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Sample records for low-dose ct head-to-head

  1. [Indications for low-dose CT in the emergency setting].

    PubMed

    Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre; Andereggen, Elisabeth; Rutschmann, Olivier; de Perrot, Thomas; Caviezel, Alessandro; Platon, Alexandra

    2009-08-19

    CT delivers a large dose of radiation, especially in abdominal imaging. Recently, a low-dose abdominal CT protocol (low-dose CT) has been set-up in our institution. "Low-dose CT" is almost equivalent to a single standard abdominal radiograph in term of dose of radiation (about one sixth of those delivered by a standard CT). "Low-dose CT" is now used routinely in our emergency service in two main indications: patients with a suspicion of renal colic and those with right lower quadrant pain. It is obtained without intravenous contrast media. Oral contrast is given to patients with suspicion of appendicitis. "Low-dose CT" is used in the frame of well defined clinical algorithms, and does only replace standard CT when it can reach a comparable diagnostic quality.

  2. Low-dose CT via convolutional neural network

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hu; Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Weihua; Liao, Peixi; Li, Ke; Zhou, Jiliu; Wang, Ge

    2017-01-01

    In order to reduce the potential radiation risk, low-dose CT has attracted an increasing attention. However, simply lowering the radiation dose will significantly degrade the image quality. In this paper, we propose a new noise reduction method for low-dose CT via deep learning without accessing original projection data. A deep convolutional neural network is here used to map low-dose CT images towards its corresponding normal-dose counterparts in a patch-by-patch fashion. Qualitative results demonstrate a great potential of the proposed method on artifact reduction and structure preservation. In terms of the quantitative metrics, the proposed method has showed a substantial improvement on PSNR, RMSE and SSIM than the competing state-of-art methods. Furthermore, the speed of our method is one order of magnitude faster than the iterative reconstruction and patch-based image denoising methods. PMID:28270976

  3. Screening for lung cancer with low-dose CT.

    PubMed

    Coche, E

    2008-01-01

    Lung cancer represents the leading cause of cancer-related mortality in the world. In the past, many attempts were made to detect the disease at an early stage and subsequently reduce its mortality. Chest X-ray was abandoned for this purpose. For several years low-dose computed tomography has been introduced as a potential tool for early screening in a high-risk population. As demonstrated in several papers, the task is not easy and researchers are faced with many difficulties. This paper reviews mainly the role of low-dose CT for early cancer screening. Results of past and current trials, controversies related to the high rate of lung nodules, cost-effectiveness, and delivered radiation dose to the patient are presented. Finally some limitations of low dose CT for lung cancer detection are explained.

  4. Head-to-head comparison between (18)F-FDOPA PET/CT and MR/CT angiography in clinically recurrent head and neck paragangliomas.

    PubMed

    Heimburger, Céline; Veillon, Francis; Taïeb, David; Goichot, Bernard; Riehm, Sophie; Petit-Thomas, Julie; Averous, Gerlinde; Cavalcanti, Marcela; Hubelé, Fabrice; Chabrier, Gerard; Namer, Izzie Jacques; Charpiot, Anne; Imperiale, Alessio

    2017-06-01

    Head and neck paragangliomas (HNPGLs) can relapse after primary treatment. Optimal imaging protocols have not yet been established for posttreatment evaluation. The aim of the present study was to assess the diagnostic value of (18)F-FDOPA PET/CT and MR/CT angiography (MRA/CTA) in HNPGL patients with clinical relapse during their follow-up. Sixteen consecutive patients presenting with local pain, tinnitus, dysphagia, hoarse voice, cranial nerve involvement, deafness, or retrotympanic mass appearing during follow-up after the initial treatment of HNPGLs were retrospectively evaluated. Patients underwent both (18)F-FDOPA PET/CT and MRA (15 patents) or CTA (1 patent). Both methods were first assessed under blinded conditions and afterwards correlated. Head and neck imaging abnormalities without histological confirmation were considered true-positive results based on a consensus between radiologists and nuclear physicians and on further (18)F-FDOPA PET/CT and/or MRA. (18)F-FDOPA PET/CT and MRA/CTA were concordant in 14 patients and in disagreement in 2 patients. (18)F-FDOPA PET/CT and MRA/CTA identified, respectively, 12 and 10 presumed recurrent HNPGLs in 12 patients. The two lesions diagnosed by PET/CT only were confirmed during follow-up by otoscopic examination and MRA performed 29 and 17 months later. (18)F-FDOPA PET/CT images were only slightly influenced by the posttreatment sequelae, showing a better interobserver reproducibility than MRA/CTA. Finally, in 2 of the 16 studied patients, (18)F-FDOPA PET/CT detected two additional synchronous primary HNPGLs. (18)F-FDOPA PET/CT is highly sensitive in posttreatment evaluation of patients with HNPGLs, and also offers better interobserver reproducibility than MRA/CTA and whole-body examination. We therefore suggest that (18)F-FDOPA PET/CT is performed as the first diagnostic imaging modality in symptomatic patients with suspicion of HNPGL relapse after primary treatment when (68)Ga-labeled somatostatin analogues are

  5. Adaptively Tuned Iterative Low Dose CT Image Denoising

    PubMed Central

    Hashemi, SayedMasoud; Paul, Narinder S.; Beheshti, Soosan; Cobbold, Richard S. C.

    2015-01-01

    Improving image quality is a critical objective in low dose computed tomography (CT) imaging and is the primary focus of CT image denoising. State-of-the-art CT denoising algorithms are mainly based on iterative minimization of an objective function, in which the performance is controlled by regularization parameters. To achieve the best results, these should be chosen carefully. However, the parameter selection is typically performed in an ad hoc manner, which can cause the algorithms to converge slowly or become trapped in a local minimum. To overcome these issues a noise confidence region evaluation (NCRE) method is used, which evaluates the denoising residuals iteratively and compares their statistics with those produced by additive noise. It then updates the parameters at the end of each iteration to achieve a better match to the noise statistics. By combining NCRE with the fundamentals of block matching and 3D filtering (BM3D) approach, a new iterative CT image denoising method is proposed. It is shown that this new denoising method improves the BM3D performance in terms of both the mean square error and a structural similarity index. Moreover, simulations and patient results show that this method preserves the clinically important details of low dose CT images together with a substantial noise reduction. PMID:26089972

  6. Sinogram smoothing with bilateral filtering for low-dose CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Lifeng; Manduca, Armando; Trzasko, Joshua D.; Khaylova, Natalia; Kofler, James M.; McCollough, Cynthia M.; Fletcher, Joel G.

    2008-03-01

    Optimal noise control is critical for dose reduction in CT. In this work, we investigated the use of a locally-adaptive method for noise reduction in low-dose CT. This method is based upon bilateral filtering, which smoothes the projection data using a weighted average in a local neighborhood, where the weights are determined according to both the spatial proximity and intensity similarity between the center pixel and the neighboring pixels. This filtering is locally adaptive and can preserve important edge information in the sinogram, thus without significantly sacrificing the spatial resolution. It is closely related to anisotropic diffusion, but is significantly faster. More importantly, a CT noise model can be readily incorporated in the filtering and denoising process. We have evaluated the noise-resolution properties of the bilateral filtering in a phantom study and a preliminary patient study with contrast-enhanced abdominal CT exams. The results demonstrated that bilateral filtering can achieve a better noise-resolution tradeoff than a series of commercial reconstruction kernels. This improvement on noise-resolution properties can be used for improving the image quality in low-dose CT and can also be translated to substantial dose reduction.

  7. Adaptively Tuned Iterative Low Dose CT Image Denoising.

    PubMed

    Hashemi, SayedMasoud; Paul, Narinder S; Beheshti, Soosan; Cobbold, Richard S C

    2015-01-01

    Improving image quality is a critical objective in low dose computed tomography (CT) imaging and is the primary focus of CT image denoising. State-of-the-art CT denoising algorithms are mainly based on iterative minimization of an objective function, in which the performance is controlled by regularization parameters. To achieve the best results, these should be chosen carefully. However, the parameter selection is typically performed in an ad hoc manner, which can cause the algorithms to converge slowly or become trapped in a local minimum. To overcome these issues a noise confidence region evaluation (NCRE) method is used, which evaluates the denoising residuals iteratively and compares their statistics with those produced by additive noise. It then updates the parameters at the end of each iteration to achieve a better match to the noise statistics. By combining NCRE with the fundamentals of block matching and 3D filtering (BM3D) approach, a new iterative CT image denoising method is proposed. It is shown that this new denoising method improves the BM3D performance in terms of both the mean square error and a structural similarity index. Moreover, simulations and patient results show that this method preserves the clinically important details of low dose CT images together with a substantial noise reduction.

  8. Gamma regularization based reconstruction for low dose CT.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junfeng; Chen, Yang; Hu, Yining; Luo, Limin; Shu, Huazhong; Li, Bicao; Liu, Jin; Coatrieux, Jean-Louis

    2015-09-07

    Reducing the radiation in computerized tomography is today a major concern in radiology. Low dose computerized tomography (LDCT) offers a sound way to deal with this problem. However, more severe noise in the reconstructed CT images is observed under low dose scan protocols (e.g. lowered tube current or voltage values). In this paper we propose a Gamma regularization based algorithm for LDCT image reconstruction. This solution is flexible and provides a good balance between the regularizations based on l0-norm and l1-norm. We evaluate the proposed approach using the projection data from simulated phantoms and scanned Catphan phantoms. Qualitative and quantitative results show that the Gamma regularization based reconstruction can perform better in both edge-preserving and noise suppression when compared with other norms.

  9. Low-dose techniques in CT-guided interventions.

    PubMed

    Sarti, Marc; Brehmer, William P; Gay, Spencer B

    2012-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT)-guided interventions such as biopsy, drainage, and ablation may be significant sources of radiation exposure in both patients and radiologists. Simple CT techniques to reduce radiation dose may be employed without increasing the procedure time or significantly degrading image quality. To develop low-dose protocols, it is important to understand the key concepts of delivered radiation dose to patients and physicians during CT-guided interventions. Patient dose estimates are easily followed and are provided at CT workstations. Familiarity with dose estimates, which are expressed as CT dose index and dose-length product, is also important. Methods to reduce radiation exposure in patients and physicians include performing proper preprocedure planning and paying careful attention to technique during the planning stage, making use of personal protective equipment, performing CT fluoroscopy intermittently instead of in real time, and optimizing needle visualization. Representative examples of these techniques have resulted in dose reductions of as much as 89%. Alternative imaging technologies that do not use ionizing radiation, such as virtual and ultrasonographic guidance, may also be used to reduce radiation dose. Understanding dose contribution strategies to reduce radiation dose provides a safer, more efficient environment for patients and the radiology team.

  10. Low dose CT perfusion using k-means clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisana, Francesco; Henzler, Thomas; Schönberg, Stefan; Klotz, Ernst; Schmidt, Bernhard; Kachelrieß, Marc

    2016-03-01

    We aim at improving low dose CT perfusion functional parameters maps and CT images quality, preserving quantitative information. In a dynamic CT perfusion dataset, each voxel is measured T times, where T is the number of acquired time points. In this sense, we can think about a voxel as a point in a T-dimensional space, where the coordinates of the voxels would be the values of its time attenuation curve (TAC). Starting from this idea, a k-means algorithm was designed to group voxels in K classes. A modified guided time-intensity profile similarity (gTIPS) filter was implemented and applied only for those voxels belonging to the same class. The approach was tested on a digital brain perfusion phantom as well as on clinical brain and body perfusion datasets, and compared to the original TIPS implementation. The TIPS filter showed the highest CNR improvement, but lowest spatial resolution. gTIPS proved to have the best combination of spatial resolution and CNR improvement for CT images, while k-gTIPS was superior to both gTIPS and TIPS in terms of perfusion maps image quality. We demonstrate k-means clustering analysis can be applied to denoise dynamic CT perfusion data and to improve functional maps. Beside the promising results, this approach has the major benefit of being independent from the perfusion model employed for functional parameters calculation. No similar approaches were found in literature.

  11. Ultra low-dose CT attenuation correction in PET SPM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shyh-Jen; Yang, Bang-Hung; Tsai, Chia-Jung; Yang, Ching-Ching; Lee, Jason J. S.; Wu, Tung-Hsin

    2010-07-01

    The use of CT images for attenuation correction (CTAC) allows significantly shorter scanning time and a high quality noise-free attenuation map compared with conventional germanium-68 transmission scan because at least 10 4 times greater of photon flux would be generated from a CT scan under standard operating condition. However, this CTAC technique would potentially introduce more radiation risk to the patients owing to the higher radiation exposure from CT scan. Statistic parameters mapping (SPM) is a prominent technique in nuclear medicine community for the analysis of brain imaging data. The purpose of this study is to assess the feasibility of low-dose CT (LDCT) and ultra low-dose CT (UDCT) in PET SPM applications. The study was divided into two parts. The first part was to evaluate of tracer uptake distribution pattern and quantity analysis by using the striatal phantom to initially assess the feasibility of AC for clinical purpose. The second part was to examine the group SPM analysis using the Hoffman brain phantom. The phantom study is to simulate the human brain and to reduce the experimental uncertainty of real subjects. The initial studies show that the results of PET SPM analysis have no significant differences between LDCT and UDCT comparing to the current used default CTAC. Moreover, the dose of the LDCT is lower than that of the default CT by a factor of 9, and UDCT can even yield a 42 times dose reduction. We have demonstrated the SPM results while using LDCT and UDCT for PET AC is comparable to those using default CT setting, suggesting their feasibility in PET SPM applications. In addition, the necessity of UDCT in PET SPM studies to avoid excess radiation dose is also evident since most of the subjects involved are non-cancer patients or children and some normal subjects are even served as a comparison group in the experiment. It is our belief that additional attempts to decrease the radiation dose would be valuable, especially for children and

  12. Algorithm-enabled Low-dose Micro-CT Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Han, Xiao; Bian, Junguo; Eaker, Diane R.; Kline, Timothy L.; Sidky, Emil Y.; Ritman, Erik L.; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2013-01-01

    Micro-CT is an important tool in biomedical research and preclinical applications that can provide visual inspection of and quantitative information about imaged small animals and biological samples such as vasculature specimens. Currently, micro-CT imaging uses projection data acquired at a large number (300 – 1000) of views, which can limit system throughput and potentially degrade image quality due to radiation-induced deformation or damage to the small animal or specimen. In this work, we have investigated low-dose micro-CT and its application to specimen imaging from substantially reduced projection data by using a recently developed algorithm, referred to as the adaptive-steepest-descent-projection-onto-convex-sets (ASD-POCS) algorithm, which reconstructs an image through minimizing the image total-variation and enforcing data constraints. To validate and evaluate the performance of the ASD-POCS algorithm, we carried out quantitative evaluation studies in a number of tasks of practical interest in imaging of specimens of real animal organs. The results show that the ASD-POCS algorithm can yield images with quality comparable to that obtained with existing algorithms, while using one-sixth to one quarter of the 361-view data currently used in typical micro-CT specimen imaging. PMID:20977983

  13. Standardization and optimization of CT protocols to achieve low dose.

    PubMed

    Trattner, Sigal; Pearson, Gregory D N; Chin, Cynthia; Cody, Dianna D; Gupta, Rajiv; Hess, Christopher P; Kalra, Mannudeep K; Kofler, James M; Krishnam, Mayil S; Einstein, Andrew J

    2014-03-01

    The increase in radiation exposure due to CT scans has been of growing concern in recent years. CT scanners differ in their capabilities, and various indications require unique protocols, but there remains room for standardization and optimization. In this paper, the authors summarize approaches to reduce dose, as discussed in lectures constituting the first session of the 2013 UCSF Virtual Symposium on Radiation Safety and Computed Tomography. The experience of scanning at low dose in different body regions, for both diagnostic and interventional CT procedures, is addressed. An essential primary step is justifying the medical need for each scan. General guiding principles for reducing dose include tailoring a scan to a patient, minimizing scan length, use of tube current modulation and minimizing tube current, minimizing tube potential, iterative reconstruction, and periodic review of CT studies. Organized efforts for standardization have been spearheaded by professional societies such as the American Association of Physicists in Medicine. Finally, all team members should demonstrate an awareness of the importance of minimizing dose.

  14. Three-minute SPECT/CT is sufficient for the assessment of bone metastasis as add-on to planar bone scintigraphy: prospective head-to-head comparison to 11-min SPECT/CT.

    PubMed

    Zacho, Helle D; Manresa, José A Biurrun; Aleksyniene, Ramune; Ejlersen, June A; Fledelius, Joan; Bertelsen, Henrik; Petersen, Lars J

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study is to assess whether ultra-fast acquisition SPECT/CT (UF-SPECT/CT) can replace standard SPECT/CT (std-SPECT/CT) as "add-on" to whole-body bone scintigraphy (WB-BS) for the investigation of bone metastases. Consecutive cancer patients referred for WB-BS who underwent SPECT/CT in addition to WB-BS were included. Std-SPECT, UF-SPECT, and low-dose CT were performed (std-SPECT: matrix 128 × 128, zoom factor 1, 20 s/view, 32 views; UF-SPECT: identical parameters except for 10 s/view and 16 views, reducing the acquisition time from 11 to 3 min). A consensus diagnosis was reached by two observers for each set of images (WB-BS + standard SPECT/CT or WB-BS + UF-SPECT/CT) using a three-category evaluation scale: M0: no bone metastases; M1: bone metastases; and Me: equivocal findings. Among the 104 included patients, most presented with prostate cancer (n = 71) or breast cancer (n = 28). Using WB-BS + std-SPECT/CT, 71 (68%) patients were classified as M0, 19 (18%) as M1, and 14 (14%) as Me. Excellent agreement was observed between WB-BS + std-SPECT/CT and WB-BS + UF-SPECT/CT using the three-category scale: kappa = 0.91 (95% CI 0.84-0.97). No difference in observer agreement between cancer types was detected. SPECT/CT provided a definitive classification in 90 of 104 cases in which WB-BS was not entirely diagnostic. To investigate potential bone metastases, UF-SPECT/CT can be conducted as add-on to WB-BS to notably reduce the SPECT acquisition time without compromising diagnostic confidence.

  15. Prospective head-to-head comparison of (11)C-choline-PET/MR and (11)C-choline-PET/CT for restaging of biochemical recurrent prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Eiber, Matthias; Rauscher, Isabel; Souvatzoglou, Michael; Maurer, Tobias; Schwaiger, Markus; Holzapfel, Konstantin; Beer, Ambros J

    2017-08-12

    Whole-body integrated (11)C-choline PET/MR might provide advantages compared to (11)C-choline PET/CT for restaging of prostate cancer (PC) due to the high soft-tissue contrast and the use of multiparametric MRI, especially for detection of local recurrence and bone metastases. Ninety-four patients with recurrent PC underwent a single-injection/dual-imaging protocol with contrast-enhanced PET/CT followed by fully diagnostic PET/MR. Imaging datasets were read separately by two reader teams (team 1 and 2) assessing the presence of local recurrence, lymph node and bone metastases in predefined regions using a five-point scale. Detection rates were calculated. The diagnostic performance of PET/CT vs. PET/MR was compared using ROC analysis. Inter-observer and inter-modality variability, radiation exposure, and mean imaging time were evaluated. Clinical follow-up, imaging, and/or histopathology served as standard of reference (SOR). Seventy-five patients qualified for the final image analysis. A total of 188 regions were regarded as positive: local recurrence in 37 patients, 87 regions with lymph node metastases, and 64 regions with bone metastases. Mean detection rate between both readers teams for PET/MR was 84.7% compared to 77.3% for PET/CT (p > 0.05). Local recurrence was identified significantly more often in PET/MR compared to PET/CT by team 1. Lymph node and bone metastases were identified significantly more often in PET/CT compared to PET/MR by both teams. However, this difference was not present in the subgroup of patients with PSA values ≤2 ng/ml. Inter-modality and inter-observer agreement (K > 0.6) was moderate to substantial for nearly all categories. Mean reduction of radiation exposure for PET/MR compared to PET/CT was 79.7% (range, 72.6-86.2%). Mean imaging time for PET/CT was substantially lower (18.4 ± 0.7 min) compared to PET/MR (50.4 ± 7.9 min). (11)C-choline PET/MR is a robust imaging modality for restaging biochemical recurrent PC and

  16. In vivo CT detection of lipid-rich coronary artery atherosclerotic plaques using quantitative histogram analysis: a head to head comparison with IVUS.

    PubMed

    Marwan, Mohamed; Taher, Mohamed Awad; El Meniawy, Khaled; Awadallah, Hany; Pflederer, Tobias; Schuhbäck, Annika; Ropers, Dieter; Daniel, Werner G; Achenbach, Stephan

    2011-03-01

    Coronary atherosclerotic plaque characterisation may contribute to risk stratification for future cardiovascular events. The ability of computed tomography to classify plaques as 'fibrous' or 'lipid-rich' based on their average CT attenuation has been investigated but is fraught with substantial limitations. In this study, we evaluated the potential of analysing the distribution of CT attenuation values measured in Hounsfield Units (HU) within coronary atherosclerotic plaques to classify non-calcified plaques into fibrous and lipid-rich subtypes. Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) served as the gold standard. We evaluated the data sets of 40 patients (30 males, 59±10 years) who had been referred for invasive coronary angiography for clinical reasons and in whom IVUS was performed in at least one coronary vessel. Using dual source CT, coronary CT angiography was performed as a part of a research protocol within 24 h previous to invasive coronary angiography. A contrast-enhanced volume dataset was acquired with retrospective ECG gating (120 kV, 400 mAs/rot, collimation 2 mm×64 mm×0.6 mm, 60-80 ml contrast agent i.v). IVUS was performed using a 40-MHz IVUS catheter (Atlantis, Boston Scientific Corporation, Natick, MA) and motorized pullback at 0.5 mm/s. Fifty five corresponding non-calcified plaques within the coronary artery system were identified in both DSCT and IVUS using bifurcation points as fiducial markers. In DSCT data sets, serial parallel cross-sections (1mm slice thickness) were rendered orthogonally to the centre line of the coronary artery for each of the 55 plaques. For each cross section and each plaque, a histogram of CT attenuation values (increments of 10HU) was determined. The percentage of pixels with a density ≤30 HU was calculated. Using IVUS as the gold standard, plaques were classified as predominantly fibrous (hyperechoic) or predominantly lipid-rich (hypoechoic). 15 predominantly fibrous plaques vs. 40 predominantly lipid-rich plaques were

  17. Personalized low dose CT via variable kVp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hui; Jin, Yannan; Yao, Yangyang; Wu, Mingye; Yan, Ming; Tao, Kun; Yin, Zhye; De Man, Bruno

    2015-03-01

    Computerized Tomography (CT) is a powerful radiographic imaging technology but the health risk due to the exposure of x-ray radiation has drawn wide concern. In this study, we propose to use kVp modulation to reduce the radiation dose and achieve the personalized low dose CT. Two sets of simulation are performed to demonstrate the effectiveness of kVp modulation and the corresponding calibration. The first simulation used the helical body phantom (HBP) that is an elliptical water cylinder with high density bone inserts. The second simulation uses the NCAT phantom to emulate the practical use of kVp modulation approach with region of interest (ROI) selected in the cardiac region. The kVp modulation profile could be optimized view by view based on the knowledge of patient attenuation. A second order correction is applied to eliminate the beam hardening artifacts. To simplify the calibration process, we first generate the calibration vectors for a few representative spectra and then acquire other calibration vectors with interpolation. The simulation results demonstrate the beam hardening artifacts in the images with kVp modulation can be eliminated with proper beam hardening correction. The results also show that the simplification of calibration did not impair the image quality: the calibration with the simplified and the complete vectors both eliminate the artifacts effectively and the results are comparable. In summary, this study demonstrates the feasibility of kVp modulation and gives a practical way to calibrate the high order beam hardening artifacts.

  18. Detection and quantification of coronary atherosclerotic plaque by 64-slice multidetector CT: a systematic head-to-head comparison with intravascular ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulou, Stella-Lida; Neefjes, Lisan A; Schaap, Michiel; Li, Hui-Ling; Capuano, Ermanno; van der Giessen, Alina G; Schuurbiers, Johan C H; Gijsen, Frank J H; Dharampal, Anoeshka S; Nieman, Koen; van Geuns, Robert Jan; Mollet, Nico R; de Feyter, Pim J

    2011-11-01

    We evaluated the ability of 64-slice multidetector computed tomography (MDCT)-derived plaque parameters to detect and quantify coronary atherosclerosis, using intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) as the reference standard. In 32 patients, IVUS and 64-MDCT was performed. The MDCT and IVUS datasets of 44 coronary arteries were co-registered using a newly developed fusion technique and quantitative parameters were derived from both imaging modalities. The threshold of >0.5 mm of maximum wall thickness was used to establish plaque presence on MDCT and IVUS. We analyzed 1364 coregistered 1-mm coronary cross-sections and 255 segments of 5-mm length. Compared with IVUS, 64-MDCT enabled correct detection in 957 of 1109 cross-sections containing plaque (sensitivity 86%). In 180 of 255 cross-sections atherosclerosis was correctly excluded (specificity 71%). On the segmental level, MDCT detected 213 of 220 segments with any atherosclerotic plaque (sensitivity 96%), whereas the presence of any plaque was correctly ruled out in 28 of 32 segments (specificity 88%). Interobserver agreement for the detection of atherosclerotic cross-sections was moderate (Cohen's kappa coefficient K=0.51), but excellent for the atherosclerotic segments (K=1.0). Pearson's correlation coefficient for vessel plaque volumes measured by MDCT and IVUS was r=0.91 (p<0.001). Bland-Altman analysis showed a slight non-significant underestimation of any plaque volume by MDCT (p=0.5), with a trend to underestimate noncalcified and overestimate mixed/calcified plaque volumes (p=0.22 and p=0.87 respectively). MDCT is able to detect and quantify atherosclerotic plaque. Further improvement in CT resolution is necessary for more reliable assessment of very small and distal coronary plaques. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Ultra-low dose CT attenuation correction for PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Xia, Ting; Alessio, Adam M; De Man, Bruno; Manjeshwar, Ravindra; Asma, Evren; Kinahan, Paul E

    2012-01-21

    A challenge for positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) quantitation is patient respiratory motion, which can cause an underestimation of lesion activity uptake and an overestimation of lesion volume. Several respiratory motion correction methods benefit from longer duration CT scans that are phase matched with PET scans. However, even with the currently available, lowest dose CT techniques, extended duration cine CT scans impart a substantially high radiation dose. This study evaluates methods designed to reduce CT radiation dose in PET/CT scanning. We investigated selected combinations of dose reduced acquisition and noise suppression methods that take advantage of the reduced requirement of CT for PET attenuation correction (AC). These include reducing CT tube current, optimizing CT tube voltage, adding filtration, CT sinogram smoothing and clipping. We explored the impact of these methods on PET quantitation via simulations on different digital phantoms. CT tube current can be reduced much lower for AC than that in low dose CT protocols. Spectra that are higher energy and narrower are generally more dose efficient with respect to PET image quality. Sinogram smoothing could be used to compensate for the increased noise and artifacts at radiation dose reduced CT images, which allows for a further reduction of CT dose with no penalty for PET image quantitation. When CT is not used for diagnostic and anatomical localization purposes, we showed that ultra-low dose CT for PET/CT is feasible. The significant dose reduction strategies proposed here could enable respiratory motion compensation methods that require extended duration CT scans and reduce radiation exposure in general for all PET/CT imaging.

  20. Ultra-low dose CT attenuation correction for PET/CT

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Ting; Alessio, Adam M.; De Man, Bruno; Manjeshwar, Ravindra; Asma, Evren; Kinahan, Paul E.

    2012-01-01

    A challenge for PET/CT quantitation is patient respiratory motion, which can cause an underestimation of lesion activity uptake and an overestimation of lesion volume. Several respiratory motion correction methods benefit from longer duration CT scans that are phase matched with PET scans. However, even with the currently-available, lowest dose CT techniques, extended duration CINE CT scans impart a substantially high radiation dose. This study evaluates methods designed to reduce CT radiation dose in PET/CT scanning. Methods We investigated selected combinations of dose reduced acquisition and noise suppression methods that take advantage of the reduced requirement of CT for PET attenuation correction (AC). These include reducing CT tube current, optimizing CT tube voltage, adding filtration, CT sinogram smoothing and clipping. We explored the impact of these methods on PET quantitation via simulations on different digital phantoms. Results CT tube current can be reduced much lower for AC than that in low dose CT protocols. Spectra that are higher energy and narrower are generally more dose efficient with respect to PET image quality. Sinogram smoothing could be used to compensate for the increased noise and artifacts at radiation dose reduced CT images, which allows for a further reduction of CT dose with no penalty for PET image quantitation. Conclusion When CT is not used for diagnostic and anatomical localization purposes, we showed that ultra-low dose CT for PET/CT is feasible. The significant dose reduction strategies proposed here could enable respiratory motion compensation methods that require extended duration CT scans and reduce radiation exposure in general for all PET/CT imaging. PMID:22156174

  1. Ultra-low dose CT attenuation correction for PET/CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Ting; Alessio, Adam M.; De Man, Bruno; Manjeshwar, Ravindra; Asma, Evren; Kinahan, Paul E.

    2012-01-01

    A challenge for positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) quantitation is patient respiratory motion, which can cause an underestimation of lesion activity uptake and an overestimation of lesion volume. Several respiratory motion correction methods benefit from longer duration CT scans that are phase matched with PET scans. However, even with the currently available, lowest dose CT techniques, extended duration cine CT scans impart a substantially high radiation dose. This study evaluates methods designed to reduce CT radiation dose in PET/CT scanning. We investigated selected combinations of dose reduced acquisition and noise suppression methods that take advantage of the reduced requirement of CT for PET attenuation correction (AC). These include reducing CT tube current, optimizing CT tube voltage, adding filtration, CT sinogram smoothing and clipping. We explored the impact of these methods on PET quantitation via simulations on different digital phantoms. CT tube current can be reduced much lower for AC than that in low dose CT protocols. Spectra that are higher energy and narrower are generally more dose efficient with respect to PET image quality. Sinogram smoothing could be used to compensate for the increased noise and artifacts at radiation dose reduced CT images, which allows for a further reduction of CT dose with no penalty for PET image quantitation. When CT is not used for diagnostic and anatomical localization purposes, we showed that ultra-low dose CT for PET/CT is feasible. The significant dose reduction strategies proposed here could enable respiratory motion compensation methods that require extended duration CT scans and reduce radiation exposure in general for all PET/CT imaging.

  2. A Simple Low-dose X-ray CT Simulation from High-dose Scan.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Dong; Huang, Jing; Bian, Zhaoying; Niu, Shanzhou; Zhang, Hua; Feng, Qianjin; Liang, Zhengrong; Ma, Jianhua

    2015-10-01

    Low-dose X-ray computed tomography (CT) simulation from high-dose scan is required in optimizing radiation dose to patients. In this study, we propose a simple low-dose CT simulation strategy in sinogram domain using the raw data from high-dose scan. Specially, a relationship between the incident fluxes of low- and high- dose scans is first determined according to the repeated projection measurements and analysis. Second, the incident flux level of the simulated low-dose scan is generated by properly scaling the incident flux level of high-dose scan via the determined relationship in the first step. Third, the low-dose CT transmission data by energy integrating detection is simulated by adding a statistically independent Poisson noise distribution plus a statistically independent Gaussian noise distribution. Finally, a filtered back-projection (FBP) algorithm is implemented to reconstruct the resultant low-dose CT images. The present low-dose simulation strategy is verified on the simulations and real scans by comparing it with the existing low-dose CT simulation tool. Experimental results demonstrated that the present low-dose CT simulation strategy can generate accurate low-dose CT sinogram data from high-dose scan in terms of qualitative and quantitative measurements.

  3. Low-dose interpolated average CT for attenuation correction in cardiac PET/CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Tung-Hsin; Zhang, Geoffrey; Wang, Shyh-Jen; Chen, Chih-Hao; Yang, Bang-Hung; Wu, Nien-Yun; Huang, Tzung-Chi

    2010-07-01

    Because of the advantages in the use of high photon flux and thus the short scan times of CT imaging, the traditional 68Ge scans for positron emission tomography (PET) image attenuation correction have been replaced by CT scans in the modern PET/CT technology. The combination of fast CT scan and slow PET scan often causes image misalignment between the PET and CT images due to respiration motion. Use of the average CT derived from cine CT images is reported to reduce such misalignment. However, the radiation dose to patients is higher with cine CT scans. This study introduces a method that uses breath-hold CT images and their interpolations to generate the average CT for PET image attenuation correction. Breath-hold CT sets are taken at end-inspiration and end-expiration. Deformable image registration is applied to generate a voxel-to-voxel motion matrix between the two CT sets. The motion is equally divided into 5 steps from inspiration to expiration and 5 steps from expiration to inspiration, generating a total of 8 phases of interpolated CT sets. An average CT image is generated from all the 10 phase CT images, including original inhale/exhale CT and 8 interpolated CT sets. Quantitative comparison shows that the reduction of image misalignment artifacts using the average CT from the interpolation technique for PET attenuation correction is at a similar level as that using cine average CT, while the dose to the patient from the CT scans is reduced significantly. The interpolated average CT method hence provides a low dose alternative to cine CT scans for PET attenuation correction.

  4. Noise reduction with low dose CT data based on a modified ROF model.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yining; Zhao, Mengliu; Zhao, Yunsong; Li, Hongwei; Zhang, Peng

    2012-07-30

    In order to reduce the radiation exposure caused by Computed Tomography (CT) scanning, low dose CT has gained much interest in research as well as in industry. One fundamental difficulty for low dose CT lies in its heavy noise pollution in the raw data which leads to quality deterioration for reconstructed images. In this paper, we propose a modified ROF model to denoise low dose CT measurement data in light of Poisson noise model. Experimental results indicate that the reconstructed CT images based on measurement data processed by our model are in better quality, compared to the original ROF model or bilateral filtering.

  5. Low dose dynamic myocardial CT perfusion using advanced iterative reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eck, Brendan L.; Fahmi, Rachid; Fuqua, Christopher; Vembar, Mani; Dhanantwari, Amar; Bezerra, Hiram G.; Wilson, David L.

    2015-03-01

    Dynamic myocardial CT perfusion (CTP) can provide quantitative functional information for the assessment of coronary artery disease. However, x-ray dose in dynamic CTP is high, typically from 10mSv to >20mSv. We compared the dose reduction potential of advanced iterative reconstruction, Iterative Model Reconstruction (IMR, Philips Healthcare, Cleveland, Ohio) to hybrid iterative reconstruction (iDose4) and filtered back projection (FBP). Dynamic CTP scans were obtained using a porcine model with balloon-induced ischemia in the left anterior descending coronary artery to prescribed fractional flow reserve values. High dose dynamic CTP scans were acquired at 100kVp/100mAs with effective dose of 23mSv. Low dose scans at 75mAs, 50mAs, and 25mAs were simulated by adding x-ray quantum noise and detector electronic noise to the projection space data. Images were reconstructed with FBP, iDose4, and IMR at each dose level. Image quality in static CTP images was assessed by SNR and CNR. Blood flow was obtained using a dynamic CTP analysis pipeline and blood flow image quality was assessed using flow-SNR and flow-CNR. IMR showed highest static image quality according to SNR and CNR. Blood flow in FBP was increasingly over-estimated at reduced dose. Flow was more consistent for iDose4 from 100mAs to 50mAs, but was over-estimated at 25mAs. IMR was most consistent from 100mAs to 25mAs. Static images and flow maps for 100mAs FBP, 50mAs iDose4, and 25mAs IMR showed comparable, clear ischemia, CNR, and flow-CNR values. These results suggest that IMR can enable dynamic CTP at significantly reduced dose, at 5.8mSv or 25% of the comparable 23mSv FBP protocol.

  6. Detection and size measurements of pulmonary nodules in ultra-low-dose CT with iterative reconstruction compared to low dose CT.

    PubMed

    Sui, Xin; Meinel, Felix G; Song, Wei; Xu, Xiaoli; Wang, Zixing; Wang, Yuyan; Jin, Zhengyu; Chen, Jiuhong; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn; Schoepf, U Joseph

    2016-03-01

    In this study, the accuracy of ultra-low-dose computed tomography (CT) with iterative reconstruction (IR) for detection and measurement of pulmonary nodules was evaluated. Eighty-four individuals referred for lung cancer screening (mean age: 54.5±10.8 years) underwent low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) and ultra-low-dose CT. CT examinations were performed with attenuation-based tube current modulation. Reference tube voltage and current were set to 120kV/25mÅs for LDCT and 80kV/4mÅs for ultra-low-dose CT. CT images were reconstructed with filtered back projection (FBP) for LDCT, and with FBP and IR for ultra-low-dose CT datasets. A reference standard was established by a consensus panel of 2 different radiologists on LDCT. Volume and diameter of the solid nodules were measured on LDCT with FBP and ultra-low dose CT with FBP and IR. Interobserver and interscan variability were analyzed and compared by the Bland-Altman method. A total of 127 nodules were identified, including 105 solid nodules, 15 part solid nodules, 7 ground glass nodules. On ultra-low-dose CT scans, the effective radiation dose was 0.13±0.11mSv. A total of 113 (88.9%) and 110 (86.6%) true-positive nodules with FBP versus 117 (92.1%) and 118(92.9%) with IR were detected by two observers, respectively. The volume and size of the 105 solid nodules were measured, with mean volume/diameter of 46.5±46.6 mm(3)/5.1±1.6mm. There was no significant difference in nodule volume or diameter measurements between ultra-low-dose CT and LDCT protocols for solid nodules. Ultra-low-dose CT with iterative reconstruction has high sensitivity for lung nodule detection without significant difference in nodule size and volume measurement compared to LDCT. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Improving abdomen tumor low-dose CT images using a fast dictionary learning based processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yang; Yin, Xindao; Shi, Luyao; Shu, Huazhong; Luo, Limin; Coatrieux, Jean-Louis; Toumoulin, Christine

    2013-08-01

    In abdomen computed tomography (CT), repeated radiation exposures are often inevitable for cancer patients who receive surgery or radiotherapy guided by CT images. Low-dose scans should thus be considered in order to avoid the harm of accumulative x-ray radiation. This work is aimed at improving abdomen tumor CT images from low-dose scans by using a fast dictionary learning (DL) based processing. Stemming from sparse representation theory, the proposed patch-based DL approach allows effective suppression of both mottled noise and streak artifacts. The experiments carried out on clinical data show that the proposed method brings encouraging improvements in abdomen low-dose CT images with tumors.

  8. Low-dose versus standard-dose CT protocol in patients with clinically suspected renal colic.

    PubMed

    Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre; Platon, Alexandra; Rutschmann, Olivier T; Schmidlin, Franz R; Iselin, Christophe E; Becker, Christoph D

    2007-04-01

    The purpose of our study was to compare a low-dose abdominal CT protocol, delivering a dose of radiation close to the dose delivered by abdominal radiography, with standard-dose unenhanced CT in patients with suspected renal colic. One hundred twenty-five patients (87 men, 38 women; mean age, 45 years) who were admitted with suspected renal colic underwent both abdominal low-dose CT (30 mAs) and standard-dose CT (180 mAs). Low-dose CT and standard-dose CT were independently reviewed, in a delayed fashion, by two radiologists for the characterization of renal and ureteral calculi (location, size) and for indirect signs of renal colic (renal enlargement, pyeloureteral dilatation, periureteral or renal stranding). Results reported for low-dose CT, with regard to the patients' body mass indexes (BMIs), were compared with those obtained with standard-dose CT (reference standard). The presence of non-urinary tract-related disorders was also assessed. Informed consent was obtained from all patients. In patients with a BMI < 30, low-dose CT achieved 96% sensitivity and 100% specificity for the detection of indirect signs of renal colic and a sensitivity of 95% and a specificity of 97% for detecting ureteral calculi. In patients with a BMI < 30, low-dose CT was 86% sensitive for detecting ureteral calculi < 3 mm and 100% sensitive for detecting calculi > 3 mm. Low-dose CT was 100% sensitive and specific for depicting non-urinary tract-related disorders (n = 6). Low-dose CT achieves sensitivities and specificities close to those of standard-dose CT in assessing the diagnosis of renal colic, depicting ureteral calculi > 3 mm in patients with a BMI < 30, and correctly identifying alternative diagnoses.

  9. Low-dose high-resolution CT of lung parenchyma

    SciTech Connect

    Zwirewich, C.V.; Mayo, J.R.; Mueller, N.L. )

    1991-08-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of low-dose high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) in the assessment of lung parenchyma, three observers reviewed the scans of 31 patients. The 1.5-mm-collimation, 2-second, 120-kVp scans were obtained at 20 and 200 mA at selected identical levels in the chest. The observers evaluated the visualization of normal pulmonary anatomy, various parenchymal abnormalities and their distribution, and artifacts. The low-dose and conventional scans were equivalent in the evaluation of vessels, lobar and segmental bronchi, and anatomy of secondary pulmonary lobules, and in characterizing the extent and distribution of reticulation, honeycomb cysts, and thickened interlobular septa. The low-dose technique failed to demonstrate ground-glass opacity in two of 10 cases (20%) and emphysema in one of nine cases (11%), in which they were evident but subtle on the high-dose scans. These differences were not statistically significant. Linear streak artifact was more prominent on images acquired with the low-dose technique, but the two techniques were judged equally diagnostic in 97% of cases. The authors conclude that HRCT images acquired at 20 mA yield anatomic information equivalent to that obtained with 200-mA scans in the majority of patients, without significant loss of spatial resolution or image degradation due to linear streak artifact.

  10. Accuracy of low dose CT in the diagnosis of appendicitis in childhood and comparison with USG and standard dose CT.

    PubMed

    Yi, Dae Yong; Lee, Kyung Hoon; Park, Sung Bin; Kim, Jee Taek; Lee, Na Mi; Kim, Hyery; Yun, Sin Weon; Chae, Soo Ahn; Lim, In Seok

    2017-04-23

    Computed tomography should be performed after careful consideration due to radiation hazard, which is why interest in low dose CT has increased recently in acute appendicitis. Previous studies have been performed in adult and adolescents populations, but no studies have reported on the efficacy of using low-dose CT in children younger than 10 years. Patients (n=475) younger than 10 years who were examined for acute appendicitis were recruited. Subjects were divided into three groups according to the examinations performed: low-dose CT, ultrasonography, and standard-dose CT. Subjects were categorized according to age and body mass index (BMI). Low-dose CT was a contributive tool in diagnosing appendicitis, and it was an adequate method, when compared with ultrasonography and standard-dose CT in terms of sensitivity (95.5% vs. 95.0% and 94.5%, p=0.794), specificity (94.9% vs. 80.0% and 98.8%, p=0.024), positive-predictive value (96.4% vs. 92.7% and 97.2%, p=0.019), and negative-predictive value (93.7% vs. 85.7% and 91.3%, p=0.890). Low-dose CT accurately diagnosed patients with a perforated appendix. Acute appendicitis was effectively diagnosed using low-dose CT in both early and middle childhood. BMI did not influence the accuracy of detecting acute appendicitis on low-dose CT. Low-dose CT is effective and accurate for diagnosing acute appendicitis in childhood, as well as in adolescents and young adults. Additionally, low-dose CT was relatively accurate, irrespective of age or BMI, for detecting acute appendicitis. Therefore, low-dose CT is recommended for assessing children with suspected acute appendicitis. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda.

  11. 20 percent lower lung cancer mortality with low-dose CT vs chest X-ray

    Cancer.gov

    Scientists have found a 20 percent reduction in deaths from lung cancer among current or former heavy smokers who were screened with low-dose helical computed tomography (CT) versus those screened by chest X-ray.

  12. Attenuation correction of PET cardiac data with low-dose average CT in PET/CT

    SciTech Connect

    Pan Tinsu; Mawlawi, Osama; Luo, Dershan; Liu, Hui H.; Chi Paichun, M.; Mar, Martha V.; Gladish, Gregory; Truong, Mylene; Erasmus, Jeremy Jr.; Liao Zhongxing; Macapinlac, H. A.

    2006-10-15

    We proposed a low-dose average computer tomography (ACT) for attenuation correction (AC) of the PET cardiac data in PET/CT. The ACT was obtained from a cine CT scan of over one breath cycle per couch position while the patient was free breathing. We applied this technique on four patients who underwent tumor imaging with {sup 18}F-FDG in PET/CT, whose PET data showed high uptake of {sup 18}F-FDG in the heart and whose CT and PET data had misregistration. All four patients did not have known myocardiac infarction or ischemia. The patients were injected with 555-740 MBq of {sup 18}F-FDG and scanned 1 h after injection. The helical CT (HCT) data were acquired in 16 s for the coverage of 100 cm. The PET acquisition was 3 min per bed of 15 cm. The duration of cine CT acquisition per 2 cm was 5.9 s. We used a fast gantry rotation cycle time of 0.5 s to minimize motion induced reconstruction artifacts in the cine CT images, which were averaged to become the ACT images for AC of the PET data. The radiation dose was about 5 mGy for 5.9 s cine duration. The selection of 5.9 s was based on our analysis of the respiratory signals of 600 patients; 87% of the patients had average breath cycles of less than 6 s and 90% had standard deviations of less than 1 s in the period of breath cycle. In all four patient studies, registrations between the CT and the PET data were improved. An increase of average uptake in the anterior and the lateral walls up to 48% and a decrease of average uptake in the septal and the inferior walls up to 16% with ACT were observed. We also compared ACT and conventional slow scan CT (SSCT) of 4 s duration in one patient study and found ACT was better than SSCT in depicting average respiratory motion and the SSCT images showed motion-induced reconstruction artifacts. In conclusion, low-dose ACT improved registration of the CT and the PET data in the heart region in our study of four patients. ACT was superior than SSCT for depicting average respiration

  13. Convolutional auto-encoder for image denoising of ultra-low-dose CT.

    PubMed

    Nishio, Mizuho; Nagashima, Chihiro; Hirabayashi, Saori; Ohnishi, Akinori; Sasaki, Kaori; Sagawa, Tomoyuki; Hamada, Masayuki; Yamashita, Tatsuo

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to validate a patch-based image denoising method for ultra-low-dose CT images. Neural network with convolutional auto-encoder and pairs of standard-dose CT and ultra-low-dose CT image patches were used for image denoising. The performance of the proposed method was measured by using a chest phantom. Standard-dose and ultra-low-dose CT images of the chest phantom were acquired. The tube currents for standard-dose and ultra-low-dose CT were 300 and 10 mA, respectively. Ultra-low-dose CT images were denoised with our proposed method using neural network, large-scale nonlocal mean, and block-matching and 3D filtering. Five radiologists and three technologists assessed the denoised ultra-low-dose CT images visually and recorded their subjective impressions of streak artifacts, noise other than streak artifacts, visualization of pulmonary vessels, and overall image quality. For the streak artifacts, noise other than streak artifacts, and visualization of pulmonary vessels, the results of our proposed method were statistically better than those of block-matching and 3D filtering (p-values < 0.05). On the other hand, the difference in the overall image quality between our proposed method and block-matching and 3D filtering was not statistically significant (p-value = 0.07272). The p-values obtained between our proposed method and large-scale nonlocal mean were all less than 0.05. Neural network with convolutional auto-encoder could be trained using pairs of standard-dose and ultra-low-dose CT image patches. According to the visual assessment by radiologists and technologists, the performance of our proposed method was superior to that of large-scale nonlocal mean and block-matching and 3D filtering.

  14. Spectrotemporal CT data acquisition and reconstruction at low dose

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Darin P.; Badea, Cristian T.; Lee, Chang-Lung; Kirsch, David G.

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: X-ray computed tomography (CT) is widely used, both clinically and preclinically, for fast, high-resolution anatomic imaging; however, compelling opportunities exist to expand its use in functional imaging applications. For instance, spectral information combined with nanoparticle contrast agents enables quantification of tissue perfusion levels, while temporal information details cardiac and respiratory dynamics. The authors propose and demonstrate a projection acquisition and reconstruction strategy for 5D CT (3D + dual energy + time) which recovers spectral and temporal information without substantially increasing radiation dose or sampling time relative to anatomic imaging protocols. Methods: The authors approach the 5D reconstruction problem within the framework of low-rank and sparse matrix decomposition. Unlike previous work on rank-sparsity constrained CT reconstruction, the authors establish an explicit rank-sparse signal model to describe the spectral and temporal dimensions. The spectral dimension is represented as a well-sampled time and energy averaged image plus regularly undersampled principal components describing the spectral contrast. The temporal dimension is represented as the same time and energy averaged reconstruction plus contiguous, spatially sparse, and irregularly sampled temporal contrast images. Using a nonlinear, image domain filtration approach, the authors refer to as rank-sparse kernel regression, the authors transfer image structure from the well-sampled time and energy averaged reconstruction to the spectral and temporal contrast images. This regularization strategy strictly constrains the reconstruction problem while approximately separating the temporal and spectral dimensions. Separability results in a highly compressed representation for the 5D data in which projections are shared between the temporal and spectral reconstruction subproblems, enabling substantial undersampling. The authors solved the 5D reconstruction

  15. Fast reconstruction of low dose proton CT by sinogram interpolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, David C.; Sangild Sørensen, Thomas; Rit, Simon

    2016-08-01

    Proton computed tomography (CT) has been demonstrated as a promising image modality in particle therapy planning. It can reduce errors in particle range calculations and consequently improve dose calculations. Obtaining a high imaging resolution has traditionally required computationally expensive iterative reconstruction techniques to account for the multiple scattering of the protons. Recently, techniques for direct reconstruction have been developed, but these require a higher imaging dose than the iterative methods. No previous work has compared the image quality of the direct and the iterative methods. In this article, we extend the methodology for direct reconstruction to be applicable for low imaging doses and compare the obtained results with three state-of-the-art iterative algorithms. We find that the direct method yields comparable resolution and image quality to the iterative methods, even at 1 mSv dose levels, while yielding a twentyfold speedup in reconstruction time over previously published iterative algorithms.

  16. Automated coronary artery calcification detection on low-dose chest CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yiting; Cham, Matthew D.; Henschke, Claudia; Yankelevitz, David; Reeves, Anthony P.

    2014-03-01

    Coronary artery calcification (CAC) measurement from low-dose CT images can be used to assess the risk of coronary artery disease. A fully automatic algorithm to detect and measure CAC from low-dose non-contrast, non-ECG-gated chest CT scans is presented. Based on the automatically detected CAC, the Agatston score (AS), mass score and volume score were computed. These were compared with scores obtained manually from standard-dose ECG-gated scans and low-dose un-gated scans of the same patient. The automatic algorithm segments the heart region based on other pre-segmented organs to provide a coronary region mask. The mitral valve and aortic valve calcification is identified and excluded. All remaining voxels greater than 180HU within the mask region are considered as CAC candidates. The heart segmentation algorithm was evaluated on 400 non-contrast cases with both low-dose and regular dose CT scans. By visual inspection, 371 (92.8%) of the segmentations were acceptable. The automated CAC detection algorithm was evaluated on 41 low-dose non-contrast CT scans. Manual markings were performed on both low-dose and standard-dose scans for these cases. Using linear regression, the correlation of the automatic AS with the standard-dose manual scores was 0.86; with the low-dose manual scores the correlation was 0.91. Standard risk categories were also computed. The automated method risk category agreed with manual markings of gated scans for 24 cases while 15 cases were 1 category off. For low-dose scans, the automatic method agreed with 33 cases while 7 cases were 1 category off.

  17. Ultra-Low-Dose Fetal CT With Model-Based Iterative Reconstruction: A Prospective Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Imai, Rumi; Miyazaki, Osamu; Horiuchi, Tetsuya; Asano, Keisuke; Nishimura, Gen; Sago, Haruhiko; Nosaka, Shunsuke

    2017-06-01

    Prenatal diagnosis of skeletal dysplasia by means of 3D skeletal CT examination is highly accurate. However, it carries a risk of fetal exposure to radiation. Model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) technology can reduce radiation exposure; however, to our knowledge, the lower limit of an optimal dose is currently unknown. The objectives of this study are to establish ultra-low-dose fetal CT as a method for prenatal diagnosis of skeletal dysplasia and to evaluate the appropriate radiation dose for ultra-low-dose fetal CT. Relationships between tube current and image noise in adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction and MBIR were examined using a 32-cm CT dose index (CTDI) phantom. On the basis of the results of this examination and the recommended methods for the MBIR option and the known relationship between noise and tube current for filtered back projection, as represented by the expression SD = (milliamperes)(-0.5), the lower limit of the optimal dose in ultra-low-dose fetal CT with MBIR was set. The diagnostic power of the CT images obtained using the aforementioned scanning conditions was evaluated, and the radiation exposure associated with ultra-low-dose fetal CT was compared with that noted in previous reports. Noise increased in nearly inverse proportion to the square root of the dose in adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction and in inverse proportion to the fourth root of the dose in MBIR. Ultra-low-dose fetal CT was found to have a volume CTDI of 0.5 mGy. Prenatal diagnosis was accurately performed on the basis of ultra-low-dose fetal CT images that were obtained using this protocol. The level of fetal exposure to radiation was 0.7 mSv. The use of ultra-low-dose fetal CT with MBIR led to a substantial reduction in radiation exposure, compared with the CT imaging method currently used at our institution, but it still enabled diagnosis of skeletal dysplasia without reducing diagnostic power.

  18. Statistical distributions of ultra-low dose CT sinograms and their fundamental limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Tzu-Cheng; Zhang, Ruoqiao; Alessio, Adam M.; Fu, Lin; De Man, Bruno; Kinahan, Paul E.

    2017-03-01

    Low dose CT imaging is typically constrained to be diagnostic. However, there are applications for even lowerdose CT imaging, including image registration across multi-frame CT images and attenuation correction for PET/CT imaging. We define this as the ultra-low-dose (ULD) CT regime where the exposure level is a factor of 10 lower than current low-dose CT technique levels. In the ULD regime it is possible to use statistically-principled image reconstruction methods that make full use of the raw data information. Since most statistical based iterative reconstruction methods are based on the assumption of that post-log noise distribution is close to Poisson or Gaussian, our goal is to understand the statistical distribution of ULD CT data with different non-positivity correction methods, and to understand when iterative reconstruction methods may be effective in producing images that are useful for image registration or attenuation correction in PET/CT imaging. We first used phantom measurement and calibrated simulation to reveal how the noise distribution deviate from normal assumption under the ULD CT flux environment. In summary, our results indicate that there are three general regimes: (1) Diagnostic CT, where post-log data are well modeled by normal distribution. (2) Lowdose CT, where normal distribution remains a reasonable approximation and statistically-principled (post-log) methods that assume a normal distribution have an advantage. (3) An ULD regime that is photon-starved and the quadratic approximation is no longer effective. For instance, a total integral density of 4.8 (ideal pi for 24 cm of water) for 120kVp, 0.5mAs of radiation source is the maximum pi value where a definitive maximum likelihood value could be found. This leads to fundamental limits in the estimation of ULD CT data when using a standard data processing stream

  19. SU-E-P-03: Implementing a Low Dose Lung Screening CT Program Meeting Regulatory Requirements

    SciTech Connect

    LaFrance, M; Marsh, S; O'Donnell, G

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To provide information pertaining to IROC Houston QA Center's (RPC) credentialing process for institutions participating in NCI-sponsored clinical trials. Purpose: Provide guidance to the Radiology Departments with the intent of implementing a Low Dose CT Screening Program using different CT Scanners with multiple techniques within the framework of the required state regulations. Method: State Requirements for the purpose of implementing a Low Dose CT Lung Protocol required working with the Radiology and Pulmonary Department in setting up a Low Dose Screening Protocol designed to reduce the radiation burden to the patients enrolled. Radiation dose measurements (CTDIvol) for various CT manufacturers (Siemens16, Siemens 64, Philips 64, and Neusoft128) for three different weight based protocols. All scans were reviewed by the Radiologist. Prior to starting a low dose lung screening protocol, information had to be submitted to the state for approval. Performing a Healing Arts protocol requires extensive information. This not only includes name and address of the applicant but a detailed description of the disease, the x-ray examination and the population to be examined. The unit had to be tested by a qualified expert using the technique charts. The credentials of all the operators, the supervisors and the Radiologists had to be submitted to the state. Results: All the appropriate documentation was sent to the state for review. The measured results between the Low Dose Protocol versus the default Adult Chest Protocol showed that there was a dose reduction of 65% for small (100-150 lb.) patient, 75% for the Medium patient (151-250 lbs.), and a 55% reduction for the Large patient ( over 250 lbs.). Conclusion: Measured results indicated that the Low Dose Protocol indeed lowered the screening patient's radiation dose and the institution was able to submit the protocol to the State's regulators.

  20. Low-dose CT screening for lung cancer with automatic exposure control: phantom study.

    PubMed

    Gomi, Shiho; Muramatsu, Yoshihisa; Tsukagoshi, Shinsuke; Suzuki, Masahiro; Kakinuma, Ryutaro; Tsuchiya, Ryosuke; Moriyama, Noriyuki

    2008-07-01

    We conducted a study to determine optimal scan conditions for automatic exposure control (AEC) in computed tomography (CT) of low-dose chest screening in order to provide consistent image quality without increasing the collective dose. Using a chest CT phantom, we set CT-AEC scan conditions with a dose-reduction wedge (DR-Wedge) to the same radiation dose as those for low-tube current, fixed-scan conditions. Image quality was evaluated with the use of the standard deviation of the CT number, contrast-noise ratios (CNR), and receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. At the same radiation dose, in the scan conditions using CT-AEC with the DR-Wedge, the SD of the CT number of each slice position was stable. The CNR values were higher at the lung apex and lung base under CT-AEC with the DR-Wedge than under standard scan conditions (p < 0.0002). In addition, ROC analysis of blind evaluation by four radiologists and three technologists showed that the image quality was improved for the lung apex (p < 0.009), tracheal bifurcation (p < 0.038), and lung base (p < 0.022) in the scan conditions using CT-AEC with the DR-Wedge. We achieved improvement of image quality without increasing the collective dose by using CT-AEC with the DR-Wedge under low-dose scan conditions.

  1. Three-Dimensions Segmentation of Pulmonary Vascular Trees for Low Dose CT Scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Jun; Huang, Ying; Wang, Ying; Wang, Jun

    2016-12-01

    Due to the low contrast and the partial volume effects, providing an accurate and in vivo analysis for pulmonary vascular trees from low dose CT scans is a challenging task. This paper proposes an automatic integration segmentation approach for the vascular trees in low dose CT scans. It consists of the following steps: firstly, lung volumes are acquired by the knowledge based method from the CT scans, and then the data are smoothed by the 3D Gaussian filter; secondly, two or three seeds are gotten by the adaptive 2D segmentation and the maximum area selecting from different position scans; thirdly, each seed as the start voxel is inputted for a quick multi-seeds 3D region growing to get vascular trees; finally, the trees are refined by the smooth filter. Through skeleton analyzing for the vascular trees, the results show that the proposed method can provide much better and lower level vascular branches.

  2. Low dose dynamic CT myocardial perfusion imaging using a statistical iterative reconstruction method

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, Yinghua; Chen, Guang-Hong; Hacker, Timothy A.; Raval, Amish N.; Van Lysel, Michael S.; Speidel, Michael A.

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: Dynamic CT myocardial perfusion imaging has the potential to provide both functional and anatomical information regarding coronary artery stenosis. However, radiation dose can be potentially high due to repeated scanning of the same region. The purpose of this study is to investigate the use of statistical iterative reconstruction to improve parametric maps of myocardial perfusion derived from a low tube current dynamic CT acquisition. Methods: Four pigs underwent high (500 mA) and low (25 mA) dose dynamic CT myocardial perfusion scans with and without coronary occlusion. To delineate the affected myocardial territory, an N-13 ammonia PET perfusion scan was performed for each animal in each occlusion state. Filtered backprojection (FBP) reconstruction was first applied to all CT data sets. Then, a statistical iterative reconstruction (SIR) method was applied to data sets acquired at low dose. Image voxel noise was matched between the low dose SIR and high dose FBP reconstructions. CT perfusion maps were compared among the low dose FBP, low dose SIR and high dose FBP reconstructions. Numerical simulations of a dynamic CT scan at high and low dose (20:1 ratio) were performed to quantitatively evaluate SIR and FBP performance in terms of flow map accuracy, precision, dose efficiency, and spatial resolution. Results: Forin vivo studies, the 500 mA FBP maps gave −88.4%, −96.0%, −76.7%, and −65.8% flow change in the occluded anterior region compared to the open-coronary scans (four animals). The percent changes in the 25 mA SIR maps were in good agreement, measuring −94.7%, −81.6%, −84.0%, and −72.2%. The 25 mA FBP maps gave unreliable flow measurements due to streaks caused by photon starvation (percent changes of +137.4%, +71.0%, −11.8%, and −3.5%). Agreement between 25 mA SIR and 500 mA FBP global flow was −9.7%, 8.8%, −3.1%, and 26.4%. The average variability of flow measurements in a nonoccluded region was 16.3%, 24.1%, and 937

  3. Low dose dynamic CT myocardial perfusion imaging using a statistical iterative reconstruction method

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Yinghua; Chen, Guang-Hong; Hacker, Timothy A.; Raval, Amish N.; Van Lysel, Michael S.; Speidel, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Dynamic CT myocardial perfusion imaging has the potential to provide both functional and anatomical information regarding coronary artery stenosis. However, radiation dose can be potentially high due to repeated scanning of the same region. The purpose of this study is to investigate the use of statistical iterative reconstruction to improve parametric maps of myocardial perfusion derived from a low tube current dynamic CT acquisition. Methods: Four pigs underwent high (500 mA) and low (25 mA) dose dynamic CT myocardial perfusion scans with and without coronary occlusion. To delineate the affected myocardial territory, an N-13 ammonia PET perfusion scan was performed for each animal in each occlusion state. Filtered backprojection (FBP) reconstruction was first applied to all CT data sets. Then, a statistical iterative reconstruction (SIR) method was applied to data sets acquired at low dose. Image voxel noise was matched between the low dose SIR and high dose FBP reconstructions. CT perfusion maps were compared among the low dose FBP, low dose SIR and high dose FBP reconstructions. Numerical simulations of a dynamic CT scan at high and low dose (20:1 ratio) were performed to quantitatively evaluate SIR and FBP performance in terms of flow map accuracy, precision, dose efficiency, and spatial resolution. Results: Forin vivo studies, the 500 mA FBP maps gave −88.4%, −96.0%, −76.7%, and −65.8% flow change in the occluded anterior region compared to the open-coronary scans (four animals). The percent changes in the 25 mA SIR maps were in good agreement, measuring −94.7%, −81.6%, −84.0%, and −72.2%. The 25 mA FBP maps gave unreliable flow measurements due to streaks caused by photon starvation (percent changes of +137.4%, +71.0%, −11.8%, and −3.5%). Agreement between 25 mA SIR and 500 mA FBP global flow was −9.7%, 8.8%, −3.1%, and 26.4%. The average variability of flow measurements in a nonoccluded region was 16.3%, 24.1%, and 937

  4. Statistical image reconstruction for low-dose CT using nonlocal means-based regularization.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hao; Ma, Jianhua; Wang, Jing; Liu, Yan; Lu, Hongbing; Liang, Zhengrong

    2014-09-01

    Low-dose computed tomography (CT) imaging without sacrifice of clinical tasks is desirable due to the growing concerns about excessive radiation exposure to the patients. One common strategy to achieve low-dose CT imaging is to lower the milliampere-second (mAs) setting in data scanning protocol. However, the reconstructed CT images by the conventional filtered back-projection (FBP) method from the low-mAs acquisitions may be severely degraded due to the excessive noise. Statistical image reconstruction (SIR) methods have shown potentials to significantly improve the reconstructed image quality from the low-mAs acquisitions, wherein the regularization plays a critical role and an established family of regularizations is based on the Markov random field (MRF) model. Inspired by the success of nonlocal means (NLM) in image processing applications, in this work, we propose to explore the NLM-based regularization for SIR to reconstruct low-dose CT images from low-mAs acquisitions. Experimental results with both digital and physical phantoms consistently demonstrated that SIR with the NLM-based regularization can achieve more gains than SIR with the well-known Gaussian MRF regularization or the generalized Gaussian MRF regularization and the conventional FBP method, in terms of image noise reduction and resolution preservation.

  5. Statistical image reconstruction for low-dose CT using nonlocal means-based regularization

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hao; Ma, Jianhua; Wang, Jing; Liu, Yan; Lu, Hongbing

    2014-01-01

    Low-dose computed tomography (CT) imaging without sacrifice of clinical tasks is desirable due to the growing concerns about excessive radiation exposure to the patients. One common strategy to achieve low-dose CT imaging is to lower the milliampere-second (mAs) setting in data scanning protocol. However, the reconstructed CT images by the conventional filtered back-projection (FBP) method from the low-mAs acquisitions may be severely degraded due to the excessive noise. Statistical image reconstruction (SIR) methods have shown potentials to significantly improve the reconstructed image quality from the low-mAs acquisitions, wherein the regularization plays a critical role and an established family of regularizations is based on the Markov random field (MRF) model. Inspired by the success of nonlocal means (NLM) in image processing applications, in this work, we propose to explore the NLM-based regularization for SIR to reconstruct low-dose CT images from low-mAs acquisitions. Experimental results with both digital and physical phantoms consistently demonstrated that SIR with the NLM-based regularization can achieve more gains than SIR with the well-known Gaussian MRF regularization or the generalized Gaussian MRF regularization and the conventional FBP method, in terms of image noise reduction and resolution preservation. PMID:24881498

  6. Low-Dose X-ray CT Reconstruction via Dictionary Learning

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qiong; Zhang, Lei; Hsieh, Jiang; Wang, Ge

    2013-01-01

    Although diagnostic medical imaging provides enormous benefits in the early detection and accuracy diagnosis of various diseases, there are growing concerns on the potential side effect of radiation induced genetic, cancerous and other diseases. How to reduce radiation dose while maintaining the diagnostic performance is a major challenge in the computed tomography (CT) field. Inspired by the compressive sensing theory, the sparse constraint in terms of total variation (TV) minimization has already led to promising results for low-dose CT reconstruction. Compared to the discrete gradient transform used in the TV method, dictionary learning is proven to be an effective way for sparse representation. On the other hand, it is important to consider the statistical property of projection data in the low-dose CT case. Recently, we have developed a dictionary learning based approach for low-dose X-ray CT. In this paper, we present this method in detail and evaluate it in experiments. In our method, the sparse constraint in terms of a redundant dictionary is incorporated into an objective function in a statistical iterative reconstruction framework. The dictionary can be either predetermined before an image reconstruction task or adaptively defined during the reconstruction process. An alternating minimization scheme is developed to minimize the objective function. Our approach is evaluated with low-dose X-ray projections collected in animal and human CT studies, and the improvement associated with dictionary learning is quantified relative to filtered backprojection and TV-based reconstructions. The results show that the proposed approach might produce better images with lower noise and more detailed structural features in our selected cases. However, there is no proof that this is true for all kinds of structures. PMID:22542666

  7. Low-dose X-ray CT reconstruction via dictionary learning.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qiong; Yu, Hengyong; Mou, Xuanqin; Zhang, Lei; Hsieh, Jiang; Wang, Ge

    2012-09-01

    Although diagnostic medical imaging provides enormous benefits in the early detection and accuracy diagnosis of various diseases, there are growing concerns on the potential side effect of radiation induced genetic, cancerous and other diseases. How to reduce radiation dose while maintaining the diagnostic performance is a major challenge in the computed tomography (CT) field. Inspired by the compressive sensing theory, the sparse constraint in terms of total variation (TV) minimization has already led to promising results for low-dose CT reconstruction. Compared to the discrete gradient transform used in the TV method, dictionary learning is proven to be an effective way for sparse representation. On the other hand, it is important to consider the statistical property of projection data in the low-dose CT case. Recently, we have developed a dictionary learning based approach for low-dose X-ray CT. In this paper, we present this method in detail and evaluate it in experiments. In our method, the sparse constraint in terms of a redundant dictionary is incorporated into an objective function in a statistical iterative reconstruction framework. The dictionary can be either predetermined before an image reconstruction task or adaptively defined during the reconstruction process. An alternating minimization scheme is developed to minimize the objective function. Our approach is evaluated with low-dose X-ray projections collected in animal and human CT studies, and the improvement associated with dictionary learning is quantified relative to filtered backprojection and TV-based reconstructions. The results show that the proposed approach might produce better images with lower noise and more detailed structural features in our selected cases. However, there is no proof that this is true for all kinds of structures.

  8. Lateral topography for reducing effective dose in low-dose chest CT.

    PubMed

    Bang, Dong-Ho; Lim, Daekeon; Hwang, Wi-Sub; Park, Seong-Hoon; Jeong, Ok-man; Kang, Kyung Wook; Kang, Hohyung

    2013-06-01

    The purposes of this study were to assess radiation exposure during low-dose chest CT by using lateral topography and to compare the lateral topographic findings with findings obtained with anteroposterior topography alone and anteroposterior and lateral topography combined. From November 2011 to February 2012, 210 male subjects were enrolled in the study. Age, weight, and height of the men were recorded. All subjects were placed into one of three subgroups based on the type of topographic image obtained: anteroposterior topography, lateral topography, and both anteroposterior and lateral topography. Imaging was performed with a 128-MDCT scanner. CT, except for topography, was the same for all subjects. A radiologist analyzed each image, recorded scan length, checked for any insufficiencies in the FOV, and calculated the effective radiation dose. One-way analysis of variance and multiple comparisons were used to compare the effective radiation exposure and scan length between groups. The mean scan length in the anteroposterior topography group was significantly greater than that of the lateral topography group and the combined anteroposterior and lateral topography group (p < 0.001). The mean effective radiation dose for the lateral topography group (0.735 ± 0.033 mSv) was significantly lower than that for the anteroposterior topography group (0.763 ± 0.038 mSv) and the combined anteroposterior and lateral topography group (0.773 ± 0.038) (p < 0.001). Lateral topographic low-dose CT was associated with a lower effective radiation dose and scan length than either anteroposterior topographic low-dose chest CT or low-dose chest CT with both anteroposterior and lateral topograms.

  9. Impact of iterative reconstruction on image quality of low-dose CT of the lumbar spine.

    PubMed

    Alshamari, Muhammed; Geijer, Mats; Norrman, Eva; Lidén, Mats; Krauss, Wolfgang; Jendeberg, Johan; Magnuson, Anders; Geijer, Håkan

    2017-06-01

    Background Iterative reconstruction (IR) is a recent reconstruction algorithm for computed tomography (CT) that can be used instead of the standard algorithm, filtered back projection (FBP), to reduce radiation dose and/or improve image quality. Purpose To evaluate and compare the image quality of low-dose CT of the lumbar spine reconstructed with IR to conventional FBP, without further reduction of radiation dose. Material and Methods Low-dose CT on 55 patients was performed on a Siemens scanner using 120 kV tube voltage, 30 reference mAs, and automatic dose modulation. From raw CT data, lumbar spine CT images were reconstructed with a medium filter (B41f) using FBP and four levels of IR (levels 2-5). Five reviewers scored all images on seven image quality criteria according to the European guidelines on quality criteria for CT, using a five-grade scale. A side-by-side comparison was also performed. Results There was significant improvement in image quality for IR (levels 2-4) compared to FBP. According to visual grading regression, odds ratios of all criteria with 95% confidence intervals for IR2, IR3, IR4, and IR5 were: 1.59 (1.39-1.83), 1.74 (1.51-1.99), 1.68 (1.46-1.93), and 1.08 (0.94-1.23), respectively. In the side-by-side comparison of all reconstructions, images with IR (levels 2-4) received the highest scores. The mean overall CTDIvol was 1.70 mGy (SD 0.46; range, 1.01-3.83 mGy). Image noise decreased in a linear fashion with increased strength of IR. Conclusion Iterative reconstruction at levels 2, 3, and 4 improves image quality of low-dose CT of the lumbar spine compared to FPB.

  10. Ultra-Low-Dose CT of the Thorax Using Iterative Reconstruction: Evaluation of Image Quality and Radiation Dose Reduction.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yookyung; Kim, Yoon Kyung; Lee, Bo Eun; Lee, Seok Jeong; Ryu, Yon Ju; Lee, Jin Hwa; Chang, Jung Hyun

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the image quality and radiation dose reduction of ultra-low-dose CT using sinogram-affirmed iterative reconstruction (SAFIRE). This prospective study enrolled 25 patients who underwent three consecutive unenhanced CT scans including low-dose CT (120 kVp and 30 mAs) and two ultra-low-dose CT protocols (protocol A, 100 kVp and 20 mAs; protocol B, 80 kVp and 30 mAs) with image reconstruction using SAFIRE. The image quality and radiation dose reduction were assessed. The mean (± SD) effective radiation dose was 1.06 ± 0.11, 0.44 ± 0.05, and 0.31 ± 0.03 mSv for low-dose CT, ultra-low-dose CT protocol A, and ultra-low-dose CT protocol B, respectively. Overall image quality was determined as diagnostic in 100% of low-dose CT scans, 96% of ultra-low-dose CT protocol A scans, and 88% of ultra-low-dose CT protocol B scans. All patients with nondiagnostic quality images had a body mass index (weight in kilograms divided by the square of height in meters) greater than 25. There was no statistically significant difference in detection frequencies of 14 lesion types among the three CT protocols, but pulmonary emphysema was detected in fewer patients (3/25) in ultra-low-dose CT protocol B scans compared with ultra-low-dose CT protocol A scans (5/25) or low-dose CT scans (6/25). We measured the longest dimensions of 33 small solid nodules (3.8-12.4 mm in long diameter) and found no statistically significant difference in the values afforded by the three CT protocols (p = 0.135). Iterative reconstruction allows ultra-low-dose CT and affords acceptable image quality, allowing size measurements of solid pulmonary nodules to be made.

  11. Low-dose CT for quantitative analysis in acute respiratory distress syndrome

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-31

    few studies on pulmonary emphysema [22-24], that showed that quantification of hyperinflated tissue is not affected by a reduction of tube current...Pulmonary emphysema : radiation dose and section thickness at multidetector CT quantification--comparison with macroscopic and microscopic...pulmonary emphysema using a low-dose technique. Radiol Med 2002, 104:13-24. 24. Nishio M, Matsumoto S, Ohno Y, Sugihara N, Inokawa H, Yoshikawa T

  12. Low-Dose CT of the Paranasal Sinuses: Minimizing X-Ray Exposure with Spectral Shaping.

    PubMed

    Wuest, Wolfgang; May, Matthias; Saake, Marc; Brand, Michael; Uder, Michael; Lell, Michael

    2016-11-01

    Shaping the energy spectrum of the X-ray beam has been shown to be beneficial in low-dose CT. This study's aim was to investigate dose and image quality of tin filtration at 100 kV for pre-operative planning in low-dose paranasal CT imaging in a large patient cohort. In a prospective trial, 129 patients were included. 64 patients were randomly assigned to the study protocol (100 kV with additional tin filtration, 150mAs, 192x0.6-mm slice collimation) and 65 patients to the standard low-dose protocol (100 kV, 50mAs, 128 × 0.6-mm slice collimation). To assess the image quality, subjective parameters were evaluated using a five-point scale. This scale was applied on overall image quality and contour delineation of critical anatomical structures. All scans were of diagnostic image quality. Bony structures were of good diagnostic image quality in both groups, soft tissues were of sufficient diagnostic image quality in the study group because of a high level of noise. Radiation exposure was very low in both groups, but significantly lower in the study group (CTDIvol 1.2 mGy vs. 4.4 mGy, p < 0.001). Spectral optimization (tin filtration at 100 kV) allows for visualization of the paranasal sinus with sufficient image quality at a very low radiation exposure. • Spectral optimization (tin filtration) is beneficial to low-dose parasinus CT • Tin filtration at 100 kV yields sufficient image quality for pre-operative planning • Diagnostic parasinus CT can be performed with an effective dose <0.05 mSv.

  13. Screening of illegal intracorporeal containers ("body packing"): is abdominal radiography sufficiently accurate? A comparative study with low-dose CT.

    PubMed

    Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre; Canel, Laurent; Becker, Christoph D; Wolff, Hans; Elger, Bernice; Lock, Eric; Sarasin, François; Bonfanti, Monica S; Dupuis-Lozeron, Elise; Perneger, Thomas; Platon, Alexandra

    2012-12-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic performance of abdominal radiography in the detection of illegal intracorporeal containers (hereafter, packets), with low-dose computed tomography (CT) as the reference standard. This study was approved by the institutional ethical review board, with written informed consent. From July 2007 to July 2010, 330 people (296 men, 34 women; mean age, 32 years [range, 18-55 years]) suspected of having ingested drug packets underwent supine abdominal radiography and low-dose CT. The presence or absence of packets at abdominal radiography was reported, with low-dose CT as the reference standard. The density and number of packets (≤ 12 or >12) at low-dose CT were recorded and analyzed to determine whether those variables influence interpretation of results at abdominal radiography. Packets were detected at low-dose CT in 53 (16%) suspects. Sensitivity of abdominal radiography for depiction of packets was 0.77 (41 of 53), and specificity was 0.96 (267 of 277). The packets appeared isoattenuated to the bowel contents at low-dose CT in 16 (30%) of the 53 suspects with positive results. Nineteen (36%) of the 53 suspects with positive low-dose CT results had fewer than 12 packets. Packets that were isoattenuated at low-dose CT and a low number of packets (≤12) were both significantly associated with false-negative results at abdominal radiography (P = .004 and P = .016, respectively). Abdominal radiography is mainly limited by low sensitivity when compared with low-dose CT in the screening of people suspected of carrying drug packets. Low-dose CT is an effective imaging alternative to abdominal radiography. © RSNA, 2012.

