Science.gov

Sample records for low-energy ion beam

  1. Low energy ion beam dynamics of NANOGAN ECR ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sarvesh; Mandal, A.

    2016-04-01

    A new low energy ion beam facility (LEIBF) has been developed for providing the mass analyzed highly charged intense ion beams of energy ranging from a few tens of keV to a few MeV for atomic, molecular and materials sciences research. The new facility consists of an all permanent magnet 10 GHz electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source (NANOGAN) installed on a high voltage platform (400 kV) which provides large currents of multiply charged ion beams. Higher emittance at low energy of intense ion beam puts a tremendous challenge to the beam optical design of this facility. The beam line consists of mainly the electrostatic quadrupoles, an accelerating section, analyzing cum switching magnet and suitable beam diagnostics including vacuum components. The accelerated ion beam is analyzed for a particular mass to charge (m/q) ratio as well as guided to three different lines along 75°, 90° and 105° using a large acceptance analyzing cum switching magnet. The details of transverse beam optics to all the beam lines with TRANSPORT and GICOSY beam optics codes are being described. Field computation code, OPERA 3D has been utilized to design the magnets and electrostatic quadrupoles. A theoretical estimation of emittance for optimized geometry of ion source is given so as to form the basis of beam optics calculations. The method of quadrupole scan of the beam is used to characterize the emittance of the final beam on the target. The measured beam emittance increases with m/q ratios of various ion beams similar to the trend observed theoretically.

  2. Surface modification using low energy ground state ion beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, Ara (Inventor); Hecht, Michael H. (Inventor); Orient, Otto J. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A method of effecting modifications at the surfaces of materials using low energy ion beams of known quantum state, purity, flux, and energy is presented. The ion beam is obtained by bombarding ion-generating molecules with electrons which are also at low energy. The electrons used to bombard the ion generating molecules are separated from the ions thus obtained and the ion beam is directed at the material surface to be modified. Depending on the type of ion generating molecules used, different ions can be obtained for different types of surface modifications such as oxidation and diamond film formation. One area of application is in the manufacture of semiconductor devices from semiconductor wafers.

  3. Linac4 low energy beam measurements with negative hydrogen ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scrivens, R.; Bellodi, G.; Crettiez, O.; Dimov, V.; Gerard, D.; Granemann Souza, E.; Guida, R.; Hansen, J.; Lallement, J.-B.; Lettry, J.; Lombardi, A.; Midttun, Ø.; Pasquino, C.; Raich, U.; Riffaud, B.; Roncarolo, F.; Valerio-Lizarraga, C. A.; Wallner, J.; Yarmohammadi Satri, M.; Zickler, T.

    2014-02-01

    Linac4, a 160 MeV normal-conducting H- linear accelerator, is the first step in the upgrade of the beam intensity available from the LHC proton injectors at CERN. The Linac4 Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) line from the pulsed 2 MHz RF driven ion source, to the 352 MHz RFQ (Radiofrequency Quadrupole) has been built and installed at a test stand, and has been used to transport and match to the RFQ a pulsed 14 mA H- beam at 45 keV. A temporary slit-and-grid emittance measurement system has been put in place to characterize the beam delivered to the RFQ. In this paper a description of the LEBT and its beam diagnostics is given, and the results of beam emittance measurements and beam transmission measurements through the RFQ are compared with the expectation from simulations.

  4. Linac4 low energy beam measurements with negative hydrogen ions

    SciTech Connect

    Scrivens, R. Bellodi, G.; Crettiez, O.; Dimov, V.; Gerard, D.; Granemann Souza, E.; Guida, R.; Hansen, J.; Lallement, J.-B.; Lettry, J.; Lombardi, A.; Midttun, Ø.; Pasquino, C.; Raich, U.; Riffaud, B.; Roncarolo, F.; Valerio-Lizarraga, C. A.; Wallner, J.; Yarmohammadi Satri, M.; Zickler, T.

    2014-02-15

    Linac4, a 160 MeV normal-conducting H{sup −} linear accelerator, is the first step in the upgrade of the beam intensity available from the LHC proton injectors at CERN. The Linac4 Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) line from the pulsed 2 MHz RF driven ion source, to the 352 MHz RFQ (Radiofrequency Quadrupole) has been built and installed at a test stand, and has been used to transport and match to the RFQ a pulsed 14 mA H{sup −} beam at 45 keV. A temporary slit-and-grid emittance measurement system has been put in place to characterize the beam delivered to the RFQ. In this paper a description of the LEBT and its beam diagnostics is given, and the results of beam emittance measurements and beam transmission measurements through the RFQ are compared with the expectation from simulations.

  5. Linac4 low energy beam measurements with negative hydrogen ions.

    PubMed

    Scrivens, R; Bellodi, G; Crettiez, O; Dimov, V; Gerard, D; Granemann Souza, E; Guida, R; Hansen, J; Lallement, J-B; Lettry, J; Lombardi, A; Midttun, Ø; Pasquino, C; Raich, U; Riffaud, B; Roncarolo, F; Valerio-Lizarraga, C A; Wallner, J; Yarmohammadi Satri, M; Zickler, T

    2014-02-01

    Linac4, a 160 MeV normal-conducting H(-) linear accelerator, is the first step in the upgrade of the beam intensity available from the LHC proton injectors at CERN. The Linac4 Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) line from the pulsed 2 MHz RF driven ion source, to the 352 MHz RFQ (Radiofrequency Quadrupole) has been built and installed at a test stand, and has been used to transport and match to the RFQ a pulsed 14 mA H(-) beam at 45 keV. A temporary slit-and-grid emittance measurement system has been put in place to characterize the beam delivered to the RFQ. In this paper a description of the LEBT and its beam diagnostics is given, and the results of beam emittance measurements and beam transmission measurements through the RFQ are compared with the expectation from simulations.

  6. A compact, versatile low-energy electron beam ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Zschornack, G.; König, J.; Schmidt, M.; Thorn, A.

    2014-02-15

    A new compact Electron Beam Ion Source, the Dresden EBIT-LE, is introduced as an ion source working at low electron beam energies. The EBIT-LE operates at an electron energy ranging from 100 eV to some keV and can easily be modified to an EBIT also working at higher electron beam energies of up to 15 keV. We show that, depending on the electron beam energy, electron beam currents from a few mA in the low-energy regime up to about 40 mA in the high-energy regime are possible. Technical solutions as well as first experimental results of the EBIT-LE are presented. In ion extraction experiments, a stable production of low and intermediate charged ions at electron beam energies below 2 keV is demonstrated. Furthermore, X-ray spectroscopy measurements confirm the possibility of using the machine as a source of X-rays from ions excited at low electron energies.

  7. Low energy ion beam induced changes in ETFE polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parada, M. A.; Delalez, N.; de Almeida, A.; Muntele, C.; Muntele, I.; Ila, D.

    2006-01-01

    Low energy ion beam bombardment of ethylenetetrafluoroethylene (ETFE) modifies the physical and chemical properties of the polymer surface in ways that enhance or compromise applications in the technological and medical physics fields. When a material is exposed to ionizing radiation, its changes depends on the type, energy and intensity of the applied radiation. In order to determine the nature of the induced radiation changes, ETFE films were bombarded with fluences from 1012 up to 1015 ions/cm2 of keV N and protons. The emission of gaseous species during the bombardments was monitored with a residual gas analyser (RGA). The bombarded films were analysed with optical absorption photospectrometry (OAP), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and micro-Raman spectrometries that determine the chemical nature of the structural changes caused by ions bombardment.

  8. Ion beam extraction from electron cyclotron resonance ion sources and the subsequent low energy beam transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winklehner, Daniel

    Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Sources (ECRIS) are capable of delivering high currents of Highly Charged Ions (HCIs) to heavy ion accelerators (e.g.: to the future FRIB). The use of a sextupole magnet for confinement of the plasma inside the source imposes a unique triangular structure on the beam. This, together with the multitude of ion species that are extracted at the same time and the high axial magnetic field at the plasma aperture, resulting from additional confining solenoids, make the simulation and design of ECRIS extraction systems particularly challenging. The first objective of this thesis was to refine and test a semi-empirical simulation model of the formation and extraction of HCIs from ECR ion sources as well as their transport through the subsequent Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) system. To this end, a set of utility functions was written to simplify performing the simulations. In the LEBT system, another interesting, yet so far unanswered, question arises: The influence of space-charge effects on the beam and the level of space-charge compensation in the ECRIS beam line. This interesting topic quickly became the second main objective of the thesis. A Retarding Field Analyzer (RFA) was built and systematic measurements of the neutralization level in ECRIS LEBT systems were done for the first time as part of this thesis (this intensity and pressure regime was previously not well explored). The measured neutralization levels for typical ECRIS beams were found to be between 0% and 50% and agreed reasonably well with a simple formula developed by Gabovich et al. for highly neutralized proton and H- beams after it was re-derived and extended in this thesis for low neutralization and multiple species. Preliminary tests of the refined and integrated simulation model for the ECR ion sources VENUS and SuSI and their respective low energy beam transport systems include comparisons of measured beam currents, cross sections and emittances with the

  9. Space charge compensation in the Linac4 low energy beam transport line with negative hydrogen ions

    SciTech Connect

    Valerio-Lizarraga, Cristhian A.; Lallement, Jean-Baptiste; Lettry, Jacques; Scrivens, Richard; Leon-Monzon, Ildefonso; Midttun, Øystein

    2014-02-15

    The space charge effect of low energy, unbunched ion beams can be compensated by the trapping of ions or electrons into the beam potential. This has been studied for the 45 keV negative hydrogen ion beam in the CERN Linac4 Low Energy Beam Transport using the package IBSimu [T. Kalvas et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 81, 02B703 (2010)], which allows the space charge calculation of the particle trajectories. The results of the beam simulations will be compared to emittance measurements of an H{sup −} beam at the CERN Linac4 3 MeV test stand, where the injection of hydrogen gas directly into the beam transport region has been used to modify the space charge compensation degree.

  10. Neutralization of Space Charge Effects for Low Energy Ion Beams Using Field Emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Nicolaescu, D.; Sakai, S.; Matsuda, K.; Gotoh, Y.; Ishikawa, J.

    2008-11-03

    The paper presents models and computations for neutralization of space charge effects using electrons provided by field emitter arrays. Different ion species ({sup 11}B{sup +},{sup 31}P{sup +},{sup 75}As{sup +}) with energy in the range E{sub ion} = 200 eV-1 keV have been considered. The ion beam divergence is studied as a function of electron beam geometry and physical parameters (electron and ion energy, electron/ion current ratio I{sub el}/I{sub ion}). The electron beam geometry takes into account electron source positions and initial launching angles. It is shown that optimal ion beam neutralization occurs for low energy electrons emitted parallel to the ion beam.

  11. Ultra-low-energy (<10 eV/u) ion beam bombardment effect on naked DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thopan, P.; Thongkumkoon, P.; Prakrajang, K.; Suwannakachorn, D.; Yu, L. D.

    2014-05-01

    Since ion energy deposition in the ion-bombarded materials dominantly occurs in the low-energy range, it is very interesting to know effects from ultra-low-energy ion interaction with DNA for understanding ion-beam-induced genetic mutation. Tens-keV Ar- and N-ion beams were decelerated to ultra-low energy ranging from 20 to 100 eV, or only a few to 10 eV/u, to bombard naked plasmid DNA. The bombarded DNA was analyzed using gel electrophoresis for DNA form changes. The original DNA supercoiled form was found to change to relaxed and linear forms, indicating single or double strand breaks after bombarded by tens-eV ion beam. N-ion beam was found more effective in inducing DNA change and mutation than Ar-ion beam. The study demonstrated that the ion bombardment with energy as low as several-tens eV was able to break DNA strands and thus potentially to cause genetic modification of biological cells. The experimental results were discussed in terms of direct atomic collision between the ions and DNA atoms.

  12. Nanopatterning of mica surface under low energy ion beam sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Metya, A.; Ghose, D.; Mollick, S. A.; Majumdar, A.

    2012-04-01

    Irradiation of crystalline muscovite mica samples by 500 eV Ar{sup +} ions at different incident angles can induce significant surface morphological variations. A periodic ripple pattern of nano-dimensions forms in the angle window 47 deg. -70 deg. . On the other hand, tilted conical protrusions develop on the surface at grazing incidence angles around 80 deg. . From the derivative of the topographic images the distribution of the side-facet slopes in the ion incidence plane are measured, which is found to be strongly related to the pattern morphology. Additionally, it has been shown that, for the ripple structures, the base angles can be tuned by changing the ion fluence. An asymmetric sawtooth profile of the ripples obtained at low fluence is transformed to a symmetrical triangular profile at high fluence. As the slopes are found to be small, the pattern formation is not provoked by the gradient-dependent erosion mechanism rather it is the general effect of the curvature-dependent sputtering phenomena.

  13. High intensity ion guides and purification techniques for low energy radioactive ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grévy, S.

    2016-06-01

    This report gives an overview of the different devices which can be used for the purification of high intensity low energy radioactive ion beams: high resolution magnetic separators (HRS), multi-reflection time-of-flight mass separators (MR-TOF-MS) and Penning traps (PT). An overview of HRS, existing or in development, and the methods to increase the resolving power are presented. The MR-TOF-MS of ISOLTRAP and other projects having been presented during this conference, only the main characteristics of such devices are discussed. Concerning the PT, intensively used to measure masses with high precisions, we will present the PIPERADE project which aims to provide pure beams of exotic nuclei with unprecedent intensities at the future DESIR/SPIRAL2 facility.

  14. Extraction characteristics of a low-energy ion beam system with a remote plasma chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasquez, M. R.; Wada, M.

    2016-02-01

    Low-energy argon beams were extracted from a dual-chamber ion source system. The first chamber is a quartz cylinder where dense inductively coupled plasmas were produced using 13.56 MHz radio frequency (rf) power. The discharge was driven into an adjacent chamber which acts as a reservoir for ion beam extraction using a dual-electrode extractor configuration. Extraction of ions from the second chamber with energies in the 100 eV range was achieved while minimizing fluctuations induced by the rf signal. A custom-built retarding potential analyzer was used to analyze the effectiveness of ion beam transport using the remote plasma chamber. Well-defined beams were extracted between 60 and 100 V extraction potentials at 50-100 W rf powers. An increase in rf power resulted in an increase in average ion energy, increase in ion current density while the energy spread remains constant.

  15. A new beam loss detector for low-energy proton and heavy-ion accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhengzheng; Crisp, Jenna; Russo, Tom; Webber, Robert; Zhang, Yan

    2014-12-01

    The Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) to be constructed at Michigan State University shall deliver a continuous, 400 kW heavy ion beam to the isotope production target. This beam is capable of inflicting serious damage on accelerator components, e.g. superconducting RF accelerating cavities. A Beam Loss Monitoring (BLM) System is essential for detecting beam loss with sufficient sensitivity and promptness to inform the machine protection system (MPS) and operations personnel of impending dangerous losses. Radiation transport simulations reveal shortcomings in the use of ionization chambers for the detection of beam losses in low-energy, heavy-ion accelerators. Radiation cross-talk effects due to the folded geometry of the FRIB LINAC pose further complications to locating specific points of beam loss. We propose a newly developed device, named the Loss Monitor Ring (LMR1

  16. Design study of low energy beam transport line for ion beams of the post-accelerator at RAON

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yumi; Kim, Eun-San

    2015-07-01

    Low-energy ions produced by the ion source pass through the focusing and acceleration sections. During this process, the ions accumulate energy and are finally transported to the apparatus that utilizes them for a specific purpose. Thus, in order to increase the transmission efficiency of the ion beams, the low energy beam transport (LEBT) system must minimize the beam loss and the emittance growth. The LEBT system is designed and optimized to transmit 132Sn16+ and 58Ni8+ beams of the post-accelerator at RAON that is the accelerator complex for the rare isotope science. The post-accelerator LEBT line comprises solenoids and electrostatic quadrupoles for transverse focusing and a multi-harmonic buncher for longitudinal focusing. This paper presents the results of the optical design and beam tracking for the post-accelerator LEBT obtained by using TraceWIN and TRACK codes.

  17. High-flux source of low-energy neutral beams using reflection of ions from metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuthbertson, John W.; Motley, Robert W.; Langer, William D.

    1992-01-01

    Reflection of low-energy ions from surfaces can be applied as a method of producing high-flux beams of low-energy neutral particles, and is an important effect in several areas of plasma technology, such as in the edge region of fusion devices. We have developed a beam source based on acceleration and reflection of ions from a magnetically confined coaxial RF plasma source. The beam provides a large enough flux to allow the energy distribution of the reflected neutrals to be measured despite the inefficiency of detection, by means of an electrostatic cylindrical mirror analyzer coupled with a quadrupole mass spectrometer. Energy distributions have been measured for oxygen, nitrogen, and inert gas ions incident with from 15 to 70 eV reflected from amorphous metal surfaces of several compositions. For ions of lighter atomic mass than the reflecting metal, reflected beams have peaked energy distributions; beams with the peak at 4-32 eV have been measured. The energy and mass dependences of the energy distributions as well as measurements of absolute flux, and angular distribution and divergence are reported. Applications of the neutral beams produced are described.

  18. Studies on low energy beam transport for high intensity high charged ions at IMP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Y.; Sun, L. T.; Hu, Q.; Cao, Y.; Lu, W.; Feng, Y. C.; Fang, X.; Zhang, X. Z.; Zhao, H. W.; Xie, D. Z.

    2014-02-01

    Superconducting Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source with Advanced design in Lanzhou (SECRAL) is an advanced fully superconducting ECR ion source at IMP designed to be operational at the microwave frequency of 18-24 GHz. The existing SECRAL beam transmission line is composed of a solenoid lens and a 110° analyzing magnet. Simulations of particle tracking with 3D space charge effect and realistic 3D magnetic fields through the line were performed using particle-in-cell code. The results of the beam dynamics show that such a low energy beam is very sensitive to the space charge effect and significantly suffers from the second-order aberration of the analyzing magnet resulting in large emittance. However, the second-order aberration could be reduced by adding compensating sextupole components in the beam line. On this basis, a new 110° analyzing magnet with relatively larger acceptance and smaller aberration is designed and will be used in the design of low energy beam transport line for a new superconducting ECR ion source SECRAL-II. The features of the analyzer and the corresponding beam trajectory calculation will be detailed and discussed in this paper.

  19. Studies on low energy beam transport for high intensity high charged ions at IMP

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Y. Lu, W.; Fang, X.; Sun, L. T.; Hu, Q.; Cao, Y.; Feng, Y. C.; Zhang, X. Z.; Zhao, H. W.; Xie, D. Z.

    2014-02-15

    Superconducting Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source with Advanced design in Lanzhou (SECRAL) is an advanced fully superconducting ECR ion source at IMP designed to be operational at the microwave frequency of 18–24 GHz. The existing SECRAL beam transmission line is composed of a solenoid lens and a 110° analyzing magnet. Simulations of particle tracking with 3D space charge effect and realistic 3D magnetic fields through the line were performed using particle-in-cell code. The results of the beam dynamics show that such a low energy beam is very sensitive to the space charge effect and significantly suffers from the second-order aberration of the analyzing magnet resulting in large emittance. However, the second-order aberration could be reduced by adding compensating sextupole components in the beam line. On this basis, a new 110° analyzing magnet with relatively larger acceptance and smaller aberration is designed and will be used in the design of low energy beam transport line for a new superconducting ECR ion source SECRAL-II. The features of the analyzer and the corresponding beam trajectory calculation will be detailed and discussed in this paper.

  20. Nano-ranged low-energy ion-beam-induced DNA transfer in biological cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, L. D.; Wongkham, W.; Prakrajang, K.; Sangwijit, K.; Inthanon, K.; Thongkumkoon, P.; Wanichapichart, P.; Anuntalabhochai, S.

    2013-06-01

    Low-energy ion beams at a few tens of keV were demonstrated to be able to induce exogenous macromolecules to transfer into plant and bacterial cells. In the process, the ion beam with well controlled energy and fluence bombarded living cells to cause certain degree damage in the cell envelope in nanoscales to facilitate the macromolecules such as DNA to pass through the cell envelope and enter the cell. Consequently, the technique was applied for manipulating positive improvements in the biological species. This physical DNA transfer method was highly efficient and had less risk of side-effects compared with chemical and biological methods. For better understanding of mechanisms involved in the process, a systematic study on the mechanisms was carried out. Applications of the technique were also expanded from DNA transfer in plant and bacterial cells to DNA transfection in human cancer cells potentially for the stem cell therapy purpose. Low-energy nitrogen and argon ion beams that were applied in our experiments had ranges of 100 nm or less in the cell envelope membrane which was majorly composed of polymeric cellulose. The ion beam bombardment caused chain-scission dominant damage in the polymer and electrical property changes such as increase in the impedance in the envelope membrane. These nano-modifications of the cell envelope eventually enhanced the permeability of the envelope membrane to favor the DNA transfer. The paper reports details of our research in this direction.

  1. A pepper-pot emittance meter for low-energy heavy-ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Kremers, H. R.; Beijers, J. P. M.; Brandenburg, S.

    2013-02-15

    A novel emittance meter has been developed to measure the four-dimensional, transverse phase-space distribution of a low-energy ion beam using the pepper-pot technique. A characteristic feature of this instrument is that the pepper-pot plate, which has a linear array of holes in the vertical direction, is scanned horizontally through the ion beam. This has the advantage that the emittance can also be measured at locations along the beam line where the beam has a large horizontal divergence. A set of multi-channel plates, scintillation screen, and ccd camera is used as a position-sensitive ion detector allowing a large range of beam intensities that can be handled. This paper describes the design, construction, and operation of the instrument as well as the data analysis used to reconstruct the four-dimensional phase-space distribution of an ion beam. Measurements on a 15 keV He{sup +} beam are used as an example.

  2. Transferring Gus gene into intact rice cells by low energy ion beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zengliang, Yu; Jianbo, Yang; Yuejin, Wu; Beijiu, Cheng; Jianjun, He; Yuping, Huo

    1993-06-01

    A new technique of transferring genes by low energy ion beam has been reported in this paper. The Gus and CAT (chloramphenicol acetyltransferase) genes, as "foreign" genetic materials, were introduced into the suspension cells and ripe embryos or rice by implantation of 20-30 keV Ar + at doses ranging from 1 × 10 15 to 4 × 10 15 ions/cm 2. The activities of CAT and Gus were detected in the cells and embryos after several weeks. The results indicate that the transfer was a success.

  3. Low-energy ionization cooling of ions for beta beam sources

    SciTech Connect

    Neuffer, David; /Fermilab

    2007-10-01

    Rubbia et al.[1] have recently suggested that multiturn passage of a low-energy ion beam (v/c {approx_equal} 0.1) through a low-Z target can be used in the production of ions useable for beta-beam sources and that ionization cooling techniques can increase the circulating beam lifetime and thus enhance that production. Some parameters in their initial discussion are somewhat optimistic, and the conditions for 3-D cooling are not completely developed. In the present paper we reconsider some features of the scenarios and suggest some variations that may be more practical. While 3-D cooling is possible at these energies, mixing of longitudinal motion with both horizontal and vertical motion is necessary to obtain simultaneous cooling in all dimensions; we suggest lattice variations that would be needed. Direct and reverse kinematics are described and explored.

  4. The Low-Energy State ofCirculating Stored Ion Beams: Crystalline Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, J.; Li, X.-P.; Sessler, Andrew M.

    1994-03-10

    Molecular dynamics is employed to study the low energy states of a beam of charged particles subject to circumferentially varying guiding and focusing forces and with Coulomb forces between the particles. In a constant gradient ring, the lowest energy state is never ordered, but in an alternating gradient structure, operating below the transition energy, the lowest state is ordered. The nature and characteristics of the ground state depends upon the beam density and the ring parameters. For zero temperature the crystal remains intact for a very long time, but at nonzero temperatures it gains energy from the lattice. A critical temperature exists above which the crystal melts rapidly.

  5. Surface modification and metallization of polycarbonate using low energy ion beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reheem, A. M. Abdel; Maksoud, M. I. A. Abdel; Ashour, A. H.

    2016-08-01

    The low energy argon ion is used for irradiation polycarbonate samples using cold cathode ion source. The surface of the PC substrates is examined using SEM, UV-spectroscopy and FTIR. It was found that the energy band gap decrease by increase argon ion fluence. Copper films are deposited onto polycarbonate (PC) substrates after irradiation by argon ion beam. The structure, surface morphology and the optical band gap are investigated using XRD, SEM and UV spectroscopy. It can be seen that the intensity increases with deposition time and band gap decreases from 3.45 eV for the pristine PC to ∼1.7 eV for copper thin film.

  6. Development of microwave ion source and low energy beam transport system for high current cyclotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandit, V. S.; Sing Babu, P.; Goswami, A.; Srivastava, S.; Misra, A.; Chatterjee, Mou; Nabhiraj, P. Y.; Yadav, R. C.; Bhattacharya, S.; Roy, S.; Nandi, C.; Pal, G.; Thakur, S. K.

    2013-12-01

    A 2.45 GHz microwave ion source and a low energy beam transport system have been developed to study the high intensity proton beam injection into a 10 MeV, 5 mA compact cyclotron. We have extracted proton beam more than 10 mA at 80 kV as measured by the DCCT after the extraction and a well collimated beam of 7 mA (through 1 cm × 1 cm slit) at the faraday cup 1.5 m away from the source. The transport of protons from the ion source in the presence of H2+, H3+ species has been studied using PIC simulations through our transport line which consists of two solenoids. We have also installed a small dipole magnet with similar field as that of the cyclotron along with vacuum chamber, spiral inflector and few diagnostic elements at the end of the beam line. In the preliminary testing of inflection, we achieved 1 mA beam on the faraday cup at the exit of inflector with ∼60% transmission efficiency.

  7. Characterization of hydrogen binding to tungsten and beryllium surfaces using low energy ion beam analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolasinski, Robert; Whaley, Josh

    2015-11-01

    In this study, we use low energy ion beam analysis to determine how hydrogen interacts with tungsten and beryllium surfaces. The goal of this work is to provide insight into processes that contribute to recycling from plasma-facing surfaces in magnetic fusion devices. Here we have applied low energy ion scattering (LEIS) to enable detection of adsorbed hydrogen at sub-monolayer resolution and to provide isotopic sensitivity. We probe the surfaces of interest with He + and Ne + at energies less than 5 keV to determine the structure and composition of the first few atomic layers. This approach enables us to examine how hydrogen surface concentrations evolve in real time, providing insight into adsorption kinetics. In addition, we have developed a means of determining the hydrogen binding configuration at different temperatures by exploiting mechanisms of ion channeling along surfaces. Using these methods, we have been able to identify hydrogen binding configurations for the W(100) +H, W(110) +H, and Be(0001) +H adsorption systems. We also report on our efforts to more accurately and efficiently model atomic collisions during scattering, key steps needed to extract structural information from LEIS signals. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. DOE's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  8. Fabrication of a TEM sample of ion-irradiated material using focused ion beam microprocessing and low-energy Ar ion milling.

    PubMed

    Jin, Hyung-Ha; Shin, Chansun; Kwon, Junhyun

    2010-01-01

    Cross-section-view TEM samples of ion-irradiated material are successfully fabricated using a focused ion beam (FIB) system and low-energy Ar ion milling. Ga ion-induced damages in FIB processing are reduced remarkably by the means of low-energy Ar ion milling. There are optimized ion milling conditions for the reduction and removal of the secondary artifacts such as defects and ripples. Incident angles and accelerated voltages are especially more important factors on the preservation of a clean surface far from secondary defects and surface roughing due to Ga and Ar ion bombardment.

  9. Neutralization of space charge on high-current low-energy ion beam by low-energy electrons supplied from silicon based field emitter arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Gotoh, Yasuhito; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Taguchi, Shuhei; Ikeda, Keita; Kitagawa, Takayuki; Ishikawa, Junzo; Sakai, Shigeki

    2012-11-06

    Neutralization of space charge on a high-current and low-energy ion beam was attempted to reduce the divergence with an aid of low-energy electrons supplied from silicon based field emitter arrays (Si-FEAs). An argon ion beam with the energy of 500 eV and the current of 0.25 mA was produced by a microwave ion source. The initial beam divergence and the emittance were measured at the entrance of the analysis chamber in order to estimate the intrinsic factors for beam divergence. The current density distribution of the beam after transport of 730 mm was measured by a movable Faraday cup, with and without electron supply from Si-FEAs. A similar experiment was performed with tungsten filaments as an electron source. The results indicated that the electron supply from FEA had almost the same effect as the thermionic filament, and it was confirmed that both electron sources can neutralize the ion beam.

  10. Investigation of Mn-implanted n-Si by low-energy ion beam deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lifeng; Chen, Nuofu; Song, Shulin; Yin, Zhigang; Yang, Fei; Chai, Chunlin; Yang, Shaoyan; Liu, Zhikai

    2005-01-01

    Mn ions were implanted to n-type Si(0 0 1) single crystal by low-energy ion beam deposition technique with an energy of 1000 eV and a dose of 7.5×10 17 cm -2. The samples were held at room temperature and at 300 °C during implantation. Auger electron spectroscopy depth profiles of samples indicate that the Mn ions reach deeper in the sample implanted at 300 °C than in the sample implanted at room temperature. X-ray diffraction measurements show that the structure of the sample implanted at room temperature is amorphous while that of the sample implanted at 300 °C is crystallized. There are no new phases found except silicon both in the two samples. Atomic force microscopy images of samples indicate that the sample implanted at 300 °C has island-like humps that cover the sample surface while there is no such kind of characteristic in the sample implanted at room temperature. The magnetic properties of samples were investigated by alternating gradient magnetometer (AGM). The sample implanted at 300 °C shows ferromagnetic behavior at room temperature.

  11. High current density ion beam obtained by a transition to a highly focused state in extremely low-energy region

    SciTech Connect

    Hirano, Y. E-mail: hirano.yoichi@phys.cst.nihon-u.ac.jp; Kiyama, S.; Koguchi, H.; Fujiwara, Y.; Sakakita, H.

    2015-11-15

    A high current density (≈3 mA/cm{sup 2}) hydrogen ion beam source operating in an extremely low-energy region (E{sub ib} ≈ 150–200 eV) has been realized by using a transition to a highly focused state, where the beam is extracted from the ion source chamber through three concave electrodes with nominal focal lengths of ≈350 mm. The transition occurs when the beam energy exceeds a threshold value between 145 and 170 eV. Low-level hysteresis is observed in the transition when E{sub ib} is being reduced. The radial profiles of the ion beam current density and the low temperature ion current density can be obtained separately using a Faraday cup with a grid in front. The measured profiles confirm that more than a half of the extracted beam ions reaches the target plate with a good focusing profile with a full width at half maximum of ≈3 cm. Estimation of the particle balances in beam ions, the slow ions, and the electrons indicates the possibility that the secondary electron emission from the target plate and electron impact ionization of hydrogen may play roles as particle sources in this extremely low-energy beam after the compensation of beam ion space charge.

  12. High current density ion beam obtained by a transition to a highly focused state in extremely low-energy region.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Y; Kiyama, S; Fujiwara, Y; Koguchi, H; Sakakita, H

    2015-11-01

    A high current density (≈3 mA/cm(2)) hydrogen ion beam source operating in an extremely low-energy region (E(ib) ≈ 150-200 eV) has been realized by using a transition to a highly focused state, where the beam is extracted from the ion source chamber through three concave electrodes with nominal focal lengths of ≈350 mm. The transition occurs when the beam energy exceeds a threshold value between 145 and 170 eV. Low-level hysteresis is observed in the transition when E(ib) is being reduced. The radial profiles of the ion beam current density and the low temperature ion current density can be obtained separately using a Faraday cup with a grid in front. The measured profiles confirm that more than a half of the extracted beam ions reaches the target plate with a good focusing profile with a full width at half maximum of ≈3 cm. Estimation of the particle balances in beam ions, the slow ions, and the electrons indicates the possibility that the secondary electron emission from the target plate and electron impact ionization of hydrogen may play roles as particle sources in this extremely low-energy beam after the compensation of beam ion space charge.

  13. Characterization of a Gafchromic film for the two-dimensional profile measurement of low-energy heavy-ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuri, Yosuke; Narumi, Kazumasa; Yuyama, Takahiro

    2016-08-01

    The feasibility of the transverse intensity distribution measurement of low-energy (keV/u range) heavy-ion beams using radiochromic films is experimentally explored. We employ a Gafchromic radiochromic film, HD-V2, whose active layer is not laminated by a surface-protection layer. The coloration response of films irradiated with several ion beams is characterized in terms of optical density (OD) by reading the films with a general-purpose scanner. To explore the energy dependence of the film response widely, the kinetic energy of the beams is varied from 1.5 keV/u to 27 MeV/u. We have found that the coloration of HD-V2 films is induced by irradiation with low-energy ion beams of the order of 10 keV/u. The range of the beams is considerably shorter than the thickness of the film's active layer. The dependence of OD response on ion species is also discussed. We demonstrate that the Gafchromic film used here is useful for measuring the intensity distribution of such low-energy ion beams.

  14. Low energy highly charged ion beam facility at Inter University Accelerator Centre: Measurement of the plasma potential and ion energy distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Sairam, T. Bhatt, Pragya; Safvan, C. P.; Kumar, Ajit; Kumar, Herendra

    2015-11-15

    A deceleration lens coupled to one of the beam lines of the electron cyclotron resonance based low energy beam facility at Inter University Accelerator Centre is reported. This system is capable of delivering low energy (2.5 eV/q–1 keV/q) highly charged ion beams. The presence of plasma potential hinders the measurements of low energies (<50 eV), therefore, plasma potential measurements have been undertaken using a retarding plate analyzer in unison with the deceleration assembly. The distributions of the ion energies have been obtained and the effect of different source parameters on these distributions is studied.

  15. Low energy ion beam induced changes in structural and thermal properties of polycarbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reheem, A. M. Abdel; Atta, A.; Maksoud, M. I. A. Abdel

    2016-10-01

    The aim of the present study is extended for obtaining relation between the collision of ion beam with polycarbonate polymer (PC) and the introduced modification of technological applications. Polycarbonate films are irradiated by a 6 keV argon ion beam extracted from locally design cold cathode ion source with different ion fluences. The films are characterized using X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Mechanical tester, Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA). The increase in ion beam irradiation leads to an increase in the tensile strength and reduction in elongation at break for PC. TGA Analysis shows that the thermal decomposition temperature of irradiated polycarbonate changes with ion fluence. The DSC graphs show improvements in thermal stability with increase in the activation energy after ion beam irradiation. Ion penetration depths and distributions of scattered atoms are calculated using SRIM Monte Carlo simulation programs.

  16. Extraction and low energy beam transport from a surface ion source at the TRIUMF-ISAC facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, A.; Ames, F.; Bricault, P.; Lassen, J.; Laxdal, A.; Mjos, A.

    2016-06-01

    A large fraction of radioactive beams produced and delivered at TRIUMF's isotope separator and accelerator facility, ISAC, are using either a surface ion source or a resonant ionization laser ion source, which share a common design. To characterize the operation of the ion sources, simulations were performed to determine the ion beam optics and beam envelope properties of the extracted beam. Furthermore ion-optics calculations were performed to determine the transmission parameters through the mass separator magnet. Emittances are measured in the ISAC low energy beam line right after the mass separator. The recent addition of a channeltron to the Allison emittance meter scanner now allows us to measure emittances for ion beams with intensities as low as 105 ions/s. This is particularly useful for establishing high resolution, high throughput mass separator tunes for radioactive isotope beams. This paper discusses emittance measurements of low intensity beams, typical emittance scans for the surface ion source and the resonant laser ionized source for different source parameters. The observed results are compared to the simulations and discussed.

  17. A Sensitivity Enhanced MWCNT/PDMS Tactile Sensor Using Micropillars and Low Energy Ar⁺ Ion Beam Treatment.

    PubMed

    Azkar Ul Hasan, Syed; Jung, Youngdo; Kim, Seonggi; Jung, Cho-Long; Oh, Sunjong; Kim, Junhee; Lim, Hyuneui

    2016-01-01

    High sensitive flexible and wearable devices which can detect delicate touches have attracted considerable attentions from researchers for various promising applications. This research was aimed at enhancing the sensitivity of a MWCNT/PDMS piezoresistive tactile sensor through modification of its surface texture in the form of micropillars on MWCNT/PDMS film and subsequent low energy Ar⁺ ion beam treatment of the micropillars. The introduction of straight micropillars on the MWCNT/PDMS surface increased the sensitivity under gentle touch. Low energy ion beam treatment was performed to induce a stiff layer on the exposed surface of the micropillar structured MWCNT/PDMS film. The low energy ion bombardment stabilized the electrical properties of the MWCNT/PDMS surface and tuned the curvature of micropillars according to the treatment conditions. The straight micropillars which were treated by Ar⁺ ion with an incident angle of 0° demonstrated the enhanced sensitivity under normal pressure and the curved micropillars which were treated with Ar⁺ ion with an incident angle of 60° differentiated the direction of an applied shear pressure. The ion beam treatment on micropillar structured MWCNT/PDMS tactile sensors can thus be applied to reliable sensing under gentle touch with directional discrimination. PMID:26771616

  18. A Sensitivity Enhanced MWCNT/PDMS Tactile Sensor Using Micropillars and Low Energy Ar+ Ion Beam Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Syed Azkar Ul; Jung, Youngdo; Kim, Seonggi; Jung, Cho-Long; Oh, Sunjong; Kim, Junhee; Lim, Hyuneui

    2016-01-01

    High sensitive flexible and wearable devices which can detect delicate touches have attracted considerable attentions from researchers for various promising applications. This research was aimed at enhancing the sensitivity of a MWCNT/PDMS piezoresistive tactile sensor through modification of its surface texture in the form of micropillars on MWCNT/PDMS film and subsequent low energy Ar+ ion beam treatment of the micropillars. The introduction of straight micropillars on the MWCNT/PDMS surface increased the sensitivity under gentle touch. Low energy ion beam treatment was performed to induce a stiff layer on the exposed surface of the micropillar structured MWCNT/PDMS film. The low energy ion bombardment stabilized the electrical properties of the MWCNT/PDMS surface and tuned the curvature of micropillars according to the treatment conditions. The straight micropillars which were treated by Ar+ ion with an incident angle of 0° demonstrated the enhanced sensitivity under normal pressure and the curved micropillars which were treated with Ar+ ion with an incident angle of 60° differentiated the direction of an applied shear pressure. The ion beam treatment on micropillar structured MWCNT/PDMS tactile sensors can thus be applied to reliable sensing under gentle touch with directional discrimination. PMID:26771616

  19. Ion energy distribution functions of low energy beams formed by wire extraction electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Tokumura, S.; Kasuya, T.; Vasquez, M. Jr.; Maeno, S.; Wada, M.

    2012-02-15

    The two-electrode extractor system made of 0.1 mm diameter tungsten wires separated by 0.7 mm has formed an argon ion beam with 50 V extraction potential. Energy spreads of the extracted beams were typically less than 2 eV when the beam current density was low. The beam intensity rapidly decreased as the distance between the extractor and the beam detector increased, indicating space charge limited transport of the beam. Problems associated with the emittance measurements are also discussed.

  20. A comparative study on low-energy ion beam and neutralized beam modifications of naked DNA and biological effect on mutation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarapirom, S.; Thongkumkoon, P.; Prakrajang, K.; Anuntalabhochai, S.; Yu, L. D.

    2012-02-01

    DNA conformation change or damage induced by low-energy ion irradiation has been of great interest owing to research developments in ion beam biotechnology and ion beam application in biomedicine. Mechanisms involved in the induction of DNA damage may account for effect from implanting ion charge. In order to check this effect, we used both ion beam and neutralized beam at keV energy to bombard naked DNA. Argon or nitrogen ion beam was generated and extracted from a radiofrequency (RF) ion source and neutralized by microwave-driven plasma in the beam path. Plasmid DNA pGFP samples were irradiated with the ion or neutralized beam in vacuum, followed by gel electrophoresis to observe changes in the DNA conformations. It was revealed that the ion charge played a certain role in inducing DNA conformation change. The subsequent DNA transfer into bacteria Escherichia coli ( E. coli) for mutation analysis indicated that the charged ion beam induced DNA change had high potential in mutation induction while neutralized beam did not. The intrinsic reason was attributed to additional DNA deformation and contortion caused by ion charge exchange effect so that the ion beam induced DNA damage could hardly be completely repaired, whereas the neutralized beam induced DNA change could be more easily recoverable owing to absence of the additional DNA deformation and contortion.

  1. Feasibility of a 90° electric sector energy analyzer for low energy ion beam characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Mahinay, C. L. S. Ramos, H. J.; Wada, M.

    2015-02-15

    A simple formula to calculate refocusing by locating the output slit at a specific distance away from the exit of 90° ion deflecting electric sector is given. Numerical analysis is also performed to calculate the ion beam trajectories for different values of the initial angular deviation of the beam. To validate the theory, a compact (90 mm × 5.5 mm × 32 mm) 90° sector ESA is fabricated which can fit through the inner diameter of a conflat 70 vacuum flange. Experimental results show that the dependence of resolution upon the distance between the sector exit and the Faraday cup agrees with the theory. The fabricated 90° sector electrostatic energy analyzer was then used to measure the space resolved ion energy distribution functions of an ion beam with the energy as low as 600 eV.

  2. Effect of low energy oxygen ion beam irradiation on ionic conductivity of solid polymer electrolyte

    SciTech Connect

    Manjunatha, H. Kumaraswamy, G. N.; Damle, R.

    2014-04-24

    Over the past three decades, solid polymer electrolytes (SPEs) have drawn significant attention of researchers due to their prospective commercial applications in high energy-density batteries, electrochemical sensors and super-capacitors. The optimum conductivity required for such applications is about 10{sup −2} – 10{sup −4} S/cm, which is hard to achieve in these systems. It is known that the increase in the concentration of salt in the host polymer results in a continuous increase in the ionic conductivity. However, there is a critical concentration of the salt beyond which the conductivity decreases due to formation of ion pairs with no net charge. In the present study, an attempt is made to identify the concentration at which ion pair formation occurs in PEO: RbBr. We have attempted to modify microstructure of the host polymer matrix by low energy ion (Oxygen ion, O{sup +1} with energy 100 keV) irradiation. Ionic conductivity measurements in these systems were carried out using Impedance Spectroscopy before and after irradiation to different fluencies of the oxygen ion. It is observed that the conductivity increases by one order in magnitude. The increase in ionic conductivity may be attributed to the enhanced segmental motion of the polymer chains. The study reveals the importance of ion irradiation as an effective tool to enhance conductivity in SPEs.

  3. Effect of low energy oxygen ion beam irradiation on ionic conductivity of solid polymer electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manjunatha, H.; Kumaraswamy, G. N.; Damle, R.

    2014-04-01

    Over the past three decades, solid polymer electrolytes (SPEs) have drawn significant attention of researchers due to their prospective commercial applications in high energy-density batteries, electrochemical sensors and super-capacitors. The optimum conductivity required for such applications is about 10-2 - 10-4 S/cm, which is hard to achieve in these systems. It is known that the increase in the concentration of salt in the host polymer results in a continuous increase in the ionic conductivity. However, there is a critical concentration of the salt beyond which the conductivity decreases due to formation of ion pairs with no net charge. In the present study, an attempt is made to identify the concentration at which ion pair formation occurs in PEO: RbBr. We have attempted to modify microstructure of the host polymer matrix by low energy ion (Oxygen ion, O+1 with energy 100 keV) irradiation. Ionic conductivity measurements in these systems were carried out using Impedance Spectroscopy before and after irradiation to different fluencies of the oxygen ion. It is observed that the conductivity increases by one order in magnitude. The increase in ionic conductivity may be attributed to the enhanced segmental motion of the polymer chains. The study reveals the importance of ion irradiation as an effective tool to enhance conductivity in SPEs.

  4. Making AlN(x) Tunnel Barriers Using a Low-Energy Nitrogen-Ion Beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaul, Anupama; Kleinsasser, Alan; Bumble, Bruce; LeDuc, Henry; Lee, Karen

    2005-01-01

    A technique based on accelerating positive nitrogen ions onto an aluminum layer has been demonstrated to be effective in forming thin (<2 nm thick) layers of aluminum nitride (AlN(x)) for use as tunnel barriers in Nb/Al-AlN(x)/Nb superconductor/insulator/ superconductor (SIS) Josephson junctions. AlN(x) is the present material of choice for tunnel barriers because, to a degree greater than that of any other suitable material, it offers the required combination of low leakage current at high current density and greater thermal stability. While ultra-thin AlN films with good thickness and stoichiometry control are easily formed using techniques such as reactive molecular beam epitaxy and chemical vapor deposition, growth temperatures of 900 C are necessary for the dissociative adsorption of nitrogen from either nitrogen (N2) or ammonia (NH3). These growth temperatures are prohibitively high for the formation of tunnel barriers on Nb films because interfacial reactions at temperatures as low as 200 to 300 C degrade device properties. Heretofore, deposition by reactive sputtering and nitridation of thin Al layers with DC and RF nitrogen plasmas have been successfully used to form AlN barriers in SIS junctions. However, precise control over critical current density Jc has proven to be a challenge, as is attaining adequate process reproducibility from system to system. The present ion-beam technique is an alternative to the plasma or reactive sputtering techniques as it provides a highly controlled arrival of reactive species, independent of the electrical conditions of the substrate or vacuum chamber. Independent and accurate control of parameters such as ion energy, flux, species, and direction promises more precise control of film characteristics such as stoichiometry and thickness than is the case with typical plasma processes. In particular, the background pressure during ion-beam nitride growth is 2 or 3 orders of magnitude lower, minimizing the formation of

  5. Recent Performance of the SNS H- ion source and low-energy beam transport system

    SciTech Connect

    Stockli, Martin P; Ewald, Kerry D; Han, Baoxi; Murray Jr, S N; Pennisi, Terry R; Piller, Chip; Santana, Manuel; Tang, Johnny Y; Welton, Robert F

    2014-01-01

    Recent measurements of the H beam current show that SNS is injecting about 55 mA into the RFQ compared to 45 mA in 2010. Since 2010, the H beam exiting the RFQ dropped from 40 mA to 34 mA, which is sufficient for 1 MW of beam power. To minimize the impact of the RFQ degradation, the service cycle of the best performing source was extended to 6 weeks. The only degradation is fluctuations in the electron dump voltage towards the end of some service cycles, a problem that is being investigated. Very recently, the RFQ was retuned, which partly restored its transmission. In addition, the electrostatic low-energy beam transport system was reengineered to double its heat sinking and equipped with a thermocouple that monitors the temperature of the ground electrode between the two Einzel lenses. The recorded data show that emissions from the source at high voltage dominate the heat load. Emissions from the partly Cs-covered first lens cause the temperature to peak several hours after starting up. On rare occasions, the temperature can also peak due to corona discharges between the center ground electrode and one of the lenses.

  6. TEM sample preparation using a new nanofabrication technique combining electron-beam-induced deposition and low-energy ion milling.

    PubMed

    Mitsuishi, Kazutaka; Shimojo, Masayuki; Tanaka, Miyoko; Takeguchi, Masaki; Song, Minghui; Furuya, Kazuo

    2006-12-01

    A new TEM sample preparation technique using electron-beam-induced deposition combined with low-energy ion milling was used to fabricate for two different shapes of sample, conical and plate. High-quality HREM images can be obtained from samples prepared by this technique. A desired sample position can be obtained with high accuracy, and the total sample preparation time can be much less than conventional techniques. Because the gas deposition system used can easily be integrated in a conventional SEM, the method can be performed in any laboratory equipped with a SEM and an ion milling machine.

  7. Laboratory degradation of Kapton in a low energy oxygen ion beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, D. C.

    1984-01-01

    An atomic oxygen ion beam, accelerated from a tunable microwave resonant cavity, was used at Lewis Research Center to bombard samples of the widely used polyimide Kapton. The Kapton experienced degradation and mass loss at high rates, which may be comparable to those found in Space Shuttle operations if the activation energy supplied by the beam enabled surface reactions with the ambient oxygen. The simulation reproduced the directionality (ram-wake dependence) of the degradation, the change in optical properties of the degraded materials, and the structure seen in scanning electron micrographs of samples returned on the Shuttle Trails with a substituted argon ion beam produced no rapid degradation. Energy Dispersive X-ray Analysis (EDAX) showed significant surface composition changes in all bombarded samples. Mass loss rates and surface composition changes are discussed in terms of the possible oxidation chemistry of the interaction. Finally, the question of how the harmful degradation of materials in low Earth orbit can be minimized is addressed.

  8. Laboratory degradation of Kapton in a low energy oxygen ion beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, D. C.

    1983-01-01

    An atomic oxygen ion beam, accelerated from a tunable microwave resonant cavity, was used at Lewis Research Center to bombard samples of the widely used polyimide Kapton. The Kapton experienced degradation and mass loss at high rates, which may be comparable to those found in Space Shuttle operations if the activation energy supplied by the beam enabled surface reactions with the ambient oxygen. The simulation reproduced the directionality (ram-wake dependence) of the degradiation, the change in optical properties of the degraded materials, and the structure seen in scanning electron micrographs of samples returned on the Shuttle Trails with a substituted argon ion beam produced no rapid degradation. Energy Dispersive X-ray Analysis (EDAX) showed significant surface composition changes in all bombarded samples. Mass loss rates and surface composition changes are discussed in terms of the possible oxidation chemistry of the interaction. Finally, the question of how the harmful degradation of materials in low earth orbit can be minimized is addressed.

  9. A 2.45 GHz electron cyclotron resonance proton ion source and a dual-lens low energy beam transport.

    PubMed

    Zhang, W H; Ma, H Y; Yang, Y; Wu, Q; Zhang, X Z; Wang, H; Ma, B H; Feng, Y C; Fang, X; Guo, J W; Cao, Y; Li, X X; Zhu, Y H; Li, J Y; Sha, S; Lu, W; Lin, S H; Guo, X H; Zhao, H Y; Sun, L T; Xie, D Z; Peng, S X; Liu, Z W; Zhao, H W

    2012-02-01

    The structure and preliminary commissioning results of a new 2.45 GHz ECR proton ion source and a dual-lens low energy beam transport (LEBT) system are presented in this paper. The main magnetic field of the ion source is provided by a set of permanent magnets with two small electro-solenoid magnets at the injection and the extraction to fine tune the magnetic field for better microwave coupling. A 50 keV pulsed proton beam extracted by a three-electrode mechanism passes through the LEBT system of length of 1183 mm. This LEBT consists of a diagnosis chamber, two Glaser lenses, two steering magnets, and a final beam defining cone. A set of inner permanent magnetic rings is embedded in each of the two Glaser lenses to produce a flatter axial-field to reduce the lens aberrations.

  10. Investigation of the mechanism of impurity assisted nanoripple formation on Si induced by low energy ion beam erosion

    SciTech Connect

    Koyiloth Vayalil, Sarathlal; Gupta, Ajay; Roth, Stephan V.; Ganesan, V.

    2015-01-14

    A detailed mechanism of the nanoripple pattern formation on Si substrates generated by the simultaneous incorporation of pure Fe impurities at low energy (1 keV) ion beam erosion has been studied. To understand and clarify the mechanism of the pattern formation, a comparative analysis of the samples prepared for various ion fluence values using two complimentary methods for nanostructure analysis, atomic force microscopy, and grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering has been done. We observed that phase separation of the metal silicide formed during the erosion does not precede the ripple formation. It rather concurrently develops along with the ripple structure. Our work is able to differentiate among various models existing in the literature and provides an insight into the mechanism of pattern formation under ion beam erosion with impurity incorporation.

  11. Design of a compact Faraday cup for low energy, low intensity ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantero, E. D.; Sosa, A.; Andreazza, W.; Bravin, E.; Lanaia, D.; Voulot, D.; Welsch, C. P.

    2016-01-01

    Beam intensity is one of the key parameters in particle accelerators, in particular during machine commissioning, but also during operation for experiments. At low beam energies and low intensities a number of challenges arise in its measurement as commonly used non-invasive devices are no longer sensitive enough. It then becomes necessary to stop the beam in order to measure its absolute intensity. A very compact Faraday cup for determining ion beam currents from a few nanoamperes down to picoamperes for the HIE-ISOLDE post-accelerator at CERN has been designed, built and tested with beam. It has a large aperture diameter of 30 mm and a total length of only 16 mm, making it one of the most compact designs ever used. In this paper we present the different steps that were involved in the design and optimization of this device, including beam tests with two early prototypes and the final monitor. We also present an analysis of the losses caused by secondary particle emission for different repelling electrode voltages and beam energies. Finally, we show that results obtained from an analytical model for electron loss probability combined with Monte Carlo simulations of particles trajectories provide a very good agreement with experimental data.

  12. Simulation studies for operating electron beam ion trap at very low energy for disentangling edge plasma spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Jin Xuelong; Fei Zejie; Xiao Jun; Lu Di; Hutton, Roger; Zou Yaming

    2012-07-15

    Electron beam ion traps (EBITs) are very useful tools for disentanglement studies of atomic processes in plasmas. In order to assist studies on edge plasma spectroscopic diagnostics, a very low energy EBIT, SH-PermEBIT, has been set up at the Shanghai EBIT lab. In this work, simulation studies for factors which hinder an EBIT to operate at very low electron energies were made based on the Tricomp (Field Precision) codes. Longitudinal, transversal, and total kinetic energy distributions were analyzed for all the electron trajectories. Influences from the electron current and electron energy on the energy depression caused by the space charge are discussed. The simulation results show that although the energy depression is most serious along the center of the electron beam, the electrons in the outer part of the beam are more likely to be lost when an EBIT is running at very low energy. Using the simulation results to guide us, we successfully managed to reach the minimum electron beam energy of 60 eV with a beam transmission above 57% for the SH-PermEBIT. Ar and W spectra were measured from the SH-PermEBIT at the apparent electron beam energies (read from the voltage difference between the electron gun cathode and the central drift tube) of 60 eV and 1200 eV, respectively. The spectra are shown in this paper.

  13. Simulation studies for operating electron beam ion trap at very low energy for disentangling edge plasma spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Xuelong; Fei, Zejie; Xiao, Jun; Lu, Di; Hutton, Roger; Zou, Yaming

    2012-07-01

    Electron beam ion traps (EBITs) are very useful tools for disentanglement studies of atomic processes in plasmas. In order to assist studies on edge plasma spectroscopic diagnostics, a very low energy EBIT, SH-PermEBIT, has been set up at the Shanghai EBIT lab. In this work, simulation studies for factors which hinder an EBIT to operate at very low electron energies were made based on the Tricomp (Field Precision) codes. Longitudinal, transversal, and total kinetic energy distributions were analyzed for all the electron trajectories. Influences from the electron current and electron energy on the energy depression caused by the space charge are discussed. The simulation results show that although the energy depression is most serious along the center of the electron beam, the electrons in the outer part of the beam are more likely to be lost when an EBIT is running at very low energy. Using the simulation results to guide us, we successfully managed to reach the minimum electron beam energy of 60 eV with a beam transmission above 57% for the SH-PermEBIT. Ar and W spectra were measured from the SH-PermEBIT at the apparent electron beam energies (read from the voltage difference between the electron gun cathode and the central drift tube) of 60 eV and 1200 eV, respectively. The spectra are shown in this paper.

  14. Irradiation effect on PET surface using low energy argon ion beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soliman, Barakat A.; Abdelrahman, Moustafa M.; Abdelsalam, Fatama W.; Aly, Kamal A.

    2013-01-01

    A study of various physical properties of a PET film irradiated with an Ar beam is reported. SEM images and UV-VIS and FTIR spectra were obtained for a number of ionic fluxes and three irradiation times. Small changes in the energy gap of degradated samples were found, and the SEM images indicate that the optimum homogeneity and roughness are reached after 30 min of irradiation. These results may well be of practical interest. A modified saddle field ion source was used as a preparation tool of the surface of polyethylene terephthalate PET polymer substrate to be ready for coating or thin film deposition. Argon ion beam was used for this purpose, where the scanning electron microscope (SEM) shows that, the best sample is the one which was irradiated to 30 min, where this sample is more homogenous and roughness than other irradiated samples. Also the (UV-VIS) spectrum tells us that, there is small change on energy gap and this is meaning that, the change on electric properties is small also. In this case the sample is more homogenous and of higher roughness than other irradiated samples.

  15. A Study of Mutation Breeding of High-Yielding Tryptophanase Escherichia coli by Low-Energy N+ Ion Beam Implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Min; Yao, Jianming; Wang, Dongmei

    2009-12-01

    Low energy ion beam has been widely applied in microbe breeding, plant breeding, gene transfer and cell modification. In this study, the Escherichia coli (E.coli) strain producing tryptophanase was irradiated by a low energy nitrogen ion beam with an energy of 10 keV at a fluence of 13 × 1014 N+/cm2 when glycerin at a 15% concentration was used as a protector. The effect on the biomass of E. coli after N+ implantation was analyzed in detail by statistic methods. The screening methods used in this study were proven to be effective. After continuous mutagenicity, a high-yield tryptophanase strain was selected and both its biomass and enzymatic activity were higher than those of the parent strain. The results of scale-up production showed that the biomass could reach wet weight 8.2 g/L and 110 g L-tryptophan could be formed in the volume of the 1l enzymatic reaction system.

  16. Fabrication of surface magnetic nanoclusters using low energy ion implantation and electron beam annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, J.; Leveneur, J.; Williams, G. V. M.; Mitchell, D. R. G.; Markwitz, A.

    2011-03-01

    Magnetic nanoclusters have novel applications as magnetic sensors, spintronic and biomedical devices, as well as applications in more traditional materials such as high-density magnetic storage media and high performance permanent magnets. We describe a new synthesis protocol which combines the advantages of ion implantation and electron beam annealing (EBA) to produce surface iron nanoclusters. We compare the structure, composition and magnetic properties of iron nanoclusters fabricated by low dose 15 keV Fe implantation into SiO2 followed by 1000 °C EBA or furnace annealing. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) images together with superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometry measurements show that only EBA leads to the rapid formation of surface crystalline Fe spherical nanoclusters, showing magnetic moments per Fe atom comparable to that of bulk bcc Fe and superparamagnetic properties. We propose a fabrication mechanism which includes e-beam enhanced desorption of SiO2. This method has potential for fabricating nanoscale magnetic sensors integrated in microelectronic devices.

  17. Intense low energy positron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Lynn, K.G.; Jacobsen, F.M.

    1993-12-31

    Intense positron beams are under development or being considered at several laboratories. Already today a few accelerator based high intensity, low brightness e{sup +} beams exist producing of the order of 10{sup 8} {minus} 10{sup 9} e{sup +}/sec. Several laboratories are aiming at high intensity, high brightness e{sup +} beams with intensities greater than 10{sup 9} e{sup +}/sec and current densities of the order of 10{sup 13} {minus} 10{sup 14} e{sup +} sec{sup {minus}} {sup 1}cm{sup {minus}2}. Intense e{sup +} beams can be realized in two ways (or in a combination thereof) either through a development of more efficient B{sup +} moderators or by increasing the available activity of B{sup +} particles. In this review we shall mainly concentrate on the latter approach. In atomic physics the main trust for these developments is to be able to measure differential and high energy cross-sections in e{sup +} collisions with atoms and molecules. Within solid state physics high intensity, high brightness e{sup +} beams are in demand in areas such as the re-emission e{sup +} microscope, two dimensional angular correlation of annihilation radiation, low energy e{sup +} diffraction and other fields. Intense e{sup +} beams are also important for the development of positronium beams, as well as exotic experiments such as Bose condensation and Ps liquid studies.

  18. Low energy beam transport system developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudnikov, V.; Han, B.; Stockli, M.; Welton, R.; Dudnikova, G.

    2015-04-01

    For high brightness beam production it is important to preserve the brightness in the low energy beam transport system (LEBT) used to transport and match the ion beams to the next stage of acceleration, usually an RFQ. While electrostatic focusing can be problematic for high current beam transport, reliable electrostatic LEBT operation has been demonstrated with H- beams up to 60 mA. Now, however, it is commonly accepted that an optimal LEBT for high current accelerator applications consists of focusing solenoids with space charge compensation. Two-solenoid LEBTs are successfully used for high current (>100 mA) proton beam transport. Preservation of low emittances (~0.15 π mm-mrad) requires the addition of a heavy gas (Xe, Kr), which causes ~5% of proton loss in a 1 m long LEBT. Similar Xe densities would be required to preserve low emittances of H- beams, but such gas densities cause unacceptably high H- beam losses. A short LEBT with only one short solenoid, movable for RFQ matching, can be used for reduced negative ion stripping. A strong electrostatic-focusing LEBT has been successfully adopted for transport of high current H- beams in the SNS Front End. Some modifications of such electrostatic LEBTs are expected to improve the reliable transport of intense positive and negative ion beams without greatly degrading their low emittances. We concentrate on processes that determine the beam brightness degradation and on their prevention. Proposed improvements to the SNS electrostatic LEBT are discussed.

  19. Space-charge compensation measurements in electron cyclotron resonance ion source low energy beam transport lines with a retarding field analyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Winklehner, D.; Leitner, D. Cole, D.; Machicoane, G.; Tobos, L.

    2014-02-15

    In this paper we describe the first systematic measurement of beam neutralization (space charge compensation) in the ECR low energy transport line with a retarding field analyzer, which can be used to measure the potential of the beam. Expected trends for the space charge compensation levels such as increase with residual gas pressure, beam current, and beam density could be observed. However, the overall levels of neutralization are consistently low (<60%). The results and the processes involved for neutralizing ion beams are discussed for conditions typical for ECR injector beam lines. The results are compared to a simple theoretical beam plasma model as well as simulations.

  20. Sub-5 nm graphene nanopore fabrication by nitrogen ion etching induced by a low-energy electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Daniel S.; Maguire, Pierce; Zhou, Yangbo; Rodenburg, Cornelia; O’Neill, Arlene; Coleman, Jonathan N.; Zhang, Hongzhou

    2016-05-01

    A flexible and efficient method to fabricate nanopores in graphene has been developed. A focused, low-energy (5 keV) electron beam was used to locally activate etching of a graphene surface in a low pressure (0.3 Pa) N2 environment. Nanopores with sub-5 nm diameters were fabricated. The lattice structure of the graphene was observed to recover within 20 nm of the nanopore edge. Nanopore growth rates were investigated systematically. The effects of nitrogen pressure, electron beam dwell time and beam current were characterised in order to understand the etching mechanism and enable optimisation of the etching parameters. A model was developed which describes how the diffusion of ionised nitrogen affects the nanopore growth rate. Etching of other two-dimensional materials was attempted as demonstrated with MoS2. The lack of etching observed supports our model of a chemical reaction-based mechanism. The understanding of the etching mechanism will allow more materials to be etched by selection of an appropriate ion species.

  1. Sub-5 nm graphene nanopore fabrication by nitrogen ion etching induced by a low-energy electron beam.

    PubMed

    Fox, Daniel S; Maguire, Pierce; Zhou, Yangbo; Rodenburg, Cornelia; O'Neill, Arlene; Coleman, Jonathan N; Zhang, Hongzhou

    2016-05-13

    A flexible and efficient method to fabricate nanopores in graphene has been developed. A focused, low-energy (5 keV) electron beam was used to locally activate etching of a graphene surface in a low pressure (0.3 Pa) N2 environment. Nanopores with sub-5 nm diameters were fabricated. The lattice structure of the graphene was observed to recover within 20 nm of the nanopore edge. Nanopore growth rates were investigated systematically. The effects of nitrogen pressure, electron beam dwell time and beam current were characterised in order to understand the etching mechanism and enable optimisation of the etching parameters. A model was developed which describes how the diffusion of ionised nitrogen affects the nanopore growth rate. Etching of other two-dimensional materials was attempted as demonstrated with MoS2. The lack of etching observed supports our model of a chemical reaction-based mechanism. The understanding of the etching mechanism will allow more materials to be etched by selection of an appropriate ion species.

