Science.gov

Sample records for low-background gamma spectroscopy

  1. Applications of the low-background gamma spectroscopy to the geographical origin of marine salts and prunes

    SciTech Connect

    Perrot, F.

    2007-03-28

    The low background gamma spectroscopy has been applied to try to sign the geographical origin of the French atlantic marine salts and of the prunes from Agen. Most of the activity measurements have been done using low background Ge spectrometers located in Bordeaux. Results have shown that a clear signature exists in the case of the French atlantic salts using the 40K, 137Cs and 226Ra isotopes but not in the case of the prunes.

  2. The Dortmund Low Background Facility - Low-background gamma ray spectrometry with an artificial overburden.

    PubMed

    Gastrich, Holger; Gößling, Claus; Klingenberg, Reiner; Kröninger, Kevin; Neddermann, Till; Nitsch, Christian; Quante, Thomas; Zuber, Kai

    2016-06-01

    The Dortmund Low Background Facility is an instrument for low-level gamma ray spectrometry with an artificial overburden of ten meters of water equivalent, an inner shielding, featuring a neutron absorber, and an active muon veto. An integral background count rate between 40keV and 2700keV of (2.528±0.004)counts/(kgmin) enables low-background gamma ray spectrometry with sensitivities in the range of some 10mBq/kg within a week of measurement time. PMID:27082973

  3. Low Background Gamma-Ray Spectrometry in the 'Laboratoire Souterrain de Modane'

    SciTech Connect

    Hubert, Ph.; Hubert, F.

    2007-03-28

    Most of the underground experiments in physics and many studies in geology, biology or environmental sciences face a common requirement with the necessity of using experimental devices with ultra-low background radioactivity. Many developments involving many different techniques have been used in order to be able to measure extremely low levels of radioactivity in materials. This report will focus on low background gamma-ray spectrometry and will describe the work which has been carried out over the last fifteen years in the 'Laboratoire Souterrain de Modane' (LSM)

  4. Berkeley Low Background Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, K. J.; Norman, E. B.; Smith, A. R.; Poon, A. W. P.; Chan, Y. D.; Lesko, K. T.

    2015-08-17

    The Berkeley Low Background Facility (BLBF) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) in Berkeley, California provides low background gamma spectroscopy services to a wide array of experiments and projects. The analysis of samples takes place within two unique facilities; locally within a carefully-constructed, low background laboratory on the surface at LBNL and at the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, SD. These facilities provide a variety of gamma spectroscopy services to low background experiments primarily in the form of passive material screening for primordial radioisotopes (U, Th, K) or common cosmogenic/anthropogenic products; active screening via neutron activation analysis for U,Th, and K as well as a variety of stable isotopes; and neutron flux/beam characterization measurements through the use of monitors. A general overview of the facilities, services, and sensitivities will be presented. Recent activities and upgrades will also be described including an overview of the recently installed counting system at SURF (recently relocated from Oroville, CA in 2014), the installation of a second underground counting station at SURF in 2015, and future plans. The BLBF is open to any users for counting services or collaboration on a wide variety of experiments and projects.

  5. Low background counting at the LBNL low background facility

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, K. J.; Norman, E. B.; Smith, A. R.; Chan, Y. D.; Hurley, D. L.; Wang, B. S.

    2013-08-08

    The Low Background Facility (LBF) at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) in Berkeley, California provides low background gamma spectroscopy services to end-users in two unique facilities: locally within a carefully-constructed, low background laboratory space; and a satellite underground station (600 m.w.e) in Oroville, CA. These facilities provide a variety of gamma spectroscopy services to low background experiments primarily in the form of passive material screening for primordial radioisotopes (U, Th, K) or common cosmogenic and anthropogenic products, as well as active screening via neutron activation analysis for specific applications. A general overview of the facilities, services, and capabilities will be discussed. Recent activities will also be presented, including the recent installation of a 3π muon veto at the surface facility, cosmogenic activation studies of TeO{sub 2} for CUORE, and environmental monitoring of Fukushima fallout.

  6. The characteristics of a low background germanium gamma ray spectrometer at China JinPing Underground Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Zhi; Mi, Yuhao; Ma, Hao; Cheng, Jianping; Su, Jian; Yue, Qian

    2014-09-01

    A low background germanium gamma ray spectrometer, GeTHU, has been installed at China JinPing Underground Laboratory (CJPL). The integral background count rate of the spectrometer was 0.629 cpm between 40 and 2700 keV, the origins of which were studied by Monte Carlo simulation. Detection limits and efficiencies were calculated for selected gamma peaks. Some samples of rare event experiments were measured and (137)Cs contamination was found in boric acid. GeTHU will be mainly used to measure environmental samples and screen materials in dark matter and double beta decay experiments. PMID:24950199

  7. Low Background Counting at LBNL

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Smith, A. R.; Thomas, K. J.; Norman, E. B.; Chan, Y. D.; Lesko, K. T.; Hurley, D. L.

    2015-03-24

    The Low Background Facility (LBF) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in Berkeley, California provides low background gamma spectroscopy services to a wide array of experiments and projects. The analysis of samples takes place within two unique facilities; locally within a carefully-constructed, low background cave and remotely at an underground location that historically has operated underground in Oroville, CA, but has recently been relocated to the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, SD. These facilities provide a variety of gamma spectroscopy services to low background experiments primarily in the form of passive material screening for primordial radioisotopes (U, Th, K)more » or common cosmogenic/anthropogenic products, as well as active screening via Neutron Activation Analysis for specific applications. The LBF also provides hosting services for general R&D testing in low background environments on the surface or underground for background testing of detector systems or similar prototyping. A general overview of the facilities, services, and sensitivities is presented. Recent activities and upgrades will also be presented, such as the completion of a 3π anticoincidence shield at the surface station and environmental monitoring of Fukushima fallout. The LBF is open to any users for counting services or collaboration on a wide variety of experiments and projects.« less

  8. Low Background Counting at LBNL

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, A. R.; Thomas, K. J.; Norman, E. B.; Chan, Y. D.; Lesko, K. T.; Hurley, D. L.

    2015-03-24

    The Low Background Facility (LBF) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in Berkeley, California provides low background gamma spectroscopy services to a wide array of experiments and projects. The analysis of samples takes place within two unique facilities; locally within a carefully-constructed, low background cave and remotely at an underground location that historically has operated underground in Oroville, CA, but has recently been relocated to the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, SD. These facilities provide a variety of gamma spectroscopy services to low background experiments primarily in the form of passive material screening for primordial radioisotopes (U, Th, K) or common cosmogenic/anthropogenic products, as well as active screening via Neutron Activation Analysis for specific applications. The LBF also provides hosting services for general R&D testing in low background environments on the surface or underground for background testing of detector systems or similar prototyping. A general overview of the facilities, services, and sensitivities is presented. Recent activities and upgrades will also be presented, such as the completion of a 3π anticoincidence shield at the surface station and environmental monitoring of Fukushima fallout. The LBF is open to any users for counting services or collaboration on a wide variety of experiments and projects.

  9. Two-photon fluorescence correlation spectroscopy with high count rates and low background using dielectric microspheres

    PubMed Central

    Aouani, Heykel; Schön, Peter; Brasselet, Sophie; Rigneault, Hervé; Wenger, Jérôme

    2010-01-01

    Two-photon excitation fluorescence is a powerful technique commonly used for biological imaging. However, the low absorption cross section of this non-linear process is a critical issue for performing biomolecular spectroscopy at the single molecule level. Enhancing the two-photon fluorescence signal would greatly improve the effectiveness of this technique, yet current methods struggle with medium enhancement factors and/or high background noise. Here, we show that the two-photon fluorescence signal from single Alexa Fluor 488 molecules can be enhanced up to 10 times by using a 3 µm diameter latex sphere while adding almost no photoluminescence background. We report a full characterization of the two-photon fluorescence enhancement by a single microsphere using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. This opens new routes to enhance non-linear optical signals and extend biophotonic applications. PMID:21258531

  10. Low-Background In-Trap Decay Spectroscopy with TITAN at TRIUMF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leach, K. G.; Lennarz, A.; Grossheim, A.; Klawitter, R.; Brunner, T.; Chaudhuri, A.; Chowdhury, U.; Crespo López-Urrutia, J. R.; Gallant, A. T.; Kwiatkowski, A. A.; Macdonald, T. D.; Schultz, B. E.; Seeraji, S.; Andreoiu, C.; Frekers, D.; Dilling, J.

    An in-trap decay spectroscopy setup has been developed and constructed for use with the TITAN facility at TRIUMF. The goal of this device is to observe weak electron-capture (EC) branching ratios for the odd-odd intermediate nuclei in the ββ decay process. This apparatus consists of an up-to 6 Tesla, open-access spectroscopy ion-trap, surrounded radially by up to 7 planar Si(Li) detectors which are separated from the trap by thin Be windows. This configuration provides a significant increase in sensitivity for the detection of low-energy photons by providing backing-free ion storage and eliminating charged-particle-induced backgrounds. An intense electron beam is also employed to increase the charge-states of the trapped ions, thus providing storage times on the order of minutes, allowing for decay-spectroscopy measurements. The technique of multiple ion-bunch stacking was also recently demonstrated, which further extends the measurement possibilities of this apparatus. The current status of the facility and initial results from a 116In measurement are presented.

  11. Low background screening capability in the UK

    SciTech Connect

    Ghag, Chamkaur

    2015-08-17

    Low background rare event searches in underground laboratories seeking observation of direct dark matter interactions or neutrino-less double beta decay have the potential to profoundly advance our understanding of the physical universe. Successful results from these experiments depend critically on construction from extremely radiologically clean materials and accurate knowledge of subsequent low levels of expected background. The experiments must conduct comprehensive screening campaigns to reduce radioactivity from detector components, and these measurements also inform detailed characterisation and quantification of background sources and their impact, necessary to assign statistical significance to any potential discovery. To provide requisite sensitivity for material screening and characterisation in the UK to support our rare event search activities, we have re-developed our infrastructure to add ultra-low background capability across a range of complementary techniques that collectively allow complete radioactivity measurements. Ultra-low background HPGe and BEGe detectors have been installed at the Boulby Underground Laboratory, itself undergoing substantial facility re-furbishment, to provide high sensitivity gamma spectroscopy in particular for measuring the uranium and thorium decay series products. Dedicated low-activity mass spectrometry instrumentation has been developed at UCL for part per trillion level contaminant identification to complement underground screening with direct U and Th measurements, and meet throughput demands. Finally, radon emanation screening at UCL measures radon background inaccessible to gamma or mass spectrometry techniques. With this new capability the UK is delivering half of the radioactivity screening for the LZ dark matter search experiment.

  12. Low background screening capability in the UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghag, Chamkaur

    2015-08-01

    Low background rare event searches in underground laboratories seeking observation of direct dark matter interactions or neutrino-less double beta decay have the potential to profoundly advance our understanding of the physical universe. Successful results from these experiments depend critically on construction from extremely radiologically clean materials and accurate knowledge of subsequent low levels of expected background. The experiments must conduct comprehensive screening campaigns to reduce radioactivity from detector components, and these measurements also inform detailed characterisation and quantification of background sources and their impact, necessary to assign statistical significance to any potential discovery. To provide requisite sensitivity for material screening and characterisation in the UK to support our rare event search activities, we have re-developed our infrastructure to add ultra-low background capability across a range of complementary techniques that collectively allow complete radioactivity measurements. Ultra-low background HPGe and BEGe detectors have been installed at the Boulby Underground Laboratory, itself undergoing substantial facility re-furbishment, to provide high sensitivity gamma spectroscopy in particular for measuring the uranium and thorium decay series products. Dedicated low-activity mass spectrometry instrumentation has been developed at UCL for part per trillion level contaminant identification to complement underground screening with direct U and Th measurements, and meet throughput demands. Finally, radon emanation screening at UCL measures radon background inaccessible to gamma or mass spectrometry techniques. With this new capability the UK is delivering half of the radioactivity screening for the LZ dark matter search experiment.

  13. Simultaneous beta and gamma spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Farsoni, Abdollah T.; Hamby, David M.

    2010-03-23

    A phoswich radiation detector for simultaneous spectroscopy of beta rays and gamma rays includes three scintillators with different decay time characteristics. Two of the three scintillators are used for beta detection and the third scintillator is used for gamma detection. A pulse induced by an interaction of radiation with the detector is digitally analyzed to classify the type of event as beta, gamma, or unknown. A pulse is classified as a beta event if the pulse originated from just the first scintillator alone or from just the first and the second scintillator. A pulse from just the third scintillator is recorded as gamma event. Other pulses are rejected as unknown events.

  14. Concentrations and their ratio of (222)Rn decay products in rainwater measured by gamma-ray spectrometry using a low-background Ge detector.

    PubMed

    Takeyasu, Masanori; Iida, Takao; Tsujimoto, Tadashi; Yamasaki, Keizo; Ogawa, Yoshihiro

    2006-01-01

    The concentrations and the concentration ratios of individual short-lived (222)Rn decay products ((214)Pb and (214)Bi) in rainwater were measured at Kumatori village (34.39 degrees N, 135.35 degrees E, approximately 70 m above sea level) in Osaka, Japan, by gamma-ray spectrometry using a low-background Ge detector. The dependence of the time variations of the concentrations and their ratios on rainfall rate was investigated. It was observed that the concentrations were negatively correlated with the rainfall rate in some rainfall events, and that there was no clear correlation in other rainfall events. The changes in the dependence of the concentration on the rainfall rate occurred after the passage of a cold front during a single rainfall event. The concentration ratios showed a weak negative correlation with the rainfall rate for most of the observed rainfall events. A scavenging model was designed in this study in order to explain the observation results. Based on the relationship between the concentrations of (214)Pb and (214)Bi in the rainwater and the rainfall rate for an individual rainfall event, the increase in the environmental gamma-ray dose rate from (214)Pb and (214)Bi deposited on the ground was calculated, and the calculated increase agreed well with that observed by the in situ measurement on flat ground. PMID:16530896

  15. Gamma ray spectroscopy in astrophysics. [conferences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cline, T. L. (Editor); Ramaty, R. (Editor)

    1978-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical aspects of gamma ray spectroscopy in high energy astrophysics are discussed. Line spectra from solar, stellar, planetary, and cosmic gamma rays are examined as well as HEAO investigations, the prospects of a gamma ray observatory, and follow-on X-ray experiments in space.

  16. Gamma spectroscopy of environmental samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegel, P. B.

    2013-05-01

    We describe experiments for the undergraduate laboratory that use a high-resolution gamma detector to measure radiation in environmental samples. The experiments are designed to instruct the students in the quantitative analysis of gamma spectra and secular equilibrium. Experiments include the radioactive dating of Brazil nuts, determining radioisotope concentrations in natural samples, and measurement of the 235U abundance in uranium rich rocks.

  17. Soudan Low Background Counting Facility (SOLO)

    SciTech Connect

    Attisha, Michael; Viveiros, Luiz de; Gaitksell, Richard; Thompson, John-Paul

    2005-09-08

    The Soudan Low Background Counting Facility (SOLO) has been in operation at the Soudan Mine, MN since March 2003. In the past two years, we have gamma-screened samples for the Majorana, CDMS and XENON experiments. With individual sample exposure times of up to two weeks we have measured sample contamination down to the 0.1 ppb level for 238U / 232Th, and down to the 0.25 ppm level for 40K.

  18. Low background techniques in XMASS

    SciTech Connect

    Takeda, Atsushi

    2011-04-27

    The XMASS project aims to detect pp and {sup 7}Be solar neutrinos, neutrino-less double beta decay, and dark matter searches using ultra-pure liquid xenon. The first stage of XMASS project is concentrated on dark matter searches using 800 kg liquid xenon detector which requires low background and low threshold. Several techniques applied to XMASS detector for low background will be presented.

  19. Nuclear Forensics using Gamma-ray Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norman, E. B.

    2016-09-01

    Much of George Dracoulis's research career was devoted to utilising gamma-ray spectroscopy in fundamental studies in nuclear physics. This same technology is useful in a wide range of applications in the area of nuclear forensics. Over the last several years, our research group has made use of both high- and low-resolution gamma-ray spectrometers to: identify the first sample of plutonium large enough to be weighed; determine the yield of the Trinity nuclear explosion; measure fission fragment yields as a function of target nucleus and neutron energy; and observe fallout in the U. S. from the Fukushima nuclear reactor accident.

  20. Low Background Micromegas in CAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garza, J. G.; Aune, S.; Aznar, F.; Calvet, D.; Castel, J. F.; Christensen, F. E.; Dafni, T.; Davenport, M.; Decker, T.; Ferrer-Ribas, E.; Galán, J.; García, J. A.; Giomataris, I.; Hill, R. M.; Iguaz, F. J.; Irastorza, I. G.; Jakobsen, A. C.; Jourde, D.; Mirallas, H.; Ortega, I.; Papaevangelou, T.; Pivovaroff, M. J.; Ruz, J.; Tomás, A.; Vafeiadis, T.; Vogel, J. K.

    2015-11-01

    Solar axions could be converted into x-rays inside the strong magnetic field of an axion helioscope, triggering the detection of this elusive particle. Low background x-ray detectors are an essential component for the sensitivity of these searches. We report on the latest developments of the Micromegas detectors for the CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST), including technological pathfinder activities for the future International Axion Observatory (IAXO). The use of low background techniques and the application of discrimination algorithms based on the high granularity of the readout have led to background levels below 10-6 counts/keV/cm2/s, more than a factor 100 lower than the first generation of Micromegas detectors. The best levels achieved at the Canfranc Underground Laboratory (LSC) are as low as 10-7 counts/keV/cm2/s, showing good prospects for the application of this technology in IAXO. The current background model, based on underground and surface measurements, is presented, as well as the strategies to further reduce the background level. Finally, we will describe the R&D paths to achieve sub-keV energy thresholds, which could broaden the physics case of axion helioscopes.

  1. Low Background Counting At SNOLAB

    SciTech Connect

    Lawson, Ian; Cleveland, Bruce

    2011-04-27

    It is a continuous and ongoing effort to maintain radioactivity in materials and in the environment surrounding most underground experiments at very low levels. These low levels are required so that experiments can achieve the required detection sensitivities for the detection of low-energy neutrinos, searches for dark matter and neutrinoless double-beta decay. SNOLAB has several facilities which are used to determine these low background levels in the materials and the underground environment. This proceedings will describe the SNOLAB High Purity Germanium Detector which has been in continuous use for the past five years and give results of many of the items that have been counted over that period. Brief descriptions of SNOLAB's alpha-beta and electrostatic counters will be given, and the radon levels at SNOLAB will be discussed.

  2. Low-Background Counting at Homestake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Iseley

    2009-10-01

    Background characterization at Homestake is an ongoing project crucial to the experiments located there. From neutrino physics to WIMP detection, low-background materials and their screening require highly sensitive detectors. Naturally, shielding is needed to lower ``noise'' in these detectors. Because of its vast depth, Homestake will be effective in shielding against cosmic-ray radiation. This means little, however, if radiation from materials used still interferes. Specifically, our group is working on designing the first low-background counting facility at the Homestake mine. Using a high-purity germanium crystal detector from ORTEC, measurements will be taken within a shield that is made to specifically account for radiation underground and fits the detector. Currently, in the design, there is a layer of copper surrounded by an intricate stainless steel casing, which will be manufactured air tight to accommodate for nitrogen purging. Lead will surround the stainless steel shell to further absorb gamma rays. A mobile lift system has been designed for easy access to the detector. In the future, this project will include multiple testing stations located in the famous Davis Cavern where future experiments will have the ability to use the site as an efficient and accurate counting facility for their needs (such as measuring radioactive isotopes in materials). Overall, this detector (and its shield system) is the beginning of a central testing facility that will serve Homestake's scientific community.

  3. Low background aspects of GERDA

    SciTech Connect

    Simgen, Hardy

    2011-04-27

    The GERDA experiment operates bare Germanium diodes enriched in {sup 76}Ge in an environment of pure liquid argon to search for neutrinoless double beta decay. A very low radioactive background is essential for the success of the experiment. We present here the research done in order to remove radio-impurities coming from the liquid argon, the stainless steel cryostat and the front-end electronics. We found that liquid argon can be purified efficiently from {sup 222}Rn. The main source of {sup 222}Rn in GERDA is the cryostat which emanates about 55 mBq. A thin copper shroud in the center of the cryostat was implemented to prevent radon from approaching the diodes. Gamma ray screening of radio-pure components for front-end electronics resulted in the development of a pre-amplifier with a total activity of less than 1 mBq {sup 228}Th.

  4. Validating the Melusine Gamma Spectroscopy Tool

    SciTech Connect

    Erikson, Luke E.; Keillor, Martin E.; Stavenger, Timothy J.

    2013-11-26

    This technical report describes testing to evaluate the gamma spectroscopy tool, Melusine, under development by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The goal was to verify that the software can successfully be used to provide accurate results and statistical uncertainties for the detection of isotopes of interest and their activities. Of special interest were spectra similar to those produced by radionuclide stations that contribute to the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty Organization’s International Monitoring System. Two data sets were used to test Melusine’s capabilities. The first was the result of a multi-lab calibration effort based on neutron activations produced at the University of California at Davis. The second was taken from the Proficiency Test Exercises conducted by the CTBTO directly in 2005. In 37 of 42 cases, Melusine produced results in agreement with the best answer presently available, in most cases with calculated uncertainties comparable to or better than competing analyses. In fact, Melusine technically provided one more result than CTBTO’s PTE analyses that agreed with the “book answer” (Monte Carlo simulation). Despite these promising results, the Melusine software is still under development. Effort is especially needed to simplify its analysis process, improve stability, and provide user documentation. Some significant analysis tasks require further vetting, such as those to address summing effects. However, our test results indicate that Melusine’s calculations as presently implemented are sound and can be used to reliably analyze spectra from the CTBTO’s radionuclide stations.

  5. Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy of Nearby OB Associations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaaret, Philip

    1997-01-01

    This final report is a summary of the study on gamma ray spectroscopy of nearby OB associations. The goal of this work is to investigate the gamma ray line emission detected with the Compton Telescope (COMPTEL) from the Orion star forming region. This is accomplished by searching for similar emission from other nearby OB associations.

  6. Low background physics at the Kimballton Mine

    SciTech Connect

    MacMullin, S.

    2011-04-27

    The Kimballton Underground Research Facility (KURF) is home to several experiments. One consists to two HPGe detectors designed to screen candidate materials to be used in low-background experiments for radioactivity. Analysis techniques, including our efficiency calculations will be presented. We have also deployed a customized BEGe (Broad Energy Germanium) detector in a low-background cryostat. This paper will focus on the shield design, detector characteristics and measurements that can be performed with such a detector in a low-background environment.

  7. Low-background direct readout array performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goebel, J. H.; Mckelvey, M. E.; Mccreight, C. R.; Anderson, G. M.

    1986-01-01

    The development and evaluation of an integrated array of antimony-doped silicon detectors is described. The spectral range of extrinsic silicon-integrated arrays useful for low-background IR astronomical applications is extended to about 31 microns with this development. The 58 x 62-element array is accessed by a direct readout multiplexer. The device is evaluated with a flexible microcomputer-based drive and readout electronics system in a low-background test dewar. Acceptance testing indicates single-pixel NEPs in the mid-10 to the -18th W/sq rt Hz range, and good global uniformity statistics.

  8. Nucleosynthesis and astrophysical gamma ray spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, Allan S.

    1987-01-01

    The HEAO-3 gamma ray spectrometer has provided evidence in the quest for the understanding of complex element formation in the universe with the discovery of Al-26 in the interstellar medium. It has demonstrated that the synthesis of intermediate mass nuclei is currently going on in the galaxy. This discovery was confirmed by the Solar Maximum Mission. The flux is peaked near the galactic center and indicates about 3 solar masses of Al-26 in the interstellar medium, with an implied ratio of Al-26/Al-27 = .00001. Several possible distributions were studied but the data gathered thus far do not allow discrimination between them. It is felt that only the spaceflight of a high resolution gamma ray spectrometer with adequate sensitivity will ultimately resolve the issue of the source of this material.

  9. Low background counting techniques at SNOLAB

    SciTech Connect

    Lawson, Ian; Cleveland, Bruce

    2013-08-08

    Many of the experiments currently searching for dark matter, studying properties of neutrinos or searching for neutrinoless double beta decay require very low levels of radioactive backgrounds both in their own construction materials and in the surrounding environment. These low background levels are required so that the experiments can achieve the required sensitivities for their searches. SNOLAB has several facilities which are used to directly measure these radioactive backgrounds. This proceedings will describe SNOLAB's High Purity Germanium Detectors, one of which has been in continuous use for the past seven years measuring materials for many experiments in operation or under construction at SNOLAB. A description of the characterisation of SNOLAB's new germanium well detector will be presented. In addition, brief descriptions of SNOLAB's alpha-beta and electrostatic counters will be presented and a description of SNOLAB's future low background counting laboratory will be given.

  10. Low-background detector arrays for infrared astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccreight, C. R.; Estrada, J. A.; Goebel, J. H.; Mckelvey, M. E.; Mckibbin, D. D.; Mcmurray, R. E., Jr.; Weber, T. T.

    1989-01-01

    The status of a program which develops and characterizes integrated infrared (IR) detector array technology for space astronomical applications is described. The devices under development include intrinsic, extrinsic silicon, and extrinsic germanium detectors, coupled to silicon readout electronics. Low-background laboratory test results include measurements of responsivity, noise, dark current, temporal response, and the effects of gamma-radiation. In addition, successful astronomical imagery has been obtained on some arrays from this program. These two aspects of the development combine to demonstrate the strong potential for integrated array technology for IR space astronomy.

  11. Elemental mapping of planetary surfaces using gamma-ray spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Reedy, R.C.

    1990-01-01

    The gamma rays escaping from a planet can be used to map the concentrations of various elements in its surface. In a planet, the high-energy particles in the galactic cosmic rays induce a cascade of particles that includes many neutrons. The {gamma} rays are made by the nuclear excitations induced by these cosmic-ray particles and their secondaries (especially capture or inelastic-scattering reactions induced by neutrons) and decay of the naturally-occurring radioelements. After a short history of planetary {gamma}-ray spectroscopy and its applications, the {gamma}-ray spectrometer planned for the Mars Observer mission is presented. The results of laboratory experiments that simulate the cosmic-ray bombardments of planetary surfaces or measure cross sections for the production of {gamma} rays and the status of the theoretical calculations for the processes that make and transport neutrons and {gamma} rays will be reviewed. The emphasis here is on studies of Mars and on new ideas, concepts, and problems that have arisen over the last decade, such as Doppler broadening and peaks from neutron scattering with germanium nuclei in a high-resolution {gamma}-ray spectrometer. 31 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  12. Gamma-ray spectroscopy of hypernuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Chrien, R.E.

    1984-01-01

    The study of hypernuclei is a frontier area of nuclear physics. As more intense beams of strange mesons have become available, methods of in-beam spectroscopy have been applied to the study of hypernuclei. The feasibility of detecting hypernuclear electromagnetic radiation has been demonstrated at the Brookhaven Alternating Gradient Synchrotron. Studies have been made of the effective LAMBDA hyperon-nucleon interaction in p-shell hypernuclei. The first results are described and they place useful constraints on the effective interaction and the shell model description of hypernuclear states.

  13. Combined Gamma Ray/neutron Spectroscopy for Mapping Lunar Resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reedy, R. C.; Byrd, R. C.; Drake, D. M.; Feldman, W. C.; Masarik, J.; Moss, C. E.

    1992-01-01

    Some elements in the Moon can be resources, such as hydrogen and oxygen. Other elements, like Ti or the minerals in which they occur, such as ilmenite, could be used in processing lunar materials. Certain elements can also be used as tracers for other elements or lunar processes, such as hydrogen for mature regoliths with other solar-wind-implanted elements like helium, carbon, and nitrogen. A complete knowledge of the elemental composition of a lunar region is desirable both in identifying lunar resources and in lunar geochemical studies, which also helps in identifying and using lunar resources. The use of gamma ray and neutron spectroscopy together to determine abundances of many elements in the top few tens of centimeters of the lunar surface is discussed. To date, very few discussions of elemental mapping of planetary surfaces considered measurements of both gamma rays and the full range of neutron energies. The theories for gamma ray and neutron spectroscopy of the Moon and calculations of leakage fluxes are presented here with emphasis on why combined gamma ray/neutron spectroscopy is much more powerful than measuring either radiation alone.

  14. Delayed Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy for Spent Nuclear Fuel Assay

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Luke W.; Hunt, Alan W.; Ludewigt, Bernhard A.; Mozin, Vladimir V.

    2012-04-01

    High-energy, beta-delayed gamma-ray spectroscopy is investigated as a non-destructive assay technique for the determination of plutonium mass in spent nuclear fuel. This approach exploits the unique isotope-specific signatures contained in the delayed gamma-ray emission spectra detected following active interrogation with an external neutron source. A high fidelity modeling approach is described that couples radiation transport, analytical decay/depletion, and a newly developed gamma-ray emission source reconstruction code. Initially simulated and analyzed was a “one-pass” delayed gamma-ray assay that focused on the long-lived signatures. Also presented are the results of an independent study that investigated “pulsed mode” measurements, to capture the more isotope-specific, short-lived signatures. Initial modeling results outlined in this paper suggest that delayed gamma-ray assay of spent nuclear fuel assemblies can be accomplished with a neutron generator of sufficient strength and currently available gamma-ray detectors.

  15. In Situ Underwater Gamma Spectroscopy System. Innovative Technology Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    2001-06-01

    The baseline approach to characterize underwater objects is to use radiation sensors on an extendable pole or the Remote Underwater Characterization System to detect gamma radiation and to collect samples for laboratory analysis to determine concentrations of specific radionuclides. The In-Situ Underwater Gamma Spectroscopy (ISUGS) System is essentially a submersible In-Situ Object Counting System from Canberra that can determine both the total gamma radiation and quantify the specific radionuclides contributing to the radiation. ISUGS was demonstrated to characterize objects in the canal of the Materials Test Reactor in INEEL's Test Reactor Area. Cost analysis based on demonstration data revealed that ISUGS reduced costs by 80% for characterization of ten objects compared to the baseline approach. Frammatome provides ISUGS as part of its characterization services. Based on these promising results, INEEL and other DOE sites plan to use ISUGS to characterize their reactor fuel pools.

  16. High resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy at GANIL

    SciTech Connect

    France, G. de

    2014-11-11

    Gamma-ray spectroscopy is intensively used at GANIL to measure low lying states in exotic nuclei on the neutron-rich as well as on the neutron-deficient side of the nuclear chart. On the neutron deficient border, gamma-rays have been observed for the first time in {sup 92}Pd. The level scheme which could be established points to the role of isoscalar pairing. On the neutron rich side, the lifetime of excited states in nuclei around {sup 68}Ni have been been measured using the plunger technique. This allows us to study the evolution of collectivity in a broad range of nuclei. In 2014 GANIL will host the AGATA array for a campaign of at least 2 years. This array is based on the gamma-ray tracking technique, which allows an impressive gain in resolving power.

  17. A pneumatic sample changer for gamma-ray spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Massoni, C.J.; Fones, R.V.; Simon, F.O.

    1973-01-01

    A gravity-feed, pneumatic-ejection sample changer has been developed. The changer is suitable for both flat and well-type detectors and permits the continuous use of gamma-ray spectroscopy equipment 24 h a day, 7 days a week. The electronic circuitry has a fail-safe feature which stops the operation of the changer if a malfunction occurs. ?? 1973 The American Institute of Physics.

  18. Low background techniques applied in the BOREXINO experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Zuzel, G.

    2015-08-17

    The BOREXINO detector, located in the Gran Sasso National Laboratory in Italy, has been designed for real-time spectroscopy of low-energy solar neutrinos. Within the experiment several novel background reduction and assay techniques have been established. In many cases they are still the most sensitive world-wide. Developed methods and apparatus provided tools for a strict quality control program during the construction phase of the BOREXINO detector, which was the key to meet the background requirements. Achievement of extremely low background rate opened the possibility to probe in realtime almost entire spectrum of the solar neutrinos.

  19. Low Background Assay Results for LZ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver-Mallory, Kelsey; Thomas, Keenan; Lux-Zeplin Collaboration; Berkeley Low Background Facility Team

    2016-03-01

    The next generation dark matter experiment LUX-ZEPLIN (LZ) requires careful control of intrinsic radioactivity in all critical detector components in order to reach its unprecedented target sensitivity to Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs): 2 ×10-48 cm2 at 50 GeV/c2. Appropriate material selection is essential to meeting this goal, and an extensive campaign of low background screening is currently being carried out using assay devices at the Sanford Underground Research Facility and the Boulby Underground Laboratory. We will present results from this work, including measurements for the Ti cryostat, PMT bases, PMT raw materials, PTFE, and other components. This work was partially supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) under Award Number DE-AC02-05CH11231, and is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship under Grant No. 1106400.

  20. BATSE spectroscopy catalog of bright gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, Bradley E.; Teegarden, Bonnard J.; Fantasia, Stephan F.; Palmer, David; Cline, Thomas L.; Matteson, James L.; Band, David L.; Ford, Lyle A.; Fishman, Gerald J.; Meegar, Charles A.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents comprehensive results on the spectra of 30 bright gamma ray bursts (GRBs) as observed by the Spectroscopy Detectors (SDs) of the Burst And Transient Source Experiment (BATSE). The data selection was strict in including only spectra that are of high reliability for continuum shape studies. This BATSE Spectroscopy Catalog presents fluences, model fits (for five spectral models for three energy ranges), and photon spectra in a standard manner for each burst. Complete information is provided to describe the data selection and analysis procedures. The catalog results are also presented in electronic format (from the Compton Observatory Science Support Center) and CD-ROM format (AAS CD-ROM series, Vol. 2). These electronic formats also present the count spectra and detector response matrices so as to allow for independent study and fitting by researchers outside the BATSE Team. This BATSE Spectroscopy Catalog complements the catalog from BATSE Large Area Detector (LAD) data by Fishman et al. (1994).

  1. {gamma}-ray spectroscopy of N = Z nuclei.

    SciTech Connect

    Lister, C. J.

    1999-09-10

    The use of {gamma}-ray spectroscopy to probe the properties of marginally bound nuclear states has evolved from being a curiosity a decade ago to being the mainstream use for these devices. The key to this success has been the development of ultra-sensitive channel selection techniques which allow the parentage of each emitted y-ray to be established. With these techniques, and the enhanced efficiency of the arrays themselves, the level of sensitivity for nuclear spectroscopy has increased by several orders of magnitude, in some special cases reaching the 10's nanobarns level, 1000 times more sensitive than was possible a decade ago. In this paper the author discusses some recent developments in light nuclear spectroscopy, on nuclei with N = Z, below mass 100. These examples have been chosen to compliment other presentations at this conference which have covered similar experiments in heavier nuclei.

  2. Miniaturization in x ray and gamma ray spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iwanczyk, Jan S.; Wang, Yuzhong J.; Bradley, James G.

    1993-01-01

    The paper presents advances in two new sensor technologies and a miniaturized associated electronics technology which, when combined, can allow for very significant miniaturization and for the reduction of weight and power consumption in x-ray and gamma-ray spectroscopy systems: (1) Mercuric iodide (HgI2) x-ray technology, which allows for the first time the construction of truly portable, high-energy resolution, non-cryogenic x-ray fluorescence (XRF) elemental analyzer systems, with parameters approaching those of laboratory quality cryogenic instruments; (2) the silicon avalanche photodiode (APD), which is a solid-state light sensitive device with internal amplification, capable of uniquely replacing the vacuum photomultiplier tube in scintillation gamma-ray spectrometer applications, and offering substantial improvements in size, ruggedness, low power operation and energy resolution; and (3) miniaturized (hybridized) low noise, low power amplification and processing electronics, which take full advantage of the favorable properties of these new sensors and allow for the design and fabrication of advanced, highly miniaturized x-ray and gamma-ray spectroscopy systems. The paper also presents experimental results and examples of spectrometric systems currently under construction. The directions for future developments are discussed.

  3. Elastic properties of gamma-Pu by resonant ultrasound spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Migliori, Albert; Betts, J; Trugman, A; Mielke, C H; Mitchell, J N; Ramos, M; Stroe, I

    2009-01-01

    Despite intense experimental and theoretical work on Pu, there is still little understanding of the strange properties of this metal. We used resonant ultrasound spectroscopy method to investigate the elastic properties of pure polycrystalline Pu at high temperatures. Shear and longitudinal elastic moduli of the {gamma}-phase of Pu were determined simultaneously and the bulk modulus was computed from them. A smooth linear and large decrease of all elastic moduli with increasing temperature was observed. We calculated the Poisson ratio and found that it increases from 0.242 at 519K to 0.252 at 571K.

  4. Nuclear Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy at the Limit of Particle Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Norbert Pietralla

    2006-03-29

    The research project ''Nuclear Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy at the Limit of Particle Stability'' with sponsor ID ''DE-FG02-04ER41334'' started late-summer 2004 and aims at the investigation of highly excited low-spin states of selected key-nuclei in the vicinity of the particle separation threshold by means of high-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy in electromagnetic excitation reactions. This work addresses nuclear structures with excitation energies close to the binding energy or highly excited off-yrast states in accordance with the NSAC milestones. In 2005 the program was extended towards additional use of virtual photons and theoretical description of the low-lying collective excitations in the well deformed nuclei.

  5. A phoswich detector for simultaneous alpha-gamma spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghadam, S. Rajabi; Feghhi, S. A. H.; Safari, M. J.

    2015-11-01

    Phoswich detectors are of value for radiation spectroscopy, especially in cases where a low-cost solution for a mixed radiation field is desired. Meanwhile, simultaneous spectroscopy of alpha particles and gamma-rays has many applications in quantification and distinguishing the alpha-emitting radionuclides which usually occur in the analysis of environmental solid samples. Here, we have developed a system for detection of radioactive actinides (e.g., 241Am) based on the alpha-gamma coincidence technique. The underlying concept, is to assemble two appropriately selected scintillators (i.e., a fast and a slow one) together with a discriminating unit for analysis of their data. Detailed Monte Carlo simulation procedure has been developed using the GEANT4 toolkit to design and find enough knowledge about the response of the system in the studied radiation field. Various comparisons were made between experimental and simulation data which showed appropriate agreement between them. The calibration was performed and the MDA was estimated as 60 mBq for the phoswich system.

  6. High-spin. gamma. -ray spectroscopy: past successes, future hopes

    SciTech Connect

    Diamond, R.M.

    1983-04-01

    Nuclei can carry angular momentum by aligning individual particles along the rotation axis or by rotation of a deformed nucleus as a whole. The interweaving of these modes leads to a variety of behavior that is just beginning to be observed and explained. The discrete ..gamma..-ray studies have led to a new backbending spectroscopy, which is telling us about the details of particle alignments and monopole and quadrupole pairing. The high-spin continuum studies, as yet less well developed, are indicating changes in shape and structure, as well as particle alignments from higher shells. New developments in detector systems and in theory promise much more detailed comparisons of experiment and theory and consequent increase in our knowledge of nuclear behavior at high spin.

  7. Determination of plutonium isotopic composition by gamma-ray spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Sampson, T.E.; Hsue, S.T.; Parker, J.L.; Johnson, S.S.; Bowersox, D.F.

    1981-01-01

    We discuss the general approach, computerized data analysis methods, and results of measurements used to determine the isotopic composition of plutonium by gamma-ray spectroscopy. The simple techniques are designed to be applicable to samples of arbitrary size, geometry, age, chemical, and isotopic composition. The combination of the gamma spectroscopic measurement of isotopic composition coupled with calorimetric measurement of total sample power is shown to give a totally nondestructive determination of sample plutonium mass with a precision of 0.6% for 1000-g samples of PuO/sub 2/ with 12% /sup 240/Pu content. The precision of isotopic measurements depends upon many factors, including sample size, sample geometry, and isotopic content. Typical ranges are found to be /sup 238/Pu, 1 to 10%; /sup 239/Pu, 0.1 to 0.5%; /sup 240/Pu, 2 to 5%; /sup 241/Pu, 0.3 to 0.7%; /sup 242/Pu (determined by isotopic correlation); and /sup 241/Am, 0.2 to 10%.

  8. Gamma-ray spectroscopy on irradiated MTR fuel elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terremoto, L. A. A.; Zeituni, C. A.; Perrotta, J. A.; da Silva, J. E. R.

    2000-08-01

    The availability of burnup data is an important requirement in any systematic approach to the enhancement of safety, economics and performance of a nuclear research reactor. This work presents the theory and experimental techniques applied to determine, by means of nondestructive gamma-ray spectroscopy, the burnup of Material Testing Reactor (MTR) fuel elements irradiated in the IEA-R1 research reactor. Burnup measurements, based on analysis of spectra that result from collimation and detection of gamma-rays emitted in the decay of radioactive fission products, were performed at the reactor pool area. The measuring system consists of a high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector together with suitable fast electronics and an on-line microcomputer data acquisition module. In order to achieve absolute burnup values, the detection set (collimator tube+HPGe detector) was previously calibrated in efficiency. The obtained burnup values are compared with ones provided by reactor physics calculations, for three kinds of MTR fuel elements with different cooling times, initial enrichment grades and total number of fuel plates. Both values show good agreement within the experimental error limits.

  9. Shielding concepts for low-background proportional counter arrays in surface laboratories.

    PubMed

    Aalseth, C E; Humble, P H; Mace, E K; Orrell, J L; Seifert, A; Williams, R M

    2016-02-01

    Development of ultra low background gas proportional counters has made the contribution from naturally occurring radioactive isotopes - primarily α and β activity in the uranium and thorium decay chains - inconsequential to instrumental sensitivity levels when measurements are performed in above ground surface laboratories. Simple lead shielding is enough to mitigate against gamma rays as gas proportional counters are already relatively insensitive to naturally occurring gamma radiation. The dominant background in these surface laboratory measurements using ultra low background gas proportional counters is due to cosmic ray generated muons, neutrons, and protons. Studies of measurements with ultra low background gas proportional counters in surface and underground laboratories as well as radiation transport Monte Carlo simulations suggest a preferred conceptual design to achieve the highest possible sensitivity from an array of low background gas proportional counters when operated in a surface laboratory. The basis for a low background gas proportional counter array and the preferred shielding configuration is reported, especially in relation to measurements of radioactive gases having low energy decays such as (37)Ar. PMID:26720259

  10. Shielding concepts for low-background proportional counter arrays in surface laboratories.

    PubMed

    Aalseth, C E; Humble, P H; Mace, E K; Orrell, J L; Seifert, A; Williams, R M

    2016-02-01

    Development of ultra low background gas proportional counters has made the contribution from naturally occurring radioactive isotopes - primarily α and β activity in the uranium and thorium decay chains - inconsequential to instrumental sensitivity levels when measurements are performed in above ground surface laboratories. Simple lead shielding is enough to mitigate against gamma rays as gas proportional counters are already relatively insensitive to naturally occurring gamma radiation. The dominant background in these surface laboratory measurements using ultra low background gas proportional counters is due to cosmic ray generated muons, neutrons, and protons. Studies of measurements with ultra low background gas proportional counters in surface and underground laboratories as well as radiation transport Monte Carlo simulations suggest a preferred conceptual design to achieve the highest possible sensitivity from an array of low background gas proportional counters when operated in a surface laboratory. The basis for a low background gas proportional counter array and the preferred shielding configuration is reported, especially in relation to measurements of radioactive gases having low energy decays such as (37)Ar.

  11. Purification of cerium, neodymium and gadolinium for low background experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boiko, R. S.; Barabash, A. S.; Belli, P.; Bernabei, R.; Cappella, F.; Cerulli, R.; Danevich, F. A.; Incicchitti, A.; Laubenstein, M.; Mokina, V. M.; Nisi, S.; Poda, D. V.; Polischuk, O. G.; Tretyak, V. I.

    2014-01-01

    Cerium, neodymium and gadolinium contain double beta active isotopes. The most interesting are 150Nd and 160Gd (promising for 0ν2β search), 136Ce (2β+ candidate with one of the highest Q2β). The main problem of compounds containing lanthanide elements is their high radioactive contamination by uranium, radium, actinium and thorium. The new generation 2β experiments require development of methods for a deep purification of lanthanides from the radioactive elements. A combination of physical and chemical methods was applied to purify cerium, neodymium and gadolinium. Liquid-liquid extraction technique was used to remove traces of Th and U from neodymium, gadolinium and for purification of cerium from Th, U, Ra and K. Co-precipitation and recrystallization methods were utilized for further reduction of the impurities. The radioactive contamination of the samples before and after the purification was tested by using ultra-low-background HPGe gamma spectrometry. As a result of the purification procedure the radioactive contamination of gadolinium oxide (a similar purification efficiency was reached also with cerium and neodymium oxides) was decreased from 0.12 Bq/kg to 0.007 Bq/kg in 228Th, from 0.04 Bq/kg to <0.006 Bq/kg in 226Ra, and from 0.9 Bq/kg to 0.04 Bq/kg in 40K. The purification methods are much less efficient for chemically very similar radioactive elements like actinium, lanthanum and lutetium.

  12. A Novel Low Background Cryogenic Detector for Radon in Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wójcik, Marcin; Zuzel, Grzegorz

    2007-03-01

    A prototype of a new detector for measurements of radon in gases and radon emanation investigations is presented. It is based on the low-temperature collection of 222Rn on a stainless steel plate and the following counting of emitted alpha particles using a standard ORTEC semiconductor detector for alpha spectroscopy. A low background of the constructed system was achieved, in the order of 25 counts per day for the 222Rn energy window. Relatively high detection efficiency of 32 % in 2π geometry, and large volume of the detector allow radon concentration measurements at the level of 12 mBq/m3 with a 30 % accuracy. The detector can be also used to measure short-lived 220Rn. In the next step we plan to improve the system so that we could reach the sensitivity of 1 mBq/m3. This can be achieved by reducing the background, improving the detection efficiency and/or increasing the active volume of the detector (with respect to the prototype).

  13. A Novel Low Background Cryogenic Detector for Radon in Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Wojcik, Marcin; Zuzel, Grzegorz

    2007-03-28

    A prototype of a new detector for measurements of radon in gases and radon emanation investigations is presented. It is based on the low-temperature collection of 222Rn on a stainless steel plate and the following counting of emitted alpha particles using a standard ORTEC semiconductor detector for alpha spectroscopy. A low background of the constructed system was achieved, in the order of 25 counts per day for the 222Rn energy window. Relatively high detection efficiency of 32% in 2{pi} geometry, and large volume of the detector allow radon concentration measurements at the level of 12 mBq/m3 with a 30% accuracy. The detector can be also used to measure short-lived 220Rn. In the next step we plan to improve the system so that we could reach the sensitivity of 1 mBq/m3. This can be achieved by reducing the background, improving the detection efficiency and/or increasing the active volume of the detector (with respect to the prototype)

  14. Decay Heat Measurements Using Total Absorption Gamma-ray Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, S.; Valencia, E.; Algora, A.; Taín, J. L.; Regan, P. H.; Podolyák, Z.; Agramunt, J.; Gelletly, W.; Nichols, A. L.

    2012-09-01

    A knowledge of the decay heat emitted by thermal neutron-irradiated nuclear fuel is an important factor in ensuring safe reactor design and operation, spent fuel removal from the core, and subsequent storage prior to and after reprocessing, and waste disposal. Decay heat can be readily calculated from the nuclear decay properties of the fission products, actinides and their decay products as generated within the irradiated fuel. Much of the information comes from experiments performed with HPGe detectors, which often underestimate the beta feeding to states at high excitation energies. This inability to detect high-energy gamma emissions effectively results in the derivation of decay schemes that suffer from the pandemonium effect, although such a serious problem can be avoided through application of total absorption γ-ray spectroscopy (TAS). The beta decay of key radionuclei produced as a consequence of the neutron-induced fission of 235U and 239Pu are being re-assessed by means of this spectroscopic technique. A brief synopsis is given of the Valencia-Surrey (BaF2) TAS detector, and their method of operation, calibration and spectral analysis.

  15. Bismuth-Loaded Polymer Scintillators for Gamma Ray Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Rupert, B L; Cherepy, N J; Sturm, B W; Sanner, R D; Dai, Z; Payne, S A

    2011-04-11

    We synthesize a series of polyvinylcarbazole monoliths containing varying loadings of triphenyl bismuth as a high-Z dopant and varying fluors, either organic or organometallic, in order to study their use as scintillators capable of gamma ray spectroscopy. A trend of increasing bismuth loading resulting in a better-resolved photopeak is observed. For PVK parts with no fluor or a standard organic fluor, diphenylanthracene, increasing bismuth loading results in decreasing light yield while with samples 1 or 3 % by weight of the spin-orbit coupling organometallic fluor FIrpic, which emits light from both singlet and triple excitons, show increasing light yield with increasing bismuth loading. Our best performing PVK/ BiPh{sub 3}/FIrpic scintillator with 40 wt % BiPh3 and 3 wt % FIrpic has an emission maximum of 500 nm, a light yield of {approx}30,000 photons/MeV, and energy resolution better than 7% FWHM at 662 keV. Replacing the Ir complex with an equal weight of diphenylanthracene produces a sample with a light yield of {approx}6,000 photons/MeV, with an emission maximum at 420 nm and energy resolution of 9% at 662 keV. Transmission electron microscopy studies show that the BiPh{sub 3} forms small clusters of approximately 5 nm diameter.

  16. Strontium Iodide Instrument Development for Gamma Spectroscopy and Radioisotope Identification

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, P; Cherepy, Nerine; Payne, Stephen A.; Swanberg, E.; Nelson, K.; Thelin, P; Fisher, S E; Hunter, Steve; Wihl, B; Shah, Kanai; Hawrami, Rastgo; Burger, Arnold; Boatner, Lynn A; Momayezi, M; Stevens, K; Randles, M H; Solodovnikov, D

    2014-01-01

    Development of the Europium-doped Strontium Iodide scintillator, SrI2(Eu), has progressed significantly in recent years. SrI2(Eu) has excellent material properties for gamma ray spectroscopy: high light yield (>80,000 ph/MeV), excellent light yield proportionality, and high effective atomic number (Z=49) for high photoelectric cross-section. High quality 1.5 and 2 diameter boules are now available due to rapid advances in SrI2(Eu) crystal growth. In these large SrI2(Eu) crystals, optical self-absorption by Eu2+ degrades the energy resolution as measured by analog electronics, but we mitigate this effect through on-the-fly correction of the scintillation pulses by digital readout electronics. Using this digital correction technique we have demonstrated energy resolution of 2.9% FWHM at 662 keV for a 4 in3 SrI2(Eu) crystal, over 2.6 inches long. Based on this digital readout technology, we have developed a detector prototype with greatly improved radioisotope identification capability compared to Sodium Iodide, NaI(Tl). The higher resolution of SrI2(Eu) yields a factor of 2 to 5 improvement in radioisotope identification (RIID) error rate compared to NaI(Tl).

  17. Planetary gamma-ray spectroscopy: the effects of hydrogen absorption cross-section of the gamma-ray spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Lapides, J.R.

    1981-01-01

    The gamma-ray spectroscopy of planet surfaces is one of several possible methods that are useful in determining the elemental composition of planet surfaces from orbiting spacecraft. This has been demonstrated on the Apollos 15 and 16 missions as well as the Soviet Mars-5 mission. Planetary gamma-ray emission is primarily the result of natural radioactive decay and cosmic-ray and solar-flare-induced nuclear reactions. Secondary neutron reactions play a large role in the more intense gamma-ray emission. The technique provides information on the elemental composition of the top few tens of centimeters of the planet surface. Varying concentrations of hydrogen and compositional variations that alter the macroscopic thermal-neutron absorption cross section have a significant effect on the neutron flux in the planet surface and therefore also on the gamma-ray emission from the surface. These effects have been systematically studied for a wide range of possible planetary compositions that include Mercury, the moon, Mars, the comets, and the asteroids. The problem of the Martian atmosphere was also investigated. The results of these calculations, in which both surface neutron fluxes and gamma-ray emission fluxes were determined, were used to develop general procedures for obtaining planet compositions from the gamma-ray spectrum. Several changes have been suggested for reanalyzing the Apollos 15 and 16 gamma-ray results. In addition, procedures have been suggested that can be applied to neutron-gamma techniques in mineral and oil exploration.

  18. The AGATA Spectrometer: next generation gamma-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, J.; AGATA Collaboration

    2015-05-01

    The Advanced GAmma Tracking Array (AGATA) is a European project to develop and operate the next generation gamma-ray spectrometer. AGATA is based on the technique of gamma-ray energy tracking in electrically segmented high-purity germanium crystals. The spectrometer will have an unparalleled level of detection power for electromagnetic nuclear radiation. The tracking technique requires the accurate determination of the energy, time and position of every interaction as a gamma ray deposits its energy within the detector volume. Reconstruction of the full interaction path results in a detector with very high efficiency and excellent spectral response. The realisation of gamma-ray tracking and AGATA is a result of many technical advances and the spectrometer is now operational. AGATA has been operated in a series of scientific campaigns at Legnaro National Laboratory in Italy and GSI in Germany and is presently being assembled at GANIL in France. The status of the instrument will be reviewed.

  19. Gamma ray production cross section from energetic neutron inelastic scattering for methodical improvements in planetary gamma-ray spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Castaneda, C.M.; Gearhart, R.; Sanii, B.; Englert, P.A.J.; Drake, D.M.; Reedy, R.C.

    1991-12-31

    Planetary Gamma ray spectroscopy can be used to chemically analyze the top soil from planets in future planetary missions. The production from inelastic neutron interaction plays an effective role in the determination on the C and H at the surface. The gamma ray production cross section from the strongest lines excited in the neutron bombardment of Fe have been measured by the use of a time analyzed quasi-mono-energetic neutron beam and a high purity germanium detector. The results from En=6.5, 32, 43, and 65 MeV are presented.

  20. The Northern Marshall Islands radiological survey: A quality control program for radiochemical and gamma spectroscopy analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kehl, S.R.; Mount, M.E.; Robison, W.L.

    1995-09-01

    From 1979 to 1989, approximately 25,000 Post Northern Marshall Islands Radiological Survey (PNMIRS) samples were collected, and over 71,400 radiochemical and gamma spectroscopy analyses were performed to establish the concentration of {sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 241}Am, and plutonium isotopes in soil, vegetation, fish, and animals in the Northern Marshall Islands. While the Low Level Gamma Counting Facility (B379) in the Health and Ecological Assessment (HEA) division accounted for over 80% of all gamma spectroscopy analyses, approximately 4889 radiochemical and 5437 gamma spectroscopy analyses were performed on 4784 samples of soil, vegetation, terrestrial animal, and marine organisms by outside laboratories. Four laboratories were used by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to perform the radiochemical analyses: Thermo Analytical Norcal, Richmond, California (TMA); Nuclear Energy Services, North Carolina State University (NCSU); Laboratory of Radiation Ecology, University of Washington (LRE); and Health and Ecological Assessment (HEA) division, LLNL, Livermore, California. Additionally, LRE and NCSU were used to perform gamma spectroscopy analyses. The analytical precision and accuracy were monitored by including blind duplicates and natural matrix standards in each group of samples analyzed. On the basis of reported analytical values for duplicates and standards, 88% of the gamma and 87% of the radiochemical analyses in this survey were accepted. By laboratory, 93% of the radiochemical analyses by TMA; 88% of the gamma-ray spectrometry and 100% of the radiochemistry analyses by NCSU; 89% of the gamma spectroscopy and 87% of the radiochemistry analyses by LRE; and 90% of the radiochemistry analyses performed by HEA`s radiochemistry department were accepted.

  1. Design of a Low Background Liquid Scintillation Counter for a Shallow Underground Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orrell, John; Aalseth, Craig; Bernacki, Bruce; Douglas, Matt; Erchinger, Jennifer; Fuller, Erin; Keillor, Martin; Morley, Shannon; Mullen, Crystal; Panisko, Mark; Shaff, Sarah; Warren, Glen; Wright, Michael

    2014-09-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory operates a 35-meter water-equivalent overburden, shallow underground laboratory for measuring low-concentration radioactive isotopes in environmental samples collected. A low-background liquid scintillation counter is under development. Liquid scintillation counting is useful for beta-emitting isotopes without (or low) gamma ray yields. The high-efficiency beta detection in a liquid scintillation cocktail coupled with the low-background environment of a shield located in a clean underground laboratory provides for increased-sensitivity measurements to a range of isotopes. Benchmarked simulations have evaluated the shield design requirements to assess the background rate achievable. Assay of shield construction materials provides the basis for the shield design development. The low background design is informed by efforts in experimental design of neutrinoless double beta decay experiments, direct detection dark matter experiments, and low energy neutrino detection experiments. In this vein a background budget for the instrument is presented with attention to low background methods directed toward applications of nuclear measurements.

  2. Ultra-low background measurement capabilities at SNOLAB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, Ian

    2016-05-01

    Experiments currently searching for dark matter, studying properties of neutrinos or searching for neutrinoless double-beta decay require very low levels of radioactive backgrounds both in their own construction materials and in the surrounding environment. These low background levels are required so that the current generation of experiments can achieve the required sensitivities for their searches. SNOLAB has several facilities which are used to directly measure these radioactive backgrounds. This paper will describe SNOLAB’s ultra-low background germanium detectors, describe the data analysis techniques used and present results from these detectors. A description of SNOLAB’s alpha-beta and electrostatic counters will be presented and the underground low background counting laboratory currently under construction at SNOLAB will be presented.

  3. Neutron counting and gamma spectroscopy with PVT detectors.

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Dean James; Brusseau, Charles A.

    2011-06-01

    Radiation portals normally incorporate a dedicated neutron counter and a gamma-ray detector with at least some spectroscopic capability. This paper describes the design and presents characterization data for a detection system called PVT-NG, which uses large polyvinyl toluene (PVT) detectors to monitor both types of radiation. The detector material is surrounded by polyvinyl chloride (PVC), which emits high-energy gamma rays following neutron capture reactions. Assessments based on high-energy gamma rays are well suited for the detection of neutron sources, particularly in border security applications, because few isotopes in the normal stream of commerce have significant gamma ray yields above 3 MeV. Therefore, an increased count rate for high-energy gamma rays is a strong indicator for the presence of a neutron source. The sensitivity of the PVT-NG sensor to bare {sup 252}Cf is 1.9 counts per second per nanogram (cps/ng) and the sensitivity for {sup 252}Cf surrounded by 2.5 cm of polyethylene is 2.3 cps/ng. The PVT-NG sensor is a proof-of-principal sensor that was not fully optimized. The neutron detector sensitivity could be improved, for instance, by using additional moderator. The PVT-NG detectors and associated electronics are designed to provide improved resolution, gain stability, and performance at high-count rates relative to PVT detectors in typical radiation portals. As well as addressing the needs for neutron detection, these characteristics are also desirable for analysis of the gamma-ray spectra. Accurate isotope identification results were obtained despite the common impression that the absence of photopeaks makes data collected by PVT detectors unsuitable for spectroscopic analysis. The PVT detectors in the PVT-NG unit are used for both gamma-ray and neutron detection, so the sensitive volume exceeds the volume of the detection elements in portals that use dedicated components to detect each type of radiation.

  4. Low-background temperature sensors fabricated on parylene substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhar, A.; Loach, J. C.; Barton, P. J.; Larsen, J. T.; Poon, A. W. P.

    2015-12-01

    Temperature sensors fabricated from ultra-low radioactivity materials have been developed for low-background experiments searching for neutrinoless double-beta decay and the interactions of WIMP dark matter. The sensors consist of electrical traces photolithographically-patterned onto substrates of vapor-deposited parylene. They are demonstrated to function as expected, to do so reliably and robustly, and to be highly radio-pure. This work is a proof-of-concept study of a technology that can be applied to broad class of electronic circuits used in low-background experiments.

  5. Neutron Spallation Measurements And Impacts On Low Background Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Aguayo, Estanislao; Kouzes, Richard T.; Siciliano, Edward R.

    2014-09-01

    Ultra-low background experiments, such as neutrinoless double beta decay, carried out deep underground to escape cosmic ray backgrounds can nonetheless be limited in sensitivity by cosmogenically induced signals. This limit can either be produced directly during operation from cosmic muon events in the detector volume, or can be produced by radioactive decay of cosmogenically generated radionuclides created while the detector materials were above ground. An accurate knowledge of the production of the latter source of background is of paramount importance in order to be able to interpret the results of low-background experiments.

  6. Experimental approaches for the development of gamma spectroscopy well logging system

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Jehyun; Hwang, Seho; Kim, Jongman; Won, Byeongho

    2015-03-10

    This article discusses experimental approaches for the development of gamma spectroscopy well logging system. Considering the size of borehole sonde, we customize 2 x 2 inches inorganic scintillators and the system including high voltage, preamplifier, amplifier and multichannel analyzer (MCA). The calibration chart is made by test using standard radioactive sources so that the measured count rates are expressed by energy spectrum. Optimum high-voltage supplies and the measurement parameters of each detector are set up by experimental investigation. Also, the responses of scintillation detectors have been examined by analysis according to the distance between source and detector. Because gamma spectroscopy well logging needs broad spectrum, high sensitivity and resolution, the energy resolution and sensitivity as a function of gamma ray energy are investigated by analyzing the gamma ray activities of the radioactive sources.

  7. Energy Content in Flares From Gamma Ray Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, R. J.; Kozlovsky, B.; Share, G. H.

    2001-12-01

    How the energy content of energetic particles is shared between electrons and ions is a fundamental consideration for understanding the acceleration processes in solar flares. The accelerated electron spectrum greater than about 30 keV can be deduced from measurements of the hard X-ray bremsstrahlung spectrum. The accelerated ion spectrum from a few MeV/nucleon to about 70 MeV/nucleon can be deduced from ratios of measured gamma-ray lines. The recent application of these methods to combined HXRBS and GRS SMM gamma-ray data from 19 strong gamma-ray line flares indicated aproximate equipartition of the energy between electrons and ions. The techniques used for these determinations will be discussed with emphasis on the ion spectral determination. A new extended study of more than 135 SMM flares will also be discussed.

  8. GRASP - Gamma ray astronomy with spectroscopy and positioning

    SciTech Connect

    Bignami, G.F.; Dean, A.J.; Durouchoux, P.; Lund, N.; McBreen, B.; Ramsden, D.; Staubert, R.; Taylor, B.G.; Vedrenne, G.

    1987-02-01

    The GRASP telescope, which is currently under assessment by the European Space Agency as a future space mission, is designed to generate high resolution images of the gamma-ray sky with high sensitivity and fine spectral resolution. The telescope employs a coded aperture mask and the capability to function as a Spectral Imager is achieved by the incorporation of an array of discrete germanium solid state detectors within the matrix of a larger position sensitive (CsI(T1) gamma-ray detection plane.

  9. Solar neon abundances from gamma-ray spectroscopy and He-3-rich particle events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reames, D. V.; Ramaty, R.; Von Rosenvinge, T. T.

    1988-01-01

    Ambient solar atmospheric abundances derived from gamma-ray spectroscopy are compared with observations of solar energetic particles. Agreement is found between the gamma-ray-derived Ne/O ratio and the corresponding mean ratio for He-3-rich flares. Both of these values are significantly higher than inferred coronal Ne/O ratios. It is suggested that the mean Ne/O ratio in He-3-rich flares reflects the composition of the flare plasma rather than the acceleration process.

  10. Detector arrays for low-background space infrared astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccreight, C. R.; Mckelvey, M. E.; Goebel, J. H.; Anderson, G. M.; Lee, J. H.

    1986-01-01

    The status of development and characterization tests of integrated infrared detector array technology for astronomy applications is described. The devices under development include intrinsic, extrinsic silicon, and extrinsic germanium detectors, with hybrid silicon multiplexers. Laboratary test results and successful astronomy imagery have established the usefulness of integrated arrays in low-background astronomy applications.

  11. Detector arrays for low-background space infrared astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccreight, C. R.; Mckelvey, M. E.; Goebel, J. H.; Anderson, G. M.; Lee, J. H.

    1986-01-01

    The status of development and characterization tests of integrated infrared detector array technology for astronomy applications is described. The devices under development include intrinsic, extrinsic silicon, and extrinsic germanium detectors, with hybrid silicon multiplexers. Laboratory test results and successful astronomy imagery have established the usefulness of integrated arrays in low-background astronomy applications.

  12. In situ gamma-ray spectrometry in the environment using dose rate spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Young-Yong; Kim, Chang-Jong; Chung, Kun Ho; Choi, Hee-Yeoul; Lee, Wanno; Kang, Mun Ja; Park, Sang Tae

    2016-02-01

    In order to expand the application of dose rate spectroscopy to the environment, in situ gamma-ray spectrometry was first conducted at a height of 1 m above the ground to calculate the ambient dose rate and individual dose rate at that height, as well as the radioactivity in the soil layer for the detected gamma nuclides from the dose rate spectroscopy. The reliable results could be obtained by introducing the angular correction factor to correct the G-factor with respect to incident photons distributed in a certain range of angles. The intercomparison results of radioactivity using ISOCS software, an analysis of a sample taken from the soil around a detector, and dose rate spectroscopy had a difference of <20% for 214Pb, 214Bi, 228Ac, 212Bi, 208Tl, and 40K, except for 212Pb with low-energy photons, that is, <300 keV. In addition, the drawback of using dose rate spectroscopy, that is, all gamma rays from a nuclide should be identified to accurately assess the individual dose rate, was overcome by adopting the concept of contribution ratio of the key gamma ray to the individual dose rate of a nuclide, so that it could be accurately calculated by identifying only a key gamma ray from a nuclide.

  13. Proton range verification through prompt gamma-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verburg, Joost M.; Seco, Joao

    2014-12-01

    We present an experimental study of a novel method to verify the range of proton therapy beams. Differential cross sections were measured for 15 prompt gamma-ray lines from proton-nuclear interactions with 12C and 16O at proton energies up to 150 MeV. These cross sections were used to model discrete prompt gamma-ray emissions along proton pencil-beams. By fitting detected prompt gamma-ray counts to these models, we simultaneously determined the beam range and the oxygen and carbon concentration of the irradiated matter. The performance of the method was assessed in two phantoms with different elemental concentrations, using a small scale prototype detector. Based on five pencil-beams with different ranges delivering 5 × 108 protons and without prior knowledge of the elemental composition at the measurement point, the absolute range was determined with a standard deviation of 1.0-1.4 mm. Relative range shifts at the same dose level were detected with a standard deviation of 0.3-0.5 mm. The determined oxygen and carbon concentrations also agreed well with the actual values. These results show that quantitative prompt gamma-ray measurements enable knowledge of nuclear reaction cross sections to be used for precise proton range verification in the presence of tissue with an unknown composition.