  14. Investigation of iterative image reconstruction in low-dose breast CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Junguo; Yang, Kai; Boone, John M.; Han, Xiao; Sidky, Emil Y.; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2014-06-01

    There is interest in developing computed tomography (CT) dedicated to breast-cancer imaging. Because breast tissues are radiation-sensitive, the total radiation exposure in a breast-CT scan is kept low, often comparable to a typical two-view mammography exam, thus resulting in a challenging low-dose-data-reconstruction problem. In recent years, evidence has been found that suggests that iterative reconstruction may yield images of improved quality from low-dose data. In this work, based upon the constrained image total-variation minimization program and its numerical solver, i.e., the adaptive steepest descent-projection onto the convex set (ASD-POCS), we investigate and evaluate iterative image reconstructions from low-dose breast-CT data of patients, with a focus on identifying and determining key reconstruction parameters, devising surrogate utility metrics for characterizing reconstruction quality, and tailoring the program and ASD-POCS to the specific reconstruction task under consideration. The ASD-POCS reconstructions appear to outperform the corresponding clinical FDK reconstructions, in terms of subjective visualization and surrogate utility metrics.

  15. Detecting airway remodeling in COPD and emphysema using low-dose CT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudyanto, R.; Ceresa, M.; Muñoz-Barrutia, A.; Ortiz-de-Solorzano, C.

    2012-03-01

    In this study, we quantitatively characterize lung airway remodeling caused by smoking-related emphysema and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD), in low-dose CT scans. To that end, we established three groups of individuals: subjects with COPD (n=35), subjects with emphysema (n=38) and healthy smokers (n=28). All individuals underwent a low-dose CT scan, and the images were analyzed as described next. First the lung airways were segmented using a fast marching method and labeled according to its generation. Along each airway segment, cross-section images were resampled orthogonal to the airway axis. Next 128 rays were cast from the center of the airway lumen in each crosssection slice. Finally, we used an integral-based method, to measure lumen radius, wall thickness, mean wall percentage and mean peak wall attenuation on every cast ray. Our analysis shows that both the mean global wall thickness and the lumen radius of the airways of both COPD and emphysema groups were significantly different from those of the healthy group. In addition, the wall thickness change starts at the 3rd airway generation in the COPD patients compared with emphysema patients, who display the first significant changes starting in the 2nd generation. In conclusion, it is shown that airway remodeling happens in individuals suffering from either COPD or emphysema, with some local difference between both groups, and that we are able to detect and accurately quantify this process using images of low-dose CT scans.

  16. Investigation of iterative image reconstruction in low-dose breast CT.

    PubMed

    Bian, Junguo; Yang, Kai; Boone, John M; Han, Xiao; Sidky, Emil Y; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2014-06-07

    There is interest in developing computed tomography (CT) dedicated to breast-cancer imaging. Because breast tissues are radiation-sensitive, the total radiation exposure in a breast-CT scan is kept low, often comparable to a typical two-view mammography exam, thus resulting in a challenging low-dose-data-reconstruction problem. In recent years, evidence has been found that suggests that iterative reconstruction may yield images of improved quality from low-dose data. In this work, based upon the constrained image total-variation minimization program and its numerical solver, i.e., the adaptive steepest descent-projection onto the convex set (ASD-POCS), we investigate and evaluate iterative image reconstructions from low-dose breast-CT data of patients, with a focus on identifying and determining key reconstruction parameters, devising surrogate utility metrics for characterizing reconstruction quality, and tailoring the program and ASD-POCS to the specific reconstruction task under consideration. The ASD-POCS reconstructions appear to outperform the corresponding clinical FDK reconstructions, in terms of subjective visualization and surrogate utility metrics.

  17. Patient-specific image denoising for ultra-low-dose CT-guided lung biopsies.

    PubMed

    Green, Michael; Marom, Edith M; Konen, Eli; Kiryati, Nahum; Mayer, Arnaldo

    2017-06-10

    Low-dose CT screening of the lungs is becoming a reality, triggering many more CT-guided lung biopsies. During these biopsies, the patient is submitted to repeated guiding scans with substantial cumulated radiation dose. Extension of the dose reduction to the biopsy procedure is therefore necessary. We propose an image denoising algorithm that specifically addresses the setup of CT-guided lung biopsies. It minimizes radiation exposure while keeping the image quality appropriate for navigation to the target lesion. A database of high-SNR CT patches is used to filter noisy pixels in a non-local means framework, while explicitly enforcing local spatial consistency in order to preserve fine image details and structures. The patch database may be created from a multi-patient set of high-SNR lung scans. Alternatively, the first scan, acquired at high-SNR right before the needle insertion, can provide a convenient patient-specific patch database. The proposed algorithm is compared to state-of-the-art denoising algorithms for a dataset of 43 real CT-guided biopsy scans. Ultra-low-dose scans were simulated by synthetic noise addition to the sinogram, equivalent to a 96% reduction in radiation dose. The feature similarity score for the proposed algorithm outperformed the compared methods for all the scans in the dataset. The benefit of the patient-specific patch database over the multi-patient one is demonstrated in terms of recovered contrast for a tiny porcine lung nodule, following denoising with both approaches. The proposed method provides a promising approach to the denoising of ultra-low-dose CT-guided biopsy images.

  18. A low dose simulation tool for CT systems with energy integrating detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Zabic, Stanislav; Morton, Thomas; Brown, Kevin M.; Wang Qiu

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: This paper introduces a new strategy for simulating low-dose computed tomography (CT) scans using real scans of a higher dose as an input. The tool is verified against simulations and real scans and compared to other approaches found in the literature. Methods: The conditional variance identity is used to properly account for the variance of the input high-dose data, and a formula is derived for generating a new Poisson noise realization which has the same mean and variance as the true low-dose data. The authors also derive a formula for the inclusion of real samples of detector noise, properly scaled according to the level of the simulated x-ray signals. Results: The proposed method is shown to match real scans in number of experiments. Noise standard deviation measurements in simulated low-dose reconstructions of a 35 cm water phantom match real scans in a range from 500 to 10 mA with less than 5% error. Mean and variance of individual detector channels are shown to match closely across the detector array. Finally, the visual appearance of noise and streak artifacts is shown to match in real scans even under conditions of photon-starvation (with tube currents as low as 10 and 80 mA). Additionally, the proposed method is shown to be more accurate than previous approaches (1) in achieving the correct mean and variance in reconstructed images from pure-Poisson noise simulations (with no detector noise) under photon-starvation conditions, and (2) in simulating the correct noise level and detector noise artifacts in real low-dose scans. Conclusions: The proposed method can accurately simulate low-dose CT data starting from high-dose data, including effects from photon starvation and detector noise. This is potentially a very useful tool in helping to determine minimum dose requirements for a wide range of clinical protocols and advanced reconstruction algorithms.

  19. Effects of filtering on colorectal polyp detection in ultra low dose CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoonenberg, Gert A.; de Vries, Ayso; Grigorescu, Simona; Peters, Joost; Vilanova, Anna; Truyen, Roel; Stoker, Jaap; Gerritsen, Frans

    2006-03-01

    We have evaluated the feasibility of polyp detection on simulated ultra low dose CT Colonography data by a computer aided polyp detection (CAD) algorithm. We compared the results of ultra low dose to normal dose data. Twenty-three extensively prepared patients were scanned in prone and supine position at 25 to 100 mAs (average 70 mAs) depending on their waist circumference. Noise was added and the scans were reconstructed at 6.25 and 1.39 mAs. To evaluate the performance of the CAD system, polyps detected by an experienced reviewer and confirmed at colonoscopy were used as ground truth. Curvature, concavity and sphericity of the colon surface were used to detect polyp candidates. Bilateral filtering was used to reduce noise. We present the results for 40 polyps of 6 mm or larger as measured during colonoscopy. The by-polyp sensitivity was 80% for medium size polyps (6-9 mm) and 97% for large polyps (10 mm or larger) at an average value of 5 false-positives per scan for normal dose data. The by-polyp sensitivity was 81% for medium size polyps and 85% for large size polyps at an average value of 5 false-positives per scan for low dose data (6.25 mAs). Finally for the ultra low dose data (1.39 mAs) we achieved a by-polyp sensitivity of 75% for medium size polyps and 97% for large polyps at an average value of 5 false-positives per scan. The conclusion of our study is that CAD for polyp detection is feasible on ultra low dose CT colonography data.

  20. A framework to measure myocardial extracellular volume fraction using dual-phase low dose CT images

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yixun; Liu, Songtao; Nacif, Marcelo S.; Sibley, Christopher T.; Bluemke, David A.; Summers, Ronald M.; Yao, Jianhua

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Myocardial extracellular volume fraction (ECVF) is a surrogate imaging biomarker of diffuse myocardial fibrosis, a hallmark of pathologic ventricular remodeling. Low dose cardiac CT is emerging as a promising modality to detect diffuse interstitial myocardial fibrosis due to its fast acquisition and low radiation; however, the insufficient contrast in the low dose CT images poses great challenge to measure ECVF from the image. Methods: To deal with this difficulty, the authors present a complete ECVF measurement framework including a point-guided myocardial modeling, a deformable model-based myocardium segmentation, nonrigid registration of pre- and post-CT, and ECVF calculation. Results: The proposed method was evaluated on 20 patients by two observers. Compared to the manually delineated reference segmentations, the accuracy of our segmentation in terms of true positive volume fraction (TPVF), false positive volume fraction (FPVF), and average surface distance (ASD), were 92.18% ± 3.52%, 0.31% ± 0.10%, 0.69 ± 0.14 mm, respectively. The interobserver variability measured by concordance correlation coefficient regarding TPVF, FPVF, and ASD were 0.95, 0.90, 0.94, respectively, demonstrating excellent agreement. Bland-Altman method showed 95% limits of agreement between ECVF at CT and ECVF at MR. Conclusions: The proposed framework demonstrates its efficiency, accuracy, and noninvasiveness in ECVF measurement and dramatically advances the ECVF at cardiac CT toward its clinical use. PMID:24089934

  1. A framework to measure myocardial extracellular volume fraction using dual-phase low dose CT images

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yixun; Summers, Ronald M.; Yao, Jianhua; Liu, Songtao; Sibley, Christopher T.; Bluemke, David A.; Nacif, Marcelo S.

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: Myocardial extracellular volume fraction (ECVF) is a surrogate imaging biomarker of diffuse myocardial fibrosis, a hallmark of pathologic ventricular remodeling. Low dose cardiac CT is emerging as a promising modality to detect diffuse interstitial myocardial fibrosis due to its fast acquisition and low radiation; however, the insufficient contrast in the low dose CT images poses great challenge to measure ECVF from the image. Methods: To deal with this difficulty, the authors present a complete ECVF measurement framework including a point-guided myocardial modeling, a deformable model-based myocardium segmentation, nonrigid registration of pre- and post-CT, and ECVF calculation. Results: The proposed method was evaluated on 20 patients by two observers. Compared to the manually delineated reference segmentations, the accuracy of our segmentation in terms of true positive volume fraction (TPVF), false positive volume fraction (FPVF), and average surface distance (ASD), were 92.18% ± 3.52%, 0.31% ± 0.10%, 0.69 ± 0.14 mm, respectively. The interobserver variability measured by concordance correlation coefficient regarding TPVF, FPVF, and ASD were 0.95, 0.90, 0.94, respectively, demonstrating excellent agreement. Bland-Altman method showed 95% limits of agreement between ECVF at CT and ECVF at MR. Conclusions: The proposed framework demonstrates its efficiency, accuracy, and noninvasiveness in ECVF measurement and dramatically advances the ECVF at cardiac CT toward its clinical use.

  2. Ultrasound measured renal length versus low dose CT volume in predicting single kidney glomerular filtration rate.

    PubMed

    Widjaja, E; Oxtoby, J W; Hale, T L; Jones, P W; Harden, P N; McCall, I W

    2004-09-01

    Ultrasound measured renal length and CT measured renal volume are potential surrogate markers for single kidney glomerular filtration rate (SKGFR). The aims of this study are to determine: (1) the repeatability of ultrasound measured length and low radiation dose spiral CT measured volume; (2) the relationship between renal length and volume; and (3) whether length and/or volume is a predictor of SKGFR. 69 patients with suspected renal artery stenosis underwent ultrasound renal length measurement, CT evaluation of renal volume and assessment of SKGFR. 40 patients had ultrasound measurement of length and CT evaluation of volume performed twice on two separate visits. 25 patients also had ultrasound measured renal parenchymal thickness and area. The region of interest was drawn around the kidneys and a threshold set to subtract renal peripelvic fat and renal pelvis. The volume from each slice was summed to obtain the total volume for each kidney. The limits of agreement for ultrasound measured renal length were -1.6 cm to 1.52 cm and that for CT renal volume were -33 ml to 32 ml. There was significant correlation between ultrasound measured length and CT volume (r=0.74, p<0.01). Volume was a better predictor of SKGFR (r(2)=0.57) than length (r(2)=0.48). The combined parameters of ultrasound measured length, area and parenchymal thickness were a better predictor of volume (r(2)=0.81) and SKGFR (r(2)=0.58) than ultrasound measured length on its own. The low dose CT technique was reasonably reproducible and renal volume measurements correlate better with SKGFR than length. Ultrasound predictions of renal volume and SKGFR can be improved by incorporating cross-sectional area and parenchymal thickness. Further investigation is required to refine our low dose CT technique.

  3. Automated segmentation of cardiac visceral fat in low-dose non-contrast chest CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yiting; Liang, Mingzhu; Yankelevitz, David F.; Henschke, Claudia I.; Reeves, Anthony P.

    2015-03-01

    Cardiac visceral fat was segmented from low-dose non-contrast chest CT images using a fully automated method. Cardiac visceral fat is defined as the fatty tissues surrounding the heart region, enclosed by the lungs and posterior to the sternum. It is measured by constraining the heart region with an Anatomy Label Map that contains robust segmentations of the lungs and other major organs and estimating the fatty tissue within this region. The algorithm was evaluated on 124 low-dose and 223 standard-dose non-contrast chest CT scans from two public datasets. Based on visual inspection, 343 cases had good cardiac visceral fat segmentation. For quantitative evaluation, manual markings of cardiac visceral fat regions were made in 3 image slices for 45 low-dose scans and the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) was computed. The automated algorithm achieved an average DSC of 0.93. Cardiac visceral fat volume (CVFV), heart region volume (HRV) and their ratio were computed for each case. The correlation between cardiac visceral fat measurement and coronary artery and aortic calcification was also evaluated. Results indicated the automated algorithm for measuring cardiac visceral fat volume may be an alternative method to the traditional manual assessment of thoracic region fat content in the assessment of cardiovascular disease risk.

  4. Discriminative feature representation: an effective postprocessing solution to low dose CT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yang; Liu, Jin; Hu, Yining; Yang, Jian; Shi, Luyao; Shu, Huazhong; Gui, Zhiguo; Coatrieux, Gouenou; Luo, Limin

    2017-03-01

    This paper proposes a concise and effective approach termed discriminative feature representation (DFR) for low dose computerized tomography (LDCT) image processing, which is currently a challenging problem in medical imaging field. This DFR method assumes LDCT images as the superposition of desirable high dose CT (HDCT) 3D features and undesirable noise-artifact 3D features (the combined term of noise and artifact features induced by low dose scan protocols), and the decomposed HDCT features are used to provide the processed LDCT images with higher quality. The target HDCT features are solved via the DFR algorithm using a featured dictionary composed by atoms representing HDCT features and noise-artifact features. In this study, the featured dictionary is efficiently built using physical phantom images collected from the same CT scanner as the target clinical LDCT images to process. The proposed DFR method also has good robustness in parameter setting for different CT scanner types. This DFR method can be directly applied to process DICOM formatted LDCT images, and has good applicability to current CT systems. Comparative experiments with abdomen LDCT data validate the good performance of the proposed approach. This research was supported by National Natural Science Foundation under grants (81370040, 81530060), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, and the Qing Lan Project in Jiangsu Province.

  5. Reproducibility and variability of very low dose hepatic perfusion CT in metastatic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Topcuoğlu, Osman Melih; Karçaaltıncaba, Muşturay; Akata, Deniz; Özmen, Mustafa Nasuh

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to determine the intra- and interobserver agreement on the software analysis of very low dose hepatic perfusion CT (pCT). METHODS A total of 53 pCT examinations were obtained from 21 patients (16 men, 5 women; mean age, 60.4 years) with proven liver metastasis from various primary cancers. The pCT examinations were analyzed by two readers independently and perfusion parameters were noted for whole liver, whole metastasis, metastasis wall, and normal-looking liver (liver tissue without metastasis) in regions of interest (ROIs). Readers repeated the analysis after an interval of one month. Intra- and interobserver agreements were assessed with intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) and Bland-Altman statistics. RESULTS The mean ICCs of all ROIs between readers were 0.91, 0.93, 0.86, 0.45, 0.53, and 0.66 for blood flow (BF), blood volume (BV), permeability, arterial liver perfusion (ALP), portal venous perfusion (PVP) and hepatic perfusion index (HPI), respectively. The mean ICCs of all ROIs between readings were 0.86, 0.91, 0.81, 0.53, 0.56, and 0.71 for BF, BV, permeability, ALP, PVP, and HPI, respectively. There was greater agreement on the parameters measured for the whole metastasis than on the parameters measured for the metastasis wall. The effective dose of all perfusion CT studies was 2.9 mSv. CONCLUSION There is greater intra- and interobserver agreement for BF and BV than for permeability, ALP, PVP, and HPI at very low dose hepatic pCT. Permeability, ALP, PVP, and HPI parameters cannot be used in clinical practice for hepatic pCT with an effective dose of 2.9 mSv. PMID:27759566

  6. Model-based iterative reconstruction in ultra-low-dose pediatric chest CT: comparison with adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hae Jin; Yoo, So-Young; Jeon, Tae Yeon; Kim, Ji Hye

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate image quality and dose reduction of ultra-low-dose pediatric chest CT reconstructed with model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR), as compared with adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR). Fifty-seven patients (mean age 14 years, M:F=31:26) who underwent ultra-low-dose chest CT reconstructed with both MBIR and ASIR were enrolled in the study. The subjective and objective image qualities of both reconstruction techniques were assessed by 3 radiologists, and compared using statistical analysis. We also evaluated radiation dose of ultra-low-dose chest CT as well as degree of dose reduction in comparison to the prior CT (either standard dose or reduced dose protocol) available in 36 patients. The image quality of MBIR was superior to ASIR both subjectively and objectively. While MBIR showed preserved diagnostic acceptability in 100%, ASIR showed 92% at mean 0.31 mSv (range, 0.13-0.57 mSv) ultra-low-dose CT. In the 36 patients who underwent the prior CT, mean decrease in size-specific dose estimate (SSDE) and dose length product (DLP) at ultra-low-dose CT was 88% (range, 34% - 98%) and 86% (range,42% - 99%), respectively. MBIR significantly improves image quality, as compared to ASIR. Furthermore, MBIR facilitates diagnostically acceptable ultra-low-dose chest CT with nearly 90% less radiation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. A Longitudinal Low Dose μCT Analysis of Bone Healing in Mice: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Di, Lu-Zhao; Leblanc, Élisabeth; Alinejad, Yasaman; Beaudoin, Jean-François; Lecomte, Roger; Berthod, François; Faucheux, Nathalie; Balg, Frédéric

    2014-01-01

    Low dose microcomputed tomography (μCT) is a recently matured technique that enables the study of longitudinal bone healing and the testing of experimental treatments for bone repair. This imaging technique has been used for studying craniofacial repair in mice but not in an orthopedic context. This is mainly due to the size of the defects (approximately 1.0 mm) in long bone, which heal rapidly and may thus negatively impact the assessment of the effectiveness of experimental treatments. We developed a longitudinal low dose μCT scan analysis method combined with a new image segmentation and extraction software using Hounsfield unit (HU) scores to quantitatively monitor bone healing in small femoral cortical defects in live mice. We were able to reproducibly quantify bone healing longitudinally over time with three observers. We used high speed intramedullary reaming to prolong healing in order to circumvent the rapid healing typical of small defects. Bone healing prolongation combined with μCT imaging to study small bone defects in live mice thus shows potential as a promising tool for future preclinical research on bone healing. PMID:25431676

  8. Computer-aided detection of early interstitial lung diseases using low-dose CT images.

    PubMed

    Park, Sang Cheol; Tan, Jun; Wang, Xingwei; Lederman, Dror; Leader, Joseph K; Kim, Soo Hyung; Zheng, Bin

    2011-02-21

    This study aims to develop a new computer-aided detection (CAD) scheme to detect early interstitial lung disease (ILD) using low-dose computed tomography (CT) examinations. The CAD scheme classifies each pixel depicted on the segmented lung areas into positive or negative groups for ILD using a mesh-grid-based region growth method and a multi-feature-based artificial neural network (ANN). A genetic algorithm was applied to select optimal image features and the ANN structure. In testing each CT examination, only pixels selected by the mesh-grid region growth method were analyzed and classified by the ANN to improve computational efficiency. All unselected pixels were classified as negative for ILD. After classifying all pixels into the positive and negative groups, CAD computed a detection score based on the ratio of the number of positive pixels to all pixels in the segmented lung areas, which indicates the likelihood of the test case being positive for ILD. When applying to an independent testing dataset of 15 positive and 15 negative cases, the CAD scheme yielded the area under receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC = 0.884 ± 0.064) and 80.0% sensitivity at 85.7% specificity. The results demonstrated the feasibility of applying the CAD scheme to automatically detect early ILD using low-dose CT examinations.

  9. Computer-aided detection of early interstitial lung diseases using low-dose CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sang Cheol; Tan, Jun; Wang, Xingwei; Lederman, Dror; Leader, Joseph K.; Kim, Soo Hyung; Zheng, Bin

    2011-02-01

    This study aims to develop a new computer-aided detection (CAD) scheme to detect early interstitial lung disease (ILD) using low-dose computed tomography (CT) examinations. The CAD scheme classifies each pixel depicted on the segmented lung areas into positive or negative groups for ILD using a mesh-grid-based region growth method and a multi-feature-based artificial neural network (ANN). A genetic algorithm was applied to select optimal image features and the ANN structure. In testing each CT examination, only pixels selected by the mesh-grid region growth method were analyzed and classified by the ANN to improve computational efficiency. All unselected pixels were classified as negative for ILD. After classifying all pixels into the positive and negative groups, CAD computed a detection score based on the ratio of the number of positive pixels to all pixels in the segmented lung areas, which indicates the likelihood of the test case being positive for ILD. When applying to an independent testing dataset of 15 positive and 15 negative cases, the CAD scheme yielded the area under receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC = 0.884 ± 0.064) and 80.0% sensitivity at 85.7% specificity. The results demonstrated the feasibility of applying the CAD scheme to automatically detect early ILD using low-dose CT examinations.

  10. Automatic detection of lung nodules from multislice low-dose CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Li; Novak, Carol L.; Qian, JianZhong; Kohl, Gerhard; Naidich, David

    2001-07-01

    We describe in this paper a novel, efficient method to automatically detect lung nodules from low-dose, high- resolution CT (HRCT) images taken with a multi-slice scanner. First, the program identifies initial anatomical seeds, including lung nodule candidates, airways, vessels, and other features that appear as bright opacities in CT images. Next, a 3D region growing method is applied to each seed. The thresholds for segmentation are adaptively adjusted based upon automatic analysis of the local histogram. Once an object has been examined, vessels and other non-nodule objects are quickly excluded from future study, thus saving computation time. Finally, extracted 3D objects are classified a nodule candidates or non-nodule structures. Anatomical knowledge and multiple measurements, such as volume and sphericity, are used to categorize each object. The detected nodules are presented to the user for examination and verification. The proposed method was applied to 14 low dose HRCT patient studies. Since the CT images were taken with a multi-slice scanner, the average number of slices per study was 292. In every case the x-ray exposure was about 20 mAs, a suitable dosage for screening. In our preliminary results, the method detected an average of 8 nodules per study, with an average size of 3.3 mm in diameter.

  11. Automated measurement of pulmonary artery in low-dose non-contrast chest CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yiting; Liang, Mingzhu; Yankelevitz, David F.; Henschke, Claudia I.; Reeves, Anthony P.

    2015-03-01

    A new measurement of the pulmonary artery diameter is obtained where the artery may be robustly segmented between the heart and the artery bifurcation. An automated algorithm is presented that can make this pulmonary artery measurement in low-dose non-contrast chest CT images. The algorithm uses a cylinder matching method following geometric constraints obtained from other adjacent organs that have been previously segmented. This new measurement and the related ratio of pulmonary artery to aortic artery measurement are compared to traditional manual approaches for pulmonary artery characterization. The algorithm was qualitatively evaluated on 124 low-dose and 223 standard-dose non-contrast chest CT scans from two public datasets; 324 out of the 347 cases had good segmentations and in the other 23 cases there was significant boundary inaccuracy. For quantitative evaluation, the comparison was to manually marked pulmonary artery boundary in an axial slice in 45 cases; the resulting average Dice Similarity Coefficient was 0.88 (max 0.95, min 0.74). For the 45 cases with manual markings, the correlation between the automated pulmonary artery to ascending aorta diameter ratio and manual ratio at pulmonary artery bifurcation level was 0.81. Using Bland-Altman analysis, the mean difference of the two ratios was 0.03 and the limits of agreement was (-0.12, 0.18). This automated measurement may have utility as an alternative to the conventional manual measurement of pulmonary artery diameter at the bifurcation level especially in the context of noisy low-dose CT images.

  12. Ultra-low dose CT attenuation correction for PET/CT: analysis of sparse view data acquisition and reconstruction algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rui, Xue; Cheng, Lishui; Long, Yong; Fu, Lin; Alessio, Adam M.; Asma, Evren; Kinahan, Paul E.; De Man, Bruno

    2015-09-01

    For PET/CT systems, PET image reconstruction requires corresponding CT images for anatomical localization and attenuation correction. In the case of PET respiratory gating, multiple gated CT scans can offer phase-matched attenuation and motion correction, at the expense of increased radiation dose. We aim to minimize the dose of the CT scan, while preserving adequate image quality for the purpose of PET attenuation correction by introducing sparse view CT data acquisition. We investigated sparse view CT acquisition protocols resulting in ultra-low dose CT scans designed for PET attenuation correction. We analyzed the tradeoffs between the number of views and the integrated tube current per view for a given dose using CT and PET simulations of a 3D NCAT phantom with lesions inserted into liver and lung. We simulated seven CT acquisition protocols with {984, 328, 123, 41, 24, 12, 8} views per rotation at a gantry speed of 0.35 s. One standard dose and four ultra-low dose levels, namely, 0.35 mAs, 0.175 mAs, 0.0875 mAs, and 0.043 75 mAs, were investigated. Both the analytical Feldkamp, Davis and Kress (FDK) algorithm and the Model Based Iterative Reconstruction (MBIR) algorithm were used for CT image reconstruction. We also evaluated the impact of sinogram interpolation to estimate the missing projection measurements due to sparse view data acquisition. For MBIR, we used a penalized weighted least squares (PWLS) cost function with an approximate total-variation (TV) regularizing penalty function. We compared a tube pulsing mode and a continuous exposure mode for sparse view data acquisition. Global PET ensemble root-mean-squares-error (RMSE) and local ensemble lesion activity error were used as quantitative evaluation metrics for PET image quality. With sparse view sampling, it is possible to greatly reduce the CT scan dose when it is primarily used for PET attenuation correction with little or no measureable effect on the PET image. For the four ultra-low dose

  13. Ultra-low dose CT attenuation correction for PET/CT: analysis of sparse view data acquisition and reconstruction algorithms.

    PubMed

    Rui, Xue; Cheng, Lishui; Long, Yong; Fu, Lin; Alessio, Adam M; Asma, Evren; Kinahan, Paul E; De Man, Bruno

    2015-10-07

    For PET/CT systems, PET image reconstruction requires corresponding CT images for anatomical localization and attenuation correction. In the case of PET respiratory gating, multiple gated CT scans can offer phase-matched attenuation and motion correction, at the expense of increased radiation dose. We aim to minimize the dose of the CT scan, while preserving adequate image quality for the purpose of PET attenuation correction by introducing sparse view CT data acquisition.We investigated sparse view CT acquisition protocols resulting in ultra-low dose CT scans designed for PET attenuation correction. We analyzed the tradeoffs between the number of views and the integrated tube current per view for a given dose using CT and PET simulations of a 3D NCAT phantom with lesions inserted into liver and lung. We simulated seven CT acquisition protocols with {984, 328, 123, 41, 24, 12, 8} views per rotation at a gantry speed of 0.35 s. One standard dose and four ultra-low dose levels, namely, 0.35 mAs, 0.175 mAs, 0.0875 mAs, and 0.043 75 mAs, were investigated. Both the analytical Feldkamp, Davis and Kress (FDK) algorithm and the Model Based Iterative Reconstruction (MBIR) algorithm were used for CT image reconstruction. We also evaluated the impact of sinogram interpolation to estimate the missing projection measurements due to sparse view data acquisition. For MBIR, we used a penalized weighted least squares (PWLS) cost function with an approximate total-variation (TV) regularizing penalty function. We compared a tube pulsing mode and a continuous exposure mode for sparse view data acquisition. Global PET ensemble root-mean-squares-error (RMSE) and local ensemble lesion activity error were used as quantitative evaluation metrics for PET image quality.With sparse view sampling, it is possible to greatly reduce the CT scan dose when it is primarily used for PET attenuation correction with little or no measureable effect on the PET image. For the four ultra-low dose levels

  14. Ultra-low dose CT attenuation correction for PET/CT: analysis of sparse view data acquisition and reconstruction algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Rui, Xue; Cheng, Lishui; Long, Yong; Fu, Lin; Alessio, Adam M.; Asma, Evren; Kinahan, Paul E.; De Man, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    For PET/CT systems, PET image reconstruction requires corresponding CT images for anatomical localization and attenuation correction. In the case of PET respiratory gating, multiple gated CT scans can offer phase-matched attenuation and motion correction, at the expense of increased radiation dose. We aim to minimize the dose of the CT scan, while preserving adequate image quality for the purpose of PET attenuation correction by introducing sparse view CT data acquisition. Methods We investigated sparse view CT acquisition protocols resulting in ultra-low dose CT scans designed for PET attenuation correction. We analyzed the tradeoffs between the number of views and the integrated tube current per view for a given dose using CT and PET simulations of a 3D NCAT phantom with lesions inserted into liver and lung. We simulated seven CT acquisition protocols with {984, 328, 123, 41, 24, 12, 8} views per rotation at a gantry speed of 0.35 seconds. One standard dose and four ultra-low dose levels, namely, 0.35 mAs, 0.175 mAs, 0.0875 mAs, and 0.04375 mAs, were investigated. Both the analytical FDK algorithm and the Model Based Iterative Reconstruction (MBIR) algorithm were used for CT image reconstruction. We also evaluated the impact of sinogram interpolation to estimate the missing projection measurements due to sparse view data acquisition. For MBIR, we used a penalized weighted least squares (PWLS) cost function with an approximate total-variation (TV) regularizing penalty function. We compared a tube pulsing mode and a continuous exposure mode for sparse view data acquisition. Global PET ensemble root-mean-squares-error (RMSE) and local ensemble lesion activity error were used as quantitative evaluation metrics for PET image quality. Results With sparse view sampling, it is possible to greatly reduce the CT scan dose when it is primarily used for PET attenuation correction with little or no measureable effect on the PET image. For the four ultra-low dose levels

  15. Texture-preserving Bayesian image reconstruction for low-dose CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao; Han, Hao; Hu, Yifan; Liu, Yan; Ma, Jianhua; Li, Lihong; Moore, William; Liang, Zhengrong

    2016-03-01

    Markov random field (MRF) model has been widely used in Bayesian image reconstruction to reconstruct piecewise smooth images in the presence of noise, such as in low-dose X-ray computed tomography (LdCT). While it can preserve edge sharpness via edge-preserving potential function, its regional smoothing may sacrifice tissue image textures, which have been recognized as useful imaging biomarkers, and thus it compromises clinical tasks such as differentiating malignant vs. benign lesions, e.g., lung nodule or colon polyp. This study aims to shift the edge preserving regional noise smoothing paradigm to texture-preserving framework for LdCT image reconstruction while retaining the advantage of MRF's neighborhood system on edge preservation. Specifically, we adapted the MRF model to incorporate the image textures of lung, bone, fat, muscle, etc. from previous full-dose CT scan as a priori knowledge for texture-preserving Bayesian reconstruction of current LdCT images. To show the feasibility of proposed reconstruction framework, experiments using clinical patient scans (with lung nodule or colon polyp) were conducted. The experimental outcomes showed noticeable gain by the a priori knowledge for LdCT image reconstruction with the well-known Haralick texture measures. Thus, it is conjectured that texture-preserving LdCT reconstruction has advantages over edge-preserving regional smoothing paradigm for texture-specific clinical applications.

  16. Evaluation of a low-dose CT protocol with oral contrast for assessment of acute appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Platon, Alexandra; Jlassi, Helmi; Rutschmann, Olivier T; Becker, Christoph D; Verdun, Francis R; Gervaz, Pascal; Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre

    2009-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate a low-dose CT with oral contrast medium (LDCT) for the diagnosis of acute appendicitis and compare its performance with standard-dose i.v. contrast-enhanced CT (standard CT) according to patients' BMIs. Eighty-six consecutive patients admitted with suspicion of acute appendicitis underwent LDCT (30 mAs), followed by standard CT (180 mAs). Both examinations were reviewed by two experienced radiologists for direct and indirect signs of appendicitis. Clinical and surgical follow-up was considered as the reference standard. Appendicitis was confirmed by surgery in 37 (43%) of the 86 patients. Twenty-nine (34%) patients eventually had an alternative discharge diagnosis to explain their abdominal pain. Clinical and biological follow-up was uneventful in 20 (23%) patients. LDCT and standard CT had the same sensitivity (100%, 33/33) and specificity (98%, 45/46) to diagnose appendicitis in patients with a body mass index (BMI) >or= 18.5. In slim patients (BMI<18.5), sensitivity to diagnose appendicitis was 50% (2/4) for LDCT and 100% (4/4) for standard CT, while specificity was identical for both techniques (67%, 2/3). LDCT may play a role in the diagnostic workup of patients with a BMI >or= 18.5.

  17. Robust low-dose dynamic cerebral perfusion CT image restoration via coupled dictionary learning scheme.

    PubMed

    Tian, Xiumei; Zeng, Dong; Zhang, Shanli; Huang, Jing; Zhang, Hua; He, Ji; Lu, Lijun; Xi, Weiwen; Ma, Jianhua; Bian, Zhaoying

    2016-11-22

    Dynamic cerebral perfusion x-ray computed tomography (PCT) imaging has been advocated to quantitatively and qualitatively assess hemodynamic parameters in the diagnosis of acute stroke or chronic cerebrovascular diseases. However, the associated radiation dose is a significant concern to patients due to its dynamic scan protocol. To address this issue, in this paper we propose an image restoration method by utilizing coupled dictionary learning (CDL) scheme to yield clinically acceptable PCT images with low-dose data acquisition. Specifically, in the present CDL scheme, the 2D background information from the average of the baseline time frames of low-dose unenhanced CT images and the 3D enhancement information from normal-dose sequential cerebral PCT images are exploited to train the dictionary atoms respectively. After getting the two trained dictionaries, we couple them to represent the desired PCT images as spatio-temporal prior in objective function construction. Finally, the low-dose dynamic cerebral PCT images are restored by using a general DL image processing. To get a robust solution, the objective function is solved by using a modified dictionary learning based image restoration algorithm. The experimental results on clinical data show that the present method can yield more accurate kinetic enhanced details and diagnostic hemodynamic parameter maps than the state-of-the-art methods.

  18. Low dose chest CT protocol (50 mAs) as a routine protocol for comprehensive assessment of intrathoracic abnormality.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Takeshi; Ohno, Yoshiharu; Nishino, Mizuki; Lin, Pei-Jan; Gautam, Shiva; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Hatabu, Hiroto

    2016-01-01

    To determine the diagnostic capability of low-dose CT (50 mAs) in comparison to standard-dose CT (150 mAs). Fifty-nine consecutive patients underwent two non-contrast chest CT scans with different current-time products (50 and 150 mAs at 120 kVp) on a 64-detector row CT scanner. Three board certified chest radiologists independently reviewed 118 series of 2 mm-thick images (2 series for each of 59 patients) in a random order. The readers assessed abnormal findings including emphysema, ground-glass opacity, reticular opacity, micronodules, bronchiectasis, honeycomb, nodules (>5 mm), aortic aneurysm, coronary artery calcification, pericardial and pleural effusion, pleural thickening, mediastinal tumor and lymph node enlargement. Five-point scale from 1 (definitely absent) to 5 (definitely present) was used to record the results. The rates of score agreement between two images were calculated. Deviation of one observer's score from other two observers was compared between low dose CT and standard dose CT. Mean agreement rate of the lung parenchymal findings between low dose CT and standard dose CT images was 0.836 (range, 0.746-0.926). Mean agreement rates for mediastinal and pleural findings were 0.920 (range, 0.735-1.000). There was no statistically significant difference in the deviation of the observers' scores between low-dose CT and standard-dose CT. Low dose CT protocol at 50 mAs can produce the screening results consistent with standard dose CT protocol (150 mAs), supporting routine use of low dose chest CT protocol.

  19. Low-dose 4D myocardial perfusion with x-ray micro-CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, D. P.; Badea, C. T.

    2017-03-01

    X-ray CT is widely used, both clinically and pre-clinically, for fast, high-resolution, anatomic imaging; however, compelling opportunities exist to expand its use in functional imaging applications. For instance, temporally-resolved CT data can detail cardiac motion and blood flow dynamics for one-stop cardiovascular CT imaging procedures. In previous work, we demonstrated efficient, low-dose projection acquisition and reconstruction strategies for cardiac micro-CT imaging and for multiple-injection micro-CT perfusion imaging. Here, we extend this previous work with regularization based on rank-sparse kernel regression and on filtration with the Karhunen-Loeve transform. Using a dual source, prospectively gated sampling strategy which produces an approximately uniform distribution of projections, we apply this revised algorithm to the assessment of both myocardial perfusion and cardiac functional metrics from the same set of projection data. We test the algorithm in simulations using a modified version of the MOBY mouse phantom which contains realistic perfusion and cardiac dynamics. The proposed algorithm reduces the reconstruction error by 81% relative to unregularized, algebraic reconstruction. The results confirm our ability to simultaneously solve for cardiac temporal motion and perfusion dynamics. In future work, we will apply the algorithm and sampling protocol to small animal cardiac studies.

  20. Automated aortic calcification detection in low-dose chest CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yiting; Htwe, Yu Maw; Padgett, Jennifer; Henschke, Claudia; Yankelevitz, David; Reeves, Anthony P.

    2014-03-01

    The extent of aortic calcification has been shown to be a risk indicator for vascular events including cardiac events. We have developed a fully automated computer algorithm to segment and measure aortic calcification in low-dose noncontrast, non-ECG gated, chest CT scans. The algorithm first segments the aorta using a pre-computed Anatomy Label Map (ALM). Then based on the segmented aorta, aortic calcification is detected and measured in terms of the Agatston score, mass score, and volume score. The automated scores are compared with reference scores obtained from manual markings. For aorta segmentation, the aorta is modeled as a series of discrete overlapping cylinders and the aortic centerline is determined using a cylinder-tracking algorithm. Then the aortic surface location is detected using the centerline and a triangular mesh model. The segmented aorta is used as a mask for the detection of aortic calcification. For calcification detection, the image is first filtered, then an elevated threshold of 160 Hounsfield units (HU) is used within the aorta mask region to reduce the effect of noise in low-dose scans, and finally non-aortic calcification voxels (bony structures, calcification in other organs) are eliminated. The remaining candidates are considered as true aortic calcification. The computer algorithm was evaluated on 45 low-dose non-contrast CT scans. Using linear regression, the automated Agatston score is 98.42% correlated with the reference Agatston score. The automated mass and volume score is respectively 98.46% and 98.28% correlated with the reference mass and volume score.

  1. Low-dose dual-energy electronic cleansing for fecal-tagging CT Colonography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Wenli; Zhang, Da; Lee, June-Goo; Yoshida, Hiroyuki

    2013-03-01

    Dual-energy electronic cleansing (DE-EC) provides a promising means for cleansing the tagged fecal materials in fecaltagging CT colonography (CTC). However, the increased radiation dose due to the double exposures in dual-energy CTC (DE-CTC) scanning is a major limitation for the use of DE-EC in clinical practice. The purpose of this study was to develop and evaluate a low-dose DE-EC scheme in fecal-tagging DE-CTC. In this study, a custom-made anthropomorphic colon phantom, which was filled with simulated tagged materials by non-ionic iodinated contrast agent (Omnipaque iohexol, GE Healthcare), was scanned by a dual-source CT scanner (SOMATON Definition Flash, Siemens Healthcare) at two photon energies: 80 kVp and 140 kVp with nine different tube current settings ranging from 12 to 74 mAs for 140 kVp, and then reconstructed by soft-tissue reconstruction kernel (B30f). The DE-CTC images were subjected to a low-dose DE-EC scheme. First, our image-space DE-CTC denoising filter was applied for reduction of image noise. Then, the noise-reduced images were processed by a virtual lumen tagging method for reduction of partial volume effect and tagging inhomogeneity. The results were compared with the registered CTC images of native phantom without fillings. Preliminary results showed that our low-dose DE-EC scheme achieved the cleansing ratios, defined by the proportion of the cleansed voxels in the tagging mask, between 93.18% (12 mAs) and 96.62% (74 mAs). Also, the soft-tissue preservation ratios, defined by the proportion of the persevered voxels in the soft-tissue mask, were maintained in the range between 94.67% and 96.41%.

  2. Low-dose and scatter-free cone-beam CT imaging: a preliminary study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Xue; Jia, Xun; Niu, Tianye; Zhu, Lei

    2012-03-01

    Clinical applications of CBCT imaging are still limited by excessive imaging dose from repeated scans and poor image quality mainly due to scatter contamination. Compressed sensing (CS) reconstruction algorithms have shown promises in recovering faithful signals from low-dose projection data, but do not serve well the needs of accurate CBCT imaging if effective scatter correction is not in place. Scatter can be accurately measured and removed using measurement-based methods. However, in conventional FDK reconstruction, these approaches are considered unpractical since they require multiple scans or moving the beam blocker during the data acquisition to compensate for the inevitable primary loss. In this work, we combine the measurement-based scatter correction and CS-based iterative reconstruction algorithm, such that scatter-free images can be obtained from low-dose data. We lower the CBCT dose by reducing the projection number and inserting lead strips between the x-ray source and the object. The insertion of lead strips also enables scatter measurement on the measured samples inside the strip shadows. CS-based iterative reconstruction is finally carried out to obtain scatter-free and low-dose CBCT images. Simulation studies are designed to optimize the lead strip geometry for a certain dose reduction ratio. After optimization, our approach reduces the CT number error from over 220HU to below 5HU on the Shepp-Logan phantom, with a dose reduction of ~80%. With the same dose reduction and the optimized method parameters, the CT number error is reduced from 242HU to 20HU in the selected region of interest on Catphan©600 phantom.

  3. Improving Low-dose Cardiac CT Images based on 3D Sparse Representation

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Luyao; Hu, Yining; Chen, Yang; Yin, Xindao; Shu, Huazhong; Luo, Limin; Coatrieux, Jean-Louis

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac computed tomography (CCT) is a reliable and accurate tool for diagnosis of coronary artery diseases and is also frequently used in surgery guidance. Low-dose scans should be considered in order to alleviate the harm to patients caused by X-ray radiation. However, low dose CT (LDCT) images tend to be degraded by quantum noise and streak artifacts. In order to improve the cardiac LDCT image quality, a 3D sparse representation-based processing (3D SR) is proposed by exploiting the sparsity and regularity of 3D anatomical features in CCT. The proposed method was evaluated by a clinical study of 14 patients. The performance of the proposed method was compared to the 2D spares representation-based processing (2D SR) and the state-of-the-art noise reduction algorithm BM4D. The visual assessment, quantitative assessment and qualitative assessment results show that the proposed approach can lead to effective noise/artifact suppression and detail preservation. Compared to the other two tested methods, 3D SR method can obtain results with image quality most close to the reference standard dose CT (SDCT) images. PMID:26980176

  4. Improving Low-dose Cardiac CT Images based on 3D Sparse Representation.

    PubMed

    Shi, Luyao; Hu, Yining; Chen, Yang; Yin, Xindao; Shu, Huazhong; Luo, Limin; Coatrieux, Jean-Louis

    2016-03-16

    Cardiac computed tomography (CCT) is a reliable and accurate tool for diagnosis of coronary artery diseases and is also frequently used in surgery guidance. Low-dose scans should be considered in order to alleviate the harm to patients caused by X-ray radiation. However, low dose CT (LDCT) images tend to be degraded by quantum noise and streak artifacts. In order to improve the cardiac LDCT image quality, a 3D sparse representation-based processing (3D SR) is proposed by exploiting the sparsity and regularity of 3D anatomical features in CCT. The proposed method was evaluated by a clinical study of 14 patients. The performance of the proposed method was compared to the 2D spares representation-based processing (2D SR) and the state-of-the-art noise reduction algorithm BM4D. The visual assessment, quantitative assessment and qualitative assessment results show that the proposed approach can lead to effective noise/artifact suppression and detail preservation. Compared to the other two tested methods, 3D SR method can obtain results with image quality most close to the reference standard dose CT (SDCT) images.

  5. A Shearlet-based algorithm for quantum noise removal in low-dose CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Aguan; Jiang, Huiqin; Ma, Ling; Liu, Yumin; Yang, Xiaopeng

    2016-03-01

    Low-dose CT (LDCT) scanning is a potential way to reduce the radiation exposure of X-ray in the population. It is necessary to improve the quality of low-dose CT images. In this paper, we propose an effective algorithm for quantum noise removal in LDCT images using shearlet transform. Because the quantum noise can be simulated by Poisson process, we first transform the quantum noise by using anscombe variance stabilizing transform (VST), producing an approximately Gaussian noise with unitary variance. Second, the non-noise shearlet coefficients are obtained by adaptive hard-threshold processing in shearlet domain. Third, we reconstruct the de-noised image using the inverse shearlet transform. Finally, an anscombe inverse transform is applied to the de-noised image, which can produce the improved image. The main contribution is to combine the anscombe VST with the shearlet transform. By this way, edge coefficients and noise coefficients can be separated from high frequency sub-bands effectively. A number of experiments are performed over some LDCT images by using the proposed method. Both quantitative and visual results show that the proposed method can effectively reduce the quantum noise while enhancing the subtle details. It has certain value in clinical application.

  6. Improving Low-dose Cardiac CT Images based on 3D Sparse Representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Luyao; Hu, Yining; Chen, Yang; Yin, Xindao; Shu, Huazhong; Luo, Limin; Coatrieux, Jean-Louis

    2016-03-01

    Cardiac computed tomography (CCT) is a reliable and accurate tool for diagnosis of coronary artery diseases and is also frequently used in surgery guidance. Low-dose scans should be considered in order to alleviate the harm to patients caused by X-ray radiation. However, low dose CT (LDCT) images tend to be degraded by quantum noise and streak artifacts. In order to improve the cardiac LDCT image quality, a 3D sparse representation-based processing (3D SR) is proposed by exploiting the sparsity and regularity of 3D anatomical features in CCT. The proposed method was evaluated by a clinical study of 14 patients. The performance of the proposed method was compared to the 2D spares representation-based processing (2D SR) and the state-of-the-art noise reduction algorithm BM4D. The visual assessment, quantitative assessment and qualitative assessment results show that the proposed approach can lead to effective noise/artifact suppression and detail preservation. Compared to the other two tested methods, 3D SR method can obtain results with image quality most close to the reference standard dose CT (SDCT) images.

  7. Effects of sparse sampling schemes on image quality in low-dose CT

    SciTech Connect

    Abbas, Sajid; Lee, Taewon; Cho, Seungryong; Shin, Sukyoung; Lee, Rena

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: Various scanning methods and image reconstruction algorithms are actively investigated for low-dose computed tomography (CT) that can potentially reduce a health-risk related to radiation dose. Particularly, compressive-sensing (CS) based algorithms have been successfully developed for reconstructing images from sparsely sampled data. Although these algorithms have shown promises in low-dose CT, it has not been studied how sparse sampling schemes affect image quality in CS-based image reconstruction. In this work, the authors present several sparse-sampling schemes for low-dose CT, quantitatively analyze their data property, and compare effects of the sampling schemes on the image quality.Methods: Data properties of several sampling schemes are analyzed with respect to the CS-based image reconstruction using two measures: sampling density and data incoherence. The authors present five different sparse sampling schemes, and simulated those schemes to achieve a targeted dose reduction. Dose reduction factors of about 75% and 87.5%, compared to a conventional scan, were tested. A fully sampled circular cone-beam CT data set was used as a reference, and sparse sampling has been realized numerically based on the CBCT data.Results: It is found that both sampling density and data incoherence affect the image quality in the CS-based reconstruction. Among the sampling schemes the authors investigated, the sparse-view, many-view undersampling (MVUS)-fine, and MVUS-moving cases have shown promising results. These sampling schemes produced images with similar image quality compared to the reference image and their structure similarity index values were higher than 0.92 in the mouse head scan with 75% dose reduction.Conclusions: The authors found that in CS-based image reconstructions both sampling density and data incoherence affect the image quality, and suggest that a sampling scheme should be devised and optimized by use of these indicators. With this strategic

  8. Targeting of Low-Dose CT Screening According to the Risk of Lung-Cancer Death

    PubMed Central

    Kovalchik, Stephanie A.; Tammemagi, Martin; Berg, Christine D.; Caporaso, Neil E.; Riley, Tom L.; Korch, Mary; Silvestri, Gerard A.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND In the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST), screening with low-dose computed tomography (CT) resulted in a 20% reduction in lung-cancer mortality among participants between the ages of 55 and 74 years with a minimum of 30 pack-years of smoking and no more than 15 years since quitting. It is not known whether the benefits and potential harms of such screening vary according to lung-cancer risk. METHODS We assessed the variation in efficacy, the number of false positive results, and the number of lung-cancer deaths prevented among 26,604 participants in the NLST who underwent low-dose CT screening, as compared with the 26,554 participants who underwent chest radiography, according to the quintile of 5-year risk of lung-cancer death (ranging from 0.15 to 0.55% in the lowest-risk group [quintile 1] to more than 2.00% in the highest-risk group [quintile 5]). RESULTS The number of lung-cancer deaths per 10,000 person-years that were prevented in the CT-screening group, as compared with the radiography group, increased according to risk quintile (0.2 in quintile 1, 3.5 in quintile 2, 5.1 in quintile 3, 11.0 in quintile 4, and 12.0 in quintile 5; P = 0.01 for trend). Across risk quintiles, there were significant decreasing trends in the number of participants with false positive results per screening-prevented lung-cancer death (1648 in quintile 1, 181 in quintile 2, 147 in quintile 3, 64 in quintile 4, and 65 in quintile 5). The 60% of participants at highest risk for lung-cancer death (quintiles 3 through 5) accounted for 88% of the screening-prevented lung-cancer deaths and for 64% of participants with false positive results. The 20% of participants at lowest risk (quintile 1) accounted for only 1% of prevented lung-cancer deaths. CONCLUSIONS Screening with low-dose CT prevented the greatest number of deaths from lung cancer among participants who were at highest risk and prevented very few deaths among those at lowest risk. These findings provide empirical

  9. Effect of Third-generation Dual-source CT Technology on Image Quality of Low-dose Chest CT.

    PubMed

    Sui, Xin; Xu, Xiaoli; Song, Lan; DU, Qianni; Wang, Xiao; Jing, Zhengyu; Song, Wei

    2017-02-20

    Objective To evaluate the image quality and radiation dose of third-generation dual-source CT with tin filtration for spectral shaping and iterative reconstructions.Methods Thirty-five patients underwent low-dose CT (LDCT) for lung cancer screening on second-generation dual-source CT and follow-ups on third-generation dual-source CT. Image quality and radiation dose were compared between the two examinations.ResultsThe radiation dose of third-generation dual-source CT [dose-length product (DLP)(49.7±18.2)mGy·cm, effective dose (ED)(0.73±0.26)mSv] was lower than second-generation dual-source CT [DLP (86.37±13.44) mGy·cm, ED(1.20±0.42)mSv](t=6.01, P=0.000;t=6.57, P=0.000). The objective image noise of second-generation dual-source CT [(25.7±2.9)HU] was higher than that of third-generation dual-soure CT[(18.6±4.2)HU](t=5.24,P=0.000).The subjective image noise of second-generation dual-source CT [(4.60±0.49)scores] was significantly lower than that of third-generation dual-source CT [(4.80±0.40)scores] (t=4.15, P=0.000). Conclusion Chest CT for the detection of pulmonary nodules can be performed with third-generation dual-source CT that produces high image quality and low radiation dose when using a stellar infinity detector with spectral shaping.

  10. Coronary artery calcification identification and labeling in low-dose chest CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yiting; Liu, Shuang; Miller, Albert; Miller, Jeffrey A.; Markowitz, Steven; Akhund, Ali; Reeves, Anthony P.

    2017-03-01

    A fully automated computer algorithm has been developed to evaluate coronary artery calcification (CAC) from lowdose CT scans. CAC is identified and evaluated in three main coronary artery groups: Left Main and Left Anterior Descending Artery (LM + LAD) CAC, Left Circumflex Artery (LCX) CAC, and Right Coronary Artery (RCA) CAC. The artery labeling is achieved by segmenting all CAC candidates in the heart region and applying geometric constraints on the candidates using locally pre-identified anatomy regions. This algorithm was evaluated on 1,359 low-dose ungated CT scans, in which each artery CAC content was categorically visually scored by a radiologist into none, mild, moderate and extensive. The Spearman correlation coefficient R was used to assess the agreement between three automated CAC scores (Agatston-weighted, volume, and mass) and categorical visual scores. For Agatston-weighted automated scores, R was 0.87 for total CAC, 0.82 for LM + LAD CAC, 0.66 for LCX CAC and 0.72 for RCA CAC; results using volume and mass scores were similar. CAC detection sensitivities were: 0.87 for total, 0.82 for LM + LAD, 0.65 for LCX and 0.74 for RCA. To assess the impact of image noise, the dataset was further partitioned into three subsets based on heart region noise level (low<=80HU, medium=(80HU, 110HU], high>110HU). The low and medium noise subsets had higher sensitivities and correlations than the high noise subset. These results indicate that location specific heart risk assessment is possible from low-dose chest CT images.

  11. Sinogram restoration for ultra-low-dose x-ray multi-slice helical CT by nonparametric regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Lu; Siddiqui, Khan; Zhu, Bin; Tao, Yang; Siegel, Eliot

    2007-03-01

    During the last decade, x-ray computed tomography (CT) has been applied to screen large asymptomatic smoking and nonsmoking populations for early lung cancer detection. Because a larger population will be involved in such screening exams, more and more attention has been paid to studying low-dose, even ultra-low-dose x-ray CT. However, reducing CT radiation exposure will increase noise level in the sinogram, thereby degrading the quality of reconstructed CT images as well as causing more streak artifacts near the apices of the lung. Thus, how to reduce the noise levels and streak artifacts in the low-dose CT images is becoming a meaningful topic. Since multi-slice helical CT has replaced conventional stop-and-shoot CT in many clinical applications, this research mainly focused on the noise reduction issue in multi-slice helical CT. The experiment data were provided by Siemens SOMATOM Sensation 16-Slice helical CT. It included both conventional CT data acquired under 120 kvp voltage and 119 mA current and ultra-low-dose CT data acquired under 120 kvp and 10 mA protocols. All other settings are the same as that of conventional CT. In this paper, a nonparametric smoothing method with thin plate smoothing splines and the roughness penalty was proposed to restore the ultra-low-dose CT raw data. Each projection frame was firstly divided into blocks, and then the 2D data in each block was fitted to a thin-plate smoothing splines' surface via minimizing a roughness-penalized least squares objective function. By doing so, the noise in each ultra-low-dose CT projection was reduced by leveraging the information contained not only within each individual projection profile, but also among nearby profiles. Finally the restored ultra-low-dose projection data were fed into standard filtered back projection (FBP) algorithm to reconstruct CT images. The rebuilt results as well as the comparison between proposed approach and traditional method were given in the results and

  12. Synthetic CT: simulating low dose single and dual energy protocols from a dual energy scan.

    PubMed

    Wang, Adam S; Pelc, Norbert J

    2011-10-01

    The choice of CT protocol can greatly impact patient dose and image quality. Since acquiring multiple scans at different techniques on a given patient is undesirable, the ability to predict image quality changes starting from a high quality exam can be quite useful. While existing methods allow one to generate simulated images of lower exposure (mAs) from an acquired CT exam, the authors present and validate a new method called synthetic CT that can generate realistic images of a patient at arbitrary low dose protocols (kVp, mAs, and filtration) for both single and dual energy scans. The synthetic CT algorithm is derived by carefully ensuring that the expected signal and noise are accurate for the simulated protocol. The method relies on the observation that the material decomposition from a dual energy CT scan allows the transmission of an arbitrary spectrum to be predicted. It requires an initial dual energy scan of the patient to either synthesize raw projections of a single energy scan or synthesize the material decompositions of a dual energy scan. The initial dual energy scan contributes inherent noise to the synthesized projections that must be accounted for before adding more noise to simulate low dose protocols. Therefore, synthetic CT is subject to the constraint that the synthesized data have noise greater than the inherent noise. The authors experimentally validated the synthetic CT algorithm across a range of protocols using a dual energy scan of an acrylic phantom with solutions of different iodine concentrations. An initial 80/140 kVp dual energy scan of the phantom provided the material decomposition necessary to synthesize images at 100 kVp and at 120 kVp, across a range of mAs values. They compared these synthesized single energy scans of the phantom to actual scans at the same protocols. Furthermore, material decompositions of a 100/120 kVp dual energy scan are synthesized by adding correlated noise to the initial material decompositions. The

  13. Effect of low-dose CT and iterative reconstruction on trabecular bone microstructure assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopp, Felix K.; Baum, Thomas; Nasirudin, Radin A.; Mei, Kai; Garcia, Eduardo G.; Burgkart, Rainer; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Bauer, Jan S.; Noël, Peter B.

    2016-03-01

    The trabecular bone microstructure is an important factor in the development of osteoporosis. It is well known that its deterioration is one effect when osteoporosis occurs. Previous research showed that the analysis of trabecular bone microstructure enables more precise diagnoses of osteoporosis compared to a sole measurement of the mineral density. Microstructure parameters are assessed on volumetric images of the bone acquired either with high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging, high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography or high-resolution computed tomography (CT), with only CT being applicable to the spine, which is one of clinically most relevant fracture sites. However, due to the high radiation exposure for imaging the whole spine these measurements are not applicable in current clinical routine. In this work, twelve vertebrae from three different donors were scanned with standard and low radiation dose. Trabecular bone microstructure parameters were assessed for CT images reconstructed with statistical iterative reconstruction (SIR) and analytical filtered backprojection (FBP). The resulting structure parameters were correlated to the biomechanically determined fracture load of each vertebra. Microstructure parameters assessed for low-dose data reconstructed with SIR significantly correlated with fracture loads as well as parameters assessed for standard-dose data reconstructed with FBP. Ideal results were achieved with low to zero regularization strength yielding microstructure parameters not significantly different from those assessed for standard-dose FPB data. Moreover, in comparison to other approaches, superior noise-resolution trade-offs can be found with the proposed methods.

  14. [Lung cancer screening with low-dose thoracic CT-scan in the Somme area].

    PubMed

    Leleu, O; Auquier, M; Carre, O; Chauffert, B; Dubreuil, A; Petigny, V; Trancart, B; Berna, P; Jounieaux, V

    2017-03-01

    This feasibility trial proposes to set up in the department of the Somme an annual screening for lung cancer with low-dose thoracic CT. It responds to the first objective of the third cancer plan and follows the publication of the results of the National Lung Screening Trial in 2011. The method of this study is to use the existing networks among and between healthcare professionals and the departmental cancer screening structure. The inclusion criteria will be those of the National Lung Screening Trial. Screening will be proposed by treating physicians and chest physicians. The CT-scan will be performed in radiological centers that adhere to the good practice charter for low radiation scanning. A copy of CT results will be sent to the departmental structure of cancer screening (ADEMA80) which will ensure traceability and will perform statistical analysis. The study received funding from the Agence régionale de santé de la Picardie and la ligue contre le cancer. The primary endpoints of this screening will be the number of cancers diagnosed and the survival of the patients. The follow-up of positive examinations, delays in management and the level of participation will also be assessed. Copyright © 2016 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Low Dose CT Filtering in the Image Domain Using MAP Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geraldo, Rafael J.; Cura, Luis M. V.; Cruvinel, Paulo E.; Mascarenhas, Nelson D. A.

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present two new noise reduction filters techniques in the CT image space, in order to provide a better quality to the images acquired with low radiation exposure. For the noise reduction, a new denoising technique is presented based on a pointwise Maximum a Posteriori (MAP). The noise is considered Gaussian with zero mean, as observed experimentally, and the variance is estimated considering a signal-independent noise. For the a priori density of the signal, we used different non-negative probability densities (reflecting the fact that the pixels of an image are non-negative). In another approach, the histogram of the images were segmented into unimodal parts and each segment was filtered using the filter based on the MAP criterion with the a priori density that best fits it. After filtering, the evaluation of the method is performed using the following criteria: Peak Signal-to-Noise Ratio, Universal Image Quality Index and Structural Similarity Index. The 2D filtering results are compared with the results obtained by pointwise Wiener filter. Simulation and real CT images results show that the proposed techniques increase the image quality and improve the use of a low-dose CT protocol.

  16. FBP embedded iterative method to efficiently solve the low-dose CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueda, Ryosuke; Yamazaki, Fukashi; Kudo, Hiroyuki

    2017-03-01

    Low-dose X-ray CT is the reconstruction under the less X-ray intensity. In exchange for the intensity reduction, the noise level increases relatively. It is known that the Statistical Iterative Reconstruction (SIR) method is effective in reducing the image degradation due to the noise. One of the SIR formulations is the penalized weighted least squares (PWLS). Since the PWLS requires a large computational cost, the acceleration method such as the Iterative FBP (IFBP) has been studied. However, IFBP cannot exactly minimize the PWLS cost function. This paper shows a new acceleration method for efficiently solving the PWLS problem. Based on the Alternating Projection Proximal (APP) method, our approach exactly solves the PWLS. The design of the FBP filter is also presented. The reconstruction of the chest X-ray image is carried out. It is shown that the proposed method can give the highly acceleration and the exact solution.

  17. Low Dose CT Reconstruction via Edge-preserving Total Variation Regularization

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Zhen; Jia, Xun; Yuan, Kehong; Pan, Tinsu; Jiang, Steve B.

    2014-01-01

    High radiation dose in CT scans increases a lifetime risk of cancer and has become a major clinical concern. Recently, iterative reconstruction algorithms with Total Variation (TV) regularization have been developed to reconstruct CT images from highly undersampled data acquired at low mAs levels in order to reduce the imaging dose. Nonetheless, the low contrast structures tend to be smoothed out by the TV regularization, posing a great challenge for the TV method. To solve this problem, in this work we develop an iterative CT reconstruction algorithm with edge-preserving TV regularization to reconstruct CT images from highly undersampled data obtained at low mAs levels. The CT image is reconstructed by minimizing an energy consisting of an edge-preserving TV norm and a data fidelity term posed by the x-ray projections. The edge-preserving TV term is proposed to preferentially perform smoothing only on non-edge part of the image in order to better preserve the edges, which is realized by introducing a penalty weight to the original total variation norm. During the reconstruction process, the pixels at edges would be gradually identified and given small penalty weight. Our iterative algorithm is implemented on GPU to improve its speed. We test our reconstruction algorithm on a digital NCAT phantom, a physical chest phantom, and a Catphan phantom. Reconstruction results from a conventional FBP algorithm and a TV regularization method without edge preserving penalty are also presented for comparison purpose. The experimental results illustrate that both TV-based algorithm and our edge-preserving TV algorithm outperform the conventional FBP algorithm in suppressing the streaking artifacts and image noise under the low dose context. Our edge-preserving algorithm is superior to the TV-based algorithm in that it can preserve more information of low contrast structures and therefore maintain acceptable spatial resolution. PMID:21860076

  18. Low-dose CT reconstruction via edge-preserving total variation regularization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Zhen; Jia, Xun; Yuan, Kehong; Pan, Tinsu; Jiang, Steve B.

    2011-09-01

    High radiation dose in computed tomography (CT) scans increases the lifetime risk of cancer and has become a major clinical concern. Recently, iterative reconstruction algorithms with total variation (TV) regularization have been developed to reconstruct CT images from highly undersampled data acquired at low mAs levels in order to reduce the imaging dose. Nonetheless, the low-contrast structures tend to be smoothed out by the TV regularization, posing a great challenge for the TV method. To solve this problem, in this work we develop an iterative CT reconstruction algorithm with edge-preserving TV (EPTV) regularization to reconstruct CT images from highly undersampled data obtained at low mAs levels. The CT image is reconstructed by minimizing energy consisting of an EPTV norm and a data fidelity term posed by the x-ray projections. The EPTV term is proposed to preferentially perform smoothing only on the non-edge part of the image in order to better preserve the edges, which is realized by introducing a penalty weight to the original TV norm. During the reconstruction process, the pixels at the edges would be gradually identified and given low penalty weight. Our iterative algorithm is implemented on graphics processing unit to improve its speed. We test our reconstruction algorithm on a digital NURBS-based cardiac-troso phantom, a physical chest phantom and a Catphan phantom. Reconstruction results from a conventional filtered backprojection (FBP) algorithm and a TV regularization method without edge-preserving penalty are also presented for comparison purposes. The experimental results illustrate that both the TV-based algorithm and our EPTV algorithm outperform the conventional FBP algorithm in suppressing the streaking artifacts and image noise under a low-dose context. Our edge-preserving algorithm is superior to the TV-based algorithm in that it can preserve more information of low-contrast structures and therefore maintain acceptable spatial resolution.

  19. Heart region segmentation from low-dose CT scans: an anatomy based approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, Anthony P.; Biancardi, Alberto M.; Yankelevitz, David F.; Cham, Matthew D.; Henschke, Claudia I.

    2012-02-01

    Cardiovascular disease is a leading cause of death in developed countries. The concurrent detection of heart diseases during low-dose whole-lung CT scans (LDCT), typically performed as part of a screening protocol, hinges on the accurate quantification of coronary calcification. The creation of fully automated methods is ideal as complete manual evaluation is imprecise, operator dependent, time consuming and thus costly. The technical challenges posed by LDCT scans in this context are mainly twofold. First, there is a high level image noise arising from the low radiation dose technique. Additionally, there is a variable amount of cardiac motion blurring due to the lack of electrocardiographic gating and the fact that heart rates differ between human subjects. As a consequence, the reliable segmentation of the heart, the first stage toward the implementation of morphologic heart abnormality detection, is also quite challenging. An automated computer method based on a sequential labeling of major organs and determination of anatomical landmarks has been evaluated on a public database of LDCT images. The novel algorithm builds from a robust segmentation of the bones and airways and embodies a stepwise refinement starting at the top of the lungs where image noise is at its lowest and where the carina provides a good calibration landmark. The segmentation is completed at the inferior wall of the heart where extensive image noise is accommodated. This method is based on the geometry of human anatomy and does not involve training through manual markings. Using visual inspection by an expert reader as a gold standard, the algorithm achieved successful heart and major vessel segmentation in 42 of 45 low-dose CT images. In the 3 remaining cases, the cardiac base was over segmented due to incorrect hemidiaphragm localization.

  20. Median prior constrained TV algorithm for sparse view low-dose CT reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi; Shangguan, Hong; Zhang, Quan; Zhu, Hongqing; Shu, Huazhong; Gui, Zhiguo

    2015-05-01

    It is known that lowering the X-ray tube current (mAs) or tube voltage (kVp) and simultaneously reducing the total number of X-ray views (sparse view) is an effective means to achieve low-dose in computed tomography (CT) scan. However, the associated image quality by the conventional filtered back-projection (FBP) usually degrades due to the excessive quantum noise. Although sparse-view CT reconstruction algorithm via total variation (TV), in the scanning protocol of reducing X-ray tube current, has been demonstrated to be able to result in significant radiation dose reduction while maintain image quality, noticeable patchy artifacts still exist in reconstructed images. In this study, to address the problem of patchy artifacts, we proposed a median prior constrained TV regularization to retain the image quality by introducing an auxiliary vector m in register with the object. Specifically, the approximate action of m is to draw, in each iteration, an object voxel toward its own local median, aiming to improve low-dose image quality with sparse-view projection measurements. Subsequently, an alternating optimization algorithm is adopted to optimize the associative objective function. We refer to the median prior constrained TV regularization as "TV_MP" for simplicity. Experimental results on digital phantoms and clinical phantom demonstrated that the proposed TV_MP with appropriate control parameters can not only ensure a higher signal to noise ratio (SNR) of the reconstructed image, but also its resolution compared with the original TV method. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Optimization of SPECT-CT Hybrid Imaging Using Iterative Image Reconstruction for Low-Dose CT: A Phantom Study

    PubMed Central

    Grosser, Oliver S.; Kupitz, Dennis; Ruf, Juri; Czuczwara, Damian; Steffen, Ingo G.; Furth, Christian; Thormann, Markus; Loewenthal, David; Ricke, Jens; Amthauer, Holger

    2015-01-01

    Background Hybrid imaging combines nuclear medicine imaging such as single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) or positron emission tomography (PET) with computed tomography (CT). Through this hybrid design, scanned patients accumulate radiation exposure from both applications. Imaging modalities have been the subject of long-term optimization efforts, focusing on diagnostic applications. It was the aim of this study to investigate the influence of an iterative CT image reconstruction algorithm (ASIR) on the image quality of the low-dose CT images. Methodology/Principal Findings Examinations were performed with a SPECT-CT scanner with standardized CT and SPECT-phantom geometries and CT protocols with systematically reduced X-ray tube currents. Analyses included image quality with respect to photon flux. Results were compared to the standard FBP reconstructed images. The general impact of the CT-based attenuation maps used during SPECT reconstruction was examined for two SPECT phantoms. Using ASIR for image reconstructions, image noise was reduced compared to FBP reconstructions for the same X-ray tube current. The Hounsfield unit (HU) values reconstructed by ASIR were correlated to the FBP HU values(R2 ≥ 0.88) and the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) was improved by ASIR. However, for a phantom with increased attenuation, the HU values shifted for low X-ray tube currents I ≤ 60 mA (p ≤ 0.04). In addition, the shift of the HU values was observed within the attenuation corrected SPECT images for very low X-ray tube currents (I ≤ 20 mA, p ≤ 0.001). Conclusion/Significance In general, the decrease in X-ray tube current up to 30 mA in combination with ASIR led to a reduction of CT-related radiation exposure without a significant decrease in image quality. PMID:26390216

  2. Adaptive Tensor-Based Principal Component Analysis for Low-Dose CT Image Denoising.

    PubMed

    Ai, Danni; Yang, Jian; Fan, Jingfan; Cong, Weijian; Wang, Yongtian

    2015-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) has a revolutionized diagnostic radiology but involves large radiation doses that directly impact image quality. In this paper, we propose adaptive tensor-based principal component analysis (AT-PCA) algorithm for low-dose CT image denoising. Pixels in the image are presented by their nearby neighbors, and are modeled as a patch. Adaptive searching windows are calculated to find similar patches as training groups for further processing. Tensor-based PCA is used to obtain transformation matrices, and coefficients are sequentially shrunk by the linear minimum mean square error. Reconstructed patches are obtained, and a denoised image is finally achieved by aggregating all of these patches. The experimental results of the standard test image show that the best results are obtained with two denoising rounds according to six quantitative measures. For the experiment on the clinical images, the proposed AT-PCA method can suppress the noise, enhance the edge, and improve the image quality more effectively than NLM and KSVD denoising methods.

  3. Computer simulation of low-dose CT with clinical lung image database: a preliminary study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rong, Junyan; Gao, Peng; Liu, Wenlei; Zhang, Yuanke; Liu, Tianshuai; Lu, Hongbing

    2017-03-01

    Large samples of raw low-dose CT (LDCT) projections on lungs are needed for evaluating or designing novel and effective reconstruction algorithms suitable for lung LDCT imaging. However, there exists radiation risk when getting them from clinical CT scanning. To avoid the problem, a new strategy for producing large samples of lung LDCT projections with computer simulations is proposed in this paper. In the simulation, clinical images from the publicly available medical image database-the Lung Image Database Consortium(LIDC) and Image Database Resource Initiative (IDRI) database (LIDC/IDRI) are used as the projected object to form the noise-free sinogram. Then by adding a Poisson distributed quantum noise plus Gaussian distributed electronic noise to the projected transmission data calculated from the noise-free sinogram, different noise levels of LDCT projections are obtained. At last the LDCT projections are used for evaluating two reconstruction strategies. One is the conventional filtered back projection (FBP) algorithm and the other is FBP reconstruction from the filtered sinogram with penalized weighted least square criterion (PWLS-FBP). Images reconstructed with the LDCT simulations have shown that the PWLS-FBP algorithm performs better than the FBP algorithm in reducing streaking artifacts and preserving resolution. Preliminary results indicate that the feasibility of the proposed lung LDCT simulation strategy for helping to determine advanced reconstruction algorithms.

  4. Adaptive Tensor-Based Principal Component Analysis for Low-Dose CT Image Denoising

    PubMed Central

    Ai, Danni; Yang, Jian; Fan, Jingfan; Cong, Weijian; Wang, Yongtian

    2015-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) has a revolutionized diagnostic radiology but involves large radiation doses that directly impact image quality. In this paper, we propose adaptive tensor-based principal component analysis (AT-PCA) algorithm for low-dose CT image denoising. Pixels in the image are presented by their nearby neighbors, and are modeled as a patch. Adaptive searching windows are calculated to find similar patches as training groups for further processing. Tensor-based PCA is used to obtain transformation matrices, and coefficients are sequentially shrunk by the linear minimum mean square error. Reconstructed patches are obtained, and a denoised image is finally achieved by aggregating all of these patches. The experimental results of the standard test image show that the best results are obtained with two denoising rounds according to six quantitative measures. For the experiment on the clinical images, the proposed AT-PCA method can suppress the noise, enhance the edge, and improve the image quality more effectively than NLM and KSVD denoising methods. PMID:25993566

  5. Computerized lung nodule detection: comparison of performance for low-dose and standard-dose helical CT scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armato, Samuel G., III; Giger, Maryellen L.; Doi, Kunio; Bick, Ulrich; MacMahon, Heber

    2001-07-01

    The vast amount of image data acquired during a computed tomography (CT) scan makes lung nodule detection a burdensome task. Moreover, the growing acceptance of low-dose CT for lung cancer screening promises to further impact radiologists' workloads. Therefore, we have developed a computerized method to automatically analyze structures within a CT scan and identify those structures that represent lung nodules. Gray-level thresholding is performed to segment the lungs in each section to produce a segmented lung volume, which is then iteratively thresholded. At each iteration, remaining voxels are grouped into contiguous three-dimensional structures. Structures that satisfy a volume criterion then become nodule candidates. The set of nodule candidates is subjected to feature analysis. To distinguish candidates representing nodule and non-nodule structures, a rule-based approach is combined with an automated classifier. This method was applied to 43 standard-dose (diagnostic) CT scans and 13 low-dose CT scans. The method achieved an overall detection sensitivity of 71% with 1.5 false-positive detections per section on the standard-dose database and 71% sensitivity with 1.2 false-positive detections per section on the low-dose database. This automated method demonstrates promising performance in its ability to accurately detect lung nodules in standard-dose and low-dose CT images.