  2. Electron stripping processes of H⁻ ion beam in the 80 kV high voltage extraction column and low energy beam transport line at LANSCE.

    PubMed

    Draganic, I N

    2016-02-01

    Basic vacuum calculations were performed for various operating conditions of the Los Alamos National Neutron Science H(-) Cockcroft-Walton (CW) injector and the Ion Source Test Stand (ISTS). The vacuum pressure was estimated for both the CW and ISTS at five different points: (1) inside the H(-) ion source, (2) in front of the Pierce electrode, (3) at the extraction electrode, (4) at the column electrode, and (5) at the ground electrode. A static vacuum analysis of residual gases and the working hydrogen gas was completed for the normal ion source working regime. Gas density and partial pressure were estimated for the injected hydrogen gas. The attenuation of H(-) beam current and generation of electron current in the high voltage acceleration columns and low energy beam transport lines were calculated. The interaction of H(-) ions on molecular hydrogen (H2) is discussed as a dominant collision process in describing electron stripping rates. These results are used to estimate the observed increase in the ratio of electrons to H(-) ion beam in the ISTS beam transport line.

  3. Electron stripping processes of H- ion beam in the 80 kV high voltage extraction column and low energy beam transport line at LANSCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Draganic, I. N.

    2016-02-01

    Basic vacuum calculations were performed for various operating conditions of the Los Alamos National Neutron Science H- Cockcroft-Walton (CW) injector and the Ion Source Test Stand (ISTS). The vacuum pressure was estimated for both the CW and ISTS at five different points: (1) inside the H- ion source, (2) in front of the Pierce electrode, (3) at the extraction electrode, (4) at the column electrode, and (5) at the ground electrode. A static vacuum analysis of residual gases and the working hydrogen gas was completed for the normal ion source working regime. Gas density and partial pressure were estimated for the injected hydrogen gas. The attenuation of H- beam current and generation of electron current in the high voltage acceleration columns and low energy beam transport lines were calculated. The interaction of H- ions on molecular hydrogen (H2) is discussed as a dominant collision process in describing electron stripping rates. These results are used to estimate the observed increase in the ratio of electrons to H- ion beam in the ISTS beam transport line.

  4. Doping of Graphene by Low-Energy Ion Beam Implantation: Structural, Electronic, and Transport Properties.

    PubMed

    Willke, Philip; Amani, Julian A; Sinterhauf, Anna; Thakur, Sangeeta; Kotzott, Thomas; Druga, Thomas; Weikert, Steffen; Maiti, Kalobaran; Hofsäss, Hans; Wenderoth, Martin

    2015-08-12

    We investigate the structural, electronic, and transport properties of substitutional defects in SiC-graphene by means of scanning tunneling microscopy and magnetotransport experiments. Using ion incorporation via ultralow energy ion implantation, the influence of different ion species (boron, nitrogen, and carbon) can directly be compared. While boron and nitrogen atoms lead to an effective doping of the graphene sheet and can reduce or raise the position of the Fermi level, respectively, (12)C(+) carbon ions are used to study possible defect creation by the bombardment. For low-temperature transport, the implantation leads to an increase in resistance and a decrease in mobility in contrast to undoped samples. For undoped samples, we observe in high magnetic fields a positive magnetoresistance that changes to negative for the doped samples, especially for (11)B(+)- and (12)C(+)-ions. We conclude that the conductivity of the graphene sheet is lowered by impurity atoms and especially by lattice defects, because they result in weak localization effects at low temperatures. PMID:26120803

  5. Energy straggling of low-energy ion beam in a charge exchange cell for negative ion production

    SciTech Connect

    Takeuchi, S.; Sasao, M.; Sugawara, H.; Tanaka, N.; Kisaki, M.; Okamoto, A.; Shinto, K.; Kitajima, S.; Nishiura, M.; Wada, M.

    2008-02-15

    Energy straggling in a charge exchange cell, which is frequently used for negative ion production, was studied experimentally and compared with the results of theoretical evaluation. The change of the energy spectrum of a He{sup +} beam due to charge exchange processes in argon gas was measured in the energy range of 2-6 keV. Energy straggling by multiple collisions is expressed by the energy loss formula due to inelastic and elastic processes. The impact parameter is related to the elastic scattering angle, and the geometry of the charge exchange cell and other components of the beam transportation system determines the maximum acceptable scattering angle. The energy spread was evaluated taking the integral limit over the impact parameter into consideration. The theoretical results showed good agreement with those of actual measurement.

  6. Electron density profile measurements at a self-focusing ion beam with high current density and low energy extracted through concave electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Fujiwara, Y. Nakamiya, A.; Sakakita, H.; Hirano, Y.; Kiyama, S.; Koguchi, H.

    2014-02-15

    The self-focusing phenomenon has been observed in a high current density and low energy ion beam. In order to study the mechanism of this phenomenon, a special designed double probe to measure the electron density and temperature is installed into the chamber where the high current density ion beam is injected. Electron density profile is successfully measured without the influence of the ion beam components. Estimated electron temperature and density are ∼0.9 eV and ∼8 × 10{sup 8} cm{sup −3} at the center of ion beam cross section, respectively. It was found that a large amount of electrons are spontaneously accumulated in the ion beam line in the case of self-forcing state.

  7. RHIC low energy beam loss projections

    SciTech Connect

    Satogata,T.

    2009-08-01

    For RHIC low-energy operations, we plan to collide Au beams with energies of E = 2:5-10 GeV/u in RHIC. Beams are injected into collision optics, and RHIC runs as a storage ring with no acceleration. At these low energies, observed beam lifetimes are minutes, with measured beam lifetimes of 3.5 min (fast) and 50 min (slow) at E=4.6 GeV/u in the March 2008 test run. With these lifetimes we can operate RHIC as a storage ring to produce reasonable integrated luminosity. This note estimates beam losses and collimator/dump energy deposition in normal injection modes of low energy operation. The main question is whether a normal injection run is feasible for an FY10 10-15 week operations run from a radiation safety perspective. A peripheral question is whether continuous injection operations is feasible from a radiation safety perspective. In continuous injection mode, we fill both rings, then continuously extract and reinject the oldest bunches that have suffered the most beam loss to increase the overall integrated luminosity. We expect to gain a factor of 2-3 in integrated luminosity from continuous injection at lowest energies if implemented[1]. Continuous injection is feasible by FY11 from an engineering perspective given enough effort, but the required extra safety controls and hardware dose risk make it unappealing for the projected luminosity improvement. Low-energy electron cooling will reduce beam losses by at least an order of magnitude vs normal low-energy operations, but low energy cooling is only feasible in the FY13 timescale and therefore beyond the scope of this note. For normal injection low energy estimates we assume the following: (1) RHIC beam total energies are E=2.5-10 GeV/u. (Continuous injection mode is probably unnecessary above total energies of E=7-8 GeV/u.); (2) RHIC operates only as a storage ring, with no acceleration; (3) 110 bunches of about 0.5-1.0 x 10{sup 9} initial bunch intensities (50-100% injection efficiency, likely conservative

  8. Genetic Transformation of Watermelon with Pumpkin DNA by Low Energy Ion Beam-Mediated Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hao-bo; Gao, Xiu-wu; Guo, Jin-hua; Huang, Qun-ce; Yu, Zeng-liang

    2002-12-01

    The No.601 watermelon (citrullus lanatus) seeds were treated with 25 keV N+ implantation at the dosage of 7.8 × 1016 ions/cm2. After treatment, watermelon seeds were incubated with 380 μg/μl pumpkin (Cucubita, maxima Duch) DNA solution at 35 °C for 5 hours. By two-generations of selection and resistance screening at seedling stage, one transformed material was selected out, whose rind color is similar to that of the donor pumpkin and whose size of seeds is between that of the donor and the receptor. Using AFLP (amplified fragment length polymorphism) technique, two polymorphic DNA fragments were amplified. This primarily testified that the donor DNA fragments/gene were introduced into the receptor cell and integrated into the genomic DNA of the receptor.

  9. Development of a pepper-pot emittance meter for diagnostics of low-energy multiply charged heavy ion beams extracted from an ECR ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagatomo, T.; Tzoganis, V.; Kase, M.; Kamigaito, O.; Nakagawa, T.

    2016-02-01

    Several fluorescent materials were tested for use in the imaging screen of a pepper-pot emittance meter that is suitable for investigating the beam dynamics of multiply charged heavy ions extracted from an ECR ion source. SiO2 (quartz), KBr, Eu-doped CaF2, and Tl-doped CsI crystals were first irradiated with 6.52-keV protons to determine the effects of radiation damage on their fluorescence emission properties. For such a low-energy proton beam, only the quartz was found to be a suitable fluorescent material, since the other materials suffered a decay in fluorescence intensity with irradiation time. Subsequently, quartz was irradiated with heavy 12C4+, 16O4+, and 40Ar11+ ions, but it was found that the fluorescence intensity decreased too rapidly to measure the emittance of these heavy-ion beams. These results suggest that a different energy loss mechanism occurs for heavier ions and for protons.

  10. Development of a pepper-pot emittance meter for diagnostics of low-energy multiply charged heavy ion beams extracted from an ECR ion source.

    PubMed

    Nagatomo, T; Tzoganis, V; Kase, M; Kamigaito, O; Nakagawa, T

    2016-02-01

    Several fluorescent materials were tested for use in the imaging screen of a pepper-pot emittance meter that is suitable for investigating the beam dynamics of multiply charged heavy ions extracted from an ECR ion source. SiO2 (quartz), KBr, Eu-doped CaF2, and Tl-doped CsI crystals were first irradiated with 6.52-keV protons to determine the effects of radiation damage on their fluorescence emission properties. For such a low-energy proton beam, only the quartz was found to be a suitable fluorescent material, since the other materials suffered a decay in fluorescence intensity with irradiation time. Subsequently, quartz was irradiated with heavy (12)C(4+), (16)O(4+), and (40)Ar(11+) ions, but it was found that the fluorescence intensity decreased too rapidly to measure the emittance of these heavy-ion beams. These results suggest that a different energy loss mechanism occurs for heavier ions and for protons.

  11. Self-focusing of a high current density ion beam extracted with concave electrodes in a low energy region around 150 eV

    SciTech Connect

    Hirano, Y.; Kiyama, S.; Koguchi, H.; Sakakita, H.

    2014-02-15

    Spontaneous self-focusing of ion beam with high current density (J{sub c} ∼ 2 mA/cm{sup 2}, I{sub b} ∼ 65 mA) in low energy region (∼150 eV) is observed in a hydrogen ion beam extracted from an ordinary bucket type ion source with three electrodes having concave shape (acceleration, deceleration, and grounded electrodes). The focusing appears abruptly in the beam energy region over ∼135–150 eV, and the J{sub c} jumps up from 0.7 to 2 mA/cm{sup 2}. Simultaneously a strong electron flow also appears in the beam region. The electron flow has almost the same current density. Probably these electrons compensate the ion space charge and suppress the beam divergence.

  12. Low energy beam transport system developments

    SciTech Connect

    Dudnikov, V.; Han, B.; Stockli, M.; Welton, R.; Dudnikova, G.

    2015-04-08

    For high brightness beam production it is important to preserve the brightness in the low energy beam transport system (LEBT) used to transport and match the ion beams to the next stage of acceleration, usually an RFQ. While electrostatic focusing can be problematic for high current beam transport, reliable electrostatic LEBT operation has been demonstrated with H{sup −} beams up to 60 mA. Now, however, it is commonly accepted that an optimal LEBT for high current accelerator applications consists of focusing solenoids with space charge compensation. Two-solenoid LEBTs are successfully used for high current (>100 mA) proton beam transport. Preservation of low emittances (~0.15 π mm-mrad) requires the addition of a heavy gas (Xe, Kr), which causes ~5% of proton loss in a 1 m long LEBT. Similar Xe densities would be required to preserve low emittances of H{sup −} beams, but such gas densities cause unacceptably high H{sup −} beam losses. A short LEBT with only one short solenoid, movable for RFQ matching, can be used for reduced negative ion stripping. A strong electrostatic-focusing LEBT has been successfully adopted for transport of high current H{sup −} beams in the SNS Front End. Some modifications of such electrostatic LEBTs are expected to improve the reliable transport of intense positive and negative ion beams without greatly degrading their low emittances. We concentrate on processes that determine the beam brightness degradation and on their prevention. Proposed improvements to the SNS electrostatic LEBT are discussed.

  13. Interaction between Low Energy Ions and the Complicated Organism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zeng-liang

    1999-12-01

    Low energy ions exist widely in natural world, but people pay a little attention on the interaction between low energy ions and matter, it is even more out of the question of studying on the relation of low energy ions and the complicated organism. The discovery of bioeffect induced by ion implantation has, however, opened a new branch in the field of ion beam application in life sciences. This paper reports recent advances in research on the role of low energy ions in chemical synthesis of the biomolecules and application in genetic modification.

  14. Beam lifetime and limitations during low-energy RHIC operation

    SciTech Connect

    Fedotov, A.V.; Bai, M.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Fischer, W.; Kayran, D.; Montag, C.; Satogata, T.; Tepikian, S.; Wang, G.

    2011-03-28

    The low-energy physics program at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), motivated by a search for the QCD phase transition critical point, requires operation at low energies. At these energies, large nonlinear magnetic field errors and large beam sizes produce low beam lifetimes. A variety of beam dynamics effects such as Intrabeam Scattering (IBS), space charge and beam-beam forces also contribute. All these effects are important to understand beam lifetime limitations in RHIC at low energies. During the low-energy RHIC physics run in May-June 2010 at beam {gamma} = 6.1 and {gamma} = 4.1, gold beam lifetimes were measured for various values of space-charge tune shifts, transverse acceptance limitation by collimators, synchrotron tunes and RF voltage. This paper summarizes our observations and initial findings.

  15. MEIC Proton Beam Formation with a Low Energy Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yuhong

    2015-09-01

    The MEIC proton and ion beams are generated, accumulated, accelerated and cooled in a new green-field ion injector complex designed specifically to support its high luminosity goal. This injector consists of sources, a linac and a small booster ring. In this paper we explore feasibility of a short ion linac that injects low-energy protons and ions into the booster ring.

  16. Electrostatic energy analyzer measurements of low energy zirconium beam parameters in a plasma sputter-type negative ion source.

    PubMed

    Malapit, Giovanni M; Mahinay, Christian Lorenz S; Poral, Matthew D; Ramos, Henry J

    2012-02-01

    A plasma sputter-type negative ion source is utilized to produce and detect negative Zr ions with energies between 150 and 450 eV via a retarding potential-type electrostatic energy analyzer. Traditional and modified semi-cylindrical Faraday cups (FC) inside the analyzer are employed to sample negative Zr ions and measure corresponding ion currents. The traditional FC registered indistinct ion current readings which are attributed to backscattering of ions and secondary electron emissions. The modified Faraday cup with biased repeller guard ring, cut out these signal distortions leaving only ringings as issues which are theoretically compensated by fitting a sigmoidal function into the data. The mean energy and energy spread are calculated using the ion current versus retarding potential data while the beam width values are determined from the data of the transverse measurement of ion current. The most energetic negative Zr ions yield tighter energy spread at 4.11 eV compared to the least energetic negative Zr ions at 4.79 eV. The smallest calculated beam width is 1.04 cm for the negative Zr ions with the highest mean energy indicating a more focused beam in contrast to the less energetic negative Zr ions due to space charge forces.

  17. Electrostatic energy analyzer measurements of low energy zirconium beam parameters in a plasma sputter-type negative ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Malapit, Giovanni M.; Mahinay, Christian Lorenz S.; Poral, Matthew D.; Ramos, Henry J.

    2012-02-15

    A plasma sputter-type negative ion source is utilized to produce and detect negative Zr ions with energies between 150 and 450 eV via a retarding potential-type electrostatic energy analyzer. Traditional and modified semi-cylindrical Faraday cups (FC) inside the analyzer are employed to sample negative Zr ions and measure corresponding ion currents. The traditional FC registered indistinct ion current readings which are attributed to backscattering of ions and secondary electron emissions. The modified Faraday cup with biased repeller guard ring, cut out these signal distortions leaving only ringings as issues which are theoretically compensated by fitting a sigmoidal function into the data. The mean energy and energy spread are calculated using the ion current versus retarding potential data while the beam width values are determined from the data of the transverse measurement of ion current. The most energetic negative Zr ions yield tighter energy spread at 4.11 eV compared to the least energetic negative Zr ions at 4.79 eV. The smallest calculated beam width is 1.04 cm for the negative Zr ions with the highest mean energy indicating a more focused beam in contrast to the less energetic negative Zr ions due to space charge forces.

  18. Nitrogen Doping of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube by Using Mass-Separated Low-Energy Ion Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Kamimura, Takafumi; Matsumoto, Kazuhiko

    2005-04-01

    Mass-separated nitrogen ions with the mass number of 14 were irradiated to the single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) under an ultra high-vacuum pressure of 10-7 Pa for the purpose of achieving nitrogen doping in nanotubes. The incident angle of the ion beam was normal to the target nanotube, and the ion beam energy was 30 eV, which was close to the displacement energy of graphite. The dependence of the structure of SWCNTs on the ion dose was investigated. The ion dose ranged from 2.8× 1014 to 2.2× 1016 ions/cm2. The nitrogen ions are incorporated into graphite sheets of SWCNTs after irradiation at 2.8× 1014 ions/cm2. The graphite structure is distorted and many defects are induced in the nanotube by the nitrogen incorporation. The structure is changed to amorphous after irradiation at 2.2× 1016 ions/cm2. The nitrogen ions with the ion energy of 25 eV are irradiated to the field effect transistor device with the nanotube channel. The n-type characteristic appears upon ion irradiation, and the device exhibits ambipolar behavior.

  19. Recent performance of the SNS H{sup −} ion source and low-energy beam transport system

    SciTech Connect

    Stockli, Martin P. Ewald, K. D.; Han, B. X.; Murray, S. N.; Pennisi, T. R.; Piller, C.; Santana, M.; Tang, J.; Welton, R.

    2014-02-15

    Recent measurements of the H{sup −} beam current show that SNS is injecting about 55 mA into the RFQ compared to ∼45 mA in 2010. Since 2010, the H{sup −} beam exiting the RFQ dropped from ∼40 mA to ∼34 mA, which is sufficient for 1 MW of beam power. To minimize the impact of the RFQ degradation, the service cycle of the best performing source was extended to 6 weeks. The only degradation is fluctuations in the electron dump voltage towards the end of some service cycles, a problem that is being investigated. Very recently, the RFQ was retuned, which partly restored its transmission. In addition, the electrostatic low-energy beam transport system was reengineered to double its heat sinking and equipped with a thermocouple that monitors the temperature of the ground electrode between the two Einzel lenses. The recorded data show that emissions from the source at high voltage dominate the heat load. Emissions from the partly Cs-covered first lens cause the temperature to peak several hours after starting up. On rare occasions, the temperature can also peak due to corona discharges between the center ground electrode and one of the lenses.

  20. Low-energy operation of the Livermore electron beam ion traps: Atomic spectroscopy of Si V, S VII, and Ar IX

    SciTech Connect

    Lepson, J K; Beiersdorfer, P

    2004-01-02

    As part of a project to compile a comprehensive catalog of astrophysically relevant emission lines, we used the low-energy capability of the Lawrence Livermore electron beam ion traps to extend the spectroscopy of neon-like ions and the neighboring charge states to silicon, sulfur, and argon. They present wavelength data of Si V and demonstrate the effect of collisional deexcitation of electric dipole forbidden lines on the 2-3 L-shell spectra of Si V, S VII, and Ar IX.

  1. Molecular ion sources for low energy semiconductor ion implantation (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hershcovitch, A.; Gushenets, V. I.; Seleznev, D. N.; Bugaev, A. S.; Dugin, S.; Oks, E. M.; Kulevoy, T. V.; Alexeyenko, O.; Kozlov, A.; Kropachev, G. N.; Kuibeda, R. P.; Minaev, S.; Vizir, A.; Yushkov, G. Yu.

    2016-02-01

    Smaller semiconductors require shallow, low energy ion implantation, resulting space charge effects, which reduced beam currents and production rates. To increase production rates, molecular ions are used. Boron and phosphorous (or arsenic) implantation is needed for P-type and N-type semiconductors, respectively. Carborane, which is the most stable molecular boron ion leaves unacceptable carbon residue on extraction grids. A self-cleaning carborane acid compound (C4H12B10O4) was synthesized and utilized in the ITEP Bernas ion source resulting in large carborane ion output, without carbon residue. Pure gaseous processes are desired to enable rapid switch among ion species. Molecular phosphorous was generated by introducing phosphine in dissociators via 4PH3 = P4 + 6H2; generated molecular phosphorous in a pure gaseous process was then injected into the HCEI Calutron-Bernas ion source, from which P4+ ion beams were extracted. Results from devices and some additional concepts are described.

  2. Molecular ion sources for low energy semiconductor ion implantation (invited).

    PubMed

    Hershcovitch, A; Gushenets, V I; Seleznev, D N; Bugaev, A S; Dugin, S; Oks, E M; Kulevoy, T V; Alexeyenko, O; Kozlov, A; Kropachev, G N; Kuibeda, R P; Minaev, S; Vizir, A; Yushkov, G Yu

    2016-02-01

    Smaller semiconductors require shallow, low energy ion implantation, resulting space charge effects, which reduced beam currents and production rates. To increase production rates, molecular ions are used. Boron and phosphorous (or arsenic) implantation is needed for P-type and N-type semiconductors, respectively. Carborane, which is the most stable molecular boron ion leaves unacceptable carbon residue on extraction grids. A self-cleaning carborane acid compound (C4H12B10O4) was synthesized and utilized in the ITEP Bernas ion source resulting in large carborane ion output, without carbon residue. Pure gaseous processes are desired to enable rapid switch among ion species. Molecular phosphorous was generated by introducing phosphine in dissociators via 4PH3 = P4 + 6H2; generated molecular phosphorous in a pure gaseous process was then injected into the HCEI Calutron-Bernas ion source, from which P4(+) ion beams were extracted. Results from devices and some additional concepts are described.

  3. Scanning ion microscopy with low energy lithium ions.

    PubMed

    Twedt, Kevin A; Chen, Lei; McClelland, Jabez J

    2014-07-01

    Using an ion source based on photoionization of laser-cooled lithium atoms, we have developed a scanning ion microscope with probe sizes of a few tens of nanometers and beam energies from 500eV to 5keV. These beam energies are much lower than the typical operating energies of the helium ion microscope or gallium focused ion beam systems. We demonstrate how low energy can be advantageous in ion microscopy when detecting backscattered ions, due to a decreased interaction volume and the potential for surface sensitive composition analysis. As an example application that demonstrates these advantages, we non-destructively image the removal of a thin residual resist layer during plasma etching in a nano-imprint lithography process.

  4. Straight low energy beam transport for intense uranium beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, C.; Groening, L.; Vormann, H.; Mickat, S.; Hollinger, R.; Adonin, A.; Orzhekhovskaya, A.; Maier, M.; Al-Omari, H.; Barth, W.; Kester, O. K.; Yaramyshev, S.

    2015-07-01

    A new high current uranium ion source and dedicated Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) will be built at the GSI High Current Injector (HSI). This LEBT will be integrated into the existing complex which already comprises two branches. The paper presents the design and dynamics simulation using the TRACE-3D and TRACK code. The simulation results illustrate that this straight LEBT can transport uranium beams over a wide range of space-charge compensation, and can provide 15.4 (14.2) mA U4+ inside of the effective acceptance of the subsequent RFQ assuming the space-charge is compensated to 100% (95%).

  5. Sub microsecond notching of a negative hydrogen beam at low energy utilizing a magnetron ion source with a split extractor

    SciTech Connect

    Moehs, Douglas; /Fermilab

    2004-12-01

    A technique for sub-microsecond beam notching is being developed at 20 keV utilizing a Magnetron ion source with a slit extraction system and a split extractor. Each half of the extractor is treated as part of a 50 ohm transmission line which can be pulsed at {+-}700 volts creating a 1400 volt gradient. This system along with the associated electronics is electrically floated on top of a pulsed extraction voltage. A beam reduction of 95% has been observed at the end of the Fermilab 400 MeV Linac and 35% notching has recently been achieved in the Booster.

  6. A Parallel 3d Model for The Multi-Species Low Energy BeamTransport System of the RIA Prototype ECR Ion Source Venus

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, J.; Leitner, D.; Todd, D.

    2005-05-16

    The driver linac of the proposed Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) requires a great variety of high intensity, high charge state ion beams. In order to design and to optimize the low energy beamline optics of the RIA front end,we have developed a new parallel three-dimensional model to simulate the low energy, multi-species ion beam formation and transport from the ECR ion source extraction region to the focal plane of the analyzing magnet. A multisection overlapped computational domain has been used to break the original transport system into a number of each subsystem, macro-particle tracking is used to obtain the charge density distribution in this subdomain. The three-dimensional Poisson equation is solved within the subdomain and particle tracking is repeated until the solution converges. Two new Poisson solvers based on a combination of the spectral method and the multigrid method have been developed to solve the Poisson equation in cylindrical coordinates for the beam extraction region and in the Frenet-Serret coordinates for the bending magnet region. Some test examples and initial applications will also be presented.

  7. Preliminary Studies on Base Substitutions and Repair of DNA Mismatch Damage Stimulated by Low Energy N+ Ion Beam Implantation in Escherichia coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Chuan-xiao; Guo, Jin-hua; Cheng, Bei-jiu; Yu, Zeng-liang

    2003-02-01

    Ever since the low energy N+ ion beam has been accepted that the mutation effects of ionizing radiation are attributed mainly to direct or indirect damage to DNA. Evidences based on naked DNA irradiation in support of a mutation spectrum appears to be consistent, but direct proof of such results in vivo are limited. Using mutS, dam and/or dcm defective Eschericha coli mutator strains, an preliminary experimental system on induction of in vivo mutation spectra of low energy N+ ion beam has been established in this study. It was observed that the mutation rates of rifampicin resistance induced by N+ implantation were quite high, ranging from 9.2 × 10-8 to 4.9 × 10-5 at the dosage of 5.2 × 1014 ions/cm2. Strains all had more than 90-fold higher mutation rate than its spontaneous mutation rate determined by this method. It reveals that base substitutions involve in induction of mutation of low energy nitrogen ion beam implantation. The mutation rates of mutator strains were nearly 500-fold (GM2929), 400-fold (GM5864) and 6-fold larger than that of AB1157. The GM2929 and GM5864 both lose the ability of repair DNA mismatch damage by virtue of both dam and dcm pathways defective (GM2929) or failing to assemble the repair complex (GM5864) respectively. It may explain the both strains had a similar higher mutation rate than GM124 did. It indicated that DNA cytosine methylase might play an important role in mismatch repair of DNA damage induced by N+ implantation. The further related research were also discussed.

  8. Low energy ion-molecule reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Farrar, J.M.

    1993-12-01

    This project is concerned with elucidating the dynamics of elementary ion-molecule reactions at collision energies near and below 1 eV. From measurements of the angular and energy distributions of the reaction products, one can infer intimathe details about the nature of collisions leading to chemical reaction, the geometries and lifetimes of intermediate complexes that govern the reaction dynamics, and the collision energy dependence of these dynamical features. The author employs crossed-beam low energy mass spectrometry technology developed over the last several years, with the focus of current research on proton transfer and hydrogen atom transfer reactions of te O{sup {minus}} ion with species such as HF, H{sub 2}O, and NH{sub 3}.

  9. Infrared Photodiodes Made by Low Energy Ion Etching of Molecular Beam Epitaxy Grown Mercury-Cadmium Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Sung-Shik

    Ion etching was used to form junctions on the p-type (111)B Hg_{1-x}Cd_ {x}Te grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy(MBE). When Hg_{1-x}Cd_{x}Te layers are etched by Ar ions at energies ranging between 300 and 450eV, the top Hg_{1 -x}Cd_{x}Te layer is converted to n-type. The converted region is electrically characterized as a defective n^+-region near the surface, and a low doped n^--region exist below the damaged region. The total thickness of the converted n-type layer was found to be considerable. These results suggest that the creation of the n-type layer is due to the filling of mercury vacancies by mercury atoms displaced by the Ar ion irradiation on the surface. For the performance of the resulting photodiodes on MBE grown (111)B Hg_{1-x}Cd _{x}Te using this technique, the dynamic resistances at 80K are one order of magnitude less than those of junctions made on Liquid Phase Epitaxially and Bulk grown Hg_{1 -x}Cd_{x}Te. The ion etching technique was compared with ion implantation technique by fabricating diodes on the same MBE grown (111)B Hg _{1-x}Cd_{x}Te layers. The result of the comparison illustrates that ion etching technique is as good as ion implantation technique for the fabrication of Hg_{1-x}Cd _{x}Te photodiodes. Also it is believed that the performance of the diodes is limited by a relatively large density of twin defects usually found in MBE grown (111)B Hg_{1-x}Cd _{x}Te.

  10. Low Energy Ion-Molecule Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    James M. Farrar

    2004-05-01

    This objective of this project is to study the dynamics of the interactions of low energy ions important in combustion with small molecules in the gas phase and with liquid hydrocarbon surfaces. The first of these topics is a long-standing project in our laboratory devoted to probing the key features of potential energy surfaces that control chemical reactivity. The project provides detailed information on the utilization of specific forms of incident energy, the role of preferred reagent geometries, and the disposal of total reaction energy into product degrees of freedom. We employ crossed molecular beam methods under single collision conditions, at collision energies from below one eV to several eV, to probe potential surfaces over a broad range of distances and interaction energies. These studies allow us to test and validate dynamical models describing chemical reactivity. Measurements of energy and angular distributions of the reaction products with vibrational state resolution provide the key data for these studies. We employ the crossed beam low energy mass spectrometry methods that we have developed over the last several years.

  11. Excitation of Alfven eigenmodes by low energy beam ions in the DIII-D and JET tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Nazikian, R.; Gorelenkov, N. N.; Budny, R. V.; Fu, G. Y.; Kramer, G. J.; Solomon, W. M.; White, R. B.; Alper, B.; Pinches, S. D.; Sharapov, S. E.; Borba, D.; Makowski, M. A.; Strait, E. J.; Van Zeeland, M. A.

    2008-05-15

    Core localized Alfven eigenmodes in DIII-D [J. L. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)] and Joint European Torus (JET) [P. H. Rebut and B. E. Keen, Fusion Technol. 11, 13 (1987)] plasmas are driven by deuterium neutral beam ions traveling well below the Alfven speed. Modes are observed in reverse magnetic shear discharges with deuterium ion velocities as low as 0.23 and 0.16 of the Alfven speed parallel to the magnetic field in DIII-D and JET plasmas, respectively. Ellipticity-induced Alfven eigenmodes in DIII-D and toroidicity-induced Alfven eigenmodes in JET are excited by deuterium ions traveling well below the fundamental passing ion resonance condition, indicating the role of high-order resonances in driving these modes. NOVA-K analysis reveals many high-order resonances as contributing to the mode drive at high central safety factor due to the correspondingly large poloidal orbit width and the decrease in the perpendicular scale length of the modes.

  12. Self-assembly of germanium islands under pulsed irradiation by a low-energy ion beam during heteroepitaxy of Ge/Si(100) structures

    SciTech Connect

    Smagina, J. V. Zinovyev, V. A.; Nenashev, A. V.; Dvurechenskii, A. V.; Armbrister, V. A.; Teys, S. A.

    2008-03-15

    The effect of pulsed irradiation by a low-energy (50-250 eV) ion beam with a pulse duration of 0.5 s on the nucleation and growth of three-dimensional germanium islands during molecular-beam heteroepitaxy of Ge/Si(100) structures is investigated experimentally. It is revealed that, at specific values of the integrated ion flux (less than 10{sup 12} cm{sup -2}), pulsed ion irradiation leads to an increase in the density of islands and a decrease in their mean size and size dispersion as compared to those obtained in the case of heteroepitaxy without ion irradiation. The observed phenomena are explained in the framework of the proposed model based on the concept of a change in the diffusion mobility of adatoms due to the instantaneous generation of interstitial atoms and vacancies under pulsed ion irradiation. It is assumed that the vacancies and interstitial atoms give rise to an additional surface strain responsible for the change in the binding energy of the adatoms. Under certain conditions, these processes bring about the formation of centers of preferential nucleation of three-dimensional islands at the places where the ions impinge on the surface. The model accounts for the possibility of annihilating vacancies and interstitial atoms on the surface of the growing layer. It is demonstrated that the results obtained from the Monte Carlo calculations based on the proposed model are in good agreement with the experimental data.

  13. Breeding for blast-disease-resistant and high-yield Thai jasmine rice (Oryza sativa L. cv. KDML 105) mutants using low-energy ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahadtanapuk, S.; Teraarusiri, W.; Phanchaisri, B.; Yu, L. D.; Anuntalabhochai, S.

    2013-07-01

    Low-energy ion beam was applied on mutation induction for plant breeding of blast-disease-resistant Thai jasmine rice (Oryza sativa L. cv. KDML 105). Seeds of the wild-type rice were bombarded in vacuum by nitrogen ion beam at energy of 60-80 keV to a beam fluence range of 2 × 1016-2 × 1017 ions/cm2. The ion-bombarded rice seeds were grown in soil for 2 weeks as transplanted rice in plastic pots at 1 seedling/pot. The seedlings were then screened for blast resistance by Pyricularia grisea inoculation with 106 spores/ml concentrations. The blast-resistant rice mutant was planted up to F6 generation with the consistent phenotypic variation. The high percentage of the blast-disease-resistant rice was analyzed with DNA fingerprint. The HAT-RAPD (high annealing temperature-random amplified polymorphic DNA) marker revealed the modified polymorphism fragment presenting in the mutant compared with wild type (KDML 105). The cDNA fingerprints were investigated and the polymorphism fragment was subcloned into pGEM-T easy vector and then sequenced. The sequence of this fragment was compared with those already contained in the database, and the fragment was found to be related to the Spotted leaf protein 11 (Spl11).

  14. Prize for Industrial Applications of Physics Talk: Low energy spread Ion source for focused ion beam systems-Search for the holy grail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Bill

    2011-03-01

    In this talk I will cover my personal experiences as a serial entrepreneur and founder of a succession of focused ion beam companies (1). Ion Beam Technology, which developed a 200kv (FIB) direct ion implanter (2). Micrion, where the FIB found a market in circuit edit and mask repair, which eventually merged with FEI corporation. and (3). ALIS Corporation which develop the Orion system, the first commercially successful sub-nanometer helium ion microscope, that was ultimately acquired by Carl Zeiss corporation. I will share this adventure beginning with my experiences in the early days of ion beam implantation and e-beam lithography which lead up to the final breakthrough understanding of the mechanisms that govern the successful creation and operation of a single atom ion source.

  15. Amorphous silicon carbonitride diaphragm for environmental-cell transmission electron microscope fabricated by low-energy ion beam induced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsutani, Takaomi; Yamasaki, Kayo; Imaeda, Norihiro; Kawasaki, Tadahiro

    2015-12-01

    An amorphous silicon carbonitride (a-SiCN) diaphragm for an environmental-cell transmission electron microscope (E-TEM) was fabricated by low-energy ion beam induced chemical vapor deposition (LEIBICVD) with hexamethyldisilazane (HMDSN). The films were prepared by using gaseous HMDSN and N2+ ions with energies ranging from 300 to 600 eV. The diaphragms were applied to Si (1 0 0) and a Cu grid with 100-μm-diameter holes. With increasing ion energy, these diaphragms became perfectly smooth surfaces (RMS = 0.43 nm at 600 eV), as confirmed by atomic force microscopy and TEM. The diaphragms were amorphous and transparent to 200 kV electrons, and no charge-up was observed. Fourier transform infrared spectra and X-ray photoelectron spectra revealed that the elimination of organic compounds and formation of Si-N and C-N bonds can be promoted in diaphragms by increasing the ion impact energy. The resistance to electron beams and reaction gases in the E-cell was improved when the diaphragm was formed with high ion energy.

  16. Low-energy beam transport studies supporting the Spallation Neutron Source 1-MW beam operationa

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Baoxi; Kalvas, T.; Tarvainen, O.; Welton, Robert F; Murray Jr, S N; Pennisi, Terry R; Santana, Manuel; Stockli, Martin P

    2012-01-01

    The H- injector consisting of a cesium enhanced RF-driven ion source and a 2-lens electrostatic low-energy beam transport (LEBT) system supports the Spallation Neutron Source 1-MW beam operation with ~38 mA beam current in the linac at 60 Hz with a pulse length of up to ~1.0 ms. In this work, two important issues associated with the low-energy beam transport are discussed: 1) inconsistent dependence of the post-RFQ beam current on the ion source tilt angle, and 2) high power beam losses on the LEBT electrodes under some off-nominal conditions compromising their reliability.

  17. Pin diode calibration - beam overlap monitoring for low energy cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Drees, A.; Montag, C.; Thieberger, P.

    2015-09-30

    We were trying to address the question whether or not the Pin Diodes, currently installed approximately 1 meter downstream of the RHIC primary collimators, are suitable to monitor a recombination signal from the future RHIC low energy cooling section. A maximized recombination signal, with the Au+78 ions being lost on the collimator, will indicate optimal Au-electron beam overlap as well as velocity matching of the electron beam in the cooling section.

  18. Study of nuclear reactions with intense, high-purity, low-energy radioactive ion beams using a versatile multi-configuration dual superconducting-solenoid system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, M. Y.; Becchetti, F. D.; O'Donnell, T. W.; Roberts, D. A.; Zimmerman, J. A.; Guimarães, V.; Kolata, J. J.; Peterson, D.; Santi, P.; DeYoung, P. A.; Peaslee, G. F.; Hinnefeld, J. D.

    1999-02-01

    A new device (TwinSol) installed at the Nuclear Structure Laboratory at the University of Notre Dame implements a pair of large-bore 6 T superconducting solenoids for producing relatively pure, high-intensity beams of exotic light nuclei at low-energies (10-80 MeV). Typical beams include 8Li and 6He (T 1/2<1 s). The device efficiently produces, collects and focuses beams onto (or implants into) suitable target foils and test materials. The system uses various combinations of the following detection schemes: XY position sensitive gas counters for time-of-flight and ion ray-tracing; multiple stacks of silicon surface barrier detector telescopes mounted at various angles on a rotating table; 2D position-sensitive silicon detectors (PSDs) for high precision angular measurements; multi-annular, multisectored "CD" detectors for large solid angle (nearly 2π in lab frame), high-collection efficiency (multi-hit) particle detection; and ion-implanted stacks of target foils for off-line detection. Also available are a set of HPGe detectors which will be implemented upon completion of a low-background gamma cave. TwinSol represents an advancement in the application of large-bore superconducting magnet technology, capable of running in persistent mode for weeks without liquid helium (LHe) refill or measurable degradation of magnetic field (<0.1%).

  19. Atomic Oxygen (ATOX) simulation of Teflon FEP and Kapton H surfaces using a high intensity, low energy, mass selected, ion beam facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vered, R.; Grossman, E.; Lempert, G. D.; Lifshitz, Y.

    1994-01-01

    A high intensity (greater than 10(exp 15) ions/sq cm) low energy (down to 5 eV) mass selected ion beam (MSIB) facility was used to study the effects of ATOX on two polymers commonly used for space applications (Kapton H and Teflon FEP). The polymers were exposed to O(+) and Ne(+) fluences on 10(exp 15) - 10(exp 19) ions/sq cm, using 30eV ions. A variety of analytical methods were used to analyze the eroded surfaces including: (1) atomic force microscopy (AFM) for morphology measurements; (2) total mass loss measurements using a microbalance; (3) surface chemical composition using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and (4) residual gas analysis (RGA) of the released gases during bombardment. The relative significance of the collisional and chemical degradation processes was evaluated by comparing the effects of Ne(+) and O(+) bombardment. For 30 eV ions it was found that the Kapton is eroded via chemical mechanisms while Teflon FEP is eroded via collisional mechanisms. AFM analysis was found very powerful in revealing the evolution of the damage from its initial atomic scale (roughness of approx. 1 nm) to its final microscopic scale (roughness greater than 1 micron). Both the surface morphology and the average roughness of the bombarded surfaces (averaged over 1 micron x 1 micron images by the system's computer) were determined for each sample. For 30 eV a non linear increase of the Kapton roughness with the O(+) fluence was discovered (a slow increase rate for fluences phi less than 5 x 10(exp 17) O(+)/sq cm, and a rapid increase rate for phi greater than 5 x 10(exp 17) O(+)/sq cm). Comparative studies on the same materials exposed to RF and DC oxygen plasmas indicate that the specific details of the erosion depend on the simulation facility emphasizing the advantages of the ion beam facility.

  20. Atomic Oxygen (ATOX) simulation of Teflon FEP and Kapton H surfaces using a high intensity, low energy, mass selected, ion beam facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vered, R.; Grossman, E.; Lempert, G. D.; Lifshitz, Y.

    1994-11-01

    A high intensity (greater than 10(exp 15) ions/sq cm) low energy (down to 5 eV) mass selected ion beam (MSIB) facility was used to study the effects of ATOX on two polymers commonly used for space applications (Kapton H and Teflon FEP). The polymers were exposed to O(+) and Ne(+) fluences on 10(exp 15) - 10(exp 19) ions/sq cm, using 30eV ions. A variety of analytical methods were used to analyze the eroded surfaces including: (1) atomic force microscopy (AFM) for morphology measurements; (2) total mass loss measurements using a microbalance; (3) surface chemical composition using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and (4) residual gas analysis (RGA) of the released gases during bombardment. The relative significance of the collisional and chemical degradation processes was evaluated by comparing the effects of Ne(+) and O(+) bombardment. For 30 eV ions it was found that the Kapton is eroded via chemical mechanisms while Teflon FEP is eroded via collisional mechanisms. AFM analysis was found very powerful in revealing the evolution of the damage from its initial atomic scale (roughness of approx. 1 nm) to its final microscopic scale (roughness greater than 1 micron). Both the surface morphology and the average roughness of the bombarded surfaces (averaged over 1 micron x 1 micron images by the system's computer) were determined for each sample. For 30 eV a non linear increase of the Kapton roughness with the O(+) fluence was discovered (a slow increase rate for fluences phi less than 5 x 10(exp 17) O(+)/sq cm, and a rapid increase rate for phi greater than 5 x 10(exp 17) O(+)/sq cm). Comparative studies on the same materials exposed to RF and DC oxygen plasmas indicate that the specific details of the erosion depend on the simulation facility emphasizing the advantages of the ion beam facility.

  1. Low-Energy Ions from Laser-Cooled Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shayeganrad, G.; Fioretti, A.; Guerri, I.; Tantussi, F.; Ciampini, D.; Allegrini, M.; Viteau, M.; Fuso, F.

    2016-05-01

    We report the features of an ion source based on two-color photoionization of a laser-cooled cesium beam outsourced from a pyramidal magneto-optical trap. The ion source operates in continuous or pulsed mode. At acceleration voltages below 300 V, it delivers some ten ions per bunch with a relative energy spread Δ Urms/U ≃0.032 , as measured through the retarding field-energy-analyzer approach. Space-charge effects are negligible thanks to the low ion density attained in the interaction volume. The performances of the ion beam in a configuration using focused laser beams are extrapolated on the basis of the experimental results. Calculations demonstrate that our low-energy and low-current ion beam can be attractive for the development of emerging technologies requiring the delivery of a small amount of charge, down to the single-ion level and its eventual focusing in the 10-nm range.

  2. Real time x-ray studies during nanostructure formation on silicon via low energy ion beam irradiation using ultrathin iron films

    SciTech Connect

    El-Atwani, Osman; Suslova, Anastassiya; Gonderman, Sean; Fowler, Justin; El-Atwani, Mohamad; DeMasi, Alexander; Ludwig, Karl; Paul Allain, Jean

    2012-12-24

    Real time grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering and x-ray fluorescence (XRF) are used to elucidate nanodot formation on silicon surfaces during low energy ion beam irradiation of ultrathin iron-coated silicon substrates. Four surface modification stages were identified: (1) surface roughening due to film erosion, (2) surface smoothing and silicon-iron mixing, (3) structure formation, and (4) structure smoothing. The results conclude that 2.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 15} iron atoms in a 50 nm depth triggers surface nanopatterning with a correlated nanodots distance of 25 nm. Moreover, there is a wide window in time where the surface can have correlated nanostructures even after the removal of all the iron atoms from the sample as confirmed by XRF and ex-situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). In addition, in-situ XPS results indicated silicide formation, which plays a role in the structure formation mechanism.

  3. Low energy ion loss at Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curry, S.; Liemohn, M.; Fang, X.; Ma, Y.

    2012-04-01

    Current data observations and modeling efforts have indicated that the low-energy pick-up ions on Mars significantly contribute to the overall escape rate. Due to the lack of a dipole magnetic field, the solar wind directly interacts with the dayside upper atmosphere causing particles to be stripped away. In this study, we use a 3-D Monte Carlo test particle simulation with virtual detectors to observe low energy ions (< 50 eV) in the Mars space environment. We will present velocity space distributions that can capture the asymmetric and non-gyrotropic features of particle motion. The effect of different solar conditions will also be discussed with respect to ion fluxes at various spatial locations as well as overall loss in order to robustly describe the physical processes controlling the distribution of planetary ions and atmospheric escape.

  4. Methods of studying the composition of the low-energy ion beams and the surface of deuterated-metal targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, S. I.; Dudkin, G. N.; Nechaev, B. A.; Bystritsky, I. D.

    2016-06-01

    To study the reactions between the light nuclei (dd, pd, d3He, d4He) with ultralow collision energies, there is a need to obtain the high-precision experimental results on the purity of the target surface saturated with the hydrogen isotopes (protium, deuterium) and on the number and composition of the accelerated particles falling on the target. To solve this problem, a method has been developed and tested for operational testing the quality of the vacuum system and the cleaning of the metal target surface saturated with deuterium. The paper also presents the measurement results for the true flow of the accelerated ions and neutrals of hydrogen (deuterium), using a multigrid electrostatic energy analyzer. The values of the ion and neutral components of the accelerated particle flow were received for the Hall ion source. The values of the secondary electron emission coefficients were determined for a number of the metal targets (Cu, Ti, Ta, Zr) in the range of the accelerated ion energies of 3-12 keV.

  5. Metal impurity-assisted formation of nanocone arrays on Si by low energy ion-beam irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steeves Lloyd, Kayla; Bolotin, Igor L.; Schmeling, Martina; Hanley, Luke; Veryovkin, Igor V.

    2016-10-01

    Fabrication of nanocone arrays on Si surfaces was demonstrated using grazing incidence irradiation with 1 keV Ar+ ions concurrently sputtering the surface and depositing metal impurity atoms on it. Among three materials compared as co-sputtering targets Si, Cu and stainless steel, only steel was found to assist the growth of dense arrays of nanocones at ion fluences between 1018 and 1019 ions/cm2. The structural characterization of samples irradiated with these ion fluences using Scanning Electron Microscopy and Atomic Force Microscopy revealed that regions far away from co-sputtering targets are covered with nanoripples, and that nanocones popped-up out of the rippled surfaces when moving closer to co-sputtering targets, with their density gradually increasing and reaching saturation in the regions close to these targets. The characterization of the samples' chemical composition with Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence Spectrometry and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy revealed that the concentration of metal impurities originating from stainless steel (Fe, Cr and Ni) was relatively high in the regions with high density of nanocones (Fe reaching a few atomic percent) and much lower (factor of 10 or so) in the region of nanoripples. Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence Spectrometry measurements showed that higher concentrations of these impurities are accumulated under the surface in both regions. X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy experiments showed no direct evidence of metal silicide formation occurring on one region only (nanocones or nanoripples) and thus showed that this process could not be the driver of nanocone array formation. Also, these measurements indicated enhancement in oxide formation on regions covered by nanocones. Overall, the results of this study suggest that the difference in concentration of metal impurities in the thin near-surface layer forming under ion irradiation might be responsible for the differences in surface structures.

  6. Simultaneous Counter-Ion Co-Deposition a Technique Enabling Matrix Isolation Spectroscopy Studies Using Low-Energy Beams of Mass-Selected Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, Ryan M.; Moore, David T.

    2014-06-01

    Matrix isolation spectroscopy was first developed in Pimentel's group during the 1950's to facilitate spectroscopic studies of transient species. Cryogenic matrices of condensed rare gases provide an inert chemical environment with facile energy dissipation and are transparent at all wavelengths longer than vacuum UV, making them ideal for studying labile and reactive species such as radicals, weakly bound complexes, and ions. Since frozen rare gases are poor electrolytes, studies of ions require near-equal populations of anions and cations in order to stabilize the number densities required for spectroscopic experiments. Many techniques for generation of ions for using in matrix isolation studies satisfy this criterion intrinsically, however when ion beams generated in external sources are deposited, the counter-ions typically arise via secondary processes that are at best loosely controlled. It has long been recognized that it would be desirable to stabilize deposition of mass-selected ions generated in an external source using simultaneous co-deposition of a beam of counter-ions, however previous attempts to achieve this have been reported as unsuccessful. The Moore group at Lehigh has demonstrated successful experiments of this type, using mass-selected anions generated from a metal cluster source, co-deposited with a balanced current of cations generated in a separate electron ionization source. This talk will focus on the details of the technique, and present some results from proof-of-concept studies on anionic copper carbonyl complexes formed in argon matrices following co-deposition of Cu- with Ar+ or Kr+. Funding support from NSF CAREER Award CHE-0955637 is gratefully acknowledged. Whittle et al., J. Chem. Phys. 22, p.1943 (1954); Becker et al., J. Chem. Phys. 25, p.224 (1956). Godbout et al., J. Chem. Phys. 96, p.2892 (1996). Sabo et al., Appl. Spectrosc. 45, p. 535 (1991).

  7. Beam simulation studies of ECR beam extraction and low energy beam transport for FRIB.

    PubMed

    Ren, Haitao; Pozdeyev, Eduard; Lund, Steven M; Machicoane, Guillaume; Wu, Xiaoyu; Morgan, Glenn

    2016-02-01

    To meet the beam power requirements of 400 kW at the fragmentation target for facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB), simultaneous acceleration of two-charge states should be used for heavier ions. These intense multi-charged ion beams will be produced by a 28 GHz electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source at a high voltage of 35 kV. After extraction, the ion beam will be pre-accelerated to 12 keV/u with a 50 kV platform, transported down to an achromatic charge state selection (CSS) system followed by a vertical transport line, and then injected into a radio frequency quadrupole accelerator. The TRACK code developed at ANL is used to perform the simulations of the ECR beam extraction and low energy beam transport for FRIB. In this study, we include the magnetic field of ECR ion source into simulations. Different initial beam conditions as well as different space charge neutralization levels are tested for the ECR beamline. The beam loss in CSS system and the corresponding protective measures are discussed. The detailed results about the beam dynamic simulation and beam loss in CSS system will be presented in this paper. PMID:26932091

  8. Beam simulation studies of ECR beam extraction and low energy beam transport for FRIB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Haitao; Pozdeyev, Eduard; Lund, Steven M.; Machicoane, Guillaume; Wu, Xiaoyu; Morgan, Glenn

    2016-02-01

    To meet the beam power requirements of 400 kW at the fragmentation target for facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB), simultaneous acceleration of two-charge states should be used for heavier ions. These intense multi-charged ion beams will be produced by a 28 GHz electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source at a high voltage of 35 kV. After extraction, the ion beam will be pre-accelerated to 12 keV/u with a 50 kV platform, transported down to an achromatic charge state selection (CSS) system followed by a vertical transport line, and then injected into a radio frequency quadrupole accelerator. The TRACK code developed at ANL is used to perform the simulations of the ECR beam extraction and low energy beam transport for FRIB. In this study, we include the magnetic field of ECR ion source into simulations. Different initial beam conditions as well as different space charge neutralization levels are tested for the ECR beamline. The beam loss in CSS system and the corresponding protective measures are discussed. The detailed results about the beam dynamic simulation and beam loss in CSS system will be presented in this paper.

  9. Beam simulation studies of ECR beam extraction and low energy beam transport for FRIB.

    PubMed

    Ren, Haitao; Pozdeyev, Eduard; Lund, Steven M; Machicoane, Guillaume; Wu, Xiaoyu; Morgan, Glenn

    2016-02-01

    To meet the beam power requirements of 400 kW at the fragmentation target for facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB), simultaneous acceleration of two-charge states should be used for heavier ions. These intense multi-charged ion beams will be produced by a 28 GHz electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source at a high voltage of 35 kV. After extraction, the ion beam will be pre-accelerated to 12 keV/u with a 50 kV platform, transported down to an achromatic charge state selection (CSS) system followed by a vertical transport line, and then injected into a radio frequency quadrupole accelerator. The TRACK code developed at ANL is used to perform the simulations of the ECR beam extraction and low energy beam transport for FRIB. In this study, we include the magnetic field of ECR ion source into simulations. Different initial beam conditions as well as different space charge neutralization levels are tested for the ECR beamline. The beam loss in CSS system and the corresponding protective measures are discussed. The detailed results about the beam dynamic simulation and beam loss in CSS system will be presented in this paper.

  10. Analysis of a Partial Male-Sterile Mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana Isolated from a Low-Energy Argon Ion Beam Mutagenized Pool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Min; Bian, Po; Wu, Yuejin; Yu, Zengliang

    2008-04-01

    A screen for Arabidopsis fertility mutants, mutagenized by low-energy argon ion beam, yielded two partial male-sterile mutants tc243-1 and tc243-2 which have similar phenotypes. tc243-2 was investigated in detail. The segregation ratio of the mutant phenotypes in the M2 pools suggested that mutation behaved as single Mendelian recessive mutations. tc243 showed a series of mutant phenotypes, among which partial male-sterile was its striking mutant characteristic. Phenotype analysis indicates that there are four factors leading to male sterility. a. Floral organs normally develop inside the closed bud, but the anther filaments do not elongate sufficiently to position the locules above the stigma at anthesis. b. The anther locules do not dehisce at the time of flower opening (although limited dehiscence occurs later). c. Pollens of mutant plants develop into several types of pollens at the trinucleated stage, as determined by staining with DAPI (4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole), which shows a variable size, shape and number of nucleus. d. The viability of pollens is lower than that of the wild type on the germination test in vivo and vitro.

  11. Low energy, high power hydrogen neutral beam for plasma heating

    SciTech Connect

    Deichuli, P.; Davydenko, V.; Ivanov, A. Mishagin, V.; Sorokin, A.; Stupishin, N.; Korepanov, S.; Smirnov, A.

    2015-11-15

    A high power, relatively low energy neutral beam injector was developed to upgrade of the neutral beam system of the gas dynamic trap device and C2-U experiment. The ion source of the injector produces a proton beam with the particle energy of 15 keV, current of up to 175 A, and pulse duration of a few milliseconds. The plasma emitter of the ion source is produced by superimposing highly ionized plasma jets from an array of four arc-discharge plasma generators. A multipole magnetic field produced with permanent magnets at the periphery of the plasma box is used to increase the efficiency and improve the uniformity of the plasma emitter. Multi-slit grids with 48% transparency are fabricated from bronze plates, which are spherically shaped to provide geometrical beam focusing. The focal length of the Ion Optical System (IOS) is 3.5 m and the initial beam diameter is 34 cm. The IOS geometry and grid potentials were optimized numerically to ensure accurate beam formation. The measured angular divergences of the beam are ±0.01 rad parallel to the slits and ±0.03 rad in the transverse direction.

  12. Low energy, high power hydrogen neutral beam for plasma heating.

    PubMed

    Deichuli, P; Davydenko, V; Ivanov, A; Korepanov, S; Mishagin, V; Smirnov, A; Sorokin, A; Stupishin, N

    2015-11-01

    A high power, relatively low energy neutral beam injector was developed to upgrade of the neutral beam system of the gas dynamic trap device and C2-U experiment. The ion source of the injector produces a proton beam with the particle energy of 15 keV, current of up to 175 A, and pulse duration of a few milliseconds. The plasma emitter of the ion source is produced by superimposing highly ionized plasma jets from an array of four arc-discharge plasma generators. A multipole magnetic field produced with permanent magnets at the periphery of the plasma box is used to increase the efficiency and improve the uniformity of the plasma emitter. Multi-slit grids with 48% transparency are fabricated from bronze plates, which are spherically shaped to provide geometrical beam focusing. The focal length of the Ion Optical System (IOS) is 3.5 m and the initial beam diameter is 34 cm. The IOS geometry and grid potentials were optimized numerically to ensure accurate beam formation. The measured angular divergences of the beam are ±0.01 rad parallel to the slits and ±0.03 rad in the transverse direction.

  13. Low energy, high power hydrogen neutral beam for plasma heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deichuli, P.; Davydenko, V.; Ivanov, A.; Korepanov, S.; Mishagin, V.; Smirnov, A.; Sorokin, A.; Stupishin, N.

    2015-11-01

    A high power, relatively low energy neutral beam injector was developed to upgrade of the neutral beam system of the gas dynamic trap device and C2-U experiment. The ion source of the injector produces a proton beam with the particle energy of 15 keV, current of up to 175 A, and pulse duration of a few milliseconds. The plasma emitter of the ion source is produced by superimposing highly ionized plasma jets from an array of four arc-discharge plasma generators. A multipole magnetic field produced with permanent magnets at the periphery of the plasma box is used to increase the efficiency and improve the uniformity of the plasma emitter. Multi-slit grids with 48% transparency are fabricated from bronze plates, which are spherically shaped to provide geometrical beam focusing. The focal length of the Ion Optical System (IOS) is 3.5 m and the initial beam diameter is 34 cm. The IOS geometry and grid potentials were optimized numerically to ensure accurate beam formation. The measured angular divergences of the beam are ±0.01 rad parallel to the slits and ±0.03 rad in the transverse direction.

  14. Low-energy beam transport studies supporting the spallation neutron source 1-MW beam operation

    SciTech Connect

    Han, B. X.; Welton, R. F.; Murray, S. N. Jr.; Pennisi, T. R.; Santana, M.; Stockli, M. P.; Kalvas, T.; Tarvainen, O.

    2012-02-15

    The H{sup -} injector consisting of a cesium enhanced RF-driven ion source and a 2-lens electrostatic low-energy beam transport (LEBT) system supports the spallation neutron source 1 MW beam operation with {approx}38 mA beam current in the linac at 60 Hz with a pulse length of up to {approx}1.0 ms. In this work, two important issues associated with the low-energy beam transport are discussed: (1) inconsistent dependence of the post-radio frequency quadrupole accelerator beam current on the ion source tilt angle and (2) high power beam losses on the LEBT electrodes under some off-nominal conditions compromising their reliability.

  15. Low-energy beam transport studies supporting the spallation neutron source 1-MW beam operation

    SciTech Connect

    Kalvas, T.; Welton, Robert F; Pennisi, Terry R

    2012-01-01

    The H{sup -} injector consisting of a cesium enhanced RF-driven ion source and a 2-lens electrostatic low-energy beam transport (LEBT) system supports the spallation neutron source 1 MW beam operation with {approx}38 mA beam current in the linac at 60 Hz with a pulse length of up to {approx}1.0 ms. In this work, two important issues associated with the low-energy beam transport are discussed: (1) inconsistent dependence of the post-radio frequency quadrupole accelerator beam current on the ion source tilt angle and (2) high power beam losses on the LEBT electrodes under some off-nominal conditions compromising their reliability.

  16. Low-energy beam transport studies supporting the spallation neutron source 1-MW beam operation.

    PubMed

    Han, B X; Kalvas, T; Tarvainen, O; Welton, R F; Murray, S N; Pennisi, T R; Santana, M; Stockli, M P

    2012-02-01

    The H(-) injector consisting of a cesium enhanced RF-driven ion source and a 2-lens electrostatic low-energy beam transport (LEBT) system supports the spallation neutron source 1 MW beam operation with ∼38 mA beam current in the linac at 60 Hz with a pulse length of up to ∼1.0 ms. In this work, two important issues associated with the low-energy beam transport are discussed: (1) inconsistent dependence of the post-radio frequency quadrupole accelerator beam current on the ion source tilt angle and (2) high power beam losses on the LEBT electrodes under some off-nominal conditions compromising their reliability.

  17. A low energy beam transport system for proton beam

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Y.; Zhang, Z. M.; Wu, Q.; Zhang, W. H.; Ma, H. Y.; Sun, L. T.; Zhang, X. Z.; Liu, Z. W.; He, Y.; Zhao, H. W.; Xie, D. Z.

    2013-03-15

    A low energy beam transport (LEBT) system has been built for a compact pulsed hadron source (CPHS) at Tsinghua University in China. The LEBT, consisting of two solenoids and three short-drift sections, transports a pulsed proton beam of 60 mA of energy of 50 keV to the entrance of a radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ). Measurement has shown a normalized RMS beam emittance less than 0.2 {pi} mm mrad at the end of the LEBT. Beam simulations were carried out to compare with the measurement and are in good agreement. Based on the successful CPHS LEBT development, a new LEBT for a China ADS projector has been designed. The features of the new design, including a beam chopper and beam simulations of the LEBT are presented and discussed along with CPHS LEBT development in this article.

  18. Characteristics of low energy atom and molecule beams generated by the charge exchange reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Hara, Yasuhiro; Takashima, Seigo; Toyoda, Hirotaka; Sekine, Makoto; Hori, Masaru; Yamakawa, Koji; Den, Shoji

    2008-03-01

    A low energy NB source, which consisted of a surface wave plasma (SWP) source and two large diameter carbon electrodes, was developed for damageless etching of ultralarge-scale integrated devices. Ion beams were extracted from the SWP using two carbon electrodes, accelerated and injected to the process chamber, and then neutralized without energy loss by a charge exchange reaction. The energy distribution functions of an Ar ion beam and an Ar atom beam was observed using a quadrupole mass spectroscope equipped with an energy analyzer. The energy of the Ar ion beam and the Ar atom beam was controlled by the acceleration voltage. N{sub 2} ion and N ion beams were also extracted from a nitrogen plasma source. The intensity ratio of the N ion beam to the N{sub 2} ion beam was 5:9, indicating that N ions were efficiently generated in the nitrogen SWP. The N{sub 2} ion and N ion beams were changed to N{sub 2} molecule and N atom beams, respectively, through a charge exchange reaction without energy loss. The energy of these beams was controlled by the acceleration voltage and was in the region less of than 100 eV. When the acceleration voltage is higher than 40 V, not only the primary peaks due to the N{sub 2} ion beam or N ion beam were observed but also a low energy second peak was observed in the energy distribution. The energy of the low energy second peak was controlled by the acceleration voltage. It was concluded that the low energy second peak corresponds to the N{sub 2} molecule ion beam and the N ion beam, which is extracted from the second plasma generated in the space between the two carbon electrodes.

  19. Ion-beam technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Fenske, G.R.

    1993-01-01

    This compilation of figures and diagrams reviews processes for depositing diamond/diamond-like carbon films. Processes addressed are chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD, PACVD, etc.), plasma vapor deposition (plasma sputtering, ion beam sputtering, evaporation, etc.), low-energy ion implantation, and hybrid processes (biased sputtering, IBAD, biased HFCVD, etc.). The tribological performance of coatings produced by different means is discussed.

  20. The Marshall Space Flight Center Low-Energy Ion Facility: A preliminary report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biddle, A. P.; Reynolds, J. W.; Chisholm, W. L., Jr.; Hunt, R. D.