  14. Proton range verification through prompt gamma-ray spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Verburg, Joost M; Seco, Joao

    2014-12-01

    We present an experimental study of a novel method to verify the range of proton therapy beams. Differential cross sections were measured for 15 prompt gamma-ray lines from proton-nuclear interactions with (12)C and (16)O at proton energies up to 150 MeV. These cross sections were used to model discrete prompt gamma-ray emissions along proton pencil-beams. By fitting detected prompt gamma-ray counts to these models, we simultaneously determined the beam range and the oxygen and carbon concentration of the irradiated matter. The performance of the method was assessed in two phantoms with different elemental concentrations, using a small scale prototype detector. Based on five pencil-beams with different ranges delivering 5 × 10(8) protons and without prior knowledge of the elemental composition at the measurement point, the absolute range was determined with a standard deviation of 1.0-1.4 mm. Relative range shifts at the same dose level were detected with a standard deviation of 0.3-0.5 mm. The determined oxygen and carbon concentrations also agreed well with the actual values. These results show that quantitative prompt gamma-ray measurements enable knowledge of nuclear reaction cross sections to be used for precise proton range verification in the presence of tissue with an unknown composition.

  15. Gamma-ray spectroscopy of neutron-rich products of heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, M.P.; Janssens, R.V.F.; Ahmad, I.

    1995-08-01

    Thick-target {gamma}{gamma} coincidence techniques are being used to explore the spectroscopy of otherwise hard-to-reach neutron-rich products of deep-inelastic heavy ion reactions. Extensive {gamma}{gamma} coincidence measurements were performed at ATLAS using pulsed beams of {sup 80}Se, {sup 136}Xe, and {sup 238}U on lead-backed {sup 122,124}Sn targets with energies 10-15% above the Coulomb barrier. Gamma-ray coincidence intensities were used to map out yield distributions with A and Z for even-even product nuclei around the target and around the projectile. The main features of the yield patterns are understandable in terms of N/Z equilibration. We had the most success in studying the decays of yrast isomers. Thus far, more than thirty new {mu}s isomers in the Z = 50 region were found and characterized. Making isotopic assignments for previously unknown {gamma}-ray cascades proves to be one of the biggest problems. Our assignments were based (a) on rare overlaps with radioactivity data, (b) on the relative yields with different beams, and (c) on observed cross-coincidences between {gamma} rays from light and heavy reaction partners. However, the primary products of deep inelastic collisions often are sufficiently excited for subsequent neutron evaporation, so {gamma}{gamma} cross-coincidence results require careful interpretation.

  16. Modeling of neutron spectrum in the gamma spectroscopy measurements with Ge-detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knežević, D.; Jovančević, N.; Krmar, M.; Petrović, J.

    2016-10-01

    In this study, we present a novel approach for estimation of neutron spectra that are present during gamma spectroscopy measurements performed by a Ge detector. This method is based on the calculation of the neutron spectra by using an unfolding procedure, where the activity of the Ge isotopes, produced by the neutron reactions, and the available cross section data for those reactions are the input parameters. This new approach was tested by background gamma spectroscopy measurements with a HPGe detector. Obtained results show that this method can provide useful information about the neutron spectra at the position of the Ge detectors.

  17. Gamma ray spectroscopy in astrophysics: Solar gamma ray astronomy on solar maximum mission. [experimental design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forrest, D. J.

    1978-01-01

    The SMM gamma ray experiment and the important scientific capabilities of the instrument are discussed. The flare size detectable as a function of spectrum integration time was studied. A preliminary estimate indicates that a solar gamma ray line at 4.4 MeV one-fifth the intensity of that believed to have been emitted on 4 August 1972 can be detected in approximately 1000 sec with a confidence level of 99%.

  18. Radiation detection system for portable gamma-ray spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Rowland, Mark S.; Howard, Douglas E.; Wong, James L.; Jessup, James L.; Bianchini, Greg M.; Miller, Wayne O.

    2006-06-20

    A portable gamma ray detection apparatus having a gamma ray detector encapsulated by a compact isolation structure having at least two volumetrically-nested enclosures where at least one is a thermal shield. The enclosures are suspension-mounted to each other to successively encapsulate the detector without structural penetrations through the thermal shields. A low power cooler is also provided capable of cooling the detector to cryogenic temperatures without consuming cryogens, due to the heat load reduction by the isolation structure and the reduction in the power requirements of the cooler. The apparatus also includes a lightweight portable power source for supplying power to the apparatus, including to the cooler and the processing means, and reducing the weight of the apparatus to enable handheld operation or toting on a user's person.

  19. Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy of A 100 Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leblanc, J. D.; Meyer, D. A.; Heinz, A.; Ai, H.; Casperson, R. J.; Hugon, J. L.; Huber, B.; Luttke, R.; McCutchan, E. A.; Qian, J.; Shoraka, B.; Smith, J. K.; Terry, J. R.; Williams, E.

    2007-10-01

    Structural evolution is often characterized as a function of nucleon number. When investigating a specific nuclide, structural evolution may be described as a function of angular momentum, referred to as the E-GOS (E-Gamma Over Spin) method. An experiment was performed using the ESTU tandem Van de Graff accelerator at the Wright Nuclear Structure Laboratory at Yale University. Several nuclei in the A 100 region were populated via the fusion-evaporation reaction ^92Zr(^12C,4n+γ)^100Pd. Subsequent gamma ray emissions were detected using the detector array SPEEDY, which is comprised of eight clover-leafed HP Ge crystal detectors. Data were collected at four different beam energies: 66, 68, 70, and 75MeV. The data will be interpreted utilizing the E-GOS method.

  20. High resolution {gamma}-ray spectroscopy: The first 85 years

    SciTech Connect

    Deslattes, R.D.

    2000-02-01

    This opening review attempts to follow the main trends in crystal diffraction spectrometry of nuclear {gamma} rays from its 1914 beginning in Rutherford's laboratory to the ultra-high resolution instrumentation realized in the current generation of spectrometers at the Institute Laue Langeven (ILL). The authors perspective is that of an instrumentalist hoping to convey a sense of intellectual debt to a number of predecessors, each of whom realized a certain elegance in making the tools that have enabled much good science, including that to which the remainder of this workshop is dedicated. This overview follows some of the main ideas along a trajectory toward higher resolution at higher energies, thereby enabling not only the disentangling of dense spectra, but also allowing detailed study of aspects of spectral profiles sensitive to excited state lifetimes and interatomic potentials. The parallel evolution toward increasing efficiency while preserving needed resolution is also an interesting story of artful compromise that should not be neglected. Finally, it is the robustness of the measurement chain connecting {gamma}-ray wavelengths with optical wave-lengths associated with the Rydberg constant that only recently has allowed {gamma}-ray data to contribute to determine of particle masses and fundamental constants, as will be described in more detail in other papers from this workshop.

  1. {gamma}-ray spectroscopy of {sup 197}At

    SciTech Connect

    Andgren, K.; Cederwall, B.; Baeck, T.; Hadinia, B.; Johnson, A.; Khaplanov, A.; Sandzelius, M.; Wyss, R.; Jakobsson, U.; Uusitalo, J.; Greenlees, P. T.; Jones, P. M.; Juutinen, S.; Julin, R.; Ketelhut, S.; Leino, M.; Nyman, M.; Rahkila, P.; Saren, J.; Scholey, C.

    2008-10-15

    Excited states of the extremely neutron-deficient nucleus {sup 197}At have been studied in an in-beam experiment using the fusion-evaporation reaction {sup 118}Sn({sup 82}Kr,p2n){sup 197}At. {gamma} rays belonging to {sup 197}At feeding the I{sup {pi}}=(9/2{sup -}) ground state, as well as {gamma} rays feeding the 311-keV I{sup {pi}}=(13/2{sup +}) isomer, decaying via the emission of {gamma} rays, and the 52-keV I{sup {pi}}=(1/2{sup +}){alpha}-decaying isomer have been identified using the recoil-{alpha}-decay tagging technique. Total Routhian surface calculations predict a near-spherical shape for the (9/2{sup -}) ground state and oblate shapes with {beta}{sub 2} around -0.2 for the (1/2{sup +}) and the (13/2{sup +}) states. These predictions agree with our experimental findings.

  2. Quantum Well Infrared Photodetectors for Low Background Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunapala, S. D.; Bandara, S. V.; Singh, A.; Liu, J. K.; Luong, E. M.; Mumolo, J. M.; McKelvey, M. J.

    1998-01-01

    High performance long-wavelength GaAs/Al(x)Ga(1-x)As quantum well infrared photodetectors for low background applications have been demonstrated. This is the first theoretical analysis of quantum well infrared photodetectors for low background applications and the detectivity D* of 6 x 10(exp 13) cm.square root of Hz/W has been achieved at T = 40 K with 2 x 10(exp 9) photons/cm2/sec background. In addition, this paper describes the demonstration of mid-wavelength/long-wavelength dualband quantum well infrared photodetectors and long-wavelength/very long-wavelength dualband quantum well infrared photodetectors in 4-26 micrometers wavelength region.

  3. Low background HPGe spectrometer in investigations of 2β decay

    SciTech Connect

    Rukhadze, Ekaterina [Institute of Experimental and Applied Physics, CTU in Prague, Horska 3a Collaboration: OBELIX Collaboration; TGV Collaboration; SuperNEMO Collaboration; and others

    2013-08-08

    The low background high sensitive HPGe spectrometer called OBELIX is briefly described. The calibration measurements using {sup 152}Eu, {sup 133}Ba and La{sub 2}O{sub 3} sources in different geometries, the obtained efficiency curves for OBELIX HPGe detector, the results of measurements of radioactivity of the NEMO-3 sources ({sup 100}Mo, {sup 150}Nd) as well as future plans for OBELIX detector (e.g. 0νEC/EC decay of {sup 106}Cd) are presented.

  4. Adopted low background techniques and analysis of radioactive trace impurities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernabei, R.; Belli, P.; Incicchitti, A.; Dai, C. J.

    2016-10-01

    The application of very low background techniques has a great importance in deep underground experiments devoted to the investigation of the Dark Matter (DM) particles and of other rare processes. In this paper, some related arguments are addressed mainly considering their crucial role in case of inorganic crystal scintillators developed for direct DM investigation and, in particular, in the realization of DAMA/LIBRA apparatus.

  5. GeMSE: A new low-background facility for meteorite and material screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivers, M. V.; Hofmann, B. A.; Rosén, Å. V.; Schumann, M.

    2015-08-01

    We are currently setting up a facility for low-background gamma-ray spectrometry based on a HPGe detector. It is dedicated to material screening for the XENON and DARWIN dark matter projects as well as to the characterization of meteorites. The detector will be installed in a medium depth (˜620 m.w.e.) underground laboratory in Switzerland with several layers of shielding and an active muon-veto. The GeMSE facility will be operational by fall 2015 with an expected background rate of ˜250 counts/day (100-2700 keV).

  6. Sub-Kelvin Thermal Conductivity and Radioactivity of Some Useful Materials in Low Background Cryogenic Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellaris, N.; Daal, M.; Epland, M.; Pepin, M.; Kamaev, O.; Cushman, P.; Kramer, E.; Sadoulet, B.; Mirabolfathi, N.; Golwala, S.; Runyan, M.

    2014-08-01

    We present measurements of the thermal conductivity between 0.05 and 1 K, and radioactive contamination levels, for some thermally isolating materials. TIMET Ti 15-3-3-3, Mersen grade 2020 graphite, Vespel SP-1, Vespel SP-22, Vespel SCP-5000, Vespel SCP-5050, Graphlite CFRP, and a Kapton/epoxy composite are all investigated. Thermal conductivities were measured using a single-heater longitudinal heat flow method. Material radioactivity was determined for the materials at a low background counting facility using a high-purity gamma detector and GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulations.

  7. Design Considerations for Large Mass Ultra-Low Background Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Aguayo Navarrete, Estanislao; Reid, Douglas J.; Fast, James E.; Orrell, John L.

    2011-07-01

    Summary The objective of this document is to present the designers of the next generation of large-mass, ultra-low background experiments with lessons learned and design strategies from previous experimental work. Design issues divided by topic into mechanical, thermal and electrical requirements are addressed. Large mass low-background experiments have been recognized by the scientific community as appropriate tools to aid in the refinement of the standard model. The design of these experiments is very costly and a rigorous engineering review is required for their success. The extreme conditions that the components of the experiment must withstand (heavy shielding, vacuum/pressure and temperature gradients), in combination with unprecedented noise levels, necessitate engineering guidance to support quality construction and safe operating conditions. Physical properties and analytical results of typical construction materials are presented. Design considerations for achieving ultra-low-noise data acquisition systems are addressed. Five large-mass, low-background conceptual designs for the one-tonne scale germanium experiment are proposed and analyzed. The result is a series of recommendations for future experiments engineering and for the Majorana simulation task group to evaluate the different design approaches.

  8. Development of Magnetic Microcalorimeters for Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, L. N.; Hummatov, R.; Hall, J. A.; Cantor, R. C.; Boyd, S. T. P.

    2016-07-01

    Integrating the SQUIDs and sensing coils of magnetic microcalorimeters onto the same die is a promising approach for maximizing flux coupling and signal/noise. However, new challenges in microfabrication must be overcome, because the underlying SQUID devices are sensitive to chemical attack and elevated processing temperatures. In this report, we describe development and details of a microfabrication process for integrated SQUID/sensor gamma-ray magnetic microcalorimeters with electroformed gold absorbers, starting from a modified version of the STAR Cryoelectronics "Delta 1000" Josephson Junction process.

  9. Gamma-ray spectroscopy: The diffuse galactic glow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, Dieter H.

    1991-01-01

    The goal of this project is the development of a numerical code that provides statistical models of the sky distribution of gamma-ray lines due to the production of radioactive isotopes by ongoing Galactic nucleosynthesis. We are particularly interested in quasi-steady emission from novae, supernovae, and stellar winds, but continuum radiation and transient sources must also be considered. We have made significant progress during the first half period of this project and expect the timely completion of a code that can be applied to Oriented Scintillation Spectrometer Experiment (OSSE) Galactic plane survey data.

  10. Instructions for calibrating gamma detectors using the Canberra-Nuclear Data Genie Gamma Spectroscopy System

    SciTech Connect

    Brunk, J.L.

    1995-09-01

    A straight forward protocol provides a way to guide the calibration of a gamma detector for a particular geometry and material. Several programs have used the Low Level Gamma Counting Facility of the Health and Ecological Assessment Division of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to count a variety of large environmental samples contained in several unique geometries. The equipment and calibration requirements needed to analyze these types of samples are explained. This document describes the calibration protocol that has been developed and describes how it is used to calibrate the detectors.

  11. Development of a low background liquid scintillation counter for a shallow underground laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Erchinger, Jennifer L.; Aalseth, Craig E.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Douglas, Matthew; Fuller, Erin S.; Keillor, Martin E.; Morley, Shannon M.; Mullen, Crystal A.; Orrell, John L.; Panisko, Mark E.; Warren, Glen A.; Williams, Russell O.; Wright, Michael E.

    2015-08-20

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has recently opened a shallow underground laboratory intended for measurement of lowconcentration levels of radioactive isotopes in samples collected from the environment. The development of a low-background liquid scintillation counter is currently underway to further augment the measurement capabilities within this underground laboratory. Liquid scintillation counting is especially useful for measuring charged particle (e.g., B, a) emitting isotopes with no (orvery weak) gamma-ray yields. The combination of high-efficiency detection of charged particle emission in a liquid scintillation cocktail coupled with the low-background environment of an appropriately-designed shield located in a clean underground laboratory provides the opportunity for increased-sensitivity measurements of a range of isotopes. To take advantage of the 35-meter water-equivalent overburden of the underground laboratory, a series of simulations have evaluated the instrumental shield design requirements to assess the possible background rate achievable. This report presents the design and background evaluation for a shallow underground, low background liquid scintillation counter design for sample measurements.

  12. CASCADES: An Ultra-Low-Background Germanium Crystal Array at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keillor, M. E.; Aalseth, C. E.; Day, A. R.; Erikson, L. E.; Fast, J. E.; Glasgow, B. D.; Hoppe, E. W.; Hossbach, T. W.; Hyronimus, B. J.; Miley, H. S.; Myers, A. W.; Seifert, A.; Stavenger, T. J.

    2011-12-01

    State-of-the-art treaty verification techniques, environmental surveillance, and physics experiments require increased sensitivity for detecting and quantifying radionuclides of interest. This can be accomplished with new detector designs that establish high detection efficiency and reduced instrument backgrounds. Current research is producing an intrinsic germanium (HPGe) array designed for high detection efficiency, ultra-low-background performance, and sensitive γ—γ coincidence detection. The system design is optimized to accommodate filter paper samples, e.g. samples collected by the Radionuclide Aerosol Sampler/Analyzer. The system will provide high sensitivity for weak collections on atmospheric filter samples (e.g.<105 fissions) as well as offering the potential to gather additional information from higher activity filters using gamma cascade coincidence detection. The first of two HPGe crystal arrays in ultra-low-background vacuum cryostats has been assembled, with the second in progress. Traditional methods for constructing ultra-low-background detectors were followed, including use of materials known to be low in radioactive contaminants, use of ultra-pure reagents, and clean room assembly. The cryostat is constructed mainly from copper electroformed into near-final geometry at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Details of the detector assembly and initial background and spectroscopic measurement results are presented; also a description of the custom analysis package used by this project is given.

  13. Development of a low background liquid scintillation counter for a shallow underground laboratory.

    PubMed

    Erchinger, J L; Aalseth, C E; Bernacki, B E; Douglas, M; Fuller, E S; Keillor, M E; Morley, S M; Mullen, C A; Orrell, J L; Panisko, M E; Warren, G A; Williams, R O; Wright, M E

    2015-11-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has recently opened a shallow underground laboratory intended for measurement of low-concentration levels of radioactive isotopes in samples collected from the environment. The development of a low-background liquid scintillation counter is currently underway to further augment the measurement capabilities within this underground laboratory. Liquid scintillation counting is especially useful for measuring charged particle (e.g., β and α) emitting isotopes with no (or very weak) gamma-ray yields. The combination of high-efficiency detection of charged particle emission in a liquid scintillation cocktail coupled with the low-background environment of an appropriately designed shield located in a clean underground laboratory provides the opportunity for increased-sensitivity measurements of a range of isotopes. To take advantage of the 35m-water-equivalent overburden of the underground laboratory, a series of simulations have evaluated the scintillation counter's shield design requirements to assess the possible background rate achievable. This report presents the design and background evaluation for a shallow underground, low background liquid scintillation counter design for sample measurements. PMID:26334781

  14. Environmental Radioactivity: Gamma Ray Spectroscopy with Germanium detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyas, Gargi; Beausang, Cornelius; Hughes, Richard; Tarlow, Thomas; Gell, Kristen; University of Richmond Physics Team

    2013-10-01

    A CF-1000BRL series portable Air Particle Sampler with filter paper as filter media was placed in one indoor and one outdoor location at 100 LPM flow rate on six dates under alternating rainy and warm weather conditions over the course of sixteen days in May 2013. The machine running times spanned between 6 to 69 hours. Each filter paper was then put in a germanium gamma ray detector, and the counts ranged from 93000 to 250000 seconds. The spectra obtained were analyzed by the CANBERRA Genie 2000 software, corrected using a background spectrum, and calibrated using a 20.27 kBq activity multi-nuclide source. We graphed the corrected counts (from detector analysis time)/second (from air sampler running time)/liter (from the air sampler's flow rate) of sharp, significantly big peaks corresponding to a nuclide in every sample against the sample number along with error bars. The graphs were then used to compare the samples and they showed a similar trend. The slight differences were usually due to the different running times of the air sampler. The graphs of about 22 nuclides were analyzed. We also tried to recognize the nuclei to which several gamma rays belonged that were displayed but not recognized by the Genie 2000 software.

  15. HIGH ENERGY DELAYED GAMMA SPECTROSCOPY FOR PLUTONIUM ASSAY OF SPENT REACTOR FUEL

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Luke W.; Smith, L. E.; Misner, Alex C.

    2011-07-18

    Nuclear safeguards requires accountancy of plutonium present in spent reactor fuels. Current non-destructive methods do not directly measure plutonium content but instead rely on indirect measurements that require operator declarations of the fuel history. Delayed gamma spectroscopy is one method being investigated which can overcome these limitations. Delayed gamma rays from fission depend on the isotopic fission yield of the fissile isotope, and thus can be used to fingerprint the isotopes undergoing fission. However, difficulties arise because of the intense background due to long lived fission radionuclides already present in the fuel. We report on progress on simulated measurements of the delayed gamma spectrum in the presence of this background, using neutrons from a D-T source thermalized in an interrogation chamber slipped over a fuel assembly. By focusing on delayed gammas in the 3 to 4 MeV range, the passive spectrum becomes negligible, while allowing the preferential attenuation of the passive background to acceptable levels.

  16. High resolution spectroscopy from low altitude satellites. [gamma ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakano, G. H.; Imhof, W. L.

    1978-01-01

    The P 78 1 satellite to be placed in a synchronous polar orbit at an altitude of 550-660 km will carry two identical high resolution spectrometers each consisting of a single (approximately 85 cc) intrinsic germanium IGE detector. The payload also includes a pair of phoswitch scintillators, an array of CdTe detectors and several particle detectors, all of which are mounted on the wheel of the satellite. The intrinsic high purity IGE detectors receive cooling from two Stirling cycle refrigerators and facilitate the assembly of large and complex detector arrays planned for the next generation of high sensitivity instruments such as those planned for the gamma ray observatory. The major subsystems of the spectrometer are discussed as well as its capabilities.

  17. In-beam gamma-ray spectroscopy at the RIBF

    SciTech Connect

    Doornenbal, Pieter

    2015-10-15

    At the Radioactive Isotope Beam Factory stable primary beams are accelerated up to 345 MeV/u and incident on a primary target to produce secondary cocktail beams with the fragment separator BigRIPS ranging from the lightest nuclei up to the uranium region. For in-beam γ-ray spectroscopy, the secondary beam impinge on a reaction target at energies between 100 and 300 MeV/u. Reaction residues are identified with the ZeroDegree spectrometer and γ-rays detected with the NaI(Tl) based DALI2 array. This conference paper outlines the experimental setup and presents recent exemplary results.

  18. Ultra-Low-Background Copper Production and Clean Fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Aalseth, C.E.; Brodzinski, R.L.; Farmer, O.T.; Hoppe, E.W.; Hossbach, T.W.; Miley, H.S.; Reeves, J.H.

    2005-09-08

    Commercial high-purity copper is an attractive material for constructing ultra-low-background radiation measurement devices. When even higher purity is desired, additional electrolytic and chemical purification can be combined with the final fabrication step. This process results in 'electroformed' copper parts of extreme purity. Copper electroforming can be done underground, providing a way to eliminate cosmogenic activation products seen in copper that has had above-ground exposure. A brief summary of the history, cosmogenics, process chemistry, cleaning, and passivation of this material is given. Examples of finished parts illustrate the method. The required infrastructure is summarized.

  19. Ultra-Low-Background Copper Production and Clean Fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Aalseth, Craig E.; Brodzinski, Ronald L.; Farmer, O T.; Hoppe, Eric W.; Hossbach, Todd W.; Miley, Harry S.; Reeves, James H.

    2005-11-01

    Commercial high-purity copper is an attractive material for constructing ultra-low-background radiation measurement devices. When even higher purity is desired, additional electrolytic and chemical purification can be combined with the final fabrication step. This process results in ''electroformed'' copper parts of extreme purity. Copper electroforming can be done underground, providing a way to eliminate cosmogenic activation products seen in copper that has had above-ground exposure. A brief summary of the history, cosmogenics, process chemistry, cleaning, and passivation of this material is given. Examples of finished parts illustrate the method. The required infrastructure is summarized.

  20. Low background techniques for the Borexino nylon vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Pocar, Andrea

    2005-09-08

    Borexino is an organic liquid scintillator underground detector for low energy solar neutrinos. The experiment has to satisfy extremely stringent low background requirements. The thin nylon spherical scintillator containment vessel has to meet cleanliness and low radioactivity levels second only, within the detector, to the scintillator itself. Overall, the background from the vessel in the fiducial volume of the detector must be kept at the level of one event per day or better. The requirements, design choices, results from laboratory tests, and fabrication techniques that have been adopted to meet this goal are presented. Details of the precautions taken during the installation of the vessels inside the Borexino detector are also discussed.

  1. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy based-on interferon-gamma detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guan-Wei; Kuo, Yi-Ching; Tsai, Pei-I.; Lee, Chih-Kung

    2014-03-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is an ancient disease constituted a long-term menace to public health. According to World Health Organization (WHO), mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) infected nearly a third of people of the world. There is about one new TB occurrence every second. Interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) is associated with susceptibility to TB, and interferongamma release assays (IGRA) is considered to be the best alternative of tuberculin skin test (TST) for diagnosis of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI). Although significant progress has been made with regard to the design of enzyme immunoassays for IFN-γ, adopting this assay is still labor-intensive and time-consuming. To alleviate these drawbacks, we used IFN-γ antibody to facilitate the detection of IFN-γ. An experimental verification on the performance of IGRA was done in this research. We developed two biosensor configurations, both of which possess high sensitivity, specificity, and rapid IFN-γ diagnoses. The first is the electrochemical method. The second is a circular polarization interferometry configuration, which incorporates two light beams with p-polarization and s-polarization states individually along a common path, a four photo-detector quadrature configuration to arrive at a phase modulated ellipsometer. With these two methods, interaction between IFN-γ antibody and IFN-γ were explored and presented in detail.

  2. Identification of gamma-irradiated fruit juices by EPR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksieva, K. I.; Dimov, K. G.; Yordanov, N. D.

    2014-10-01

    The results of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) study on commercially available juices from various fruits and different fruit contents: 25%, 40%, 50%, and 100%, homemade juices, nectars and concentrated fruit syrups, before and after gamma-irradiation are reported. In order to remove water from non- and irradiated samples all juices and nectars were filtered; the solid residue was washed with alcohol and dried at room temperature. Only concentrated fruit syrups were dried for 60 min at 40 °C in a standard laboratory oven. All samples under study show a singlet EPR line with g=2.0025 before irradiation with exception of concentrated fruit syrups, which are EPR silent. Irradiation of juice samples gives rise to complex EPR spectra which gradually transferred to “cellulose-like” EPR spectrum from 25% to 100% fruit content. Concentrated fruit syrups show typical “sugar-like“ spectra due to added saccharides. All EPR spectra are characteristic and can prove radiation treatment. The fading kinetics of radiation-induced EPR signals were studied for a period of 60 days after irradiation.

  3. A silicon photomultiplier readout for time of flight neutron spectroscopy with {gamma}-ray detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Pietropaolo, A.; Gorini, G.; Festa, G.; Andreani, C.; De Pascale, M. P.; Reali, E.; Grazzi, F.; Schooneveld, E. M.

    2009-09-15

    The silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) is a recently developed photosensor used in particle physics, e.g., for detection of minimum ionizing particles and/or Cherenkov radiation. Its performance is comparable to that of photomultiplier tubes, but with advantages in terms of reduced volume and magnetic field insensitivity. In the present study, the performance of a gamma ray detector made of an yttrium aluminum perovskite scintillation crystal and a SiPM-based readout is assessed for use in time of flight neutron spectroscopy. Measurements performed at the ISIS pulsed neutron source demonstrate the feasibility of {gamma}-detection based on the new device.

  4. The ultra-pure Ti for the low background experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chepurnov, Alexander; Nisi, Stefano; di Vacri, Maria Laura; Suvorov, Yury

    2013-08-01

    The constant increase in mass of the cryostats, containment tanks, passive shielding and other mechanical elements of the modern low background detectors put more stringent requirements on their radiopurity levels. In general they have to be ˜1 mBq/kg of 238U/232Th or lower, which means that mass concentration should be < 0.1 ppb for 238U and < 0.25 ppb for 232Th. Traditionally, the field relies on specially selected low background stainless steel, electrochemical oxygen-free copper, or a combination of the two. However, the most promising material in terms of physical and mechanical properties is Titanium. Our study of various Ti samples show that the levels of contaminations of commercially available industrial titanium can varies from 0.2 to 100 mBq/kg for U/Th. Therefore, the only possible way to obtain the material with a low and controlled level of contamination is to develop (or improve the existing) the production technology and to build the dedicated manufactory line.

  5. The ultra-pure Ti for the low background experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Chepurnov, Alexander; Nisi, Stefano; Vacri, Maria Laura di; Suvorov, Yury

    2013-08-08

    The constant increase in mass of the cryostats, containment tanks, passive shielding and other mechanical elements of the modern low background detectors put more stringent requirements on their radiopurity levels. In general they have to be ∼1 mBq/kg of {sup 238}U/{sup 232}Th or lower, which means that mass concentration should be < 0.1 ppb for {sup 238}U and < 0.25 ppb for {sup 232}Th. Traditionally, the field relies on specially selected low background stainless steel, electrochemical oxygen-free copper, or a combination of the two. However, the most promising material in terms of physical and mechanical properties is Titanium. Our study of various Ti samples show that the levels of contaminations of commercially available industrial titanium can varies from 0.2 to 100 mBq/kg for U/Th. Therefore, the only possible way to obtain the material with a low and controlled level of contamination is to develop (or improve the existing) the production technology and to build the dedicated manufactory line.

  6. Neutron-induced gamma-ray spectroscopy: simulations for chemical mapping of planetary surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Brueckner, J.; Waenke, H.; Reedy, R.C.

    1986-01-01

    Cosmic rays interact with the surface of a planetary body and produce a cascade of secondary particles, such as neutrons. Neutron-induced scattering and capture reactions play an important role in the production of discrete gamma-ray lines that can be measured by a gamma-ray spectrometer on board of an orbiting spacecraft. These data can be used to determine the concentration of many elements in the surface of a planetary body, which provides clues to its bulk composition and in turn to its origin and evolution. To investigate the gamma rays made by neutron interactions, thin targets were irradiated with neutrons having energies from 14 MeV to 0.025 eV. By means of foil activation technique the ratio of epithermal to thermal neutrons was determined to be similar to that in the Moon. Gamma rays emitted by the targets and the surrounding material were detected by a high-resolution germanium detector in the energy range of 0.1 to 8 MeV. Most of the gamma-ray lines that are expected to be used for planetary gamma-ray spectroscopy were found in the recorded spectra and the principal lines in these spectra are presented. 58 refs., 7 figs., 9 tabs.

  7. Gamma-ray and neutron spectroscopy of planetary surfaces and atmospheres

    SciTech Connect

    Reedy, R.C.

    1987-01-01

    The neutrons and gamma rays escaping from a planet can be used to map the concentrations of various elements in its surface. In a planet, the high-energy particles in the galactic cosmic rays induce a cascade of particles that includes many neutrons. The ..gamma.. rays are made by the decay of the naturally-occurring radioelements and by nuclear excitations induced by cosmic-ray particles and their secondaries (especially neutron capture or inelastic scattering reactions). After a short history of planetary ..gamma..-ray and neutron spectroscopy, the ..gamma..-ray spectrometer and active neutron detection system planned for the Mars Observer Mission are presented. The results of laboratory experiments that simulate the cosmic-ray bombardments of planetary surfaces and the status of the theoretical calculations for the processes that make and transport neutrons and ..gamma.. rays will be reviewed. Studies of Mars, including its atmosphere, are emphasized, as are new ideas, concepts, and problems that have arisen over the last decade, such as Doppler broadening and peaks from neutron scattering with germanium nuclei in a ..gamma..-ray spectrometer. 23 refs., 1 fig.

  8. Neutron-induced gamma ray spectroscopy: Simulations for chemical mapping of planetary surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brückner, J.; Wänke, H.; Reedy, R. C.

    Cosmic rays interact with the surface of a planetary body and produce a cascade of secondary particles, such as neutrons. Neutron-induced scattering and capture reactions play an important role in the production of discrete gamma ray lines that can be measured by a gamma ray spectrometer on board an orbiting spacecraft. These data can be used to determine the concentration of many elements in the surface of a planetary body, which enables us to recognize individual geological units and provides clues to the bulk composition and in turn the origin and evolution of the body. To investigate the gamma ray fluxes induced by accelerator neutrons, experiments were carried out by irradiating thin targets with neutrons of energies from 14 MeV to 0.025 eV. The neutron fluxes at target position were measured by foil activation techniques. The ratio of the epithermal to thermal neutron flux was determined to be 2.0, a value that is similar to that in the moon. Gamma rays in the energy range of 0.1 to 8 MeV emitted by the targets and the surrounding material were measured by a high-resolution germanium detector. Most of the gamma ray lines that are expected to be used for planetary gamma ray Spectroscopy were found in the recorded spectra. These spectra were unfolded, background was subtracted, and gamma ray attenuation corrections were made to obtain the corresponding gamma ray fluxes from the targets. The majority of gamma ray lines were narrow without noticeable Doppler broadening except for the very broad 4.4-MeV line of carbon and five asymmetric germanium lines produced by the detector itself. The agreement of measured gamma ray flux ratios with calculated flux ratios for neutron-capture reactions showed that thermal neutron data can be used for theoretical calculations of low-energy neutron-induced gamma ray fluxes. This study was a first step toward a more realistic simulation of cosmic-ray-induced gamma-ray production and it indicates the importance of accelerator

  9. Neutron-induced gamma ray spectroscopy: Simulations for chemical mapping of planetary surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brückner, J.; Wänke, H.; Reedy, R. C.

    1987-09-01

    Cosmic rays interact with the surface of a planetary body and produce a cascade of secondary particles, such as neutrons. Neutron-induced scattering and capture reactions play an important role in the production of discrete gamma ray lines that can be measured by a gamma ray spectrometer on board an orbiting spacecraft. These data can be used to determine the concentration of many elements in the surface of a planetary body, which enables us to recognize individual geological units and provides clues to the bulk composition and in turn the origin and evolution of the body. To investigate the gamma ray fluxes induced by accelerator neutrons, experiments were carried out by irradiating thin targets with neutrons of energies from 14 MeV to 0.025 eV. The neutron fluxes at target position were measured by foil activation techniques. The ratio of the epithermal to thermal neutron flux was determined to be 2.0, a value that is similar to that in the moon. Gamma rays in the energy range of 0.1 to 8 MeV emitted by the targets and the surrounding material were measured by a high-resolution germanium detector. Most of the gamma ray lines that are expected to be used for planetary gamma ray spectroscopy were found in the recorded spectra. These spectra were unfolded, background was subtracted, and gamma ray attenuation corrections were made to obtain the corresponding gamma ray fluxes from the targets. The majority of gamma ray lines were narrow without noticeable Doppler broadening except for the very broad 4.4-MeV line of carbon and five asymmetric germanium lines produced by the detector itself. The agreement of measured gamma ray flux ratios with calculated flux ratios for neutron-capture reactions showed that thermal neutron data can be used for theoretical calculations of low-energy neutron-induced gamma ray fluxes. This study was a first step toward a more realistic simulation of cosmic-ray-induced gamma-ray production and it indicates the importance of accelerator

  10. Towards combining in-beam {gamma}-ray and conversion electron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Papadakis, P.; Herzberg, R.-D.; Pakarinen, J.; Butler, P. A.; Cresswell, J. R.; Page, R. D.; Parr, E.; Seddon, D. A.; Thornhill, J.; Wells, D.; Coleman-Smith, P. J.; Lazarus, I. H.; Letts, S. C.; Pucknell, V. F. E.; Simpson, J.; Greenlees, P. T.; Jones, P.; Julin, R.; Peura, P.; Rahkila, P.

    2009-01-28

    The SAGE spectrometer will combine a segmented Si-detector with a Ge-detector array aiming to take the simultaneous in-beam {gamma}-ray and conversion electron spectroscopy to the next level. It will be coupled with the GREAT focal plane spectrometer and the RITU gas-filled recoil separator at the accelerator laboratory of the University of Jyvaeskylae, Finland. Its high efficiency and resolution will open the door to a new era of complete spectroscopy directed, amongst others, at the study of superheavy nuclei aiming to investigate the properties of the next spherical proton shell above Z = 82.

  11. {gamma} spectroscopy around doubly magic {sup 48}Ca by heavy-ion transfer reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Leoni, Silvia

    2012-10-20

    {gamma} spectroscopy of neutron-rich nuclei around {sup 48}Ca is performed by the heavy-ion transfer reaction {sup 48}Ca on {sup 64}Ni at 282 MeV, with the PRISMA-CLARA setup at Legnaro Laboratory. Angular distributions, polarizations and lifetimes analysis probe spin and parities of several excited states, shading lights on their configuration. In the one neutron transfer channels, {sup 49}Ca and {sup 47}Ca, states arising by coupling a single particle to the 3{sup -} phonon of {sup 48}Ca are observed, showing the robustness of nuclear collectivity in rather light systems. The work demonstrates the feasibility of complete in-beam {gamma}-spectroscopy with heavy-ion transfer reactions and provides a method that can be further exploited in the future with heavy targets and radioactive beams.

  12. Delayed Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy for Non-Destructive Assay of Nuclear Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ludewigt, Bernhard; Mozin, Vladimir; Campbell, Luke; Favalli, Andrea; Alan W. Hunt; Edward T. Reedy; Heather A. Seipel

    2015-06-01

    Modeling capabilities were added to an existing framework and codes were adapted as needed for analyzing experiments and assessing application-specific assay concepts including simulation of measurements over many short irradiation/spectroscopy cycles. The code package was benchmarked against the data collected at the IAC for small targets and assembly-scale data collected at LANL. A study of delayed gamma-ray spectroscopy for nuclear safeguards was performed for a variety of assemblies in the extensive NGSI spent fuel library. The modeling results indicate that delayed gamma-ray responses can be collected from spent fuel assemblies with statistical quality sufficient for analyzing their isotopic composition using a 1011 n/s neutron generator and COTS detector instrumentation.

  13. Vibrational spectrum of gamma-HNIW investigated using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Guo, Lantao; Hu, Ying; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Cunlin; Chen, Yunqing; Zhang, X-C

    2006-04-17

    Experimental and theoretical investigations of the vibration spectrum of gamma-Hexanitrohexaazaisowurtzitane in the region of 0.2-2.5 terahertz are presented for the first time. The refraction index, absorption coefficient, and complex dielectric function of this sample are measured by terahertz time-domain spectroscopy. The simulated spectrum using density functional theory (DFT) is in agreement with the experimental data. The observed spectra features are assigned based on DFT calculation.

  14. Low background counting of 222Rn, 220Rn and 219Rn with electrostatic counters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mong, Brian; EXO-200 Collaboration; nEXO Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    The radon counting technique based on electrostatic precipitation of progenies in gas followed by alpha spectroscopy has been applied to support the material selection programs of low background, neutrino and dark matter experiments with emphasis on EXO. An array of 8 counters operated by Laurentian University at SNOLAB and the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant have reached the sensitivity of 10 atoms/day in the uranium, thorium and actinium chains. Hardware improvements are underway to further increase the capacity and sensitivity in support of nEXO. The radon counting technique based on electrostatic precipitation of progenies in gas followed by alpha spectroscopy has been applied to support the material selection programs of low background, neutrino and dark matter experiments with emphasis on EXO. An array of 8 counters operated by Laurentian University at SNOLAB and the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant have reached the sensitivity of 10 atoms/day in the uranium, thorium and actinium chains. Hardware improvements are underway to further increase the capacity and sensitivity in support of nEXO. Supported by NSERC Project Grants ``Search for Double Beta Decay with EXO.''

  15. Study of environmental radioactivity in Palestine by in situ gamma-ray spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lahham, Adnan; Al-Masri, Hussein; Judeh, Adnan

    2009-07-01

    This work presents qualitative and quantitative evaluation of environmental radioactivity in the central and southern areas of the West Bank, Palestine. For this purpose, the technology of in situ gamma-ray spectroscopy is used with a scintillation of 7.6 x 7.6 cm NaI(Tl) crystal connected to multichannel analyzer InSpector 2000 from Canberra instruments and laptop computer. Gamma-ray spectra were collected using the detector placed 1 m above the ground surface. Calibration of the detection system for in situ measurements of gamma-emitting radionuclides in open terrain is performed theoretically using Monte Carlo techniques. Measurements are conducted in 18 locations in 3 regions across the West Bank. The vast majority of identified radionuclides are naturally occurring gamma-emitting sources (the decay products of (238)U, (232)Th and (40)K). The only identified anthropogenic radionuclide is (137)Cs. Activity concentrations of (40)K, (238)U, (232)Th as well as the total outdoor gamma dose rate from these radionuclides were determined from the gamma-ray spectra. The highest activity concentrations of the three primordial radionuclides were 203 Bq kg(-1) for (40)K, 32 Bq kg(-1) for (238)U and 30 Bq kg(-1) for (232)Th. The total outdoor gamma dose rate calculated for the whole study area at 1 m above ground ranged from 6 to 30 nGy h(-1) with a mean of 18 +/- 7 nGy h(-1), which represents about 30% of the world average value. PMID:19470444

  16. Sensitivity of LDEF foil analyses using ultra-low background germanium vs. large NaI(Tl) multidimensional spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reeves, James H.; Arthur, Richard J.; Brodzinski, Ronald L.

    1993-01-01

    Cobalt foils and stainless steel samples were analyzed for induced Co-60 activity with both an ultra-low background germanium gamma-ray spectrometer and with a large NaI(Tl) multidimensional spectrometer, both of which use electronic anticoincidence shielding to reduce background counts resulting from cosmic rays. Aluminum samples were analyzed for Na-22. The results, in addition to the relative sensitivities and precisions afforded by the two methods, are presented.

  17. Monitoring of the interconversion of gamma-butyrolactone (GBL) to gamma hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) by Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Munshi, Tasnim; Brewster, Victoria L; Edwards, Howell G M; Hargreaves, Michael D; Jilani, Shelina K; Scowen, Ian J

    2013-08-01

    Gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) is a drug-of-abuse that has recently become associated with drug-facilitated sexual assault, known as date rape. For this reason the drug is commonly found 'spiked' in alcoholic beverages. When GHB is in solution it may undergo conversion into the corresponding lactone, Gamma-butyrolactone (GBL). Studies have been carried out to determine the detection limits of GHB and GBL in various solutions by Raman spectroscopy and to monitor the interconversion of GHB and GBL in solution with different pH conditions and temperature. In this study, a portable Raman spectrometer was used to study the interconversion of GHB and GBL in water and ethanol solutions as a function of pH, time, and temperature. The aim of this was to determine the optimum pH range for conversion in order to relate this to the pH ranges that the drug is likely to be subjected to, first in spiked beverages and secondly after ingestion in the digestive system. The aim was also to identify a timescale for this conversion in relation to possible scenarios, for example if GHB takes a number of hours to convert to GBL, it is likely for the beverage to be ingested before esterification can take place. GHB and GBL were then spiked into a selection of beverages of known pH in order to study the stability of GHB and GBL in real systems.

  18. Monitoring of the interconversion of gamma-butyrolactone (GBL) to gamma hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) by Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Munshi, Tasnim; Brewster, Victoria L; Edwards, Howell G M; Hargreaves, Michael D; Jilani, Shelina K; Scowen, Ian J

    2013-08-01

    Gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) is a drug-of-abuse that has recently become associated with drug-facilitated sexual assault, known as date rape. For this reason the drug is commonly found 'spiked' in alcoholic beverages. When GHB is in solution it may undergo conversion into the corresponding lactone, Gamma-butyrolactone (GBL). Studies have been carried out to determine the detection limits of GHB and GBL in various solutions by Raman spectroscopy and to monitor the interconversion of GHB and GBL in solution with different pH conditions and temperature. In this study, a portable Raman spectrometer was used to study the interconversion of GHB and GBL in water and ethanol solutions as a function of pH, time, and temperature. The aim of this was to determine the optimum pH range for conversion in order to relate this to the pH ranges that the drug is likely to be subjected to, first in spiked beverages and secondly after ingestion in the digestive system. The aim was also to identify a timescale for this conversion in relation to possible scenarios, for example if GHB takes a number of hours to convert to GBL, it is likely for the beverage to be ingested before esterification can take place. GHB and GBL were then spiked into a selection of beverages of known pH in order to study the stability of GHB and GBL in real systems. PMID:23225646

  19. Calibration of an Ultra-Low-Background Proportional Counter for Measuring 37Ar

    SciTech Connect

    Seifert, Allen; Aalseth, Craig E.; Bonicalzi, Ricco; Bowyer, Ted W.; Day, Anthony R.; Fuller, Erin S.; Haas, Derek A.; Hayes, James C.; Hoppe, Eric W.; Humble, Paul H.; Keillor, Martin E.; LaFerriere, Brian D.; Mace, Emily K.; McIntyre, Justin I.; Merriman, Jason H.; Miley, Harry S.; Myers, Allan W.; Orrell, John L.; Overman, Cory T.; Panisko, Mark E.; Williams, Richard M.

    2013-08-08

    Abstract. An ultra-low-background proportional counter (ULBPC) design has been developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) using clean materials, primarily electrochemically-purified copper. This detector, along with an ultra-low-background counting system (ULBCS), was developed to complement a new shallow underground laboratory (30 meters water-equivalent) constructed at PNNL. The ULBCS design includes passive neutron and gamma shielding, along with an active cosmic-veto system. This system provides a capability for making ultra-sensitive measurements to support applications like age-dating soil hydrocarbons with 14C/3H, age-dating of groundwater with 39Ar, and soil-gas assay for 37Ar to support On-Site Inspection (OSI). On-Site Inspection is a key component of the verification regime for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). Measurements of radionuclides created by an underground nuclear explosion are valuable signatures of a Treaty violation. For OSI, the 35-day half-life of 37Ar, produced from neutron interactions with calcium in soil, provides both high specific activity and sufficient time for inspection before decay limits sensitivity. This work describes the calibration techniques and analysis methods developed to enable quantitative measurements of 37Ar samples over a broad range of pressures. These efforts, along with parallel work in progress on gas chemistry separation, are expected to provide a significant new capability for 37Ar soil gas background studies.

  20. Calibration of an ultra-low-background proportional counter for measuring 37Ar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifert, A.; Aalseth, C. E.; Bonicalzi, R. M.; Bowyer, T. W.; Day, A. R.; Fuller, E. S.; Haas, D. A.; Hayes, J. C.; Hoppe, E. W.; Humble, P. H.; Keillor, M. E.; LaFerriere, B. D.; Mace, E. K.; McIntyre, J. I.; Merriman, J. H.; Miley, H. S.; Myers, A. W.; Orrell, J. L.; Overman, C. T.; Panisko, M. E.; Williams, R. M.

    2013-08-01

    An ultra-low-background proportional counter design has been developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) using clean materials, primarily electro-chemically-purified copper. This detector, along with an ultra-low-background counting system (ULBCS), was developed to complement a new shallow underground laboratory (30 meters water-equivalent) at PNNL. The ULBCS design includes passive neutron and gamma shielding, along with an active cosmic-veto system. This system provides a capability for making ultra-sensitive measurements to support applications like age-dating soil hydrocarbons with 14C/3H, age-dating of groundwater with 39Ar, and soil-gas assay for 37Ar to support On-Site Inspection (OSI). On-Site Inspection is a key component of the verification regime for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). Measurements of radionuclides created by an underground nuclear explosion are valuable signatures of a Treaty violation. For OSI, the 35-day half-life of 37Ar, produced from neutron interactions with calcium in soil, provides both high specific activity and sufficient time for inspection before decay limits sensitivity. This work describes the calibration techniques and analysis methods developed to enable quantitative measurements of 37Ar samples over a broad range of proportional counter operating pressures. These efforts, along with parallel work in progress on gas chemistry separation, are expected to provide a significant new capability for 37Ar soil gas background studies.

  1. Calibration of an ultra-low-background proportional counter for measuring {sup 37}Ar

    SciTech Connect

    Seifert, A.; Aalseth, C. E.; Bonicalzi, R. M.; Bowyer, T. W.; Day, A. R.; Fuller, E. S.; Haas, D. A.; Hayes, J. C.; Hoppe, E. W.; Humble, P. H.; Keillor, M. E.; LaFerriere, B. D.; Mace, E. K.; McIntyre, J. I.; Merriman, J. H.; Miley, H. S.; Myers, A. W.; Orrell, J. L.; Overman, C. T.; Panisko, M. E.; and others

    2013-08-08

    An ultra-low-background proportional counter design has been developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) using clean materials, primarily electro-chemically-purified copper. This detector, along with an ultra-low-background counting system (ULBCS), was developed to complement a new shallow underground laboratory (30 meters water-equivalent) at PNNL. The ULBCS design includes passive neutron and gamma shielding, along with an active cosmic-veto system. This system provides a capability for making ultra-sensitive measurements to support applications like age-dating soil hydrocarbons with {sup 14}C/{sup 3}H, age-dating of groundwater with {sup 39}Ar, and soil-gas assay for {sup 37}Ar to support On-Site Inspection (OSI). On-Site Inspection is a key component of the verification regime for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). Measurements of radionuclides created by an underground nuclear explosion are valuable signatures of a Treaty violation. For OSI, the 35-day half-life of {sup 37}Ar, produced from neutron interactions with calcium in soil, provides both high specific activity and sufficient time for inspection before decay limits sensitivity. This work describes the calibration techniques and analysis methods developed to enable quantitative measurements of {sup 37}Ar samples over a broad range of proportional counter operating pressures. These efforts, along with parallel work in progress on gas chemistry separation, are expected to provide a significant new capability for {sup 37}Ar soil gas background studies.

  2. Low-background tracker development for SuperNEMO

    SciTech Connect

    Mott, James; Collaboration: SuperNEMO Collaboration; and others

    2013-08-08

    The SuperNEMO experiment will search for neutrinoless double beta decay (0νββ) with a target sensitivity of T{sub 1/2}(0ν) > 10{sup 26} years, corresponding to an effective neutrino mass of 50-100 meV. At its heart there is a low-background gaseous tracking detector which allows for extremely efficient background rejection and, if 0νββ is observed, may provide important insights into the mechanism via which it may be mediated. Radon inside the tracker, which can mimic rare ββ events, is one of the most dangerous backgrounds for SuperNEMO. To reach the target sensitivity the radon concentration inside the tracking volume must be < 0.15 mBq/m{sup 3}. To reach this challengingly-low level of radon, a considerable program of R and D has been undertaken. This includes automation of the tracker-wiring process, development of a dedicated setup to measure radon diffusion and a 'radon concentration line' which will be able to measure levels of radon in the μBq/m{sup 3} range.

  3. Achieving low backgrounds in a variety of situations

    SciTech Connect

    Miley, H.S.; Brodzinski, R.L.; Reeves, J.H.; Avignone, F.T.

    1994-04-01

    To be sufficiently interesting, a physics experiment must measure a process that is relatively rare. The process may be rare due to small cross sections, low detector mass, or low detector efficiency. In any case, the process of interest must compete with processes in the detector`s environment that are much more prolific. Although these processes may have been of interest last year, they serve only to hide signals of interest today. The most common method of background reduction is to construct a lead shield around the detector. A less common technique is to reconstruct a detector apparatus with materials with a lower specific activity. The effects of cosmic rays are also frequently reduced by using an active veto system or relocating underground. However, the judicious use of these and other techniques requires some knowledge of the vulnerability of the detector and the relative sizes of potential backgrounds. The Pacific Northwest Laboratory-University of South Carolina (PNL-USC) double beta-decay collaboration and more recently the International Germanium Experiment (IGEX) collaboration have accrued a great deal of experience with semiconductor detectors operated above ground, in shallow below-ground locations (36 m), and in several deep underground locations. The effect of low-background materials, coincidence techniques, cosmic neutrons, and ubiquitous uranium and thorium decay products will be discussed as a function of depth and specifically for above-ground experiments.

  4. Low background high efficiency radiocesium detection system based on positron emission tomography technology

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Ogata, Yoshimune

    2013-09-15

    After the 2011 nuclear power plant accident at Fukushima, radiocesium contamination in food became a serious concern in Japan. However, low background and high efficiency radiocesium detectors are expensive and huge, including semiconductor germanium detectors. To solve this problem, we developed a radiocesium detector by employing positron emission tomography (PET) technology. Because {sup 134}Cs emits two gamma photons (795 and 605 keV) within 5 ps, they can selectively be measured with coincidence. Such major environmental gamma photons as {sup 40}K (1.46 MeV) are single photon emitters and a coincidence measurement reduces the detection limit of radiocesium detectors. We arranged eight sets of Bi{sub 4}Ge{sub 3}O{sub 12} (BGO) scintillation detectors in double rings (four for each ring) and measured the coincidence between these detectors using PET data acquisition system. A 50 × 50 × 30 mm BGO was optically coupled to a 2 in. square photomultiplier tube (PMT). By measuring the coincidence, we eliminated most single gamma photons from the energy distribution and only detected those from {sup 134}Cs at an average efficiency of 12%. The minimum detectable concentration of the system for the 100 s acquisition time is less than half of the food monitor requirements in Japan (25 Bq/kg). These results show that the developed radiocesium detector based on PET technology is promising to detect low level radiocesium.

  5. Fast shutter for low background radiation environments at SPR III

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, J.G.; Sites, K.; Scott, W.

    1994-08-01

    A fast shutter system has been developed and used to isolate experiments from the radiation emitted after the main pulse of the Sandia Pulse Reactor, SPR 3. In about 15 ms the system moves a massive 20 kg shield in front of the beam port aperture in the facility shield wall. A second gravity-driven shutter is dropped into place in about 200 ms. The total attenuation achieved in the beam intensity is about a factor of one hundred. The shutter assembly was used, along with a sensitive detection system, to observe the gamma ray flux emitted by various materials activated by the neutron beam at levels nine orders of magnitude smaller than the gamma flux level at the target during the reactor pulse.

  6. A shallow underground laboratory for low-background radiation measurements and materials development

    SciTech Connect

    Aalseth, C. E.; Bonicalzi, R. M.; Cantaloub, M. G.; Day, A. R.; Erikson, L. E.; Fast, J.; Forrester, J. B.; Fuller, E. S.; Glasgow, B. D.; Greenwood, L. R.; Hoppe, E. W.; Hossbach, T. W.; Hyronimus, B. J.; Keillor, M. E.; Mace, E. K.; McIntyre, J. I.; Merriman, J. H.; Myers, A. W.; Overman, C. T.; Overman, N. R.; and others

    2012-11-15

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory recently commissioned a new shallow underground laboratory, located at a depth of approximately 30 meters-water-equivalent. This new addition to the small class of radiation measurement laboratories located at modest underground depths houses the latest generation of custom-made, high-efficiency, low-background gamma-ray spectrometers and gas proportional counters. This paper describes the unique capabilities present in the shallow underground laboratory; these include large-scale ultra-pure materials production and a suite of radiation detection systems. Reported data characterize the degree of background reduction achieved through a combination of underground location, graded shielding, and rejection of cosmic-ray events. We conclude by presenting measurement targets and future opportunities.

  7. A Shallow Underground Laboratory for Low-Background Radiation Measurements and Materials Development

    SciTech Connect

    Aalseth, Craig E.; Bonicalzi, Ricco; Cantaloub, Michael G.; Day, Anthony R.; Erikson, Luke E.; Fast, James E.; Forrester, Joel B.; Fuller, Erin S.; Glasgow, Brian D.; Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Hoppe, Eric W.; Hossbach, Todd W.; Hyronimus, Brian J.; Keillor, Martin E.; Mace, Emily K.; McIntyre, Justin I.; Merriman, Jason H.; Myers, Allan W.; Overman, Cory T.; Overman, Nicole R.; Panisko, Mark E.; Seifert, Allen; Warren, Glen A.; Runkle, Robert C.

    2012-11-08

    Abstract: Pacific Northwest National Laboratory recently commissioned a new shallow underground laboratory, located at a depth of approximately 30 meters water-equivalent. This new addition to the small class of radiation measurement laboratories located at modest underground depths worldwide houses the latest generation of custom-made, high-efficiency, low-background gamma-ray spectrometers and gas proportional counters. This manuscript describes the unique capabilities present in the shallow underground laboratory; these include large-scale ultra-pure materials production and a suite of radiation detection systems. Reported data characterize the degree of background reduction achieved through a combination of underground location, graded shielding, and rejection of cosmic-ray events. We conclude by presenting measurement targets and future opportunities.

  8. Obelix, a new low-background HPGe at Modane Underground Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loaiza, P.; Brudanin, V.; Piquemal, F.; Rukhadze, E.; Rukhadze, N.; Stekl, I.; Warot, G.; Zampaolo, M.

    2015-08-01

    An ultra-low background coaxial HPGe detector for gamma-ray spectrometry with a relative efficiency of 160%, corresponding to a 600 cm3 Ge crystal, was installed at the Laboratoire Souterrain de Modane, France (4800 m.w.e). To reduce the instrinsic detector background, all parts involved in the detector cryostat were selected for their low radioactivity contamination. A shielding, composed of an inner layer of roman lead and an external layer of regular lead was installed, together with a system to reduce the Rn level inside the sample chamber. The shielding was designed to allow the measurement of Marinelli-shaped samples. We present the constructional details which lead to a remarkable low detector background of 73 cts/kg.d in [40, 3000] keV. Measured samples showed that sensitivities about 100 μBq/kg in 226Ra and 228Th are reached for samples of some kg and 30 days of lifetime.

  9. Low-background instrumental neutron activation analysis of silicon semiconductor materials

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, A.R.; McDonald, R.J.; Manini, H.; Hurley, D.L.; Norman, E.B.; Vella, M.C.; Odom, R.W.

    1996-01-01

    Samples of silicon wafers, some implanted with zinc, some with memory circuits fabricated on them, and some with oxide coatings were activated with neutrons and analyzed for trace element impurities with low-background germanium gamma-ray spectrometers. Results are presented for these samples as well as for a reference material. Because the silicon matrix activation is so small, reduced spectrometer system background permits the detection of significantly lower impurity concentrations than would otherwise be possible. For the highest efficiency and lowest background system, limits on the lowest levels of trace element concentrations have been measured for wafer sized (1 to 10 g) samples and inferred for bulk sized (365 g) samples. For wafer-sized samples, part-per-trillion detection capabilities are demonstrated for a variety of elemental contaminants important in semiconductor fabrication.

  10. Exploitation of Geometric Occlusion and Covariance Spectroscopy in a Gamma Sensor Array

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhopadhyay, Sanjoy; Maurer, Richard; Wolff, Ronald; Mitchell, Stephen; Guss, Paul; Trainham, Clifford

    2013-09-01

    The National Security Technologies, LLC, Remote Sensing Laboratory has recently used an array of six small-footprint (1-inch diameter by 3-inch long) cylindrical crystals of thallium-doped sodium iodide scintillators to obtain angular information from discrete gamma ray–emitting point sources. Obtaining angular information in a near-field measurement for a field-deployed gamma sensor is a requirement for radiological emergency work. Three of the sensors sit at the vertices of a 2-inch isosceles triangle, while the other three sit on the circumference of a 3-inch-radius circle centered in this triangle. This configuration exploits occlusion of sensors, correlation from Compton scattering within a detector array, and covariance spectroscopy, a spectral coincidence technique. Careful placement and orientation of individual detectors with reference to other detectors in an array can provide improved angular resolution for determining the source position by occlusion mechanism. By evaluating the values of, and the uncertainties in, the photopeak areas, efficiencies, branching ratio, peak area correction factors, and the correlations between these quantities, one can determine the precise activity of a particular radioisotope from a mixture of radioisotopes that have overlapping photopeaks that are ordinarily hard to deconvolve. The spectral coincidence technique, often known as covariance spectroscopy, examines the correlations and fluctuations in data that contain valuable information about radiation sources, transport media, and detection systems. Covariance spectroscopy enhances radionuclide identification techniques, provides directional information, and makes weaker gamma-ray emission—normally undetectable by common spectroscopic analysis—detectable. A series of experimental results using the concept of covariance spectroscopy are presented.

  11. A broadband THz receiver for low background space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagmann, C.; Benford, D. J.; Clapp, A. C.; Richards, P. L.; Timbie, P.

    1992-01-01

    We have developed a sensitive bolometric receiver for low background space applications. In a 10 percent bandwidth at 1 THz, this receiver is approximately 100 times more sensitive than a quantum limited heterodyne receiver with a 1 GHz IF bandwidth. This receiver is designed to be used for the long wavelength band (200-700 microns) in the MIPS instrument on NASA's SIRTF satellite. The bolometers are cooled to 100 mK by an adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator. Roughly 60 g of cesium chrome alum salt is partially demagnetized to 100 mK, followed by a slow regulated downramp to compensate for the heat leak. The hold time of the ADR system is about 18 hours with a temperature stability of delta T(sub rms) approx. equals 10 micro-K. The composite bolometers have electrical responsivities of 10(exp 9)V/W and electrical NEP's of about 3x10(exp -17) W/square root of Hz. The bolometer signals are read out by JFET preamplifiers located on the helium plate and operated at 120 K. We have addressed a number of space qualification issues, such as the development of an analog magnet controller, construction of a cryogenic shake-table for bolometers and selection of the paramagnetic salt CCA which can survive a bakeout at 50 C. The receiver is scheduled to be flown in the spring of 1992 on a balloon telescope. This flight has a dual purpose. One is to provide realistic test of the capabilities of the new receiver. The other is to search for anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background on scales of a few degrees.

  12. Neutron spallation measurements and impacts on low-background experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguayo, E.; Kouzes, R. T.; Siciliano, E. R.

    2014-09-01

    Ultralow-background experiments, such as neutrinoless double-β decay, solar neutrino, and dark-matter searches, are carried out deep underground to escape background events created by cosmic-ray muons passing through the detector volumes. However, such experiments may nevertheless be limited in sensitivity by cosmogenically induced backgrounds. This limit can be attributable to cosmogenically created radioactive isotopes produced either in situ during operation or prior to construction when the detector construction materials are above ground. An accurate knowledge of the production of the latter source of background is of paramount importance to be able to interpret the results of low-background experiments. One way to deal with the characterization of cosmogenic background production is to use Monte Carlo simulations to model the spallation reactions arising from cosmic-ray neutrons, protons, and muons. The objective of this work was to evaluate the degree of accuracy that such simulations could provide by comparing measurements for various materials to results from two standard Monte Carlo codes using the same physics model for generating intranuclear cascades. The simulated results from both codes provide the correct trends of neutron production with increasing material density. However, there was substantial disagreement between the models and experimental results for lower-density materials of Al, Fe, and Cu. The model values, when normalized to the Pb experimental results, show disagreement with experiment by a factor of about two for Fe and Cu and significantly greater for Al. It is concluded that additional neutron-induced spallation measurements are required to refine models routinely employed in underground physics research. Further data collection against the above materials is an initial list for benchmarking.

  13. Identification of lunar rock types and search for polar ice by gamma ray spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metzger, Albert E.; Drake, Darrell M.

    1990-01-01

    This paper examines the possibility of mapping the surface composition of the moon from an orbiting spin-stabilized spacecraft, using gamma ray spectroscopy and a cooled germanium solid-state device as a detector. A design for accommodating the germanium detector gamma ray spectrometer was devised, and the detection sensitivity was applied to typical lunar-rock compositions. For sets comprising nine highland and 16 mare types, the most useful elements were found to be Mg, Al, K, Ti, Fe, U, and Th. An analysis of the expected instrument response to the gamma ray and neutron fluxes of water ice indicated that a neutron mode added to the spectrometer will be more sensitive than the gamma ray mode to the possible presence of polar ice. It was calculated that, with a pair of selected neutron absorbers and a model which provides that 2.5 percent of the area above 75-deg latitude is occupied by trapping sites, the instrument will provide a 1-yr mission detection limit of 0.056 percent H2O by weight for each polar region.

  14. Study of spin-temperature effects using energy-ordered gamma-ray spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Baktash, C.

    1990-01-01

    We investigated a new continuum {gamma}-ray spectroscopy technique which is based on the detection of all emitted {gamma} rays in a 4{pi} detector system, and ordering them according to their energies on an event-by-event basis. The technique allows determination of growth strength functions, and rotational damping width as a function of spin and temperature. Thus, it opens up the possibility of studying the onset of motional narrowing and the mapping of the evolution of nuclear collectivity with spin and temperature. Application of the technique for preferential entry-state population, exit-channel selection, and feeding of the discrete states via selective pathways will be discussed. 19 refs., 6 figs.

  15. BATSE gamma-ray burst line search. 1: Search for narrow lines in spectroscopy detector data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, David M.; Teegarden, Bonnard J.; Schaefer, Bradley E.; Cline, Thomas L.; Band, David L.; Ford, Lyle A.; Matteson, James L.; Paciesas, William S.; Pendleton, Geoffrey N.; Briggs, Michael S.

    1994-01-01

    Analysis of data from the Spectroscopy Detectors (SDs) of the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO) has found no convincing line features in the spectra of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) in almost 3 years of operation, in contrast to expectations based on results from other experiments. In this Letter we discuss the visual search for narrow lines in the SD data. The search has examined 192 bursts, of which approximately 18 were intense enough that lines similar to those seen by instruments on the Ginga satellite would have been visible between approximately 20 and approximately 100 keV. A simplified calculation shows that the BATSE and Ginga results are consistent at the 13% level.

  16. Perspectives for neutron and gamma spectroscopy in high power laser driven experiments at ELI-NP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negoita, F.; Gugiu, M.; Petrascu, H.; Petrone, C.; Pietreanu, D.; Fuchs, J.; Chen, S.; Higginson, D.; Vassura, L.; Hannachi, F.; Tarisien, M.; Versteegen, M.; Antici, P.; Balabanski, D.; Balascuta, S.; Cernaianu, M.; Dancus, I.; Gales, S.; Neagu, L.; Petcu, C.; Risca, M.; Toma, M.; Turcu, E.; Ursescu, D.

    2015-02-01

    The measurement of energy spectra of neutrons and gamma rays emitted by nuclei, together with charge particles spectroscopy, are the main tools for understanding nuclear phenomena occurring also in high power laser driven experiments. However, the large number of particles emitted in a very short time, in particular the strong X-rays flash produced in laser-target interaction, impose adaptation of technique currently used in nuclear physics experiment at accelerator based facilities. These aspects are discussed (Section 1) in the context of proposed studies at high power laser system of ELI-NP. Preliminary results from two experiments performed at Titan (LLNL) and ELFIE (LULI) facilities using plastic scintillators for neutron detection (Section 2) and LaBr3(Ce) scintillators for gamma detection (Section 3) are presented demonstrating the capabilities and the limitations of the employed methods. Possible improvements of these spectroscopic methods and their proposed implementation at ELI-NP will be discussed as well in the last section.