  6. Deformable 3D-2D registration for CT and its application to low dose tomographic fluoroscopy.

    PubMed

    Flach, Barbara; Brehm, Marcus; Sawall, Stefan; Kachelrieß, Marc

    2014-12-21

    Many applications in medical imaging include image registration for matching of images from the same or different modalities. In the case of full data sampling, the respective reconstructed images are usually of such a good image quality that standard deformable volume-to-volume (3D-3D) registration approaches can be applied. But research in temporal-correlated image reconstruction and dose reductions increases the number of cases where rawdata are available from only few projection angles. Here, deteriorated image quality leads to non-acceptable deformable volume-to-volume registration results. Therefore a registration approach is required that is robust against a decreasing number of projections defining the target position. We propose a deformable volume-to-rawdata (3D-2D) registration method that aims at finding a displacement vector field maximizing the alignment of a CT volume and the acquired rawdata based on the sum of squared differences in rawdata domain. The registration is constrained by a regularization term in accordance with a fluid-based diffusion. Both cost function components, the rawdata fidelity and the regularization term, are optimized in an alternating manner. The matching criterion is optimized by a conjugate gradient descent for nonlinear functions, while the regularization is realized by convolution of the vector fields with Gaussian kernels. We validate the proposed method and compare it to the demons algorithm, a well-known 3D-3D registration method. The comparison is done for a range of 4-60 target projections using datasets from low dose tomographic fluoroscopy as an application example. The results show a high correlation to the ground truth target position without introducing artifacts even in the case of very few projections. In particular the matching in the rawdata domain is improved compared to the 3D-3D registration for the investigated range. The proposed volume-to-rawdata registration increases the robustness regarding sparse

  7. Deformable 3D-2D registration for CT and its application to low dose tomographic fluoroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flach, Barbara; Brehm, Marcus; Sawall, Stefan; Kachelrieß, Marc

    2014-12-01

    Many applications in medical imaging include image registration for matching of images from the same or different modalities. In the case of full data sampling, the respective reconstructed images are usually of such a good image quality that standard deformable volume-to-volume (3D-3D) registration approaches can be applied. But research in temporal-correlated image reconstruction and dose reductions increases the number of cases where rawdata are available from only few projection angles. Here, deteriorated image quality leads to non-acceptable deformable volume-to-volume registration results. Therefore a registration approach is required that is robust against a decreasing number of projections defining the target position. We propose a deformable volume-to-rawdata (3D-2D) registration method that aims at finding a displacement vector field maximizing the alignment of a CT volume and the acquired rawdata based on the sum of squared differences in rawdata domain. The registration is constrained by a regularization term in accordance with a fluid-based diffusion. Both cost function components, the rawdata fidelity and the regularization term, are optimized in an alternating manner. The matching criterion is optimized by a conjugate gradient descent for nonlinear functions, while the regularization is realized by convolution of the vector fields with Gaussian kernels. We validate the proposed method and compare it to the demons algorithm, a well-known 3D-3D registration method. The comparison is done for a range of 4-60 target projections using datasets from low dose tomographic fluoroscopy as an application example. The results show a high correlation to the ground truth target position without introducing artifacts even in the case of very few projections. In particular the matching in the rawdata domain is improved compared to the 3D-3D registration for the investigated range. The proposed volume-to-rawdata registration increases the robustness regarding sparse

  8. Texture-based CAD improves diagnosis for low-dose CT colonography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Zhengrong; Cohen, Harris; Posniak, Erica; Fiore, Eddie; Wang, Zigang; Li, Bin; Andersen, Joseph; Harrington, Donald

    2008-03-01

    Computed tomography (CT)-based virtual colonoscopy or CT colonography (CTC) currently utilizes oral contrast solutions to tag the colonic fluid and possibly residual stool for differentiation from the colon wall and polyps. The enhanced image density of the tagged colonic materials causes a significant partial volume (PV) effect into the colon wall as well as the lumen space (filled with air or CO II). The PV effect on the colon wall can "bury" polyps of size as large as 5mm by increasing their image densities to a noticeable level, resulting in false negatives. It can also create false positives when PV effect goes into the lumen space. We have been modeling the PV effect for mixture-based image segmentation and developing text-based computer-aided detection of polyp (CADpolyp) by utilizing the PV mixture-based image segmentation. This work presents some preliminary results of developing and applying texture-based CADpolyp technique to low-dose CTC studies. A total of 114 studies of asymptomatic patients older than 50, who underwent CTC and then optical colonoscopy (OC) on the same day, were selected from a database, which was accumulated in the past decade and contains various bowel preparations and CT scanning protocols. The participating radiologists found ten polyps of greater than 5 mm from a total of 16 OC proved polyps, i.e., a detection sensitivity of 63%. They scored 23 false positives from the database, i.e., a 20% false positive rate. Approximately 70% of the datasets were marked as imperfect bowel cleansing and/or presence of image artifacts. The impact of imperfect bowel cleansing and image artifacts on VC performance is significant. The texture-based CADpolyp detected all the polyps with an average of 2.68 false positives per patient. This indicates that texture-based CADpolyp can improve the CTC performance in the cases of imperfect cleansed bowels and presence of image artifacts.

  9. Nonlinear Sinogram Smoothing for Low-Dose X-Ray CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tianfang; Li, Xiang; Wang, Jing; Wen, Junhai; Lu, Hongbing; Hsieh, Jiang; Liang, Zhengrong

    2004-10-01

    When excessive quantum noise is present in extremely low dose X-ray CT imaging, statistical properties of the data has to be considered to achieve a satisfactory image reconstruction. Statistical iterative reconstruction with accurate modeling of the noise, rather than a filtered back-projection (FBP) with low-pass filtering, is one way to deal with the problem. Estimating a noise-free sinogram to satisfy the FBP reconstruction for the Radon transform is another way. The benefits of the latter include a higher computation efficiency, more uniform spatial resolution in the reconstructed image, and less modification of the current machine configurations. In a clinic X-ray CT system, the acquired raw data must be calibrated, in addition to the logarithmic transform, to achieve the high diagnostic image quality. The calibrated projection data or sinogram no longer follow a compound Poisson distribution in general, but are close to a Gaussian distribution with signal-dependent variance. In this paper, we first investigated a relatively accurate statistical model for the sinogram data, based on several phantom experiments. Then we developed a penalized likelihood method to smooth the sinogram, which led to a set of nonlinear equations that can be solved by iterated conditional mode (ICM) algorithm within a reasonable computing time. The method was applied to several experimental datasets acquired at 120 kVp, 10 mA/20 mA/50 mA protocols with a GE HiSpeed multi-slice detector CT scanner and demonstrated a significant noise suppression without noticeable sacrifice of the spatial resolution.

  10. Anatomical-based partial volume correction for low-dose dedicated cardiac SPECT/CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hui; Chan, Chung; Grobshtein, Yariv; Ma, Tianyu; Liu, Yaqiang; Wang, Shi; Stacy, Mitchel R.; Sinusas, Albert J.; Liu, Chi

    2015-09-01

    Due to the limited spatial resolution, partial volume effect has been a major degrading factor on quantitative accuracy in emission tomography systems. This study aims to investigate the performance of several anatomical-based partial volume correction (PVC) methods for a dedicated cardiac SPECT/CT system (GE Discovery NM/CT 570c) with focused field-of-view over a clinically relevant range of high and low count levels for two different radiotracer distributions. These PVC methods include perturbation geometry transfer matrix (pGTM), pGTM followed by multi-target correction (MTC), pGTM with known concentration in blood pool, the former followed by MTC and our newly proposed methods, which perform the MTC method iteratively, where the mean values in all regions are estimated and updated by the MTC-corrected images each time in the iterative process. The NCAT phantom was simulated for cardiovascular imaging with 99mTc-tetrofosmin, a myocardial perfusion agent, and 99mTc-red blood cell (RBC), a pure intravascular imaging agent. Images were acquired at six different count levels to investigate the performance of PVC methods in both high and low count levels for low-dose applications. We performed two large animal in vivo cardiac imaging experiments following injection of 99mTc-RBC for evaluation of intramyocardial blood volume (IMBV). The simulation results showed our proposed iterative methods provide superior performance than other existing PVC methods in terms of image quality, quantitative accuracy, and reproducibility (standard deviation), particularly for low-count data. The iterative approaches are robust for both 99mTc-tetrofosmin perfusion imaging and 99mTc-RBC imaging of IMBV and blood pool activity even at low count levels. The animal study results indicated the effectiveness of PVC to correct the overestimation of IMBV due to blood pool contamination. In conclusion, the iterative PVC methods can achieve more accurate quantification, particularly for low

  11. Anatomical-based partial volume correction for low-dose dedicated cardiac SPECT/CT.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui; Chan, Chung; Grobshtein, Yariv; Ma, Tianyu; Liu, Yaqiang; Wang, Shi; Stacy, Mitchel R; Sinusas, Albert J; Liu, Chi

    2015-09-07

    Due to the limited spatial resolution, partial volume effect has been a major degrading factor on quantitative accuracy in emission tomography systems. This study aims to investigate the performance of several anatomical-based partial volume correction (PVC) methods for a dedicated cardiac SPECT/CT system (GE Discovery NM/CT 570c) with focused field-of-view over a clinically relevant range of high and low count levels for two different radiotracer distributions. These PVC methods include perturbation geometry transfer matrix (pGTM), pGTM followed by multi-target correction (MTC), pGTM with known concentration in blood pool, the former followed by MTC and our newly proposed methods, which perform the MTC method iteratively, where the mean values in all regions are estimated and updated by the MTC-corrected images each time in the iterative process. The NCAT phantom was simulated for cardiovascular imaging with (99m)Tc-tetrofosmin, a myocardial perfusion agent, and (99m)Tc-red blood cell (RBC), a pure intravascular imaging agent. Images were acquired at six different count levels to investigate the performance of PVC methods in both high and low count levels for low-dose applications. We performed two large animal in vivo cardiac imaging experiments following injection of (99m)Tc-RBC for evaluation of intramyocardial blood volume (IMBV). The simulation results showed our proposed iterative methods provide superior performance than other existing PVC methods in terms of image quality, quantitative accuracy, and reproducibility (standard deviation), particularly for low-count data. The iterative approaches are robust for both (99m)Tc-tetrofosmin perfusion imaging and (99m)Tc-RBC imaging of IMBV and blood pool activity even at low count levels. The animal study results indicated the effectiveness of PVC to correct the overestimation of IMBV due to blood pool contamination. In conclusion, the iterative PVC methods can achieve more accurate quantification, particularly

  12. Anatomical-based Partial Volume Correction for Low-dose Dedicated Cardiac SPECT/CT

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hui; Chan, Chung; Grobshtein, Yariv; Ma, Tianyu; Liu, Yaqiang; Wang, Shi; Stacy, Mitchel R.; Sinusas, Albert J.; Liu, Chi

    2016-01-01

    Due to the limited spatial resolution, partial volume effect (PVE) has been a major degrading factor on quantitative accuracy in emission tomography systems. This study aims to investigate the performance of several anatomical-based partial volume correction (PVC) methods for a dedicated cardiac SPECT/CT system (GE Discovery NM/CT 570c) with focused field-of-view (FOV) over a clinically relevant range of high and low count levels for two different radiotracer distributions. These PVC methods include perturbation Geometry Transfer Matrix (pGTM), pGTM followed by multi-target correction (MTC), pGTM with known concentration in blood pool, the former followed by MTC and our newly proposed methods, which perform the MTC method iteratively, where the mean values in all regions are estimated and updated by the MTC-corrected images each time in the iterative process. The NCAT phantom was simulated for cardiovascular imaging with 99mTc-tetrofosmin, a myocardial perfusion agent, and 99mTc-red blood cell (RBC), a pure intravascular imaging agent. Images were acquired at six different count levels to investigate the performance of PVC methods in both high and low count levels for low-dose applications. We performed two large animal in vivo cardiac imaging experiments following injection of 99mTc-RBC for evaluation of intramyocardial blood volume (IMBV). The simulation results showed our proposed iterative methods provide superior performance than other existing PVC methods in terms of image quality, quantitative accuracy, and reproducibility (standard deviation), particularly for low-count data. The iterative approaches are robust for both 99mTc-tetrofosmin perfusion imaging and 99mTc-RBC imaging of IMBV and blood pool activity even at low count levels. The animal study results indicated the effectiveness of PVC to correct the overestimation of IMBV due to blood pool contamination. In conclusion, the iterative PVC methods can achieve more accurate quantification, particularly

  13. Early interim FDG PET/CT prediction of treatment response and prognosis in pediatric Hodgkin disease-added value of low-dose CT.

    PubMed

    Ilivitzki, Anat; Radan, Lea; Ben-Arush, Miriam; Israel, Ora; Ben-Barak, Ayelet

    2013-01-01

    Interim 18F-FDG PET helps predict outcome and tailor treatment in adults with Hodgkin disease (HD). The purpose of this study was to assess predictive values of interim 18F-FDG PET/CT in children with HD and to define the potential added value to interim PET of low-dose CT. Children were prospectively enrolled August 2002-April 2007. PET/low-dose CT was performed at staging, after 2 cycles, at the end of treatment and during follow-up (mean 45 months). Treatment was unchanged regardless of interim results. PET and low-dose CT were read independently. Of 34 enrolled children (ages 3-17 years), 27 achieved complete response, 4 had progressive disease and 3 had relapse. Interim PET alone had positive and negative predictive values of 67% and 89%, respectively. Interim low-dose CT alone had positive and negative predictive values of 35% and 100%, respectively. Interim PET/CT had positive and negative predictive values of 75% and 96%, respectively. Early interim PET/CT was a good predictor of outcome. Integrated PET and low-dose CT improved the predictive value in children with HD.

  14. Segmentation of the whole breast from low-dose chest CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shuang; Salvatore, Mary; Yankelevitz, David F.; Henschke, Claudia I.; Reeves, Anthony P.

    2015-03-01

    The segmentation of whole breast serves as the first step towards automated breast lesion detection. It is also necessary for automatically assessing the breast density, which is considered to be an important risk factor for breast cancer. In this paper we present a fully automated algorithm to segment the whole breast in low-dose chest CT images (LDCT), which has been recommended as an annual lung cancer screening test. The automated whole breast segmentation and potential breast density readings as well as lesion detection in LDCT will provide useful information for women who have received LDCT screening, especially the ones who have not undergone mammographic screening, by providing them additional risk indicators for breast cancer with no additional radiation exposure. The two main challenges to be addressed are significant range of variations in terms of the shape and location of the breast in LDCT and the separation of pectoral muscles from the glandular tissues. The presented algorithm achieves robust whole breast segmentation using an anatomy directed rule-based method. The evaluation is performed on 20 LDCT scans by comparing the segmentation with ground truth manually annotated by a radiologist on one axial slice and two sagittal slices for each scan. The resulting average Dice coefficient is 0.880 with a standard deviation of 0.058, demonstrating that the automated segmentation algorithm achieves results consistent with manual annotations of a radiologist.

  15. Improving spatial adaptivity of nonlocal means in low-dosed CT imaging using pointwise fractal dimension.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiuqing; Liao, Zhiwu; Hu, Shaoxiang; Li, Ming; Zhou, Jiliu

    2013-01-01

    NLMs is a state-of-art image denoising method; however, it sometimes oversmoothes anatomical features in low-dose CT (LDCT) imaging. In this paper, we propose a simple way to improve the spatial adaptivity (SA) of NLMs using pointwise fractal dimension (PWFD). Unlike existing fractal image dimensions that are computed on the whole images or blocks of images, the new PWFD, named pointwise box-counting dimension (PWBCD), is computed for each image pixel. PWBCD uses a fixed size local window centered at the considered image pixel to fit the different local structures of images. Then based on PWBCD, a new method that uses PWBCD to improve SA of NLMs directly is proposed. That is, PWBCD is combined with the weight of the difference between local comparison windows for NLMs. Smoothing results for test images and real sinograms show that PWBCD-NLMs with well-chosen parameters can preserve anatomical features better while suppressing the noises efficiently. In addition, PWBCD-NLMs also has better performance both in visual quality and peak signal to noise ratio (PSNR) than NLMs in LDCT imaging.

  16. Optimized Parallelization for Nonlocal Means Based Low Dose CT Image Processing

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Libo; Yang, Benqiang; Zhuang, Zhikun; Hu, Yining; Chen, Yang; Luo, Limin; Shu, Huazhong

    2015-01-01

    Low dose CT (LDCT) images are often significantly degraded by severely increased mottled noise/artifacts, which can lead to lowered diagnostic accuracy in clinic. The nonlocal means (NLM) filtering can effectively remove mottled noise/artifacts by utilizing large-scale patch similarity information in LDCT images. But the NLM filtering application in LDCT imaging also requires high computation cost because intensive patch similarity calculation within a large searching window is often required to be used to include enough structure-similarity information for noise/artifact suppression. To improve its clinical feasibility, in this study we further optimize the parallelization of NLM filtering by avoiding the repeated computation with the row-wise intensity calculation and the symmetry weight calculation. The shared memory with fast I/O speed is also used in row-wise intensity calculation for the proposed method. Quantitative experiment demonstrates that significant acceleration can be achieved with respect to the traditional straight pixel-wise parallelization. PMID:26078781

  17. Individual bone structure segmentation and labeling from low-dose chest CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shuang; Xie, Yiting; Reeves, Anthony P.

    2017-03-01

    The segmentation and labeling of the individual bones serve as the first step to the fully automated measurement of skeletal characteristics and the detection of abnormalities such as skeletal deformities, osteoporosis, and vertebral fractures. Moreover, the identified landmarks on the segmented bone structures can potentially provide relatively reliable location reference to other non-rigid human organs, such as breast, heart and lung, thereby facilitating the corresponding image analysis and registration. A fully automated anatomy-directed framework for the segmentation and labeling of the individual bone structures from low-dose chest CT is presented in this paper. The proposed system consists of four main stages: First, both clavicles are segmented and labeled by fitting a piecewise cylindrical envelope. Second, the sternum is segmented under the spatial constraints provided by the segmented clavicles. Third, all ribs are segmented and labeled based on 3D region growing within the volume of interest defined with reference to the spinal canal centerline and lungs. Fourth, the individual thoracic vertebrae are segmented and labeled by image intensity based analysis in the spatial region constrained by the previously segmented bone structures. The system performance was validated with 1270 lowdose chest CT scans through visual evaluation. Satisfactory performance was obtained respectively in 97.1% cases for the clavicle segmentation and labeling, in 97.3% cases for the sternum segmentation, in 97.2% cases for the rib segmentation, in 94.2% cases for the rib labeling, in 92.4% cases for vertebra segmentation and in 89.9% cases for the vertebra labeling.

  18. Quantification of pulmonary vessel diameter in low-dose CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudyanto, Rina D.; Ortiz de Solórzano, Carlos; Muñoz-Barrutia, Arrate

    2015-03-01

    Accurate quantification of vessel diameter in low-dose Computer Tomography (CT) images is important to study pulmonary diseases, in particular for the diagnosis of vascular diseases and the characterization of morphological vascular remodeling in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). In this study, we objectively compare several vessel diameter estimation methods using a physical phantom. Five solid tubes of differing diameters (from 0.898 to 3.980 mm) were embedded in foam, simulating vessels in the lungs. To measure the diameters, we first extracted the vessels using either of two approaches: vessel enhancement using multi-scale Hessian matrix computation, or explicitly segmenting them using intensity threshold. We implemented six methods to quantify the diameter: three estimating diameter as a function of scale used to calculate the Hessian matrix; two calculating equivalent diameter from the crosssection area obtained by thresholding the intensity and vesselness response, respectively; and finally, estimating the diameter of the object using the Full Width Half Maximum (FWHM). We find that the accuracy of frequently used methods estimating vessel diameter from the multi-scale vesselness filter depends on the range and the number of scales used. Moreover, these methods still yield a significant error margin on the challenging estimation of the smallest diameter (on the order or below the size of the CT point spread function). Obviously, the performance of the thresholding-based methods depends on the value of the threshold. Finally, we observe that a simple adaptive thresholding approach can achieve a robust and accurate estimation of the smallest vessels diameter.

  19. Computational and human observer image quality evaluation of low dose, knowledge-based CT iterative reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Eck, Brendan L.; Fahmi, Rachid; Brown, Kevin M.; Zabic, Stanislav; Raihani, Nilgoun; Miao, Jun; Wilson, David L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Aims in this study are to (1) develop a computational model observer which reliably tracks the detectability of human observers in low dose computed tomography (CT) images reconstructed with knowledge-based iterative reconstruction (IMR™, Philips Healthcare) and filtered back projection (FBP) across a range of independent variables, (2) use the model to evaluate detectability trends across reconstructions and make predictions of human observer detectability, and (3) perform human observer studies based on model predictions to demonstrate applications of the model in CT imaging. Methods: Detectability (d′) was evaluated in phantom studies across a range of conditions. Images were generated using a numerical CT simulator. Trained observers performed 4-alternative forced choice (4-AFC) experiments across dose (1.3, 2.7, 4.0 mGy), pin size (4, 6, 8 mm), contrast (0.3%, 0.5%, 1.0%), and reconstruction (FBP, IMR), at fixed display window. A five-channel Laguerre–Gauss channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) was developed with internal noise added to the decision variable and/or to channel outputs, creating six different internal noise models. Semianalytic internal noise computation was tested against Monte Carlo and used to accelerate internal noise parameter optimization. Model parameters were estimated from all experiments at once using maximum likelihood on the probability correct, PC. Akaike information criterion (AIC) was used to compare models of different orders. The best model was selected according to AIC and used to predict detectability in blended FBP-IMR images, analyze trends in IMR detectability improvements, and predict dose savings with IMR. Predicted dose savings were compared against 4-AFC study results using physical CT phantom images. Results: Detection in IMR was greater than FBP in all tested conditions. The CHO with internal noise proportional to channel output standard deviations, Model-k4, showed the best trade-off between fit and

  20. Computational and human observer image quality evaluation of low dose, knowledge-based CT iterative reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Eck, Brendan L.; Fahmi, Rachid; Miao, Jun; Brown, Kevin M.; Zabic, Stanislav; Raihani, Nilgoun; Wilson, David L.

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: Aims in this study are to (1) develop a computational model observer which reliably tracks the detectability of human observers in low dose computed tomography (CT) images reconstructed with knowledge-based iterative reconstruction (IMR™, Philips Healthcare) and filtered back projection (FBP) across a range of independent variables, (2) use the model to evaluate detectability trends across reconstructions and make predictions of human observer detectability, and (3) perform human observer studies based on model predictions to demonstrate applications of the model in CT imaging. Methods: Detectability (d′) was evaluated in phantom studies across a range of conditions. Images were generated using a numerical CT simulator. Trained observers performed 4-alternative forced choice (4-AFC) experiments across dose (1.3, 2.7, 4.0 mGy), pin size (4, 6, 8 mm), contrast (0.3%, 0.5%, 1.0%), and reconstruction (FBP, IMR), at fixed display window. A five-channel Laguerre–Gauss channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) was developed with internal noise added to the decision variable and/or to channel outputs, creating six different internal noise models. Semianalytic internal noise computation was tested against Monte Carlo and used to accelerate internal noise parameter optimization. Model parameters were estimated from all experiments at once using maximum likelihood on the probability correct, P{sub C}. Akaike information criterion (AIC) was used to compare models of different orders. The best model was selected according to AIC and used to predict detectability in blended FBP-IMR images, analyze trends in IMR detectability improvements, and predict dose savings with IMR. Predicted dose savings were compared against 4-AFC study results using physical CT phantom images. Results: Detection in IMR was greater than FBP in all tested conditions. The CHO with internal noise proportional to channel output standard deviations, Model-k4, showed the best trade-off between fit

  1. Evaluation of dose reduction and image quality in CT colonography: comparison of low-dose CT with iterative reconstruction and routine-dose CT with filtered back projection.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Koichi; Fujiwara, Masanori; Kanazawa, Hidenori; Mogi, Tomohiro; Iida, Nao; Mitsushima, Toru; Lefor, Alan T; Sugimoto, Hideharu

    2015-01-01

    To prospectively evaluate the radiation dose and image quality comparing low-dose CT colonography (CTC) reconstructed using different levels of iterative reconstruction techniques with routine-dose CTC reconstructed with filtered back projection. Following institutional ethics clearance and informed consent procedures, 210 patients underwent screening CTC using automatic tube current modulation for dual positions. Examinations were performed in the supine position with a routine-dose protocol and in the prone position, randomly applying four different low-dose protocols. Supine images were reconstructed with filtered back projection and prone images with iterative reconstruction. Two blinded observers assessed the image quality of endoluminal images. Image noise was quantitatively assessed by region-of-interest measurements. The mean effective dose in the supine series was 1.88 mSv using routine-dose CTC, compared to 0.92, 0.69, 0.57, and 0.46 mSv at four different low doses in the prone series (p < 0.01). Overall image quality and noise of low-dose CTC with iterative reconstruction were significantly improved compared to routine-dose CTC using filtered back projection. The lowest dose group had image quality comparable to routine-dose images. Low-dose CTC with iterative reconstruction reduces the radiation dose by 48.5 to 75.1% without image quality degradation compared to routine-dose CTC with filtered back projection. • Low-dose CTC reduces radiation dose ≥ 48.5% compared to routine-dose CTC. • Iterative reconstruction improves overall CTC image quality compared with FBP. • Iterative reconstruction reduces overall CTC image noise compared with FBP. • Automated exposure control with iterative reconstruction is useful for low-dose CTC.

  2. Low-dose CT pulmonary angiography on a 15-year-old CT scanner: a feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Kaup, Moritz; Gruber-Rouh, Tatjana; Scholtz, Jan E; Albrecht, Moritz H; Bucher, Andreas; Frellesen, Claudia; Vogl, Thomas J

    2016-01-01

    Background Computed tomography (CT) low-dose (LD) imaging is used to lower radiation exposure, especially in vascular imaging; in current literature, this is mostly on latest generation high-end CT systems. Purpose To evaluate the effects of reduced tube current on objective and subjective image quality of a 15-year-old 16-slice CT system for pulmonary angiography (CTPA). Material and Methods CTPA scans from 60 prospectively randomized patients (28 men, 32 women) were examined in this study on a 15-year-old 16-slice CT scanner system. Standard CT (SD) settings were 100 kV and 150 mAs, LD settings were 100 kV and 50 mAs. Attenuation of the pulmonary trunk, various anatomic landmarks, and image noise were quantitatively measured; contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) and signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) were calculated. Three independent blinded radiologists subjectively rated each image series using a 5-point grading scale. Results CT dose index (CTDI) in the LD series was 66.46% lower compared to the SD settings (2.49 ± 0.55 mGy versus 7.42 ± 1.17 mGy). Attenuation of the pulmonary trunk showed similar results for both series (SD 409.55 ± 91.04 HU; LD 380.43 HU ± 93.11 HU; P = 0.768). Subjective image analysis showed no significant differences between SD and LD settings regarding the suitability for detection of central and peripheral PE (central SD/LD, 4.88; intra-class correlation coefficients [ICC], 0.894/4.83; ICC, 0.745; peripheral SD/LD, 4.70; ICC, 0.943/4.57; ICC, 0.919; all P > 0.4). Conclusion The LD protocol, on a 15-year-old CT scanner system without current high-end hardware or post-processing tools, led to a dose reduction of approximately 67% with similar subjective image quality and delineation of central and peripheral pulmonary arteries. PMID:28286671

  3. A new method of kidney biopsy using low dose CT-guidance with coaxial trocar and bard biopsy gun.

    PubMed

    Pi, Xiao-Ling; Tang, Zhen; Fu, Li-Qian; Guo, Mei-Hua; Shi, Mei-Hua; Chen, Lan; Wan, Zheng-Ying

    2013-01-07

    To explore a new method of kidney biopsy with coaxial trocar and bard biopsy gun under low dose computed tomography (CT)-guidance and evaluate its accuracy, safety, and efficacy. Sixty patients underwent renal biopsy under CT-guidance. They were randomly divided into two groups: group I, low dose CT-guided (120 kV and 25 or 50 mAs) and group II, standard dose CT-guided (120 kV and 250 mAs). For group I, the coaxial trocar was accurately placed adjacent to the renal capsule of the lower pole, the needle core was removed, and samples were obtained with a bard biopsy gun. For group II, the coaxial trocar was not used. Total number of passes, mean biopsy diameter, mean glomeruli per specimen, mean operation time, mean scanning time, and mean radiation dose were noted. Dose-length product (DLP) was used to calculate the radiation doses. After 24 hours of the biopsy, ultrasound was repeated to identify any subcapsular hematoma. Success rate of biopsy in group I was 100% while using low dose CT-guidance along with coaxial trocar renal. There was no statistic differences bewteen group I and II in the total number of passes, mean biopsy diameter, mean glomeruli per specimen and mean time of operation and CT scanning. The average DLP of group I was lower as compared to the value of group II (p <0.05). Kidney biopsy using coaxial trocar and bard biopsy gun under low dose CT was an accurate, simple and safe method for diagnosis and treatment of kidney diseases. It can be used for repeat and multiple biopsies, particularly suitable for obese and renal atrophy patients in whom the kidneys are difficult to image.

  4. Segmentation of the sternum from low-dose chest CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shuang; Xie, Yiting; Reeves, Anthony P.

    2015-03-01

    Segmentation of the sternum in medical images is of clinical significance as it frequently serves as a stable reference to image registration and segmentation of other organs in the chest region. In this paper we present a fully automated algorithm to segment the sternum in low-dose chest CT images (LDCT). The proposed algorithm first locates an axial seed slice and then segments the sternum cross section on the seed slice by matching a rectangle model. Furthermore, it tracks and segments the complete sternum in the cranial and caudal direction respectively through sequential axial slices starting from the seed slice. The cross section on each axial slice is segmented using score functions that are designed to have local maxima at the boundaries of the sternum. Finally, the sternal angle is localized. The algorithm is designed to be specifically robust with respect to cartilage calcifications and to accommodate the high noise levels encountered with LDCT images. Segmentation of 351 cases from public datasets was evaluated visually with only 1 failing to produce a usable segmentation. 87.2% of the 351 images have good segmentation and 12.5% have acceptable segmentation. The sternal body segmentation and the localization of the sternal angle and the vertical extents of the sternum were also evaluated quantitatively for 25 good cases and 25 acceptable cases. The overall weighted mean DC of 0.897 and weighted mean distance error of 2.88 mm demonstrate that the algorithm achieves encouraging performance in both segmenting the sternal body and localizing the sternal angle.

  5. Fully automated breast density assessment from low-dose chest CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shuang; Margolies, Laurie R.; Xie, Yiting; Yankelevitz, David F.; Henschke, Claudia I.; Reeves, Anthony P.

    2017-03-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer diagnosed among US women and the second leading cause of cancer death 1 . Breast density is an independent risk factor for breast cancer and more than 25 states mandate its reporting to patients as part of the lay mammogram report 2 . Recent publications have demonstrated that breast density measured from low-dose chest CT (LDCT) correlates well with that measured from mammograms and MRIs 3-4 , thereby providing valuable information for many women who have undergone LDCT but not recent mammograms. A fully automated framework for breast density assessment from LDCT is presented in this paper. The whole breast region is first segmented using an anatomy-orientated novel approach based on the propagation of muscle fronts for separating the fibroglandular tissue from the underlying muscles. The fibroglandular tissue regions are then identified from the segmented whole breast and the percentage density is calculated based on the volume ratio of the fibroglandular tissue to the local whole breast region. The breast region segmentation framework was validated with 1270 LDCT scans, with 96.1% satisfactory outcomes based on visual inspection. The density assessment was evaluated by comparing with BI-RADS density grades established by an experienced radiologist in 100 randomly selected LDCT scans of female subjects. The continuous breast density measurement was shown to be consistent with the reference subjective grading, with the Spearman's rank correlation 0.91 (p-value < 0.001). After converting the continuous density to categorical grades, the automated density assessment was congruous with the radiologist's reading in 91% cases.

  6. Usefulness of low dose chest CT for initial evaluation of blunt chest trauma

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung Jung; Bista, Anjali Basnyat; Min, Young Gi; Kim, Eun Young; Park, Kyung Joo; Kang, Doo Kyoung; Sun, Joo Sung

    2017-01-01

    Abstract We aimed to compare the diagnostic performance and inter-observer consistency between low dose chest CT (LDCT) and standard dose chest CT (SDCT) in the patients with blunt chest trauma. A total of 69 patients who met criteria indicative of blunt chest trauma (77% of male; age range, 16–85) were enrolled. All patients underwent LDCT without intravenous (IV) contrast and SDCT with IV contrast using parameters as following: LDCT, 40 mAs with automatic tube current modulation (ATCM) and 100 kVp (BMI <25, n = 51) or 120 kVp (BMI>25, n = 18); SDCT, 180 mAs with ATCM and 120 kVp. Transverse, coronal, sagittal images were reconstructed with 3-mm slice thickness without gap and provided for evaluation of 3 observers. Reference standard images (transverse, coronal, sagittal) were reconstructed using SDCT data with 1-mm slice thickness without gap. Reference standard was established by 2 experienced thoracic radiologists by consensus. Three observers independently evaluated each data set of LDCT and SDCT. Multiple-reader receiver operating characteristic analysis for comparing areas under the ROC curves demonstrated that there was no significant difference of diagnostic performance between LDCT and SDCT for the diagnosis of pulmonary injury, skeletal trauma, mediastinal injury, and chest wall injury (P > 0.05). The intraclass correlation coefficient was measured for inter-observer consistency and revealed that there was good inter-observer consistency in each examination of LDCT and SDCT for evaluation of blunt chest injury (0.8601–1.000). Aortic and upper abdominal injury could not be appropriately compared as LDCT was performed without using contrast materials and this was limitation of this study. The effective radiation dose of LDCT (average DLP = 1.52 mSv⋅mGy−1 cm−1) was significantly lower than those of SDCT (7.21 mSv mGy−1 cm−1). There is a great potential benefit to use of LDCT for initial evaluation of blunt chest trauma

  7. Accurate low-dose iterative CT reconstruction from few projections by Generalized Anisotropic Total Variation minimization for industrial CT.

    PubMed

    Debatin, Maurice; Hesser, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    Reducing the amount of time for data acquisition and reconstruction in industrial CT decreases the operation time of the X-ray machine and therefore increases the sales. This can be achieved by reducing both, the dose and the pulse length of the CT system and the number of projections for the reconstruction, respectively. In this paper, a novel generalized Anisotropic Total Variation regularization for under-sampled, low-dose iterative CT reconstruction is discussed and compared to the standard methods, Total Variation, Adaptive weighted Total Variation and Filtered Backprojection. The novel regularization function uses a priori information about the Gradient Magnitude Distribution of the scanned object for the reconstruction. We provide a general parameterization scheme and evaluate the efficiency of our new algorithm for different noise levels and different number of projection views. When noise is not present, error-free reconstructions are achievable for AwTV and GATV from 40 projections. In cases where noise is simulated, our strategy achieves a Relative Root Mean Square Error that is up to 11 times lower than Total Variation-based and up to 4 times lower than AwTV-based iterative statistical reconstruction (e.g. for a SNR of 223 and 40 projections). To obtain the same reconstruction quality as achieved by Total Variation, the projection number and the pulse length, and the acquisition time and the dose respectively can be reduced by a factor of approximately 3.5, when AwTV is used and a factor of approximately 6.7, when our proposed algorithm is used.

  8. TU-EF-204-07: Add Tube Current Modulation to a Low Dose Simulation Tool for CT Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Y.; Wen, G.; Brown, K.; Klahr, P.; Dhanantwari, A.

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: We extended the capabilities of a low dose simulation tool to model Tube-Current Modulation (TCM). TCM is widely used in clinical practice to reduce radiation dose in CT scans. We expect the tool to be valuable for various clinical applications (e.g., optimize protocols, compare reconstruction techniques and evaluate TCM methods). Methods: The tube current is input as a function of z location, instead of a fixed value. Starting from the line integrals of a scan, a new Poisson noise realization at a lower dose is generated for each view. To validate the new functionality, we compared simulated scans with real scans in image space. Results: First we assessed noise in the difference between the low-dose simulations and the original high-dose scan. When the simulated tube current is a step function of z location, the noise at each segment matches the noise of 3 separate constant-tube-current-simulations. Secondly, with a phantom that forces TCM, we compared a low-dose simulation with an equivalent real low-dose scan. The mean CT number of the simulated scan and the real low-dose scan were 137.7±0.6 and 137.8±0.5 respectively. Furthermore, with 240 ROIs, the noise of the simulated scan and the real low-dose scan were 24.03±0.45 and 23.99±0.43 respectively, and they were not statistically different (2-sample t-test, p-value=0.28). The facts that the noise reflected the trend of the TCM curve, and that the absolute noise measurements were not statistically different validated the TCM function. Conclusion: We successfully added tube-current modulation functionality in an existing low dose simulation tool. We demonstrated that the noise reflected an input tube-current modulation curve. In addition, we verified that the noise and mean CT number of our simulation agreed with a real low dose scan. The authors are all employees of Philips. Yijun Ding is also supported by NIBIB P41EB002035 and NIBIB R01EB000803.

  9. Estimation of the total effective dose from low-dose CT scans and radiopharmaceutical administrations delivered to patients undergoing SPECT/CT explorations.

    PubMed

    Montes, Carlos; Tamayo, Pilar; Hernandez, Jorge; Gomez-Caminero, Felipe; García, Sofia; Martín, Carlos; Rosero, Angela

    2013-08-01

    Hybrid imaging, such as SPECT/CT, is used in routine clinical practice, allowing coregistered images of the functional and structural information provided by the two imaging modalities. However, this multimodality imaging may mean that patients are exposed to a higher radiation dose than those receiving SPECT alone. The study aimed to determine the radiation exposure of patients who had undergone SPECT/CT examinations and to relate this to the Background Equivalent Radiation Time (BERT). 145 SPECT/CT studies were used to estimate the total effective dose to patients due to both radiopharmaceutical administrations and low-dose CT scans. The CT contribution was estimated by the Dose-Length Product method. Specific conversion coefficients were calculated for SPECT explorations. The radiation dose from low-dose CTs ranged between 0.6 mSv for head and neck CT and 2.6 mSv for whole body CT scan, representing a maximum of 1 year of background radiation exposure. These values represent a decrease of 80-85% with respect to the radiation dose from diagnostic CT. The radiation exposure from radiopharmaceutical administration varied from 2.1 mSv for stress myocardial perfusion SPECT to 26 mSv for gallium SPECT in patients with lymphoma. The BERT ranged from 1 to 11 years. The contribution of low-dose CT scans to the total radiation dose to patients undergoing SPECT/CT examinations is relatively low compared with the effective dose from radiopharmaceutical administration. When a CT scan is only acquired for anatomical localization and attenuation correction, low-dose CT scan is justified on the basis of its lower dose.

  10. Low-dose lung cancer screening with photon-counting CT: a feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Symons, Rolf; Cork, Tyler E.; Sahbaee, Pooyan; Fuld, Matthew K.; Kappler, Steffen; Folio, Les R.; Bluemke, David A.; Pourmorteza, Amir

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of using a whole-body photon-counting detector (PCD) CT scanner for low-dose lung cancer screening compared to a conventional energy integrating detector (EID) system. Radiation dose-matched EID and PCD scans of the COPDGene 2 phantom were acquired at different radiation dose levels (CTDIvol: 3.0, 1.5, and 0.75 mGy) and different tube voltages (120, 100, and 80 kVp). EID and PCD images were compared for quantitative Hounsfield unit (HU) accuracy, noise levels, and contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) for detection of ground-glass nodules (GGN) and emphysema. The PCD HU accuracy was better than EID for water at all scan parameters. PCD HU stability for lung, GGN and emphysema regions were superior to EID and PCD attenuation values were more reproducible than EID for all scan parameters (all P  <  0.01), while HUs for lung, GGN and emphysema ROIs changed significantly for EID with decreasing dose (all P  <  0.001). PCD showed lower noise levels at the lowest dose setting at 120, 100 and 80 kVp (15.2  ±  0.3 HU versus 15.8  ±  0.2 HU, P  =  0.03 16.1  ±  0.3 HU versus 18.0  ±  0.4 HU, P  =  0.003 and 16.1  ±  0.3 HU versus 17.9  ±  0.3 HU, P  =  0.001, respectively), resulting in superior CNR for evaluation of GGNs and emphysema at 100 and 80 kVp. PCD provided better HU stability for lung, ground-glass, and emphysema-equivalent foams at lower radiation dose settings with better reproducibility than EID. Additionally, PCD showed up to 10% less noise, and 11% higher CNR at 0.75 mGy for both 100 and 80 kVp. PCD technology may help reduce radiation exposure in lung cancer screening while maintaining diagnostic quality.

  11. Effects of JPEG and wavelet compression of spiral low-dose ct images on detection of small lung cancers.

    PubMed

    Li, F; Sone, S; Takashima, S; Kiyono, K; Yang, Z G; Hasegawa, M; Kawakami, S; Saito, A; Hanamura, K; Asakura, K

    2001-03-01

    To compare the effect of compression of spiral low-dose CT images by the Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG) and wavelet algorithms on detection of small lung cancers. Low-dose spiral CT images of 104 individuals (52 with peripheral lung cancers smaller than 20 mm and 52 control subjects) were used. The original images were compressed using JPEG or wavelet algorithms at a ratio of 10:1 or 20:1. Five radiologists interpreted these images and evaluated the image quality on a high-resolution CRT monitor. Observer performance was studied by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. There was no significant difference in the detection of cancers measuring 6 to 15 mm in uncompressed images and in those compressed by either of the algorithms, although the quality of images compressed at 20:1 with the wavelet algorithm was somewhat inferior. A lower diagnostic accuracy was noted using images compressed by the JPEG or wavelet algorithms at 20:1 in detecting lung cancers measuring 6 to 10 mm and cancers measuring from 6 to 15 mm with ground-glass opacity. Compression of low-dose CT images at a ratio of 10:1 using JPEG and wavelet algorithms does not compromise the detection rate of small lung cancers.

  12. Initial Performance of Radiologists and Radiology Residents in Interpreting Low-Dose (2-mSv) Appendiceal CT.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hyun Kyung; Ko, Yousun; Lee, Min Hee; Woo, Hyunsik; Ahn, Soyeon; Kim, Bohyoung; Pickhardt, Perry J; Kim, Mi Sung; Park, Sung Bin; Lee, Kyoung Ho

    2015-12-01

    The objective of our study was to prospectively evaluate the initial diagnostic performance and learning curve of a community of radiologists and residents in interpreting 2-mSv appendiceal CT. We included 46 attending radiologists and 153 radiology residents from 22 hospitals who completed an online training course of 30 2-mSv CT cases. Appendicitis was confirmed in 14 cases. Most of the readers had limited (≤ 10 cases, n = 32) or no (n = 118) prior experience with low-dose appendiceal CT. The order of cases was randomized for each reader. A multireader multicase ROC analysis was performed. Generalized estimating equations were used to model the learning curves in diagnostic performance. Diagnostic performance gradually improved with years of training. The average AUC was 0.94 (95% CI, 0.90-0.98), 0.92 (0.88-0.96), 0.90 (0.85-0.96), and 0.86 (0.80-0.92) for the attending radiologists, senior residents, 2nd-year residents, and 1st-year residents, respectively. We did not observe any notable intrareader learning curves over the training course of the 30 cases except a decrease in reading time. Diagnostic accuracy and sensitivity were significantly affected by the reader training level and prior overall experience with appendiceal CT but not by the prior specific experience with low-dose appendiceal CT. The learning curve is likely prolonged and forms gradually over years by overall radiology training and clinical experience in general rather than by experience with low-dose appendiceal CT specifically.

  13. Incidental renal tumours on low-dose CT lung cancer screening exams.

    PubMed

    Pinsky, Paul F; Dunn, Barbara; Gierada, David; Nath, P Hrudaya; Munden, Reginald; Berland, Lincoln; Kramer, Barnett S

    2017-06-01

    Introduction Renal cancer incidence has increased markedly in the United States in recent decades, largely due to incidentally detected tumours from computed tomography imaging. Here, we analyze the potential for low-dose computed tomography lung cancer screening to detect renal cancer. Methods The National Lung Screening Trial randomized subjects to three annual screens with either low-dose computed tomography or chest X-ray. Eligibility criteria included 30 + pack-years, current smoking or quit within 15 years, and age 55-74. Subjects were followed for seven years. Low-dose computed tomography screening forms collected information on lung cancer and non-lung cancer abnormalities, including abnormalities below the diaphragm. A reader study was performed on a sample of National Lung Screening Trial low-dose computed tomography images assessing presence of abnormalities below the diaphragms and abnormalities suspicious for renal cancer. Results There were 26,722 and 26,732 subjects enrolled in the low-dose computed tomography and chest X-ray arms, respectively, and there were 104 and 85 renal cancer cases diagnosed, respectively (relative risk = 1.22, 95% CI: 0.9-1.5). From 75,126 low-dose computed tomography screens, there were 46 renal cancer diagnoses within one year. Abnormalities below the diaphragm rates were 39.1% in screens with renal cancer versus 4.1% in screens without (P < 0.001). Cases with abnormalities below the diaphragms had shorter median time to diagnosis than those without (71 vs. 160 days, P = 0.004). In the reader study, 64% of renal cancer cases versus 13% of non-cases had abnormalities below the diaphragms; 55% of cases and 0.8% of non-cases had a finding suspicious for renal cancer (P < 0.001). Conclusion Low-dose computed tomography screens can potentially detect renal cancers. The benefits to harms tradeoff of incidental detection of renal tumours on low-dose computed tomography is unknown.

  14. Algorithm for x-ray beam hardening and scatter correction in low-dose cone-beam CT: phantom studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wenlei; Rong, Junyan; Gao, Peng; Liao, Qimei; Lu, HongBing

    2016-03-01

    X-ray scatter poses a significant limitation to image quality in cone-beam CT (CBCT), as well as beam hardening, resulting in image artifacts, contrast reduction, and lack of CT number accuracy. Meanwhile the x-ray radiation dose is also non-ignorable. Considerable scatter or beam hardening correction methods have been developed, independently, and rarely combined with low-dose CT reconstruction. In this paper, we combine scatter suppression with beam hardening correction for sparse-view CT reconstruction to improve CT image quality and reduce CT radiation. Firstly, scatter was measured, estimated, and removed using measurement-based methods, assuming that signal in the lead blocker shadow is only attributable to x-ray scatter. Secondly, beam hardening was modeled by estimating an equivalent attenuation coefficient at the effective energy, which was integrated into the forward projector of the algebraic reconstruction technique (ART). Finally, the compressed sensing (CS) iterative reconstruction is carried out for sparse-view CT reconstruction to reduce the CT radiation. Preliminary Monte Carlo simulated experiments indicate that with only about 25% of conventional dose, our method reduces the magnitude of cupping artifact by a factor of 6.1, increases the contrast by a factor of 1.4 and the CNR by a factor of 15. The proposed method could provide good reconstructed image from a few view projections, with effective suppression of artifacts caused by scatter and beam hardening, as well as reducing the radiation dose. With this proposed framework and modeling, it may provide a new way for low-dose CT imaging.

  15. Improving abdomen tumor low-dose CT images using dictionary learning based patch processing and unsharp filtering.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yang; Yu, Fei; Luo, Limin; Toumoulin, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Reducing patient radiation dose, while maintaining a high-quality image, is a major challenge in Computed Tomography (CT). The purpose of this work is to improve abdomen tumor low-dose CT (LDCT) image quality by using a two-step strategy: a first patch-wise non linear processing is first applied to suppress the noise and artifacts, that is based on a sparsity prior in term of a learned dictionary, then an unsharp filtering aiming to enhance the contrast of tissues and compensate the contrast loss caused by the DL processing. Preliminary results show that the proposed method is effective in suppressing mottled noise as well as improving tumor detectability.

  16. Automatic lobar segmentation for diseased lungs using an anatomy-based priority knowledge in low-dose CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sang Joon; Kim, Jung Im; Goo, Jin Mo; Lee, Doohee

    2014-03-01

    Lung lobar segmentation in CT images is a challenging tasks because of the limitations in image quality inherent to CT image acquisition, especially low-dose CT for clinical routine environment. Besides, complex anatomy and abnormal lesions in the lung parenchyma makes segmentation difficult because contrast in CT images are determined by the differential absorption of X-rays by neighboring structures, such as tissue, vessel or several pathological conditions. Thus, we attempted to develop a robust segmentation technique for normal and diseased lung parenchyma. The images were obtained with low-dose chest CT using soft reconstruction kernel (Sensation 16, Siemens, Germany). Our PC-based in-house software segmented bronchial trees and lungs with intensity adaptive region-growing technique. Then the horizontal and oblique fissures were detected by using eigenvalues-ratio of the Hessian matrix in the lung regions which were excluded from airways and vessels. To enhance and recover the faithful 3-D fissure plane, our proposed fissure enhancing scheme were applied to the images. After finishing above steps, for careful smoothening of fissure planes, 3-D rolling-ball algorithm in xyz planes were performed. Results show that success rate of our proposed scheme was achieved up to 89.5% in the diseased lung parenchyma.

  17. A knowledge-based iterative model reconstruction algorithm: can super-low-dose cardiac CT be applicable in clinical settings?

    PubMed

    Oda, Seitaro; Utsunomiya, Daisuke; Funama, Yoshinori; Katahira, Kazuhiro; Honda, Keiichi; Tokuyasu, Shinichi; Vembar, Mani; Yuki, Hideaki; Noda, Katsuo; Oshima, Shuichi; Yamashita, Yasuyuki

    2014-01-01

    To investigate whether "full" iterative reconstruction, a knowledge-based iterative model reconstruction (IMR), enables radiation dose reduction by 80% at cardiac computed tomography (CT). A total of 23 patients (15 men, eight women; mean age 64.3 ± 13.4 years) who underwent retrospectively electrocardiography-gated cardiac CT with dose modulation were evaluated. We compared full-dose (FD; 730 mAs) images reconstructed with filtered back projection (FBP) technique and the low-dose (LD; 146 mAs) images reconstructed with FBP and IMR techniques. Objective and subjective image quality parameters were compared among the three different CT images. There was no significant difference in the CT attenuation among the three reconstructions. The mean image noise of LD-IMR (18.3 ± 10.6 Hounsfield units [HU]) was significantly lowest among the three reconstructions (41.9 ± 15.3 HU for FD-FBP and 109.9 ± 42.6 HU for LD-FBP; P < .01). The contrast-to-noise ratio of LD-IMR was better than that of FD-FBP and LD-FBP (P < .01). Visual evaluation score was also highest for LD-IMR. The IMR can provide improved image quality at super-low-dose cardiac CT with 20% of the standard tube current. Copyright © 2014 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Comparison between Pre-log and Post-log Statistical Models in Ultra-Low-Dose CT Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Fu, Lin; Lee, Tzu-Cheng; Kim, Soo Mee; Alessio, Adam; Kinahan, Paul; Chang, Zhiqian; Sauer, Ken; Kalra, Mannudeep; De Man, Bruno

    2016-11-09

    X-ray detectors in clinical computed tomography (CT) usually operate in current-integrating mode. Their complicated signal statistics often lead to intractable likelihood functions for practical use in model-based image reconstruction (MBIR). It is therefore desirable to design simplified statistical models without losing the essential factors. Depending on whether the CT transmission data are logarithmically transformed, pre-log and post-log models are two major categories of choices in CT MBIR. Both being approximations, it remains an open question whether one model can notably improve image quality over the other on real scanners. In this study, we develop and compare several pre-log and post-log MBIR algorithms under a unified framework. Their reconstruction accuracy based on simulation and clinical datasets are evaluated. The results show that pre-log MBIR can achieve notably better quantitative accuracy than post-log MBIR in ultra-low-dose CT, although in less extreme cases, post-log MBIR with handcrafted pre-processing remains a competitive alternative. Pre-log MBIR could play a growing role in emerging ultra-low-dose CT applications.

  19. SU-F-I-12: Region-Specific Dictionary Learning for Low-Dose X-Ray CT Reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Q; Han, H; Xing, L

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Dictionary learning based method has attracted more and more attentions in low-dose CT due to the superior performance on suppressing noise and preserving structural details. Considering the structures and noise vary from region to region in one imaging object, we propose a region-specific dictionary learning method to improve the low-dose CT reconstruction. Methods: A set of normal-dose images was used for dictionary learning. Segmentations were performed on these images, so that the training patch sets corresponding to different regions can be extracted out. After that, region-specific dictionaries were learned from these training sets. For the low-dose CT reconstruction, a conventional reconstruction, such as filtered back-projection (FBP), was performed firstly, and then segmentation was followed to segment the image into different regions. Sparsity constraints of each region based on its dictionary were used as regularization terms. The regularization parameters were selected adaptively according to different regions. A low-dose human thorax dataset was used to evaluate the proposed method. The single dictionary based method was performed for comparison. Results: Since the lung region is very different from the other part of thorax, two dictionaries corresponding to lung region and the rest part of thorax respectively were learned to better express the structural details and avoid artifacts. With only one dictionary some artifact appeared in the body region caused by the spot atoms corresponding to the structures in the lung region. And also some structure in the lung regions cannot be recovered well by only one dictionary. The quantitative indices of the result by the proposed method were also improved a little compared to the single dictionary based method. Conclusion: Region-specific dictionary can make the dictionary more adaptive to different region characteristics, which is much desirable for enhancing the performance of dictionary learning

  20. High-pitch low-dose abdominopelvic CT with tin-filtration technique for detecting urinary stones.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Gu-Mu-Yang; Shi, Bing; Sun, Hao; Xue, Hua-Dan; Wang, Yun; Liang, Ji-Xiang; Xu, Kai; Wang, Ming; Wang, Man; Xu, Min; Jin, Zheng-Yu

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate urinary stone detection, radiation exposure, image quality, breathing-motion artifacts, and scanning time with high-pitch tin filter-based abdominopelvic CT. Sixty-three consecutive patients with urolithiasis underwent non-enhanced abdominopelvic CT with both regular (120 kV, pitch 0.6) and low-dose (Sn150kV, pitch 3.0) protocols on a third-generation dual-source CT. Stone characteristics, image noise (SD), signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), subjective image quality on a 5-point likert scale breathing-motion artifacts, and scanning time were evaluated. Volume CT dose index (CTDIvol), dose-length product (DLP), effective dose (ED) were compared. A total of 157 urinary stones were detected by regular protocol; 154 were correctly identified by low-dose protocol with an overall detection rate of 98.1%. No significant differences were observed in SD, SNR, or subjective image quality between two protocols (P > 0.05). Compared to regular protocol, CTDIvol and ED were 56.6% (7.19 vs. 3.12 mGy, P < 0.001) and 55.6% (5.25 vs. 2.33 mSv, P < 0.001) lower; scanning time was 89.5% (7.9 vs. 0.83, P < 0.001) shorter; and breathing-motion artifacts were fewer (8 vs. 0 patients) with low-dose protocol. High-pitch abdominopelvic CT with Sn150kV substantially reduced radiation exposure and scanning time, while maintained stone detection and image quality and prevented breathing-motion artifacts.

  1. Single low-dose CT scan optimized for rest-stress PET attenuation correction and quantification of coronary artery calcium.

    PubMed

    Kaster, Tyler S; Dwivedi, Girish; Susser, Leah; Renaud, Jennifer M; Beanlands, Rob S B; Chow, Benjamin J W; deKemp, Robert A

    2015-06-01

    Coronary artery calcium is an important marker of coronary artery disease. Myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) using PET-CT technology requires a CT scan for attenuation correction (CTAC) but is not used routinely to measure coronary calcium burden. This study aimed to determine if a low-dose CTAC scan can also accurately quantify coronary artery calcium. Twenty-three patients underwent both a traditional coronary artery calcium scan on a dedicated cardiac CT scanner (CAC-CT) and a myocardial perfusion scan on a hybrid PET-CT scanner. The standard MPI protocol includes rest and stress-matched PET and CTAC scans. The post-stress CTAC scan was modified to approximate the CAC-CT scan protocol while maintaining ~0.5 mSv dose. Coronary artery calcium scores were compared between the Ca-CTAC and CAC-CT scans. The modified Ca-CTAC scan showed a trend toward slight decreases in segmental stress perfusion of 2-3.5% in the anterior wall segments (P < 0.05). Correlation and agreement between the proposed Ca-CTAC and standard CAC-CT calcium scores at the optimal threshold of 110 HU were also excellent (r (2) = 0.99, κ = 1.0). There was a small difference in the regression slope vs unity: Ca-CTAC = 0.96 × CAC (P < 0.05), but the categorical classification of calcium was accurate in all twenty-three patients (κ = 1.0). A single low-dose rest CTAC scan can be used for accurate attenuation correction of rest and stress PET perfusion images, thus allowing a post-stress CTAC scan to be optimized for improved quantification of coronary artery calcium without increasing radiation dose vs standard protocols.

  2. A computer simulation method for low-dose CT images by use of real high-dose images: a phantom study.

    PubMed

    Takenaga, Tomomi; Katsuragawa, Shigehiko; Goto, Makoto; Hatemura, Masahiro; Uchiyama, Yoshikazu; Shiraishi, Junji

    2016-01-01

    Practical simulations of low-dose CT images have a possibility of being helpful means for optimization of the CT exposure dose. Because current methods reported by several researchers are limited to specific vendor platforms and generally rely on raw sinogram data that are difficult to access, we have developed a new computerized scheme for producing simulated low-dose CT images from real high-dose images without use of raw sinogram data or of a particular phantom. Our computerized scheme for low-dose CT simulation was based on the addition of a simulated noise image to a real high-dose CT image reconstructed by the filtered back-projection algorithm. First, a sinogram was generated from the forward projection of a high-dose CT image. Then, an additional noise sinogram resulting from use of a reduced exposure dose was estimated from a predetermined noise model. Finally, a noise CT image was reconstructed with a predetermined filter and was added to the real high-dose CT image to create a simulated low-dose CT image. The noise power spectrum and modulation transfer function of the simulated low-dose images were very close to those of the real low-dose images. In order to confirm the feasibility of our method, we applied this method to clinical cases which were examined with the high dose initially and then followed with a low-dose CT. In conclusion, our proposed method could simulate the low-dose CT images from their real high-dose images with sufficient accuracy and could be used for determining the optimal dose setting for various clinical CT examinations.

  3. Applications of nonlocal means algorithm in low-dose X-ray CT image processing and reconstruction: A review.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hao; Zeng, Dong; Zhang, Hua; Wang, Jing; Liang, Zhengrong; Ma, Jianhua

    2017-03-01

    Low-dose X-ray computed tomography (LDCT) imaging is highly recommended for use in the clinic because of growing concerns over excessive radiation exposure. However, the CT images reconstructed by the conventional filtered back-projection (FBP) method from low-dose acquisitions may be severely degraded with noise and streak artifacts due to excessive X-ray quantum noise, or with view-aliasing artifacts due to insufficient angular sampling. In 2005, the nonlocal means (NLM) algorithm was introduced as a non-iterative edge-preserving filter to denoise natural images corrupted by additive Gaussian noise, and showed superior performance. It has since been adapted and applied to many other image types and various inverse problems. This paper specifically reviews the applications of the NLM algorithm in LDCT image processing and reconstruction, and explicitly demonstrates its improving effects on the reconstructed CT image quality from low-dose acquisitions. The effectiveness of these applications on LDCT and their relative performance are described in detail.

  4. Towards robust deconvolution of low-dose perfusion CT: Sparse perfusion deconvolution using online dictionary learning

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Ruogu; Chen, Tsuhan; Sanelli, Pina C.

    2014-01-01

    Computed tomography perfusion (CTP) is an important functional imaging modality in the evaluation of cerebrovascular diseases, particularly in acute stroke and vasospasm. However, the post-processed parametric maps of blood flow tend to be noisy, especially in low-dose CTP, due to the noisy contrast enhancement profile and the oscillatory nature of the results generated by the current computational methods. In this paper, we propose a robust sparse perfusion deconvolution method (SPD) to estimate cerebral blood flow in CTP performed at low radiation dose. We first build a dictionary from high-dose perfusion maps using online dictionary learning and then perform deconvolution-based hemodynamic parameters estimation on the low-dose CTP data. Our method is validated on clinical data of patients with normal and pathological CBF maps. The results show that we achieve superior performance than existing methods, and potentially improve the differentiation between normal and ischemic tissue in the brain. PMID:23542422

  5. A clinical evaluation of total variation-Stokes image reconstruction strategy for low-dose CT imaging of the chest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yan; Zhang, Hao; Moore, William; Bhattacharji, Priya; Liang, Zhengrong

    2015-03-01

    One hundred "normal-dose" computed tomography (CT) studies of the chest (i.e., 1,160 projection views, 120kVp, 100mAs) data sets were acquired from the patients who were scheduled for lung biopsy at Stony Brook University Hospital under informed consent approved by our Institutional Review Board. To mimic low-dose CT imaging scenario (i.e., sparse-view scan), sparse projection views were evenly extracted from the total 1,160 projections of each patient and the total radiation dose was reduced according to how many sparse views were selected. A standard filtered backprojection (FBP) algorithm was applied to the 1160 projections to produce reference images for comparison purpose. In the low-dose scenario, both the FBP and total variation-stokes (TVS) algorithms were applied to reconstruct the corresponding low-dose images. The reconstructed images were evaluated by an experienced thoracic radiologist against the reference images. Both the low-dose reconstructions and the reference images were displayed on a 4- megapixel monitor in soft tissue and lung windows. The images were graded by a five-point scale from 0 to 4 (0, nondiagnostic; 1, severe artifact with low confidence; 2, moderate artifact or moderate diagnostic confidences; 3, mild artifact or high confidence; 4, well depicted without artifacts). Quantitative evaluation measurements such as standard deviations for different tissue types and universal quality index were also studied and reported for the results. The evaluation concluded that the TVS can reduce the view number from 1,160 to 580 with slightly lower scores as the reference, resulting in a dose reduction to close 50%.

  6. SU-E-I-25: Determining Tube Current, Tube Voltage and Pitch Suitable for Low- Dose Lung Screening CT

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, K; Matthews, K

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The quality of a computed tomography (CT) image and the dose delivered during its acquisition depend upon the acquisition parameters used. Tube current, tube voltage, and pitch are acquisition parameters that potentially affect image quality and dose. This study investigated physicians' abilities to characterize small, solid nodules in low-dose CT images for combinations of current, voltage and pitch, for three CT scanner models. Methods: Lung CT images was acquired of a Data Spectrum anthropomorphic torso phantom with various combinations of pitch, tube current, and tube voltage; this phantom was used because acrylic beads of various sizes could be placed within the lung compartments to simulate nodules. The phantom was imaged on two 16-slice scanners and a 64-slice scanner. The acquisition parameters spanned a range of estimated CTDI levels; the CTDI estimates from the acquisition software were verified by measurement. Several experienced radiologists viewed the phantom lung CT images and noted nodule location, size and shape, as well as the acceptability of overall image quality. Results: Image quality for assessment of nodules was deemed unsatisfactory for all scanners at 80 kV (any tube current) and at 35 mA (any tube voltage). Tube current of 50 mA or more at 120 kV resulted in similar assessments from all three scanners. Physician-measured sphere diameters were closer to actual diameters for larger spheres, higher tube current, and higher kV. Pitch influenced size measurements less for larger spheres than for smaller spheres. CTDI was typically overestimated by the scanner software compared to measurement. Conclusion: Based on this survey of acquisition parameters, a low-dose CT protocol of 120 kV, 50 mA, and pitch of 1.4 is recommended to balance patient dose and acceptable image quality. For three models of scanners, this protocol resulted in estimated CTDIs from 2.9–3.6 mGy.

  7. The feasibility of low-dose CT protocols for coronary artery calcium scoring and PET attenuation correction in cardiac PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tung-Hsin; Lu, Kun-Mu; Wu, Nien-Yun; Wang, Shyh-Jen; Mok, Greta S P; Yang, Bang-Hung; Yang, Ching-Ching

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of using low-dose computed tomography (CT) in coronary artery calcium scoring and PET attenuation correction for patients in different weight categories undergoing cardiac PET/CT examinations. Calcium scoring computed tomography (CSCT) scans and PET scans of anthropomorphic cardiac phantoms simulating normal-weight, mildly obese, and severely obese patients were acquired with a hybrid PET/CT scanner. CSCT images were acquired at 120 kVp, with tube current ranging from 10 to 550 mA. PET scans were performed in three-dimensional mode, with acquisition time of 3 min/bed position. The image quality of cardiac PET/CT was evaluated by assessing the signal-to-noise ratio. CT-based coronary artery calcium quantification was performed using the Agatston scoring system. On the basis of our results, the CSCT protocols using tube currents of 50 and 150 mA should be able to achieve the lowest possible radiation dose while maintaining the desired image quality for normal-weight and mildly obese patients undergoing cardiac PET/CT examinations, respectively. When the proposed low-dose CSCT protocols were performed, radiation dose could be reduced by 83.34 and 50% compared with those from CSCT scans acquired with standard tube current settings for normal-weight and mildly obese patients, respectively. In the scanning of severely obese patients, an increase in tube voltage or current would help improve the reliability of image information provided by cardiac PET/CT. Our study demonstrated the feasibility of low-dose CT protocols for coronary artery calcium scoring and PET attenuation correction in cardiac PET/CT to examine patients in different weight categories. The calculations performed in this work should be able to provide practical information to achieve necessary diagnostic information while keeping radiation dose as low as reasonably achievable.

  8. Deep convolutional neural networks for automatic coronary calcium scoring in a screening study with low-dose chest CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lessmann, Nikolas; Išgum, Ivana; Setio, Arnaud A. A.; de Vos, Bob D.; Ciompi, Francesco; de Jong, Pim A.; Oudkerk, Matthjis; Mali, Willem P. Th. M.; Viergever, Max A.; van Ginneken, Bram

    2016-03-01

    The amount of calcifications in the coronary arteries is a powerful and independent predictor of cardiovascular events and is used to identify subjects at high risk who might benefit from preventive treatment. Routine quantification of coronary calcium scores can complement screening programs using low-dose chest CT, such as lung cancer screening. We present a system for automatic coronary calcium scoring based on deep convolutional neural networks (CNNs). The system uses three independently trained CNNs to estimate a bounding box around the heart. In this region of interest, connected components above 130 HU are considered candidates for coronary artery calcifications. To separate them from other high intensity lesions, classification of all extracted voxels is performed by feeding two-dimensional 50 mm × 50 mm patches from three orthogonal planes into three concurrent CNNs. The networks consist of three convolutional layers and one fully-connected layer with 256 neurons. In the experiments, 1028 non-contrast-enhanced and non-ECG-triggered low-dose chest CT scans were used. The network was trained on 797 scans. In the remaining 231 test scans, the method detected on average 194.3 mm3 of 199.8 mm3 coronary calcifications per scan (sensitivity 97.2 %) with an average false-positive volume of 10.3 mm3 . Subjects were assigned to one of five standard cardiovascular risk categories based on the Agatston score. Accuracy of risk category assignment was 84.4 % with a linearly weighted κ of 0.89. The proposed system can perform automatic coronary artery calcium scoring to identify subjects undergoing low-dose chest CT screening who are at risk of cardiovascular events with high accuracy.

  9. A rare 'incidentaloma' found on low-dose CT screening for lung cancer: 'scanner beware'.

    PubMed

    Federman, Daniel G; Baldassarri, Rebecca J; Cain, Hilary C

    2017-08-01

    Screening for lung cancer with low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) has been shown to reduce mortality and has been recommended by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force for adults 55 to 80 years of age with a 30 pack-year smoking history who are either current smokers or those that quit within 15 years. However, the overwhelming majority of abnormalities detected are not from malignancy. We report a case of pulmonary Langerhans' cell histiocytosis, here-to-fore thought of as extremely uncommon, and make readers aware that this may be increasingly found as LDCT is more widely adopted.

  10. Lung cancer screening - Low dose CT for lung cancer screening: recent trial results and next steps.

    PubMed

    O'Dowd, Emma L; Baldwin, David R

    2017-07-27

    Screening for lung cancer using low-dose computed tomography has already been implemented in North America following the results of the National Lung Screening Trial. Outside North America, clinicians and researchers are addressing issues that may have a major impact on the success of screening programmes by reviewing results of existing trials and by designing new research and pilot programmes. This review summarises the work that has been done to try to answer the remaining questions and highlights potential barriers which may affect screening uptake and cost effectiveness.

  11. Ultra-low dose comprehensive cardiac CT imaging in a patient with acute myocarditis.

    PubMed

    Tröbs, Monique; Brand, Michael; Achenbach, Stephan; Marwan, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    The ability of contrast-enhanced CT to detect "late enhancement" in a fashion similar to magnetic resonance imaging has been previously reported. We report a case of acute myocarditis with coronary CT angiography as well as "late enhancement" imaging with ultra-low effective radiation dose.

  12. SU-F-I-31: Reproducibility of An Automatic Exposure Control Technique in the Low-Dose CT Scan of Cardiac PET/CT Exams

    SciTech Connect

    Park, M; Rosica, D; Agarwal, V; Di Carli, M; Dorbala, S

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Two separate low-dose CT scans are usually performed for attenuation correction of rest and stress N-13 ammonia PET/CT myocardial perfusion imaging (PET/CT). We utilize an automatic exposure control (AEC) technique to reduce CT radiation dose while maintaining perfusion image quality. Our goal is to assess the reproducibility of displayed CT dose index (CTDI) on same-day repeat CT scans (CT1 and CT2). Methods: Retrospectively, we reviewed CT images of PET/CT studies performed on the same day. Low-dose CT utilized AEC technique based on tube current modulation called Smart-mA. The scan parameters were 64 × 0.625mm collimation, 5mm slice thickness, 0.984 pitch, 1-sec rotation time, 120 kVp, and noise index 50 with a range of 10–200 mA. The scan length matched with PET field of view (FOV) with the heart near the middle of axial FOV. We identified the reference slice number (RS) for an anatomical landmark (carina) and used it to estimate axial shift between two CTs. For patient size, we measured an effective diameter on the reference slice. The effect of patient positioning to CTDI was evaluated using the table height. We calculated the absolute percent difference of the CTDI (%diff) for estimation of the reproducibility. Results: The study included 168 adults with an average body-mass index of 31.72 ± 9.10 (kg/m{sup 2}) and effective diameter was 32.72 ± 4.60 cm. The average CTDI was 1.95 ± 1.40 mGy for CT1 and 1.97 ± 1.42mGy for CT2. The mean %diff was 7.8 ± 6.8%. Linear regression analysis showed a significant correlation between the table height and %diff CTDI. (r=0.82, p<0.001) Conclusion: We have shown for the first time in human subjects, using two same-day CT images, that the AEC technique in low-dose CT is reproducible within 10% and significantly depends on the patient centering.

  13. Towards robust deconvolution of low-dose perfusion CT: sparse perfusion deconvolution using online dictionary learning.

    PubMed

    Fang, Ruogu; Chen, Tsuhan; Sanelli, Pina C

    2013-05-01

    Computed tomography perfusion (CTP) is an important functional imaging modality in the evaluation of cerebrovascular diseases, particularly in acute stroke and vasospasm. However, the post-processed parametric maps of blood flow tend to be noisy, especially in low-dose CTP, due to the noisy contrast enhancement profile and the oscillatory nature of the results generated by the current computational methods. In this paper, we propose a robust sparse perfusion deconvolution method (SPD) to estimate cerebral blood flow in CTP performed at low radiation dose. We first build a dictionary from high-dose perfusion maps using online dictionary learning and then perform deconvolution-based hemodynamic parameters estimation on the low-dose CTP data. Our method is validated on clinical data of patients with normal and pathological CBF maps. The results show that we achieve superior performance than existing methods, and potentially improve the differentiation between normal and ischemic tissue in the brain. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Impact of image denoising on image quality, quantitative parameters and sensitivity of ultra-low-dose volume perfusion CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Othman, Ahmed E; Brockmann, Carolin; Yang, Zepa; Kim, Changwon; Afat, Saif; Pjontek, Rastislav; Nikoubashman, Omid; Brockmann, Marc A; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Wiesmann, Martin; Kim, Jong Hyo

    2016-01-01

    To examine the impact of denoising on ultra-low-dose volume perfusion CT (ULD-VPCT) imaging in acute stroke. Simulated ULD-VPCT data sets at 20 % dose rate were generated from perfusion data sets of 20 patients with suspected ischemic stroke acquired at 80 kVp/180 mAs. Four data sets were generated from each ULD-VPCT data set: not-denoised (ND); denoised using spatiotemporal filter (D1); denoised using quanta-stream diffusion technique (D2); combination of both methods (D1 + D2). Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was measured in the resulting 100 data sets. Image quality, presence/absence of ischemic lesions, CBV and CBF scores according to a modified ASPECTS score were assessed by two blinded readers. SNR and qualitative scores were highest for D1 + D2 and lowest for ND (all p ≤ 0.001). In 25 % of the patients, ND maps were not assessable and therefore excluded from further analyses. Compared to original data sets, in D2 and D1 + D2, readers correctly identified all patients with ischemic lesions (sensitivity 1.0, kappa 1.0). Lesion size was most accurately estimated for D1 + D2 with a sensitivity of 1.0 (CBV) and 0.94 (CBF) and an inter-rater agreement of 1.0 and 0.92, respectively. An appropriate combination of denoising techniques applied in ULD-VPCT produces diagnostically sufficient perfusion maps at substantially reduced dose rates as low as 20 % of the normal scan. Perfusion-CT is an accurate tool for the detection of brain ischemias. The high associated radiation doses are a major drawback of brain perfusion CT. Decreasing tube current in perfusion CT increases image noise and deteriorates image quality. Combination of different image-denoising techniques produces sufficient image quality from ultra-low-dose perfusion CT.

  15. Reduced image noise at low-dose multidetector CT of the abdomen with prior image constrained compressed sensing algorithm.

    PubMed

    Lubner, Meghan G; Pickhardt, Perry J; Tang, Jie; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2011-07-01

    To assess the effect of prior image constrained compressed sensing (PICCS) on noise reduction and image quality at low-dose computed tomography (CT). This HIPAA-compliant institutional review board-approved retrospective study was performed by using DICOM CT colonography data sets obtained in 20 adult patients. Informed consent was waived. Low-dose CT colonography was performed with 64-detector CT by using the standard protocol with mean effective dose per series of 3.06 mSv (range, 1.4-7.7 mSv). PICCS was applied to standard filtered back-projection (FBP) series. For FBP and PICCS series, mean and standard deviation (SD) of attenuation were obtained with 100-mm(2) circular region of interest (ROI) at six sites (240 soft-tissue, colonic gas, and subcutaneous fat measurements). Two abdominal radiologists reviewed two- and three-dimensional CT colonography displays and graded image quality with a five-point scale. Phantom studies were performed to compare spatial resolution and image quality between FBP and PICCS. Mean image noise and image quality scores were calculated and compared for clinical and phantom data sets. Bland-Altman, generalized estimating equation regression model, and Student t tests were used to obtain limits of agreement and to compare noise ratios and subjective image quality. Mean SD of attenuation (image noise) for ROIs was 38.0 for FBP and 12.2 for PICCS, corresponding to a noise-reduction factor of 3.1 (P < .001). Average noise reduction was 3.3 for soft tissue, 2.8 for air, and 3.0 for fat attenuation. Attenuation did not substantially change between FBP and PICCS images. Average two-dimensional image quality was 2.45 for FBP and 3.4 for PICCS (P < .001). Average three-dimensional image quality at three sites in the colon was 3.5 for FBP and 3.7 for PICCS (P = .34). Phantom data sets revealed no loss of spatial resolution in a line phantom and reduced noise in a liver tumor phantom when PICCS was compared with FBP. Application of PICCS to

  16. Investigation of ultra low-dose scans in the context of quantum-counting clinical CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidinger, T.; Buzug, T. M.; Flohr, T.; Fung, G. S. K.; Kappler, S.; Stierstorfer, K.; Tsui, B. M. W.

    2012-03-01

    In clinical computed tomography (CT), images from patient examinations taken with conventional scanners exhibit noise characteristics governed by electronics noise, when scanning strongly attenuating obese patients or with an ultra-low X-ray dose. Unlike CT systems based on energy integrating detectors, a system with a quantum counting detector does not suffer from this drawback. Instead, the noise from the electronics mainly affects the spectral resolution of these detectors. Therefore, it does not contribute to the image noise in spectrally non-resolved CT images. This promises improved image quality due to image noise reduction in scans obtained from clinical CT examinations with lowest X-ray tube currents or obese patients. To quantify the benefits of quantum counting detectors in clinical CT we have carried out an extensive simulation study of the complete scanning and reconstruction process for both kinds of detectors. The simulation chain encompasses modeling of the X-ray source, beam attenuation in the patient, and calculation of the detector response. Moreover, in each case the subsequent image preprocessing and reconstruction is modeled as well. The simulation-based, theoretical evaluation is validated by experiments with a novel prototype quantum counting system and a Siemens Definition Flash scanner with a conventional energy integrating CT detector. We demonstrate and quantify the improvement from image noise reduction achievable with quantum counting techniques in CT examinations with ultra-low X-ray dose and strong attenuation.

  17. Low-Dose PET/CT and Full-Dose Contrast-Enhanced CT at the Initial Staging of Localized Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Sabaté-Llobera, Aida; Cortés-Romera, Montserrat; Mercadal, Santiago; Hernández-Gañán, Javier; Pomares, Helena; González-Barca, Eva; Gámez-Cenzano, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) has been used as the reference imaging technique for the initial staging of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma until recent days, when the introduction of positron emission tomography (PET)/CT imaging as a hybrid technique has become of routine use. However, the performance of both examinations is still common. The aim of this work was to compare the findings between low-dose 2-deoxy-2-(18F)fluoro-d-glucose (18F-FDG) PET/CT and full-dose contrast-enhanced CT (ceCT) in 28 patients with localized diffuse large B-cell lymphoma according to PET/CT findings, in order to avoid the performance of ceCT. For each technique, a comparison in the number of nodal and extranodal involved regions was performed. PET/CT showed more lesions than ceCT in both nodal (41 vs. 36) and extranodal localizations (16 vs. 15). Disease staging according to both techniques was concordant in 22 patients (79%) and discordant in 6 patients (21%), changing treatment management in 3 patients (11%). PET/CT determined a better staging and therapeutic approach, making the performance of an additional ceCT unnecessary. PMID:27559300

  18. Treating Alzheimer's Dementia With CT-Induced Low-Dose Ionizing Radiation: Problematic, Yet Potential for More Precise Inquiry.

    PubMed

    Raynor, Stephanie; Giordano, James

    2017-01-01

    This commentary evaluates a recent single-case study by Cuttler et al that posits that a series of computerized tomographic (CT) scans ameliorated symptoms and signs of advanced Alzheimer's dementia in an elderly female patient. The report proposes that CT scanning delivered low-dose ionizing radiation (LDIR) that activated adaptive mechanisms in the brain to induce the effects observed and reported. However, the report evidenced methodologic problems that threaten the validity and value of its approach, stated results, and conclusions. We provide discussion of these issues, with view and intent toward developing more precise investigations of the potential mechanisms and utility of LDIR in treating Alzheimer's dementia and possibly other neurodegenerative disorders.

  19. Impact of low-dose CT scan in dual timepoint investigations: a phantom study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micheelsen, M. A.; Jensen, M.