    1983-01-01

    The Low-Energy Ion Facility (LEIF) is designed for laboratory research of low-energy ion beams similar to those present in the magnetosphere. In addition, it provides the ability to develop and calibrate low-energy, less than 50 eV, plasma instrumentation over its full range of energy, mass, flux, and arrival angle. The current status of this evolving resource is described. It also provides necessary information to allow users to utilize it most efficiently.

  1. ULTRA-LOW-ENERGY HIGH-CURRENT ION SOURCE

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre; Yushkov, Georgy Yu.; Baldwin, David A.

    2009-11-20

    The technical objective of the project was to develop an ultra-low-energy, high-intensity ion source (ULEHIIS) for materials processing in high-technology fields including semiconductors, micro-magnetics and optics/opto-electronics. In its primary application, this ion source can be incorporated into the 4Wave thin-film deposition technique called biased target ion-beam deposition (BTIBD), which is a deposition technique based on sputtering (without magnetic field, i.e., not the typical magnetron sputtering). It is a technological challenge because the laws of space charge limited current (Child-Langmuir) set strict limits of how much current can be extracted from a reservoir of ions, such as a suitable discharge plasma. The solution to the problem was an innovative dual-discharge system without the use of extraction grids.

  2. H- beam transport experiments in a solenoid low energy beam transport.

    PubMed

    Gabor, C; Back, J J; Faircloth, D C; Izaola, Z; Lawrie, S R; Letchford, A P

    2012-02-01

    The Front End Test Stand (FETS) is located at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory and aims for a high current, fast chopped 3 MeV H(-) ion beam suitable for future high power proton accelerators like ISIS upgrade. The main components of the front end are the Penning ion source, a low energy beam transport line, an radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) and a medium energy beam transport (MEBT) providing also a chopper section and rebuncher. FETS is in the stage of commissioning its low energy beam transport (LEBT) line consisting of three solenoids. The LEBT has to transport an H(-) high current beam (up to 60 mA) at 65 keV. This is the injection energy of the beam into the RFQ. The main diagnostics are slit-slit emittance scanners for each transversal plane. For optimizing the matching to the RFQ, experiments have been performed with a variety of solenoid settings to better understand the actual beam transport. Occasionally, source parameters such as extractor slit width and beam energy were varied as well. The paper also discusses simulations based on these measurements.

  3. H{sup -} beam transport experiments in a solenoid low energy beam transport

    SciTech Connect

    Gabor, C.; Back, J. J.; Faircloth, D. C.; Lawrie, S. R.; Letchford, A. P.; Izaola, Z.

    2012-02-15

    The Front End Test Stand (FETS) is located at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory and aims for a high current, fast chopped 3 MeV H{sup -} ion beam suitable for future high power proton accelerators like ISIS upgrade. The main components of the front end are the Penning ion source, a low energy beam transport line, an radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) and a medium energy beam transport (MEBT) providing also a chopper section and rebuncher. FETS is in the stage of commissioning its low energy beam transport (LEBT) line consisting of three solenoids. The LEBT has to transport an H{sup -} high current beam (up to 60 mA) at 65 keV. This is the injection energy of the beam into the RFQ. The main diagnostics are slit-slit emittance scanners for each transversal plane. For optimizing the matching to the RFQ, experiments have been performed with a variety of solenoid settings to better understand the actual beam transport. Occasionally, source parameters such as extractor slit width and beam energy were varied as well. The paper also discusses simulations based on these measurements.

  4. Design study of low-energy beam transport for multi-charge beams at RAON

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahng, Jungbae; Qiang, Ji; Kim, Eun-San

    2015-12-01

    The Rare isotope Accelerator Of Newness (RAON) at the Rare Isotope Science Project (RISP) is being designed to simultaneously accelerate beams with multiple charge states. It includes a driver superconducting (SC) linac for producing 200 MeV/u and 400 kW continuous wave (CW) heavy ion beams from protons to uranium. The RAON consists of a few electron cyclotron resonance ion sources, a low-energy beam transport (LEBT) system, a CW 81.25 MHz, 500 keV/u radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator, a medium-energy beam transport system, the SC linac, and a charge-stripper system. The LEBT system for the RISP accelerator facility consists of a high-voltage platform, two 90° dipoles, a multi-harmonic buncher (MHB), solenoids, electrostatic quadrupoles, a velocity equalizer, and a diagnostic system. The ECR ion sources are located on a high-voltage platform to reach an initial beam energy of 10 keV/u. After extraction, the ion beam is transported through the LEBT system to the RFQ accelerator. The generated charge states are selected by an achromatic bending system and then bunched by the MHB in the LEBT system. The MHB is used to achieve a small longitudinal emittance in the RFQ by generating a sawtooth wave with three harmonics. In this paper, we present the results and issues of the beam dynamics of the LEBT system.

  5. Low energy ion-molecule reaction dynamics and chemiionization kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrar, J. M.

    Low energy crossed ion beam neutral beam studies of a wide spectrum of elementary chemical reactions were performed. The reactive scattering work embodies crossed beam studies of simple chemical processes under single collision conditions which elucidate reaction dynamics by measuring product branching ratios, translational energy distributions and scattering angle distributions. The studies have emphasized the proton transfer reactions of the important flame cations HCO(+) and H3O(+) with a number of neutral molecules present in flames, including H2O, CH3OH, CH3CH2OH, and (CH3)2CO, and a wide variety of reactions of the ground state carbon cation, C(+)((2)P), with neutrals, illustrating the important reactions of insertion into C-H, O-H, N-H, and C-C bonds, as well as condensation reactions in which new C-C bonds are formed, yielding significant increases in the molecular weight of the charged product. These studies represent the first crossed beam studies in which information more detailed than rate constants and energy dependent total cross sections was inferred about the reaction dynamics.

  6. Optimization of solenoid based low energy beam transport line for high current H+ beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pande, R.; Singh, P.; Rao, S. V. L. S.; Roy, S.; Krishnagopal, S.

    2015-02-01

    A 20 MeV, 30 mA CW proton linac is being developed at BARC, Mumbai. This linac will consist of an ECR ion source followed by a Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) and Drift tube Linac (DTL). The low energy beam transport (LEBT) line is used to match the beam from the ion source to the RFQ with minimum beam loss and increase in emittance. The LEBT is also used to eliminate the unwanted ions like H2+ and H3+ from entering the RFQ. In addition, space charge compensation is required for transportation of such high beam currents. All this requires careful design and optimization. Detailed beam dynamics simulations have been done to optimize the design of the LEBT using the Particle-in-cell code TRACEWIN. We find that with careful optimization it is possible to transport a 30 mA CW proton beam through the LEBT with 100% transmission and minimal emittance blow up, while at the same time suppressing unwanted species H2+ and H3+ to less than 3.3% of the total beam current.

  7. Studies on Nuclear Astrophysics and Exotic Structure at the Low-Energy RI Beam Facility CRIB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, H.; Kahl, D.; Hayakawa, S.; Sakaguchi, Y.; Nakao, T.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Hashimoto, T.; Teranishi, T.; Kubono, S.; Cherubini, S.; Mazzocco, M.; Signorini, C.; Gulino, M.; Di Pietro, A.; Figuera, P.; La Cognata, M.; Lattuada, M.; Spitaleri, C.; Torresi, D.; Lee, P. S.; Lee, C. S.; Komatsubara, T.; Iwasa, N.; Okoda, Y.; Pierroutsakou, D.; Parascandolo, C.; La Commara, M.; Strano, E.; Boiano, C.; Boiano, A.; Manea, C.; Sánchez-Benítez, A. M.; Miyatake, H.; Watanabe, Y. X.; Ishiyama, H.; Jeong, S. C.; Imai, N.; Hirayama, Y.; Kimura, S.; Mukai, M.; Kim, Y. H.; Lin, C. J.; Jia, H. M.; Yan, L.; Yang, Y. Y.; Kawabata, T.; Kwon, Y. K.; Binh, D. N.; Khiem, L. H.; Duy, N. N.

    Studies on nuclear astrophysics, resonant structure, and nuclear reaction are going on at CRIB (CNS Radioactive Ion Beam separator), a low-energy RI beam separator operated by Center for Nuclear Study (CNS), the University of Tokyo. Two major methods used at CRIB to study nuclear reactions of astrophysical relevance are the resonant scattering, and direct measurements of (α,p) reactions using a thick-gas target. Several experiments for decay measurements and reaction mechanism are also performed using low-energy RI beams at CRIB. Some of the results from recent experiments at CRIB are discussed.

  8. Nuclear Astrophysics and Structure Studies Using Low-energy RI Beams at CRIB

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaguchi, H.; Hashimoto, T.; Hayakawa, S.; Binh, D. N.; Kahl, D.; Kubono, S.

    2010-05-12

    CRIB (CNS Radioactive Ion Beam separator) is a low-energy RI beam separator at the Center for Nuclear Study (CNS) of the University of Tokyo. Using the RI beams at CRIB, Many measurements on proton and alpha resonance scatterings, (alpha,p) reactions, and others were peformed in recent years, mainly for studying astrophysical reactions and exotic nuclear structure. Among them, the results on the {sup 7}Be+p and {sup 7}Li+alpha resonance scatterings are presented.

  9. Experimental studies using a low-energy RI beam separator at CNS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teranishi, T.; Kubono, S.; Shimoura, S.; Notani, M.; Yanagisawa, Y.; Michimasa, S.; Ue, K.; Iwasaki, H.; Kurokawa, M.; Satou, Y.; Morikawa, T.; Saito, A.; Baba, H.; Lee, J. H.; Lee, C. S.; Fülöp, Zs.; Kato, S.

    2003-05-01

    Radioactive-ion (RI) beams of 10C, 14O, 12N and 11C with energies low 10 A MeV were produced by using a low-energy in-flight RI beam separator newly constructed by CNS, University of Tokyo. Using the 12N and 11C beams, some resonance states were identified in the proton elastic scattering 12N+p and 11C+p, respectively.

  10. Nuclear Astrophysics and Structure Studies Using Low-energy RI Beams at CRIB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, H.; Hashimoto, T.; Hayakawa, S.; Binh, D. N.; Kahl, D.; Kubono, S.

    2010-05-01

    CRIB (CNS Radioactive Ion Beam separator) is a low-energy RI beam separator at the Center for Nuclear Study (CNS) of the University of Tokyo. Using the RI beams at CRIB, Many measurements on proton and alpha resonance scatterings, (α,p) reactions, and others were peformed in recent years, mainly for studying astrophysical reactions and exotic nuclear structure. Among them, the results on the 7Be+p and 7Li+α resonance scatterings are presented.

  11. The production of low-energy neutral oxygen beams by grazing-incidence neutralization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albridge, R. G.; Haglund, R. F.; Tolk, N. H.; Daech, A. F.

    1987-01-01

    The Vanderbilt University neutral oxygen facility produces beams of low-energy neutral oxygen atoms by means of grazing-incidence collisions between ion beams and metal surfaces. Residual ions are reflected by applied electric fields. This method can utilize initial ion beams of either O(+) or O2(+) since a very large percentage of molecular oxygen ions are dissociated when they undergo grazing-incidence neutralization. The method of neutralization is applicable to low-energy beams and to all ions. Particular emphasis is on O and N2 beams for simulation of the low Earth orbit space environment. Since the beam is a pure O-neutral beam and since measurements of the interaction of the beam with solid surfaces are made spectroscopically, absolute reaction rates can be determined. The technique permits the beams to be used in conjunction with electron and photon irradiation for studies of synergistic effects. Comparisons of optical spectra of Kapton excited by 2.5-keV O, O(+), and O2(+) show significant differences. Optical spectra of Kapton excited by neutral oxygen beams of less than 1 keV have been recorded.

  12. A study on the effect of low energy ion beam irradiation on Au/TiO2 system for its application in photoelectrochemical splitting of water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Anuradha; Srivastav, Anupam; Sharma, Dipika; Banerjee, Anamika; Sharma, Shailja; Satsangi, Vibha Rani; Shrivastav, Rohit; Avasthi, Devesh Kumar; Dass, Sahab

    2016-07-01

    Nanostructured TiO2 thin films were deposited on indium tin oxide (ITO) substrate via sol-gel technique and were modified by plasmonic Au layer. The plasmonic Au modified TiO2 (Au/TiO2) thin films were then irradiated with 500 keV Ar2+ ion beam at different ion fluences viz. 1 × 1016, 3 × 1016 and 1 × 1017 to study the effect of nuclear energy deposition on the morphology, crystallinity, band gap, surface plasmon resonance (SPR) peak exhibited by Au particles and photoelectrochemical properties of the system. Prepared thin films were characterized by X-ray diffractometry (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) measurements and UV-visible spectroscopy. The photoelectrochemical measurements revealed that both Au/TiO2 and Au/TiO2 thin film irradiated at 1 × 1016 fluence exhibits enhanced photoelectrochemical response in comparison to pristine TiO2. The film irradiated at 1 × 1016 fluence offered maximum applied bias photon-to-current efficiency (ABPE) and shows 6 times increment in photocurrent density which was attributed to more negative flat band potential, maximum decrease in band gap, high open circuit voltage (Voc) and reduced charge transfer resistance.

  13. Study on electron beam in a low energy plasma focus

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Muhammad Zubair; Ling, Yap Seong; San, Wong Chiow

    2014-03-05

    Electron beam emission was investigated in a low energy plasma focus device (2.2 kJ) using copper hollow anode. Faraday cup was used to estimate the energy of the electron beam. XR100CR X-ray spectrometer was used to explore the impact of the electron beam on the target observed from top-on and side-on position. Experiments were carried out at optimized pressure of argon gas. The impact of electron beam is exceptionally notable with two different approaches using lead target inside hollow anode in our plasma focus device.

  14. ELISA - an electrostatic storage ring for low-energy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pape Moeller, Soeren

    1997-05-01

    The design of a new type of storage ring for low-energy ions using electrostatic deflection and focusing devices is described. Electrostatic bends and quadrupoles are used since they are more efficient than magnetic ones for low-velocity heavy ions. Furthermore, electrostatic devices are more compact and easier to construct than magnetic devices. In comparison to an electromagnetic trap, one important advantage of the elecrostatic ring is the easy access to the circulating beam and its decay products. These and other features, e.g. no magnetic fields, makes such storage devices attractive for many atomic-physics experiments. Also neigboring fields as chemistry and biology might benefit from such an relatively inexpensive device. One important difference between an electrostatic and a magnetic ring is, that the longitudinal energy is not conserved for the electrostatic ring. The actual ring will have a race-track shape as defined by two straight sections each with two quadrupole doublets connected by 180-degrees bends. The bends will consist of 160-degrees spherical deflection plates surrounded by two parallel plate 10-degrees bends. The storage ring ELISA, currently being built, will have a circumference of 6 meters. The first beam tests will take place during summer 1996.

  15. Measurements of low energy auroral ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urban, A.

    1981-12-01

    Ion measurements in the energy range 0.1-30 keV observed during the 'Substorm Phenomena' and 'Porcupine' campaigns are summarized. Acceleration of the ions by an electrostatic field aligned parallel to the magnetic field is identified and found to be accompanied by intense electron precipitation. On the other hand, deceleration of the ions is observed in other field-aligned current sheets which are indicated by the electron and magnetic field measurements. Temporal successive monoenergetic ion variations suggest energy dispersion and a location of the source region at 9 earth radii. What is more, ion fluxes higher than those of the electrons are measured at pitch angles parallel to the magnetic field. It is noted that each of the examples was observed during different flights.

  16. Low-Energy Electron Beam Direct Writing Equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuse, Takashi; Ando, Atsushi; Kotsugi, Tadashi; Kinoshita, Hidetoshi; Sugihara, Kazuyoshi

    2007-09-01

    We proposed an electron beam direct writing (EBDW) system capable of high throughput and maskless operation based on a novel concept of using both low-energy electron beam (EB) and character projection (CP) system. We fabricated an EB optical column of low-energy EBDW equipment and obtained a resist pattern. We also investigated the beam blur and line width roughness (LWR) of lines and spaces (L/S) formed on a resist to change various EB current densities and convergence half angles. The obtained results show that a Coulomb interaction effect markedly affects the beam blur in our EB optical column. Thus, we reduce the number of sources caused by LWR and developed photoresists to obtain small LWR L/S patterns for achieving a high throughput.

  17. Low-energy run of Fermilab Electron Cooler's beam generation system

    SciTech Connect

    Prost, Lionel; Shemyakin, Alexander; Fedotov, Alexei; Kewisch, Jorg; /Brookhaven

    2010-08-01

    As a part of a feasibility study of using the Fermilab Electron Cooler for a low-energy Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) run at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), the cooler operation at 1.6 MeV electron beam energy was tested in a short beam line configuration. The main result of the study is that the cooler beam generation system is suitable for BNL needs. In a striking difference with running 4.3 MeV beam, no unprovoked beam recirculation interruptions were observed.

  18. Ion Beam Epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, I.

    The following sections are included: * FILM FORMATION BY ION BEAMS * Fundamental Processes in Film Formation by Low Energy Ion Beams * Comparison of ICB with Other Physical Vapor Deposition Methods * Vacuum Deposition * Sputter Deposition * Ion Plating * Ion Beam Deposition * Simultaneous Deposition and Implantation * Plasma Enhanced Deposition * Section I References * ION CLUSTER BEAM DEPOSITION AND CLUSTER BEAM FORMATION * Nucleation Process * Growth and Condensation Process * Section II References * CHARACTERISTICS OF THE CLUSTER * Velocity of Clusters * Energy of Clusters * TEM Observation of Clusters * Structural Properties * Section III References * IONIZED CLUSTER BEAM DEPOSITION SYSTEM * Section IV References * FILM DEPOSITION PROCESS BY ICB * Fundamental Process * Effects of Kinetic Energy on the Film Properties * Epitaxial phenomena * Crystallographic Structure * Physical Structure of Films * Effects of the Electric Charge on the Film Properties * Section V References * APPLICATIONS * Silicon and Silicon Alloy Films * Low Temperature Epitaxy of Silicon Films * Thermally Stable a-Si Film Growth * High Quality SiO2 Film Deposition * Epitaxial A1 Films * Electromigration Resistant A1 Film * Thermally Stable Al/Si Contact * II-VI and III-V Compound Films * Thin Multiple Layered Film * CONCLUSIONS * Acknowledgements * Section VI References

  19. Erosion of a-C:D Thin Films by Low Energy D+, D2+, and D3+ Ion Beam Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Fred W; Harris, Peter R; Zhang, Hengda; Jacob, W.; Schwarz-Selinger, T.; Von Toussaint, U.

    2011-01-01

    We report measurements of total C sputtering yields for room temperature a-C:D thin films irrradiated by equal velocity D{sup +}, D{sub 2}{sup +}, and D{sub 3}{sup +} beams in the energy range 30-200 eV/D. The C sputtering yields were deduced from crater volumes determined from 2-D ellipsometry scans, the known thin film C density, and the measured total number of incident D particles during the beam exposures. While our results for incident D{sub 3}{sup +} ions are in good agreement with mass loss measurements for D{sub 3}{sup +}, our results for D{sub 2}{sup +} and D{sup +} incident ions fall systematically below the D{sub 3}{sup +} results, indicating a significant molecular size effect. A molecular size effect has been previously found for CD{sub 4} production during low energy impact of same velocity D{sup +}, D{sub 2}{sup +}, and D{sub 3}{sup +} ions incident on ATJ graphite, which, however, was smaller in magnitude. The ellipsometry-based total C sputtering yields are compared with recently deduced total C production yields based on a mass spectroscopy approach.

  20. IONS (ANURADHA): Ionization states of low energy cosmic rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biswas, S.; Chakraborti, R.; Cowsik, R.; Durgaprasad, N.; Kajarekar, P. J.; Singh, R. K.; Vahia, M. N.; Yadav, J. S.; Dutt, N.; Goswami, J. N.

    1987-01-01

    IONS (ANURADHA), the experimental payload designed specifically to determine the ionization states, flux, composition, energy spectra and arrival directions of low energy (10 to 100 MeV/amu) anomalous cosmic ray ions of helium to iron in near-Earth space, had a highly successful flight and operation Spacelab-3 mission. The experiment combines the accuracy of a highly sensitive CR-39 nuclear track detector with active components included in the payload to achieve the experimental objectives. Post-flight analysis of detector calibration pieces placed within the payload indicated no measurable changes in detector response due to its exposure in spacelab environment. Nuclear tracks produced by alpha-particles, oxygen group and Fe ions in low energy anomalous cosmic rays were identified. It is calculated that the main detector has recorded high quality events of about 10,000 alpha-particles and similar number of oxygen group and heavier ions of low energy cosmic rays.

  1. Design study of the Low Energy Beam Transport system at RISP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahng, Jungbae; Kim, Eunsan; Kim, Yonghwan; Hong, In-Seok

    2013-03-01

    We present the design status of LEBT for the RISP that consists of two 90 degree dipoles, a multi-harmonic buncher, pair solenoids, electrostatic quadrupoles and a high voltage platform. After ECR-IS with an energy of 10 keV/u, heavy-ion beams are selected by achromatic bending systems and then be bunched in the LEBT. A multi-harmonic buncher is used to achieve a small longitudinal emittance in the RFQ. We show the results on the optics design by using the TRANSPORT code and the beam tracking of two-charge beams by using the code IMPACT. We present the results and issues on beam dynamics simulaitons in the designed LEBT system. For heavy ion beams in the low energy system, we have to separate and select desire beam. we also transport beam from ECR to RFQ with high transmission.

  2. Secondary Ions Sputtered by Low Energy Ion Bombardment of Copper and Aluminum Surfaces.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Liang-Yu.

    1995-11-01

    We have bombarded Cu and Al surfaces with rm O_2^+ ions and measured the relative yields of secondary ions in the energy range from 50 to 500 eV. We have determined both the relative yield as a function of incident ion energy and the kinetic energy distributions of the ejected ions for selected incident ion energies. In addition to looking at rm Cu^+ ions from Cu and rm Al ^+ ions from Al, we have investigated ion signals from alkali impurities in the targets. For the Cu surface, ions ejected by rm Ar^+ bombardment were examined both before and after sputter cleaning of the surface. Data on beam energy dependent secondary ion yields from the literature and this investigation have been fit by an exponential formula Acdotexp( -B/(C + E)), where A, B and C are fitting parameters. The results, with standard deviations for fitting parameters, are reported. A distinct plateau structure has been found for beam energy dependent yields of rm Na^+ and rm K^+ ions sputtered from untreated (long existing) Cu surfaces. A series of well controlled experiments indicate that this structure is caused by a surface excess of sodium and potassium at the surfaces of copper samples. The calculation of beam energy dependent energy deposition shows that the energy deposited on the top surface of a polycrystal copper target by oxygen ions rm (O_2^+) does not further increase with the increase of beam energy above 250 eV. This result very well explains the beam energy dependence of the yield of secondary alkali ions contributed from the surface excess. Combined with the experimental data, thermodynamic calculations indicate that the positive surface excess of alkali metals near Cu surfaces is due to their segregation near the copper surface. Thus, the data for secondary ion yield vs. beam energy at low energy may provide a very surface sensitive probe with high spatial resolution (monolayer) for investigating segregation near solid material surfaces. Compared with secondary ion signals

  3. Si etching with reactive neutral beams of very low energy

    SciTech Connect

    Hara, Yasuhiro; Hamagaki, Manabu; Mise, Takaya; Iwata, Naotaka; Hara, Tamio

    2014-12-14

    A Si etching process has been investigated with reactive neutral beams (NBs) extracted using a low acceleration voltage of less than 100 V from CF{sub 4} and Ar mixed plasmas. The etched Si profile shows that the etching process is predominantly anisotropic. The reactive NB has a constant Si etching rate in the acceleration voltage range from 20 V to 80 V. It is considered that low-energy NBs can trigger Si etching because F radicals adsorb onto the Si surface and weaken Si–Si bonds. The etching rate per unit beam flux is 33 times higher than that with Ar NB. These results show that the low-energy reactive NB is useful for damage-free high speed Si etching.

  4. Developments in low energy electron beam machinery and processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nablo, S. V.; Chrusciel, J.; Cleghorn, D. A.; Rangwalla, I.

    2003-08-01

    The engineering and development of a new generation of low energy, high power electron beam equipment is presented. Operating voltages range from 80 to 125 kV at widths to 1.65 m. At 110 kV these systems deliver 1000 Mrad m min -1 at 110 kV. Equipment operating power levels and their impact on reducing equipment size and cost are reviewed. The advantages of electron curing at these reduced operating voltages are described. The principles of the electron beam fluidized bed process for the treatment of powders and particulates in high-speed pneumatic transport are discussed. Typical system performances for polymer dissociation and crosslinking, or for agroproduct disinfestation and disinfection are presented. A process for the sterilization of polymer food containers employing the injection of low energy electrons through the open mouth has been developed. Some of its sterilization capabilities for bottles up to 2 l capacity are described.

  5. Design of the Proposed Low Energy Ion Collider Ring at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Nissen, Edward W.; Lin, Fanglei; Morozov, Vasiliy; Zhang, Yuhong

    2013-06-01

    The polarized Medium energy Electron-Ion Collider (MEIC) envisioned at Jefferson Lab will cover a range of center-of-mass energies up to 65 GeV. The present MEIC design could also allow the accommodation of low energy electron-ion collisions (LEIC) for additional science reach. This paper presents the first design of the low energy ion collider ring which is converted from the large ion booster of MEIC. It can reach up to 25 GeV energy for protons and equivalent ion energies of the same magnetic rigidity. An interaction region and an electron cooler designed for MEIC are integrated into the low energy collider ring, in addition to other required new elements including crab cavities and ion spin rotators, for later reuse in MEIC itself. A pair of vertical chicanes which brings the low energy ion beams to the plane of the electron ring and back to the low energy ion ring are also part of the design.

  6. Low energy electron magnetometer using a monoenergetic electron beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.; Wood, G. M.; Rayborn, G. H.; White, F. A. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A low energy electron beam magnetometer utilizes near-monoenergetic electrons thereby reducing errors due to electron energy spread and electron nonuniform angular distribution. In a first embodiment, atoms in an atomic beam of an inert gas are excited to a Rydberg state and then electrons of near zero energy are detached from the Rydberg atoms. The near zero energy electrons are then accelerated by an electric field V(acc) to form the electron beam. In a second embodiment, a filament emits electrons into an electrostatic analyzer which selects electrons at a predetermined energy level within a very narrow range. These selected electrons make up the electron beam that is subjected to the magnetic field being measured.

  7. Charge neutralized low energy beam transport at Brookhaven 200 MeV linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raparia, D.; Alessi, J.; Atoian, G.; Zelenski, A.

    2016-02-01

    The H- magnetron source provides about 100 mA H- beam to be match into the radio-frequency quadrupole accelerator. As H- beam traverses through low energy transport, it ionizes the residual gas and electrons are repelled and positive ions are trapped in the beam, due to negative potential of the beam, providing charge neutralization for the H- beam. The neutralization time for the critical density depends upon the background gas and its pressure. Critical density for xenon gas at 35 keV is about 43 times smaller than that of hydrogen and stripping cross section is only 5 times than that of hydrogen gas. We are using xenon gas to reduce neutralization time and to improve transmission through the 200 MeV linac. We are also using pulse nitrogen gas to improve transmission and stability of polarized H- beam from optically pumped polarized ion source.

  8. Charge neutralized low energy beam transport at Brookhaven 200 MeV linac.

    PubMed

    Raparia, D; Alessi, J; Atoian, G; Zelenski, A

    2016-02-01

    The H(-) magnetron source provides about 100 mA H(-) beam to be match into the radio-frequency quadrupole accelerator. As H(-) beam traverses through low energy transport, it ionizes the residual gas and electrons are repelled and positive ions are trapped in the beam, due to negative potential of the beam, providing charge neutralization for the H(-) beam. The neutralization time for the critical density depends upon the background gas and its pressure. Critical density for xenon gas at 35 keV is about 43 times smaller than that of hydrogen and stripping cross section is only 5 times than that of hydrogen gas. We are using xenon gas to reduce neutralization time and to improve transmission through the 200 MeV linac. We are also using pulse nitrogen gas to improve transmission and stability of polarized H(-) beam from optically pumped polarized ion source. PMID:26932107

  9. Alpha-induced reaction studies using low-energy RI beams at CRIB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, H.; Kahl, D.; Hu, J.; Kubono, S.; Hayakawa, S.; Hashimoto, T.

    2012-11-01

    CRIB (CNS Radioactive Ion Beam separator) is a low-energy RI beam separator at the Center for Nuclear Study (CNS) of the University of Tokyo. Studies on proton and alpha resonance scatterings, (α, p) reactions, and other types of measurements (β-decay lifetimes etc.) have been performed using RI beams at CRIB, motivated by interests on astrophysical reactions and exotic nuclear structure. Among the studies at CRIB, the measurement of 7Li+α/7Be+α resonant scatterings are presented.

  10. Alpha-induced reaction studies using low-energy RI beams at CRIB

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaguchi, H.; Kahl, D.; Hu, J.; Kubono, S.; Hayakawa, S.; Hashimoto, T.

    2012-11-12

    CRIB (CNS Radioactive Ion Beam separator) is a low-energy RI beam separator at the Center for Nuclear Study (CNS) of the University of Tokyo. Studies on proton and alpha resonance scatterings, ({alpha}, p) reactions, and other types of measurements ({beta}-decay lifetimes etc.) have been performed using RI beams at CRIB, motivated by interests on astrophysical reactions and exotic nuclear structure. Among the studies at CRIB, the measurement of {sup 7}Li+{alpha}/{sup 7}Be+{alpha} resonant scatterings are presented.

  11. Conserved vector current test using low energy beta beams

    SciTech Connect

    Balantekin, A.B.; Jesus, J.H. de; Lazauskas, R.; Volpe, C.

    2006-04-01

    We discuss the possibility of testing the weak currents and, in particular, the weak magnetism term through the measurement of the {nu}{sub e}+p{yields}e{sup +}+n reaction at a low energy beta-beam facility. We analyze the sensitivity using both the total number of events and the angular distribution of the positrons emitted in a water Cerenkov detector. We show that the weak magnetism form factor might be determined with better than several percent accuracy using the angular distribution. This offers a new way of testing the conserved vector current hypothesis.

  12. Modification of polymer (PET) surface reactivity by low energy ion bombardment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertrand, P.; De Puydt, Y.; Beuken, J.-M.; Lutgen, P.; Feyder, G.

    The surface of polyethylene terephtalate (PET) was studied by low energy He + ion scattering (ISS). Modifications of the surface composition induced by the He + and Ar + bombardments are observed. The ion bombardment causes surface damages with bond breaking and it results a highly activated surface for the chemisorption of nitrogen from the residual gas phase. Similar effects were observed on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite when analyzed in the same beam conditions.

  13. Low energy sputtering of cobalt by cesium ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handoo, A.; Ray, Pradosh K.

    1989-01-01

    An experimental facility to investigate low energy (less than 500 eV) sputtering of metal surfaces with ions produced by an ion gun is described. Results are reported on the sputtering yield of cobalt by cesium ions in the 100 to 500 eV energy range at a pressure of 1 times 10(exp -6) Torr. The target was electroplated on a copper substrate. The sputtered atoms were collected on a cobalt foil surrounding the target. Co-57 was used as a tracer to determine the sputtering yield.

  14. Design of the low energy beam transport line between CARIBU and the EBIS charge breeder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, A.; Ostroumov, P. N.; Barcikowski, A.; Dickerson, C.; Kondrashev, S. A.; Mustapha, B.; Savard, G.

    2015-01-01

    An Electron Beam Ion Source Charge Breeder (EBIS-CB) has been developed to breed radioactive beams from the CAlifornium Rare Isotope Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) facility at ATLAS. The EBIS-CB will replace the existing ECR charge breeder to increase the intensity and improve the purity of reaccelerated radioactive ion beams. The EBIS-CB is in the final stage of off-line commissioning. Currently, we are developing a low energy beam transport (LEBT) system to transfer CARIBU beams to the EBIS-CB. As was originally planned, an RFQ cooler-buncher will precede the EBIS-CB. Recently, it was decided to include a multi-reflection time-of-flight (MR-TOF) mass-spectrometer following the RFQ. MR-TOF is a relatively new technology used to purify beams with a mass-resolving power up to 3×105 as was demonstrated in experiments at CERN/ISOLDE. Very high purity singly-charged radioactive ion beams will be injected into the EBIS for charge breeding and due to its inherent properties, the EBIS-CB will maintain the purity of the charge bred beams. Possible contamination of residual gas ions will be greatly suppressed by achieving ultra-high vacuum in the EBIS trap. This paper will present and discuss the design of the LEBT and the overall integration of the EBIS-CB into ATLAS.

  15. Design of the low energy beam transport line between CARIBU and the EBIS charge breeder

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, A.; Ostroumov, P. N.; Barcikowski, A.; Dickerson, C.; Kondrashev, S. A.; Mustapha, B.; Savard, G.

    2015-01-09

    An Electron Beam Ion Source Charge Breeder (EBIS-CB) has been developed to breed radioactive beams from the CAlifornium Rare Isotope Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) facility at ATLAS. The EBIS-CB will replace the existing ECR charge breeder to increase the intensity and improve the purity of reaccelerated radioactive ion beams. The EBIS-CB is in the final stage of off-line commissioning. Currently, we are developing a low energy beam transport (LEBT) system to transfer CARIBU beams to the EBIS-CB. As was originally planned, an RFQ cooler-buncher will precede the EBIS-CB. Recently, it was decided to include a multi-reflection time-of-flight (MR-TOF) mass-spectrometer following the RFQ. MR-TOF is a relatively new technology used to purify beams with a mass-resolving power up to 3×10{sup 5} as was demonstrated in experiments at CERN/ISOLDE. Very high purity singly-charged radioactive ion beams will be injected into the EBIS for charge breeding and due to its inherent properties, the EBIS-CB will maintain the purity of the charge bred beams. Possible contamination of residual gas ions will be greatly suppressed by achieving ultra-high vacuum in the EBIS trap. This paper will present and discuss the design of the LEBT and the overall integration of the EBIS-CB into ATLAS.

  16. Formation of nanostructures on HOPG surface in presence of surfactant atom during low energy ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjan, M.; Joshi, P.; Mukherjee, S.

    2016-07-01

    Low energy ions beam often develop periodic patterns on surfaces under normal or off-normal incidence. Formation of such periodic patterns depends on the substrate material, the ion beam parameters, and the processing conditions. Processing conditions introduce unwanted contaminant atoms, which also play strong role in pattern formation by changing the effective sputtering yield of the material. In this work we have analysed the effect of Cu, Fe and Al impurities introduced during low energy Ar+ ion irradiation on HOPG substrate. It is observed that by changing the species of foreign atoms the surface topography changes drastically. The observed surface topography is co-related with the modified sputtering yield of HOPG. Presence of Cu and Fe amplify the effective sputtering yield of HOPG, so that the required threshold for the pattern formation is achieved with the given fluence, whereas Al does not lead to any significant change in the effective yield and hence no pattern formation occurs.

  17. Beam transfer between the coupled cavity linac and the low energy booster synchrotron for the SSC (Superconducting Super Collider)

    SciTech Connect

    Bhandari, R.K.; Penner, S.

    1990-09-01

    Ion optical design of the transfer line, which will be used to inject H{sup {minus}} beam at 600 MeV from the Coupled Cavity Linac (CCL) into the Low Energy Booster (LEB) synchrotron, is described. Space charge effects of up to 50 mA average beam current have been taken into account.

  18. Low-Energy Run of Fermilab Electron Cooler's Beam Generation System

    SciTech Connect

    Prost, L.R.; Shemyakin, A.; Fedotov, A.; Kewisch, J.; /Brookhaven

    2011-03-14

    In the context of the evaluation of possibly using the Fermilab Electron Cooler for the proposed low-energy RHIC run at BNL, operating the cooler at 1.6 MeV electron beam energy was tested in a short beam line configuration. The main conclusion of this feasibility study is that the cooler's beam generation system is suitable for BNL needs. The beam recirculation was stable for all tested parameters. In particular, a beam current of 0.38 A was achieved with the cathode magnetic field up to the maximum value presently available of 250 G. The energy ripple was measured to be 40 eV. A striking difference with running the 4.3 MeV beam (nominal for operation at FNAL) is that no unprovoked beam recirculation interruptions were observed. Electron cooling proposed to increase the luminosity of the RHIC collider for heavy ion beam energies below 10 GeV/nucleon [1] needs a good quality, 0.9-5 MeV electron beam. Preliminary design studies indicate that the scheme of the Recycler's electron cooler at FNAL is suitable for low-energy RHIC cooling and most parts of the cooler can be re-used after the end of the Tevatron Run II. To analyze issues related to the generation of the electron beam in the energy recovery mode and to gain experience with the beam transport at lower beam energy, a dedicated study was performed at FNAL with a beam run through a short beam line (so called U-bend). This report summarizes our findings and observations in the course of the measurements.

  19. Study on astrophysical reactions using low-energy RI beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Hidetoshi

    2009-10-01

    In recent years, low-energy RI beams can be produced in a good intensity and they have been used for studying many astrophysical reactions. One of the facilities producing low-energy RI beams is CRIB (CNS Radio-Isotope Beam separator) [1,2], an RI-beam separator of Center for Nuclear Study, University of Tokyo. Taking CRIB as an example, recent improvements on the RI-beam production and experimental results on astrophysical studies are presented. Several experimental approaches have been taken for the studies on astrophysical reactions.The feature of each method are discussed based on real measurements performed at CRIB. One is the direct method, applied for measurements of reactions such as (α,p) [3]. Another is the measurement of proton/alpha resonance scattering using the thick target method in inverse kinematics, by which we can obtain information on the resonances relevant in astrophysical reactions [4,5]. A recent fruitful result was from a measurement of proton resonance scattering using a ^7Be beam [5]. The energy level structure of ^8B, revealed by the experiment, is especially of interest as it is related with the ^7Be(p,γ) ^8B reaction, responsible for the production of ^8B neutrinos in the sun. We successfully determined parameters of resonances in ^8B below 6.7 MeV, which may affect the ^7Be(p,γ)^8B reaction rate at the solar temparature. Indirect methods, such as ANC and the Trojan Horse Method, were also used in some of the measurements.[4pt] [1] S. Kubono et al., Eur. Phys. J. A13 (2002) 217.[0pt] [2] Y. Yanagisawa et al., Nucl. Instrum. Meth. Phys. Res., Sect. A 539 (2005) 74.[0pt] [3] M. Notani et al., Nucl. Phys. A 764 (2004) 113c.[0pt] [4] T. Teranishi et al., Phys. Lett. B 650 (2007) 129.[0pt] [5] H. Yamaguchi et al., Phys. Lett. B 672 (2009) 230.

  20. Development of a low energy ion source for ROSINA ion mode calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, Martin; Altwegg, Kathrin; Jaeckel, Annette; Balsiger, Hans

    2006-10-15

    The European Rosetta mission on its way to comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko will remain for more than a year in the close vicinity (1 km) of the comet. The two ROSINA mass spectrometers on board Rosetta are designed to analyze the neutral and ionized volatile components of the cometary coma. However, the relative velocity between the comet and the spacecraft will be minimal and also the velocity of the outgassing particles is below 1 km/s. This combination leads to very low ion energies in the surrounding plasma of the comet, typically below 20 eV. Additionally, the spacecraft may charge up to a few volts in this environment. In order to simulate such plasma and to calibrate the mass spectrometers, a source for ions with very low energies had to be developed for the use in the laboratory together with the different gases expected at the comet. In this paper we present the design of this ion source and we discuss the physical parameters of the ion beam like sensitivity, energy distribution, and beam shape. Finally, we show the first ion measurements that have been performed together with one of the two mass spectrometers.

  1. Plasma characteristics of single- and dual-electrode ion source systems utilized in low-energy ion extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Vasquez, M. R.; Tokumura, S.; Kasuya, T.; Wada, M.

    2014-02-15

    Discharge characteristics in the upstream as well as in the downstream regions of a 50-eV positive ion beam were measured along the beam axis. Single- and dual-electrode configurations made of 0.1-mm diameter tungsten wires were tested. By varying the upstream discharge parameters, the shape of the sheath edge around the extractors, which can either be “planar” or “cylindrical,” can be controlled. The sheath eventually affected the simultaneous extraction of ions and neutralizing electrons. The dual-electrode configuration at the lower discharge current, revealed a homogeneous discharge downstream. At this condition, the edge of the sheath can be inferred to be “planar” which allowed the uniform extraction and propagation of low-energy ions at longer distances. The dual-electrode configuration was capable of transmitting low-energy ions up to 70 mm downstream.

  2. Design of low energy beam transport for new LANSCE H+ injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batygin, Y. K.; Draganic, I. N.; Fortgang, C. M.; Garnett, R. W.; Kurennoy, S. S.; McCrady, R. C.; O'Hara, J. F.; Rybarcyk, L. J.

    2014-07-01

    The present LANSCE injector utilizes two 750-keV Cockcroft-Walton (CW) based injectors for simultaneous injection of H+ and H- beams into 800-MeV accelerator. To reduce long-term operational risks, the new project to replace the existing H+ CW injector with a Radio-Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator is underway [1]. The new injector requires a Low-Energy Beam Transport (LEBT). An ion source and 2-solenoid magnetic LEBT have been designed and optimized to transport beams over a wide range of space-charge neutralization and transverse emittance, while allowing sufficient space for diagnostics and a beam deflector. The design layout minimizes the beam size in the LEBT and potential emittance growth due to solenoid aberrations and nonlinear space-charge forces. This paper describes the details of the LEBT design activity.

  3. Oxidation of nickel surfaces by low energy ion bombardment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saric, Iva; Peter, Robert; Kavre, Ivna; Badovinac, Ivana Jelovica; Petravic, Mladen

    2016-03-01

    We have studied formation of oxides on Ni surfaces by low energy oxygen bombardment using X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). Different oxidation states of Ni ions have been identified in XPS spectra measured around Ni 2p and O 1s core-levels. We have compared our results with thermal oxidation of Ni and shown that ion bombardment is more efficient in creating thin oxide films on Ni surfaces. The dominant Ni-oxide in both oxidation processes is NiO (Ni2+ oxidation state), while some Ni2O3 contributions (Ni3+ oxidation state) are still present in all oxidised samples. The oxide thickness of bombarded Ni samples, as determined by SIMS, was shown to be related to the penetration depth of oxygen ions in Ni.

  4. Sources and transport systems for low energy extreme of ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Hershcovitch, A.; Batalin, V.A.; Bugaev, A.S.; Gushenets, V.I.; Alexeyenko, O.; Gurkova, E.; Johnson, B.M.; Kolomiets, A.A.; Kropachev, G.N.; Kuibeda, R.P.; Kulevoy, T.V.; Masunov, E.S.; Oks, E.M.; Pershin, V.I.; Polozov, S.M.; Poole, H.J.; Seleznev, D.N.; Storozhenko, P.A.; Vizir, A.; Svarovski, A.Ya.; Yakushin, P.; Yushkov, G.Yu.

    2010-06-06

    For the past seven years a joint research and development effort focusing on the design of steady state, intense ion sources has been in progress with the ultimate goal being to meet the two, energy extreme range needs of mega-electron-volt and 100's of electron-volt ion implanters. However, since the last Fortier is low energy ion implantation, focus of the endeavor has shifted to low energy ion implantation. For boron cluster source development, we started with molecular ions of decaborane (B{sub 10}H{sub 14}), octadecaborane (B{sub 18}H{sub 22}), and presently our focus is on carborane (C{sub 2}B{sub 10}H{sub 12}) ions developing methods for mitigating graphite deposition. Simultaneously, we are developing a pure boron ion source (without a working gas) that can form the basis for a novel, more efficient, plasma immersion source. Our Calutron-Berna ion source was converted into a universal source capable of switching between generating molecular phosphorous P{sub 4}{sup +}, high charge state ions, as well as other types of ions. Additionally, we have developed transport systems capable of transporting a very large variety of ion species, and simulations of a novel gasless/plasmaless ion beam deceleration method were also performed.

  5. Status of the PXIE Low Energy Beam Transport Line

    SciTech Connect

    Prost, Lionel; Andrews, Richard; Chen, Alex; Hanna, Bruce; Scarpine, Victor; Shemyakin, Alexander; Steimel, Jim; D'Arcy, Richard

    2014-07-01

    A CW-compatible, pulsed H- superconducting RF linac (a.k.a. PIP-II) is envisaged as a possible path for upgrading Fermilab’s injection complex [1]. To validate the concept of the front-end of such machine, a test accelerator (a.k.a. PXIE) [2] is under construction. The warm part of this accelerator comprises a 10 mA DC, 30 keV H- ion source, a 2m-long LEBT, a 2.1 MeV CW RFQ, and a MEBT that feeds the first cryomodule. In addition to operating in the nominal CW mode, the LEBT should be able to produce a pulsed beam for both PXIE commissioning and modelling of the front-end nominal operation in the pulsed mode. Concurrently, it needs to provide effective means of inhibiting beam as part of the overall machine protection system. A peculiar feature of the present LEBT design is the capability of using the ~1m-long section immediately preceding the RFQ in two regimes of beam transport dynamics: neutralized and space charge dominated. This paper introduces the PXIE LEBT, reports on the status of the ion source and LEBT installation, and presents the first beam measurements.

  6. Effective doping of low energy ions into superfluid helium droplets

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jie; Chen, Lei; Freund, William M.; Kong, Wei

    2015-01-01

    We report a facile method of doping cations from an electrospray ionization (ESI) source into superfluid helium droplets. By decelerating and stopping the ion pulse of reserpine and substance P from an ESI source in the path of the droplet beam, about 104 ion-doped droplets (one ion per droplet) can be recorded, corresponding to a pickup efficiency of nearly 1 out of 1000 ions. We attribute the success of this simple approach to the long residence time of the cations in the droplet beam. The resulting size of the doped droplets, on the order of 105/droplet, is measured using deflection and retardation methods. Our method does not require an ion trap in the doping region, which significantly simplifies the experimental setup and procedure for future spectroscopic and diffraction studies. PMID:26298127

  7. Effective doping of low energy ions into superfluid helium droplets

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jie; Chen, Lei; Freund, William M.; Kong, Wei

    2015-08-21

    We report a facile method of doping cations from an electrospray ionization (ESI) source into superfluid helium droplets. By decelerating and stopping the ion pulse of reserpine and substance P from an ESI source in the path of the droplet beam, about 10{sup 4} ion-doped droplets (one ion per droplet) can be recorded, corresponding to a pickup efficiency of nearly 1 out of 1000 ions. We attribute the success of this simple approach to the long residence time of the cations in the droplet beam. The resulting size of the doped droplets, on the order of 10{sup 5}/droplet, is measured using deflection and retardation methods. Our method does not require an ion trap in the doping region, which significantly simplifies the experimental setup and procedure for future spectroscopic and diffraction studies.

  8. Effective doping of low energy ions into superfluid helium droplets.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Chen, Lei; Freund, William M; Kong, Wei

    2015-08-21

    We report a facile method of doping cations from an electrospray ionization (ESI) source into superfluid helium droplets. By decelerating and stopping the ion pulse of reserpine and substance P from an ESI source in the path of the droplet beam, about 10(4) ion-doped droplets (one ion per droplet) can be recorded, corresponding to a pickup efficiency of nearly 1 out of 1000 ions. We attribute the success of this simple approach to the long residence time of the cations in the droplet beam. The resulting size of the doped droplets, on the order of 10(5)/droplet, is measured using deflection and retardation methods. Our method does not require an ion trap in the doping region, which significantly simplifies the experimental setup and procedure for future spectroscopic and diffraction studies.

  9. A low energy ion source for electron capture spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Tusche, C.; Kirschner, J.

    2014-06-15

    We report on the design of an ion source for the production of single and double charged Helium ions with kinetic energies in the range from 300 eV down to 5 eV. The construction is based on a commercial sputter ion gun equipped with a Wien-filter for mass/charge separation. Retardation of the ions from the ionizer potential (2 keV) takes place completely within the lens system of the sputter gun, without modification of original parts. For 15 eV He{sup +} ions, the design allows for beam currents up to 30 nA, limited by the space charge repulsion in the beam. For He{sup 2+} operation, we obtain a beam current of 320 pA at 30 eV, and 46 pA at 5 eV beam energy, respectively. In addition, operating parameters can be optimized for a significant contribution of metastable He*{sup +} (2s) ions.

  10. Sub-microsecond beam notching at low energy

    SciTech Connect

    Moehs, D.P.; /Fermilab

    2005-09-01

    A technique for creating a burst of 100 ns notches (beam extinctions) in an H{sup -} beam at 454 kHz has been developed at {le} 20 keV utilizing a Magnetron ion source with a slit extraction system and a split extractor. Each half of the extractor is treated as part of a 50 ohm transmission line which can be pulsed at {+-} 700 volts creating a 1400 volt gradient across the extractor. A beam current reduction of better than 95% has been observed at the end of the Fermilab 400 MeV Linac. Notched multi-turn charge-exchange injection into the Booster, a 400 MeV to 8 GeV synchrotron, has been demonstrated with a charge reduction in the resulting beam gap of 83%. Presently, the trailing edge of the notch may be adversely affected by space charge resulting in a beam recovery with two different time constants. Efforts to minimize this effect are discussed.

  11. Low energy ion assisted carbon film growth: Methods and mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullmann, Jens

    1997-05-01

    Hydrogen-free amorphous carbon films (a-C) prepared by different ion assisted methods (i) ion assisted evaporation (IAE), (ii) unbalanced magnetron sputtering (MS), (iii) mass separated ion beam deposition (MSIBD) and (iv) filtered vacuum cathodic arc evaporation (VA) in the optimum energy range of about 100 eV were compared. Density data, Raman spectra and surface topography images show a different behaviour of the films. The different growth processes were discussed in connection with results from ion implantation experiments into IAE a-C and computer calculations of the ion-solid interactions by use of the TRIM-code. Self-interstitials in the sub-surface region of the carbon matrix created due to pure carbon ion beam bombardment (MSIBD and VA) are the key for the understanding of the densification process. The lower number of self-interstitials created during the noble-gas ion assisted processes can be compensated by extremely high argon-ion to carbon-neutral arrival ratios in the case of MS. Furthermore, the sputtered carbon atoms with energies in the range of a few eV should assist this deposition process. Without energetic carbon particles (thermal carbon atoms from the evaporation process) as in the case of neon ion assisted evaporation, it is also possible to prepare dense a-C, however with lower density (2.7 g/cm 3).

  12. Low energy spread ion source with a coaxial magnetic filter

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Lee, Yung-Hee Yvette

    2000-01-01

    Multicusp ion sources are capable of producing ions with low axial energy spread which are necessary in applications such as ion projection lithography (IPL) and radioactive ion beam production. The addition of a radially extending magnetic filter consisting of a pair of permanent magnets to the multicusp source reduces the energy spread considerably due to the improvement in the uniformity of the axial plasma potential distribution in the discharge region. A coaxial multicusp ion source designed to further reduce the energy spread utilizes a cylindrical magnetic filter to achieve a more uniform axial plasma potential distribution. The coaxial magnetic filter divides the source chamber into an outer annular discharge region in which the plasma is produced and a coaxial inner ion extraction region into which the ions radially diffuse but from which ionizing electrons are excluded. The energy spread in the coaxial source has been measured to be 0.6 eV. Unlike other ion sources, the coaxial source has the capability of adjusting the radial plasma potential distribution and therefore the transverse ion temperature (or beam emittance).

  13. Hybrid Organic/Inorganic Materials Depth Profiling Using Low Energy Cesium Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noël, Céline; Houssiau, Laurent

    2016-05-01

    The structures developed in organic electronics, such as organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) or organic photovoltaics (OPVs) devices always involve hybrid interfaces, joining metal or oxide layers with organic layers. No satisfactory method to probe these hybrid interfaces physical chemistry currently exists. One promising way to analyze such interfaces is to use in situ ion beam etching, but this requires ion beams able to depth profile both inorganic and organic layers. Mono- or diatomic ion beams commonly used to depth profile inorganic materials usually perform badly on organics, while cluster ion beams perform excellently on organics but yield poor results when organics and inorganics are mixed. Conversely, low energy Cs+ beams (<500 eV) allow organic and inorganic materials depth profiling with comparable erosion rates. This paper shows a successful depth profiling of a model hybrid system made of metallic (Au, Cr) and organic (tyrosine) layers, sputtered with 500 eV Cs+ ions. Tyrosine layers capped with metallic overlayers are depth profiled easily, with high intensities for the characteristic molecular ions and other specific fragments. Metallic Au or Cr atoms are recoiled into the organic layer where they cause some damage near the hybrid interface as well as changes in the erosion rate. However, these recoil implanted metallic atoms do not appear to severely degrade the depth profile overall quality. This first successful hybrid depth profiling report opens new possibilities for the study of OLEDs, organic solar cells, or other hybrid devices.

  14. Hybrid Organic/Inorganic Materials Depth Profiling Using Low Energy Cesium Ions.

    PubMed

    Noël, Céline; Houssiau, Laurent

    2016-05-01

    The structures developed in organic electronics, such as organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) or organic photovoltaics (OPVs) devices always involve hybrid interfaces, joining metal or oxide layers with organic layers. No satisfactory method to probe these hybrid interfaces physical chemistry currently exists. One promising way to analyze such interfaces is to use in situ ion beam etching, but this requires ion beams able to depth profile both inorganic and organic layers. Mono- or diatomic ion beams commonly used to depth profile inorganic materials usually perform badly on organics, while cluster ion beams perform excellently on organics but yield poor results when organics and inorganics are mixed. Conversely, low energy Cs(+) beams (<500 eV) allow organic and inorganic materials depth profiling with comparable erosion rates. This paper shows a successful depth profiling of a model hybrid system made of metallic (Au, Cr) and organic (tyrosine) layers, sputtered with 500 eV Cs(+) ions. Tyrosine layers capped with metallic overlayers are depth profiled easily, with high intensities for the characteristic molecular ions and other specific fragments. Metallic Au or Cr atoms are recoiled into the organic layer where they cause some damage near the hybrid interface as well as changes in the erosion rate. However, these recoil implanted metallic atoms do not appear to severely degrade the depth profile overall quality. This first successful hybrid depth profiling report opens new possibilities for the study of OLEDs, organic solar cells, or other hybrid devices. PMID:26883532

  15. Hybrid Organic/Inorganic Materials Depth Profiling Using Low Energy Cesium Ions.

    PubMed

    Noël, Céline; Houssiau, Laurent

    2016-05-01

    The structures developed in organic electronics, such as organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) or organic photovoltaics (OPVs) devices always involve hybrid interfaces, joining metal or oxide layers with organic layers. No satisfactory method to probe these hybrid interfaces physical chemistry currently exists. One promising way to analyze such interfaces is to use in situ ion beam etching, but this requires ion beams able to depth profile both inorganic and organic layers. Mono- or diatomic ion beams commonly used to depth profile inorganic materials usually perform badly on organics, while cluster ion beams perform excellently on organics but yield poor results when organics and inorganics are mixed. Conversely, low energy Cs(+) beams (<500 eV) allow organic and inorganic materials depth profiling with comparable erosion rates. This paper shows a successful depth profiling of a model hybrid system made of metallic (Au, Cr) and organic (tyrosine) layers, sputtered with 500 eV Cs(+) ions. Tyrosine layers capped with metallic overlayers are depth profiled easily, with high intensities for the characteristic molecular ions and other specific fragments. Metallic Au or Cr atoms are recoiled into the organic layer where they cause some damage near the hybrid interface as well as changes in the erosion rate. However, these recoil implanted metallic atoms do not appear to severely degrade the depth profile overall quality. This first successful hybrid depth profiling report opens new possibilities for the study of OLEDs, organic solar cells, or other hybrid devices.

  16. Biological characterization of low-energy ions with high-energy deposition on human cells.

    PubMed

    Saha, Janapriya; Wilson, Paul; Thieberger, Peter; Lowenstein, Derek; Wang, Minli; Cucinotta, Francis A

    2014-09-01

    During space travel, astronauts are exposed to cosmic radiation that is comprised of high-energy nuclear particles. Cancer patients are also exposed to high-energy nuclear particles when treated with proton and carbon beams. Nuclear interactions from high-energy particles traversing shielding materials and tissue produce low-energy (<10 MeV/n) secondary particles of high-LET that contribute significantly to overall radiation exposures. Track structure theories suggest that high charge and energy (HZE) particles and low-energy secondary ions of similar LET will have distinct biological effects for cellular and tissue damage endpoints. We investigated the biological effects of low-energy ions of high LET utilizing the Tandem Van de Graaff accelerator at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), and compared these to experiments with HZE particles, that mimic the space environment produced at NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at BNL. Immunostaining for DNA damage response proteins was carried out after irradiation with 5.6 MeV/n boron (LET 205 keV/μm), 5.3 MeV/n silicon (LET 1241 keV/μm), 600 MeV/n Fe (LET 180 keV/μm) and 77 MeV/n oxygen (LET 58 keV/μm) particles. Low-energy ions caused more persistent DNA damage response (DDR) protein foci in irradiated human fibroblasts and esophageal epithelial cells compared to HZE particles. More detailed studies comparing boron ions to Fe particles, showed that boron-ion radiation resulted in a stronger G2 delay compared to Fe-particle exposure, and boron ions also showed an early recruitment of Rad51 at double-strand break (DSB) sites, which suggests a preference of homologous recombination for DSB repair in low-energy albeit high-LET particles. Our experiments suggest that the very high-energy radiation deposition by low-energy ions, representative of galactic cosmic radiation and solar particle event secondary radiation, generates massive but localized DNA damage leading to delayed DSB repair, and distinct cellular

  17. Biological characterization of low-energy ions with high-energy deposition on human cells.

    PubMed

    Saha, Janapriya; Wilson, Paul; Thieberger, Peter; Lowenstein, Derek; Wang, Minli; Cucinotta, Francis A

    2014-09-01

    During space travel, astronauts are exposed to cosmic radiation that is comprised of high-energy nuclear particles. Cancer patients are also exposed to high-energy nuclear particles when treated with proton and carbon beams. Nuclear interactions from high-energy particles traversing shielding materials and tissue produce low-energy (<10 MeV/n) secondary particles of high-LET that contribute significantly to overall radiation exposures. Track structure theories suggest that high charge and energy (HZE) particles and low-energy secondary ions of similar LET will have distinct biological effects for cellular and tissue damage endpoints. We investigated the biological effects of low-energy ions of high LET utilizing the Tandem Van de Graaff accelerator at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), and compared these to experiments with HZE particles, that mimic the space environment produced at NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at BNL. Immunostaining for DNA damage response proteins was carried out after irradiation with 5.6 MeV/n boron (LET 205 keV/μm), 5.3 MeV/n silicon (LET 1241 keV/μm), 600 MeV/n Fe (LET 180 keV/μm) and 77 MeV/n oxygen (LET 58 keV/μm) particles. Low-energy ions caused more persistent DNA damage response (DDR) protein foci in irradiated human fibroblasts and esophageal epithelial cells compared to HZE particles. More detailed studies comparing boron ions to Fe particles, showed that boron-ion radiation resulted in a stronger G2 delay compared to Fe-particle exposure, and boron ions also showed an early recruitment of Rad51 at double-strand break (DSB) sites, which suggests a preference of homologous recombination for DSB repair in low-energy albeit high-LET particles. Our experiments suggest that the very high-energy radiation deposition by low-energy ions, representative of galactic cosmic radiation and solar particle event secondary radiation, generates massive but localized DNA damage leading to delayed DSB repair, and distinct cellular

  18. Nonlinear and long-term beam dynamics in low energy storage rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papash, A. I.; Smirnov, A. V.; Welsch, C. P.

    2013-06-01

    Electrostatic storage rings operate at very low energies in the keV range and have proven to be invaluable tools for atomic and molecular physics. Because of the mass independence of electric rigidity, these machines are able to store a wide range of different particles, from light ions to heavy singly charged biomolecules, opening up unique research opportunities. However, earlier measurements have shown strong limitations in maximum beam intensity, fast decay of the stored ion current, and reduced beam lifetime. The nature of these effects has not been fully understood and an improved understanding of the physical processes influencing beam motion and stability in such rings is needed. In this paper, a comprehensive study into nonlinear and long-term beam dynamics studies is presented on the examples of a number of existing and planned electrostatic storage rings using the BETACOOL, OPERA-3D, and MAD-X simulation software. A detailed investigation into ion kinetics, under consideration of effects from electron cooling and multiple scattering of the beam on a supersonic gas jet target, is carried out and yields a consistent explanation of the physical effects in a whole class of storage rings. The lifetime, equilibrium momentum spread, and equilibrium lateral spread during collisions with the target are estimated. In addition, the results from experiments at the Test Storage Ring, where a low-intensity beam of CF+ ions at 93keV/u has been shrunk to extremely small dimensions, are reproduced. Based on these simulations, the conditions for stable ring operation with an extremely low-emittance beam are presented. Finally, results from studies into the interaction of 3-30 keV ions with a gas jet target are summarized.

  19. Development of ion chambers for the measurement of low energy synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahant, A. K.; Singh, Sunil Kumar; Panyam, Vinatha S.

    2009-04-01

    Measurement of radiation fields due to low energy synchrotron radiation (SR) needs special considerations. The photoelectric interactions, which are mainly responsible for signal generation in this case, result in electron emission in a direction nearly perpendicular to the direction of incident photon. A free air ionisation chamber was designed and used for measurement of intensity of SR in the beam line and a methodology has been developed to measure SR fields away from the beam line using large volume ion chambers. Studies with spherical and cylindrical ion chambers in X-ray beams obtained at a tube potential of 15 kV (3 mm Be inherent filtration) showed that the chamber sensitivity at low energy strongly depended on curvature of the chamber wall especially in thick walled chambers. Our studies further showed that large volume thin and plane walled (0.01 mm thick aluminium wall) chambers could be used for measurement of SR fields away from the beam lines, with reasonably good accuracy (±10%) by calibrating them against the free air ion chamber through a similar chamber of smaller dimensions.

  20. Nuclear Astrophysical studies using low-energy RI beams at CRIB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, H.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Hayakawa, S.; Binh, D. N.; Kahl, D.; Kurihara, Y.; Kubono, S.; Teranishi, T.; He, J. J.; Kwon, Y. K.; Nishimura, S.; Togano, Y.; Iwasa, N.; Niikura, M.; Khiem, L. H.

    2009-05-01

    CRIB (CNS Radioactive Ion Beam separator) is a low-energy RI beam separator at the Center for Nuclear Study (CNS) of the University of Tokyo, used for various studies covering nuclear-astrophysical topics. An application of the RI beam at CRIB for the astrophysical studies is a new measurement of the proton resonance scattering on 7Be. The measurement was performed up to the excitation energy of 6.8 MeV, ans the excitation function above 3.5 MeV was successfully measured for the first time, providing important information about the reaction rate of 7Be(p,γ)8B, which is the key reaction in the solar 8B neutrino production. A preliminary result of the 7Be+p experiment is presented.

  1. Nuclear Astrophysical studies using low-energy RI beams at CRIB

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaguchi, H.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Hayakawa, S.; Binh, D. N.; Kahl, D.; Kurihara, Y.; Kubono, S.; Niikura, M.; Teranishi, T.; He, J. J.; Kwon, Y. K.; Nishimura, S.; Togano, Y.; Iwasa, N.; Khiem, L. H.

    2009-05-04

    CRIB (CNS Radioactive Ion Beam separator) is a low-energy RI beam separator at the Center for Nuclear Study (CNS) of the University of Tokyo, used for various studies covering nuclear-astrophysical topics. An application of the RI beam at CRIB for the astrophysical studies is a new measurement of the proton resonance scattering on {sup 7}Be. The measurement was performed up to the excitation energy of 6.8 MeV, ans the excitation function above 3.5 MeV was successfully measured for the first time, providing important information about the reaction rate of {sup 7}Be(p,{gamma}){sup 8}B, which is the key reaction in the solar {sup 8}B neutrino production. A preliminary result of the {sup 7}Be+p experiment is presented.

