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Sample records for low-energy proton-induced fission

  1. Proton induced fission of 232Th at intermediate energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gikal, K. B.; Kozulin, E. M.; Bogachev, A. A.; Burtebaev, N. T.; Edomskiy, A. V.; Itkis, I. M.; Itkis, M. G.; Knyazhev, G. N.; Kovalchuk, K. V.; Kvochkina, T. N.; Piasecki, E.; Rubchenya, V. A.; Sahiev, S. K.; Trzaska, W. H.; Vardaci, E.

    2016-12-01

    The mass-energy distributions and cross sections of proton-induced fission of 232Th have been measured at the proton energies of 7, 10, 13, 20, 40, and 55 MeV. Experiments were carried out at the proton beam of the K-130 cyclotron of the JYFL Accelerator Laboratory of the University of Jyväskylä and U-150m cyclotron of the Institute of Nuclear Physics, Ministry of Energy of the Republic of Kazakhstan. The yields of fission fragments in the mass range A = 60-170 a.m.u. have been measured up to the level of 10-4%. The three humped shape of the mass distribution up has been observed at higher proton energies. The contribution of the symmetric component grows up with increasing proton incident energy; although even at 55 MeV of proton energy the shoulders in the mass energy distribution clearly indicate the asymmetric fission peaks. Evolution of shell structure was observed in the fission fragment mass distributions even at high excitation energy.

  2. Proton induced fission of {sup 232}Th at intermediate energies

    SciTech Connect

    Gikal, K. B. Kozulin, E. M.; Bogachev, A. A.; Burtebaev, N. T.; Edomskiy, A. V.; Itkis, I. M.; Itkis, M. G.; Knyazhev, G. N.; Kovalchuk, K. V.; Kvochkina, T. N.; Piasecki, E.; Rubchenya, V. A.; Sahiev, S. K.; Trzaska, W. H.; Vardaci, E.

    2016-12-15

    The mass-energy distributions and cross sections of proton-induced fission of {sup 232}Th have been measured at the proton energies of 7, 10, 13, 20, 40, and 55 MeV. Experiments were carried out at the proton beam of the K-130 cyclotron of the JYFL Accelerator Laboratory of the University of Jyväskylä and U-150m cyclotron of the Institute of Nuclear Physics, Ministry of Energy of the Republic of Kazakhstan. The yields of fission fragments in the mass range A = 60–170 a.m.u. have been measured up to the level of 10−4%. The three humped shape of the mass distribution up has been observed at higher proton energies. The contribution of the symmetric component grows up with increasing proton incident energy; although even at 55 MeV of proton energy the shoulders in the mass energy distribution clearly indicate the asymmetric fission peaks. Evolution of shell structure was observed in the fission fragment mass distributions even at high excitation energy.

  3. Low energy proton induced single event upset in 65 nm DDR and QDR commercial SRAMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, B.; Liu, J.; Wang, T. S.; Liu, T. Q.; Maaz, K.; Luo, J.; Wang, B.; Yin, Y. N.; Ji, Q. G.; Sun, Y. M.; Hou, M. D.

    2017-09-01

    The single event upset (SEU) response of 65 nm commercial double data rate static random access memory (SRAM) and quad data rate SRAM was investigated by using proton beams with energies in the range of 0.15 MeV to 8.0 MeV. Experimental results show that a significant number of SEU occurrences can be triggered when the energy of incident proton is below 1 MeV. For the low energy protons, the SEU cross section measured in these SRAMs was found to increase with increasing proton energy, attaining a peak value, and then decreases as the proton energy was further increased. While in case of quad data rate SRAMs, it seems that they are more sensitive to SEU occurrences as compared with double data rate SRAMs. The bias voltage and data pattern dependence on SEU cross section induced by the low energy protons were also investigated in this work. In addition, the over-layer thickness of the SRAMs and the impact of degrader use in proton induced SEU test were also analyzed in detail. Monte Carlo simulations results indicate that the use of degrader in case of low energy proton induced SEU test results in a significant reduction of the SEU cross section.

  4. Langevin model of low-energy fission

    DOE PAGES

    Sierk, Arnold John

    2017-09-05

    Since the earliest days of fission, stochastic models have been used to describe and model the process. For a quarter century, numerical solutions of Langevin equations have been used to model fission of highly excited nuclei, where microscopic potential-energy effects have been neglected. In this paper I present a Langevin model for the fission of nuclei with low to medium excitation energies, for which microscopic effects in the potential energy cannot be ignored. I solve Langevin equations in a five-dimensional space of nuclear deformations. The macroscopic-microscopic potential energy from a global nuclear structure model well benchmarked to nuclear masses ismore » tabulated on a mesh of approximately 107 points in this deformation space. The potential is defined continuously inside the mesh boundaries by use of a moving five-dimensional cubic spline approximation. Because of reflection symmetry, the effective mesh is nearly twice this size. For the inertia, I use a (possibly scaled) approximation to the inertia tensor defined by irrotational flow. A phenomenological dissipation tensor related to one-body dissipation is used. A normal-mode analysis of the dynamical system at the saddle point and the assumption of quasiequilibrium provide distributions of initial conditions appropriate to low excitation energies, and are extended to model spontaneous fission. A dynamical model of postscission fragment motion including dynamical deformations and separation allows the calculation of final mass and kinetic-energy distributions, along with other interesting quantities. The model makes quantitative predictions for fragment mass and kinetic-energy yields, some of which are very close to measured ones. Varying the energy of the incident neutron for induced fission allows the prediction of energy dependencies of fragment yields and average kinetic energies. With a simple approximation for spontaneous fission starting conditions, quantitative predictions are made for

  5. Langevin model of low-energy fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sierk, Arnold J.

    2017-09-01

    Background: Since the earliest days of fission, stochastic models have been used to describe and model the process. For a quarter century, numerical solutions of Langevin equations have been used to model fission of highly excited nuclei, where microscopic potential-energy effects have been neglected. Purpose: In this paper I present a Langevin model for the fission of nuclei with low to medium excitation energies, for which microscopic effects in the potential energy cannot be ignored. Method: I solve Langevin equations in a five-dimensional space of nuclear deformations. The macroscopic-microscopic potential energy from a global nuclear structure model well benchmarked to nuclear masses is tabulated on a mesh of approximately 107 points in this deformation space. The potential is defined continuously inside the mesh boundaries by use of a moving five-dimensional cubic spline approximation. Because of reflection symmetry, the effective mesh is nearly twice this size. For the inertia, I use a (possibly scaled) approximation to the inertia tensor defined by irrotational flow. A phenomenological dissipation tensor related to one-body dissipation is used. A normal-mode analysis of the dynamical system at the saddle point and the assumption of quasiequilibrium provide distributions of initial conditions appropriate to low excitation energies, and are extended to model spontaneous fission. A dynamical model of postscission fragment motion including dynamical deformations and separation allows the calculation of final mass and kinetic-energy distributions, along with other interesting quantities. Results: The model makes quantitative predictions for fragment mass and kinetic-energy yields, some of which are very close to measured ones. Varying the energy of the incident neutron for induced fission allows the prediction of energy dependencies of fragment yields and average kinetic energies. With a simple approximation for spontaneous fission starting conditions

  6. New insights gained on mechanisms of low-energy proton-induced SEUs by minimizing energy straggle

    DOE PAGES

    Dodds, Nathaniel Anson; Dodd, Paul E.; Shaneyfelt, Marty R.; ...

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we present low-energy proton single-event upset (SEU) data on a 65 nm SOI SRAM whose substrate has been completely removed. Since the protons only had to penetrate a very thin buried oxide layer, these measurements were affected by far less energy loss, energy straggle, flux attrition, and angular scattering than previous datasets. The minimization of these common sources of experimental interference allows more direct interpretation of the data and deeper insight into SEU mechanisms. The results show a strong angular dependence, demonstrate that energy straggle, flux attrition, and angular scattering affect the measured SEU cross sections, andmore » prove that proton direct ionization is the dominant mechanism for low-energy proton-induced SEUs in these circuits.« less

  7. New insights gained on mechanisms of low-energy proton-induced SEUs by minimizing energy straggle

    SciTech Connect

    Dodds, Nathaniel Anson; Dodd, Paul E.; Shaneyfelt, Marty R.; Sexton, Frederick W.; Martinez, Marino J.; Black, Jeffrey D.; Marshall, P. W.; Reed, R. A.; McCurdy, M. W.; Weller, R. A.; Pellish, J. A.; Rodbell, K. P.; Gordon, M. S.

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we present low-energy proton single-event upset (SEU) data on a 65 nm SOI SRAM whose substrate has been completely removed. Since the protons only had to penetrate a very thin buried oxide layer, these measurements were affected by far less energy loss, energy straggle, flux attrition, and angular scattering than previous datasets. The minimization of these common sources of experimental interference allows more direct interpretation of the data and deeper insight into SEU mechanisms. The results show a strong angular dependence, demonstrate that energy straggle, flux attrition, and angular scattering affect the measured SEU cross sections, and prove that proton direct ionization is the dominant mechanism for low-energy proton-induced SEUs in these circuits.

  8. Proton-induced fission of actinides at energies 26.5 and 62.9 MeV—Theoretical interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demetriou, P.; Keutgen, Th.; Prieels, R.; El Masri, Y.

    2011-10-01

    Fission properties of proton-induced fission on 232Th, 237Np, 238U, 239Pu and 241Am targets, measured at the Louvain-la-Neuve cyclotron facility at proton energies of 26.5 and 62.9 MeV, are compared with the predictions of the state-of-the-art nuclear reaction code TALYS. The sensitivity of the calculations to the input parameters of the code and possible improvements are discussed.

  9. Feasibility of 99Mo production by proton-induced fission of 232Th

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbas, Kamel; Holzwarth, Uwe; Simonelli, Federica; Kozempel, Jan; Cydzik, Izabela; Bulgheroni, Antonio; Cotogno, Giulio; Apostolidis, Christos; Bruchertseifer, Frank; Morgenstern, Alfred

    2012-05-01

    The current global crisis in supply of the medical isotope generator 99Mo/99mTc has triggered much research into alternative non-reactor based production methods for 99Mo including innovative radionuclide production techniques using ion accelerators. A novel method is presented here that has thus far not been considered: 232Th is used as target material to produce carrier-free 99Mo for 99Mo/99mTc generators by proton-induced fission (232Th (p, f) 99Mo). The thick target yields of 99Mo are estimated as 3.6 MBq/μA·h and 21 MBq/μA·h for proton energies of 22 MeV and 40 MeV, respectively, energies that are available from many cyclotrons. With respect to 99Mo reactor based methods using uranium targets, the presented concept using 232Th does not pose proliferation concerns, transport of highly radioactive target materials can be reduced and unused cyclotron capacities could be exploited. Radiochemical target processing could be based on existing technologies of extraction of 99Mo from reactor irradiated 235U. The presented method could be used for co-production of other radioisotopes of medical interest such as 131I.

  10. a Microscopic Theory of Low Energy Fission:. Fragment Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Younes, W.; Gogny, D.; Schunck, N.

    2014-09-01

    We present fully microscopic time-dependent calculations of fission-fragment properties (mass distributions, pre-scission energies, total kinetic and excitation energies) for the 235U(n, f) and 239Pu (n, f) reactions. The mass distributions for both reactions have been obtained as a function of incident neutron energy from thermal to 5 MeV. The various energies have been calculated for the thermal 239Pu (n, f) reaction. We compare our calculations to experimental results, wherever possible.

  11. Measurements of isomeric yield ratios of fission products from proton-induced fission on natU and 232Th via direct ion counting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakopoulos, Vasileios; Lantz, Mattias; Al-Adili, Ali; Gorelov, Dmitry; Jokinen, Ari; Kolhinen, Veli; Mattera, Andrea; Moore, Iain D.; Penttilä, Heikki; Prokofiev, Alexander V.; Solders, Andreas; Pomp, Stephan

    2017-09-01

    Independent isomeric yield ratios (IYR) of 81Ge, 96Y, 97Y, 97Nb, 128Sn and 130Sn have been determined in the 25 MeV proton-induced fission of natU and 232Th. The measurements were performed at the Ion Guide Isotope Separator On-Line (IGISOL) facility at the University of Jyväskylä. A direct ion counting measurement of the isomeric fission yield ratios was accomplished for the first time, registering the fission products in less than a second after their production. In addition, the IYRs of natU were measured by means of γ-spectroscopy in order to verify the consistency of the recently upgraded experimental setup. From the obtained results, indications of a dependence of the production rate on the fissioning system can be noticed. These data were compared with data available in the literature, whenever possible. Using the TALYS code and the experimentally obtained IYRs, we also deduced the average angular momentum of the fission fragments after scission.

  12. Sequential character of low-energy ternary and quaternary nuclear fission

    SciTech Connect

    Kadmensky, S. G. Bulychev, A. O.

    2016-09-15

    An analysis of low-energy true ternary (quaternary) nuclear fission leads to the conclusion that these fission modes have a sequential two-step (three-step) character such that the emission of a third particle (third and fourth particles) and the separation of fission fragments occur at distinctly different instants, in contrast to the simultaneous emergence of all fission products in the case of onestep ternary (quaternary) fission. This conclusion relies on the following arguments. First, the emission of a third particle (third and fourth particles) from a fissile nucleus is due to a nonevaporative mechanism associated with a nonadiabatic character of the collective deformation motion of this nucleus at the stages preceding its scission. Second, the axial symmetry of the deformed fissile compound nucleus and the direction of its symmetry axis both remain unchanged at all stages of ternary (quaternary) fission. This circumstancemakes it possible to explain themechanism of the appearance of observed anisotropies and T — odd asymmeries in the angular distributions of products of ternary (quaternary) nuclear fission. Third, the T —odd asymmetry discovered experimentally in ternary nuclear fission induced by cold polarized neutrons obeys the T —invariance condition only in the case of a sequential two-step (three-step) character of true ternary (quaternary) nuclear fission. At the same time, this asymmetry is not a T —invariant quantity in the case of the simultaneous emission of products of true ternary (quaternary) nuclear fission from the fissile compound nucleus.

  13. MCNP6 updated proton-induced fission cross section calculations at intermediate energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerby, Leslie; Mashnik, Stepan; Mulvaney, John

    2017-09-01

    MCNP6 has been Validated and Verified against intermediate- and high-energy fission cross-section experimental data. Recent improvements contained in CEM03.03F and MCNP6-F to consider precompound emission of heavy clusters up to 28Mg has necessitated a re-calculation of fission cross sections. With our re-calculation, we find that CEM03.03F, which is used in MCNP6-F, predicts fission cross sections in good agreement with available experimental data for reactions induced by protons on both subactinide and actinide nuclei at incident energies from several tens of MeV to several GeV.

  14. Hardness Assurance for Low-Energy Proton-Induced Single-Event Effects: Final report for LDRD Project 173134

    SciTech Connect

    Dodds, Nathaniel Anson

    2015-08-01

    This report briefly summarizes three publications that resulted from a two-year LDRD. The three publications address a recently emerging reliability issue: namely, that low-energy protons (LEPs) can cause single-event effects (SEEs) in highly scaled microelectronics. These publications span from low to high technology readiness levels. In the first, novel experiments were used to prove that proton direct ionization is the dominant mechanism for LEP-induced SEEs. In the second, a simple method was developed to calculate expected on-orbit error rates for LEP effects. This simplification was enabled by creating (and characterizing) an accelerated space-like LEP environment in the laboratory. In the third publication, this new method was applied to many memory circuits from the 20-90 nm technology nodes to study the general importance of LEP effects, in terms of their contribution to the total on-orbit SEE rate.

  15. Angular momentum of fission fragments in low energy fission of actinides

    SciTech Connect

    Naik, H.; Dange, S.P.; Singh, R.J.

    2005-01-01

    Independent isomeric yield ratios (IYR) of {sup 128}Sb, {sup 130}Sb, {sup 132}Sb, {sup 131}Te, {sup 133}Te, {sup 132}I, {sup 134}I, {sup 136}I, {sup 135}Xe, and {sup 138}Cs have been determined in fast neutron induced fission of {sup 232}Th, {sup 238}U, {sup 240}Pu, and {sup 244}Cm as well as in thermal neutron induced fission of {sup 232}U and {sup 238}Pu using radiochemical and offline {gamma}-ray spectrometric techniques. From the IYR, fragment angular momenta (J{sub rms}) have been deduced using a spin-dependent statistical model analysis. These data along with the literature data for {sup 230}Th*, {sup 234}U*, {sup 236}U*, {sup 240}Pu*, {sup 242}Pu*, {sup 244}Cm(SF), {sup 246}Cm*, {sup 250}Cf*, and {sup 252}Cf(SF) for fifteen even-Z fissioning systems show the following important features: (i) The J{sub rms} of the odd-Z fission products are higher than those of the even-Z fission products, indicating the odd-even effect. For both the odd-Z and even-Z fission products, the J{sub rms} increase with Z{sub F}{sup 2}/A{sub F}. (ii) The J{sub rms} of fragments with spherical 50-p and 82-n shells are lower compared to those of fragments outside the spherical shell, indicating the effect of shell closure proximity. (iii) The J{sub rms} of the fission products increase with mass number in spite of fluctuations in shell closure proximity and odd-even effects but do not show any correlation with the neutron emission curve. (iv) In all fifteen even-Z fissioning systems from Th to Cf, the yield-weighted J{sub rms} values show an anticorrelation with the elemental yields. (v) The odd-even fluctuation on J{sub rms} does not change drastically from Th to Cf, unlike the proton odd-even effect ({delta}{sub p}) which decreases significantly with the increase of Coulomb parameter (Z{sub F}{sup 2}/A{sub F}{sup 1/3})

  16. Impact of low-energy photons on the characteristics of prompt fission γ -ray spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberstedt, A.; Billnert, R.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Oberstedt, S.

    2015-07-01

    In this paper we report on a new study of prompt γ -rays from the spontaneous fission of 252Cf . Photons were measured in coincidence with fission fragments by employing four different lanthanide halide scintillation detectors. Together with results from a previous work of ours, we determined characteristic parameters with high precision, such as the average γ -ray multiplicity ν¯γ=(8.29 ±0.13 ), the average energy per photon ɛγ=(0.80 ±0.02 ) MeV, and the total γ -ray energy release per fission Eγ ,tot=(6.65 ±0.10 ) MeV. The excellent agreement between the individual results obtained in all six measurements proves the good repeatability of the applied experimental technique. The impact of low-energy photons, i.e., below 500 keV, on prompt fission γ -ray spectra characteristics has been investigated as well by comparing our results with those taken with the DANCE detector system, which appears to suffer from absorption effects in the low-energy region. Correction factors for this effect were estimated, giving results comparable to ours as well as to historical ones. From this we demonstrate that the different techniques of determining the average γ -ray multiplicity, either from a properly measured and normalized spectrum or a measured multiplicity distribution, give equivalent and consistent results.

  17. Independent isotopic yields in 25 MeV and 50 MeV proton-induced fission of natU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penttilä, H.; Gorelov, D.; Elomaa, V.-V.; Eronen, T.; Hager, U.; Hakala, J.; Jokinen, A.; Kankainen, A.; Karvonen, P.; Moore, I. D.; Parkkonen, J.; Peräjärvi, K.; Pohjalainen, I.; Rahaman, S.; Rinta-Antila, S.; Rissanen, J.; Rubchenya, V. A.; Saastamoinen, A.; Simutkin, V.; Sonoda, T.; Weber, C.; Voss, A.; Äystö, J.

    2016-04-01

    Independent isotopic yields for elements from Zn to La in the 25 MeV proton-induced fission of {}^{nat}U were determined with the JYFLTRAP facility. In addition, isotopic yields for Zn, Ga, Rb, Sr, Zr, Pd and Xe in the 50 MeV proton-induced fission of {}^{nat}U were measured. The deduced isotopic yield distributions are compared with a Rubchenya model, the GEF model with universal parameters and the semi-empirical Wahl model. Of these, the Rubchenya model gives the best overall agreement with the obtained data. Combining the isotopic yield data with mass yield data to obtain the absolute independent yields was attempted. The result depends on the mass yield distribution.

  18. Understanding Low Energy Gamma Emission from Fission and Capture with DANCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilburn, Grey; Couture, Aaron; Mosby, Shea

    2012-10-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory's Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) consists of 160 barium fluoride (BaF2) detectors in a 4π array used to study cross-section measurements from neutron capture reactions. Further, recent studies have taken advantage of DANCE to study the gamma emission from fission, which is not well characterized. Neutron capture is studied because of its relevance to nuclear astrophysics (almost all elements heavier than iron are formed via neutron capture) and nuclear energy, where neutron capture is a poison in the reactor. Gamma ray cascades following neutron capture and fission include photons with energies between 100 keV and 10 MeV. DANCE uses a ^6LiH sphere to attenuate scattered neutrons, the primary background in DANCE. Unfortunately, it also attenuates low energy gamma rays. In order to quantify this effect and validate simulations, direct measurements of low energy gammas were made with a high purity germanium (HPGe) crystal. HPGe's allow for high resolution measurements of low energy gamma rays that are not possible using the BaF2 crystals. The results and their agreement with simulations will be discussed.

  19. Measurements of charge distributions of the fragments in the low energy fission reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Taofeng; Han, Hongyin; Meng, Qinghua; Wang, Liming; Zhu, Liping; Xia, Haihong

    2013-01-01

    The measurement for charge distributions of fragments in spontaneous fission 252Cf has been performed by using a unique style of detector setup consisting of a typical grid ionization chamber and a ΔΕ-Ε particle telescope, in which a thin grid ionization chamber served as the ΔΕ-section and the E-section was an Au-Si surface barrier detector. The typical physical quantities of fragments, such as mass number and kinetic energies as well as the deposition in the gas ΔΕ detector and E detector were derived from the coincident measurement data. The charge distributions of the light fragments for the fixed mass number A2* and total kinetic energy (TKE) were obtained by the least-squares fits for the response functions of the ΔΕ detector with multi-Gaussian functions representing the different elements. The results of the charge distributions for some typical fragments are shown in this article which indicates that this detection setup has the charge distribution capability of Ζ:ΔΖ>40:1. The experimental method developed in this work for determining the charge distributions of fragments is expected to be employed in the neutron induced fissions of 232Th and 238U or other low energy fission reactions.

