    2014-12-01

    The Green's function between two locations within which seismograms that were not physically recorded, are retrieved by cross-correlation, convolution or deconvolution and summation of other recorded wavefields (also known as seismic interferometry). More recently seismic interferometry was applied in exploration seismology by Bakulin and Calvert (2006) and Schuster et al. (2004), in ultrasound by Weaver and Lobkis (2001), in crustal seismology by Campillo and Paul (2003), Sabra et al. (2005a, b), Roux et al. (2005) and Shapiro et al. (2005), and in helioseismology by Rickett and Claerbout (1999). Theory of the retrieval of Green's function can also be represented by time-reversal propagation because of time invariance of wave equations in the lossless media. In the presence of intrinsic attenuation in the media, however, the time invariance of wave equations is invalid. My previous work present methods of using novel viscoacoustic and viscoelastic wave equations to recover the time invariance property of such wave equations for viscoacoustic and viscoelastic time-reversal modeling. More importantly, attenuation effects are compensated for during time-reversal wave propagation. In this paper, I investigate the possibility of retrieving the Green's function through time-reversal modeling techniques in attenuating media. I consider two different models to illustrate the feasibility of Green's function retrieval in attenuating media. I consider the viscoacoustic as well as the viscoelastic situation. Numerical results show that the Green's function can be retrieved in the correct amplitude and phase by time-reversal modeling with compensating both amplitude loss and dispersion effects.

  12. Effects of time-reversing array deformation in an ocean waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabra, Karim G.; Dowling, David R.

    2003-10-01

    Active acoustic time reversal is a technique for transmitting and focusing sounds recorded in complex unknown environments back to their remote point(s) of origin. It can be accomplished with a transducer array-a time-reversing array (TRA) or time-reversal mirror (TRM) that can both send and receive sound. Nearly all prior work on underwater TRA performance has involved stationary arrays. This presentation describes how random array deformation influences TRA retrofocusing in a shallow ocean environment. Both theory and simulation results are presented for frequencies of 250, 500, and 750 Hz. For harmonic signals, randomly drifting array elements degrade TRA performance by approximately 20% when the average horizontal wave number times the root-mean-square horizontal element displacement approaches one half. For randomly rising or sinking elements, TRA performance is similarly degraded when the average vertical wave number times the root-mean-square vertical displacement reaches four or five. [Work supported by ONR.

  13. On the numerical implementation of time-reversal mirrors for tomographic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masson, Yder; Cupillard, Paul; Capdeville, Yann; Romanowicz, Barbara

    2014-03-01

    A general approach for constructing numerical equivalents of time-reversal mirrors is introduced. These numerical mirrors can be used to regenerate an original wavefield locally within a confined volume of arbitrary shape. Though time-reversal mirrors were originally designed to reproduce a time-reversed version of an original wavefield, the proposed method is independent of the time direction and can be used to regenerate a wavefield going either forward in time or backward in time. Applications to computational seismology and tomographic imaging of such local wavefield reconstructions are discussed. The key idea of the method is to directly express the source terms constituting the time-reversal mirror by introducing a spatial window function into the wave equation. The method is usable with any numerical method based on the discrete form of the wave equation, for example, with finite difference (FD) methods and with finite/spectral elements methods. The obtained mirrors are perfect in the sense that no additional error is introduced into the reconstructed wavefields apart from rounding errors that are inherent in floating-point computations. They are fully transparent as they do not interact with waves that are not part of the original wavefield and are permeable to these. We establish a link between some hybrid methods introduced in seismology, such as wave-injection, and the proposed time-reversal mirrors. Numerical examples based on FD and spectral elements methods in the acoustic, the elastic and the visco-elastic cases are presented. They demonstrate the accuracy of the method and illustrate some possible applications. An alternative implementation of the time-reversal mirrors based on the discretization of the surface integrals in the representation theorem is also introduced. Though it is out of the scope of the paper, the proposed method also apply to numerical schemes for modelling of other types of waves such as electro-magnetic waves.

  14. Audio signal separation via a combination procedure of time-reversal and deconvolution process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Bo-Hsien; Too, Gee-Pinn; Lee, Sony

    2010-07-01

    Time-reversal method (TRM) is based on principle of reciprocity of sound by propagating of a reversal signal in time series to compensate distortion due to path effect in propagation and to focus the signal at the original source location. In recent years, the technique has been applied in optics, ultrasound and underwater acoustic communication. In the present study, a procedure for audio signal separation is developed by applying time-reversal and deconvolution process. The procedure separates sources from audio signal in time domain. The advantages of this procedure are to separate a specific source from a combination signal of multiple sources and to reduce reverberation effectively. Finally, a deconvolution process of finding impulse response function (IRF) is developed where single value decomposition (SVD) and Tikhonov regularization process are used to solve ill-conditioned and singular linear systems. In addition, the effect of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and number of array sensors are discussed in details.

  15. Application of Reverse Transcription-PCR and Real-Time PCR in Nanotoxicity Research

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Yiqun; Wan, Rong; Zhang, Qunwei

    2016-01-01

    Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) is a relatively simple and inexpensive technique to determine the expression level of target genes and is widely used in biomedical science research including nanotoxicology studies for semiquantitative analysis. Real-time PCR allows for the detection of PCR amplification in the exponential growth phase of the reaction and is much more quantitative than traditional RT-PCR. Although a number of kits and reagents for RT-PCR and real-time PCR are commercially available, the basic principles are the same. Here, we describe the procedures for total RNA isolation by using TRI Reagent, for reverse transcription (RT) by M-MLV reverse transcriptase, and for PCR by GoTaq® DNA Polymerase. And real-time PCR will be performed on an iQ5 multicolor real-time PCR detection system by using iQ™ SYBR Green Supermix. PMID:22975959

  16. Time reversal invariance, entropy production and work dissipation in stochastic thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaveau, B.; Moreau, M.

    2015-07-01

    We consider the work production in a mesosccopic Markov system obeying discrete stochastic dynamics with time-dependent constraints. Using asymmetry relations presented elsewhere, which result from time reversal invariance of the underlying microscopic system, we derive, beside known equalities in stochastic thermodynamics, a new result: the "Carnot equality", that generalizes the Carnot relation for macroscopic bi-thermal engines. Such equalities, which extend the classical inequalities of thermodynamics, result from microscopic time reversal invariance only. On the other hand we show that, on the mesoscopic level, notions such as entropy production and power dissipation per transition cannot always be defined. In the absence of a precise mechanical model, such definitions are possible if, and only if, the asymmetry relations due to microscopic time reversal invariance are supplemented by space symmetry relations, equivalent to parity, which are not always satisfied. This article is supplemented with comments by J.M.R. Parrondo and L. Granger and a final reply by the authors.

  17. Bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) detection of simulated echoes from normal and time-reversed clicks.

    PubMed

    Finneran, James J; Wu, Teri; Borror, Nancy; Tormey, Megan; Brewer, Arial; Black, Amy; Bakhtiari, Kimberly

    2013-12-01

    In matched filter processing, a stored template of the emitted sonar pulse is compared to echoes to locate individual replicas of the emitted pulse embedded in the echo stream. A number of experiments with bats have suggested that bats utilize matched filter processing for target ranging, but not for target detection. For dolphins, the few available data suggest that dolphins do not utilize matched filter processing. In this study, the effect of time-reversing a dolphin's emitted click was investigated. If the dolphin relied upon matched filter processing, time-reversal of the click would be expected to reduce the correlation between the (unaltered) click and the echoes and therefore lower detection performance. Two bottlenose dolphins were trained to perform a phantom echo detection task. On a small percentage of trials ("probe trials"), a dolphin's emitted click was time-reversed before interacting with the phantom echo system. Data from the normal and time-reversed trials were then analyzed and compared. There were no significant differences in detection performance or click emissions between the normal and time-reversed conditions for either subject, suggesting that the dolphins did not utilize matched filter processing for this echo detection task.

  18. Efficiency Statistics and Bounds for Systems with Broken Time-Reversal Symmetry.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jian-Hua; Agarwalla, Bijay Kumar; Segal, Dvira

    2015-07-24

    Universal properties of the statistics of stochastic efficiency for mesoscopic time-reversal symmetry broken energy transducers are revealed in the Gaussian approximation. We also discuss how the second law of thermodynamics restricts the statistics of stochastic efficiency. The tight-coupling limit becomes unfavorable, characterized by an infinitely broad distribution of efficiency at all times, when time-reversal symmetry breaking leads to an asymmetric Onsager response matrix. The underlying physics is demonstrated through the quantum Hall effect and further elaborated in a triple-quantum-dot three-terminal thermoelectric engine.

  19. Effects of time-reversing array deformation in an ocean wave guide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabra, Karim G.; Dowling, David R.

    2004-06-01

    Active acoustic time reversal is a technique for focusing sounds recorded in complex unknown environments back to their remote point(s) of origin. It can be accomplished with a transducer array-a time-reversing array (TRA)-that sends and receives sound. Nearly all prior work on TRA performance has involved stationary arrays. This letter describes how random array deformation influences TRA retrofocusing in shallow ocean environments. For harmonic signals, randomly drifting array elements degrade TRA performance by ~20% when the average horizontal wavenumber times the root-mean-square horizontal element displacement approaches 0.5. TRA focusing should be less sensitive to vertical element drift.

  20. Efficiency Statistics and Bounds for Systems with Broken Time-Reversal Symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Jian-Hua; Agarwalla, Bijay Kumar; Segal, Dvira

    2015-07-01

    Universal properties of the statistics of stochastic efficiency for mesoscopic time-reversal symmetry broken energy transducers are revealed in the Gaussian approximation. We also discuss how the second law of thermodynamics restricts the statistics of stochastic efficiency. The tight-coupling limit becomes unfavorable, characterized by an infinitely broad distribution of efficiency at all times, when time-reversal symmetry breaking leads to an asymmetric Onsager response matrix. The underlying physics is demonstrated through the quantum Hall effect and further elaborated in a triple-quantum-dot three-terminal thermoelectric engine.

  1. Time-resolved imaging of pulse-induced magnetization reversal with a microwave assist field

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Siddharth; Rhensius, Jan; Bisig, Andre; Mawass, Mohamad-Assaad; Weigand, Markus; Kläui, Mathias; Bhatia, Charanjit S.; Yang, Hyunsoo

    2015-01-01

    The reversal of the magnetization under the influence of a field pulse has been previously predicted to be an incoherent process with several competing phenomena such as domain wall relaxation, spin wave-mediated instability regions, and vortex-core mediated reversal dynamics. However, there has been no study on the direct observation of the switching process with the aid of a microwave signal input. We report a time-resolved imaging study of magnetization reversal in patterned magnetic structures under the influence of a field pulse with microwave assistance. The microwave frequency is varied to demonstrate the effect of resonant microwave-assisted switching. We observe that the switching process is dominated by spin wave dynamics generated as a result of magnetic instabilities in the structures, and identify the frequencies that are most dominant in magnetization reversal. PMID:26023723

  2. Time resolved transport studies of magnetization reversal in orthogonal spin transfer magnetic tunnel junction devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, Georg; Chaves-O'Flynn, Gabriel; Kent, Andrew D.; Kardasz, Bartek; Watts, Steve; Pinarbasi, Mustafa

    2014-08-01

    In this work we report on time resolved magnetization reversal driven by spin transfer torque in an orthogonal spin transfer (OST) magnetic tunnel junction device. We focus on the transitions from parallel (P) to antiparallel (AP) states and the reverse transitions (AP to P) under the influence of 10 ns voltage pulses. The electrical response is monitored with a fast real-time oscilloscope and thus timing information of the reversal process is obtained. The P to AP transition switching time decreases with increasing current and shows only direct switching behavior. The AP to P transition shows similar behavior, but has a broader distribution of switching times at high currents. The rare AP to P switching events that occur at later times are due to the occurrence of a pre-oscillation, which could be identified in time resolve voltage traces. A possible origin of these pre-oscillations is seen in micromagnetic simulations, where they are associated with the breakdown of the uniform precession of the magnetization, and lead to reversal of the magnetization at later times.

  3. Time-resolved VUV spectroscopy in the EXTRAP-T2 reversed field pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedqvist, Anders; Rachlew-Källne, Elisabeth

    1998-09-01

    Time-resolved VUV spectroscopy has been used to investigate the effects of impurities in a reversed field pinch operating with a resistive shell. Results of electron temperature, impurity ion densities, particle confinement time and 0741-3335/40/9/004/img1 together with a description of the interpretation and the equipment are presented.

  4. Structural health monitoring using time reversal and cracked rod spectral element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucena, R. L.; Dos Santos, J. M. C.

    2016-10-01

    Structural health monitoring (SHM) has received substantial attention in the last decades. Damage detection methods based on dynamic analysis seem to be appropriate to detect large damages, but fail for small ones. Alternative methods use elastic wave propagation allowing a quick and long range test. In this paper, a new approach based on the combination of Time Reversal Method (TRM) and Spectral Element Method (SEM) is proposed to perform structural damage detection. The main novelty is to combine wave-based spectral element model together with time reversal signal processing. Although the methodology is evaluated by numerical simulation, this combination of numerical modeling and time reversal signal processing can be applied as an experimental approach to provide a useful tool for damage detection. Simulated examples of the damage detection method using rod-like structures are illustrated and the results discussed and compared with those from literature.

  5. Multi-channel time-reversal receivers for multi and 1-bit implementations

    DOEpatents

    Candy, James V.; Chambers, David H.; Guidry, Brian L.; Poggio, Andrew J.; Robbins, Christopher L.

    2008-12-09

    A communication system for transmitting a signal through a channel medium comprising digitizing the signal, time-reversing the digitized signal, and transmitting the signal through the channel medium. In one embodiment a transmitter is adapted to transmit the signal, a multiplicity of receivers are adapted to receive the signal, a digitizer digitizes the signal, and a time-reversal signal processor is adapted to time-reverse the digitized signal. An embodiment of the present invention includes multi bit implementations. Another embodiment of the present invention includes 1-bit implementations. Another embodiment of the present invention includes a multiplicity of receivers used in the step of transmitting the signal through the channel medium.

  6. Enhanced focal-resolution of dipole sources using aeroacoustic time-reversal in a wind tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mimani, A.; Moreau, D. J.; Prime, Z.; Doolan, C. J.

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents the first application of the Point-Time-Reversal-Sponge-Layer (PTRSL) damping technique to enhance the focal-resolution of experimental flow-induced dipole sources obtained using the Time-Reversal (TR) source localization method. Experiments were conducted in an Anechoic Wind Tunnel for the case of a full-span cylinder located in a low Mach number cross-flow. The far-field acoustic pressure sampled using two line arrays of microphones located above and below the cylinder exhibited a dominant Aeolian tone. The aeroacoustic TR simulations were implemented using the time-reversed signals whereby the source map revealed the lift-dipole nature at the Aeolian tone frequency. A PTRSL (centred at the predicted dipole location) was shown to reduce the size of dipole focal spots to 7/20th of a wavelength as compared to one wavelength without its use, thereby dramatically enhancing the focal-resolution of the TR technique.

  7. Time-reversal acoustics and ultrasound-assisted convection-enhanced drug delivery to the brain.

    PubMed

    Olbricht, William; Sistla, Manjari; Ghandi, Gaurav; Lewis, George; Sarvazyan, Armen

    2013-08-01

    Time-reversal acoustics is an effective way of focusing ultrasound deep inside heterogeneous media such as biological tissues. Convection-enhanced delivery is a method of delivering drugs into the brain by infusing them directly into the brain interstitium. These two technologies are combined in a focusing system that uses a "smart needle" to simultaneously infuse fluid into the brain and provide the necessary feedback for focusing ultrasound using time-reversal acoustics. The effects of time-reversal acoustics-focused ultrasound on the spatial distribution of infused low- and high-molecular weight tracer molecules are examined in live, anesthetized rats. Results show that exposing the rat brain to focused ultrasound significantly increases the penetration of infused compounds into the brain. The addition of stabilized microbubbles enhances the effect of ultrasound exposure.

  8. Time-reversal-symmetry breaking in circuit-QED-based photon lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, Jens; Le Hur, Karyn; Girvin, S. M.; Houck, Andrew A.

    2010-10-15

    Breaking time-reversal symmetry is a prerequisite for accessing certain interesting many-body states such as fractional quantum Hall states. For polaritons, charge neutrality prevents magnetic fields from providing a direct symmetry-breaking mechanism and, similar to the situation in ultracold atomic gases, an effective magnetic field has to be synthesized. We show that in the circuit-QED architecture, this can be achieved by inserting simple superconducting circuits into the resonator junctions. In the presence of such coupling elements, constant parallel magnetic and electric fields suffice to break time-reversal symmetry. We support these theoretical predictions with numerical simulations for realistic sample parameters, specify general conditions under which time reversal is broken, and discuss the application to chiral Fock-state transfer, an on-chip circulator, and tunable band structure for the Kagome lattice.

  9. Time-reversal acoustics and ultrasound-assisted convection-enhanced drug delivery to the brain.

    PubMed

    Olbricht, William; Sistla, Manjari; Ghandi, Gaurav; Lewis, George; Sarvazyan, Armen

    2013-08-01

    Time-reversal acoustics is an effective way of focusing ultrasound deep inside heterogeneous media such as biological tissues. Convection-enhanced delivery is a method of delivering drugs into the brain by infusing them directly into the brain interstitium. These two technologies are combined in a focusing system that uses a "smart needle" to simultaneously infuse fluid into the brain and provide the necessary feedback for focusing ultrasound using time-reversal acoustics. The effects of time-reversal acoustics-focused ultrasound on the spatial distribution of infused low- and high-molecular weight tracer molecules are examined in live, anesthetized rats. Results show that exposing the rat brain to focused ultrasound significantly increases the penetration of infused compounds into the brain. The addition of stabilized microbubbles enhances the effect of ultrasound exposure. PMID:23927197

  10. Comparison study of time reversal OFDM acoustic communication with vector and scalar sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhongkang; Zhang, Hongtao; Xie, Zhe

    2012-11-01

    To compare the performance of time reversal orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) acoustic communication on vector and scalar sensors, the vector and scalar acoustic fields were modeled. Time reversal OFDM acoustic communication was then simulated for each sensor type. These results are compared with data from the CAPEx'09 experiment. The abilityof particle velocity channels to achieve reliable acoustic communication, as predicted by the model, is confirmed with the experiment data. Experimental results show that vector receivers can reduce the required array size, in comparisonto hydrophone arrays, whileproviding comparable communication performance.

  11. Reconstructed imaging of acoustic cloak using time-lapse reversal method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chen; Cheng, Ying; Xu, Jian-yi; Li, Bo; Liu, Xiao-jun

    2014-08-01

    We proposed and investigated a solution to the inverse acoustic cloak problem, an anti-stealth technology to make cloaks visible, using the time-lapse reversal (TLR) method. The TLR method reconstructs the image of an unknown acoustic cloak by utilizing scattered acoustic waves. Compared to previous anti-stealth methods, the TLR method can determine not only the existence of a cloak but also its exact geometric information like definite shape, size, and position. Here, we present the process for TLR reconstruction based on time reversal invariance. This technology may have potential applications in detecting various types of cloaks with different geometric parameters.

  12. Quantum-Enhanced Sensing Based on Time Reversal of Nonlinear Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Linnemann, D; Strobel, H; Muessel, W; Schulz, J; Lewis-Swan, R J; Kheruntsyan, K V; Oberthaler, M K

    2016-07-01

    We experimentally demonstrate a nonlinear detection scheme exploiting time-reversal dynamics that disentangles continuous variable entangled states for feasible readout. Spin-exchange dynamics of Bose-Einstein condensates is used as the nonlinear mechanism which not only generates entangled states but can also be time reversed by controlled phase imprinting. For demonstration of a quantum-enhanced measurement we construct an active atom SU(1,1) interferometer, where entangled state preparation and nonlinear readout both consist of parametric amplification. This scheme is capable of exhausting the quantum resource by detecting solely mean atom numbers. Controlled nonlinear transformations widen the spectrum of useful entangled states for applied quantum technologies. PMID:27419565

  13. The Born Rule and Time-Reversal Symmetry of Quantum Equations of Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilyin, Aleksey V.

    2016-07-01

    It was repeatedly underlined in literature that quantum mechanics cannot be considered a closed theory if the Born Rule is postulated rather than derived from the first principles. In this work the Born Rule is derived from the time-reversal symmetry of quantum equations of motion. The derivation is based on a simple functional equation that takes into account properties of probability, as well as the linearity and time-reversal symmetry of quantum equations of motion. The derivation presented in this work also allows to determine certain limits to applicability of the Born Rule.

  14. Time reverse modeling of acoustic emissions in a reinforced concrete beam.

    PubMed

    Kocur, Georg Karl; Saenger, Erik H; Grosse, Christian U; Vogel, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    The time reverse modeling (TRM) is applied for signal-based acoustic emission (AE) analysis of reinforced concrete (RC) specimens. TRM uses signals obtained from physical experiments as input. The signals are re-emitted numerically into a structure in a time-reversed manner, where the wavefronts interfere and appear as dominant concentrations of energy at the origin of the AE. The experimental and numerical results presented for selected AE signals confirm that TRM is capable of localizing AE activity in RC caused by concrete cracking. The accuracy of the TRM results is corroborated by three-dimensional crack distributions obtained from X-ray computed tomography images.

  15. Time reverse modeling of acoustic emissions in a reinforced concrete beam.

    PubMed

    Kocur, Georg Karl; Saenger, Erik H; Grosse, Christian U; Vogel, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    The time reverse modeling (TRM) is applied for signal-based acoustic emission (AE) analysis of reinforced concrete (RC) specimens. TRM uses signals obtained from physical experiments as input. The signals are re-emitted numerically into a structure in a time-reversed manner, where the wavefronts interfere and appear as dominant concentrations of energy at the origin of the AE. The experimental and numerical results presented for selected AE signals confirm that TRM is capable of localizing AE activity in RC caused by concrete cracking. The accuracy of the TRM results is corroborated by three-dimensional crack distributions obtained from X-ray computed tomography images. PMID:26518525

  16. Effective time reversal and echo dynamics in the transverse field Ising model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Markus; Kehrein, Stefan

    2016-09-01

    The question of thermalisation in closed quantum many-body systems has received a lot of attention in the past few years. An intimately related question is whether a closed quantum system shows irreversible dynamics. However, irreversibility and what we actually mean by this in a quantum many-body system with unitary dynamics has been explored very little. In this work we investigate the dynamics of the Ising model in a transverse magnetic field involving an imperfect effective time reversal. We propose a definition of irreversibility based on the echo peak decay of observables. Inducing the effective time reversal by different protocols we find an algebraic decay of the echo peak heights or an ever persisting echo peak indicating that the dynamics in this model is well reversible.

  17. Time-Reversal Imaging of seismic sources and application to recent large Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montagner, J.; Larmat, C.; Fink, M.; Capdeville, Y.; Tourin, A.

    2006-12-01

    The occurrence of the disastrous Sumatra-Andaman earthquake on dec. 26, 2004 makes it necessary to develop innovative techniques for studying the complex spatio-temporal characteristics of rupture. The concept of time-reversal (hereafter referred to as TR) was previously successfully applied for acoustic waves in many fields such as medical imaging, underwater acoustics and non destructive testing. The increasing power of computers and numerical methods (such as spectral element methods) enables one to simulate more and more accurately the propagation of seismic waves in heterogeneous media and to develop new applications, in particular time reversal in the three-dimensional Earth. We present here the first applications at the global scale of TR with associated reverse movies of seismic waves propagation by sending back time--reversed seismograms. We show that seismic wave energy is refocused at the right location and the right time of the earthquake. When TR is applied to the Sumatra-- Andaman earthquake (26 dec. 2004), the migration of the rupture from the south towards the north is retrieved. All corresponding movies can be downloaded at the following webpage: http://www.gps.caltech.edu/~carene Other applications to recent smaller earthquakes will be also shown. Therefore, the technique of TR is potentially interesting for automatically locating earthquakes in space and time and for constraining the spatio-temporal history of complex earthquakes .

  18. Time Reversal Mirrors and Cross Correlation Functions in Acoustic Wave Propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fishman, Louis; Jonsson, B. Lars G.; de Hoop, Maarten V.

    2009-03-01

    In time reversal acoustics (TRA), a signal is recorded by an array of transducers, time reversed, and then retransmitted into the configuration. The retransmitted signal propagates back through the same medium and retrofocuses on the source that generated the signal. If the transducer array is a single, planar (flat) surface, then this configuration is referred to as a planar, one-sided, time reversal mirror (TRM). In signal processing, for example, in active-source seismic interferometry, the measurement of the wave field at two distinct receivers, generated by a common source, is considered. Cross correlating these two observations and integrating the result over the sources yield the cross correlation function (CCF). Adopting the TRM experiments as the basic starting point and identifying the kinematically correct correspondences, it is established that the associated CCF signal processing constructions follow in a specific, infinite recording time limit. This perspective also provides for a natural rationale for selecting the Green's function components in the TRM and CCF expressions. For a planar, one-sided, TRM experiment and the corresponding CCF signal processing construction, in a three-dimensional homogeneous medium, the exact expressions are explicitly calculated, and the connecting limiting relationship verified. Finally, the TRM and CCF results are understood in terms of the underlying, governing, two-way wave equation, its corresponding time reversal invariance (TRI) symmetry, and the absence of TRI symmetry in the associated one-way wave equations, highlighting the role played by the evanescent modal contributions.

  19. Time reversal invariance violating and parity conserving effects in neutron-deuteron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Young-Ho; Gudkov, Vladimir; Lazauskas, Rimantas

    2011-08-15

    Time reversal invariance violating and parity conserving effects for low-energy elastic neutron-deuteron scattering are calculated for meson exchange and effective field theory type potentials in a distorted wave-born approximation using realistic hadronic wave functions, obtained by solving three-body Faddeev equations in configuration space.

  20. The invariance of classical electromagnetism under Charge-conjugation, Parity and Time-reversal (CPT) transformations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.

    1989-01-01

    The invariance of classical electromagnetism under charge-conjugation, parity, and time-reversal (CPT) is studied by considering the motion of a charged particle in electric and magnetic fields. Upon applying CPT transformations to various physical quantities and noting that the motion still behaves physically demonstrates invariance.

  1. Performance of an underwater acoustic volume array using time-reversal focusing.

    PubMed

    Root, Joseph A; Rogers, Peter H

    2002-11-01

    Time reversal permits acoustic focusing and beam forming in inhomogeneous and/or high-scattering environments. A volumetric array geometry can suppress back lobes and can fit a large, powerful array of elements into small spaces, like the free-water spaces on submarines. This research investigates applying the time-reversal method to an underwater acoustic volume array. The experiments evaluate the focusing performance of a 27-element volume array when different scattering structures are present within the volume of the array. The array is arranged in a 3x3x3 cubic matrix configuration with 18.75-cm vertical and horizontal element spacing. The system utilizes second-derivative Gaussian pulses to focus on a point 30 cm from the array. Results include a comparison between time-reversal focusing and standard focusing, an evaluation of the volume array's ability to suppress back lobes, and an analysis of how different scattering environments affect focal region size. Potential underwater applications for a volume array using time reversal include acoustic imaging, naval mine hunting, sonar, and underwater communications.

  2. Effects of adhesive, host plate, transducer and excitation parameters on time reversibility of ultrasonic Lamb waves.

    PubMed

    Agrahari, J K; Kapuria, S

    2016-08-01

    To develop an effective baseline-free damage detection strategy using the time-reversal process (TRP) of Lamb waves in thin walled structures, it is essential to develop a good understanding of the parameters that affect the amplitude dispersion and consequently the time reversibility of the Lamb wave signal. In this paper, the effects of adhesive layer between the transducers and the host plate, the tone burst count of the excitation signal, the plate thickness, and the piezoelectric transducer thickness on the time reversibility of Lamb waves in metallic plates are studied using experiments and finite element simulations. The effect of adhesive layer on the forward propagation response and frequency tuning has been also studied. The results show that contrary to the general expectation, the quality of the reconstruction of the input signal after the TRP may increase with the increase in the adhesive layer thickness at certain frequency ranges. Similarly, an increase in the tone burst count resulting in a narrowband signal does not necessarily enhance the time reversibility at all frequencies, contrary to what has been reported earlier. For a given plate thickness, a thinner transducer yields a better reconstruction, but for a given transducer thickness, the similarity of the reconstructed signal may not be always higher for a thicker plate. It is important to study these effects to achieve the best quality of reconstruction in undamaged plates, for effective damage detection. PMID:27176646

  3. Stopping and time reversal of light in dynamic photonic structures via Bloch oscillations.

    PubMed

    Longhi, Stefano

    2007-02-01

    It is theoretically shown that storage and time reversal of light pulses can be achieved in a coupled-resonator optical waveguide by dynamic tuning of the cavity resonances without maintaining the translational invariance of the system. The control exploits the Bloch oscillation motion of a light pulse in the presence of a refractive index ramp, and it is therefore rather different from the mechanism of adiabatic band compression and reversal proposed by Yanik and Fan in recent works [Phys. Rev. Lett., 92, 083901 (2004); 93, 173903 (2004)].

  4. Effect of ocean currents on the performance of a time-reversing array in shallow water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabra, Karim G.; Dowling, David R.

    2003-12-01

    Active acoustic time reversal may be accomplished by recording sounds with an array of transducers-a time-reversing array (TRA) or time-reversal mirror (TRM)-and then replaying the recorded and time-reversed sounds from the same array to produce back-propagating waves that converge at the location(s) of the remote sound source(s). Future active sonar and underwater communication systems suitable for use in unknown shallow ocean waters may be developed from the automatic spatial and temporal focusing properties of TRAs. However, ocean currents affect time reversal because they alter acoustic reciprocity in the environment. This paper presents a theoretical and computational investigation into how ocean currents influence TRA retrofocusing in shallow ocean environments for various array orientations. The case of TRA retrofocusing in a three-dimensional range-independent sound channel with a steady horizontal ocean current is covered here, based on a normal-mode propagation model valid for low Mach number currents. The main finding is that in the presence of ocean currents (typically <1 m/s), a TRA performs well (the associated retrofocus amplitude decay is less than 1 dB) except that a retrofocus shift (up to a few wavelengths at 500 Hz at a range of 2.5 km) may occur due to the differing interaction between the ocean current profile and each acoustic normal mode. In addition, TRA performance is predicted to depend on the array orientation relative to the ocean current direction, especially for horizontal arrays.

  5. Effect of ocean currents on the performance of a time-reversing array in shallow water.

    PubMed

    Sabra, Karim G; Dowling, David R

    2003-12-01

    Active acoustic time reversal may be accomplished by recording sounds with an array of transducers--a time-reversing array (TRA) or time-reversal mirror (TRM)--and then replaying the recorded and time-reversed sounds from the same array to produce back-propagating waves that converge at the location(s) of the remote sound source(s). Future active sonar and underwater communication systems suitable for use in unknown shallow ocean waters may be developed from the automatic spatial and temporal focusing properties of TRAs. However, ocean currents affect time reversal because they alter acoustic reciprocity in the environment. This paper presents a theoretical and computational investigation into how ocean currents influence TRA retrofocusing in shallow ocean environments for various array orientations. The case of TRA retrofocusing in a three-dimensional range-independent sound channel with a steady horizontal ocean current is covered here, based on a normal-mode propagation model valid for low Mach number currents. The main finding is that in the presence of ocean currents (typically <1 m/s), a TRA performs well (the associated retrofocus amplitude decay is less than 1 dB) except that a retrofocus shift (up to a few wavelengths at 500 Hz at a range of 2.5 km) may occur due to the differing interaction between the ocean current profile and each acoustic normal mode. In addition, TRA performance is predicted to depend on the array orientation relative to the ocean current direction, especially for horizontal arrays.

  6. Time and temperature dependences of the magnetization reversal in a Co /Pd multilayer film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, C. Scott; Harrell, J. W.; Matsunuma, S.

    2006-09-01

    The time and temperature dependences of the magnetization reversal have been measured in a high-coercivity Co /Pd multilayer film characterized by nucleation and domain wall motion. The time and field dependences of magnetic relaxation curves at room temperature were interpreted in terms of an energy barrier that depends linearly on reverse field, suggesting a Sharrock-type [M. P. Sharrock and J. T. McKinney, IEEE Trans. Magn. 17, 3020 (1981)] equation for the time and temperature dependences of coercivity with unity exponent. The sweep rate and temperature dependence of the coercivity were analyzed using the Sharrock equation to obtain the temperature dependence of the intrinsic, short-time coercivity H0 and the zero-field energy barrier E0. A single power law behavior was found for H0 versus the saturation magnetization Ms.

  7. Time-reversal formalism applied to maximal bipartite entanglement: Theoretical and experimental exploration

    SciTech Connect

    Laforest, M.; Baugh, J.; Laflamme, R.

    2006-03-15

    Within the context of quantum teleportation, a proposed interpretation of bipartite entanglement describes teleportation as consisting of a qubit of information evolving along and against the flow of time of an external observer. We investigate the physicality of such a model by applying time reversal to the Schroedinger equation in the teleportation context. To do so, we first present the theory of time reversal applied to the circuit model. We then show that the outcome of a teleportationlike circuit is consistent with the usual tensor product treatment and is therefore independent of the physical quantum system used to encode the information. Finally, we illustrate these concepts with a proof-of-principle experiment on a liquid-state NMR quantum-information processor. The experimental results are consistent with the interpretation that information can be seen as flowing backward in time through entanglement.

  8. Gradual time reversal in thermo- and photo-acoustic tomography within a resonant cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holman, B.; Kunyansky, L.

    2015-03-01

    Thermo- and photo-acoustic tomography require reconstructing initial acoustic pressure in a body from time series of pressure measured on a surface surrounding the body. For the classical case of free space wave propagation, various reconstruction techniques are well known. However, some novel measurement schemes place the object of interest between reflecting walls that form a de facto resonant cavity. In this case, known methods (including the popular time reversal algorithm) cannot be used. The inverse problem involving reflecting walls can be solved by the gradual time reversal method we propose here. It consists in solving back in time on the interval [0,T] the initial/boundary value problem for the wave equation, with the Dirichlet boundary data multiplied by a smooth cutoff function. If T is sufficiently large one obtains a good approximation to the initial pressure; in the limit of large T such an approximation converges (under certain conditions) to the exact solution.

  9. Reversing Stimulus Timing in Visual Conditioning Leads to Memories with Opposite Valence in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Vogt, Katrin; Yarali, Ayse; Tanimoto, Hiromu

    2015-01-01

    Animals need to associate different environmental stimuli with each other regardless of whether they temporally overlap or not. Drosophila melanogaster displays olfactory trace conditioning, where an odor is followed by electric shock reinforcement after a temporal gap, leading to conditioned odor avoidance. Reversing the stimulus timing in olfactory conditioning results in the reversal of memory valence such that an odor that follows shock is later on approached (i.e. relief conditioning). Here, we explored the effects of stimulus timing on memory in another sensory modality, using a visual conditioning paradigm. We found that flies form visual memories of opposite valence depending on stimulus timing and can associate a visual stimulus with reinforcement despite being presented with a temporal gap. These results suggest that associative memories with non-overlapping stimuli and the effect of stimulus timing on memory valence are shared across sensory modalities. PMID:26430885

  10. Effect of magnesium sulphate on sugammadex reversal time for neuromuscular blockade: a randomised controlled study.

    PubMed

    Germano Filho, P A; Cavalcanti, I L; Barrucand, L; Verçosa, N

    2015-08-01

    Magnesium potentiates neuromuscular blockade. Sugammadex reverses rocuronium-induced blockade. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of pre-treatment with magnesium sulphate on sugammadex reversal time for neuromuscular blockade. Seventy-three patients were randomly assigned to receive magnesium sulphate (40 mg.kg(-1) ) or saline intravenously. After anaesthetic induction, continuous train-of-four monitoring was performed and rocuronium was administered (0.6 mg.kg(-1) ). When a second twitch appeared, the patients received sugammadex (2 mg.kg(-1) ). The median (IQR [range]) reversal time of moderate neuromuscular blockade to a train-of-four ratio of 0.9 facilitated by sugammadex was 115 (93-177.5 [68-315]) s in the magnesium group and 120 (105-140 [70-298]) s in the saline group (p = 0.79). The median (IQR [range]) clinical duration was 45 (35.5-53 [22-102]) min in the magnesium group and 37 (31-43 [19-73]) min in the saline group (p = 0.031). Pre-treatment with magnesium did not significantly affect sugammadex reversal time of moderate neuromuscular blockade induced by rocuronium.

  11. Imaging of a Defect in Thin Plates Using the Time Reversal of Single Mode Lamb Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Hyunjo; Lee, Jung-Sik; Bae, Sung-Min

    2011-06-01

    This paper presents an analytical investigation for a baseline-free imaging of a defect in plate-like structures using the time-reversal of Lamb waves. We first consider the flexural wave (A0 mode) propagation in a plate containing a defect, and reception and time reversal process of the output signal at the receiver. The received output signal is then composed of two parts: a directly propagated wave and a scattered wave from the defect. The time reversal of these waves recovers the original input signal, and produces two additional sidebands that contain the time-of-flight information on the defect location. One of the side band signals is then extracted as a pure defect signal. A defect localization image is then constructed from a beamforming technique based on the time-frequency analysis of the side band signal for each transducer pair in a network of sensors. The simulation results show that the proposed scheme enables the accurate, baseline-free detection of a defect, so that experimental studies are needed to verify the proposed method and to be applied to real structure.

  12. A Baseline-Free Defect Imaging Technique in Plates Using Time Reversal of Lamb Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyunjo, Jeong; Sungjong, Cho; Wei, Wei

    2011-06-01

    We present an analytical investigation for a baseline-free imaging of a defect in plate-like structures using the time-reversal of Lamb waves. We first consider the flexural wave (A0 mode) propagation in a plate containing a defect, and reception and time reversal process of the output signal at the receiver. The received output signal is then composed of two parts: a directly propagated wave and a scattered wave from the defect. The time reversal of these waves recovers the original input signal, and produces two additional sidebands that contain the time-of-flight information on the defect location. One of the side-band signals is then extracted as a pure defect signal. A defect localization image is then constructed from a beamforming technique based on the time-frequency analysis of the side band signal for each transducer pair in a network of sensors. The simulation results show that the proposed scheme enables the accurate, baseline-free imaging of a defect.

  13. Time reversal for photoacoustic tomography based on the wave equation of Nachman, Smith, and Waag.

    PubMed

    Kowar, Richard

    2014-02-01

    One goal of photoacoustic tomography (PAT) is to estimate an initial pressure function φ from pressure data measured at a boundary surrounding the object of interest. This paper is concerned with a time reversal method for PAT that is based on the dissipative wave equation of Nachman, Smith, and Waag [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 88, 1584 (1990)]. This equation is a correction of the thermoviscous wave equation such that its solution has a finite wave front speed and, in contrast, it can model several relaxation processes. In this sense, it is more accurate than the thermoviscous wave equation. For simplicity, we focus on the case of one relaxation process. We derive an exact formula for the time reversal image I, which depends on the relaxation time τ(1) and the compressibility κ(1) of the dissipative medium, and show I(τ(1),κ(1)) → φ for κ(1) → 0. This implies that I = φ holds in the dissipation-free case and that I is similar to φ for sufficiently small compressibility κ(1). Moreover, we show for tissue similar to water that the small wave number approximation I(0) of the time reversal image satisfies I(0) = η(0)*(x)φ with η[over ̂](0)(|k|) ≈ const. for |k| ≪ 1/c(0)τ(1), where φ denotes the initial pressure function. For such tissue, our theoretical analysis and numerical simulations show that the time reversal image I is very similar to the initial pressure function φ and that a resolution of σ≈0.036mm is feasible (for exact measurement data).

  14. Broadband performance of a time reversing array with a moving source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabra, Karim G.; Dowling, David R.

    2004-06-01

    The automatic spatial and temporal focusing properties of a time-reversing array (TRA) make it an attractive technology for active and passive sonar systems that may be deployed in unknown multipath environments. However, in these and other potential underwater applications of TRAs, either the source, the array, or both are likely to be moving. In this paper we present broadband-signal TRA performance predictions that include the influence of the Doppler effect on the time-reversal process for broadband signals transmitted from an arbitrarily moving source to a stationary vertical TRA through a shallow ocean environment. Here, the impact of source motion on TRA performance is predicted from analysis and numerical simulations using a formulation of the Doppler shifted field based on Fourier superposition of stationary but spatially distributed time-harmonic sources. Quantitative results for the size and location of the TRA's retrofocus are presented as well as the correlation of the TRA retrofocus signal with the time-reversed original signal for various source motions in range-independent and range-dependent shallow water sound channels. Overall, source motion is predicted to have little effect on TRA operations with source speeds less than 20 m/s for signals having a center frequency of 500 Hz at source-array ranges of a few kilometers.

  15. Experimental studies of applications of time-reversal acoustics to noncoherent underwater communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinemann, M.; Larraza, A.; Smith, K. B.

    2003-06-01

    The most difficult problem in shallow underwater acoustic communications is considered to be the time-varying multipath propagation because it impacts negatively on data rates. At high data rates the intersymbol interference requires adaptive algorithms on the receiver side that lead to computationally intensive and complex signal processing. A novel technique called time-reversal acoustics (TRA) can environmentally adapt the acoustic propagation effects of a complex medium in order to focus energy at a particular target range and depth. Using TRA, the multipath structure is reduced because all the propagation paths add coherently at the intended target location. This property of time-reversal acoustics suggests a potential application in the field of noncoherent acoustic communications. This work presents results of a tank scale experiment using an algorithm for rapid transmission of binary data in a complex underwater environment with the TRA approach. A simple 15-symbol code provides an example of the simplicity and feasibility of the approach. Covert coding due to the inherent scrambling induced by the environment at points other than the intended receiver is also investigated. The experiments described suggest a high potential in data rate for the time-reversal approach in underwater acoustic communications while keeping the computational complexity low.

  16. Time reversal odd fragmentation functions in semi-inclusive deep inelastic lepton-hadron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Mulders, P.J.; Levelt, J.

    1994-04-01

    In semi-inclusive scattering of polarized leptons from unpolarized hadrons, one can measure a time reversal odd structure function. It shows up as a sin({phi}) asymmetry of the produced hadrons. This asymmetry can be expressed as the product of a twist-three {open_quotes}hadron {r_arrow} quark{close_quotes} profile function and a time reversal odd twist-two {open_quotes}quark {r_arrow} hadron{close_quotes} fragmentation function. This fragmentation function can only be measured for nonzero transverse momenta of the produced hadron. Its appearance is a consequence of final state interactions between the produced hadron and the rest of the final state.

  17. Preparing the COSY-Ring for a Test of Time-Reversal-Invariance

    SciTech Connect

    Eversheim, P.D.; TRI Collaboration

    2000-12-31

    At the cooler synchrotron COSY at Juelich a novel (P-even, T-odd) true null test of time-reversal invariance (TRI) was proposed and accepted, that is supposed to measure TRI to an accuracy of 10{sup {minus}4} (Phase 1) or 10{sup {minus}6} (Phase 2). The parity conserving time-reversal violating observable is the total cross-section asymmetry A{sub y,XZ}. The measurement is planned as an internal target transmission experiment at the cooler synchrotron COSY. A{sub y,XZ} is measured using a polarized beam with an energy of about 1 GeV and a tensor polarized deuteron atomic-beam target.

  18. Time-reversal symmetry breaking superconductivity in the coexistence phase with magnetism in Fe pnictides.

    PubMed

    Hinojosa, Alberto; Fernandes, Rafael M; Chubukov, Andrey V

    2014-10-17

    We argue that superconductivity in the coexistence region with spin-density-wave (SDW) order in weakly doped Fe pnictides erdiffers qualitatively from the ordinary s(+-) state outside the coexistence region as it develops an additional gap component which is a mixture of intrapocket singlet (s(++)) and interpocket spin-triplet pairings (the t state). The coupling constant for the t channel is proportional to the SDW order and involves interactions that do not contribute to superconductivity outside of the SDW region. We argue that the s(+-)- and t-type superconducting orders coexist at low temperatures, and the relative phase between the two is, in general, different from 0 or π, manifesting explicitly the breaking of the time-reversal symmetry promoted by long-range SDW order. We argue that time reversal may get broken even before true superconductivity develops.

  19. Fractional topological liquids with time-reversal symmetry and their lattice realization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neupert, Titus; Santos, Luiz; Ryu, Shinsei; Chamon, Claudio; Mudry, Christopher

    2011-10-01

    We present a class of time-reversal-symmetric fractional topological liquid states in two dimensions that support fractionalized excitations. These are incompressible liquids made of electrons, for which the charge Hall conductance vanishes and the spin Hall conductance needs not be quantized. We then analyze the stability of edge states in these two-dimensional topological fluids against localization by disorder. We find a Z2 stability criterion for whether or not there exists a Kramers pair of edge modes that is robust against disorder. We also introduce an interacting electronic two-dimensional lattice model based on partially filled flattened bands of a Z2 topological band insulator, which we study using numerical exact diagonalization. We show evidence for instances of the fractional topological liquid phase as well as for a time-reversal symmetry broken phase with a quantized (charge) Hall conductance in the phase diagram for this model.

  20. Time reversal versus adaptive optimization for spatiotemporal nanolocalization in a random nanoantenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Differt, Dominik; Hensen, Matthias; Pfeiffer, Walter

    2016-05-01

    Spatiotemporal nanolocalization of ultrashort pulses in a random scattering nanostructure via time reversal and adaptive optimization employing a genetic algorithm and a suitably defined fitness function is studied for two embedded nanoparticles that are separated by only a tenth of the free space wavelength. The nanostructure is composed of resonant core-shell nanoparticles (TiO2 core and Ag shell) placed randomly surrounding these two nanoparticles acting as targets. The time reversal scheme achieves selective nanolocalization only by chance if the incident radiation can couple efficiently to dipolar local modes interacting with the target/emitter particle. Even embedding the structure in a reverberation chamber fails improving the nanolocalization. In contrast, the adaptive optimization strategy reliably yields nanolocalization of the radiation and allows a highly selective excitation of either target position. This demonstrates that random scattering structures are interesting multi-purpose optical nanoantennas to realize highly flexible spatiotemporal optical near-field control.

