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Sample records for low-dose unenhanced ct

  1. [Indications for low-dose CT in the emergency setting].

    PubMed

    Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre; Andereggen, Elisabeth; Rutschmann, Olivier; de Perrot, Thomas; Caviezel, Alessandro; Platon, Alexandra

    2009-08-19

    CT delivers a large dose of radiation, especially in abdominal imaging. Recently, a low-dose abdominal CT protocol (low-dose CT) has been set-up in our institution. "Low-dose CT" is almost equivalent to a single standard abdominal radiograph in term of dose of radiation (about one sixth of those delivered by a standard CT). "Low-dose CT" is now used routinely in our emergency service in two main indications: patients with a suspicion of renal colic and those with right lower quadrant pain. It is obtained without intravenous contrast media. Oral contrast is given to patients with suspicion of appendicitis. "Low-dose CT" is used in the frame of well defined clinical algorithms, and does only replace standard CT when it can reach a comparable diagnostic quality.

  2. Low-dose CT via convolutional neural network

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hu; Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Weihua; Liao, Peixi; Li, Ke; Zhou, Jiliu; Wang, Ge

    2017-01-01

    In order to reduce the potential radiation risk, low-dose CT has attracted an increasing attention. However, simply lowering the radiation dose will significantly degrade the image quality. In this paper, we propose a new noise reduction method for low-dose CT via deep learning without accessing original projection data. A deep convolutional neural network is here used to map low-dose CT images towards its corresponding normal-dose counterparts in a patch-by-patch fashion. Qualitative results demonstrate a great potential of the proposed method on artifact reduction and structure preservation. In terms of the quantitative metrics, the proposed method has showed a substantial improvement on PSNR, RMSE and SSIM than the competing state-of-art methods. Furthermore, the speed of our method is one order of magnitude faster than the iterative reconstruction and patch-based image denoising methods. PMID:28270976

  3. Screening for lung cancer with low-dose CT.

    PubMed

    Coche, E

    2008-01-01

    Lung cancer represents the leading cause of cancer-related mortality in the world. In the past, many attempts were made to detect the disease at an early stage and subsequently reduce its mortality. Chest X-ray was abandoned for this purpose. For several years low-dose computed tomography has been introduced as a potential tool for early screening in a high-risk population. As demonstrated in several papers, the task is not easy and researchers are faced with many difficulties. This paper reviews mainly the role of low-dose CT for early cancer screening. Results of past and current trials, controversies related to the high rate of lung nodules, cost-effectiveness, and delivered radiation dose to the patient are presented. Finally some limitations of low dose CT for lung cancer detection are explained.

  4. Adaptively Tuned Iterative Low Dose CT Image Denoising

    PubMed Central

    Hashemi, SayedMasoud; Paul, Narinder S.; Beheshti, Soosan; Cobbold, Richard S. C.

    2015-01-01

    Improving image quality is a critical objective in low dose computed tomography (CT) imaging and is the primary focus of CT image denoising. State-of-the-art CT denoising algorithms are mainly based on iterative minimization of an objective function, in which the performance is controlled by regularization parameters. To achieve the best results, these should be chosen carefully. However, the parameter selection is typically performed in an ad hoc manner, which can cause the algorithms to converge slowly or become trapped in a local minimum. To overcome these issues a noise confidence region evaluation (NCRE) method is used, which evaluates the denoising residuals iteratively and compares their statistics with those produced by additive noise. It then updates the parameters at the end of each iteration to achieve a better match to the noise statistics. By combining NCRE with the fundamentals of block matching and 3D filtering (BM3D) approach, a new iterative CT image denoising method is proposed. It is shown that this new denoising method improves the BM3D performance in terms of both the mean square error and a structural similarity index. Moreover, simulations and patient results show that this method preserves the clinically important details of low dose CT images together with a substantial noise reduction. PMID:26089972

  5. Adaptively Tuned Iterative Low Dose CT Image Denoising.

    PubMed

    Hashemi, SayedMasoud; Paul, Narinder S; Beheshti, Soosan; Cobbold, Richard S C

    2015-01-01

    Improving image quality is a critical objective in low dose computed tomography (CT) imaging and is the primary focus of CT image denoising. State-of-the-art CT denoising algorithms are mainly based on iterative minimization of an objective function, in which the performance is controlled by regularization parameters. To achieve the best results, these should be chosen carefully. However, the parameter selection is typically performed in an ad hoc manner, which can cause the algorithms to converge slowly or become trapped in a local minimum. To overcome these issues a noise confidence region evaluation (NCRE) method is used, which evaluates the denoising residuals iteratively and compares their statistics with those produced by additive noise. It then updates the parameters at the end of each iteration to achieve a better match to the noise statistics. By combining NCRE with the fundamentals of block matching and 3D filtering (BM3D) approach, a new iterative CT image denoising method is proposed. It is shown that this new denoising method improves the BM3D performance in terms of both the mean square error and a structural similarity index. Moreover, simulations and patient results show that this method preserves the clinically important details of low dose CT images together with a substantial noise reduction.

  6. Gamma regularization based reconstruction for low dose CT.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junfeng; Chen, Yang; Hu, Yining; Luo, Limin; Shu, Huazhong; Li, Bicao; Liu, Jin; Coatrieux, Jean-Louis

    2015-09-07

    Reducing the radiation in computerized tomography is today a major concern in radiology. Low dose computerized tomography (LDCT) offers a sound way to deal with this problem. However, more severe noise in the reconstructed CT images is observed under low dose scan protocols (e.g. lowered tube current or voltage values). In this paper we propose a Gamma regularization based algorithm for LDCT image reconstruction. This solution is flexible and provides a good balance between the regularizations based on l0-norm and l1-norm. We evaluate the proposed approach using the projection data from simulated phantoms and scanned Catphan phantoms. Qualitative and quantitative results show that the Gamma regularization based reconstruction can perform better in both edge-preserving and noise suppression when compared with other norms.

  7. Low dose CT perfusion using k-means clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisana, Francesco; Henzler, Thomas; Schönberg, Stefan; Klotz, Ernst; Schmidt, Bernhard; Kachelrieß, Marc

    2016-03-01

    We aim at improving low dose CT perfusion functional parameters maps and CT images quality, preserving quantitative information. In a dynamic CT perfusion dataset, each voxel is measured T times, where T is the number of acquired time points. In this sense, we can think about a voxel as a point in a T-dimensional space, where the coordinates of the voxels would be the values of its time attenuation curve (TAC). Starting from this idea, a k-means algorithm was designed to group voxels in K classes. A modified guided time-intensity profile similarity (gTIPS) filter was implemented and applied only for those voxels belonging to the same class. The approach was tested on a digital brain perfusion phantom as well as on clinical brain and body perfusion datasets, and compared to the original TIPS implementation. The TIPS filter showed the highest CNR improvement, but lowest spatial resolution. gTIPS proved to have the best combination of spatial resolution and CNR improvement for CT images, while k-gTIPS was superior to both gTIPS and TIPS in terms of perfusion maps image quality. We demonstrate k-means clustering analysis can be applied to denoise dynamic CT perfusion data and to improve functional maps. Beside the promising results, this approach has the major benefit of being independent from the perfusion model employed for functional parameters calculation. No similar approaches were found in literature.

  8. Ultra low-dose CT attenuation correction in PET SPM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shyh-Jen; Yang, Bang-Hung; Tsai, Chia-Jung; Yang, Ching-Ching; Lee, Jason J. S.; Wu, Tung-Hsin

    2010-07-01

    The use of CT images for attenuation correction (CTAC) allows significantly shorter scanning time and a high quality noise-free attenuation map compared with conventional germanium-68 transmission scan because at least 10 4 times greater of photon flux would be generated from a CT scan under standard operating condition. However, this CTAC technique would potentially introduce more radiation risk to the patients owing to the higher radiation exposure from CT scan. Statistic parameters mapping (SPM) is a prominent technique in nuclear medicine community for the analysis of brain imaging data. The purpose of this study is to assess the feasibility of low-dose CT (LDCT) and ultra low-dose CT (UDCT) in PET SPM applications. The study was divided into two parts. The first part was to evaluate of tracer uptake distribution pattern and quantity analysis by using the striatal phantom to initially assess the feasibility of AC for clinical purpose. The second part was to examine the group SPM analysis using the Hoffman brain phantom. The phantom study is to simulate the human brain and to reduce the experimental uncertainty of real subjects. The initial studies show that the results of PET SPM analysis have no significant differences between LDCT and UDCT comparing to the current used default CTAC. Moreover, the dose of the LDCT is lower than that of the default CT by a factor of 9, and UDCT can even yield a 42 times dose reduction. We have demonstrated the SPM results while using LDCT and UDCT for PET AC is comparable to those using default CT setting, suggesting their feasibility in PET SPM applications. In addition, the necessity of UDCT in PET SPM studies to avoid excess radiation dose is also evident since most of the subjects involved are non-cancer patients or children and some normal subjects are even served as a comparison group in the experiment. It is our belief that additional attempts to decrease the radiation dose would be valuable, especially for children and

  9. Standardization and optimization of CT protocols to achieve low dose.

    PubMed

    Trattner, Sigal; Pearson, Gregory D N; Chin, Cynthia; Cody, Dianna D; Gupta, Rajiv; Hess, Christopher P; Kalra, Mannudeep K; Kofler, James M; Krishnam, Mayil S; Einstein, Andrew J

    2014-03-01

    The increase in radiation exposure due to CT scans has been of growing concern in recent years. CT scanners differ in their capabilities, and various indications require unique protocols, but there remains room for standardization and optimization. In this paper, the authors summarize approaches to reduce dose, as discussed in lectures constituting the first session of the 2013 UCSF Virtual Symposium on Radiation Safety and Computed Tomography. The experience of scanning at low dose in different body regions, for both diagnostic and interventional CT procedures, is addressed. An essential primary step is justifying the medical need for each scan. General guiding principles for reducing dose include tailoring a scan to a patient, minimizing scan length, use of tube current modulation and minimizing tube current, minimizing tube potential, iterative reconstruction, and periodic review of CT studies. Organized efforts for standardization have been spearheaded by professional societies such as the American Association of Physicists in Medicine. Finally, all team members should demonstrate an awareness of the importance of minimizing dose.

  10. Personalized low dose CT via variable kVp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hui; Jin, Yannan; Yao, Yangyang; Wu, Mingye; Yan, Ming; Tao, Kun; Yin, Zhye; De Man, Bruno

    2015-03-01

    Computerized Tomography (CT) is a powerful radiographic imaging technology but the health risk due to the exposure of x-ray radiation has drawn wide concern. In this study, we propose to use kVp modulation to reduce the radiation dose and achieve the personalized low dose CT. Two sets of simulation are performed to demonstrate the effectiveness of kVp modulation and the corresponding calibration. The first simulation used the helical body phantom (HBP) that is an elliptical water cylinder with high density bone inserts. The second simulation uses the NCAT phantom to emulate the practical use of kVp modulation approach with region of interest (ROI) selected in the cardiac region. The kVp modulation profile could be optimized view by view based on the knowledge of patient attenuation. A second order correction is applied to eliminate the beam hardening artifacts. To simplify the calibration process, we first generate the calibration vectors for a few representative spectra and then acquire other calibration vectors with interpolation. The simulation results demonstrate the beam hardening artifacts in the images with kVp modulation can be eliminated with proper beam hardening correction. The results also show that the simplification of calibration did not impair the image quality: the calibration with the simplified and the complete vectors both eliminate the artifacts effectively and the results are comparable. In summary, this study demonstrates the feasibility of kVp modulation and gives a practical way to calibrate the high order beam hardening artifacts.

  11. Ultra-low dose CT attenuation correction for PET/CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Ting; Alessio, Adam M.; De Man, Bruno; Manjeshwar, Ravindra; Asma, Evren; Kinahan, Paul E.

    2012-01-01

    A challenge for positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) quantitation is patient respiratory motion, which can cause an underestimation of lesion activity uptake and an overestimation of lesion volume. Several respiratory motion correction methods benefit from longer duration CT scans that are phase matched with PET scans. However, even with the currently available, lowest dose CT techniques, extended duration cine CT scans impart a substantially high radiation dose. This study evaluates methods designed to reduce CT radiation dose in PET/CT scanning. We investigated selected combinations of dose reduced acquisition and noise suppression methods that take advantage of the reduced requirement of CT for PET attenuation correction (AC). These include reducing CT tube current, optimizing CT tube voltage, adding filtration, CT sinogram smoothing and clipping. We explored the impact of these methods on PET quantitation via simulations on different digital phantoms. CT tube current can be reduced much lower for AC than that in low dose CT protocols. Spectra that are higher energy and narrower are generally more dose efficient with respect to PET image quality. Sinogram smoothing could be used to compensate for the increased noise and artifacts at radiation dose reduced CT images, which allows for a further reduction of CT dose with no penalty for PET image quantitation. When CT is not used for diagnostic and anatomical localization purposes, we showed that ultra-low dose CT for PET/CT is feasible. The significant dose reduction strategies proposed here could enable respiratory motion compensation methods that require extended duration CT scans and reduce radiation exposure in general for all PET/CT imaging.

  12. A Simple Low-dose X-ray CT Simulation from High-dose Scan.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Dong; Huang, Jing; Bian, Zhaoying; Niu, Shanzhou; Zhang, Hua; Feng, Qianjin; Liang, Zhengrong; Ma, Jianhua

    2015-10-01

    Low-dose X-ray computed tomography (CT) simulation from high-dose scan is required in optimizing radiation dose to patients. In this study, we propose a simple low-dose CT simulation strategy in sinogram domain using the raw data from high-dose scan. Specially, a relationship between the incident fluxes of low- and high- dose scans is first determined according to the repeated projection measurements and analysis. Second, the incident flux level of the simulated low-dose scan is generated by properly scaling the incident flux level of high-dose scan via the determined relationship in the first step. Third, the low-dose CT transmission data by energy integrating detection is simulated by adding a statistically independent Poisson noise distribution plus a statistically independent Gaussian noise distribution. Finally, a filtered back-projection (FBP) algorithm is implemented to reconstruct the resultant low-dose CT images. The present low-dose simulation strategy is verified on the simulations and real scans by comparing it with the existing low-dose CT simulation tool. Experimental results demonstrated that the present low-dose CT simulation strategy can generate accurate low-dose CT sinogram data from high-dose scan in terms of qualitative and quantitative measurements.

  13. Low-dose interpolated average CT for attenuation correction in cardiac PET/CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Tung-Hsin; Zhang, Geoffrey; Wang, Shyh-Jen; Chen, Chih-Hao; Yang, Bang-Hung; Wu, Nien-Yun; Huang, Tzung-Chi

    2010-07-01

    Because of the advantages in the use of high photon flux and thus the short scan times of CT imaging, the traditional 68Ge scans for positron emission tomography (PET) image attenuation correction have been replaced by CT scans in the modern PET/CT technology. The combination of fast CT scan and slow PET scan often causes image misalignment between the PET and CT images due to respiration motion. Use of the average CT derived from cine CT images is reported to reduce such misalignment. However, the radiation dose to patients is higher with cine CT scans. This study introduces a method that uses breath-hold CT images and their interpolations to generate the average CT for PET image attenuation correction. Breath-hold CT sets are taken at end-inspiration and end-expiration. Deformable image registration is applied to generate a voxel-to-voxel motion matrix between the two CT sets. The motion is equally divided into 5 steps from inspiration to expiration and 5 steps from expiration to inspiration, generating a total of 8 phases of interpolated CT sets. An average CT image is generated from all the 10 phase CT images, including original inhale/exhale CT and 8 interpolated CT sets. Quantitative comparison shows that the reduction of image misalignment artifacts using the average CT from the interpolation technique for PET attenuation correction is at a similar level as that using cine average CT, while the dose to the patient from the CT scans is reduced significantly. The interpolated average CT method hence provides a low dose alternative to cine CT scans for PET attenuation correction.

  14. Noise reduction with low dose CT data based on a modified ROF model.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yining; Zhao, Mengliu; Zhao, Yunsong; Li, Hongwei; Zhang, Peng

    2012-07-30

    In order to reduce the radiation exposure caused by Computed Tomography (CT) scanning, low dose CT has gained much interest in research as well as in industry. One fundamental difficulty for low dose CT lies in its heavy noise pollution in the raw data which leads to quality deterioration for reconstructed images. In this paper, we propose a modified ROF model to denoise low dose CT measurement data in light of Poisson noise model. Experimental results indicate that the reconstructed CT images based on measurement data processed by our model are in better quality, compared to the original ROF model or bilateral filtering.

  15. Low dose dynamic myocardial CT perfusion using advanced iterative reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eck, Brendan L.; Fahmi, Rachid; Fuqua, Christopher; Vembar, Mani; Dhanantwari, Amar; Bezerra, Hiram G.; Wilson, David L.

    2015-03-01

    Dynamic myocardial CT perfusion (CTP) can provide quantitative functional information for the assessment of coronary artery disease. However, x-ray dose in dynamic CTP is high, typically from 10mSv to >20mSv. We compared the dose reduction potential of advanced iterative reconstruction, Iterative Model Reconstruction (IMR, Philips Healthcare, Cleveland, Ohio) to hybrid iterative reconstruction (iDose4) and filtered back projection (FBP). Dynamic CTP scans were obtained using a porcine model with balloon-induced ischemia in the left anterior descending coronary artery to prescribed fractional flow reserve values. High dose dynamic CTP scans were acquired at 100kVp/100mAs with effective dose of 23mSv. Low dose scans at 75mAs, 50mAs, and 25mAs were simulated by adding x-ray quantum noise and detector electronic noise to the projection space data. Images were reconstructed with FBP, iDose4, and IMR at each dose level. Image quality in static CTP images was assessed by SNR and CNR. Blood flow was obtained using a dynamic CTP analysis pipeline and blood flow image quality was assessed using flow-SNR and flow-CNR. IMR showed highest static image quality according to SNR and CNR. Blood flow in FBP was increasingly over-estimated at reduced dose. Flow was more consistent for iDose4 from 100mAs to 50mAs, but was over-estimated at 25mAs. IMR was most consistent from 100mAs to 25mAs. Static images and flow maps for 100mAs FBP, 50mAs iDose4, and 25mAs IMR showed comparable, clear ischemia, CNR, and flow-CNR values. These results suggest that IMR can enable dynamic CTP at significantly reduced dose, at 5.8mSv or 25% of the comparable 23mSv FBP protocol.

  16. Improving abdomen tumor low-dose CT images using a fast dictionary learning based processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yang; Yin, Xindao; Shi, Luyao; Shu, Huazhong; Luo, Limin; Coatrieux, Jean-Louis; Toumoulin, Christine

    2013-08-01

    In abdomen computed tomography (CT), repeated radiation exposures are often inevitable for cancer patients who receive surgery or radiotherapy guided by CT images. Low-dose scans should thus be considered in order to avoid the harm of accumulative x-ray radiation. This work is aimed at improving abdomen tumor CT images from low-dose scans by using a fast dictionary learning (DL) based processing. Stemming from sparse representation theory, the proposed patch-based DL approach allows effective suppression of both mottled noise and streak artifacts. The experiments carried out on clinical data show that the proposed method brings encouraging improvements in abdomen low-dose CT images with tumors.

  17. Low-dose high-resolution CT of lung parenchyma

    SciTech Connect

    Zwirewich, C.V.; Mayo, J.R.; Mueller, N.L. )

    1991-08-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of low-dose high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) in the assessment of lung parenchyma, three observers reviewed the scans of 31 patients. The 1.5-mm-collimation, 2-second, 120-kVp scans were obtained at 20 and 200 mA at selected identical levels in the chest. The observers evaluated the visualization of normal pulmonary anatomy, various parenchymal abnormalities and their distribution, and artifacts. The low-dose and conventional scans were equivalent in the evaluation of vessels, lobar and segmental bronchi, and anatomy of secondary pulmonary lobules, and in characterizing the extent and distribution of reticulation, honeycomb cysts, and thickened interlobular septa. The low-dose technique failed to demonstrate ground-glass opacity in two of 10 cases (20%) and emphysema in one of nine cases (11%), in which they were evident but subtle on the high-dose scans. These differences were not statistically significant. Linear streak artifact was more prominent on images acquired with the low-dose technique, but the two techniques were judged equally diagnostic in 97% of cases. The authors conclude that HRCT images acquired at 20 mA yield anatomic information equivalent to that obtained with 200-mA scans in the majority of patients, without significant loss of spatial resolution or image degradation due to linear streak artifact.

  18. Attenuation correction of PET cardiac data with low-dose average CT in PET/CT

    SciTech Connect

    Pan Tinsu; Mawlawi, Osama; Luo, Dershan; Liu, Hui H.; Chi Paichun, M.; Mar, Martha V.; Gladish, Gregory; Truong, Mylene; Erasmus, Jeremy Jr.; Liao Zhongxing; Macapinlac, H. A.

    2006-10-15

    We proposed a low-dose average computer tomography (ACT) for attenuation correction (AC) of the PET cardiac data in PET/CT. The ACT was obtained from a cine CT scan of over one breath cycle per couch position while the patient was free breathing. We applied this technique on four patients who underwent tumor imaging with {sup 18}F-FDG in PET/CT, whose PET data showed high uptake of {sup 18}F-FDG in the heart and whose CT and PET data had misregistration. All four patients did not have known myocardiac infarction or ischemia. The patients were injected with 555-740 MBq of {sup 18}F-FDG and scanned 1 h after injection. The helical CT (HCT) data were acquired in 16 s for the coverage of 100 cm. The PET acquisition was 3 min per bed of 15 cm. The duration of cine CT acquisition per 2 cm was 5.9 s. We used a fast gantry rotation cycle time of 0.5 s to minimize motion induced reconstruction artifacts in the cine CT images, which were averaged to become the ACT images for AC of the PET data. The radiation dose was about 5 mGy for 5.9 s cine duration. The selection of 5.9 s was based on our analysis of the respiratory signals of 600 patients; 87% of the patients had average breath cycles of less than 6 s and 90% had standard deviations of less than 1 s in the period of breath cycle. In all four patient studies, registrations between the CT and the PET data were improved. An increase of average uptake in the anterior and the lateral walls up to 48% and a decrease of average uptake in the septal and the inferior walls up to 16% with ACT were observed. We also compared ACT and conventional slow scan CT (SSCT) of 4 s duration in one patient study and found ACT was better than SSCT in depicting average respiratory motion and the SSCT images showed motion-induced reconstruction artifacts. In conclusion, low-dose ACT improved registration of the CT and the PET data in the heart region in our study of four patients. ACT was superior than SSCT for depicting average respiration

  19. Spectrotemporal CT data acquisition and reconstruction at low dose

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Darin P.; Badea, Cristian T.; Lee, Chang-Lung; Kirsch, David G.

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: X-ray computed tomography (CT) is widely used, both clinically and preclinically, for fast, high-resolution anatomic imaging; however, compelling opportunities exist to expand its use in functional imaging applications. For instance, spectral information combined with nanoparticle contrast agents enables quantification of tissue perfusion levels, while temporal information details cardiac and respiratory dynamics. The authors propose and demonstrate a projection acquisition and reconstruction strategy for 5D CT (3D + dual energy + time) which recovers spectral and temporal information without substantially increasing radiation dose or sampling time relative to anatomic imaging protocols. Methods: The authors approach the 5D reconstruction problem within the framework of low-rank and sparse matrix decomposition. Unlike previous work on rank-sparsity constrained CT reconstruction, the authors establish an explicit rank-sparse signal model to describe the spectral and temporal dimensions. The spectral dimension is represented as a well-sampled time and energy averaged image plus regularly undersampled principal components describing the spectral contrast. The temporal dimension is represented as the same time and energy averaged reconstruction plus contiguous, spatially sparse, and irregularly sampled temporal contrast images. Using a nonlinear, image domain filtration approach, the authors refer to as rank-sparse kernel regression, the authors transfer image structure from the well-sampled time and energy averaged reconstruction to the spectral and temporal contrast images. This regularization strategy strictly constrains the reconstruction problem while approximately separating the temporal and spectral dimensions. Separability results in a highly compressed representation for the 5D data in which projections are shared between the temporal and spectral reconstruction subproblems, enabling substantial undersampling. The authors solved the 5D reconstruction

  20. Fast reconstruction of low dose proton CT by sinogram interpolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, David C.; Sangild Sørensen, Thomas; Rit, Simon

    2016-08-01

    Proton computed tomography (CT) has been demonstrated as a promising image modality in particle therapy planning. It can reduce errors in particle range calculations and consequently improve dose calculations. Obtaining a high imaging resolution has traditionally required computationally expensive iterative reconstruction techniques to account for the multiple scattering of the protons. Recently, techniques for direct reconstruction have been developed, but these require a higher imaging dose than the iterative methods. No previous work has compared the image quality of the direct and the iterative methods. In this article, we extend the methodology for direct reconstruction to be applicable for low imaging doses and compare the obtained results with three state-of-the-art iterative algorithms. We find that the direct method yields comparable resolution and image quality to the iterative methods, even at 1 mSv dose levels, while yielding a twentyfold speedup in reconstruction time over previously published iterative algorithms.

  1. Automated coronary artery calcification detection on low-dose chest CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yiting; Cham, Matthew D.; Henschke, Claudia; Yankelevitz, David; Reeves, Anthony P.

    2014-03-01

    Coronary artery calcification (CAC) measurement from low-dose CT images can be used to assess the risk of coronary artery disease. A fully automatic algorithm to detect and measure CAC from low-dose non-contrast, non-ECG-gated chest CT scans is presented. Based on the automatically detected CAC, the Agatston score (AS), mass score and volume score were computed. These were compared with scores obtained manually from standard-dose ECG-gated scans and low-dose un-gated scans of the same patient. The automatic algorithm segments the heart region based on other pre-segmented organs to provide a coronary region mask. The mitral valve and aortic valve calcification is identified and excluded. All remaining voxels greater than 180HU within the mask region are considered as CAC candidates. The heart segmentation algorithm was evaluated on 400 non-contrast cases with both low-dose and regular dose CT scans. By visual inspection, 371 (92.8%) of the segmentations were acceptable. The automated CAC detection algorithm was evaluated on 41 low-dose non-contrast CT scans. Manual markings were performed on both low-dose and standard-dose scans for these cases. Using linear regression, the correlation of the automatic AS with the standard-dose manual scores was 0.86; with the low-dose manual scores the correlation was 0.91. Standard risk categories were also computed. The automated method risk category agreed with manual markings of gated scans for 24 cases while 15 cases were 1 category off. For low-dose scans, the automatic method agreed with 33 cases while 7 cases were 1 category off.

  2. SU-E-P-03: Implementing a Low Dose Lung Screening CT Program Meeting Regulatory Requirements

    SciTech Connect

    LaFrance, M; Marsh, S; O'Donnell, G

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To provide information pertaining to IROC Houston QA Center's (RPC) credentialing process for institutions participating in NCI-sponsored clinical trials. Purpose: Provide guidance to the Radiology Departments with the intent of implementing a Low Dose CT Screening Program using different CT Scanners with multiple techniques within the framework of the required state regulations. Method: State Requirements for the purpose of implementing a Low Dose CT Lung Protocol required working with the Radiology and Pulmonary Department in setting up a Low Dose Screening Protocol designed to reduce the radiation burden to the patients enrolled. Radiation dose measurements (CTDIvol) for various CT manufacturers (Siemens16, Siemens 64, Philips 64, and Neusoft128) for three different weight based protocols. All scans were reviewed by the Radiologist. Prior to starting a low dose lung screening protocol, information had to be submitted to the state for approval. Performing a Healing Arts protocol requires extensive information. This not only includes name and address of the applicant but a detailed description of the disease, the x-ray examination and the population to be examined. The unit had to be tested by a qualified expert using the technique charts. The credentials of all the operators, the supervisors and the Radiologists had to be submitted to the state. Results: All the appropriate documentation was sent to the state for review. The measured results between the Low Dose Protocol versus the default Adult Chest Protocol showed that there was a dose reduction of 65% for small (100-150 lb.) patient, 75% for the Medium patient (151-250 lbs.), and a 55% reduction for the Large patient ( over 250 lbs.). Conclusion: Measured results indicated that the Low Dose Protocol indeed lowered the screening patient's radiation dose and the institution was able to submit the protocol to the State's regulators.

  3. Low-dose CT screening for lung cancer with automatic exposure control: phantom study.

    PubMed

    Gomi, Shiho; Muramatsu, Yoshihisa; Tsukagoshi, Shinsuke; Suzuki, Masahiro; Kakinuma, Ryutaro; Tsuchiya, Ryosuke; Moriyama, Noriyuki

    2008-07-01

    We conducted a study to determine optimal scan conditions for automatic exposure control (AEC) in computed tomography (CT) of low-dose chest screening in order to provide consistent image quality without increasing the collective dose. Using a chest CT phantom, we set CT-AEC scan conditions with a dose-reduction wedge (DR-Wedge) to the same radiation dose as those for low-tube current, fixed-scan conditions. Image quality was evaluated with the use of the standard deviation of the CT number, contrast-noise ratios (CNR), and receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. At the same radiation dose, in the scan conditions using CT-AEC with the DR-Wedge, the SD of the CT number of each slice position was stable. The CNR values were higher at the lung apex and lung base under CT-AEC with the DR-Wedge than under standard scan conditions (p < 0.0002). In addition, ROC analysis of blind evaluation by four radiologists and three technologists showed that the image quality was improved for the lung apex (p < 0.009), tracheal bifurcation (p < 0.038), and lung base (p < 0.022) in the scan conditions using CT-AEC with the DR-Wedge. We achieved improvement of image quality without increasing the collective dose by using CT-AEC with the DR-Wedge under low-dose scan conditions.

  4. Three-Dimensions Segmentation of Pulmonary Vascular Trees for Low Dose CT Scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Jun; Huang, Ying; Wang, Ying; Wang, Jun

    2016-12-01

    Due to the low contrast and the partial volume effects, providing an accurate and in vivo analysis for pulmonary vascular trees from low dose CT scans is a challenging task. This paper proposes an automatic integration segmentation approach for the vascular trees in low dose CT scans. It consists of the following steps: firstly, lung volumes are acquired by the knowledge based method from the CT scans, and then the data are smoothed by the 3D Gaussian filter; secondly, two or three seeds are gotten by the adaptive 2D segmentation and the maximum area selecting from different position scans; thirdly, each seed as the start voxel is inputted for a quick multi-seeds 3D region growing to get vascular trees; finally, the trees are refined by the smooth filter. Through skeleton analyzing for the vascular trees, the results show that the proposed method can provide much better and lower level vascular branches.

  5. Pearls and pitfalls in the diagnosis of ureterolithiasis with unenhanced helical CT.

    PubMed

    Dalrymple, N C; Casford, B; Raiken, D P; Elsass, K D; Pagan, R A

    2000-01-01

    Several signs to assist interpretation of unenhanced helical computed tomographic (CT) scans obtained for suspected ureterolithiasis have been described. Because signs such as perinephric stranding are not always readily apparent, a methodical approach to interpretation of CT studies is important in determining the presence or absence of ureterolithiasis. Evaluation of the poles of the kidneys is helpful in detecting subtle stranding of the perinephric fat. Inspection of the intrarenal collecting system within the poles of the kidneys is helpful in identifying subtle collecting system dilatation and can help prevent mistaking an extrarenal pelvis for hydronephrosis. Careful inspection of the ureter throughout its course is the most reliable method of distinguishing between ureteral stones and phleboliths. However, when the ureter cannot be followed antegrade, the pelvic portion can often be identified in a retrograde fashion. When secondary signs of obstruction are present but no stone is present, differential diagnostic considerations include a recently passed stone, pyelonephritis, urinary tract obstruction unrelated to stone disease, and protease inhibitor deposition disease.

  6. Low dose dynamic CT myocardial perfusion imaging using a statistical iterative reconstruction method

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, Yinghua; Chen, Guang-Hong; Hacker, Timothy A.; Raval, Amish N.; Van Lysel, Michael S.; Speidel, Michael A.

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: Dynamic CT myocardial perfusion imaging has the potential to provide both functional and anatomical information regarding coronary artery stenosis. However, radiation dose can be potentially high due to repeated scanning of the same region. The purpose of this study is to investigate the use of statistical iterative reconstruction to improve parametric maps of myocardial perfusion derived from a low tube current dynamic CT acquisition. Methods: Four pigs underwent high (500 mA) and low (25 mA) dose dynamic CT myocardial perfusion scans with and without coronary occlusion. To delineate the affected myocardial territory, an N-13 ammonia PET perfusion scan was performed for each animal in each occlusion state. Filtered backprojection (FBP) reconstruction was first applied to all CT data sets. Then, a statistical iterative reconstruction (SIR) method was applied to data sets acquired at low dose. Image voxel noise was matched between the low dose SIR and high dose FBP reconstructions. CT perfusion maps were compared among the low dose FBP, low dose SIR and high dose FBP reconstructions. Numerical simulations of a dynamic CT scan at high and low dose (20:1 ratio) were performed to quantitatively evaluate SIR and FBP performance in terms of flow map accuracy, precision, dose efficiency, and spatial resolution. Results: Forin vivo studies, the 500 mA FBP maps gave −88.4%, −96.0%, −76.7%, and −65.8% flow change in the occluded anterior region compared to the open-coronary scans (four animals). The percent changes in the 25 mA SIR maps were in good agreement, measuring −94.7%, −81.6%, −84.0%, and −72.2%. The 25 mA FBP maps gave unreliable flow measurements due to streaks caused by photon starvation (percent changes of +137.4%, +71.0%, −11.8%, and −3.5%). Agreement between 25 mA SIR and 500 mA FBP global flow was −9.7%, 8.8%, −3.1%, and 26.4%. The average variability of flow measurements in a nonoccluded region was 16.3%, 24.1%, and 937

  7. Low dose dynamic CT myocardial perfusion imaging using a statistical iterative reconstruction method

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Yinghua; Chen, Guang-Hong; Hacker, Timothy A.; Raval, Amish N.; Van Lysel, Michael S.; Speidel, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Dynamic CT myocardial perfusion imaging has the potential to provide both functional and anatomical information regarding coronary artery stenosis. However, radiation dose can be potentially high due to repeated scanning of the same region. The purpose of this study is to investigate the use of statistical iterative reconstruction to improve parametric maps of myocardial perfusion derived from a low tube current dynamic CT acquisition. Methods: Four pigs underwent high (500 mA) and low (25 mA) dose dynamic CT myocardial perfusion scans with and without coronary occlusion. To delineate the affected myocardial territory, an N-13 ammonia PET perfusion scan was performed for each animal in each occlusion state. Filtered backprojection (FBP) reconstruction was first applied to all CT data sets. Then, a statistical iterative reconstruction (SIR) method was applied to data sets acquired at low dose. Image voxel noise was matched between the low dose SIR and high dose FBP reconstructions. CT perfusion maps were compared among the low dose FBP, low dose SIR and high dose FBP reconstructions. Numerical simulations of a dynamic CT scan at high and low dose (20:1 ratio) were performed to quantitatively evaluate SIR and FBP performance in terms of flow map accuracy, precision, dose efficiency, and spatial resolution. Results: Forin vivo studies, the 500 mA FBP maps gave −88.4%, −96.0%, −76.7%, and −65.8% flow change in the occluded anterior region compared to the open-coronary scans (four animals). The percent changes in the 25 mA SIR maps were in good agreement, measuring −94.7%, −81.6%, −84.0%, and −72.2%. The 25 mA FBP maps gave unreliable flow measurements due to streaks caused by photon starvation (percent changes of +137.4%, +71.0%, −11.8%, and −3.5%). Agreement between 25 mA SIR and 500 mA FBP global flow was −9.7%, 8.8%, −3.1%, and 26.4%. The average variability of flow measurements in a nonoccluded region was 16.3%, 24.1%, and 937

  8. Statistical image reconstruction for low-dose CT using nonlocal means-based regularization.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hao; Ma, Jianhua; Wang, Jing; Liu, Yan; Lu, Hongbing; Liang, Zhengrong

    2014-09-01

    Low-dose computed tomography (CT) imaging without sacrifice of clinical tasks is desirable due to the growing concerns about excessive radiation exposure to the patients. One common strategy to achieve low-dose CT imaging is to lower the milliampere-second (mAs) setting in data scanning protocol. However, the reconstructed CT images by the conventional filtered back-projection (FBP) method from the low-mAs acquisitions may be severely degraded due to the excessive noise. Statistical image reconstruction (SIR) methods have shown potentials to significantly improve the reconstructed image quality from the low-mAs acquisitions, wherein the regularization plays a critical role and an established family of regularizations is based on the Markov random field (MRF) model. Inspired by the success of nonlocal means (NLM) in image processing applications, in this work, we propose to explore the NLM-based regularization for SIR to reconstruct low-dose CT images from low-mAs acquisitions. Experimental results with both digital and physical phantoms consistently demonstrated that SIR with the NLM-based regularization can achieve more gains than SIR with the well-known Gaussian MRF regularization or the generalized Gaussian MRF regularization and the conventional FBP method, in terms of image noise reduction and resolution preservation.

  9. Statistical image reconstruction for low-dose CT using nonlocal means-based regularization

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hao; Ma, Jianhua; Wang, Jing; Liu, Yan; Lu, Hongbing

    2014-01-01

    Low-dose computed tomography (CT) imaging without sacrifice of clinical tasks is desirable due to the growing concerns about excessive radiation exposure to the patients. One common strategy to achieve low-dose CT imaging is to lower the milliampere-second (mAs) setting in data scanning protocol. However, the reconstructed CT images by the conventional filtered back-projection (FBP) method from the low-mAs acquisitions may be severely degraded due to the excessive noise. Statistical image reconstruction (SIR) methods have shown potentials to significantly improve the reconstructed image quality from the low-mAs acquisitions, wherein the regularization plays a critical role and an established family of regularizations is based on the Markov random field (MRF) model. Inspired by the success of nonlocal means (NLM) in image processing applications, in this work, we propose to explore the NLM-based regularization for SIR to reconstruct low-dose CT images from low-mAs acquisitions. Experimental results with both digital and physical phantoms consistently demonstrated that SIR with the NLM-based regularization can achieve more gains than SIR with the well-known Gaussian MRF regularization or the generalized Gaussian MRF regularization and the conventional FBP method, in terms of image noise reduction and resolution preservation. PMID:24881498

  10. Low-dose X-ray CT reconstruction via dictionary learning.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qiong; Yu, Hengyong; Mou, Xuanqin; Zhang, Lei; Hsieh, Jiang; Wang, Ge

    2012-09-01

    Although diagnostic medical imaging provides enormous benefits in the early detection and accuracy diagnosis of various diseases, there are growing concerns on the potential side effect of radiation induced genetic, cancerous and other diseases. How to reduce radiation dose while maintaining the diagnostic performance is a major challenge in the computed tomography (CT) field. Inspired by the compressive sensing theory, the sparse constraint in terms of total variation (TV) minimization has already led to promising results for low-dose CT reconstruction. Compared to the discrete gradient transform used in the TV method, dictionary learning is proven to be an effective way for sparse representation. On the other hand, it is important to consider the statistical property of projection data in the low-dose CT case. Recently, we have developed a dictionary learning based approach for low-dose X-ray CT. In this paper, we present this method in detail and evaluate it in experiments. In our method, the sparse constraint in terms of a redundant dictionary is incorporated into an objective function in a statistical iterative reconstruction framework. The dictionary can be either predetermined before an image reconstruction task or adaptively defined during the reconstruction process. An alternating minimization scheme is developed to minimize the objective function. Our approach is evaluated with low-dose X-ray projections collected in animal and human CT studies, and the improvement associated with dictionary learning is quantified relative to filtered backprojection and TV-based reconstructions. The results show that the proposed approach might produce better images with lower noise and more detailed structural features in our selected cases. However, there is no proof that this is true for all kinds of structures.

  11. Low-dose CT for quantitative analysis in acute respiratory distress syndrome

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-31

    few studies on pulmonary emphysema [22-24], that showed that quantification of hyperinflated tissue is not affected by a reduction of tube current...Pulmonary emphysema : radiation dose and section thickness at multidetector CT quantification--comparison with macroscopic and microscopic...pulmonary emphysema using a low-dose technique. Radiol Med 2002, 104:13-24. 24. Nishio M, Matsumoto S, Ohno Y, Sugihara N, Inokawa H, Yoshikawa T

  12. Detecting airway remodeling in COPD and emphysema using low-dose CT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudyanto, R.; Ceresa, M.; Muñoz-Barrutia, A.; Ortiz-de-Solorzano, C.

    2012-03-01

    In this study, we quantitatively characterize lung airway remodeling caused by smoking-related emphysema and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD), in low-dose CT scans. To that end, we established three groups of individuals: subjects with COPD (n=35), subjects with emphysema (n=38) and healthy smokers (n=28). All individuals underwent a low-dose CT scan, and the images were analyzed as described next. First the lung airways were segmented using a fast marching method and labeled according to its generation. Along each airway segment, cross-section images were resampled orthogonal to the airway axis. Next 128 rays were cast from the center of the airway lumen in each crosssection slice. Finally, we used an integral-based method, to measure lumen radius, wall thickness, mean wall percentage and mean peak wall attenuation on every cast ray. Our analysis shows that both the mean global wall thickness and the lumen radius of the airways of both COPD and emphysema groups were significantly different from those of the healthy group. In addition, the wall thickness change starts at the 3rd airway generation in the COPD patients compared with emphysema patients, who display the first significant changes starting in the 2nd generation. In conclusion, it is shown that airway remodeling happens in individuals suffering from either COPD or emphysema, with some local difference between both groups, and that we are able to detect and accurately quantify this process using images of low-dose CT scans.

  13. Effects of filtering on colorectal polyp detection in ultra low dose CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoonenberg, Gert A.; de Vries, Ayso; Grigorescu, Simona; Peters, Joost; Vilanova, Anna; Truyen, Roel; Stoker, Jaap; Gerritsen, Frans

    2006-03-01

    We have evaluated the feasibility of polyp detection on simulated ultra low dose CT Colonography data by a computer aided polyp detection (CAD) algorithm. We compared the results of ultra low dose to normal dose data. Twenty-three extensively prepared patients were scanned in prone and supine position at 25 to 100 mAs (average 70 mAs) depending on their waist circumference. Noise was added and the scans were reconstructed at 6.25 and 1.39 mAs. To evaluate the performance of the CAD system, polyps detected by an experienced reviewer and confirmed at colonoscopy were used as ground truth. Curvature, concavity and sphericity of the colon surface were used to detect polyp candidates. Bilateral filtering was used to reduce noise. We present the results for 40 polyps of 6 mm or larger as measured during colonoscopy. The by-polyp sensitivity was 80% for medium size polyps (6-9 mm) and 97% for large polyps (10 mm or larger) at an average value of 5 false-positives per scan for normal dose data. The by-polyp sensitivity was 81% for medium size polyps and 85% for large size polyps at an average value of 5 false-positives per scan for low dose data (6.25 mAs). Finally for the ultra low dose data (1.39 mAs) we achieved a by-polyp sensitivity of 75% for medium size polyps and 97% for large polyps at an average value of 5 false-positives per scan. The conclusion of our study is that CAD for polyp detection is feasible on ultra low dose CT colonography data.

  14. A low dose simulation tool for CT systems with energy integrating detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Zabic, Stanislav; Morton, Thomas; Brown, Kevin M.; Wang Qiu

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: This paper introduces a new strategy for simulating low-dose computed tomography (CT) scans using real scans of a higher dose as an input. The tool is verified against simulations and real scans and compared to other approaches found in the literature. Methods: The conditional variance identity is used to properly account for the variance of the input high-dose data, and a formula is derived for generating a new Poisson noise realization which has the same mean and variance as the true low-dose data. The authors also derive a formula for the inclusion of real samples of detector noise, properly scaled according to the level of the simulated x-ray signals. Results: The proposed method is shown to match real scans in number of experiments. Noise standard deviation measurements in simulated low-dose reconstructions of a 35 cm water phantom match real scans in a range from 500 to 10 mA with less than 5% error. Mean and variance of individual detector channels are shown to match closely across the detector array. Finally, the visual appearance of noise and streak artifacts is shown to match in real scans even under conditions of photon-starvation (with tube currents as low as 10 and 80 mA). Additionally, the proposed method is shown to be more accurate than previous approaches (1) in achieving the correct mean and variance in reconstructed images from pure-Poisson noise simulations (with no detector noise) under photon-starvation conditions, and (2) in simulating the correct noise level and detector noise artifacts in real low-dose scans. Conclusions: The proposed method can accurately simulate low-dose CT data starting from high-dose data, including effects from photon starvation and detector noise. This is potentially a very useful tool in helping to determine minimum dose requirements for a wide range of clinical protocols and advanced reconstruction algorithms.

  15. A framework to measure myocardial extracellular volume fraction using dual-phase low dose CT images

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yixun; Liu, Songtao; Nacif, Marcelo S.; Sibley, Christopher T.; Bluemke, David A.; Summers, Ronald M.; Yao, Jianhua

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Myocardial extracellular volume fraction (ECVF) is a surrogate imaging biomarker of diffuse myocardial fibrosis, a hallmark of pathologic ventricular remodeling. Low dose cardiac CT is emerging as a promising modality to detect diffuse interstitial myocardial fibrosis due to its fast acquisition and low radiation; however, the insufficient contrast in the low dose CT images poses great challenge to measure ECVF from the image. Methods: To deal with this difficulty, the authors present a complete ECVF measurement framework including a point-guided myocardial modeling, a deformable model-based myocardium segmentation, nonrigid registration of pre- and post-CT, and ECVF calculation. Results: The proposed method was evaluated on 20 patients by two observers. Compared to the manually delineated reference segmentations, the accuracy of our segmentation in terms of true positive volume fraction (TPVF), false positive volume fraction (FPVF), and average surface distance (ASD), were 92.18% ± 3.52%, 0.31% ± 0.10%, 0.69 ± 0.14 mm, respectively. The interobserver variability measured by concordance correlation coefficient regarding TPVF, FPVF, and ASD were 0.95, 0.90, 0.94, respectively, demonstrating excellent agreement. Bland-Altman method showed 95% limits of agreement between ECVF at CT and ECVF at MR. Conclusions: The proposed framework demonstrates its efficiency, accuracy, and noninvasiveness in ECVF measurement and dramatically advances the ECVF at cardiac CT toward its clinical use. PMID:24089934

  16. Automated segmentation of cardiac visceral fat in low-dose non-contrast chest CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yiting; Liang, Mingzhu; Yankelevitz, David F.; Henschke, Claudia I.; Reeves, Anthony P.

    2015-03-01

    Cardiac visceral fat was segmented from low-dose non-contrast chest CT images using a fully automated method. Cardiac visceral fat is defined as the fatty tissues surrounding the heart region, enclosed by the lungs and posterior to the sternum. It is measured by constraining the heart region with an Anatomy Label Map that contains robust segmentations of the lungs and other major organs and estimating the fatty tissue within this region. The algorithm was evaluated on 124 low-dose and 223 standard-dose non-contrast chest CT scans from two public datasets. Based on visual inspection, 343 cases had good cardiac visceral fat segmentation. For quantitative evaluation, manual markings of cardiac visceral fat regions were made in 3 image slices for 45 low-dose scans and the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) was computed. The automated algorithm achieved an average DSC of 0.93. Cardiac visceral fat volume (CVFV), heart region volume (HRV) and their ratio were computed for each case. The correlation between cardiac visceral fat measurement and coronary artery and aortic calcification was also evaluated. Results indicated the automated algorithm for measuring cardiac visceral fat volume may be an alternative method to the traditional manual assessment of thoracic region fat content in the assessment of cardiovascular disease risk.

  17. Discriminative feature representation: an effective postprocessing solution to low dose CT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yang; Liu, Jin; Hu, Yining; Yang, Jian; Shi, Luyao; Shu, Huazhong; Gui, Zhiguo; Coatrieux, Gouenou; Luo, Limin

    2017-03-01

    This paper proposes a concise and effective approach termed discriminative feature representation (DFR) for low dose computerized tomography (LDCT) image processing, which is currently a challenging problem in medical imaging field. This DFR method assumes LDCT images as the superposition of desirable high dose CT (HDCT) 3D features and undesirable noise-artifact 3D features (the combined term of noise and artifact features induced by low dose scan protocols), and the decomposed HDCT features are used to provide the processed LDCT images with higher quality. The target HDCT features are solved via the DFR algorithm using a featured dictionary composed by atoms representing HDCT features and noise-artifact features. In this study, the featured dictionary is efficiently built using physical phantom images collected from the same CT scanner as the target clinical LDCT images to process. The proposed DFR method also has good robustness in parameter setting for different CT scanner types. This DFR method can be directly applied to process DICOM formatted LDCT images, and has good applicability to current CT systems. Comparative experiments with abdomen LDCT data validate the good performance of the proposed approach. This research was supported by National Natural Science Foundation under grants (81370040, 81530060), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, and the Qing Lan Project in Jiangsu Province.

  18. Reproducibility and variability of very low dose hepatic perfusion CT in metastatic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Topcuoğlu, Osman Melih; Karçaaltıncaba, Muşturay; Akata, Deniz; Özmen, Mustafa Nasuh

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to determine the intra- and interobserver agreement on the software analysis of very low dose hepatic perfusion CT (pCT). METHODS A total of 53 pCT examinations were obtained from 21 patients (16 men, 5 women; mean age, 60.4 years) with proven liver metastasis from various primary cancers. The pCT examinations were analyzed by two readers independently and perfusion parameters were noted for whole liver, whole metastasis, metastasis wall, and normal-looking liver (liver tissue without metastasis) in regions of interest (ROIs). Readers repeated the analysis after an interval of one month. Intra- and interobserver agreements were assessed with intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) and Bland-Altman statistics. RESULTS The mean ICCs of all ROIs between readers were 0.91, 0.93, 0.86, 0.45, 0.53, and 0.66 for blood flow (BF), blood volume (BV), permeability, arterial liver perfusion (ALP), portal venous perfusion (PVP) and hepatic perfusion index (HPI), respectively. The mean ICCs of all ROIs between readings were 0.86, 0.91, 0.81, 0.53, 0.56, and 0.71 for BF, BV, permeability, ALP, PVP, and HPI, respectively. There was greater agreement on the parameters measured for the whole metastasis than on the parameters measured for the metastasis wall. The effective dose of all perfusion CT studies was 2.9 mSv. CONCLUSION There is greater intra- and interobserver agreement for BF and BV than for permeability, ALP, PVP, and HPI at very low dose hepatic pCT. Permeability, ALP, PVP, and HPI parameters cannot be used in clinical practice for hepatic pCT with an effective dose of 2.9 mSv. PMID:27759566

  19. Automatic detection of lung nodules from multislice low-dose CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Li; Novak, Carol L.; Qian, JianZhong; Kohl, Gerhard; Naidich, David

    2001-07-01

    We describe in this paper a novel, efficient method to automatically detect lung nodules from low-dose, high- resolution CT (HRCT) images taken with a multi-slice scanner. First, the program identifies initial anatomical seeds, including lung nodule candidates, airways, vessels, and other features that appear as bright opacities in CT images. Next, a 3D region growing method is applied to each seed. The thresholds for segmentation are adaptively adjusted based upon automatic analysis of the local histogram. Once an object has been examined, vessels and other non-nodule objects are quickly excluded from future study, thus saving computation time. Finally, extracted 3D objects are classified a nodule candidates or non-nodule structures. Anatomical knowledge and multiple measurements, such as volume and sphericity, are used to categorize each object. The detected nodules are presented to the user for examination and verification. The proposed method was applied to 14 low dose HRCT patient studies. Since the CT images were taken with a multi-slice scanner, the average number of slices per study was 292. In every case the x-ray exposure was about 20 mAs, a suitable dosage for screening. In our preliminary results, the method detected an average of 8 nodules per study, with an average size of 3.3 mm in diameter.

  20. A Longitudinal Low Dose μCT Analysis of Bone Healing in Mice: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Di, Lu-Zhao; Leblanc, Élisabeth; Alinejad, Yasaman; Beaudoin, Jean-François; Lecomte, Roger; Berthod, François; Faucheux, Nathalie; Balg, Frédéric

    2014-01-01

    Low dose microcomputed tomography (μCT) is a recently matured technique that enables the study of longitudinal bone healing and the testing of experimental treatments for bone repair. This imaging technique has been used for studying craniofacial repair in mice but not in an orthopedic context. This is mainly due to the size of the defects (approximately 1.0 mm) in long bone, which heal rapidly and may thus negatively impact the assessment of the effectiveness of experimental treatments. We developed a longitudinal low dose μCT scan analysis method combined with a new image segmentation and extraction software using Hounsfield unit (HU) scores to quantitatively monitor bone healing in small femoral cortical defects in live mice. We were able to reproducibly quantify bone healing longitudinally over time with three observers. We used high speed intramedullary reaming to prolong healing in order to circumvent the rapid healing typical of small defects. Bone healing prolongation combined with μCT imaging to study small bone defects in live mice thus shows potential as a promising tool for future preclinical research on bone healing. PMID:25431676

  1. Computer-aided detection of early interstitial lung diseases using low-dose CT images.

    PubMed

    Park, Sang Cheol; Tan, Jun; Wang, Xingwei; Lederman, Dror; Leader, Joseph K; Kim, Soo Hyung; Zheng, Bin

    2011-02-21

    This study aims to develop a new computer-aided detection (CAD) scheme to detect early interstitial lung disease (ILD) using low-dose computed tomography (CT) examinations. The CAD scheme classifies each pixel depicted on the segmented lung areas into positive or negative groups for ILD using a mesh-grid-based region growth method and a multi-feature-based artificial neural network (ANN). A genetic algorithm was applied to select optimal image features and the ANN structure. In testing each CT examination, only pixels selected by the mesh-grid region growth method were analyzed and classified by the ANN to improve computational efficiency. All unselected pixels were classified as negative for ILD. After classifying all pixels into the positive and negative groups, CAD computed a detection score based on the ratio of the number of positive pixels to all pixels in the segmented lung areas, which indicates the likelihood of the test case being positive for ILD. When applying to an independent testing dataset of 15 positive and 15 negative cases, the CAD scheme yielded the area under receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC = 0.884 ± 0.064) and 80.0% sensitivity at 85.7% specificity. The results demonstrated the feasibility of applying the CAD scheme to automatically detect early ILD using low-dose CT examinations.

  2. Computer-aided detection of early interstitial lung diseases using low-dose CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sang Cheol; Tan, Jun; Wang, Xingwei; Lederman, Dror; Leader, Joseph K.; Kim, Soo Hyung; Zheng, Bin

    2011-02-01

    This study aims to develop a new computer-aided detection (CAD) scheme to detect early interstitial lung disease (ILD) using low-dose computed tomography (CT) examinations. The CAD scheme classifies each pixel depicted on the segmented lung areas into positive or negative groups for ILD using a mesh-grid-based region growth method and a multi-feature-based artificial neural network (ANN). A genetic algorithm was applied to select optimal image features and the ANN structure. In testing each CT examination, only pixels selected by the mesh-grid region growth method were analyzed and classified by the ANN to improve computational efficiency. All unselected pixels were classified as negative for ILD. After classifying all pixels into the positive and negative groups, CAD computed a detection score based on the ratio of the number of positive pixels to all pixels in the segmented lung areas, which indicates the likelihood of the test case being positive for ILD. When applying to an independent testing dataset of 15 positive and 15 negative cases, the CAD scheme yielded the area under receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC = 0.884 ± 0.064) and 80.0% sensitivity at 85.7% specificity. The results demonstrated the feasibility of applying the CAD scheme to automatically detect early ILD using low-dose CT examinations.

  3. Automated measurement of pulmonary artery in low-dose non-contrast chest CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yiting; Liang, Mingzhu; Yankelevitz, David F.; Henschke, Claudia I.; Reeves, Anthony P.

    2015-03-01

    A new measurement of the pulmonary artery diameter is obtained where the artery may be robustly segmented between the heart and the artery bifurcation. An automated algorithm is presented that can make this pulmonary artery measurement in low-dose non-contrast chest CT images. The algorithm uses a cylinder matching method following geometric constraints obtained from other adjacent organs that have been previously segmented. This new measurement and the related ratio of pulmonary artery to aortic artery measurement are compared to traditional manual approaches for pulmonary artery characterization. The algorithm was qualitatively evaluated on 124 low-dose and 223 standard-dose non-contrast chest CT scans from two public datasets; 324 out of the 347 cases had good segmentations and in the other 23 cases there was significant boundary inaccuracy. For quantitative evaluation, the comparison was to manually marked pulmonary artery boundary in an axial slice in 45 cases; the resulting average Dice Similarity Coefficient was 0.88 (max 0.95, min 0.74). For the 45 cases with manual markings, the correlation between the automated pulmonary artery to ascending aorta diameter ratio and manual ratio at pulmonary artery bifurcation level was 0.81. Using Bland-Altman analysis, the mean difference of the two ratios was 0.03 and the limits of agreement was (-0.12, 0.18). This automated measurement may have utility as an alternative to the conventional manual measurement of pulmonary artery diameter at the bifurcation level especially in the context of noisy low-dose CT images.

  4. Ultra-low dose CT attenuation correction for PET/CT: analysis of sparse view data acquisition and reconstruction algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rui, Xue; Cheng, Lishui; Long, Yong; Fu, Lin; Alessio, Adam M.; Asma, Evren; Kinahan, Paul E.; De Man, Bruno

    2015-09-01

    For PET/CT systems, PET image reconstruction requires corresponding CT images for anatomical localization and attenuation correction. In the case of PET respiratory gating, multiple gated CT scans can offer phase-matched attenuation and motion correction, at the expense of increased radiation dose. We aim to minimize the dose of the CT scan, while preserving adequate image quality for the purpose of PET attenuation correction by introducing sparse view CT data acquisition. We investigated sparse view CT acquisition protocols resulting in ultra-low dose CT scans designed for PET attenuation correction. We analyzed the tradeoffs between the number of views and the integrated tube current per view for a given dose using CT and PET simulations of a 3D NCAT phantom with lesions inserted into liver and lung. We simulated seven CT acquisition protocols with {984, 328, 123, 41, 24, 12, 8} views per rotation at a gantry speed of 0.35 s. One standard dose and four ultra-low dose levels, namely, 0.35 mAs, 0.175 mAs, 0.0875 mAs, and 0.043 75 mAs, were investigated. Both the analytical Feldkamp, Davis and Kress (FDK) algorithm and the Model Based Iterative Reconstruction (MBIR) algorithm were used for CT image reconstruction. We also evaluated the impact of sinogram interpolation to estimate the missing projection measurements due to sparse view data acquisition. For MBIR, we used a penalized weighted least squares (PWLS) cost function with an approximate total-variation (TV) regularizing penalty function. We compared a tube pulsing mode and a continuous exposure mode for sparse view data acquisition. Global PET ensemble root-mean-squares-error (RMSE) and local ensemble lesion activity error were used as quantitative evaluation metrics for PET image quality. With sparse view sampling, it is possible to greatly reduce the CT scan dose when it is primarily used for PET attenuation correction with little or no measureable effect on the PET image. For the four ultra-low dose

  5. Ultra-low dose CT attenuation correction for PET/CT: analysis of sparse view data acquisition and reconstruction algorithms.

    PubMed

    Rui, Xue; Cheng, Lishui; Long, Yong; Fu, Lin; Alessio, Adam M; Asma, Evren; Kinahan, Paul E; De Man, Bruno

    2015-10-07

    For PET/CT systems, PET image reconstruction requires corresponding CT images for anatomical localization and attenuation correction. In the case of PET respiratory gating, multiple gated CT scans can offer phase-matched attenuation and motion correction, at the expense of increased radiation dose. We aim to minimize the dose of the CT scan, while preserving adequate image quality for the purpose of PET attenuation correction by introducing sparse view CT data acquisition.We investigated sparse view CT acquisition protocols resulting in ultra-low dose CT scans designed for PET attenuation correction. We analyzed the tradeoffs between the number of views and the integrated tube current per view for a given dose using CT and PET simulations of a 3D NCAT phantom with lesions inserted into liver and lung. We simulated seven CT acquisition protocols with {984, 328, 123, 41, 24, 12, 8} views per rotation at a gantry speed of 0.35 s. One standard dose and four ultra-low dose levels, namely, 0.35 mAs, 0.175 mAs, 0.0875 mAs, and 0.043 75 mAs, were investigated. Both the analytical Feldkamp, Davis and Kress (FDK) algorithm and the Model Based Iterative Reconstruction (MBIR) algorithm were used for CT image reconstruction. We also evaluated the impact of sinogram interpolation to estimate the missing projection measurements due to sparse view data acquisition. For MBIR, we used a penalized weighted least squares (PWLS) cost function with an approximate total-variation (TV) regularizing penalty function. We compared a tube pulsing mode and a continuous exposure mode for sparse view data acquisition. Global PET ensemble root-mean-squares-error (RMSE) and local ensemble lesion activity error were used as quantitative evaluation metrics for PET image quality.With sparse view sampling, it is possible to greatly reduce the CT scan dose when it is primarily used for PET attenuation correction with little or no measureable effect on the PET image. For the four ultra-low dose levels

  6. Evaluation of a low-dose CT protocol with oral contrast for assessment of acute appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Platon, Alexandra; Jlassi, Helmi; Rutschmann, Olivier T; Becker, Christoph D; Verdun, Francis R; Gervaz, Pascal; Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre

    2009-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate a low-dose CT with oral contrast medium (LDCT) for the diagnosis of acute appendicitis and compare its performance with standard-dose i.v. contrast-enhanced CT (standard CT) according to patients' BMIs. Eighty-six consecutive patients admitted with suspicion of acute appendicitis underwent LDCT (30 mAs), followed by standard CT (180 mAs). Both examinations were reviewed by two experienced radiologists for direct and indirect signs of appendicitis. Clinical and surgical follow-up was considered as the reference standard. Appendicitis was confirmed by surgery in 37 (43%) of the 86 patients. Twenty-nine (34%) patients eventually had an alternative discharge diagnosis to explain their abdominal pain. Clinical and biological follow-up was uneventful in 20 (23%) patients. LDCT and standard CT had the same sensitivity (100%, 33/33) and specificity (98%, 45/46) to diagnose appendicitis in patients with a body mass index (BMI) >or= 18.5. In slim patients (BMI<18.5), sensitivity to diagnose appendicitis was 50% (2/4) for LDCT and 100% (4/4) for standard CT, while specificity was identical for both techniques (67%, 2/3). LDCT may play a role in the diagnostic workup of patients with a BMI >or= 18.5.

  7. Texture-preserving Bayesian image reconstruction for low-dose CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao; Han, Hao; Hu, Yifan; Liu, Yan; Ma, Jianhua; Li, Lihong; Moore, William; Liang, Zhengrong

    2016-03-01

    Markov random field (MRF) model has been widely used in Bayesian image reconstruction to reconstruct piecewise smooth images in the presence of noise, such as in low-dose X-ray computed tomography (LdCT). While it can preserve edge sharpness via edge-preserving potential function, its regional smoothing may sacrifice tissue image textures, which have been recognized as useful imaging biomarkers, and thus it compromises clinical tasks such as differentiating malignant vs. benign lesions, e.g., lung nodule or colon polyp. This study aims to shift the edge preserving regional noise smoothing paradigm to texture-preserving framework for LdCT image reconstruction while retaining the advantage of MRF's neighborhood system on edge preservation. Specifically, we adapted the MRF model to incorporate the image textures of lung, bone, fat, muscle, etc. from previous full-dose CT scan as a priori knowledge for texture-preserving Bayesian reconstruction of current LdCT images. To show the feasibility of proposed reconstruction framework, experiments using clinical patient scans (with lung nodule or colon polyp) were conducted. The experimental outcomes showed noticeable gain by the a priori knowledge for LdCT image reconstruction with the well-known Haralick texture measures. Thus, it is conjectured that texture-preserving LdCT reconstruction has advantages over edge-preserving regional smoothing paradigm for texture-specific clinical applications.

  8. Low-dose dual-energy electronic cleansing for fecal-tagging CT Colonography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Wenli; Zhang, Da; Lee, June-Goo; Yoshida, Hiroyuki

    2013-03-01

    Dual-energy electronic cleansing (DE-EC) provides a promising means for cleansing the tagged fecal materials in fecaltagging CT colonography (CTC). However, the increased radiation dose due to the double exposures in dual-energy CTC (DE-CTC) scanning is a major limitation for the use of DE-EC in clinical practice. The purpose of this study was to develop and evaluate a low-dose DE-EC scheme in fecal-tagging DE-CTC. In this study, a custom-made anthropomorphic colon phantom, which was filled with simulated tagged materials by non-ionic iodinated contrast agent (Omnipaque iohexol, GE Healthcare), was scanned by a dual-source CT scanner (SOMATON Definition Flash, Siemens Healthcare) at two photon energies: 80 kVp and 140 kVp with nine different tube current settings ranging from 12 to 74 mAs for 140 kVp, and then reconstructed by soft-tissue reconstruction kernel (B30f). The DE-CTC images were subjected to a low-dose DE-EC scheme. First, our image-space DE-CTC denoising filter was applied for reduction of image noise. Then, the noise-reduced images were processed by a virtual lumen tagging method for reduction of partial volume effect and tagging inhomogeneity. The results were compared with the registered CTC images of native phantom without fillings. Preliminary results showed that our low-dose DE-EC scheme achieved the cleansing ratios, defined by the proportion of the cleansed voxels in the tagging mask, between 93.18% (12 mAs) and 96.62% (74 mAs). Also, the soft-tissue preservation ratios, defined by the proportion of the persevered voxels in the soft-tissue mask, were maintained in the range between 94.67% and 96.41%.

  9. Automated aortic calcification detection in low-dose chest CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yiting; Htwe, Yu Maw; Padgett, Jennifer; Henschke, Claudia; Yankelevitz, David; Reeves, Anthony P.

    2014-03-01

    The extent of aortic calcification has been shown to be a risk indicator for vascular events including cardiac events. We have developed a fully automated computer algorithm to segment and measure aortic calcification in low-dose noncontrast, non-ECG gated, chest CT scans. The algorithm first segments the aorta using a pre-computed Anatomy Label Map (ALM). Then based on the segmented aorta, aortic calcification is detected and measured in terms of the Agatston score, mass score, and volume score. The automated scores are compared with reference scores obtained from manual markings. For aorta segmentation, the aorta is modeled as a series of discrete overlapping cylinders and the aortic centerline is determined using a cylinder-tracking algorithm. Then the aortic surface location is detected using the centerline and a triangular mesh model. The segmented aorta is used as a mask for the detection of aortic calcification. For calcification detection, the image is first filtered, then an elevated threshold of 160 Hounsfield units (HU) is used within the aorta mask region to reduce the effect of noise in low-dose scans, and finally non-aortic calcification voxels (bony structures, calcification in other organs) are eliminated. The remaining candidates are considered as true aortic calcification. The computer algorithm was evaluated on 45 low-dose non-contrast CT scans. Using linear regression, the automated Agatston score is 98.42% correlated with the reference Agatston score. The automated mass and volume score is respectively 98.46% and 98.28% correlated with the reference mass and volume score.

  10. Low-dose and scatter-free cone-beam CT imaging: a preliminary study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Xue; Jia, Xun; Niu, Tianye; Zhu, Lei

    2012-03-01

    Clinical applications of CBCT imaging are still limited by excessive imaging dose from repeated scans and poor image quality mainly due to scatter contamination. Compressed sensing (CS) reconstruction algorithms have shown promises in recovering faithful signals from low-dose projection data, but do not serve well the needs of accurate CBCT imaging if effective scatter correction is not in place. Scatter can be accurately measured and removed using measurement-based methods. However, in conventional FDK reconstruction, these approaches are considered unpractical since they require multiple scans or moving the beam blocker during the data acquisition to compensate for the inevitable primary loss. In this work, we combine the measurement-based scatter correction and CS-based iterative reconstruction algorithm, such that scatter-free images can be obtained from low-dose data. We lower the CBCT dose by reducing the projection number and inserting lead strips between the x-ray source and the object. The insertion of lead strips also enables scatter measurement on the measured samples inside the strip shadows. CS-based iterative reconstruction is finally carried out to obtain scatter-free and low-dose CBCT images. Simulation studies are designed to optimize the lead strip geometry for a certain dose reduction ratio. After optimization, our approach reduces the CT number error from over 220HU to below 5HU on the Shepp-Logan phantom, with a dose reduction of ~80%. With the same dose reduction and the optimized method parameters, the CT number error is reduced from 242HU to 20HU in the selected region of interest on Catphan©600 phantom.

  11. A Shearlet-based algorithm for quantum noise removal in low-dose CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Aguan; Jiang, Huiqin; Ma, Ling; Liu, Yumin; Yang, Xiaopeng

    2016-03-01

    Low-dose CT (LDCT) scanning is a potential way to reduce the radiation exposure of X-ray in the population. It is necessary to improve the quality of low-dose CT images. In this paper, we propose an effective algorithm for quantum noise removal in LDCT images using shearlet transform. Because the quantum noise can be simulated by Poisson process, we first transform the quantum noise by using anscombe variance stabilizing transform (VST), producing an approximately Gaussian noise with unitary variance. Second, the non-noise shearlet coefficients are obtained by adaptive hard-threshold processing in shearlet domain. Third, we reconstruct the de-noised image using the inverse shearlet transform. Finally, an anscombe inverse transform is applied to the de-noised image, which can produce the improved image. The main contribution is to combine the anscombe VST with the shearlet transform. By this way, edge coefficients and noise coefficients can be separated from high frequency sub-bands effectively. A number of experiments are performed over some LDCT images by using the proposed method. Both quantitative and visual results show that the proposed method can effectively reduce the quantum noise while enhancing the subtle details. It has certain value in clinical application.

  12. Improving Low-dose Cardiac CT Images based on 3D Sparse Representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Luyao; Hu, Yining; Chen, Yang; Yin, Xindao; Shu, Huazhong; Luo, Limin; Coatrieux, Jean-Louis

    2016-03-01

    Cardiac computed tomography (CCT) is a reliable and accurate tool for diagnosis of coronary artery diseases and is also frequently used in surgery guidance. Low-dose scans should be considered in order to alleviate the harm to patients caused by X-ray radiation. However, low dose CT (LDCT) images tend to be degraded by quantum noise and streak artifacts. In order to improve the cardiac LDCT image quality, a 3D sparse representation-based processing (3D SR) is proposed by exploiting the sparsity and regularity of 3D anatomical features in CCT. The proposed method was evaluated by a clinical study of 14 patients. The performance of the proposed method was compared to the 2D spares representation-based processing (2D SR) and the state-of-the-art noise reduction algorithm BM4D. The visual assessment, quantitative assessment and qualitative assessment results show that the proposed approach can lead to effective noise/artifact suppression and detail preservation. Compared to the other two tested methods, 3D SR method can obtain results with image quality most close to the reference standard dose CT (SDCT) images.

  13. Improving Low-dose Cardiac CT Images based on 3D Sparse Representation

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Luyao; Hu, Yining; Chen, Yang; Yin, Xindao; Shu, Huazhong; Luo, Limin; Coatrieux, Jean-Louis

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac computed tomography (CCT) is a reliable and accurate tool for diagnosis of coronary artery diseases and is also frequently used in surgery guidance. Low-dose scans should be considered in order to alleviate the harm to patients caused by X-ray radiation. However, low dose CT (LDCT) images tend to be degraded by quantum noise and streak artifacts. In order to improve the cardiac LDCT image quality, a 3D sparse representation-based processing (3D SR) is proposed by exploiting the sparsity and regularity of 3D anatomical features in CCT. The proposed method was evaluated by a clinical study of 14 patients. The performance of the proposed method was compared to the 2D spares representation-based processing (2D SR) and the state-of-the-art noise reduction algorithm BM4D. The visual assessment, quantitative assessment and qualitative assessment results show that the proposed approach can lead to effective noise/artifact suppression and detail preservation. Compared to the other two tested methods, 3D SR method can obtain results with image quality most close to the reference standard dose CT (SDCT) images. PMID:26980176

  14. Improving Low-dose Cardiac CT Images based on 3D Sparse Representation.

    PubMed

    Shi, Luyao; Hu, Yining; Chen, Yang; Yin, Xindao; Shu, Huazhong; Luo, Limin; Coatrieux, Jean-Louis

    2016-03-16

    Cardiac computed tomography (CCT) is a reliable and accurate tool for diagnosis of coronary artery diseases and is also frequently used in surgery guidance. Low-dose scans should be considered in order to alleviate the harm to patients caused by X-ray radiation. However, low dose CT (LDCT) images tend to be degraded by quantum noise and streak artifacts. In order to improve the cardiac LDCT image quality, a 3D sparse representation-based processing (3D SR) is proposed by exploiting the sparsity and regularity of 3D anatomical features in CCT. The proposed method was evaluated by a clinical study of 14 patients. The performance of the proposed method was compared to the 2D spares representation-based processing (2D SR) and the state-of-the-art noise reduction algorithm BM4D. The visual assessment, quantitative assessment and qualitative assessment results show that the proposed approach can lead to effective noise/artifact suppression and detail preservation. Compared to the other two tested methods, 3D SR method can obtain results with image quality most close to the reference standard dose CT (SDCT) images.

  15. Effects of sparse sampling schemes on image quality in low-dose CT

    SciTech Connect

    Abbas, Sajid; Lee, Taewon; Cho, Seungryong; Shin, Sukyoung; Lee, Rena

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: Various scanning methods and image reconstruction algorithms are actively investigated for low-dose computed tomography (CT) that can potentially reduce a health-risk related to radiation dose. Particularly, compressive-sensing (CS) based algorithms have been successfully developed for reconstructing images from sparsely sampled data. Although these algorithms have shown promises in low-dose CT, it has not been studied how sparse sampling schemes affect image quality in CS-based image reconstruction. In this work, the authors present several sparse-sampling schemes for low-dose CT, quantitatively analyze their data property, and compare effects of the sampling schemes on the image quality.Methods: Data properties of several sampling schemes are analyzed with respect to the CS-based image reconstruction using two measures: sampling density and data incoherence. The authors present five different sparse sampling schemes, and simulated those schemes to achieve a targeted dose reduction. Dose reduction factors of about 75% and 87.5%, compared to a conventional scan, were tested. A fully sampled circular cone-beam CT data set was used as a reference, and sparse sampling has been realized numerically based on the CBCT data.Results: It is found that both sampling density and data incoherence affect the image quality in the CS-based reconstruction. Among the sampling schemes the authors investigated, the sparse-view, many-view undersampling (MVUS)-fine, and MVUS-moving cases have shown promising results. These sampling schemes produced images with similar image quality compared to the reference image and their structure similarity index values were higher than 0.92 in the mouse head scan with 75% dose reduction.Conclusions: The authors found that in CS-based image reconstructions both sampling density and data incoherence affect the image quality, and suggest that a sampling scheme should be devised and optimized by use of these indicators. With this strategic

  16. Assessment of Bowel Wall Enhancement for the Diagnosis of Intestinal Ischemia in Patients with Small Bowel Obstruction: Value of Adding Unenhanced CT to Contrast-enhanced CT.