  20. Yields of neutron-rich isotopes around Z = 28 produced in 30 MeV proton-induced fission of 238U

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruglov, K.; Andreyev, A.; Bruyneel, B.; Dean, S.; Franchoo, S.; Górska, M.; Helariutta, K.; Huyse, M.; Kudryavtsev, Yu.; Mueller, W. F.; Prasad, N. V. S. V.; Raabe, R.; Schmidt, K.-H.; Van Duppen, P.; Van Roosbroeck, J.; Van de Vel, K.; Weissman, L.

    Heavy 65-70Co, 68-74Ni, 70-76Cu and 74-81Ga isotopes were produced at the LISOL facility by means of 30 MeV proton-induced fission of 238U. Production rates were deduced and compared to two types of cross-section calculations: the empirical model (V. Rubchenya, private communication) and the PROFI code. Comparison with experimental data favors the latter model. Yields using different beam-target combinations and different energies are calculated and discussed.

  1. Characteristics of Symmetric and Asymmetric Fission Modes as a Function of the Compound Nucleus Excitation in the Proton-Induced Fission of 233Pa, 239Np and 243Am

    SciTech Connect

    Beresova, M.; Kliman, J.; Krupa, L.; Bogatchev, A. A.; Itkis, I. M.; Itkis, M. G.; Kniajeva, G. N.; Kondratiev, N. A.; Kozulin, E. M.; Pokrovsky, I. V.; Dorvaux, O.; Khlebnikov, S.; Lyapin, V.; Rubchenia, W.; Stuttge, L.; Trzaska, W.; Vakhtin, D.

    2007-05-22

    Average preequilibrium average statistical prescission and postscission neutron multiplicities as well as average {gamma}-ray multiplicity , average energy emitted by {gamma}-rays and average energy per one gamma quantum <{epsilon}{gamma}> as a function of mass and total kinetic energy (TKE) of fission fragments were measured in the proton-induced reactions p+232Th{yields}233Pa, p+238U{yields}239Np and p+242Pu{yields}243Am (at proton energy Ep=13, 20, 40 and 55 MeV). The fragment mass and energy distributions (MEDs) have been analyzed in terms of the multimodal fission. The decomposition of the experimental MEDs onto the MEDs of the distinct modes has been fulfilled in the framework of a method that is free from any parameterization of the distinct fission mode mass distribution shapes. The main characteristics for symmetric and asymmetric modes have been studied in their dependence on the compound nucleus composition and proton energy. The manifestation of multimodal fission in average {gamma}-ray multiplicities of fission fragments was also studied in this work.

  2. Developments toward Understanding and Improving the Low Energy Measurement Capabilities of a Fission Time Projection Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bundgaard, Jeremy J.

    Nuclear physicists have been recently called upon for new, high precision fission measurements to improve existing fission models, ultimately enabling engineers to design next generation reactors as well as guarding the nation's stockpile. In response, a resurgence in fission research is aimed at developing detectors to design and build new experiments to meet these needs. The Neutron Induced Fission Fragment Tracking Experiment (NIFFTE) collaboration has developed the fission Time Projection Chamber (fissionTPC) to measure neutron induced fission with unprecedented precision. The fissionTPC is annually deployed to the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center LANSCE where it operates with a neutron beam passing axially through the drift volume, irradiating heavy actinide targets to induce fission. The fissionTPC was developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL) TPC lab, where it is tested with spontaneous fission (SF) from radioactive sources, typically 252Cf and 244Cm, to characterize detector response, improve performance, and evolve the design. One of the experiments relevant for both nuclear energy and nonproliferation is to measure the neutron induced fission of 239Pu, which exhibits a high alpha activity, generating a large unwanted background for the fission measurements. The ratio of alpha to fission present in our neutron induced fission measurement of 239Pu is on the same order of magnitude as the 244Cm alpha/SF branching ratio. The high alpha rate required the TPC to be triggering on fission signals during beam time and we set out to build a trigger system, which, using 244Cm to produce a similar alpha to fission ratio as 239Pu in the neutron beam, we successfully demonstrated the viability of this approach. The trigger design has been evolved for use in NIFFTE's current measurements at LANSCE. In addition to several hardware and software contributions in the development and operation of the fissionTPC, a central purpose of this thesis was

  3. Assessing the role of the (n, γ f) process in the low-energy fission of actinides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talou, Patrick; Lynn, J. E.; Kawano, T.; Mosby, S.; Couture, A.; Bouland, O.

    2016-06-01

    We review the role of the (n, γ f) process in the low-energy neutron-induced fission reaction of 239Pu. Recent measurements of the average total γ-ray energy released in this reaction were performed with the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) at Los Alamos. Significant fluctuations of this quantity in the resonance region below 100 eV can be interpreted by invoking the presence of the indirect (n, γ f) process. Modern calculations of the probability for such an event to occur are presented.

  4. Effect of transverse vibrations of fissile nuclei on the angular and spin distributions of low-energy fission fragments

    SciTech Connect

    Bunakov, V. E.; Kadmensky, S. G.; Lyubashevsky, D. E.

    2016-05-15

    It is shown that A. Bohr’s classic theory of angular distributions of fragments originating from low-energy fission should be supplemented with quantum corrections based on the involvement of a superposition of a very large number of angular momenta L{sub m} in the description of the relative motion of fragments flying apart along the straight line coincidentwith the symmetry axis. It is revealed that quantum zero-point wriggling-type vibrations of the fissile system in the vicinity of its scission point are a source of these angular momenta and of high fragment spins observed experimentally.

  5. Odd-even effect dependence on the excitation energy in low energy fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirea, M.

    2017-09-01

    An inversion of the odd-even effect was observed experimentally in cold fission: the odd-odd fragmentation yields are favored over the even-even ones for excitations energies of the fragments smaller than 4 MeV. This effect is linked to the important problem of quasiparticle excitations during the dynamical evolution of the nuclear system from its ground-state configuration up to scission. An explanation based on the Landau-Zener promotion mechanism generalized for superfluid systems is offered for the inversion of the odd-even effect. In principle, the even-even fission products cannot be produced at very low excitation energies due dynamical quasiparticle excitations produced in the avoided- level-crossing regions. These excitations are produced with a large probability when the nuclear system deforms slowly.

  6. Neutron-fragment and Neutron-neutron Correlations in Low-energy Fission

    SciTech Connect

    Lestone, J.P.

    2016-01-15

    A computational method has been developed to simulate neutron emission from thermal-neutron induced fission of {sup 235}U and from spontaneous fission of {sup 252}Cf. Measured pre-emission mass-yield curves, average total kinetic energies and their variances, both as functions of mass split, are used to obtain a representation of the distribution of fragment velocities. Measured average neutron multiplicities as a function of mass split and their dependence on total kinetic energy are used. Simulations can be made to reproduce measured factorial moments of neutron-multiplicity distributions with only minor empirical adjustments to some experimental inputs. The neutron-emission spectra in the rest-frame of the fragments are highly constrained by ENDF/B-VII.1 prompt-fission neutron-spectra evaluations. The n-f correlation measurements of Vorobyev et al. (2010) are consistent with predictions where all neutrons are assumed to be evaporated isotropically from the rest frame of fully accelerated fragments. Measured n-f and n-n correlations of others are a little weaker than the predictions presented here. These weaker correlations could be used to infer a weak scission-neutron source. However, the effect of neutron scattering on the experimental results must be studied in detail before moving away from a null hypothesis that all neutrons are evaporated from the fragments.

  7. Structure of Nuclei Deformed at Maximum and the Mass Asymmetry in Low-Energy Fission

    SciTech Connect

    Carjan, N.; Rizea, M.; Pashkevich, V.

    2010-06-01

    Single-particle spectra of neutrons and protons in {sup 236}U at scission (i.e., the maximum deformation this nucleus can sustain) are calculated as function of the mass asymmetry of the future fission fragments. Modified Cassini ovals were used to describe the nuclear shapes involved. Moving away from symmetric fission up to very asymmetric fission we observe the appearance and the disappearance of closed shells. This explains the complexity of the mass distribution and the strong preference for asymmetric divisions. For a more quantitative analyses we have calculated the pairing gap DELTA and the Fermi energy gamma in the frame of the renormalized BCS theory. A strong dependence of DELTA on the fragment mass ratio A{sub H}/A{sub L} was found with a pronounced minimum at 1.5 for both neutrons and protons. This is in agreement with the most probable mass division measured in {sup 235}U(n{sub th},f). Concerning the Fermi energies, the protons have lower values than the neutrons by more than 1 MeV. They are also stronger bound at symmetry (A{sub L} = 110-118) than at large asymmetries (A{sub L} = 70-80). To answer the important question of where the mass asymmetry is determined we have extended the calculations to successive stages between saddle and scission.

  8. Low-energy fission investigated in reactions of 750 AMeV238U-ions with Pb and Be targets. I. Nuclear charge distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armbruster, P.; Bernas, M.; Czajkowski, S.; Geissel, H.; Aumann, T.; Dessagne, Ph.; Donzaud, C.; Hanelt, E.; Heinz, A.; Hesse, M.; Kozhuharov, C.; Miehe, Ch.; Münzenberg, G.; Pfützner, M.; Schmidt, K.-H.; Schwab, W.; Stéphan, C.; Sümmerer, K.; Tassan-Got, L.; Voss, B.

    1996-12-01

    Charge distributions of fragments from low energy nuclear fission are investigated in reactions of highly fissile238U projectiles at relativistic energies (750 A·MeV) with a heavy (Pb) and a light (Be) target. The fully stripped fission fragments are separated by the Fragment Separator (FRS). Their high kinetic energies in the laboratory system allow the identification of all atomic numbers by using Multiple-Sampling Ionization Chambers (MUSIC). The elemental distributions of fragments observed at larger magnetic rigidities than the238U projectiles show asymmetric break-up and odd-even effects. They indicate a low energy fission process, induced mainly by dissociation in the electro-magnetic field for the U/Pb-system, or by peripheral nuclear interactions for the U/Be-system.

  9. Neutron emission effects on final fragments mass and kinetic energy distribution from low energy fission of 34U

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montoya, M.; Rojas, J.; Lobato, I.

    2008-12-01

    The kinetic energy distribution as a function of mass of final fragments (m) from low energy fission of $^{234}U$, measured with the Lohengrin spectrometer by Belhafaf et al. presents a peak around m=108 and another around m = 122. The authors attribute the first peak to the evaporation of a large number of neutrons around the corresponding mass number; and the second peak to the distribution of the primary fragment kinetic energy. Nevertheless, the theoretical calculations related to primary distribution made by Faust et al. do not result in a peak around m = 122. In order to clarify this apparent controversy, we have made a numerical experiment in which the masses and the kinetic energy of final fragments are calculated, assuming an initial distribution of the kinetic energy without peaks on the standard deviation as function of fragment mass. As a result we obtain a pronounced peak on the standard deviation of the kinetic energy distribution around m = 109, a depletion from m = 121 to m = 129, and an small peak around m = 122, which is not as big as the measured by Belhafaf et al. Our simulation also reproduces the experimental results on the yield of the final mass, the average number of emitted neutrons as a function of the provisional mass (calculated from the values of the final kinetic energy of the complementary fragments) and the average value of fragment kinetic energy as a function of the final mass.

  10. Phenomenological analysis of fission induced by high-energy protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simbel, M. H.

    1989-06-01

    High-energy proton induced fission is studied in the framework of a two-step model. In the first step, the projectile penetrates the target nucleus, knocks out few nucleons and leaves the residual nucleus with a spectrum of excitation energies depending upon the number of projectile-nucleon collisions. This stage is described in terms of a simplified version of Glauber's multiple-scattering theory. The second stage in which the residual nucleus fissions, is treated by assuming phenomenological expressions for the dependence of the fission probability on excitation energy which take into account the onset of fragmentation at a certain “crack” energy. Comparison with experimental data suggests that high energy fission of heavy nuclei proceeds in a way similar to low-energy fission. Light nuclei, however, require a more violent fission mechanism.

  11. Calibration factors for determination of relativistic particle induced fission rates in natU, 235U, 232Th, natPb and 197Au foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashemi-Nezhad, S. R.; Zhuk, Igor; Potapenko, A.; Kievets, M.; Krivopustov, M. I.

    2012-02-01

    Calibration factors w, for determination of fission rate in metallic foils of natU, 235U, 232Th, natPb and 197Au were determined for foils in contact with synthetic mica track detectors. Proton-induced fission at proton energies of 0.7 GeV and 1.5 GeV were used. Using our experimental results as well as those of the other authors, w for different foil-mica systems were determined. Two methods were used to calculate w, relative to the calibration factor for uranium-mica system, which has been obtained in a standard neutron field of energy 14.7 MeV. One of these methods requires the knowledge of the mean range of the fission fragments in the foils of interest and other method needs information on the values of the fission cross-sections at the required energies as well as the density of the tracks recorded in the track detectors in contact with the foil surfaces. The obtained w-values were compared with Monte Carlo calculations and good agreements were found. It is shown that a calibration factor obtained at low energy neutron induced fissions in uranium isotopes deviates only by less than 10% from those obtained at relativistic proton induced fissions.

  12. Systematic measurements of proton-induced reactions on enriched molybdenum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamere, Edward; Gilardy, Gwenaelle; Meisel, Zach; Moran, Michael; Seymore, Christopher; Skulski, Michael; Simonetti, Antonio; Couder, Manoel

    2016-09-01

    Between 2008 and 2010, shortages in the world-wide supply of Mo highlighted weaknesses in the current fission-based production method of mTc, a critical medical isotope. This crisis sparked interest in developing the direct production of mTc from proton-induced reactions on enriched Mo targets as an alternative. One complication with this method is that mTc must be chemically extracted from the irradiated target. Therefore, radiopharmaceuticals produced from proton bombardment will contain a mixture of all Tc-species with open production channels, affecting radiochemical purity, specific activity and total production yield of mTc-factors critical for the feasibility of this production method. Reactions on trace impurities in the enriched targets have been shown to impact these factors dramatically. Precise cross-section measurements for all Mo +p reactions that lead to Tc or Mo species are required for proper assessment of this production technique. Cross-section measurements for the main reaction of interest, mTc(p,2n), have been performed in recent years, however, other reactions producing Tc have been mostly neglected. We will introduce a systematic study of proton-induced reactionson 92, 94-98, 100 Mo currently being performed at Notre Dame. Preliminary results will be presented. NRC-HQ-12-G-38-0073.

  13. An observation of proton-induced latchup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, Donald K.; Coss, James R.; Watson, R. K.; Schwartz, Harvey R.; Pease, Ronald L.

    1992-01-01

    Proton-induced latchup in a CMOS microprocessor known to have a very low heavy-ion-induced latchup threshold LET was observed. The latchup cross section vs. proton energy for three different bias conditions is displayed. Average measures of latchup current within an 11-ms window following the onset of latchup are provided, as a function of bias and incident proton energy. These data can be interpreted in terms of the present understanding of SEE phenomena.

  14. An observation of proton-induced latchup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, Donald K.; Coss, James R.; Watson, R. K.; Schwartz, Harvey R.; Pease, Ronald L.

    1992-01-01

    Proton-induced latchup in a CMOS microprocessor known to have a very low heavy-ion-induced latchup threshold LET was observed. The latchup cross section vs. proton energy for three different bias conditions is displayed. Average measures of latchup current within an 11-ms window following the onset of latchup are provided, as a function of bias and incident proton energy. These data can be interpreted in terms of the present understanding of SEE phenomena.

  15. Bimodal fission

    SciTech Connect

    Hulet, E.K.

    1989-04-19

    In recent years, we have measured the mass and kinetic-energy distributions from the spontaneous fission of /sup 258/Fm, /sup 259/Md, /sup 260/Md, /sup 258/No, /sup 262/No, and /sup 260/(104). All are observed to fission with a symmetrical division of mass, whereas the total-kinetic-energy (TKE) distributions strongly deviated from the Gaussian shape characteristically found in the fission of all other actinides. When the TKE distributions are resolved into two Gaussians the constituent peaks lie near 200 and near 233 MeV. We conclude two modes or bimodal fission is occurring in five of the six nuclides studied. Both modes are possible in the same nuclides, but one generally predominates. We also conclude the low-energy but mass-symmetrical mode is likely to extend to far heavier nuclei; while the high-energy mode will be restricted to a smaller region, a region of nuclei defined by the proximity of the fragments to the strong neutron and proton shells in /sup 132/Sn. 16 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Low energy supersymmetry phenomenology

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, H.; Chen, C.H.; Bartl, A.

    1995-03-01

    The authors summarize the current status and future prospects for low energy (weak scale) supersymmetry. In particular, they evaluate the capabilities of various e{sup +}e{sup {minus}}, p{anti p} and pp colliders to discover evidence for supersymmetric particles. Furthermore, assuming supersymmetry is discovered, they discuss capabilities of future facilities to disentangle the anticipated spectrum of superparticles, and, via precision measurements, to test mass and coupling parameters for comparison with various theoretical expectations. They comment upon the complementarity of proposed hadron and e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} machines for a comprehensive study of low energy supersymmetry.

  17. Low energy supersymmetry phenomenology

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, H.; Chen, C.H.; Bartl, A.; Feng, J.; Fujii, K.; Gunion, J.; Kamon, T.; Lopez, J.L.; Kao, C.

    1995-04-01

    The authors summarize the current status and future prospects for low energy (weak scale) supersymmetry. In particular, they evaluate the capabilities of various e{sup +}e{sup {minus}}, p{bar p} and pp colliders to discover evidence for supersymmetric particles. Furthermore, assuming supersymmetry is discovered, they discuss capabilities of future facilities to disentangle the anticipated spectrum of super-particles, and, via precision measurements, to test mass and coupling parameters for comparison with various theoretical expectations. The authors then comment upon the complementarity of proposed hadron and e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} machines for a comprehensive study of low energy supersymmetry.

  18. LOW ENERGY COUNTING CHAMBERS

    DOEpatents

    Hayes, P.M.

    1960-02-16

    A beta particle counter adapted to use an end window made of polyethylene terephthalate was designed. The extreme thinness of the film results in a correspondingly high transmission of incident low-energy beta particles by the window. As a consequence, the counting efficiency of the present counter is over 40% greater than counters using conventional mica end windows.

  19. Fission yield measurements at IGISOL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lantz, M.; Al-Adili, A.; Gorelov, D.; Jokinen, A.; Kolhinen, V. S.; Mattera, A.; Moore, I.; Penttilä, H.; Pomp, S.; Prokofiev, A. V.; Rakopoulos, V.; Rinta-Antila, S.; Simutkin, V.; Solders, A.

    2016-06-01

    The fission product yields are an important characteristic of the fission process. In fundamental physics, knowledge of the yield distributions is needed to better understand the fission process. For nuclear energy applications good knowledge of neutroninduced fission-product yields is important for the safe and efficient operation of nuclear power plants. With the Ion Guide Isotope Separator On-Line (IGISOL) technique, products of nuclear reactions are stopped in a buffer gas and then extracted and separated by mass. Thanks to the high resolving power of the JYFLTRAP Penning trap, at University of Jyväskylä, fission products can be isobarically separated, making it possible to measure relative independent fission yields. In some cases it is even possible to resolve isomeric states from the ground state, permitting measurements of isomeric yield ratios. So far the reactions U(p,f) and Th(p,f) have been studied using the IGISOL-JYFLTRAP facility. Recently, a neutron converter target has been developed utilizing the Be(p,xn) reaction. We here present the IGISOL-technique for fission yield measurements and some of the results from the measurements on proton induced fission. We also present the development of the neutron converter target, the characterization of the neutron field and the first tests with neutron-induced fission.

  20. Low energy antiproton beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klapisch, R.

    1992-04-01

    It was the invention of stochastic cooling by S. Van Meer that has allowed antiproton beams to become a powerful tool for the physicist. As a byproduct of the high energy proton-antiproton collider, a versatile low-energy facility, LEAR has been operating at CERN since 1984. The facility and its characteristics will be described as well as examples of its use for studying fundamental properties of the antiproton and for topics in atomic, nuclear and particle Physics.

  1. Low-energy neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludhova, Livia

    2016-05-01

    There exist several kinds of sources emitting neutrinos in the MeV energy range. These low-energy neutrinos from different sources can be often detected by the same multipurpose detectors. The status-of-art of the field of solar neutrinos, geoneutrinos, and the search for sterile neutrino with artificial neutrino sources is provided here; other neutrino sources, as for example reactor or high-energy neutrinos, are described elsewhere. For each of these three fields, the present-day motivation and open questions, as well as the latest experimental results and future perspectives are discussed.

  2. Systematic Study of Technetium Production by Proton-Induced Reactions on Molybdenum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamere, Edward; Gilardy, Gwenaelle; Meisel, Zach; Moran, Michael; Skulski, Michael; Couder, Manoel

    2015-10-01

    Recent shortages in the world-wide supply of 99mTc have sparked interest in developing alternative production methods which do not rely on fission based 99Mo. The direct production of 99mTc from proton induced reactions on enriched 100Mo targets is one such approach. With this approach, 99mTc must be chemically extracted from the irradiated target and therefore radiopharmaceuticals will contain a mixture of all Tc-species produced from the proton bombardment. Commercial viability of cyclotron-produced 99mTc will depend on a number of factors including, production yield, radiochemical purity, and specific activity. Reactions on trace impurities in the targets has been shown to impact these factors dramatically. Precise cross-section measurements for not just the main reaction, 99mTc(p,2n), but for all Mo + p reactions that lead to Tc or Mo species are required for proper assessment of this 99mTc production technique. We will introduce a systematic study of proton-induced reactions on 92, 94-98, 100 Mo currently being performed at the University of Notre Dame. First results of 96Mo + p reactions will be presented. NRC-HQ-12-G-38-0073.

  3. Low energy ballasted flotation.

    PubMed

    Jarvis, P; Buckingham, P; Holden, B; Jefferson, B

    2009-08-01

    A novel process which involves the replacement or supplementation of bubbles in the dissolved air flotation process with low density beads is presented. The work comprised a series of bench-scale flotation trials treating three commonly encountered algal species (Microcystis, Melosira and Chlorella) that were removed in a flotation cell configured as either: conventional dissolved air flotation (DAF); ballasted flotation using low density 70 microm glass beads with a density of 100 kg m(-3); or a hybrid process of ballasted flotation combined with conventional DAF. Results indicated that the bead only system was capable of achieving better residual turbidity than standard DAF at bead concentrations of 500 mg L(-1). Addition of beads in combination with standard DAF reduced turbidity further to even lower residual turbidity levels. Algae removal was improved when glass beads were dosed, but removal was dependent on algal species. Microcystis was removed by 97% for bead only systems and this removal did not change significantly with the addition of air bubbles. Melosira was the next best removed algae with bead only dosed systems giving similar removals to that achieved by standard DAF using a 10% air recycle ratio (81 and 76% removal respectively). Chlorella was the least well removed algae by bead only systems (63% removal). However, removal was rapidly improved to 86% by the addition of air bubbles using only a 2% recycle ratio. Energy estimations suggested that at least a 50% energy reduction could be achieved using the process offering a potential route for future development of low energy separation processes for algae removal.