  2. Trapping low-energy antiprotons in an ion trap

    SciTech Connect

    Fei, Xiang.

    1990-01-01

    A fraction of antiprotons from the Low Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR) of CERN are slowed from 5.9 MeV to below 3 keV as they pass through thin foils. Transmitted particle energy distribution and low energy antiproton yield are measured by a time-of-flight technique. The difference in the range of protons and antiprotons (known as the Barkas effect) is observed. While still in flight, up to 1.3 {times} 10{sup 5} antiprotons with energies between 0 eV to 3 keV are stored in an ion trap from a single pulse of 5.9 MeV antiprotons leaving LEAR, thus a trapping efficiency exceeding of 4 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} is established. Trapped antiprotons maintain their initial energy distribution unless allowed to collide with a cloud of trapped electrons, whereupon they slow and cool below 1 meV in 10 s, and fall into a harmonic potential well suited for precision mass measurements. The slowing, trapping and cooling of antiprotons are the main focus of this thesis. The stored antiprotons are in thermal equilibrium at 4.2 K. In this ion trap, the antiproton cyclotron frequency is measured and compared with the proton (or electron) cyclotron frequency. The new measured ratio of the antiproton and proton inertial masses, with its 4 {times} 10{sup {minus}8} uncertainty, is more than three orders of magnitude more accurate than previous measurements using exotic atoms. This is a most precise test of CPT invariance with baryons. The antiproton lifetime in an ion trap was measured to be more than 103 days by trapping a cloud of antiprotons for 59 days. The indicates the number density of atoms is less than 100/cm{sup 3} which corresponds to the pressure in the vacuum chamber being less than 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}17} Torr at 4.2 K if we apply the ideal gas law.

  3. Low energy electrons and swift ion track structure in PADC

    DOE PAGES

    Fromm, Michel; Quinto, Michele A.; Weck, Philippe F.; Champion, Christophe

    2015-05-27

    The current work aims at providing an accurate description of the ion track-structure in poly-allyl dyglycol carbonate (PADC) by using an up-to-date Monte-Carlo code-called TILDA-V (a French acronym for Transport d’Ions Lourds Dans l’Aqua & Vivo). In this simulation the ion track-structure in PADC is mainly described in terms of ejected electrons with a particular attention done to the Low Energy Electrons (LEEs). After a brief reminder of the most important channels through which LEEs are prone to break a chemical bond, we will report on the simulated energetic distributions of LEEs along an ion track in PADC for particularmore » incident energies located on both sides of the Bragg-peak position. Lastly, based on the rare data dealing with LEEs interaction with polymers or organic molecules, we will emphasise the role played by the LEEs in the formation of a latent track in PADC, and more particularly the one played by the sub-ionization electrons.« less

  4. Low energy electrons and swift ion track structure in PADC

    SciTech Connect

    Fromm, Michel; Quinto, Michele A.; Weck, Philippe F.; Champion, Christophe

    2015-05-27

    The current work aims at providing an accurate description of the ion track-structure in poly-allyl dyglycol carbonate (PADC) by using an up-to-date Monte-Carlo code-called TILDA-V (a French acronym for Transport d’Ions Lourds Dans l’Aqua & Vivo). In this simulation the ion track-structure in PADC is mainly described in terms of ejected electrons with a particular attention done to the Low Energy Electrons (LEEs). After a brief reminder of the most important channels through which LEEs are prone to break a chemical bond, we will report on the simulated energetic distributions of LEEs along an ion track in PADC for particular incident energies located on both sides of the Bragg-peak position. Lastly, based on the rare data dealing with LEEs interaction with polymers or organic molecules, we will emphasise the role played by the LEEs in the formation of a latent track in PADC, and more particularly the one played by the sub-ionization electrons.

  5. Low-energy dc ion source for low operating pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Oks, Efim; Shandrikov, Maxim; Brown, Ian

    2014-08-15

    We report on an experimental study of an ion source based on a Penning discharge with a cold hollow cathode in crossed electric and magnetic fields. The minimum vacuum chamber operating pressure was 3 × 10{sup −5} Torr for argon and 5 × 10{sup −5} Torr for hydrogen. The use of a hollow cathode allowed decreasing the discharge operating voltage down to 350 V at a discharge current of ∼100 mA. At a discharge current of 100 mA and beam accelerating voltage of 2 kV, the ion current was 2.5 mA for argon and 8 mA for hydrogen, and the ion beam on-axis current density 170 and 450 μA/cm{sup 2}, respectively. The current-voltage characteristics of the discharge and the radial ion beam current density distribution were measured. The influence of pressure on the discharge parameters and their time stability was investigated.

  6. Plasma formed ion beam projection lithography system

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Lee, Yung-Hee Yvette; Ngo, Vinh; Zahir, Nastaran

    2002-01-01

    A plasma-formed ion-beam projection lithography (IPL) system eliminates the acceleration stage between the ion source and stencil mask of a conventional IPL system. Instead a much thicker mask is used as a beam forming or extraction electrode, positioned next to the plasma in the ion source. Thus the entire beam forming electrode or mask is illuminated uniformly with the source plasma. The extracted beam passes through an acceleration and reduction stage onto the resist coated wafer. Low energy ions, about 30 eV, pass through the mask, minimizing heating, scattering, and sputtering.

  7. Broad beam ion implanter

    DOEpatents

    Leung, K.N.

    1996-10-08

    An ion implantation device for creating a large diameter, homogeneous, ion beam is described, as well as a method for creating same, wherein the device is characterized by extraction of a diverging ion beam and its conversion by ion beam optics to an essentially parallel ion beam. The device comprises a plasma or ion source, an anode and exit aperture, an extraction electrode, a divergence-limiting electrode and an acceleration electrode, as well as the means for connecting a voltage supply to the electrodes. 6 figs.

  8. Broad beam ion implanter

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo

    1996-01-01

    An ion implantation device for creating a large diameter, homogeneous, ion beam is described, as well as a method for creating same, wherein the device is characterized by extraction of a diverging ion beam and its conversion by ion beam optics to an essentially parallel ion beam. The device comprises a plasma or ion source, an anode and exit aperture, an extraction electrode, a divergence-limiting electrode and an acceleration electrode, as well as the means for connecting a voltage supply to the electrodes.

  9. Cold atomic beam ion source for focused ion beam applications

    SciTech Connect

    Knuffman, B.; Steele, A. V.; McClelland, J. J.

    2013-07-28

    We report measurements and modeling of an ion source that is based on ionization of a laser-cooled atomic beam. We show a high brightness and a low energy spread, suitable for use in next-generation, high-resolution focused ion beam systems. Our measurements of total ion current as a function of ionization conditions support an analytical model that also predicts the cross-sectional current density and spatial distribution of ions created in the source. The model predicts a peak brightness of 2 × 10{sup 7} A m{sup −2} sr{sup −1} eV{sup −1} and an energy spread less than 0.34 eV. The model is also combined with Monte-Carlo simulations of the inter-ion Coulomb forces to show that the source can be operated at several picoamperes with a brightness above 1 × 10{sup 7} A m{sup −2} sr{sup −1} eV{sup −1}. We estimate that when combined with a conventional ion focusing column, an ion source with these properties could focus a 1 pA beam into a spot smaller than 1 nm. A total current greater than 5 nA was measured in a lower-brightness configuration of the ion source, demonstrating the possibility of a high current mode of operation.

  10. Variations of Low-energy Ion Distributions Measured in the Heliosheath

    SciTech Connect

    Decker, R. B.; Roelof, E. C.; Hill, M. E.; Krimigis, S. M.

    2010-12-30

    This report is an update of low-energy ion intensities and angular distributions measured recently by the Low Energy Charged Particle instruments on the Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft in the inner heliosheath.

  11. Low-energy plasma immersion ion implantation to induce DNA transfer into bacterial E. coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangwijit, K.; Yu, L. D.; Sarapirom, S.; Pitakrattananukool, S.; Anuntalabhochai, S.

    2015-12-01

    Plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) at low energy was for the first time applied as a novel biotechnology to induce DNA transfer into bacterial cells. Argon or nitrogen PIII at low bias voltages of 2.5, 5 and 10 kV and fluences ranging from 1 × 1012 to 1 × 1017 ions/cm2 treated cells of Escherichia coli (E. coli). Subsequently, DNA transfer was operated by mixing the PIII-treated cells with DNA. Successes in PIII-induced DNA transfer were demonstrated by marker gene expressions. The induction of DNA transfer was ion-energy, fluence and DNA-size dependent. The DNA transferred in the cells was confirmed functioning. Mechanisms of the PIII-induced DNA transfer were investigated and discussed in terms of the E. coli cell envelope anatomy. Compared with conventional ion-beam-induced DNA transfer, PIII-induced DNA transfer was simpler with lower cost but higher efficiency.

  12. Transmission of low energy (< 10 eV) oxygen ions through ultrathin xenon films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sack, N. J.; Akbulut, M.; Madey, T. E.

    1994-05-01

    In studies of desorption induced by electronic transitions (DIET) such as electron or photon stimulated desorption, it is important to know whether the desorbing species originate solely from the outermost surface layer, or also from layers beneath the surface. In order to gain better understanding of the charge transfer, elastic scattering, and other inelastic processes involved in this issue, we are currently performing a series of experimental studies of the transmission of low energy ions (˜ 7 eV) through ultrathin films (submonolayer to multilayer) of condensed gases. Here we report on the first quantitative measurements of the yield, angle, and energy of oxygen ions after transmission through ultrathin films of xenon. In our novel approach, a focused 300 eV electron beam bombards a target at 25 K consisting of an oxidized tungsten (100) crystal with adsorbed overlayers of xenon. In the absence of the xenon, O + ions desorb in a sharp beam normal to the surface, as measured in a velocity and angle resolving ESDIAD apparatus (electron stimulated desorption ion angular distribution). When Xe layers are present, some oxygen ions penetrate several monolayers of xenon without significant change in energy and angle while others seem to be scattered by large-angle elastic scattering or to be attenuated from the O + beam. The work presented is the first experimental study of the depth of origin of desorbing ions in DIET processes.

  13. Phase Rotation of Muon Beams for Producing Intense Low-Energy Muon Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Neuffer, D.; Bao, Y.; Hansen, G.

    2016-01-01

    Low-energy muon beams are useful for rare decay searches, which provide access to new physics that cannot be addressed at high-energy colliders. However, muons are produced within a broad energy spread unmatched to the low-energy required. In this paper we outline a phase rotation method to significantly increase the intensity of low-energy muons. The muons are produced from a short pulsed proton driver, and develop a time-momentum correlation in a drift space following production. A series of rf cavities is used to bunch the muons and phase-energy rotate the bunches to a momentum of around 100 MeV/c. Then another group of rf cavities is used to decelerate the muon bunches to low-energy. This obtains ~0.1 muon per 8 GeV proton, which is significantly higher than currently planned Mu2e experiments, and would enable a next generation of rare decay searches, and other intense muon beam applications.

  14. Fabrication and characterization of a co-planar detector in diamond for low energy single ion implantation

    DOE PAGES

    Abraham, John Bishoy Sam; Pacheco, Jose L.; Aguirre, Brandon Adrian; Vizkelethy, Gyorgy; Bielejec, Edward S.

    2016-08-09

    We demonstrate low energy single ion detection using a co-planar detector fabricated on a diamond substrate and characterized by ion beam induced charge collection. Histograms are taken with low fluence ion pulses illustrating quantized ion detection down to a single ion with a signal-to-noise ratio of approximately 10. We anticipate that this detection technique can serve as a basis to optimize the yield of single color centers in diamond. In conclusion, the ability to count ions into a diamond substrate is expected to reduce the uncertainty in the yield of color center formation by removing Poisson statistics from the implantationmore » process.« less

  15. Fabrication and characterization of a co-planar detector in diamond for low energy single ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, J. B. S.; Aguirre, B. A.; Pacheco, J. L.; Vizkelethy, G.; Bielejec, E.

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate low energy single ion detection using a co-planar detector fabricated on a diamond substrate and characterized by ion beam induced charge collection. Histograms are taken with low fluence ion pulses illustrating quantized ion detection down to a single ion with a signal-to-noise ratio of approximately 10. We anticipate that this detection technique can serve as a basis to optimize the yield of single color centers in diamond. The ability to count ions into a diamond substrate is expected to reduce the uncertainty in the yield of color center formation by removing Poisson statistics from the implantation process.

  16. Improved design of proton source and low energy beam transport line for European Spallation Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neri, L.; Celona, L.; Gammino, S.; Mascali, D.; Castro, G.; Torrisi, G.; Cheymol, B.; Ponton, A.; Galatà, A.; Patti, G.; Gozzo, A.; Lega, L.; Ciavola, G.

    2014-02-01

    The design update of the European Spallation Source (ESS) accelerator is almost complete and the construction of the prototype of the microwave discharge ion source able to provide a proton beam current larger than 70 mA to the 3.6 MeV Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) started. The source named PS-ESS (Proton Source for ESS) was designed with a flexible magnetic system and an extraction system able to merge conservative solutions with significant advances. The ESS injector has taken advantage of recent theoretical updates and new plasma diagnostics tools developed at INFN-LNS (Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare). The design strategy considers the PS-ESS and the low energy beam transport line as a whole, where the proton beam behaves like an almost neutralized non-thermalized plasma. Innovative solutions have been used as hereinafter described. Thermo-mechanical optimization has been performed to withstand the chopped beam and the misaligned focused beam over the RFQ input collimator; the results are reported here.

  17. Improved design of proton source and low energy beam transport line for European Spallation Source.

    PubMed

    Neri, L; Celona, L; Gammino, S; Mascali, D; Castro, G; Torrisi, G; Cheymol, B; Ponton, A; Galatà, A; Patti, G; Gozzo, A; Lega, L; Ciavola, G

    2014-02-01

    The design update of the European Spallation Source (ESS) accelerator is almost complete and the construction of the prototype of the microwave discharge ion source able to provide a proton beam current larger than 70 mA to the 3.6 MeV Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) started. The source named PS-ESS (Proton Source for ESS) was designed with a flexible magnetic system and an extraction system able to merge conservative solutions with significant advances. The ESS injector has taken advantage of recent theoretical updates and new plasma diagnostics tools developed at INFN-LNS (Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare). The design strategy considers the PS-ESS and the low energy beam transport line as a whole, where the proton beam behaves like an almost neutralized non-thermalized plasma. Innovative solutions have been used as hereinafter described. Thermo-mechanical optimization has been performed to withstand the chopped beam and the misaligned focused beam over the RFQ input collimator; the results are reported here.

  18. Improved design of proton source and low energy beam transport line for European Spallation Source

    SciTech Connect

    Neri, L. Celona, L.; Gammino, S.; Mascali, D.; Castro, G.; Ciavola, G.; Torrisi, G.; Cheymol, B.; Ponton, A.; Galatà, A.; Patti, G.; Gozzo, A.; Lega, L.

    2014-02-15

    The design update of the European Spallation Source (ESS) accelerator is almost complete and the construction of the prototype of the microwave discharge ion source able to provide a proton beam current larger than 70 mA to the 3.6 MeV Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) started. The source named PS-ESS (Proton Source for ESS) was designed with a flexible magnetic system and an extraction system able to merge conservative solutions with significant advances. The ESS injector has taken advantage of recent theoretical updates and new plasma diagnostics tools developed at INFN-LNS (Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare). The design strategy considers the PS-ESS and the low energy beam transport line as a whole, where the proton beam behaves like an almost neutralized non-thermalized plasma. Innovative solutions have been used as hereinafter described. Thermo-mechanical optimization has been performed to withstand the chopped beam and the misaligned focused beam over the RFQ input collimator; the results are reported here.

  19. Extending ion-track lithography to the low-energy ion regime

    SciTech Connect

    Musket, R G

    2005-10-14

    Ion tracking and ion-track lithography have been performed almost exclusively using ions with energies near or above the maximum in electronic stopping, which occurs at {approx}1 MeV/amu. In this paper, ion-track lithography using ions with energies well below this maximum is discussed. The results of etching ion tracks created in polycarbonate films by ions with energies just above the anticipated threshold for creating etchable latent tracks with cylindrical geometry have been examined. Low-energy neon and argon ions with 18-60 keV/amu and fluences of {approx}10{sup 8}/cm{sup 2} were used to examine the limits for producing useful, etchable tracks in polycarbonate films. By concentrating on the early stages of etching (i.e., {approx}20 nm < SEM hole diameter < {approx}100 nm), the energy deposition calculated for the incident ion was correlated with the creation of etchable tracks. The experimental results are discussed with regard to the energy losses of the ions in the polycarbonate films and to the formation of continuous latent tracks through the entire thickness of the films. The probability distributions for large-angle scattering events were calculated to assess their importance as a function of ion energy. All these results have significant implications with respect to the threshold for formation of etchable tracks and to the use of low-energy ions for lithographic applications of ion tracking.

  20. Extending ion-track lithography to the low-energy ion regime

    SciTech Connect

    Musket, R.G.

    2006-06-01

    Ion tracking and ion-track lithography have been performed almost exclusively using ions with energies near or above the maximum in electronic stopping, which occurs at {approx}1 MeV/amu. In this paper, ion-track lithography using ions with energies well below this maximum is discussed. The results of etching ion tracks created in polycarbonate films by ions with energies just above the anticipated threshold for creating etchable latent tracks with cylindrical geometry have been examined. Low-energy neon and argon ions with 18-60 keV/amu and fluences of {approx}10{sup 8} cm{sup -2} were used to examine the limits for producing useful, etchable tracks in polycarbonate films. By concentrating on the early stages of etching (i.e., {approx}20 nmion was correlated with the creation of etchable tracks. The experimental results are discussed with regard to the energy losses of the ions in the polycarbonate films and to the formation of continuous latent tracks through the entire thickness of the films. The probability distributions for large-angle scattering events were calculated to assess their importance as a function of ion energy. All these results have significant implications with respect to the threshold for formation of etchable tracks and to the use of low-energy ions for lithographic applications of ion tracking.

  1. Intense ion beam generator

    DOEpatents

    Humphries, Jr., Stanley; Sudan, Ravindra N.

    1977-08-30

    Methods and apparatus for producing intense megavolt ion beams are disclosed. In one embodiment, a reflex triode-type pulsed ion accelerator is described which produces ion pulses of more than 5 kiloamperes current with a peak energy of 3 MeV. In other embodiments, the device is constructed so as to focus the beam of ions for high concentration and ease of extraction, and magnetic insulation is provided to increase the efficiency of operation.

  2. Etching and Damage Action on Microbes' Cells by Low Energy N+ Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Dao-jun; Yu, Zeng-liang

    2000-08-01

    The action of etching and damage by 20 keV N+ beam on the cells of Deinococcus radiodurans and Escherichia coli was investigated by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and the electron spin resonance (ESR) spectrum of free radicals. The results showed that N+ implantation exerted the direct action of etching and damage of momentum transferring and the indirect action of the free radicals of energy deposition on their cells, many microholes were found on the surface of cells' wall and/or membrane by SEM, the damaged DNA was determined using DNA unwinding technique, and the signal of free radicals was measured by ESR. The degree of damage to cells by ion beam gradually increased with the increase implantation dose. With the post-treatment of 2 mmol/l caffeine and 0.5 mmol/l Na2-EDTA, the survival rate of D.radiodurans and E.coli further decreased in the order of caffeine > Na2-EDTA > control, and this suggested that low energy ion beam could be implanted into nucleus, doing a damage to DNA and resulting in the mutation of organisms.

  3. Scheme for Low Energy Beam Transport with a Non-Neutralized Section

    SciTech Connect

    Shemyakin, A.; Prost, L.

    2015-04-23

    A typical Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) design relies on dynamics with nearly complete beam space charge neutralization over the entire length of the LEBT. This paper argues that, for a beam with modest perveance and uniform current density distribution when generated at the source, a downstream portion of the LEBT can be un-neutralized without significant emittance growth.

  4. Oxygen ion-beam microlithography

    DOEpatents

    Tsuo, Y.S.

    1991-08-20

    A method of providing and developing a resist on a substrate for constructing integrated circuit (IC) chips includes the following steps: of depositing a thin film of amorphous silicon or hydrogenated amorphous silicon on the substrate and exposing portions of the amorphous silicon to low-energy oxygen ion beams to oxidize the amorphous silicon at those selected portions. The nonoxidized portions are then removed by etching with RF-excited hydrogen plasma. Components of the IC chip can then be constructed through the removed portions of the resist. The entire process can be performed in an in-line vacuum production system having several vacuum chambers. Nitrogen or carbon ion beams can also be used. 5 figures.

  5. Oxygen ion-beam microlithography

    DOEpatents

    Tsuo, Y. Simon

    1991-01-01

    A method of providing and developing a resist on a substrate for constructing integrated circuit (IC) chips includes the following steps: of depositing a thin film of amorphous silicon or hydrogenated amorphous silicon on the substrate and exposing portions of the amorphous silicon to low-energy oxygen ion beams to oxidize the amorphous silicon at those selected portions. The nonoxidized portions are then removed by etching with RF-excited hydrogen plasma. Components of the IC chip can then be constructed through the removed portions of the resist. The entire process can be performed in an in-line vacuum production system having several vacuum chambers. Nitrogen or carbon ion beams can also be used.

  6. Precision shape modification of nanodevices with a low-energy electron beam

    DOEpatents

    Zettl, Alex; Yuzvinsky, Thomas David; Fennimore, Adam

    2010-03-09

    Methods of shape modifying a nanodevice by contacting it with a low-energy focused electron beam are disclosed here. In one embodiment, a nanodevice may be permanently reformed to a different geometry through an application of a deforming force and a low-energy focused electron beam. With the addition of an assist gas, material may be removed from the nanodevice through application of the low-energy focused electron beam. The independent methods of shape modification and material removal may be used either individually or simultaneously. Precision cuts with accuracies as high as 10 nm may be achieved through the use of precision low-energy Scanning Electron Microscope scan beams. These methods may be used in an automated system to produce nanodevices of very precise dimensions. These methods may be used to produce nanodevices of carbon-based, silicon-based, or other compositions by varying the assist gas.

  7. Silkworm eggs: An ideal model for studying the biological effects of low energy Ar + ion interaction in animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Lin; Liu, Xuelan; Xu, Jiaping; You, Zhengying; Zhou, Jingbo

    2011-09-01

    The object of the current work was to study low energy Ar + ion beam interactions with silkworm eggs and thus provide further understanding of the mechanisms involved in ion bombardment-induced direct gene transfer into silkworm eggs. In this paper, using low-energy Ar + ion beam bombardment combined with piggyBac transposon, we developed a novel method to induce gene transfer in silkworm. Using bombardment conditions optimized for egg-incubation (25 keV with ion fluences of 800 × 2.6 × 10 15 ions/cm 2 in dry state under vacuum), vector pBac{3 × P3-EGFPaf} and helper plasmid pHA3pig were successfully transferred into the silkworm eggs. Our results obtained from by PCR assay and genomic Southern blotting analysis of the G1 generations provide evidence that low-energy ion beam can generate some craters that play a role in acting as pathways of exogenous DNA molecules into silkworm eggs.

  8. Ion beam accelerator system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aston, G. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A system is described that combines geometrical and electrostatic focusing to provide high ion extraction efficiency and good focusing of an accelerated ion beam. The apparatus includes a pair of curved extraction grids with multiple pairs of aligned holes positioned to direct a group of beamlets along converging paths. The extraction grids are closely spaced and maintained at a moderate potential to efficiently extract beamlets of ions and allow them to combine into a single beam. An accelerator electrode device downstream from the extraction grids is at a much lower potential than the grids to accelerate the combined beam. The application of the system to ion implantation is mentioned.

  9. Ion beam thruster shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Power, J. L. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    An ion thruster beam shield is provided that comprises a cylindrical housing that extends downstream from the ion thruster and a plurality of annular vanes which are spaced along the length of the housing, and extend inwardly from the interior wall of the housing. The shield intercepts and stops all charge exchange and beam ions, neutral propellant, and sputter products formed due to the interaction of beam and shield emanating from the ion thruster outside of a fixed conical angle from the thruster axis. Further, the shield prevents the sputter products formed during the operation of the engine from escaping the interior volume of the shield.

  10. Correlation measurements in nuclear {beta}-decay using traps and polarized low energy beams

    SciTech Connect

    Naviliat-Cuncic, Oscar

    2013-05-06

    Precision measurements in nuclear {beta}-decay provide sensitive means to test discrete symmetries in the weak interaction and to determine some of the fundamental constants in semi-leptonic decays, like the coupling of the lightest quarks to charged weak bosons. The main motivation of such measurements is to find deviations from Standard Model predictions as possible indications of new physics. In this contribution I will focus on two topics related to precision measurements in nuclear {beta}-decay: i) the determination of the V{sub ud} element of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa quark mixing matrix from nuclear mirror transitions and ii) the search for exotic scalar or tensor contributions from {beta}{nu} angular correlations. The purpose is to underline the role being played by experimental techniques based on the confinement of radioactive species with atom and ion traps as well as the plans to use low energy polarized beams.

  11. Results of a pilot study and a proposal to build a high current pulsed nanosecond low energy Si ion beam for the detection of trace amounts of heavy impurities in silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobsen, F.M.; Zarcone, M.J.; Steski, D.; Smith, K.; Thieberger, P.; Lynn, K.G.; Throwe, J.; Cholewa, M. |

    1996-01-01

    Next generations of Very Large Scale Integrated circuits will require impurity contamination below 10{sup 8} atoms/cm. To detect such small quantities at or near the surface, new techniques have to be developed. The authors propose to build a high current nanosecond pulsed Si ion beam which can detect such small quantities of heavy impurities with a high mass resolution. A pilot study shows that the approach can be used to detect impurities in silicon below the 10{sup 7} atoms/cm{sup 2} level.

  12. Beam dynamics in an ultra-low energy storage rings (review of existing facilities and feasibility studies for future experiments)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papash, A. I.; Smirnov, A. V.; Welsch, C. P.

    2014-03-01

    Storage rings operating at ultra-low energies and in particular electrostatic storage rings have proven to be invaluable tools for atomic and molecular physics. Due to the mass independence of the electrostatic rigidity, these machines are able to store a wide range of different particles, from light ions to heavy singly charged bio-molecules. However, earlier measurements showed strong limitations on beam intensity, fast decay of ion current, reduced life time etc. The nature of these effects was not fully understood. Also a large variety of experiments in future generation ultra-low energy storage and decelerator facilities including in-ring collision studies with a reaction microscope require a comprehensive investigation of the physical processes involved into the operation of such rings. In this paper, we present review of non-linear and long term beam dynamics studies on example of the ELISA, AD Recycler, TSR and USR rings using the computer codes BETACOOL, OPERA-3D and MAD-X. The results from simulations were benchmarked against experimental data of beam losses in the ELISA storage ring. We showed that decay of beam intensity in ultra-low energy rings is mainly caused by ion losses on ring aperture due to multiple scattering on residual gas. Beam is lost on ring aperture due to small ring acceptance. Rate of beam losses increases at high intensities because of the intra-beam scattering effect adds to vacuum losses. Detailed investigations into the ion kinetics under consideration of the effects from electron cooling and multiple scattering of the beam on a supersonic gas jet target have been carried out as well. The life time, equilibrium momentum spread and equilibrium lateral spread during collisions with this internal gas jet target were estimated. In addition, the results from experiments at the TSR ring, where low intensity beam of CF+ ions at 93 keV/u has been shrunk to extremely small dimensions have been reproduced. Based on these simulations

  13. Magnetic reconnection at the magnetopause: Low-energy ions and modification of the Hall physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    André, Mats; Li, Wenya; Toledo-Redondo, Sergio; Vaivads, Andris; Khotyaintsev, Yuri; Graham, Daniel; Norgren, Cecilia; Burch, James; Lindqvist, Per-Arne; Ergun, Robert; Torbert, Roy; Magnes, Werner; Russell, Christopher; Giles, Barbara; Pollock, Craig

    2016-04-01

    We use statistics from the Cluster spacecraft and show that low-energy ions with energies less than tens of eV originating from the ionosphere are common just inside the magnetopause. During magnetopause magnetic reconnection events, these low-energy ions remain magnetized down to smaller length-scales than the hot (keV) magnetospheric ions, introducing a new scale. When magnetized low-energy ions are present, the Hall currents carried by electrons can be partially cancelled by these ions. The electrons and the magnetized low-energy ions ExB drift together. We investigate magnetic reconnection separatrices at various magnetopause locations, using MMS and Cluster spacecraft observations. We verify that when a mixture of ions of very different temperatures is present in reconnecting plasmas, the microphysics related to the Hall effect is significantly modified.

  14. Ion beam accelerator system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aston, Graeme (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A system is described that combines geometrical and electrostatic focusing to provide high ion extraction efficiency and good focusing of an accelerated ion beam. The apparatus includes a pair of curved extraction grids (16, 18) with multiple pairs of aligned holes positioned to direct a group of beamlets (20) along converging paths. The extraction grids are closely spaced and maintained at a moderate potential to efficiently extract beamlets of ions and allow them to combine into a single beam (14). An accelerator electrode device (22) downstream from the extraction grids, is at a much lower potential than the grids to accelerate the combined beam.

  15. A nuclear reaction analysis and optical microscopy study on controlled growth of large SiC nanocrystals on Si formed by low-energy ion implantation and electron beam annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markwitz, A.; Lucas, F.; Rusterucci, J.; Kennedy, J.; Trompetter, W. J.; Rudolphi, M.; Ryan, M.; White, V.; Johnson, S.

    2006-08-01

    Ion implantation of 20 keV 12C+ ions into (1 0 0), p-type silicon with ion fluence of 8 × 1016 at. cm-2 followed by an electron beam annealing under high vacuum conditions has been performed to investigate the formation of crystalline nano-scale SiC features on the silicon surface. Depending on the implantation and annealing conditions, the SiC nanocrystal numbers and average spacing can be controlled by adjusting the implantation and annealing conditions. Typically 300-1000 SiC nanocrystals are produced per 1000 μm2 spaced 0.7-1.2 ± 0.1 μm. Nuclear reaction analysis measurements using the deuterium induced 12C(d, p)13C reaction show that carbon is present in the implanted and annealed samples and varies only to a small degree by the annealing time. However, by not using a liquid nitrogen trap surrounding the targets during implantation, the carbon contamination on the surface reduces the number of SiC nanocrystals and increases their average distance. Specific results are discussed.

  16. Scintillating screens sensitivity and resolution studies for low energy, low intensity beam diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Harasimowicz, Janusz; Cosentino, Luigi; Finocchiaro, Paolo; Pappalardo, Alfio; Welsch, Carsten P

    2010-10-01

    In order to investigate the limits of scintillating screens for beam profile monitoring in the ultra-low energy, ultra-low intensity regime, CsI:Tl, YAG:Ce, and a Tb glass-based scintillating fiber optic plate (SFOP) were tested. The screens response to 200 and 50 keV proton beams with intensities ranging from a few picoampere down to the subfemtoampere region was examined. In the following paper, the sensitivity and resolution studies are presented in detail for CsI:Tl and the SFOP, the two most sensitive screens. In addition, a possible use of scintillators for ultra-low energy antiproton beam monitoring is discussed.

  17. Focused ion beam system

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Gough, Richard A.; Ji, Qing; Lee, Yung-Hee Yvette

    1999-01-01

    A focused ion beam (FIB) system produces a final beam spot size down to 0.1 .mu.m or less and an ion beam output current on the order of microamps. The FIB system increases ion source brightness by properly configuring the first (plasma) and second (extraction) electrodes. The first electrode is configured to have a high aperture diameter to electrode thickness aspect ratio. Additional accelerator and focusing electrodes are used to produce the final beam. As few as five electrodes can be used, providing a very compact FIB system with a length down to only 20 mm. Multibeamlet arrangements with a single ion source can be produced to increase throughput. The FIB system can be used for nanolithography and doping applications for fabrication of semiconductor devices with minimum feature sizes of 0.1 .mu.m or less.

  18. Focused ion beam system

    DOEpatents

    Leung, K.; Gough, R.A.; Ji, Q.; Lee, Y.Y.

    1999-08-31

    A focused ion beam (FIB) system produces a final beam spot size down to 0.1 {mu}m or less and an ion beam output current on the order of microamps. The FIB system increases ion source brightness by properly configuring the first (plasma) and second (extraction) electrodes. The first electrode is configured to have a high aperture diameter to electrode thickness aspect ratio. Additional accelerator and focusing electrodes are used to produce the final beam. As few as five electrodes can be used, providing a very compact FIB system with a length down to only 20 mm. Multibeamlet arrangements with a single ion source can be produced to increase throughput. The FIB system can be used for nanolithography and doping applications for fabrication of semiconductor devices with minimum feature sizes of 0.1 m or less. 13 figs.

  19. Ion beam texturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, W. R.

    1976-01-01

    A microscopic surface texture is created by sputter etching a surface while simultaneously sputter depositing a lower sputter yield material onto the surface. A xenon ion beam source has been used to perform this texturing process on samples as large as three centimeters in diameter. Ion beam textured surface structures have been characterized with SEM photomicrographs for a large number of materials including Cu, Al, Si, Ti, Ni, Fe, Stainless steel, Au, and Ag. Surfaces have been textured using a variety of low sputter yield materials - Ta, Mo, Nb, and Ti. The initial stages of the texture creation have been documented, and the technique of ion beam sputter removal of any remaining deposited material has been studied. A number of other texturing parameters have been studied such as the variation of the texture with ion beam power, surface temperature, and the rate of texture growth with sputter etching time.

  20. Pulsed ion beam source

    DOEpatents

    Greenly, John B.

    1997-01-01

    An improved pulsed ion beam source having a new biasing circuit for the fast magnetic field. This circuit provides for an initial negative bias for the field created by the fast coils in the ion beam source which pre-ionize the gas in the source, ionize the gas and deliver the gas to the proper position in the accelerating gap between the anode and cathode assemblies in the ion beam source. The initial negative bias improves the interaction between the location of the nulls in the composite magnetic field in the ion beam source and the position of the gas for pre-ionization and ionization into the plasma as well as final positioning of the plasma in the accelerating gap. Improvements to the construction of the flux excluders in the anode assembly are also accomplished by fabricating them as layered structures with a high melting point, low conductivity material on the outsides with a high conductivity material in the center.

  1. Beam chopper For the Low-Energy Undulator Test Line (LEUTL) in the APS

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Y.; Wang, J.; Milton, S.; Teng, L.

    1997-08-01

    The low-energy undulator test line (LEUTL) is being built and will be tested with a short beam pulse from an rf gun in the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at the Argonne National Laboratory. In the LEUTL a beam chopper is used after the rf gun to deflect the unwanted beam to a beam dump. The beam chopper consists of a permanent magnet and an electric deflector that can compensate for the magnetic deflection. A 30-kV pulsed power supply is used for the electric deflector. The chopper subsystem was assembled and tested for beamline installation. The electrical and beam properties of the chopper assembly are presented.

  2. Micro-radiosurgery: a new concept for radiotherapy based upon low energy, ion-induced nuclear reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horn, K. M.; Doyle, B. L.

    1993-06-01

    Traditionally, proton radiotherapy has required the use of high energy proton beams (50-200 MeV) which can penetrate into a patient's body to the site of a tumor that is to be destroyed through irradiation. However, substantial damage is still done to healthy tissue along the path of the incident proton beam, as much as 30% of that done at the tumor site. We propose a new concept for the production and delivery of energetic protons for use in medical radiotherapy, based upon the fact that low energy, ion-induced nuclear reactions can produce radiation products suitable for use in radiotherapy applications. By employing specially fabricated "conduit needles" to deliver beams of energetic ions to selected target materials plugging the end of the needle, ion beam-induced nuclear reactions can be generated at the needle tip, emitting reaction-specific radiation products directly at the tumor site. In this paper, we show that the 13.6 MeV protons produced by the d( 3He, p) 4He nuclear reaction can deliver a lethal dose (7 krad) of radiation to a 4.4 mm diameter sphere of tissue in only 30 s using a 1 μA, 800 keV 3He ion beam. If also proven clinically feasible, the use of low energy, ion-induced nuclear reactions would allow the utilization of relatively inexpensive, compact, low energy ion accelerators for proton radiotherapy and minimize unintended radiation damage to healthy tissue by providing much greater precision in controlling the irradiated volume.

  3. Measurement of ultra-low ion energy of decelerated ion beam using a deflecting electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thopan, P.; Suwannakachorn, D.; Tippawan, U.; Yu, L. D.

    2015-12-01

    In investigation on ultra-low-energy ion bombardment effect on DNA, an ion beam deceleration lens was developed for high-quality ultra-low-energy ion beam. Measurement of the ion energy after deceleration was necessary to confirm the ion beam really decelerated as theoretically predicted. In contrast to conventional methods, this work used a simple deflecting electrostatic field after the deceleration lens to bend the ion beam. The beam bending distance depended on the ion energy and was described and simulated. A system for the measurement of the ion beam energy was constructed. It consisted of a pair of parallel electrode plates to generate the deflecting electrical field, a copper rod measurement piece to detect ion beam current, a vernier caliper to mark the beam position, a stepping motor to translate the measurement rod, and a webcam-camera to read the beam bending distance. The entire system was installed after the ion-beam deceleration lens inside the large chamber of the bioengineering vertical ion beam line. Moving the measurement rod across the decelerated ion beam enabled to obtain beam profiles, from which the beam bending distance could be known and the ion beam energy could be calculated. The measurement results were in good agreement with theoretical and simulated results.

  4. Comparison between single- and dual-electrode ion source systems for low-energy ion transport

    SciTech Connect

    Vasquez, M. Jr.; Tokumura, S.; Kasuya, T.; Maeno, S.; Wada, M.

    2012-11-06

    Extraction of ions with energies below 100 eV has been demonstrated using a hot-cathode multi-cusp ion source equipped with extraction electrodes made of thin wires. Two electrode geometries, a single-electrode system, and a dual-electrode system were built and tested. The single-electrode configuration showed high ion beam current densities at shorter distances from the electrode but exhibited rapid attenuation as the distance from the electrode increased. Beam angular spread measurements showed similar beam divergence for both electrode configurations at low plasma densities. At high plasma densities and low extraction potentials, the single-electrode system showed the angular spread twice as large as that of the dual-electrode system. Energy distribution analyses showed a broader energy spread for ion beams extracted from a single-electrode set-up.

  5. Surface modification of structural materials by low-energy high-current pulsed electron beam treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Panin, A. V. E-mail: kms@ms.tsc.ru; Kazachenok, M. S. E-mail: kms@ms.tsc.ru; Sinyakova, E. A.; Borodovitsina, O. M.; Ivanov, Yu. F.; Leontieva-Smirnova, M. V.

    2014-11-14

    Microstructure formation in surface layers of pure titanium and ferritic-martensitic steel subjected to electron beam treatment is studied. It is shown that low energy high-current pulsed electron beam irradiation leads to the martensite structure within the surface layer of pure titanium. Contrary, the columnar ferrite grains grow during solidification of ferritic-martensitic steel. The effect of electron beam energy density on the surface morphology and microstructure of the irradiated metals is demonstrated.

  6. Modulator considerations for beam chopping in the low energy beam transport at the SSC Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, D.; Pappas, G.

    1991-06-01

    Beam chopping in the low energy transport line at the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory is accomplished using an electrostatic deflection system. LINAC requirements dictate the design of two modulators operating at 10 Hz with rise and fall times (as measured from approximately 10--99%) of {approximately}100 ns. Design of the first pulser, normally at 10 kV and pulsed to ground potential, utilizes a transformer-coupled diode-clamped solid state circuit to achieve the 2--35 {mu}s pulse width range required. The second pulser, which pulses from ground to approximately 7 kV, relies on a series vacuum tube circuit. The current designs, as well as recent test results and other circuit topologies considered, will be presented. 6 refs.

  7. High current ion beam transport using solenoids

    SciTech Connect

    Hollinger, R.; Spaedtke, P.

    2008-02-15

    In the framework of the future project FAIR several upgrade programs and construction of new facilities are in progress such as the U{sup 4+} upgrade for the existing high current injector and the new 70 MeV proton injector. For both injectors solenoids in the low energy beam transport section are foreseen to inject the beam into the following rf accelerator. The paper presents beam quality measurements of high current ion beams behind a solenoid using a slit-grid emittance measurement device, viewing targets, and a pepper pot measurement device at the high current test bench at GSI.

  8. Ion beam generating apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Brown, I.G.; Galvin, J.

    1987-12-22

    An ion generating apparatus utilizing a vacuum chamber, a cathode and an anode in the chamber. A source of electrical power produces an arc or discharge between the cathode and anode. The arc is sufficient to vaporize a portion of the cathode to form a plasma. The plasma is directed to an extractor which separates the electrons from the plasma, and accelerates the ions to produce an ion beam. 10 figs.

  9. Non-Gaussian beam dynamics in low energy antiproton storage rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resta-López, J.; Hunt, J. R.; Welsch, C. P.

    2016-10-01

    In low energy antiproton facilities, where electron cooling is fundamental, the cooling forces together with heating phenomena causing emittance blow-up, such as Intra Beam Scattering (IBS), result in highly non-Gaussian beam distributions. In these cases, a precise simulation of IBS effects is essential to realistically evaluate the long term beam evolution, taking into account the non-Gaussian characteristics of the beam. Here, we analyse the beam dynamics in the Extra Low ENergy Antiproton ring (ELENA), which is a new small synchrotron currently being constructed at CERN to decelerate antiprotons to energies as low as 100 keV. Simulations are performed using the code BETACOOL, comparing different models of IBS.

  10. Utilizing Neon Ion Microscope for GaSb nanopatterning studies: Nanostructure formation and comparison with low energy nanopatterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Atwani, Osman; Huynh, Chuong; Norris, Scott

    2016-05-01

    Low energy irradiation of GaSb surfaces has been shown to lead to nanopillar formation. Being performed ex-situ, controlling the parameters of the ion beam for controlled nanopattern formation is challenging. While mainly utilized for imaging and cutting purposes, the development of multibeam (helium/neon) ion microscopes has opened the path towards the use of these microscopes for in-situ ion irradiation and nanopatterning studies. In this study, in-situ irradiation (neon ions)/imaging (helium ions) of GaSb surfaces is performed using Carl Zeiss-neon ion microscope at low energies (5 and 10 keV). Imaging with helium ions, nanodots were shown to form at particular fluences after which are smoothed. Ex-situ imaging with SEM showed nanopore formation of size controlled by the ion energy and fluence. Compared to lower energy ex-situ neon ion irradiation at similar fluxes, where nanopillars are formed, the results demonstrated a transition in the nanostructure type and formation mechanism as the energy is changed from 2 to 5 keV. Simulations show an increase in the ballistic diffusion and a decrease in the strength of phase separation as a function of ion energy in agreement with the suppression of nanopillar formation at higher energies. Collision cascade simulations suggest a transition toward bulk-driven mechanisms.

  11. Low-energy neutrinos at off-axis from a standard beta beam

    SciTech Connect

    Lazauskas, R.; Volpe, C.; Balantekin, A. B.; Jesus, J. H. de

    2007-09-01

    We discuss a scenario to extract up to 150 MeV neutrinos at a standard beta-beam facility using one and two detectors off-axis. In particular we show that the high-energy component of the neutrino fluxes can be subtracted through a specific combination of the response of two off-axis detectors. A systematic analysis of the neutrino fluxes using different detector geometries is presented, as well as a comparison with the expected fluxes at a low-energy beta-beam facility. The presented option could offer an alternative way to perform low-energy neutrino experiments.

  12. Mechanism of Long-Range Penetration of Low-Energy Ions in Botanic Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Feng; Wang, Yu-Gang; Xue, Jian-Ming; Wang, Si-Xue; Du, Guang-Hua; Yan, Sha; Zhao, Wei-Jiang

    2002-03-01

    We present experimental evidence to reveal the mechanism of long-range penetration of low-energy ions in botanic samples. In the 100 keV Ar+ ion transmission measurement, the result confirmed that low-energy ions could penetrate at least 60 µm thick kidney bean slices with the probability of about 1.0×10-5. The energy spectrum of 1 MeV He+ ions penetrating botanic samples has shown that there is a peak of the count of ions with little energy loss. The probability of the low-energy ions penetrating the botanic sample is almost the same as that of the high-energy ions penetrating the same samples with little energy loss. The results indicate that there are some micro-regions with mass thickness less than the projectile range of low-energy ions in the botanic samples and they result in the long-range penetration of low-energy ions in botanic samples.

  13. Low-energy ion implantation: Large mass fractionation of argon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponganis, K. V.; Graf, TH.; Marti, K.

    1993-01-01

    The isotropic signatures of noble gases in the atmospheres of the Earth and other planets are considerably evolved when compared to signatures observed in the solar wind. The mechanisms driving the evolution of planetary volatiles from original compositions in the solar accretion disk are currently poorly understood. Modeling of noble-gas compositional histories requires knowledge of fractionating processes that may have operated through the evolutionary stages. Since these gases are chemically inert, information on noble-gas fractionation processes can be used as probes. The importance of understanding these processes extends well beyond 'noble-gas planetology.' Trapped argon acquired by low-energy implantation (approximately less than 100 eV) into solids is strongly mass fractionated (approximately greater than or equal to 3 percent/amu). This has potential implications for the origin and evolution of terrestrial planet atmospheres.

  14. Study on the Growth and the Photosynthetic Characteristics of Low Energy C+ Ion Implantation on Peanut

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yuguo; Xu, Lei; Yang, Peiling; Ren, Shumei

    2013-01-01

    Employing the Nonghua 5 peanut as experimental material, the effects of low energy C+ ion implantation on caulis height, root length, dry weight, photosynthetic characteristics and leaf water use efficiency (WUE) of Peanut Ml Generation were studied. Four fluences were observed in the experiment. The results showed that ion implantation harmed the peanut seeds because caulis height, root length and dry weight all were lower in the treatments than in CK, and the harm was aggravated with the increase of ion fluence. Both Pn and Tr show a saddle-shape curve due to midday depression of photosynthesis. Low fluence of low energy C+ ion implantation could increase the diurnal average Pn of peanut. The diurnal variation of Tr did not change as significantly as Pn. The light saturation point (LSP) was restrained by the ions. After low energy C+ ion implantation, WUE was enhanced. When the fluence increased to a certain level, the WUE began to decrease. PMID:23861939

  15. Ion Beam Simulator

    2005-11-08

    IBSimu(Ion Beam Simulator) is a computer program for making two and three dimensional ion optical simulations. The program can solve electrostatic field in a rectangular mesh using Poisson equation using Finite Difference method (FDM). The mesh can consist of a coarse and a fine part so that the calculation accuracy can be increased in critical areas of the geometry, while most of the calculation is done quickly using the coarse mesh. IBSimu can launch ionmore » beam trajectories into the simulation from an injection surface or fomo plasma. Ion beam space charge of time independent simulations can be taken in account using Viasov iteration. Plasma is calculated by compensating space charge with electrons having Boltzmann energy distribution. The simulation software can also be used to calculate time dependent cases if the space charge is not calculated. Software includes diagnostic tools for plotting the geometry, electric field, space charge map, ion beam trajectories, emittance data and beam profiles.« less

  16. The use of low energy, ion induced nuclear reactions for proton radiotherapy applications

    SciTech Connect

    Horn, K.M.; Doyle, B.; Segal, M.N.; Hamm, R.W.; Adler, R.J.; Glatstein, E.

    1995-04-01

    Medical radiotherapy has traditionally relied upon the use of external photon beams and internally implanted radioisotopes as the chief means of irradiating tumors. However, advances in accelerator technology and the exploitation of novel means of producing radiation may provide useful alternatives to some current modes of medical radiation delivery with reduced total dose to surrounding healthy tissue, reduced expense, or increased treatment accessibility. This paper will briefly overview currently established modes of radiation therapy, techniques still considered experimental but in clinical use, innovative concepts under study that may enable new forms of treatment or enhance existing ones. The potential role of low energy, ion-induced nuclear reactions in radiotherapy applications is examined specifically for the 650 keV d({sup 3}He,p){sup 4}He nuclear reaction. This examination will describe the basic physics associated with this reaction`s production of 17.4 MeV protons and the processes used to fabricate the necessary materials used in the technique. Calculations of the delivered radiation dose, heat generation, and required exposure times are presented. Experimental data are also presented validating the dose calculations. The design of small, lower cost ion accelerators, as embodied in `nested`-tandem and radio frequency quadrupole accelerators is examined, as is the potential use of high-output {sup 3}He and deuterium ion sources. Finally, potential clinical applications are discussed in terms of the advantages and disadvantages of this technique with respect to current radiotherapy methods and equipment.

  17. Effect of secondary electrons suppression on emittance measurement of an intense, low-energy beam

    SciTech Connect

    Weissman, L.

    2014-02-15

    Transversal emittance measurements of intense low-energy beams involve use of collimators. As most of the beam is stopped by a collimator, a question arises whether the special conditions in the vicinity of the collimator influence emittance measurement. In particular, the secondary electrons emitted from the slit surface may affect the measurement of the beam phase distribution. We have observed significant modification in the measured phase space distribution of a 5–6 mA DC proton beam at the Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility low-energy transport after application of a weak magnetic field in the plane of the slit collimator. The periphery region of the phase distribution was mostly affected. The overall effect on the emittance value was as large as 20%.

  18. Ion beam lithography system

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2005-08-02

    A maskless plasma-formed ion beam lithography tool provides for patterning of sub-50 nm features on large area flat or curved substrate surfaces. The system is very compact and does not require an accelerator column and electrostatic beam scanning components. The patterns are formed by switching beamlets on or off from a two electrode blanking system with the substrate being scanned mechanically in one dimension. This arrangement can provide a maskless nano-beam lithography tool for economic and high throughput processing.

  19. Low-energy neutrino-nucleus interactions and beta-beam neutrino

    SciTech Connect

    Jachowicz, N.; Pandey, V.

    2015-05-15

    We present an overview of neutrino-nucleus scattering at low energies with cross sections obtained within a continuum random phase approximation (CRPA) formalism. We highlight potential applications of beta-beam neutrino experiments for neutrino astrophysics. Our calculations are compared with MiniBooNe data at intermediate energies.

  20. Nonpropulsive applications of ion beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, W. R.

    1976-01-01

    Eight centimeter ion beam sources utilizing xenon and argon have been developed that operate over a wide range of beam energies and currents. Three types of processes have been studied: sputter deposition, ion beam machining, and ion beam surface texturing. The broad range of source operating conditions allows optimum sputter deposition of various materials. An ion beam source was used to ion mill laser reflection holograms using photoresist patterns on silicon. Ion beam texturing was tried with many materials and has a multitude of potential applications.

  1. A study of low-energy ion induced radiolysis of thiol-containing amino acid cysteine in the solid and aqueous solution states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Zhigang; Huang, Qing; Dang, Bingrong; Lu, Yilin; Yuan, Hang; Zhang, Shuqing; Yu, Zengliang

    2010-09-01

    The radiolysis of cysteine under plasma discharge and irradiation of low-energy ion beam was investigated. The damage of cysteine in aqueous solution under discharge was assessed via the acid ninhydrin reagent and the yield of cystine produced from the reaction was analyzed by FTIR. In addition, the generation of hydrogen sulfide was also identified. The destruction of solid cysteine under low-energy ion beam irradiation was estimated via monitoring IR bands of different functional groups (-SH, -NH 3, -COO -) of cysteine, and the production of cystine from ion-irradiated solid cysteine after dissolution in water was also verified. These results may help us to understand the inactivation of sulphydryl enzymes under direct and indirect interaction with the low-energy ion irradiation.

  2. Pulsed ion beam source

    DOEpatents

    Greenly, J.B.

    1997-08-12

    An improved pulsed ion beam source is disclosed having a new biasing circuit for the fast magnetic field. This circuit provides for an initial negative bias for the field created by the fast coils in the ion beam source which pre-ionize the gas in the source, ionize the gas and deliver the gas to the proper position in the accelerating gap between the anode and cathode assemblies in the ion beam source. The initial negative bias improves the interaction between the location of the nulls in the composite magnetic field in the ion beam source and the position of the gas for pre-ionization and ionization into the plasma as well as final positioning of the plasma in the accelerating gap. Improvements to the construction of the flux excluders in the anode assembly are also accomplished by fabricating them as layered structures with a high melting point, low conductivity material on the outsides with a high conductivity material in the center. 12 figs.

  3. Low energy ion distribution measurements in Madison Symmetric Torus plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titus, J. B.; Mezonlin, E. D.; Johnson, J. A.

    2014-06-01

    Charge-exchange neutrals contain information about the contents of a plasma and can be detected as they escape confinement. The Florida A&M University compact neutral particle analyzer (CNPA), used to measure the contents of neutral particle flux, has been reconfigured, calibrated, and installed on the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) for high temperature deuterium plasmas. The energy range of the CNPA has been extended to cover 0.34-5.2 keV through an upgrade of the 25 detection channels. The CNPA has been used on all types of MST plasmas at a rate of 20 kHz throughout the entire discharge (˜70 ms). Plasma parameter scans show that the ion distribution is most dependent on the plasma current. Magnetic reconnection events throughout these scans produce stronger poloidal electric fields, stronger global magnetic modes, and larger changes in magnetic energy all of which heavily influence the non-Maxwellian part of the ion distribution (the fast ion tail).

  4. Low energy ion distribution measurements in Madison Symmetric Torus plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Titus, J. B. Mezonlin, E. D.; Johnson, J. A.

    2014-06-15

    Charge-exchange neutrals contain information about the contents of a plasma and can be detected as they escape confinement. The Florida A and M University compact neutral particle analyzer (CNPA), used to measure the contents of neutral particle flux, has been reconfigured, calibrated, and installed on the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) for high temperature deuterium plasmas. The energy range of the CNPA has been extended to cover 0.34–5.2 keV through an upgrade of the 25 detection channels. The CNPA has been used on all types of MST plasmas at a rate of 20 kHz throughout the entire discharge (∼70 ms). Plasma parameter scans show that the ion distribution is most dependent on the plasma current. Magnetic reconnection events throughout these scans produce stronger poloidal electric fields, stronger global magnetic modes, and larger changes in magnetic energy all of which heavily influence the non-Maxwellian part of the ion distribution (the fast ion tail)

  5. Low-Energy Plasma Focus Device as an Electron Beam Source

    PubMed Central

    Seong Ling, Yap; Naresh Kumar, Nitturi; Lian Kuang, Lim; Chiow San, Wong

    2014-01-01

    A low-energy plasma focus device was used as an electron beam source. A technique was developed to simultaneously measure the electron beam intensity and energy. The system was operated in Argon filling at an optimum pressure of 1.7 mbar. A Faraday cup was used together with an array of filtered PIN diodes. The beam-target X-rays were registered through X-ray spectrometry. Copper and lead line radiations were registered upon usage as targets. The maximum electron beam charge and density were estimated to be 0.31 μC and 13.5 × 1016/m3, respectively. The average energy of the electron beam was 500 keV. The high flux of the electron beam can be potentially applicable in material sciences. PMID:25544952

  6. Simulation and measurement of the electrostatic beam kicker in the low-energy undulator test line.

    SciTech Connect

    Waldschmidt, G. J.

    1998-10-27

    An electrostatic kicker has been constructed for use in the Low-Energy Undulator Test Line (LEUTL) at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). The function of the kicker is to limit the amount of beam current to be accelerated by the APS linac. Two electrodes within the kicker create an electric field that adjusts the trajectory of the beam. This paper will explore the static fields that are set up between the offset electrode plates and determine the reaction of the beam to this field. The kicker was numerically simulated using the electromagnetic solver package MAFIA [1].

  7. Low-energy D+ and H+ ion irradiation effects on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kue Park, Jun; Won Lee, Kyu; Hee Han, Jun; Jung Kweon, Jin; Kim, Dowan; Eui Lee, Cheol; Lim, Sun-Taek; Kim, Gon-Ho; Noh, S. J.; Kim, H. S.

    2013-12-01

    We have investigated the low-energy (100 eV) D+ and H+ ion irradiation effects on the structural and chemical properties of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG). Structural disorder due to the ion irradiation was identified by the Raman spectroscopy, the D+ irradiation giving rise to greater structural disorder than the H+ irradiation. Only sp2 bonding was identified in the X-ray photoemission spectroscopy of the D+-irradiated HOPG, indicating no change in the surface chemical structure. The H+ irradiation, on the other hand, gave rise to sp3 bonding and π -π* transition, the sp3 bonding increasing with increasing irradiation dose. It is thus shown that the chemical properties of the HOPG surface may be sensitively modified by the low-energy H+ ion irradiation, but not by the low-energy D+ ion irradiation.

  8. Low Energy Sputtering Experiments for Ion Engine Lifetime Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duchemin Olivier B.; Polk, James E.

    1999-01-01

    The sputtering yield of molybdenum under xenon ion bombardment was measured using a Quartz Crystal Microbalance. The measurements were made for ion kinetic energies in the range 100-1keV on molybdenum films deposited by magnetron sputtering in conditions optimized to reproduce or approach bulk-like properties. SEM micrographs for different anode bias voltages during the deposition are compared, and four different methods were implemented to estimate the density of the molybdenum films. A careful discussion of the Quartz Crystal Microbalance is proposed and it is shown that this method can be used to measure mass changes that are distributed unevenly on the crystal electrode surface, if an analytical expression is known for the differential mass-sensitivity of the crystal and the erosion profile. Finally, results are presented that are in good agreement with previously published data, and it is concluded that this method holds the promise of enabling sputtering yield measurements at energies closer to the threshold energy in the very short term.

  9. Electron-beam diagnostic for space-charge measurement of an ion beam

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Prabir K.; Yu, Simon S.; Henestroza, Enrique; Eylon, Shmuel; Shuman, Derek B.; Ludvig, Jozsef; Bieniosek, Frank M.; Waldron, William L.; Greenway, Wayne G.; Vanecek, David L.; Hannink, Ryan; Amezcua, Monserrat

    2005-02-01

    A nonperturbing electron-beam diagnostic system for measuring the charge distribution of an ion beam is developed for heavy ion fusion beam physics studies. Conventional diagnostics require temporary insertion of sensors into the beam, but such diagnostics stop the beam, or significantly alter its properties. In this diagnostic a low energy, low current electron beam is swept transversely across the ion beam; the measured electron-beam deflection is used to infer the charge density profile of the ion beam. The initial application of this diagnostic is to the neutralized transport experiment (NTX), which is exploring the physics of space-charge-dominated beam focusing onto a small spot using a neutralizing plasma. Design and development of this diagnostic and performance with the NTX ion beamline is presented.

  10. Electron beam diagnostic for space charge measurement of an ion beam

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Prabir K.; Yu, Simon S.; Henestroza, Enrique; Eylon, Shmuel; Shuman, Derek B.; Ludvig, Jozsef; Bieniosek, Frank M.; Waldron, William L.; Greenway, Wayne G.; Vanecek, David L.; Hannink, Ryan; Amezcua, Monserrat

    2004-09-25

    A non-perturbing electron beam diagnostic system for measuring the charge distribution of an ion beam is developed for Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF) beam physics studies. Conventional diagnostics require temporary insertion of sensors into the beam, but such diagnostics stop the beam, or significantly alter its properties. In this diagnostic a low energy, low current electron beam is swept transversely across the ion beam; the measured electron beam deflection is used to infer the charge density profile of the ion beam. The initial application of this diagnostic is to the Neutralized Transport Experiment (NTX), which is exploring the physics of space-charge-dominated beam focusing onto a small spot using a neutralizing plasma. Design and development of this diagnostic and performance with the NTX ion beamline is presented.

  11. Solenoid Transport of an Intense Ion Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, J. E.; Henestroza, E.; Roy, P. K.; Waldron, W. L.; Armijo, J.; Baca, D.; Seidl, P. A.; Haber, I.; Sharp, W. M.; Vay, J. L.; Welch, D. R.

    2006-10-01

    Future WDM and HEDP experiments may use solenoids for transverse focusing of low energy, space-charge dominated ion beams during acceleration. An experiment to transport a 10 μs long, singly charged potassium ion bunch at an ion energy of 0.3 MeV and current of 45 mA through a solenoid lattice (STX) has been commissioned at LBNL. The beam should establish a Brillouin-flow condition, particle rotation at the Larmor frequency, with fields greater than 2T. The principal objectives of the STX are to match and transport the space-charge dominated ion beam and to study mechanisms that would degrade beam quality such as focusing-field aberrations, beam halo, spacing of lattice elements, and electron-cloud and gas effects. A qualitative comparison of experimental and calculated results are presented, which include time resolved transverse phase-space of the beam at different diagnostic planes throughout the focusing lattice, beam current density and beam-induced gas desorption, ionization and electron effects. (This work was supported by the U.S. D.O.E. under DE-AC02-05H11231)

  12. Low energy ions in the heavy ions in space (HIIS) experiment on LDEF.

    PubMed

    Kleis, T; Tylka, A J; Boberg, P R; Adams, J H; Beahm, L P

    1996-01-01

    We present data from the Lexan top stacks in the Heavy Ions In Space (HIIS) experiment which was flown for six years (April 1984-Jan 1990) onboard the LDEF spacecraft in 28.5 degrees orbit at about 476 km altitude. HIIS was built of passive (i.e. no timing resolution) plastic track detectors which collected particles continuously over the entire mission. In this paper we present data on low energy heavy ions (10 < or = Z, 20MeV/nuc < E < 200 MeV/nuc). These ions are far below the geomagnetic cutoff for fully ionized ions in the LDEF orbit even after taking into account the severe cutoff suppression caused by occasional large geomagnetic storms during the LDEF mission. Our preliminary results indicate an unusual elemental composition of trapped particles in the inner magnetosphere during the LDEF mission, including both trapped anomalous cosmic ray species (Ne, Ar) and other elements (such as Mg and Fe) which are not found in the anomalous component of cosmic rays. The origin of the non-anomalous species is not understood, but they may be associated with the solar energetic particle events and geomagnetic disturbances of 1989.