    2011-09-01

    Dual timepoint FDG takeup investigations have a potential for separating malignant lymph nodes from non-malignant in certain cases of suspected lung cancer. One hour seems to be the optimal time interval between the two scans (50-120 min). Many of the new PET scanners benefit from image fusion with a CT image and also use the CT for attenuation correction. In any practical hospital setting, 1 hour is too long to occupy the scanner bed and a second CT procedure thus becomes necessary. This study tries to validate to what extent the dose/quality of the second CT scan can be lowered, without compromising attenuation correction, lesion detection and quantification. Using a standard NEMA phantom with the GE Discovery PET/CT scanner, taken in and out between scan sessions, we have tried to find the minimal CT dose necessary for the second scan while still reaching tissue activity quantification within predetermined error limits. For a hot sphere to background activity concentration ratio of 1:5, the average uptake (normalised by the time corrected input activity concentration) in a sphere of 6 cm3 was found to be 0.90 ± 0.08 for the standard scan, yielding a dose of 5.5 mGy, and 0.90 ± 0.14 for a scan with lowest possible mAs product and lowest possible kV, yielding a dose of 0.65 mGy. With an insignificant increase in the uncertainty in the uptake measurement, we can get an order of magnitude reduction for the CT dose.

  20. Low-dose computed tomography scans with automatic exposure control for patients of different ages undergoing cardiac PET/CT and SPECT/CT.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ching-Ching; Yang, Bang-Hung; Tu, Chun-Yuan; Wu, Tung-Hsin; Liu, Shu-Hsin

    2017-06-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of automatic exposure control (AEC) in order to optimize low-dose computed tomography (CT) protocols for patients of different ages undergoing cardiac PET/CT and single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT). One PET/CT and one SPECT/CT were used to acquire CT images for four anthropomorphic phantoms representative of 1-year-old, 5-year-old and 10-year-old children and an adult. For the hybrid systems investigated in this study, the radiation dose and image quality of cardiac CT scans performed with AEC activated depend mainly on the selection of a predefined image quality index. Multiple linear regression methods were used to analyse image data from anthropomorphic phantom studies to investigate the effects of body size and predefined image quality index on CT radiation dose in cardiac PET/CT and SPECT/CT scans. The regression relationships have a coefficient of determination larger than 0.9, indicating a good fit to the data. According to the regression models, low-dose protocols using the AEC technique were optimized for patients of different ages. In comparison with the standard protocol with AEC activated for adult cardiac examinations used in our clinical routine practice, the optimized paediatric protocols in PET/CT allow 32.2, 63.7 and 79.2% CT dose reductions for anthropomorphic phantoms simulating 10-year-old, 5-year-old and 1-year-old children, respectively. The corresponding results for cardiac SPECT/CT are 8.4, 51.5 and 72.7%. AEC is a practical way to reduce CT radiation dose in cardiac PET/CT and SPECT/CT, but the AEC settings should be determined properly for optimal effect. Our results show that AEC does not eliminate the need for paediatric protocols and CT examinations using the AEC technique should be optimized for paediatric patients to reduce the radiation dose as low as reasonably achievable.

  1. New developed urological protocols for the Uro Dyna-CT reduce radiation exposure of endourological patients below the levels of the low dose standard CT scans.

    PubMed

    Rassweiler, M-C; Banckwitz, R; Koehler, C; Mueller-Allissat, B; Michel, M-S; Häcker, A; Ritter, M

    2014-10-01

    Cross-sectional imaging by computed tomography (CT) is associated with higher radiation dose compared to plain X-ray. The Uro Dyna-CT provides CT-like images in the endourological operating room. Our aim was to reduce the radiation exposure of endourological patients with the Uro Dyna-CT and optimize the cross-sectional image quality. For the hard contrast protocol, two artificial stones were placed in a Rando-Alderson phantom's left kidney region. Relevant parameters of the standard abdomen protocol were changed. After each modification, two urologists subjectively evaluated the image quality. We developed two customized protocols (standard, low-dose) for hard contrast imaging. To optimize the examination protocol for soft tissue imaging a standardized cone beam phantom was used. Parameters of the preset high-resolution protocol were changed to develop a protocol with similar objective image quality but lower radiation dose. To evaluate the effective radiation dose we embedded 129 thermoluminescence dosimeters in the kidney and ureter region of the Rando-Alderson phantom and performed each protocol five times (stone, soft tissue) and ten times (low-dose protocol). Mean effective dose values per 3D-examination were calculated. We detected a dose area product (DAP) 776.2 (standard) and 163.5 μGym(2) (low-dose) for the stone protocols with an effective dose of 1.96 and 0.33 mSv, respectively. The soft tissue protocol produced a DAP of 5,070 μGym(2) and an effective dose of 7.76 mSv. Our newly developed examination protocols for the Uro Dyna-CT provide CT-like image quality during urological interventions with low radiation dose.

  2. Comparison of biophysical factors influencing on emphysema quantification with low-dose CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heo, Chang Yong; Kim, Jong Hyo

    2014-03-01

    Emphysema Index(EI) measurements in MDCT is known to be influenced by various biophysical factors such as total lung volume, and body size. We investigated the association of the four biophysical factors with emphysema index in low-dose MDCT. In particular, we attempted to identify a potentially stronger biophysical factor than total lung volume. A total of 400 low-dose MDCT volumes taken at 120kVp, 40mAs, 1mm thickness, and B30f reconstruction kernel were used. The lungs, airways, and pulmonary vessels were automatically segmented, and two Emphysema Indices, relative area below -950HU(RA950) and 15th percentile(Perc15), were extracted from the segmented lungs. The biophysical factors such as total lung volume(TLV), mode of lung attenuation(ModLA), effective body diameter(EBD), and the water equivalent body diameter(WBD) were estimated from the segmented lung and body area. The association of biophysical factors with emphysema indices were evaluated by correlation coefficients. The mean emphysema indices were 8.3±5.5(%) in RA950, and -930±18(HU) in Perc15. The estimates of biophysical factors were 4.7±1.0(L) in TLV, -901±21(HU) in ModLA, 26.9±2.2(cm) in EBD, and 25.9±2.6(cm) in WBD. The correlation coefficients of biophysical factors with RA950 were 0.73 in TLV, 0.94 in ModLA, 0.31 in EBD, and 0.18 WBD, the ones with Perc15 were 0.74 in TLV, 0.98 in ModLA, 0.29 in EBD, and 0.15 WBD. Study results revealed that two biophysical factors, TLV and ModLA, mostly affects the emphysema indices. In particular, the ModLA exhibited strongest correlation of 0.98 with Perc15, which indicating the ModLA is the most significant confounding biophysical factor in emphysema indices measurement.

  3. Lung Cancer Screening With Low-Dose CT: Its Effect on Smoking Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Meaghan McEntee; LoBiondo-Wood, Geri

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer screening provides an opportunity for smoking cessation interventions. A review of the literature found that smokers who participated in lung cancer screening had a higher smoking cessation rate compared with smokers in the general population. However, the randomized controlled trials included in the review did not identify any difference in smoking cessation rates between the individuals who had a CT scan to screen for lung cancer and unscreened control groups. Multiple studies observed participants for lengths of time ranging from 1 to 36 months and concluded that individuals who received abnormal CT results had a higher smoking cessation rate compared with participants with normal CT results. A single study that observed participants for 6 years initially found similar increased cessation rates among those with abnormal CT results, but at the conclusion of the study the difference in cessation rates had dissipated. Lung cancer screening produces a teachable moment when individuals may be more receptive to smoking cessation interventions. Advanced practitioners should take an active role in promoting smoking cessation interventions and fostering this teachable moment created by lung cancer screening. PMID:25032020

  4. A comprehensive study on the relationship between the image quality and imaging dose in low-dose cone beam CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Hao; Cervino, Laura; Jia, Xun; Jiang, Steve B.

    2012-04-01

    While compressed sensing (CS)-based algorithms have been developed for the low-dose cone beam CT (CBCT) reconstruction, a clear understanding of the relationship between the image quality and imaging dose at low-dose levels is needed. In this paper, we qualitatively investigate this subject in a comprehensive manner with extensive experimental and simulation studies. The basic idea is to plot both the image quality and imaging dose together as functions of the number of projections and mAs per projection over the whole clinically relevant range. On this basis, a clear understanding of the tradeoff between the image quality and imaging dose can be achieved and optimal low-dose CBCT scan protocols can be developed to maximize the dose reduction while minimizing the image quality loss for various imaging tasks in image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT). Main findings of this work include (1) under the CS-based reconstruction framework, image quality has little degradation over a large range of dose variation. Image quality degradation becomes evident when the imaging dose (approximated with the x-ray tube load) is decreased below 100 total mAs. An imaging dose lower than 40 total mAs leads to a dramatic image degradation, and thus should be used cautiously. Optimal low-dose CBCT scan protocols likely fall in the dose range of 40-100 total mAs, depending on the specific IGRT applications. (2) Among different scan protocols at a constant low-dose level, the super sparse-view reconstruction with the projection number less than 50 is the most challenging case, even with strong regularization. Better image quality can be acquired with low mAs protocols. (3) The optimal scan protocol is the combination of a medium number of projections and a medium level of mAs/view. This is more evident when the dose is around 72.8 total mAs or below and when the ROI is a low-contrast or high-resolution object. Based on our results, the optimal number of projections is around 90 to 120. (4

  5. A comprehensive study on the relationship between the image quality and imaging dose in low-dose cone beam CT.

    PubMed

    Yan, Hao; Cervino, Laura; Jia, Xun; Jiang, Steve B

    2012-04-07

    While compressed sensing (CS)-based algorithms have been developed for the low-dose cone beam CT (CBCT) reconstruction, a clear understanding of the relationship between the image quality and imaging dose at low-dose levels is needed. In this paper, we qualitatively investigate this subject in a comprehensive manner with extensive experimental and simulation studies. The basic idea is to plot both the image quality and imaging dose together as functions of the number of projections and mAs per projection over the whole clinically relevant range. On this basis, a clear understanding of the tradeoff between the image quality and imaging dose can be achieved and optimal low-dose CBCT scan protocols can be developed to maximize the dose reduction while minimizing the image quality loss for various imaging tasks in image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT). Main findings of this work include (1) under the CS-based reconstruction framework, image quality has little degradation over a large range of dose variation. Image quality degradation becomes evident when the imaging dose (approximated with the x-ray tube load) is decreased below 100 total mAs. An imaging dose lower than 40 total mAs leads to a dramatic image degradation, and thus should be used cautiously. Optimal low-dose CBCT scan protocols likely fall in the dose range of 40-100 total mAs, depending on the specific IGRT applications. (2) Among different scan protocols at a constant low-dose level, the super sparse-view reconstruction with the projection number less than 50 is the most challenging case, even with strong regularization. Better image quality can be acquired with low mAs protocols. (3) The optimal scan protocol is the combination of a medium number of projections and a medium level of mAs/view. This is more evident when the dose is around 72.8 total mAs or below and when the ROI is a low-contrast or high-resolution object. Based on our results, the optimal number of projections is around 90 to 120. (4

  6. A comprehensive study on the relationship between image quality and imaging dose in low-dose cone beam CT

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Hao; Cervino, Laura; Jia, Xun; Jiang, Steve B.

    2012-01-01

    While compressed sensing (CS) based algorithms have been developed for low-dose cone beam CT (CBCT) reconstruction, a clear understanding on the relationship between the image quality and imaging dose at low dose levels is needed. In this paper, we qualitatively investigate this subject in a comprehensive manner with extensive experimental and simulation studies. The basic idea is to plot both the image quality and imaging dose together as functions of number of projections and mAs per projection over the whole clinically relevant range. On this basis, a clear understanding on the tradeoff between image quality and imaging dose can be achieved and optimal low-dose CBCT scan protocols can be developed to maximize the dose reduction while minimizing the image quality loss for various imaging tasks in image guided radiation therapy (IGRT). Main findings of this work include: 1) Under the CS-based reconstruction framework, image quality has little degradation over a large range of dose variation. Image quality degradation becomes evident when the imaging dose (approximated with the x-ray tube load) is decreased below 100 total mAs. An imaging dose lower than 40 total mAs leads to a dramatic image degradation, and thus should be used cautiously. Optimal low-dose CBCT scan protocols likely fall in the dose range of 40–100 total mAs, depending on the specific IGRT applications. 2) Among different scan protocols at a constant low-dose level, the super sparse-view reconstruction with projection number less than 50 is the most challenging case, even with strong regularization. Better image quality can be acquired with low mAs protocols. 3) The optimal scan protocol is the combination of a medium number of projections and a medium level of mAs/view. This is more evident when the dose is around 72.8 total mAs or below and when the ROI is a low-contrast or high-resolution object. Based on our results, the optimal number of projections is around 90 to 120. 4) The clinically

  7. Application of low dose radiation and low concentration contrast media in enhanced CT scans in children with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhimin; Song, Lei; Yu, Tong; Gao, Jun; Zhang, Qifeng; Jiang, Ling; Liu, Yong; Peng, Yun

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the feasibility of using low dose radiation and low concentration contrast media in enhanced CT examinations in children with congenital heart disease. Ninety patients with congenital heart disease were randomly divided into three groups of 30 patients each who underwent contrast-enhanced cardiac scans on a Discovery CT750 HD scanner. Group A received 270 mg I/mL iodixanol, and group B received 320 mg I/mL iodixanol contrast media and was scanned with prospective ECG triggering mode. Group C received 320 mg I/mL iodixanol and was scanned with conventional retrospective ECG gating mode. The same weight-based contrast injection protocol was used for all three groups. Images were reconstructed using a 30% adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) algorithm and a 50% ASIR in groups A and B and a 30% ASIR in group C. The subjective and objective image quality evaluations, diagnostic accuracies, radiation doses and amounts of contrast media in the three groups were measured and compared. All images in the three groups met the diagnostic requirements, with the same diagnostic accuracy and image quality scores greater than 3 in a 4-point scoring system. However, ventricular enhancement and the objective noise, signal-to-noise ratio, contrast-to-noise ratio and subjective image quality scores in group C were better than those in groups A and B (all P<.001). The effective radiation dose in groups A and B was 84% lower than that in group C (P<.001); group A received the lowest contrast dose (14% lower than that of groups B and C). Enhanced CT scan images with low dose radiation and low concentration contrast media can meet the diagnostic requirements for examining children with congenital heart disease while reducing the potential risk of radiation damage and contrast-induced nephropathy. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Task-based image quality evaluation of iterative reconstruction methods for low dose CT using computer simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jingyan; Fuld, Matthew K.; Fung, George S. K.; Tsui, Benjamin M. W.

    2015-04-01

    Iterative reconstruction (IR) methods for x-ray CT is a promising approach to improve image quality or reduce radiation dose to patients. The goal of this work was to use task based image quality measures and the channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) to evaluate both analytic and IR methods for clinical x-ray CT applications. We performed realistic computer simulations at five radiation dose levels, from a clinical reference low dose D0 to 25% D0. A fixed size and contrast lesion was inserted at different locations into the liver of the XCAT phantom to simulate a weak signal. The simulated data were reconstructed on a commercial CT scanner (SOMATOM Definition Flash; Siemens, Forchheim, Germany) using the vendor-provided analytic (WFBP) and IR (SAFIRE) methods. The reconstructed images were analyzed by CHOs with both rotationally symmetric (RS) and rotationally oriented (RO) channels, and with different numbers of lesion locations (5, 10, and 20) in a signal known exactly (SKE), background known exactly but variable (BKEV) detection task. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) was used as a summary measure to compare the IR and analytic methods; the AUC was also used as the equal performance criterion to derive the potential dose reduction factor of IR. In general, there was a good agreement in the relative AUC values of different reconstruction methods using CHOs with RS and RO channels, although the CHO with RO channels achieved higher AUCs than RS channels. The improvement of IR over analytic methods depends on the dose level. The reference dose level D0 was based on a clinical low dose protocol, lower than the standard dose due to the use of IR methods. At 75% D0, the performance improvement was statistically significant (p < 0.05). The potential dose reduction factor also depended on the detection task. For the SKE/BKEV task involving 10 lesion locations, a dose reduction of at least 25% from D0 was achieved.

  9. [Ultra-low-dose spiral (helical) CT of the thorax: a filtering technique].

    PubMed

    Nitta, N; Takahashi, M; Murata, K; Mori, M; Shimoyama, K; Mishina, A; Matsuo, H; Morita, R; Sugii, K; Nomura, A

    1996-01-01

    To reduce the radiation dose from spiral (helical) CT, a custom-made aluminium filter was installed in the X-ray tube and a reduction of effective tube current was attempted. A pronounced reduction of effective tube current, namely, 6 and 3 mA, was achieved with 26 and 37 mm thick aluminium filters, respectively. Visualization of normal lung structure was accomplished with both 6 and 3 mA settings. However, images of 3 mA failed to delineate mediastinal structures because of marked beam hardening resulting from the bone structure of the thoracic inlet. Six mA was considered the lowest dose setting of spiral (helical) CT of the thorax that could be used for lung cancer screening.

  10. Projection domain denoising method based on dictionary learning for low-dose CT image reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haiyan; Zhang, Liyi; Sun, Yunshan; Zhang, Jingyu

    2015-01-01

    Reducing X-ray tube current is one of the widely used methods for decreasing the radiation dose. Unfortunately, the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the projection data degrades simultaneously. To improve the quality of reconstructed images, a dictionary learning based penalized weighted least-squares (PWLS) approach is proposed for sinogram denoising. The weighted least-squares considers the statistical characteristic of noise and the penalty models the sparsity of sinogram based on dictionary learning. Then reconstruct CT image using filtered back projection (FBP) algorithm from the denoised sinogram. The proposed method is particularly suitable for the projection data with low SNR. Experimental results show that the proposed method can get high-quality CT images when the signal to noise ratio of projection data declines sharply.

  11. Dose and Image Quality in Low-dose CT for Urinary Stone Disease: Added Value of Automatic Tube Current Modulation and Iterative Reconstruction Techniques.

    PubMed

    Soenen, Olivier; Balliauw, Christophe; Oyen, Raymond; Zanca, Federica

    2016-05-31

    The aim of this study was to compare dose and image quality (IQ) of a baseline low-dose computed tomography (CT) (fix mAs) vs. an ultra-low-dose CT (automatic tube current modulation, ATCM) in patients with suspected urinary stone disease and to assess the added value of iterative reconstruction. CT examination was performed on 193 patients (103 baseline low-dose, 90 ultra-low-dose). Filtered back projection (FBP) was used for both protocols, and Sinogram Affirmed Iterative Reconstruction (SAFIRE) was used for the ultra-low-dose protocol only. Dose and ureter stones information were collected for both protocols. Subjective IQ was assessed by two radiologists scoring noise, visibility of the ureter and overall IQ. Objective IQ (contrast-to-noise ratio, CNR) was assessed for the ultra-low-dose protocol only (FBP and SAFIRE). The ultra-low-dose protocol (ATCM) showed a 22% decrease in mean effective dose (p < 0.001) and improved visibility of the pelvic ureter (p = 0.02). CNR was higher for SAFIRE (p < 0.0001). SAFIRE improves the objective IQ, but not the subjective IQ for the chosen clinical task.

  12. Low-dose dynamic myocardial perfusion CT imaging using a motion adaptive sparsity prior.

    PubMed

    Bian, Zhaoying; Zeng, Dong; Zhang, Zhang; Gong, Changfei; Tian, Xiumei; Yan, Gang; Huang, Jing; Guo, Hong; Chen, Bo; Zhang, Jing; Feng, Qianjin; Chen, Wufan; Ma, Jianhua

    2017-09-01

    Dynamic myocardial perfusion computed tomography (DM-PCT) imaging offers benefits over quantitative assessment of myocardial blood flow (MBF) for diagnosis and risk stratification of coronary artery disease. However, one major drawback of DM-PCT imaging is that a high radiation level is imparted by repeated scanning. To address this issue, in this work, we developed a statistical iterative reconstruction algorithm based on the penalized weighted least-squares (PWLS) scheme by incorporating a motion adaptive sparsity prior (MASP) model to achieve high-quality DM-PCT imaging with low tube current dynamic data acquisition. For simplicity, we refer to the proposed algorithm as "PWLS-MASP''. The MASP models both the spatial and temporal structured sparsity of DM-PCT sequence images with the assumption that the differences between adjacent frames after motion correction are sparse in the gradient image domain. To validate and evaluate the effectiveness of the present PWLS-MASP algorithm thoroughly, a modified XCAT phantom and preclinical porcine DM-PCT dataset were used in the study. The present PWLS-MASP algorithm can obtain high-quality DM-PCT images in both phantom and porcine cases, and outperforms the existing filtered back-projection algorithm and PWLS-based algorithms with total variation regularization (PWLS-TV) and robust principal component analysis regularization (PWLS-RPCA) in terms of noise reduction, streak artifacts mitigation, and time density curve estimation. Moreover, the PWLS-MASP algorithm can yield more accurate diagnostic hemodynamic parametric maps than the PWLS-TV and PWLS-RPCA algorithms. The study indicates that there is a substantial advantage in using the present PWLS-MASP algorithm for low-dose DM-PCT, and potentially in other dynamic tomography areas. © 2017 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  13. Performance evaluation of multi-material electronic cleansing for ultra-low-dose dual-energy CT colonography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tachibana, Rie; Kohlhase, Naja; Näppi, Janne J.; Hironaka, Toru; Ota, Junko; Ishida, Takayuki; Regge, Daniele; Yoshida, Hiroyuki

    2016-03-01

    Accurate electronic cleansing (EC) for CT colonography (CTC) enables the visualization of the entire colonic surface without residual materials. In this study, we evaluated the accuracy of a novel multi-material electronic cleansing (MUMA-EC) scheme for non-cathartic ultra-low-dose dual-energy CTC (DE-CTC). The MUMA-EC performs a wateriodine material decomposition of the DE-CTC images and calculates virtual monochromatic images at multiple energies, after which a random forest classifier is used to label the images into the regions of lumen air, soft tissue, fecal tagging, and two types of partial-volume boundaries based on image-based features. After the labeling, materials other than soft tissue are subtracted from the CTC images. For pilot evaluation, 384 volumes of interest (VOIs), which represented sources of subtraction artifacts observed in current EC schemes, were sampled from 32 ultra-low-dose DE-CTC scans. The voxels in the VOIs were labeled manually to serve as a reference standard. The metric for EC accuracy was the mean overlap ratio between the labels of the reference standard and the labels generated by the MUMA-EC, a dualenergy EC (DE-EC), and a single-energy EC (SE-EC) scheme. Statistically significant differences were observed between the performance of the MUMA/DE-EC and the SE-EC methods (p<0.001). Visual assessment confirmed that the MUMA-EC generated less subtraction artifacts than did DE-EC and SE-EC. Our MUMA-EC scheme yielded superior performance over conventional SE-EC scheme in identifying and minimizing subtraction artifacts on noncathartic ultra-low-dose DE-CTC images.

  14. Low-Dose High-Pitch CT Angiography of the Supraaortic Arteries Using Sinogram-Affirmed Iterative Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Beitzke, Dietrich; Nolz, Richard; Unterhumer, Sylvia; Plank, Christina; Weber, Michael; Schernthaner, Rüdiger; Schöpf, Veronika; Wolf, Florian; Loewe, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Objective To prospectively evaluate image quality and radiation dose using a low-dose computed tomography angiography protocol and iterative image reconstruction for high-pitch dual-source CT-angiography (DSCTA) of the supraaortic arteries. Material and Methods DSCTA was performed in 42 patients, using either 120 kVp tube voltage, 120 mAS tube current, 2.4 pitch and filtered back projection, or 100 kVp tube voltage, 100 mAs tube current, 3.2 pitch, and sinogram affirmed iterative reconstruction. Measurements of vessel attenuation, of the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) were performed to objectively evaluate image quality. Two readers evaluated subjective image quality and image noise, using a four-point scale. Effective dose was used to compare the differences in radiation dose. Results Low-dose protocol application showed significantly higher vessel opacification (p = 0.013), and non-significantly higher CNR and SNR values. There was no difference in the subjective image quality and image noise reading between the protocols. Effective dose was significantly lower using the low-dose protocol (1.29±0.21 mSv vs. 2.92±0.72 mSv; p<0.001). Conclusion The combined use of reduced tube voltage, reduced tube current, and iterative reconstruction reduces radiation dose by 55.4% in high-pitch DSCTA of the supraaortic arteries without impairment of image quality. PMID:24919195

  15. Anxiety in Cancer Patients during (18)F-FDG PET/CT Low Dose: A Comparison of Anxiety Levels before and after Imaging Studies.

    PubMed

    Grilo, Ana; Vieira, Lina; Carolino, Elisabete; Oliveira, Cátia; Pacheco, Carolina; Castro, Maria; Alonso, Juan

    2017-01-01

    Objective. Assessing the level of anxiety in oncology patients who underwent (18)F-FDG PET/CT low dose scan and identifying the main reasons that generate anxiety. Material and Method. The study included 81 cancer patients submitted to the (18)F-FDG PET/CT low dose scan. Patients filled in the Scan Experience Questionnaire and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) before and after (18)F-FDG PET/CT low dose scan. Results. Substantial levels of anxiety were detected both before and after (18)F-FDG PET/CT low dose scan (STAI mean > 30), with a significant increase in the state of anxiety after scan performance (p < 0.0001, Medianpre = 31.1, and Medianpos = 33.0). (18)F-FDG PET/CT low dose results are the main cause of anxiety both before (79.1%) and after (86.9%) the scan. The information provided by staff both before and on the (18)F-FDG PET/CT low dose day was classified mostly as completely understandable (70.5% and 75.3%, resp.) and as very useful (70.5% and 72.6%, resp.) and correlated positively with patients' overall satisfaction with NM Department (rS = 0.372, p = 0.004 and rS = 0.528, p = 0.000, resp.), but not with anxiety levels. Conclusions. Patients perceive high levels of anxiety during the (18)F-FDG PET/CT low dose scan and the concern with scan results was pointed out as the main factor for that emotional reaction.

  16. Anxiety in Cancer Patients during 18F-FDG PET/CT Low Dose: A Comparison of Anxiety Levels before and after Imaging Studies

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Lina; Carolino, Elisabete; Oliveira, Cátia; Pacheco, Carolina; Castro, Maria; Alonso, Juan

    2017-01-01

    Objective. Assessing the level of anxiety in oncology patients who underwent 18F-FDG PET/CT low dose scan and identifying the main reasons that generate anxiety. Material and Method. The study included 81 cancer patients submitted to the 18F-FDG PET/CT low dose scan. Patients filled in the Scan Experience Questionnaire and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) before and after 18F-FDG PET/CT low dose scan. Results. Substantial levels of anxiety were detected both before and after 18F-FDG PET/CT low dose scan (STAI mean > 30), with a significant increase in the state of anxiety after scan performance (p < 0.0001, Medianpre = 31.1, and Medianpos = 33.0). 18F-FDG PET/CT low dose results are the main cause of anxiety both before (79.1%) and after (86.9%) the scan. The information provided by staff both before and on the 18F-FDG PET/CT low dose day was classified mostly as completely understandable (70.5% and 75.3%, resp.) and as very useful (70.5% and 72.6%, resp.) and correlated positively with patients' overall satisfaction with NM Department (rS = 0.372, p = 0.004 and rS = 0.528, p = 0.000, resp.), but not with anxiety levels. Conclusions. Patients perceive high levels of anxiety during the 18F-FDG PET/CT low dose scan and the concern with scan results was pointed out as the main factor for that emotional reaction. PMID:28392942

  17. Low-Dose CT Screening for Lung Cancer: Computer-aided Detection of Missed Lung Cancers.

    PubMed

    Liang, Mingzhu; Tang, Wei; Xu, Dong Ming; Jirapatnakul, Artit C; Reeves, Anthony P; Henschke, Claudia I; Yankelevitz, David

    2016-10-01

    Purpose To update information regarding the usefulness of computer-aided detection (CAD) systems with a focus on the most critical category, that of missed cancers at earlier imaging, for cancers that manifest as a solid nodule. Materials and Methods By using a HIPAA-compliant institutional review board-approved protocol where informed consent was obtained, 50 lung cancers that manifested as a solid nodule on computed tomographic (CT) scans in annual rounds of screening (time 1) were retrospectively identified that could, in retrospect, be identified on the previous CT scans (time 0). Four CAD systems were compared, which were referred to as CAD 1, CAD 2, CAD 3, and CAD 4. The total number of accepted CAD-system-detected nodules at time 0 was determined by consensus of two radiologists and the number of CAD-system-detected nodules that were rejected by the radiologists was also documented. Results At time 0 when all the cancers had been missed, CAD system detection rates for the cancers were 56%, 70%, 68%, and 60% (κ = 0.45) for CAD systems 1, 2, 3, and 4, respectively. At time 1, the rates were 74%, 82%, 82%, and 78% (κ = 0.32), respectively. The average diameter of the 50 cancers at time 0 and time 1 was 4.8 mm and 11.4 mm, respectively. The number of CAD-system-detected nodules that were rejected per CT scan for CAD systems 1-4 at time 0 was 7.4, 1.7, 0.6, and 4.5 respectively. Conclusion CAD systems detected up to 70% of lung cancers that were not detected by the radiologist but failed to detect about 20% of the lung cancers when they were identified by the radiologist, which suggests that CAD may be useful in the role of second reader. (©) RSNA, 2016.

  18. Low-dose multiphase abdominal CT reconstruction with phase-induced swap prior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selim, Mona; Rashed, Essam A.; Kudo, Hiroyuki

    2016-10-01

    Multiphase abdominal CT is an imaging protocol in which the patient is scanned at different phases before and after the injection of a contrast agent. Reconstructed images with different concentrations of contrast material provide useful information for effective detection of abnormalities. However, several scanning during a short period of time eventually increase the patient radiation dose to a remarkable value up to a risky level. Reducing the patient dose by modulating the x-ray tube current or acquiring the projection data through a small number of views are known to degrade the image quality and reduce the possibility to be useful for diagnosis purpose. In this work, we propose a novel multiphase abdominal CT imaging protocol with patient dose reduction and high image quality. The image reconstruction cost function consists of two terms, namely the data fidelity term and penalty term to enforce the anatomical similarity in successive contrast phase reconstruction. The prior information, named phase-induced swap prior (PISP) is computed using total variation minimization of image acquired from different contrast phases. The new method is evaluated through a simulation study using digital abdominal phantom and real data and results are promising.

  19. Low dose CT image restoration using a database of image patches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Sungsoo; Mueller, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Reducing the radiation dose in CT imaging has become an active research topic and many solutions have been proposed to remove the significant noise and streak artifacts in the reconstructed images. Most of these methods operate within the domain of the image that is subject to restoration. This, however, poses limitations on the extent of filtering possible. We advocate to take into consideration the vast body of external knowledge that exists in the domain of already acquired medical CT images, since after all, this is what radiologists do when they examine these low quality images. We can incorporate this knowledge by creating a database of prior scans, either of the same patient or a diverse corpus of different patients, to assist in the restoration process. Our paper follows up on our previous work that used a database of images. Using images, however, is challenging since it requires tedious and error prone registration and alignment. Our new method eliminates these problems by storing a diverse set of small image patches in conjunction with a localized similarity matching scheme. We also empirically show that it is sufficient to store these patches without anatomical tags since their statistics are sufficiently strong to yield good similarity matches from the database and as a direct effect, produce image restorations of high quality. A final experiment demonstrates that our global database approach can recover image features that are difficult to preserve with conventional denoising approaches.

  20. Low dose CT image restoration using a database of image patches.

    PubMed

    Ha, Sungsoo; Mueller, Klaus

    2015-01-21

    Reducing the radiation dose in CT imaging has become an active research topic and many solutions have been proposed to remove the significant noise and streak artifacts in the reconstructed images. Most of these methods operate within the domain of the image that is subject to restoration. This, however, poses limitations on the extent of filtering possible. We advocate to take into consideration the vast body of external knowledge that exists in the domain of already acquired medical CT images, since after all, this is what radiologists do when they examine these low quality images. We can incorporate this knowledge by creating a database of prior scans, either of the same patient or a diverse corpus of different patients, to assist in the restoration process. Our paper follows up on our previous work that used a database of images. Using images, however, is challenging since it requires tedious and error prone registration and alignment. Our new method eliminates these problems by storing a diverse set of small image patches in conjunction with a localized similarity matching scheme. We also empirically show that it is sufficient to store these patches without anatomical tags since their statistics are sufficiently strong to yield good similarity matches from the database and as a direct effect, produce image restorations of high quality. A final experiment demonstrates that our global database approach can recover image features that are difficult to preserve with conventional denoising approaches.

  1. Noise performance of low-dose CT: comparison between an energy integrating detector and a photon counting detector using a whole-body research photon counting CT scanner.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhicong; Leng, Shuai; Kappler, Steffen; Hahn, Katharina; Li, Zhoubo; Halaweish, Ahmed F; Henning, Andre; McCollough, Cynthia H

    2016-10-01

    Photon counting detector (PCD)-based computed tomography (CT) is an emerging imaging technique. Compared to conventional energy integrating detector (EID)-based CT, PCD-CT is able to exclude electronic noise that may severely impair image quality at low photon counts. This work focused on comparing the noise performance at low doses between the PCD and EID subsystems of a whole-body research PCD-CT scanner, both qualitatively and quantitatively. An anthropomorphic thorax phantom was scanned, and images of the shoulder portion were reconstructed. The images were visually and quantitatively compared between the two subsystems in terms of streak artifacts, an indicator of the impact of electronic noise. Furthermore, a torso-shaped water phantom was scanned using a range of tube currents. The product of the noise and the square root of the tube current was calculated, normalized, and compared between the EID and PCD subsystems. Visual assessment of the thorax phantom showed that electronic noise had a noticeably stronger degrading impact in the EID images than in the PCD images. The quantitative results indicated that in low-dose situations, electronic noise had a noticeable impact (up to a 5.8% increase in magnitude relative to quantum noise) on the EID images, but negligible impact on the PCD images.

  2. Low-dose micro-CT imaging for vascular segmentation and analysis using sparse-view acquisitions.

    PubMed

    Vandeghinste, Bert; Vandenberghe, Stefaan; Vanhove, Chris; Staelens, Steven; Van Holen, Roel

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate whether reliable and accurate 3D geometrical models of the murine aortic arch can be constructed from sparse-view data in vivo micro-CT acquisitions. This would considerably reduce acquisition time and X-ray dose. In vivo contrast-enhanced micro-CT datasets were reconstructed using a conventional filtered back projection algorithm (FDK), the image space reconstruction algorithm (ISRA) and total variation regularized ISRA (ISRA-TV). The reconstructed images were then semi-automatically segmented. Segmentations of high- and low-dose protocols were compared and evaluated based on voxel classification, 3D model diameters and centerline differences. FDK reconstruction does not lead to accurate segmentation in the case of low-view acquisitions. ISRA manages accurate segmentation with 1024 or more projection views. ISRA-TV needs a minimum of 256 views. These results indicate that accurate vascular models can be obtained from micro-CT scans with 8 times less X-ray dose and acquisition time, as long as regularized iterative reconstruction is used.

  3. Longitudinal follow-up study of smoking-induced emphysema progression in low-dose CT screening of lung cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, H.; Matsuhiro, M.; Kawata, Y.; Niki, N.; Nakano, Y.; Ohmatsu, H.; Kusumoto, M.; Tsuchida, T.; Eguchi, K.; Kaneko, Masahiro; Moriyama, N.

    2014-03-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is a major public health problem that is predicted to be third leading cause of death in 2030. Although spirometry is traditionally used to quantify emphysema progression, it is difficult to detect the loss of pulmonary function by emphysema in early stage, and to assess the susceptibility to smoking. This study presents quantification method of smoking-induced emphysema progression based on annual changes of low attenuation volume (LAV) by each lung lobe acquired from low-dose CT images in lung cancer screening. The method consists of three steps. First, lung lobes are segmented using extracted interlobar fissures by enhancement filter based on fourdimensional curvature. Second, LAV of each lung lobe is segmented. Finally, smoking-induced emphysema progression is assessed by statistical analysis of the annual changes represented by linear regression of LAV percentage in each lung lobe. This method was applied to 140 participants in lung cancer CT screening for six years. The results showed that LAV progressions of nonsmokers, past smokers, and current smokers are different in terms of pack-year and smoking cessation duration. This study demonstrates effectiveness in diagnosis and prognosis of early emphysema in lung cancer CT screening.

  4. Lung cancer screening with low-dose helical CT in Korea: experiences at the Samsung Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Chong, Semin; Lee, Kyung Soo; Chung, Myung Jin; Kim, Tae Sung; Kim, Hojoong; Kwon, O Jung; Choi, Yoon-Ho; Rhee, Chong H

    2005-06-01

    To determine overall detection rates of lung cancer by low-dose CT (LDCT) screening and to compare histopathologic and imaging differences of detected cancers between high- and low-risk groups, this study included 6,406 asymptomatic Korean adults with >or=45 yr of age who underwent LDCT for lung cancer screening. All were classified into high- (>or=20 pack-year smoking; 3,353) and low-risk (3,053; <20 pack-yr smoking and non-smokers) groups. We compared CT findings of detected cancers and detection rates between high- and low-risk. At initial CT, 35% (2,255 of 6,406) had at least one or more non-calcified nodule. Lung cancer detection rates were 0.36% (23 of 6,406). Twenty-one non-small cell lung cancers appeared as solid (n=14) or ground-glass opacity (GGO) (n=7) nodules. Cancer likelihood was higher in GGO nodules than in solid nodules (p<0.01). Fifteen of 23 cancers occurred in high-risk group and 8 in low-risk group (p=0.215). Therefore, LDCT screening help detect early stage of lung cancer in asymptomatic Korean population with detection rate of 0.36% on a population basis and may be useful for discovering early lung cancer in low-risk group as well as in high-risk group.

  5. Image quality improvement using model-based iterative reconstruction in low dose chest CT for children with necrotizing pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jihang; Yu, Tong; Liu, Jinrong; Duan, Xiaomin; Hu, Di; Liu, Yong; Peng, Yun

    2017-03-16

    Model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) is a promising reconstruction method which could improve CT image quality with low radiation dose. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the advantage of using MBIR for noise reduction and image quality improvement in low dose chest CT for children with necrotizing pneumonia, over the adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) and conventional filtered back-projection (FBP) technique. Twenty-six children with necrotizing pneumonia (aged 2 months to 11 years) who underwent standard of care low dose CT scans were included. Thinner-slice (0.625 mm) images were retrospectively reconstructed using MBIR, ASIR and conventional FBP techniques. Image noise and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for these thin-slice images were measured and statistically analyzed using ANOVA. Two radiologists independently analyzed the image quality for detecting necrotic lesions, and results were compared using a Friedman's test. Radiation dose for the overall patient population was 0.59 mSv. There was a significant improvement in the high-density and low-contrast resolution of the MBIR reconstruction resulting in more detection and better identification of necrotic lesions (38 lesions in 0.625 mm MBIR images vs. 29 lesions in 0.625 mm FBP images). The subjective display scores (mean ± standard deviation) for the detection of necrotic lesions were 5.0 ± 0.0, 2.8 ± 0.4 and 2.5 ± 0.5 with MBIR, ASIR and FBP reconstruction, respectively, and the respective objective image noise was 13.9 ± 4.0HU, 24.9 ± 6.6HU and 33.8 ± 8.7HU. The image noise decreased by 58.9 and 26.3% in MBIR images as compared to FBP and ASIR images. Additionally, the SNR of MBIR images was significantly higher than FBP images and ASIR images. The quality of chest CT images obtained by MBIR in children with necrotizing pneumonia was significantly improved by the MBIR technique as compared to the ASIR and FBP reconstruction, to

  6. Extracting information from previous full-dose CT scan for knowledge-based Bayesian reconstruction of current low-dose CT images

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hao; Han, Hao; Liang, Zhengrong; Hu, Yifan; Liu, Yan; Moore, William; Ma, Jianhua; Lu, Hongbing

    2015-01-01

    Markov random field (MRF) model has been widely employed in edge-preserving regional noise smoothing penalty to reconstruct piece-wise smooth images in the presence of noise, such as in low-dose computed tomography (LdCT). While it preserves edge sharpness, its regional smoothing may sacrifice tissue image textures, which have been recognized as useful imaging biomarkers, and thus it may compromise clinical tasks such as differentiating malignant vs. benign lesions, e.g., lung nodules or colon polyps. This study aims to shift the edge-preserving regional noise smoothing paradigm to texture-preserving framework for LdCT image reconstruction while retaining the advantage of MRF’s neighborhood system on edge preservation. Specifically, we adapted the MRF model to incorporate the image textures of muscle, fat, bone, lung, etc. from previous full-dose CT (FdCT) scan as a priori knowledge for texture-preserving Bayesian reconstruction of current LdCT images. To show the feasibility of the proposed reconstruction framework, experiments using clinical patient scans were conducted. The experimental outcomes showed a dramatic gain by the a priori knowledge for LdCT image reconstruction using the commonly-used Haralick texture measures. Thus, it is conjectured that the texture-preserving LdCT reconstruction has advantages over the edge-preserving regional smoothing paradigm for texture-specific clinical applications. PMID:26561284

  7. Can low-dose CT with iterative reconstruction reduce both the radiation dose and the amount of iodine contrast medium in a dynamic CT study of the liver?

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hiroto; Okada, Masahiro; Hyodo, Tomoko; Hidaka, Syojiro; Kagawa, Yuki; Matsuki, Mitsuru; Tsurusaki, Masakatsu; Murakami, Takamichi

    2014-04-01

    To investigate whether low-dose dynamic CT of the liver with iterative reconstruction can reduce both the radiation dose and the amount of contrast medium. This study was approved by our institutional review board. 113 patients were randomly assigned to one of two groups. Group A/group B (fifty-eight/fifty-five patients) underwent liver dynamic CT at 120/100 kV, with 0/40% adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR), with a contrast dose of 600/480 mg I/kg, respectively. Radiation exposure was estimated based on the manufacturer's phantom data. The enhancement value of the hepatic parenchyma, vessels and the tumor-to-liver contrast of hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) were compared between two groups. Two readers independently assessed the CT images of the hepatic parenchyma and HCCs. The mean CT dose indices: 6.38/4.04 mGy, the dose-length products: 194.54/124.57 mGy cm, for group A/group B. The mean enhancement value of the hepatic parenchyma and the tumor-to-liver contrast of HCCs with diameters greater than 1cm in the post-contrast all phases did not differ significantly between two groups (P>0.05). The enhancement values of vessels in group B were significantly higher than that in group A in the delayed phases (P<0.05). Two reader's confidence levels for the hepatic parenchyma in the delayed phases and HCCs did not differ significantly between the groups (P>0.05). Low-dose dynamic CT with ASIR can reduce both the radiation dose and the amount of contrast medium without image quality degradation, compared to conventional dynamic CT without ASIR. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Acute appendicitis: comparison of low-dose and standard-dose unenhanced multi-detector row CT.

    PubMed

    Keyzer, Caroline; Tack, Denis; de Maertelaer, Viviane; Bohy, Pascale; Gevenois, Pierre Alain; Van Gansbeke, Daniel

    2004-07-01

    To prospectively compare low- and standard-dose unenhanced multi-detector row computed tomography (CT) in patients suspected of having acute appendicitis. Ninety-five consecutive patients underwent two unenhanced multi-detector row CT examinations with 4 x 2.5-mm collimation, 120 kVp, and 30 and 100 effective mAs. Two radiologists independently read the images obtained at each dose during two sessions. Readers recorded visualization of the appendix and presence of gas in its lumen, appendicolith, periappendiceal fat stranding, cecal wall thickening, and abscess or phlegmon to measure the diameter of the appendix and to propose diagnosis (appendicitis or alternative). Data were compared according to dose and reader, with definite diagnosis established on basis of surgical findings (n = 37) or clinical follow-up. chi(2) tests and logistic regression were used. Measurement agreements were assessed with Cohen kappa statistics. Twenty-nine patients had a definite diagnosis of appendicitis. No difference was observed between the frequency of visualization of the appendix (P =.874) neither in its mean diameter (P =.101-.696, according to readers and sessions) nor in the readers' overall diagnosis (P =.788) at each dose. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy of each sign were not different between doses. Fat stranding, appendicolith, and diameter were the most predictive signs, regardless of dose, yielding approximately 90% of correct diagnoses. The ability to propose a correct alternative diagnosis was not influenced by the dose. Low-dose unenhanced multi-detector row CT has similar diagnostic performance as standard-dose unenhanced multi-detector row CT for the diagnosis of acute appendicitis. Copyright RSNA, 2004

  9. Comparison of computational to human observer detection for evaluation of CT low dose iterative reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eck, Brendan; Fahmi, Rachid; Brown, Kevin M.; Raihani, Nilgoun; Wilson, David L.

    2014-03-01

    Model observers were created and compared to human observers for the detection of low contrast targets in computed tomography (CT) images reconstructed with an advanced, knowledge-based, iterative image reconstruction method for low x-ray dose imaging. A 5-channel Laguerre-Gauss Hotelling Observer (CHO) was used with internal noise added to the decision variable (DV) and/or channel outputs (CO). Models were defined by parameters: (k1) DV-noise with standard deviation (std) proportional to DV std; (k2) DV-noise with constant std; (k3) CO-noise with constant std across channels; and (k4) CO-noise in each channel with std proportional to CO variance. Four-alternative forced choice (4AFC) human observer studies were performed on sub-images extracted from phantom images with and without a "pin" target. Model parameters were estimated using maximum likelihood comparison to human probability correct (PC) data. PC in human and all model observers increased with dose, contrast, and size, and was much higher for advanced iterative reconstruction (IMR) as compared to filtered back projection (FBP). Detection in IMR was better than FPB at 1/3 dose, suggesting significant dose savings. Model(k1,k2,k3,k4) gave the best overall fit to humans across independent variables (dose, size, contrast, and reconstruction) at fixed display window. However Model(k1) performed better when considering model complexity using the Akaike information criterion. Model(k1) fit the extraordinary detectability difference between IMR and FBP, despite the different noise quality. It is anticipated that the model observer will predict results from iterative reconstruction methods having similar noise characteristics, enabling rapid comparison of methods.

  10. Robust Low-dose CT Perfusion Deconvolution via Tensor Total-Variation Regularization

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shaoting; Chen, Tsuhan; Sanelli, Pina C.

    2016-01-01

    Acute brain diseases such as acute strokes and transit ischemic attacks are the leading causes of mortality and morbidity worldwide, responsible for 9% of total death every year. ‘Time is brain’ is a widely accepted concept in acute cerebrovascular disease treatment. Efficient and accurate computational framework for hemodynamic parameters estimation can save critical time for thrombolytic therapy. Meanwhile the high level of accumulated radiation dosage due to continuous image acquisition in CT perfusion (CTP) raised concerns on patient safety and public health. However, low-radiation leads to increased noise and artifacts which require more sophisticated and time-consuming algorithms for robust estimation. In this paper, we focus on developing a robust and efficient framework to accurately estimate the perfusion parameters at low radiation dosage. Specifically, we present a tensor total-variation (TTV) technique which fuses the spatial correlation of the vascular structure and the temporal continuation of the blood signal flow. An efficient algorithm is proposed to find the solution with fast convergence and reduced computational complexity. Extensive evaluations are carried out in terms of sensitivity to noise levels, estimation accuracy, contrast preservation, and performed on digital perfusion phantom estimation, as well as in-vivo clinical subjects. Our framework reduces the necessary radiation dose to only 8% of the original level and outperforms the state-of-art algorithms with peak signal-to-noise ratio improved by 32%. It reduces the oscillation in the residue functions, corrects over-estimation of cerebral blood flow (CBF) and under-estimation of mean transit time (MTT), and maintains the distinction between the deficit and normal regions. PMID:25706579

  11. Fast radioactive seed localization in intraoperative cone beam CT for low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yu-chi; Xiong, Jian-ping; Cohan, Gilad; Zaider, Marco; Mageras, Gig; Zelefsky, Michael

    2013-03-01

    A fast knowledge-based radioactive seed localization method for brachytherapy was developed to automatically localize radioactive seeds in an intraoperative volumetric cone beam CT (CBCT) so that corrections, if needed, can be made during prostate implant surgery. A transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) scan is acquired for intraoperative treatment planning. Planned seed positions are transferred to intraoperative CBCT following TRUS-to-CBCT registration using a reference CBCT scan of the TRUS probe as a template, in which the probe and its external fiducial markers are pre-segmented and their positions in TRUS are known. The transferred planned seeds and probe serve as an atlas to reduce the search space in CBCT. Candidate seed voxels are identified based on image intensity. Regions are grown from candidate voxels and overlay regions are merged. Region volume and intensity variance is checked against known seed volume and intensity profile. Regions meeting the above criteria are flagged as detected seeds; otherwise they are flagged as likely seeds and sorted by a score that is based on volume, intensity profile and distance to the closest planned seed. A graphical interface allows users to review and accept or reject likely seeds. Likely seeds with approximately twice the seed volume are automatically split. Five clinical cases are tested. Without any manual correction in seed detection, the method performed the localization in 5 seconds (excluding registration time) for a CBCT scan with 512×512×192 voxels. The average precision rate per case is 99% and the recall rate is 96% for a total of 416 seeds. All false negative seeds are found with 15 in likely seeds and 1 included in a detected seed. With the new method, updating of calculations of dose distribution during the procedure is possible and thus facilitating evaluation and improvement of treatment quality.

  12. Optimization of image quality in pulmonary CT angiography with low dose of contrast material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assi, Abed Al Nasser; Abu Arra, Ali

    2017-06-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to compare objective image quality data for patient pulmonary embolism between a conventional pulmonary CTA protocol with respect to a novel acquisition protocol performed with optimize radiation dose and less amount of iodinated contrast medium injected to the patients during PE scanning. Materials and Methods: Sixty- four patients with Pulmonary Embolism (PE) possibility, were examined using angio-CT protocol. Patients were randomly assigned to two groups: A (16 women and 16 men, with age ranging from 19-89 years) mean age, 62 years with standard deviation 16; range, 19-89 years) - injected contrast agent: 35-40 ml. B (16 women and 16 men, with age ranging from 28-86 years) - injected contrast agent: 70-80 ml. Other scanning parameters were kept constant. Pulmonary vessel enhancement and image noise were quantified; signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were calculated. Subjective vessel contrast was assessed by two radiologists in consensus. Result: A total of 14 cases of PE (22 %) were found in the evaluated of subjects (nine in group A, and five in group B). All PE cases were detected by the two readers. There was no significant difference in the size or location of the PEs between the two groups, the average image noise was 14 HU for group A and 19 HU for group B. The difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.09). Overall, the SNR and CNR were slightly higher on group B (24.4 and 22.5 respectively) compared with group A (19.4 and 16.4 respectively), but those differences were not statistically significant (p = 0.71 and p = 0.35, respectively). Conclusion and Discussion: Both groups that had been evaluated by pulmonary CTA protocol allow similar image quality to be achieved as compared with each other's, with optimize care dose for both protocol and contrast volume were reduced by 50 % in new protocol comparing to the conventional protocol.

  13. Unenhanced low-dose versus standard-dose CT localization in patients with upper urinary calculi for minimally invasive percutaneous nephrolithotomy (MPCNL)

    PubMed Central

    Licheng, Jiang; Yidong, Fan; Ping, Wang; Keqiang, Yan; Xueting, Wang; Yingchen, Zhang; Lei, Gao; Jiyang, Ding; Zhonghua, Xu

    2014-01-01

    Background & objectives: With the ethical concern about the dose of CT scan and wide use of CT in protocol of suspected renal colic, more attention has been paid to low dose CT. The aim of the present study was to make a comparison of unenhanced low-dose spiral CT localization with unenhanced standard-dose spiral CT in patients with upper urinary tract calculi for minimally invasive percutaneous nephrolithotomy (MPCNL) treatment. Methods: Twenty eight patients with ureter and renal calculus, preparing to take MPCNL, underwent both abdominal low-dose CT (25 mAs) and standard-dose CT (100 mAs). Low-dose CT and standard-dose CT were independently evaluated for the characterization of renal/ureteral calculi, perirenal adjacent organs, blood vessels, indirect signs of renal or ureteral calculus (renal enlargement, pyeloureteral dilatation), and the indices of localization (percutaneous puncture angulation and depth) used in the MPCNL procedure. Results: In all 28 patients, low-dose CT was 100 per cent coincidence 100 per cent sensitive and 100 per cent specific for depicting the location of the renal and ureteral calculus, renal enlargement, pyeloureteral dilatation, adjacent organs, and the presumptive puncture point and a 96.3 per cent coincidence 96 per cent sensitivity and 93 per cent specificity for blood vessel signs within the renal sinus, and with an obvious lower radiation exposure for patients when compared to standard-dose CT (P<0.05). The indices of puncture depth, puncture angulation, and maximum calculus transverse diameter on the axial surface showed no significant difference between the two doses of CT scans, with a significant variation in calculus visualization slice numbers (P<0.05). Interpretation & conclusions: Our findings show that unenhanced low-dose CT achieves a sensitivity and accuracy similar to that of standard-dose CT in assessing the localization of renal ureteral calculus and adjacent organs conditions and identifying the maximum calculus

  14. Unenhanced low-dose versus standard-dose CT localization in patients with upper urinary calculi for minimally invasive percutaneous nephrolithotomy (MPCNL).

    PubMed

    Licheng, Jiang; Yidong, Fan; Ping, Wang; Keqiang, Yan; Xueting, Wang; Yingchen, Zhang; Lei, Gao; Jiyang, Ding; Zhonghua, Xu

    2014-03-01

    With the ethical concern about the dose of CT scan and wide use of CT in protocol of suspected renal colic, more attention has been paid to low dose CT. The aim of the present study was to make a comparison of unenhanced low-dose spiral CT localization with unenhanced standard-dose spiral CT in patients with upper urinary tract calculi for minimally invasive percutaneous nephrolithotomy (MPCNL) treatment. Twenty eight patients with ureter and renal calculus, preparing to take MPCNL, underwent both abdominal low-dose CT (25 mAs) and standard-dose CT (100 mAs). Low-dose CT and standard-dose CT were independently evaluated for the characterization of renal/ureteral calculi, perirenal adjacent organs, blood vessels, indirect signs of renal or ureteral calculus (renal enlargement, pyeloureteral dilatation), and the indices of localization (percutaneous puncture angulation and depth) used in the MPCNL procedure. In all 28 patients, low-dose CT was 100 per cent coincidence 100 per cent sensitive and 100 per cent specific for depicting the location of the renal and ureteral calculus, renal enlargement, pyeloureteral dilatation, adjacent organs, and the presumptive puncture point and a 96.3 per cent coincidence 96 per cent sensitivity and 93 per cent specificity for blood vessel signs within the renal sinus, and with an obvious lower radiation exposure for patients when compared to standard-dose CT (P<0.05). The indices of puncture depth, puncture angulation, and maximum calculus transverse diameter on the axial surface showed no significant difference between the two doses of CT scans, with a significant variation in calculus visualization slice numbers (P<0.05). Our findings show that unenhanced low-dose CT achieves a sensitivity and accuracy similar to that of standard-dose CT in assessing the localization of renal ureteral calculus and adjacent organs conditions and identifying the maximum calculus transverse diameter on the axial surface, percutaneous puncture depth

  15. A Model of Regularization Parameter Determination in Low-Dose X-Ray CT Reconstruction Based on Dictionary Learning.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cheng; Zhang, Tao; Zheng, Jian; Li, Ming; Lu, Yanfei; You, Jiali; Guan, Yihui

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, X-ray computed tomography (CT) is becoming widely used to reveal patient's anatomical information. However, the side effect of radiation, relating to genetic or cancerous diseases, has caused great public concern. The problem is how to minimize radiation dose significantly while maintaining image quality. As a practical application of compressed sensing theory, one category of methods takes total variation (TV) minimization as the sparse constraint, which makes it possible and effective to get a reconstruction image of high quality in the undersampling situation. On the other hand, a preliminary attempt of low-dose CT reconstruction based on dictionary learning seems to be another effective choice. But some critical parameters, such as the regularization parameter, cannot be determined by detecting datasets. In this paper, we propose a reweighted objective function that contributes to a numerical calculation model of the regularization parameter. A number of experiments demonstrate that this strategy performs well with better reconstruction images and saving of a large amount of time.

  16. SU-D-12A-06: A Comprehensive Parameter Analysis for Low Dose Cone-Beam CT Reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, W; Yan, H; Gu, X; Jiang, S; Jia, X; Bai, T; Zhou, L

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: There is always a parameter in compressive sensing based iterative reconstruction (IR) methods low dose cone-beam CT (CBCT), which controls the weight of regularization relative to data fidelity. A clear understanding of the relationship between image quality and parameter values is important. The purpose of this study is to investigate this subject based on experimental data and a representative advanced IR algorithm using Tight-frame (TF) regularization. Methods: Three data sets of a Catphan phantom acquired at low, regular and high dose levels are used. For each tests, 90 projections covering a 200-degree scan range are used for reconstruction. Three different regions-of-interest (ROIs) of different contrasts are used to calculate contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) for contrast evaluation. A single point structure is used to measure modulation transfer function (MTF) for spatial-resolution evaluation. Finally, we analyze CNRs and MTFs to study the relationship between image quality and parameter selections. Results: It was found that: 1) there is no universal optimal parameter. The optimal parameter value depends on specific task and dose level. 2) There is a clear trade-off between CNR and resolution. The parameter for the best CNR is always smaller than that for the best resolution. 3) Optimal parameters are also dose-specific. Data acquired under a high dose protocol require less regularization, yielding smaller optimal parameter values. 4) Comparing with conventional FDK images, TF-based CBCT images are better under a certain optimally selected parameters. The advantages are more obvious for low dose data. Conclusion: We have investigated the relationship between image quality and parameter values in the TF-based IR algorithm. Preliminary results indicate optimal parameters are specific to both the task types and dose levels, providing guidance for selecting parameters in advanced IR algorithms. This work is supported in part by NIH (1R01CA154747-01)

  17. Emergency assessment of patients with acute abdominal pain using low-dose CT with iterative reconstruction: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre; Becker, Minerva; Becker, Christoph D; Halfon Poletti, Alice; Rutschmann, Olivier T; Zaidi, Habib; Perneger, Thomas; Platon, Alexandra

    2017-08-01

    To determine if radiation dose delivered by contrast-enhanced CT (CECT) for acute abdominal pain can be reduced to the dose administered in abdominal radiography (<2.5 mSv) using low-dose CT (LDCT) with iterative reconstruction algorithms. One hundred and fifty-one consecutive patients requiring CECT for acute abdominal pain were included, and their body mass index (BMI) was calculated. CECT was immediately followed by LDCT. LDCT series was processed using 1) 40% iterative reconstruction algorithm blended with filtered back projection (LDCT-IR-FBP) and 2) model-based iterative reconstruction algorithm (LDCT-MBIR). LDCT-IR-FBP and LDCT-MBIR images were reviewed independently by two board-certified radiologists (Raters 1 and 2). Abdominal pathology was revealed on CECT in 120 (79%) patients. In those with BMI <30, accuracies for correct diagnosis by Rater 1 with LDCT-IR-FBP and LDCT-MBIR, when compared to CECT, were 95.4% (104/109) and 99% (108/109), respectively, and 92.7% (101/109) and 100% (109/109) for Rater 2. In patients with BMI ≥30, accuracies with LDCT-IR-FBP and LDCT-MBIR were 88.1% (37/42) and 90.5% (38/42) for Rater 1 and 78.6% (33/42) and 92.9% (39/42) for Rater 2. The radiation dose delivered by CT to non-obese patients with acute abdominal pain can be safely reduced to levels close to standard radiography using LDCT-MBIR. • LDCT-MBIR (<2.5 mSv) can be used to assess acute abdominal pain. • LDCT-MBIR (<2.5 mSv) cannot safely assess acute abdominal pain in obese patients. • LDCT-IR-FBP (<2.5 mSv) cannot safely assess patients with acute abdominal pain.

  18. In Vivo Comparison of Radiation Exposure of Dual-Energy CT Versus Low-Dose CT Versus Standard CT for Imaging Urinary Calculi

    PubMed Central

    Jepperson, Maria A.; Cernigliaro, Joseph G.; Ibrahim, El-Sayed H.; Morin, Richard L.; Haley, William E.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: Dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) is an emerging imaging modality with the unique capability of determining urinary stone composition. This study compares radiation exposure of DECT, standard single-energy CT (SECT), and low-dose renal stone protocol single-energy CT (LDSECT) for the evaluation of nephrolithiasis in a single in vivo patient cohort. Materials and Methods: Following institutional review board (IRB) approval, we retrospectively reviewed 200 consecutive DECT examinations performed on patients with suspected urolithiasis over a 6-month period. Of these, 35 patients had undergone examination with our LDSECT protocol, and 30 patients had undergone examination of the abdomen and pelvis with our SECT imaging protocol within 2 years of the DECT examination. The CT dose index volume (CTDIvol) was used to compare radiation exposure between scans. Image quality was objectively evaluated by comparing image noise. Statistical evaluation was performed using a Student's t-test. Results: DECT performed at 80/140 kVp and 100/140 kVp did not produce a significant difference in radiation exposure compared with LDSECT (p=0.09 and 0.18, respectively). DECT performed at 80/140 kVp and 100/140 kVp produced an average 40% and 31%, respectively, reduction in radiation exposure compared with SECT (p<0.001). For patients imaged with the 100/140 kVp protocol, average values for images noise were higher in the LDSECT images compared with DECT images (p<0.001) and there was no significant difference in image noise between DECT and SECT images in the same patient (p=0.88). Patients imaged with the 80/140 kVp protocol had equivocal image noise compared with LDSECT images (p=0.44), however, DECT images had greater noise compared with SECT images in the same patient (p<0.001). Of the 75 patients included in the study, stone material was available for 16; DECT analysis correctly predicted stone composition in 15/16 patients (93%). Conclusion: DECT

  19. Low-dose CT for the diagnosis of appendicitis in adolescents and young adults (LOCAT): a pragmatic, multicentre, randomised controlled non-inferiority trial.

    PubMed

    2017-11-01

    CT radiation is arguably carcinogenic. Results from single-centre studies, mostly retrospective, have advocated lowering the CT radiation dose for the diagnosis of appendicitis. However, adoption of low-dose CT has been slow. We aimed to assess the effectiveness of low-dose CT compared with standard-dose CT in the diagnosis of appendicitis in adolescents and young adults. We did this pragmatic, multicentre, randomised controlled non-inferiority trial at 20 South Korean teaching hospitals with little experience with low-dose CT. Patients aged 15-44 years with suspected appendicitis were randomly assigned (1:1), via computer-generated random assignments (permuted block sizes of two, four, six, and eight) concealed in sequentially numbered envelopes, to receive low-dose CT (2 mSv) or standard-dose CT (≤8 mSv). Randomisation was stratified by site. Group allocation was concealed from patients, outcome assessors, and adverse event adjudicators; care providers, site pathologists, and data collectors were aware of allocation. The primary endpoint was the negative (unnecessary) appendectomy rate among all appendectomies, with a non-interiority margin of 4·5% for low-dose versus standard-dose CT. Primary analysis was by modified intention to treat, which included all patients who received an appendectomy in the group to which they were assigned. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01925014. Between Dec 4, 2013, and Aug 18, 2016, we assigned 1535 patients to the low-dose CT group and 1539 patients to the standard-dose CT group. 22 (3·9%) of 559 patients had a negative appendectomy in the low-dose group versus 16 (2·7%) of 601 patients in the standard-dose group (difference 1·3%, 95% CI -0·8 to 3·3; p=0·0022 for the non-inferiority test). We recorded 43 adverse events in 43 (2·8%) of 1535 patients in the low-dose group and 41 adverse events in 40 (2·6%) of 1539 patients in the standard-dose group. One life-threatening adverse event of

  20. Acute appendicitis: prospective evaluation of a diagnostic algorithm integrating ultrasound and low-dose CT to reduce the need of standard CT.

    PubMed

    Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre; Platon, Alexandra; De Perrot, Thomas; Sarasin, Francois; Andereggen, Elisabeth; Rutschmann, Olivier; Dupuis-Lozeron, Elise; Perneger, Thomas; Gervaz, Pascal; Becker, Christoph D

    2011-12-01

    To evaluate an algorithm integrating ultrasound and low-dose unenhanced CT with oral contrast medium (LDCT) in the assessment of acute appendicitis, to reduce the need of conventional CT. Ultrasound was performed upon admission in 183 consecutive adult patients (111 women, 72 men, mean age 32) with suspicion of acute appendicitis and a BMI between 18.5 and 30 (step 1). No further examination was recommended when ultrasound was positive for appendicitis, negative with low clinical suspicion, or demonstrated an alternative diagnosis. All other patients underwent LDCT (30 mAs) (step 2). Standard intravenously enhanced CT (180 mAs) was performed after indeterminate LDCT (step 3). No further imaging was recommended after ultrasound in 84 (46%) patients; LDCT was obtained in 99 (54%). LDCT was positive or negative for appendicitis in 81 (82%) of these 99 patients, indeterminate in 18 (18%) who underwent standard CT. Eighty-six (47%) of the 183 patients had a surgically proven appendicitis. The sensitivity and specificity of the algorithm were 98.8% and 96.9%. The proposed algorithm achieved high sensitivity and specificity for detection of acute appendicitis, while reducing the need for standard CT and thus limiting exposition to radiation and to intravenous contrast media.

  1. Head-to-head comparison of chest x-ray/head and neck MRI, chest CT/head and neck MRI, and (18)F-FDG-PET/CT for detection of distant metastases and synchronous cancer in oral, pharyngeal, and laryngeal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Rohde, Max; Nielsen, Anne L; Johansen, Jørgen; Sørensen, Jens A; Diaz, Anabel; Asmussen, Jon T; Nielsen, Mie K; Thomassen, Anders; Christiansen, Janus M; Nguyen, Nina; Gerke, Oke; Alavi, Abass; Høilund-Carlsen, Poul Flemming; Godballe, Christian

    2017-06-01

    Purpose: To determine the detection rate of distant metastasis and synchronous cancer comparing clinically used imaging strategies based on a) chest X-ray + head and neck magnetic resonance imaging (CXR/MRI) and b) chest computed tomography + head and neck MRI (CHCT/MRI) to c) (18)F-fluoro-deoxy-glucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) upfront in the diagnostic work-up of patients with oral, pharyngeal, or laryngeal cancer. Methods: A prospective cohort study based on paired data. Consecutive patients with histologically verified primary head and squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) at Odense University Hospital from September 2013 to March 2016 were offered participation. Included patients underwent a) CXR/MRI and b) CHCT/MRI and c) PET/CT on the same day and prior to biopsy. Scans were read blind by separate teams of experienced nuclear physicians and/or radiologists. The true detection rate (TDR) of distant metastasis and synchronous cancer was assessed for CXR/MRI, CHCT/MRI, and PET/CT. Results: A total of 307 patients were included. CXR/MRI correctly detected 3 (1%) patients with distant metastasis, CHCT/MRI detected 11 (4%) patients, and PET/CT detected 18 (6%) patients. The absolute differences of 5% and 2%, respectively, were statistically significant in favor of PET/CT. Also, PET/CT correctly detected 25 (8%) synchronous cancers, which was significantly more than CXR/MRI (3 patients, 1%) and CHCT/MRI (6 patients, 2%). TDR of distant metastasis and/or synchronous cancer with PET/CT was 13% (40 patients), which was significantly higher than 2% (6 patients) for CXR/MRI and 6% (17 patients) for CHCT/MRI. Conclusion: A clinical imaging strategy based on PET/CT demonstrated a significantly higher detection rate of distant metastasis and/or synchronous cancer than strategies in current clinical imaging guidelines, of which European ones primarily recommend CXR/MRI, while US guidelines preferably point to CHCT/MRI in patients with HNSCC

  2. Noise reduction for low-dose helical CT by 3D penalized weighted least-squares sinogram smoothing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing; Li, Tianfang; Lu, Hongbing; Liang, Zhengrong

    2006-03-01

    Helical computed tomography (HCT) has several advantages over conventional step-and-shoot CT for imaging a relatively large object, especially for dynamic studies. However, HCT may increase X-ray exposure significantly to the patient. This work aims to reduce the radiation by lowering the X-ray tube current (mA) and filtering the low-mA (or dose) sinogram noise. Based on the noise properties of HCT sinogram, a three-dimensional (3D) penalized weighted least-squares (PWLS) objective function was constructed and an optimal sinogram was estimated by minimizing the objective function. To consider the difference of signal correlation among different direction of the HCT sinogram, an anisotropic Markov random filed (MRF) Gibbs function was designed as the penalty. The minimization of the objection function was performed by iterative Gauss-Seidel updating strategy. The effectiveness of the 3D-PWLS sinogram smoothing for low-dose HCT was demonstrated by a 3D Shepp-Logan head phantom study. Comparison studies with our previously developed KL domain PWLS sinogram smoothing algorithm indicate that the KL+2D-PWLS algorithm shows better performance on in-plane noise-resolution trade-off while the 3D-PLWS shows better performance on z-axis noise-resolution trade-off. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) studies by using channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) shows that 3D-PWLS and KL+2DPWLS algorithms have similar performance on detectability in low-contrast environment.

  3. Information-Preserving Pseudo-Enhancement Correction for Non-Cathartic Low-Dose Dual-Energy CT Colonography.

    PubMed

    Näppi, Janne J; Tachibana, Rie; Regge, Daniele; Yoshida, Hiroyuki

    2014-09-01

    In CT colonography (CTC), orally administered positive-contrast fecal-tagging agents can cause artificial elevation of the observed radiodensity of adjacent soft tissue. Such pseudo-enhancement makes it challenging to differentiate polyps and folds reliably from tagged materials, and it is also present in dual-energy CTC (DE-CTC). We developed a method that corrects for pseudo-enhancement on DE-CTC images without distorting the dual-energy information contained in the data. A pilot study was performed to evaluate the effect of the method visually and quantitatively by use of clinical non-cathartic low-dose DE-CTC data from 10 patients including 13 polyps covered partially or completely by iodine-based fecal tagging. The results indicate that the proposed method can be used to reduce the pseudo-enhancement distortion of DE-CTC images without losing material-specific dual-energy information. The method has potential application in improving the accuracy of automated image-processing applications, such as computer-aided detection and virtual bowel cleansing in CTC.

  4. Small pulmonary nodules in baseline and incidence screening rounds of low-dose CT lung cancer screening

    PubMed Central

    Walter, Joan E.; Oudkerk, Matthijs

    2017-01-01

    Currently, lung cancer screening by low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) is widely recommended for high-risk individuals by US guidelines, but there still is an ongoing debate concerning respective recommendations for European countries. Nevertheless, the available data regarding pulmonary nodules released by lung cancer screening studies could improve future screening guidelines, as well as the clinical practice of incidentally detected pulmonary nodules on routine CT scans. Most lung cancer screening trials present results for baseline and incidence screening rounds separately, clustering pulmonary nodules initially found at baseline screening and newly detected pulmonary nodules after baseline screening together. This approach does not appreciate possible differences among pulmonary nodules detected at baseline and firstly detected at incidence screening rounds and is heavily influenced by methodological differences of the respective screening trials. This review intends to create a basis for assessing non-calcified pulmonary nodules detected during LDCT lung cancer screening in a more clinical relevant manner. The aim is to present data of non-calcified pulmonary baseline nodules and new non-calcified pulmonary incident nodules without clustering them together, thereby also simplifying translation to the clinical practice of incidentally detected pulmonary nodules. Small pulmonary nodules newly detected at incidence screening rounds of LDCT lung cancer screening may possess a greater lung cancer probability than pulmonary baseline nodules at a smaller size, which is essential for the development of new guidelines. PMID:28331823

  5. Automated detection of nodules attached to the pleural and mediastinal surface in low-dose CT scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Ginneken, Bram; Tan, Andre; Murphy, Keelin; de Hoop, Bart-Jan; Prokop, Mathias

    2008-03-01

    This paper presents a new computer-aided detection scheme for lung nodules attached to the pleural or mediastinal surface in low dose CT scans. First the lungs are automatically segmented and smoothed. Any connected set of voxels attached to the wall - with each voxel above minus 500 HU and the total object within a specified volume range - was considered a candidate finding. For each candidate, a refined segmentation was computed using morphological operators to remove attached structures. For each candidate, 35 features were defined, based on their position in the lung and relative to other structures, and the shape and density within and around each candidate. In a training procedure an optimal set of 15 features was determined with a k-nearest-neighbor classifier and sequential floating forward feature selection. The algorithm was trained with a data set of 708 scans from a lung cancer screening study containing 224 pleural nodules and tested on an independent test set of 226 scans from the same program with 58 pleural nodules. The algorithm achieved a sensitivity of 52% with an average of 0.76 false positives per scan. At 2.5 false positive marks per scan, the sensitivity increased to 80%.

  6. Small pulmonary nodules in baseline and incidence screening rounds of low-dose CT lung cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Walter, Joan E; Heuvelmans, Marjolein A; Oudkerk, Matthijs

    2017-02-01

    Currently, lung cancer screening by low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) is widely recommended for high-risk individuals by US guidelines, but there still is an ongoing debate concerning respective recommendations for European countries. Nevertheless, the available data regarding pulmonary nodules released by lung cancer screening studies could improve future screening guidelines, as well as the clinical practice of incidentally detected pulmonary nodules on routine CT scans. Most lung cancer screening trials present results for baseline and incidence screening rounds separately, clustering pulmonary nodules initially found at baseline screening and newly detected pulmonary nodules after baseline screening together. This approach does not appreciate possible differences among pulmonary nodules detected at baseline and firstly detected at incidence screening rounds and is heavily influenced by methodological differences of the respective screening trials. This review intends to create a basis for assessing non-calcified pulmonary nodules detected during LDCT lung cancer screening in a more clinical relevant manner. The aim is to present data of non-calcified pulmonary baseline nodules and new non-calcified pulmonary incident nodules without clustering them together, thereby also simplifying translation to the clinical practice of incidentally detected pulmonary nodules. Small pulmonary nodules newly detected at incidence screening rounds of LDCT lung cancer screening may possess a greater lung cancer probability than pulmonary baseline nodules at a smaller size, which is essential for the development of new guidelines.

  7. Detection of bladder cancer: comparison of low-dose scans with AIDR 3D and routine-dose scans with FBP on the excretory phase in CT urography

    PubMed Central

    Tsuboyama, Takahiro; Kumano, Seishi; Inada, Yuki; Koyama, Mitsuhiro; Azuma, Haruhito; Narumi, Yoshifumi

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To prospectively compare the detection of bladder cancer between low-dose scans with adaptive iterative dose reduction three dimensional projection (AIDR 3D) and routine-dose scans with filtered back projection (FBP) on the excretory phase (EP) in CT urography. Methods: 42 patients were included. Routine- and low-dose EP were performed in each patient. Routine-dose images were reconstructed with FBP, and low-dose images were reconstructed with AIDR 3D. Two radiologists scored confidence levels for the presence or absence of bladder cancer using a 5-point scale. The CT dose index of each EP was measured, and the dose reduction was calculated. Results: Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were 86.4%, 95.0% and 90.5% on routine-dose scans and were 86.4%, 90.0% and 88.1% on low-dose scans, respectively. There was no significant difference (p; not significant, 1.00 and 1.00, respectively). The average CT dose index was 8.07 and 2.63 mGy on routine- and low-dose scans, and the ratio of dose reduction was 67.6%. Conclusion: The detection of bladder cancer on low-dose scans with AIDR 3D is almost equal to that on routine-dose scans with FBP on the EP, with nearly 70% dose reduction. Advances in knowledge: Using AIDR 3D, the radiation dose may be reduced on the EP in CT urography for the detection of bladder cancer. PMID:26642306

  8. NIH-funded study shows 20 percent reduction in lung cancer mortality with low-dose CT compared to chest X-ray: | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Scientists have found a 20 percent reduction in deaths from lung cancer among current or former heavy smokers who were screened with low-dose helical computed tomography (CT) versus those screened by chest X-ray. The primary research results from the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) were published online today in the New England Journal of Medicine. |

  9. Low-dose preview for patient-specific, task-specific technique selection in cone-beam CT

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Adam S.; Stayman, J. Webster; Otake, Yoshito; Vogt, Sebastian; Kleinszig, Gerhard; Khanna, A. Jay; Gallia, Gary L.; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose : A method is presented for generating simulated low-dose cone-beam CT (CBCT) preview images from which patient- and task-specific minimum-dose protocols can be confidently selected prospectively in clinical scenarios involving repeat scans. Methods : In clinical scenarios involving a series of CBCT images, the low-dose preview (LDP) method operates upon the first scan to create a projection dataset that accurately simulates the effects of dose reduction in subsequent scans by injecting noise of proper magnitude and correlation, including both quantum and electronic readout noise as important components of image noise in flat-panel detector CBCT. Experiments were conducted to validate the LDP method in both a head phantom and a cadaveric torso by performing CBCT acquisitions spanning a wide dose range (head: 0.8–13.2 mGy, body: 0.8–12.4 mGy) with a prototype mobile C-arm system. After injecting correlated noise to simulate dose reduction, the projections were reconstructed using both conventional filtered backprojection (FBP) and an iterative, model-based image reconstruction method (MBIR). The LDP images were then compared to real CBCT images in terms of noise magnitude, noise-power spectrum (NPS), spatial resolution, contrast, and artifacts. Results : For both FBP and MBIR, the LDP images exhibited accurate levels of spatial resolution and contrast that were unaffected by the correlated noise injection, as expected. Furthermore, the LDP image noise magnitude and NPS were in strong agreement with real CBCT images acquired at the corresponding, reduced dose level across the entire dose range considered. The noise magnitude agreed within 7% for both the head phantom and cadaveric torso, and the NPS showed a similar level of agreement up to the Nyquist frequency. Therefore, the LDP images were highly representative of real image quality across a broad range of dose and reconstruction methods. On the other hand, naïve injection ofuncorrelated noise

  10. Low-dose preview for patient-specific, task-specific technique selection in cone-beam CT

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Adam S.; Stayman, J. Webster; Otake, Yoshito; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.; Vogt, Sebastian; Kleinszig, Gerhard; Khanna, A. Jay; Gallia, Gary L.