  4. Bimodal fission of Hs*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itkis, I. M.; Itkis, M. G.; Knyazheva, G. N.; Kozulin, E. M.; Loktev, T. A.; Novikov, K. V.; Hanappe, F.; Vardaci, E.

    2014-05-01

    Mass and energy distributions of fission fragments obtained in the reactions 22Ne + 249Cf, 26Mg + 248Cm, and 22Ne + 238U have been measured. A special attention will be paid on the properties of mass-energy distribution of fission fragments obtained in the reaction 26Mg + 248Cm at an excitation energy of 35 MeV. At this energy shell effects should become more effective in fission, the TKE distribution of symmetric fragments obtained in the reaction 26Mg + 248Cm differs strongly from a Gaussian shape. Besides a low-energy component, a high-energy component, not foreseen in the LDM, arises. This is attributed to the fact that both fission fragments are close to the spherical neutron shell N = 82. It means that for the compound nucleus 274Hs*, formed in the reaction 26Mg + 248Cm, the phenomenon of bimodal fission was observed for the first time. For the compound nucleus 260No* formed in the reaction 22Ne + 238U at the initial excitation energy of 41 MeV the bimodal fission as well as superasymmetric fission were observed.

  5. Singlet exciton fission photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jiye; Jadhav, Priya; Reusswig, Philip D; Yost, Shane R; Thompson, Nicholas J; Congreve, Daniel N; Hontz, Eric; Van Voorhis, Troy; Baldo, Marc A

    2013-06-18

    Singlet exciton fission, a process that generates two excitons from a single photon, is perhaps the most efficient of the various multiexciton-generation processes studied to date, offering the potential to increase the efficiency of solar devices. But its unique characteristic, splitting a photogenerated singlet exciton into two dark triplet states, means that the empty absorption region between the singlet and triplet excitons must be filled by adding another material that captures low-energy photons. This has required the development of specialized device architectures. In this Account, we review work to develop devices that harness the theoretical benefits of singlet exciton fission. First, we discuss singlet fission in the archetypal material, pentacene. Pentacene-based photovoltaic devices typically show high external and internal quantum efficiencies. They have enabled researchers to characterize fission, including yield and the impact of competing loss processes, within functional devices. We review in situ probes of singlet fission that modulate the photocurrent using a magnetic field. We also summarize studies of the dissociation of triplet excitons into charge at the pentacene-buckyball (C60) donor-acceptor interface. Multiple independent measurements confirm that pentacene triplet excitons can dissociate at the C60 interface despite their relatively low energy. Because triplet excitons produced by singlet fission each have no more than half the energy of the original photoexcitation, they limit the potential open circuit voltage within a solar cell. Thus, if singlet fission is to increase the overall efficiency of a solar cell and not just double the photocurrent at the cost of halving the voltage, it is necessary to also harvest photons in the absorption gap between the singlet and triplet energies of the singlet fission material. We review two device architectures that attempt this using long-wavelength materials: a three-layer structure that uses

  6. New experimental approaches to investigate the fission dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Benlliure, J. Rodríguez-Sánchez, J. L.; Alvarez-Pol, H.; Ayyad, Y.; Cortina-Gil, D.; Paradela, C.; Pietras, B.; Ramos, D.; Vargas, J.; Audouin, L.; Boutoux, G.; Bélier, G.; Chatillon, A.; Gorbinet, T.; Laurent, B.; Martin, J.-F.; Pellereau, E.; Taïeb, J.; Casarejos, E.; Heinz, A.; and others

    2016-07-07

    The first ever achieved full identification of both fission fragments, in atomic and mass number, made it possible to define new observables sensitive to the fission dynamics along the fission path up to the scission point. Moreover, proton-induced fission of {sup 208}Pb at high energies offers optimal conditions for the investigation of dissipative, and transient effects, because of the high-excitation energy of the fissioning nuclei, its low angular momentum, and limited shape distortion by the reaction. In this work we show that the charge distribution of the final fission fragments can constrain the ground-to-saddle dynamics while the mass distribution is sensitive to the dynamics until the scission point.

  7. Measurements of high-energy neutron-induced fission ofnatPb and 209Bi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarrío, D.; Tassan-Got, L.; Audouin, L.; Berthier, B.; Duran, I.; Ferrant, L.; Isaev, S.; Le Naour, C.; Paradela, C.; Stephan, C.; Trubert, D.; Abbondanno, U.; Aerts, G.; Álvarez, H.; Álvarez-Velarde, F.; Andriamonje, S.; Andrzejewski, J.; Assimakopoulos, P.; Badurek, G.; Baumann, P.; Becvár, F.; Berthoumieux, E.; Calviño, F.; Calviani, M.; Cano-Ott, D.; Capote, R.; Carrapiço, C.; Cennini, P.; Chepel, V.; Chiaveri, E.; Colonna, N.; Cortes, G.; Couture, A.; Cox, J.; Dahlfors, M.; David, S.; Dillmann, I.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Dridi, W.; Eleftheriadis, C.; Embid-Segura, M.; Ferrari, A.; Ferreira-Marques, R.; Fujii, K.; Furman, W.; Gonçalves, I.; González-Romero, E.; Gramegna, F.; Guerrero, C.; Gunsig, F.; Haas, B.; Haight, R.; Heil, M.; Herrera-Martinez, A.; Igashira, M.; Jericha, E.; Kadi, Y.; Käppeler, F.; Karadimos, D.; Karamanis, D.; Kerveno, M.; Koehler, P.; Kossionides, E.; Krticka, M.; Lampoudis, C.; Leeb, H.; Lindote, A.; Lopes, I.; Lozano, M.; Lukic, S.; Marganiec, J.; Marrone, S.; Martínez, T.; Massimi, C.; Mastinu, P.; Mengoni, A.; Milazzo, P. M.; Moreau, C.; Mosconi, M.; Neves, F.; Oberhummer, H.; O'Brien, S.; Oshima, M.; Pancin, J.; Papachristodoulou, C.; Papadopoulos, C.; Patronis, N.; Pavlik, A.; Pavlopoulos, P.; Perrot, L.; Pigni, M. T.; Plag, R.; Plompen, A.; Plukis, A.; Poch, A.; Praena, J.; Pretel, C.; Quesada, J.; Rauscher, T.; Reifarth, R.; Rubbia, C.; Rudolf, G.; Rullhusen, P.; Salgado, J.; Santos, C.; Sarchiapone, L.; Savvidis, I.; Tagliente, G.; Tain, J. L.; Tavora, L.; Terlizzi, R.; Vannini, G.; Vaz, P.; Ventura, A.; Villamarin, D.; Vicente, M. C.; Vlachoudis, V.; Vlastou, R.; Voss, F.; Walter, S.; Wiescher, M.; Wisshak, K.

    2010-10-01

    The CERN Neutron Time-Of-Flight (n_TOF) facility is well suited to measure low cross sections as those of neutron-induced fission in subactinides. The cross section ratios of natPb and 209Bi relative to 235U and 238U were measured using PPAC detectors and a fragment coincidence method that allows us to identify the fission events. The present experiment provides first results for neutron-induced fission up to 1 GeV. Good agreement is found with previous experimental data below 200 MeV. The comparison with proton-induced fission indicates that the limiting regime where neutron-induced and proton-induced fission reach equal cross sections is close to 1 GeV.

  8. Actin-cytoskeleton rearrangement modulates proton-induced uptake

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Dov, Nadav; Korenstein, Rafi

    2013-04-15

    Recently it has been shown that elevating proton concentration at the cell surface stimulates the formation of membrane invaginations and vesicles accompanied by an enhanced uptake of macromolecules. While the initial induction of inward membrane curvature was rationalized in terms of proton-based increase of charge asymmetry across the membrane, the mechanisms underlying vesicle formation and its scission are still unknown. In light of the critical role of actin in vesicle formation during endocytosis, the present study addresses the involvement of cytoskeletal actin in proton-induced uptake (PIU). The uptake of dextran-FITC is used as a measure for the factual fraction of inward invaginations that undergo scission from the cell's plasma membrane. Our findings show that the rate of PIU in suspended cells is constant, whereas the rate of PIU in adherent cells is gradually increased in time, saturating at the level possessed by suspended cells. This is consistent with pH induced gradual degradation of stress-fibers in adherent cells. Wortmannin and calyculin-A are able to elevate PIU by 25% in adherent cells but not in suspended cells, while cytochalasin-D, rapamycin and latrunculin-A elevate PIU both in adherent and suspended cells. However, extensive actin depolymerization by high concentrations of latrunculin-A is able to inhibit PIU. We conclude that proton-induced membrane vesiculation is restricted by the actin structural resistance to the plasma membrane bending. Nevertheless, a certain degree of cortical actin restructuring is required for the completion of the scission process. - Highlights: ► Acidification of cells' exterior enhances uptake of macromolecules by the cells. ► Disruption of actin stress fibers leads to enhancement of proton induced uptake. ► Extensive depolymerization of cellular actin attenuates proton-induced uptake.

  9. A low energy electron magnetometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.; Wood, G. M., Jr.; Rayborn, G. H.; White, F. A.

    1979-01-01

    The concept of a highly sensitive magnetometer based on the deflection of low energy electron beams in magnetic fields is analyzed. Because of its extremely low mass and consequently high e/m ratio, a low energy electron is easily deflected in a magnetic field, thus providing a basis for very low field measurement. Calculations for a specific instrument design indicate that a low energy electron magnetometer (LEEM) can measure magnetic fields as low as 1000 nT. The anticipated performance of LEEM is compared with that of the existing high resolution magnetometers in selected applications. The fast response time of LEEM makes it especially attractive as a potential instrument for magnetic signature analysis in large engineering systems.

  10. Fission yield studies at the IGISOL facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penttilä, H.; Elomaa, V.-V.; Eronen, T.; Hakala, J.; Jokinen, A.; Kankainen, A.; Moore, I. D.; Rahaman, S.; Rinta-Antila, S.; Rissanen, J.; Rubchenya, V.; Saastamoinen, A.; Weber, C.; Äystö, J.

    2012-04-01

    Low-energy-particle-induced fission is a cost-effective way to produce neutron-rich nuclei for spectroscopic studies. Fission has been utilized at the IGISOL to produce isotopes for decay and nuclear structure studies, collinear laser spectroscopy and precision mass measurements. The ion guide technique is also very suitable for the fission yield measurements, which can be performed very efficiently by using the Penning trap for fission fragment identification and counting. The proton- and neutron-induced fission yield measurements at the IGISOL are reviewed, and the independent isotopic yields of Zn, Ga, Rb, Sr, Cd and In in 25MeV deuterium-induced fission are presented for the first time. Moving to a new location next to the high intensity MCC30/15 light-ion cyclotron will allow also the use of the neutron-induced fission to produce the neutron rich nuclei at the IGISOL in the future.

  11. Dynamical Aspects of Nuclear Fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kliman, J.; Itkis, M. G.; Gmuca, Š.

    2008-11-01

    [symbol]Pu / Y. V. Pyatkov. Comparative study of the ternary particle emission in [symbol] and [symbol]Cm(SF) / S. Vermote ... [et al.] -- Structure of fission fragments and neurton rich nuclei / manifestation of average y-ray multiplicity in the fission modes of [symbol]Cf(sf) and the proton-induced fission of [symbol]Pa, [symbol]Np, and [symbol]Am / M. Berešová ... [et al.]. Yields of correlated fragment pairs and average gamma-ray multiplicities and energies in [symbol]Pb([symbol]O, f) / A. Bogachev ... [et al.]. Recent experiments at gammasphere intended to the study of [symbol]Cf spontaneous fission / A. V. Daniel ... [et al.]. Nuclear structure studies of microsecond isomers near A =100 / J. Genevey ... [et al.]. Covariant density functional theory: isospin properties of nuclei far from stability / G. A. Lalazisis. Relativistic mean-field description of light nuclei / J. Leja and Š. Gmuca. Energy nucleon spectra from reactions at intermediate energies / O. Grudzevich ... [et al.] -- Developments in experimental techniques. Analysis, processing and visualization of multidimensional data using DaqProVis system / M. Morháč ... [et al.].

  12. Nuclear Fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denschlag, J. O.

    This chapter first gives a survey on the history of the discovery of nuclear fission. It briefly presents the liquid-drop and shell models and their application to the fission process. The most important quantities accessible to experimental determination such as mass yields, nuclear charge distribution, prompt neutron emission, kinetic energy distribution, ternary fragment yields, angular distributions, and properties of fission isomers are presented as well as the instrumentation and techniques used for their measurement. The contribution concentrates on the fundamental aspects of nuclear fission. The practical aspects of nuclear fission are discussed in http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4419-0720-2_57 of Vol. 6.

  13. Prompt Fission Neutrons as Probes to Nuclear Configurations at Scission

    SciTech Connect

    Talou, P.; Kawano, T.; Bonneau, L.

    2008-04-17

    Prompt fission neutrons and gamma-rays emitted by excited primary fission fragments are indirect probes to the nuclear configurations present near the scission point. By studying detailed characteristics of these quantities, it is shown that one can discriminate between various assumptions regarding the sharing of the free energy at scission among the two fragments. The case of low-energy neutron-induced fission on {sup 235}U is studied and interpreted in terms of fission modes.

  14. Low Energy Schools in Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heffernan, Martin

    2004-01-01

    Out of a commitment to reducing carbon dioxide emissions, Ireland's Department of Education and Science has designed and constructed two low energy schools, in Tullamore, County Offaly, and Raheen, County Laois. With energy use in buildings responsible for approximately 55% of the CO[subscript 2] released into the atmosphere and a major…

  15. Low Energy Schools in Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heffernan, Martin

    2004-01-01

    Out of a commitment to reducing carbon dioxide emissions, Ireland's Department of Education and Science has designed and constructed two low energy schools, in Tullamore, County Offaly, and Raheen, County Laois. With energy use in buildings responsible for approximately 55% of the CO[subscript 2] released into the atmosphere and a major…

  16. The low energy signaling network

    PubMed Central

    Tomé, Filipa; Nägele, Thomas; Adamo, Mattia; Garg, Abhroop; Marco-llorca, Carles; Nukarinen, Ella; Pedrotti, Lorenzo; Peviani, Alessia; Simeunovic, Andrea; Tatkiewicz, Anna; Tomar, Monika; Gamm, Magdalena

    2014-01-01

    Stress impacts negatively on plant growth and crop productivity, caicultural production worldwide. Throughout their life, plants are often confronted with multiple types of stress that affect overall cellular energy status and activate energy-saving responses. The resulting low energy syndrome (LES) includes transcriptional, translational, and metabolic reprogramming and is essential for stress adaptation. The conserved kinases sucrose-non-fermenting-1-related protein kinase-1 (SnRK1) and target of rapamycin (TOR) play central roles in the regulation of LES in response to stress conditions, affecting cellular processes and leading to growth arrest and metabolic reprogramming. We review the current understanding of how TOR and SnRK1 are involved in regulating the response of plants to low energy conditions. The central role in the regulation of cellular processes, the reprogramming of metabolism, and the phenotypic consequences of these two kinases will be discussed in light of current knowledge and potential future developments. PMID:25101105

  17. The Low Energy Neutrino Factory

    SciTech Connect

    Bross, Alan; Geer, Steve; Ellis, Malcolm; Fernandez Martinez, Enrique; Li, Tracey; Pascoli, Silvia; Mena, Olga

    2010-03-30

    We show that a low energy neutrino factory with a baseline of 1300 km and muon energy of 4.5 GeV has an excellent physics reach. The results of our optimisation studies demonstrate that such a setup can have remarkable sensitivity to theta{sub 13} and delta for sin{sup 2}(2theta{sub 13})>10{sup -4}, and to the mass hierarchy for sin{sup 2}(2theta{sub 13})>10{sup -3}. We also illustrate the power of the unique combination of golden and platinum channels accessible to the low energy neutrino factory. We have considered both a 20 kton totally active scintillating detector and a 100 kton liquid argon detector as possible detector technologies, finding that a liquid argon detector with very good background rejection can produce sensitivity to theta{sub 13} and delta with that of the International Design Study neutrino factory.

  18. Review of Low Energy Neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergados, J. D.

    2007-04-01

    Some issues regarding low energy neutrinos are reviewed. We focus on three aspects i)We show that by employing very low energy (a few keV) electron neutrinos, neutrino disappearance oscillations can be investigated by detecting recoiling electrons with low threshold spherical gaseous TPC's. In such an experiment, which is sensitive to the small mixing angle θ13, the novel feature is that the oscillation length is so small that the full oscillation takes place inside the detector. Thus one can determine accurately all the oscillation parameters and, in particular, measure or set a good limit on θ13. ii) Low threshold gaseous TPC detectors can also be used in detecting nuclear recoils by exploiting the neutral current interaction. Thus these robust and stable detectors can be employed in supernova neutrino detection. iii) The lepton violating neutrinoless double decay is investigated focusing on how the absolute neutrino mass can be extracted from the data.

  19. Accurate Fission Data for Nuclear Safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solders, A.; Gorelov, D.; Jokinen, A.; Kolhinen, V. S.; Lantz, M.; Mattera, A.; Penttilä, H.; Pomp, S.; Rakopoulos, V.; Rinta-Antila, S.

    2014-05-01

    The Accurate fission data for nuclear safety (AlFONS) project aims at high precision measurements of fission yields, using the renewed IGISOL mass separator facility in combination with a new high current light ion cyclotron at the University of Jyväskylä. The 30 MeV proton beam will be used to create fast and thermal neutron spectra for the study of neutron induced fission yields. Thanks to a series of mass separating elements, culminating with the JYFLTRAP Penning trap, it is possible to achieve a mass resolving power in the order of a few hundred thousands. In this paper we present the experimental setup and the design of a neutron converter target for IGISOL. The goal is to have a flexible design. For studies of exotic nuclei far from stability a high neutron flux (1012 neutrons/s) at energies 1 - 30 MeV is desired while for reactor applications neutron spectra that resembles those of thermal and fast nuclear reactors are preferred. It is also desirable to be able to produce (semi-)monoenergetic neutrons for benchmarking and to study the energy dependence of fission yields. The scientific program is extensive and is planed to start in 2013 with a measurement of isomeric yield ratios of proton induced fission in uranium. This will be followed by studies of independent yields of thermal and fast neutron induced fission of various actinides.

  20. Low energy neutrons from sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahluwalia, H. S.

    1975-01-01

    Arguments are presented in support of an earlier suggestion that low-energy neutrons are likely to be more commonly produced in the solar atmosphere. It appears that protons with an energy not exceeding 100 MeV are more significant, especially those with an energy of about 10 MeV. It is also clear that in addition to the light elements C, N, O, and Ne, due attention should be paid to elements such as Mg, Si, S, Fe, etc., and their isotopes, even if they are not so abundant.-

  1. Spontaneous Fission

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Segre, Emilio

    1950-11-22

    The first attempt to discover spontaneous fission in uranium was made by [Willard] Libby, who, however, failed to detect it on account of the smallness of effect. In 1940, [K. A.] Petrzhak and [G. N.] Flerov, using more sensitive methods, discovered spontaneous fission in uranium and gave some rough estimates of the spontaneous fission decay constant of this substance. Subsequently, extensive experimental work on the subject has been performed by several investigators and will be quoted in the various sections. [N.] Bohr and [A.] Wheeler have given a theory of the effect based on the usual ideas of penetration of potential barriers. On this project spontaneous fission has been studied for the past several years in an effort to obtain a complete picture of the phenomenon. For this purpose the spontaneous fission decay constants {lambda} have been measured for separated isotopes of the heavy elements wherever possible. Moreover, the number {nu} of neutrons emitted per fission has been measured wherever feasible, and other characteristics of the spontaneous fission process have been studied. This report summarizes the spontaneous fission work done at Los Alamos up to January 1, 1945. A chronological record of the work is contained in the Los Alamos monthly reports.

  2. Fusion reactions at low energy

    SciTech Connect

    Beckerman, M.