  13. Performance Studies of the Vibration Wire Monitor on the Test Stand with Low Energy Electron Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okabe, Kota; Yoshimoto, Masahiro; Kinsho, Michikazu

    In the high intensity proton accelerator as the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) accelerators, serious radiation and residual dose is induced by a small beam loss such a beam halo. Therefore, diagnostics of the beam halo formation is one of the most important issues to control the beam loss. For the beam halo monitor, the vibration wire monitor (VWM) has a potential for investigating the beam halo and weak beam scanning. The VWM has a wide dynamic range, high resolution and the VWM is not susceptible to secondary electrons and electric noises. We have studied the VWM features as a new beam-halo monitor on the test stand with low energy electron gun. The frequency shift of the irradiated vibration wire was confirmed about wire material and the electron beam profile measured by using the VWM was consistent with the results of the Faraday cup measurement. Also we calculated a temperature distribution on the vibration wire which is irradiated by the electron beam with the numerical simulation. The simulations have been fairly successful in reproducing the transient of the irradiated vibration wire frequency measured by test stand experiments. In this paper, we will report a result of performance evaluation for the VWM on the test stands and discuss the VWM for beam halo diagnostic

  14. Tumortherapy with ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraft, G.; Heary Ion Therapy Collaboration

    2000-11-01

    Beams of heavy-charged particles like protons or carbon ions represent the optimum tool for the treatment of deep-seated inoperable tumors: in contrast to the conventionally used photons the dose increases along with the penetration depth through the body, culminating in a sharp maximum at the end of the particle range. In order to achieve a precisely conform irradiation of the selected target volume, this maximum can be shifted in depth by energy variation and distributed laterally through magnetic deflection of the particle beam. Because carbon ions have a lateral scattering of only about 1 mm at 10 cm depth they offer the most conform irradiation. In addition to this excellent physical selectivity the biological efficiency concerning cell killing increases towards the end of the carbon ions' range. Therefore, the increase in dose is potentiated by an increase in biological efficiency. Finally, the stopping of the carbon ions can be monitored by tracing a small amount of β + active 10C and 11C ions which are produced in nuclear reactions with atoms of the penetrated tissue. This β + distribution can be visualized by applying PET-techniques, thus allowing a good control of the beam distribution. At GSI Darmstadt a heavy-ion therapy unit has been designed and constructed in collaboration with the Radiological Clinic and the DKFZ Heidelberg and the FZR Dresden. The layout of this facility as well as the treatment of now more than 30 patients will be reported on. The proposal for the layout of a dedicated medical facility at Heidelberg will be presented

  15. Introduction to Ion Beam Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Martisikova, Maria

    2010-01-05

    Presently, ion beam therapy reaches an increasing interest within the field of radiation therapy, which is caused by the promising clinical results obtained in the last decades. Ion beams enable higher dose conformation to the tumor and increased sparing of the surrounding tissue in comparison to the standard therapy using high energy photons. Heavy ions, like carbon, offer in addition increased biological effectiveness, which makes them suitable for treatment of radioresistant tumors. This contribution gives an overview over the physical and biological properties of ion beams. Common fundamental principles of ion beam therapy are summarized and differences between standard therapy with high energy photons, proton and carbon ion therapy are discussed. The technologies used for the beam production and delivery are introduced, with emphasis to the differences between passive and active beam delivery systems. The last part concentrates on the quality assurance in ion therapy. Specialties of dosimetry in medical ion beams are discussed.

  16. Ion beam sputter etching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Rutledge, Sharon K.

    1986-01-01

    An ion beam etching process which forms extremely high aspect ratio surface microstructures using thin sputter masks is utilized in the fabrication of integrated circuits. A carbon rich sputter mask together with unmasked portions of a substrate is bombarded with inert gas ions while simultaneous carbon deposition occurs. The arrival of the carbon deposit is adjusted to enable the sputter mask to have a near zero or even slightly positive increase in thickness with time while the unmasked portions have a high net sputter etch rate.

  17. Low-Energy E-Beam Proximity Lithography (LEEPL): Is the Simplest the Best?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utsumi, Takao

    1999-12-01

    Low-energy e-beam proximity lithography (LEEPL) is proposed as the simplest integrated circuit lithography for minimum feature sizes ≤0.1 µm. This new e-beam lithography is similar to 1× X-ray proximity lithography except that the X-ray beam is replaced with a beam of low-energy electrons of 2 kV. This low e-beam energy permits the use of single-crystal 0.5-µm-thick silicon stencil masks without an absorbing metal layer of high atomic number. This membrane mask is thick enough for good heat conduction and thin enough for feature sizes ≤0.1 µm. Mask distortion caused by fabrication can be corrected by a fine-tuning deflector. Therefore, a mask with a residual distortion of more than 100 nm is acceptable. This eliminates the main difficulty of X-ray proximity lithography. The proposed system is not affected by a space-charge effect in the electron optics column, and a proximity effect with respect to both wafer and mask writings, and it is fundamentally low-power lithography which needs no special cooling system. The analysis shows that the e-beam column can be made entirely of electrostatic components to achieve sufficient resolution. For an appropriate resist process for this low-energy e-beam, we propose a bilayer process such as the chemical amplification of resist lines (CARL) process which consists of a chemically amplified thin deep ultraviolet (DUV) photoresist and a thick planarizing layer as a starting point. We estimated a throughput of about 40 12 inch wafers per hour and a resolution of a significantly less than 50 nm.

  18. Use of low energy hydrogen ion implants in high efficiency crystalline silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fonash, S. J.; Singh, R.

    1985-01-01

    This program is a study of the use of low energy hydrogen ion implantation for high efficiency crystalline silicon solar cells. The first quarterly report focuses on two tasks of this program: (1) an examination of the effects of low energy hydrogen implants on surface recombination speed; and (2) an examination of the effects of hydrogen on silicon regrowth and diffusion in silicon. The first part of the project focussed on the measurement of surface properties of hydrogen implanted silicon. Low energy hydrogen ions when bombarded on the silicon surface will create structural damage at the surface, deactivate dopants and introduce recombination centers. At the same time the electrically active centers such as dangling bonds will be passivated by these hydrogen ions. Thus hydrogen is expected to alter properties such as the surface recombination velocity, dopant profiles on the emitter, etc. In this report the surface recombination velocity of a hydrogen emplanted emitter was measured.

  19. Nuclear Astrophysics Programs with Low-Energy RI Beams at CRIB

    SciTech Connect

    Kubono, S.; Binh, Dam N.; Hayakawa, S.; Hashimoto, T.; Kahl, D. M.; Yamaguchi, H.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Teranishi, T.; Iwasa, N.; Komatsubara, T.; Kato, S.; Khiem, Le H.

    2010-04-30

    Nuclear astrophysics activities with CNS RI beam separator (CRIB) are reported together with the present status of the CRIB facility which is supported by the AVF upgrade project for the total development of the low-energy RIB facility. The activities include direct and indirect measurements of stellar reactions especially relevant to explosive burning processes such as nova and supernovae. Some recent results are discussed together with a scope of the facility.

  20. Nuclear Astrophysics Programs with Low-Energy RI Beams at CRIB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubono, S.; Binh, Dam N.; Hayakawa, S.; Hashimoto, T.; Kahl, D. M.; Yamaguchi, H.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Teranishi, T.; Iwasa, N.; Komatsubara, T.; Kato, S.; Khiem, Le H.

    2010-04-01

    Nuclear astrophysics activities with CNS RI beam separator (CRIB) are reported together with the present status of the CRIB facility which is supported by the AVF upgrade project for the total development of the low-energy RIB facility. The activities include direct and indirect measurements of stellar reactions especially relevant to explosive burning processes such as nova and supernovae. Some recent results are discussed together with a scope of the facility.

  1. Effect of low energy ion irradiation on CdTe crystals: Luminescence enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Olvera, J.; Plaza, J. L.; Dios, S. de; Dieguez, E.; Martinez, O.; Avella, M.

    2010-12-15

    In this work we show that low energy ion sputtering is a very efficient technique as a cleaning process for CdTe substrates. We demonstrate, by using several techniques like grazing-angle x-ray diffraction, cathodoluminescence, microluminescence, and micro-Raman spectroscopy that the luminescent properties of CdTe substrates can be very much increased when CdTe surfaces are irradiated with low energy Argon ions. We postulate that this enhancement is mainly due to the removal of surface damage induced by the cutting and polishing processes. The formation of a low density of nonluminescent aggregates after the sputtering process has also been observed.

  2. Manipulating a neutrino spectrum to maximize the physics potential from a low-energy {beta} beam

    SciTech Connect

    Amanik, Philip S.; McLaughlin, Gail C.

    2007-06-15

    Proposed low-energy {beta}-beam facilities would be capable of producing intense beams of neutrinos (antineutrinos) with well-defined spectra. We present analytic expressions and numerical results that accurately show how the total neutrino flux reaching the detector depends on the geometry of the source and the detector. Several authors have proposed measurements which require using different flux shapes. We show that detectors of different sizes and shapes will receive neutrino fluxes with different spectral shapes and that the spectral shape will also be different in different regions of the same detector. Our findings also show that for certain measurements, systematic uncertainties and run time can be reduced.

  3. Low-Energy Electrons Emitted in Ion Collisions with Thin Foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraemer, Michael; Kozhuharov, Christophor; Durante, Marco; Hagmann, Siegbert; Kraft, Gerhard; Lineva, Natallia

    The realistic description of radiation damage after charged particle passage is an ongoing issue for both radiotherapy as well as space applications. In both areas of applied radiological science, living as well as nonliving matter is exposed to ionizing radiation, and it is of vital interest to predict the responses of structures like cells, detectors or electronic devices. In ion beam radiotherapy, for example, the Local Effect Model (LEM) is being used to calculate radiobiological effects with so far unprecedented versatility. This has been shown in the GSI radiotherapy pilot project and consequently this model has become the "industry standard" for treatment planning in subsequent commercial ion radiotherapy sites. The model has also been extended to nonliving matter, i.e. to describe the response of solid state detectors such as TLDs and films. A prerequisite for this model (and possibly similar ones) is the proper description of microscopic track structure and energy deposition. In particular, the area at a very low distance (¡20 nm) from the ion path needs special attention due to the locally very high dose and the rather limited experimental evidence for the shape of the dose distribution. The dose distribution at low distances is inevitably associated with the creation and transport of low-energy (sub-keV) electrons. While some data, elementary cross sections as well as dose distributions, exist for gaseous media, i.e. under single collision conditions, experimental data for the condensed phase are scarce. We have, therefore, launched a project aimed at systematic research of the energy and angular distributions of low-energy (sub-keV) electrons emitted from solids. These investigations com-prise creation as well as transport of low-energy electrons under multiple collision conditions and hence require accounting for the properties of the target, both bulk and surface, i.e. for the inherent inhomogeneity of the thickness and for the surface roughness. To

  4. Heavy ion beam probing

    SciTech Connect

    Hickok, R L

    1980-07-01

    This report consists of the notes distributed to the participants at the IEEE Mini-Course on Modern Plasma Diagnostics that was held in Madison, Wisconsin in May 1980. It presents an overview of Heavy Ion Beam Probing that briefly describes the principles and discuss the types of measurements that can be made. The problems associated with implementing beam probes are noted, possible variations are described, estimated costs of present day systems, and the scaling requirements for large plasma devices are presented. The final chapter illustrates typical results that have been obtained on a variety of plasma devices. No detailed calculations are included in the report, but a list of references that will provide more detailed information is included.

  5. Study of Biological Effects of Low Energy Ion Implantation on Tomato and Radish Breeding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Qiuxia; Huang, Qunce; Cao, Gangqiang; Ying, Fangqing; Liu, Yanbo; Huang, Wen

    2008-04-01

    Biological effects of 30 keV low energy nitrogen ion implantation on the seeds of five types of tomato and one type of radish were investigated. Results showed that low energy ions have different effects on different vegetables. The whole dose-response curve of the germination ratio did not take on "the shape of saddle", but was a rising and falling waveform with the increase or decrease in ion implantation. In the vegetable of Solanaceae, two outstanding aberrant plants were selected from M1 of Henan No.4 tomato at a dose of 7 × 1017 nitrogen ions/cm2, which had thin-leaves, long-petal and nipple tip fruit stably inherited to M7. Furthermore the analysis of the isozyme showed that the activity of the mutant tomato seedling was distinct in quantity and color. In Raphanus sativus L., the aberrances were obvious in the mutant of radish 791 at a dose of 5 × 1017 nitrogen ions/cm2, and the weight of succulent root and the volume of growth were over twice the control's. At present, many species for breeding have been identified in the field and only stable species have been selected for the experiment of production. It is evident that the low energy ion implantation technology has clear effects on vegetables' genetic improvement.

  6. Low-energy nuclear reaction studies with RI beams in nuclear astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubono, S.; Teranishi, T.; Kato, S.

    2003-07-01

    After a brief discussion on the recent development in nuclear astrophysics, two reaction studies of typical astrophysical reactions at low energies where nuclear reactions play the main contributions to the nucleosynthesis in the universe, are discussed. One is the proton capture reaction, 11C(p, γ)12N, studied by the direct method using a 11C beam produced with a new low-energy RIB separator CRIB at CNS, Japan. The second one is the 13C(α, n)16O rearrangement reaction, which is believed to be the main neutron source for the s-process at low temperatures, investigated by an indirect method using the direct α-transfer reaction 13C(6Li, d)17O. Detailed investigations are suggested on the nuclear reactions relevant.

  7. Emittance and Energy Measurements of Low-Energy Electron Beam Using Optical Transition Radiation Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, Fumito; Iijima, Hokuto; Dobashi, Katsuhiro; Imai, Takayuki; Ueda, Toru; Watanabe, Takahiro; Uesaka, Mitsuru

    2005-03-01

    Emittance and energy of an electron beam in the range of 8 to 22 MeV were measured via optical transition radiation (OTR) techniques. The beam divergence effect on observations of the far-field OTR image at low energies was studied by means of numerical analysis. The numerical analysis indicates that if the beam divergence is under 1.5 mrad, a simultaneous single-shot measurement of emittance and energy is possible. The results of the single-shot experiment agree with independent measurements conducted using the quadrupole scan method and an electron spectrometer. The experiments were performed with an S-band linac at the Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, The University of Tokyo (UTNL).

  8. Effect of Low-Energy Ions on Plasma-Enhanced Deposition of Cubic Boron Nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torigoe, M.; Fukui, S.; Teii, K.; Matsumoto, S.

    2015-09-01

    The effect of low-energy ions on deposition of cubic boron nitride (cBN) films in an inductively coupled plasma with the chemistry of fluorine is studied in terms of ion energy, ion flux, and ion to boron flux ratio onto the substrate. The ion energy and the ion to boron flux ratio are determined from the sheath potential and the ratio of incident ion flux to net deposited boron flux, respectively. For negative substrate biases where sp2-bonded BN phase only or no deposit is formed, both the ion energy and the ion to boron flux ratio are high. For positive substrate biases where cBN phase is formed, the ion energy and the ion to boron flux ratio are estimated in the range of a few eV to 35 eV and 100 to 130, respectively. The impact of negative ions is presumed to be negligible due to their low kinetic energy relative to the sheath potential over the substrate surface. The impact of positive ions with high ion to boron flux ratios is primarily responsible for reduction of the ion energy for cBN film deposition. Work supported in part by a Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (B), a Funding Program for Next Generation World-Leading Researchers, and an Industrial Technology Research Grant Program 2008.

  9. A transverse emittance and acceptance measurement system in a low-energy beam transport line

    SciTech Connect

    Kashiwagi, H. Miyawaki, N.; Kurashima, S.; Okumura, S.

    2014-02-15

    A transverse beam emittance and acceptance measurement system has been developed to visualize the relationship between the injected beam emittance and the acceptance of a cyclotron. The system is composed of a steering magnet, two pairs of slits to limit the horizontal and vertical phase-space, a beam intensity detector just behind the slits for the emittance measurement, and a beam intensity detector in the cyclotron for the acceptance measurement. The emittance is obtained by scanning the slits and measuring the beam intensity distribution. The acceptance is obtained by measuring the distribution of relative beam transmission by injecting small emittance beams at various positions in a transverse phase-space using the slits. In the acceptance measurement, the beam from an ion source is deflected to the defined region by the slits using the steering magnet so that measurable acceptance area covers a region outside the injection beam emittance. Measurement tests were carried out under the condition of accelerating a beam of {sup 16}O{sup 6+} from 50.2 keV to 160 MeV. The emittance of the injected beam and the acceptance for accelerating and transporting the beam to the entrance of the extraction deflector were successfully measured. The relationship between the emittance and acceptance is visualized by displaying the results in the same phase-plane.

  10. Surface Modifications Induced by High Fluxes of Low Energy Helium Ions

    PubMed Central

    Tanyeli, İrem; Marot, Laurent; Mathys, Daniel; van de Sanden, Mauritius C. M.; De Temmerman, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Several metal surfaces, such as titanium, aluminum and copper, were exposed to high fluxes (in the range of 1023 m−2s−1) of low energy (<100 eV) Helium (He) ions. The surfaces were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy and to get a better understanding on morphology changes both top view and cross sectional images were taken. Different surface modifications, such as voids and nano pillars, are observed on these metals. The differences and similarities in the development of surface morphologies are discussed in terms of the material properties and compared with the results of similar experimental studies. The results show that He ions induced void growth and physical sputtering play a significant role in surface modification using high fluxes of low energy He ions. PMID:25919912

  11. A Kinematically Beamed, Low Energy Pulsed Neutron Source for Active Interrogation

    SciTech Connect

    Dietrich, D; Hagmann, C; Kerr, P; Nakae, L; Rowland, M; Snyderman, N; Stoeffl, W; Hamm, R

    2004-10-07

    We are developing a new active interrogation system based on a kinematically focused low energy neutron beam. The key idea is that one of the defining characteristics of SNM (Special Nuclear Materials) is the ability for low energy or thermal neutrons to induce fission. Thus by using low energy neutrons for the interrogation source we can accomplish three goals, (1) Energy discrimination allows us to measure the prompt fast fission neutrons produced while the interrogation beam is on; (2) Neutrons with an energy of approximately 60 to 100 keV do not fission 238U and Thorium, but penetrate bulk material nearly as far as high energy neutrons do and (3) below about 100keV neutrons lose their energy by kinematical collisions rather than via the nuclear (n,2n) or (n,n') processes thus further simplifying the prompt neutron induced background. 60 keV neutrons create a low radiation dose and readily thermal capture in normal materials, thus providing a clean spectroscopic signature of the intervening materials. The kinematically beamed source also eliminates the need for heavy backward and sideway neutron shielding. We have designed and built a very compact pulsed neutron source, based on an RFQ proton accelerator and a lithium target. We are developing fast neutron detectors that are nearly insensitive to the ever-present thermal neutron and neutron capture induced gamma ray background. The detection of only a few high energy fission neutrons in time correlation with the linac pulse will be a clear indication of the presence of SNM.

  12. Prototyping of beam position monitor for medium energy beam transport section of RAON heavy ion accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Hyojae; Jin, Hyunchang; Jang, Ji-Ho; Hong, In-Seok

    2016-02-01

    A heavy ion accelerator, RAON is going to be built by Rare Isotope Science Project in Korea. Its target is to accelerate various stable ions such as uranium, proton, and xenon from electron cyclotron resonance ion source and some rare isotopes from isotope separation on-line. The beam shaping, charge selection, and modulation should be applied to the ions from these ion sources because RAON adopts a superconducting linear accelerator structure for beam acceleration. For such treatment, low energy beam transport, radio frequency quadrupole, and medium energy beam transport (MEBT) will be installed in injector part of RAON accelerator. Recently, development of a prototype of stripline beam position monitor (BPM) to measure the position of ion beams in MEBT section is under way. In this presentation, design of stripline, electromagnetic (EM) simulation results, and RF measurement test results obtained from the prototyped BPM will be described.

  13. Generation of a pulsed low-energy electron beam using the channel spark device

    SciTech Connect

    Elgarhy, M. A. I. Hassaballa, S. E.; Rashed, U. M.; ElSabbagh, M. M.; Saudy, A. H.; Soliman, H. M.

    2015-12-15

    For the generation of low-energy electron beam, the design and characteristics of channel spark discharge (CSD) operating at a low voltage are presented in this paper. The discharge voltage, discharge current, X-ray emissions, and electron beam current were experimentally determined. The effects of the applied voltage, working gas pressure, and external capacitance on the CSD and beam parameters were measured. At an applied voltage of 11 kV, an oxygen gas pressure of 25 mTorr, and an external capacitance of 16.45 nF, the maximum measured current was 900 A. The discharge current increased with the increase in the pressure and capacitance, while its periodic time decreased with the increase in the pressure. Two types of the discharge were identified and recorded: the hollow cathode discharge and the conduction discharge. A Faraday cup was used to measure the beam current. The maximum measured beam current was 120 A, and the beam signal exhibited two peaks. The increase in both the external capacitance and the applied discharge voltage increased the maximum electron beam current. The electron-beam pulse time decreased with the increase in the gas pressure at a constant voltage and increased with the decrease in the applied discharge voltage. At an applied voltage of 11 kV and an oxygen gas pressure of 15 mTorr, the maximum beam energy was 2.8 keV. The X-ray signal intensity decreased with the increase in the gas pressure and increased with the increase in the capacitance.

  14. Generation of a pulsed low-energy electron beam using the channel spark device.

    PubMed

    Elgarhy, M A I; Hassaballa, S E; Rashed, U M; ElSabbagh, M M; Soliman, H M; Saudy, A H

    2015-12-01

    For the generation of low-energy electron beam, the design and characteristics of channel spark discharge (CSD) operating at a low voltage are presented in this paper. The discharge voltage, discharge current, X-ray emissions, and electron beam current were experimentally determined. The effects of the applied voltage, working gas pressure, and external capacitance on the CSD and beam parameters were measured. At an applied voltage of 11 kV, an oxygen gas pressure of 25 mTorr, and an external capacitance of 16.45 nF, the maximum measured current was 900 A. The discharge current increased with the increase in the pressure and capacitance, while its periodic time decreased with the increase in the pressure. Two types of the discharge were identified and recorded: the hollow cathode discharge and the conduction discharge. A Faraday cup was used to measure the beam current. The maximum measured beam current was 120 A, and the beam signal exhibited two peaks. The increase in both the external capacitance and the applied discharge voltage increased the maximum electron beam current. The electron-beam pulse time decreased with the increase in the gas pressure at a constant voltage and increased with the decrease in the applied discharge voltage. At an applied voltage of 11 kV and an oxygen gas pressure of 15 mTorr, the maximum beam energy was 2.8 keV. The X-ray signal intensity decreased with the increase in the gas pressure and increased with the increase in the capacitance. PMID:26724026

  15. Overview of Alternative Bunching and Current-shaping Techniques for Low-Energy Electron Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Piot, Philippe

    2015-12-01

    Techniques to bunch or shape an electron beam at low energies (E <15 MeV) have important implications toward the realization of table-top radiation sources [1] or to the design of compact multi-user free-electron lasers[2]. This paper provides an overview of alternative methods recently developed including techniques such as wakefield-based bunching, space-charge-driven microbunching via wave-breaking [3], ab-initio shaping of the electron-emission process [4], and phase space exchangers. Practical applications of some of these methods to foreseen free-electron-laser configurations are also briefly discussed [5].

  16. Corneal surgery by two-dimensional scanning of a low-energy excimer laser beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unkroth, Angela; Pachomis, Karin; Walther, Jens-Uwe; Zimare, D.

    1994-06-01

    We describe a new multipurpose maskless method of corneal surgery based on the point-by-point scanning of a focused laser beam which allows the application of a low-energy excimer laser. The crucial scanning parameters to achieve a smooth corneal surface have been investigated. A computer program for the simulation and optimization of the point-by-point scanning process has been developed and tested on contact lenses consisting of PMMA. In addition, a method of measuring the eye-movement by means of the computer-assisted interpretation of photographs was proved for its application in an eye-tracking-system.

  17. Improvement in both giant magnetoresistance and exchange bias through hydrogen ion irradiation at low energy

    SciTech Connect

    Shim, Jaechul; Han, Yoonsung; Lee, Jinwon; Hong, Jongill

    2008-09-01

    Irradiation of IrMn-based spin valves with 550 eV hydrogen ions increased their giant magnetoresistance and exchange bias by 20% and 60%, respectively. This significant enhancement stems from the strong (111) texture and small mosaic spread of the IrMn antiferromagnet that resulted from the microstructural reconstruction caused by the energy transfer during the bombardment by hydrogen ions, as well as by the narrow dispersion in the exchange bias. Irradiation with the hydrogen ion at low energy can improve the properties of spin valves without resulting in undue degradation in the performance or the microstructure.

  18. Fermilab HINS Proton Ion Source Beam Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Tam, W.M.; Apollinari, G.; Chaurize, S.; Hays, S.; Romanov, G.; Scarpine, V.; Schmidt, C.; Webber, R.; /Fermilab

    2009-05-01

    The proton ion source for the High Intensity Neutrino Source (HINS) Linac front-end at Fermilab has been successfully commissioned. It produces a 50 keV, 3 msec beam pulse with a peak current greater than 20mA at 2.5Hz. The beam is transported to the radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) by a low energy beam transport (LEBT) that consists of two focusing solenoids, four steering dipole magnets and a beam current transformer. To understand beam transmission through the RFQ, it is important to characterize the 50 keV beam before connecting the LEBT to the RFQ. A wire scanner and a Faraday cup are temporarily installed at the exit of the LEBT to study the beam parameters. Beam profile measurements are made for different LEBT settings and results are compared to those from computer simulations. In lieu of direct emittance measurements, solenoid variation method based on profile measurements is used to reconstruct the beam emittance.

  19. Production of energetic neutral particles and low energy electrons from four anode rods ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Mostafa, O. A.; El-Khabeary, H.; Abdel Reheem, A. M.

    2013-11-15

    The factors affecting the energetic neutral current, the low energy electron current, and the positive ion current emerging from a four-anode-rods ion source have been studied using argon gas. The neutral and electron current were measured using a simple, new technique. It was found that the energetic neutral current and the electron current depend on the positive ion current and the gas pressure. The ratio of the neutral and electron current to the positive ion current increases by increasing the gas pressure. Also it was found that at a pressure equal to 9 × 10{sup −4} mmHg, the ratio of the neutral to the positive ion current reaches 2.34 while the ratio of the electron current to the positive ion current reaches 1.7.

  20. Elemental Discrimination of Low-energy Ions Using Risetime Analysis of Silicon-strip Detector Signals

    SciTech Connect

    Bardayan, Daniel W; Moazen, Brian; Pain, Steven D; Smith, Michael Scott

    2009-01-01

    To make measurements with the intense (but often contaminated) radioactive beams available today, one often needs to identify the reaction products to determine the events of interest. The low energies required for many astrophysics measurements make impossible the use of traditional energy loss techniques, and additional constraints are required. We demonstrate a simple technique to measure the risetimes of silicon strip-detector signals and show partial discrimination can be obtained even at energies below 1 MeV/u.

  1. LEIC - A Polarized Low Energy Electron-ion Collider at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Derbenev, Yaroslav S.; Hutton, Andrew M.; Krafft, Geoffrey A.; Li, Rui; Lin, Fanglei; Morozov, Vasiliy; Nissen, Edward W.; Yunn, Byung C.; Zhang, He; Sullivan, Michael K.; Zhang, Yuhong

    2013-06-01

    A polarized electron-ion collider is envisioned as the future nuclear science program at JLab beyond the 12 GeV CEBAF. Presently, a medium energy collider (MEIC) is set as an immediate goal with options for a future energy upgrade. A comprehensive design report for MEIC has been released recently. The MEIC facility could also accommodate electron and proton/ion collisions in a low CM energy range, covering proton energies from 10 to 25 GeV and ion energies with a similar magnetic rigidity, for additional science reach. In this paper, we present a conceptual design of this low energy collider, LEIC, showing its luminosity can reach above 10{sup 33} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. The design specifies that the large booster of the MEIC is converted to a low energy ion collider ring with an interaction region and an electron cooler integrated into it. The design provides options for either sharing the detector with the MEIC or a dedicated low energy detector in a third collision point, with advantages of either a minimum cost or extra detection parallel to the MEIC operation, respectively. The LEIC could be positioned as the first and low cost phase of a multi-stage approach to realize the full MEIC.

  2. Effect of low energy ion irradiation on the transport and structural behavior of PEDOT:PSS systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shilpa, S.; Venkatachalaiah, K. N.; Damle, R.; Kumar, Pravin; Kanjilal, D.; Kumaraswamy, G. N.

    2016-05-01

    In the past two decades, organic conductors have been widely explored for use in different applications. One of the extensively studied organic material for the use in the field of electronic devices is PEDOT:PSS. Organic/inorganic nanocomposite systems have been developed to improve the properties of organic materials. In the present study, we have made an attempt to understand the effect of low energy oxygen ion beam irradiation on the electrical and structural properties of PEDOT:PSS and PEDOT:PSS/TiO2 nanocomposites. The observed reduction in electrical properties in PEDOT:PSS systems may be linked to radiation induced phase change. The nanocomposite systems show better stability to the ion irradiation compared to the pure systems.

  3. Electrical and optoelectrical modification of cadmium sulfide nanobelts by low-energy electron beam irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lijie; Liu, Manman; Zhao, Mei; Dong, Youqing; Zou, Chao; Yang, Keqin; Yang, Yun; Huang, Shaoming; Zhu, Da-Ming

    2016-09-01

    In this report, we describe a method for modifying electrical and optoelectrical properties of CdS nanobelts using low-energy (lower than 10 keV) e-beam irradiation in a scanning electron microscope. The electrical conductivity of the nanobelts was dramatically improved via the irradiation of e-beams. The modified conductivity of the nanobelts depends on the energy of the e-beam; it exhibits a larger photocurrent and higher external quantum efficiency but slower time-response than that before the modification. A possible mechanism about the modification is the increase of electron accumulation (injected electrons) in the nanobelts due to e-beam irradiation. In addition, the optoelectrical modification could be caused by the trapped electrons in the nanobelts and the decrease of contact resistance between the nanobelts and metal electrodes induced by e-beam irradiation. The results of this work are significant for the in situ study of semiconductor nanostructures in the electron microscope. Besides, the method of electrical and optoelectrical modification presented here has potential application in electronics and optoelectronics.

  4. Electrical and optoelectrical modification of cadmium sulfide nanobelts by low-energy electron beam irradiation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lijie; Liu, Manman; Zhao, Mei; Dong, Youqing; Zou, Chao; Yang, Keqin; Yang, Yun; Huang, Shaoming; Zhu, Da-Ming

    2016-09-30

    In this report, we describe a method for modifying electrical and optoelectrical properties of CdS nanobelts using low-energy (lower than 10 keV) e-beam irradiation in a scanning electron microscope. The electrical conductivity of the nanobelts was dramatically improved via the irradiation of e-beams. The modified conductivity of the nanobelts depends on the energy of the e-beam; it exhibits a larger photocurrent and higher external quantum efficiency but slower time-response than that before the modification. A possible mechanism about the modification is the increase of electron accumulation (injected electrons) in the nanobelts due to e-beam irradiation. In addition, the optoelectrical modification could be caused by the trapped electrons in the nanobelts and the decrease of contact resistance between the nanobelts and metal electrodes induced by e-beam irradiation. The results of this work are significant for the in situ study of semiconductor nanostructures in the electron microscope. Besides, the method of electrical and optoelectrical modification presented here has potential application in electronics and optoelectronics. PMID:27561004

  5. Reconstructing supernova-neutrino spectra using low-energy beta beams.

    PubMed

    Jachowicz, N; McLaughlin, G C

    2006-05-01

    Neutrinos are the principal messengers reaching us from the center of a supernova. Terrestrial neutrino telescopes can provide precious information about the processes in the core of the star. But the information that a neutrino detector can supply is restricted by the fact that little experimental data on the neutrino-nucleus cross sections exist and by the uncertainties in theoretical calculations. In this Letter, we propose a novel procedure that determines the response of a target nucleus in a supernova-neutrino detector, by using low-energy beta beams. We show that fitting "synthetic" spectra, constructed by taking linear combinations of beta-beam spectra, to the original supernova-neutrino spectra reproduces the folded differential cross sections very accurately. Comparing the response in a detector to these synthetic responses provides a direct way to determine the main parameters of the supernova-neutrino energy distribution.

  6. Surface modification study of low energy electron beam irradiated polycarbonate film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nathawat, Rashi; Kumar, Anil; Kulshrestha, Vaibhav; Singh, M.; Ganesan, V.; Phase, D. M.; Vijay, Y. K.

    2007-05-01

    The effect of low energy electron beam irradiation on polycarbonate (PC) film has been studied here. The PC film of thickness 20 μm was exposed by 10 keV electron beam with 100 nA/cm 2 current density. The irradiated film was characterized by mean of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and residual gas analyzer (RGA). Formation of unsaturated bonds and partial graphitization of the surface layer are measured by XPS. Results of the AFM imaging shows electron implantation induce changes in surface morphology of the polymer film. The residual gas analyzer (RGA) spectrum of PC is recorded in situ during irradiation. The results show the change in cross-linking density of the polymer at the top surface.

  7. Ion Beam Modification of Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Averback, B; de la Rubia, T D; Felter, T E; Hamza, A V; Rehn, L E

    2005-10-10

    This volume contains the proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Ion Beam Modification of Materials, IBMM 2004, and is published by Elsevier-Science Publishers as a special issue of Nuclear Instruments and Methods B. The conference series is the major international forum to present and discuss recent research results and future directions in the field of ion beam modification, synthesis and characterization of materials. The first conference in the series was held in Budapest, Hungary, 1978, and subsequent conferences were held every two years at locations around the Globe, most recently in Japan, Brazil, and the Netherlands. The series brings together physicists, materials scientists, and ion beam specialists from all over the world. The official conference language is English. IBMM 2004 was held on September 5-10, 2004. The focus was on materials science involving both basic ion-solid interaction processes and property changes occurring either during or subsequent to ion bombardment and ion beam processing in relation to materials and device applications. Areas of research included Nanostructures, Multiscale Modeling, Patterning of Surfaces, Focused Ion Beams, Defects in Semiconductors, Insulators and Metals, Cluster Beams, Radiation Effects in Materials, Photonic Devices, Ion Implantation, Ion Beams in Biology and Medicine including New Materials, Imaging, and Treatment.

  8. Electronic structure of nitinol surfaces oxidized by low-energy ion bombardment

    SciTech Connect

    Petravic, M. Varasanec, M.; Peter, R.; Kavre, I.; Metikos-Hukovic, M.; Yang, Y.-W.

    2014-06-28

    We have studied the electronic structure of nitinol exposed to low-energy oxygen-ion bombardment, using x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) and near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy. XPS spectra reveal a gradual transformation of nitinol surfaces into TiO{sub 2} with increased dose of implanted oxygen. No oxidation of Ni atoms has been detected. NEXAFS spectra around O K-edge and Ti L{sub 2,3}-edge, reflecting the element-specific partial density of empty electronic states, exhibit features, which can be attributed to the creation of molecular orbitals, crystal field splitting, and the absence of long-range order, characteristic of the amorphous TiO{sub 2}. Based on these results, we discuss the oxidation kinetics of nitinol under low-energy oxygen-ion bombardment.

  9. Anisotropy of low energy direct photons in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koide, T.; Kodama, T.

    2016-09-01

    Using the Wigner function approach for electromagnetic radiation fields, we investigate the behavior of low energy photons radiated by the deceleration processes of two colliding nuclei in relativistic heavy ion collisions. The angular distribution reveals information of the initial geometric configurations, which is reflected in the anisotropic parameter v 2, with an increasing v 2 as energy decreases. This behavior is qualitatively different to the v 2 from the hadrons produced in the collisions.

  10. Ion beam deposition in materials research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuhr, R. A.; Pennycook, S. J.; Noggle, T. S.; Herbots, N.; Haynes, T. E.; Appleton, B. R.

    1989-02-01

    Ion beam deposition (IBD) is the direct formation of thin films using a low-energy (tens of eV) mass-analyzed ion beam. The process allows depositions in which the energy, isotopic species, deposition rate, defect production, and many other beam and sample parameters can be accurately controlled. This paper will review recent research at ORNL on the IBD process and the effects of deposition parameters on the materials properties of deposited thin films, epitaxial layers, and isotopic heterostructures. A variety of techniques including ion scattering/channeling, cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and Auger spectroscopy has been used for analysis. The fabrication of isotopic heterostructures of 74Ge and 30Si will be discussed, as well as the fabrication of metal and semiconductor overlayers on Si and Ge. The use of IBD for low-temperature epitaxy of 30Si on Si and 76Ge on Ge will be presented. The use of self-ion sputter cleaning and in situ reactive ion cleaning as methods for preparing single-crystal substrates for epitaxial deposition will be discussed. Examples of IBD formation of oxides and suicides on Si at low temperatures will also be presented.

  11. Self-neutralized ion beam

    SciTech Connect

    Salvadori, M. C.; Teixeira, F. S.; Nikolaev, A.; Savkin, K. P.; Oks, E. M.; Spaedtke, P.; Yu, K. M.; Brown, I. G.

    2011-10-15

    A vacuum arc ion source provides high current beams of metal ions that have been used both for accelerator injection and for ion implantation, and in both of these applications the degree of space charge neutralization of the beam is important. In accelerator injection application, the beam from the ion source may be accelerated further (post-acceleration), redirected by a bending magnet(s), or focused with magnetic or electrostatic lenses, and knowledge of the beam space charge is needed for optimal design of the optical elements. In ion implantation application, any build-up of positive charge in the insulating targets must be compensated by a simultaneous flux of cold electrons so as to provide overall charge neutrality of the target. We show that in line-of-sight ion implantation using a vacuum arc ion source, the high current ion beam carries along its own background sea of cold electrons, and this copious source of electrons provides a ''self-neutralizing'' feature to the beam. Here we describe experiments carried out in order to demonstrate this effect, and we provide an analysis showing that the beam is space-charge-neutralized to a very high degree.

  12. Studying astrophysical reactions with low-energy RI beams at CRIB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, H.; Kahl, D.; Hayakawa, S.; Sakaguchi, Y.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Hashimoto, T.; Cherubini, S.; Gulino, M.; Spitaleri, C.; Rapisarda, G. G.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Romano, S.; Kubono, S.; Iwasa, N.; Teranishi, T.; Kawabata, T.; Kwon, Y. K.; Binh, D. N.; Khiem, L. H.; Duy, N. N.; Kato, S.; Komatsubara, T.; Coc, A.; De Sereville, N.; Hammache, F.; Kiss, G.; Bishop, S.

    2016-05-01

    Studies on nuclear astrophysics, nuclear structure, and other interests have been performed using the radioactive-isotope (RI) beams at the low-energy RI beam separator CRIB, operated by Center for Nuclear Study (CNS), the University of Tokyo. A typical measurement performed at CRIB is the elastic resonant scattering with the inverse kinematics. One recent experiment was on the α resonant scattering with 7Li and 7Be beams. This study is related to the astrophysical 7Li/7Be(α,γ) reactions, important at hot p-p chain and νp-process in supernovae. There have also been measurements based on other experimental methods. The first THM measurement using an RI beam has been performed at CRIB, to study the 18F(p, α)15O reaction at astrophysical energies via the three body reaction 2H(18F, α15O)n. The 18F(p, α) 15O reaction rate is crucial to understand the 511-keV γ-ray production in nova explosion phenomena, and we successfully evaluated the reaction cross section at novae temperature and below experimentally for the first time.

  13. Low-energy ion-molecule reaction dynamics and chemiionization kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrar, J. M.

    1981-07-01

    Experiments in photodissociation of organic cations to study the competition between isomerization and fragmentation and low energy proton transfer reactions of HCO(+) with selected neutrals are described. The former area provides a sideline to combustion studies of proton transfer in hydrocarbon flames, but the question of energy transfer in highly excited gas phase ion impacts directly upon questions closely related to the fate of ions in combustion. The latter area, currently in progress, focuses upon the dynamics of biomolecular reactions of direct relevance to combustion.

  14. Combining dynamic and static depth profiling in low energy ion scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Veen, Rik ter; Fartmann, Michael; Kersting, Reinhard; Hagenhoff, Birgit

    2013-01-15

    The advantages of combining dynamic and static depth profiling in low energy ion scattering are demonstrated for an Si/SiO{sub x}/W/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ALD stack. Dynamic depth profiling can be used to calibrate static depth profiling. Energy losses of 152 and 215 eV/nm were found for 3 keV {sup 4}He{sup +} and 5 keV {sup 4}He{sup +} primary ions, respectively, for the experimental configuration used. This is in good agreement with the values used in the field. Static depth profiling can be used to recognize sputter artifacts in dynamic depth profiles.

  15. Investigation of Charge Transfer in Low Energy D2+ + H Collisions using Merged Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Andrianarijaona, Vola M; Rada, J. J.; Rejoub, Riad A; Havener, Charles C

    2009-01-01

    Synopsis The hydrogen - hydrogen (deuterium) molecular ion is the most fundamental ion-molecule two-electron system. Charge transfer proceeds through dynamically coupled electronic, vibrational and rotational degrees of freedom. Using the ion-atom merged-beams apparatus at Oak Ridge National Laboratory absolute charge transfer cross sections for D2+ + H are measured from keV/u collision energies where the collision is considered "ro-vibrationally frozen" to meV/u energies where collision times are long enough to sample vibrational and rotational modes. The measurements benchmark high energy theory and vibrationally specific adiabatic theory.

  16. Low energy Fe{sup +} beam irradiation to C{sub 60} thin film

    SciTech Connect

    Minezaki, H.; Yoshida, Y.; Oshima, K.; Uchida, T.; Muramatsu, M.; Kitagawa, A.; Asaji, T.; Kato, Y.; Biri, S.

    2012-02-15

    We have developed an electron cyclotron resonance ion source apparatus, which is designed for the production of endohedral fullerene. In this study, we irradiated the Fe{sup +} beam to the C{sub 60} thin film. We changed the experimental condition of the dose and the ion energy. We could observe the Fe + C{sub 60} peak by analysis of the time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The highest intensity of the Fe + C{sub 60} peak was observed at the ion energy of 200 eV. The Fe + C{sub 60} peak intensity tended to become high in the case of long irradiation time and large dose.

  17. Ion beam probe diagnostic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickok, R. L.; Jennings, W. C.; Woo, J. T.; Connor, K. A.

    1980-07-01

    Tokomak plasmas suitable for diagnostic development were produced in RENTOR following technological improvements in the vacuum chamber and discharge cleaning systems. Secondary ion signals were obtained from the heavy ion beam probe on RENTOR leading to initial estimates of the plasma space potential, which appears to vary by several hundred volts during the plasma pulse. The principle of measuring space potential in a minimum-B geometry was established using an ion gun mounted at the center of the ALEX baseball coil. The neutral beam probe was installed for measuring the space potential using actual secondary ion signals from a hollow cathode arc in ALEX and preliminary tests have begun. The ion beam test stand was significantly altered to allow more flexibility in testing energy analyzers, ion guns, and ion focusing concepts.

  18. Investigation of the Direct Charge Transfer in Low Energy D2+ + H Collisions using Merged-Beams Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, S. L.; Guillen, C. I.; Andrianarijaona, V. M.; Havener, C. C.

    2011-10-01

    The hydrogen - hydrogen (deuterium) molecular ion is the most fundamental ion-molecule two-electron system. Charge transfer (CT) for H2+ on H, which is one of the possible reaction paths for the (H-H2)+ system, is of special interest because of its contribution to H2 formation in the early universe, its exoergicity, and rich collision dynamics. Due to technical difficulty in making an atomic H target, the direct experimental investigations of CT for H2+ on H are sparse and generally limited to higher collision energies. The measurements of the absolute cross section of different CT paths for H2+ on H over a large range of collision energy are needed to benchmark theoretical calculations, especially the ones at low energies. The rate coefficient of CT at low energy is not known but may be comparable to other reaction rate coefficients in cold plasmas with H, H+, H2+, and H3+ as constituents. For instance, CT for H2+ on H and the following H3+ formation reaction H2+ + H2 → H + H3+ are clearly rate interdependent although it was always assumed that every ionization of H2 will lead to the formation of H3+. CT proceeds through dynamically coupled electronic, vibrational and rotational degrees of freedom. One can depict three paths, electronic CT, CT with nuclear substitution, and CT with dissociation. Electronic CT and CT with nuclear substitution in the H2+ on H collisions are not distinguishable by any quantum theory. Here we use the isotopic system (D2+ - H) to measure without ambiguity the electronic CT cross section by observing the H+ products. Using the ion-atom merged-beam apparatus at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the absolute direct CT cross sections for D2+ + H from keV/u to meV/u collision energies have been measured. The molecular ions are extracted from an Electron-Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) ion source with a vibrational state distribution which is most likely determined by Frank-Condon transitions between ground state D2 and D2+. A ground-state H beam

  19. Inhibited flammability and surface inactivation of wood irradiated by low energy hydrogen ion showers (LEHIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blantocas, Gene Q.; Mateum, Philip Edward R.; Orille, Ross William M.; Ramos, Rafael Julius U.; Monasterial, Jonathan Lee C.; Ramos, Henry J.; Bo-ot, Luis Ma. T.

    2007-06-01

    Changes on the properties of wood irradiated by low energy hydrogen ion showers (LEHIS) were examined. The experimental facility employed was an in-house constructed, compact gas discharge ion source with beam energies maintained approximately in the 1 keV range fixed at 1 mA discharge current, 3 mTorr gas filling pressure. Wood specimens used were of species endemic in the Philippines namely Shorea sp., Shorea polysperma and Cocos nucifera. Results showed the processed samples manifested characteristics of inhibited flammability, and became relatively hydrophobic after the treatment. In the fire resistance test, it was also observed during initial flaming that the processed surfaces accumulated less soot attesting to a much lower smoldering rate, i.e. lesser combustibility. To assess the increase in fire endurance time for the processed wood against the control substrates, a non-directional, two-tailed t-test was utilized. Significant at the 0.05 level, the t-statistic measured 9.164 as opposed to only 4.303 in its corresponding critical value at two degrees of freedom. Hence, the treatment appeared to show strong statistical evidence of being effective in enhancing fire resistance. The processed specimens also exhibited moisture absorptive inhibition time of more than 10 min versus an average absorption period of just 8 s for the unprocessed samples. Spectroscopy using a cast steel mass analyzer indicated a predominance of H+ with faint signals of H2+in the ion showers. It is hypothesized that the monatomic ion plays an essential participatory role in the surface modification process. Data from an earlier work using Narra wood (Pterocarpus indicus) [G.Q. Blantocas, H.J. Ramos, M. Wada, Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. 45 (2006) 8498] was extended in the current study to substantiate this hypothesis. The data is now presented as current density ratio H+ /H2+versus the change rate constant K of the wetting model equation. It is shown that wood affinity to water decreased as the

  20. Shock-associated low-energy ion enhancements observed by Voyagers 1 and 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decker, R. B.; Pesses, M. E.; Krimigis, S. M.

    1981-09-01

    Observations of shock-associated ion enhancements at energies of not less than 30 keV are presented from data gathered by Voyagers 1 and 2. Observations include examples of energetic storm particle events associated with flare-produced shocks and examples of corotating particle events (CPE) associated with forward and reverse shocks that bound corotating interaction regions in the outer heliosphere. Most of the CPE have recurrent double-peaked intensity enhancements showing little or no velocity dispersion at peak intensities, time durations of several days, and soft energy spectra extending up to 5 MeV/nucleon. The lowest energy ion enhancements are confined mainly downstream of the corotating interaction regions with the magnitude and duration of the upstream enhancements increasing with increasing ion energy. The observations are consistent with the dynamical and kinematical effects expected when low energy ions are accelerated at quasi-perpendicular shocks.

  1. Electron beam ion source and electron beam ion trap (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, Reinard; Kester, Oliver

    2010-02-15

    The electron beam ion source (EBIS) and its trap variant [electron beam ion trap (EBIT)] celebrated their 40th and 20th anniversary, respectively, at the EBIS/T Symposium 2007 in Heidelberg. These technologically challenging sources of highly charged ions have seen a broad development in many countries over the last decades. In contrast to most other ion sources the recipe of improvement was not ''sorcery'' but a clear understanding of the physical laws and obeying the technological constraints. This review will report important achievements of the past as well as promising developments in the future.

  2. Biological Effects of Low Energy Ar+ Ion Bombardment on Silkworm Eggs: a Novel Animal Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jiaping; Wu, Yuejin; Liu, Xuelan; Yuan, Hang; Yu, Zengliang

    2009-06-01

    In this study, we found for the first time that silkworm eggs were able to survive in vacuum for a long period of time. Subsequently, low energy Ar+ ions with different energies and fluences were used to bombard silkworm eggs so as to explore the resulting biological effects. Results showed that (i) the exposure of silkworm eggs to vacuum within 10 min did not cause significant impact on the hatching rates, while the irradiation of silkworm eggs by Ar+ ions of 25 keV or 30 keV with fluences ranging from 2.6×2.6 × 1015 ion/cm2 to 8×2.6 × 1015 ion/cm2 caused a significant impact on the hatching rates, and the hatching rates decreased with the increase in the fluence and energy level; (ii) the irradiation of silkworm eggs by Ar+ ions of 30 keV with a fluence of 8×2.6 × 1015 ion/cm2 or 9×2.6 × 1015 ion/cm2 resulted in a noticeable etching on the egg shell surface which could be observed by a scanning electron microscope; and (iii) the irradiation of silkworm eggs by Ar+ ions of 30 keV with a fluence of 9×2.6 × 1015 ion/cm2 generated several mutant phenotypes which were observed in the 5th instar silkworms and a moth.

  3. Ion beam sputtering of fluoropolymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sovey, J. S.

    1978-01-01

    Etching and deposition of fluoropolymers are of considerable industrial interest for applications dealing with adhesion, chemical inertness, hydrophobicity, and dielectric properties. This paper describes ion beam sputter processing rates as well as pertinent characteristics of etched targets and films. An argon ion beam source was used to sputter etch and deposit the fluoropolymers PTFE, FEP, and CTFE. Ion beam energy, current density, and target temperature were varied to examine effects on etch and deposition rates. The ion etched fluoropolymers yield cone or spire-like surface structures which vary depending upon the type of polymer, ion beam power density, etch time, and target temperature. Also presented are sputter target and film characteristics which were documented by spectral transmittance measurements, X-ray diffraction, ESCA, and SEM photomicrographs.

  4. ION BEAM COLLIMATOR

    DOEpatents

    Langsdorf, A.S. Jr.

    1957-11-26

    A device is described for defining a beam of high energy particles wherein the means for defining the beam in the horizontal and vertical dimension are separately adjustable and the defining members are internally cooled. In general, the device comprises a mounting block having a central opening through which the beam is projected, means for rotatably supporting two pairs of beam- forming members, passages in each member for the flow of coolant; the beam- forming members being insulated from each other and the block, and each having an end projecting into the opening. The beam-forming members are adjustable and may be cooperatively positioned to define the beam passing between the end of the members. To assist in projecting and defining the beam, the member ends have individual means connected thereto for indicating the amount of charge collected thereon due to beam interception.

  5. Desorption of cluster ions from solid Ne by low-energy ion impact.

    PubMed

    Tachibana, T; Fukai, K; Koizumi, T; Hirayama, T

    2010-12-01

    We investigated Ne(+) ions and Ne(n)(+) (n = 2-20) cluster ions desorbed from the surface of solid Ne by 1.0 keV Ar(+) ion impact. Kinetic energy analysis shows a considerably narrower energy distribution for Ne(n)(+) (n ≥ 3) ions than for Ne(n)(+) (n = 1, 2) ions. The dependence of ion yields on Ne film thickness indicates that cluster ions (n ≥ 3) are desorbed only from relatively thick films. We conclude that desorbed ions grow into large cluster ions during the outflow of deep bulk atoms to the vacuum.

  6. Evaluation of low energy electron beam dose application by means of a portable optical device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reitzig, Manuela; Winkler, Martin; Härtling, Thomas; Röder, Olaf; Opitz, Jörg

    2014-11-01

    We present our recent development concerning the evaluation of a low energy dose application to electron beam responding materials with a simple portable optical device. Electron beam irradiation is a promising option to sterilize sensitive and high performance products or surfaces at a low temperature and without moisture. Especially in the fields of the food industry and medicine, regulations regarding sterility are increasingly tightened. Because of this, a secure proof for electron-beam-assisted sterilization is required. However, no nondestructive and in situ method exists up until now. Our approach to provide a secure proof of sterilization is to place a suitable marker material based on rare-earth-doped phosphors inside or on the top of the packaging material of the respective product. Upon electron irradiation the marker material changes its luminescence properties as a function of the applied energy dose. We verified the energy dependence by means of time-resolved measurements of the luminescence decay of an upconversion phosphor with a portable optical device. In our experimental realization, short laser pulses in the near-infrared range are triggered by a microcontrol unit (MCU) and excite the marker material. The light emitted by the marker is collected in the range between 400 and 1100 nm via a silicon photodiode, processed by the MCU, and analyzed in a Labview program via a single-exponential fit. As a main result, we observe an increasing reduction of the luminescence lifetime with higher dose applications.

  7. Use of a wire scanner for monitoring residual gas ionization in Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility 20 keV/u proton/deuteron low energy beam transport beam line

    SciTech Connect

    Vainas, B.; Eliyahu, I.; Weissman, L.; Berkovits, D.

    2012-02-15

    The ion source end of the Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility accelerator consists of a proton/deuteron ECR ion source and a low energy beam transport (LEBT) beam line. An observed reduction of the radio frequency quadrupole transmission with increase of the LEBT current prompted additional study of the LEBT beam properties. Numerous measurements have been made with the LEBT bream profiler wire biased by a variable voltage. Current-voltage characteristics in presence of the proton beam were measured even when the wire was far out of the beam. The current-voltage characteristic in this case strongly resembles an asymmetric diodelike characteristic, which is typical of Langmuir probes monitoring plasma. The measurement of biased wire currents, outside the beam, enables us to estimate the effective charge density in vacuum.

  8. Flow direction variations of low energy ions as measured by the ion electron sensor (IES) flying on board of Rosetta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szegö, Karoly; Nemeth, Zoltan; Foldy, Lajos; Burch, James L.; Goldstein, Raymond; Mandt, Kathleen; Mokashi, Prachet; Broiles, Tom

    2015-04-01

    The Ion Electron Sensor (IES) simultaneously measures ions and electrons with two separate electrostatic plasma analyzers in the energy range of 4 eV- 22 keV for ions. The field of view is 90ox360o, with angular resolution 5ox45o for ions, with a sector containing the solar wind being further segmented to 5o × 5o. IES has operated continuously since early 2014. In the ion data a low energy (<50-100 eV) component is well separated from the higher energy ions. Here we analyze the arrival direction of this low energy component. The origin of these low energy ions is certainly the ionized component of the neutral gas emitted due to solar activity from comet 67P/Churiumov-Gerasimenko. The low energy component in general shows a 6h periodicity due to cometary rotation. The data show, however, that the arrival direction of the low energy ions is smeared both in azimuth and elevation, due possibly to the diverse mechanisms affecting these ions. One of these effects is the spacecraft potential (~-10V), which accelerates the ions towards the spacecraft omnidirectionally. To characterize the flow direction in azimuth-elevation, we have integrated over the lowest 8 energy channels using weighted energy: sum(counts * energy)/sum(counts); and considered only cases when the counts are above 30. When we apply higher cut for counts, the flow direction became more definite. For this analysis we use data files where the two neighbouring energy values and elevation values are collapsed; and the azimuthal resolution is 45o, that is the solar wind azimuthal segmentation is also collapsed. Here we use day 2014.09.11. as illustration. On that day a solar wind shock reached the spacecraft at about ~10 UT. After the shock transition the energy of the solar wind became higher, and after ~12 UT the flow direction of the solar wind fluctuated, sometimes by 35o. On this day Rosetta flew at about 29.3-29.6 km from the nucleus. In the azimuth-elevation plots summed over "weighted energy" (as

  9. Ion source and low energy injection line for a central region model cyclotrona)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tianjue; Li, Zhenguo; Lu, Yinlong; Wei, Sumin; Cai, Hongru; Ge, Tao; Wu, Longcheng; Pan, Gaofeng; Yao, Hongjuan; Kuo, T.; Yuan, D.

    2008-02-01

    At CIAE, a 100MeV H- cyclotron (CYCIAE-100) is under design and construction. A central region model (CRM) cyclotron was built for various experimental verifications for the CYCIAE-100 project and for research and development of high current injection to accelerate milliampere H- beam. The H- multicusp source built in 2003 has been improved recently to make the source operation more stable. A new injection line for axial low energy high current injection has been designed and constructed for the CRM cyclotron.

  10. OPENMED: A facility for biomedical experiments based on the CERN Low Energy Ion Ring (LEIR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carli, Christian

    At present protons and carbon ions are in clinical use for hadron therapy at a growing number of treatment centers all over the world. Nevertheless, only limited direct clinical evidence of their superiority over other forms of radiotherapy is available [1]. Furthermore fundamental studies on biological effects of hadron beams have been carried out at different times (some a long time ago) in different laboratories and under different conditions. Despite an increased availability of ion beams for hadron therapy, beam time for preclinical studies is expected to remain insufficient as the priority for therapy centers is to treat the maximum number of patients. Most of the remaining beam time is expected to be required for setting up and measurements to guarantee appropriate good quality beams for treatments. The proposed facility for biomedical research [2] in support of hadron therapy centers would provide ion beams for interested research groups and allow them to carry out basic studies under well defined conditions. Typical studies would include radiobiological phenomena like relative biological effectiveness with different energies, ion species, and intensities. Furthermore possible studies include the development of advanced dosimetry in heterogeneous materials that resemble the human body, imaging techniques and, at a later stage, when the maximum energy with the LEIR magnets can be reached, fragmentation.

  11. Gabor lens focusing of a negative ion beam

    SciTech Connect

    Palkovic, J.A.; Mills, F.E.; Schmidt, C.; Young, D.E.

    1989-05-01

    Gabor or plasma lenses have previously been used to focus intense beams of positive ions at energies from 10 keV to 5 MeV. It is the large electrostatic field of the non-neutral plasma in the Gabor lens which is responsible for the focusing. Focusing an ion beam with a given sign of charge in a Gabor lens requires a non-neutral plasma with the opposite sign of charge as the beam. A Gabor lens constructed at Fermilab has been used to focus a 30 keV proton beam with good optical quality. We discuss studies of the action of a Gabor lens on a beam of negative ions. A Gabor lens has been considered for matching an H/sup /minus// beam into an RFQ in the redesign of the low energy section of the Fermilab linac. 9 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Applications of ion beam technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gelerinter, E.; Spielberg, N.

    1980-01-01

    Wire adhesion in steel belted radial tires; carbon fibers and composite; cold welding, brazing, and fabrication; hydrogen production, separation, and storage; membrane use; catalysis; sputtering and texture; and ion beam implantation are discussed.

  13. Narrow conducting channels defined by helium ion beam damage

    SciTech Connect

    Cheeks, T.L.; Roukes, M.L.; Scherer, A.; Craighead, H.G.

    1988-11-14

    We have developed a new technique for patterning narrow conducting channels in GaAs-AlGaAs two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) materials. A low-energy He ion beam successfully patterned narrow wires with little or no etching of the thin GaAs cap. The damage propagation of the He ion even at low energies was sufficient to decrease the mobility of the 2DEG located deep within the structure. The damage can be removed by a low-temperature anneal but remains stable at room temperature. Conducting channels as narrow as 300 nm have been fabricated and measured using low-temperature magnetoresistance.

  14. Ultra Cold Photoelectron Beams for Ion Storage Rings

    SciTech Connect

    Orlov, D. A.; Krantz, C.; Shornikov, A.; Lestinsky, M.; Hoffmann, J.; Wolf, A.; Jaroshevich, A. S.; Kosolobov, S. N.; Terekhov, A. S.

    2009-08-04

    An ultra cold electron target with a cryogenic GaAs photocathode source, developed for the Heidelberg TSR, delivers electron currents up to a few mA with typical kinetic energies of few keV and provides unprecedented energy resolution below 1 meV for electron-ion recombination merged-beam experiments. For the new generation of low-energy electrostatic storage rings, cold electron beams from a photocathode source can bring additional benefits, improving the cooling efficiency of stored ions and making it possible to cool even heavy, slow molecules by electron beams of energies of only a few eV or even below.

  15. Radiation damage in urania crystals implanted with low-energy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Tien Hien; Garrido, Frédérico; Debelle, Aurélien; Mylonas, Stamatis; Nowicki, Lech; Thomé, Lionel; Bourçois, Jérôme; Moeyaert, Jérémy

    2014-05-01

    Implantations with low-energy ions (470-keV Xe and 500-keV La with corresponding ion range Rp ∼ 85 nm and range straggling ΔRp ∼ 40 nm) have been performed to investigate both radiation and chemical effects due to the incorporation of different species in UO2 (urania) crystals. The presence of defects was monitored in situ after each implantation fluence step by the RBS/C technique. Channelling data were analysed afterwards by Monte-Carlo simulations with a model of defects involving (i) randomly displaced atoms (RDA) and (ii) distorted rows, i.e. bent channels (BC). While increasing the ion fluence, the accumulation of RDA leads to a steep increase of the defect fraction in the range from 4 to 7 dpa regardless of the nature of bombarding ions followed by a saturation plateau over a large dpa range. A clear difference of 6% in the yield of saturation plateaus between irradiation with Xe and La ions was observed. Conversely, the evolutions of the fraction of BC showed a similar regular increase with increasing ion fluence for both ions. Moreover, this increase is shifted to a larger fluence in comparison to the sharp increase step of RDA. This phenomenon indicates a continuous structural modification of UO2 crystals under irradiation unseen by the measurement of RDA.

  16. An electrostatic ion guide for efficient transmission of low energy externally formed ions into a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limbach, Patrick A.; Marshall, Alan G.; Wang, Mingda

    1993-06-01

    A new method for transmitting externally formed ions into an ICR ion trap is demonstrated. In an electrostatic ion guide, a potential difference is applied between a conductive cylinder and a rigid wire suspended along the central axis of the cylinder. The cylinder is then positioned between an ion source located outside the bore of superconducting solenoidal magnet and an ion trap located at or near the center of the solenoid. simion simulations predict that low-energy ions entering the ion guide will spiral around the central wire and pass through the fringe of the magnet to reach the ICR ion trap. The theoretical predictions are borne out by experiments in which Na+ and K+ ions from a thermionic emitter are transmitted with high efficiency through the fringe field of the magnet to the ICR ion trap. Mass resolving power of 285 000 for K+ is shown. The electrostatic ion guide offers the advantages that: (a) a wide range of low-energy external sources (e.g., fast-atom on fast-ion bombardment, electrospray, glow discharge, etc.) may be used; (b) prior acceleration of the ions along the magnetic field direction (and subsequent deceleration to slow the ions on entry into the ICR ion trap) is not required; (c) ions are focused along magnetic field lines once the ions have passed through the magnetic fringe field; and (d) ions formed initially off axis are efficiently captured and transmitted by the ion guide without additional focusing.

  17. Triple ion beam irradiation facility

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, M.B.; Allen, W.R.; Buhl, R.A.; Packan, N.H.; Cook, S.W.; Mansur, L.K.

    1988-12-01

    A unique ion irradiation facility consisting of three accelerators is described. The accelerators can be operated simultaneously to deliver three ion beams on one target sample. The energy ranges of the ions are 50 to 400 keV, 200 keV to 2.5 MeV, and 1.0 to 5.0 MeV. Three different ions in the appropriate mass range can be simultaneously implanted to the same depth in a target specimen as large as 100 mm/sup 2/ in area. Typical depth ranges are 0.1 to 1.0 ..mu..m. The X-Y profiles of all three ion beams are measured by a system of miniature Faraday cups. The low-voltage accelerator can periodically ramp the ion beam energy during the implantation. Three different types of target chambers are in use at this facility. The triple-beam high-vacuum chamber can hold nine transmission electron microscopy specimens at elevated temperature during a irradiation by the three simultaneous beams. A second high-vacuum chamber on the medium-voltage accelerator beamline houses a low- and high-temperature translator and a two-axis goniometer for ion channeling measurements. The third chamber on the high-energy beamline can be gas-filled for special stressed specimen irradiations. Special applications for the surface modification of materials with this facility are described. Appendixes containing operating procedures are also included. 18 refs., 27 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Defect diffusion during annealing of low-energy ion-implanted silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Bedrossian, P J; Caturla, M-J; Diaz de la Rubia, T

    2000-03-08

    We present a new approach for investigating the kinetics of defect migration during annealing of low-energy, ion-implanted silicon, employing a combination of computer simulations and atomic-resolution tunneling microscopy. Using atomically-clean Si(111)-7x7 as a sink for bulk point defects created by 5 keV Xe and Ar irradiation, we observe distinct, temperature-dependent surface arrival rates for vacancies and interstitials. A combination of simulation tools provides a detailed description of the processes that underly the observed temperature-dependence of defect segregation, and the predictions of the simulations agree closely with the experimental observations.