  17. Time-resolved spectroscopy measurements of hydrogen-alpha, -beta, and -gamma emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Parigger, Christian G.; Dackman, Matthew; Hornkohl, James O

    2008-11-01

    Hydrogen emission spectroscopy results are reported following laser-induced optical breakdown with infrared Nd:YAG laser radiation focused into a pulsed methane flow. Measurements of Stark-broadened atomic hydrogen-alpha, -beta, and -gamma lines show electron number densities of 0.3 to 4x10{sup 17} cm{sup -3} for time delays of 2.1 to 0.4 {mu}s after laser-induced optical breakdown. In methane flow, recombination molecular spectra of the {delta}{nu}=+2 progression of the C2 Swan system are discernable in the H{beta} and H{gamma} plasma emissions within the first few microseconds. The recorded atomic spectra indicate the occurrence of hydrogen self-absorption for pulsed CH4 flow pressures of 2.7x10{sup 5} Pa (25 psig) and 6.5x10{sup 5} Pa (80 psig)

  18. Comparison of in situ and laboratory gamma spectroscopy of natural radionuclides in desert soil.

    PubMed

    Benke, R R; Kearfott, K J

    1997-08-01

    In situ and laboratory gamma spectroscopy were used to characterize natural background levels of radiation in the soil at eight sites around the Yucca Mountain Range. The purpose of this practical field analysis was to determine if published empirical in situ calibration factors would yield accurate quantitative specific activities (Bq kg(-1)) in a desert environment. Corrections were made to the in situ calibration factors to account for the on-axis response of a detector with a thin beryllium end window. The in situ gamma spectroscopy results were compared to laboratory gamma spectroscopy of soil samples gathered from each site. Five natural radionuclides were considered: 40K, 214Pb, 214Bi, 208Tl, and 228Ac. The in situ determined specific activities were consistently within +/-15% of the laboratory soil sample results. A quantitative discussion of the factors contributing to the uncertainty in the in situ and laboratory results is included. Analysis on the specific activity data using statistical hypothesis tests determined that three nuclides, 214Pb, 214Bi, and 228Ac showed a weak site dependence while the other two nuclides, 40K and 208Tl, did not exhibit a site dependence. Differing radiation background levels from site to site along with in situ and laboratory uncertainties in excess of 10% are two factors that account for the weak site dependence. Despite the good correlation between data, it was recommended that the in situ detector be calibrated by a detector-specific Monte Carlo code which would accurately model more complex geometries and source distributions. PMID:9228170

  19. Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy at TRIUMF-ISAC: the New Frontier of Radioactive Ion Beam Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, G. C.; Andreoiu, C.; Austin, R. A. E.; Bandyopadhyay, D.; Becker, J. A.; Bricault, P.; Brown, N.; Chan, S.; Churchman, R.; Colosimo, S.; Coombes, H.; Cross, D.; Demand, G.; Drake, T. E.; Dombsky, M.; Ettenauer, S.; Finlay, P.; Furse, D.; Garnsworthy, A.; Garrett, P. E.; Green, K. L.; Grinyer, G. F.; Hyland, B.; Hackman, G.; Kanungo, R.; Kulp, W. D.; Lassen, J.; Leach, K. G.; Leslie, J. R.; Mattoon, C.; Melconian, D.; Morton, A. C.; Pearson, C. J.; Phillips, A. A.; Rand, E.; Sarazin, F.; Svensson, C. E.; Sumithrarachchi, S.; Schumaker, M. A.; Triambak, S.; Waddington, J. C.; Walker, P. M.; Williams, S. J.; Wood, J. L.; Wong, J.; Zganjar, E. F.

    2009-03-01

    High-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy is essential to fully exploit the unique scientific opportunities at the next generation radioactive ion beam facilities such as the TRIUMF Isotope Separator and Accelerator (ISAC). At ISAC the 8π spectrometer and its associated auxiliary detectors is optimize for β-decay studies while TIGRESS an array of segmented clover HPGe detectors has been designed for studies with accelerated beams. This paper gives a brief overview of these facilities and also presents recent examples of the diverse experimental program carried out at the 8π spectrometer.

  20. Gamma-ray-spectroscopy following high-flux 14-MeV neutron activation

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, R.E.

    1981-10-12

    The Rotating Target Neutron Source (RTNS-I), a high-intensity source of 14-MeV neutrons at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), has been used for applications in activation analysis, inertial-confinement-fusion diagnostic development, and fission decay-heat studies. The fast-neutron flux from the RTNS-I is at least 50 times the maximum fluxes available from typical neutron generators, making these applications possible. Facilities and procedures necessary for gamma-ray spectroscopy of samples irradiated at the RTNS-I were developed.

  1. Synthesis and proton NMR spectroscopy of intra-vesicular gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA).

    PubMed

    Wang, Luke Y-J; Tong, Rong; Kohane, Daniel S

    2013-01-01

    We report the synthesis of vesicles containing gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), and their proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR) spectra. These vesicles were constructed to more closely mimic the intracellular environment wherein GABA exists. For this study, these GABA-containing vesicles were examined under (1)H NMR as a potential platform for future studies on the differences between aqueous phantoms, ex vivo brain extracts, and in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy results. We found that intra-vesicular GABA faithfully yielded the chemical shifts and J-coupling constants of free aqueous GABA, alongside the chemical shift signals of the vesicle wall.

  2. Concentration of liquid sample for gamma-ray spectroscopy with ultrasonic nebulization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jungsoon; Kim, Jihyang; Jung, Jihee; Kim, Moojoon; Ha, Kanglyeol

    2015-07-01

    Radionuclide analysis of sea water is necessary to monitor environmental contamination due to the radioactive substances from nuclear facilities. However, it is difficult to analyze the nuclides promptly with the conventional method of coprecipitation during emergencies because the method requires long precipitation times. In this study, an effective concentration method with ultrasonic nebulization was suggested for sea water samples. When a sea water sample of 40 L was concentrated, 30 h was required with the conventional method, whereas it took less than 11 h with the suggested method. The validity of the suggested method was verified by gamma-ray spectroscopy.

  3. Study of asymmetries of Cd(Zn)Te devices investigated using photo-induced current transient spectroscopy, Rutherford backscattering, surface photo-voltage spectroscopy, and gamma ray spectroscopies

    SciTech Connect

    Crocco, J.; Bensalah, H.; Zheng, Q.; Dieguez, E.; Corregidor, V.; Avles, E.; Castaldini, A.; Fraboni, B.; Cavalcoli, D.; Cavallini, A.; Vela, O.

    2012-10-01

    Despite these recent advancements in preparing the surface of Cd(Zn)Te devices for detector applications, large asymmetries in the electronic properties of planar Cd(Zn)Te detectors are common. Furthermore, for the development of patterned electrode geometries, selection of each electrode surface is crucial for minimizing dark current in the device. This investigation presented here has been carried out with three objectives. Each objective is oriented towards establishing reliable methods for the selection of the anode and cathode surfaces independent of the crystallographic orientation. The objectives of this study are (i) investigate how the asymmetry in I-V characteristics of Cd(Zn)Te devices may be associated with the TeO2 interfacial layer using Rutherford backscattering to study the structure at the Au-Cd(Zn)Te interface, (ii) develop an understanding of how the concentration of the active traps in Cd(Zn)Te varies with the external bias, and (iii) propose non-destructive methods for selection of the anode and cathode which are independent of crystallographic orientation. The spectroscopic methods employed in this investigation include Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, photo-induced current transient spectroscopy, and surface photo-voltage spectroscopy, as well as gamma ray spectroscopy to demonstrate the influence on detector properties.

  4. BASIS mission concept for gamma-ray burst imaging and spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehrels, Neil A.; Teegarden, Bonnard J.; Barbier, Louis M.; Barthelmy, Scott D.; Bartlett, Lyle M.; Cline, Thomas L.; Fenimore, Edward E.; Fishman, Gerald J.; Hurley, Kevin; Krizmanic, John F.; Kouveliotou, C.; Leventhal, M.; McCammon, Dan; Norris, Jay P.; Palmer, David; Parsons, Ann M.; Paciesas, William S.; Sanders, Wilton T.; Schaefer, B.; Stahle, Carl M.; Tueller, Jack; van Paradijs, J.; Woosley, Stanford E.

    1996-10-01

    We are studying a gamma-ray burst mission concept called burst arcsecond imaging and spectroscopy (BASIS) as part of NASA's new mission concepts for astrophysics program. The scientific objectives are to accurately locate bursts, determine their distance scale, and measure the physical characteristics of the emission region. Arcsecond burst positions (angular resolution approximately 30 arcsec, source positions approximately 3 arcsec) will be obtained for approximately 100 bursts per year using the 10 - 100 keV emission. This will allow the first deep, unconfused counterpart searches at other wavelengths. The key technological breakthrough that makes such measurements possible is the development of CdZnTe room-temperature semiconductor detectors with fine (approximately 100 micron) spatial resolution. Fine spectroscopy will be obtained between 0.2 and 150 keV. The 0.2 keV threshold will allow the first measurements of absorption in our galaxy and possible host galaxies, constraining the distance scale and host environment.

  5. Spectrochemical Analysis Using Low-Background Laser Plasma Induced by Nd-YAG Laser at Low Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madjid, Syahrun Nur; Kitazima, Iwao; Lie, Tjung Jie; Kurniawan, Hendrik; Kagawa, Kiichiro; Ikezawa, Kazuhiro; Maruyama, Tadashi

    2003-06-01

    It was demonstrated that the atomic emission lines emitted from a low-background plasma which is produced when a Q-switched Nd-YAG laser (28 mJ, 1064 nm, 8 ns) is focused on a sample at a reduced pressure of 0.5 Torr, can be successfully applied to microarea analysis of samples such as stone. In this regard, it was stressed that analytical equipment can be constructed at low cost using low-background plasma spectroscopy because the gated optical multichannel analyzer (OMA) which is normally used in laser plasma spectroscopy can be replaced by a much simpler OMA system without gating. By comparing the results obtained by low-background plasma spectroscopy and those obtained using an electron-probe microanalyzer (EPMA), it was shown that by using this laser method, a much more sensitive analysis can be achieved. By attaching a small chamber directly to the sample surface with the aid of an o-ring, and applying this laser method, we can construct an in-situ mobile analytical system for use in fields such as geology and archeology.

  6. Gamma detectors for spectroscopy and imaging based on scintillators coupled to semiconductor detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorini, Carlo

    2000-11-01

    Silicon photodetectors have been successfully employed for scintillation detection in gamma-ray spectroscopy and imaging applications. When compared to photomultiplier tubes (PMTs), silicon photodetectors are characterized by higher quantum efficiency to the scintillation light. Moreover, these devices are more compact, immune to magnetic fields and can be easily integrated in monolithic arrays of units whose size could range from few mm2 up to some cm2. New gamma-ray detection systems based on scintillators coupled to silicon photodetectors have been recently developed for astrophysics experiments as well as for imaging systems in nuclear medicine. Among silicon detectors, conventional silicon PN photodiodes (PDs), avalanche photodiodes (APDs) and silicon drift detectors (SDDs) have been used with scintillators both as single units and as monolithic arrays. In the paper, the main features of silicon photodetectors used with scintillators for gamma detection are shortly described and the more recent achievements in their development are overviewed. Finally, a comparison of the achievable performances with PDs, APDs, and SDDs is reported.

  7. Delayed Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy for Non-Destructive Assay of Nuclear Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ludewigt, Bernhard; Mozin, Vladimir; Campbell, Luke; Favalli, Andrea; Alan W. Hunt; Reedy, Edward T.E.; Seipel, Heather

    2015-06-01

    High-­energy, beta-delayed gamma-­ray spectroscopy is a potential, non-­destructive assay techniques for the independent verification of declared quantities of special nuclear materials at key stages of the fuel cycle and for directly assaying nuclear material inventories for spent fuel handling, interim storage, reprocessing facilities, repository sites, and final disposal. Other potential applications include determination of MOX fuel composition, characterization of nuclear waste packages, and challenges in homeland security and arms control verification. Experimental measurements were performed to evaluate fission fragment yields, to test methods for determining isotopic fractions, and to benchmark the modeling code package. Experimental measurement campaigns were carried out at the IAC using a photo-­neutron source and at OSU using a thermal neutron beam from the TRIGA reactor to characterize the emission of high-­energy delayed gamma rays from 235U, 239Pu, and 241Pu targets following neutron induced fission. Data were collected for pure and combined targets for several irradiation/spectroscopy cycle times ranging from 10/10 seconds to 15/30 minutes.The delayed gamma-ray signature of 241Pu, a significant fissile constituent in spent fuel, was measured and compared to 239Pu. The 241Pu/239Pu ratios varied between 0.5 and 1.2 for ten prominent lines in the 2700-­3600 keV energy range. Such significant differences in relative peak intensities make it possible to determine relative fractions of these isotopes in a mixed sample. A method for determining fission product yields by fitting the energy and time dependence of the delayed gamma-­ray emission was developed and demonstrated on a limited 235U data set. De-­convolution methods for determining fissile fractions were developed and tested on the experimental data. The use of high count-­rate LaBr3 detectors

  8. Elemental composition of the lunar surface: Analysis of gamma ray spectroscopy data from Lunar Prospector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prettyman, T. H.; Hagerty, J. J.; Elphic, R. C.; Feldman, W. C.; Lawrence, D. J.; McKinney, G. W.; Vaniman, D. T.

    2006-12-01

    Gamma ray spectroscopy data acquired by Lunar Prospector are used to determine global maps of the elemental composition of the lunar surface. Maps of the abundance of major oxides, MgO, Al2O3, SiO2, CaO, TiO2, and FeO, and trace incompatible elements, K and Th, are presented along with their geochemical interpretation. Linear spectral mixing is used to model the observed gamma ray spectrum for each map pixel. The spectral shape for each elemental constituent is determined by a Monte Carlo radiation transport calculation. Linearization of the mixing model is accomplished by scaling the spectral shapes with lunar surface parameters determined by neutron spectroscopy, including the number density of neutrons slowing down within the surface and the effective atomic mass of the surface materials. The association of the highlands with the feldspathic lunar meteorites is used to calibrate the mixing model and to determine backgrounds. A linear least squares approach is used to unmix measured spectra to determine the composition of each map pixel. The present analysis uses new gamma ray production cross sections for neutron interactions, resulting in improved accuracy compared to results previously submitted to the Planetary Data System. Systematic variations in lunar composition determined by the spectral unmixing analysis are compared with the lunar soil sample and meteorite collections. Significant results include improved accuracy for the abundance of Th and K in the highlands; identification of large regions, including western Procellarum, that are not well represented by the sample collection; and the association of relatively high concentrations of Mg with KREEP-rich regions on the lunar nearside, which may have implications for the concept of an early magma ocean.

  9. Experimental investigation of silicon photomultipliers as compact light readout systems for gamma-ray spectroscopy applications in fusion plasmas.

    PubMed

    Nocente, M; Fazzi, A; Tardocchi, M; Cazzaniga, C; Lorenzoli, M; Pirovano, C; Rebai, M; Uboldi, C; Varoli, V; Gorini, G

    2014-11-01

    A matrix of Silicon Photo Multipliers has been developed for light readout from a large area 1 in. × 1 in. LaBr3 crystal. The system has been characterized in the laboratory and its performance compared to that of a conventional photo multiplier tube. A pulse duration of 100 ns was achieved, which opens up to spectroscopy applications at high counting rates. The energy resolution measured using radioactive sources extrapolates to 3%-4% in the energy range Eγ = 3-5 MeV, enabling gamma-ray spectroscopy measurements at good energy resolution. The results reported here are of relevance in view of the development of compact gamma-ray detectors with spectroscopy capabilities, such as an enhanced gamma-ray camera for high power fusion plasmas, where the use of photomultiplier is impeded by space limitation and sensitivity to magnetic fields. PMID:25430287

  10. Experimental investigation of silicon photomultipliers as compact light readout systems for gamma-ray spectroscopy applications in fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Nocente, M. Gorini, G.; Fazzi, A.; Lorenzoli, M.; Pirovano, C.; Tardocchi, M.; Cazzaniga, C.; Rebai, M.; Uboldi, C.; Varoli, V.

    2014-11-15

    A matrix of Silicon Photo Multipliers has been developed for light readout from a large area 1 in. × 1 in. LaBr{sub 3} crystal. The system has been characterized in the laboratory and its performance compared to that of a conventional photo multiplier tube. A pulse duration of 100 ns was achieved, which opens up to spectroscopy applications at high counting rates. The energy resolution measured using radioactive sources extrapolates to 3%–4% in the energy range E{sub γ} = 3–5 MeV, enabling gamma-ray spectroscopy measurements at good energy resolution. The results reported here are of relevance in view of the development of compact gamma-ray detectors with spectroscopy capabilities, such as an enhanced gamma-ray camera for high power fusion plasmas, where the use of photomultiplier is impeded by space limitation and sensitivity to magnetic fields.

  11. High-performance gamma spectroscopy for equipment retrieval from Hanford high-level nuclear waste tanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troyer, Gary L.; Hillesand, K. E.; Goodwin, S. G.; Kessler, S. F.; Killian, E. W.; Legare, D.; Nelson, Joseph V., Jr.; Richard, R. F.; Nordquist, E. M.

    1999-01-01

    The cleanup of high level defense nuclear waste at the Hanford site presents several progressive challenges. Among these is the removal and disposal of various components from buried active waste tanks to allow new equipment insertion or hazards mitigation. A unique automated retrieval system at the tank provides for retrieval, high pressure washing, inventory measurement, and containment for disposal. Key to the inventory measurement is a three detector HPGe high performance gamma spectroscopy system capable of recovering data at up to ninety per cent saturation (200,000 counts per second). Data recovery is based on a unique embedded electronic pulser and specialized software to report the inventory. Each of the detectors have different shielding specified through Monte Carlo simulation with the MCNP program. This shielding provides performance over a dynamic range of eight orders of magnitude. System description, calibration issues and operational experiences are discussed.

  12. Burst ArcSecond Imaging & Spectroscopy (BASIS): A Gamma-Ray Burst Mission Concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehrels, N.; Teegarden, B.; Barbier, L.; Cline, T.; Parsons, A.; Tueller, J.; Barthelmy, S.; Palmer, D.; Krizmanic, J.; Fenimore, E.; Fishman, G.; Kouveliotou, C.; Hurley, K.; Paciesas, W.; van Paradijs, J.; Woosley, S.; Leventhal, M.; McCammon, D.; Sanders, W.; Schaefer, B.

    1996-12-01

    We are studying a gamma-ray burst mission concept called Burst ArcSecond Imaging and Spectroscopy (BASIS) as part of NASA's New Mission Concepts for Astrophysics program. The scientific objectives are to accurately locate bursts, determine their distance scale, and measure the physical characteristics of the emission region. Arcsecond burst positions (angular resolution ~ 30 arcsec, source positions ~ 3 arcsec for >10(-6) erg/cm(2) bursts) would be obtained for ~ 100 bursts per year using the 10-100 keV emission. This would allow the first deep, unconfused counterpart searches at other wavelengths. The key technological breakthrough that makes such measurements possible is the development of CdZnTe room-temperature semiconductor detectors with fine ( ~ 100 micron) spatial resolution. A secondary scientific objective is to perform a sensitive hard x-ray all-sky survey. A description of the mission concept and its scientific objectives will be presented.

  13. Low-Energy Study of Gamma-Ray Bursts Using Two BATSE Spectroscopy Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pangia, Michael J.

    2002-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are energetic, short-duration emissions of gamma-rays from astronomical sources typically well beyond our galaxy. The Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) that was onboard NASA's Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (CGRO) had detected an unprecedented 2704 GRBs during CGRO's nine-year mission. BATSE consisted of eight detector assemblies located at the corners of CGRO to give full sky coverage. Each assembly consisted of two detectors, a Large Area Detector (LAD) and a Spectroscopy Detector (SD). In determining the detail features of GRBs, the degree to which they possess a low-energy component (approx. 10 keV) is of interest. Preece has developed a method to study the low-energy characteristics and concluded that 14% of the 86 bright GRBs they studied had a definite low-energy component, referred to as a low-energy excess. Their study, and the present study as well, needed to use SD data, because it extends down to the low-energy range when operating in a high-gain mode. For their study, low-energy data was used from just one SD. To better quantify the low-energy behavior, this study will consider bursts for which two SDs satisfy the same criteria as used by Preece. The procedure developed by Preece to study the low-energy aspects of GRBs with BATSE data is to fit the data to a representative spectral function. In particular, two components are used, one corresponding to the low-energy component, and another representing the main part of the spectrum. The low-energy function used is the optically thin thermal bremsstrahlung (OTTB) model.

  14. High-precision gamma-ray spectroscopy for enhancing production and application of medical isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCutchan, E. A.; Sonzogni, A. A.; Smith, S. V.; Muench, L.; Nino, M.; Greene, J. P.; Carpenter, M. P.; Zhu, S.; Chillery, T.; Chowdhury, P.; Harding, R.; Lister, C. J.

    2015-10-01

    Nuclear medicine is a field which requires precise decay data for use in planning radionuclide production and in imaging and therapeutic applications. To address deficiencies in decay data, sources of medical isotopes were produced and purified at the Brookhaven Linear Isotope Producer (BLIP) then shipped to Argonne National Laboratory where high-precision, gamma-ray measurements were performed using Gammasphere. New decay schemes for a number of PET isotopes and the impact on dose calculations will be presented. To investigate the production of next-generation theranostic or radiotherapeutic isotopes, cross section measurements with high energy protons have also been explored at BLIP. The 100-200 MeV proton energy regime is relatively unexplored for isotope production, thus offering high discovery potential but at the same time a challenging analysis due to the large number of open channels at these energies. Results of cross sections deduced from Compton-suppressed, coincidence gamma-ray spectroscopy performed at Lowell will be presented, focusing on the production of platinum isotopes by irradiating natural platinum foils with 100 to 200 MeV protons. DOE Isotope Program is acknowledged for funding ST5001030. Work supported by the US DOE under Grant DE-FG02-94ER40848 and Contracts DE-AC02-98CH10946 and DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  15. Distance dependent quenching and gamma-ray spectroscopy in tin-loaded polystyrene scintillators

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Feng, Patrick L; Mengesha, Wondwosen; Anstey, Mitchell R.; Cordaro, Joseph Gabriel

    2016-02-01

    In this study, we report the synthesis and inclusion of rationally designed organotin compounds in polystyrene matrices as a route towards plastic scintillators capable of gamma-ray spectroscopy. Tin loading ratios of up to 15% w/w have been incorporated, resulting in photopeak energy resolution values as low as 10.9% for 662 keV gamma-rays. Scintillator constituents were selected based upon a previously reported distance-dependent quenching mechanism. Data obtained using UV-Vis and photoluminescence measurements are consistent with this phenomenon and are correlated with the steric and electronic properties of the respective organotin complexes. We also report fast scintillation decay behavior that is comparablemore » to the quenched scintillators 0.5% trans-stilbene doped bibenzyl and the commercial plastic scintillator BC-422Q-1%. These observations are discussed in the context of practical considerations such as optical transparency, ease-of-preparation/scale-up, and total scintillator cost.« less

  16. Investigation of LaBr3:Ce probe for gamma-ray spectroscopy and dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maghraby, Ahmed M.; Alzimami, K. S.; Alkhorayef, M. A.; Alsafi, K. G.; Ma, A.; Alfuraih, A. A.; Alghamdi, A. A.; Spyrou, N. M.

    2014-02-01

    The main thrust of this work is the investigation of performance of relatively new commercial LaBr3:Ce probe (Inspector 1000™ with LaBr3:Ce crystal) for gamma-ray spectroscopy and dosimetry measurements in comparison to LaCl3:Ce and NaI:Tl scintillators. The crystals were irradiated by a wide range of energies (57Co, 22Na, 18F, 137Cs and 60Co). The study involved recording of detected spectra and measurement of energy resolution, photopeak efficiency, internal radioactivity measurements as well as dose rate. The Monte Carlo package, Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission (GATE) was used to validate the experiments. Overall results showed very good agreement between the measurements and the simulations. The LaBr3:Ce crystal has excellent energy resolution, energy resolutions of (3.37±0.05)% and (2.98±0.07)% for a 137Cs 662 keV and a 60Co 1332 keV gamma-ray point sources respectively, were recorded. The disadvantage of the lanthanum halide scintillators is their internal radioactivity. Inspector 1000™ with LaBr3:Ce scintillator has shown an accurate and quick dose measurements at Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Units which allows accurate assessment of the radiation dose received by staff members compared to the use of electronic personal dosimeters (EPD).

  17. Raman spectroscopy of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate-acrylamide copolymer using gamma irradiation for crosslinking

    SciTech Connect

    Goheen, Steven C.; Saunders, Rachel M.; Davis, Rachel M.; Harvey, Scott D.; Olsen, Peter C.

    2006-02-18

    A copolymer hydrogel was made by mixing acrylamide and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate monomers in water and polymerizing with gamma irradiation. The progress of polymerization and the vibrational structure of the hydrogel was examined using Raman spectroscopy. Raman spectra indicated that the co-polymer has a molecular structure different from polyacrylamide or the individual monomers. The Raman data also indicate the presence of crosslinking at the C=O, NH2 and OH side chains. The spectra further suggest the continuous lengthening of the backbone of the polymers with increasing gamma dose. This is shown as the increase in C-C modes as C=C vibrations decrease. Raman spectra changed most dramatically as the monomer mixture became a gel at a dose of approximately 320 Gy. Spectral differences were subtler with doses exceeding 640 Gy, although chain lengthening continued beyond 1500 Gy. Potential applications of the copolymer hydrogel include reconstructive tissue as well as a standard material for radiation protection dosimetry. Results are discussed in relation to other potential applications of this polymer and dose-dependent changes in the Raman spectrum.

  18. Perspectives for neutron and gamma spectroscopy in high power laser driven experiments at ELI-NP

    SciTech Connect

    Negoita, F. Gugiu, M. Petrascu, H. Petrone, C. Pietreanu, D.; Fuchs, J.; Chen, S.; Higginson, D.; Vassura, L.; Hannachi, F.; Tarisien, M.; Versteegen, M.; Antici, P.; Balabanski, D.; Balascuta, S.; Cernaianu, M.; Dancus, I.; Gales, S.; Neagu, L.; Petcu, C.; and others

    2015-02-24

    The measurement of energy spectra of neutrons and gamma rays emitted by nuclei, together with charge particles spectroscopy, are the main tools for understanding nuclear phenomena occurring also in high power laser driven experiments. However, the large number of particles emitted in a very short time, in particular the strong X-rays flash produced in laser-target interaction, impose adaptation of technique currently used in nuclear physics experiment at accelerator based facilities. These aspects are discussed (Section 1) in the context of proposed studies at high power laser system of ELI-NP. Preliminary results from two experiments performed at Titan (LLNL) and ELFIE (LULI) facilities using plastic scintillators for neutron detection (Section 2) and LaBr{sub 3}(Ce) scintillators for gamma detection (Section 3) are presented demonstrating the capabilities and the limitations of the employed methods. Possible improvements of these spectroscopic methods and their proposed implementation at ELI-NP will be discussed as well in the last section.

  19. Obelix, a new low-background HPGe at Modane Underground Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Loaiza, P.; Piquemal, F.; Warot, G.; Zampaolo, M.

    2015-08-17

    An ultra-low background coaxial HPGe detector for gamma-ray spectrometry with a relative efficiency of 160%, corresponding to a 600 cm{sup 3} Ge crystal, was installed at the Laboratoire Souterrain de Modane, France (4800 m.w.e). To reduce the instrinsic detector background, all parts involved in the detector cryostat were selected for their low radioactivity contamination. A shielding, composed of an inner layer of roman lead and an external layer of regular lead was installed, together with a system to reduce the Rn level inside the sample chamber. The shielding was designed to allow the measurement of Marinelli-shaped samples. We present the constructional details which lead to a remarkable low detector background of 73 cts/kg·d in [40, 3000] keV. Measured samples showed that sensitivities about 100 μBq/kg in {sup 226}Ra and {sup 228}Th are reached for samples of some kg and 30 days of lifetime.

  20. Digital Pulse-Shape Discrimination Applied to an Ultra-Low-Background Gas-Proportional Counting System: First Results

    SciTech Connect

    Aalseth, Craig E.; Day, Anthony R.; Fuller, Erin S.; Hoppe, Eric W.; Keillor, Martin E.; Mace, Emily K.; Myers, A. W.; Overman, Cory T.; Panisko, Mark E.; Seifert, Allen; Warren, Glen A.; Williams, Richard M.

    2013-05-01

    Abstract A new ultra-low-background proportional counter (ULBPC) design was recently developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). This design, along with an ultra-low-background counting system (ULBCS) which provides passive and active shielding with radon exclusion, has been developed to complement a new shallow underground laboratory (~30 meters water-equivalent) constructed at PNNL. After these steps to mitigate dominant backgrounds (cosmic rays, external gamma-rays, radioactivity in materials), remaining background events do not exclusively arise from ionization of the proportional counter gas. Digital pulse-shape discrimination (PSD) is thus employed to further improve measurement sensitivity. In this work, a template shape is generated for each individual sample measurement of interest, a "self-calibrating" template. Differences in event topology can also cause differences in pulse shape. In this work, the temporal region analyzed for each event is refined to maximize background discrimination while avoiding unwanted sensitivity to event topology. This digital PSD method is applied to sample and background data, and initial measurement results from a biofuel methane sample are presented in the context of low-background measurements currently being developed.

  1. BASIS: a new gamma-ray burst imaging and spectroscopy mission concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teegarden, Bonnard J.; Gehrels, Neil A.; Fenimore, E. E.; Barbier, L.; Cline, Thomas L.; Parsons, Ann M.; Tueller, J.; Krizmanic, J.; Barthelmy, S.; Palmer, D.; Fishman, Gerald J.; Kouveliotou, C.; Hurley, Kevin; Paciesas, William S.; van Paradijs, J.; Leventhal, M.; Woosley, Stanford E.; McCammon, Dan; Sanders, Wilton T.; Schaefer, Barbara A.; Bartlett, L.; Lisse, Casey M.; Stahle, Carl M.

    1995-09-01

    We have proposed a gamma-ray burst mission concept called burst arcsecond imaging and spectroscopy (BASIS) in response to NASA's announcement for new mission concept studies. The scientific objectives are to accurately locate bursts, determine their distance scale, and measure the physical characteristics of the emission region. Arcsecond burst positions (angular resolution approximately 30 arcsec, source positions approximately 3 arcsec for greater than 10-6 erg cm-2 bursts) are obtained for about 100 bursts per year using the 10 - 200 keV emission. This allows the first deep, unconfused counterpart searches at other wavelengths. The key technological breakthrough that makes such measurements possible is the development of CdZnTe room-temperature semiconductor detectors with fine (approximately 100 micron) spatial resolution. Fine spectroscopy is obtained between 0.2 keV and 200 keV. The 0.2 keV threshold allows the first measurements of absorption in our galaxy and possible host galaxies, constraining the distance scale and host environment. The mission concept and its scientific objectives are described.

  2. Gamma-induced positron annihilation spectroscopy and application to radiation-damaged alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, D. P.; Hunt, A. W.; Tchelidze, L.; Kumar, J.; Smith, K.; Thompson, S.; Selim, F.; Williams, J.; Harmon, J. F.; Maloy, S.; Roy, A.

    2006-06-01

    Radiation damage and other defect studies of materials are limited to thin samples because of inherent limitations of well-established techniques such as diffraction methods and traditional positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) [P. Hautojarvi, et al., Positrons in Solids, Springer, Berlin, 1979, K.G. Lynn, et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 47 (1985) 239]. This limitation has greatly hampered industrial and in-situ applications. ISU has developed new methods that use pair-production to produce positrons throughout the volume of thick samples [F.A. Selim, D.P. Wells, et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. B 192 (2002) 197, F.A. Selim, D.P. Wells, et al., Nucl. Instru. Meth. A 495 (2002) 154, F.A. Selim, et al., J. Rad. Phys. Chem. 68 (2004) 427, F.A. Selim, D.P. Wells, et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. B 241 (2005) 253, A.W. Hunt, D.P. Wells, et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. B. 241 (2005) 262]. Unlike prior work at other laboratories that use bremsstrahlung beams to create positron beams (via pair-production) that are then directed at a sample of interest, we produce electron-positron pairs directly in samples of interest, and eliminate the intermediate step of a positron beam and its attendant penetrability limitations. Our methods include accelerator-based bremsstrahlung-induced pair-production in the sample for positron annihilation energy spectroscopy measurements (PAES), coincident proton-capture gamma-rays (where one of the gammas is used for pair-production in the sample) for positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS), or photo-nuclear activation of samples for either type of measurement. The positrons subsequently annihilate with sample electrons, emitting coincident 511 keV gamma-rays [F.A. Selim, D.P. Wells, et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. B 192 (2002) 197, F.A. Selim, D.P. Wells, et al., Nucl. Instru. Meth. A 495 (2002) 154, F.A. Selim, et al., J. Rad. Phys. Chem. 68 (2004) 427, F.A. Selim, D.P. Wells, et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. B 241 (2005) 253, A.W. Hunt, D

  3. Photon-induced positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy using ultrashort laser-Compton-scattered gamma-ray pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Taira, Y.; Toyokawa, H.; Kuroda, R.; Yamamoto, N.; Adachi, M.; Tanaka, S.; Katoh, M.

    2013-05-15

    High-energy ultrashort gamma-ray pulses can be generated via laser Compton scattering with 90 Degree-Sign collisions at the UVSOR-II electron storage ring. As an applied study of ultrashort gamma-ray pulses, a new photon-induced positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy approach has been developed. Ultrashort gamma-ray pulses with a maximum energy of 6.6 MeV and pulse width of 2.2 ps created positrons throughout bulk lead via pair production. Annihilation gamma rays were detected by a BaF{sub 2} scintillator mounted on a photomultiplier tube. A positron lifetime spectrum was obtained by measuring the time difference between the RF frequency of the electron storage ring and the detection time of the annihilation gamma rays. We calculated the response of the BaF{sub 2} scintillator and the time jitter caused by the variation in the total path length of the ultrashort gamma-ray pulses, annihilation gamma rays, and scintillation light using a Monte Carlo simulation code. The positron lifetime for bulk lead was successfully measured.

  4. Simulation of background reduction and Compton suppression in a low-background HPGe spectrometer at a surface laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Shun-Li; Cai, Xiao; Wu, Zhen-Zhong; Liu, Yi; Xie, Yu-Guang; Yu, Bo-Xiang; Wang, Zhi-Gang; Fang, Jian; Sun, Xi-Lei; Sun, Li-Jun; Liu, Ying-Biao; Gao, Long; Zhang, Xuan; Zhao, Hang; Zhou, Li; Lü, Jun-Guang; Hu, Tao

    2015-08-01

    High-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors are well suited to analyse the radioactivity of samples. In order to reduce the environmental background for an ultra-low background HPGe spectrometer, low-activity lead and oxygen free copper are installed outside the probe to shield from gamma radiation, with an outer plastic scintillator to veto cosmic rays, and an anti-Compton detector to improve the peak-to-Compton ratio. Using Geant4 tools and taking into account a detailed description of the detector, we optimize the sizes of these detectors to reach the design requirements. A set of experimental data from an existing HPGe spectrometer was used to compare with the simulation. For the future low-background HPGe detector simulation, considering different thicknesses of BGO crystals and anti-coincidence efficiency, the simulation results show that the optimal BGO thickness is 5.5 cm, and the peak-to-Compton ratio of 40K is raised to 1000 when the anti-coincidence efficiency is 0.85. In the background simulation, 15 cm oxygen-free copper plus 10 cm lead can reduce the environmental gamma rays to 0.0024 cps/100 cm3 Ge (50 keV-2.8 MeV), which is about 10-5 of the environmental background.

  5. Comparative Gamma Spectroscopy with SrI2(Eu), GYGAG(Ce) and Bi-loaded Plastic Scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Cherepy, N J

    2010-11-19

    We are developing new scintillator materials that offer potential for high resolution gamma ray spectroscopy at low cost. Single crystal SrI{sub 2}(Eu) offers {approx}3% resolution at 662 keV, in sizes of {approx}1 in{sup 3}. We have developed ceramics processing technology allowing us to achieve cubic inch scale transparent ceramic scintillators offering gamma spectroscopy performance superior to NaI(Tl). We fabricated a bismuth-loaded plastic scintillator that demonstrates energy resolution of {approx}8% at 662 keV in small sizes. Gamma ray spectroscopy can be used to identify the presence of weak radioactive sources within natural background. The ability to discriminate close-lying spectral lines is strongly dependent upon the energy resolution of the detector. In addition to excellent energy resolution, large volume detectors are needed to acquire sufficient events, for example, to identify a radioactive anomaly moving past a detector. We have employed a 'directed search' methodology for identifying potential scintillator materials candidates, resulting in the discovery of Europium-doped Strontium Iodide, SrI{sub 2}(Eu), Cerium-doped Gadolinium Garnet, GYGAG(Ce), and Bismuth-loaded Polymers. These scintillators possess very low self-radioactivity, offer energy resolution of 3-8% at 662 keV, and have potential to be grown cost-effectively to sizes similar to the most widely deployed gamma spectroscopy scintillator, Thallium-doped Sodium Iodide, NaI(Tl). In this study, gamma ray spectra of a variety of sources, were obtained employing SrI{sub 2}(Eu), GYGAG(Ce), Bi-loaded polymers, LaBr{sub 3}(Ce), and NaI(Tl). The effects of detector size, energy resolution, and background radioactivity (including self-radioactivity) on the ability to distinguish weak sources is quantified, based on a simple model, and qualitatively compared to laboratory data.

  6. Determination of environmental radiation flux and organ doses using in-situ gamma spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Ghamdi, Abdulrahman S.

    Contamination of buildings represent a unique problem during Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) of nuclear facilities. It is necessary to determine the long-lived radionuclides and their respective specific activities in building materials before the right D&D decision can be made. At the same time, radiation risk of workers or potential occupants in the facility must be assessed as part of the D&D process. The goal of this project was to develop a methodology of obtaining gamma radiation flux and organ doses from in-situ gamma spectroscopy. Algorithms were developed to simulate the response functions of the HPGe detector and to convert the spectra into photon fluences. A Monte Carlo code, MCNP4C, was used to simulate HPGe detector response and to develop the conversion algorithm. The simulated spectra obtained for an HPGe detector were converted to flux using the algorithm for various different geometries. The response functions of the detector are presented in this document for the gamma energies from 60 keV to 2.2 MeV. Published fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients were used to calculate organ doses and effective dose equivalent. We then tested the theory at a 100-MeV linear electron accelerator at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI). Samples of the activated concrete walls and floor in the target room of the Linac facility as well as some steel samples were taken to quantify the specific activities of the structures. The results show that the most important long-lived radionuclides include 22 Na, 46Sc, 54 Mn, 57Co, 60 Co, 65Zn, 152 Eu and 154Eu, depending on the location and composition of the material. The specific activities at the Linac facility range from 1.15E-01 to 765.31 muCi/Kg. The annual effective dose equivalent was assessed to be 2.44 mSv y-1 (0.244 rem y-1 ), which is about 5% of the Annual EDE limits to workers.

  7. Transparent ceramic scintillators for gamma spectroscopy and MeV imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherepy, N. J.; Seeley, Z. M.; Payne, S. A.; Swanberg, E. L.; Beck, P. R.; Schneberk, D. J.; Stone, G.; Perry, R.; Wihl, B.; Fisher, S. E.; Hunter, S. L.; Thelin, P. A.; Thompson, R. R.; Harvey, N. M.; Stefanik, T.; Kindem, J.

    2015-09-01

    We report on the development of two new mechanically rugged, high light yield transparent ceramic scintillators: (1) Ce-doped Gd-garnet for gamma spectroscopy, and (2) Eu-doped Gd-Lu-bixbyite for radiography. GYGAG(Ce) garnet transparent ceramics offer ρ = 5.8g/cm3, Zeff = 48, principal decay of <100 ns, and light yield of 50,000 Ph/MeV. Gdgarnet ceramic scintillators offer the best energy resolution of any oxide scintillator, as good as R(662 keV) = 3% (Si-PD readout) for small sizes and typically R(662 keV) < 5% for cubic inch sizes. For radiography, the bixbyite transparent ceramic scintillator, (Gd,Lu,Eu)2O3, or "GLO," offers excellent x-ray stopping, with ρ = 9.1 g/cm3 and Zeff = 68. Several 10" diameter by 0.1" thickness GLO scintillators have been fabricated. GLO outperforms scintillator glass for high energy radiography, due to higher light yield (55,000 Ph/MeV) and better stopping, while providing spatial resolution of >8 lp/mm.

  8. Gamma-ray spectroscopy in the decay of (83)Se to levels of (83)Br.

    PubMed

    Krane, K S

    2015-03-01

    High-resolution γ ray spectroscopy experiments have been done to study the emissions from the radioactive decay of 22-min (83g)Se produced from neutron capture using samples of enriched (82)Se. Energy and intensity values have been obtained to roughly an order of magnitude greater precision than in previous studies. Based on energy sums, 2 new levels are proposed in the daughter (83)Br and one previously proposed level is shown to be doubtful. Some 25 new transitions appear to decay with the (83)Se halflife, about half of which can be accommodated among the previous or newly proposed levels. Several previous γ ray placements are shown to be inconsistent with the new determinations of the (83)Br energy levels, but cannot be accommodated anywhere else among the known levels. As a result of the missing γ ray placements, some of the β branchings in the decay to levels of (83)Br appear to be negative. Gamma rays from the 2.4-h decay of the daughter (83)Br to levels of (83)Kr have also been observed, along with decays of (81g)(,m)Se present as a small impurity in the enriched samples and also as a strong component in irradiated samples of natural Se.

  9. A numerical method for the calibration of in situ gamma ray spectroscopy systems.

    PubMed

    Dewey, S C; Whetstone, Z D; Kearfott, K J

    2010-05-01

    High purity germanium in situ gamma ray spectroscopy systems are typically calibrated using pre-calculated tables and empirical formulas to estimate the response of a detector to an exponentially distributed source in a soil matrix. Although this method is effective, it has estimated uncertainties of 10-15%, is limited to only a restricted set of measurement scenarios, and the approach only applies to an exponentially distributed source. In addition, the only soil parameters that can be varied are density and moisture content, while soil attenuation properties are fixed. This paper presents a more flexible method for performing such calibrations. For this new method, a three- or four-dimensional analytical expression is derived that is a combination of a theoretical equation and experimentally measured data. Numerical methods are used to integrate this expression, which approximates the response of a detector to a large variety of source distributions within any soil, concrete, or other matrix. The calculation method is flexible enough to allow for the variation of multiple parameters, including media attenuation properties and the measurement geometry. The method could easily be adapted to horizontally non-uniform sources as well. Detector responses are calculated analytically and Monte Carlo radiation transport simulations are used to verify the results. Results indicate that the method adds an uncertainty of only approximately 5% to the other uncertainties typically associated with the calibration of a detector system. PMID:20386196

  10. A Multi-Contact, Low Capacitance HPGe Detector for High Rate Gamma Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, Christopher

    2014-12-04

    The detection, identification and non-destructive assay of special nuclear materials and nuclear fission by-products are critically important activities in support of nuclear non-proliferation programs. Both national and international nuclear safeguard agencies recognize that current accounting methods for spent nuclear fuel are inadequate from a safeguards perspective. Radiation detection and analysis by gamma-ray spectroscopy is a key tool in this field, but no instrument exists that can deliver the required performance (energy resolution and detection sensitivity) in the presence of very high background count rates encountered in the nuclear safeguards arena. The work of this project addresses this critical need by developing a unique gamma-ray detector based on high purity germanium that has the previously unachievable property of operating in the 1 million counts-per-second range while achieving state-of-the-art energy resolution necessary to identify and analyze the isotopes of interest. The technical approach was to design and fabricate a germanium detector with multiple segmented electrodes coupled to multi-channel high rate spectroscopy electronics. Dividing the germanium detector’s signal electrode into smaller sections offers two advantages; firstly, the energy resolution of the detector is potentially improved, and secondly, the detector is able to operate at higher count rates. The design challenges included the following; determining the optimum electrode configuration to meet the stringent energy resolution and count rate requirements; determining the electronic noise (and therefore energy resolution) of the completed system after multiple signals are recombined; designing the germanium crystal housing and vacuum cryostat; and customizing electronics to perform the signal recombination function in real time. In this phase I work, commercial off-the-shelf electrostatic modeling software was used to develop the segmented germanium crystal geometry

  11. Digitized detection of gamma-ray signals concentrated in narrow time windows for transient positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kinomura, A. Suzuki, R.; Oshima, N.; O’Rourke, B. E.; Nishijima, T.; Ogawa, H.

    2014-12-15

    A pulsed slow-positron beam generated by an electron linear accelerator was directly used for positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy without any positron storage devices. A waveform digitizer was introduced to simultaneously capture multiple gamma-ray signals originating from positron annihilation events during a single accelerator pulse. The positron pulse was chopped and bunched with the chopper signals also sent to the waveform digitizer. Time differences between the annihilation gamma-ray and chopper peaks were calculated and accumulated as lifetime spectra in a computer. The developed technique indicated that positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy can be performed in a 20 μs time window at a pulse repetition rate synchronous with the linear accelerator. Lifetime spectra of a Kapton sheet and a thermally grown SiO{sub 2} layer on Si were successfully measured. Synchronization of positron lifetime measurements with pulsed ion irradiation was demonstrated by this technique.

  12. CdZnTe detectors for gamma-ray Burst ArcSecond Imaging and Spectroscopy (BASIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stahle, C. M.; Palmer, D.; Bartlett, L. M.; Parsons, A.; Shi, Zhiqing; Lisse, C. M.; Sappington, C.; Cao, N.; Shu, P.; Gehrels, N.; Teegarden, B.; Birsa, F.; Singh, S.; Odom, J.; Hanchak, C.; Tueller, J.; Barthelmy, S.; Krizmanic, J.; Barbier, L.

    A CdZnTe detector array is being developed for the proposed gamma-ray Burst ArcSecond Imaging and Spectroscopy (BASIS) spaceflight mission to accurately locate gamma-ray bursts, determine their distance scale, and measure the physical characteristics of the emission region. Two-dimensional strip detectors with 100 μm pitch have been fabricated and wire bonded to readout electronics to demonstrate the ability to localize 60 and 122 keV gamma-rays to less than 100 μm. Radiation damage studies on a CdZnTe detector exposed to MeV neutrons showed a small amount of activation but no detector performance degradation for fluences up to 1010 neutrons/cm2. A 1 × 1 in. CdZnTe detector has also been flown on a balloon payload at 115 000 ft in order to measure the CdZnTe background rates.

  13. Geant4 simulation of continuum gamma spectroscopy with GAMMASPHERE and the SPINSPECTROMETER

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, Z.; Ferrer, M.; Cristancho, F.

    2007-10-26

    The use of the so called Hk-technique ({gamma}-energy sum and multiplicity data) is checked with simulations of the multi-detector {gamma}-arrays GAMMASPHERE and SPINSPECTROMETER. Their response to typical {gamma}-cascades is obtained and compared.

  14. Structure of the propeptide of prothrombin containing the. gamma. -carboxylation recognition site determined by two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, D.G.; Sudmeier, J.L.; Bachovchin, W.W.; Kanagy, C.; Furie, B.C.; Furie, B. )

    1991-10-15

    The propeptides of the vitamin K dependent blood clotting and regulatory proteins contain a {gamma}-carboxylation recognition site that directs precursor forms of these proteins for posttranslational {gamma}-carboxylation. Peptides corresponding to the propeptide of prothrombin were synthesized and examined by circular dichroism (CD) and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR). CD spectra indicate that these peptides have little or no secondary structure in aqueous solutions but that the addition of trifluoroethanol induces or stabilizes a structure containing {alpha}-helical character. The maximum helical content occurs at 35-40% trifluoroethanol. This trifluoroethanol-stabilized structure was solved by two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy. The NMR results demonstrate that residues {minus}13 to {minus}3 form an amphipathic {alpha}-helix. NMR spectra indicate that a similar structure is present at 5C, in the absence of trifluoroethanol. Of the residues previously implicated in defining the {gamma}-carboxylation recognition site, four residues ({minus}18, {minus}17, {minus}16, and {minus}15) are adjacent to the helical region and one residue ({minus}10) is located within the helix. The potential role of the amphipathic {alpha}-helix in the {gamma}-carboxylation recognition site is discussed.

  15. Investigation of Martian H2O and CO2 via orbital gamma ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, L. G.; Squyres, S. W.

    1987-08-01

    The capability of an orbital gamma ray spectrometer to address presently unanswered questions concerning H2O and CO2 on Mars is investigated. The gamma ray signal produced by the Martian atmosphere and by several simple models of Martian surface materials is calculated. Results are reported for: (1) the production of neutrons in the atmosphere and in the subsurface material by cosmic ray interactions, (2) the scattering of neutrons and the resultant neutron energy spectrum and spatial distributions, (3) the reproduction of gamma rays by neutron prompt capture and nonelastic scatter reactions, (4) the production of gamma rays by natural radionuclides, (5) the attenuation of the gamma ray signal by passage through surface materials and the Martian atmosphere, (6) the production of the gamma ray continuum background, and (7) the uncertainty in gamma ray line strengths that results from the combined signal and background observed by the detector.

  16. Development of a Small-Sized, Flexible, and Insertable Fiber-Optic Radiation Sensor for Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Wook Jae; Shin, Sang Hun; Lee, Dong Eun; Jang, Kyoung Won; Cho, Seunghyun; Lee, Bongsoo

    2015-08-28

    We fabricated a small-sized, flexible, and insertable fiber-optic radiation sensor (FORS) that is composed of a sensing probe, a plastic optical fiber (POF), a photomultiplier tube (PMT)-amplifier system, and a multichannel analyzer (MCA) to obtain the energy spectra of radioactive isotopes. As an inorganic scintillator for gamma-ray spectroscopy, a cerium-doped lutetium yttrium orthosilicate (LYSO:Ce) crystal was used and two solid-disc type radioactive isotopes with the same dimensions, cesium-137 (Cs-137) and cobalt-60 (Co-60), were used as gamma-ray emitters. We first determined the length of the LYSO:Ce crystal considering the absorption of charged particle energy and measured the gamma-ray energy spectra using the FORS. The experimental results demonstrated that the proposed FORS can be used to discriminate species of radioactive isotopes by measuring their inherent energy spectra, even when gamma-ray emitters are mixed. The relationship between the measured photon counts of the FORS and the radioactivity of Cs-137 was subsequently obtained. The amount of scintillating light generated from the FORS increased by increasing the radioactivity of Cs-137. Finally, the performance of the fabricated FORS according to the length and diameter of the POF was also evaluated. Based on the results of this study, it is anticipated that a novel FORS can be developed to accurately measure the gamma-ray energy spectrum in inaccessible locations such as narrow areas and holes.

  17. Development of a Small-Sized, Flexible, and Insertable Fiber-Optic Radiation Sensor for Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Wook Jae; Shin, Sang Hun; Lee, Dong Eun; Jang, Kyoung Won; Cho, Seunghyun; Lee, Bongsoo

    2015-01-01

    We fabricated a small-sized, flexible, and insertable fiber-optic radiation sensor (FORS) that is composed of a sensing probe, a plastic optical fiber (POF), a photomultiplier tube (PMT)-amplifier system, and a multichannel analyzer (MCA) to obtain the energy spectra of radioactive isotopes. As an inorganic scintillator for gamma-ray spectroscopy, a cerium-doped lutetium yttrium orthosilicate (LYSO:Ce) crystal was used and two solid-disc type radioactive isotopes with the same dimensions, cesium-137 (Cs-137) and cobalt-60 (Co-60), were used as gamma-ray emitters. We first determined the length of the LYSO:Ce crystal considering the absorption of charged particle energy and measured the gamma-ray energy spectra using the FORS. The experimental results demonstrated that the proposed FORS can be used to discriminate species of radioactive isotopes by measuring their inherent energy spectra, even when gamma-ray emitters are mixed. The relationship between the measured photon counts of the FORS and the radioactivity of Cs-137 was subsequently obtained. The amount of scintillating light generated from the FORS increased by increasing the radioactivity of Cs-137. Finally, the performance of the fabricated FORS according to the length and diameter of the POF was also evaluated. Based on the results of this study, it is anticipated that a novel FORS can be developed to accurately measure the gamma-ray energy spectrum in inaccessible locations such as narrow areas and holes. PMID:26343667

  18. Development of a Small-Sized, Flexible, and Insertable Fiber-Optic Radiation Sensor for Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Wook Jae; Shin, Sang Hun; Lee, Dong Eun; Jang, Kyoung Won; Cho, Seunghyun; Lee, Bongsoo

    2015-01-01

    We fabricated a small-sized, flexible, and insertable fiber-optic radiation sensor (FORS) that is composed of a sensing probe, a plastic optical fiber (POF), a photomultiplier tube (PMT)-amplifier system, and a multichannel analyzer (MCA) to obtain the energy spectra of radioactive isotopes. As an inorganic scintillator for gamma-ray spectroscopy, a cerium-doped lutetium yttrium orthosilicate (LYSO:Ce) crystal was used and two solid-disc type radioactive isotopes with the same dimensions, cesium-137 (Cs-137) and cobalt-60 (Co-60), were used as gamma-ray emitters. We first determined the length of the LYSO:Ce crystal considering the absorption of charged particle energy and measured the gamma-ray energy spectra using the FORS. The experimental results demonstrated that the proposed FORS can be used to discriminate species of radioactive isotopes by measuring their inherent energy spectra, even when gamma-ray emitters are mixed. The relationship between the measured photon counts of the FORS and the radioactivity of Cs-137 was subsequently obtained. The amount of scintillating light generated from the FORS increased by increasing the radioactivity of Cs-137. Finally, the performance of the fabricated FORS according to the length and diameter of the POF was also evaluated. Based on the results of this study, it is anticipated that a novel FORS can be developed to accurately measure the gamma-ray energy spectrum in inaccessible locations such as narrow areas and holes. PMID:26343667

  19. The BATSE Gamma-Ray Burst Spectral Catalog. 1; High Time Resolution Spectroscopy of Bright Bursts Using High Energy Resolution Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Preece, Robert D.; Briggs, Michael S.; Mallozzi, Robert S.; Pendleton, Geoffrey N.; Paciesas, W. S.; Band, David L.

    1999-01-01

    This is the first in a series of gamma-ray burst spectroscopy catalogs from the Burst And Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) on the Compton Gamma Ray Abstract: Observatory, each covering a different aspect of burst phenomenology. In this paper, we present time-sequences of spectral fit parameters for 156 bursts selected either for their high peak flux or fluence.

  20. Proximal Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy to Predict Soil Properties Using Windows and Full-Spectrum Analysis Methods

    PubMed Central

    Mahmood, Hafiz Sultan; Hoogmoed, Willem B.; van Henten, Eldert J.

    2013-01-01

    Fine-scale spatial information on soil properties is needed to successfully implement precision agriculture. Proximal gamma-ray spectroscopy has recently emerged as a promising tool to collect fine-scale soil information. The objective of this study was to evaluate a proximal gamma-ray spectrometer to predict several soil properties using energy-windows and full-spectrum analysis methods in two differently managed sandy loam fields: conventional and organic. In the conventional field, both methods predicted clay, pH and total nitrogen with a good accuracy (R2 ≥ 0.56) in the top 0–15 cm soil depth, whereas in the organic field, only clay content was predicted with such accuracy. The highest prediction accuracy was found for total nitrogen (R2 = 0.75) in the conventional field in the energy-windows method. Predictions were better in the top 0–15 cm soil depths than in the 15–30 cm soil depths for individual and combined fields. This implies that gamma-ray spectroscopy can generally benefit soil characterisation for annual crops where the condition of the seedbed is important. Small differences in soil structure (conventional vs. organic) cannot be determined. As for the methodology, we conclude that the energy-windows method can establish relations between radionuclide data and soil properties as accurate as the full-spectrum analysis method. PMID:24287541

  1. Proximal gamma-ray spectroscopy to predict soil properties using windows and full-spectrum analysis methods.

    PubMed

    Mahmood, Hafiz Sultan; Hoogmoed, Willem B; van Henten, Eldert J

    2013-11-27

    Fine-scale spatial information on soil properties is needed to successfully implement precision agriculture. Proximal gamma-ray spectroscopy has recently emerged as a promising tool to collect fine-scale soil information. The objective of this study was to evaluate a proximal gamma-ray spectrometer to predict several soil properties using energy-windows and full-spectrum analysis methods in two differently managed sandy loam fields: conventional and organic. In the conventional field, both methods predicted clay, pH and total nitrogen with a good accuracy (R2 ≥ 0.56) in the top 0-15 cm soil depth, whereas in the organic field, only clay content was predicted with such accuracy. The highest prediction accuracy was found for total nitrogen (R2 = 0.75) in the conventional field in the energy-windows method. Predictions were better in the top 0-15 cm soil depths than in the 15-30 cm soil depths for individual and combined fields. This implies that gamma-ray spectroscopy can generally benefit soil characterisation for annual crops where the condition of the seedbed is important. Small differences in soil structure (conventional vs. organic) cannot be determined. As for the methodology, we conclude that the energy-windows method can establish relations between radionuclide data and soil properties as accurate as the full-spectrum analysis method.

  2. Real time method and computer system for identifying radioactive materials from HPGe gamma-ray spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Rowland, Mark S.; Howard, Douglas E.; Wong, James L.; Jessup, James L.; Bianchini, Greg M.; Miller, Wayne O.

    2007-10-23

    A real-time method and computer system for identifying radioactive materials which collects gamma count rates from a HPGe gamma-radiation detector to produce a high-resolution gamma-ray energy spectrum. A library of nuclear material definitions ("library definitions") is provided, with each uniquely associated with a nuclide or isotope material and each comprising at least one logic condition associated with a spectral parameter of a gamma-ray energy spectrum. The method determines whether the spectral parameters of said high-resolution gamma-ray energy spectrum satisfy all the logic conditions of any one of the library definitions, and subsequently uniquely identifies the material type as that nuclide or isotope material associated with the satisfied library definition. The method is iteratively repeated to update the spectrum and identification in real time.

  3. New concepts for HgI2 scintillator gamma ray spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iwanczyk, Jan S.

    1994-01-01

    The primary goals of this project are development of the technology for HgI2 photodetectors (PD's), development of a HgI2/scintillator gamma detector, development of electronics, and development of a prototype gamma spectrometer. Work on the HgI2 PD's involved HgI2 purification and crystal growth, detector surface and electrical contact studies, PD structure optimization, encapsulation and packaging, and testing. Work on the HgI2/scintillator gamma detector involved a study of the optical - mechanical coupling for the optimization of CsI(Tl)/HgI2 gamma ray detectors and determination of the relationship between resolution versus scintillator type and size. The development of the electronics focused on low noise amplification circuits using different preamp input FET's and the use of a coincidence technique to maximize the signal, minimize the noise contribution in the gamma spectra, and improve the overall system resolution.

  4. Lu1-xI3:Cex--A Scintillator for gamma ray spectroscopy and time-of-flight PET

    DOEpatents

    Shah, Kanai S.

    2009-03-17

    The present invention concerns very fast scintillator materials comprising lutetium iodide doped with Cerium Lu.sub.1-xI.sub.3:Ce.sub.x; LuI.sub.3:Ce). The LuI.sub.3 scintillator material has surprisingly good characteristics including high light output, high gamma ray stopping efficiency, fast response, low cost, good proportionality, and minimal afterglow that the material is useful for gamma ray spectroscopy, medical imaging, nuclear and high energy physics research, diffraction, non-destructive testing, nuclear treaty verification and safeguards, and geological exploration. The timing resolution of the scintillators of the present invention provide compositions capable of resolving the position of an annihilation event within a portion of a human body cross-section.

  5. New Measurement of ^39Ar in Underground Argon with a Low Background Liquid Argon Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jingke

    2012-03-01

    A low background liquid argon detector has been developed for sensitive measurements of the beta radioactive ^39Ar in argon from underground sources. The measurement is motivated by the need to improve on earlier studies that showed no sign of ^39Ar in certain sources of underground argon, but with a limited sensitivity of ˜ 5% relative to ^39Ar in atmospheric argon[1]. We will report preliminary measurements taken with the low background detector that was commissioned and operated at the Kimballton Underground Research Facility (KURF) in Virginia. A combination of passive and active background reduction techniques resulted in a very low background and a null result with sensitivity to ^39Ar less than 1% of atmospheric. The results confirm that underground argon is well suited for direct detection of dark matter WIMPs. [4pt] [1] D. Acosta-Kane et al., Nucl. Instr. Meth. A 587:46 (2008)

  6. Construction of a Shallow Underground Low-background Detector for a CTBT Radionuclide Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Forrester, Joel B.; Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Miley, Harry S.; Myers, Allan W.; Overman, Cory T.

    2013-05-01

    The International Monitoring System (IMS) is a verification component of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT), and in addition to a series of radionuclide monitoring stations, contains sixteen radionuclide laboratories capable of verification of radionuclide station measurements. This paper presents an overview of a new commercially obtained low-background detector system for radionuclide aerosol measurements recently installed in a shallow (>30 meters water equivalent) underground clean-room facility at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Specifics such as low-background shielding materials, active shielding methods, and improvements in sensitivity to IMS isotopes will be covered.

  7. Detection system for high-resolution gamma radiation spectroscopy with neutron time-of-flight filtering

    DOEpatents

    Dioszegi, Istvan; Salwen, Cynthia; Vanier, Peter

    2014-12-30

    A .gamma.-radiation detection system that includes at least one semiconductor detector such as HPGe-Detector, a position-sensitive .alpha.-Detector, a TOF Controller, and a Digitizer/Integrator. The Digitizer/Integrator starts to process the energy signals of a .gamma.-radiation sent from the HPGe-Detector instantly when the HPGe-Detector detects the .gamma.-radiation. Subsequently, it is determined whether a coincidence exists between the .alpha.-particles and .gamma.-radiation signal, based on a determination of the time-of-flight of neutrons obtained from the .alpha.-Detector and the HPGe-Detector. If it is determined that the time-of-flight falls within a predetermined coincidence window, the Digitizer/Integrator is allowed to continue and complete the energy signal processing. If, however, there is no coincidence, the Digitizer/Integrator is instructed to be clear and reset its operation instantly.

  8. {gamma}-Spectroscopy and Radioactive Beams: How To Perform Channel Selection ?

    SciTech Connect

    Rosse, B.; Redon, N.; Stezowski, O.; Schmitt, Ch.; Guinet, D.; Meyer, M.; Lautesse, Ph.; De France, G.; Bhattachasyya, S.; Mukherjee, G.

    2006-04-26

    An experiment has been performed using a SPIRAL 76Kr radioactive beam at GANIL to investigate rare-earth nuclei near the proton drip-line. The EXOGAM gamma array was coupled with the DIAMANT light charged-particle detector and the VAMOS spectrometer. We report here on the powerful of this setup to extract fusion-evaporation {gamma}-rays from a large beam contamination.

  9. Astroparticle physics with a customized low-background broad energy Germanium detector

    SciTech Connect

    Aalseth, Craig E.; Amman, M.; Avignone, Frank T.; Back, Henning O.; Barabash, Alexander S.; Barbeau, P. S.; Bergevin, M.; Bertrand, F.; Boswell, M.; Brudanin, V.; Bugg, William; Burritt, Tom H.; Busch, Matthew; Capps, Greg L.; Chan, Yuen-Dat; Collar, J. I.; Cooper, R. J.; Creswick, R.; Detwiler, Jason A.; Diaz, J.; Doe, Peter J.; Efremenko, Yuri; Egorov, Viatcheslav; Ejiri, H.; Elliott, Steven R.; Ely, James H.; Esterline, James H.; Farach, H. A.; Fast, James E.; Fields, N.; Finnerty, P.; Fujikawa, Brian; Fuller, Erin S.; Gehman, Victor M.; Giovanetti, G. K.; Guiseppe, Vincente; Gusey, K.; Hallin, A. L.; Harper, Gregory; Hazama, R.; Henning, Reyco; Hime, Andrew; Hoppe, Eric W.; Hossbach, Todd W.; Howe, M. A.; Johnson, R. A.; Keeter, K.; Keillor, Martin E.; Keller, C.; Kephart, Jeremy D.; Kidd, Mary; Knecht, A.; Kochetov, Oleg; Konovalov, S.; Kouzes, Richard T.; Leviner, L.; Loach, J. C.; Luke, P.; MacMullin, S.; Marino, Michael G.; Martin, R. D.; Mei, Dong-Ming; Miley, Harry S.; Miller, M. L.; Mizouni, Leila; Myers, Allan W.; Nomachi, Masaharu; Orrell, John L.; Peterson, David; Phillips, D.; Poon, Alan; Prior, Gersende; Qian, J.; Radford, D. C.; Rielage, Keith; Robertson, R. G. H.; Rodriguez, Larry; Rykaczewski, Krzysztof P.; Salazar, Harold; Schubert, Alexis G.; Shima, T.; Shirchenko, M.; Steele, David; Strain, J.; Swift, Gary; Thomas, K.; Timkin, V.; Tornow, W.; Van Wechel, T. D.; Vanyushin, I.; Varner, R. L.; Vetter, Kai; Wilkerson, J. F.; Wolfe, B. A.; Xiang, W.; Yakushev, E.; Yaver, Harold; Young, A.; Yu, Chang-Hong; Yumatov, Vladimir; Zhang, C.; Zimmerman, S.

    2011-10-01

    The Majorana Collaboration is building the Majorana Demonstrator, a 60 kg array of high purity germanium detectors housed in an ultra-low background shield at the Sanford Underground Laboratory in Lead, SD. The Majorana Demonstrator will search for neutrinoless double-beta decay of 76Ge while demonstrating the feasibility of a tonne-scale experiment. It may also carry out a dark matter search in the 1-10 GeV/c² mass range. We have found that customized Broad Energy Germanium (BEGe) detectors produced by Canberra have several desirable features for a neutrinoless double-beta decay experiment, including low electronic noise, excellent pulse shape analysis capabilities, and simple fabrication. We have deployed a customized BEGe, the Majorana Low-Background BEGe at Kimballton (MALBEK), in a low-background cryostat and shield at the Kimballton Underground Research Facility in Virginia. This paper will focus on the detector characteristics and measurements that can be performed with such a radiation detector in a low-background environment.

  10. Time-resolved Spectroscopy of the Three Brightest and Hardest Short Gamma-ray Bursts Observed with the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guiriec, Sylvain; Briggs, Michael S.; Connaugthon, Valerie; Kara, Erin; Daigne, Frédéric; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; van der Horst, Alexander J.; Paciesas, William; Meegan, Charles A.; Bhat, P. N.; Foley, Suzanne; Bissaldi, Elisabetta; Burgess, Michael; Chaplin, Vandiver; Diehl, Roland; Fishman, Gerald; Gibby, Melissa; Giles, Misty M.; Goldstein, Adam; Greiner, Jochen; Gruber, David; von Kienlin, Andreas; Kippen, Marc; McBreen, Sheila; Preece, Robert; Rau, Arne; Tierney, Dave; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen

    2010-12-01

    From 2008 July to 2009 October, the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has detected 320 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). About 20% of these events are classified as short based on their T 90 duration below 2 s. We present here for the first time time-resolved spectroscopy at timescales as short as 2 ms for the three brightest short GRBs observed with GBM. The time-integrated spectra of the events deviate from the Band function, indicating the existence of an additional spectral component, which can be fit by a power law with index ~-1.5. The time-integrated E peak values exceed 2 MeV for two of the bursts and are well above the values observed in the brightest long GRBs. Their E peak values and their low-energy power-law indices (α) confirm that short GRBs are harder than long ones. We find that short GRBs are very similar to long ones, but with light curves contracted in time and with harder spectra stretched toward higher energies. In our time-resolved spectroscopy analysis, we find that the E peak values range from a few tens of keV up to more than 6 MeV. In general, the hardness evolutions during the bursts follow their flux/intensity variations, similar to long bursts. However, we do not always see the E peak leading the light-curve rises and confirm the zero/short average light-curve spectral lag below 1 MeV, already established for short GRBs. We also find that the time-resolved low-energy power-law indices of the Band function mostly violate the limits imposed by the synchrotron models for both slow and fast electron cooling and may require additional emission processes to explain the data. Finally, we interpreted these observations in the context of the current existing models and emission mechanisms for the prompt emission of GRBs.