    PubMed

    Chuong, Anh Minh; Corno, Lucie; Beaussier, Hélène; Boulay-Coletta, Isabelle; Millet, Ingrid; Hodel, Jérôme; Taourel, Patrice; Chatellier, Gilles; Zins, Marc

    2016-07-01

    Purpose To determine whether adding unenhanced computed tomography (CT) to contrast material-enhanced CT improves the diagnostic performance of decreased bowel wall enhancement as a sign of ischemia complicating mechanical small bowel obstruction (SBO). Materials and Methods This retrospective study was approved by the institutional review board, which waived the requirement for informed consent. Two gastrointestinal radiologists independently performed retrospective assessments of 164 unenhanced and contrast-enhanced CT studies from 158 consecutive patients (mean age, 71.2 years) with mechanical SBO. The reference standard was the intraoperative and/or histologic diagnosis (in 80 cases) or results from clinical follow-up in patients who did not undergo surgery (84 cases). Decreased bowel wall enhancement was evaluated with contrast-enhanced images then and both unenhanced and contrast-enhanced images 1 month later. Diagnostic performance of decreased bowel wall enhancement and confidence in the diagnosis were compared between the two readings by using McNemar and Wilcoxon signed rank tests. Interobserver agreement was assessed by using κ statistics and compared with bootstrapping. Results Ischemia was diagnosed in 41 of 164 (25%) episodes of SBO. For both observers, adding unenhanced images improved decreased bowel wall enhancement sensitivity (observer 1: 46.3% [19 of 41] vs 65.8% [27 of 41], P = .02; observer 2: 56.1% [23 of 41] vs 63.4% [26 of 41], P = .45), Youden index (from 0.41 to 0.58 for observer 1 and from 0.42 to 0.61 for observer 2), and confidence score (P < .001 for both). Specificity significantly increased for observer 2 (84.5% [104 of 123] vs 94.3% [116 of 123], P = .002), and interobserver agreement significantly increased, from moderate (κ = 0.48) to excellent (κ = 0.89; P < .0001). Conclusion Adding unenhanced CT to contrast-enhanced CT improved the sensitivity, diagnostic confidence, and interobserver agreement of the diagnosis of ischemia

  17. Sinogram restoration for ultra-low-dose x-ray multi-slice helical CT by nonparametric regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Lu; Siddiqui, Khan; Zhu, Bin; Tao, Yang; Siegel, Eliot

    2007-03-01

    During the last decade, x-ray computed tomography (CT) has been applied to screen large asymptomatic smoking and nonsmoking populations for early lung cancer detection. Because a larger population will be involved in such screening exams, more and more attention has been paid to studying low-dose, even ultra-low-dose x-ray CT. However, reducing CT radiation exposure will increase noise level in the sinogram, thereby degrading the quality of reconstructed CT images as well as causing more streak artifacts near the apices of the lung. Thus, how to reduce the noise levels and streak artifacts in the low-dose CT images is becoming a meaningful topic. Since multi-slice helical CT has replaced conventional stop-and-shoot CT in many clinical applications, this research mainly focused on the noise reduction issue in multi-slice helical CT. The experiment data were provided by Siemens SOMATOM Sensation 16-Slice helical CT. It included both conventional CT data acquired under 120 kvp voltage and 119 mA current and ultra-low-dose CT data acquired under 120 kvp and 10 mA protocols. All other settings are the same as that of conventional CT. In this paper, a nonparametric smoothing method with thin plate smoothing splines and the roughness penalty was proposed to restore the ultra-low-dose CT raw data. Each projection frame was firstly divided into blocks, and then the 2D data in each block was fitted to a thin-plate smoothing splines' surface via minimizing a roughness-penalized least squares objective function. By doing so, the noise in each ultra-low-dose CT projection was reduced by leveraging the information contained not only within each individual projection profile, but also among nearby profiles. Finally the restored ultra-low-dose projection data were fed into standard filtered back projection (FBP) algorithm to reconstruct CT images. The rebuilt results as well as the comparison between proposed approach and traditional method were given in the results and

  18. Effect of low-dose CT and iterative reconstruction on trabecular bone microstructure assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopp, Felix K.; Baum, Thomas; Nasirudin, Radin A.; Mei, Kai; Garcia, Eduardo G.; Burgkart, Rainer; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Bauer, Jan S.; Noël, Peter B.

    2016-03-01

    The trabecular bone microstructure is an important factor in the development of osteoporosis. It is well known that its deterioration is one effect when osteoporosis occurs. Previous research showed that the analysis of trabecular bone microstructure enables more precise diagnoses of osteoporosis compared to a sole measurement of the mineral density. Microstructure parameters are assessed on volumetric images of the bone acquired either with high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging, high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography or high-resolution computed tomography (CT), with only CT being applicable to the spine, which is one of clinically most relevant fracture sites. However, due to the high radiation exposure for imaging the whole spine these measurements are not applicable in current clinical routine. In this work, twelve vertebrae from three different donors were scanned with standard and low radiation dose. Trabecular bone microstructure parameters were assessed for CT images reconstructed with statistical iterative reconstruction (SIR) and analytical filtered backprojection (FBP). The resulting structure parameters were correlated to the biomechanically determined fracture load of each vertebra. Microstructure parameters assessed for low-dose data reconstructed with SIR significantly correlated with fracture loads as well as parameters assessed for standard-dose data reconstructed with FBP. Ideal results were achieved with low to zero regularization strength yielding microstructure parameters not significantly different from those assessed for standard-dose FPB data. Moreover, in comparison to other approaches, superior noise-resolution trade-offs can be found with the proposed methods.

  19. Low Dose CT Reconstruction via Edge-preserving Total Variation Regularization

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Zhen; Jia, Xun; Yuan, Kehong; Pan, Tinsu; Jiang, Steve B.

    2014-01-01

    High radiation dose in CT scans increases a lifetime risk of cancer and has become a major clinical concern. Recently, iterative reconstruction algorithms with Total Variation (TV) regularization have been developed to reconstruct CT images from highly undersampled data acquired at low mAs levels in order to reduce the imaging dose. Nonetheless, the low contrast structures tend to be smoothed out by the TV regularization, posing a great challenge for the TV method. To solve this problem, in this work we develop an iterative CT reconstruction algorithm with edge-preserving TV regularization to reconstruct CT images from highly undersampled data obtained at low mAs levels. The CT image is reconstructed by minimizing an energy consisting of an edge-preserving TV norm and a data fidelity term posed by the x-ray projections. The edge-preserving TV term is proposed to preferentially perform smoothing only on non-edge part of the image in order to better preserve the edges, which is realized by introducing a penalty weight to the original total variation norm. During the reconstruction process, the pixels at edges would be gradually identified and given small penalty weight. Our iterative algorithm is implemented on GPU to improve its speed. We test our reconstruction algorithm on a digital NCAT phantom, a physical chest phantom, and a Catphan phantom. Reconstruction results from a conventional FBP algorithm and a TV regularization method without edge preserving penalty are also presented for comparison purpose. The experimental results illustrate that both TV-based algorithm and our edge-preserving TV algorithm outperform the conventional FBP algorithm in suppressing the streaking artifacts and image noise under the low dose context. Our edge-preserving algorithm is superior to the TV-based algorithm in that it can preserve more information of low contrast structures and therefore maintain acceptable spatial resolution. PMID:21860076

  20. Low-dose CT reconstruction via edge-preserving total variation regularization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Zhen; Jia, Xun; Yuan, Kehong; Pan, Tinsu; Jiang, Steve B.

    2011-09-01

    High radiation dose in computed tomography (CT) scans increases the lifetime risk of cancer and has become a major clinical concern. Recently, iterative reconstruction algorithms with total variation (TV) regularization have been developed to reconstruct CT images from highly undersampled data acquired at low mAs levels in order to reduce the imaging dose. Nonetheless, the low-contrast structures tend to be smoothed out by the TV regularization, posing a great challenge for the TV method. To solve this problem, in this work we develop an iterative CT reconstruction algorithm with edge-preserving TV (EPTV) regularization to reconstruct CT images from highly undersampled data obtained at low mAs levels. The CT image is reconstructed by minimizing energy consisting of an EPTV norm and a data fidelity term posed by the x-ray projections. The EPTV term is proposed to preferentially perform smoothing only on the non-edge part of the image in order to better preserve the edges, which is realized by introducing a penalty weight to the original TV norm. During the reconstruction process, the pixels at the edges would be gradually identified and given low penalty weight. Our iterative algorithm is implemented on graphics processing unit to improve its speed. We test our reconstruction algorithm on a digital NURBS-based cardiac-troso phantom, a physical chest phantom and a Catphan phantom. Reconstruction results from a conventional filtered backprojection (FBP) algorithm and a TV regularization method without edge-preserving penalty are also presented for comparison purposes. The experimental results illustrate that both the TV-based algorithm and our EPTV algorithm outperform the conventional FBP algorithm in suppressing the streaking artifacts and image noise under a low-dose context. Our edge-preserving algorithm is superior to the TV-based algorithm in that it can preserve more information of low-contrast structures and therefore maintain acceptable spatial resolution.

  1. Heart region segmentation from low-dose CT scans: an anatomy based approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, Anthony P.; Biancardi, Alberto M.; Yankelevitz, David F.; Cham, Matthew D.; Henschke, Claudia I.

    2012-02-01

    Cardiovascular disease is a leading cause of death in developed countries. The concurrent detection of heart diseases during low-dose whole-lung CT scans (LDCT), typically performed as part of a screening protocol, hinges on the accurate quantification of coronary calcification. The creation of fully automated methods is ideal as complete manual evaluation is imprecise, operator dependent, time consuming and thus costly. The technical challenges posed by LDCT scans in this context are mainly twofold. First, there is a high level image noise arising from the low radiation dose technique. Additionally, there is a variable amount of cardiac motion blurring due to the lack of electrocardiographic gating and the fact that heart rates differ between human subjects. As a consequence, the reliable segmentation of the heart, the first stage toward the implementation of morphologic heart abnormality detection, is also quite challenging. An automated computer method based on a sequential labeling of major organs and determination of anatomical landmarks has been evaluated on a public database of LDCT images. The novel algorithm builds from a robust segmentation of the bones and airways and embodies a stepwise refinement starting at the top of the lungs where image noise is at its lowest and where the carina provides a good calibration landmark. The segmentation is completed at the inferior wall of the heart where extensive image noise is accommodated. This method is based on the geometry of human anatomy and does not involve training through manual markings. Using visual inspection by an expert reader as a gold standard, the algorithm achieved successful heart and major vessel segmentation in 42 of 45 low-dose CT images. In the 3 remaining cases, the cardiac base was over segmented due to incorrect hemidiaphragm localization.

  2. Optimization of SPECT-CT Hybrid Imaging Using Iterative Image Reconstruction for Low-Dose CT: A Phantom Study

    PubMed Central

    Grosser, Oliver S.; Kupitz, Dennis; Ruf, Juri; Czuczwara, Damian; Steffen, Ingo G.; Furth, Christian; Thormann, Markus; Loewenthal, David; Ricke, Jens; Amthauer, Holger

    2015-01-01

    Background Hybrid imaging combines nuclear medicine imaging such as single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) or positron emission tomography (PET) with computed tomography (CT). Through this hybrid design, scanned patients accumulate radiation exposure from both applications. Imaging modalities have been the subject of long-term optimization efforts, focusing on diagnostic applications. It was the aim of this study to investigate the influence of an iterative CT image reconstruction algorithm (ASIR) on the image quality of the low-dose CT images. Methodology/Principal Findings Examinations were performed with a SPECT-CT scanner with standardized CT and SPECT-phantom geometries and CT protocols with systematically reduced X-ray tube currents. Analyses included image quality with respect to photon flux. Results were compared to the standard FBP reconstructed images. The general impact of the CT-based attenuation maps used during SPECT reconstruction was examined for two SPECT phantoms. Using ASIR for image reconstructions, image noise was reduced compared to FBP reconstructions for the same X-ray tube current. The Hounsfield unit (HU) values reconstructed by ASIR were correlated to the FBP HU values(R2 ≥ 0.88) and the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) was improved by ASIR. However, for a phantom with increased attenuation, the HU values shifted for low X-ray tube currents I ≤ 60 mA (p ≤ 0.04). In addition, the shift of the HU values was observed within the attenuation corrected SPECT images for very low X-ray tube currents (I ≤ 20 mA, p ≤ 0.001). Conclusion/Significance In general, the decrease in X-ray tube current up to 30 mA in combination with ASIR led to a reduction of CT-related radiation exposure without a significant decrease in image quality. PMID:26390216

  3. Adaptive Tensor-Based Principal Component Analysis for Low-Dose CT Image Denoising.

    PubMed

    Ai, Danni; Yang, Jian; Fan, Jingfan; Cong, Weijian; Wang, Yongtian

    2015-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) has a revolutionized diagnostic radiology but involves large radiation doses that directly impact image quality. In this paper, we propose adaptive tensor-based principal component analysis (AT-PCA) algorithm for low-dose CT image denoising. Pixels in the image are presented by their nearby neighbors, and are modeled as a patch. Adaptive searching windows are calculated to find similar patches as training groups for further processing. Tensor-based PCA is used to obtain transformation matrices, and coefficients are sequentially shrunk by the linear minimum mean square error. Reconstructed patches are obtained, and a denoised image is finally achieved by aggregating all of these patches. The experimental results of the standard test image show that the best results are obtained with two denoising rounds according to six quantitative measures. For the experiment on the clinical images, the proposed AT-PCA method can suppress the noise, enhance the edge, and improve the image quality more effectively than NLM and KSVD denoising methods.

  4. Adaptive Tensor-Based Principal Component Analysis for Low-Dose CT Image Denoising

    PubMed Central

    Ai, Danni; Yang, Jian; Fan, Jingfan; Cong, Weijian; Wang, Yongtian

    2015-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) has a revolutionized diagnostic radiology but involves large radiation doses that directly impact image quality. In this paper, we propose adaptive tensor-based principal component analysis (AT-PCA) algorithm for low-dose CT image denoising. Pixels in the image are presented by their nearby neighbors, and are modeled as a patch. Adaptive searching windows are calculated to find similar patches as training groups for further processing. Tensor-based PCA is used to obtain transformation matrices, and coefficients are sequentially shrunk by the linear minimum mean square error. Reconstructed patches are obtained, and a denoised image is finally achieved by aggregating all of these patches. The experimental results of the standard test image show that the best results are obtained with two denoising rounds according to six quantitative measures. For the experiment on the clinical images, the proposed AT-PCA method can suppress the noise, enhance the edge, and improve the image quality more effectively than NLM and KSVD denoising methods. PMID:25993566

  5. Computerized lung nodule detection: comparison of performance for low-dose and standard-dose helical CT scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armato, Samuel G., III; Giger, Maryellen L.; Doi, Kunio; Bick, Ulrich; MacMahon, Heber

    2001-07-01

    The vast amount of image data acquired during a computed tomography (CT) scan makes lung nodule detection a burdensome task. Moreover, the growing acceptance of low-dose CT for lung cancer screening promises to further impact radiologists' workloads. Therefore, we have developed a computerized method to automatically analyze structures within a CT scan and identify those structures that represent lung nodules. Gray-level thresholding is performed to segment the lungs in each section to produce a segmented lung volume, which is then iteratively thresholded. At each iteration, remaining voxels are grouped into contiguous three-dimensional structures. Structures that satisfy a volume criterion then become nodule candidates. The set of nodule candidates is subjected to feature analysis. To distinguish candidates representing nodule and non-nodule structures, a rule-based approach is combined with an automated classifier. This method was applied to 43 standard-dose (diagnostic) CT scans and 13 low-dose CT scans. The method achieved an overall detection sensitivity of 71% with 1.5 false-positive detections per section on the standard-dose database and 71% sensitivity with 1.2 false-positive detections per section on the low-dose database. This automated method demonstrates promising performance in its ability to accurately detect lung nodules in standard-dose and low-dose CT images.

  6. Deformable 3D-2D registration for CT and its application to low dose tomographic fluoroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flach, Barbara; Brehm, Marcus; Sawall, Stefan; Kachelrieß, Marc

    2014-12-01

    Many applications in medical imaging include image registration for matching of images from the same or different modalities. In the case of full data sampling, the respective reconstructed images are usually of such a good image quality that standard deformable volume-to-volume (3D-3D) registration approaches can be applied. But research in temporal-correlated image reconstruction and dose reductions increases the number of cases where rawdata are available from only few projection angles. Here, deteriorated image quality leads to non-acceptable deformable volume-to-volume registration results. Therefore a registration approach is required that is robust against a decreasing number of projections defining the target position. We propose a deformable volume-to-rawdata (3D-2D) registration method that aims at finding a displacement vector field maximizing the alignment of a CT volume and the acquired rawdata based on the sum of squared differences in rawdata domain. The registration is constrained by a regularization term in accordance with a fluid-based diffusion. Both cost function components, the rawdata fidelity and the regularization term, are optimized in an alternating manner. The matching criterion is optimized by a conjugate gradient descent for nonlinear functions, while the regularization is realized by convolution of the vector fields with Gaussian kernels. We validate the proposed method and compare it to the demons algorithm, a well-known 3D-3D registration method. The comparison is done for a range of 4-60 target projections using datasets from low dose tomographic fluoroscopy as an application example. The results show a high correlation to the ground truth target position without introducing artifacts even in the case of very few projections. In particular the matching in the rawdata domain is improved compared to the 3D-3D registration for the investigated range. The proposed volume-to-rawdata registration increases the robustness regarding sparse

  7. Deformable 3D-2D registration for CT and its application to low dose tomographic fluoroscopy.

    PubMed

    Flach, Barbara; Brehm, Marcus; Sawall, Stefan; Kachelrieß, Marc

    2014-12-21

    Many applications in medical imaging include image registration for matching of images from the same or different modalities. In the case of full data sampling, the respective reconstructed images are usually of such a good image quality that standard deformable volume-to-volume (3D-3D) registration approaches can be applied. But research in temporal-correlated image reconstruction and dose reductions increases the number of cases where rawdata are available from only few projection angles. Here, deteriorated image quality leads to non-acceptable deformable volume-to-volume registration results. Therefore a registration approach is required that is robust against a decreasing number of projections defining the target position. We propose a deformable volume-to-rawdata (3D-2D) registration method that aims at finding a displacement vector field maximizing the alignment of a CT volume and the acquired rawdata based on the sum of squared differences in rawdata domain. The registration is constrained by a regularization term in accordance with a fluid-based diffusion. Both cost function components, the rawdata fidelity and the regularization term, are optimized in an alternating manner. The matching criterion is optimized by a conjugate gradient descent for nonlinear functions, while the regularization is realized by convolution of the vector fields with Gaussian kernels. We validate the proposed method and compare it to the demons algorithm, a well-known 3D-3D registration method. The comparison is done for a range of 4-60 target projections using datasets from low dose tomographic fluoroscopy as an application example. The results show a high correlation to the ground truth target position without introducing artifacts even in the case of very few projections. In particular the matching in the rawdata domain is improved compared to the 3D-3D registration for the investigated range. The proposed volume-to-rawdata registration increases the robustness regarding sparse

  8. Texture-based CAD improves diagnosis for low-dose CT colonography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Zhengrong; Cohen, Harris; Posniak, Erica; Fiore, Eddie; Wang, Zigang; Li, Bin; Andersen, Joseph; Harrington, Donald

    2008-03-01

    Computed tomography (CT)-based virtual colonoscopy or CT colonography (CTC) currently utilizes oral contrast solutions to tag the colonic fluid and possibly residual stool for differentiation from the colon wall and polyps. The enhanced image density of the tagged colonic materials causes a significant partial volume (PV) effect into the colon wall as well as the lumen space (filled with air or CO II). The PV effect on the colon wall can "bury" polyps of size as large as 5mm by increasing their image densities to a noticeable level, resulting in false negatives. It can also create false positives when PV effect goes into the lumen space. We have been modeling the PV effect for mixture-based image segmentation and developing text-based computer-aided detection of polyp (CADpolyp) by utilizing the PV mixture-based image segmentation. This work presents some preliminary results of developing and applying texture-based CADpolyp technique to low-dose CTC studies. A total of 114 studies of asymptomatic patients older than 50, who underwent CTC and then optical colonoscopy (OC) on the same day, were selected from a database, which was accumulated in the past decade and contains various bowel preparations and CT scanning protocols. The participating radiologists found ten polyps of greater than 5 mm from a total of 16 OC proved polyps, i.e., a detection sensitivity of 63%. They scored 23 false positives from the database, i.e., a 20% false positive rate. Approximately 70% of the datasets were marked as imperfect bowel cleansing and/or presence of image artifacts. The impact of imperfect bowel cleansing and image artifacts on VC performance is significant. The texture-based CADpolyp detected all the polyps with an average of 2.68 false positives per patient. This indicates that texture-based CADpolyp can improve the CTC performance in the cases of imperfect cleansed bowels and presence of image artifacts.

  9. Anatomical-based Partial Volume Correction for Low-dose Dedicated Cardiac SPECT/CT

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hui; Chan, Chung; Grobshtein, Yariv; Ma, Tianyu; Liu, Yaqiang; Wang, Shi; Stacy, Mitchel R.; Sinusas, Albert J.; Liu, Chi

    2016-01-01

    Due to the limited spatial resolution, partial volume effect (PVE) has been a major degrading factor on quantitative accuracy in emission tomography systems. This study aims to investigate the performance of several anatomical-based partial volume correction (PVC) methods for a dedicated cardiac SPECT/CT system (GE Discovery NM/CT 570c) with focused field-of-view (FOV) over a clinically relevant range of high and low count levels for two different radiotracer distributions. These PVC methods include perturbation Geometry Transfer Matrix (pGTM), pGTM followed by multi-target correction (MTC), pGTM with known concentration in blood pool, the former followed by MTC and our newly proposed methods, which perform the MTC method iteratively, where the mean values in all regions are estimated and updated by the MTC-corrected images each time in the iterative process. The NCAT phantom was simulated for cardiovascular imaging with 99mTc-tetrofosmin, a myocardial perfusion agent, and 99mTc-red blood cell (RBC), a pure intravascular imaging agent. Images were acquired at six different count levels to investigate the performance of PVC methods in both high and low count levels for low-dose applications. We performed two large animal in vivo cardiac imaging experiments following injection of 99mTc-RBC for evaluation of intramyocardial blood volume (IMBV). The simulation results showed our proposed iterative methods provide superior performance than other existing PVC methods in terms of image quality, quantitative accuracy, and reproducibility (standard deviation), particularly for low-count data. The iterative approaches are robust for both 99mTc-tetrofosmin perfusion imaging and 99mTc-RBC imaging of IMBV and blood pool activity even at low count levels. The animal study results indicated the effectiveness of PVC to correct the overestimation of IMBV due to blood pool contamination. In conclusion, the iterative PVC methods can achieve more accurate quantification, particularly

  10. Anatomical-based partial volume correction for low-dose dedicated cardiac SPECT/CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hui; Chan, Chung; Grobshtein, Yariv; Ma, Tianyu; Liu, Yaqiang; Wang, Shi; Stacy, Mitchel R.; Sinusas, Albert J.; Liu, Chi

    2015-09-01

    Due to the limited spatial resolution, partial volume effect has been a major degrading factor on quantitative accuracy in emission tomography systems. This study aims to investigate the performance of several anatomical-based partial volume correction (PVC) methods for a dedicated cardiac SPECT/CT system (GE Discovery NM/CT 570c) with focused field-of-view over a clinically relevant range of high and low count levels for two different radiotracer distributions. These PVC methods include perturbation geometry transfer matrix (pGTM), pGTM followed by multi-target correction (MTC), pGTM with known concentration in blood pool, the former followed by MTC and our newly proposed methods, which perform the MTC method iteratively, where the mean values in all regions are estimated and updated by the MTC-corrected images each time in the iterative process. The NCAT phantom was simulated for cardiovascular imaging with 99mTc-tetrofosmin, a myocardial perfusion agent, and 99mTc-red blood cell (RBC), a pure intravascular imaging agent. Images were acquired at six different count levels to investigate the performance of PVC methods in both high and low count levels for low-dose applications. We performed two large animal in vivo cardiac imaging experiments following injection of 99mTc-RBC for evaluation of intramyocardial blood volume (IMBV). The simulation results showed our proposed iterative methods provide superior performance than other existing PVC methods in terms of image quality, quantitative accuracy, and reproducibility (standard deviation), particularly for low-count data. The iterative approaches are robust for both 99mTc-tetrofosmin perfusion imaging and 99mTc-RBC imaging of IMBV and blood pool activity even at low count levels. The animal study results indicated the effectiveness of PVC to correct the overestimation of IMBV due to blood pool contamination. In conclusion, the iterative PVC methods can achieve more accurate quantification, particularly for low

  11. Anatomical-based partial volume correction for low-dose dedicated cardiac SPECT/CT.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui; Chan, Chung; Grobshtein, Yariv; Ma, Tianyu; Liu, Yaqiang; Wang, Shi; Stacy, Mitchel R; Sinusas, Albert J; Liu, Chi

    2015-09-07

    Due to the limited spatial resolution, partial volume effect has been a major degrading factor on quantitative accuracy in emission tomography systems. This study aims to investigate the performance of several anatomical-based partial volume correction (PVC) methods for a dedicated cardiac SPECT/CT system (GE Discovery NM/CT 570c) with focused field-of-view over a clinically relevant range of high and low count levels for two different radiotracer distributions. These PVC methods include perturbation geometry transfer matrix (pGTM), pGTM followed by multi-target correction (MTC), pGTM with known concentration in blood pool, the former followed by MTC and our newly proposed methods, which perform the MTC method iteratively, where the mean values in all regions are estimated and updated by the MTC-corrected images each time in the iterative process. The NCAT phantom was simulated for cardiovascular imaging with (99m)Tc-tetrofosmin, a myocardial perfusion agent, and (99m)Tc-red blood cell (RBC), a pure intravascular imaging agent. Images were acquired at six different count levels to investigate the performance of PVC methods in both high and low count levels for low-dose applications. We performed two large animal in vivo cardiac imaging experiments following injection of (99m)Tc-RBC for evaluation of intramyocardial blood volume (IMBV). The simulation results showed our proposed iterative methods provide superior performance than other existing PVC methods in terms of image quality, quantitative accuracy, and reproducibility (standard deviation), particularly for low-count data. The iterative approaches are robust for both (99m)Tc-tetrofosmin perfusion imaging and (99m)Tc-RBC imaging of IMBV and blood pool activity even at low count levels. The animal study results indicated the effectiveness of PVC to correct the overestimation of IMBV due to blood pool contamination. In conclusion, the iterative PVC methods can achieve more accurate quantification, particularly

  12. Optimized Parallelization for Nonlocal Means Based Low Dose CT Image Processing

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Libo; Yang, Benqiang; Zhuang, Zhikun; Hu, Yining; Chen, Yang; Luo, Limin; Shu, Huazhong

    2015-01-01

    Low dose CT (LDCT) images are often significantly degraded by severely increased mottled noise/artifacts, which can lead to lowered diagnostic accuracy in clinic. The nonlocal means (NLM) filtering can effectively remove mottled noise/artifacts by utilizing large-scale patch similarity information in LDCT images. But the NLM filtering application in LDCT imaging also requires high computation cost because intensive patch similarity calculation within a large searching window is often required to be used to include enough structure-similarity information for noise/artifact suppression. To improve its clinical feasibility, in this study we further optimize the parallelization of NLM filtering by avoiding the repeated computation with the row-wise intensity calculation and the symmetry weight calculation. The shared memory with fast I/O speed is also used in row-wise intensity calculation for the proposed method. Quantitative experiment demonstrates that significant acceleration can be achieved with respect to the traditional straight pixel-wise parallelization. PMID:26078781

  13. Segmentation of the whole breast from low-dose chest CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shuang; Salvatore, Mary; Yankelevitz, David F.; Henschke, Claudia I.; Reeves, Anthony P.

    2015-03-01

    The segmentation of whole breast serves as the first step towards automated breast lesion detection. It is also necessary for automatically assessing the breast density, which is considered to be an important risk factor for breast cancer. In this paper we present a fully automated algorithm to segment the whole breast in low-dose chest CT images (LDCT), which has been recommended as an annual lung cancer screening test. The automated whole breast segmentation and potential breast density readings as well as lesion detection in LDCT will provide useful information for women who have received LDCT screening, especially the ones who have not undergone mammographic screening, by providing them additional risk indicators for breast cancer with no additional radiation exposure. The two main challenges to be addressed are significant range of variations in terms of the shape and location of the breast in LDCT and the separation of pectoral muscles from the glandular tissues. The presented algorithm achieves robust whole breast segmentation using an anatomy directed rule-based method. The evaluation is performed on 20 LDCT scans by comparing the segmentation with ground truth manually annotated by a radiologist on one axial slice and two sagittal slices for each scan. The resulting average Dice coefficient is 0.880 with a standard deviation of 0.058, demonstrating that the automated segmentation algorithm achieves results consistent with manual annotations of a radiologist.

  14. Improving spatial adaptivity of nonlocal means in low-dosed CT imaging using pointwise fractal dimension.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiuqing; Liao, Zhiwu; Hu, Shaoxiang; Li, Ming; Zhou, Jiliu

    2013-01-01

    NLMs is a state-of-art image denoising method; however, it sometimes oversmoothes anatomical features in low-dose CT (LDCT) imaging. In this paper, we propose a simple way to improve the spatial adaptivity (SA) of NLMs using pointwise fractal dimension (PWFD). Unlike existing fractal image dimensions that are computed on the whole images or blocks of images, the new PWFD, named pointwise box-counting dimension (PWBCD), is computed for each image pixel. PWBCD uses a fixed size local window centered at the considered image pixel to fit the different local structures of images. Then based on PWBCD, a new method that uses PWBCD to improve SA of NLMs directly is proposed. That is, PWBCD is combined with the weight of the difference between local comparison windows for NLMs. Smoothing results for test images and real sinograms show that PWBCD-NLMs with well-chosen parameters can preserve anatomical features better while suppressing the noises efficiently. In addition, PWBCD-NLMs also has better performance both in visual quality and peak signal to noise ratio (PSNR) than NLMs in LDCT imaging.

  15. Quantification of pulmonary vessel diameter in low-dose CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudyanto, Rina D.; Ortiz de Solórzano, Carlos; Muñoz-Barrutia, Arrate

    2015-03-01

    Accurate quantification of vessel diameter in low-dose Computer Tomography (CT) images is important to study pulmonary diseases, in particular for the diagnosis of vascular diseases and the characterization of morphological vascular remodeling in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). In this study, we objectively compare several vessel diameter estimation methods using a physical phantom. Five solid tubes of differing diameters (from 0.898 to 3.980 mm) were embedded in foam, simulating vessels in the lungs. To measure the diameters, we first extracted the vessels using either of two approaches: vessel enhancement using multi-scale Hessian matrix computation, or explicitly segmenting them using intensity threshold. We implemented six methods to quantify the diameter: three estimating diameter as a function of scale used to calculate the Hessian matrix; two calculating equivalent diameter from the crosssection area obtained by thresholding the intensity and vesselness response, respectively; and finally, estimating the diameter of the object using the Full Width Half Maximum (FWHM). We find that the accuracy of frequently used methods estimating vessel diameter from the multi-scale vesselness filter depends on the range and the number of scales used. Moreover, these methods still yield a significant error margin on the challenging estimation of the smallest diameter (on the order or below the size of the CT point spread function). Obviously, the performance of the thresholding-based methods depends on the value of the threshold. Finally, we observe that a simple adaptive thresholding approach can achieve a robust and accurate estimation of the smallest vessels diameter.

  16. Computational and human observer image quality evaluation of low dose, knowledge-based CT iterative reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Eck, Brendan L.; Fahmi, Rachid; Brown, Kevin M.; Zabic, Stanislav; Raihani, Nilgoun; Miao, Jun; Wilson, David L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Aims in this study are to (1) develop a computational model observer which reliably tracks the detectability of human observers in low dose computed tomography (CT) images reconstructed with knowledge-based iterative reconstruction (IMR™, Philips Healthcare) and filtered back projection (FBP) across a range of independent variables, (2) use the model to evaluate detectability trends across reconstructions and make predictions of human observer detectability, and (3) perform human observer studies based on model predictions to demonstrate applications of the model in CT imaging. Methods: Detectability (d′) was evaluated in phantom studies across a range of conditions. Images were generated using a numerical CT simulator. Trained observers performed 4-alternative forced choice (4-AFC) experiments across dose (1.3, 2.7, 4.0 mGy), pin size (4, 6, 8 mm), contrast (0.3%, 0.5%, 1.0%), and reconstruction (FBP, IMR), at fixed display window. A five-channel Laguerre–Gauss channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) was developed with internal noise added to the decision variable and/or to channel outputs, creating six different internal noise models. Semianalytic internal noise computation was tested against Monte Carlo and used to accelerate internal noise parameter optimization. Model parameters were estimated from all experiments at once using maximum likelihood on the probability correct, PC. Akaike information criterion (AIC) was used to compare models of different orders. The best model was selected according to AIC and used to predict detectability in blended FBP-IMR images, analyze trends in IMR detectability improvements, and predict dose savings with IMR. Predicted dose savings were compared against 4-AFC study results using physical CT phantom images. Results: Detection in IMR was greater than FBP in all tested conditions. The CHO with internal noise proportional to channel output standard deviations, Model-k4, showed the best trade-off between fit and

  17. Computational and human observer image quality evaluation of low dose, knowledge-based CT iterative reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Eck, Brendan L.; Fahmi, Rachid; Miao, Jun; Brown, Kevin M.; Zabic, Stanislav; Raihani, Nilgoun; Wilson, David L.

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: Aims in this study are to (1) develop a computational model observer which reliably tracks the detectability of human observers in low dose computed tomography (CT) images reconstructed with knowledge-based iterative reconstruction (IMR™, Philips Healthcare) and filtered back projection (FBP) across a range of independent variables, (2) use the model to evaluate detectability trends across reconstructions and make predictions of human observer detectability, and (3) perform human observer studies based on model predictions to demonstrate applications of the model in CT imaging. Methods: Detectability (d′) was evaluated in phantom studies across a range of conditions. Images were generated using a numerical CT simulator. Trained observers performed 4-alternative forced choice (4-AFC) experiments across dose (1.3, 2.7, 4.0 mGy), pin size (4, 6, 8 mm), contrast (0.3%, 0.5%, 1.0%), and reconstruction (FBP, IMR), at fixed display window. A five-channel Laguerre–Gauss channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) was developed with internal noise added to the decision variable and/or to channel outputs, creating six different internal noise models. Semianalytic internal noise computation was tested against Monte Carlo and used to accelerate internal noise parameter optimization. Model parameters were estimated from all experiments at once using maximum likelihood on the probability correct, P{sub C}. Akaike information criterion (AIC) was used to compare models of different orders. The best model was selected according to AIC and used to predict detectability in blended FBP-IMR images, analyze trends in IMR detectability improvements, and predict dose savings with IMR. Predicted dose savings were compared against 4-AFC study results using physical CT phantom images. Results: Detection in IMR was greater than FBP in all tested conditions. The CHO with internal noise proportional to channel output standard deviations, Model-k4, showed the best trade-off between fit

  18. SU-E-P-49: Evaluation of Image Quality and Radiation Dose of Various Unenhanced Head CT Protocols

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, L; Khan, M; Alapati, K; Hsieh, M; Barry, K

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the diagnostic value of various unenhanced head CT protocols and predicate acceptable radiation dose level for head CT exam. Methods: Our retrospective analysis included 3 groups, 20 patients per group, who underwent clinical routine unenhanced adult head CT examination. All exams were performed axially with 120 kVp. Three protocols, 380 mAs without iterative reconstruction and automAs, 340 mAs with iterative reconstruction without automAs, 340 mAs with iterative reconstruction and automAs, were applied on each group patients respectively. The images were reconstructed with H30, J30 for brain window and H60, J70 for bone window. Images acquired with three protocols were randomized and blindly reviewed by three radiologists. A 5 point scale was used to rate each exam The percentage of exam score above 3 and average scores of each protocol were calculated for each reviewer and tissue types. Results: For protocols without automAs, the average scores of bone window with iterative reconstruction were higher than those without iterative reconstruction for each reviewer although the radiation dose was 10 percentage lower. 100 percentage exams were scored 3 or higher and the average scores were above 4 for both brain and bone reconstructions. The CTDIvols are 64.4 and 57.8 mGy of 380 and 340 mAs, respectively. With automAs, the radiation dose varied with head size, resulting in 47.5 mGy average CTDIvol between 39.5 and 56.5 mGy. 93 and 98 percentage exams were scored great than 3 for brain and bone windows, respectively. The diagnostic confidence level and image quality of exams with AutomAs were less than those without AutomAs for each reviewer. Conclusion: According to these results, the mAs was reduced to 300 with automAs OFF for head CT exam. The radiation dose was 20 percentage lower than the original protocol and the CTDIvol was reduced to 51.2 mGy.

  19. Low-dose CT pulmonary angiography on a 15-year-old CT scanner: a feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Kaup, Moritz; Gruber-Rouh, Tatjana; Scholtz, Jan E; Albrecht, Moritz H; Bucher, Andreas; Frellesen, Claudia; Vogl, Thomas J

    2016-01-01

    Background Computed tomography (CT) low-dose (LD) imaging is used to lower radiation exposure, especially in vascular imaging; in current literature, this is mostly on latest generation high-end CT systems. Purpose To evaluate the effects of reduced tube current on objective and subjective image quality of a 15-year-old 16-slice CT system for pulmonary angiography (CTPA). Material and Methods CTPA scans from 60 prospectively randomized patients (28 men, 32 women) were examined in this study on a 15-year-old 16-slice CT scanner system. Standard CT (SD) settings were 100 kV and 150 mAs, LD settings were 100 kV and 50 mAs. Attenuation of the pulmonary trunk, various anatomic landmarks, and image noise were quantitatively measured; contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) and signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) were calculated. Three independent blinded radiologists subjectively rated each image series using a 5-point grading scale. Results CT dose index (CTDI) in the LD series was 66.46% lower compared to the SD settings (2.49 ± 0.55 mGy versus 7.42 ± 1.17 mGy). Attenuation of the pulmonary trunk showed similar results for both series (SD 409.55 ± 91.04 HU; LD 380.43 HU ± 93.11 HU; P = 0.768). Subjective image analysis showed no significant differences between SD and LD settings regarding the suitability for detection of central and peripheral PE (central SD/LD, 4.88; intra-class correlation coefficients [ICC], 0.894/4.83; ICC, 0.745; peripheral SD/LD, 4.70; ICC, 0.943/4.57; ICC, 0.919; all P > 0.4). Conclusion The LD protocol, on a 15-year-old CT scanner system without current high-end hardware or post-processing tools, led to a dose reduction of approximately 67% with similar subjective image quality and delineation of central and peripheral pulmonary arteries. PMID:28286671

  20. Segmentation of the sternum from low-dose chest CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shuang; Xie, Yiting; Reeves, Anthony P.

    2015-03-01

    Segmentation of the sternum in medical images is of clinical significance as it frequently serves as a stable reference to image registration and segmentation of other organs in the chest region. In this paper we present a fully automated algorithm to segment the sternum in low-dose chest CT images (LDCT). The proposed algorithm first locates an axial seed slice and then segments the sternum cross section on the seed slice by matching a rectangle model. Furthermore, it tracks and segments the complete sternum in the cranial and caudal direction respectively through sequential axial slices starting from the seed slice. The cross section on each axial slice is segmented using score functions that are designed to have local maxima at the boundaries of the sternum. Finally, the sternal angle is localized. The algorithm is designed to be specifically robust with respect to cartilage calcifications and to accommodate the high noise levels encountered with LDCT images. Segmentation of 351 cases from public datasets was evaluated visually with only 1 failing to produce a usable segmentation. 87.2% of the 351 images have good segmentation and 12.5% have acceptable segmentation. The sternal body segmentation and the localization of the sternal angle and the vertical extents of the sternum were also evaluated quantitatively for 25 good cases and 25 acceptable cases. The overall weighted mean DC of 0.897 and weighted mean distance error of 2.88 mm demonstrate that the algorithm achieves encouraging performance in both segmenting the sternal body and localizing the sternal angle.

  1. Usefulness of low dose chest CT for initial evaluation of blunt chest trauma

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung Jung; Bista, Anjali Basnyat; Min, Young Gi; Kim, Eun Young; Park, Kyung Joo; Kang, Doo Kyoung; Sun, Joo Sung

    2017-01-01

    Abstract We aimed to compare the diagnostic performance and inter-observer consistency between low dose chest CT (LDCT) and standard dose chest CT (SDCT) in the patients with blunt chest trauma. A total of 69 patients who met criteria indicative of blunt chest trauma (77% of male; age range, 16–85) were enrolled. All patients underwent LDCT without intravenous (IV) contrast and SDCT with IV contrast using parameters as following: LDCT, 40 mAs with automatic tube current modulation (ATCM) and 100 kVp (BMI <25, n = 51) or 120 kVp (BMI>25, n = 18); SDCT, 180 mAs with ATCM and 120 kVp. Transverse, coronal, sagittal images were reconstructed with 3-mm slice thickness without gap and provided for evaluation of 3 observers. Reference standard images (transverse, coronal, sagittal) were reconstructed using SDCT data with 1-mm slice thickness without gap. Reference standard was established by 2 experienced thoracic radiologists by consensus. Three observers independently evaluated each data set of LDCT and SDCT. Multiple-reader receiver operating characteristic analysis for comparing areas under the ROC curves demonstrated that there was no significant difference of diagnostic performance between LDCT and SDCT for the diagnosis of pulmonary injury, skeletal trauma, mediastinal injury, and chest wall injury (P > 0.05). The intraclass correlation coefficient was measured for inter-observer consistency and revealed that there was good inter-observer consistency in each examination of LDCT and SDCT for evaluation of blunt chest injury (0.8601–1.000). Aortic and upper abdominal injury could not be appropriately compared as LDCT was performed without using contrast materials and this was limitation of this study. The effective radiation dose of LDCT (average DLP = 1.52 mSv⋅mGy−1 cm−1) was significantly lower than those of SDCT (7.21 mSv mGy−1 cm−1). There is a great potential benefit to use of LDCT for initial evaluation of blunt chest trauma

  2. TU-EF-204-07: Add Tube Current Modulation to a Low Dose Simulation Tool for CT Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Y.; Wen, G.; Brown, K.; Klahr, P.; Dhanantwari, A.

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: We extended the capabilities of a low dose simulation tool to model Tube-Current Modulation (TCM). TCM is widely used in clinical practice to reduce radiation dose in CT scans. We expect the tool to be valuable for various clinical applications (e.g., optimize protocols, compare reconstruction techniques and evaluate TCM methods). Methods: The tube current is input as a function of z location, instead of a fixed value. Starting from the line integrals of a scan, a new Poisson noise realization at a lower dose is generated for each view. To validate the new functionality, we compared simulated scans with real scans in image space. Results: First we assessed noise in the difference between the low-dose simulations and the original high-dose scan. When the simulated tube current is a step function of z location, the noise at each segment matches the noise of 3 separate constant-tube-current-simulations. Secondly, with a phantom that forces TCM, we compared a low-dose simulation with an equivalent real low-dose scan. The mean CT number of the simulated scan and the real low-dose scan were 137.7±0.6 and 137.8±0.5 respectively. Furthermore, with 240 ROIs, the noise of the simulated scan and the real low-dose scan were 24.03±0.45 and 23.99±0.43 respectively, and they were not statistically different (2-sample t-test, p-value=0.28). The facts that the noise reflected the trend of the TCM curve, and that the absolute noise measurements were not statistically different validated the TCM function. Conclusion: We successfully added tube-current modulation functionality in an existing low dose simulation tool. We demonstrated that the noise reflected an input tube-current modulation curve. In addition, we verified that the noise and mean CT number of our simulation agreed with a real low dose scan. The authors are all employees of Philips. Yijun Ding is also supported by NIBIB P41EB002035 and NIBIB R01EB000803.

  3. Low-dose lung cancer screening with photon-counting CT: a feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Symons, Rolf; Cork, Tyler E.; Sahbaee, Pooyan; Fuld, Matthew K.; Kappler, Steffen; Folio, Les R.; Bluemke, David A.; Pourmorteza, Amir

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of using a whole-body photon-counting detector (PCD) CT scanner for low-dose lung cancer screening compared to a conventional energy integrating detector (EID) system. Radiation dose-matched EID and PCD scans of the COPDGene 2 phantom were acquired at different radiation dose levels (CTDIvol: 3.0, 1.5, and 0.75 mGy) and different tube voltages (120, 100, and 80 kVp). EID and PCD images were compared for quantitative Hounsfield unit (HU) accuracy, noise levels, and contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) for detection of ground-glass nodules (GGN) and emphysema. The PCD HU accuracy was better than EID for water at all scan parameters. PCD HU stability for lung, GGN and emphysema regions were superior to EID and PCD attenuation values were more reproducible than EID for all scan parameters (all P  <  0.01), while HUs for lung, GGN and emphysema ROIs changed significantly for EID with decreasing dose (all P  <  0.001). PCD showed lower noise levels at the lowest dose setting at 120, 100 and 80 kVp (15.2  ±  0.3 HU versus 15.8  ±  0.2 HU, P  =  0.03 16.1  ±  0.3 HU versus 18.0  ±  0.4 HU, P  =  0.003 and 16.1  ±  0.3 HU versus 17.9  ±  0.3 HU, P  =  0.001, respectively), resulting in superior CNR for evaluation of GGNs and emphysema at 100 and 80 kVp. PCD provided better HU stability for lung, ground-glass, and emphysema-equivalent foams at lower radiation dose settings with better reproducibility than EID. Additionally, PCD showed up to 10% less noise, and 11% higher CNR at 0.75 mGy for both 100 and 80 kVp. PCD technology may help reduce radiation exposure in lung cancer screening while maintaining diagnostic quality.

  4. Algorithm for x-ray beam hardening and scatter correction in low-dose cone-beam CT: phantom studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wenlei; Rong, Junyan; Gao, Peng; Liao, Qimei; Lu, HongBing

    2016-03-01

    X-ray scatter poses a significant limitation to image quality in cone-beam CT (CBCT), as well as beam hardening, resulting in image artifacts, contrast reduction, and lack of CT number accuracy. Meanwhile the x-ray radiation dose is also non-ignorable. Considerable scatter or beam hardening correction methods have been developed, independently, and rarely combined with low-dose CT reconstruction. In this paper, we combine scatter suppression with beam hardening correction for sparse-view CT reconstruction to improve CT image quality and reduce CT radiation. Firstly, scatter was measured, estimated, and removed using measurement-based methods, assuming that signal in the lead blocker shadow is only attributable to x-ray scatter. Secondly, beam hardening was modeled by estimating an equivalent attenuation coefficient at the effective energy, which was integrated into the forward projector of the algebraic reconstruction technique (ART). Finally, the compressed sensing (CS) iterative reconstruction is carried out for sparse-view CT reconstruction to reduce the CT radiation. Preliminary Monte Carlo simulated experiments indicate that with only about 25% of conventional dose, our method reduces the magnitude of cupping artifact by a factor of 6.1, increases the contrast by a factor of 1.4 and the CNR by a factor of 15. The proposed method could provide good reconstructed image from a few view projections, with effective suppression of artifacts caused by scatter and beam hardening, as well as reducing the radiation dose. With this proposed framework and modeling, it may provide a new way for low-dose CT imaging.

  5. Improving abdomen tumor low-dose CT images using dictionary learning based patch processing and unsharp filtering.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yang; Yu, Fei; Luo, Limin; Toumoulin, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Reducing patient radiation dose, while maintaining a high-quality image, is a major challenge in Computed Tomography (CT). The purpose of this work is to improve abdomen tumor low-dose CT (LDCT) image quality by using a two-step strategy: a first patch-wise non linear processing is first applied to suppress the noise and artifacts, that is based on a sparsity prior in term of a learned dictionary, then an unsharp filtering aiming to enhance the contrast of tissues and compensate the contrast loss caused by the DL processing. Preliminary results show that the proposed method is effective in suppressing mottled noise as well as improving tumor detectability.

  6. Automatic lobar segmentation for diseased lungs using an anatomy-based priority knowledge in low-dose CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sang Joon; Kim, Jung Im; Goo, Jin Mo; Lee, Doohee

    2014-03-01

    Lung lobar segmentation in CT images is a challenging tasks because of the limitations in image quality inherent to CT image acquisition, especially low-dose CT for clinical routine environment. Besides, complex anatomy and abnormal lesions in the lung parenchyma makes segmentation difficult because contrast in CT images are determined by the differential absorption of X-rays by neighboring structures, such as tissue, vessel or several pathological conditions. Thus, we attempted to develop a robust segmentation technique for normal and diseased lung parenchyma. The images were obtained with low-dose chest CT using soft reconstruction kernel (Sensation 16, Siemens, Germany). Our PC-based in-house software segmented bronchial trees and lungs with intensity adaptive region-growing technique. Then the horizontal and oblique fissures were detected by using eigenvalues-ratio of the Hessian matrix in the lung regions which were excluded from airways and vessels. To enhance and recover the faithful 3-D fissure plane, our proposed fissure enhancing scheme were applied to the images. After finishing above steps, for careful smoothening of fissure planes, 3-D rolling-ball algorithm in xyz planes were performed. Results show that success rate of our proposed scheme was achieved up to 89.5% in the diseased lung parenchyma.

  7. Comparison between Pre-log and Post-log Statistical Models in Ultra-Low-Dose CT Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Fu, Lin; Lee, Tzu-Cheng; Kim, Soo Mee; Alessio, Adam; Kinahan, Paul; Chang, Zhiqian; Sauer, Ken; Kalra, Mannudeep; De Man, Bruno

    2016-11-09

    X-ray detectors in clinical computed tomography (CT) usually operate in current-integrating mode. Their complicated signal statistics often lead to intractable likelihood functions for practical use in model-based image reconstruction (MBIR). It is therefore desirable to design simplified statistical models without losing the essential factors. Depending on whether the CT transmission data are logarithmically transformed, pre-log and post-log models are two major categories of choices in CT MBIR. Both being approximations, it remains an open question whether one model can notably improve image quality over the other on real scanners. In this study, we develop and compare several pre-log and post-log MBIR algorithms under a unified framework. Their reconstruction accuracy based on simulation and clinical datasets are evaluated. The results show that pre-log MBIR can achieve notably better quantitative accuracy than post-log MBIR in ultra-low-dose CT, although in less extreme cases, post-log MBIR with handcrafted pre-processing remains a competitive alternative. Pre-log MBIR could play a growing role in emerging ultra-low-dose CT applications.

  8. Initial evaluation of virtual un-enhanced imaging derived from fast kVp-switching dual energy contrast enhanced CT for the abdomen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, M.; Mendonca, P.; Okerlund, D.; Lamb, P.; Kulkarni, N.; Pinho, D.; Sahani, D.; Bhotika, R.

    2011-03-01

    The feasibility and utility of creating virtual un-enhanced images from contrast enhanced data acquired using a fast switching dual energy CT acquisition, is explored. Utilizing projection based material decomposition data, monochromatic images are generated and a Multi-material decomposition technique is applied. Quantitative and qualitative evaluation is performed to assess the equivalence of Virtual Un-Enhanced (VUE) and True Un-enhanced (TUE) for multiple tissue types and different organs in the abdomen. Ten patient cases were analyzed where a TUE and a subsequent Contrast Enhanced (CE) acquisition were obtained using fast kVp-switching dual energy CT utilizing Gemstone Spectral Imaging. Quantitative measurements were made by placing multiple Regions of Interest on the different tissues and organs in both the TUE and the VUE images. The absolute Hounsfield Unit (HU) differences in the mean values between TUE & VUE were calculated as well as the differences of the standard deviations. Qualitative analysis was done by two radiologists for overall image quality, presence of residual contrast, appearance of pathology, appearance and contrast of normal tissues and organs in comparison to the TUE. There is a very strong correlation between the TUE and VUE images.

  9. Applications of nonlocal means algorithm in low-dose X-ray CT image processing and reconstruction: A review.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hao; Zeng, Dong; Zhang, Hua; Wang, Jing; Liang, Zhengrong; Ma, Jianhua

    2017-03-01

    Low-dose X-ray computed tomography (LDCT) imaging is highly recommended for use in the clinic because of growing concerns over excessive radiation exposure. However, the CT images reconstructed by the conventional filtered back-projection (FBP) method from low-dose acquisitions may be severely degraded with noise and streak artifacts due to excessive X-ray quantum noise, or with view-aliasing artifacts due to insufficient angular sampling. In 2005, the nonlocal means (NLM) algorithm was introduced as a non-iterative edge-preserving filter to denoise natural images corrupted by additive Gaussian noise, and showed superior performance. It has since been adapted and applied to many other image types and various inverse problems. This paper specifically reviews the applications of the NLM algorithm in LDCT image processing and reconstruction, and explicitly demonstrates its improving effects on the reconstructed CT image quality from low-dose acquisitions. The effectiveness of these applications on LDCT and their relative performance are described in detail.

  10. A clinical evaluation of total variation-Stokes image reconstruction strategy for low-dose CT imaging of the chest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yan; Zhang, Hao; Moore, William; Bhattacharji, Priya; Liang, Zhengrong

    2015-03-01

    One hundred "normal-dose" computed tomography (CT) studies of the chest (i.e., 1,160 projection views, 120kVp, 100mAs) data sets were acquired from the patients who were scheduled for lung biopsy at Stony Brook University Hospital under informed consent approved by our Institutional Review Board. To mimic low-dose CT imaging scenario (i.e., sparse-view scan), sparse projection views were evenly extracted from the total 1,160 projections of each patient and the total radiation dose was reduced according to how many sparse views were selected. A standard filtered backprojection (FBP) algorithm was applied to the 1160 projections to produce reference images for comparison purpose. In the low-dose scenario, both the FBP and total variation-stokes (TVS) algorithms were applied to reconstruct the corresponding low-dose images. The reconstructed images were evaluated by an experienced thoracic radiologist against the reference images. Both the low-dose reconstructions and the reference images were displayed on a 4- megapixel monitor in soft tissue and lung windows. The images were graded by a five-point scale from 0 to 4 (0, nondiagnostic; 1, severe artifact with low confidence; 2, moderate artifact or moderate diagnostic confidences; 3, mild artifact or high confidence; 4, well depicted without artifacts). Quantitative evaluation measurements such as standard deviations for different tissue types and universal quality index were also studied and reported for the results. The evaluation concluded that the TVS can reduce the view number from 1,160 to 580 with slightly lower scores as the reference, resulting in a dose reduction to close 50%.

  11. SU-E-I-25: Determining Tube Current, Tube Voltage and Pitch Suitable for Low- Dose Lung Screening CT

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, K; Matthews, K

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The quality of a computed tomography (CT) image and the dose delivered during its acquisition depend upon the acquisition parameters used. Tube current, tube voltage, and pitch are acquisition parameters that potentially affect image quality and dose. This study investigated physicians' abilities to characterize small, solid nodules in low-dose CT images for combinations of current, voltage and pitch, for three CT scanner models. Methods: Lung CT images was acquired of a Data Spectrum anthropomorphic torso phantom with various combinations of pitch, tube current, and tube voltage; this phantom was used because acrylic beads of various sizes could be placed within the lung compartments to simulate nodules. The phantom was imaged on two 16-slice scanners and a 64-slice scanner. The acquisition parameters spanned a range of estimated CTDI levels; the CTDI estimates from the acquisition software were verified by measurement. Several experienced radiologists viewed the phantom lung CT images and noted nodule location, size and shape, as well as the acceptability of overall image quality. Results: Image quality for assessment of nodules was deemed unsatisfactory for all scanners at 80 kV (any tube current) and at 35 mA (any tube voltage). Tube current of 50 mA or more at 120 kV resulted in similar assessments from all three scanners. Physician-measured sphere diameters were closer to actual diameters for larger spheres, higher tube current, and higher kV. Pitch influenced size measurements less for larger spheres than for smaller spheres. CTDI was typically overestimated by the scanner software compared to measurement. Conclusion: Based on this survey of acquisition parameters, a low-dose CT protocol of 120 kV, 50 mA, and pitch of 1.4 is recommended to balance patient dose and acceptable image quality. For three models of scanners, this protocol resulted in estimated CTDIs from 2.9–3.6 mGy.

  12. Are the unenhanced and excretory CT phases necessary for the evaluation of acute pyelonephritis?

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Lincoln S; Torres, Ulysses S; Souza, Saulo M; Torres, Lucas R; D'Ippolito, Giuseppe

    2017-05-01

    Background The most widely accepted computed tomography (CT) protocol for diagnosis of acute pyelonephritis (APN) includes at least a pre- and post-contrast scan, which may expose patients to higher doses of ionizing radiation. Purpose To establish the accuracy, reproducibility, and degree of confidence in CT diagnosis of acute pyelonephritis (APN) and urolithiasis using only images obtained during the nephrographic phase. Material and Methods A retrospective study of 100 consecutive patients (88 women; age range, 19-70 years) with clinical and laboratory suspicion of APN and who underwent triphasic abdominal CT scans (non-contrast, nephrographic, and excretory phases) was performed. Two readers first evaluated independently only the nephrographic phase of scans, and, in a second session, the entire study. The diagnostic reference standard was settled by a third experienced radiologist who reviewed all triphasic scans and clinical data. Results The accuracy of only nephrographic phase for diagnosis of APN and urolithiasis was in the range of 90.3-91.78% and 96.27-99.25%, respectively. There was no significant difference in comparison with the triphasic reading (z: -0.4 - 0.2; P = 0.34-0.83). The average degree of confidence for APN also showed no significant variation for both readers ( P = 0.4 and 0.08). Almost perfect inter-observer agreements for the diagnosis of APN (k = 0.86, P < 0.001) and for urolithiasis (k = 0.84, P < 0.001) were observed when considering only the nephrographic phase. Conclusion CT assessment of APN and urolithiasis can be accurately performed using only the late nephrographic phase, with consequent dose reduction.

  13. Deep convolutional neural networks for automatic coronary calcium scoring in a screening study with low-dose chest CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lessmann, Nikolas; Išgum, Ivana; Setio, Arnaud A. A.; de Vos, Bob D.; Ciompi, Francesco; de Jong, Pim A.; Oudkerk, Matthjis; Mali, Willem P. Th. M.; Viergever, Max A.; van Ginneken, Bram

    2016-03-01

    The amount of calcifications in the coronary arteries is a powerful and independent predictor of cardiovascular events and is used to identify subjects at high risk who might benefit from preventive treatment. Routine quantification of coronary calcium scores can complement screening programs using low-dose chest CT, such as lung cancer screening. We present a system for automatic coronary calcium scoring based on deep convolutional neural networks (CNNs). The system uses three independently trained CNNs to estimate a bounding box around the heart. In this region of interest, connected components above 130 HU are considered candidates for coronary artery calcifications. To separate them from other high intensity lesions, classification of all extracted voxels is performed by feeding two-dimensional 50 mm × 50 mm patches from three orthogonal planes into three concurrent CNNs. The networks consist of three convolutional layers and one fully-connected layer with 256 neurons. In the experiments, 1028 non-contrast-enhanced and non-ECG-triggered low-dose chest CT scans were used. The network was trained on 797 scans. In the remaining 231 test scans, the method detected on average 194.3 mm3 of 199.8 mm3 coronary calcifications per scan (sensitivity 97.2 %) with an average false-positive volume of 10.3 mm3 . Subjects were assigned to one of five standard cardiovascular risk categories based on the Agatston score. Accuracy of risk category assignment was 84.4 % with a linearly weighted κ of 0.89. The proposed system can perform automatic coronary artery calcium scoring to identify subjects undergoing low-dose chest CT screening who are at risk of cardiovascular events with high accuracy.

  14. Ultra-low dose comprehensive cardiac CT imaging in a patient with acute myocarditis.

    PubMed

    Tröbs, Monique; Brand, Michael; Achenbach, Stephan; Marwan, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    The ability of contrast-enhanced CT to detect "late enhancement" in a fashion similar to magnetic resonance imaging has been previously reported. We report a case of acute myocarditis with coronary CT angiography as well as "late enhancement" imaging with ultra-low effective radiation dose.

  15. Investigation of ultra low-dose scans in the context of quantum-counting clinical CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidinger, T.; Buzug, T. M.; Flohr, T.; Fung, G. S. K.; Kappler, S.; Stierstorfer, K.; Tsui, B. M. W.

    2012-03-01

    In clinical computed tomography (CT), images from patient examinations taken with conventional scanners exhibit noise characteristics governed by electronics noise, when scanning strongly attenuating obese patients or with an ultra-low X-ray dose. Unlike CT systems based on energy integrating detectors, a system with a quantum counting detector does not suffer from this drawback. Instead, the noise from the electronics mainly affects the spectral resolution of these detectors. Therefore, it does not contribute to the image noise in spectrally non-resolved CT images. This promises improved image quality due to image noise reduction in scans obtained from clinical CT examinations with lowest X-ray tube currents or obese patients. To quantify the benefits of quantum counting detectors in clinical CT we have carried out an extensive simulation study of the complete scanning and reconstruction process for both kinds of detectors. The simulation chain encompasses modeling of the X-ray source, beam attenuation in the patient, and calculation of the detector response. Moreover, in each case the subsequent image preprocessing and reconstruction is modeled as well. The simulation-based, theoretical evaluation is validated by experiments with a novel prototype quantum counting system and a Siemens Definition Flash scanner with a conventional energy integrating CT detector. We demonstrate and quantify the improvement from image noise reduction achievable with quantum counting techniques in CT examinations with ultra-low X-ray dose and strong attenuation.

  16. Low-Dose PET/CT and Full-Dose Contrast-Enhanced CT at the Initial Staging of Localized Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Sabaté-Llobera, Aida; Cortés-Romera, Montserrat; Mercadal, Santiago; Hernández-Gañán, Javier; Pomares, Helena; González-Barca, Eva; Gámez-Cenzano, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) has been used as the reference imaging technique for the initial staging of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma until recent days, when the introduction of positron emission tomography (PET)/CT imaging as a hybrid technique has become of routine use. However, the performance of both examinations is still common. The aim of this work was to compare the findings between low-dose 2-deoxy-2-(18F)fluoro-d-glucose (18F-FDG) PET/CT and full-dose contrast-enhanced CT (ceCT) in 28 patients with localized diffuse large B-cell lymphoma according to PET/CT findings, in order to avoid the performance of ceCT. For each technique, a comparison in the number of nodal and extranodal involved regions was performed. PET/CT showed more lesions than ceCT in both nodal (41 vs. 36) and extranodal localizations (16 vs. 15). Disease staging according to both techniques was concordant in 22 patients (79%) and discordant in 6 patients (21%), changing treatment management in 3 patients (11%). PET/CT determined a better staging and therapeutic approach, making the performance of an additional ceCT unnecessary. PMID:27559300

  17. Comparison of biophysical factors influencing on emphysema quantification with low-dose CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heo, Chang Yong; Kim, Jong Hyo

    2014-03-01

    Emphysema Index(EI) measurements in MDCT is known to be influenced by various biophysical factors such as total lung volume, and body size. We investigated the association of the four biophysical factors with emphysema index in low-dose MDCT. In particular, we attempted to identify a potentially stronger biophysical factor than total lung volume. A total of 400 low-dose MDCT volumes taken at 120kVp, 40mAs, 1mm thickness, and B30f reconstruction kernel were used. The lungs, airways, and pulmonary vessels were automatically segmented, and two Emphysema Indices, relative area below -950HU(RA950) and 15th percentile(Perc15), were extracted from the segmented lungs. The biophysical factors such as total lung volume(TLV), mode of lung attenuation(ModLA), effective body diameter(EBD), and the water equivalent body diameter(WBD) were estimated from the segmented lung and body area. The association of biophysical factors with emphysema indices were evaluated by correlation coefficients. The mean emphysema indices were 8.3±5.5(%) in RA950, and -930±18(HU) in Perc15. The estimates of biophysical factors were 4.7±1.0(L) in TLV, -901±21(HU) in ModLA, 26.9±2.2(cm) in EBD, and 25.9±2.6(cm) in WBD. The correlation coefficients of biophysical factors with RA950 were 0.73 in TLV, 0.94 in ModLA, 0.31 in EBD, and 0.18 WBD, the ones with Perc15 were 0.74 in TLV, 0.98 in ModLA, 0.29 in EBD, and 0.15 WBD. Study results revealed that two biophysical factors, TLV and ModLA, mostly affects the emphysema indices. In particular, the ModLA exhibited strongest correlation of 0.98 with Perc15, which indicating the ModLA is the most significant confounding biophysical factor in emphysema indices measurement.

  18. Lung Cancer Screening With Low-Dose CT: Its Effect on Smoking Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Meaghan McEntee; LoBiondo-Wood, Geri

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer screening provides an opportunity for smoking cessation interventions. A review of the literature found that smokers who participated in lung cancer screening had a higher smoking cessation rate compared with smokers in the general population. However, the randomized controlled trials included in the review did not identify any difference in smoking cessation rates between the individuals who had a CT scan to screen for lung cancer and unscreened control groups. Multiple studies observed participants for lengths of time ranging from 1 to 36 months and concluded that individuals who received abnormal CT results had a higher smoking cessation rate compared with participants with normal CT results. A single study that observed participants for 6 years initially found similar increased cessation rates among those with abnormal CT results, but at the conclusion of the study the difference in cessation rates had dissipated. Lung cancer screening produces a teachable moment when individuals may be more receptive to smoking cessation interventions. Advanced practitioners should take an active role in promoting smoking cessation interventions and fostering this teachable moment created by lung cancer screening. PMID:25032020

  19. A comprehensive study on the relationship between the image quality and imaging dose in low-dose cone beam CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Hao; Cervino, Laura; Jia, Xun; Jiang, Steve B.

    2012-04-01

    While compressed sensing (CS)-based algorithms have been developed for the low-dose cone beam CT (CBCT) reconstruction, a clear understanding of the relationship between the image quality and imaging dose at low-dose levels is needed. In this paper, we qualitatively investigate this subject in a comprehensive manner with extensive experimental and simulation studies. The basic idea is to plot both the image quality and imaging dose together as functions of the number of projections and mAs per projection over the whole clinically relevant range. On this basis, a clear understanding of the tradeoff between the image quality and imaging dose can be achieved and optimal low-dose CBCT scan protocols can be developed to maximize the dose reduction while minimizing the image quality loss for various imaging tasks in image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT). Main findings of this work include (1) under the CS-based reconstruction framework, image quality has little degradation over a large range of dose variation. Image quality degradation becomes evident when the imaging dose (approximated with the x-ray tube load) is decreased below 100 total mAs. An imaging dose lower than 40 total mAs leads to a dramatic image degradation, and thus should be used cautiously. Optimal low-dose CBCT scan protocols likely fall in the dose range of 40-100 total mAs, depending on the specific IGRT applications. (2) Among different scan protocols at a constant low-dose level, the super sparse-view reconstruction with the projection number less than 50 is the most challenging case, even with strong regularization. Better image quality can be acquired with low mAs protocols. (3) The optimal scan protocol is the combination of a medium number of projections and a medium level of mAs/view. This is more evident when the dose is around 72.8 total mAs or below and when the ROI is a low-contrast or high-resolution object. Based on our results, the optimal number of projections is around 90 to 120. (4

  20. A comprehensive study on the relationship between the image quality and imaging dose in low-dose cone beam CT.

    PubMed

    Yan, Hao; Cervino, Laura; Jia, Xun; Jiang, Steve B

    2012-04-07

    While compressed sensing (CS)-based algorithms have been developed for the low-dose cone beam CT (CBCT) reconstruction, a clear understanding of the relationship between the image quality and imaging dose at low-dose levels is needed. In this paper, we qualitatively investigate this subject in a comprehensive manner with extensive experimental and simulation studies. The basic idea is to plot both the image quality and imaging dose together as functions of the number of projections and mAs per projection over the whole clinically relevant range. On this basis, a clear understanding of the tradeoff between the image quality and imaging dose can be achieved and optimal low-dose CBCT scan protocols can be developed to maximize the dose reduction while minimizing the image quality loss for various imaging tasks in image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT). Main findings of this work include (1) under the CS-based reconstruction framework, image quality has little degradation over a large range of dose variation. Image quality degradation becomes evident when the imaging dose (approximated with the x-ray tube load) is decreased below 100 total mAs. An imaging dose lower than 40 total mAs leads to a dramatic image degradation, and thus should be used cautiously. Optimal low-dose CBCT scan protocols likely fall in the dose range of 40-100 total mAs, depending on the specific IGRT applications. (2) Among different scan protocols at a constant low-dose level, the super sparse-view reconstruction with the projection number less than 50 is the most challenging case, even with strong regularization. Better image quality can be acquired with low mAs protocols. (3) The optimal scan protocol is the combination of a medium number of projections and a medium level of mAs/view. This is more evident when the dose is around 72.8 total mAs or below and when the ROI is a low-contrast or high-resolution object. Based on our results, the optimal number of projections is around 90 to 120. (4

  1. A comprehensive study on the relationship between image quality and imaging dose in low-dose cone beam CT

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Hao; Cervino, Laura; Jia, Xun; Jiang, Steve B.

    2012-01-01

    While compressed sensing (CS) based algorithms have been developed for low-dose cone beam CT (CBCT) reconstruction, a clear understanding on the relationship between the image quality and imaging dose at low dose levels is needed. In this paper, we qualitatively investigate this subject in a comprehensive manner with extensive experimental and simulation studies. The basic idea is to plot both the image quality and imaging dose together as functions of number of projections and mAs per projection over the whole clinically relevant range. On this basis, a clear understanding on the tradeoff between image quality and imaging dose can be achieved and optimal low-dose CBCT scan protocols can be developed to maximize the dose reduction while minimizing the image quality loss for various imaging tasks in image guided radiation therapy (IGRT). Main findings of this work include: 1) Under the CS-based reconstruction framework, image quality has little degradation over a large range of dose variation. Image quality degradation becomes evident when the imaging dose (approximated with the x-ray tube load) is decreased below 100 total mAs. An imaging dose lower than 40 total mAs leads to a dramatic image degradation, and thus should be used cautiously. Optimal low-dose CBCT scan protocols likely fall in the dose range of 40–100 total mAs, depending on the specific IGRT applications. 2) Among different scan protocols at a constant low-dose level, the super sparse-view reconstruction with projection number less than 50 is the most challenging case, even with strong regularization. Better image quality can be acquired with low mAs protocols. 3) The optimal scan protocol is the combination of a medium number of projections and a medium level of mAs/view. This is more evident when the dose is around 72.8 total mAs or below and when the ROI is a low-contrast or high-resolution object. Based on our results, the optimal number of projections is around 90 to 120. 4) The clinically

  2. Task-based image quality evaluation of iterative reconstruction methods for low dose CT using computer simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jingyan; Fuld, Matthew K.; Fung, George S. K.; Tsui, Benjamin M. W.

    2015-04-01

    Iterative reconstruction (IR) methods for x-ray CT is a promising approach to improve image quality or reduce radiation dose to patients. The goal of this work was to use task based image quality measures and the channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) to evaluate both analytic and IR methods for clinical x-ray CT applications. We performed realistic computer simulations at five radiation dose levels, from a clinical reference low dose D0 to 25% D0. A fixed size and contrast lesion was inserted at different locations into the liver of the XCAT phantom to simulate a weak signal. The simulated data were reconstructed on a commercial CT scanner (SOMATOM Definition Flash; Siemens, Forchheim, Germany) using the vendor-provided analytic (WFBP) and IR (SAFIRE) methods. The reconstructed images were analyzed by CHOs with both rotationally symmetric (RS) and rotationally oriented (RO) channels, and with different numbers of lesion locations (5, 10, and 20) in a signal known exactly (SKE), background known exactly but variable (BKEV) detection task. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) was used as a summary measure to compare the IR and analytic methods; the AUC was also used as the equal performance criterion to derive the potential dose reduction factor of IR. In general, there was a good agreement in the relative AUC values of different reconstruction methods using CHOs with RS and RO channels, although the CHO with RO channels achieved higher AUCs than RS channels. The improvement of IR over analytic methods depends on the dose level. The reference dose level D0 was based on a clinical low dose protocol, lower than the standard dose due to the use of IR methods. At 75% D0, the performance improvement was statistically significant (p < 0.05). The potential dose reduction factor also depended on the detection task. For the SKE/BKEV task involving 10 lesion locations, a dose reduction of at least 25% from D0 was achieved.

  3. Projection domain denoising method based on dictionary learning for low-dose CT image reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haiyan; Zhang, Liyi; Sun, Yunshan; Zhang, Jingyu

    2015-01-01

    Reducing X-ray tube current is one of the widely used methods for decreasing the radiation dose. Unfortunately, the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the projection data degrades simultaneously. To improve the quality of reconstructed images, a dictionary learning based penalized weighted least-squares (PWLS) approach is proposed for sinogram denoising. The weighted least-squares considers the statistical characteristic of noise and the penalty models the sparsity of sinogram based on dictionary learning. Then reconstruct CT image using filtered back projection (FBP) algorithm from the denoised sinogram. The proposed method is particularly suitable for the projection data with low SNR. Experimental results show that the proposed method can get high-quality CT images when the signal to noise ratio of projection data declines sharply.

  4. [Ultra-low-dose spiral (helical) CT of the thorax: a filtering technique].

    PubMed

    Nitta, N; Takahashi, M; Murata, K; Mori, M; Shimoyama, K; Mishina, A; Matsuo, H; Morita, R; Sugii, K; Nomura, A

    1996-01-01

    To reduce the radiation dose from spiral (helical) CT, a custom-made aluminium filter was installed in the X-ray tube and a reduction of effective tube current was attempted. A pronounced reduction of effective tube current, namely, 6 and 3 mA, was achieved with 26 and 37 mm thick aluminium filters, respectively. Visualization of normal lung structure was accomplished with both 6 and 3 mA settings. However, images of 3 mA failed to delineate mediastinal structures because of marked beam hardening resulting from the bone structure of the thoracic inlet. Six mA was considered the lowest dose setting of spiral (helical) CT of the thorax that could be used for lung cancer screening.

  5. Dose and Image Quality in Low-dose CT for Urinary Stone Disease: Added Value of Automatic Tube Current Modulation and Iterative Reconstruction Techniques.

    PubMed

    Soenen, Olivier; Balliauw, Christophe; Oyen, Raymond; Zanca, Federica

    2016-05-31

    The aim of this study was to compare dose and image quality (IQ) of a baseline low-dose computed tomography (CT) (fix mAs) vs. an ultra-low-dose CT (automatic tube current modulation, ATCM) in patients with suspected urinary stone disease and to assess the added value of iterative reconstruction. CT examination was performed on 193 patients (103 baseline low-dose, 90 ultra-low-dose). Filtered back projection (FBP) was used for both protocols, and Sinogram Affirmed Iterative Reconstruction (SAFIRE) was used for the ultra-low-dose protocol only. Dose and ureter stones information were collected for both protocols. Subjective IQ was assessed by two radiologists scoring noise, visibility of the ureter and overall IQ. Objective IQ (contrast-to-noise ratio, CNR) was assessed for the ultra-low-dose protocol only (FBP and SAFIRE). The ultra-low-dose protocol (ATCM) showed a 22% decrease in mean effective dose (p < 0.001) and improved visibility of the pelvic ureter (p = 0.02). CNR was higher for SAFIRE (p < 0.0001). SAFIRE improves the objective IQ, but not the subjective IQ for the chosen clinical task.