  19. Experimental Approach to High-Temperature Stellar Reactions with Low-Energy RI Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubono, S.; Yamaguchi, H.; Amadio, G.; Hayakawa, S.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Kurihara, Y.; He, J. J.; Saito, A.; Fujikawa, H.; Khiem, Le Hong; Niikura, M.; Teranishi, T.; Nishimura, S.; Kato, S.; Lee, C. S.; Kwon, Y. K.; Hahn, I. S.; Kim, A.

    2008-04-01

    The experimental efforts for the stellar reactions under high-temperature and high densities have been made as the major program using the RI beams from the CNS low-energy in-flight RI beam separator (CRIB) of University of Tokyo, in order to understand the evolution of the universe as well as various stellar phenomena. Specifically, two subjects of hydrogen burning are discussed here. One is a reaction study of the pp-chain and the second is of the explosive hydrogen burning, the rp-process. Some s-wave resonances have been identified by the thick target method in the crucial reaction processes in the hydrogen burning. The resonant scattering with the thick target method also succeeded in identifying inelastic resonant scattering, giving proton widths for the first excited state of the target nucleus. This provides very efficiently the reaction rate estimate for the process under high-temperature equilibrium condition. Possibilities of the CRIB facility in near future are also briefly discussed.

  20. Optical transition radiation used in the diagnostic of low energy and low current electron beams in particle accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, T. F.; Bonini, A. L.; Lima, R. R.; Maidana, N. L.; Malafronte, A. A.; Pascholati, P. R.; Vanin, V. R.; Martins, M. N.

    2012-09-15

    Optical transition radiation (OTR) plays an important role in beam diagnostics for high energy particle accelerators. Its linear intensity with beam current is a great advantage as compared to fluorescent screens, which are subject to saturation. Moreover, the measurement of the angular distribution of the emitted radiation enables the determination of many beam parameters in a single observation point. However, few works deals with the application of OTR to monitor low energy beams. In this work we describe the design of an OTR based beam monitor used to measure the transverse beam charge distribution of the 1.9-MeV electron beam of the linac injector of the IFUSP microtron using a standard vision machine camera. The average beam current in pulsed operation mode is of the order of tens of nano-Amps. Low energy and low beam current make OTR observation difficult. To improve sensitivity, the beam incidence angle on the target was chosen to maximize the photon flux in the camera field-of-view. Measurements that assess OTR observation (linearity with beam current, polarization, and spectrum shape) are presented, as well as a typical 1.9-MeV electron beam charge distribution obtained from OTR. Some aspects of emittance measurement using this device are also discussed.

  1. Optical transition radiation used in the diagnostic of low energy and low current electron beams in particle accelerators.

    PubMed

    Silva, T F; Bonini, A L; Lima, R R; Maidana, N L; Malafronte, A A; Pascholati, P R; Vanin, V R; Martins, M N

    2012-09-01

    Optical transition radiation (OTR) plays an important role in beam diagnostics for high energy particle accelerators. Its linear intensity with beam current is a great advantage as compared to fluorescent screens, which are subject to saturation. Moreover, the measurement of the angular distribution of the emitted radiation enables the determination of many beam parameters in a single observation point. However, few works deals with the application of OTR to monitor low energy beams. In this work we describe the design of an OTR based beam monitor used to measure the transverse beam charge distribution of the 1.9-MeV electron beam of the linac injector of the IFUSP microtron using a standard vision machine camera. The average beam current in pulsed operation mode is of the order of tens of nano-Amps. Low energy and low beam current make OTR observation difficult. To improve sensitivity, the beam incidence angle on the target was chosen to maximize the photon flux in the camera field-of-view. Measurements that assess OTR observation (linearity with beam current, polarization, and spectrum shape) are presented, as well as a typical 1.9-MeV electron beam charge distribution obtained from OTR. Some aspects of emittance measurement using this device are also discussed.

  2. Low energy stopping cross section of light ions in light gases using time of flight techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jedrejcic, David

    Electronic stopping occurs when an energetic particle interacts with the electrons of a target material, causing charge exchange, excitation, and ionization of the atomic electrons and a corresponding energy loss for the impinging particle. Charge exchange between the projectile and target, in the form of electron capture and electron stripping, is the dominant mode of energy transfer for low energy projectiles in the keV region. In the case of protons in Helium gas, the difference between the ground state energy level of an ionized H atom and the first ionization energy of a Helium atom is large (11.0 eV), and so the process of electron capture is suppressed at very low energy. This leads to a reduction in the stopping cross section near this threshold, and a resultant deviation from the velocity proportionality which is otherwise characteristic of this low energy regime. The present work uses time-of-flight techniques to directly measure the stopping cross section of various target gases for the light ions H +, D+, and He+ using projectile energies between 2.4 -- 22 keV/u. Measurements are obtained using a low-energy linear accelerator fed by an RF ion source at the Colorado School of Mines Department of Physics. System accuracy is checked with a projectile-target pair which has been well measured in the past using gaseous targets in the energy regime of interest (He+-N2). Data is then accumulated for several projectile-target pairs (H+-He, D+-He, H+-N 2, D+-N2, H+-Ne, D+ -Ne, He+-H2, He+-He, He +-Ne). Results show that the stopping cross section of H+, D+ in He does exhibit a threshold effect for projectile energies lower than ˜20 keV/u. This work provides an independent measurement of this interaction, for which we find only two previous data sets below the threshold energy, and whose results differ by an order of magnitude below 6 keV/u. This work also provides measurements of several other projectile-target pairs for which there exist only limited

  3. Observation of oversaturation-induced defect formation in tungsten irradiated by low energy deuterium ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Younggil; Song, Jae-Min; Roh, Ki-Baek; Kim, Nam-Kyun; Roh, Hyun-Joon; Jang, Yunchang; Ryu, Sangwon; Bae, Byeongjun; Kim, Gon-Ho

    2016-08-01

    The type of induced material damage in the tungsten irradiated by using deuterium ions was investigated for various value of the fluence at low energy. Experiments were carried out in an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma source that provided an ion flux of 2.8 × 1021 D 2 + /m2s and a sheath energy of 100 eV/ D 2 + on the tungsten target. The energy of irradiated ions was much smaller than the threshold energy for generating cascade collisional damage (˜ 250 eV) in tungsten and was similar of the plasma at the first wall of KSTAR. The target temperature was kept as 700 - 800 K by using an active cooling system. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) was employed to observe the depth profiles of deuterium. The peak of the trapped deuterium concentration in the irradiated tungsten was located near 16 - 17 nm for 2.0 - 4.0 × 1025 D 2/m2, which is far deeper than the 1.6 nm for ion implantation at 100 eV/ D 2 + ions. Thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) data were analyzed to determine the binding energy ( E b = 1.45 eV) of trapped deuterium, which corresponded to an oversaturation-induced vacancy. This observation is very important for understanding the refueling property of the retained deuterium during steady-state fusion plasma operation.

  4. Interaction of atomic and low-energy deuterium with tungsten pre-irradiated with self-ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogorodnikova, O. V.; Markelj, S.; von Toussaint, U.

    2016-02-01

    Polycrystalline tungsten (W) specimens were pre-irradiated with self-ions to create identical samples with high density of defects up to ˜2.5 μm near the surface. Then, W specimens were exposed to either thermal atomic deuterium (D) beam with an incident energy of ˜0.2 eV or low energy D plasma with the incident energy varied between 5 and 200 eV at different sample temperatures. Each sample was exposed once at certain temperature and fluence. The D migration and accumulation in W were studied post-mortem by nuclear reaction method. It was shown that the rate of the D to occupy radiation-induced defects increases with increasing the incident energy, ion flux, and temperature. Experimental investigation was accompanied by modelling using the rate-equation model. Moreover, the analytical model was developed and benchmarked against numerical model. The calculations of the deuterium diffusion with trapping at radiation-induced defects in tungsten by analytical model are consistent with numerical calculations using rate-equation model. The data of reflection and penetration of atomic and low-energy D were taking from calculations using molecular dynamics (MD) with Juslin interatomic potentials and a binary collision code TRIM. MD calculations show an agreement with a binary collision code TRIM only in a very narrow range of deuterium energies between 1 and 20 eV. Incorporation of the data of reflection and penetration of deuterium in the macroscopic modelling has been done to verify the range of validity of calculations using MD and binary collision code TRIM by comparison of modelling results with experimental data. Modelling results are consistent with experiments using reflection and penetration data of D obtained from TRIM code for incident ion energy above 1 eV. Otherwise, the parameters obtained from MD should be incorporated in the rate-equation model to have a good agreement with the experiments.

  5. Anti-hydrogen production with positron beam ion trap

    SciTech Connect

    Itahashi, Takahisa

    2008-08-08

    In low-energy antiproton physics, it is advantageous to be able to manipulate anti-particles as freely as normal particles. A robust production and storage system for high-quality positrons and antiprotons would be a substantial advance for the development of anti-matter science. The idea of electron beam ion trap could be applied for storage of anti-particle when the electron beam could be replaced by the positron beam. The bright positron beam would be brought about using synchrotron radiation source with a superconducting wiggler. The new scheme for production of anti-particles is proposed by using new accelerator technologies.

  6. Poster — Thur Eve — 22: A water calorimeter for low-energy particle beams

    SciTech Connect

    Renaud, J; Sarfehnia, A; Seuntjens, J; Rossomme, S; Vynckier, S

    2014-08-15

    In this work, the feasibility of absolute dose to water measurements in low-energy electron beams using a water calorimeter specifically developed for shallow measurements is established. The calorimeter design consists of a cylindrical glass vessel encased in a block of expanded polystyrene. The vessel has a front window thickness of 1.1 mm, a 4 cm radius, and is 2.5 cm in depth. The vessel-block assembly sits inside a thermally-insulated box and is air-cooled to an operating temperature of 4 °C. Radiation-induced thermal gradients were simulated in a geometric model of the calorimeter using a finite element analysis software package. 52 absorbed dose to water measurements were performed in a 6 and 8 MeV electron beam (z{sub max} of 1.32 and 1.76 cm, respectively) for 60 seconds at a repetition rate of 400 MU/min and an SSD of 120 cm. Within the vessel, the depth of measurement was set to 1.08 cm relative to the inner front window. The average measured dose to water was 59.6 ± 0.2 cGy/100 MU (6 MeV), and 63.7 ± 0.3 cGy/100 MU (8 MeV). The associated heat transfer corrections were determined to be 1.026 ± 0.003 and 1.017 ± 0.004 for the 6 and 8 MeV beams, respectively. The most significant source of uncertainty in this study was the repeatability (type A, 0.42%). It is expected that performing fewer consecutive measurements under higher dose rate conditions will improve the stability of the thermal background, thereby improving the repeatability and reducing the overall standard uncertainty.

  7. Design of the prototype of a beam transport line for handling and selection of low energy laser-driven beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schillaci, F.; Maggiore, M.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Cuttone, G.; Pisciotta, P.; Costa, M.; Rifuggiato, D.; Romano, F.; Scuderi, V.

    2016-11-01

    A first prototype of transport beam-line for laser-driven ion beams to be used for the handling of particles accelerated by high-power laser interacting with solid targets has been realized at INFN. The goal is the production of a controlled and stable beam in terms of energy and angular spread. The beam-line consists of two elements: an Energy Selection System (ESS), already realized and characterized with both conventional and laser-accelerated beams, and a Permanent Magnet Quadrupole system (PMQ) designed, in collaboration with SIGMAPHI (Fr), to improve the ESS performances. In this work a description of the ESS system and some results of its characterization with conventional beams are reported, in order to provide a complete explanation of the acceptance calculation. Then, the matching with the PMQ system is presented and, finally, the results of preliminary simulations with a realistic laser-driven energy spectrum are discussed demonstrating the possibility to provide a good quality beam downstream the systems.

  8. Use of low-energy hydrogen ion implants in high-efficiency crystalline-silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fonash, S. J.; Sigh, R.; Mu, H. C.

    1986-01-01

    The use of low-energy hydrogen implants in the fabrication of high-efficiency crystalline silicon solar cells was investigated. Low-energy hydrogen implants result in hydrogen-caused effects in all three regions of a solar cell: emitter, space charge region, and base. In web, Czochralski (Cz), and floating zone (Fz) material, low-energy hydrogen implants reduced surface recombination velocity. In all three, the implants passivated the space charge region recombination centers. It was established that hydrogen implants can alter the diffusion properties of ion-implanted boron in silicon, but not ion-implated arsenic.

  9. Voyager 1 observes low-energy galactic cosmic rays in a region depleted of heliospheric ions.

    PubMed

    Stone, E C; Cummings, A C; McDonald, F B; Heikkila, B C; Lal, N; Webber, W R

    2013-07-12

    On 25 August 2012, Voyager 1 was at 122 astronomical units when the steady intensity of low-energy ions it had observed for the previous 6 years suddenly dropped for a third time and soon completely disappeared as the ions streamed away into interstellar space. Although the magnetic field observations indicate that Voyager 1 remained inside the heliosphere, the intensity of cosmic ray nuclei from outside the heliosphere abruptly increased. We report the spectra of galactic cosmic rays down to ~3 × 10(6) electron volts per nucleon, revealing H and He energy spectra with broad peaks from 10 × 10(6) to 40 × 10(6) electron volts per nucleon and an increasing galactic cosmic-ray electron intensity down to ~10 × 10(6) electron volts.

  10. Temporal evolution of a silicon surface subject to low energy ion irradiation and concurrent sample rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Tanmoy; Pearson, Daniel A.; Bradley, R. Mark; Som, Tapobrata

    2016-08-01

    We study the temporal evolution of silicon surfaces subject to low energy Ar+-ion bombardment and concurrent sample rotation. Systematic experiments are carried out in both the linear and nonlinear regimes. It is observed that an experiment which produces an anisotropic surface without sample rotation produces a statistically isotropic surface with a smaller surface roughness if the sample is rotated at a sufficiently high angular speed. Interrupted coarsening of the nanoscale mounds on the surface at long times t is observed without concurrent deposition of metal impurities for the first time. We find that the characteristic lateral size and height of the mounds increase as t 1 / 2 and t, respectively. Both our experiments and simulations show that azimuthally rotating ripples form at a sufficiently small rotational speeds, as predicted two decades ago. Finally, predictions from theories on rotating samples subject to ion bombardment are tested.

  11. Characterization of nitrogen species incorporated into graphite using low energy nitrogen ion sputtering.

    PubMed

    Kiuchi, Hisao; Kondo, Takahiro; Sakurai, Masataka; Guo, Donghui; Nakamura, Junji; Niwa, Hideharu; Miyawaki, Jun; Kawai, Maki; Oshima, Masaharu; Harada, Yoshihisa

    2016-01-01

    The electronic structures of nitrogen species incorporated into highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG), prepared by low energy (200 eV) nitrogen ion sputtering and subsequent annealing at 1000 K, were investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), angle-dependent X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), and Raman spectroscopy. An additional peak was observed at higher binding energy of 401.9 eV than 400.9 eV for graphitic1 N (graphitic N in the basal plane) in N 1s XPS, where graphitic2 N (graphitic N in the zigzag edge and/or vacancy sites) has been theoretically expected to appear. N 1s XPS showed that graphitic1 N and graphitic2 N were preferably incorporated under low nitrogen content doping conditions (8 × 10(13) ions cm(-2)), while pyridinic N and graphitic1 N were dominantly observed under high nitrogen content doping conditions. In addition, angle-dependent N 1s XAS showed that the graphitic N and pyridinic N atoms were incorporated into the basal plane of HOPG and thus were highly oriented. Furthermore, Raman spectroscopy revealed that low energy sputtering resulted in almost no fraction of the disturbed graphite surface layers under the lowest nitrogen doping condition. The suitable nitrogen doping condition was discovered for realizing the well-controlled nitrogen doped HOPG. The electrochemical properties for the oxygen reduction reaction of these samples in acidic solution were examined and discussed.

  12. Neutron Transport Models and Methods for HZETRN and Coupling to Low Energy Light Ion Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blattnig, S.R.; Slaba, T.C.; Heinbockel, J.H.

    2008-01-01

    Exposure estimates inside space vehicles, surface habitats, and high altitude aircraft exposed to space radiation are highly influenced by secondary neutron production. The deterministic transport code HZETRN has been identified as a reliable and efficient tool for such studies, but improvements to the underlying transport models and numerical methods are still necessary. In this paper, the forward-backward (FB) and directionally coupled forward-backward (DC) neutron transport models are derived, numerical methods for the FB model are reviewed, and a computationally efficient numerical solution is presented for the DC model. Both models are compared to the Monte Carlo codes HETCHEDS and FLUKA, and the DC model is shown to agree closely with the Monte Carlo results. Finally, it is found in the development of either model that the decoupling of low energy neutrons from the light ion (A<4) transport procedure adversely affects low energy light ion fluence spectra and exposure quantities. A first order correction is presented to resolve the problem, and it is shown to be both accurate and efficient.

  13. Excitation of positive ions by low-energy electrons - Relevance to the Io Torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, S. J.; Chutjian, A.; Mawhorter, R. J.; Williams, I. D.; Shemansky, D. E.

    1993-03-01

    The importance of measuring electron-ion excitation cross sections in singly and multiply charged positive ions is outlined, and recent results for Mg II and O II ions are given using the JPL's electron energy-loss merged-beams apparatus. Theoretical comparisons are given with two five-state close-coupling calculations. The energy variation of the collision strength is fitted with a semiempirical analytic function which includes approximations to polarization, resonance, and exchange contributions. In O II, first spectra anywhere of electron excitation of the optically allowed transitions are presented. In addition, excitations of two low lying, optically forbidden transitions are detected for the first time.

  14. Hydrogen removal from e-beam deposited alumina thin films by oxygen ion beam

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Arijeet Mukharjee, C. Rajiv, K. Bose, Aniruddha Singh, S. D. Rai, S. K.; Ganguli, Tapas; Joshi, S. C.; Deb, S. K.; Phase, D. M.

    2014-04-24

    Hydrogen interstitials and oxygen vacancies defects create energy levels in the band gap of alumina. This limits the application of alumina as a high-k dielectric. A low thermal budget method for removal of hydrogen from alumina is discussed. It is shown that bombardment of alumina films with low energy oxygen ion beam during electron beam evaporation deposition decreases the hydrogen concentration in the film significantly.

  15. Surface Modification and Chemical Sputtering of Graphite Induced by Low Energy Atomic and Molecular Deuterium Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Hengda; Meyer, Fred W; Meyer III, Harry M; Lance, Michael J

    2008-01-01

    The surface morphology, and chemical/structural modifications induced during chemical sputtering of ATJ graphite by low-energy (<200 eV/D) deuterium atomic and molecular ions are explored by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Raman and Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES) diagnostics. At the lowest impact energies, the ion range may become less than the probe depth of Raman and AES spectroscopy diagnostics. We show that such diagnostics are still useful probes at these energies. As demonstration, we used these surface diagnostics to confirm the characteristic changes of surface texture, increased amorphization, enhanced surface reactivity to impurity species, and increased sp{sup 3} content that low-energy deuterium ion bombardment to steady-state chemical sputtering conditions produces. To put these studies into proper context, we also present new chemical sputtering yields for methane production of ATJ graphite at room temperature by impact of D{sub 2}{sup +} in the energy range 10-250 eV/D, and by impact of D{sup +} and D{sub 3}{sup +} at 30 eV/D and 125 eV/D, obtained using a Quadrupole Mass Spectroscopy (QMS) approach. Below 100 eV/D, the methane production in ATJ graphite is larger than that in HOPG by a factor of {approx} 2. In the energy range 10-60 eV/D, the methane production yield is almost independent of energy and then decreases with increasing ion energies. The results are in good agreement with recent molecular dynamics simulations.

  16. Nitrogen mass transfer models for plasma-based low-energy ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Bocong; Wang, Kesheng; Zhang, Zhipeng; Che, Honglong; Lei, Mingkai

    2015-03-15

    The nitrogen mass transfer process in plasma-based low-energy ion implantation (PBLEII) is theoretically and experimentally studied in order to explore the process mechanism of PBLEII and therefore to optimize the apparatus design and the process conditions. An electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) microwave discharge generates the nitrogen plasma with a high density of 10{sup 11}–10{sup 12} ions/cm{sup 3}, which diffuses downstream to the process chamber along the divergent magnetic field. The nitrogen ions in the plasma implant into the surface and transport to the matrix of an austenitic stainless steel under the low negative pulsed bias of −2 kV at a process temperature of 400 °C. A global plasma model is used to simulate the ECR microwave plasma discharge for a range of working pressures and microwave powers. The fluid models are adopted to calculate the plasma downstream diffusion, the sheath expansion and the low-energy ion implantation on the surface. A nonlinear kinetic discrete model is established to describe the nitrogen transport in the austenitic stainless steel and the results are compared with the experimental measurements. Under an average implantation current density of 0.3–0.6 mA/cm{sup 2}, the surface nitrogen concentration in the range from 18.5 to 29 at. % is a critical factor for the nitrogen transport in the AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel by PBLEII, which accelerates the implanted nitrogen diffusion inward up to 6–12 μm during a nitriding time of 4 h.

  17. Comprehensive study of the surface peak in charge-integrated low-energy ion scattering spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Draxler, M.; Gruber, R.; Bauer, P.; Beikler, R.; Taglauer, E.; Schmid, K.; Ermolov, S. N.

    2003-08-01

    Low-energy ion scattering is very surface sensitive if scattered ions are analyzed. By time-of-flight (TOF) techniques, the neutral and the charge-integrated spectra (ions plus neutrals) are obtained, which yield information about deeper layers. It is well known that charge integrated spectra may exhibit a surface peak which is more pronounced for heavier projectiles, e.g., Ne ions. Aiming at a more profound physical understanding of this surface peak, we performed TOF experiments and computer simulations for H, He, and Ne projectiles scattered from a polycrystalline copper target. Measurements were done in the range of 1-9 keV for a scattering angle of 129 degree sign under UHV conditions. The simulations were performed using the MARLOWE code for the given experimental parameters and a polycrystalline target. In the experiments, a pronounced surface peak was observed at low energies, which fades away at higher energies. This peak is quantitatively reproduced by the simulation. Several atomic layers may contribute to the surface peak, depending on the energy. Analyzing the contributions of the individual outermost atomic layers, one finds that the binary collisions of the projectiles with atoms in the first and the second layer yield a narrow energy distribution, while the contribution from the deeper layers is dominated by multiple scattering and therefore exhibits a very broad energy spectrum. It is shown that the appearance of a more or less pronounced surface peak is due to the relative contributions of single scattering and multiple scattering and thus depends on the projectile energy and mass.

  18. Structural modifications of low-energy heavy-ion irradiated germanium

    SciTech Connect

    Steinbach, T.; Wernecke, J.; Wesch, W.; Kluth, P.; Ridgway, M. C.

    2011-09-01

    of plastic deformation shows a linear dependence on the ion fluence. Based on these results, we provide an explanation for the differences in surface morphology observed for different angles of incidence of the ion beam will be discussed in detail.

  19. Low energy singly and multiply charged ion irradiation of astrophysical ices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawes, A.; Holtom, P. D.; Mukerji, R. J.; Davis, M. P.; Sivaraman, B.; McCullough, R. W.; Williams, I.; Mason, N. J.

    Ion induced processes play an important role in the chemical modification of astrophysical ices, both on the surfaces of satellites in the outer solar system and in the depths of dark molecular clouds where few photons penetrate. To date many laboratory studies have been developed to study energetic singly charged ion interactions with astrophysical ice analogues (e.g. Mennella, et al 2004; Strazzulla, Baratta & Palumbo 2001; Gerakines, Moore, & Hudson 2000) and have been found to produce new chemical species and cause significant effects on ice morphology (Palumbo 2005). However, the effects of low energy and multiply charged ions have not yet been investigated. Such ions are prevalent in many astrophysical environments: as primary and secondary particles generated by cosmic ray bombardment and as constituents of planetary magnetospheres (e.g. Jupiter and Saturn). These ions comprise a rich variety of reactive species in a variety of charge states with typical kinetic energies of few keV. The effect of slow, multiply charged ions (MCIs) with the surfaces of astrophysical ices and their possible effect on chemical processing is unclear. However, studies of MCI impacts with insulator surfaces suggest that they may play an important role due to surplus potential energy imparted at the surface of the target (Winter & Aumayr 2001). We have developed a research program to study ion interactions with astrophysical ices using an Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) ion source at Queens University Belfast. Such a source can produce different species of ions with variable energy and different charge states. Ices are prepared in situ by depositing gas onto a cold infrared transmitting window. Samples are analysed using FTIR spectroscopy during irradiation. We have conducted a series of experiments to investigate the effects of ion charge state (potential vs. kinetic energy effects), ion energy (nuclear vs. electronic stopping processes) and sample temperature. In this poster

  20. Low energy cluster beam deposited BN films as the cascade for field emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, F.; Zhang, L.; Zhu, L.; Ge, J.; Wang, G.

    2005-07-01

    The atomic deposited BN films with the thickness of nanometers (ABN) were prepared by radio frequency magnetron sputtering method and the nanostructured BN films (CBN) were prepared by Low Energy Cluster Beam Deposition. UV-Vis Absorption measurement proves the band gap of 4.27 eV and field emission of the BN films were carried out. F-N plots of all the samples give a good fitting and demonstrate the F-N tunneling of the emission process. The emission of ABN begins at the electric field of 14.6 V/μ m while that of CBN starts at 5.10 V/μ m. Emission current density of 1 mA/cm2 for ABN needs the field of 20 V/μ m while that of CBN needs only 12.1 V/μ m. The cluster-deposited BN on n-type Silicon substrate proves a good performance in terms of the lower gauge voltage, more emission sites and higher electron intensity and seems a promising substitute for the cascade of field emission.

  1. Tuning surface porosity on vanadium surface by low energy He+ ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, J. K.; Novakowski, T. J.; Hassanein, A.

    2016-08-01

    In the present study, we report on tuning the surface porosity on vanadium surfaces using high-flux, low-energy He+ ion irradiation as function of sample temperature. Polished, mirror-finished vanadium samples were irradiated with 100 eV He+ ions at a constant ion-flux of 7.2 × 1020 ions m-2 s-1 for 1 h duration at constant sample temperatures in the wide range of 823-1173 K. Our results show that the surface porosity of V2O5 (naturally oxidized vanadium porous structure, after taking out from UHV) is strongly correlated to the sample temperature and is highly tunable. In fact, the surface porosity significantly increases with reducing sample temperature and reaches up to ∼87%. Optical reflectivity on these highly porous V2O5 surfaces show ∼0% optical reflectivity at 670 nm wavelength, which is very similar to that of "black metal". Combined with the naturally high melting point of V2O5, this very low optical reflectivity suggests potential application in solar power concentration technology. Additionally, this top-down approach guarantees relatively good contact between the different crystallites and avoids electrical conductivity limitations (if required). Since V2O5 is naturally a potential photocatalytic material, the resulting sub-micron-sized cube-shaped porous structures could be used in solar water splitting for hydrogen production in energy applications.

  2. New apparatus increases ion beam power density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baldwin, L. V.; Sandborn, V. A.

    1964-01-01

    To increase ion engine or rocket power, an ion source and emitter, an ion beam focusing electrode, and an ion accelerator are incorporated into the system. In operation the space charge surrounding the ion emitter decreases, the ion beam density accelerates, and engine power increases.

  3. Ripple formation on atomically flat cleaved Si surface with roughness of 0.038 nm rms by low-energy Ar{sup 1+} ion bombardment

    SciTech Connect

    Pahlovy, Shahjada A.; Mahmud, S. F.; Yanagimoto, K.; Miyamoto, I.

    2011-03-15

    The authors have conducted research regarding ripple formation on an atomically flat cleaved Si surface by low-energy Ar{sup +} ion bombardment. The cleaved atomically flat and smooth plane of a Si wafer was obtained by cutting vertically against the orientation of a Si (100) wafer. Next, the cleaved surface was sputtered by a 1 keV Ar{sup +} ion beam at ion-incidence angles of 0 deg., 60 deg., 70 deg., and 80 deg. The results confirm the successful ripple formation at ion-incidence angles of 60 deg. - 80 deg. and that the wavelength of the ripples increases with the increase of the ion-incidence angle, as well as the inverse of ion doses. The direction of the ripple also changes from perpendicular to parallel to the projection of the ion-beam direction along the surface with the increasing ion-incidence angle. The authors have also observed the dose effects on surface roughness of cleaved Si surface at the ion-incidence angle of 60 deg., where the surface roughness increases with the increased ion dose. Finally, to understand the roughening mechanism, the authors studied the scaling behavior, measured the roughness exponent {alpha}, and compared the evolution of scaling regimes with Cuerno's one-dimensional simulation results.

  4. Biological effects of low energy nitrogen ion implantation on Jatropha curcas L. seed germination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Gang; Wang, Xiao-teng; Gan, Cai-ling; Fang, Yan-qiong; Zhang, Meng

    2012-09-01

    To explore the biological effects of nitrogen ion beam implantation on dry Jatropha curcas seed, a beam of N+ with energy of 25 keV was applied to treat the dry seed at six different doses. N+ beam implantation greatly decreased germination rate and seedling survival rate. The doses within the range of 12 × 1016 to 15 × 1016 ions cm-2 severely damaged the seeds: total antioxidant capacity (TAC), germination rate, seedling survival rate, reduced ascorbate acid (HAsA) and reduced glutathione (GSH) contents, and most of the tested antioxidases activity (i.e. catalase (CAT), ascorbate peroxidase (APX) and superoxide dismutase (SOD)) reached their lowest levels. At a dose of 18 × 1016 ion cm-2, biological repair took place: moderate increases were found in TAC, germination rate, seedling survival rate, HAsA and GSH contents, and some antioxidant enzyme activities (i.e. CAT, APX, SOD and GPX). The dose of 18 × 1016 ions cm-2 may be the optimum dose for use in dry J. curcas seed mutation breeding. CAT, HAsA and GSH contributed to the increase of TAC, but CAT was the most important. POD performed its important role as seed was severely damaged. The main role of the HAsA-GSH cycle appeared to be for regeneration of HAsA.

  5. Surface Passivation and Junction Formation Using Low Energy Hydrogen Implants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fonash, S. J.

    1985-01-01

    New applications for high current, low energy hydrogen ion implants on single crystal and polycrystal silicon grain boundaries are discussed. The effects of low energy hydrogen ion beams on crystalline Si surfaces are considered. The effect of these beams on bulk defects in crystalline Si is addressed. Specific applications of H+ implants to crystalline Si processing are discussed. In all of the situations reported on, the hydrogen beams were produced using a high current Kaufman ion source.

  6. Controllable laser ion beam generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamiyama, D.; Takano, M.; Nagashima, T.; Barada, D.; Gu, Y. J.; Li, X. F.; Kong, Q.; Wang, P. X.; Kawata, S.

    2016-05-01

    In intense-laser plasma interaction, several issues still remain to be solved for a future laser particle acceleration. In this paper we focus on a bunching of ion beam, which is preaccelerated by a strong electric field generated in a laser plasma interaction. In this study, a nearcritical-density plasma target is illuminated by an intense short laser pulse. A moving strong inductive electric field is generated inside of the target. We have successfully obtained a bunched ion beam in our particle-in-cell simulations in this paper.

  7. Surface degeneration of W crystal irradiated with low-energy hydrogen ions.

    PubMed

    Fan, Hongyu; You, Yuwei; Ni, Weiyuan; Yang, Qi; Liu, Lu; Benstetter, Günther; Liu, Dongping; Liu, Changsong

    2016-01-01

    The damage layer of a W (100) crystal irradiated with 120 eV hydrogen ions at a fluence of up to 1.5 × 10(25)/m(2) was investigated by scanning electron microscopy and conductive atomic force microscopy (CAFM). The periodic surface degeneration of the W crystal at a surface temperature of 373 K was formed at increasing hydrogen fluence. Observations by CCD camera and CAFM indicate the existence of ultrathin surface layers due to low-energy H irradiation. The W surface layer can contain a high density of nanometer-sized defects, resulting in the thermal instability of W atoms in the surface layer. Our findings suggest that the periodic surface degeneration of the W crystal can be ascribed to the lateral erosion of W surface layers falling off during the low-energy hydrogen irradiation. Our density functional theory calculations confirm the thermal instability of W atoms in the top layer, especially if H atoms are adsorbed on the surface.

  8. Surface degeneration of W crystal irradiated with low-energy hydrogen ions

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Hongyu; You, Yuwei; Ni, Weiyuan; Yang, Qi; Liu, Lu; Benstetter, Günther; Liu, Dongping; Liu, Changsong

    2016-01-01

    The damage layer of a W (100) crystal irradiated with 120 eV hydrogen ions at a fluence of up to 1.5 × 1025/m2 was investigated by scanning electron microscopy and conductive atomic force microscopy (CAFM). The periodic surface degeneration of the W crystal at a surface temperature of 373 K was formed at increasing hydrogen fluence. Observations by CCD camera and CAFM indicate the existence of ultrathin surface layers due to low-energy H irradiation. The W surface layer can contain a high density of nanometer-sized defects, resulting in the thermal instability of W atoms in the surface layer. Our findings suggest that the periodic surface degeneration of the W crystal can be ascribed to the lateral erosion of W surface layers falling off during the low-energy hydrogen irradiation. Our density functional theory calculations confirm the thermal instability of W atoms in the top layer, especially if H atoms are adsorbed on the surface. PMID:27020839

  9. Low-Energy Sputtering Studies of Boron Nitride with Xenon Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, P. K.; Shutthanandan, V.

    1999-01-01

    Sputtering of boron nitride with xenon ions was investigated using secondary ion (SIMS) and secondary neutral (SNMS) mass spectrometry. The ions generated from the ion gun were incident on the target at an angle of 50' with respect to the surface'normal. The energy of ions ranged from 100 eV to 3 keV. A flood electron gun was used to neutralize the positive charge build-up on the target surface. The intensities of sputtered neutral and charged particles, including single atoms, molecules, and clusters, were measured as a function of ion energy. Positive SIMS spectra were dominated by the two boron isotopes whereas BN- and B- were the two major constituents of the negative SIMS spectra. Nitrogen could be detected only in the SNMS spectra. The intensity-energy curves of the sputtered particles were similar in shape. The knees in P-SIMS and SNMS intensity-energy curves appear at around I keV which is significantly higher that 100 to 200 eV energy range at which knees appear in the sputtering of medium and heavy elements by ions of argon and xenon. This difference in the position of the sputter yield knee between boron nitride and heavier targets is due to the reduced ion energy differences. The isotopic composition of secondary ions of boron were measured by bombarding boron nitride with xenon ions at energies ranging from 100 eV to 1.5 keV using a quadrupole mass spectrometer. An ion gun was used to generate the ion beam. A flood electron gun was used to neutralize the positive charge buildup on the target surface. The secondary ion flux was found to be enriched in heavy isotopes at lower incident ion energies. The heavy isotope enrichment was observed to decrease with increasing primary ion energy. Beyond 350 eV, light isotopes were sputtered preferentially with the enrichment increasing to an asymptotic value of 1.27 at 1.5 keV. The trend is similar to that of the isotopic enrichment observed earlier when copper was sputtered with xenon ions in the same energy

  10. Characteristics of low energy ions in the Heavy Ions In Space (HIIS) experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleis, Thomas; Tylka, Allan J.; Boberg, Paul R.; Adams, James H., Jr.; Beahm, Lorraine P.

    1995-01-01

    We present preliminary data on heavy ions (Z greater than or equal to 10) detected in the topmost Lexan sheets of the track detector stacks of the Heavy Ions in space (HIIS) experiment (M0001) on LDEF. The energy interval covered by these observations varies with the element, with (for example) Ne observable at 18-100 MeV nuc and Fe at 45-200 MeV/nuc. All of the observed ions are at energies far below the geomagnetic cutoff for fully-ionized particles at the LDEF orbit. Above 50 MeV/nuc (where most of our observed particles are Fe), the ions arrive primarily from the direction of lowest geomagnetic cutoff. This suggests that these particles originate outside the magnetosphere from a source with a steeply-falling spectrum and may therefore be associated with solar energetic particle (SEP) events. Below 50 MeV/nuc, the distribution of arrival directions suggests that most of the observed heavy ions are trapped in the Earth's magnetic field. Preliminary analysis, however, shows that these trapped heavy ions have a very surprising composition: they include not only Ne and Ar, which are expected from the trapping of anomalous cosmic rays (ACR's), but also Mg and Si, which are not part of the anomalous component. Our preliminary analysis shows that trapped heavy ions at 12 less than or equal to Zeta less than or equal to 14 have a steeply-falling spectrum, similar to that reported by the Kiel experiment (exp 1,2,3) on LDEF (M0002) for trapped Ar and Fe at E less than 50 MeV/nuc. The trapped Mg, Si, and Fe may also be associated with SEP events, but the mechanism by which they have appeared to deep in the inner magnetosphere requires further theoretical investigation.

  11. Multi-beam RFQ linac structure for heavy ion fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashizaki, Noriyosu; Ishibashi, Takuya; Ito, Taku; Hattori, Toshiyuki

    2009-07-01

    Both the RF linear accelerator (linac) and the linear induction accelerator have been considered as injectors in a driver system for heavy ion fusion (HIF). In order to relax beam defocusing by space charge effect in the low-energy region, the accelerating beams that were merged and had their beam currents increased by the funnel tree system are injected into storage rings. A multi-beam linac that accelerates multiple beams in an accelerator cavity has the advantages of cost reduction and downsizing of the system. We modeled the multi-beam Interdigital-H type radio frequency quadruple (IH-RFQ) cavities with the different beam numbers and evaluated the electromagnetic characteristics by simulation. As a result, the reasonable ranges of their configuration were indicated for a practical use.

  12. Quightness: A proposed figure of merit for sources of low-energy, high-charge-state ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmieder, Robert W.

    1990-03-01

    A variety of ion sources, including the EBIS and ECRIS, are distinguished by their ability to produce low-energy ions of very high charge state. It would be useful to have some figure of merit that is particularly sensitive to this performance. I propose here such a quantity, called ``Quightness,'' which is related to brightness but which enhances the contrast between sources supplying multicharged ions of low energy. The rationale for introducing this quantity, its etymology and relationship to other figures of merit, and some representative values are presented.

  13. Low-energy extensions of the eikonal approximation to heavy-ion scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Aguiar, C.E.; Aguiar, C.E.; Zardi, F.; Vitturi, A.

    1997-09-01

    We discuss different schemes devised to extend the eikonal approximation to the regime of low bombarding energies (below 50 MeV per nucleon) in heavy-ion collisions. From one side we consider the first- and second-order corrections derived from Wallace{close_quote}s expansion. As an alternative approach we examine the procedure of accounting for the distortion of the eikonal straight-line trajectory by shifting the impact parameter to the corresponding classical turning point. The two methods are tested for different combinations of colliding systems and bombarding energies, by comparing the angular distributions they provide with the exact solution of the scattering problem. We find that the best results are obtained with the shifted trajectories, the Wallace expansion showing a slow convergence at low energies, in particular for heavy systems characterized by a strong Coulomb field. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  14. Microscopic Damage of Tungsten and Molybdenum Exposed to Low-Energy Helium Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Hongyu; Yang, Qi; Li, Xin; Ni, Weiyuan; Niu, Jinhai; Liu, Dongping

    2015-04-01

    Polycrystalline tungsten (W) and molybdenum (Mo) materials both non-annealed and annealed at temperatures of 800-1750°C have been irradiated with low-energy (220 eV), high-flux (∼1021 ions/m2 ·s) He+ at an irradiation temperature of 600°C and at a dose of 1.0×1025 ions/m2. This non-destructive conductive atomic force microscopy technique provides direct observation and comparison of surface swellings with growth of nanoscale defects in the irradiated materials. A coral-like surface structure and nanostructured defects were formed in W when irradiated at a He+ dose of 1.0×1025 ions/m2. Increasing the annealing temperature resulted in an increase in the size of nanostructured defects and serious surface damage of W. Compared to W, Mo suffered much less surface damage after being irradiated at various He+ doses. supported by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Program of China (No. 2011GB108011), National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 11405023) and the Scientific Research Fund of Liaoning Provincial Education Department (No. L2014539) and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities of China (No. DC201502080410)

  15. Charge exchange of low-energy ions in thin carbon foils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buergi, Alfred; Oetliker, Michael; Bochsler, Peter; Geiss, Johannes; Coplan, Michael A.

    1990-01-01

    In order to calibrate a time-of-flight mass spectrometer which is to be flown in the solar wind, the charge exchange properties of low-energy ions in thin carbon foils have been investigated. Incident ions of He, C, N, O, Ne, and Ar with energies in the range 0.5-2 keV/nucleon have been used to measure charge-state distribution, residual energy, and angular distribution after transmission through thin (1-6 microgram/sq cm) carbon foils. Within such foils, an equilibrium between ionization and recombination of the projectile is rapidly established, and, consequently, the charge state of the emerging particle depends essentially on its residual velocity. A comparison of the charge exchange properties of Ne-22 with Ne-20 demonstrates that indeed the velocity (and not the energy) of the emerging particle determines its final charge. A comparison of properties of different elements provides an indication of an electron shell effect. Predictions for the energy loss of ions within the carbon foils made with the TRIM code are in good agreement with the experimental results presented in this paper.

  16. Maskless, resistless ion beam lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Qing

    2003-03-10

    As the dimensions of semiconductor devices are scaled down, in order to achieve higher levels of integration, optical lithography will no longer be sufficient for the needs of the semiconductor industry. Alternative next-generation lithography (NGL) approaches, such as extreme ultra-violet (EUV), X-ray, electron-beam, and ion projection lithography face some challenging issues with complicated mask technology and low throughput. Among the four major alternative NGL approaches, ion beam lithography is the only one that can provide both maskless and resistless patterning. As such, it can potentially make nano-fabrication much simpler. This thesis investigates a focused ion beam system for maskless, resistless patterning that can be made practical for high-volume production. In order to achieve maskless, resistless patterning, the ion source must be able to produce a variety of ion species. The compact FIB system being developed uses a multicusp plasma ion source, which can generate ion beams of various elements, such as O{sub 2}{sup +}, BF{sub 2}{sup +}, P{sup +} etc., for surface modification and doping applications. With optimized source condition, around 85% of BF{sub 2}{sup +}, over 90% of O{sub 2}{sup +} and P{sup +} have been achieved. The brightness of the multicusp-plasma ion source is a key issue for its application to maskless ion beam lithography. It can be substantially improved by optimizing the source configuration and extractor geometry. Measured brightness of 2 keV He{sup +} beam is as high as 440 A/cm{sup 2} {center_dot} Sr, which represents a 30x improvement over prior work. Direct patterning of Si thin film using a focused O{sub 2}{sup +} ion beam has been investigated. A thin surface oxide film can be selectively formed using 3 keV O{sub 2}{sup +} ions with the dose of 10{sup 15} cm{sup -2}. The oxide can then serve as a hard mask for patterning of the Si film. The process flow and the experimental results for directly patterned poly-Si features

  17. High resolution energy analyzer for broad ion beam characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Kanarov, V.; Hayes, A.; Yevtukhov, R.; Siegfried, D.; Sferlazzo, P.

    2008-09-15

    Characterization of the ion energy distribution function (IEDF) of low energy high current density ion beams by conventional retarding field and deflection type energy analyzers is limited due to finite ion beam emittance and beam space charge spreading inside the analyzer. These deficiencies are, to a large extent, overcome with the recent development of the variable-focusing retarding field energy analyzer (RFEA), which has a cylindrical focusing electrode preceding the planar retarding grid. The principal concept of this analyzer is conversion of a divergent charged particle beam into a quasiparallel beam before analyzing it by the planar retarding field. This allows analysis of the beam particle total kinetic energy distribution with greatly improved energy resolution. Whereas this concept was first applied to analyze 5-10 keV pulsed electron beams, the present authors have adapted it to analyze the energy distribution of a low energy ({<=}1 KeV) broad ion beam. In this paper we describe the RFEA design, which was modified from the original, mainly as required by the specifics of broad ion beam energy analysis, and the device experimental characterization and modeling results. Among the modifications, an orifice electrode placed in front of the RFEA provides better spatial resolution of the broad ion beam ion optics emission region and reduces the beam plasma density in the vicinity of analyzer entry. An electron repeller grid placed in front of the RFEA collector was found critical for suppressing secondary electrons, both those incoming to the collector and those released from its surface, and improved energy spectrum measurement repeatability and accuracy. The use of finer mesh single- and double-grid retarding structures reduces the retarding grid lens effect and improves the analyzer energy resolution and accuracy of the measured spectrum mean energy. However, additional analyzer component and configuration improvements did not further change the analyzed

  18. Common features of particle beams and x-rays generated in a low energy dense plasma focus device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behbahani, R. A.; Xiao, C.

    2015-02-01

    Features of energetic charged particle beams and x-ray emission in a low energy (1-2 kJ) plasma focus (DPF) device are described and the possible mechanism are explained based on circuit analyses and energy balance in the DPF system. In particular, the resistance and the voltage across the plasma column are estimated to explain the mechanisms of the generation of particle beams and hard x-ray. The analysis shows that the total inductance of a DPF might have played a role for enhancement of the particle beams and x-ray emissions during the phase of anomalous resistance.

  19. Common features of particle beams and x-rays generated in a low energy dense plasma focus device

    SciTech Connect

    Behbahani, R. A.; Xiao, C.

    2015-02-15

    Features of energetic charged particle beams and x-ray emission in a low energy (1–2 kJ) plasma focus (DPF) device are described and the possible mechanism are explained based on circuit analyses and energy balance in the DPF system. In particular, the resistance and the voltage across the plasma column are estimated to explain the mechanisms of the generation of particle beams and hard x-ray. The analysis shows that the total inductance of a DPF might have played a role for enhancement of the particle beams and x-ray emissions during the phase of anomalous resistance.

  20. Ion Beam Therapy in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraft, Gerhard

    2009-03-01

    At present, seven facilities in Europe treat deep-seated tumors with particle beams, six with proton beams and one with carbon ions. Three of these facilities are in Moscow, St. Petersburg and Dubna, Russia. Other facilities include the TSL Uppsala, Sweden, CPO Orsay, France, and PSI Villigen, Switzerland, all for proton therapy, and GSI, Darmstadt, Germany, which utilizes carbon ions only. But only two of these facilities irradiate with scanned ion beams: the Paul Scherer Institute (PSI), Villigen (protons) and the Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Darmstadt. These two facilities are experimental units within physics laboratories and have developed the technique of intensity-modulated beam scanning in order to produce irradiation conforming to a 3-D target. There are three proton centers presently under construction in Munich, Essen and Orsay, and the proton facility at PSI has added a superconducting accelerator connected to an isocentric gantry in order to become independent of the accelerator shared with the physics research program. The excellent clinical results using carbon ions at National Institute of Radiological Science (NIRS) in Chiba and GSI have triggered the construction of four new heavy-ion therapy projects (carbon ions and protons), located in Heidelberg, Pavia, Marburg and Kiel. The projects in Heidelberg and Pavia will begin patient treatment in 2009, and the Marburg and Kiel projects will begin in 2010 and 2011, respectively. These centers use different accelerator designs but have the same kind of treatment planning system and use the same approach for the calculation of the biological effectiveness of the carbon ions as developed at GSI [1]. There are many other planned projects in the works. Do not replace the word "abstract," but do replace the rest of this text. If you must insert a hard line break, please use Shift+Enter rather than just tapping your "Enter" key. You may want to print this page and refer to it as a style

  1. Focused ion beams in biology.

    PubMed

    Narayan, Kedar; Subramaniam, Sriram

    2015-11-01

    A quiet revolution is under way in technologies used for nanoscale cellular imaging. Focused ion beams, previously restricted to the materials sciences and semiconductor fields, are rapidly becoming powerful tools for ultrastructural imaging of biological samples. Cell and tissue architecture, as preserved in plastic-embedded resin or in plunge-frozen form, can be investigated in three dimensions by scanning electron microscopy imaging of freshly created surfaces that result from the progressive removal of material using a focused ion beam. The focused ion beam can also be used as a sculpting tool to create specific specimen shapes such as lamellae or needles that can be analyzed further by transmission electron microscopy or by methods that probe chemical composition. Here we provide an in-depth primer to the application of focused ion beams in biology, including a guide to the practical aspects of using the technology, as well as selected examples of its contribution to the generation of new insights into subcellular architecture and mechanisms underlying host-pathogen interactions.

  2. EBIS charge breeder for radioactive ion beams at ATLAS.

    SciTech Connect

    Ostroumov, P.; Kondrashev, S.; Pardo, R.; Savard, G.; Vondrasek, R.; Alessi, J.; Beebe, E.; Pikin, A.

    2010-07-01

    The construction of the Californium Rare Isotope Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) for the Argonne National Laboratory ATLAS facility is completed and its commissioning is being performed. In its full capacity, the CARIBU facility will use fission fragments from a 1 Curie (Ci) {sup 252}Cf source. The ions will be thermalized and collected into a low-energy ion beam by a helium gas catcher, mass analyzed by an isobar separator, and charge bred to higher charge states for acceleration in ATLAS. To reach energies E/A 10 MeV/u, one should inject ions with charge-to-mass ratio (q/A) {ge} 1/7 into the ATLAS linac. In the first stage, the existing Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) ion source will be used as a charge breeder. The maximum intensity of radioactive ion beams at the output of the gas catcher will not exceed 10{sup 7} ions per second. A charge breeder based on an Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) has significant advantages over the ECR option for ion beam intensities up to about 10{sup 9} ions per second, providing 3-4 times higher efficiency and significantly better purity of highly charged radioactive ion beams for further acceleration. The proposed EBIS project for CARIBU will heavily utilize state-of-the-art EBIS technology recently developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory. This will allow us to reduce both the project cost and timescale, simultaneously insuring reliable technical realization of the cutting-edge technology. Several parameters of the CARIBU EBIS charge breeder (EBIS-CB) will be relaxed with respect to the BNL EBIS in favor of higher reliability and lower cost. Technical performance of the CARIBU charge breeder will not suffer from such a relaxation and will provide high efficiency for a whole range of radioactive ion beams. The goal of this paper is to present the initial design of the EBIS charge breeder for radioactive ion beams at ATLAS.

  3. EBIS charge breeder for radioactive ion beams at ATLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostroumov, P.; Kondrashev, S.; Pardo, R.; Savard, G.; Vondrasek, R.; Alessi, J.; Beebe, E.; Pikin, A.

    2010-07-01

    The construction of the Californium Rare Isotope Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) for the Argonne National Laboratory ATLAS facility is completed and its commissioning is being performed. In its full capacity, the CARIBU facility will use fission fragments from a 1 Curie (Ci) 252Cf source. The ions will be thermalized and collected into a low-energy ion beam by a helium gas catcher, mass analyzed by an isobar separator, and charge bred to higher charge states for acceleration in ATLAS. To reach energies E/A 10 MeV/u, one should inject ions with charge-to-mass ratio (q/A) >= 1/7 into the ATLAS linac. In the first stage, the existing Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) ion source will be used as a charge breeder. The maximum intensity of radioactive ion beams at the output of the gas catcher will not exceed 107 ions per second. A charge breeder based on an Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) has significant advantages over the ECR option for ion beam intensities up to about 109 ions per second, providing 3-4 times higher efficiency and significantly better purity of highly charged radioactive ion beams for further acceleration. The proposed EBIS project for CARIBU will heavily utilize state-of-the-art EBIS technology recently developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory. This will allow us to reduce both the project cost and timescale, simultaneously insuring reliable technical realization of the cutting-edge technology. Several parameters of the CARIBU EBIS charge breeder (EBIS-CB) will be relaxed with respect to the BNL EBIS in favor of higher reliability and lower cost. Technical performance of the CARIBU charge breeder will not suffer from such a relaxation and will provide high efficiency for a whole range of radioactive ion beams. The goal of this paper is to present the initial design of the EBIS charge breeder for radioactive ion beams at ATLAS.

  4. EBIS charge breeder for radioactive ion beams at ATLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Ostroumov, P.; Alessi, J.; Kondrashev, S.; Pardo, R.; Savard, G.; Vondrasek, R.; Beebe, E.; Pikin, A.

    2010-07-20

    The construction of the Californium Rare Isotope Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) for the Argonne National Laboratory ATLAS facility is completed and its commissioning is being performed. In its full capacity, the CARIBU facility will use fission fragments from a 1 Curie (Ci) {sup 252}Cf source. The ions will be thermalized and collected into a low-energy ion beam by a helium gas catcher, mass analyzed by an isobar separator, and charge bred to higher charge states for acceleration in ATLAS. To reach energies E/A 10 MeV/u, one should inject ions with charge-to-mass ratio (q/A) {ge} 1/7 into the ATLAS linac. In the first stage, the existing Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) ion source will be used as a charge breeder. The maximum intensity of radioactive ion beams at the output of the gas catcher will not exceed 10{sup 7} ions per second. A charge breeder based on an Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) has significant advantages over the ECR option for ion beam intensities up to about 10{sup 9} ions per second, providing 3-4 times higher efficiency and significantly better purity of highly charged radioactive ion beams for further acceleration. The proposed EBIS project for CARIBU will heavily utilize state-of-the-art EBIS technology recently developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory. This will allow us to reduce both the project cost and timescale, simultaneously insuring reliable technical realization of the cutting-edge technology. Several parameters of the CARIBU EBIS charge breeder (EBIS-CB) will be relaxed with respect to the BNL EBIS in favor of higher reliability and lower cost. Technical performance of the CARIBU charge breeder will not suffer from such a relaxation and will provide high efficiency for a whole range of radioactive ion beams. The goal of this paper is to present the initial design of the EBIS charge breeder for radioactive ion beams at ATLAS.

  5. Prospects of ion beam extraction and transport simulations (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Spaedtke, Peter; Tinschert, K.; Lang, R.; Maeder, J.; Rossbach, J.; Stetson, J. W.; Celona, L.

    2008-02-15

    Beam profile measurements using viewing targets and emittance measurements with pepper pot devices have established new insights about the ion beam extracted from an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS). In our measurements we have compared two different ECRISs of CAPRICE type, one source was equipped with a standard 1.0 T hexapole magnet, whereas for the other ion source a stronger hexapole magnet with a flux density of 1.2 T has been installed. The resulting ion beam profile for each individual charge state produced by different focal strengths of an optical element can be used to estimate the emittance, but it also shows the negative influence of the hexapole on the extracted ion beam. A hexapole correction would be desirable to improve further beam transport. A possible correction scheme will be discussed. All experimental observations can be reproduced by computer simulation if a magnetic plasma is assumed. When the Larmor radius for ions becomes small, collisions are negligible for the path of ions within the plasma. Low energy electrons are highly movable along the magnetic field lines and can compensate the ion space charge within the plasma chamber.

  6. Interactions of Low-Energy Spin-Polarized ^4He^+ Ions with Au(100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bixler, D. L.; Lancaster, J. C.; Popple, R. A.; Dunning, F. B.; Walters, G. K.

    1998-05-01

    A spin polarized He^+ ion source has been developed to study the dynamics of ion-surface interactions. The He^+ ions are produced by Penning ionization in collisions between electron-spin-polarized He(2^3S) metastable atoms contained in a weak rf-excited discharge. The ions are extracted from the discharge and focused onto a clean Au(100) surface using a series of electrostatic lenses. The impact energy can be varied from <=10eV to >=650eV and typical beam polarizations are 10-15%. Measurements of the polarization of electrons ejected from the surface as a result of Auger neutralization reveal spin correlation that can be explained by considering the local perturbation in the surface electronic structure induced by the presence of the (polarized) He^+ ion. The calculated induced densities of states are spin dependent and exhibit sharp Kondo-like features near the Fermi level. These features, and their influence on Auger neutralization, are being further explored through measurements at several different incident ion energies. *This research is support by the U. S. Department of Energy and the Robert A. Welch Foundation.

  7. Focused ion beams using a high-brightness plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guharay, Samar

    2002-10-01

    High-brightness ion beams, with low energy spread, have merits for many new applications in microelectronics, materials science, and biology. Negative ions are especially attractive for the applications that involve beam-solid interactions. When negative ions strike a surface, especially an electrically isolated surface, the surface charging voltage is limited to few volts [1]. This property can be effectively utilized to circumvent problems due to surface charging, such as device damage and beam defocusing. A compact plasma source, with the capability to deliver either positive or negative ion beams, has been developed. H- beams from this pulsed source showed brightness within an order of magnitude of the value for beams from liquid-metal ion sources. The beam angular intensity is > 40 mAsr-1 and the corresponding energy spread is <2.5 eV [2]. Using a simple Einzel lens with magnification of about 0.1, a focused current density of about 40 mAcm-2 is obtained. It is estimated that an additional magnification of about 0.1 can yield a focused current density of > 1 Acm-2 and a spot size of 100 nm. Such characteristics of focused beam parameters, using a dc source, will immediately open up a large area of new applications. [1] P. N. Guzdar, A. S. Sharma, S. K. Guharay, "Charging of substrates irradiated by particle beams" Appl. Phys. Lett. 71, 3302 (1997). [2] S. K. Guharay, E. Sokolovsky, J. Orloff, "Characteristics of ion beams from a Penning source for focused ion beam applications" J. Vac. Sci Technol. B17, 2779 (1999).

  8. A statistical analysis of the low-energy geosynchronous plasma environment. I - Electrons. II - Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrett, H. B.; Schwank, D. C.; Deforest, S. E.

    1981-01-01

    Data on the geosynchronous plasma environment between approximately 30 eV and 80 keV are analyzed statistically. Nearly 50 days of 10 minute averages of the first four moments of the distribution function from low-energy plasma detectors on the ATS-5 and ATS-6 geosynchronous satellites were used. The data were studied in terms of occurrence frequency, local time variations, and response to geomagnetic activity. These techniques revealed marked differences in the ATS-5 and ATS-6 data bases. When translated into a 2-Maxwellian representation, it was found that (1) the ATS-6 data covered an energy range not covered by ATS-5 (between 1 and 50 eV) and (2) there was a definite change in the ion plasma between the ATS-5 and ATS-6 measurements. Simple expressions are derived to simulate the relationship between the four moments, and a model is presented, which takes into account the ATS-5 and ATS-6 plasma variations. Despite the differences in the ion data, the accuracy of the four-moment representation was found valid for characterizing the geosynchronous electron population.

  9. Surface analysis of zeolites: An XPS, variable kinetic energy XPS, and low energy ion scattering study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bare, Simon R.; Knop-Gericke, Axel; Teschner, Detre; Hävacker, Michael; Blume, Raoul; Rocha, Tulio; Schlögl, Robert; Chan, Ally S. Y.; Blackwell, N.; Charochak, M. E.; ter Veen, Rik; Brongersma, Hidde H.

    2016-06-01

    The surface Si/Al ratio in a series of zeolite Y samples has been obtained using laboratory XPS, synchrotron (variable kinetic energy) XPS, and low energy ion scattering (LEIS) spectroscopy. The non-destructive depth profile obtained using variable kinetic energy XPS is compared to that from the destructive argon ion bombardment depth profile from the lab XPS instrument. All of the data indicate that the near surface region of both the ammonium form and steamed Y zeolites is strongly enriched in aluminum. It is shown that when the inelastic mean free path of the photoelectrons is taken into account the laboratory XPS of aluminosilicates zeolites does not provide a true measurement of the surface stoichiometry, while variable kinetic energy XPS results in a more surface sensitive measurement. A comprehensive Si/Al concentration profile as a function of depth is developed by combining the data from the three surface characterization techniques. The LEIS spectroscopy reveals that the topmost atomic layer is further enriched in Al compared to subsequent layers.

  10. Geant4 models for simulation of hadron/ion nuclear interactions at moderate and low energies.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivantchenko, Anton; Ivanchenko, Vladimir; Quesada, Jose-Manuel; Wright, Dennis

    The Geant4 toolkit is intended for Monte Carlo simulation of particle transport in media. It was initially designed for High Energy Physics purposes such as experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. The toolkit offers a set of models allowing effective simulation of cosmic ray interactions with different materials. For moderate and low energy hadron/ion interactions with nuclei there are a number of competitive models: Binary and Bertini intra-nuclear cascade models, quantum molecular dynamic model (QMD), INCL/ABLA cascade model, and Chiral Invariant Phase Space Decay model (CHIPS). We report the status of these models for the recent version of Geant4 (release 9.3, December 2009). The Bertini cascade in-ternal cross sections were upgraded. The native Geant4 precompound and deexcitation models were used in the Binary cascade and QMD. They were significantly improved including emis-sion of light fragments, the Fermi break-up model, the General Evaporation Model (GEM), the multi-fragmentation model, and the fission model. Comparisons between model predictions and data for thin target experiments for neutron, proton, light ions, and isotope production are presented and discussed. The focus of these validations is concentrated on target materials important for space missions.

  11. Simulation of ion beam scattering in a gas stripper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxeiner, Sascha; Suter, Martin; Christl, Marcus; Synal, Hans-Arno

    2015-10-01

    Ion beam scattering in the gas stripper of an accelerator mass spectrometer (AMS) enlarges the beam phase space and broadens its energy distribution. As the size of the injected beam depends on the acceleration voltage through phase space compression, the stripper becomes a limiting factor of the overall system transmission especially for low energy AMS system in the sub MV region. The spatial beam broadening and collisions with the accelerator tube walls are a possible source for machine background and energy loss fluctuations influence the mass resolution and thus isotope separation. To investigate the physical processes responsible for these effects, a computer simulation approach was chosen. Monte Carlo simulation methods are applied to simulate elastic two body scattering processes in screened Coulomb potentials in a (gas) stripper and formulas are derived to correctly determine random collision parameters and free path lengths for arbitrary (and non-homogeneous) gas densities. A simple parametric form for the underlying scattering cross sections is discussed which features important scaling behaviors. An implementation of the simulation was able to correctly model the data gained with the TANDY AMS system at ETH Zurich. The experiment covered transmission measurements of uranium ions in helium and beam profile measurements after the ion beam passed through the He-stripper. Beam profiles measured up to very high stripper densities could be understood in full system simulations including the relevant ion optics. The presented model therefore simulates the fundamental physics of the interaction between an ion beam and a gas stripper reliably. It provides a powerful and flexible tool for optimizing existing AMS stripper geometries and for designing new, state of the art low energy AMS systems.

  12. ARCS 3 ionospheric artificial argon ion beam injections - Waves near the heavy ion gyrofrequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erlandson, R. E.; Cahill, L. J., Jr.; Kaufmann, R. L.; Arnoldy, R. L.; Pollock, C. J.

    1989-01-01

    Low-frequency electric field data below the proton gyrofrequency are presented for the duration of the argon ion beam experiment conducted as part of the Argon Release for Controlled Studies (ARCS) program. An argon ion beam was injected from the subpayload antiparallel or perpendicular to the magnetic field at altitudes from 250 to 405 km. During the injections, the wave spectra were broadband near the subpayload and narrow-band near heavy ion gyrofrequencies at perpendicular separation distances between 42 and 254 m. It is suggested that the narrow-band waves are associated with both the perpendicular argon ion beam and an unexpected flux of low-energy ions which peaked in energy near 15 eV and pitch angle near 90 deg with respect to the magnetic field.

  13. Evolution of the CaF2:Tm (TLD-300) glow curve as an indicator of beam quality for low-energy photon beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz, I. D.; Avila, O.; Gamboa-deBuen, I.; Brandan, M. E.