  1. Breaking time-reversal symmetry at the topological insulator surface by metal-organic coordination networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otrokov, M. M.; Chulkov, E. V.; Arnau, A.

    2015-10-01

    We propose a way to break the time-reversal symmetry at the surface of a three-dimensional topological insulator that combines features of both surface magnetic doping and magnetic proximity effect. Based on the possibility of organizing an ordered array of local magnetic moments by inserting them into a two-dimensional matrix of organic ligands, we study the magnetic coupling and electronic structure of such metal-organic coordination networks on a topological insulator surface from first principles. In this way, we find that both Co and Cr centers, linked by the tetracyanoethylenelike organic ligand, are coupled ferromagnetically and, depending on the distance to the topological insulator substrate, can yield a magnetic proximity effect. This latter leads to the Dirac point gap opening indicative of the time-reversal symmetry breaking.

  2. Time-Reversal-Violating Photonic Topological Insulators with Helical Edge States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochiai, Tetsuyuki

    2015-05-01

    We theoretically demonstrate the realization of photonic topological insulators in photonic crystals made of circular cylinders with the Tellegen-type magnetoelectric coupling as a photospin-orbit interaction. Although the magnetoelectric coupling breaks the conventional (bosonic) time-reversal symmetry for photons, the electromagnetic duality between permittivity and permeability gives rise to a fermionic time-reversal symmetry. This symmetry along with the space-inversion symmetry enables us to imitate the Kane-Mele model of two-dimensional topological insulators in a photonics platform. Even if the space-inversion symmetry is broken, a photonic topological insulator can emerge owing to the photospin-orbit interaction. We present bulk and edge properties of the photonic topological insulators and discuss their possible realization.

  3. Real-time Assessment of Flow Reversal in an Eccentric Arterial Stenotic Model

    PubMed Central

    Ai, Lisong; Zhang, Lequan; Dai, Wangde; Hu, Changhong; Shung, K. Kirk; Hsiai, Tzung K.

    2010-01-01

    Plaque rupture is the leading cause of acute coronary syndromes and stroke. Plaque formation, or otherwise known as stenosis, preferentially occurs in the regions of arterial bifurcation or curvatures. To date, real-time assessment of stenosis-induced flow reversal remains a clinical challenge. By interfacing Micro-electro-mechanical Systems (MEMS) thermal sensors with the high frequency Pulsed Wave (PW) Doppler ultrasound, we proposed to assess flow reversal in the presence of an eccentric stenosis. We developed a 3-D stenotic model (inner diameter of 6 mm, an eccentric stenosis with a height of 2.75mm and width of 21 mm) simulating a superficial arterial vessel. We demonstrated that heat transfer from the sensing element (2 × 80 μm) to the flow field peaked as a function of flow rates at the throat of the stenosis alone the center/midline of arterial model, and dropped downstream from the stenosis where flow reversal was detected by the high frequency ultrasound device at 45 MHz. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes were in agreement with the ultrasound-acquired flow profiles upstream, downstream, and at the throat of the stenosis. Hence, we characterized regions of eccentric stenosis in terms of changes in heat transfer alone the midline of vessel and identified points of flow reversal with high spatial and temporal resolution. PMID:20655537

  4. Time-reversal duality of high-efficiency RF power amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Reveyrand, T; Ramos, I; Popovic, Z

    2012-12-06

    The similarity between RF power amplifiers and rectifiers is discussed. It is shown that the same high-efficiency harmonically-terminated power amplifier can be operated in a dual rectifier mode. Nonlinear simulations with a GaN HEMT transistor model show the time-reversal intrinsic voltage and current waveform relationship between a class-F amplifier and rectifier. Measurements on a class-F-1 amplifier and rectifier at 2.14 GHz demonstrate over 80% efficiency in both cases.

  5. LISA simulations of time-reversed acoustic and elastic wave experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delsanto, P. P.; Johnson, P. A.; Scalerandi, M.; Ten Cate, J. A.

    2002-12-01

    Several experiments in the last decade have demonstrated the enormous potential of time-reversed acoustic (TRA) and elastic (TRE) waves for applications in many fields, such as medicine, materials characterization and oceanography. In the present contribution, we demonstrate the applicability of the local interaction simulation approach (LISA) to simulate, by means of virtual experiments, both TRA and TRE and to reproduce the relevant features of both techniques.

  6. Test of Time-Reversal Invariance Violation in Neutron Scattering At Spallation Neutron Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudkov, Vladimir

    2015-10-01

    Time Reversal Invariant Violating effects in neutron transmission through a nuclear target are discussed. A class of free from false asymmetries experiments is presented, and a comparison of a sensitivity of these transmission experiments and electric dipole moment measurements to different mechanisms of CP-violation is discussed. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics program under Award Number DE-FG02-09ER41621.

  7. Can we Relate Time-Reversal Violation to New Physics Processes in Weak Hadronic Decays?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajaltouni, Z. J.; di Salvo, E.

    2013-03-01

    This review paper stresses the possible connection between time-reversal violation and new physics processes beyond the standard model. In particular, this violation is proposed as an alternative to CP violation in the search for such unkown processes. Emphasis is put on the weak decays of heavy hadrons, especially beauty ones. Specific methods for extracting useful parameters from experimental data are elaborated in order to test TR symmetry. These methods could be used successfully in the analysis of the LHC data.

  8. Semiclassical matrix model for quantum chaotic transport with time-reversal symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Novaes, Marcel

    2015-10-15

    We show that the semiclassical approach to chaotic quantum transport in the presence of time-reversal symmetry can be described by a matrix model. In other words, we construct a matrix integral whose perturbative expansion satisfies the semiclassical diagrammatic rules for the calculation of transport statistics. One of the virtues of this approach is that it leads very naturally to the semiclassical derivation of universal predictions from random matrix theory.

  9. Damage imaging in a laminated composite plate using an air-coupled time reversal mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Le Bas, P. -Y.; Remillieux, M. C.; Pieczonka, L.; Ten Cate, J. A.; Anderson, B. E.; Ulrich, T. J.

    2015-11-03

    We demonstrate the possibility of selectively imaging the features of a barely visible impact damage in a laminated composite plate by using an air-coupled time reversal mirror. The mirror consists of a number of piezoelectric transducers affixed to wedges of power law profiles, which act as unconventional matching layers. The transducers are enclosed in a hollow reverberant cavity with an opening to allow progressive emission of the ultrasonic wave field towards the composite plate. The principle of time reversal is used to focus elastic waves at each point of a scanning grid spanning the surface of the plate, thus allowing localized inspection at each of these points. The proposed device and signal processing removes the need to be in direct contact with the plate and reveals the same features as vibrothermography and more features than a C-scan. More importantly, this device can decouple the features of the defect according to their orientation, by selectively focusing vector components of motion into the object, through air. For instance, a delamination can be imaged in one experiment using out-of-plane focusing, whereas a crack can be imaged in a separate experiment using in-plane focusing. As a result, this capability, inherited from the principle of time reversal, cannot be found in conventional air-coupled transducers.

  10. Damage imaging in a laminated composite plate using an air-coupled time reversal mirror

    DOE PAGES

    Le Bas, P. -Y.; Remillieux, M. C.; Pieczonka, L.; Ten Cate, J. A.; Anderson, B. E.; Ulrich, T. J.

    2015-11-03

    We demonstrate the possibility of selectively imaging the features of a barely visible impact damage in a laminated composite plate by using an air-coupled time reversal mirror. The mirror consists of a number of piezoelectric transducers affixed to wedges of power law profiles, which act as unconventional matching layers. The transducers are enclosed in a hollow reverberant cavity with an opening to allow progressive emission of the ultrasonic wave field towards the composite plate. The principle of time reversal is used to focus elastic waves at each point of a scanning grid spanning the surface of the plate, thus allowingmore » localized inspection at each of these points. The proposed device and signal processing removes the need to be in direct contact with the plate and reveals the same features as vibrothermography and more features than a C-scan. More importantly, this device can decouple the features of the defect according to their orientation, by selectively focusing vector components of motion into the object, through air. For instance, a delamination can be imaged in one experiment using out-of-plane focusing, whereas a crack can be imaged in a separate experiment using in-plane focusing. As a result, this capability, inherited from the principle of time reversal, cannot be found in conventional air-coupled transducers.« less

  11. Damage imaging in a laminated composite plate using an air-coupled time reversal mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Bas, P.-Y.; Remillieux, M. C.; Pieczonka, L.; Ten Cate, J. A.; Anderson, B. E.; Ulrich, T. J.

    2015-11-01

    We demonstrate the possibility of selectively imaging the features of a barely visible impact damage in a laminated composite plate by using an air-coupled time reversal mirror. The mirror consists of a number of piezoelectric transducers affixed to wedges of power law profiles, which act as unconventional matching layers. The transducers are enclosed in a hollow reverberant cavity with an opening to allow progressive emission of the ultrasonic wave field towards the composite plate. The principle of time reversal is used to focus elastic waves at each point of a scanning grid spanning the surface of the plate, thus allowing localized inspection at each of these points. The proposed device and signal processing removes the need to be in direct contact with the plate and reveals the same features as vibrothermography and more features than a C-scan. More importantly, this device can decouple the features of the defect according to their orientation, by selectively focusing vector components of motion into the object, through air. For instance, a delamination can be imaged in one experiment using out-of-plane focusing, whereas a crack can be imaged in a separate experiment using in-plane focusing. This capability, inherited from the principle of time reversal, cannot be found in conventional air-coupled transducers.

  12. Exploiting spatiotemporal degrees of freedom for far-field subwavelength focusing using time reversal in fractals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupré, Matthieu; Lemoult, Fabrice; Fink, Mathias; Lerosey, Geoffroy

    2016-05-01

    Materials which possess a high local density of states varying at a subwavelength scale theoretically permit the focusing of waves onto focal spots much smaller than the free space wavelength. To do so, metamaterials—manmade composite media exhibiting properties not available in nature—are usually considered. However, this approach is limited to narrow bandwidths due to their resonant nature. Here, we prove that it is possible to use a fractal resonator alongside time reversal to focus microwaves onto λ /15 subwavelength focal spots from the far field, on extremely wide bandwidths. We first numerically prove that this approach can be realized using a multiple-channel time reversal mirror that utilizes all the degrees of freedom offered by the fractal resonator. Then, we experimentally demonstrate that this approach can be drastically simplified by coupling the fractal resonator to a complex medium, here a cavity, that efficiently converts its spatial degrees of freedom into temporal ones. This makes it possible to achieve deep subwavelength focusing of microwave radiation by time reversing a single channel. Our method can be generalized to other systems coupling complex media and fractal resonators.

  13. Differential geometric invariants for time-reversal symmetric Bloch-bundles: The "Real" case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Nittis, Giuseppe; Gomi, Kiyonori

    2016-05-01

    Topological quantum systems subjected to an even (resp. odd) time-reversal symmetry can be classified by looking at the related "Real" (resp. "Quaternionic") Bloch-bundles. If from one side the topological classification of these time-reversal vector bundle theories has been completely described in De Nittis and Gomi [J. Geom. Phys. 86, 303-338 (2014)] for the "Real" case and in De Nittis and Gomi [Commun. Math. Phys. 339, 1-55 (2015)] for the "Quaternionic" case, from the other side it seems that a classification in terms of differential geometric invariants is still missing in the literature. With this article and its companion [G. De Nittis and K. Gomi (unpublished)] we want to cover this gap. More precisely, we extend in an equivariant way the theory of connections on principal bundles and vector bundles endowed with a time-reversal symmetry. In the "Real" case we generalize the Chern-Weil theory and we show that the assignment of a "Real" connection, along with the related differential Chern class and its holonomy, suffices for the classification of "Real" vector bundles in low dimensions.

  14. Automatic determination of the number of targets present when using the time reversal operator.

    PubMed

    Quinlan, Angela; Barbot, Jean-Pierre; Larzabal, Pascal

    2006-04-01

    Acoustical time reversal mirrors have been shown to provide a highly accurate means of studying and focusing on acoustical sources. The DORT method is a derivation of the time reversal process, which allows for focusing on multiple targets. An important step in this process is the determination of the number of targets or sources present. This is achieved by examining the eigenvalues of the time reversal operator (TRO). The number of significant eigenvalues is then chosen as the number of sources present. However, as mentioned in [N. Mordant, C. Prada, and M. Fink, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 105, 2634-2642 (1999) and C. Prada, M. Tanter, and M. Fink, in Proceedings of the IEEE Symposium, 1997, pp. 679-683], factors such as low signal to noise ratio (SNR), small data sample, array configuration and the target location may result in the eigenvalues corresponding to the targets no longer being distinguishable from the background noise eigenvalues. This paper proposes a robust method of automatically determining the number of targets even in the presence of a small number of snapshots. For white Gaussian noise, the profile of the ordered eigenvalues is seen to fit an exponential law. The observed eigenvalues are then compared to this model and a mismatch is detected between the observed profile and the noise-only model. The index of the mismatch gives the number of scatterers present. PMID:16642836

  15. Tunable time-reversal cavity for high-pressure ultrasonic pulses generation: A tradeoff between transmission and time compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnal, Bastien; Pernot, Mathieu; Fink, Mathias; Tanter, Mickael

    2012-08-01

    This Letter presents a time reversal cavity that has both a high reverberation time and a good transmission factor. A multiple scattering medium has been embedded inside a fluid-filled reverberating cavity. This allows creating smart ultrasonic sources able to generate very high pressure pulses at the focus outside the cavity with large steering capabilities. Experiments demonstrate a 25 dB gain in pressure at the focus. This concept will enable us to convert conventional ultrasonic imaging probes driven by low power electronics into high power probes for therapeutic applications requiring high pressure focused pulses, such as histotripsy or lithotripsy.

  16. Application of Carbonate Reservoir using waveform inversion and reverse-time migration methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, W.; Kim, H.; Min, D.; Keehm, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Recent exploration targets of oil and gas resources are deeper and more complicated subsurface structures, and carbonate reservoirs have become one of the attractive and challenging targets in seismic exploration. To increase the rate of success in oil and gas exploration, it is required to delineate detailed subsurface structures. Accordingly, migration method is more important factor in seismic data processing for the delineation. Seismic migration method has a long history, and there have been developed lots of migration techniques. Among them, reverse-time migration is promising, because it can provide reliable images for the complicated model even in the case of significant velocity contrasts in the model. The reliability of seismic migration images is dependent on the subsurface velocity models, which can be extracted in several ways. These days, geophysicists try to obtain velocity models through seismic full waveform inversion. Since Lailly (1983) and Tarantola (1984) proposed that the adjoint state of wave equations can be used in waveform inversion, the back-propagation techniques used in reverse-time migration have been used in waveform inversion, which accelerated the development of waveform inversion. In this study, we applied acoustic waveform inversion and reverse-time migration methods to carbonate reservoir models with various reservoir thicknesses to examine the feasibility of the methods in delineating carbonate reservoir models. We first extracted subsurface material properties from acoustic waveform inversion, and then applied reverse-time migration using the inverted velocities as a background model. The waveform inversion in this study used back-propagation technique, and conjugate gradient method was used in optimization. The inversion was performed using the frequency-selection strategy. Finally waveform inversion results showed that carbonate reservoir models are clearly inverted by waveform inversion and migration images based on the

  17. Two effective approaches to reduce data storage in reverse time migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Weijia; Fu, Li-Yun

    2013-07-01

    Prestack reverse time migration (RTM) requires extensive data storage since it computes wavefields in forward time and accesses wavefields in reverse order. We first review several successful schemes that have been proposed to reduce data storage, but require more computational redundancies. We propose two effective strategies to reduce data storage during RTM. The first strategy is based on the Nyquist sampling theorem, which involves no extra computational cost. The fact is that the time sampling intervals required by numerical algorithms or given by field records is generally several times smaller than that satisfied by the Nyquist sampling theorem. Therefore, we can correlate the source wavefields with the receiver wavefields at the Nyquist time step, which helps decrease storage of time history. The second strategy is based on a lossless compression algorithm, which is widely used in computer science and information theory. The compression approach reduces storage significantly at a little computational cost. Numerical examples show that the two proposed strategies are effective and efficient.

  18. Analysis of liver connexin expression using reverse transcription quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction

    PubMed Central

    Maes, Michaël; Willebrords, Joost; Crespo Yanguas, Sara; Cogliati, Bruno; Vinken, Mathieu

    2016-01-01

    Summary Although connexin production is mainly regulated at the protein level, altered connexin gene expression has been identified as the underlying mechanism of several pathologies. When studying the latter, appropriate methods to quantify connexin mRNA levels are required. The present chapter describes a well-established reverse transcription quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction procedure optimized for analysis of hepatic connexins. The method includes RNA extraction and subsequent quantification, generation of complementary DNA, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and data analysis. PMID:27207283

  19. Analysis of Liver Connexin Expression Using Reverse Transcription Quantitative Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction.

    PubMed

    Maes, Michaël; Willebrords, Joost; Crespo Yanguas, Sara; Cogliati, Bruno; Vinken, Mathieu

    2016-01-01

    Although connexin production is mainly regulated at the protein level, altered connexin gene expression has been identified as the underlying mechanism of several pathologies. When studying the latter, appropriate methods to quantify connexin RNA levels are required. The present chapter describes a well-established reverse transcription quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction procedure optimized for analysis of hepatic connexins. The method includes RNA extraction and subsequent quantification, generation of complementary DNA, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, and data analysis. PMID:27207283

  20. Application of the Time Reversed Acoustic Concept to Earthquake Location and Focal Depth Determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toksoz, M.; Lu, R.; Pearce, F.; Sarkar, S.

    2007-12-01

    Local and regional seismograms have long codas due to strong scattering of seismic waves in the crust. Accurate identification of individual phases (P, pP, PmP, S, sS, etc.) is difficult because the scattered arrivals complicate the local seismograms and introduce errors in picking phases and their arrival times. These, in turn, introduce errors in hypocenter parameters. Strong scattering, that is a detriment to picking individual phases, makes it possible to apply the Time Reversed Acoustic (TRA) concept to local earthquake location and focal depth determination. The basic idea in TRA is to time reverse the recorded signals (seismograms) and to inject them into the earth. If the earth structure is known, the back-propagated signals could focus at the source. We demonstrate this by synthetic (numerical) examples and with seismograms from earthquakes. Foci, determined by TRA and by traditional methods with arrival times from close-in stations, agree very well. Independently, we present a method based on the TRA concept for earthquake focal depth determination. In a highly scattering medium, the source time function determination and pP identification can be accomplished simply, by autocorrelation of the seismograms.

  1. A New Characteristic Function for Fast Time-Reverse Seismic Event Location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendriyana, Andri; Bauer, Klaus; Weber, Michael; Jaya, Makky; Muksin, Muksin

    2015-04-01

    Microseismicity produced by natural activities is usually characterized by low signal-to-noise ratio and huge amount of data as recording is conducted for a long period of time. Locating microseismic events is preferably carried out using migration-based methods such as time-reverse modeling (TRM). The original TRM is based on backpropagating the wavefield from the receiver down to the source location. Alternatively, we are using a characteristic function (CF) derived from the measured wavefield as input for the TRM. The motivation for such a strategy is to avoid undesired contributions from secondary arrivals which may generate artifacts in the final images. In this presentation, we introduce a new CF as input for TRM method. To obtain this CF, initially we apply kurtosis-based automatic onset detection and convolution with a given wavelet. The convolution with low frequency wavelets allows us to conduct time-reverse modeling using coarser sampling hence it will reduce computing time. We apply the method to locate seismic events measured along an active part of the Sumatra Fault around the Tarutung pull-apart basin (North Sumatra, Indonesia). The results show that seismic events are well-determined since they are concentrated along the Sumatran fault. Internal details of the Tarutung basin structure could be derived. Our results are consistent with those obtained from inversion of manually picked travel time data.

  2. Least-squares reverse-time migration with cost-effective computation and memory storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xuejian; Liu, Yike; Huang, Xiaogang; Li, Peng

    2016-06-01

    Least-squares reverse-time migration (LSRTM), which involves several iterations of reverse-time migration (RTM) and Born modeling procedures, can provide subsurface images with better balanced amplitudes, higher resolution and fewer artifacts than standard migration. However, the same source wavefield is repetitively computed during the Born modeling and RTM procedures of different iterations. We developed a new LSRTM method with modified excitation-amplitude imaging conditions, where the source wavefield for RTM is forward propagated only once while the maximum amplitude and its excitation-time at each grid are stored. Then, the RTM procedure of different iterations only involves: (1) backward propagation of the residual between Born modeled and acquired data, and (2) implementation of the modified excitation-amplitude imaging condition by multiplying the maximum amplitude by the back propagated data residuals only at the grids that satisfy the imaging time at each time-step. For a complex model, 2 or 3 local peak-amplitudes and corresponding traveltimes should be confirmed and stored for all the grids so that multiarrival information of the source wavefield can be utilized for imaging. Numerical experiments on a three-layer and the Marmousi2 model demonstrate that the proposed LSRTM method saves huge computation and memory cost.

  3. Time-reversal symmetric resolution of unity without background integrals in open quantum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hatano, Naomichi; Ordonez, Gonzalo

    2014-12-15

    We present a new complete set of states for a class of open quantum systems, to be used in expansion of the Green’s function and the time-evolution operator. A remarkable feature of the complete set is that it observes time-reversal symmetry in the sense that it contains decaying states (resonant states) and growing states (anti-resonant states) parallelly. We can thereby pinpoint the occurrence of the breaking of time-reversal symmetry at the choice of whether we solve Schrödinger equation as an initial-condition problem or a terminal-condition problem. Another feature of the complete set is that in the subspace of the central scattering area of the system, it consists of contributions of all states with point spectra but does not contain any background integrals. In computing the time evolution, we can clearly see contribution of which point spectrum produces which time dependence. In the whole infinite state space, the complete set does contain an integral but it is over unperturbed eigenstates of the environmental area of the system and hence can be calculated analytically. We demonstrate the usefulness of the complete set by computing explicitly the survival probability and the escaping probability as well as the dynamics of wave packets. The origin of each term of matrix elements is clear in our formulation, particularly, the exponential decays due to the resonance poles.

  4. Geomagnetic Field Reversals and Life on the Earth in Phanerozoic Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pechersky, D. M.

    2014-10-01

    Global paleomagnetic and biostratigraphic data are generalized. As a result it is found out that the direct connection between geomagnetic reversals, biozones and maxima of mass extinction of a biota is absent. At the same time it is noted close to a synchronous total picture of consistent changes of biozones and geomagnetic polarity. It is explained by the general source - the Earth's diurnal rotation. The reversal polarity of a geomagnetic field prevailed during the Phanerozoic that is agreed with the Earth's counterclockwise rotation. Change of polarity of a field, most likely, is connected with acceleration or deceleration of rotation speed of the internal core relative to the Earth's mantle. Lack of direct interrelation between changes in the biosphere and geomagnetic field indicate a lack of influence of a field on life evolution on Earth. It follows also from the fact that life on Earth developed from primitive unicellular forms to mammals and the man and diversity of biota was grew against a close condition of a geomagnetic field during ~2,5 billion years and irrespective of numerous geomagnetic reversals. Main conclusion: evolutionary development of life on Earth doesn't depend both on large changes of a geomagnetic field, and on the extreme catastrophic events conducting to mass extinction of a biota.

  5. Nonlinear detection of land mines using wide bandwidth time-reversal techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutin, Alexander; Libbey, Brad; Kurtenoks, Victor; Fenneman, Douglas; Sarvazyan, Armen

    2006-05-01

    Time reversal acoustic (TRA) focusing allows concentration of elastic energy at a location in the soil being investigated to detect landmines. The TRA process is conducted by broadcasting a wide bandwidth signal and recording the surface vibration by a Laser Doppler Vibrometer (LDV). The system impulse response from speaker to the LDV output can then be computed by cross correlating the original and recorded signals for each channel. Each transducer re-radiates the time reversal impulse response. This provides efficient focusing of the seismic wave in both space and time, thus enhancing the nonlinear effects associated with soil and landmine vibrations. Using orthogonal initial signals the suggested TRA procedure can be implemented simultaneously with multiple transmitters to increase the scanning speed. The nonlinear effects were investigated using a phase inversion method where the TRA signal is broadcast a second time with an opposite sign and the two received signals are added in post processing. The summed signal contains mainly the results of nonlinear wave interaction and tends to cancel the linear response. Small scale land mine detection experiments were conducted using a laser Doppler vibrometer and an array of speakers in the frequency band 50-500Hz. They demonstrate that the TRA system provides high concentration of elastic wave energy in the tested area. The measurements of spectral density of the TRA focused signal reveal increased spectral density in the vicinity of mine resonance frequencies. The nonlinear TRA phase inversion method shows higher contrast between mine and no mine than the linear TRA method.

  6. Time-reversal symmetry breaking and spontaneous Hall effect without magnetic dipole order.

    PubMed

    Machida, Yo; Nakatsuji, Satoru; Onoda, Shigeki; Tayama, Takashi; Sakakibara, Toshiro

    2010-01-14

    Spin liquids are magnetically frustrated systems, in which spins are prevented from ordering or freezing, owing to quantum or thermal fluctuations among degenerate states induced by the frustration. Chiral spin liquids are a hypothetical class of spin liquids in which the time-reversal symmetry is macroscopically broken in the absence of an applied magnetic field or any magnetic dipole long-range order. Even though such chiral spin-liquid states were proposed more than two decades ago, an experimental realization and observation of such states has remained a challenge. One of the characteristic order parameters in such systems is a macroscopic average of the scalar spin chirality, a solid angle subtended by three nearby spins. In previous experimental reports, however, the spin chirality was only parasitic to the non-coplanar spin structure associated with a magnetic dipole long-range order or induced by the applied magnetic field, and thus the chiral spin-liquid state has never been found. Here, we report empirical evidence that the time-reversal symmetry can be broken spontaneously on a macroscopic scale in the absence of magnetic dipole long-range order. In particular, we employ the anomalous Hall effect to directly probe the broken time-reversal symmetry for the metallic frustrated magnet Pr(2)Ir(2)O(7). An onset of the Hall effect is observed at zero field in the absence of uniform magnetization, within the experimental accuracy, suggesting an emergence of a chiral spin liquid. The origin of this spontaneous Hall effect is ascribed to chiral spin textures, which are inferred from the magnetic measurements indicating the spin ice-rule formation. PMID:20010605

  7. Results of the Baikal Experiment on Observations of Macroscopic Nonlocal Correlations in Reverse Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korotaev, S. M.; Serdyuk, V. O.; Kiktenko, E. O.; Budnev, N. M.; Gorohov, J. V.

    Although the general theory macroscopic quantum entanglement of is still in its infancy, consideration of the matter in the framework of action-at-a distance electrodynamics predicts for the random dissipative processes observability of the advanced nonlocal correlations (time reversal causality). These correlations were really revealed in our previous experiments with some large-scale heliogeophysical processes as the source ones and the lab detectors as the probe ones. Recently a new experiment has been performing on the base of Baikal Deep Water Neutrino Observatory. The thick water layer is an excellent shield against any local impacts on the detectors. The first annual series 2012/2013 has demonstrated that detector signals respond to the heliogeophysical (external) processes and causal connection of the signals directed downwards: from the Earth surface to the Baikal floor. But this nonlocal connection proved to be in reverse time. In addition advanced nonlocal correlation of the detector signal with the regional source-process: the random component of hydrological activity in the upper layer was revealed and the possibility of its forecast on nonlocal correlations was demonstrated. But the strongest macroscopic nonlocal correlations are observed at extremely low frequencies, that is at periods of several months. Therefore the above results should be verified in a longer experiment. We verify them by data of the second annual series 2013/2014 of the Baikal experiment. All the results have been confirmed, although some quantitative parameters of correlations and time reversal causal links turned out different due to nonstationarity of the source-processes. A new result is displaying of the advanced response of nonlocal correlation detector to the earthquake. This opens up the prospect of the earthquake forecast on the new physical principle, although further confirmation in the next events is certainly needed. The continuation of the Baikal experiment with

  8. Time-reversal symmetry in nonstationary Markov processes with application to some fluctuation theorems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Vliet, Carolyne M.

    2012-11-01

    Nonequilibrium processes require that the density operator of an interacting system with Hamiltonian H(t)=H0(t)+λV converges and produces entropy. Employing projection operators in the state space, the density operator is developed to all orders of perturbation and then resummed. In contrast to earlier treatments by Van Hove [Physica0031-891410.1016/S0031-8914(54)92646-4 21, 517 (1955)] and others [U. Fano, Rev. Mod. Phys.0034-686110.1103/RevModPhys.29.74 29, 74 (1959); U. Fano, in Lectures on the Many-Body Problem, Vol 2, edited by E. R. Caniello (Academic Press, New York, 1964); R. Zwanzig, in Lectures in Theoretical Physics, Vol. III, edited by W. E. Britten, B. W. Downs, and J. Downs (Wiley Interscience, New York, 1961), pp. 116-141; K. M. Van Vliet, J. Math. Phys.0022-248810.1063/1.523833 19, 1345 (1978); K. M. Van Vliet, Can. J. Phys. 56, 1206 (1978)], closed expressions are obtained. From these we establish the time-reversal symmetry property P(γ,t|γ',t')=P˜(γ',t'|γ,t), where the tilde refers to the time-reversed protocol; also a nonstationary Markovian master equation is derived. Time-reversal symmetry is then applied to thermostatted systems yielding the Crooks-Tasaki fluctuation theorem (FT) and the quantum Jarzynski work-energy theorem, as well as the general entropy FT. The quantum mechanical concepts of work and entropy are discussed in detail. Finally, we present a nonequilibrium extension of Mazo's lemma of linear response theory, obtaining some applications via this alternate route.

  9. High-frequency reverse-time chaos generation using an optical matched filter.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xingxing; Liu, Deming; Cheng, Mengfan; Deng, Lei; Fu, Songnian; Zhang, Minming; Tang, Ming; Shum, Ping

    2016-03-15

    The optical reverse-time chaos is realized by modulating a binary pseudo-random bit sequence onto an optical carrier, and then driving an optical matched filter. The filter is demonstrated experimentally by using two fiber Bragg gratings and a Fourier-domain programmable optical processor. The complexity relationship between the binary input sequence and the output chaos signal is studied. This approach could be a novel way to generate a high speed repeatable and controllable optical chaos signal, which has the potential to be used in optical secure communication systems. PMID:26977658

  10. Time reversal of continuous-wave, monochromatic signals in elastic media

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Brian E; Guyer, Robert A; Ulrich, Timothy J; Johnson, Paul A

    2009-01-01

    Experimental observations of spatial focusing of continuous-wave, steady-state elastic waves in a reverberant elastic cavity using time reversal are reported here. Spatially localized focusing is achieved when multiple channels are employed, while a single channel does not yield such focusing. The amplitude of the energy at the focal location increases as the square of the number of channels used, while the amplitude elsewhere in the medium increases proportionally with the number of channels used. The observation is important in the context of imaging in solid laboratory samples as well as problems involving continuous-wave signals in Earth.

  11. Suppression and Revival of Weak Localization through Control of Time-Reversal Symmetry.

    PubMed

    Müller, K; Richard, J; Volchkov, V V; Denechaud, V; Bouyer, P; Aspect, A; Josse, V

    2015-05-22

    We report on the observation of suppression and revival of coherent backscattering of ultracold atoms launched in an optical disorder in a quasi-2D geometry and submitted to a short dephasing pulse, as proposed by Micklitz, Müller, and Altland [Phys. Rev. B 91, 064203 (2015)]. This observation demonstrates a novel and general method to study weak localization by manipulating time reversal symmetry in disordered systems. In future experiments, this scheme could be extended to investigate higher order localization processes at the heart of Anderson (strong) localization.

  12. Facility for parity and time reversal experiments with intense epithermal (eV) neutron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, C.D.; Bowman, J.D.; Herczeg, P.; Szymanski, J.; Yuan, V.W.; Anaya, J.M.; Mortensen, R.; Postma, H.; Delheij, P.P.J.; Baker, O.K.

    1988-01-01

    A facility for polarized epithermal neutrons of high intensity is set up at the Los Alamos National Laboratory for parity-violation and time reversal experiments at neutron resonances over a wide range of neutron energies. The beam is polarized with the aid of a polarized proton target used as a neutron-spin filter. Total cross section measurements as well as capture gamma-ray experiments will be carried out. The main features of this system will be discussed. 20 refs., 5 figs.

  13. Pairing state with a time-reversal symmetry breaking in FeAs-based superconductors.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wei-Cheng; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; Wu, Congjun

    2009-05-29

    We investigate the competition between the extended s+/--wave and dx2-y2-wave pairing order parameters in the iron-based superconductors. Because of the frustrating pairing interactions among the electron and the hole Fermi pockets, a time-reversal symmetry breaking s+id pairing state could be favored. We analyze this pairing state within the Ginzburg-Landau theory and explore the experimental consequences. In such a state, spatial inhomogeneity induces a supercurrent near a nonmagnetic impurity and the corners of a square sample. The resonance mode between the s+/-- and dx2-y2-wave order parameters can be detected through the B1g Raman spectroscopy.

  14. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION: A trivial observation on time reversal in random matrix theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, L.; Leyvraz, F.; Pineda, C.; Seligman, T. H.

    2007-12-01

    It is commonly thought that a state-dependent quantity, after being averaged over a classical ensemble of random Hamiltonians, will always become independent of the state. We point out that this is in general incorrect: if the ensemble of Hamiltonians is time-reversal invariant, and the quantity involves the state in higher than bilinear order, then we show that the quantity is only a constant over the orbits of the invariance group on the Hilbert space. Examples include fidelity and decoherence in appropriate models.

  15. Observation of coherence in the time-reversed relativistic photoelectric effect.

    PubMed

    Tashenov, S; Banaś, D; Beyer, H; Brandau, C; Fritzsche, S; Gumberidze, A; Hagmann, S; Hillenbrand, P-M; Jörg, H; Kojouharov, I; Kozhuharov, Ch; Lestinsky, M; Litvinov, Yu A; Maiorova, A V; Schaffner, H; Shabaev, V M; Spillmann, U; Stöhlker, Th; Surzhykov, A; Trotsenko, S

    2014-09-12

    The photoelectric effect has been studied in the regime of hard x rays and strong Coulomb fields via its time-reversed process of radiative recombination (RR). In the experiment, the relativistic electrons recombined into the 2p_{3/2} excited state of hydrogenlike uranium ions, and both the RR x rays and the subsequently emitted characteristic x rays were detected in coincidence. This allowed us to observe the coherence between the magnetic substates in a highly charged ion and to identify the contribution of the spin-orbit interaction to the RR process.

  16. Suppression and Revival of Weak Localization through Control of Time-Reversal Symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, K.; Richard, J.; Volchkov, V. V.; Denechaud, V.; Bouyer, P.; Aspect, A.; Josse, V.

    2015-05-01

    We report on the observation of suppression and revival of coherent backscattering of ultracold atoms launched in an optical disorder in a quasi-2D geometry and submitted to a short dephasing pulse, as proposed by Micklitz, Müller, and Altland [Phys. Rev. B 91, 064203 (2015)]. This observation demonstrates a novel and general method to study weak localization by manipulating time reversal symmetry in disordered systems. In future experiments, this scheme could be extended to investigate higher order localization processes at the heart of Anderson (strong) localization.

  17. Axion field theory and Z16 classification of time reversal invariant topological superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Yingfei; Qi, Xiaoliang

    2015-03-01

    Time-reversal invariant topological superconductors (TRI TSC) are gapped superconductors with topologically robust gapless modes on the boundary. In the work by X. L. Qi et al, [PRB, 87, 134519(2013)], a topological field theory description was proposed for 3+1-dimensional TRI TSC, which contains an axionic coupling between superconducting phase and electromagnetic field. In my talk, I will describe a generalization of this theory to include interaction effects which provides a physical explanation why the integer classification is reduced to Z16. I will also attempt to generalize our results to higher dimensions and give constraints on the possible collapsing of topological classification induced by interaction effects.

  18. Time-reversal-symmetric single-photon wave packets for free-space quantum communication.

    PubMed

    Trautmann, N; Alber, G; Agarwal, G S; Leuchs, G

    2015-05-01

    Readout and retrieval processes are proposed for efficient, high-fidelity quantum state transfer between a matter qubit, encoded in the level structure of a single atom or ion, and a photonic qubit, encoded in a time-reversal-symmetric single-photon wave packet. They are based on controlling spontaneous photon emission and absorption of a matter qubit on demand in free space by stimulated Raman adiabatic passage. As these processes do not involve mode selection by high-finesse cavities or photon transport through optical fibers, they offer interesting perspectives as basic building blocks for free-space quantum-communication protocols.

  19. Effective Field Theory and Time-Reversal Violation in Light Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mereghetti, E.; van Kolck, U.

    2015-10-01

    Thanks to the unnaturally small value of the QCD vacuum angle [Formula: see text], time-reversal violation ([Formula: see text]) offers a window into physics beyond the Standard Model (SM) of particle physics. We review the effective field theory framework that establishes a clean connection between (a) [Formula: see text] mechanisms, which can be represented by higher-dimensional operators involving SM fields and symmetries, and (b) hadronic interactions, which allow for controlled calculations of low-energy observables involving strong interactions. The chiral properties of [Formula: see text] mechanisms lead to a pattern that should be identifiable in measurements of the electric dipole moments of the nucleon and light nuclei.

  20. Pairing state with a time-reversal symmetry breaking in FeAs-based superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Wei-Sheng

    2010-05-26

    We investigate the competition between the extended s{+-} wave and dx2-y2 -wave pairing order parameters in the iron-based superconductors. Because of the frustrating pairing interactions among the electron and the hole fermi pockets, a time-reversal symmetry breaking s + id pairing state could be favored. We analyze this pairing state within the Ginzburg-Landau theory, and explore the experimental consequences. In such a state, spatial inhomogeneity induces supercurrent near a non-magnetic impurity and the corners of a square sample. The resonance mode between the s{+-} and dx2?y2 -wave order parameters can be detected through the B1g-Raman spectroscopy.

  1. Power Spectrum Analysis and Missing Level Statistics of Microwave Graphs with Violated Time Reversal Invariance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Białous, Małgorzata; Yunko, Vitalii; Bauch, Szymon; Ławniczak, Michał; Dietz, Barbara; Sirko, Leszek

    2016-09-01

    We present experimental studies of the power spectrum and other fluctuation properties in the spectra of microwave networks simulating chaotic quantum graphs with violated time reversal invariance. On the basis of our data sets, we demonstrate that the power spectrum in combination with other long-range and also short-range spectral fluctuations provides a powerful tool for the identification of the symmetries and the determination of the fraction of missing levels. Such a procedure is indispensable for the evaluation of the fluctuation properties in the spectra of real physical systems like, e.g., nuclei or molecules, where one has to deal with the problem of missing levels.

  2. Depth profile of a time-reversal focus in an elastic solid

    SciTech Connect

    Remillieux, Marcel C.; Anderson, Brian E.; Ulrich, T. J.; Le Bas, Pierre -Yves; Payan, Cedric

    2015-04-01

    The out-of-plane velocity component is focused on the flat surface of an isotropic solid sample using the principle of time reversal. This experiment is often reproduced in the context of nondestructive testing for imaging features near the surface of the sample. However, it is not clear how deep the focus extends into the bulk of the sample and what its profile is. In this paper, this question is answered using both numerical simulations and experimental data. The profiles of the foci are expressed in terms of the wavelengths of the dominant waves, based on the interpretation of the Lamb’s problem and the use of the diffraction limit.

  3. A New Limit on Time-Reversal Violation in Beta Decay

    SciTech Connect

    Mumm, H P; Chupp, T E; Cooper, R L; Coulter, K P; Freedman, S J; Fujikawa, B K; Garcia, A; Jones, G L; Nico, J S; Thompson, A K; Trull, C A; Wilkerson, J F; Wietfeldt, F E

    2011-04-26

    We report the results of an improved determination of the triple correlation DP {center_dot} (p{sub e} x p{sub v}) that can be used to limit possible time-reversal invariance in the beta decay of polarized neutrons and constrain extensions to the Standard Model. Our result is D = (-0.96 {+-} 1.89(stat) {+-} 1.01(sys)) x 10{sup -4}. The corresponding phase between g{sub A} and g{sub V} is {phi}{sub AV} = 180.013{sup o} {+-} 0.028{sup o} (68% confidence level). This result represents the most sensitive measurement of D in nuclear beta decay.

  4. QCD evolution of naive-time-reversal-odd parton distribution functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Zhong-Bo; Qiu, Jian-Wei

    2012-07-01

    We reexamine the derivation of the leading order QCD evolution equations of twist-3 quark-gluon correlation functions, Tq,F (x , x) and Tq,F (σ) (x , x), which are the first transverse-momentum-moment of the naive-time-reversal-odd parton distribution functions - the Sivers and Boer-Mulders function, respectively. The evolution equations were derived by several groups with apparent differences. We identify the sources that are responsible for the differences, and are able to reconcile the results from various groups.

  5. Imaging of human tooth using ultrasound based chirp-coded nonlinear time reversal acoustics.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Serge; Prevorovsky, Zdenek

    2011-08-01

    Human tooth imaging sonography is investigated experimentally with an acousto-optic noncoupling set-up based on the chirp-coded nonlinear time reversal acoustic concept. The complexity of the tooth internal structure (enamel-dentine interface, cracks between internal tubules) is analyzed by adapting the nonlinear elastic wave spectroscopy (NEWS) with the objective of the tomography of damage. Optimization of excitations using intrinsic symmetries, such as time reversal (TR) invariance, reciprocity, correlation properties are then proposed and implemented experimentally. The proposed medical application of this TR-NEWS approach is implemented on a third molar human tooth and constitutes an alternative of noncoupling echodentography techniques. A 10 MHz bandwidth ultrasonic instrumentation has been developed including a laser vibrometer and a 20 MHz contact piezoelectric transducer. The calibrated chirp-coded TR-NEWS imaging of the tooth is obtained using symmetrized excitations, pre- and post-signal processing, and the highly sensitive 14 bit resolution TR-NEWS instrumentation previously calibrated. Nonlinear signature coming from the symmetry properties is observed experimentally in the tooth using this bi-modal TR-NEWS imaging after and before the focusing induced by the time-compression process. The TR-NEWS polar B-scan of the tooth is described and suggested as a potential application for modern echodentography. It constitutes the basis of the self-consistent harmonic imaging sonography for monitoring cracks propagation in the dentine, responsible of human tooth structural health.

  6. Data Communications Using Guided Elastic Waves by Time Reversal Pulse Position Modulation: Experimental Study

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Yuanwei; Ying, Yujie; Zhao, Deshuang

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we present and demonstrate a low complexity elastic wave signaling and reception method to achieve high data rate communication on dispersive solid elastic media, such as metal pipes, using piezoelectric transducers of PZT (lead zirconate titanate). Data communication is realized using pulse position modulation (PPM) as the signaling method and the elastic medium as the communication channel. The communication system first transmits a small number of training pulses to probe the dispersive medium. The time-reversed probe signals are then utilized as the information carrying waveforms. Rapid timing acquisition of transmitted waveforms for demodulation over elastic medium is made possible by exploring the reciprocity property of guided elastic waves. The experimental tests were conducted using a National Instrument PXI system for waveform excitation and data acquisition. Data telemetry bit rates of 10 kbps, 20 kbps, 50 kbps and 100 kbps with the average bit error rates of 0, 5.75 x 10-4, 1.09 x 10-2 and 5.01 x 10-2, respectively, out of a total of 40, 000 transmitted bits were obtained when transmitting at the center frequency of 250 kHz and a 500 kHz bandwidth on steel pipe specimens. To emphasize the influence of time reversal, no complex processing techniques, such as adaptive channel equalization or error correction coding, were employed. PMID:23881122

  7. Topological crystalline semimetals in non-symmorphic lattices without time-reversal symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yige; Kim, Heung-Sik; Kee, Hae-Young

    Numerous efforts have been devoted to reveal exotic semimetallic phases with topologically non-trivial bulk and surface states in materials with strong spin-orbit coupling. Recent theoretical works on orthorhombic perovskite iridates SrIrO3 have indicated that non-symmorphic symmetry is crucial to protect a nodal line Fermi surface (FS) in addition to space-time inversion symmetry [C. Fang et.al, PRB 92, 081201(R) (2015), Y. Chen et.al, Nat. Commu. 6, (2015)]. In this work, we investigate possible topological semimetals in the absence of time-reversal symmetry. In principle, an anti-unitary operator, defined as a product of time-reversal and glide operators, can protect a four-fold or two-fold degenerate nodal FS. Indeed this happens in SrIrO3 with the magnetic field along a particular direction. A trivial gapped insulator can also occur due to a lack of such anti-unitary operation. This study shows that non-symmorphic crystals with multiple fractional lattice translations exhibit rich topological properties.

  8. Imaging non-classical elastic nonlinearities using reciprocal time reversal and phase symmetry analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciampa, Francesco; Meo, Michele

    2012-04-01

    In this research work, an imaging method of the nonlinear signature in a reverberant complex anisotropic structure with hysteretic behaviour is reported. The proposed technique relies on a combination of phase symmetry analysis with frequency modulation excitation and nonlinear time reversal, and it is applied to a number of waveforms containing the nonlinear impulse responses of the medium. Phase symmetry analysis was used to characterize the third order nonlinearity of the structure due to delamination and cracks, by exploiting its invariant properties with the phase angle of the input waveforms. Then, a "virtual" reciprocal time reversal imaging process, using only two sensors in pitch-catch mode, was used to "illuminate" the damage. Taking advantage of multiple linear scattering, this methodology allows achieving the optimal focalization at the nonlinear source by a compensation of the distortion effects in a dissipative medium. The robustness of this technique was experimentally demonstrated on a damaged sandwich panel undergone to low-velocity impact loading. The nonlinear source was retrieved with a high level of accuracy with little computational time (less than 1 sec). Its minimal processing requirements make this method a valid alternative to the traditional nonlinear elastic wave spectroscopy techniques for materials showing either classical or non-classical nonlinear behaviour.