    1985-01-01

    Fusion measurement methods at low energies are briefly described, and experimental and theoretical fusion cross sections for /sup 58/Ni + /sup 58/Ni, /sup 58/Ni + /sup 64/Ni and /sup 64/Ni + /sup 64/Ni reactions are discussed. It is shown that quantal tunneling calculations do not describe the near- and sub-barrier behavior of the fusion data. Instead, the WKB predictions fall progressively further blow the experimental results as the energy is lowered. At far subbarrier energies the measured cross sections exceed the WKB predictions by more than three orders of magnitude. The unexpectedly strong dependence of the fusion probability upon the nuclear valence structure is illustrated and discussed. The relationship of channel coupling and quantal tunneling is discussed. In conclusion, it was established that atomic nuclei fuse far more readily at low energies that would be expected from quantal tunneling considerations alone. It was found that the behavior of the cross sections for fusion depends strongly upon the valence structure of the collision partners. This structural dependence extends from light 1p-shell systems to systems involving nearly 200 nucleons. These new phenomena may be viewed as characterizing the tunneling of a quantal system with many degrees of freedom. The failure of standard tunneling models may be understood as resulting from the ability of the dinuclear system to tunnel into the classically forbidden region by means of couplings to intrinsic degrees of freedom. 38 refs. (WHK)

  3. Proton-induced x-ray fluorescence CT imaging

    PubMed Central

    Bazalova-Carter, Magdalena; Ahmad, Moiz; Matsuura, Taeko; Takao, Seishin; Matsuo, Yuto; Fahrig, Rebecca; Shirato, Hiroki; Umegaki, Kikuo; Xing, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate the feasibility of proton-induced x-ray fluorescence CT (pXFCT) imaging of gold in a small animal sized object by means of experiments and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Methods: First, proton-induced gold x-ray fluorescence (pXRF) was measured as a function of gold concentration. Vials of 2.2 cm in diameter filled with 0%–5% Au solutions were irradiated with a 220 MeV proton beam and x-ray fluorescence induced by the interaction of protons, and Au was detected with a 3 × 3 mm2 CdTe detector placed at 90° with respect to the incident proton beam at a distance of 45 cm from the vials. Second, a 7-cm diameter water phantom containing three 2.2-diameter vials with 3%–5% Au solutions was imaged with a 7-mm FWHM 220 MeV proton beam in a first generation CT scanning geometry. X-rays scattered perpendicular to the incident proton beam were acquired with the CdTe detector placed at 45 cm from the phantom positioned on a translation/rotation stage. Twenty one translational steps spaced by 3 mm at each of 36 projection angles spaced by 10° were acquired, and pXFCT images of the phantom were reconstructed with filtered back projection. A simplified geometry of the experimental data acquisition setup was modeled with the MC TOPAS code, and simulation results were compared to the experimental data. Results: A linear relationship between gold pXRF and gold concentration was observed in both experimental and MC simulation data (R2 > 0.99). All Au vials were apparent in the experimental and simulated pXFCT images. Specifically, the 3% Au vial was detectable in the experimental [contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) = 5.8] and simulated (CNR = 11.5) pXFCT image. Due to fluorescence x-ray attenuation in the higher concentration vials, the 4% and 5% Au contrast were underestimated by 10% and 15%, respectively, in both the experimental and simulated pXFCT images. Conclusions: Proton-induced x-ray fluorescence CT imaging of 3%–5% gold solutions in a small animal

  4. Proton-induced x-ray fluorescence CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Bazalova-Carter, Magdalena; Ahmad, Moiz; Matsuura, Taeko; Takao, Seishin; Matsuo, Yuto; Fahrig, Rebecca; Shirato, Hiroki; Umegaki, Kikuo; Xing, Lei

    2015-02-01

    To demonstrate the feasibility of proton-induced x-ray fluorescence CT (pXFCT) imaging of gold in a small animal sized object by means of experiments and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. First, proton-induced gold x-ray fluorescence (pXRF) was measured as a function of gold concentration. Vials of 2.2 cm in diameter filled with 0%-5% Au solutions were irradiated with a 220 MeV proton beam and x-ray fluorescence induced by the interaction of protons, and Au was detected with a 3 × 3 mm(2) CdTe detector placed at 90° with respect to the incident proton beam at a distance of 45 cm from the vials. Second, a 7-cm diameter water phantom containing three 2.2-diameter vials with 3%-5% Au solutions was imaged with a 7-mm FWHM 220 MeV proton beam in a first generation CT scanning geometry. X-rays scattered perpendicular to the incident proton beam were acquired with the CdTe detector placed at 45 cm from the phantom positioned on a translation/rotation stage. Twenty one translational steps spaced by 3 mm at each of 36 projection angles spaced by 10° were acquired, and pXFCT images of the phantom were reconstructed with filtered back projection. A simplified geometry of the experimental data acquisition setup was modeled with the MC TOPAS code, and simulation results were compared to the experimental data. A linear relationship between gold pXRF and gold concentration was observed in both experimental and MC simulation data (R(2) > 0.99). All Au vials were apparent in the experimental and simulated pXFCT images. Specifically, the 3% Au vial was detectable in the experimental [contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) = 5.8] and simulated (CNR = 11.5) pXFCT image. Due to fluorescence x-ray attenuation in the higher concentration vials, the 4% and 5% Au contrast were underestimated by 10% and 15%, respectively, in both the experimental and simulated pXFCT images. Proton-induced x-ray fluorescence CT imaging of 3%-5% gold solutions in a small animal sized water phantom has been demonstrated

  5. Proton-induced x-ray fluorescence CT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Bazalova-Carter, Magdalena Xing, Lei; Ahmad, Moiz; Matsuura, Taeko; Takao, Seishin; Shirato, Hiroki; Umegaki, Kikuo; Matsuo, Yuto; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: To demonstrate the feasibility of proton-induced x-ray fluorescence CT (pXFCT) imaging of gold in a small animal sized object by means of experiments and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Methods: First, proton-induced gold x-ray fluorescence (pXRF) was measured as a function of gold concentration. Vials of 2.2 cm in diameter filled with 0%–5% Au solutions were irradiated with a 220 MeV proton beam and x-ray fluorescence induced by the interaction of protons, and Au was detected with a 3 × 3 mm{sup 2} CdTe detector placed at 90° with respect to the incident proton beam at a distance of 45 cm from the vials. Second, a 7-cm diameter water phantom containing three 2.2-diameter vials with 3%–5% Au solutions was imaged with a 7-mm FWHM 220 MeV proton beam in a first generation CT scanning geometry. X-rays scattered perpendicular to the incident proton beam were acquired with the CdTe detector placed at 45 cm from the phantom positioned on a translation/rotation stage. Twenty one translational steps spaced by 3 mm at each of 36 projection angles spaced by 10° were acquired, and pXFCT images of the phantom were reconstructed with filtered back projection. A simplified geometry of the experimental data acquisition setup was modeled with the MC TOPAS code, and simulation results were compared to the experimental data. Results: A linear relationship between gold pXRF and gold concentration was observed in both experimental and MC simulation data (R{sup 2} > 0.99). All Au vials were apparent in the experimental and simulated pXFCT images. Specifically, the 3% Au vial was detectable in the experimental [contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) = 5.8] and simulated (CNR = 11.5) pXFCT image. Due to fluorescence x-ray attenuation in the higher concentration vials, the 4% and 5% Au contrast were underestimated by 10% and 15%, respectively, in both the experimental and simulated pXFCT images. Conclusions: Proton-induced x-ray fluorescence CT imaging of 3%–5% gold solutions in a

  6. Low energy p p physics

    SciTech Connect

    Amsler, C.; Crowe, K. . Inst. fuer Physik; Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA )

    1989-02-01

    A detailed investigation of proton-antiproton interactions at low energy has become feasible with the commissioning of the LEAR facility in 1983. We shall shortly review the status of {bar p}p annihilation at rest and the physics motivations for second generation experiments with the Crystal Barrel detector. This type of detector would be adequate for the study of both Kp and {bar p}p interactions on an extracted beam of the KAON Factory. We shall conclude with a few remarks on the physics opportunities with {bar p}'s at the KAON Factory which, in our opinion, will not be covered by the present LEAR facility. 11 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Low-energy electron potentiometry.

    PubMed

    Jobst, Johannes; Kautz, Jaap; Mytiliniou, Maria; Tromp, Rudolf M; van der Molen, Sense Jan

    2017-10-01

    In a lot of systems, charge transport is governed by local features rather than being a global property as suggested by extracting a single resistance value. Consequently, techniques that resolve local structure in the electronic potential are crucial for a detailed understanding of electronic transport in realistic devices. Recently, we have introduced a new potentiometry method based on low-energy electron microscopy (LEEM) that utilizes characteristic features in the reflectivity spectra of layered materials [1]. Performing potentiometry experiments in LEEM has the advantage of being fast, offering a large field of view and the option to zoom in and out easily, and of being non-invasive compared to scanning-probe methods. However, not all materials show clear features in their reflectivity spectra. Here we, therefore, focus on a different version of low-energy electron potentiometry (LEEP) that uses the mirror mode transition, i.e. the drop in electron reflectivity around zero electron landing energy when they start to interact with the sample rather than being reflected in front of it. This transition is universal and sensitive to the local electrostatic surface potential (either workfunction or applied potential). It can consequently be used to perform LEEP experiments on a broader range of material compared to the method described in Ref[1]. We provide a detailed description of the experimental setup and demonstrate LEEP on workfunction-related intrinsic potential variations on the Si(111) surface and for a metal-semiconductor-metal junction with external bias applied. In the latter, we visualize the Schottky effect at the metal-semiconductor interface. Finally, we compare how robust the two LEEP techniques discussed above are against image distortions due to sample inhomogeneities or contamination. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Electron- and proton-induced ionization of pyrimidine

    SciTech Connect

    Champion, Christophe; Quinto, Michele; Weck, Philippe F

    2015-03-27

    This present work describes a quantum-mechanically based model of the electron- and proton-induced ionization of isolated pyrimidine molecules. The impact energies range from the target ionization threshold up to ~1 keV for electrons and from 10 keV up to 10 MeV for protons. The cross-section calculations are performed within the 1st Born approximation in which the ejected electron is described by a Coulomb wave whereas the incident and the scattered projectiles are both described by plane waves. The pyrimidine target is described using the Gaussian 09 software package. Furthermore, our theoretical predictions obtained are in good agreement with experimental absolute total cross sections, while large discrepancies are observed between existing semi-empirical models and the present calculations.

  9. Electron- and proton-induced ionization of pyrimidine

    DOE PAGES

    Champion, Christophe; Quinto, Michele; Weck, Philippe F

    2015-03-27

    This present work describes a quantum-mechanically based model of the electron- and proton-induced ionization of isolated pyrimidine molecules. The impact energies range from the target ionization threshold up to ~1 keV for electrons and from 10 keV up to 10 MeV for protons. The cross-section calculations are performed within the 1st Born approximation in which the ejected electron is described by a Coulomb wave whereas the incident and the scattered projectiles are both described by plane waves. The pyrimidine target is described using the Gaussian 09 software package. Furthermore, our theoretical predictions obtained are in good agreement with experimental absolutemore » total cross sections, while large discrepancies are observed between existing semi-empirical models and the present calculations.« less

  10. First measurements of laser-accelerated proton induced luminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Floquet, V.; Ceccotti, T.; Dobosz Dufrenoy, S.; Bonnaud, G.; Monot, P.; Martin, Ph.; Gremillet, L.

    2012-09-15

    We present our first results about laser-accelerated proton induced luminescence in solids. In the first part, we describe the optimization of the proton source as a function of the target thickness as well as the laser pulse duration and energy. Due to the ultra high contrast ratio of our laser beam, we succeeded in using targets ranging from the micron scale down to nanometers thickness. The two optimal thicknesses we put in evidence are in good agreement with numerical simulations. Laser pulse duration shows a small influence on proton maximum energy, whereas the latter turns out to vary almost linearly as a function of laser energy. Thanks to this optimisation work, we have been able to acquire images of the proton energy deposition in a solid scintillator.

  11. Low-Energy Proton Testing Methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellish, Jonathan A.; Marshall, Paul W.; Heidel, David F.; Schwank, James R.; Shaneyfelt, Marty R.; Xapsos, M.A.; Ladbury, Raymond L.; LaBel, Kenneth A.; Berg, Melanie; Kim, Hak S.; Phan, Anthony; Friendlich, M.R.; Rodbell, Kenneth P.; Hakey, Mark C.; Dodd, Paul E.; Reed, Robert A.; Weller, Robert A.; Mendenhall, Marcus H.; Sierawski, B.D.

    2009-01-01

    Use of low-energy protons and high-energy light ions is becoming necessary to investigate current-generation SEU thresholds. Systematic errors can dominate measurements made with low-energy protons. Range and energy straggling contribute to systematic error. Low-energy proton testing is not a step-and-repeat process. Low-energy protons and high-energy light ions can be used to measure SEU cross section of single sensitive features; important for simulation.

  12. Intense low energy positron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Lynn, K.G.; Jacobsen, F.M.

    1993-12-31

    Intense positron beams are under development or being considered at several laboratories. Already today a few accelerator based high intensity, low brightness e{sup +} beams exist producing of the order of 10{sup 8} {minus} 10{sup 9} e{sup +}/sec. Several laboratories are aiming at high intensity, high brightness e{sup +} beams with intensities greater than 10{sup 9} e{sup +}/sec and current densities of the order of 10{sup 13} {minus} 10{sup 14} e{sup +} sec{sup {minus}} {sup 1}cm{sup {minus}2}. Intense e{sup +} beams can be realized in two ways (or in a combination thereof) either through a development of more efficient B{sup +} moderators or by increasing the available activity of B{sup +} particles. In this review we shall mainly concentrate on the latter approach. In atomic physics the main trust for these developments is to be able to measure differential and high energy cross-sections in e{sup +} collisions with atoms and molecules. Within solid state physics high intensity, high brightness e{sup +} beams are in demand in areas such as the re-emission e{sup +} microscope, two dimensional angular correlation of annihilation radiation, low energy e{sup +} diffraction and other fields. Intense e{sup +} beams are also important for the development of positronium beams, as well as exotic experiments such as Bose condensation and Ps liquid studies.

  13. Low energy neutral atom imaging

    SciTech Connect

    McComas, D.J.; Funsten, H.O.; Gosling, J.T.; Moore, K.R.; Thomsen, M.F.

    1992-01-01

    Energetic neutral atom (ENA) and low energy neutral atom (LENA) imaging of space plasmas are emerging new technology which promises to revolutionize the way we view and understand large scale space plasma phenomena and dynamics. ENAs and LENAs are produced in the magnetosphere by charge exchange between energetic and plasma ions and cold geocoronal neutrals. While imaging techniques have been previously developed for observing ENAs, with energies above several tens of keV, most of the ions found in the terrestrial magnetosphere have lower energies. We recently suggested that LENAs could be imaged by first converting the neutrals to ions and then electrostatically analyzing them to reject the UV background. In this paper we extend this work to examine in detail the sensor elements needed to make an LENA imager. These elements are (1) a biased collimator to remove the ambient plasma ions and electrons and set the azimuthal field-of-view; (2) a charge modifier to convert a portion of the incident LENAs to ions; (3) an electrostatic analyzer to reject UV light and set the energy passband; and (4) a coincidence detector to measure converted LENAs while rejecting noise and penetrating radiation. We also examine the issue of LENA imager sensitivity and describe ways of optimizing sensitivity in the various sensor components. Finally, we demonstrate in detail how these general considerations are implemented by describing one relatively straightforward design based on a hemispherical electrostatic analyzer.

  14. a Study of Proton Induced Nuclear Fragmentation in the Threshold Region: 1 TO 20 GEV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangster, Thomas Craig

    This thesis contains the details of the experimental set-up and final results of BNL E-778. The experimental objective was to study proton induced nuclear fragmentation using an internal gas jet target facility that was specifically designed for this experiment and installed in the AGS main ring. The fragment telescopes were designed to measure a broad range of fragment charge (2 to 14) and kinetic energy (5 to 100 MeV). Using a mixed gas target (1% or 3% Xe with H(,2)), normalized fragment production cross sections were obtained by separately measuring p-p elastic production from the H(,2) component. Fragment production cross sections are observed to rise dramatically ((TURN) x 10) for incident proton energies between 1 and 10 GeV, while above 10 GeV, fragment production appears to be independent of the incident proton energy. The measured differential cross sections (above 10 GeV) are found to agree (within 20%) with the differential cross sections measured during a previous internal target experiment (E-591) conducted at FNAL, where the lowest available proton energies were 50 GeV. The measured fragment kinetic energy spectra (above 10 GeV) are fit with a functional form motivated by the observation that fragment production in an excited nuclear system is consistent with a critical phenomenon (a liquid -gas phase transition). The failure of this functional form at the lowest available incident energies (below 10 GeV) is interpreted as the observation of an additional fragment production mechanism. Recent theoretical and experimental evidence for an asymmetric fission process (binary decay), is used to modify the original functional form for the two-component spectra. It is concluded that, in the threshold region, two fragment production mechanisms are observed. Although insufficient information is available to uniquely separate the two components, certain features of the asymmetric fission mechanism are identified. The observed p-nucleus systematics are also

  15. Low-Energy Sputtering Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, P. K.; Shutthanandan, V.

    1999-01-01

    An experimental study is described to measure low-energy (less than 600 eV) sputtering yields of molybdenum with xenon ions using Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) and secondary neutral mass spectroscopy (SNMS). An ion gun was used to generate the ion beam. The ion current density at the target surface was approximately 30 (micro)A/sq cm. For RBS measurements, the sputtered material was collected on a thin aluminum strip which was mounted on a semi-circular collector plate. The target was bombarded with 200 and 500 eV xenon ions at normal incidence. The differential sputtering yields were measured using the RBS method with 1 MeV helium ions. The differential yields were fitted with a cosine fitting function and integrated with respect to the solid angle to provide the total sputtering yields. The sputtering yields obtained using the RBS method are in reasonable agreement with those measured by other researchers using different techniques. For the SNMS measurements, 150 to 600 eV xenon ions were used at 50deg angle of incidence. The SNMS spectra were converted to sputtering yields for perpendicular incidence by normalizing SNMS spectral data at 500 eV with the yield measured by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. Sputtering yields as well as the shape of the yield-energy curve obtained in this manner are in reasonable agreement with those measured by other researchers using different techniques. Sputtering yields calculated by using two semi-spherical formulations agree reasonably well with measured data. The isotopic composition of secondary ions were measured by bombarding copper with xenon ions at energies ranging from 100 eV to 1.5 keV. The secondary ion flux was found to be enriched in heavy isotopes at low incident ion energies. The heavy isotope enrichment was observed to decrease with increasing impact energy. Beyond 700 eV, light isotopes were sputtered preferentially with the enrichment remaining nearly constant.

  16. Predicting Proton-Induced Single Event Upsets Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Robert Andrew

    Microelectronic devices are susceptible to single event effects in some space radiation environments. A traversal by a single energetic particle that leads to a change in the information stored on a single memory element is known as a single event upset. The cross section for producing an upset can vary with the angle of incidence of the proton, depending on the dimensions of the sensitive volume and the critical charge. Satellites encounter a high proton flux region when they traverse the inner radiation belts in space. The goal of this research was to develop an algorithm for predicting proton-induced memory upset rates for orbits that cross these belts that includes the angular variations in the upset cross section. This required extending an existing Monte-Carlo code that simulates proton -induced spallation reactions in silicon to be capable of handling protons incident at any angle of incidence. These codes were used to predict upset cross sections. The radiation environment was modeled as a set of monoenergetic omnidirectional proton beams where the relative flux at each energy was predicted by AP8. The shielding that surrounds a device was assumed to be a six sided shell. Protons that traverse the shell will enter the device with a new energy. A shielding code was developed that translated each omnidirectional exposure into a new spectrum of energies. Each spectrum was used as input into the Monte-Carlo code which determined the angle-average upset cross section for that incident proton energy (i.e., the proton's energy before traversing the shielding). The upset rate was predicted from the cross section predictions and the flux prediction of AP8. Applying the codes to specific devices requires knowledge of the dimensions of the sensitive volume and the critical charge, i.e., the threshold energy that must be deposited in the sensitive volume to upset the device. These parameters were determined for four devices flown as part of the Microelectronic Package

  17. Fission dynamics at high excitation energies investigated in complete kinematics measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Sánchez, J. L.; Benlliure, J.; Taïeb, J.; Álvarez-Pol, H.; Audouin, L.; Ayyad, Y.; B´elier, G.; Boutoux, G.; Casarejos, E.; Chatillon, A.; Cortina-Gil, D.; Gorbinet, T.; Heinz, A.; Kelić-Heil, A.; Laurent, B.; Martin, J. F.; Paradela, C.; Pellereau, E.; Pietras, B.; Ramos, D.; Rodríguez-Tajes, C.; Simon, H.; Vargas, J.

    2017-06-01

    Light-charged particles emitted in proton-induced fission reactions on 208Pb have been measured at different kinetic energies: 370A, 500A, and 650A MeV. The experiment was performed by the SOFIA collaboration at the GSI facilities in Darmstadt (Germany). The inverse kinematics technique was combined with a setup especially designed to measure light-charged particles in coincidence with fission fragments. The data were compared with different model calculations to assess the ground-to-saddle dynamics. The results confirm that transient and dissipative effects are required for an accurate description of the fission observables.

  18. Towards Low Energy Atrial Defibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Philip; Kodoth, Vivek; McEneaney, David; Rodrigues, Paola; Velasquez, Jose; Waterman, Niall; Escalona, Omar

    2015-01-01

    transcutaneous power transfer and sensing of ICI during cardioversion are evidenced as key to the advancement of low-energy atrial defibrillation. PMID:26404298

  19. Towards Low Energy Atrial Defibrillation.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Philip; Kodoth, Vivek; McEneaney, David; Rodrigues, Paola; Velasquez, Jose; Waterman, Niall; Escalona, Omar

    2015-09-03

    transcutaneous power transfer and sensing of ICI during cardioversion are evidenced as key to the advancement of low-energy atrial defibrillation.

  20. Electron- and proton-induced ionization of pyrimidine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Champion, Christophe; Quinto, Michele A.; Weck, Philippe F.

    2015-05-01

    The present work describes a quantum-mechanically based model of the electron- and proton-induced ionization of isolated pyrimidine molecules. The impact energies range from the target ionization threshold up to ~1 keV for electrons and from 10 keV up to 10 MeV for protons. The cross-section calculations are performed within the 1st Born approximation in which the ejected electron is described by a Coulomb wave whereas the incident and the scattered projectiles are both described by plane waves. The pyrimidine target is described using the Gaussian 09 software package. The theoretical predictions obtained are in good agreement with experimental absolute total cross sections, while large discrepancies are observed between existing semi-empirical models and the present calculations. Contribution to the Topical Issue "COST Action Nano-IBCT: Nano-scale Processes Behind Ion-Beam Cancer Therapy", edited by Andrey Solov'yov, Nigel Mason, Gustavo García, Eugene Surdutovich.

  1. Proton-Induced Collisions on Potential Prebiotic Species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacchus-Montabonel, Marie-Christine

    2016-11-01

    With regard to the fascinating question of the origin of life, special interest has been devoted to potential prebiotic molecules which could drive the emergence of life. In the widely discussed hypothesis of a possible exogen apparition of life, the transport of those prebiotic species and their survival under spatial conditions is of strong interest. In particular their stability under solar radiation or in collisions with bare nucleus has to be considered. In that sense, taking account of the abundance of protons in ionized clouds of the interstellar medium, we have developed a detailed theoretical study of the charge transfer collision dynamics induced by impact of protons on a series of possible prebiotic compounds. Three main types of molecules have been considered: first of all the DNA and RNA building blocks with on a one hand the nucleobases uracil and thymine, and on the other hand the 2-deoxy-D-ribose sugar skeleton in its furanose and pyranose forms. The study has been extended to the 2-aminooxazole suggested to be a possible precursor of RNA nucleotides. The theoretical treatment involves ab-initio quantum chemistry molecular calculations followed by a semiclassical collision dynamics. Some qualitative trends may be suggested for the proton-induced damage of such prebiotic species.

  2. Proton-induced knockout reactions with polarized and unpolarized beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakasa, T.; Ogata, K.; Noro, T.