  6. Anxiety in Cancer Patients during 18F-FDG PET/CT Low Dose: A Comparison of Anxiety Levels before and after Imaging Studies

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Lina; Carolino, Elisabete; Oliveira, Cátia; Pacheco, Carolina; Castro, Maria; Alonso, Juan

    2017-01-01

    Objective. Assessing the level of anxiety in oncology patients who underwent 18F-FDG PET/CT low dose scan and identifying the main reasons that generate anxiety. Material and Method. The study included 81 cancer patients submitted to the 18F-FDG PET/CT low dose scan. Patients filled in the Scan Experience Questionnaire and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) before and after 18F-FDG PET/CT low dose scan. Results. Substantial levels of anxiety were detected both before and after 18F-FDG PET/CT low dose scan (STAI mean > 30), with a significant increase in the state of anxiety after scan performance (p < 0.0001, Medianpre = 31.1, and Medianpos = 33.0). 18F-FDG PET/CT low dose results are the main cause of anxiety both before (79.1%) and after (86.9%) the scan. The information provided by staff both before and on the 18F-FDG PET/CT low dose day was classified mostly as completely understandable (70.5% and 75.3%, resp.) and as very useful (70.5% and 72.6%, resp.) and correlated positively with patients' overall satisfaction with NM Department (rS = 0.372, p = 0.004 and rS = 0.528, p = 0.000, resp.), but not with anxiety levels. Conclusions. Patients perceive high levels of anxiety during the 18F-FDG PET/CT low dose scan and the concern with scan results was pointed out as the main factor for that emotional reaction. PMID:28392942

  7. Performance evaluation of multi-material electronic cleansing for ultra-low-dose dual-energy CT colonography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tachibana, Rie; Kohlhase, Naja; Näppi, Janne J.; Hironaka, Toru; Ota, Junko; Ishida, Takayuki; Regge, Daniele; Yoshida, Hiroyuki

    2016-03-01

    Accurate electronic cleansing (EC) for CT colonography (CTC) enables the visualization of the entire colonic surface without residual materials. In this study, we evaluated the accuracy of a novel multi-material electronic cleansing (MUMA-EC) scheme for non-cathartic ultra-low-dose dual-energy CTC (DE-CTC). The MUMA-EC performs a wateriodine material decomposition of the DE-CTC images and calculates virtual monochromatic images at multiple energies, after which a random forest classifier is used to label the images into the regions of lumen air, soft tissue, fecal tagging, and two types of partial-volume boundaries based on image-based features. After the labeling, materials other than soft tissue are subtracted from the CTC images. For pilot evaluation, 384 volumes of interest (VOIs), which represented sources of subtraction artifacts observed in current EC schemes, were sampled from 32 ultra-low-dose DE-CTC scans. The voxels in the VOIs were labeled manually to serve as a reference standard. The metric for EC accuracy was the mean overlap ratio between the labels of the reference standard and the labels generated by the MUMA-EC, a dualenergy EC (DE-EC), and a single-energy EC (SE-EC) scheme. Statistically significant differences were observed between the performance of the MUMA/DE-EC and the SE-EC methods (p<0.001). Visual assessment confirmed that the MUMA-EC generated less subtraction artifacts than did DE-EC and SE-EC. Our MUMA-EC scheme yielded superior performance over conventional SE-EC scheme in identifying and minimizing subtraction artifacts on noncathartic ultra-low-dose DE-CTC images.

  8. Low-Dose High-Pitch CT Angiography of the Supraaortic Arteries Using Sinogram-Affirmed Iterative Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Beitzke, Dietrich; Nolz, Richard; Unterhumer, Sylvia; Plank, Christina; Weber, Michael; Schernthaner, Rüdiger; Schöpf, Veronika; Wolf, Florian; Loewe, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Objective To prospectively evaluate image quality and radiation dose using a low-dose computed tomography angiography protocol and iterative image reconstruction for high-pitch dual-source CT-angiography (DSCTA) of the supraaortic arteries. Material and Methods DSCTA was performed in 42 patients, using either 120 kVp tube voltage, 120 mAS tube current, 2.4 pitch and filtered back projection, or 100 kVp tube voltage, 100 mAs tube current, 3.2 pitch, and sinogram affirmed iterative reconstruction. Measurements of vessel attenuation, of the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) were performed to objectively evaluate image quality. Two readers evaluated subjective image quality and image noise, using a four-point scale. Effective dose was used to compare the differences in radiation dose. Results Low-dose protocol application showed significantly higher vessel opacification (p = 0.013), and non-significantly higher CNR and SNR values. There was no difference in the subjective image quality and image noise reading between the protocols. Effective dose was significantly lower using the low-dose protocol (1.29±0.21 mSv vs. 2.92±0.72 mSv; p<0.001). Conclusion The combined use of reduced tube voltage, reduced tube current, and iterative reconstruction reduces radiation dose by 55.4% in high-pitch DSCTA of the supraaortic arteries without impairment of image quality. PMID:24919195

  9. Development of a low-dose protocol for cone beam CT examinations of the anterior maxilla in children

    PubMed Central

    Hidalgo Rivas, Jose A; Horner, Keith; Thiruvenkatachari, Badri; Davies, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to develop a low-dose protocol suitable for cone beam CT (CBCT) examination of an impacted maxillary canine in children by using a combination of dosimetry with subjective and objective image quality assessment. Methods: Radiation dose and image quality measurements were made using a dental CBCT machine. An image quality phantom was used to investigate the relationship between objective image quality and dose–area product (DAP) for a broad range of exposure settings. Subjective image quality assessment was achieved using a paediatric skull phantom submerged in a water bath for the same range of exposure settings. Eight clinicians assessed each CBCT data set for nine aspects of image quality using a five-point rating scale of agreement. Results: Acceptable image quality, defined using subjective judgements by the clinicians of the skull phantom images, was achievable with DAP values of 127 mGy cm2 or greater and a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of 4.8 or greater. A cautious choice was made to recommend a low-dose protocol of 80 kV and 3 mA for implementation into clinical practice, corresponding to a DAP value of 146 mGy cm2 and a PTFE CNR of 5.0. Conclusion: A low-dose protocol for this particular CBCT machine was established which represents as much as a 50% reduction compared with manufacturer's recommendations. Advances in knowledge: To the authors' best knowledge, this is the first study that addresses dose optimization in paediatric clinical protocols in dental CBCT. Furthermore, this study explores the relationship between radiation dose, objective and subjective image quality. PMID:26279087

  10. Low-dose multiphase abdominal CT reconstruction with phase-induced swap prior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selim, Mona; Rashed, Essam A.; Kudo, Hiroyuki

    2016-10-01

    Multiphase abdominal CT is an imaging protocol in which the patient is scanned at different phases before and after the injection of a contrast agent. Reconstructed images with different concentrations of contrast material provide useful information for effective detection of abnormalities. However, several scanning during a short period of time eventually increase the patient radiation dose to a remarkable value up to a risky level. Reducing the patient dose by modulating the x-ray tube current or acquiring the projection data through a small number of views are known to degrade the image quality and reduce the possibility to be useful for diagnosis purpose. In this work, we propose a novel multiphase abdominal CT imaging protocol with patient dose reduction and high image quality. The image reconstruction cost function consists of two terms, namely the data fidelity term and penalty term to enforce the anatomical similarity in successive contrast phase reconstruction. The prior information, named phase-induced swap prior (PISP) is computed using total variation minimization of image acquired from different contrast phases. The new method is evaluated through a simulation study using digital abdominal phantom and real data and results are promising.

  11. Low dose CT image restoration using a database of image patches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Sungsoo; Mueller, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Reducing the radiation dose in CT imaging has become an active research topic and many solutions have been proposed to remove the significant noise and streak artifacts in the reconstructed images. Most of these methods operate within the domain of the image that is subject to restoration. This, however, poses limitations on the extent of filtering possible. We advocate to take into consideration the vast body of external knowledge that exists in the domain of already acquired medical CT images, since after all, this is what radiologists do when they examine these low quality images. We can incorporate this knowledge by creating a database of prior scans, either of the same patient or a diverse corpus of different patients, to assist in the restoration process. Our paper follows up on our previous work that used a database of images. Using images, however, is challenging since it requires tedious and error prone registration and alignment. Our new method eliminates these problems by storing a diverse set of small image patches in conjunction with a localized similarity matching scheme. We also empirically show that it is sufficient to store these patches without anatomical tags since their statistics are sufficiently strong to yield good similarity matches from the database and as a direct effect, produce image restorations of high quality. A final experiment demonstrates that our global database approach can recover image features that are difficult to preserve with conventional denoising approaches.

  12. Low dose CT image restoration using a database of image patches.

    PubMed

    Ha, Sungsoo; Mueller, Klaus

    2015-01-21

    Reducing the radiation dose in CT imaging has become an active research topic and many solutions have been proposed to remove the significant noise and streak artifacts in the reconstructed images. Most of these methods operate within the domain of the image that is subject to restoration. This, however, poses limitations on the extent of filtering possible. We advocate to take into consideration the vast body of external knowledge that exists in the domain of already acquired medical CT images, since after all, this is what radiologists do when they examine these low quality images. We can incorporate this knowledge by creating a database of prior scans, either of the same patient or a diverse corpus of different patients, to assist in the restoration process. Our paper follows up on our previous work that used a database of images. Using images, however, is challenging since it requires tedious and error prone registration and alignment. Our new method eliminates these problems by storing a diverse set of small image patches in conjunction with a localized similarity matching scheme. We also empirically show that it is sufficient to store these patches without anatomical tags since their statistics are sufficiently strong to yield good similarity matches from the database and as a direct effect, produce image restorations of high quality. A final experiment demonstrates that our global database approach can recover image features that are difficult to preserve with conventional denoising approaches.

  13. Longitudinal follow-up study of smoking-induced emphysema progression in low-dose CT screening of lung cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, H.; Matsuhiro, M.; Kawata, Y.; Niki, N.; Nakano, Y.; Ohmatsu, H.; Kusumoto, M.; Tsuchida, T.; Eguchi, K.; Kaneko, Masahiro; Moriyama, N.

    2014-03-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is a major public health problem that is predicted to be third leading cause of death in 2030. Although spirometry is traditionally used to quantify emphysema progression, it is difficult to detect the loss of pulmonary function by emphysema in early stage, and to assess the susceptibility to smoking. This study presents quantification method of smoking-induced emphysema progression based on annual changes of low attenuation volume (LAV) by each lung lobe acquired from low-dose CT images in lung cancer screening. The method consists of three steps. First, lung lobes are segmented using extracted interlobar fissures by enhancement filter based on fourdimensional curvature. Second, LAV of each lung lobe is segmented. Finally, smoking-induced emphysema progression is assessed by statistical analysis of the annual changes represented by linear regression of LAV percentage in each lung lobe. This method was applied to 140 participants in lung cancer CT screening for six years. The results showed that LAV progressions of nonsmokers, past smokers, and current smokers are different in terms of pack-year and smoking cessation duration. This study demonstrates effectiveness in diagnosis and prognosis of early emphysema in lung cancer CT screening.

  14. Lung cancer screening with low-dose helical CT in Korea: experiences at the Samsung Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Chong, Semin; Lee, Kyung Soo; Chung, Myung Jin; Kim, Tae Sung; Kim, Hojoong; Kwon, O Jung; Choi, Yoon-Ho; Rhee, Chong H

    2005-06-01

    To determine overall detection rates of lung cancer by low-dose CT (LDCT) screening and to compare histopathologic and imaging differences of detected cancers between high- and low-risk groups, this study included 6,406 asymptomatic Korean adults with >or=45 yr of age who underwent LDCT for lung cancer screening. All were classified into high- (>or=20 pack-year smoking; 3,353) and low-risk (3,053; <20 pack-yr smoking and non-smokers) groups. We compared CT findings of detected cancers and detection rates between high- and low-risk. At initial CT, 35% (2,255 of 6,406) had at least one or more non-calcified nodule. Lung cancer detection rates were 0.36% (23 of 6,406). Twenty-one non-small cell lung cancers appeared as solid (n=14) or ground-glass opacity (GGO) (n=7) nodules. Cancer likelihood was higher in GGO nodules than in solid nodules (p<0.01). Fifteen of 23 cancers occurred in high-risk group and 8 in low-risk group (p=0.215). Therefore, LDCT screening help detect early stage of lung cancer in asymptomatic Korean population with detection rate of 0.36% on a population basis and may be useful for discovering early lung cancer in low-risk group as well as in high-risk group.

  15. Extracting information from previous full-dose CT scan for knowledge-based Bayesian reconstruction of current low-dose CT images

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hao; Han, Hao; Liang, Zhengrong; Hu, Yifan; Liu, Yan; Moore, William; Ma, Jianhua; Lu, Hongbing

    2015-01-01

    Markov random field (MRF) model has been widely employed in edge-preserving regional noise smoothing penalty to reconstruct piece-wise smooth images in the presence of noise, such as in low-dose computed tomography (LdCT). While it preserves edge sharpness, its regional smoothing may sacrifice tissue image textures, which have been recognized as useful imaging biomarkers, and thus it may compromise clinical tasks such as differentiating malignant vs. benign lesions, e.g., lung nodules or colon polyps. This study aims to shift the edge-preserving regional noise smoothing paradigm to texture-preserving framework for LdCT image reconstruction while retaining the advantage of MRF’s neighborhood system on edge preservation. Specifically, we adapted the MRF model to incorporate the image textures of muscle, fat, bone, lung, etc. from previous full-dose CT (FdCT) scan as a priori knowledge for texture-preserving Bayesian reconstruction of current LdCT images. To show the feasibility of the proposed reconstruction framework, experiments using clinical patient scans were conducted. The experimental outcomes showed a dramatic gain by the a priori knowledge for LdCT image reconstruction using the commonly-used Haralick texture measures. Thus, it is conjectured that the texture-preserving LdCT reconstruction has advantages over the edge-preserving regional smoothing paradigm for texture-specific clinical applications. PMID:26561284

  16. Fast radioactive seed localization in intraoperative cone beam CT for low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yu-chi; Xiong, Jian-ping; Cohan, Gilad; Zaider, Marco; Mageras, Gig; Zelefsky, Michael

    2013-03-01

    A fast knowledge-based radioactive seed localization method for brachytherapy was developed to automatically localize radioactive seeds in an intraoperative volumetric cone beam CT (CBCT) so that corrections, if needed, can be made during prostate implant surgery. A transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) scan is acquired for intraoperative treatment planning. Planned seed positions are transferred to intraoperative CBCT following TRUS-to-CBCT registration using a reference CBCT scan of the TRUS probe as a template, in which the probe and its external fiducial markers are pre-segmented and their positions in TRUS are known. The transferred planned seeds and probe serve as an atlas to reduce the search space in CBCT. Candidate seed voxels are identified based on image intensity. Regions are grown from candidate voxels and overlay regions are merged. Region volume and intensity variance is checked against known seed volume and intensity profile. Regions meeting the above criteria are flagged as detected seeds; otherwise they are flagged as likely seeds and sorted by a score that is based on volume, intensity profile and distance to the closest planned seed. A graphical interface allows users to review and accept or reject likely seeds. Likely seeds with approximately twice the seed volume are automatically split. Five clinical cases are tested. Without any manual correction in seed detection, the method performed the localization in 5 seconds (excluding registration time) for a CBCT scan with 512×512×192 voxels. The average precision rate per case is 99% and the recall rate is 96% for a total of 416 seeds. All false negative seeds are found with 15 in likely seeds and 1 included in a detected seed. With the new method, updating of calculations of dose distribution during the procedure is possible and thus facilitating evaluation and improvement of treatment quality.

  17. Robust Low-dose CT Perfusion Deconvolution via Tensor Total-Variation Regularization

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shaoting; Chen, Tsuhan; Sanelli, Pina C.

    2016-01-01

    Acute brain diseases such as acute strokes and transit ischemic attacks are the leading causes of mortality and morbidity worldwide, responsible for 9% of total death every year. ‘Time is brain’ is a widely accepted concept in acute cerebrovascular disease treatment. Efficient and accurate computational framework for hemodynamic parameters estimation can save critical time for thrombolytic therapy. Meanwhile the high level of accumulated radiation dosage due to continuous image acquisition in CT perfusion (CTP) raised concerns on patient safety and public health. However, low-radiation leads to increased noise and artifacts which require more sophisticated and time-consuming algorithms for robust estimation. In this paper, we focus on developing a robust and efficient framework to accurately estimate the perfusion parameters at low radiation dosage. Specifically, we present a tensor total-variation (TTV) technique which fuses the spatial correlation of the vascular structure and the temporal continuation of the blood signal flow. An efficient algorithm is proposed to find the solution with fast convergence and reduced computational complexity. Extensive evaluations are carried out in terms of sensitivity to noise levels, estimation accuracy, contrast preservation, and performed on digital perfusion phantom estimation, as well as in-vivo clinical subjects. Our framework reduces the necessary radiation dose to only 8% of the original level and outperforms the state-of-art algorithms with peak signal-to-noise ratio improved by 32%. It reduces the oscillation in the residue functions, corrects over-estimation of cerebral blood flow (CBF) and under-estimation of mean transit time (MTT), and maintains the distinction between the deficit and normal regions. PMID:25706579

  18. Comparison of computational to human observer detection for evaluation of CT low dose iterative reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eck, Brendan; Fahmi, Rachid; Brown, Kevin M.; Raihani, Nilgoun; Wilson, David L.

    2014-03-01

    Model observers were created and compared to human observers for the detection of low contrast targets in computed tomography (CT) images reconstructed with an advanced, knowledge-based, iterative image reconstruction method for low x-ray dose imaging. A 5-channel Laguerre-Gauss Hotelling Observer (CHO) was used with internal noise added to the decision variable (DV) and/or channel outputs (CO). Models were defined by parameters: (k1) DV-noise with standard deviation (std) proportional to DV std; (k2) DV-noise with constant std; (k3) CO-noise with constant std across channels; and (k4) CO-noise in each channel with std proportional to CO variance. Four-alternative forced choice (4AFC) human observer studies were performed on sub-images extracted from phantom images with and without a "pin" target. Model parameters were estimated using maximum likelihood comparison to human probability correct (PC) data. PC in human and all model observers increased with dose, contrast, and size, and was much higher for advanced iterative reconstruction (IMR) as compared to filtered back projection (FBP). Detection in IMR was better than FPB at 1/3 dose, suggesting significant dose savings. Model(k1,k2,k3,k4) gave the best overall fit to humans across independent variables (dose, size, contrast, and reconstruction) at fixed display window. However Model(k1) performed better when considering model complexity using the Akaike information criterion. Model(k1) fit the extraordinary detectability difference between IMR and FBP, despite the different noise quality. It is anticipated that the model observer will predict results from iterative reconstruction methods having similar noise characteristics, enabling rapid comparison of methods.

  19. A Model of Regularization Parameter Determination in Low-Dose X-Ray CT Reconstruction Based on Dictionary Learning.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cheng; Zhang, Tao; Zheng, Jian; Li, Ming; Lu, Yanfei; You, Jiali; Guan, Yihui

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, X-ray computed tomography (CT) is becoming widely used to reveal patient's anatomical information. However, the side effect of radiation, relating to genetic or cancerous diseases, has caused great public concern. The problem is how to minimize radiation dose significantly while maintaining image quality. As a practical application of compressed sensing theory, one category of methods takes total variation (TV) minimization as the sparse constraint, which makes it possible and effective to get a reconstruction image of high quality in the undersampling situation. On the other hand, a preliminary attempt of low-dose CT reconstruction based on dictionary learning seems to be another effective choice. But some critical parameters, such as the regularization parameter, cannot be determined by detecting datasets. In this paper, we propose a reweighted objective function that contributes to a numerical calculation model of the regularization parameter. A number of experiments demonstrate that this strategy performs well with better reconstruction images and saving of a large amount of time.

  20. SU-D-12A-06: A Comprehensive Parameter Analysis for Low Dose Cone-Beam CT Reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, W; Yan, H; Gu, X; Jiang, S; Jia, X; Bai, T; Zhou, L

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: There is always a parameter in compressive sensing based iterative reconstruction (IR) methods low dose cone-beam CT (CBCT), which controls the weight of regularization relative to data fidelity. A clear understanding of the relationship between image quality and parameter values is important. The purpose of this study is to investigate this subject based on experimental data and a representative advanced IR algorithm using Tight-frame (TF) regularization. Methods: Three data sets of a Catphan phantom acquired at low, regular and high dose levels are used. For each tests, 90 projections covering a 200-degree scan range are used for reconstruction. Three different regions-of-interest (ROIs) of different contrasts are used to calculate contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) for contrast evaluation. A single point structure is used to measure modulation transfer function (MTF) for spatial-resolution evaluation. Finally, we analyze CNRs and MTFs to study the relationship between image quality and parameter selections. Results: It was found that: 1) there is no universal optimal parameter. The optimal parameter value depends on specific task and dose level. 2) There is a clear trade-off between CNR and resolution. The parameter for the best CNR is always smaller than that for the best resolution. 3) Optimal parameters are also dose-specific. Data acquired under a high dose protocol require less regularization, yielding smaller optimal parameter values. 4) Comparing with conventional FDK images, TF-based CBCT images are better under a certain optimally selected parameters. The advantages are more obvious for low dose data. Conclusion: We have investigated the relationship between image quality and parameter values in the TF-based IR algorithm. Preliminary results indicate optimal parameters are specific to both the task types and dose levels, providing guidance for selecting parameters in advanced IR algorithms. This work is supported in part by NIH (1R01CA154747-01)

  1. Small pulmonary nodules in baseline and incidence screening rounds of low-dose CT lung cancer screening

    PubMed Central

    Walter, Joan E.; Oudkerk, Matthijs

    2017-01-01

    Currently, lung cancer screening by low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) is widely recommended for high-risk individuals by US guidelines, but there still is an ongoing debate concerning respective recommendations for European countries. Nevertheless, the available data regarding pulmonary nodules released by lung cancer screening studies could improve future screening guidelines, as well as the clinical practice of incidentally detected pulmonary nodules on routine CT scans. Most lung cancer screening trials present results for baseline and incidence screening rounds separately, clustering pulmonary nodules initially found at baseline screening and newly detected pulmonary nodules after baseline screening together. This approach does not appreciate possible differences among pulmonary nodules detected at baseline and firstly detected at incidence screening rounds and is heavily influenced by methodological differences of the respective screening trials. This review intends to create a basis for assessing non-calcified pulmonary nodules detected during LDCT lung cancer screening in a more clinical relevant manner. The aim is to present data of non-calcified pulmonary baseline nodules and new non-calcified pulmonary incident nodules without clustering them together, thereby also simplifying translation to the clinical practice of incidentally detected pulmonary nodules. Small pulmonary nodules newly detected at incidence screening rounds of LDCT lung cancer screening may possess a greater lung cancer probability than pulmonary baseline nodules at a smaller size, which is essential for the development of new guidelines. PMID:28331823

  2. Automated detection of nodules attached to the pleural and mediastinal surface in low-dose CT scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Ginneken, Bram; Tan, Andre; Murphy, Keelin; de Hoop, Bart-Jan; Prokop, Mathias

    2008-03-01

    This paper presents a new computer-aided detection scheme for lung nodules attached to the pleural or mediastinal surface in low dose CT scans. First the lungs are automatically segmented and smoothed. Any connected set of voxels attached to the wall - with each voxel above minus 500 HU and the total object within a specified volume range - was considered a candidate finding. For each candidate, a refined segmentation was computed using morphological operators to remove attached structures. For each candidate, 35 features were defined, based on their position in the lung and relative to other structures, and the shape and density within and around each candidate. In a training procedure an optimal set of 15 features was determined with a k-nearest-neighbor classifier and sequential floating forward feature selection. The algorithm was trained with a data set of 708 scans from a lung cancer screening study containing 224 pleural nodules and tested on an independent test set of 226 scans from the same program with 58 pleural nodules. The algorithm achieved a sensitivity of 52% with an average of 0.76 false positives per scan. At 2.5 false positive marks per scan, the sensitivity increased to 80%.

  3. Noise reduction for low-dose helical CT by 3D penalized weighted least-squares sinogram smoothing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing; Li, Tianfang; Lu, Hongbing; Liang, Zhengrong

    2006-03-01

    Helical computed tomography (HCT) has several advantages over conventional step-and-shoot CT for imaging a relatively large object, especially for dynamic studies. However, HCT may increase X-ray exposure significantly to the patient. This work aims to reduce the radiation by lowering the X-ray tube current (mA) and filtering the low-mA (or dose) sinogram noise. Based on the noise properties of HCT sinogram, a three-dimensional (3D) penalized weighted least-squares (PWLS) objective function was constructed and an optimal sinogram was estimated by minimizing the objective function. To consider the difference of signal correlation among different direction of the HCT sinogram, an anisotropic Markov random filed (MRF) Gibbs function was designed as the penalty. The minimization of the objection function was performed by iterative Gauss-Seidel updating strategy. The effectiveness of the 3D-PWLS sinogram smoothing for low-dose HCT was demonstrated by a 3D Shepp-Logan head phantom study. Comparison studies with our previously developed KL domain PWLS sinogram smoothing algorithm indicate that the KL+2D-PWLS algorithm shows better performance on in-plane noise-resolution trade-off while the 3D-PLWS shows better performance on z-axis noise-resolution trade-off. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) studies by using channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) shows that 3D-PWLS and KL+2DPWLS algorithms have similar performance on detectability in low-contrast environment.

  4. Small pulmonary nodules in baseline and incidence screening rounds of low-dose CT lung cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Walter, Joan E; Heuvelmans, Marjolein A; Oudkerk, Matthijs

    2017-02-01

    Currently, lung cancer screening by low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) is widely recommended for high-risk individuals by US guidelines, but there still is an ongoing debate concerning respective recommendations for European countries. Nevertheless, the available data regarding pulmonary nodules released by lung cancer screening studies could improve future screening guidelines, as well as the clinical practice of incidentally detected pulmonary nodules on routine CT scans. Most lung cancer screening trials present results for baseline and incidence screening rounds separately, clustering pulmonary nodules initially found at baseline screening and newly detected pulmonary nodules after baseline screening together. This approach does not appreciate possible differences among pulmonary nodules detected at baseline and firstly detected at incidence screening rounds and is heavily influenced by methodological differences of the respective screening trials. This review intends to create a basis for assessing non-calcified pulmonary nodules detected during LDCT lung cancer screening in a more clinical relevant manner. The aim is to present data of non-calcified pulmonary baseline nodules and new non-calcified pulmonary incident nodules without clustering them together, thereby also simplifying translation to the clinical practice of incidentally detected pulmonary nodules. Small pulmonary nodules newly detected at incidence screening rounds of LDCT lung cancer screening may possess a greater lung cancer probability than pulmonary baseline nodules at a smaller size, which is essential for the development of new guidelines.

  5. NIH-funded study shows 20 percent reduction in lung cancer mortality with low-dose CT compared to chest X-ray: | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Scientists have found a 20 percent reduction in deaths from lung cancer among current or former heavy smokers who were screened with low-dose helical computed tomography (CT) versus those screened by chest X-ray. The primary research results from the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) were published online today in the New England Journal of Medicine. |

  6. Low-dose preview for patient-specific, task-specific technique selection in cone-beam CT

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Adam S.; Stayman, J. Webster; Otake, Yoshito; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.; Vogt, Sebastian; Kleinszig, Gerhard; Khanna, A. Jay; Gallia, Gary L.

    2014-07-15

    Purpose : A method is presented for generating simulated low-dose cone-beam CT (CBCT) preview images from which patient- and task-specific minimum-dose protocols can be confidently selected prospectively in clinical scenarios involving repeat scans. Methods : In clinical scenarios involving a series of CBCT images, the low-dose preview (LDP) method operates upon the first scan to create a projection dataset that accurately simulates the effects of dose reduction in subsequent scans by injecting noise of proper magnitude and correlation, including both quantum and electronic readout noise as important components of image noise in flat-panel detector CBCT. Experiments were conducted to validate the LDP method in both a head phantom and a cadaveric torso by performing CBCT acquisitions spanning a wide dose range (head: 0.8–13.2 mGy, body: 0.8–12.4 mGy) with a prototype mobile C-arm system. After injecting correlated noise to simulate dose reduction, the projections were reconstructed using both conventional filtered backprojection (FBP) and an iterative, model-based image reconstruction method (MBIR). The LDP images were then compared to real CBCT images in terms of noise magnitude, noise-power spectrum (NPS), spatial resolution, contrast, and artifacts. Results : For both FBP and MBIR, the LDP images exhibited accurate levels of spatial resolution and contrast that were unaffected by the correlated noise injection, as expected. Furthermore, the LDP image noise magnitude and NPS were in strong agreement with real CBCT images acquired at the corresponding, reduced dose level across the entire dose range considered. The noise magnitude agreed within 7% for both the head phantom and cadaveric torso, and the NPS showed a similar level of agreement up to the Nyquist frequency. Therefore, the LDP images were highly representative of real image quality across a broad range of dose and reconstruction methods. On the other hand, naïve injection ofuncorrelated noise

  7. WE-FG-207A-03: Low-Dose Cone-Beam Breast CT: Physics and Technology Development.

    PubMed

    Boone, J

    2016-06-01

    dedicated breast CT. The development of large-area flat-panel detectors with field-of-view sufficient to image the entire breast in each projection enabled development of flat-panel cone-beam breast CT. More recently, the availability of complimentary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) detectors with lower system noise and finer pixel pitch, combined with the development of x-ray tubes with focal spot dimensions similar to mammography systems, has shown improved spatial resolution and could improve visualization of microcalcifications. These technological developments promise clinical translation of low-dose cone-beam breast CT. Dedicated photon-counting breast CT (pcBCT) systems represent a novel detector design, which provide high spatial resolution (∼ 100µm) and low mean glandular dose (MGD). The CdTe-based direct conversion detector technology was previously evaluated and confirmed by simulations and basic experiments on laboratory setups [Kalender et al., Eur Radiol 22: 1-8, 2012]. Measurements of dose, technical image quality parameters, and surgical specimens on a pcBCT scanner have been completed. Comparative evaluation of surgical specimens showed that pcBCT outperformed mammography and digital breast tomosynthesis with respect to 3D spatial resolution, detectability of calcifications, and soft tissue delineation. Major barriers to widespread clinical use of BCT relate to radiation dose, imaging of microcalcifications, and adequate coverage of breast tissue near the chest wall. Adequate chest wall coverage is also technically challenging but recent progress in x-ray tube, detector and table design now enables full breast coverage in the majority of patients. At this time, BCT has been deemed to be suitable for diagnostic imaging but not yet for screening. The mean glandular dose (MGD) from BCT has been reported to be between 5.7 to 27.8 mGy, and this range is comparable to, and within the range of, the MGD of 2.6 to 31.6 mGy in diagnostic mammography. In

  8. Over-exposure correction in knee cone-beam CT imaging with automatic exposure control using a partial low dose scan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jang-Hwan; Muller, Kerstin; Hsieh, Scott; Maier, Andreas; Gold, Garry; Levenston, Marc; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2016-03-01

    C-arm-based cone-beam CT (CBCT) systems with flat-panel detectors are suitable for diagnostic knee imaging due to their potentially flexible selection of CT trajectories and wide volumetric beam coverage. In knee CT imaging, over-exposure artifacts can occur because of limitations in the dynamic range of the flat panel detectors present on most CBCT systems. We developed a straightforward but effective method for correction and detection of over-exposure for an Automatic Exposure Control (AEC)-enabled standard knee scan incorporating a prior low dose scan. The radiation dose associated with the low dose scan was negligible (0.0042mSv, 2.8% increase) which was enabled by partially sampling the projection images considering the geometry of the knees and lowering the dose further to be able to just see the skin-air interface. We combined the line integrals from the AEC and low dose scans after detecting over-exposed regions by comparing the line profiles of the two scans detector row-wise. The combined line integrals were reconstructed into a volumetric image using filtered back projection. We evaluated our method using in vivo human subject knee data. The proposed method effectively corrected and detected over-exposure, and thus recovered the visibility of exterior tissues (e.g., the shape and density of the patella, and the patellar tendon), incorporating a prior low dose scan with a negligible increase in radiation exposure.

  9. TU-A-12A-09: Absolute Blood Flow Measurement in a Cardiac Phantom Using Low Dose CT

    SciTech Connect

    Ziemer, B; Hubbard, L; Lipinski, J; Molloi, S

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate a first pass analysis technique to measure absolute flow from low dose CT images in a cardiac phantom. This technique can be combined with a myocardial mass assignment to yield absolute perfusion using only two volume scans and reduce the radiation dose to the patient. Methods: A four-chamber cardiac phantom and perfusion chamber were constructed from poly-acrylic and connected with tubing to approximate anatomical features. The system was connected to a pulsatile pump, input/output reservoirs and power contrast injector. Flow was varied in the range of 1-2.67 mL/s with the pump operating at 60 beats/min. The system was imaged once a second for 14 seconds with a 320-row scanner (Toshiba Medical Systems) using a contrast-enhanced, prospective-gated cardiac perfusion protocol. Flow was calculated by the following steps: subsequent images of the perfusion volume were subtracted to find the contrast entering the volume; this was normalized by an upstream, known volume region to convert Hounsfield (HU) values to concentration; this was divided by the subtracted images time difference. The technique requires a relatively stable input contrast concentration and no contrast can leave the perfusion volume before the flow measurement is completed. Results: The flow calculated from the images showed an excellent correlation with the known rates. The data was fit to a linear function with slope 1.03, intercept 0.02 and an R{sup 2} value of 0.99. The average root mean square (RMS) error was 0.15 mL/s and the average standard deviation was 0.14 mL/s. The flow rate was stable within 7.7% across the full scan and served to validate model assumptions. Conclusion: Accurate, absolute flow rates were measured from CT images using a conservation of mass model. Measurements can be made using two volume scans which can substantially reduce the radiation dose compared with current dynamic perfusion techniques.

  10. Low-Dose and Scatter-Free Cone-Beam CT Imaging Using a Stationary Beam Blocker in a Single Scan: Phantom Studies

    PubMed Central

    Petrongolo, Michael; Niu, Tianye; Zhu, Lei

    2013-01-01

    Excessive imaging dose from repeated scans and poor image quality mainly due to scatter contamination are the two bottlenecks of cone-beam CT (CBCT) imaging. Compressed sensing (CS) reconstruction algorithms show promises in recovering faithful signals from low-dose projection data but do not serve well the needs of accurate CBCT imaging if effective scatter correction is not in place. Scatter can be accurately measured and removed using measurement-based methods. However, these approaches are considered unpractical in the conventional FDK reconstruction, due to the inevitable primary loss for scatter measurement. We combine measurement-based scatter correction and CS-based iterative reconstruction to generate scatter-free images from low-dose projections. We distribute blocked areas on the detector where primary signals are considered redundant in a full scan. Scatter distribution is estimated by interpolating/extrapolating measured scatter samples inside blocked areas. CS-based iterative reconstruction is finally carried out on the undersampled data to obtain scatter-free and low-dose CBCT images. With only 25% of conventional full-scan dose, our method reduces the average CT number error from 250 HU to 24 HU and increases the contrast by a factor of 2.1 on Catphan 600 phantom. On an anthropomorphic head phantom, the average CT number error is reduced from 224 HU to 10 HU in the central uniform area. PMID:24348742

  11. Dual-energy CT for the characterization of urinary calculi: In vitro and in vivo evaluation of a low-dose scanning protocol.

    PubMed

    Thomas, C; Patschan, O; Ketelsen, D; Tsiflikas, I; Reimann, A; Brodoefel, H; Buchgeister, M; Nagele, U; Stenzl, A; Claussen, C; Kopp, A; Heuschmid, M; Schlemmer, H-P

    2009-06-01

    The efficiency and radiation dose of a low-dose dual-energy (DE) CT protocol for the evaluation of urinary calculus disease were evaluated. A low-dose dual-source DE-CT renal calculi protocol (140 kV, 46 mAs; 80 kV, 210 mAs) was derived from the single-energy (SE) CT protocol used in our institution for the detection of renal calculi (120 kV, 75 mAs). An Alderson-Rando phantom was equipped with thermoluminescence dosimeters and examined by CT with both protocols. The effective doses were calculated. Fifty-one patients with suspected or known urinary calculus disease underwent DE-CT. DE analysis was performed if calculi were detected using a dedicated software tool. Results were compared to chemical analysis after invasive calculus extraction. An effective dose of 3.43 mSv (male) and 5.30 mSv (female) was measured in the phantom for the DE protocol (vs. 3.17/4.57 mSv for the SE protocol). Urinary calculi were found in 34 patients; in 28 patients, calculi were removed and analyzed (23 patients with calcified calculi, three with uric acid calculi, one with 2,8-dihyxdroxyadenine-calculi, one patient with a mixed struvite calculus). DE analysis was able to distinguish between calcified and non-calcified calculi in all cases. In conclusion, dual-energy urinary calculus analysis is effective also with a low-dose protocol. The protocol tested in this study reliably identified calcified urinary calculi in vivo.

  12. Deriving adaptive MRF coefficients from previous normal-dose CT scan for low-dose image reconstruction via penalized weighted least-squares minimization

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hao; Han, Hao; Wang, Jing; Ma, Jianhua; Liu, Yan; Moore, William; Liang, Zhengrong

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Repeated computed tomography (CT) scans are required for some clinical applications such as image-guided interventions. To optimize radiation dose utility, a normal-dose scan is often first performed to set up reference, followed by a series of low-dose scans for intervention. One common strategy to achieve the low-dose scan is to lower the x-ray tube current and exposure time (mAs) or tube voltage (kVp) setting in the scanning protocol, but the resulted image quality by the conventional filtered back-projection (FBP) method may be severely degraded due to the excessive noise. Penalized weighted least-squares (PWLS) image reconstruction has shown the potential to significantly improve the image quality from low-mAs acquisitions, where the penalty plays an important role. In this work, the authors' explore an adaptive Markov random field (MRF)-based penalty term by utilizing previous normal-dose scan to improve the subsequent low-dose scans image reconstruction. Methods: In this work, the authors employ the widely-used quadratic-form MRF as the penalty model and explore a novel idea of using the previous normal-dose scan to obtain the MRF coefficients for adaptive reconstruction of the low-dose images. In the coefficients determination, the authors further explore another novel idea of using the normal-dose scan to obtain a scale map, which describes an optimal neighborhood for the coefficients determination such that a local uniform region has a small spread of frequency spectrum and, therefore, a small MRF window, and vice versa. The proposed penalty term is incorporated into the PWLS image reconstruction framework, and the low-dose images are reconstructed via the PWLS minimization. Results: The presented adaptive MRF based PWLS algorithm was validated by physical phantom and patient data. The experimental results demonstrated that the presented algorithm is superior to the PWLS reconstruction using the conventional Gaussian MRF penalty or the edge

  13. SU-E-I-86: Ultra-Low Dose Computed Tomography Attenuation Correction for Pediatric PET CT Using Adaptive Statistical Iterative Reconstruction (ASiR™)

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, S; Shulkin, B

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop ultra-low dose computed tomography (CT) attenuation correction (CTAC) acquisition protocols for pediatric positron emission tomography CT (PET CT). Methods: A GE Discovery 690 PET CT hybrid scanner was used to investigate the change to quantitative PET and CT measurements when operated at ultra-low doses (10–35 mAs). CT quantitation: noise, low-contrast resolution, and CT numbers for eleven tissue substitutes were analyzed in-phantom. CT quantitation was analyzed to a reduction of 90% CTDIvol (0.39/3.64; mGy) radiation dose from baseline. To minimize noise infiltration, 100% adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR) was used for CT reconstruction. PET images were reconstructed with the lower-dose CTAC iterations and analyzed for: maximum body weight standardized uptake value (SUVbw) of various diameter targets (range 8–37 mm), background uniformity, and spatial resolution. Radiation organ dose, as derived from patient exam size specific dose estimate (SSDE), was converted to effective dose using the standard ICRP report 103 method. Effective dose and CTAC noise magnitude were compared for 140 patient examinations (76 post-ASiR implementation) to determine relative patient population dose reduction and noise control. Results: CT numbers were constant to within 10% from the non-dose reduced CTAC image down to 90% dose reduction. No change in SUVbw, background percent uniformity, or spatial resolution for PET images reconstructed with CTAC protocols reconstructed with ASiR and down to 90% dose reduction. Patient population effective dose analysis demonstrated relative CTAC dose reductions between 62%–86% (3.2/8.3−0.9/6.2; mSv). Noise magnitude in dose-reduced patient images increased but was not statistically different from pre dose-reduced patient images. Conclusion: Using ASiR allowed for aggressive reduction in CTAC dose with no change in PET reconstructed images while maintaining sufficient image quality for co

  14. Investigation of sinonasal anatomy via low-dose multidetector CT examination in chronic rhinosinusitis patients with higher risk for perioperative complications.

    PubMed

    Fraczek, Marcin; Guzinski, Maciej; Morawska-Kochman, Monika; Krecicki, Tomasz

    2017-02-01

    The aim of the study was to compare visualisation of the surgically relevant anatomical structures via low- and standard-dose multidetector CT protocol in patients with chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) and higher risk for perioperative complications (i.e. presence of bronchial asthma, history of sinus surgery and advanced nasal polyposis). 135 adult CRS patients were divided randomly into standard-dose (120 kVp, 100 mAs) or low-dose CT groups (120 kVp, 45 mAs). The detectability of the vital anatomical structures (anterior ethmoid artery, optic nerve, cribriform plate and lamina papyracea) was scored using a five-point scale (from excellent to unacceptable) by a radiologist and sinus surgeon. Polyp sizes were quantified endoscopically according to the Lildholdt's scale (LS). Olfactory function was tested with the "Sniffin' Sticks" test. On the low-dose CT images, detectability ranged from 2.42 (better than poor) for cribriform plate among anosmic cases to 4.11 (better than good) for lamina papyracea in cases without nasal polyps. Identification of lamina papyracea on low-dose scans was significantly worse in each group and the same was the case with cribriform plates in patients with advanced polyposis and anosmia. Cribriform plates were the most poorly identified (between poor and average) among all the structures on low-dose images. Identification of anterior ethmoid artery (AEA) with reduced dose was insignificantly worse than with standard-dose examination. The AEA was scored as an average-defined structure and was the second weakest visualised. In conclusion, preoperatively, low-dose protocols may not sufficiently visualise the surgically relevant anatomical structures in patients with CRS and bronchial asthma, advanced nasal polyps (LS > 2) and history of sinus surgery. Low mAs value enables comparable detectability of sinonasal landmarks with standard-dose protocols in patients without analysed risk factors. In the context of planned surgery, the current

  15. Total variation minimization-based spiral CT reconstruction in a dental panoramic imaging system for cost-effective, low-dose dental X-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, D. K.; Lee, S. H.; Cho, H. S.; Oh, J. E.; Lee, M. S.; Kim, H. J.; Park, Y. O.; Je, U. K.; Choi, S. I.; Koo, Y. S.; Cho, H. M.

    2012-12-01

    In the paper, we proposed a pragmatic method capable of implementing a cost-effective, low-dose CT reconstruction directly onto a dental panoramic X-ray imaging system by adopting a spiral source trajectory. In the proposed geometry, a linear-type panoramic imaging sensor is rotated 90° from the orientation for panoramic imaging to imitate fan-beam image acquisition. For image reconstruction, we considered a total variation (TV) minimization-based algorithm that exploited the sparsity of the image gradient and was capable of reconstructing CT images with substantially high image accuracy against the image artifacts from sparse-view data. We implemented the algorithm for the proposed geometry and performed systematic simulation works to demonstrate its feasibility for dental imaging applications. CT images were successfully reconstructed from the proposed geometry, and the reconstruction quality was evaluated quantitatively by using an image similarity metric. We expect the proposed method to be applicable to developing a cost-effective, low-dose, all-in-one dental imaging system.

  16. Application of the Low-dose One-stop-shop Cardiac CT Protocol with Third-generation Dual-source CT.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lu; Wang, Yining; Yi, Yan; Cao, Jian; Kong, Lingyan; Qian, Hao; Zhang, Hongzhi; Wu, Wei; Wang, Yun; Jin, Zhengyu

    2017-02-20

    Objective To evaluate the feasibility of a low-dose one-stop-shop cardiac CT imaging protocol with third-generation dual-source CT (DSCT). Methods Totally 23 coronary artery disease (CAD) patients were prospectively enrolled between March to September in 2016. All patients underwent an ATP stress dynamic myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) (data acquired prospectively ECG-triggered during end systole by table shuttle mode in 32 seconds) at 70 kV combined with prospectively ECG-triggered high-pitch coronary artery angiography (CCTA) on a third-generation DSCT system. Myocardial blood flow (MBF) was quantified and compared between perfusion normal and abnormal myocardial segments based on AHA-17-segment model. CCTA images were evaluated qualitatively based on SCCT-18-segment model and the effective dose(ED) was calculated. In patients with subsequent catheter coronary angiography (CCA) as reference,the diagnosis performance of MPI (for per-vessel ≥50% and ≥70% stenosis) and CCTA (for≥50% stenosis) were assessed. Results Of 23 patients who had completed the examination of ATP stress MPI plus CCTA,12 patients received follow-up CCA. At ATP stress MPI,77 segments (19.7%) in 13 patients (56.5%) had perfusion abnormalities. The MBF values of hypo-perfused myocardial segments decreased significantly compared with normal segments [(93±22)ml/(100 ml·min) vs. (147±27)ml/(100 ml·min);t=15.978,P=0.000]. At CCTA,93.9% (308/328) of the coronary segments had diagnostic image quality. With CCA as the reference standard,the per-vessel and per-segment sensitivity,specificity,and accuracy of CCTA for stenosis≥50% were 94.1%,93.5%,and 93.7% and 90.9%,97.8%,and 96.8%,and the per-vessel sensitivity,specificity and accuracy of ATP stress MPI for stenosis≥50% and ≥70% were 68.7%,100%,and 89.5% and 91.7%,100%,and 97.9%. The total ED of MPI and CCTA was (3.9±1.3) mSv [MPI:(3.5±1.2) mSv,CCTA:(0.3±0.1) mSv]. Conclusion The third-generation DSCT stress dynamic MPI at 70 k

  17. MicroPET/CT Imaging of an Orthotopic Model of Human Glioblastoma Multiforme and Evaluation of Pulsed Low-Dose Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Sean S.; Chunta, John L.; Robertson, John M.; Martinez, Alvaro A.; Oliver Wong, Ching-Yee; Amin, Mitual; Wilson, George D.; Marples, Brian

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is an aggressive tumor that typically causes death due to local progression. To assess a novel low-dose radiotherapy regimen for treating GBM, we developed an orthotopic murine model of human GBM and evaluated in vivo treatment efficacy using micro-positron-emission tomography/computed tomography (microPET/CT) tumor imaging. Methods: Orthotopic GBM xenografts were established in nude mice and treated with standard 2-Gy fractionation or 10 0.2-Gy pulses with 3-min interpulse intervals, for 7 consecutive days, for a total dose of 14 Gy. Tumor growth was quantified weekly using the Flex Triumph (GE Healthcare/Gamma Medica-Ideas, Waukesha, WI) combined PET-single-photon emission CT (SPECT)-CT imaging system and necropsy histopathology. Normal tissue damage was assessed by counting dead neural cells in tissue sections from irradiated fields. Results: Tumor engraftment efficiency for U87MG cells was 86%. Implanting 0.5 x 10{sup 6} cells produced a 50- to 70-mm{sup 3} tumor in 10 to 14 days. A significant correlation was seen between CT-derived tumor volume and histopathology-measured volume (p = 0.018). The low-dose 0.2-Gy pulsed regimen produced a significantly longer tumor growth delay than standard 2-Gy fractionation (p = 0.045). Less normal neuronal cell death was observed after the pulsed delivery method (p = 0.004). Conclusion: This study successfully demonstrated the feasibility of in vivo brain tumor imaging and longitudinal assessment of tumor growth and treatment response with microPET/CT. Pulsed radiation treatment was more efficacious than the standard fractionated treatment and was associated with less normal tissue damage.

  18. Pulmonary fibrosis: tissue characterization using late-enhanced MRI compared with unenhanced anatomic high-resolution CT

    PubMed Central

    Lavelle, Lisa P.; Brady, Darragh; McEvoy, Sinead; Murphy, David; Gibney, Brian; Gallagher, Annika; Butler, Marcus; Shortt, Fionnula; McMullen, Marie; Fabre, Aurelie; Lynch, David A.; Keane, Michael P.; Dodd, Jonathan D.

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to prospectively evaluate anatomic chest computed tomography (CT) with tissue characterization late gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the evaluation of pulmonary fibrosis (PF). METHODS Twenty patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) and twelve control patients underwent late-enhanced MRI and high-resolution CT. Tissue characterization of PF was depicted using a segmented inversion-recovery turbo low-angle shot MRI sequence. Pulmonary arterial blood pool nulling was achieved by nulling main pulmonary artery signal. Images were read in random order by a blinded reader for presence and extent of overall PF (reticulation and honeycombing) at five anatomic levels. Overall extent of IPF was estimated to the nearest 5% as well as an evaluation of the ratios of IPF made up of reticulation and honeycombing. Overall grade of severity was dependent on the extent of reticulation and honeycombing. RESULTS No control patient exhibited contrast enhancement on lung late-enhanced MRI. All IPF patients were identified with late-enhanced MRI. Mean signal intensity of the late-enhanced fibrotic lung was 31.8±10.6 vs. 10.5±1.6 for normal lung regions, P < 0.001, resulting in a percent elevation in signal intensity from PF of 204.8%±90.6 compared with the signal intensity of normal lung. The mean contrast-to-noise ratio was 22.8±10.7. Late-enhanced MRI correlated significantly with chest CT for the extent of PF (R=0.78, P = 0.001) but not for reticulation, honeycombing, or coarseness of reticulation or honeycombing. CONCLUSION Tissue characterization of IPF is possible using inversion recovery sequence thoracic MRI. PMID:28067202

  19. Detection of Bone Marrow Edema in Nondisplaced Hip Fractures: Utility of a Virtual Unenhanced Dual-Energy CT Application.

    PubMed

    Kellock, Trenton T; Nicolaou, Savvas; Kim, Sandra S Y; Al-Busaidi, Sultan; Louis, Luck J; O'Connell, Tim W; Ouellette, Hugue A; McLaughlin, Patrick D

    2017-03-16

    Purpose To quantify the sensitivity and specificity of dual-energy computed tomographic (CT) virtual noncalcium images in the detection of nondisplaced hip fractures and to assess whether obtaining these images as a complement to bone reconstructions alters sensitivity, specificity, or diagnostic confidence. Materials and Methods The clinical research ethics board approved chart review, and the requirement to obtain informed consent was waived. The authors retrospectively identified 118 patients who presented to a level 1 trauma center emergency department and who underwent dual-energy CT for suspicion of a nondisplaced traumatic hip fracture. Clinical follow-up was the standard of reference. Three radiologists interpreted virtual noncalcium images for traumatic bone marrow edema. Bone reconstructions for the same cases were interpreted alone and then with virtual noncalcium images. Diagnostic confidence was rated on a scale of 1 to 10. McNemar, Fleiss κ, and Wilcoxon signed-rank tests were used for statistical analysis. Results Twenty-two patients had nondisplaced hip fractures and 96 did not have hip fractures. Sensitivity with virtual noncalcium images was 77% and 91% (17 and 20 of 22 patients), and specificity was 92%-99% (89-95 of 96 patients). Sensitivity increased by 4%-5% over that with bone reconstruction images alone for two of the three readers when both bone reconstruction and virtual noncalcium images were used. Specificity remained unchanged (99% and 100%). Diagnostic confidence in the exclusion of fracture was improved with combined bone reconstruction and virtual noncalcium images (median score: 10, 9, and 10 for readers 1, 2, and 3, respectively) compared with bone reconstruction images alone (median score: 9, 8, and 9). Conclusion When used as a supplement to standard bone reconstructions, dual-energy CT virtual noncalcium images increased sensitivity for the detection of nondisplaced traumatic hip fractures and improved diagnostic confidence in

  20. Fat quantification and analysis of lung transplant patients on unenhanced chest CT images based on standardized anatomic space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Yubing; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Torigian, Drew A.; Wu, Caiyun; Christie, Jason; Lederer, David J.

    2016-03-01

    Chest fat estimation is important for identifying high-risk lung transplant candidates. In this paper, an approach to chest fat quantification based on a recently formulated concept of standardized anatomic space (SAS) is presented. The goal of this paper is to seek answers to the following questions related to chest fat quantification on single slice versus whole volume CT, which have not been addressed in the literature. What level of correlation exists between total chest fat volume and fat areas measured on single abdominal and thigh slices? What is the anatomic location in the chest where maximal correlation of fat area with fat volume can be expected? Do the components of subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) and visceral adipose tissue (VAT) have the same area-to-volume correlative behavior or do they differ? The SAS approach includes two steps: calibration followed by transformation which will map the patient slice locations non-linearly to SAS. The optimal slice locations found for SAT and VAT based on SAS are different and at the mid-level of the T8 vertebral body for SAT and mid-level of the T7 vertebral body for VAT. Fat volume and area on optimal slices for SAT and VAT are correlated with Pearson correlation coefficients of 0.97 and 0.86, respectively. The correlation of chest fat volume with abdominal and thigh fat areas is weak to modest.

  1. SU-E-I-41: Dictionary Learning Based Quantitative Reconstruction for Low-Dose Dual-Energy CT (DECT)

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Q; Xing, L; Xiong, G; Elmore, K; Min, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: DECT collects two sets of projection data under higher and lower energies. With appropriates composition methods on linear attenuation coefficients, quantitative information about the object, such as density, can be obtained. In reality, one of the important problems in DECT is the radiation dose due to doubled scans. This work is aimed at establishing a dictionary learning based reconstruction framework for DECT for improved image quality while reducing the imaging dose. Methods: In our method, two dictionaries were learned respectively from the high-energy and lowenergy image datasets of similar objects under normal dose in advance. The linear attenuation coefficient was decomposed into two basis components with material based composition method. An iterative reconstruction framework was employed. Two basis components were alternately updated with DECT datasets and dictionary learning based sparse constraints. After one updating step under the dataset fidelity constraints, both high-energy and low-energy images can be obtained from the two basis components. Sparse constraints based on the learned dictionaries were applied to the high- and low-energy images to update the two basis components. The iterative calculation continues until a pre-set number of iteration was reached. Results: We evaluated the proposed dictionary learning method with dual energy images collected using a DECT scanner. We re-projected the projection data with added Poisson noise to reflect the low-dose situation. The results obtained by the proposed method were compared with that obtained using FBP based method and TV based method. It was found that the proposed approach yield better results than other methods with higher resolution and less noise. Conclusion: The use of dictionary learned from DECT images under normal dose is valuable and leads to improved results with much lower imaging dose.

  2. Assessment of dedicated low-dose cardiac micro-CT reconstruction algorithms using the left ventricular volume of small rodents as a performance measure

    SciTech Connect

    Maier, Joscha; Sawall, Stefan; Kachelrieß, Marc

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: Phase-correlated microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) imaging plays an important role in the assessment of mouse models of cardiovascular diseases and the determination of functional parameters as the left ventricular volume. As the current gold standard, the phase-correlated Feldkamp reconstruction (PCF), shows poor performance in case of low dose scans, more sophisticated reconstruction algorithms have been proposed to enable low-dose imaging. In this study, the authors focus on the McKinnon-Bates (MKB) algorithm, the low dose phase-correlated (LDPC) reconstruction, and the high-dimensional total variation minimization reconstruction (HDTV) and investigate their potential to accurately determine the left ventricular volume at different dose levels from 50 to 500 mGy. The results were verified in phantom studies of a five-dimensional (5D) mathematical mouse phantom. Methods: Micro-CT data of eight mice, each administered with an x-ray dose of 500 mGy, were acquired, retrospectively gated for cardiac and respiratory motion and reconstructed using PCF, MKB, LDPC, and HDTV. Dose levels down to 50 mGy were simulated by using only a fraction of the projections. Contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) was evaluated as a measure of image quality. Left ventricular volume was determined using different segmentation algorithms (Otsu, level sets, region growing). Forward projections of the 5D mouse phantom were performed to simulate a micro-CT scan. The simulated data were processed the same way as the real mouse data sets. Results: Compared to the conventional PCF reconstruction, the MKB, LDPC, and HDTV algorithm yield images of increased quality in terms of CNR. While the MKB reconstruction only provides small improvements, a significant increase of the CNR is observed in LDPC and HDTV reconstructions. The phantom studies demonstrate that left ventricular volumes can be determined accurately at 500 mGy. For lower dose levels which were simulated for real mouse data sets, the

  3. Patient-bounded extrapolation using low-dose priors for volume-of-interest imaging in C-arm CT

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Y.; Maier, A.; Berger, M.; Hornegger, J.; Bauer, S.

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: Three-dimensional (3D) volume-of-interest (VOI) imaging with C-arm systems provides anatomical information in a predefined 3D target region at a considerably low x-ray dose. However, VOI imaging involves laterally truncated projections from which conventional reconstruction algorithms generally yield images with severe truncation artifacts. Heuristic based extrapolation methods, e.g., water cylinder extrapolation, typically rely on techniques that complete the truncated data by means of a continuity assumption and thus appear to be ad-hoc. It is our goal to improve the image quality of VOI imaging by exploiting existing patient-specific prior information in the workflow. Methods: A necessary initial step prior to a 3D acquisition is to isocenter the patient with respect to the target to be scanned. To this end, low-dose fluoroscopic x-ray acquisitions are usually applied from anterior–posterior (AP) and medio-lateral (ML) views. Based on this, the patient is isocentered by repositioning the table. In this work, we present a patient-bounded extrapolation method that makes use of these noncollimated fluoroscopic images to improve image quality in 3D VOI reconstruction. The algorithm first extracts the 2D patient contours from the noncollimated AP and ML fluoroscopic images. These 2D contours are then combined to estimate a volumetric model of the patient. Forward-projecting the shape of the model at the eventually acquired C-arm rotation views gives the patient boundary information in the projection domain. In this manner, we are in the position to substantially improve image quality by enforcing the extrapolated line profiles to end at the known patient boundaries, derived from the 3D shape model estimate. Results: The proposed method was evaluated on eight clinical datasets with different degrees of truncation. The proposed algorithm achieved a relative root mean square error (rRMSE) of about 1.0% with respect to the reference reconstruction on

  4. A very fast iterative algorithm for TV-regularized image reconstruction with applications to low-dose and few-view CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudo, Hiroyuki; Yamazaki, Fukashi; Nemoto, Takuya; Takaki, Keita

    2016-10-01

    This paper concerns iterative reconstruction for low-dose and few-view CT by minimizing a data-fidelity term regularized with the Total Variation (TV) penalty. We propose a very fast iterative algorithm to solve this problem. The algorithm derivation is outlined as follows. First, the original minimization problem is reformulated into the saddle point (primal-dual) problem by using the Lagrangian duality, to which we apply the first-order primal-dual iterative methods. Second, we precondition the iteration formula using the ramp filter of Filtered Backprojection (FBP) reconstruction algorithm in such a way that the problem solution is not altered. The resulting algorithm resembles the structure of so-called iterative FBP algorithm, and it converges to the exact minimizer of cost function very fast.

  5. Very low-dose adult whole-body tumor imaging with F-18 FDG PET/CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krol, Andrzej; Naveed, Muhammad; McGrath, Mary; Lisi, Michele; Lavalley, Cathy; Feiglin, David

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate if effective radiation dose due to PET component in adult whole-body tumor imaging with time-of-flight F-18 FDG PET/CT could be significantly reduced. We retrospectively analyzed data for 10 patients with the body mass index ranging from 25 to 50. We simulated F-18 FDG dose reduction to 25% of the ACR recommended dose via reconstruction of simulated shorter acquisition time per bed position scans from the acquired list data. F-18 FDG whole-body scans were reconstructed using time-of-flight OSEM algorithm and advanced system modeling. Two groups of images were obtained: group A with a standard dose of F-18 FDG and standard reconstruction parameters and group B with simulated 25% dose and modified reconstruction parameters, respectively. Three nuclear medicine physicians blinded to the simulated activity independently reviewed the images and compared diagnostic quality of images. Based on the input from the physicians, we selected optimal modified reconstruction parameters for group B. In so obtained images, all the lesions observed in the group A were visible in the group B. The tumor SUV values were different in the group A, as compared to group B, respectively. However, no significant differences were reported in the final interpretation of the images from A and B groups. In conclusion, for a small number of patients, we have demonstrated that F-18 FDG dose reduction to 25% of the ACR recommended dose, accompanied by appropriate modification of the reconstruction parameters provided adequate diagnostic quality of PET images acquired on time-of-flight PET/CT.

  6. Characteristic performance evaluation of a photon counting Si strip detector for low dose spectral breast CT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Hyo-Min; Ding, Huanjun; Molloi, Sabee; Barber, William C.; Iwanczyk, Jan S.

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: The possible clinical applications which can be performed using a newly developed detector depend on the detector's characteristic performance in a number of metrics including the dynamic range, resolution, uniformity, and stability. The authors have evaluated a prototype energy resolved fast photon counting x-ray detector based on a silicon (Si) strip sensor used in an edge-on geometry with an application specific integrated circuit to record the number of x-rays and their energies at high flux and fast frame rates. The investigated detector was integrated with a dedicated breast spectral computed tomography (CT) system to make use of the detector's high spatial and energy resolution and low noise performance under conditions suitable for clinical breast imaging. The aim of this article is to investigate the intrinsic characteristics of the detector, in terms of maximum output count rate, spatial and energy resolution, and noise performance of the imaging system. Methods: The maximum output count rate was obtained with a 50 W x-ray tube with a maximum continuous output of 50 kVp at 1.0 mA. A{sup 109}Cd source, with a characteristic x-ray peak at 22 keV from Ag, was used to measure the energy resolution of the detector. The axial plane modulation transfer function (MTF) was measured using a 67 μm diameter tungsten wire. The two-dimensional (2D) noise power spectrum (NPS) was measured using flat field images and noise equivalent quanta (NEQ) were calculated using the MTF and NPS results. The image quality parameters were studied as a function of various radiation doses and reconstruction filters. The one-dimensional (1D) NPS was used to investigate the effect of electronic noise elimination by varying the minimum energy threshold. Results: A maximum output count rate of 100 million counts per second per square millimeter (cps/mm{sup 2}) has been obtained (1 million cps per 100 × 100 μm pixel). The electrical noise floor was less than 4 keV. The energy

  7. Characteristic performance evaluation of a photon counting Si strip detector for low dose spectral breast CT imaging

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hyo-Min; Barber, William C.; Ding, Huanjun; Iwanczyk, Jan S.; Molloi, Sabee

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The possible clinical applications which can be performed using a newly developed detector depend on the detector's characteristic performance in a number of metrics including the dynamic range, resolution, uniformity, and stability. The authors have evaluated a prototype energy resolved fast photon counting x-ray detector based on a silicon (Si) strip sensor used in an edge-on geometry with an application specific integrated circuit to record the number of x-rays and their energies at high flux and fast frame rates. The investigated detector was integrated with a dedicated breast spectral computed tomography (CT) system to make use of the detector's high spatial and energy resolution and low noise performance under conditions suitable for clinical breast imaging. The aim of this article is to investigate the intrinsic characteristics of the detector, in terms of maximum output count rate, spatial and energy resolution, and noise performance of the imaging system. Methods: The maximum output count rate was obtained with a 50 W x-ray tube with a maximum continuous output of 50 kVp at 1.0 mA. A109Cd source, with a characteristic x-ray peak at 22 keV from Ag, was used to measure the energy resolution of the detector. The axial plane modulation transfer function (MTF) was measured using a 67 μm diameter tungsten wire. The two-dimensional (2D) noise power spectrum (NPS) was measured using flat field images and noise equivalent quanta (NEQ) were calculated using the MTF and NPS results. The image quality parameters were studied as a function of various radiation doses and reconstruction filters. The one-dimensional (1D) NPS was used to investigate the effect of electronic noise elimination by varying the minimum energy threshold. Results: A maximum output count rate of 100 million counts per second per square millimeter (cps/mm2) has been obtained (1 million cps per 100 × 100 μm pixel). The electrical noise floor was less than 4 keV. The energy resolution

  8. A multiscale Laplacian of Gaussian filtering approach to automated pulmonary nodule detection from whole-lung low-dose CT scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fotin, Sergei V.; Reeves, Anthony P.; Biancardi, Alberto M.; Yankelevitz, David F.; Henschke, Claudia I.

    2009-02-01

    The primary stage of a pulmonary nodule detection system is typically a candidate generator that efficiently provides the centroid location and size estimate of candidate nodules. A scale-normalized Laplacian of Gaussian (LOG) filtering method presented in this paper has been found to provide high sensitivity along with precise locality and size estimation. This approach involves a computationally efficient algorithm that is designed to identify all solid nodules in a whole lung anisotropic CT scan. This nodule candidate generator has been evaluated in conjunction with a set of discriminative features that target both isolated and attached nodules. The entire detection system was evaluated with respect to a sizeenriched dataset of 656 whole-lung low-dose CT scans containing 459 solid nodules with diameter greater than 4 mm. Using a soft margin SVM classifier, and setting false positive rate of 10 per scan, we obtained a sensitivity of 97% for isolated, 93% for attached, and 89% for both nodule types combined. Furthermore, the LOG filter was shown to have good agreement with the radiologist ground truth for size estimation.

  9. Low-dose dynamic myocardial perfusion CT image reconstruction using pre-contrast normal-dose CT scan induced structure tensor total variation regularization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Changfei; Han, Ce; Gan, Guanghui; Deng, Zhenxiang; Zhou, Yongqiang; Yi, Jinling; Zheng, Xiaomin; Xie, Congying; Jin, Xiance

    2017-04-01

    Dynamic myocardial perfusion CT (DMP-CT) imaging provides quantitative functional information for diagnosis and risk stratification of coronary artery disease by calculating myocardial perfusion hemodynamic parameter (MPHP) maps. However, the level of radiation delivered by dynamic sequential scan protocol can be potentially high. The purpose of this work is to develop a pre-contrast normal-dose scan induced structure tensor total variation regularization based on the penalized weighted least-squares (PWLS) criteria to improve the image quality of DMP-CT with a low-mAs CT acquisition. For simplicity, the present approach was termed as ‘PWLS-ndiSTV’. Specifically, the ndiSTV regularization takes into account the spatial-temporal structure information of DMP-CT data and further exploits the higher order derivatives of the objective images to enhance denoising performance. Subsequently, an effective optimization algorithm based on the split-Bregman approach was adopted to minimize the associative objective function. Evaluations with modified dynamic XCAT phantom and preclinical porcine datasets have demonstrated that the proposed PWLS-ndiSTV approach can achieve promising gains over other existing approaches in terms of noise-induced artifacts mitigation, edge details preservation, and accurate MPHP maps calculation.

  10. Fusion of CT Angiography or MR Angiography with Unenhanced CBCT and Fluoroscopy Guidance in Endovascular Treatments of Aorto-Iliac Steno-Occlusion: Technical Note on a Preliminary Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Ierardi, Anna Maria; Duka, Ejona; Radaelli, Alessandro; Rivolta, Nicola; Piffaretti, Gabriele; Carrafiello, Gianpaolo

    2016-01-15

    AimTo evaluate the feasibility of image fusion (IF) of pre-procedural arterial-phase CT angiography or MR angiography with intra-procedural fluoroscopy for road-mapping in endovascular treatment of aorto-iliac steno-occlusive disease.Materials and MethodsBetween September and November, 2014, we prospectively evaluated 5 patients with chronic aorto-iliac steno-occlusive disease, who underwent endovascular treatment in the angiography suite. Fusion image road-mapping was performed using angiographic phase CT images or MR images acquired before and intra-procedural unenhanced cone-beam CT. Radiation dose of the procedure, volume of intra-procedural iodinated contrast medium, fluoroscopy time, and overall procedural time were recorded. Reasons for potential fusion imaging inaccuracies were also evaluated.ResultsImage co-registration and fusion guidance were feasible in all procedures. Mean radiation dose of the procedure was 60.21 Gycm2 (range 55.02–63.75 Gycm2). The mean total procedure time was 32.2 min (range 27–38 min). The mean fluoroscopy time was 12 min and 3 s. The mean procedural iodinated contrast material dose was 24 mL (range 20–40 mL).ConclusionsIF gives Interventional Radiologists the opportunity to use new technologies in order to improve outcomes with a significant reduction of contrast media administration.

  11. Use of computed tomography (CT) for urolithiasis in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Angela; Castellan, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Numbers of annual CT examinations have been increasing incrementally each year during the last 10-20 years. Use of unenhanced CT has been increasingly used for evaluation of urolithiasis, and concerned had been raised about the risks of increased radiation exposure in pediatric patients. Sensitivities and specificity for ureteral stones on conventional CT have been reported up to 98-100%, respectively. Low dose protocols have been developed with the goal of reducing radiation dose with adequate image quality. Although the sensitivity and the specificity of CT is the highest, many can be diagnosed with combination of KUB and ultrasound. CT can be utilized in equivocal cases. Low-dose radiation CT protocols have been reported with high sensitivity and specificity and should be used in pediatric patients when a CT scan is needed.

  12. Use of computed tomography (CT) for urolithiasis in pediatric patients

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Numbers of annual CT examinations have been increasing incrementally each year during the last 10-20 years. Use of unenhanced CT has been increasingly used for evaluation of urolithiasis, and concerned had been raised about the risks of increased radiation exposure in pediatric patients. Sensitivities and specificity for ureteral stones on conventional CT have been reported up to 98-100%, respectively. Low dose protocols have been developed with the goal of reducing radiation dose with adequate image quality. Although the sensitivity and the specificity of CT is the highest, many can be diagnosed with combination of KUB and ultrasound. CT can be utilized in equivocal cases. Low-dose radiation CT protocols have been reported with high sensitivity and specificity and should be used in pediatric patients when a CT scan is needed. PMID:26835357

  13. WE-G-18A-04: 3D Dictionary Learning Based Statistical Iterative Reconstruction for Low-Dose Cone Beam CT Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, T; Yan, H; Shi, F; Jia, X; Jiang, Steve B.; Lou, Y; Xu, Q; Mou, X

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a 3D dictionary learning based statistical reconstruction algorithm on graphic processing units (GPU), to improve the quality of low-dose cone beam CT (CBCT) imaging with high efficiency. Methods: A 3D dictionary containing 256 small volumes (atoms) of 3x3x3 voxels was trained from a high quality volume image. During reconstruction, we utilized a Cholesky decomposition based orthogonal matching pursuit algorithm to find a sparse representation on this dictionary basis of each patch in the reconstructed image, in order to regularize the image quality. To accelerate the time-consuming sparse coding in the 3D case, we implemented our algorithm in a parallel fashion by taking advantage of the tremendous computational power of GPU. Evaluations are performed based on a head-neck patient case. FDK reconstruction with full dataset of 364 projections is used as the reference. We compared the proposed 3D dictionary learning based method with a tight frame (TF) based one using a subset data of 121 projections. The image qualities under different resolutions in z-direction, with or without statistical weighting are also studied. Results: Compared to the TF-based CBCT reconstruction, our experiments indicated that 3D dictionary learning based CBCT reconstruction is able to recover finer structures, to remove more streaking artifacts, and is less susceptible to blocky artifacts. It is also observed that statistical reconstruction approach is sensitive to inconsistency between the forward and backward projection operations in parallel computing. Using high a spatial resolution along z direction helps improving the algorithm robustness. Conclusion: 3D dictionary learning based CBCT reconstruction algorithm is able to sense the structural information while suppressing noise, and hence to achieve high quality reconstruction. The GPU realization of the whole algorithm offers a significant efficiency enhancement, making this algorithm more feasible for potential

  14. Reliability analysis of visual ranking of coronary artery calcification on low-dose CT of the thorax for lung cancer screening: comparison with ECG-gated calcium scoring CT.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yoon Kyung; Sung, Yon Mi; Cho, So Hyun; Park, Young Nam; Choi, Hye-Young

    2014-12-01

    Coronary artery calcification (CAC) is frequently detected on low-dose CT (LDCT) of the thorax. Concurrent assessment of CAC and lung cancer screening using LDCT is beneficial in terms of cost and radiation dose reduction. The aim of our study was to evaluate the reliability of visual ranking of positive CAC on LDCT compared to Agatston score (AS) on electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated calcium scoring CT. We studied 576 patients who were consecutively registered for health screening and undergoing both LDCT and ECG-gated calcium scoring CT. We excluded subjects with an AS of zero. The final study cohort included 117 patients with CAC (97 men; mean age, 53.4 ± 8.5). AS was used as the gold standard (mean score 166.0; range 0.4-3,719.3). Two board-certified radiologists and two radiology residents participated in an observer performance study. Visual ranking of CAC was performed according to four categories (1-10, 11-100, 101-400, and 401 or higher) for coronary artery disease risk stratification. Weighted kappa statistics were used to measure the degree of reliability on visual ranking of CAC on LDCT. The degree of reliability on visual ranking of CAC on LDCT compared to ECG-gated calcium scoring CT was excellent for board-certified radiologists and good for radiology residents. A high degree of association was observed with 71.6% of visual rankings in the same category as the Agatston category and 98.9% varying by no more than one category. Visual ranking of positive CAC on LDCT is reliable for predicting AS rank categorization.

  15. Low-Dose Carcinogenicity Studies

    EPA Science Inventory

    One of the major deficiencies of cancer risk assessments is the lack of low-dose carcinogenicity data. Most assessments require extrapolation from high to low doses, which is subject to various uncertainties. Only 4 low-dose carcinogenicity studies and 5 low-dose biomarker/pre-n...