  9. A time reversal focusing based impact imaging method and its evaluation on complex composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Lei; Yuan, Shenfang; Zhang, Xiaoyue; Wang, Yu

    2011-10-01

    The growing use of composite structures in aerospace structures has attracted much interest in structural health monitoring (SHM) for the localization of impact positions due to their poor impact resistance properties. The propagation mechanism and the frequency dispersion features of signals on complex composite structures are more complicated than those on simple composite plates. In this paper, a time reversal focusing based impact imaging method for impact localization of complex composite structures is proposed. A complex Shannon wavelet transform is adopted to extract frequency narrow-band signals of impact response signals of a PZT sensors array at a special time-frequency scale and to measure the phase velocity of the signals. The frequency narrow-band signals are synthesized using software, depending on the time reversal focusing principle, to generate an impact image to estimate the impact position. A demonstration system is built on a composite panel with many bolt holes and stiffeners on an aircraft wing box to validate this method. The validating results show that the method can estimate the position of impact efficiently.

  10. Time-Resolved AMR measurements of current induced magnetization reversal in ferromagnetic nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guittienne, Ph.; Wegrowe, J.-E.; Kelly, D.; Ansermet, J.-Ph.

    2001-03-01

    Time-resolved detection of the magnetization switching in static magnetic fields was achieved by pulsing current densities of about 107 A/cm2 in single isolated Nickel nanowires (80nm in diameter, 6000 nm in length, electrodeposited in porous membranes), using a Weathstone bridge of a 1GHz bandwidth. This irreversible transition is found to occur in a time of about 10 ns. The time of switching within the pulse, tsw, is measured as a function of applied field and current. The temperature rise due to Joule heating is deduced from the change in resistance. The entire set of data tsw(H,T) are fitted with a simple activation law, with the energy barrier height as the unique fitting parameter. The results show a strong departure from pure thermal activation indicating a current-induced magnetization reversal.

  11. Parity and time-reversal symmetry nonconservation in neutron-nucleus interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, J.D.; Bowman, C.D.; Knudson, J.; Penttilae, S.; Seestrom, S.J.; Szymanski, J.J.; Yuan, V.W. ); Bush, J.E.; Frankle, C.M.; Gould, C.R.; Haase, D.G.; Mitchell, G.E Triangle Universities Nuclear Lab., Durham, NC ); Delheij, P.P.J. ); Postma, H. (Technische Hogeschool Delft (Netherlands

    1990-01-01

    Parity non-conversation was studied for seventeen states in the compound nucleus {sup 239}U by measuring the helicity dependence of the p-wave resonance cross section for epithermal neutrons scattered from {sup 238}U. The root-mean-squared parity-violating matrix element for the mixing of p-wave and s-wave states was determined to be M = 0.58{sub -0.25}{sup +0.50} meV. This corresponds to a parity-violating spreading width of {Gamma}{sup PV} = 1.0 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} eV. This gives a value of 4 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} for {alpha}{sub p}, the ratio of strengths of the P-odd and P-even effective nucleon-nucleon interactions in {sup 239}U. The implications of these results for studies of Time Reversal Symmetry in the compound nucleus is discussed.

  12. Measurement of effective gas diffusion coefficients of catalyst layers of PEM fuel cells with a Loschmidt diffusion cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Jun; Zhou, Jianqin; Astrath, Nelson G. C.; Navessin, Titichai; Liu, Zhong-Sheng (Simon); Lei, Chao; Rohling, Jurandir H.; Bessarabov, Dmitri; Knights, Shanna; Ye, Siyu

    In this work, using an in-house made Loschmidt diffusion cell, we measure the effective coefficient of dry gas (O 2-N 2) diffusion in cathode catalyst layers of PEM fuel cells at 25 °C and 1 atmosphere. The thicknesses of the catalyst layers under investigation are from 6 to 29 μm. Each catalyst layer is deposited on an Al 2O 3 membrane substrate by an automated spray coater. Diffusion signal processing procedure is developed to deduce the effective diffusion coefficient, which is found to be (1.47 ± 0.05) × 10 -7 m 2 s -1 for the catalyst layers. Porosity and pore size distribution of the catalyst layers are also measured using Hg porosimetry. The diffusion resistance of the interface between the catalyst layer and the substrate is found to be negligible. The experimental results show that the O 2-N 2 diffusion in the catalyst layers is dominated by the Knudsen effect.

  13. Multi-frequency time-reversal-based imaging for ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation using full matrix capture.

    PubMed

    Fan, Chengguang; Pan, Mengchun; Luo, Feilu; Drinkwater, Bruce

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, two multi-frequency time-reversal (TR)-based imaging algorithms are explored for application to the nondestructive evaluation (NDE) imaging of defects in solids: time reversal with multiple signal classification (TRMUSIC) and a related phase-coherent form (PC-MUSIC). These algorithms are tested with simulated and experimental ultrasonic array data acquired using the full matrix capture (FMC) process. The performance of these algorithms is quantified in terms of their spatial resolution and robustness to noise. The effect of frequency bandwidth is investigated and the results are compared with the single-frequency versions of these algorithms. It is shown that both TR-MUSIC and PCMUSIC are capable of resolving lateral targets spaced closer than the Rayleigh limit, achieving super-resolution imaging. TR-MUSIC can locate the positions of scatterers correctly, whereas the results from PC-MUSIC are less clear because of the presence of multiple peaks in the vicinity of target. However, an advantage of PC-MUSIC is that it can overcome the elongated point spread function that appears in TR-MUSIC images, and hence provide enhanced axial resolution. For high noise levels, TR-MUSIC and PC-MUSIC are shown to provide stable images and suppress the presence of artifacts seen in their single-frequency equivalents.

  14. Scattering experiments with microwave billiards at an exceptional point under broken time-reversal invariance.

    PubMed

    Bittner, S; Dietz, B; Harney, H L; Miski-Oglu, M; Richter, A; Schäfer, F

    2014-03-01

    Scattering experiments with microwave cavities were performed and the effects of broken time-reversal invariance (TRI), induced by means of a magnetized ferrite placed inside the cavity, on an isolated doublet of nearly degenerate resonances were investigated. All elements of the effective Hamiltonian of this two-level system were extracted. As a function of two experimental parameters, the doublet and the associated eigenvectors could be tuned to coalesce at a so-called exceptional point (EP). The behavior of the eigenvalues and eigenvectors when encircling the EP in parameter space was studied, including the geometric amplitude that builds up in the case of broken TRI. A one-dimensional subspace of parameters was found where the differences of the eigenvalues are either real or purely imaginary. There, the Hamiltonians were found to be PT invariant under the combined operation of parity (P) and time reversal (T) in a generalized sense. The EP is the point of transition between both regions. There a spontaneous breaking of PT occurs.

  15. Dc SQUID based on a three-band superconductor with broken time-reversal symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yerin, Y. S.; Omelyanchouk, A. N.; Il'ichev, E.

    2015-09-01

    The behavior of a dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID), based on dirty-point contacts between a single-band and three-band superconductor with broken time-reversal symmetry, is investigated. Using previously obtained results for Josephson effects in such systems, new features in characteristics of a dc SQUID are revealed. It is shown that in the case of a BTRS (broken time-reversal symmetry) three-band superconductor for the applied external magnetic flux, which is divisible by the half-integer flux, strong degeneracy of ground states of a dc SQUID has taken place. This can lead to the appearance of possible multi-hysteresis loops on a dependence of a total flux in the dc SQUID from the externally applied flux. The number of these loops depends on the position of ground states of a three-band superconductor. Also it is found that dependencies of a critical current on applied magnetic flux can have complicated multi-periodic forms, which differ from strictly periodic characteristics for conventional dc SQUIDs and Fraunhofer patterns for Josephson contacts in the external magnetic field.

  16. Analysis of the time-reversal operator for planar dipole arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, D H; Berryman, J G

    2004-01-16

    The problem of imaging of targets in random media or cluttered environments is found in a wide variety of different applications, including ocean acoustics, medical ultrasound, geophysics, and radar. The solution often requires separating targets of interest from other scatterers, and compensating for wave speed variations in the medium. The problem is not usually the lack of data, but too much data, specifically the lack of a useful organizing principle for the data. The difficult part is separating the meaningful data from the remainder. It would therefore be most helpful if there were some means for skipping over those parts of the data that we do not really want to image very much, and looking at those parts (targets) that do interest us. This sounds challenging (maybe even impossible), but recent developments in acoustics make it clear that certain very limited imaging goals are achievable with much smaller data sets than are traditionally needed in, for example, seismic array processing. Early versions of this new method have been given the names of ''time-reversal acoustics'' or ''time-reversal mirrors,'' and have been developed most extensively by the French ultrasonics group led by Fink.

  17. Analysis of short range entangled topological phases protected by time-reversal symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dick, Sebastian

    We discuss a short-range entangled topological phase in 3+1 dimensions that is protected by time-reversal symmetry. Two models are compared that realize this phase: The first is a construction developed by Chen, Gu, Liu and Wen, which encodes the system's topological properties in the representation of the symmetry group. The second theory uses a non-linear sigma model in which the distinct topological phases differ by the way the symmetry acts on the order parameter. Both theories have in common that the modeled phases are in one to one correspondence with the elements of the co-homology group Hd+1(Z2 T, UT(1)). In this work, we extend the Chen-Gu construction to 3+1 dimensional systems. Furthermore, we show that both models coincide with respect to their topological properties. This is proved by comparing spin-flip processes and their associated topological phase factors. We derive spin-flip operators on the surface of the (3+1)-dimensional Chen-Gu construction that commute with time-reversal symmetry. To implement spin-flip processes in the non-linear sigma model, we interpolate spin-configurations from a discrete, triangular lattice into the continuum. We proceed by analyzing the phases, generated by the theta-term, for spacetime configurations of the O(4) order parameter that correspond to these spin-flip processes.

  18. ``Ultrasonic stars'' for time-reversal focusing using induced cavitation bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pernot, Mathieu; Montaldo, Gabriel; Tanter, Mickael; Fink, Mathias

    2006-01-01

    Ultrasound waves can be focused by multichannel arrays through heterogeneous media using a time-reversal focusing method. In this method, it is required that a reference signal be either sent by a small active source embedded in the medium or backscattered by a strong scatterer acting as a passive source. The potential of this method in ultrasonic medical imaging has been already envisioned for aberration corrections. However, in many practical situations it is not possible to insert an active source in the medium or to rely on the presence of a unique strong scatterer in order to generate the reference signal. Analogous to the field of adaptive optics in astronomy, we propose here to create artificial ``ultrasonic stars'' in the body. The trick consists of first creating a bubble inside the medium using a section of the ultrasonic array. Due to cavitation, the bubble generates a spherical wave that propagates through a heterogeneous medium to the ultrasound array. The time-reversal method is then applied to the ultrasonic wave received by the array. This technique is experimentally validated for aberrations corrections in tissue mimicking phantoms.

  19. Time-reversal symmetric Kitaev model and topological superconductor in two dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakai, R.; Ryu, S.; Furusaki, A.

    2012-04-01

    A time-reversal invariant Kitaev-type model is introduced in which spins (Dirac matrices) on the square lattice interact via anisotropic nearest-neighbor and next-nearest-neighbor exchange interactions. The model is exactly solved by mapping it onto a tight-binding model of free Majorana fermions coupled with static Z2 gauge fields. The Majorana fermion model can be viewed as a model of time-reversal-invariant superconductor and is classified as a member of symmetry class DIII in the Altland-Zirnbauer classification. The ground-state phase diagram has two topologically distinct gapped phases which are distinguished by a Z2 topological invariant. The topologically nontrivial phase supports both a Kramers’ pair of gapless Majorana edge modes at the boundary and a Kramers’ pair of zero-energy Majorana states bound to a 0-flux vortex in the π-flux background. Power-law decaying correlation functions of spins along the edge are obtained by taking the gapless Majorana edge modes into account. The model is also defined on the one-dimension ladder, in which case again the ground-state phase diagram has Z2 trivial and nontrivial phases.

  20. Imaging Faults with Reverse-Time Migration for Geothermal Exploration at Jemez Pueblo in New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Lianjie; Albrecht, Michael; Kaufman, Greg; Kelley, Shari; Rehfeldt, Kenneth; Zhang, Zhifu

    2011-01-01

    The fault zones at Jemez Pueblo may dominate the flow paths of hot water, or confine the boundaries of the geothermal reservoir. Therefore, it is crucial to image the geometry of these fault zones for geothermal exploration in the area. We use reverse-time migration with a separation imaging condition to image the faults at Jemez Pueblo. A finite-difference full-wave equation method with a perfectly-matching-layer absorbing boundary condition is used for backward propagation of seismic reflection data from receivers and forward propagation of wavefields from sources. In the imaging region, the wavefields are separated into the upgoing and downgoing waves, and leftgoing and rightgoing waves. The upgoing and downgoing waves are used to obtain the downward-looking image, and the leftgoing and rightgoing waves are used to form the left-looking image and right-looking image from sources. The left-looking and right-looking images are normally weaker than the downward-looking image because the reflections from the fault zones are much weaker than those from sedimentary layers, but these migration results contain the images of the faults. We apply our reverse-time migration with a wavefield separation imaging condition to seismic data acquired at Jemez Pueblo, and our preliminary results reveal many faults in the area.

  1. Generation of ultrasound radiation force with the use of time reversal acoustics principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarvazyan, Armen; Sutin, Alexander

    2005-09-01

    There are numerous medical applications of ultrasound radiation force (RF) which could be made more effective using the time reversal acoustics (TRA) principles. This paper gives an overview of research into physical and technical bases of RF generation in heterogeneous biological media using TRA focusing systems. A custom-designed compact multichannel TRA system for receiving, digitizing, storing, time reversing, and transmitting acoustic signals in a wide frequency range from 0.01 to 10 MHz has been developed and extensively tested in model systems and ex vivo tissues and bones. Shear strain and shear waves remotely induced in soft tissues and bones by radiation force were detected using various acoustical and optical means. Experimental studies fully confirmed the feasibility of TRA generation of RF and demonstrated several advantages over conventional means of remotely inducing shear stress in biological media. These advantages include a possibility to create highly localized (close to diffraction limit) shear stress in heterogeneous media stir focused ultrasound beam in 3-D volume using very simple hardware. [Work supported by NIH grant.

  2. Influence of shallow water currents on the performance of a broadband time-reversing array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabra, Karim G.; Dowling, David R.

    2002-11-01

    In recent shallow water experiments, the temporal and spatial focusing properties of time-reversing arrays (TRAs) were shown to be robust in a reciprocal medium and useful for underwater applications. The presence of oceanic currents in coastal environments leads to nonreciprocal acoustic propagation. In this case, time-reversal invariance is modified because the propagation speed inhomogeneity depends on the direction of acoustic propagation. Therefore, similarly to phase coherent reciprocal transmissions, a TRA will be influenced by the current-induced effects but not by the scalar contributions due to temperature or salinity. TRA performance, in the presence of steady currents, is investigated both theoretically using a simple first order normal mode formulation and numerically using a parabolic equation code for moving media, GCPEM [D. Mikhin, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 105, 1362 (1999)]. In a multipath shallow ocean environment, the retrofocus field is shifted relative to its location in a nonmoving medium. This shift depends on the current speed and the range-depth dependency of the ocean current profile because each acoustic mode is influenced differently. The possibility of using TRAs for monitoring coastal currents will be discussed.

  3. Time reversal communication in Rayleigh-fading broadcast channels with pinholes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fannjiang, Albert C.

    2006-05-01

    The Letter presents an analysis of the time reversal in independent-multipath Rayleigh-fading channels with N inputs (transmitters) and M outputs (receivers). The main issues addressed are the condition of statistical stability, the rate of information transfer and the effect of pinholes. The stability condition is proved to be MC≪NB for broadband channels and M≪N for narrowband channels where C is the symbol rate, B is the bandwidth and N is the effective number (maybe less than 1) of transmitters. It is shown that when the number of screens, n-1, is relatively low compared to the logarithm of numbers of pinholes N is given by the harmonic (or inverse) sum of the number of transmitters and the numbers of pinholes at all screens. The novel idea of the effective number of time reversal array (TRA) elements is introduced to derive the stability condition and estimate the channel capacity in the presence of multi-screen pinholes. The information rate, under the constraints of the noise power ν per unit frequency and the average total power P, attains the supremum P/ν in the regime M∧N≫P/(νB). In particular, when N≫M≫P/(Bν) the optimal information rate can be achieved with statistically stable, sharply focused signals.

  4. Unexpected edge conduction in mercury telluride quantum wells under broken time-reversal symmetry.

    PubMed

    Ma, Eric Yue; Calvo, M Reyes; Wang, Jing; Lian, Biao; Mühlbauer, Mathias; Brüne, Christoph; Cui, Yong-Tao; Lai, Keji; Kundhikanjana, Worasom; Yang, Yongliang; Baenninger, Matthias; König, Markus; Ames, Christopher; Buhmann, Hartmut; Leubner, Philipp; Molenkamp, Laurens W; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; Goldhaber-Gordon, David; Kelly, Michael A; Shen, Zhi-Xun

    2015-01-01

    The realization of quantum spin Hall effect in HgTe quantum wells is considered a milestone in the discovery of topological insulators. Quantum spin Hall states are predicted to allow current flow at the edges of an insulating bulk, as demonstrated in various experiments. A key prediction yet to be experimentally verified is the breakdown of the edge conduction under broken time-reversal symmetry. Here we first establish a systematic framework for the magnetic field dependence of electrostatically gated quantum spin Hall devices. We then study edge conduction of an inverted quantum well device under broken time-reversal symmetry using microwave impedance microscopy, and compare our findings to a non-inverted device. At zero magnetic field, only the inverted device shows clear edge conduction in its local conductivity profile, consistent with theory. Surprisingly, the edge conduction persists up to 9 T with little change. This indicates physics beyond simple quantum spin Hall model, including material-specific properties and possibly many-body effects.

  5. Optical focusing inside scattering media with time-reversed ultrasound microbubble encoded light

    PubMed Central

    Ruan, Haowen; Jang, Mooseok; Yang, Changhuei

    2015-01-01

    Focusing light inside scattering media in a freely addressable fashion is challenging, as the wavefront of the scattered light is highly disordered. Recently developed ultrasound-guided wavefront shaping methods are addressing this challenge, albeit with relatively low modulation efficiency and resolution limitations. In this paper, we present a new technique, time-reversed ultrasound microbubble encoded (TRUME) optical focusing, which can focus light with improved efficiency and sub-ultrasound wavelength resolution. This method ultrasonically destroys microbubbles, and measures the wavefront change to compute and render a suitable time-reversed wavefront solution for focusing. We demonstrate that the TRUME technique can create an optical focus at the site of bubble destruction with a size of ∼2 μm. We further demonstrate a twofold enhancement in addressable focus resolution in a microbubble aggregate target by exploiting the nonlinear pressure-to-destruction response of the microbubbles. The reported technique provides a deep tissue-focusing solution with high efficiency, resolution, and specificity. PMID:26597439

  6. Iterative Time-Reversed Ultrasonically Encoded Light Focusing in Backscattering Mode

    PubMed Central

    Ruan, Haowen; Jang, Mooseok; Judkewitz, Benjamin; Yang, Changhuei

    2014-01-01

    The Time-Reversed Ultrasound-Encoded (TRUE) light technique enables noninvasive focusing deep inside scattering media. However, the time-reversal procedure usually has a low signal-to-noise ratio because the intensity of ultrasound-encoded light is intrinsically low. Consequently, the contrast and resolution of TRUE focus is far from ideal, especially in the backscattering geometry, which is more practical in many biomedical applications. To improve the light intensity and resolution of TRUE focus, we developed an iterative TRUE (iTRUE) light focusing technique that employs the TRUE focus itself as a signal source (rather than diffused light) for subsequent TRUE procedures. Importantly, this iTRUE technique enables light focusing in backscattering mode. Here, we demonstrate the concept by focusing light in between scattering layers in a backscattering configuration and show that the light intensity at the focus is progressively enhanced by a factor of ~20. By scanning across a fluorescent bead between these two scattering layers, the focusing resolution in the ultrasound axial and lateral directions was improved ~2-fold and ~3-fold, respectively. We further explored the application of iTRUE in biological samples by focusing light between 1 mm thick chicken tissue and cartilage, and light intensity enhancements of the same order were also observed. PMID:25412687

  7. Time reversibility and nonequilibrium thermodynamics of second-order stochastic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Hao

    2014-02-01

    Nonequilibrium thermodynamics of a general second-order stochastic system is investigated. We prove that at steady state, under inversion of velocities, the condition of time reversibility over the phase space is equivalent to the antisymmetry of spatial flux and the symmetry of velocity flux. Then we show that the condition of time reversibility alone cannot always guarantee the Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution. Comparing the two conditions together, we find that the frictional force naturally emerges as the unique odd term of the total force at thermodynamic equilibrium, and is followed by the Einstein relation. The two conditions respectively correspond to two previously reported different entropy production rates. In the case where the external force is only position dependent, the two entropy production rates become one. We prove that such an entropy production rate can be decomposed into two non-negative terms, expressed respectively by the conditional mean and variance of the thermodynamic force associated with the irreversible velocity flux at any given spatial coordinate. In the small inertia limit, the former term becomes the entropy production rate of the corresponding overdamped dynamics, while the anomalous entropy production rate originates from the latter term. Furthermore, regarding the connection between the first law and second law, we find that in the steady state of such a limit, the anomalous entropy production rate is also the leading order of the Boltzmann-factor weighted difference between the spatial heat dissipation densities of the underdamped and overdamped dynamics, while their unweighted difference always tends to vanish.

  8. The effective chiral Lagrangian from dimension-six parity and time-reversal violation

    SciTech Connect

    Vries, J. de; Mereghetti, E.; Timmermans, R.G.E.; Kolck, U. van

    2013-11-15

    We classify the parity- and time-reversal-violating operators involving quark and gluon fields that have effective dimension six: the quark electric dipole moment, the quark and gluon chromo-electric dipole moments, and four four-quark operators. We construct the effective chiral Lagrangian with hadronic and electromagnetic interactions that originate from them, which serves as the basis for calculations of low-energy observables. The form of the effective interactions depends on the chiral properties of these operators. We develop a power-counting scheme and calculate within this scheme, as an example, the parity- and time-reversal-violating pion–nucleon form factor. We also discuss the electric dipole moments of the nucleon and light nuclei. -- Highlights: •Classification of T-odd dimension-six sources based on impact on observables. •Building of the chiral Lagrangian for each dimension-six source. •Calculation of the PT-odd pion–nucleon form factor for each source. •Discussion of hadronic EDMs for each source and comparison with the theta term.

  9. Seismic modeling and reverse-time depth migration by flux-corrected transport

    SciTech Connect

    Fei, Tong

    1993-01-01

    Where the Earth`s subsurface is generally inhomogeneous, lateral and vertical variation in velocity and density should be considered when doing seismic modeling and migration. Finite-difference modeling and reverse-time depth migration based on the full wave equation are approaches that take such variation into account. Here, through a change of dependent variables, the second-order acoustic wave equation is replaced by four first-order partial differential equations. The flux-corrected transport (FCT) method, commonly used in hydrodynamics for shockwave simulation, can then be used in solving these equations. The FCT method offers the opportunity to preserve a broader range of frequencies at lower computational cost than in conventional finite-difference modeling and reverse-time wave extrapolation. Moreover, it is also applicable in circumstances involving discontinuities in the wavefield, where other conventional finite-difference approaches fail. Computed two-dimensional impulse responses and synthetic data indicate that this method can accurately image positions of reflectors with greater than 90-degree dip for variable-velocity media.

  10. Seismic modeling and reverse-time depth migration by flux-corrected transport

    SciTech Connect

    Fei, Tong.

    1993-01-01

    Where the Earth's subsurface is generally inhomogeneous, lateral and vertical variation in velocity and density should be considered when doing seismic modeling and migration. Finite-difference modeling and reverse-time depth migration based on the full wave equation are approaches that take such variation into account. Here, through a change of dependent variables, the second-order acoustic wave equation is replaced by four first-order partial differential equations. The flux-corrected transport (FCT) method, commonly used in hydrodynamics for shockwave simulation, can then be used in solving these equations. The FCT method offers the opportunity to preserve a broader range of frequencies at lower computational cost than in conventional finite-difference modeling and reverse-time wave extrapolation. Moreover, it is also applicable in circumstances involving discontinuities in the wavefield, where other conventional finite-difference approaches fail. Computed two-dimensional impulse responses and synthetic data indicate that this method can accurately image positions of reflectors with greater than 90-degree dip for variable-velocity media.

  11. Deterministic time-reversible thermostats: chaos, ergodicity, and the zeroth law of thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patra, Puneet Kumar; Sprott, Julien Clinton; Hoover, William Graham; Griswold Hoover, Carol

    2015-09-01

    The relative stability and ergodicity of deterministic time-reversible thermostats, both singly and in coupled pairs, are assessed through their Lyapunov spectra. Five types of thermostat are coupled to one another through a single Hooke's-law harmonic spring. The resulting dynamics shows that three specific thermostat types, Hoover-Holian, Ju-Bulgac, and Martyna-Klein-Tuckerman, have very similar Lyapunov spectra in their equilibrium four-dimensional phase spaces and when coupled in equilibrium or nonequilibrium pairs. All three of these oscillator-based thermostats are shown to be ergodic, with smooth analytic Gaussian distributions in their extended phase spaces (coordinate, momentum, and two control variables). Evidently these three ergodic and time-reversible thermostat types are particularly useful as statistical-mechanical thermometers and thermostats. Each of them generates Gibbs' universal canonical distribution internally as well as for systems to which they are coupled. Thus they obey the zeroth law of thermodynamics, as a good heat bath should. They also provide dissipative heat flow with relatively small nonlinearity when two or more such temperature baths interact and provide useful deterministic replacements for the stochastic Langevin equation.

  12. Unexpected edge conduction in mercury telluride quantum wells under broken time-reversal symmetry

    DOE PAGES

    Ma, Eric Yue; Calvo, M. Reyes; Wang, Jing; Lian, Biao; Muhlbauer, Mathias; Brune, Christoph; Cui, Yong -Tao; Lai, Keji; Kundhikanjana, Worasom; Yang, Yongliang; et al

    2015-05-26

    The realization of quantum spin Hall effect in HgTe quantum wells is considered a milestone in the discovery of topological insulators. Quantum spin Hall states are predicted to allow current flow at the edges of an insulating bulk, as demonstrated in various experiments. A key prediction yet to be experimentally verified is the breakdown of the edge conduction under broken time-reversal symmetry. Here we first establish a systematic framework for the magnetic field dependence of electrostatically gated quantum spin Hall devices. We then study edge conduction of an inverted quantum well device under broken time-reversal symmetry using microwave impedance microscopy,more » and compare our findings to a non-inverted device. At zero magnetic field, only the inverted device shows clear edge conduction in its local conductivity profile, consistent with theory. Surprisingly, the edge conduction persists up to 9 T with little change. Finally, this indicates physics beyond simple quantum spin Hall model, including material-specific properties and possibly many-body effects.« less

  13. Unexpected edge conduction in mercury telluride quantum wells under broken time-reversal symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Eric Yue; Calvo, M. Reyes; Wang, Jing; Lian, Biao; Muhlbauer, Mathias; Brune, Christoph; Cui, Yong -Tao; Lai, Keji; Kundhikanjana, Worasom; Yang, Yongliang; Baenninger, Matthias; Konig, Markus; Ames, Christopher; Buhmann, Hartmut; Leubner, Philipp; Molenkamp, Laurens W.; Zhang, Shou -Cheng; Goldhaber-Gordon, David; Kelly, Michael A.; Shen, Zhi -Xun

    2015-05-26

    The realization of quantum spin Hall effect in HgTe quantum wells is considered a milestone in the discovery of topological insulators. Quantum spin Hall states are predicted to allow current flow at the edges of an insulating bulk, as demonstrated in various experiments. A key prediction yet to be experimentally verified is the breakdown of the edge conduction under broken time-reversal symmetry. Here we first establish a systematic framework for the magnetic field dependence of electrostatically gated quantum spin Hall devices. We then study edge conduction of an inverted quantum well device under broken time-reversal symmetry using microwave impedance microscopy, and compare our findings to a non-inverted device. At zero magnetic field, only the inverted device shows clear edge conduction in its local conductivity profile, consistent with theory. Surprisingly, the edge conduction persists up to 9 T with little change. Finally, this indicates physics beyond simple quantum spin Hall model, including material-specific properties and possibly many-body effects.

  14. Precise discussion of time-reversal asymmetries in B-meson decays

    DOE PAGES

    Morozumi, Takuya; Okane, Hideaki; Umeeda, Hiroyuki

    2015-02-26

    BaBar collaboration announced that they observed time reversal (T) asymmetry through B meson system. In the experiment, time dependencies of two distinctive processes, B_ →B¯0 and B¯0 → B_ (– expresses CP value) are compared with each other. In our study, we examine event number difference of these two processes. In contrast to the BaBar asymmetry, the asymmetry of events number includes the overall normalization difference for rates. Time dependence of the asymmetry is more general and it includes terms absent in one used by BaBar collaboration. Both of the BaBar asymmetry and ours are naively thought to be T-oddmore » since two processes compared are related with flipping time direction. We investigate the time reversal transformation property of our asymmetry. Using our notation, one can see that the asymmetry is not precisely a T-odd quantity, taking into account indirect CP and CPT violation of K meson systems. The effect of ϵK is extracted and gives rise to O(10–3) contribution. The introduced parameters are invariant under rephasing of quarks so that the coefficients of our asymmetry are expressed as phase convention independent quantities. Some combinations of the asymmetry enable us to extract parameters for wrong sign decays of Bd meson, CPT violation, etc. As a result, we also study the reason why the T-even terms are allowed to contribute to the asymmetry, and find that several conditions are needed for the asymmetry to be a T-odd quantity.« less

  15. Precise discussion of time-reversal asymmetries in B-meson decays

    SciTech Connect

    Morozumi, Takuya; Okane, Hideaki; Umeeda, Hiroyuki

    2015-02-26

    BaBar collaboration announced that they observed time reversal (T) asymmetry through B meson system. In the experiment, time dependencies of two distinctive processes, B_ →B¯0 and B¯0 → B_ (– expresses CP value) are compared with each other. In our study, we examine event number difference of these two processes. In contrast to the BaBar asymmetry, the asymmetry of events number includes the overall normalization difference for rates. Time dependence of the asymmetry is more general and it includes terms absent in one used by BaBar collaboration. Both of the BaBar asymmetry and ours are naively thought to be T-odd since two processes compared are related with flipping time direction. We investigate the time reversal transformation property of our asymmetry. Using our notation, one can see that the asymmetry is not precisely a T-odd quantity, taking into account indirect CP and CPT violation of K meson systems. The effect of ϵK is extracted and gives rise to O(10–3) contribution. The introduced parameters are invariant under rephasing of quarks so that the coefficients of our asymmetry are expressed as phase convention independent quantities. Some combinations of the asymmetry enable us to extract parameters for wrong sign decays of Bd meson, CPT violation, etc. As a result, we also study the reason why the T-even terms are allowed to contribute to the asymmetry, and find that several conditions are needed for the asymmetry to be a T-odd quantity.

  16. Real-time NASBA detection of SARS-associated coronavirus and comparison with real-time reverse transcription-PCR.

    PubMed

    Keightley, Maria Cristina; Sillekens, Peter; Schippers, Wim; Rinaldo, Charles; George, Kirsten St

    2005-12-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) exhibits a high mortality rate and the potential for rapid epidemic spread. Additionally, it has a poorly defined clinical presentation, and no known treatment or prevention methods. Collectively, these factors underscore the need for early diagnosis. Molecular tests have been developed to detect SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV) RNA using real time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) with varying levels of sensitivity. However, RNA amplification methods have been demonstrated to be more sensitive for the detection of some RNA viruses. We therefore developed a real-time nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA) test for SARS-CoV. A number of primer/beacon sets were designed to target different regions of the SARS-CoV genome, and were tested for sensitivity and specificity. The performance of the assays was compared with RT-PCR assays. A multi-target real-time NASBA application was developed for detection of SARS-CoV polymerase (Pol) and nucleocapsid (N) genes. The N targets were found to be consistently more sensitive than the Pol targets, and the real-time NASBA assay demonstrates equivalent sensitivity when compared to testing by real-time RT-PCR. A multi-target real-time NASBA assay has been successfully developed for the sensitive detection of SARS-CoV.

  17. Nonlinear optical response induced by non-Abelian Berry curvature in time-reversal-invariant insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fan; Liu, Ren-Bao

    2014-12-01

    We propose a general framework of nonlinear optics induced by non-Abelian Berry curvature in time-reversal-invariant (TRI) insulators. We find that the third-order response of a TRI insulator under optical and terahertz light fields is directly related to the integration of the non-Abelian Berry curvature over the Brillouin zone. We apply the result to insulators with rotational symmetry near the band edge. Under resonant excitations, the optical susceptibility is proportional to the flux of the Berry curvature through the iso-energy surface, which is equal to the Chern number of the surface times 2 π . For the III-V compound semiconductors, microscopic calculations based on the six-band model give a third-order susceptibility with the Chern number of the iso-energy surface equal to 3.

  18. The MTV experiment: a test of time reversal symmetry using polarized 8Li

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murata, J.; Baba, H.; Behr, J. A.; Hirayama, Y.; Iguri, T.; Ikeda, M.; Kato, T.; Kawamura, H.; Kishi, R.; Levy, C. D. P.; Nakaya, Y.; Ninomiya, K.; Ogawa, N.; Onishi, J.; Openshaw, R.; Pearson, M.; Seitaibashi, E.; Tanaka, S.; Tanuma, R.; Totsuka, Y.; Toyoda, T.

    2014-01-01

    The MTV ( Mott Polarimetry for T- Violation Experiment) experiment at TRIUMF-ISAC ( Isotope Separator and ACcelerator), which aims to achieve the highest precision test of time reversal symmetry in polarized nuclear beta decay by measuring a triple correlation ( R-correlation), is motivated by the search for a new physics beyond the Standard Model. In this experiment, the existence of non-zero transverse electron polarization is examined utilizing the analyzing power of Mott scattering from a thin metal foil. Backward scattering electron tracks are measured using a multi-wire drift chamber for the first time. The MTV experiment was commissioned at ISAC in 2009 using an 80 % polarized 8Li beam at 107 pps, resulting in 0.1 % statistical precision on the R-parameter in the first physics run performed in 2010. Next generation cylindrical drift chamber (CDC) is now being installed for the future run.

  19. Time-reversed adapted-perturbation (TRAP) optical focusing onto dynamic objects inside scattering media

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Cheng; Xu, Xiao; Liu, Yan; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to steer and focus light inside scattering media has long been sought for a multitude of applications. To form optical foci inside scattering media, the only feasible strategy at present is to guide photons by using either implanted1 or virtual2–4 guide stars, which can be inconvenient and limits potential applications. Here, we report a scheme for focusing light inside scattering media by employing intrinsic dynamics as guide stars. By time-reversing the perturbed component of the scattered light adaptively, we show that it is possible to focus light to the origin of the perturbation. Using the approach, we demonstrate non-invasive dynamic light focusing onto moving targets and imaging of a time-variant object obscured by highly scattering media. Anticipated applications include imaging and photoablation of angiogenic vessels in tumours as well as other biomedical uses. PMID:25530797

  20. Time-Reversal Acoustic Focusing with Liquid Resonator for Medical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinelnikov, Yegor D.; Sutin, Alexandre Y.; Sarvazyan, Armen P.

    2007-05-01

    Time Reversal Acoustic (TRA) focusing system based on the use of liquid filled resonators with single or few transducers is demonstrated to effectively converge acoustic energy in space and time. Because the wavelength in liquid is typically smaller than in solids, liquid based TRA focusing resonators can have smaller dimensions than solid resonators. The efficiency of liquid-based TRA focusing resonators to transmit acoustic power to soft tissues is improved by impedance matching of the acoustic transducer assembly to the surrounding liquid. Experiments were conducted to understand the properties of TRA focusing with the liquid-filled resonators and possible application of the TRA systems for biomedical applications. The factors defining the efficiency of liquid based TRA focusing resonators were explored. In media with high attenuation, the binary mode of ultrasound delivery yielded noticeably narrower focusing of ultrasound than conventional analog focusing.

  1. A model for inferring transport rates from observed confinement times in field-reversed configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinhauer, Loren C.; Milroy, Richard D.; Slough, John T.

    1985-03-01

    A one-dimensional transport model is developed to simulate the confinement of plasma and magnetic flux in a field-reversed configuration. Given the resistivity, the confinement times can be calculated. Approximate expressions are found which yield the magnitude and gross profile of the resistivity if the confinement times are known. These results are applied to experimental data from experiments, primarily TRX-1, to uncover trends in the transport properties. Several important conclusions emerge. The transport depends profoundly, and inexplicably, on the plasma formation mode. The inferred transport differs in several ways from the predictions of local lower-hybrid-drift turbulence theory. Finally, the gross resistivity exhibits an unusual trend with xs (separatrix radius rs divided by the conducting wall radius rc ), and is peaked near the magnetic axis for certain predictable conditions.

  2. Measuring the spin Chern number in time-reversal-invariant Hofstadter optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dan-Wei; Cao, Shuai

    2016-10-01

    We propose an experimental scheme to directly measure the spin Chern number of the time-reversal-invariant Hofstadter model in optical lattices. We first show that this model can be realized by using ultracold Fermi atoms with two pseudo-spin states encoded by the internal Zeeman states in a square optical lattice and the corresponding topological Bloch bands are characterized by the spin Chern number. We then propose and numerically demonstrate that this topological invariant can be extracted from the shift of the hybrid Wannier center in the optical lattice. By spin-resolved in situ detection of the atomic densities along the transverse direction combined with time-of-flight measurement along another spatial direction, the spin Chern number in this system is directly measured.

  3. Real-Time Reverse Transcription–Polymerase Chain Reaction Assay for SARS-associated Coronavirus

    PubMed Central

    Emery, Shannon L.; Bowen, Michael D.; Newton, Bruce R.; Winchell, Jonas M.; Meyer, Richard F.; Tong, Suxiang; Cook, Byron T.; Holloway, Brian P.; McCaustland, Karen A.; Rota, Paul A.; Bankamp, Bettina; Lowe, Luis E.; Ksiazek, Tom G.; Bellini, William J.; Anderson, Larry J.

    2004-01-01

    A real-time reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay was developed to rapidly detect the severe acute respiratory syndrome–associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV). The assay, based on multiple primer and probe sets located in different regions of the SARS-CoV genome, could discriminate SARS-CoV from other human and animal coronaviruses with a potential detection limit of <10 genomic copies per reaction. The real-time RT-PCR assay was more sensitive than a conventional RT-PCR assay or culture isolation and proved suitable to detect SARS-CoV in clinical specimens. Application of this assay will aid in diagnosing SARS-CoV infection. PMID:15030703

  4. Suppression and Revival of Weak Localization of Ultra-Cold Atoms by Manipulation of Time-Reversal Symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aspect, Alain

    In the early 1980's, observation of a magneto-resistance anomaly in metallic thin films was attributed to the phenomenon of weak localization of electrons and to time-reversal symmetry breaking due to a magnetic field acting upon charged particles. We have observed weak localization of ultra-cold atoms in a 2D configuration, placed in a disordered potential created by a laser speckle. In order to manipulate time-reversal symmetry with our neutral atoms, we take advantage of the slow evolution of our system, and we observe the suppression and revival of weak localization when time reversal symmetry is cancelled and reestablished. References: K. Muller, J. Richard, V. V. Volchkov, V. Denechaud, P. Bouyer, A. Aspect, and V. Josse, ''Suppression and Revival of Weak Localization through Control of Time-Reversal Symmetry,'' Physical Review Letters 114 (20) (2015) and references in. Work supported by the ERC Avanced Grant Quantatop.

  5. Demonstrating trend reversal of groundwater quality in relation to time of recharge determined by 3H/3He.

    PubMed

    Visser, A; Broers, H P; van der Grift, B; Bierkens, M F P

    2007-08-01

    Recent EU legislation is directed to reverse the upward trends in the concentrations of agricultural pollutants in groundwater. However, uncertainty of the groundwater travel time towards the screens of the groundwater quality monitoring networks complicates the demonstration of trend reversal. We investigated whether trend reversal can be demonstrated by relating concentrations of pollutants in groundwater to the time of recharge, instead of the time of sampling. To do so, we used the travel time to monitoring screens in sandy agricultural areas in the Netherlands, determined by (3)H/(3)He groundwater dating. We observed that concentrations of conservative pollutants increased in groundwater recharged before 1985 and decreased after 1990. Thereby, we demonstrated trend reversal of groundwater quality. From this research we concluded that (3)H/(3)He dating can be used to facilitate (re)interpretation of existing groundwater quality data. The presented approach is widely applicable in areas with unconsolidated granular aquifers and large agricultural pressures on groundwater resources.

  6. Efficient elastic reverse-time migration for the decomposed P-wavefield using stress tensor in the time domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Jiho; Shin, Sungryul; Shin, Changsoo; Chung, Wookeen

    2015-05-01

    Because complex mixed waves are typically generated in elastic media, wavefield decomposition is required for such media to obtain migration images accurately. In isotropic media, this is achieved according to the Helmholtz decomposition theorem; in particular, the divergence operator is commonly applied to P-wavefield decomposition. In this study, two types of elastic reverse-time migration algorithms are proposed for decomposition of the P-wavefield without requiring the divergence operator. The first algorithm involves formulation of the stress tensor by spatially differentiated displacement according to the stress-strain relationship and is utilized to construct an imaging condition for the decomposed P-wavefield. We demonstrate this approach through numerical testing. The second algorithm allows us to obtain emphasized interfaces through the application of the absolute value function to decomposed wavefield in imaging condition. Because reverse-time migration can be defined by a zero-lag cross-correlation relationship between the partial-derivative wavefield and the observed wavefield data, we derive the virtual source to construct the partial-derivative wavefield based on a 2D staggered-grid finite-difference modeling method in the time domain. The explicitly computed partial-derivative wavefield from virtual sources with the stress tensor is in agreement with the partial-derivative wavefield directly computed from residual by between with and without a perturbation point in the subsurface. Moreover, the back-propagation technique is used to enhance the computational efficiency. To validate our two types of imaging conditions, numerical tests are conducted. The migration images created according to our imaging conditions can represent the subsurface structure accurately. Thus, we can confirm the feasibility of obtaining migration images of the decomposed P-wavefield without requiring the application of the divergence operator.

  7. Change ΔS of the entropy in natural time under time reversal: Complexity measures upon change of scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarlis, N. V.; Christopoulos, S.-R. G.; Bemplidaki, M. M.

    2015-01-01

    The entropy S in natural time as well as the entropy in natural time under time reversal S- have already found useful applications in the physics of complex systems, e.g., in the analysis of electrocardiograms (ECGs). Here, we focus on the complexity measures Λl which result upon considering how the statistics of the time series Δ S≤ft[\\equiv S- S-\\right] changes upon varying the scale l. These scale-specific measures are ratios of the standard deviations σ(Δ S_l) and hence independent of the mean value and the standard deviation of the data. They focus on the different dynamics that appear on different scales. For this reason, they can be considered complementary to other standard measures of heart rate variability in ECG, like SDNN, as well as other complexity measures already defined in natural time. An application to the analysis of ECG —when solely using NN intervals— is presented: We show how Λl can be used to separate ECG of healthy individuals from those suffering from congestive heart failure and sudden cardiac death.

  8. Rethinking fast and slow based on a critique of reaction-time reverse inference

    PubMed Central

    Krajbich, Ian; Bartling, Björn; Hare, Todd; Fehr, Ernst

    2015-01-01

    Do people intuitively favour certain actions over others? In some dual-process research, reaction-time (RT) data have been used to infer that certain choices are intuitive. However, the use of behavioural or biological measures to infer mental function, popularly known as ‘reverse inference', is problematic because it does not take into account other sources of variability in the data, such as discriminability of the choice options. Here we use two example data sets obtained from value-based choice experiments to demonstrate that, after controlling for discriminability (that is, strength-of-preference), there is no evidence that one type of choice is systematically faster than the other. Moreover, using specific variations of a prominent value-based choice experiment, we are able to predictably replicate, eliminate or reverse previously reported correlations between RT and selfishness. Thus, our findings shed crucial light on the use of RT in inferring mental processes and strongly caution against using RT differences as evidence favouring dual-process accounts. PMID:26135809

  9. Structure-guided residence time optimization of a dabigatran reversal agent

    PubMed Central

    Schiele, Felix; van Ryn, Joanne; Litzenburger, Tobias; Ritter, Michael; Seeliger, Daniel; Nar, Herbert

    2015-01-01

    Novel oral anticoagulants are effective and safe alternatives to vitamin-K antagonists for anticoagulation therapy. However, anticoagulation therapy in general is associated with an elevated risk of bleeding. Idarucizumab is a reversal agent for the direct thrombin inhibitor, dabigatran etexilate (Pradaxa®) and is currently in Phase 3 studies. Here, we report data on the antibody fragment aDabi-Fab2, a putative backup molecule for idarucizumab. Although aDabi-Fab2 completely reversed effects of dabigatran in a rat model in vivo, we observed significantly reduced duration of action compared to idarucizumab. Rational protein engineering, based on the X-ray structure of aDabi-Fab2, led to the identification of mutant Y103W. The mutant had optimized shape complementarity to dabigatran while maintaining an energetically favored hydrogen bond. It displayed increased affinity for dabigatran, mainly driven by a slower off-rate. Interestingly, the increased residence time translated into longer duration of action in vivo. It was thus possible to further enhance the efficacy of aDabi-Fab2 based on rational design, giving it the potential to serve as a back-up candidate for idarucizumab. PMID:26047352

  10. An application of time-reversed acoustics to the imaging of a salt-dome flank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willis, M. E.; Lu, R.; Campman, X.; Toksöz, N.; Zhang, Y.; de Hoop, M. V.