    2017-09-01

    Proton-induced knockout reactions provide a direct means of studying the single particle or cluster structures of target nuclei. In addition, these knockout reactions are expected to play a unique role in investigations of the effects of the nuclear medium on nucleon-nucleon interactions as well as the properties of nucleons and mesons. However, due to the nature of hadron probes, these reactions can suffer significant disturbances from the nuclear surroundings and the quantitative theoretical treatment of such processes can also be challenging. In this article, we review the experimental and theoretical progress in this field, particularly focusing on the use of these reactions as a spectroscopic tool and as a way to examine the medium modification of nucleon-nucleon interactions. With regard to the former aspect, the review presents a semi-quantitative evaluation of these reactions based on existing experimental data. In terms of the latter point, we introduce a significant body of evidence that suggests, although does not conclusively prove, the existence of medium effects. In addition, this paper also provides information and comments on other related subjects.

  3. Benchmarking nuclear fission theory

    DOE PAGES

    Bertsch, G. F.; Loveland, W.; Nazarewicz, W.; ...

    2015-05-14

    We suggest a small set of fission observables to be used as test cases for validation of theoretical calculations. Thus, the purpose is to provide common data to facilitate the comparison of different fission theories and models. The proposed observables are chosen from fission barriers, spontaneous fission lifetimes, fission yield characteristics, and fission isomer excitation energies.

  4. Benchmarking nuclear fission theory

    SciTech Connect

    Bertsch, G. F.; Loveland, W.; Nazarewicz, W.; Talou, P.

    2015-05-14

    We suggest a small set of fission observables to be used as test cases for validation of theoretical calculations. Thus, the purpose is to provide common data to facilitate the comparison of different fission theories and models. The proposed observables are chosen from fission barriers, spontaneous fission lifetimes, fission yield characteristics, and fission isomer excitation energies.

  5. Fission Spectrum

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Bloch, F.; Staub, H.

    1943-08-18

    Measurements of the spectrum of the fission neutrons of 25 are described, in which the energy of the neutrons is determined from the ionization produced by individual hydrogen recoils. The slow neutrons producing fission are obtained by slowing down the fast neutrons from the Be-D reaction of the Stanford cyclotron. In order to distinguish between fission neutrons and the remaining fast cyclotron neutrons both the cyclotron current and the pusle amplifier are modulated. A hollow neutron container, in which slow neutrons have a lifetime of about 2 milliseconds, avoids the use of large distances. This method results in much higher intensities than the usual modulation arrangement. The results show a continuous distribution of neutrons with a rather wide maximum at about 0.8 MV falling off to half of its maximum value at 2.0 MV. The total number of netrons is determined by comparison with the number of fission fragments. The result seems to indicate that only about 30% of the neutrons have energies below .8 MV. Various tests are described which were performed in order to rule out modification of the spectrum by inelastic scattering. Decl. May 4, 1951

  6. Fission and Properties of Neutron-Rich Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Joseph H.; Ramayya, A. V.; Carter, H. K.

    2008-08-01

    . Fission-fragment spectroscopy with STEFF / A. G. Smith ... [et al.]. Gamma ray multiplicity of [symbol]Cf spontaneous fission using LiBerACE / D. L. Bleuel ... [et al.]. Excitation energy dependence of fragment mass and total kinetic energy distributions in proton-induced fission of light actinides / I. Nishinaka ... [et al.]. A dynamical calculation of multi-modal nuclear fission / T. Wada and T. Asano. Structure of fission potential energy surfaces in ten-dimensional spaces / V. V. Pashkevich, Y. K Pyatkov and A. V. Unzhakova. A possible enhancement of nuclear fission in scattering with low energy charged particles / V. Gudkov. Dynamical multi-break processes in the [symbol]Sn + [symbol]Ni system at 35 MeV/Nucleon / M. Papa and ISOSPIN-RE VERSE collaboration -- New experimental techniques. MTOF - a high resolution isobar separator for studies of exotic decays / A. Piechaczek ... [et al.]. Development of ORRUBA: a silicon array for the measurement of transfer reactions in inverse kinematics / S. D. Pain ... [et al.]. Indian national gamma array: present & future / R. K. Bhowmik. Absolute intensities of [symbol] rays emitted in the decay of [symbol]U / H. C. Griffin -- Superheavy elements theory and experiments / M. G. Itkis ... [et al.]. Study of superheavy elements at SHIP / S. Hofinann. Heaviest nuclei from [symbol]Ca-induced reactions / Yu. Ts. Oaanessian. Superheavy nuclei and giant nuclear systems / W. Greiner and V. Zagrebaev. Fission approach to alpha-decay of superheavy nuclei / D.N. Poenaru and W. Greiner. Superheavy elements in the Magic Islands / C. Samanta. Relativistic mean field studies of superheavy nuclei / A. V. Afanas jev. Understanding the synthesis of the heaviest nuclei / W. Loveland -- Mass measurements and g-factors. G factor measurements in neutron-rich [symbol]Cf fission fragments, measured using the gammasphere array / R. Orlandi ... [et al.]. Technique for measuring angular correlations and g-factors in neutron rich nuclei produced by the

  7. Mass-asymmetric fission in the 40ca+142Nd reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, E.; Hinde, D. J.; Williams, E.; Dasgupta, M.; Carter, I. P.; Cook, K. J.; Jeung, D. Y.; Luong, D. H.; McNeil, S.; Palshetkar, C. S.; Rafferty, D. C.; Simenel, C.; Wakhle, A.; Ramachandran, K.; Khuyagbaatar, J.; Dullmann, Ch. E.; Lommel, B.; Kindler, B.

    2016-09-01

    Shell effects play a major role in fission. Mass-asymmetric fission observed in the spontaneous and low energy fission of actinide nuclei was explained by incorporating the fragment shell properties in liquid drop model. Asymmetric fission has also been observed in the low energy fission of neutron-deficient 180Hg nuclei in recent β-delayed fission experiments. This low-energy β-delayed fission has been explained in terms of strong shell effects in pre-scission configurations associated with the system after capture. Calculations predicted asymmetric fission for heavier Hg isotopes as well, at compound nuclear excitation energy as high as 40 MeV. To explore the evolution of fission fragment mass distribution as a function of neutron and proton numbers and also with excitation energy, fission fragment mass distributions have been measured for the 40Ca+142Nd reaction forming the compound nucleus 182Hg at energies around the capture barrier, using the Heavy Ion Accelerator Facility and CUBE spectrometer at the Australian National University. Mass-asymmetric fission is observed in this reaction at an excitation energy of 33.6 MeV. The results are consistent with the β-delayed fission measurements and indicate the presence of shell effects even at higher exciation energies.

  8. SOFIA, a Next-Generation Facility for Fission Yields Measurements and Fission Study. First Results and Perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audouin, L.; Pellereau, E.; Taieb, J.; Boutoux, G.; Béliera, G.; Chatillon, A.; Ebran, A.; Gorbinet, T.; Laurent, B.; Martin, J.-F.; Tassan-Got, L.; Jurado, B.; Alvarez-Pol, H.; Ayyad, Y.; Benlliure, J.; Caamano, M.; Cortina-Gil, D.; Fernandez-Dominguez, B.; Paradela, C.; Rodriguez-Sanchez, J.-L.; Vargas, J.; Casarejos, E.; Heinz, A.; Kelic-Heil, A.; Kurz, N.; Nociforo, C.; Pietri, S.; Prochazka, A.; Rossi, D.; Schmidt, K.-H.; Simon, H.; Voss, B.; Weick, H.; Winfield, J. S.

    2015-10-01

    Fission fragments play an important role in nuclear reactors evolution and safety. However, fragments yields are poorly known : data are essentially limited to mass yields from thermal neutron-induced fissions on a very few nuclei. SOFIA (Study On FIssion with Aladin) is an innovative experimental program on nuclear fission carried out at the GSI facility, which aims at providing isotopic yields on a broad range of fissioning systems. Relativistic secondary beams of actinides and pre-actinides are selected by the Fragment Separator (FRS) and their fission is triggered by electromagnetic interaction. The resulting excitation energy is comparable to the result of an interaction with a low-energy neutron, thus leading to useful data for reactor simulations. For the first time ever, both fission fragments are completely identified in charge and mass in a new recoil spectrometer, allowing for precise yields measurements. The yield of prompt neutrons can then be deduced, and the fission mechanism can be ascribed, providing new constraints for fission models. During the first experiment, all the technical challenges were matched : we have thus set new experimental standards in the measurements of relativistic heavy ions (time of flight, position, energy loss).This communication presents a first series of results obtained on the fission of 238U; many other fissioning systems have also been measured and are being analyzed presently. A second SOFIA experiment is planned in September 2014, and will be focused on the measurement of the fission of 236U, the analog of 235U+n.

  9. Spontaneous fission properties of the heavy elements: Bimodal fission

    SciTech Connect

    Hulet, E.K.

    1988-11-11

    We have measured the mass and kinetic-energy distributions from the spontaneous fission of SVYFm, SVYNo, SVZMd, SWMd, SW(104), and SWSNo. All are observed to fission with a symmetrical division of mass, whereas the total-kinetic-energy (TKE) distributions strongly deviated from the Gaussian shape characteristically found in the fission of all other actinides. When the TKE distributions are resolved into two Gaussian's, the constituent peaks lie near 200 and near 233 MeV. We conclude two modes or bimodal fission is occurring in five of the six nuclides studied. Both modes are possible in the same nuclide, but one generally predominates. We also conclude the low-energy but mass-symmetrical mode is likely to extend to far heavier nuclei; while the high-energy mode will be restricted to a smaller region, a region of nuclei defined by the proximity of the fragments to the strong neutron and proton shells in TSSn. 21 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Fission meter

    DOEpatents

    Rowland, Mark S [Alamo, CA; Snyderman, Neal J [Berkeley, CA

    2012-04-10

    A neutron detector system for discriminating fissile material from non-fissile material wherein a digital data acquisition unit collects data at high rate, and in real-time processes large volumes of data directly into information that a first responder can use to discriminate materials. The system comprises counting neutrons from the unknown source and detecting excess grouped neutrons to identify fission in the unknown source.

  11. Light charged particles emitted in fission reactions induced by protons on 208Pb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Sánchez, J. L.; Benlliure, J.; Paradela, C.; Ayyad, Y.; Casarejos, E.; Alvarez-Pol, H.; Audouin, L.; Bélier, G.; Boutoux, G.; Chatillon, A.; Cortina-Gil, D.; Gorbinet, T.; Heinz, A.; Kelić-Heil, A.; Laurent, B.; Martin, J.-F.; Pellereau, E.; Pietras, B.; Ramos, D.; Rodríguez-Tajes, C.; Rossi, D. M.; Simon, H.; Taïeb, J.; Vargas, J.; Voss, B.

    2016-09-01

    Light charged particles emitted in proton-induced fission reactions on 208Pb have been measured at different kinetic energies: 370 A ,500 A , and 650 A MeV. The experiment was performed by the SOFIA Collaboration at the GSI facilities in Darmstadt (Germany). The inverse kinematics technique was combined with a setup especially designed to measure light charged particles in coincidence with fission fragments. This measurement allowed us, for the first time, to obtain correlations between the light charged particles emitted during the fission process and the charge distributions of the fission fragments. These correlations were compared with different model calculations to assess the ground-to-saddle dynamics. The results confirm that transient and dissipative effects are required for an accurate description of the fission observables.

  12. Energetics of the fission process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gönnenwein, Friedrich

    1994-09-01

    The mass asymmetry of fragments from nuclear fission of heavy nuclei is reviewed. While mass asymmetry is a common and well-known phenomenon for low-energy fission of the lighter actinides, more recent experiments have demonstrated that, for the heaviest actinides, the mass distribution switches to a symmetric one. On the other hand, it has been discovered that, though for fissioning nuclei with mass numbers A225 the mass distribution is basically symmetric, an asymmetric component is clearly to be identified for nuclei down to the Pb-region. In the absence of a generally accepted dynamical theory of fission, the above experimental findings are discussed in terms of static energy considerations. Triggered from the outset by the structure of the potential energy surface at the saddlepoint, the energy balance at the scission point between the available energy ( Q-value) of the reaction and the Coulomb and deformation energy of the nascent fragments is shown to steer the characteristics of the fragment mass distributions.

  13. Solar-assisted low energy dwellings

    SciTech Connect

    Esbensen, T V

    1980-02-01

    The Zero Energy House Group was formed as a subproject of the CCMS Solar Energy Pilot Study in 1974 by seven participating countries experimenting with solar-assisted low-energy dwellings for temperate and northern European climatic conditions. A Zero Energy House is one in which solar energy is used to meet the reduced energy needs of buildings incorporating various thermal energy conservation features. This final report of the Zero Energy House Group includes brief descriptions of 13 major low-energy dwellings in the participating CCMS countries. An overall assessment of the state-of-the-art in solar-assisted low-energy dwellings is also included.

  14. Single track nanodosimetry of low energy electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bantsar, A.; Grosswendt, B.; Pszona, S.; Kula, J.

    2009-02-01

    Auger-electron-emitting radionuclides (for instance, 125I) with a predominant energy spectrum below 3 keV are an active area of research towards the clinical application of radiopharmaceuticals. Hence, the necessity for an adequate description of the effects of radiation by low-energy electrons on nanometric biological targets seems to be unquestionable. Experimental nanodosimetry for low-energy electrons has been accomplished with a device named JET COUNTER. The present paper describes, for the first time, nanodosimetric experiments in nanometer-sized cavities of nitrogen using low energy electrons ranging from 100 eV to 2 keV.

  15. Low energy ghosts and the Jeans' instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gümrükçüoǧlu, A. Emir; Mukohyama, Shinji; Sotiriou, Thomas P.

    2016-09-01

    We show that a massless canonical scalar field minimally coupled to general relativity can become a tachyonic ghost at low energies around a background in which the scalar's gradient is spacelike. By performing a canonical transformation we demonstrate that this low energy ghost can be recast, at the level of the action, in a form of a fluid that undergoes a Jeans-like instability affecting only modes with large wavelength. This illustrates that low energy tachyonic ghosts do not lead to a catastrophic quantum vacuum instability, unlike the usual high-energy ghost degrees of freedom.

  16. Low-Energy Charged Particle Instrument Assembly

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-12-03

    This image shows the low-energy charged particle instrument before it was installed on one of NASA Voyager spacecraft in 1977. The instrument includes a stepper motor that turns the platform on which the sensors are mounted.

  17. Measurement of prompt fission neutron spectrum for spontaneous fission of 252Cf using γ multiplicity tagging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blain, E.; Daskalakis, A.; Block, R. C.; Danon, Y.

    2017-06-01

    The prompt fission neutron spectrum from spontaneous fission of 252Cf is an integral part of several aspects of nuclear data. Not only is the spectrum itself of interest, but neutron detectors often use the spectrum for calibration, and other prompt fission neutron spectra are measured as a ratio to 252Cf. Therefore, reducing the uncertainties in this spectrum will allow for more accurate nuclear data to be available across a wide range of fields. The prompt fission neutron spectrum for the spontaneous fission of 252Cf was measured at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute using the multiple γ tagging method with a 18.4-ng fission sample. An EJ-301 liquid scintillator fast neutron detector was used to measure the high energy portion of the spectrum, 0.5-7 MeV, and a thin EJ-204 plastic scintillator was used to measure the low energy portion of the spectrum, from 50 keV to 2 MeV. These spectra both show good agreement with the current evaluation of 252Cf and have low associated uncertainties providing a new high precision measurement that helps reduce the uncertainties in the prompt fission neutron spectrum for the spontaneous fission of 252Cf.

  18. A new design of fission detector for prompt fission neutron investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeynalov, Sh.; Zeynalova, O.; Nazarenko, M. A.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Oberstedt, S.

    2012-10-01

    In this work we report recent achievements in design of twin back-to-back ionization chamber (TIC) for fission fragment (FF) mass and kinetic energy spectroscopy. Correlated FF kinetic energies, their masses and the angle of the fission axes in 3D Cartesian coordinates can be determined from analysis of the heights and shapes of the pulses induced by the fission fragments on the anodes of TIC. Anodes of TIC were designed as consisting of isolated strips each having independent electronic circuitry and special multi-channel pulse processing apparatus. Mathematical algorithms were provided along with formulae derived for fission axis angles determination. It was shown how the point of fission fragments origin on the target plane may be determined using the same measured data. The last feature made the TIC a rather powerful tool for prompt fission neutron (PFN) emission investigation in event by event analysis of individual fission reactions from non point fissile source. Position sensitive neutron induced fission detector for neutron imaging applications with both thermal and low energy neutrons was found as another possible implementation of the designed TIC.

  19. Nuclear Fission: A Review of Experimental Advances and Phenomenology.

    PubMed

    Andreyev, Andrei; Nishio, Katsuhisa; Schmidt, Karl-Heinz

    2017-07-28

    In the last two decades, through technological, experimental and theoretical advances, the situation in experimental fission studies has changed dramatically. With the use of advanced production and detection techniques both much more detailed and precise information can now be obtained for the traditional regions of fission research and, crucially, new regions of nuclei have become routinely accessible for fission studies. This work first of all reviews the recent developments in experimental fission techniques, in particular the resurgence of transfer-induced fission reactions with light and heavy ions, the emerging use of inverse-kinematic approaches, both at Coulomb and relativistic energies, and of fission studies with radioactive beams. The emphasis on the fission-fragment mass and charge distributions will be made in this work, though some of the other fission observables, such as prompt neutron and γ-ray emission will also be reviewed. A particular attention will be given to the low-energy fission in the so far scarcely explored nuclei in the very neutron-deficient lead region. They recently became the focus for several complementary experimental studies, such as β-delayed fission with radioactive beams at ISOLDE(CERN), Coulex-induced fission of relativistic secondary beams at FRS(GSI), and several prompt fusion-fission studies. The synergy of these approaches allows a unique insight in the new region of asymmetric fission around <sup>180</sup>Hg, recently discovered at ISOLDE. Recent extensive theoretical efforts in this region will also be outlined. The unprecedented high-quality data for fission fragments, completely identified in <i>Z</i> and <i>A</i>, by means of reactions in inverse kinematics at FRS(GSI) and VAMOS(GANIL) will be also reviewed. These experiments explored an extended range of mercury-to-californium elements, spanning from the neutron-deficient to neutron-rich nuclides, and

  20. Flux and dose transmission through concrete of neutrons from proton induced reactions on various target elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiti, Moumita; Nandy, Maitreyee; Roy, S. N.; Sarkar, P. K.

    2004-12-01

    Simple empirical expressions for transmission of flux and dose through concrete are presented for neutrons from proton induced reactions. For this purpose the neutron emission from different targets in proton induced reactions in the energy range 25-200 MeV have been considered. The calculated effective dose outside a concrete shield shows overall good agreement with the effective dose estimated from measured neutron flux in the framework of the Moyer model. The calculated effective attenuation length shows a rising trend with incident proton energy and shield thickness.

  1. Delayed-fission properties of neutron-deficient americium nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, H.L. . Dept. of Chemistry)

    1989-10-23

    Characteristics of the delayed-fission decay mode in light americium nuclei have been investigated. Measurements on the unknown isotopes {sup 230}Am and {sup 236}Am were attempted, and upper limits on the delayed-fission branches of these nuclei were determined. Evidence of the existence of {sup 236}Am was observed in radiochemical separations. Total kinetic energy and mass-yield distributions of the electron-capture delayed-fission mode were measured for {sup 232}Am (t{sub 1/2} = 1.31 {plus minus} 0.04 min) and for {sup 234}Am (t{sub 1/2} = 2.32 {plus minus} 0.08 min), and delayed-fission probabilities of 6.9 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} and 6.6 {times} 10{sup {minus}5}, respectively, were determined. The total kinetic energy and the asymmetric mass-yield distributions are typical of fission of mid-range actinides. No discernible influence of the anomalous triple-peaked mass division characteristic of the thorium-radium region was detected. Measurements of the time correlation between the electron-capture x-rays and the subsequent fission conform that the observed fissions arise from the electron-capture delayed-fission mechanism. Delayed fission has provided a unique opportunity to extend the range of low-energy fission studies to previously inaccessible regions. 71 refs., 44 figs., 13 tabs.

  2. Spontaneous fission of the heaviest elements

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, D.C.

    1989-04-01

    Although spontaneous fission was discovered in /sup 238/U in 1940, detailed studies of the process were first made possible in the 1960's with the availability of milligram quantities of /sup 252/Cf. The advent of solid-state detectors made it possible to perform measurements of coincident fission fragments from even very short-lived spontaneous fission activities or those available in only very small quantities. Until 1971 it was believed that the main features of the mass and kinetic-energy distributions were essentially the same as those for thermal neutron-induced fission and that all low-energy fission proceeded via asymmetric mass division with total kinetic energies which could be derived by linear extrapolation from those of lighter elements. In 1971, measurements of /sup 257/Fm showed an increase in symmetric mass division with anomalously high TKE's. Subsequent experiments showed that in /sup 258/Fm and /sup 259/Fm, the most probable mass split was symmetric with very high total kinetic energy. Measurements for the heavier elements have shown symmetric mass distributions with both high and low total kinetic energies. Recent results for spontaneous fission properties of the heaviest elements are reviewed and compared with theory. 31 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Ionization Chamber for Prompt Fission Neutron Investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeynalov, Sh.; Zeynalova, O.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Sedyshev, P.; Shvetsov, V.

    In this work we report recent achievements in design of twin back-to-back ionization chamber (TIC) for fission fragment (FF) mass and kinetic energy measurement. Correlated FF kinetic energies, their masses and the angle of FF in respect to the axes in 3D Cartesian coordinates can be determined from analysis of the heights and shapes of the pulses induced by the fission fragments on the anodes of TIC. Anodes of TIC were designed as consisting of isolated strips each having independent electronic circuitry and special multi-channel pulse processing apparatus. Mathematical formulae provided for FF angles measured in respect to the coordinate axes. It was shown how the point of fission fragments origin on the target plane may be determined using the same measured data. The last feature made the TIC a rather powerful tool for prompt fission neutron (PFN) emission investigation in event-by-event analysis of individual fission reactions from non- point fissile source. Position sensitive neutron induced fission detector for neutron-imaging applications with both thermal and low energy neutrons was found as another possible implementation of the designed TIC.