  11. Radioactivity of Potassium Solutions: A Comparison of Calculated Activity to Measured Activity from Gross Beta Counting and Gamma Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Gaylord, R F

    2005-07-26

    In order to determine if the measured beta activity for a solution containing potassium was exactly as predicted, particularly since the CES gas counter is not calibrated specifically with K-40, an experiment was conducted to compare measured activities from two radioanalytical methods (gamma spectroscopy and gas proportional counting) to calculated activities across a range of potassium concentrations. Potassium, being ubiquitous and naturally radioactive, is a well-known and common interference in gross beta counting methods. By measuring the observed beta activity due to K-40 in potassium-containing solutions across a wide range of concentrations, it was found that the observed beta activity agrees well with the beta activity calculated from the potassium concentration measured by standard inorganic analytical techniques, such as ICP-OES, and that using the measured potassium concentration to calculate the expected beta activity, and comparing this to the observed beta activity to determine if potassium can account for all the observed activity in a sample, is a valid technique. It was also observed that gamma spectroscopy is not an effective means of measuring K-40 activity below approximately 700 pCi/L, which corresponds to a solution with approximately 833 mg/L total potassium. Gas proportional counting for gross beta activity has a much lower detection limit, typically 20-50 picoCi/L for a liquid low in total dissolved solids, which corresponds to a potassium concentration of approximately 30-70 ppm K.

  12. Non-destructive method of characterisation of radioactive waste containers using gamma spectroscopy and Monte Carlo techniques.

    PubMed

    Ridikas, D; Feray, S; Cometto, M; Damoy, F

    2005-01-01

    During the decommissioning of the SATURNE accelerator at CEA Saclay (France), a number of concrete containers with radioactive materials of low or very low activity had to be characterised before their final storage. In this paper, a non-destructive approach combining gamma ray spectroscopy and Monte Carlo simulations is used in order to characterise massive concrete blocks containing some radioactive waste. The limits and uncertainties of the proposed method are quantified for the source term activity estimates using 137Cs as a tracer element. A series of activity measurements with a few representative waste containers were performed before and after destruction. It has been found that neither was the distribution of radioactive materials homogeneous nor was its density unique, and this became the major source of systematic errors in this study. Nevertheless, we conclude that by combining gamma ray spectroscopy and full scale Monte Carlo simulations one can estimate the source term activity for some tracer elements such as 134Cs, 137Cs, 60Co, etc. The uncertainty of this estimation should not be bigger than a factor of 2-3. PMID:16381694

  13. The Music of the Stars : Spectroscopy of Pulsations in gamma Doradus Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunsden, Emily

    2013-05-01

    p>The mysteries of the interior structures of stars are being tackled with asteroseismology. The observable parameters of the surface pulsations of stars inform us of the interior characteristics of numerous classes of stars. The main-sequence gamma Doradus stars, just a little hotter than the Sun, offer the potential of determining stellar structure right down to the core. To determine the structural profile of a star, the observed frequencies and a full geometric description must be determined. This is only possible with long-term spectroscopic monitoring and careful analysis of the pulsation signature in spectral lines. This work seeks to identify the pulsational geometry of several gamma Doradus stars and to identify areas of improvement for current observation, analysis and modelling techniques. More than 4500 spectra were gathered on five stars for this purpose. For three stars a successful multi-frequency and mode identification solution was determined and significant progress has been made towards the understanding of a binary system involving a gamma Doradus star. A hybrid gamma Doradus/nbsp;delta Scuti pulsator was also intensely monitored and results from this work raise important questions about the classification of this type of star. Current analysis techniques were found to be fit-for-purpose for pure gamma Doradus stars, but stars with complexities such as hybrid pulsations and/or fast rotation require future development of the current models./p>

  14. Advanced performance and scalability of Si nanowire field-effect transistors analyzed using noise spectroscopy and gamma radiation techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Li, J.; Vitusevich, S. A. Pud, S.; Offenhäusser, A.; Petrychuk, M. V.; Danilchenko, B. A.

    2013-11-28

    High-quality Si nanowire field effect transistors (FETs) were fabricated using thermal nanoimprint and chemical wet etching technologies. FET structures of different lengths demonstrate high carrier mobility with values of about 750 cm{sup 2}/Vs and low volume densities of active traps in the dielectric layers of 5 × 10{sup 17} cm{sup −3} eV{sup −1}. We investigated the transport properties of these n-type channel structures using low-frequency noise spectroscopy before and after gamma radiation treatment. Before gamma irradiation, FET structures with lengths of less than 4 μm exhibited noise from contact regions with 1/(L{sup 2}) dependence for the relative 1/f noise. After gamma radiation, the spectra reflected the priority of channel noise with 1/L dependence for all samples. The transport characteristics show that the fabricated nanowire FETs improved scalability, decreased parameter scattering, and increased stability after treatment. The results demonstrate that these nanowire FETs are promising for nanoelectronic and biosensor applications due to the cost-efficient technology and advanced performance of FETs with improved stability and reliability.

  15. Pressure- and temperature-induced unfolding and aggregation of recombinant human interferon-gamma: a Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy study.

    PubMed Central

    Goossens, Koen; Haelewyn, Joost; Meersman, Filip; De Ley, Marc; Heremans, Karel

    2003-01-01

    The effect of hydrostatic pressure on the secondary structure of recombinant human interferon-gamma (rhIFN-gamma) and its biologically inactive truncated form rhIFN-Delta C15 has been studied using Fourier-transform IR (FTIR) spectroscopy. In situ observation of the pressure-induced changes using the diamond anvil cell shows that the alpha-helical structure is mainly transformed into disordered structure at high pressure. Increasing pressure also induces the formation of a gel. Addition of 0.5 M MgCl(2) significantly reduces the pressure stability. Releasing the pressure below 300 MPa results in the formation of intermolecular antiparallel beta-sheets, which is seldom observed. This suggests that the intermolecular beta-sheet of rhIFN-gamma is stabilized by electrostatic interactions that are disrupted at high pressure. For comparison we also studied the effect of temperature. Temperature-induced changes reflect extensive transformation of alpha-helical structure into intermolecular antiparallel beta-sheet, as is usually observed for most proteins. PMID:12425720

  16. Development of a detector based on Silicon Drift Detectors for gamma-ray spectroscopy and imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busca, P.; Butt, A. D.; Fiorini, C.; Marone, A.; Occhipinti, M.; Peloso, R.; Quaglia, R.; Bombelli, L.; Giacomini, G.; Piemonte, C.; Camera, F.; Giaz, A.; Million, B.; Nelms, N.; Shortt, B.

    2014-05-01

    This work deals with the development of a new gamma detector based on Silicon Drift Detectors (SDDs) to readout large LaBr3:Ce scintillators for gamma-ray spectroscopy and imaging applications. The research is supported by the European Space Agency through the Technology Research Programme (TRP) and by Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN) within the Gamma project. The SDDs, produced at Fondazione Bruno Kessler (FBK) semiconductor laboratories, are designed as monolithic arrays of 3 × 3 units, each one of an active area of 8 mm × 8 mm (overall area of 26 mm × 26 mm). The readout electronics and the architecture of the camera are briefly described and then first experimental results coupling the SDD array with a 1'' × 1'' LaBr3:Ce scintillator are reported. An energy resolution of 3% FWHM at 662 keV has been measured at -20°C, better than coupling the same scintillator with a photomultiplier tube. The same scintillator is also used to evaluate position sensitivity with a 1 mm collimated Cs-137 source. The main difficulty in determining the position of the gamma-ray interaction in the crystal is associated to the high thickness/diameter ratio of the crystal (1:1) and the use of reflectors on all lateral and top sides the crystal. This last choice enhances energy resolution but makes imaging capability more challenging because light is spread over all photodetectors. Preliminary results show that the camera is able to detect shifts in the measured signals, when the source is moved with steps of 5 mm. A modified version of the centroid method is finally implemented to evaluate the imaging capability of the system.

  17. Metabolic Study of Breast MCF-7 Tumor Spheroids after Gamma Irradiation by 1H NMR Spectroscopy and Microimaging

    PubMed Central

    Palma, Alessandra; Grande, Sveva; Luciani, Anna Maria; Mlynárik, Vladimír; Guidoni, Laura; Viti, Vincenza; Rosi, Antonella

    2016-01-01

    Multicellular tumor spheroids are an important model system to investigate the response of tumor cells to radio- and chemotherapy. They share more properties with the original tumor than cells cultured as 2D monolayers do, which helps distinguish the intrinsic properties of monolayer cells from those induced during cell aggregation in 3D spheroids. The paper investigates some metabolic aspects of small tumor spheroids of breast cancer and their originating MCF-7 cells, grown as monolayer, by means of high–resolution (HR) 1H NMR spectroscopy and MR microimaging before and after gamma irradiation. The spectra of spheroids were characterized by higher intensity of mobile lipids, mostly neutral lipids, and glutamine (Gln) signals with respect to their monolayer cells counterpart, mainly owing to the lower oxygen supply in spheroids. Morphological changes of small spheroids after gamma-ray irradiation, such as loss of their regular shape, were observed by MR microimaging. Lipid signal intensity increased after irradiation, as evidenced in both MR localized spectra of the single spheroid and in HR NMR spectra of spheroid suspensions. Furthermore, the intense Gln signal from spectra of irradiated spheroids remained unchanged, while the low Gln signal observed in monolayer cells increased after irradiation. Similar results were observed in cells grown in hypoxic conditions. The different behavior of Gln in 2D monolayers and in 3D spheroids supports the hypothesis that a lower oxygen supply induces both an upregulation of Gln synthetase and a downregulation of glutaminases with the consequent increase in Gln content, as already observed under hypoxic conditions. The data herein indicate that 1H NMR spectroscopy can be a useful tool for monitoring cell response to different constraints. The use of spheroid suspensions seems to be a feasible alternative to localized spectroscopy since similar effects were found after radiation treatment. PMID:27200293

  18. Delayed Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy for Non-Destructive Assay of Nuclear Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ludewigt, Bernhard; Mozin, Vladimir; Campbell, Luke; Favalli, Andrea; Hunt, Alan W.; Reedy, Edward T.E.; Seipel, Heather A.

    2015-09-28

    This project has been a collaborative effort of researchers from four National Laboratories, Lawrence Berkley National Laboratory (LBNL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), and Idaho State University’s (ISU) Idaho Accelerator Center (IAC). Experimental measurements at the Oregon State University (OSU) were also supported. The research included two key components, a strong experimental campaign to characterize the delayed gamma-ray signatures of the isotopes of interests and of combined targets, and a closely linked modeling effort to assess system designs and applications. Experimental measurements were performed to evaluate fission fragment yields, to test methods for determining isotopic fractions, and to benchmark the modeling code package. Detailed signature knowledge is essential for analyzing the capabilities of the delayed gamma technique, optimizing measurement parameters, and specifying neutron source and gamma-ray detection system requirements. The research was divided into three tasks: experimental measurements, characterization of fission yields, and development of analysis methods (task 1), modeling in support of experiment design and analysis and for the assessment of applications (task 2), and high-rate gamma-ray detector studies (task 3).

  19. Review of superconducting transition-edge sensors for x-ray and gamma-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullom, Joel N.; Bennett, Douglas A.

    2015-08-01

    We present a review of emerging x-ray and gamma-ray spectrometers based on arrays of superconducting transition-edge sensors (TESs). Special attention will be given to recent progress in TES applications and in understanding TES physics. Contribution of a U.S. government agency, not subject to copyright.

  20. CZT detectors with 3D readout for gamma-ray spectroscopy and imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matteson, James L.; Pelling, Michael R.; Skelton, Robert T.

    2003-01-01

    We are developing 10 mm thick CZT detectors with 3-D readout for ~100 keV to ~1.5 MeV gamma-rays. Multiple-site gamma-ray interactions are fully measured, i.e., the energy and 3-D position of each site are determined. Spatial resolution is 1 mm FWHM. Anode pixel readout with 1 mm pitch is used for x- and y-positions and charge drift times for z-positions. Drift time measurements are triggered by the cathode signal and end when each interaction site's charge cloud reaches an anode pixel. Post-event processing corrects for signal loss due to charge trapping and accurately determines gamma-ray energies, with a goal of 1% energy resolution at 662 keV. Compton kinematic analysis can identify the initial interaction site in most cases as well as constrain the incident gamma-ray direction. Tests were made with a prototype detector, measuring 10 x 10 x 10 mm3 and operated at 1000 V bias. The measured drift time resolution of 25 nsec FWHM at 662 keV and 60 nsec at 122 keV corresponds to z-position resolution of 0.25 and 0.60 mm FWHM, respectively. The technique is described and results of modeling and tests are presented.

  1. Continuous versus pulse neutron induced gamma spectroscopy for soil carbon analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Neutron induced gamma spectra analysis (NGA) provides a means of measuring carbon in large soil volumes without destructive sampling. Calibration of the NGA system must account for system background and the interference of other nuclei on the carbon peak at 4.43 MeV. Accounting for these factors pro...

  2. {gamma}-ray spectroscopy of the neutron-rich nuclei {sup 89}Rb, {sup 92}Y, and {sup 93}Y with multinucleon transfer reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Bucurescu, D.; Ionescu-Bujor, M.; Iordachescu, A.; Mihai, C.; Suliman, G.; Rusu, C.; Marginean, N.; Ur, C. A.; Marginean, R.; De Angelis, G.; Corradi, L.; Vedova, F. Della; Fioretto, E.; Gadea, A.; Guiot, B.; Napoli, D.; Stefanini, A. M.; Valiente-Dobon, J. J.; Bazzacco, D.; Beghini, S.

    2007-12-15

    The positive-parity yrast states in the {sup 89}Rb, {sup 92}Y, and {sup 93}Y nuclei were studied using {gamma}-ray spectroscopy with heavy-ion induced reactions. In the multinucleon transfer reactions {sup 208}Pb+{sup 90}Zr (590 MeV) and {sup 238}U+{sup 82}Se (505 MeV), several {gamma}-ray transitions were identified in these nuclei by means of coincidences between recoiling ions identified with the PRISMA spectrometer and {gamma} rays detected with the CLARA {gamma}-ray array in thin target experiments. Level schemes were subsequently determined from triple-{gamma} coincidences recorded with the GASP array in a thick target experiment, in the reactions produced by a 470 MeV {sup 82}Se beam with a {sup 192}Os target. The observed level schemes are compared to shell-model calculations.

  3. A low background facility at the Gran Sasso underground laboratory: the prototype of Borexino

    SciTech Connect

    Ianni, A.

    2005-09-08

    The prototype of the Borexino solar neutrino experiment is a low counting rate detector located at the underground Gran Sasso Laboratory. The detector was designed and built to achieve ultra-purity in an organic liquid scintillator on a massive scale. A number of ancillary plants and screening facilities are needed to reach low background in the sub-MeV region. The detector and its screening facilities are briefly described in this paper.

  4. Development of optimized detector/spectrophotometer technology for low background space astronomy missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, B.

    1985-01-01

    This program was directed towards a better understanding of some of the important factors in the performance of infrared detector arrays at low background conditions appropriate for space astronomy. The arrays were manufactured by Aerojet Electrosystems Corporation, Azusa. Two arrays, both bismuth doped silicon, were investigated: an AMCID 32x32 Engineering mosiac Si:Bi accumulation mode charge injection device detector array and a metal oxide semiconductor/field effect transistor (MOS-FET) switched array of 16x32 pixels.

  5. A low background facility at the Gran Sasso underground laboratory: the prototype of Borexino

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ianni, A.

    2005-09-01

    The prototype of the Borexino solar neutrino experiment is a low counting rate detector located at the underground Gran Sasso Laboratory. The detector was designed and built to achieve ultra-purity in an organic liquid scintillator on a massive scale. A number of ancillary plants and screening facilities are needed to reach low background in the sub-MeV region. The detector and its screening facilities are briefly described in this paper.

  6. Assessment study of infrared detector arrays for low-background astronomical research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ando, K. J.

    1978-01-01

    The current state-of-the-art of infrared detector arrays employing charge coupled devices (CCD) or charge injection devices (CID) readout are assessed. The applicability, limitations and potentials of such arrays under the low-background astronomical observing conditions of interest for SIRFT (Shuttle Infrared Telescope Facility) are determined. The following are reviewed: (1) monolithic extrinsic arrays; (2) monolithic intrinsic arrays; (3) charge injection devices; and (4) hybrid arrays.

  7. Controlling Low-Rate Signal Path Microdischarge for an Ultra-Low-Background Proportional Counter

    SciTech Connect

    Mace, Emily K.; Aalseth, Craig E.; Bonicalzi, Ricco; Day, Anthony R.; Hoppe, Eric W.; Keillor, Martin E.; Myers, Allan W.; Overman, Cory T.; Seifert, Allen

    2013-05-01

    ABSTRACT Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has developed an ultra-low-background proportional counter (ULBPC) made of high purity copper. These detectors are part of an ultra-low-background counting system (ULBCS) in the newly constructed shallow underground laboratory at PNNL (at a depth of ~30 meters water-equivalent). To control backgrounds, the current preamplifier electronics are located outside the ULBCS shielding. Thus the signal from the detector travels through ~1 meter of cable and is potentially susceptible to high voltage microdischarge and other sources of electronic noise. Based on initial successful tests, commercial cables and connectors were used for this critical signal path. Subsequent testing across different batches of commercial cables and connectors, however, showed unwanted (but still low) rates of microdischarge noise. To control this noise source, two approaches were pursued: first, to carefully validate cables, connectors, and other commercial components in this critical signal path, making modifications where necessary; second, to develop a custom low-noise, low-background preamplifier that can be integrated with the ULBPC and thus remove most commercial components from the critical signal path. This integrated preamplifier approach is based on the Amptek A250 low-noise charge-integrating preamplifier module. The initial microdischarge signals observed are presented and characterized according to the suspected source. Each of the approaches for mitigation is described, and the results from both are compared with each other and with the original performance seen with commercial cables and connectors.

  8. DESIGN OF A THERMOSIPHON FOR COOLING LOW-BACKGROUND HPGE ARRAYS

    SciTech Connect

    Aguayo Navarrete, Estanislao; Fast, James E.; Reid, Douglas J.

    2012-11-26

    ABSTRACT A two-phase nitrogen thermosiphon was developed for the new generation of low-background high-purity germanium (HPGe) arrays. The cooling system for these arrays has to be able to handle the heat load (>20 W) presented by a large detector mass while meeting stringent requirements necessary for low-background systems. The HPGe detector modules should operate as close to liquid nitrogen temperature (<80K) as possible to provide adequate operating conditions for a full range of HPGe impurity concentrations. In addition, exceptional temperature stability (<1 K) is needed to reduce electronic gain shifts due to changes in the front-end electronics operating temperature. In order to meet the background requirements of state-of-the-art systems these arrays are enclosed in passive lead and copper shielding up to 1 m thick. In this paper we present a cooling system for low-background experiments that complies with these stringent geometrical restrictions. Active cooling was integrated via a horizontal thermosiphon that can be fabricated using ultra-pure electroformed copper. It was charged with nitrogen to 434 kPa (63 PSIA) at 292 K, which provided a fill ratio of 10%. The results showed that the thermosiphon can effectively remove in excess of 25 W of heat load.

  9. Evaluation of Ultra-Low Background Materials for Uranium and Thorium Using ICP-MS

    SciTech Connect

    Hoppe, Eric W.; Overman, Nicole R.; LaFerriere, Brian D.

    2013-08-08

    An increasing number of physics experiments require low background materials for their construction. The presence of Uranium and Thorium and their progeny in these materials present a variety of unwanted background sources for these experiments. The sensitivity of the experiments continues to drive the necessary levels of detection ever lower as well. This requirement for greater sensitivity has rendered direct radioassay impractical in many cases requiring large quantities of material, frequently many kilograms, and prolonged counting times, often months. Other assay techniques have been employed such as Neutron Activation Analysis but this requires access to expensive facilities and instrumentation and can be further complicated and delayed by the formation of unwanted radionuclides. Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) is a useful tool and recent advancements have increased the sensitivity particularly in the elemental high mass range of U and Th. Unlike direct radioassay, ICP-MS is a destructive technique since it requires the sample to be in liquid form which is aspirated into a high temperature plasma. But it benefits in that it usually requires a very small sample, typically about a gram. Here we will discuss how a variety of low background materials such as copper, polymers, and fused silica are made amenable to ICP-MS assay and how the arduous task of maintaining low backgrounds of U and Th is achieved.

  10. Evaluation of ultra-low background materials for uranium and thorium using ICP-MS

    SciTech Connect

    Hoppe, E. W.; Overman, N. R.; LaFerriere, B. D.

    2013-08-08

    An increasing number of physics experiments require low background materials for their construction. The presence of Uranium and Thorium and their progeny in these materials present a variety of unwanted background sources for these experiments. The sensitivity of the experiments continues to drive the necessary levels of detection ever lower as well. This requirement for greater sensitivity has rendered direct radioassay impractical in many cases requiring large quantities of material, frequently many kilograms, and prolonged counting times, often months. Other assay techniques have been employed such as Neutron Activation Analysis but this requires access to expensive facilities and instrumentation and can be further complicated and delayed by the formation of unwanted radionuclides. Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) is a useful tool and recent advancements have increased the sensitivity particularly in the elemental high mass range of U and Th. Unlike direct radioassay, ICP-MS is a destructive technique since it requires the sample to be in liquid form which is aspirated into a high temperature plasma. But it benefits in that it usually requires a very small sample, typically about a gram. This paper discusses how a variety of low background materials such as copper, polymers, and fused silica are made amenable to ICP-MS assay and how the arduous task of maintaining low backgrounds of U and Th is achieved.

  11. Topics in Astrophysical X-Ray and Gamma Ray Spectroscopy. Ph.D. Thesis - Maryland Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bussard, R. W.

    1978-01-01

    A number of topics relating to astrophysical observations that have already been made or are currently planned of spectral features, mostly emission lines, in the X-ray and gamma ray region of the electromagnetic spectrum are investigated. These topics include: the production of characteristic X-ray and gamma ray lines by nonthermal ions, spectral features induced by processes occurring in strong magnetic fields, and the positron annihilation line at 0.5 MeV. The rate of X-ray production at 6.8 keV by the 2p to 1s transition in fast hydrogen- and helium-like iron ions, following both electron capture to excited levels and collisional excitation is calculated. The cross section for electron-ion Coulomb collisions in strong fields is also calculated.

  12. High resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy applied to bulk sample analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kosanke, K.L.; Koch, C.D.; Wilson, R.D.

    1980-01-01

    A high resolution Ge(Li) gamma-ray spectrometer has been installed and made operational for use in routine bulk sample analysis by the Bendix Field Engineering Corporation (BFEC) geochemical analysis department. The Ge(Li) spectrometer provides bulk sample analyses for potassium, uranium, and thorium that are superior to those obtained by the BFEC sodium iodide spectrometer. The near term analysis scheme permits a direct assay for uranium that corrects for bulk sample self-absorption effects and is independent of the uranium/radium disequilibrium condition of the sample. A more complete analysis scheme has been developed that fully utilizes the gamma-ray data provided by the Ge(Li) spectrometer and that more properly accounts for the sample self-absorption effect. This new analysis scheme should be implemented on the BFEC Ge(Li) spectrometer at the earliest date.

  13. GAMIDEN: a program to aid in the identification of unknown materials by gamma-ray spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Howerton, R.J.

    1983-05-10

    The intent of the computer code GAMIDEN is to help identify isotopes by their gamma-ray emissions and thus to assist in the nondestructive assay of unknown materials. From both radioactive decays and neutron captures, GAMIDEN searches GAMTOT83, a file of gamma-ray spectra, for matches with observed photon energies. This report describes the search procedure, outlines the use of the code, and gives an example. The code is designed to operate on the CRAY 1 computer at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). It is written in standard Fortran (ANSI) for the most part but contains some LRLTRAN instructions to make use of the Livermore time-sharing system (LTSS). The code uses about 545,000 words of memory. Typical problems run in about 45 s. The source program and the data file are available on request.

  14. Total absorption {gamma}-ray spectroscopy of beta delayed neutron emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Valencia, E.; Algora, A.; Tain, J. L.; Agramunt, J.; Jordan, M. D.; Molina, F.; Estevez, E.; Rubio, B.; Perez, A.; Rice, S.; Bowry, M.; Gelletly, W.; Podolyak, Zs.; Regan, P. H.; Farrelly, G. F.; Zakari-Issoufou, A.-A.; Porta, A.; Fallot, M.; Bui, V. M.; and others

    2013-06-10

    Preliminary results of the data analysis of the beta decay of {sup 94}Rb using a novel - segmented- total absorption spectrometer are shown in this contribution. This result is part of a systematic study of important contributors to the decay heat problem in nuclear reactors. In this particular case the goal is to determine the beta intensity distribution below the neutron separation energy and the gamma/beta competition above.

  15. High energy gamma-ray spectroscopy with LaBr3 scintillation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quarati, F. G. A.; Owens, Alan; Dorenbos, P.; de Haas, J. T. M.; Benzoni, G.; Blasi, N.; Boiano, C.; Brambilla, S.; Camera, F.; Alba, R.; Bellia, G.; Maiolino, C.; Santonocito, D.; Ahmed, M.; Brown, N.; Stave, S.; Weller, H. R.; Wu, Y. K.

    2011-02-01

    Lanthanum bromide scintillation detectors produce very high light outputs (˜60,000 ph/MeV) within a very short decay time (typically ˜20 ns) which means that high instantaneous currents can be generated in the photocathode and dynode chain of the photomultiplier tube (PMT) used for the scintillation readout. The net result is that signal saturation can occur long before the recommended PMT biasing conditions can be reached.In search of an optimized light readout system for LaBr3, we have tested and compared two different PMT configurations for detection of gamma-rays up to 15 MeV. This range was chosen as being appropriate for gamma-ray remote sensing and medium energy nuclear physics applications. The experiments were conducted at two facilities: the Laboratori Nazionali del Sud (LNS) in Catania, Italy [1] and the High Intensity Gamma-ray Source (HIγS) at Triangle University Nuclear Laboratory, in Durham, North Carolina, USA [2].The PMT configurations we have tested are (1) a standard dynode chain operated under-biased; (2) a 4-stage reduced chain operated at nominal inter-dynode bias.The results are that shortening the number of active stages, as in configuration (2), has advantages in preserving energy resolution and avoiding PMT saturation over a large energy range.However, the use of an under-biased PMT, configuration (1), can still be considered a satisfactory solution, at least in the case of PMTs manufactured by Photonis.The results of this study will be used in support of the Mercury Gamma-ray and Neutron Spectrometer (MGNS) on board of BepiColombo, the joint ESA/JAXA mission to Mercury, scheduled for launch in 2014.

  16. Spectroscopy of {sup 189,187}Pb from gamma-FMA coincidences

    SciTech Connect

    Janssens, R.V.F.; Davids, C.N.; Blumenthal, D.

    1995-08-01

    The very neutron-deficient Pb isotopes are of much current interest because they exhibit shape coexistence between a spherical groundstate and a deformed prolate excited configuration located very low in excitation energy. Last year the nucleus {sup 186}Pb was studied at the FMA in an FMA-{gamma}-{gamma} coincidence experiment. The purpose of the present measurement was to delineate, for the first time, the groundstate and near groundstate excitations in the odd Pb isotopes {sup 189,187}Pb in order to identify the orbitals which have an important role in driving the nuclear shape. The experiment was performed only very recently at the FMA with 10 Compton-suppressed Ge detectors from the Argonne Notre Dame BGO Gamma-Ray facility. {sup 187}Pb was studied with the {sup 155}Gd({sup 36}Ar,4n) reaction at 179 MeV, while {sup 189}Pb was reached with the {sup 158}Gd({sup 36}Ar,5n) reaction at the same beam energy. The analysis just began. It can already be stated that transitions in both Pb isotopes were identified and that it should be possible to establish level schemes. The presence of possible isomeric states in {sup 189}Pb will be checked in a follow-up experiment planned in Canberra. A similar measurement on {sup 187}Pb appears very difficult because of the very small cross section involved.

  17. Coupling Deterministic and Monte Carlo Transport Methods for the Simulation of Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy Scenarios

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Leon E.; Gesh, Christopher J.; Pagh, Richard T.; Miller, Erin A.; Shaver, Mark W.; Ashbaker, Eric D.; Batdorf, Michael T.; Ellis, J. E.; Kaye, William R.; McConn, Ronald J.; Meriwether, George H.; Ressler, Jennifer J.; Valsan, Andrei B.; Wareing, Todd A.

    2008-10-31

    Radiation transport modeling methods used in the radiation detection community fall into one of two broad categories: stochastic (Monte Carlo) and deterministic. Monte Carlo methods are typically the tool of choice for simulating gamma-ray spectrometers operating in homeland and national security settings (e.g. portal monitoring of vehicles or isotope identification using handheld devices), but deterministic codes that discretize the linear Boltzmann transport equation in space, angle, and energy offer potential advantages in computational efficiency for many complex radiation detection problems. This paper describes the development of a scenario simulation framework based on deterministic algorithms. Key challenges include: formulating methods to automatically define an energy group structure that can support modeling of gamma-ray spectrometers ranging from low to high resolution; combining deterministic transport algorithms (e.g. ray-tracing and discrete ordinates) to mitigate ray effects for a wide range of problem types; and developing efficient and accurate methods to calculate gamma-ray spectrometer response functions from the deterministic angular flux solutions. The software framework aimed at addressing these challenges is described and results from test problems that compare coupled deterministic-Monte Carlo methods and purely Monte Carlo approaches are provided.

  18. Study of the Nuclear Structure of 39P Using Beta-Delayed Gamma Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abromeit, Brittany; NSCL Experiment E14063 Team Team

    2016-03-01

    Investigation of nuclei with neutron and proton imbalance is at the forefront of nuclear physics research today. This is driven by the fact that the structure in these regimes may vary with that seen near the valley of stability. With eight neutrons more than the stable isotope of phosphorous, 39P is a neutron-rich exotic nucleus that has very limited information on it: previous studies of 39P produce only three known energy levels and gamma rays. The fragmentation of a 48Ca primary beam on a 564mg/cm2 thick Be target at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL) was used to produce exotic 39Si. Using the NSCL Beta Counting System (BCS), consisting of a thick planner germanium double-sided strip detector (GeDSSD) and 16 High-purity germanium detectors in an array, SeGA, the beta-gamma coincidences from the decay of 39Si to 39P were analyzed. The resulting level scheme of 39P, including over 12 new gamma rays and energy states, confirmation of the previously measured half-life, and first-time logft values will be presented. This work was supported by the NSF under Grant No. 1401574.

  19. Rapid, non-destructive carbon analysis of forest soils using neutron-induced gamma-ray spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wielopolski, L.; Mitra, S.; Yanai, R. D.; Levine, C. R.; Vadeboncoeur, M. A.

    2010-08-01

    Forest soils are pivotal to understanding global carbon (C) cycling and evaluating policies for mitigating global change. However, they are very difficult to monitor because of the heterogeneity of soil characteristics, the difficulty of representative sampling, and the slow time scale of response to environmental change. Here we demonstrate that use of gamma-ray spectroscopy facilitates in situ non-destructive analysis of C and other elements in forest soils. In this approach the element-specific gamma-rays are induced by fast and thermal neutrons interacting with the nuclei of the elements present in the soil. Background gamma-rays emanating from naturally occurring radionuclides in the forest are recorded as well. We applied this approach in a mature northern hardwood forest on glacial till soils at the Bartlett Experimental Forest in New Hampshire, USA. The inelastic neutron scattering (INS) system yielded strong signals in gamma-ray counts/h, from C and other elements present in the soil matrix that included silicon, oxygen, hydrogen, iron, aluminum, manganese and potassium. The INS sensitivity for carbon was 20.656 counts h{sup -1} kg{sup -1} C m{sup -2} based on current net C gamma-ray counts and the data for the O horizon and mineral soil to a depth of 30 cm obtained from a nearby quantitative soil pit (7.35 kg C m{sup -2}). We estimate the minimum detectable change to be {approx}0.34 kg C m{sup -2}, which is {approx}5% of the current soil C content, and the minimum detectable limit to be {approx}0.23 kg C m{sup -1}. Eight % reproducibility from 11 measurements was limited, in part, by the large variability in the system counting geometry due to the uneven forest microtopography. The INS approach has the potential to revolutionize belowground monitoring of C and other elements, because the possibility of detecting a 5% change in forest soils has not been possible with destructive sampling methods.

  20. Photon Activation Analysis Of Light Elements Using 'Non-Gamma' Radiation Spectroscopy - The Instrumental Determination Of Phosphorus

    SciTech Connect

    Segebade, Christian; Goerner, Wolf

    2011-06-01

    Unlike metal determinations the analysis of light elements (e.g., carbon, oxygen, phosphorus) is frequently problematic, in particular if analysed instrumentally. In photon activation analysis (PAA) the respective activation products do not emit gamma radiation in the most cases. Usually, annihilation quanta counting and subsequent decay curve analysis have been used for determinations of C, N, O, and F. However, radiochemical separation of the respective radioisotopes mostly is indispensable. For several reasons, some of the light elements cannot be analysed following this procedure, e.g. phosphorus. In this contribution the instrumental PAA of phosphorus in organic matrix by activation with bremsstrahlung of an electron linear accelerator and subsequent beta spectroscopy is described. The accuracy of the results was excellent as obtained by analysis of a BCR Reference Material.

  1. Feasibility study of in vivo partial body potassium determination in the human body using gamma-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez, Lisa Marie

    This work investigates partial body potassium determination in the human body using gamma-ray spectroscopy. Potassium is an essential element in the human body that controls many of the enzyme systems and intra- and extra-cellular water flow. Potassium is symptomatic to several disease cases and has gender and ethnic variability. This work assesses the feasibility to measure partial body potassium in three specific regions: brain, arm, and leg, that are of interest to multiple sclerosis, chronic renal failure, and spinal cord injury, respectively. Three detector systems were constructed and their capabilities assessed. System characterization and analytical procedure for potassium evaluation and determination are presented together with experimental and initial clinical results. The results indicate that partial body potassium measurement is viable, statistically reproducible, and has potential clinical significance.

  2. OPTIMIZATION OF VIRTUAL FRISCH-GRID CdZnTe DETECTOR DESIGNS FOR IMAGING AND SPECTROSCOPY OF GAMMA RAYS.

    SciTech Connect

    BOLOTNIKOV,A.E.; ABDUL-JABBAR, N.M.; BABALOLA, S.; CAMARDA, G.S.; CUI, Y.; HOSSAIN, A.; JACKSON, E.; JACKSON, H.; JAMES, J.R.; LURYI, A.L.; JAMES, R.B.

    2007-08-21

    In the past, various virtual Frisch-grid designs have been proposed for cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) and other compound semiconductor detectors. These include three-terminal, semi-spherical, CAPture, Frisch-ring, capacitive Frisch-grid and pixel devices (along with their modifications). Among them, the Frisch-grid design employing a non-contacting ring extended over the entire side surfaces of parallelepiped-shaped CZT crystals is the most promising. The defect-free parallelepiped-shaped crystals with typical dimensions of 5x5{approx}12 mm3 are easy to produce and can be arranged into large arrays used for imaging and gamma-ray spectroscopy. In this paper, we report on further advances of the virtual Frisch-grid detector design for the parallelepiped-shaped CZT crystals. Both the experimental testing and modeling results are described.

  3. High-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy with a microwave-multiplexed transition-edge sensor array

    SciTech Connect

    Noroozian, Omid; Mates, John A. B.; Bennett, Douglas A.; Brevik, Justus A.; Fowler, Joseph W.; Gao, Jiansong; Hilton, Gene C.; Horansky, Robert D.; Irwin, Kent D.; Schmidt, Daniel R.; Vale, Leila R.; Ullom, Joel N.; Kang, Zhao

    2013-11-11

    We demonstrate very high resolution photon spectroscopy with a microwave-multiplexed two-pixel transition-edge sensor (TES) array. We measured a {sup 153}Gd photon source and achieved an energy resolution of 63 eV full-width-at-half-maximum at 97 keV and an equivalent readout system noise of 86 pA/√(Hz) at the TES. The readout circuit consists of superconducting microwave resonators coupled to radio-frequency superconducting-quantum-interference-devices and transduces changes in input current to changes in phase of a microwave signal. We use flux-ramp modulation to linearize the response and evade low-frequency noise. This demonstration establishes one path for the readout of cryogenic X-ray and gamma-ray sensor arrays with more than 10{sup 3} elements and spectral resolving powers R=λ/Δλ>10{sup 3}.

  4. Application of Geant4 in routine close geometry gamma spectroscopy for environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Dababneh, Saed; Al-Nemri, Ektimal; Sharaf, Jamal

    2014-08-01

    This work examines the utilization of Geant4 to practically achieve crucial corrections, in close geometry, for self-absorption and true coincidence summing in gamma-ray spectrometry of environmental samples, namely soil and water. After validation, different simulation options have been explored and compared. The simulation was used to correct for self-absorption effects, and to establish a summing-free efficiency curve, thus overcoming limitations and uncertainties imposed by conventional calibration standards. To be applicable in busy laboratories, simulation results were introduced into the conventional software Genie 2000 in order to be reliably used in everyday routine measurements.

  5. A 222Rn source for low-background liquid scintillation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Michael; Benziger, Jay; Stoia, Catherine; Calaprice, Frank; Chen, Mark; Darnton, Nicholas; Loeser, Fred; Bruce Vogelaar, R.

    A technique for producing a radioactive source suitable for use in a low-background liquid scintillation detector is described. 222Rn was concentrated from air to prepare liquid scintillator sources spiked with 10 6 Bq/m 3 of the radioisotope. Air was stripped of CO 2 and water vapor, and passed over cooled charcoal which trapped the radon. The accumulated radon was desorbed and transferred into a pseudocumene-based scintillator. These sources have been used for position calibration in the Counting Test Facility (a 5 m 3 spherical liquid scintillation detector) at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso.

  6. The MAJORANA experiment: an ultra-low background search for neutrinoless double-beta decay

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, D.; Aguayo Navarrete, Estanislao; Avignone, Frank T.; Back, Henning O.; Barabash, Alexander S.; Bergevin, M.; Bertrand, F.; Boswell, M.; Brudanin, V.; Busch, Matthew; Chan, Yuen-Dat; Christofferson, Cabot-Ann; Collar, J. I.; Combs, Dustin C.; Cooper, R. J.; Detwiler, Jason A.; Doe, Peter J.; Efremenko, Yuri; Egorov, Viatcheslav; Ejiri, H.; Elliott, Steven R.; Esterline, James H.; Fast, James E.; Fields, N.; Finnerty, P.; Fraenkle, Florian; Gehman, Victor; Giovanetti, G. K.; Green, Matthew P.; Guiseppe, Vincente; Gusey, K.; Hallin, A. L.; Hazama, R.; Henning, Reyco; Hime, Andrew; Hoppe, Eric W.; Horton, Mark; Howard, Stanley; Howe, M. A.; Johnson, R. A.; Keeter, K.; Keller, C.; Kidd, Mary; Knecht, A.; Kochetov, Oleg; Konovalov, S.; Kouzes, Richard T.; LaFerriere, Brian D.; LaRoque, B. H.; Leon, Jonathan D.; Leviner, L.; Loach, J. C.; MacMullin, S.; Marino, Michael G.; Martin, R. D.; Mei, Dong-Ming; Merriman, Jason H.; Miller, M. L.; Mizouni, Leila; Nomachi, Masaharu; Orrell, John L.; Overman, Nicole R.; Poon, Alan; Perumpilly, Gopakumar; Prior, Gersende; Radford, D. C.; Rielage, Keith; Robertson, R. G. H.; Ronquest, M. C.; Schubert, Alexis G.; Shima, T.; Shirchenko, M.; Snavely, Kyle J.; Steele, David; Strain, J.; Thomas, K.; Timkin, V.; Tornow, W.; Vanyushin, I.; Varner, R. L.; Vetter, Kai; Vorren, Kris R.; Wilkerson, J. F.; Wolfe, B. A.; Yakushev, E.; Young, A.; Yu, Chang-Hong; Yumatov, Vladimir; Zhang, C.

    2012-12-01

    The observation of neutrinoless double-beta decay would resolve the Majorana nature of the neutrino and could provide information on the absolute scale of the neutrino mass. The initial phase of the Majorana Experiment, known as the Demonstrator, will house 40 kg of Ge in an ultra-low background shielded environment at the 4850' level of the Sanford Underground Laboratory in Lead, SD. The objective of the Demonstrator is to validate whether a future 1-tonne experiment can achieve a background goal of one count per tonne-year in a narrow region of interest around the 76Ge neutrinoless double-beta decay peak.

  7. ³⁹Ar/Ar measurements using ultra-low background proportional counters.

    PubMed

    Hall, Jeter; Aalseth, Craig E; Bonicalzi, Ricco M; Brandenberger, Jill M; Day, Anthony R; Humble, Paul H; Mace, Emily K; Panisko, Mark E; Seifert, Allen

    2016-01-01

    Age-dating groundwater and seawater using the (39)Ar/Ar ratio is an important tool to understand water mass-flow rates and mean residence time. Low-background proportional counters developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory use mixtures of argon and methane as counting gas. We demonstrate sensitivity to (39)Ar by comparing geological (ancient) argon recovered from a carbon dioxide gas well and commercial argon. The demonstrated sensitivity to the (39)Ar/Ar ratio is sufficient to date water masses as old as 1000 years. PMID:26516993

  8. ³⁹Ar/Ar measurements using ultra-low background proportional counters.

    PubMed

    Hall, Jeter; Aalseth, Craig E; Bonicalzi, Ricco M; Brandenberger, Jill M; Day, Anthony R; Humble, Paul H; Mace, Emily K; Panisko, Mark E; Seifert, Allen

    2016-01-01

    Age-dating groundwater and seawater using the (39)Ar/Ar ratio is an important tool to understand water mass-flow rates and mean residence time. Low-background proportional counters developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory use mixtures of argon and methane as counting gas. We demonstrate sensitivity to (39)Ar by comparing geological (ancient) argon recovered from a carbon dioxide gas well and commercial argon. The demonstrated sensitivity to the (39)Ar/Ar ratio is sufficient to date water masses as old as 1000 years.

  9. Practical gamma spectroscopy assay techniques for large volume low-level waste boxes.

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, S. C.; Gruetzmacher, K. M.; Scheffing, C. C.; Gallegos, L. E.; Bustos, R. M.

    2002-01-01

    A study was conducted at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to evaluate the performance of the SNAPrM (Spectral Nondestructive Assay Platform) analytical software for measurements of known standards in large metal waste boxes (2.5 m' volume). The trials were designed to test the accuracy and variance of the analytical results for low-density combustible matrices and higher-density metal matrices at two discrete gamma-ray energies: 121.78 keV and 411.12 keV. For both matrix types the measurement method that produced the most accurate results with the lowest associated standard deviation involved combining four individual measurements taken at the geometric center of each of the box's four vertical sides. With this method the overall bias and the standard deviation amongst 24 individual results for the 121.78 keV and 411.12 keV gamma rays were as follows: 3.38% (k 20.19%) and 3.68% (k 15.47%) for the combustible matrix and 37,88% (k 67.64%) and 9.38% (k 33.15%) for the metal matrix. The persistent positive bias from measurements of the metal box is believed to be a result of a nonhomogenously distributed matrix.

  10. High-resolution imaging gamma-ray spectroscopy with externally segmented germanium detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callas, J. L.; Mahoney, W. A.; Varnell, L. S.; Wheaton, W. A.

    1993-01-01

    Externally segmented germanium detectors promise a breakthrough in gamma-ray imaging capabilities while retaining the superb energy resolution of germanium spectrometers. An angular resolution of 0.2 deg becomes practical by combining position-sensitive germanium detectors having a segment thickness of a few millimeters with a one-dimensional coded aperture located about a meter from the detectors. Correspondingly higher angular resolutions are possible with larger separations between the detectors and the coded aperture. Two-dimensional images can be obtained by rotating the instrument. Although the basic concept is similar to optical or X-ray coded-aperture imaging techniques, several complicating effects arise because of the penetrating nature of gamma rays. The complications include partial transmission through the coded aperture elements, Compton scattering in the germanium detectors, and high background count rates. Extensive electron-photon Monte Carlo modeling of a realistic detector/coded-aperture/collimator system has been performed. Results show that these complicating effects can be characterized and accounted for with no significant loss in instrument sensitivity.

  11. gamma-ray spectroscopy of neutron-rich {sup 40}S

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Z. M.; Chapman, R.; Liang, X.; Burns, M.; Hodsdon, A.; Keyes, K.; Kumar, V.; Papenberg, A.; Smith, J. F.; Spohr, K. M.; Haas, F.; Caurier, E.; Curien, D.; Nowacki, F.; Azaiez, F.; Ibrahim, F.; Verney, D.; Behera, B. R.; Corradi, L.; Fioretto, E.

    2010-05-15

    Yrast states up to (6{sup +}) in the neutron-rich {sup 40}S nucleus have been studied using binary grazing reactions produced by the interaction of a 215 MeV beam of {sup 36}S ions with a thin {sup 208}Pb target. The novel experimental setup that combines the large acceptance magnetic spectrometer, PRISMA, and the high-efficiency gamma-ray detection array, CLARA, was used. A new gamma-ray transition at an energy of 1572 keV was observed and tentatively assigned to the (6{sup +})->(4{sup +}) transition. A comparison of experimental observations and the results of large-scale 0(Planck constant/2pi)omega sd-pf shell-model calculations indicates that one- and two-proton excitations from the 2s{sub 1/2} to the 1d{sub 3/2} orbitals play an important role in reproducing the {sup 40}S yrast level structure and the published B(E2;0{sub g.s.}{sup +}->2{sub 1}{sup +}) value. The structure of the yrast states of the even-A isotopes of sulfur is interpreted in terms of the configurations of valence protons and neutrons within the context of large-scale 0(Planck constant/2pi)omega sd-pf shell-model calculations.

  12. ZnO Luminescence and scintillation studied via photoexcitation, X-ray excitation, and gamma-induced positron spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ji, J; Colosimo, A M; Anwand, W; Boatner, L A; Wagner, A; Stepanov, P S; Trinh, T T; Liedke, M O; Krause-Rehberg, R; Cowan, T E; Selim, F A

    2016-01-01

    The luminescence and scintillation properties of ZnO single crystals were studied by photoluminescence and X-ray-induced luminescence (XRIL) techniques. XRIL allowed a direct comparison to be made between the near-band emission (NBE) and trap emissions providing insight into the carrier recombination efficiency in the ZnO crystals. It also provided bulk luminescence measurements that were not affected by surface states. The origin of a green emission, the dominant trap emission in ZnO, was then investigated by gamma-induced positron spectroscopy (GIPS) - a unique defect spectroscopy method that enables positron lifetime measurements to be made for a sample without contributions from positron annihilation in the source materials. The measurements showed a single positron decay curve with a 175 ps lifetime component that was attributed to Zn vacancies passivated by hydrogen. Both oxygen vacancies and hydrogen-decorated Zn vacancies were suggested to contribute to the green emission. By combining scintillation measurements with XRIL, the fast scintillation in ZnO crystals was found to be strongly correlated with the ratio between the defect luminescence and NBE. This study reports the first application of GIPS to semiconductors, and it reveals the great benefits of the XRIL technique for the study of emission and scintillation properties of materials. PMID:27550235

  13. ZnO Luminescence and scintillation studied via photoexcitation, X-ray excitation, and gamma-induced positron spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ji, J.; Colosimo, A. M.; Anwand, W.; Boatner, L. A.; Wagner, A.; Stepanov, P. S.; Trinh, T. T.; Liedke, M. O.; Krause-Rehberg, R.; Cowan, T. E.; Selim, F. A.

    2016-01-01

    The luminescence and scintillation properties of ZnO single crystals were studied by photoluminescence and X-ray-induced luminescence (XRIL) techniques. XRIL allowed a direct comparison to be made between the near-band emission (NBE) and trap emissions providing insight into the carrier recombination efficiency in the ZnO crystals. It also provided bulk luminescence measurements that were not affected by surface states. The origin of a green emission, the dominant trap emission in ZnO, was then investigated by gamma-induced positron spectroscopy (GIPS) - a unique defect spectroscopy method that enables positron lifetime measurements to be made for a sample without contributions from positron annihilation in the source materials. The measurements showed a single positron decay curve with a 175 ps lifetime component that was attributed to Zn vacancies passivated by hydrogen. Both oxygen vacancies and hydrogen-decorated Zn vacancies were suggested to contribute to the green emission. By combining scintillation measurements with XRIL, the fast scintillation in ZnO crystals was found to be strongly correlated with the ratio between the defect luminescence and NBE. This study reports the first application of GIPS to semiconductors, and it reveals the great benefits of the XRIL technique for the study of emission and scintillation properties of materials. PMID:27550235

  14. ZnO Luminescence and scintillation studied via photoexcitation, X-ray excitation, and gamma-induced positron spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ji, J; Colosimo, A M; Anwand, W; Boatner, L A; Wagner, A; Stepanov, P S; Trinh, T T; Liedke, M O; Krause-Rehberg, R; Cowan, T E; Selim, F A

    2016-08-23

    The luminescence and scintillation properties of ZnO single crystals were studied by photoluminescence and X-ray-induced luminescence (XRIL) techniques. XRIL allowed a direct comparison to be made between the near-band emission (NBE) and trap emissions providing insight into the carrier recombination efficiency in the ZnO crystals. It also provided bulk luminescence measurements that were not affected by surface states. The origin of a green emission, the dominant trap emission in ZnO, was then investigated by gamma-induced positron spectroscopy (GIPS) - a unique defect spectroscopy method that enables positron lifetime measurements to be made for a sample without contributions from positron annihilation in the source materials. The measurements showed a single positron decay curve with a 175 ps lifetime component that was attributed to Zn vacancies passivated by hydrogen. Both oxygen vacancies and hydrogen-decorated Zn vacancies were suggested to contribute to the green emission. By combining scintillation measurements with XRIL, the fast scintillation in ZnO crystals was found to be strongly correlated with the ratio between the defect luminescence and NBE. This study reports the first application of GIPS to semiconductors, and it reveals the great benefits of the XRIL technique for the study of emission and scintillation properties of materials.

  15. ZnO Luminescence and scintillation studied via photoexcitation, x-ray excitation, and gamma-induced positron spectroscopy"

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, C; Colosimo, A; Anwand, W; Boatner, Lynn A; Wagner, A; Stepanov, P S; Trinh, t t; Liedke, m o; Krause-Rehberg, R; Cowan, T E; Selim, F. A.

    2016-01-01

    Luminescence and scintillation in ZnO single crystals were measured by photoluminescence and X-ray-induced luminescence (XRIL). XRIL allowed a direct comparison to be made between the near-band emission (NBE) and trap emissions providing insight into the carrier recombination efficiency in the ZnO crystals. The origin of green emission, the dominant trap emission in ZnO, was investigated by gamma-induced positron spectroscopy (GIPS) - a unique defect spectroscopy method that enables positron lifetime measurements to be made for a sample without contributions from positron annihilation in the source materials or the surroundings. The measurements showed the absence of positron traps in the crystals and yielded a bulk positron lifetime value that is in complete agreement with the predicted theoretical value = thereby confirming the advantage of the GIPS method. By combining scintillation measurements with XRIL, the fast scintillation in ZnO crystals was found to be strongly correlated with the ratio between the defect luminescence and NBE.

  16. ZnO Luminescence and scintillation studied via photoexcitation, x-ray excitation, and gamma-induced positron spectroscopy"

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ji, C; Colosimo, A; Anwand, W; Boatner, Lynn A; Wagner, A; Stepanov, P S; Trinh, t t; Liedke, m o; Krause-Rehberg, R; Cowan, T E; et al

    2016-01-01

    Luminescence and scintillation in ZnO single crystals were measured by photoluminescence and X-ray-induced luminescence (XRIL). XRIL allowed a direct comparison to be made between the near-band emission (NBE) and trap emissions providing insight into the carrier recombination efficiency in the ZnO crystals. The origin of green emission, the dominant trap emission in ZnO, was investigated by gamma-induced positron spectroscopy (GIPS) - a unique defect spectroscopy method that enables positron lifetime measurements to be made for a sample without contributions from positron annihilation in the source materials or the surroundings. The measurements showed the absence of positron traps in the crystalsmore » and yielded a bulk positron lifetime value that is in complete agreement with the predicted theoretical value = thereby confirming the advantage of the GIPS method. By combining scintillation measurements with XRIL, the fast scintillation in ZnO crystals was found to be strongly correlated with the ratio between the defect luminescence and NBE.« less

  17. ZnO Luminescence and scintillation studied via photoexcitation, X-ray excitation, and gamma-induced positron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, J.; Colosimo, A. M.; Anwand, W.; Boatner, L. A.; Wagner, A.; Stepanov, P. S.; Trinh, T. T.; Liedke, M. O.; Krause-Rehberg, R.; Cowan, T. E.; Selim, F. A.

    2016-08-01

    The luminescence and scintillation properties of ZnO single crystals were studied by photoluminescence and X-ray-induced luminescence (XRIL) techniques. XRIL allowed a direct comparison to be made between the near-band emission (NBE) and trap emissions providing insight into the carrier recombination efficiency in the ZnO crystals. It also provided bulk luminescence measurements that were not affected by surface states. The origin of a green emission, the dominant trap emission in ZnO, was then investigated by gamma-induced positron spectroscopy (GIPS) - a unique defect spectroscopy method that enables positron lifetime measurements to be made for a sample without contributions from positron annihilation in the source materials. The measurements showed a single positron decay curve with a 175 ps lifetime component that was attributed to Zn vacancies passivated by hydrogen. Both oxygen vacancies and hydrogen-decorated Zn vacancies were suggested to contribute to the green emission. By combining scintillation measurements with XRIL, the fast scintillation in ZnO crystals was found to be strongly correlated with the ratio between the defect luminescence and NBE. This study reports the first application of GIPS to semiconductors, and it reveals the great benefits of the XRIL technique for the study of emission and scintillation properties of materials.

  18. Development of an Ultra-Low Background Liquid Scintillation Counter for Trace Level Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Erchinger, Jennifer L.; Orrell, John L.; Aalseth, Craig E.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Douglas, Matthew; Finn, Erin C.; Fuller, Erin S.; Keillor, Martin E.; Morley, Shannon M.; Mullen, Crystal A.; Panisko, Mark E.; Shaff, Sarah M.; Warren, Glen A.; Wright, Michael E.

    2015-09-01

    Low-level liquid scintillation counting (LSC) has been established as one of the radiation detection techniques useful in elucidating environmental processes and environmental monitoring around nuclear facilities. The Ultra-Low Background Liquid Scintillation Counter (ULB-LSC) under construction in the Shallow Underground Laboratory at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory aims to further reduce the MDAs and/or required sample processing. Through layers of passive shielding in conjunction with an active veto and 30 meters water equivalent overburden, the background reduction is expected to be 10 to 100 times below typical analytic low-background liquid scintillation systems. Simulations have shown an expected background of around 14 counts per day. A novel approach to the light collection will use a coated hollow light guide cut into the inner copper shielding. Demonstration LSC measurements will show low-energy detection, spectral deconvolution, and alpha/beta discrimination capabilities, from trials with standards of tritium, strontium-90, and actinium-227, respectively. An overview of the system design and expected demonstration measurements will emphasize the potential applications of the ULB-LSC in environmental monitoring for treaty verification, reach-back sample analysis, and facility inspections.

  19. Combined in-beam electron and {gamma}-ray spectroscopy of {sup 184,186}Hg

    SciTech Connect

    Scheck, M.; Butler, P. A.; Gaffney, L. P.; Carrol, R. J.; Cox, D.; Joss, D. T.; Herzberg, R.-D.; Page, R. D.; Papadakis, P.; Watkins, H. V.; Bree, N.; Huyse, M.; Van Duppen, P.; Grahn, T.; Greenlees, P. T.; Herzan, A.; Jakobsson, U.; Jones, P.; Julin, R.; Juutinen, S.

    2011-03-15

    By exploiting the SAGE spectrometer a simultaneous measurement of conversion electrons and {gamma} rays emitted in the de-excitation of excited levels in the neutron-deficient nuclei {sup 184,186}Hg was performed. The light Hg isotopes under investigation were produced using the 4n channels of the fusion-evaporation reactions of {sup 40}Ar and {sup 148,150}Sm. The measured K- and L-conversion electron ratios confirmed the stretched E2 nature of several transitions of the yrast bands in {sup 184,186}Hg. Additional information on the E0 component of the 2{sub 2}{sup +}{yields}2{sub 1}{sup +} transition in {sup 186}Hg was obtained.

  20. Cesium hafnium chloride: A high light yield, non-hygroscopic cubic crystal scintillator for gamma spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Burger, Arnold; Rowe, Emmanuel; Groza, Michael; Morales Figueroa, Kristle; Cherepy, Nerine J.; Beck, Patrick R.; Hunter, Steven; Payne, Stephen A.

    2015-10-05

    We report on the scintillation properties of Cs{sub 2}HfCl{sub 6} (cesium hafnium chloride or CHC) as an example of a little-known class of non-hygroscopic compounds having the generic cubic crystal structure of K{sub 2}PtCl{sub 6}. The crystals are easily growable from the melt using the Bridgman method with minimal precursor treatments or purification. CHC scintillation is centered at 400 nm, with a principal decay time of 4.37 μs and a light yield of up to 54 000 photons/MeV when measured using a silicon CCD photodetector. The light yield is the highest ever reported for an undoped crystal, and CHC also exhibits excellent light yield nonproportionality. These desirable properties allowed us to build and test CHC gamma-ray spectrometers providing energy resolution of 3.3% at 662 keV.

  1. Hard X-ray and gamma-ray imaging spectroscopy for the next solar maximum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, H. S.; Crannell, C. J.; Dennis, B. R.; Spicer, D. S.; Davis, J. M.; Hurford, G. J.; Lin, R. P.

    1990-01-01

    The objectives and principles are described of a single spectroscopic imaging package that can provide effective imaging in the hard X- and gamma-ray ranges. Called the High-Energy Solar Physics (HESP) mission instrument for solar investigation, the device is based on rotating modulation collimators with germanium semiconductor spectrometers. The instrument is planned to incorporate thick modulation plates, and the range of coverage is discussed. The optics permit the coverage of high-contrast hard X-ray images from small- and medium-sized flares with large signal-to-noise ratios. The detectors allow angular resolution of less than 1 arcsec, time resolution of less than 1 arcsec, and spectral resolution of about 1 keV. The HESP package is considered an effective and important instrument for investigating the high-energy solar events of the near-term future efficiently.

  2. Development of a Reference Database for Particle-Induced Gamma-ray Emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitriou, P.; Becker, H.-W.; Bogdanović-Radović, I.; Chiari, M.; Goncharov, A.; Jesus, A. P.; Kakuee, O.; Kiss, A. Z.; Lagoyannis, A.; Räisänen, J.; Strivay, D.; Zucchiatti, A.

    2016-03-01

    Particle-Induced Gamma-ray Emission (PIGE) is a powerful analytical technique that exploits the interactions of rapid charged particles with nuclei located near a sample surface to determine the composition and structure of the surface regions of solids by measurement of characteristic prompt γ rays. The potential for depth profiling of this technique has long been recognized, however, the implementation has been limited owing to insufficient knowledge of the physical data and lack of suitable user-friendly computer codes for the applications. Although a considerable body of published data exists in the nuclear physics literature for nuclear reaction cross sections with γ rays in the exit channel, there is no up-to-date, comprehensive compilation specifically dedicated to IBA applications. A number of PIGE cross-section data had already been uploaded to the Ion Beam Analysis Nuclear Data Library (IBANDL)

  3. Practical Gamma Spectroscopy Assay Techniques for Large Volume Low-Level Waste Boxes

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, S. C.; Gruetzmacher, K.; Sheffing, C. C.; Gallegos, L.; Bustos, R.

    2002-02-26

    A study was conducted at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to evaluate the performance of the SNAP (Spectral Nondestructive Assay Platform) analytical software for measurements of known standards in large metal waste boxes (2.5 m3 volume). The trials were designed to test the accuracy and variance of the analytical results for low-density combustible matrices and higher-density metal matrices at two discrete gamma-ray energies: 121.78 keV and 411.12 keV. For both matrix types the measurement method that produced the most accurate results with the lowest associated standard deviation involved combining four individual measurements taken at the geometric center of each of the box's four vertical sides.

  4. Low Level Gamma Spectroscopy Measurements of Radium and Cesium in Lucerne (Medicago Sativa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fokapić, S.; Bikit, I.; Mrđa, D.; Vesković, M.; Slivka, J.; Mihaljev, Ž.; Ćupić, Ž.

    2007-04-01

    Nineteen years after Chernobyl nuclear accident, activity concentration of 137Cs still could be detected in food and soil samples in Central and Eastern Europe. In this paper radiation levels of radium and cesium in Lucerne will be presented. It is a perennial plant with a deep root system and it is widely grown throughout the world as forage for cattle. The samples of Lucerne were taken from twelve different locations in Vojvodina in the summer period July-September 2004. The samples were specially dried on the air and after that ground, powdered and mineralized by method of dry burning on the temperature of 450°C. Gamma spectrometry measurements of the ash were performed by means of actively shielded germanium detector with maximal background reduction. For cesium 137Cs 10 mBq/kg order of magnitude detection limits were achieved.

  5. Synthesis of bulk-size transparent gadolinium oxide–polymer nanocomposites for gamma ray spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Wen; Chen, Qi; Cherepy, Nerine; Dooraghi, Alex; Kishpaugh, David; Chatziioannou, Arion; Payne, Stephen; Xiang, Weidong

    2015-01-01

    Heavy element loaded polymer composites have long been proposed to detect high energy X- and γ-rays upon scintillation. The previously reported bulk composite scintillators have achieved limited success because of the diminished light output resulting from fluorescence quenching and opacity. We demonstrate the synthesis of a transparent nanocomposite comprising gadolinium oxide nanocrystals uniformly dispersed in bulk-size samples at a high loading content. The strategy to avoid luminescence quenching and opacity in the nanocomposite was successfully deployed, which led to the radioluminescence light yield of up to 27 000/MeV, about twice as much as standard commercial plastic scintillators. Nanocomposites monoliths (14 mm diameter by 3 mm thickness) with 31 wt% loading of nanocrystals generated a photoelectric peak for Cs-137 gamma (662 keV) with 11.4% energy resolution. PMID:26478816

  6. Nuclear structure and shapes from prompt gamma ray spectroscopy of fission products

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, I.; Morss, L.R.; Durell, J.L.

    1996-10-01

    Many nuclear shape phenomena are predicted to occur in neutron-rich nuclei. The best source for the production of these nuclides is the spontaneous fission which produces practically hundreds of nuclides with yields of greater than 0.1 % per decay. Measurements of coincident gamma rays with large Ge arrays have recently been made to obtain information on nuclear structures and shapes of these neutron- rich nuclei. Among the important results that have been obtained from such measurements are octupole correlations in Ba isotopes, triaxial shapes in Ru nuclei, two-phonon vibrations in {sup 106}Mo and level lifetimes and quadrupole moments in Nd isotopes and A=100 nuclei. These data have been used to test theoretical models.

  7. Low Level Gamma Spectroscopy Measurements of Radium and Cesium in Lucerne (Medicago Sativa)

    SciTech Connect

    Fokapic, S.; Bikit, I.; Mrda, D.; Veskovic, M.; Slivka, J.; Mihaljev, Z.; Cupic, Z.

    2007-04-23

    Nineteen years after Chernobyl nuclear accident, activity concentration of 137Cs still could be detected in food and soil samples in Central and Eastern Europe. In this paper radiation levels of radium and cesium in Lucerne will be presented. It is a perennial plant with a deep root system and it is widely grown throughout the world as forage for cattle. The samples of Lucerne were taken from twelve different locations in Vojvodina in the summer period July-September 2004. The samples were specially dried on the air and after that ground, powdered and mineralized by method of dry burning on the temperature of 450 deg. C. Gamma spectrometry measurements of the ash were performed by means of actively shielded germanium detector with maximal background reduction. For cesium 137Cs 10 mBq/kg order of magnitude detection limits were achieved.

  8. Pixellated thallium bromide detectors for gamma-ray spectroscopy and imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onodera, T.; Hitomi, K.; Shoji, T.; Hiratate, Y.

    2004-06-01

    Recently, pixellated semiconductor detectors exhibit high-energy resolution, which have been studied actively and fabricated from CdTe, CZT and HgI 2. Thallium bromide (TlBr) is a compound semiconductor characterized with its high atomic numbers (Tl=81, Br=35) and high density (7.56 g/cm 3). Thus, TlBr exhibits higher photon stopping power than other semiconductor materials used for radiation detector fabrication such as CdTe, CZT and HgI 2. The wide band gap of TlBr (2.68 eV) permits the detectors low-noise operation at around room temperature. Our studies made an effort to fabricate pixellated TlBr detectors had sufficient detection efficiency and good charge collection efficiency. In this study, pixellated TlBr detectors were fabricated from the crystals purified by the multipass zone-refining method and grown by the horizontal traveling molten zone (TMZ) method. The TlBr detector has a continuous cathode over one crystal surface and 3×3 pixellated anodes (0.57×0.57 mm 2 each) surrounded by a guard ring on the opposite surface. The electrodes were realized by vacuum evaporation of palladium through a shadow mask. Typical thickness of the detector was 2 mm. Spectrometric performance of the TlBr detectors was tested by irradiating them with 241Am (59.5 keV), 57Co (122 keV) and 137Cs (662 keV) gamma-ray sources at temperature of -20°C. Energy resolutions (FWHM) were measured to be 4.0, 6.0 and 9.7 keV for 59.5, 122 and 662 keV gamma-rays, respectively.