    2005-12-01

    We present results of applying the concept of time-reversed acoustics (TRA) to the imaging of a salt-dome flank in a v(z) medium. A simulated multi-level walk-away VSP survey with sources at the surface and receivers in the borehole can be sorted into an equivalent reverse VSP (RVSP) with effective downhole sources and surface receivers. We apply the TRA process to the RVSP traces and create a zero offset seismic section as if it had been collected from collocated downhole sources and receivers. This procedure effectively redatums the wavefield from the surface to the borehole, eliminating the need for any complicated processing. The redatummed traces are created by summing the autocorrelations of the traces in the RVSP common shot gather. Theory says that each shot gather should be from receivers which completely surround the source. From practical considerations, we only have available the RVSP common receivers on the earth's surface, so we obtain an approximate zero offset section. Even with this restriction, our example shows that the results are encouraging. The image of the salt dome flank is created from the redatummed traces using a standard post-stack depth migration algorithm. This image compares favorably with the salt dome flank model.

  11. Structure-guided residence time optimization of a dabigatran reversal agent.

    PubMed

    Schiele, Felix; van Ryn, Joanne; Litzenburger, Tobias; Ritter, Michael; Seeliger, Daniel; Nar, Herbert

    2015-01-01

    Novel oral anticoagulants are effective and safe alternatives to vitamin-K antagonists for anticoagulation therapy. However, anticoagulation therapy in general is associated with an elevated risk of bleeding. Idarucizumab is a reversal agent for the direct thrombin inhibitor, dabigatran etexilate (Pradaxa®) and is currently in Phase 3 studies. Here, we report data on the antibody fragment aDabi-Fab2, a putative backup molecule for idarucizumab. Although aDabi-Fab2 completely reversed effects of dabigatran in a rat model in vivo, we observed significantly reduced duration of action compared to idarucizumab. Rational protein engineering, based on the X-ray structure of aDabi-Fab2, led to the identification of mutant Y103W. The mutant had optimized shape complementarity to dabigatran while maintaining an energetically favored hydrogen bond. It displayed increased affinity for dabigatran, mainly driven by a slower off-rate. Interestingly, the increased residence time translated into longer duration of action in vivo. It was thus possible to further enhance the efficacy of aDabi-Fab2 based on rational design, giving it the potential to serve as a back-up candidate for idarucizumab. PMID:26047352

  12. Wideband Multichannel Time-Reversal Processing for Acoustic Communications in a Tunnel-like Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Candy, J V; Chambers, D H; Robbins, C L; Guidry, B L; Poggio, A J; Dowla, F; Hertzog, C A

    2006-01-12

    The development of multichannel time-reversal (T/R) processing techniques continues to progress rapidly especially when the need to communicate in a highly reverberative environment becomes critical. The underlying T/R concept is based on time-reversing the Green's function characterizing the uncertain communications channel investigating the deleterious dispersion and multipath effects. In this paper, attention is focused on two major objectives: (1) wideband communications leading to a time reference modulation technique; and (2) multichannel acoustic communications in a tunnel (or cave or pipe) with many obstructions, multipath returns, severe background noise, disturbances, long propagation paths ({approx}180) with disruptions (bends). For this extremely hostile environment, it is shown that multichannel T/R receivers can easily be extended to the wideband designs while demonstrating their performance in both the ''canonical'' stairwell of our previous work as well as a tunnel-like structure. Acoustic information signals are transmitted with an 8-element host or base station array to two client receivers with a significant loss in signal levels due to the propagation environment. In this paper, the results of the new wideband T/R processor and modulation scheme are discussed to demonstrate the overall performance for both high (24-bit) and low (1-bit) bit level analog-to-digital (A/D) converter designs. These results are validated by performing proof-of-principle acoustic communications experiments in air. It is shown that the resulting T/R receivers are capable of extracting the transmitted coded sequence from noisy microphone array measurements with zero-bit error.

  13. Effect of the stimulus frequency and pulse number of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on the inter-reversal time of perceptual reversal on the right superior parietal lobule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nojima, Kazuhisa; Ge, Sheng; Katayama, Yoshinori; Ueno, Shoogo; Iramina, Keiji

    2010-05-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of the stimulus frequency and pulses number of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) on the inter-reversal time (IRT) of perceptual reversal on the right superior parietal lobule (SPL). The spinning wheel illusion was used as the ambiguous figures stimulation in this study. To investigate the rTMS effect over the right SPL during perceptual reversal, 0.25 Hz 60 pulse, 1 Hz 60 pulse, 0.5 Hz 120 pulse, 1 Hz 120 pulse, and 1 Hz 240 pulse biphasic rTMS at 90% of resting motor threshold was applied over the right SPL and the right posterior temporal lobe (PTL), respectively. As a control, a no TMS was also conducted. It was found that rTMS on 0.25 Hz 60 pulse and 1 Hz 60 pulse applied over the right SPL caused shorter IRT. In contrast, it was found that rTMS on 1 Hz 240-pulse applied over the right SPL caused longer IRT. On the other hand, there is no significant difference between IRTs when the rTMS on 0.5 Hz 120 pulse and 1 Hz 120 pulse were applied over the right SPL. Therefore, the applying of rTMS over the right SPL suggests that the IRT of perceptual reversal is effected by the rTMS conditions such as the stimulus frequency and the number of pulses.

  14. Time-reversal imaging techniques applied to tremor waveforms near Cholame, California to locate tectonic tremor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horstmann, T.; Harrington, R. M.; Cochran, E. S.

    2012-12-01

    Frequently, the lack of distinctive phase arrivals makes locating tectonic tremor more challenging than locating earthquakes. Classic location algorithms based on travel times cannot be directly applied because impulsive phase arrivals are often difficult to recognize. Traditional location algorithms are often modified to use phase arrivals identified from stacks of recurring low-frequency events (LFEs) observed within tremor episodes, rather than single events. Stacking the LFE waveforms improves the signal-to-noise ratio for the otherwise non-distinct phase arrivals. In this study, we apply a different method to locate tectonic tremor: a modified time-reversal imaging approach that potentially exploits the information from the entire tremor waveform instead of phase arrivals from individual LFEs. Time reversal imaging uses the waveforms of a given seismic source recorded by multiple seismometers at discrete points on the surface and a 3D velocity model to rebroadcast the waveforms back into the medium to identify the seismic source location. In practice, the method works by reversing the seismograms recorded at each of the stations in time, and back-propagating them from the receiver location individually into the sub-surface as a new source time function. We use a staggered-grid, finite-difference code with 2.5 ms time steps and a grid node spacing of 50 m to compute the rebroadcast wavefield. We calculate the time-dependent curl field at each grid point of the model volume for each back-propagated seismogram. To locate the tremor, we assume that the source time function back-propagated from each individual station produces a similar curl field at the source position. We then cross-correlate the time dependent curl field functions and calculate a median cross-correlation coefficient at each grid point. The highest median cross-correlation coefficient in the model volume is expected to represent the source location. For our analysis, we use the velocity model of

  15. Acoustic Longitudinal Field NIF Optic Feature Detection Map Using Time-Reversal & MUSIC

    SciTech Connect

    Lehman, S K

    2006-02-09

    We developed an ultrasonic longitudinal field time-reversal and MUltiple SIgnal Classification (MUSIC) based detection algorithm for identifying and mapping flaws in fused silica NIF optics. The algorithm requires a fully multistatic data set, that is one with multiple, independently operated, spatially diverse transducers, each transmitter of which, in succession, launches a pulse into the optic and the scattered signal measured and recorded at every receiver. We have successfully localized engineered ''defects'' larger than 1 mm in an optic. We confirmed detection and localization of 3 mm and 5 mm features in experimental data, and a 0.5 mm in simulated data with sufficiently high signal-to-noise ratio. We present the theory, experimental results, and simulated results.

  16. Time-reversal-invariant Hofstadter-Hubbard model with ultracold fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orth, Peter; Cocks, Daniel; Rachel, Stephan; Buchhold, Michael; Le Hur, Karyn; Hofstetter, Walter

    2013-03-01

    We consider the time-reversal-invariant Hofstadter-Hubbard model which can be realized in cold-atom experiments. In these experiments, an additional staggered potential and an artificial Rashba-type spin-orbit coupling are available. Without interactions, the system exhibits various phases such as topological and normal insulator, metal as well as semi-metal phases with two or even more Dirac cones. Using a combination of real-space dynamical mean-field theory and analytical techniques, we discuss the effect of on-site interactions and determine the corresponding phase diagram. In particular, we investigate the semi-metal to antiferromagnetic insulator transition and the stability of different topological insulator phases in the presence of strong interactions. We compute spectral functions which allow us to study the edge states of the strongly correlated topological phases.

  17. Time-Reversal-Invariant Hofstadter-Hubbard Model with Ultracold Fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cocks, Daniel; Orth, Peter P.; Rachel, Stephan; Buchhold, Michael; Le Hur, Karyn; Hofstetter, Walter

    2012-11-01

    We consider the time-reversal-invariant Hofstadter-Hubbard model which can be realized in cold-atom experiments. In these experiments, an additional staggered potential and an artificial Rashba-type spin-orbit coupling are available. Without interactions, the system exhibits various phases such as topological and normal insulator, metal as well as semi-metal phases with two or even more Dirac cones. Using a combination of real-space dynamical mean-field theory and analytical techniques, we discuss the effect of on-site interactions and determine the corresponding phase diagram. In particular, we investigate the semi-metal to antiferromagnetic insulator transition and the stability of different topological insulator phases in the presence of strong interactions. We compute spectral functions which allow us to study the edge states of the strongly correlated topological phases.

  18. Interferometric measurement method for Z2 invariants of time-reversal invariant topological insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grusdt, Fabian; Abanin, Dmitry; Demler, Eugene

    2013-05-01

    Recently experiments with ultracold atoms started to explore topological phases in 1D optical lattices. While transport measurements are challenging in these systems, ways to directly measure topological quantum numbers using a combination of Bloch oscillations and Ramsey interferometry have been explored (Atala et al., arXiv:1212.0572). In this talk I will present ways to measure the Z2 topological quantum numbers of two and three dimensional time-reversal invariant (TR) topological insulators. In this case non-Abelian Bloch oscillations can be combined with Ramsey interferometry to map out the topological properties of a given band-structure. Our method is very general and works even in the presence of accidental degeneracies. The applicability of the scheme is discussed for different theoretically proposed implementations of TR topological insulators using ultracold atoms. F. G. is grateful to Harvard University for hospitality and acknowledges financial support from Graduate School Materials Science in Mainz (MAINZ).

  19. Time-reversal invariant SU(2 ) Hofstadter problem in three-dimensional lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yi

    2015-05-01

    We formulate the three-dimensional SU(2 ) Landau level problem in cubic lattices with time-reversal invariance. By taking a Landau-type SU(2 ) gauge, the system can be reduced into one dimension, as characterized by the SU(2 ) generalization of the usual Harper equations with a periodic spin-dependent gauge potential. The surface spectra indicate the spatial separation of helical states with opposite eigenvalues of a lattice helicity operator. The band topology is investigated from both the analysis of the boundary helical Fermi surfaces and the calculation of the Z2 index based on the bulk wave functions. The transition between a three-dimensional weak topological insulator to a strong one is studied as varying the anisotropy of hopping parameters.

  20. Four-port photonic structures with mirror-time reversal symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Huanan; Thomas, Roney; Ellis, F. M.; Kottos, Tsampikos

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the transport characteristics of a four-port gyrotropic photonic structure with mirror-time reversal symmetry. The structure consists of two coupled cavities with balanced amplification and attenuation. The cavities are placed on top of a gyrotropic substrate and are coupled to two bus waveguides. Using detail simulations in the microwave domain we demonstrate a strong non-reciprocal intra-guide port transport and an enhanced inter-guide port transmittance. The non-reciprocal features are dramatically amplified in the gain-loss parameter domain where an exceptional point degeneracy, for the associated isolated set-up, occurs. These results are explained theoretically in terms of an equivalent lumped circuit.

  1. Non invasive transcostal focusing based on the decomposition of the time reversal operator: in vitro validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cochard, Étienne; Prada, Claire; Aubry, Jean-François; Fink, Mathias

    2010-03-01

    Thermal ablation induced by high intensity focused ultrasound has produced promising clinical results to treat hepatocarcinoma and other liver tumors. However skin burns have been reported due to the high absorption of ultrasonic energy by the ribs. This study proposes a method to produce an acoustic field focusing on a chosen target while sparing the ribs, using the decomposition of the time-reversal operator (DORT method). The idea is to apply an excitation weight vector to the transducers array which is orthogonal to the subspace of emissions focusing on the ribs. The ratio of the energies absorbed at the focal point and on the ribs has been enhanced up to 100-fold as demonstrated by the measured specific absorption rates.

  2. Selective source reduction to identify masked sources using time reversal acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalerandi, M.; Gliozzi, A. S.; Anderson, Brian E.; Griffa, M.; Johnson, Paul A.; Ulrich, T. J.

    2008-08-01

    The presence of strong sources of elastic waves often makes it impossible to localize weaker ones, which are sometimes the most meaningful, e.g. in the characterization of complexity of active Earth faults or of microdamage in a composite structural material. To address this problem, a selective source reduction method is proposed here which, applied in conjunction with time reversal acoustics (TRA), provides the means to selectively reduce the contribution of strong sources allowing full illumination of the weak ones. The method is complementary to other methods based on TRA which aim at the selective illumination of scatterers in the propagation medium. In this paper, a description of the method is given along with presentation of a few numerical results to demonstrate its usefulness for localization of sources. Validation and some experimental results are also presented.

  3. Nonlinear Elastic Wave NDE II. Nonlinear Wave Modulation Spectroscopy and Nonlinear Time Reversed Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutin, A. M.; Johnson, P. A.

    2005-04-01

    This paper presents the second part of the review of Nonlinear Elastic Wave Spectroscopy (NEWS) in NDE, and describe two different methods of nonlinear NDE that provide not only damage detection but location as well. Nonlinear Wave Modulation Spectroscopy is based on the application of an ultrasonic probe signal modulated by a low frequency vibration. Damage location can be obtained by application of Impulse Modulation Techniques that exploit the modulation of a short pulse reflected from a damage feature (e.g. crack) by low frequency vibration. Nonlinear Time Reversed Acoustic methods provide the means to focus acoustic energy to any point in a solid. In combination, we are applying the focusing properties of TRA and the nonlinear properties of cracks to locate them.

  4. Double-Polarized pd Scattering and Test of Time-reversal Invariance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uzikov, Yuriy

    2016-02-01

    The integrated proton-deuteron cross section σ˜ for the case of transversal polarization ppy of the proton and tensor polarization Pxz of the deuteron provides a null test signal for time-reversal invariance violating but P-parity conserving effects. The corresponding experiment is planned at COSY to measure the observable σ˜. Here we consider in general case the status of the null-test observable in pd scattering, calculate σ˜ within the Glauber theory of the double-polarized pd scattering at 100 - 1000 MeV and study the contribution of the deuteron S- and D-waves for several type of the T-odd NN interactions.

  5. [INVITED] Time reversal optical tomography: Detecting and locating tumors in an ex vivo model human breast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Binlin; Alrubaiee, Mohammad; Gayen, S. K.

    2016-03-01

    Time reversal optical tomography (TROT), a recently introduced diffuse optical imaging approach, is used to detect, locate, and obtain cross-section images of tumors inside a "model human breast." The model cancerous breast is assembled as a semi-cylindrical slab of uniform thickness using ex vivo human breast tissues with two pieces of tumors embedded in it. The experimental arrangement used a 750-nm light beam from a Ti:sapphire laser to illuminate an end face (source plane) of the sample in a multi-source probing scheme. A multi-detector signal acquisition scheme measured transmitted light intensity distribution on the other end face (detector plane). The perturbations in light intensity distribution in the detector plane were analyzed using TROT to obtain locations of the tumor pieces in three dimensions and estimate their cross sections. The estimated locations and dimensions of targets are in good agreement with the results of a corroborating magnetic resonance imaging experiment.

  6. Time-reversal-invariance-violating nucleon-nucleon potential in the 1 /Nc expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samart, Daris; Schat, Carlos; Schindler, Matthias R.; Phillips, Daniel R.

    2016-08-01

    We apply the large-Nc expansion to the time-reversal-invariance-violating (TV) nucleon-nucleon potential. The operator structures contributing to next-to-next-to-leading order in the large-Nc counting are constructed. For the TV and parity-violating case we find a single operator structure at leading order. The TV but parity-conserving potential contains two leading-order terms, which, however, are suppressed by 1 /Nc compared to the parity-violating potential. Comparison with phenomenological potentials, including the chiral effective field theory potential in the TV parity-violating case, leads to large-Nc scaling relations for TV meson-nucleon and nucleon-nucleon couplings.

  7. Thermodynamic glass transition in a spin glass without time-reversal symmetry

    PubMed Central

    Baños, Raquel Alvarez; Cruz, Andres; Fernandez, Luis Antonio; Gil-Narvion, Jose Miguel; Gordillo-Guerrero, Antonio; Guidetti, Marco; Iñiguez, David; Maiorano, Andrea; Marinari, Enzo; Martin-Mayor, Victor; Monforte-Garcia, Jorge; Muñoz Sudupe, Antonio; Navarro, Denis; Parisi, Giorgio; Perez-Gaviro, Sergio; Ruiz-Lorenzo, Juan Jesus; Schifano, Sebastiano Fabio; Seoane, Beatriz; Tarancon, Alfonso; Tellez, Pedro; Tripiccione, Raffaele; Yllanes, David

    2012-01-01

    Spin glasses are a longstanding model for the sluggish dynamics that appear at the glass transition. However, spin glasses differ from structural glasses in a crucial feature: they enjoy a time reversal symmetry. This symmetry can be broken by applying an external magnetic field, but embarrassingly little is known about the critical behavior of a spin glass in a field. In this context, the space dimension is crucial. Simulations are easier to interpret in a large number of dimensions, but one must work below the upper critical dimension (i.e., in d < 6) in order for results to have relevance for experiments. Here we show conclusive evidence for the presence of a phase transition in a four-dimensional spin glass in a field. Two ingredients were crucial for this achievement: massive numerical simulations were carried out on the Janus special-purpose computer, and a new and powerful finite-size scaling method. PMID:22493229

  8. Polarized proton-deuteron scattering as a test of time-reversal invariance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uzikov, Yu. N.; Haidenbauer, J.

    2016-09-01

    Scattering of protons with transversal polarization pyp on deuterons with tensor polarization Px z provides a null-test signal for time-reversal (T) invariance violating but parity (P) conserving effects. We calculate the corresponding null-test observable at beam energies 100 -1000 MeV within the spin-dependent Glauber theory considering T-violating P-conserving nucleon-nucleon interactions. The S -wave component of the deuteron wave function as well as the D wave are taken into account and the latter is found to play an important role for the magnitude and the energy dependence of the observable in question. Specifically, with inclusion of the D wave the maximum of the obtained signal is shifted to higher beam energies, i.e., to 700 -800 MeV.

  9. Time reverse imaging for far-field tsunami forecasting: 2011 Tohoku earthquake case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossen, M. Jakir; Cummins, Phil R.; Dettmer, Jan; Baba, Toshitaka

    2015-11-01

    This paper describes a new method for forecasting far-field tsunamis by combining aspects of least squares tsunami source inversion (LSQ) with time reverse imaging (TRI). This method has the same source representation as LSQ but uses TRI to estimate initial sea surface displacement. We apply this method to the 2011 Japan tsunami, and the results show that the method produces tsunami waveforms of excellent agreement with observed waveforms at both near- and far-field stations not used in the source estimation. The spatial distribution of cumulative sea surface displacement agrees well with other models obtained in more sophisticated inversions, but resolve source kinematics are not well resolved. The method has potential for application in tsunami warning systems, as it is computationally efficient and can be used to estimate the initial source model by applying precomputed Green's functions in order to provide more accurate and realistic tsunami predictions.

  10. Depth profile of a time-reversal focus in an elastic solid

    DOE PAGES

    Remillieux, Marcel C.; Anderson, Brian E.; Ulrich, T. J.; Le Bas, Pierre -Yves; Payan, Cedric

    2015-04-01

    The out-of-plane velocity component is focused on the flat surface of an isotropic solid sample using the principle of time reversal. This experiment is often reproduced in the context of nondestructive testing for imaging features near the surface of the sample. However, it is not clear how deep the focus extends into the bulk of the sample and what its profile is. In this paper, this question is answered using both numerical simulations and experimental data. The profiles of the foci are expressed in terms of the wavelengths of the dominant waves, based on the interpretation of the Lamb’s problemmore » and the use of the diffraction limit.« less

  11. Wideband nonlinear time reversal seismo-acoustic method for landmine detection.

    PubMed

    Sutin, Alexander; Libbey, Brad; Fillinger, Laurent; Sarvazyan, Armen

    2009-04-01

    Acoustic and seismic waves provide a method to localize compliant mines by vibrating the top plate and a thin soil layer above the mine. This vibration is mostly linear, but also includes a small nonlinear deviation. The main goal of this paper is to introduce a method of processing that uses phase-inversion to observe nonlinear effects in a wide frequency band. The method extracts a nonlinear part of surface velocity from two similar broadcast signals of opposite sign by summing and cancelling the linear components and leaving the nonlinear components. This phase-inversion method is combined with time reversal focusing to provide increased seismic vibration and enhance the nonlinear effect. The experiments used six loudspeakers in a wood box placed over sand in which inert landmines were buried. The nonlinear surface velocity of the sand with a mine compared to the sand without a mine was greater as compared to a linear technique. PMID:19354365

  12. Groundwater contamination: identification of source signal by time-reverse mass transport computation and filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koussis, A. S.; Mazi, K.; Lykoudis, S.; Argyriou, A.

    2003-04-01

    Source signal identification is a forensic task, within regulatory and legal activities. Estimation of the contaminant's release history by reverse-solution (stepping back in time) of the mass transport equation, partialC/partialt + u partialC/partialx = D partial^2C/ partialx^2, is an ill-posed problem (its solution is non-unique and unstable). For this reason we propose the recovery of the source signal from measured concentration profile data through a numerical technique that is based on the premise of advection-dominated transport. We derive an explicit numerical scheme by discretising the pure advection equation, partialC/ partialt + u partial C/partialx = 0, such that it also models gradient-transport by matching numerical diffusion (leading truncation error term) to physical dispersion. The match is achieved by appropriate choice of the scheme’s spatial weighting coefficient q as function of the grid Peclet number P = u Δx/D: θ = 0.5 - P-1. This is a novel and efficient direct solution approach for the signal identification problem at hand that can accommodate space-variable transport parameters as well. First, we perform numerical experiments to define proper grids (in terms of Courant {bf C} = uΔt/Δx and grid Peclet P numbers) for control of spurious oscillations (instability). We then assess recovery of source signals, from perfect as well as from error-seeded field data, considering field data resulting from single- and double-peaked source signals. With perfect data, the scheme recovers source signals with very good accuracy. With imperfect data, however, additional data conditioning is required for control of signal noise. Alternating reverse profile computation with Savitzky-Golay low-pass filtering allows the recovery of well-timed and smooth source signals that satisfy mass conservation very well. Current research focuses on: a) optimising the performance of Savitzky-Golay filters, through selection of appropriate parameters (order of least

  13. High resolution crustal image of South California Continental Borderland: Reverse time imaging including multiples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, A.; Gantela, C.

    2014-12-01

    Strong multiples were observed in marine seismic data of Los Angeles Regional Seismic Experiment (LARSE).It is crucial to eliminate these multiples in conventional ray-based or one-way wave-equation based depth image methods. As long as multiples contain information of target zone along travelling path, it's possible to use them as signal, to improve the illumination coverage thus enhance the image quality of structural boundaries. Reverse time migration including multiples is a two-way wave-equation based prestack depth image method that uses both primaries and multiples to map structural boundaries. Several factors, including source wavelet, velocity model, back ground noise, data acquisition geometry and preprocessing workflow may influence the quality of image. The source wavelet is estimated from direct arrival of marine seismic data. Migration velocity model is derived from integrated model building workflow, and the sharp velocity interfaces near sea bottom needs to be preserved in order to generate multiples in the forward and backward propagation steps. The strong amplitude, low frequency marine back ground noise needs to be removed before the final imaging process. High resolution reverse time image sections of LARSE Lines 1 and Line 2 show five interfaces: depth of sea-bottom, base of sedimentary basins, top of Catalina Schist, a deep layer and a possible pluton boundary. Catalina Schist shows highs in the San Clemente ridge, Emery Knoll, Catalina Ridge, under Catalina Basin on both the lines, and a minor high under Avalon Knoll. The high of anticlinal fold in Line 1 is under the north edge of Emery Knoll and under the San Clemente fault zone. An area devoid of any reflection features are interpreted as sides of an igneous plume.

  14. Studies of parity and time reversal symmetries in neutron scattering from165Ho

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haase, D. G.; Gould, C. R.; Koster, J. E.; Roberson, N. R.; Seagondollar, L. W.; Soderstrum, J. P.; Schneider, M. B.; Zhu, X.

    1988-12-01

    We describe searches for parity and time reversal violations in the scattering of polarized neutrons from polarized and aligned165Ho targets. We have completed a search with 7.1 and 11.0 MeV neutrons for PoddTodd terms in the elastic scattering forward amplitude of the form s. ( I×K), where s is the neutron spin, I is the target spin and k is the neutron momentum vector. The target was a single crystal of holmium, polarized horizontally along its b axis by a 1 Tesla magnetic field. The neutrons were polarized vertically. Differences in the neutron transmission were measured for neutrons with spins parallel (antiparallel) to I×k. The P,T violating analyzing powers were found to be consistent with zero at the few 10-3 level: ρP,T(7.1 MeV)=-0.88 (±2.02) x 10-3, ρP,T(11.0 MeV)=-0.4 (±2.88) x 10-3. We have also attempted to find enhancements with MeV neutrons in P-violation due to the term s k. We are preparing an aligned target cryostat for investigations of PevenTodd terms {bd(Ik)(I×k)s} in neutron scattering. The target will be a single crystal cylinder of165Ho cooled to 100 mK in a bath of liquid helium and rotated by a shaft from a room temperature stepping motor. The cylinder will be oriented vertically and the alignment ( c) axis oriented horizontally. Warming or rotation of the sample allows one to separate effects that mimic the sought-after time reversal violating term.

  15. Evaluating the Reverse Time Migration Method on the dense Lapnet / Polenet seismic array in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupont, Aurélien; Le Pichon, Alexis

    2013-04-01

    In this study, results are obtained using the reverse time migration method used as benchmark to evaluate the implemented method by Walker et al., (2010, 2011). Explosion signals recorded by the USArray and extracted from the TAIRED catalogue (TA Infrasound Reference Event Database user community / Vernon et al., 2012) are investigated. The first one is an explosion at Camp Minden, Louisiana (2012-10-16 04:25:00 UTC) and the second one is a natural gas explosion near Price, Utah (2012-11-20 15:20:00 UTC). We compare our results to automatic solutions (www.iris.edu/spud/infrasoundevent). The good agreement between both solutions validates our detection method. In a second time, we analyse data from the Lapnet / Polenet dense seismic network (Kozlovskaya et al., 2008). Detection and location in two-dimensional space and time of infrasound events presumably due to acoustic-to-seismic coupling, during the 2007-2009 period in Europe, are presented. The aim of this work is to integrate near-real time network performance predictions at regional scales to improve automatic detection of infrasonic sources. The use of dense seismic networks provides a valuable tool to monitor infrasonic phenomena, since seismic location has recently proved to be more accurate than infrasound locations due to the large number of seismic sensors.

  16. Predictions of narrow-band acoustic time reversal in the shallow ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dungan, Michael Robert

    2000-10-01

    A time-reversing array (TRA) can retrofocus acoustic energy, in both time and space, to the original sound- source location without any environmental information. This unique capability may be degraded in time-dependent, lossy, or noisy acoustic environments. A broad computational and analytical investigation into narrow- band acoustic time reversal in the shallow ocean has been undertaken. This includes investigating (1)variability in the water column due to dynamic linear internal waves, (2)roughness in the ocean bottom, and (3)limiting orientations of TRAs. TRA retrofocusing performance predictions are primarily determined via monochromatic propagation simulations using the wide-angle parabolic equation code RAM (Collins 1993, 1994, and 1998). Results for the influence of source-array range, source depth, channel depth, acoustic frequency, bottom absorption, bottom roughness, internal wave strength, roundtrip time delay, and array orientation and spacing are presented. For a fixed channel geometry, higher frequencies, deeper sources, and lower bottom absorption improve TRA performance and allow retrofocusing at longer ranges. After several minutes in a dynamic shallow-water channel containing a random superposition of linear internal waves, there is significant TRA retrofocus amplitude decay, and the decay rate increases with increasing internal wave activity and acoustic frequency. Randomness in the environment, either from bottom roughness or random linear internal waves, reduces the predicted azimuthal angular width of the vertical-TRA retrofocus to as little as a fraction of a degree (compared to 360° for uniform environments) for source-array ranges from 2.5 to 20 km at frequencies from 250 Hz to 2 kHz. In a sound channel with bottom roughness, the azimuthal size of the retrofocus is predicted to be proportional to the roughness correlation length divided by the wavenumber, source-array range, and roughness RMS-height all raised to the three-halves power

  17. A nodal discontinuous Galerkin method for reverse-time migration on GPU clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modave, A.; St-Cyr, A.; Mulder, W. A.; Warburton, T.

    2015-11-01

    Improving both accuracy and computational performance of numerical tools is a major challenge for seismic imaging and generally requires specialized implementations to make full use of modern parallel architectures. We present a computational strategy for reverse-time migration (RTM) with accelerator-aided clusters. A new imaging condition computed from the pressure and velocity fields is introduced. The model solver is based on a high-order discontinuous Galerkin time-domain (DGTD) method for the pressure-velocity system with unstructured meshes and multirate local time stepping. We adopted the MPI+X approach for distributed programming where X is a threaded programming model. In this work we chose OCCA, a unified framework that makes use of major multithreading languages (e.g. CUDA and OpenCL) and offers the flexibility to run on several hardware architectures. DGTD schemes are suitable for efficient computations with accelerators thanks to localized element-to-element coupling and the dense algebraic operations required for each element. Moreover, compared to high-order finite-difference schemes, the thin halo inherent to DGTD method reduces the amount of data to be exchanged between MPI processes and storage requirements for RTM procedures. The amount of data to be recorded during simulation is reduced by storing only boundary values in memory rather than on disk and recreating the forward wavefields. Computational results are presented that indicate that these methods are strong scalable up to at least 32 GPUs for a three-dimensional RTM case.

  18. Observation of time-reversal violation in the B0 meson system.

    PubMed

    Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Garra Tico, J; Grauges, E; Palano, A; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Brown, D N; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Lynch, G; Koch, H; Schroeder, T; Asgeirsson, D J; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; So, R Y; Khan, A; Blinov, V E; Buzykaev, A R; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Yushkov, A N; Bondioli, M; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; Atmacan, H; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Vitug, G M; Campagnari, C; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; West, C A; Eisner, A M; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Martinez, A J; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Chao, D S; Cheng, C H; Echenard, B; Flood, K T; Hitlin, D G; Ongmongkolkul, P; Porter, F C; Rakitin, A Y; Andreassen, R; Huard, Z; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Sun, L; Bloom, P C; Ford, W T; Gaz, A; Nauenberg, U; Smith, J G; Wagner, S R; Ayad, R; Toki, W H; Spaan, B; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Bernard, D; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Playfer, S; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Fioravanti, E; Garzia, I; Luppi, E; Munerato, M; Piemontese, L; Santoro, V; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Contri, R; Guido, E; Lo Vetere, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Bhuyan, B; Prasad, V; Lee, C L; Morii, M; Edwards, A J; Adametz, A; Uwer, U; Lacker, H M; Lueck, T; Dauncey, P D; Mallik, U; Chen, C; Cochran, J; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rubin, A E; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Derkach, D; Grosdidier, G; Le Diberder, F; Lutz, A M; Malaescu, B; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Chavez, C A; Coleman, J P; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Sigamani, M; Cowan, G; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Gradl, W; Griessinger, K; Hafner, A; Prencipe, E; Barlow, R J; Jackson, G; Lafferty, G D; Behn, E; Cenci, R; Hamilton, B; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Dallapiccola, C; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Sciolla, G; Cheaib, R; Lindemann, D; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Biassoni, P; Neri, N; Palombo, F; Stracka, S; Cremaldi, L; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sonnek, P; Summers, D J; Nguyen, X; Simard, M; Taras, P; De Nardo, G; Monorchio, D; Onorato, G; Sciacca, C; Martinelli, M; Raven, G; Jessop, C P; Losecco, J M; Wang, W F; Honscheid, K; Kass, R; Brau, J; Frey, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Feltresi, E; Gagliardi, N; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simi, G; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Akar, S; Ben-Haim, E; Bomben, M; Bonneaud, G R; Briand, H; Calderini, G; Chauveau, J; Hamon, O; Leruste, Ph; Marchiori, G; Ocariz, J; Sitt, S; Biasini, M; Manoni, E; Pacetti, S; Rossi, A; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Carpinelli, M; Casarosa, G; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Oberhof, B; Paoloni, E; Perez, A; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Lopes Pegna, D; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Anulli, F; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Piredda, G; Bünger, C; Grünberg, O; Hartmann, T; Leddig, T; Schröder, H; Voss, C; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Aston, D; Bard, D J; Bartoldus, R; Benitez, J F; Cartaro, C; Convery, M R; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Ebert, M; Field, R C; Franco Sevilla, M; Fulsom, B G; Gabareen, A M; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Hast, C; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Lewis, P; Lindquist, B; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; MacFarlane, D B; Muller, D R; Neal, H; Nelson, S; Perl, M; Pulliam, T; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Snyder, A; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Va'vra, J; Wagner, A P; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Wulsin, H W; Young, C C; Ziegler, V; Park, W; Purohit, M V; White, R M; Wilson, J R; Randle-Conde, A; Sekula, S J; Bellis, M; Burchat, P R; Miyashita, T S; Puccio, E M T; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Gorodeisky, R; Guttman, N; Peimer, D R; Soffer, A; Lund, P; Spanier, S M; Ritchie, J L; Ruland, A M; Schwitters, R F; Wray, B C; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Bianchi, F; Gamba, D; Zambito, S; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Bernabeu, J; Martinez-Vidal, F; Oyanguren, A; Villanueva-Perez, P; Ahmed, H; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Bernlochner, F U; Choi, H H F; King, G J; Kowalewski, R; Lewczuk, M J; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Tasneem, N; Gershon, T J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Band, H R; Dasu, S; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Wu, S L

    2012-11-21

    Although CP violation in the B meson system has been well established by the B factories, there has been no direct observation of time-reversal violation. The decays of entangled neutral B mesons into definite flavor states (B(0) or B(0)), and J/ψK(L)(0) or ccK(S)(0) final states (referred to as B(+) or B(-)), allow comparisons between the probabilities of four pairs of T-conjugated transitions, for example, B(0) → B(-) and B(-) → B(0), as a function of the time difference between the two B decays. Using 468 × 10(6) BB pairs produced in Υ(4S) decays collected by the BABAR detector at SLAC, we measure T-violating parameters in the time evolution of neutral B mesons, yielding ΔS(T)(+) = -1.37 ± 0.14(stat) ± 0.06(syst) and ΔS(T)(-) = 1.17 ± 0.18(stat) ± 0.11(syst). These nonzero results represent the first direct observation of T violation through the exchange of initial and final states in transitions that can only be connected by a T-symmetry transformation. PMID:23215586

  19. Time-reversal transcranial ultrasound beam focusing using a k-space method.

    PubMed

    Jing, Yun; Meral, F Can; Clement, Greg T

    2012-02-21

    This paper proposes the use of a k-space method to obtain the correction for transcranial ultrasound beam focusing. Mirroring past approaches, a synthetic point source at the focal point is numerically excited, and propagated through the skull, using acoustic properties acquired from registered computed tomography of the skull being studied. The received data outside the skull contain the correction information and can be phase conjugated (time reversed) and then physically generated to achieve a tight focusing inside the skull, by assuming quasi-plane transmission where shear waves are not present or their contribution can be neglected. Compared with the conventional finite-difference time-domain method for wave propagation simulation, it will be shown that the k-space method is significantly more accurate even for a relatively coarse spatial resolution, leading to a dramatically reduced computation time. Both numerical simulations and experiments conducted on an ex vivo human skull demonstrate that precise focusing can be realized using the k-space method with a spatial resolution as low as only 2.56 grid points per wavelength, thus allowing treatment planning computation on the order of minutes. PMID:22290477

  20. Time-reversal transcranial ultrasound beam focusing using a k-space method

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Yun; Meral, F. Can; Clement, Greg. T.

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes the use of a k-space method to obtain the correction for transcranial ultrasound beam focusing. Mirroring past approaches, A synthetic point source at the focal point is numerically excited, and propagated through the skull, using acoustic properties acquired from registered computed tomograpy of the skull being studied. The received data outside the skull contains the correction information and can be phase conjugated (time reversed) and then physically generated to achieve a tight focusing inside the skull, by assuming quasi-plane transmission where shear waves are not present or their contribution can be neglected. Compared with the conventional finite-difference time-domain method for wave propagation simulation, it will be shown that the k-space method is significantly more accurate even for a relatively coarse spatial resolution, leading to a dramatically reduced computation time. Both numerical simulations and experiments conducted on an ex vivo human skull demonstrate that, precise focusing can be realized using the k-space method with a spatial resolution as low as only 2.56 grid points per wavelength, thus allowing treatment planning computation on the order of minutes. PMID:22290477

  1. An efficient higher-order PML in WLP-FDTD method for time reversed wave simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xiao-Kun; Shao, Wei; Ou, Haiyan; Wang, Bing-Zhong

    2016-09-01

    Derived from a stretched coordinate formulation, a higher-order complex frequency shifted (CFS) perfectly matched layer (PML) is proposed for the unconditionally stable finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method based on weighted Laguerre polynomials (WLPs). The higher-order PML is implemented with an auxiliary differential equation (ADE) approach. In order to further improve absorbing performance, the parameter values of stretching functions in the higher-order PML are optimized by the multi-objective genetic algorithm (MOGA). The optimal solutions can be chosen from the Pareto front for trading-off between two independent objectives. It is shown in a numerical test that the higher-order PML is efficient in terms of attenuating propagating waves and reducing late time reflections. Moreover, the higher-order PML can be placed very close to the wall when analyzing the channel characteristics of time reversal (TR) waves in a multipath indoor environment. Numerical examples of TR wave propagation demonstrate the availability of the proposed method.

  2. Estimation of contributions to population growth: a reverse-time capture-recapture approach

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nichols, J.D.; Hines, J.E.; Lebreton, J.D.; Pradel, R.

    2000-01-01

    We consider methods for estimating the relative contributions of different demographic components, and their associated vital rates, to population growth. We identify components of the population at time i (including a component for animals not in the population at i). For each such component we ask the following question: 'What is the probability that an individual randomly selected from the population at time i + 1 was a member of this component at i?' The estimation methods for these probabilities ((i) are based on capture-recapture studies of marked animal populations and use reverse-time modeling. We consider several different sampling situations and present example analyses for meadow voles, Microtus pennsylvanicus. The relationship between these (i parameters and elasticities (and other parameters based on projection matrix asymptotics) is noted and discussed. We conclude by suggesting that model-based asymptotics be viewed as demographic theory and that direct estimation approaches be used to test this theory with data from sampled populations with marked animals.

  3. Comparison of a subrank to a full-rank time-reversal operator in a dynamic ocean.

    PubMed

    Edelmann, Geoffrey F; Lingevitch, Joseph F; Gaumond, Charles F; Fromm, David M; Calvo, David C

    2007-11-01

    This paper investigates the application of time-reversal techniques to the detection and ensonification of a target of interest. The focusing method is based on a generalization of time-reversal operator techniques. A subrank time-reversal operator is derived and implemented using a discrete set of transmission beams to ensonify a region of interest. In a dynamic ocean simulation, target focusing using a subrank matrix is shown to be superior to using a full-rank matrix, specifically when the subrank matrix is captured in a period shorter than the coherence time of the modeled environment. Backscatter from the point target was propagated to a vertical 64-element source-receiver array and processed to form the sub-rank time-reversal operator matrix. The eigenvector corresponding to the strongest eigenvalue of the time-reversal operator was shown to focus energy on the target in simulation. Modeled results will be augmented by a limited at-sea experiment conducted on the New Jersey shelf in April-May 2004 measured low-frequency backscattered signal from an artificial target (echo repeater).

  4. Imaging Fracking Zones by Microseismic Reverse Time Migration for Downhole Microseismic Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Y.; Zhang, H.

    2015-12-01

    Hydraulic fracturing is an engineering tool to create fractures in order to better recover oil and gas from low permeability reservoirs. Because microseismic events are generally associated with fracturing development, microseismic monitoring has been used to evaluate the fracking process. Microseismic monitoring generally relies on locating microseismic events to understand the spatial distribution of fractures. For the multi-stage fracturing treatment, fractures created in former stages are strong scatterers in the medium and can induce strong scattering waves on the waveforms for microseismic events induced during later stages. In this study, we propose to take advantage of microseismic scattering waves to image fracking zones by using seismic reverse time migration method. For downhole microseismic monitoring that involves installing a string of seismic sensors in a borehole near the injection well, the observation geometry is actually similar to the VSP (vertical seismic profile) system. For this reason, we adapt the VSP migration method for the common shot gather to the common event gather. Microseismic reverse-time migration method involves solving wave equation both forward and backward in time for each microseismic event. At current stage, the microseismic RTM is based on 2D acoustic wave equation (Zhang and Sun, 2008), solved by the finite-difference method with PML absorbing boundary condition applied to suppress the reflections of artificial boundaries. Additionally, we use local wavefield decomposition instead of cross-correlation imaging condition to suppress the imaging noise. For testing the method, we create a synthetic dataset for a downhole microseismic monitoring system with multiple fracking stages. It shows that microseismic migration using individual event is able to clearly reveal the fracture zone. The shorter distance between fractures and the microseismic event the clearer the migration image is. By summing migration images for many

  5. Echodentography based on nonlinear time reversal tomography: Ultrasonic nonlinear signature identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Serge Dos; Farova, Zuzana; Kus, Vaclav; Prevorovsky, Zdenek

    2012-05-01

    This paper examines possibilities of using Nonlinear Elastic Wave Spectroscopy (NEWS) methods in dental investigations. Themain task consisted in imaging cracks or other degradation signatures located in dentin close to the Enamel-Dentine Junction (EDJ). NEWS approach was investigated experimentally with a new bi-modal acousto-optic set-up based on the chirp-coded nonlinear ultrasonic time reversal (TR) concepts. Complex internal structure of the tooth is analyzed by the TR-NEWS procedure adapted to tomography-like imaging of the tooth damages. Ultrasonic instrumentation with 10 MHz bandwidth has been set together including laser vibrometer used to detect responses of the tooth on its excitation carried out by a contact piezoelectric transducer. Bi-modal TR-NEWS images of the tooth were created before and after focusing, which resulted from the time compression. The polar B-scan of the tooth realized with TR-NEWS procedure is suggested to be applied as a new echodentography imaging.

  6. Ultrasound time-reversal MUSIC imaging with diffraction and attenuation compensation.

    PubMed

    Labyed, Yassin; Huang, Lianjie

    2012-10-01

    Time-reversal imaging with multiple signal classification (TR-MUSIC) is an algorithm for imaging point-like scatterers embedded in a homogeneous and non-attenuative medium. We generalize this algorithm to account for the attenuation in the medium and the diffraction effects caused by the finite size of the transducer elements. The generalized algorithm yields higher-resolution images than those obtained with the original TR-MUSIC algorithm. We evaluate the axial and lateral resolutions of the images obtained with the generalized algorithm when noise corrupts the recorded signals and show that the axial resolution is degraded more than the lateral resolution. The TR-MUSIC algorithm is valid only when the number of point-like targets in the imaging plane is fewer than the number of transducer elements used to interrogate the medium. We remedy this shortcoming by dividing the imaging plane into subregions and applying the TR-MUSIC algorithm to the windowed backscattered signals corresponding to each subregion. The images of all subregions are then combined to form the total image. Imaging results of numerical and phantom data show that when the number of scatterers within each subregion is much smaller than the number of transducer elements, the windowing method yields super-resolution images with accurate scatterer localization. We use computer simulations and tissue-mimicking phantom data acquired with a real-time synthetic-aperture ultrasound system to illustrate the algorithms presented in the paper. PMID:23143569

  7. Critical analysis of rhinovirus RNA load quantification by real-time reverse transcription-PCR.

    PubMed

    Schibler, Manuel; Yerly, Sabine; Vieille, Gaël; Docquier, Mylène; Turin, Lara; Kaiser, Laurent; Tapparel, Caroline

    2012-09-01

    Rhinoviruses are the most frequent cause of human respiratory infections, and quantitative rhinovirus diagnostic tools are needed for clinical investigations. Although results obtained by real-time reverse-transcription PCR (RT-PCR) assays are frequently converted to viral RNA loads, this presents several limitations regarding accurate virus RNA quantification, particularly given the need to reliably quantify all known rhinovirus genotypes with a single assay. Using an internal extraction control and serial dilutions of an in vitro-transcribed rhinovirus RNA reference standard, we validated a quantitative one-step real-time PCR assay. We then used chimeric rhinovirus genomes with 5'-untranslated regions (5'UTRs) originating from the three rhinovirus species and from one enterovirus to estimate the impact of the 5'UTR diversity. Respiratory specimens from infected patients were then also analyzed. The assay quantification ability ranged from 4.10 to 9.10 log RNA copies/ml, with an estimated error margin of ±10%. This variation was mainly linked to target variability and interassay variability. Taken together, our results indicate that our assay can reliably estimate rhinovirus RNA load, provided that the appropriate error margin is used. In contrast, due to the lack of a universal rhinovirus RNA standard and the variability related to sample collection procedures, accurate absolute rhinovirus RNA quantification in respiratory specimens is currently hardly feasible.