  4. Low energy strong electroweak sector with decoupling

    SciTech Connect

    Casalbuoni, R.; Dominici, D. |; Deandrea, A.; Gatto, R.; De Curtis, S.; Grazzini, M. |

    1996-05-01

    We discuss possible symmetries of effective theories describing spinless and spin-1 bosons, mainly to concentrate on an intriguing phenomenological possibility: that of a hardly noticeable strong electroweak sector at relatively low energies. Specifically, a model with both vector and axial vector strong interacting bosons may possess a discrete symmetry imposing degeneracy of the two sets of bosons (degenerate BESS model). In such a case its effects at low energies become almost invisible and the model easily passes all low energy precision tests. The reason lies essentially in the fact that the model automatically satisfies decoupling, contrary to models with only vectors. For large mass of the degenerate spin-one bosons the model becomes identical at the classical level to the standard model taken in the limit of infinite Higgs boson mass. For these reasons we have thought it worthwhile to fully develop the model, together with its possible generalizations, and to study the expected phenomenology. For instance, just because of its invisibility at low energy, it is conceivable that degenerate BESS has low mass spin-one states and gives quite visible signals at existing or forthcoming accelerators. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  5. What is a low-energy house?

    SciTech Connect

    Litt, B.R.; Meier, A.K.

    1994-08-01

    Traditionally, a ``low-energy`` house has been one that used little energy for space heating. But space heating typically accounts for less than half of the energy used by new US homes, and for low heating energy homes, space heating is often the third largest end use, behind water heating and appliances, and sometimes behind cooling. Low space heat alone cannot identify a low-energy house. To better understand the determinants of a low-energy house, we collected data on housing characteristics, incremental costs, and energy measurements from energy-efficient houses around the world and in a range of climates. We compare the energy required to provide thermal comfort as well as water heating, and other appliances. We do not have a single definition of a low-energy house, but through comparisons of actual buildings, we show how different definitions and quantitative indicators fail. In comparing the energy use of whole houses, weather normalization can be important, but for cases in which heating or cooling energy is surpassed by other end uses, other normalization methods must be used.

  6. The Simbol-X Low Energy Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Lechner, Peter

    2009-05-11

    For the Low Energy Detector of Simbol-X a new type of active pixel sensor based on the integrated amplifier DEPFET has been developed. This concept combines large area, scalable pixel size, low noise, and ultra-fast readout. Flight representative prototypes have been processed with a performance matching the Simbol-X specifications and demonstrating the technology readiness.

  7. The Simbol-X Low Energy Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lechner, Peter

    2009-05-01

    For the Low Energy Detector of Simbol-X a new type of active pixel sensor based on the integrated amplifier DEPFET has been developed. This concept combines large area, scalable pixel size, low noise, and ultra-fast readout. Flight representative prototypes have been processed with a performance matching the Simbol-X specifications and demonstrating the technology readiness.

  8. Parity violation in low-energy

    SciTech Connect

    Martin Savage

    2001-12-01

    Parity violation in low-energy nuclear observables is included in the pionless effective field theory. The model-independent relation between the parity-violating asymmetry in polarized np -> d gamma and the non-nucleon part of the deuteron anapole moment is discussed. The asymmetry in np -> d gamma computed with KSW power-counting, and recently criticized by Desplanques, is discussed.

  9. Studies in Low-Energy Nuclear Science

    SciTech Connect

    Carl R. Brune; Steven M. Grimes

    2010-01-13

    This report presents a summary of research projects in the area of low energy nuclear reactions and structure, carried out between March 1, 2006 and October 31, 2009 which were supported by U.S. DOE grant number DE-FG52-06NA26187.

  10. Superspace duality in low-energy superstrings

    SciTech Connect

    Siegel, W. )

    1993-09-15

    We extend spacetime duality to superspace, including fermions in the low-energy limits of superstrings. The tangent space is a curved, extended superspace. The geometry is based on an enlarged coordinate space where the vanishing of the d'Alembertian is as fundamental as the vanishing of the curl of a gradient.

  11. Solution-processable singlet fission photovoltaic devices.

    PubMed

    Yang, Le; Tabachnyk, Maxim; Bayliss, Sam L; Böhm, Marcus L; Broch, Katharina; Greenham, Neil C; Friend, Richard H; Ehrler, Bruno

    2015-01-14

    We demonstrate the successful incorporation of a solution-processable singlet fission material, 6,13-bis(triisopropylsilylethynyl)pentacene (TIPS-pentacene), into photovoltaic devices. TIPS-pentacene rapidly converts high-energy singlet excitons into pairs of triplet excitons via singlet fission, potentially doubling the photocurrent from high-energy photons. Low-energy photons are captured by small-bandgap electron-accepting lead chalcogenide nanocrystals. This is the first solution-processable singlet fission system that performs with substantial efficiency with maximum power conversion efficiencies exceeding 4.8%, and external quantum efficiencies of up to 60% in the TIPS-pentacene absorption range. With PbSe nanocrystal of suitable bandgap, its internal quantum efficiency reaches 170 ± 30%.

  12. Comparison of yields of neutron-rich nuclei in proton- and photon-induced 238U fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, F. A.; Bhowmick, Debasis; Basu, D. N.; Farooq, M.; Chakrabarti, Alok

    2016-11-01

    A comparative study of fission of actinides, especially 238U, by proton and bremsstrahlung photon is performed. The relative mass distribution of 238U fission fragments has been explored theoretically for both proton- and photon-induced fission. The integrated yield along with charge distribution of the products are calculated to find the neutron richness in comparison with the nuclei produced by the r process in nucleosynthesis. Some r -process nuclei in the intermediate-mass range for symmetric fission mode are found to be produced almost two orders of magnitude more for proton-induced fission than for photofission, although the rest of the neutron-rich nuclei in the asymmetric mode are produced in comparable proportion for both processes.

  13. New Results on Nuclear Fission--Data and Interpretation

    SciTech Connect

    Kelic, Aleksandra; Ricciardi, Maria Valentina; Schmidt, Karl-Heinz

    2008-04-17

    An overview on phenomena observed in low-energy fission is presented, including new results from a GSI experiment with relativistic secondary beams. The interpretation of the structural effects in terms of fission channels reveals an astonishing stability of the fission-channel positions in the heavy fragment in nuclear charge in contrast to the previously assumed constancy in mass. The statistical model is applied to deduce the relevant characteristics of the potential-energy surface. It is assumed that the different degrees of freedom are frozen at a specific stage each on the descent from saddle to scission due to the fission dynamics. Evidence for the separability of compound-nucleus and fragment properties in fission is deduced.

  14. Symmetry Energy Effects on Low Energy Dissipative Heavy Ion Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzo, C.; Baran, V.; Colonna, M.; Di Toro, M.; Odsuren, M.

    2011-02-01

    We investigate the reaction path followed by Heavy Ion Collisions with exotic nuclear beams at low energies. We focus on the interplay between reaction mechanisms, fusion vs. break-up (fast-fission, deep-inelastic), that in exotic systems is expected to be influenced by the symmetry energy term at densities around the normal value. The method described here, based on the event by event evolution of phase space quadrupole collective modes, will nicely allow to extract the fusion probability at relatively early times, when the transport results are reliable. Fusion probabilities for reactions induced by 132Sn on 64,58Ni targets at 10 AMeV are evaluated. We obtain larger fusion cross sections for the more n-rich composite system, and, for a given reaction, with a soft symmetry term above saturation. A collective charge equilibration mechanism (the Dynamical Dipole Resonance, DDR) is revealed in both fusion and break-up events, depending on the stiffness of the symmetry term just below saturation. Finally we investigate the effect of the mass asymmetry in the entrance channel for systems with the same overall isospin content and similar initial charge asymmetry. As expected we find reduced fusion probabilities for the more mass symmetric case, while the DDR strength appears not much affected. This is a nice confirmation of the prompt nature of such collective isovector mode.

  15. Low energy cyclotron for radiocarbon dating

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, J.J.

    1985-01-01

    The author built and tested a low energy cyclotron for radiocarbon dating similar to a conventional mass spectrometer. These tests clearly show that with the addition of a conventional ion source, the low energy cyclotron can perform the extremely high sensitivity /sup 14/C measurements that are now done at accelerator facilities. The author found that no significant background is present when the cyclotron is tuned to accelerate /sup 14/C negative ions and the transmission efficiency is adequate to perform radiocarbon dating on milligram samples of carbon. The internal ion source used did not produce sufficient current to detect /sup 14/C directly at modern concentrations. The author shows how a conventional carbon negative ion source located outside the cyclotron magnet, would produce sufficient beam and provide for quick sample changing to make radiocarbon dating milligram samples with a modest laboratory instrument feasible.

  16. Low-Energy Polymeric Phases of Alanates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huan, Tran Doan; Amsler, Maximilian; Marques, Miguel A. L.; Botti, Silvana; Willand, Alexander; Goedecker, Stefan

    2013-03-01

    Low-energy structures of alanates are currently known to be described by patterns of isolated, nearly ideal tetrahedral [AlH4] anions and metal cations. We discover that the novel polymeric motif recently proposed for LiAlH4 plays a dominant role in a series of alanates, including LiAlH4, NaAlH4, KAlH4, Mg(AlH4)2, Ca(AlH4)2, and Sr(AlH4)2. In particular, most of the low-energy structures discovered for the whole series are characterized by networks of corner-sharing [AlH6] octahedra, forming wires and/or planes throughout the materials. Finally, for Mg(AlH4)2 and Sr(AlH4)2, we identify two polymeric phases to be lowest in energy at low temperatures.

  17. Unitarization and low-energy scattering data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magalhães, P. C.; Robilotta, M. R.

    2014-07-01

    A procedure based on the well-known K-matrix formalism is presented, which makes patterns in inelastic regions of low-energy scattering data considerably more transparent. It relies on the use of an empirical kernel, obtained by eliminating elastic loops from the experimental amplitude. This allows structures associated with resonances, such as locations, widths, and heights, to become visible with the naked eye. The method is illustrated with a study of the P-wave Kπ amplitude.

  18. Physics with ultra-low energy antiprotons

    SciTech Connect

    Holtkamp, D.B.; Holzscheiter, M.H.; Hughes, R.J. )

    1989-01-01

    The experimental observation that all forms of matter experience the same gravitational acceleration is embodied in the weak equivalence principle of gravitational physics. However no experiment has tested this principle for particles of antimatter such as the antiproton or the antihydrogen atom. Clearly the question of whether antimatter is in compliance with weak equivalence is a fundamental experimental issue, which can best be addressed at an ultra-low energy antiproton facility. This paper addresses the issue. 20 refs.

  19. PHYSICS WITH ULTRA-LOW ENERGY ANTIPROTONS

    SciTech Connect

    M. HOLZSCHEITER

    2001-02-01

    In this report the author describes the current status of the antiproton deceleration (AD) facility at CERN, and highlights the physics program with ultra-low energy antiproton at this installation. He also comments on future possibilities provided higher intensity antiproton beams become available at Fermilab, and review possibilities for initial experiments using direct degrading of high energy antiprotons in material has been developed and proven at CERN.

  20. Experimental Measurement of Low Energy Neutrino Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Scholberg, Kate

    2011-11-23

    Neutrino interactions in the few to few tens of MeV range are of importance for several physics topics, including solar, supernova and reactor neutrinos, as well as future proposed oscillation and Standard Model test experiments. Although interaction cross-sections for some simple targets are well understood, very little experimental data exist for interactions with nuclei. This talk will discuss the motivation for measuring low energy neutrino interactions, the state of knowledge, and possible future strategies.

  1. Low energy {bar p} physics at FNAL

    SciTech Connect

    Hsueh, S.Y.

    1992-12-01

    The charmonium formation experiment is the only low energy {bar p} experiment at FNAL. This paper describes the performance of the Fermilab {bar p} Accumulator during fixed target run for the experiment and the planned upgrades. We also discuss the proposal for the direct CP violation search in {bar p} + p {yields} {bar {Lambda}} + {Lambda} {yields} {bar p}{pi}{sup +} + p{pi}{sup {minus}}.

  2. Study on low-energy positron polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schälicke, A.; Alexander, G.; Dollan, R.; Laihem, K.; Lohse, T.; Riemann, S.; Starovoitov, P.; Ushakov, A.

    2007-12-01

    A polarised positron source has been proposed for the design of the international linear collider (ILC). In order to optimise the positron beam, a measurement of its degree of polarisation close to the positron creation point is desired. In this contribution, methods for determining the positron polarisation at low energies are reviewed. A newly developed polarisation extension to GEANT4 will provide the basis for further polarimeter investigations.

  3. Low-energy sterile neutrinos: Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palazzo, Antonio

    2013-04-01

    Several experimental anomalies seem to point towards the existence of light sterile neutrinos. We focus on the low-energy anomalous results (the so-called gallium and reactor anomalies), which indicate a non-zero admixture U of the electron neutrino with a fourth (mostly) sterile mass eigenstate ν4. We point out that solar sector data, in combination with the precision measurement of θ13, provide the constraint |<0.041 (90% C.L.), independent of the reactor flux determinations.

  4. Targeting Low-Energy Ballistic Lunar Transfers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Jeffrey S.

    2010-01-01

    Numerous low-energy ballistic transfers exist between the Earth and Moon that require less fuel than conventional transfers, but require three or more months of transfer time. An entirely ballistic lunar transfer departs the Earth from a particular declination at some time in order to arrive at the Moon at a given time along a desirable approach. Maneuvers may be added to the trajectory in order to adjust the Earth departure to meet mission requirements. In this paper, we characterize the (Delta)V cost required to adjust a low-energy ballistic lunar transfer such that a spacecraft may depart the Earth at a desirable declination, e.g., 28.5(white bullet), on a designated date. This study identifies the optimal locations to place one or two maneuvers along a transfer to minimize the (Delta)V cost of the transfer. One practical application of this study is to characterize the launch period for a mission that aims to launch from a particular launch site, such as Cape Canaveral, Florida, and arrive at a particular orbit at the Moon on a given date using a three-month low-energy transfer.

  5. Targeting Low-Energy Ballistic Lunar Transfers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Jeffrey S.

    2010-01-01

    Numerous low-energy ballistic transfers exist between the Earth and Moon that require less fuel than conventional transfers, but require three or more months of transfer time. An entirely ballistic lunar transfer departs the Earth from a particular declination at some time in order to arrive at the Moon at a given time along a desirable approach. Maneuvers may be added to the trajectory in order to adjust the Earth departure to meet mission requirements. In this paper, we characterize the (Delta)V cost required to adjust a low-energy ballistic lunar transfer such that a spacecraft may depart the Earth at a desirable declination, e.g., 28.5(white bullet), on a designated date. This study identifies the optimal locations to place one or two maneuvers along a transfer to minimize the (Delta)V cost of the transfer. One practical application of this study is to characterize the launch period for a mission that aims to launch from a particular launch site, such as Cape Canaveral, Florida, and arrive at a particular orbit at the Moon on a given date using a three-month low-energy transfer.

  6. RHIC low energy beam loss projections

    SciTech Connect

    Satogata,T.

    2009-08-01

    For RHIC low-energy operations, we plan to collide Au beams with energies of E = 2:5-10 GeV/u in RHIC. Beams are injected into collision optics, and RHIC runs as a storage ring with no acceleration. At these low energies, observed beam lifetimes are minutes, with measured beam lifetimes of 3.5 min (fast) and 50 min (slow) at E=4.6 GeV/u in the March 2008 test run. With these lifetimes we can operate RHIC as a storage ring to produce reasonable integrated luminosity. This note estimates beam losses and collimator/dump energy deposition in normal injection modes of low energy operation. The main question is whether a normal injection run is feasible for an FY10 10-15 week operations run from a radiation safety perspective. A peripheral question is whether continuous injection operations is feasible from a radiation safety perspective. In continuous injection mode, we fill both rings, then continuously extract and reinject the oldest bunches that have suffered the most beam loss to increase the overall integrated luminosity. We expect to gain a factor of 2-3 in integrated luminosity from continuous injection at lowest energies if implemented[1]. Continuous injection is feasible by FY11 from an engineering perspective given enough effort, but the required extra safety controls and hardware dose risk make it unappealing for the projected luminosity improvement. Low-energy electron cooling will reduce beam losses by at least an order of magnitude vs normal low-energy operations, but low energy cooling is only feasible in the FY13 timescale and therefore beyond the scope of this note. For normal injection low energy estimates we assume the following: (1) RHIC beam total energies are E=2.5-10 GeV/u. (Continuous injection mode is probably unnecessary above total energies of E=7-8 GeV/u.); (2) RHIC operates only as a storage ring, with no acceleration; (3) 110 bunches of about 0.5-1.0 x 10{sup 9} initial bunch intensities (50-100% injection efficiency, likely conservative

  7. Nuclear fragmentation induced by low-energy antiprotons within a microscopic transport approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Zhao-Qing

    2016-12-01

    Within the framework of the Lanzhou quantum molecular-dynamics transport model, the nuclear fragmentation induced by low-energy antiprotons has been investigated thoroughly. A coalescence approach is developed for constructing the primary fragments in phase space. The secondary decay process of the fragments is described by a well-known statistical code. It is found that the localized energy released in antibaryon-baryon annihilation is deposited in a nucleus mainly via pion-nucleon collisions, which leads to the emissions of pre-equilibrium particles, fission, evaporation of nucleons, light fragments, etc. The strangeness exchange reactions dominate the hyperon production. The averaged mass loss increases with the mass number of target nucleus. A bump structure in the domain of intermediate mass for heavy targets appears owing to the contribution of fission fragments.

  8. Low energy intake plus low energy expenditure (low energy flux), not energy surfeit, predicts future body fat gain12

    PubMed Central

    Yokum, Sonja; Stice, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Background: There is a paucity of studies that have prospectively tested the energy surfeit theory of obesity with the use of objectively estimated energy intake and energy expenditure in humans. An alternative theory is that homeostatic regulation of body weight is more effective when energy intake and expenditure are both high (high energy flux), implying that low energy flux should predict weight gain. Objective: We aimed to examine the predictive relations of energy balance and energy flux to future weight gain and tested whether results were replicable in 2 independent samples. Design: Adolescents (n = 154) and college-aged women (n = 75) underwent 2-wk objective doubly labeled water, resting metabolic rate, and percentage of body fat measures at baseline. Percentage of body fat was measured annually for 3 y of follow-up for the adolescent sample and for 2 y of follow-up for the young adult sample. Results: Low energy flux, but not energy surfeit, predicted future increases in body fat in both studies. Furthermore, high energy flux appeared to prevent fat gain in part because it was associated with a higher resting metabolic rate. Conclusion: Counter to the energy surfeit model of obesity, results suggest that increasing energy expenditure may be more effective for reducing body fat than caloric restriction, which is currently the treatment of choice for obesity. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT02084836. PMID:27169833

  9. Low energy intake plus low energy expenditure (low energy flux), not energy surfeit, predicts future body fat gain.

    PubMed

    Hume, David John; Yokum, Sonja; Stice, Eric

    2016-06-01

    There is a paucity of studies that have prospectively tested the energy surfeit theory of obesity with the use of objectively estimated energy intake and energy expenditure in humans. An alternative theory is that homeostatic regulation of body weight is more effective when energy intake and expenditure are both high (high energy flux), implying that low energy flux should predict weight gain. We aimed to examine the predictive relations of energy balance and energy flux to future weight gain and tested whether results were replicable in 2 independent samples. Adolescents (n = 154) and college-aged women (n = 75) underwent 2-wk objective doubly labeled water, resting metabolic rate, and percentage of body fat measures at baseline. Percentage of body fat was measured annually for 3 y of follow-up for the adolescent sample and for 2 y of follow-up for the young adult sample. Low energy flux, but not energy surfeit, predicted future increases in body fat in both studies. Furthermore, high energy flux appeared to prevent fat gain in part because it was associated with a higher resting metabolic rate. Counter to the energy surfeit model of obesity, results suggest that increasing energy expenditure may be more effective for reducing body fat than caloric restriction, which is currently the treatment of choice for obesity. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT02084836. © 2016 American Society for Nutrition.

  10. A Very Low Energy Electrostatic Analyzer,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-12-31

    SCIENTFI C-1 AFGL-TR-80-0023 NL... mlllEllilllE EIIIIIIIIIEEI IIIIIIIIIw SAFGL-T -0023 LEYE " - A VERY LOW ENERGY ELECTROSTATIC ANALYZER ROBERT E. LA...probably be per- formed for less than $200,000 in a period of about one year. ~1 -3t - i L..i. Cr L- 4 z iu 0 . SI ’ a D, Io rl 7 I a ZcrT a- / Clio) ~ ’ r~ !- 2 ’I - L~J~ ~AIo -~ C arLC) T IA1

  11. Low energy source for seismic operation

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, P.N.

    1980-09-23

    A lightweight, mobile, low-energy seismic source comprises an industrial shotgun, having a solid projectile combined with a base structure to support the gun in a substantially vertical position, slightly above the surface of the earth. The muzzle velocity of the projectile is sufficiently high that it can provide up to 9,000 foot pounds of energy impacting on the earth, which is comparable to that of some of the larger weight drop machines. Wheels or carrying bars can be provided for manual transport of the source.

  12. RHIC CHALLENGES FOR LOW ENERGY OPERATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    SATOGATA,T.; BRENNAN, J.M.; DREES, A.; FEDOTOV, A.; ROSER, T.; TSOUPAS, N.

    2007-06-25

    There is significant interest in RHIC heavy ion collisions at {radical}s =5-50 GeV/u, motivated by a search for the QCD phase transition critical point. The lowest energies are well below the nominal RHIC gold injection {radical}s = 19.6 GeV/u. There are several challenges that face RHIC operations in this regime, including longitudinal acceptance, magnet field quality, lattice control, and luminosity monitoring. We report on the status of work to address these challenges, including results from beam tests of low energy RHIC operations with protons and gold.

  13. The Low-Energy Telescopes on EXIST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsey, Brian; Kaaret, P.; Jernigan, J. G.; Remillard, R. A.; Rothschild, R.; Hong, J.; Grindlay, J. E.

    2007-05-01

    The low-energy telescopes on EXIST are a coded aperture system that will continually image the 5-30 keV sky with 1' angular resolution and 12" source localization accuracy. The good source localization accuracy is essential to uniquely identify counterparts to obscured AGN and gamma-ray bursts. A total detector area of about one square meter with 200 micron square pixel is required. We are evaluating two silicon-based technologies capable of achieving the required performance: active pixel sensors with integrated DEPFET readout, and fully pixellated hybrid sensors with CMOS readout multiplexers optimized for X-ray detection.