    2014-07-15

    Purpose : A method is presented for generating simulated low-dose cone-beam CT (CBCT) preview images from which patient- and task-specific minimum-dose protocols can be confidently selected prospectively in clinical scenarios involving repeat scans. Methods : In clinical scenarios involving a series of CBCT images, the low-dose preview (LDP) method operates upon the first scan to create a projection dataset that accurately simulates the effects of dose reduction in subsequent scans by injecting noise of proper magnitude and correlation, including both quantum and electronic readout noise as important components of image noise in flat-panel detector CBCT. Experiments were conducted to validate the LDP method in both a head phantom and a cadaveric torso by performing CBCT acquisitions spanning a wide dose range (head: 0.8–13.2 mGy, body: 0.8–12.4 mGy) with a prototype mobile C-arm system. After injecting correlated noise to simulate dose reduction, the projections were reconstructed using both conventional filtered backprojection (FBP) and an iterative, model-based image reconstruction method (MBIR). The LDP images were then compared to real CBCT images in terms of noise magnitude, noise-power spectrum (NPS), spatial resolution, contrast, and artifacts. Results : For both FBP and MBIR, the LDP images exhibited accurate levels of spatial resolution and contrast that were unaffected by the correlated noise injection, as expected. Furthermore, the LDP image noise magnitude and NPS were in strong agreement with real CBCT images acquired at the corresponding, reduced dose level across the entire dose range considered. The noise magnitude agreed within 7% for both the head phantom and cadaveric torso, and the NPS showed a similar level of agreement up to the Nyquist frequency. Therefore, the LDP images were highly representative of real image quality across a broad range of dose and reconstruction methods. On the other hand, naïve injection ofuncorrelated noise

  11. WE-FG-207A-03: Low-Dose Cone-Beam Breast CT: Physics and Technology Development.

    PubMed

    Boone, J

    2016-06-01

    dedicated breast CT. The development of large-area flat-panel detectors with field-of-view sufficient to image the entire breast in each projection enabled development of flat-panel cone-beam breast CT. More recently, the availability of complimentary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) detectors with lower system noise and finer pixel pitch, combined with the development of x-ray tubes with focal spot dimensions similar to mammography systems, has shown improved spatial resolution and could improve visualization of microcalcifications. These technological developments promise clinical translation of low-dose cone-beam breast CT. Dedicated photon-counting breast CT (pcBCT) systems represent a novel detector design, which provide high spatial resolution (∼ 100µm) and low mean glandular dose (MGD). The CdTe-based direct conversion detector technology was previously evaluated and confirmed by simulations and basic experiments on laboratory setups [Kalender et al., Eur Radiol 22: 1-8, 2012]. Measurements of dose, technical image quality parameters, and surgical specimens on a pcBCT scanner have been completed. Comparative evaluation of surgical specimens showed that pcBCT outperformed mammography and digital breast tomosynthesis with respect to 3D spatial resolution, detectability of calcifications, and soft tissue delineation. Major barriers to widespread clinical use of BCT relate to radiation dose, imaging of microcalcifications, and adequate coverage of breast tissue near the chest wall. Adequate chest wall coverage is also technically challenging but recent progress in x-ray tube, detector and table design now enables full breast coverage in the majority of patients. At this time, BCT has been deemed to be suitable for diagnostic imaging but not yet for screening. The mean glandular dose (MGD) from BCT has been reported to be between 5.7 to 27.8 mGy, and this range is comparable to, and within the range of, the MGD of 2.6 to 31.6 mGy in diagnostic mammography. In

  12. Over-exposure correction in knee cone-beam CT imaging with automatic exposure control using a partial low dose scan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jang-Hwan; Muller, Kerstin; Hsieh, Scott; Maier, Andreas; Gold, Garry; Levenston, Marc; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2016-03-01

    C-arm-based cone-beam CT (CBCT) systems with flat-panel detectors are suitable for diagnostic knee imaging due to their potentially flexible selection of CT trajectories and wide volumetric beam coverage. In knee CT imaging, over-exposure artifacts can occur because of limitations in the dynamic range of the flat panel detectors present on most CBCT systems. We developed a straightforward but effective method for correction and detection of over-exposure for an Automatic Exposure Control (AEC)-enabled standard knee scan incorporating a prior low dose scan. The radiation dose associated with the low dose scan was negligible (0.0042mSv, 2.8% increase) which was enabled by partially sampling the projection images considering the geometry of the knees and lowering the dose further to be able to just see the skin-air interface. We combined the line integrals from the AEC and low dose scans after detecting over-exposed regions by comparing the line profiles of the two scans detector row-wise. The combined line integrals were reconstructed into a volumetric image using filtered back projection. We evaluated our method using in vivo human subject knee data. The proposed method effectively corrected and detected over-exposure, and thus recovered the visibility of exterior tissues (e.g., the shape and density of the patella, and the patellar tendon), incorporating a prior low dose scan with a negligible increase in radiation exposure.

  13. Assessment of prior image induced nonlocal means regularization for low-dose CT reconstruction: Change in anatomy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hao; Ma, Jianhua; Wang, Jing; Moore, William; Liang, Zhengrong

    2017-09-01

    Repeated computed tomography (CT) scans are prescribed for some clinical applications such as lung nodule surveillance. Several studies have demonstrated that incorporating a high-quality prior image into the reconstruction of subsequent low-dose CT (LDCT) acquisitions can either improve image quality or reduce data fidelity requirements. Our proposed previous normal-dose image induced nonlocal means (ndiNLM) regularization method for LDCT is an example of such a method. However, one major concern with prior image based methods is that they might produce false information when the prior image and the current LDCT image show different structures (for example, if a lung nodule emerges, grows, shrinks, or disappears over time). This study aims to assess the performance of the ndiNLM regularization method in situations with change in anatomy. We incorporated the ndiNLM regularization into the statistical image reconstruction (SIR) framework for reconstruction of subsequent LDCT images. Because of its patch-based search mechanism, a rough registration between the prior image and the current LDCT image is adequate for the SIR-ndiNLM method. We assessed the performance of the SIR-ndiNLM method in lung nodule surveillance for two different scenarios: (a) the nodule was not found in a baseline exam but appears in a follow-up LDCT scan; (b) the nodule was present in a baseline exam but disappears in a follow-up LDCT scan. We further investigated the effect of nodule size on the performance of the SIR-ndiNLM method. We found that a relatively large search-window (e.g., 33 × 33) should be used for the SIR-ndiNLM method to account for misalignment between the prior image and the current LDCT image, and to ensure that enough similar patches can be found in the prior image. With proper selection of other parameters, experimental results with two patient datasets demonstrated that the SIR-ndiNLM method did not miss true nodules nor introduce false nodules in the lung nodule

  14. Motion-compensated PET image reconstruction with respiratory-matched attenuation correction using two low-dose inhale and exhale CT images.

    PubMed

    Nam, Woo Hyun; Ahn, Il Jun; Kim, Kyeong Min; Kim, Byung Il; Ra, Jong Beom

    2013-10-21

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is widely used for diagnosis and follow up assessment of radiotherapy. However, thoracic and abdominal PET suffers from false staging and incorrect quantification of the radioactive uptake of lesion(s) due to respiratory motion. Furthermore, respiratory motion-induced mismatch between a computed tomography (CT) attenuation map and PET data often leads to significant artifacts in the reconstructed PET image. To solve these problems, we propose a unified framework for respiratory-matched attenuation correction and motion compensation of respiratory-gated PET. For the attenuation correction, the proposed algorithm manipulates a 4D CT image virtually generated from two low-dose inhale and exhale CT images, rather than a real 4D CT image which significantly increases the radiation burden on a patient. It also utilizes CT-driven motion fields for motion compensation. To realize the proposed algorithm, we propose an improved region-based approach for non-rigid registration between body CT images, and we suggest a selection scheme of 3D CT images that are respiratory-matched to each respiratory-gated sinogram. In this work, the proposed algorithm was evaluated qualitatively and quantitatively by using patient datasets including lung and/or liver lesion(s). Experimental results show that the method can provide much clearer organ boundaries and more accurate lesion information than existing algorithms by utilizing two low-dose CT images.

  15. Motion-compensated PET image reconstruction with respiratory-matched attenuation correction using two low-dose inhale and exhale CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, Woo Hyun; Ahn, Il Jun; Kim, Kyeong Min; Kim, Byung Il; Ra, Jong Beom

    2013-10-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is widely used for diagnosis and follow up assessment of radiotherapy. However, thoracic and abdominal PET suffers from false staging and incorrect quantification of the radioactive uptake of lesion(s) due to respiratory motion. Furthermore, respiratory motion-induced mismatch between a computed tomography (CT) attenuation map and PET data often leads to significant artifacts in the reconstructed PET image. To solve these problems, we propose a unified framework for respiratory-matched attenuation correction and motion compensation of respiratory-gated PET. For the attenuation correction, the proposed algorithm manipulates a 4D CT image virtually generated from two low-dose inhale and exhale CT images, rather than a real 4D CT image which significantly increases the radiation burden on a patient. It also utilizes CT-driven motion fields for motion compensation. To realize the proposed algorithm, we propose an improved region-based approach for non-rigid registration between body CT images, and we suggest a selection scheme of 3D CT images that are respiratory-matched to each respiratory-gated sinogram. In this work, the proposed algorithm was evaluated qualitatively and quantitatively by using patient datasets including lung and/or liver lesion(s). Experimental results show that the method can provide much clearer organ boundaries and more accurate lesion information than existing algorithms by utilizing two low-dose CT images.

  16. TU-A-12A-09: Absolute Blood Flow Measurement in a Cardiac Phantom Using Low Dose CT

    SciTech Connect

    Ziemer, B; Hubbard, L; Lipinski, J; Molloi, S

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate a first pass analysis technique to measure absolute flow from low dose CT images in a cardiac phantom. This technique can be combined with a myocardial mass assignment to yield absolute perfusion using only two volume scans and reduce the radiation dose to the patient. Methods: A four-chamber cardiac phantom and perfusion chamber were constructed from poly-acrylic and connected with tubing to approximate anatomical features. The system was connected to a pulsatile pump, input/output reservoirs and power contrast injector. Flow was varied in the range of 1-2.67 mL/s with the pump operating at 60 beats/min. The system was imaged once a second for 14 seconds with a 320-row scanner (Toshiba Medical Systems) using a contrast-enhanced, prospective-gated cardiac perfusion protocol. Flow was calculated by the following steps: subsequent images of the perfusion volume were subtracted to find the contrast entering the volume; this was normalized by an upstream, known volume region to convert Hounsfield (HU) values to concentration; this was divided by the subtracted images time difference. The technique requires a relatively stable input contrast concentration and no contrast can leave the perfusion volume before the flow measurement is completed. Results: The flow calculated from the images showed an excellent correlation with the known rates. The data was fit to a linear function with slope 1.03, intercept 0.02 and an R{sup 2} value of 0.99. The average root mean square (RMS) error was 0.15 mL/s and the average standard deviation was 0.14 mL/s. The flow rate was stable within 7.7% across the full scan and served to validate model assumptions. Conclusion: Accurate, absolute flow rates were measured from CT images using a conservation of mass model. Measurements can be made using two volume scans which can substantially reduce the radiation dose compared with current dynamic perfusion techniques.

  17. 3D CT to 2D low dose single-plane fluoroscopy registration algorithm for in-vivo knee motion analysis.

    PubMed

    Akter, Masuma; Lambert, Andrew J; Pickering, Mark R; Scarvell, Jennie M; Smith, Paul N

    2014-01-01

    A limitation to accurate automatic tracking of knee motion is the noise and blurring present in low dose X-ray fluoroscopy images. For more accurate tracking, this noise should be reduced while preserving anatomical structures such as bone. Noise in low dose X-ray images is generated from different sources, however quantum noise is by far the most dominant. In this paper we present an accurate multi-modal image registration algorithm which successfully registers 3D CT to 2D single plane low dose noisy and blurred fluoroscopy images that are captured for healthy knees. The proposed algorithm uses a new registration framework including a filtering method to reduce the noise and blurring effect in fluoroscopy images. Our experimental results show that the extra pre-filtering step included in the proposed approach maintains higher accuracy and repeatability for in vivo knee joint motion analysis.

  18. Effects of Iterative Reconstruction Algorithms on Computer-assisted Detection (CAD) Software for Lung Nodules in Ultra-low-dose CT for Lung Cancer Screening.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Yukihiro; Higaki, Toru; Fujita, Masayo; Miki, Soichiro; Awaya, Yoshikazu; Nakanishi, Toshio; Yoshikawa, Takeharu; Hayashi, Naoto; Awai, Kazuo

    2017-02-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effects of iterative reconstruction (IR) algorithms on computer-assisted detection (CAD) software for lung nodules in ultra-low-dose computed tomography (ULD-CT) for lung cancer screening. We selected 85 subjects who underwent both a low-dose CT (LD-CT) scan and an additional ULD-CT scan in our lung cancer screening program for high-risk populations. The LD-CT scans were reconstructed with filtered back projection (FBP; LD-FBP). The ULD-CT scans were reconstructed with FBP (ULD-FBP), adaptive iterative dose reduction 3D (AIDR 3D; ULD-AIDR 3D), and forward projected model-based IR solution (FIRST; ULD-FIRST). CAD software for lung nodules was applied to each image dataset, and the performance of the CAD software was compared among the different IR algorithms. The mean volume CT dose indexes were 3.02 mGy (LD-CT) and 0.30 mGy (ULD-CT). For overall nodules, the sensitivities of CAD software at 3.0 false positives per case were 78.7% (LD-FBP), 9.3% (ULD-FBP), 69.4% (ULD-AIDR 3D), and 77.8% (ULD-FIRST). Statistical analysis showed that the sensitivities of ULD-AIDR 3D and ULD-FIRST were significantly higher than that of ULD-FBP (P < .001). The performance of CAD software in ULD-CT was improved by using IR algorithms. In particular, the performance of CAD in ULD-FIRST was almost equivalent to that in LD-FBP. Copyright © 2017 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Low-Dose and Scatter-Free Cone-Beam CT Imaging Using a Stationary Beam Blocker in a Single Scan: Phantom Studies

    PubMed Central

    Petrongolo, Michael; Niu, Tianye; Zhu, Lei

    2013-01-01

    Excessive imaging dose from repeated scans and poor image quality mainly due to scatter contamination are the two bottlenecks of cone-beam CT (CBCT) imaging. Compressed sensing (CS) reconstruction algorithms show promises in recovering faithful signals from low-dose projection data but do not serve well the needs of accurate CBCT imaging if effective scatter correction is not in place. Scatter can be accurately measured and removed using measurement-based methods. However, these approaches are considered unpractical in the conventional FDK reconstruction, due to the inevitable primary loss for scatter measurement. We combine measurement-based scatter correction and CS-based iterative reconstruction to generate scatter-free images from low-dose projections. We distribute blocked areas on the detector where primary signals are considered redundant in a full scan. Scatter distribution is estimated by interpolating/extrapolating measured scatter samples inside blocked areas. CS-based iterative reconstruction is finally carried out on the undersampled data to obtain scatter-free and low-dose CBCT images. With only 25% of conventional full-scan dose, our method reduces the average CT number error from 250 HU to 24 HU and increases the contrast by a factor of 2.1 on Catphan 600 phantom. On an anthropomorphic head phantom, the average CT number error is reduced from 224 HU to 10 HU in the central uniform area. PMID:24348742

  20. The Head to Head That Had to Happen: A Case Study of Television Sport and Entrepreneurship.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whannel, Garry

    The race between Mary Decker and Zola Budd, a head to head confrontation in the 1985 Olympic Games, is examined within the broader context of the transformation taking place in sports as a result of the combined efforts of television and the economic forces of sponsorship. Athletics is going through this process of transformation both economically…

  1. Low-dose 4D cone-beam CT via joint spatiotemporal regularization of tensor framelet and nonlocal total variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Hao; Gao, Hao; Xing, Lei

    2017-08-01

    Excessive radiation exposure is still a major concern in 4D cone-beam computed tomography (4D-CBCT) due to its prolonged scanning duration. Radiation dose can be effectively reduced by either under-sampling the x-ray projections or reducing the x-ray flux. However, 4D-CBCT reconstruction under such low-dose protocols is prone to image artifacts and noise. In this work, we propose a novel joint regularization-based iterative reconstruction method for low-dose 4D-CBCT. To tackle the under-sampling problem, we employ spatiotemporal tensor framelet (STF) regularization to take advantage of the spatiotemporal coherence of the patient anatomy in 4D images. To simultaneously suppress the image noise caused by photon starvation, we also incorporate spatiotemporal nonlocal total variation (SNTV) regularization to make use of the nonlocal self-recursiveness of anatomical structures in the spatial and temporal domains. Under the joint STF-SNTV regularization, the proposed iterative reconstruction approach is evaluated first using two digital phantoms and then using physical experiment data in the low-dose context of both under-sampled and noisy projections. Compared with existing approaches via either STF or SNTV regularization alone, the presented hybrid approach achieves improved image quality, and is particularly effective for the reconstruction of low-dose 4D-CBCT data that are not only sparse but noisy.

  2. Dual-energy CT for the characterization of urinary calculi: In vitro and in vivo evaluation of a low-dose scanning protocol.

    PubMed

    Thomas, C; Patschan, O; Ketelsen, D; Tsiflikas, I; Reimann, A; Brodoefel, H; Buchgeister, M; Nagele, U; Stenzl, A; Claussen, C; Kopp, A; Heuschmid, M; Schlemmer, H-P

    2009-06-01

    The efficiency and radiation dose of a low-dose dual-energy (DE) CT protocol for the evaluation of urinary calculus disease were evaluated. A low-dose dual-source DE-CT renal calculi protocol (140 kV, 46 mAs; 80 kV, 210 mAs) was derived from the single-energy (SE) CT protocol used in our institution for the detection of renal calculi (120 kV, 75 mAs). An Alderson-Rando phantom was equipped with thermoluminescence dosimeters and examined by CT with both protocols. The effective doses were calculated. Fifty-one patients with suspected or known urinary calculus disease underwent DE-CT. DE analysis was performed if calculi were detected using a dedicated software tool. Results were compared to chemical analysis after invasive calculus extraction. An effective dose of 3.43 mSv (male) and 5.30 mSv (female) was measured in the phantom for the DE protocol (vs. 3.17/4.57 mSv for the SE protocol). Urinary calculi were found in 34 patients; in 28 patients, calculi were removed and analyzed (23 patients with calcified calculi, three with uric acid calculi, one with 2,8-dihyxdroxyadenine-calculi, one patient with a mixed struvite calculus). DE analysis was able to distinguish between calcified and non-calcified calculi in all cases. In conclusion, dual-energy urinary calculus analysis is effective also with a low-dose protocol. The protocol tested in this study reliably identified calcified urinary calculi in vivo.

  3. A low-dose and an ultra-low-dose contrast agent protocol for coronary CT angiography in a clinical setting: quantitative and qualitative comparison to a standard dose protocol.

    PubMed

    Benz, Dominik C; Gräni, Christoph; Hirt Moch, Beatrice; Mikulicic, Fran; Vontobel, Jan; Fuchs, Tobias A; Stehli, Julia; Clerc, Olivier F; Possner, Mathias; Pazhenkottil, Aju P; Gaemperli, Oliver; Buechel, Ronny R; Kaufmann, Philipp A

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate the impact of a low-dose (LD) and an ultra-LD (ULD) contrast protocol for coronary CT angiography on qualitative and quantitative image parameters in a clinical setting. We scanned 120 consecutive patients with a 256-slice CT scanner applying a LD (60 patients, 35-55 ml) or ULD (60 patients, 25-45 ml) contrast protocol adapted to the body mass index. Visually assessed image quality and attenuation measured in each coronary segment were retrospectively compared in 20 consecutive patients scanned with a normal-dose (ND, 40-105 ml) contrast protocol. Visually assessed image quality did not differ significantly among protocols. By contrast, attenuation obtained from the ULD protocol (median contrast volume 35 ml) differed significantly from the LD (median 45 ml) and ND (median 70 ml) protocols in the coronary segments (316 ± 52 vs 363 ± 60 and 359 ± 52 HU, p < 0.001). Attenuation did not differ significantly between the LD and ND protocol. The proportion of patients with inadequate coronary vessel attenuation was significantly higher (p < 0.001) in the ULD protocol (37%) than in the ND (5%) and LD (10%) protocols but did not differ significantly between the ND and LD protocols. In a clinical setting, a LD contrast protocol with a median volume of 45 ml is feasible for the latest generation 256-slice coronary CT angiography as it yields attenuation comparable to a ND protocol. By contrast, the implementation of an ULD protocol remains challenging. Advances in knowledge: Although not perceived by the naked eye, an ULD contrast protocol in a clinical setting yields attenuation below a threshold for diagnostic image quality.

  4. Adaptive iterative dose reduction (AIDR) 3D in low dose CT abdomen-pelvis: Effects on image quality and radiation exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ang, W. C.; Hashim, S.; Karim, M. K. A.; Bahruddin, N. A.; Salehhon, N.; Musa, Y.

    2017-05-01

    The widespread use of computed tomography (CT) has increased the medical radiation exposure and cancer risk. We aimed to evaluate the impact of AIDR 3D in CT abdomen-pelvic examinations based on image quality and radiation dose in low dose (LD) setting compared to standard dose (STD) with filtered back projection (FBP) reconstruction. We retrospectively reviewed the images of 40 patients who underwent CT abdomen-pelvic using a 80 slice CT scanner. Group 1 patients (n=20, mean age 41 ± 17 years) were performed at LD with AIDR 3D reconstruction and Group 2 patients (n=20, mean age 52 ± 21 years) were scanned with STD using FBP reconstruction. Objective image noise was assessed by region of interest (ROI) measurements in the liver and aorta as standard deviation (SD) of the attenuation value (Hounsfield Unit, HU) while subjective image quality was evaluated by two radiologists. Statistical analysis was used to compare the scan length, CT dose index volume (CTDIvol) and image quality of both patient groups. Although both groups have similar mean scan length, the CTDIvol significantly decreased by 38% in LD CT compared to STD CT (p<0.05). Objective and subjective image quality were statistically improved with AIDR 3D (p<0.05). In conclusion, AIDR 3D enables significant dose reduction of 38% with superior image quality in LD CT abdomen-pelvis.

  5. Diagnostic value of CT-localizer and axial low-dose computed tomography for the detection of drug body packing.

    PubMed

    Aissa, Joel; Kohlmeier, Antonia; Rubbert, Christian; Hohn, Ulrich; Blondin, Dirk; Schleich, Christoph; Kröpil, Patric; Boos, Johannes; Antoch, Gerald; Miese, Falk

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the diagnostic performance of CT-localizers in the detection of intracorporal containers. This study was approved by the research ethics committee of our clinic. From March 2012 to March 2013, 108 subjects were referred to our institute with suspected body packing. The CT-localizer and the axial CT-images were compared by two blinded observers retrospectively. Presence of body packs was assessed in consensus. Sensitivity and specificity, PPV and NPV of the CT-localizer were calculated. Packets were detected in the CT-localizer of 19 suspects. In 28 of 108 cases packs were detected in axial CT-images. Sensitivity of CT-localizer for detection of packs was 0.68, and specificity was 1.00. There were no cases rated as false positive. The PPV was 1.0 and the NPV was 0.89. The omission of the axial CT-images would have led to a mean radiation dose reduction of 1.94 ± 0.5 mSv. The value of CT-localizers lies in their high PPV. Localizers are limited by low sensitivity, compared to axial CT-images in screening of potential body packers. However, in positive cases their high PPV may possibly allow to omit the complete axial abdominal CT to achieve even lower radiation exposure. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  6. Prospective randomised comparison of diagnostic confidence and image quality with normal-dose and low-dose CT pulmonary angiography at various body weights.

    PubMed

    Szucs-Farkas, Zsolt; Megyeri, Boglarka; Christe, Andreas; Vock, Peter; Heverhagen, Johannes T; Schindera, Sebastian T

    2014-08-01

    To find a threshold body weight (BW) below 100 kg above which computed tomography pulmonary angiography (CTPA) using reduced radiation and a reduced contrast material (CM) dose provides significantly impaired quality and diagnostic confidence compared with standard-dose CTPA. In this prospectively randomised study of 501 patients with suspected pulmonary embolism and BW <100 kg, 246 were allocated into the low-dose group (80 kVp, 75 ml CM) and 255 into the normal-dose group (100 kVp, 100 ml CM). Contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in the pulmonary trunk was calculated. Two blinded chest radiologists independently evaluated subjective image quality and diagnostic confidence. Data were compared between the normal-dose and low-dose groups in five BW subgroups. Vessel attenuation did not differ between the normal-dose and low-dose groups within each BW subgroup (P = 1.0). The CNR was higher with the normal-dose compared with the low-dose protocol (P < 0.006) in all BW subgroups except for the 90-99 kg subgroup (P = 0.812). Subjective image quality and diagnostic confidence did not differ between CT protocols in all subgroups (P between 0.960 and 1.0). Subjective image quality and diagnostic confidence with 80 kVp CTPA is not different from normal-dose protocol in any BW group up to 100 kg. • 80 kVp CTPA is safe in patients weighing <100 kg • Reduced radiation and iodine dose still provide high vessel attenuation • Image quality and diagnostic confidence with low-dose CTPA is good • Diagnostic confidence does not deteriorate in obese patients weighing <100 kg.

  7. Deriving adaptive MRF coefficients from previous normal-dose CT scan for low-dose image reconstruction via penalized weighted least-squares minimization

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hao; Han, Hao; Wang, Jing; Ma, Jianhua; Liu, Yan; Moore, William; Liang, Zhengrong

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Repeated computed tomography (CT) scans are required for some clinical applications such as image-guided interventions. To optimize radiation dose utility, a normal-dose scan is often first performed to set up reference, followed by a series of low-dose scans for intervention. One common strategy to achieve the low-dose scan is to lower the x-ray tube current and exposure time (mAs) or tube voltage (kVp) setting in the scanning protocol, but the resulted image quality by the conventional filtered back-projection (FBP) method may be severely degraded due to the excessive noise. Penalized weighted least-squares (PWLS) image reconstruction has shown the potential to significantly improve the image quality from low-mAs acquisitions, where the penalty plays an important role. In this work, the authors' explore an adaptive Markov random field (MRF)-based penalty term by utilizing previous normal-dose scan to improve the subsequent low-dose scans image reconstruction. Methods: In this work, the authors employ the widely-used quadratic-form MRF as the penalty model and explore a novel idea of using the previous normal-dose scan to obtain the MRF coefficients for adaptive reconstruction of the low-dose images. In the coefficients determination, the authors further explore another novel idea of using the normal-dose scan to obtain a scale map, which describes an optimal neighborhood for the coefficients determination such that a local uniform region has a small spread of frequency spectrum and, therefore, a small MRF window, and vice versa. The proposed penalty term is incorporated into the PWLS image reconstruction framework, and the low-dose images are reconstructed via the PWLS minimization. Results: The presented adaptive MRF based PWLS algorithm was validated by physical phantom and patient data. The experimental results demonstrated that the presented algorithm is superior to the PWLS reconstruction using the conventional Gaussian MRF penalty or the edge

  8. A new low-dose multi-phase trauma CT protocol and its impact on diagnostic assessment and radiation dose in multi-trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Alagic, Zlatan; Eriksson, Andreas; Drageryd, Erika; Motamed, Sara Rezaei; Wick, Marius C

    2017-04-05

    Computed tomography (CT) examinations, often using high-radiation dosages, are increasingly used in the acute management of polytrauma patients. This study compares a low-dose polytrauma multi-phase whole-body CT (WBCT) protocol on a latest generation of 16-cm detector 258-slice multi-detector CT (MDCT) scanner with advanced dose reduction techniques to a single-phase polytrauma WBCT protocol on a 64-slice MDCT scanner. Between March and September 2015, 109 polytrauma patients (group A) underwent acute WBCT with a low-dose multi-phase WBCT protocol on a 258-slice MDCT whereas 110 polytrauma patients (group B) underwent single-phase trauma CT on a 64-slice MDCT. The diagnostic accuracy to trauma-related injuries, radiation dose, quantitative and semiquantitative image quality parameters, subjective image quality scorings, and workflow time parameters were compared. In group A, statistically significantly more arterial injuries (p = 0.04) and arterial dissections (p = 0.002) were detected. In group A, the mean (±SD) dose length product value was 1681 ± 183 mGy*cm and markedly lower when compared to group B (p < 0.001). The SDs of the mean Houndsfield unit values of the brain, liver, and abdominal aorta were lower in group A (p < 0.001). Mean signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) for the brain, liver, and abdominal aorta were significantly higher in group A (p < 0.001). Group A had significantly higher image quality scores for all analyzed anatomical locations (p < 0.02). However, the mean time from patient registration until completion of examination was significantly longer for group A (p < 0.001). The low-dose multi-phase CT protocol improves diagnostic accuracy and image quality at markedly reduced radiation. However, due to technical complexities and surplus electronic data provided by the newer low-dose technique, examination time increases, which reduces workflow in acute emergency situations.

  9. SU-E-I-86: Ultra-Low Dose Computed Tomography Attenuation Correction for Pediatric PET CT Using Adaptive Statistical Iterative Reconstruction (ASiR™)

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, S; Shulkin, B

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop ultra-low dose computed tomography (CT) attenuation correction (CTAC) acquisition protocols for pediatric positron emission tomography CT (PET CT). Methods: A GE Discovery 690 PET CT hybrid scanner was used to investigate the change to quantitative PET and CT measurements when operated at ultra-low doses (10–35 mAs). CT quantitation: noise, low-contrast resolution, and CT numbers for eleven tissue substitutes were analyzed in-phantom. CT quantitation was analyzed to a reduction of 90% CTDIvol (0.39/3.64; mGy) radiation dose from baseline. To minimize noise infiltration, 100% adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR) was used for CT reconstruction. PET images were reconstructed with the lower-dose CTAC iterations and analyzed for: maximum body weight standardized uptake value (SUVbw) of various diameter targets (range 8–37 mm), background uniformity, and spatial resolution. Radiation organ dose, as derived from patient exam size specific dose estimate (SSDE), was converted to effective dose using the standard ICRP report 103 method. Effective dose and CTAC noise magnitude were compared for 140 patient examinations (76 post-ASiR implementation) to determine relative patient population dose reduction and noise control. Results: CT numbers were constant to within 10% from the non-dose reduced CTAC image down to 90% dose reduction. No change in SUVbw, background percent uniformity, or spatial resolution for PET images reconstructed with CTAC protocols reconstructed with ASiR and down to 90% dose reduction. Patient population effective dose analysis demonstrated relative CTAC dose reductions between 62%–86% (3.2/8.3−0.9/6.2; mSv). Noise magnitude in dose-reduced patient images increased but was not statistically different from pre dose-reduced patient images. Conclusion: Using ASiR allowed for aggressive reduction in CTAC dose with no change in PET reconstructed images while maintaining sufficient image quality for co

  10. Agreement of Visual Estimation of Coronary Artery Calcium from Low-Dose CT Attenuation Correction Scans in Hybrid PET/CT and SPECT/CT with Standard Agatston Score

    PubMed Central

    Einstein, Andrew J.; Johnson, Lynne L.; Bokhari, Sabahat; Son, Jessica; Thompson, Randall C.; Bateman, Timothy M.; Hayes, Sean W.; Berman, Daniel S.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives We sought to evaluate the accuracy and reproducibility of visual estimation of coronary artery calcium (CAC) from CT attenuation correction (CTAC) scans performed for hybrid PET/CT and SPECT/CT myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI). Background At the time of MPI, hybrid systems obtain a low-dose, non-ECG-gated CT scan that is used to perform attenuation correction. Utility of this CTAC scan in estimating actual CAC as measured by Agatston score (AS) on standard ECG-gated scans has not been previously studied. Methods 492 patients from 3 centers receiving both MPI with CTAC and a standard CAC scan were studied. At each site, experienced readers blinded to AS reviewed CTAC images, visually estimating CAC on a six-level scale: classifying patients as estimated AS of 0, 1-9, 10-99, 100-300, 400-999, or ≥1000. Agreement between visually-estimated CAC (VECAC) on CTAC and AS, measured standardly and converted to the same scale, was evaluated, as was inter-reader agreement. Results Although CTAC images are low-dose and non-gated, a high degree of association was observed between VECAC and AS, with 63% of VECACs in the same category as the AS category and 93% within one category. Weighted kappa was 0.89 (95% confidence interval 0.88 to 0.91, p<0.0001). High weighted kappa statistics were observed for each site, scanner type, and gender. Readers reported identical scores in 65% of cases and scores within one category in 93%. Conclusions CAC can be visually assessed from low-dose CTAC scans with high agreement with AS. CTAC scans should be routinely assessed for VECAC. PMID:21109114

  11. Investigation of sinonasal anatomy via low-dose multidetector CT examination in chronic rhinosinusitis patients with higher risk for perioperative complications.

    PubMed

    Fraczek, Marcin; Guzinski, Maciej; Morawska-Kochman, Monika; Krecicki, Tomasz

    2017-02-01

    The aim of the study was to compare visualisation of the surgically relevant anatomical structures via low- and standard-dose multidetector CT protocol in patients with chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) and higher risk for perioperative complications (i.e. presence of bronchial asthma, history of sinus surgery and advanced nasal polyposis). 135 adult CRS patients were divided randomly into standard-dose (120 kVp, 100 mAs) or low-dose CT groups (120 kVp, 45 mAs). The detectability of the vital anatomical structures (anterior ethmoid artery, optic nerve, cribriform plate and lamina papyracea) was scored using a five-point scale (from excellent to unacceptable) by a radiologist and sinus surgeon. Polyp sizes were quantified endoscopically according to the Lildholdt's scale (LS). Olfactory function was tested with the "Sniffin' Sticks" test. On the low-dose CT images, detectability ranged from 2.42 (better than poor) for cribriform plate among anosmic cases to 4.11 (better than good) for lamina papyracea in cases without nasal polyps. Identification of lamina papyracea on low-dose scans was significantly worse in each group and the same was the case with cribriform plates in patients with advanced polyposis and anosmia. Cribriform plates were the most poorly identified (between poor and average) among all the structures on low-dose images. Identification of anterior ethmoid artery (AEA) with reduced dose was insignificantly worse than with standard-dose examination. The AEA was scored as an average-defined structure and was the second weakest visualised. In conclusion, preoperatively, low-dose protocols may not sufficiently visualise the surgically relevant anatomical structures in patients with CRS and bronchial asthma, advanced nasal polyps (LS > 2) and history of sinus surgery. Low mAs value enables comparable detectability of sinonasal landmarks with standard-dose protocols in patients without analysed risk factors. In the context of planned surgery, the current

  12. Total variation minimization-based spiral CT reconstruction in a dental panoramic imaging system for cost-effective, low-dose dental X-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, D. K.; Lee, S. H.; Cho, H. S.; Oh, J. E.; Lee, M. S.; Kim, H. J.; Park, Y. O.; Je, U. K.; Choi, S. I.; Koo, Y. S.; Cho, H. M.

    2012-12-01

    In the paper, we proposed a pragmatic method capable of implementing a cost-effective, low-dose CT reconstruction directly onto a dental panoramic X-ray imaging system by adopting a spiral source trajectory. In the proposed geometry, a linear-type panoramic imaging sensor is rotated 90° from the orientation for panoramic imaging to imitate fan-beam image acquisition. For image reconstruction, we considered a total variation (TV) minimization-based algorithm that exploited the sparsity of the image gradient and was capable of reconstructing CT images with substantially high image accuracy against the image artifacts from sparse-view data. We implemented the algorithm for the proposed geometry and performed systematic simulation works to demonstrate its feasibility for dental imaging applications. CT images were successfully reconstructed from the proposed geometry, and the reconstruction quality was evaluated quantitatively by using an image similarity metric. We expect the proposed method to be applicable to developing a cost-effective, low-dose, all-in-one dental imaging system.

  13. Application of the Low-dose One-stop-shop Cardiac CT Protocol with Third-generation Dual-source CT.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lu; Wang, Yining; Yi, Yan; Cao, Jian; Kong, Lingyan; Qian, Hao; Zhang, Hongzhi; Wu, Wei; Wang, Yun; Jin, Zhengyu

    2017-02-20

    Objective To evaluate the feasibility of a low-dose one-stop-shop cardiac CT imaging protocol with third-generation dual-source CT (DSCT). Methods Totally 23 coronary artery disease (CAD) patients were prospectively enrolled between March to September in 2016. All patients underwent an ATP stress dynamic myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) (data acquired prospectively ECG-triggered during end systole by table shuttle mode in 32 seconds) at 70 kV combined with prospectively ECG-triggered high-pitch coronary artery angiography (CCTA) on a third-generation DSCT system. Myocardial blood flow (MBF) was quantified and compared between perfusion normal and abnormal myocardial segments based on AHA-17-segment model. CCTA images were evaluated qualitatively based on SCCT-18-segment model and the effective dose(ED) was calculated. In patients with subsequent catheter coronary angiography (CCA) as reference,the diagnosis performance of MPI (for per-vessel ≥50% and ≥70% stenosis) and CCTA (for≥50% stenosis) were assessed. Results Of 23 patients who had completed the examination of ATP stress MPI plus CCTA,12 patients received follow-up CCA. At ATP stress MPI,77 segments (19.7%) in 13 patients (56.5%) had perfusion abnormalities. The MBF values of hypo-perfused myocardial segments decreased significantly compared with normal segments [(93±22)ml/(100 ml·min) vs. (147±27)ml/(100 ml·min);t=15.978,P=0.000]. At CCTA,93.9% (308/328) of the coronary segments had diagnostic image quality. With CCA as the reference standard,the per-vessel and per-segment sensitivity,specificity,and accuracy of CCTA for stenosis≥50% were 94.1%,93.5%,and 93.7% and 90.9%,97.8%,and 96.8%,and the per-vessel sensitivity,specificity and accuracy of ATP stress MPI for stenosis≥50% and ≥70% were 68.7%,100%,and 89.5% and 91.7%,100%,and 97.9%. The total ED of MPI and CCTA was (3.9±1.3) mSv [MPI:(3.5±1.2) mSv,CCTA:(0.3±0.1) mSv]. Conclusion The third-generation DSCT stress dynamic MPI at 70 k

  14. Computer-aided nodule detection and volumetry to reduce variability between radiologists in the interpretation of lung nodules at low-dose screening CT

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Kyung Nyeo; Goo, Jin Mo; Lee, Chang Hyun; Lee, Youkyung; Choo, Ji Yung; Lee, Nyoung Keun; Shim, Mi-Suk; Lee, In Sun; Kim, Kwang Gi; Gierada, David S.; Bae, Kyongtae T.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate whether a computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) system improves interobserver agreement in the interpretation of lung nodules at low-dose CT screening for lung cancer. Materials and Methods Baseline low-dose screening CT examinations from 134 participants enrolled in the National Lung Screening Trial were reviewed by seven chest radiologists. All participants consented to the use of their de-identified images for research purposes. Screening results were classified as positive when noncalcified nodules larger than 4 mm in diameter were present. Follow-up evaluation was recommended according to the nodule diameter: ≤ 4 mm; >4–8 mm; > 8 mm. When multiple nodules were present, recommendations were based on the largest nodule. Readers initially assessed the nodule presence visually and measured the average nodule diameter manually. Revision of their decisions after reviewing the CAD marks and size measurement was allowed. Interobserver agreement evaluated using multirater κ statistics was compared between initial assessment and that with CAD. Results Multirater κ values for the positivity of the screening results and follow-up recommendations were improved from moderate (κ=0.53; 0.54) at initial assessment to good (κ=0.66; 0.67) after reviewing CAD results. The average percentage of agreement between reader pairs on the positivity of screening results and follow-up recommendations per case was also increased from 77% and 72% at initial assessment to 84% and 80% with CAD. Conclusion CAD may improve the reader agreement on the positivity of screening results and follow-up recommendations in the assessment of low-dose screening CT. PMID:22717879

  15. MicroPET/CT Imaging of an Orthotopic Model of Human Glioblastoma Multiforme and Evaluation of Pulsed Low-Dose Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Sean S.; Chunta, John L.; Robertson, John M.; Martinez, Alvaro A.; Oliver Wong, Ching-Yee; Amin, Mitual; Wilson, George D.; Marples, Brian

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is an aggressive tumor that typically causes death due to local progression. To assess a novel low-dose radiotherapy regimen for treating GBM, we developed an orthotopic murine model of human GBM and evaluated in vivo treatment efficacy using micro-positron-emission tomography/computed tomography (microPET/CT) tumor imaging. Methods: Orthotopic GBM xenografts were established in nude mice and treated with standard 2-Gy fractionation or 10 0.2-Gy pulses with 3-min interpulse intervals, for 7 consecutive days, for a total dose of 14 Gy. Tumor growth was quantified weekly using the Flex Triumph (GE Healthcare/Gamma Medica-Ideas, Waukesha, WI) combined PET-single-photon emission CT (SPECT)-CT imaging system and necropsy histopathology. Normal tissue damage was assessed by counting dead neural cells in tissue sections from irradiated fields. Results: Tumor engraftment efficiency for U87MG cells was 86%. Implanting 0.5 x 10{sup 6} cells produced a 50- to 70-mm{sup 3} tumor in 10 to 14 days. A significant correlation was seen between CT-derived tumor volume and histopathology-measured volume (p = 0.018). The low-dose 0.2-Gy pulsed regimen produced a significantly longer tumor growth delay than standard 2-Gy fractionation (p = 0.045). Less normal neuronal cell death was observed after the pulsed delivery method (p = 0.004). Conclusion: This study successfully demonstrated the feasibility of in vivo brain tumor imaging and longitudinal assessment of tumor growth and treatment response with microPET/CT. Pulsed radiation treatment was more efficacious than the standard fractionated treatment and was associated with less normal tissue damage.

  16. Transverse changes determined by rapid and slow maxillary expansion--a low-dose CT-based randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Martina, R; Cioffi, I; Farella, M; Leone, P; Manzo, P; Matarese, G; Portelli, M; Nucera, R; Cordasco, G

    2012-08-01

    To compare transverse skeletal changes produced by rapid (RME) and slow (SME) maxillary expansion using low-dose computed tomography. The null hypothesis was that SME and RME are equally effective in producing skeletal maxillary expansion in patients with posterior crossbite. This study was carried out at the Department of Oral Sciences, University of Naples Federico II, Italy. Twelve patients (seven males, five females, mean age ± SD: 10.3 ± 2.5 years) were allocated to the SME group and 14 patients (six males, eight females, mean age ± SD: 9.7 ± 1.5 years) to the RME group. All patients received a two-band palatal expander and were randomly allocated to either RME or SME. Low-dose computed tomography was used to identify skeletal and dental landmarks and to measure transverse maxillary changes with treatment. A significant increase in skeletal transverse diameters was found in both SME and RME groups (anterior expansion = 2.2 ± 1.4 mm, posterior expansion = 2.2 ± 0.9 mm, pterygoid expansion = 0.9 ± 0.8 mm). No significant differences were found between groups at anterior (SME = 1.9 ± 1.3 mm; RME = 2.5 ± 1.5 mm) or posterior (SME = 1.9 ± 1.0 mm; RME = 2.4 ± 0.9 mm) locations, while a statistically significant difference was measured at the pterygoid processes (SME = 0.6 ± 0.6 mm; RME = 1.2 ± 0.9 mm, p = 0.04), which was not clinically relevant. Rapid maxillary expansion is not more effective than SME in expanding the maxilla in patients with posterior crossbite. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  17. Lung cancer probability in patients with CT-detected pulmonary nodules: a prespecified analysis of data from the NELSON trial of low-dose CT screening.

    PubMed

    Horeweg, Nanda; van Rosmalen, Joost; Heuvelmans, Marjolein A; van der Aalst, Carlijn M; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn; Scholten, Ernst Th; ten Haaf, Kevin; Nackaerts, Kristiaan; Lammers, Jan-Willem J; Weenink, Carla; Groen, Harry J; van Ooijen, Peter; de Jong, Pim A; de Bock, Geertruida H; Mali, Willem; de Koning, Harry J; Oudkerk, Matthijs

    2014-11-01

    The main challenge in CT screening for lung cancer is the high prevalence of pulmonary nodules and the relatively low incidence of lung cancer. Management protocols use thresholds for nodule size and growth rate to determine which nodules require additional diagnostic procedures, but these should be based on individuals' probabilities of developing lung cancer. In this prespecified analysis, using data from the NELSON CT screening trial, we aimed to quantify how nodule diameter, volume, and volume doubling time affect the probability of developing lung cancer within 2 years of a CT scan, and to propose and evaluate thresholds for management protocols. Eligible participants in the NELSON trial were those aged 50-75 years, who have smoked 15 cigarettes or more per day for more than 25 years, or ten cigarettes or more for more than 30 years and were still smoking, or had stopped smoking less than 10 years ago. Participants were randomly assigned to low-dose CT screening at increasing intervals, or no screening. We included all participants assigned to the screening group who had attended at least one round of screening, and whose results were available from the national cancer registry database. We calculated lung cancer probabilities, stratified by nodule diameter, volume, and volume doubling time and did logistic regression analysis using diameter, volume, volume doubling time, and multinodularity as potential predictor variables. We assessed management strategies based on nodule threshold characteristics for specificity and sensitivity, and compared them to the American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP) guidelines. The NELSON trial is registered at www.trialregister.nl, number ISRCTN63545820. Volume, volume doubling time, and volumetry-based diameter of 9681 non-calcified nodules detected by CT screening in 7155 participants in the screening group of NELSON were used to quantify lung cancer probability. Lung cancer probability was low in participants with a nodule

  18. Low-dose CT Lung Cancer Screening Practices and Attitudes Among Primary Care Providers at an Academic Medical Center

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Jennifer A.; Petty, W. Jeffrey; Tooze, Janet A.; Miller, David Philip; Chiles, Caroline; Miller, Antonius A.; Bellinger, Christina; Weaver, Kathryn E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) screening reduces lung cancer-specific and overall mortality. We sought to assess lung cancer screening practices and attitudes among primary care providers (PCPs) in the era of new LDCT screening guidelines. Methods In 2013, we surveyed PCPs at an academic medical center (60% response) and assessed: lung cancer screening use, perceived screening effectiveness, knowledge of screening guidelines, perceived barriers to LDCT use, and interest in LDCT screening education. Results Few PCPs (n=212) reported ordering lung cancer screening: chest x-ray (21%), LDCT (12%), and sputum cytology (3%). Only 47% of providers knew three or more of six guideline components for LDCT screening; 24% did not know any guideline components. In multiple logistic regression analysis, providers who knew three or more guideline components were more likely to order LDCT (OR 7.1, 95% CI 2.0-25.6). Many providers (30%) were unsure of the effectiveness of LDCT. Mammography, colonoscopy, and Pap smear were rated more frequently as effective in reducing cancer mortality compared to LDCT (all p-values < 0.0001). Common perceived barriers included patient cost (86.9% major or minor barrier), harm from false positives (82.7%), patients’ lack of awareness (81.3%), risk of incidental findings (81.3%), and insurance coverage (80.1%). Conclusions LDCT lung cancer screening is currently an uncommon practice at an academic medical center. PCPs report ordering chest x-ray, a non-recommended screening test, more often than LDCT. PCPs had a limited understanding of lung cancer screening guidelines and LDCT effectiveness. Provider educational interventions are needed to facilitate shared-decision making with patients. PMID:25613118

  19. SU-E-I-41: Dictionary Learning Based Quantitative Reconstruction for Low-Dose Dual-Energy CT (DECT)

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Q; Xing, L; Xiong, G; Elmore, K; Min, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: DECT collects two sets of projection data under higher and lower energies. With appropriates composition methods on linear attenuation coefficients, quantitative information about the object, such as density, can be obtained. In reality, one of the important problems in DECT is the radiation dose due to doubled scans. This work is aimed at establishing a dictionary learning based reconstruction framework for DECT for improved image quality while reducing the imaging dose. Methods: In our method, two dictionaries were learned respectively from the high-energy and lowenergy image datasets of similar objects under normal dose in advance. The linear attenuation coefficient was decomposed into two basis components with material based composition method. An iterative reconstruction framework was employed. Two basis components were alternately updated with DECT datasets and dictionary learning based sparse constraints. After one updating step under the dataset fidelity constraints, both high-energy and low-energy images can be obtained from the two basis components. Sparse constraints based on the learned dictionaries were applied to the high- and low-energy images to update the two basis components. The iterative calculation continues until a pre-set number of iteration was reached. Results: We evaluated the proposed dictionary learning method with dual energy images collected using a DECT scanner. We re-projected the projection data with added Poisson noise to reflect the low-dose situation. The results obtained by the proposed method were compared with that obtained using FBP based method and TV based method. It was found that the proposed approach yield better results than other methods with higher resolution and less noise. Conclusion: The use of dictionary learned from DECT images under normal dose is valuable and leads to improved results with much lower imaging dose.

  20. Assessment of dedicated low-dose cardiac micro-CT reconstruction algorithms using the left ventricular volume of small rodents as a performance measure

    SciTech Connect

    Maier, Joscha; Sawall, Stefan; Kachelrieß, Marc

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: Phase-correlated microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) imaging plays an important role in the assessment of mouse models of cardiovascular diseases and the determination of functional parameters as the left ventricular volume. As the current gold standard, the phase-correlated Feldkamp reconstruction (PCF), shows poor performance in case of low dose scans, more sophisticated reconstruction algorithms have been proposed to enable low-dose imaging. In this study, the authors focus on the McKinnon-Bates (MKB) algorithm, the low dose phase-correlated (LDPC) reconstruction, and the high-dimensional total variation minimization reconstruction (HDTV) and investigate their potential to accurately determine the left ventricular volume at different dose levels from 50 to 500 mGy. The results were verified in phantom studies of a five-dimensional (5D) mathematical mouse phantom. Methods: Micro-CT data of eight mice, each administered with an x-ray dose of 500 mGy, were acquired, retrospectively gated for cardiac and respiratory motion and reconstructed using PCF, MKB, LDPC, and HDTV. Dose levels down to 50 mGy were simulated by using only a fraction of the projections. Contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) was evaluated as a measure of image quality. Left ventricular volume was determined using different segmentation algorithms (Otsu, level sets, region growing). Forward projections of the 5D mouse phantom were performed to simulate a micro-CT scan. The simulated data were processed the same way as the real mouse data sets. Results: Compared to the conventional PCF reconstruction, the MKB, LDPC, and HDTV algorithm yield images of increased quality in terms of CNR. While the MKB reconstruction only provides small improvements, a significant increase of the CNR is observed in LDPC and HDTV reconstructions. The phantom studies demonstrate that left ventricular volumes can be determined accurately at 500 mGy. For lower dose levels which were simulated for real mouse data sets, the

  1. Patient-bounded extrapolation using low-dose priors for volume-of-interest imaging in C-arm CT

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Y.; Maier, A.; Berger, M.; Hornegger, J.; Bauer, S.

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: Three-dimensional (3D) volume-of-interest (VOI) imaging with C-arm systems provides anatomical information in a predefined 3D target region at a considerably low x-ray dose. However, VOI imaging involves laterally truncated projections from which conventional reconstruction algorithms generally yield images with severe truncation artifacts. Heuristic based extrapolation methods, e.g., water cylinder extrapolation, typically rely on techniques that complete the truncated data by means of a continuity assumption and thus appear to be ad-hoc. It is our goal to improve the image quality of VOI imaging by exploiting existing patient-specific prior information in the workflow. Methods: A necessary initial step prior to a 3D acquisition is to isocenter the patient with respect to the target to be scanned. To this end, low-dose fluoroscopic x-ray acquisitions are usually applied from anterior–posterior (AP) and medio-lateral (ML) views. Based on this, the patient is isocentered by repositioning the table. In this work, we present a patient-bounded extrapolation method that makes use of these noncollimated fluoroscopic images to improve image quality in 3D VOI reconstruction. The algorithm first extracts the 2D patient contours from the noncollimated AP and ML fluoroscopic images. These 2D contours are then combined to estimate a volumetric model of the patient. Forward-projecting the shape of the model at the eventually acquired C-arm rotation views gives the patient boundary information in the projection domain. In this manner, we are in the position to substantially improve image quality by enforcing the extrapolated line profiles to end at the known patient boundaries, derived from the 3D shape model estimate. Results: The proposed method was evaluated on eight clinical datasets with different degrees of truncation. The proposed algorithm achieved a relative root mean square error (rRMSE) of about 1.0% with respect to the reference reconstruction on

  2. Treatment Comparison in Rheumatoid Arthritis: Head-to-Head Trials and Innovative Study Designs

    PubMed Central

    Favalli, Ennio Giulio; Bugatti, Serena; Biggioggero, Martina; Caporali, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decades, the increasing knowledge in the area of rheumatoid arthritis has progressively expanded the arsenal of available drugs, especially with the introduction of novel targeted therapies such as biological disease modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs). In this situation, rheumatologists are offered a wide range of treatment options, but on the other side the need for comparisons between available drugs becomes more and more crucial in order to better define the strategies for the choice and the optimal sequencing. Indirect comparisons or meta-analyses of data coming from different randomised controlled trials (RCTs) are not immune to conceptual and technical challenges and often provide inconsistent results. In this review we examine some of the possible evolutions of traditional RCTs, such as the inclusion of active comparators, aimed at individualising treatments in real-life conditions. Although head-to-head RCTs may be considered the best tool to directly compare the efficacy and safety of two different DMARDs, surprisingly only 20 studies with such design have been published in the last 25 years. Given the recent advent of the first RCTs truly comparing biological DMARDs, we also review the state of the art of head-to-head trials in RA. PMID:24839607

  3. A very fast iterative algorithm for TV-regularized image reconstruction with applications to low-dose and few-view CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudo, Hiroyuki; Yamazaki, Fukashi; Nemoto, Takuya; Takaki, Keita

    2016-10-01

    This paper concerns iterative reconstruction for low-dose and few-view CT by minimizing a data-fidelity term regularized with the Total Variation (TV) penalty. We propose a very fast iterative algorithm to solve this problem. The algorithm derivation is outlined as follows. First, the original minimization problem is reformulated into the saddle point (primal-dual) problem by using the Lagrangian duality, to which we apply the first-order primal-dual iterative methods. Second, we precondition the iteration formula using the ramp filter of Filtered Backprojection (FBP) reconstruction algorithm in such a way that the problem solution is not altered. The resulting algorithm resembles the structure of so-called iterative FBP algorithm, and it converges to the exact minimizer of cost function very fast.

  4. Occurrence and lung cancer probability of new solid nodules at incidence screening with low-dose CT: analysis of data from the randomised, controlled NELSON trial.

    PubMed

    Walter, Joan E; Heuvelmans, Marjolein A; de Jong, Pim A; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn; van Ooijen, Peter M A; Peters, Robin B; Ten Haaf, Kevin; Yousaf-Khan, Uraujh; van der Aalst, Carlijn M; de Bock, Geertruida H; Mali, Willem; Groen, Harry J M; de Koning, Harry J; Oudkerk, Matthijs

    2016-07-01

    US guidelines now recommend lung cancer screening with low-dose CT for high-risk individuals. Reports of new nodules after baseline screening have been scarce and are inconsistent because of differences in definitions used. We aimed to identify the occurrence of new solid nodules and their probability of being lung cancer at incidence screening rounds in the Dutch-Belgian Randomized Lung Cancer Screening Trial (NELSON). In the ongoing, multicentre, randomised controlled NELSON trial, between Dec 23, 2003, and July 6, 2006, 15 822 participants who had smoked at least 15 cigarettes a day for more than 25 years or ten cigarettes a day for more than 30 years and were current smokers, or had quit smoking less than 10 years ago, were enrolled and randomly assigned to receive either screening with low-dose CT (n=7915) or no screening (n=7907). From Jan 28, 2004, to Dec 18, 2006, 7557 individuals underwent baseline screening with low-dose CT; 7295 participants underwent second and third screening rounds. We included all participants with solid non-calcified nodules, registered by the NELSON radiologists as new or smaller than 15 mm(3) (study detection limit) at previous screens. Nodule volume was generated semiautomatically by software. We calculated the maximum volume doubling time for nodules with an estimated percentage volume change of 25% or more, representing the minimum growth rate for the time since the previous scan. Lung cancer diagnosis was based on histology, and benignity was based on histology or stable size for at least 2 years. The NELSON trial is registered at trialregister.nl, number ISRCTN63545820. We analysed data for participants with at least one solid non-calcified nodule at the second or third screening round. In the two incidence screening rounds, the NELSON radiologists registered 1222 new solid nodules in 787 (11%) participants. A new solid nodule was lung cancer in 49 (6%) participants with new solid nodules and, in total, 50 lung cancers were

  5. Low-activity (124)I-PET/low-dose CT versus (131)I probe measurements in pretherapy assessment of radioiodine uptake in benign thyroid diseases.

    PubMed

    Westphal, Julian G; Winkens, Thomas; Kühnel, Christian; Freesmeyer, Martin

    2014-06-01

    Radioiodine therapy of benign thyroid diseases requires pretherapy assessment of radioactive iodine uptake (RAIU) for reliable therapy planning. Our objective was to assess RAIU by low-activity (124)I-positron emission tomography/low-dose computed tomography ((124)I-PET/CT) in comparison with standard (131)I probe measurements. This prospective comparative study was conducted at the Jena University Hospital, Jena, Germany, in a referral center setting. A total of 79 patients with benign thyroid diseases were screened, 40 of whom met the inclusion criteria (stable TSH, free T3 and free T4 levels; no thyroid-specific medication, no iodine contamination) and 24 of whom agreed to participate by signing an informed consent. All patients received the standard (131)I scintillation probe uptake test 30 hours after administration of 3 MBq (131)I. Seven days later, all patients were subjected to (124)I-PET/CT uptake measurement 30 hours after administration of 1 MBq (124)I. The decay-corrected uptake values of both techniques were compared. Additionally, 3 different volume-of-interest-based evaluation methods in PET/CT (whole neck [WN], automatic isocontour [IC], and manually contoured [MC]) were evaluated. The (131)I probe measurement and (124)I-PET.WN method provided very similar mean RAIU (30.7% ± 10.3%; 31.7% ± 8.9%), resulting in a significant positive correlation (r = 0.93, P < .001). Compared with (124)I-PET.WN, the (124)I-PET.IC (29.8% ± 8.6%) and the (124)I-PET.MC (24.5% ± 7.1%) demonstrated lower uptake values. Using activities as low as 1 MBq, the (124)I-PET.WN method shows a good correlation with conventional (131)I probe measurement. Thus, (124)I-PET/CT is a suitable alternative for pretherapy RAIU evaluations. This may offer potential additional benefits such as PET/ultrasound fusion imaging and CT volumetry.

  6. Which patients benefit from post-implant CT dosimetry after real-time intraoperative planning for low dose rate prostate brachytherapy? Case series and systematic literature review.

    PubMed

    Mitina, Natalia; Christie, David; Hill, Brendan; Middlebrook, Nigel; Nadezhdin, Nikita

    2016-04-01

    At present, post-implant CT-based dosimetry is a standard quality assurance practice following low dose rate (LDR) prostate brachytherapy. However, it rarely influences management and involves radiation exposure, costs and inconvenience. The purpose of our study was to assess the need for post-implant CT-based dosimetry through correlation with pre-implant and real-time dosimetry and review its place in the management of patients treated with LDR brachytherapy, so that it could be undertaken more selectively. The real-time dosimetry parameters of 34 consecutive patients who underwent LDR brachytherapy were compared with day 30 post-implant CT-based dosimetry. To validate our results against the world practice, we performed a meta-analysis of six relevant published studies, which combined data from 699 patients. The Student's t-test was performed to verify whether our dosimetric parameters significantly differ from the results of the meta-analysis. In our case series, the mean target volume on real-time-planned US and post-implant CT was 33.9 and 32.7 cc, respectively (P > 0.05). The dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters were significantly different between real-time-planned and post-implant dosimetry, but re-implantation was not needed for any patients. The literature review demonstrated that there is no consensus on measures being reported. Comparison showed that our cohort had significantly smaller prostate volumes, but the DVHs were similar to other series. Post-implant CT and dosimetry did not alter patients' management after real-time intraoperative planning. However, we recommend that it still be employed for difficult cases or if there are any concerns identified in real-time planned dosimetry. © 2015 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  7. Detection of coronary artery stenoses by low-dose, prospectively ECG-triggered, high-pitch spiral coronary CT angiography.

    PubMed

    Achenbach, Stephan; Goroll, Tobias; Seltmann, Martin; Pflederer, Tobias; Anders, Katharina; Ropers, Dieter; Daniel, Werner G; Uder, Michael; Lell, Michael; Marwan, Mohamed

    2011-04-01

    We sought to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of a new prospectively electrocardiogram (ECG)-triggered high-pitch scan mode for coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA), which allows an effective dose of less than 1 mSv. Coronary CTA provides increasingly reliable image quality, but the associated radiation exposure can be high. Seventy-five patients with suspected coronary artery disease and in sinus rhythm were screened for participation. After exclusion of 25 patients for body weight >100 kg or failure to lower heart rate to ≤ 60 beats/min, 50 patients were studied by prospectively ECG-triggered high-pitch spiral computed tomography (CT). Coronary CTA was performed using a dual-source CT system with 2 × 128 × 0.6-mm collimation, 0.28-s rotation time, a pitch of 3.4, 100-kVp tube voltage, and current of 320 mA. Data acquisition was prospectively triggered at 60% of the R-R interval and completed within 1 cardiac cycle. Diagnostic accuracy for detection of coronary artery stenoses ≥ 50% diameter stenosis was determined by comparison to invasive coronary angiography. Per-patient diagnostic performance was the primary form of analysis. In all 50 patients (34 males, 59 ± 12 years of age), imaging was successful. For the detection of 16 patients with at least 1 coronary artery stenosis, CT demonstrated a sensitivity of 100% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 79% to 100%) and specificity of 82% (95% CI: 65% to 93%). The positive predictive value was 72% (95% CI: 49% to 89%) and the negative predictive value was 100% (95% CI: 87% to 100%). Sensitivity was 100% (95% CI: 88% to 100%) and specificity was 94% (95% CI: 89% to 97%) on a per-vessel basis. Per-segment sensitivity was 92% (95% CI: 80% to 97%), and specificity was 98% (95% CI: 96% to 98%). Mean dose-length product for coronary CTA was 54 ± 6 mGy · cm, the effective dose was 0.76 ± 0.08 mSv (0.64 to 0.95 mSv). In nonobese patients with a low and stable heart rate, prospectively ECG-triggered high

  8. Assessment of the ability of CT urography with low-dose multi-phasic excretory phases for opacification of the urinary system

    PubMed Central

    Juri, Hiroshi; Tsuboyama, Takahiro; Koyama, Mitsuhiro; Yamamoto, Kiyohito; Nakai, Go; Nakamoto, Atsushi; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Azuma, Haruhito; Narumi, Yoshifumi

    2017-01-01

    Objective To prospectively evaluate the ability of CT urography with a low-dose multi-phasic excretory phase for opacification of the urinary system. Materials and methods Thirty-two patients underwent CT urography with low-dose multi-phasic s using adaptive iterative dose reduction 3D acquired at 5-, 10-, and 15-minute delays. Opacification scores of the upper urinary tracts and the urinary bladder were assigned for each excretory phase by two radiologists, who recorded whether adequate (>75%) or complete (100%) opacification of the upper urinary tract and urinary bladder was achieved in each patient. Adequate and complete opacification rates of the upper urinary tracts and the urinary bladder were compared among three excretory phases and among combined multi-phasic excretory phases using Cochran's Q test. Results There was no significant difference among three excretory phases with 5-, 10-, and 15-minute delays in adequate (56.3, 43.8, and 63.5%, respectively; P = 0.174) and complete opacification rates (9.3, 15.6, and 18.7%, respectively; P = 0.417) of the upper urinary tracts. Combined tri-phasic excretory phases significantly improved adequate and complete opacification rates to 84.4% and 43.8%, respectively (P = 0.002). In contrast, there were significant differences among three excretory phases for the rate of adequate (31.3, 84.4, and 93.8%, respectively; P<0.001) and complete opacification (21.9, 53.1, and 81.3%, respectively; P<0.001) of the urinary bladder. Multi-phasic excretory phases did not improve these rates because opacification was always better with a longer delay. Conclusion Although multi-phasic acquisition of excretory phases is effective at improving opacification of the upper urinary tracts, complete opacification is difficult even with tri-phasic acquisition. PMID:28384174

  9. Very low-dose adult whole-body tumor imaging with F-18 FDG PET/CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krol, Andrzej; Naveed, Muhammad; McGrath, Mary; Lisi, Michele; Lavalley, Cathy; Feiglin, David

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate if effective radiation dose due to PET component in adult whole-body tumor imaging with time-of-flight F-18 FDG PET/CT could be significantly reduced. We retrospectively analyzed data for 10 patients with the body mass index ranging from 25 to 50. We simulated F-18 FDG dose reduction to 25% of the ACR recommended dose via reconstruction of simulated shorter acquisition time per bed position scans from the acquired list data. F-18 FDG whole-body scans were reconstructed using time-of-flight OSEM algorithm and advanced system modeling. Two groups of images were obtained: group A with a standard dose of F-18 FDG and standard reconstruction parameters and group B with simulated 25% dose and modified reconstruction parameters, respectively. Three nuclear medicine physicians blinded to the simulated activity independently reviewed the images and compared diagnostic quality of images. Based on the input from the physicians, we selected optimal modified reconstruction parameters for group B. In so obtained images, all the lesions observed in the group A were visible in the group B. The tumor SUV values were different in the group A, as compared to group B, respectively. However, no significant differences were reported in the final interpretation of the images from A and B groups. In conclusion, for a small number of patients, we have demonstrated that F-18 FDG dose reduction to 25% of the ACR recommended dose, accompanied by appropriate modification of the reconstruction parameters provided adequate diagnostic quality of PET images acquired on time-of-flight PET/CT.

  10. Low-dose CT reconstruction via L1 dictionary learning regularization using iteratively reweighted least-squares.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cheng; Zhang, Tao; Li, Ming; Peng, Chengtao; Liu, Zhaobang; Zheng, Jian

    2016-06-18

    In order to reduce the radiation dose of CT (computed tomography), compressed sensing theory has been a hot topic since it provides the possibility of a high quality recovery from the sparse sampling data. Recently, the algorithm based on DL (dictionary learning) was developed to deal with the sparse CT reconstruction problem. However, the existing DL algorithm focuses on the minimization problem with the L2-norm regularization term, which leads to reconstruction quality deteriorating while the sampling rate declines further. Therefore, it is essential to improve the DL method to meet the demand of more dose reduction. In this paper, we replaced the L2-norm regularization term with the L1-norm one. It is expected that the proposed L1-DL method could alleviate the over-smoothing effect of the L2-minimization and reserve more image details. The proposed algorithm solves the L1-minimization problem by a weighting strategy, solving the new weighted L2-minimization problem based on IRLS (iteratively reweighted least squares). Through the numerical simulation, the proposed algorithm is compared with the existing DL method (adaptive dictionary based statistical iterative reconstruction, ADSIR) and other two typical compressed sensing algorithms. It is revealed that the proposed algorithm is more accurate than the other algorithms especially when further reducing the sampling rate or increasing the noise. The proposed L1-DL algorithm can utilize more prior information of image sparsity than ADSIR. By transforming the L2-norm regularization term of ADSIR with the L1-norm one and solving the L1-minimization problem by IRLS strategy, L1-DL could reconstruct the image more exactly.

  11. A head-to-head comparison between CT- and IVUS-derived coronary blood flow models.

    PubMed

    Bulant, C A; Blanco, P J; Maso Talou, G D; Bezerra, C Guedes; Lemos, P A; Feijóo, R A

    2017-01-25

    The goal of this work is to compare coronary hemodynamics as predicted by computational blood flow models derived from two imaging modalities: coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) and intravascular ultrasound integrated with angiography (IVUS). Criteria to define boundary conditions are proposed to overcome the dissimilar anatomical definition delivered by both modalities. The strategy to define boundary conditions is novel in the present context, and naturally accounts for the flow redistribution induced by the resistance of coronary vessels. Hyperemic conditions are assumed to assess model predictions under stressed hemodynamic environments similar to those encountered in Fractional Flow Reserve (FFR) calculations. As results, it was found that CCTA models predict larger pressure drops, higher average blood velocity and smaller FFR. Concerning the flow rate at distal locations in the major vessels of interest, it was found that CCTA predicted smaller flow than IVUS, which is a consequence of a larger sensitivity of CCTA models to coronary steal phenomena. Comparisons to in-vivo measurements of FFR are shown. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Characteristic performance evaluation of a photon counting Si strip detector for low dose spectral breast CT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Hyo-Min; Ding, Huanjun; Molloi, Sabee; Barber, William C.; Iwanczyk, Jan S.

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: The possible clinical applications which can be performed using a newly developed detector depend on the detector's characteristic performance in a number of metrics including the dynamic range, resolution, uniformity, and stability. The authors have evaluated a prototype energy resolved fast photon counting x-ray detector based on a silicon (Si) strip sensor used in an edge-on geometry with an application specific integrated circuit to record the number of x-rays and their energies at high flux and fast frame rates. The investigated detector was integrated with a dedicated breast spectral computed tomography (CT) system to make use of the detector's high spatial and energy resolution and low noise performance under conditions suitable for clinical breast imaging. The aim of this article is to investigate the intrinsic characteristics of the detector, in terms of maximum output count rate, spatial and energy resolution, and noise performance of the imaging system. Methods: The maximum output count rate was obtained with a 50 W x-ray tube with a maximum continuous output of 50 kVp at 1.0 mA. A{sup 109}Cd source, with a characteristic x-ray peak at 22 keV from Ag, was used to measure the energy resolution of the detector. The axial plane modulation transfer function (MTF) was measured using a 67 μm diameter tungsten wire. The two-dimensional (2D) noise power spectrum (NPS) was measured using flat field images and noise equivalent quanta (NEQ) were calculated using the MTF and NPS results. The image quality parameters were studied as a function of various radiation doses and reconstruction filters. The one-dimensional (1D) NPS was used to investigate the effect of electronic noise elimination by varying the minimum energy threshold. Results: A maximum output count rate of 100 million counts per second per square millimeter (cps/mm{sup 2}) has been obtained (1 million cps per 100 × 100 μm pixel). The electrical noise floor was less than 4 keV. The energy

  13. Characteristic performance evaluation of a photon counting Si strip detector for low dose spectral breast CT imaging

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hyo-Min; Barber, William C.; Ding, Huanjun; Iwanczyk, Jan S.; Molloi, Sabee

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The possible clinical applications which can be performed using a newly developed detector depend on the detector's characteristic performance in a number of metrics including the dynamic range, resolution, uniformity, and stability. The authors have evaluated a prototype energy resolved fast photon counting x-ray detector based on a silicon (Si) strip sensor used in an edge-on geometry with an application specific integrated circuit to record the number of x-rays and their energies at high flux and fast frame rates. The investigated detector was integrated with a dedicated breast spectral computed tomography (CT) system to make use of the detector's high spatial and energy resolution and low noise performance under conditions suitable for clinical breast imaging. The aim of this article is to investigate the intrinsic characteristics of the detector, in terms of maximum output count rate, spatial and energy resolution, and noise performance of the imaging system. Methods: The maximum output count rate was obtained with a 50 W x-ray tube with a maximum continuous output of 50 kVp at 1.0 mA. A109Cd source, with a characteristic x-ray peak at 22 keV from Ag, was used to measure the energy resolution of the detector. The axial plane modulation transfer function (MTF) was measured using a 67 μm diameter tungsten wire. The two-dimensional (2D) noise power spectrum (NPS) was measured using flat field images and noise equivalent quanta (NEQ) were calculated using the MTF and NPS results. The image quality parameters were studied as a function of various radiation doses and reconstruction filters. The one-dimensional (1D) NPS was used to investigate the effect of electronic noise elimination by varying the minimum energy threshold. Results: A maximum output count rate of 100 million counts per second per square millimeter (cps/mm2) has been obtained (1 million cps per 100 × 100 μm pixel). The electrical noise floor was less than 4 keV. The energy resolution

  14. Characteristic performance evaluation of a photon counting Si strip detector for low dose spectral breast CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hyo-Min; Barber, William C; Ding, Huanjun; Iwanczyk, Jan S; Molloi, Sabee

    2014-09-01

    The possible clinical applications which can be performed using a newly developed detector depend on the detector's characteristic performance in a number of metrics including the dynamic range, resolution, uniformity, and stability. The authors have evaluated a prototype energy resolved fast photon counting x-ray detector based on a silicon (Si) strip sensor used in an edge-on geometry with an application specific integrated circuit to record the number of x-rays and their energies at high flux and fast frame rates. The investigated detector was integrated with a dedicated breast spectral computed tomography (CT) system to make use of the detector's high spatial and energy resolution and low noise performance under conditions suitable for clinical breast imaging. The aim of this article is to investigate the intrinsic characteristics of the detector, in terms of maximum output count rate, spatial and energy resolution, and noise performance of the imaging system. The maximum output count rate was obtained with a 50 W x-ray tube with a maximum continuous output of 50 kVp at 1.0 mA. A109Cd source, with a characteristic x-ray peak at 22 keV from Ag, was used to measure the energy resolution of the detector. The axial plane modulation transfer function (MTF) was measured using a 67 μm diameter tungsten wire. The two-dimensional (2D) noise power spectrum (NPS) was measured using flat field images and noise equivalent quanta (NEQ) were calculated using the MTF and NPS results. The image quality parameters were studied as a function of various radiation doses and reconstruction filters. The one-dimensional (1D) NPS was used to investigate the effect of electronic noise elimination by varying the minimum energy threshold. A maximum output count rate of 100 million counts per second per square millimeter (cps/mm2) has been obtained (1 million cps per 100×100 μm pixel). The electrical noise floor was less than 4 keV. The energy resolution measured with the 22 keV photons

  15. Determining the composition of urinary tract calculi using stone-targeted dual-energy CT: evaluation of a low-dose scanning protocol in a clinical environment.

    PubMed

    Chaytor, Richard J; Rajbabu, Krishnamoorthy; Jones, Paul A; McKnight, Liam

    2016-11-01

    This study will evaluate the accuracy of dual-energy CT (DECT) in characterizing urinary tract stone composition on patients presenting to a UK hospital with renal colic. The study will also assess the additional radiation dose burden of DECT over standard protocol. Data from 106 DECTs between October 2011 and October 2015 were retrospectively analyzed. Patients were imaged using a Toshiba Aquilion ONE(™) CT scanner (Toshiba Medical Systems, Otawara-shi, Japan). All patients received a low-dose non-contrast CT of the abdomen and pelvis prior to stone-targeted DECT at 80 and 135 kVp and 40-mm field of view. Radiation dose output was evaluated using dose-length product (DLP). 19 stones were recovered and their compositions were analyzed using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. 137 stones were characterized. Mean stone diameter was 8.8 mm (range 3-48 mm). There was an 18.7% increase in mean DLP for DECT over standard CT protocol (319.4 vs 269.1 mGy cm; p < 0.001). Infrared spectroscopy analysis of 19 recovered stones identified 15 stones as calcium, 2 stones as cystine and 2 stones as mixed composition. Dual energy correctly predicted 11 (78.6%) of 14 calcium stones, 2 (100%) of 2 mixed composition stones and 0 (0%) of 2 cystine stones, resulting in a fair agreement (Cohen's κ = 0.374, p = 0.009). DECT is able to determine the composition of urinary tract stones with fair accuracy. Its utility is offset by a small but significant supplementary radiation exposure. Advances in knowledge: DECT can provide urological surgeons with useful diagnostic stone material information prior to planning optimal management of stone disease.

  16. Estimation of non-solid lung nodule volume with low-dose CT protocols: effect of reconstruction algorithm and measurement method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrielides, Marios A.; DeFilippo, Gino; Berman, Benjamin P.; Li, Qin; Petrick, Nicholas; Schultz, Kurt; Siegelman, Jenifer

    2017-03-01

    Computed tomography is primarily the modality of choice to assess stability of nonsolid pulmonary nodules (sometimes referred to as ground-glass opacity) for three or more years, with change in size being the primary factor to monitor. Since volume extracted from CT is being examined as a quantitative biomarker of lung nodule size, it is important to examine factors affecting the performance of volumetric CT for this task. More specifically, the effect of reconstruction algorithms and measurement method in the context of low-dose CT protocols has been an under-examined area of research. In this phantom study we assessed volumetric CT with two different measurement methods (model-based and segmentation-based) for nodules with radiodensities of both nonsolid (-800HU and -630HU) and solid (-10HU) nodules, sizes of 5mm and 10mm, and two different shapes (spherical and spiculated). Imaging protocols included CTDIvol typical of screening (1.7mGy) and sub-screening (0.6mGy) scans and different types of reconstruction algorithms across three scanners. Results showed that radio-density was the factor contributing most to overall error based on ANOVA. The choice of reconstruction algorithm or measurement method did not affect substantially the accuracy of measurements; however, measurement method affected repeatability with repeatability coefficients ranging from around 3-5% for the model-based estimator to around 20-30% across reconstruction algorithms for the segmentation-based method. The findings of the study can be valuable toward developing standardized protocols and performance claims for nonsolid nodules.