  8. Symmetry analysis for nonlinear time reversal methods applied to nonlinear acoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dos Santos, Serge; Chaline, Jennifer

    2015-10-01

    Using symmetry invariance, nonlinear Time Reversal (TR) and reciprocity properties, the classical NEWS methods are supplemented and improved by new excitations having the intrinsic property of enlarging frequency analysis bandwidth and time domain scales, with now both medical acoustics and electromagnetic applications. The analysis of invariant quantities is a well-known tool which is often used in nonlinear acoustics in order to simplify complex equations. Based on a fundamental physical principle known as symmetry analysis, this approach consists in finding judicious variables, intrinsically scale dependant, and able to describe all stages of behaviour on the same theoretical foundation. Based on previously published results within the nonlinear acoustic areas, some practical implementation will be proposed as a new way to define TR-NEWS based methods applied to NDT and medical bubble based non-destructive imaging. This paper tends to show how symmetry analysis can help us to define new methodologies and new experimental set-up involving modern signal processing tools. Some example of practical realizations will be proposed in the context of biomedical non-destructive imaging using Ultrasound Contrast Agents (ACUs) where symmetry and invariance properties allow us to define a microscopic scale-invariant experimental set-up describing intrinsic symmetries of the microscopic complex system.

  9. The detection of flaws in austenitic welds using the decomposition of the time-reversal operator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunningham, Laura J.; Mulholland, Anthony J.; Tant, Katherine M. M.; Gachagan, Anthony; Harvey, Gerry; Bird, Colin

    2016-04-01

    The non-destructive testing of austenitic welds using ultrasound plays an important role in the assessment of the structural integrity of safety critical structures. The internal microstructure of these welds is highly scattering and can lead to the obscuration of defects when investigated by traditional imaging algorithms. This paper proposes an alternative objective method for the detection of flaws embedded in austenitic welds based on the singular value decomposition of the time-frequency domain response matrices. The distribution of the singular values is examined in the cases where a flaw exists and where there is no flaw present. A lower threshold on the singular values, specific to austenitic welds, is derived which, when exceeded, indicates the presence of a flaw. The detection criterion is successfully implemented on both synthetic and experimental data. The datasets arising from welds containing a flaw are further interrogated using the decomposition of the time-reversal operator (DORT) method and the total focusing method (TFM), and it is shown that images constructed via the DORT algorithm typically exhibit a higher signal-to-noise ratio than those constructed by the TFM algorithm.

  10. Orientation effects on linear time-reversing array retrofocusing in shallow water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dungan, Michael R.; Dowling, David R.

    2002-11-01

    A time-reversing array (TRA) can retrofocus acoustic energy, in both time and space, to the original sound-source location without any environmental information. This paper presents results from an analytical and computational investigation into the effects that array orientation has on linear TRA retrofocusing in shallow water environments. A linear TRA has three limiting orthogonal orientations with respect to a distant sound source in a shallow water waveguide: vertical, endfire, and broadside. Here, TRA retrofocus characteristics are predicted for monochromatic sound propagation in a Pekeris waveguide using a modal sum Green's function and in a more realistic sound channel having vertical sound speed variation using a computed Green's function. Both analytical and computational results are compared for the three orthogonal array orientations with vertical arrays performing best. Differences in TRA retrofocusing performance in the three orientations are primarily determined by geometrical considerations and the extra mode-shape weighting inherent in the back-propagated field of horizontal TRAs. copyright 2002 Acoustical Society of America.

  11. Least-squares reverse time migration with and without source wavelet estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qingchen; Zhou, Hui; Chen, Hanming; Wang, Jie

    2016-11-01

    Least-squares reverse time migration (LSRTM) attempts to find the best fit reflectivity model by minimizing the mismatching between the observed and simulated seismic data, where the source wavelet estimation is one of the crucial issues. We divide the frequency-domain observed seismic data by the numerical Green's function at the receiver nodes to estimate the source wavelet for the conventional LSRTM method, and propose the source-independent LSRTM based on a convolution-based objective function. The numerical Green's function can be simulated with a dirac wavelet and the migration velocity in the frequency or time domain. Compared to the conventional method with the additional source estimation procedure, the source-independent LSRTM is insensitive to the source wavelet and can still give full play to the amplitude-preserving ability even using an incorrect wavelet without the source estimation. In order to improve the anti-noise ability, we apply the robust hybrid norm objective function to both the methods and use the synthetic seismic data contaminated by the random Gaussian and spike noises with a signal-to-noise ratio of 5 dB to verify their feasibilities. The final migration images show that the source-independent algorithm is more robust and has a higher amplitude-preserving ability than the conventional source-estimated method.

  12. A real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction for detection and quantification of Vesiculovirus

    PubMed Central

    Tolardo, Aline Lavado; de Souza, William Marciel; Romeiro, Marilia Farignoli; Vieira, Luiz Carlos; Luna, Luciano Kleber de Souza; Henriques, Dyana Alves; de Araujo, Jansen; Siqueira, Carlos Eduardo Hassegawa; Colombo, Tatiana Elias; Aquino, Victor Hugo; da Fonseca, Benedito Antonio Lopes; Bronzoni, Roberta Vieira de Morais; Nogueira, Maurício Lacerda; Durigon, Edison Luiz; Figueiredo, Luiz Tadeu Moraes

    2016-01-01

    Vesiculoviruses (VSV) are zoonotic viruses that cause vesicular stomatitis disease in cattle, horses and pigs, as well as sporadic human cases of acute febrile illness. Therefore, diagnosis of VSV infections by reliable laboratory techniques is important to allow a proper case management and implementation of strategies for the containment of virus spread. We show here a sensitive and reproducible real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for detection and quantification of VSV. The assay was evaluated with arthropods and serum samples obtained from horses, cattle and patients with acute febrile disease. The real-time RT-PCR amplified the Piry, Carajas, Alagoas and Indiana Vesiculovirus at a melting temperature 81.02 ± 0.8ºC, and the sensitivity of assay was estimated in 10 RNA copies/mL to the Piry Vesiculovirus. The viral genome has been detected in samples of horses and cattle, but not detected in human sera or arthropods. Thus, this assay allows a preliminary differential diagnosis of VSV infections. PMID:27276185

  13. The detection of flaws in austenitic welds using the decomposition of the time-reversal operator

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Laura J.; Mulholland, Anthony J.; Gachagan, Anthony; Harvey, Gerry; Bird, Colin

    2016-01-01

    The non-destructive testing of austenitic welds using ultrasound plays an important role in the assessment of the structural integrity of safety critical structures. The internal microstructure of these welds is highly scattering and can lead to the obscuration of defects when investigated by traditional imaging algorithms. This paper proposes an alternative objective method for the detection of flaws embedded in austenitic welds based on the singular value decomposition of the time-frequency domain response matrices. The distribution of the singular values is examined in the cases where a flaw exists and where there is no flaw present. A lower threshold on the singular values, specific to austenitic welds, is derived which, when exceeded, indicates the presence of a flaw. The detection criterion is successfully implemented on both synthetic and experimental data. The datasets arising from welds containing a flaw are further interrogated using the decomposition of the time-reversal operator (DORT) method and the total focusing method (TFM), and it is shown that images constructed via the DORT algorithm typically exhibit a higher signal-to-noise ratio than those constructed by the TFM algorithm. PMID:27274683

  14. Reversibility of time series: revealing the hidden messages in X-ray binaries and cataclysmic variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scaringi, S.; Maccarone, T. J.; Middleton, M.

    2014-11-01

    We explore the non-linear, high-frequency, aperiodic variability properties in the three cataclysmic variables MV Lyr, KIC 8751494 and V1504 Cyg observed with Kepler, as well as the X-ray binary Cyg X-1 observed with RXTE. This is done through the use of a high-order Fourier statistic called the bispectrum and its related biphase and bicoherence, as well as the time-skewness statistic. We show how all objects display qualitatively similar biphase trends. In particular, all biphase amplitudes are found to be smaller than π/2, suggesting that the flux distributions for all sources are positively skewed on all observed time-scales, consistent with the lognormal distributions expected from the fluctuating accretion disc model. We also find that for all objects, the biphases are positive at frequencies where the corresponding power spectral densities display their high-frequency break. This suggests that the noise-like flaring observed is rising more slowly than it is falling, and thus not time-reversible. This observation is also consistent with the fluctuating accretion disc model. Furthermore, we observe the same qualitative biphase trends in all four objects, where the biphases display a distinct decrease at frequencies below the high-frequency break in their respective power spectral densities. This behaviour can also be observed in the time skewness of all four objects. As far as we are aware, there is no immediate explanation for the observed biphase decreases. The biphase decreases may thus suggest that the fluctuating accretion disc model begins to break down at frequencies below the high-frequency break.

  15. Double plane wave reverse time migration with plane wave Green's function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Z.; Sen, M. K.; Stoffa, P. L.

    2015-12-01

    Reverse time migration (RTM) is effective in obtaining complex subsurface structures from seismic data. By solving the two-way wave equation, RTM can use entire wavefield for imaging. Although powerful computer are becoming available, the conventional pre-stack shot gather RTM is still computationally expensive. Solving forward and backward wavefield propagation for each source location and shot gather is extremely time consuming, especially for large seismic datasets. We present an efficient, accurate and flexible plane wave RTM in the frequency domain where we utilize a compressed plane wave dataset, known as the double plane wave (DPW) dataset. Provided with densely sampled seismic dataset, shot gathers can be decomposed into source and receiver plane wave components with minimal artifacts. The DPW RTM is derived under the Born approximation and utilizes frequency domain plane wave Green's function for imaging. Time dips in the shot profiles can help to estimate the range of plane wave components present in shot gathers. Therefore, a limited number of plane wave Green's functions are needed for imaging. Plane wave Green's functions can be used for imaging both source and receiver plane waves. Source and receiver reciprocity can be used for imaging plane wave components at no cost and save half of the computation time. As a result, the computational burden for migration is substantially reduced. Plane wave components can be migrated independently to recover specific targets with given dips, and ray parameter common image gathers (CIGs) can be generated after migration directly. The ray parameter CIGs can be used to justify the correctness of velocity models. Subsurface anisotropy effects can also be included in our imaging condition, provided with plane wave Green's functions in the anisotropic media.

  16. Kinetic Analysis of Parallel-Consecutive First-Order Reactions with a Reversible Step: Concentration-Time Integrals Method

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mucientes, A. E.; de la Pena, M. A.

    2009-01-01

    The concentration-time integrals method has been used to solve kinetic equations of parallel-consecutive first-order reactions with a reversible step. This method involves the determination of the area under the curve for the concentration of a given species against time. Computer techniques are used to integrate experimental curves and the method…

  17. Detecting a subsurface cylinder by a Time Reversal MUSIC like method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solimene, Raffaele; Dell'Aversano, Angela; Leone, Giovanni

    2014-05-01

    In this contribution the problem of imaging a buried homogeneous circular cylinder is dealt with for a two-dimensional scalar geometry. Though the addressed geometry is extremely simple as compared to real world scenarios, it can be considered of interest for a classical GPR civil engineering applicative context: that is the subsurface prospecting of urban area in order to detect and locate buried utilities. A large body of methods for subsurface imaging have been presented in literature [1], ranging from migration algorithms to non-linear inverse scattering approaches. More recently, also spectral estimation methods, which benefit from sub-array data arrangement, have been proposed and compared in [2].Here a Time Reversal MUSIC (TRM) like method is employed. TRM has been initially conceived to detect point-like scatterers and then generalized to the case of extended scatterers [3]. In the latter case, no a priori information about the scatterers is exploited. However, utilities often can be schematized as circular cylinders. Here, we develop a TRM variant which use this information to properly tailor the steering vector while implementing TRM. Accordingly, instead of a spatial map [3], the imaging procedure returns the scatterer's parameters such as its center position, radius and dielectric permittivity. The study is developed by numerical simulations. First the free-space case is considered in order to more easily introduce the idea and the problem mathematical structure. Then the analysis is extended to the half-space case. In both situations a FDTD forward solver is used to generate the synthetic data. As usual in TRM, a multi-view/multi-static single-frequency configuration is considered and emphasis is put on the role played by the number of available sensors. Acknowledgement This work benefited from networking activities carried out within the EU funded COST Action TU1208 "Civil Engineering Applications of Ground Penetrating Radar." [1] A. Randazzo and R

  18. Search for a Permanent Electric Dipole Moment on MERCURY-199 Atoms as a Test of Time Reversal Symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, James Patrick

    Optically pumped atomic oscillators driven with a modulated light source have been used to measure the Permanent Electric Dipole Moment (PEDM) of the ^{199}Hg atom. A nonzero PEDM on the ground state of ^{199} Hg would be a direct violation of time reversal symmetry. The measurement was obtained by searching for a relative shift in the resonance frequency of the processing nuclear magnetic moments when an externally applied electric field was reversed relative to an externally applied magnetic field. The null result, d(^{199} Hg) = (.3 +/- 5.7 +/- 5.0) times 10 ^{-28} ecdotcm, represents nearly a factor of 15 improvement over previous ^{199}Hg measurements, and a factor of 25 improvement in statistical uncertainty. When combined with theoretical calculations, the result sets stringent limits on possible sources of time reversal symmetry violation in atomic systems.

  19. Time-Reversal to Estimate Focal Depth for Local, Shallow Earthquakes in Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearce, F.; Lu, R.; Toksoz, N.

    2007-12-01

    Current approaches for focal depth estimation are typically based on travel times and result in large uncertainties primarily due to poor data coverage and inaccurate travel time picks. We propose an alternative method based on an adaptation of time-reversed acoustics (TRA). In the context of TRA theory, the autocorrelation of an earthquake recording can be thought of as the convolution of the source autocorrelation function with the autocorrelation of the Green's function describing propagation between source and receiver. Furthermore, the signal to noise ratio (S/N) of stationary phases in the Green's function may be improved by stacking the autocorrelations from many receivers. In this study, we employ such an approach to estimate the focal depth of shallow earthquakes based on the time lag between the direct P phase and pP converted phase, which is assumed to be stationary across the receiver array. Focal depth estimates are easily obtained by multiplying half the pP time lag by the average velocity above the earthquake. We apply this methodology to estimate focal depths for several local earthquakes in Southern California. Earthquake recordings were obtained from the Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC) for events with accurate, independent estimates of focal depth below about 15 km, and local magnitudes between 4.0 and 6.0. We observe pP in the stacked autocorrelations that correspond to the focal depths listed in the SCEC catalog for earthquakes located throughout Southern California. The predictive capability of the method is limited by S/N, defined as the pP amplitude divided by the background noise level of the stacked correlation. By considering subsets of the Southern California array, we explore the sensitivity of the S/N on station density and location (i.e. epicentral distance & azimuth). We find S/N is generally better for subsets of receivers within regions with relatively simple geologic structure. We are currently developing an extension

  20. Universal reverse-transcriptase real-time PCR for infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Purcell, Maureen K.; Thompson, Rachel L.; Garver, Kyle A.; Hawley, Laura M.; Batts, William N.; Sprague, Laura; Sampson, Corie; Winton, James R.

    2013-01-01

    Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) is an acute pathogen of salmonid fishes in North America, Europe and Asia and is reportable to the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE). Phylogenetic analysis has identified 5 major virus genogroups of IHNV worldwide, designated U, M, L, E and J; multiple subtypes also exist within those genogroups. Here, we report the development and validation of a universal IHNV reverse-transcriptase real-time PCR (RT-rPCR) assay targeting the IHNV nucleocapsid (N) gene. Properties of diagnostic sensitivity (DSe) and specificity (DSp) were defined using laboratory-challenged steelhead trout Oncorhynchus mykiss, and the new assay was compared to the OIE-accepted conventional PCR test and virus isolation in cell culture. The IHNV N gene RT-rPCR had 100% DSp and DSe and a higher estimated diagnostic odds ratio (DOR) than virus culture or conventional PCR. The RT-rPCR assay was highly repeatable within a laboratory and highly reproducible between laboratories. Field testing of the assay was conducted on a random sample of juvenile steelhead collected from a hatchery raceway experiencing an IHN epizootic. The RT-rPCR detected a greater number of positive samples than cell culture and there was 40% agreement between the 2 tests. Overall, the RT-rPCR assay was highly sensitive, specific, repeatable and reproducible and is suitable for use in a diagnostic setting.

  1. Ultrasound imaging of extended targets using a windowed time-reversal MUSIC method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labyed, Yassin; Huang, Lianjie

    2012-03-01

    Time-reversal with Multiple Signal Classification (TR-MUSIC) is an ultrasound imaging algorithm for detecting small targets embedded in a medium. This technique can produce images with subwavelength resolution when the targets are pointlike, and when the number of targets is fewer than the number of transducer elements used to image the medium. In this experimental study, we evaluate the performance of the TR-MUSIC algorithm when the interrogated medium contains extended targets that cannot be considered as point scatterers. We construct tissue-mimicking phantoms embedded with distributed glass spheres. We show that the quality of the phantom images obtained using the TR-MUSIC algorithm decreases with increasing sphere size. However, significant improvement is achieved when the image plane is divided into sub-regions, where each sub-region is imaged separately. The windowed TR-MUSIC algorithm accurately locates the spheres (extended targets), but the images do not provide quantitative information about the shape and reflectivity of the spheres.

  2. Time-reversal constraint limits unidirectional photon emission in slow-light photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Lang, Ben; Beggs, Daryl M; Oulton, Ruth

    2016-08-28

    Photonic crystal waveguides are known to support C-points-point-like polarization singularities with local chirality. Such points can couple with dipole-like emitters to produce highly directional emission, from which spin-photon entanglers can be built. Much is made of the promise of using slow-light modes to enhance this light-matter coupling. Here we explore the transition from travelling to standing waves for two different photonic crystal waveguide designs. We find that time-reversal symmetry and the reciprocal nature of light places constraints on using C-points in the slow-light regime. We observe two distinctly different mechanisms through which this condition is satisfied in the two waveguides. In the waveguide designs, we consider a modest group velocity of vg≈c/10 is found to be the optimum for slow-light coupling to the C-points.This article is part of the themed issue 'Unifying physics and technology in light of Maxwell's equations'. PMID:27458258

  3. Pseudo-time-reversal symmetry and topological edge states in two-dimensional acoustic crystals

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Jun; Chen, Zeguo; Wu, Ying

    2016-01-01

    We propose a simple two-dimensional acoustic crystal to realize topologically protected edge states for acoustic waves. The acoustic crystal is composed of a triangular array of core-shell cylinders embedded in a water host. By utilizing the point group symmetry of two doubly degenerate eigenstates at the Γ point, we can construct pseudo-time-reversal symmetry as well as pseudo-spin states in this classical system. We develop an effective Hamiltonian for the associated dispersion bands around the Brillouin zone center, and find the inherent link between the band inversion and the topological phase transition. With numerical simulations, we unambiguously demonstrate the unidirectional propagation of acoustic edge states along the interface between a topologically nontrivial acoustic crystal and a trivial one, and the robustness of the edge states against defects with sharp bends. Our work provides a new design paradigm for manipulating and transporting acoustic waves in a topologically protected manner. Technological applications and devices based on our design are expected in various frequency ranges of interest, spanning from infrasound to ultrasound. PMID:27587311

  4. Two applications of time reversal mirrors: seismic radio and seismic radar.

    PubMed

    Hanafy, Sherif M; Schuster, Gerard T

    2011-10-01

    Two seismic applications of time reversal mirrors (TRMs) are introduced and tested with field experiments. The first one is sending, receiving, and decoding coded messages similar to a radio except seismic waves are used. The second one is, similar to radar surveillance, detecting and tracking a moving object(s) in a remote area, including the determination of the objects speed of movement. Both applications require the prior recording of calibration Green's functions in the area of interest. This reference Green's function will be used as a codebook to decrypt the coded message in the first application and as a moving sensor for the second application. Field tests show that seismic radar can detect the moving coordinates (x(t), y(t), z(t)) of a person running through a calibration site. This information also allows for a calculation of his velocity as a function of location. Results with the seismic radio are successful in seismically detecting and decoding coded pulses produced by a hammer. Both seismic radio and radar are highly robust to signals in high noise environments due to the super-stacking property of TRMs. PMID:21973353

  5. Nickel: The time-reversal symmetry conserving partner of iron on a chalcogenide topological insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vondráček, M.; Cornils, L.; Minár, J.; Warmuth, J.; Michiardi, M.; Piamonteze, C.; Barreto, L.; Miwa, J. A.; Bianchi, M.; Hofmann, Ph.; Zhou, L.; Kamlapure, A.; Khajetoorians, A. A.; Wiesendanger, R.; Mi, J.-L.; Iversen, B.-B.; Mankovsky, S.; Borek, St.; Ebert, H.; Schüler, M.; Wehling, T.; Wiebe, J.; Honolka, J.

    2016-10-01

    We report on the quenching of single Ni adatom moments on Te-terminated Bi2Te2Se and Bi2Te3 topological insulator surfaces. The effect is noted as a missing x-ray magnetic circular dichroism for resonant L3 ,2 transitions into partially filled Ni 3 d states of theory-derived occupancy nd=9.2 . On the basis of a comparative study of Ni and Fe using scanning tunneling microscopy and ab initio calculations, we are able to relate the element specific moment formation to a local Stoner criterion. Our theory shows that while Fe adatoms form large spin moments of ms=2.54 μB with out-of-plane anisotropy due to a sufficiently large density of states at the Fermi energy, Ni remains well below an effective Stoner threshold for local moment formation. With the Fermi level remaining in the bulk band gap after adatom deposition, nonmagnetic Ni and preferentially out-of-plane oriented magnetic Fe with similar structural properties on Bi2Te2Se surfaces constitute a perfect platform to study the off-on effects of time-reversal symmetry breaking on topological surface states.

  6. Two applications of time reversal mirrors: seismic radio and seismic radar.

    PubMed

    Hanafy, Sherif M; Schuster, Gerard T

    2011-10-01

    Two seismic applications of time reversal mirrors (TRMs) are introduced and tested with field experiments. The first one is sending, receiving, and decoding coded messages similar to a radio except seismic waves are used. The second one is, similar to radar surveillance, detecting and tracking a moving object(s) in a remote area, including the determination of the objects speed of movement. Both applications require the prior recording of calibration Green's functions in the area of interest. This reference Green's function will be used as a codebook to decrypt the coded message in the first application and as a moving sensor for the second application. Field tests show that seismic radar can detect the moving coordinates (x(t), y(t), z(t)) of a person running through a calibration site. This information also allows for a calculation of his velocity as a function of location. Results with the seismic radio are successful in seismically detecting and decoding coded pulses produced by a hammer. Both seismic radio and radar are highly robust to signals in high noise environments due to the super-stacking property of TRMs.

  7. Pseudo-time-reversal symmetry and topological edge states in two-dimensional acoustic crystals.

    PubMed

    Mei, Jun; Chen, Zeguo; Wu, Ying

    2016-01-01

    We propose a simple two-dimensional acoustic crystal to realize topologically protected edge states for acoustic waves. The acoustic crystal is composed of a triangular array of core-shell cylinders embedded in a water host. By utilizing the point group symmetry of two doubly degenerate eigenstates at the Γ point, we can construct pseudo-time-reversal symmetry as well as pseudo-spin states in this classical system. We develop an effective Hamiltonian for the associated dispersion bands around the Brillouin zone center, and find the inherent link between the band inversion and the topological phase transition. With numerical simulations, we unambiguously demonstrate the unidirectional propagation of acoustic edge states along the interface between a topologically nontrivial acoustic crystal and a trivial one, and the robustness of the edge states against defects with sharp bends. Our work provides a new design paradigm for manipulating and transporting acoustic waves in a topologically protected manner. Technological applications and devices based on our design are expected in various frequency ranges of interest, spanning from infrasound to ultrasound. PMID:27587311

  8. Time reversal ultrasound focusing to a point away from the beacon location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinelnikov, Yegor; Sutin, Alexander; Gandhi, Gaurav; Sarvazyan, Armen

    2012-10-01

    In percutaneous procedures there is often a need to focus therapeutic ultrasound to a predefined area without affecting surrounding tissues. Focusing based on Time Reversal Acoustics (TRA) principles constitutes a promising approach for generating high intensity ultrasound field tailored to the shape of the predefined area. Conventional TRA technique enables ultrasound focusing only at a site, where there is an ultrasound beacon, e.g. piezo-transducer mounted at the tip of a catheter. We developed a method of steering the focus away from the beacon location. The method is based on the measurements of impulse response (IR) in several reference points and calculating virtual IRs for the points outside the reference beacon location. The IR for the point away from the beacon is constructed based on mathematical extrapolation of the measured reference IRs frequency spectra, particularly phases. The effectiveness of extrapolated TRA focusing is explored experimentally and by computer simulation. Potential applications include ultrasounda-ssisted drug delivery, artery recanalization and tumor ablation.

  9. Time reversed test particle calculations at Titan, based on CAPS-IMS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bebesi, Zsofia; Erdos, Geza; Szego, Karoly; Young, David T.

    2013-04-01

    We used the theoretical approach of Kobel and Flückiger (1994) to construct a magnetic environment model in the vicinity of Titan - with the exception of placing the bow shock (which is not present at Titan) into infinity. The model has 4 free parameters to calibrate the shape and orientation of the field. We investigate the CAPS-IMS Singles data to calculate/estimate the location of origin of the detected cold ions at Titan, and we also use the measurements of the onboard Magnetometer to set the parameters of the model magnetic field. A 4th order Runge-Kutta method is applied to calculate the test particle trajectories in a time reversed scenario, in the curved magnetic environment. Several different ion species can be tracked by the model along their possible trajectories, as a first approach we considered three particle groups (1, 2 and 16 amu ions). In this initial study we show the results for some thoroughly discussed flybys like TA, TB and T5, but we consider more recent tailside encounters as well. Reference: Kobel, E. and E.O. Flückiger, A model of the steady state magnetic field in the magnetosheath, JGR 99, Issue A12, 23617, 1994

  10. Conductance fluctuations in disordered superconductors with broken time-reversal symmetry near two dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, S.; Furusaki, A.; Ludwig, A. W. W.; Mudry, C.

    2007-10-01

    We extend the analysis of the conductance fluctuations in disordered metals by Altshuler, Kravtsov, and Lerner (AKL) to disordered superconductors with broken time-reversal symmetry in d=(2+ɛ) dimensions (symmetry classes C and D of Altland and Zirnbauer). Using a perturbative renormalization group analysis of the corresponding non-linear sigma model (NL σM) we compute the anomalous scaling dimensions of the dominant scalar operators with 2 s gradients to one-loop order. We show that, in analogy with the result of AKL for ordinary, metallic systems (Wigner-Dyson classes), an infinite number of high-gradient operators would become relevant (in the renormalization group sense) near two dimensions if contributions beyond one-loop order are ignored. We explore the possibility to compare, in symmetry class D, the ɛ=(2-d) expansion in d<2 with exact results in one dimension. The method we use to perform the one-loop renormalization analysis is valid for general symmetric spaces of Kähler type, and suggests that this is a generic property of the perturbative treatment of NL σMs defined on Riemannian symmetric target spaces.

  11. On valuing patches: Estimating contributions to metapopulation growth with reverse-time capture-recapture modelling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sanderlin, J.S.; Waser, P.M.; Hines, J.E.; Nichols, J.D.

    2012-01-01

    Metapopulation ecology has historically been rich in theory, yet analytical approaches for inferring demographic relationships among local populations have been few. We show how reverse-time multi-state capture-recapture models can be used to estimate the importance of local recruitment and interpopulation dispersal to metapopulation growth. We use 'contribution metrics' to infer demographic connectedness among eight local populations of banner-tailed kangaroo rats, to assess their demographic closure, and to investigate sources of variation in these contributions. Using a 7 year dataset, we show that: (i) local populations are relatively independent demographically, and contributions to local population growth via dispersal within the system decline with distance; (ii) growth contributions via local survival and recruitment are greater for adults than juveniles, while contributions involving dispersal are greater for juveniles; (iii) central populations rely more on local recruitment and survival than peripheral populations; (iv) contributions involving dispersal are not clearly related to overall metapopulation density; and (v) estimated contributions from outside the system are unexpectedly large. Our analytical framework can classify metapopulations on a continuum between demographic independence and panmixia, detect hidden population growth contributions, and make inference about other population linkage forms, including rescue effects and source-sink structures. Finally, we discuss differences between demographic and genetic population linkage patterns for our system. ?? 2011 The Royal Society.

  12. Effect of membrane bioreactor solids retention time on reverse osmosis membrane fouling for wastewater reuse.

    PubMed

    Farias, Elizabeth L; Howe, Kerry J; Thomson, Bruce M

    2014-02-01

    The effect of the solids retention time (SRT) in a membrane bioreactor (MBR) on the fouling of the membranes in a subsequent reverse osmosis (RO) process used for wastewater reuse was studied experimentally using a pilot-scale treatment system. The MBR-RO pilot system was fed effluent from the primary clarifiers at a large municipal wastewater treatment plant. The SRT in the MBRs was adjusted to approximately 2, 10, and 20 days in three experiments. The normalized specific flux through the MBR and RO membranes was evaluated along with inorganic and organic constituents in the influent and effluent of each process. Increasing the SRT in the MBR led to an increase in the removal of bulk DOC, protein, and carbohydrates, as has been observed in previous studies. Increasing the SRT led to a decrease in the fouling of the MBR membranes, which is consistent with previous studies. However, the opposite trend was observed for fouling of the RO membranes; increasing the SRT of the MBR resulted in increased fouling of the RO membranes. These results indicate that the constituents that foul MBR membranes are not the same as those that foul RO membranes; to be an RO membrane foulant in a MBR-RO system, the constituents must first pass through the MBR membranes without being retained. Thus, an intermediate value of SRT may be best choice of operating conditions in an MBR when the MBR is followed by RO for wastewater reuse.

  13. Relating the performance of time-reversal-based underwater acoustic communications in different shallow water environments.

    PubMed

    Yang, T C

    2011-10-01

    The performance of underwater acoustic communications, such as the output signal-to-noise ratio (OSNR), is generally dependent on the channel specifics, hence a channel model is normally required as the performance of the channel equalizer depends on the number of tap coefficients used (e.g., a sparse equalizer) which are different for different oceans having different multipath arrivals. This letter presents theoretical arguments, and experimental data from different oceans that suggest that the increase of OSNR with the number of diverse receivers (in terms of the effective number of receivers) and the decrease of OSNR with the channel-estimation error follow a universal relationship using the time-reversal or correlation-based equalizer, despite the fact that the channels have very different properties. The reason is due to the fact that the OSNR is a function of the q function, the auto-correlation of the received impulse responses summed over all receiver channels, and the q function is approximately the same for all shallow waters given a sufficient (≥4-6) number of receivers.

  14. Time reversal for localization of sources of infrasound signals in a windy stratified atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Lonzaga, Joel B

    2016-06-01

    Time reversal is used for localizing sources of recorded infrasound signals propagating in a windy, stratified atmosphere. Due to the convective effect of the background flow, the back-azimuths of the recorded signals can be substantially different from the source back-azimuth, posing a significant difficulty in source localization. The back-propagated signals are characterized by negative group velocities from which the source back-azimuth and source-to-receiver (STR) distance can be estimated using the apparent back-azimuths and trace velocities of the signals. The method is applied to several distinct infrasound arrivals recorded by two arrays in the Netherlands. The infrasound signals were generated by the Buncefield oil depot explosion in the U.K. in December 2005. Analyses show that the method can be used to substantially enhance estimates of the source back-azimuth and the STR distance. In one of the arrays, for instance, the deviations between the measured back-azimuths of the signals and the known source back-azimuth are quite large (-1° to -7°), whereas the deviations between the predicted and known source back-azimuths are small with an absolute mean value of <1°. Furthermore, the predicted STR distance is off only by <5% of the known STR distance. PMID:27369127

  15. Odd-parity magnetoresistance in pyrochlore iridate thin films with broken time-reversal symmetry

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, T. C.; Kozuka, Y.; Uchida, M.; Tsukazaki, A.; Arima, T.; Kawasaki, M.

    2015-01-01

    A new class of materials termed topological insulators have been intensively investigated due to their unique Dirac surface state carrying dissipationless edge spin currents. Recently, it has been theoretically proposed that the three dimensional analogue of this type of band structure, the Weyl Semimetal phase, is materialized in pyrochlore oxides with strong spin-orbit coupling, accompanied by all-in-all-out spin ordering. Here, we report on the fabrication and magnetotransport of Eu2Ir2O7 single crystalline thin films. We reveal that one of the two degenerate all-in-all-out domain structures, which are connected by time-reversal operation, can be selectively formed by the polarity of the cooling magnetic field. Once formed, the domain is robust against an oppositely polarised magnetic field, as evidenced by an unusual odd field dependent term in the magnetoresistance and an anomalous term in the Hall resistance. Our findings pave the way for exploring the predicted novel quantum transport phenomenon at the surfaces/interfaces or magnetic domain walls of pyrochlore iridates. PMID:25959576

  16. Laser ultrasound and simulated time reversal on bulk waves for non destructive control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diot, G.; Walaszek, H.; Kouadri-David, A.; Guégan, S.; Flifla, J.

    2014-06-01

    Laser welding of aluminium generally creates embedded welding defects, such as porosities or cracks. Non Destructive Inspection (NDI) after processing may ensure an acceptable weld quality by defect detection. Nowadays, NDI techniques used to control the inside of a weld are mainly limited to X-Rays or ultrasonics. The current paper describes the use of a Laser Ultrasound (LU) technique to inspect porosities in 2 and 4-mm thick sheet lap welds. First experimentations resulted in the detection of 0.5-mm drilled holes in bulk aluminium sheets. The measurement of the depth of these defects is demonstrated too. Further experimentations shows the applicability of the LU technique to detect porosities in aluminium laser welds. However, as the interpretation of raw measures is limiting the detection capacity of this technique, we developed a signal processing using Time-Reversal capabilities to enhance detection capacities. Furthermore, the signal processing output is a geometrical image of the material's inner state, increasing the ease of interpretation. It is based on a mass-spring simulation which enables the back-propagation of the acquired ultrasound signal. The spring-mass simulation allows the natural generation of all the different sound waves and thus enables the back-propagation of a raw signal without any need of filtering or wave identification and extraction. Therefore the signal processing uses the information contained in the compression wave as well as in the shear wave.

  17. Examination of time-reversal acoustics in shallow water and applications to noncoherent underwater communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Kevin B.; Abrantes, Antonio A. M.; Larraza, Andres

    2003-06-01

    The shallow water acoustic communication channel is characterized by strong signal degradation caused by multipath propagation and high spatial and temporal variability of the channel conditions. At the receiver, multipath propagation causes intersymbol interference and is considered the most important of the channel distortions. This paper examines the application of time-reversal acoustic (TRA) arrays, i.e., phase-conjugated arrays (PCAs), that generate a spatio-temporal focus of acoustic energy at the receiver location, eliminating distortions introduced by channel propagation. This technique is self-adaptive and automatically compensates for environmental effects and array imperfections without the need to explicitly characterize the environment. An attempt is made to characterize the influences of a PCA design on its focusing properties with particular attention given to applications in noncoherent underwater acoustic communication systems. Due to the PCA spatial diversity focusing properties, PC arrays may have an important role in an acoustic local area network. Each array is able to simultaneously transmit different messages that will focus only at the destination receiver node.

  18. Tests of Parity and Time-Reversal Violation Using Diatomic Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demille, D.

    2011-06-01

    Our group is pursuing several experiments to study violations of discrete symmetries such as parity (P-) and time-reversal (T-). These effects arise due to particle physics phenomona at very high energy scales, yet can give rise to observable effects in precision spectroscopic measurements. Our experiments all use the structure of diatomic molecules to dramatically amplify the signals due to P- and T-violation, relative to previous experiments using atoms for similar purposes. This talk will focus on two of our experiments. The ACME project seeks to measure the permanent electric dipole moment of the electron, a P- and T-violating effect predicted in many extensions to the Standard Model of particle physics (e.g. Supersymmetric theories). ACME uses ThO molecules, delivered from a newly-developed type of cryogenic molecular beam source, to simultaneously provide high statistical sensitivity and unprcedented rejection of systematic errors. The ZOMBEY experiment seeks to measure P-violating effects in free radicals, with the goal to determine properties of the electroweak force that are inaccessible to accelerator-based measurements. This talk will describe the concepts and methods of these experiments, highlighting the crucial role of molecular spectroscopy in optimizing their performance. A. C. Vutha et al., J. Phys. B 43, 074007 (2010). N. R. Hutzler et al., arXiv:1101.4217 J. F. Barry et al., arXiv:1101.4229. D. DeMille et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 023003 (2008).

  19. Development and Evaluation of an Enterovirus D68 Real-Time Reverse Transcriptase PCR Assay

    PubMed Central

    Wylie, Todd N.; Wylie, Kristine M.; Buller, Richard S.; Cannella, Maria

    2015-01-01

    We have developed and evaluated a real-time reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) assay for the detection of human enterovirus D68 (EV-D68) in clinical specimens. This assay was developed in response to the unprecedented 2014 nationwide EV-D68 outbreak in the United States associated with severe respiratory illness. As part of our evaluation of the outbreak, we sequenced and published the genome sequence of the EV-D68 virus circulating in St. Louis, MO. This sequence, along with other GenBank sequences from past EV-D68 occurrences, was used to computationally select a region of EV-D68 appropriate for targeting in a strain-specific RT-PCR assay. The RT-PCR assay amplifies a segment of the VP1 gene, with an analytic limit of detection of 4 copies per reaction, and it was more sensitive than commercially available assays that detect enteroviruses and rhinoviruses without distinguishing between the two, including three multiplex respiratory panels approved for clinical use by the FDA. The assay did not detect any other enteroviruses or rhinoviruses tested and did detect divergent strains of EV-D68, including the first EV-D68 strain (Fermon) identified in California in 1962. This assay should be useful for identifying and studying current and future outbreaks of EV-D68 viruses. PMID:26063859

  20. Pseudo-time-reversal symmetry and topological edge states in two-dimensional acoustic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Jun; Chen, Zeguo; Wu, Ying

    2016-09-01

    We propose a simple two-dimensional acoustic crystal to realize topologically protected edge states for acoustic waves. The acoustic crystal is composed of a triangular array of core-shell cylinders embedded in a water host. By utilizing the point group symmetry of two doubly degenerate eigenstates at the Γ point, we can construct pseudo-time-reversal symmetry as well as pseudo-spin states in this classical system. We develop an effective Hamiltonian for the associated dispersion bands around the Brillouin zone center, and find the inherent link between the band inversion and the topological phase transition. With numerical simulations, we unambiguously demonstrate the unidirectional propagation of acoustic edge states along the interface between a topologically nontrivial acoustic crystal and a trivial one, and the robustness of the edge states against defects with sharp bends. Our work provides a new design paradigm for manipulating and transporting acoustic waves in a topologically protected manner. Technological applications and devices based on our design are expected in various frequency ranges of interest, spanning from infrasound to ultrasound.

  1. Time-reversal focusing in microwave hyperthermia for deep-seated tumors.

    PubMed

    Trefná, Hana Dobsícek; Vrba, Jan; Persson, Mikael

    2010-04-21

    A fast beam-forming method for hyperthermia treatment of deep-seated tumors is described and verified. The approach is based on the time-reversal characteristics of Maxwell equations. The basic principle of the method is coupling of the electromagnetic modeling of the system with the actual application. In this modeling the wavefront of the source is propagated through a patient-specific model from a virtual antenna placed in the tumor of the model. The simulated radiated field is then captured using a computer model of the surrounding antenna system. The acquired amplitudes and phases are then used in the real antenna system. The effectiveness of this procedure is demonstrated by calculating the power absorption distribution using FDTD electromagnetic simulations of a realistic 2D breast model as well as a 2D neck model. Several design parameters, i.e. number of antennas, operating frequency and dimensions, have been evaluated by performance indicators. The promising results suggest that the development of this technique is pursued further.

  2. Defect detection around rebars in concrete using focused ultrasound and reverse time migration.

    PubMed

    Beniwal, Surendra; Ganguli, Abhijit

    2015-09-01

    Experimental and numerical investigations have been performed to assess the feasibility of damage detection around rebars in concrete using focused ultrasound and a Reverse Time Migration (RTM) based subsurface imaging algorithm. Since concrete is heterogeneous, an unfocused ultrasonic field will be randomly scattered by the aggregates, thereby masking information about damage(s). A focused ultrasonic field, on the other hand, increases the possibility of detection of an anomaly due to enhanced amplitude of the incident field in the focal region. Further, the RTM based reconstruction using scattered focused field data is capable of creating clear images of the inspected region of interest. Since scattering of a focused field by a damaged rebar differs qualitatively from that of an undamaged rebar, distinct images of damaged and undamaged situations are obtained in the RTM generated images. This is demonstrated with both numerical and experimental investigations. The total scattered field, acquired on the surface of the concrete medium, is used as input for the RTM algorithm to generate the subsurface image that helps to identify the damage. The proposed technique, therefore, has some advantage since knowledge about the undamaged scenario for the concrete medium is not necessary to assess its integrity.

  3. Paleomagnetism of Miocene East African Rift sediments and the calibration of the geomagnetic reversal time scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tauxe, L.; Monaghan, M.; Drake, R.; Curtis, G.; Staudigel, H.

    1985-05-01

    Paleomagnetic stratigraphy and K-Ar age determinations are reported for the type section of the middle Miocene Ngorora Formation, found in the Kenya rift valley. The magnetostratigraphy is well correlated to the geomagnetic reversal time scale (GRTS) and spans from the lower part of Chron C5 (9) to Chron C5AB-r (14). K-Ar dates were determined for euhedral sanidines, handpicked from seven tuff horizons within the Ngorora Formation and the underlying Turn phonolite flow. These dates can therefore be tied directly to the GRTS. The eight dates fall into three discrete groups averaging 12.5±0.22 Ma (mean and standard deviation of results from four tuffs), 11.6±0.06 Ma (mean and standard deviation from three tuffs), and 10.16±0.38 (average of three analyses from one tuff). We interpret the age groups as resulting from three successive eruptive episodes, the stratigraphic positions of which are well constrained. In spite of episodic supply at the eruptive source, sediment accumulation is continuous at the resolution of the GRTS. This suggests that accumulation is controlled by basin subsidence rather than sediment supply. Sanidine dates support an age for the older boundary of marine magnetic anomaly 5 of about 10 Ma, as opposed to 11.12 Ma, suggested by the most recent results from Icelandic basaltic lava flows.

  4. The time evolution of turbulent parameters in reversed-field pinch plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Titus, J. B.; Alexander, Brandon; Johnson, J. A. III

    2013-04-28

    Turbulence is abundant in fully ionized fusion plasmas, with unique turbulent characteristics in different phases of the discharge. Using Fourier and chaos-based techniques, a set of parameters have been developed to profile the time evolution of turbulence in high temperature, fusion plasmas, specifically in self-organized, reversed-field pinch plasma in the Madison Symmetric Torus. With constant density and plasma current, the turbulence profile is measured during ramp-up, magnetic reconnection, and increased confinement phases. During magnetic reconnection, a scan of plasma current is performed with a constant density. Analysis revealed that the energy associated with turbulence (turbulent energy) is found to increase when changes in magnetic energy occur and is correlated to edge ion temperatures. As the turbulent energy increases with increasing current, the rate at which this energy flow between scales (spectral index) and anti-persistence of the fluctuations increases (Hurst exponent). These turbulent parameters are then compared to the ramp-up phase and increased confinement regime.

  5. Locating the source of diffusion in complex networks by time-reversal backward spreading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Zhesi; Cao, Shinan; Wang, Wen-Xu; Di, Zengru; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2016-03-01

    Locating the source that triggers a dynamical process is a fundamental but challenging problem in complex networks, ranging from epidemic spreading in society and on the Internet to cancer metastasis in the human body. An accurate localization of the source is inherently limited by our ability to simultaneously access the information of all nodes in a large-scale complex network. This thus raises two critical questions: how do we locate the source from incomplete information and can we achieve full localization of sources at any possible location from a given set of observable nodes. Here we develop a time-reversal backward spreading algorithm to locate the source of a diffusion-like process efficiently and propose a general locatability condition. We test the algorithm by employing epidemic spreading and consensus dynamics as typical dynamical processes and apply it to the H1N1 pandemic in China. We find that the sources can be precisely located in arbitrary networks insofar as the locatability condition is assured. Our tools greatly improve our ability to locate the source of diffusion in complex networks based on limited accessibility of nodal information. Moreover, they have implications for controlling a variety of dynamical processes taking place on complex networks, such as inhibiting epidemics, slowing the spread of rumors, pollution control, and environmental protection.

  6. Quantum anomalous Hall effect in time-reversal-symmetry breaking topological insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Cui-Zu; Li, Mingda

    2016-03-01

    The quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE), the last member of Hall family, was predicted to exhibit quantized Hall conductivity {σyx}=\\frac{{{e}2}}{h} without any external magnetic field. The QAHE shares a similar physical phenomenon with the integer quantum Hall effect (QHE), whereas its physical origin relies on the intrinsic topological inverted band structure and ferromagnetism. Since the QAHE does not require external energy input in the form of magnetic field, it is believed that this effect has unique potential for applications in future electronic devices with low-power consumption. More recently, the QAHE has been experimentally observed in thin films of the time-reversal symmetry breaking ferromagnetic (FM) topological insulators (TI), Cr- and V- doped (Bi,Sb)2Te3. In this topical review, we review the history of TI based QAHE, the route to the experimental observation of the QAHE in the above two systems, the current status of the research of the QAHE, and finally the prospects for future studies.