  16. Development of Prior Image-Based, High-Quality, Low-Dose Kilovoltage Cone Beam CT for Use in Adaptive Radiotherapy of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-01

    mathematically ready for reconstruction. 1.1.4 Scatter compensation for synthesized physical phantom data Compared to diagnostic CT where X - ray beam spanning a...Truncated, Diagnostic -CT Data", SPIE Medical Imaging, Lake Buena Vista, Florida, 2013 37. X . Han, E. Pearson, C. A. Pelizzari, X . Pan, “Investigation of...Prince, C. A. Pelizzari, and X . Pan,“Evaluation of sparse-view reconstruction from flat - panel -detector cone-beam CT,” Physics in Medicine and Biology

  17. Can use of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction reduce radiation dose in unenhanced head CT? An analysis of qualitative and quantitative image quality

    PubMed Central

    Heggen, Kristin Livelten; Pedersen, Hans Kristian; Andersen, Hilde Kjernlie; Martinsen, Anne Catrine T

    2016-01-01

    Background Iterative reconstruction can reduce image noise and thereby facilitate dose reduction. Purpose To evaluate qualitative and quantitative image quality for full dose and dose reduced head computed tomography (CT) protocols reconstructed using filtered back projection (FBP) and adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR). Material and Methods Fourteen patients undergoing follow-up head CT were included. All patients underwent full dose (FD) exam and subsequent 15% dose reduced (DR) exam, reconstructed using FBP and 30% ASIR. Qualitative image quality was assessed using visual grading characteristics. Quantitative image quality was assessed using ROI measurements in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), white matter, peripheral and central gray matter. Additionally, quantitative image quality was measured in Catphan and vendor’s water phantom. Results There was no significant difference in qualitative image quality between FD FBP and DR ASIR. Comparing same scan FBP versus ASIR, a noise reduction of 28.6% in CSF and between −3.7 and 3.5% in brain parenchyma was observed. Comparing FD FBP versus DR ASIR, a noise reduction of 25.7% in CSF, and −7.5 and 6.3% in brain parenchyma was observed. Image contrast increased in ASIR reconstructions. Contrast-to-noise ratio was improved in DR ASIR compared to FD FBP. In phantoms, noise reduction was in the range of 3 to 28% with image content. Conclusion There was no significant difference in qualitative image quality between full dose FBP and dose reduced ASIR. CNR improved in DR ASIR compared to FD FBP mostly due to increased contrast, not reduced noise. Therefore, we recommend using caution if reducing dose and applying ASIR to maintain image quality. PMID:27583169

  18. SU-C-207-03: Optimization of a Collimator-Based Sparse Sampling Technique for Low-Dose Cone-Beam CT

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, T; Cho, S; Kim, I; Han, B

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In computed tomography (CT) imaging, radiation dose delivered to the patient is one of the major concerns. Sparse-view CT takes projections at sparser view angles and provides a viable option to reducing dose. However, a fast power switching of an X-ray tube, which is needed for the sparse-view sampling, can be challenging in many CT systems. We have earlier proposed a many-view under-sampling (MVUS) technique as an alternative to sparse-view CT. In this study, we investigated the effects of collimator parameters on the image quality and aimed to optimize the collimator design. Methods: We used a bench-top circular cone-beam CT system together with a CatPhan600 phantom, and took 1440 projections from a single rotation. The multi-slit collimator made of tungsten was mounted on the X-ray source for beam blocking. For image reconstruction, we used a total-variation minimization (TV) algorithm and modified the backprojection step so that only the measured data through the collimator slits are to be used in the computation. The number of slits and the reciprocation frequency have been varied and the effects of them on the image quality were investigated. We also analyzed the sampling efficiency: the sampling density and data incoherence in each case. We tested three sets of slits with their number of 6, 12 and 18, each at reciprocation frequencies of 10, 30, 50 and 70 Hz/ro. Results: Consistent results in the image quality have been produced with the sampling efficiency, and the optimum condition was found to be using 12 slits at 30 Hz/ro. As image quality indices, we used the CNR and the detectability. Conclusion: We conducted an experiment with a moving multi-slit collimator to realize a sparse-sampled cone-beam CT. Effects of collimator parameters on the image quality have been systematically investigated, and the optimum condition has been reached.

  19. Brain metastases detectability of routine whole body (18)F-FDG PET and low dose CT scanning in 2502 asymptomatic patients with solid extracranial tumors.

    PubMed

    Bochev, Pavel; Klisarova, Aneliya; Kaprelyan, Ara; Chaushev, Borislav; Dancheva, Zhivka

    2012-01-01

    As fluorine-18-fluorodesoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography ( (18)F-FDG PET/CT) is gaining wider availability, more and more patients with malignancies undergo whole body PET/CT, mostly to assess tumor spread in the rest of the body, but not in the brain. Brain is a common site of metastatic spread in patients with solid extracranial tumors. Gold standard in the diagnosis of brain metastases remains magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However MRI is not routinely indicated and is not available for all cancer patients. Fluorine-18-FDG PET is considered as having poor sensitivity in detecting brain metastases, but this may not be true for PET/CT. The aim of our study was to assess the value of (18)F-FDG PET/CT in the detection of brain metastases found by whole body scan including the brain, in patients with solid extracranial neoplasms. A total of 2502 patients with solid extracranial neoplasms were studied. All patients underwent a routine whole body (18)F-FDG PET/CT scan with the whole brain included in the scanned field. Patients with known or suspected brain metastases were preliminary excluded from the study. Hypermetabolic and ring-like brain lesions on the PET scan were considered as metastases. Lesions with CT characteristics of brain metastases were regarded as such irrespective of their metabolic pattern. Lesions in doubt were verified by MRI during first testing or on follow-up or by operation. Our results showed that brain lesions, indicative of and verified to be metastases were detected in 25 out of the 2502 patients (1%), with lung cancer being the most common primary. Twenty three out of these 25 patients had no neurological symptoms by the time of the scan. The detection rate of brain metastases was relatively low, but information was obtained with a minimum increase of radiation burden. In conclusion, whole body (18)F-FDG PET/CT detected brain metastases in 1% of the patients if brain was included in the scanned field. Brain

  20. Nutrient intake and nutrient patterns and risk of lung cancer among heavy smokers: results from the COSMOS screening study with annual low-dose CT.

    PubMed

    Gnagnarella, Patrizia; Maisonneuve, Patrick; Bellomi, Massimo; Rampinelli, Cristiano; Bertolotti, Raffaella; Spaggiari, Lorenzo; Palli, Domenico; Veronesi, Giulia

    2013-06-01

    The role of nutrients in lung cancer aetiology remains controversial and has never been evaluated in the context of screening. Our aim was to investigate the role of single nutrients and nutrient patterns in the aetiology of lung cancer in heavy smokers. Asymptomatic heavy smokers (≥20 pack-years) were invited to undergo annual low-dose computed tomography. We assessed diet using a self-administered food frequency questionnaire and collected information on multivitamin supplement use. We performed principal component analysis identifying four nutrient patterns and used Cox proportional Hazards regression to assess the association between nutrients and nutrients patterns and lung cancer risk. During a mean follow-up of 5.7 years, 178 of 4,336 participants were diagnosed with lung cancer by screening. We found a significant risk reduction of lung cancer with increasing vegetable fat consumption (HR for highest vs. lowest quartile = 0.50, 95% CI = 0.31-0.80; P-trend = 0.02). Participants classified in the high "vitamins and fiber" pattern score had a significant risk reduction of lung cancer (HR = 0.57; 95% CI = 0.36-0.90, P-trend = 0.01). Among heavy smokers enrolled in a screening trial, high vegetable fat intake and adherence to the "vitamin and fiber" nutrient pattern were associated with reduced lung cancer incidence.

  1. Half-Fan-Based Intensity-Weighted Region-of-Interest Imaging for Low-Dose Cone-Beam CT in Image-Guided Radiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Boyeol; Son, Kihong; Pua, Rizza; Kim, Jinsung; Solodov, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Objectives With the increased use of computed tomography (CT) in clinics, dose reduction is the most important feature people seek when considering new CT techniques or applications. We developed an intensity-weighted region-of-interest (IWROI) imaging method in an exact half-fan geometry to reduce the imaging radiation dose to patients in cone-beam CT (CBCT) for image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT). While dose reduction is highly desirable, preserving the high-quality images of the ROI is also important for target localization in IGRT. Methods An intensity-weighting (IW) filter made of copper was mounted in place of a bowtie filter on the X-ray tube unit of an on-board imager (OBI) system such that the filter can substantially reduce radiation exposure to the outer ROI. In addition to mounting the IW filter, the lead-blade collimation of the OBI was adjusted to produce an exact half-fan scanning geometry for a further reduction of the radiation dose. The chord-based rebinned backprojection-filtration (BPF) algorithm in circular CBCT was implemented for image reconstruction, and a humanoid pelvis phantom was used for the IWROI imaging experiment. Results The IWROI image of the phantom was successfully reconstructed after beam-quality correction, and it was registered to the reference image within an acceptable level of tolerance. Dosimetric measurements revealed that the dose is reduced by approximately 61% in the inner ROI and by 73% in the outer ROI compared to the conventional bowtie filter-based half-fan scan. Conclusions The IWROI method substantially reduces the imaging radiation dose and provides reconstructed images with an acceptable level of quality for patient setup and target localization. The proposed half-fan-based IWROI imaging technique can add a valuable option to CBCT in IGRT applications. PMID:27895964

  2. SU-E-I-39: Combining Conventional Tomographic Imaging Strategy and Interior Tomography for Low Dose Dual-Energy CT (DECT)

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Q; Xing, L; Xiong, G; Elmore, K; Min, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Dual-energy CT (DECT) affords quantitative information of tissue density and provides a new dimension for disease diagnosis and treatment planning. The technique, however, increases the imaging dose because of the doubled scans, and thus hinders its widespread clinical applications. The purpose of this work is to develop a novel hybrid DECT image acquisition and reconstruction strategy, in which one of the energies is dealt by interior tomography while the other one is obtained using conventional tomography approach. Methods: In the proposed hybrid imaging strategy, the projection data of one of the energies (e.g., high-energy) were acquired and processed in an interior scanning model, whereas the other energy in the conventional tomographic approach. It known that, if the ROI is piecewise constant or polynomial, the interior ROI can be reconstructed with TV or HOT minimization. Here we extend the TV based interior reconstruction method into dual-energy situation. The ROI images so obtained were overlaid in the context of conventional CT of the companion energy. A material based composition in ROI was used in the proposed reconstruction framework. Results: In the simulation experiment with a diagnostic DECT geometry and energies, we were able to derive the densities of soft-tissues and bones in the ROI with high fidelity. In the experimental CBCT study, both kV and MV data were collected using the on-board kV and MV imaging system. The MV data were truncated only across the ROI. Using the interior tomography reconstruction above, we were able to obtain the ROI images as that obtained using un-truncated MV data with known tissue densities. Conclusion: The proposed DECT imaging strategy provides an effective way to extract tissue density information in the ROI and in the context of anatomical images of CT imaging, with much reduced imaging dose.

  3. A comparative study of seed localization and dose calculation on pre- and post-implantation ultrasound and CT images for low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Imad; Algan, Ozer; Thompson, Spencer; Sindhwani, Puneet; Herman, Terence; Cheng, Chih-Yao; Ahmad, Salahuddin

    2009-09-01

    This work investigates variation in the volume of the prostate measured at different stages through the prostate brachytherapy procedure for 30 patients treated with I-125 radioactive seeds. The implanted seeds were localized on post-implantation ultrasound (US) images and the effect of prostate enlargement due to edema on dose coverage for 15 patients was studied. The volume of the prostate was measured at four stages as follows: (a) 2-3 weeks prior to implantation using US imaging, (b) then at the start of the intra-operative prostate brachytherapy procedure on the day of the implant, (c) immediately post-implantation using US imaging in the operating room and (d) finally by CT imaging at nearly 4 weeks post-implantation. Comparative prostate volume studies were performed using US imaging stepper and twister modes. For the purpose of this study, the implanted seeds were localized successfully on post-implant ultrasound twister images, retrospectively. The plans using post-implant US imaging were compared with intra-operative plans on US and plans created on CT images. The prostate volume increases about 10 cm3 on average due to edema induced by needle insertion and seed loading during implantation. The visibility of the implanted seeds on US twister images acquired post-implantation is as good as those on CT images and can be localized and used for dose calculation. The dose coverage represented by parameters such as D90 (dose covering 90% of the volume) and V100 (volume covered by 100% dose) is poorer on plans performed on post-implantation twister US studies than on the intra-operative live plan or the CT scan performed 4 weeks post-operatively. For example, the mean D90 difference on post-implantation US is lower by more than 15% than that on pre-implantation US. The volume enlargement of the prostate due to edema induced by needle insertion and seed placement has a significant effect on the quality of dosimetric coverage in brachytherapy prostate seed

  4. Preliminary performance of image quality for a low-dose C-arm CT system with a flat-panel detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyung Cha, Bo; Seo, Chang-Woo; Yang, Keedong; Jeon, Seongchae; Huh, Young

    2015-06-01

    Digital flat panel imager (FPI)-based cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) has been widely used in C-arm imaging for spine surgery and interventional procedures. The system provides real-time fluoroscopy with high spatial resolution and three-dimensional (3D) visualization of anatomical structure without the need for patient transportation in interventional suite. In this work, a prototype CBCT imaging platform with continuous single rotation about the gantry was developed by using a large-area flat-panel detector with amorphous Si-based thin film transistor matrix. The different 2D projection images were acquired during constant gantry velocity for reconstructed images at a tube voltage of 80-120 kVp, and different current (10-50 mA) conditions. Various scan protocols were applied to a chest phantom human by changing the number of projection images and scanning angles. The projections were then reconstructed into a volumetric data of sections by using a 3D reconstruction algorithm (e.g., filtered back projection). The preliminary quantitative X-ray performance of our CBCT system was investigated by using the American Association of Physicists in Medicine CT phantom in terms of spatial resolution, contrast resolution, and CT number linearity for mobile or fixed C-arm based CBCT application with limited rotational geometry. The novel results of the projection data with different scanning angles and angular increments in the orbital gantry platform were acquired and evaluated experimentally.

  5. SU-F-18C-13: Low-Dose X-Ray CT Reconstruction Using a Hybrid First-Order Method

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, L; Lin, W; Jin, M

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a novel reconstruction method for X-ray CT that can lead to accurate reconstruction at significantly reduced dose levels combining low X-ray incident intensity and few views of projection data. Methods: The noise nature of the projection data at low X-ray incident intensity was modeled and accounted by the weighted least-squares (WLS) criterion. The total variation (TV) penalty was used to mitigate artifacts caused by few views of data. The first order primal-dual (FOPD) algorithm was used to minimize TV in image domain, which avoided the difficulty of the non-smooth objective function. The TV penalized WLS reconstruction was achieved by alternated FOPD TV minimization and projection onto convex sets (POCS) for data fidelity constraints. The proposed FOPD-POCS method was evaluated using the FORBILD jaw phantom and the real cadaver head CT data. Results: The quantitative measures, root mean square error (RMSE) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), demonstrate the superior denoising capability of WLS over LS-based TV iterative reconstruction. The improvement of RMSE (WLS vs. LS) is 15%∼21% and that of CNR is 17%∼72% when the incident counts per ray are ranged from 1×10{sup 5} to 1×10{sup 3}. In addition, the TV regularization can accurately reconstruct images from about 50 views of the jaw phantom. The FOPD-POCS reconstruction reveals more structural details and suffers fewer artifacts in both the phantom and real head images. The FOPD-POCS method also shows fast convergence at low X-ray incident intensity. Conclusion: The new hybrid FOPD-POCS method, based on TV penalized WLS, yields excellent image quality when the incident X-ray intensity is low and the projection views are limited. The reconstruction is computationally efficient since the FOPD minimization of TV is applied only in the image domain. The characteristics of FOPD-POCS can be exploited to significantly reduce radiation dose of X-ray CT without compromising accuracy for diagnosis

  6. Lung Cancer Screening with Low Dose CT

    PubMed Central

    Caroline, Chiles

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The announcement of the results of the NLST, showing a 20% reduction in lung-cancer specific mortality with LDCT screening in a high risk population, marked a turning point in lung cancer screening. This was the first time that a randomized controlled trial had shown a mortality reduction with an imaging modality aimed at early detection of lung cancer. Current guidelines endorse LDCT screening for smokers and former smokers ages 55 to 74, with at least a 30 pack year smoking history. Adherence to published algorithms for nodule follow-up is strongly encouraged. Future directions for screening research include risk stratification for selection of the screening population, and improvements in the diagnostic follow-up for indeterminate pulmonary nodules. As with screening for other malignancies, screening for lung cancer with LDCT has revealed that there are indolent lung cancers which may not be fatal. More research is necessary if we are to maximize the risk-benefit ratio in lung cancer screening. PMID:24267709

  7. TU-A-12A-12: Improved Airway Measurement Accuracy for Low Dose Quantitative CT (qCT) Using Statistical (ASIR), at Reduced DFOV, and High Resolution Kernels in a Phantom and Swine Model

    SciTech Connect

    Yadava, G; Imai, Y; Hsieh, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Quantitative accuracy of Iodine Hounsfield Unit (HU) in conventional single-kVp scanning is susceptible to beam-hardening effect. Dual-energy CT has unique capabilities of quantification using monochromatic CT images, but this scanning mode requires the availability of the state-of-the-art CT scanner and, therefore, is limited in routine clinical practice. Purpose of this work was to develop a beam-hardening-correction (BHC) for single-kVp CT that can linearize Iodine projections at any nominal energy, apply this approach to study Iodine response with respect to keV, and compare with dual-energy based monochromatic images obtained from material-decomposition using 80kVp and 140kVp. Methods: Tissue characterization phantoms (Gammex Inc.), containing solid-Iodine inserts of different concentrations, were scanned using GE multi-slice CT scanner at 80, 100, 120, and 140 kVp. A model-based BHC algorithm was developed where Iodine was estimated using re-projection of image volume and corrected through an iterative process. In the correction, the re-projected Iodine was linearized using a polynomial mapping between monochromatic path-lengths at various nominal energies (40 to 140 keV) and physically modeled polychromatic path-lengths. The beam-hardening-corrected 80kVp and 140kVp images (linearized approximately at effective energy of the beam) were used for dual-energy material-decomposition in Water-Iodine basis-pair followed by generation of monochromatic images. Characterization of Iodine HU and noise in the images obtained from singlekVp with BHC at various nominal keV, and corresponding dual-energy monochromatic images, was carried out. Results: Iodine HU vs. keV response from single-kVp with BHC and dual-energy monochromatic images were found to be very similar, indicating that single-kVp data may be used to create material specific monochromatic equivalent using modelbased projection linearization. Conclusion: This approach may enable quantification of

  8. WE-G-18A-01: JUNIOR INVESTIGATOR WINNER - Low-Dose C-Arm Cone-Beam CT with Model-Based Image Reconstruction for High-Quality Guidance of Neurosurgical Intervention

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, A; Stayman, J; Otake, Y; Gallia, G; Siewerdsen, J

    2014-06-15

    improvement in image quality, dose reduction, and reconstruction time of ∼4 min will enable practical deployment of low-dose C-arm CBCT within the operating room. AAPM Research Seed Funding (2013-2014); NIH Fellowship F32EB017571; Siemens Healthcare (XP Division)

  9. Effect of a small number of training cases on the performance of massive training artificial neural network (MTANN) for reduction of false positives in computerized detection of lung nodules in low-dose CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Kenji; Armato, Samuel G., III; Li, Feng; Sone, Shusuke; Doi, Kunio

    2003-05-01

    In this study, we investigated a pattern-classification technique which can be trained with a small number of cases with a massive training artificial neural network (MTANN) for reduction of false positives in computerized detection of lung nodules in low-dose CT (LDCT). The MTANN consists of a modified multilayer artificial neural network (ANN), which is capable of operating on image data directly. The MTANN is trained by use of a large number of sub-regions extracted from input images together with the teacher images containing the distribution for the "likelihood of being a nodule." The output image is obtained by scanning of an input image with the MTANN. In the MTANN, the distinction between nodules and non-nodules is treated as an image-processing task, in other words, as a highly nonlinear filter that performs both nodule enhancement and non-nodule suppression. This allows us to train the MTANN not on a case basis, but on a sub-region basis. Therefore, the MTANN can be trained with a very small number of cases. Our database consisted of 101 LDCT scans acquired from 71 patients in a lung cancer screening program. The scans consisted of 2,822 sections, and contained 121 nodules including 104 nodules representing confirmed primary cancers. With our current CAD scheme, a sensitivity of 81.0% (98/121 nodules) with 0.99 false positives per section (2,804/2,822) was achieved. By use of the MTANN trained with a small number of training cases (n=10), i.e., five pairs of nodules and non-nodules, we were able to remove 55.8% of false positives without a reduction in the number of true positives, i.e., a classification sensitivity of 100%. Thus, the false-positive rate of our current CAD scheme was reduced from 0.99 to 0.44 false positive per section, while the current sensitivity (81.0%) was maintained.

  10. Towards the clinical implementation of iterative low-dose cone-beam CT reconstruction in image-guided radiation therapy: Cone/ring artifact correction and multiple GPU implementation

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Hao; Wang, Xiaoyu; Shi, Feng; Bai, Ti; Folkerts, Michael; Cervino, Laura; Jiang, Steve B.; Jia, Xun

    2014-01-01

    , an overall 3.1 × speedup factor has been achieved with four GPU cards compared to a single GPU-based reconstruction. The total computation time is ∼30 s for typical clinical cases. Conclusions: The authors have developed a low-dose CBCT IR system for IGRT. By incorporating data consistency-based weighting factors in the IR model, cone/ring artifacts can be mitigated. A boost in computational efficiency is achieved by multi-GPU implementation. PMID:25370645

  11. Towards the clinical implementation of iterative low-dose cone-beam CT reconstruction in image-guided radiation therapy: Cone/ring artifact correction and multiple GPU implementation

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Hao E-mail: xun.jia@utsouthwestern.edu; Shi, Feng; Jiang, Steve B.; Jia, Xun E-mail: xun.jia@utsouthwestern.edu; Wang, Xiaoyu; Cervino, Laura; Bai, Ti; Folkerts, Michael

    2014-11-01

    , an overall 3.1 × speedup factor has been achieved with four GPU cards compared to a single GPU-based reconstruction. The total computation time is ∼30 s for typical clinical cases. Conclusions: The authors have developed a low-dose CBCT IR system for IGRT. By incorporating data consistency-based weighting factors in the IR model, cone/ring artifacts can be mitigated. A boost in computational efficiency is achieved by multi-GPU implementation.

  12. Diagnostic value of unenhanced computerized tomography urography in the evaluation of acute renal colic.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jia-Hwia; Lin, Wen-Chiung; Wei, Chao-Jung; Chang, Cheng-Yen

    2003-10-01

    This study prospectively evaluated the diagnostic value of unenhanced computerized tomography (CT) urography in patients with acute renal colic. Fifty-nine patients with clinical manifestations of acute renal colic underwent unenhanced helical CT to evaluate urinary tract abnormalities. Reformatted three-dimensional CT urography was performed in all patients. The findings were correlated with ureteroscopy, surgical findings, histopathologic findings, and clinical course. CT urography detected urinary abnormalities in 57 of 59 patients with the clinical manifestation of acute renal colic, including 45 cases of urolithiasis, three urinary malignancies, one congenital abnormality, and eight ureteral strictures (due to chronic inflammation or fibrosis). CT urography showed negative findings in the urinary system in two patients, and after clinical follow-up, urinary abnormality was excluded in these patients. Incidental findings of extrarenal disease were noted in six patients (pulmonary abnormalities, n = 2; gallstones, n = 4). Only one patient with urolithiasis was misdiagnosed as having a renal tumor by CT urography. The sensitivity and specificity of CT urography in diagnosing urolithiasis was 97.8% (44/45) and 100% (14/14), respectively. Three-dimensional CT urography is a newly developed modality to evaluate anomalies of the urinary tract. The highly accurate diagnostic value of CT urography makes it a suitable alternative or substitutive modality in patients with acute flank pain.

  13. Low-dose computed tomography to diagnose fetal bone dysplasias.

    PubMed

    Montoya Filardi, A; Guasp Vizcaíno, M; Gómez Fernández-Montes, J; Llorens Salvador, R

    We present a case of cleidocranial dysplasia diagnosed by low-dose fetal computed tomography (CT) in the 25th week of gestation. Severe bone dysplasia was suspected because of the fetus' low percentile in long bones length and the appearance of craniosynostosis on sonography. CT found no abnormalities incompatible with life. The effective dose was 5 mSv, within the recommended range for this type of examination. Low-dose fetal CT is a new technique that makes precision study of the bony structures possible from the second trimester of pregnancy. In Spain, abortion is legal even after the 22nd week of gestation in cases of severe fetal malformations. Therefore, in cases in which severe bone dysplasia is suspected, radiologists must know the strategies for reducing the dose of radiation while maintaining sufficient diagnostic quality, and they must also know which bony structures to evaluate.

  14. Asbestos Surveillance Program Aachen (ASPA): initial results from baseline screening for lung cancer in asbestos-exposed high-risk individuals using low-dose multidetector-row CT.

    PubMed

    Das, Marco; Mühlenbruch, Georg; Mahnken, Andreas H; Hering, K G; Sirbu, H; Zschiesche, W; Knoll, Lars; Felten, Michael K; Kraus, Thomas; Günther, Rolf W; Wildberger, Joachim E

    2007-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of lung cancer in a high-risk asbestos-exposed cohort using low-dose MDCT. Of a population of 5,389 former power-plant workers, 316 were characterized as individuals at highest risk for lung cancer according to a lung-cancer risk model including age, asbestos exposure and smoking habits. Of these 316, 187 (mean age: 66.6 years) individuals were included in a prospective trial. Mean asbestos exposure time was 29.65 years and 89% were smokers. Screening was performed on a 16-slice MDCT (Siemens) with low-dose technique (10/20 mAs(eff.); 1 mm/0.5 mm increment). In addition to soft copy PACS reading analysis on a workstation with a dedicated lung analysis software (LungCARE; Siemens) was performed. One strongly suspicious mass and eight cases of histologically proven lung cancer were found plus 491 additional pulmonary nodules (average volume: 40.72 ml, average diameter 4.62 mm). Asbestos-related changes (pleural plaques, fibrosis) were visible in 80 individuals. Lung cancer screening in this high-risk cohort showed a prevalence of lung cancer of 4.28% (8/187) at baseline screening with an additional large number of indeterminate pulmonary nodules. Low-dose MDCT proved to be feasible in this highly selected population.

  15. Diagnostic Performance of Ultra-Low-Dose Computed Tomography for Detecting Asbestos-Related Pleuropulmonary Diseases: Prospective Study in a Screening Setting

    PubMed Central

    Schaal, Marysa; Severac, François; Labani, Aissam; Jeung, Mi-Young; Roy, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the diagnostic performance of Ultra-Low-Dose Chest CT (ULD CT) for the detection of any asbestos-related lesions (primary endpoint) and specific asbestos-related abnormalities, i.e. non-calcified and calcified pleural plaques, diffuse pleural thickening, asbestosis and significant lung nodules (secondary endpoints). Material and Methods 55 male patients (55.7±8.1 years old) with occupational asbestos exposure for at least 15 years and where CT screening was indicated were prospectively included. They all underwent a standard unenhanced chest CT (120kV, automated tube current modulation), considered as the reference, and an ULD CT (135kV, 10mA), both with iterative reconstruction. Two chest radiologists independently and blindly read the examinations, following a detailed protocol. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, accuracy and error rate of ULD CT were calculated using the exact method of Pearson with a confidence interval of 95%. Results Radiation dose was 17.9±1.2mGy.cm (0.25mSv) for the ULD-CT versus 288.8 ±151mGy.cm (4mSv); p <2.2e-16. Prevalence of abnormalities was 20%. The ULD CT’s diagnostic performance in joint reading was high for the primary endpoint (sensitivity = 90.9%, specificity = 100%, positive predictive value = 100%, negative predictive value = 97.8%), high for lung nodules, diffuse pleural thickening and calcified pleural plaques (sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV = 100%) and fair for asbestosis (sensitivity = 75%, specificity = 100%, PPV = 00%, NPV = 98.1%). Intra-reader accuracy between the ULD CT and the reference CT for the primary endpoint was 98% for the senior and 100% for the junior radiologist. Inter-reader agreement for the primary endpoint was almost perfect (Cohen’s Kappa of 0.81). Conclusion ULD CT in the screening of asbestos exposure related diseases has 90.9% sensitivity and 100% specificity, and could therefore be proposed as a first line examination

  16. CT Colonography (Virtual Colonoscopy)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Z CT Colonography Computed tomography (CT) colonography or virtual colonoscopy uses special x-ray equipment to examine ... and blood vessels. CT colonography, also known as virtual colonoscopy, uses low dose radiation CT scanning to ...

  17. Low Dose Risk, Decisions, and Risk Communication

    SciTech Connect

    Flynn, James

    2002-09-14

    The overall research objective was to establish new levels of information about how people, groups, and communities respond to low dose radiation exposure. This is basic research into the social psychology of individual, group, and community responses to radiation exposures. The results of this research are directed to improving risk communication and public participation in management of environmental problems resulting from low dose radiation.

  18. Enhancing acupuncture by low dose naltrexone.

    PubMed

    Hesselink, Jan M Keppel; Kopsky, David J

    2011-06-01

    To find appropriate and effective treatment options for chronic pain syndromes is a challenging task. Multimodal treatment approach has been gaining acceptance for chronic pain. However, combining treatments, such as acupuncture, with rational pharmacology is still in its infancy. Acupuncture influences the opioid and cannabinoid system through releasing endogenous receptor ligands. Low dose naltrexone also acts on both these systems, and upregulates the opioid and cannabinoid receptors. The authors hypothesise that low dose naltrexone could enhance the pain-relieving effect of acupuncture.

  19. Radiation Leukemogenesis at Low Dose Rates

    SciTech Connect

    Weil, Michael; Ullrich, Robert

    2013-09-25

    The major goals of this program were to study the efficacy of low dose rate radiation exposures for the induction of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and to characterize the leukemias that are caused by radiation exposures at low dose rate. An irradiator facility was designed and constructed that allows large numbers of mice to be irradiated at low dose rates for protracted periods (up to their life span). To the best of our knowledge this facility is unique in the US and it was subsequently used to study radioprotectors being developed for radiological defense (PLoS One. 7(3), e33044, 2012) and is currently being used to study the role of genetic background in susceptibility to radiation-induced lung cancer. One result of the irradiation was expected; low dose rate exposures are ineffective in inducing AML. However, another result was completely unexpected; the irradiated mice had a very high incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), approximately 50%. It was unexpected because acute exposures are ineffective in increasing HCC incidence above background. This is a potential important finding for setting exposure limits because it supports the concept of an 'inverse dose rate effect' for some tumor types. That is, for the development of some tumor types low dose rate exposures carry greater risks than acute exposures.

  20. Health benefits from low-dose irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Luckey, T.D.

    1996-12-31

    Whole-body exposures of mice and humans show no harm from low doses of ionizing radiation. Forty reports show statistically significant, p < 0.01, beneficial effects when cancer and total mortality rates were examined in mice. In vitro experiments indicate that radiogenic metabolism, adaptive repair mechanisms, such as DNA repair enzymes, and the essential nature of ionizing radiation are responsible for part of this activity. However, overwhelming evidence shows that low-dose irradiation increases immune competence. Such data negate the linear concept, which has no reliable whole-animal data to support it in the low-dose range. Cell culture data are not pertinent; such cells do not have a complete immune system.

  1. Mammography-oncogenecity at low doses.

    PubMed

    Heyes, G J; Mill, A J; Charles, M W

    2009-06-01

    Controversy exists regarding the biological effectiveness of low energy x-rays used for mammography breast screening. Recent radiobiology studies have provided compelling evidence that these low energy x-rays may be 4.42 +/- 2.02 times more effective in causing mutational damage than higher energy x-rays. These data include a study involving in vitro irradiation of a human cell line using a mammography x-ray source and a high energy source which matches the spectrum of radiation observed in survivors from the Hiroshima atomic bomb. Current radiation risk estimates rely heavily on data from the atomic bomb survivors, and a direct comparison between the diagnostic energies used in the UK breast screening programme and those used for risk estimates can now be made. Evidence highlighting the increase in relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of mammography x-rays to a range of x-ray energies implies that the risks of radiation-induced breast cancers for mammography x-rays are potentially underestimated by a factor of four. A pooled analysis of three measurements gives a maximal RBE (for malignant transformation of human cells in vitro) of 4.02 +/- 0.72 for 29 kVp (peak accelerating voltage) x-rays compared to high energy electrons and higher energy x-rays. For the majority of women in the UK NHS breast screening programme, it is shown that the benefit safely exceeds the risk of possible cancer induction even when this higher biological effectiveness factor is applied. The risk/benefit analysis, however, implies the need for caution for women screened under the age of 50, and particularly for those with a family history (and therefore a likely genetic susceptibility) of breast cancer. In vitro radiobiological data are generally acquired at high doses, and there are different extrapolation mechanisms to the low doses seen clinically. Recent low dose in vitro data have indicated a potential suppressive effect at very low dose rates and doses. Whilst mammography is a low

  2. Low dose naltrexone therapy in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Y P

    2005-01-01

    The use of low doses of naltrexone for the treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS) enjoys a worldwide following amongst MS patients. There is overwhelming anecdotal evidence, that in low doses naltrexone not only prevents relapses in MS but also reduces the progression of the disease. It is proposed that naltrexone acts by reducing apoptosis of oligodendrocytes. It does this by reducing inducible nitric oxide synthase activity. This results in a decrease in the formation of peroxynitrites, which in turn prevent the inhibition of the glutamate transporters. Thus, the excitatory neurotoxicity of glutamate on neuronal cells and oligodendrocytes via activation of the alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-isoxazole-4-propionic acid class of glutamate receptor is prevented. It is crucial that the medical community respond to patient needs and investigate this drug in a clinical trial.

  3. Epigenomic Adaptation to Low Dose Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Gould, Michael N.

    2015-06-30

    The overall hypothesis of this grant application is that the adaptive responses elicited by low dose ionizing radiation (LDIR) result in part from heritable DNA methylation changes in the epigenome. In the final budget period at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, we will specifically address this hypothesis by determining if the epigenetically labile, differentially methylated regions (DMRs) that regulate parental-specific expression of imprinted genes are deregulated in agouti mice by low dose radiation exposure during gestation. This information is particularly important to ascertain given the 1) increased human exposure to medical sources of radiation; 2) increased number of people predicted to live and work in space; and 3) enhanced citizen concern about radiation exposure from nuclear power plant accidents and terrorist ‘dirty bombs.’

  4. Genomic Instability Induced by Low Dose Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Helen H. Sedwick, David W. Veigl, Martina L.

    2006-07-15

    The goal of this project was to determine if genomic instability could be initiated by poorly repaired DNA damage induced by low doses of ionizing radiation leading to a mutator phenotype. Human cells were irradiated, then transfected with an unirradiated reporter gene at various times AFTER exposure. The vector carried an inactive GFP gene that fluoresced when the gene was activated by a delayed mutation. Fluorescent cells were measured in the interval of 50 hours to four days after transfection. The results showed that delayed mutations occurred in these cells after exposure to relatively low doses (0.3-1.0 Gy) of low or high ionizing radiation, as well as after treatment with hyrodgen peroxide (30-100 micromolar). The occurrence was both dose and time dependent, often decreasing at higher doses and later times. No marked difference was observed between the response of mis-match repair-proficient and -deficient cell lines. Although the results were quite reproducible within single experiments, difficulties were observed from experiment to experiment. Different reagents and assays were tested, but no improvement resulted. We concluded that this method is not sufficiently robust or consisent to be useful in the assay of the induction of genomic instability by low doses of radiation, at least in these cell lines under our conditions.

  5. Low dose aprotinin and low dose tranexamic acid in elective cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed

    Waldow, Thomas; Krutzsch, Diana; Wils, Michael; Plötze, Katrin; Matschke, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    The antifibrinolytic agents aprotinin and tranexamic acid have both been proven to be efficient in reducing postoperative blood loss and transfusion requirements in patients in cardiac surgery. In light of recent safety issues regarding aprotinin, this single-centre study compared efficacy and safety of low dose aprotinin (2 million KIU, pump-prime volume only) and low dose tranexamic acid (1 g, pump-prime volume) in 708 consecutive patients from two prospective registers undergoing elective cardiac procedures with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Incidences of postoperative complications showed no significant differences between groups. Postoperative blood loss and transfusion requirements were significantly lower in aprotinin compared to tranexamic acid patients. Overall, both antifibrinolytic low dose regimens are safe components of perioperative patient management in elective cardiac surgery with CPB. Cardiac procedures requiring longer CPB times might benefit from the administration of low dose aprotinin.

  6. Ultra-low dose naltrexone potentiates the anticonvulsant effect of low dose morphine on clonic seizures.

    PubMed

    Honar, H; Riazi, K; Homayoun, H; Sadeghipour, H; Rashidi, N; Ebrahimkhani, M R; Mirazi, N; Dehpour, A R

    2004-01-01

    Significant potentiation of analgesic effects of opioids can be achieved through selective blockade of their stimulatory effects on intracellular signaling pathways by ultra-low doses of opioid receptor antagonists. However, the generality and specificity of this interaction is not well understood. The bimodal modulation of pentylenetetrazole-induced seizure threshold by opioids provide a model to assess the potential usefulness of this approach in seizure disorders and to examine the differential mechanisms involved in opioid anti- (morphine at 0.5-3 mg/kg) versus pro-convulsant (20-100 mg/kg) effects. Systemic administration of ultra-low doses of naltrexone (100 fg/kg-10 ng/kg) significantly potentiated the anticonvulsant effect of morphine at 0.5 mg/kg while higher degrees of opioid receptor antagonism blocked this effect. Moreover, inhibition of opioid-induced excitatory signaling by naltrexone (1 ng/kg) unmasked a strong anticonvulsant effect for very low doses of morphine (1 ng/kg-100 microg/kg), suggesting that a presumed inhibitory component of opioid receptor signaling can exert strong seizure-protective effects even at very low levels of opioid receptor activation. However, ultra-low dose naltrexone could not increase the maximal anticonvulsant effect of morphine (1-3 mg/kg), possibly due to a ceiling effect. The proconvulsant effects of morphine on seizure threshold were minimally altered by ultra-low doses of naltrexone while being completely blocked by a higher dose (1 mg/kg) of the antagonist. The present data suggest that ultra-low doses of opioid receptor antagonists may provide a potent strategy to modulate seizure susceptibility, especially in conjunction with very low doses of opioids.

  7. Low-dose computed tomography screening for lung cancer: how strong is the evidence?

    PubMed

    Woolf, Steven H; Harris, Russell P; Campos-Outcalt, Doug

    2014-12-01

    In 2013, the US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommended low-dose computed tomographic (CT) screening for high-risk current and former smokers with a B recommendation (indicating a level of certainty that it offered moderate to substantial net benefit). Under the Affordable Care Act, the USPSTF recommendation requires commercial insurers to fully cover low-dose CT. The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) is now considering whether to also offer coverage for Medicare beneficiaries. Although the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) demonstrated the efficacy of low-dose CT, implementation of national screening may be premature. The magnitude of benefit from routine screening is uncertain; estimates are based on data from a single study and simulation models commissioned by the USPSTF. The potential harms-which could affect a large population-include false-positive results, anxiety, radiation exposure, diagnostic workups, and the resulting complications. It is unclear if routine screening would result in net benefit or net harm. The NLST may not be generalizable to a national screening program for the Medicare age group because 73% of NLST participants were younger than 65 years. Moreover, screening outside of trial conditions is less likely to be restricted to high-risk smokers and qualified imaging centers with responsible referral protocols. Until better data are available for older adults who are screened in ordinary (nontrial) community settings, CMS should postpone coverage of low-dose CT screening for Medicare beneficiaries.

  8. The importance of lung cancer screening with low-dose computed tomography for Medicare beneficiaries.

    PubMed

    Wood, Douglas E

    2014-12-01

    The National Lung Screening Trial has provided convincing evidence of a substantial mortality benefit of lung cancer screening with low-dose computed tomography (CT) for current and former smokers at high risk. The United States Preventive Services Task Force has recommended screening, triggering coverage of low-dose CT by private health insurers under provisions of the Affordable Care Act. The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) are currently evaluating coverage of lung cancer screening for Medicare beneficiaries. Since 70% of lung cancer occurs in patients 65 years or older, CMS should cover low-dose CT, thus avoiding the situation of at-risk patients being screened up to age 64 through private insurers and then abruptly ceasing screening at exactly the ages when their risk for developing lung cancer is increasing. Legitimate concerns include false-positive findings that lead to further testing and invasive procedures, overdiagnosis (detection of clinically unimportant cancers), the morbidity and mortality of surgery, and the overall costs of follow-up tests and procedures. These concerns can be mitigated by clear criteria for screening high-risk patients, disciplined management of abnormalities based on algorithms, and high-quality multidisciplinary care. Lung cancer screening with low-dose CT can lead to early diagnosis and cure for thousands of patients each year. Professional societies can help CMS responsibly implement a program that is patient-centered and minimizes unintended harms and costs.

  9. Low-dose radiation exposure and carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Keiji; Yamashita, Shunichi

    2012-07-01

    Absorption of energy from ionizing radiation by the genetic material in the cell leads to damage to DNA, which in turn leads to cell death, chromosome aberrations and gene mutations. While early or deterministic effects result from organ and tissue damage caused by cell killing, latter two are considered to be involved in the initial events that lead to the development of cancer. Epidemiological studies have demonstrated the dose-response relationships for cancer induction and quantitative evaluations of cancer risk following exposure to moderate to high doses of low-linear energy transfer radiation. A linear, no-threshold model has been applied to assessment of the risks resulting from exposure to moderate and high doses of ionizing radiation; however, a statistically significant increase has hardly been described for radiation doses below 100 mSv. This review summarizes our current knowledge of the physical and biological features of low-dose radiation and discusses the possibilities of induction of cancer by low-dose radiation.

  10. Effects of low doses of radiation.

    PubMed

    Fry, R J

    1996-06-01

    This is a brief review of what is known from experimental studies about the effects of low doses of radiation, and approaches that might improve risk estimates are discussed. The dose-response relationships for cancer induction by radiation vary markedly between tissues. The evidence suggests that 1) the induction of the initial events is dependent on the cell type because the size and/or the number of targets and how the cells handle the initial lesions differs between cell types; and 2) there are marked differences among tissues how initial lesions are expressed and proceed to overt cancer. The recent findings about adaptive responses are discussed in the context of what they contribute to our understanding about the response to irradiation. Lastly, the possibility of extending the approach of determining "The probability of causation," which Vic Bond played such an important role in establishing, is raised.

  11. Low dose neutron late effects: Cataractogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Worgul, B.V.

    1991-12-01

    The work is formulated to resolve the uncertainty regarding the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of low dose neutron radiation. The study exploits the fact that cataractogenesis is sensitive to the inverse dose-rate effect as has been observed with heavy ions and was an endpoint considered in the follow-up of the A-bomb survivors. The neutron radiations were initiated at the Radiological Research Accelerator facility (RARAF) of the Nevis Laboratory of Columbia University. Four week old ({plus minus} 1 day) rats were divided into eight dose groups each receiving single or fractionated total doses of 0.2, 1.0, 5.0 and 25.0 cGy of monoenergetic 435 KeV neutrons. Special restraining jigs insured that the eye, at the midpoint of the lens, received the appropriate energy and dose with a relative error of {plus minus}5%. The fractionation regimen consisted of four exposures, each administered at three hour ({plus minus}) intervals. The neutron irradiated groups are being compared to rats irradiated with 250kVp X-rays in doses ranging from 0.5 to 7 Gy. The animals are being examined on a biweekly basis utilizing conventional slit-lamp biomicroscopy and the Scheimpflug Slit Lamp Imaging System (Zeiss). The follows-ups, entering their second year, will continue throughout the life-span of the animals. This is essential inasmuch as given the extremely low doses which are being utilized clinically detectable opacities were not anticipated until a significant fraction of the life span has lapsed. Current data support this contention. At this juncture cataracts in the irradiated groups are beginning to exceed control levels.

  12. Low-Dose Radiotherapy in Indolent Lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Rossier, Christine; Schick, Ulrike; Miralbell, Raymond; Mirimanoff, Rene O.; Weber, Damien C.; Ozsahin, Mahmut

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: To assess the response rate, duration of response, and overall survival after low-dose involved-field radiotherapy in patients with recurrent low-grade lymphoma or chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Methods and Materials: Forty-three (24 women, 19 men) consecutive patients with indolent lymphoma or CLL were treated with a total dose of 4 Gy (2 x 2 Gy) using 6- 18-MV photons. The median age was 73 years (range, 39-88). Radiotherapy was given either after (n = 32; 75%) or before (n = 11; 25%) chemotherapy. The median time from diagnosis was 48 months (range, 1-249). The median follow-up period was 20 months (range, 1-56). Results: The overall response rate was 90%. Twelve patients (28%) had a complete response, 15 (35%) had a partial response, 11 (26%) had stable disease, and 5 (11%) had progressive disease. The median overall survival for patients with a positive response (complete response/partial response/stable disease) was 41 months; for patients with progressive disease it was 6 months (p = 0.001). The median time to in-field progression was 21 months (range, 0-24), and the median time to out-field progression was 8 months (range, 0-40). The 3-year in-field control was 92% in patients with complete response (median was not reached). The median time to in-field progression was 9 months (range, 0.5-24) in patients with partial response and 6 months (range, 0.6-6) in those with stable disease (p < 0.05). Younger age, positive response to radiotherapy, and no previous chemotherapy were the best factors influencing the outcome. Conclusions: Low-dose involved-field radiotherapy is an effective treatment in the management of patients with recurrent low-grade lymphoma or CLL.

  13. Low Dose Ionizing Radiation Modulates Immune Function

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Gregory A.

    2016-01-12

    In order to examine the effects of low dose ionizing radiation on the immune system we chose to examine an amplified adaptive cellular immunity response. This response is Type IV delayed-type hypersensitivity also called contact hypersensitivity. The agent fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) is a low molecular weight, lipophilic, reactive, fluorescent molecule that can be applied to the skin where it (hapten) reacts with proteins (carriers) to become a complete antigen. Exposure to FITC leads to sensitization which is easily measured as a hypersensitivity inflammatory reaction following a subsequent exposure to the ear. Ear swelling, eosinophil infiltration, immunoglobulin E production and cytokine secretion patterns characteristic of a “Th2 polarized” immune response are the components of the reaction. The reaction requires successful implementation of antigen processing and presentation by antigen presenting Langerhans cells, communication with naïve T lymphocytes in draining lymph nodes, expansion of activated T cell clones, migration of activated T cells to the circulation, and recruitment of memory T cells, macrophages and eosinophils to the site of the secondary challenge. Using this model our approach was to quantify system function rather than relying only on indirect biomarkers of cell. We measured the FITC-induced hypersensitivity reaction over a range of doses from 2 cGy to 2 Gy. Irradiations were performed during key events or prior to key events to deplete critical cell populations. In addition to quantifying the final inflammatory response, we assessed cell populations in peripheral blood and spleen, cytokine signatures, IgE levels and expression of genes associated with key processes in sensitization and elicitation/recall. We hypothesized that ionizing radiation would produce a biphasic effect on immune system function resulting in an enhancement at low doses and a depression at higher doses and suggested that this transition would occur in the

  14. An automated system for lung nodule detection in low-dose computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gori, I.; Fantacci, M. E.; Preite Martinez, A.; Retico, A.

    2007-03-01

    A computer-aided detection (CAD) system for the identification of pulmonary nodules in low-dose multi-detector helical Computed Tomography (CT) images was developed in the framework of the MAGIC-5 Italian project. One of the main goals of this project is to build a distributed database of lung CT scans in order to enable automated image analysis through a data and cpu GRID infrastructure. The basic modules of our lung-CAD system, a dot-enhancement filter for nodule candidate selection and a neural classifier for false-positive finding reduction, are described. The system was designed and tested for both internal and sub-pleural nodules. The results obtained on the collected database of low-dose thin-slice CT scans are shown in terms of free response receiver operating characteristic (FROC) curves and discussed.

  15. Enhanced Low Dose Rate Sensitivity at Ultra-Low Dose Rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Dakai; Pease, Ronald; Forney, James; Carts, Martin; Phan, Anthony; Cox, Stephen; Kruckmeyer, Kriby; Burns, Sam; Albarian, Rafi; Holcombe, Bruce; Little, Bradley; Salzman, James; Chaumont, Geraldine; Duperray, Herve; Ouellet, Al; Buchner, Stephen; LaBel, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    We have presented results of ultra-low dose rate irradiations (< or = 10 mrad(Si)/s) for a variety of radiation hardened and commercial linear bipolar devices. We observed low dose rate enhancement factors exceeding 1.5 in several parts. The worst case of dose rate enhancement resulted in functional failures, which occurred after 10 and 60 krad(Si), for devices irradiated at 0.5 and 10 mrad(Si)/s, respectively. Devices fabricated with radiation hardened processes and designs also displayed dose rate enhancement at below 10 mrad(Si)/s. Furthermore, the data indicated that these devices have not reached the damage saturation point. Therefore the degradation will likely continue to increase with increasing total dose, and the low dose rate enhancement will further magnify. The cases presented here, in addition to previous examples, illustrate the significance and pervasiveness of low dose rate enhancement at dose rates lower than 10 mrad(Si). These results present further challenges for radiation hardness assurance of bipolar linear circuits, and raise the question of whether the current standard test dose rate is conservative enough to bound degradations due to ELDRS.

  16. Low-dose computed tomography image restoration using previous normal-dose scan

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Jianhua; Huang, Jing; Feng, Qianjin; Zhang, Hua; Lu, Hongbing; Liang, Zhengrong; Chen, Wufan

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: In current computed tomography (CT) examinations, the associated x-ray radiation dose is of a significant concern to patients and operators. A simple and cost-effective means to perform the examinations is to lower the milliampere-seconds (mAs) or kVp parameter (or delivering less x-ray energy to the body) as low as reasonably achievable in data acquisition. However, lowering the mAs parameter will unavoidably increase data noise and the noise would propagate into the CT image if no adequate noise control is applied during image reconstruction. Since a normal-dose high diagnostic CT image scanned previously may be available in some clinical applications, such as CT perfusion imaging and CT angiography (CTA), this paper presents an innovative way to utilize the normal-dose scan as a priori information to induce signal restoration of the current low-dose CT image series. Methods: Unlike conventional local operations on neighboring image voxels, nonlocal means (NLM) algorithm utilizes the redundancy of information across the whole image. This paper adapts the NLM to utilize the redundancy of information in the previous normal-dose scan and further exploits ways to optimize the nonlocal weights for low-dose image restoration in the NLM framework. The resulting algorithm is called the previous normal-dose scan induced nonlocal means (ndiNLM). Because of the optimized nature of nonlocal weights calculation, the ndiNLM algorithm does not depend heavily on image registration between the current low-dose and the previous normal-dose CT scans. Furthermore, the smoothing parameter involved in the ndiNLM algorithm can be adaptively estimated based on the image noise relationship between the current low-dose and the previous normal-dose scanning protocols. Results: Qualitative and quantitative evaluations were carried out on a physical phantom as well as clinical abdominal and brain perfusion CT scans in terms of accuracy and resolution properties. The gain by the use

  17. Advanced Computational Approaches for Characterizing Stochastic Cellular Responses to Low Dose, Low Dose Rate Exposures

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, Bobby, R., Ph.D.

    2003-06-27

    OAK - B135 This project final report summarizes modeling research conducted in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Low Dose Radiation Research Program at the Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute from October 1998 through June 2003. The modeling research described involves critically evaluating the validity of the linear nonthreshold (LNT) risk model as it relates to stochastic effects induced in cells by low doses of ionizing radiation and genotoxic chemicals. The LNT model plays a central role in low-dose risk assessment for humans. With the LNT model, any radiation (or genotoxic chemical) exposure is assumed to increase one¡¯s risk of cancer. Based on the LNT model, others have predicted tens of thousands of cancer deaths related to environmental exposure to radioactive material from nuclear accidents (e.g., Chernobyl) and fallout from nuclear weapons testing. Our research has focused on developing biologically based models that explain the shape of dose-response curves for low-dose radiation and genotoxic chemical-induced stochastic effects in cells. Understanding the shape of the dose-response curve for radiation and genotoxic chemical-induced stochastic effects in cells helps to better understand the shape of the dose-response curve for cancer induction in humans. We have used a modeling approach that facilitated model revisions over time, allowing for timely incorporation of new knowledge gained related to the biological basis for low-dose-induced stochastic effects in cells. Both deleterious (e.g., genomic instability, mutations, and neoplastic transformation) and protective (e.g., DNA repair and apoptosis) effects have been included in our modeling. Our most advanced model, NEOTRANS2, involves differing levels of genomic instability. Persistent genomic instability is presumed to be associated with nonspecific, nonlethal mutations and to increase both the risk for neoplastic transformation and for cancer occurrence. Our research results, based on

  18. The role of renal scintigraphy and unenhanced helical computerized tomography in patients with ureterolithiasis.

    PubMed

    Lorberboym, M; Kapustin, Z; Elias, S; Nikolov, G; Katz, R

    2000-04-01

    Unenhanced helical computerized tomography (UHCT) has recently evolved as an accurate imaging modality for determination of the presence or absence of ureterolithiasis in patients with acute flank pain. Functional renal scintigraphy is considered the gold standard for urinary tract obstruction. The objective of this study was to correlate the secondary signs of urinary obstruction on UHCT with findings of functional renal scintigraphy. UHCT was performed in 30 patients admitted to the emergency room with acute flank pain. All patients had a calcified urinary stone identified on UHCT. The location of each urinary stone was classified as ureteral or in the ureterovesical junction. The presence of secondary CT signs of ureteral obstruction was determined for each patient. After oral or intravenous hydration, a technetium-99m diethylene triamine penta-acetic acid renal scan was performed in all patients within 12 h of the CT scan. Follow-up delayed scintigraphic images were obtained at 2 h and 24 h in patients with evidence of ureteral obstruction. The sensitivity, specificity and predictive values of each possible combination of CT findings were determined by comparison with the scintigraphic results. The distal ureter was the most common location for a calculus on UHCT, followed in frequency by the ureterovesical junction, proximal ureter and mid-ureter. The renograms showed high-grade, unilateral obstruction in 12 patients, indeterminate scans in five patients and normal renograms in 13 patients. The sensitivities and specificities of individual CT findings ranged from 50% to 75% and from 8% to 69%, respectively. Perinephric stranding gave the highest positive predictive value (PPV) for obstruction (69% including indeterminate renograms). None of the individual CT findings showed a statistically significant correlation with scintigraphic findings. A combination of one or two positive CT findings had a PPV of only 25% for obstruction. A combination of three or four

  19. Low-dose effects of hormones and endocrine disruptors.

    PubMed

    Vandenberg, Laura N

    2014-01-01

    Endogenous hormones have effects on tissue morphology, cell physiology, and behaviors at low doses. In fact, hormones are known to circulate in the part-per-trillion and part-per-billion concentrations, making them highly effective and potent signaling molecules. Many endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) mimic hormones, yet there is strong debate over whether these chemicals can also have effects at low doses. In the 1990s, scientists proposed the "low-dose hypothesis," which postulated that EDCs affect humans and animals at environmentally relevant doses. This chapter focuses on data that support and refute the low-dose hypothesis. A case study examining the highly controversial example of bisphenol A and its low-dose effects on the prostate is examined through the lens of endocrinology. Finally, the chapter concludes with a discussion of factors that can influence the ability of a study to detect and interpret low-dose effects appropriately.

  20. Validation of true low-dose (18)F-FDG PET of the brain.

    PubMed

    Fällmar, David; Lilja, Johan; Kilander, Lena; Danfors, Torsten; Lubberink, Mark; Larsson, Elna-Marie; Sörensen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    The dosage of (18)F-FDG must be sufficient to ensure adequate PET image quality. For younger patients and research controls, the lowest possible radiation dose should be used. The purpose of this study was to find a protocol for FDG-PET of the brain with reduced radiation dose and preserved quantitative characteristics. Eight patients with neurodegenerative disorders and nine controls (n=17) underwent FDG-PET/CT twice on separate occasions, first with normal-dose (3 MBq/kg), and second with low-dose (0.75 MBq/kg, 25% of the original). Five additional controls (total n=22) underwent FDG-PET twice, using normal-dose and ultra-low-dose (0.3 MBq/kg, 10% of original). All subjects underwent MRI. Ten-minute summation images were spatially normalized and intensity normalized. Regional standard uptake value ratios (SUV-r) were calculated using an automated atlas. SUV-r values from the normal- and low-dose images were compared pairwise. No clinically significant bias was found in any of the three groups. The mean absolute difference in regional SUV-r values was 0.015 (1.32%) in controls and 0.019 (1.67%) in patients. The ultra-low-dose protocol produced a slightly higher mean difference of 0.023 (2.10%). The main conclusion is that 0.75 MBq/kg (56 MBq for a 75-kg subject) is a sufficient FDG dose for evaluating regional SUV-ratios in brain PET scans in adults with or without neurodegenerative disease, resulting in a reduction of total PET/CT effective dose from 4.54 to 1.15 mSv. The ultra-low-dose (0.5 mSv) could be useful in research studies requiring serial PET in healthy controls or children.

  1. Validation of true low-dose 18F-FDG PET of the brain

    PubMed Central

    Fällmar, David; Lilja, Johan; Kilander, Lena; Danfors, Torsten; Lubberink, Mark; Larsson, Elna-Marie; Sörensen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    The dosage of 18F-FDG must be sufficient to ensure adequate PET image quality. For younger patients and research controls, the lowest possible radiation dose should be used. The purpose of this study was to find a protocol for FDG-PET of the brain with reduced radiation dose and preserved quantitative characteristics. Eight patients with neurodegenerative disorders and nine controls (n=17) underwent FDG-PET/CT twice on separate occasions, first with normal-dose (3 MBq/kg), and second with low-dose (0.75 MBq/kg, 25% of the original). Five additional controls (total n=22) underwent FDG-PET twice, using normal-dose and ultra-low-dose (0.3 MBq/kg, 10% of original). All subjects underwent MRI. Ten-minute summation images were spatially normalized and intensity normalized. Regional standard uptake value ratios (SUV-r) were calculated using an automated atlas. SUV-r values from the normal- and low-dose images were compared pairwise. No clinically significant bias was found in any of the three groups. The mean absolute difference in regional SUV-r values was 0.015 (1.32%) in controls and 0.019 (1.67%) in patients. The ultra-low-dose protocol produced a slightly higher mean difference of 0.023 (2.10%). The main conclusion is that 0.75 MBq/kg (56 MBq for a 75-kg subject) is a sufficient FDG dose for evaluating regional SUV-ratios in brain PET scans in adults with or without neurodegenerative disease, resulting in a reduction of total PET/CT effective dose from 4.54 to 1.15 mSv. The ultra-low-dose (0.5 mSv) could be useful in research studies requiring serial PET in healthy controls or children. PMID:27766185

  2. Low-dose-rate, low-dose irradiation delays neurodegeneration in a model of retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Otani, Atsushi; Kojima, Hiroshi; Guo, Congrong; Oishi, Akio; Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    2012-01-01

    The existence of radiation hormesis is controversial. Several stimulatory effects of low-dose (LD) radiation have been reported to date; however, the effects on neural tissue or neurodegeneration remain unknown. Here, we show that LD radiation has a neuroprotective effect in mouse models of retinitis pigmentosa, a hereditary, progressive neurodegenerative disease that leads to blindness. Various LD radiation doses were administered to the eyes in a retinal degeneration mouse model, and their pathological and physiological effects were analyzed. LD gamma radiation in a low-dose-rate (LDR) condition rescues photoreceptor cell apoptosis both morphologically and functionally. The greatest effect was observed in a condition using 650 mGy irradiation and a 26 mGy/minute dose rate. Multiple rounds of irradiation strengthened this neuroprotective effect. A characteristic up-regulation (563%) of antioxidative gene peroxiredoxin-2 (Prdx2) in the LDR-LD-irradiated retina was observed compared to the sham-treated control retina. Silencing the Prdx2 using small-interfering RNA administration reduced the LDR-LD rescue effect on the photoreceptors. Our results demonstrate for the first time that LDR-LD irradiation has a biological effect in neural cells of living animals. The results support that radiation exhibits hormesis, and this effect may be applied as a novel therapeutic concept for retinitis pigmentosa and for other progressive neurodegenerative diseases regardless of the mechanism of degeneration involved.

  3. Low dose irradiation profoundly affects transcriptome and microRNAme in rat mammary gland tissues

    PubMed Central

    Luzhna, Lidia; Kovalchuk, Olga

    2014-01-01

    Ionizing radiation has been successfully used in medical tests and treatment therapies for a variety of medical conditions. However, patients and health-care workers are greatly concerned about overexposure to medical ionizing radiation and possible cancer induction due to frequent mammographies and/or CT scans. Diagnostic imaging involves the use of low doses of ionizing radiation, and its potential carcinogenic role creates a cancer risk concern for exposed individuals. In this study, the effects of X-ray exposure of different doses on the gene expression patterns and the micro-RNA expression patterns in normal breast tissue were investigated in rats. Our results revealed the activation of immune response pathways upon low dose of radiation exposure. These included natural killer mediated cytotoxicity pathways, antigen processing and presentation pathways, chemokine signaling pathways, and T- and B-cell receptor signaling pathways. Both high and low doses of radiation led to miRNA expression alterations. Increased expression of miR-34a may be linked to cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Up-regulation of miR-34a was correlated with down-regulation of its target E2F3 and up-regulation of p53. This data suggests that ionizing radiation at specific high and low doses leads to cell cycle arrest and a possible initiation of apoptosis. PMID:25594002

  4. Comparison of high dose inhaled steroids, low dose inhaled steroids plus low dose theophylline, and low dose inhaled steroids alone in chronic asthma in general practice

    PubMed Central

    Lim, S.; Jatakanon, A.; Gordon, D.; Macdonald, C.; Chung, K. F.; Barnes, P.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Theophylline is widely used in the treatment of asthma, and there is evidence that theophylline has anti-inflammatory or immunomodulatory effects. A study was undertaken to determine whether theophylline added to low dose inhaled steroids would be as efficacious as high dose inhaled steroids in asthma.
METHODS—In a study in general practice of 155 recruited asthmatic patients with continuing symptomatic asthma while on 400 µg beclomethasone dipropionate (BDP) daily and inhaled β2 agonist as required, the effect of (1) continuing low dose inhaled steroids alone (LDS, 200 µg BDP twice daily), (2) low dose inhaled steroids plus low dose theophylline (LDT, 400 mg daily), or (3) high dose inhaled steroids (HDS, 500 µg BDP) over a six month period was examined.
RESULTS—One hundred and thirty patients completed the study. Between group comparison using analysis of variance showed no overall differences in peak flow measurements, diurnal variation, and symptom scores. Changes in evening peak flows approached significance at the 5% level (p=0.077). The mean improvement in evening peak flow in the LDT compared with the LDS group was 20.6 l/min (95% confidence interval (CI) -2.5 to 38.8). In the LDT group there was an increase in evening peak flows at the end of the study compared with entry values (22.5 l/min), while in the LDS and HDS groups evening peak flows increased by 1.9 and 8.3 l/min, respectively. There was no significant difference in exacerbations or in side effects.
CONCLUSION—There were no overall significant differences between the low dose steroid, low dose steroid with theophylline, and the high dose steroid groups. The greatest within-group improvement in evening peak flows was found after theophylline. A larger study may be necessary to show significant effects.

 PMID:10992535

  5. High-order noise analysis for low dose iterative image reconstruction methods: ASIR, IRIS, and MBAI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Do, Synho; Singh, Sarabjeet; Kalra, Mannudeep K.; Karl, W. Clem; Brady, Thomas J.; Pien, Homer

    2011-03-01

    Iterative reconstruction techniques (IRTs) has been shown to suppress noise significantly in low dose CT imaging. However, medical doctors hesitate to accept this new technology because visual impression of IRT images are different from full-dose filtered back-projection (FBP) images. Most common noise measurements such as the mean and standard deviation of homogeneous region in the image that do not provide sufficient characterization of noise statistics when probability density function becomes non-Gaussian. In this study, we measure L-moments of intensity values of images acquired at 10% of normal dose and reconstructed by IRT methods of two state-of-art clinical scanners (i.e., GE HDCT and Siemens DSCT flash) by keeping dosage level identical to each other. The high- and low-dose scans (i.e., 10% of high dose) were acquired from each scanner and L-moments of noise patches were calculated for the comparison.

  6. Low-Dose Hyper-Radiosensitivity: Past, Present, and Future

    SciTech Connect

    Marples, Brian Collis, Spencer J.

    2008-04-01

    This review article discusses the biology of low-dose hyper-radiosensitivity (HRS) with reference to the molecular regulation of DNA repair and cell cycle control processes. Particular attention is paid to the significance of G2-phase cell cycle checkpoints in overcoming low-dose hyper-radiosensitivity and the impact of HRS on low-dose rate radiobiology. The history of HRS from the original in vivo discovery to the most recent in vitro and clinical data are examined to present a unifying hypothesis concerning the molecular control and regulation of this important low dose radiation response. Finally, preclinical and clinical data are discussed, from a molecular viewpoint, to provide theoretical approaches to exploit HRS biology for clinical gain.

  7. Risk of cancer subsequent to low-dose radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, S.

    1980-01-01

    The author puts low dose irradiation risks in perspective using average background radiation doses for standards. He assailed irresponsible media coverage during the height of public interest in the Three-Mile Island Reactor incident. (PCS)

  8. Bradycardia following a single low dose of trazodone.

    PubMed

    Li, Tien-Chun; Chiu, Hsiu-Wen; Ho, Kai-Jen; Tzeng, Dong-Sheng

    2011-03-01

    Symptomatic bradycardia following a single low dose of oral trazodone is rare. Herein, we report the case of a patient with major depressive disorder who developed and was able to resolve symptomatic bradycardia following administration of a single low dose of trazodone 50mg, and then discontinuation. This is the first case report of symptomatic bradycardia which might be attributed to a single lowest dose of trazodone in the world.

  9. Low-dose cyclophosphamide-induced acute hepatotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Subramaniam, S. Ravih; Cader, Rizna Abdul; Mohd, Rozita; Yen, Kong Wei; Ghafor, Halim Abdul

    2013-01-01

    Patient: Male, 48 Final Diagnosis: Low dose cyclophosphamide-induced acute hepatotoxicity Symptoms: Epigastric pain Medication: Withdrawal of cyclophosphamide Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Nephrology • Hepatology • Gastroenterology • Toxicology Objective: Unexpected drug reaction Background: Cyclophosphamide is commonly used to treat cancers, systemic vasculitides, and kidney diseases (e.g., lupus nephritis and focal segmental glomerulosclerosis). Acute adverse effects include bone marrow suppression, hemorrhagic cystitis, nausea, vomiting, and hair loss. Hepatotoxicity with high dose cyclophosphamide is well recognized but hepatitis due to low dose cyclophosphamide has rarely been described. Case Report: We report the case of a 48-year-old Chinese man with a rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis secondary to granulomatosis with polyangiitis who developed severe acute hepatic failure within 24 hours of receiving low-dose intravenous cyclophosphamide. The diagnosis of granulomatosis with polyangiitis was supported with a positive c-ANCA serology. The patient was treated with high dose methylprednisolone, plasmapheresis, intermittent hemodialysis, and low-dose intravenous cyclophosphamide. Conclusions: Hepatotoxicity may occur even after low-dose intravenous cyclophosphamide treatment. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of severe, non-viral, liver inflammation developing within 24 hours of administration of low-dose intravenous cyclophosphamide (200 mg). Physicians should be aware of this serious adverse reaction and should not repeat the cyclophosphamide dose when there is hepatotoxicity caused by the first dose. Initial and follow-up liver function tests should be monitored in all patients receiving cyclophosphamide treatment. PMID:24023976

  10. SR-NLM: a sinogram restoration induced non-local means image filtering for low-dose computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Bian, Zhaoying; Ma, Jianhua; Huang, Jing; Zhang, Hua; Niu, Shanzhou; Feng, Qianjin; Liang, Zhengrong; Chen, Wufan

    2013-06-01

    Radiation dose has raised significant concerns to patients and operators in modern X-ray computed tomography (CT) examinations. A simple and cost-effective means to perform a low-dose CT scan is to lower the milliampere-seconds (mAs) as low as reasonably achievable in data acquisition. However, the associated image quality with lower-mAs scans (or low-dose scans) will be unavoidably degraded due to the excessive data noise, if no adequate noise control is applied during image reconstruction. For image reconstruction with low-dose scans, sinogram restoration algorithms based on modeling the noise properties of measurement can produce an image with noise-induced artifact suppression, but they often suffer noticeable resolution loss. As an alternative technique, the noise-reduction algorithms via edge-preserving image filtering can yield an image without noticeable resolution loss, but they often do not completely eliminate the noise-induced artifacts. With above observations, in this paper, we present a sinogram restoration induced non-local means (SR-NLM) image filtering algorithm to retain the CT image quality by fully considering the advantages of the sinogram restoration and image filtering algorithms in low-dose image reconstruction. Extensive experimental results show that the present SR-NLM algorithm outperforms the existing methods in terms of cross profile, noise reduction, contrast-to-ratio measure, noise-resolution tradeoff and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves.

  11. Data of low-dose phase-based X-ray imaging for in situ soft tissue engineering assessments

    PubMed Central

    Izadifar, Zohreh; Honaramooz, Ali; Wiebe, Sheldon; Belev, George; Chen, Xiongbiao; Chapman, Dean

    2016-01-01

    This article presents the data of using three phase-based X-ray imaging techniques to characterize biomaterial scaffold and soft tissues in situ, as reported in our study “Low-dose phase-based X-ray imaging techniques for in situ soft tissue engineering assessments” [1]. The examined parameters include the radiation dose, scan time, and image quality, which are all critical to longitudinal in situ live animal assessments. The data presented were obtained from three dimensional imaging of scaffolds in situ cartilage by means of synchrotron-based computed tomography-diffraction enhanced imaging (CT-DEI), analyzer based imaging (CT-ABI), and in-line phase contrast imaging (CT-PCI) at standard and low dose imaging modalities. PMID:26909381

  12. Low Dose Suppression of Neoplastic Transformation in Vitro

    SciTech Connect

    John Leslie Redpath

    2012-05-01

    This grant was to study the low dose suppression of neoplastic transformation in vitro and the shape of the dose-response curve at low doses and dose-rates of ionizing radiation. Previous findings had indicated a suppression of transformation at dose <10cGy of low-LET radiation when delivered at high dose-rate. The present study indicates that such suppression extends out to doses in excess of 100cGy when the dose (from I-125 photons) is delivered at dose-rates as low as 0.2 mGy/min and out to in excess of {approx}25cGy the highest dose studied at the very low dose-rate of 0.5 mGy/day. We also examined dose-rate effects for high energy protons (which are a low-LET radiation) and suppression was evident below {approx}10cGy for high dose-rate delivery and at least out to 50cGy for low dose-rate (20cGy/h) delivery. Finally, we also examined the effect of low doses of 1 GeV/n iron ions (a high-LET radiation) delivered at high dose-rate on transformation at low doses and found a suppression below {approx}10cGy that could be attributable to an adaptive response in bystander cells induced by the associated low-LET delta rays. These results have implications for cancer risk assessment at low doses.

  13. [Mechanism of cytogenetic adaptive response induced by low dose radiation].

    PubMed

    Cai, L; Liu, S

    1990-11-01

    Cytogenetic observation on human lymphocytes indicated that pre-exposure of 10, 50 and 75 mGy X-rays could induced the adaptive response. Experimental results with different temperature treatment showed that the adaptive response induced by low dose radiation could be enhanced by 41 degrees C and 43 degrees C, but inhibited by 4 degrees C in addition the treatment by 41 degrees C for one hour could also cause the adaptive response as did low dose radiation. Results showed that adaptive response induced by low dose radiation (10 or 50 mGy X-rays) could be eliminated by the protein synthesis inhibitor, implying that the adaptive response is related with the metabolism of cells, especially with the production of certain protective proteins.

  14. Low-dose radiation epidemiology studies: status and issues.

    PubMed

    Shore, Roy E

    2009-11-01

    Although the Japanese atomic bomb study and radiotherapy studies have clearly documented cancer risks from high-dose radiation exposures, radiation risk assessment groups have long recognized that protracted or low exposures to low-linear energy transfer radiations are key radiation protection concerns because these are far more common than high-exposure scenarios. Epidemiologic studies of human populations with low-dose or low dose-rate exposures are one approach to addressing those concerns. A number of large studies of radiation workers (Chernobyl clean-up workers, U.S. and Chinese radiological technologists, and the 15-country worker study) or of persons exposed to environmental radiation at moderate to low levels (residents near Techa River, Semipalatinsk, Chernobyl, or nuclear facilities) have been conducted. A variety of studies of medical radiation exposures (multiple-fluoroscopy, diagnostic (131)I, scatter radiation doses from radiotherapy, etc.) also are of interest. Key results from these studies are summarized and compared with risk estimates from the Japanese atomic bomb study. Ideally, one would like the low-dose and low dose-rate studies to guide radiation risk estimation regarding the shape of the dose-response curve, DDREF (dose and dose-rate effectiveness factor), and risk at low doses. However, the degree to which low-dose studies can do so is subject to various limitations, especially those pertaining to dosimetric uncertainties and limited statistical power. The identification of individuals who are particularly susceptible to radiation cancer induction also is of high interest in terms of occupational and medical radiation protection. Several examples of studies of radiation-related cancer susceptibility are discussed, but none thus far have clearly identified radiation-susceptible genotypes.

  15. High-resolution low-dose scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Buban, James P; Ramasse, Quentin; Gipson, Bryant; Browning, Nigel D; Stahlberg, Henning

    2010-01-01

    During the past two decades instrumentation in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) has pushed toward higher intensity electron probes to increase the signal-to-noise ratio of recorded images. While this is suitable for robust specimens, biological specimens require a much reduced electron dose for high-resolution imaging. We describe here protocols for low-dose STEM image recording with a conventional field-emission gun STEM, while maintaining the high-resolution capability of the instrument. Our findings show that a combination of reduced pixel dwell time and reduced gun current can achieve radiation doses comparable to low-dose TEM.

  16. Unenhanced Cone Beam Computed Tomography and Fusion Imaging in Direct Percutaneous Sac Injection for Treatment of Type II Endoleak: Technical Note

    SciTech Connect

    Carrafiello, Gianpaolo Ierardi, Anna Maria; Radaelli, Alessandro; Marchi, Giuseppe De; Floridi, Chiara; Piffaretti, Gabriele; Federico, Fontana

    2016-03-15

    AimTo evaluate safety, feasibility, technical success, and clinical success of direct percutaneous sac injection (DPSI) for the treatment of type II endoleaks (T2EL) using anatomical landmarks on cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) and fusion imaging (FI).Materials and MethodsEight patients with T2EL were treated with DPSI using CBCT as imaging guidance. Anatomical landmarks on unenhanced CBCT were used for referencing T2EL location in the first five patients, while FI between unenhanced CBCT and pre-procedural computed tomography angiography (CTA) was used in the remaining three patients. Embolization was performed with thrombin, glue, and ethylene–vinyl alcohol copolymer. Technical and clinical success, iodinated contrast utilization, procedural time, fluoroscopy time, and mean radiation dose were registered.ResultsDPSI was technically successful in all patients: the needle was correctly positioned at the first attempt in six patients, while in two of the first five patients the needle was repositioned once. Neither minor nor major complications were registered. Average procedural time was 45 min and the average administered iodinated contrast was 13 ml. Mean radiation dose of the procedure was 60.43 Gy cm{sup 2} and mean fluoroscopy time was 18 min. Clinical success was achieved in all patients (mean follow-up of 36 months): no sign of T2EL was reported in seven patients until last CT follow-up, while it persisted in one patient with stability of sac diameter.ConclusionsDPSI using unenhanced CBCT and FI is feasible and provides the interventional radiologist with an accurate and safe alternative to endovascular treatment with limited iodinated contrast utilization.

  17. Ultra-low dose naltrexone enhances cannabinoid-induced antinociception.

    PubMed

    Paquette, Jay; Olmstead, Mary C; Olmstead, Mary

    2005-12-01

    Both opioids and cannabinoids have inhibitory effects at micromolar doses, which are mediated by activated receptors coupling to Gi/o-proteins. Surprisingly, the analgesic effects of opioids are enhanced by ultra-low doses (nanomolar to picomolar) of the opioid antagonist, naltrexone. As opioid and cannabinoid systems interact, this study investigated whether ultra-low dose naltrexone also influences cannabinoid-induced antinociception. Separate groups of Long-Evans rats were tested for antinociception following an injection of vehicle, a sub-maximal dose of the cannabinoid agonist WIN 55 212-2, naltrexone (an ultra-low or a high dose) or a combination of WIN 55 212-2 and naltrexone doses. Tail-flick latencies were recorded for 3 h, at 10-min intervals for the first hour, and at 15-min intervals thereafter. Ultra-low dose naltrexone elevated WIN 55 212-2-induced tail flick thresholds without extending its duration of action. This enhancement was replicated in animals receiving intraperitoneal or intravenous injections. A high dose of naltrexone had no effect on WIN 55 212-2-induced tail flick latencies, but a high dose of the cannabinoid 1 receptor antagonist SR 141716 blocked the elevated tail-flick thresholds produced by WIN 55 212-2+ultra-low dose naltrexone. These data suggest a mechanism of cannabinoid-opioid interaction whereby activated opioid receptors that couple to Gs-proteins may attenuate cannabinoid-induced antinociception and/or motor functioning.