    2015-03-01

    We study the high- to low- temperature signal ratio (HLTR) of the CaF2:Tm glow curve as a function of beam quality for low-energy photon beams with effective energy between 15.2 and 33.6 keV, generated with W, Mo and Rh anodes. CaF2:Tm dosemeters (TLD-300) were exposed to x-rays and 60Co gamma-rays. Glow curves were deconvoluted into 7 peaks, using computerized glow curve deconvolution and HLTR was evaluated. Air kerma and dose in water were between 2.1-15.0 mGy and 49.8-373.8 mGy, respectively. All peaks in the glow curve showed a linear response with respect to air kerma and dose in water. HLTR values decreased monotonically between 1.029  ±  0.010 (at 15.2 keV) and 0.821  ±  0.011 (33.6 keV), and no effects due to the use of different anode/filter combinations were observed. The results indicate a relatively high value of HLTR (about 1 for 17 keV effective energy, or 3 keV μm-1 track-average LET) and a measurable dependence on the photon beam quality. Comparison of these photon data with HLTR for ions shows good quantitative agreement. The reported evolution of the CaF2:Tm glow curve could facilitate the estimation of the effective energy of unknown photon fields by this technique.

  14. Evolution of the CaF₂:Tm (TLD-300) glow curve as an indicator of beam quality for low-energy photon beams.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, I D; Avila, O; Gamboa-deBuen, I; Brandan, M E

    2015-03-21

    We study the high- to low- temperature signal ratio (HLTR) of the CaF2:Tm glow curve as a function of beam quality for low-energy photon beams with effective energy between 15.2 and 33.6 keV, generated with W, Mo and Rh anodes. CaF2:Tm dosemeters (TLD-300) were exposed to x-rays and (60)Co gamma-rays. Glow curves were deconvoluted into 7 peaks, using computerized glow curve deconvolution and HLTR was evaluated. Air kerma and dose in water were between 2.1-15.0 mGy and 49.8-373.8 mGy, respectively. All peaks in the glow curve showed a linear response with respect to air kerma and dose in water. HLTR values decreased monotonically between 1.029  ±  0.010 (at 15.2 keV) and 0.821  ±  0.011 (33.6 keV), and no effects due to the use of different anode/filter combinations were observed. The results indicate a relatively high value of HLTR (about 1 for 17 keV effective energy, or 3 keV μm(-1) track-average LET) and a measurable dependence on the photon beam quality. Comparison of these photon data with HLTR for ions shows good quantitative agreement. The reported evolution of the CaF2:Tm glow curve could facilitate the estimation of the effective energy of unknown photon fields by this technique. PMID:25683355

  15. ION BEAM FOCUSING MEANS FOR CALUTRON

    DOEpatents

    Backus, J.G.

    1959-06-01

    An ion beam focusing arrangement for calutrons is described. It provides a virtual focus of origin for the ion beam so that the ions may be withdrawn from an arc plasma of considerable width providing greater beam current and accuracy. (T.R.H.)

  16. Ion-beam Plasma Neutralization Interaction Images

    SciTech Connect

    Igor D. Kaganovich; Edward Startsev; S. Klasky; Ronald C. Davidson

    2002-04-09

    Neutralization of the ion beam charge and current is an important scientific issue for many practical applications. The process of ion beam charge and current neutralization is complex because the excitation of nonlinear plasma waves may occur. Computer simulation images of plasma neutralization of the ion beam pulse are presented.

  17. Optical and chemical behaviors of CR-39 and Makrofol plastics under low-energy electron beam irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Saftawy, Ashraf Ali; Abd El Aal, Saad Ahmed; Hassan, Nabil Mohamed; Abdelrahman, Moustafa Mohamed

    2016-07-01

    In this study, CR-39 and Makrofol plastic nuclear track detectors were irradiated with low-energy electron beams to study the effect of the induced changes on their optical and chemical properties. Surface chemical changes were recorded by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, which showed successive degradation and crosslinking for CR-39 and decomposition for Makrofol. The optical band gap was determined by UV-vis spectroscopy. Also, the parameters of carbon cluster formation and disordering (Urbach’s energy) occurring on plastic surfaces were examined. The intrinsic viscosity changes were investigated as well. As a result, low-energy electron beams were found to be useful for the control of many properties of the surfaces of the investigated detectors.

  18. Previously hidden low-energy ions: a better map of near-Earth space and the terrestrial mass balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    André, Mats

    2015-12-01

    This is a review of the mass balance of planet Earth, intended also for scientists not usually working with space physics or geophysics. The discussion includes both outflow of ions and neutrals from the ionosphere and upper atmosphere, and the inflow of meteoroids and larger objects. The focus is on ions with energies less than tens of eV originating from the ionosphere. Positive low-energy ions are complicated to detect onboard sunlit spacecraft at higher altitudes, which often become positively charged to several tens of volts. We have invented a technique to observe low-energy ions based on the detection of the wake behind a charged spacecraft in a supersonic ion flow. We find that low-energy ions usually dominate the ion density and the outward flux in large volumes in the magnetosphere. The global outflow is of the order of 1026 ions s-1. This is a significant fraction of the total number outflow of particles from Earth, and changes plasma processes in near-Earth space. We compare order of magnitude estimates of the mass outflow and inflow for planet Earth and find that they are similar, at around 1 kg s-1 (30 000 ton yr-1). We briefly discuss atmospheric and ionospheric outflow from other planets and the connection to evolution of extraterrestrial life.

  19. Calculations on Electron Capture in Low Energy Ion-Molecule Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Stancil, P.C.; Zygelman, B.; Kirby, K.

    1997-12-31

    Recent progress on the application of a quantal, molecular-orbital, close-coupling approach to the calculation of electron capture in collisions of multiply charged ions with molecules is discussed. Preliminary results for single electron capture by N{sup 2+} with H{sub 2} are presented. Electron capture by multiply charged ions colliding with H{sub 2} is an important process in laboratory and astrophysical plasmas. It provides a recombination mechanism for multiply charged ions in x-ray ionized astronomical environments which may have sparse electron and atomic hydrogen abundances. In the divertor region of a tokamak fusion device, charge exchange of impurity ions with H{sub 2} plays a role in the ionization balance and the production of radiative energy loss leading to cooling, X-ray and ultraviolet auroral emission from Jupiter is believed to be due to charge exchange of O and S ions with H{sub 2} in the Jovian atmosphere. Solar wind ions interacting with cometary molecules may have produced the x-rays observed from Comet Hyakutake. In order to model and understand the behavior of these environments, it is necessary to obtain total, electronic state-selective (ESS), and vibrational (or rotational) state-selective (VSS) capture cross sections for collision energies as low as 10 meV/amu to as high as 100 keV/amu in some instances. Fortunately, charge transfer with molecular targets has received considerable experimental attention. Numerous measurements have been made with flow tubes, ion traps, and ion beams. Flow tube and ion trap studies generally provide information on rate coefficients for temperatures between 800 K and 20,000 K. In this article, we report on the progress of our group in implementing a quantum-mechanical Molecular Orbital Close Coupling (MOCC) approach to the study of electron capture by multiply charged ions in collisions with molecules. We illustrate this with a preliminary investigation of Single Electron Capture (SEC) by N{sup 2+} with H

  20. Influence of magnetic fields on electron-Ion recombination at very low energies

    PubMed

    Gwinner; Hoffknecht; Bartsch; Beutelspacher; Eklow; Glans; Grieser; Krohn; Lindroth; Muller; Saghiri; Schippers; Schramm; Schwalm; Tokman; Wissler; Wolf

    2000-05-22

    Radiative recombination (inverse photoionization) is believed to be well understood since the beginning of quantum mechanics. Still, modern experiments consistently reveal excess recombination rates at very low electron-ion center-of-mass energies. In a detailed study on recombination of F6+ and C6+ ions with magnetically guided electrons we explored the yet unexplained rate enhancement, its dependence on the magnetic field B, the electron density n(e), and the beam temperatures T( perpendicular) and T( ||). The excess scales as T(-1/2)( perpendicular) and, surprisingly, as T(-1/2)( ||), increases strongly with B, and is insensitive to n(e). This puts strong constraints on explanations of the enhancement.

  1. Multi-Effects and Mechanism of Broad Bean M1 Root-Tip Cells Implanted by Low Energy N+ Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Gu-feng; Gu, Yue-hua

    2001-06-01

    Broad beans were divided into six groups and implanted with N+ beam of 30 KeV, 8 × 1016/cm2 per time for various radiating times respectively. Besides the statistics of its vigor of germination, the M1 root-tip cells of these broad beans were systematically analyzed on their changes in mitotic percentage, morphology and behavior of chromosomes, along with the structure of cytoskeletons, including microtubule and intermediate filament. Based on all results of these studies, our opinions have been expressed in the report on the mechanism of low-energy N+ beams effecting on higher dicotyledons such as broad bean.

  2. Low-energy RI beam technology and nuclear clusters in the explosive pp-chain breakout process

    SciTech Connect

    Kubono, S.; Yamaguchi, H.; Kahl, D. M.; Ohshiro, Y.; Watanabe, S.; Yamazaki, N.; Teranishi, T.; Yanagisawa, Y.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Kase, M.; Hayakawa, S.; Kwon, Y. K.; Hashimoto, T.; Fukuda, Y.; He, J. J.; Goto, A.; Muto, H.

    2014-05-09

    The lecture includes two parts: One is a discussion on the technology for developing RIB beam facility based on the in-flight method and relevant experimental technology. The second part is a discussion on experimental efforts for studying the breakout process from the pp-chain region based on recent works with low energy RI beams. The discussion of the second part specifically covers the problem of the vp-process in type II supernovae in terms of alpha cluster nature for the reactions.

  3. Ion beam microtexturing of surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, R. S.

    1981-01-01

    Some recent work in surface microtecturing by ion beam sputtering is described. The texturing is accomplished by deposition of an impurity onto a substrate while simultaneously bombarding it with an ion beam. A summary of the theory regarding surface diffusion of impurities and the initiation of cone formation is provided. A detailed experimental study of the time-development of individual sputter cones is described. A quasi-liquid coating was observed that apparently reduces the sputter rate of the body of a cone compared to the bulk material. Experimental measurements of surface diffusion activation energies are presented for a variety of substrate-seed combinations and range from about 0.3 eV to 1.2 eV. Observations of apparent crystal structure in sputter cones are discussed. Measurements of the critical temperature for cone formation are also given along with a correlation of critical temperature with substrate sputter rate.

  4. SIMULATION OF A WIDE-BAND LOW-ENERGY NEUTRINO BEAM FOR VERY LONG BASELINE NEUTRINO OSCILLATION EXPERIMENTS.

    SciTech Connect

    BISHAI, M.; HEIM, J.; LEWIS, C.; MARINO, A.D.; VIREN, B.; YUMICEVA, F.

    2006-08-01

    We present simulations of a wide-band low-energy neutrino beam for a future very long baseline neutrino oscillation (VLBNO) program using the proton beam from the Main Injector (MI) proton accelerator at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab). The target and horn designs previously developed for Brookhaven Laboratory's Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) VLBNO program are used without modifications. The neutrino flux distributions for various MI proton beam energies and new high-intensity neutrino beam-line designs possible at Fermilab are presented. The beam-line siting and design parameters are chosen to match the requirements of an on-axis beam from Fermilab to one of the two possible sites for the future Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory (DUSEL). A preliminary estimate of the observable event rates and spectra at a detector located in DUSEL for different beam configurations has been performed. Our preliminary conclusions are that a 40-60 GeV 0.5 to 1 MW beam from the Fermilab Main Injector to a DUSEL site has the potential to reach the desired intensity for the next generation of neutrino oscillation experiments. Recent studies indicate that the Fermilab MI can reach a beam power of 0.5 MW at 60 GeV with incremental upgrades to the existing accelerator complex.

  5. Ion beam inertial confinement target

    DOEpatents

    Bangerter, Roger O.; Meeker, Donald J.

    1985-01-01

    A target for implosion by ion beams composed of a spherical shell of frozen DT surrounded by a low-density, low-Z pusher shell seeded with high-Z material, and a high-density tamper shell. The target has various applications in the inertial confinement technology. For certain applications, if desired, a low-density absorber shell may be positioned intermediate the pusher and tamper shells.

  6. Transmission measurement based on STM observation to detect the penetration depth of low-energy heavy ions in botanic samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Feng; Wang, Yugang; Xue, Jianming; Wang, Sixue; Du, Guanhua; Zhao, Weijiang

    2003-01-01

    The penetration depth of low-energy heavy ions in botanic samples was detected with a new transmission measurement. In the measurement, highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) pieces were placed behind the botanic samples with certain thickness. During the irradiation of heavy ions with energy of tens of keV, the energetic particles transmitted from those samples were received by the HOPG pieces. After irradiation, scanning tunneling microscope (STM) was applied to observe protrusion-like damage induced by these transmitted ions on the surface of the HOPG. The statistical average number density of protrusions and the minimum transmission rate of the low-energy heavy ions can be obtained. The detection efficiency of the new method for low-energy heavy ions was about 0.1-1 and the background in the measurement can be reduced to as low as 1.0 x 10(8) protrusions/cm2. With this method, the penetration depth of the energetic particles was detected to be no less than 60 micrometers in kidney bean slices when the slices were irradiated by 100 keVAr+ ion at the fluence of 5 x 10(16) ions/cm2. c2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Development of an ion beam analyzing system for the KBSI heavy-ion accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahng, Jungbae; Hong, Jonggi; Park, Jin Yong; Kim, Seong Jun; Ok, Jung-Woo; Choi, Seyong; Shin, Chang Seouk; Yoon, Jang-Hee; Won, Mi-Sook; Lee, Byoung-Seob; Kim, Eun-San

    2016-02-01

    The Korea Basic Science Institute (KBSI) has been developing a heavy ion accelerator system to accelerate high current, multi-charge state ions produced by a 28 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron ion source. A beam analyzing system as a part of the low energy beam transport apparatus was developed to select charged particles with desirable charge states from the ion beams. The desired species of ion, which is generated and extracted from the ECR ion source including various ion particles, can be selected by 90° dipole electromagnet. Due to the non-symmetrical structure in the coil as well as the non-linear permeability of the yoke material coil, a three dimensional analysis was carried out to confirm the design parameters. In this paper, we present the experimental results obtained as result of an analysis of KBSI accelerator. The effectiveness of beam selection was confirmed during the test of the analyzing system by injecting an ion beam from an ECR ion source.

  8. Investigations of low-energy ion irradiation influence on glassy polymeric carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abidzina, V.; Tereshko, I.; Elkin, I.; Muntele, I.; Muntele, C.; Minamisawa, R. A.; Ila, D.

    2007-04-01

    Glassy polymeric carbon (GPC), which is made from phenolic resins, has a high chemical inertness and is used as high temperature and radiation resistant coatings, as high temperature heat-exchangers, as well as a biomaterial in medicine for the manufacture of heart valves and prosthetic devices [G.M. Jenkins, D. Ila, H. Maleki, Mater. Res. Soc. Symp. Proc. 394 (1995) 181]. GPC is also used for the harsh environment of space, as well as for protective coating against extreme environments such as high temperature, highly ionizing radiation, as well as corrosive environments. In this work, we present the results of our investigation of the influence of the low-energy ion irradiation in glow-discharge plasma on GPC. Chemical changes in GPC prepared at 1000 °C were studied using FTIR, micro-Raman spectroscopy and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS). Porosity changes were monitored through introducing lithium from a molten LiCl salt into GPC and using the (p, α) nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) to measure Li concentration in treated GPC.

  9. Role of Electronic Structure In Ion Band State Theory of Low Energy Nuclear Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chubb, Scott

    2004-03-01

    The Nuts and Bolts of our Ion Band State (IBS) theory of low energy nuclear reactions (LENR's) in palladium-deuteride (PdD) and palladium-hydride (PdH) are the electrons that hold together or tear apart the bonds (or lack of bonds) between deuterons (d's) or protons (p's) and the host material. In PdDx and PdH_x, this bonding is strongly correlated with loading: in ambient loading conditions (x< 0. 6), the bonding in hibits IBS occupation. As x arrow 1, slight increases and decreases in loading can lead to vibrations (which have conventionally been thought to occur from phonons) that can induce potential losses or increases of p/d. Naive assumptions about phonons fail to include these losses and increases. These effects can occur because neither H or D has core electrons and because in either PdD or PdH, the electrons near the Fermi Energy have negligible overlap with the nucleus of either D or H. I use these ideas to develop a formal justification, based on a generalization of conventional band theory (Scott Chubb, "Semi-Classical Conduction of Charged and Neutral Particles in Finite Lattices," 2004 March Meeting."), for the idea that occupation of IBS's can occur and that this can lead to nuclear reactions.

  10. Creation of High-Yield Polyhydroxyalkanoates Engineered Strains by Low Energy Ion Implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Shiquan; Cheng, Ying; Zhu, Suwen; Cheng, Beijiu

    2008-12-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs), as a candidate for biodegradable plastic materials, can be synthesized by numerous microorganisms. However, as its production cost is high in comparison with those of chemically synthesized plastics, a lot of research has been focused on the efficient production of PHAs using different methods. In the present study, the mutation effects of PHAs production in strain pCB4 were investigated with implantation of low energy ions. It was found that under the implantation conditions of 7.8 × 1014 N+/cm2 at 10 keV, a high-yield PHAs strain with high genetic stability was generated from many mutants. After optimizing its fermentation conditions, the biomass, PHAs concentration and PHAs content of pCBH4 reached 2.26 g/L, 1.81 g/L, and 80.08% respectively, whereas its wild type controls were about 1.24 g/L, 0.61 g/L, and 49.20%. Moreover, the main constituent of PHAs was identified as poly-3-hydroxybutyrates (PHB) in the mutant stain and the yield of this compound was increased up to 41.33% in contrast to that of 27.78% in the wild type strain.

  11. Effect of low-energy hydrogen ion implantation on dendritic web silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohatgi, A.; Meier, D. L.; Rai-Choudhury, P.; Fonash, S. J.; Singh, R.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of a low-energy (0.4 keV), short-time (2-min), heavy-dose (10 to the 18th/sq cm) hydrogen ion implant on dendritic web silicon solar cells and material was investigated. Such an implant was observed to improve the cell open-circuit voltage and short-circuit current appreciably for a number of cells. In spite of the low implant energy, measurements of internal quantum efficiency indicate that it is the base of the cell, rather than the emitter, which benefits from the hydrogen implant. This is supported by the observation that the measured minority-carrier diffusion length in the base did not change when the emitter was removed. In some cases, a threefold increase of the base diffusion length was observed after implantation. The effects of the hydrogen implantation were not changed by a thermal stress test at 250 C for 111 h in nitrogen. It is speculated that hydrogen enters the bulk by traveling along dislocations, as proposed recently for edge-defined film-fed growth silicon ribbon.

  12. Low-energy outer-shell photodetachment of the negative ion of boron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kedong; Zatsarinny, Oleg; Bartschat, Klaus

    2016-04-01

    The photodetachment of the negative ion of boron, B-(2s22p2)3P, is investigated by employing the B-spline R-matrixmethod for photon energies ranging from threshold to 12 eV. A multi-configuration Hartree-Fock method with nonorthogonal, term-dependent orbitals is employed to generate accurate initial bound-state and final continuum-state wavefunctions. The close-coupling expansion includes all principal scattering channels for photodetachment from both the 2p and 2s orbitals. The calculated photodetachment cross sections are in good agreement with the available experimental data. Several prominent resonance features are predicted, thereby providing new challenges in the study of this highly correlated process. To classify the resonance structure, both the partial cross sections and the main contributions of the individual scattering channels are discussed. The presented cross sections, along with the asymmetry parameter β for the angular distribution, are believed to be the most comprehensive and accurate dataset currently available for the B- photodetachment process at low energies. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Advances in Positron and Electron Scattering", edited by Paulo Limao-Vieira, Gustavo Garcia, E. Krishnakumar, James Sullivan, Hajime Tanuma and Zoran Petrovic.

  13. Diffusion enhancement due to low-energy ion bombardment during sputter etching and deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Eltoukhy, A.H.; Greene, J.E.

    1980-08-01

    The effects of low-energy ion bombardment on enhancing elemental diffusion rates at both heterojunction interfaces during film deposition and over the compositionally altered layer created during sputter etching alloy targets have been considered. Depth dependent enhanced interdiffusion coefficients, expressed as D*(x)=D*(0) exp(-x/L/sub d/), where D*(0) is more than five orders of magnitude greater than thermal diffusion values, were measured in InSb/GaSb multilayer structures deposited by multitarget bias sputering. D*(0) was determined from the amplitude u of the compositional modulation in the multilayered films (layer thicknesses between 20 and 45 A) as measured by superlattice x-ray diffraction techniques. The value of D*(0) was found to increase from 3 x 10/sup -17/ to 1 x 10/sup -16/ cm/sup 2//sec as the applied substrate bias was increased from 0 to -75 V. However even at V/sub a/=0, the diffusion coefficient was enhanced owing to an induced substrate potential with respect to the positive space-charge region in the Ar discharge. The diffusion length of L/sub d/ of the ion bombardment created defects was approx.1000 A. Enhanced diffusion also has a significiant effect on the altered layer thickness x/sub e/ and the total sputtering time t/sub e/ (or ion dose) required to reach steady state during ion etching of multielement targets. The effects of using an exponentially depth dependent versus a constant value of the enhanced diffusion coefficient on calculated values of x/sub e/ and t/sub e/ in single-phase binary alloys were considered. The results show that both x/sub e/ and t/sub e/ are considerably larger using a depth dependent D*(x), when L/sub d/D*(0)/v, the usual case for most sputtering applications, the two solutions approach each other.

  14. A large-acceptance beam-deceleration module for retrofitting into ion-source beam lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hijazi, H.; Meyer, F. W.

    2013-03-01

    We describe a large-acceptance deceleration module capable of decelerating large-emittance full-intensity ion beams typical of ECR ion sources to very low energies with high efficiency. The deceleration module is designed to permit convenient retrofitting into an existing beam line to replace, e.g., the first Faraday cup after magnetic analysis of the beam extracted from the ion source. For starting energies of 10 keV, and incident ion currents as large as 300 μA, deceleration efficiencies have been measured to be greater than 80% for final energies as low as 70 eV. The decelerated beam intensity can be monitored either by insertion of a beam catcher floating at the final deceleration voltage or from the current to the exit grid itself, with suitable correction applied for the grid transparency factor. The behavior of the deceleration optics was modeled using SIMION, incorporating the effects of intra-beam space charge repulsion. We describe a recent application of this deceleration module to study near-surface He bubble and blister formation of a W target heated to 1250 K and irradiated with a 98 eV He ion beam with a flux of ˜1016 cm-2 s-1.

  15. The Scientific program with RIBRAS (Radioactive Ion Beams in Brasil)

    SciTech Connect

    Lichtenthaeler, R.; Lepine-Szily, A.; Guimaraes, V.; Faria, P. N. de; Mendes, D. R. Jr.; Pires, K. C. C.; Morcelle, V.; Hussein, M. S.; Barioni, A.; Condori, R. Pampa; Morais, M. C.; Alcantara Nunez, J.; Camargo, O. Jr.; Otani, Y.; Leistenschneider, E.; Scarduelli, V.; Benjamim, E. A.; Arazi, A.; Assuncao, M.

    2009-06-03

    The Radioactive Ion Beams Facility (RIBRAS) is in operation since 2004 at the Pelletron Accelerator Laboratory of the University of Sao Paulo and consists of two superconducting solenoids capable of producing low energy secondary beams of light exotic nuclei. Measurements of the elastic scattering, breakup and transfer reactions with radioactive projectiles such as {sup 6}He,{sup 8}Li,{sup 7}Be on several targets have been performed. A review of the research program carried on along the last four years using the RIBRAS facility is presented.

  16. Space Charge Correction on Emittance Measurement of Low Energy Electron Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Treado, Colleen J.; /Massachusetts U., Amherst

    2012-09-07

    The goal of any particle accelerator is to optimize the transport of a charged particle beam along a set path by confining the beam to a small region close to the design trajectory and directing it accurately along the beamline. To do so in the simplest fashion, accelerators use a system of magnets that exert approximately linear electromagnetic forces on the charged beam. These electromagnets bend the beam along the desired path, in the case of bending magnets, and constrain the beam to the desired area through alternating focusing and defocusing effects, in the case of quadrupole magnets. We can model the transport of such a beam through transfer matrices representing the actions of the various beamline elements. However, space charge effects, produced from self electric fields within the beam, defocus the beam and must be accounted for in the calculation of beam emittance. We present below the preliminary results of a MATLAB code built to model the transport of a charged particle beam through an accelerator and measure the emittance under the influence of space charge effects. We demonstrate the method of correctly calculating the emittance of a beam under space charge effects using a least square fit to determine the initial properties of the beam given the beam size measured at a specific point after transport.

  17. SU-D-19A-01: Can Farmer-Type Ionization Chambers Be Used to Improve the Accuracy of Low-Energy Electron Beam Reference Dosimetry?

    SciTech Connect

    Muir, B R; McEwen, M R

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the use of cylindrical Farmer-type ionization chambers to improve the accuracy of low-energy electron beam calibration. Historically, these chamber types have not been used in beams with incident energies less than 10 MeV (R{sub 5} {sub 0} < 4.3 cm) because early investigations suggested large (up to 5 %) fluence perturbation factors in these beams, implying that a significant component of uncertainty would be introduced if used for calibration. More recently, the assumptions used to determine perturbation corrections for cylindrical chambers have been questioned. Methods: Measurements are made with cylindrical chambers in Elekta Precise 4, 8 and 18 MeV electron beams. Several chamber types are investigated that employ graphite walls and aluminum electrodes with very similar specifications (NE2571, NE2505/3, FC65-G). Depth-ionization scans are measured in water in the 8 and 18 MeV beams. To reduce uncertainty from chamber positioning, measurements in the 4 MeV beam are made at the reference depth in Virtual Water™. The variability of perturbation factors is quantified by comparing normalized response of various chambers. Results: Normalized ion chamber response varies by less than 0.7 % for similar chambers at average electron energies corresponding to that at the reference depth from 4 or 6 MeV beams. Similarly, normalized measurements made with similar chambers at the reference depth in the 4 MeV beam vary by less than 0.4 %. Absorbed dose calibration coefficients derived from these results are stable within 0.1 % on average over a period of 6 years. Conclusion: These results indicate that the uncertainty associated with differences in fluence perturbations for cylindrical chambers with similar specifications is only 0.2 %. The excellent long-term stability of these chambers in both photon and electron beams suggests that these chambers might offer the best performance for all reference dosimetry applications.

  18. Neurosurgical applications of ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabrikant, Jacob I.; Levy, Richard P.; Phillips, Mark H.; Frankel, Kenneth A.; Lyman, John T.

    1989-04-01

    The program at Donner Pavilion has applied nuclear medicine research to the diagnosis and radiosurgical treatment of life-threatening intracranial vascular disorders that affect more than half a million Americans. Stereotactic heavy-charged-particle Bragg peak radiosurgery, using narrow beams of heavy ions, demonstrates superior biological and physical characteristics in brain over X-and γ-rays, viz., improved dose distribution in the Bragg peak and sharp lateral and distal borders and less scattering of the beam. Examination of CNS tissue response and alteration of cerebral blood-flow dynamics related to heavy-ion Bragg peak radiosurgery is carried out using three-dimensional treatment planning and quantitative imaging utilizing cerebral angiography, computerized tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), cine-CT, xenon X-ray CT and positron emission tomography (PET). Also under examination are the physical properties of narrow heavy-ion beams for improving methods of dose delivery and dose distribution and for establishing clinical RBE/LET and dose-response relationships for human CNS tissues. Based on the evaluation and treatment with stereotactically directed narrow beams of heavy charged particles of over 300 patients, with cerebral angiography, CT scanning and MRI and PET scanning of selected patients, plus extensive clinical and neuroradiological followup, it appears that Stereotactic charged-particle Bragg peak radiosurgery obliterates intracranial arteriovenous malformations or protects against rebleeding with reduced morbidity and no mortality. Discussion will include the method of evaluation, the clinical research protocol, the Stereotactic neuroradiological preparation, treatment planning, the radiosurgery procedure and the protocol for followup. Emphasis will be placed on the neurological results, including the neuroradiological and clinical response and early and late delayed injury in brain leading to complications (including vasogenic edema

  19. Simulation study of beam-beam effects in ion beams with large space charge tuneshift

    SciTech Connect

    Montag C.

    2012-05-20

    During low-energy operations with gold-gold collisions at 3.85 GeV beam energy, significant beam lifetime reductions have been observed due to the beam-beam interaction in the presence of large space charge tuneshifts. These beam-beam tuneshift parameters were about an order of magnitude smaller than during regular high energy operations. To get a better understanding of this effect, simulations have been performed. Recent results are presented.

  20. Development of Linear Mode Detection for Top-down Ion Implantation of Low Energy Sb Donors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacheco, Jose; Singh, Meenakshi; Bielejec, Edward; Lilly, Michael; Carroll, Malcolm

    2015-03-01

    Fabrication of donor spin qubits for quantum computing applications requires deterministic control over the number of implanted donors and the spatial accuracy to within which these can be placed. We present an ion implantation and detection technique that allows us to deterministically implant a single Sb ion (donor) with a resulting volumetric distribution of <10 nm. This donor distribution is accomplished by implanting 30keV Sb into Si which yields a longitudinal straggle of <10 nm and combined with a <50 nm spot size using the Sandia NanoImplanter (nI). The ion beam induced charge signal is collected using a MOS detector that is integrated with a Si quantum dot for transport measurments. This work was performed, in part, at the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, a U.S. DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences user facility. The work was supported by Sandia National Laboratories Directed Research and Development Program. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed-Martin Company, for the U. S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  1. Expansion of the radioactive ion beam program at Argonne

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, J. A.

    2011-01-01

    The Argonne Tandem Linear Accelerator System (ATLAS) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) provides a wide range of stable ion beams and radioactive beams which have contributed to our understanding of nuclear structure and reactions. Until now, most radioactive ion beams at ATLAS were produced in flight using light-ion reactions such as (p, n), (d, n), (d, p), (d,3He), and (3He,n). Within the next few months, the radioactive ion beam program at ATLAS will acquire much extended, new capabilities with the commissioning of a new facility: the CAlifornium Rare Isotope Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU). CARIBU will supply ion beams of 252Cf fission fragments, which are thermalized in a gas catcher. The singly- and doubly-charged ions extracted from the gas catcher will be mass-separated and either delivered to a low-energy experimental area, or charge bred with a modified ECR source and subsequently reaccelerated by the ATLAS facility. Properties of hundreds of these neutron-rich nuclides will be investigated using ion traps, decay stations, the newly commissioned HELical Orbit Spectrometer (HELIOS), and other available experimental equipment such as Gammasphere and the FMA. HELIOS was constructed to take advantage of rare ion beams, such as those provided by CARIBU, through light-ion transfer reactions in inverse kinematics, and represents a new approach to the study of direct reactions in inverse kinematics which avoids kinematic broadening. Experiments are currently being conducted with HELIOS, and first results with the d(28Si,p) and d(12B,p) reactions have shown excellent energy resolution.

  2. Focused electron and ion beam systems

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Reijonen, Jani; Persaud, Arun; Ji, Qing; Jiang, Ximan

    2004-07-27

    An electron beam system is based on a plasma generator in a plasma ion source with an accelerator column. The electrons are extracted from a plasma cathode in a plasma ion source, e.g. a multicusp plasma ion source. The beam can be scanned in both the x and y directions, and the system can be operated with multiple beamlets. A compact focused ion or electron beam system has a plasma ion source and an all-electrostatic beam acceleration and focusing column. The ion source is a small chamber with the plasma produced by radio-frequency (RF) induction discharge. The RF antenna is wound outside the chamber and connected to an RF supply. Ions or electrons can be extracted from the source. A multi-beam system has several sources of different species and an electron beam source.

  3. A gas circulation and purification system for gas-cell-based low-energy RI-beam production.

    PubMed

    Sonoda, T; Tsubota, T; Wada, M; Katayama, I; Kojima, T M; Reponen, M

    2016-06-01

    A gas circulation and purification system was developed at the RIKEN Radioactive Isotope Beam Factory that can be used for gas-cell-based low-energy RI-beam production. A high-flow-rate gas cell filled with one atmosphere of buffer gas (argon or helium) is used for the deceleration and thermalization of high-energy RI-beams. The exhausted buffer gas is efficiently collected using a compact dry pump and returned to the gas cell with a recovery efficiency of >97%. The buffer gas is efficiently purified using two gas purifiers as well as collision cleaning, which eliminates impurities in the gas. An impurity level of one part per billion is achieved with this method. PMID:27370494

  4. A gas circulation and purification system for gas-cell-based low-energy RI-beam production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonoda, T.; Tsubota, T.; Wada, M.; Katayama, I.; Kojima, T. M.; Reponen, M.

    2016-06-01

    A gas circulation and purification system was developed at the RIKEN Radioactive Isotope Beam Factory that can be used for gas-cell-based low-energy RI-beam production. A high-flow-rate gas cell filled with one atmosphere of buffer gas (argon or helium) is used for the deceleration and thermalization of high-energy RI-beams. The exhausted buffer gas is efficiently collected using a compact dry pump and returned to the gas cell with a recovery efficiency of >97%. The buffer gas is efficiently purified using two gas purifiers as well as collision cleaning, which eliminates impurities in the gas. An impurity level of one part per billion is achieved with this method.

  5. Enhanced nitrogen and phosphorus removal from eutrophic lake water by Ipomoea aquatica with low-energy ion implantation.

    PubMed

    Li, Miao; Wu, Yue-Jin; Yu, Zeng-Liang; Sheng, Guo-Ping; Yu, Han-Qing

    2009-03-01

    Ipomoea aquatica with low-energy N+ ion implantation was used for the removal of both nitrogen and phosphorus from the eutrophic Chaohu Lake, China. The biomass growth, nitrate reductase and peroxidase activities of the implanted I. aquatica were found to be higher than those of I. aquatica without ion implantation. Higher NO3-N and PO4-P removal efficiencies were obtained for the I. aquatica irradiation at 25 keV, 3.9 x 10(16) N+ ions/cm(2) and 20 keV 5.2 x 10(16) N+ ions/cm(2), respectively (p < 0.05). Moreover, the nitrogen and phosphorus contents in the plant biomass with ion implantation were also greater than those of the controls. I. aquatica with ion implantation was directly responsible for 51-68% N removal and 54-71% P removal in the three experiments. The results further confirm that the ion implantation could enhance the growth potential of I. aquatica in real eutrophic water and increase its nutrient removal efficiency. Thus, the low-energy ion implantation for aquatic plants could be considered as an approach for in situ phytoremediation and bioremediation of eutrophic waters.

  6. Surface engineering of a Zr-based bulk metallic glass with low energy Ar- or Ca-ion implantation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lu; Zhu, Chao; Muntele, Claudiu I; Zhang, Tao; Liaw, Peter K; He, Wei

    2015-02-01

    In the present study, low energy ion implantation was employed to engineer the surface of a Zr-based bulk metallic glass (BMG), aiming at improving the biocompatibility and imparting bioactivity to the surface. Ca- or Ar-ions were implanted at 10 or 50 keV at a fluence of 8 × 10(15)ions/cm(2) to (Zr0.55Al0.10Ni0.05Cu0.30)99Y1 (at.%) BMG. The effects of ion implantation on material properties and subsequent cellular responses were investigated. Both Ar- and Ca-ion implantations were suggested to induce atom displacements on the surfaces according to the Monte-Carlo simulation. The change of atomic environment of Zr in the surface regions as implied by the alteration in X-ray absorption measurements at Zr K-edge. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed that the ion implantation process has modified the surface chemical compositions and indicated the presence of Ca after Ca-ion implantation. The surface nanohardness has been enhanced by implantation of either ion species, with Ca-ion implantation showing more prominent effect. The BMG surfaces were altered to be more hydrophobic after ion implantation, which can be attributed to the reduced amount of hydroxyl groups on the implanted surfaces. Higher numbers of adherent cells were found on Ar- and Ca-ion implanted samples, while more pronounced cell adhesion was observed on Ca-ion implanted substrates. The low energy ion implantation resulted in concurrent modifications in atomic structure, nanohardness, surface chemistry, hydrophobicity, and cell behavior on the surface of the Zr-based BMG, which were proposed to be mutually correlated with each other. PMID:25492195

  7. Investigation of ion capture in an electron beam ion trap charge-breeder for rare isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kittimanapun, Kritsada

    Charge breeding of rare isotope ions has become an important ingredient for providing reaccelerated rare isotope beams for science. At the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL), a reaccelerator, ReA, has been built that employs an advanced Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) as a charge breeder. ReA will provide rare-isotope beams with energies of a few hundred keV/u up to tens of MeV/u to enable the study of properties of rare isotopes via low energy Coulomb excitation and transfer reactions, and to investigate nuclear reactions important for nuclear astrophysics. ReA consists of an EBIT charge breeder, a charge-over-mass selector, a room temperature radio-frequency quadrupole accelerator, and a superconducting radio-frequency linear accelerator. The EBIT charge breeder features a high-current electron gun, a long trap structure, and a hybrid superconducting magnet to reach both high acceptance for injected low-charge ions as well as high-electron beam current densities for fast charge breeding. In this work, continuous ion injection and capture in the EBIT have been investigated with a dedicated Monte-Carlo simulation code and in experimental studies. The Monte-Carlo code NEBIT considers the electron-impact ionization cross sections, space charge due to the electron beam current, ion dynamics, electric field from electrodes, and magnetic field from the superconducting magnet. Experiments were performed to study the capture efficiency as a function of injected ion beam current, electron beam current, trap size, and trap potential depth. The charge state evolution of trapped ions was studied, providing information about the effective current density of the electron beam inside the EBIT. An attempt was made to measure the effective space-charge potential of the electron beam by studying the dynamics of a beam injected and reflected inside the trap.

  8. Pseudo ribbon metal ion beam source

    SciTech Connect

    Stepanov, Igor B. Ryabchikov, Alexander I.; Sivin, Denis O.; Verigin, Dan A.

    2014-02-15

    The paper describes high broad metal ion source based on dc macroparticle filtered vacuum arc plasma generation with the dc ion-beam extraction. The possibility of formation of pseudo ribbon beam of metal ions with the parameters: ion beam length 0.6 m, ion current up to 0.2 A, accelerating voltage 40 kV, and ion energy up to 160 kV has been demonstrated. The pseudo ribbon ion beam is formed from dc vacuum arc plasma. The results of investigation of the vacuum arc evaporator ion-emission properties are presented. The influence of magnetic field strength near the cathode surface on the arc spot movement and ion-emission properties of vacuum-arc discharge for different cathode materials are determined. It was shown that vacuum-arc discharge stability can be reached when the magnetic field strength ranges from 40 to 70 G on the cathode surface.

  9. Design and characterization of a movable emittance meter for low-energy electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Catani, Luciano; Chiadroni, Enrica; Cianchi, Alessandro; Tazzari, Sergio; Boscolo, Manuela; Castellano, Michele; Di Pirro, Giampiero; Ferrario, Massimo; Fusco, Valeria; Filippetto, Daniele; Palumbo, Luigi; Vaccarezza, Cristina; Vicario, Carlo; Ronsivalle, Concetta

    2006-09-15

    In order to characterize and optimize the beam emittance compensation scheme [L. Serafini and J. B. Rosenzweig, Phys. Rev. E 55, 7565 (1997)] of the Sorgente Pulsata Autoamplificata di Radiazione Coerente project [D. Alesini et al., Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res. A 507, 345 (2003)] high brightness preinjector a system to accurately measure the beam rms emittance evolution downstream of the rf gun has been developed. Since in a space charge dominated beam the quadrupole-scan method is not applicable, a movable emittance measurement device has been built based on the pepper-pot technique. The device consists of a double system of horizontal and vertical slit arrays and a downstream screen, all installed on a longitudinally movable support equipped with bellows and spanning the {approx_equal}1.2 m long drift space between gun and first accelerating section. The system allows the measuring of the beam rms emittance all along the spanned region so as to accurately reconstruct its evolution along the beam trajectory. More than a simple improvement over more conventional beam emittance measurement tools this device defines a new strategy for characterizing high performance photoinjectors as it allows a detailed analysis of the beam behavior over a section of the accelerator where crucial beam shaping takes place. Numerical simulations of the measurement, mainly based on PARMELA [J. Billen, PARMELA Report No. LA-UR 96-1835, 1996 (unpublished)], have been used to estimate the achievable accuracy and to optimize the experimental setup. Wake field effects induced by the beam propagation through the bellows have also been investigated with HOMDYN [M. Ferrario et al., LCLS Report No. SLAC-PUB 84000, 1999 (unpublished)]. A series of laboratory tests to evaluate its performance has been carried out at LNF in Frascati. The system was then moved to DESY Zeuthen and installed on the Photo Injector Test Facility PITZ, for further testing with beam. Design criteria and tests

  10. Laser ion source for high brightness heavy ion beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamura, M.

    2016-09-01

    A laser ion source is known as a high current high charge state heavy ion source. However we place great emphasis on the capability to realize a high brightness ion source. A laser ion source has a pinpoint small volume where materials are ionized and can achieve quite uniform low temperature ion beam. Those features may enable us to realize very small emittance beams. In 2014, a low charge state high brightness laser ion source was successfully commissioned in Brookhaven National Laboratory. Now most of all the solid based heavy ions are being provided from the laser ion source for regular operation.

  11. The role of low-energy electrons in focused electron beam induced deposition: four case studies of representative precursors.

    PubMed

    Thorman, Rachel M; Kumar T P, Ragesh; Fairbrother, D Howard; Ingólfsson, Oddur

    2015-01-01

    Focused electron beam induced deposition (FEBID) is a single-step, direct-write nanofabrication technique capable of writing three-dimensional metal-containing nanoscale structures on surfaces using electron-induced reactions of organometallic precursors. Currently FEBID is, however, limited in resolution due to deposition outside the area of the primary electron beam and in metal purity due to incomplete precursor decomposition. Both limitations are likely in part caused by reactions of precursor molecules with low-energy (<100 eV) secondary electrons generated by interactions of the primary beam with the substrate. These low-energy electrons are abundant both inside and outside the area of the primary electron beam and are associated with reactions causing incomplete ligand dissociation from FEBID precursors. As it is not possible to directly study the effects of secondary electrons in situ in FEBID, other means must be used to elucidate their role. In this context, gas phase studies can obtain well-resolved information on low-energy electron-induced reactions with FEBID precursors by studying isolated molecules interacting with single electrons of well-defined energy. In contrast, ultra-high vacuum surface studies on adsorbed precursor molecules can provide information on surface speciation and identify species desorbing from a substrate during electron irradiation under conditions more representative of FEBID. Comparing gas phase and surface science studies allows for insight into the primary deposition mechanisms for individual precursors; ideally, this information can be used to design future FEBID precursors and optimize deposition conditions. In this review, we give a summary of different low-energy electron-induced fragmentation processes that can be initiated by the secondary electrons generated in FEBID, specifically, dissociative electron attachment, dissociative ionization, neutral dissociation, and dipolar dissociation, emphasizing the different

  12. Chemical composition, morphology and optical properties of zinc sulfide coatings deposited by low-energy electron beam evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragachev, A. V.; Yarmolenko, M. A.; Rogachev, A. A.; Gorbachev, D. L.; Zhou, Bing

    2014-06-01

    The research determines the features of formation, morphology, chemical composition and optical properties of the coatings deposited by the method, proposed for the first time, of the exposure of mechanical mixture of zinc and sulfur powders to low-energy electron beam evaporation. The findings show that the deposited coatings are characterized by high chemical and structural homogeneity in thickness. The study considers the influence of substrate temperature and thickness of the deposited layer on the morphology and the width of the formed ZnS thin layers band gap. Also was shown the possibility to form ZnS coatings with this method using the mixture of zinc and copper sulfide powders.

  13. The role of low-energy electrons in focused electron beam induced deposition: four case studies of representative precursors

    PubMed Central

    Thorman, Rachel M; Kumar T. P., Ragesh; Fairbrother, D Howard

    2015-01-01

    Summary Focused electron beam induced deposition (FEBID) is a single-step, direct-write nanofabrication technique capable of writing three-dimensional metal-containing nanoscale structures on surfaces using electron-induced reactions of organometallic precursors. Currently FEBID is, however, limited in resolution due to deposition outside the area of the primary electron beam and in metal purity due to incomplete precursor decomposition. Both limitations are likely in part caused by reactions of precursor molecules with low-energy (<100 eV) secondary electrons generated by interactions of the primary beam with the substrate. These low-energy electrons are abundant both inside and outside the area of the primary electron beam and are associated with reactions causing incomplete ligand dissociation from FEBID precursors. As it is not possible to directly study the effects of secondary electrons in situ in FEBID, other means must be used to elucidate their role. In this context, gas phase studies can obtain well-resolved information on low-energy electron-induced reactions with FEBID precursors by studying isolated molecules interacting with single electrons of well-defined energy. In contrast, ultra-high vacuum surface studies on adsorbed precursor molecules can provide information on surface speciation and identify species desorbing from a substrate during electron irradiation under conditions more representative of FEBID. Comparing gas phase and surface science studies allows for insight into the primary deposition mechanisms for individual precursors; ideally, this information can be used to design future FEBID precursors and optimize deposition conditions. In this review, we give a summary of different low-energy electron-induced fragmentation processes that can be initiated by the secondary electrons generated in FEBID, specifically, dissociative electron attachment, dissociative ionization, neutral dissociation, and dipolar dissociation, emphasizing the

  14. Nuclear astrophysics at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M.S.

    1994-12-31

    The potential for understanding spectacular stellar explosions such as novae, supernovae, and X-ray bursts will be greatly enhanced by the availability of the low-energy, high-intensity, accelerated beams of proton-rich radioactive nuclei currently being developed at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. These beams will be utilized in absolute cross section measurements of crucial (p, {gamma}) capture reactions in efforts to resolve the substantial qualitative uncertainties in current models of explosive stellar hydrogen burning outbursts. Details of the nuclear astrophysics research program with the unique HRIBF radioactive beams and a dedicated experimental endstation--centered on the Daresbury Recoil Separator--will be presented.

  15. Low-energy D{sup +} and H{sup +} ion irradiation effects on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Kue Park, Jun; Won Lee, Kyu; Hee Han, Jun; Jung Kweon, Jin; Kim, Dowan; Eui Lee, Cheol; Lim, Sun-Taek; Kim, Gon-Ho; Noh, S. J.; Kim, H. S.

    2013-12-07

    We have investigated the low-energy (100 eV) D{sup +} and H{sup +} ion irradiation effects on the structural and chemical properties of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG). Structural disorder due to the ion irradiation was identified by the Raman spectroscopy, the D{sup +} irradiation giving rise to greater structural disorder than the H{sup +} irradiation. Only sp{sup 2} bonding was identified in the X-ray photoemission spectroscopy of the D{sup +}-irradiated HOPG, indicating no change in the surface chemical structure. The H{sup +} irradiation, on the other hand, gave rise to sp{sup 3} bonding and π−π{sup *} transition, the sp{sup 3} bonding increasing with increasing irradiation dose. It is thus shown that the chemical properties of the HOPG surface may be sensitively modified by the low-energy H{sup +} ion irradiation, but not by the low-energy D{sup +} ion irradiation.

  16. Neutral Beam Ion Confinement in NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    D.S. Darrow; E.D. Fredrickson; S.M. Kaye; S.S. Medley; and A.L. Roquemore

    2001-07-24

    Neutral-beam (NB) heating in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) began in September 2000 using up to 5 MW of 80 keV deuterium (D) beams. An initial assessment of beam ion confinement has been made using neutron detectors, a neutral particle analyzer (NPA), and a Faraday cup beam ion loss probe. Preliminary neutron results indicate that confinement may be roughly classical in quiescent discharges, but the probe measurements do not match a classical loss model. MHD activity, especially reconnection events (REs) causes substantial disturbance of the beam ion population.

  17. Issues concerning high current lower energy electron beams required for ion cooling between EBIS LINAC and booster

    SciTech Connect

    Hershcovitch,A.

    2009-03-01

    Some issues, regarding a low energy high current electron beam that will be needed for electron beam cooling to reduce momentum of gold ions exiting the EBIS LINAC before injection into the booster, are examined. Options for propagating such an electron beam, as well as the effect of neutralizing background plasma on electron and ion beam parameters are calculated. Computations and some experimental data indicate that none of these issues is a show stopper.

  18. Kinetic Simulations of Ion Beam Neutralization

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Joseph

    2010-05-21

    Ion beam emission/neutralization is one of the most fundamental problems in spacecraft plasma interactions and electric propulsion. Although ion beam neutralization is readily achieved in experiments, the understanding of the underlying physical process remains at a rather primitive level. No theoretical or simulation models have convincingly explained the detailed neutralization mechanism, and no conclusions have been reached. This paper presents a fully kinetic simulation of ion beam neutralization and plasma beam propagation and discusses the physics of electron-ion coupling and the resulting propagation of a neutralized mesothermal plasma.

  19. Structured organic materials and devices using low-energy particle beams

    DOEpatents

    Vardeny, Z. Valy; Li, Sergey; Delong, Matthew C.; Jiang, Xiaomei

    2005-09-13

    Organic materials exposed to an electron beam for patterning a substrate (1) to make an optoelectronic organic device which includes a source, a drain, gate dielectric layer (4), and a substrate for emitting light.

  20. The Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS)

    ScienceCinema

    Brookhaven Lab

    2016-07-12

    Brookhaven National Lab has successfully developed a new pre-injector system, called the Electron Beam Ion Source, for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and NASA Space Radiation Laboratory science programs. The first of several planned improvemen

  1. The Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS)

    SciTech Connect

    Brookhaven Lab

    2009-06-09

    Brookhaven National Lab has successfully developed a new pre-injector system, called the Electron Beam Ion Source, for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and NASA Space Radiation Laboratory science programs. The first of several planned improvemen

  2. Fabrication of Superconducting Mo/Cu Bilayers Using Ion-Beam-Assisted e-Beam Evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeckel, Felix T.; Kripps, Kari L.; Morgan, Kelsey M.; Zhang, Shuo; McCammon, Dan

    2016-08-01

    Superconducting/normal metal bilayers with tunable transition temperature are a critical ingredient to the fabrication of high-performance transition edge sensors. Popular material choices include Mo/Au and Mo/Cu, which exhibit good environmental stability and provide low resistivity films to achieve adequate thermal conductivity. The deposition of high-quality Mo films requires sufficient adatom mobility, which can be provided by energetic ions in sputter deposition or by heating the substrate in an e-beam evaporation process. The bilayer T_c depends sensitively on the exact deposition conditions of the Mo layer and the superconducting/normal metal interface. Because the individual contributions (strain, crystalline structure, contamination) are difficult to disentangle and control, reproducibility remains a challenge. Recently, we have demonstrated that low-energy ion-beam-assisted e-beam evaporation offers an alternative route to reliably produce high-quality Mo films without the use of substrate heating. The energy and momentum delivered by the ion beam provides an additional control knob to tune film properties such as resistivity and stress. In this report we describe modifications made to the commercial end-Hall ion source to avoid iron contamination allowing us to produce superconducting Mo films. We show that the ion beam is effective at enhancing the bilayer interface transparency and that bilayers can be further tuned towards reduced T_c and higher conductivity by vacuum annealing.

  3. Transmission sputtering of gold thin films by low-energy (< 1 keV) xenon ions. I. The system and the measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayrault, Guy; Seidman, David N.

    1982-10-01

    A novel system for direct measurement of the transmission-sputtering yields of ion-irradiated thin films is described. The system was specifically designed for the study of the transmission sputtering caused by low-energy (<1 keV) xenon ions. The xenon ion beam employed is first mass-analyzed in a specially constructed corssed magnetic- and electric-field mass spectrometer; this analyzer eliminates all energetic neutral and singly charged ions of mass less than 40 amu; it is also expected that ≤2% of the xenon ions which actually reach a specimen are doubly charged. The analyzed xenon ion beam is made to impinge on a gold thin film (˜100-500 Å thick) which is mounted in a JEM 200 transmission electron-microscope holder. The temperature of the specimen can be varied between ˜25 and 300 K employing a continuous transfer liquid-helium cryostat. The particles (atoms or ions) ejected from the unirradiated surface of the gold thin film are detected by two channeltron electron-multiplier arrays (CEMA) in the Chevron configuration; the Chevron detector is able to detect individual transmission-sputtered particles when operated in the saturated mode. To further enhance resolution, the electron cascades (produced by the CEMA), are amplified and shaped electronically into uniform square pulses. The shaped signals are detected with an Ithaco 391A lock-in amplifier (LIA). With the aid of a ratiometer feature in the LIA, we are able to measure directly the ratio of the transmission-sputtered current It to the incident ion current Ib; for Ibn=1 μA cm-2, a ratio of It/Ib as small as 1×10-9 has been measured. A detailed discussion of the calibration procedure and the experimental errors, involved in this technique, are also presented.

  4. MODULATION OF LOW ENERGY BEAM TO GENERATE PREDEFINED BUNCH TRAINS FOR THE NSLS-II TOP-OFF INJECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, G.M.; Cheng, W.X.; Shaftan, T.; Fliller, R.; Heese, R.; Rose, J.

    2011-03-28

    The NSLS II linac will produce a bunch train, 80-150 bunches long with 2 ns bunch spacing. Having the ability to tailor the bunch train can lead to the smaller bunch to bunch charge variation in the storage ring. A stripline is planned to integrate into the linac baseline to achieve this tailoring. The stripline must have a fast field rise and fall time to tailor each bunch. The beam dynamics is minimally affected by including the extra space for the stripline. This paper discusses the linac beam dynamics with stripline, and the optimal design of the stripline. A stripline is to be integrated in the linac to match the storage ring uniform bunch charge requirement, which simplifies the gun pulser electronics and looses the edge uniform requirement. It is located at low energy to lower the stripline power supply requirement and limit the dumped electron radiation. By turning off the stripline, the beam dynamics through linac is comparable with the baseline design. More advanced ideas can be explored. If a DC corrector along with the stripline is used, the core bunch trains gets kick from the stripline while the head and the tail of bunch train just gets a DC kick. The stripline power supply waveform is a single flat top waveform with fast rise and drop and the pulse length is {approx}200 ns long or 100 bunches, which may be easier from the power supply view point. We are also considering the bunch by bunch charge manipulation to match the storage ring uniform bunch charge distribution requirement. By modulating the flat top waveform at 250 MHz with adjustable amplitude, each the bunch center is either at 45 degree or 135 degree. Only the head or tail of the bunch is trimmed out. Although each bunch center deviation from idea center is very different at low energy, it is gradually minimized with beam energy increase.

  5. Experimental results of an electron cyclotron resonance oxygen source and a low energy beam transport system for 1 MeV integral split ring radio frequency quadruple accelerator upgrade project

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, S. X.; Zhang, M.; Song, Z. Z.; Xu, R.; Zhao, J.; Yuan, Z. X.; Yu, J. X.; Chen, J.; Guo, Z. Y.

    2008-02-15

    To meet the requirements of developing separated function radio frequency quadruple (rfq) and upgrading the 1 MeV integral split ring rfq accelerator, an electron cyclotron resonance O{sup +} ion source and low energy beam transport (LEBT) system have been developed. Using two Einzel lenses to focus the beam, more than 6 mA O{sup +} peak beam current with energy of 22 keV can be easily obtained at the end of LEBT when the duty faction is at 1/6. The normalized root-mean-square emittance of 90% of the beam is about 0.12{pi} mm mrad. By changing the focusing power of lenses, the beam waist can be shifted from 80 mm before the beam diaphragm 2 to 80 mm after it. The experimental results will be presented in this article.

  6. Formation of Si/SiC multilayers by low-energy ion implantation and thermal annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrovolskiy, S.; Yakshin, A. E.; Tichelaar, F. D.; Verhoeven, J.; Louis, E.; Bijkerk, F.

    2010-03-01

    Si/SiC multilayer systems for XUV reflection optics with a periodicity of 10-20 nm were produced by sequential deposition of Si and implantation of 1 keV CHx+ ions. Only about 3% of the implanted carbon was transferred into the SiC, with a thin, 0.5-1 nm, buried SiC layer being formed. We investigated the effect of thermal annealing on further completion of the carbide layer. For the annealing we used a vacuum furnace, a rapid thermal annealing system in argon atmosphere, and a scanning e-beam, for different temperatures, heating rates, and annealing durations. Annealing to a temperature as low as 600 °C resulted in the formation of a 4.5 nm smooth, amorphous carbide layer in the carbon-implanted region. However, annealing at a higher temperature, 1000 °C, lead to the formation of a rough poly-crystalline carbide layer. The multilayers were characterized by grazing incidence X-ray reflectometry and cross section TEM.

  7. Closely spaced nanomagnets by dual e-beam exposure for low-energy nanomagnet logic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Faisal A.; Csaba, Gyorgy; Butler, Katherine; Bernstein, Gary H.

    2013-05-01

    The effect of nanomagnet spacing on required clock field has been studied by micromagnetic simulation for supermalloy (Ni79Fe16Mo5) dots with dimensions 90 × 60 × 20 nm3 and 120 × 60 × 20 nm3. Reduction of the inter-magnet spacing for both dimensions has resulted in reduction of the required clock field in the simulation. A dual e-beam exposure technique has been developed to allow fabrication of ultra dense features using conventional poly(methylmethacrylate) e-beam resist. Nanomagnet logic (NML) datalines of supermalloy dots with ˜10 nm and ˜15 nm spacing have been fabricated using dual e-beam exposure with a 3σ overlay accuracy of ˜4 nm. Fabricated NML datalines have been characterized using magnetic force microscopy for various clock fields. Datalines of both spacing have shown proper NML functionality with a clock field as low as 60 mT.

  8. The impact of charging on low-energy electron beam lithography.

    PubMed

    Mun, Lau Kien; Drouin, Dominique; Lavallée, Eric; Beauvais, Jacques

    2004-12-01

    A major issue in low voltage lithography is surface charging, which results in beam deflection presented as uneven exposure between adjacent structures. In this study, charge-induced pattern distortions in low-voltage energy beam lithography (LVEBL) were investigated using a silicide direct-write electron beam lithography process. Two methodologies have been proposed to avert charging effects in LVEBL, namely, pattern randomizing and lithography using the crossover voltage. Experimental results demonstrated that these methods are effective in significantly reducing the problems associated with charging. They indicate that charging on a sample is a function of time interval and proximity between line structures. In addition, the optimum time and distance between exposures for no charge-induced pattern distortion were determined. By using the crossover voltage of the material for lithography, charging effect can be significantly minimized. PMID:19780323

  9. Ion Beam Bombardment of Biological Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangyuenyongpipat, S.; Yu, L. D.; Vilaithong, T.; Phanchaisri, B.; Anuntalabhochai, S.; Brown, I. G.

    2003-10-01

    While ion implantation has become a well-established technique for the surface modification of inorganic materials, the ion bombardment of cellular tissue has received little research attention. A program in ion beam bioengineering has been initiated at Chiang Mai University, and the ion beam induced transfer of plasmid DNA molecules into bacterial cells (E. coli) has been demonstrated. Subsequent work has been directed toward exploration of ion beam bombardment of plant cells in an effort to understand the possible mechanisms involved in the DNA transfer. In particular, ion beam bombardment of onion cells was carried out and the effects investigated. Among the novel features observed is the formation of "microcraters" - sub-micron surface features that could provide a pathway for the transfer of large molecules into the interior cell region. Here we describe our onion skin ion bombardment investigations.

  10. Ion beam texturing of surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, H. R.; Robinson, R. S.

    1979-01-01

    Textured surfaces, typically with conical structures, have been produced previously by simultaneously etching a surface and seeding that surface with another material. A theory based on surface diffusion predicts a variation in cone spacing with surface temperature, as well as a critical temperature below which cones will not form. Substantial agreement with theory has been found for several combinations of seed and surface materials, including one with a high sputter yield seed on a low sputter yield surface (gold on aluminum). Coning with this last combination was predicted by the theory for a sufficiently mobile seed material. The existence of a minimum temperature for the formation of cones should also be important to those interested in ion-beam machining smooth surfaces. Elements contained in the environmental contaminants or in the sputtered alloys or compounds may serve as seed material.

  11. Modeling Proton- and Light Ion-Induced Reactions at Low Energies in the MARS15 Code

    SciTech Connect

    Rakhno, I. L.; Mokhov, N. V.; Gudima, K. K.

    2015-04-25

    An implementation of both ALICE code and TENDL evaluated nuclear data library in order to describe nuclear reactions induced by low-energy projectiles in the Monte Carlo code MARS15 is presented. Comparisons between results of modeling and experimental data on reaction cross sections and secondary particle distributions are shown.

  12. AREAL low energy electron beam applications in life and materials sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsakanov, V. M.; Aroutiounian, R. M.; Amatuni, G. A.; Aloyan, L. R.; Aslanyan, L. G.; Avagyan, V. Sh.; Babayan, N. S.; Buniatyan, V. V.; Dalyan, Y. B.; Davtyan, H. D.; Derdzyan, M. V.; Grigoryan, B. A.; Grigoryan, N. E.; Hakobyan, L. S.; Haroutyunian, S. G.; Harutiunyan, V. V.; Hovhannesyan, K. L.; Khachatryan, V. G.; Martirosyan, N. W.; Melikyan, G. S.; Petrosyan, A. G.; Petrosyan, V. H.; Sahakyan, A. A.; Sahakyan, V. V.; Sargsyan, A. A.; Simonyan, A. S.; Tatikyan, S. Sh.; Tsakanova, G. V.; Tsovyan, E.; Vardanyan, A. S.; Vardanyan, V. V.; Yeremyan, A. S.; Yeritsyan, H. N.; Zanyan, G. S.

    2016-09-01

    The AREAL laser-driven RF gun provides 2-5 MeV energy ultrashort electron pulses for experimental study in life and materials sciences. We report the first experimental results of the AREAL beam application in the study of molecular-genetic effects, silicon-dielectric structures, ferroelectric nanofilms, and single crystals for scintillators.

  13. Method and apparatus for generating high-energy nuclear reactions by low-energy ion bombardment of solids

    SciTech Connect

    Grabowski, K.; Eridon, J.; Chambers, G.; Hubler, G.

    1992-01-01

    A method and apparatus for producing an exoergic nuclear reaction. A target made of solid material is positioned in a vacuum chamber containing deuterium gas and having an operating pressure below atmospheric pressure. The target is ion bombarded with a deuterium ion beam produced by an electron cyclotron resonance microwave plasma source.

  14. Heavy ion beams for inertial fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Godlove, T.F.; Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.

    1980-05-01

    The United States' program in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) is described in this paper, with emphasis on the studies of the use of intense high energy beams of heavy ions to provide the power and energy needed to initiate thermonuclear burn. Preliminary calculations of the transport of intense ion beams in an electrostatic quadrupole focussing structure are discussed.

  15. IMPACT: a facility to study the interaction of low-energy intense particle beams with dynamic heterogeneous surfaces.

    PubMed

    Allain, J P; Nieto, M; Hendricks, M R; Plotkin, P; Harilal, S S; Hassanein, A

    2007-11-01

    The Interaction of Materials with Particles and Components Testing (IMPACT) experimental facility is furnished with multiple ion sources and in situ diagnostics to study the modification of surfaces undergoing physical, chemical, and electronic changes during exposure to energetic particle beams. Ion beams with energies in the range between 20 and 5000 eV can bombard samples at flux levels in the range of 10(10)-10(15) cm(-2) s(-1); parameters such as ion angle of incidence and exposed area are also controllable during the experiment. IMPACT has diagnostics that allow full characterization of the beam, including a Faraday cup, a beam imaging system, and a retarding field energy analyzer. IMPACT is equipped with multiple diagnostics, such as electron (Auger, photoelectron) and ion scattering spectroscopies that allow different probing depths of the sample to monitor compositional changes in multicomponent and/or layered targets. A unique real-time erosion diagnostic based on a dual quartz crystal microbalance measures deposition from an eroding surface with rates smaller than 0.01 nm/s, which can be converted to a sputter yield measurement. The monitoring crystal can be rotated and placed in the target position so that the deposited material on the quartz crystal oscillator surface can be characterized without transfer outside of the vacuum chamber.