  7. Prestack reverse time migration for 3D marine reflection seismic data

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, Seonghyung; Kim, Taeyoun

    2015-03-10

    Prestack reverse time migration (RTM) is a method for imaging the subsurface using the inner product of wavefield extrapolation in shot domain and in receiver domain. It is well known that RTM is better for preserving amplitudes and phases than other prestack migrations. Since 3D seismic data is huge data volume and it needs heavy computing works, it requires parallel computing in order to have a meaningful depth image of the 3D subsurface. We implemented a parallelized version of 3D RTM for prestack depth migration. The results of numerical example for 3D SEG/EAGE salt model showed good agreement with the original geological model. We applied RTM to offshore 3D seismic reflection data. The study area is 12 × 25 km with 120 survey lines. Shot and receiver spacing is 25 m and 12.5 m. The line spacing is 100 m. Shot gathers were preprocessed to enhance signal to noise ratio and velocity model was calculated from conventional stack velocity. Both of them were used to obtain 3D image using RTM. The results show reasonable subsurface image.

  8. Tunneling magnetoresistance in junctions composed of ferromagnets and time-reversal invariant topological superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zhongbo; Wan, Shaolong

    2016-02-01

    Tunneling magnetoresistance between two ferrromagnets is an issue of fundamental importance in spintronics. In this work, we show that tunneling magnetoresistance can also emerge in junctions composed of ferromagnets and time-reversal invariant topological superconductors without spin-rotation symmetry. Here the physical origin is that when the spin-polarization direction of an injected electron from the ferromagnet lies in the same plane of the spin-polarization direction of Majorana zero modes, the electron will undergo a perfect spin-equal Andreev reflection, while injected electrons with other spin-polarization directions will be partially Andreev reflected and partially normal reflected, which consequently has a lower conductance, and therefore, the magnetoresistance effect emerges. Compared to conventional magnetic tunnel junctions, an unprecedented advantage of the junctions studied here is that arbitrary high tunneling magnetoresistance can be obtained even when the magnetization of the ferromagnets are weak and the insulating tunneling barriers are featureless. Our findings provide a new fascinating mechanism to obtain high tunneling magnetoresistance.

  9. Converted-waves Imaging Condition for Elastic Reverse-Time Migration with Decomposed Wavefields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, B.; Choi, H.; Seol, S. J.; Byun, J.

    2015-12-01

    To successfully deal with responses from the elastic earth, imaging techniques need to incorporate the elastic wave equation. Elastic Reverse-Time Migration (ERTM) with separating-while-imaging approach is capable of yielding physically meaningful PP, PS, SP, and SS images from multicomponent data. Even in PP images, ERTM has brought enhancements comparing to those from acoustic RTM because ERTM can handle converted waves. Converted-wave images, core results of ERTM, however, have two major problems related to characteristics of S-waves. First, polarity reversals according to propagation directions of S-waves cause destructive effect to final PS and SP images while each migrated result is stacked over the shots. In addition, non-existent spurious events which are produced by crosscorrelating downgoing S-waves in source wavefields and reflections associated with downgoing P-waves in receiver wavefields lead masking effects over true reflection events in SP and SS images. In this study, we adopt a wavefield decomposition method to solve the polarity problems and derive a new converted-wave imaging condition for SP and SS images to alleviate the generation of spurious events. The acceleration vector wavefield decomposition method used in our ERTM has advantages over the conventional wavefield separation method based on the Helmholtz decomposition because the wavefield decomposition can automatically compensate polarity changes in PS and SP images when the zero-lag crosscorrelation for vector wavefields is applied. To suppress spurious events in SP and SS images, our imaging condition is designed to make images only where S- and converted P-waves from source wavefields are coexisted with decomposed wavefields from receiver wavefields at reflection boundaries. To verify our new imaging condition, we tested our algorithm with OBC (Ocean Bottom Cable) data from elastic Marmousi-II model and compared the migrated images with those from ERTM with the zero

  10. Switching times of nanoscale FePt: Finite size effects on the linear reversal mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, M. O. A.; Chantrell, R. W.

    2015-04-20

    The linear reversal mechanism in FePt grains ranging from 2.316 nm to 5.404 nm has been simulated using atomistic spin dynamics, parametrized from ab-initio calculations. The Curie temperature and the critical temperature (T{sup *}), at which the linear reversal mechanism occurs, are observed to decrease with system size whilst the temperature window T{sup *}reversal paths close to the Curie temperature have been calculated, showing that for decreasing system size the reversal path becomes more elliptic at lower temperatures, consistent with the decrease in the Curie temperature arising from finite size effects. Calculations of the minimum pulse duration show faster switching in small grains and are qualitatively described by the Landau-Lifshitz-Bloch equation with finite size atomistic parameterization, which suggests that multiscale modeling of FePt down to a grain size of ≈3.5 nm is possible.

  11. Real time bolt preload monitoring using piezoceramic transducers and time reversal technique—a numerical study with experimental verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parvasi, Seyed Mohammad; Ho, Siu Chun Michael; Kong, Qingzhao; Mousavi, Reza; Song, Gangbing

    2016-08-01

    Bolted joints are ubiquitous structural elements, and form critical connections in mechanical and civil structures. As such, loosened bolted joints may lead to catastrophic failures of these structures, thus inspiring a growing interest in monitoring of bolted joints. A novel energy based wave method is proposed in this study to monitor the axial load of bolted joint connections. In this method, the time reversal technique was used to focus the energy of a piezoelectric (PZT)-generated ultrasound wave from one side of the interface to be measured as a signal peak by another PZT transducer on the other side of the interface. A tightness index (TI) was defined and used to correlate the peak amplitude to the bolt axial load. The TI bypasses the need for more complex signal processing required in other energy-based methods. A coupled, electro-mechanical analysis with elasto-plastic finite element method was used to simulate and analyze the PZT based ultrasonic wave propagation through the interface of two steel plates connected by a single nut and bolt connection. Numerical results, backed by experimental results from testing on a bolted connection between two steel plates, revealed that the peak amplitude of the focused signal increases as the bolt preload (torque level) increases due to the enlarging true contact area of the steel plates. The amplitude of the focused peak saturates and the TI reaches unity as the bolt axial load reaches a threshold value. These conditions are associated with the maximum possible true contact area between the surfaces of the bolted connection.

  12. On-chip single-copy real-time reverse-transcription PCR in isolated picoliter droplets

    SciTech Connect

    Beer, N R; Wheeler, E; Lee-Houghton, L; Watkins, N; Nasarabadi, S; Hebert, N; Leung, P; Arnold, D; Bailey, C; Colston, B

    2007-12-19

    The first lab-on-chip system for picoliter droplet generation and RNA isolation, followed by reverse transcription, and PCR amplification with real-time fluorescence detection in the trapped droplets has been developed. The system utilized a shearing T-junction in a fused silica device to generate a stream of monodisperse picoliter-scale droplets that were isolated from the microfluidic channel walls and each other by the oil phase carrier. An off-chip valving system stopped the droplets on-chip, allowing thermal cycling for reverse transcription and subsequent PCR amplification without droplet motion. This combination of the established real-time reverse transcription-PCR assay with digital microfluidics is ideal for isolating single-copy RNA and virions from a complex environment, and will be useful in viral discovery and gene-profiling applications.

  13. The Reverse Time Migration technique coupled with Interior Penalty Discontinuous Galerkin method.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldassari, C.; Barucq, H.; Calandra, H.; Denel, B.; Diaz, J.

    2009-04-01

    Seismic imaging is based on the seismic reflection method which produces an image of the subsurface from reflected waves recordings by using a tomography process and seismic migration is the industrial standard to improve the quality of the images. The migration process consists in replacing the recorded wavefields at their actual place by using various mathematical and numerical methods but each of them follows the same schedule, according to the pioneering idea of Claerbout: numerical propagation of the source function (propagation) and of the recorded wavefields (retropropagation) and next, construction of the image by applying an imaging condition. The retropropagation step can be realized accouting for the time reversibility of the wave equation and the resulting algorithm is currently called Reverse Time Migration (RTM). To be efficient, especially in three dimensional domain, the RTM requires the solution of the full wave equation by fast numerical methods. Finite element methods are considered as the best discretization method for solving the wave equation, even if they lead to the solution of huge systems with several millions of degrees of freedom, since they use meshes adapted to the domain topography and the boundary conditions are naturally taken into account in the variational formulation. Among the different finite element families, the spectral element one (SEM) is very interesting because it leads to a diagonal mass matrix which dramatically reduces the cost of the numerical computation. Moreover this method is very accurate since it allows the use of high order finite elements. However, SEM uses meshes of the domain made of quadrangles in 2D or hexaedra in 3D which are difficult to compute and not always suitable for complex topographies. Recently, Grote et al. applied the IPDG (Interior Penalty Discontinuous Galerkin) method to the wave equation. This approach is very interesting since it relies on meshes with triangles in 2D or tetrahedra in 3D

  14. Closeout Report - Search for Time Reversal Symmetry Violation with TREK at J-PARC

    SciTech Connect

    Kohl, Michael

    2015-04-15

    positions. Two former graduate students of the group have graduated and received their PhD degrees in nuclear physics (Dr. Anusha Liyanage and Dr. Ozgur Ates). In particular, this award has enabled Dr. Kohl to pursue the TREK project (Time Reversal Experiment with Kaons) at J-PARC, which he has been leading and advancing as International Spokesperson. Originally proposed as a search for time reversal symmetry violation [6], the project has evolved into a precision test of lepton flavor universality in the Standard Model along with sensitive searches for physics beyond the Standard Model through a possible discovery of new particles such as a sterile neutrino or a neutral gauge boson from the hidden sector in the mass region up to 300 MeV/c2 [7]. Experiment TREK/E36, first proposed in 2010, has been mounted between November 2014 and April 2015, and commissioning with beam has been started in April 2015, with production running anticipated in early summer and late fall 2015. It uses the apparatus from the previous KEK/E-246 experiment with partial upgrades to measure the ratio of decay widths of leptonic two-body decays of the charged kaon to µν and eν, respectively, which is highly sensitive to the ratio of electromagnetic charged lepton couplings and possible new physics processes that could differentiate between μ and e, hence breaking lepton flavor universality of the Standard Model. Through the searches for neutral massive particles, TREK/E36 can severely constrain any new physics scenarios designed to explain the proton radius puzzle [12, 13].

  15. Focusing light in deep tissue with time-reversed ultrasound microbubble encoded light (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, Haowen; Jang, Mooseok; Yang, Changhuei

    2016-03-01

    Optical scattering of biological tissue limits the penetration depth of conventional optical techniques, which rely on the detection of ballistic photons. Recent developed optical phase conjugation (OPC) technique breaks through this depth limit by shaping an optical wavefront that can "undo" the optical scattering. Assisted with an ultrasound focus, this technique enables optical focusing inside biological tissue in a freely addressable fashion. However, ultrasound modulation efficiency is low and the focusing resolution is limited by the ultrasound. Here we present a new technique, time-reversed ultrasound microbubble encoded (TRUME) optical focusing, which is able to provide high focusing efficiency and sub-ultrasound resolution. This technique achieves the wavefront solution by taking the difference of the optical fields captured outside the sample before and after ultrasound-driven microbubble destruction. A conjugated wavefront was then reconstructed and sent back to the sample to form a focus at the site of microbubble destruction. We experimentally demonstrate that a focus with ~2 um size was formed through a 2-mm thick biological tissue using this method. While the size the microbubble sets the resolution of an individual focus, the scale of the ultrasound focus limits the focusing addressability of this technique. Importantly, by utilizing the nonlinear destruction of microbubbles, the TRUME technique breaks the addressable focus resolution barrier imposed by the ultrasound focus. We experimentally demonstrate a 2-fold improvement in addressability using this effect. Since microbubbles are widely used as ultrasound contrast agents in human, this technique provides a promising solution for focusing light deep inside biological tissue.

  16. SHORT GAMMA-RAY BURSTS IN THE ''TIME-REVERSAL'' SCENARIO

    SciTech Connect

    Ciolfi, Riccardo; Siegel, Daniel M. E-mail: daniel.siegel@aei.mpg.de

    2015-01-10

    Short gamma-ray bursts (SGRBs) are among the most luminous explosions in the universe and their origin still remains uncertain. Observational evidence favors the association with binary neutron star or neutron star-black hole (NS-BH) binary mergers. Leading models relate SGRBs to a relativistic jet launched by the BH-torus system resulting from the merger. However, recent observations have revealed a large fraction of SGRB events accompanied by X-ray afterglows with durations ∼10{sup 2}-10{sup 5} s, suggesting continuous energy injection from a long-lived central engine, which is incompatible with the short (≲ 1 s) accretion timescale of a BH-torus system. The formation of a supramassive NS, resisting the collapse on much longer spin-down timescales, can explain these afterglow durations, but leaves serious doubts on whether a relativistic jet can be launched at the merger. Here we present a novel scenario accommodating both aspects, where the SGRB is produced after the collapse of a supramassive NS. Early differential rotation and subsequent spin-down emission generate an optically thick environment around the NS consisting of a photon-pair nebula and an outer shell of baryon-loaded ejecta. While the jet easily drills through this environment, spin-down radiation diffuses outward on much longer timescales and accumulates a delay that allows the SGRB to be observed before (part of) the long-lasting X-ray signal. By analyzing diffusion timescales for a wide range of physical parameters, we find delays that can generally reach ∼10{sup 5} s, compatible with observations. The success of this fundamental test makes this ''time-reversal'' scenario an attractive alternative to current SGRB models.

  17. Breaking time reversal symmetry, quantum anomalous Hall state and dissipationless chiral conduction in topological insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moodera, Jagadeesh

    Breaking time reversal symmetry (TRS) in a topological insulator (TI) with ferromagnetic perturbation can lead to many exotic quantum phenomena exhibited by Dirac surface states including the quantum anomalous Hall (QAH) effect and dissipationless quantized Hall transport. The realization of the QAH effect in realistic materials requires ferromagnetic insulating materials and topologically non-trivial electronic band structures. In a TI, the ferromagnetic order and TRS breaking is achievable by conventional way, through doping with a magnetic element, or by ferromagnetic proximity coupling. Our experimental studies by both approaches will be discussed. In doped TI van Vleck ferromagnetism was observed. The proximity induced magnetism at the interface was stable, beyond the expected temperature range. We shall describe in a hard ferromagnetic TI system a robust QAH state and dissipationless edge current flow is achieved,1,2 a major step towards dissipationless electronic applications with no external fields, making such devices more amenable for metrology and spintronics applications. Our study of the gate and temperature dependences of local and nonlocal magnetoresistance, may elucidate the causes of the dissipative edge channels and the need for very low temperature to observe QAH. In close collaboration with: CuiZu Chang,2,3 Ferhat Katmis, 1 . 2 , 3 Peng Wei. 1 , 2 , 3 ; From Nuclear Eng. Dept. MIT, M. Li, J. Li; From Penn State U, W-W. Zhao, D. Y. Kim, C-x. Liu, J. K. Jain, M. H. W. Chan; From Oakridge National Lab, V. Lauter; From Northeastern U., B. A. Assaf, M. E. Jamer, D. Heiman; From Argonne Lab, J. W. Freeland; From Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum (Germany), F. S. Nogueira, I. Eremin; From Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics (India), B. Satpati. Work supported by NSF Grant DMR-1207469, the ONR Grant N00014-13-1-0301, and the STC Center for Integrated Quantum Materials under NSF Grant DMR-1231319.

  18. Health monitoring of cuplok scaffold joint connection using piezoceramic transducers and time reversal method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Liuyu; Wang, Chenyu; Huo, Linsheng; Song, Gangbing

    2016-03-01

    Cuplok scaffolds are widely used to form temporary supporting structures when constructing bridges and other structures all over the world. The safety and stability of cuplok scaffolds are important issues during construction. Cuplok scaffolds are subjected to various types of vibrations, which may loosen the cuplok connection, negatively impacting the stability of the structure and even leading to severe accidents. In this paper, the authors propose a time reversal (TR) method to monitor the looseness status of the cuplok connection by using stress wave-based active sensing. Lead zirconate titanate (PZT), a commonly used piezoceramic material with a strong piezoelectric effect, is employed. In the proposed approach, PZT patches are used as sensors and actuators to monitor the cuplok joint looseness. One PZT patch is bonded to the vertical bar and two PZT patches are bonded to the cross bars of the cuplok scaffold. The PZT patch on the vertical bar is used as an actuator to generate a stress wave and the other two PZT patches are used as sensors to detect the propagated waves through the cuplok connection, the looseness of which will directly impact the stress wave propagation. The TR method is used to analyse the transmitted signal between the PZT patches through the cuplok connection. By comparing the peak values of the TR focused signal, it can be found that the peak value increases as the tightness of the cuplok connection increases. Therefore, the peak value of the TR focused signal can be used to monitor the tightness of the cuplok connection. In addition, the experimental results demonstrated that the TR method is superior to the energy method in consistency, sensitivity and anti-noise properties.

  19. Second law considerations on the third law: From Boltzmann and Loschmidt paradox to non equilibrium temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucia, Umberto

    2016-02-01

    The balance of forces and processes between the system and the environment and the processes inside the system are the result of the flows of the quanta. Moreover, the transition between two thermodynamic states is the consequence of absorption or emission of quanta, but, during the transition, the entropy variation due to the irreversibility occurs and it breaks any symmetry of time. Consequently, the irreversibility is the result of a transition, a process, an interaction between the system and its environment. This interaction results completely time-irreversible for any real process because of irreversibility. As a consequence, a proof of the third law is obtained proving that the zero temperature state can be achieved only for an infinite work lost for dissipation or in an infinite time. The fundamental role of time both in equilibrium and in non equilibrium analysis is pointed out. Moreover, the non equilibrium temperature is related to the entropy generation and its fluctuation rate; indeed, non-stationary temperature means that the system has not yet attained free energy minimum state, i.e., the maximum entropy state; the consequence is that the zero temperature state can be achieved only for an infinite work lost for dissipation or in an infinite time. In engineering thermodynamics the efficiency is always obtained without any consideration on time, while, here, just the time is introduced as a fundamental quantity of the analysis of non equilibrium states.

  20. Analog time-reversed ultrasonically encoded light focusing inside scattering media with a 33,000× optical power gain.

    PubMed

    Ma, Cheng; Xu, Xiao; Wang, Lihong V

    2015-01-01

    Recent breakthrough in wavefront engineering shows great promises in controlling light propagation inside scattering media. At present, the digital approaches enjoy high gain, while their speeds are slow because of high data throughputs. In contrast, the analog approaches are intrinsically fast but suffer from poor efficiencies and small gains. Further improvements in both speed and gain are necessary to advance the existing technologies toward real-world applications. Here, we report analog time-reversal of acousto-optically tagged photons with a flux amplification of over 33,000 times (45 dB) at a target location inside scattering media. Such a substantial power gain enhancement is achieved when the temporal width of the time-reversed photon packet is squeezed below the carrier-recombination-limited hologram decay time in a photorefractive crystal. Despite a focusing energy gain below unity, the unprecedented power gain is expected to enable new optical imaging, sensing, manipulation and treatment applications. PMID:25753905

  1. Analog time-reversed ultrasonically encoded light focusing inside scattering media with a 33,000× optical power gain

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Cheng; Xu, Xiao; Wang, Lihong V.

    2015-01-01

    Recent breakthrough in wavefront engineering shows great promises in controlling light propagation inside scattering media. At present, the digital approaches enjoy high gain, while their speeds are slow because of high data throughputs. In contrast, the analog approaches are intrinsically fast but suffer from poor efficiencies and small gains. Further improvements in both speed and gain are necessary to advance the existing technologies toward real-world applications. Here, we report analog time-reversal of acousto-optically tagged photons with a flux amplification of over 33,000 times (45 dB) at a target location inside scattering media. Such a substantial power gain enhancement is achieved when the temporal width of the time-reversed photon packet is squeezed below the carrier-recombination-limited hologram decay time in a photorefractive crystal. Despite a focusing energy gain below unity, the unprecedented power gain is expected to enable new optical imaging, sensing, manipulation and treatment applications. PMID:25753905

  2. A Way of Distinguishing Chaos from Random Fractal Sequences Based on the Difference in Time Reversal Symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Naoki; Okamoto, Hiroshi; Naito, Masayoshi

    1995-07-01

    We propose a method of distinguishing chaos from random fractal sequences which have been difficult to discriminate from chaos. In the proposed method, time series is predicted both toward the future and toward the past, and the accuracy of the two types of predictions is compared. We show, considering the time reversal symmetry of time series, that if the time series is chaotic and originates from a dissipative dynamical system, the accuracy is better for the future prediction than for the past prediction, whereas the accuracy is the same if the time series is a random fractal sequence. The method is also applicable to distinguishing between chaos and stationary noise.

  3. Expansions for infinite or finite plane circular time-reversal mirrors and acoustic curtains for wave-field-synthesis.

    PubMed

    Mellow, Tim; Kärkkäinen, Leo

    2014-03-01

    An acoustic curtain is an array of microphones used for recording sound which is subsequently reproduced through an array of loudspeakers in which each loudspeaker reproduces the signal from its corresponding microphone. Here the sound originates from a point source on the axis of symmetry of the circular array. The Kirchhoff-Helmholtz integral for a plane circular curtain is solved analytically as fast-converging expansions, assuming an ideal continuous array, to speed up computations and provide insight. By reversing the time sequence of the recording (or reversing the direction of propagation of the incident wave so that the point source becomes an "ideal" point sink), the curtain becomes a time reversal mirror and the analytical solution for this is given simultaneously. In the case of an infinite planar array, it is demonstrated that either a monopole or dipole curtain will reproduce the diverging sound field of the point source on the far side. However, although the real part of the sound field of the infinite time-reversal mirror is reproduced, the imaginary part is an approximation due to the missing singularity. It is shown that the approximation may be improved by using the appropriate combination of monopole and dipole sources in the mirror.

  4. An Introductory-Geology Exercise on the Polar-Reversal Time Scale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shea, James Herbert

    1986-01-01

    Presents a three-part exercise which provides undergraduates with opportunities to work with data related to the earth's magnetic field. Includes student materials for activities in determining the history of the earth's magnetic field, in finding the general pattern of declination, and for looking for a polar reversal history. (ML)

  5. An investigation of parity and time-reversal symmetry breaking in tight-binding lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Derek Douglas

    More than a decade ago, it was shown that non-Hermitian Hamiltonians with combined parity (P) and time-reversal (T) symmetry exhibit real eigenvalues over a range of parameters. Since then, the field of PT symmetry has seen rapid progress on both the theoretical and experimental fronts. These effective Hamiltonians are excellent candidates for describing open quantum systems with balanced gain and loss. Nature seems to be replete with examples of PT-symmetric systems; in fact, recent experimental investigations have observed the effects of PT symmetry breaking in systems as diverse as coupled mechanical pendula, coupled optical waveguides, and coupled electrical circuits. Recently, PT-symmetric Hamiltonians for tight-binding lattice models have been extensively investigated. Lattice models, in general, have been widely used in physics due to their analytical and numerical tractability. Perhaps one of the best systems for experimentally observing the effects of PT symmetry breaking in a one-dimensional lattice with tunable hopping is an array of evanescently-coupled optical waveguides. The tunneling between adjacent waveguides is tuned by adjusting the width of the barrier between them, and the imaginary part of the local refractive index provides the loss or gain in the respective waveguide. Calculating the time evolution of a wave packet on a lattice is relatively straightforward in the tight-binding model, allowing us to make predictions about the behavior of light propagating down an array of PT-symmetric waveguides. In this thesis, I investigate the the strength of the PT-symmetric phase (the region over which the eigenvalues are purely real) in lattices with a variety of PT-symmetric potentials. In Chapter 1, I begin with a brief review of the postulates of quantum mechanics, followed by an outline of the fundamental principles of PT-symmetric systems. Chapter 2 focuses on one-dimensional uniform lattices with a pair of PT-symmetric impurities in the case of

  6. Generalized shot noise model for time-reversal in multiple-scattering media allowing for arbitrary inputs and windowing

    PubMed Central

    Haworth, Kevin J.; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Carson, Paul L.; Kripfgans, Oliver D.

    2009-01-01

    A theoretical shot noise model to describe the output of a time-reversal experiment in a multiple-scattering medium is developed. This (non-wave equation based) model describes the following process. An arbitrary waveform is transmitted through a high-order multiple-scattering environment and recorded. The recorded signal is arbitrarily windowed and then time-reversed. The processed signal is retransmitted into the environment and the resulting signal recorded. The temporal and spatial signal and noise of this process is predicted statistically. It is found that the time when the noise is largest depends on the arbitrary windowing and this noise peak can occur at times outside the main lobe. To determine further trends, a common set of parameters is applied to the general result. It is seen that as the duration of the input function increases, the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) decreases (independent of signal bandwidth). It is also seen that longer persisting impulse responses result in increased main lobe amplitudes and SNR. Assumptions underpinning the generalized shot noise model are compared to an experimental realization of a multiple-scattering medium (a time-reversal chaotic cavity). Results from the model are compared to random number numerical simulation. PMID:19425655

  7. Synthetic seismic monitoring using reverse-time migration and Kirchhoff migration for CO2 sequestration in Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, W.; Kim, Y.; Min, D.; Oh, J.; Huh, C.; Kang, S.

    2012-12-01

    During last two decades, CO2 sequestration in the subsurface has been extensively studied and progressed as a direct tool to reduce CO2 emission. Commercial projects such as Sleipner, In Salah and Weyburn that inject more than one million tons of CO2 per year are operated actively as well as test projects such as Ketzin to study the behavior of CO2 and the monitoring techniques. Korea also began the CCS (CO2 capture and storage) project. One of the prospects for CO2 sequestration in Korea is the southwestern continental margin of Ulleung basin. To monitor the behavior of CO2 underground for the evaluation of stability and safety, several geophysical monitoring techniques should be applied. Among various geophysical monitoring techniques, seismic survey is considered as the most effective tool. To verify CO2 migration in the subsurface more effectively, seismic numerical simulation is an essential process. Furthermore, the efficiency of the seismic migration techniques should be investigated for various cases because numerical seismic simulation and migration test help us accurately interpret CO2 migration. In this study, we apply the reverse-time migration and Kirchhoff migration to synthetic seismic monitoring data generated for the simplified model based on the geological structures of Ulleung basin in Korea. Synthetic seismic monitoring data are generated for various cases of CO2 migration in the subsurface. From the seismic migration images, we can investigate CO2 diffusion patterns indirectly. From seismic monitoring simulation, it is noted that while the reverse-time migration generates clear subsurface images when subsurface structures are steeply dipping, Kirchhoff migration has an advantage in imaging horizontal-layered structures such as depositional sediments appearing in the continental shelf. The reverse-time migration and Kirchhoff migration present reliable subsurface images for the potential site characterized by stratigraphical traps. In case of

  8. Real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction: technical considerations for gene expression analysis.

    PubMed

    Doak, Shareen H; Zaïr, Zoulikha M

    2012-01-01

    The reverse transcription - polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) is a sensitive technique for the quantification of steady-state mRNA levels, particularly in samples with limited quantities of extracted RNA, or for analysis of low level transcripts. The procedure amplifies defined mRNA transcripts by taking advantage of retroviral enzymes with reverse transcriptase (RT) activity, coupled to PCR. The resultant PCR product concentration is directly proportional to the initial starting quantity of mRNA, therefore allowing quantification of gene expression by incorporation of a fluorescence detector for the appropriate amplicons. In this chapter, we describe a number of the most popular techniques for performing RT-PCR and detail the subsequent analysis methodologies required to interpret the resultant data in either a relative manner or through absolute quantification of gene expression levels.

  9. Analog time-reversed ultrasonically encoded (TRUE) optical focusing inside scattering media with high power gain (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Cheng; Xu, Xiao; Wang, Lihong V.

    2016-03-01

    Focusing light deep inside scattering media plays a key role in such biomedical applications as high resolution optical imaging, control, and therapy. In recent years, wavefront shaping technologies have come a long way in controlling light propagation in complex media. A prominent example is time-reversed ultrasonically encoded (TRUE) focusing, which allows noninvasive introduction of "guide stars" inside biological tissue to guide light focusing. By measuring the optical wavefront emanating from an ultrasound focus created at the target location, TRUE determines the desired wavefront non-iteratively, and achieves focusing at the target position via a subsequent optical time reversal. Compared to digital counterparts that employ slow electronic spatial light modulators and cameras, analog TRUE focusing relies on nonlinear photorefractive crystals that inherently accommodate more spatial modes and eliminate the troublesome alignment and data transfer required by digital approaches. However, analog TRUE focusing suffers from its small gain, defined as the energy or power ratio between the focusing and probing beams in the focal volume. Here, by implementing a modified analog TRUE focusing scheme that squeezes the duration of the time-reversed photon packet below the carrier-recombination-limited hologram decay time of the crystal, we demonstrated a photon flux amplification much greater than unity at a preset focal voxel in between two scattering layers. Although the energy gain was still below unity, the unprecedented power gain will nevertheless benefit new biomedical applications.

  10. Educational reversals and first-birth timing in sub-Saharan Africa: a dynamic multilevel approach.

    PubMed

    DeRose, Laurie F; Kravdal, Oystein

    2007-02-01

    In many areas throughout sub-Saharan Africa, young adult cohorts are less educated than their predecessors because of declines in school enrollments during the 1980s and 1990s. Because a woman with little education typically becomes a mother earlier and has more children than one with better education, and because of a similar well-established relationship between current education and current fertility at the societal level, one might expect such education reversals to raise fertility. However, if there is an additional negative effect of low educational level among currently young women compared with that in the past, which would accord with ideas about the impact of relative deprivation, the total effect of an education reversal may run in either direction. This possibility has not been explored in earlier studies, which have taken a more static approach. We focus on the initiation of childbearing. Using Demographic and Health Survey data from 16 sub-Saharan African countries with multiple surveys, we estimate a fixed-effects multilevel model for first births that includes the woman's own education, community education, and community education relative to the past. There are negative effects of individual and community education, but no effect of relative education. Thus we conclude that education reversals do seem to speed up entry into parenthood.

  11. Spontaneous breaking of time-reversal symmetry in strongly interacting two-dimensional electron layers in silicon and germanium.

    PubMed

    Shamim, S; Mahapatra, S; Scappucci, G; Klesse, W M; Simmons, M Y; Ghosh, A

    2014-06-13

    We report experimental evidence of a remarkable spontaneous time-reversal symmetry breaking in two-dimensional electron systems formed by atomically confined doping of phosphorus (P) atoms inside bulk crystalline silicon (Si) and germanium (Ge). Weak localization corrections to the conductivity and the universal conductance fluctuations were both found to decrease rapidly with decreasing doping in the Si:P and Ge:P delta layers, suggesting an effect driven by Coulomb interactions. In-plane magnetotransport measurements indicate the presence of intrinsic local spin fluctuations at low doping, providing a microscopic mechanism for spontaneous lifting of the time-reversal symmetry. Our experiments suggest the emergence of a new many-body quantum state when two-dimensional electrons are confined to narrow half-filled impurity bands.

  12. Investigation of the robustness of time reversal acoustics in solid media through the reconstruction of temporally symmetric sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffa, M.; Anderson, B. E.; Guyer, R. A.; Ulrich, T. J.; Johnson, P. A.

    2008-04-01

    We investigate some of the limitations of time reversal acoustics (TRA) in solid media with transducers attached to the surface. In particular, we consider the limitations due to the finite size of the transducers and elastic wave propagation. Using a theoretical approach, numerical simulations and validation from laboratory ultrasound experiments, we find that finite size transducers and the existence of longitudinal and shear waves play significant roles in perturbing the time reversal process. Despite these limitations, we show that TRA in solids is very robust, providing the means to reconstruct the main features of the source signal. The analysis of TRA retro-focusing properties in solid specimens is of foremost importance for the development of new non-destructive evaluation techniques.

  13. And the first one now will later be last: Time-reversal in cormack-jolly-seber models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nichols, James

    2016-01-01

    The models of Cormack, Jolly and Seber (CJS) are remarkable in providing a rich set of inferences about population survival, recruitment, abundance and even sampling probabilities from a seemingly limited data source: a matrix of 1's and 0's reflecting animal captures and recaptures at multiple sampling occasions. Survival and sampling probabilities are estimated directly in CJS models, whereas estimators for recruitment and abundance were initially obtained as derived quantities. Various investigators have noted that just as standard modeling provides direct inferences about survival, reversing the time order of capture history data permits direct modeling and inference about recruitment. Here we review the development of reverse-time modeling efforts, emphasizing the kinds of inferences and questions to which they seem well suited.

  14. Spin and Time-Reversal Symmetries of Superconducting Electron Pairs Probed by the Muon Spin Rotation and Relaxation Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higemoto, Wataru; Aoki, Yuji; MacLaughlin, Douglas E.

    2016-09-01

    Unconventional superconductivity based on the strong correlation of electrons is one of the central issues of solid-state physics. Although many experimental techniques are appropriate for investigating unconventional superconductivity, a complete perspective has not been established yet. The symmetries of electron pairs are crucial properties for understanding the essential state of unconventional superconductivity. In this review, we discuss the investigation of the time-reversal and spin symmetries of superconducting electron pairs using the muon spin rotation and relaxation technique. By detecting a spontaneous magnetic field under zero field and/or the temperature dependence of the muon Knight shift in the superconducting phase, the time-reversal symmetry and spin parity of electron pairs have been determined for several unconventional superconductors.

  15. Detection of time-reversal symmetry breaking in the noncentrosymmetric superconductor Re6Zr using muon-spin spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Singh, R P; Hillier, A D; Mazidian, B; Quintanilla, J; Annett, J F; Paul, D McK; Balakrishnan, G; Lees, M R

    2014-03-14

    We have investigated the superconducting state of the noncentrosymmetric compound Re6Zr using magnetization, heat capacity, and muon-spin relaxation or rotation (μSR) measurements. Re6Zr has a superconducting transition temperature, Tc=6.75±0.05  K. Transverse-field μSR experiments, used to probe the superfluid density, suggest an s-wave character for the superconducting gap. However, zero and longitudinal-field μSR data reveal the presence of spontaneous static magnetic fields below Tc indicating that time-reversal symmetry is broken in the superconducting state and an unconventional pairing mechanism. An analysis of the pairing symmetries identifies the ground states compatible with time-reversal symmetry breaking.

  16. Implicit time-marching solution of the Navier-Stokes equations for thrust reversing and thrust vectoring nozzle flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imlay, S. T.

    1986-01-01

    An implicit finite volume method is investigated for the solution of the compressible Navier-Stokes equations for flows within thrust reversing and thrust vectoring nozzles. Thrust reversing nozzles typically have sharp corners, and the rapid expansion and large turning angles near these corners are shown to cause unacceptable time step restrictions when conventional approximate factorization methods are used. In this investigation these limitations are overcome by using second-order upwind differencing and line Gauss-Siedel relaxation. This method is implemented with a zonal mesh so that flows through complex nozzle geometries may be efficiently calculated. Results are presented for five nozzle configurations including two with time varying geometries. Three cases are compared with available experimental data and the results are generally acceptable.

  17. Isolating scattering resonances of an air-filled spherical shell using iterative, single-channel time reversal.

    PubMed

    Waters, Zachary J; Dzikowicz, Benjamin R; Simpson, Harry J

    2012-01-01

    Iterative, single-channel time reversal is employed to isolate backscattering resonances of an air-filled spherical shell in a frequency range of 0.5-20 kHz. Numerical simulations of free-field target scattering suggest improved isolation of the dominant target response frequency in the presence of varying levels of stochastic noise, compared to processing returns from a single transmission and also coherent averaging. To test the efficacy of the technique in a realistic littoral environment, monostatic scattering experiments are conducted in the Gulf of Mexico near Panama City, Florida. The time reversal technique is applied to returns from a hollow spherical shell target sitting proud on a sandy bottom in 14 m deep water. Distinct resonances in the scattering response of the target are isolated, depending upon the bandwidth of the sonar system utilized.

  18. Issues in measure-preserving three dimensional flow integrators: Self-adjointness, reversibility, and non-uniform time stepping

    SciTech Connect

    Finn, John M.

    2015-03-01

    Properties of integration schemes for solenoidal fields in three dimensions are studied, with a focus on integrating magnetic field lines in a plasma using adaptive time stepping. It is shown that implicit midpoint (IM) and a scheme we call three-dimensional leapfrog (LF) can do a good job (in the sense of preserving KAM tori) of integrating fields that are reversible, or (for LF) have a 'special divergence-free' property. We review the notion of a self-adjoint scheme, showing that such schemes are at least second order accurate and can always be formed by composing an arbitrary scheme with its adjoint. We also review the concept of reversibility, showing that a reversible but not exactly volume-preserving scheme can lead to a fractal invariant measure in a chaotic region, although this property may not often be observable. We also show numerical results indicating that the IM and LF schemes can fail to preserve KAM tori when the reversibility property (and the SDF property for LF) of the field is broken. We discuss extensions to measure preserving flows, the integration of magnetic field lines in a plasma and the integration of rays for several plasma waves. The main new result of this paper relates to non-uniform time stepping for volume-preserving flows. We investigate two potential schemes, both based on the general method of Ref. [11], in which the flow is integrated in split time steps, each Hamiltonian in two dimensions. The first scheme is an extension of the method of extended phase space, a well-proven method of symplectic integration with non-uniform time steps. This method is found not to work, and an explanation is given. The second method investigated is a method based on transformation to canonical variables for the two split-step Hamiltonian systems. This method, which is related to the method of non-canonical generating functions of Ref. [35], appears to work very well.

  19. Focusing waves at arbitrary locations in a ray-chaotic enclosure using time-reversed synthetic sonas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Bo; Antonsen, Thomas M.; Ott, Edward; Anlage, Steven M.

    2016-05-01

    Time-reversal methods are widely used to achieve wave focusing in acoustics and electromagnetics. Past time-reversal experiments typically require that a transmitter be initially present at the target focusing point, which limits the application of this technique. In this paper, we propose a method to focus waves at an arbitrary location inside a complex enclosure using a numerically calculated wave excitation signal. We use a semiclassical ray algorithm to calculate the signal that would be received at a transceiver port resulting from the injection of a short pulse at the desired target location. The time-reversed version of this signal is then injected into the transceiver port, and an approximate reconstruction of the short pulse is created at the target. The quality of the pulse reconstruction is quantified in three different ways, and the values of these metrics are shown to be predicted by the statistics of the scattering parameter | S21|2 between the transceiver and target points in the enclosure over the bandwidth of the pulse. We demonstrate the method experimentally using a flat microwave billiard, and we quantify the reconstruction quality as a function of enclosure loss, port coupling, and other considerations.

  20. Focusing waves at arbitrary locations in a ray-chaotic enclosure using time-reversed synthetic sonas.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Bo; Antonsen, Thomas M; Ott, Edward; Anlage, Steven M

    2016-05-01

    Time-reversal methods are widely used to achieve wave focusing in acoustics and electromagnetics. Past time-reversal experiments typically require that a transmitter be initially present at the target focusing point, which limits the application of this technique. In this paper, we propose a method to focus waves at an arbitrary location inside a complex enclosure using a numerically calculated wave excitation signal. We use a semiclassical ray algorithm to calculate the signal that would be received at a transceiver port resulting from the injection of a short pulse at the desired target location. The time-reversed version of this signal is then injected into the transceiver port, and an approximate reconstruction of the short pulse is created at the target. The quality of the pulse reconstruction is quantified in three different ways, and the values of these metrics are shown to be predicted by the statistics of the scattering parameter |S_{21}|^{2} between the transceiver and target points in the enclosure over the bandwidth of the pulse. We demonstrate the method experimentally using a flat microwave billiard, and we quantify the reconstruction quality as a function of enclosure loss, port coupling, and other considerations.

  1. Translation of time-reversal violation in the neutral K-meson system into a table-top mechanical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiser, Andreas; Schubert, Klaus R.; Stiewe, Jürgen

    2012-08-01

    Weak interactions break time-reversal (T) symmetry in the two-state system of neutral K-mesons. We present and discuss a two-state mechanical system, i.e. a Foucault-type pendulum on a rotating table, for a full representation of {K^0}{{\\overlineK}{}^0} transitions by the pendulum motions including T violation. The pendulum moves with two different oscillation frequencies and two different magnetic dampings. Its equation of motion is identical to the differential equation for the real part of the CPT-symmetric K-meson wavefunction. The pendulum is able to represent microscopic CP and T violation with CPT symmetry owing to the macroscopic Coriolis force, which breaks the symmetry under reversal-of-motion. Video clips of the pendulum motions are given as supplementary material.

  2. Comparison of prothrombin time tests used in the monitoring of edoxaban and their evaluation as indicators of the reversal effect.

    PubMed

    Iba, Toshiaki; Emmi, Mari; Hiki, Makoto; Nagayama, Masataka; Aihara, Koichiro; Tabe, Yoko; Yuri, Maiko; Ohsaka, Akimichi

    2016-06-01

    Clinical demand for the prompt assessment of the activity of direct-acting factor Xa inhibitors in the emergency care setting is increasing. In the present study, we examined whether prothrombin time (PT) tests can serve as a clinically useful indicator of anti-factor Xa activity. In the first series, the in vitro effect of edoxaban on PT was evaluated by spiking human plasma with edoxaban and measuring PT using three different commercial PT tests. In the second series, the reversal effect of prothrombin complex concentrates (PCC) and activated PCC (aPCC) in edoxaban-spiked plasma was evaluated. In the third series, PT of plasma samples from patients administered either 15 or 30 mg/day of edoxaban was assessed, and the results were compared with edoxaban concentrations determined by a calibrated anti-factor Xa activity assay. The spike test revealed that all PT reagents positively correlated with edoxaban. The sensitivity to edoxaban varied among the three reagents and Triniclot(®) Excel S showed the best performance. Prolonged PT by edoxaban was reversed by PCC and aPCC in a dose-dependent manner; however, complete reversal was not achieved. Positive correlation between anti-factor Xa activity and PT was shown in the clinical samples at the edoxaban range from 0 to >300 ng/mL.

  3. Comparison of prothrombin time tests used in the monitoring of edoxaban and their evaluation as indicators of the reversal effect.

    PubMed

    Iba, Toshiaki; Emmi, Mari; Hiki, Makoto; Nagayama, Masataka; Aihara, Koichiro; Tabe, Yoko; Yuri, Maiko; Ohsaka, Akimichi

    2016-06-01

    Clinical demand for the prompt assessment of the activity of direct-acting factor Xa inhibitors in the emergency care setting is increasing. In the present study, we examined whether prothrombin time (PT) tests can serve as a clinically useful indicator of anti-factor Xa activity. In the first series, the in vitro effect of edoxaban on PT was evaluated by spiking human plasma with edoxaban and measuring PT using three different commercial PT tests. In the second series, the reversal effect of prothrombin complex concentrates (PCC) and activated PCC (aPCC) in edoxaban-spiked plasma was evaluated. In the third series, PT of plasma samples from patients administered either 15 or 30 mg/day of edoxaban was assessed, and the results were compared with edoxaban concentrations determined by a calibrated anti-factor Xa activity assay. The spike test revealed that all PT reagents positively correlated with edoxaban. The sensitivity to edoxaban varied among the three reagents and Triniclot(®) Excel S showed the best performance. Prolonged PT by edoxaban was reversed by PCC and aPCC in a dose-dependent manner; however, complete reversal was not achieved. Positive correlation between anti-factor Xa activity and PT was shown in the clinical samples at the edoxaban range from 0 to >300 ng/mL. PMID:26984594

  4. Understanding the Structure of Reversible Coordination Polymers Based on Europium in Electrostatic Assemblies Using Time-Resolved Luminescence.

    PubMed

    Xu, Limin; Xie, Mengqi; Huang, Jianbin; Yan, Yun

    2016-06-14

    In situ characterization of the structure of reversible coordination polymers remains a challenge because of their dynamic and concentration-responsive nature. It is especially difficult to determine these structures in their self-assemblies where their degree of polymerization responds to the local concentration. In this paper, we report on the structure of reversible lanthanide coordination polymers in electrostatic assemblies using time-resolved luminescence (TRL) measurement. The reversible coordinating system is composed of the bifunctional ligand 1,11-bis(2,6-dicarboxypyridin-4-yloxy)-3,6,9-trioxaundecane (L2EO4) and europium ion Eu(3+). Upon mixing with the positively charged diblock copolymer poly(2-vinylpyridine)-b-poly(ethylene oxide) (P2VP41-b-PEO205), electrostatic polyion micelles are formed and the negatively charged L2EO4-Eu coordination complex simultaneously transforms into coordination "polymers" in the micellar core. By virtue of the water-sensitive luminescence of Eu(3+), we are able to obtain the structural information of the L2EO4-Eu coordination polymers before and after the formation of polyion micelles. Upon analyzing the fluorescence decay curves of Eu(3+) before and after micellization, the fraction of Eu(3+) fully coordinated with L2EO4 is found to increase from 32 to 83%, which verifies the occurrence of chain extension of the L2EO4-Eu coordination polymers in the micellar core. Our work provides a qualitative picture for the structure change of reversible coordination polymers, which allows us to look into these "invisible" structures.

  5. Understanding the Structure of Reversible Coordination Polymers Based on Europium in Electrostatic Assemblies Using Time-Resolved Luminescence.