  17. Low kV settings CT angiography (CTA) with low dose contrast medium volume protocol in the assessment of thoracic and abdominal aorta disease: a feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Talei Franzesi, C; Fior, D; Bonaffini, P A; Minutolo, O; Sironi, S

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess the diagnostic quality of low dose (100 kV) CT angiography (CTA), by using ultra-low contrast medium volume (30 ml), for thoracic and abdominal aorta evaluation. Methods: 67 patients with thoracic or abdominal vascular disease underwent multidetector CT study using a 256 slice scanner, with low dose radiation protocol (automated tube current modulation, 100 kV) and low contrast medium volume (30 ml; 4 ml s−1). Density measurements were performed on ascending, arch, descending thoracic aorta, anonymous branch, abdominal aorta, and renal and common iliac arteries. Radiation dose exposure [dose–length product (DLP)] was calculated. A control group of 35 patients with thoracic or abdominal vascular disease were evaluated with standard CTA protocol (automated tube current modulation, 120 kV; contrast medium, 80 ml). Results: In all patients, we correctly visualized and evaluated main branches of the thoracic and abdominal aorta. No difference in density measurements was achieved between low tube voltage protocol (mean attenuation value of thoracic aorta, 304 HU; abdominal, 343 HU; renal arteries, 331 HU) and control group (mean attenuation value of thoracic aorta, 320 HU; abdominal, 339; renal arteries, 303 HU). Radiation dose exposure in low tube voltage protocol was significantly different between thoracic and abdominal low tube voltage studies (490 and 324 DLP, respectively) and the control group (thoracic DLP, 1032; abdomen, DLP 1078). Conclusion: Low-tube-voltage protocol may provide a diagnostic performance comparable with that of the standard protocol, decreasing radiation dose exposure and contrast material volume amount. Advances in knowledge: Low-tube-voltage-setting protocol combined with ultra-low contrast agent volume (30 ml), by using new multidetector-row CT scanners, represents a feasible diagnostic tool to significantly reduce the radiation dose delivered to patients and to preserve renal function

  18. A multiscale Laplacian of Gaussian filtering approach to automated pulmonary nodule detection from whole-lung low-dose CT scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fotin, Sergei V.; Reeves, Anthony P.; Biancardi, Alberto M.; Yankelevitz, David F.; Henschke, Claudia I.

    2009-02-01

    The primary stage of a pulmonary nodule detection system is typically a candidate generator that efficiently provides the centroid location and size estimate of candidate nodules. A scale-normalized Laplacian of Gaussian (LOG) filtering method presented in this paper has been found to provide high sensitivity along with precise locality and size estimation. This approach involves a computationally efficient algorithm that is designed to identify all solid nodules in a whole lung anisotropic CT scan. This nodule candidate generator has been evaluated in conjunction with a set of discriminative features that target both isolated and attached nodules. The entire detection system was evaluated with respect to a sizeenriched dataset of 656 whole-lung low-dose CT scans containing 459 solid nodules with diameter greater than 4 mm. Using a soft margin SVM classifier, and setting false positive rate of 10 per scan, we obtained a sensitivity of 97% for isolated, 93% for attached, and 89% for both nodule types combined. Furthermore, the LOG filter was shown to have good agreement with the radiologist ground truth for size estimation.

  19. Individual drug sampling does not supplant the need for head-to-head trials in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Resneck, Jack S; Vanbeek, Marta

    2010-06-01

    A growing body of evidence has highlighted several risks and benefits associated with in-office sampling of prescription medications. While use-testing dermatologic medications from a sample closet may benefit some patients, it seems that the stunning lack of head-to-head trials comparing therapeutic options is a much larger and more important impediment to our determination of when the increased cost of newer agents is justified by superior efficacy, safety, or tolerability. If physicians are to retain the critical autonomy to make independent prescribing decisions in concert with our individual patients, we must take responsibility to call for and generate the comparative data we need to evaluate therapeutic options. Copyright 2010 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. A head-to-head comparison of hydrogen peroxide vapor and aerosol room decontamination systems.

    PubMed

    Holmdahl, T; Lanbeck, P; Wullt, M; Walder, M H

    2011-09-01

    New technologies have emerged in recent years for the disinfection of hospital rooms and equipment that may not be disinfected adequately using conventional methods. There are several hydrogen peroxide-based area decontamination technologies on the market, but no head-to-head studies have been performed. We conducted a head-to-head in vitro comparison of a hydrogen peroxide vapor (HPV) system (Bioquell) and an aerosolized hydrogen peroxide (aHP) system (Sterinis). The tests were conducted in a purpose-built 136-m(3) test room. One HPV generator and 2 aHP machines were used, following recommendations of the manufacturers. Three repeated tests were performed for each system. The microbiological efficacy of the 2 systems was tested using 6-log Tyvek-pouched Geobacillus stearothermophilus biological indicators (BIs). The indicators were placed at 20 locations in the first test and 14 locations in the subsequent 2 tests for each system. All BIs were inactivated for the 3 HPV tests, compared with only 10% in the first aHP test and 79% in the other 2 aHP tests. The peak hydrogen peroxide concentration was 338 ppm for HPV and 160 ppm for aHP. The total cycle time (including aeration) was 3 and 3.5 hours for the 3 HPV tests and the 3 aHP tests, respectively. Monitoring around the perimeter of the enclosure with a handheld sensor during tests of both systems did not identify leakage. One HPV generator was more effective than 2 aHP machines for the inactivation of G. stearothermophilus BIs, and cycle times were faster for the HPV system.

  1. A qualitative systematic review of head-to-head randomized controlled trials of oral analgesics in neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Watson, C Peter N; Gilron, Ian; Sawynok, Jana

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Neuropathic pain (NP) encompasses many difficult-to-treat disorders. There are few head-to-head, comparative, randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of drugs for NP in different analgesic categories, or of different drugs within a category, despite many placebo-controlled RCTs for individual agents. Well-designed head-to-head comparative trials are an effective way to determine the relative efficacy and safety of a new drug. OBJECTIVE: To perform a systematic review of head-to-head RCTs of oral analgesics in NP. METHODS: A systematic review of RCTs involving NP patients was performed, of which head-to-head comparative trials were selected. Reference lists from published systematic reviews were searched. These studies were rated according to the Jadad scale for quality. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: Twenty-seven such trials were identified. Seventeen were comparisons of different analgesics, and 10 were of different drugs within an analgesic class. Important information was obtained about the relative efficacy and safety of drugs in different categories and within a category. Some significant differences between active treatments were reported. Trial inadequacies were identified. More and improved head-to-head RCTs are needed to inform clinical choices. PMID:20577657

  2. Low-dose dynamic myocardial perfusion CT image reconstruction using pre-contrast normal-dose CT scan induced structure tensor total variation regularization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Changfei; Han, Ce; Gan, Guanghui; Deng, Zhenxiang; Zhou, Yongqiang; Yi, Jinling; Zheng, Xiaomin; Xie, Congying; Jin, Xiance

    2017-04-01

    Dynamic myocardial perfusion CT (DMP-CT) imaging provides quantitative functional information for diagnosis and risk stratification of coronary artery disease by calculating myocardial perfusion hemodynamic parameter (MPHP) maps. However, the level of radiation delivered by dynamic sequential scan protocol can be potentially high. The purpose of this work is to develop a pre-contrast normal-dose scan induced structure tensor total variation regularization based on the penalized weighted least-squares (PWLS) criteria to improve the image quality of DMP-CT with a low-mAs CT acquisition. For simplicity, the present approach was termed as ‘PWLS-ndiSTV’. Specifically, the ndiSTV regularization takes into account the spatial-temporal structure information of DMP-CT data and further exploits the higher order derivatives of the objective images to enhance denoising performance. Subsequently, an effective optimization algorithm based on the split-Bregman approach was adopted to minimize the associative objective function. Evaluations with modified dynamic XCAT phantom and preclinical porcine datasets have demonstrated that the proposed PWLS-ndiSTV approach can achieve promising gains over other existing approaches in terms of noise-induced artifacts mitigation, edge details preservation, and accurate MPHP maps calculation.

  3. Impact of low-dose CT screening on smoking cessation among high-risk participants in the UK Lung Cancer Screening Trial.

    PubMed

    Brain, Kate; Carter, Ben; Lifford, Kate J; Burke, Olivia; Devaraj, Anand; Baldwin, David R; Duffy, Stephen; Field, John K

    2017-10-01

    Smoking cessation was examined among high-risk participants in the UK Lung Cancer Screening (UKLS) Pilot Trial of low-dose CT screening. High-risk individuals aged 50-75 years who completed baseline questionnaires were randomised to CT screening (intervention) or usual care (no screening control). Smoking habit was determined at baseline using self-report. Smokers were asked whether they had quit smoking since joining UKLS at T1 (2 weeks after baseline scan results or control assignment) and T2 (up to 2 years after recruitment). Intention-to-treat (ITT) regression analyses were undertaken, adjusting for baseline lung cancer distress, trial site and sociodemographic variables. Of a total 4055 individuals randomised to CT screening or control, 1546 were baseline smokers (759 intervention, 787 control). Smoking cessation rates were 8% (control n=36/479) versus 14% (intervention n=75/527) at T1 and 21% (control n=79/377) versus 24% (intervention n=115/488) at T2. ITT analyses indicated that the odds of quitting among screened participants were significantly higher at T1 (adjusted OR (aOR) 2.38, 95% CI 1.56 to 3.64, p<0.001) and T2 (aOR 1.60, 95% CI 1.17 to 2.18, p=0.003) compared with control. Intervention participants who needed additional clinical investigation were more likely to quit in the longer term compared with the control group (aOR 2.29, 95% CI 1.62 to 3.22, p=0.007) and those receiving a negative result (aOR 2.43, 95% CI 1.54 to 3.84, p<0.001). CT lung cancer screening for high-risk participants presents a teachable moment for smoking cessation, especially among those who receive a positive scan result. Further behavioural research is needed to evaluate optimal strategies for integrating smoking cessation intervention with stratified lung cancer screening. Results, ISRCTN 78513845. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  4. Adaptive Statistical Iterative Reconstruction-Applied Ultra-Low-Dose CT with Radiography-Comparable Radiation Dose: Usefulness for Lung Nodule Detection.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Hyun Jung; Chung, Myung Jin; Hwang, Hye Sun; Moon, Jung Won; Lee, Kyung Soo

    2015-01-01

    To assess the performance of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR)-applied ultra-low-dose CT (ULDCT) in detecting small lung nodules. Thirty patients underwent both ULDCT and standard dose CT (SCT). After determining the reference standard nodules, five observers, blinded to the reference standard reading results, independently evaluated SCT and both subsets of ASIR- and filtered back projection (FBP)-driven ULDCT images. Data assessed by observers were compared statistically. Converted effective doses in SCT and ULDCT were 2.81 ± 0.92 and 0.17 ± 0.02 mSv, respectively. A total of 114 lung nodules were detected on SCT as a standard reference. There was no statistically significant difference in sensitivity between ASIR-driven ULDCT and SCT for three out of the five observers (p = 0.678, 0.735, < 0.01, 0.038, and < 0.868 for observers 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5, respectively). The sensitivity of FBP-driven ULDCT was significantly lower than that of ASIR-driven ULDCT in three out of the five observers (p < 0.01 for three observers, and p = 0.064 and 0.146 for two observers). In jackknife alternative free-response receiver operating characteristic analysis, the mean values of figure-of-merit (FOM) for FBP, ASIR-driven ULDCT, and SCT were 0.682, 0.772, and 0.821, respectively, and there were no significant differences in FOM values between ASIR-driven ULDCT and SCT (p = 0.11), but the FOM value of FBP-driven ULDCT was significantly lower than that of ASIR-driven ULDCT and SCT (p = 0.01 and 0.00). Adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction-driven ULDCT delivering a radiation dose of only 0.17 mSv offers acceptable sensitivity in nodule detection compared with SCT and has better performance than FBP-driven ULDCT.

  5. High quality high spatial resolution functional classification in low dose dynamic CT perfusion using singular value decomposition (SVD) and k-means clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisana, Francesco; Henzler, Thomas; Schönberg, Stefan; Klotz, Ernst; Schmidt, Bernhard; Kachelrieß, Marc

    2017-03-01

    Dynamic CT perfusion acquisitions are intrinsically high-dose examinations, due to repeated scanning. To keep radiation dose under control, relatively noisy images are acquired. Noise is then further enhanced during the extraction of functional parameters from the post-processing of the time attenuation curves of the voxels (TACs) and normally some smoothing filter needs to be employed to better visualize any perfusion abnormality, but sacrificing spatial resolution. In this study we propose a new method to detect perfusion abnormalities keeping both high spatial resolution and high CNR. To do this we first perform the singular value decomposition (SVD) of the original noisy spatial temporal data matrix to extract basis functions of the TACs. Then we iteratively cluster the voxels based on a smoothed version of the three most significant singular vectors. Finally, we create high spatial resolution 3D volumes where to each voxel is assigned a distance from the centroid of each cluster, showing how functionally similar each voxel is compared to the others. The method was tested on three noisy clinical datasets: one brain perfusion case with an occlusion in the left internal carotid, one healthy brain perfusion case, and one liver case with an enhancing lesion. Our method successfully detected all perfusion abnormalities with higher spatial precision when compared to the functional maps obtained with a commercially available software. We conclude this method might be employed to have a rapid qualitative indication of functional abnormalities in low dose dynamic CT perfusion datasets. The method seems to be very robust with respect to both spatial and temporal noise and does not require any special a priori assumption. While being more robust respect to noise and with higher spatial resolution and CNR when compared to the functional maps, our method is not quantitative and a potential usage in clinical routine could be as a second reader to assist in the maps

  6. Head-to-head running race simulation alters pacing strategy, performance, and mood state.

    PubMed

    Tomazini, Fabiano; Pasqua, Leonardo A; Damasceno, Mayara V; Silva-Cavalcante, Marcos D; de Oliveira, Fernando R; Lima-Silva, Adriano E; Bertuzzi, Rômulo

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the influence of the presence and absence of competitors on pacing, overall running performance, and mood state during a self-paced 3-km run. Nine recreational runners participated in this study. They performed the following tests: a) an incremental test to exhaustion to measure the respiratory compensation point (RCP), maximal oxygen uptake, and peak treadmill speed; b) a submaximal speed constant test to measure running economy; and c) two 3-km running time trials performed collectively (COL, head-to-head competition) or individually (IND, performed alone) to establish pacing and running performance. The COL condition was formed of a group of four runners or five runners. Runners were grouped by matched performance times and to retain head-to-head characteristics.A mood state profile questionnaire was completed before and after the 3-km running time trial. The overall performance was better in the COL than in the IND (11.75 ± 0.05 min vs. 12.25 ± 0.06 min, respectively; p = 0.04). The running speeds during the first 500 m were significantly greater in COL (16.8 ± 2.16 km·h−1) than in IND (15.3 ± 2.45 km·h−1) (p = 0.03).The gain in running speed from IND to COL during the first 400 m (i.e. running speed in COL less running speed in IND) was significantly correlated with the RCP (r = 0.88; p = 0.05). The vigor score significantly decreased from pre- to post-running in COL (p=0.05), but not in IND (p=0.20). Additionally, the post running vigor was significantly higher in IND compared to COL (p = 0.03).These findings suggested that the presence of competitors induces a fast start, which results in an improved overall performance and reduced post-exercise vigor scores, compared to an individual run.

  7. Head-to-Head Comparison of Anti-Inflammatory Performance of Known Natural Products In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Allijn, Iris E.; Vaessen, Stefan F. C.; Quarles van Ufford, Linda C.; Beukelman, Kees J.; de Winther, Menno P. J.; Storm, Gert; Schiffelers, Raymond M.

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation is an important therapeutic target. Due to their potency, steroidal drugs dominate the current treatment of inflammatory disorders. However, steroidal drugs can also exert a broad range of side effects and appear not always effective. This calls for the development of alternative drugs with a different mechanism of action, which are likely to be found in the field of natural products (NPs). For many NPs strong anti-inflammatory effects have been described, but usually investigating a single compound in a single assay. In this study, eight promising NPs were selected and tested against the strong anti-inflammatory drug prednisolone. For this head-to-head comparison, in vitro assays were used which represent different pathways of the inflammatory response: TNF-α and IL-6 expression by macrophages, IL-8 expression by colon epithelial cells, ROS production in polymorphonuclear leukocytes and platelet activation in whole blood. Performance profiles were established which allowed us to identify curcumin, berberine chloride and epigallocatechin gallate as potential alternatives for prednisolone or other glucocorticoids in inflammation. PMID:27163931

  8. Very low-dose (0.15 mGy) chest CT protocols using the COPDGene 2 test object and a third-generation dual-source CT scanner with corresponding third-generation iterative reconstruction software.

    PubMed

    Newell, John D; Fuld, Matthew K; Allmendinger, Thomas; Sieren, Jered P; Chan, Kung-Sik; Guo, Junfeng; Hoffman, Eric A

    2015-01-01

    size (P < 0.0001) and dose level (P < 0.0001). The number of voxels in the region of interest for the particular material studied did not demonstrate a significant effect (P > 0.05). The SD was lower with ADMIRE compared with WFBP at all dose levels and ring sizes (P < 0.05). The third-generation dual-source CT scanners using third-generation iterative reconstruction methods can acquire accurate quantitative CT images with acceptable image noise at very low-dose levels (0.15 mGy). This opens up new diagnostic and research opportunities in CT phenotyping of the lung for developing new treatments and increased understanding of pulmonary disease.

  9. Identification of early-stage usual interstitial pneumonia from low-dose chest CT scans using fractional high-density lung distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yiting; Salvatore, Mary; Liu, Shuang; Jirapatnakul, Artit; Yankelevitz, David F.; Henschke, Claudia I.; Reeves, Anthony P.

    2017-03-01

    A fully-automated computer algorithm has been developed to identify early-stage Usual Interstitial Pneumonia (UIP) using features computed from low-dose CT scans. In each scan, the pre-segmented lung region is divided into N subsections (N = 1, 8, 27, 64) by separating the lung from anterior/posterior, left/right and superior/inferior in 3D space. Each subsection has approximately the same volume. In each subsection, a classic density measurement (fractional high-density volume h) is evaluated to characterize the disease severity in that subsection, resulting in a feature vector of length N for each lung. Features are then combined in two different ways: concatenation (2*N features) and taking the maximum in each of the two corresponding subsections in the two lungs (N features). The algorithm was evaluated on a dataset consisting of 51 UIP and 56 normal cases, a combined feature vector was computed for each case and an SVM classifier (RBF kernel) was used to classify them into UIP or normal using ten-fold cross validation. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) area under the curve (AUC) was used for evaluation. The highest AUC of 0.95 was achieved by using concatenated features and an N of 27. Using lung partition (N = 27, 64) with concatenated features had significantly better result over not using partitions (N = 1) (p-value < 0.05). Therefore this equal-volume partition fractional high-density volume method is useful in distinguishing early-stage UIP from normal cases.

  10. A Head-to-head Comparison between SurgiMend and Epiflex in 127 Breast Reconstructions

    PubMed Central

    Vogt, Nadine; Brunnert, Klaus; Sauerwald, Axel; Puppe, Julian; Warm, Mathias

    2015-01-01

    Background: The use of acellular dermal matrices (ADM) has become a widely used option in breast reconstruction. A great deal of literature is available, totaling over 2400 ADM reconstructions. Nonetheless, head-to-head comparisons between SurgiMend and Epiflex are not yet reported. In fact, this is the first clinical data report on the use of Epiflex. This work will, therefore, compare postoperative complication rates and costs for these ADMs. Methods: This analysis is a retrospective review of a single surgeon’s 6-year experience with both SurgiMend—an acellular bovine dermal collagen matrix for soft-tissue reconstruction and Epiflex—a decellularized human skin tissue from 2008 to 2013. Results: One hundred patients had a total of 127 implant-based reconstructions using SurgiMend (64 cases; 50.4%) or Epiflex (63 cases; 49.6%). Gross complication rates were 11.1% for SurgiMend and 40.6% for Epiflex including hematoma, postoperative skin irritation, infection, necrosis, and revision surgery. The most common complication was postoperative red breast syndrome. Severe complications requiring revision surgery were significantly increased in patients treated with Epiflex (12.5%) compared with SurgiMend (4.8%). Conclusions: This retrospective analysis favors the use of SurgiMend over Epiflex because of significantly lower gross complication rates. Severe complication rates are comparable with those reported in literature for both products. Although results promote the use of SurgiMend, the single surgeon retrospective nature of this work limits its clinical impact. PMID:26180740

  11. Head-to-head comparisons of hydrochlorothiazide with indapamide and chlorthalidone: antihypertensive and metabolic effects.

    PubMed

    Roush, George C; Ernst, Michael E; Kostis, John B; Tandon, Suraj; Sica, Domenic A

    2015-05-01

    Hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ) has often been contrasted with chlorthalidone, but relatively little is known about HCTZ versus indapamide (INDAP). This systematic review retrieved 9765 publications, and from these, it identified 14 randomized trials with 883 patients comparing HCTZ with INDAP and chlorthalidone on antihypertensive potency or metabolic effects. To make fair comparisons, the dose of the diuretic in each arm was assigned 1 of 3 dose levels. In random effects meta-analysis, INDAP and chlorthalidone lowered systolic blood pressure more than HCTZ: -5.1 mm Hg (95% confidence interval, -8.7 to -1.6); P=0.004 and -3.6 mm Hg (95% confidence interval, -7.3 to 0.0); P=0.052, respectively. For both comparisons, there was minimal heterogeneity in effect across trials and no evidence for publication bias. The HCTZ-INDAP contrast was biased in favor of greater HCTZ potency because of a much greater contribution to the overall effect from trials in which the HCTZ arm had a higher dose level than the INDAP arm. For the HCTZ-INDAP comparison, no single trial was responsible for the overall result nor was it possible to detect significant modifications of this comparison by duration of follow-up, high- versus low-bias trials, or the presence or absence of background medications. There were no detectable differences between HCTZ and INDAP in metabolic adverse effects, including effects on serum potassium. In conclusion, these head-to-head comparisons demonstrate that, like chlorthalidone, INDAP is more potent than HCTZ at commonly prescribed doses without evidence for greater adverse metabolic effects.

  12. Cell delivery: intramyocardial injections or epicardial deposition? A head-to-head comparison.

    PubMed

    Hamdi, Hadhami; Furuta, Akira; Bellamy, Valérie; Bel, Alain; Puymirat, Etienne; Peyrard, Séverine; Agbulut, Onnik; Menasché, Philippe

    2009-04-01

    Multiple needle-based injections of cells in the myocardium are associated with a low engraftment rate, which may limit the benefits of the procedure. This study used skeletal myoblasts to perform a head-to-head comparison of conventional injections with epicardial deposition of scaffold-embedded cells. Four weeks after ligation-induced myocardial infarction, 40 rats were randomly allocated to receive intramyocardial injections of 5 million human skeletal myoblasts or control medium or to have the infarcted area covered with either a bilayer myoblast cell sheet prepared from a fibrin-coated culture plate or a myoblast-seeded collagen sponge (Gelfoam; Pharmacia & Upjohn, Kalamazoo, MI). End points, assessed after 1 month, included left ventricular function blindly measured by echocardiography, quantification of cell engraftment by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and immunostaining, histologic assessment of fibrosis and angiogenesis, and tissue levels of host-specific angiogenic and antifibrotic cytokines. Compared with control medium- or myoblast-injected hearts, those receiving the two cell constructs demonstrated the highest recoveries of left ventricular function (p = 0.004 versus controls). Both myoblast cell sheets and myoblast-seeded Gelfoam sponges also resulted in significantly greater angiogenesis compared with controls. The Gelfoam group was associated with the best outcome with regard to the number of engrafted donor cells (p = 0.03 versus myoblasts) and the reduction of fibrosis (p = 0.02 and p = 0.04 versus the control and myoblast groups, respectively). Compared with injections, delivery of myoblasts in a construct overlaying the infarcted area is associated with better graft functionality, possibly because of maintenance of improved cell patterning. The cell-seeded Gelfoam construct was found to feature a user-friendly, reproducible, and atraumatic technique.

  13. SU-C-206-07: A Practical Sparse View Ultra-Low Dose CT Acquisition Scheme for PET Attenuation Correction in the Extended Scan Field-Of-View

    SciTech Connect

    Miao, J; Fan, J; Gopinatha Pillai, A

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To further reduce CT dose, a practical sparse-view acquisition scheme is proposed to provide the same attenuation estimation as higher dose for PET imaging in the extended scan field-of-view. Methods: CT scans are often used for PET attenuation correction and can be acquired at very low CT radiation dose. Low dose techniques often employ low tube voltage/current accompanied with a smooth filter before backprojection to reduce CT image noise. These techniques can introduce bias in the conversion from HU to attenuation values, especially in the extended CT scan field-of-view (FOV). In this work, we propose an ultra-low dose CT technique for PET attenuation correction based on sparse-view acquisition. That is, instead of an acquisition of full amount of views, only a fraction of views are acquired. We tested this technique on a 64-slice GE CT scanner using multiple phantoms. CT scan FOV truncation completion was performed based on the published water-cylinder extrapolation algorithm. A number of continuous views per rotation: 984 (full), 246, 123, 82 and 62 have been tested, corresponding to a CT dose reduction of none, 4x, 8x, 12x and 16x. We also simulated sparse-view acquisition by skipping views from the fully-acquired view data. Results: FBP reconstruction with Q. AC filter on reduced views in the full extended scan field-of-view possesses similar image quality to the reconstruction on acquired full view data. The results showed a further potential for dose reduction compared to the full acquisition, without sacrificing any significant attenuation support to the PET. Conclusion: With the proposed sparse-view method, one can potential achieve at least 2x more CT dose reduction compared to the current Ultra-Low Dose (ULD) PET/CT protocol. A pre-scan based dose modulation scheme can be combined with the above sparse-view approaches, which can even further reduce the CT scan dose during a PET/CT exam.

  14. WE-G-18A-04: 3D Dictionary Learning Based Statistical Iterative Reconstruction for Low-Dose Cone Beam CT Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, T; Yan, H; Shi, F; Jia, X; Jiang, Steve B.; Lou, Y; Xu, Q; Mou, X

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a 3D dictionary learning based statistical reconstruction algorithm on graphic processing units (GPU), to improve the quality of low-dose cone beam CT (CBCT) imaging with high efficiency. Methods: A 3D dictionary containing 256 small volumes (atoms) of 3x3x3 voxels was trained from a high quality volume image. During reconstruction, we utilized a Cholesky decomposition based orthogonal matching pursuit algorithm to find a sparse representation on this dictionary basis of each patch in the reconstructed image, in order to regularize the image quality. To accelerate the time-consuming sparse coding in the 3D case, we implemented our algorithm in a parallel fashion by taking advantage of the tremendous computational power of GPU. Evaluations are performed based on a head-neck patient case. FDK reconstruction with full dataset of 364 projections is used as the reference. We compared the proposed 3D dictionary learning based method with a tight frame (TF) based one using a subset data of 121 projections. The image qualities under different resolutions in z-direction, with or without statistical weighting are also studied. Results: Compared to the TF-based CBCT reconstruction, our experiments indicated that 3D dictionary learning based CBCT reconstruction is able to recover finer structures, to remove more streaking artifacts, and is less susceptible to blocky artifacts. It is also observed that statistical reconstruction approach is sensitive to inconsistency between the forward and backward projection operations in parallel computing. Using high a spatial resolution along z direction helps improving the algorithm robustness. Conclusion: 3D dictionary learning based CBCT reconstruction algorithm is able to sense the structural information while suppressing noise, and hence to achieve high quality reconstruction. The GPU realization of the whole algorithm offers a significant efficiency enhancement, making this algorithm more feasible for potential

  15. Computer-aided diagnostic scheme for distinction between benign and malignant nodules in thoracic low-dose CT by use of massive training artificial neural network.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Kenji; Li, Feng; Sone, Shusuke; Doi, Kunio

    2005-09-01

    Low-dose helical computed tomography (LDCT) is being applied as a modality for lung cancer screening. It may be difficult, however, for radiologists to distinguish malignant from benign nodules in LDCT. Our purpose in this study was to develop a computer-aided diagnostic (CAD) scheme for distinction between benign and malignant nodules in LDCT scans by use of a massive training artificial neural network (MTANN). The MTANN is a trainable, highly nonlinear filter based on an artificial neural network. To distinguish malignant nodules from six different types of benign nodules, we developed multiple MTANNs (multi-MTANN) consisting of six expert MTANNs that are arranged in parallel. Each of the MTANNs was trained by use of input CT images and teaching images containing the estimate of the distribution for the "likelihood of being a malignant nodule," i.e., the teaching image for a malignant nodule contains a two-dimensional Gaussian distribution and that for a benign nodule contains zero. Each MTANN was trained independently with ten typical malignant nodules and ten benign nodules from each of the six types. The outputs of the six MTANNs were combined by use of an integration ANN such that the six types of benign nodules could be distinguished from malignant nodules. After training of the integration ANN, our scheme provided a value related to the "likelihood of malignancy" of a nodule, i.e., a higher value indicates a malignant nodule, and a lower value indicates a benign nodule. Our database consisted of 76 primary lung cancers in 73 patients and 413 benign nodules in 342 patients, which were obtained from a lung cancer screening program on 7847 screenees with LDCT for three years in Nagano, Japan. The performance of our scheme for distinction between benign and malignant nodules was evaluated by use of receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. Our scheme achieved an Az (area under the ROC curve) value of 0.882 in a round-robin test. Our scheme correctly

  16. Lung cancer incidence and mortality in National Lung Screening Trial participants who underwent low-dose CT prevalence screening: a retrospective cohort analysis of a randomised, multicentre, diagnostic screening trial.

    PubMed

    Patz, Edward F; Greco, Erin; Gatsonis, Constantine; Pinsky, Paul; Kramer, Barnett S; Aberle, Denise R

    2016-05-01

    Annual low-dose CT screening for lung cancer has been recommended for high-risk individuals, but the necessity of yearly low-dose CT in all eligible individuals is uncertain. This study examined rates of lung cancer in National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) participants who had a negative prevalence (initial) low-dose CT screen to explore whether less frequent screening could be justified in some lower-risk subpopulations. We did a retrospective cohort analysis of data from the NLST, a randomised, multicentre screening trial comparing three annual low-dose CT assessments with three annual chest radiographs for the early detection of lung cancer in high-risk, eligible individuals (aged 55-74 years with at least a 30 pack-year history of cigarette smoking, and, if a former smoker, had quit within the past 15 years), recruited from US medical centres between Aug 5, 2002, and April 26, 2004. Participants were followed up for up to 5 years after their last annual screen. For the purposes of this analysis, our cohort consisted of all NLST participants who had received a low-dose CT prevalence (T0) screen. We determined the frequency, stage, histology, study year of diagnosis, and incidence of lung cancer, as well as overall and lung cancer-specific mortality, and whether lung cancers were detected as a result of screening or within 1 year of a negative screen. We also estimated the effect on mortality if the first annual (T1) screen in participants with a negative T0 screen had not been done. The NLST is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00047385. Our cohort consisted of 26 231 participants assigned to the low-dose CT screening group who had undergone their T0 screen. The 19 066 participants with a negative T0 screen had a lower incidence of lung cancer than did all 26 231 T0-screened participants (371·88 [95% CI 337·97-408·26] per 100 000 person-years vs 661·23 [622·07-702·21]) and had lower lung cancer-related mortality (185·82 [95% CI 162·17

  17. Dialkoxybithiazole: a new building block for head-to-head polymer semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xugang; Quinn, Jordan; Chen, Zhihua; Usta, Hakan; Zheng, Yan; Xia, Yu; Hennek, Jonathan W; Ortiz, Rocío Ponce; Marks, Tobin J; Facchetti, Antonio

    2013-02-06

    Polymer semiconductors have received great attention for organic electronics due to the low fabrication cost offered by solution-based printing techniques. To enable the desired solubility/processability and carrier mobility, polymers are functionalized with hydrocarbon chains by strategically manipulating the alkylation patterns. Note that head-to-head (HH) linkages have traditionally been avoided because the induced backbone torsion leads to poor π-π overlap and amorphous film microstructures, and hence to low carrier mobilities. We report here the synthesis of a new building block for HH linkages, 4,4'-dialkoxy-5,5'-bithiazole (BTzOR), and its incorporation into polymers for high performance organic thin-film transistors. The small oxygen van der Waals radius and intramolecular S(thiazolyl)···O(alkoxy) attraction promote HH macromolecular architectures with extensive π-conjugation, low bandgaps (1.40-1.63 eV), and high crystallinity. In comparison to previously reported 3,3'-dialkoxy-2,2'-bithiophene (BTOR), BTzOR is a promising building block in view of thiazole geometric and electronic properties: (a) replacing (thiophene)C-H with (thiazole)N reduces steric encumbrance in -BTzOR-Ar- dyads by eliminating repulsive C-H···H-C interactions with neighboring arene units, thereby enhancing π-π overlap and film crystallinity; and (b) thiazole electron-deficiency compensates alkoxy electron-donating characteristics, thereby lowering the BTzOR polymer HOMO versus that of the BTOR analogues. Thus, the new BTzOR polymers show substantial hole mobilities (0.06-0.25 cm(2)/(V s)) in organic thin-film transistors, as well as enhanced I(on):I(off) ratios and greater ambient stability than the BTOR analogues. These geometric and electronic properties make BTzOR a promising building block for new classes of polymer semiconductors, and the synthetic route to BTzOR reported here should be adaptable to many other bithiazole-based building blocks.

  18. Reliability analysis of visual ranking of coronary artery calcification on low-dose CT of the thorax for lung cancer screening: comparison with ECG-gated calcium scoring CT.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yoon Kyung; Sung, Yon Mi; Cho, So Hyun; Park, Young Nam; Choi, Hye-Young

    2014-12-01

    Coronary artery calcification (CAC) is frequently detected on low-dose CT (LDCT) of the thorax. Concurrent assessment of CAC and lung cancer screening using LDCT is beneficial in terms of cost and radiation dose reduction. The aim of our study was to evaluate the reliability of visual ranking of positive CAC on LDCT compared to Agatston score (AS) on electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated calcium scoring CT. We studied 576 patients who were consecutively registered for health screening and undergoing both LDCT and ECG-gated calcium scoring CT. We excluded subjects with an AS of zero. The final study cohort included 117 patients with CAC (97 men; mean age, 53.4 ± 8.5). AS was used as the gold standard (mean score 166.0; range 0.4-3,719.3). Two board-certified radiologists and two radiology residents participated in an observer performance study. Visual ranking of CAC was performed according to four categories (1-10, 11-100, 101-400, and 401 or higher) for coronary artery disease risk stratification. Weighted kappa statistics were used to measure the degree of reliability on visual ranking of CAC on LDCT. The degree of reliability on visual ranking of CAC on LDCT compared to ECG-gated calcium scoring CT was excellent for board-certified radiologists and good for radiology residents. A high degree of association was observed with 71.6% of visual rankings in the same category as the Agatston category and 98.9% varying by no more than one category. Visual ranking of positive CAC on LDCT is reliable for predicting AS rank categorization.

  19. POP-pincer osmium-polyhydrides: head-to-head (Z)-dimerization of terminal alkynes.

    PubMed

    Alós, Joaquín; Bolaño, Tamara; Esteruelas, Miguel A; Oliván, Montserrat; Oñate, Enrique; Valencia, Marta

    2013-05-20

    A wide range of osmium-polyhydride complexes stabilized by the POP-pincer ligand xant(P(i)Pr2)2 (9,9-dimethyl-4,5-bis(diisopropylphosphino)xanthene) have been synthesized through cis-OsCl2{κ-S-(DMSO)4} (1, DMSO = dimethyl sulfoxide). Treatment of toluene solutions of this adduct with the diphosphine, under reflux, leads to OsCl2{xant(P(i)Pr2)2}(κ-S-DMSO) (2). The reaction of 2 with H2 in the presence of Et3N affords OsH3Cl{xant(P(i)Pr2)2} (3), which can be also prepared by addition of xant(P(i)Pr2)2 to toluene solutions of the unsaturated d(4)-trihydride OsH3Cl(P(i)Pr3)2 (5). Complex 3 reductively eliminates H2 in toluene at 90 °C. In the presence of dimethyl sulfoxide, the resulting monohydride is trapped by the S-donor molecule to give OsHCl{xant(P(i)Pr2)2}(κ-S-DMSO) (6). The reaction of 2 with H2 is sensible to the Brønsted base. Thus, in contrast to Et3N, NaH removes both chloride ligands and the hexahydride OsH6{xant(P(i)Pr2)2} (7), containing a κ(2)-P-binding diphosphine, is formed under 3 atm of hydrogen at 50 °C. Complex 7 releases a H2 molecule to yield the tetrahydride OsH4{xant(P(i)Pr2)2} (8), which can be also prepared by reaction of OsH6(P(i)Pr3)2 (9) with xant(P(i)Pr2)2. Complex 8 reduces H(+) to give, in addition to H2, the oxidized OsH4-species [OsH4(OTf){xant(P(i)Pr2)2}](+) (10, OTf = trifluoromethanesulfonate). The redox process occurs in two stages via the OsH5-cation [OsH5{xant(P(i)Pr2)2}](+) (11). The metal oxidation state four can be recovered. The addition of acetonitrile to 10 leads to [OsH2(η(2)-H2)(CH3CN){xant(P(i)Pr2)2}](2+) (12). The deprotonation of 12 yields the osmium(IV) trihydride [OsH3(CH3CN){xant(P(i)Pr2)2}](+) (13), which is also formed by addition of HOTf to the acetonitrile solutions of 8. The latter is further an efficient catalyst precursor for the head-to-head (Z)-dimerization of phenylacetylene and tert-butylacetylene. During the activation process of the tetrahydride, the bis(alkynyl)vinylidene derivatives Os

  20. Low-dose 90Y PET/CT imaging optimized for lesion detectability and quantitative accuracy: a phantom study to assess the feasibility of pretherapy imaging to plan the therapeutic dose.

    PubMed

    Khazaee, Maryam; Kamali-Asl, Alireza; Geramifar, Parham; Rahmim, Arman

    2017-09-11

    The overall aim of this work is to optimize the reconstruction parameters for low-dose yttrium-90 (Y) PET/computed tomography (CT) imaging, and to determine Y minimum detectable activity, in an endeavor to investigate the feasibility of performing low-dose Y imaging in-vivo to plan the therapeutic dose in radioembolization. This study was carried out using a Siemens Biograph 6 True Point PET/CT scanner. A Jaszczak phantom containing five hot syringes was imaged serially over 15 days. For 128 reconstruction parameters/algorithms, detectability performance and quantitative accuracy were evaluated using the contrast-to-noise ratio and the recovery coefficient, respectively. For activity concentrations greater than 2.5 MBq/ml, the linearity of the scanner was confirmed while the corresponding relative error was below 10%. Reconstructions with smaller numbers of iterations and smoother filters led to higher detectability performance, irrespective of the activity concentration and lesion size. In this study, the minimum detectable activity was found to be 3.28±10% MBq/ml using the optimized reconstruction parameters. Although the recovered activities were generally underestimated, for lesions with activity concentration greater than 4 MBq/ml, the amount of underestimation is limited to -15% for optimized reconstructions. Y PET/CT imaging, even with a low activity concentration, is feasible for depicting the distribution of Y implanted microspheres using optimized reconstruction parameters. As such, in-vivo PET/CT imaging of low-dose Y in the pretherapeutic stage may be feasible and fruitful to optimally plan the therapeutic activity delivered to patients undergoing radioembolization.

  1. Head-to-head randomized trials are mostly industry sponsored and almost always favor the industry sponsor.

    PubMed

    Flacco, Maria Elena; Manzoli, Lamberto; Boccia, Stefania; Capasso, Lorenzo; Aleksovska, Katina; Rosso, Annalisa; Scaioli, Giacomo; De Vito, Corrado; Siliquini, Roberta; Villari, Paolo; Ioannidis, John P A

    2015-07-01

    To map the current status of head-to-head comparative randomized evidence and to assess whether funding may impact on trial design and results. From a 50% random sample of the randomized controlled trials (RCTs) published in journals indexed in PubMed during 2011, we selected the trials with ≥ 100 participants, evaluating the efficacy and safety of drugs, biologics, and medical devices through a head-to-head comparison. We analyzed 319 trials. Overall, 238,386 of the 289,718 randomized subjects (82.3%) were included in the 182 trials funded by companies. Of the 182 industry-sponsored trials, only 23 had two industry sponsors and only three involved truly antagonistic comparisons. Industry-sponsored trials were larger, more commonly registered, used more frequently noninferiority/equivalence designs, had higher citation impact, and were more likely to have "favorable" results (superiority or noninferiority/equivalence for the experimental treatment) than nonindustry-sponsored trials. Industry funding [odds ratio (OR) 2.8; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.6, 4.7] and noninferiority/equivalence designs (OR 3.2; 95% CI: 1.5, 6.6), but not sample size, were strongly associated with "favorable" findings. Fifty-five of the 57 (96.5%) industry-funded noninferiority/equivalence trials got desirable "favorable" results. The literature of head-to-head RCTs is dominated by the industry. Industry-sponsored comparative assessments systematically yield favorable results for the sponsors, even more so when noninferiority designs are involved. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The Science of Racing against Opponents: Affordance Competition and the Regulation of Exercise Intensity in Head-to-Head Competition

    PubMed Central

    Hettinga, Florentina J.; Konings, Marco J.; Pepping, Gert-Jan

    2017-01-01

    Athlete–environment interactions are crucial factors in understanding the regulation of exercise intensity in head-to-head competitions. Previously, we have proposed a framework based on the interdependence of perception and action, which allows us to explore athletic behavior in the more complex pacing situations occurring when athletes need to respond to actions of their opponents. In the present perspective we will further explore whether opponents, crucial external factors in competitive sports, could indeed be perceived as social invitations for action. Decisions regarding how to expend energy over the race are based on internal factors such as the physiological/biomechanical capacity of the athlete in relation to external factors such as those presented by opponents. For example: Is the athlete able to overtake competitors, or not? We present several experimental studies that demonstrate that athletes regulate their exercise intensity differently in head-to-head competition compared to time-trial exercises: Relational athlete-environment aspects seem to outweigh benefits of the individual optimal energy distribution. Also, the behavior of the opponents has been shown to influence pacing strategies of competing athletes, again demonstrating the importance of relational athlete–environment aspects in addition to strictly internal factors. An ecological perspective is presented in which opponents are proposed to present social affordances, and decision-making is conceptualized as a resultant of affordance-competition. This approach will provide novel insights in tactical decision-making and pacing behavior in head-to-head competitions. Future research should not only focus on the athlete's internal state, but also try to understand opponents in the context of the social affordances they provide. PMID:28293199

  3. The Science of Racing against Opponents: Affordance Competition and the Regulation of Exercise Intensity in Head-to-Head Competition.

    PubMed

    Hettinga, Florentina J; Konings, Marco J; Pepping, Gert-Jan

    2017-01-01

    Athlete-environment interactions are crucial factors in understanding the regulation of exercise intensity in head-to-head competitions. Previously, we have proposed a framework based on the interdependence of perception and action, which allows us to explore athletic behavior in the more complex pacing situations occurring when athletes need to respond to actions of their opponents. In the present perspective we will further explore whether opponents, crucial external factors in competitive sports, could indeed be perceived as social invitations for action. Decisions regarding how to expend energy over the race are based on internal factors such as the physiological/biomechanical capacity of the athlete in relation to external factors such as those presented by opponents. For example: Is the athlete able to overtake competitors, or not? We present several experimental studies that demonstrate that athletes regulate their exercise intensity differently in head-to-head competition compared to time-trial exercises: Relational athlete-environment aspects seem to outweigh benefits of the individual optimal energy distribution. Also, the behavior of the opponents has been shown to influence pacing strategies of competing athletes, again demonstrating the importance of relational athlete-environment aspects in addition to strictly internal factors. An ecological perspective is presented in which opponents are proposed to present social affordances, and decision-making is conceptualized as a resultant of affordance-competition. This approach will provide novel insights in tactical decision-making and pacing behavior in head-to-head competitions. Future research should not only focus on the athlete's internal state, but also try to understand opponents in the context of the social affordances they provide.

  4. Two-phase (low-dose) computed tomography is as effective as 4D-CT for identifying enlarged parathyroid glands.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Michael J; Sicuro, Paul; Alseidi, Adnan; Blackmore, C Craig; Ryan, John A

    2015-02-01

    Four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) is often used for patients with primary hyperparathyroidism and non-definitive localization after Sestamibi scan (MIBI) and ultrasound (US), but may expose patients to unnecessary radiation, typically between 10 and 26 millisieverts (mSv). We hypothesize that a simpler two-phase CT protocol would have a similar sensitivity, specificity and accuracy to those published for 4D-CT, while exposing the patient to less radiation. We reviewed 54 patients with primary hyperparathyroidism and non-definitive localization studies who had a two-phase CT between 2009 and 2012 at our tertiary referral center. The mean radiation dose of two-phase CT over the course of the study was 5.2 mSv (range 3.5 mSv-9.1 mSv). Two-phase CT had a 77% (CI = 65%-86%) sensitivity and an 87% (CI = 73%-95%) specificity to lateralize enlarged parathyroid glands to the correct side of the neck and a 58% (CI = 45%-68%) sensitivity and 91% (CI = 83%-94%) specificity to localize parathyroid tumors to the correct quadrant of the neck. The overall accuracy of two-phase CT to lateralize enlarged parathyroids was 81% (CI = 73%, 88%) and the accuracy to localize enlarged parathyroids was 79% (CI = 73%, 84%). As a second line investigation two-phase CT has a similar sensitivity, specificity and accuracy to those published for 4D-CT in patients with non-localized, enlarged parathyroids with less radiation exposure. Two-phase CT can help localize enlarged parathyroid glands not definitively identified using MIBI and US. Two-phase CT allows clinicians to accurately identify enlarged parathyroid glands while exposing the patient to less radiation than 4D-CT. Copyright © 2015 Surgical Associates Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Is there evidence for recommending specific intravenous immunoglobulin formulations? A systematic review of head-to-head randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Buehler, Anna Maria; Flato, Uri P; Ferri, Cleusa P; Fernandes, Jefferson G

    2015-01-15

    Intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIG) have been used for several licensed and off-label indications. Each IVIG product is a unique formulation of IgG and excipients, making them distinct products. How these differences impact on individual IVIG product efficacy and safety are not well established but can be investigated by head-to-head randomized controlled trials (RCT). A systematic review of head-to-head RCT comparing different formulations of IVIG, regardless of the target condition and outcomes investigated. Two reviewers screened 4084 citations retrieved from MEDLINE, Embase, Cochrane and LILACS, and 23 citations were fully-text evaluated. Eight trials were included. The clinical conditions, outcomes and risk of bias were assessed. Of the eight trials included only two investigated products that are currently on the market. One evaluated two Grifols brands used in patients with primary immunodeficiency and another evaluated two Baxter brands used in patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy. There were no differences between the formulations for the outcomes evaluated. In the other trials, either the manufacturers were acquired by other companies or the formulation was withdrawn from the market. As consequence, evidence concerning these products could not be considered. The quality of the studies was low, showing high risk of bias. Direct evidence about the different IVIGs is scarce and, at present, there is no scientific evidence that can be applied for a specific brand or formulation. Further comparative effectiveness studies are highly desirable for a better understanding of the differences in safety and efficacy of IVIGs.

  6. Low-Dose Carcinogenicity Studies

    EPA Science Inventory

    One of the major deficiencies of cancer risk assessments is the lack of low-dose carcinogenicity data. Most assessments require extrapolation from high to low doses, which is subject to various uncertainties. Only 4 low-dose carcinogenicity studies and 5 low-dose biomarker/pre-n...

  7. Low-Dose Carcinogenicity Studies

    EPA Science Inventory

    One of the major deficiencies of cancer risk assessments is the lack of low-dose carcinogenicity data. Most assessments require extrapolation from high to low doses, which is subject to various uncertainties. Only 4 low-dose carcinogenicity studies and 5 low-dose biomarker/pre-n...

  8. Acceptability of oral iodinated contrast media: a head-to-head comparison of four media.

    PubMed

    Pollentine, A; Ngan-Soo, E; McCoubrie, P

    2013-05-01

    To assess the palatability of iodinated oral contrast media commonly used in abdominopelvic CT and CT colonography (CTC). 80 volunteers assessed the palatability of a 20-ml sample of a standard 30 mg ml(-1) dilution of Omnipaque® (iohexol; GE Healthcare, Cork, Ireland), Telebrix® (meglumine ioxithalamate; Guerbet, Aulnay-sous-Bois, France), Gastromiro® (iopamidol; Bracco, High Wycombe, UK) and Gastrografin® (sodium diatrizoate and meglumine diatrizoate; Bayer, Newbury, UK) in a computer-generated random order. Gastrografin is rated significantly less palatable than the remaining media (p<0.005). Omnipaque and Telebrix are significantly more palatable than Gastromiro. No difference existed between Omnipaque and Telebrix. 39% of participants would refuse to consume the quantities of Gastrografin required for a CTC examination compared with Telebrix (7%) and Omnipaque (9%) (p<0.05). Omnipaque and Telebrix are significantly more palatable than both Gastromiro and Gastrografin, with participants more willing to ingest them in larger quantities as well as being less expensive. Omnipaque and Telebrix are significantly more palatable iodinated oral contrast media than both Gastromiro and Gastrografin, which has potential implications in compliance with both abdominopelvic CT and CTC.

  9. Acceptability of oral iodinated contrast media: a head-to-head comparison of four media

    PubMed Central

    Ngan-Soo, E; McCoubrie, P

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To assess the palatability of iodinated oral contrast media commonly used in abdominopelvic CT and CT colonography (CTC). Methods: 80 volunteers assessed the palatability of a 20-ml sample of a standard 30 mg ml−1 dilution of Omnipaque® (iohexol; GE Healthcare, Cork, Ireland), Telebrix® (meglumine ioxithalamate; Guerbet, Aulnay-sous-Bois, France), Gastromiro® (iopamidol; Bracco, High Wycombe, UK) and Gastrografin® (sodium diatrizoate and meglumine diatrizoate; Bayer, Newbury, UK) in a computer-generated random order. Results: Gastrografin is rated significantly less palatable than the remaining media (p<0.005). Omnipaque and Telebrix are significantly more palatable than Gastromiro. No difference existed between Omnipaque and Telebrix. 39% of participants would refuse to consume the quantities of Gastrografin required for a CTC examination compared with Telebrix (7%) and Omnipaque (9%) (p<0.05). Conclusion: Omnipaque and Telebrix are significantly more palatable than both Gastromiro and Gastrografin, with participants more willing to ingest them in larger quantities as well as being less expensive. Advances in knowledge: Omnipaque and Telebrix are significantly more palatable iodinated oral contrast media than both Gastromiro and Gastrografin, which has potential implications in compliance with both abdominopelvic CT and CTC. PMID:23564884

  10. Development of Prior Image-Based, High-Quality, Low-Dose Kilovoltage Cone Beam CT for Use in Adaptive Radiotherapy of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-01

    mathematically ready for reconstruction. 1.1.4 Scatter compensation for synthesized physical phantom data Compared to diagnostic CT where X - ray beam spanning a...Truncated, Diagnostic -CT Data", SPIE Medical Imaging, Lake Buena Vista, Florida, 2013 37. X . Han, E. Pearson, C. A. Pelizzari, X . Pan, “Investigation of...Prince, C. A. Pelizzari, and X . Pan,“Evaluation of sparse-view reconstruction from flat - panel -detector cone-beam CT,” Physics in Medicine and Biology

  11. Context-specific method for detection of soft-tissue lesions in non-cathartic low-dose dual-energy CT colonography.

    PubMed

    Näppi, Janne J; Regge, Daniele; Yoshida, Hiroyuki

    2015-03-01

    In computed tomographic colonography (CTC), orally administered fecal-tagging agents can be used to indicate residual feces and fluid that could otherwise hide or imitate lesions on CTC images of the colon. Although the use of fecal tagging improves the detection accuracy of CTC, it can introduce image artifacts that may cause lesions that are covered by fecal tagging to have a different visual appearance than those not covered by fecal tagging. This can distort the values of image-based computational features, thereby reducing the accuracy of computer-aided detection (CADe). We developed a context-specific method that performs the detection of lesions separately on lumen regions covered by air and on those covered by fecal tagging, thereby facilitating the optimization of detection parameters separately for these regions and their detected lesion candidates to improve the detection accuracy of CADe. For pilot evaluation, the method was integrated into a dual-energy CADe (DE-CADe) scheme and evaluated by use of leave-one-patient-out evaluation on 66 clinical non-cathartic low-dose dual-energy CTC (DE-CTC) cases that were acquired at a low effective radiation dose and reconstructed by use of iterative image reconstruction. There were 22 colonoscopy-confirmed lesions ≥6 mm in size in 21 patients. The DE-CADe scheme detected 96% of the lesions at a median of 6 FP detections per patient. These preliminary results indicate that the use of context-specific detection can yield high detection accuracy of CADe in non-cathartic low-dose DE-CTC examinations.

  12. Context-specific method for detection of soft-tissue lesions in non-cathartic low-dose dual-energy CT colonography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Näppi, Janne J.; Regge, Daniele; Yoshida, Hiroyuki

    2015-03-01

    In computed tomographic colonography (CTC), orally administered fecal-tagging agents can be used to indicate residual feces and fluid that could otherwise hide or imitate lesions on CTC images of the colon. Although the use of fecal tagging improves the detection accuracy of CTC, it can introduce image artifacts that may cause lesions that are covered by fecal tagging to have a different visual appearance than those not covered by fecal tagging. This can distort the values of image-based computational features, thereby reducing the accuracy of computer-aided detection (CADe). We developed a context-specific method that performs the detection of lesions separately on lumen regions covered by air and on those covered by fecal tagging, thereby facilitating the optimization of detection parameters separately for these regions and their detected lesion candidates to improve the detection accuracy of CADe. For pilot evaluation, the method was integrated into a dual-energy CADe (DE-CADe) scheme and evaluated by use of leave-one-patient-out evaluation on 66 clinical non-cathartic low dose dual-energy CTC (DE-CTC) cases that were acquired at a low effective radiation dose and reconstructed by use of iterative image reconstruction. There were 22 colonoscopy-confirmed lesions ≥6 mm in size in 21 patients. The DE-CADe scheme detected 96% of the lesions at a median of 6 FP detections per patient. These preliminary results indicate that the use of context-specific detection can yield high detection accuracy of CADe in non-cathartic low-dose DE-CTC examinations.

  13. Head-to-head and tail-to-tail 180° domain walls in an isolated ferroelectric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gureev, M. Y.; Tagantsev, A. K.; Setter, N.

    2011-05-01

    Head-to-head and tail-to-tail 180° domain walls in a finite isolated ferroelectric sample are theoretically studied using Landau theory. The full set of equations, suitable for numerical calculations, is developed. The explicit expressions for the polarization profile across the walls are derived for several limiting cases and wall widths are estimated. It is shown analytically that different regimes of screening and different dependences for the width of charged domain walls on the temperature and parameters of the system are possible, depending on spontaneous polarization and concentration of carriers in the material. It is shown that the half-width of charged domain walls in typical perovskites is about the nonlinear Thomas-Fermi screening length and about one order of magnitude larger than the half-width of neutral domain walls. The formation energies of head-to-head walls under different regimes of screening are obtained, neglecting the poling ability of the surface. In the nonlinear regimes of screening, this energy is equal to the energy necessary for the creation of electron-hole pairs in the amount sufficient to screen the spontaneous polarization, which is proportional to the band gap of the ferroelectric. It is shown that either head-to-head or tail-to-tail configurations can be energetically favorable in comparison with the monodomain state of the ferroelectric if the poling ability of the surface is large enough. If this is not the case, the existence of charged domain walls in bulk ferroelectrics is merely a result of the domain-growth kinetics. Formation energies of the other possible states, i.e., the multidomain state with antiparallel domains separated by neutral walls and the state with the zero polarization, were compared with the formation energy of the charged domain wall. It was shown that, at large enough sample thicknesses, a charged domain wall can be energetically favorable in comparison with the states mentioned above. This size effect

  14. Evaluation of the use of automatic exposure control and automatic tube potential selection in low-dose cerebrospinal fluid shunt head CT.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Adam N; Vyhmeister, Ross; Bagade, Swapnil; Chatterjee, Arindam; Hicks, Brandon; Ramirez-Giraldo, Juan Carlos; McKinstry, Robert C

    2015-06-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid shunts are primarily used for the treatment of hydrocephalus. Shunt complications may necessitate multiple non-contrast head CT scans resulting in potentially high levels of radiation dose starting at an early age. A new head CT protocol using automatic exposure control and automated tube potential selection has been implemented at our institution to reduce radiation exposure. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the reduction in radiation dose achieved by this protocol compared with a protocol with fixed parameters. A retrospective sample of 60 non-contrast head CT scans assessing for cerebrospinal fluid shunt malfunction was identified, 30 of which were performed with each protocol. The radiation doses of the two protocols were compared using the volume CT dose index and dose length product. The diagnostic acceptability and quality of each scan were evaluated by three independent readers. The new protocol lowered the average volume CT dose index from 15.2 to 9.2 mGy representing a 39 % reduction (P < 0.01; 95 % CI 35-44 %) and lowered the dose length product from 259.5 to 151.2 mGy/cm representing a 42 % reduction (P < 0.01; 95 % CI 34-50 %). The new protocol produced diagnostically acceptable scans with comparable image quality to the fixed parameter protocol. A pediatric shunt non-contrast head CT protocol using automatic exposure control and automated tube potential selection reduced patient radiation dose compared with a fixed parameter protocol while producing diagnostic images of comparable quality.

  15. SU-C-207-03: Optimization of a Collimator-Based Sparse Sampling Technique for Low-Dose Cone-Beam CT

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, T; Cho, S; Kim, I; Han, B

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In computed tomography (CT) imaging, radiation dose delivered to the patient is one of the major concerns. Sparse-view CT takes projections at sparser view angles and provides a viable option to reducing dose. However, a fast power switching of an X-ray tube, which is needed for the sparse-view sampling, can be challenging in many CT systems. We have earlier proposed a many-view under-sampling (MVUS) technique as an alternative to sparse-view CT. In this study, we investigated the effects of collimator parameters on the image quality and aimed to optimize the collimator design. Methods: We used a bench-top circular cone-beam CT system together with a CatPhan600 phantom, and took 1440 projections from a single rotation. The multi-slit collimator made of tungsten was mounted on the X-ray source for beam blocking. For image reconstruction, we used a total-variation minimization (TV) algorithm and modified the backprojection step so that only the measured data through the collimator slits are to be used in the computation. The number of slits and the reciprocation frequency have been varied and the effects of them on the image quality were investigated. We also analyzed the sampling efficiency: the sampling density and data incoherence in each case. We tested three sets of slits with their number of 6, 12 and 18, each at reciprocation frequencies of 10, 30, 50 and 70 Hz/ro. Results: Consistent results in the image quality have been produced with the sampling efficiency, and the optimum condition was found to be using 12 slits at 30 Hz/ro. As image quality indices, we used the CNR and the detectability. Conclusion: We conducted an experiment with a moving multi-slit collimator to realize a sparse-sampled cone-beam CT. Effects of collimator parameters on the image quality have been systematically investigated, and the optimum condition has been reached.

  16. Improving pulmonary vessel image quality with a full model-based iterative reconstruction algorithm in 80kVp low-dose chest CT for pediatric patients aged 0-6 years.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jihang; Zhang, Qifeng; Hu, Di; Duan, Xiaomin; Peng, Yun

    2015-06-01

    Full model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) algorithm decreasing image noise and improving spatial resolution significantly, combined with low voltage scan may improve image and vessels quality. To evaluate the image quality improvement of pulmonary vessels using a full MBIR in low-dose chest computed tomography (CT) for children. This study was institutional review board approved. Forty-one children (age range, 28 days-6 years, mean age, 2.0 years) who underwent 80 kVp low-dose CT scans were included. Age-dependent noise index (NI) for a 5-mm slice thickness image was used for the acquisition: NI = 11 for 0-12 months old, NI = 13 for 1-2 years old, and NI = 15 for 3-6 years old. Images were retrospectively reconstructed into thin slice thickness of 0.625 mm using the MBIR and a conventional filtered back projection (FBP) algorithm. Two radiologists independently evaluated images subjectively focusing on the ability to display small arteries and diagnosis confidence on a 5-point scale with 3 being clinically acceptable. CT value and image noise in the descending aorta, muscle and fat were measured and statistically compared between the two reconstruction groups. The ability to display small vessels was significantly improved with the MBIR reconstruction. The subjective scores of displaying small vessels were 5.0 and 3.7 with MBIR and FBP, respectively, while the respective diagnosis confidence scores were 5.0 and 3.8. Quantitative image noise for the 0.625 mm slice thickness images in the descending aorta was 15.8 ± 3.8 HU in MBIR group, 57.3% lower than the 37.0 ± 7.3 HU in FBP group. The signal-to-noise ratio and contrast-to-noise ratio for the descending aorta were 28.3 ± 7.9 and 24.05 ± 7.5 in MBIR group, and 12.1 ± 3.7 and 10.6 ± 3.5 in FBP group, respectively. These values were improved by 133.9% and 132.1%, respectively, with MBIR reconstruction compared to FBP reconstruction. Compared to the conventional FBP reconstruction, the image quality and

  17. Brain metastases detectability of routine whole body (18)F-FDG PET and low dose CT scanning in 2502 asymptomatic patients with solid extracranial tumors.

    PubMed

    Bochev, Pavel; Klisarova, Aneliya; Kaprelyan, Ara; Chaushev, Borislav; Dancheva, Zhivka

    2012-01-01

    As fluorine-18-fluorodesoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography ( (18)F-FDG PET/CT) is gaining wider availability, more and more patients with malignancies undergo whole body PET/CT, mostly to assess tumor spread in the rest of the body, but not in the brain. Brain is a common site of metastatic spread in patients with solid extracranial tumors. Gold standard in the diagnosis of brain metastases remains magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However MRI is not routinely indicated and is not available for all cancer patients. Fluorine-18-FDG PET is considered as having poor sensitivity in detecting brain metastases, but this may not be true for PET/CT. The aim of our study was to assess the value of (18)F-FDG PET/CT in the detection of brain metastases found by whole body scan including the brain, in patients with solid extracranial neoplasms. A total of 2502 patients with solid extracranial neoplasms were studied. All patients underwent a routine whole body (18)F-FDG PET/CT scan with the whole brain included in the scanned field. Patients with known or suspected brain metastases were preliminary excluded from the study. Hypermetabolic and ring-like brain lesions on the PET scan were considered as metastases. Lesions with CT characteristics of brain metastases were regarded as such irrespective of their metabolic pattern. Lesions in doubt were verified by MRI during first testing or on follow-up or by operation. Our results showed that brain lesions, indicative of and verified to be metastases were detected in 25 out of the 2502 patients (1%), with lung cancer being the most common primary. Twenty three out of these 25 patients had no neurological symptoms by the time of the scan. The detection rate of brain metastases was relatively low, but information was obtained with a minimum increase of radiation burden. In conclusion, whole body (18)F-FDG PET/CT detected brain metastases in 1% of the patients if brain was included in the scanned field. Brain

  18. Combined albumin and bicarbonate induces head-to-head sperm agglutination which physically prevents equine sperm-oviduct binding.

    PubMed

    Leemans, Bart; Gadella, Bart M; Stout, Tom A E; Sostaric, Edita; De Schauwer, Catharina; Nelis, Hilde; Hoogewijs, Maarten; Van Soom, Ann

    2016-04-01

    In many species, sperm binding to oviduct epithelium is believed to be an essential step in generating a highly fertile capacitated sperm population primed for fertilization. In several mammalian species, this interaction is based on carbohydrate-lectin recognition. D-galactose has previously been characterized as a key molecule that facilitates sperm-oviduct binding in the horse. We used oviduct explant and oviduct apical plasma membrane (APM) assays to investigate the effects of various carbohydrates; glycosaminoglycans; lectins; S-S reductants; and the capacitating factors albumin, Ca(2+) and HCO3(-) on sperm-oviduct binding in the horse. Carbohydrate-specific lectin staining indicated that N-acetylgalactosamine, N-acetylneuraminic acid (sialic acid) and D-mannose or D-glucose were the most abundant carbohydrates on equine oviduct epithelia, whereas D-galactose moieties were not detected. However, in a competitive binding assay, sperm-oviduct binding density was not influenced by any tested carbohydrates, glycosaminoglycans, lectins or D-penicillamine, nor did the glycosaminoglycans induce sperm tail-associated protein tyrosine phosphorylation. Furthermore, N-glycosidase F (PNGase) pretreatment of oviduct explants and APM did not alter sperm-oviduct binding density. By contrast, a combination of the sperm-capacitating factors albumin and HCO3(-) severely reduced (>10-fold) equine sperm-oviduct binding density by inducing rapid head-to-head agglutination, both of which events were independent of Ca(2+) and an elevated pH (7.9). Conversely, neither albumin and HCO3(-) nor any other capacitating factor could induce release of oviduct-bound sperm. In conclusion, a combination of albumin and HCO3(-) markedly induced sperm head-to-head agglutination which physically prevented stallion sperm to bind to oviduct epithelium. © 2016 Society for Reproduction and Fertility.

  19. Nutrient intake and nutrient patterns and risk of lung cancer among heavy smokers: results from the COSMOS screening study with annual low-dose CT.

    PubMed

    Gnagnarella, Patrizia; Maisonneuve, Patrick; Bellomi, Massimo; Rampinelli, Cristiano; Bertolotti, Raffaella; Spaggiari, Lorenzo; Palli, Domenico; Veronesi, Giulia

    2013-06-01

    The role of nutrients in lung cancer aetiology remains controversial and has never been evaluated in the context of screening. Our aim was to investigate the role of single nutrients and nutrient patterns in the aetiology of lung cancer in heavy smokers. Asymptomatic heavy smokers (≥20 pack-years) were invited to undergo annual low-dose computed tomography. We assessed diet using a self-administered food frequency questionnaire and collected information on multivitamin supplement use. We performed principal component analysis identifying four nutrient patterns and used Cox proportional Hazards regression to assess the association between nutrients and nutrients patterns and lung cancer risk. During a mean follow-up of 5.7 years, 178 of 4,336 participants were diagnosed with lung cancer by screening. We found a significant risk reduction of lung cancer with increasing vegetable fat consumption (HR for highest vs. lowest quartile = 0.50, 95% CI = 0.31-0.80; P-trend = 0.02). Participants classified in the high "vitamins and fiber" pattern score had a significant risk reduction of lung cancer (HR = 0.57; 95% CI = 0.36-0.90, P-trend = 0.01). Among heavy smokers enrolled in a screening trial, high vegetable fat intake and adherence to the "vitamin and fiber" nutrient pattern were associated with reduced lung cancer incidence.

  20. Noise indices adjusted to body mass index and an iterative reconstruction algorithm maintain image quality on low-dose contrast-enhanced liver CT.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yongxia; Suo, Hongna; Wu, Yanmin; Zuo, Ziwei; Zhao, Sisi; Cheng, Shujie

    2017-04-05

    Since body mass index (BMI) affects medical imaging quality or noise due to penetration of the radiation through bodies with varying sizes, this study aims to investigate and determine the optimal BMI-adjusted noise index (NI) setting on the contrast-enhanced liver CT scans obtained using 3D Smart mA technology with adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR 2.0) algorithm. A total of 320 patients who had contrast-enhanced liver CT scans were divided into two equal-sized groups: A (18.5 kg/m2≤BMI<24.9 kg/m2) and B (24.9 kg/m2 ≤ BMI ≤34.9 kg/m2). The two groups were randomly divided into four subgroups with an NI of 11, 13, 15, and 17. All images were reconstructed with 50% ASIR 2.0. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were calculated after the late arterial, portal venous, and equilibrium phases were completed. Images were evaluated by two radiologists using a subjective 0 -5 scale. Mean CT dose index of volume, dose-length product, and effective dose (ED) were calculated and compared using one-way ANOVA. In group A, the best-quality images obtained at the lowest ED were scanned at an NI of 15 in the late arterial phase, and at an NI of 17 in the portal venous and equilibrium phases. In group B, the best results were obtained at an NI of 13 in the late arterial phase, and at an NI of 15 in the portal venous and equilibrium phases. Adjusting NI and iterative reconstruction algorithm based on body mass index can help improve image quality on contrast-enhanced liver CT scans, even at low radiation dose.

  1. Half-Fan-Based Intensity-Weighted Region-of-Interest Imaging for Low-Dose Cone-Beam CT in Image-Guided Radiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Boyeol; Son, Kihong; Pua, Rizza; Kim, Jinsung; Solodov, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Objectives With the increased use of computed tomography (CT) in clinics, dose reduction is the most important feature people seek when considering new CT techniques or applications. We developed an intensity-weighted region-of-interest (IWROI) imaging method in an exact half-fan geometry to reduce the imaging radiation dose to patients in cone-beam CT (CBCT) for image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT). While dose reduction is highly desirable, preserving the high-quality images of the ROI is also important for target localization in IGRT. Methods An intensity-weighting (IW) filter made of copper was mounted in place of a bowtie filter on the X-ray tube unit of an on-board imager (OBI) system such that the filter can substantially reduce radiation exposure to the outer ROI. In addition to mounting the IW filter, the lead-blade collimation of the OBI was adjusted to produce an exact half-fan scanning geometry for a further reduction of the radiation dose. The chord-based rebinned backprojection-filtration (BPF) algorithm in circular CBCT was implemented for image reconstruction, and a humanoid pelvis phantom was used for the IWROI imaging experiment. Results The IWROI image of the phantom was successfully reconstructed after beam-quality correction, and it was registered to the reference image within an acceptable level of tolerance. Dosimetric measurements revealed that the dose is reduced by approximately 61% in the inner ROI and by 73% in the outer ROI compared to the conventional bowtie filter-based half-fan scan. Conclusions The IWROI method substantially reduces the imaging radiation dose and provides reconstructed images with an acceptable level of quality for patient setup and target localization. The proposed half-fan-based IWROI imaging technique can add a valuable option to CBCT in IGRT applications. PMID:27895964

  2. SU-E-I-39: Combining Conventional Tomographic Imaging Strategy and Interior Tomography for Low Dose Dual-Energy CT (DECT)

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Q; Xing, L; Xiong, G; Elmore, K; Min, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Dual-energy CT (DECT) affords quantitative information of tissue density and provides a new dimension for disease diagnosis and treatment planning. The technique, however, increases the imaging dose because of the doubled scans, and thus hinders its widespread clinical applications. The purpose of this work is to develop a novel hybrid DECT image acquisition and reconstruction strategy, in which one of the energies is dealt by interior tomography while the other one is obtained using conventional tomography approach. Methods: In the proposed hybrid imaging strategy, the projection data of one of the energies (e.g., high-energy) were acquired and processed in an interior scanning model, whereas the other energy in the conventional tomographic approach. It known that, if the ROI is piecewise constant or polynomial, the interior ROI can be reconstructed with TV or HOT minimization. Here we extend the TV based interior reconstruction method into dual-energy situation. The ROI images so obtained were overlaid in the context of conventional CT of the companion energy. A material based composition in ROI was used in the proposed reconstruction framework. Results: In the simulation experiment with a diagnostic DECT geometry and energies, we were able to derive the densities of soft-tissues and bones in the ROI with high fidelity. In the experimental CBCT study, both kV and MV data were collected using the on-board kV and MV imaging system. The MV data were truncated only across the ROI. Using the interior tomography reconstruction above, we were able to obtain the ROI images as that obtained using un-truncated MV data with known tissue densities. Conclusion: The proposed DECT imaging strategy provides an effective way to extract tissue density information in the ROI and in the context of anatomical images of CT imaging, with much reduced imaging dose.

  3. Feasibility of low-dose contrast medium high pitch CT angiography for the combined evaluation of coronary, head and neck arteries.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhiwei; Chen, Yu; Wang, Yining; Xue, Huadan; Jin, Zhengyu; Kong, Lingyan; Cao, Jian; Li, Shuo

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the image quality and radiation dose of combined heart, head, and neck CT angiography (CTA) using prospectively electrocardiography (ECG)-triggered high-pitch spiral scan protocol, compared with single coronary CTA. 151 consecutive patients were prospectively included and randomly divided into three groups. Group 1 (n = 47) underwent combined heart, neck, and head CTA using prospectively ECG-triggered high-pitch spiral (Flash) scan protocol with a single-phase intravenous injection of iodinated contrast and saline flush; Group 2 (n = 51) underwent single coronary CTA with Flash scan protocol; and Group 3 (n = 53) underwent single coronary CTA with prospective sequence scan protocol. All patients were examined on a dual source CT (Definition FLASH). The image quality was determined for each CT study. Patients of scanning protocol Group 1, 2, and 3 showed no significant differences in age, sex, heart rates, and BMI. Evaluation of coronary artery image quality showed comparable results in the three scanning protocol groups on a per patient-based analysis. In group 1, image quality was found to be sufficient to be diagnostic in all arterial segments of carotid arteries. The mean dose-length product (DLP) for group 1 was 256.3±24.5 mGy×cm and was significantly higher in comparison with group 2 (93.4±19.9 mGy×cm; p < 0.001). However, there was no significant difference of DLP between group 1 and group 3 (254.1±69.9 mGy×cm). The combined heart, neck, and head arteries scan using prospectively electrocardiography (ECG)-triggered high-pitch spiral scan protocol in 1 single examination resulted in an excellent opacification of the aorta, the carotid arteries, and the coronary arteries and provided a good image quality with low radiation dose.

  4. A comparative study of seed localization and dose calculation on pre- and post-implantation ultrasound and CT images for low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Imad; Algan, Ozer; Thompson, Spencer; Sindhwani, Puneet; Herman, Terence; Cheng, Chih-Yao; Ahmad, Salahuddin

    2009-09-01

    This work investigates variation in the volume of the prostate measured at different stages through the prostate brachytherapy procedure for 30 patients treated with I-125 radioactive seeds. The implanted seeds were localized on post-implantation ultrasound (US) images and the effect of prostate enlargement due to edema on dose coverage for 15 patients was studied. The volume of the prostate was measured at four stages as follows: (a) 2-3 weeks prior to implantation using US imaging, (b) then at the start of the intra-operative prostate brachytherapy procedure on the day of the implant, (c) immediately post-implantation using US imaging in the operating room and (d) finally by CT imaging at nearly 4 weeks post-implantation. Comparative prostate volume studies were performed using US imaging stepper and twister modes. For the purpose of this study, the implanted seeds were localized successfully on post-implant ultrasound twister images, retrospectively. The plans using post-implant US imaging were compared with intra-operative plans on US and plans created on CT images. The prostate volume increases about 10 cm3 on average due to edema induced by needle insertion and seed loading during implantation. The visibility of the implanted seeds on US twister images acquired post-implantation is as good as those on CT images and can be localized and used for dose calculation. The dose coverage represented by parameters such as D90 (dose covering 90% of the volume) and V100 (volume covered by 100% dose) is poorer on plans performed on post-implantation twister US studies than on the intra-operative live plan or the CT scan performed 4 weeks post-operatively. For example, the mean D90 difference on post-implantation US is lower by more than 15% than that on pre-implantation US. The volume enlargement of the prostate due to edema induced by needle insertion and seed placement has a significant effect on the quality of dosimetric coverage in brachytherapy prostate seed

  5. Preliminary performance of image quality for a low-dose C-arm CT system with a flat-panel detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyung Cha, Bo; Seo, Chang-Woo; Yang, Keedong; Jeon, Seongchae; Huh, Young

    2015-06-01

    Digital flat panel imager (FPI)-based cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) has been widely used in C-arm imaging for spine surgery and interventional procedures. The system provides real-time fluoroscopy with high spatial resolution and three-dimensional (3D) visualization of anatomical structure without the need for patient transportation in interventional suite. In this work, a prototype CBCT imaging platform with continuous single rotation about the gantry was developed by using a large-area flat-panel detector with amorphous Si-based thin film transistor matrix. The different 2D projection images were acquired during constant gantry velocity for reconstructed images at a tube voltage of 80-120 kVp, and different current (10-50 mA) conditions. Various scan protocols were applied to a chest phantom human by changing the number of projection images and scanning angles. The projections were then reconstructed into a volumetric data of sections by using a 3D reconstruction algorithm (e.g., filtered back projection). The preliminary quantitative X-ray performance of our CBCT system was investigated by using the American Association of Physicists in Medicine CT phantom in terms of spatial resolution, contrast resolution, and CT number linearity for mobile or fixed C-arm based CBCT application with limited rotational geometry. The novel results of the projection data with different scanning angles and angular increments in the orbital gantry platform were acquired and evaluated experimentally.