  16. Focused Ion beam source method and Apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Pellin, Michael J.; Lykke, Keith R.; Lill, Thorsten B.

    1998-08-17

    A focused ion beam having a cross section of submicron diameter, a high ion current, and a narrow energy range is generated from a target comprised of particle source material by laser ablation. The method involves directing a laser beam having a cross section of critical diameter onto the target, producing a cloud of laser ablated particles having unique characteristics, and extracting and focusing a charged particle beam from the laser ablated cloud. The method is especially suited for producing focused ion beams for semiconductor device analysis and modification.

  17. Focused ion beam source method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Pellin, Michael J.; Lykke, Keith R.; Lill, Thorsten B.

    2000-01-01

    A focused ion beam having a cross section of submicron diameter, a high ion current, and a narrow energy range is generated from a target comprised of particle source material by laser ablation. The method involves directing a laser beam having a cross section of critical diameter onto the target, producing a cloud of laser ablated particles having unique characteristics, and extracting and focusing a charged particle beam from the laser ablated cloud. The method is especially suited for producing focused ion beams for semiconductor device analysis and modification.

  18. Ion beam sputtering in electric propulsion facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sovey, James S.; Patterson, Michael J.

    1991-01-01

    Experiments were undertaken to determine sputter yields of potential ion beam target materials, to assess the impact of charge exchange on beam diagnostics in large facilities, and to examine material erosion and deposition after a 957 hr test of a 5 kW-class ion thruster. The xenon ion sputter yield of flexible graphite was lower than other graphite forms especially at high angles of incidence. Ion beam charge exchange effects were found to hamper beam probe current collection diagnostics even at pressures from 0.7 to 1.7 mPa. Estimates of the xenon ion beam envelope were made and predictions of the thickness of sputter deposited coatings in the facility were compared with measurements.

  19. Ion beam sputtering in electric propulsion facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sovey, James S.; Patterson, Michael J.

    1991-01-01

    Experiments were undertaken to determine sputter yields of potential ion beam target materials, to assess the impact of charge exchange on beam diagnostics in large facilities, and to examine material erosion and deposition after a 957-hour test of a 5 kW-class ion thruster. The xenon ion sputter yield of flexible graphite was lower than other graphite forms especialy at high angles of incidence. Ion beam charge exchange effects were found to hamper beam probe current collection diagnostics even at pressures from 0.7 to 1.7 mPa. Estimates of the xenon ion beam envelope were made and predictions of the thickness of sputter deposited coatings in the facility were compared with measurements.

  20. Transfer reactions using a low-energy {sup 11}Be beam

    SciTech Connect

    Johansen, Jacob

    2011-10-28

    A series of experiments have been performed to investigate neutron rich beryllium isotopes. Scattering as well as one neutron transfer reactions have been studied using a {sup 11}Be beam on deuteron targets. Bound states of {sup 10,11,12}Be have been studied and reaction cross sections have been calculated. The elastic scattering cross section has shown remarkable structure due to the halo structure of {sup 11}Be.

  1. Range and Energy Straggling in Ion Beam Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John W.; Tai, Hsiang

    2000-01-01

    A first-order approximation to the range and energy straggling of ion beams is given as a normal distribution for which the standard deviation is estimated from the fluctuations in energy loss events. The standard deviation is calculated by assuming scattering from free electrons with a long range cutoff parameter that depends on the mean excitation energy of the medium. The present formalism is derived by extrapolating Payne's formalism to low energy by systematic energy scaling and to greater depths of penetration by a second-order perturbation. Limited comparisons are made with experimental data.

  2. Closely spaced nanomagnets by dual e-beam exposure for low-energy nanomagnet logic

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, Faisal A.; Csaba, Gyorgy; Butler, Katherine; Bernstein, Gary H.

    2013-05-07

    The effect of nanomagnet spacing on required clock field has been studied by micromagnetic simulation for supermalloy (Ni{sub 79}Fe{sub 16}Mo{sub 5}) dots with dimensions 90 Multiplication-Sign 60 Multiplication-Sign 20 nm{sup 3} and 120 Multiplication-Sign 60 Multiplication-Sign 20 nm{sup 3}. Reduction of the inter-magnet spacing for both dimensions has resulted in reduction of the required clock field in the simulation. A dual e-beam exposure technique has been developed to allow fabrication of ultra dense features using conventional poly(methylmethacrylate) e-beam resist. Nanomagnet logic (NML) datalines of supermalloy dots with {approx}10 nm and {approx}15 nm spacing have been fabricated using dual e-beam exposure with a 3{sigma} overlay accuracy of {approx}4 nm. Fabricated NML datalines have been characterized using magnetic force microscopy for various clock fields. Datalines of both spacing have shown proper NML functionality with a clock field as low as 60 mT.

  3. Beam brilliance investigation of high current ion beams at GSI heavy ion accelerator facility

    SciTech Connect

    Adonin, A. A. Hollinger, R.

    2014-02-15

    In this work the emittance measurements of high current Ta-beam provided by VARIS (Vacuum Arc Ion Source) ion source are presented. Beam brilliance as a function of beam aperture at various extraction conditions is investigated. Influence of electrostatic ion beam compression in post acceleration gap on the beam quality is discussed. Use of different extraction systems (single aperture, 7 holes, and 13 holes) in order to achieve more peaked beam core is considered. The possible ways to increase the beam brilliance are discussed.

  4. Beam brilliance investigation of high current ion beams at GSI heavy ion accelerator facility.

    PubMed

    Adonin, A A; Hollinger, R

    2014-02-01

    In this work the emittance measurements of high current Ta-beam provided by VARIS (Vacuum Arc Ion Source) ion source are presented. Beam brilliance as a function of beam aperture at various extraction conditions is investigated. Influence of electrostatic ion beam compression in post acceleration gap on the beam quality is discussed. Use of different extraction systems (single aperture, 7 holes, and 13 holes) in order to achieve more peaked beam core is considered. The possible ways to increase the beam brilliance are discussed.

  5. Beam-beam observations in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Y.; Fischer, W.; White, S.

    2015-06-24

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory has been operating since 2000. Over the past decade, thanks to the continuously increased bunch intensity and reduced β*s at the interaction points, the maximum peak luminosity in the polarized proton operation has been increased by more than two orders of magnitude. In this article, we first present the beam-beam observations in the previous RHIC polarized proton runs. Then we analyze the mechanisms for the beam loss and emittance growth in the presence of beam-beam interaction. The operational challenges and limitations imposed by beam-beam interaction and their remedies are also presented. In the end, we briefly introduce head-on beam-beam compensation with electron lenses in RHIC.

  6. Ion beam microtexturing and enhanced surface diffusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, R. S.

    1982-01-01

    Ion beam interactions with solid surfaces are discussed with particular emphasis on microtexturing induced by the deliberate deposition of controllable amounts of an impurity material onto a solid surface while simultaneously sputtering the surface with an ion beam. Experimental study of the optical properties of microtextured surfaces is described. Measurements of both absorptance as a function of wavelength and emissivity are presented. A computer code is described that models the sputtering and ion reflection processes involved in microtexture formation.

  7. Spatial distribution of fluorescent light emitted from neon and nitrogen excited by low energy electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Morozov, A.; Kruecken, R.; Ulrich, A.; Wieser, J.

    2006-11-01

    Side-view intensity profiles of fluorescent light were measured for neon and nitrogen excited with 12 keV electron beams at gas pressures from 250 to 1400 hPa. The intensity profiles were compared with theoretical profiles calculated using the CASINO program which performs Monte Carlo simulations of electron scattering. It was assumed that the spatial distribution of fluorescent intensity is directly proportional to the spatial distribution of energy loss by primary electrons. The comparison shows good correlation of experimental data and the results of numeric simulations.

  8. Ion Beam Micro-Sculpturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubby, Joel Alan

    Unique experimental observations are reported on the quasi-dynamic evolution of surface morphology during sputter erosion on two different length scales. The results provide qualitative confirmation of current first and second order approximation theories of cone evolution. On a length scale that is large in comparison to the incident ions projected range R(,p)(E) within a target matrix, experimental observations using the Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) show the initiation and temporal development of sputter induced morphology that can be explained by the variation of sputter efficiency with angle of ion incidence. On a length scale of ion penetration depth, typically 5 to 20 nm, the unique target configuration used in our experiments allows a high resolution study to be performed by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) that reveals changes in surface topography on the 10's of nanometers length scale. The first high resolution TEM observations of a sputter induced cone show a reduced sputter yield within a distance of R(,p)(E) of the cone apex. These experimental observations support mechanisms that link the events taking place on an atomic length scale within the atomic collision cascade with those features that are predicted by first order erosion theory. Previous experimental SEM observations had concentrated on the enhanced erosion predicted by this mechanism at the base of a cone. However results in this basal region are also influenced by secondary (recoil) sputtering that obscures experimental confirmation of these cascade density effects. Qualitative agreement between the observed surface evolution and analytical analysis using computer simulations on both length scales allows these analytical tools, in conjunction with a model of the erosion (and accretion) processes, to be used to physically control surface evolution in a useful manner. This ion beam sculpturing technique is used to produce field emitters for application to charged particle sources

  9. Transport of intense beams of highly charged ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, M.; Gammino, S.; Ciavola, G.; Celona, L.; Spadtke, P.; Tinschert, K.

    2005-10-01

    The new generation of ion sources delivers beams with intensities of several mA. This requires a careful design of the analysing system and the low-energy beam transport (LEBT) from the source to the subsequent systems. At INFN-LNS, high intensity proton sources (TRIPS [L. Celona, G. Ciavola, S. Gammino et al ., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 75(5) 1423 (2004)], PM-TRIPS [G. Ciavola, L. Celona, S. Gammino et al ., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 75(5) 1453 (2004)]) as well as ECR ion sources for the production of highly charged high-intensity heavy ion beams are developed (SERSE [S. Gammino, G. Ciavola, L. Celona et al ., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 72(11) 4090 (2001), and references therein], GyroSERSE [S. Gammino et al ., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 75(5) 1637 (2004)], MS-ECRIS [G. Ciavola et al ., (2005), 11th Int. Conf. on Ion Sources, Caen, (in press)]). In this paper, we present ion-optical design studies of various LEBT systems for ion-sources devoted to the production of intense beams. Calculations were performed using the computer codes GIOS [H. Wollnik, J. Brezina and M. Berz, NIM A 258 (1987)], GICO [M. Berz, H.C. Hoffmann, and H. Wollnik, NIM A 258 (1987)], and TRANSPORT [K.L. Brown, F. Rothacker and D.C. Carey, SLAC-R-95-462, Fermilab-Pub-95/069, UC-414 (1995)]. Simulations take into account the expected phase space growth of the beam emittance due to space-charge effects and image aberrations introduced by the magnetic elements.

  10. Measurement of the beam-recoil polarization in low-energy virtual Compton scattering from the proton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doria, L.; Janssens, P.; Achenbach, P.; Ayerbe Gayoso, C.; Baumann, D.; Bensafa, I.; Benali, M.; Beričič, J.; Bernauer, J. C.; Böhm, R.; Bosnar, D.; Correa, L.; D'Hose, N.; Defaÿ, X.; Ding, M.; Distler, M. O.; Fonvieille, H.; Friedrich, J.; Friedrich, J. M.; Laveissière, G.; Makek, M.; Marroncle, J.; Merkel, H.; Mihovilovič, M.; Müller, U.; Nungesser, L.; Pasquini, B.; Pochodzalla, J.; Postavaru, O.; Potokar, M.; Ryckbosch, D.; Sánchez Majos, S.; Schlimme, B. S.; Seimetz, M.; Širca, S.; Tamas, G.; Van de Vyver, R.; Van Hoorebeke, L.; Van Overloop, A.; Walcher, Th.; Weinriefer, M.; A1 Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    Double-polarization observables in the reaction e ⃗p →e'p ⃗'γ have been measured at Q2=0.33 (GeV/c ) 2 . The experiment was performed at the spectrometer setup of the A1 Collaboration using the 855 MeV polarized electron beam provided by the Mainz Microtron (MAMI) and a recoil proton polarimeter. From the double-polarization observables the structure function PLT ⊥ is extracted for the first time, with the value (-15.4 ±3 .3(stat .)-2.4+1.5(syst.)) GeV-2 , using the low-energy theorem for virtual Compton scattering. This structure function provides a hitherto unmeasured linear combination of the generalized polarizabilities of the proton.

  11. Ion-beam nitriding of steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salik, Joshua (Inventor); Hubbell, Theodore E. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A surface of a steel substrate is nitrided without external heating by exposing it to a beam of nitrogen ions under low pressure, a pressure much lower than that employed for ion-nitriding. An ion source is used instead of a glow discharge. Both of these features reduce the introduction of impurities into the substrate surface.

  12. High yield antibiotic producing mutants of Streptomyces erythreus induced by low energy ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Chen; Zhixin, Lin; Zuyao, Zou; Feng, Zhang; Duo, Liu; Xianghuai, Liu; Jianzhong, Tang; Weimin, Zhu; Bo, Huang

    1998-05-01

    Conidia of Streptomyces erythreus, an industrial microbe, were implanted by nitrogen ions with energy of 40-60 keV and fluence from 1 × 10 11 to 5 × 10 14 ions/cm 2. The logarithm value of survival fraction had good linear relationship with the logarithm value of fluence. Some mutants with a high yield of erythromycin were induced by ion implantation. The yield increment was correlated with the implantation fluence. Compared with the mutation results induced by ultraviolet rays, mutation effects of ion implantation were obvious having higher increasing erythromycin potency and wider mutation spectrum. The spores of Bacillus subtilis were implanted by arsenic ions with energy of 100 keV. The distribution of implanted ions was measured by Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) and calculated in theory. The mechanism of mutation induced by ion implantation was discussed.

  13. Multiple scattering of low energy H+ ions in matter: Approximation of mean energy on the Sigmund and Winterbon model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mekhtiche, A.; Khalal-Kouache, K.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, angular distributions of slow H+ ions transmitted through different targets (Al, Ag and Au) are calculated using the model of Sigmund and Winterbon (SW) in the multiple scattering theory. Valdés and Arista (VA) developed a method extending the SW model by including the effect of energy loss in the calculation of angular distributions of transmitted ions. Another method has been proposed for such calculations: one can consider the SW model by using an average value for the energy of the ions inside the target. In this contribution, a new expression is proposed for the mean energy which gives a better agreement with the VA model than the precedent one at low energy. Different potentials have been considered to describe the interaction projectile-target atom in this study and the new expression is found to be independent of the interaction potential.

  14. Ordered arrangement of irradiation-induced defects of polycrystalline tungsten irradiated with low-energy hydrogen ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Weiyuan; Yang, Qi; Fan, Hongyu; Liu, Lu; Berthold, Tobias; Benstetter, Günther; Liu, Dongping

    2015-09-01

    Low-energy (20-520 eV) hydrogen ion irradiations were performed at W surface temperature of 373-1073 K and a fluence ranging from 5.0 × 1023 to 1.0 × 1025/m2. Conductive atomic force microscopy (CAFM) as a nondestructive analytical technique was successfully used to detect irradiation-induced defects in polycrystalline W. The size and density of these nanometer-sized defects were strongly dependent on the fluence of hydrogen ions. Both ion energy (E) and temperature (T) play a crucial role in determining the ordering of nanometer-sized defects. Ordered arrangements were formed at relatively high E and T. This can be attributed to the stress-driven ripple effect of defect growth at crystal grains, resulting in the movement of W lattice along one certain crystal planes.

  15. High efficiency ion beam accelerator system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aston, G.

    1981-01-01

    An ion accelerator system that successfully combines geometrical and electrostatic focusing principles is presented. This accelerator system uses thin, concave, multiple-hole, closely spaced graphite screen and focusing grids which are coupled to single slot accelerator and decelerator grids to provide high ion extraction efficiency and good focusing. Tests with the system showed a substantial improvement in ion beam current density and collimation as compared with a Pierce electrode configuration. Durability of the thin graphite screen and focusing grids has been proven, and tests are being performed to determine the minimum screen and focusing grid spacing and thickness required to extract the maximum reliable beam current density. Compared with present neutral beam injector accelerator systems, this one has more efficient ion extraction, easier grid alignment, easier fabrication, a less cumbersome design, and the capacity to be constructed in a modular fashion. Conceptual neutral beam injector designs using this modular approach have electrostatic beam deflection plates downstream of each module.

  16. A field-assisted moderator for low-energy positron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beling, C. D.; Simpson, R. I.; Charlton, M.; Jacobsen, F. M.; Griffith, T. C.; Moriarty, P.; Fung, S.

    1987-01-01

    A new positron field-assisted (FA) moderator based on the drift of positrons across a cooled silicon crystal is proposed. Using estimates for both the β + implantation profile and attainable drift velocities, the efficiency of drift to a slow e+ emitting surface is calculated using a diffusion equation which incorporates terms describing positron drift and annihilation. It is conjectured that efficiencies of up to 10% can be achieved. The use of epitaxially grown metallic suicide contacts to facilitate the application of the electric field is described and the consequences of using such contacts are fully discussed. Applications of the FA transmission mode moderator described here to produce timed brightness enhanced beams are briefly discussed.

  17. Simulation of ion beam transport through the 400 Kv ion implanter at Michigan Ion Beam Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naab, F. U.; Toader, O. F.; Was, G. S.

    2013-04-01

    The Michigan Ion Beam Laboratory houses a 400 kV ion implanter. An application that simulates the ion beam trajectories through the implanter from the ion source to the target was developed using the SIMION® code. The goals were to have a tool to develop an intuitive understanding of abstract physics phenomena and diagnose ion trajectories. Using this application, new implanter users of different fields in science quickly understand how the machine works and quickly learn to operate it. In this article we describe the implanter simulation application and compare the parameters of the implanter components obtained from the simulations with the measured ones. The overall agreement between the simulated and measured values of magnetic fields and electric potentials is ˜10%.

  18. Transport of radioactive ion beams and related safety issues: The 132Sn+ case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osswald, F.; Bouquerel, E.; Boutin, D.; Dinkov, A.; Kazarinov, N.; Perrot, L.; Sellam, A.

    2014-12-01

    The transport of intense radioactive ion beam currents requires a careful design in order to limit the beam losses, the contamination and thus the dose rates. Some investigations based on numerical models and calculations have been performed in the framework of the SPIRAL 2 project to evaluate the performance of a low energy beam transport line located between the isotope separation on line (ISOL) production cell and the experiment areas. The paper presents the results of the transverse phase-space analysis, the beam losses assessment, the resulting contamination, and radioactivity levels. They show that reasonable beam transmission, emittance growth, and dose rates can be achieved considering the current standards.

  19. Transport of radioactive ion beams and related safety issues: the 132Sn+ case study.

    PubMed

    Osswald, F; Bouquerel, E; Boutin, D; Dinkov, A; Kazarinov, N; Perrot, L; Sellam, A

    2014-12-01

    The transport of intense radioactive ion beam currents requires a careful design in order to limit the beam losses, the contamination and thus the dose rates. Some investigations based on numerical models and calculations have been performed in the framework of the SPIRAL 2 project to evaluate the performance of a low energy beam transport line located between the isotope separation on line (ISOL) production cell and the experiment areas. The paper presents the results of the transverse phase-space analysis, the beam losses assessment, the resulting contamination, and radioactivity levels. They show that reasonable beam transmission, emittance growth, and dose rates can be achieved considering the current standards.

  20. Intense non-relativistic cesium ion beam

    SciTech Connect

    Lampel, M.C.

    1984-02-01

    The Heavy Ion Fusion group at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory has constructed the One Ampere Cesium Injector as a proof of principle source to supply an induction linac with a high charge density and high brightness ion beam. This is studied here. An electron beam probe was developed as the major diagnostic tool for characterizing ion beam space charge. Electron beam probe data inversion is accomplished with the EBEAM code and a parametrically adjusted model radial charge distribution. The longitudinal charge distribution was not derived, although it is possible to do so. The radial charge distribution that is derived reveals an unexpected halo of trapped electrons surrounding the ion beam. A charge fluid theory of the effect of finite electron temperature on the focusing of neutralized ion beams (Nucl. Fus. 21, 529 (1981)) is applied to the problem of the Cesium beam final focus at the end of the injector. It is shown that the theory's predictions and assumptions are consistent with the experimental data, and that it accounts for the observed ion beam radius of approx. 5 cm, and the electron halo, including the determination of an electron Debye length of approx. 10 cm.

  1. Ion velocities in the presheath of electronegative, radio-frequency plasmas measured by low-energy cutoff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobolewski, Mark A.; Wang, Yicheng; Goyette, Amanda

    2016-07-01

    Simple kinematic considerations indicate that, under certain conditions in radio-frequency (rf) plasmas, the amplitude of the low-energy peak in ion energy distributions (IEDs) measured at an electrode depends sensitively on ion velocities upstream, at the presheath/sheath boundary. By measuring this amplitude, the velocities at which ions exit the presheath can be determined and long-standing controversies regarding presheath transport can be resolved. Here, IEDs measured in rf-biased, inductively coupled plasmas in CF4 gas determined the presheath exit velocities of all significant positive ions: CF3+, CF2+, CF+, and F+. At higher bias voltages, we detected essentially the same velocity for all four ions. For all ions, measured velocities were significantly lower than the Bohm velocity and the electropositive ion sound speed. Neither is an accurate boundary condition for rf sheaths in electronegative gases: under certain low-frequency, high-voltage criteria defined here, either yields large errors in predicted IEDs. These results indicate that many widely used sheath models will need to be revised.

  2. Intense Pulsed Heavy Ion Beam Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masugata, Katsumi; Ito, Hiroaki

    Development of intense pulsed heavy ion beam accelerator technology is described for the application of materials processing. Gas puff plasma gun and vacuum arc discharge plasma gun were developed as an active ion source for magnetically insulated pulsed ion diode. Source plasma of nitrogen and aluminum were successfully produced with the gas puff plasma gun and the vacuum arc plasma gun, respectively. The ion diode was successfully operated with gas puff plasma gun at diode voltage 190 kV, diode current 2.2 kA and nitrogen ion beam of ion current density 27 A/cm2 was obtained. The ion composition was evaluated by a Thomson parabola spectrometer and the purity of the nitrogen ion beam was estimated to be 86%. The diode also operated with aluminum ion source of vacuum arc plasma gun. The ion diode was operated at 200 kV, 12 kA, and aluminum ion beam of current density 230 A/cm2 was obtained. The beam consists of aluminum ions (Al(1-3)+) of energy 60-400 keV, and protons (90-130 keV), and the purity was estimated to be 89 %. The development of the bipolar pulse accelerator (BPA) was reported. A double coaxial type bipolar pulse generator was developed as the power supply of the BPA. The generator was tested with dummy load of 7.5 ohm, bipolar pulses of -138 kV, 72 ns (1st pulse) and +130 kV, 70 ns (2nd pulse) were succesively generated. By applying the bipolar pulse to the drift tube of the BPA, nitrogen ion beam of 2 A/cm2 was observed in the cathode, which suggests the bipolar pulse acceleration.

  3. Induction of antioxidant enzyme activity and lipid peroxidation level in ion-beam-bombarded rice seeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semsang, Nuananong; Yu, LiangDeng

    2013-07-01

    Low-energy ion beam bombardment has been used to mutate a wide variety of plant species. To explore the indirect effects of low-energy ion beam on biological damage due to the free radical production in plant cells, the increase in antioxidant enzyme activities and lipid peroxidation level was investigated in ion-bombarded rice seeds. Local rice seeds were bombarded with nitrogen or argon ion beams at energies of 29-60 keV and ion fluences of 1 × 1016 ions cm-2. The activities of the antioxidant enzymes; superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), ascorbate peroxidase (APX), dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR), glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione S-transferase (GST) and lipid peroxidation level were assayed in the germinated rice seeds after ion bombardment. The results showed most of the enzyme activities and lipid peroxidation levels in both the argon and nitrogen bombarded samples were higher than those in the natural control. N-ion bombardment could induce higher levels of antioxidant enzyme activities in the rice samples than the Ar-ion bombardment. Additional effects due to the vacuum condition were found to affect activities of some antioxidant enzymes and lipid peroxidation level. This study demonstrates that ion beam bombardment and vacuum condition could induce the antioxidant enzyme activity and lipid peroxidation level which might be due to free radical production in the bombarded rice seeds.

  4. High and low energy gamma beam dump designs for the gamma beam delivery system at ELI-NP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasin, Zafar; Matei, Catalin; Ur, Calin A.; Mitu, Iani-Octavian; Udup, Emil; Petcu, Cristian

    2016-03-01

    The Extreme Light Infrastructure - Nuclear Physics (ELI-NP) is under construction in Magurele, Bucharest, Romania. The facility will use two 10 PW lasers and a high intensity, narrow bandwidth gamma beam for stand-alone and combined laser-gamma experiments. The accurate estimation of particle doses and their restriction within the limits for both personel and general public is very important in the design phase of any nuclear facility. In the present work, Monte Carlo simulations are performed using FLUKA and MCNPX to design 19.4 and 4 MeV gamma beam dumps along with shielding of experimental areas. Dose rate contour plots from both FLUKA and MCNPX along with numerical values of doses in experimental area E8 of the facility are performed. The calculated doses are within the permissible limits. Furthermore, a reasonable agreement between both codes enhances our confidence in using one or both of them for future calculations in beam dump designs, radiation shielding, radioactive inventory, and other calculations releated to radiation protection. Residual dose rates and residual activity calculations are also performed for high-energy beam dump and their effect is negligible in comparison to contributions from prompt radiation.

  5. Infrared imaging diagnostics for INTF ion beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudhir, D.; Bandyopadhyay, M.; Pandey, R.; Joshi, J.; Yadav, A.; Rotti, C.; Bhuyan, M.; Bansal, G.; Soni, J.; Tyagi, H.; Pandya, K.; Chakraborty, A.

    2015-04-01

    In India, testing facility named INTF [1] (Indian test facility) is being built in Institute for Plasma Research to characterize ITER-Diagnostic Neutral Beam (DNB). INTF is expected to deliver 60A negative hydrogen ion beam current of energy 100keV. The beam will be operated with 5Hz modulation having 3s ON/20s OFF duty cycle. To characterize the beam parameters several diagnostics are at different stages of design and development. One of them will be a beam dump, made of carbon fiber composite (CFC) plates placed perpendicular to the beam direction at a distance lm approximately. The beam dump needs to handle ˜ 6MW of beam power with peak power density ˜ 38.5MW/m2. The diagnostic is based on thermal (infra-red - IR) imaging of the footprint of the 1280 beamlets falling on the beam dump using four IR cameras from the rear side of the dump. The beam dump will be able to measure beam uniformity, beamlet divergence. It may give information on relative variation of negative ion stripping losses for different beam pulses. The design of this CFC based beam dump needs to address several physics and engineering issues, including some specific inputs from manufacturers. The manuscript will describe an overview of the diagnostic system and its design methodology highlighting those issues and the present status of its development.

  6. Confined ion beam sputtering device and method

    DOEpatents

    Sharp, Donald J.

    1988-01-01

    A hollow cylindrical target, lined internally with a sputter deposit material and open at both ends, surrounds a substrate on which sputtered deposition is to be obtained. An ion beam received through either one or both ends of the open cylindrical target is forced by a negative bias applied to the target to diverge so that ions impinge at acute angles at different points of the cylindrical target surface. The ion impingement results in a radially inward and downstream directed flux of sputter deposit particles that are received by the substrate. A positive bias applied to the substrate enhances divergence of the approaching ion beams to generate a higher sputtered deposition flux rate. Alternatively, a negative bias applied to the substrate induces the core portion of the ion beams to reach the substrate and provide ion polishing of the sputtered deposit thereon.

  7. Confined ion beam sputtering device and method

    DOEpatents

    Sharp, D.J.

    1986-03-25

    A hollow cylindrical target, lined internally with a sputter deposit material and open at both ends, surrounds a substrate on which sputtered deposition is to be obtained. An ion beam received through either one or both ends of the open cylindrical target is forced by a negative bias applied to the target to diverge so that ions impinge at acute angles at different points of the cylindrical target surface. The ion impingement results in a radially inward and downstream directed flux of sputter deposit particles that are received by the substrate. A positive bias applied to the substrate enhances divergence of the approaching ion beams to generate a higher sputtered deposition flux rate. Alternatively, a negative bias applied to the substrate induces the core portion of the ion beams to reach the substrate and provide ion polishing of the sputtered deposit thereon.

  8. Features of spectra of low-energy neon ions scattered from gallium phosphide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolstoguzov, A. B.; Belykh, S. F.; Gololobov, G. P.; Suvorov, D. V.

    2016-09-01

    Using mass-resolved ion scattering spectrometry, spectra of Ne+ ions scattered at an angle of 120° from the surface of GaP in the energy range of 0.4-1.96 keV have been studied in detail. In the spectra, in addition to the peaks of elastic binary Ne+/P and Ne+/Ga collisions, the peak of sputtered neon ions has been found, as well as the wide peak (a "hump"), the energy of which slightly depends on the energy of primary ions and the intensity considerably increases with an increase in this energy. In our opinion, the main contribution to this peak is made by neon ions that undergo multiple collisions with gallium and phosphorus atoms on the surface and deeper layers of the sample and keep their charge due to reionization processes.

  9. Observations of the 3-D distribution of interplanetary electrons and ions from solar wind plasma to low energy cosmic rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, R. P.; Anderson, K. A.; Ashford, S.; Carlson, C.; Curtis, D.; Ergun, R.; Larson, D.; McFadden, J.; McCarthy, M.; Parks, G. K.

    1995-01-01

    The 3-D Plasma and Energetic Particle instrument on the GGS Wind spacecraft (launched November 1, 1994) is designed to make measurements of the full three-dimensional distribution of suprathermal electrons and ions from solar wind plasma to low energy cosmic rays, with high sensitivity, wide dynamic range, good energy and angular resolution, and high time resolution. Three pairs of double-ended telescopes, each with two or three closely sandwiched passivated ion implanted silicon detectors measure electrons and ions from approximately 20 keV to greater than or equal to 300 keV. Four top-hat symmetrical spherical section electrostatic analyzers with microchannel plate detectors, a large and a small geometric factor analyzer for electrons and a similar pair for ions, cover from approximately 3 eV to 30 keV. We present preliminary observations of the electron and ion distributions in the absence of obvious solar impulsive events and upstream particles. The quiet time electron energy spectrum shows a smooth approximately power law fall-off extending from the halo population at a few hundred eV to well above approximately 100 keV The quiet time ion energy spectrum also shows significant fluxes over this energy range. Detailed 3-D distributions and their temporal variations will be presented.

  10. Plasma ion sources and ion beam technology inmicrofabrications

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Lili

    2007-01-01

    For over decades, focused ion beam (FIB) has been playing a very important role in microscale technology and research, among which, semiconductor microfabrication is one of its biggest application area. As the dimensions of IC devices are scaled down, it has shown the need for new ion beam tools and new approaches to the fabrication of small-scale devices. In the meanwhile, nanotechnology has also deeply involved in material science research and bioresearch in recent years. The conventional FIB systems which utilize liquid gallium ion sources to achieve nanometer scale resolution can no longer meet the various requirements raised from such a wide application area such as low contamination, high throughput and so on. The drive towards controlling materials properties at nanometer length scales relies on the availability of efficient tools. In this thesis, three novel ion beam tools have been developed and investigated as the alternatives for the conventional FIB systems in some particular applications. An integrated focused ion beam (FIB) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) system has been developed for direct doping or surface modification. This new instrument employs a mini-RF driven plasma source to generate focused ion beam with various ion species, a FEI two-lens electron (2LE) column for SEM imaging, and a five-axis manipulator system for sample positioning. An all-electrostatic two-lens column has been designed to focus the ion beam extracted from the source. Based on the Munro ion optics simulation, beam spot sizes as small as 100 nm can be achieved at beam energies between 5 to 35 keV if a 5 μm-diameter extraction aperture is used. Smaller beam spot sizes can be obtained with smaller apertures at sacrifice of some beam current. The FEI 2LE column, which utilizes Schottky emission, electrostatic focusing optics, and stacked-disk column construction, can provide high-resolution (as small as 20 nm) imaging capability, with fairly long working distance (25

  11. A 3D Model for Ion Beam Formation and Transport Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, J.; Todd, D.; Leitner, D.

    2006-02-07

    In this paper, we present a three-dimensional model forself-consistently modeling ion beam formation from plasma ion sources andtransporting in low energy beam transport systems. A multi-sectionoverlapped computational domain has been used to break the originaltransport system into a number of weakly coupled subsystems. Within eachsubsystem, macro-particle tracking is used to obtain the charge densitydistribution in this subdomain. The three-dimensional Poisson equation issolved within the subdomain after each particle tracking to obtain theself-consistent space-charge forces and the particle tracking is repeateduntil the solution converges. Two new Poisson solvers based on acombination of the spectral method and the finite difference multigridmethod have been developed to solve the Poisson equation in cylindricalcoordinates for the straight beam transport section and in Frenet-Serretcoordinates for the bending magnet section. This model can have importantapplication in design and optimization of the low energy beam line opticsof the proposed Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) front end.

  12. Low energy electron beam irradiation effect on optical properties of nanopillar MQW InGaN/GaN structures

    SciTech Connect

    Yakimov, E. B.; Vergeles, P. S.; Polyakov, A. Y.; Jeon, Dae-Woo; Lee, In-Hwan

    2014-02-21

    The low energy electron beam irradiation (LEEBI) effect on optical properties of planar and nanopillar InGaN/GaN muliple quantum well light emitting structures was studied by the cathodoluminescence (CL) method. On the planar structures LEEBI leads to a formation of new InGaN-related emission bands red shifted in comparison with initial one at small irradiation doses and blue shifted at doses higher than 0.5 C/cm{sup 2}. It was observed that after dry etching used for the nanopillar formation the main InGaN-related emission line moves from 2.92 to 2.98 eV that can be explained by a strain relaxation in the quantum wells. The optical properties of nanopilars start to change under LEEBI at a dose of about one order of magnitude lower than that for planar structures. At high irradiation doses the behavior of both structures under LEEBI is similar. The results obtained were explained by the formation and reconstruction of quantum dots inside the quantum wells due to a point defect generation and redistribution stimulated by the electron beam irradiation.

  13. Potential biomedical applications of ion beam technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, B. A.; Weigand, A. J.; Babbush, C. A.; Vankampen, C. L.

    1976-01-01

    Electron bombardment ion thrusters used as ion sources have demonstrated a unique capability to vary the surface morphology of surgical implant materials. The microscopically rough surface texture produced by ion beam sputtering of these materials may result in improvements in the biological response and/or performance of implanted devices. Control of surface roughness may result in improved attachment of the implant to soft tissue, hard tissue, bone cement, or components deposited from blood. Potential biomedical applications of ion beam texturing discussed include: vascular prostheses, artificial heart pump diaphragms, pacemaker fixation, percutaneous connectors, orthopedic pros-thesis fixtion, and dental implants.

  14. Potential biomedical applications of ion beam technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, B. A.; Weigand, A. J.; Van Kampen, C. L.; Babbush, C. A.

    1976-01-01

    Electron bombardment ion thrusters used as ion sources have demonstrated a unique capability to vary the surface morphology of surgical implant materials. The microscopically rough surface texture produced by ion beam sputtering of these materials may result in improvements in the biological response and/or performance of implanted devices. Control of surface roughness may result in improved attachment of the implant to soft tissue, hard tissue, bone cement, or components deposited from blood. Potential biomedical applications of ion beam texturing discussed include: vascular prostheses, artificial heart pump diaphragms, pacemaker fixation, percutaneous connectors, orthopedic prosthesis fixation, and dental implants.

  15. Ion-beam technology and applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, W. R.; Robson, R. R.; Sovey, J. S.

    1977-01-01

    Ion propulsion research and development yields a mature technology that is transferable to a wide range of nonpropulsive applications, including terrestrial and space manufacturing. A xenon ion source was used for an investigation into potential ion-beam applications. The results of cathode tests and discharge-chamber experiments are presented. A series of experiments encompassing a wide range of potential applications is discussed. Two types of processes, sputter deposition, and erosion were studied. Some of the potential applications are thin-film Teflon capacitor fabrication, lubrication applications, ion-beam cleaning and polishing, and surface texturing.

  16. Investigation of a rf inductively coupled plasma ion source capable of highly uniform and collimated ion-beam generation

    SciTech Connect

    Kanarov, V.; Hayes, A.; Yevtukhov, R.; Kameyama, I.; Siegfried, D.; Waahlin, E.

    2006-03-15

    In accordance with advanced data storage device fabrication requirements, we have evaluated a new broad-beam rf ion source for ion beam etching and deposition application. This source utilizes a novel reentrant shaped plasma inductively coupled plasma generator for improved radial plasma density uniformity and a dynamic magnetic field for improved static etch uniformity. It has the capability of reproducibly generating extremely uniform ion beams from 500 to 1500 eV with divergence angle <3 deg. and high directionality [Kanarov et al. (patent pending)]. For a 150 mm diameter wafer, an etch uniformity of <1% {sigma}/mean in static condition or <0.5% with wafer rotation is obtained over an ion incident angle range of 0 deg. - 65 deg. Recently, we have investigated extending the operation of this source to the critical low energy range, 100-500 eV, required for fabricating thin film magnetic head sensors. It was found that, under optimum operating conditions, excellent static etch uniformity (1%-1.5% {sigma}/mean) could be obtained at high ion beam current densities, up to 0.5 mA/cm{sup 2}, over the entire low-energy range while still achieving low divergence angles (<5 deg.) and high beam directionality. The ion beam performance was consistent with results obtained by simulation and by experiment using a 19-hole array ion optic test stand with scanning ion probe [E. Waahlin (unpublished)]. In this article we will describe the design of the ion source and then present the experimental performance data including plasma density distribution measured by an array of flat Langmuir probes, beam divergence distribution obtained by a 'pepper-pot' etch measurement technique, and etching rate distributions.

  17. The Empirical Low Energy Ion Flux Model for the Terrestrial Magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackwell, William C.; Minow, Joseph I.; Diekmann, Anne M.

    2007-01-01

    This document includes a viewgraph presentation plus the full paper presented at the conference. The Living With a Star Ion Flux Model (IFM) is a radiation environment risk mitigation tool that provides magnetospheric ion flux values for varying geomagnetic disturbance levels in the geospace environment. IFM incorporates flux observations from the Polar and Geotail spacecraft in a single statistical flux model. IFM is an engineering environment model which predicts the proton flux not only in the magnetosphere, but also in the solar wind and magnetosheath phenomenological regions. This paper describes the ion flux databases that allows for IFM output to be correlated with the geomagnetic activity level, as represented by the Kp index.

  18. Cross section for production of low-energy electron-positron pairs by relativistic heavy ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eby, P. B.

    1991-01-01

    Starting with the lowest-order unscreened QED matrix element for electron-positron pair production by heavy charged particles, the paper calculates the cross section for this process differential in all independent variables and valid for all pair energies small compared to the incident particle energy. Integration over the possible emission angles of one of the pair members gives an expression that is valid for low-energy pairs that can be compared with previous work based on the Weizsaecker-Williams method. Integration over the possible angles of the other pair member then yields an expression identical to one derived by Racah. The high energy-transfer limit of the expression for the cross section integrated over electron and positron angles is found to be identical to that of Kelner in the unscreened case.

  19. Radiotherapy With Protons And Ion Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Jaekel, Oliver

    2010-04-26

    The use of proton and ion beams has been proposed more than 60 years ago in 1946 by Robert Wilson. In 1955 the first patients were treated with proton beams in Berkeley. Since then radiotherapy with proton and ion beams has constantly been developed at research centers. Within the last decade, however, a considerable number of hospital based facilities came into operation. In this paper an overview over the basic physical and biological properties of proton and ion beams is given. The basic accelerator concepts are outlined and the design of treatment facilities is described. Then the medical physics aspects of the beam delivery, dosimetry and treatment planning are discussed before the clinical concepts are briefly reviewed.

  20. Radiotherapy With Protons And Ion Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jäkel, Oliver

    2010-04-01

    The use of proton and ion beams has been proposed more than 60 years ago in 1946 by Robert Wilson. In 1955 the first patients were treated with proton beams in Berkeley. Since then radiotherapy with proton and ion beams has constantly been developed at research centers. Within the last decade, however, a considerable number of hospital based facilities came into operation. In this paper an overview over the basic physical and biological properties of proton and ion beams is given. The basic accelerator concepts are outlined and the design of treatment facilities is described. Then the medical physics aspects of the beam delivery, dosimetry and treatment planning are discussed before the clinical concepts are briefly reviewed.

  1. ACCELERATION OF LOW-ENERGY IONS AT PARALLEL SHOCKS WITH A FOCUSED TRANSPORT MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    Zuo, Pingbing; Zhang, Ming; Rassoul, Hamid K.

    2013-04-10

    We present a test particle simulation on the injection and acceleration of low-energy suprathermal particles by parallel shocks with a focused transport model. The focused transport equation contains all necessary physics of shock acceleration, but avoids the limitation of diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) that requires a small pitch angle anisotropy. This simulation verifies that the particles with speeds of a fraction of to a few times the shock speed can indeed be directly injected and accelerated into the DSA regime by parallel shocks. At higher energies starting from a few times the shock speed, the energy spectrum of accelerated particles is a power law with the same spectral index as the solution of standard DSA theory, although the particles are highly anisotropic in the upstream region. The intensity, however, is different from that predicted by DSA theory, indicating a different level of injection efficiency. It is found that the shock strength, the injection speed, and the intensity of an electric cross-shock potential (CSP) jump can affect the injection efficiency of the low-energy particles. A stronger shock has a higher injection efficiency. In addition, if the speed of injected particles is above a few times the shock speed, the produced power-law spectrum is consistent with the prediction of standard DSA theory in both its intensity and spectrum index with an injection efficiency of 1. CSP can increase the injection efficiency through direct particle reflection back upstream, but it has little effect on the energetic particle acceleration once the speed of injected particles is beyond a few times the shock speed. This test particle simulation proves that the focused transport theory is an extension of DSA theory with the capability of predicting the efficiency of particle injection.

  2. Integration of a broad beam ion source with a high-temperature x-ray diffraction vacuum chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manova, D.; Bergmann, A.; Mändl, S.; Neumann, H.; Rauschenbach, B.

    2012-11-01

    Here, the integration of a low energy, linearly variable ion beam current density, mechanically in situ adjustable broad beam ion source with a high-temperature x-ray diffraction (XRD) vacuum chamber is reported. This allows in situ XRD investigation of phase formation and evolution processes induced by low energy ion implantation. Special care has been taken to an independent adjustment of the ion beam for geometrical directing towards the substrate, a 15 mm small ion source exit aperture to avoid a secondary sputter process of the chamber walls, linearly variable ion current density by using a pulse length modulation (PLM) for the accelerating voltages without changing the ion beam density profile, nearly homogeneous ion beam distribution over the x-ray footprint, together with easily replaceable Kapton® windows for x-rays entry and exit. By combining a position sensitive x-ray detector with this PLM-modulated ion beam, a fast and efficient time resolved investigation of low energy implantation processes is obtained in a compact experimental setup.

  3. Integration of a broad beam ion source with a high-temperature x-ray diffraction vacuum chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Manova, D.; Bergmann, A.; Maendl, S.; Neumann, H.; Rauschenbach, B.

    2012-11-15

    Here, the integration of a low energy, linearly variable ion beam current density, mechanically in situ adjustable broad beam ion source with a high-temperature x-ray diffraction (XRD) vacuum chamber is reported. This allows in situ XRD investigation of phase formation and evolution processes induced by low energy ion implantation. Special care has been taken to an independent adjustment of the ion beam for geometrical directing towards the substrate, a 15 mm small ion source exit aperture to avoid a secondary sputter process of the chamber walls, linearly variable ion current density by using a pulse length modulation (PLM) for the accelerating voltages without changing the ion beam density profile, nearly homogeneous ion beam distribution over the x-ray footprint, together with easily replaceable Kapton{sup Registered-Sign} windows for x-rays entry and exit. By combining a position sensitive x-ray detector with this PLM-modulated ion beam, a fast and efficient time resolved investigation of low energy implantation processes is obtained in a compact experimental setup.

  4. Biomedical applications of ion-beam technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, B. A.; Weigand, A. J.; Gibbons, D. F.; Vankampen, C. L.; Babbush, C. A.

    1979-01-01

    Microscopically-rough surface texture of various biocompatible alloys and polymers produced by ion-beam sputtering may result in improvements in response of hard or soft tissue to various surgical implants.

  5. Magnetic Reconnection Dynamics in the Presence of Low-energy Ion Component: PIC Simulations of Hidden Particle Population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khotyaintsev, Y. V.; Divin, A. V.; Toledo Redondo, S.; Andre, M.; Vaivads, A.; Markidis, S.; Lapenta, G.

    2015-12-01

    Magnetospheric and astrophysical plasmas are rarely in the state of thermal equilibrium. Plasma distribution functions may contain beams, supra-thermal tails, multiple ion and electron populations which are not thermalized over long time scales due to the lack of collisions between particles. In particular, the equatorial region of the dayside Earth's magnetosphere is often populated by plasma containing hot and cold ion components of comparable densities [Andre and Cully, 2012], and such ion distribution alters properties of the magnetic reconnection regions at the magnetopause [Toledo-Redondo et. al., 2015]. Motivated by these recent findings and also by fact that this region is one of the targets of the recently launched MMS mission, we performed 2D PIC simulations of magnetic reconnection in collisionless plasma with hot and cold ion components. We used a standard Harris current sheet, to which a uniform cold ion background is added. We found that introduction of the cold component modifies the structure of reconnection diffusion region. Diffusion region displays three-scale structure, with the cold Ion Diffusion Region (cIDR) scale appearing in-between the Electron Diffusion Region (EDR) and Ion Diffusion Region (IDR) scales. Structure and strength of the Hall magnetic field depends weakly on cold ion temperature or density, and is rather controlled by the conditions (B, n) upstream the reconnection region. The cold ions are accelerated predominantly transverse to the magnetic field by the Hall electric fields inside the IDR, leading to a large ion pressure anisotropy, which is unstable to ion Weibel-type or mirror-type mode. On the opposite, acceleration of cold ions is mostly field-aligned at the reconnection jet fronts downstream the X-line, producing intense ion phase-space holes there. Despite comparable reconnection rates produced , we find that the overall evolution of reconnection in presence of cold ion population is more dynamic compared to the case

  6. Quantitative Assessment of Amino Acid Damage upon keV Ion Beam Irradiation Through FTIR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Qing; Ke, Zhigang; Su, Xi; Yuan, Hang; Zhang, Shuqing; Yu, Zengliang

    2010-06-01

    Ion beam irradiation induces important biological effects and it is a long-standing task to acquire both qualitative and quantitative assessment of these effects. One effective way in the investigation is to utilize Fourier transformation infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy because it can offer sensitive and non-invasive measurements. In this paper a novel protocol was employed to prepare biomolecular samples in the form of thin and transversely uniform solid films that were suitable for both infrared and low-energy ion beam irradiation experiments. Under the irradiation of N+ and Ar+ ion beams of 25 keV with fluence ranging from 5×1015 ions/cm2 to 2.5×10 ions/cm2, the ion radio-sensitivity of four amino acids, namely, glycine, tyrosine, methionine and phenylalanine, were evaluated and compared. The ion beam irradiation caused biomolecular decomposition accompanied by molecular desorption of volatile species and the damage was dependent on ion type, fluence, energy and types of amino acids. The effectiveness of application of FTIR spectroscopy to the quantitative assessment of biomolecular damage dose effect induced by low-energy ion radiation was thus demonstrated.

  7. Tailoring molybdenum nanostructure evolution by low-energy He+ ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, J. K.; Novakowski, T. J.; Hassanein, A.

    2015-10-01

    Mirror-finished polished molybdenum (Mo) samples were irradiated with 100 eV He+ ions as a function of ion fluence (using a constant flux of 7.2 × 1020 ions m-2 s-1) at normal incidence and at 923 K. Mo surface deterioration and nanoscopic fiber-form filament ("Mo fuzz") growth evolution were monitored by using field emission (FE) scanning electron (SEM) and atomic force (AFM) microscopy studies. Those studies confirm a reasonably clean and flat surface, up to several micrometer scales along with a few mechanical-polishing-induced scratches. However, He+ ion irradiation deteriorates the surface significantly even at 2.1 × 1023 ions m-2 fluence (about 5 min. irradiation time) and leads to evolution of homogeneously populated ∼75-nm-long Mo nanograins having ∼8 nm intergrain width. The primary stages of Mo fuzz growth, i.e., elongated half-cylindrical ∼70 nm nanoplatelets, and encapsulated bubbles of 20-45 nm in diameter and preferably within the grain boundaries of sub-micron-sized grains, were observed after 1.3 × 1024 ions m-2 fluence irradiation. Additionally, a sequential enhancement in the sharpness, density, and protrusions of Mo fuzz at the surface with ion fluence was also observed. Fluence- and flux-dependent studies have also been performed at 1223 K target temperature (beyond the temperature window for Mo fuzz formation). At a constant fluence of 2.6 × 1024 ions m-2, 7.2 × 1020 ions m-2 s-1 flux generates a homogeneous layered and stacked nanodiscs of ∼70 nm diameter. On the other hand, 1.2 × 1021 ions m-2 s-1 flux generates a combination of randomly patched netlike nanomatrix networked structure, mostly with ∼105 nm nanostructure wall width, various-shaped pores, and self-organized nano arrays. While the observed netlike nanomatrix network structures for 8.6 × 1024 ions m-2 fluence (at a constant flux of 1.2 × 1021 ions m-2 s-1) is quite similar to those for 2.6 × 1024 ions m-2 fluence, the nanostructure wall width extends up to ∼45

  8. Oscillatory spin asymmetric scattering of low-energy He+ ions on Sn surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, T. T.; Sakai, O.

    2016-09-01

    Spin-polarized He+ ion scattering spectroscopy (SP-ISS) study on a polycrystalline Sn target surface is reported. We observed substantial spin dependent He+ ion scattering on the non-magnetic Sn target. It is not due to He+ ion neutralization, but it is attributed to spin-orbit coupling (SOC) that acts transiently on the He+ 1 s electron spin in the He+-Sn atom binary collision. We found that the spin dependent scattering quantified as the spin asymmetry exhibits periodic oscillation with the reciprocal of the He+ ion velocity. The oscillation originates from the SOC induced-slight energy difference of the [He+-Sn] and [He0-Sn+] systems which are involved in the quasi-resonant charge transfer. The oscillatory spin asymmetry shows that SOC arises from collision induced intermediate state.

  9. Low-energy ion distribution functions on a magnetically quiet day at geostationary altitude /L = 7/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, N.; Raitt, W. J.; Yasuhara, F.

    1982-01-01

    Ion energy and pitch angle distribution functions are examined for a magnetically quiet day using averaged data from ATS 6. For both field-aligned and perpendicular fluxes, the populations have a mixture of characteristic energies, and the distribution functions can be fairly well approximated by Maxwellian distributions over three different energy bands in the range 3-600 eV. Pitch angle distributions varying with local time, and energy distributions are used to compute total ion density. Pitch angle scattering mechanisms responsible for the observed transformation of pitch angle distribution are examined, and it is found that a magnetic noise of a certain power spectral density belonging to the electromagnetic ion cyclotron mode near the ion cyclotron frequency can be effective in trapping the field aligned fluxes by pitch angle scattering.

  10. Quantum diffraction and shielding effects on the low-energy electron-ion bremsstrahlung in two-component semiclassical plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Myoung-Jae; Jung, Young-Dae

    2015-10-15

    The quantum diffraction and shielding effects on the low-energy bremsstrahlung process are investigated in two-component semiclassical plasmas. The impact-parameter analysis with the micropotential taking into account the quantum diffraction and shielding effects is employed to obtain the electron-ion bremsstrahlung radiation cross section as a function of the de Broglie wavelength, density parameter, impact parameter, photon energy, and projectile energy. The result shows that the influence of quantum diffraction and shielding strongly suppresses the bremsstrahlung radiation spectrum in semiclassical plasmas. It is found that the quantum diffraction and shielding effects have broaden the photon emission domain. It is also found that the photon emission domain is almost independent of the radiation photon energy. In addition, it is found that the influence of quantum diffraction and shielding on the bremsstrahlung spectrum decreases with an increase of the projectile energy. The density effect on the electron-ion bremsstrahlung cross section is also discussed.

  11. Ion beam processing of advanced electronic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, N.W.; Marwick, A.D.; Roberto, J.B.; International Business Machines Corp., Yorktown Heights, NY . Thomas J. Watson Research Center; Oak Ridge National Lab., TN )

    1989-01-01

    This report contains research programs discussed at the materials research society symposia on ion beam processing of advanced electronic materials. Major topics include: shallow implantation and solid-phase epitaxy; damage effects; focused ion beams; MeV implantation; high-dose implantation; implantation in III-V materials and multilayers; and implantation in electronic materials. Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases. (CBS)

  12. Ion-beam nitriding of steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salik, J.

    1984-01-01

    The application of the ion beam technique to the nitriding of steels is described. It is indicated that the technique can be successfully applied to nitriding. Some of the structural changes obtained by this technique are similar to those obtained by ion nitriding. The main difference is the absence of the iron nitride diffraction lines. It is found that the dependence of the resultant microhardness on beam voltage for super nitralloy is different from that of 304 stainless steel.

  13. Beam dynamics in heavy ion induction LINACS

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, L.

    1981-10-01

    Interest in the use of an induction linac to accelerate heavy ions for the purpose of providing the energy required to initiate an inertially confined fusion reaction has stimulated a theoretical effort to investigate various beam dynamical effects associated with high intensity heavy ion beams. This paper presents a summary of the work that has been done so far; transverse, longitudinal and coupled longitudinal transverse effects are discussed.

  14. Evidence for MeV-particle emission from Ti charged with low-energy deuterium ions. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, G.P.; Hubler, G.K.; Grabowski, K.S.

    1991-12-18

    Thin titanium films have been bombarded with low energy (350 eV) deuterium ions at high current density (0.2-0.4 mA.cm2) to investigate the reported occurrence of nuclear reactions at ambient temperatures in deuterium charged metals. A silicon charged particle detector was used to search for charged particles produced by such reactions. Evidence is reported for the detection of hydrogen isotopes with 5 MeV energy at a rate of 10-16 events/deuteron pair/s. Low energy deuterium (350 eV) ions produced by an ECR microwave source impinge normally on a thin metal film in vacuum, while a Si particle detector placed directly behind the film detects particle emission. The advantages of this method are rapid and efficient deuterium charging of any material (including insulators), high particle detection efficiency and sensitivity (low background), and the ability to measure the particle energy and determine the particle type. Titanium was chosen as the target because previous work by Jones had shown neutron emission and because Ti retains more hydrogen near room temperature than does PD.

  15. Internal Energy Deposition for Low Energy, Femtosecond Laser Vaporization and Nanospray Post-ionization Mass Spectrometry using Thermometer Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flanigan, Paul M.; Shi, Fengjian; Archer, Jieutonne J.; Levis, Robert J.

    2015-05-01

    The internal energy of p-substituted benzylpyridinium ions after laser vaporization using low energy, femtosecond duration laser pulses of wavelengths 800 and 1042 nm was determined using the survival yield method. Laser vaporization of dried benzylpyridinium ions from metal slides into a buffered nanospray with 75 μJ, 800 nm laser pulses resulted in a higher extent of fragmentation than conventional nanospray due to the presence of a two-photon resonance fragmentation pathway. Using higher energy 800 nm laser pulses (280 and 505 μJ) led to decreased survival yields for the four different dried benzylpyridinium ions. Analyzing dried thermometer ions with 46.5 μJ, 1042 nm pulse-bursts resulted in little fragmentation and mean internal energy distributions equivalent to nanospray, which is attributable to the absence of a two-photon resonance that occurs with higher energy, 800 nm laser pulses. Vaporization of thermometer ions from solution with either 800 nm or 1042 nm laser pulses resulted in comparable internal energy distributions to nanospray ionization.

  16. Response of a delta-doped charge-coupled device to low energy protons and nitrogen ions

    SciTech Connect

    Lepri, S.T.; Nikzad, Shouleh; Jones, T.; Blacksberg, J.; Zurbuchen, T.H.

    2006-05-15

    We present the results of a study of the response of a delta-doped charge-coupled device (CCD) exposed to ions with energies less than 10 keV. The study of ions in the solar wind, the majority having energies in the 1-5 keV range, has proven to be vital in understanding the solar atmosphere and the near Earth space environment. Delta-doped CCD technology has essentially removed the dead layer of the silicon detector. Using the delta-doped detector, we are able to detect H{sup +} and N{sup +} ions with energies ranging from 1 to 10 keV in the laboratory. This is a remarkable improvement in the low energy detection threshold over conventional solid-state detectors, such as those used in space sensors, one example being the solar wind ion composition spectrometer (SWICS) on the Advanced Composition Explorer spacecraft, which can only detect ions with energies greater than 30 keV because of the solid-state detector's minimum energy threshold. Because this threshold is much higher than the average energy of the solar wind ions, the SWICS instrument employs a bulky high voltage postacceleration stage that accelerates ions above the 30 keV detection threshold. This stage is massive, exposes the instrument to hazardous high voltages, and is therefore problematic both in terms of price and its impact on spacecraft resources. Adaptation of delta-doping technology in future space missions may be successful in reducing the need for heavy postacceleration stages allowing for miniaturization of space-borne ion detectors.

  17. Low-energy electron beam proximity projection lithography (LEEPL): the world's first e-beam production tool, LEEPL 3000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behringer, Uwe F. W.

    2004-06-01

    In June 2000 ago the company Accretech and LEEPL corporation decided to develop an E-beam lithography tool for high throughput wafer exposure, called LEEPL. In an amazing short time the alpha tool was built. In 2002 the beta tool was installed at Accretech. Today the first production tool the LEEPL 3000 is ready to be shipped. The 2keV E-beam tool will be used in the first lithography strategy to expose (in mix and match mode with optical exposure tools) critical levels like gate structures, contact holes (CH), and via pattern of the 90 nm and 65 nm node. At the SEMATECH EPL workshop on September 22nd in Cambridge, England it was mentioned that the amount of these levels will increase very rapidly (8 in 2007; 13 in 2010 and 17 in 2013). The schedule of the production tool for 45 nm node is mid 2005 and for the 32 nm node 2008. The Figure 1 shows from left to right α-tool, the β-tool and the production tool LEEPL 3000. Figure 1 also shows the timetable of the 4 LEEPL forum all held in Japan.

  18. 1x stencil masks fabrication and their use in Low-Energy Electron-beam Proximity Lithography (LEEPL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behringer, Uwe F. W.

    2004-12-01

    Thirty years ago it was the common believe of most of the lithographer that the limit end for the optical lithography will be at about 1 μm ground rule. So NGL tools were developed to go in the 500nm and 250nm regions. 15 years later the different optical lithography techniques were still alive exposing feature sizes down to 200nm and the NGL tool developer had to move to 100nm and below. Today 100nm features made by optical lithography is world wide a common technique in most of the modern chip manufacturing plants, and feature sizes beyond the used wavelength are state of art. So do we really need NGL or will the optical lithography lives forever? Well, there are already optical system available or will be soon delivered to the manufacturing lines which are able to expose feature sizes down to 70nm and even to 50nm if they use 193nm immersion lithography. But for what price? The optical lithography became extremely expensive. Reticles for the 70nm technology full with OPC structures may cost up to 500 K and an optical reticle set up to 2 Million. So in my understanding the introduction of any NGL technique will only happen if such a technique can demonstrate at least the same performance as the optical lithography but at a lower cost level. The best understood NGLs are the electron beam lithography techniques used in e-beam direct writing tools for the exposure of masks and reticles or e-beam techniques which expose the wafers using masks like E-beam Projection Lithography (EPL) or Low Energy E-beam Proximity Lithography (LEEPL) respectively. Both EPL and LEEPL require a similar mask technique so called stencil masks. The first 1x stencil masks (a silicon wafer with a thin membrane area containing the pattern as physical holes) were developed by IBM Germany more than 25 years ago and perfected in the Advanced Mask Facility (AMF) at IBM Vermont. Today, these 1x stencil masks used for LEEPL are mainly produced by Hoya, DNP, Toppan and NTT-AT in Japan. This paper

  19. Low flux and low energy helium ion implantation into tungsten using a dedicated plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pentecoste, Lucile; Thomann, Anne-Lise; Melhem, Amer; Caillard, Amael; Cuynet, Stéphane; Lecas, Thomas; Brault, Pascal; Desgardin, Pierre; Barthe, Marie-France

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this work is to investigate the first stages of defect formation in tungsten (W) due to the accumulation of helium (He) atoms inside the crystal lattice. To reach the required implantation conditions, i.e. low He ion fluxes (1011-1014 ions.cm2.s-1) and kinetic energies below the W atom displacement threshold (about 500 eV for He+), an ICP source has been designed and connected to a diffusion chamber. Implantation conditions have been characterized by means of complementary diagnostics modified for measurements in this very low density helium plasma. It was shown that lowest ion fluxes could only be reached for the discharge working in capacitive mode either in α or γ regime. Special attention was paid to control the energy gained by the ions by acceleration through the sheath at the direct current biased substrate. At very low helium pressure, in α regime, a broad ion energy distribution function was evidenced, whereas a peak centered on the potential difference between the plasma and the biased substrate was found at higher pressures in the γ mode. Polycrystalline tungsten samples were exposed to the helium plasma in both regimes of the discharge and characterized by positron annihilation spectroscopy in order to detect the formed vacancy defects. It was found that W vacancies are able to be formed just by helium accumulation and that the same final implanted state is reached, whatever the operating mode of the capacitive discharge.

  20. A pencil beam algorithm for helium ion beam therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Fuchs, Hermann; Stroebele, Julia; Schreiner, Thomas; Hirtl, Albert; Georg, Dietmar

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To develop a flexible pencil beam algorithm for helium ion beam therapy. Dose distributions were calculated using the newly developed pencil beam algorithm and validated using Monte Carlo (MC) methods. Methods: The algorithm was based on the established theory of fluence weighted elemental pencil beam (PB) kernels. Using a new real-time splitting approach, a minimization routine selects the optimal shape for each sub-beam. Dose depositions along the beam path were determined using a look-up table (LUT). Data for LUT generation were derived from MC simulations in water using GATE 6.1. For materials other than water, dose depositions were calculated by the algorithm using water-equivalent depth scaling. Lateral beam spreading caused by multiple scattering has been accounted for by implementing a non-local scattering formula developed by Gottschalk. A new nuclear correction was modelled using a Voigt function and implemented by a LUT approach. Validation simulations have been performed using a phantom filled with homogeneous materials or heterogeneous slabs of up to 3 cm. The beams were incident perpendicular to the phantoms surface with initial particle energies ranging from 50 to 250 MeV/A with a total number of 10{sup 7} ions per beam. For comparison a special evaluation software was developed calculating the gamma indices for dose distributions. Results: In homogeneous phantoms, maximum range deviations between PB and MC of less than 1.1% and differences in the width of the distal energy falloff of the Bragg-Peak from 80% to 20% of less than 0.1 mm were found. Heterogeneous phantoms using layered slabs satisfied a {gamma}-index criterion of 2%/2mm of the local value except for some single voxels. For more complex phantoms using laterally arranged bone-air slabs, the {gamma}-index criterion was exceeded in some areas giving a maximum {gamma}-index of 1.75 and 4.9% of the voxels showed {gamma}-index values larger than one. The calculation precision of the