    PubMed

    Xu, Limin; Xie, Mengqi; Huang, Jianbin; Yan, Yun

    2016-06-14

    In situ characterization of the structure of reversible coordination polymers remains a challenge because of their dynamic and concentration-responsive nature. It is especially difficult to determine these structures in their self-assemblies where their degree of polymerization responds to the local concentration. In this paper, we report on the structure of reversible lanthanide coordination polymers in electrostatic assemblies using time-resolved luminescence (TRL) measurement. The reversible coordinating system is composed of the bifunctional ligand 1,11-bis(2,6-dicarboxypyridin-4-yloxy)-3,6,9-trioxaundecane (L2EO4) and europium ion Eu(3+). Upon mixing with the positively charged diblock copolymer poly(2-vinylpyridine)-b-poly(ethylene oxide) (P2VP41-b-PEO205), electrostatic polyion micelles are formed and the negatively charged L2EO4-Eu coordination complex simultaneously transforms into coordination "polymers" in the micellar core. By virtue of the water-sensitive luminescence of Eu(3+), we are able to obtain the structural information of the L2EO4-Eu coordination polymers before and after the formation of polyion micelles. Upon analyzing the fluorescence decay curves of Eu(3+) before and after micellization, the fraction of Eu(3+) fully coordinated with L2EO4 is found to increase from 32 to 83%, which verifies the occurrence of chain extension of the L2EO4-Eu coordination polymers in the micellar core. Our work provides a qualitative picture for the structure change of reversible coordination polymers, which allows us to look into these "invisible" structures. PMID:27228142

  6. Absolute quantification of mRNA using real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction assays.

    PubMed

    Bustin, S A

    2000-10-01

    The reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) is the most sensitive method for the detection of low-abundance mRNA, often obtained from limited tissue samples. However, it is a complex technique, there are substantial problems associated with its true sensitivity, reproducibility and specificity and, as a quantitative method, it suffers from the problems inherent in PCR. The recent introduction of fluorescence-based kinetic RT-PCR procedures significantly simplifies the process of producing reproducible quantification of mRNAs and promises to overcome these limitations. Nevertheless, their successful application depends on a clear understanding of the practical problems, and careful experimental design, application and validation remain essential for accurate quantitative measurements of transcription. This review discusses the technical aspects involved, contrasts conventional and kinetic RT-PCR methods for quantitating gene expression and compares the different kinetic RT-PCR systems. It illustrates the usefulness of these assays by demonstrating the significantly different levels of transcription between individuals of the housekeeping gene family, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate-dehydrogenase (GAPDH).

  7. Near-threshold photoionization of hydrogenlike uranium studied in ion-atom collisions via the time-reversed process.

    PubMed

    Stöhlker, T; Ma, X; Ludziejewski, T; Beyer, H F; Bosch, F; Brinzanescu, O; Dunford, R W; Eichler, J; Hagmann, S; Ichihara, A; Kozhuharov, C; Krämer, A; Liesen, D; Mokler, P H; Stachura, Z; Swiat, P; Warczak, A

    2001-02-01

    Radiative electron capture, the time-reversed photoionization process occurring in ion-atom collisions, provides presently the only access to photoionization studies for very highly charged ions. By applying the deceleration mode of the ESR storage ring, we studied this process in low-energy collisions of bare uranium ions with low- Z target atoms. This technique allows us to extend the current information about photoionization to much lower energies than those accessible for neutral heavy elements in the direct reaction channel. The results prove that for high- Z systems, higher-order multipole contributions and magnetic corrections persist even at energies close to the threshold.

  8. Mean-field studies of time reversal breaking states in super-heavy nuclei with the Gogny force

    SciTech Connect

    Robledo, L. M.

    2015-10-15

    Recent progress on the description of time reversal breaking (odd mass and multi-quasiparticle excitation) states in super-heavy nuclei within a mean field framework and using several flavors of the Gogny interaction is reported. The study includes ground and excited states in selected odd mass isotopes of nobelium and mendelevium as well as high K isomeric states in {sup 254}No. These are two and four-quasiparticle excitations that are treated in the same self-consistent HFB plus blocking framework as the odd mass states.

  9. Issues in measure-preserving three dimensional flow integrators: Self-adjointness, reversibility, and non-uniform time stepping

    DOE PAGES

    Finn, John M.

    2015-03-01

    Properties of integration schemes for solenoidal fields in three dimensions are studied, with a focus on integrating magnetic field lines in a plasma using adaptive time stepping. It is shown that implicit midpoint (IM) and a scheme we call three-dimensional leapfrog (LF) can do a good job (in the sense of preserving KAM tori) of integrating fields that are reversible, or (for LF) have a 'special divergence-free' property. We review the notion of a self-adjoint scheme, showing that such schemes are at least second order accurate and can always be formed by composing an arbitrary scheme with its adjoint. Wemore » also review the concept of reversibility, showing that a reversible but not exactly volume-preserving scheme can lead to a fractal invariant measure in a chaotic region, although this property may not often be observable. We also show numerical results indicating that the IM and LF schemes can fail to preserve KAM tori when the reversibility property (and the SDF property for LF) of the field is broken. We discuss extensions to measure preserving flows, the integration of magnetic field lines in a plasma and the integration of rays for several plasma waves. The main new result of this paper relates to non-uniform time stepping for volume-preserving flows. We investigate two potential schemes, both based on the general method of Ref. [11], in which the flow is integrated in split time steps, each Hamiltonian in two dimensions. The first scheme is an extension of the method of extended phase space, a well-proven method of symplectic integration with non-uniform time steps. This method is found not to work, and an explanation is given. The second method investigated is a method based on transformation to canonical variables for the two split-step Hamiltonian systems. This method, which is related to the method of non-canonical generating functions of Ref. [35], appears to work very well.« less

  10. Mean-field studies of time reversal breaking states in super-heavy nuclei with the Gogny force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robledo, L. M.

    2015-10-01

    Recent progress on the description of time reversal breaking (odd mass and multi-quasiparticle excitation) states in super-heavy nuclei within a mean field framework and using several flavors of the Gogny interaction is reported. The study includes ground and excited states in selected odd mass isotopes of nobelium and mendelevium as well as high K isomeric states in 254No. These are two and four-quasiparticle excitations that are treated in the same self-consistent HFB plus blocking framework as the odd mass states.

  11. Issues in measure-preserving three dimensional flow integrators: Self-adjointness, reversibility, and non-uniform time stepping

    SciTech Connect

    Finn, John M.

    2015-03-15

    Properties of integration schemes for solenoidal fields in three dimensions are studied, with a focus on integrating magnetic field lines in a plasma using adaptive time stepping. It is shown that implicit midpoint (IM) and a scheme we call three-dimensional leapfrog (LF) can do a good job (in the sense of preserving KAM tori) of integrating fields that are reversible, or (for LF) have a “special divergence-free” (SDF) property. We review the notion of a self-adjoint scheme, showing that such schemes are at least second order accurate and can always be formed by composing an arbitrary scheme with its adjoint. We also review the concept of reversibility, showing that a reversible but not exactly volume-preserving scheme can lead to a fractal invariant measure in a chaotic region, although this property may not often be observable. We also show numerical results indicating that the IM and LF schemes can fail to preserve KAM tori when the reversibility property (and the SDF property for LF) of the field is broken. We discuss extensions to measure preserving flows, the integration of magnetic field lines in a plasma and the integration of rays for several plasma waves. The main new result of this paper relates to non-uniform time stepping for volume-preserving flows. We investigate two potential schemes, both based on the general method of Feng and Shang [Numer. Math. 71, 451 (1995)], in which the flow is integrated in split time steps, each Hamiltonian in two dimensions. The first scheme is an extension of the method of extended phase space, a well-proven method of symplectic integration with non-uniform time steps. This method is found not to work, and an explanation is given. The second method investigated is a method based on transformation to canonical variables for the two split-step Hamiltonian systems. This method, which is related to the method of non-canonical generating functions of Richardson and Finn [Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 54, 014004 (2012

  12. Near-threshold photoionization of hydrogenlike uranium studied in ion-atom collisions via the time-reversed process.

    PubMed

    Stöhlker, T; Ma, X; Ludziejewski, T; Beyer, H F; Bosch, F; Brinzanescu, O; Dunford, R W; Eichler, J; Hagmann, S; Ichihara, A; Kozhuharov, C; Krämer, A; Liesen, D; Mokler, P H; Stachura, Z; Swiat, P; Warczak, A

    2001-02-01

    Radiative electron capture, the time-reversed photoionization process occurring in ion-atom collisions, provides presently the only access to photoionization studies for very highly charged ions. By applying the deceleration mode of the ESR storage ring, we studied this process in low-energy collisions of bare uranium ions with low- Z target atoms. This technique allows us to extend the current information about photoionization to much lower energies than those accessible for neutral heavy elements in the direct reaction channel. The results prove that for high- Z systems, higher-order multipole contributions and magnetic corrections persist even at energies close to the threshold. PMID:11177990

  13. Construction and properties of a topological index for periodically driven time-reversal invariant 2D crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpentier, D.; Delplace, P.; Fruchart, M.; Gawędzki, K.; Tauber, C.

    2015-07-01

    We present mathematical details of the construction of a topological invariant for periodically driven two-dimensional lattice systems with time-reversal symmetry and quasienergy gaps, which was proposed recently by some of us. The invariant is represented by a gap-dependent Z2-valued index that is simply related to the Kane-Mele invariants of quasienergy bands but contains an extra information. As a byproduct, we prove new expressions for the two-dimensional Kane-Mele invariant relating the latter to Wess-Zumino amplitudes and the boundary gauge anomaly.

  14. Dynamical invariants in systems with and without broken time-reversal symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Schuch, Dieter

    2011-03-21

    In the first part of the lectures dynamical invariants in classical mechanics and conventional quantum mechanics will be considered. In particular, we will begin with some remarks on classical mechanics and on quantization in order to establish the theory in the form that will be used later on. Starting from the time-dependent Schroedinger equation, the dynamics of Gaussian wave packets and Ermakov invariants, the time-dependent Green function/Feynman kernel, quantum-classical connections, energetics and Lagrange-Hamilton formalism for quantum uncertainties, momentum space representation and the relation between the Wigner function and the Ermakov invariant will be discussed. The representation of canonical transformations in time-independent and time-dependent quantum mechanics, factorization of the Ermakov invariant and generalized creation/annihilation operators will be studied. Subsequently, the time-independent Schroedinger equation, leading to nonlinear quantum mechanics related to Riccati/Ermakov systems as well as the occurrence of Riccati/Ermakov systems in the treatment of Bose-Einstein condensates via the so-called moment method will be analyzed.In part two, irreversible dynamics of dissipative systems, classical and quantum mechanical descriptions and corresponding invariants will be treated. After some general remarks on classical and quantum mechanics with unitary time-evolution and energy conservation, phenomenological Langevin and Fokker--Planck equations, master equations in classical and quantum mechanics and the system-plus-reservoir approach will be mentioned briefly. Then follows a more detailed discussion of modified Schroedinger equations and, particularly, of a nonlinear Schroedinger equation with complex logarithmic nonlinearity; its properties, solutions, invariants and energetics will be studied. Finally, a comparison with a classical description in expanding coordinates will lead to a non-unitary connection between the logarithmic

  15. Effect of Time Dependent Bending of Current Sheets in Response to Generation of Plasma Jets and Reverse Currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Anna

    Magnetic reconnection is a basis for many impulsive phenomena in space and laboratory plasmas accompanied by effective transformation of magnetic energy. Reconnection processes usually occur in relatively thin current sheets (CSs), which separate magnetic fields of different or opposite directions. We report on recent observations of time dependent bending of CSs, which results from plasma dynamics inside the sheet. The experiments are carried out with the CS-3D laboratory device (Institute of General Physics RAS, Moscow) [1]. The CS magnetic structure with an X line provides excitation of the Hall currents and plasma acceleration from the X line to both side edges [2]. In the presence of the guide field By the Hall currents give rise to bending of the sheet: the peripheral regions located away from the X line are deflected from CS middle plane (z=0) in the opposite directions ±z [3]. We have revealed generation of reverse currents jy near the CS edges, i.e. the currents flowing in the opposite direction to the main current in the sheet [4]. There are strong grounds to believe that reverse currents are generated by the outflow plasma jets [5], accelerated inside the sheet and penetrated into the regions with strong normal magnetic field component Bz [4]. An impressive effect of sudden change in the sign of the CS bend has been disclosed recently, when analyzing distributions of plasma density [6] and current away from the X line, in the presence of the guide field By. The CS configuration suddenly becomes opposite from that observed at the initial stage, and this effect correlates well with generation of reverse currents. Consequently this effect can be related to excitation of the reverse Hall currents owing to generation of reverse currents jy in the CS. Hence it may be concluded that CSs may exhibit time dependent vertical z-displacements, and the sheet geometry depends on excitation of the Hall currents, acceleration of plasma jets and generation of reverse

  16. Optical focusing deep inside dynamic scattering media with near-infrared time-reversed ultrasonically encoded (TRUE) light.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Lai, Puxiang; Ma, Cheng; Xu, Xiao; Grabar, Alexander A; Wang, Lihong V

    2015-01-01

    Focusing light deep inside living tissue has not been achieved despite its promise to play a central role in biomedical imaging, optical manipulation and therapy. To address this challenge, internal-guide-star-based wavefront engineering techniques--for example, time-reversed ultrasonically encoded (TRUE) optical focusing--were developed. The speeds of these techniques, however, were limited to no greater than 1 Hz, preventing them from in vivo applications. Here we improve the speed of optical focusing deep inside scattering media by two orders of magnitude, and focus diffuse light inside a dynamic scattering medium having a speckle correlation time as short as 5.6 ms, typical of living tissue. By imaging a target, we demonstrate the first focusing of diffuse light inside a dynamic scattering medium containing living tissue. Since the achieved focusing speed approaches the tissue decorrelation rate, this work is an important step towards in vivo deep tissue noninvasive optical imaging, optogenetics and photodynamic therapy. PMID:25556918

  17. Optical focusing deep inside dynamic scattering media with near-infrared time-reversed ultrasonically encoded (TRUE) light

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yan; Lai, Puxiang; Ma, Cheng; Xu, Xiao; Grabar, Alexander A.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2015-01-01

    Focusing light deep inside living tissue has not been achieved despite its promise to play a central role in biomedical imaging, optical manipulation and therapy. To address this challenge, internal-guide-star-based wavefront engineering techniques—for example, time-reversed ultrasonically encoded (TRUE) optical focusing—were developed. The speeds of these techniques, however, were limited to no greater than 1 Hz, preventing them from in vivo applications. Here we improve the speed of optical focusing deep inside scattering media by two orders of magnitude, and focus diffuse light inside a dynamic scattering medium having a speckle correlation time as short as 5.6 ms, typical of living tissue. By imaging a target, we demonstrate the first focusing of diffuse light inside a dynamic scattering medium containing living tissue. Since the achieved focusing speed approaches the tissue decorrelation rate, this work is an important step towards in vivo deep tissue noninvasive optical imaging, optogenetics and photodynamic therapy. PMID:25556918

  18. QUANTIFICATION OF ENTEROVIRUS AND HEPATITIS A VIRUSES IN WELLS AND SPRINGS IN EAST TENNESSEE USING REAL-TIME REVERSE TRANSCIPTION PCR

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project involves development, validation testing and application of a fast, efficient method of quantitatively measuring occurrence and concentration of common human viral pathogens, enterovirus and hepatitis A virus, in ground water samples using real-time reverse transcrip...

  19. GPU-accelerated Modeling and Element-free Reverse-time Migration with Gauss Points Partition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhen, Z.; Jia, X.

    2014-12-01

    Element-free method (EFM) has been applied to seismic modeling and migration. Compared with finite element method (FEM) and finite difference method (FDM), it is much cheaper and more flexible because only the information of the nodes and the boundary of the study area are required in computation. In the EFM, the number of Gauss points should be consistent with the number of model nodes; otherwise the accuracy of the intermediate coefficient matrices would be harmed. Thus when we increase the nodes of velocity model in order to obtain higher resolution, we find that the size of the computer's memory will be a bottleneck. The original EFM can deal with at most 81×81 nodes in the case of 2G memory, as tested by Jia and Hu (2006). In order to solve the problem of storage and computation efficiency, we propose a concept of Gauss points partition (GPP), and utilize the GPUs to improve the computation efficiency. Considering the characteristics of the Gaussian points, the GPP method doesn't influence the propagation of seismic wave in the velocity model. To overcome the time-consuming computation of the stiffness matrix (K) and the mass matrix (M), we also use the GPUs in our computation program. We employ the compressed sparse row (CSR) format to compress the intermediate sparse matrices and try to simplify the operations by solving the linear equations with the CULA Sparse's Conjugate Gradient (CG) solver instead of the linear sparse solver 'PARDISO'. It is observed that our strategy can significantly reduce the computational time of K and Mcompared with the algorithm based on CPU. The model tested is Marmousi model. The length of the model is 7425m and the depth is 2990m. We discretize the model with 595x298 nodes, 300x300 Gauss cells and 3x3 Gauss points in each cell. In contrast to the computational time of the conventional EFM, the GPUs-GPP approach can substantially improve the efficiency. The speedup ratio of time consumption of computing K, M is 120 and the

  20. Reverse engineering of biochemical equations from time-course data by means of genetic programming.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Masahiro; Kikuchi, Shinichi; Tomita, Masaru

    2005-05-01

    Increased research aimed at simulating biological systems requires sophisticated parameter estimation methods. All current approaches, including genetic algorithms, need pre-existing equations to be functional. A generalized approach to predict not only parameters but also biochemical equations from only observable time-course information must be developed and a computational method to generate arbitrary equations without knowledge of biochemical reaction mechanisms must be developed. We present a technique to predict an equation using genetic programming. Our technique can search topology and numerical parameters of mathematical expression simultaneously. To improve the search ability of numeric constants, we added numeric mutation to the conventional procedure. As case studies, we predicted two equations of enzyme-catalyzed reactions regarding adenylate kinase and phosphofructokinase. Our numerical experimental results showed that our approach could obtain correct topology and parameters that were close to the originals. The mean errors between given and simulation-predicted time-courses were 1.6 x 10(-5)% and 2.0 x 10(-3)%, respectively. Our equation prediction approach can be applied to identify metabolic reactions from observable time-courses.

  1. Rapid quantification of murine ABC mRNAs by real time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Su, Yan Ru; Linton, MacRae F; Fazio, Sergio

    2002-12-01

    Several ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are critically involved in cholesterol and phospholipid efflux, reverse cholesterol transport, and play an important role in the development of atherosclerosis. Quantification of ABC mRNA is important in studying the regulation of cellular cholesterol homeostasis and mechanisms related to the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. We have developed a one-step real time quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) method for measuring mRNA levels of ABCA1, ABCG1, and ABCA2 in murine tissues using the TaqMan(TM) technology. It has significant methodological benefits when compared to classic Northern blotting or semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis. Using this method, we found high expression levels of ABCA1 in liver and macrophages, and of ABCG1 in the brain and macrophages. The expression of ABCA1 and ABCG1 were further induced in macrophages loaded with acLDL. In contrast, ABCA2 was expressed exclusively in the brain with low expression levels in the macrophages. This method provides a rapid, highly sensitive, specific, and reproducible quantification of ABC mRNA, and can be performed with nanograms of total RNA sample, thus making it a superior method for studying the regulation of ABC transporters in cholesterol efflux and its role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis in murine models.

  2. Growth behavior of additional offspring with a beneficial reversal allele in the asymmetric sharply-peaked landscape in the coupled discrete-time mutation-selection model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, Wonpyong

    2013-01-01

    The probability of additional offspring with a beneficial reversal allele for growing to a size NC for a range of population sizes N, sequence lengths L, selective advantages s, and measuring parameters C was calculated for a haploid, asexual population in the coupled discrete-time mutation-selection model in an asymmetric sharply-peaked landscape with a positive selective advantage of the reversal allele over the optimal allele. The growing probability in the stochastic region was inversely proportional to the measuring parameter when C < 1 /Ns, bent when C ≈ 1/ Ns and saturated when C > 1/ Ns. The crossing time and the time dependence of the increase in relative density of the reversal allele in the coupled discrete-time mutation-selection model was approximated using the Wright-Fisher two-allele model with the same selective advantage and corresponding effective mutation rate. The growth behavior of additional offspring with the reversal allele in the asymmetric sharply-peaked landscape in the coupled discrete-time mutation-selection model was controlled by the selective advantage of the reversal allele compared to the optimal allele and could be described by using the Wright-Fisher two-allele model, in spite of there being many other alleles with lower fitness, and in spite of there being two alleles, the optimal and reversal allele, separated by a low-fitness valley with a tunable depth and width.

  3. Phase Transition to a Time-Reversal Symmetry-Breaking State in d-Wave Superconducting Films with Rough Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higashitani, Seiji; Miyawaki, Nobumi

    2015-03-01

    The normal-superconducting phase transition in d-wave superconducting films is discussed with a focus on the effect of diffuse surface scattering. A specularity parameter S characterizing the boundary condition is introduced for systematic analysis of the surface effect. When S = 1 (the specular limit), the film can exhibit a novel superconductivity that spontaneously breaks time-reversal symmetry, as was shown by Vorontsov [Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 177001 (2009)]. We find that this superconducting phase is suppressed as the degree of surface roughness increases, i.e., as the specularity S decreases. In particular, it is completely suppressed when S = 0 (the diffusive limit). Those results are explained from the viewpoint of surface odd-frequency pairing.

  4. Manipulating one-way space wave and its refraction by time-reversal and parity symmetry breaking

    PubMed Central

    Poo, Yin; He, Cheng; Xiao, Chao; Lu, Ming-Hui; Wu, Rui-Xin; Chen, Yan-Feng

    2016-01-01

    One-way transmission and negative refraction are the exotic wave properties founded in photonic crystals which attract a great attention due to their promising applications in photonic devices. How to integrate such two phenomena in one material or device is interesting and valuable. In this work, we theoretically and experimentally demonstrate that one-way electromagnetic space wave can be realized by means of two-dimensional magnetic photonic crystals. Simultaneously breaking the time-reversal and parity symmetries of the magnetic photonic crystals designed, we observe oblique incident space wave propagating one-way in the magnetic photonic crystals with positive or negative refraction occurring at interfaces, which can be manipulated upon the incident angle and operating frequency. Our work may offer a potential platform to realize some exotic photoelectronic and microwave devices such as one-way imaging and one-way cloaking. PMID:27387438

  5. Manipulating one-way space wave and its refraction by time-reversal and parity symmetry breaking.

    PubMed

    Poo, Yin; He, Cheng; Xiao, Chao; Lu, Ming-Hui; Wu, Rui-Xin; Chen, Yan-Feng

    2016-07-08

    One-way transmission and negative refraction are the exotic wave properties founded in photonic crystals which attract a great attention due to their promising applications in photonic devices. How to integrate such two phenomena in one material or device is interesting and valuable. In this work, we theoretically and experimentally demonstrate that one-way electromagnetic space wave can be realized by means of two-dimensional magnetic photonic crystals. Simultaneously breaking the time-reversal and parity symmetries of the magnetic photonic crystals designed, we observe oblique incident space wave propagating one-way in the magnetic photonic crystals with positive or negative refraction occurring at interfaces, which can be manipulated upon the incident angle and operating frequency. Our work may offer a potential platform to realize some exotic photoelectronic and microwave devices such as one-way imaging and one-way cloaking.

  6. Comparison of confinement in resistive-shell reversed-field pinch devices with two different magnetic shell penetration times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gravestijn, R. M.; Drake, J. R.; Hedqvist, A.; Rachlew, E.

    2004-01-01

    A loop voltage is required to sustain the reversed-field pinch (RFP) equilibrium. The configuration is characterized by redistribution of magnetic helicity but with the condition that the total helicity is maintained constant. The magnetic field shell penetration time, tgrs, has a critical role in the stability and performance of the RFP. Confinement in the EXTRAP device has been studied with two values of tgrs, first (EXTRAP-T2) with tgrs of the order of the typical relaxation cycle timescale and then (EXTRAP-T2R) with tgrs much longer than the relaxation cycle timescale, but still much shorter than the pulse length. Plasma parameters show significant improvements in confinement in EXTRAP-T2R. The typical loop voltage required to sustain comparable electron poloidal beta values is a factor of 3 lower in the EXTRAP-T2R device. The improvement is attributed to reduced magnetic turbulence.

  7. Measurement of the speed of sound in trabecular bone by using a time reversal acoustics focusing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kang Il; Choi, Bok Kyoung

    2014-10-01

    A new method for measuring the speed of sound (SOS) in trabecular bone by using a time reversal acoustics (TRA) focusing system was proposed and validated with measurements obtained by using the conventional pulse-transmission technique. The SOS measured in 14 bovine femoral trabecular bone samples by using the two methods was highly correlated each other, although the SOS measured by using the TRA focusing system was slightly lower by an average of 2.2 m/s. The SOS measured by using the two methods showed high correlation coefficients of r = 0.92 with the apparent bone density, consistent with the behavior in human trabecular bone in vitro. These results prove the efficacy of the new method based on the principle of TRA to measure the SOS in trabecular bone.

  8. Manipulating one-way space wave and its refraction by time-reversal and parity symmetry breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poo, Yin; He, Cheng; Xiao, Chao; Lu, Ming-Hui; Wu, Rui-Xin; Chen, Yan-Feng

    2016-07-01

    One-way transmission and negative refraction are the exotic wave properties founded in photonic crystals which attract a great attention due to their promising applications in photonic devices. How to integrate such two phenomena in one material or device is interesting and valuable. In this work, we theoretically and experimentally demonstrate that one-way electromagnetic space wave can be realized by means of two-dimensional magnetic photonic crystals. Simultaneously breaking the time-reversal and parity symmetries of the magnetic photonic crystals designed, we observe oblique incident space wave propagating one-way in the magnetic photonic crystals with positive or negative refraction occurring at interfaces, which can be manipulated upon the incident angle and operating frequency. Our work may offer a potential platform to realize some exotic photoelectronic and microwave devices such as one-way imaging and one-way cloaking.

  9. Overcoming the diffraction limit in wave physics using a time-reversal mirror and a novel acoustic sink.

    PubMed

    de Rosny, J; Fink, M

    2002-09-16

    In recent years, time-reversal (TR) mirrors have been developed that create TR waves for ultrasonic transient fields propagating through complex media. A TR wave back propagates and refocuses exactly at its initial source. However, because of diffraction, even if the source is pointlike the wave refocuses on a spot size that cannot be smaller than half a wavelength. Here, by using a TR interpretation of this limit, we show that this latter limitation can be overcome if the source is replaced by its TR image. This new device acts as an acoustic sink that absorbs the TR wave. Here we report the first experimental result obtained with an acoustic sink where a focal spot size of less than 1/14th of one wavelength is recorded.

  10. It's Only A Matter of Time (Reversal): A New Search For The Electric Dipole Moment Of The Neutron

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, M. D.

    2007-10-26

    An international collaboration has undertaken a project to search for the electric dipole moment (EDM) of the neutron with a sensitivity of 10{sup -28} e{center_dot}cm. The search should span a region of sensitivity where effects are expected from supersysmmetric models and from models of time reversal violation that might explain electroweak baryogenesis. The technique utilizes the special properties for producing and storing ultra-cold neutrons in a bottle filled with liquid {sup 4}He and doped with a small amount of {sup 3}He. The technique will be discussed and compared to that of competing experiments. The extensive R and D program undertaken by the collaboration will be reviewed. The status of the DOE project will be explained.

  11. Detection of Avian bornavirus in multiple tissues of infected psittacine birds using real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Delnatte, Pauline; Mak, Matthew; Ojkic, Davor; Raghav, Raj; DeLay, Josepha; Smith, Dale A

    2014-03-01

    Avian bornavirus (ABV), the cause of proventricular dilation disease in psittacine birds, has been detected in multiple tissues of infected birds using immunohistochemical staining (IHC) and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). In the current study, real-time RT-PCR, using primers targeting the ABV matrix gene, was used to detect ABV in 146 tissues from 7 ABV-infected psittacine birds. Eighty-six percent of the samples tested positive, with crossing point values ranging from 13.82 to 37.82 and a mean of 22.3. These results were compared to the findings of a previous study using gel-based RT-PCR and IHC on the same samples. The agreement between the 2 RT-PCR techniques was 91%; when tests disagreed it was because samples were negative using gel-based RT-PCR but positive on real-time RT-PCR. Agreement with IHC was 77%; 16 out of 74 samples were negative using IHC but positive on real-time RT-PCR. The results suggest that real-time RT-PCR is a more sensitive technique than gel-based RT-PCR and IHC to detect ABV in tissues. The tissues that were ranked most frequently as having a high amount of viral RNA were proventriculus, kidney, colon, cerebrum, and cerebellum. Skeletal muscle, on the other hand, was found to have a consistently low amount of viral RNA.

  12. The use of reverse iontophoresis based surface plasmon resonance for the development of a noninvasive real time transdermal biomarker sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Niraj K.; Hwang, Yongsoon; Cameron, Brent D.

    2016-03-01

    Recent developments in the identification of biomarkers offer a potential means to facilitate early disease detection, gauge treatment in drug therapy clinical trials, and to assess the impact of fatigue and/or stress as related to human physical and cognitive performance. For practical implementation, however, real-time sensing and quantification of such physiological biomarkers is preferred. Some key aspects in this process are continuous sample collection and real time detection. Traditionally, blood is considered the gold standard for samples but frequent phlebotomy is painful and inconvenient. Other sources like saliva and passive sweat cannot be precisely controlled and are affected by other limitations. Some of these can be addressed by reverse iontophoresis which is a noninvasive technique capable of facilitating controlled transport of biomolecules up to 20kDa in size across the skin barrier by passing a low level current between two dermal electrodes. The samples collected at the electrode site can then be monitored at site or transported via a microfluidic channel towards a sensor. In the case reported here, the sensor is based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR), which is a label free, real time, and highly sensitive optical sensing technique. The real time SPR detection of targeted biomarkers is then achieved through the use of aptamer surface modification. In this experiment, extraction and detection of orexin A, a stress related biomarker, is used for demonstration purposes.

  13. Quantification of substance p mRNA in human immune cells by real-time reverse transcriptase PCR assay.

    PubMed

    Lai, Jian-Ping; Douglas, Steven D; Shaheen, Farida; Pleasure, David E; Ho, Wen-Zhe

    2002-01-01

    We have applied a newly developed real-time reverse transcriptase (RT) PCR (RT-PCR) assay for quantification of substance P (SP) mRNA expression (the SP real-time RT-PCR assay) in human blood monocyte-derived macrophages, peripheral blood lymphocytes, and microglia isolated from fetal brain. The SP real-time RT-PCR assay had a sensitivity of 60 mRNA copies, with a dynamic range of detection between 60 and 600,000 copies of the SP gene transcript per reaction mixture. The coefficient of variation of the threshold cycle number between the SP real-time RT-PCR assays was less than 1.16%. This assay with an SP-specific primer pair efficiently recognizes all four isoforms of preprotachykinin A (the SP precursor) gene transcripts. In order to use this assay to measure the levels of SP mRNA in the human immune cells quantitatively, we designed a specific probe (molecular beacon) derived from exon 3 of the SP gene. We demonstrated that the real-time RT-PCR quantitatively detected SP mRNA in the human immune cells, among which the microglia isolated from fetal brain had the highest levels of SP mRNA. The SP real-time PCR assay yielded reproducible data, as the intra-assay variation was less than 1%. Thus, it is feasible to apply the real-time RT-PCR assay for quantification of SP mRNA levels in human immune cells, as well as in other nonneuronal cells. Since SP is a major modulator of neuroimmunoregulation, this assay has the potential for widespread application for basic and clinical investigations.

  14. Quantification of mRNA using real-time reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR): trends and problems.

    PubMed

    Bustin, S A

    2002-08-01

    The fluorescence-based real-time reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) is widely used for the quantification of steady-state mRNA levels and is a critical tool for basic research, molecular medicine and biotechnology. Assays are easy to perform, capable of high throughput, and can combine high sensitivity with reliable specificity. The technology is evolving rapidly with the introduction of new enzymes, chemistries and instrumentation. However, while real-time RT-PCR addresses many of the difficulties inherent in conventional RT-PCR, it has become increasingly clear that it engenders new problems that require urgent attention. Therefore, in addition to providing a snapshot of the state-of-the-art in real-time RT-PCR, this review has an additional aim: it will describe and discuss critically some of the problems associated with interpreting results that are numerical and lend themselves to statistical analysis, yet whose accuracy is significantly affected by reagent and operator variability.

  15. Real-time sub-Ångstrom imaging of reversible and irreversible conformations in rhodium catalysts and graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kisielowski, Christian; Wang, Lin-Wang; Specht, Petra; Calderon, Hector A.; Barton, Bastian; Jiang, Bin; Kang, Joo H.; Cieslinski, Robert

    2013-07-01

    The dynamic responses of a rhodium catalyst and a graphene sheet are investigated upon random excitation with 80 kV electrons. An extraordinary electron microscope stability and resolution allow studying temporary atom displacements from their equilibrium lattice sites into metastable sites across projected distances as short as 60 pm. In the rhodium catalyst, directed and reversible atom displacements emerge from excitations into metastable interstitial sites and surface states that can be explained by single atom trajectories. Calculated energy barriers of 0.13 eV and 1.05 eV allow capturing single atom trapping events at video rates that are stabilized by the Rh [110] surface corrugation. Molecular dynamics simulations reveal that randomly delivered electrons can also reversibly enhance the sp3 and the sp1 characters of the sp2-bonded carbon atoms in graphene. The underlying collective atom motion can dynamically stabilize characteristic atom displacements that are unpredictable by single atom trajectories. We detect three specific displacements and use two of them to propose a path for the irreversible phase transformation of a graphene nanoribbon into carbene. Collectively stabilized atom displacements greatly exceed the thermal vibration amplitudes described by Debye-Waller factors and their measured dose rate dependence is attributed to tunable phonon contributions to the internal energy of the systems. Our experiments suggest operating electron microscopes with beam currents as small as zepto-amperes/nm2 in a weak-excitation approach to improve on sample integrity and allow for time-resolved studies of conformational object changes that probe for functional behavior of catalytic surfaces or molecules.

  16. Neural correlates of causality judgment in physical and social context--the reversed effects of space and time.

    PubMed

    Blos, Johannes; Chatterjee, Anjan; Kircher, Tilo; Straube, Benjamin

    2012-11-01

    The perception of causal relationships is crucial to understanding and interacting with our physical and social environment. However, whether the same or different neural processes are involved in perceiving physical and social causality is unknown. Therefore, this study is focused on commonalities and differences in the neural correlates of causality perception in both contexts. During fMRI data-acquisition, participants judged causal relationships of objects in two types of animated video clips (physical/social) with similar manipulations of temporal and spatial stimulus characteristics. Four conditions were analyzed in a two-factorial design [physical causal (PC), physical non-causal (PNC), social causal (SC), social non-causal (SNC)]. We found that higher angles and longer time delays led to decreasing judgments of causality in the physical context, whereas the same manipulations led to increasing judgments in the social context. Instead of a common network for causal judgments (PC>PNC∩SC>SNC), we found a reversed activation pattern for the factors context and judgment. PC and SNC [(PC>PNC)>(SC>SNC)] produced activations in the bilateral insula, the right angular and inferior frontal gyrus and the medial supplementary motor area. PNC and SC [(PC>PNC)<(SC>SNC)] produced activity in medial frontal, left superior temporal and anterior cingulate brain regions. Our data suggest, that the same brain regions contribute to the impression of physical and social causality. However, they demonstrate a reversed activation pattern that reflects the stimulus characteristics of the respective conditions. Thus, specific stimulus characteristics are crucial for the perception of causality.

  17. Ultrasonic imaging of defects in coarse-grained steels with the decomposition of the time reversal operator.

    PubMed

    Lopez Villaverde, Eduardo; Robert, Sébastien; Prada, Claire

    2016-07-01

    In the present work, the Synthetic Transmit Aperture (STA) imaging is combined with the Decomposition of the Time Reversal Operator (DORT) method to image a coarse grained austenitic-ferritic steel using a contact transducer array. The highly heterogeneous structure of this material produces a strong scattering noise in ultrasound images. Furthermore, the surface waves guided along the array interfere with the bulk waves backscattered by defects. In order to overcome these problems, the DORT method is applied before calculating images with the STA algorithm. The method consists in analyzing in the frequency domain the singular values and singular vectors of the full array transfer matrix. This paper first presents an analysis of the singular values of different waves contained in the data acquisition, which facilitates the identification of the subspace associated with the surface guided waves for filtering operations. Then, a filtered matrix is defined where the contribution of structural noise and guided waves are reduced. Finally, in the time domain, the STA algorithm is applied to this matrix in order to calculate an image with reduced structural noise. Experiments demonstrate that this filtering improves the signal-to-noise ratio by more than 12 dB in comparison with the STA image before filtering. PMID:27475176

  18. The prolate spheroidal wave functions as invariants of the time reversal operator for an extended scatterer in the Fraunhofer approximation.

    PubMed

    Robert, Jean-Luc; Fink, Mathias

    2009-01-01

    The decomposition of the time reversal operator, known by the French acronym DORT, is widely used to detect, locate, and focus on scatterers in various domains such as underwater acoustics, medical ultrasound, and nondestructive evaluation. In the case of point-scatterers, the theory is well understood: The number of nonzero eigenvalues is equal to the number of scatterers, and the eigenvectors correspond to the scatterers Green's function. In the case of extended objects, however, the formalism is not as simple. It is shown here that, in the Fraunhofer approximation, analytical solutions can be found and that the solutions are functions called prolate spheroidal wave-functions. These functions have been studied in information theory as a basis of band-limited and time-limited signals. They also arise in optics. The theoretical solutions are compared to simulation results. Most importantly, the intuition that for an extended objects, the number of nonzero eigenvalues is proportional to the number of resolution cell in the object is justified. The case of three-dimensional objects imaged by a two-dimensional array is also dealt with. Comparison with previous solutions is made, and an application to super-resolution of scatterers is presented.

  19. Real-time fluorogenic reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction assay for the specific detection of Bagaza virus.

    PubMed

    Buitrago, Dolores; Rocha, Ana; Tena-Tomás, Cristina; Vigo, Marta; Agüero, Montserrat; Jiménez-Clavero, Miguel Angel

    2012-09-01

    In September 2010, an outbreak of disease in 2 wild bird species (red-legged partridge, Alectoris rufa; ring-necked pheasant, Phasianus colchicus) occurred in southern Spain. Bagaza virus (BAGV) was identified as the etiological agent of the outbreak. BAGV had only been reported before in Western Africa (Central African Republic, Senegal) and in India. The first occurrence of BAGV in Spain stimulated a demand for rapid, reliable, and efficacious diagnostic methods to facilitate the surveillance of this disease in the field. This report describes a real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) method based on a commercial 5'-Taq nuclease-3' minor groove binder DNA probe and primers targeting the Bagaza NS5 gene. The method allowed the detection of BAGV with a high sensitivity, whereas other closely related flaviviruses (Usutu virus, West Nile virus, and Japanese encephalitis virus) were not detected. The assay was evaluated using field samples of red-legged partridges dead during the outbreak (n = 11), as well as samples collected from partridges during surveillance programs (n = 81). The results were compared to those obtained with a pan-flaviviral hemi-nested RT-PCR followed by nucleotide sequencing, which was employed originally to identify the virus involved in the outbreak. The results obtained with both techniques were 100% matching, indicating that the newly developed real-time RT-PCR is a valid technique for BAGV genome detection, useful in both diagnosis and surveillance studies.

  20. Improved peptide elution time prediction for reversed-phase liquid chromatography-MS by incorporating peptide sequence information

    SciTech Connect

    Petritis, Konstantinos; Kangas, Lars J.; Yan, Bo; Monroe, Matthew E.; Strittmatter, Eric F.; Qian, Weijun; Adkins, Joshua N.; Moore, Ronald J.; Xu, Ying; Lipton, Mary S.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.

    2006-07-15

    We describe an improved artificial neural network (ANN)-based method for predicting peptide retention times in reversed phase liquid chromatography. In addition to the peptide amino acid composition, this study investigated several other peptide descriptors to improve the predictive capability, such as peptide length, sequence, hydrophobicity and hydrophobic moment, and nearest neighbor amino acid, as well as peptide predicted structural configurations (i.e., helix, sheet, coil). An ANN architecture that consisted of 1052 input nodes, 24 hidden nodes, and 1 output node was used to fully consider the amino acid residue sequence in each peptide. The network was trained using {approx}345,000 non-redundant peptides identified from a total of 12,059 LC-MS/MS analyses of more than 20 different organisms, and the predictive capability of the model was tested using 1303 confidently identified peptides that were not included in the training set. The model demonstrated an average elution time precision of {approx}1.5% and was able to distinguish among isomeric peptides based upon the inclusion of peptide sequence information. The prediction power represents a significant improvement over our earlier report (Petritis et al., Anal. Chem. 2003, 75, 1039-1048) and other previously reported models.

  1. Optical focusing deep inside dynamic scattering media with near-infrared time-reversed ultrasonically encoded (TRUE) light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yan; Lai, Puxiang; Ma, Cheng; Xu, Xiao; Grabar, Alexander A.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2015-01-01

    Focusing light deep inside living tissue has not been achieved despite its promise to play a central role in biomedical imaging, optical manipulation and therapy. To address this challenge, internal-guide-star-based wavefront engineering techniques—for example, time-reversed ultrasonically encoded (TRUE) optical focusing—were developed. The speeds of these techniques, however, were limited to no greater than 1 Hz, preventing them from in vivo applications. Here we improve the speed of optical focusing deep inside scattering media by two orders of magnitude, and focus diffuse light inside a dynamic scattering medium having a speckle correlation time as short as 5.6 ms, typical of living tissue. By imaging a target, we demonstrate the first focusing of diffuse light inside a dynamic scattering medium containing living tissue. Since the achieved focusing speed approaches the tissue decorrelation rate, this work is an important step towards in vivo deep tissue noninvasive optical imaging, optogenetics and photodynamic therapy.

  2. Real-Time Reverse Transcription-PCR Assay for Detection of Mumps Virus RNA in Clinical Specimens▿

    PubMed Central

    Boddicker, Jennifer D.; Rota, Paul A.; Kreman, Trisha; Wangeman, Andrea; Lowe, Louis; Hummel, Kimberly B.; Thompson, Robert; Bellini, William J.; Pentella, Michael; DesJardin, Lucy E.

    2007-01-01

    The mumps virus is a negative-strand RNA virus in the family Paramyxoviridae. Mumps infection results in an acute illness with symptoms including fever, headache, and myalgia, followed by swelling of the salivary glands. Complications of mumps can include meningitis, deafness, pancreatitis, orchitis, and first-trimester abortion. Laboratory confirmation of mumps infection can be made by the detection of immunoglobulin M-specific antibodies to mumps virus in acute-phase serum samples, the isolation of mumps virus in cell culture, or by detection of the RNA of the mumps virus by reverse transcription (RT)-PCR. We developed and validated a multiplex real-time RT-PCR assay for rapid mumps diagnosis in a clinical setting. This assay used oligonucleotide primers and a TaqMan probe targeting the mumps SH gene, as well as primers and a probe that targeted the human RNase P gene to assess the presence of PCR inhibitors and as a measure of specimen quality. The test was specific, since it did not amplify a product from near-neighbor viruses, as well as sensitive and accurate. Real-time RT-PCR results showed 100% correlation with results from viral culture, the gold standard for mumps diagnostic testing. Assay efficiency was over 90% and displayed good precision after performing inter- and intraassay replicates. Thus, we have developed and validated a molecular method for rapidly diagnosing mumps infection that may be used to complement existing techniques. PMID:17652480

  3. Rapid and Real-Time Detection of Chikungunya Virus by Reverse Transcription Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification Assay▿

    PubMed Central

    Parida, M. M.; Santhosh, S. R.; Dash, P. K.; Tripathi, N. K.; Lakshmi, V.; Mamidi, N.; Shrivastva, A.; Gupta, N.; Saxena, P.; Babu, J. Pradeep; Rao, P. V. Lakshmana; Morita, Kouichi

    2007-01-01

    The standardization and validation of a one-step, single-tube, accelerated, quantitative reverse transcription (RT) loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP) assay targeting the E1 gene for the rapid and real-time detection of Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) are reported. A linear relationship between the amount of template and time of positivity value over a range of 2 × 108 to 2 × 102 copies was obtained. The feasibility of CHIKV RT-LAMP for clinical diagnosis was validated with patient serum samples from an ongoing epidemic in Southern India. Optimal assay conditions with zero background were established for the detection of low levels of CHIKV in acute-phase patient serum samples. The comparative evaluation of the RT-LAMP assay with acute-phase patient serum samples demonstrated exceptionally higher sensitivity by correctly identifying 21 additional positive borderline cases that were missed by conventional RT-PCR (P < 0.0001) with a detection limit of 20 copies. The quantification of virus load in patient serum samples was also determined from the standard curve based on their time of positivity and was found to be in the range of 2 × 108 to 2 × 101 copies. In addition, the field applicability of the RT-LAMP assay was also demonstrated by standardizing SYBR Green I-based RT-LAMP wherein the amplification was carried out in a water bath at 63°C for 60 min, which was followed by monitoring gene amplification with the naked eye through color changes. These findings demonstrated that the RT-LAMP assay is a valuable tool for rapid, real-time detection as well as quantification of CHIKV in acute-phase serum samples without requiring any sophisticated equipment and has potential usefulness for clinical diagnosis and surveillance of CHIKV in developing countries. PMID:17135444

  4. Time reversal optical tomography and decomposition methods for detection and localization of targets in highly scattering turbid media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Binlin

    New near-infrared (NIR) diffuse optical tomography (DOT) approaches were developed to detect, locate, and image small targets embedded in highly scattering turbid media. The first approach, referred to as time reversal optical tomography (TROT), is based on time reversal (TR) imaging and multiple signal classification (MUSIC). The second approach uses decomposition methods of non-negative matrix factorization (NMF) and principal component analysis (PCA) commonly used in blind source separation (BSS) problems, and compare the outcomes with that of optical imaging using independent component analysis (OPTICA). The goal is to develop a safe, affordable, noninvasive imaging modality for detection and characterization of breast tumors in early growth stages when those are more amenable to treatment. The efficacy of the approaches was tested using simulated data, and experiments involving model media and absorptive, scattering, and fluorescent targets, as well as, "realistic human breast model" composed of ex vivo breast tissues with embedded tumors. The experimental arrangements realized continuous wave (CW) multi-source probing of samples and multi-detector acquisition of diffusely transmitted signal in rectangular slab geometry. A data matrix was generated using the perturbation in the transmitted light intensity distribution due to the presence of absorptive or scattering targets. For fluorescent targets the data matrix was generated using the diffusely transmitted fluorescence signal distribution from the targets. The data matrix was analyzed using different approaches to detect and characterize the targets. The salient features of the approaches include ability to: (a) detect small targets; (b) provide three-dimensional location of the targets with high accuracy (~within a millimeter or 2); and (c) assess optical strength of the targets. The approaches are less computation intensive and consequently are faster than other inverse image reconstruction methods that

  5. Spontaneous time reversal symmetry breaking in atomically confined two-dimensional impurity bands in silicon and germanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Arindam

    Three-dimensional bulk-doped semiconductors, in particular phosphorus (P)-doped silicon (Si) and germanium (Ge), are among the best studied systems for many fundamental concepts in solid state physics, ranging from the Anderson metal-insulator transition to the many-body Coulomb interaction effects on quantum transport. Recent advances in material engineering have led to vertically confined doping of phosphorus (P) atoms inside bulk crystalline silicon and germanium, where the electron transport occurs through one or very few atomic layers, constituting a new and unique platform to investigate many of these phenomena at reduced dimensions. In this talk I shall present results of extensive quantum transport experiments in delta-doped silicon and germanium epilayers, over a wide range of doping density that allow independent tuning of the on-site Coulomb interaction and hopping energy scales. We find that low-frequency flicker noise, or the 1 / f noise, in the electrical conductance of these systems is exceptionally low, and in fact among the lowest when compared with other low-dimensional materials. This is attributed to the physical separation of the conduction electrons, embedded inside the crystalline semiconductor matrix, from the charged fluctuators at the surface. Most importantly, we find a remarkable suppression of weak localization effects, including the quantum correction to conductivity and universal conductance fluctuations, with decreasing doping density or, equivalently, increasing effective on-site Coulomb interaction. In-plane magneto-transport measurements indicate the presence of intrinsic local spin fluctuations at low doping although no signatures of long range magnetic order could be identified. We argue that these results indicate a spontaneous breakdown of time reversal symmetry, which is one of the most fundamental and robust symmetries of nonmagnetic quantum systems. While the microscopic origin of this spontaneous time reversal symmetry

  6. Eliminating the redundant source effects from the cross-correlation reverse-time migration using a modified stabilized division

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qiancheng; Zhang, Jianfeng; Zhang, Hao

    2016-07-01

    Cross-correlation reverse-time migration is the kernel of two-way wave-equation migration and inversion. However, it more or less tapers the spectrum of receiver data due to a redundant overlay of the source wavelet, whose amplitude spectrum is usually bandlimited and non-flat. To circumvent this issue, there are two optional strategies: whitening the source directly, or preconditioning the seismic traces by division with the amplitude spectrum of the source in the frequency domain. In this paper, we choose the latter one because the source signature is crucial to illumination compensation and seismic inversion. To avoid division by zero, a modified stabilized division algorithm based on the Taylor-expansion is developed. The modified division is easy to complete with computers and can be extend to any order. Moreover, when simulating 2-D source wavefield, the half-integral effect is also considered. We will demonstrate our proposed scheme using the Sigsbee2b synthetic data and a real field data.