  18. CARCINOGENIC EFFECTS OF LOW DOSES OF IONIZING RADIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Carcinogenic Effects of Low Doses of Ionizing Radiation

    R Julian Preston, Environmental Carcinogenesis Division, NHEERL, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711

    The form of the dose-response curve for radiation-induced cancers, particu...

  19. Mechanisms of Low Dose Radio-Suppression of Genomic Instability

    SciTech Connect

    Engelward, Bevin P

    2009-09-16

    The major goal of this project is to contribute toward the elucidation of the impact of long term low dose radiation on genomic stability. We have created and characterized novel technologies for delivering long term low dose radiation to animals, and we have studied genomic stability by applying cutting edge molecular analysis technologies. Remarkably, we have found that a dose rate that is 300X higher than background radiation does not lead to any detectable genomic damage, nor is there any significant change in gene expression for genes pertinent to the DNA damage response. These results point to the critical importance of dose rate, rather than just total dose, when evaluating public health risks and when creating regulatory guidelines. In addition to these studies, we have also further developed a mouse model for quantifying cells that have undergone a large scale DNA sequence rearrangement via homologous recombination, and we have applied these mice in studies of both low dose radiation and space radiation. In addition to more traditional approaches for assessing genomic stability, we have also explored radiation and possible beneficial effects (adaptive response), long term effects (persistent effects) and effects on communication among cells (bystander effects), both in vitro and in vivo. In terms of the adaptive response, we have not observed any significant induction of an adaptive response following long term low dose radiation in vivo, delivered at 300X background. In terms of persistent and bystander effects, we have revealed evidence of a bystander effect in vivo and with researchers at and demonstrated for the first time the molecular mechanism by which cells “remember” radiation exposure. Understanding the underlying molecular mechanisms by which radiation can induce genomic instability is fundamental to our ability to assess the biological impact of low dose radiation. Finally, in a parallel set of studies we have explored the effects of heavy

  20. Mechanical Solitaire Thrombectomy with Low-Dose Booster Tirofiban Injection

    PubMed Central

    Goh, Duck-Ho; Jeong, Hae Woong; Ha, Sam Yeol

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Mechanical thrombectomy using a Solitaire stent has been associated with a high recanalization rate and favorable clinical outcome in intra-arterial thrombolysis. To achieve a higher recanalization rate for mechanical Solitaire thrombectomy, we used an intra-arterial low-dose booster tirofiban injection into the occluded segment after stent deployment. We report the safety and recanalization rates for mechanical Solitaire thrombectomy with a low-dose booster tirofiban injection. Materials and Methods Between February and March 2013, 13 consecutive patients underwent mechanical Solitaire thrombectomy with low-dose booster tirofiban injection. The occlusion sites included the proximal middle cerebral artery (5 patients), the internal carotid artery (5 patients), the top of the basilar artery (2 patients) and the distal middle cerebral artery (M2 segment, 1 patient). Six patients underwent bridge treatment, including intravenous tissue plasminogen activator. Tirofiban of 250 µg was used in all patients except one (500 µg). All occluded vessels were recanalized after 3 attempts at stent retrieval (1 time, n=9; 2 times, n=2; 3 times, n=2). Results Successful recanalization was achieved in all patients (TICI 3, n=8; TICI 2b, n=5). Procedural complications developed in 3 patients (subarachnoid hemorrhage, n=2; hemorrhagic transformation, n=1). Mortality occurred in one patient with a basilar artery occlusion due to reperfusion brain swelling after mechanical Solitaire thrombectomy with low-dose booster tirofiban injection. Favorable clinical outcome (mRS≤2) was observed in 8 patients (61.5%). Conclusion Our modified mechanical Solitaire thrombectomy method using a low-dose booster tirofiban injection might enhance the recanalization rate with no additive hemorrhagic complications. PMID:27621948

  1. Low dose naltrexone: side effects and efficacy in gastrointestinal disorders.

    PubMed

    Ploesser, Jennifer; Weinstock, Leonard B; Thomas, Erin

    2010-01-01

    Use of low dose naltrexone has been advocated for a variety of medical problems. Only a few articles published in peer review journals have documented side effects of low dose naltrexone. The purpose of this study was to determine the frequency of adverse effects of low dose naltrexone in patients who have been treated for a variety of gastrointestinal disorders. The secondary purpose was to determine global efficacy in a retrospective survey. Patients (206) form a single gastroenterologist's clinical practice who had been prescribed naltrexone were mailed a survey to evaluate the side effects and efficacy of naltrexone. Patients had either irritable bowel syndrome without evidence for small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, chronic idiopathic constipation, or inflammatory bowel disease. Patients with diarrhea were given 2.5 mg daily, constipation 2.5 mg twice daily, and inflammatory bowel disease 4.5 mg daily. In the patients who returned the survey, 47/121 (38.8%) had no side effects. Of the 74/121 (61.2%) patients who had side effects, 58 had one or more neurological complaints, and 32 had one or more gastrointestinal side effects. In the patients with side effects, 24/74 (32.4%) had short lived symptoms. Low dose naltrexone was terminated owing to side effects in 20/74 patients (27.0%). In 13 patients with idiopathic irritable bowel syndrome, 2 were markedly worse. In 85 patients with irritable bowel syndrome-small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, 15 were markedly improved, 32 were moderately worse, and 1 was markedly worse. In 12 patients with chronic constipation, 7 were markedly improved, 1 was moderately improved, 1 was mildly improved, and 4 were unchanged. Low dose naltrexone frequently has side effects but in most is tolerable. It appears to be helpful for a member of patients with gastrointestinal disorders.

  2. Investigation of lung nodule detectability in low-dose 320-slice computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Silverman, J. D.; Paul, N. S.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2009-05-15

    Low-dose imaging protocols in chest CT are important in the screening and surveillance of suspicious and indeterminate lung nodules. Techniques that maintain nodule detectability yet permit dose reduction, particularly for large body habitus, were investigated. The objective of this study was to determine the extent to which radiation dose can be minimized while maintaining diagnostic performance through knowledgeable selection of reconstruction techniques. A 320-slice volumetric CT scanner (Aquilion ONE, Toshiba Medical Systems) was used to scan an anthropomorphic phantom at doses ranging from {approx}0.1 mGy up to that typical of low-dose CT (LDCT, {approx}5 mGy) and diagnostic CT ({approx}10 mGy). Radiation dose was measured via Farmer chamber and MOSFET dosimetry. The phantom presented simulated nodules of varying size and contrast within a heterogeneous background, and chest thickness was varied through addition of tissue-equivalent bolus about the chest. Detectability of a small solid lung nodule (3.2 mm diameter, -37 HU, typically the smallest nodule of clinical significance in screening and surveillance) was evaluated as a function of dose, patient size, reconstruction filter, and slice thickness by means of nine-alternative forced-choice (9AFC) observer tests to quantify nodule detectability. For a given reconstruction filter, nodule detectability decreased sharply below a threshold dose level due to increased image noise, especially for large body size. However, nodule detectability could be maintained at lower doses through knowledgeable selection of (smoother) reconstruction filters. For large body habitus, optimal filter selection reduced the dose required for nodule detection by up to a factor of {approx}3 (from {approx}3.3 mGy for sharp filters to {approx}1.0 mGy for the optimal filter). The results indicate that radiation dose can be reduced below the current low-dose (5 mGy) and ultralow-dose (1 mGy) levels with knowledgeable selection of

  3. Influence of low-dose and low-dose-rate ionizing radiation on mutation induction in human cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yatagai, F.; Umebayashi, Y.; Suzuki, M.; Abe, T.; Suzuki, H.; Shimazu, T.; Ishioka, N.; Iwaki, M.; Honma, M.

    This is a review paper to introduce our recent studies on the genetic effects of low-dose and low-dose-rate ionizing radiation (IR). Human lymphoblastoid TK6 cells were exposed to γ-rays at a dose-rate of 1.2 mGy/h (total 30 mGy). The frequency of early mutations (EMs) in the thymidine kinase ( TK) gene locus was determined to be 1.7 × 10 -6, or 1.9-fold higher than the level seen in unirradated controls [Umebayashi, Y., Honma, M., Suzuki, M., Suzuki, H., Shimazu, T., Ishioka, N., Iwaki, M., Yatagai, F., Mutation induction in cultured human cells after low-dose and low-dose-rate γ-ray irradiation: detection by LOH analysis. J. Radiat. Res., 48, 7-11, 2007]. These mutants were then analyzed for loss of heterozygosity (LOH) events. Small interstitial-deletion events were restricted to the TK gene locus and were not observed in EMs in unirradated controls, but they comprised about half of the EMs (8/15) after IR exposure. Because of the low level of exposure to IR, this specific type of event cannot be considered to be the direct result of an IR-induced DNA double strand break (DSB). To better understand the effects of low-level IR exposure, the repair efficiency of site-specific chromosomal DSBs was also examined. The pre γ-irradiation under the same condition did not largely influence the efficiency of DSB repair via end-joining, but enhanced such efficiency via homologous recombination to an about 40% higher level (unpublished data). All these results suggest that DNA repair and mutagenesis can be indirectly influenced by low-dose/dose-rate IR.

  4. SU-F-18C-15: Model-Based Multiscale Noise Reduction On Low Dose Cone Beam Projection

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, W; Farr, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To improve image quality of low dose cone beam CT for patient positioning in radiation therapy. Methods: In low dose cone beam CT (CBCT) imaging systems, Poisson process governs the randomness of photon fluence at x-ray source and the detector because of the independent binomial process of photon absorption in medium. On a CBCT projection, the variance of fluence consists of the variance of noiseless imaging structure and that of Poisson noise, which is proportional to the mean (noiseless) of the fluence at the detector. This requires multiscale filters to smoothen noise while keeping the structure information of the imaged object. We used a mathematical model of Poisson process to design multiscale filters and established the balance of noise correction and structure blurring. The algorithm was checked with low dose kilo-voltage CBCT projections acquired from a Varian OBI system. Results: From the investigation of low dose CBCT of a Catphan phantom and patients, it showed that our model-based multiscale technique could efficiently reduce noise and meanwhile keep the fine structure of the imaged object. After the image processing, the number of visible line pairs in Catphan phantom scanned with 4 ms pulse time was similar to that scanned with 32 ms, and soft tissue structure from simulated 4 ms patient head-and-neck images was also comparable with scanned 20 ms ones. Compared with fixed-scale technique, the image quality from multiscale one was improved. Conclusion: Use of projection-specific multiscale filters can reach better balance on noise reduction and structure information loss. The image quality of low dose CBCT can be improved by using multiscale filters.

  5. Low Dose Naltrexone in the Treatment of Fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Metyas, Samy K; Yeter, Karen; Solyman, John; Arkfeld, Daniel

    2017-03-21

    Fibromyalgia is a chronic pain disorder characterized by diffuse musculoskeletal pain, fatigue, sleep disturbance and cognitive impairment. A significant number of fibromyalgia patients do not respond adequately to the current drugs (pregabalin, milnacipran, duloxetine) approved for fibromyalgia treatment by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Thus, there is still a need for adjunctive therapies. Naltrexone is an opioid receptor antagonist used to treat alcohol and opioid dependence. It is hypothesized that low dose naltrexone causes transient blockade of opioid receptors centrally resulting in a rebound of endorphin function which may attenuate pain in fibromyalgia. Treatment with low dose naltrexone may be an effective, highly tolerable and inexpensive treatment for fibromyalgia. Further controlled trials are needed.

  6. Response of human fibroblasts to low dose rate gamma irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Dritschilo, A.; Brennan, T.; Weichselbaum, R.R.; Mossman, K.L.

    1984-11-01

    Cells from 11 human strains, including fibroblasts from patients with the genetic diseases of ataxia telangiectasia (AT), xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), and Fanconi's anemia (FA), were exposed to ..gamma.. radiation at high (1.6-2.2 Gy/min) and at low (0.03-0.07 Gy/min) dose rates. Survival curves reveal an increase inthe terminal slope (D/sub 0/) when cells are irradiated at low dose rates compared to high dose rates. This was true for all cell lines tested, although the AT, FA, and XP cells are reported or postulated to have radiation repair deficiencies. From the response of these cells, it is apparent that radiation sensitivities differ; however, at low dose rate, all tested human cells are able to repair injury.

  7. Low Dose, Low Energy 3d Image Guidance during Radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, C. J.; Marchant, T.; Amer, A.; Sharrock, P.; Price, P.; Burton, D.

    2006-04-01

    Patient kilo-voltage X-ray cone beam volumetric imaging for radiotherapy was first demonstrated on an Elekta Synergy mega-voltage X-ray linear accelerator. Subsequently low dose, reduced profile reconstruction imaging was shown to be practical for 3D geometric setup registration to pre-treatment planning images without compromising registration accuracy. Reconstruction from X-ray profiles gathered between treatment beam deliveries was also introduced. The innovation of zonal cone beam imaging promises significantly reduced doses to patients and improved soft tissue contrast in the tumour target zone. These developments coincided with the first dynamic 3D monitoring of continuous body topology changes in patients, at the moment of irradiation, using a laser interferometer. They signal the arrival of low dose, low energy 3D image guidance during radiotherapy itself.

  8. Patient release criteria for low dose rate brachytherapy implants.

    PubMed

    Boyce, Dale E; Sheetz, Michael A

    2013-04-01

    A lack of consensus regarding a model governing the release of patients following sealed source brachytherapy has led to a set of patient release policies that vary from institution to institution. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has issued regulatory guidance on patient release in NUREG 1556, Volume 9, Rev. 2, Appendix U, which allows calculation of release limits following implant brachytherapy. While the formalism presented in NUREG is meaningful for the calculation of release limits in the context of relatively high energy gamma emitters, it does not estimate accurately the effective dose equivalent for the common low dose rate brachytherapy sources Cs, I, and Pd. NUREG 1556 states that patient release may be based on patient-specific calculations as long as the calculation is documented. This work is intended to provide a format for patient-specific calculations to be used for the consideration of patients' release following the implantation of certain low dose rate brachytherapy isotopes.

  9. Low Dose Sarin Leads To Murine Cardiac Dysfunction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    reduced heart rate at smooth muscle level; at exocrine glands , it causes secretions in the lung, nasal, oral, and sweat glands . Among clinical effects...smooth muscles, skeletal muscles, most exocrine glands , the central nervous system (CNS), and the cardiac system (central and ganglionic afferents...sarin need to 8 be critically analyzed at low doses to help provide early diagnosis. Similarly, functional and structural changes in the heart

  10. Secondary infertility due to use of low-dose finasteride.

    PubMed

    Şalvarci, Ahmet; Istanbulluoğlu, Okan

    2013-02-01

    Herein, we present an unusual case of secondary infertility after prolonged use of low-dose finasteride for androgenetic alopecia in a 40-year-old man. We detected sperm DNA damage in the patient. Despite such a long-term use, we observed that impairment in semen parameters and sperm DNA fragmentation index regressed after the drug was discontinued. Consequently, pregnancy occurred and resulted in live birth.

  11. Role of animal studies in low-dose extrapolation

    SciTech Connect

    Fry, R.J.M.

    1981-01-01

    Current data indicate that in the case of low-LET radiation linear, extrapolation from data obtained at high doses appears to overestimate the risk at low doses to a varying degree. In the case of high-LET radiation, extrapolation from data obtained at doses as low as 40 rad (0.4 Gy) is inappropriate and likely to result in an underestimate of the risk.

  12. Responses of astrocytes in culture after low dose laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Yew, D.T.; Zheng, D.R.; Au, C.; Li, W.W. )

    1990-03-01

    The effect of Helium-Neon low dose laser on astrocytes was investigated in cultures of isolated astrocytes from albino neonatal rats. The laser appeared to inhibit the growth of astrocytes as exemplified by the smaller sizes of the cells and the decreased leucine uptake in each cell after treatment. Temporary decrease in the number of mitoses was also observed, but this trend was reversed soon after. Electron microscopic studies revealed an increase in buddings from cell bodies and processes (branches) after irradiation.

  13. Low-dose dasatinib rescues cardiac function in Noonan syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Jae-Sung; Huang, Yan; Kwaczala, Andrea T.; Kuo, Ivana Y.; Ehrlich, Barbara E.; Campbell, Stuart G.; Giordano, Frank J.; Bennett, Anton M.

    2016-01-01

    Noonan syndrome (NS) is a common autosomal dominant disorder that presents with short stature, craniofacial dysmorphism, and cardiac abnormalities. Activating mutations in the PTPN11 gene encoding for the Src homology 2 (SH2) domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase-2 (SHP2) causes approximately 50% of NS cases. In contrast, NS with multiple lentigines (NSML) is caused by mutations that inactivate SHP2, but it exhibits some overlapping abnormalities with NS. Protein zero-related (PZR) is a SHP2-binding protein that is hyper-tyrosyl phosphorylated in the hearts of mice from NS and NSML, suggesting that PZR and the tyrosine kinase that catalyzes its phosphorylation represent common targets for these diseases. We show that the tyrosine kinase inhibitor, dasatinib, at doses orders of magnitude lower than that used for its anticancer activities inhibited PZR tyrosyl phosphorylation in the hearts of NS mice. Low-dose dasatinib treatment of NS mice markedly improved cardiomyocyte contractility and functionality. Remarkably, a low dose of dasatinib reversed the expression levels of molecular markers of cardiomyopathy and reduced cardiac fibrosis in NS and NSML mice. These results suggest that PZR/SHP2 signaling is a common target of both NS and NSML and that low-dose dasatinib may represent a unifying therapy for the treatment of PTPN11-related cardiomyopathies. PMID:27942593

  14. Exercise and sport performance with low doses of caffeine.

    PubMed

    Spriet, Lawrence L

    2014-11-01

    Caffeine is a popular work-enhancing supplement that has been actively researched since the 1970s. The majority of research has examined the effects of moderate to high caffeine doses (5-13 mg/kg body mass) on exercise and sport. These caffeine doses have profound effects on the responses to exercise at the whole-body level and are associated with variable results and some undesirable side effects. Low doses of caffeine (<3 mg/kg body mass, ~200 mg) are also ergogenic in some exercise and sport situations, although this has been less well studied. Lower caffeine doses (1) do not alter the peripheral whole-body responses to exercise; (2) improve vigilance, alertness, and mood and cognitive processes during and after exercise; and (3) are associated with few, if any, side effects. Therefore, the ergogenic effect of low caffeine doses appears to result from alterations in the central nervous system. However, several aspects of consuming low doses of caffeine remain unresolved and suffer from a paucity of research, including the potential effects on high-intensity sprint and burst activities. The responses to low doses of caffeine are also variable and athletes need to determine whether the ingestion of ~200 mg of caffeine before and/or during training and competitions is ergogenic on an individual basis.

  15. Therapeutic rationale for low dose doxepin in insomnia patients

    PubMed Central

    Katwala, Jigar; Kumar, Ananda K; Sejpal, Jaykumar J; Terrence, Marcelle; Mishra, Manish

    2013-01-01

    Histamine is an excitatory neurotransmitter in central nervous system. It plays an important role in the regulation of the sleep-wake cycle. Antidepressant with sleep-promoting effects, for example, doxepin, promotes sleep not through a sedative action but through resynchronisation of circadian cycle. The stimulation of the H1 receptor is thought to play an important role in mediating arousal. Doxepin has a high affinity for the H1 receptor, making it a selective H1 antagonist at low dose and it has been shown to display sedating properties. Compared to other sedative antidepressant, low dose doxepin is the only tricyclic drug which has been evaluated by well-designed, randomised, double blind, placebo controlled studies in both adult and elderly patients. Doxepin is not designated as controlled substance/unscheduled drugs and thus may be of special advantage to use in patients with a history of substance abuse. Hence, well-documented therapeutic efficacy, tolerability and lack of important adverse effects make the low dose doxepin as a unique, rational drug for the treatment of insomnia in adult and elderly patients.

  16. MELODI: the 'Multidisciplinary European Low-Dose Initiative'.

    PubMed

    Belli, M; Salomaa, S; Ottolenghi, A

    2011-02-01

    The importance of research to reduce uncertainties in risk assessment of low and protracted exposures is now recognised globally. In Europe a new initiative, called 'Multidisciplinary European LOw Dose Initiative' (MELODI), has been proposed by a 'European High Level and Expert Group on low-dose risk research' (www.hleg.de), aimed at integrating national and EC (Euratom) efforts. Five national organisations: BfS (DE), CEA (FR), IRSN (FR), ISS (IT) and STUK (FI), with the support of the EC, have initiated the creation of MELODI by signing a letter of intent. In the forthcoming years, MELODI will integrate in a step-by-step approach EU institutions with significant programmes in the field and will be open to other scientific organisations and stakeholders. A key role of MELODI is to develop and maintain over time a strategic research agenda (SRA) and a road map of scientific priorities within a multidisciplinary approach, and to transfer the results for the radiation protection system. Under the coordination of STUK a network has been proposed in the 2009 Euratom Programme, called DoReMi (Low-Dose Research towards Mutidisciplinary Integration), which can help the integration process within the MELODI platform. DoReMi and the First MELODI Open Workshop, organised by BfS in September 2009, are now important inputs for the European SRA.

  17. Low-dose prophylactic craniospinal radiotherapy for intracranial germinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenfeld, Gordon O.; Amdur, Robert J. . E-mail: amdurrj@ufl.edu; Schmalfuss, Ilona M.; Morris, Christopher G.; Keole, Sameer R.; Mendenhall, William M.; Marcus, Robert B.

    2006-06-01

    Purpose: To report outcomes of patients with localized intracranial germinoma treated with low-dose craniospinal irradiation (CSI) followed by a boost to the ventricular system and primary site. Methods and Materials: Thirty-one patients had pathologically confirmed intracranial germinoma and no spine metastases. Low-dose CSI was administered in 29 patients: usually 21 Gy of CSI, 9.0 Gy of ventricular boost, and a 19.5-Gy tumor boost, all at 1.5 Gy per fraction. Our neuroradiologist recorded three-dimensional tumor size on magnetic resonance images before, during, and after radiotherapy. Results: With a median follow-up of 7.0 years, 29 of 31 patients (94%) are disease free. One failure had nongerminomatous histology; the initial diagnosis was a sampling error. Of 3 patients who did not receive CSI, 1 died. No patient developed myelopathy, visual deficits, dementia, or skeletal growth problems. In locally controlled patients, tumor response according to magnetic resonance scan was nearly complete within 6 months after radiotherapy. Conclusions: Radiotherapy alone with low-dose prophylactic CSI cures almost all patients with localized intracranial germinoma. Complications are rare when the daily dose of radiotherapy is limited to 1.5 Gy and the total CSI dose to 21 Gy. Patients without a near-complete response to radiotherapy should undergo resection to rule out a nongerminomatous element.

  18. Analysis of low-dose radiation shield effectiveness of multi-gate polymeric sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S. C.; Lee, H. K.; Cho, J. H.

    2014-07-01

    Computed tomography (CT) uses a high dose of radiation to create images of the body. As patients are exposed to radiation during a CT scan, the use of shielding materials becomes essential in CT scanning. This study was focused on the radiation shielding materials used for patients during a CT scan. In this study, sheets were manufactured to shield the eyes and the thyroid, the most sensitive parts of the body, against radiation exposure during a CT scan. These sheets are manufactured using silicone polymers, barium sulfate (BaSO4) and tungsten, with the aim of making these sheets equally or more effective in radiation shielding and more cost-effective than lead sheets. The use of barium sulfate drew more attention than tungsten due to its higher cost-effectiveness. The barium sulfate sheets were coated to form a multigate structure by applying the maximum charge rate during the agitator and subsequent mixing processes and creating multilayered structures on the surface. To measure radiation shielding effectiveness, the radiation dose was measured around both eyes and the thyroid gland using sheets in three different thicknesses (1, 2 and 3 mm). Among the 1 and 2 mm sheets, the Pb sheets exhibited greater effectiveness in radiation shielding around both eyes, but the W sheets were more effective in radiation shielding around the thyroid gland. In the 3 mm sheets, the Pb sheet also attenuated a higher amount of radiation around both eyes while the W sheet was more effective around the thyroid gland. In conclusion, the sheets made from barium sulfate and tungsten proved highly effective in shielding against low-dose radiation in CT scans without causing ill-health effects, unlike lead.

  19. Biological-Based Modeling of Low Dose Radiation Risks

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, Bobby R., Ph.D.

    2006-11-08

    The objective of this project was to refine a biological-based model (called NEOTRANS2) for low-dose, radiation-induced stochastic effects taking into consideration newly available data, including data on bystander effects (deleterious and protective). The initial refinement led to our NEOTRANS3 model which has undergone further refinement (e.g., to allow for differential DNA repair/apoptosis over different dose regions). The model has been successfully used to explain nonlinear dose-response curves for low-linear-energy-transfer (LET) radiation-induced mutations (in vivo) and neoplastic transformation (in vitro). Relative risk dose-response functions developed for neoplastic transformation have been adapted for application to cancer relative risk evaluation for irradiated humans. Our low-dose research along with that conducted by others collectively demonstrate the following regarding induced protection associated with exposure to low doses of low-LET radiation: (1) protects against cell killing by high-LET alpha particles; (2) protects against spontaneous chromosomal damage; (3) protects against spontaneous mutations and neoplastic transformations; (4) suppresses mutations induced by a large radiation dose even when the low dose is given after the large dose; (5) suppresses spontaneous and alpha-radiation-induced cancers; (6) suppresses metastasis of existing cancer; (7) extends tumor latent period; (8) protects against diseases other than cancer; and (9) extends life expectancy. These forms of radiation-induced protection are called adapted protection as they relate to induced adaptive response. Thus, low doses and dose rates of low-LET radiation generally protect rather than harm us. These findings invalidate the linear not threshold (LNT) hypothesis which is based on the premise that any amount of radiation is harmful irrespective of its type. The hypothesis also implicates a linear dose-response curve for cancer induction that has a positive slope and no

  20. Induction of reciprocal translocations in rhesus monkey stem-cell spermatogonia: effects of low doses and low dose rates

    SciTech Connect

    van Buul, P.P.; Richardson, J.F. Jr.; Goudzwaard, J.H.

    1986-01-01

    The induction of reciprocal translocation in rhesus monkey spermatogonial stem cells was studied following exposure to low doses of acute X rays (0.25 Gy, 300 mGy/min) or to low-dose-rate X rays (1 Gy, 2 mGy/min) and gamma rays (1 Gy, 0.2 mGy/min). The results obtained at 0.25 Gy of X rays fitted exactly the linear extrapolation down from the 0.5 and 1.0 Gy points obtained earlier. Extension of X-ray exposure reduced the yield of translocations similar to that in the mouse by about 50%. The reduction to 40% of translocation rate after chronic gamma exposure was clearly less than the value of about 80% reported for the mouse over the same range of dose rates. Differential cell killing with ensuing differential elimination of aberration-carrying cells is the most likely explanation for the differences between mouse and monkey.

  1. Animal Studies of Residual Hematopoietic and Immune System Injury from Low Dose/Low Dose Rate Radiation and Heavy Metals.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-09-01

    accidents and industrial accidents (e.g., Chernobyl ) who receive high doses of radiation over a relatively short period of time, there are thousands of...several years after exposure may have been terminated. Examples of such groups include those affected by the fallout near Chernobyl , those living near...cohorts (e.g., Chernobyl victims) particular damage from low dose irradiation, especially membrane damage and mismatched DNA repair. Dosimetric Problems

  2. New approach for food allergy management using low-dose oral food challenges and low-dose oral immunotherapies.

    PubMed

    Yanagida, Noriyuki; Okada, Yu; Sato, Sakura; Ebisawa, Motohiro

    2016-04-01

    A number of studies have suggested that a large subset of children (approximately 70%) who react to unheated milk or egg can tolerate extensively heated forms of these foods. A diet that includes baked milk or egg is well tolerated and appears to accelerate the development of regular milk or egg tolerance when compared with strict avoidance. However, the indications for an oral food challenge (OFC) using baked products are limited for patients with high specific IgE values or large skin prick test diameters. Oral immunotherapies (OITs) are becoming increasingly popular for the management of food allergies. However, the reported efficacy of OIT is not satisfactory, given the high frequency of symptoms and requirement for long-term therapy. With food allergies, removing the need to eliminate a food that could be consumed in low doses could significantly improve quality of life. This review discusses the importance of an OFC and OIT that use low doses of causative foods as the target volumes. Utilizing an OFC or OIT with a low dose as the target volume could be a novel approach for accelerating the tolerance to causative foods.

  3. European low-dose radiation risk research strategy: future of research on biological effects at low doses.

    PubMed

    Salomaa, Sisko; Averbeck, Dietrich; Ottolenghi, Andrea; Sabatier, Laure; Bouffler, Simon; Atkinson, Michael; Jourdain, Jean-René

    2015-04-01

    In 2009, the European High Level and Expert Group identified key policy and scientific questions to be addressed through a strategic research agenda for low-dose radiation risk. This initiated the establishment of a European Research Platform, called MELODI (Multidisciplinary European Low Dose Research Initiative). In 2010, the DoReMi Network of Excellence was launched in the Euratom 7th Framework Programme. DoReMi has acted as an operational tool for the sustained development of the MELODI platform during its early years. A long-term Strategic Research Agenda for European low-dose radiation risk research has been developed by MELODI. Strategic planning of DoReMi research activities is carried out in close collaboration with MELODI. The research priorities for DoReMi are designed to focus on objectives that are achievable within the 6-y lifetime of the project and that are in areas where stimulus and support can help progress towards the longer-term strategic objectives.

  4. Low-dose computed tomography image denoising based on joint wavelet and sparse representation.

    PubMed

    Ghadrdan, Samira; Alirezaie, Javad; Dillenseger, Jean-Louis; Babyn, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Image denoising and signal enhancement are the most challenging issues in low dose computed tomography (CT) imaging. Sparse representational methods have shown initial promise for these applications. In this work we present a wavelet based sparse representation denoising technique utilizing dictionary learning and clustering. By using wavelets we extract the most suitable features in the images to obtain accurate dictionary atoms for the denoising algorithm. To achieve improved results we also lower the number of clusters which reduces computational complexity. In addition, a single image noise level estimation is developed to update the cluster centers in higher PSNRs. Our results along with the computational efficiency of the proposed algorithm clearly demonstrates the improvement of the proposed algorithm over other clustering based sparse representation (CSR) and K-SVD methods.

  5. Evaluation of in vivo low-dose mouse irradiation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noh, S. J.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, H.; Kye, Y.-U.; Kim, J. K.; Son, T. G.; Lee, M. W.; Jeong, D. H.; Yang, K. M.; Nam, S.-H.; Kang, Y.-R.

    2016-03-01

    This study aims to develop a facility that can irradiate subjects with a desired low dose, which can be used to assess the biological effects of low-dose radiation. We develop a single-occupancy mouse-cage and shelf system with adjustable geometric parameters, such as the distances and angles of the cages relative to the collimator. We assess the irradiation-level accuracy using two measurement methods. First, we calculate the angle and distance of each mouse cage relative to the irradiator. We employ a Monte Carlo n-particle simulation for all of the cages at a given distance from the radiation source to calculate the air kerma and the relative absorbed dose in the in-house designed shelving system; these are found to be approximately 0.108 and 0.109 Gy, respectively. Second, we measure the relative absorbed dose using glass dosimeters inserted directly into the heads and bodies of the mice. For a conventional irradiation system, the irradiation measurements show a maximum discrepancy of 42% between the absorbed and desired doses, whereas a discrepancy of only 6% from the desired dose is found for the designed mouse apartment system. In addition, multi-mouse cages are shown to yield to significantly greater differences in the mouse head and body relative absorbed doses, compared to the discrepancies found for single-occupancy cages in the conventional irradiation system. Our findings suggest that the in-house shelving system has greater reliability for the biological analysis of the effects of low-dose radiation.

  6. Low doses and thresholds in genotoxicity: from theories to experiments.

    PubMed

    Zito, R

    2001-09-01

    The absence of threshold in the action of genotoxic carcinogens was theoretically postulated more than thirty years ago, but continuously challenged for scientific and practical reasons. The direct experimental demonstration of the presence of a threshold for genotoxic damage is precluded by the insufficient sensitivity of the biological methods presently available. In the last twenty years the sensitivity of the methods for quantitative determination of the DNA adducts of the carcinogens was enormously improved, demonstrating linearity of the dose/adducts pattern over dose intervals of more than million-fold. The arguments more often advanced for the presence of a threshold for genotoxic carcinogens were mainly based on the action of intracellular scavengers, detoxification enzymes and repair systems, being able to block completely the genotoxic carcinogens at very low doses. This hypothesis is disproved by the constant presence of DNA adducts at extremely low doses of different carcinogens, whatever their chemical structure can be. On the other hand if genotoxic damage results from damage to proteins involved in cell division, like tubulin, there is a threshold dose for such genotoxic effects. The detailed knowledge of the genotoxicity mechanism is therefore needed for a sound carcinogenic risk assessment. Most of the genotoxic carcinogens, or their metabolites, damage directly the DNA. In this case the absence of threshold must be assumed, not only for theoretical reasons, but for the results of the experiments quantitatively relating DNA damage and very low doses of carcinogens. For the sake of clarity the "adjectivated" thresholds, like practical pragmatic, apparent and operational, must disappear from documents analysing the carcinogenic risk.

  7. Low-dose fixed-target serial synchrotron crystallography.

    PubMed

    Owen, Robin L; Axford, Danny; Sherrell, Darren A; Kuo, Anling; Ernst, Oliver P; Schulz, Eike C; Miller, R J Dwayne; Mueller-Werkmeister, Henrike M

    2017-04-01

    The development of serial crystallography has been driven by the sample requirements imposed by X-ray free-electron lasers. Serial techniques are now being exploited at synchrotrons. Using a fixed-target approach to high-throughput serial sampling, it is demonstrated that high-quality data can be collected from myoglobin crystals, allowing room-temperature, low-dose structure determination. The combination of fixed-target arrays and a fast, accurate translation system allows high-throughput serial data collection at high hit rates and with low sample consumption.

  8. Harderian Gland Tumorigenesis: Low-Dose and LET Response.

    PubMed

    Chang, Polly Y; Cucinotta, Francis A; Bjornstad, Kathleen A; Bakke, James; Rosen, Chris J; Du, Nicholas; Fairchild, David G; Cacao, Eliedonna; Blakely, Eleanor A

    2016-05-01

    Increased cancer risk remains a primary concern for travel into deep space and may preclude manned missions to Mars due to large uncertainties that currently exist in estimating cancer risk from the spectrum of radiations found in space with the very limited available human epidemiological radiation-induced cancer data. Existing data on human risk of cancer from X-ray and gamma-ray exposure must be scaled to the many types and fluences of radiations found in space using radiation quality factors and dose-rate modification factors, and assuming linearity of response since the shapes of the dose responses at low doses below 100 mSv are unknown. The goal of this work was to reduce uncertainties in the relative biological effect (RBE) and linear energy transfer (LET) relationship for space-relevant doses of charged-particle radiation-induced carcinogenesis. The historical data from the studies of Fry et al. and Alpen et al. for Harderian gland (HG) tumors in the female CB6F1 strain of mouse represent the most complete set of experimental observations, including dose dependence, available on a specific radiation-induced tumor in an experimental animal using heavy ion beams that are found in the cosmic radiation spectrum. However, these data lack complete information on low-dose responses below 0.1 Gy, and for chronic low-dose-rate exposures, and there are gaps in the LET region between 25 and 190 keV/μm. In this study, we used the historical HG tumorigenesis data as reference, and obtained HG tumor data for 260 MeV/u silicon (LET ∼70 keV/μm) and 1,000 MeV/u titanium (LET ∼100 keV/μm) to fill existing gaps of data in this LET range to improve our understanding of the dose-response curve at low doses, to test for deviations from linearity and to provide RBE estimates. Animals were also exposed to five daily fractions of 0.026 or 0.052 Gy of 1,000 MeV/u titanium ions to simulate chronic exposure, and HG tumorigenesis from this fractionated study were compared to the

  9. Low Dose IR Creates an Oncogenic Microenvironment by Inducing Premature

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Zhi-Min

    2013-04-28

    Introduction Much of the work addressing ionizing radiation-induced cellular response has been carried out mainly with the traditional cell culture technique involving only one cell type, how cellular response to IR is influenced by the tissue microenvironment remains elusive. By use of a three-dimensional (3D) co-culture system to model critical interactions of different cell types with their neighbors and with their environment, we recently showed that low-dose IR-induced extracellular signaling via the tissue environment affects profoundly cellular responses. This proposal aims at determining the response of mammary epithelial cells in a tissue-like setting.

  10. Water Intoxication Following Low-Dose Intravenous Cyclophosphamide

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Tai Yeon; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Park, Joon Sung; Lee, Chang Hwa; Park, Moon Hyang; Kang, Chong Myung

    2007-01-01

    Cyclophosphamide is frequently used for the treatment of severe lupus nephritis, but is very rarely associated with dilutional hyponatremia. Recently we experienced a case of water intoxication following low-dose intravenous cyclophosphamide. Five hours after one dose of intravenous pulse cyclophosphamide 750 mg, the patient developed nausea, vomiting, and general weakness. Serum sodium concentration revealed 114 mEq/L and her hyponatremia was initially treated with hypertonic saline infusion. Then her serum sodium concentration rapidly recovered to normal with water restriction alone. During the course of intravenous pulse cyclophosphamide therapy, one must be aware of the possibility of significant water retention. PMID:24459501

  11. Water intoxication following low-dose intravenous cyclophosphamide.

    PubMed

    Koo, Tai Yeon; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Park, Joon Sung; Lee, Chang Hwa; Park, Moon Hyang; Kang, Chong Myung; Kim, Gheun-Ho

    2007-06-01

    Cyclophosphamide is frequently used for the treatment of severe lupus nephritis, but is very rarely associated with dilutional hyponatremia. Recently we experienced a case of water intoxication following low-dose intravenous cyclophosphamide. Five hours after one dose of intravenous pulse cyclophosphamide 750 mg, the patient developed nausea, vomiting, and general weakness. Serum sodium concentration revealed 114 mEq/L and her hyponatremia was initially treated with hypertonic saline infusion. Then her serum sodium concentration rapidly recovered to normal with water restriction alone. During the course of intravenous pulse cyclophosphamide therapy, one must be aware of the possibility of significant water retention.

  12. Low-dose Computed Tomography in a Pregnant Woman with a Ruptured Pseudoaneurysm of the Abdominal Aorta.

    PubMed

    Ramac, Jelena Popić; Vidjak, Vinko; Skegro, Dinko; Duić, Zeljko; Blasković, Darko; Erdelez, Lidija; Skopljanac-Macina, Andrija; Suknaić, Slaven; Slavica, Marko; Leder, Nikola Ivan

    2015-09-01

    Imaging the pregnant patient presents a unique challenge to radiologist due to the risk of radiation to the conceptus (embryo/fetus). A rare case of a successfully recognized and treated pseudoaneurysm (PA) of the abdominal aorta is to be presented. The pseudoaneurysm occurred in the third trimester and had a favorable outcome for the mother and the baby. Emergent abdominal ultrasound (US) is the first modality in diagnostic algorithm for the rupture of aortic aneurysm in a pregnant woman. It provides the most rapid diagnostic information, although intestinal gas and abdominal tenderness may limit its accuracy. To confirm the findings, magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) or CT angiography (CTA) can be used. In our case, the diagnosis was established using a color Doppler ultrasonography of the abdomen and was later confirmed by a low dose CT scan of the abdominal aorta. MRA in such cases have some disadvantages. At many health centers, the monitoring of patients with acute ruptures is more difficult in the MR suite than at the CT scanner. MRA angiographic images are also subject to degradation by multiple artifacts and the visualization of the distal vasculature is suboptimal and inferior to the one done by CTA. Due to fetal movements, a small quantity of fresh blood can be overlooked by MR. MRA is often not available on a 24-hours basis, and the time required for making a diagnosis can preclude the use of MRA in an unstable patient. For this reason, we used a low dose CTA protocol to confirm the diagnosis. Low dose scanning protocols in CT can obtain sufficient diagnostic information while reducing the risk of radiation. A particular focus is put on the outline of new concepts for dose management and optimization. We used new approaches based on tube current modulation. The birth was induced by an urgent Caesarean section followed by a resection of a pseudoaneurysm and a reconstruction of the aorta with an end-to-end vascular prosthesis.

  13. Oxytrex: an oxycodone and ultra-low-dose naltrexone formulation.

    PubMed

    Webster, Lynn R

    2007-08-01

    Oxytrex (Pain Therapeutics, Inc.) is an oral opioid that combines a therapeutic amount of oxycodone with an ultra-low dose of the antagonist naltrexone. Animal data indicate that this combination minimizes the development of physical dependence and analgesic tolerance while prolonging analgesia. Oxytrex is in late-stage clinical development by Pain Therapeutics for the treatment of moderate-to-severe chronic pain. To evaluate the safety and efficacy of the oxycodone/naltrexone combination, three clinical studies have been conducted, one in healthy volunteers and the other two in patients with chronic pain. The putative mechanism of ultra-low-dose naltrexone is to prevent an alteration in G-protein coupling by opioid receptors that is associated with opioid tolerance and dependence. Opioid agonists are initially inhibitory but become excitatory through constant opioid receptor activity. The agonist/antagonist combination of Oxytrex may reduce the conversion from an inhibitory to an excitatory receptor, thereby decreasing the development of tolerance and physical dependence.

  14. Low doses of neutrons induce changes in gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Woloschak, G.E.; Chang-Liu, C.M. ); Panozzo, J.; Libertin, C.R. )

    1993-01-01

    Studies were designed to identify genes induced following low-dose neutron but not following [gamma]-ray exposure in fibroblasts. Our past work had shown differences in the expression of [beta]-protein kinase C and c-fos genes, both being induced following [gamma]-ray but not neutron exposure. We have identified two genes that are induced following neutron, but not [gamma]-ray, exposure: Rp-8 (a gene induced by apoptosis) and the long terminal repeat (LTR) of the human immunodeficiency (HIV). Rp-8 mRNA induction was demonstrated in Syrian hamster embryo fibroblasts and was found to be induced in cells exposed to neutrons administered at low (0.5 cGy/min) and at high dose rate (12 cGy/min). The induction of transcription from the LTR of HIV was demonstrated in HeLa cells bearing a transfected construct of the chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) gene driven by the HIV-LTR promoter. Measures of CAT activity and CAT transcripts following irradiation demonstrated an unresponsiveness to [gamma] rays over a broad range of doses. Twofold induction of the HIV-LTR was detected following neutron exposure (48 cGy) administered at low (0.5 cGy/min) but not high (12 cGy/min) dose rates. Ultraviolet-mediated HIV-LTR induction was inhibited by low-dose-rate neutron exposure.

  15. Low doses of neutrons induce changes in gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Woloschak, G.E.; Chang-Liu, C.M.; Panozzo, J.; Libertin, C.R.

    1993-06-01

    Studies were designed to identify genes induced following low-dose neutron but not following {gamma}-ray exposure in fibroblasts. Our past work had shown differences in the expression of {beta}-protein kinase C and c-fos genes, both being induced following {gamma}-ray but not neutron exposure. We have identified two genes that are induced following neutron, but not {gamma}-ray, exposure: Rp-8 (a gene induced by apoptosis) and the long terminal repeat (LTR) of the human immunodeficiency (HIV). Rp-8 mRNA induction was demonstrated in Syrian hamster embryo fibroblasts and was found to be induced in cells exposed to neutrons administered at low (0.5 cGy/min) and at high dose rate (12 cGy/min). The induction of transcription from the LTR of HIV was demonstrated in HeLa cells bearing a transfected construct of the chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) gene driven by the HIV-LTR promoter. Measures of CAT activity and CAT transcripts following irradiation demonstrated an unresponsiveness to {gamma} rays over a broad range of doses. Twofold induction of the HIV-LTR was detected following neutron exposure (48 cGy) administered at low (0.5 cGy/min) but not high (12 cGy/min) dose rates. Ultraviolet-mediated HIV-LTR induction was inhibited by low-dose-rate neutron exposure.

  16. The Effects of ELDRS at Ultra-Low Dose Rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Dakai; Forney, James; Carts, Martin; Phan, Anthony; Pease, Ronald; Kruckmeyer, Kirby; Cox, Stephen; LaBel, Kenneth; Burns, Samuel; Albarian, Rafi; Holcombe, Bruce; Little, Bradley; Salzman, James; Chaumont, Geraldine; Duperray, Herve; Ouellet, Al

    2011-01-01

    We present results on the effects on ELDRS at dose rates of 10, 5, 1, and 0.5 mrad(Si)/s for a variety of radiation hardened and commercial devices. We observed low dose rate enhancement below 10 mrad(Si)/s in several different parts. The magnitudes of the dose rate effects vary. The TL750L, a commercial voltage regulator, showed dose rate dependence in the functional failures, with initial failures occurring after 10 krad(Si) for the parts irradiated at 0.5 mrad(Si)/s. The RH1021 showed an increase in low dose rate enhancement by 2x at 5 mrad(Si)/s relative to 8 mrad(Si)/s and high dose rate, and parametric failure after 100 krad(Si). Additionally the ELDRS-free devices, such as the LM158 and LM117, showed evidence of dose rate sensitivity in parametric degradations. Several other parts also displayed dose rate enhancement, with relatively lower degradations up to approx.15 to 20 krad(Si). The magnitudes of the dose rate enhancement will likely increase in significance at higher total dose levels.

  17. Low-dose endotoxemia and human neuropsychological functions.

    PubMed

    Krabbe, Karen Suárez; Reichenberg, Abraham; Yirmiya, Raz; Smed, Annelise; Pedersen, Bente Klarlund; Bruunsgaard, Helle

    2005-09-01

    Epidemiological data demonstrate an association between systemic low-grade inflammation defined as 2- to 3-fold increases in circulating inflammatory mediators and age-related decline in cognitive function. However, it is not known whether small elevations of circulating cytokine levels cause direct effects on human neuropsychological functions. We investigated changes in emotional, cognitive, and inflammatory parameters in an experimental in vivo model of low-grade inflammation. In a double-blind crossover study, 12 healthy young males completed neuropsychological tests before as well as 1.5, 6, and 24 h after an intravenous injection of Escherichia coli endotoxin (0.2 ng/kg) or saline in two experimental sessions. Endotoxin administration had no effect on body temperature, cortisol levels, blood pressure or heart rate, but circulating levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and interleukin (IL)-6 increased 2- and 7-fold, respectively, reaching peak values at 3 h, whereas soluble TNF-receptors and IL-1 receptor antagonist peaked at 4.5 h. The neutrophil count increased and the lymphocyte count declined. In this model, low-dose endotoxemia did not affect cognitive performance significantly but declarative memory performance was inversely correlated with cytokine increases. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate a negative association between circulating IL-6 and memory functions during very low-dose endotoxemia independently of physical stress symptoms, and the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis.

  18. [Phantom Study on Dose Reduction Using Iterative Reconstruction in Low-dose Computed Tomography for Lung Cancer Screening].

    PubMed

    Minehiro, Kaori; Takata, Tadanori; Hayashi, Hiroyuki; Sakuda, Keita; Nunome, Haruka; Kawashima, Hiroko; Sanada, Shigeru

    2015-12-01

    We investigated dose reduction ability of an iterative reconstruction technology for low-dose computed tomography (CT) for lung cancer screening. The Sinogram Affirmed Iterative Reconstruction (SAFIRE) provided in a multi slice CT system, Somatom Definition Flash (Siemens Healthcare) was used. An anthropomorphic chest phantom (N-1, Kyoto Kagaku) was scanned at volume CT dose index (CTDIvol) of 0.50-11.86 mGy with 120 kV. For noise (standard deviation) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) measurements, CTP486 and CTP515 modules in the Catphan (The Phantom Laboratory) were scanned. Radiological technologists were participated in the perceptual comparison. SAFIRE reduced the SD values by approximately 50% compared with filter back projection (FBP). The estimated dose reduction rates by SAFIRE determined from the perceptual comparison was approximately 23%, while 75% dose reduction rate was expected from the SD value reduction of 50%.

  19. Low-dose cardiovascular computed tomography: where are the limits?

    PubMed

    Schoenhagen, Paul; Thompson, Carla M; Halliburton, Sandra S

    2012-02-01

    Since its introduction in the 1970s, diagnostic computed tomography (CT) imaging has grown rapidly and developed into a standard diagnostic test for a wide variety of cardiovascular conditions. Although this has undoubtedly led to improved medical care, it has also been associated with a significant increase in population-based radiation exposure and the potential downstream increase in cancer is a justified concern. For cardiovascular CT, new CT scanner technologies were initially directed toward maximizing image quality rather than minimizing radiation exposure. Only more recently have technologic advances yielded dose-saving protocols for cardiovascular applications, with impressive reduction of radiation exposure. The achievable limits of population-based exposure are dependent on responsible, evidence-based use of CT for cardiovascular imaging as well as exploitation of available and emerging dose-saving strategies.

  20. Low-dose aripiprazole for refractory burning mouth syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Umezaki, Yojiro; Takenoshita, Miho; Toyofuku, Akira

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of refractory burning mouth syndrome (BMS) ameliorated with low dose of aripiprazole. The patient was a 66-year-old female who had suffered from chronic burning pain in her tongue for 13 months. No abnormality associated with the burning sensation was detected in the laboratory tests and the oral findings. Considering the clinical feature and the history together, we diagnosed the burning sensation as BMS. The BMS pain was decreased by aripiprazole (powder) 1.0 mg/d, though no other antidepressants had satisfying pain relief. It could be supposed that the efficacy of aripiprazole is caused by dopamine stabilization in this case, and BMS might have a subtype that is reactive to aripiprazole. Further studies are needed to confirm the efficacy of aripiprazole for BMS. PMID:27279742

  1. Early outcomes following low dose naltrexone enhancement of opioid detoxification.

    PubMed

    Mannelli, Paolo; Patkar, Ashwin A; Peindl, Kathleen; Gottheil, Edward; Wu, Li-Tzy; Gorelick, David A

    2009-01-01

    Although withdrawal severity and treatment completion are the initial focus of opioid detoxification, post-detoxification outcome better defines effective interventions. Very low dose naltrexone (VLNTX) in addition to methadone taper was recently associated with attenuated withdrawal intensity during detoxification. We describe the results of a seven-day follow-up evaluation of 96 subjects who completed inpatient detoxification consisting of the addition of VLNTX (0.125 or 0.250 mg per day) or placebo to methadone taper in a double blind, randomized investigation. Individuals receiving VLNTX during detoxification reported reduced withdrawal and drug use during the first 24 hours after discharge. VLNTX addition was also associated with higher rates of negative drug tests for opioids and cannabis and increased engagement in outpatient treatment after one week. Further studies are needed to test the utility of this approach in easing the transition from detoxification to various follow-up treatment modalities designed to address opioid dependence.

  2. Radiobiological evaluation of low dose-rate prostate brachytherapy implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knaup, Courtney James

    Low dose-rate brachytherapy is a radiation therapy treatment for men with prostate cancer. While this treatment is common, the use of isotopes with varying dosimetric characteristics means that the prescription level and normal organ tolerances vary. Additionally, factors such as prostate edema, seed loss and seed migration may alter the dose distribution within the prostate. The goal of this work is to develop a radiobiological response tool based on spatial dose information which may be used to aid in treatment planning, post-implant evaluation and determination of the effects of prostate edema and seed migration. Aim 1: Evaluation of post-implant prostate edema and its dosimetric and biological effects. Aim 2: Incorporation of biological response to simplify post-implant evaluation. Aim 3: Incorporation of biological response to simplify treatment plan comparison. Aim 4: Radiobiologically based comparison of single and dual-isotope implants. Aim 5: Determine the dosimetric and radiobiological effects of seed disappearance and migration.

  3. Surrogates of Protection in Repeated Low-Dose Challenge Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Long, Dustin M.; Hudgens, Michael G.; Wu, Chih-Da

    2015-01-01

    A critical step toward developing a successful vaccine to control the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) pandemic entails evaluation of vaccine candidates in non-human primates (NHPs). Historically, these studies have usually entailed challenges (i.e., exposures) with very high doses of a simian version of HIV, resulting in infection of all NHPs in the experiment after a single challenge. More recently, researchers have begun to conduct repeated low-dose challenge (RLC) studies in NHPs that are believed to more closely mimic typical exposure in natural human transmission settings. One objective of RLC studies is to assess whether measured immune responses to vaccination can serve as surrogate endpoints for the primary endpoint of interest, namely infection. In this paper, different designs of RLC studies for assessing a binary surrogate of protection are considered. PMID:25628249

  4. Optical fiber sensor for low dose gamma irradiation monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Andrés, Ana I.; Esteban, Ã.`scar; Embid, Miguel

    2016-05-01

    An optical fiber gamma ray detector is presented in this work. It is based on a Terbium doped Gadolinium Oxysulfide (Gd2O2S:Tb) scintillating powder which cover a chemically etched polymer fiber tip. This etching improves the fluorescence gathering by the optical fiber. The final diameter has been selected to fulfill the trade-off between light gathering and mechanical strength. Powder has been encapsulated inside a microtube where the fiber tip is immersed. The sensor has been irradiated with different air Kerma doses up to 2 Gy/h with a 137Cs source, and the spectral distribution of the fluorescence intensity has been recorded in a commercial grade CCD spectrometer. The obtained signal-to-noise ratio is good enough even for low doses, which has allowed to reduce the integration time in the spectrometer. The presented results show the feasibility for using low cost equipment to detect/measure ionizing radiation as gamma rays are.

  5. Quantifying exploratory low dose compounds in humans with AMS.

    PubMed

    Dueker, Stephen R; Vuong, Le T; Lohstroh, Peter N; Giacomo, Jason A; Vogel, John S

    2011-06-19

    Accelerator Mass Spectrometry is an established technology whose essentiality extends beyond simply a better detector for radiolabeled molecules. Attomole sensitivity reduces radioisotope exposures in clinical subjects to the point that no population need be excluded from clinical study. Insights in human physiochemistry are enabled by the quantitative recovery of simplified AMS processes that provide biological concentrations of all labeled metabolites and total compound related material at non-saturating levels. In this paper, we review some of the exploratory applications of AMS (14)C in toxicological, nutritional, and pharmacological research. This body of research addresses the human physiochemistry of important compounds in their own right, but also serves as examples of the analytical methods and clinical practices that are available for studying low dose physiochemistry of candidate therapeutic compounds, helping to broaden the knowledge base of AMS application in pharmaceutical research.

  6. Low dose ionizing radiation detection using conjugated polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, E.A.B.; Borin, J.F.; Nicolucci, P.; Graeff, C.F.O.; Netto, T. Ghilardi; Bianchi, R.F.

    2005-03-28

    In this work, the effect of gamma radiation on the optical properties of poly[2-methoxy-5-(2{sup '}-ethylhexyloxy)-p-phenylenevinylene] (MEH-PPV) is studied. The samples were irradiated at room temperature with different doses from 0 Gy to 152 Gy using a {sup 60}Co gamma ray source. For thin films, significant changes in the UV-visible spectra were only observed at high doses (>1 kGy). In solution, shifts in absorption peaks are observed at low doses (<10 Gy), linearly dependent on dose. The shifts are explained by conjugation reduction, and possible causes are discussed. Our results indicate that MEH-PPV solution can be used as a dosimeter adequate for medical applications.

  7. Low-dose aripiprazole for refractory burning mouth syndrome.

    PubMed

    Umezaki, Yojiro; Takenoshita, Miho; Toyofuku, Akira

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of refractory burning mouth syndrome (BMS) ameliorated with low dose of aripiprazole. The patient was a 66-year-old female who had suffered from chronic burning pain in her tongue for 13 months. No abnormality associated with the burning sensation was detected in the laboratory tests and the oral findings. Considering the clinical feature and the history together, we diagnosed the burning sensation as BMS. The BMS pain was decreased by aripiprazole (powder) 1.0 mg/d, though no other antidepressants had satisfying pain relief. It could be supposed that the efficacy of aripiprazole is caused by dopamine stabilization in this case, and BMS might have a subtype that is reactive to aripiprazole. Further studies are needed to confirm the efficacy of aripiprazole for BMS.

  8. Transcriptome profiling of mice testes following low dose irradiation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Radiotherapy is used routinely to treat testicular cancer. Testicular cells vary in radio-sensitivity and the aim of this study was to investigate cellular and molecular changes caused by low dose irradiation of mice testis and to identify transcripts from different cell types in the adult testis. Methods Transcriptome profiling was performed on total RNA from testes sampled at various time points (n = 17) after 1 Gy of irradiation. Transcripts displaying large overall expression changes during the time series, but small expression changes between neighbouring time points were selected for further analysis. These transcripts were separated into clusters and their cellular origin was determined. Immunohistochemistry and in silico quantification was further used to study cellular changes post-irradiation (pi). Results We identified a subset of transcripts (n = 988) where changes in expression pi can be explained by changes in cellularity. We separated the transcripts into five unique clusters that we associated with spermatogonia, spermatocytes, early spermatids, late spermatids and somatic cells, respectively. Transcripts in the somatic cell cluster showed large changes in expression pi, mainly caused by changes in cellularity. Further investigations revealed that the low dose irradiation seemed to cause Leydig cell hyperplasia, which contributed to the detected expression changes in the somatic cell cluster. Conclusions The five clusters represent gene expression in distinct cell types of the adult testis. We observed large expression changes in the somatic cell profile, which mainly could be attributed to changes in cellularity, but hyperplasia of Leydig cells may also play a role. We speculate that the possible hyperplasia may be caused by lower testosterone production and inadequate inhibin signalling due to missing germ cells. PMID:23714422

  9. Cardiovascular risks associated with low dose ionizing particle radiation.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xinhua; Sasi, Sharath P; Gee, Hannah; Lee, JuYong; Yang, Yongyao; Mehrzad, Raman; Onufrak, Jillian; Song, Jin; Enderling, Heiko; Agarwal, Akhil; Rahimi, Layla; Morgan, James; Wilson, Paul F; Carrozza, Joseph; Walsh, Kenneth; Kishore, Raj; Goukassian, David A

    2014-01-01

    Previous epidemiologic data demonstrate that cardiovascular (CV) morbidity and mortality may occur decades after ionizing radiation exposure. With increased use of proton and carbon ion radiotherapy and concerns about space radiation exposures to astronauts on future long-duration exploration-type missions, the long-term effects and risks of low-dose charged particle irradiation on the CV system must be better appreciated. Here we report on the long-term effects of whole-body proton ((1)H; 0.5 Gy, 1 GeV) and iron ion ((56)Fe; 0.15 Gy, 1GeV/nucleon) irradiation with and without an acute myocardial ischemia (AMI) event in mice. We show that cardiac function of proton-irradiated mice initially improves at 1 month but declines by 10 months post-irradiation. In AMI-induced mice, prior proton irradiation improved cardiac function restoration and enhanced cardiac remodeling. This was associated with increased pro-survival gene expression in cardiac tissues. In contrast, cardiac function was significantly declined in (56)Fe ion-irradiated mice at 1 and 3 months but recovered at 10 months. In addition, (56)Fe ion-irradiation led to poorer cardiac function and more adverse remodeling in AMI-induced mice, and was associated with decreased angiogenesis and pro-survival factors in cardiac tissues at any time point examined up to 10 months. This is the first study reporting CV effects following low dose proton and iron ion irradiation during normal aging and post-AMI. Understanding the biological effects of charged particle radiation qualities on the CV system is necessary both for the mitigation of space exploration CV risks and for understanding of long-term CV effects following charged particle radiotherapy.

  10. Low dose mTHPC photodynamic therapy for cholangiocarcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepp, Herbert; Kniebühler, Gesa; Pongratz, Thomas; Betz, Christian S.; Göke, Burkhard; Sroka, Ronald; Schirra, Jörg

    2013-06-01

    Objective: Demonstration of whether a low dose of mTHPC (temoporfin , Foscan) is sufficient to induce an efficient clinical response in palliative PDT of non-resectable cholangiocarcinoma (CC), while showing a low side effect profile as compared to the standard Photofrin PDT. Materials and Methods: 13 patients (14 treatment sessions) with non-resectable CC were treated with stenting and PDT (3 mg Foscan per treatment, 0.032-0.063 mg/kg body weight, 652 nm, 50 J/cm). Fluorescence measurements were performed with a single bare fiber for 5/13 patients prior to PDT at the tumor site to determine the fluorescence contrast. For another 7/13 patients, long-term fluorescence-kinetics were measured on the oral mucosa to determine the time of maximal relative fluorescence intensity. Results: Foscan fluorescence could clearly be identified spectroscopically as early as 20 hours after administration. It was not significantly different between lesion and normal tissue within the bile duct. Fluorescence kinetics assessed at the oral mucosa were highest at 72-96 hours after administration. The DLI was therefore extended from 20 hours to approx. 70 hours for the last 5 patients treated. The treatment effect was promising with a median survival of 11 months for the higher grade tumors (Bismuth types III and IV). Local side effects occurred in one patient (pancreatitis), systemic side effects were much reduced compared to prior experience with Photofrin. Conclusion: Combined stenting and photodynamic therapy (PDT) performed with a low dose of Foscan results in comparable survival times relative to standard Photofrin PDT, while lowering the risk of side effects significantly.

  11. Low-Dose Radiation Cataract and Genetic Determinants of Radiosensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Kleiman, Norman Jay

    2013-11-30

    The lens of the eye is one of the most radiosensitive tissues in the body. Ocular ionizing radiation exposure results in characteristic, dose related, progressive lens changes leading to cataract formation. While initial, early stages of lens opacification may not cause visual disability, the severity of such changes progressively increases with dose until vision is impaired and cataract extraction surgery may be required. Because of the transparency of the eye, radiation induced lens changes can easily be followed non-invasively over time. Thus, the lens provides a unique model system in which to study the effects of low dose ionizing radiation exposure in a complex, highly organized tissue. Despite this observation, considerable uncertainties remain surrounding the relationship between dose and risk of developing radiation cataract. For example, a growing number of human epidemiological findings suggest significant risk among various groups of occupationally and accidentally exposed individuals and confidence intervals that include zero dose. Nevertheless, questions remain concerning the relationship between lens opacities, visual disability, clinical cataract, threshold dose and/or the role of genetics in determining radiosensitivity. Experimentally, the response of the rodent eye to radiation is quite similar to that in humans and thus animal studies are well suited to examine the relationship between radiation exposure, genetic determinants of radiosensitivity and cataractogenesis. The current work has expanded our knowledge of the low-dose effects of X-irradiation or high-LET heavy ion exposure on timing and progression of radiation cataract and has provided new information on the genetic, molecular, biochemical and cell biological features which contribute to this pathology. Furthermore, findings have indicated that single and/or multiple haploinsufficiency for various genes involved in DNA repair and cell cycle checkpoint control, such as Atm, Brca1 or Rad9

  12. Cardiovascular Risks Associated with Low Dose Ionizing Particle Radiation

    DOE PAGES

    Yan, Xinhua; Sasi, Sharath P.; Gee, Hannah; ...

    2014-10-22

    Previous epidemiologic data demonstrate that cardiovascular (CV) morbidity and mortality may occur decades after ionizing radiation exposure. With increased use of proton and carbon ion radiotherapy and concerns about space radiation exposures to astronauts on future long-duration exploration-type missions, the long-term effects and risks of low-dose charged particle irradiation on the CV system must be better appreciated. Here we report on the long-term effects of whole-body proton (1H; 0.5 Gy, 1 GeV) and iron ion (56Fe; 0.15 Gy, 1GeV/nucleon) irradiation with and without an acute myocardial ischemia (AMI) event in mice. We show that cardiac function of proton-irradiated mice initiallymore » improves at 1 month but declines by 10 months post-irradiation. In AMI-induced mice, prior proton irradiation improved cardiac function restoration and enhanced cardiac remodeling. This was associated with increased pro-survival gene expression in cardiac tissues. In contrast, cardiac function was significantly declined in 56Fe ion-irradiated mice at 1 and 3 months but recovered at 10 months. In addition, 56Fe ion-irradiation led to poorer cardiac function and more adverse remodeling in AMI-induced mice, and was associated with decreased angiogenesis and pro-survival factors in cardiac tissues at any time point examined up to 10 months. This is the first study reporting CV effects following low dose proton and iron ion irradiation during normal aging and post-AMI. Finally, understanding the biological effects of charged particle radiation qualities on the CV system is necessary both for the mitigation of space exploration CV risks and for understanding of long-term CV effects following charged particle radiotherapy.« less

  13. Cardiovascular Risks Associated with Low Dose Ionizing Particle Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Xinhua; Sasi, Sharath P.; Gee, Hannah; Lee, JuYong; Yang, Yongyao; Mehrzad, Raman; Onufrak, Jillian; Song, Jin; Enderling, Heiko; Agarwal, Akhil; Rahimi, Layla; Morgan, James; Wilson, Paul F.; Carrozza, Joseph; Walsh, Kenneth; Kishore, Raj; Goukassian, David A.

    2014-10-22

    Previous epidemiologic data demonstrate that cardiovascular (CV) morbidity and mortality may occur decades after ionizing radiation exposure. With increased use of proton and carbon ion radiotherapy and concerns about space radiation exposures to astronauts on future long-duration exploration-type missions, the long-term effects and risks of low-dose charged particle irradiation on the CV system must be better appreciated. Here we report on the long-term effects of whole-body proton (1H; 0.5 Gy, 1 GeV) and iron ion (56Fe; 0.15 Gy, 1GeV/nucleon) irradiation with and without an acute myocardial ischemia (AMI) event in mice. We show that cardiac function of proton-irradiated mice initially improves at 1 month but declines by 10 months post-irradiation. In AMI-induced mice, prior proton irradiation improved cardiac function restoration and enhanced cardiac remodeling. This was associated with increased pro-survival gene expression in cardiac tissues. In contrast, cardiac function was significantly declined in 56Fe ion-irradiated mice at 1 and 3 months but recovered at 10 months. In addition, 56Fe ion-irradiation led to poorer cardiac function and more adverse remodeling in AMI-induced mice, and was associated with decreased angiogenesis and pro-survival factors in cardiac tissues at any time point examined up to 10 months. This is the first study reporting CV effects following low dose proton and iron ion irradiation during normal aging and post-AMI. Finally, understanding the biological effects of charged particle radiation qualities on the CV system is necessary both for the mitigation of space exploration CV risks and for understanding of long-term CV effects following charged particle radiotherapy.

  14. Cardiovascular Risks Associated with Low Dose Ionizing Particle Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Xinhua; Sasi, Sharath P.; Gee, Hannah; Lee, JuYong; Yang, Yongyao; Mehrzad, Raman; Onufrak, Jillian; Song, Jin; Enderling, Heiko; Agarwal, Akhil; Rahimi, Layla; Morgan, James; Wilson, Paul F.; Carrozza, Joseph; Walsh, Kenneth; Kishore, Raj; Goukassian, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Previous epidemiologic data demonstrate that cardiovascular (CV) morbidity and mortality may occur decades after ionizing radiation exposure. With increased use of proton and carbon ion radiotherapy and concerns about space radiation exposures to astronauts on future long-duration exploration-type missions, the long-term effects and risks of low-dose charged particle irradiation on the CV system must be better appreciated. Here we report on the long-term effects of whole-body proton (1H; 0.5 Gy, 1 GeV) and iron ion (56Fe; 0.15 Gy, 1GeV/nucleon) irradiation with and without an acute myocardial ischemia (AMI) event in mice. We show that cardiac function of proton-irradiated mice initially improves at 1 month but declines by 10 months post-irradiation. In AMI-induced mice, prior proton irradiation improved cardiac function restoration and enhanced cardiac remodeling. This was associated with increased pro-survival gene expression in cardiac tissues. In contrast, cardiac function was significantly declined in 56Fe ion-irradiated mice at 1 and 3 months but recovered at 10 months. In addition, 56Fe ion-irradiation led to poorer cardiac function and more adverse remodeling in AMI-induced mice, and was associated with decreased angiogenesis and pro-survival factors in cardiac tissues at any time point examined up to 10 months. This is the first study reporting CV effects following low dose proton and iron ion irradiation during normal aging and post-AMI. Understanding the biological effects of charged particle radiation qualities on the CV system is necessary both for the mitigation of space exploration CV risks and for understanding of long-term CV effects following charged particle radiotherapy. PMID:25337914

  15. Evaluation of a low-dose progestagen as a contraceptive.

    PubMed

    Iizuka, R; Hayashi, M; Kamouchi, Y; Yamanaka, K

    1971-01-01

    In order to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of a low-dose progestagen oral contraceptive, 46 women were administered 0.25 mg daily of a synthetic gestagen, R-2453 (17alpha-methyl delta 9-19 norprogesterone) for 1-12 months for a total of 189 cycles. The pill was found to be safe and completely effective with no pregnancies occurring in the study group. The length of the bleeding cycle was found to be prolonged under this treatment, to an average of 40 days . Bleeding duration and amount were generally the same as those before treatment, except in 3 cases where irregular bleeding prompted discontinuance of the pill use. Basal body temperature patterns were measured and found to be atypical biphasic in 17.3% of the cases, high temperature monophasic in 47.2%, and irregular in 34.6%. Routine blood, kidney and liver function tests were normal. Pregnandiol excretion before withdrawal bleeding was low in all but 1 case. Cervical mucus was also low and no crystal formation was observed. In the nidation menstrual stage the endometrial glands were few in number and adenomeres were small in size. In glandular cells, supranuclear vacuoles were found and interstices were coarse and edematous. Histological examinations in the implantation phase showed some alterations but their relationship to the contraceptive mechanism of this pill is not clear. Low-dose progestagens appear to be highly effective contraceptive agents that do not suppress ovulatory activity but their prescription must take careful note of dosage and formulas.

  16. A comparison of six software packages for evaluation of solid lung nodules using semi-automated volumetry: what is the minimum increase in size to detect growth in repeated CT examinations.

    PubMed

    de Hoop, Bartjan; Gietema, Hester; van Ginneken, Bram; Zanen, Pieter; Groenewegen, Gerard; Prokop, Mathias

    2009-04-01

    We compared interexamination variability of CT lung nodule volumetry with six currently available semi-automated software packages to determine the minimum change needed to detect the growth of solid lung nodules. We had ethics committee approval. To simulate a follow-up examination with zero growth, we performed two low-dose unenhanced CT scans in 20 patients referred for pulmonary metastases. Between examinations, patients got off and on the table. Volumes of all pulmonary nodules were determined on both examinations using six nodule evaluation software packages. Variability (upper limit of the 95% confidence interval of the Bland-Altman plot) was calculated for nodules for which segmentation was visually rated as adequate. We evaluated 214 nodules (mean diameter 10.9 mm, range 3.3 mm-30.0 mm). Software packages provided adequate segmentation in 71% to 86% of nodules (p < 0.001). In case of adequate segmentation, variability in volumetry between scans ranged from 16.4% to 22.3% for the various software packages. Variability with five to six software packages was significantly less for nodules >or=8 mm in diameter (range 12.9%-17.1%) than for nodules <8 mm (range 18.5%-25.6%). Segmented volumes of each package were compared to each of the other packages. Systematic volume differences were detected in 11/15 comparisons. This hampers comparison of nodule volumes between software packages.

  17. Lung cancer screening beyond low-dose computed tomography: the role of novel biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Naveed; Kumar, Rohit; Kavuru, Mani S

    2014-10-01

    Lung cancer is the most common and lethal malignancy in the world. The landmark National lung screening trial (NLST) showed a 20% relative reduction in mortality in high-risk individuals with screening low-dose computed tomography. However, the poor specificity and low prevalence of lung cancer in the NLST provide major limitations to its widespread use. Furthermore, a lung nodule on CT scan requires a nuanced and individualized approach towards management. In this regard, advances in high through-put technology (molecular diagnostics, multi-gene chips, proteomics, and bronchoscopic techniques) have led to discovery of lung cancer biomarkers that have shown potential to complement the current screening standards. Early detection of lung cancer can be achieved by analysis of biomarkers from tissue samples within the respiratory tract such as sputum, saliva, nasal/bronchial airway epithelial cells and exhaled breath condensate or through peripheral biofluids such as blood, serum and urine. Autofluorescence bronchoscopy has been employed in research setting to identify pre-invasive lesions not identified on CT scan. Although these modalities are not yet commercially available in clinic setting, they will be available in the near future and clinicians who care for patients with lung cancer should be aware. In this review, we present up-to-date state of biomarker development, discuss their clinical relevance and predict their future role in lung cancer management.

  18. The Contribution of Tissue Level Organization to Genomic Stability Following Low Dose/Low Dose Rate Gamma and Proton Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Cheryl G. Burrell, Ph.D.

    2012-05-14

    The formation of functional tissue units is necessary in maintaining homeostasis within living systems, with individual cells contributing to these functional units through their three-dimensional organization with integrin and adhesion proteins to form a complex extra-cellular matrix (ECM). This is of particular importance in those tissues susceptible to radiation-induced tumor formation, such as epithelial glands. The assembly of epithelial cells of the thyroid is critical to their normal receipt of, and response to, incoming signals. Traditional tissue culture and live animals present significant challenges to radiation exposure and continuous sampling, however, the production of bioreactor-engineered tissues aims to bridge this gap by improve capabilities in continuous sampling from the same functional tissue, thereby increasing the ability to extrapolate changes induced by radiation to animals and humans in vivo. Our study proposes that the level of tissue organization will affect the induction and persistence of low dose radiation-induced genomic instability. Rat thyroid cells, grown in vitro as 3D tissue analogs in bioreactors and as 2D flask grown cultures were exposed to acute low dose (1, 5, 10 and 200 cGy) gamma rays. To assess immediate (6 hours) and delayed (up to 30 days) responses post-irradiation, various biological endpoints were studied including cytogenetic analyses, apoptosis analysis and cell viability/cytotoxicity analyses. Data assessing caspase 3/7 activity levels show that, this activity varies with time post radiation and that, overall, 3D cultures display more genomic instability (as shown by the lower levels of apoptosis over time) when compared to the 2D cultures. Variation in cell viability levels were only observed at the intermediate and late time points post radiation. Extensive analysis of chromosomal aberrations will give further insight on the whether the level of tissue organization influences genomic instability patterns after

  19. Effect of low dose levodopa on motor outcome of different types of stroke.

    PubMed

    Masihuzzaman, A M; Uddin, M J; Majumder, S; Barman, K K; Ullah, M A

    2011-10-01

    This case control study interventional study was carried out in Neurology out patient department of Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University (BSMMU) from January 2004 to June 2005. The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of low dose levodopa on motor outcome of patients with stroke both ischaemic and haemorrhagic. A total of 97 patients of stroke confirmed by computerized tomography (CT) scan of brain were included in the study. Of them 51 were treated with levodopa 125mg (L group) and physiotherapy while 46 patients (NL group) were treated only with physiotherapy without levodopa. The patients were followed up every 2 weeks interval for 8 weeks. Motor outcome was measured in Rivermead Mobility Index (RMI). Comparison was made between L & NL group irrespective of stroke types at the end of 4th visit. Also the effect of levodopa was assessed separately in ischaemic & haemorrhaegic stroke. The results of the study showed that the age of stroke patients was 54.70±15.07 years in L group & 58.10±14.69 years in NL group. Ischaemic stroke patients were 72% and haemorrhagic stroke patients were 28%. The mean increase RMI score in L group irrespective of stroke subtypes was 6.9 while in NL group was 3.0. The increase in motor outcome was significantly higher in levodopa group than non-levodopa group (p<0.001). Similarly motor outcome measured in RMI score were significantly better individually in ischaemic & haemorrhagic stroke patients of L group than NL (p<0.001). So, the study result concludes that low dose levodopa improves motor outcome in patient with stroke both ischaemic and haemorrhagic.