  9. Time Resolved Spectroscopy of SGR J1550-5418 Bursts Detected with Fermi/Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Younes, G.; Kouveliotou, C.; van der Horst, A. J.; Baring, M. G.; Granot, J.; Watts, A. L.; Bhat, P. N.; Collazzi, A.; Gehrels, N.; Gorgone, N.; Göğüş, E.; Gruber, D.; Grunblatt, S.; Huppenkothen, D.; Kaneko, Y.; von Kienlin, A.; van der Klis, M.; Lin, L.; Mcenery, J.; van Putten, T.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.

    2014-04-01

    We report on a time-resolved spectroscopy of the 63 brightest bursts of SGR J1550-5418, detected with the Fermi/Gamma-ray Burst Monitor during its 2008-2009 intense bursting episode. We performed spectral analysis down to 4 ms timescales to characterize the spectral evolution of the bursts. Using a Comptonized model, we find that the peak energy, E peak, anti-correlates with flux, while the low-energy photon index remains constant at ~ - 0.8 up to a flux limit F ≈ 10-5 erg s-1 cm-2. Above this flux value, the E peak-flux correlation changes sign, and the index positively correlates with the flux reaching ~1 at the highest fluxes. Using a two blackbody model, we find that the areas and fluxes of the two emitting regions correlate positively. Further, we study here for the first time the evolution of the temperatures and areas as a function of flux. We find that the area-kT relation follows the lines of constant luminosity at the lowest fluxes, R 2vpropkT -4, with a break at the higher fluxes (F > 10-5.5 erg s-1 cm-2). The area of the high-kT component increases with the flux while its temperature decreases, which we interpret as being due to an adiabatic cooling process. The area of the low-kT component, on the other hand, appears to saturate at the highest fluxes, toward R max ≈ 30 km. Assuming that crust quakes are responsible for soft gamma repeater (SGR) bursts and considering R max as the maximum radius of the emitting photon-pair plasma fireball, we relate this saturation radius to a minimum excitation radius of the magnetosphere, and we put a lower limit on the internal magnetic field of SGR J1550-5418, B int >~ 4.5 × 1015 G.

  10. Low-background measurements of neutron emission from Ti metal in pressurized deuterium gas

    SciTech Connect

    Menlove, H.O.; Paciotti, M.A.; Claytor, T.N.; Tuggle, D.G.

    1991-01-01

    A wide variety of neutron detector systems have been used at various research facilities to search for anomalous neutron emission from deuterated metals. Some of these detector systems are summarized here together with possible sources of spurious signals from electronic noise. During the past two years, we have performed experiments to measure neutron emission from pressurized D{sub 2} gas mixed with various forms of titanium metal chips and sponge. Details concerning the neutron detectors, experimental procedures, and results have been reported previously. Our recent experiments have focused on increasing the low-level neutron emission and finding a way to trigger the emission. To improve our detection sensitivity, we have increased the shielding in our counting laboratory, changed to low-background {sup 3}He tubes, and set up additional detector systems in deep underground counting stations. This report is an update on this experimental work. 7 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  11. Estimation of Equivalent Sea Level Cosmic Ray Exposure for Low Background Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, Austen T.; Orrell, John L.

    2012-08-25

    While scientists at CERN and other particle accelerators around the world explore the boundaries of high energy physics, the Majorana project investigates the other end of the spectrum with its extremely sensitive, low background, low energy detector. The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR aims to detect neutrinoless double beta decay (0νββ), a rare theoretical process in which two neutrons decay into two protons and two electrons, without the emission of the two antineutrinos that are a product of a normal double beta decay. This process is only possible if – and therefore a detection would prove — the neutrino is a Majorana particle, meaning that it is its own antiparticle [Aaselth et al. 2004] . The existence of such a decay would also disprove lepton conservation and give information about the neutrino's mass.

  12. Low-background performance of a monolithic InSb CCD array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bregman, J. D.; Goebel, J. H.; Mccreight, C. R.; Matsumoto, T.

    1982-01-01

    A 20 element monolithic InSb charge coupled device (CCD) detector array was measured under low background conditions to assess its potential for orbital astronomical applications. At a temperature of 64 K, previous results for charge transfer efficiency (CTE) were reproduced, and a sensitivity of about 2 x 10 to the minus 15th power joules was measured. At 27 and 6 K, extended integration times were achieved, but CTE was substantially degraded. The noise was approximately 6000 charges, which was in excess of the level where statistical fluctuations from the illumination could be detected. A telescope demonstration was performed showing that the array sensitivity and difficulty of operation were not substantially different from laboratory levels. Ways in which the device could be improved for astronomical applications were discussed.

  13. Investigations of 2β decay measured by low background HPGe spectrometer OBELIX

    SciTech Connect

    Rukhadze, Ekaterina [Institute of Experimental and Applied Physics, CTU in Prague, Horska 3a Collaboration: OBELIX Collaboration; SuperNEMO Collaboration

    2013-12-30

    A low background high sensitive HPGe spectrometer OBELIX was installed at the Modane Underground Laboratory (LSM, France, 4800 m w.e.). The detector was designed to measure a contamination of enriched isotopes and radio-impurities in construction materials, to investigate rare nuclear processes such as resonance neutrinoless double electron capture and two-neutrino double beta decay to excited states of daughter nuclei. Spectrometer sensitivity, contamination of NEMO-3 sources and results of 2ν2β{sup −} decay of {sup 100}Mo to the 0{sup +} (1130 keV) and 2{sup +} (540 keV) excited states as well as future plans for OBELIX detector are given.

  14. SPECTROSCOPY OF THE LARGEST EVER {gamma}-RAY-SELECTED BL LAC SAMPLE

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, Michael S.; Romani, Roger W.; Healey, Stephen E.; Michelson, Peter F.; Readhead, Anthony C. S.; Richards, Joseph L.; Max-Moerbeck, Walter; King, Oliver G.

    2013-02-20

    We report on spectroscopic observations covering most of the 475 BL Lacs in the second Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) catalog of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Including archival measurements (correcting several erroneous literature values) we now have spectroscopic redshifts for 44% of the BL Lacs. We establish firm lower redshift limits via intervening absorption systems and statistical lower limits via searches for host galaxies for an additional 51% of the sample leaving only 5% of the BL Lacs unconstrained. The new redshifts raise the median spectroscopic z-tilde from 0.23 to 0.33 and include redshifts as large as z = 2.471. Spectroscopic redshift minima from intervening absorbers have z-tilde = 0.70, showing a substantial fraction at large z and arguing against strong negative evolution. We find that detected BL Lac hosts are bright ellipticals with black hole masses M {sub .} {approx} 10{sup 8.5} - 10{sup 9}, substantially larger than the mean of optical AGNs and LAT Flat Spectrum Radio Quasar samples. A slow increase in M {sub .} with z may be due to selection bias. We find that the power-law dominance of the optical spectrum extends to extreme values, but this does not strongly correlate with the {gamma}-ray properties, suggesting that strong beaming is the primary cause of the range in continuum dominance.

  15. Benchmark Gamma Spectroscopy Measurements of Uranium Hexafluoride in Aluminmum Pipe with a Sodium Iodide Detector

    SciTech Connect

    March-Leuba, Jose A; Uckan, Taner; Gunning, John E; Brukiewa, Patrick D; Upadhyaya, Belle R; Revis, Stephen M

    2010-01-01

    ) and an enrichment monitor (EM). Development of the FM is primarily the responsibility of Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and development of the EM is primarily the responsibility of Los Alamos National Laboratory. The FM will measure {sup 235}U mass flow rate by combining information from measuring the UF{sub 6} volumetric flow rate and the {sup 235}U density. The UF{sub 6} flow rate will be measured using characteristics of the process pumps used in product and tail UF{sub 6} header process lines of many GCEPs, and the {sup 235}U density will be measured using commercially available sodium iodide (NaI) gamma ray scintillation detectors. This report describes the calibration of the portion of the FM that measures the {sup 235}U density. Research has been performed to define a methodology and collect data necessary to perform this calibration without the need for plant declarations. The {sup 235}U density detector is a commercially available system (GammaRad made by Amptek, www.amptek.com) that contains the NaI crystal, photomultiplier tube, signal conditioning electronics, and a multichannel analyzer (MCA). Measurements were made with the detector system installed near four {sup 235}U sources. Two of the sources were made of solid uranium, and the other two were in the form of UF{sub 6} gas in aluminum piping. One of the UF{sub 6} gas sources was located at ORNL and the other at LANL. The ORNL source consisted of two pipe sections (schedule 40 aluminum pipe of 4-inch and 8-inch outside diameter) with 5.36% {sup 235}U enrichment, and the LANL source was a 4-inch schedule 40 aluminum pipe with 3.3% {sup 235}U enrichment. The configurations of the detector on these test sources, as well as on long straight pipe configurations expected to exist at GCEPs, were modeled using the computer code MCNP. The results of the MCNP calculations were used to define geometric correction factors between the test source and the GCEP application. Using these geometric correction factors

  16. Ultrahigh-Resolution {gamma}-Ray Spectroscopy of {sup 156}Gd: A Test of Tetrahedral Symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Jentschel, M.; Krempel, J.; Urban, W.; Tonev, D.; Petkov, P.; Dudek, J.; Curien, D.; Lauss, B.; Angelis, G. de

    2010-06-04

    Tetrahedral symmetry in strongly interacting systems would establish a new class of quantum effects at subatomic scale. Excited states in {sup 156}Gd that could carry the information about the tetrahedral symmetry were populated in the {sup 155}Gd(n,{gamma}){sup 156}Gd reaction and studied using the GAMS4/5 Bragg spectrometers at the Institut Laue-Langevin. We have identified the 5{sub 1}{sup -{yields}}3{sub 1}{sup -} transition of 131.983(12) keV in {sup 156}Gd and determined its intensity to be 1.9(3)x10{sup -6} per neutron capture. The lifetime {tau}=220{sub -30}{sup +180}fs of the 5{sub 1}{sup -} state in {sup 156}Gd has been measured using the GRID technique. The resulting B(E2)=293{sub -134}{sup +61}Weisskopf unit rate of the 131.983 keV transition provides the intrinsic quadrupole moment of the 5{sub 1}{sup -} state in {sup 156}Gd to be Q{sub 0}=7.1{sub -1.6}{sup +0.7} b. This large value, comparable to the quadrupole moment of the ground state in {sup 156}Gd, gives strong evidence against tetrahedral symmetry in the lowest odd-spin, negative-parity band of {sup 156}Gd.

  17. Lu.sub.1-xI.sub.3:Ce.sub.x-a scintillator for gamma-ray spectroscopy and time-of-flight pet

    DOEpatents

    Shah, Kanai S.

    2008-02-12

    The present invention includes very fast scintillator materials including lutetium iodide doped with Cerium (Lu.sub.1-xI.sub.3:Ce.sub.x; LuI.sub.3:Ce). The LuI.sub.3 scintillator material has surprisingly good characteristics including high light output, high gamma-ray stopping efficiency, fast response, low cost, good proportionality, and minimal afterglow that the material is useful for gamma-ray spectroscopy, medical imaging, nuclear and high energy physics research, diffraction, non-destructive testing, nuclear treaty verification and safeguards, and geological exploration.

  18. The Design of an Ultra-Low Background Thermosyphon for the Majorana Demonstrator

    SciTech Connect

    Aguayo Navarrete, Estanislao; Busch, Matthew; Daniels, Randy; Fast, James E.; Green, Matthew P.; Reid, Douglas J.

    2013-05-01

    The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR (MJD) is an ultra-low background neutrinoless double-beta decay (0νββ) experiment that will deploy up to 40 kg of high purity germanium detectors (HPGe). The goal of this experiment is to demonstrate the feasibility of building a detector array with less than 1 event/ton-year in a 4 keV region of interest around the 0νββ signal. HPGe diodes, when used as ionizing radiation detectors, need to be maintained at a temperature close to that of liquid nitrogen (77 K). This work describes the R&D results of a cryogenic system capable of meeting the requirements of low background and the cooling capacity required to successfully operate such a detector system. The MJD germanium detector modules will operate at liquid nitrogen temperature to provide adequate cooling for a full range of HPGe impurity concentrations. This paper shows the experimental results obtained using a two-phase horizontal thermosyphon using liquid nitrogen as the MJD’s cooling system. The cold test shows that the proposed thermosyphon has sufficient cooling power to handle the heat load of an MJD module. Results for the temperature gradient across the thermosyphon, cooling capacity, and design considerations demonstrate that the thermosyphon can effectively remove the calculated heat load of each module of the experiment. The thermosyphon will be bolted to a cold plate from which detector strings will hang. The thermal conductivity of a mockup of the MJD bolted thermal joint is experimentally determined to be below 0.1 K/W.

  19. Detection of explosive substances by tomographic inspection using neutron and gamma-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farahmand, M.; Boston, A. J.; Grint, A. N.; Nolan, P. J.; Joyce, M. J.; Mackin, R. O.; D'Mellow, B.; Aspinall, M.; Peyton, A. J.; van Silfhout, R.

    2007-08-01

    In recent years the detection and identification of hazardous materials has become increasingly important. This work discusses research and development of a technique which is capable of detecting and imaging hidden explosives. It is proposed to utilise neutron interrogation of the substances under investigation facilitating the detection of emitted gamma radiation and scattered neutrons. Pulsed fast neutron techniques are attractive because they can be used to determine the concentrations of the light elements (hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen) which can be the primary components of explosive materials. Using segmented High Purity Ge (HPGe) detectors and digital pulse processing [R.J. Cooper, G. Turk, A.J. Boston, H.C. Boston, J.R. Cresswell, A.R. Mather, P.J. Nolan, C.J. Hall, I. Lazarus, J. Simpson, A. Berry, T. Beveridge, J. Gillam, R.A. Lewis, in: Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Position Sensitive Detectors, Nuclear Instruments and Methods A, in press; I. Lazarus, D.E. Appelbe, A. J. Boston, P.J. Coleman-Smith, J.R. Cresswell, M. Descovich, S.A.A. Gros, M. Lauer, J. Norman, C.J. Pearson, V.F.E. Pucknell, J.A. Sampson, G. Turk, J.J. Valiente-Dobón, IEEE Trans. Nucl. Sci., 51 (2004) 1353; R.J. Cooper, A.J. Boston, H.C. Boston, J.R. Cresswell, A.N. Grint, A.R. Mather, P.J. Nolan, D.P. Scraggs, G. Turk, C.J. Hall, I. Lazarus, A. Berry, T. Beveridge, J. Gillam, R.A. Lewis, in: Proceedings of the 11th International Symposium on Radiation Measurements and Application, 2006. [1-3

  20. AlSb photonic detectors for gamma-ray spectroscopy. Progress report, October 1994--August 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Becla, P.; Witt, A.F.

    1995-12-31

    Aluminum antimony (AlSb) is an indirect band gap semiconductor with Eg of about 1.62 eV at 300 K and about 1.75 eV at 77 K. This material, is extremely difficult to obtain in single crystal form because of the very high reactivity of aluminum with oxygen, and the high volatility of antimony. Moreover, molten AlSb reacts with nearly all crucible materials available. Since Welker`s first attempts in 1952, only very few different experimental approaches have been used to grow single crystals of AlSb, e.g. by Bridgman, Czochralski and MBE. All experimental results, however, indicate that many of the properties of AlSb, e.g. carrier concentration, electron-hole mobility and carrier life-time, differ significantly from the theoretically predicted values. The main objective of this research period has been to develop a method leading to improved crystallographic and electronic quality of AlSb crystals, making them more suitable for device applications. The research program was aimed along the following two directions: (1) study the growth of AlSb via Bridgman, Czochralski and THM techniques; (2) comprehensive characterization of grown material, related to the use of compounds for high energy gamma detectors. Variables in the growth study were growth temperature, equilibrium pressure, growth rate, doping, crucible material, seeding and encapsulation. The characterization study included crystallographic quality (grain size, etch pits, precipitates, inclusions), electronic quality (conductivity type, carrier concentration and mobility), optical properties (spectral absorption, photoconductivity, persistent absorption) and others (SIMS, EPR).

  1. Laboratory Studies of Lead Removal from Liquid Scintillator in Preparation for KamLAND's Low Background Phase

    SciTech Connect

    Keefer, Gregory

    2011-04-27

    The removal of Radon induced Lead from liquid scintillator was extensively studied in preparation for KamLAND's low background phase. This work presents the results from laboratory experiments performed at the University of Alabama and their implications for KamLAND and future low background experiments using carbon based liquid scintillator. It was observed that distillation was the most effective purification procedure and that one must consider a non-polar and non-ionic component of Lead in order to reach the levels of radio-purity required for these new class of ultra-low background experiments.

  2. ESR spectroscopy for detecting gamma-irradiated dried vegetables and estimating absorbed doses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Joong-Ho; Chung, Hyung-Wook; Byun, Myung-Woo

    2000-03-01

    In view of an increasing demand for food irradiation technology, the development of a reliable means of detection for the control of irradiated foods has become necessary. Various vegetable food materials (dried cabbage, carrot, chunggyungchae, garlic, onion, and green onion), which can be legally irradiated in Korea, were subjected to a detection study using ESR spectroscopy. Correlation coefficients ( R2) between absorbed doses (2.5-15 kGy) and their corresponding ESR signals were identified from ESR signals. Pre-established threshold values were successfully applied to the detection of 54 coded unknown samples of dried clean vegetables ( chunggyungchae, Brassica camestris var. chinensis), both non-irradiated and irradiated. The ESR signals of irradiated chunggyungchae decreased over a longer storage time, however, even after 6 months of ambient storage, these signals were still distinguishable from those of non-irradiated samples. The most successful estimates of absorbed dose (5 and 8 kGy) were obtained immediately after irradiation using a quadratic fit with average values of 4.85 and 8.65 kGy being calculated.

  3. Studies on spin-trapped radicals in. gamma. -irradiated aqueous L-valine solutions by high-performance liquid chromatography and ESR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Makino, K.

    1980-05-01

    Short-lived radicals produced in ..gamma..-irradiated aqueous L-valine solution were investigated by the method of spin trapping and subsequently by means of high-performance liquid chromatography combined with ESR spectroscopy. Four spin adducts due to L-valine could be identified. Among them, even the diastereoisomeric spin adducts due to L-valine could be separated. In addition, the effect of pH on the change in the spectra of the diastereoisomers is discussed.

  4. FY12 Final Report for PL10-Mod Separations-PD12: Electrochemically Modulated Separation of Plutonium from Dilute and Concentrated Dissolver Solutions for Analysis by Gamma Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, Sandra H.; Arrigo, Leah M.; Duckworth, Douglas C.; Cloutier, Janet M.; Breshears, Andrew T.; Schwantes, Jon M.

    2013-05-01

    Accurate and timely analysis of plutonium in spent nuclear fuel is critical in nuclear safeguards for detection of both protracted and rapid plutonium diversions. Gamma spectroscopy is a viable method for accurate and timely measurements of plutonium provided that the plutonium is well separated from the interfering fission and activation products present in spent nuclear fuel. Electrochemically modulated separation (EMS) is a method that has been used successfully to isolate picogram amounts of Pu from nitric acid matrices. With EMS, Pu adsorption may be turned “on” and “off” depending on the applied voltage, allowing for collection and stripping of Pu without the addition of chemical reagents. In this work, we have scaled up the EMS process to isolate microgram quantities of Pu from matrices encountered in spent nuclear fuel during reprocessing. Several challenges have been addressed including surface area limitations, radiolysis effects, electrochemical cell performance stability, and chemical interferences. After these challenges were resolved, 6 µg Pu was deposited in the electrochemical cell with approximately an 800-fold reduction of fission and activation product levels from a spent nuclear fuel sample. Modeling showed that these levels of Pu collection and interference reduction may not be sufficient for Pu detection by gamma spectroscopy. The main remaining challenges are to achieve a more complete Pu isolation and to deposit larger quantities of Pu for successful gamma analysis of Pu. If gamma analyses of Pu are successful, EMS will allow for accurate and timely on-site analysis for enhanced Pu safeguards.

  5. Ship Effect Neutron Measurements And Impacts On Low-Background Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Aguayo Navarrete, Estanislao; Kouzes, Richard T.; Siciliano, Edward R.

    2013-10-01

    The primary particles entering the upper atmosphere as cosmic rays create showers in the atmosphere that include a broad spectrum of secondary neutrons, muons and protons. These cosmic-ray secondaries interact with materials at the surface of the Earth, yielding prompt backgrounds in radiation detection systems, as well as inducing long-lived activities through spallation events, dominated by the higher-energy neutron secondaries. For historical reasons, the multiple neutrons produced in spallation cascade events are referred to as “ship effect” neutrons. Quantifying the background from cosmic ray induced activities is important to low-background experiments, such as neutrino-less double beta decay. Since direct measurements of the effects of shielding on the cosmic-ray neutron spectrum are not available, Monte Carlo modeling is used to compute such effects. However, there are large uncertainties (orders of magnitude) in the possible cross-section libraries and the cosmic-ray neutron spectrum for the energy range needed in such calculations. The measurements reported here were initiated to validate results from Monte Carlo models through experimental measurements in order to provide some confidence in the model results. The results indicate that the models provide the correct trends of neutron production with increasing density, but there is substantial disagreement between the model and experimental results for the lower-density materials of Al, Fe and Cu.

  6. TREX-DM: a low background Micromegas-based TPC for low-mass WIMP detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iguaz, F. J.; Garza, J. G.; Aznar, F.; Castel, J. F.; Cebrián, S.; Dafni, T.; García, J. A.; Irastorza, I. G.; Lagraba, A.; Luzón, G.; Peiró, A.

    2016-05-01

    Dark Matter experiments are recently focusing their detection techniques in low-mass WIMPs, which requires the use of light elements and low energy threshold. In this context, we describe the TREX-DM experiment, a low background Micromegas-based TPC for low-mass WIMP detection. Its main goal is the operation of an active detection mass ~0.3 kg, with an energy threshold below 0.4 keVee and fully built with previously selected radiopure materials. This work describes the commissioning of the actual setup situated in a laboratory on surface and the updates needed for a possible physics run at the Canfranc Underground Laboratory (LSC) in 2016. A preliminary background model of TREX-DM is also presented, based on a Geant4 simulation, the simulation of the detector’s response and two discrimination methods: a conservative muon/electron and one based on a neutron source. Based on this background model, TREX-DM could be competitive in the search for low-mass WIMPs. In particular it could be sensitive, e.g., to the low-mass WIMP interpretation of the DAMA/LIBRA and other hints in a conservative scenario.

  7. The Majorana low-noise low-background front-end electronics

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Abgrall, N.; Aguayo, E.; Avignone, III, F. T.; Barabash, A. S.; Bertrand, F. E.; Boswell, M.; Brudanin, V.; Busch, M.; Byram, D.; Caldwell, A. S.; et al

    2015-03-24

    The Majorana Demonstrator will search for the neutrinoless double beta decay (ββ(0ν)) of the isotope ⁷⁶Ge with a mixed array of enriched and natural germanium detectors. In view of the next generation of tonne-scale germanium-based ββ(0ν)-decay searches, a major goal of the Majorana Demonstrator is to demonstrate a path forward to achieving a background rate at or below 1 cnt/(ROI-t-y) in the 4 keV region of interest (ROI) around the 2039-keV Q-value of the ⁷⁶Ge ββ(0ν)-decay. Such a requirement on the background level significantly constrains the design of the readout electronics, which is further driven by noise and energy resolutionmore » performances. We present here the low-noise low-background front-end electronics developed for the low-capacitance p-type point contact (P-PC) germanium detectors of the Majorana Demonstrator. This resistive-feedback front-end, specifically designed to have low mass, is fabricated on a radioassayed fused-silica substrate where the feedback resistor consists of a sputtered thin film of high purity amorphous germanium and the feedback capacitor is based on the capacitance between gold conductive traces.« less

  8. GERDA phase II detectors: Behind the production and characterisation at low background conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Maneschg, Werner; Collaboration: GERDA Collaboration; and others

    2013-08-08

    The low background GERmanium Detector Array (GERDA) at Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (LNGS) is designed to search for the rare neutrinoless double beta decay (0νββ) in {sup 76}Ge. Bare germanium diodes are operated in liquid argon which is used as coolant, as passive and soon active as well shield against external radiation. Currently, Phase I of the experiment is running using ∼15 kg of co-axial High Purity Germanium diodes. In order to increase the sensitivity of the experiment 30 Broad Energy Germanium (BEGe) diodes will be added within 2013. This presentation reviews the production chain of the new BEGe detectors from isotopic enrichment to diode production and testing. As demonstrated all steps were carefully planned in order to minimize the exposure of the enriched germanium to cosmic radiation. Following this premise, acceptance and characterisation measurement of the newly produced diodes have been performed within the HEROICA project in the Belgian underground laboratory HADES close to the diode manufacturer. The test program and the results from a subset of the recently terminated GERDA Phase II BEGe survey will be presented.

  9. The Majorana low-noise low-background front-end electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Abgrall, N.; Aguayo, E.; Avignone, III, F. T.; Barabash, A. S.; Bertrand, F. E.; Boswell, M.; Brudanin, V.; Busch, M.; Byram, D.; Caldwell, A. S.; Chan, Y. -D.; Christofferson, C. D.; Combs, D. C.; Cuesta, C.; Detwiler, J. A.; Doe, P. J.; Efremenko, Yu.; Egorov, V.; Ejiri, H.; Elliott, S. R.; Fast, J. E.; Finnerty, P.; Fraenkle, F. M.; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Giovanetti, G. K.; Goett, J.; Green, M. P.; Gruszko, J.; Guiseppe, V. E.; Gusev, K.; Hallin, A. L.; Hazama, R.; Hegai, A.; Henning, R.; Hoppe, E. W.; Howard, S.; Howe, M. A.; Keeter, K. J.; Kidd, M. F.; Kochetov, O.; Konovalov, S. I.; Kouzes, R. T.; LaFerriere, B. D.; Leon, J.; Leviner, L. E.; Loach, J. C.; MacMullin, J.; MacMullin, S.; Martin, R. D.; Meijer, S.; Mertens, S.; Nomachi, M.; Orrell, J. L.; O'Shaughnessy, C.; Overman, N. R.; Phillips, II, D. G.; Poon, A. W.P.; Pushkin, K.; Radford, D. C.; Rager, J.; Rielage, K.; Robertson, R. G.H.; Romero-Romero, E.; Ronquest, M. C.; Schubert, A. G.; Shanks, B.; Shima, T.; Shirchenko, M.; Snavely, K. J.; Snyder, N.; Suriano, A. M.; Thompson, J.; Timkin, V.; Tornow, W.; Trimble, J. E.; Varner, R. L.; Vasilyev, S.; Vetter, K.; Vorren, K.; White, B. R.; Wilkerson, J. F.; Wiseman, C.; Xu, W.; Yakushev, E.; Young, A. R.; Yu, C. -H.; Yumatov, V.

    2015-03-24

    The Majorana Demonstrator will search for the neutrinoless double beta decay (ββ(0ν)) of the isotope ⁷⁶Ge with a mixed array of enriched and natural germanium detectors. In view of the next generation of tonne-scale germanium-based ββ(0ν)-decay searches, a major goal of the Majorana Demonstrator is to demonstrate a path forward to achieving a background rate at or below 1 cnt/(ROI-t-y) in the 4 keV region of interest (ROI) around the 2039-keV Q-value of the ⁷⁶Ge ββ(0ν)-decay. Such a requirement on the background level significantly constrains the design of the readout electronics, which is further driven by noise and energy resolution performances. We present here the low-noise low-background front-end electronics developed for the low-capacitance p-type point contact (P-PC) germanium detectors of the Majorana Demonstrator. This resistive-feedback front-end, specifically designed to have low mass, is fabricated on a radioassayed fused-silica substrate where the feedback resistor consists of a sputtered thin film of high purity amorphous germanium and the feedback capacitor is based on the capacitance between gold conductive traces.

  10. A 220Rn source for the calibration of low-background experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, R. F.; Brown, A.; Brown, E.; Cervantes, M.; Macmullin, S.; Masson, D.; Schreiner, J.; Simgen, H.

    2016-04-01

    We characterize two 40 kBq sources of electrodeposited 228Th for use in low-background experiments. The sources efficiently emanate 220Rn, a noble gas that can diffuse in a detector volume. 220Rn and its daughter isotopes produce α-, β-, and γ-radiation, which may used to calibrate a variety of detector responses and features, before decaying completely in only a few days. We perform various tests to place limits on the release of other long-lived isotopes. In particular, we find an emanation of < 0.008 atoms/min/kBq (90% CL) for 228Th and (1.53 ± 0.04) atoms/min/kBq for 224Ra. The sources lend themselves in particular to the calibration of detectors employing liquid noble elements such as argon and xenon. With the source mounted in a noble gas system, we demonstrate that filters are highly efficient in reducing the activity of these longer-lived isotopes further. We thus confirm the suitability of these sources even for use in next-generation experiments, such as XENON1T/XENONnT, LZ, and nEXO.

  11. Time resolved spectroscopy of SGR J1550–5418 bursts detected with Fermi/gamma-ray burst monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Younes, G.; Kouveliotou, C.; Collazzi, A.; Van der Horst, A. J.; Watts, A. L.; Huppenkothen, D.; Van der Klis, M.; Van Putten, T.; Baring, M. G.; Granot, J.; Bhat, P. N.; Gorgone, N.; Gehrels, N.; Mcenery, J.; Göğüş, E.; Kaneko, Y.; Lin, L.; Gruber, D.; Von Kienlin, A.; Grunblatt, S.; and others

    2014-04-10

    We report on a time-resolved spectroscopy of the 63 brightest bursts of SGR J1550–5418, detected with the Fermi/Gamma-ray Burst Monitor during its 2008-2009 intense bursting episode. We performed spectral analysis down to 4 ms timescales to characterize the spectral evolution of the bursts. Using a Comptonized model, we find that the peak energy, E {sub peak}, anti-correlates with flux, while the low-energy photon index remains constant at ∼ – 0.8 up to a flux limit F ≈ 10{sup –5} erg s{sup –1} cm{sup –2}. Above this flux value, the E {sub peak}–flux correlation changes sign, and the index positively correlates with the flux reaching ∼1 at the highest fluxes. Using a two blackbody model, we find that the areas and fluxes of the two emitting regions correlate positively. Further, we study here for the first time the evolution of the temperatures and areas as a function of flux. We find that the area–kT relation follows the lines of constant luminosity at the lowest fluxes, R {sup 2}∝kT {sup –4}, with a break at the higher fluxes (F > 10{sup –5.5} erg s{sup –1} cm{sup –2}). The area of the high-kT component increases with the flux while its temperature decreases, which we interpret as being due to an adiabatic cooling process. The area of the low-kT component, on the other hand, appears to saturate at the highest fluxes, toward R {sub max} ≈ 30 km. Assuming that crust quakes are responsible for soft gamma repeater (SGR) bursts and considering R {sub max} as the maximum radius of the emitting photon-pair plasma fireball, we relate this saturation radius to a minimum excitation radius of the magnetosphere, and we put a lower limit on the internal magnetic field of SGR J1550–5418, B {sub int} ≳ 4.5 × 10{sup 15} G.

  12. Orbital Measurement of Bulk Carbon, Hydrogen, Oxygen, and Sulfur of Carbonaceous Asteroids via High Energy Resolution Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Lucy F.; Starr, Richard D.; Evans, Larry G.; Parsons, Ann M.; Zolensky, Michael E.; Boynton, William V.; Thomas, Cristina A.

    2014-11-01

    Various populations of low-albedo asteroids (C-complex, D, and P spectral types) dominate the outer Main Asteroid Belt, Hildas, and Trojan clouds and are thought to be related to carbonaceous meteorites. However, carbonaceous meteorites are themselves a diverse group and it remains unclear which types represent which asteroids or asteroid populations. A high-energy-resolution (HPGe) gamma-ray spectroscopy (GRS) experiment on an asteroid orbiter would be sensitive to many of the elements that differentiate carbonaceous chondrite subclasses from each other and from the ureilites, including H, C, O, and S, in the outer ~20-50 cm of the asteroid surface. We have therefore conducted new simulations of the performance of a GRS experiment in orbit around asteroids with carbonaceous chondriticcompositions at levels of hydration ranging from CI-like 17 wt% structural water) to CO-like (<2 wt% structural water). Cosmic-ray interactions with the asteroid surfaces were modeled using the MCNPX Monte-Carlo radiation transport code. A spacecraft background (based on a Dawn-like spacecraft model) was also modeled using MCNPX: this included background due to direct GCR/spacecraft interactions as well as background due to asteroidal neutron flux on the spacecraft. A Dawn-like mission scenario was modeled withthe altitude equal to the asteroid radius for a 4.5-month low-orbit phase. The detector model was based on Mars Odyssey Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (MOGRS), the largest and most sensitive HPGe GRS flown to date. The spectra from the MCNPX output were broadened to a resolution based on the in-flight performance of MOGRS, FWHM = 4.1 keV at 1332 keV. Doppler broadening was also modeled where applicable. Line fluxes were then extracted from the combined background + asteroid spectrum and statistical uncertainties evaluated.We find that within 4.5 months the GRS can measure H/Si, O/Si, C/Si, and S/Si with sufficient precision to distinguish OH-rich CI and CM chondrites from drier CO

  13. First Year PIDDP Report on gamma-ray and x-ray spectroscopy: X-ray remote sensing and in situ spectroscopy for planetary exploration missions and gamma-ray remote sensing and in situ spectroscopy for planetary exploration missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahdavi, M.; Giboni, K. L.; Vajda, S.; Schweitzer, J. S.; Truax, J. A.

    1994-01-01

    Detectors that will be used for planetary missions must have their responses calibrated in a reproducible manner. In addition, it is important to characterize a detector system at uneven portions of its life cycle, for example after exposure to different amounts of radiation. A calibration and response characterization facility has been constructed at Schlumberger-Doll Research for all types of gamma- and x-ray detectors that may be used for planetary measurement. This facility is currently being tested. Initial use is expected for the MARS 94 detectors. The facility will then also be available for calibrating other detectors as well as arrays of detectors such as the NEAR detector with its central Nal(TI) crystal surrounded with a large BGO crystal. Cadmium telluride detectors are investigated for applications in space explorations. These detectors show an energy resolution of 5 keV for the 122 keV 57Co line. Earlier reported polarization effects are not observed. The detectors can be used at temperatures up to 100 C, although with reduced energy resolution. The thickness of standard detectors is limited to 2 mm. These detectors become fully efficient at bias voltages above 200 V. Initial results for a 1 cm thick detector show that the quality of the material is inferior to the thinner standard detectors and hole trapping affects the pulse height. A detailed characterization of the detector is in progress. Prototypes of photomultipliers based on a Channel Electron Multiplier (CEM) are being built to study their performance. Such photomultipliers promise better timing characteristics and a higher dynamic range while being more compact and of lower in weight.

  14. Holdup Measures on an SRNL Mossbauer Spectroscopy Instrument

    SciTech Connect

    Dewberry, R.; Brown, T.; Salaymeh, S.

    2010-05-05

    Gamma-ray holdup measurements of a Mossbauer spectroscopy instrument are described and modeled. In the qualitative acquisitions obtained in a low background area of Savannah River National Laboratory, only Am-241 and Np-237 activity were observed. The Am-241 was known to be the instrumental activation source, while the Np-237 is clearly observed as a source of contamination internal to the instrument. The two sources of activity are modeled separately in two acquisition configurations using two separate modeling tools. The results agree well, demonstrating a content of (1980 {+-} 150) {mu}Ci Am-241 and (110 {+-} 50) {mu}Ci of Np-237.

  15. The Design, Construction, and Initial Characterization of an Ultra-Low-Background Gas-Proportional Counting System

    SciTech Connect

    Seifert, Allen; Aalseth, Craig E.; Day, Anthony R.; Fuller, Erin S.; Hoppe, Eric W.; Keillor, Martin E.; Mace, Emily K.; Overman, Cory T.; Warren, Glen A.

    2013-05-01

    ABSTRACT Over the past several years, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has developed an ultra-low background proportional counter (ULBPC) technology. The resulting detector is the product of an effort to produce a low-background, physically robust gas proportional counter for applications like radon emanation measurements, groundwater tritium, and 37Ar. In order to fully take advantage of the inherent low-background properties designed into the ULBPC, a comparably low-background dedicated counting system is required. An ultra-low-background counting system (ULBCS) was recently built in the new shallow underground laboratory at PNNL. With a design depth of 30 meters water-equivalent, the shallow underground laboratory provides approximately 100x fewer fast neutrons and 6x fewer muons than a surface location. The ULBCS itself provides additional shielding in the form of active anti-cosmic veto (via 2-in. thick plastic scintillator paddles) and passive borated poly (1 in.), lead (6 in.), and copper (~3 in.) shielding. This work will provide details on PNNL’s new shallow underground laboratory, examine the motivation for the design of the counting system, and provide results from the characterization of the ULBCS, including initial detector background.

  16. Estimation of Cosmic Induced Contamination in Ultra-low Background Detector Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Aguayo Navarrete, Estanislao; Kouzes, Richard T.; Orrell, John L.; Berguson, Timothy J.; Greene, Austen T.

    2012-08-01

    Executive Summary This document presents the result of investigating a way to reliably determine cosmic induced backgrounds for ultra-low background materials. In particular, it focuses on those radioisotopes produced by the interactions with cosmic ray particles in the detector materials that act as a background for experiments looking for neutrinoless double beta decay. This investigation is motivated by the desire to determine background contributions from cosmic ray activation of the electroformed copper that is being used in the construction of the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR. The most important radioisotope produced in copper that contributes to the background budget is 60Co, which has the potential to deposit energy in the region of interest of this experiment. Cobalt-60 is produced via cosmic ray neutron collisions in the copper. This investigation aims to provide a method for determining whether or not the copper has been exposed to cosmic radiation beyond the threshold which the Majorana Project has established as the maximum exposure. This threshold is set by the Project as the expected contribution of this source of background to the overall background budget. One way to estimate cosmic ray neutron exposure of materials on the surface of the Earth is to relate it to the cosmic ray muon exposure. Muons are minimum-ionizing particles and the available technologies to detect muons are easier to implement than those to detect neutrons. We present the results of using a portable, ruggedized muon detector, the µ-Witness made by our research group, for determination of muon exposure of materials for the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR. From the muon flux measurement, this report presents a method to estimate equivalent sea-level exposure, and then infer the neutron exposure of the tracked material and thus the cosmogenic activation of the copper. This report combines measurements of the muon flux taken by the µ-Witness detector with Geant4 simulations in order to assure our

  17. Gamma-ray spectroscopy at MHz counting rates with a compact LaBr3 detector and silicon photomultipliers for fusion plasma applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nocente, M.; Rigamonti, D.; Perseo, V.; Tardocchi, M.; Boltruczyk, G.; Broslawski, A.; Cremona, A.; Croci, G.; Gosk, M.; Kiptily, V.; Korolczuk, S.; Mazzocco, M.; Muraro, A.; Strano, E.; Zychor, I.; Gorini, G.

    2016-11-01

    Gamma-ray spectroscopy measurements at MHz counting rates have been carried out, for the first time, with a compact spectrometer based on a LaBr3 scintillator and silicon photomultipliers. The instrument, which is also insensitive to magnetic fields, has been developed in view of the upgrade of the gamma-ray camera diagnostic for α particle measurements in deuterium-tritium plasmas of the Joint European Torus. Spectra were measured up to 2.9 MHz with a projected energy resolution of 3%-4% in the 3-5 MeV range, of interest for fast ion physics studies in fusion plasmas. The results reported here pave the way to first time measurements of the confined α particle profile in high power plasmas of the next deuterium-tritium campaign at the Joint European Torus.

  18. Lu.sub.1-xI.sub.3:Ce.sub.x--a scintillator for gamma ray spectroscopy and time-of-flight PET

    DOEpatents

    Shah, Kanai S.

    2007-02-06

    The present invention concerns very fast scintillator materials comprising lutetium iodide doped with Cerium (Lu.sub.1-xI.sub.3:Ce.sub.x; LuI.sub.3:Ce). The LuI.sub.3 scintillator material has surprisingly good characteristics including high light output, high gamma ray stopping efficiency, fast response, low cost, good proportionality, and minimal afterglow that the material is useful for gamma ray spectroscopy, medical imaging, nuclear and high energy physics research, diffraction, non-destructive testing, nuclear treaty verification and safeguards, and geological exploration. The timing resolution of the scintillators of the present invention provide compositions capable of resolving the position of an annihilation event within a portion of a human body cross-section.

  19. In-beam gamma-ray spectroscopy of {sup 248,250,252}Cf by neutron-transfer reactions using a Cf target

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, R.; Ishii, T.; Asai, M.; Nagae, D.; Makii, H.; Tsukada, K.; Toyoshima, A.; Ishii, Y.; Matsuda, M.; Makishima, A.; Shizuma, T.; Kohno, T.; Ogawa, M.

    2010-05-15

    The ground-state bands of {sup 248,250,252}Cf have been established up to the 10{sup +}, 12{sup +}, and 10{sup +} states, respectively, by in-beam gamma-ray spectroscopy using neutron-transfer reactions with a 153-MeV {sup 18}O beam and a highly radioactive Cf target. The deexcitation gamma rays in {sup 248,250,252}Cf were identified by taking coincidences with outgoing particles of {sup 16-19}O measured with Si DELTAE-E detectors, and by selecting their kinetic energies. Moments of inertia of {sup 248,250,252}Cf were discussed in terms of the N=152 deformed shell gap.

  20. Nondestructive assay in complex, self-attenuating radioactive materials by gamma spectroscopy: A mathematical model and empirical determination of error

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soukup, James David

    2001-12-01

    Over the past several years, portable High Purity Germanium (HPGe) gamma spectroscopy systems have been used with nondestructive assay techniques to characterize waste items at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and other Department of Energy (DOE) sites. Accurate quantification of the radionuclide contamination required that an analytical model be developed. The resulting model, based on a point kernel volumetric approach, is used to translate the raw spectral information into total activity for each detected radionuclide. Using uncollimated, in situ counting techniques, a relatively high-efficiency n-type HPGe detector, a portable laptop computer, and a multi-channel analyzer, the nondestructive assay system has superior detection limits with state of-the-art accuracy. Not only can the system be used to successfully count drums, but also large items such as 90 cubic foot boxes, gloveboxes and heavy machinery. Additionally, contaminated materials such as floors, walls, soil and water have been characterized with the same model. Because of the versatility of the model and the very low detection limits attainable, tremendous cost savings have been realized from low-level/TRU waste segregation activities, and free-release/low-level determinations. The model has been used to determine the activity in a number of contaminated and spiked items and matrices with both known and unknown quantities. In an extensive study to determine the empirical accuracy of the model, a number of measurements were made on sources of known activity. The results show that measurement errors of 20 to 50 percent are achieved, depending on item size, geometry and radionuclide contamination. For larger items, results were typically 30 to 50 percent from the known value. Measurements of smaller and homogeneously contaminated items showed that the measurement errors were the same order of magnitude as the uncertainty of the source (10 to 20 percent). Furthermore, although individual error

  1. Infrared receivers for low background astronomy: Incoherent detectors and coherent devices from one micrometer to one millimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boggess, N. W.; Greenberg, L. T.; Hauser, M. G.; Houck, J. R.; Low, F. J.; Mccreight, C. R.; Rank, D. M.; Richards, P. L.; Weiss, R.

    1979-01-01

    The status of incoherent detectors and coherent receivers over the infrared wavelength range from one micrometer to one millimeter is described. General principles of infrared receivers are included, and photon detectors, bolometers, coherent receivers, and important supporting technologies are discussed, with emphasis on their suitability for low background astronomical applications. Broad recommendations are presented and specific opportunities are identified for development of improved devices.

  2. Phase I Rinal Report: Ultra-Low Background Alpha Activity Counter

    SciTech Connect

    Warburton, W.K.

    2005-07-22

    In certain important physics experiments that search for rare-events, such as neutrino or double beta decay detections, it is critical to minimize the number of background events that arise from alpha particle emitted by the natural radioactivity in the materials used to construct the experiment. Similarly, the natural radioactivity in materials used to connect and package silicon microcircuits must also be minimized in order to eliminate ''soft errors'' caused by alpha particles depositing charges within the microcircuits and thereby changing their logic states. For these, and related reasons in the areas of environmental cleanup and nuclear materials tracking, there is a need that is important from commercial, scientific, and national security perspectives to develop an ultra-low background alpha counter that would be capable of measuring materials' alpha particle emissivity at rates well below 0.00001 alpha/cm{sup 2}/hour. This rate, which corresponds to 24 alpha particles per square meter per day, is essentially impossible to achieve with existing commercial instruments because the natural radioactivity of the materials used to construct even the best of these counters produces background rates at the 0.005 alpha/cm{sup 2}/hr level. Our company (XIA) had previously developed an instrument that uses electronic background suppression to operate at the 0.0005 0.005 alpha/cm{sup 2}/hr level. This patented technology sets up an electric field between a large planar sample and a large planar anode, and fills the gap with pure Nitrogen. An alpha particle entering the chamber ionizes the Nitrogen, producing a ''track'' of electrons, which drift to the anode in the electric field. Tracks close to the anode take less than 10 microseconds (us) to be collected, giving a preamplifier signal with a 10 us risetime. Tracks from the sample have to drift across the full anode-sample gap and produce a 35 us risetime signal. By analyzing the preamplifier signals with a digital

  3. New Applications of Gamma Spectroscopy: Characterization Tools for D&D Process Development, Inventory Reduction Planning & Shipping, Safety Analysis & Facility Management During the Heavy Element Facility Risk Reduction Program

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, M; Anderson, B; Gray, L; Vellinger, R; West, M; Gaylord, R; Larson, J; Jones, G; Shingleton, J; Harris, L; Harward, N

    2006-01-23

    Novel applications of gamma ray spectroscopy for D&D process development, inventory reduction, safety analysis and facility management are discussed in this paper. These applications of gamma spectroscopy were developed and implemented during the Risk Reduction Program (RPP) to successfully downgrade the Heavy Element Facility (B251) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) from a Category II Nuclear Facility to a Radiological Facility. Non-destructive assay in general, gamma spectroscopy in particular, were found to be important tools in project management, work planning, and work control (''Expect the unexpected and confirm the expected''), minimizing worker dose, and resulted in significant safety improvements and operational efficiencies. Inventory reduction activities utilized gamma spectroscopy to identify and confirm isotopics of legacy inventory, ingrowth of daughter products and the presence of process impurities; quantify inventory; prioritize work activities for project management; and to supply information to satisfy shipper/receiver documentation requirements. D&D activities utilize in-situ gamma spectroscopy to identify and confirm isotopics of legacy contamination; quantify contamination levels and monitor the progress of decontamination efforts; and determine the point of diminishing returns in decontaminating enclosures and glove boxes containing high specific activity isotopes such as {sup 244}Cm and {sup 238}Pu. In-situ gamma spectroscopy provided quantitative comparisons of several decontamination techniques (e.g. TLC-free Stripcoat{trademark}, Radiac{trademark} wash, acid wash, scrubbing) and was used as a part of an iterative process to determine the appropriate level of decontamination and optimal cost to benefit ratio. Facility management followed a formal, rigorous process utilizing an independent, state certified, peer-reviewed gamma spectroscopy program, in conjunction with other characterization techniques, process knowledge, and

  4. An Ultrasensitive Hot-Electron Bolometer for Low-Background SMM Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olayaa, David; Wei, Jian; Pereverzev, Sergei; Karasik, Boris S.; Kawamura, Jonathan H.; McGrath, William R.; Sergeev, Andrei V.; Gershenson, Michael E.

    2006-01-01

    We are developing a hot-electron superconducting transition-edge sensor (TES) that is capable of counting THz photons and operates at T = 0.3K. The main driver for this work is moderate resolution spectroscopy (R approx. 1000) on the future space telescopes with cryogenically cooled (approx. 4 K) mirrors. The detectors for these telescopes must be background-limited with a noise equivalent power (NEP) approx. 10(exp -19)-10(exp -20) W/Hz(sup 1/2) over the range v = 0.3-10 THz. Above about 1 THz, the background photon arrival rate is expected to be approx. 10-100/s), and photon counting detectors may be preferable to an integrating type. We fabricated superconducting Ti nanosensors with a volume of approx. 3x10(exp -3) cubic microns on planar substrate and have measured the thermal conductance G to the thermal bath. A very low G = 4x10(exp -14) W/K, measured at 0.3 K, is due to the weak electron-phonon coupling in the material and the thermal isolation provided by superconducting Nb contacts. This low G corresponds to NEP(0.3K) = 3x10(exp -19) W/Hz(sup 1/2). This Hot-Electron Direct Detector (HEDD) is expected to have a sufficient energy resolution for detecting individual photons with v > 0.3 THz at 0.3 K. With the sensor time constant of a few microseconds, the dynamic range is approx. 50 dB.

  5. Potential radionuclide emissions from stacks on the Hanford site, Part 2: Dose assessment methodology using portable low-resolution gamma spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Barnett, J.M.

    1995-02-01

    In September 1992, the Westinghouse Hanford Company began developing an in situ measurement method to assess gamma radiation emanating from high-efficiency particulate air filters using portable low-resolution gamma spectroscopy. The purpose of the new method was to assess radioactive exhaust stack air emissions from empirical data rather than from theoretical models and to determine the potential unabated dose to an offsite theoretical maximally exposed individual. In accordance with Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 61, Subpart H, {open_quotes}National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants{close_quotes}, stacks that have the potential to emit {ge} 1 {mu}Sv y{sup {minus}1} (0.1 mrem y{sup {minus}1}) to the maximally exposed individual are considered {open_quotes}major{close_quotes} and must meet the continuous monitoring requirements. After the method was tested and verified, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region 10, approved its use in June 1993. Of the 125 stacks operated by the Westinghouse Hanford Company, 22 were targeted for evaluation by this method, and 15 were assessed. (The method could not be applied at seven stacks because of excessive background radiation or because no gamma emitting particles appear in the emission stream.) The most significant result from this study was the redesignation of the T Plant main stack. The stack was assessed as being {open_quotes}minor{close_quotes}, and it now only requires periodic confirmatory measurements and meets federally imposed sampling requirements.

  6. {gamma}-ray Spectroscopy of Proton Drip-Line Nuclei in the A{approx}130 Region using SPIRAL beams

    SciTech Connect

    Stezowski, O.; Guinet, D.; Lautesse, Ph.; Meyer, M.; Redon, N.; Rosse, B.; Schmitt, Ch.; De France, G.; Bhattachasyya, S.; Mukherjee, G.

    2008-11-11

    A fusion-evaporation experiment has been performed with a SPIRAL {sup 76}Kr radioactive beam in order to study the deformation of rare-earth nuclei near the proton drip-line. The experimental setup consisted in the EXOGAM {gamma}-array, coupled to the light-charged particles (LCP) DIAMANT detector and to the VAMOS heavy-ion spectrometer. The difficulties inherent to such measurements are enlightened. The coupling between EXOGAM and DIAMANT has been used to decrease the huge background caused by the radioactivity of the beam. It further permits assigning new {gamma}-ray transitions to specific residual nuclei. A {gamma}-ray belonging to the {sup 130}Pm level scheme has thus been observed for the first time.

  7. Development of low background CsI(Tl) and NaI(Tl) crystals for WIMP search

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hyun Su

    2015-08-17

    We have developed low background CsI(Tl) and NaI(Tl) crystals to search for weakly interacting massive particles as well as to verify the origin of the annual modulation signal observed by the DAMA/LIBRA experiment. Extensive studies about the contamination mechanisim of {sup 137}Cs in CsI powder lead to the growth of ultra-low-background CsI(Tl) crystals. Similar approaches for NaI(Tl) crystals have been applied to reduce internal backgrounds to less than 0.5 counts/kg/day/keV. Status and understanding of backgrounds and background reduction in NaI(Tl) crystals will be discussed.

  8. Development of photodetection system based on multipixel avalanche Geiger photodiodes with WLS for LXe low-background detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akimov, D. Yu.; Akindinov, A. V.; Alexandrov, I. S.; Burenkov, A. A.; Danilov, M. V.; Kovalenko, A. G.; Stekhanov, V. N.

    2010-04-01

    A multipixel avalanche Geiger photodiode with a p-terphenyl wavelength shifter in front of it has been tested in the liquid xenon to detect the 175-nm scintillation light. The global detection efficiency of the VUV photons of ~10% is obtained. A photodetection system with sensitivity to sub-keV ionization and few-mm coordinate accuracy is proposed for LXe low-background experiments.

  9. Coupled multi-group neutron photon transport for the simulation of high-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy applications

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, Kimberly A.

    2009-08-01

    The accurate and efficient simulation of coupled neutron-photon problems is necessary for several important radiation detection applications. Examples include the detection of nuclear threats concealed in cargo containers and prompt gamma neutron activation analysis for nondestructive determination of elemental composition of unknown samples.

  10. A new opportunity: coincident spectroscopy in neutron-deficient actinides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gothe, Oliver; Gates, J. M.; Gregorich, K. E.; Baartman, B.; Fallon, P.; Esker, N. E.; Kwarsick, J.; Machiavelli, A. O.; Mudder, P. R.; Olive, D. T.; Pang, G.; Rissanen, J.; Nitsche, H.

    2014-09-01

    Due to high γ-ray background rates heavy element production facilities are usually not sensitive to the electron capture decay of neutron deficient actinides. We have developed new capabilities at the Berkeley Gas Filled Separator (BGS) that allow us to study these isotopes. The highly selective and efficient separation of compound nucleus evaporation residue products using the BGS couple with a rapid delivery to a low-background detector facility, opens up many new possibilities for nuclear decay and structure studies in the neutron deficient actinides. The decay of these actinides produces vacancies in the K-shell resulting in x-rays uniquely identifying the Z of the decay products. We present the first results of this new methodology in studying the nuclear structure of fermium-254 by observing the gamma rays in coincidence with fermium x-rays. Coincident gamma-decay spectroscopy gives us a new tool to study the nuclear structure of previously inaccessible systems.

  11. {gamma}-ray spectroscopy of neutron-deficient {sup 110}Te. II. High-spin smooth-terminating structures

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, E. S.; Evans, A. O.; Boston, A. J.; Nolan, P. J.; Semple, A. T.; Chiara, C. J.; Fossan, D. B.; Lane, G. J.; Sears, J. M.; Starosta, K.; Devlin, M.; LaFosse, D. R.; Sarantites, D. G.; Freeman, S. J.; Leddy, M. J.; Lee, I. Y.; Macchiavelli, A. O.; Smith, J. F.; Afanasjev, A. V.; Ragnarsson, I.

    2007-09-15

    High-spin states have been populated in {sub 52}{sup 110}Te via {sup 58}Ni({sup 58}Ni,{alpha}2p{gamma}) reactions at 240 and 250 MeV. The Gammasphere {gamma}-ray spectrometer was used in conjunction with the Microball charged-particle detector. The high-spin (I>30) collective level scheme of {sup 110}Te, up to {approx}45({Dirac_h}/2{pi}), is discussed in this paper. Four new decoupled ({delta}I=2) high-spin structures have been observed for the first time, together with two strongly coupled ({delta}I=1) bands. These bands all show the characteristics of smooth band termination, and are discussed within the framework of the cranked Nilsson-Strutinsky approach.

  12. Gamma-ray spectroscopy of the galactic center region: Confirmation of the time-variability of the positron annihilation line

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paciesas, W. S.; Cline, T. L.; Teegarden, B. J.; Tueller, J.; Durouchoux, P.; Hameury, J. M.

    1982-01-01

    The GSFC Low-Energy Gamma-Ray Spectrometer observed the region of the galactic center during a balloon flight from Alice Springs, Australia, on 1981 November 20. No significant excess over background was evident in the 511 keV annihilation line. A 98 percent confidence upper limit is derived for this line of 1.2 x .001 photons/sq. cm-s. Continuum emission was detected above 100 keV with a best-fitting power law spectrum.

  13. Evidence for prolate structure in light Pb isotopes from in-beam {gamma}-ray spectroscopy of {sup 185}Pb

    SciTech Connect

    Pakarinen, J.; Grahn, T.; Andreyev, A. N.; Julin, R.; Juutinen, S.; Eeckhaudt, S.; Greenlees, P. T.; Jones, P.; Kettunen, H.; Leino, M.; Leppaenen, A.-P.; Nyman, M.; Perkowski, J.; Rahkila, P.; Saren, J.; Scholey, C.; Sorri, J.; Uusitalo, J.; Van de Vel, K.; Venhart, M.

    2009-09-15

    For the first time, excited states in {sup 185}Pb have been observed in in-beam {gamma}-ray spectroscopic measurements using the recoil-decay tagging method. The resulting level scheme reveals a strongly coupled yrast band structure that originates from coupling of the i{sub 13/2} quasineutron to a prolate deformed core. The band is also observed to de-excite via the spherical {alpha}-decaying 13/2{sup +}isomeric state.

  14. Characterization of the low-background Hamamatsu R11410- 20 cryogenic PMTs for the RED100 detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akimov, D. Yu; Bolozdynya, A. I.; Efremenko, Yu V.; Kaplin, V. A.; Khromov, A. V.; Melikyan, Yu A.; Sosnovtsev, V. V.

    2016-02-01

    The RED100 two-phase liquid xenon emission detector for neutrino coherent scattering experiments is equipped with 38 Hamamatsu R11410-20 photomultiplier tubes capable to operate at cryogenic temperatures and made of low background materials. A dedicated characterization procedure has been carried out for each PMT unit to be installed into the detector. The results presented here include single photoelectron analysis, gain curves for a wide range of the bias voltage values, data on dark count rate for 34 PMT samples. Peculiar noise characteristics of selected PMT units are analysed and discussed.

  15. Copper doping of ZnO crystals by transmutation of {sup 64}Zn to {sup 65}Cu: An electron paramagnetic resonance and gamma spectroscopy study

    SciTech Connect

    Recker, M. C.; McClory, J. W. Holston, M. S.; Golden, E. M.; Giles, N. C.; Halliburton, L. E.

    2014-06-28

    Transmutation of {sup 64}Zn to {sup 65}Cu has been observed in a ZnO crystal irradiated with neutrons. The crystal was characterized with electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) before and after the irradiation and with gamma spectroscopy after the irradiation. Major features in the gamma spectrum of the neutron-irradiated crystal included the primary 1115.5 keV gamma ray from the {sup 65}Zn decay and the positron annihilation peak at 511 keV. Their presence confirmed the successful transmutation of {sup 64}Zn nuclei to {sup 65}Cu. Additional direct evidence for transmutation was obtained from the EPR of Cu{sup 2+} ions (where {sup 63}Cu and {sup 65}Cu hyperfine lines are easily resolved). A spectrum from isolated Cu{sup 2+} (3d{sup 9}) ions acquired after the neutron irradiation showed only hyperfine lines from {sup 65}Cu nuclei. The absence of {sup 63}Cu lines in this Cu{sup 2+} spectrum left no doubt that the observed {sup 65}Cu signals were due to transmuted {sup 65}Cu nuclei created as a result of the neutron irradiation. Small concentrations of copper, in the form of Cu{sup +}-H complexes, were inadvertently present in our as-grown ZnO crystal. These Cu{sup +}-H complexes are not affected by the neutron irradiation, but they dissociate when a crystal is heated to 900 °C. This behavior allowed EPR to distinguish between the copper initially in the crystal and the copper subsequently produced by the neutron irradiation. In addition to transmutation, a second major effect of the neutron irradiation was the formation of zinc and oxygen vacancies by displacement. These vacancies were observed with EPR.

  16. Radiocarbon dating of archaeological samples (sambaqui) using CO(2) absorption and liquid scintillation spectrometry of low background radiation.

    PubMed

    Mendonça, Maria Lúcia T G; Godoy, José M; da Cruz, Rosana P; Perez, Rhoneds A R

    2006-01-01

    Sambaqui means, in the Tupi language, a hill of shells. The sambaquis are archaeological sites with remains of pre-historical Brazilian occupation. Since the sambaqui sites in the Rio de Janeiro state region are older than 10,000 years, the applicability of CO(2) absorption on Carbo-sorb and (14)C determination by counting on a low background liquid scintillation counter was tested. In the present work, sambaqui shells were treated with H(3)PO(4) in a closed vessel in order to generate CO(2). The produced CO(2) was absorbed on Carbo-sorb. On saturation about 0.6g of carbon, as CO(2), was mixed with commercial liquid scintillation cocktail (Permafluor), and the (14)C activity determined by counting on a low background counter, Packard Tricarb 3170 TR/SL, for a period of 1000 mins to enable detection of a radiocarbon age of 22,400 BP. But only samples with ages up to 3500 BP were submitted to the method because the samples had been collected in the municipality of Guapimirim, in archaeological sambaqui-type sites belonging to this age range. The same samples were sent to the (14)C Laboratory of the Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA/USP) where similar results were obtained.

  17. Low background signal platform for the detection of ATP: when a molecular aptamer beacon meets graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    He, Yue; Wang, Zhi-Gang; Tang, Hong-Wu; Pang, Dai-Wen

    2011-11-15

    A novel molecular aptamer beacon (MAB) was designed by integrating a single-labeled hairpin-shaped aptamer and graphene oxide (GO). The hairpin-shaped aptamer was constructed with anti-ATP aptamer and another five nucleotides added to the 5'-end of the aptamer which are complementary to nucleotides at the 3'-end of the aptamer to form a hairpin-shaped probe. This newly designed MAB which acts as a low background signal platform was used for the ATP detection based on long-range resonance energy transfer (LrRET). In the absence of ATP, the adsorption of the dye-labeled hairpin-shaped aptamer on GO makes the dyes close proximity to GO surface resulting in high efficiency quenching of fluorescence of the dyes. Therefore, the fluorescence of the designed MAB is completely quenched by GO, and the system shows very low background. Conversely, and very importantly, upon the adding of ATP, the quenched fluorescence is recovered significantly, and ATP can be detected in a wide range of 5-2500μM with a detection limit of 2μM and good selectivity. Moreover, when the GO-based MAB was used in cellular ATP assays, preeminent fluorescence signals were obtained, thus the platform of GO-based MAB could be used to detect ATP in real-world samples.

  18. First results of a simultaneous measurement of tritium and (14)C in an ultra-low-background proportional counter for environmental sources of methane.

    PubMed

    Mace, E K; Aalseth, C E; Day, A R; Hoppe, E W; Keillor, M E; Moran, J J; Panisko, M E; Seifert, A; Tatishvili, G; Williams, R M

    2016-05-01

    Simultaneous measurement of tritium and (14)C would provide an added tool for tracing organic compounds through environmental systems and is possible via beta energy spectroscopy of sample-derived methane in internal-source gas proportional counters. Since the mid-1960's atmospheric tritium and (14)C have fallen dramatically as the isotopic injections from aboveground nuclear testing have been diluted into the ocean and biosphere. In this work, the feasibility of simultaneous tritium and (14)C measurements via proportional counters is revisited in light of significant changes in both the atmospheric and biosphere isotopics and the development of new ultra-low-background gas proportional counting capabilities for small samples (roughly 50 cc methane). A Geant4 Monte Carlo model of a Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) proportional counter response to tritium and (14)C is used to analyze small samples of two different methane sources to illustrate the range of applicability of contemporary simultaneous measurements and their limitations. Because the two methane sources examined were not sample size limited, we could compare the small-sample measurements performed at PNNL with analysis of larger samples performed at a commercial laboratory. These first results show that the dual-isotope simultaneous measurement is well matched for methane samples that are atmospheric or have an elevated source of tritium (i.e. landfill gas). However, for samples with low/modern tritium isotopics (rainwater), commercial separation and counting is a better fit. PMID:26990077

  19. A generalized method for characterization of 235U and 239Pu content using short-lived fission product gamma spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knowles, Justin; Skutnik, Steven; Glasgow, David; Kapsimalis, Roger

    2016-10-01

    Rapid nondestructive assay methods for trace fissile material analysis are needed in both nuclear forensics and safeguards communities. To address these needs, research at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Neutron Activation Analysis facility has developed a generalized nondestructive assay method to characterize materials containing fissile isotopes. This method relies on gamma-ray emissions from short-lived fission products and makes use of differences in fission product yields to identify fissile compositions of trace material samples. Although prior work has explored the use of short-lived fission product gamma-ray measurements, the proposed method is the first to provide a complete characterization of isotopic identification, mass ratios, and absolute mass determination. Successful single fissile isotope mass recoveries of less than 6% recovery bias have been conducted on standards of 235U and 239Pu as low as 12 ng in less than 10 minutes. Additionally, mixtures of fissile isotope standards containing 235U and 239Pu have been characterized as low as 198 ng of fissile mass with less than 7% recovery bias. The generalizability of this method is illustrated by evaluating different fissile isotopes, mixtures of fissile isotopes, and two different irradiation positions in the reactor. It is anticipated that this method will be expanded to characterize additional fissile nuclides, utilize various irradiation facilities, and account for increasingly complex sample matrices.

  20. A generalized method for characterization of 235U and 239Pu content using short-lived fission product gamma spectroscopy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Knowles, Justin R.; Skutnik, Steven E.; Glasgow, David C.; Kapsimalis, Roger J.

    2016-06-23

    Rapid non-destructive assay methods for trace fissile material analysis are needed in both nuclear forensics and safeguards communities. To address these needs, research at the High Flux Isotope Reactor Neutron Activation Analysis laboratory has developed a generalized non-destructive assay method to characterize materials containing fissile isotopes. This method relies on gamma-ray emissions from short-lived fission products and capitalizes off of differences in fission product yields to identify fissile compositions of trace material samples. Although prior work has explored the use of short-lived fission product gamma-ray measurements, the proposed method is the first to provide a holistic characterization of isotopic identification,more » mass ratios, and absolute mass determination. Successful single fissile isotope mass recoveries of less than 6% error have been conducted on standards of 235U and 239Pu as low as 12 nanograms in less than 10 minutes. Additionally, mixtures of fissile isotope standards containing 235U and 239Pu have been characterized as low as 229 nanograms of fissile mass with less than 12% error. The generalizability of this method is illustrated by evaluating different fissile isotopes, mixtures of fissile isotopes, and two different irradiation positions in the reactor. Furthermore, it is anticipated that this method will be expanded to characterize additional fissile nuclides, utilize various irradiation sources, and account for increasingly complex sample matrices.« less

  1. Measurement of Cross-sections of Yttrium (n,xn) Threshold Reactions by Means of Gamma Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chudoba, P.; Kilim, S.; Wagner, V.; Vrzalova, J.; Svoboda, O.; Majerle, M.; Stefanik, M.; Suchopar, M.; Kugler, A.; Bielewicz, M.; Strugalska-Gola, E.; Szuta, M.; Hervas, D.; Herman, T.; Geier, B.