  7. Shannon information capacity of time reversal wideband multiple-input multiple-output system based on correlated statistical channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yang; Bing-Zhong, Wang; Shuai, Ding

    2016-05-01

    Utilizing channel reciprocity, time reversal (TR) technique increases the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) at the receiver with very low transmitter complexity in complex multipath environment. Present research works about TR multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) communication all focus on the system implementation and network building. The aim of this work is to analyze the influence of antenna coupling on the capacity of wideband TR MIMO system, which is a realistic question in designing a practical communication system. It turns out that antenna coupling stabilizes the capacity in a small variation range with statistical wideband channel response. Meanwhile, antenna coupling only causes a slight detriment to the channel capacity in a wideband TR MIMO system. Comparatively, uncorrelated stochastic channels without coupling exhibit a wider range of random capacity distribution which greatly depends on the statistical channel. The conclusions drawn from information difference entropy theory provide a guideline for designing better high-performance wideband TR MIMO communication systems. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61331007, 61361166008, and 61401065) and the Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (Grant No. 20120185130001).

  8. Spatial discordance and phase reversals during alternate pacing in discrete-time kinematic and cardiomyocyte ionic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinberg, Seth H.

    2015-10-01

    Alternans, a beat-to-beat alternation in the cardiac action potential duration (APD), is a dynamical instability linked with the initiation of arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death, and arises via a period-doubling bifurcation when myocytes are stimulated at fast rates. In this study, we analyze the stability of a propagating electrical wave in a one-dimensional cardiac myocyte model in response to an arrhythmogenic rhythm known as alternate pacing. Using a discrete-time kinematic model and complex frequency (Z) domain analysis, we derive analytical expressions to predict phase reversals and spatial discordance in the interbeat interval (IBI) and APD, which, importantly, cannot be predicted with a model that neglects the influence of cell coupling on repolarization. We identify key dimensionless parameters that determine the transition from spatial concordance to discordance. Finally, we show that the theoretical predictions agree closely with numerical simulations of an ionic myocyte model, over a wide range of parameters, including variable IBI, altered ionic current gating, and reduced cell coupling. We demonstrate a novel approach to predict instability in cardiac tissue during alternate pacing and further illustrate how this approach can be generalized to more detail models of myocyte dynamics.

  9. Validation of a real-time reverse transcriptase-PCR assay for the detection of H7 avian influenza virus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pedersen, J.; Killian, M.L.; Hines, N.; Senne, D.; Panigrahy, B.; Ip, H.S.; Spackman, Erica

    2010-01-01

    This report describes the validation of an avian influenza virus (AIV) H7 subtype-specific real-time reverse transcriptasePCR (rRT-PCR) assay developed at the Southeast Poultry Research Laboratory (SEPRL) for the detection of H7 AI in North and South American wild aquatic birds and poultry. The validation was a collaborative effort by the SEPRL and the National Veterinary Services Laboratories. The 2008 H7 rRT-PCR assay detects 101 50% embryo infectious doses per reaction, or 103104 copies of transcribed H7 RNA. Diagnostic sensitivity and specificity were estimated to be 97.5% and 82.4%, respectively; the assay was shown to be specific for H7 AI when tested with >270 wild birds and poultry viruses. Following validation, the 2008 H7 rRT-PCR procedure was adopted as an official U.S. Department of Agriculture procedure for the detection of H7 AIV. The 2008 H7 assay replaced the previously used (2002) assay, which does not detect H7 viruses currently circulating in wild birds in North and South America. ?? 2010 American Association of Avian Pathologists.

  10. Time-reversal breaking and spin transport induced by magnetic impurities in a 2D topological insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derakhshan, V.; Ketabi, S. A.; Moghaddam, A. G.

    2016-09-01

    We employed the formalism of bond currents, expressed in terms of non-equilibrium Green’s function to obtain the local currents and transport features of zigzag silicene ribbon in the presence of magnetic impurity. When only intrinsic and Rashba spin-orbit interactions are present, silicene behaves as a two-dimensional topological insulator with gapless edge states. But in the presence of finite intrinsic spin-orbit interaction, the edge states start to penetrate into the bulk of the sample by increasing Rashba interaction strength. The exchange interaction induced by local impurities breaks the time-reversal symmetry of the gapless edge states and influences the topological properties strongly. Subsequently, the singularity of partial Berry curvature disappears and the silicene nanoribbon becomes a trivial insulator. On the other hand, when the concentration of the magnetic impurities is low, the edge currents are not affected significantly. In this case, when the exchange field lies in the x-y plane, the spin mixing around magnetic impurity is more profound rather than the case in which the exchange field is directed along the z-axis. Nevertheless, when the exchange field of magnetic impurities is placed in the x-y plane, a spin-polarized conductance is observed. The resulting conductance polarization can be tuned by the concentration of the impurities and even completely polarized spin transport is achievable.

  11. Survey of Bovine Enterovirus in Biological and Environmental Samples by a Highly Sensitive Real-Time Reverse Transcription-PCR

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Clavero, Miguel Angel; Escribano-Romero, Estela; Mansilla, Carmen; Gómez, Nuria; Córdoba, Laura; Roblas, Neftal; Ponz, Fernando; Ley, Victoria; Sáiz, Juan-Carlos

    2005-01-01

    Animal enteroviruses shed in the feces of infected animals are likely environmental contaminants and thus can be used as indicators of animal fecal pollution. Previous work has demonstrated that bovine enterovirus (BEV) present in bovine feces contaminates waters adjacent to cattle herds and that BEV-like sequences are also present in shellfish and in deer feces from the same geographical area. However, little information is available about the prevalence, molecular epidemiology, and genomic sequence variation of BEV field isolates. Here we describe an optimized highly sensitive real-time reverse transcription-PCR method to detect BEV RNA in biological and environmental samples. A combination of the amplification procedure with a previously described filtration step with electropositive filters allowed us to detect up to 12 BEV RNA molecules per ml of water. The feasibility of using the method to detect BEV in surface waters at a high risk of fecal pollution was confirmed after analysis of water samples obtained from different sources. The method was also used to study the prevalence of BEV in different cattle herds around Spain, and the results revealed that 78% (78 of 100) of the fecal samples were BEV positive. BEV-like sequences were also detected in feces from sheep, goats, and horses. Nucleotide sequence analyses showed that BEV isolates are quite heterogeneous and suggested the presence of species-specific BEV-like variants. Detection of BEV-like sequences may help in the differentiation and characterization of animal sources of contamination. PMID:16000759

  12. Observation of Quantum Spin Hall States in InAs/GaSb Bilayers under Broken Time-Reversal Symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Lingjie; Knez, Ivan; Sullivan, Gerard; Du, Rui-Rui

    2014-03-01

    Topological insulators (TIs) are a novel class of materials with nontrivial surface or edge states. Time-reversal symmetry (TRS) protected TIs are characterized by the Z2 topological invariant. The fate of the Z2 TIs under broken TRS is a fundamental question in understanding the physics of topological matter but remains largely unanswered. Here we show, a two-dimensional TI is realized in an inverted electron-hole bilayer engineered from InAs/GaSb semiconductors which retains robust helical liquid (HL) edge states under a strong magnetic field. Wide conductance plateaus of 2e2/h value are observed; they persist to 10T applied in-plane field before transitioning to a trivial semimetal. In a perpendicular field up to 35T, broken TRS leads to a spatial separation of the movers in Kramers pair and consequently the intra-pair backscattering phase space vanishes, i.e., the conductance increases from 2e2/h in strong fields manifesting chiral edge transport. We propose a phenomenological phases diagram, where inside the topological gap the HL transfers into a ``canned helical state'' driven by perpendicular fields. Our findings suggest that once established, the HL is remarkably resilient and only undergoes adiabatic deformation under TRS breaking. The work at Rice was supported by DOE, NSF, and Welch Foundation.

  13. Time-reversal breaking and spin transport induced by magnetic impurities in a 2D topological insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derakhshan, V.; Ketabi, S. A.; Moghaddam, A. G.

    2016-09-01

    We employed the formalism of bond currents, expressed in terms of non-equilibrium Green’s function to obtain the local currents and transport features of zigzag silicene ribbon in the presence of magnetic impurity. When only intrinsic and Rashba spin–orbit interactions are present, silicene behaves as a two-dimensional topological insulator with gapless edge states. But in the presence of finite intrinsic spin–orbit interaction, the edge states start to penetrate into the bulk of the sample by increasing Rashba interaction strength. The exchange interaction induced by local impurities breaks the time-reversal symmetry of the gapless edge states and influences the topological properties strongly. Subsequently, the singularity of partial Berry curvature disappears and the silicene nanoribbon becomes a trivial insulator. On the other hand, when the concentration of the magnetic impurities is low, the edge currents are not affected significantly. In this case, when the exchange field lies in the x–y plane, the spin mixing around magnetic impurity is more profound rather than the case in which the exchange field is directed along the z-axis. Nevertheless, when the exchange field of magnetic impurities is placed in the x–y plane, a spin-polarized conductance is observed. The resulting conductance polarization can be tuned by the concentration of the impurities and even completely polarized spin transport is achievable.

  14. Investigation of the effects of metal-wire resonators in sub-wavelength array based on time-reversal technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Hui-Lin; Xiao, Shao-Qiu

    2016-05-01

    The resonant metalens consisting of metal-wire resonators with equally finite length can break the diffraction barrier well suited for super-resolution imaging. In this study, a basic combination constructed by two metal-wire resonators with different lengths is proposed, and its resonant characteristics is analyzed using the method of moments (MoM). Based on the time reversal (TR) technique, this kind of combination can be applied to a sub-wavelength two-element antenna array with a 1/40-wavelength interval to make the elements work simultaneously with little interference in the frequency band of 1.0-1.5 GHz and 1.5-2.0 GHz, respectively. The simulations and experiments show that analysis of MoM and the application of the resonators can be used to design multi-frequency sub-wavelength antenna arrays efficiently. This general design method is convenient and can be used for many applications, such as weakening jamming effectiveness in communication systems, and sub-wavelength imaging in a broad frequency band.

  15. Selection of reference genes for reverse transcription quantitative real-time PCR normalization in black rockfish (Sebastes schlegeli).

    PubMed

    Liman, Ma; Wenji, Wang; Conghui, Liu; Haiyang, Yu; Zhigang, Wang; Xubo, Wang; Jie, Qi; Quanqi, Zhang

    2013-09-01

    Reverse transcription quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) is a technique widely used for quantification of mRNA transcription. Data normalization is an indispensable process for RT-qPCR and reference genes are most commonly used to normalize RT-qPCR and to reduce possible errors generated in the quantification of genes among several proposed methods. To date, RT-qPCR has been used in terms of gene expression studies in black rockfish (Sebastes schlegeli) but the majority of published RT-qPCR studies still lack proper validation of the reference genes. In the present study, mRNA transcription profiles of eight putative reference genes (18S rRNA, ACTB, GAPDH, TUBA, RPL17, EF1A, HPRT, and B2M) were examined using RT-qPCR in different tissues and larvae developmental stages of black rockfish. Three common statistical algorithms (geNorm, NormFinder, and BestKeeper) were used to assess expression stability and select the most stable genes for gene normalization. Two reference genes, RPL17 and EF1A showed high stability in black rockfish tissue analysis, while GAPDH was the least stable gene. During larvae developmental stages, EF1A, RPL17 and ACTB were identified as the optimal reference genes for data normalization, whereas B2M appeared unsuitable as the reference gene. In summary, our results could provide a useful guideline for reference gene selection and enable more accurate normalization of gene expression data in gene expression studies of black rockfish.

  16. Dual Combined Real-Time Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction Assay for the Diagnosis of Lyssavirus Infection.

    PubMed

    Dacheux, Laurent; Larrous, Florence; Lavenir, Rachel; Lepelletier, Anthony; Faouzi, Abdellah; Troupin, Cécile; Nourlil, Jalal; Buchy, Philippe; Bourhy, Herve

    2016-07-01

    The definitive diagnosis of lyssavirus infection (including rabies) in animals and humans is based on laboratory confirmation. The reference techniques for post-mortem rabies diagnosis are still based on direct immunofluorescence and virus isolation, but molecular techniques, such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based methods, are increasingly being used and now constitute the principal tools for diagnosing rabies in humans and for epidemiological analyses. However, it remains a key challenge to obtain relevant specificity and sensitivity with these techniques while ensuring that the genetic diversity of lyssaviruses does not compromise detection. We developed a dual combined real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (combo RT-qPCR) method for pan-lyssavirus detection. This method is based on two complementary technologies: a probe-based (TaqMan) RT-qPCR for detecting the RABV species (pan-RABV RT-qPCR) and a second reaction using an intercalating dye (SYBR Green) to detect other lyssavirus species (pan-lyssa RT-qPCR). The performance parameters of this combined assay were evaluated with a large panel of primary animal samples covering almost all the genetic variability encountered at the viral species level, and they extended to almost all lyssavirus species characterized to date. This method was also evaluated for the diagnosis of human rabies on 211 biological samples (positive n = 76 and negative n = 135) including saliva, skin and brain biopsies. It detected all 41 human cases of rabies tested and confirmed the sensitivity and the interest of skin biopsy (91.5%) and saliva (54%) samples for intra-vitam diagnosis of human rabies. Finally, this method was successfully implemented in two rabies reference laboratories in enzootic countries (Cambodia and Morocco). This combined RT-qPCR method constitutes a relevant, useful, validated tool for the diagnosis of rabies in both humans and animals, and represents a promising tool for lyssavirus

  17. Dual Combined Real-Time Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction Assay for the Diagnosis of Lyssavirus Infection.

    PubMed

    Dacheux, Laurent; Larrous, Florence; Lavenir, Rachel; Lepelletier, Anthony; Faouzi, Abdellah; Troupin, Cécile; Nourlil, Jalal; Buchy, Philippe; Bourhy, Herve

    2016-07-01

    The definitive diagnosis of lyssavirus infection (including rabies) in animals and humans is based on laboratory confirmation. The reference techniques for post-mortem rabies diagnosis are still based on direct immunofluorescence and virus isolation, but molecular techniques, such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based methods, are increasingly being used and now constitute the principal tools for diagnosing rabies in humans and for epidemiological analyses. However, it remains a key challenge to obtain relevant specificity and sensitivity with these techniques while ensuring that the genetic diversity of lyssaviruses does not compromise detection. We developed a dual combined real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (combo RT-qPCR) method for pan-lyssavirus detection. This method is based on two complementary technologies: a probe-based (TaqMan) RT-qPCR for detecting the RABV species (pan-RABV RT-qPCR) and a second reaction using an intercalating dye (SYBR Green) to detect other lyssavirus species (pan-lyssa RT-qPCR). The performance parameters of this combined assay were evaluated with a large panel of primary animal samples covering almost all the genetic variability encountered at the viral species level, and they extended to almost all lyssavirus species characterized to date. This method was also evaluated for the diagnosis of human rabies on 211 biological samples (positive n = 76 and negative n = 135) including saliva, skin and brain biopsies. It detected all 41 human cases of rabies tested and confirmed the sensitivity and the interest of skin biopsy (91.5%) and saliva (54%) samples for intra-vitam diagnosis of human rabies. Finally, this method was successfully implemented in two rabies reference laboratories in enzootic countries (Cambodia and Morocco). This combined RT-qPCR method constitutes a relevant, useful, validated tool for the diagnosis of rabies in both humans and animals, and represents a promising tool for lyssavirus

  18. Reference gene selection for quantitative real-time reverse-transcriptase PCR in orchardgrass subjected to various abiotic stresses.

    PubMed

    Huang, Linkai; Yan, Haidong; Jiang, Xiaomei; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Xinquan; Ji, Yang; Zeng, Bing; Xu, Bin; Yin, Guohua; Lee, Samantha; Yan, Yanhong; Ma, Xiao; Peng, Yan

    2014-12-15

    Quantitative real-time reverse-transcriptase PCR (qRT-PCR) is a powerful tool for the measurement of gene expression; however, the accuracy of this approach depends on the stability of reference genes. The objective of the present study was to identify the stable reference genes in orchardgrass (Dactylis glomerata L.), a principal cool-season forage grass in the world. Ten candidate reference genes were selected in this study including ATP-binding [ABC], actin [ACTIN], cyclophilin [CYP2], glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase [GAPDH], beta-amylase 4 [BAM4], zeitlupe [ZTL], MAP Kinase 4 [MPK4], ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme [UBC], S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase [SAMDC], and translationally controlled tumor protein [TCTP]. The candidate genes were assessed in orchardgrass leaves and roots under conditions of drought, high salinity, heat, waterlogging, and abscisic acid (ABA) treatments. We used GeNorm, BestKeeper, NormFinder, and RefFinder for qRT-PCR normalization and validation to determine that the expression of these reference genes was stress-dependent. ACTIN, CYP2, and ABC were found to be the most stably expressed genes for drought stress while ACTIN, TCTP, and ABC were the most stable under salt stress. ACTIN, CYP2, and ABC were all found to be good reference genes for studying heat stress. Likewise, CYP2, MPK4, and ABC were most suitable to study waterlogging, and ACTIN, CYP2, and MPK4 were determined as the three best reference genes for ABA studies. Our study identified and validated the possible reference genes in orchardgrass that may be used for quantification of target gene expression under various abiotic stresses.

  19. Dual Combined Real-Time Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction Assay for the Diagnosis of Lyssavirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lavenir, Rachel; Lepelletier, Anthony; Faouzi, Abdellah; Troupin, Cécile; Nourlil, Jalal; Buchy, Philippe; Bourhy, Herve

    2016-01-01

    The definitive diagnosis of lyssavirus infection (including rabies) in animals and humans is based on laboratory confirmation. The reference techniques for post-mortem rabies diagnosis are still based on direct immunofluorescence and virus isolation, but molecular techniques, such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based methods, are increasingly being used and now constitute the principal tools for diagnosing rabies in humans and for epidemiological analyses. However, it remains a key challenge to obtain relevant specificity and sensitivity with these techniques while ensuring that the genetic diversity of lyssaviruses does not compromise detection. We developed a dual combined real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (combo RT-qPCR) method for pan-lyssavirus detection. This method is based on two complementary technologies: a probe-based (TaqMan) RT-qPCR for detecting the RABV species (pan-RABV RT-qPCR) and a second reaction using an intercalating dye (SYBR Green) to detect other lyssavirus species (pan-lyssa RT-qPCR). The performance parameters of this combined assay were evaluated with a large panel of primary animal samples covering almost all the genetic variability encountered at the viral species level, and they extended to almost all lyssavirus species characterized to date. This method was also evaluated for the diagnosis of human rabies on 211 biological samples (positive n = 76 and negative n = 135) including saliva, skin and brain biopsies. It detected all 41 human cases of rabies tested and confirmed the sensitivity and the interest of skin biopsy (91.5%) and saliva (54%) samples for intra-vitam diagnosis of human rabies. Finally, this method was successfully implemented in two rabies reference laboratories in enzootic countries (Cambodia and Morocco). This combined RT-qPCR method constitutes a relevant, useful, validated tool for the diagnosis of rabies in both humans and animals, and represents a promising tool for lyssavirus

  20. Real-time reverse transcriptase PCR for the rapid and sensitive detection of Salmonella typhimurium from pork.

    PubMed

    Techathuvanan, Chayapa; Draughon, Frances Ann; D'Souza, Doris Helen

    2010-03-01

    Reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) detects the presence of mRNA and has a greater potential for detecting viable pathogens than do DNA-based PCR assays, with improved speed and sensitivity compared with traditional methods. Our objective was to rapidly and sensitively detect Salmonella Typhimurium from pork within two 8-h work shifts using a SYBR Green I real-time RT-PCR (rt-RT-PCR) assay. Pork chop and sausage samples (25 g) were inoculated with 10(8) to 10(0) CFU of Salmonella Typhimurium and stomached in 225 ml of tetrathionate broth. Serial dilutions were spread plated on xylose lysine Tergitol 4 agar either immediately or after 10 h of selective preenrichment or preenrichment followed by 12 h of selective enrichment (for stressed cells) at 37 degrees C for standard cultural enumeration. RNA was extracted using the TRIzol method. The rt-RT-PCR assay was carried out in a Bio-Rad iCycler using a SYBR Green I one-step RT-PCR kit and Salmonella specific invA gene primers with an internal amplification control (IAC). The PCR was followed by melting temperature (T(m)) analysis to determine specific Salmonella invA (T(m) = 87.5 degrees C) and IAC (T(m) = 82 degrees C) products. Improved Salmonella detection up to 10(1) CFU/25 g of pork and 10(0) CFU/25 g of sausages was obtained after 10 h of enrichment within approximately 24 h. Even without enrichment, Salmonella could be detected from both pork chop and sausage at 10(6) CFU/25 g within 1 day. This robust rt-RT-PCR detects and confirms Salmonella in pork within approximately 24 h and thus is significantly faster than traditional methods that take >/=1 week. This assay shows promise for routine testing and monitoring of Salmonella by the pork industry.

  1. Development, optimization, and validation of a Classical swine fever virus real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction assay.

    PubMed

    Eberling, August J; Bieker-Stefanelli, Jill; Reising, Monica M; Siev, David; Martin, Barbara M; McIntosh, Michael T; Beckham, Tammy R

    2011-09-01

    Classical swine fever (CSF) is an economically devastating disease of pigs. Instrumental to the control of CSF is a well-characterized assay that can deliver a rapid, accurate diagnosis prior to the onset of clinical signs. A real-time fluorogenic-probe hydrolysis (TaqMan) reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for CSF was developed by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) at the Plum Island Animal Disease Center (CSF PIADC assay) and evaluated for analytical and diagnostic sensitivity and specificity. A well-characterized panel including Classical swine fever virus (CSFV), Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), and Border disease virus (BDV) isolates was utilized in initial feasibility and optimization studies. The assay was initially designed and validated for use on the ABI 7900HT using the Qiagen QuantiTect® Probe RT-PCR chemistry. However, demonstrating equivalency with multiple one-step RT-PCR chemistries and PCR platforms increased the versatility of the assay. Limit of detection experiments indicated that the Qiagen QuantiTect® Multiplex (NoROX) and the Invitrogen SuperScript® III RT-PCR kits were consistently the most sensitive one-step chemistries for use with the CSF PIADC primer/probe set. Analytical sensitivity of the CSF PIADC assay ranged from <1-2.95 log(10) TCID(50)/ml on both the ABI 7900HT and ABI 7500 platforms. The CSF PIADC assay had 100% diagnostic sensitivity and specificity when tested on a panel of 152 clinical samples from the Dominican Republic and Colombia. The ability to perform this newly developed assay in 96-well formats provides an increased level of versatility for use in CSF surveillance programs.

  2. A new multichannel time reversal focusing method for circumferential Lamb waves and its applications for defect detection in thick-walled pipe with large-diameter.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zenghua; Xu, Qinglong; Gong, Yu; He, Cunfu; Wu, Bin

    2014-09-01

    This paper proposes a new multichannel time reversal focusing (MTRF) method for circumferential Lamb waves which is based on modified time reversal algorithm and applies this method for detecting different kinds of defects in thick-walled pipe with large-diameter. The principle of time reversal of circumferential Lamb waves in pipe is presented along with the influence from multiple guided wave modes and propagation paths. Experimental study is carried out in a thick-walled and large-diameter pipe with three artificial defects, namely two axial notches on its inner and outer surface respectively, and a corrosion-like defect on its outer surface. By using the proposed MTRF method, the multichannel signals focus at the defects, leading to the amplitude improvement of the defect scattered signal. Besides, another energy focus arises in the direct signal due to the partial compensation of dispersion and multimode of circumferential Lamb waves, alongside the multichannel focusing, during MTRF process. By taking the direct focus as a time base, accurate defect localization is implemented. Secondly, a new phenomenon is exhibited in this paper that defect scattered wave packet appears just before the right boundary of truncation window after time reversal, and to which two feasible explanations are given. Moreover, this phenomenon can be used as the theoretical basis in the determination of defect scattered waves in time reversal response signal. At last, in order to detect defects without prior knowing their exact position, a large-range truncation window is used in the proposed method. As a result, the experimental operation of MTRF method is simplified and defect detection and localization are well accomplished. PMID:24877582

  3. Strand-specific real-time RT-PCR quantitation of Maize fine streak virus genomic and positive-sense RNAs using high temperature reverse transcription

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Efforts to analyze the replicative RNA produced by Maize fine streak virus (MVSF) within maize tissue was complicated by the lack of specificity during cDNA generation using standard reverse transcriptase protocols. Real-time qRT-PCR using cDNA generated by priming with random hexamers does not dist...

  4. Development of duplex SYBR Green I-based real-time quantitative reverse-transcription PCR for detection and discrimination of grapevine viruses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A SYBR® Green-based real-time quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) assay in combination with melt curve analysis (MCA) was developed for the detection of nine grapevine viruses. The detection limits for singleplex qRT-PCR for all nine grapevine viruses were determined to be in the range ...

  5. Design and Assessment of a Real Time Reverse Transcription-PCR Method to Genotype Single-Stranded RNA Male-Specific Coliphages (Family Leviviridae).

    EPA Science Inventory

    A real-time, reverse transcription-PCR (RT-qPCR) assay was developed to differentiate the four genogroups of male-specific ssRNA coliphages (FRNA) (family Leviviridae). As FRNA display a trend of source-specificity (human sewage or animal waste) at the genogroup level, this assa...

  6. Time-reversal in geophysics: the key for imaging a seismic source, generating a virtual source or imaging with no source (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tourin, A.; Fink, M.

    2010-12-01

    The concept of time-reversal (TR) focusing was introduced in acoustics by Mathias Fink in the early nineties: a pulsed wave is sent from a source, propagates in an unknown media and is captured at a transducer array termed a “Time Reversal Mirror (TRM)”. Then the waveforms received at each transducer are flipped in time and sent back resulting in a wave converging at the original source regardless of the complexity of the propagation medium. TRMs have now been implemented in a variety of physical scenarios from GHz microwaves to MHz ultrasonics and to hundreds of Hz in ocean acoustics. Common to this broad range of scales is a remarkable robustness exemplified by observations that the more complex the medium (random or chaotic), the sharper the focus. A TRM acts as an antenna that uses complex environments to appear wider than it is, resulting for a broadband pulse, in a refocusing quality that does not depend on the TRM aperture. We show that the time-reversal concept is also at the heart of very active research fields in seismology and applied geophysics: imaging of seismic sources, passive imaging based on noise correlations, seismic interferometry, monitoring of CO2 storage using the virtual source method. All these methods can indeed be viewed in a unified framework as an application of the so-called time-reversal cavity approach. That approach uses the fact that a wave field can be predicted at any location inside a volume (without source) from the knowledge of both the field and its normal derivative on the surrounding surface S, which for acoustic scalar waves is mathematically expressed in the Helmholtz Kirchhoff (HK) integral. Thus in the first step of an ideal TR process, the field coming from a point-like source as well as its normal derivative should be measured on S. In a second step, the initial source is removed and monopole and dipole sources reemit the time reversal of the components measured in the first step. Instead of directly computing

  7. Vasectomy reversal.

    PubMed

    Belker, A M

    1987-02-01

    A vasovasostomy may be performed on an outpatient basis with local anesthesia, but also may be performed on an outpatient basis with epidural or general anesthesia. Local anesthesia is preferred by most of my patients, the majority of whom choose this technique. With proper preoperative and intraoperative sedation, patients sleep lightly through most of the procedure. Because of the length of time often required for bilateral microsurgical vasoepididymostomy, epidural or general anesthesia and overnight hospitalization are usually necessary. Factors influencing the preoperative choice for vasovasostomy or vasoepididymostomy in patients undergoing vasectomy reversal are considered. The preoperative planned choice of vasovasostomy or vasoepididymostomy for patients having vasectomy reversal described herein does not have the support of all urologists who regularly perform these procedures. My present approach has evolved as the data reported in Tables 1 and 2 have become available, but it may change as new information is evaluated. However, it offers a logical method for planning choices of anesthesia and inpatient or outpatient status for patients undergoing vasectomy reversal procedures. PMID:3811050

  8. Vasectomy reversal.

    PubMed

    Belker, A M

    1987-02-01

    A vasovasostomy may be performed on an outpatient basis with local anesthesia, but also may be performed on an outpatient basis with epidural or general anesthesia. Local anesthesia is preferred by most of my patients, the majority of whom choose this technique. With proper preoperative and intraoperative sedation, patients sleep lightly through most of the procedure. Because of the length of time often required for bilateral microsurgical vasoepididymostomy, epidural or general anesthesia and overnight hospitalization are usually necessary. Factors influencing the preoperative choice for vasovasostomy or vasoepididymostomy in patients undergoing vasectomy reversal are considered. The preoperative planned choice of vasovasostomy or vasoepididymostomy for patients having vasectomy reversal described herein does not have the support of all urologists who regularly perform these procedures. My present approach has evolved as the data reported in Tables 1 and 2 have become available, but it may change as new information is evaluated. However, it offers a logical method for planning choices of anesthesia and inpatient or outpatient status for patients undergoing vasectomy reversal procedures.

  9. On thermodynamic and microscopic reversibility

    SciTech Connect

    Crooks, Gavin E.

    2011-07-12

    The word 'reversible' has two (apparently) distinct applications in statistical thermodynamics. A thermodynamically reversible process indicates an experimental protocol for which the entropy change is zero, whereas the principle of microscopic reversibility asserts that the probability of any trajectory of a system through phase space equals that of the time reversed trajectory. However, these two terms are actually synonymous: a thermodynamically reversible process is microscopically reversible, and vice versa.

  10. Real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction for the rapid detection of Salmonella using invA primers.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Doris H; Critzer, Faith J; Golden, David A

    2009-11-01

    Recent outbreaks of Salmonella linked to fresh produce emphasize the need for rapid detection methods to help control the spread of disease. Reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) can detect the presence of mRNA (shorter half-life than DNA) with greater potential for detecting viable pathogens. The chromosomally located invA gene required for host invasion by Salmonella is widely used for detection of this pathogen by PCR. Detection of Salmonella was undertaken by real-time RT-PCR (rt-RT-PCR) using newly designed invA gene primers to develop a sensitive and specific assay. Salmonella serovars Typhimurium and Enteritidis were grown (7.68 log(10) CFU/mL) in Luria-Bertani broth overnight at 37 degrees C, and RNA was extracted, followed by rt-RT-PCR with and without SYBR green I and agarose gel electrophoresis. All experiments were replicated at least thrice. Detection for both serovars using traditional RT-PCR was lower ( approximately 10(5) CFU/mL) than rt-RT-PCR (10(3) CFU/mL) by gel electrophoresis. Melt curve analysis showed melt temperatures at 87.5 degrees C with Ct values from 12 to 15 for up to 10(3) CFU/mL and improved to 10(2) CFU/mL after further optimization. Further, addition of RNA internal amplification control constructed using in vitro transcription with a T7 RNA polymerase promoter, to the RT-PCR assay also gave detection limits of 10(2) CFU/mL. Cross-reactivity was not observed against a panel of 21 non-Salmonella bacteria. Heat-inactivated (autoclaved) Salmonella showed faint or no detection by rt-RT-PCR or gel electrophoresis. This method has potential to be applied for the detection of Salmonella serovars in fresh produce and the simultaneous detection of foodborne viral (RNA viruses) and bacterial pathogens in a multiplex format.

  11. Time-resolved observation of discrete and continuous magnetohydrodynamic dynamo in the reversed-field pinch edge

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, H.; Almagri, A.F.; Prager, S.C.; Sarff, J.S. )

    1994-08-01

    We report the first experimental verification of the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) dynamo in the reversed-field pinch (RFP). A burst of MHD dynamo electric field is observed during the sawtooth crash, followed by an increase in the local parallel current in the Madison Symmetric Totus RFP edge. By measuring each term, the parallel MHD mean-field Ohm's law is observed to hold within experimental error bars both between and during sawtooth crashes.

  12. Effects of Degree and Timing of Social Housing on Reversal Learning and Response to Novel Objects in Dairy Calves

    PubMed Central

    Meagher, Rebecca K.; Daros, Rolnei R.; Costa, João H. C.; von Keyserlingk, Marina A. G.; Hötzel, Maria J.; Weary, Daniel M.

    2015-01-01

    Rodents and primates deprived of early social contact exhibit deficits in learning and behavioural flexibility. They often also exhibit apparent signs of elevated anxiety, although the relationship between these effects has not been studied. To investigate whether dairy calves are similarly affected, we first compared calves housed in standard individual pens (n = 7) to those housed in a dynamic group with access to their mothers (n = 8). All calves learned to approach the correct stimulus in a visual discrimination task. Only one individually housed calf was able to re-learn the task when the stimuli were reversed, compared to all but one calf from the group. A second experiment investigated whether this effect might be explained by anxiety in individually housed animals interfering with their learning, and tested varying degrees of social contact in addition to the complex group: pair housing beginning early (approximately 6 days old) and late (6 weeks old). Again, fewer individually reared calves learned the reversal task (2 of 10 or 20%) compared to early paired and grouped calves (16 of 21 or 76% of calves). Late paired calves had intermediate success. Individually housed calves were slower to touch novel objects, but the magnitude of the fear response did not correlate with reversal performance. We conclude that individually housed calves have learning deficits, but these deficits were not likely associated with increased anxiety. PMID:26274583

  13. Sequential Polarity-Reversing Circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labaw, Clayton C.

    1994-01-01

    Proposed circuit reverses polarity of electric power supplied to bidirectional dc motor, reversible electro-mechanical actuator, or other device operating in direction depending on polarity. Circuit reverses polarity each time power turned on, without need for additional polarity-reversing or direction signals and circuitry to process them.

  14. Arbitrary shaped, liquid filled reverberators with non-resonant transducers for broadband focusing of ultrasound using Time Reversed Acoustics.

    PubMed

    Sarvazyan, A; Fillinger, L

    2009-03-01

    The ability to generate short focused ultrasonic pulses with duration on the order of one period of carrier frequency depends on the bandwidth of the transmitter as the pulse duration is inversely proportional to the bandwidth. Conventional focusing arrays used for focusing ultrasound have limited bandwidth due to the resonant nature of the piezoelements generating ultrasound. Theoretically it is possible to build a broadband phased array composed of "non-resonant" elements: wedge-shaped or flat-concave piezotransducers, though there are numerous technical difficulties in designing arrays with hundreds of elements of complex shape. This task is much easier to realize in an alternative technique of ultrasound focusing based on the principles of Time Reversed Acoustics (TRA) because in TRA systems, effective focusing can be achieved with just a few, or even one, transducers. The goal of this study is to demonstrate the possibility of broadband focusing of ultrasonic waves using a TRA system with non-resonant transducers and to explore the factors affecting the performance of such a system. A new type of TRA reverberators, such as water-filled thin-wall plastic vessels, which can be used with the submersible piezotransducers fixed internally in the reverberator, are proposed and tested. The experiments are conducted in a water tank with the walls and bottom covered by a sound absorbing lining. A needle hydrophone mounted on a 3D positioning system is used as a beacon for the TRA focusing and then for measuring the spatial distribution of the focused ultrasound field. The bandwidth and spatial distribution of the signal focused by the TRA system using a single channel with the resonant versus non-resonant transducers have been analyzed. Two types of non-resonant transducers were tested: a flat-concave transducer with a diameter of 30 mm, and a thickness varying from 2 mm in the center to 11 mm at the edge, and a specially designed submersible transducer having an

  15. Arbitrary shaped, liquid filled reverberators with non-resonant transducers for broadband focusing of ultrasound using Time Reversed Acoustics.

    PubMed

    Sarvazyan, A; Fillinger, L

    2009-03-01

    The ability to generate short focused ultrasonic pulses with duration on the order of one period of carrier frequency depends on the bandwidth of the transmitter as the pulse duration is inversely proportional to the bandwidth. Conventional focusing arrays used for focusing ultrasound have limited bandwidth due to the resonant nature of the piezoelements generating ultrasound. Theoretically it is possible to build a broadband phased array composed of "non-resonant" elements: wedge-shaped or flat-concave piezotransducers, though there are numerous technical difficulties in designing arrays with hundreds of elements of complex shape. This task is much easier to realize in an alternative technique of ultrasound focusing based on the principles of Time Reversed Acoustics (TRA) because in TRA systems, effective focusing can be achieved with just a few, or even one, transducers. The goal of this study is to demonstrate the possibility of broadband focusing of ultrasonic waves using a TRA system with non-resonant transducers and to explore the factors affecting the performance of such a system. A new type of TRA reverberators, such as water-filled thin-wall plastic vessels, which can be used with the submersible piezotransducers fixed internally in the reverberator, are proposed and tested. The experiments are conducted in a water tank with the walls and bottom covered by a sound absorbing lining. A needle hydrophone mounted on a 3D positioning system is used as a beacon for the TRA focusing and then for measuring the spatial distribution of the focused ultrasound field. The bandwidth and spatial distribution of the signal focused by the TRA system using a single channel with the resonant versus non-resonant transducers have been analyzed. Two types of non-resonant transducers were tested: a flat-concave transducer with a diameter of 30 mm, and a thickness varying from 2 mm in the center to 11 mm at the edge, and a specially designed submersible transducer having an

  16. Global real-time quantification/reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction for detecting proto-oncogenes associated with 14q32 chromosomal translocation in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Tajima, Emi; Uranishi, Miyuki; Iida, Shinsuke; Komatsu, Hirokazu; Nitta, Masakazu; Ueda, Ryuzo

    2005-04-01

    A global real-time quantitative/reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction technique for detecting the expression of six 14q32 chromosomal translocation-associated proto-oncogenes in marrow plasma cells was established and applied to myeloma specimens. This technique is an alternative method of detecting 14q32 rearrangements and allows investigation of the relationship between proto-oncogene expression and clinical features.

  17. Transient Orthogonality Catastrophe in a Time Dependent Nonequilibrium Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiro, Marco; Mitra, Aditi; 0 Team

    2015-03-01

    We study the response of a highly-excited time dependent quantum many-body state to a sudden local perturbation, a sort of orthogonality catastrophe problem in a transient non-equilibrium environment. To this extent we consider, as key quantity, the overlap between time dependent wave-functions, that we write in terms of a novel two-time correlator generalizing the standard Loschmidt Echo. We discuss its physical meaning, general properties, and its connection with experimentally measurable quantities probed through non-equilibrium Ramsey interferometry schemes. Then we present explicit calculations for a one dimensional interacting Fermi system brought out of equilibrium by a sudden change of the interaction, and perturbed by the switching on of a local static potential. We show that different scattering processes give rise to remarkably different behaviors at long times, quite opposite from the equilibrium situation. In particular, while the forward scattering contribution retains its power law structure even in the presence of a large non-equilibrium perturbation, with an exponent that is strongly affected by the transient nature of the bath, the backscattering term is a source of non-linearity which generates an exponential decay in time of the Loschmidt Echo, reminiscent of

  18. Transient Orthogonality Catastrophe in a Time-Dependent Nonequilibrium Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiró, Marco; Mitra, Aditi

    2014-06-01

    We study the response of a highly excited time-dependent quantum many-body state to a sudden local perturbation, a sort of orthogonality catastrophe problem in a transient nonequilibrium environment. To this extent we consider, as a key quantity, the overlap between time-dependent wave functions, which we write in terms of a novel two-time correlator generalizing the standard Loschmidt echo. We discuss its physical meaning, general properties, and its connection with experimentally measurable quantities probed through nonequilibrium Ramsey interferometry schemes. Then we present explicit calculations for a one-dimensional interacting Fermi system brought out of equilibrium by a sudden change of the interaction, and perturbed by the switching on of a local static potential. We show that different scattering processes give rise to remarkably different behaviors at long times, quite opposite from the equilibrium situation. In particular, while the forward scattering contribution retains its power-law structure even in the presence of a large nonequilibrium perturbation, with an exponent that is strongly affected by the transient nature of the bath, the backscattering term is a source of nonlinearity which generates an exponential decay in time of the Loschmidt Echo, reminiscent of an effective thermal behavior.

  19. Using a modified time-reverse imaging technique to locate low-frequency earthquakes on the San Andreas Fault near Cholame, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Horstmann, Tobias; Harrington, Rebecca M.; Cochran, Elizabeth S.

    2015-01-01

    We present a new method to locate low-frequency earthquakes (LFEs) within tectonic tremor episodes based on time-reverse imaging techniques. The modified time-reverse imaging technique presented here is the first method that locates individual LFEs within tremor episodes within 5 km uncertainty without relying on high-amplitude P-wave arrivals and that produces similar hypocentral locations to methods that locate events by stacking hundreds of LFEs without having to assume event co-location. In contrast to classic time-reverse imaging algorithms, we implement a modification to the method that searches for phase coherence over a short time period rather than identifying the maximum amplitude of a superpositioned wavefield. The method is independent of amplitude and can help constrain event origin time. The method uses individual LFE origin times, but does not rely on a priori information on LFE templates and families.We apply the method to locate 34 individual LFEs within tremor episodes that occur between 2010 and 2011 on the San Andreas Fault, near Cholame, California. Individual LFE location accuracies range from 2.6 to 5 km horizontally and 4.8 km vertically. Other methods that have been able to locate individual LFEs with accuracy of less than 5 km have mainly used large-amplitude events where a P-phase arrival can be identified. The method described here has the potential to locate a larger number of individual low-amplitude events with only the S-phase arrival. Location accuracy is controlled by the velocity model resolution and the wavelength of the dominant energy of the signal. Location results are also dependent on the number of stations used and are negligibly correlated with other factors such as the maximum gap in azimuthal coverage, source–station distance and signal-to-noise ratio.

  20. Optimization of the elution buffer and concentration method for detecting hepatitis E virus in swine liver using a nested reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Son, Na Ry; Seo, Dong Joo; Lee, Min Hwa; Seo, Sheungwoo; Wang, Xiaoyu; Lee, Bog-Hieu; Lee, Jeong-Su; Joo, In-Sun; Hwang, In-Gyun; Choi, Changsun

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to develop an optimal technique for detecting hepatitis E virus (HEV) in swine livers. Here, three elution buffers and two concentration methods were compared with respect to enhancing recovery of HEV from swine liver samples. Real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and nested RT-PCR were performed to detect HEV RNA. When phosphate-buffered saline (PBS, pH 7.4) was used to concentrate HEV in swine liver samples using ultrafiltration, real-time RT-PCR detected HEV in 6 of the 26 samples. When threonine buffer was used to concentrate HEV using polyethylene glycol (PEG) precipitation and ultrafiltration, real-time RT-PCR detected HEV in 1 and 3 of the 26 samples, respectively. When glycine buffer was used to concentrate HEV using ultrafiltration and PEG precipitation, real-time RT-PCR detected HEV in 1 and 3 samples of the 26 samples, respectively. When nested RT-PCR was used to detect HEV, all samples tested negative regardless of the type of elution buffer or concentration method used. Therefore, the combination of real-time RT-PCR and ultrafiltration with PBS buffer was the most sensitive and reliable method for detecting HEV in swine livers.