  20. Evaluation of low-dose limits in 3D-2D rigid registration for surgical guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uneri, A.; Wang, A. S.; Otake, Y.; Kleinszig, G.; Vogt, S.; Khanna, A. J.; Gallia, G. L.; Gokaslan, Z. L.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2014-09-01

    An algorithm for intensity-based 3D-2D registration of CT and C-arm fluoroscopy is evaluated for use in surgical guidance, specifically considering the low-dose limits of the fluoroscopic x-ray projections. The registration method is based on a framework using the covariance matrix adaptation evolution strategy (CMA-ES) to identify the 3D patient pose that maximizes the gradient information similarity metric. Registration performance was evaluated in an anthropomorphic head phantom emulating intracranial neurosurgery, using target registration error (TRE) to characterize accuracy and robustness in terms of 95% confidence upper bound in comparison to that of an infrared surgical tracking system. Three clinical scenarios were considered: (1) single-view image + guidance, wherein a single x-ray projection is used for visualization and 3D-2D guidance; (2) dual-view image + guidance, wherein one projection is acquired for visualization, combined with a second (lower-dose) projection acquired at a different C-arm angle for 3D-2D guidance; and (3) dual-view guidance, wherein both projections are acquired at low dose for the purpose of 3D-2D guidance alone (not visualization). In each case, registration accuracy was evaluated as a function of the entrance surface dose associated with the projection view(s). Results indicate that images acquired at a dose as low as 4 μGy (approximately one-tenth the dose of a typical fluoroscopic frame) were sufficient to provide TRE comparable or superior to that of conventional surgical tracking, allowing 3D-2D guidance at a level of dose that is at most 10% greater than conventional fluoroscopy (scenario #2) and potentially reducing the dose to approximately 20% of the level in a conventional fluoroscopically guided procedure (scenario #3).

  1. Evaluation of low-dose limits in 3D-2D rigid registration for surgical guidance.

    PubMed

    Uneri, A; Wang, A S; Otake, Y; Kleinszig, G; Vogt, S; Khanna, A J; Gallia, G L; Gokaslan, Z L; Siewerdsen, J H

    2014-09-21

    An algorithm for intensity-based 3D-2D registration of CT and C-arm fluoroscopy is evaluated for use in surgical guidance, specifically considering the low-dose limits of the fluoroscopic x-ray projections. The registration method is based on a framework using the covariance matrix adaptation evolution strategy (CMA-ES) to identify the 3D patient pose that maximizes the gradient information similarity metric. Registration performance was evaluated in an anthropomorphic head phantom emulating intracranial neurosurgery, using target registration error (TRE) to characterize accuracy and robustness in terms of 95% confidence upper bound in comparison to that of an infrared surgical tracking system. Three clinical scenarios were considered: (1) single-view image+guidance, wherein a single x-ray projection is used for visualization and 3D-2D guidance; (2) dual-view image+guidance, wherein one projection is acquired for visualization, combined with a second (lower-dose) projection acquired at a different C-arm angle for 3D-2D guidance; and (3) dual-view guidance, wherein both projections are acquired at low dose for the purpose of 3D-2D guidance alone (not visualization). In each case, registration accuracy was evaluated as a function of the entrance surface dose associated with the projection view(s). Results indicate that images acquired at a dose as low as 4 μGy (approximately one-tenth the dose of a typical fluoroscopic frame) were sufficient to provide TRE comparable or superior to that of conventional surgical tracking, allowing 3D-2D guidance at a level of dose that is at most 10% greater than conventional fluoroscopy (scenario #2) and potentially reducing the dose to approximately 20% of the level in a conventional fluoroscopically guided procedure (scenario #3).

  2. Ergogenic effects of low doses of caffeine on cycling performance.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Nathan T; Trilk, Jennifer L; Singhal, Arpit; O'Connor, Patrick J; Cureton, Kirk J

    2008-06-01

    The purpose of this experiment was to learn whether low doses of caffeine have ergogenic, perceptual, and metabolic effects during cycling. To determine the effects of 1, 2, and 3 mg/kg caffeine on cycling performance, differentiated ratings of perceived exertion (D-RPE), quadriceps pain intensity, and metabolic responses to cycling exercise, 13 cyclists exercised on a stationary ergometer for 15 min at 80% VO, then, after 4 min of active recovery, completed a 15-min VO2peak performance ride 60 min after ingesting caffeine or placebo. Work done (kJ/kg) during the performance ride was used as a measure of performance. D-RPE, pain ratings, and expired-gas data were obtained every 3 min, and blood lactate concentrations were obtained at 15 and 30 min. Compared with placebo, caffeine doses of 2 and 3 mg/kg increased performance by 4% (95% CI: 1.0-6.8%, p = .02) and 3% (95% CI: -0.4% to 6.8%, p = .077), respectively. These effects were ergogenic, on average, but varied considerably in magnitude among individual cyclists. There were no effects of caffeine on D-RPE or pain throughout the cycling task. Selected metabolic variables were affected by caffeine, consistent with its known actions. The authors conclude that caffeine preparations of 2 and 3 mg/kg enhanced performance, but future work should aim to explain the considerable interindividual variability of the drug's ergogenic properties.

  3. Functional modulation on macrophage by low dose naltrexone (LDN).

    PubMed

    Yi, Zhe; Guo, Shengnan; Hu, Xu; Wang, Xiaonan; Zhang, Xiaoqing; Griffin, Noreen; Shan, Fengping

    2016-10-01

    Previously it was confirmed that naltrexone, a non-peptide δ-opioid receptor selective antagonist is mainly used for alcoholic dependence and opioid addiction treatment. However, there is increasing data on immune regulation of low dose naltrexone (LDN). The aim of this work was to explore the effect of LDN on the phenotype and function of macrophage. The changes of macrophage after treatment with LDN were examined using flow cytometry (FCM); FITC-dextran phagocytosis and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). We have found that LDN enhances function of macrophage as confirmed by up-regulating MHC II molecule and CD64 on macrophage while down-regulating CD206 expression. Furthermore the productions of TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β, increased significantly. Macrophages in LDN treated group performed the enhanced phagocytosis. Therefore it is concluded that LDN could promote function of macrophage and this work has provided concrete data of impact on immune system by LDN. Especially the data would support interaction between CD4+T cell and macrophage in AIDS treatment with LDN in Africa (LDN has already been approved in Nigeria for the use in AIDS treatment).

  4. Low dose radiation damage effects in silicon strip detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiącek, P.; Dąbrowski, W.

    2016-11-01

    The radiation damage effects in silicon segmented detectors caused by X-rays have become recently an important research topic driven mainly by development of new detectors for applications at the European X-ray Free Electron Laser (E-XFEL). However, radiation damage in silicon strip is observed not only after extreme doses up to 1 GGy expected at E-XFEL, but also at doses in the range of tens of Gy, to which the detectors in laboratory instruments like X-ray diffractometers or X-ray spectrometers can be exposed. In this paper we report on investigation of radiation damage effects in a custom developed silicon strip detector used in laboratory diffractometers equipped with X-ray tubes. Our results show that significant degradation of detector performance occurs at low doses, well below 200 Gy, which can be reached during normal operation of laboratory instruments. Degradation of the detector energy resolution can be explained by increasing leakage current and increasing interstrip capacitance of the sensor. Another observed effect caused by accumulation of charge trapped in the surface oxide layer is change of charge division between adjacent strips. In addition, we have observed unexpected anomalies in the annealing process.

  5. Low dose radiation-induced endothelial cell retraction.

    PubMed

    Kantak, S S; Diglio, C A; Onoda, J M

    1993-09-01

    We characterized in vitro the effects of gamma-radiation (12.5-100 cGy) on pulmonary microvascular endothelial cell (PMEC) morphology and F-actin organization. Cellular retraction was documented by phase-contrast microscopy and the organization of actin microfilaments was determined by immunofluorescence. Characterization included radiation dose effects, their temporal duration and reversibility of the effects. A dose-dependent relationship between the level of exposure (12.5-100 cGy) and the rate and extent of endothelial retraction was observed. Moreover, analysis of radiation-induced depolymerization of F-actin microfilament stress fibres correlated positively with the changes in PMEC morphology. The depolymerization of the stress fibre bundles was dependent on radiation dose and time. Cells recovered from exposure to reform contact inhibited monolayers > or = 24 h post-irradiation. Concomitantly, the depolymerized microfilaments reorganized to their preirradiated state as microfilament stress fibres arrayed parallel to the boundaries of adjacent contact-inhibited cells. The data presented here are representative of a series of studies designed to characterize low-dose radiation effects on pulmonary microvascular endothelium. Our data suggest that post-irradiation lung injuries (e.g. oedema) may be induced with only a single fraction of therapeutic radiation, and thus microscopic oedema may initiate prior to the lethal effects of radiation on the microvascular endothelium, and much earlier than would be suggested by the time course for clinically-detectable oedema.

  6. Role of heme Oxygenase-1 in low dose Radioadaptive response

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Lingzhi; Ma, Jie; Chen, Guodong; Hou, Jue; Hei, Tom K.; Yu, K.N.; Han, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Radioadaptive response (RAR) is an important phenomenon induced by low dose radiation. However, the molecular mechanism of RAR is obscure. In this study, we focused on the possible role of heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) in RAR. Consistent with previous studies, priming dose of X-ray radiation (1–10 cGy) induced significant RAR in normal human skin fibroblasts (AG 1522 cells). Transcription and translation of HO-1 was up-regulated more than two fold by a priming dose of radiation (5 cGy). Zinc protoporphyrin Ⅸ, a specific competitive inhibitor of HO-1, efficiently inhibited RAR whereas hemin, an inducer of HO-1, could mimic priming dose of X-rays to induce RAR. Knocking down of HO-1 by transfection of HO-1 siRNA significantly attenuated RAR. Furthermore, the expression of HO-1 gene was modulated by the nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2), which translocated from cytoplasm to nucleus after priming dose radiation and enhance the antioxidant level of cells. PMID:26966892

  7. Pb low doses induced genotoxicity in Lactuca sativa plants.

    PubMed

    Silva, S; Silva, P; Oliveira, H; Gaivão, I; Matos, M; Pinto-Carnide, O; Santos, C

    2017-03-01

    Soil and water contamination by lead (Pb) remains a topic of great concern, particularly regarding crop production. The admissible Pb values in irrigation water in several countries range from ≈0.1 to ≈5 mg L(-1). In order to evaluate putative effects of Pb within legal doses on crops growth, we exposed Lactuca sativa seeds and seedlings to increasing doses of Pb(NO3)2 up to 20 mg L(-1). The OECD parameter seed germination and seedling/plant growth were not affected by any of the Pb-concentrations used. However, for doses higher than 5 mg L(-1) significant DNA damage was detected: Comet assay detected DNA fragmentation at ≥ 5 mg L(-1) and presence of micronuclei (MN) were detected for 20 mg L(-1). Also, cell cycle impairment was observed for doses as low as 0.05 mg L(-1) and 0.5 mg L(-1) (mostly G2 arrest). Our data show that for the low doses of Pb used, the OECD endpoints were not able to detect toxicity, while more sensitive endpoints (related with DNA damage and mitotic/interphase disorders) identified genotoxic and cytostatic effects. Furthermore, the nature of the genotoxic effect was dependent on the concentration. Finally, we recommend that MN test and the comet assay should be included as sensitive endpoints in (eco)toxicological assays.

  8. Pharmacogenetics of Low Dose Clonidine in Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Camilleri, Michael; Busciglio, Irene; Carlson, Paula; McKinzie, Sanna; Burton, Duane; Baxter, Kari; Ryks, Michael; Zinsmeister, Alan R.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives Adrenergic and serotonergic (ADR-SER) mechanisms alter gut (GI) sensorimotor functions. We aimed to determine whether candidate ADR-SER genes affect GI responses to low dose clonidine (CLO) in humans. Methods Forty healthy and 120 irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) participants received CLO, 0.1mg or 0.15mg b.i.d., for 6 days. At baseline and post-clonidine, we measured: gastric volume (GV); satiation volume; rectal compliance, sensation thresholds and ratings with distensions. Genetic variations tested were: α2A (C-1291G), α2C (Del 332-325), GNβ3 (C825T) and SLC6A4 (5-HTT-LPR). Results CLO reduced volume to satiation (p=0.002), postprandial GV (p<0.001), sensation threshold for pain (<0.001); CLO increased rectal compliance (p=0.024). There were significant associations between post-CLO responses and gene variations for Δ GV (α2A and SLC6A4), rectal sensation of gas (α2A, GNβ3), urgency (α2A); and pain (GNβ3 and SLC6A4); and rectal compliance (SLC6A4). Conclusion α2A, GNβ3 and SLC6A4 genotypes significantly modify responses to clonidine on sensory and motor GI functions in health and IBS. PMID:19309415

  9. Benzodiazepine dependence and its treatment with low dose flumazenil.

    PubMed

    Hood, Sean David; Norman, Amanda; Hince, Dana Adelle; Melichar, Jan Krzysztof; Hulse, Gary Kenneth

    2014-02-01

    Globally benzodiazepines remain one of the most prescribed medication groups, especially in the primary care setting. With such high levels of prescribing it is not surprising that benzodiazepine dependence is common, cutting across all socioeconomic levels. Despite recognition of the potential for the development of iatrogenic dependence and the lack of any effective treatment, benzodiazepines continue to be widely prescribed in general practice. Conventional dependence management, benzodiazepine tapering, is commonly a protracted process over several weeks or months. It is often associated with significant withdrawal symptoms and craving leading to patient drop out and return to use. Accordingly, there is a worldwide need to find effective pharmacotherapeutic interventions for benzodiazepine dependence. One drug of increasing interest is the GABAA benzodiazepine receptor antagonist/partial agonist, flumazenil. Multiple bolus intravenous infusions of low dose flumazenil used either with or without benzodiazepine tapering can reduce withdrawal sequelae, and/or longer term symptoms in the months following withdrawal. Preliminary data suggest that continuous intravenous or subcutaneous flumazenil infusion for 4 days significantly reduces acute benzodiazepine withdrawal sequelae. The subcutaneous infusion was shown to be tissue compatible so the development of a longer acting (i.e. several weeks) depot flumazenil formulation has been explored. This could be capable of managing both acute and longer term benzodiazepine withdrawal sequelae. Preliminary in vitro water bath and in vivo biocompatibility data in sheep show that such an implant is feasible and so is likely to be used in clinical trials in the near future.

  10. Dosimetric Study of a Low-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Villafuerte, M.; Arzamendi, S.; Díaz-Perches, R.

    Carcinoma of the cervix is the most common malignancy - in terms of both incidence and mortality - in Mexican women. Low dose rate (LDR) intracavitary brachytherapy is normally prescribed for the treatment of this disease to the vast majority of patients attending public hospitals in our country. However, most treatment planning systems being used in these hospitals still rely on Sievert integral dose calculations. Moreover, experimental verification of dose distributions are hardly ever done. In this work we present a dosimetric characterisation of the Amersham CDCS-J 137Cs source, an LDR brachytherapy source commonly used in Mexican hospitals. To this end a Monte Carlo simulation was developed, that includes a realistic description of the internal structure of the source embedded in a scattering medium. The Monte Carlo results were compared to experimental measurements of dose distributions. A lucite phantom with the same geometric characteristics as the one used in the simulation was built. Dose measurements were performed using thermoluminescent dosimeters together with commercial RadioChromic dye film. A comparison between our Monte Carlo simulation, the experimental data, and results reported in the literature is presented.

  11. Sensitivity to low-dose radiation in radiosensitive wasted mice

    SciTech Connect

    Paunesku, T.; Protic, M.; Woloschak, G. E.

    1999-11-12

    Mice homozygous for the autosomal recessive wasted mutation (wst/wst) have abnormalities in T-lymphocytes and in the anterior motor neuron cells of the spinal cord, leading to sensitivity to low doses of ionizing radiation, hind limb paralysis, and immunodeficiency. This defect results in a failure to gain weight by 20 days and death at 28 days of age. The wasted mutation (previously mapped to mouse chromosome 2) is shown to be a 3-bp deletion in a T-cell-specific (and perhaps motor-neuron-specific) regulatory region (promoter) of the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) gene on mouse chromosome 2. A regulatory element is also shown to be important in PCNA expression in T-lymphocytes and motor neuron cells afflicted by the 3-bp deletion in the PCNA promoter. The model is as follows: Absence of PCNA expression in the thymuses (and motor neurons) of wasted mice causes cellular apoptosis; this absence of expression is mediated by a positive transactor that can bind to the wild-type but not the wasted mutant PCNA promoter; the bound protein induces late expression of PCNA in T-lymphocytes and prevents onset of radiation sensitivity in the cells.

  12. Information content of low-dose radiographs: Part 2

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, R.A.

    1997-10-01

    The previous paper described the concept of using the net number of information bits transmitted in a radiographic image as a measure of the contrast parameter of image quality. The concept is particularly useful when the image contrast is limited by the statistics of the photon fluence incident on the detector (low doses). The Wolfram Research Mathematica program (described in Ref. 1) that was used to simulate a noisy image of an object with two thicknesses and to calculate the resulting IC (information content). The only noise source in the simulation was fluctuations in the photon fluence incident on the detector. The results from the simulation were compared to data obtained from actual radiographs of a copper step wedge radiographed with 10 and 50 pulses from a 150-p, V x-ray machine. Good agreement between the simulation and experiment was obtained when the photon fluence was considered a free, adjustable parameter. This report extends the simulation described in Ref. 1 and shows how IC varies as the following radiographic parameters change: object thickness; object Z number; x-ray energy; and incident x-ray fluence.

  13. Automated aortic calcium scoring on low-dose chest computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Isgum, Ivana; Rutten, Annemarieke; Prokop, Mathias; Staring, Marius; Klein, Stefan; Pluim, Josien P. W.; Viergever, Max A.; Ginneken, Bram van

    2010-02-15

    Purpose: Thoracic computed tomography (CT) scans provide information about cardiovascular risk status. These scans are non-ECG synchronized, thus precise quantification of coronary calcifications is difficult. Aortic calcium scoring is less sensitive to cardiac motion, so it is an alternative to coronary calcium scoring as an indicator of cardiovascular risk. The authors developed and evaluated a computer-aided system for automatic detection and quantification of aortic calcifications in low-dose noncontrast-enhanced chest CT. Methods: The system was trained and tested on scans from participants of a lung cancer screening trial. A total of 433 low-dose, non-ECG-synchronized, noncontrast-enhanced 16 detector row examinations of the chest was randomly divided into 340 training and 93 test data sets. A first observer manually identified aortic calcifications on training and test scans. A second observer did the same on the test scans only. First, a multiatlas-based segmentation method was developed to delineate the aorta. Segmented volume was thresholded and potential calcifications (candidate objects) were extracted by three-dimensional connected component labeling. Due to image resolution and noise, in rare cases extracted candidate objects were connected to the spine. They were separated into a part outside and parts inside the aorta, and only the latter was further analyzed. All candidate objects were represented by 63 features describing their size, position, and texture. Subsequently, a two-stage classification with a selection of features and k-nearest neighbor classifiers was performed. Based on the detected aortic calcifications, total calcium volume score was determined for each subject. Results: The computer system correctly detected, on the average, 945 mm{sup 3} out of 965 mm{sup 3} (97.9%) calcified plaque volume in the aorta with an average of 64 mm{sup 3} of false positive volume per scan. Spearman rank correlation coefficient was {rho}=0.960 between

  14. Health Risks From Low Doses and Low Dose-Rates of Ionizing Radiation. Session 5: Future of Radiation Protection Regulations.

    PubMed

    Cool, Donald A

    2016-03-01

    The system of radiological protection is a prospective approach to protection of individuals in all exposure situations. It must be applied equitably across all age groups and all populations. This is a very different circumstance from dose assessment for a particular individual where the unique characteristics of the individual and the exposure can be taken into account. Notwithstanding the ongoing discussions on the possible shape of the dose response at low doses and dose rates, the prospective system of protection has therefore historically used a linear assumption as a pragmatic, prudent and protective approach. These radiation protection criteria are not intended to be a demarcation between "safe" and "unsafe" and are the product of a risk-informed judgement that includes inputs from science, ethics, and experience. There are significant implications for different dose response relationships. A linear model allows for equal treatment of an exposure, irrespective of the previously accumulated exposure. In contrast, other models would predict different implications. Great care is therefore needed in separating the thinking around risk assessment from risk management, and prospective protection for all age groups and genders from retrospective assessment for a particular individual. In the United States, the prospective regulatory structure functions effectively because of assumptions that facilitate independent treatment of different types of exposures, and which provide pragmatic and prudent protection. While the a linear assumption may, in fact, not be consistent with the biological reality, the implications of a different regulatory model must be considered carefully.

  15. Low-dose ethanol aggravates allergic dermatitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Sakazaki, Fumitoshi; Ogino, Hirofumi; Arakawa, Tomohiro; Okuno, Tomofumi; Ueno, Hitoshi

    2014-08-01

    Alcohol injures dendritic cells and suppresses cellular immunity, while some evidence indicates that drinking alcohol aggravates allergic asthma. This study investigated the effect of low doses of ethanol in enhancing allergic reactions in the skin of mice. Liquid food containing alcohol was administered to conventional NC/Nga mice to induce alcoholic hepatic steatosis, and spontaneous dermatitis was evaluated. BALB/c mice were administered approximately 1 g/kg body weight of ethanol by gavage, and contact hypersensitivity (CHS) or active cutaneous anaphylaxis (ACA) was induced. Spleens were collected 24 h after the elicitation of CHS and mRNA expressions of interferon (IFN)-γ, interleukin (IL)-4, IL-6, IL-10, and IL-18 were measured by quantitative RT-PCR. Alcohol-containing diet exaggerated spontaneous dermatitis in conventional NC/Nga mice and contact hypersensitivity in BALB/c mice. Ethanol administered by gavage for 5 days enhanced contact hypersensitivity in BALB/c mice. Ethanol administration with gavage also enhanced ACA of BALB/c mice. Ethanol did not affect mRNA expression of IFN-γ and IL-4, but did enhance IL-6, IL-10, and IL-18 mRNA expression. Histological evaluation revealed an absence of hepatic steatosis in mice administered ethanol by gavage for 5 days. In ethanol-administered mice, inflamed areas presented as lesions or a local extreme accumulation of mononuclear cells in the epidermis. These findings suggest that ethanol enhances the expression of inflammatory cytokines independently from T helper (Th)1/Th2 cytokine phenotypes, causing abnormalities in the epidermis resulting in exacerbated allergic reactivity.

  16. Low dose TBT exposure decreases amphipod immunocompetence and reproductive fitness.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Therese; Sundelin, Brita; Yang, Gongda; Ford, Alex T

    2011-01-17

    The antifouling agent tributyltin (TBT) is a highly toxic pollutant present in many aquatic ecosystems. Despite of regulations on the usage of TBT, it remains in high concentrations in sediments both in harbors and in off-shore sites. The toxicity of TBT in mollusks is well documented. However, adverse effects in other aquatic organisms, such as crustaceans, are less well known. This study is an effort to assess the effects of environmentally realistic concentrations of TBT on an ecologically important species in Swedish fresh and brackish water ecosystems, the benthic amphipod Monoporeia affinis. Field collected animals were exposed during gonad maturation to TBT (70 and 170 ng/g sediment d wt) for five weeks in static microcosms with natural sediment. Exposure concentrations were chosen to reflect effects at concentrations found in Swedish coastal sediment, but below expected effects on survival. TBT exposure resulted in a statistically significant adverse effect on oocyte viability and a doubling of the prevalence of microsporidian parasites in females, from 17% in the control to 34% in the 170 ng TBT/g sediment d wt exposure. No effects on survival were observed. Borderline significant effects were observed on male sexual maturation in the 70 ng TBT/g d wt exposure and on ecdysteroid levels in the 170 ng/g sediment d wt exposure. Both reproduction and parasite infection effects are of ecological importance since they have the potential to affect population viability in the field. This study gives further evidence to the connection between low dose contaminant exposure and increases in microsporidian parasite infection.

  17. Effect of low-dose gaseous ozone on pathogenic bacteria

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Treatment of chronically infected wounds is a challenge, and bacterial environmental contamination is a growing issue in infection control. Ozone may have a role in these situations. The objective of this study was to determine whether a low dose of gaseous ozone/oxygen mixture eliminates pathogenic bacteria cultivated in Petri dishes. Methods A pilot study with 6 bacterial strains was made using different concentrations of ozone in an ozone-oxygen mixture to determine a minimally effective dose that completely eliminated bacterial growth. The small and apparently bactericidal gaseous dose of 20 μg/mL ozone/oxygen (1:99) mixture, applied for 5min under atmospheric pressure was selected. In the 2nd phase, eight bacterial strains with well characterized resistance patterns were evaluated in vitro using agar-blood in adapted Petri dishes (105 bacteria/dish). The cultures were divided into 3 groups: 1- ozone-oxygen gaseous mixture containing 20 μg of O3/mL for 5 min; 2- 100% oxygen for 5 min; 3- baseline: no gas was used. Results The selected ozone dose was applied to the following eight strains: Escherichia coli, oxacillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, oxacillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus, vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecalis, extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae, carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii, Acinetobacter baumannii susceptible only to carbapenems, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa susceptible to imipenem and meropenem. All isolates were completely inhibited by the ozone-oxygen mixture while growth occurred in the other 2 groups. Conclusion A single topical application by nebulization of a low ozone dose completely inhibited the growth of all potentially pathogenic bacterial strains with known resistance to antimicrobial agents. PMID:23249441

  18. Evaluation of a low-dose neonatal chest radiographic system

    SciTech Connect

    Burton, E.M.; Kirks, D.R.; Strife, J.L.; Henry, G.C.; Kereiakes, J.G.

    1988-11-01

    A new low-dose chest radiographic system for use in the neonatal nursery was evaluated. This test system, composed of a Du Pont Kevlar fiber-front cassette, Quanta fast-detail screen, Cronex 4L film (wide latitude), and additional yttrium filtration (0.1 mm), reduced the radiation dose in neonatal chest radiography by 69% (0.9 vs 2.9 mrad (0.009 vs 0.029 mGy)) as compared with a conventional system without added yttrium filtration; the thyroid dose was reduced by 76% (0.9 vs 3.7 mrad (0.009 vs 0.037 mGy)). The cumulative dose reduction was achieved through a combination of factors, including (1) beam hardening by the added yttrium filter, (2) increased X-ray transmission through the Kevlar cassette, and (3) a fast film-screen combination. Scatter radiation at distances of 1 and 6 ft. (0.3 and 1.8 m) was negligible for both systems. Image sharpness was compared for the conventional system with and without added yttrium filtration and for the Kevlar system with yttrium. Although sharpness of bony detail was unchanged by adding yttrium filtration to the conventional system, a decrease in sharpness was noted with the Kevlar system. Because image sharpness was affected in the test system, we are not using the Kevlar-Cronex 4L system for mobile chest radiography in the neonatal intensive care unit, despite dose reductions. However, further study is recommended to determine if there is a slower film-screen combination with yttrium filtration that will not degrade image sharpness.

  19. Low dose of propranolol does not affect rat osteotomy healing and callus strength

    PubMed Central

    Smitham, Peter; Crossfield, Lawrence; Hughes, Gillian; Goodship, Allen; Blunn, Gordon; Chenu, Chantal

    2014-01-01

    Experimental studies suggest that the β-blocker propranolol stimulates bone formation but little work has investigated its effect on fracture healing. In this study, we examined if a low dose of propranolol, previously shown to be preventive against bone loss in rats, improves bone repair. Female Wistar rats were injected with saline or propranolol (0.1 mg/kg/day) (n = 20/group), 5 days a week for 8 weeks. Three weeks after the beginning of treatment, all rats underwent a mid-diaphyseal transverse osteotomy in the left femur. Radiographic analysis of ostetomy healing was performed 2 and 5 weeks after osteotomy. Rats were sacrificed at 5 weeks and femora collected for measurements of fracture strength by torsional testing, callus volume, and mineral content by micro-CT analysis and histology of fracture callus. Eighty nine percent of osteotomies achieved apparent radiological union by 5 weeks in both groups. Propranolol treatment did not significantly alter the torsional strength of the fractured femur compared with controls. The volume and mineralization of fracture callus at 5 weeks were not significantly different in both groups. Histology showed that endochondral ossification was not affected by propranolol. Altogether, our results demonstrate that propranolol using the regimen described does not significantly improve or inhibit rat osteotomy healing and mechanical strength. PMID:24710688

  20. The MAGIC-5 CAD for nodule detection in low dose and thin slice lung CTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerello, Piergiorgio; MAGIC-5 Collaboration

    2010-11-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality in developed countries. Only 10-15% of all men and women diagnosed with lung cancer live 5 years after the diagnosis. However, the 5-year survival rate for patients diagnosed in the early asymptomatic stage of the disease can reach 70%. Early-stage lung cancers can be diagnosed by detecting non-calcified small pulmonary nodules with computed tomography (CT). Computer-aided detection (CAD) could support radiologists in the analysis of the large amount of noisy images generated in screening programs, where low-dose and thin-slice settings are used. The MAGIC-5 project, funded by the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN, Italy) and Ministero dell'Università e della Ricerca (MUR, Italy), developed a multi-method approach based on three CAD algorithms to be used in parallel with a merging of their results: the Channeler Ant Model (CAM), based on Virtual Ant Colonies, the Dot-Enhancement/Pleura Surface Normals/VBNA (DE-PSN-VBNA), and the Region Growing Volume Plateau (RGVP). Preliminary results show quite good performances, to be improved with the refining of the single algorithm and the added value of the results merging.

  1. Dosimetry Modeling for Focal Low-Dose-Rate Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Qaisieh, Bashar; Mason, Josh; Bownes, Peter; Henry, Ann; Dickinson, Louise; Ahmed, Hashim U.; Emberton, Mark; Langley, Stephen

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: Focal brachytherapy targeted to an individual lesion(s) within the prostate may reduce side effects experienced with whole-gland brachytherapy. The outcomes of a consensus meeting on focal prostate brachytherapy were used to investigate optimal dosimetry of focal low-dose-rate (LDR) prostate brachytherapy targeted using multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mp-MRI) and transperineal template prostate mapping (TPM) biopsy, including the effects of random and systematic seed displacements and interseed attenuation (ISA). Methods and Materials: Nine patients were selected according to clinical characteristics and concordance of TPM and mp-MRI. Retrospectively, 3 treatment plans were analyzed for each case: whole-gland (WG), hemi-gland (hemi), and ultra-focal (UF) plans, with 145-Gy prescription dose and identical dose constraints for each plan. Plan robustness to seed displacement and ISA were assessed using Monte Carlo simulations. Results: WG plans used a mean 28 needles and 81 seeds, hemi plans used 17 needles and 56 seeds, and UF plans used 12 needles and 25 seeds. Mean D90 (minimum dose received by 90% of the target) and V100 (percentage of the target that receives 100% dose) values were 181.3 Gy and 99.8% for the prostate in WG plans, 195.7 Gy and 97.8% for the hemi-prostate in hemi plans, and 218.3 Gy and 99.8% for the focal target in UF plans. Mean urethra D10 was 205.9 Gy, 191.4 Gy, and 92.4 Gy in WG, hemi, and UF plans, respectively. Mean rectum D2 cm{sup 3} was 107.5 Gy, 77.0 Gy, and 42.7 Gy in WG, hemi, and UF plans, respectively. Focal plans were more sensitive to seed displacement errors: random shifts with a standard deviation of 4 mm reduced mean target D90 by 14.0%, 20.5%, and 32.0% for WG, hemi, and UF plans, respectively. ISA has a similar impact on dose-volume histogram parameters for all plan types. Conclusions: Treatment planning for focal LDR brachytherapy is feasible. Dose constraints are easily met with a notable

  2. Compelling Issues Compounding the Understanding of Low Dose Radiation Effects: But Do They Matter?

    PubMed

    Morgan, William F

    2016-03-01

    Recent advances in low dose radiation research have raised a number of compelling issues that have compounded the understanding of low dose radiation effects. Here some of them are outlined: the linear no-threshold model for predicting effects at low radiation doses, dose rate effectiveness factor, attributability, and public perception of low dose radiation effects. The impact of changes in any of these hotly debated issues on radiation protection is considered.

  3. [Epidemiology of digestive complications associated with use of low-dose aspirin].

    PubMed

    Czernichow, Pierre; Merle, Véronique

    2004-04-01

    Low-dose aspirin (< 330 mg/d) is recommended for the prevention of myocardial infarction or ischemic stroke. Six to 12% of the general population is exposed to low-dose aspirin. The most frequently studied digestive complications are bleeding peptic ulcers, whose risk is increased twofold by low-dose aspirin treatment, and non-complicated peptic ulcers. History of bleeding or non-complicated peptic ulcer, alcohol intake, concomitant treatment with NSAID or calcic inhibitors are demonstrated risk factors of bleeding ulcer associated with low-dose aspirin. The role of enteric coating, of low-dose aspirin dose, of delay since low-dose aspirin treatment onset, and of Helicobacter pylori infection, remains controversial. Antisecretory drugs (H2 inhibitors, proton pump inhibitors), and nitroglycerin are associated with a decreased risk of bleeding ulcer. The protective effect of COX-2 inhibitors on the risk of bleeding ulcer is suppressed by concomitant treatment with low-dose aspirin. The risk of no- complicated peptic ulcer was increased by low-dose aspirin intake by a factor 2.9 in one study. Low-dose aspirin dose, infection by Helicobacter pylori, NSAID intake, and absence of enteric coating, are possible risk factors for non-complicated peptic ulcer. No association was retrieved with alcohol intake and peptic ulcer history.

  4. The effects of repeated low-dose sarin exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Shih, T.-M. . E-mail: tsungming.a.shih@us.army.mil; Hulet, S.W.; McDonough, J.H.

    2006-09-01

    This project assessed the effects of repeated low-dose exposure of guinea pigs to the organophosphorus nerve agent sarin. Animals were injected once a day, 5 days per week (Monday-Friday), for 2 weeks with fractions (0.3x, 0.4x, 0.5x, or 0.6x) of the established LD{sub 5} dose of sarin (42 {mu}g/kg, s.c.). The animals were assessed for changes in body weight, red blood cell (RBC) acetylcholinesterase (AChE) levels, neurobehavioral reactions to a functional observational battery (FOB), cortical electroencephalographic (EEG) power spectrum, and intrinsic acetylcholine (ACh) neurotransmitter (NT) regulation over the 2 weeks of sarin exposure and for up to 12 days postinjection. No guinea pig receiving 0.3, 0.4 or 0.5 x LD{sub 5} of sarin showed signs of cortical EEG seizures despite decreases in RBC AChE levels to as low as 10% of baseline, while seizures were evident in animals receiving 0.6 x LD{sub 5} of sarin as early as the second day; subsequent injections led to incapacitation and death. Animals receiving 0.5 x LD{sub 5} sarin showed obvious signs of cholinergic toxicity; overall, 2 of 13 animals receiving 0.5 x LD{sub 5} sarin died before all 10 injections were given, and there was a significant increase in the angle of gait in the animals that lived. By the 10th day of injection, the animals receiving saline were significantly easier to remove from their cages and handle and significantly less responsive to an approaching pencil and touch on the rump in comparison with the first day of testing. In contrast, the animals receiving 0.4 x LD{sub 5} sarin failed to show any significant reductions in their responses to an approaching pencil and a touch on the rump as compared with the first day. The 0.5 x LD{sub 5} sarin animals also failed to show any significant changes to the approach and touch responses and did not adjust to handling or removal from the cage from the first day of injections to the last day of handling. Thus, the guinea pigs receiving the 0

  5. Imprinted genes and transpositions: epigenomic targets for low dose radiation effects. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Jirtle, Randy L.

    2012-10-11

    The overall hypothesis of this grant application is that low dose ionizing radiation (LDIR) elicits adaptive responses in part by causing heritable DNA methylation changes in the epigenome. This novel postulate was tested by determining if the level of DNA methylation at the Agouti viable yellow (A{sup vy}) metastable locus is altered, in a dose-dependent manner, by low dose radiation exposure (<10 cGy) during early gestation. This information is particularly important to ascertain given the increased use of CT scans in disease diagnosis, increased number of people predicted to live and work in space, and the present concern about radiological terrorism. We showed for the first time that LDIR significantly increased DNA methylation at the A{sup vy} locus in a sex-specific manner (p=0.004). Average DNA methylation was significantly increased in male offspring exposed to doses between 0.7 cGy and 7.6 cGy with maximum effects at 1.4 cGy and 3.0 cGy (p<0.01). Offspring coat color was concomitantly shifted towards pseudoagouti (p<0.01). Maternal dietary antioxidant supplementation mitigated both the DNA methylation changes and coat color shift in the irradiated offspring (p<0.05). Thus, LDIR exposure during gestation elicits epigenetic alterations that lead to positive adaptive phenotypic changes that are negated with antioxidants, indicating they are mediated in part by oxidative stress. These findings provide evidence that in the isogenic Avy mouse model epigenetic alterations resulting from LDIR play a role in radiation hormesis, bringing into question the assumption that every dose of radiation is harmful. Our findings not only have significant implications concerning the mechanism of hormesis, but they also emphasize the potential importance of this phenomenon in determining human risk at low radiation doses. Since the epigenetic regulation of genes varies markedly between species, the effect of LDIR on other epigenetically labile genes (e.g. imprinted genes) in

  6. Molecular dissection of the roles of the SOD genes in mammalian response to low dose irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Chuan-Yaun

    2009-01-27

    “Molecular dissection of the roles of the SOD genes in mammalian response to low dose irradiation " was started on 09/01/03 and ended on 08/31/07. The primary objective of the project was to carry out mechanistic studies of the roles of the anti-oxidant SOD genes in mammalian cellular response to low dose ionizing radiation.

  7. [Risk and prevention of gastrointestinal complications due to low-dose aspirin and other antiplatelet agents].

    PubMed

    Bretagne, Jean-François

    2008-09-15

    Upper and lower gastrointestinal (GI) haemorrhages are the main complications associated with low-dose aspirin or anti-thrombotic drugs. In France, low-dose aspirin or anti-thrombotic agents use has been found in 30% of upper GI and 40% of lower GI bleeding episodes. Main causes of GI bleeding with low-dose aspirin are gastroduodenal peptic ulcer and colonic diverticulosis. Recent cohort studies have shown that the relative risk of GI bleeding with low-dose aspirin was comprised between 2 and 4 and the absolute risk comprised between 1 per 100 and 1 per 1000 aspirin users per year. Main risk factors for upper GI bleeding with low-dose aspirin are concomitant antiplatelet agents, anticoagulants, non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or steroids use, and recent history of complicated or non-complicated gastroduodenal ulcer. Helicobacter pylori infection increases the risk for upper GI bleeding with low-dose aspirin, but infection should be searched and treated only in patients with peptic ulcer. Despite eradication of H. pylori in the latter patients, gastroprotection with PPI is strongly recommended. In patients presenting with peptic ulcer bleeding with low-dose aspirin, aspirin should be continued in association with PPI rather than replaced with clopidogrel. Discontinuation of low-dose aspirin which exposes to increased cardiovascular complications and mortality should be avoided, even in cases of peptic ulcer bleeding.

  8. Low doses of glyphosate change the response of soybean to later glyphosate exposures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The stimulatory effect of low doses of toxic substances is known as hormesis. Many herbicides that cause severe injury to plants at recommended rates, promote growth or have other stimulatory effects at very low doses. The objective of this study was to evaluate glyphosate-induced hormesis in soyb...

  9. Effects of low dose FGF-2 and BMP-2 on healing of calvarial defects in old mice.

    PubMed

    Charles, Lyndon F; Woodman, Jessica L; Ueno, Daisuke; Gronowicz, Gloria; Hurley, Marja M; Kuhn, Liisa T

    2015-04-01

    There is an age-associated reduction in the bone healing activity of bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) that is currently addressed by administering higher doses of BMP-2 in elderly patients. The unwanted medical complications from high dose BMP-2 motivated this investigation to determine whether the addition of a low dose of fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2) could enhance the ability of a lower dose of BMP-2 to heal calvarial bone defects in old mice (18-20 months old). FGF-2 (5 ng) and BMP-2 (2 μg) were administered by a controlled release two-phase biomaterial scaffold placed into the bone defect. FGF-2 released more rapidly and completely in vitro than BMP-2 (40% vs 2%). In vivo, both BMP-2 and FGF-2+BMP-2 groups formed more new bone in calvarial defects than scaffold alone (p < 0.001) or FGF-2 only groups (p < 0.01). The overall total volume of new bone was not statistically increased by the addition of FGF-2 to BMP-2 as measured by microCT, but the pattern of bone deposition was different. In old mice, but not young, there was enhanced bony fill in the central bone defect area when the BMP-2 was supplemented with FGF-2. Histological analysis of the center of the defect revealed an increased bone volume (%BV/TV (p = 0.004)) from the addition of FGF-2. These studies suggest that combining a low dose of FGF-2 with a low dose of BMP-2 has the potential to increase bone healing in old mice relative to BMP-2 alone.

  10. Low-dose megavoltage cone-beam computed tomography for lung tumors using a high-efficiency image receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Sillanpaa, Jussi; Chang Jenghwa; Mageras, Gikas; Yorke, Ellen; Arruda, Fernando De; Rosenzweig, Kenneth E.; Munro, Peter; Seppi, Edward; Pavkovich, John; Amols, Howard

    2006-09-15

    We report on the capabilities of a low-dose megavoltage cone-beam computed tomography (MV CBCT) system. The high-efficiency image receptor consists of a photodiode array coupled to a scintillator composed of individual CsI crystals. The CBCT system uses the 6 MV beam from a linear accelerator. A synchronization circuit allows us to limit the exposure to one beam pulse [0.028 monitor units (MU)] per projection image. 150-500 images (4.2-13.9 MU total) are collected during a one-minute scan and reconstructed using a filtered backprojection algorithm. Anthropomorphic and contrast phantoms are imaged and the contrast-to-noise ratio of the reconstruction is studied as a function of the number of projections and the error in the projection angles. The detector dose response is linear (R{sup 2} value 0.9989). A 2% electron density difference is discernible using 460 projection images and a total exposure of 13 MU (corresponding to a maximum absorbed dose of about 12 cGy in a patient). We present first patient images acquired with this system. Tumors in lung are clearly visible and skeletal anatomy is observed in sufficient detail to allow reproducible registration with the planning kV CT images. The MV CBCT system is shown to be capable of obtaining good quality three-dimensional reconstructions at relatively low dose and to be clinically usable for improving the accuracy of radiotherapy patient positioning.

  11. Value of image fusion using single photon emission computed tomography with integrated low dose computed tomography in comparison with a retrospective voxel-based method in neuroendocrine tumours.

    PubMed

    Amthauer, H; Denecke, T; Rohlfing, T; Ruf, J; Böhmig, M; Gutberlet, M; Plöckinger, U; Felix, R; Lemke, A J

    2005-07-01

    The objective was the evaluation of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with integrated low dose computed tomography (CT) in comparison with a retrospective fusion of SPECT and high-resolution CT and a side-by-side analysis for lesion localisation in patients with neuroendocrine tumours. Twenty-seven patients were examined by multidetector CT. Additionally, as part of somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS), an integrated SPECT-CT was performed. SPECT and CT data were fused using software with a registration algorithm based on normalised mutual information. The reliability of the topographic assignment of lesions in SPECT-CT, retrospective fusion and side-by-side analysis was evaluated by two blinded readers. Two patients were not enrolled in the final analysis because of misregistrations in the retrospective fusion. Eighty-seven foci were included in the analysis. For the anatomical assignment of foci, SPECT-CT and retrospective fusion revealed overall accuracies of 91 and 94% (side-by-side analysis 86%). The correct identification of foci as lymph node manifestations (n=25) was more accurate by retrospective fusion (88%) than from SPECT-CT images (76%) or by side-by-side analysis (60%). Both modalities of image fusion appear to be well suited for the localisation of SRS foci and are superior to side-by-side analysis of non-fused images especially concerning lymph node manifestations.

  12. Megavoltage computed tomography image-based low-dose rate intracavitary brachytherapy planning for cervical carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Thomas H; Langen, Katja M; Meeks, Sanford L; Willoughby, Twyla R; Zeidan, Omar A; Staton, Robert J; Shah, Amish P; Manon, Rafael R; Kupelian, Patrick A

    2009-04-01

    Initial results of megavoltage computed tomography (MVCT) brachytherapy treatment planning are presented, using a commercially available helical tomotherapy treatment unit and standard low dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy applicators used for treatment of cervical carcinoma. The accuracy of MVCT imaging techniques, and dosimetric accuracy of the CT based plans were tested with in-house and commercially-available phantoms. Three dimensional (3D) dose distributions were computed and compared to the two dimensional (2D) dosimetry results. Minimal doses received by the 2 cm3 of bladder and rectum receiving the highest doses (D(B2cc) and D(R2cc), respectively) were computed from dose-volume histograms and compared to the doses computed for the standard ICRU bladder and rectal reference dose points. Phantom test objects in MVCT image sets were localized with sub-millimetric accuracy, and the accuracy of the MVCT-based dose calculation was verified. Fifteen brachytherapy insertions were also analyzed. The ICRU rectal point dose did not differ significantly from D(R2cc) (p=0.749, mean difference was 24 cGy +/- 283 cGy). The ICRU bladder point dose was significantly lower than the D(B2cc) (p=0.024, mean difference was 291 cGy +/- 444 cGy). The median volumes of bladder and rectum receiving at least the corresponding ICRU reference point dose were 6.1 cm(3) and 2.0 cm(3), respectively. Our initial experience in using MVCT imaging for clinical LDR gynecological brachytherapy indicates that the MVCT images are of sufficient quality for use in 3D, MVCT-based dose planning.

  13. Beneficial effects of low dose radiation in response to the oncogenic KRAS induced cellular transformation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Rae-Kwon; Kim, Min-Jung; Seong, Ki Moon; Kaushik, Neha; Suh, Yongjoon; Yoo, Ki-Chun; Cui, Yan-Hong; Jin, Young Woo; Nam, Seon Young; Lee, Su-Jae

    2015-01-01

    Recently low dose irradiation has gained attention in the field of radiotherapy. For lack of understanding of the molecular consequences of low dose irradiation, there is much doubt concerning its risks on human beings. In this article, we report that low dose irradiation is capable of blocking the oncogenic KRAS-induced malignant transformation. To address this hypothesis, we showed that low dose irradiation, at doses of 0.1 Gray (Gy); predominantly provide defensive response against oncogenic KRAS -induced malignant transformation in human cells through the induction of antioxidants without causing cell death and acts as a critical regulator for the attenuation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Importantly, we elucidated that knockdown of antioxidants significantly enhanced ROS generation, invasive and migratory properties and abnormal acini formation in KRAS transformed normal as well as cancer cells. Taken together, this study demonstrates that low dose irradiation reduces the KRAS induced malignant cellular transformation through diminution of ROS. This interesting phenomenon illuminates the beneficial effects of low dose irradiation, suggesting one of contributory mechanisms for reducing the oncogene induced carcinogenesis that intensify the potential use of low dose irradiation as a standard regimen. PMID:26515758

  14. Beneficial effects of low dose radiation in response to the oncogenic KRAS induced cellular transformation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Rae-Kwon; Kim, Min-Jung; Seong, Ki Moon; Kaushik, Neha; Suh, Yongjoon; Yoo, Ki-Chun; Cui, Yan-Hong; Jin, Young Woo; Nam, Seon Young; Lee, Su-Jae

    2015-10-30

    Recently low dose irradiation has gained attention in the field of radiotherapy. For lack of understanding of the molecular consequences of low dose irradiation, there is much doubt concerning its risks on human beings. In this article, we report that low dose irradiation is capable of blocking the oncogenic KRAS-induced malignant transformation. To address this hypothesis, we showed that low dose irradiation, at doses of 0.1 Gray (Gy); predominantly provide defensive response against oncogenic KRAS -induced malignant transformation in human cells through the induction of antioxidants without causing cell death and acts as a critical regulator for the attenuation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Importantly, we elucidated that knockdown of antioxidants significantly enhanced ROS generation, invasive and migratory properties and abnormal acini formation in KRAS transformed normal as well as cancer cells. Taken together, this study demonstrates that low dose irradiation reduces the KRAS induced malignant cellular transformation through diminution of ROS. This interesting phenomenon illuminates the beneficial effects of low dose irradiation, suggesting one of contributory mechanisms for reducing the oncogene induced carcinogenesis that intensify the potential use of low dose irradiation as a standard regimen.

  15. The Inhibitory Effects of Low-Dose Ionizing Radiation in IgE-Mediated Allergic Responses

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Seon Young; Yang, Kwang Hee; Kim, Cha Soon; Lee, In Kyung; Kim, Ji Young

    2015-01-01

    Ionizing radiation has different biological effects according to dose and dose rate. In particular, the biological effect of low-dose radiation is unclear. Low-dose whole-body gamma irradiation activates immune responses in several ways. However, the effects and mechanism of low-dose radiation on allergic responses remain poorly understood. Previously, we reported that low-dose ionizing radiation inhibits mediator release in IgE-mediated RBL-2H3 mast cell activation. In this study, to have any physiological relevance, we investigated whether low-dose radiation inhibits allergic responses in activated human mast cells (HMC-1(5C6) and LAD2 cells), mouse models of passive cutaneous anaphylaxis and the late-phase cutaneous response. High-dose radiation induced cell death, but low-dose ionizing radiation of <0.5 Gy did not induce mast cell death. Low-dose ionizing radiation that did not induce cell death significantly suppressed mediator release from human mast cells (HMC-1(5C6) and LAD2 cells) that were activated by antigen-antibody reaction. To determine the inhibitory mechanism of mediator released by low-dose ionizing radiation, we examined the phosphorylation of intracellular signaling molecules such as Lyn, Syk, phospholipase Cγ, and protein kinase C, as well as the intracellular free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i). The phosphorylation of signaling molecules and [Ca2+]i following stimulation of FcεRI receptors was inhibited by low dose ionizing radiation. In agreement with its in vitro effect, ionizing radiation also significantly inhibited inflammatory cells infiltration, cytokine mRNA expression (TNF-α, IL-4, IL-13), and symptoms of passive cutaneous anaphylaxis reaction and the late-phase cutaneous response in anti-dinitrophenyl IgE-sensitized mice. These results indicate that ionizing radiation inhibits both mast cell-mediated immediate- and delayed-type allergic reactions in vivo and in vitro. PMID:26317642

  16. Is There a Dose-Response Relationship for Heart Disease With Low-Dose Radiation Therapy?

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Eugene; Corbett, James R.; Moran, Jean M.; Griffith, Kent A.; Marsh, Robin B.; Feng, Mary; Jagsi, Reshma; Kessler, Marc L.; Ficaro, Edward C.; Pierce, Lori J.

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To quantify cardiac radiation therapy (RT) exposure using sensitive measures of cardiac dysfunction; and to correlate dysfunction with heart doses, in the setting of adjuvant RT for left-sided breast cancer. Methods and Materials: On a randomized trial, 32 women with node-positive left-sided breast cancer underwent pre-RT stress single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT-CT) myocardial perfusion scans. Patients received RT to the breast/chest wall and regional lymph nodes to doses of 50 to 52.2 Gy. Repeat SPECT-CT scans were performed 1 year after RT. Perfusion defects (PD), summed stress defects scores (SSS), and ejection fractions (EF) were evaluated. Doses to the heart and coronary arteries were quantified. Results: The mean difference in pre- and post-RT PD was −0.38% ± 3.20% (P=.68), with no clinically significant defects. To assess for subclinical effects, PD were also examined using a 1.5-SD below the normal mean threshold, with a mean difference of 2.53% ± 12.57% (P=.38). The mean differences in SSS and EF before and after RT were 0.78% ± 2.50% (P=.08) and 1.75% ± 7.29% (P=.39), respectively. The average heart Dmean and D95 were 2.82 Gy (range, 1.11-6.06 Gy) and 0.90 Gy (range, 0.13-2.17 Gy), respectively. The average Dmean and D95 to the left anterior descending artery were 7.22 Gy (range, 2.58-18.05 Gy) and 3.22 Gy (range, 1.23-6.86 Gy), respectively. No correlations were found between cardiac doses and changes in PD, SSS, and EF. Conclusions: Using sensitive measures of cardiac function, no clinically significant defects were found after RT, with the average heart Dmean <5 Gy. Although a dose response may exist for measures of cardiac dysfunction at higher doses, no correlation was found in the present study for low doses delivered to cardiac structures and perfusion, SSS, or EF.

  17. Diagnostic Performance on Low Dose Computed Tomography For Acute Appendicitis Among Attending and Resident Radiologists

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chih-Chen; Wong, Yon-Cheong; Wu, Cheng-Hsien; Chen, Huan-Wu; Wang, Li-Jen; Lee, Yu-Hsien; Wu, Patricia Wanping; Irama, Wiwan; Chen, Wei Yuan; Chang, Chee-Jen

    2016-01-01

    Background Low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) techniques can reduce exposure to radiation. Several previous studies have shown that radiation dose reduction in LDCT does not decrease the diagnostic performance for appendicitis among attending radiologists. But, the LDCT diagnostic performance for acute appendicitis in radiology residents with variable training levels has not been well discussed. Objectives To compare inter-observer and intra-observer differences of diagnostic performance on non-enhanced LDCT (NE-LDCT) and contrast-enhanced standard dose CT (CE-SDCT) for acute appendicitis among attending and resident radiologists. Patients and Methods This retrospective study included 101 patients with suspected acute appendicitis who underwent NE-LDCT and CE-SDCT. The CT examinations were interpreted and recorded on a five-point scale independently by three attending radiologists and three residents with 4, 1 and 1 years of training. Diagnostic performance for acute appendicitis of all readers on both examinations was represented by area under receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. Inter-observer and intra-observer AUC values were compared using Jackknife FROC software on both modalities. The diagnostic accuracy of each reader on NE-LDCT was compared with body mass index (BMI) subgroups and noise using independent T test. Results Diagnostic performances for acute appendicitis were not statistically different for attending radiologists at both examinations. Better performance was noted on the CE-SDCT with a borderline significant difference (P = 0.05) for senior radiology resident. No statistical difference of AUC values was observed between attending radiologists and fourth year resident on both examinations. Statistically significant differences of AUC values were observed between attending radiologists and first year residents (P = 0.001 ~ 0.018) on NE-LDCT. Diagnostic accuracies of acute appendicitis on NE-LDCT for each reader were not significantly

  18. Modeling Low-Dose-Rate Effects in Irradiated Bipolar-Base Oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Cirba, C.R.; Fleetwood, D.M.; Graves, R.J.; Michez, A.; Milanowski, R.J.; Saigne, F.; Schrimpf, R.D.; Witczak, S.C.

    1998-10-26

    A physical model is developed to quantify the contribution of oxide-trapped charge to enhanced low-dose-rate gain degradation in bipolar junction transistors. Multiple-trapping simulations show that space charge limited transport is partially responsible for low-dose-rate enhancement. At low dose rates, more holes are trapped near the silicon-oxide interface than at high dose rates, resulting in larger midgap voltage shifts at lower dose rates. The additional trapped charge near the interface may cause an exponential increase in excess base current, and a resultant decrease in current gain for some NPN bipolar technologies.

  19. Enhanced Low Dose Rate Effects in Bipolar Circuits: A New Hardness Assurance Problem for NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, A.; Barnes, C.

    1995-01-01

    Many bipolar integrated circuits are much more susceptible to ionizing radiation at low dose rates than they are at high dose rates typically used for radiation parts testing. Since the low dose rate is equivalent to that seen in space, the standard lab test no longer can be considered conservative and has caused the Air Force to issue an alert. Although a reliable radiation hardness assurance test has not yet been designed, possible mechanisms for low dose rate enhancement and hardness assurance tests are discussed.

  20. Evaluation of Enhanced Low Dose Rate Sensitivity in Discrete Bipolar Junction Transistors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Dakai; Ladbury Raymond; LaBel, Kenneth; Topper, Alyson; Ladbury, Raymond; Triggs, Brian; Kazmakites, Tony

    2012-01-01

    We evaluate the low dose rate sensitivity in several families of discrete bipolar transistors across device parameter, quality assurance level, and irradiation bias configuration. The 2N2222 showed the most significant low dose rate sensitivity, with low dose rate enhancement factor of 3.91 after 100 krad(Si). The 2N2907 also showed critical degradation levels. The devices irradiated at 10 mrad(Si)/s exceeded specifications after 40 and 50 krad(Si) for the 2N2222 and 2N2907 devices, respectively.

  1. SU-C-207-05: A Comparative Study of Noise-Reduction Algorithms for Low-Dose Cone-Beam Computed Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Mukherjee, S; Yao, W

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To study different noise-reduction algorithms and to improve the image quality of low dose cone beam CT for patient positioning in radiation therapy. Methods: In low-dose cone-beam CT, the reconstructed image is contaminated with excessive quantum noise. In this study, three well-developed noise reduction algorithms namely, a) penalized weighted least square (PWLS) method, b) split-Bregman total variation (TV) method, and c) compressed sensing (CS) method were studied and applied to the images of a computer–simulated “Shepp-Logan” phantom and a physical CATPHAN phantom. Up to 20% additive Gaussian noise was added to the Shepp-Logan phantom. The CATPHAN phantom was scanned by a Varian OBI system with 100 kVp, 4 ms and 20 mA. For comparing the performance of these algorithms, peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR) of the denoised images was computed. Results: The algorithms were shown to have the potential in reducing the noise level for low-dose CBCT images. For Shepp-Logan phantom, an improvement of PSNR of 2 dB, 3.1 dB and 4 dB was observed using PWLS, TV and CS respectively, while for CATPHAN, the improvement was 1.2 dB, 1.8 dB and 2.1 dB, respectively. Conclusion: Penalized weighted least square, total variation and compressed sensing methods were studied and compared for reducing the noise on a simulated phantom and a physical phantom scanned by low-dose CBCT. The techniques have shown promising results for noise reduction in terms of PSNR improvement. However, reducing the noise without compromising the smoothness and resolution of the image needs more extensive research.

  2. The impact of low-dose carcinogens and environmental disruptors on tissue invasion and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Ochieng, Josiah; Nangami, Gladys N.; Ogunkua, Olugbemiga; Miousse, Isabelle R.; Koturbash, Igor; Odero-Marah, Valerie; McCawley, Lisa; Nangia-Makker, Pratima; Ahmed, Nuzhat; Luqmani, Yunus; Chen, Zhenbang; Papagerakis, Silvana; Wolf, Gregory T.; Dong, Chenfang; Zhou, Binhua P.; Brown, Dustin G.; Colacci, Annamaria; Hamid, Roslida A.; Mondello, Chiara; Raju, Jayadev; Ryan, Elizabeth P.; Woodrick, Jordan; Scovassi, Ivana; Singh, Neetu; Vaccari, Monica; Roy, Rabindra; Forte, Stefano; Memeo, Lorenzo; Salem, Hosni K.; Amedei, Amedeo; Al-Temaimi, Rabeah; Al-Mulla, Fahd; Bisson, William H.; Eltom, Sakina E.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to stimulate new ideas regarding low-dose environmental mixtures and carcinogens and their potential to promote invasion and metastasis. Whereas a number of chapters in this review are devoted to the role of low-dose environmental mixtures and carcinogens in the promotion of invasion and metastasis in specific tumors such as breast and prostate, the overarching theme is the role of low-dose carcinogens in the progression of cancer stem cells. It is becoming clearer that cancer stem cells in a tumor are the ones that assume invasive properties and colonize distant organs. Therefore, low-dose contaminants that trigger epithelial–mesenchymal transition, for example, in these cells are of particular interest in this review. This we hope will lead to the collaboration between scientists who have dedicated their professional life to the study of carcinogens and those whose interests are exclusively in the arena of tissue invasion and metastasis. PMID:26106135

  3. Low-Dose Radioactive Iodine Destroys Thyroid Tissue Left after Surgery

    Cancer.gov

    A low dose of radioactive iodine given after surgery for thyroid cancer destroyed (ablated) residual thyroid tissue as effectively as a higher dose, with fewer side effects and less exposure to radiation, according to two randomized controlled trials.

  4. An evaluation of human ADME and mass balance studies using regular or low doses of radiocarbon.

    PubMed

    Roffel, A F; van Marle, S P; van Lier, J J; Hartstra, J; van Hoogdalem, E-J

    2016-12-01

    There has been increased interest in conducting human absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME) studies with low doses (up to 0.1 MBq) as opposed to regular doses (1.85-3.7 MBq) of radiocarbon ((14) C). This is due to the fact that low-dose human ADME studies may be conducted without dosimetry calculations and will lead to lower human radiation exposure. Here, we sought to compare the outcomes of low-dose versus regular-dose human ADME studies in healthy volunteers. Forty oral human ADME studies conducted at PRA were surveyed, among which 12 were low-dose studies. The fraction of drug material absorbed was 67% ± 7% in the regular-dose studies (data for 13 studies) versus 39% ± 16% in the low-dose studies (data for 5 studies). The average total recovery of (14) C in excreta was 93% ± 5% for regular-dose studies, and 21 of 28 such studies showed recoveries more than 90%. For low-dose studies, average total recovery was 89% ± 9%, and 6 of 12 studies showed recoveries more than 90%. Metabolite profiling was successful in all cases reported (13 regular-dose studies and 5 low-dose studies). There was no obvious relationship between the total recoveries of (14) C in excreta and the proportion of (14) C excreted in feces, or between the total recoveries and the plasma elimination half-lives for parent or total (14) C, neither in the low-dose nor the regular-dose studies. A significant correlation was found between the fraction absorbed and the recovery in feces in the low-dose but not in the regular-dose studies, and no correlation was found between the fractions absorbed and the total recoveries in both types of studies. Low-dose studies were more often conducted on drugs that had a plasma elimination half-life of parent drug more than 100 hours (5 of 12 studies) than regular-dose studies (1 of 26 studies). We conclude that both low-dose as well as regular-dose human ADME studies provide adequate data to support decision making for further

  5. Is there an advantage in performing a combined examination: diuretic renal scintigraphy and low dose computed tomography compared to the separate use of these methods in urolithiasis.

    PubMed

    Hadzhiyska, Valeriya; Kostadinova, Irena; Demirev, Anastas

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasonography (US), radiography of the kidneys, ureters and bladder (RKUB), intravenous urography (IVU) and especially non-enchanced CT are well established diagnostic modalities in screening patients with urolithiasis, while not always fully diagnostic especially when obstructive uropathy or calculous pyelonephritis are present . Diuretic renal scintigraphy (DRS) can determine obstruction, may differentiate between complete or partial, acute or chronic obstruction, but can not specify the cause and often the location of obstruction. The imaging protocol, including DRS with technetium-99m-mercaptylacetyltriglycine ((99m)Tc-MAG3) and single photon emission tomography/computed tomography (SPET/CT) of the kidneys, ureters, and urinary bladder allows for both functional and morphological information, visualization of renal stones and possible renal complications. The main advantages and limitations of this combined examination are discussed and the test is compared to the separate use of DRS and low dose of CT, in urolithiasis.

  6. Low-Dose Naltrexone: A New Therapy Option for Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Type I Patients.

    PubMed

    Sturn, Kayla M; Collin, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Naltrexone (an opioid antagonist) has long been used in patients overcoming alcohol and opioid dependency. However, at doses one-tenth of those commonly prescribed for the above conditions, an unexpected effect occurs that aids in alleviating pain. Although there are currently no randomized clinical trials supporting the use of low-dose naltrexone, we present a case study describing the impact of compounding low-dose naltrexone that has dramatically improved the patient's pain symptoms which were refractory to other treatments.

  7. [The advance of model of action in low-dose chronic benzene exposure induced hematotoxicity].

    PubMed

    Gao, Chen; Zhang, Zhengbao; Chen, Liping; Chen, Wen

    2015-09-01

    Benzene is classified as Group 1 carcinogen by IARC. It has been found that benzene induces hematotoxicity even in low dose exposure. The identification of key events during benzene induced hematotoxicty leads to adjustment of occupational exposure limits of benzene. In this review, we focus on the exposure, metabolism, target organs, key epigenetic changes, toxicty effects and end points of low-dose chronic benzene exposure induced hematotoxicity and finally discuss the perspectives on the future study of this area.

  8. Cytogenetic Low-Dose Hyperradiosensitivity Is Observed in Human Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Seth, Isheeta; Joiner, Michael C.; Tucker, James D.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The shape of the ionizing radiation response curve at very low doses has been the subject of considerable debate. Linear-no-threshold (LNT) models are widely used to estimate risks associated with low-dose exposures. However, the low-dose hyperradiosensitivity (HRS) phenomenon, in which cells are especially sensitive at low doses but then show increased radioresistance at higher doses, provides evidence of nonlinearity in the low-dose region. HRS is more prominent in the G2 phase of the cell cycle than in the G0/G1 or S phases. Here we provide the first cytogenetic mechanistic evidence of low-dose HRS in human peripheral blood lymphocytes using structural chromosomal aberrations. Methods and Materials: Human peripheral blood lymphocytes from 2 normal healthy female donors were acutely exposed to cobalt 60 γ rays in either G0 or G2 using closely spaced doses ranging from 0 to 1.5 Gy. Structural chromosomal aberrations were enumerated, and the slopes of the regression lines at low doses (0-0.4 Gy) were compared with doses of 0.5 Gy and above. Results: HRS was clearly evident in both donors for cells irradiated in G2. No HRS was observed in cells irradiated in G0. The radiation effect per unit dose was 2.5- to 3.5-fold higher for doses ≤0.4 Gy than for doses >0.5 Gy. Conclusions: These data provide the first cytogenetic evidence for the existence of HRS in human cells irradiated in G2 and suggest that LNT models may not always be optimal for making radiation risk assessments at low doses.

  9. Use of MOS structures for the investigation of low-dose-rate effects in bipolar transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Belyakov, V.V.; Pershenkov, V.S.; Shalnov, A.V.; Shvetzov-Shilovsky, I.N.

    1995-12-01

    A possible physical mechanism for bipolar transistor low-dose-rate irradiation response is discussed. This mechanism is described in terms of shallow electron traps in oxide. The experimental results on positive charge build-up at low dose-rates and small electric field in oxide are presented. The use of MOS transistor in bipolar mode for investigation of surface peripheral recombination current in bipolar transistor and extraction of MOS structure physical parameters is described.

  10. Low-dose Ketamine Versus Morphine for Acute Pain In the ED: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-01

    Original Contribution Low-dose ketamine vs morphine for acute pain in the ED: a randomized controlled trial☆,☆☆ Joshua P. Miller, MD a,b,⁎, Steven G...numeric rating scale (NRS) pain scores, in patients receiving low-dose ketamine (LDK) or morphine (MOR) for acute pain in the emergency department...convenience sample of patients aged 18 to 59 years with acute abdominal, flank, low back, or extremity pain were enrolled. Subjects were consented and

  11. Low-Dose Radiation and Genotoxic Chemicals Can Protect Against Stochastic Biological Effects

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Bobby R.; Walker, Dale M.; Walker, Vernon E.

    2004-01-01

    A protective apoptosis-mediated (PAM) process that is turned on in mammalian cells by low-dose photon (X and γ) radiation and appears to also be turned on by the genotoxic chemical ethylene oxide is discussed. Because of the PAM process, exposure to low-dose photon radiation (and possibly also some genotoxic chemicals) can lead to a reduction in the risk of stochastic effects such as problematic mutations, neoplastic transformation (an early step in cancer occurrence), and cancer. These findings indicate a need to revise the current low-dose risk assessment paradigm for which risk of cancer is presumed to increase linearly with dose (without a threshold) after exposure to any amount of a genotoxic agent such as ionizing radiation. These findings support a view seldom mentioned in the past, that cancer risk can actually decrease, rather than increase, after exposure to low doses of photon radiation and possibly some other genotoxic agents. The PAM process (a form of natural protection) may contribute substantially to cancer prevention in humans and other mammals. However, new research is needed to improve our understanding of the process. The new research could unlock novel strategies for optimizing cancer prevention and novel protocols for low-dose therapy for cancer. With low-dose cancer therapy, normal tissue could be spared from severe damage while possibly eliminating the cancer. PMID:19330143

  12. Comparison of the Effects of Low-Dose Midazolam, Magnesium Sulfate, Remifentanil and Low-Dose Etomidate on Prevention of Etomidate-Induced Myoclonus in Orthopedic Surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Sedighinejad, Abbas; Naderi Nabi, Bahram; Haghighi, Mohammad; Biazar, Gelareh; Imantalab, Vali; Rimaz, Siamak; Zaridoost, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Background Etomidate is a potent hypnotic agent with several desirable advantages such as providing a stable cardiovascular profile with minimal respiratory adverse effects and better hemodynamic stability compared with other induction agents. This drug is associated, however, with myoclonic movements which is characterized by a sudden, brief muscle contractions as a disturbing side-effect. Objectives The present study was designed to compare the effectiveness of low- dose midazolam, magnesium sulfate, remifentanil and low-dose etomidate to suppress etomidate-induced myoclonus in orthopedic surgery. Patients and Methods A double-blind clinical trial study was conducted in an academic hospital from September 2014 to August 2015. Two hundred and eighty-four eligible patients, American society of anesthesiologists class I - II, scheduled for elective orthopedic surgery were randomly allocated into four equal groups (n = 71). They received premedication with intravenous low-dose midazolam 0.015 mg/kg, magnesium sulfate 30 mg/kg, remifentanil 1 μg/kg and low-dose etomidate 0.03 mg/kg two minutes before induction of anesthesia with 0.3 mg/kg intravenous etomidate. Then the incidence and intensity of myoclonus were evaluated on a scale of 0 - 3; 0 = no myoclonus; 1 = mild (movement at wrist); 2 = moderate (movement at arm only, elbow or shoulder); and 3 = severe, generalized response or movement in more than one extremity, within ninety seconds. Any adverse effect due to these premedication agents was recorded. Results The incidence and intensity of myoclonus were significantly lower in the low-dose etomidate group. The incidence rates of myoclonus were 51 (71.85%), 61 (85.9%), 30 (42.3%) and 41 (57.7%), and the percentages of patients who experienced grade III of myoclonus were 30 (58.8%), 32 (52.5%), 9 (30%) and 14 (34.1%) in the midazolam, magnesium sulfate, etomidate and remifentanil groups, respectively. The incidence and intensity of myoclonus were significantly

  13. The Impact of Iterative Reconstruction in Low-Dose Computed Tomography on the Evaluation of Diffuse Interstitial Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Hyun-ju; Shin, Kyung Eun; Hwang, Hye Sun; Lee, Kyung Soo

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the impact of iterative reconstruction (IR) on the assessment of diffuse interstitial lung disease (DILD) using CT. Materials and Methods An American College of Radiology (ACR) phantom (module 4 to assess spatial resolution) was scanned with 10–100 effective mAs at 120 kVp. The images were reconstructed using filtered back projection (FBP), adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR), with blending ratios of 0%, 30%, 70% and 100%, and model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR), and their spatial resolution was objectively assessed by the line pair structure method. The patient study was based on retrospective interpretation of prospectively acquired data, and it was approved by the institutional review board. Chest CT scans of 23 patients (mean age 64 years) were performed at 120 kVp using 1) standard dose protocol applying 142–275 mA with dose modulation (high-resolution computed tomography [HRCT]) and 2) low-dose protocol applying 20 mA (low dose CT, LDCT). HRCT images were reconstructed with FBP, and LDCT images were reconstructed using FBP, ASIR, and MBIR. Matching images were randomized and independently reviewed by chest radiologists. Subjective assessment of disease presence and radiological diagnosis was made on a 10-point scale. In addition, semi-quantitative results were compared for the extent of abnormalities estimated to the nearest 5% of parenchymal involvement. Results In the phantom study, ASIR was comparable to FBP in terms of spatial resolution. However, for MBIR, the spatial resolution was greatly decreased under 10 mA. In the patient study, the detection of the presence of disease was not significantly different. The values for area under the curve for detection of DILD by HRCT, FBP, ASIR, and MBIR were as follows: 0.978, 0.979, 0.972, and 0.963. LDCT images reconstructed with FBP, ASIR, and MBIR tended to underestimate reticular or honeycombing opacities (-2.8%, -4.1%, and -5.3%, respectively) and

  14. Multiscale Penalized Weighted Least-Squares Sinogram Restoration for Low-Dose X-Ray Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Lu, Hongbing; Wen, Junhai; Liang, Zhengrong

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel multiscale penalized weighted least-squares (PWLS) method for restoration of low-dose computed tomography (CT) sinogram. The method utilizes wavelet transform for the multiscale or multi-resolution analysis on the sinogram. Specifically, the Mallat-Zhong's wavelet transform is applied to decompose the sinogram to different resolution levels. At each decomposed resolution level, a PWLS criterion is applied to restore the noise-contaminated wavelet coefficients, where the penalty is adaptive to each resolution scale and the weight is updated by an exponential relationship between the data variance and mean at each scale and location. The proposed PWLS method is based on the observations that (1) noise in CT sinogram after logarithm transform and calibration can be modeled as signal-dependent variables and the sample variance depends on the sample mean by an exponential relationship; and (2) noise reduction can be more effective when it is adaptive to different resolution levels. The effectiveness of the proposed multiscale PWLS method is validated by both computer simulations and experimental studies. The gain by multiscale approach over single-scale means is quantified by noise-resolution tradeoff measures. PMID:17946172

  15. Risk of Low Dose/Low Dose Rate Ionizing Radiation to Humans Symposium Annual Meeting of the Environmental Mutagen Society: Agenda and Abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    Veigl, Martina L.; Morgan, William F.; Schwartz, Jeffrey L.

    2009-11-11

    The low dose symposium thoughtfully addressed controversy of risk from low dose radiation exposure, hormesis and radon therapy. The stem cell symposium cogently considered the role of DNA damage and repair in hematopoietic stem cells underlying aging and malignancy and provocatively presented evidence that stem cells may have distinct morphologies and replicative properties, as well as special roles in cancer initiation. In the epigenetics symposium, studies illustrated the long range interaction of epigenetic mechanisms, the roles of CTCF and BORIS in region/specific regulation of epigenetic processes, the impact of DNA damage on epigenetic processes as well as links between epigenetic mechanisms and early nutrition and bystander effects. This report shows the agenda and abstracts for this symposium.