  6. SU-F-18C-13: Low-Dose X-Ray CT Reconstruction Using a Hybrid First-Order Method

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, L; Lin, W; Jin, M

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a novel reconstruction method for X-ray CT that can lead to accurate reconstruction at significantly reduced dose levels combining low X-ray incident intensity and few views of projection data. Methods: The noise nature of the projection data at low X-ray incident intensity was modeled and accounted by the weighted least-squares (WLS) criterion. The total variation (TV) penalty was used to mitigate artifacts caused by few views of data. The first order primal-dual (FOPD) algorithm was used to minimize TV in image domain, which avoided the difficulty of the non-smooth objective function. The TV penalized WLS reconstruction was achieved by alternated FOPD TV minimization and projection onto convex sets (POCS) for data fidelity constraints. The proposed FOPD-POCS method was evaluated using the FORBILD jaw phantom and the real cadaver head CT data. Results: The quantitative measures, root mean square error (RMSE) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), demonstrate the superior denoising capability of WLS over LS-based TV iterative reconstruction. The improvement of RMSE (WLS vs. LS) is 15%∼21% and that of CNR is 17%∼72% when the incident counts per ray are ranged from 1×10{sup 5} to 1×10{sup 3}. In addition, the TV regularization can accurately reconstruct images from about 50 views of the jaw phantom. The FOPD-POCS reconstruction reveals more structural details and suffers fewer artifacts in both the phantom and real head images. The FOPD-POCS method also shows fast convergence at low X-ray incident intensity. Conclusion: The new hybrid FOPD-POCS method, based on TV penalized WLS, yields excellent image quality when the incident X-ray intensity is low and the projection views are limited. The reconstruction is computationally efficient since the FOPD minimization of TV is applied only in the image domain. The characteristics of FOPD-POCS can be exploited to significantly reduce radiation dose of X-ray CT without compromising accuracy for diagnosis

  7. Assessment of Selection Criteria for Low-Dose Lung Screening CT Among Asian Ethnic Groups in Taiwan: From Mass Screening to Specific Risk-Based Screening for Non-Smoker Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fu-Zong; Huang, Yi-Luan; Wu, Carol C; Tang, En-Kuei; Chen, Chi-Shen; Mar, Guang-Yuan; Yen, Yu; Wu, Ming-Ting

    2016-09-01

    The National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) showed low-dose screening chest computed tomography (CT) reduced the lung cancer mortality rate up to 20% in high-risk patients in the United States. We aimed to investigate the impact of applying the NLST eligibility criteria to the population in Taiwan, and to identify additional risk factors to select subjects at risk for lung cancer. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 1763 asymptomatic healthy subjects (age range, 40-80 years) who voluntarily underwent low-dose chest CT (1029 male, 734 female) from August 2013 to August 2014. Clinical information and nodule characteristics were recorded. The results of subsequent follow-up and outcome were also recorded. A total of 8.4% (148/1763) of subjects would have been eligible for lung cancer screening based on the NLST criteria. However, only 1 of these eligible subjects would have a lung cancer detected at baseline. Among the 1615 subjects who did not meet the NLST criteria, the detection rates of lung cancer were 2.6% in women and 0.56% in men. Logistic regression showed that female gender and a family history of lung cancer were the 2 most important predictors of lung cancer in Taiwan (odds ratio, 6.367; P = .003; odds ratio, 3.017; P = .016, respectively). In conclusion, NLST eligibility criteria may not be effective in screening for lung cancer in Taiwan. A risk-based prediction model based on the family history of lung cancer and female gender can potentially improve the efficiency of lung cancer screening programs in Taiwan. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. 64Cu-DOTATATE PET for Neuroendocrine Tumors: A Prospective Head-to-Head Comparison with 111In-DTPA-Octreotide in 112 Patients.

    PubMed

    Pfeifer, Andreas; Knigge, Ulrich; Binderup, Tina; Mortensen, Jann; Oturai, Peter; Loft, Annika; Berthelsen, Anne Kiil; Langer, Seppo W; Rasmussen, Palle; Elema, Dennis; von Benzon, Eric; Højgaard, Liselotte; Kjaer, Andreas

    2015-06-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) can be visualized using radiolabeled somatostatin analogs. We have previously shown the clinical potential of (64)Cu-DOTATATE in a small first-in-human feasibility study. The aim of the present study was, in a larger prospective design, to compare on a head-to-head basis the performance of (64)Cu-DOTATATE and (111)In-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA)-octreotide ((111)In-DTPA-OC) as a basis for implementing (64)Cu-DOTATATE as a routine. We prospectively enrolled 112 patients with pathologically confirmed NETs of gastroenteropancreatic or pulmonary origin. All patients underwent both PET/CT with (64)Cu-DOTATATE and SPECT/CT with (111)In-DTPA-OC within 60 d. PET scans were acquired 1 h after injection of 202 MBq (range, 183-232 MBq) of (64)Cu-DOTATATE after a diagnostic contrast-enhanced CT scan. Patients were followed for 42-60 mo for evaluation of discrepant imaging findings. The McNemar test was used to compare the diagnostic performance. Eighty-seven patients were congruently PET- and SPECT-positive. No SPECT-positive cases were PET-negative, whereas 10 false-negative SPECT cases were identified using PET. The diagnostic sensitivity and accuracy of (64)Cu-DOTATATE (97% for both) were significantly better than those of (111)In-DTPA-OC (87% and 88%, respectively, P = 0.017). In 84 patients (75%), (64)Cu-DOTATATE identified more lesions than (111)In-DTPA-OC and always at least as many. In total, twice as many lesions were detected with (64)Cu-DOTATATE than with (111)In-DTPA-OC. Moreover, in 40 of 112 cases (36%) lesions were detected by (64)Cu-DOTATATE in organs not identified as disease-involved by (111)In-DTPA-OC. With these results, we demonstrate that (64)Cu-DOTATATE is far superior to (111)In-DTPA-OC in diagnostic performance in NET patients. Therefore, we do not hesitate to recommend implementation of (64)Cu-DOTATATE as a replacement for (111)In-DTPA-OC. © 2015 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  9. Extracellular calcium is involved in egg yolk-induced head-to-head agglutination of bull sperm.

    PubMed

    Yang, D H; McMillan, A G; Standley, N T; Shannon, P; Xu, Z Z

    2012-10-15

    Head-to-head agglutination of bull sperm occurs when semen is highly diluted in an egg yolk-citrate diluent without streptomycin. The objectives were to investigate causes of sperm agglutination and the underlying mechanism. Aliquots of bull semen were diluted in a base diluent (BD) supplemented with various test components and the percentage of agglutinated sperm (% AggSp) was quantified at 1, 5, 24, 48, and 72 h of incubation. When sperm were incubated at 22 °C, no agglutination was observed in BD for up to 72 h, whereas the % AggSp was 5.0, 41.7, 72.2, 91.1, and 92.8% in BD + 5% egg yolk (BD + EY) at 1, 5, 24, 48 and 72 h, respectively. However, no sperm agglutination was observed in BD + EY if incubation temperature was 37 °C. Addition of 5 or 10 mM ethylenebis (oxyethyleneni-trilo) tetra-acetic acid to BD + EY reduced the % AggSp from 95% to <5% at 72 h (P < 0.001), but addition of 5 mM CaCl(2) to BD failed to induce sperm agglutination in the absence of egg yolk, implicating calcium and other factors in egg yolk. Addition of the citrate-soluble fraction (CSF) of egg yolk to BD induced sperm agglutination similar to whole egg yolk, whereas water- and saline-soluble fractions of egg yolk were ineffective. The sperm-agglutinating efficacy of CSF (the % AggSp = 95% at 72 h) was reduced by dialysis (20%; P < 0.05), partially restored by addition of 5 mM CaCl2 (70%; P < 0.05), but the calcium effect was neutralized by addition of 5 mM ethylenebis (oxyethyleneni-trilo) tetra-acetic acid (1.7%; P < 0.05), again implicating calcium. Addition of 30 μM of a protein kinase A inhibitor (H-89) to an agglutinating diluent failed to inhibit sperm agglutination, whereas addition of 2 mM of a cAMP analogue, dbcAMP, to a nonagglutinating diluent failed to induce sperm agglutination. Agglutination status had no effect on sperm plasma membrane/acrosome status and mitochondrial membrane potential. In conclusion, calcium and other component(s) in the CSF of egg yolk induced head-to-head

  10. Clinical Value of a One-Stop-Shop Low-Dose Lung Screening Combined with (18)F-FDG PET/CT for the Detection of Metastatic Lung Nodules from Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Han, Yeon-Hee; Lim, Seok Tae; Jeong, Hwan-Jeong; Sohn, Myung-Hee

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical usefulness of additional low-dose high-resolution lung computed tomography (LD-HRCT) combined with (18)F-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography with CT ((18)F-FDG PET/CT) compared with conventional lung setting image of (18)F-FDG PET/CT for the detection of metastatic lung nodules from colorectal cancer. From January 2011 to September 2011, 649 patients with colorectal cancer underwent additional LD-HRCT at maximum inspiration combined with (18)F-FDG PET/CT. Forty-five patients were finally diagnosed to have lung metastasis based on histopathologic study or clinical follow-up. Twenty-five of the 45 patients had ≤5 metastatic lung nodules and the other 20 patients had >5 metastatic nodules. One hundred and twenty nodules in the 25 patients with ≤5 nodules were evaluated by conventional lung setting image of (18)F-FDG PET/CT and by additional LD-HRCT respectively. Sensitivities, specificities, diagnostic accuracies, positive predictive values (PPVs), and negative predictive values (NPVs) of conventional lung setting image of (18)F-FDG PET/CT and additional LD-HRCT were calculated using standard formulae. The McNemar test and receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analysis were performed. Of the 120 nodules in the 25 patients with ≤5 metastatic lung nodules, 66 nodules were diagnosed as metastatic. Eleven of the 66 nodules were confirmed histopathologically and the others were diagnosed by clinical follow-up. Conventional lung setting image of (18)F-FDG PET/CT detected 40 of the 66 nodules and additional LD-HRCT detected 55 nodules. All 15 nodules missed by conventional lung setting imaging but detected by additional LD-HRCT were <1 cm in size. The sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic accuracy of the modalities were 60.6 %, 85.2 %, and 71.1 % for conventional lung setting image and 83.3 %, 88.9 %, and 85.8 % for additional LD-HRCT. By ROC analysis, the area under the ROC curve

  11. Efficacy and safety profiles of manidipine compared with amlodipine: A meta-analysis of head-to-head trials

    PubMed Central

    RICHY, FLORENT F; LAURENT, STEPHANE

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this meta-analysis was to compare the efficacy and safety profile of manidipine 20 mg with that of amlodipine 10 mg. A systematic research of quantitative data produced or published between 1995 and 2009 was performed. Head-to-head randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of 12 months minimum duration reporting comparative efficacy (changes in systolic and diastolic blood pressure) and safety (total adverse events and ankle oedema), were included. Four high-quality RCTs, accounting for 838 patients (436 received manidipine and 402 received amlodipine) were included. The effi cacy of manidipine and amlodipine was statistically equivalent: effect size for DBP =−0.08 (p = 0.22) and SBP =−0.01 (p =0.83).The global safety of manidipine was signifi cantly better than amlodipine: the relative risk (RR) for adverse event was 0.69 (0.56 – 0.85), and particularly for ankle oedema RR was 0.35 (0.22 – 0.54). Publication bias was not signifi cant and the robustness of the analyses was good. These data suggest a better efficacy/safety ratio of manidipine over amlodipine. PMID:20945994

  12. Head-to-Head Comparison of Transcranial Random Noise Stimulation, Transcranial AC Stimulation, and Transcranial DC Stimulation for Tinnitus

    PubMed Central

    Vanneste, Sven; Fregni, Felipe; De Ridder, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    Tinnitus is the perception of a sound in the absence of an external sound stimulus. This phantom sound has been related to plastic changes and hyperactivity in the auditory cortex. Different neuromodulation techniques such as transcranial magnetic stimulation and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) have been used in an attempt to modify local and distant neuroplasticity as to reduce tinnitus symptoms. Recently, two techniques of pulsed electrical stimulation using weak electrical currents – transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) and transcranial random noise stimulation (tRNS) – have also shown significant neuromodulatory effects. In the present study we conducted the first head-to-head comparison of three different transcranial electrical stimulation (tES) techniques, namely tDCS, tACS, and tRNS in 111 tinnitus patients by placing the electrodes overlying the auditory cortex bilaterally. The results demonstrated that tRNS induced the larger transient suppressive effect on the tinnitus loudness and the tinnitus related distress as compared to tDCS and tACS. Both tDCS and tACS induced small and non-significant effects on tinnitus symptoms, supporting the superior effects of tRNS as a method for tinnitus suppression. PMID:24391599

  13. Are head-to-head trials of biologics needed? The role of value of information methods in arthritis research.

    PubMed

    Welton, Nicky J; Madan, Jason; Ades, Anthony E

    2011-09-01

    Reimbursement decisions are typically based on cost-effectiveness analyses. While a cost-effectiveness analysis can identify the optimum strategy, there is usually some degree of uncertainty around this decision. Sources of uncertainty include statistical sampling error in treatment efficacy measures, underlying baseline risk, utility measures and costs, as well as uncertainty in the structure of the model. The optimal strategy is therefore only optimal on average, and a decision to adopt this strategy might still be the wrong decision if all uncertainty could be eliminated. This means that there is a quantifiable expected (average) loss attaching to decisions made under uncertainty, and hence a value in collecting information to reduce that uncertainty. Value of information (VOI) analyses can be used to provide guidance on whether more research would be cost-effective, which particular model inputs (parameters) have the most bearing on decision uncertainty, and can also help with the design and sample size of further research. Here, we introduce the key concepts in VOI analyses, and highlight the inputs required to calculate it. The adoption of the new biologic treatments for RA and PsA tends to be based on placebo-controlled trials. We discuss the possible role of VOI analyses in deciding whether head-to-head comparisons of the biologic therapies should be carried out, illustrating with examples from other fields. We emphasize the need for a model of the natural history of RA and PsA, which reflects a consensus view.

  14. Noninvasive stress testing of myocardial perfusion defects: head-to-head comparison of thallium-201 SPECT to MRI perfusion.

    PubMed

    Vincenti, Gabriella; Nkoulou, René; Steiner, Charles; Imperiano, Hestia; Ambrosio, Giuseppe; Mach, François; Ratib, Osman; Vallee, Jean-Paul; Schindler, Thomas H

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of myocardial perfusion in the assessment of flow-limiting epicardial stenosis in a head-to-head comparison with abnormal thallium-201 ((201)TI) single photon emission tomography (SPECT) studies in patients with predominantly known coronary artery disease (CAD). Twenty-one patients (mean age 65 +/- 10 years) with reversible myocardial perfusion defects on (201)TI-SPECT images during dipyridamole-stimulated hyperemia were recruited for study purpose. Within 5 days of the (201)TI-SPECT study, myocardial perfusion was studied again with MRI during dipyridamole stimulation and at rest. Overall, (201)TI-SPECT identified 30 reversible regional perfusion defects. The sensitivity to detect hypoperfused segments was 70% (21/30) with the GRE-MRI perfusion analysis with (201)TI-SPECT as reference. When patients were subgrouped according to the extent of regional reversible perfusion defects on (201)TI-SPECT, mild- (SDS: 2-4), moderate- (SDS: 5-8), and severe- (SDS > 8) perfusion defects were also identified by GRE-MRI perfusion analysis in 75% (6/8), in 56% (9/16) and 100% (6/6), respectively. GRE-MRI first-pass stress perfusion imaging may not identify up to 30% of mild-to-moderate perfusion defects in a group of preselected patients with predominantly known CAD and abnormal (201)TI-SPECT studies.

  15. Head-To-Head Comparison of Different Solubility-Enabling Formulations of Etoposide and Their Consequent Solubility-Permeability Interplay.

    PubMed

    Beig, Avital; Miller, Jonathan M; Lindley, David; Carr, Robert A; Zocharski, Philip; Agbaria, Riad; Dahan, Arik

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to conduct a head-to-head comparison of different solubility-enabling formulations, and their consequent solubility-permeability interplay. The low-solubility anticancer drug etoposide was formulated in several strengths of four solubility-enabling formulations: hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin, the cosolvent polyethylene glycol 400 (PEG-400), the surfactant sodium lauryl sulfate, and an amorphous solid dispersion formulation. The ability of these formulations to increase the solubility of etoposide was investigated, followed by permeability studies using the parallel artificial membrane permeability assay (PAMPA) and examination of the consequent solubility-permeability interplay. All formulations significantly increased etoposide's apparent solubility. The cyclodextrin-, surfactant-, and cosolvent-based formulations resulted in a concomitant decreased permeability that could be modeled directly from the proportional increase in the apparent solubility. On the contrary, etoposide permeability remained constant when using the ASD formulation, irrespective of the increased apparent solubility provided by the formulation. In conclusion, supersaturation resulting from the amorphous form overcomes the solubility-permeability tradeoff associated with other formulation techniques. Accounting for the solubility-permeability interplay may allow to develop better solubility-enabling formulations, thereby maximizing the overall absorption of lipophilic orally administered drugs. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  16. Relative biological effectiveness of 144 keV neutrons in producing dicentric chromosomes in human lymphocytes compared with 60Co gamma rays under head-to-head conditions.

    PubMed

    Schmid, E; Regulla, D; Guldbakke, S; Schlegel, D; Roos, M

    2002-04-01

    The RBE for neutrons was assessed in a head-to-head experiment in which cultures of lymphocytes from the same male donor were irradiated simultaneously with 144 keV neutrons and with 60Co gamma rays as the reference radiation and evaluated using matched time, culture conditions, and the end point of chromosomal aberrations to avoid potential confounding factors that would influence the outcome of the experiment. In addition, the irradiation time was held constant at 2 h for the high-dose groups for both radiation types, which resulted in rather low dose rates. For the induction of dicentric chromosomes, the exposure to the 144 keV neutrons was found to be almost equally as effective (yield coefficient alpha(dic) = 0.786 +/- 0.066 dicentrics per cell per gray) as that found previously for irradiation with monoenergetic neutrons at 565 keV (alpha(dic) = 0.813 +/- 0.052 dicentrics per cell per gray) under comparable exposure and culture conditions (Radiat. Res. 154, 307-312, 2000). However, the values of the maximum low-dose RBE (RBE(m)) relative to 60Co gamma rays that were determined in the present and previous studies show an insignificant but conspicuous difference: 57.0 +/- 18.8 and 76.0 +/- 29.5, respectively. This difference is mainly due to the difference in the alpha(dic) value of the 60Co gamma rays, the reference radiation, which was 0.0138 +/- 0.0044 Gy(-1) in the present study and 0.0107 +/- 0.0041 Gy(-1) in the previous study. In the present experiment, irradiations with 144 keV neutrons and 60Co gamma rays were both performed at 21 degrees C, while in the earlier experiment irradiations with 565 keV neutrons were performed at 21 degrees C and the corresponding reference irradiation with gamma rays was performed at 37 degrees C. However, the temperature difference between 21 degrees C and 37 degrees C has a minor influence on the yield of chromosomal alterations and hence RBE values. The large cubic PMMA phantom that was used for the gamma irradiations

  17. Inter-scan variability of coronary artery calcium scoring assessed on 64-multidetector computed tomography vs. dual-source computed tomography: a head-to-head comparison.

    PubMed

    Ghadri, Jelena R; Goetti, Robert; Fiechter, Michael; Pazhenkottil, Aju P; Küest, Silke M; Nkoulou, Rene N; Windler, Christina; Buechel, Ronny R; Herzog, Bernhard A; Gaemperli, Oliver; Templin, Christian; Kaufmann, Philipp A

    2011-08-01

    Coronary artery calcium (CAC) scoring has emerged as a tool for risk stratification and potentially for monitoring response to risk factor modification. Therefore, repeat measurements should provide robust results and low inter-scanner variability for allowing meaningful comparison. The purpose of this study was to investigate inter-scanner variability of CAC for Agatston, volume, and mass scores by head-to-head comparison using two different cardiac computed tomography scanners: 64-detector multislice CT (MSCT) and 64-slice dual-source CT (DSCT). Thirty patients underwent CAC measurements on both 64-MSCT (GE LightSpeed XT scanner: 120 kV, 70 mAs, 2.5 mm slices) and 64-DSCT (Siemens Somatom Definition: 120 kV, 80 mAs, 3 mm slices) within <100 days (0-97). Retrospective intra-scan comparison revealed an excellent correlation. The excellent intra-scan (inter-observer) agreement was documented by narrow limits of agreement and a correlation coefficient of variation (COV) of r ≥ 0.99 (P < 0.001) for all CAC scores with a low COV for both scanners (64-MSCT/64-DSCT), i.e. Agatston (2.0/2.1%), mass (3.0/2.0%), and volume (4.7/3.9%). Inter-scanner comparison revealed larger Bland-Altman (BA) limits of agreement, despite high correlation (r ≥ 0.97) for all scores, with COV at 15.1, 21.6, and 44.9% for Agatston, mass, and volume scores. The largest BA limits were observed for volume scores (-1552.8 to 574.2), which was massively improved (-241.0 to 300.4, COV 11.5%) after reanalysing the 64-DSCT scans (Siemens) with GE software/workstation (while Siemens software/workstation does not allow cross-vendor analysis). Phantom measurements confirmed overestimation of volume scores by 'syngo Ca-Scoring' (Siemens) software which should therefore be reviewed (vendor has been notified). Intra- and inter-scan agreement of CAC measurement in a given data set is excellent. Inter-scanner variability is reasonable, particularly for Agatston units in the clinically most relevant range

  18. Widespread Head-to-Head Hydrocarbon Biosynthesis in Bacteria and Role of OleA ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Sukovich, David J.; Seffernick, Jennifer L.; Richman, Jack E.; Gralnick, Jeffrey A.; Wackett, Lawrence P.

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies identified the oleABCD genes involved in head-to-head olefinic hydrocarbon biosynthesis. The present study more fully defined the OleABCD protein families within the thiolase, α/β-hydrolase, AMP-dependent ligase/synthase, and short-chain dehydrogenase superfamilies, respectively. Only 0.1 to 1% of each superfamily represents likely Ole proteins. Sequence analysis based on structural alignments and gene context was used to identify highly likely ole genes. Selected microorganisms from the phyla Verucomicrobia, Planctomyces, Chloroflexi, Proteobacteria, and Actinobacteria were tested experimentally and shown to produce long-chain olefinic hydrocarbons. However, different species from the same genera sometimes lack the ole genes and fail to produce olefinic hydrocarbons. Overall, only 1.9% of 3,558 genomes analyzed showed clear evidence for containing ole genes. The type of olefins produced by different bacteria differed greatly with respect to the number of carbon-carbon double bonds. The greatest number of organisms surveyed biosynthesized a single long-chain olefin, 3,6,9,12,15,19,22,25,28-hentriacontanonaene, that contains nine double bonds. Xanthomonas campestris produced the greatest number of distinct olefin products, 15 compounds ranging in length from C28 to C31 and containing one to three double bonds. The type of long-chain product formed was shown to be dependent on the oleA gene in experiments with Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 ole gene deletion mutants containing native or heterologous oleA genes expressed in trans. A strain deleted in oleABCD and containing oleA in trans produced only ketones. Based on these observations, it was proposed that OleA catalyzes a nondecarboxylative thiolytic condensation of fatty acyl chains to generate a β-ketoacyl intermediate that can decarboxylate spontaneously to generate ketones. PMID:20418421

  19. Lung Cancer Screening with Low Dose CT

    PubMed Central

    Caroline, Chiles

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The announcement of the results of the NLST, showing a 20% reduction in lung-cancer specific mortality with LDCT screening in a high risk population, marked a turning point in lung cancer screening. This was the first time that a randomized controlled trial had shown a mortality reduction with an imaging modality aimed at early detection of lung cancer. Current guidelines endorse LDCT screening for smokers and former smokers ages 55 to 74, with at least a 30 pack year smoking history. Adherence to published algorithms for nodule follow-up is strongly encouraged. Future directions for screening research include risk stratification for selection of the screening population, and improvements in the diagnostic follow-up for indeterminate pulmonary nodules. As with screening for other malignancies, screening for lung cancer with LDCT has revealed that there are indolent lung cancers which may not be fatal. More research is necessary if we are to maximize the risk-benefit ratio in lung cancer screening. PMID:24267709

  20. DPP-4 inhibitors in the management of type 2 diabetes: a critical review of head-to-head trials.

    PubMed

    Scheen, A J

    2012-04-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors offer new options for the management of type 2 diabetes. Direct comparisons with active glucose-lowering comparators in drug-naive patients have demonstrated that DPP-4 inhibitors exert slightly less pronounced HbA(1c) reduction than metformin (with the advantage of better gastrointestinal tolerability) and similar glucose-lowering effects as with a thiazolidinedione (TZD; with the advantage of no weight gain). In metformin-treated patients, gliptins were associated with similar HbA(1c) reductions compared with a sulphonylurea (SU; with the advantage of no weight gain, considerably fewer hypoglycaemic episodes and no need for titration) and a TZD (with the advantage of no weight gain and better overall tolerability). DPP-4 inhibitors also exert clinically relevant glucose-lowering effects compared with a placebo in patients treated with SU or TZD (of potential interest when metformin is either not tolerated or contraindicated), and as oral triple therapy with a good tolerability profile when added to a metformin-SU or pioglitazone-SU combination. Several clinical trials also showed a consistent reduction in HbA(1c) when DPP-4 inhibitors were added to basal insulin therapy, with no increased risk of hypoglycaemia. Because of the complex pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes and the complementary actions of glucose-lowering agents, initial combination of a DPP-4 inhibitor with either metformin or a glitazone may be applied in drug-naive patients, resulting in greater efficacy and similar safety compared with either drug as monotherapy. However, DPP-4 inhibitors were less effective than GLP-1 receptor agonists for reducing HbA(1c) and body weight, but offer the advantage of being easier to use (oral instead of injected administration) and lower in cost. Only one head-to-head trial demonstrated the non-inferiority of saxagliptin vs sitagliptin. Clearly, more trials of direct comparisons between different incretin-based therapies

  1. Image quality of mean temporal arterial and mean temporal portal venous phase images calculated from low dose dynamic volume perfusion CT datasets in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma and pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Henzler, T; Gawlitza, J; Diehl, S; Wilhelm, T; Schoenberg, S O; Jin, Z Y; Xue, H D; Smakic, A

    2016-11-01

    Dynamic volume perfusion CT (dVPCT) provides valuable information on tissue perfusion in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and pancreatic cancer. However, currently dVPCT is often performed in addition to conventional CT acquisitions due to the limited morphologic image quality of dose optimized dVPCT protocols. The aim of this study was to prospectively compare objective and subjective image quality, lesion detectability and radiation dose between mean temporal arterial (mTA) and mean temporal portal venous (mTPV) images calculated from low dose dynamic volume perfusion CT (dVPCT) datasets with linearly blended 120-kVp arterial and portal venous datasets in patients with HCC and pancreatic cancer. All patients gave written informed consent for this institutional review board-approved HIPAA compliant study. 27 consecutive patients (18 men, 9 women, mean age, 69.1 years±9.4) with histologically proven HCC or suspected pancreatic cancer were prospectively enrolled. The study CT protocol included a dVPCT protocol performed with 70 or 80kVp tube voltage (18 spiral acquisitions, 71.2s total acquisition times) and standard dual-energy (90/150kVpSn) arterial and portal venous acquisition performed 25min after the dVPCT. The mTA and mTPV images were manually reconstructed from the 3 to 5 best visually selected single arterial and 3 to 5 best single portal venous phases dVPCT dataset. The linearly blended 120-kVp images were calculated from dual-energy CT (DECT) raw data. Image noise, SNR, and CNR of the liver, abdominal aorta (AA) and main portal vein (PV) were compared between the mTA/mTPV and the linearly blended 120-kVp dual-energy arterial and portal venous datasets, respectively. Subjective image quality was evaluated by two radiologists regarding subjective image noise, sharpness and overall diagnostic image quality using a 5-point Likert Scale. In addition, liver lesion detectability was performed for each liver segment by the two radiologists using the

  2. TU-A-12A-12: Improved Airway Measurement Accuracy for Low Dose Quantitative CT (qCT) Using Statistical (ASIR), at Reduced DFOV, and High Resolution Kernels in a Phantom and Swine Model

    SciTech Connect

    Yadava, G; Imai, Y; Hsieh, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Quantitative accuracy of Iodine Hounsfield Unit (HU) in conventional single-kVp scanning is susceptible to beam-hardening effect. Dual-energy CT has unique capabilities of quantification using monochromatic CT images, but this scanning mode requires the availability of the state-of-the-art CT scanner and, therefore, is limited in routine clinical practice. Purpose of this work was to develop a beam-hardening-correction (BHC) for single-kVp CT that can linearize Iodine projections at any nominal energy, apply this approach to study Iodine response with respect to keV, and compare with dual-energy based monochromatic images obtained from material-decomposition using 80kVp and 140kVp. Methods: Tissue characterization phantoms (Gammex Inc.), containing solid-Iodine inserts of different concentrations, were scanned using GE multi-slice CT scanner at 80, 100, 120, and 140 kVp. A model-based BHC algorithm was developed where Iodine was estimated using re-projection of image volume and corrected through an iterative process. In the correction, the re-projected Iodine was linearized using a polynomial mapping between monochromatic path-lengths at various nominal energies (40 to 140 keV) and physically modeled polychromatic path-lengths. The beam-hardening-corrected 80kVp and 140kVp images (linearized approximately at effective energy of the beam) were used for dual-energy material-decomposition in Water-Iodine basis-pair followed by generation of monochromatic images. Characterization of Iodine HU and noise in the images obtained from singlekVp with BHC at various nominal keV, and corresponding dual-energy monochromatic images, was carried out. Results: Iodine HU vs. keV response from single-kVp with BHC and dual-energy monochromatic images were found to be very similar, indicating that single-kVp data may be used to create material specific monochromatic equivalent using modelbased projection linearization. Conclusion: This approach may enable quantification of

  3. Long-acting methylphenidate formulations in the treatment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: a systematic review of head-to-head studies

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The stimulant methylphenidate (MPH) has been a mainstay of treatment for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) for many years. Owing to the short half-life and the issues associated with multiple daily dosing of immediate-release MPH formulations, a new generation of long-acting MPH formulations has emerged. Direct head-to-head studies of these long-acting MPH formulations are important to facilitate an evaluation of their comparative pharmacokinetics and efficacy; however, to date, relatively few head-to-head studies have been performed. The objective of this systematic review was to compare the evidence available from head-to-head studies of long-acting MPH formulations and provide information that can guide treatment selection. Methods A systematic literature search was conducted in MEDLINE and PsycINFO in March 2012 using the MeSH terms: attention deficit disorder with hyperactivity/drug therapy; methylphenidate/therapeutic use and All Fields: Concerta; Ritalin LA; OROS and ADHD; Medikinet; Equasym XL and ADHD; long-acting methylphenidate; Diffucaps and ADHD; SODAS and methylphenidate. No filters were applied and no language, publication date or publication status limitations were imposed. Articles were selected if the title indicated a comparison of two or more long-acting MPH preparations in human subjects of any age; non-systematic review articles and unpublished data were not included. Results Of 15,295 references returned in the literature search and screened by title, 34 articles were identified for inclusion: nine articles from pharmacokinetic studies (nine studies); nine articles from laboratory school studies (six studies); two articles from randomized controlled trials (two studies); three articles from switching studies (two studies) and three articles from one observational study. Conclusions Emerging head-to-head studies provide important data on the comparative efficacy of the formulations available. At a group level, efficacy

  4. Long-acting methylphenidate formulations in the treatment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: a systematic review of head-to-head studies.

    PubMed

    Coghill, David; Banaschewski, Tobias; Zuddas, Alessandro; Pelaz, Antonio; Gagliano, Antonella; Doepfner, Manfred

    2013-09-27

    The stimulant methylphenidate (MPH) has been a mainstay of treatment for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) for many years. Owing to the short half-life and the issues associated with multiple daily dosing of immediate-release MPH formulations, a new generation of long-acting MPH formulations has emerged. Direct head-to-head studies of these long-acting MPH formulations are important to facilitate an evaluation of their comparative pharmacokinetics and efficacy; however, to date, relatively few head-to-head studies have been performed.The objective of this systematic review was to compare the evidence available from head-to-head studies of long-acting MPH formulations and provide information that can guide treatment selection. A systematic literature search was conducted in MEDLINE and PsycINFO in March 2012 using the MeSH terms: attention deficit disorder with hyperactivity/drug therapy; methylphenidate/therapeutic use and All Fields: Concerta; Ritalin LA; OROS and ADHD; Medikinet; Equasym XL and ADHD; long-acting methylphenidate; Diffucaps and ADHD; SODAS and methylphenidate. No filters were applied and no language, publication date or publication status limitations were imposed. Articles were selected if the title indicated a comparison of two or more long-acting MPH preparations in human subjects of any age; non-systematic review articles and unpublished data were not included. Of 15,295 references returned in the literature search and screened by title, 34 articles were identified for inclusion: nine articles from pharmacokinetic studies (nine studies); nine articles from laboratory school studies (six studies); two articles from randomized controlled trials (two studies); three articles from switching studies (two studies) and three articles from one observational study. Emerging head-to-head studies provide important data on the comparative efficacy of the formulations available. At a group level, efficacy across the day generally follows the

  5. Charge compensation of head-to-head and tail-to-tail domain walls in barium titanate and its influence on conductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Zuo, Yinan; Genenko, Yuri A.; Xu, Bai-Xiang

    2014-07-28

    The effect of the polarization charge compensation by ionic and electronic space charges on domain properties in ferroelectrics with semiconducting features is considered, in particular, the conductivity of head-to-head and tail-to-tail domain walls is studied. It is shown that the domain wall conductivity that is enhanced by electrons or holes depends on the configuration and the types of domains as well as on the energy levels and concentrations of the defects involved. Phase field simulation results are used to explain recent equivocal experimental results on conductivity of charged domain walls in different ferroelectrics.

  6. Effect of a small number of training cases on the performance of massive training artificial neural network (MTANN) for reduction of false positives in computerized detection of lung nodules in low-dose CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Kenji; Armato, Samuel G., III; Li, Feng; Sone, Shusuke; Doi, Kunio

    2003-05-01

    In this study, we investigated a pattern-classification technique which can be trained with a small number of cases with a massive training artificial neural network (MTANN) for reduction of false positives in computerized detection of lung nodules in low-dose CT (LDCT). The MTANN consists of a modified multilayer artificial neural network (ANN), which is capable of operating on image data directly. The MTANN is trained by use of a large number of sub-regions extracted from input images together with the teacher images containing the distribution for the "likelihood of being a nodule." The output image is obtained by scanning of an input image with the MTANN. In the MTANN, the distinction between nodules and non-nodules is treated as an image-processing task, in other words, as a highly nonlinear filter that performs both nodule enhancement and non-nodule suppression. This allows us to train the MTANN not on a case basis, but on a sub-region basis. Therefore, the MTANN can be trained with a very small number of cases. Our database consisted of 101 LDCT scans acquired from 71 patients in a lung cancer screening program. The scans consisted of 2,822 sections, and contained 121 nodules including 104 nodules representing confirmed primary cancers. With our current CAD scheme, a sensitivity of 81.0% (98/121 nodules) with 0.99 false positives per section (2,804/2,822) was achieved. By use of the MTANN trained with a small number of training cases (n=10), i.e., five pairs of nodules and non-nodules, we were able to remove 55.8% of false positives without a reduction in the number of true positives, i.e., a classification sensitivity of 100%. Thus, the false-positive rate of our current CAD scheme was reduced from 0.99 to 0.44 false positive per section, while the current sensitivity (81.0%) was maintained.

  7. Towards the clinical implementation of iterative low-dose cone-beam CT reconstruction in image-guided radiation therapy: Cone/ring artifact correction and multiple GPU implementation

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Hao E-mail: xun.jia@utsouthwestern.edu; Shi, Feng; Jiang, Steve B.; Jia, Xun E-mail: xun.jia@utsouthwestern.edu; Wang, Xiaoyu; Cervino, Laura; Bai, Ti; Folkerts, Michael

    2014-11-01

    , an overall 3.1 × speedup factor has been achieved with four GPU cards compared to a single GPU-based reconstruction. The total computation time is ∼30 s for typical clinical cases. Conclusions: The authors have developed a low-dose CBCT IR system for IGRT. By incorporating data consistency-based weighting factors in the IR model, cone/ring artifacts can be mitigated. A boost in computational efficiency is achieved by multi-GPU implementation.

  8. Towards the clinical implementation of iterative low-dose cone-beam CT reconstruction in image-guided radiation therapy: Cone/ring artifact correction and multiple GPU implementation

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Hao; Wang, Xiaoyu; Shi, Feng; Bai, Ti; Folkerts, Michael; Cervino, Laura; Jiang, Steve B.; Jia, Xun

    2014-01-01

    , an overall 3.1 × speedup factor has been achieved with four GPU cards compared to a single GPU-based reconstruction. The total computation time is ∼30 s for typical clinical cases. Conclusions: The authors have developed a low-dose CBCT IR system for IGRT. By incorporating data consistency-based weighting factors in the IR model, cone/ring artifacts can be mitigated. A boost in computational efficiency is achieved by multi-GPU implementation. PMID:25370645

  9. WE-G-18A-01: JUNIOR INVESTIGATOR WINNER - Low-Dose C-Arm Cone-Beam CT with Model-Based Image Reconstruction for High-Quality Guidance of Neurosurgical Intervention

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, A; Stayman, J; Otake, Y; Gallia, G; Siewerdsen, J

    2014-06-15

    improvement in image quality, dose reduction, and reconstruction time of ∼4 min will enable practical deployment of low-dose C-arm CBCT within the operating room. AAPM Research Seed Funding (2013-2014); NIH Fellowship F32EB017571; Siemens Healthcare (XP Division)

  10. Stable p-type conduction from Sb-decorated head-to-head basal plane inversion domain boundaries in ZnO nanowires.

    PubMed

    Yankovich, Andrew B; Puchala, Brian; Wang, Fei; Seo, Jung-Hun; Morgan, Dane; Wang, Xudong; Ma, Zhenqiang; Kvit, Alex V; Voyles, Paul M

    2012-03-14

    We report that Sb-decorated head-to-head (H-H) basal plane inversion domain boundaries (b-IDBs) lead to stable p-type conduction in Sb-doped ZnO nanowires (NWs) due to Sb and O codoping. Aberration-corrected Z-contrast scanning transmission electron microscopy shows that all of the Sb in the NWs is incorporated into H-H b-IDBs just under the (0001) NW growth surfaces and the (0001) bottom facets of interior voids. Density functional theory calculations show that the extra basal plane of O per H-H b-IDB makes them electron acceptors. NWs containing these defects exhibited stable p-type behavior in a single NW FET over 18 months. This new mechanism for p-type conduction in ZnO offers the potential of ZnO NW based p-n homojunction devices. © 2012 American Chemical Society

  11. Head-to-head comparisons of metabolic side effects of second generation antipsychotics in the treatment of schizophrenia: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Rummel-Kluge, Christine; Komossa, Katja; Schwarz, Sandra; Hunger, Heike; Schmid, Franziska; Lobos, Claudia Asenjo; Kissling, Werner; Davis, John M; Leucht, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    Objective The metabolic side effects of second-generation antipsychotics (SGA) are serious and have not been compared head to head in a meta-analysis. We conducted a meta-analysis of studies comparing the metabolic side effects of the following SGAs head-to-head: amisulpride, aripiprazole, clozapine, olanzapine, quetiapine, risperidone, sertindole, ziprasidone, zotepine. Method We searched the register of the Cochrane schizophrenia group (last search May 2007), supplemented by MEDLINE and EMBASE (last search January 2009) for randomized, blinded studies comparing the above mentioned SGA in the treatment of schizophrenia or related disorders. At least three reviewers extracted the data independently. The primary outcome was weight change. We also assessed changes of cholesterol and glucose. The results were combined in a meta-analysis. Results We included 48 studies with 105 relevant arms. Olanzapine produced more weight gain than all other second-generation antipsychotics except for clozapine where no difference was found. Clozapine produced more weight gain than risperidone, risperidone more than amisulpride, and sertindole more than risperidone. Olanzapine produced more cholesterol increase than aripiprazole, risperidone and ziprasidone. (No differences with amisulpride, clozapine and quetiapine were found). Quetiapine produced more cholesterol increase than risperidone and ziprasidone. Olanzapine produced more increase in glucose than amisulpride, aripiprazole, quetiapine, risperidone and ziprasidone; no difference was found with clozapine. Conclusions Some SGAs lead to substantially more metabolic side effects than other SGAs. When choosing an SGA for an individual patient these side effects with their potential cause of secondary diseases must be weighed against efficacy and characteristics of the individual patient. PMID:20692814

  12. Asbestos Surveillance Program Aachen (ASPA): initial results from baseline screening for lung cancer in asbestos-exposed high-risk individuals using low-dose multidetector-row CT.

    PubMed

    Das, Marco; Mühlenbruch, Georg; Mahnken, Andreas H; Hering, K G; Sirbu, H; Zschiesche, W; Knoll, Lars; Felten, Michael K; Kraus, Thomas; Günther, Rolf W; Wildberger, Joachim E

    2007-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of lung cancer in a high-risk asbestos-exposed cohort using low-dose MDCT. Of a population of 5,389 former power-plant workers, 316 were characterized as individuals at highest risk for lung cancer according to a lung-cancer risk model including age, asbestos exposure and smoking habits. Of these 316, 187 (mean age: 66.6 years) individuals were included in a prospective trial. Mean asbestos exposure time was 29.65 years and 89% were smokers. Screening was performed on a 16-slice MDCT (Siemens) with low-dose technique (10/20 mAs(eff.); 1 mm/0.5 mm increment). In addition to soft copy PACS reading analysis on a workstation with a dedicated lung analysis software (LungCARE; Siemens) was performed. One strongly suspicious mass and eight cases of histologically proven lung cancer were found plus 491 additional pulmonary nodules (average volume: 40.72 ml, average diameter 4.62 mm). Asbestos-related changes (pleural plaques, fibrosis) were visible in 80 individuals. Lung cancer screening in this high-risk cohort showed a prevalence of lung cancer of 4.28% (8/187) at baseline screening with an additional large number of indeterminate pulmonary nodules. Low-dose MDCT proved to be feasible in this highly selected population.

  13. Head-to-head comparison of the diagnostic performance of coronary computed tomography angiography and dobutamine-stress echocardiography in the evaluation of acute chest pain with normal ECG findings and negative troponin tests: A prospective multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Durand, Eric; Bauer, Fabrice; Mansencal, Nicolas; Azarine, Arshid; Diebold, Benoit; Hagege, Albert; Perdrix, Ludivine; Gilard, Martine; Jobic, Yannick; Eltchaninoff, Hélène; Bensalah, Mourad; Dubourg, Benjamin; Caudron, Jérôme; Niarra, Ralph; Chatellier, Gilles; Dacher, Jean-Nicolas; Mousseaux, Elie

    2017-08-15

    To perform a head-to-head comparison of coronary CT angiography (CCTA) and dobutamine-stress echocardiography (DSE) in patients presenting recent chest pain when troponin and ECG are negative. Two hundred seventeen patients with recent chest pain, normal ECG findings, and negative troponin were prospectively included in this multicenter study and were scheduled for CCTA and DSE. Invasive coronary angiography (ICA), was performed in patients when either DSE or CCTA was considered positive or when both were non-contributive or in case of recurrent chest pain during 6month follow-up. The presence of coronary artery stenosis was defined as a luminal obstruction >50% diameter in any coronary segment at ICA. ICA was performed in 75 (34.6%) patients. Coronary artery stenosis was identified in 37 (17%) patients. For CCTA, the sensitivity was 96.9% (95% CI 83.4-99.9), specificity 48.3% (29.4-67.5), positive likelihood ratio 2.06 (95% CI 1.36-3.11), and negative likelihood ratio 0.07 (95% CI 0.01-0.52). The sensitivity of DSE was 51.6% (95% CI 33.1-69.9), specificity 46.7% (28.3-65.7), positive likelihood ratio 1.03 (95% CI 0.62-1.72), and negative likelihood ratio 1.10 (95% CI 0.63-1.93). The CCTA: DSE ratio of true-positive and false-positive rates was 1.70 (95% CI 1.65-1.75) and 1.00 (95% CI 0.91-1.09), respectively, when non-contributive CCTA and DSE were both considered positive. Only one missed acute coronary syndrome was observed at six months. CCTA has higher diagnostic performance than DSE in the evaluation of patients with recent chest pain, normal ECG findings, and negative troponine to exclude coronary artery disease. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Head-to-head comparison of statins versus fibrates in reducing plasma fibrinogen concentrations: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Sahebkar, Amirhossein; Serban, Maria-Corina; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P; Toth, Peter P; Muntner, Paul; Ursoniu, Sorin; Mosterou, Svetlana; Glasser, Stephen; Martin, Seth S; Jones, Steven R; Rizzo, Manfredi; Rysz, Jacek; Sniderman, Allan D; Pencina, Michael J; Banach, Maciej

    2016-01-01

    Several studies suggest differences between fibrates and statins in lowering plasma fibrinogen (Fib) concentrations, but the evidence is not definitive. Therefore, the aim of this meta-analysis of head-to-head randomized trials was to compare the efficacy of statins and fibrates on plasma Fib concentrations. The literature search included Medline, Scopus, and Web of Science up to February 1st, 2015, to identify head-to-head comparative randomized trials investigating the efficacy of fibrates vs statins on plasma Fib concentrations. In total 22 trials with 2762 participants were included to the meta-analysis. Random-effect meta-analysis suggested a significantly greater effect of fibrates vs statins in lowering plasma Fib concentrations (weighted mean difference [WMD]: -40.7mg/dL, 95% confidence interval [CI]: -55.2, -26.3, p<0.001). When the analysis was stratified according to the type of fibrate administered, there were significant Fib-lowering effects with both bezafibrate (n=8 treatment arms; WMD: -23.7mg/dL, 95% CI: -41.8, -5.7, p=0.01) and fenofibrate (n=15 treatment arms; WMD: -43.7mg/dL, 95% CI: -61.3, -26.2, p<0.001). Overall, there was a numerically greater effect in the subgroup of trials with ≥12 weeks duration (n=17 treatment arms; WMD: -42.7mg/dL, 95% CI: -60.3, -25.1, p<0.001) compared with the subgroup of trials lasting <12 weeks (n=7 treatment arms; WMD: -36.7mg/dL, 95% CI: -52.0, -21.4, p<0.001). Monotherapy with either fibrates or statins suggested a significantly greater effect of fibrates in lowering plasma Fib concentrations. According to these findings, mechanisms associated with fibrinogen metabolism might be responsible for the distinct effects of statins and fibrates in reducing cardiovascular endpoints. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Head-to-head comparison of 2 myocardial fibrosis biomarkers for long-term heart failure risk stratification: ST2 versus galectin-3.

    PubMed

    Bayes-Genis, Antoni; de Antonio, Marta; Vila, Joan; Peñafiel, Judith; Galán, Amparo; Barallat, Jaume; Zamora, Elisabet; Urrutia, Agustin; Lupón, Josep

    2014-01-21

    ST2 and galectin-3 (Gal-3) were compared head-to-head for long-term risk stratification in an ambulatory heart failure (HF) population on top of other risk factors including N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide. ST2 and Gal-3 are promising biomarkers of myocardial fibrosis and remodeling in HF. This cohort study included 876 patients (median age: 70 years, median left ventricular ejection fraction: 34%). The 2 biomarkers were evaluated relative to conventional assessment (11 risk factors) plus N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide in terms of discrimination, calibration, and reclassification analysis. Endpoints were 5-year all-cause and cardiovascular mortality, and the combined all-cause death/HF hospitalization. During a median follow-up of 4.2 years (5.9 for alive patients), 392 patients died. In bivariate analysis, Gal-3 and ST2 were independent variables for all endpoints. In multivariate analysis, only ST2 remained independently associated with cardiovascular mortality (hazard ratio: 1.27, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.05 to 1.53, p = 0.014). Incorporation of ST2 into a full-adjusted model for all-cause mortality (including clinical variables and N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide) improved discrimination (C-statistic: 0.77, p = 0.004) and calibration, and reclassified significantly better (integrated discrimination improvement: 1.5, 95% CI: 0.5 to 2.5, p = 0.003; net reclassification index: 9.4, 95% CI: 4.8 to 14.1, p < 0.001). Incorporation of Gal-3 showed no significant increase in discrimination or reclassification and worse calibration metrics. On direct model comparison, ST2 was superior to Gal-3. Head-to-head comparison of fibrosis biomarkers ST2 and Gal-3 in chronic HF revealed superiority of ST2 over Gal-3 in risk stratification. The incremental predictive contribution of Gal-3 to existing clinical risk factors was trivial. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Remission, dropouts, and adverse drug reaction rates in major depressive disorder: a meta-analysis of head-to-head trials.

    PubMed

    Machado, Márcio; Iskedjian, Michael; Ruiz, Inés; Einarson, Thomas R

    2006-09-01

    To summarize remission rates and dropouts due to adverse drug reactions (ADRs) or lack of efficacy (LoE) of serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs), selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), and tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) in treating major depressive disorder. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, IPA, and the Cochrane International Library from 1980-2005. Meta-analysis summarized outcomes from head-to-head randomized clinical trials comparing >or= 2 drugs from three antidepressants classes (SNRIs, and/or SSRIs, and/or TCAs) followed by >or= 6 weeks of treatment. Remission was a final Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD) score head-to-head trials with 2458 patients. SNRIs had the highest ITT remission rate (49.0%), then TCAs (44.1%), and SSRIs (37.7%) (p > 0.05 for SNRIs versus TCAs; p < 0.001 for TCAs versus SSRIs and SNRIs versus SSRIs). When categorized as inpatients (n = 582) and outpatients (n = 1613), SNRIs had the highest remission rates (52.0% for 144 inpatients and 49.3% for 559 outpatients). SNRIs had lowest overall dropouts (26.1%), followed by SSRIs (28.4%), and TCAs (35.7%). Dropouts due to ADRs and LoE were 10.3% and 6.2% for SNRIs, 8.3% and 7.2% for SSRIs, and 19.8% and 9.9% for TCAs, respectively (p > 0.05 for ADR dropouts only). One limitation was the inclusion of only venlafaxine-XR; results may not be the same for immediate release forms. In addition, few studies reported remission rates. SNRIs had the highest efficacy remission rates (statistically significant for inpatients and outpatients), and the lowest overall dropout rates, suggesting clinical superiority in treating major depression.

  17. Reduced lung-cancer mortality with low-dose computed tomographic screening.

    PubMed

    Aberle, Denise R; Adams, Amanda M; Berg, Christine D; Black, William C; Clapp, Jonathan D; Fagerstrom, Richard M; Gareen, Ilana F; Gatsonis, Constantine; Marcus, Pamela M; Sicks, JoRean D

    2011-08-04

    The aggressive and heterogeneous nature of lung cancer has thwarted efforts to reduce mortality from this cancer through the use of screening. The advent of low-dose helical computed tomography (CT) altered the landscape of lung-cancer screening, with studies indicating that low-dose CT detects many tumors at early stages. The National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) was conducted to determine whether screening with low-dose CT could reduce mortality from lung cancer. From August 2002 through April 2004, we enrolled 53,454 persons at high risk for lung cancer at 33 U.S. medical centers. Participants were randomly assigned to undergo three annual screenings with either low-dose CT (26,722 participants) or single-view posteroanterior chest radiography (26,732). Data were collected on cases of lung cancer and deaths from lung cancer that occurred through December 31, 2009. The rate of adherence to screening was more than 90%. The rate of positive screening tests was 24.2% with low-dose CT and 6.9% with radiography over all three rounds. A total of 96.4% of the positive screening results in the low-dose CT group and 94.5% in the radiography group were false positive results. The incidence of lung cancer was 645 cases per 100,000 person-years (1060 cancers) in the low-dose CT group, as compared with 572 cases per 100,000 person-years (941 cancers) in the radiography group (rate ratio, 1.13; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.03 to 1.23). There were 247 deaths from lung cancer per 100,000 person-years in the low-dose CT group and 309 deaths per 100,000 person-years in the radiography group, representing a relative reduction in mortality from lung cancer with low-dose CT screening of 20.0% (95% CI, 6.8 to 26.7; P=0.004). The rate of death from any cause was reduced in the low-dose CT group, as compared with the radiography group, by 6.7% (95% CI, 1.2 to 13.6; P=0.02). Screening with the use of low-dose CT reduces mortality from lung cancer. (Funded by the National Cancer

  18. Ventilation-perfusion SPECT with 99mTc-DTPA versus Technegas: a head-to-head study in obstructive and nonobstructive disease.

    PubMed

    Jögi, Jonas; Jonson, Björn; Ekberg, Marie; Bajc, Marika

    2010-05-01

    Lung scintigraphy is primarily used to diagnose pulmonary embolism. Ventilation imaging is often performed using (99m)Tc-DTPA or Technegas, an ultrafine dispersion of (99m)Tc-labeled carbon. Despite the common use of these radioaerosols, they have not been compared in an intraindividual study, and not with ventilation-perfusion (V/P) SPECT. The aim of the present head-to-head study was to systematically investigate differences in ventilation studies performed with (99m)Tc-diethylenetriaminepentaacetate (DTPA) and Technegas. Sixty-three patients, 28 without and 35 with obstructive lung disease, were examined with V/P SPECT using both (99m)Tc-DTPA and Technegas. V/P SPECT images were randomized and assessed independently by 2 masked physicians according to a predefined scoring system. A paired comparison was performed using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. In both obstructive and nonobstructive disease, the overall unevenness of radiotracer deposition and the degree of central deposition were more pronounced in (99m)Tc-DTPA than Technegas studies. Because of better peripheral penetration, the extent of reverse mismatch was less when Technegas was used. Additionally, in obstructive disease, the degree of focal deposition in distal airways was more pronounced with (99m)Tc-DTPA. Mismatched perfusion defects were more frequently found with Technegas in obstructive disease. This intraindividual comparative study shows that Technegas is the preferred radioaerosol, particularly in obstructive disease.

  19. Two-dimensional electron gases at head-to-head and tail-to-tail domain walls in ferroelectric thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Fernández, Pablo; Íñiguez, Jorge; Junquera, Javier

    Symmetry breaking at ferroelectric domain walls gives rise to new physical properties, offering the opportunity to use the domain walls themselves as a functional separate object in a device. One example is the appearance of an enhanced conductivity at the boundaries between ferroelectric domains in oxides. A realistic first-principles simulation of the domains walls is limited to highly-symmetric cleanly-cut walls in order to keep the number of atoms in the simulation box small. Here we use a recently developed second-principles method that treats all the lattice degrees of freedom and the relevant electronic ones on the same foot with high accuracy at a modest computational cost. We apply it to the demading physical problem of head-to-head (HH) and tail-to-tail (TT) domain walls in ferroelectric PbTiO3 thin films. These interfaces present a large and unfavourable electrostatic energy due to the polarization-induced bound charge at the domain wall. An accurate simulation should capture eventual charge transfers between the walls, and the concomitant electron-lattice coupling. We show how the polarization discontinuity in HH and TT domain walls in PbTiO3 thin films can be effectively screened by the formation of two-dimensional electron gases of electrons and holes. Finantial support from MINECO Grant No. FIS2012-37549-C05-04.

  20. H3N2 Mismatch of 2014-15 Northern Hemisphere Influenza Vaccines and Head-to-head Comparison between Human and Ferret Antisera derived Antigenic Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Hang; Wan, Xiu-Feng; Ye, Zhiping; Plant, Ewan P.; Zhao, Yangqing; Xu, Yifei; Li, Xing; Finch, Courtney; Zhao, Nan; Kawano, Toshiaki; Zoueva, Olga; Chiang, Meng-Jung; Jing, Xianghong; Lin, Zhengshi; Zhang, Anding; Zhu, Yanhong

    2015-10-01

    The poor performance of 2014-15 Northern Hemisphere (NH) influenza vaccines was attributed to mismatched H3N2 component with circulating epidemic strains. Using human serum samples collected from 2009-10, 2010-11 and 2014-15 NH influenza vaccine trials, we assessed their cross-reactive hemagglutination inhibition (HAI) antibody responses against recent H3 epidemic isolates. All three populations (children, adults, and older adults) vaccinated with the 2014-15 NH egg- or cell-based vaccine, showed >50% reduction in HAI post-vaccination geometric mean titers against epidemic H3 isolates from those against egg-grown H3 vaccine strain A/Texas/50/2012 (TX/12e). The 2014-15 NH vaccines, regardless of production type, failed to further extend HAI cross-reactivity against H3 epidemic strains from previous seasonal vaccines. Head-to-head comparison between ferret and human antisera derived antigenic maps revealed different antigenic patterns among representative egg- and cell-grown H3 viruses characterized. Molecular modeling indicated that the mutations of epidemic H3 strains were mainly located in antibody-binding sites A and B as compared with TX/12e. To improve vaccine strain selection, human serologic testing on vaccination-induced cross-reactivity need be emphasized along with virus antigenic characterization by ferret model.

  1. CT Colonography (Virtual Colonoscopy)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Z CT Colonography Computed tomography (CT) colonography or virtual colonoscopy uses special x-ray equipment to examine ... and blood vessels. CT colonography, also known as virtual colonoscopy, uses low dose radiation CT scanning to ...

  2. Low Dose Risk, Decisions, and Risk Communication

    SciTech Connect

    Flynn, James

    2002-09-14

    The overall research objective was to establish new levels of information about how people, groups, and communities respond to low dose radiation exposure. This is basic research into the social psychology of individual, group, and community responses to radiation exposures. The results of this research are directed to improving risk communication and public participation in management of environmental problems resulting from low dose radiation.

  3. Low Dose Effects in Psychopharmacology: Ontogenetic Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Spear, Linda Patia; Varlinskaya, Elena I.

    2005-01-01

    Low doses of psychoactive drugs often elicit a behavioral profile opposite to that observed following administration of more substantial doses. Our laboratory has observed that these effects are often age-specific in rats. For instance, whereas moderate to high doses of the dopamine agonist apomorphine increase locomotion, suppressed locomotor activity is seen following low dose exposure, with this low dose effect not emerging consistently until adolescence. A somewhat earlier emergence of a low dose “paradoxical” effect is seen with the 5HT1a receptor agonist, 8-OH-DPAT, with late preweanling, but not neonatal, rats showing increases in ingestive behavior at low doses but suppression at higher doses. In contrast to these ontogenetic increases in expression of low dose drug effects, low dose facilitation of social behavior is seen following ethanol only in adolescent rats and not their mature counterparts, although suppression of social interactions at higher doses is seen at both ages. This hormesis-like low dose stimulation appears related in part to overcompensation, with brief social suppression preceding the subsequent stimulation response, and also bears a number of ontogenetic similarities to acute tolerance, a well characterized, rapidly emerging adaptation to ethanol. Implications of these and other ontogenetic findings for studies of hormesis are discussed. PMID:19330157

  4. Low-dose head computed tomography in children: a single institutional experience in pediatric radiation risk reduction: clinical article.

    PubMed

    Morton, Ryan P; Reynolds, Renee M; Ramakrishna, Rohan; Levitt, Michael R; Hopper, Richard A; Lee, Amy; Browd, Samuel R

    2013-10-01

    In this study, the authors describe their experience with a low-dose head CT protocol for a preselected neurosurgical population at a dedicated pediatric hospital (Seattle Children's Hospital), the largest number of patients with this protocol reported to date. All low-dose head CT scans between October 2011 and November 2012 were reviewed. Two different low-dose radiation dosages were used, at one-half or one-quarter the dose of a standard head CT scan, based on patient characteristics agreed upon by the neurosurgery and radiology departments. Patient information was also recorded, including diagnosis and indication for CT scan. Six hundred twenty-four low-dose head CT procedures were performed within the 12-month study period. Although indications for the CT scans varied, the most common reason was to evaluate the ventricles and catheter placement in hydrocephalic patients with shunts (70%), followed by postoperative craniosynostosis imaging (12%). These scans provided adequate diagnostic imaging, and no patient required a follow-up full-dose CT scan as a result of poor image quality on a low-dose CT scan. Overall physician comfort and satisfaction with interpretation of the images was high. An additional 2150 full-dose head CT scans were performed during the same 12-month time period, making the total number of CT scans 2774. This value compares to 3730 full-dose head CT scans obtained during the year prior to the study when low-dose CT and rapid-sequence MRI was not a reliable option at Seattle Children's Hospital. Thus, over a 1-year period, 22% of the total CT scans were able to be converted to low-dose scans, and full-dose CT scans were able to be reduced by 42%. The implementation of a low-dose head CT protocol substantially reduced the amount of ionizing radiation exposure in a preselected population of pediatric neurosurgical patients. Image quality and diagnostic utility were not significantly compromised.

  5. Qualify: a randomized head-to-head study of aripiprazole once-monthly and paliperidone palmitate in the treatment of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Naber, Dieter; Hansen, Karina; Forray, Carlos; Baker, Ross A; Sapin, Christophe; Beillat, Maud; Peters-Strickland, Timothy; Nylander, Anna-Greta; Hertel, Peter; Andersen, Henrik Steen; Eramo, Anna; Loze, Jean-Yves; Potkin, Steven G

    2015-10-01

    To directly compare aripiprazole once-monthly 400mg (AOM 400) and paliperidone palmitate once-monthly (PP) on the Heinrichs-Carpenter Quality-of-Life Scale (QLS), a validated health-related quality of life and functioning measure in schizophrenia. This 28-week, randomized, non-inferiority, open-label, rater-blinded, head-to-head study (QUALIFY) of AOM 400 and PP in adult patients (18-60 years) comprised oral conversion, initiation of AOM 400 or PP treatment, and continuation with intramuscular injections every 4weeks. The primary endpoint assessed non-inferiority and superiority on QLS total score analyzed using a mixed model for repeated measurements. Of 295 randomized patients, 100/148 (67.6%) of AOM 400 and 83/147 (56.5%) of PP patients completed 28weeks of treatment. A statistically significant least squares mean difference in change from baseline to week 28 on QLS total score (4.67 [95%CI: 0.32;9.02], p=0.036) confirmed non-inferiority and established superiority of AOM 400 vs PP. There were also significant improvements in Clinical Global Impression - Severity scale and the Investigator's Assessment Questionnaire for AOM 400 vs PP, and pre-defined sub-group analyses revealed a consistent pattern of significance favoring AOM 400 in patients ≤35years. Common treatment-emergent adverse events in the treatment continuation phase were more frequent with PP vs AOM 400, and adverse events were the most frequent reason for discontinuation (27/137 [19.7%] for PP and 16/144 [11.1%] for AOM 400). All-cause discontinuation was numerically lower with AOM 400. Superior improvements on clinician-rated health-related quality of life and a favorable tolerability profile suggest greater overall effectiveness for aripiprazole once-monthly vs paliperidone palmitate. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier:NCT01795547. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. A six year head-to-head comparison of osteopathic and allopathic applicants to a university-based, allopathic general surgery residency.

    PubMed

    Schlitzkus, Lisa L; Clark, Christopher J; Agle, Steven C; Schenarts, Paul J

    2012-01-01

    The number of osteopathic physicians is increasing as is the number applying to allopathic general surgery residency programs. A lack of knowledge of osteopathic schooling leads to a potential applicant bias in favor of allopathic applicants, but the 2 groups have not been compared head to head. Applications over a 6-year period to an allopathic general surgery residency program were reviewed. Demographics, examination scores, employment, education, and research experience were catalogued into a database. Allopathic applicants were compared with osteopathic applicants utilizing statistical analysis. A university teaching hospital. Allopathic and osteopathic applicants to an allopathic general surgery residency program. A total of 1290 applications were reviewed; 1155 allopathic and 135 osteopathic applications. Other than race, the 2 cohorts are similar in age, gender, and citizenship. The groups are not significantly different with regard to the number of letter of recommendations, volunteer activities, scholarly works, and advanced degrees. Graduates of both proceed directly to residency. A significantly higher percentage of allopathic graduates reported their United States medical licensing examination (USMLE) scores, yet when osteopaths released their USMLE transcript, they scored significantly higher on the USMLE Step 1 examination and required fewer attempts to pass. These differences do not apply to the USMLE Step 2 examination. No single screening tool exists for selecting a successful general surgery resident. We are seeing increased numbers of osteopathic applicants. Many criteria used to evaluate applicants do not apply to osteopathic applicants, but our comparison of common selection variables on the Electronic Residency Application Service (ERAS) application did not demonstrate an overall difference. While our analysis demonstrated a statistically higher USMLE Step 1 score by osteopathic applicants, they may only self-report favorable data. Copyright

  7. Is investigator background related to outcome in head to head trials of psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy for adult depression? A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Cristea, Ioana A; Gentili, Claudio; Pietrini, Pietro; Cuijpers, Pim

    2017-01-01

    The influence of factors related to the background of investigators conducting trials comparing psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy has remained largely unstudied. Specializations emphasizing biological determinants of mental disorders, like psychiatry, might favor pharmacotherapy, while others stressing psychosocial factors, like psychology, could promote psychotherapy. Yet financial conflict of interest (COI) could be a confounding factor as authors with a medical specialization might receive more sponsoring from the pharmaceutical industry. We conducted a meta-analysis with subgroup and meta-regression analysis examining whether the specialization and affiliation of trial authors were associated to outcomes in the direct comparison of psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy for the acute treatment of depression. Meta-regression analysis also included trial risk of bias and author conflict of interest in relationship to the pharmaceutical industry. We included 45 trials. In half, the first author was psychologist. The last author was psychiatrist/MD in half of the trials, and a psychologist or statistician/other technical in the rest. Most lead authors had medical affiliations. Subgroup analysis indicated that studies with last authors statisticians favored pharmacotherapy. Univariate analysis showed a negative relationship between the presence of statisticians and outcomes favoring psychotherapy. Multivariate analysis showed that trials including authors with financial COI reported findings more favorable to pharmacotherapy. We report the first detailed overview of the background of authors conducting head to head trials for depression. Trials co-authored by statisticians appear to subtly favor pharmacotherapy. Receiving funding from the industry is more closely related to finding better outcomes for the industry's elective treatment than are factors related to authors' background. For a minority of authors we could not retrieve background information. The number of

  8. Is investigator background related to outcome in head to head trials of psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy for adult depression? A systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gentili, Claudio; Pietrini, Pietro; Cuijpers, Pim

    2017-01-01

    Background The influence of factors related to the background of investigators conducting trials comparing psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy has remained largely unstudied. Specializations emphasizing biological determinants of mental disorders, like psychiatry, might favor pharmacotherapy, while others stressing psychosocial factors, like psychology, could promote psychotherapy. Yet financial conflict of interest (COI) could be a confounding factor as authors with a medical specialization might receive more sponsoring from the pharmaceutical industry. Method We conducted a meta-analysis with subgroup and meta-regression analysis examining whether the specialization and affiliation of trial authors were associated to outcomes in the direct comparison of psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy for the acute treatment of depression. Meta-regression analysis also included trial risk of bias and author conflict of interest in relationship to the pharmaceutical industry. Results We included 45 trials. In half, the first author was psychologist. The last author was psychiatrist/MD in half of the trials, and a psychologist or statistician/other technical in the rest. Most lead authors had medical affiliations. Subgroup analysis indicated that studies with last authors statisticians favored pharmacotherapy. Univariate analysis showed a negative relationship between the presence of statisticians and outcomes favoring psychotherapy. Multivariate analysis showed that trials including authors with financial COI reported findings more favorable to pharmacotherapy. Discussion We report the first detailed overview of the background of authors conducting head to head trials for depression. Trials co-authored by statisticians appear to subtly favor pharmacotherapy. Receiving funding from the industry is more closely related to finding better outcomes for the industry’s elective treatment than are factors related to authors’ background. Limitations For a minority of authors we could

  9. Pharmacoeconomic comparison of aripiprazole once-monthly and paliperidone palmitate from a head-to-head clinical trial in schizophrenia: a US analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sapin, Christophe; Hartry, Ann; Kamat, Siddhesh A.; Beillat, Maud; Baker, Ross A.; Eramo, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Schizophrenia presents a substantial clinical and economic burden to the health-care system. In QUAlity of LIfe with AbiliFY Maintena (QUALIFY), a randomized head-to-head study of aripiprazole once-monthly 400 mg (AOM 400) compared with paliperidone palmitate (PP; 78–234 mg/mo), AOM 400 demonstrated greater improvement in health-related quality of life and functioning in patients with stable schizophrenia. The present analysis used health economics assessment data collected during the QUALIFY study to determine the direct medical and pharmacy costs and the cost-effectiveness associated with each treatment over 6 months. Compared with those receiving PP, patients receiving AOM 400 incurred significantly lower direct total costs ($8908±186 vs $9675±190, p=0.005) and treatment costs ($7967±113 vs $8706±116, p<0.001). Effectiveness results in the subset of patients included in the cost analyses were similar to the overall population: mean (95% CI) improvement in Heinrichs-Carpenter Quality of Life Scale total score was greater with AOM 400 (5.97 [3.87; 8.08]) compared with PP (2.85 [0.56; 5.08]). Likewise, Clinical Global Impression–Severity improved more in the AOM 400 group (−0.59 [−0.71; −0.47]) compared with PP group (−0.37 [−0.46; −0.27]). Therefore, the analysis of data from stabilized patients with schizophrenia in the QUALIFY study indicated that AOM 400 is associated with lower health-care costs and greater effectiveness compared with PP and thus represents the economically dominant strategy. PMID:27708677

  10. A head-to-head hands-on comparison of ERCP mechanical simulator (EMS) and Ex-vivo Porcine Stomach Model (PSM).

    PubMed

    Leung, Joseph W; Wang, Dong; Hu, Bing; Lim, Brian; Leung, Felix W

    2011-07-01

    BACKGROUND: ERCP mechanical simulator (EMS) and ex-vivo porcine stomach model (PSM) have been described. No direct comparison was reported on endoscopists' perception regarding their efficacy for ERCP training OBJECTIVE: Comparative assessment of EMS and PSM. DESIGN: Questionnaire survey before and after practice. SETTING: Hands-on practice workshops. SUBJECTS: 22 endoscopists with prior experience in 111±225 (mean±SD) ERCP. INTERVENTIONS: Participants performed scope insertion, selective bile duct cannulation with guide wire and insertion of a single biliary stent. Simulated fluoroscopy with external pin-hole camera (EMS), or with additional transillumination (PSM) was used to monitor exchange of accessories. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Participants rated their understanding and confidence before and after hands-on practice, and credibility of each simulator for ERCP training. Comparative efficacy of EMS and PSM for ERCP education was scored (1=not, 10=very) based on pre and post practice surveys: realism (tissue pliability, papilla anatomy, visual/cannulation realism, wire manipulation, simulated fluoroscopy, overall experience); usefulness (assessment of results, supplementing clinical experience, easy for trainees to learn new skills) and application (overall ease of use, prepare trainees to use real instrument and ease of incorporation into training). RESULTS: Before hands-on practice, both EMS and PSM received high scores. After practice, there was a significantly greater increase in confidence score for EMS than PSM (p<0.003). Participants found EMS more useful for training (p=0.017). LIMITATIONS: Subjective scores. CONCLUSIONS: Based on head-to-head hands-on comparison, endoscopists considered both EMS and PSM credible options for improving understanding and supplementing clinical ERCP training. EMS is more useful for basic learning.

  11. A randomized head to head trial of MoodSwings.net.au: an Internet based self-help program for bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Lauder, Sue; Chester, Andrea; Castle, David; Dodd, Seetal; Gliddon, Emma; Berk, Lesley; Chamberlain, James; Klein, Britt; Gilbert, Monica; Austin, David W; Berk, Michael

    2015-01-15

    Adjunctive psychosocial interventions are efficacious in bipolar disorder, but their incorporation into routine management plans are often confounded by cost and access constraints. We report here a comparative evaluation of two online programs hosted on a single website (www.moodswings.net.au). A basic version, called MoodSwings (MS), contains psychoeducation material and asynchronous discussion boards; and a more interactive program, MoodSwings Plus (MS-Plus), combined the basic psychoeducation material and discussion boards with elements of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy. These programs were evaluated in a head-to-head study design. Participants with Bipolar I or II disorder (n=156) were randomized to receive either MoodSwings or MoodSwings-Plus. Outcomes included mood symptoms, the occurrence of relapse, functionality, Locus of Control, social support, quality of life and medication adherence. Participants in both groups showed baseline to endpoint reductions in mood symptoms and improvements in functionality, quality of life and medication adherence. The MoodSwings-Plus group showed a greater number of within-group changes on symptoms and functioning in depression and mania, quality of life and social support, across both poles of the illness. MoodSwings-Plus was superior to MoodSwings in improvement on symptoms of mania scores at 12 months (p=0.02) but not on the incidence of recurrence. The study did not have an attention control group and therefore could not demonstrate efficacy of the two active arms. There was notable (81%) attrition by 12 months from baseline. This study suggests that both CBT and psychoeducation delivered online may have utility in the management of bipolar disorder. They are feasible, readily accepted, and associated with improvement. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Head-to-Head Comparison of Three Vaccination Strategies Based on DNA and Raw Insect-Derived Recombinant Proteins against Leishmania

    PubMed Central

    Núñez, María del Carmen; Laurenti, Márcia D.; Gómez-Sebastián, Silvia; Rodríguez, Fernando; Pérez-Martín, Eva; Escribano, José M.

    2012-01-01

    Parasitic diseases plague billions of people among the poorest, killing millions annually, and causing additional millions of disability-adjusted life years lost. Leishmaniases affect more than 12 million people, with over 350 million people at risk. There is an urgent need for efficacious and cheap vaccines and treatments against visceral leishmaniasis (VL), its most severe form. Several vaccination strategies have been proposed but to date no head-to-head comparison was undertaken to assess which is the best in a clinical model of the disease. We simultaneously assayed three vaccination strategies against VL in the hamster model, using KMPII, TRYP, LACK, and PAPLE22 vaccine candidate antigens. Four groups of hamsters were immunized using the following approaches: 1) raw extracts of baculovirus-infected Trichoplusia ni larvae expressing individually one of the four recombinant proteins (PROT); 2) naked pVAX1 plasmids carrying the four genes individually (DNA); 3) a heterologous prime-boost (HPB) strategy involving DNA followed by PROT (DNA-PROT); and 4) a Control including empty pVAX1 plasmid followed by raw extract of wild-type baculovirus-infected T. ni larvae. Hamsters were challenged with L. infantum promastigotes and maintained for 20 weeks. While PROT vaccine was not protective, DNA vaccination achieved protection in spleen. Only DNA-PROT vaccination induced significant NO production by macrophages, accompanied by a significant parasitological protection in spleen and blood. Thus, the DNA-PROT strategy elicits strong immune responses and high parasitological protection in the clinical model of VL, better than its corresponding naked DNA or protein versions. Furthermore, we show that naked DNA coupled with raw recombinant proteins produced in insect larvae biofactories –the cheapest way of producing DNA-PROT vaccines– is a practical and cost-effective way for potential “off the shelf” supplying vaccines at very low prices for the protection against

  13. Head-to-head comparison of H2-receptor antagonists and proton pump inhibitors in the treatment of erosive esophagitis: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei-Hong; Huang, Jia-Qing; Zheng, Ge-Fan; Xia, Harry Hua-Xiang; Wong, Wai-Man; Lam, Shiu-Kum; Wong, Benjamin Chun-Yu

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To systematically evaluate the efficacy of H2-receptor antagonists (H2RAs) and proton pump inhibitors in healing erosive esophagitis (EE). METHODS: A meta-analysis was performed. A literature search was conducted in PubMed, Medline, Embase, and Cochrane databases to include randomized controlled head-to-head comparative trials evaluating the efficacy of H2RAs or proton pump inhibitors in healing EE. Relative risk (RR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated under a random-effects model. RESULTS: RRs of cumulative healing rates for each comparison at 8 wk were: high dose vs standard dose H2RAs, 1.17 (95%CI, 1.02-1.33); standard dose proton pump inhibitors vs standard dose H2RAs, 1.59 (95%CI, 1.44-1.75); standard dose other proton pump inhibitors vs standard dose omeprazole, 1.06 (95%CI, 0.98-1.06). Proton pump inhibitors produced consistently greater healing rates than H2RAs of all doses across all grades of esophagitis, including patients refractory to H2RAs. Healing rates achieved with standard dose omeprazole were similar to those with other proton pump inhibitors in all grades of esophagitis. CONCLUSION: H2RAs are less effective for treating patients with erosive esophagitis, especially in those with severe forms of esophagitis. Standard dose proton pump inhibitors are significantly more effective than H2RAs in healing esophagitis of all grades. Proton pump inhibitors given at the recommended dose are equally effective for healing esophagitis. PMID:15996033

  14. A head-to-head randomized clinical trial of methylphenidate and atomoxetine treatment for executive function in adults with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder.

    PubMed

    Ni, Hsing-Chang; Shang, Chi-Yung; Gau, Susan Shur-Fen; Lin, Yu-Ju; Huang, Hui-Chun; Yang, Li-Kuang

    2013-10-01

    Results regarding the effects of methylphenidate and atomoxetine on executive functions were inconsistent and no study has directly compared the efficacy of these two medications in improving executive functions in adults with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). We conducted an 8-10 wk, open-label, head-to-head, randomized clinical trial involving adults with a clinical diagnosis of ADHD confirmed by psychiatric interview. The two treatment arms were immediate-release methylphenidate (IR-methylphenidate) (n = 31) and atomoxetine once daily (n = 32). Executive functions were assessed by the Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery (CANTAB), including spatial working memory, spatial span, intra-extra dimensional set shifts, rapid visual information processing and Stockings of Cambridge (SOC). In addition to the symptom assessments at baseline (week 0), visit 2 (week 4-5) and visit 3 (week 8–10), they received CANTAB assessments at baseline and visit 3 (60.4 ± 6.3 d). Compared to baseline, adults treated with atomoxetine showed significant improvement in spatial working memory, spatial short-term memory, sustained attention and spatial planning at visit 3; adults treated with IR-methylphenidate showed significant improvement in spatial working memory at visit 3. Comparing the magnitude of improvement in executive functions between these two medications, the effect was generally similar for the two groups, although atomoxetine might have significantly greater efficacy than IR-methylphenidate in terms of improving spatial planning (SOC). Our results provide evidence to support that both IR-methylphenidate and atomoxetine improved various executive functions in adults with ADHD with greater improvement in atomoxetine than IR-methylphenidate in spatial planning.