    Neutron activation and gamma spectrometry are usable also for the determination of cross-sections of different neutron reactions. We have studied the cross-section of yttrium (n,xn) threshold reactions using quasi mono-energetic neutron source based on the reaction on 7Li target at Nuclear Physics Institute of ASCR in Rez. Yttrium (n,xn) threshold reactions are suitable candidates for fast neutron field measurement by activation detectors. Fast neutron field monitoring is necessary already today at a wide range of accelerator facilities and will gain on importance in future fast reactors of generation IV, accelerator transmutation systems or fusion reactors. The knowledge of the cross-sections is crucial for such purpose. Unfortunately, the cross-section is sufficiently known only for 89Y(n,2n)88Y reaction. For higher orders of reactions there are almost no experimental data. Special attention was paid to the 89Y(n,3n)87Y reaction. The nuclei are produced, both in the ground state with half-life 79.8 hours and in the isomeric state with half-life 13.38 hours. The isomer decays mainly through the gamma transition to the ground state, the beta decay of the excited state is negligible within our accuracy. The cross-sections of both 87Y productions were analyzed.

  2. A study of reversible gamma-induced structural transformations in vitreous Ge23.5Sb11.8S64.7 by high-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kovalskiy, Andriy; Jain, Himanshu; Miller, Alfred C; Golovchak, Roman Ya; Shpotyuk, Oleh I

    2006-11-16

    The structural origin of reversible gamma-induced effects in vitreous Ge(23.5)Sb(11.8)S(64.7) has been investigated by high-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The changes in valence band spectrum from gamma-irradiation suggest a decrease of sulfur lone pair electron concentration accompanied by changes in bonding states of S and Ge. The appearance of additional doublets in the core-level XPS spectra of Ge, Sb, and S atoms for gamma-irradiated sample is described by the formation of over- and under-coordinated charged defect pairs (Ge(3)(-)-S(3)(+)) as a result of radiation treatment. The results verify the switching of Ge-S covalent bonds into S-S bonds as the main microstructural mechanism for gamma-induced optical effects in this glass.

  3. Gamma-ray spectrometry of LDEF samples

    SciTech Connect

    Winn, W.G.

    1991-01-01

    A total of 31 samples from the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF), including materials of aluminum, vanadium, and steel trunnions were analyzed by ultra-low-level gamma spectroscopy. The study quantified particle induced activations of (sup 22)Na, {sup 46}Sc, {sup 51}Cr, {sup 54}Mn, {sup 56}Co, {sup 57}Co, {sup 58}Co, and {sup 60}Co. The samples of trunnion sections exhibited increasing activity toward the outer end of the trunnion and decreasing activity toward its radial center. The trunnion sections did not include end pieces, which have been reported to collect noticeable {sup 7}Be on their leading surfaces. No significant {sup 7}Be was detected in the samples analyzed. The Underground Counting Facility at Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) was used in this work. The facility is 50 ft. underground, constructed with low-background shielding materials, and operated as a clean room. The most sensitive analyses were performed with a 90%-efficient HPGe gamma-ray detector, which is enclosed in a purged active/passive shield. Each sample was counted for one to six days in two orientations to yield more representative average activities for the sample. The non-standard geometries of the LDEF samples prompted the development of a novel calibration method, whereby the efficiency about the samples surfaces (measured with point sources) predicted the efficiency for the bulk sample.

  4. Study of heavy element structure with in-beam. cap alpha. /sup -/,. beta. /sup -/ and. gamma. -ray spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, R.A.; Decman, D.J.; Henry, E.A.; Hoff, R.W.; Mann, L.G.; Struble, G.L.; Ussery, L.E.

    1984-05-10

    We describe our in-beam superconducting conversion electron spectrometer and its use in a (t,p) proton-conversion electron coincidence mode. Several examples of completed and on-going investigations are presented. These include: E0 strength from the /sup 238/U fission isomer; electromagnetic properties of the J/sup ..pi../ = 6/sup +/ and 8/sup +/ states of /sup 210/Pb; single particle and cluster states of /sup 213/Fr; the J/sup ..pi../ = 21/2/sup +/ isomer in /sup 197/Au and /sup 199/Au; and the cluster states of /sup 199/Au. Results of the study of odd-odd deformed /sup 244/Am are presented. The latter results performed using neutron-capture gamma-ray and conversion electron techniques are compared to recent developments in the modeling of deformed odd-odd nuclei. 23 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Cross-Section Measurements for (n,xn) Reactions by In-Beam Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlik, A.; Baumann, P.; Kerveno, M.; Rudolf, G.; Borcea, C.; Mihailescu, L.C.; Jericha, E.; Raskinyte, I.; Jokic, S.; Lukic, S.; Meulders, J.P.; Nolte, R.; Plompen, A.J.M.

    2005-05-24

    The nuclear reactions 207Pb(n,2n)206Pb and 232Th(n,5n)228Th were studied by measuring prompt gamma-ray emission spectra from the interaction of neutrons with an enriched 207Pb sample and a natTh sample. For 207Pb the measurements were performed at the white neutron beam of the GELINA neutron source at IRMM Geel in the neutron energy range up to 20 MeV. The Th measurements were done at the quasi-monoenergetic 7Li(p,n)7Be neutron source at the Universite Catholique de Louvain for five peak neutron energies in the range 29 MeV to 42 MeV. The measurements were complemented by model calculations using the code system EMPIRE-II.

  6. Characterization and identification of gamma-irradiated sauces by electron spin resonance spectroscopy using different sample pretreatments.

    PubMed

    Akram, Kashif; Ahn, Jae-Jun; Kwon, Joong-Ho

    2013-06-01

    Tomato ketchup, barbeque sauce, sweet chili sauce, and spaghetti sauce were gamma irradiated at 0, 1, 5, and 10 kGy. Electron spin resonance (ESR) technique was used to characterize the irradiated sauces, targeting radiation-induced cellulose radicals and using a modified sample pretreatment method. The samples were first washed with water, and then the residues were extracted with alcohol. The non-irradiated sauces exhibited the single central signal, whose intensity showed a significant increase on irradiation. The ESR spectra from the radiation-induced cellulose radicals, with two side peaks (g=2.02012 and g=1.98516) equally spaced (± 3 mT) from the central signal, were also observed in the irradiated sauces. The improvements in the central (natural) and radiation-induced (two side peaks corresponding to the cellulose radicals) signal intensities were obvious, when compared with routine freeze-drying and alcoholic-extraction techniques. PMID:23411320

  7. Gamma-gamma colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.J.; Sessler, A.

    1996-06-01

    Gamma-gamma colliders make intense beams of gamma rays and have them collide so as to make elementary particles. The authors show, in this article, that constructing a gamma-gamma collider as an add-on to an electron-positron linear collider is possible with present technology and that it does not require much additional cost. Furthermore, they show that the resulting capability is very interesting from a particle physics point of view. An overview of a linear collider, with a second interaction region devoted to {gamma}{gamma} collisions is shown.

  8. FIRST-YEAR RESULTS OF BROADBAND SPECTROSCOPY OF THE BRIGHTEST FERMI-GBM GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Bissaldi, Elisabetta; Von Kienlin, Andreas; Greiner, Jochen; Gruber, David; Lichti, Giselher; Diehl, Roland; Foley, Suzanne; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Fishman, Gerald J.; Fitzpatrick, Gerard; Gibby, Melissa H.; Giles, Misty M.; Van der Horst, Alexander J.

    2011-06-01

    We present our results of the temporal and spectral analysis of a sample of 52 bright and hard gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) observed with the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) during its first year of operation (2008 July-2009 July).Our sample was selected from a total of 253 GBM GRBs based on the event peak count rate measured between 0.2 and 40 MeV. The final sample comprised of 34 long and 18 short GRBs. These numbers show that the GBM sample contains a much larger fraction of short GRBs than the CGRO/BATSE data set, which we explain as the result of our (different) selection criteria, which favor collection of short, bright GRBs over BATSE. A first by-product of our selection methodology is the determination of a detection threshold from the GBM data alone, above which GRBs most likely will be detected in the MeV/GeV range with the Large Area Telescope on board Fermi. This predictor will be very useful for future multi-wavelength GRB follow-ups with ground- and space-based observatories. Further, we have estimated the burst durations up to 10 MeV and for the first time expanded the duration-energy relationship in the GRB light curves to high energies. We confirm that GRB durations decline with energy as a power law with index approximately -0.4, as was found earlier with the BATSE data and we also notice evidence of a possible cutoff or break at higher energies. Finally, we performed time-integrated spectral analysis of all 52 bursts and compared their spectral parameters with those obtained with the larger data sample of the BATSE data. We find that the two parameter data sets are similar and confirm that short GRBs are in general harder than longer ones.

  9. First-year Results of Broadband Spectroscopy of the Brightest Fermi-GBM Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bissaldi, Elisabetta; von Kienlin, Andreas; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Briggs, Michael S.; Connaughton, Valerie; Greiner, Jochen; Gruber, David; Lichti, Giselher; Bhat, P. N.; Burgess, Michael; Chaplin, Vandiver; Diehl, Roland; Fishman, Gerald J.; Fitzpatrick, Gerard; Foley, Suzanne; Gibby, Melissa H.; Giles, Misty M.; Goldstein, Adam; Guiriec, Sylvain; van der Horst, Alexander J.; Kippen, R. Marc; Lin, Lin; McBreen, Sheila; Meegan, Charles A.; Paciesas, William S.; Preece, Robert D.; Rau, Arne; Tierney, Dave; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen

    2011-06-01

    We present our results of the temporal and spectral analysis of a sample of 52 bright and hard gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) observed with the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) during its first year of operation (2008 July-2009 July).Our sample was selected from a total of 253 GBM GRBs based on the event peak count rate measured between 0.2 and 40 MeV. The final sample comprised of 34 long and 18 short GRBs. These numbers show that the GBM sample contains a much larger fraction of short GRBs than the CGRO/BATSE data set, which we explain as the result of our (different) selection criteria, which favor collection of short, bright GRBs over BATSE. A first by-product of our selection methodology is the determination of a detection threshold from the GBM data alone, above which GRBs most likely will be detected in the MeV/GeV range with the Large Area Telescope on board Fermi. This predictor will be very useful for future multi-wavelength GRB follow-ups with ground- and space-based observatories. Further, we have estimated the burst durations up to 10 MeV and for the first time expanded the duration-energy relationship in the GRB light curves to high energies. We confirm that GRB durations decline with energy as a power law with index approximately -0.4, as was found earlier with the BATSE data and we also notice evidence of a possible cutoff or break at higher energies. Finally, we performed time-integrated spectral analysis of all 52 bursts and compared their spectral parameters with those obtained with the larger data sample of the BATSE data. We find that the two parameter data sets are similar and confirm that short GRBs are in general harder than longer ones.

  10. Initial Characterization of Unequal-Length, Low-Background Proportional Counters for Absolute Gas-Counting Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Mace, Emily K.; Aalseth, Craig E.; Bonicalzi, Ricco; Day, Anthony R.; Fuller, Erin S.; Hayes, James C.; Hoppe, Eric W.; LaFerriere, Brian D.; Merriman, Jason H.; Overman, Cory T.; Seifert, Allen; Williams, Richard M.

    2013-08-31

    Abstract. Characterization of two sets of custom unequal length proportional counters is underway at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). These detectors will be used in measurements to determine the absolute activity concentration of gaseous radionuclides (e.g., 37Ar). A set of three detectors has been fabricated based on previous PNNL ultra-low-background proportional counters (ULBPC) designs and now operate in PNNL’s shallow underground counting laboratory. A second set of four counters has also been fabricated using clean assembly of OFHC copper components for use in an above-ground counting laboratory. Characterization of both sets of detectors is underway with measurements of background rates, gas gain, energy resolution, and shielding considerations. These results will be presented along with uncertainty estimates of future absolute gas counting measurements.

  11. Low background stainless steel for the pressure vessel in the PandaX-II dark matter experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, T.; Fu, C.; Ji, X.; Liu, J.; Liu, X.; Wang, X.; Yao, C.; Yuan, Xunhua

    2016-09-01

    We report on the custom produced low radiation background stainless steel and the welding rod for the PandaX experiment, one of the deep underground experiments to search for dark matter and neutrinoless double beta decay using xenon. The anthropogenic 60Co concentration in these samples is at the range of 1 mBq/kg or lower. We also discuss the radioactivity of nuclear-grade stainless steel from TISCO which has a similar background rate. The PandaX-II pressure vessel was thus fabricated using the stainless steel from CISRI and TISCO. Based on the analysis of the radioactivity data, we also made discussions on potential candidate for low background metal materials for future pressure vessel development.

  12. Recent developments on a 128 x 128 indium antimonide/FET switch hybrid imager for low-background applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Gary C.; Niblack, Curtiss A.; Wimmers, James T.

    1986-01-01

    By combining high-quality mesa photovoltaic indium antimonide detector material with a silicon x-y FET switch multiplexer, a useful infrared area detector has been developed. This device is intended for low-background applications, where high sensitivity is required. Initial characterization of the detector at 80 K showed a KTC limited read noise of less than 1000 electrons, good dark current, responsivity uniformity, and a maximum readout rate of 10 MHz. The hybrid mating technology has sufficient precision to allow expansion to a 256 x 256 format. The dark current in the detector material is sufficiently low to allow full-frame integration, even with arrays as large as 256 x 256 elements.

  13. Initial characterization of unequal-length, low-background proportional counters for absolute gas-counting applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mace, E. K.; Aalseth, C. E.; Bonicalzi, R.; Day, A. R.; Fuller, E. S.; Hayes, J. C.; Hoppe, E. W.; LaFerriere, B. D.; Merriman, J. H.; Overman, C. T.; Seifert, A.; Williams, R. M.

    2013-08-01

    Characterization of two sets of custom unequal length proportional counters is underway at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). These detectors will be used in measurements to determine the absolute activity concentration of gaseous radionuclides (e.g., 37Ar). A set of three detectors has been fabricated based on previous PNNL ultra-low-background proportional counter designs and now operate in PNNL's shallow underground counting laboratory. A second set of four counters has also been fabricated using clean assembly of Oxygen-Free High-Conductivity copper components for use in a shielded above-ground counting laboratory. Characterization of both sets of detectors is underway with measurements of background rates, gas gain, and energy resolution. These results will be presented along with a shielding study for the above-ground cave.

  14. HDice, Highly-Polarized Low-Background Frozen-Spin HD Targets for CLAS experiments at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Xiangdong; Bass, Christopher; D'Angelo, Annalisa; Deur, Alexandre P.; Dezern, Gary L.; Ho, Dao Hoang; Kageya, Tsuneo; Khandaker, Mahbubul A,; Kashy, David H.; Laine, Vivien Eric; Lowry, Michael M.; O'Connell, Thomas Robert; Sandorfi, Andrew M.; Teachey, II, Robert W.; Whisnant, Charles Steven; Zarecky, Michael R.

    2012-12-01

    Large, portable frozen-spin HD (Deuterium-Hydride) targets have been developed for studying nucleon spin properties with low backgrounds. Protons and Deuterons in HD are polarized at low temperatures (~10mK) inside a vertical dilution refrigerator (Oxford Kelvinox-1000) containing a high magnetic field (up to 17T). The targets reach a frozen-spin state within a few months, after which they can be cold transferred to an In-Beam Cryostat (IBC). The IBC, a thin-walled dilution refrigerator operating either horizontally or vertically, is use with quasi-4{pi} detector systems in open geometries with minimal energy loss for exiting reaction products in nucleon structure experiments. The first application of this advanced target system has been used for Spin Sum Rule experiments at the LEGS facility in Brookhaven National Laboratory. An improved target production and handling system has been developed at Jefferson Lab for experiments with the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer, CLAS.

  15. Initial characterization of unequal-length, low-background proportional counters for absolute gas-counting applications

    SciTech Connect

    Mace, E. K.; Aalseth, C. E.; Bonicalzi, R.; Day, A. R.; Fuller, E. S.; Hayes, J. C.; Hoppe, E. W.; LaFerriere, B. D.; Merriman, J. H.; Overman, C. T.; Seifert, A.; Williams, R. M.

    2013-08-08

    Characterization of two sets of custom unequal length proportional counters is underway at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). These detectors will be used in measurements to determine the absolute activity concentration of gaseous radionuclides (e.g., {sup 37}Ar). A set of three detectors has been fabricated based on previous PNNL ultra-low-background proportional counter designs and now operate in PNNL's shallow underground counting laboratory. A second set of four counters has also been fabricated using clean assembly of Oxygen-Free High-Conductivity copper components for use in a shielded above-ground counting laboratory. Characterization of both sets of detectors is underway with measurements of background rates, gas gain, and energy resolution. These results will be presented along with a shielding study for the above-ground cave.

  16. LOW-RESOLUTION SPECTROSCOPY OF GAMMA-RAY BURST OPTICAL AFTERGLOWS: BIASES IN THE SWIFT SAMPLE AND CHARACTERIZATION OF THE ABSORBERS

    SciTech Connect

    Fynbo, J. P. U.; Malesani, D.; Vreeswijk, P. M.; Hjorth, J.; Sollerman, J.; Thoene, C. C.; Jakobsson, P.; Bjoernsson, G.; De Cia, A.; Prochaska, J. X.; Nardini, M.; Chen, H.-W.; Bloom, J. S.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Gorosabel, J.; Christensen, L.; Fruchter, A. S.

    2009-12-01

    We present a sample of 77 optical afterglows (OAs) of Swift detected gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) for which spectroscopic follow-up observations have been secured. Our first objective is to measure the redshifts of the bursts. For the majority (90%) of the afterglows, the redshifts have been determined from the spectra. We provide line lists and equivalent widths (EWs) for all detected lines redward of Ly{alpha} covered by the spectra. In addition to the GRB absorption systems, these lists include line strengths for a total of 33 intervening absorption systems. We discuss to what extent the current sample of Swift bursts with OA spectroscopy is a biased subsample of all Swift detected GRBs. For that purpose we define an X-ray-selected statistical sample of Swift bursts with optimal conditions for ground-based follow-up from the period 2005 March to 2008 September; 146 bursts fulfill our sample criteria. We derive the redshift distribution for the statistical (X-ray selected) sample and conclude that less than 18% of Swift bursts can be at z > 7. We compare the high-energy properties (e.g., {gamma}-ray (15-350 keV) fluence and duration, X-ray flux, and excess absorption) for three subsamples of bursts in the statistical sample: (1) bursts with redshifts measured from OA spectroscopy; (2) bursts with detected optical and/or near-IR afterglow, but no afterglow-based redshift; and (3) bursts with no detection of the OA. The bursts in group (1) have slightly higher {gamma}-ray fluences and higher X-ray fluxes and significantly less excess X-ray absorption than bursts in the other two groups. In addition, the fractions of dark bursts, defined as bursts with an optical to X-ray slope {beta}{sub OX} < 0.5, is 14% in group (1), 38% in group (2), and >39% in group (3). For the full sample, the dark burst fraction is constrained to be in the range 25%-42%. From this we conclude that the sample of GRBs with OA spectroscopy is not representative for all Swift bursts, most likely due

  17. Studies on spin-trapped radicals in. gamma. -irradiated aqueous solutions of glycylglycine and glycyl-L-alanine by high-performance liquid chromatography and ESR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Moriya, F.; Makino, K.; Suzuki, N.; Rokushika, S.; Hatano, H.

    1980-12-25

    Aqueous solutions of glycylglycine and glycyl-L-alanine were ..gamma..-irradiated in the presence of a spin trap, 2-methyl-2-nitrosopropane. Stable spin adducts produced in the ..gamma..-irradiated solutions were analyzed by means of high-performance liquid chromatography and ESR spectroscopy. Five spin adducts were found and identified, as follows: t-BuN(O.)CH/sub 2/CONHCH/sub 2/COO/sup -/ (I) and NH/sub 3//sup +/CH/sub 2/CONHCH(COO/sup -/)N(O.)-t-Bu (IIb) from glycylglycine; t-BuN(O.)CH/sub 2/CONHCH(CH/sub 3/)COO/sup -/ (III), NH/sub 3//sup +/CH/sub 2/CONHC(CH/sub 3/)(COO/sup -/)N(O.)-t-Bu (IV) and NH/sub 3//sup +/CH/sub 2/CONHCH(COO/sup -/)CH/sub 2/N(O.)-t-Bu (V) from glycyl-L-alanine. It was found that spin adduct III exhibits ESR spectra with unequal splittings of the two ..beta.. hydrogens while spin adduct I does not. This fact revealed that the asymmetry of the delta carbon in spin adduct III causes the magnetic nonequivalence through a peptide bond. It was demonstrated that ESR spectra of spin adducts IIb and V changed remarkably with pH through the acid-dissociation equilibria of the carboxyl or amino groups. The pK/sub a/ values for the dissociation have been determined to be 2.0 for the carboxyl group of spin adduct IIb, and 3.0 for that of V.

  18. Fully automated radiochemical preparation system for gamma-spectroscopy on fission products and the study of the intruder and vibrational levels in /sup 83/Se

    SciTech Connect

    Lien, O.G. III

    1983-10-01

    AUTOBATCH was developed to provide a usable source of short-lived neutron-rich nuclides through chemical preparation of the sample from fission products for detailed gamma-ray spectroscopy, which would complement the output of on-line isotope separators. With AUTOBATCH the gamma rays following the ..beta../sup -/ decay of /sup 83/As were studied to determine the ground state spin and parity of /sup 83/As to be 5/2/sup -/; the absolute intensity of the ..beta../sup -/ branch from /sup 83/As to /sup 83/Se/sup m/ to be 0.3%; the absolute intensity of the ground state ..beta../sup -/ branch from /sup 83/Se/sup m/ to /sup 83/Br to be 39%; the halflife of the 5/2/sub 1//sup +/ level to be 3.2 ns; and the structure of /sup 83/Se/sub 49/. Results are used to show that the intruder structure which had been previously observed in the odd mass /sub 49/In isotopes could be observed in the N = 49 isotones. The observed structure is discussed in terms of the unified model calculations of Heyde which has been used to describe the intruder structure in the indium nuclei. The intruder structure is most strongly developed, not at core mid-shell, /sup 89/Zr/sub 49/, but rather at core mid-sub-shell /sup 83/Se. This difference is qualitatively understood to be due to the blocking of collectivity by the Z = 40 subshell closure which prevents the intruder structure from occurring in /sup 87/Sr/sub 49/ and /sup 89/Zr/sub 49/.

  19. Determination of curie content and {sup 134/137}cesium ratios by gamma spectroscopy of high burnup plutonium-aluminum fuel assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Haggard, D.L.; Tanner, J.E.

    1997-06-01

    Nondestructive assay (NDA) gamma spectroscopy techniques were used to measure {sup 134/137}Cs ratios on nine PuAl Mark 42 fuel assemblies. The purpose of the ratio measurement was to confirm theoretical burnup calculations. {sup 134/137}Cs ratios were determined from the measured activity based on corrected net peak area counts for the 605 keV peak from {sup 134}Cs and the 662 keV peak from {sup 137}Cs/{sup 137m}Ba. Assembly No. 2 {sup 134/137}Cs ratio measured on 4-15-92 was 0.19. The measured {sup 134/137}Cs ratio was decay corrected to be 2.11 on 8-1-84 based on the half lives of {sup 134}Cs and {sup 137}Cs. The measured {sup 134/137}Cs ratio range was 1.90--2.14 for all nine assemblies. These measured values compare to a theoretical ratio of 1.7 on 8-1-84 determined by burnup calculations. Total cesium curie content was also requested and determined using the NDA direct measurements. Gamma spectral data were measured on the nine sectioned Mark 42 fuel assemblies. Measured cesium curie content, decay corrected to 8-1-84, ranged from 18170--24480 curies of {sup 134}Cs and 8620--11646 curies of {sup 137}Cs. Theoretical cesium curie content of 8-1-84 was 15200 curies {sup 134}Cs and 8973 curies {sup 137}Cs. Direct assay cesium ratio is 12% to 26% higher than the predicted ratio of 1.7. The measured {sup 134}Cs data indicate between 20%--61% more activity than that predicted by the burnup code, whereas the measured {sup 137}Cs activity is between 4% less to 30% more than the predicted activity. This information may be used to address issues concerning criticality safety, storage, and shipping of this type of material.

  20. Proton-induced x-ray emission, proton-induced gamma-ray emission, and x-ray absorption spectroscopy: applications to environmental analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lytle, N.W.

    1986-01-01

    Two sample preparation techniques, the single-acid wet-oxidation and the lithium metaborate fusion-dissolution, have been applied to PIXE analysis with acceptable trace-element recoveries. A variety of samples have been prepared, including: white bass organs, deer and elk antlers. NRS standard reference materials, IAEA standard animal bone, USGS standard rock samples, and munitions disposal residues. PIGE analysis has been applied to light-element analysis of environment samples. Thin-and thick-target gamma-ray yields were determined for Li, B, O, F, Na, Mg, and Al. Light-elements in coal and oil fly ash were determined with parts per million sensitivity. Nickel and vanadium compounds have been identified in fly ash collected from vanadium compounds have been identified in fly ash collected from the flue lines of an oil-fired power plant using x-ray absorption spectroscopy. VOSO/sub 4/.3H/sub 2/O was the primary vanadium compound and NiO and NiSO/sub 4/ were the primary nickel compounds. NXRAY was written to control data acquisition on a Canberra Series 90 MCA-PDP 11/23PLUS computer system. This program provides for data to be transferred between individual collection regions of the MCA and the host computer, and spectra to be plotted on a HP 7475A graphics plotter.

  1. Application of high resolution NMR, ESR, and gamma-ray scintillation spectroscopy to the study of ligand binding in proteins. [Torpedo californica

    SciTech Connect

    Lancione, G.V.

    1982-01-01

    Electron spin resonance spectroscopy has been employed to study the nature of the ligand binding site of alpha-1-antitrypsin. Spectra of spin-labeled alpha-1-antitrypsin were recorded at pH's ranging from 2.4 to 12.5. This data demonstrates the tight binding of the spin-label to the protease, and the sensitivity of the bound spin-label to informational changes in the protease inhibitor. A molecular dipstick approach has also been applied to this system and has yielded information on the geometry of the cleft accommodating the spin-label. /sup 160/Terbium(III) exchange experiments have been performed on the acetylcholine receptor protein isolated from Torpedo californica, employing a specially designed flow dialysis apparatus constructed in the laboratory. The apparatus is designed to allow continuous monitoring of /sup 160/Tb(III) gamma-ray emission from the protein compartment of the flow dialysis cell. Nicotinic ligand-induced displacement of /sup 160/Tb(III) from the nicotinic binding site of the receptor was monitored as a funtion of (1) the concentration of nicotinic ligand in the washout buffer, and (2) the nature of the nicotinic ligand in the buffer. Measured /sup 160/Tb(III) exchange half-lives indicate (1) a direct relationship between /sup 160/Tb(III) displacement and nicotinic ligand concentration in the wash-out buffer, and (2) an enhanced /sup 160/Tb(III) displacement for nicotinic agents possessing quaternary ammonium functions.

  2. Development of CZT strip detector modules for 0.05- to 1-MeV gamma-ray imaging and spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, James M.; Donmez, B.; Macri, John R.; McClish, Mickel; McConnell, Mark L.; Miller, Richard S.; Widholm, Mark; Hamel, Louis-Andre; Julien, Manuel

    2003-03-01

    We report progress in our study of cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) strip detectors featuring orthogonal coplanar anode contacts. We specifically report on the performance, characterization and stability of 5 and 10 mm thick prototype CZT detectors fabricated using material from several manufacturers. Our ongoing work includes laboratory and simulation studies aimed at optimizing and developing compact, efficient, high performance detector modules for 0.05 to 1 MeV gamma radiation measurements with space-based instrumentation. The coplanar anode strip configuration retains many of the performance advantages of pixel detectors yet requires far fewer electronic channels to perform both 3-d imaging and spectroscopy. Minimizing the channel count is important for large balloon or space instruments including coded aperture telescopes (such as MARGIE or EXIST) and Compton imaging telescopes (such as TIGRE or ACT). We also present plans for developing compact, space qualified imaging modules designed for integration into closely packed large area detector arrays. We discuss issues associated with detector module and array electronics design and development.

  3. TREX-DM: a low-background Micromegas-based TPC for low-mass WIMP detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iguaz, F. J.; Garza, J. G.; Aznar, F.; Castel, J. F.; Cebrián, S.; Dafni, T.; García, J. A.; Irastorza, I. G.; Lagraba, A.; Luzón, G.; Peiró, A.

    2016-10-01

    If Dark Matter is made of Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) with masses below {˜ }20 GeV, the corresponding nuclear recoils in mainstream WIMP experiments are of energies too close, or below, the experimental threshold. Gas Time Projection Chambers (TPCs) can be operated with a variety of target elements, offer good tracking capabilities and, on account of the amplification in gas, very low thresholds are achievable. Recent advances in electronics and in novel radiopure TPC readouts, especially micro-mesh gas structure (Micromegas), are improving the scalability and low-background prospects of gaseous TPCs. Here we present TREX-DM, a prototype to test the concept of a Micromegas-based TPC to search for low-mass WIMPs. The detector is designed to host an active mass of {˜ }0.300 kg of Ar at 10 bar, or alternatively {˜ }0.160 kg of Ne at 10 bar, with an energy threshold below 0.4 keVee, and is fully built with radiopure materials. We will describe the detector in detail, the results from the commissioning phase on surface, as well as a preliminary background model. The anticipated sensitivity of this technique may go beyond current experimental limits for WIMPs of masses of 2-8 GeV.

  4. Study of the Kroll-process to produce ultra-pure Ti for the low background experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Mozhevitina, Elena; Chepurnov, Alexander; Chub, Alexander; Avetissov, Igor; Glebovsky, Vadim; Nisi, Stefano; Di Vacri, Maria Laura; Suvorov, Yury

    2015-08-17

    To construct G2 & G3 low background experiments for direct Dark Matter search, a lot of ultra-pure construction materials will be needed. Our study of various Ti samples shows that the levels of contaminations of commercially available industrial Ti can varies from 0.2 to 100 mBq/kg for U/Th. It means that the metal Ti is such a promising material for future experiments if the way of production in bulk quantities with very low level of contaminations (below ∼1 mBq/kg of {sup 238}U /{sup 232}Th) would be developed. Our study of the industrial Kroll-process is focused on the possible sources of U and Th and their migration during the multistage Kroll process. To understand migration of U and Th during the Kroll process the set of other impurities available due to precise ICP-MS analysis have been studied. Preliminary results confirm that the Kroll process could be used for the ultra pure Ti sponge production while the following stages of the metal Ti production of from the Ti sponge with necessary mechanical properties need to be additionally studied.

  5. Sensitive detection of ozone by a practical resorufin-based spectroscopic probe with extremely low background signal

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yangyang; Shi, Wen; Li, Xiaohua; Ma, Huimin

    2013-01-01

    Ozone (O3) has attracted much attention because of its key role in human health and disease, and its detection is of great importance for various biochemical studies as well as environmental evaluation. Here we develop a simple and practical spectroscopic off-on O3 probe based on resorufin and the specific reaction of but-3-enyl with O3. The probe shows an extremely low background spectroscopic signal, but reacts with O3 producing a distinct color and fluorescence change. The detection limit of the probe for O3 is 5.9 nM, which corresponds to an ozone concentration of 0.056 mg m−3 in air in this study and is lower than the international ambient air quality standard of 0.1 mg m−3. More importantly, the proposed probe is worth popularizing, and its applicability has been successfully demonstrated on both the determination of O3 in real ambient air samples and the imaging of O3 in biological cells. PMID:24088783

  6. Nano {gamma}'/{gamma}'' composite precipitates in Alloy 718

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, P. J.; McAllister, D.; Gao, Y.; Lv, D.; Williams, R. E. A.; Wang, Y.; Mills, M. J.; Peterson, B.

    2012-05-21

    Nanoscale composite precipitates of Alloy 718 have been investigated with both high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy and phase field modeling. Chemical analysis via energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy allowed for the differentiation of {gamma}' and {gamma}'' particles, which is not otherwise possible through traditional Z-contrast methods. Phase field modeling was applied to determine the stress distribution and elastic interaction around and between the particles, respectively, and it was determined that a composite particle (of both {gamma}' and {gamma}'') has an elastic energy that is significantly lower than, for example, single {gamma}' and {gamma}'' precipitates which are non-interacting.

  7. SYNTH - Gamma Ray Spectrum Synthesizer

    2009-05-18

    SYNTH was designed to synthesize the results of typical gamma-ray spectroscopy experiments. The code allows a user to specify the physical characteristics of a gamma-ray source, the quantity of radionuclides emitting gamma radiation, the source-to-detector distance and the presence and type of any intervening absorbers, the size and type of the gamma-ray detector, and the electronic set-up used to gather the data.

  8. Resonance production in. gamma gamma. collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Renard, F.M.

    1983-04-01

    The processes ..gamma gamma.. ..-->.. hadrons can be depicted as follows. One photon creates a q anti q pair which starts to evolve; the other photon can either (A) make its own q anti q pair and the (q anti q q anti q) system continue to evolve or (B) interact with the quarks of the first pair and lead to a modified (q anti q) system in interaction with C = +1 quantum numbers. A review of the recent theoretical activity concerning resonance production and related problems is given under the following headings: hadronic C = +1 spectroscopy (q anti q, qq anti q anti q, q anti q g, gg, ggg bound states and mixing effects); exclusive ..gamma gamma.. processes (generalities, unitarized Born method, VDM and QCD); total cross section (soft and hard contributions); q/sup 2/ dependence of soft processes (soft/hard separation, 1/sup +- +/ resonances); and polarization effects. (WHK)

  9. Gamma Spectroscopy of 150Sm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianco, L.; Garrett, P. E.; Sharpey-Schafer, F.; Bark, R. A.; Bvumbi, S. P.; Lawrie, E. A.; Lawrie, J. J.; Madiba, T. E.; Mullins, S. M.; Papka, P.; Roux, D. G.; Minkova, A.; Dombràdi, Z.; Nyakó, B. M.; Timàr, J.; Juhàz, K.; Korichi, A.; Curien, D.; Dudeck, J.; Riley, M. A.; Wang, X.; Riedinger, L. L.; Simpson, J.; Hartley, D. J.; Kulp, W. D.; Wood, J. L.; Kondev, F. G.; Sletten, G. S.; Ragnarsson, I.

    2013-03-01

    The N=88 nucleus 150Sm has been produced during the 148Nd(α, 2n)150Sm reaction at the Accelerator Laboratory of the University of Jyväskylä, Finland. Nuclei around the N=90 are considered transitional nuclei, since they lie in a region between lighter nuclei which display vibrational-like spectra and heavier isotopes with a rotational-like structure. The structure of this transitional nuclei and in particular the structure of low-lying excited states still poses some question, and in particular more experimental data are required to investigate their non-yrast collective structures. Some preliminary results which include the placing of new levels and a new positive parity band will be presented.

  10. Extending the Astronomical Application of Photon Counting HgCdTe Linear Avalanche Photo-Diode Arrays to Low Background Space Observations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Donald

    infrared photon counting performance at the low and ultra-low backgrounds required for NASA space astronomy missions. Specifically this will involve 1) Measuring the gain normalized dark count rate and avalanche gain of 2.5, 3.3 and 4 micron cutoff HgCdTe at cryogenic temperatures from 30 to 80 K and bias voltages up to 20 V, 2) Using these results to validate and refine models of avalanche gain along with generation- recombination and surface trap induced tunneling current in L-APD HgCdTe and, 3) Modeling the gain normalized dark count rate, surface tunneling current and avalanche gain of 2 to 5 micron cutoff HgCdTe L-APD arrays for astrophysics and other NASA missions. The overall objective of the investigation is to develop the tools to identify the sweet spot in bandgap and cryogenic operating temperature for each specific NASA astrophysics mission and to accurately predict ultimate performance. HgCdTe L-APD technology offers to NASA the ultimate performance for space astronomy in photon starved applications such as: 1) ultra-low background, extra- Zodiacal imaging and faint object spectroscopy from elliptical orbits beyond the asteroid belt with missions such as Extra-Zodiacal Explorer, 2) spectroscopy of the faintest O/IR sources from near earth and L-2 orbit at moderate to high resolution and, 3) time domain astronomy observations (photometric or spectral variations at frequencies above 1 Hz) of sources as diverse as close binaries, accretion disks, compact objects etc. HgCdTe L- APD arrays have the potential to enable new classes of missions and to bring critical observations within reach of the capabilities of the NASA SMD Astrophysics Explorer program. As they utilize the same mature TRL base as the large format JWST HgCdTe arrays, requiring only qualification of n-on-p material operated at higher bias voltages, the path to flight qualification is unusually direct.

  11. RESEARCH NOTE FROM COLLABORATION: Production and decay of the 73Ge*(1/2-) metastable state in a low-background germanium detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, H. Y.; Chang, H. M.; Chou, M. H.; Deniz, M.; Huang, H. X.; Lee, F. S.; Li, H. B.; Li, J.; Lin, C. W.; Lin, F. K.; Lin, S. K.; Lin, S. T.; Singh, V.; Wong, H. T.; Wu, S. C.; TEXONO Collaboration

    2008-07-01

    The 73Ge*(1/2-) metastable state decays with a very characteristic signature which allows it to be tagged event-by-event. Studies were performed using data taken with a high-purity germanium detector in a low-background laboratory near a nuclear power reactor core where the \\rm{\\bar{\

  12. Gamma-Ray Pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, Alice K.

    2011-01-01

    The Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope has revolutionized the study of pulsar physics with the detection of over 80 gamma-ray pulsars. Several new populations have been discovered, including 24 radio quiet pulsars found through gamma-ray pulsations alone and about 20 millisecond gamma-ray pulsars. The gamma-ray pulsations from millisecond pulsars were discovered by both folding at periods of known radio millisecond pulsars or by detecting them as gamma-ray sources that are followed up by radio pulsar searches. The second method has resulted in a phenomenally successful synergy, with -35 new radio MSPs (to date) having been discovered at Fermi unidentified source locations and the gamma-ray pulsations having then been detected in a number of these using the radio timing solutions. The higher sensitivity and larger energy range of the Fermi Large Area Telescope has produced detailed energy-dependent light curves and phase-resolved spectroscopy on brighter pulsars, that have ruled out polar cap models as the major source of the emission in favor of outer magnetosphere accelerators. The large number of gamma-ray pulsars now allows for the first time meaningful population and sub-population studies that are revealing surprising properties of these fascinating sources.

  13. Low-resolution Spectroscopy of Gamma-ray Burst Optical Afterglows: Biases in the Swift Sample and Characterization of the Absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fynbo, J. P. U.; Jakobsson, P.; Prochaska, J. X.; Malesani, D.; Ledoux, C.; de Ugarte Postigo, A.; Nardini, M.; Vreeswijk, P. M.; Wiersema, K.; Hjorth, J.; Sollerman, J.; Chen, H.-W.; Thöne, C. C.; Björnsson, G.; Bloom, J. S.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Christensen, L.; De Cia, A.; Fruchter, A. S.; Gorosabel, J.; Graham, J. F.; Jaunsen, A. O.; Jensen, B. L.; Kann, D. A.; Kouveliotou, C.; Levan, A. J.; Maund, J.; Masetti, N.; Milvang-Jensen, B.; Palazzi, E.; Perley, D. A.; Pian, E.; Rol, E.; Schady, P.; Starling, R. L. C.; Tanvir, N. R.; Watson, D. J.; Xu, D.; Augusteijn, T.; Grundahl, F.; Telting, J.; Quirion, P.-O.

    2009-12-01

    We present a sample of 77 optical afterglows (OAs) of Swift detected gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) for which spectroscopic follow-up observations have been secured. Our first objective is to measure the redshifts of the bursts. For the majority (90%) of the afterglows, the redshifts have been determined from the spectra. We provide line lists and equivalent widths (EWs) for all detected lines redward of Lyα covered by the spectra. In addition to the GRB absorption systems, these lists include line strengths for a total of 33 intervening absorption systems. We discuss to what extent the current sample of Swift bursts with OA spectroscopy is a biased subsample of all Swift detected GRBs. For that purpose we define an X-ray-selected statistical sample of Swift bursts with optimal conditions for ground-based follow-up from the period 2005 March to 2008 September; 146 bursts fulfill our sample criteria. We derive the redshift distribution for the statistical (X-ray selected) sample and conclude that less than 18% of Swift bursts can be at z > 7. We compare the high-energy properties (e.g., γ-ray (15-350 keV) fluence and duration, X-ray flux, and excess absorption) for three subsamples of bursts in the statistical sample: (1) bursts with redshifts measured from OA spectroscopy; (2) bursts with detected optical and/or near-IR afterglow, but no afterglow-based redshift; and (3) bursts with no detection of the OA. The bursts in group (1) have slightly higher γ-ray fluences and higher X-ray fluxes and significantly less excess X-ray absorption than bursts in the other two groups. In addition, the fractions of dark bursts, defined as bursts with an optical to X-ray slope βOX < 0.5, is 14% in group (1), 38% in group (2), and >39% in group (3). For the full sample, the dark burst fraction is constrained to be in the range 25%-42%. From this we conclude that the sample of GRBs with OA spectroscopy is not representative for all Swift bursts, most likely due to a bias against the

  14. Spectroscopy of the {sup 29}Si(p,{gamma}) reaction for E{sub p}=1.00{endash}1.75 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Vavrina, G.A.; Bybee, C.R.; Mitchell, G.E.; Moore, E.F.; Shriner, J.D.; Bilpuch, E.G.; Wallace, P.M.; Westerfeldt, C.R.; Shriner, J.F. , Jr.

    1997-03-01

    The {sup 29}Si(p,{gamma}) reaction has been studied in the range E{sub p}=1.00{endash}1.75 MeV. Three previously unknown states in {sup 30}P were identified, and one state previously assigned to {sup 30}P was identified as a state in {sup 14}N. Gamma-ray strengths were determined for the three new levels, and branching ratios were measured for 17 resonances. Revised J{sup {pi}};T assignments were made for nine of these states. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  15. Neutrons and gamma-rays spectroscopy of Mercury surface: global mapping from ESA MPO-BepiColombo spacecraft by MGNS instrument.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozyrev, A. S.; Gurvits, L. I.; Litvak, M. L.; Malakhov, A. A.; Mokrousov, M. I.; Mitrofanov, I. G.; Rogozhin, A. A.; Sanin, A. B.; Owens, A.; Schvetsov, V. N.

    2009-04-01

    For analyse chemistry composition of Mercury subsurface we will apply method of as-called remote sensing of neutrons. This method can be use for study celestial body of Solar system without thick atmospheres, like Moon, Mars, Phobos, Mercury etc. by the analysis of induced nuclear gamma-rays and neutron emission. These gamma-rays and neutrons are produced by energetic galactic cosmic rays colliding with nuclei of regolith within a 1-2 meter layer of subsurface. Mercury Planetary Orbiter of BepiColombo mission includes the nuclear instrument MGNS (Mercury Gamma-rays and Neutrons Spectrometers), which consists of gamma-rays spectrometer for detection of gamma-ray lines and neutron spectrometer for measurement of the neutron leakage flux. To test know theoretical models of Mercury composition, MGNS will provide the data for the set of gamma-ray lines, which are necessary and sufficient to discriminate between the models. Neutron data are known to be very sensitive for the presence of hydrogen within heavy soil-constituting elements. Mapping measurements of epithermal neutrons and 2.2 MeV line will allow us to study the content of hydrogen over the surface of Mercury and to test the presence of water ice deposits in the cold traps of permanently shadowed polar craters of this planet. There are also three natural radioactive elements, K, Th and U, which contents in the soil of a celestial body characterizes the physical condition of its formation in the proto-planetary cloud. The data from gamma-spectrometer will allow to compare the origin of Mercury with evolution of Earth, Moon and Mars. Three sensors for thermal and epithermal neutrons are made with similar 3He proportional counters, but have different polyethylene enclosures and cadmium shielding for different sensitivity of thermal and epithermal neutrons at different energy ranges. The fourth neutron sensor for high energy neutrons 1-10 MeV contains the scintillation crystal of stylbene with cylindrical shape of

  16. Peak shifted properties of the "low background NaI(Tl) detectors": An experimental study of response function behavior in different temperature and acquisition time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezaei Moghaddam, Y.; Rafat Motavalli, L.; Miri Hakimabadi, H.

    2016-09-01

    Due to the necessity of using low background NaI detector in sensitive and accurate measurements, study on the response function variations in different conditions is very important. These types of detectors have different responses in various measurement conditions, including time, temperature and high voltage. In this study, the response function of 76 B 76 LB NaI (SCIONIX) in different conditions is discussed. According to the channel shifting in these detectors and its direct effect on degrading the resolution, the most convenient measurement condition for these detectors, is proposed. Finally, it is recommended that before long-time measurements a "waiting time" is needed to avoid the channel shifting effects.

  17. Assessment of individual organ doses in a realistic human phantom from neutron and gamma stimulated spectroscopy of the breast and liver

    PubMed Central

    Belley, Matthew D.; Segars, William Paul; Kapadia, Anuj J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Understanding the radiation dose to a patient is essential when considering the use of an ionizing diagnostic imaging test for clinical diagnosis and screening. Using Monte Carlo simulations, the authors estimated the three-dimensional organ-dose distribution from neutron and gamma irradiation of the male liver, female liver, and female breasts for neutron- and gamma-stimulated spectroscopic imaging. Methods: Monte Carlo simulations were developed using the Geant4 GATE application and a voxelized XCAT human phantom. A male and a female whole body XCAT phantom was voxelized into 256 × 256 × 600 voxels (3.125 × 3.125 × 3.125 mm3). A monoenergetic rectangular beam of 5.0 MeV neutrons or 7.0 MeV photons was made incident on a 2 cm thick slice of the phantom. The beam was rotated at eight different angles around the phantom ranging from 0° to 180°. Absorbed dose was calculated for each individual organ in the body and dose volume histograms were computed to analyze the absolute and relative doses in each organ. Results: The neutron irradiations of the liver showed the highest organ dose absorption in the liver, with appreciably lower doses in other proximal organs. The dose distribution within the irradiated slice exhibited substantial attenuation with increasing depth along the beam path, attenuating to ∼15% of the maximum value at the beam exit side. The gamma irradiation of the liver imparted the highest organ dose to the stomach wall. The dose distribution from the gammas showed a region of dose buildup at the beam entrance, followed by a relatively uniform dose distribution to all of the deep tissue structures, attenuating to ∼75% of the maximum value at the beam exit side. For the breast scans, both the neutron and gamma irradiation registered maximum organ doses in the breasts, with all other organs receiving less than 1% of the breast dose. Effective doses ranged from 0.22 to 0.37 mSv for the neutron scans and 41 to 66 mSv for the gamma scans

  18. Assessment of individual organ doses in a realistic human phantom from neutron and gamma stimulated spectroscopy of the breast and liver

    SciTech Connect

    Belley, Matthew D.; Segars, William Paul; Kapadia, Anuj J.

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Understanding the radiation dose to a patient is essential when considering the use of an ionizing diagnostic imaging test for clinical diagnosis and screening. Using Monte Carlo simulations, the authors estimated the three-dimensional organ-dose distribution from neutron and gamma irradiation of the male liver, female liver, and female breasts for neutron- and gamma-stimulated spectroscopic imaging. Methods: Monte Carlo simulations were developed using the Geant4 GATE application and a voxelized XCAT human phantom. A male and a female whole body XCAT phantom was voxelized into 256 × 256 × 600 voxels (3.125 × 3.125 × 3.125 mm{sup 3}). A monoenergetic rectangular beam of 5.0 MeV neutrons or 7.0 MeV photons was made incident on a 2 cm thick slice of the phantom. The beam was rotated at eight different angles around the phantom ranging from 0° to 180°. Absorbed dose was calculated for each individual organ in the body and dose volume histograms were computed to analyze the absolute and relative doses in each organ. Results: The neutron irradiations of the liver showed the highest organ dose absorption in the liver, with appreciably lower doses in other proximal organs. The dose distribution within the irradiated slice exhibited substantial attenuation with increasing depth along the beam path, attenuating to ∼15% of the maximum value at the beam exit side. The gamma irradiation of the liver imparted the highest organ dose to the stomach wall. The dose distribution from the gammas showed a region of dose buildup at the beam entrance, followed by a relatively uniform dose distribution to all of the deep tissue structures, attenuating to ∼75% of the maximum value at the beam exit side. For the breast scans, both the neutron and gamma irradiation registered maximum organ doses in the breasts, with all other organs receiving less than 1% of the breast dose. Effective doses ranged from 0.22 to 0.37 mSv for the neutron scans and 41 to 66 mSv for the gamma

  19. In-beam {gamma}-ray spectroscopy of {sup 240}U using the ({sup 18}O,{sup 16}O) reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Ishii, T.; Matsuda, M.; Ichikawa, S.; Shigematsu, S.; Kohno, T.; Asai, M.; Makishima, A.; Kaneko, J.; Ogawa, M.; Hossain, I.

    2005-08-01

    In the two-neutron-transfer reaction of a 200-MeV {sup 18}O beam with a {sup 238}U target, deexcitation {gamma} rays in a neutron-rich nucleus of {sup 240}U were measured. The {gamma} rays in {sup 240}U were identified by taking coincidence with {sup 16}O, using Si {delta}E-E detectors. The kinetic energies of {sup 16}O particles allowed us to select the excitation energies of {sup 240}U below the neutron separation energy. The ground-state band and the K{sup {pi}}=0{sup -} octupole band of {sup 240}U were established up to 12{sup +} and 9{sup -}, respectively. The octupole-band head of {sup 240}U is about a hundred keV higher than those of {sup 236,238}U, suggesting that a secondary maximum of octupole correlations exists at N=144-146 in U isotopes.

  20. Low background techniques in CANDLES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, K.; Iida, T.; Kishimoto, T.; Matsuoka, K.; Nomachi, M.; Umehara, S.; Chan, W. M.; Kakubata, H.; Li, X.; Maeda, T.; Ohata, T.; Temuge, B.; Tetsuno, K.; Trang, V. T. T.; Uehara, T.; Yoshida, S.; Morishita, K.; Ogawa, I.; Sakamoto, K.; Tamagawa, Y.; Yoshizawa, M.; Fushimi, K.; Hazama, R.; Naktani, N.; Suzuki, K.

    2015-08-01

    CANDLES is a double beta decay experiment using 48Ca in CaF2 crystals. The measurement is being performed with prototype detector (CANDLES III) for high sensitive measurement in the future. Recent status of detector improvements and background reduction techniques are described in this paper.

  1. Low background techniques in CANDLES

    SciTech Connect

    Nakajima, K. E-mail: nkyohei@u-fukui.ac.jp; Iida, T.; Matsuoka, K.; Nomachi, M.; Umehara, S.; Kishimoto, T.; Chan, W. M.; Kakubata, H.; Li, X.; Maeda, T.; Ohata, T.; Temuge, B.; Tetsuno, K.; Trang, V. T. T.; Uehara, T.; Yoshida, S.; Morishita, K.; Ogawa, I.; Sakamoto, K.; Tamagawa, Y.; and others

    2015-08-17

    CANDLES is a double beta decay experiment using {sup 48}Ca in CaF{sub 2} crystals. The measurement is being performed with prototype detector (CANDLES III) for high sensitive measurement in the future. Recent status of detector improvements and background reduction techniques are described in this paper.

  2. Prompt-gamma activation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lindstrom, R.M.

    1993-01-01

    A permenent, full-time instrument for prompt-gamma activation analysis is nearing completion as part of the Cold Neutron Research Facility (CNRF). The design of the analytical system has been optimized for high gamma detection efficiency and low background, particularly for hydrogen. Because of the purity of the neutron beam, shielding requirements are modest and the scatter-capture background is low. As a result of a compact sample-detector geometry, the sensitivity (counting rate per gram of analyte) is a factor of four better than the existing Maryland-NIST thermal-neutron instrument at the reactor. Hydrogen backgrounds of a few micrograms have already been achieved, which promises to be of value in numerous applications where quantitative nondestructive analysis of small quantities of hydrogen in materials is necessary.

  3. High-precision gamma-ray spectroscopy of 82Rb and 72As, two important medical isotopes used in positron emission tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nino, Michael; McCutchan, E.; Smith, S.; Sonzogni, A.; Muench, L.; Greene, J.; Carpenter, M.; Zhu, S.; Lister, C.

    2015-10-01

    Both 82Rb and 72As are very important medical isotopes used in imaging procedures, yet their full decay schemes were last studied decades ago using low-sensitivity detection systems; high quality decay data is necessary to determine the total dose received by the patient, the background in imaging technologies, and shielding requirements in production facilities. To improve the decay data of these two isotopes, sources were produced at the Brookhaven Linac Isotope Producer (BLIP) and then the Gammasphere array, consisting of 89 Compton-suppressed HPGe detectors, at Argonne National Laboratory was used to analyze the gamma-ray emissions from the daughter nuclei 82 Kr and 72 Ge. Gamma-ray singles and coincidence information were recorded and analyzed using Radware Gf3m software. Significant revisions were made to the level schemes including the observation of many new transitions and levels as well as a reduction in uncertainty on measured γ-ray intensities and deduced β-feedings. The new decay schemes as well as their impact on dose calculations will be presented. DOE Isotope Program is acknowledged for funding ST5001030. Work supported by the U.S. DOE under Grant No. DE-FG02-94ER40848 and Contract Nos. DE-AC02-98CH10946 and DE-AC02-06CH11357 and by the Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internships Program (SULI).

  4. Exploring the Impact of Nuclear Data Uncertainties in Ultra-high Resolution Gamma Spectroscopy for Isotopic Analysis Using Approximate Bayesian Computation

    SciTech Connect

    Burr, T.; Hoover, A.; Croft, S.; Rabin, M.

    2015-01-15

    High purity germanium (HPGe) currently provides the highest readily available resolution gamma detection for a broad range of radiation measurements, but microcalorimetry is a developing option that has considerably higher resolution even than HPGe. Superior microcalorimetry resolution offers the potential to better distinguish closely spaced X-rays and gamma-rays, a common challenge for the low energy spectral region near 100 keV from special nuclear materials, and the higher signal-to-background ratio also confers an advantage in detection limit. As microcalorimetry continues to develop, it is timely to assess the impact of uncertainties in detector and item response functions and in basic nuclear data, such as branching ratios and half-lives, used to interpret spectra in terms of the contributory radioactive isotopes. We illustrate that a new inference option known as approximate Bayesian computation (ABC) is effective and convenient both for isotopic inference and for uncertainty quantification for microcalorimetry. The ABC approach opens a pathway to new and more powerful implementations for practical applications than currently available.

  5. X-ray remote sensing and in-situ spectroscopy for planetary exploration missions and gamma-ray remote sensing and in-situ spectroscopy for planetary exploration missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahdavi, M.; Giboni, K. L.; Vajda, S.; Schweitzer, J.

    1994-01-01

    Detectors that will be used for planetary missions must have their responses calibrated in a reproducible manner. A calibration facility is being constructed at Schlumberger-Doll Research for gamma and x ray detectors. With this facility the detector response can be determined in an invariant and reproducible fashion. Initial use of the facility is expected for the MARS94 detectors. Work is continuing to better understand the rare earth oxyorthosilicates and to define their characteristics. This will allow a better use of these scintillators for planetary missions. In a survey of scintillating materials two scintillators were identified as promising candidates besides GSO, LSO, and YSO. These are CdWO4 and CsI(Tl). It will be investigated if a detector with a better overall performance can be assembled with various photon converters. Considerable progress was achieved in photomultiplier design. The length of an 1 inch diameter PMT could be reduced from 4.2 to 2.5 inches without performance degradation. This technology is being employed in the gamma ray detector for the NEAR project. A further weight and size reduction of the detector package can be achieved with miniaturized integrated power supplies.

  6. Search for 2νββ Decay of 130Te to the First Excited State of 130Xe with an Ultra-Low-Background Germanium Crystal Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizouni, L. K.; Aalseth, C. E.; Avignone, F. T.; Erikson, L. E.; Hossbach, T. W.; Keillor, M. E.; Orrell, J. L.

    2011-12-01

    The goal of searching for zero-neutrino double-beta (0νββ) decay is to probe an absolute neutrino mass scale suggested by the mass-splitting parameters observed by neutrino oscillation experiments. Furthermore, observation of 0νββ decay is an explicit instance of Lepton-number non-conservation. A sensitive measurement of two-neutrino double-beta (2νββ) decay can provide critical input to Quasiparticle Random Phase Approximation (QRPA) calculations of the nuclear matrix elements in models similar to those used to extract the absolute neutrino mass from (0νββ) decay experiments. Tellurium-130, an even-even nucleus, can undergo 2νββ decay to the first 0+ excited state of 130Xe producing three possible γ-ray cascades as it transitions to the ground state. The Cascades detector is a high purity germanium (HPGe) crystal array consisting of two ultra-low-background copper cryostats each housing a hexagonal array of seven crystals. The project is currently being developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in Richland, WA (USA), and aims to obtain very high γ-ray detection efficiency while utilizing highly effective and low-background shielding. GEANT4 simulations of the detector are performed for a 130Te sample in order to determine the optimum size and geometry of the source for maximum detection efficiency and predict its sensitivity for measuring 2νββ decay to the first 0+ excited state of 130Xe. These simulations are validated with calibration sources and presented.

  7. Polonium–lead extractions to determine the best method for the quantification of clean lead used in low-background radiation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Miley, Sarah M.; Payne, Rosara F.; Schulte, Shannon M.; Finn, Erin C.

    2009-12-01

    Very sensitive detectors are used for low-background applications including the detection of environmental radioactivity, double-beta decay, and dark matter. In order to reduce the background noise enough to utilize the sensitivity of these detectors, lead with little or no alpha activity is required to form the shielding. In the past, antiquity lead shielding was used for low-background detectors because lead’s most prominent alpha-emitting isotope, 210Pb, has a short half-life. The microelectronics industry is also greatly affected by alpha activity in lead and solder, and has begun producing “clean” lead for purchase. To quantify how clean the available lead is, 210Pb and, during procedural experiments, a 209Po tracer must be physically or chemically removed from the bulk lead. A reliable procedure for chemical separations that does not use large volumes of ultra-high-purity chemicals has not yet been established. Lead was dissolved and a known amount of 209Po tracer was added. The samples were put through each of two new procedures. The first procedure was based on complete dissolution of the lead followed by a column separation. The second method investigates the utility of a pre-separation step using precipitation of the lead prior to column separation. The resulting solutions were run through strontium resin columns from Eichrom Inc., a United States Transuranium and Uranium Registries (USTUR) electrodeposition procedure, and scheduled to be alpha counted for a minimum of three days. Though neither of the tested procedures had acceptable logistics for large scale implementation, later alpha counting will show which procedure is more promising for further development

  8. Proton response of CEPA4: A novel LaBr3(Ce)-LaCl3(Ce) phoswich array for high-energy gamma and proton spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nácher, E.; Mårtensson, M.; Tengblad, O.; Álvarez-Pol, H.; Bendel, M.; Cortina-Gil, D.; Gernhäuser, R.; Le Bleis, T.; Maj, A.; Nilsson, T.; Perea, A.; Pietras, B.; Ribeiro, G.; Sánchez del Río, J.; Sánchez Rosado, J.; Heinz, A.; Szpak, B.; Winkel, M.; Zieblinski, M.

    2015-01-01

    A new phoswich array, for the detection of high-energy protons and gamma rays from nuclear reactions, has been built. This new detector consists of four individual closely packed scintillator detectors, each of them made of 4 cm of LaBr3(Ce) and 6 cm of LaCl3(Ce) in phoswich configuration (optically coupled and with a common readout). In this paper we report on the results of a beam test performed at the Bronowice Cyclotron Centre (CCB) in Krakow, showing the response of this versatile instrument to high energy protons (70-230 MeV). Furthermore, for the first time we prove that we can reconstruct the original energy of fast protons (E > 200 MeV) which pass through the total length of the crystal while still retaining a good energy resolution.

  9. Observation of high-j quasiparticle states in {sup 249}Cm by in-beam {gamma}-ray spectroscopy using heavy-ion transfer reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Ishii, T.; Makii, H.; Asai, M.; Tsukada, K.; Toyoshima, A.; Matsuda, M.; Makishima, A.; Shigematsu, S.; Kohno, T.; Kaneko, J.; Ogawa, M.; Shizuma, T.; Toume, H.; Hossain, I.

    2008-11-15

    We have measured de-excitation {gamma} rays in {sup 249}Cm populated by one-neutron stripping reactions with a {sup 248}Cm target and 162-MeV {sup 16}O, 162-MeV {sup 18}O, and 120-MeV {sup 13}C beams. {gamma} rays in {sup 249}Cm were identified by measuring kinetic energies of outgoing particles using Si {delta}E-E detectors. It was demonstrated that high-j orbitals were selectively populated in the ({sup 16}O, {sup 15}O) reaction having a large negative Q value. We have observed eight quasiparticle states above the deformed shell gap of N=152. The 1/2{sup +}[620], 1/2{sup -}[750], and 7/2{sup +}[613] bands were extended up to 19/2{sup +}, 19/2{sup -}, and 13/2{sup +} states, respectively. We have established the 9/2 9/2{sup +}[615] state at 526 keV, the 9/2 9/2{sup +}[604] state with a short life of T{sub 1/2}<<2 ps at 1030 keV, and the 11/2 11/2{sup -}[725] state with T{sub 1/2}=19(1) ns at 375 keV. Furthermore, the 17/2 1/2{sup +}[880] state, having a large component of the k{sub 17/2} spherical single-particle state, has been identified at 1505 keV. We discuss the properties of those quasiparticle states in the framework of a deformed shell model.

  10. Gamma Ray Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. T.

    2000-01-01

    The project has progressed successfully during this period of performance. The highlights of the Gamma Ray Astronomy teams efforts are: (1) Support daily BATSE data operations, including receipt, archival and dissemination of data, quick-look science analysis, rapid gamma-ray burst and transient monitoring and response efforts, instrument state-of-health monitoring, and instrument commanding and configuration; (2) On-going scientific analysis, including production and maintenance of gamma-ray burst, pulsed source and occultation source catalogs, gamma-ray burst spectroscopy, studies of the properties of pulsars and black holes, and long-term monitoring of hard x-ray sources; (3) Maintenance and continuous improvement of BATSE instrument response and calibration data bases; (4) Investigation of the use of solid state detectors for eventual application and instrument to perform all sky monitoring of X-Ray and Gamma sources with high sensitivity; and (5) Support of BATSE outreach activities, including seminars, colloquia and World Wide Web pages. The highlights of this efforts can be summarized in the publications and presentation list.

  11. X-shooter spectroscopy of the puzzling gamma-ray source 3FGL1603.9-4903/PMN J1603-4904

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldoni, P.; Pita, S.; Boisson, C.; Müller, C.; Dauser, T.; Jung, I.; Krauss, F.; Lenain, J.-P.; Sol, H.

    2016-08-01

    The Fermi/LAT instrument has detected about two thousand extragalactic high energy (E > 100 MeV) gamma-ray sources. 3FGL 1603.9-4903 is a very hard and bright one and it is associated to the radio source PMN J1603-4904. Its nature is not yet clear as it could be either a very peculiar BL Lac or a compact symmetric object radio source which are considered as the early stage of a radio galaxy. The latter, if confirmed, would be the first detection in gamma-rays for this class of objects. A redshift z=0.18 +/- 0.01 has recently been claimed on the basis of the detection of a single X-ray line at 5.44 +/- 0.05 keV which has been interpreted as a 6.4 keV (rest frame) fluorescent line. We observed PMN J1603-4904 with the UV-NIR VLT/X-shooter spectrograph for two hours. We extracted spectra in the visible and NIR range that we calibrated in flux and corrected for telluric absorption. We systematically searched for absorption and emission features. The source was detected starting from ~ 6300 Ang down to 24000 Ang with an intensity similar to that of its 2MASS counterpart and a mostly featureless spectrum. The continuum lacks absorption features and thus is non-stellar in origin and most likely non-thermal. In addition to this spectrum, we detected three emission lines that we interpret as the Halpha-[NII] complex, the [SII] 6716,6731 doublet and the [SIII] 9530 line; we obtain a redshift estimate of z= 0.2321 +/- 0.0004. The line ratios suggest that a LINER/Seyfert nucleus powers the emission. This new redshift measurement implies that the X-ray line previously detected should be interpreted as a 6.7 keV line which is very peculiar but not impossible for this kind of source.

  12. A label-free fluorescence strategy for selective detection of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide based on a dumbbell-like probe with low background noise.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xuexu; Lin, Chunshui; Chen, Yiying; Wang, Yiru; Chen, Xi

    2016-03-15

    In this work we developed a novel label-free fluorescence sensing approach for the detection of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) based on a dumbbell-like DNA probe designed for both ligation reaction and digestion reaction with low background noise. SYBR Green I (SG I), a double-helix dye, was chosen as the readout fluorescence signal. In the absence of NAD(+), the ligation reaction did not occur, but the probe was digested to mononucleotides after the addition of exonuclease I (Exo I) and exonuclease I (Exo III), resulting in a weak fluorescence intensity due to the weak interaction between SG I and mononucleotides. In the presence of NAD(+), the DNA probe was ligated by Escherichia coli DNA ligase, blocking the digestion by Exo I and Exo III. As a result, SG I was intercalated into the stem part of the DNA dumbbell probe and fluorescence enhancement was achieved. This method was simple in design, fast to operate, with good sensitivity and selectivity which could discriminate NAD(+) from its analogs. PMID:26454831

  13. A new method based on low background instrumental neutron activation analysis for major, trace and ultra-trace element determination in atmospheric mineral dust from polar ice cores.

    PubMed

    Baccolo, Giovanni; Clemenza, Massimiliano; Delmonte, Barbara; Maffezzoli, Niccolò; Nastasi, Massimiliano; Previtali, Ezio; Prata, Michele; Salvini, Andrea; Maggi, Valter

    2016-05-30

    Dust found in polar ice core samples present extremely low concentrations, in addition the availability of such samples is usually strictly limited. For these reasons the chemical and physical analysis of polar ice cores is an analytical challenge. In this work a new method based on low background instrumental neutron activation analysis (LB-INAA) for the multi-elemental characterization of the insoluble fraction of dust from polar ice cores is presented. Thanks to an accurate selection of the most proper materials and procedures it was possible to reach unprecedented analytical performances, suitable for ice core analyses. The method was applied to Antarctic ice core samples. Five samples of atmospheric dust (μg size) from ice sections of the Antarctic Talos Dome ice core were prepared and analyzed. A set of 37 elements was quantified, spanning from all the major elements (Na, Mg, Al, Si, K, Ca, Ti, Mn and Fe) to trace ones, including 10 (La, Ce, Nd, Sm, Eu, Tb, Ho, Tm, Yb and Lu) of the 14 natural occurring lanthanides. The detection limits are in the range of 10(-13)-10(-6) g, improving previous results of 1-3 orders of magnitude depending on the element; uncertainties lies between 4% and 60%.

  14. A new method based on low background instrumental neutron activation analysis for major, trace and ultra-trace element determination in atmospheric mineral dust from polar ice cores.