  16. Local application of low-dose insulin in improving wound healing after deep burn surgery

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chejiang; Wang, Jiazhe; Feng, Jianke

    2016-01-01

    The clinical effects of local application of low-dose insulin in improving wound healing after deep burn self-skin transplantation surgery were examined. Fifty-eight patients with deep burns were selected and randomly divided into 3 groups. In the blank control group, normal saline was injected to the subcutaneous tissue of wounds; in large dose insulin group, 1.0 µ long-term suspended zinc insulin was locally injected; and in the low-dose insulin group, 0.1 µ long-term suspended zinc insulin was locally injected. The healing effects were compared. After 7 and 14 days of treatments, wound surface area in the low-dose group was significantly smaller than in the other groups, and differences were statistically significant (P<0.05); wound healing duration and infection rate for patients in the low-dose group were significantly lower, class A healing rate was significantly improved, and the differences were statistically significant (P<0.05). Insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR) in the low-dose group was significantly lower, insulin secretion index (HOMA-β) and the insulin sensitivity index (HOMA-ISI) significantly increased. The expression levels of vascular endothelial growth factor and tumor necrosis factor-α in local tissue for the low-dose group were significantly higher than those in the other two groups. Differences were statistically significant (P<0.05). In conclusion, local application of low-dose insulin can effectively improve wound healing after deep burn surgeries. PMID:27698753

  17. Hormones and Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals: Low-Dose Effects and Nonmonotonic Dose Responses

    PubMed Central

    Colborn, Theo; Hayes, Tyrone B.; Heindel, Jerrold J.; Jacobs, David R.; Lee, Duk-Hee; Shioda, Toshi; Soto, Ana M.; vom Saal, Frederick S.; Welshons, Wade V.; Zoeller, R. Thomas

    2012-01-01

    For decades, studies of endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) have challenged traditional concepts in toxicology, in particular the dogma of “the dose makes the poison,” because EDCs can have effects at low doses that are not predicted by effects at higher doses. Here, we review two major concepts in EDC studies: low dose and nonmonotonicity. Low-dose effects were defined by the National Toxicology Program as those that occur in the range of human exposures or effects observed at doses below those used for traditional toxicological studies. We review the mechanistic data for low-dose effects and use a weight-of-evidence approach to analyze five examples from the EDC literature. Additionally, we explore nonmonotonic dose-response curves, defined as a nonlinear relationship between dose and effect where the slope of the curve changes sign somewhere within the range of doses examined. We provide a detailed discussion of the mechanisms responsible for generating these phenomena, plus hundreds of examples from the cell culture, animal, and epidemiology literature. We illustrate that nonmonotonic responses and low-dose effects are remarkably common in studies of natural hormones and EDCs. Whether low doses of EDCs influence certain human disorders is no longer conjecture, because epidemiological studies show that environmental exposures to EDCs are associated with human diseases and disabilities. We conclude that when nonmonotonic dose-response curves occur, the effects of low doses cannot be predicted by the effects observed at high doses. Thus, fundamental changes in chemical testing and safety determination are needed to protect human health. PMID:22419778

  18. Clofarabine plus Low-Dose Cytarabine Followed by Clofarabine plus Low-Dose Cytarabine Alternating with Decitabine in AML Frontline Therapy of Older Patients

    PubMed Central

    Faderl, Stefan; Ravandi, Farhad; Huang, Xuelin; Wang, Xuemei; Jabbour, Elias; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Kadia, Tapan; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Konopleva, Marina; Borthakur, Gautam; Burger, Jan; Feliu, Jennie; Kantarjian, Hagop M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Standard therapy for older patients with AML has a poor outcome. We have designed a combination of clofarabine plus low-dose cytarabine followed by a prolonged consolidation alternating with decitabine. Methods Sixty patients with a median age of 70 years (range 60-81) with newly diagnosed AML were included. They received clofarabine 20mg/m2 intravenously daily × 5 days plus cytarabine 20mg subcutaneously twice daily × 10 days. Responding patients continued for up to 17 courses of consolidation therapy including decitabine. Results Forty of 59 evaluable patients responded (66%). Complete remission rate was 58%. Median relapse-free survival (RFS) was 14.1 (95% CI: 6.9-not estimable) and median overall survival (OS) 12.7 months (95% CI: 8.8-not estimable). Median OS of responding patients (CR/CRp) was 24.2 months (95% CI: 17-not estimable). Compared to a historical group of patients who received clofarabine plus low-dose cytarabine with a shorter consolidation, RFS was not statistically different. Induction mortality was low (7% at 8 weeks) and toxicities manageable. Conclusions Clofarabine plus low-dose cytarabine alternating with decitabine in consolidation is active in older patients with newly diagnosed AML. The benefits of a prolonged consolidation remain unproven. PMID:22282348

  19. Low dose tomographic fluoroscopy: 4D intervention guidance with running prior

    SciTech Connect

    Flach, Barbara; Kuntz, Jan; Brehm, Marcus; Kachelrieß, Marc; Kueres, Rolf; Bartling, Sönke

    2013-10-15

    . Reconstructed volumes based on the running prior show high image quality without introducing new artifacts and the interventional materials are displayed at the correct position.Conclusions: The running prior improves the robustness of low dose 3D+T intervention guidance toward intended or unintended patient motion.

  20. Terminate lung cancer (TLC) study-A mixed-methods population approach to increase lung cancer screening awareness and low-dose computed tomography in Eastern Kentucky.

    PubMed

    Cardarelli, Roberto; Reese, David; Roper, Karen L; Cardarelli, Kathryn; Feltner, Frances J; Studts, Jamie L; Knight, Jennifer R; Armstrong, Debra; Weaver, Anthony; Shaffer, Dana

    2017-02-01

    For low dose CT lung cancer screening to be effective in curbing disease mortality, efforts are needed to overcome barriers to awareness and facilitate uptake of the current evidence-based screening guidelines. A sequential mixed-methods approach was employed to design a screening campaign utilizing messages developed from community focus groups, followed by implementation of the outreach campaign intervention in two high-risk Kentucky regions. This study reports on rates of awareness and screening in intervention regions, as compared to a control region.

  1. What proportions of focal liver lesions detected by unenhanced ultrasound are inconclusive?

    PubMed Central

    Willits, Iain; Burn, Julie; Cole, Helen; Hoare, Tim

    2014-01-01

    In August 2012, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence produced positive diagnostics guidance on the ultrasound contrast agent SonoVue®, but recommended further research involving an estimation of the proportion of unenhanced ultrasound scans reporting, but not characterising, focal liver lesions, particularly in cirrhotic livers. Patient records from the Radiology Information System of an acute hospital trust were progressively filtered based on categorical fields and keywords in the free text reports, to obtain ultrasound records including the liver that were appropriate for manual analysis. In total, 21,731 records referred from general practice or out-patient clinics were analysed. Patients described as having cirrhosis were analysed as a subgroup. After automatic exclusion of records considered likely to be negative, 5812 records were manually read and categorised as focal liver lesion inconclusive, benign or malignant. In the general practice cohort of 9175 records, 746 reported the presence of one or more focal liver lesions, with 18.4% (95% CI 15.7% to 21.3%) of these records mentioning an inconclusive focal liver lesion. In the out-patient cohort of 12,556 records, 1437 reported one or more focal liver lesions, and 29.4% (95% CI 26.9% to 32.0%) of these were inconclusive. Cirrhosis was reported in 10.8% of the out-patient scans that also reported a focal liver lesion, and 47.4% (95% CI 39.3% to 55.6%) of these scans had an inconclusive focal liver lesion, compared with 27.3% (95% CI 24.9% to 29.8%) that were inconclusive in non-cirrhotic livers (odds ratio 2.4; 95% CI 1.7 to 3.4). This retrospective study indicates that unenhanced ultrasound scans, in which a focal liver lesion is detected, are frequently inconclusive, with the probability of an inconclusive scan being greater in out-patient than general practice referrals. Inconclusive focal liver lesions were also reported in greater proportions of cirrhotic than non-cirrhotic livers. The

  2. Spinal uptake mimicking metastasis in SPECT/CT bone scan in a patient with superior vena cava obstruction.

    PubMed

    Rager, Olivier; Nkoulou, René; Garibotto, Valentina; Boudabbous, Sana; Arditi, Daniel

    2013-11-01

    A 46-year-old female patient with a mediastinal neuroendocrine carcinoma complicated by superior vena cava syndrome was referred for a bone metastatic workup. Bone scan with SPECT/CT showed several vertebral fixations without alterations on the unenhanced CT, but a CT scan with injection of contrast media showed vertebral densities matched to the lesions described on the SPECT/CT. This pattern confirmed presence of collateral paths through vertebral veins due to superior vena cava syndrome. Lack of metastases was confirmed by MRI.

  3. Noise correlation in CBCT projection data and its application for noise reduction in low-dose CBCT

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Hua; Ouyang, Luo; Wang, Jing E-mail: jing.wang@utsouthwestern.edu; Ma, Jianhua E-mail: jing.wang@utsouthwestern.edu; Huang, Jing; Chen, Wufan

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: To study the noise correlation properties of cone-beam CT (CBCT) projection data and to incorporate the noise correlation information to a statistics-based projection restoration algorithm for noise reduction in low-dose CBCT. Methods: In this study, the authors systematically investigated the noise correlation properties among detector bins of CBCT projection data by analyzing repeated projection measurements. The measurements were performed on a TrueBeam onboard CBCT imaging system with a 4030CB flat panel detector. An anthropomorphic male pelvis phantom was used to acquire 500 repeated projection data at six different dose levels from 0.1 to 1.6 mAs per projection at three fixed angles. To minimize the influence of the lag effect, lag correction was performed on the consecutively acquired projection data. The noise correlation coefficient between detector bin pairs was calculated from the corrected projection data. The noise correlation among CBCT projection data was then incorporated into the covariance matrix of the penalized weighted least-squares (PWLS) criterion for noise reduction of low-dose CBCT. Results: The analyses of the repeated measurements show that noise correlation coefficients are nonzero between the nearest neighboring bins of CBCT projection data. The average noise correlation coefficients for the first- and second-order neighbors are 0.20 and 0.06, respectively. The noise correlation coefficients are independent of the dose level. Reconstruction of the pelvis phantom shows that the PWLS criterion with consideration of noise correlation (PWLS-Cor) results in a lower noise level as compared to the PWLS criterion without considering the noise correlation (PWLS-Dia) at the matched resolution. At the 2.0 mm resolution level in the axial-plane noise resolution tradeoff analysis, the noise level of the PWLS-Cor reconstruction is 6.3% lower than that of the PWLS-Dia reconstruction. Conclusions: Noise is correlated among nearest neighboring

  4. Low-dose budesonide for maintenance of clinical remission in collagenous colitis: a randomised, placebo-controlled, 12-month trial

    PubMed Central

    Münch, Andreas; Bohr, Johan; Miehlke, Stephan; Benoni, Cecilia; Olesen, Martin; Öst, Åke; Strandberg, Lars; Hellström, Per M; Hertervig, Erik; Armerding, Peter; Stehlik, Jiri; Lindberg, Greger; Björk, Jan; Lapidus, Annika; Löfberg, Robert; Bonderup, Ole; Avnström, Sören; Rössle, Martin; Dilger, Karin; Mueller, Ralph; Greinwald, Roland; Tysk, Curt; Ström, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    Objective This 1-year study aimed to assess low-dose budesonide therapy for maintenance of clinical remission in patients with collagenous colitis. Design A prospective, randomised, placebo-controlled study beginning with an 8-week open-label induction phase in which patients with histologically confirmed active collagenous colitis received budesonide (Budenofalk, 9 mg/day initially, tapered to 4.5 mg/day), after which 92 patients in clinical remission were randomised to budesonide (mean dose 4.5 mg/day; Budenofalk 3 mg capsules, two or one capsule on alternate days) or placebo in a 12-month double-blind phase with 6 months treatment-free follow-up. Primary endpoint was clinical remission throughout the double-blind phase. Results Clinical remission during open-label treatment was achieved by 84.5% (93/110 patients). The median time to remission was 10.5 days (95% CI (9.0 to 14.0 days)). The maintenance of clinical remission at 1 year was achieved by 61.4% (27/44 patients) in the budesonide group versus 16.7% (8/48 patients) receiving placebo (treatment difference 44.5% in favour of budesonide; 95% CI (26.9% to 62.7%), p<0.001). Health-related quality of life was maintained during the 12-month double-blind phase in budesonide-treated patients. During treatment-free follow-up, 82.1% (23/28 patients) formerly receiving budesonide relapsed after study drug discontinuation. Low-dose budesonide over 1 year resulted in few suspected adverse drug reactions (7/44 patients), all non-serious. Conclusions Budesonide at a mean dose of 4.5 mg/day maintained clinical remission for at least 1 year in the majority of patients with collagenous colitis and preserved health-related quality of life without safety concerns. Treatment extension with low-dose budesonide beyond 1 year may be beneficial given the high relapse rate after budesonide discontinuation. Trial registration numbers http://www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT01278082) and http

  5. Low dose gamma irradiation enhances defined signaling components of intercellular reactive oxygen-mediated apoptosis induction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, G.

    2011-01-01

    Transformed cells are selectively removed by intercellular ROS-mediated induction of apoptosis. Signaling is based on the HOCl and the NO/peroxynitrite pathway (major pathways) and the nitryl chloride and the metal-catalyzed Haber-Weiss pathway (minor pathways). During tumor progression, resistance against intercellular induction of apoptosis is acquired through expression of membrane-associated catalase. Low dose radiation of nontransformed cells has been shown to enhance intercellular induction of apoptosis. The present study was performed to define the signaling components which are modulated by low dose gamma irradiation. Low dose radiation induced the release of peroxidase from nontransformed, transformed and tumor cells. Extracellular superoxide anion generation was strongly enhanced in the case of transformed cells and tumor cells, but not in nontransformed cells. Enhancement of peroxidase release and superoxide anion generation either increased intercellular induction of apoptosis of transformed cells, or caused a partial protection under specific signaling conditions. In tumor cells, low dose radiation enhanced the production of major signaling components, but this had no effect on apoptosis induction, due to the strong resistance mechanism of tumor cells. Our data specify the nature of low dose radiation-induced effects on specific signaling components of intercellular induction of apoptosis at defined stages of multistep carcinogenesis.

  6. Bromocriptine and low dose cyclosporine in the treatment of experimental autoimmune uveitis in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Palestine, A G; Muellenberg-Coulombre, C G; Kim, M K; Gelato, M C; Nussenblatt, R B

    1987-01-01

    The immunologic effects of bromocriptine and low dose cyclosporine on experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU) induced in Lewis rats by S-antigen immunization were studied. Rats treated with a sub-optimal dose (low dose) of cyclosporine (2 mg/kg per d), bromocriptine (1.8 mg/kg per d), or both drugs were compared with untreated rats in regard to the development of EAU, lymphocyte proliferative responses, and anti-S-antigen serum antibodies. Bromocriptine alone decreased the incidence of EAU only in female rats (P less than 0.01), did not effect the lymphocyte proliferative response, but did significantly decrease antibody titers in both males (P less than 0.004) and females (P less than 0.0005). Low dose cyclosporine also partially decreased the incidence of EAU in female rats, but did not decrease antibody titers or lymphocyte proliferative responses. Bromocriptine plus low-dose cyclosporine led to more marked decreases in the incidence of EAU and anti-S-antigen antibody titers as well as in the lymphocyte proliferative assay (P less than 0.01 for males, P less than 0.0005 for females). This study suggests that bromocriptine can enhance the immunosuppression of low dose cyclosporine. PMID:3494043

  7. What can be learned from epidemiologic studies of persons exposed to low doses of radiation?

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, E.S.

    1993-04-01

    The main objective of radiation risk assessment is to determine the risk of various adverse health effects associated with exposure to low doses and low dose rates. Extrapolation of risks from studies of persons exposed at high doses (generally exceeding 1 Sv) and dose rates has been the primary approach used to achieve this objective. The study of Japanese atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki has played an especially important role in risk assessment efforts. A direct assessment of the dose-response function based on studies of persons exposed at low doses and dose rates is obviously desirable. This paper focuses on the potential of both current and future nuclear workers studies for investigating the dose-response functions at low doses, and also discusses analyses making use of the low dose portion of the atomic bomb survivor data. Difficulties in using these data are the statistical imprecision of estimated dose-response parameters, and potential bias resulting from confounding factors and from uncertainties in dose estimates.

  8. Irradiation with low-dose gamma ray enhances tolerance to heat stress in Arabidopsis seedlings.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liang; Zheng, Fengxia; Qi, Wencai; Wang, Tianqi; Ma, Lingyu; Qiu, Zongbo; Li, Jingyuan

    2016-06-01

    Gamma irradiation at low doses can stimulate the tolerance to environmental stress in plants. However, the knowledge regarding the mechanisms underlying the enhanced tolerance induced by low-dose gamma irradiation is far from fully understood. In this study, to investigate the physiological and molecular mechanisms of heat stress alleviated by low-dose gamma irradiation, the Arabidopsis seeds were exposed to a range of doses before subjected to heat treatment. Our results showed that 50-Gy gamma irradiation maximally promoted seedling growth in response to heat stress. The production rate of superoxide radical and contents of hydrogen peroxide and malondialdehyde in the seedlings irradiated with 50-Gy dose under heat stress were significantly lower than those of controls. The activities of antioxidant enzymes, glutathione (GSH) content and proline level in the gamma-irradiated seedlings were significantly increased compared with the controls. Furthermore, transcriptional expression analysis of selected genes revealed that some components related to heat tolerance were stimulated by low-dose gamma irradiation under heat shock. Our results suggest that low-dose gamma irradiation can modulate the physiological responses as well as gene expression related to heat tolerance, thus alleviating the stress damage in Arabidopsis seedlings.

  9. Body-wide anatomy recognition in PET/CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huiqian; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Odhner, Dewey; Tong, Yubing; Zhao, Liming; Torigian, Drew A.

    2015-03-01

    With the rapid growth of positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT)-based medical applications, body-wide anatomy recognition on whole-body PET/CT images becomes crucial for quantifying body-wide disease burden. This, however, is a challenging problem and seldom studied due to unclear anatomy reference frame and low spatial resolution of PET images as well as low contrast and spatial resolution of the associated low-dose CT images. We previously developed an automatic anatomy recognition (AAR) system [15] whose applicability was demonstrated on diagnostic computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) images in different body regions on 35 objects. The aim of the present work is to investigate strategies for adapting the previous AAR system to low-dose CT and PET images toward automated body-wide disease quantification. Our adaptation of the previous AAR methodology to PET/CT images in this paper focuses on 16 objects in three body regions - thorax, abdomen, and pelvis - and consists of the following steps: collecting whole-body PET/CT images from existing patient image databases, delineating all objects in these images, modifying the previous hierarchical models built from diagnostic CT images to account for differences in appearance in low-dose CT and PET images, automatically locating objects in these images following object hierarchy, and evaluating performance. Our preliminary evaluations indicate that the performance of the AAR approach on low-dose CT images achieves object localization accuracy within about 2 voxels, which is comparable to the accuracies achieved on diagnostic contrast-enhanced CT images. Object recognition on low-dose CT images from PET/CT examinations without requiring diagnostic contrast-enhanced CT seems feasible.

  10. Low-dose phase-based X-ray imaging techniques for in situ soft tissue engineering assessments.

    PubMed

    Izadifar, Zohreh; Honaramooz, Ali; Wiebe, Sheldon; Belev, George; Chen, Xiongbiao; Chapman, Dean

    2016-03-01

    In tissue engineering, non-invasive imaging of biomaterial scaffolds and tissues in living systems is essential to longitudinal animal studies for assessments without interrupting the repair process. Conventional X-ray imaging is inadequate for use in soft tissue engineering due to the limited absorption difference between the soft tissue and biomaterial scaffolds. X-ray phase-based imaging techniques that derive contrast from refraction or phase effects rather than absorption can provide the necessary contrast to see low-density biomaterial scaffolds and tissues in large living systems. This paper explores and compares three synchrotron phase-based X-ray imaging techniques-computed tomography (CT)-diffraction enhanced imaging (DEI), -analyzer based imaging (ABI), and -phase contrast imaging (PCI)-for visualization and characterization of low-density biomaterial scaffolds and tissues in situ for non-invasive soft tissue engineering assessments. Intact pig joints implanted with polycaprolactone scaffolds were used as the model to assess and compare the imaging techniques in terms of different qualitative and quantitative criteria. For long-term in vivo live animal imaging, different strategies for reducing the imaging radiation dose and scan time-reduced number of CT projections, region of interest, and low resolution imaging-were examined with the presented phase-based imaging techniques. The results demonstrated promising capabilities of the phase-based techniques for visualization of biomaterial scaffolds and soft tissues in situ. The low-dose imaging strategies were illustrated effective for reducing the radiation dose to levels appropriate for live animal imaging. The comparison among the imaging techniques suggested that CT-DEI has the highest efficiency in retaining image contrast at considerably low radiation doses.

  11. Low doses of ionizing radiation to mammalian cells may rather control than cause DNA damage

    SciTech Connect

    Feinendegen, L.E.; Bond, V.P.; Sondhaus, C.A.; Altman, K.I.

    1998-12-31

    This report examines the origin of tissue effects that may follow from different cellular responses to low-dose irradiation, using published data. Two principal categories of cellular responses are considered. One response category relates to the probability of radiation-induced DNA damage. The other category consists of low-dose induced metabolic changes that induce mechanisms of DNA damage mitigation, which do not operate at high levels of exposure. Modeled in this way, tissue is treated as a complex adaptive system. The interaction of the various cellular responses results in a net tissue dose-effect relation that is likely to deviate from linearity in the low-dose region. This suggests that the LNT hypothesis should be reexamined. This paper aims at demonstrating tissue effects as an expression of cellular responses, both damaging and defensive, in relation to the energy deposited in cell mass, by use of microdosimetric concepts.

  12. Final Technical Report for the grant entitled "Genetic Factors Affecting Susceptibility to Low-Dose Radiation"

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, William, F., Ph.D., D.Sc.

    2006-11-22

    The goal of this proposal was to test the hypothesis that mice heterozygous for the Nijmegen Breakage Syndrome (NBS1) gene are genetically susceptible to low doses of ionizing radiation. The rationale for this is that patients with NBS are radiation sensitive, because of defects in cellular responses to radiation induced genetic damage and haploinsufficiency at this genetic locus provides the potential for genetic susceptibility to low doses of ionizing radiation. Wild type and heterozygous NBS1 mice were irradiated and followed over their lifetime for radiation induced genomic instability, carcinogenesis and non-specific life shortening. No differences in cytogenetic damage, cancer induction or life span were observed between the hypomorphic mice indicating that genetic imbalance at the NBS1 loci does not modulate low dose radiation sensitivity.

  13. Unenhanced areas revealed by contrast-enhanced abdominal ultrasonography with Sonazoid™ potentially correspond to colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tomizawa, Minoru; Togashi, Mizuki; Shinozaki, Fuminobu; Hasegawa, Rumiko; Shirai, Yoshinori; Noritake, Midori; Matsuoka, Yukie; Kainuma, Hiroaki; Iwasaki, Yasuji; Fugo, Kazunori; Motoyoshi, Yasufumi; Sugiyama, Takao; Yamamoto, Shigenori; Kishimoto, Takashi; Ishige, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated the potential utility of contrast-enhanced abdominal ultrasonography (CEUS), using Sonazoid™, in colorectal cancer (CRC). Three patients were subjected to CEUS with Sonazoid™. Surgical specimens were immunostained for CD31. Numbers of blood vessels positive for CD31 were analyzed in each of five fields at ×400 magnification and averaged to determine blood vessel density. Blood vessel density was compared between non-tumorous and tumorous areas. Prior to the administration of Sonazoid™, CRC was illustrated as irregular-shaped wall thickening. One minute after the administration of Sonazoid™, the majority of the thickened wall was enhanced, while some parts of the thickened wall remained unenhanced. Blood vessel densities of non-tumorous and tumorous areas in patient two were 25.2±2.5 and 5.2±1.1 (P<0.0001). Blood vessel densities of non-tumorous and tumorous areas in patient three were 19.0±3.1 and 2.2±0.8 (P<0.0001). Tumorous areas of CRC were not enhanced 1 min after the administration of Sonazoid™. Blood vessel density was lower in tumorous areas compared with non-tumorous areas, as evidenced by immunohistochemistry for CD31. These findings suggest that CEUS may be useful for the determination of the extent of CRC. PMID:28105132

  14. Bystander responses in low dose irradiated cells treated with plasma from gamma irradiated blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acheva, A.; Georgieva, R.; Rupova, I.; Boteva, R.; Lyng, F.

    2008-02-01

    There are two specific low-dose radiation-induced responses that have been the focus of radiobiologists' interest in recent years. These are the bystander effect in non-irradiated cells and the adaptive response to a challenge dose after prior low dose irradiation. In the present study we have investigated if plasma from irradiated blood can act as a 'challenge dose' on low dose irradiated reporter epithelial cells (HaCaT cell line). The main aim was to evaluate the overall effect of low dose irradiation (0.05 Gy) of reporter cells and the influence of bystander factors in plasma from 0.5 Gy gamma irradiated blood on these cells. The effects were estimated by clonogenic survival of the reporter cells. We also investigated the involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) as potential factors involved in the bystander signaling. Calcium fluxes and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) depolarization were also examined as a marker for initiation of apoptosis in the reporter cells. The results show that there are large individual differences in the production of bystander effects and adaptive responses between different donors. These may be due to the specific composition of the donor plasma. The observed effects generally could be divided into two groups: adaptive responses and additive effects. ROS appeared to be involved in the responses of the low dose pretreated reporter cells. In all cases there was a significant decrease in MMP which may be an early event in the apoptotic process. Calcium signaling also appeared to be involved in triggering apoptosis in the low dose pretreated reporter cells. The heterogeneity of the bystander responses makes them difficult to be modulated for medical uses. Specific plasma characteristics that cause these large differences in the responses would need to be identified to make them useful for radiotherapy.

  15. Low-dose total-body γ irradiation modulates immune response to acute proton radiation.

    PubMed

    Luo-Owen, Xian; Pecaut, Michael J; Rizvi, Asma; Gridley, Daila S

    2012-03-01

    Health risks due to exposure to low-dose/low-dose-rate radiation alone or when combined with acute irradiation are not yet clearly defined. This study quantified the effects of protracted exposure to low-dose/low-dose-rate γ rays with and without acute exposure to protons on the response of immune and other cell populations. C57BL/6 mice were irradiated with ⁵⁷Co (0.05 Gy at 0.025 cGy/h); subsets were subsequently exposed to high-dose/high-dose-rate proton radiation (250 MeV; 2 or 3 Gy at 0.5 Gy/min). Analyses were performed at 4 and 17 days postexposure. Spleen and thymus masses relative to body mass were decreased on day 4 after proton irradiation with or without pre-exposure to γ rays; by day 17, however, the decrease was attenuated by the priming dose. Proton dose-dependent decreases, either with or without pre-exposure to γ rays, occurred in white blood cell, lymphocyte and granulocyte counts in blood but not in spleen. A similar pattern was found for lymphocyte subpopulations, including CD3+ T, CD19+ B, CD4+ T, CD8+ T and NK1.1+ natural killer (NK) cells. Spontaneous DNA synthesis by leukocytes after proton irradiation was high in blood on day 4 and high in spleen on day 17; priming with γ radiation attenuated the effect of 3 Gy in both body compartments. Some differences were also noted among groups in erythrocyte and thrombocyte characteristics. Analysis of splenocytes activated with anti-CD3/anti-CD28 antibodies showed changes in T-helper 1 (Th1) and Th2 cytokines. Overall, the data demonstrate that pre-exposure of an intact mammal to low-dose/low-dose-rate γ rays can attenuate the response to acute exposure to proton radiation with respect to at least some cell populations.

  16. Micro RNA responses to chronic or acute exposures to low dose ionizing radiation

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhry, M. Ahmad; Omaruddin, Romaica A.; Kreger, Bridget; de Toledo, Sonia M.; Azzam, Edouard I.

    2014-01-01

    Human health risks of exposure to low dose ionizing radiation remain ambiguous and are the subject of intense debate. A wide variety of biological effects are induced after cellular exposure to ionizing radiation, but the underlying molecular mechanism(s) remain to be completely understood. We hypothesized that low dose c-radiation-induced effects are controlled by the modulation of micro RNA (miRNA) that participate in the control of gene expression at the posttranscriptional level and are involved in many cellular processes. We monitored the expression of several miRNA in human cells exposed to acute or chronic low doses of 10 cGy or a moderate dose of 400 cGy of 137Cs γ-rays. Dose, dose rate and time dependent differences in the relative expression of several miRNA were investigated. The expression patterns of many miRNA differed after exposure to either chronic or acute 10 cGy. The expression of miRNA let-7e, a negative regulator of RAS oncogene, and the c-MYC miRNA cluster were upregulated after 10 cGy chronic dose but were downregulated after 3 h of acute 10 cGy. The miR-21 was upregulated in chronic or acute low dose and moderate dose treated cells and its target genes hPDCD4, hPTEN, hSPRY2, and hTPM1 were found to be downregulated. These findings provide evidence that low dose and dose rate c-irradiation dictate the modulation of miRNA, which can result in a differential cellular response than occurs at high doses. This information will contribute to understanding the risks to human health after exposure to low dose radiation. PMID:22367372

  17. Data integration reveals key homeostatic mechanisms following low dose radiation exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Tilton, Susan C.; Matzke, Melissa M.; Sowa, Marianne B.; Stenoien, David L.; Weber, Thomas J.; Morgan, William F.; Waters, Katrina M.

    2015-05-15

    The goal of this study was to define pathways regulated by low dose radiation to understand how biological systems respond to subtle perturbations in their environment and prioritize pathways for human health assessment. Using an in vitro 3-D human full thickness skin model, we have examined the temporal response of dermal and epidermal layers to 10 cGy X-ray using transcriptomic, proteomic, phosphoproteomic and metabolomic platforms. Bioinformatics analysis of each dataset independently revealed potential signaling mechanisms affected by low dose radiation, and integrating data shed additional insight into the mechanisms regulating low dose responses in human tissue. We examined direct interactions among datasets (top down approach) and defined several hubs as significant regulators, including transcription factors (YY1, MYC and CREB1), kinases (CDK2, PLK1) and a protease (MMP2). These data indicate a shift in response across time — with an increase in DNA repair, tissue remodeling and repression of cell proliferation acutely (24–72 h). Pathway-based integration (bottom up approach) identified common molecular and pathway responses to low dose radiation, including oxidative stress, nitric oxide signaling and transcriptional regulation through the SP1 factor that would not have been identified by the individual data sets. Significant regulation of key downstream metabolites of nitrative stress was measured within these pathways. Among the features identified in our study, the regulation of MMP2 and SP1 was experimentally validated. Our results demonstrate the advantage of data integration to broadly define the pathways and networks that represent the mechanisms by which complex biological systems respond to perturbation. - Highlights: • Low dose ionizing radiation altered homeostasis in 3D skin tissue model. • Global gene/protein/metabolite data integrated using complementary statistical approaches • Time and location-specific change in matrix regulation

  18. Low Dose Radiation Hypersensitivity is Caused by p53-dependent Apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Enns, L; Bogen, K; Wizniak, J; Murtha, A; Weinfeld, M

    2004-04-08

    Exposure to environmental radiation and the application of new clinical modalities, such as radioimmunotherapy, have heightened the need to understand cellular responses to low dose and low-dose rate ionizing radiation. Many tumor cell lines have been observed to exhibit a hypersensitivity to radiation doses below 50 cGy, which manifests as a significant deviation from the clonogenic survival response predicted by a linear-quadratic fit to higher doses. However, the underlying processes for this phenomenon remain unclear. Using a gel microdrop/flow cytometry assay to monitor single cell proliferation at early times post irradiation, we examined the response of human A549 lung carcinoma, T98G glioma and MCF7 breast carcinoma cell lines exposed to gamma radiation doses from 0 to 200 cGy delivered at 0.18 and 22 cGy/min. The A549 and T98G cells, but not MCF7 cells, showed the marked hypersensitivity at doses <50 cGy. To further characterize the low-dose hypersensitivity, we examined the influence of low-dose radiation on cell cycle status and apoptosis by assays for active caspase-3 and phosphatidylserine translocation (annexin-V binding). We observed that caspase-3 activation and annexin-V binding mirrored the proliferation curves for the cell lines. Furthermore, the low-dose hypersensitivity and annexin-V binding to irradiated A549 and T98G cells were eliminated by treating the cells with pifithrin, an inhibitor of p53. When p53-inactive cell lines (2800T skin fibroblasts and HCT116 colorectal carcinoma cells) were examined for similar patterns, we found that there was no HRS and apoptosis was not detectable by annexin-V or caspase-3 assays. Our data therefore suggest that low-dose hypersensitivity is associated with p53-dependent apoptosis.

  19. Alteration of cytokine profiles in mice exposed to chronic low-dose ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Suk Chul; Lee, Kyung-Mi; Kang, Yu Mi; Kim, Kwanghee; Kim, Cha Soon; Yang, Kwang Hee; Jin, Young-Woo; Kim, Chong Soon; Kim, Hee Sun

    2010-07-09

    While a high-dose of ionizing radiation is generally harmful and causes damage to living organisms, a low-dose of radiation has been shown to be beneficial in a variety of animal models. To understand the basis for the effect of low-dose radiation in vivo, we examined the cellular and immunological changes evoked in mice exposed to low-dose radiation at very low (0.7 mGy/h) and low (3.95 mGy/h) dose rate for the total dose of 0.2 and 2 Gy, respectively. Mice exposed to low-dose radiation, either at very low- or low-dose rate, demonstrated normal range of body weight and complete blood counts. Likewise, the number and percentage of peripheral lymphocyte populations, CD4{sup +} T, CD8{sup +} T, B, or NK cells, stayed unchanged following irradiation. Nonetheless, the sera from these mice exhibited elevated levels of IL-3, IL-4, leptin, MCP-1, MCP-5, MIP-1{alpha}, thrombopoietin, and VEGF along with slight reduction of IL-12p70, IL-13, IL-17, and IFN-{gamma}. This pattern of cytokine release suggests the stimulation of innate immunity facilitating myeloid differentiation and activation while suppressing pro-inflammatory responses and promoting differentiation of naive T cells into T-helper 2, not T-helper 1, types. Collectively, our data highlight the subtle changes of cytokine milieu by chronic low-dose {gamma}-radiation, which may be associated with the functional benefits observed in various experimental models.

  20. Enteric coating can lead to reduced antiplatelet effect of low-dose acetylsalicylic acid.

    PubMed

    Haastrup, Peter Fentz; Grønlykke, Thor; Jarbøl, Dorte Ejg

    2015-03-01

    Low-dose acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) is widely used as antithrombotic prophylaxis. Enteric-coated ASA has been developed to decrease the risk of gastrointestinal side effects. The consequences of enteric coating on pharmacokinetics and antiplatelet effect of ASA have not systematically been assessed. This MiniReview demonstrates that data from clinical trials indicate that enteric coating can reduce the antiplatelet effect of ASA compared to plain ASA. This is possibly due to decreased bioavailability of ASA caused by prolonged solvation and absorption of the enteric-coated formulations. Therefore, low-dose enteric-coated ASA might not be bioequivalent to plain ASA, entailing the risk of insufficient cardiovascular prophylaxis.

  1. Severe compensatory hyperhidrosis following thoracic sympathectomy successfully treated with low doses of botulinum toxin A.

    PubMed

    Santana-Rodríguez, Norberto; Clavo, Bernardino; Calatayud-Gastardi, Joaquín; García-Castellano, José Manuel; Ponce-González, Miguel A; Olmo-Quintana, Vicente; Llontop, Pedro; Alvarez-Prats, Alejandro; Yordi, Nagib Atallah; Ruíz-Caballero, José Antonio

    2012-12-01

    Compensatory hyperhidrosis is an adverse effect of thoracic sympathectomy that can be debilitating, which is why an efficient treatment is demanded. Botulinum toxin is an emerging treatment, not well known yet. We report two cases of compensatory hyperhidrosis following thoracic sympathectomy which were both treated with low doses of botulinum toxin A. The patients, a male and a female, noted a high level of satisfaction with the abolishment of sweating that was maintained up to 10 months. We consider that low doses of botulinum toxin A is a well tolerated, safe and effective treatment for compensatory hyperhidrosis and should be offered as an alternative treatment.

  2. Treatment of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) using low dose naltrexone (LDN).

    PubMed

    Chopra, Pradeep; Cooper, Mark S

    2013-06-01

    Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) is a neuropathic pain syndrome, which involves glial activation and central sensitization in the central nervous system. Here, we describe positive outcomes of two CRPS patients, after they were treated with low-dose naltrexone (a glial attenuator), in combination with other CRPS therapies. Prominent CRPS symptoms remitted in these two patients, including dystonic spasms and fixed dystonia (respectively), following treatment with low-dose naltrexone (LDN). LDN, which is known to antagonize the Toll-like Receptor 4 pathway and attenuate activated microglia, was utilized in these patients after conventional CRPS pharmacotherapy failed to suppress their recalcitrant CRPS symptoms.

  3. Low-dose imipramine for treatment of panic disorder during pregnancy: a retrospective chart review.

    PubMed

    Uguz, Faruk; Sahingoz, Mine; Gungor, Buket; Askin, Rustem

    2014-08-01

    Although imipramine is one of the antidepressants that could be effective in the treatment of panic disorder, data on its usage for this diagnosis in the pregnancy period are limited. This report presents the results of 16 pregnant women with panic disorder without comorbid diagnosis who underwent low-dose imipramine (10-40 mg/d) treatment. According to the Clinical Global Impression-Improvement Scale, 12 (75%) of 16 women responded to the treatment. The results suggest that low-dose imipramine may be useful for the treatment of panic disorder during pregnancy.

  4. Behavioral Effects of Low Doses of Cholinesterase Inhibitors in Robot- Tested Marmosets

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-10-01

    IJW hL l !2Y r GRANT NO.: DAMDI7-88-Z-8020 TITLE: Behavioral effects of low doses of cholinesterase inhibitors in robot-tested marmosets ...Behavioral effects of low doses of cholinesterase inhibitors in robot-tested marmosets 12Z. PERSONAL AUfl4R() Otto L. Wolt huts, Bap Groen. Raymond Vanwerech...mg/kg) and 20 min after i.m. physostigmine (0.02-0.08 mg/kg) in experimentally naive marmosets . The behavioral tasks in series 1 were hand-eye

  5. [Cerebral hemorrhage induced by low-dose streptokinase: a pharmacologic paradox? Report of a clinical case].

    PubMed

    Fedeli, F; Skouse, D; Messina, A

    1997-01-01

    A case of an important intracranial hemorrhage after a low dose (approx. 500,000 UI) of streptokinase in a 60 year-old woman suffering from myocardial infarction is presented. Clinical, electrocardiographic, echocardiographic, lab and tomographic findings are described. The authors suggest a pharmacokinetic mechanism which could be responsible of a "paradox effect" (a powerful and dangerous effect of the drug when given in low dose) and they wonder whether in case of allergic reactions should it be better not to stop the infusion of the thrombolytic drug and be more liberal with the "symptomatic" drugs. Tha patient is still alive and the clinical conditions slowly progressing.

  6. Opioid-induced myoclonus and hyperalgesia following a short course of low-dose oral morphine

    PubMed Central

    Woodward, Owen Bleddyn; Naraen, Sangeeta; Naraen, Akriti

    2016-01-01

    A 76-year-old man was admitted to hospital with a right-sided fractured neck of femur requiring repair via a cemented hemiarthroplasty. Intraoperatively he received 10 mg of intravenous morphine. Post-operatively he received a short course of low-dose oral opioids and subsequently developed myoclonic jerks and hyperalgesia. The opioids were discontinued and both adverse effects resolved. This case report discusses the concurrent development of myoclonus and hyperalgesia following a low dose of opioids and explores possible management options. PMID:28386402

  7. Bleeding Risk with Long-Term Low-Dose Aspirin: A Systematic Review of Observational Studies

    PubMed Central

    García Rodríguez, Luis A.; Martín-Pérez, Mar; Hennekens, Charles H.; Rothwell, Peter M.; Lanas, Angel

    2016-01-01

    Background Low-dose aspirin has proven effectiveness in secondary and primary prevention of cardiovascular events, but is also associated with an increased risk of major bleeding events. For primary prevention, this absolute risk must be carefully weighed against the benefits of aspirin; such assessments are currently limited by a lack of data from general populations. Methods Systematic searches of Medline and Embase were conducted to identify observational studies published between 1946 and 4 March 2015 that reported the risks of gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding or intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) with long-term, low-dose aspirin (75–325 mg/day). Pooled estimates of the relative risk (RR) for bleeding events with aspirin versus non-use were calculated using random-effects models, based on reported estimates of RR (including odds ratios, hazard ratios, incidence rate ratios and standardized incidence ratios) in 39 articles. Findings The incidence of GI bleeding with low-dose aspirin was 0.48–3.64 cases per 1000 person-years, and the overall pooled estimate of the RR with low-dose aspirin was 1.4 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.2–1.7). For upper and lower GI bleeding, the RRs with low-dose aspirin were 2.3 (2.0–2.6) and 1.8 (1.1–3.0), respectively. Neither aspirin dose nor duration of use had consistent effects on RRs for upper GI bleeding. The estimated RR for ICH with low-dose aspirin was 1.4 (1.2–1.7) overall. Aspirin was associated with increased bleeding risks when combined with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, clopidogrel and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors compared with monotherapy. By contrast, concomitant use of proton pump inhibitors decreased upper GI bleeding risks relative to aspirin monotherapy. Conclusions The risks of major bleeding with low-dose aspirin in real-world settings are of a similar magnitude to those reported in randomized trials. These data will help inform clinical judgements regarding the use of low-dose aspirin

  8. Low-dose spinal anesthesia for urgent laparotomy in severe myasthenia gravis

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Miguel Angel Palomero; Mencía, Teresa Pérez; Álvarez, Felipe Villar; Báez, Yolanda Laporta; Pérez, Gloria María Santos; García, Andrés López

    2013-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune disease with an incidence of 2-10/100,000 cases per year, characterized by muscle weakness secondary to destruction of postsynaptic acetylcholine receptors. In these patients, important perioperative issues remain unresolved, namely, optimal administration of cholinesterase inhibitors, risks of regional anesthesia, and prediction of need of postoperative mechanical ventilation. We describe the use of a low-dose spinal anesthesia in a patient with MG who was submitted for emergence exploratory laparotomy. The utilization of low-dose spinal anesthesia allowed us to perform surgery with no adverse respiratory or cardiovascular events in this patient. PMID:23717241

  9. Low-dose X-ray computed tomography image reconstruction with a combined low-mAs and sparse-view protocol

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yang; Bian, Zhaoying; Huang, Jing; Zhang, Yunwan; Niu, Shanzhou; Feng, Qianjin; Chen, Wufan; Liang, Zhengrong; Ma, Jianhua

    2014-01-01

    To realize low-dose imaging in X-ray computed tomography (CT) examination, lowering milliampere-seconds (low-mAs) or reducing the required number of projection views (sparse-view) per rotation around the body has been widely studied as an easy and effective approach. In this study, we are focusing on low-dose CT image reconstruction from the sinograms acquired with a combined low-mAs and sparse-view protocol and propose a two-step image reconstruction strategy. Specifically, to suppress significant statistical noise in the noisy and insufficient sinograms, an adaptive sinogram restoration (ASR) method is first proposed with consideration of the statistical property of sinogram data, and then to further acquire a high-quality image, a total variation based projection onto convex sets (TV-POCS) method is adopted with a slight modification. For simplicity, the present reconstruction strategy was termed as “ASR-TV-POCS.” To evaluate the present ASR-TV-POCS method, both qualitative and quantitative studies were performed on a physical phantom. Experimental results have demonstrated that the present ASR-TV-POCS method can achieve promising gains over other existing methods in terms of the noise reduction, contrast-to-noise ratio, and edge detail preservation. PMID:24977611

  10. Penalized weighted least-squares approach to sinogram noise reduction and image reconstruction for low-dose X-ray computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Li, Tianfang; Lu, Hongbing; Liang, Zhengrong

    2006-10-01

    Reconstructing low-dose X-ray computed tomography (CT) images is a noise problem. This work investigated a penalized weighted least-squares (PWLS) approach to address this problem in two dimensions, where the WLS considers first- and second-order noise moments and the penalty models signal spatial correlations. Three different implementations were studied for the PWLS minimization. One utilizes a Markov random field (MRF) Gibbs functional to consider spatial correlations among nearby detector bins and projection views in sinogram space and minimizes the PWLS cost function by iterative Gauss-Seidel algorithm. Another employs Karhunen-Loève (KL) transform to de-correlate data signals among nearby views and minimizes the PWLS adaptively to each KL component by analytical calculation, where the spatial correlation among nearby bins is modeled by the same Gibbs functional. The third one models the spatial correlations among image pixels in image domain also by a MRF Gibbs functional and minimizes the PWLS by iterative successive over-relaxation algorithm. In these three implementations, a quadratic functional regularization was chosen for the MRF model. Phantom experiments showed a comparable performance of these three PWLS-based methods in terms of suppressing noise-induced streak artifacts and preserving resolution in the reconstructed images. Computer simulations concurred with the phantom experiments in terms of noise-resolution tradeoff and detectability in low contrast environment. The KL-PWLS implementation may have the advantage in terms of computation for high-resolution dynamic low-dose CT imaging.

  11. Low-Dose Palliative Radiotherapy for Cutaneous B- and T-Cell Lymphomas

    SciTech Connect

    Neelis, Karen J. Schimmel, Erik C.; Vermeer, Maarten H.; Senff, Nancy J.; Willemze, Rein; Noordijk, Evert M.

    2009-05-01

    Purpose: To determine the efficacy of low-dose palliative radiotherapy for both low-grade malignant cutaneous B-cell lymphomas (CBCLs) and cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (mycosis fungoides). Methods and Materials: A total of 18 patients with low-grade CBCL (10 primary cutaneous marginal zone B-cell and 8 primary cutaneous follicle center lymphomas) with 44 symptomatic plaques and tumors underwent low-dose (4 Gy in two fractions) local radiotherapy. A total of 31 patients with mycosis fungoides were treated at 82 symptomatic sites, initially with 4 Gy and later with 8 Gy in two fractions. Results: The complete response rate for CBCL lesions was 72%. Of the 44 B-cell lymphoma lesions, 13 were re-treated to the same site after a median of 6.3 months because of persistent (n = 8) or recurrent (n = 5) symptomatic disease. Of the mycosis fungoides patients treated with 4 Gy in two fractions (17 lesions), 70% failed to respond. Increasing the dose to 8 Gy in two fractions yielded a complete response rate of 92% (60 of 65 lesions). The patients in whom low-dose radiotherapy failed were retreated with 20 Gy in eight fractions. Conclusion: Our results have demonstrated that low-dose involved-field radiotherapy induces a high response rate in both CBCL and cutaneous T-cell lymphoma lesions without any toxicity. Therefore, this treatment is now our standard palliative treatment. At progression, it is safe and feasible to apply greater radiation doses.

  12. Rewarding effects of ethanol combined with low doses of morphine through dopamine D1 receptors.

    PubMed

    Ise, Yuya; Mori, Tomohisa; Katayama, Shirou; Nagase, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Tsutomu

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated whether ethanol combined with low doses of morphine produces rewarding effects in rats. Ethanol (0.075-1.2 g/kg, intraperitoneal [i.p.]) alone did not induce place preference. A moderate dose (1 mg/kg, s.c.), but not a low dose (0.1 mg/kg), of morphine induced a significant place preference. The combination of ethanol (0.075-0.6 g/kg, i.p.) and 0.1 mg/kg of morphine, as well as low doses of morphine (0.03-0.1 mg/kg, subcutaneous [s.c.]) combined with ethanol (0.3 g/kg, i.p.), induced a significant place preference. The combined effect of ethanol and morphine was significantly attenuated by naloxone (0.3 mg/kg, s.c.), naltrindole (1.0 mg/kg, s.c.), or long-term administration of the dopamine D1 receptor antagonist SCH23390 (1.0 mg/kg/day, s.c.). These results suggest that the rewarding effect induced by ethanol and a low dose of morphine is mediated by activation of the central opioidergic and dopaminergic systems through dopamine D1 receptors.

  13. Low doses of alcohol have a selective effect on the recognition of happy facial expressions.

    PubMed

    Kano, Michiko; Gyoba, Jiro; Kamachi, Miyuki; Mochizuki, Hideki; Hongo, Michio; Yanai, Kazuhiko

    2003-03-01

    Alcohol is one of the most widely used recreational drugs, yet it is associated with undesirable social behaviour. It is used primarily for its psychoactive properties, increasing sociability and talkativeness. We hypothesize that low doses of alcohol can improve the performance related to positive emotional cognition. In this experiment, we examined the effect of low doses of alcohol on the processing of emotional facial expressions. Fifteen young male volunteers drank alcohol at volumes of 30, 60, 120 ml (0.14, 0.28, 0.56 g/kg) and performed discrimination tasks on morphed facial emotion expressions of anger, happiness, sadness and surprise-neutral. One-way ANOVA co-varying pretreatment performances revealed significant differences between alcohol levels in happy face discrimination ( p<0.01). Bonferroni correction demonstrated that low doses of alcohol caused a significantly better discrimination of happy faces, and that the performances were worse with higher doses ( p<0.001). No significance was observed with the other three emotional faces. These results indicate that low doses of alcohol affect positive emotional cognition of happy facial expressions.

  14. DETECTION OF LOW DOSE RADIATION INDUCED DNA DAMAGE USING TEMPERATURE DIFFERENTIAL FLUORESCENCE ASSAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A rapid and sensitive fluorescence assay for radiation-induced DNA damage is reported. Changes in temperature-induced strand separation in both calf thymus DNA and plasmid DNA (puc 19 plasmid from Escherichia coli) were measured after exposure to low doses of radiation. Exposur...

  15. DETECTION OF LOW DOSE RADIATION INDUCED DNA DAMAGE USING TEMPERATURE DIFFERENNTIAL FLUORESENCE ASSAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A rapid and sensitive fluorescence assay for radiation-induced DNA damage is reported. Changes in temperature-induced strand separation in both calf thymus DNA and plasmid DNA (puc 19 plasmid from Escherichia coli) were measured after exposure to low doses of radiation. Exposures...

  16. [The imaging principles and the structure of the low-dose digital radiographic device].

    PubMed

    Kang, Q Z; Yu, H L; Zhang, H; Zhang, D S; Cao, H D

    2001-03-01

    This article introduced A new type of X-ray radiographic device, which uses MWPC as the low-dose detector with the machinery and computer to reconstruct the X-ray digital images. In this paper, the advantages and the disadvantages of the device are analysed, thus much improvement has been made to make it better and more efficient.

  17. Accelerated tests for bounding the low dose rate radiation response of lateral PNP bipolar junction transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Witczak, S.C.; Schrimpf, R.D.; Galloway, K.F.; Schmidt, D.M.; Fleetwood, D.M.; Pease, R.L.; Coombs, W.E.; Suehle, J.S.

    1996-03-01

    Low dose rate gain degradation of lateral pnp bipolar transistors can be simulated by accelerated irradiations performed at approximately 135 degrees C. Degradation enhancement is explained by temperature- dependent radiation-induced interface trap formation above the transistor`s base.

  18. Cancer risk at low doses of ionizing radiation: artificial neural networks inference from atomic bomb survivors.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Masao S; Tachibana, Akira; Takeda, Shunichi

    2014-05-01

    Cancer risk at low doses of ionizing radiation remains poorly defined because of ambiguity in the quantitative link to doses below 0.2 Sv in atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki arising from limitations in the statistical power and information available on overall radiation dose. To deal with these difficulties, a novel nonparametric statistics based on the 'integrate-and-fire' algorithm of artificial neural networks was developed and tested in cancer databases established by the Radiation Effects Research Foundation. The analysis revealed unique features at low doses that could not be accounted for by nominal exposure dose, including (i) the presence of a threshold that varied with organ, gender and age at exposure, and (ii) a small but significant bumping increase in cancer risk at low doses in Nagasaki that probably reflects internal exposure to (239)Pu. The threshold was distinct from the canonical definition of zero effect in that it was manifested as negative excess relative risk, or suppression of background cancer rates. Such a unique tissue response at low doses of radiation exposure has been implicated in the context of the molecular basis of radiation-environment interplay in favor of recently emerging experimental evidence on DNA double-strand break repair pathway choice and its epigenetic memory by histone marking.

  19. Cancer risk at low doses of ionizing radiation: artificial neural networks inference from atomic bomb survivors

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Masao S.; Tachibana, Akira; Takeda, Shunichi

    2014-01-01

    Cancer risk at low doses of ionizing radiation remains poorly defined because of ambiguity in the quantitative link to doses below 0.2 Sv in atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki arising from limitations in the statistical power and information available on overall radiation dose. To deal with these difficulties, a novel nonparametric statistics based on the ‘integrate-and-fire’ algorithm of artificial neural networks was developed and tested in cancer databases established by the Radiation Effects Research Foundation. The analysis revealed unique features at low doses that could not be accounted for by nominal exposure dose, including (i) the presence of a threshold that varied with organ, gender and age at exposure, and (ii) a small but significant bumping increase in cancer risk at low doses in Nagasaki that probably reflects internal exposure to 239Pu. The threshold was distinct from the canonical definition of zero effect in that it was manifested as negative excess relative risk, or suppression of background cancer rates. Such a unique tissue response at low doses of radiation exposure has been implicated in the context of the molecular basis of radiation–environment interplay in favor of recently emerging experimental evidence on DNA double-strand break repair pathway choice and its epigenetic memory by histone marking. PMID:24366315

  20. Antinociceptive effects of low dose lumbosacral epidural ropivacaine in healthy ponies.

    PubMed

    van Loon, Johannes P A M; Menke, Eveline S; Doornenbal, Arie; Back, Willem; Hellebrekers, Ludo J

    2012-07-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of low dose lumbosacral epidural ropivacaine in ponies. Antinociceptive effects of epidural ropivacaine were evaluated by means of mechanical nociceptive thresholds (MNTs) at several spinal levels in conscious ponies. The effects of ropivacaine on nociceptive afferent transmission to the spinal cord were also assessed by measuring spinal cord somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEPs) in anaesthetised ponies. Ataxia scores were determined in conscious ponies to assess the effects on motor function. A randomised, placebo controlled, double blind cross-over design was used. Low dose lumbosacral epidural ropivacaine led to increases in MNTs at various anatomical locations with a maximum effect at the lumbosacral and sacrococcygeal regions, both with respect to increase in threshold and duration of effect. Analysis of SSEPs showed that epidural ropivacaine influenced both Aβ- and Aδ-mediated afferent transmission to the spinal cord at the level of the lumbosacral junction. Ponies showed mild ataxia after low dose lumbosacral epidural ropivacaine, but all ponies remained standing. Application of low dose lumbosacral epidural ropivacaine provided safe and efficacious antinociceptive effects in conscious and anaesthetised ponies, and could therefore be a valuable addition to multimodal analgesic protocols in Equidae.

  1. Effects of Chronic Low-Dose Radiation on Human Neural Progenitor Cells.

    PubMed

    Katsura, Mari; Cyou-Nakamine, Hiromasa; Zen, Qin; Zen, Yang; Nansai, Hiroko; Amagasa, Shota; Kanki, Yasuharu; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Kaneki, Kiyomi; Taguchi, Akashi; Kobayashi, Mika; Kaji, Toshiyuki; Kodama, Tatsuhiko; Miyagawa, Kiyoshi; Wada, Youichiro; Akimitsu, Nobuyoshi; Sone, Hideko

    2016-01-22

    The effects of chronic low-dose radiation on human health have not been well established. Recent studies have revealed that neural progenitor cells are present not only in the fetal brain but also in the adult brain. Since immature cells are generally more radiosensitive, here we investigated the effects of chronic low-dose radiation on cultured human neural progenitor cells (hNPCs) derived from embryonic stem cells. Radiation at low doses of 31, 124 and 496 mGy per 72 h was administered to hNPCs. The effects were estimated by gene expression profiling with microarray analysis as well as morphological analysis. Gene expression was dose-dependently changed by radiation. By thirty-one mGy of radiation, inflammatory pathways involving interferon signaling and cell junctions were altered. DNA repair and cell adhesion molecules were affected by 124 mGy of radiation while DNA synthesis, apoptosis, metabolism, and neural differentiation were all affected by 496 mGy of radiation. These in vitro results suggest that 496 mGy radiation affects the development of neuronal progenitor cells while altered gene expression was observed at a radiation dose lower than 100 mGy. This study would contribute to the elucidation of the clinical and subclinical phenotypes of impaired neuronal development induced by chronic low-dose radiation.

  2. Effects of Chronic Low-Dose Radiation on Human Neural Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Katsura, Mari; Cyou-Nakamine, Hiromasa; Zen, Qin; Zen, Yang; Nansai, Hiroko; Amagasa, Shota; Kanki, Yasuharu; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Kaneki, Kiyomi; Taguchi, Akashi; Kobayashi, Mika; Kaji, Toshiyuki; Kodama, Tatsuhiko; Miyagawa, Kiyoshi; Wada, Youichiro; Akimitsu, Nobuyoshi; Sone, Hideko

    2016-01-01

    The effects of chronic low-dose radiation on human health have not been well established. Recent studies have revealed that neural progenitor cells are present not only in the fetal brain but also in the adult brain. Since immature cells are generally more radiosensitive, here we investigated the effects of chronic low-dose radiation on cultured human neural progenitor cells (hNPCs) derived from embryonic stem cells. Radiation at low doses of 31, 124 and 496 mGy per 72 h was administered to hNPCs. The effects were estimated by gene expression profiling with microarray analysis as well as morphological analysis. Gene expression was dose-dependently changed by radiation. By thirty-one mGy of radiation, inflammatory pathways involving interferon signaling and cell junctions were altered. DNA repair and cell adhesion molecules were affected by 124 mGy of radiation while DNA synthesis, apoptosis, metabolism, and neural differentiation were all affected by 496 mGy of radiation. These in vitro results suggest that 496 mGy radiation affects the development of neuronal progenitor cells while altered gene expression was observed at a radiation dose lower than 100 mGy. This study would contribute to the elucidation of the clinical and subclinical phenotypes of impaired neuronal development induced by chronic low-dose radiation. PMID:26795421

  3. Clinical use of a low-dose medetomidine infusion in healthy dogs undergoing ovariohysterectomy.

    PubMed

    Rioja, Eva; Gianotti, Giacomo; Valverde, Alexander

    2013-09-01

    Eight healthy dogs undergoing elective ovariohysterectomy were anesthetized with a standard protocol and received a low-dose medetomidine constant rate infusion during surgery. Cardiorespiratory parameters, including non-invasive cardiac output, were measured at various times. This protocol resulted in acceptable and stable cardiovascular performance, allowed low isoflurane concentrations, and provided smooth recoveries.

  4. Mammalian Tissue Response to Low Dose Ionizing Radiation: The Role of Oxidative Metabolism and Intercellular Communication

    SciTech Connect

    Azzam, Edouard I

    2013-01-16

    The objective of the project was to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the biological effects of low dose/low dose rate ionizing radiation in organs/tissues of irradiated mice that differ in their susceptibility to ionizing radiation, and in human cells grown under conditions that mimic the natural in vivo environment. The focus was on the effects of sparsely ionizing cesium-137 gamma rays and the role of oxidative metabolism and intercellular communication in these effects. Four Specific Aims were proposed. The integrated outcome of the experiments performed to investigate these aims has been significant towards developing a scientific basis to more accurately estimate human health risks from exposures to low doses ionizing radiation. By understanding the biochemical and molecular changes induced by low dose radiation, several novel markers associated with mitochondrial functions were identified, which has opened new avenues to investigate metabolic processes that may be affected by such exposure. In particular, a sensitive biomarker that is differentially modulated by low and high dose gamma rays was discovered.

  5. Modeling Dose-response at Low Dose: A Systems Biology Approach for Ionization Radiation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuchao; Ricci, Paolo F

    2010-03-18

    For ionization radiation (IR) induced cancer, a linear non-threshold (LNT) model at very low doses is the default used by a number of national and international organizations and in regulatory law. This default denies any positive benefit from any level of exposure. However, experimental observations and theoretical biology have found that both linear and J-shaped IR dose-response curves can exist at those very low doses. We develop low dose J-shaped dose-response, based on systems biology, and thus justify its use regarding exposure to IR. This approach incorporates detailed, molecular and cellular descriptions of biological/toxicological mechanisms to develop a dose-response model through a set of nonlinear, differential equations describing the signaling pathways and biochemical mechanisms of cell cycle checkpoint, apoptosis, and tumor incidence due to IR. This approach yields a J-shaped dose response curve while showing where LNT behaviors are likely to occur. The results confirm the hypothesis of the J-shaped dose response curve: the main reason is that, at low-doses of IR, cells stimulate protective systems through a longer cell arrest time per unit of IR dose. We suggest that the policy implications of this approach are an increasingly correct way to deal with precautionary measures in public health.

  6. The debate on the use of linear no threshold for assessing the effects of low doses.

    PubMed

    Tubiana, M; Aurengo, A; Averbeck, D; Masse, R

    2006-09-01

    From December 2004 to July 2005, three reports on the effects of low doses of ionising radiation were released: ICRP (2004), the joint report of the French Academies of Science and Medicine (Tubiana et al 2005), and a report from the American Academy of Sciences (BEIR VII 2005). These reports quote the same recent articles on the biological effects of low doses, yet their conclusions diverge. The French report concludes that recent biological data show that the efficacy of defense mechanisms is modulated by dose and dose rate and that linear no threshold (LNT) is no longer plausible. The ICRP and the BEIR VII reports recognise that there are biologic arguments against LNT but feel that there are not sufficient biological proofs against it to change risk assessment methodology and subsequent regulatory policy based on LNT. They point out the remaining uncertainties and the lack of mechanistic explanations of phenomena such as low dose hyperlethality or the adaptive response. In this context, a critical analysis of the available data is necessary. The epidemiological data and the experimental data challenge the validity of the LNT hypothesis for assessing the carcinogenic effect of low doses, but do not allow its exclusion. Therefore, the main criteria for selecting the most reliable dose-effect relationship from a scientific point of view should be based on biological data. Their analysis should help one to understand the current controversy.

  7. Low Doses of Camptothecin Induced Hormetic and Neuroprotective Effects in PC12 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chao; Chen, Shenghui; Bao, Jiaolin; Zhang, Yulin; Huang, Borong; Jia, Xuejing; Chen, Meiwan; Wan, Jian-Bo; Su, Huanxing; Wang, Yitao

    2015-01-01

    Hormetic response is an adaptive mechanism for a cell or organism surviving in an unfavorable environment. It has been an intriguing subject of researches covering a broad range of biological and medical disciplines, in which the underlying significance and molecular mechanisms are under intensive investigation. In the present study, we demonstrated that topoisomerase I inhibitor camptothecin (CPT), a potent anticancer agent, induced an obvious hormetic response in rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cells. Camptothecin inhibited PC12 cell growth at relative high doses as generally acknowledged while stimulated the cell growth by as much as 39% at low doses. Moreover, low doses of CPT protected the cells from hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced cell death. Phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt and nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)/heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) pathways were reported playing pivotal roles in protecting cells from oxidative stress. We observed that these 2 pathways were upregulated by low doses of CPT, as evidenced by increased levels of phosphorylated PI3K, phosphorylated Akt, phosphorylated mammalian target of rapamycin, Nrf2, and HO-1; and abolishment of the growth-promoting and neuroprotective effects of CPT by LY294002, a PI3K inhibitor. These results suggest that the hormetic and neuroprotective effects of CPT at low doses on PC12 cells were attributable, at least partially, to upregulated PI3K/Akt and Nrf2/HO-1 pathways. PMID:26674066

  8. Effects of Low-Dose Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR-ld) on Working Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klatt, Maryanna D.; Buckworth, Janet; Malarkey, William B.

    2009-01-01

    Mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) has produced behavioral, psychological, and physiological benefits, but these programs typically require a substantial time commitment from the participants. This study assessed the effects of a shortened (low-dose [ld]) work-site MBSR intervention (MBSR-ld) on indicators of stress in healthy working…

  9. Adverse reproductive effects of maternal low-dose melamine exposure during pregnancy in rats.

    PubMed

    Chu, Ching Yan; Tang, Ling Ying; Li, Lu; Shum, Alisa Sau Wun; Fung, Kwok Pui; Wang, Chi Chiu

    2017-01-01

    Melamine is a heterocyclic, aromatic amine and nitrogen-enriched environmental toxicant, found in not only adulterated foodstuffs but also industrial household tableware and paints. Previous studies demonstrated adverse effects of high-dose melamine on human infants and pregnant animals, but effects of low-dose melamine on pregnancy have not been reported. In this study, reproductive effects of low-dose melamine were investigated in pregnant rats. Melamine in the range of 12.5-50 mg/kg was administered to pregnant rats at different gestational stages. Maternal weight gain was not significantly affected, and other maternal morbidity was not observed. Low-dose melamine exposure during pregnancy increased fetal size but reduced somite number in gastrulation (GD8.5-GD10.5) and organogenesis (GD10.5-GD16.5) periods, and increased incidence of stillbirth in whole gestational period (GD0.5 to delivery). Embryotoxicity of melamine was further confirmed by whole embryo culture in vitro that melamine retarded embryonic growth, impaired development of brain and heart, and induced open neural tube and atrioventricular defects with increased apoptosis. In conclusion, adverse reproductive effects of low-dose melamine during pregnancy were identified in the developing rat embryos and the perinatal effects of melamine were gestational and developmental stage dependent. Detailed hazard and risk assessment of melamine in reproduction system are warrant. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 32: 131-138, 2017.

  10. BYSTANDERS, ADAPTIVE RESPONSES AND GENOMIC INSTABILITY - POTENTIAL MODIFIERS OF LOW-DOSE CANCER RESPONSES.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bystanders, Adaptive Responses and Genomic Instability -Potential Modifiers ofLow-Dose
    Cancer Responses
    .
    There has been a concerted effort in the field of radiation biology to better understand cellular
    responses that could have an impact on the estin1ation of cancer...

  11. Safety and efficacy of low-dose, subacute exposure of mature ewes to sodium chlorate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective was to determine the safety and efficacy of low-dose, subacute exposure of mature ewes to NaClO3 in the drinking water. Twenty-five ewes (BW = 62.5 ± 7.3 kg) were placed indoors in individual pens with ad libitum access to water and feed. After 7 d of adaptation, ewes were assigned ran...

  12. Effect of Low-Dose MDCT and Iterative Reconstruction on Trabecular Bone Microstructure Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Baum, Thomas; Nasirudin, Radin A.; Mei, Kai; Garcia, Eduardo G.; Burgkart, Rainer; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Kirschke, Jan S.; Noël, Peter B.

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the effects of low-dose multi detector computed tomography (MDCT) in combination with statistical iterative reconstruction algorithms on trabecular bone microstructure parameters. Twelve donated vertebrae were scanned with the routine radiation exposure used in our department (standard-dose) and a low-dose protocol. Reconstructions were performed with filtered backprojection (FBP) and maximum-likelihood based statistical iterative reconstruction (SIR). Trabecular bone microstructure parameters were assessed and statistically compared for each reconstruction. Moreover, fracture loads of the vertebrae were biomechanically determined and correlated to the assessed microstructure parameters. Trabecular bone microstructure parameters based on low-dose MDCT and SIR significantly correlated with vertebral bone strength. There was no significant difference between microstructure parameters calculated on low-dose SIR and standard-dose FBP images. However, the results revealed a strong dependency on the regularization strength applied during SIR. It was observed that stronger regularization might corrupt the microstructure analysis, because the trabecular structure is a very small detail that might get lost during the regularization process. As a consequence, the introduction of SIR for trabecular bone microstructure analysis requires a specific optimization of the regularization parameters. Moreover, in comparison to other approaches, superior noise-resolution trade-offs can be found with the proposed methods. PMID:27447827

  13. Endocrine vasculatures are preferable targets of an antitumor ineffective low dose of anti-VEGF therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yin; Yang, Yunlong; Hosaka, Kayoko; Huang, Guichun; Zang, Jingwu; Chen, Fang; Zhang, Yun; Samani, Nilesh J.; Cao, Yihai

    2016-01-01

    Anti-VEGF–based antiangiogenic drugs are designed to block tumor angiogenesis for treatment of cancer patients. However, anti-VEGF drugs produce off-tumor target effects on multiple tissues and organs and cause broad adverse effects. Here, we show that vasculatures in endocrine organs were more sensitive to anti-VEGF treatment than tumor vasculatures. In thyroid, adrenal glands, and pancreatic islets, systemic treatment with low doses of an anti-VEGF neutralizing antibody caused marked vascular regression, whereas tumor vessels remained unaffected. Additionally, a low dose of VEGF blockade significantly inhibited the formation of thyroid vascular fenestrae, leaving tumor vascular structures unchanged. Along with vascular structural changes, the low dose of VEGF blockade inhibited vascular perfusion and permeability in thyroid, but not in tumors. Prolonged treatment with the low-dose VEGF blockade caused hypertension and significantly decreased circulating levels of thyroid hormone free-T3 and -T4, leading to functional impairment of thyroid. These findings show that the fenestrated microvasculatures in endocrine organs are more sensitive than tumor vasculatures in response to systemic anti-VEGF drugs. Thus, our data support the notion that clinically nonbeneficial treatments with anti-VEGF drugs could potentially cause adverse effects. PMID:27035988

  14. CANCER RISKS ATTRIBUTABLE TO LOW DOSES OF IONIZING RADIATION - ASSESSING WHAT WE REALLY KNOW?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cancer Risks Attributable to Low Doses of Ionizing Radiation - What Do We Really Know?

    Abstract
    High doses of ionizing radiation clearly produce deleterious consequences in humans including, but not exclusively, cancer induction. At very low radiation doses the situatio...

  15. Circadian Rhythms of Heart Rate and Locomotion After Treatment With Low-Dose Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    on the barrier under the experimental conditions used in this heart pacemaker due to peripheral AChE inhibition, report ( Grauer et al., 2000...cgi-bin/getrpt?GAO-03-833T 112 May 20061. Jenden DJ. 2005. Low-dose cholinesterase inhibitors do not induce Grauer E, Alkalai D, Kapon J, Cohen G

  16. The toxicity of continuous long-term low-dose formaldehyde inhalation in mice.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jiaying; Zhang, Long; Tang, Yufu; Li, Zhenhai

    2016-12-01

    Although the toxicity of high-dose formaldehyde (FA) inhalation has been extensively analyzed in animals, the effect of continuous long-term exposure to low-dose FA has not been well documented. This study aims to evaluate the toxicity of continuous long-term low-dose FA inhalation in mice. Forty-eight Kunming male mice were equally randomized to three groups according to the dose of FA inhalation exposure: a control (0 mg/m(3)) group, a low-dose (0.08 mg/m(3)) group and a high-dose (0.8 mg/m(3)) group. The mice have been selected to expose to FA for different consecutive days at 24 h/day. The learning and memory functions, pathological changes in the lung and liver, and the percentage of CD4 (+) T and CD8 (+) T cells were observed and analyzed. It was found that continuous long-term inhalation of FA at relatively low doses could impair the learning and memory functions and induce pathological changes in the lung and liver, but did not seem to significantly affect the number of immune (CD4 (+) T and CD8 (+) T) cells.

  17. Effects of Chronic Low-Dose Radiation on Human Neural Progenitor Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsura, Mari; Cyou-Nakamine, Hiromasa; Zen, Qin; Zen, Yang; Nansai, Hiroko; Amagasa, Shota; Kanki, Yasuharu; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Kaneki, Kiyomi; Taguchi, Akashi; Kobayashi, Mika; Kaji, Toshiyuki; Kodama, Tatsuhiko; Miyagawa, Kiyoshi; Wada, Youichiro; Akimitsu, Nobuyoshi; Sone, Hideko

    2016-01-01

    The effects of chronic low-dose radiation on human health have not been well established. Recent studies have revealed that neural progenitor cells are present not only in the fetal brain but also in the adult brain. Since immature cells are generally more radiosensitive, here we investigated the effects of chronic low-dose radiation on cultured human neural progenitor cells (hNPCs) derived from embryonic stem cells. Radiation at low doses of 31, 124 and 496 mGy per 72 h was administered to hNPCs. The effects were estimated by gene expression profiling with microarray analysis as well as morphological analysis. Gene expression was dose-dependently changed by radiation. By thirty-one mGy of radiation, inflammatory pathways involving interferon signaling and cell junctions were altered. DNA repair and cell adhesion molecules were affected by 124 mGy of radiation while DNA synthesis, apoptosis, metabolism, and neural differentiation were all affected by 496 mGy of radiation. These in vitro results suggest that 496 mGy radiation affects the development of neuronal progenitor cells while altered gene expression was observed at a radiation dose lower than 100 mGy. This study would contribute to the elucidation of the clinical and subclinical phenotypes of impaired neuronal development induced by chronic low-dose radiation.