  15. A Head-to-Head Comparison of UK SF-6D and Thai and UK EQ-5D-5L Value Sets in Thai Patients with Chronic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Sakthong, Phantipa; Munpan, Wipaporn

    2017-03-13

    Little was known about the head-to-head comparison of psychometric properties between SF-6D and EQ-5D-5L or the different value sets of EQ-5D-5L. Therefore, this study set out to compare the psychometric properties including agreement, convergent, and known-group validity between the SF-6D and the EQ-5D-5L using the real value sets from Thailand and the UK in patients with chronic diseases. 356 adults taking a medication for at least 3 months were identified from a university hospital in Bangkok, Thailand, between July 2014 and March 2015. Agreement was assessed by intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) and Bland-Altman plots. Convergent validity was evaluated using Spearman's rank correlation coefficients between SF-6D and EQ-5D-5L and EQ-VAS and SF-12v2. For known-groups validity, the Mann-Whitney U test and Kruskal-Wallis test were used to examine the associations between SF-6D and EQ-5D-5L and patient characteristics. Agreements between the SF-6D and the EQ-5D-5L using Thai and UK value sets were fair, with ICCs of 0.45 and 0.49, respectively. Bland-Altman plots showed that the majority of the SF-6D index scores were lower than the EQ-5D-5L index scores. Both the EQ-5D-5L value sets were more related to the EQ-VAS and physical health, while the SF-6D was more associated with mental health. Both EQ-5D-5L value sets were more sensitive than the SF-6D in discriminating patients with different levels of more known groups except for adverse drug reactions. The SF-6D and both EQ-5D-5L value sets appeared to be valid but sensitive to different outcomes in Thai patients with chronic diseases.

  16. Head-to-head comparison of high-sensitivity troponin T and sensitive-contemporary troponin I regarding heart failure risk stratification.

    PubMed

    de Antonio, Marta; Lupón, Josep; Galán, Amparo; Vila, Joan; Zamora, Elisabet; Urrutia, Agustín; Díez, Crisanto; Coll, Ramon; Altimir, Salvador; Bayes-Genis, Antoni

    2013-11-15

    High-sensitivity assays for cardiac troponins have recently become available, increasing the value of troponins in heart failure (HF) prognostication. We head-to-head compared the prognostic significance of high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T (hs-cTnT) and sensitive-contemporary cardiac troponin I (sc-cTnI) in an outpatient HF population. We studied 876 patients, mainly of ischemic etiology (52.1%). Median left ventricular ejection fraction was 34%. Median follow-up was 3.45 years. Comprehensive statistical measurements of performance (discrimination, calibration, and reclassification) were obtained. hs-cTnT was ubiquitous in the patient cohort; sc-cTnI was detected in 276 patients (31.5%). During follow-up 311 patients died. According to multivariable Cox regression analysis, both hs-cTnT (HR 2.09, 95% CI 1.46-2.99, P<0.001) and sc-cTnI (HR 1.61, 95% CI 1.24-2.08, P<0.001) remained independent predictors of all cause and cardiovascular mortality. Using the best predictive cut-off point for both troponins calibration was better for hs-cTnT, which also reclassified a larger number of patients (NRI 9.0 [2.5;15.5] P = 0.007). The higher sensitivity of hs-cTnT permitted the identification of almost the double of deaths. Both hs-cTnT and sc-cTnI predict mortality in a real-life cohort of ambulatory HF patients. However, hs-cTnT showed globally better measures of performance and identified a higher proportion of decedents during follow-up. © 2013.

  17. A Systematic Review and Head-to-Head Meta-Analysis of Outcomes following Direct-to-Implant versus Conventional Two-Stage Implant Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Basta, Marten N; Gerety, Patrick A; Serletti, Joseph M; Kovach, Stephen J; Fischer, John P

    2015-12-01

    Innovative approaches to reconstruction have ushered in an era of breast reconstruction in which direct-to-implant procedures can provide an immediately reconstructed breast. Balancing the benefits against its technical challenges is vital. The authors evaluated the safety and efficacy of using direct-to-implant versus conventional two-stage reconstruction through a systematic meta-analysis. A literature search identified all articles published after 1999 involving prosthetic-based breast reconstruction as a two-stage tissue expander/implant or direct-to-implant technique. The primary outcomes of interest, including implant loss, capsular contracture, reoperation, and infection, were analyzed by means of head-to-head meta-analysis. Thirteen studies involving 5216 breast reconstructions were included. The average patient age was 47.2 ± 1.0 years, the average body mass index was 24.9 ± 0.8 mg/k2, and the average follow-up was 40.8 months. Wound infection, seroma, and capsular contracture risk were similar between groups. However, direct-to-implant reconstruction was associated with a higher risk for skin flap necrosis (OR, 1.43; p = 0.01; I2 = 51 percent) and reoperation (OR, 1.25; p = 0.04; I2 = 43 percent). Ultimately, the risk for implant loss was nearly two-fold higher with direct-to-implant reconstruction compared with tissue expander/implant reconstruction (OR, 1.87; p = 0.04; I2 = 33 percent). Although direct-to-implant and two-stage tissue expander/implant reconstruction are successful approaches, this meta-analysis demonstrates significantly greater risk of flap necrosis and implant failure with direct-to-implant reconstruction. The authors' findings suggest that the critical component of patient selection is judgment of mastectomy flap tissue quality. These findings can enhance the risk counseling process and highlight the need for additional investigations to optimize outcomes.

  18. Head-to-head comparison of three vaccination strategies based on DNA and raw insect-derived recombinant proteins against Leishmania.

    PubMed

    Todolí, Felicitat; Rodríguez-Cortés, Alhelí; Núñez, María Del Carmen; Laurenti, Márcia D; Gómez-Sebastián, Silvia; Rodríguez, Fernando; Pérez-Martín, Eva; Escribano, José M; Alberola, Jordi

    2012-01-01

    Parasitic diseases plague billions of people among the poorest, killing millions annually, and causing additional millions of disability-adjusted life years lost. Leishmaniases affect more than 12 million people, with over 350 million people at risk. There is an urgent need for efficacious and cheap vaccines and treatments against visceral leishmaniasis (VL), its most severe form. Several vaccination strategies have been proposed but to date no head-to-head comparison was undertaken to assess which is the best in a clinical model of the disease. We simultaneously assayed three vaccination strategies against VL in the hamster model, using KMPII, TRYP, LACK, and PAPLE22 vaccine candidate antigens. Four groups of hamsters were immunized using the following approaches: 1) raw extracts of baculovirus-infected Trichoplusia ni larvae expressing individually one of the four recombinant proteins (PROT); 2) naked pVAX1 plasmids carrying the four genes individually (DNA); 3) a heterologous prime-boost (HPB) strategy involving DNA followed by PROT (DNA-PROT); and 4) a Control including empty pVAX1 plasmid followed by raw extract of wild-type baculovirus-infected T. ni larvae. Hamsters were challenged with L. infantum promastigotes and maintained for 20 weeks. While PROT vaccine was not protective, DNA vaccination achieved protection in spleen. Only DNA-PROT vaccination induced significant NO production by macrophages, accompanied by a significant parasitological protection in spleen and blood. Thus, the DNA-PROT strategy elicits strong immune responses and high parasitological protection in the clinical model of VL, better than its corresponding naked DNA or protein versions. Furthermore, we show that naked DNA coupled with raw recombinant proteins produced in insect larvae biofactories -the cheapest way of producing DNA-PROT vaccines- is a practical and cost-effective way for potential "off the shelf" supplying vaccines at very low prices for the protection against

  19. Head-to-head comparison of Microflex LT and Vitek MS systems for routine identification of microorganisms by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry in Chile

    PubMed Central

    García, Patricia; Braun, Stephanie; Ulloa, María Teresa; Lafourcade, Mónica; Montaña, Alisson; Miranda, Carolina; Acosta-Jamett, Gerardo; Weitzel, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Background Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry (MS) is a new and revolutionary identification method for microorganisms and has recently been introduced into clinical microbiology in many industrialized countries in Europe and North America. Objectives Our study aimed to compare the performance and practicality of two commercial MALDI-TOF MS platforms in a head-to head manner at a routine laboratory in Chile. Methods During a five-month period in 2012–13, the diagnostic efficiency (correct identification rate) and agreement between Microflex LT (Bruker Daltonics) and Vitek MS (bioMérieux) was compared in a parallel manner to conventional identification including genotypic analysis for difficult-to-identify strains. The study included 804 microbial isolates: 252 Enterobacteriaceae, 126 non-fermenters, 36 other gram-negative rods, 279 gram-positive cocci, 32 gram-positive rods, 32 anaerobes, and 47 yeasts. Other relevant factors of the two devices such as user friendliness and connectivity were also evaluated and compared. Results Both systems correctly identified the vast majority (98%) of the isolates to the genus level. Vitek MS reached higher rates of identification to species and species complex level than Microflex LT (81% vs. 85% and 87% vs. 93%, respectively), which was mainly based on the higher performance among coagulase negative staphylococci and Candida isolates. The evaluation of user friendliness and other technical aspects showed only marginal differences, which slightly favored Vitek MS, mainly due to its ready-to-use supplies, easier connectivity and workflow integration, and availability of local technical support. Conclusions Both MALDI-TOF MS systems permitted fast and accurate identification of most microbial strains and showed a high level of user-friendliness. The observed differences were marginal and slightly favored Vitek MS, mainly due to practicality and connectivity issues within

  20. Head-to-head comparison of Microflex LT and Vitek MS systems for routine identification of microorganisms by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry in Chile.

    PubMed

    Porte, Lorena; García, Patricia; Braun, Stephanie; Ulloa, María Teresa; Lafourcade, Mónica; Montaña, Alisson; Miranda, Carolina; Acosta-Jamett, Gerardo; Weitzel, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry (MS) is a new and revolutionary identification method for microorganisms and has recently been introduced into clinical microbiology in many industrialized countries in Europe and North America. Our study aimed to compare the performance and practicality of two commercial MALDI-TOF MS platforms in a head-to head manner at a routine laboratory in Chile. During a five-month period in 2012-13, the diagnostic efficiency (correct identification rate) and agreement between Microflex LT (Bruker Daltonics) and Vitek MS (bioMérieux) was compared in a parallel manner to conventional identification including genotypic analysis for difficult-to-identify strains. The study included 804 microbial isolates: 252 Enterobacteriaceae, 126 non-fermenters, 36 other gram-negative rods, 279 gram-positive cocci, 32 gram-positive rods, 32 anaerobes, and 47 yeasts. Other relevant factors of the two devices such as user friendliness and connectivity were also evaluated and compared. Both systems correctly identified the vast majority (98%) of the isolates to the genus level. Vitek MS reached higher rates of identification to species and species complex level than Microflex LT (81% vs. 85% and 87% vs. 93%, respectively), which was mainly based on the higher performance among coagulase negative staphylococci and Candida isolates. The evaluation of user friendliness and other technical aspects showed only marginal differences, which slightly favored Vitek MS, mainly due to its ready-to-use supplies, easier connectivity and workflow integration, and availability of local technical support. Both MALDI-TOF MS systems permitted fast and accurate identification of most microbial strains and showed a high level of user-friendliness. The observed differences were marginal and slightly favored Vitek MS, mainly due to practicality and connectivity issues within our setting.

  1. Enhancing acupuncture by low dose naltrexone.

    PubMed

    Hesselink, Jan M Keppel; Kopsky, David J

    2011-06-01

    To find appropriate and effective treatment options for chronic pain syndromes is a challenging task. Multimodal treatment approach has been gaining acceptance for chronic pain. However, combining treatments, such as acupuncture, with rational pharmacology is still in its infancy. Acupuncture influences the opioid and cannabinoid system through releasing endogenous receptor ligands. Low dose naltrexone also acts on both these systems, and upregulates the opioid and cannabinoid receptors. The authors hypothesise that low dose naltrexone could enhance the pain-relieving effect of acupuncture.

  2. Head-to-head comparison of serial soluble ST2, growth differentiation factor-15, and highly-sensitive troponin T measurements in patients with chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Gaggin, Hanna K; Szymonifka, Jackie; Bhardwaj, Anju; Belcher, Arianna; De Berardinis, Benedetta; Motiwala, Shweta; Wang, Thomas J; Januzzi, James L

    2014-02-01

    This analysis aimed to perform a head-to-head comparison of 3 of the promising biomarkers of cardiovascular (CV) outcomes in heart failure (HF)-soluble ST2 (sST2), growth differentiation factor (GDF)-15, and highly-sensitive troponin T (hsTnT)-and to evaluate the role of serial measurement of these biomarkers in patients with chronic HF. sST2, GDF-15, and hsTnT are strongly associated with CV outcomes in HF. This post-hoc analysis used data from a study in which 151 patients with chronic HF due to left ventricular systolic dysfunction were followed up over 10 months. At each visit, N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP), sST2, GDF-15, and hsTnT were measured and any major CV events were recorded. Baseline values of all 3 novel biomarkers independently predicted total CV events even after adjusting for clinical and biochemical characteristics, including NT-proBNP, with the best model including all 3 biomarkers (p < 0.001). Adding serial measurement to the base model appeared to improve the model's predictive ability (with sST2 showing the most promise), but it is not clear whether this addition is a unique contribution. However, when time-dependent factors were included, only sST2 serial measurement independently added to the risk model (odds ratio: 3.64; 95% confidence interval: 1.37 to 9.67; p = 0.009) and predicted reverse myocardial remodeling (odds ratio: 1.22; 95% confidence interval: 1.04 to 1.43; p = 0.01). In patients with chronic HF, baseline measurement of novel biomarkers added independent prognostic information to clinical variables and NT-proBNP. Only serial measurement of sST2 appeared to add prognostic information to baseline concentrations and predicted change in left ventricular function. (Use of NT-proBNP Testing to Guide Heart Failure Therapy in the Outpatient Setting (PROTECT)]; NCT00351390). Copyright © 2014 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Low-dose computed tomography to diagnose fetal bone dysplasias.

    PubMed

    Montoya Filardi, A; Guasp Vizcaíno, M; Gómez Fernández-Montes, J; Llorens Salvador, R

    We present a case of cleidocranial dysplasia diagnosed by low-dose fetal computed tomography (CT) in the 25th week of gestation. Severe bone dysplasia was suspected because of the fetus' low percentile in long bones length and the appearance of craniosynostosis on sonography. CT found no abnormalities incompatible with life. The effective dose was 5 mSv, within the recommended range for this type of examination. Low-dose fetal CT is a new technique that makes precision study of the bony structures possible from the second trimester of pregnancy. In Spain, abortion is legal even after the 22nd week of gestation in cases of severe fetal malformations. Therefore, in cases in which severe bone dysplasia is suspected, radiologists must know the strategies for reducing the dose of radiation while maintaining sufficient diagnostic quality, and they must also know which bony structures to evaluate. Copyright © 2016 SERAM. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. A 1-year follow-on study from a randomised, head-to-head, multicentre, open-label study of two pandemic influenza vaccines in children.

    PubMed

    de Whalley, P; Walker, W; Snape, M D; Oeser, C; Casey, M; Moulsdale, P; Harrill, C; Andrews, N; Hoschler, K; Thompson, B; Jones, C; Chalk, J; Kerridge, S; Tomlinson, R; Heath, P T; Finn, A; Faust, S; Miller, E; Pollard, A J

    2011-12-01

    Pandemic influenza A H1N1 infections occurred worldwide from 2009. Children were particularly vulnerable. Novel vaccines were used during the pandemic. To assess the persistence of antibody to H1N1 influenza 1 year after children aged 6 months to 12 years had been immunised with two doses of either a non-adjuvanted whole-virion H1N1 influenza vaccine or an AS03B-adjuvanted split-virion H1N1 influenza vaccine; and also to assess the immunogenicity and reactogenicity in this population of a single dose of 2010-11 trivalent seasonal influenza vaccine. Multicentre, open-label, follow-on from randomised, head-to-head trial. Five UK sites (Southampton, Oxford, Bristol, London and Exeter). Children who completed last year's head-to-head randomised study were invited to participate. Children who had subsequently received a further dose of H1N1 vaccine, or who had already received a dose of 2010-11 trivalent seasonal influenza vaccine, were excluded. In the previous study, children were randomised (in a 1 : 1 ratio) to receive two doses, 21 days apart, of either a non-adjuvanted whole-virion H1N1 influenza vaccine or an AS03B-adjuvanted split-virion H1N1 influenza vaccine. In this follow-on study, a blood sample was taken to assess the persistence of antibody 1 year later, followed by administration of one 0.5 ml-dose of trivalent seasonal influenza vaccine. A second blood sample was taken 3 weeks later. Comparison between vaccines of the percentage of participants with a microneutralisation (MN) titre ≥ 1 : 40 and a haemagglutination titre ≥ 1 : 32, 1 year after vaccination. Immunogenicity of the trivalent seasonal influenza vaccine was assessed 3 weeks after vaccination by both the MN and the haemagglutination inhibition (HI) titres. Reactogenicity data were recorded for 7 days after vaccination. A total of 323 children were enrolled and 318 were included in the analysis of the persistence of antibody. One year after receipt of whole-virion vaccine, the MN titre was

  5. Radiation Leukemogenesis at Low Dose Rates

    SciTech Connect

    Weil, Michael; Ullrich, Robert

    2013-09-25

    The major goals of this program were to study the efficacy of low dose rate radiation exposures for the induction of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and to characterize the leukemias that are caused by radiation exposures at low dose rate. An irradiator facility was designed and constructed that allows large numbers of mice to be irradiated at low dose rates for protracted periods (up to their life span). To the best of our knowledge this facility is unique in the US and it was subsequently used to study radioprotectors being developed for radiological defense (PLoS One. 7(3), e33044, 2012) and is currently being used to study the role of genetic background in susceptibility to radiation-induced lung cancer. One result of the irradiation was expected; low dose rate exposures are ineffective in inducing AML. However, another result was completely unexpected; the irradiated mice had a very high incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), approximately 50%. It was unexpected because acute exposures are ineffective in increasing HCC incidence above background. This is a potential important finding for setting exposure limits because it supports the concept of an 'inverse dose rate effect' for some tumor types. That is, for the development of some tumor types low dose rate exposures carry greater risks than acute exposures.

  6. Low Dose Rapamycin Exacerbates Autoimmune Experimental Uveitis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zili; Wu, Xiumei; Duan, Jie; Hinrichs, David; Wegmann, Keith; Zhang, Gary L.; Hall, Mark; Rosenbaum, James T.

    2012-01-01

    Background Rapamycin, a potent immune modulator, is used to treat transplant rejection and some autoimmune diseases. Uveitis is a potentially severe inflammatory eye disease, and 2 clinical trials of treating uveitis with rapamycin are under way. Unexpectedly, recent research has demonstrated that low dose rapamycin enhances the memory T cell population and function. However, it is unclear how low dose rapamycin influences the immune response in the setting of uveitis. Design and Methods B10.RIII mice were immunized to induce experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU). Ocular inflammation of control and rapamycin-treated mice was compared based on histological change. ELISPOT and T cell proliferation assays were performed to assess splenocyte response to ocular antigen. In addition, we examined the effect of rapamycin on activation-induced cell death (AICD) using the MitoCapture assay and Annexin V staining. Results Administration of low dose rapamycin exacerbated EAU, whereas treating mice with high dose rapamycin attenuated ocular inflammation. The progression of EAU by low dose rapamycin coincided with the increased frequency of antigen-reactive lymphocytes. Lastly, fewer rapamycin-treated T cells underwent AICD, which might contribute to exaggerated ocular inflammation and the uveitogenic immune response. Conclusion These data reveal a paradoxical role for rapamycin in uveitis in a dose-dependent manner. This study has a potentially important clinical implication as rapamycin might cause unwanted consequences dependent on dosing and pharmacokinetics. Thus, more research is needed to further define the mechanism by which low dose rapamycin augments the immune response. PMID:22574188

  7. Health benefits from low-dose irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Luckey, T.D.

    1996-12-31

    Whole-body exposures of mice and humans show no harm from low doses of ionizing radiation. Forty reports show statistically significant, p < 0.01, beneficial effects when cancer and total mortality rates were examined in mice. In vitro experiments indicate that radiogenic metabolism, adaptive repair mechanisms, such as DNA repair enzymes, and the essential nature of ionizing radiation are responsible for part of this activity. However, overwhelming evidence shows that low-dose irradiation increases immune competence. Such data negate the linear concept, which has no reliable whole-animal data to support it in the low-dose range. Cell culture data are not pertinent; such cells do not have a complete immune system.

  8. A Head-to-Head Comparison of Four Artemisinin-Based Combinations for Treating Uncomplicated Malaria in African Children: A Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs) are the mainstay for the management of uncomplicated malaria cases. However, up-to-date data able to assist sub-Saharan African countries formulating appropriate antimalarial drug policies are scarce. Methods and Findings Between 9 July 2007 and 19 June 2009, a randomized, non-inferiority (10% difference threshold in efficacy at day 28) clinical trial was carried out at 12 sites in seven sub-Saharan African countries. Each site compared three of four ACTs, namely amodiaquine-artesunate (ASAQ), dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine (DHAPQ), artemether-lumefantrine (AL), or chlorproguanil-dapsone-artesunate (CD+A). Overall, 4,116 children 6–59 mo old with uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria were treated (1,226 with AL, 1,002 with ASAQ, 413 with CD+A, and 1,475 with DHAPQ), actively followed up until day 28, and then passively followed up for the next 6 mo. At day 28, for the PCR-adjusted efficacy, non-inferiority was established for three pair-wise comparisons: DHAPQ (97.3%) versus AL (95.5%) (odds ratio [OR]: 0.59, 95% CI: 0.37–0.94); DHAPQ (97.6%) versus ASAQ (96.8%) (OR: 0.74, 95% CI: 0.41–1.34), and ASAQ (97.1%) versus AL (94.4%) (OR: 0.50, 95% CI: 0.28–0.92). For the PCR-unadjusted efficacy, AL was significantly less efficacious than DHAPQ (72.7% versus 89.5%) (OR: 0.27, 95% CI: 0.21–0.34) and ASAQ (66.2% versus 80.4%) (OR: 0.40, 95% CI: 0.30–0.53), while DHAPQ (92.2%) had higher efficacy than ASAQ (80.8%) but non-inferiority could not be excluded (OR: 0.35, 95% CI: 0.26–0.48). CD+A was significantly less efficacious than the other three treatments. Day 63 results were similar to those observed at day 28. Conclusions This large head-to-head comparison of most currently available ACTs in sub-Saharan Africa showed that AL, ASAQ, and DHAPQ had excellent efficacy, up to day 63 post-treatment. The risk of recurrent infections was significantly lower for DHAPQ, followed by ASAQ and then AL

  9. 3D printing for sizing left atrial appendage closure device: Head-to-head comparison with computed tomography and transesophageal echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Hell, Michaela M; Achenbach, Stephan; Yoo, In Seong; Franke, Joerg; Blachutzik, Florian; Roether, Jens; Graf, Verena; Raaz-Schrauder, Dorette; Marwan, Mohamed; Schlundt, Christian

    2017-07-04

    Device sizing for LAA closure using transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) can be challenging due to complex LAA anatomy. We investigated whether the use of 3D-printed left atrial appendage (LAA) models based on pre-procedural computed tomography (CT) permits accurate device sizing. 22 patients (73±8 years, 55% male) with atrial fibrillation requiring anticoagulation at high bleeding risk underwent LAA closure (WatchmanTM device). Pre-procedurally, LAA was sized by TEE and third-generation dual-source CT. Based on CT, 3D printing models of LAA anatomy were created for simulation of device implantation. Device compression was assessed in a CT scan of the 3D model with implanted device. Implantation was successful in all patients. Mean LAA ostium diameter based on TEE was 22±4 mm and based on CT 25±3 mm (p=0.014). Predicted device size based on simulated implantation in the 3D model was equal to the finally implanted device in 21/22 patients (95%). TEE would have undersized the device in 10/22 patients (45%). Device compression determined in the 3D-CT-model corresponded closely with compression upon implantation (16±3% vs. 18±5%, r=0.622, p=0.003). Patient-specific CT-based 3D printing models may assist device selection and prediction of device compression in the context of interventional LAA closure.

  10. Mammography-oncogenecity at low doses.

    PubMed

    Heyes, G J; Mill, A J; Charles, M W

    2009-06-01

    Controversy exists regarding the biological effectiveness of low energy x-rays used for mammography breast screening. Recent radiobiology studies have provided compelling evidence that these low energy x-rays may be 4.42 +/- 2.02 times more effective in causing mutational damage than higher energy x-rays. These data include a study involving in vitro irradiation of a human cell line using a mammography x-ray source and a high energy source which matches the spectrum of radiation observed in survivors from the Hiroshima atomic bomb. Current radiation risk estimates rely heavily on data from the atomic bomb survivors, and a direct comparison between the diagnostic energies used in the UK breast screening programme and those used for risk estimates can now be made. Evidence highlighting the increase in relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of mammography x-rays to a range of x-ray energies implies that the risks of radiation-induced breast cancers for mammography x-rays are potentially underestimated by a factor of four. A pooled analysis of three measurements gives a maximal RBE (for malignant transformation of human cells in vitro) of 4.02 +/- 0.72 for 29 kVp (peak accelerating voltage) x-rays compared to high energy electrons and higher energy x-rays. For the majority of women in the UK NHS breast screening programme, it is shown that the benefit safely exceeds the risk of possible cancer induction even when this higher biological effectiveness factor is applied. The risk/benefit analysis, however, implies the need for caution for women screened under the age of 50, and particularly for those with a family history (and therefore a likely genetic susceptibility) of breast cancer. In vitro radiobiological data are generally acquired at high doses, and there are different extrapolation mechanisms to the low doses seen clinically. Recent low dose in vitro data have indicated a potential suppressive effect at very low dose rates and doses. Whilst mammography is a low

  11. Low dose naltrexone therapy in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Y P

    2005-01-01

    The use of low doses of naltrexone for the treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS) enjoys a worldwide following amongst MS patients. There is overwhelming anecdotal evidence, that in low doses naltrexone not only prevents relapses in MS but also reduces the progression of the disease. It is proposed that naltrexone acts by reducing apoptosis of oligodendrocytes. It does this by reducing inducible nitric oxide synthase activity. This results in a decrease in the formation of peroxynitrites, which in turn prevent the inhibition of the glutamate transporters. Thus, the excitatory neurotoxicity of glutamate on neuronal cells and oligodendrocytes via activation of the alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-isoxazole-4-propionic acid class of glutamate receptor is prevented. It is crucial that the medical community respond to patient needs and investigate this drug in a clinical trial.

  12. Epigenomic Adaptation to Low Dose Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Gould, Michael N.

    2015-06-30

    The overall hypothesis of this grant application is that the adaptive responses elicited by low dose ionizing radiation (LDIR) result in part from heritable DNA methylation changes in the epigenome. In the final budget period at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, we will specifically address this hypothesis by determining if the epigenetically labile, differentially methylated regions (DMRs) that regulate parental-specific expression of imprinted genes are deregulated in agouti mice by low dose radiation exposure during gestation. This information is particularly important to ascertain given the 1) increased human exposure to medical sources of radiation; 2) increased number of people predicted to live and work in space; and 3) enhanced citizen concern about radiation exposure from nuclear power plant accidents and terrorist ‘dirty bombs.’

  13. Genomic Instability Induced by Low Dose Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Helen H. Sedwick, David W. Veigl, Martina L.

    2006-07-15

    The goal of this project was to determine if genomic instability could be initiated by poorly repaired DNA damage induced by low doses of ionizing radiation leading to a mutator phenotype. Human cells were irradiated, then transfected with an unirradiated reporter gene at various times AFTER exposure. The vector carried an inactive GFP gene that fluoresced when the gene was activated by a delayed mutation. Fluorescent cells were measured in the interval of 50 hours to four days after transfection. The results showed that delayed mutations occurred in these cells after exposure to relatively low doses (0.3-1.0 Gy) of low or high ionizing radiation, as well as after treatment with hyrodgen peroxide (30-100 micromolar). The occurrence was both dose and time dependent, often decreasing at higher doses and later times. No marked difference was observed between the response of mis-match repair-proficient and -deficient cell lines. Although the results were quite reproducible within single experiments, difficulties were observed from experiment to experiment. Different reagents and assays were tested, but no improvement resulted. We concluded that this method is not sufficiently robust or consisent to be useful in the assay of the induction of genomic instability by low doses of radiation, at least in these cell lines under our conditions.

  14. Adaption By Low Dose Radiation Exposure

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The procedures and dose limitations used for radiation protection in the nuclear industry are founded on the assumption that risk is directly proportional to dose, without a threshold. Based on this idea that any dose, no matter how small, will increase risk, radiation protection regulations generally attempt to reduce any exposure to “as low as reasonably achievable” (ALARA). We know however, that these regulatory assumptions are inconsistent with the known biological effects of low doses. Low doses induce protective effects, and these adaptive responses are part of a general response to low stress. Adaptive responses have been tightly conserved during evolution, from single celled organisms up to humans, indicating their importance. Here we examine cellular and animal studies that show the influence of radiation induced protective effects on diverse diseases, and examine the radiation dose range that is effective for different tissues in the same animal. The concept of a dose window, with upper and lower effective doses, as well as the effect of multiple stressors and the influence of genetics will also be examined. The effect of the biological variables on low dose responses will be considered from the point of view of the limitations they may impose on any revised radiation protection regulations. PMID:26672725

  15. Application of Low-dose Stereoradiography in In Vivo Vertebral Morphologic Measurements: Comparison With Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    Pasha, Saba; Schlösser, Tom; Zhu, Xiaowei; Mellor, Xochitl; Castelein, René; Flynn, John

    2017-06-30

    Though computed tomography (CT) and 3 dimensional (3D) reconstruction of the spine and ribcage are powerful techniques for detailed monitoring of spinal growth and surgical planning of patients, drawbacks can arise. We explored the application of low-dose stereoradiography of the spine to calculate distinct morphologic parameters of the vertebral body in a juvenile patient population with early-onset scoliosis or congenital scoliosis. This study compares the 3D vertebral morphology measurements using low-dose stereoradiography with the currently accepted imaging modality for such measurements, CT scans. A total of 86 vertebrae of 6 patients with early-onset scoliosis and 3 patients with congenital scoliosis, age ranged between 7.8 and 12.5 years, who had both thoracic spine CT scan and low-dose stereoradiography of the spine were included. 3D reconstructions of CT and low-dose stereoradiography were generated. Using previously validated image processing techniques, vertebral anterior (A), posterior (P), left (L), and right (R) heights, superior and inferior endplates depth and width (S-D, I-D, S-W, I-W) were measured on the CTs' 3D reconstructions and were compared with the same parameters measured on low-dose stereoradiography reconstructions using a postprocessing custom code. The agreement between the 2 techniques in measurement of the vertebral morphology was assessed using the Bland-Altman plots. No significant difference was observed in the A, P, L, R, S-W, and I-W between the stereoradiography and CT measurements (P>0.05). S-D and I-D were significantly greater in low-dose stereoradiography measurements P<0.05. Bland-Altman plots showed an agreement between the stereoradiography and CT techniques in vertebral height measurements (A, P, L, R); however, larger measurement bias and greater limits of agreement in S-D, I-D, S-W, and I-W measurements were shown. In vivo measurements of the vertebral heights using low-dose stereoradiography 3D reconstructions were

  16. Low dose aprotinin and low dose tranexamic acid in elective cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed

    Waldow, Thomas; Krutzsch, Diana; Wils, Michael; Plötze, Katrin; Matschke, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    The antifibrinolytic agents aprotinin and tranexamic acid have both been proven to be efficient in reducing postoperative blood loss and transfusion requirements in patients in cardiac surgery. In light of recent safety issues regarding aprotinin, this single-centre study compared efficacy and safety of low dose aprotinin (2 million KIU, pump-prime volume only) and low dose tranexamic acid (1 g, pump-prime volume) in 708 consecutive patients from two prospective registers undergoing elective cardiac procedures with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Incidences of postoperative complications showed no significant differences between groups. Postoperative blood loss and transfusion requirements were significantly lower in aprotinin compared to tranexamic acid patients. Overall, both antifibrinolytic low dose regimens are safe components of perioperative patient management in elective cardiac surgery with CPB. Cardiac procedures requiring longer CPB times might benefit from the administration of low dose aprotinin.

  17. Validation of a Low Dose Simulation Technique for Computed Tomography Images

    PubMed Central

    Muenzel, Daniela; Koehler, Thomas; Brown, Kevin; Žabić, Stanislav; Fingerle, Alexander A.; Waldt, Simone; Bendik, Edgar; Zahel, Tina; Schneider, Armin; Dobritz, Martin; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Noël, Peter B.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Evaluation of a new software tool for generation of simulated low-dose computed tomography (CT) images from an original higher dose scan. Materials and Methods Original CT scan data (100 mAs, 80 mAs, 60 mAs, 40 mAs, 20 mAs, 10 mAs; 100 kV) of a swine were acquired (approved by the regional governmental commission for animal protection). Simulations of CT acquisition with a lower dose (simulated 10–80 mAs) were calculated using a low-dose simulation algorithm. The simulations were compared to the originals of the same dose level with regard to density values and image noise. Four radiologists assessed the realistic visual appearance of the simulated images. Results Image characteristics of simulated low dose scans were similar to the originals. Mean overall discrepancy of image noise and CT values was −1.2% (range −9% to 3.2%) and −0.2% (range −8.2% to 3.2%), respectively, p>0.05. Confidence intervals of discrepancies ranged between 0.9–10.2 HU (noise) and 1.9–13.4 HU (CT values), without significant differences (p>0.05). Subjective observer evaluation of image appearance showed no visually detectable difference. Conclusion Simulated low dose images showed excellent agreement with the originals concerning image noise, CT density values, and subjective assessment of the visual appearance of the simulated images. An authentic low-dose simulation opens up opportunity with regard to staff education, protocol optimization and introduction of new techniques. PMID:25247422

  18. Ultra-low dose naltrexone potentiates the anticonvulsant effect of low dose morphine on clonic seizures.

    PubMed

    Honar, H; Riazi, K; Homayoun, H; Sadeghipour, H; Rashidi, N; Ebrahimkhani, M R; Mirazi, N; Dehpour, A R

    2004-01-01

    Significant potentiation of analgesic effects of opioids can be achieved through selective blockade of their stimulatory effects on intracellular signaling pathways by ultra-low doses of opioid receptor antagonists. However, the generality and specificity of this interaction is not well understood. The bimodal modulation of pentylenetetrazole-induced seizure threshold by opioids provide a model to assess the potential usefulness of this approach in seizure disorders and to examine the differential mechanisms involved in opioid anti- (morphine at 0.5-3 mg/kg) versus pro-convulsant (20-100 mg/kg) effects. Systemic administration of ultra-low doses of naltrexone (100 fg/kg-10 ng/kg) significantly potentiated the anticonvulsant effect of morphine at 0.5 mg/kg while higher degrees of opioid receptor antagonism blocked this effect. Moreover, inhibition of opioid-induced excitatory signaling by naltrexone (1 ng/kg) unmasked a strong anticonvulsant effect for very low doses of morphine (1 ng/kg-100 microg/kg), suggesting that a presumed inhibitory component of opioid receptor signaling can exert strong seizure-protective effects even at very low levels of opioid receptor activation. However, ultra-low dose naltrexone could not increase the maximal anticonvulsant effect of morphine (1-3 mg/kg), possibly due to a ceiling effect. The proconvulsant effects of morphine on seizure threshold were minimally altered by ultra-low doses of naltrexone while being completely blocked by a higher dose (1 mg/kg) of the antagonist. The present data suggest that ultra-low doses of opioid receptor antagonists may provide a potent strategy to modulate seizure susceptibility, especially in conjunction with very low doses of opioids.

  19. Star-shape redox-responsive PEG-sheddable copolymer of disulfide-linked polyethylene glycol-lysine-di-tocopherol succinate for tumor-triggering intracellular doxorubicin rapid release: head-to-head comparison.

    PubMed

    Ai, Xiaoyu; Sun, Jin; Zhong, Lu; Wu, Chunnuan; Niu, Handong; Xu, Tao; Lian, He; Han, Xiaopeng; Ren, Guolian; Ding, Wenya; Wang, Jia; Pu, Xiaohui; He, Zhonggui

    2014-10-01

    A redox-responsive poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-sheddable copolymer of disulfide-linked PEG 5000-lysine-di-tocopherol succinate (P(5k)SSLV) is developed which can self-assemble into nanomicelles in aqueous condition and trigger the rapid release of encapsulated drugs within tumor cells. The reduction-insensitive doxorubicin (DOX)-loaded P(5k)LV (P(5k)LV-DOX) nanomicelles are further prepared. Then head-to-head comparison of P(5k)SSLV-DOX, P(5k)LV-DOX and DOX-Sol is performed concerning in vitro release, cytotoxicity, cellular uptake and apoptosis. Results show that P(5k)SSLV-DOX nanomicelles have a faster DOX release, a higher anti-tumor activity and more DOX concentrating in the nucleus than P(5k)LV-DOX nanomicelles. In conclusion, the redox-responsive P(5k)SSLV nanomicelles might hold a great potential to improve chemotherapy by tumor-triggering intracellular rapid release. The outcomes of this study also address the significance of such head-to-head comparison studies in translational research of nanomedicine.

  20. [Low dose naltrexone for treatment of pain].

    PubMed

    Plesner, Karin Bruun; Vægter, Henrik Bjarke; Handberg, Gitte

    2015-10-09

    Recent years have seen an increasing interest in the use of low dose naltrexone (LDN) for off-label treatment of pain in diseases as fibromyalgia, multiple sclerosis and morbus Crohn. The evidence is poor, with only few randomized double-blind placebo-controlled studies. The studies currently available are reviewed in this paper. LDN could be a potentially useful drug in the future for the treatment of pain in fibromyalgia, but more studies are needed to verify that it is superior to placebo, and currently it cannot be recommended as first-line therapy.

  1. Low-dose computed tomography screening for lung cancer: how strong is the evidence?

    PubMed

    Woolf, Steven H; Harris, Russell P; Campos-Outcalt, Doug

    2014-12-01

    In 2013, the US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommended low-dose computed tomographic (CT) screening for high-risk current and former smokers with a B recommendation (indicating a level of certainty that it offered moderate to substantial net benefit). Under the Affordable Care Act, the USPSTF recommendation requires commercial insurers to fully cover low-dose CT. The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) is now considering whether to also offer coverage for Medicare beneficiaries. Although the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) demonstrated the efficacy of low-dose CT, implementation of national screening may be premature. The magnitude of benefit from routine screening is uncertain; estimates are based on data from a single study and simulation models commissioned by the USPSTF. The potential harms-which could affect a large population-include false-positive results, anxiety, radiation exposure, diagnostic workups, and the resulting complications. It is unclear if routine screening would result in net benefit or net harm. The NLST may not be generalizable to a national screening program for the Medicare age group because 73% of NLST participants were younger than 65 years. Moreover, screening outside of trial conditions is less likely to be restricted to high-risk smokers and qualified imaging centers with responsible referral protocols. Until better data are available for older adults who are screened in ordinary (nontrial) community settings, CMS should postpone coverage of low-dose CT screening for Medicare beneficiaries.

  2. The importance of lung cancer screening with low-dose computed tomography for Medicare beneficiaries.

    PubMed

    Wood, Douglas E

    2014-12-01

    The National Lung Screening Trial has provided convincing evidence of a substantial mortality benefit of lung cancer screening with low-dose computed tomography (CT) for current and former smokers at high risk. The United States Preventive Services Task Force has recommended screening, triggering coverage of low-dose CT by private health insurers under provisions of the Affordable Care Act. The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) are currently evaluating coverage of lung cancer screening for Medicare beneficiaries. Since 70% of lung cancer occurs in patients 65 years or older, CMS should cover low-dose CT, thus avoiding the situation of at-risk patients being screened up to age 64 through private insurers and then abruptly ceasing screening at exactly the ages when their risk for developing lung cancer is increasing. Legitimate concerns include false-positive findings that lead to further testing and invasive procedures, overdiagnosis (detection of clinically unimportant cancers), the morbidity and mortality of surgery, and the overall costs of follow-up tests and procedures. These concerns can be mitigated by clear criteria for screening high-risk patients, disciplined management of abnormalities based on algorithms, and high-quality multidisciplinary care. Lung cancer screening with low-dose CT can lead to early diagnosis and cure for thousands of patients each year. Professional societies can help CMS responsibly implement a program that is patient-centered and minimizes unintended harms and costs.

  3. Low-dose radiation exposure and carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Keiji; Yamashita, Shunichi

    2012-07-01

    Absorption of energy from ionizing radiation by the genetic material in the cell leads to damage to DNA, which in turn leads to cell death, chromosome aberrations and gene mutations. While early or deterministic effects result from organ and tissue damage caused by cell killing, latter two are considered to be involved in the initial events that lead to the development of cancer. Epidemiological studies have demonstrated the dose-response relationships for cancer induction and quantitative evaluations of cancer risk following exposure to moderate to high doses of low-linear energy transfer radiation. A linear, no-threshold model has been applied to assessment of the risks resulting from exposure to moderate and high doses of ionizing radiation; however, a statistically significant increase has hardly been described for radiation doses below 100 mSv. This review summarizes our current knowledge of the physical and biological features of low-dose radiation and discusses the possibilities of induction of cancer by low-dose radiation.

  4. Culmination of Low-Dose Pesticide Effects

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Pesticides applied in agriculture can affect the structure and function of nontarget populations at lower doses and for longer timespans than predicted by the current risk assessment frameworks. We identified a mechanism for this observation. The populations of an aquatic invertebrate (Culex pipiens) exposed over several generations to repeated pulses of low concentrations of the neonicotinoid insecticide (thiacloprid) continuously declined and did not recover in the presence of a less sensitive competing species (Daphnia magna). By contrast, in the absence of a competitor, insecticide effects on the more sensitive species were only observed at concentrations 1 order of magnitude higher, and the species recovered more rapidly after a contamination event. The underlying processes are experimentally identified and reconstructed using a simulation model. We conclude that repeated toxicant pulse of populations that are challenged with interspecific competition may result in a multigenerational culmination of low-dose effects. PMID:23859631

  5. Effects of low doses of radiation.

    PubMed

    Fry, R J

    1996-06-01

    This is a brief review of what is known from experimental studies about the effects of low doses of radiation, and approaches that might improve risk estimates are discussed. The dose-response relationships for cancer induction by radiation vary markedly between tissues. The evidence suggests that 1) the induction of the initial events is dependent on the cell type because the size and/or the number of targets and how the cells handle the initial lesions differs between cell types; and 2) there are marked differences among tissues how initial lesions are expressed and proceed to overt cancer. The recent findings about adaptive responses are discussed in the context of what they contribute to our understanding about the response to irradiation. Lastly, the possibility of extending the approach of determining "The probability of causation," which Vic Bond played such an important role in establishing, is raised.

  6. Comparison of the effects of fibrates versus statins on plasma lipoprotein(a) concentrations: a systematic review and meta-analysis of head-to-head randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Sahebkar, Amirhossein; Simental-Mendía, Luis E; Watts, Gerald F; Serban, Maria-Corina; Banach, Maciej

    2017-02-03

    Raised plasma lipoprotein(a) (Lp(a)) concentration is an independent and causal risk factor for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Several types of pharmacological approaches are under evaluation for their potential to reduce plasma Lp(a) levels. There is suggestive evidence that statins and fibrates, two frequently employed lipid-lowering drugs, can lower plasma Lp(a). The present study aims to compare the efficacy of fibrates and statins in reducing plasma concentrations of Lp(a) using a meta-analysis of randomized head-to-head trials. Medline and Scopus databases were searched to identify randomized head-to-head comparative trials investigating the efficacy of fibrates versus statins in reducing plasma Lp(a) levels. Meta-analysis was performed using a random-effects model, with inverse variance weighted mean differences (WMDs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) as summary statistics. The impact of putative confounders on the estimated effect size was explored using random effects meta-regression. Sixteen head-to-head comparative trials with a total of 1388 subjects met the eligibility criteria and were selected for this meta-analysis. Meta-analysis revealed a significantly greater effect of fibrates versus statins in reducing plasma Lp(a) concentrations (WMD, -2.70 mg/dL; 95% CI, -4.56 to -0.84; P = 0.004). Combination therapy with fibrates and statins had a significantly greater effect compared with statin monotherapy (WMD, -1.60 mg/dL; 95% CI, -2.93 to -0.26; P = 0.019) but not fibrate monotherapy (WMD, -1.76 mg/dL; 95% CI, -5.44 to +1.92; P = 0.349) in reducing plasma Lp(a) concentrations. The impact of fibrates versus statins in reducing plasma Lp(a) concentrations was not found to be significantly associated with treatment duration (P = 0.788). Fibrates have a significantly greater effect in reducing plasma Lp(a) concentrations than statins. Addition of fibrates to statins can enhance the Lp(a)-lowering effect of statins.

  7. The Efficacy of Natalizumab versus Fingolimod for Patients with Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis: A Systematic Review, Indirect Evidence from Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trials and Meta-Analysis of Observational Head-to-Head Trials

    PubMed Central

    Tsivgoulis, Georgios; Katsanos, Aristeidis H.; Mavridis, Dimitris; Grigoriadis, Nikolaos; Dardiotis, Efthymios; Heliopoulos, Ioannis; Papathanasopoulos, Panagiotis; Karapanayiotides, Theodoros; Kilidireas, Constantinos; Hadjigeorgiou, Georgios M.; Voumvourakis, Konstantinos

    2016-01-01

    Background Although Fingolimod (FGD) and Natalizumab (NTZ) appear to be effective in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS), they have never been directly compared in a randomized clinical trial (RCT). Methods and Findings We evaluated the comparative efficacy of FGD vs. NTZ using a meta-analytical approach. Data from placebo-controlled RCTs was used for indirect comparisons and observational data was utilized for head-to-head comparisons. We identified 3 RCTs (2498 patients) and 5 observational studies (2576 patients). NTZ was associated with a greater reduction in the 2-year annualized relapse rate (ARR; SMDindirect = -0.24;95% CI: from -0.44 to -0.04; p = 0.005) and with the probability of no disease activity at 2 years (ORindirect:1.82, 95% CI: from 1.05 to 3.15) compared to FGD, while no differences between the two therapies were found in the proportion of patients who remained relapse-free (ORindirect = 1.20;95% CI: from 0.84 to 1.71) and those with disability progression (ORindirect = 0.76;95% CI: from 0.48 to 1.21) at 2 years. In the analysis of observational data, we found no significant differences between NTZ and FGD in the 2-year ARR (SMD = -0.05; 95% CI: from -0.26 to 0.16), and 2-year disability progression (OR:1.08;95% CI: from 0.77 to 1.52). However, NTZ-treated patients were more likely to remain relapse-free at 2-years compared to FGD (OR: 2.19;95% CI: from 1.15 to 4.18; p = z0.020). Conclusions Indirect analyses of RCT data and head-to-head comparisons of observational findings indicate that NTZ may be more effective than FGD in terms of disease activity reduction in patients with RRMS. However, head-to-head RCTs are required to independently confirm this preliminary observation. PMID:27684943

  8. Low dose neutron late effects: Cataractogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Worgul, B.V.

    1991-12-01

    The work is formulated to resolve the uncertainty regarding the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of low dose neutron radiation. The study exploits the fact that cataractogenesis is sensitive to the inverse dose-rate effect as has been observed with heavy ions and was an endpoint considered in the follow-up of the A-bomb survivors. The neutron radiations were initiated at the Radiological Research Accelerator facility (RARAF) of the Nevis Laboratory of Columbia University. Four week old ({plus minus} 1 day) rats were divided into eight dose groups each receiving single or fractionated total doses of 0.2, 1.0, 5.0 and 25.0 cGy of monoenergetic 435 KeV neutrons. Special restraining jigs insured that the eye, at the midpoint of the lens, received the appropriate energy and dose with a relative error of {plus minus}5%. The fractionation regimen consisted of four exposures, each administered at three hour ({plus minus}) intervals. The neutron irradiated groups are being compared to rats irradiated with 250kVp X-rays in doses ranging from 0.5 to 7 Gy. The animals are being examined on a biweekly basis utilizing conventional slit-lamp biomicroscopy and the Scheimpflug Slit Lamp Imaging System (Zeiss). The follows-ups, entering their second year, will continue throughout the life-span of the animals. This is essential inasmuch as given the extremely low doses which are being utilized clinically detectable opacities were not anticipated until a significant fraction of the life span has lapsed. Current data support this contention. At this juncture cataracts in the irradiated groups are beginning to exceed control levels.

  9. Low Dose Ionizing Radiation Modulates Immune Function

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Gregory A.

    2016-01-12

    In order to examine the effects of low dose ionizing radiation on the immune system we chose to examine an amplified adaptive cellular immunity response. This response is Type IV delayed-type hypersensitivity also called contact hypersensitivity. The agent fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) is a low molecular weight, lipophilic, reactive, fluorescent molecule that can be applied to the skin where it (hapten) reacts with proteins (carriers) to become a complete antigen. Exposure to FITC leads to sensitization which is easily measured as a hypersensitivity inflammatory reaction following a subsequent exposure to the ear. Ear swelling, eosinophil infiltration, immunoglobulin E production and cytokine secretion patterns characteristic of a “Th2 polarized” immune response are the components of the reaction. The reaction requires successful implementation of antigen processing and presentation by antigen presenting Langerhans cells, communication with naïve T lymphocytes in draining lymph nodes, expansion of activated T cell clones, migration of activated T cells to the circulation, and recruitment of memory T cells, macrophages and eosinophils to the site of the secondary challenge. Using this model our approach was to quantify system function rather than relying only on indirect biomarkers of cell. We measured the FITC-induced hypersensitivity reaction over a range of doses from 2 cGy to 2 Gy. Irradiations were performed during key events or prior to key events to deplete critical cell populations. In addition to quantifying the final inflammatory response, we assessed cell populations in peripheral blood and spleen, cytokine signatures, IgE levels and expression of genes associated with key processes in sensitization and elicitation/recall. We hypothesized that ionizing radiation would produce a biphasic effect on immune system function resulting in an enhancement at low doses and a depression at higher doses and suggested that this transition would occur in the

  10. Low-Dose Radiotherapy in Indolent Lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Rossier, Christine; Schick, Ulrike; Miralbell, Raymond; Mirimanoff, Rene O.; Weber, Damien C.; Ozsahin, Mahmut

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: To assess the response rate, duration of response, and overall survival after low-dose involved-field radiotherapy in patients with recurrent low-grade lymphoma or chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Methods and Materials: Forty-three (24 women, 19 men) consecutive patients with indolent lymphoma or CLL were treated with a total dose of 4 Gy (2 x 2 Gy) using 6- 18-MV photons. The median age was 73 years (range, 39-88). Radiotherapy was given either after (n = 32; 75%) or before (n = 11; 25%) chemotherapy. The median time from diagnosis was 48 months (range, 1-249). The median follow-up period was 20 months (range, 1-56). Results: The overall response rate was 90%. Twelve patients (28%) had a complete response, 15 (35%) had a partial response, 11 (26%) had stable disease, and 5 (11%) had progressive disease. The median overall survival for patients with a positive response (complete response/partial response/stable disease) was 41 months; for patients with progressive disease it was 6 months (p = 0.001). The median time to in-field progression was 21 months (range, 0-24), and the median time to out-field progression was 8 months (range, 0-40). The 3-year in-field control was 92% in patients with complete response (median was not reached). The median time to in-field progression was 9 months (range, 0.5-24) in patients with partial response and 6 months (range, 0.6-6) in those with stable disease (p < 0.05). Younger age, positive response to radiotherapy, and no previous chemotherapy were the best factors influencing the outcome. Conclusions: Low-dose involved-field radiotherapy is an effective treatment in the management of patients with recurrent low-grade lymphoma or CLL.

  11. Low dose propranolol decreases orthodontic movement.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Erika Lira; Freitas, Fabiana Furtado; de Macedo, Cristina Gomes; Clemente-Napimoga, Juliana Trindade; Silva, Milena Bortolotto Felippe; Manhães-Jr, Luiz Roberto Coutinho; Junqueira, José Luiz Cintra; Napimoga, Marcelo Henrique

    2014-10-01

    Low dose propranolol has previously been demonstrated to suppress bone remodelling. Therefore, its effect on orthodontic movement was tested. Rats were assigned as follows (n=5): animals with no orthodontic appliance (G1); the remaining groups were fitted with a Ni-Ti closed-coil spring ligated to the upper left first molar and connected to the incisors using metal and resin and received vehicle only (G2), 0.1mg/kg (G3) or 20mg/kg (G4) of propranolol orally. Cone Beam Computed Tomography was performed using high resolution for image capture. The distance between the first and second upper molars, both with and without the orthodontic appliance, was measured in millimetres. Gingival tissue was harvested and assessed for IL-1β and IL-6 using ELISA and for ICAM-1 and RANKL by Western blotting. The orthodontic appliance induced a significant tooth movement in G2 when compared to the animals without an orthodontic appliance (G1) (p<0.05). The animals from G3 showed a significantly reduction in tooth movement (p<0.05) when compared with rats from G2. Animals treated with 20mg/kg of propranolol (G4) showed tooth movement similar to that of G2. The reduced tooth movement observed in the animals treated with 0.1mg/kg of propranolol (G3) occurred due to decreased amounts of IL-1β and IL-6, in addition to lower ICAM-1 and RANKL expression. Low dose propranolol inhibits bone remodelling and orthodontic movement. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Enhanced Low Dose Rate Sensitivity at Ultra-Low Dose Rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Dakai; Pease, Ronald; Forney, James; Carts, Martin; Phan, Anthony; Cox, Stephen; Kruckmeyer, Kriby; Burns, Sam; Albarian, Rafi; Holcombe, Bruce; Little, Bradley; Salzman, James; Chaumont, Geraldine; Duperray, Herve; Ouellet, Al; Buchner, Stephen; LaBel, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    We have presented results of ultra-low dose rate irradiations (< or = 10 mrad(Si)/s) for a variety of radiation hardened and commercial linear bipolar devices. We observed low dose rate enhancement factors exceeding 1.5 in several parts. The worst case of dose rate enhancement resulted in functional failures, which occurred after 10 and 60 krad(Si), for devices irradiated at 0.5 and 10 mrad(Si)/s, respectively. Devices fabricated with radiation hardened processes and designs also displayed dose rate enhancement at below 10 mrad(Si)/s. Furthermore, the data indicated that these devices have not reached the damage saturation point. Therefore the degradation will likely continue to increase with increasing total dose, and the low dose rate enhancement will further magnify. The cases presented here, in addition to previous examples, illustrate the significance and pervasiveness of low dose rate enhancement at dose rates lower than 10 mrad(Si). These results present further challenges for radiation hardness assurance of bipolar linear circuits, and raise the question of whether the current standard test dose rate is conservative enough to bound degradations due to ELDRS.

  13. An automated system for lung nodule detection in low-dose computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gori, I.; Fantacci, M. E.; Preite Martinez, A.; Retico, A.

    2007-03-01

    A computer-aided detection (CAD) system for the identification of pulmonary nodules in low-dose multi-detector helical Computed Tomography (CT) images was developed in the framework of the MAGIC-5 Italian project. One of the main goals of this project is to build a distributed database of lung CT scans in order to enable automated image analysis through a data and cpu GRID infrastructure. The basic modules of our lung-CAD system, a dot-enhancement filter for nodule candidate selection and a neural classifier for false-positive finding reduction, are described. The system was designed and tested for both internal and sub-pleural nodules. The results obtained on the collected database of low-dose thin-slice CT scans are shown in terms of free response receiver operating characteristic (FROC) curves and discussed.

  14. Low-dose computed tomography image restoration using previous normal-dose scan

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jianhua; Huang, Jing; Feng, Qianjin; Zhang, Hua; Lu, Hongbing; Liang, Zhengrong; Chen, Wufan

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: In current computed tomography (CT) examinations, the associated x-ray radiation dose is of a significant concern to patients and operators. A simple and cost-effective means to perform the examinations is to lower the milliampere-seconds (mAs) or kVp parameter (or delivering less x-ray energy to the body) as low as reasonably achievable in data acquisition. However, lowering the mAs parameter will unavoidably increase data noise and the noise would propagate into the CT image if no adequate noise control is applied during image reconstruction. Since a normal-dose high diagnostic CT image scanned previously may be available in some clinical applications, such as CT perfusion imaging and CT angiography (CTA), this paper presents an innovative way to utilize the normal-dose scan as a priori information to induce signal restoration of the current low-dose CT image series.Methods: Unlike conventional local operations on neighboring image voxels, nonlocal means (NLM) algorithm utilizes the redundancy of information across the whole image. This paper adapts the NLM to utilize the redundancy of information in the previous normal-dose scan and further exploits ways to optimize the nonlocal weights for low-dose image restoration in the NLM framework. The resulting algorithm is called the previous normal-dose scan induced nonlocal means (ndiNLM). Because of the optimized nature of nonlocal weights calculation, the ndiNLM algorithm does not depend heavily on image registration between the current low-dose and the previous normal-dose CT scans. Furthermore, the smoothing parameter involved in the ndiNLM algorithm can be adaptively estimated based on the image noise relationship between the current low-dose and the previous normal-dose scanning protocols.Results: Qualitative and quantitative evaluations were carried out on a physical phantom as well as clinical abdominal and brain perfusion CT scans in terms of accuracy and resolution properties. The gain by the use of

  15. Low-dose computed tomography image restoration using previous normal-dose scan.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jianhua; Huang, Jing; Feng, Qianjin; Zhang, Hua; Lu, Hongbing; Liang, Zhengrong; Chen, Wufan

    2011-10-01

    In current computed tomography (CT) examinations, the associated x-ray radiation dose is of a significant concern to patients and operators. A simple and cost-effective means to perform the examinations is to lower the milliampere-seconds (mAs) or kVp parameter (or delivering less x-ray energy to the body) as low as reasonably achievable in data acquisition. However, lowering the mAs parameter will unavoidably increase data noise and the noise would propagate into the CT image if no adequate noise control is applied during image reconstruction. Since a normal-dose high diagnostic CT image scanned previously may be available in some clinical applications, such as CT perfusion imaging and CT angiography (CTA), this paper presents an innovative way to utilize the normal-dose scan as a priori information to induce signal restoration of the current low-dose CT image series. Unlike conventional local operations on neighboring image voxels, nonlocal means (NLM) algorithm utilizes the redundancy of information across the whole image. This paper adapts the NLM to utilize the redundancy of information in the previous normal-dose scan and further exploits ways to optimize the nonlocal weights for low-dose image restoration in the NLM framework. The resulting algorithm is called the previous normal-dose scan induced nonlocal means (ndiNLM). Because of the optimized nature of nonlocal weights calculation, the ndiNLM algorithm does not depend heavily on image registration between the current low-dose and the previous normal-dose CT scans. Furthermore, the smoothing parameter involved in the ndiNLM algorithm can be adaptively estimated based on the image noise relationship between the current low-dose and the previous normal-dose scanning protocols. Qualitative and quantitative evaluations were carried out on a physical phantom as well as clinical abdominal and brain perfusion CT scans in terms of accuracy and resolution properties. The gain by the use of the previous normal

  16. Low-dose computed tomography image restoration using previous normal-dose scan

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Jianhua; Huang, Jing; Feng, Qianjin; Zhang, Hua; Lu, Hongbing; Liang, Zhengrong; Chen, Wufan

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: In current computed tomography (CT) examinations, the associated x-ray radiation dose is of a significant concern to patients and operators. A simple and cost-effective means to perform the examinations is to lower the milliampere-seconds (mAs) or kVp parameter (or delivering less x-ray energy to the body) as low as reasonably achievable in data acquisition. However, lowering the mAs parameter will unavoidably increase data noise and the noise would propagate into the CT image if no adequate noise control is applied during image reconstruction. Since a normal-dose high diagnostic CT image scanned previously may be available in some clinical applications, such as CT perfusion imaging and CT angiography (CTA), this paper presents an innovative way to utilize the normal-dose scan as a priori information to induce signal restoration of the current low-dose CT image series. Methods: Unlike conventional local operations on neighboring image voxels, nonlocal means (NLM) algorithm utilizes the redundancy of information across the whole image. This paper adapts the NLM to utilize the redundancy of information in the previous normal-dose scan and further exploits ways to optimize the nonlocal weights for low-dose image restoration in the NLM framework. The resulting algorithm is called the previous normal-dose scan induced nonlocal means (ndiNLM). Because of the optimized nature of nonlocal weights calculation, the ndiNLM algorithm does not depend heavily on image registration between the current low-dose and the previous normal-dose CT scans. Furthermore, the smoothing parameter involved in the ndiNLM algorithm can be adaptively estimated based on the image noise relationship between the current low-dose and the previous normal-dose scanning protocols. Results: Qualitative and quantitative evaluations were carried out on a physical phantom as well as clinical abdominal and brain perfusion CT scans in terms of accuracy and resolution properties. The gain by the use

  17. [Opioids in chronic noncancer pain-are opioids different? A systematic review and meta-analysis of efficacy, tolerability and safety in randomized head-to-head comparisons of opioids of at least four week's duration].

    PubMed

    Lauche, R; Klose, P; Radbruch, L; Welsch, P; Häuser, W

    2015-02-01

    We updated a systematic review on the comparative efficacy, tolerability and safety of opioids and of their routes of application in chronic noncancer pain (CNCP). We screened MEDLINE, Scopus and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) up until October 2013, as well as the reference sections of original studies and systematic reviews of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of opioids in CNCP. We included randomized head-to-head comparisons of opioids (opioid of the sponsor of the study versus standard opioid) of at least 4 week's duration. Using a random effects model, absolute risk differences (RD) were calculated for categorical data and standardized mean differences (SMD) for continuous variables. The quality of evidence was rated by the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) approach. We included 13 RCTs with 6748 participants. Median study duration was 15 weeks (range 4-56 weeks). Hydromorphone, morphine, oxymorphone and tapentadol were compared to oxycodone; fentanyl to morphine and buprenorphine to tramadol. In pooled analysis, there were no significant differences between the two groups of opioids in terms of mean pain reduction (low-quality evidence), the patient global impression to be much or very much improved outcome (low-quality evidence), physical function (very low-quality evidence), serious adverse events (moderate-quality evidence) or mortality (moderate-quality evidence). There was no significant difference between transdermal and oral application of opioids in terms of mean pain reduction, physical function, serious adverse events, mortality (all low-quality evidence) or dropout due to adverse events (very low-quality). Pooled head-to-head comparisons of opioids (opioid of the sponsor of the study versus standard opioid) provide no rational for preferring one opioid and/or administration route over another in the therapy of patients with CNCP. The English full-text version of this

  18. Advanced Computational Approaches for Characterizing Stochastic Cellular Responses to Low Dose, Low Dose Rate Exposures

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, Bobby, R., Ph.D.

    2003-06-27

    OAK - B135 This project final report summarizes modeling research conducted in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Low Dose Radiation Research Program at the Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute from October 1998 through June 2003. The modeling research described involves critically evaluating the validity of the linear nonthreshold (LNT) risk model as it relates to stochastic effects induced in cells by low doses of ionizing radiation and genotoxic chemicals. The LNT model plays a central role in low-dose risk assessment for humans. With the LNT model, any radiation (or genotoxic chemical) exposure is assumed to increase one¡¯s risk of cancer. Based on the LNT model, others have predicted tens of thousands of cancer deaths related to environmental exposure to radioactive material from nuclear accidents (e.g., Chernobyl) and fallout from nuclear weapons testing. Our research has focused on developing biologically based models that explain the shape of dose-response curves for low-dose radiation and genotoxic chemical-induced stochastic effects in cells. Understanding the shape of the dose-response curve for radiation and genotoxic chemical-induced stochastic effects in cells helps to better understand the shape of the dose-response curve for cancer induction in humans. We have used a modeling approach that facilitated model revisions over time, allowing for timely incorporation of new knowledge gained related to the biological basis for low-dose-induced stochastic effects in cells. Both deleterious (e.g., genomic instability, mutations, and neoplastic transformation) and protective (e.g., DNA repair and apoptosis) effects have been included in our modeling. Our most advanced model, NEOTRANS2, involves differing levels of genomic instability. Persistent genomic instability is presumed to be associated with nonspecific, nonlethal mutations and to increase both the risk for neoplastic transformation and for cancer occurrence. Our research results, based on

  19. Contraception. Low-dose pill launched.

    PubMed

    1993-01-01

    At a vibrant ceremony in Kampala, Uganda, the Minister of Women in Development, Youth and Culture launched the new low-dose oral contraceptive Pilplan which provides women more options for birth spacing. Diplomats, physicians, government officials, and business leaders attended the ceremony at the Sheraton Hotel Kampala. A dance group did an interpretation of "Women in Uganda: Gaining Momentum." The Minister considered the introduction of this new pill as a turning point for reproductive rights. A baseline survey among Ugandan women has shown that although almost all women were familiar with the pill, only 36% have ever used it and only 15% were currently using it. 80% thought that pill use was preferable to having an unplanned pregnancy. These findings convinced the Minister that ignorance and misconception keep women from using the pill. The government, health providers, and others need to educate women about Pilplan and how to use it correctly. A bilateral agreement between the Ministry of Health and USAID set in motion a social marketing project which has now launched two contraceptive methods: Pilplan in 1993 and the Protector condom in 1990. USAID vowed to continue to support Pilplan, particularly if men could also help in supporting birth spacing. A Uganda-based pharmaceutical firm will distribute Pilplan in Uganda through pharmacies, clinics, and health facilities. Pilplan targets all middle- to low-income women.

  20. Assessment of dose and DNA damages in individuals exposed to low dose and low dose rate ionizing radiations during computed tomography imaging.

    PubMed

    Kanagaraj, Karthik; Abdul Syed Basheerudeen, Safa; Tamizh Selvan, G; Jose, M T; Ozhimuthu, Annalakshmi; Panneer Selvam, S; Pattan, Sudha; Perumal, Venkatachalam

    2015-08-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is a frequently used imaging modality that contributes to a tenfold increase in radiation exposure to the public when compared to other medical imaging modalities. The use of radiation for therapeutic need is always rationalized on the basis of risk versus benefit thereby increasing concerns on the dose received by patients undergoing CT imaging. Therefore, it was of interest to us to investigate the effects of low dose and low dose-rate X-irradiation in patients who underwent CT imaging by recording the doses received by the eye, forehead and thyroid, and to study the levels of damages in the lymphocytes in vivo. Lithium manganese borate doped with terbium (LMB:Tb) thermo luminescence dosimeters (TLD) were used to record the doses in the patient's (n = 27) eye, forehead, and thyroid and compared with the dose length product (DLP) values. The in vivo DNA damages measured were compared before and after CT imaging using chromosomal aberration (CA) and micronucleus (MN) assays. The overall measured organ dose ranged between 2 ± 0.29 and 520 ± 41.63 mGy for the eye, 0.84 ± 0.29 and 210 ± 20.50 mGy for the forehead, and 1.79 ± 0.43 and 185 ± 0.70 mGy for the thyroid. The in vivo damages measured from the blood lymphocytes of the subjects showed an extremely significant (p < 0.0001) increase in CA frequency and significant (p < 0.001) increase in MN frequency after exposure, compared to before exposure. The results suggest that CT imaging delivers a considerable amount of radiation dose to the eye, forehead, and thyroid, and the observed increase in the CA and MN frequencies show low dose radiation effects calling for protective regulatory measures to increase patient's safety. This study is the first attempt to indicate the trend of doses received by the patient's eye, forehead and thyroid and measured directly in contrast to earlier values obtained by extrapolation from phantoms, and to assess the in vivo low dose effects in an Indian

  1. Low-dose effects of hormones and endocrine disruptors.

    PubMed

    Vandenberg, Laura N

    2014-01-01

    Endogenous hormones have effects on tissue morphology, cell physiology, and behaviors at low doses. In fact, hormones are known to circulate in the part-per-trillion and part-per-billion concentrations, making them highly effective and potent signaling molecules. Many endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) mimic hormones, yet there is strong debate over whether these chemicals can also have effects at low doses. In the 1990s, scientists proposed the "low-dose hypothesis," which postulated that EDCs affect humans and animals at environmentally relevant doses. This chapter focuses on data that support and refute the low-dose hypothesis. A case study examining the highly controversial example of bisphenol A and its low-dose effects on the prostate is examined through the lens of endocrinology. Finally, the chapter concludes with a discussion of factors that can influence the ability of a study to detect and interpret low-dose effects appropriately. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Low-dose-rate, low-dose irradiation delays neurodegeneration in a model of retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Otani, Atsushi; Kojima, Hiroshi; Guo, Congrong; Oishi, Akio; Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    2012-01-01

    The existence of radiation hormesis is controversial. Several stimulatory effects of low-dose (LD) radiation have been reported to date; however, the effects on neural tissue or neurodegeneration remain unknown. Here, we show that LD radiation has a neuroprotective effect in mouse models of retinitis pigmentosa, a hereditary, progressive neurodegenerative disease that leads to blindness. Various LD radiation doses were administered to the eyes in a retinal degeneration mouse model, and their pathological and physiological effects were analyzed. LD gamma radiation in a low-dose-rate (LDR) condition rescues photoreceptor cell apoptosis both morphologically and functionally. The greatest effect was observed in a condition using 650 mGy irradiation and a 26 mGy/minute dose rate. Multiple rounds of irradiation strengthened this neuroprotective effect. A characteristic up-regulation (563%) of antioxidative gene peroxiredoxin-2 (Prdx2) in the LDR-LD-irradiated retina was observed compared to the sham-treated control retina. Silencing the Prdx2 using small-interfering RNA administration reduced the LDR-LD rescue effect on the photoreceptors. Our results demonstrate for the first time that LDR-LD irradiation has a biological effect in neural cells of living animals. The results support that radiation exhibits hormesis, and this effect may be applied as a novel therapeutic concept for retinitis pigmentosa and for other progressive neurodegenerative diseases regardless of the mechanism of degeneration involved.

  3. Head-to-head comparison of aggressive conventional therapy and three biological treatments and comparison of two de-escalation strategies in patients who respond to treatment: study protocol for a multicenter, randomized, open-label, blinded-assessor, phase 4 study.

    PubMed

    Glinatsi, Daniel; Heiberg, Marte S; Rudin, Anna; Nordström, Dan; Haavardsholm, Espen A; Gudbjornsson, Bjorn; Østergaard, Mikkel; Uhlig, Till; Grondal, Gerdur; Hørslev-Petersen, Kim; van Vollenhoven, Ronald; Hetland, Merete L

    2017-04-04

    in remission (CDAI ≤2.8) 24 weeks after initiating treatment de-escalation. Radiographic assessment will be performed regularly throughout the trial, and blood and urine samples will be stored in a biobank for later biomarker analyses. NORD-STAR is the first investigator-initiated, randomized, early RA trial to compare (1) csDMARD and three different bDMARD therapies head to head and (2) two different de-escalation strategies. The trial has the potential to identify which treatment strategy to apply in early RA to achieve the best possible outcomes for both patients and society. NCT01491815 and NCT02466581 . Registered on 8 December 2011 and May 2015, respectively. EudraCT: 2011-004720-35.

  4. Validation of true low-dose 18F-FDG PET of the brain

    PubMed Central

    Fällmar, David; Lilja, Johan; Kilander, Lena; Danfors, Torsten; Lubberink, Mark; Larsson, Elna-Marie; Sörensen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    The dosage of 18F-FDG must be sufficient to ensure adequate PET image quality. For younger patients and research controls, the lowest possible radiation dose should be used. The purpose of this study was to find a protocol for FDG-PET of the brain with reduced radiation dose and preserved quantitative characteristics. Eight patients with neurodegenerative disorders and nine controls (n=17) underwent FDG-PET/CT twice on separate occasions, first with normal-dose (3 MBq/kg), and second with low-dose (0.75 MBq/kg, 25% of the original). Five additional controls (total n=22) underwent FDG-PET twice, using normal-dose and ultra-low-dose (0.3 MBq/kg, 10% of original). All subjects underwent MRI. Ten-minute summation images were spatially normalized and intensity normalized. Regional standard uptake value ratios (SUV-r) were calculated using an automated atlas. SUV-r values from the normal- and low-dose images were compared pairwise. No clinically significant bias was found in any of the three groups. The mean absolute difference in regional SUV-r values was 0.015 (1.32%) in controls and 0.019 (1.67%) in patients. The ultra-low-dose protocol produced a slightly higher mean difference of 0.023 (2.10%). The main conclusion is that 0.75 MBq/kg (56 MBq for a 75-kg subject) is a sufficient FDG dose for evaluating regional SUV-ratios in brain PET scans in adults with or without neurodegenerative disease, resulting in a reduction of total PET/CT effective dose from 4.54 to 1.15 mSv. The ultra-low-dose (0.5 mSv) could be useful in research studies requiring serial PET in healthy controls or children. PMID:27766185

  5. Validation of true low-dose (18)F-FDG PET of the brain.

    PubMed

    Fällmar, David; Lilja, Johan; Kilander, Lena; Danfors, Torsten; Lubberink, Mark; Larsson, Elna-Marie; Sörensen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    The dosage of (18)F-FDG must be sufficient to ensure adequate PET image quality. For younger patients and research controls, the lowest possible radiation dose should be used. The purpose of this study was to find a protocol for FDG-PET of the brain with reduced radiation dose and preserved quantitative characteristics. Eight patients with neurodegenerative disorders and nine controls (n=17) underwent FDG-PET/CT twice on separate occasions, first with normal-dose (3 MBq/kg), and second with low-dose (0.75 MBq/kg, 25% of the original). Five additional controls (total n=22) underwent FDG-PET twice, using normal-dose and ultra-low-dose (0.3 MBq/kg, 10% of original). All subjects underwent MRI. Ten-minute summation images were spatially normalized and intensity normalized. Regional standard uptake value ratios (SUV-r) were calculated using an automated atlas. SUV-r values from the normal- and low-dose images were compared pairwise. No clinically significant bias was found in any of the three groups. The mean absolute difference in regional SUV-r values was 0.015 (1.32%) in controls and 0.019 (1.67%) in patients. The ultra-low-dose protocol produced a slightly higher mean difference of 0.023 (2.10%). The main conclusion is that 0.75 MBq/kg (56 MBq for a 75-kg subject) is a sufficient FDG dose for evaluating regional SUV-ratios in brain PET scans in adults with or without neurodegenerative disease, resulting in a reduction of total PET/CT effective dose from 4.54 to 1.15 mSv. The ultra-low-dose (0.5 mSv) could be useful in research studies requiring serial PET in healthy controls or children.

  6. Optimization and head-to-head comparison of MISSR-PCR, ERIC-PCR, RAPD and 16S rRNA evolutionary clock for the genotyping of Vibrio cholerae isolated in China.

    PubMed

    Mo, Q H; Wang, H B; Tan, H; An, S L; Feng, Z L; Wang, Q; Lin, J C; Yang, Z

    2015-01-01

    To establish a new genotyping method for Vibrio cholerae and compare it with other methods. In the current study, a modified inter simple sequence repeat-polymerase chain reaction (MISSR-PCR) system was developed via several rounds of optimisation. Comparison study was then conducted between MISSR-PCR and three other methods, including enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus sequences-based PCR (ERIC-PCR), randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and 16S rRNA evolutionary clock, for the detection and genetic tracing of Vibrio cholerae isolated from seafood in China. The results indicated that the MISSR-PCR system could generate the highest polymorphic fingerprinting map in a single round PCR and showed the best discriminatory ability for Vibrio cholerae genotyping by clearly separating toxigenic/nontoxigenic strains, local/foreign strains, and O1/O139/non-O1/non-O139 serogroup strains, comparing to ERIC-PCR, RAPD and 16S rRNA evolutionary clock. Moreover, the MISSR-PCR is superior to previously described traditional simple sequence repeat based PCR method on genotyping by more clearly separating different clusters. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first head-to-head comparison of four detection and genotyping methods for Vibrio cholerae The MISSR-PCR system established here could serve as a simple, quick, reliable and cost-effective tool for the genotyping and epidemiological study.

  7. Accuracy and precision of pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling perfusion during baseline and hypercapnia: a head-to-head comparison with ¹⁵O H₂O positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Heijtel, D F R; Mutsaerts, H J M M; Bakker, E; Schober, P; Stevens, M F; Petersen, E T; van Berckel, B N M; Majoie, C B L M; Booij, J; van Osch, M J P; Vanbavel, E; Boellaard, R; Lammertsma, A A; Nederveen, A J

    2014-05-15

    Measurements of the cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) provide useful information about cerebrovascular condition and regional metabolism. Pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling (pCASL) is a promising non-invasive MRI technique to quantitatively measure the CBF, whereas additional hypercapnic pCASL measurements are currently showing great promise to quantitatively assess the CVR. However, the introduction of pCASL at a larger scale awaits further evaluation of the exact accuracy and precision compared to the gold standard. (15)O H₂O positron emission tomography (PET) is currently regarded as the most accurate and precise method to quantitatively measure both CBF and CVR, though it is one of the more invasive methods as well. In this study we therefore assessed the accuracy and precision of quantitative pCASL-based CBF and CVR measurements by performing a head-to-head comparison with (15)O H₂O PET, based on quantitative CBF measurements during baseline and hypercapnia. We demonstrate that pCASL CBF imaging is accurate during both baseline and hypercapnia with respect to (15)O H₂O PET with a comparable precision. These results pave the way for quantitative usage of pCASL MRI in both clinical and research settings.

  8. Scintigraphic head-to-head comparison between 99mTc-WBCs and 99mTc-LeukoScan in the evaluation of inflammatory bowel disease: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Stokkel, Marcel P M; Reigman, HennaI E; Pauwels, Ernest K J

    2002-02-01

    Scintigraphy with technetium-99m labelled white blood cells (WBCs) is routinely used in our hospital for the assessment of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The main disadvantages of this diagnostic tool are its time-consuming nature and the handling of blood itself. 99mTc-LeukoScan is a relatively new, easily prepared agent that is used for the detection of