  14. The Low-Energy Telescopes on EXIST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsey, Brian; Kaaret, Philip E.; Jernigan, J. G.; Remillard, R. A.; Rothschild, R. E.; Hong, J.; Grindlay, J. E.

    2006-12-01

    The low-energy telescopes on EXIST are a coded aperture system that will continually image the 5-30 keV sky with 1' angular resolution and 12" source localization accuracy. The good source localization accuracy is essential to uniquely identify counterparts to obscured AGN and gamma-ray bursts. A total detector area of about one square meter with 200 micron square pixel is required. We are evaluating two silicon-based technologies capable of achieving the required performance: active pixel sensors with integrated DEPFET readout, and fully pixellated hybrid sensors with CMOS readout multiplexers optimized for X-ray detection.

  15. FLSR - The Frankfurt low energy storage ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stiebing, K. E.; Alexandrov, V.; Dörner, R.; Enz, S.; Kazarinov, N. Yu.; Kruppi, T.; Schempp, A.; Schmidt Böcking, H.; Völp, M.; Ziel, P.; Dworak, M.; Dilfer, W.

    2010-02-01

    An electrostatic storage ring for low-energy ions with a design energy of 50 keV is presently being set up at the Institut für Kernphysik der Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main, Germany (IKF). This new device will provide a basis for new experiments on the dynamics of ionic and molecular collisions, as well as for high precision and time resolved laser spectroscopy. In this article, the design parameters of this instrument are reported.

  16. Study of electron-capture delayed fission in Am-232

    SciTech Connect

    Kreek, S.A.; Hall, H.L.; Hoffman, D.C.; Strellis, D.; Gregorich, K.E.

    1996-03-18

    An automated x-ray-fission coincidence system was designed and constructed by LLNL and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) for use inside the Gammasphere high efficiency gamma-ray detector array at LBNL. The x-ray-fission coincidence apparatus detection station consists of two surface barrier detectors (for detection of fission fragments) and two high-purity Ge (HPGe) planar x-ray detectors (for measurement of x-rays and low-energy gamma rays). The detection station is placed inside Gammasphere at the 88-Inch Cyclotron at LBNL and used in conjunction with Gammasphere to measure the x-rays, low-energy gamma-rays and fission fragments resulting from the ECDF process. A series of collaborative experiment between LLNL, LBNL, and LANL utilizing various components of the x-ray-fission coincidence apparatus to measure x-rays and gamma-rays in the decay of a stationary {sup 252}Cf source were performed to test the various components of the x-ray-fission coincidence apparatus. The test experiments have been completed and the data is currently being analyzed by LBNL. Preliminary test results indicate that the system performed better than expected (e.g., the x-ray detectors performed better than expected with no evidence of microphonic noise that would reduce the photon energy resolution).

  17. Fission foil detector calibrations with high energy protons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benton, E. V.; Frank, A. L.

    1995-01-01

    Fission foil detectors (FFD's) are passive devices composed of heavy metal foils in contact with muscovite mica films. The heavy metal nuclei have significant cross sections for fission when irradiated with neutrons and protons. Each isotope is characterized by threshold energies for the fission reactions and particular energy-dependent cross sections. In the FFD's, fission fragments produced by the reactions are emitted from the foils and create latent particle tracks in the adjacent mica films. When the films are processed surface tracks are formed which can be optically counted. The track densities are indications of the fluences and spectra of neutrons and/or protons. In the past, detection efficiencies have been calculated using the low energy neutron calibrated dosimeters and published fission cross sections for neutrons and protons. The problem is that the addition of a large kinetic energy to the (n,nucleus) or (p,nucleus) reaction could increase the energies and ranges of emitted fission fragments and increase the detector sensitivity as compared with lower energy neutron calibrations. High energy calibrations are the only method of resolving the uncertainties in detector efficiencies. At high energies, either proton or neutron calibrations are sufficient since the cross section data show that the proton and neutron fission cross sections are approximately equal. High energy proton beams have been utilized (1.8 and 4.9 GeV, 80 and 140 MeV) for measuring the tracks of fission fragments emitted backward and forward.

  18. Fission foil detector calibrations with high energy protons

    SciTech Connect

    Benton, E.V.; Frank, A.L.

    1995-03-01

    Fission foil detectors (FFD`s) are passive devices composed of heavy metal foils in contact with muscovite mica films. The heavy metal nuclei have significant cross sections for fission when irradiated with neutrons and protons. Each isotope is characterized by threshold energies for the fission reactions and particular energy-dependent cross sections. In the FFD`s, fission fragments produced by the reactions are emitted from the foils and create latent particle tracks in the adjacent mica films. When the films are processed surface tracks are formed which can be optically counted. The track densities are indications of the fluences and spectra of neutrons and/or protons. In the past, detection efficiencies have been calculated using the low energy neutron calibrated dosimeters and published fission cross sections for neutrons and protons. The problem is that the addition of a large kinetic energy to the (n,nucleus) or (p,nucleus) reaction could increase the energies and ranges of emitted fission fragments and increase the detector sensitivity as compared with lower energy neutron calibrations. High energy calibrations are the only method of resolving the uncertainties in detector efficiencies. At high energies, either proton or neutron calibrations are sufficient since the cross section data show that the proton and neutron fission cross sections are approximately equal. High energy proton beams have been utilized (1.8 and 4.9 GeV, 80 and 140 MeV) for measuring the tracks of fission fragments emitted backward and forward.

  19. Performance monitoring of low energy house, Macclesfield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephen, F. R.

    1980-01-01

    The monitoring of the energy balance of a very well insulated low-energy house in Macclesfield, England is discussed. The house is an existing dwelling which had been converted into a low-energy-requiring house by the reduction of heat loss through a high level of thermal insulation and the collection of solar energy by a water cascade solar panel with warm water storage. Measurements of house temperatures, radiation, off-peak electricity consumption and hot water and heating using were performed from January to August, 1978 and reveal that the house used less than 22,000 kWh electricity during that period, compared to 55,000 kWh expected if the house had been constructed to average insulation levels. Solar energy is found to contribute only 2% of house energy requirements, with the use of a heat pump combined with the solar panel leading to greater efficiency and thus utilization. In addition, the large thermal mass and good insulation are found to improve comfort by reducing temperature fluctuations, and the ventilation and low-temperature water return system employed provided satisfactory results.

  20. Low Energy Ion-Molecule Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    James M. Farrar

    2004-05-01

    This objective of this project is to study the dynamics of the interactions of low energy ions important in combustion with small molecules in the gas phase and with liquid hydrocarbon surfaces. The first of these topics is a long-standing project in our laboratory devoted to probing the key features of potential energy surfaces that control chemical reactivity. The project provides detailed information on the utilization of specific forms of incident energy, the role of preferred reagent geometries, and the disposal of total reaction energy into product degrees of freedom. We employ crossed molecular beam methods under single collision conditions, at collision energies from below one eV to several eV, to probe potential surfaces over a broad range of distances and interaction energies. These studies allow us to test and validate dynamical models describing chemical reactivity. Measurements of energy and angular distributions of the reaction products with vibrational state resolution provide the key data for these studies. We employ the crossed beam low energy mass spectrometry methods that we have developed over the last several years.

  1. Low Energy Accelerator Facility Upgrade and test

    SciTech Connect

    Alford, K.; Chemerisov, S.; Gromov, R.; Hafenrichter, L.; Jonah, C. D.; Tafoya, R.; Wesolowski, K.; Brown, D.; Forknall, S.; Gardner, James; Macrillo, Dave; Zulpo, A.

    2015-01-01

    The Low Energy Accelerator Facility (LEAF) contains a low-energy linac with high average beam power, which was designed and built in the late 1960’s primarily for radiation-chemistry experiments. The maximum beam energy in that configuration was 21 MeV. Although, the installation is old, it is still reliable. The accelerator was repurposed for development of accelerator-based technologies for the production of 99Mo with funding provided by the National Nuclear Security Administration’s Office of Material Management and Minimization (M3 ). An extensive scientific program on the production of radioactive isotopes demanded an upgrade of the accelerator to fit the experimental requirements. Several possible LEAF upgrades were proposed to increase the electron beam energy. The final design proposed the replacement of the old accelerating structures with new ones. In 2011-2012, the new structures were manufactured, installed, and tested with the beam energy up to 50 MeV and average beam power up to 20 kW. LEAF now is an attractive installation for performing research into medical isotope production.

  2. Low energy neutrinos in Super-Kamiokande

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekiya, Hiroyuki

    2016-05-01

    Super-Kamiokande (SK), a 50 kton water Cherenkov detector, observes 8B solar neutrinos via neutrino-electron elastic scattering. The analysis threshold was successfully lowered to 3.5 MeV (recoil electron kinetic energy) in SK-IV. To date SK has observed solar neutrinos for 18 years. An analysis regarding possible correlations between the solar neutrino flux and the 11 year solar activity cycle is shown. With large statistics, SK searches for distortions of the solar neutrino energy spectrum caused by the MSW resonance in the core of the sun. SK also searches for a day/night solar neutrino flux asymmetry induced by the matter in the Earth. The Super-Kamiokande Gd (SK-Gd) project is the upgrade of the SK detector via the addition of water-soluble gadolinium (Gd) salt. This modification will enable it to efficiently identify low energy anti-neutrinos. SK-Gd will pursue low energy physics currently inaccessible to SK due to backgrounds. The most important will be the world’s first observation of the diffuse supernova neutrino background. The main R&D program towards SK-Gd is EG ADS: a 200 ton, fully instrumented tank built in a new cavern in the Kamioka mine.

  3. Low energy cyclotron for radiocarbon dating

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, J.J.

    1984-12-01

    The measurement of naturally occurring radioisotopes whose half lives are less than a few hundred million years but more than a few years provides information about the temporal behavior of geologic and climatic processes, the temporal history of meteoritic bodies as well as the production mechanisms of these radioisotopes. A new extremely sensitive technique for measuring these radioisotopes at tandem Van de Graaff and cyclotron facilities has been very successful though the high cost and limited availability have been discouraging. We have built and tested a low energy cyclotron for radiocarbon dating similar in size to a conventional mass spectrometer. These tests clearly show that with the addition of a conventional ion source, the low energy cyclotron can perform the extremely high sensitivity /sup 14/C measurements that are now done at accelerator facilities. We found that no significant background is present when the cyclotron is tuned to accelerate /sup 14/C negative ions and the transmission efficiency is adequate to perform radiocarbon dating on milligram samples of carbon. The internal ion source used did not produce sufficient current to detect /sup 14/C directly at modern concentrations. We show how a conventional carbon negative ion source, located outside the cyclotron magnet, would produce sufficient beam and provide for quick sampling to make radiocarbon dating milligram samples with a modest laboratory instrument feasible.

  4. Low-Energy Polymeric Phases of Alanates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Huan; Amsler, Maximilian; Marques, Miguel; Botti, Silvana; Willand, Alexander; Goedecker, Stefan

    2013-03-01

    Low-energy structures of alanates are currently known to be described by patterns of isolated, nearly ideal tetrahedral [AlH4] anions and metal cations. We discover that the novel polymeric motif recently proposed for LiAlH4 plays a dominant role in a series of alanates, including LiAlH4, NaAlH4, KAlH4, Mg(AlH4)2, Ca(AlH4)2 and Sr(AlH4)2. In particular, most of the low-energy structures discovered for the whole series are characterized by networks of corner-sharing [AlH6] octahedra, forming wires and/or planes throughout the materials. Finally, for Mg(AlH4)2 and Sr(AlH4)2, we identify two polymeric phases to be lowest in energy at low temperatures. Work supported by Swiss NSF. Computational resources were provided by the Swiss National Supercomputing Center (CSCS) in Lugano.

  5. Low energy antiproton possibilities at BNL

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.Y.; Lowenstein, D.I.

    1987-01-01

    Antinuclear physics in the energy range of 0 to 20 GeV has long been a mainstay of the high energy physics program at BNL. The emphasis of the experimental program in the last couple of years has however moved to other areas as new facilities in the world have come on line. The initiatives stimulated by the USAF has caused a renewed interest in the low energy capabilities at BNL, which are still very competitive and considerable for the production of low energy antiprotons. A synopsis is given of the present BNL accelerator plans and the near term possibilities for a high yield antiproton production experiment. This paper does not address the longer term facility possibilities of producing ''large'' amounts of antimatter. Parenthetically, even though several aspects of the program are of little interest for this audience, such as the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and the Stretcher, it is important to understand their parameters and impact upon various possible antinucleon initiatives at BNL.

  6. Large Regular QCD Coupling at Low Energy?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirkov, Dmitry V.

    2008-10-01

    The issue is the expediency of the QCD notions' use in the low energy region down to the confinement scale, and, in particular, the efficacy of the QCD invariant coupling {bar α }s (Q2 ) with a minimal analytic modification in this domain. To this goal, we overview a quite recent progress in application of the ghost-free Analytic Perturbative Theory approach (with no adjustable parameters) for QCD in the region below 1 GeV. Among them the Bethe-Salpeter analysis of the meson spectra and spin-dependent (polarization) Bjorken sum rule. The impression is that there is a chance for theoretically consistent and numerically correlated description of hadronic events from the Z0 till few hundred MeV scale by combination of analytic pQCD and some explicit non-perturbative contribution in the spirit of duality. This is an invitation to practitioner community for a more courageous use of ghost-free models for data analysis in the low energy region.

  7. Low energy high pressure miniature screw valve

    DOEpatents

    Fischer, Gary J.; Spletzer, Barry L.

    2006-12-12

    A low energy high pressure screw valve having a valve body having an upper portion and a lower portion, said lower portion of said valve body defining an inlet flow passage and an outlet flow passage traversing said valve body to a valve seat, said upper portion of said valve body defining a cavity at said valve seat, a diaphragm restricting flow between said upper portion of said valve body and said lower portion, said diaphragm capable of engaging said valve seat to restrict fluid communication between said inlet passage and said outlet passage, a plunger within said cavity supporting said diaphragm, said plunger being capable of engaging said diaphragm with said valve seat at said inlet and outlet fluid passages, said plunger being in point contact with a drive screw having threads engaged with opposing threads within said upper portion of said valve body such engagement allowing motion of said drive screw within said valve body.

  8. Low-energy pion-nucleon scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbs, W.R.; Ai, L.; Kaufmann, W.B.

    1998-02-01

    An analysis of low-energy charged pion-nucleon data from recent {pi}{sup {plus_minus}}p experiments is presented. From the scattering lengths and the Goldberger-Miyazawa-Oehme (GMO) sum rule we find a value of the pion-nucleon coupling constant of f{sup 2}=0.0756{plus_minus}0.0007. We also find, contrary to most previous analyses, that the scattering volumes for the P{sub 31} and P{sub 13} partial waves are equal, within errors, corresponding to a symmetry found in the Hamiltonian of many theories. For the potential models used, the amplitudes are extrapolated into the subthreshold region to estimate the value of the {Sigma} term. Off-shell amplitudes are also provided. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  9. Low-energy dynamics of gravitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torma, Tibor

    The present status of theories of quantum gravity are reviewed from the low energy point of view. String theory relates classical black-hole type solutions of Einstein- like equations (e.g. axidilaton gravity) to the string vacuum. Several such solutions are proposed and their properties are investigated, including their behavior under supersymmetry transformations. A general feature of all possible quantum theories of gravitation is that they lead to a field theory description at low (as compared to the Planck mass) energies. The theoretical consistency, uniqueness and consequences of such an effective theory are investigated. I show that a power counting theorem allows for the momentum expansion that defines the effective theory even in the presence of large masses. I also show that graviton-graviton scattering is free of potential infrared and collinear divergencies that plague perturbative discussions of Yang-Mills theories.

  10. Low energy ion-molecule reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Farrar, J.M.

    1993-12-01

    This project is concerned with elucidating the dynamics of elementary ion-molecule reactions at collision energies near and below 1 eV. From measurements of the angular and energy distributions of the reaction products, one can infer intimathe details about the nature of collisions leading to chemical reaction, the geometries and lifetimes of intermediate complexes that govern the reaction dynamics, and the collision energy dependence of these dynamical features. The author employs crossed-beam low energy mass spectrometry technology developed over the last several years, with the focus of current research on proton transfer and hydrogen atom transfer reactions of te O{sup {minus}} ion with species such as HF, H{sub 2}O, and NH{sub 3}.

  11. Low energy consumption spintronics using multiferroic heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Trassin, Morgan

    2016-01-27

    We review the recent progress in the field of multiferroic magnetoelectric heterostructures. The lack of single phase multiferroic candidates exhibiting simultaneously strong and coupled magnetic and ferroelectric orders led to an increased effort into the development of artificial multiferroic heterostructures in which these orders are combined by assembling different materials. The magnetoelectric coupling emerging from the created interface between the ferroelectric and ferromagnetic layers can result in electrically tunable magnetic transition temperature, magnetic anisotropy or magnetization reversal. The full potential of low energy consumption magnetic based devices for spintronics lies in our understanding of the magnetoelectric coupling at the scale of the ferroic domains. Although the thin film synthesis progresses resulted into the complete control of ferroic domain ordering using epitaxial strain, the local observation of magnetoelectric coupling remains challenging. The ability to imprint ferroelectric domains into ferromagnets and to manipulate those solely using electric fields suggests new technological advances for spintronics such as magnetoelectric memories or memristors.

  12. Low-energy irradiation effects in cellulose

    SciTech Connect

    Polvi, Jussi; Nordlund, Kai

    2014-01-14

    Using molecular dynamics simulations, we determined the threshold energy for creating defects as a function of the incident angle for all carbon and oxygen atoms in the cellulose monomer. Our analysis shows that the damage threshold energy is strongly dependent on the initial recoil direction and on average slightly higher for oxygen atoms than for carbon atoms in cellulose chain. We also performed cumulative bombardment simulations mimicking low-energy electron irradiation (such as TEM imaging) on cellulose. Analyzing the results, we found that formation of free molecules and broken glucose rings were the most common forms of damage, whereas cross-linking and chain scission were less common. Pre-existing damage was found to increase the probability of cross-linking.

  13. Low-energy neutrino factory design

    SciTech Connect

    Ankenbrandt, C.; Bogacz, S.A.; Bross, A.; Geer, S.; Johnstone, C.; Neuffer, D.; Popovic, M.; /Fermilab

    2009-07-01

    The design of a low-energy (4 GeV) neutrino factory (NF) is described, along with its expected performance. The neutrino factory uses a high-energy proton beam to produce charged pions. The {pi}{sup {+-}} decay to produce muons ({mu}{sup {+-}}), which are collected, accelerated, and stored in a ring with long straight sections. Muons decaying in the straight sections produce neutrino beams. The scheme is based on previous designs for higher energy neutrino factories, but has an improved bunching and phase rotation system, and new acceleration, storage ring, and detector schemes tailored to the needs of the lower energy facility. Our simulations suggest that the NF scheme we describe can produce neutrino beams generated by {approx} 1.4 x 10{sup 21} {mu}{sup +} per year decaying in a long straight section of the storage ring, and a similar number of {mu}{sup -} decays.

  14. Low-energy pion-nucleon scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbs, W. R.; Ai, Li; Kaufmann, W. B.

    1998-02-01

    An analysis of low-energy charged pion-nucleon data from recent π+/-p experiments is presented. From the scattering lengths and the Goldberger-Miyazawa-Oehme (GMO) sum rule we find a value of the pion-nucleon coupling constant of f2=0.0756+/-0.0007. We also find, contrary to most previous analyses, that the scattering volumes for the P31 and P13 partial waves are equal, within errors, corresponding to a symmetry found in the Hamiltonian of many theories. For the potential models used, the amplitudes are extrapolated into the subthreshold region to estimate the value of the Σ term. Off-shell amplitudes are also provided.

  15. RHIC low energy tests and initial operations

    SciTech Connect

    Satogata,T.; Ahrens, L.; Bai, M.; Brennan, J.M.; Bruno, D.; Butler, J.; Drees, A.; Fedotov, A.; Fischer, W.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Jappe, W.; Lee, R.C.; Mackay, W.W.; Malitsky, N.; Marr, G.; Michnoff, R.; Oerter, B.; Pozdeyev, E.; Roser, T.; Severino, F.; Smith, K.; Tepikian, S.; Tsoupas, N.

    2009-05-04

    Future Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) runs, including a portion of FY10 heavy ion operations, will explore collisions at center of mass energies of 5-50 GeV/n (GeV/nucleon). Operations at these energies is motivated by a search for the QCD phase transition critical point. The lowest end of this energy range is nearly a factor of four below the nominal RHIC injection center of mass energy of {radical} s = 20.8 GeV/n. There are several operational challenges in the RHIC low-energy regime, including harmonic number changes, small longitudinal acceptance, lowered magnet field quality, nonlinear orbit control, and luminosity monitoring. We report on the experience with some of these challenges during beam tests with gold in March 2008, including first RHIC operations at {radical}s = 9.18 GeV/n and first beam experience at {radical}s = 5 GeV/n.

  16. Bluetooth Low Energy Mesh Networks: A Survey.

    PubMed

    Darroudi, Seyed Mahdi; Gomez, Carles

    2017-06-22

    Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) has gained significant momentum. However, the original design of BLE focused on star topology networking, which limits network coverage range and precludes end-to-end path diversity. In contrast, other competing technologies overcome such constraints by supporting the mesh network topology. For these reasons, academia, industry, and standards development organizations have been designing solutions to enable BLE mesh networks. Nevertheless, the literature lacks a consolidated view on this emerging area. This paper comprehensively surveys state of the art BLE mesh networking. We first provide a taxonomy of BLE mesh network solutions. We then review the solutions, describing the variety of approaches that leverage existing BLE functionality to enable BLE mesh networks. We identify crucial aspects of BLE mesh network solutions and discuss their advantages and drawbacks. Finally, we highlight currently open issues.

  17. Low energy dislocation structures in epitaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Der Merwe, Jan H.; Woltersdorf, J.; Jesser, W. A.

    1986-01-01

    The principle of minimum energy was applied to epitaxial interfaces to show the interrelationship beteen misfit, overgrowth thickness and misfit dislocation spacing. The low energy dislocation configurations were presented for selected interfacial geometries. A review of the interfacial energy calculations was made and a critical assessment of the agreement between theory and experiment was presented. Modes of misfit accommodation were presented with emphasis on the distinction between kinetic effects and equilibrium conditions. Two-dimensional and three-dimensional overgrowths were treated together with interdiffusion-modified interfaces, and several models of interfacial structure were treated including the classical and the current models. The paper is concluded by indicating areas of needed investigation into interfacial structure.