  18. High Dose versus Low Dose Intravenous Pantoprazole in Bleeding Peptic Ulcer: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Masjedizadeh, Abdol Rahim; Hajiani, Eskandar; Alavinejad, Pezhman; Hashemi, Seyed Jalal; Shayesteh, Ali Akbar; Jamshidian, Noordin

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND The appropriate dose of proton pump inhibitors for treatment of patients with upper (GI) bleeding remains controversial. This study compares high-dose versus low-dose intravenous proton pump inhibitor (PPI) infusion for prevention of GI bleeding complications. METHODS A total of 166 patients with bleeding peptic ulcers underwent therapeutic endoscopy using concomitant therapy by argon plasma coagulation (APC) and diluted epinephrine injection. Patients were randomly divided into two groups: high-dose pantoprazole (80 mg bolus, 8 mg per hour) and low-dose pantoprazole (40 mg bolus, 4 mg per hour) infused for three days. Initial outcomes were rebleeding, need for surgery, hemoglobin drop more than two units, and hospitalization for more than five days. Secondary outcome included mortality rate. RESULTS Overall, 166 patients (83 patients per group) enrolled in the study. The average age of patients in the high-dose group was 59.5±15.6 years and 52.3±13.3 years in the low-dose group (p=0.58). Males comprised 69.7% of patients. In the high-dose group, the mean number of units of transfused blood was 3.3±1.71 and in the low-dose group, it was 2.82±1.73 (p=0.50). There were 36 (43.37%) patients in the high-dose group and 40 (48.19%) in the low-dose group who were hospitalized for more than 5 days (p=0.53). Rebleeding was observed in 27 (32.53%) patients in the high-dose group and in 21 (25.30%) in the low-dose group (p=0.30). There were no significant differences observed in drop in hemoglobin of more than two units (p=0.15), mortality (p=0.99) and surgery (p=0.75) between the two groups. CONCLUSION For controlling peptic ulcer bleeding, there is no difference between high dose and low dose pantoprazole infusion. PMID:25093061

  19. Low Doses of Ethanol Enhance LTD-like Plasticity in Human Motor Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Fuhl, Anna; Müller-Dahlhaus, Florian; Lücke, Caroline; Toennes, Stefan W; Ziemann, Ulf

    2015-01-01

    Humans liberally use ethanol for its facilitating effects on social interactions but its effects on central nervous system function remain underexplored. We have recently described that very low doses of ethanol abolish long-term potentiation (LTP)-like plasticity in human cortex, most likely through enhancement of tonic inhibition [Lücke et al, 2014, Neuropsychopharmacology 39:1508-18]. Here, we studied the effects of low-dose ethanol on long-term depression (LTD)-like plasticity. LTD-like plasticity was induced in human motor cortex by paired associative transcranial magnetic stimulation (PASLTD), and measured as decreases of motor evoked potential input-output curve (IO-curve). In addition, sedation was measured by decreases in saccade peak velocity (SPV). Ethanol in two low doses (EtOH<10mM, EtOH<20mM) was compared to single oral doses of alprazolam (APZ, 1mg) a classical benzodiazepine, and zolpidem (ZLP, 10 mg), a non-benzodiazepine hypnotic, in a double-blinded randomized placebo-controlled crossover design in ten healthy human subjects. EtOH<10mM and EtOH<20mM but not APZ or ZLP enhanced the PASLTD-induced LTD-like plasticity, while APZ and ZLP but not EtOH<10mM or EtOH<20mM decreased SPV. Non-sedating low doses of ethanol, easily reached during social drinking, enhance LTD-like plasticity in human cortex. This effect is most likely explained by the activation of extrasynaptic α4-subunit containing gamma-aminobutyric type A receptors by low-dose EtOH, resulting in increased tonic inhibition. Findings may stimulate cellular research on the role of tonic inhibition in regulating excitability and plasticity of cortical neuronal networks. PMID:26038159

  20. Low Doses of Ethanol Enhance LTD-like Plasticity in Human Motor Cortex.

    PubMed

    Fuhl, Anna; Müller-Dahlhaus, Florian; Lücke, Caroline; Toennes, Stefan W; Ziemann, Ulf

    2015-12-01

    Humans liberally use ethanol for its facilitating effects on social interactions but its effects on central nervous system function remain underexplored. We have recently described that very low doses of ethanol abolish long-term potentiation (LTP)-like plasticity in human cortex, most likely through enhancement of tonic inhibition [Lücke et al, 2014, Neuropsychopharmacology 39:1508-18]. Here, we studied the effects of low-dose ethanol on long-term depression (LTD)-like plasticity. LTD-like plasticity was induced in human motor cortex by paired associative transcranial magnetic stimulation (PASLTD), and measured as decreases of motor evoked potential input-output curve (IO-curve). In addition, sedation was measured by decreases in saccade peak velocity (SPV). Ethanol in two low doses (EtOH<10mM, EtOH<20mM) was compared to single oral doses of alprazolam (APZ, 1mg) a classical benzodiazepine, and zolpidem (ZLP, 10 mg), a non-benzodiazepine hypnotic, in a double-blinded randomized placebo-controlled crossover design in ten healthy human subjects. EtOH<10mM and EtOH<20mM but not APZ or ZLP enhanced the PASLTD-induced LTD-like plasticity, while APZ and ZLP but not EtOH<10mM or EtOH<20mM decreased SPV. Non-sedating low doses of ethanol, easily reached during social drinking, enhance LTD-like plasticity in human cortex. This effect is most likely explained by the activation of extrasynaptic α4-subunit containing gamma-aminobutyric type A receptors by low-dose EtOH, resulting in increased tonic inhibition. Findings may stimulate cellular research on the role of tonic inhibition in regulating excitability and plasticity of cortical neuronal networks.

  1. Low-Dose Curcumin Stimulates Proliferation, Migration and Phagocytic Activity of Olfactory Ensheathing Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tello Velasquez, Johana; Watts, Michelle E.; Todorovic, Michael; Nazareth, Lynnmaria; Pastrana, Erika; Diaz-Nido, Javier; Lim, Filip; Ekberg, Jenny A. K.; Quinn, Ronald J.; John, James A. St

    2014-01-01

    One of the promising strategies for neural repair therapies is the transplantation of olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) which are the glial cells of the olfactory system. We evaluated the effects of curcumin on the behaviour of mouse OECs to determine if it could be of use to further enhance the therapeutic potential of OECs. Curcumin, a natural polyphenol compound found in the spice turmeric, is known for its anti-cancer properties at doses over 10 µM, and often at 50 µM, and it exerts its effects on cancer cells in part by activation of MAP kinases. In contrast, we found that low-dose curcumin (0.5 µM) applied to OECs strikingly modulated the dynamic morphology, increased the rate of migration by up to 4-fold, and promoted significant proliferation of the OECs. Most dramatically, low-dose curcumin stimulated a 10-fold increase in the phagocytic activity of OECs. All of these potently stimulated behavioural characteristics of OECs are favourable for neural repair therapies. Importantly, low-dose curcumin gave a transient activation of p38 kinases, which is in contrast to the high dose curcumin effects on cancer cells in which these MAP kinases tend to undergo prolonged activation. Low-dose curcumin mediated effects on OECs demonstrate cell-type specific stimulation of p38 and ERK kinases. These results constitute the first evidence that low-dose curcumin can modulate the behaviour of olfactory glia into a phenotype potentially more favourable for neural repair and thereby improve the therapeutic use of OECs for neural repair therapies. PMID:25360677

  2. Implications for human and environmental health of low doses of ionising radiation.

    PubMed

    Mothersill, Carmel; Seymour, Colin

    2014-07-01

    The last 20 years have seen a major paradigm shift in radiation biology. Several discoveries challenge the DNA centric view which holds that DNA damage is the critical effect of radiation irrespective of dose. This theory leads to the assumption that dose and effect are simply linked - the more energy deposition, the more DNA damage and the greater the biological effect. This is embodied in radiation protection (RP) regulations as the linear-non-threshold (LNT) model. However the science underlying the LNT model is being challenged particularly in relation to the environment because it is now clear that at low doses of concern in RP, cells, tissues and organisms respond to radiation by inducing responses which are not readily predictable by dose. These include adaptive responses, bystander effects, genomic instability and low dose hypersensitivity, and are commonly described as stress responses, while recognizing that "stress" can be good as well as bad. The phenomena contribute to observed radiation responses and appear to be influenced by genetic, epigenetic and environmental factors, meaning that dose and response are not simply related. The question is whether our discovery of these phenomena means that we need to re-evaluate RP approaches. The so-called "non-targeted" mechanisms mean that low dose radiobiology is very complex and supra linear or sub-linear (even hormetic) responses are possible but their occurrence is unpredictable for any given system level. Issues which may need consideration are synergistic or antagonistic effects of other pollutants. RP, at present, only looks at radiation dose but the new (NTE) radiobiology means that chemical or physical agents, which interfere with tissue responses to low doses of radiation, could critically modulate the predicted risk. Similarly, the "health" of the organism could determine the effect of a given low dose by enabling or disabling a critical response. These issues will be discussed.

  3. Costs, benefits and redundant mechanisms of adaption to chronic low-dose stress in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Markiewicz-Potoczny, Marta; Lydall, David

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT All organisms live in changeable, stressful environments. It has been reported that exposure to low-dose stresses or poisons can improve fitness. However, examining the effects of chronic low-dose chemical exposure is challenging. To address this issue we used temperature sensitive mutations affecting the yeast cell division cycle to induce low-dose stress for 40 generation times, or more. We examined cdc13-1 mutants, defective in telomere function, and cdc15-2 mutants, defective in mitotic kinase activity. We found that each stress induced similar adaptive responses. Stress-exposed cells became resistant to higher levels of stress but less fit, in comparison with unstressed cells, in conditions of low stress. The costs and benefits of adaptation to chronic stress were reversible. In the cdc13-1 context we tested the effects of Rad9, a central player in the response to telomere defects, Exo1, a nuclease that degrades defective telomeres, and Msn2 and Msn4, 2 transcription factors that contribute to the environmental stress response. We also observed, as expected, that Rad9 and Exo1 modulated the response of cells to stress. In addition we observed that adaptation to stress could still occur in these contexts, with associated costs and benefits. We conclude that functionally redundant cellular networks control the adaptive responses to low dose chronic stress. Our data suggests that if organisms adapt to low dose stress it is helpful if stress continues or increases but harmful should stress levels reduce. PMID:27628486

  4. Low-Dose Radiation Therapy (2 Gy × 2) in the Treatment of Orbital Lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Fasola, Carolina E.; Jones, Jennifer C.; Huang, Derek D.; Le, Quynh-Thu; Hoppe, Richard T.; Donaldson, Sarah S.

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: Low-dose radiation has become increasingly used in the management of indolent non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), but has not been studied specifically for cases of ocular adnexal involvement. The objective of this study is to investigate the effectiveness of low-dose radiation in the treatment of NHL of the ocular adnexa. Methods and Materials: We reviewed the records of 20 NHL patients with 27 sites of ocular adnexal involvement treated with low-dose radiation consisting of 2 successive fractions of 2 Gy at our institution between 2005 and 2011. The primary endpoint of this study is freedom from local relapse (FFLR). Results: At a median follow-up time of 26 months (range 7-92), the overall response rate for the 27 treated sites was 96%, with a complete response (CR) rate of 85% (n=23) and a partial response rate of 11% (n=3). Among all treated sites with CR, the 2-year FFLR was 100%, with no in-treatment field relapses. The 2-year freedom from regional relapse rate was 96% with 1 case of relapse within the ipsilateral orbit (outside of the treatment field). This patient underwent additional treatment with low-dose radiation of 4 Gy to the area of relapse achieving a CR and no evidence of disease at an additional 42 months of follow-up. Orbital radiation was well tolerated with only mild acute side effects (dry eye, conjunctivitis, transient periorbital edema) in 30% of treated sites without any reports of long-term toxicity. Conclusions: Low-dose radiation with 2 Gy × 2 is effective and well tolerated in the treatment of indolent NHL of the ocular adnexa with high response rates and durable local control with the option of reirradiation in the case of locoregional relapse.

  5. Successful low dose immune tolerance induction in severe haemophilia A with inhibitors below 40 Bethesda Units.

    PubMed

    Ter Avest, P C; Fischer, K; Gouw, S C; Van Dijk, K; Mauser-Bunschoten, E P

    2010-05-01

    Different regimens are used to achieve immune tolerance in patients with severe haemophilia A and inhibitory allo-antibodies against factor VIII (FVIII). In this study, results of 26 years of low dose immune tolerance induction are evaluated. We evaluated 21 patients, who were treated with regular infusions of low dose FVIII (25-50 IU kg(-1) every other day or three times a week) to obtain immune tolerance. Several risk factors for success rate and time to success were analysed. In 18 of 21 patients (86%) immune tolerance induction (ITI) was successful. The median of the maximum inhibitor titre before start of ITI was 4.5 BU mL(-1). Success rate was associated with both a pre-ITI titre and a maximum titre during ITI below 40 BU mL(-1) (P = 0.003). The time to success was significantly shorter if the maximum inhibitor level during ITI was below 40 BU mL(-1) (P = 0.040). In low titre inhibitors (<5 BU mL(-1)) this effect was even stronger (P = 0.033). Low dose immune tolerance induction therapy was successful in severe haemophilia A patients with a pre-ITI titre below 40 BU mL(-1). The time to success is predicted by a maximum ITI titre below 40 BU mL(-1), and is even shorter in low titre inhibitors (<5 BU mL(-1)). We suggest that all patients with severe haemophilia A and a pre-ITI inhibitor titre below 5 BU mL(-1), should be treated with low dose immune tolerance induction therapy. Patients with a maximum titre below 40 BU mL(-1) may also strongly benefit from the beneficial effects of low dose immune tolerance induction therapy.

  6. Proteomic-based mechanistic investigation of low-dose radiation-induced cellular responses/effects

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xian

    2013-10-23

    The goal of our project is to apply our unique systems investigation strategy to reveal the molecular mechanisms underlying the radiation induction and transmission of oxidative damage, adaptive response, and bystander effect at low-doses. Beginning with simple in vitro systems such as fibroblast or epithelial pure culture, our amino acid-coded mass tagging (AACT) comparative proteomic platform will be used to measure quantitatively proteomic changes at high- or low-dose level with respect to their endogenous damage levels respectively, in which a broad range of unique regulated proteins sensitive to low-dose IR will be distinguished. To zoom in how these regulated proteins interact with other in the form of networks in induction/transmission pathways, these regulated proteins will be selected as baits for making a series of fibroblast cell lines that stably express each of them. Using our newly developed method of ?dual-tagging? quantitative proteomics that integrate the capabilities of natural complex expression/formation, simple epitope affinity isolation (not through tandem affinity purification or TAP), and ?in-spectra? AACT quantitative measurements using mass spectrometry (MS), we will be able to distinguish systematically interacting proteins with each bait in real time. Further, in addition to both proteome-wide (global differentially expressed proteins) and pathway-scale (bait-specific) profiling information, we will perform a computational network analysis to elucidate a global pathway/mechanisms underlying cellular responses to real-time low-dose IR. Similarly, we will extend our scheme to investigate systematically those induction/transmission pathways occurring in a fibroblast-epithelial interacting model in which the bystander cell (fibroblast) monitor the IR damage to the target cell (epithelial cell). The results will provide the proteome base (molecular mechanisms/pathways for signaling) for the low dose radiation-induced essential tissue

  7. Low-Dose Cadmium Causes Metabolic and Genetic Dysregulation Associated With Fatty Liver Disease in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Go, Young-Mi; Sutliff, Roy L.; Chandler, Joshua D.; Khalidur, Rahman; Kang, Bum-Yong; Anania, Frank A.; Orr, Michael; Hao, Li; Fowler, Bruce A.; Jones, Dean P.

    2015-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is present in food at low levels and accumulates in humans throughout life because it is not effectively excreted. Cd from smoking or occupational exposure shows adverse effects on health, but the mechanistic effect of Cd at low dietary intake levels is poorly studied. Epidemiology studies found that nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), common in U.S. adults, is associated with Cd burden. In cell studies, we found that environmental low-dose Cd oxidized proteins and stimulated inflammatory signaling. However, little is known about low-dose Cd effects on liver function and associated metabolic pathways in vivo. We investigated effects of low-level Cd exposure on liver gene transcripts, metabolites, and associated metabolic pathways and function after challenging mice with Cd (10 mg/l) by drinking water. Results showed liver Cd in treated mice was similar to adult humans without occupational or smoking exposures and 10-fold higher than control mouse values. Pathway analysis of significantly altered liver genes and metabolites mapped to functional pathways of lipid metabolism, cell death and mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. These are well-recognized pathways associated with NAFLD. Cd–treated mice had higher liver enzymes in plasma and a trend toward fat accumulation in liver. To verify low-dose Cd-induced stimulation of cell death pathways, phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) was examined in cultured hepatic cells. Consistent with mouse liver data, low-dose Cd stimulated JNK activation. Together, the results show that low-dose Cd exposure causes liver function changes consistent with a role in NAFLD and possibly also nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. PMID:26187450

  8. Quantitative Proteomic Profiling of Low Dose Ionizing Radiation Effects in a Human Skin Model

    SciTech Connect

    Hengel, Shawna; Aldrich, Joshua T.; Waters, Katrina M.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Stenoien, David L.

    2014-07-29

    To assess molecular responses to low doses of radiation that may be encountered during medical diagnostic procedures, nuclear accidents, or terrorist acts, a quantitative global proteomic approach was used to identify protein alterations in a reconstituted human skin tissue treated with 10 cGy of ionizing radiation. Subcellular fractionation was employed to remove highly abundant structural proteins and provide insight on radiation induced alterations in protein abundance and localization. In addition, peptides were post-fractionated using high resolution 2-dimensional liquid chromatography to increase the dynamic range of detection of protein abundance and translocation changes. Quantitative data was obtained by labeling peptides with 8-plex isobaric iTRAQ tags. A total of 207 proteins were detected with statistically significant alterations in abundance and/or subcellular localization compared to sham irradiated tissues. Bioinformatics analysis of the data indicated that the top canonical pathways affected by low dose radiation are related to cellular metabolism. Among the proteins showing alterations in abundance, localization and proteolytic processing was the skin barrier protein filaggrin which is consistent with our previous observation that ionizing radiation alters profilaggrin processing with potential effects on skin barrier functions. In addition, a large number of proteases and protease regulators were affected by low dose radiation exposure indicating that altered proteolytic activity may be a hallmark of low dose radiation exposure. While several studies have demonstrated altered transcriptional regulation occurs following low dose radiation exposures, the data presented here indicates post-transcriptional regulation of protein abundance, localization, and proteolytic processing play an important role in regulating radiation responses in complex human tissues.

  9. Biofilm formation of Clostridium perfringens and its exposure to low-dose antimicrobials

    PubMed Central

    Charlebois, Audrey; Jacques, Mario; Archambault, Marie

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens is an opportunistic pathogen that can cause food poisoning in humans and various enterotoxemia in animal species. Very little is known on the biofilm of C. perfringens and its exposure to subminimal inhibitory concentrations of antimicrobials. This study was undertaken to address these issues. Most of the C. perfringens human and animal isolates tested in this study were able to form biofilm (230/277). Porcine clinical isolates formed significantly more biofilm than the porcine commensal isolates. A subgroup of clinical and commensal C. perfringens isolates was randomly selected for further characterization. Biofilm was found to protect C. perfringens bacterial cells from exposure to high concentrations of tested antimicrobials. Exposure to low doses of some of these antimicrobials tended to lead to a diminution of the biofilm formed. However, a few isolates showed an increase in biofilm formation when exposed to low doses of tylosin, bacitracin, virginiamycin, and monensin. Six isolates were randomly selected for biofilm analysis using scanning laser confocal microscopy. Of those, four produced more biofilm in presence of low doses of bacitracin whereas biofilms formed without bacitracin were thinner and less elevated. An increase in the area occupied by bacteria in the biofilm following exposure to low doses of bacitracin was also observed in the majority of isolates. Morphology examination revealed flat biofilms with the exception of one isolate that demonstrated a mushroom-like biofilm. Matrix composition analysis showed the presence of proteins, beta-1,4 linked polysaccharides and extracellular DNA, but no poly-beta-1,6-N-acetyl-D-glucosamine. This study brings new information on the biofilm produced by C. perfringens and its exposure to low doses of antimicrobials. PMID:24795711

  10. Biofilm formation of Clostridium perfringens and its exposure to low-dose antimicrobials.

    PubMed

    Charlebois, Audrey; Jacques, Mario; Archambault, Marie

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens is an opportunistic pathogen that can cause food poisoning in humans and various enterotoxemia in animal species. Very little is known on the biofilm of C. perfringens and its exposure to subminimal inhibitory concentrations of antimicrobials. This study was undertaken to address these issues. Most of the C. perfringens human and animal isolates tested in this study were able to form biofilm (230/277). Porcine clinical isolates formed significantly more biofilm than the porcine commensal isolates. A subgroup of clinical and commensal C. perfringens isolates was randomly selected for further characterization. Biofilm was found to protect C. perfringens bacterial cells from exposure to high concentrations of tested antimicrobials. Exposure to low doses of some of these antimicrobials tended to lead to a diminution of the biofilm formed. However, a few isolates showed an increase in biofilm formation when exposed to low doses of tylosin, bacitracin, virginiamycin, and monensin. Six isolates were randomly selected for biofilm analysis using scanning laser confocal microscopy. Of those, four produced more biofilm in presence of low doses of bacitracin whereas biofilms formed without bacitracin were thinner and less elevated. An increase in the area occupied by bacteria in the biofilm following exposure to low doses of bacitracin was also observed in the majority of isolates. Morphology examination revealed flat biofilms with the exception of one isolate that demonstrated a mushroom-like biofilm. Matrix composition analysis showed the presence of proteins, beta-1,4 linked polysaccharides and extracellular DNA, but no poly-beta-1,6-N-acetyl-D-glucosamine. This study brings new information on the biofilm produced by C. perfringens and its exposure to low doses of antimicrobials.

  11. Differentiation of hemopericardium due to ruptured myocardial infarction or aortic dissection on unenhanced postmortem computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Ampanozi, Garyfalia; Flach, Patricia M; Ruder, Thomas D; Filograna, Laura; Schweitzer, Wolf; Thali, Michael J; Ebert, Lars C

    2017-03-28

    The aim of the study was to evaluate unenhanced postmortem computed tomography (PMCT) in cases of non-traumatic hemopericardium by establishing the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of diagnostic criteria for the differentiation between aortic dissection and myocardial wall rupture due to infarction. Twenty six cases were identified as suitable for evaluation, of which ruptured aortic dissection could be identified as the underlying cause of hemopericardium in 50% of the cases, and myocardial wall rupture also in 50% of the cases. All cases underwent a PMCT and 24 of the cases also underwent one or more additional examinations: a subsequent autopsy, or a postmortem magnetic resonance (PMMR), or a PMCT angiography (PMCTA), or combinations of the above. Two radiologists evaluated the PMCT images and classified each case as "aortic dissection", "myocardial wall rupture" or "undetermined". Quantification of the pericardial blood was carried out using segmentation techniques. 17 of 26 cases were correctly identified, either as aortic dissections or myocardial ruptures, by both readers. 7 of 13 myocardial wall ruptures were identified by both readers, whereas both readers identified correctly 10 of 13 aortic dissection cases. Taking into account the responses of both readers, specificity was 100% for both causes of hemopericardium and sensitivity as well as accuracy was higher for aortic dissections than myocardial wall ruptures (72.7% and 87.5% vs 53.8% and 75% respectively). Pericardial blood volumes were constantly higher in the aortic dissection group, but a statistical significance of these differences could not be proven, since the small count of cases did not allow for statistical tests. This study showed that diagnostic criteria for the differentiation between ruptured aortic dissection and myocardial wall rupture due to infarction are highly specific and accurate.

  12. Quantitative assessment of Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis (PAP) with ultra-dose CT and correlation with Pulmonary Function Tests (PFTs)

    PubMed Central

    Sui, Xin; Du, Qianni; Xu, Kai-feng; Tian, Xinlun; Song, Lan; Wang, Xiao; Xu, Xiaoli; Wang, Zixing; Wang, Yuyan; Gu, Jun; Song, Wei; Jin, Zhengyu

    2017-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to investigate whether ultra-low-dose chest computed tomography (CT) can be used for visual assessment of CT features in patients with pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) and to evaluate the relationship between the quantitative analysis of the ultra-low-dose CT scans and the pulmonary function tests (PFTs). Methods Thirty-eight patients (mean [SD] age, 44.47 [12.28] years; 29 males, 9 females) with PAP were enrolled and subjected to two scans each with low-dose CT (reference parameters: 120 kV and 50 mAs) and ultra-low-dose CT (reference parameters, 80 kV, 25 mAs). Images were reconstructed via filtered back projection (FBP) for low-dose CT and iterative reconstruction (IR) for ultra-low-dose CT. All patients underwent PFT. The Visual analysis for ground glass opacity (GGO) is performed. The quantitative CT and PFT results were analyzed by canonical correlations. Results The mean body mass index (BMI) was 25.37±3.26 kg/m2. The effective radiation doses were 2.30±0.46 and 0.24±0.05 mSv for low-dose and ultra-low-dose CT, respectively. The size-specific dose estimates were 5.81±0.81 and 0.62±0.09 mSv for low-dose and ultra-low-dose CT. GGOs and interlobular septal thickening were observed bilaterally in all patients. The average visual GGO score was lower in the upper field (2.67±1.24) but higher in the middle and lower fields (3.08±1.32 and 3.08±0.97, respectively). The average score for the whole lung was 2.94±1.19. There is a significant correlation between PFTs and quantitative of ultra-low-dose CT (canonical loading = 0.78). Conclusions Ultra-low-dose CT has the potential to quantify the lung parenchyma changes of PAP. This technique could provide a sensitive and objective assessment of PAP and has good relation with PFTs. In addition, the radiation dose of ultra-low-dose CT was very low. PMID:28301535

  13. Adaptive-weighted Total Variation Minimization for Sparse Data toward Low-dose X-ray Computed Tomography Image Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yan; Ma, Jianhua; Fan, Yi; Liang, Zhengrong

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that by minimizing the total variation (TV) of the to-be-estimated image with some data and other constraints, a piecewise-smooth X-ray computed tomography (CT) can be reconstructed from sparse-view projection data without introducing noticeable artifacts. However, due to the piecewise constant assumption for the image, a conventional TV minimization algorithm often suffers from over-smoothness on the edges of the resulting image. To mitigate this drawback, we present an adaptive-weighted TV (AwTV) minimization algorithm in this paper. The presented AwTV model is derived by considering the anisotropic edge property among neighboring image voxels, where the associated weights are expressed as an exponential function and can be adaptively adjusted by the local image-intensity gradient for the purpose of preserving the edge details. Inspired by the previously-reported TV-POCS (projection onto convex sets) implementation, a similar AwTV-POCS implementation was developed to minimize the AwTV subject to data and other constraints for the purpose of sparse-view low-dose CT image reconstruction. To evaluate the presented AwTV-POCS algorithm, both qualitative and quantitative studies were performed by computer simulations and phantom experiments. The results show that the presented AwTV-POCS algorithm can yield images with several noticeable gains, in terms of noise-resolution tradeoff plots and full width at half maximum values, as compared to the corresponding conventional TV-POCS algorithm. PMID:23154621

  14. Unenhanced and Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasonography During Hepatic Transarterial Embolization and Chemoembolization With Drug-Eluting Beads

    SciTech Connect

    Moschouris, Hippocrates; Malagari, Katerina; Kornezos, Ioannis; Papadaki, Marina Georgiou; Gkoutzios, Panagiotis; Matsaidonis, Dimitrios

    2010-12-15

    The purpose of this study was to describe and evaluate the findings of unenhanced ultrasonography (US) and contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS) when these modalities are applied during transarterial embolization (TAE) or transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) of liver tumors. Sixteen tumors (9 hepatocellular carcinomas, 5 metastases from colorectal cancer, and 2 hemangiomas) were treated with TAE with microspheres and/or TACE with drug-eluting beads. All of these lesions were studied with intraprocedural unenhanced US and 12 were studied with intraprocedural CEUS. For the latter, a second-generation echo-enhancer (SonoVue; Bracco, Milan, Italy) and a low mechanical index technique were used. Intraprocedural findings were classified according to an arbitrary scale and were compared with pretreatment imaging (CEUS and computed tomography or CEUS and magnetic resonance imaging), with postembolization angiography, and with follow-up results. On unenhanced intraprocedural US, 13 of 16 tumors demonstrated intralesional high-level echoes of varying extent. These feature correlated poorly (r = 0.33, p = 0.097) with and generally underestimated the actual extent of necrosis. Exceptionally, high-level echoes that occupied the largest part of the treated lesions were associated with >50% tumor necrosis. Intraprocedural CEUS clearly depicted immediate partial or complete disappearance of tumor enhancement as a result of TAE/TACE. Three of 6 tumors with complete devascularization on postembolization angiogram showed residual enhancement on intraprocedural CEUS. Intraprocedural CEUS findings correlated closely (r = 0.91, p = 0.002) with follow-up findings. Intraprocedural sonography, particularly with echo-enhancers, could be used for intraprocedural monitoring in selected cases of liver tumors that undergo TAE or TACE.

  15. Askin tumor: CT and FDG-PET/CT imaging findings and follow-up.

    PubMed

    Xia, Tingting; Guan, Yubao; Chen, Yongxin; Li, Jingxu

    2014-07-01

    The aim of the study was to describe the imaging findings of Askin tumors on computed tomography (CT) and fluorine 18 fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET/CT).Seventeen cases of Askin tumors confirmed by histopathology were retrospectively analyzed in terms of CT (17 cases) and FDG-PET/CT data (6 cases).Fifteen of the tumors were located in the chest wall and the other 2 were in the anterior middle mediastinum. Of the 15 chest wall cases, 13 demonstrated irregular, heterogeneous soft tissue masses with cystic degeneration and necrosis, and 2 demonstrated homogeneous soft tissue masses on unenhanced CT scans. Two mediastinal tumors demonstrated the irregular, heterogeneous soft tissue masses. Calcifications were found in 2 tumors. The tumors demonstrated heterogeneously enhancement in 16 cases and homogeneous enhancement in 1 case on contrast-enhanced scans. FDG-PET/CT images revealed increased metabolic activity in all 6 cases undergone FDG-PET/CT scan, and the lesion SUVmax ranged from 4.0 to 18.6. At initial diagnosis, CT and FDG-PET/CT scans revealed rib destruction in 9 cases, pleural effusion in 9 cases, and lung metastasis in 1 case. At follow-up, 12 cases showed recurrence and/or metastases, 4 cases showed improvement or remained stable, and 1 was lost to follow-up.In summary, CT and FDG-PET/CT images of Askin tumors showed heterogeneous soft tissue masses in the chest wall and the mediastinum, accompanied by rib destruction, pleural effusion, and increased FDG uptake. CT and FDG-PET/CT imaging play important roles in the diagnosis and follow-up of patients with Askin tumors.

  16. Final Report - Epigenetics of low dose radiation effects in an animal model

    SciTech Connect

    Kovalchuk, Olga

    2014-10-22

    This project sought mechanistic understanding of the epigenetic response of tissues as well as the consequences of those responses, when induced by low dose irradiation in a well-established model system (mouse). Based on solid and extensive preliminary data we investigated the molecular epigenetic mechanisms of in vivo radiation responses, particularly – effects of low, occupationally relevant radiation exposures on the genome stability and adaptive response in mammalian tissues and organisms. We accumulated evidence that low dose irradiation altered epigenetic profiles and impacted radiation target organs of the exposed animals. The main long-term goal was to dissect the epigenetic basis of induction of the low dose radiation-induced genome instability and adaptive response and the specific fundamental roles of epigenetic changes (i.e. DNA methylation, histone modifications and miRNAs) in their generation. We hypothesized that changes in global and regional DNA methylation, global histone modifications and regulatory microRNAs played pivotal roles in the generation and maintenance low-dose radiation-induced genome instability and adaptive response. We predicted that epigenetic changes influenced the levels of genetic rearrangements (transposone reactivation). We hypothesized that epigenetic responses from low dose irradiation were dependent on exposure regimes, and would be greatest when organisms are exposed in a protracted/fractionated manner: fractionated exposures > acute exposures. We anticipated that the epigenetic responses were correlated with the gene expression levels. Our immediate objectives were: • To investigate the exact nature of the global and locus-specific DNA methylation changes in the LDR exposed cells and tissues and dissect their roles in adaptive response • To investigate the roles of histone modifications in the low dose radiation effects and adaptive response • To dissect the roles of regulatory microRNAs and their targets in low

  17. Comparative trial of succinylcholine vs low dose atracurium-lidocaine combination for intubation in short outpatient procedures.

    PubMed Central

    Luyk, N. H.; Weaver, J. M.; Quinn, C.; Wilson, S.; Beck, F. M.

    1990-01-01

    Despite its many disadvantages, succinylcholine is the most commonly used drug for intubation of patients for short out-patient procedure. This double blind trial compared a low dose atracurium/lidocaine combination to succinylcholine for intubation in 40 ASA1 adult patients. Low dose atracurium/lidocaine provided clinical intubating conditions at two minutes and cardiovascular stability equivalent to succinylcholine with significantly less myalgia. Spontaneous respiration was slower after low dose atracurium/lidocaine relative to succinylcholine. Low dose atracurium/lidocaine may provide an acceptable alternative to succinylcholine for intubation in short outpatient procedures. PMID:2096747

  18. Low dose naltrexone administration in morphine dependent rats attenuates withdrawal-induced norepinephrine efflux in forebrain.

    PubMed

    Van Bockstaele, Elisabeth J; Qian, Yaping; Sterling, Robert C; Page, Michelle E

    2008-05-15

    The administration of low dose opioid antagonists has been explored as a potential means of detoxification in opiate dependence. Previous results from our laboratory have shown that concurrent administration of low dose naltrexone in the drinking water of rats implanted with subcutaneous morphine pellets attenuates behavioral and biochemical signs of withdrawal in brainstem noradrenergic nuclei. Noradrenergic projections originating from the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) and the locus coeruleus (LC) have previously been shown to be important neural substrates involved in the somatic expression of opiate withdrawal. The hypothesis that low dose naltrexone treatment attenuates noradrenergic hyperactivity typically associated with opiate withdrawal was examined in the present study by assessing norepinephrine tissue content and norepinephrine efflux using in vivo microdialysis coupled to high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with electrochemical detection (ED). The frontal cortex (FC), amygdala, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) and cerebellum were analyzed for tissue content of norepinephrine following withdrawal in morphine dependent rats. Naltrexone-precipitated withdrawal elicited a significant decrease in tissue content of norepinephrine in the BNST and amygdala. This decrease was significantly attenuated in the BNST of rats that received low dose naltrexone pre-treatment compared to controls. No significant difference was observed in the other brain regions examined. In a separate group of rats, norepinephrine efflux was assessed with in vivo microdialysis in the BNST or the FC of morphine dependent rats or placebo treated rats subjected to naltrexone-precipitated withdrawal that received either naltrexone in their drinking water (5 mg/L) or unadulterated water. Following baseline dialysate collection, withdrawal was precipitated by injection of naltrexone and sample collection continued for an additional 4 h. At the end of the experiment

  19. Summary of the National Toxicology Program's report of the endocrine disruptors low-dose peer review.

    PubMed Central

    Melnick, Ronald; Lucier, George; Wolfe, Mary; Hall, Roxanne; Stancel, George; Prins, Gail; Gallo, Michael; Reuhl, Kenneth; Ho, Shuk-Mei; Brown, Terry; Moore, John; Leakey, Julian; Haseman, Joseph; Kohn, Michael

    2002-01-01

    At the request of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA), the National Toxicology Program organized an independent and open peer review to evaluate the scientific evidence on low-dose effects and nonmonotonic dose-response relationships for endocrine-disrupting chemicals in mammalian species. For this peer review, "low-dose effects" referred to biologic changes that occur in the range of human exposures or at doses lower than those typically used in the standard testing paradigm of the U.S. EPA for evaluating reproductive and developmental toxicity. The demonstration that an effect is adverse was not required because in many cases the long-term health consequences of altered endocrine function during development have not been fully characterized. A unique aspect of this peer review was the willing submission of individual animal data by principal investigators of primary research groups active in this field and the independent statistical reanalyses of selected parameters prior to the peer review meeting by a subpanel of statisticians. The expert peer-review panel (the panel) also considered mechanistic data that might influence the plausibility of low-dose effects and identified study design issues or other biologic factors that might account for differences in reported outcomes among studies. The panel found that low-dose effects, as defined for this review, have been demonstrated in laboratory animals exposed to certain endocrine-active agents. In some cases where low-dose effects have been reported, the findings have not been replicated. The shape of the dose-response curves for reported effects varied with the end point and dosing regimen and were low-dose linear, threshold-appearing, or nonmonotonic. The findings of the panel indicate that the current testing paradigm used for assessments of reproductive and developmental toxicity should be revisited to see whether changes are needed regarding dose selection, animal-model selection, age when

  20. Low Dose Gamma Irradiation Potentiates Secondary Exposure to Gamma Rays or Protons in Thyroid Tissue Analogs

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Lora M

    2006-05-25

    We have utilized our unique bioreactor model to produce three-dimensional thyroid tissue analogs that we believe better represent the effects of radiation in vivo than two-dimensional cultures. Our thyroid model has been characterized at multiple levels, including: cell-cell exchanges (bystander), signal transduction, functional changes and modulation of gene expression. We have significant preliminary data on structural, functional, signal transduction and gene expression responses from acute exposures at high doses (50-1000 rads) of gamma, protons and iron (Green et al., 2001a; 2001b; 2002a; 2002b; 2005). More recently, we used our DOE funding (ending Feb 06) to characterize the pattern of radiation modulated gene expression in rat thyroid tissue analogs using low-dose/low-dose rate radiation, plus/minus acute challenge exposures. Findings from these studies show that the low-dose/low-dose rate “priming” exposures to radiation invoked changes in gene expression profiles that varied with dose and time. The thyrocytes transitioned to a “primed” state, so that when the tissue analogs were challenged with an acute exposure to radiation they had a muted response (or an increased resistance) to cytopathological changes relative to “un-primed” cells. We measured dramatic differences in the primed tissue analogs, showing that our original hypothesis was correct: that low dose gamma irradiation will potentiate the repair/adaptation response to a secondary exposure. Implications from these findings are that risk assessments based on classical in vitro tissue culture assays will overestimate risk, and that low dose rate priming results in a reduced response in gene expression to a secondary challenge exposure, which implies that a priming dose provides enhanced protection to thyroid cells grown as tissue analogs. If we can determine that the effects of radiation on our tissue analogs more closely resemble the effects of radiation in vivo, then we can better

  1. [A new 2D and 3D imaging approach to musculoskeletal physiology and pathology with low-dose radiation and the standing position: the EOS system].

    PubMed

    Dubousset, Jean; Charpak, Georges; Dorion, Irène; Skalli, Wafa; Lavaste, François; Deguise, Jacques; Kalifa, Gabriel; Ferey, Solène

    2005-02-01

    Close collaboration between multidisciplinary specialists (physicists, biomecanical engineers, medical radiologists and pediatric orthopedic surgeons) has led to the development of a new low-dose radiation device named EOS. EOS has three main advantages: The use of a gaseous X-ray detector, invented by Georges Charpak (Nobel Prizewinner 1992), the dose necessary to obtain a 2D image of the skeletal system has been reduced by 8 to 10 times, while that required to obtain a 3D reconstruction from CT slices has fallen by a factor of 800 to 1000. The accuracy of the 3D reconstruction obtained with EOS is as good as that obtained with CT. The patient is examined in the standing (or seated) position, and is scanned simultaneously from head to feet, both frontally and laterally. This is a major advantage over conventional CT which requires the patient to be placed horizontally. -The 3D reconstructions of each element of the osteo-articular system are as precise as those obtained by conventional CT. EOS is also rapid, taking only 15 to 30 minutes to image the entire spine.

  2. Low-dose Amisulpride for Debilitating Clozapine-induced Sialorrhea: Case Series and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Ranganath R.

    2015-01-01

    Clozapine-induced sialorrhea (CIS) affects about one-third of patients treated with clozapine, at times can be stigmatizing, socially embarrassing, disabling, affect quality-of-life, cause poor compliance and can be potentially life-threatening adverse effect. Prompt and effective treatment of CIS may assist treatment tolerability, adherence, and better outcomes in patients with treatment nonresponsive schizophrenia. The beneficial effect of amisulpride augmentation of clozapine therapy for such patients may be enhanced by its anti-salivatory effect on CIS. Current series of five subjects who developed CIS that responded poorly to anticholinergic drugs found drastic improvement in daytime and nocturnal CIS with very low-dose (50-100 mg/day) of amisulpride. Low-dose amisulpride augmentation may also provide strong ameliorating effect on CIS. Nevertheless, a long-term, large-scale study with a broader dose range is warranted to evaluate the stability of this effect across time. PMID:26702180

  3. Evaluation of low-dose irradiation on microbiological quality of white carrots and string beans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koike, Amanda C. R.; Santillo, Amanda G.; Rodrigues, Flávio T.; Duarte, Renato C.; Villavicencio, Anna Lucia C. H.

    2012-08-01

    The minimally processed food provided the consumer with a product quality, safety and practicality. However, minimal processing of food does not reduce pathogenic population of microorganisms to safe levels. Ionizing radiation used in low doses is effective to maintain the quality of food, reducing the microbiological load but rather compromising the nutritional values and sensory property. The association of minimal processing with irradiation could improve the quality and safety of product. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of low-doses of ionizing radiation on the reduction of microorganisms in minimally processed foods. The results show that the ionizing radiation of minimally processed vegetables could decontaminate them without several changes in its properties.

  4. Low-dose ribavirin potentiates the antiviral activity of favipiravir against hemorrhagic fever viruses

    PubMed Central

    Westover, Jonna B.; Sefing, Eric J.; Bailey, Kevin W.; Van Wettere, Arnaud J.; Jung, Kie-Hoon; Dagley, Ashley; Wandersee, Luci; Downs, Brittney; Smee, Donald F.; Furuta, Yousuke; Bray, Mike; Gowen, Brian B.

    2016-01-01

    Favipiravir is approved in Japan to treat novel or re-emerging influenza viruses, and is active against a broad spectrum of RNA viruses, including Ebola. Ribavirin is the only other licensed drug with activity against multiple RNA viruses. Recent studies show that ribavirin and favipiravir act synergistically to inhibit bunyavirus infections in cultured cells and laboratory mice, likely due to their different mechanisms of action. Convalescent immune globulin is the only approved treatment for Argentine hemorrhagic fever caused by the rodent-borne Junin arenavirus. We previously reported that favipiravir is highly effective in a number of small animal models of Argentine hemorrhagic fever. We now report that addition of low dose of ribavirin synergistically potentiates the activity of favipiravir against Junin virus infection of guinea pigs and another arenavirus, Pichinde virus infection of hamsters. This suggests that the efficacy of favipiravir against hemorrhagic fever viruses can be further enhanced through the addition of low-dose ribavirin. PMID:26711718

  5. [Treatment of diabetic ketoacidosis and hyperosmolality with low dose insulin infusion (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Duclos, F; François, P; Dumon, P; Altmann, J J

    1978-06-03

    Fifteen patients were treated with low-dose (5 u/hour) insulin infusion, including 10 cases of ketoacidosis, 3 cases of hyperglycemia without acidosis in severely affected diabetics, and 2 cases with hyperosmolality. The treatment was successful in all cases. Insulin was infused at a constant rate, during 12 hours as a mean value. Blood glucose fell regularly and no hypoglycemia occured. Serum potassium varied within narrow limits, and no accident related to hypokalemia was observed. The correction of ketoacidosis was delayed, as compared to that of hyperglycemia. The two elderly patients with hyperosmolality recovered quickly and completely. The method of low-dose insulin infusion seems thus effective and easily applicable, at least in an intensive care unit. Our experience prompted us to increase (10 u/h) rather than to decrease the insulin infusion rate, with the aim to obtain a faster correction of ketoacidosis.

  6. Adverse Drug Effects and Preoperative Medication Factors Related to Perioperative Low-Dose Ketamine Infusions.

    PubMed

    Schwenk, Eric S; Goldberg, Stephen F; Patel, Ronak D; Zhou, Jon; Adams, Douglas R; Baratta, Jaime L; Viscusi, Eugene R; Epstein, Richard H

    2016-01-01

    High-dose opioid administration is associated with significant adverse events. Evidence suggests that low-dose ketamine infusions improve perioperative analgesia over conventional opioid management, but usage is highly variable. Ketamine's adverse drug effects (ADEs) are well known, but their prevalence during low-dose infusions in a clinical setting and how often they lead to infusion discontinuation are unknown. The purposes of this study were 3-fold: (1) to identify patient factors associated with initiation of ketamine infusions during spine surgery, (2) to identify specific spine procedures in which ketamine has been used most frequently, and (3) to identify ADEs associated with postoperative ketamine infusions and which ADEs most frequently led to discontinuation. Spine surgery was chosen because of its association with moderate to severe pain and a relatively high use of ketamine infusions in this population at our hospital.

  7. Treating skin diseases according to the low dose medicine principles. Data and hypotheses.

    PubMed

    Lotti, T; Hercogova, J; Wollina, U; Chokoeva, A A; Zarrab, Z; Gianfaldoni, S; Roccia, M G; Fioranelli, M; Tchernev, G

    2015-01-01

    Cytokines, hormones and growth factors, also defined with the collective name of “signaling molecules” are key regulating agents of physiological (and also pathological) functions according to the principles of Psycho-Neuro-Endocrine-Immunology (P.N.E.I.). From the latest evidences in the fields of Molecular Biology, P.N.E.I. and nano-concentration, a new medical approach surfaces: the Low Dose Medicine (LDM), a new tool for the study and the design of therapeutic strategies based on immune rebalance interventions. LDM suggest the use of low-doses of activated signaling molecules in order to restore P.N.E.I. homeostatic conditions and an increasing number of scientific evidences of LDM approach efficacy and safety support LDM-based therapeutic approach for the treatment of many dermatological diseases such as Psoriasis Vulgaris, Vitiligo and Atopic Dermatitis.

  8. Low-dose ribavirin potentiates the antiviral activity of favipiravir against hemorrhagic fever viruses.

    PubMed

    Westover, Jonna B; Sefing, Eric J; Bailey, Kevin W; Van Wettere, Arnaud J; Jung, Kie-Hoon; Dagley, Ashley; Wandersee, Luci; Downs, Brittney; Smee, Donald F; Furuta, Yousuke; Bray, Mike; Gowen, Brian B

    2016-02-01

    Favipiravir is approved in Japan to treat novel or re-emerging influenza viruses, and is active against a broad spectrum of RNA viruses, including Ebola. Ribavirin is the only other licensed drug with activity against multiple RNA viruses. Recent studies show that ribavirin and favipiravir act synergistically to inhibit bunyavirus infections in cultured cells and laboratory mice, likely due to their different mechanisms of action. Convalescent immune globulin is the only approved treatment for Argentine hemorrhagic fever caused by the rodent-borne Junin arenavirus. We previously reported that favipiravir is highly effective in a number of small animal models of Argentine hemorrhagic fever. We now report that addition of low dose of ribavirin synergistically potentiates the activity of favipiravir against Junin virus infection of guinea pigs and another arenavirus, Pichinde virus infection of hamsters. This suggests that the efficacy of favipiravir against hemorrhagic fever viruses can be further enhanced through the addition of low-dose ribavirin.

  9. Studies on polyethylene pellets modified by low dose radiation prior to part formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Song; Dehaye, Frédérique; Bailly, Christian; Biebuyck, Jean-Jacques; Legras, Roger; Parks, Lewis

    2005-07-01

    When it is combined with other processing steps, radiation modification of polyethylene pellets prior to conversion into end products (formed parts) has brought about significant improvement of various properties of the polymers and products made from them despite the low cross-linking degree. The physical and chemical changes of the polymers after the radiation modification by electron beam (EB) and gamma ray at low dose levels are studied using various characterizations. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) showed the formation of carbonyl groups and changes of unsaturated bonds. Gel permeation chromatography (GPC) results indicated broadening of the molecular weight distribution. Rheological analysis in linear visco-elasticity regime showed increased dynamic viscosity and large amplitude oscillatory shear (LAOS) analysis showed increased hysteresis. It is proposed that the radiation at low dose levels and under ambient conditions induces various reactions on the polymer chains including long chain branching, oxidation and changes of unsaturated bonds.

  10. Clustered DNA damages induced in human hematopoietic cells by low doses of ionizing radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutherland, Betsy M.; Bennett, Paula V.; Cintron-Torres, Nela; Hada, Megumi; Trunk, John; Monteleone, Denise; Sutherland, John C.; Laval, Jacques; Stanislaus, Marisha; Gewirtz, Alan

    2002-01-01

    Ionizing radiation induces clusters of DNA damages--oxidized bases, abasic sites and strand breaks--on opposing strands within a few helical turns. Such damages have been postulated to be difficult to repair, as are double strand breaks (one type of cluster). We have shown that low doses of low and high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation induce such damage clusters in human cells. In human cells, DSB are about 30% of the total of complex damages, and the levels of DSBs and oxidized pyrimidine clusters are similar. The dose responses for cluster induction in cells can be described by a linear relationship, implying that even low doses of ionizing radiation can produce clustered damages. Studies are in progress to determine whether clusters can be produced by mechanisms other than ionizing radiation, as well as the levels of various cluster types formed by low and high LET radiation.

  11. Therapeutic effect of low-dose imatinib on pulmonary arterial hypertension in dogs.

    PubMed

    Arita, Shinji; Arita, Noboru; Hikasa, Yoshiaki

    2013-03-01

    This was a pilot study to determine the effectiveness of low-dose imatinib therapy for hemodynamic disturbances, including pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), and clinical manifestations caused by chronic heart failure in dogs. Six client-owned dogs with PAH were administered imatinib mesylate orally, 3 mg/kg body weight q24h, for 30 d. Physical examination, blood biochemical tests, radiography, and Doppler echocardiography were performed prior to imatinib administration and again 30 days after administration. Clinical scores were significantly reduced after imatinib treatment. Systolic pulmonary arterial pressure, heart rate, maximum tricuspid regurgitation velocity, left atrium/aorta ratio, right and left ventricular Tei indexes, early diastolic transmitral flow wave/mitral annulus velocity ratio, and plasma atrial natriuretic peptide concentration decreased significantly after therapy. Diastolic blood pressure, stroke volume, cardiac output, and left ventricular fractional shortening increased significantly after therapy. These results indicate that low-dose imatinib therapy was effective for heart failure in dogs with PAH.

  12. Low-dose gamma irradiation of food protein increases its allergenicity in a chronic oral challenge.

    PubMed

    Vaz, A F M; Souza, M P; Medeiros, P L; Melo, A M M A; Silva-Lucca, R A; Santana, L A; Oliva, M L V; Perez, K R; Cuccovia, I M; Correia, M T S

    2013-01-01

    Few chronic food protein models have described the relationship between allergenicity and the molecular structure of food protein after physical processing. The effect of γ-radiation on the structure of food protein was measured by fluorescence, circular dichroism and microcalorimetry. BALB/c mice were intraperitoneally sensitized and then given non-irradiated and irradiated Con-A by daily gavage for 28days. The tendency to form insoluble amorphous aggregates and partially unfolded species was observed after irradiation. The administration of non-irradiated and irradiated samples at low-dose significantly increased weight loss as well as plasma levels of eotaxin in animals repeatedly exposed to Con-A. Significant lymphocytic infiltrate filling completely the stroma of microvilli and tubular glands was observed in the small intestinal of the group given Con-A irradiated at a low dose. This phenotype was not observed in animals treated with Con-A irradiated at a high dose.

  13. The Addition of Low-dose Thalidomide to Bortezomib and Dexamethasone for Refractory Multiple Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Shigeo; Kuroha, Takashi; Yano, Toshio; Sato, Naoko; Furukawa, Tatsuo

    2016-01-01

    Five cases were treated by adding daily low-dose thalidomide (50 mg) to bortezomib and dexamethasone therapy for refractory multiple myeloma. This therapy was effective in four cases, with an improvement of bone pain and regression of M-protein. One case was treated with cyclophosphamide, thalidomide, and dexamethasone, adding bortezomib after starting the three-drug combination therapy. This patient has remained in a stable disease state since the beginning of this therapy. Regarding the other four cases, a partial response and a prolonged survival for approximately one year were noted. Peripheral neuropathy did not increase after thalidomide addition. Adding low-dose thalidomide may safely improve the responses for multiple myeloma refractory to bortezomib and dexamethasone. PMID:27746443

  14. Hepatocellular carcinoma stem cell-like cells are enriched following low-dose 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Yongqiang; Mou, Lisha; Cheng, Kangwen; Wang, Chengyou; Deng, Xuesong; Chen, Junren; Fan, Zhibing; Ni, Yong

    2016-10-01

    It has been proposed that cancer stem cells (CSCs) are involved in tumor resistance to chemotherapy and tumor relapse. The goal of the present study was to determine the effect of low-dose 5-fluorouracil (5-Fu) on enriched hepatocellular CSC-like cells. Increased cell motility and epithelial-mesenchymal transition were observed by migration assay in human hepatoblastoma PLC/RAF/5 cells following 5-Fu treatment, as well as a significant enhancement in their sphere-forming abilities. CSC-like cells were identified by side population cell analysis. The percentage of CSC-like cells in the surviving cells was greatly increased in response to 5-Fu. These findings indicate that low-dose 5-Fu treatment may efficiently enrich the CSC-like cell population in PLC/RAF/5 cells.

  15. [Treatment of erosive gastropathy caused by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents using low doses of antacids].

    PubMed

    Rybár, I; Rovenský, J; Orlovská, M

    2000-10-01

    In an open clinical, endoscopy controlled study involving 31 patients with erosive NSAIDs-induced gastropathy without Helicobacter pylori infection, the effect of low dose of antacids (120 mmol/l) with aluminium oxide and magnesium oxide (Maalox) administered for 4 weeks was followed. The administration of NSAIDs was not interrupted during the time of treatment. Healing rate of the gastric erosions after four weeks reached 65% (20/31) and endoscopic score in the gastric mucosa proved significant improvement (0.97 +/- 0.49 compared to 0.07 +/- 0.25, p < 0.01). Our results suggest efficacy of low dose antacids containing aluminium in the treatment of NSAIDs-induced gastric erosions.

  16. The Addition of Low-dose Thalidomide to Bortezomib and Dexamethasone for Refractory Multiple Myeloma.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Shigeo; Kuroha, Takashi; Yano, Toshio; Sato, Naoko; Furukawa, Tatsuo

    Five cases were treated by adding daily low-dose thalidomide (50 mg) to bortezomib and dexamethasone therapy for refractory multiple myeloma. This therapy was effective in four cases, with an improvement of bone pain and regression of M-protein. One case was treated with cyclophosphamide, thalidomide, and dexamethasone, adding bortezomib after starting the three-drug combination therapy. This patient has remained in a stable disease state since the beginning of this therapy. Regarding the other four cases, a partial response and a prolonged survival for approximately one year were noted. Peripheral neuropathy did not increase after thalidomide addition. Adding low-dose thalidomide may safely improve the responses for multiple myeloma refractory to bortezomib and dexamethasone.

  17. Severe Tardive Dystonia on Low Dose Short Duration Exposure to Atypical Antipsychotics: Factors Explored

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Nilanjan C.; Sheth, Shabina A.; Mehta, Ritambhara Y.; Dave, Kamlesh R.

    2017-01-01

    Tardive dystonia (TD) is a serious side effect of antipsychotic medications, more with typical antipsychotics, that is potentially irreversible in affected patients. Studies show that newer atypical antipsychotics have a lower risk of TD. As a result, many clinicians may have developed a false sense of security when prescribing these medications. We report a case of 20-year-old male with hyperthymic temperament and borderline intellectual functioning, who developed severe TD after low dose short duration exposure to atypical antipsychotic risperidone and then olanzapine. The goal of this paper is to alert the reader to be judicious and cautious before using casual low dose second generation antipsychotics in patient with no core psychotic features, hyperthymic temperament, or borderline intellectual functioning suggestive of organic brain damage, who are more prone to develop adverse effects such as TD and monitor the onset of TD in patients taking atypical antipsychotics. PMID:28250568

  18. Report on FY16 Low-dose Metal Fuel Irradiation and PIE

    SciTech Connect

    Edmondson, Philip D.

    2016-09-01

    This report gives an overview of the efforts into the low-dose metal fuel irradiation and PIE as part of the Fuel Cycle Research & Development (FCRD) Advanced Fuels Campaign (AFC) milestone M3FT-16OR020303031. The current status of the FCT and FCRP irradiation campaigns are given including a description of the materials that have been irradiated, analysis of the passive temperature monitors, and the initial PIE efforts of the fuel samples.

  19. Low-dose photons modify liver response to simulated solar particle event protons.

    PubMed

    Gridley, Daila S; Coutrakon, George B; Rizvi, Asma; Bayeta, Erben J M; Luo-Owen, Xian; Makinde, Adeola Y; Baqai, Farnaz; Koss, Peter; Slater, James M; Pecaut, Michael J

    2008-03-01

    The health consequences of exposure to low-dose radiation combined with a solar particle event during space travel remain unresolved. The goal of this study was to determine whether protracted radiation exposure alters gene expression and oxidative burst capacity in the liver, an organ vital in many biological processes. C57BL/6 mice were whole-body irradiated with 2 Gy simulated solar particle event (SPE) protons over 36 h, both with and without pre-exposure to low-dose/low-dose-rate photons ((57)Co, 0.049 Gy total at 0.024 cGy/h). Livers were excised immediately after irradiation (day 0) or on day 21 thereafter for analysis of 84 oxidative stress-related genes using RT-PCR; genes up or down-regulated by more than twofold were noted. On day 0, genes with increased expression were: photons, none; simulated SPE, Id1; photons + simulated SPE, Bax, Id1, Snrp70. Down-regulated genes at this same time were: photons, Igfbp1; simulated SPE, Arnt2, Igfbp1, Il6, Lct, Mybl2, Ptx3. By day 21, a much greater effect was noted than on day 0. Exposure to photons + simulated SPE up-regulated completely different genes than those up-regulated after either photons or the simulated SPE alone (photons, Cstb; simulated SPE, Dctn2, Khsrp, Man2b1, Snrp70; photons + simulated SPE, Casp1, Col1a1, Hspcb, Il6st, Rpl28, Spnb2). There were many down-regulated genes in all irradiated groups on day 21 (photons, 13; simulated SPE, 16; photons + simulated SPE, 16), with very little overlap among groups. Oxygen radical production by liver phagocytes was significantly enhanced by photons on day 21. The results demonstrate that whole-body irradiation with low-dose-rate photons, as well as time after exposure, had a great impact on liver response to a simulated solar particle event.

  20. Inconsistencies and open questions regarding low-dose health effects of ionizing radiation.

    PubMed Central

    Nussbaum, R H; Köhnlein, W

    1994-01-01

    The effects on human health of exposures to ionizing radiation at low doses have long been the subject of dispute. In this paper we focus on open questions regarding the health effects of low-dose exposures that require further investigations. Seemingly contradictory findings of radiation health effects have been reported for the same exposed populations, or inconsistent estimates of radiation risks were found when different populations and exposure conditions were compared. Such discrepancies may be indicative of differences in sensitivities among the applied methods of epidemiological analysis or indicative of significant discrepancies in health consequences after comparable total exposures of different populations under varying conditions. We focus first on inconsistencies and contradictions in presentations of the state of knowledge by different authoritative experts. We then review studies that found positive associations between exposure and risks in dose ranges where traditional notions (generalized primarily from high-dose studies of A-bomb survivors or exposed animals) would have predicted negligible effects. One persistent notion in many reviews of low-dose effects is the hypothesis of reduced biological effectiveness of fractionated low-dose exposures, compared to that of the same acute dose. This assumption is not supported by data on human populations. From studies of populations that live in contaminated areas, more and more evidence is accumulating on unusual rates of various diseases other than radiation-induced malignancies, health effects that are suspected to be associated with relatively low levels of internal exposures originating from radioactive fallout. Such effects include congenital defects, neonatal mortality, stillbirths, and possibly genetically transmitted disease. A range of open questions challenges scientists to test imaginative hypotheses about induction of disease by radiation with novel research strategies. Images Figure 1. PMID

  1. Cell cycle alterations, apoptosis, and response to low-dose-rate radioimmunotherapy in lymphoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Macklis, R.M.; Beresford, B.A.; Palayoor, S.; Sweeney, S.; Humm, J.L.

    1993-10-20

    In an attempt to elucidate some aspects of the radiobiological basis of radioimmunotherapy, we have evaluated the in vitro cellular response patterns for malignant lymphoma cell lines exposed to high- and low-dose-rate radiation administered within the physiological context of antibody cell-surface binding. We used two different malignant lymphoma cell lines, a Thy1.2{sup +} murine T-lymphoma line called EL-4 and a CD20{sup +} human B-lymphoma line called Raji. Irradiated cells were evaluated for viability, cell-cycle changes, patterns of post-radiation morphologic changes, and biochemical hallmarks of radiation-associated necrosis and programmed cell death. The EL-4 line was sensitive to both high-dose-rate and low-dose-rate irradiation, while the Raji showed efficient cell kill only after high-dose-rate irradiation. Studies of radiation-induced cell cycle changes demonstrated that both cell lines were efficiently blocked at the G2/M interface by high-dose-rate irradiation, with the Raji cells appearing somewhat more susceptible than the EL-4 cells to low-dose-rate radiation-induced G2/M block. Electron microscopy and DNA gel electrophoresis studies showed that a significant proportion of the EL-4 cells appeared to be dying by radiation-induced programmed cell death (apoptosis) while the Raji cells appeared to be dying primarily by classical radiation-induced cellular necrosis. We propose that the unusual clinical responsiveness of some high and low grade lymphomas to modest doses of low-dose-rate radioimmunotherapy may be explained in part by the induction of apoptosis. The unusual dose-response characteristics observed in some experimental models of radiation-induced apoptosis may require a reappraisal of standard linear quadratic and alpha/beta algorithms used to predict target tissue cytoreduction after radioimmunotheraphy. 34 refs., 4 figs.

  2. Ultra-low-dose naltrexone reduces the rewarding potency of oxycodone and relapse vulnerability in rats.

    PubMed

    Leri, Francesco; Burns, Lindsay H

    2005-10-01

    Ultra-low-dose opioid antagonists have been shown to enhance opioid analgesia and alleviate opioid tolerance and dependence. Our present studies in male Sprague-Dawley rats assessed the abuse potential of oxycodone+ultra-low-dose naltrexone (NTX) versus oxycodone alone. The lowest NTX dose (1 pg/kg/infusion), but not slightly higher doses (10 and 100 pg/kg/infusion), enhanced oxycodone (0.1 mg/kg/infusion) intravenous self-administration, suggesting a reduced rewarding potency per infusion. During tests of reinstatement performed in extinction conditions, co-self-administration of any of these three NTX doses significantly reduced drug-seeking precipitated by priming injections of oxycodone (0.25 mg/kg, s.c.), a drug-conditioned cue, or foot-shock stress. During self-administration on a progressive-ratio schedule, animals self-administering oxycodone (0.1 mg/kg/infusion)+NTX (1 pg/kg/infusion) reached a "break-point" sooner and showed a trend toward less responding compared to rats self-administering oxycodone alone (0.1 mg/kg/infusion). In the final experiment, the addition of ultra-low-dose NTX (10 pg/kg, s.c.) enhanced the acute stimulatory effect of oxycodone (1 mg/kg, s.c.), as well as locomotor sensitization produced by repeated oxycodone administration (7 x 1 mg/kg, s.c.). In summary, this work shows that ultra-low-dose NTX co-treatment augments the locomotor effects of oxycodone as it enhances opioid analgesia, but reduces oxycodone's rewarding potency and subsequent vulnerability to relapse.

  3. Ventilatory effects of low-dose paraoxon result from central muscarinic effects

    SciTech Connect

    Houze, Pascal; Pronzola, Laetita; Kayouka, Maya; Villa, Antoine; Debray, Marcel; Baud, Frederic J.

    2008-12-01

    Paraoxon induces respiratory toxicity. Atropine completely reversed parathion- and paraoxon-induced respiratory toxicity. The aim of this study was to assess the peripheral or central origin of ventilatory effects of low-dose paraoxon. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were given paraoxon 0.215 mg/kg subcutaneously and treated with either atropine (10 mg/kg sc) or ascending doses of methylatropine of 5.42 (equimolar to that of atropine), 54.2, and 542 mg/kg administered subcutaneously 30 min after paraoxon. Ventilation at rest was assessed using whole-body plethysmography and rat temperature using infra-red telemetry. Results are expressed as mean {+-} SE. Statistical analysis used two-way ANOVA for repeated measurements. Paraoxon induced a significant decrease in temperature 30 min after injection lasting the 90 min of the study period. This effect was partially corrected by atropine, but not by methylatropine whatever the dose. Paraoxon induced a decrease in respiratory rate resulting from an increase in expiratory time associated with an increase in tidal volume. Atropine completely reversed the ventilatory effects of low-dose paraoxon while the equimolar dose of methylatropine had no significant effects. The 54.2 and 542 mg/kg doses of methylatropine had no significant effects. Atropine crosses the blood-brain barrier and reverses peripheral and central muscarinic effects. In contrast, methylatropine does not cross the blood-brain barrier. Atropine completely reversed the ventilatory effects of low-dose paraoxon, while methylatropine had no significant effects at doses up to 100-fold the equimolar dose of atropine. We conclude that the ventilatory effects of low-dose paraoxon are mediated by disrupted muscarinic signaling in the central nervous system.

  4. Low-dose IL-2 selectively activates subsets of CD4+ Tregs and NK cells

    PubMed Central

    Hirakawa, Masahiro; Matos, Tiago; Liu, Hongye; Koreth, John; Kim, Haesook T.; Paul, Nicole E.; Murase, Kazuyuki; Whangbo, Jennifer; Alho, Ana C.; Nikiforow, Sarah; Cutler, Corey; Ho, Vincent T.; Armand, Philippe; Alyea, Edwin P.; Antin, Joseph H.; Blazar, Bruce R.; Lacerda, Joao F.; Soiffer, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    CD4+ regulatory T cells (CD4Tregs) play a critical role in the maintenance of immune tolerance and prevention of chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. IL-2 supports the proliferation and survival of CD4Tregs and previous studies have demonstrated that IL-2 induces selective expansion of CD4Tregs and improves clinical manifestations of chronic GVHD. However, mechanisms for selective activation of CD4Tregs and the effects of low-dose IL-2 on other immune cells are not well understood. Using mass cytometry, we demonstrate that low concentrations of IL-2 selectively induce STAT5 phosphorylation in Helios+ CD4Tregs and CD56brightCD16– NK cells in vitro. Preferential activation and expansion of Helios+ CD4Tregs and CD56brightCD16– NK cells was also demonstrated in patients with chronic GVHD receiving low-dose IL-2. With prolonged IL-2 treatment for 48 weeks, phenotypic changes were also observed in Helios– CD4Tregs. The effects of low-dose IL-2 therapy on conventional CD4+ T cells and CD8+ T cells were limited to increased expression of PD-1 on effector memory T cells. These studies reveal the selective effects of low-dose IL-2 therapy on Helios+ CD4Tregs and CD56bright NK cells that constitutively express high-affinity IL-2 receptors as well as the indirect effects of prolonged exposure to low concentrations of IL-2 in vivo. PMID:27812545

  5. Accumulation of DNA damage in complex normal tissues after protracted low-dose radiation.

    PubMed

    Schanz, Stefanie; Schuler, Nadine; Lorat, Yvonne; Fan, Li; Kaestner, Lars; Wennemuth, Gunther; Rübe, Christian; Rübe, Claudia E

    2012-10-01

    The biological consequences of low levels of radiation exposure and their effects on human health are unclear. Ionizing radiation induces a variety of lesions of which DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are the most biologically significant, because unrepaired or misrepaired DSBs can lead to genomic instability and cell death. Using repair-proficient mice as an in vivo system we monitored the accumulation of DNA damage in normal tissues exposed to daily low-dose radiation of 100mGy or 10mGy. Radiation-induced foci in differentiated and tissue-specific stem cells were quantified by immunofluorescence microscopy after 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 weeks of daily low-dose radiation and DNA lesions were characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) combined with immunogold-labeling. In brain, long-living cortical neurons had a significant accumulation of foci with increasing cumulative doses. In intestine and skin, characterized by constant cell renewal of their epithelial lining, differentiated enterocytes and keratinocytes had either unchanged or only slightly increased foci levels during protracted low-dose radiation. Significantly, analysis of epidermal stem cells in skin revealed a constant increase of 53BP1 foci during the first weeks of low-dose radiation even with 10mGy, suggesting substantial accumulations of DSBs. However, TEM analysis suggests that these remaining 53BP1 foci, which are predominantly located in compact heterochromatin, do not co-localize with phosphorylated Ku70 or DNA-PKcs, core components of non-homologous end-joining. The biological relevance of these persistent 53BP1 foci, particularly their contribution to genomic instability by genetic and epigenetic alterations, has to be defined in future studies.

  6. Combination therapy with finasteride and low-dose dutasteride in the treatment of androgenetic alopecia.

    PubMed

    Boyapati, Ann; Sinclair, Rodney

    2013-02-01

    We report on a 47-year-old man who was initially treated with finasteride for androgenetic alopecia. Despite continuous treatment, after year 4 his hair density was not as good as at year 2, and low-dose dutasteride at 0.5 mg/week was added to the finasteride therapy. This resulted in a dramatic increase in his hair density, demonstrating that combined therapy with finasteride and dutasteride can improve hair density in patients already taking finasteride.

  7. Data Integration Reveals Key Homeostatic Mechanisms Following Low Dose Radiation Exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Tilton, Susan C.; Matzke, Melissa M.; Sowa, Marianne B.; Stenoien, David L.; Weber, Thomas J.; Morgan, William F.; Waters, Katrina M.

    2015-05-01

    The goal of this study was to define pathways regulated by low dose radiation to understand how biological systems respond to subtle perturbations in their environment and prioritize pathways for human health assessment. Using an in vitro 3-D human full thickness skin model, we have examined the temporal response of dermal and epidermal layers to 10 cGy X-ray using transcriptomic, proteomic, phosphoproteomic and metabolomic platforms. Bioinformatics analysis of each dataset independently revealed potential signaling mechanisms affected by low dose radiation, and integrating data shed additional insight into the mechanisms regulating low dose responses in human tissue. We examined direct interactions among datasets (top down approach) and defined several hubs as significant regulators, including transcription factors (YY1, MYC and CREB1), kinases (CDK2, PLK1) and a protease (MMP2). These data indicate a shift in response across time - with an increase in DNA repair, tissue remodeling and repression of cell proliferation acutely (24 – 72 hr). Pathway-based integration (bottom up approach) identified common molecular and pathway responses to low dose radiation, including oxidative stress, nitric oxide signaling and transcriptional regulation through the SP1 factor that would not have been identified by the individual data sets. Significant regulation of key downstream metabolites of nitrative stress were measured within these pathways. Among the features identified in our study, the regulation of MMP2 and SP1 were experimentally validated. Our results demonstrate the advantage of data integration to broadly define the pathways and networks that represent the mechanisms by which complex biological systems respond to perturbation.

  8. Molecular Mechanisms of Nonlinearity in Response to Low Dose Ionizing Radiation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-10-12

    Goldberg, Z. (2007) Transient genome -wide transcriptional response to low-dose ionizing radiation in-vivo in humans , International Journal of...and protocols. The cRNA was hybridized to the Full details are given in Rocke (31) and Rocke et al. (32), but in Human Genome U 133 Plus 2.0 arrays...Science) using CDS combined database ( Celera Discovery System v. KBMS3.2.20040119), containing 1,416,555 sequences . Searches were performed without

  9. Effect of low doses of methamphetamine on rat limbic-related neurotensin systems.

    PubMed

    Alburges, Mario E; Hoonakker, Amanda J; Cordova, Nathaniel M; Robson, Christina M; McFadden, Lisa M; Martin, Amber L; Hanson, Glen R

    2015-08-01

    Administration of methamphetamine (METH) alters limbic-related (LR) neurotensin (NT) systems. Thus, through a D1-receptor mechanism, noncontingent high doses (5-15 mg kg(-1)), and likely self-administration, of METH appears to reduce NT release causing its accumulation and an elevation of NT-like immunoreactivity (NTLI) in limbic-related NT pathways. For comparison, we tested the effect of low doses of METH, that are more like those used in therapy, on NTLI in the core and shell of the nucleus accumbens (NAc and NAs), prefrontal cortex (PFC), ventral tegmental area (VTA), the lateral habenula (Hb) and basolateral amygdala (Amyg). METH at the dose of 0.25 mg kg(-1) in particular, but not 1.00 mg kg(-1), decreased NTLI concentration in all of the LR structures studied, except for the prefrontal cortex; however, these effects were rapid and brief being observed at 5 h but not at 24 h after treatment. In all of the LR areas where NTLI levels were reduced after the low dose of METH, the effect was blocked by pretreatment with either a D1 or a D2 antagonist. Thus, opposite to high doses like those associated with abuse, the therapeutic-like low-dose METH treatment induced reduction in NT tissue levels likely reflected an increase in NT release and a short-term depletion of the levels of this neuropeptide in LR structures, manifesting features comparable to the response of basal ganglia NT systems to similar low doses of METH.

  10. The biobehavioral and neuroimmune impact of low-dose ionizing radiation

    PubMed Central

    York, Jason M; Blevins, Neil A; Meling, Daryl D; Peterlin, Molly B; Gridley, Daila S; Cengel, Keith A; Freund, Gregory G

    2011-01-01

    In the clinical setting, repeated exposures (10–30) to low-doses of ionizing radiation (≤ 200 cGy), as seen in radiotherapy for cancer, causes fatigue. Almost nothing is known, however, about the fatigue inducing effects of a single exposure to environmental low-dose ionizing radiation that might occur during high-altitude commercial air flight, a nuclear reactor accident or a solar particle event (SPE). To investigate the short-term impact of low-dose ionizing radiation on mouse biobehaviors and neuroimmunity, male CD-1 mice were whole body irradiated with 50 cGy or 200 cGy of gamma or proton radiation. Gamma radiation was found to reduce spontaneous locomotor activity by 35% and 36%, respectively, 6 h post irradiation. In contrast, the motivated behavior of social exploration was un-impacted by gamma radiation. Examination of pro-inflammatory cytokine gene transcripts in the brain demonstrated that gamma radiation increased hippocampal TNF-α expression as early as 4 h post-irradiation. This was coupled to subsequent increases in IL-1RA (8 h and 12 h post irradiation) in the cortex and hippocampus and reductions in activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein (Arc) (24 h post irradiation) in the cortex. Finally, restraint stress was a significant modulator of the neuroimmune response to radiation blocking the ability of 200 cGy gamma radiation from impairing locomotor activity and altering the brain-based inflammatory response to irradiation. Taken together, these findings indicate that low-dose ionizing radiation rapidly activates the neuroimmune system potentially causing early onset fatigue-like symptoms in mice. PMID:21958477

  11. The road to linearity: why linearity at low doses became the basis for carcinogen risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Calabrese, Edward J

    2009-03-01

    This article assesses the historical foundations of how linearity at low dose became accepted by the scientific/regulatory communities. While the threshold model was used in the 1920s/1930s in establishing radiation health standards, its foundations were challenged by the genetics community who argued that radiation induced mutations in reproductive cells followed a linear response, were cumulative and deleterious. Scientific foundations of linearity for gonadal mutations were based on non-conclusive evidence as well as not being conducted at low doses. Following years of debate, leaders in the genetics community participated in the U.S. National Academy of Sciences (NAS) (1956) Biological Effects of Atomic Radiation (BEAR) BEAR I Committee, getting their perspectives accepted, incorporating linearity for radiation-induced mutational effects in risk assessment. Overtime the concept of linearity was generalized to include somatic effects induced by radiation based on a protectionist philosophy. This affected the course of radiation-induced and later chemically-induced carcinogen risk assessment. Acceptance of linearity at low dose from chemical carcinogens was strongly influenced by the NAS Safe Drinking Water Committee report of 1977 which provided the critical guidance to the U.S. EPA to adopt linear at low dose modeling for risk assessment for chemical carcinogens with little supportive data, much of which has been either discredited or seriously weakened over the past 3 decades. Nonetheless, there has been little practical change of regulatory policy concerning carcinogen risk assessment. These observations suggest that while scientific disciplines are self correcting, that regulatory 'science' fails to display the same self-correcting mechanism despite contradictory data.

  12. Low-dose ionising radiation and cardiovascular diseases--Strategies for molecular epidemiological studies in Europe.

    PubMed

    Kreuzer, Michaela; Auvinen, Anssi; Cardis, Elisabeth; Hall, Janet; Jourdain, Jean-Rene; Laurier, Dominique; Little, Mark P; Peters, Annette; Raj, Ken; Russell, Nicola S; Tapio, Soile; Zhang, Wei; Gomolka, Maria

    2015-01-01

    It is well established that high-dose ionising radiation causes cardiovascular diseases. In contrast, the evidence for a causal relationship between long-term risk of cardiovascular diseases after moderate doses (0.5-5 Gy) is suggestive and weak after low doses (<0.5 Gy). However, evidence is emerging that doses under 0.5 Gy may also increase long-term risk of cardiovascular disease. This would have major implications for radiation protection with respect to medical use of radiation for diagnostic purposes and occupational or environmental radiation exposure. Therefore, it is of great importance to gain information about the presence and possible magnitude of radiation-related cardiovascular disease risk at doses of less than 0.5 Gy. The biological mechanisms implicated in any such effects are unclear and results from epidemiological studies are inconsistent. Molecular epidemiological studies can improve the understandin