    PubMed

    Baccolo, Giovanni; Clemenza, Massimiliano; Delmonte, Barbara; Maffezzoli, Niccolò; Nastasi, Massimiliano; Previtali, Ezio; Prata, Michele; Salvini, Andrea; Maggi, Valter

    2016-05-30

    Dust found in polar ice core samples present extremely low concentrations, in addition the availability of such samples is usually strictly limited. For these reasons the chemical and physical analysis of polar ice cores is an analytical challenge. In this work a new method based on low background instrumental neutron activation analysis (LB-INAA) for the multi-elemental characterization of the insoluble fraction of dust from polar ice cores is presented. Thanks to an accurate selection of the most proper materials and procedures it was possible to reach unprecedented analytical performances, suitable for ice core analyses. The method was applied to Antarctic ice core samples. Five samples of atmospheric dust (μg size) from ice sections of the Antarctic Talos Dome ice core were prepared and analyzed. A set of 37 elements was quantified, spanning from all the major elements (Na, Mg, Al, Si, K, Ca, Ti, Mn and Fe) to trace ones, including 10 (La, Ce, Nd, Sm, Eu, Tb, Ho, Tm, Yb and Lu) of the 14 natural occurring lanthanides. The detection limits are in the range of 10(-13)-10(-6) g, improving previous results of 1-3 orders of magnitude depending on the element; uncertainties lies between 4% and 60%. PMID:27154827

  15. A Micromegas-based low-background x-ray detector coupled to a slumped-glass telescope for axion research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aznar, F.; Castel, J.; Christensen, F. E.; Dafni, T.; Decker, T. A.; Ferrer-Ribas, E.; Garcia, J. A.; Giomataris, I.; Garza, J. G.; Hailey, C. J.; Hill, R. M.; Iguaz, F. J.; Irastorza, I. G.; Jakobsen, A. C.; Luzon, G.; Mirallas, H.; Papaevangelou, T.; Pivovaroff, M. J.; Ruz, J.; Vafeiadis, T.; Vogel, J. K.

    2015-12-01

    We report on the design, construction and operation of a low background x-ray detection line composed of a shielded Micromegas detector of the microbulk technology. The detector is made from radiopure materials and is placed at the focal point of a ~ 5 cm diameter, 1.5 m focal-length, cone-approximation Wolter I x-ray telescope (XRT) assembled from thermally-formed (or "slumped") glass substrates deposited with multilayer coatings. The system has been conceived as a technological pathfinder for the future International Axion Observatory (IAXO), as it combines two of the techniques (optic and detector) proposed in the conceptual design of the project. It is innovative for two reasons: it is the first time an x-ray optic has been designed and fabricated specifically for axion research, and the first time a Micromegas detector has been operated with an x-ray optic. The line has been installed at one end of the CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST) magnet and is currently looking for solar axions. The combination of the XRT and Micromegas detector provides the best signal-to-noise ratio obtained so far by any detection system of the CAST experiment with a background rate of 5.4×10-3 counts per hour in the energy region-of-interest and signal spot area.

  16. Investigation of (235)U, (226)Ra, (232)Th, (40)K, (137)Cs, and heavy metal concentrations in Anzali international wetland using high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry and atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zare, Mohammad Reza; Kamali, Mahdi; Fallahi Kapourchali, Maryam; Bagheri, Hashem; Khoram Bagheri, Mahdi; Abedini, Ali; Pakzad, Hamid Reza

    2016-02-01

    Measurements of natural radioactivity levels and heavy metals in sediment and soil samples of the Anzali international wetland were carried out by two HPGe-gamma ray spectrometry and atomic absorption spectroscopy techniques. The concentrations of (235)U, (226)Ra, (232)Th, (40)K, and (137)Cs in sediment samples ranged between 1.05 ± 0.51-5.81 ± 0.61, 18.06 ± 0.63-33.36 ± .0.34, 17.57 ± 0.38-45.84 ± 6.23, 371.88 ± 6.36-652.28 ± 11.60, and 0.43 ± 0.06-63.35 ± 0.94 Bq/kg, while in the soil samples they vary between 2.36-5.97, 22.71-38.37, 29.27-42.89, 472.66-533, and 1.05-9.60 Bq/kg for (235)U, (226)Ra, (232)Th, (40)K, and (137)Cs, respectively. Present results are compared with the available literature data and also with the world average values. The radium equivalent activity was well below the defined limit of 370 Bq/kg. The external hazard indices were found to be less than 1, indicating a low dose. Heavy metal concentrations were found to decrease in order as Fe > Mn > Sr > Zn > Cu > Cr > Ni > Pb > Co > Cd. These measurements will serve as background reference levels for the Anzali wetland. PMID:26490904

  17. Investigation of (235)U, (226)Ra, (232)Th, (40)K, (137)Cs, and heavy metal concentrations in Anzali international wetland using high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry and atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zare, Mohammad Reza; Kamali, Mahdi; Fallahi Kapourchali, Maryam; Bagheri, Hashem; Khoram Bagheri, Mahdi; Abedini, Ali; Pakzad, Hamid Reza

    2016-02-01

    Measurements of natural radioactivity levels and heavy metals in sediment and soil samples of the Anzali international wetland were carried out by two HPGe-gamma ray spectrometry and atomic absorption spectroscopy techniques. The concentrations of (235)U, (226)Ra, (232)Th, (40)K, and (137)Cs in sediment samples ranged between 1.05 ± 0.51-5.81 ± 0.61, 18.06 ± 0.63-33.36 ± .0.34, 17.57 ± 0.38-45.84 ± 6.23, 371.88 ± 6.36-652.28 ± 11.60, and 0.43 ± 0.06-63.35 ± 0.94 Bq/kg, while in the soil samples they vary between 2.36-5.97, 22.71-38.37, 29.27-42.89, 472.66-533, and 1.05-9.60 Bq/kg for (235)U, (226)Ra, (232)Th, (40)K, and (137)Cs, respectively. Present results are compared with the available literature data and also with the world average values. The radium equivalent activity was well below the defined limit of 370 Bq/kg. The external hazard indices were found to be less than 1, indicating a low dose. Heavy metal concentrations were found to decrease in order as Fe > Mn > Sr > Zn > Cu > Cr > Ni > Pb > Co > Cd. These measurements will serve as background reference levels for the Anzali wetland.

  18. Carbon nanotubes as a low background signal platform for a molecular aptamer beacon on the basis of long-range resonance energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Zhen, Shu Jun; Chen, Li Qiang; Xiao, Sai Jin; Li, Yuan Fang; Hu, Ping Ping; Zhan, Lei; Peng, Li; Song, Er Qun; Huang, Cheng Zhi

    2010-10-15

    Although holding the advantages of both an aptamer and a molecular beacon (MB), a molecular aptamer beacon (MAB) needs complicated and expensive modifications at both of its ends and usually has a high background signal because of the low energy transfer efficiency between the donor and the acceptor. To overcome these shortcomings, in this study, we develop a long-range resonance energy transfer (LrRET) system by separating the donor from the acceptor, wherein only one end of the MAB is fluorescently labeled and acts as the energy donor and multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are introduced as the energy acceptor. To test the feasibility of the newly designed MAB system, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) has been employed as a proof-of-concept target. It is found that the fluorescence of the designed MAB is completely quenched by MWCNTs, supplying a very low background signal. Then the quenched fluorescence is recovered significantly with the addition of ATP, so that ATP can be detected in the range of 0.8-80 μM with a limit of detection of 0.5 μM (3σ). Compared with the conventional fluorescence resonance energy transfer, the efficiency of LrRET between the dye and MWCNTs is much higher. Since only one end of the MAB needs the modification, the present strategy is simple and cost-effective. Furthermore, the use of MWCNTs can greatly reduce the fluorescence background of the MAB and supply a high sensitivity, showing its generality for detection of a variety of targets.

  19. gamma-Glutamyl dipeptides in Petiveria alliacea.

    PubMed

    Kubec, Roman; Musah, Rabi A

    2005-10-01

    Three gamma-glutamyl dipeptides have been isolated from Petiveria alliacea L. roots. These dipeptides include (S(C2)R(C7))-gamma-glutamyl-S-benzylcysteine together with two diastereomeric sulfoxides, namely (S(C2)R(C7)R(S))- and (S(C2)R(C7)R(S))-gamma-glutamyl-S-benzylcysteine S-oxides (gamma-glutamyl-petiveriins A and B, respectively). Their structures and absolute configurations have been determined by NMR, MALDI-HRMS, IR and CD spectroscopy, and confirmed by comparison with authentic compounds obtained by synthesis.

  20. Mechanisms for fluoride-promoted dissolution of bayerite [{beta}-Al(OH){sub 3}(s)] and boehmite [{gamma}-AlOOH]: {sup 19}F-NMR spectroscopy and aqueous surface chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Nordin, J.P.; Sullivan, D.J.; Phillips, B.L.; Casey, W.H.

    1999-11-01

    Some reactions that control the dissolution of bayerite [{beta}-Al(OH){sub 3}(s)] and boehmite [{gamma}-AlOOH] were identified by comparing the adsorption chemistry, the dissolution rates, and solid-state {sup 19}F-NMR spectra of the reacting surfaces. The {sup 19}F-NMR spectra of bayerite distinguish two sites for fluoride reaction that vary in relative concentration with the total adsorbate density. One resonance at {minus}131 ppm is assigned to fluoride bridges and the other resonance at {minus}142 ppm is assigned to fluoride at terminal sites. These same resonances are observed on boehmite, in addition to a third resonance at {minus}151 ppm that is tentatively assigned to aqueous AlF{sub n}(H{sub 2}O){sub 6{minus}n}{sup (3{minus}n)+} (aq) complexes in pores. Peak broadening due to dipolar coupling between surface fluorides at high loading indicates that these sites are in close proximity. A consistent picture of dissolution is derived by considering the {sup 19}F-NMR results, the aqueous experiments, and information derived from the studies of aqueous complexes, particularly studies of the dissociation mechanisms of aqueous multimers. Both fluoride and adsorbed proton enhance the dissolution rates via a series of pathways that may be coupled to one another, and there is a profound dependence of the rate on the concentration of adsorbed protons and adsorbed fluorides. Particularly important are fluoride-substituted bridges and sites where aluminum atoms are bonded to several terminal fluorides or hydroxyls. These results illustrate that it is possible to test hypotheses about molecular-scale processes if adsorption studies are coupled to spectroscopy and ligand-promoted dissolution experiments where reaction via different pathways can be distinguished.

  1. Gamma-ray burst spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teegarden, B. J.

    1982-01-01

    A review of recent results in gamma-ray burst spectroscopy is given. Particular attention is paid to the recent discovery of emission and absorption features in the burst spectra. These lines represent the strongest evidence to date that gamma-ray bursts originate on or near neutron stars. Line parameters give information on the temperature, magnetic field and possibly the gravitational potential of the neutron star. The behavior of the continuum spectrum is also discussed. A remarkably good fit to nearly all bursts is obtained with a thermal-bremsstrahlung-like continuum. Significant evolution is observed of both the continuum and line features within most events.

  2. Gamma Knife

    MedlinePlus

    ... results are sent to the Gamma Knife®'s planning computer system. Together, physicians ( radiation oncologists and neurosurgeons) and medical physicists delineate targets and normal anatomical structures. They use a planning computer program to determine the exact spatial relationship between ...

  3. Gamma watermarking

    DOEpatents

    Ishikawa, Muriel Y.; Wood, Lowell L.; Lougheed, Ronald W.; Moody, Kenton J.; Wang, Tzu-Fang

    2004-05-25

    A covert, gamma-ray "signature" is used as a "watermark" for property identification. This new watermarking technology is based on a unique steganographic or "hidden writing" digital signature, implemented in tiny quantities of gamma-ray-emitting radioisotopic material combinations, generally covertly emplaced on or within an object. This digital signature may be readily recovered at distant future times, by placing a sensitive, high energy-resolution gamma-ray detecting instrument reasonably precisely over the location of the watermark, which location may be known only to the object's owner; however, the signature is concealed from all ordinary detection means because its exceedingly low level of activity is obscured by the natural radiation background (including the gamma radiation naturally emanating from the object itself, from cosmic radiation and material surroundings, from human bodies, etc.). The "watermark" is used in object-tagging for establishing object identity, history or ownership. It thus may serve as an aid to law enforcement officials in identifying stolen property and prosecuting theft thereof. Highly effective, potentially very low cost identification-on demand of items of most all types is thus made possible.

  4. Polonium-Lead Extractions to Determine the Best Method for the Quantification of Clean Lead Used in Low-Background Radiation Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Miley, Sarah M.; Payne, Rosara F.; Schulte, Shannon M.; Finn, Erin C.

    2009-12-01

    Radiation detectors used to search for the existence of exceptionally rare phenomena, such as double-beta decay and dark matter interactions, as well as tiny traces of environmental radioactivity, require the elimination of background signals. Modern detection systems created from ultra pure materials and operated deep underground may be sensitive enough to "see" these rare phenomena, but background activity in Pb gamma-ray shielding could still be a critical stumbling block owing to alpha and beta emissions of Pb, Bi, and Po in the mass 210 chain. To minimize the probability of overwhelming activity from Pb, the alpha activity of 210Pb is quantified. However, a reliable quantification procedure that does not require large volumes of chemicals has not yet been established. Two procedures created for this purpose have been tested for the quantification of alpha activity in lead. Both procedures were designed to start with less than 10g Pb samples to reduce reagents needed and combined precipitation with column separation to isolate 210Pb, followed by alpha spectrometry. One procedure shows promise for obtaining high recoveries and good separation.

  5. Rapid screening and analysis of alpha- and gamma-emitting radionuclides in liquids using a single sample preparation procedure.

    PubMed

    Parsa, Bahman; Henitz, James B; Carter, Jennifer A

    2011-02-01

    A multifaceted radiochemical testing procedure has been developed to analyze a large number of liquid samples and measure a wide range of radionuclides in a short period of time. This method involves a single, unique and fast sample preparation procedure and allows sequential/concurrent determination of analytes with accuracy and precision. The same prepared sample can be selectively analyzed by gross alpha counting, gamma-ray spectroscopy, and alpha spectroscopy. This method is especially attractive in radiological emergency events where analytical data will be needed urgently as a basis for protective action. Given the simplicity and rapidity of the method, it may be suitable for field portable laboratories, which could save time and the cost associated with the transit of samples to a fixed laboratory. A 100 mL aliquot of sample was spiked with ¹³³Ba and ⁵⁹Fe tracers and subjected to a chemical separation procedure using a combined BaSO4 and Fe(OH)3 co-precipitation scheme. Then, the gross alpha-particle activity of the prepared sample was measured with a low-background gas-proportional counter, followed by the analysis of its photon-emitters using a gamma-ray spectroscopy system with high-purity intrinsic Ge detectors. Gamma-ray determination of ¹³³Ba and ⁵⁹Fe tracers was used to assess the chemical recoveries of BaSO4 and Fe(OH)3 fractions, respectively. Selectivity of the radionuclides for co-precipitation with either BaSO4 or Fe(OH)3 components was also investigated. Alpha mass-efficiency curves were derived using ²³⁰Th and ²⁴¹Am standards as alpha-calibration sources. Various mixtures of radionuclides, including ⁵⁴Mn, ⁵⁷Co, ⁶⁰Co, ⁸⁵Sr, ⁸⁸Y, ¹⁰⁹Cd, ¹¹³Sn, ¹³⁷Cs, ¹³⁹Ce, ²⁰³Hg, ²⁰⁹Po, ²²⁶Ra, ²²⁸Ra, ²³⁰Th, ²⁴¹Am, and natural uranium were used in this study. Most were quantitatively assayed with high chemical recoveries. Alpha-isotope identification and assessment of the prepared

  6. Gamma Ray Imaging for Environmental Remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, W. Neil; Luke, Paul N.; Kurfess, J.D.; Phlips, Bernard F.; Kroeger, R.A.; Phillips, G.W.

    1999-06-01

    The goal of this project is the development of field portable gamma-ray detectors that can both image gamma rays from radioactive emission and determine the isotopic composition by the emitted spectrum. Most instruments to date have had either very good imaging with no spectroscopy, or very good spectroscopy with no imaging. The only instruments with both imaging and spectroscopy have had rather poor quality imaging and spectroscopy (e.g. NaI Anger Cameras). The technology would have widespread applications, from laboratory nuclear physics, to breast cancer imaging, to astronomical research. For this project, we focus on the applications in the field of fissile materials, spent nuclear fuels and decontamination and decommissioning.

  7. Stereotactic radiosurgery - Gamma Knife

    MedlinePlus

    ... Gamma Knife; Gamma Knife radiosurgery; Non-invasive neurosugery; Epilepsy - Gamma Knife ... problems ( arteriovenous malformation , arteriovenous fistula ) Some types of epilepsy Trigeminal neuralgia (severe nerve pain of the face) ...

  8. Extended use of alanine irradiated in experimental reactor for combined gamma- and neutron-dose assessment by ESR spectroscopy and thermal neutron fluence assessment by measurement of (14)C by LSC.

    PubMed

    Bartoníček, B; Kučera, J; Světlík, I; Viererbl, L; Lahodová, Z; Tomášková, L; Cabalka, M

    2014-11-01

    Gamma- and neutron doses in an experimental reactor were measured using alanine/electron spin resonance (ESR) spectrometry. The absorbed dose in alanine was decomposed into contributions caused by gamma and neutron radiation using neutron kerma factors. To overcome a low sensitivity of the alanine/ESR response to thermal neutrons, a novel method has been proposed for the assessment of a thermal neutron flux using the (14)N(n,p) (14)C reaction on nitrogen present in alanine and subsequent measurement of (14)C by liquid scintillation counting (LSC).

  9. Gamma Ray Imaging for Environmental Remediation

    SciTech Connect

    B.F. Philips; R.A. Kroeger: J.D. Kurfess: W.N. Johnson; E.A. Wulf; E. I. Novikova

    2004-11-12

    This program is the development of germanium strip detectors for environmental remediation. It is a collaboration between the Naval Research Laboratory and Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. The goal is to develop detectors that are simultaneously capable of excellent spectroscopy and imaging of gamma radiation.

  10. Hadron spectroscopy at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, S.U.; Kern, W.; Willutzki, H.J.

    1990-08-01

    A description is given of the physics opportunities at RHIC regarding quark-gluon spectroscopy. The basic idea is to isolate with appropriate triggers the subprocesses pomeron + pomeron {yields} hadrons and {gamma}* + {gamma}* {yields} hadrons with the net effective mass of hadrons in the range of 1.0 to 3.0 GeV, in order to study the hadronic states composed of u, d, and s and gluons. The double-pomeron interactions are expected to produce glueballs and hybrids preferentially, while the two-offshell-photon initial states should couple predominantly to quarkonia and multiquark states. A plethora of J{sup PC}-exotic mesons can be produced either directly in both types of interactions or in association with a single recoil photon in the final state. 8 refs., 2 figs.

  11. The gamma irradiation effects on structural and optical properties of silk fibroin/HPMC blend films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shetty, G. Rajesha; Rao, B. Lakshmeesha; Gowda, Mahadeva; Shivananda, C. S.; Asha, S.; Byrappa, K.; Sangappa, Y.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper the structural, chemical and optical properties of gamma irradiated silk fibroin/Hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose (SF-HPMC) blend films were studied using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and UV-visible spectroscopy. The results indicate that the gamma radiation did not affect significantly the primary structure of polypeptide arrangement in the blend films. But the optical properties of the blends changed with gamma irradiation dosage.

  12. Gamma ray generator

    SciTech Connect

    Firestone, Richard B; Reijonen, Jani

    2014-05-27

    An embodiment of a gamma ray generator includes a neutron generator and a moderator. The moderator is coupled to the neutron generator. The moderator includes a neutron capture material. In operation, the neutron generator produces neutrons and the neutron capture material captures at least some of the neutrons to produces gamma rays. An application of the gamma ray generator is as a source of gamma rays for calibration of gamma ray detectors.

  13. Quarkonium spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Scharre, D.L.

    1981-06-01

    Recent experimental investigations of heavy quark-antiquark bound state systems are reviewed. Results from SPEAR on charmonium spectroscopy and from DORIS and CESR on bottomonium spectroscopy are presented. The current status of the search for top is also discussed.

  14. Gamma-ray constraints on supernova nucleosynthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leising, Mark D.

    1994-01-01

    Gamma-ray spectroscopy holds great promise for probing nucleosynthesis in individual supernova explosions via short-lived radioactivity, and for measuring current global Galactic supernova nucleosynthesis with longer-lived radioactivity. It was somewhat surprising that the former case was realized first for a Type II supernova, when both Co-56 and Co-57 were detected in SN 1987A. These provide unprecedented constraints on models of Type II explosions and nucleosynthesis. Live Al-26 in the Galaxy might come from Type II supernovae, and if it is eventually shown to be so, can constrain massive star evolution, supernova nucleosynthesis, and the Galactic Type II supernova rate. Type Ia supernovae, thought to be thermonuclear explosions, have not yet been detected in gamma-rays. This is somewhat surprising given current models and recent Co-56 detection attempts. Ultimately, gamma-ray measurements can confirm their thermonuclear nature, probe the nuclear burning conditions, and help evaluate their contributions to Galactic nucleosynthesis. Type Ib/c supernovae are poorly understood. Whether they are core collapse or thermonuclear events might be ultimately settled by gamma-ray observations. Depending on details of the nuclear processing, any of these supernova types might contribute to a detectable diffuse glow of Fe-60 gamma-ray lines. Previous attempts at detection have come very close to expected emission levels. Remnants of any type of age less that a few centuries might be detectable as individual spots of Ti-44 gamma-ray line emission. It is in fact quite surprising that previous surveys have not discovered such spots, and the constraints on the combination of nucleosynthesis yields and supernova rates are very interesting. All of these interesting limits and possibilities mean that the next mission, International Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL), if it has sufficient sensitivity, is very likely to lead to the realization of much of the great potential

  15. Measurement of Disintegration Rates and Absolute {gamma}-ray Intensities

    SciTech Connect

    DeVries, Daniel J.; Griffin, Henry C.

    2006-03-13

    The majority of practical radioactive materials decay by modes that include {gamma}-ray emission. For questions of 'how much' or 'how pure', one must know the absolute intensities of the major radiations. We are using liquid scintillation counting (LSC) to measurements of disintegration rates, coupled with {gamma}-ray spectroscopy to measure absolute {gamma}-ray emission probabilities. Described is a study of the 227Th chain yielding absolute {gamma}-ray intensities with {approx}0.5% accuracy and information on LSC efficiencies.

  16. Further considerations for the setting up of a low background whole-body counter for internal dosimetry at Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Carlsbad, NM, USA: transmitted photon component.

    PubMed

    Pillalamarri, Ila; Jagam, P

    2015-04-01

    One of the further considerations in the present work, while setting up a low background whole-body counter (WBC) underground at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is to reduce the background in the energy region of interest <100 keV. The goal of the present work is to determine the adequacy of a chamber located underground at WIPP of dimensions 1.83 m × 1.22 m at the base, 1.83 m high, with 15 cm thick pre-world-war II steel shielding. The objective of the present work is to estimate the transmitted photon flux into this chamber for setting up the low background WBC. The transmitted photon flux is simulated with the GEANT code for an incident photon flux consisting only of 1461 keV photons. The results are discussed with respect to a detector of choice for detecting <50 mBq emitting photons in the energy region <100 keV.

  17. Neutron capture by Ru: Neutron cross sections of {sup 96,102,104}Ru and gamma-ray spectroscopy in the decays of {sup 97,103,105}Ru

    SciTech Connect

    Krane, K. S.

    2010-04-15

    Cross sections for radiative capture of neutrons have been measured for stable isotopes of Ru with mass numbers 96,102, and 104. From separate irradiations using thermal and epithermal neutrons, independent values for the thermal cross section and effective resonance integral have been determined. Spectroscopic studies of the gamma rays emitted in the decays of {sup 97,103,105}Ru have enabled improvements in the precision of the energies and intensities of the radiations along with corresponding improvements in the beta-decay feeding intensities and the energies of the levels in the respective daughter nuclei. Similar spectroscopic measurements of the decays of {sup 105}Rh (daughter of {sup 105}Ru) and {sup 96}Tc (produced from n,p reactions on {sup 96}Ru) have resulted in improved gamma-ray energies and intensities in those decays.

  18. Spectroscopy of the {sup 29}Si({ital p},{gamma}) reaction for {ital E}{sub {ital p}}=1.75{endash}2.51 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, P.M.; Bilpuch, E.G.; Bybee, C.R.; Mitchell, G.E.; Moore, E.F.; Shriner, J.D.; Shriner, J.F. Jr.; Vavrina, G.A.; Westerfeldt, C.R. ||

    1996-12-01

    The {sup 29}Si({ital p},{gamma}) reaction has been studied for 30 resonances in the range {ital E}{sub {ital p}}=1.75{endash}2.51 MeV. Branching ratios have been measured for 28 of these resonances. The separation energy {ital S}{sub {ital p}} for {sup 30}P has been determined to be 5594.5{plus_minus}0.5 keV. Improved spin, parity, and isospin assignments have been made to a number of the resonant states. A new level has been identified in {sup 30}P at {ital E}{sub {ital x}}=6006 keV, and its {gamma}-ray branching ratios have been measured. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  19. Gamma ray astrophysics to the year 2000. Report of the NASA Gamma Ray Program Working Group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Important developments in gamma-ray astrophysics up to energies of 100 GeV during the last decade are reviewed. Also, the report seeks to define the major current scientific goals of the field and proposes a vigorous program to pursue them, extending to the year 2000. The goals of gamma-ray astronomy include the study of gamma rays which provide the most direct means of studying many important problems in high energy astrophysics including explosive nucleosynthesis, accelerated particle interactions and sources, and high-energy processes around compact objects. The current research program in gamma-ray astronomy in the U.S. including the space program, balloon program and foreign programs in gamma-ray astronomy is described. The high priority recommendations for future study include an Explorer-class high resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy mission and a Get Away Special cannister (GAS-can) or Scout class multiwavelength experiment for the study of gamma-ray bursts. Continuing programs include an extended Gamma Ray Observatory mission, continuation of the vigorous program of balloon observations of the nearby Supernova 1987A, augmentation of the balloon program to provide for new instruments and rapid scientific results, and continuation of support for theoretical research. Long term recommendations include new space missions using advanced detectors to better study gamma-ray sources, the development of these detectors, continued study for the assembly of large detectors in space, collaboration with the gamma-ray astronomy missions initiated by other countries, and consideration of the Space Station attached payloads for gamma-ray experiments.

  20. A Correlated Optical and Gamma Emission from GRB 081126A

    SciTech Connect

    Gendre, B.; Klotz, A.; Atteia, J. L.; Boeer, M.; Coward, D. M.; Imerito, A. C.

    2010-10-15

    We present an analysis of time-resolved optical emissions observed from the gamma-ray burst GRB 081126 during the prompt phase. The analysis employed time-resolved photometry using optical data obtained by the TAROT telescope, BAT data from the Swift spacecraft and time-resolved spectroscopy at high energies from the GBM instrument onboard the Fermi spacecraft. The optical emission of GRB 081126 is found to be compatible with the second gamma emission pulse shifted by a positive time-lag of 8.4{+-}3.9 sec. This is the first well resolved observation of a time lag between optical and gamma emissions during a gamma-ray burst. Our observations could potentially provide new constraints on the fireball model for gamma ray burst early emissions. Furthermore, observations of time-lags between optical and gamma ray photons provides an exciting opportunity to constrain quantum gravity theories.

  1. Fermi GBM Observations of Terrestrial Gamma Flashes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.; Briggs, M. S.; Connaughton, V.; Fishman, G. J.; Bhat, P. N.; Paciesas, W. S.; Preece, R. D.; Kippen, R. M.; vonKienlin, A.; Dwyer, J. R.; Smith, D. M.; Holzworth, R.

    2010-01-01

    In its first two years of operation, the Fermi Gamma Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) has observed 79 Terrestrial Gamma Flashes (TGFs). The thick Bismuth Germanate (BGO) detectors are excellent for TGF spectroscopy, having a high probability of recording the full energy of an incident photon, spanning a broad energy range from 150 keV to 40 MeV, and recording a large number of photons per TGF. Correlations between GBM TGF triggers and lightning sferics detected with the World-Wide Lightning Location Network indicate that TGFs and lightning are simultaneous to within tens of microseconds.

  2. gamma-Hexachlorocyclohexane (gamma-HCH)

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    gamma - Hexachlorocyclohexane ( gamma - HCH ) ; CASRN 58 - 89 - 9 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Asse

  3. Mossbauer Spectroscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, John G.; Bowen, Lawrence H.

    1980-01-01

    Reviews current research in Mossbauer spectroscopy, including instrumentation and experimental techniques, spectral analysis, catalysts and surfaces, environmental studies, medical applications and atmospheric air studies. Cites 346 references. (CS)

  4. Gamma ray detector shield

    DOEpatents

    Ohlinger, R.D.; Humphrey, H.W.

    1985-08-26

    A gamma ray detector shield comprised of a rigid, lead, cylindrical-shaped vessel having upper and lower portions with an pneumatically driven, sliding top assembly. Disposed inside the lead shield is a gamma ray scintillation crystal detector. Access to the gamma detector is through the sliding top assembly.

  5. Gamma-Ray Library and Uncertainty Analysis: Passively Emitted Gamma Rays Used in Safeguards Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, W

    2009-09-18

    Non-destructive gamma-ray analysis is a fundamental part of nuclear safeguards, including nuclear energy safeguards technology. Developing safeguards capabilities for nuclear energy will certainly benefit from the advanced use of gamma-ray spectroscopy as well as the ability to model various reactor scenarios. There is currently a wide variety of nuclear data that could be used in computer modeling and gamma-ray spectroscopy analysis. The data can be discrepant (with varying uncertainties), and it may difficult for a modeler or software developer to determine the best nuclear data set for a particular situation. To use gamma-ray spectroscopy to determine the relative isotopic composition of nuclear materials, the gamma-ray energies and the branching ratios or intensities of the gamma-rays emitted from the nuclides in the material must be well known. A variety of computer simulation codes will be used during the development of the nuclear energy safeguards, and, to compare the results of various codes, it will be essential to have all the {gamma}-ray libraries agree. Assessing our nuclear data needs allows us to create a prioritized list of desired measurements, and provides uncertainties for energies and especially for branching intensities. Of interest are actinides, fission products, and activation products, and most particularly mixtures of all of these radioactive isotopes, including mixtures of actinides and other products. Recent work includes the development of new detectors with increased energy resolution, and studies of gamma-rays and their lines used in simulation codes. Because new detectors are being developed, there is an increased need for well known nuclear data for radioactive isotopes of some elements. Safeguards technology should take advantage of all types of gamma-ray detectors, including new super cooled detectors, germanium detectors and cadmium zinc telluride detectors. Mixed isotopes, particularly mixed actinides found in nuclear reactor

  6. Raman Spectroscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerrard, Donald L.

    1984-01-01

    Reviews literature on Raman spectroscopy from late 1981 to late 1983. Topic areas include: instrumentation and sampling; liquids and solutions; gases and matrix isolation; biological molecules; polymers; high-temperature and high-pressure studies; Raman microscopy; thin films and surfaces; resonance-enhanced and surface-enhanced spectroscopy; and…

  7. Rehabilitation of gamma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poynton, Charles A.

    1998-07-01

    Gamma characterizes the reproduction of tone scale in an imaging system. Gamma summarizes, in a single numerical parameter, the nonlinear relationship between code value--in an 8-bit system, from 0 through 255--and physical intensity. Nearly all image coding systems are nonlinear, and so involve values of gamma different from unity. Owing to poor understanding of tone scale reproduction, and to misconceptions about nonlinear coding, gamma has acquired a terrible reputation in computer graphics and image processing. In addition, the world-wide web suffers from poor reproduction of grayscale and color images, due to poor handling of nonlinear image coding. This paper aims to make gamma respectable again.

  8. Covariance analysis of gamma ray spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Trainham, R.; Tinsley, J.

    2013-01-15

    The covariance method exploits fluctuations in signals to recover information encoded in correlations which are usually lost when signal averaging occurs. In nuclear spectroscopy it can be regarded as a generalization of the coincidence technique. The method can be used to extract signal from uncorrelated noise, to separate overlapping spectral peaks, to identify escape peaks, to reconstruct spectra from Compton continua, and to generate secondary spectral fingerprints. We discuss a few statistical considerations of the covariance method and present experimental examples of its use in gamma spectroscopy.

  9. Covariance Analysis of Gamma Ray Spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Trainham, R.; Tinsley, J.

    2013-01-01

    The covariance method exploits fluctuations in signals to recover information encoded in correlations which are usually lost when signal averaging occurs. In nuclear spectroscopy it can be regarded as a generalization of the coincidence technique. The method can be used to extract signal from uncorrelated noise, to separate overlapping spectral peaks, to identify escape peaks, to reconstruct spectra from Compton continua, and to generate secondary spectral fingerprints. We discuss a few statistical considerations of the covariance method and present experimental examples of its use in gamma spectroscopy.

  10. Low radioactivity spectral gamma calibration facility

    SciTech Connect

    Mathews, M.A.; Bowman, H.R.; Huang, L., H.; Lavelle, M.J.; Smith, A.R.; Hearst, J.R.; Wollenberg, H.A.; Flexser, S.

    1986-01-01

    A low radioactivity calibration facility has been constructed at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). This facility has four calibration models of natural stone that are 3 ft in diameter and 6 ft long, with a 12 in. cored borehole in the center of each model and a lead-shielded run pipe below each model. These models have been analyzed by laboratory natural gamma ray spectroscopy (NGRS) and neutron activation analysis (NAA) for their K, U, and Th content. Also, 42 other elements were analyzed in the NAA. The /sup 222/Rn emanation data were collected. Calibrating the spectral gamma tool in this low radioactivity calibration facility allows the spectral gamma log to accurately aid in the recognition and mapping of subsurface stratigraphic units and alteration features associated with unusual concentrations of these radioactive elements, such as clay-rich zones.

  11. Recent developments in semiconductor gamma-ray detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Luke, Paul N.; Amman, Mark; Tindall, Craig; Lee, Julie S.

    2003-10-28

    The successful development of lithium-drifted Ge detectors in the 1960's marked the beginning of the significant use of semiconductor crystals for direct detection and spectroscopy of gamma rays. In the 1970's, high-purity Ge became available, which enabled the production of complex detectors and multi-detector systems. In the following decades, the technology of semiconductor gamma-ray detectors continued to advance, with significant developments not only in Ge detectors but also in Si detectors and room-temperature compound-semiconductor detectors. In recent years, our group at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has developed a variety of gamma ray detectors based on these semiconductor materials. Examples include Ge strip detectors, lithium-drifted Si strip detectors, and coplanar-grid CdZnTe detectors. These advances provide new capabilities in the measurement of gamma rays, such as the ability to perform imaging and the realization of highly compact spectroscopy systems.

  12. Gamma analysis of environmental samples from the Marshall Islands

    SciTech Connect

    Brunk, J.L.

    1995-09-01

    Radiological studies of the fate of nuclear test related debris in the Marshall Islands conducted by members of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory generate large number of environmental samples. For more than 20 years, the Low-Level Gamma Spectroscopy Facility has been used to perform the analysis of gamma emitting radionuclides. A brief description of the facility, calibration, counting and analysis procedures is given.

  13. ESR response of gamma-irradiated sulfamethazine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çolak, Seyda; Korkmaz, Mustafa

    In the present work, characteristic features of the radiolytical intermediates produced in gamma-irradiated solid sulfamethazine (SMH) were investigated by electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. The heights of the resonance peaks, measured with respect to the spectrum baseline, were used to monitor microwave saturation, temperature and time-dependent kinetic features of the radical species contributing to the formation of recorded experimental ESR spectra. Three species having different spectroscopic and kinetic features were observed to be produced in gamma-irradiated SMH. SO2, which is the most sensitive group of radiation in the SMH molecule, was found to be at the origin of radiation-produced ionic radical species. Based on the experimental results derived from the present study, the applicability of ESR spectroscopy to radiosterilization of SMH was discussed. In the dose range of interest (0.5-10 kGy), the radiation yield of solid SMH was calculated to be very low (G=0.45) compared with those obtained for sulfonamide aqueous solutions (G=3.5-5.1). Based on these findings, it was concluded that SMH and SMH-containing drugs could be safely sterilized by gamma radiation and that ESR spectroscopy could be successfully used as a potential technique for monitoring their radiosterilization.

  14. Measurement of cross sections for the 63Cu(alpha,gamma)67Ga reaction from 5.9-8.7 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Basunia, M. Shamsuzzoha; Norman, Eric B.; Shugart, Howard A.; Smith, Alan R.; Dolinski, Michelle J.; Quiter, Brian J.

    2004-09-23

    We have measured cross sections for the 63Cu(alpha,gamma)67Ga reaction in the 5.9-8.7 MeV energy range using an activation technique. Natural Cu foils were bombarded with alpha beams from the 88 Cyclotron at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). Activated foils were counted using gamma spectrometry system at LBNL's Low Background Facility. The 63Cu(alpha,gamma)67Ga cross-sections were determined and compared with the latest NON-SMOKER theoretical values. Experimental cross sections were found to be in agreement with theoretical values.

  15. Infrared Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehling, Randy L.

    Infrared (IR) spectroscopy refers to measurement of the absorption of different frequencies of IR radiation by foods or other solids, liquids, or gases. IR spectroscopy began in 1800 with an experiment by Herschel. When he used a prism to create a spectrum from white light and placed a thermometer at a point just beyond the red region of the spectrum, he noted an increase in temperature. This was the first observation of the effects of IR radiation. By the 1940s, IR spectroscopy had become an important tool used by chemists to identify functional groups in organic compounds. In the 1970s, commercial near-IR reflectance instruments were introduced that provided rapid quantitative determinations of moisture, protein, and fat in cereal grains and other foods. Today, IR spectroscopy is used widely in the food industry for both qualitative and quantitative analysis of ingredients and finished foods.

  16. Effect of gamma irradiation on the structure of fucoidan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jong-il; Gu Lee, Sung; Jong Han, Se; Cho, Minho; Cheon Lee, Pyung

    2014-07-01

    The change of molecular structure of fucoidan by gamma irradiation was analyzed by spectral and chemical methods. Fucoidan samples with different molecular weights of 85, 30, 15, and 7 kDa were prepared by radiation degradation of 217 kDa fucoidan. In the molecular weight analysis, the polydispersity decreased by gamma radiation because of further degradation of higher weight molecules. Ultraviolet absorption and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy analyses were carried out to define the changes of the functional groups in fucoidan by gamma irradiation. Carboxyl groups and carbon double bonds increased by gamma irradiation; however, sulfate content remained unchanged. The granular fissures were observed from scanning electron microscopy in gamma-irradiated fucoidan.

  17. Imaging germanium telescope array for gamma-rays (IGETAGRAY)

    SciTech Connect

    Hailey, C.J.; Ziock, K.P. ); Harrison, F.A. Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA ); Fleischmann, J. )

    1990-08-10

    The Germanium Drift Chamber (GDC) is a gamma-ray detector with excellent energy and one-dimensional spatial resolution. Due to recent developments in coded aperture optics, it is feasible to couple one-dimensional coded apertures and GDCs in a special array geometry producing a telescope with true two-dimensional imaging. This Imaging Germanium Telescope Array for Gamma-rays (IGETAGRAY) has made a comparable field of view and sensitivity to true two-dimensional systems, but simplified engineering requirements. IGETAGRAY will make possible high sensitivity spectroscopy of the gamma-ray sky.

  18. Imaging Germanium Telescope Array for Gamma-Rays (IGETAGRAY)

    SciTech Connect

    Hailey, C.J.; Ziock, K.P. ); Harrison, F.A. . Dept. of Physics California Univ., Berkeley, CA . Space Sciences Lab.); Fleischmann, J. )

    1990-01-01

    The Germanium Drift Chamber (GDC) is a gamma-ray detector with excellent energy and one-dimensional spatial resolution. Due to recent developments in coded aperture optics, it is feasible to couple one-dimensional coded apertures and GDCs in a special array geometry producing a telescope with true two-dimensional imaging. This Imaging Germanium Telescope Array for Gamma-Rays (IGETAGRAY) has made a comparable field of view and sensitivity to true two-dimensional systems, but simplified engineering requirements. IGETAGRAY will make possible high sensitivity spectroscopy of the gamma-ray sky. 5 refs., 1 fig.

  19. Gamma-ray shielding properties of some travertines in Turkey

    SciTech Connect

    Akkurt, Iskender; Guenoglu, Kadir

    2012-09-06

    The radiation is an essential phenomenon in daily life. There are various amounts of radioactivite substances in the underground and the earth was irradiated by this substances. Humans are exposed to various kind of radiation from these sources. The travertines are usually used as a coating material in buildings. In this study, the photon attenuation coefficients of some travertines have been measured using a gamma spectroscopy with NaI(Tl) detector. The measurements have been performed using {sup 60}Co source which gives 1173 and 1332 keV energies gamma rays and {sup 137}Cs source which gives 662 keV energy gamma rays and the results will be discussed.

  20. Gamma ray transients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cline, Thomas L.

    1987-01-01

    The discovery of cosmic gamma ray bursts was made with systems designed at Los Alamos Laboratory for the detection of nuclear explosions beyond the atmosphere. HELIOS-2 was the first gamma ray burst instrument launched; its initial results in 1976, seemed to deepen the mystery around gamma ray transients. Interplanetary spacecraft data were reviewed in terms of explaining the behavior and source of the transients.

  1. New insights from cosmic gamma rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roland, Diehl

    2016-04-01

    The measurement of gamma rays from cosmic sources at ~MeV energies is one of the key tools for nuclear astrophysics, in its study of nuclear reactions and their impacts on objects and phenomena throughout the universe. Gamma rays trace nuclear processes most directly, as they originate from nuclear transitions following radioactive decays or high-energy collisions with excitation of nuclei. Additionally, the unique gamma-ray signature from the annihilation of positrons falls into this astronomical window and is discussed here: Cosmic positrons are often produced from β-decays, thus also of nuclear physics origins. The nuclear reactions leading to radioactive isotopes occur inside stars and stellar explosions, which therefore constitute the main objects of such studies. In recent years, both thermonuclear and core-collapse supernova radioactivities have been measured though 56Ni, 56Co, and 44Ti lines, and a beginning has thus been made to complement conventional supernova observations with such measurements of the prime energy sources of supernova light created in their deep interiors. The diffuse radioactive afterglow of massive-star nucleosynthesis in gamma rays is now being exploited towards astrophysical studies on how massive stars feed back their energy and ejecta into interstellar gas, as part of the cosmic cycle of matter through generations of stars enriching the interstellar gas and stars with metals. Large interstellar cavities and superbubbles have been recognised to be the dominating structures where new massive-star ejecta are injected, from 26Al gamma-ray spectroscopy. Also, constraints on the complex interiors of stars derive from the ratio of 60Fe/26Al gamma rays. Finally, the puzzling bulge-dominated intensity distribution of positron annihilation gamma rays is measured in greater detail, but still not understood; a recent microquasar flare provided evidence that such objects may be prime sources for positrons in interstellar space, rather than

  2. {gamma} production at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, F.

    1995-07-01

    We report on preliminary measurements of the {gamma}(1S), {gamma}(2S) and {gamma}(3S) differential and integrated cross sections in p{bar p} at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV using a sample of 16.6 {+-} 0.6 pb{sup -1} collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab. The three resonances were reconstructed through the decay {gamma} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} in the rapidity region {vert_bar}y{vert_bar} < 0.4. The cross section results are compared to theoretical models of direct bottomonium production.

  3. Gamma Oscillation in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    O'Donnell, Brian F.; Youn, Soyoung; Kwon, Jun Soo

    2011-01-01

    Dysfunctional neural circuitry has been found to be involved in abnormalities of perception and cognition in patients with schizophrenia. Gamma oscillations are essential for integrating information within neural circuits and have therefore been associated with many perceptual and cognitive processes in healthy human subjects and animals. This review presents an overview of the neural basis of gamma oscillations and the abnormalities in the GABAergic interneuronal system thought to be responsible for gamma-range deficits in schizophrenia. We also review studies of gamma activity in sensory and cognitive processes, including auditory steady state response, attention, object representation, and working memory, in animals, healthy humans and patients with schizophrenia. PMID:22216037

  4. Gamma-Ray Bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Paciesas, W.S. ); Fishman, G.J. )

    1992-01-01

    This proceedings represents the works presented at the Gamma-Ray Bursts Workshop -- 1991 which was held on the campus of theUniversity of Alabama in Huntsville, October 16-18. The emphasis ofthe Workshop was to present and discuss new observations of gamma-ray bursts made recently by experiments on the Compton Gamma-RayObservatory (CGRO), Granat, Ginga, Pioneer Venus Orbiter, Prognozand Phobos. These presentations were complemented by some groundbased observations, reanalysis of older data, descriptions offuture gamma-ray burst experiments and a wide-ranging list oftheoretical discussions. Over seventy papers are included in theproceedings. Eleven of them are abstracted for the database. (AIP)

  5. The Gamma-Ray Imaging Spectrometer (GRIS): A new balloon-borne experiment for gamma-ray line astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teegarden, B. J.; Cline, T. L.; Gehrels, N.; Porreca, G.; Tueller, J.; Leventhal, M.; Huters, A. F.; Maccallum, C. J.; Stang, P. D.

    1985-01-01

    High resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy is a relatively new field that holds great promise for further understanding of high energy astrophysical processes. When the high resolution gamma-ray spectrometer (GRSE) was removed from the GRO payload, a balloon program was initiated to permit continued development and improvement of instrumentation in this field, as well as continued scientific observations. The Gamma-Ray Imaging Spectrometer (GRIS) is one of the experiments selected as part of this program. The instrument contains a number of new and innovative features that are expected to produce a significant improvement in source location accuracy and sensitivity over previous balloon and satellite experiments.

  6. Isotopic composition analysis and age dating of uranium samples by high resolution gamma ray spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apostol, A. I.; Pantelica, A.; Sima, O.; Fugaru, V.

    2016-09-01

    Non-destructive methods were applied to determine the isotopic composition and the time elapsed since last chemical purification of nine uranium samples. The applied methods are based on measuring gamma and X radiations of uranium samples by high resolution low energy gamma spectrometric system with planar high purity germanium detector and low background gamma spectrometric system with coaxial high purity germanium detector. The "Multigroup γ-ray Analysis Method for Uranium" (MGAU) code was used for the precise determination of samples' isotopic composition. The age of the samples was determined from the isotopic ratio 214Bi/234U. This ratio was calculated from the analyzed spectra of each uranium sample, using relative detection efficiency. Special attention is paid to the coincidence summing corrections that have to be taken into account when performing this type of analysis. In addition, an alternative approach for the age determination using full energy peak efficiencies obtained by Monte Carlo simulations with the GESPECOR code is described.

  7. Gamma detectors based on high pressure xenon: their development and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulin, Sergey E.; Dmitrenko, Valery V.; Grachev, V. M.; Uteshev, Z. M.; Vlasic, K. F.; Chernysheva, I. V.; Duhvalov, A. G.; Kotler, F. G.; Pushkin, K. N.

    2004-01-01

    Various modifications of xenon detectors and their parameters in comparison with gamma-detectors of other types are considered. Prospects of xenon detectors' applications in gamma-spectroscopy based on experimental results are discussed including detection and control of radioactive and fissile materials displacement, definition of uranium enrichment rate, and measurements of nuclear reactor radioactive gas waste concentration. Possibilities for xenon detector use for environmental control and measurement of cosmic gamma radiation on orbital stations are considered.

  8. Gamma detectors based on high-pressure xenon: their development and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulin, Sergey E.; Dmitrenko, Valery V.; Grachev, V. M.; Uteshev, Z. M.; Vlasik, K. F.; Chernysheva, I. V.; Dukhvalov, A. G.; Kotler, F. G.; Pushkin, K. N.

    2004-10-01

    Various modifications of xenon detectors and their parameters in comparison with gamma-detectors of other types are considered. Prospects of xenon detectors' applicatins in gamma-spectroscopy based on experimental results are discussed including detection and control of radioactive and fissile materials displacement, definition of uranium enrichment rate, and measurements of nuclear reactor radioactive gas waste concentration. Possibilities for xenon detector use for environmental control and measurement of cosmic gamma radiation on orbital stations are considered.

  9. Directional gamma detector

    DOEpatents

    LeVert, Francis E.; Cox, Samson A.

    1981-01-01

    An improved directional gamma radiation detector has a collector sandwiched etween two layers of insulation of varying thicknesses. The collector and insulation layers are contained within an evacuated casing, or emitter, which releases electrons upon exposure to gamma radiation. Delayed electrons and electrons entering the collector at oblique angles are attenuated as they pass through the insulation layers on route to the collector.

  10. Gamma-ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Wijers, Ralph A. M. J.; Woosley, Stan

    2012-11-01

    Prologue C. Kouveliotou, R. A . M. J. Wijers and S. E. Woosley; 1. The discovery of the gamma-ray burst phenomenon R. W. Klebesadel; 2. Instrumental principles E. E. Fenimore; 3. The BATSE era G. J. Fishman and C. A. Meegan; 4. The cosmological era L. Piro and K. Hurley; 5. The Swift era N. Gehrels and D. N. Burrows; 6. Discoveries enabled by multi-wavelength afterglow observations of gamma-ray bursts J. Greiner; 7. Prompt emission from gamma-ray bursts T. Piran, R. Sari and R. Mochkovitch; 8. Basic gamma-ray burst afterglows P. Mészáros and R. A. M. J. Wijers; 9. The GRB-supernova connection J. Hjorth and J. S. Bloom; 10. Models for gamma-ray burst progenitors and central engines S. E. Woosley; 11. Jets and gamma-ray burst unification schemes J. Granot and E. Ramirez-Ruiz; 12. High-energy cosmic rays and neutrinos E. Waxman; 13. Long gamma-ray burst host galaxies and their environments J. P. U. Fynbo, D. Malesani and P. Jakobsson; 14. Gamma-ray burst cosmology V. Bromm and A. Loeb; 15. Epilogue R. D. Blandford; Index.

  11. Muons in gamma showers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanev, T.; Vankov, C. P.; Halzen, F.

    1985-01-01

    Muon production in gamma-induced air showers, accounting for all major processes. For muon energies in the GeV region the photoproduction is by far the most important process, while the contribution of micron + micron pair creation is not negligible for TeV muons. The total rate of muons in gamma showers is, however, very low.

  12. Gamma-ray astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W. (Editor); Trombka, J. I. (Editor)

    1973-01-01

    Conference papers on gamma ray astrophysics are summarized. Data cover the energy region from about 0.3 MeV to a few hundred GeV and theoretical models of production mechanisms that give rise to both galactic and extragalactic gamma rays.

  13. Optical gamma thermometer

    SciTech Connect

    Koster, Glen Peter; Xia, Hua; Lee, Boon Kwee

    2013-08-06

    An optical gamma thermometer includes a metal mass having a temperature proportional to a gamma flux within a core of a nuclear reactor, and an optical fiber cable for measuring the temperature of the heated metal mass. The temperature of the heated mass may be measured by using one or more fiber grating structures and/or by using scattering techniques, such as Raman, Brillouin, and the like. The optical gamma thermometer may be used in conjunction with a conventional reactor heat balance to calibrate the local power range monitors over their useful in-service life. The optical gamma thermometer occupies much less space within the in-core instrument tube and costs much less than the conventional gamma thermometer.

  14. Spectroscopy of 215Rn86

    SciTech Connect

    Debray, M. E.; Davidson, M.; Davidson, J.; Hojman, D.; Kreiner, A. J.; Cardona, M. A.; Lenzi, S.; Napoli, D.

    2007-02-12

    The yrast level structure of 215,216Rn has been studied using in beam spectroscopy {alpha} - {gamma} - {gamma} coincidence techniques mainly through the 207Pb(18O, 2{alpha}2n) and 208Pb(18O, 2{alpha}2n) reactions in the 91-93 MeV energy range, using the 8{pi} GASP-ISIS spectrometer at Legnaro. The obtained low lying level scheme of 215Rn does not exhibit the alternating parity structure observed in their heavier known isotones 216Fr, 217Ra and 218Ac. The level scheme of 216Rn resulting from this study shows >From this result, the lightest nucleus showing evidence for reflection asymmetry is 216Fr defining one lowest-mass corner for this kind of phenomenon as N{>=}129 and Z{>=}87.

  15. Modern Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrow, Gordon M.

    1970-01-01

    Presents the basic ideas of modern spectroscopy. Both the angular momenta and wave-nature approaches to the determination of energy level patterns for atomic and molecular systems are discussed. The interpretation of spectra, based on atomic and molecular models, is considered. (LC)

  16. Space spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Krupa, Tyler J.

    2000-02-01

    Los Alamos researchers have developed a technique to determine the composition of rock samples despite weather-induced mineral varnish deposited on the rocks. Using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), the researchers determined the true elemental composition of a Mojave Desert rock sample with a thick weather-induced deposit on it. (AIP) (c)

  17. ESR identification of gamma-irradiated albendazole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çolak, Seyda

    2010-01-01

    The use of ionizing radiation for sterilization of pharmaceuticals is a well-established technology. In the present work, the spectroscopic and kinetic features of the radicals induced in gamma-irradiated solid albendazole samples is investigated at different temperatures in the dose range of 3-34 kGy by electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. Irradiation with gamma radiation produced two different radical species in albendazole. They were fairly stable at room temperature but relatively unstable above room temperature, giving rise to an unresolved ESR spectrum consisting of three resonance peaks centered at g=2.0057. Decay activation energies of the contributing radical species were calculated to be 47.8 (±13.5) and 50.5 (±9.7) kJ/mol using the signal intensity decay data derived from annealing studies performed at high temperatures. A linear function of the applied dose was found to best describe the experimental dose-response data. Albendazole does not present the characteristics of good dosimetric materials. However, the discrimination of irradiated albendazole from its unirradiated form was possible even 6 months after storage in normal conditions. Based on these findings, it is concluded that albendazole and albendazole-containing drugs can be safely sterilized by gamma radiation and that ESR spectroscopy could be successfully used as a potential technique for monitoring their radiosterilization.

  18. Differential sensitivity of Chironomus and human hemoglobin to gamma radiation.

    PubMed

    Gaikwad, Pallavi S; Panicker, Lata; Mohole, Madhura; Sawant, Sangeeta; Mukhopadhyaya, Rita; Nath, Bimalendu B

    2016-08-01

    Chironomus ramosus is known to tolerate high doses of gamma radiation exposure. Larvae of this insect possess more than 95% of hemoglobin (Hb) in its circulatory hemolymph. This is a comparative study to see effect of gamma radiation on Hb of Chironomus and humans, two evolutionarily diverse organisms one having extracellular and the other intracellular Hb respectively. Stability and integrity of Chironomus and human Hb to gamma radiation was compared using biophysical techniques like Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS), UV-visible spectroscopy, fluorescence spectrometry and CD spectroscopy after exposure of whole larvae, larval hemolymph, human peripheral blood, purified Chironomus and human Hb. Sequence- and structure-based bioinformatics methods were used to analyze the sequence and structural similarities or differences in the heme pockets of respective Hbs. Resistivity of Chironomus Hb to gamma radiation is remarkably higher than human Hb. Human Hb exhibited loss of heme iron at a relatively low dose of gamma radiation exposure as compared to Chironomus Hb. Unlike human Hb, the heme pocket of Chironomus Hb is rich in aromatic amino acids. Higher hydophobicity around heme pocket confers stability of Chironomus Hb compared to human Hb. Previously reported gamma radiation tolerance of Chironomus can be largely attributed to its evolutionarily ancient form of extracellular Hb as evident from the present study.

  19. Differential sensitivity of Chironomus and human hemoglobin to gamma radiation.

    PubMed

    Gaikwad, Pallavi S; Panicker, Lata; Mohole, Madhura; Sawant, Sangeeta; Mukhopadhyaya, Rita; Nath, Bimalendu B

    2016-08-01

    Chironomus ramosus is known to tolerate high doses of gamma radiation exposure. Larvae of this insect possess more than 95% of hemoglobin (Hb) in its circulatory hemolymph. This is a comparative study to see effect of gamma radiation on Hb of Chironomus and humans, two evolutionarily diverse organisms one having extracellular and the other intracellular Hb respectively. Stability and integrity of Chironomus and human Hb to gamma radiation was compared using biophysical techniques like Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS), UV-visible spectroscopy, fluorescence spectrometry and CD spectroscopy after exposure of whole larvae, larval hemolymph, human peripheral blood, purified Chironomus and human Hb. Sequence- and structure-based bioinformatics methods were used to analyze the sequence and structural similarities or differences in the heme pockets of respective Hbs. Resistivity of Chironomus Hb to gamma radiation is remarkably higher than human Hb. Human Hb exhibited loss of heme iron at a relatively low dose of gamma radiation exposure as compared to Chironomus Hb. Unlike human Hb, the heme pocket of Chironomus Hb is rich in aromatic amino acids. Higher hydophobicity around heme pocket confers stability of Chironomus Hb compared to human Hb. Previously reported gamma radiation tolerance of Chironomus can be largely attributed to its evolutionarily ancient form of extracellular Hb as evident from the present study. PMID:27237970

  20. Pulser injection with subsequent removal for gamma-ray spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Hartwell, Jack K.; Goodwin, Scott G.; Johnson, Larry O.; Killian, E. Wayne

    1990-01-01

    An improved system for gamma-ray spectroscopy characterized by an interface module that controls the injection of electronic pulses as well as separation logic that enables storage of pulser events in a region of the spectrum of a multichannel analyzer distinct from the region reserved for storage of gamma-ray events. The module accomplishes this by tagging pulser events (high or low) injected into the amplification circuitry, adding an offset to the events so identified at the time the events are at the output of the analog to digital converter, and storing such events in the upper portion of the spectrum stored in the multichannel analyzer. The module can be adapted for use with existing gamma-ray spectroscopy equipment to provide for automatic analyses of radioisotopes.

  1. Effect of gamma irradiation on DC electrical conductivity of ZnO nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Swaroop, K.; Somashekarappa, H. M.; Naveen, C. S.; Jayanna, H. S.

    2015-06-24

    The temperature dependent dc electrical conductivity of gamma irradiated Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles is presented in this paper. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern shows hexagonal wurtzite structure of ZnO. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) confirms Zn-O stretching vibrations. UV-Visible spectroscopy studies show that the energy band gap (E{sub g}) of the prepared ZnO nanoparticles increases with respect to gamma irradiation dose, which can be related to room temperature dc electrical conductivity. The result shows significant variation in the high temperature dc electrical conductivity of ZnO nanoparticles due to gamma irradiation.

  2. Resting GABA and glutamate concentrations do not predict visual gamma frequency or amplitude

    PubMed Central

    Cousijn, Helena; Haegens, Saskia; Wallis, George; Near, Jamie; Stokes, Mark G.; Harrison, Paul J.; Nobre, Anna C.

    2014-01-01

    Gamma band oscillations arise in neuronal networks of interconnected GABAergic interneurons and excitatory pyramidal cells. A previous study found a correlation between visual gamma peak frequency, as measured with magnetoencephalography, and resting GABA levels, as measured with magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), in 12 healthy volunteers. If true, this would allow studies in clinical populations testing modulation of this relationship, but this finding has not been replicated. We addressed this important question by measuring gamma oscillations and GABA, as well as glutamate, in 50 healthy volunteers. Visual gamma activity was evoked using an established gratings paradigm, and we applied a beamformer spatial filtering technique to extract source-reconstructed gamma peak frequency and amplitude from the occipital lobe. We determined gamma peak frequency and amplitude from the location with maximal activation and from the location of the MRS voxel to assess the relationship of GABA with gamma. Gamma peak frequency was estimated from the highest value of the raw spectra and by a Gaussian fit to the spectra. MRS data were acquired from occipital cortex. We did not replicate the previously found correlation between gamma peak frequency and GABA concentration. Calculation of a Bayes factor provided strong evidence in favor of the null hypothesis. We also did not find a correlation between gamma activity and glutamate or between gamma and the ratio of GABA/glutamate. Our results suggest that cortical gamma oscillations do not have a consistent, demonstrable relationship to excitatory/inhibitory network activity as proxied by MRS measurements of GABA and glutamate. PMID:24927588

  3. Resting GABA and glutamate concentrations do not predict visual gamma frequency or amplitude.

    PubMed

    Cousijn, Helena; Haegens, Saskia; Wallis, George; Near, Jamie; Stokes, Mark G; Harrison, Paul J; Nobre, Anna C

    2014-06-24

    Gamma band oscillations arise in neuronal networks of interconnected GABAergic interneurons and excitatory pyramidal cells. A previous study found a correlation between visual gamma peak frequency, as measured with magnetoencephalography, and resting GABA levels, as measured with magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), in 12 healthy volunteers. If true, this would allow studies in clinical populations testing modulation of this relationship, but this finding has not been replicated. We addressed this important question by measuring gamma oscillations and GABA, as well as glutamate, in 50 healthy volunteers. Visual gamma activity was evoked using an established gratings paradigm, and we applied a beamformer spatial filtering technique to extract source-reconstructed gamma peak frequency and amplitude from the occipital lobe. We determined gamma peak frequency and amplitude from the location with maximal activation and from the location of the MRS voxel to assess the relationship of GABA with gamma. Gamma peak frequency was estimated from the highest value of the raw spectra and by a Gaussian fit to the spectra. MRS data were acquired from occipital cortex. We did not replicate the previously found correlation between gamma peak frequency and GABA concentration. Calculation of a Bayes factor provided strong evidence in favor of the null hypothesis. We also did not find a correlation between gamma activity and glutamate or between gamma and the ratio of GABA/glutamate. Our results suggest that cortical gamma oscillations do not have a consistent, demonstrable relationship to excitatory/inhibitory network activity as proxied by MRS measurements of GABA and glutamate. PMID:24927588

  4. Prospects for gamma ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The Solar Maximum Mission and the Gamma Ray Experiment aboard the SMM spacecraft are discussed. Mission plans for interplanetary probes are also discussed. The Gamma Ray observatory and its role in future gamma ray astronomy is highlighted. It is concluded that gamma ray astronomy will be of major importance in the development of astronomical models and in the development of comsological theory.

  5. The gamma-ray observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    An overview is given of the Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO) mission. Detection of gamma rays and gamma ray sources, operations using the Space Shuttle, and instruments aboard the GRO, including the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE), the Oriented Scintillation Spectrometer Experiment (OSSE), the Imaging Compton Telescope (COMPTEL), and the Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) are among the topics surveyed.

  6. Fermi GBM Observations of Terrestrial Gamma Flashes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.; Briggs, M. S.; Fishman, G. J.; Bhat, P. N.; Paciesas, W. S.; Preece, R.; Kippen, R. M.; von Kienlin, A.; Dwyer, J. R.; Smith, D. M.; Holzworth, R.

    2010-01-01

    In its first two years of operation, the Fermi Gamma Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) has observed more than 77 Terrestrial Gamma Flashes (TGFs). The thick Bismuth Germanate (BGO) detectors are excellent for TGF spectroscopy, having a high probability of recording the full energy of an incident photon, spanning a broad energy range from 150 keV to 40 MeV, and recording a large number of photons per TGF. Correlations between GBM TGF triggers and lightning sferics detected with the World-Wide Lightning Location Network indicate that TGFs and lightning are simultaneous to within tens of microseconds. The energy spectra of some TGFs have strong 511 keV positron annihilation lines, indicating that these TGFs contain a large fraction of positrons

  7. Long lived gamma emitting radionuclides in incense.

    PubMed

    Alrefae, Tareq

    2013-10-01

    A study of long-lived gamma emitters in incense was performed. The incense samples originated from seven different countries, and the investigated radionuclides were Ra, Ra, and K. Gamma spectroscopy revealed the presence of all three investigated radionuclides in all samples. Interestingly, the activity concentrations revealed a clear bimodal distribution that distinguished samples that were natural incense from others that were processed incense. The activity concentrations in the latter group were found to be one order of magnitude greater than in the former group. Consequently, the estimated annual effective dose from the latter group was one order of magnitude higher than that of the former group. Nonetheless, the doses from both groups were found to be some three orders of magnitude less than the average worldwide exposure to inhaled natural radionuclides. This finding suggests the radiological safety of incense for the investigated radionuclides.

  8. Gamma-ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramaty, R.; Lingenfelter, R. E.

    1982-01-01

    Cosmic gamma rays, the physical processes responsible for their production and the astrophysical sites from which they were seen are reported. The bulk of the observed gamma ray emission is in the photon energy range from about 0.1 MeV to 1 GeV, where observations are carried out above the atmosphere. There are also, however, gamma ray observations at higher energies obtained by detecting the Cerenkov light produced by the high energy photons in the atmosphere. Gamma ray emission was observed from sources as close as the Sun and the Moon and as distant as the quasar 3C273, as well as from various other galactic and extragalactic sites. The radiation processes also range from the well understood, e.g. energetic particle interactions with matter, to the still incompletely researched, such as radiation transfer in optically thick electron positron plasmas in intense neutron star magnetic fields.

  9. Gamma ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paciesas, William S.

    1991-01-01

    Miscellaneous tasks related to the development of the Bursts and Transient Source Experiment on the Gamma Ray Observatory and to analysis of archival data from balloon flight experiments were performed. The results are summarized and relevant references are included.

  10. Gamma ray line astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramaty, R.

    1984-01-01

    The interpretations and implications of the astrophysical observations of gamma-ray lines are reviewed. At the Galactic Center e(+)-e(-) pairs from a compact object produce an annihilation line that shows no redshift, indicating an annihilation site far removed from this object. In the jets of SS433, gamma-ray lines are produced by inelastic excitations, probably in dust grains, although line emission from fusion reactions has also been considered. Observations of diffuse galactic line emission reveal recently synthesized radioactive aluminum in the interstellar medium. In gamma-ray bursts, redshifted pair annihilation lines are consistent with a neutron star origin for the bursts. In solar flares, gamma-ray line emission reveals the prompt acceleration of protons and nuclei, in close association with the flare energy release mechanism.

  11. Dynamic gamma knife radiosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luan, Shuang; Swanson, Nathan; Chen, Zhe; Ma, Lijun

    2009-03-01

    Gamma knife has been the treatment of choice for various brain tumors and functional disorders. Current gamma knife radiosurgery is planned in a 'ball-packing' approach and delivered in a 'step-and-shoot' manner, i.e. it aims to 'pack' the different sized spherical high-dose volumes (called 'shots') into a tumor volume. We have developed a dynamic scheme for gamma knife radiosurgery based on the concept of 'dose-painting' to take advantage of the new robotic patient positioning system on the latest Gamma Knife C™ and Perfexion™ units. In our scheme, the spherical high dose volume created by the gamma knife unit will be viewed as a 3D spherical 'paintbrush', and treatment planning reduces to finding the best route of this 'paintbrush' to 'paint' a 3D tumor volume. Under our dose-painting concept, gamma knife radiosurgery becomes dynamic, where the patient moves continuously under the robotic positioning system. We have implemented a fully automatic dynamic gamma knife radiosurgery treatment planning system, where the inverse planning problem is solved as a traveling salesman problem combined with constrained least-square optimizations. We have also carried out experimental studies of dynamic gamma knife radiosurgery and showed the following. (1) Dynamic gamma knife radiosurgery is ideally suited for fully automatic inverse planning, where high quality radiosurgery plans can be obtained in minutes of computation. (2) Dynamic radiosurgery plans are more conformal than step-and-shoot plans and can maintain a steep dose gradient (around 13% per mm) between the target tumor volume and the surrounding critical structures. (3) It is possible to prescribe multiple isodose lines with dynamic gamma knife radiosurgery, so that the treatment can cover the periphery of the target volume while escalating the dose for high tumor burden regions. (4) With dynamic gamma knife radiosurgery, one can obtain a family of plans representing a tradeoff between the delivery time and the

  12. Gamma ray camera

    SciTech Connect

    Robbins, C.D.; Wang, S.

    1980-09-09

    An anger gamma ray camera is improved by the substitution of a gamma ray sensitive, proximity type image intensifier tube for the scintillator screen in the anger camera, the image intensifier tube having a negatively charged flat scintillator screen and a flat photocathode layer and a grounded, flat output phosphor display screen all of the same dimension (Unity image magnification) and all within a grounded metallic tube envelope and having a metallic, inwardly concaved input window between the scintillator screen and the collimator.

  13. Gamma ray optics

    SciTech Connect

    Jentschel, M.; Guenther, M. M.; Habs, D.; Thirolf, P. G.

    2012-07-09

    Via refractive or diffractive scattering one can shape {gamma} ray beams in terms of beam divergence, spot size and monochromaticity. These concepts might be particular important in combination with future highly brilliant gamma ray sources and might push the sensibility of planned experiments by several orders of magnitude. We will demonstrate the experimental feasibility of gamma ray monochromatization on a ppm level and the creation of a gamma ray beam with nanoradian divergence. The results are obtained using the inpile target position of the High Flux Reactor of the ILL Grenoble and the crystal spectrometer GAMS. Since the refractive index is believed to vanish to zero with 1/E{sup 2}, the concept of refractive optics has never been considered for gamma rays. The combination of refractive optics with monochromator crystals is proposed to be a promising design. Using the crystal spectrometer GAMS, we have measured for the first time the refractive index at energies in the energy range of 180 - 2000 keV. The results indicate a deviation from simple 1/E{sup 2} extrapolation of X-ray results towards higher energies. A first interpretation of these new results will be presented. We will discuss the consequences of these results on the construction of refractive optics such as lenses or refracting prisms for gamma rays and their combination with single crystal monochromators.

  14. Gamma-ray luminosity and photon index evolution of FSRQ blazars and contribution to the gamma-ray background

    SciTech Connect

    Singal, J.; Ko, A.; Petrosian, V.

    2014-05-10

    We present the redshift evolutions and distributions of the gamma-ray luminosity and photon spectral index of flat spectrum radio quasar (FSRQ) type blazars, using non-parametric methods to obtain the evolutions and distributions directly from the data. The sample we use for analysis consists of almost all FSRQs observed with a greater than approximately 7σ detection threshold in the first-year catalog of the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope's Large Area Telescope, with redshifts as determined from optical spectroscopy by Shaw et al. We find that FSQRs undergo rapid gamma-ray luminosity evolution, but negligible photon index evolution, with redshift. With these evolutions accounted for we determine the density evolution and luminosity function of FSRQs and calculate their total contribution to the extragalactic gamma-ray background radiation, resolved and unresolved, which is found to be 16(+10/–4)%, in agreement with previous studies.

  15. Development of the NPL gamma-ray spectrometer NANA for traceable nuclear decay and structure studies.

    PubMed

    Lorusso, G; Shearman, R; Regan, P H; Judge, S M; Bell, S; Collins, S M; Larijani, C; Ivanov, P; Jerome, S M; Keightley, J D; Lalkovski, S; Pearce, A K; Podolyak, Zs

    2016-03-01

    We present a brief report on the progress towards the construction of the National Nuclear Array (NANA), a gamma-ray coincidence spectrometer for discrete-line nuclear structure and decay measurements. The proposed spectrometer will combine a gamma-ray energy resolution of approximately 3% at 1MeV with sub-nanosecond timing discrimination between successive gamma rays in mutually coincident decay cascades. We also review a number of recent measurements using coincidence fast-timing gamma-ray spectroscopy for nuclear structure studies, which have helped to inform the design criteria for the NANA spectrometer.

  16. Design of a compact spectrometer for high-flux MeV gamma-ray beams

    SciTech Connect

    Corvan, D. J. Sarri, G.; Zepf, M.

    2014-06-15

    A novel design for a compact gamma-ray spectrometer is presented. The proposed system allows for spectroscopy of high-flux multi-MeV gamma-ray beams with MeV energy resolution in a compact design. In its basic configuration, the spectrometer exploits conversion of gamma-rays into electrons via Compton scattering in a low-Z material. The scattered electron population is then spectrally resolved using a magnetic spectrometer. The detector is shown to be effective for gamma-ray energies between 3 and 20 MeV. The main properties of the spectrometer are confirmed by Monte Carlo simulations.

  17. Design of a compact spectrometer for high-flux MeV gamma-ray beams.

    PubMed

    Corvan, D J; Sarri, G; Zepf, M

    2014-06-01

    A novel design for a compact gamma-ray spectrometer is presented. The proposed system allows for spectroscopy of high-flux multi-MeV gamma-ray beams with MeV energy resolution in a compact design. In its basic configuration, the spectrometer exploits conversion of gamma-rays into electrons via Compton scattering in a low-Z material. The scattered electron population is then spectrally resolved using a magnetic spectrometer. The detector is shown to be effective for gamma-ray energies between 3 and 20 MeV. The main properties of the spectrometer are confirmed by Monte Carlo simulations.

  18. Instrument Requirements for Type Ia Supernova Gamma-Ray Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leising, M.; Milne, P.; Lara, J.; The, L.

    2004-12-01

    Thermonuclear supernovae are widely used as distance indicators, which yields profound implications, yet details of their progenitor systems and explosion physics remain elusive. It has been argued for thirty-five years that these thoroughly radioactive objects can be understood through detailed gamma-ray line studies, but despite twenty years of gamma-ray instruments in orbit, no Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) has been detected in gamma-ray lines. Still the great promise of gamma-ray studies of SN Ia remains, but the instrument requirements, especially on line sensitivity, are substantial. Finally, a second-generation gamma-ray spectrometer, known now as the Advanced Compton Telescope, is being planned. Considering current SN Ia models of various types, including deflagrations, delayed detonations, and sub-Chandrasekhar-mass detonations, we outline the gamma-ray instrument requirements, especially line flux sensitivity and energy resolution, needed to discriminate among the possible models. We consider realistic SN Ia rates and distributions in space, plausible observing intervals and durations, and the information available from both gamma-ray photometry and spectroscopy. For example, we find that a wide-field compton telescope with energy resolution E/Δ E= 100 in a scanning mode would require broad line sensitivity of 7×10-7 cm-2 s-1 at 847 keV to distinguish deflagration models from delayed detonation models at the rate of one per year.

  19. Measurement of the {sup 241}Am({gamma},n){sup 240}Am reaction in the giant dipole resonance region

    SciTech Connect

    Tonchev, A. P.; Howell, C. R.; Hutcheson, A.; Kwan, E.; Raut, R.; Rusev, G.; Tornow, W.; Hammond, S. L.; Huibregtse, C.; Kelley, J. H.; Kawano, T.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.

    2010-11-15

    The photodisintegration cross section of the radioactive nucleus {sup 241}Am has been obtained using activation techniques and monoenergetic {gamma}-ray beams from the HI{gamma}S facility. The induced activity of {sup 240}Am produced via the {sup 241}Am({gamma},n) reaction was measured in the energy interval from 9 to 16 MeV utilizing high-resolution {gamma}-ray spectroscopy. The experimental data for the {sup 241}Am({gamma},n) reaction in the giant dipole resonance energy region are compared with statistical nuclear-model calculations.

  20. ESR study of gamma irradiated Nylon3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çatiker, Efkan; Güven, Olgun; Özarslan, Özdemir; Chipara, Mircea

    2013-03-01

    Nylon3 (poly-β-alanine) gamma irradiated in nitrogen was investigated by Electron Spin Resonance Spectroscopy to elucidate the type of radicals generated, their relative abundance, conversion into other radicalic species and their room temperature stability. Two types of radiation induced primary radicals have been detected. One of them (R1) occurs by hydrogen abstraction from methylene group next to the carbonyl group, while the other (R2) by hydrogen abstraction from methylene group next to amide group. R1 is observed to be converted into an alkoxy radical (R3). Decay kinetics of the radicals in nitrogen was also examined and decay mechanisms have been proposed for each radical.

  1. Polycrystalline gamma plutonium's elastic moduli versus temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Migliori, Albert; Betts, J; Trugman, A; Mielke, C H; Mitchell, J N; Ramos, M; Stroe, I

    2009-01-01

    Resonant ultrasound spectroscopy was used to measure the elastic properties of pure polycrystalline {sup 239}Pu in the {gamma} phase. Shear and longitudinal elastic moduli were measured simultaneously and the bulk modulus was computed from them. A smooth, linear, and large decrease of all elastic moduli with increasing temperature was observed. They calculated the Poisson ratio and found that it increases from 0.242 at 519 K to 0.252 at 571 K. These measurements on extremely well characterized pure Pu are in agreement with other reported results where overlap occurs.

  2. Hypernuclear spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    F. Garibaldi, O. Hashimoto, J.J. LeRose, P. Markowitz, S.N. Nakamura, J. Reinhold, L. Tang

    2011-06-01

    A program of hypernuclear spectroscopy experiments encompassing many hypernuclei has been undertaken in both Halls A and C using complimentary approaches. Spectra with sub-MeV resolution have been obtained for Li, B, and N in Hall A, while results from Hall C include He, B, and Al with new data still under analysis for He, Li, Be, B and V. High resolution and high precision in the determination of the single Λ binding energy at various shell levels has been the key success of these experiments using the (e,e'K+) reaction to produce Λ hypernuclei.

  3. Laser Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollberg, Leo; Bergquist, James Charles; Kasevich, Mark A.

    2008-04-01

    Degenerate gases. Probing vortex pair sizes in the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless regime on a two-dimensional lattice of Bose-Einstein condensates / V. Schweikhard ... [et al.]. Interacting Bose-Einstein condensates in random potentials / P. Bouyer ... [et al.]. Towards quantum magnetism with ultracold atoms in optical lattices / I. Bloch -- Precision measurement and fundamental physics. T-violation and the search for a permanent electric dipole moment of the mercury atom / E. N. Fortson -- Quantum information and control I. Quantum information processing and ramsey spectroscopy with trapped ions / C. F. Roos ... [et al.]. Quantum non-demolition counting of photons in a cavity / S. Haroche ... [et al.] -- Ultra-fast control and spectroscopy. Frequency-Comb- assisted mid-infrared spectroscopy / P. de Natale ... [et al.] -- Precision measurement and applications. Precision gravity tests by atom interferometry / G. M. Tino ... [et al.] -- Novel spectroscopic applications. On a variation of the proton-electron mass ratio / W. Ubachs ... [et al.] -- Quantum information and control II. Quantum interface between light and atomic ensembles / H. Krauter ... [et al.] -- Degenerate Fermi gases. An atomic Fermi gas near a P-wave Feshbach resonance / D. S. Jin, J. P. Gaebler and J. T. Stewart. Bragg scattering of correlated atoms from a degenerate Fermi gas / R. J. Ballagh, K. J. Challis and C. W. Gardiner -- Spectroscopy and control of atoms and molecules. Stark and Zeeman deceleration of neutral atoms and molecules / S. D. Hogan ... [et al.]. Generation of coherent, broadband and tunable soft x-ray continuum at the leading edge of the driver laser pulse / A. Jullien ... [et al.]. Controlling neural atoms and photons with optical conveyor belts and ultrathin optical fibers / D. Meschede. W. Alt and A. Rauschenbeutel -- Spectroscopy on the small scale. Wide-field cars-microscopy / C. Heinrich ... [et al.]. Atom nano-optics and nano-lithography / V. I. Balykin ... [et al

  4. Gamma ray camera

    DOEpatents

    Perez-Mendez, V.

    1997-01-21

    A gamma ray camera is disclosed for detecting rays emanating from a radiation source such as an isotope. The gamma ray camera includes a sensor array formed of a visible light crystal for converting incident gamma rays to a plurality of corresponding visible light photons, and a photosensor array responsive to the visible light photons in order to form an electronic image of the radiation therefrom. The photosensor array is adapted to record an integrated amount of charge proportional to the incident gamma rays closest to it, and includes a transparent metallic layer, photodiode consisting of a p-i-n structure formed on one side of the transparent metallic layer, and comprising an upper p-type layer, an intermediate layer and a lower n-type layer. In the preferred mode, the scintillator crystal is composed essentially of a cesium iodide (CsI) crystal preferably doped with a predetermined amount impurity, and the p-type upper intermediate layers and said n-type layer are essentially composed of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H). The gamma ray camera further includes a collimator interposed between the radiation source and the sensor array, and a readout circuit formed on one side of the photosensor array. 6 figs.

  5. Gamma ray camera

    DOEpatents

    Perez-Mendez, Victor

    1997-01-01

    A gamma ray camera for detecting rays emanating from a radiation source such as an isotope. The gamma ray camera includes a sensor array formed of a visible light crystal for converting incident gamma rays to a plurality of corresponding visible light photons, and a photosensor array responsive to the visible light photons in order to form an electronic image of the radiation therefrom. The photosensor array is adapted to record an integrated amount of charge proportional to the incident gamma rays closest to it, and includes a transparent metallic layer, photodiode consisting of a p-i-n structure formed on one side of the transparent metallic layer, and comprising an upper p-type layer, an intermediate layer and a lower n-type layer. In the preferred mode, the scintillator crystal is composed essentially of a cesium iodide (CsI) crystal preferably doped with a predetermined amount impurity, and the p-type upper intermediate layers and said n-type layer are essentially composed of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H). The gamma ray camera further includes a collimator interposed between the radiation source and the sensor array, and a readout circuit formed on one side of the photosensor array.

  6. Abstracts of papers to be presented at the fifth symposium on x- and gamma-ray sources and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    The program and abstracts of papers are presented. Topics include radiation sources, radiation detectors, mathematical models and data analysis, gamma-ray spectroscopy, instrumentation, applications of x-ray fluorescence, PIXE, and x-ray absorption. (ACR)

  7. -G gamma A gamma-Thalassemia and gamma-chain variants in Chinese newborn babies.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Y T; Huang, S Z; Nakatsuji, T; Huisman, T H

    1985-03-01

    The occurrence of gamma-chain abnormal hemoglobins and of gamma-thalassemia in Chinese newborns was evaluated through analyses of the Hb F of over 1,100 babies and of the DNA from one baby and his parents. Gene mapping data identified this baby as a homozygote for -G gamma A gamma-thalassemia, which is caused by a deletion of about 5 kb due to an unequal crossing-over between the -G gamma- and -A gamma- genes. This condition is the same as that observed in Indian and Japanese babies [2,3]. Its gene frequency among babies from the Shanghai area was 0.012. A previously unrecognized G gamma chain variant, Hb F-Shanghai or alpha 2 G gamma 266(E10)Lys----Arg, was observed in one newborn. This variant was not detected by conventional techniques but only by high performance liquid chromatography, as the G gamma 66 Lys and G gamma 66 Arg chains had slightly different chromatographic mobilities. Lys at position gamma 66 participates in contacts with the heme group, and its substitution by another amino acid residue might interfere with physiochemical and/or functional properties. No other gamma-chain variants have been detected except the well-known A gamma T or F-Sardinia chain (f.A gamma T = 0.076).

  8. Neutron-capture gamma-ray data for obtaining elemental abundances from planetary spectra.

    SciTech Connect

    Reedy, Robert; Frankle, S. C.

    2001-01-01

    Determination of elemental abundances is a top scientific priority of most planetary missions. Gamma-ray spectroscopy is an excellent method to determine elemental abundances using gamma rays made by nuclear reactions induced by cosmic-ray particles and by the decay of radioactive nuclides [Re73,Re78]. Many important planetary gamma rays are made by neutron-capture reactions. However, much of the data for the energies and intensities of neutron-capture gamma rays in the existing literature [e.g. Lo81] are poor [RF99,RF00]. With gamma-ray spectrometers having recently returned data from Lunar Prospector and NEAR and soon to be launch to Mars, there is a need for good data for neutron-capture gamma rays.

  9. Deformation-induced {alpha}{sub 2} {yields} {gamma} phase transformation in TiAl alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.L.; Lu, W.; Sun Dai; He, L.L.; Ye, H.Q.

    2010-11-15

    Deformation-induced {alpha}{sub 2} {yields} {gamma} phase transformation in high Nb containing TiAl alloys was investigated using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HREM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The dislocations appearing at the tip of deformation-induced {gamma} plate (DI-{gamma}) and the stacking sequence change of the {alpha}{sub 2} matrix were two key evidences for determining the occurrence of the deformation-induced {alpha}{sub 2} {yields} {gamma} phase transformation. Compositional analysis revealed that the product phase of the room-temperature transformation was not standard {gamma} phase; on the contrary, the product phase of the high-temperature transformation was standard {gamma} phase.

  10. Measurement of the gamma gamma* --> eta and gamma gamma* --> eta' transition form factors

    SciTech Connect

    del Amo Sanchez et al, P.

    2011-02-07

    We study the reactions e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -} {eta}{sup (/)} in the single-tag mode and measure the {gamma}{gamma}* {yields} {eta}{sup (/)} transition form factors in the momentum transfer range from 4 to 40 GeV{sup 2}. The analysis is based on 469 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected at PEP-II with the BABAR detector at e{sup +}e{sup -} center-of-mass energies near 10.6 GeV.

  11. Gamma-ray bursts.

    PubMed

    Gehrels, Neil; Mészáros, Péter

    2012-08-24

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are bright flashes of gamma rays coming from the cosmos. They occur roughly once per day, typically last for tens of seconds, and are the most luminous events in the universe. More than three decades after their discovery, and after pioneering advances from space and ground experiments, they still remain mysterious. The launch of the Swift and Fermi satellites in 2004 and 2008 brought in a trove of qualitatively new data. In this Review, we survey the interplay between these recent observations and the theoretical models of the prompt GRB emission and the subsequent afterglow. PMID:22923573

  12. Gamma camera purchasing.

    PubMed

    Wells, C P; Buxton-Thomas, M

    1995-03-01

    The purchase of a new gamma camera is a major undertaking and represents a long-term commitment for most nuclear medicine departments. The purpose of tendering for gamma cameras is to assess the best match between the requirements of the clinical department and the equipment available and not necessarily to buy the 'best camera' [1-3]. After many years of drawing up tender specifications, this paper tries to outline some of the traps and pitfalls of this potentially perilous, although largely rewarding, exercise. PMID:7770241

  13. The U.S. Spectrum X Gamma Coordination Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, William R.

    1999-01-01

    Spectrum-X-Gamma (SXG) provides for US participation in a first-class international x-ray mission. Despite launch delays, SXG will provide unique scientific opportunities due to its capability for all-sky monitoring, polarimetry, high resolution spectroscopy, and broad wavelength range-from the ultraviolet (TAUVEX and FUVITA), through the x-ray (SODART and JET-X), to the hard x-ray (MART), and gamma-ray burst detectors. Before describing our completed work, we review the unique properties of SXG and provide some examples of the scientific importance of SXG in the Chandra, XMM, and ASTRO-E era.

  14. Gamma ray facilities at the University of Maryland cyclotron. [data acquisition and radiation measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hornyak, W. F.

    1978-01-01

    A special beam line was set up in a separate shielded experimental room to provide a low background station for gamma-ray measurements at the University of Maryland cyclotron. The transmitted beam leaving the target is gathered in by a magnetic quadrupole lens located 1.8 m further downstream and focused on a Faraday cup located on the far side of the 2.5 m thick concrete shielding wall of the experimental room. A software computer program permits timing information ot be obtained using the cyclotron beam fine structure as a time reference for the observed gamma-ray events. Measurements indicate a beam fine structure width of less than 1.2 nanoseconds repeated, for example, in the case of 140 MeV alpha particles every 90 nanoseconds. Twelve contiguous time channels of adjustable width may be set as desired with reference to the RF signal. This allows the creation of 12 separate 8192 channel analyzers.

  15. High effective atomic number polymer scintillators for gamma ray spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Cherepy, Nerine Jane; Sanner, Robert Dean; Payne, Stephen Anthony; Rupert, Benjamin Lee; Sturm, Benjamin Walter

    2014-04-15

    A scintillator material according to one embodiment includes a bismuth-loaded aromatic polymer having an energy resolution at 662 keV of less than about 10%. A scintillator material according to another embodiment includes a bismuth-loaded aromatic polymer having a fluor incorporated therewith and an energy resolution at 662 keV of less than about 10%. Additional systems and methods are also presented.

  16. Combining {gamma}-ray and particle spectroscopy in Cologne

    SciTech Connect

    Pickstone, S. G.; Derya, V.; Endres, J.; Hennig, A.; Mayer, J.; Netterdon, L.; Pascu, S.; Sauerwein, A.; Scholz, P.; Spieker, M.; Streit, T.-M.; Zilges, A.

    2013-06-10

    To gain additional information on nuclear structure, the new silicon-detector array SONIC, consisting of up to eight {Delta}E-E telescopes, was installed inside the existing HPGe-detector array HORUS in Cologne. Its main purpose is the study of inelastic scattering using p-, d- and {alpha}-beams of a 10 MV Tandem accelerator. The array has already been tested with two experiments.

  17. Gamma-ray spectroscopy of the ^238U shape isomer.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauschild, K.; Bauer, R. W.; Becker, J. A.; Bernstein, L. A.; Britt, H. C.; Younes, W.; Fotiades, N.

    1997-04-01

    The γ--rays de--exciting the fission isomers ^236U and ^238U are very different despite similar excitation energies, lifetimes and low--lying yrast structures. The predominant γ--ray decay branch for ^236U^m is a 1.783 MeV E1 transition (J. Schirmer, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 63), 2196 (1989); and Refs. therein., while ^238U^m is depopulated by a 2.513 MeV E2 γ-ray (J. Kantele, et al., Phys. Rev. C 29), 1693 (1984); and Refs. therein.. Approximately 65% of the γ--branch de-exciting ^238U^m remains to be identified. To determine the multipolarity of the remaining γ-branch out of ^238U^m we used the Gammasphere array at LBNL and the ^238U(d,pn) reaction at Ed = 20 MeV. A search for excited states in the 2^nd well has also been conducted. Preliminary results will be presented, and the γ--decay of the shape isomers discussed in context with the recent A ~190 SD decay--out results (T. L. Khoo, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 76), 1583 (1996); A. Lopez-Martens, et al., Phys. Lett. B380, 18 (1996); K. Hauschild, et al., submitted to Phys. Rev. C (1996)..

  18. Gamma ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paciesas, William S.

    1991-01-01

    Miscellaneous tasks related to the development of the Burst and Transient Source Experiment on the Gamma Ray Observatory and to collection, analysis, and interpretation of data from the MSFC Very Low Frequency transient monitoring program were performed. The results are summarized and relevant references are included.

  19. Gamma ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paciesas, William S.

    1992-01-01

    Miscellaneous tasks related to mission operations and data analysis for the Burst and Transient Source Experiment on the Gamma Ray Observatory, to collection, analysis, and interpretation of data from the Marshall Space Flight Center Very Low Frequency transient monitoring program, and to compilation and analysis of induced radioactivity data were performed. The results are summarized and relevant references are included.

  20. Celestial gamma ray study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michelson, Peter F.

    1995-01-01

    This report documents the research activities performed by Stanford University investigators as part of the data reduction effort and overall support of the Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) on the Compton Observatory. This report is arranged chronologically, with each subsection detailing activities during roughly a one year period of time, beginning in June 1991.

  1. Gamma ray astronomy in perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    A brief overview of the development of gamma ray astronomy is presented. Gamma ray telescopes and other optical measuring instruments are highlighted. Emphasis is placed on findings that were unobtainable before gamma ray astronomy. Information on evolution of the solar system, the relationship of the solar system to the galaxy, and the composition of interstellar matter is discussed.

  2. pi {sup 0} {yields} gamma gamma to NLO in CHPT

    SciTech Connect

    Jose Goity

    2003-05-01

    The pi 0 {yields} gamma gamma width is determined to next to leading order in the combined chiral and 1/Nc expansions. It is shown that corrections driven by chiral symmetry breaking produce an enhancement of about 4.5% with respect to the width calculated in terms of the chiral-limit amplitude leading to Gamma{sub {pi}}{sup 0} {yields} {gamma}{gamma} = 8.1 +/- 0.08 MeV. This theoretical prediction will be tested via pi 0 Primakoff production by the PRIMEX experiment at Jefferson Lab.

  3. Baryon spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Klempt, Eberhard; Richard, Jean-Marc

    2010-04-15

    About 120 baryons and baryon resonances are known, from the abundant nucleon with u and d light-quark constituents up to the {Xi}{sub b}{sup -}=(bsd), which contains one quark of each generation and to the recently discovered {Omega}{sub b}{sup -}=(bss). In spite of this impressively large number of states, the underlying mechanisms leading to the excitation spectrum are not yet understood. Heavy-quark baryons suffer from a lack of known spin parities. In the light-quark sector, quark-model calculations have met with considerable success in explaining the low-mass excitations spectrum but some important aspects such as the mass degeneracy of positive-parity and negative-parity baryon excitations remain unclear. At high masses, above 1.8 GeV, quark models predict a very high density of resonances per mass interval which is not yet observed. In this review, issues are identified discriminating between different views of the resonance spectrum; prospects are discussed on how open questions in baryon spectroscopy may find answers from photoproduction and electroproduction experiments which are presently carried out in various laboratories.

  4. Amateur spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavin, M. V.

    1998-06-01

    (The 1997 Presidential Address to the British Astronomical Association.) Auguste Comte is remembered for an unfortunate remark. In 1825 he said the chemical composition of stars would never be revealed. Within a decade or so the heart of the atom was being explored in remote stars through the science of spectroscopy. In simplistic terms one can regard the atom as a miniature solar system, but with the novel option that electrons (representing planets) having the ability to 'jump' from one orbit to another. In 'falling' to a lower orbit a photon of light of precise wavelength is released to travel outwards. When the electron 'jumps' to a higher orbit a photon of light is absorbed. This is taking place on a vast scale which we observe as lines in the spectrum - their position and prominence relates to the particular atomic element, temperature and pressure within the stellar atmosphere. It is beyond the scope of this Address to discuss the various processes that affect spectra, or to provide a mathematical explanation which can be found elsewhere. In any case the lack of a deep understanding does not preclude enjoyable or useful observations. Methods and results from amateurs conducting such observations are discussed in this paper.

  5. Multiple gamma lines from semi-annihilation

    SciTech Connect

    D'Eramo, Francesco; McCullough, Matthew; Thaler, Jesse E-mail: mccull@mit.edu

    2013-04-01

    Hints in the Fermi data for a 130 GeV gamma line from the galactic center have ignited interest in potential gamma line signatures of dark matter. Explanations of this line based on dark matter annihilation face a parametric tension since they often rely on large enhancements of loop-suppressed cross sections. In this paper, we pursue an alternative possibility that dark matter gamma lines could arise from ''semi-annihilation'' among multiple dark sector states. The semi-annihilation reaction ψ{sub i}ψ{sub j} → ψ{sub k}γ with a single final state photon is typically enhanced relative to ordinary annihilation ψ{sub i}ψ-bar {sub i} → γγ into photon pairs. Semi-annihilation allows for a wide range of dark matter masses compared to the fixed mass value required by annihilation, opening the possibility to explain potential dark matter signatures at higher energies. The most striking prediction of semi-annihilation is the presence of multiple gamma lines, with as many as order N{sup 3} lines possible for N dark sector states, allowing for dark sector spectroscopy. A smoking gun signature arises in the simplest case of degenerate dark matter, where a strong semi-annihilation line at 130 GeV would be accompanied by a weaker annihilation line at 173 GeV. As a proof of principle, we construct two explicit models of dark matter semi-annihilation, one based on non-Abelian vector dark matter and the other based on retrofitting Rayleigh dark matter.

  6. The GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope for precision gamma-ray emission investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topchiev, N. P.; Galper, A. M.; Bonvicini, V.; Adriani, O.; Aptekar, R. L.; Arkhangelskaja, I. V.; Arkhangelskiy, A. I.; Bakaldin, A. V.; Bergstrom, L.; Berti, E.; Bigongiari, G.; Bobkov, S. G.; Boezio, M.; Bogomolov, E. A.; Bonechi, L.; Bongi, M.; Bottai, S.; Castellini, G.; Cattaneo, P. W.; Cumani, P.; Dalkarov, O. D.; Dedenko, G. L.; De Donato, C.; Dogiel, V. A.; Finetti, N.; Gascon, D.; Gorbunov, M. S.; Gusakov, Yu V.; Hnatyk, B. I.; Kadilin, V. V.; Kaplin, V. A.; Kaplun, A. A.; Kheymits, M. D.; Korepanov, V. E.; Larsson, J.; Leonov, A. A.; Loginov, V. A.; Longo, F.; Maestro, P.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Martinez, M.; Men'shenin, A. L.; Mikhailov, V. V.; Mocchiutti, E.; Moiseev, A. A.; Mori, N.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Naumov, P. Yu; Papini, P.; Paredes, J. M.; Pearce, M.; Picozza, P.; Rappoldi, A.; Ricciarini, S.; Runtso, M. F.; Ryde, F.; Serdin, O. V.; Sparvoli, R.; Spillantini, P.; Stozhkov, Yu I.; Suchkov, S. I.; Taraskin, A. A.; Tavani, M.; Tiberio, A.; Tyurin, E. M.; Ulanov, M. V.; Vacchi, A.; Vannuccini, E.; Vasilyev, G. I.; Ward, J. E.; Yurkin, Yu T.; Zampa, N.; Zirakashvili, V. N.; Zverev, V. G.

    2016-02-01

    The GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope with excellent angular and energy resolutions is designed to search for signatures of dark matter in the fluxes of gamma-ray emission and electrons + positrons. Precision investigations of gamma-ray emission from Galactic Center, Crab, Vela, Cygnus, Geminga, and other regions will be performed, as well as diffuse gamma-ray emission, along with measurements of high-energy electron + positron and nuclei fluxes. Furthermore, it will study gamma-ray bursts and gamma-ray emission from the Sun during periods of solar activity. The GAMMA-400 energy range is expected to be from ∼20 MeV up to TeV energies for gamma rays, up to 10 TeV for electrons + positrons, and up to 1015 eV for cosmic-ray nuclei. For 100-GeV gamma rays, the GAMMA-400 angular resolution is ∼0.01° and energy resolution is ∼1% the proton rejection factor is ∼5x105. GAMMA-400 will be installed onboard the Russian space observatory.

  7. Topics in gamma ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramaty, R.; Lingenfelter, R. E.

    1986-01-01

    Observations of gamma rays from solar flares, gamma ray bursts, the Galactic center, galactic nucleosynthesis, SS433, and Cygnus X-3, and their effects on astrophysical problems are discussed. It is observed that gamma ray spectra from solar flares are applicable to the study of particle acceleration and confinement and the determination of chemical abundances in the solar atmosphere. The gamma ray lines from the compact galactic object SS433 are utilized to examine the acceleration of jets, and analysis of the gamma ray lines of Cygnus X-3 reveal that particles can be accelerated in compact sources to ultrahigh energies.

  8. Automatic Energy Calibration of Gamma-Ray Spectrometers

    2011-09-19

    The software provides automatic method for calibrating the energy scale of high-purity germanium (HPGe) and scintillation gamma-ray spectrometers, using natural background radiation as the source of calibration gamma rays. In field gamma-ray spectroscopy, radioactive check sources may not be available; temperature changes can shift detector electronic gain and scintillator light output; and a user’s experience and training may not include gamma-ray energy calibration. Hence, an automated method of calibrating the spectrometer using natural background wouldmore » simplify its operation, especially by technician-level users, and by enhancing spectroscopic data quality, it would reduce false detections. Following a typically one-minute count of background gamma-rays, the measured spectrum is searched for gamma-ray peaks, producing a list of peak centroids, in channels1. Next, the ratio algorithm attempts to match the peak centroids found in the search to a user-supplied list of calibration gamma-ray energies. Finally, if three or more calibration energies have been matched to peaks, the energy equation parameters are determined by a least-squares fit2, and the spectrum has been energy-calibrated. The ratio algorithm rests on the repeatable but irregular spacing of the background gammaray energies—together they form a unique set of ratios, when normalized to the highest energy calibration gamma ray; so too, the corresponding peak centroids in the spectrum. The algorithm matches energy ratios to peak centroid ratios, to determine which peak matches a given calibration energy.« less

  9. Automatic Energy Calibration of Gamma-Ray Spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    2011-09-19

    The software provides automatic method for calibrating the energy scale of high-purity germanium (HPGe) and scintillation gamma-ray spectrometers, using natural background radiation as the source of calibration gamma rays. In field gamma-ray spectroscopy, radioactive check sources may not be available; temperature changes can shift detector electronic gain and scintillator light output; and a user’s experience and training may not include gamma-ray energy calibration. Hence, an automated method of calibrating the spectrometer using natural background would simplify its operation, especially by technician-level users, and by enhancing spectroscopic data quality, it would reduce false detections. Following a typically one-minute count of background gamma-rays, the measured spectrum is searched for gamma-ray peaks, producing a list of peak centroids, in channels1. Next, the ratio algorithm attempts to match the peak centroids found in the search to a user-supplied list of calibration gamma-ray energies. Finally, if three or more calibration energies have been matched to peaks, the energy equation parameters are determined by a least-squares fit2, and the spectrum has been energy-calibrated. The ratio algorithm rests on the repeatable but irregular spacing of the background gammaray energies—together they form a unique set of ratios, when normalized to the highest energy calibration gamma ray; so too, the corresponding peak centroids in the spectrum. The algorithm matches energy ratios to peak centroid ratios, to determine which peak matches a given calibration energy.

  10. Pulsed Photofission Delayed Gamma Ray Detection for Nuclear Material Identification

    SciTech Connect

    John Kavouras; Xianfei Wen; Daren R. Norman; Dante R. Nakazawa; Haori Yang

    2012-11-01

    Innovative systems with increased sensitivity and resolution are in great demand to detect diversion and to prevent misuse in support of nuclear materials management for the U.S. fuel cycle. Nuclear fission is the most important multiplicative process involved in non-destructive active interrogation. This process produces the most easily recognizable signature for nuclear materials. High-energy gamma rays can also excite a nucleus and cause fission through a process known as photofission. After photofission reactions, delayed signals are easily distinguishable from the interrogating radiation. Linac-based, advanced inspection techniques utilizing the fission signals after photofission have been extensively studied for homeland security applications. Previous research also showed that a unique delayed gamma ray energy spectrum exists for each fissionable isotope. Isotopic composition measurement methods based on delayed gamma ray spectroscopy will be the primary focus of this work.

  11. Future directions in experimental gamma ray astronomy. [technology assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haymes, R. C.

    1978-01-01

    Better vehicles and instruments are needed if gamma ray spectroscopy in astrophysics and cosmology is to advance. A gamma ray observatory will (1) permit long-term observations of selected sources to measure their variability and to achieve high sensitivity; (2) measure periods in days or weeks; and (3) assess the entire sky to observe various predicted sources, to measure the energy spectrum, and to map the isotropy of the cosmic ray background over larger collecting areas (of the order of a square meter). Conventional and unconventional instruments must cover the energy range from 0.1 MeV to 20 MeV with improved sensitivity. Angular resolution must be improved one degree or more to study discrete X-ray sources in the galactic center. Actively collimated detectors, improved double Compton instruments, and gamma ray correlators to actively synthesize the absolute energy spectrum of the sky protons are discussed as well as the need for scientific balloons.

  12. Nuclear-spectroscopy problems studied with neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Raman, S.

    1982-01-01

    Nuclear spectroscopy with neutrons continues to have a major impact on the progress of nuclear science. Neutrons, being uncharged, are particularly useful for the study of low energy reactions. Recent advances in time-of-flight spectroscopy, as well as in the gamma ray spectroscopy following neutron capture, have permitted precision studies of unbound and bound nuclear levels and related phenomena. By going to new energy domains, by using polarized beams and targets, through the invention of new kinds of detectors, and through the general improvement in beam quantity and quality, new features of nuclear structure and reactions have been obtained that are not ony interesting per se but are also grist for old and new theory mills. The above technical advances have opened up new opportunities for further discoveries.

  13. Solubility Enhancement of Steviol Glycosides and Characterization of Their Inclusion Complexes with Gamma-Cyclodextrin

    PubMed Central

    Upreti, Mani; Strassburger, Ken; Chen, You L.; Wu, Shaoxiong; Prakash, Indra

    2011-01-01

    Steviol glycosidesrebaudioside (reb) A, C and D have low aqueous solubilities. To improve their aqueous solubilities, inclusion complex of steviol glycosides, reb A, C and D and gamma cyclodextrin were prepared by freeze drying method and further characterized by means of differential scanning calorimetry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy. The effect of gamma cyclodextrin on chemical shifts of the steviol glycosides was also studied in proton NMR experiments as well as in solid state 13C CP/MAS NMR experiments. These results indicated that the steviol glycosides were clearly in inclusion complex formation with the gamma cyclodextrin which also results in solubility enhancement of these steviol glycosides. Phase solubility studies showed that amounts of soluble reb A, C and D increased with increasing amounts of gamma cyclodextrin indicating formation of 1:1 stoichiometric and higher order inclusion complexes. PMID:22174615

  14. Bismuth- and lithium-loaded plastic scintillators for gamma and neutron detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherepy, Nerine J.; Sanner, Robert D.; Beck, Patrick R.; Swanberg, Erik L.; Tillotson, Thomas M.; Payne, Stephen A.; Hurlbut, Charles R.

    2015-04-01

    Transparent plastic scintillators based on polyvinyltoluene (PVT) have been fabricated with high loading of bismuth carboxylates for gamma spectroscopy, and with lithium carboxylates for neutron detection. When activated with a combination of standard fluors, 2,5-diphenyloxazole (PPO) and tetraphenylbutadiene (TPB), gamma light yields with 15 wt% bismuth tripivalate of 5000 Ph/MeV are measured. A PVT plastic formulation including 30 wt% lithium pivalate and 30 wt% PPO offers both pulse shape discrimination, and a neutron capture peak at ~400 keVee. In another configuration, a bismuth-loaded PVT plastic is coated with ZnS(6Li) paint, permitting simultaneous gamma and neutron detection via pulse shape discrimination with a figure-of-merit of 3.8, while offering gamma spectroscopy with energy resolution of R(662 keV)=15%.

  15. UNIDENTIFIED {gamma}-RAY SOURCES: HUNTING {gamma}-RAY BLAZARS

    SciTech Connect

    Massaro, F.; Ajello, M.; D'Abrusco, R.; Paggi, A.; Tosti, G.; Gasparrini, D.

    2012-06-10

    One of the main scientific objectives of the ongoing Fermi mission is unveiling the nature of unidentified {gamma}-ray sources (UGSs). Despite the major improvements of Fermi in the localization of {gamma}-ray sources with respect to the past {gamma}-ray missions, about one-third of the Fermi-detected objects are still not associated with low-energy counterparts. Recently, using the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer survey, we discovered that blazars, the rarest class of active galactic nuclei and the largest population of {gamma}-ray sources, can be recognized and separated from other extragalactic sources on the basis of their infrared (IR) colors. Based on this result, we designed an association method for the {gamma}-ray sources to recognize if there is a blazar candidate within the positional uncertainty region of a generic {gamma}-ray source. With this new IR diagnostic tool, we searched for {gamma}-ray blazar candidates associated with the UGS sample of the second Fermi {gamma}-ray LAT catalog (2FGL). We found that our method associates at least one {gamma}-ray blazar candidate as a counterpart to each of 156 out of 313 UGSs analyzed. These new low-energy candidates have the same IR properties as the blazars associated with {gamma}-ray sources in the 2FGL catalog.

  16. Unidentified Gamma-Ray Sources: Hunting Gamma-Ray Blazars

    SciTech Connect

    Massaro, F.; D'Abrusco, R.; Tosti, G.; Ajello, M.; Gasparrini, A.Paggi.D.

    2012-04-02

    One of the main scientific objectives of the ongoing Fermi mission is unveiling the nature of the unidentified {gamma}-ray sources (UGSs). Despite the large improvements of Fermi in the localization of {gamma}-ray sources with respect to the past {gamma}-ray missions, about one third of the Fermi-detected objects are still not associated to low energy counterparts. Recently, using the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) survey, we discovered that blazars, the rarest class of Active Galactic Nuclei and the largest population of {gamma}-ray sources, can be recognized and separated from other extragalactic sources on the basis of their infrared (IR) colors. Based on this result, we designed an association method for the {gamma}-ray sources to recognize if there is a blazar candidate within the positional uncertainty region of a generic {gamma}-ray source. With this new IR diagnostic tool, we searched for {gamma}-ray blazar candidates associated to the UGS sample of the second Fermi {gamma}-ray catalog (2FGL). We found that our method associates at least one {gamma}-ray blazar candidate as a counterpart each of 156 out of 313 UGSs analyzed. These new low-energy candidates have the same IR properties as the blazars associated to {gamma}-ray sources in the 2FGL catalog.

  17. Gamma ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paciesas, William S.

    1994-01-01

    The Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) is one of four instruments on the Compton observatory which was launched by the space shuttle Atlantis on April 5, 1991. As of mid-March, 1994, BATSE detected more than 925 cosmic gamma-ray bursts and more than 725 solar flares. Pulsed gamma rays have been detected from at least 16 sources and emission from at least 28 sources (including most of the pulsed sources) has been detected by the earth occultation technique. UAH participation in BATSE is extensive but can be divided into two main areas, operations and data analysis. The daily BATSE operations tasks represent a substantial level of effort and involve a large team composed of MSFC personnel as well as contractors such as UAH. The scientific data reduction and analysis of BATSE data is also a substantial level of effort in which UAH personnel have made significant contributions.

  18. Gamma ray collimator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casanova, Edgar J. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A gamma ray collimator including a housing having first and second sections is disclosed. The first section encloses a first section of depleted uranium which is disposed for receiving and supporting a radiation emitting component such as cobalt 60. The second section encloses a depleted uranium member which is provided with a conical cut out focusing portion disposed in communication with the radiation emitting element for focusing the emitted radiation to the target.

  19. CEBAF at higher energies: Working group report on hadron spectroscopy and production

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, T. |; Napolitano, J.

    1994-04-01

    This report summarizes topics in hadron spectroscopy and production which could be addressed at CEBAF with an energy upgrade to E{sub {gamma}} = 8 GeV and beyond. The topics discussed include conventional meson and baryon spectrocopy, spectroscopy of exotica (especially molecules and hybrids), CP and CPT tests using {phi} mesons, and new detector and accelerator options.

  20. Gamma-Ray Localization of Terrestrial Gamma-Ray Flashes

    SciTech Connect

    Marisaldi, M.; Labanti, C.; Fuschino, F.; Bulgarelli, A.; Trifoglio, M.; Di Cocco, G.; Gianotti, F.; Argan, A.; De Paris, G.; Trois, A.; Del Monte, E.; Costa, E.; Di Persio, G.; Donnarumma, I.; Evangelista, Y.; Feroci, M.; Lazzarotto, F.; Pacciani, L.; Rubini, A.; Sabatini, S.

    2010-09-17

    Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) are very short bursts of high-energy photons and electrons originating in Earth's atmosphere. We present here a localization study of TGFs carried out at gamma-ray energies above 20 MeV based on an innovative event selection method. We use the AGILE satellite Silicon Tracker data that for the first time have been correlated with TGFs detected by the AGILE Mini-Calorimeter. We detect 8 TGFs with gamma-ray photons of energies above 20 MeV localized by the AGILE gamma-ray imager with an accuracy of {approx}5-10 deg. at 50 MeV. Remarkably, all TGF-associated gamma rays are compatible with a terrestrial production site closer to the subsatellite point than 400 km. Considering that our gamma rays reach the AGILE satellite at 540 km altitude with limited scattering or attenuation, our measurements provide the first precise direct localization of TGFs from space.

  1. An Investigation of 154Eu as a High-Precision Multi-{gamma}-Ray Intensity Calibration Standard for Detector Arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Kulp, W.D.; Wood, J.L.; Krane, K. S.; Loats, J.; Schmelzenbach, P.D.; Stapels, C.J.; Norman, E.B.

    2005-05-24

    The decay of 154Eu has been studied using {gamma}-ray singles and {gamma} - {gamma} coincidence spectroscopy with an array of Compton-suppressed Ge detectors. Particular attention to coincidence summing in the analysis, with consideration of detailed decay cascades and angular correlation effects, suggests that previous studies have overlooked necessary corrections. It is concluded that 154Eu provides 26 {gamma} rays that can be used for relative efficiency calibrations from 120 to 1600 keV at the 0.7% precision level and that this precision could be improved in the future.

  2. Chiroptical Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurst, Jerome E.

    1995-09-01

    A brief review of the literature, and Chemical and Engineering News in particular, reveals that the determination and use of optical activity is of increasing importance in today's commercial and research laboratories. The classical technique is to measure [alpha]D using a manual or recording polarimeter to provide a single value, the specific rotation at 589 nm. A spectropolarimeter can be used to determine optical activity through the UV-Visible spectrum (Optical Rotatory Dispersion [ORD]). At wavelengths far removed from electronic absorption bands, optical activity arises from circular birefringence, or the difference in the refractive index for left- and right-circularly polarized light; i.e., nL - nR does not equal zero for chiral materials. If the optical activity is measured through an absorption band, complex behavior is observed (a Cotton Effect curve). At an absorption band, chiral materials exhibit circular dichroism (CD), or a difference in the absorption of left- and right-circularly polarized light; epsilon L minus epsilon R does not equal zero. If the spectropolarimeter is set for the measurement of CD spectra, one observes what appears to be a UV-Vis spectrum except that some absorption bands are positive while others may be negative. Just as enantiomers have specific rotations that are equal and opposite at 589 nm (sodium D line), rotations are equal and opposite at all wavelengths, and CD measurements are equal and opposite at all wavelengths. Figure 1 shows the ORD curves for the enantiomeric carvones while Figure 2 contains the CD curves. The enantiomer of carvone that has the positive [alpha]D is obtained from caraway seeds and is known to have the S-configuration while the R-enantiomer is found in spearmint oil. Figure 1. ORD of S-(+)- and R-(-)-carvones Figure 2. CD of S-(+)- and R-(-)-carvones While little can be done to correlate stereochemistry with [alpha]D values, chiroptical spectroscopy (ORD and/or CD) often can be used to assign

  3. Neural networks for nuclear spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, P.E.; Kangas, L.J.; Hashem, S.; Kouzes, R.T.

    1995-12-31

    In this paper two applications of artificial neural networks (ANNs) in nuclear spectroscopy analysis are discussed. In the first application, an ANN assigns quality coefficients to alpha particle energy spectra. These spectra are used to detect plutonium contamination in the work environment. The quality coefficients represent the levels of spectral degradation caused by miscalibration and foreign matter affecting the instruments. A set of spectra was labeled with quality coefficients by an expert and used to train the ANN expert system. Our investigation shows that the expert knowledge of spectral quality can be transferred to an ANN system. The second application combines a portable gamma-ray spectrometer with an ANN. In this system the ANN is used to automatically identify, radioactive isotopes in real-time from their gamma-ray spectra. Two neural network paradigms are examined: the linear perception and the optimal linear associative memory (OLAM). A comparison of the two paradigms shows that OLAM is superior to linear perception for this application. Both networks have a linear response and are useful in determining the composition of an unknown sample when the spectrum of the unknown is a linear superposition of known spectra. One feature of this technique is that it uses the whole spectrum in the identification process instead of only the individual photo-peaks. For this reason, it is potentially more useful for processing data from lower resolution gamma-ray spectrometers. This approach has been tested with data generated by Monte Carlo simulations and with field data from sodium iodide and Germanium detectors. With the ANN approach, the intense computation takes place during the training process. Once the network is trained, normal operation consists of propagating the data through the network, which results in rapid identification of samples. This approach is useful in situations that require fast response where precise quantification is less important.

  4. Measurement of. gamma gamma. psi final states in psi' decay

    SciTech Connect

    Himel, T.M.; Abrams, G.S.; Alam, M.S.; Blocker, C.A.; Boyarski, A.M.; Breidenbach, M.; Burke, D.L.; Carithers, W.C.; Chinowsky, W.; Coles, M.W.; Cooper, S.; Dieterle, W.E.; Dillon, J.B.; Dorenbosch, J.; Dorfan, J.M.; Eaton, M.W.; Feldman, G.J.; Franklin, M.E.B.; Gidal, G.; Goldhaber, G.; Hanson, G.; Hayes, K.G.; Hitlin, D.G.; Hollebeek, R.J.; Innes, W.R.; Jaros, J.A.; Jenni, P.; Johnson, A.D.; Kadyk, J.A.; Lankford, A.J.; Larsen, R.R.; Levi, M.E.; Lueth, V.; Millikan, R.E.; Nelson, M.E.; Pang, C.Y.; Patrick, J.F.; Perl, M.L.; Richter, B.; Roussarie, A.; Scharre, D.L.; Schindler, R.H.; Schwitters, R.F.; Siegrist, J.L.; Strait, J.; Taureg, H.; Tonutti, M.; Trilling, G.H.; Vella, E.N.; Vidal, R.A.; Videau, I.; Weiss, J.M.; Zaccone, H.

    1980-04-07

    The decay mode psi' ..-->.. ..gamma gamma..psi has been studied with the Mark-II detector at SPEAR. New measurements of branching ratios for decays of the type psi' ..-->.. ..gamma..chi, chi ..-->.. ..gamma..psi involving known chi states are presented. The existence of a chi state of mass near 3455 MeV/c/sup 2/ produced in this decay chain is not confirmed, and the upper limit (90% confidence level) of the product of branching ratios is measured to be 0.13%. A new decay mode, psi' ..-->.. ..pi../sup 0/psi, which violates isospin conservation is observed with branching ratio (0.15 +- 0.06)%.

  5. Effect of high doses of gamma radiation on the functional characteristics of amniotic membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Rita; Purohit, Sumita; Chacharkar, M. P.

    2007-06-01

    The effect of different doses of gamma radiation viz. 25, 36 and 50 kGy on the chemical and functional characteristics of the amniotic membrane was studied. The change in the chemical structure of amniotic membranes at high doses of gamma irradiation was evaluated by means of Infrared (IR) Spectroscopy. The degradation of amnion on irradiation with gamma rays could produce a relative variation in IR absorption troughs. This kind of variation was absent in the samples irradiated to doses of 25, 36 and 50 kGy indicating no qualitative change in the material property of amnion. No significant differences in the water absorption capacity and water vapour transmission rate of amniotic membranes irradiated to different doses were observed. Impermeability of the amniotic membranes to different microorganisms was also not affected at high doses of gamma radiation. Gamma irradiation at doses of 25-50 kGy did not evoke undesirable changes in the functional properties of the amniotic membrane.

  6. Analysis of the gamma spectra of the uranium, actinium, and thorium decay series

    SciTech Connect

    Momeni, M.H.

    1981-09-01

    This report describes the identification of radionuclides in the uranium, actinium, and thorium series by analysis of gamma spectra in the energy range of 40 to 1400 keV. Energies and absolute efficiencies for each gamma line were measured by means of a high-resolution germanium detector and compared with those in the literature. A gamma spectroscopy method, which utilizes an on-line computer for deconvolution of spectra, search and identification of each line, and estimation of activity for each radionuclide, was used to analyze soil and uranium tailings, and ore.

  7. Thick target measurement of the 40Ca(alpha,gamma)44Ti reaction rate

    SciTech Connect

    Sheets, S A; Burke, J T; Scielzo, N D; Phair, L; Bleuel, D; Norman, E B; Grant, P G; Hurst, A M; Tumey, S; Brown, T A; Stoyer, M

    2009-02-06

    The thick-target yield for the {sup 40}Ca({alpha},{gamma}){sup 44}Ti reaction has been measured for E{sub beam} = 4.13, 4.54, and 5.36 MeV using both an activation measurement and online {gamma}-ray spectroscopy. The results of the two measurements agree. From the measured yield a reaction rate is deduced that is smaller than statistical model calculations. This implies a smaller {sup 44}Ti production in supernova compared to recently measured {sup 40}Ca({alpha},{gamma}){sup 44}Ti reaction rates.

  8. Observational techniques for solar flare gamma-rays, hard X-rays, and neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Robert P.

    1989-01-01

    The development of new instrumentation and techniques for solar hard X-ray, gamma ray and neutron observations from spacecraft and/or balloon-borne platforms is examined. The principal accomplishments are: (1) the development of a two segment germanium detector which is near ideal for solar hard X-ray and gamma ray spectroscopy; (2) the development of long duration balloon flight techniques and associated instrumentation; and (3) the development of innovative new position sensitive detectors for hard X-ray and gamma rays.

  9. Gamma-ray tracking: Characterisation of the AGATA symmetric prototype detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boston, A. J.; Boston, H. C.; Cresswell, J. R.; Dimmock, M. R.; Nelson, L.; Nolan, P. J.; Rigby, S.; Lazarus, I.; Simpson, J.; Medina, P.; Santos, C.; Parisel, C.; AGATA Collaboration

    2007-08-01

    Each major technical advance in gamma-ray detection devices has resulted in significant new insights into the structure of atomic nuclei. The next major step in gamma-ray spectroscopy involves achieving the goal of a 4pi ball of Germanium detectors by using the technique of gamma-ray energy tracking in electrically segmented Germanium crystals. The resulting spectrometer will have an unparalleled level of detection power for nuclear electromagnetic radiation. Collaborations have been established in Europe (AGATA) [J. Simpson, Acta Phys. Pol. B 36 (2005) 1383. [1

  10. Gamma Oscillations and Visual Binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Peter A.; Kim, Jong Won

    2006-03-01

    At the root of visual perception is the mechanism the brain uses to analyze features in a scene and bind related ones together. Experiments show this process is linked to oscillations of brain activity in the 30-100 Hz gamma band. Oscillations at different sites have correlation functions (CFs) that often peak at zero lag, implying simultaneous firing, even when conduction delays are large. CFs are strongest between cells stimulated by related features. Gamma oscillations are studied here by modeling mm-scale patchy interconnections in the visual cortex. Resulting predictions for gamma responses to stimuli account for numerous experimental findings, including why oscillations and zero-lag synchrony are associated, observed connections with feature preferences, the shape of the zero-lag peak, and variations of CFs with attention. Gamma waves are found to obey the Schroedinger equation, opening the possibility of cortical analogs of quantum phenomena. Gamma instabilities are tied to observations of gamma activity linked to seizures and hallucinations.

  11. Sky and Elemental Planetary Mapping Via Gamma Ray Emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roland, John M.

    2011-01-01

    Low-energy gamma ray emissions ((is) approximately 30keV to (is) approximately 30MeV) are significant to astrophysics because many interesting objects emit their primary energy in this regime. As such, there has been increasing demand for a complete map of the gamma ray sky, but many experiments to do so have encountered obstacles. Using an innovative method of applying the Radon Transform to data from BATSE (the Burst And Transient Source Experiment) on NASA's CGRO (Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory) mission, we have circumvented many of these issues and successfully localized many known sources to 0.5 - 1 deg accuracy. Our method, which is based on a simple 2-dimensional planar back-projection approximation of the inverse Radon transform (familiar from medical CAT-scan technology), can thus be used to image the entire sky and locate new gamma ray sources, specifically in energy bands between 200keV and 2MeV which have not been well surveyed to date. Samples of these results will be presented. This same technique can also be applied to elemental planetary surface mapping via gamma ray spectroscopy. Due to our method's simplicity and power, it could potentially improve a current map's resolution by a significant factor.

  12. QUASI-STAR JETS AS UNIDENTIFIED GAMMA-RAY SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Czerny, Bozena; Sikora, Marek; Janiuk, Agnieszka

    2012-08-10

    Gamma-ray catalogs contain a considerable amount of unidentified sources. Many of these are located out of the Galactic plane and therefore may have extragalactic origin. Here we assume that the formation of massive black holes in galactic nuclei proceeds through a quasi-star stage and consider the possibility of jet production by such objects. Those jets would be the sources of collimated synchrotron and Compton emission, extending from radio to gamma rays. The expected lifetimes of quasi-stars are of the order of million of years while the jet luminosities, somewhat smaller than that of quasar jets, are sufficient to account for the unidentified gamma-ray sources. The jet emission dominates over the thermal emission of a quasi-star in all energy bands, except when the jet is not directed toward an observer. The predicted synchrotron emission peaks in the IR band, with the flux close to the limits of the available IR all sky surveys. The ratio of the gamma-ray flux to the IR flux is found to be very large ({approx}60), much larger than in BL Lac objects but reached by some radio-loud quasars. On the other hand, radio-loud quasars show broad emission lines while no such lines are expected from quasi-stars. Therefore, the differentiation between various scenarios accounting for the unidentified gamma-ray sources will be possible at the basis of the photometry and spectroscopy of the IR/optical counterparts.

  13. gamma. -hexachlorocyclohexane (. gamma. -HCH) activates washed rabbit platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Lalau-Keraly, C.; Delautier, D.; Benveniste, J.; Puiseux-Dao, S.

    1986-03-01

    In guinea-pig macrophages, ..gamma..-HCH triggers activation of the phosphatidylinositol cycle and Ca/sup 2 +/ mobilization. Since these two biochemical events are also involved in platelet activation, the authors examined the effects of ..gamma..-HCH on washed rabbit platelets. Release of /sup 14/C-serotonin (/sup 14/C-5HT) and ATP from platelets prelabelled with /sup 14/C-5HT was measured simultaneously with aggregation. ..gamma..-HCH induced shape-change, aggregation and release reaction of platelets. Maximal aggregation (89 arbitrary units, AU), was observed using 170 ..mu..M ..gamma..-HCH, and was associated with 38.1 +/- 6.9% and 161 +/- 48 nM for /sup 14/C-5HT and ATP release respectively (mean +/- 1 SD, n=3). Using 80 ..mu..M ..gamma..-HCH yielded 18 AU, 12.8 +/- 1.0% and 27 +/- 14 nM for aggregation, C-5HT and ATP release respectively (n=3). No effect was observed with 40 ..mu.. M ..gamma..-HCH. Aspirin (ASA), a cyclooxygenase blocker, did not affect ..gamma..-HCH-induced platelet activation. Apyrase (APY), an ADP scavenger, inhibited by 90% aggregation induced by 170 ..mu..M ..gamma..-HCH and slightly inhibited (15%) the /sup 14/C-5HT release. In the presence of both ASA and APY, 96% inhibition of aggregation and 48% inhibition of /sup 14/C-5HT release were observed. Thus, ..gamma..-HCH induced platelet activation in a dose-dependent manner ADP, but not cyclooxygenase-dependent arachidonate metabolites, is involved in ..gamma..-HCH-induced aggregation, whereas, both appear to play a role in ..gamma..-HCH-induced release reaction.

  14. E6 Gamma Decay

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, B. Alex; Rae, W. D. M.

    2011-05-06

    Rare electric hexacontatetrapole (E6) transitions are studied in the full (f{sub 7/2},f{sub 5/2},p{sub 3/2},p{sub 1/2}) shell-model basis. Comparison of theory to the results from the gamma decay in {sup 53}Fe and from inelastic electron scattering on {sup 52}Cr provides unique and interesting tests of the valence wavefunctions, the models used for energy density functionals and into the origin of effective charge.

  15. Charmonium decays to {gamma}{pi}{sup 0}, {gamma}{eta}, and {gamma}{eta}{sup '}

    SciTech Connect

    Pedlar, T. K.; Xavier, J.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Gao, K. Y.; Hietala, J.; Klein, T.; Poling, R.; Zweber, P.; Dobbs, S.; Metreveli, Z.; Seth, K. K.; Tan, B. J. Y.; Tomaradze, A.; Libby, J.; Martin, L.; Powell, A.; Thomas, C.; Wilkinson, G.; Mendez, H.; Ge, J. Y.

    2009-06-01

    Using data acquired with the CLEO-c detector at the CESR e{sup +}e{sup -} collider, we measure branching fractions for J/{psi}, {psi}(2S), and {psi}(3770) decays to {gamma}{pi}{sup 0}, {gamma}{eta}, and {gamma}{eta}{sup '}. Defining R{sub n}{identical_to}B[{psi}(nS){yields}{gamma}{eta}]/B[{psi}(nS){yields}{gamma}{eta}{sup '}], we obtain R{sub 1}=(21.1{+-}0.9)% and, unexpectedly, an order of magnitude smaller limit, R{sub 2}<1.8% at 90% C.L. We also use J/{psi}{yields}{gamma}{eta}{sup '} events to determine branching fractions of improved precision for the five most copious {eta}{sup '} decay modes.

  16. Lunar Elemental Abundances from Gamma-Ray and Neutron Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reedy, R. C.; Vaniman, D. T.

    1999-01-01

    The determination of elemental abundances is one of the highest science objectives of most lunar missions. Such multi-element abundances, ratios, or maps should include results for elements that are diagnostic or important in lunar processes, including heat-producing elements (such as K and Th), important incompatible elements (Th and rare earth elements), H (for polar deposits and regolith maturity), and key variable elements in major lunar provinces (such as Fe and Ti in the maria). Both neutron and gamma-ray spectroscopy can be used to infer elemental abundances; the two complement each other. These elemental abundances need to be determined with high accuracy and precision from measurements such as those made by the gamma-ray spectrometer (GRS) and neutron spectrometers (NS) on Lunar Prospector. As presented here, a series of steps, computer codes, and nuclear databases are needed to properly convert the raw gamma-ray and neutron measurements into good elemental abundances, ratios, and/or maps. Lunar Prospector (LP) is the first planetary mission that has measured neutrons escaping from a planet other than the Earth. The neutron spectrometers on Lunar Prospector measured a wide range of neutron energies. The ability to measure neutrons with thermal (E < 0.1 eV), epithermal (E about equal 0.1 - 1000 eV), and fast (E about 0.1-10 MeV) energies maximizes the scientific return, being especially sensitive to both H (using epithermal neutrons) and thermal-neutron-absorbing elements. Neutrons are made in the lunar surface by the interaction of galactic-cosmic-ray (GCR) particles with the atomic nuclei in the surface. Most neutrons are produced with energies above about 0.1 MeV. The flux of fast neutrons in and escaping from the Moon depends on es the intensity of the cosmic rays (which vary with solar activity) and the elemental composition of the surface. Variations in the elemental composition of the lunar surface can affect the flux of fast neutrons by about 25

  17. Diffuse gamma radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtel, C. E.; Simpson, G. A.; Thompson, D. J.

    1977-01-01

    An examination of the intensity, energy spectrum, and spatial distribution of the diffuse gamma-radiation observed by SAS-2 satellite away from the galactic plane in the energy range above 35 MeV has shown that it consists of two components. One component is generally correlated with galactic latitudes, the atomic hydrogen column density was deduced from 21 cm measurements, and the continuum radio emission, believed to be synchrotron emission. It has an energy spectrum similar to that in the plane and joins smoothly to the intense radiation from the plane. It is therefore presumed to be of galactic origin. The other component is apparently isotropic, at least on a coarse scale, and has a steep energy spectrum. No evidence is found for a cosmic ray halo surrounding the galaxy in the shape of a sphere or oblate spheroid with galactic dimensions. Constraints for a halo model with significantly larger dimensions are set on the basis of an upper limit to the gamma-ray anisotropy.

  18. New data on ({gamma}, n), ({gamma}, 2n), and ({gamma}, 3n) partial photoneutron reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Varlamov, V. V. Ishkhanov, B. S.; Orlin, V. N.; Peskov, N. N.; Stepanov, M. E.

    2013-11-15

    Systematic discrepancies between the results of various experiments devoted to determining cross sections for total and partial photoneutron reactions are analyzed by using objective criteria of reliability of data in terms of the transitional photoneutron-multiplicity function F{sub i} = {sigma}({gamma}, in)/{sigma}({gamma}, xn), whose values for i = 1, 2, 3, ... cannot exceed by definition 1.00, 0.50, 0.33, ..., respectively. It was found that the majority of experimental data on the cross sections obtained for ({gamma}, n), ({gamma}, 2n), and ({gamma}, 3n) reactions with the aid of methods of photoneutron multiplicity sorting do not meet objective criteria (in particular, F{sub 2} > 0.50 for a vast body of data). New data on the cross sections for partial reactions on {sup 181}Ta and {sup 208}Pb nuclei were obtained within a new experimental-theoretical method that was proposed for the evaluation of cross sections for partial reactions and in which the experimental neutron yield cross section {sigma}{sup expt}({gamma}, xn) = {sigma}({gamma}, n) + 2{sigma}({gamma}, 2n) + 3{sigma}({gamma}, 3n) + ..., which is free from problems associated with determining neutron multiplicities, is used simultaneously with the functions F{sub i}{sup theor} calculated within a combined model of photonuclear reactions.

  19. Measuring the radium quartet (228Ra, 226Ra, 224Ra, 223Ra) in seawater samples using gamma spectrometry.

    PubMed

    van Beek, P; Souhaut, M; Reyss, J-L

    2010-07-01

    Radium isotopes are widely used in marine studies (eg. to trace water masses, to quantify mixing processes or to study submarine groundwater discharge). While 228Ra and 226Ra are usually measured using gamma spectrometry, short-lived Ra isotopes (224Ra and 223Ra) are usually measured using a Radium Delayed Coincidence Counter (RaDeCC). Here we show that the four radium isotopes can be analyzed using gamma spectrometry. We report 226Ra, 228Ra, 224Ra, 223Ra activities measured using low-background gamma spectrometry in standard samples, in water samples collected in the vicinity of our laboratory (La Palme and Vaccarès lagoons, France) but also in seawater samples collected in the plume of the Amazon river, off French Guyana (AMANDES project). The 223Ra and 224Ra activities determined in these samples using gamma spectrometry were compared to the activities determined using RaDeCC. Activities determined using the two techniques are in good agreement. Uncertainties associated with the 224Ra activities are similar for the two techniques. RaDeCC is more sensitive for the detection of low 223Ra activities. Gamma spectrometry thus constitutes an alternate method for the determination of short-lived Ra isotopes.

  20. Gamma-hadron families and scaling violation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaisser, T. K.; Stanev, T.; Wrotniak, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    For three different interaction models we have simulated gamma-hadron families, including the detector (Pamir emulsion chamber) response. Rates of gamma families, hadrons, and hadron-gamma ratios were compared with experiments.