  18. Low energy wearable body-sensor-network.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Hoi-Jun; Cho, Namjun; Yoo, Jerald

    2009-01-01

    Wearable body sensor network (WBSN) is realized with wireless and wireline techniques. Body channel communication (BCC), which uses the human body as a signal transmission medium, can reduce energy consumption of a wireless on-body transceiver to less than 0.5nJ/b. The 3 pulse-based transceivers for BCC are reviewed in this paper, and their interference issues are discussed. To enhance BCC robustness, an adaptive frequency hopping scheme is applied. Fabric Area Network (FAN) is introduced with a low energy inductive coupling transceiver and a fault-tolerant switch to realize intra- and inter-layer WBSN at once. Unique wearable environment issues and the adaptation technique to overcome those issues are discussed.

  19. Spin polarized low-energy positron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, V. N.; Samarin, S. N.; Sudarshan, K.; Pravica, L.; Guagliardo, P.; Williams, J. F.

    2015-06-01

    This paper presents an investigation of spin polarization of positrons from a source based on the decay of 22Na isotopes. Positrons are moderated by transmission through a tungsten film and electrostatically focussed and transported through a 90 deg deflector to produce a slow positron beam with polarization vector normal to the linear momentum. The polarization of the beam was determined to be about 10% by comparison with polarized electron scattering asymmetries from a thin Fe film on W(110) at 10-10 Torr. Low energy electron emission from Fe layer on W(100) surfaces under positron impact is explored. It is shown that the intensity asymmetry of the electron emission as a function of the incident positron energy can be used to estimate the polarization of the positron beam. Also several materials with long mean free paths for spin relaxation are considered as possible moderators with increased polarization of the emergent positrons.

  20. Low-energy neutral-atom spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Voss, D.E.; Cohen, S.A.

    1982-04-01

    The design, calibration, and performance of a low energy neutral atom spectrometer are described. Time-of-flight analysis is used to measure the energy spectrum of charge-exchange deuterium atoms emitted from the PLT tokamak plasma in the energy range from 20 to 1000 eV. The neutral outflux is gated on a 1 ..mu..sec time scale by a slotted rotating chopper disc, supported against gravity in vacuum by magnetic levitation, and is detected by secondary electron emission from a Cu-Be plate. The energy dependent detection efficiency has been measured in particle beam experiments and on the tokamak so that the diagnostic is absolutely calibrated, allowing quantitative particle fluxes to be determined with 200 ..mu..sec time resolution. In addition to its present application as a plasma diagnostic, the instrument is capable of making a wide variety of measurements relevant to atomic and surface physics.

  1. Bluetooth Low Energy Mesh Networks: A Survey

    PubMed Central

    Darroudi, Seyed Mahdi; Gomez, Carles

    2017-01-01

    Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) has gained significant momentum. However, the original design of BLE focused on star topology networking, which limits network coverage range and precludes end-to-end path diversity. In contrast, other competing technologies overcome such constraints by supporting the mesh network topology. For these reasons, academia, industry, and standards development organizations have been designing solutions to enable BLE mesh networks. Nevertheless, the literature lacks a consolidated view on this emerging area. This paper comprehensively surveys state of the art BLE mesh networking. We first provide a taxonomy of BLE mesh network solutions. We then review the solutions, describing the variety of approaches that leverage existing BLE functionality to enable BLE mesh networks. We identify crucial aspects of BLE mesh network solutions and discuss their advantages and drawbacks. Finally, we highlight currently open issues. PMID:28640183

  2. Low-energy electron scattering by pyrazine

    SciTech Connect

    Winstead, Carl; McKoy, Vincent

    2007-07-15

    We report cross sections for low-energy elastic electron collisions with the diazabenzene molecule pyrazine, obtained from first-principles calculations. The integral elastic cross section exhibits three sharp peaks that are nominally shape resonances associated with trapping in the vacant {pi}* molecular orbitals. Although the two lowest-energy resonances do in fact prove to be nearly pure single-channel shape resonances, the third contains a considerable admixture of core-excited character, and accounting for this channel coupling effect is essential to obtaining an accurate resonance energy. Such resonant channel coupling has implications for electron interactions with the DNA bases, especially the pyrimidine bases for which pyrazine is a close analog. In the absence of data on pyrazine itself, we compare our elastic differential cross section to measurements on benzene and find close agreement.

  3. Microdosimetry of low-energy electrons.

    PubMed

    Liamsuwan, Thiansin; Emfietzoglou, Dimitris; Uehara, Shuzo; Nikjoo, Hooshang

    2012-12-01

    To investigate differences in energy depositions and microdosimetric parameters of low-energy electrons in liquid and gaseous water using Monte Carlo track structure simulations. KURBUC-liq (Kyushu University and Radiobiology Unit Code for liquid water) was used for simulating electron tracks in liquid water. The inelastic scattering cross sections of liquid water were obtained from the dielectric response model of Emfietzoglou et al. (Radiation Research 2005;164:202-211). Frequencies of energy deposited in nanometre-size cylindrical targets per unit absorbed dose and associated lineal energies were calculated for 100-5000 eV monoenergetic electrons and the electron spectrum of carbon K edge X-rays. The results for liquid water were compared with those for water vapour. Regardless of electron energy, there is a limit how much energy electron tracks can deposit in a target. Phase effects on the frequencies of energy depositions are largely visible for the targets with diameters and heights smaller than 30 nm. For the target of 2.3 nm by 2.3 nm (similar to dimension of DNA segments), the calculated frequency- and dose-mean lineal energies for liquid water are up to 40% smaller than those for water vapour. The corresponding difference is less than 12% for the targets with diameters ≥ 30 nm. Condensed-phase effects are non-negligible for microdosimetry of low-energy electrons for targets with sizes smaller than a few tens of nanometres, similar to dimensions of DNA molecular structures and nucleosomes.

  4. Low energy demonstration accelerator technical area 53

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    As part of the Department of Energy`s (DOE) need to maintain the capability of producing tritium in support of its historic and near-term stewardship of the nation`s nuclear weapons stockpile, the agency has recently completed a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Tritium Supply and Recycling. The resulting Record of Decision (ROD) determined that over the next three years the DOE would follow a dual-track acquisition strategy that assures tritium production for the nuclear weapon stockpile in a rapid, cost effective, and safe manner. Under this strategy the DOE will further investigate and compare two options for producing tritium: (1) purchase of an existing commercial light-water reactor or irradiation services with an option to purchase the reactor for conversion to a defense facility; and (2) design, build, and test critical components of a system for accelerator production of tritium (APT). The final decision to select the primary production option will be made by the Secretary of Energy in the October 1998 time frame. The alternative not chosen as the primary production method, if feasible, would be developed as a back-up tritium supply source. This Environmental Assessment (EA) analyzes the potential environmental effects that would be expected to occur if the DOE were to design, build, and test critical prototypical components of the accelerator system for tritium production, specifically the front-end low-energy section of the accelerator, at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LEDA) would be incrementally developed and tested in five separate stages over the next seven years. The following issues were evaluated for the proposed action: utility demands, air, human health, environmental restoration, waste management, transportation, water, threatened and endangered species, wetlands, cultural resources, and environmental justice.

  5. Low energy AMS of americium and curium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christl, Marcus; Dai, Xiongxin; Lachner, Johannes; Kramer-Tremblay, Sheila; Synal, Hans-Arno

    2014-07-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) has evolved over the past years as one of the most sensitive, selective, and robust techniques for actinide analyses. While analyses of U and Pu isotopes have already become routine at the ETH Zurich 0.5 MV AMS system "Tandy", there is an increasing demand for highly sensitive analyses of the higher actinides such as Am and Cm for bioassay applications and beyond. In order to extend the actinide capabilities of the compact ETH Zurich AMS system and to develop new, more sensitive bioassay routines, a pilot study was carried out. The aim was to investigate and document the performance and the potential background of Am and Cm analyses with low energy AMS. Our results show that 241Am and Cm isotopes can be determined relative to a 243Am tracer if samples and AMS standards are prepared identically with regard to the matrix elements, in which the sample is dispersed. In this first test, detection limits for Cm and Am isotopes are all in the sub-femtogram range and even below 100 ag for Cm isotopes. In a systematic background study in the mass range of the Cm isotopes, two formerly unknown metastable triply charged Th molecules were found on amu(244) and amu(248). The presence of such a background is not a principal problem for AMS if the stripper pressure is increased accordingly. Based on our first results, we conclude that ultra-trace analyses of Am and Cm isotopes for bioassay are very well possible with low energy AMS.

  6. Performance of the Fourier shape parametrization for the fission process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, C.; Pomorski, K.; Nerlo-Pomorska, B.; Bartel, J.

    2017-03-01

    The availability of realistic potential energy landscapes in restricted deformation space is the prerequisite starting point for modeling several nuclear properties and reactions, namely large-amplitude phenomena. The achievement of a macroscopic-microscopic approach, employing an innovative four-dimensional (4D) nuclear shape parametrization based on a Fourier expansion, and a realistic potential-energy prescription, is presented. A systematic analysis of the 4D deformation energy landscapes over an extended region of the nuclear chart from Pt to Pu is performed, searching for fission valleys, as well as exotic ground and metastable states. The significance of the approach for predicting mass partitioning in low-energy fission is demonstrated. The ability of the model to address shape-driven effects, like stable octupole and very elongated isomeric configurations, is discussed, too. The proposed approach constitutes an efficient framework for an extended model of fission dynamics over a wide range of fissioning mass, excitation energy, and angular momentum.

  7. The Low Energy Effective Area of the Chandra Low Energy Transmission Grating Spectrograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pease, D.; Drake, J. J.; Johnson, C. O.; Kashya, V.; Ratzlaff, P. W.; Wargelin, B. J.; Brinkman, A. C.; Kaastra, J. S.; vanderMeer, R.; Paerels, F. B.

    2000-01-01

    The Chandra X-ray Observatory was successfully launched on July 23, 1999, and subsequently began an intensive calibration phase. We present the preliminary results from the in-flight calibration of the low energy response of the High Resolution Camera spectroscopic readout (HRC-S) combined with the Low Energy Transmission Grating (LETG) aboard Chandra. These instruments comprise the Low Energy Transmission Grating Spectrograph (LETGS). For this calibration study, we employ a pure hydrogen non-LTE white dwarf emission model (T = 25000 K and log g = 9.0) for comparison with the Chandra observations of Sirius B. The pre-flight calibration of the LETGS effective area only covered wavelengths shortward of 44 A (E less than 277 eV). Our Sirius B analysis shows that the HRC-S quantum efficiency (QE) model assumed for longer wavelengths leads to an overestimate of the effective area by an average factor of about 1.6. We derive a correction to the low energy HRC-S QE model to match the predicted and observed Sirius B spectra over the wavelength range of 44-185 A. We make an independent test of our results by the comparison of a Chandra LETGS observation of HZ 43 with pure hydrogen model atmosphere predictions and find good agreement.

  8. Location of Low-Energy Charged Particle Instrument

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-12-03

    This graphic shows the NASA Voyager 1 spacecraft and the location of its low-energy charged particle instrument. A labeled close-up of the low-energy charged particle instrument appears as the inset image.

  9. Fission Reaction Event Yield Algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Hagmann, Christian; Verbeke, Jerome; Vogt, Ramona; Roundrup, Jorgen

    2016-05-31

    FREYA (Fission Reaction Event Yield Algorithm) is a code that simulated the decay of a fissionable nucleus at specified excitation energy. In its present form, FREYA models spontaneous fission and neutron-induced fission up to 20 MeV. It includes the possibility of neutron emission from the nuclear prior to its fussion (nth chance fission).

  10. Low energy ion distribution around the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Y.; Yokota, S.; Tanaka, T.; Asamura, K.; Nishino, M. N.; Yamamoto, T.; Tsunakawa, H.

    2009-04-01

    More than a year has passed since MAP-PACE onboard KAGUYA (SELENE) started continuous observation of the low energy charged particles around the Moon from 100km-altitude polar orbit. MAP (MAgnetic field and Plasma experiment) was developed for the comprehensive measurement of the magnetic field and three-dimensional plasma around the Moon. MAP consists of MAP-LMAG (Lunar MAGnetometer) and MAP-PACE (Plasma energy Angle and Composition Experiment). MAP-PACE consists of 4 sensors: ESA (Electron Spectrum Analyzer)-S1, ESA-S2, IMA (Ion Mass Analyzer), and IEA (Ion Energy Analyzer). Since each sensor has hemispherical field of view, two electron sensors and two ion sensors that are installed on the spacecraft panels opposite to each other can make full 3-dimensional measurements of low energy electrons and ions. One of the ion sensors IMA is an energy mass spectrometer. IMA measures mass identified ion energy spectra that have never been obtained at 100km altitude around the Moon. Low energy charged particles around the Moon were vigorously observed by Moon orbiting satellites and plasma instrumentation placed on the lunar surface in 1960s and 1970s. Though there were some satellites that explored the Moon afterwards, most of them were dedicated to the global mapping of the lunar surface. There has been almost no new information about the low energy charged particles around the Moon except the low energy electron measurement by Lunar Prospector, the lunar wake plasma data obtained by WIND during its Moon fly-by, and reports on remote detection of the lunar ions, lunar electrons and ULF waves generated by electron beams around the lunar wake. The newly observed data show characteristic ion distributions around the Moon. Besides the solar wind, MAP-PACE-IMA discovered four clearly distinguishable ion distributions: 1) Solar wind ions reflected/scattered at the lunar surface, 2) Solar wind ions reflected by magnetic anomalies on the lunar surface, 3) Ions that are

  11. 21 CFR 878.4410 - Low energy ultrasound wound cleaner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Low energy ultrasound wound cleaner. 878.4410... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4410 Low energy ultrasound wound cleaner. (a) Identification. A low energy ultrasound wound cleaner is a device that...

  12. 21 CFR 878.4410 - Low energy ultrasound wound cleaner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Low energy ultrasound wound cleaner. 878.4410... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4410 Low energy ultrasound wound cleaner. (a) Identification. A low energy ultrasound wound cleaner is a device that...

  13. 21 CFR 878.4410 - Low energy ultrasound wound cleaner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Low energy ultrasound wound cleaner. 878.4410... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4410 Low energy ultrasound wound cleaner. (a) Identification. A low energy ultrasound wound cleaner is a device that...

  14. 21 CFR 878.4410 - Low energy ultrasound wound cleaner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Low energy ultrasound wound cleaner. 878.4410... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4410 Low energy ultrasound wound cleaner. (a) Identification. A low energy ultrasound wound cleaner is a device that...

  15. 21 CFR 878.4410 - Low energy ultrasound wound cleaner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Low energy ultrasound wound cleaner. 878.4410... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4410 Low energy ultrasound wound cleaner. (a) Identification. A low energy ultrasound wound cleaner is a device that...

  16. Low energy excitations of the neutron star core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, Sanjay

    2017-01-01

    I will summarize recent work on low energy excitations in cold dense matter and its implications for thermal and transport properties, and seismology of neutron stars. I argue that a low energy Lagrangian with a handful of low energy constants (LECs) provides an adequate framework for calculations. The LECs can be related to the equation of state of dense matter at zero temperature.

  17. Low-energy electron scattering from cyanamide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kedong; Guo, Shuangcheng; Meng, Ju; Huang, Xiaotian; Wang, Yongfeng

    2016-09-01

    The low-energy electron collisions with cyanamide molecule are investigated by using the UK molecular R -matrix codes for electron energies ranging from 0.01 eV to 10 eV. Three models including static-exchange, static-exchange plus polarization, and close-coupling (CC) approximations are employed to reveal the dynamic interaction. Elastic (integrated and differential), momentum-transfer, and excitation cross sections from the ground state to the three low-lying electron excited states have been presented. Two shape resonances, two core-excited resonances, and two Feshbach resonances are detected in the CC approximation. The role of active space in the target and scattering problem including the resonances is discussed. The precise resonance parameters are found to be sensitive to the treatment of polarization effects employed. These resonances may be responsible for the fragments observed in a recent experiment of the dissociative electron attachments to cyanamide. Since the cyanamide molecule has a large permanent dipole moment, a Born closure procedure is used to account for the contribution of partial waves higher than l =4 to obtain converged cross sections.

  18. Low Energy Electron Scattering from Fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, M. Cristina A.

    2012-06-01

    We report an investigation of processes that occur during the ignition of the plasma and its consequences in post-discharge time for an internal combustion engine, in order to find the appropriate parameters to be used in cars that operate with lean mixtures air-fuel. The relevance of this theme has attracted much attention, and has been one of the subjects of collaboration between experimental and theoretical groups in the USA and Brazil. We have produced some basic information necessary to modeling spark ignition in alcohol- fuelled engines. Total cross sections of electron scattering by methanol and ethanol molecules were obtained, using the linear transmission method based on the Beer-Lambert law to first approximation. Measurements and calculations of differential cross sections for low-energy (rotationally unresolved) electron scattering were also obtained, for scattering angles of 5 --130 . The measurements were taken using the relative flow method with an aperture source, and calculations using two different implementations of the Schwinger multichannel method, one that takes all electrons into account and is adapted for parallel computers, and another that uses pseudopotentials and considers only the valence electrons. Additionally to these, computer simulation studies of electronic discharge in mixtures of ethanol were performed, using a Zero-Dimensional Plasma Kinetic solver. Previous reported models for combustion of ethanol and cross sections data for momentum transfer of electron collisions with ethanol were used. The time evolutions of the main species densities are reported and the ignition time delay discussed.

  19. Low Energy Electron Scattering from Fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, M. C. A.; Silva, D. G. M.; Bettega, M. H. F.; da Costa, R. F.; Lima, M. A. P.; Khakoo, M. A.; Winstead, C.; McKoy, V.

    2012-11-01

    In order to understand and optimize processes occurring during the ignition of plasma and its consequences in post-discharge for an internal combustion engine, especially considering the spark plug, we have produced in this work some basic information necessary to modeling spark ignition in alcohol- fuelled engines. Total cross sections of electron scattering by methanol and ethanol molecules in the energy range from 60 to 500 eV are reported, using the linear transmission method based on the Beer-Lambert law to first approximation. Aditionally to that, measurements and calculations of differential cross sections for elastic low-energy (rotationally unresolved) electron scattering were also discussed, for impact energies of 1, 2, 5, 10, 15, 20, 30, 50, and 100 eV and for scattering angles of 5°-130°. The measurements were obtained using the relative flow method with an aperture source, and calculations using two different implementations of the Schwinger multichannel method, one that takes all electrons into account and is adapted for parallel computers, and another that uses pseudopotentials and considers only the valence electrons.

  20. Discrete R symmetries and low energy supersymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Dine, Michael; Kehayias, John

    2010-09-01

    If nature exhibits low energy supersymmetry, discrete (non-Z{sub 2}) R symmetries may well play an important role. In this paper, we explore such symmetries. We generalize gaugino condensation, constructing large classes of models which are classically scale invariant, and which spontaneously break discrete R symmetries (but not supersymmetry). The order parameters for the breaking include chiral singlets. These simplify the construction of models with metastable dynamical supersymmetry breaking. We explain that in gauge mediation, the problem of the cosmological constant makes ''retrofitting'' particularly natural--almost imperative. We describe new classes of models, with interesting scales for supersymmetry breaking, and which allow simple solutions of the {mu} problem. We argue that models exhibiting such R symmetries can readily solve not only the problem of dimension four operators and proton decay, but also dimension five operators. On the other hand, in theories of ''gravity mediation,'' the breaking of an R symmetry is typically of order M{sub p}; R parity is required to suppress dimension four B and L violating operators, and dimension five operators remain problematic.

  1. Shadowing in low-energy photonuclear reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Swapan

    2017-09-01

    The photonuclear reaction in the multi-GeV region occurs because of the electromagnetic and hadronic interactions. The latter originates due to the hadronic fluctuation, i.e., vector meson, of the photon. The total cross section of the reaction is shadowed because of the vector meson-nucleus (hadronic) interaction. To estimate it quantitatively, the cross section of the photonuclear reaction was calculated in the low energy region (˜1 -3 GeV) using the simple vector-meson dominance (SVMD) model, i.e., the low-lying vector mesons (ρ0, ω , and ϕ mesons) were considered. The nuclear shadowing is reinvestigated using the generalized vector meson (GVMD) model, where the higher ρ meson effective state (ρ' meson) is taken into account along with the low-lying vector mesons. Using the GVMD model, the total cross section of the photonuclear reaction are calculated in the above mentioned energy region. The calculated results are compared with the measured spectra.

  2. Low energy CMOS for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panwar, Ramesh; Alkalaj, Leon

    1992-01-01

    The current focus of NASA's space flight programs reflects a new thrust towards smaller, less costly, and more frequent space missions, when compared to missions such as Galileo, Magellan, or Cassini. Recently, the concept of a microspacecraft was proposed. In this concept, a small, compact spacecraft that weighs tens of kilograms performs focused scientific objectives such as imaging. Similarly, a Mars Lander micro-rover project is under study that will allow miniature robots weighing less than seven kilograms to explore the Martian surface. To bring the microspacecraft and microrover ideas to fruition, one will have to leverage compact 3D multi-chip module-based multiprocessors (MCM) technologies. Low energy CMOS will become increasingly important because of the thermodynamic considerations in cooling compact 3D MCM implementations and also from considerations of the power budget for space applications. In this paper, we show how the operating voltage is related to the threshold voltage of the CMOS transistors for accomplishing a task in VLSI with minimal energy. We also derive expressions for the noise margins at the optimal operating point. We then look at a low voltage CMOS (LVCMOS) technology developed at Stanford University which improves the power consumption over conventional CMOS by a couple of orders of magnitude and consider the suitability of the technology for space applications by characterizing its SEU immunity.

  3. Low energy stable plasma calibration facility.

    PubMed

    Frederick-Frost, K M; Lynch, K A

    2007-07-01

    We have designed and fabricated a low energy plasma calibration facility for testing and calibration of rocket-borne charged-particle detectors and for the investigation of plasma sheath formation in an environment with ionospheric plasma energies, densities, and Debye lengths. We describe the vacuum system and associated plasma source, which was modified from a Naval Research Laboratory design [Bowles et al. Rev. Sci. Instrum. 67, 455 (1996)]. Mechanical and electrical modifications to this cylindrical microwave resonant source are outlined together with a different method of operating the magnetron that achieves a stable discharge. This facility produces unmagnetized plasmas with densities from 1x10(3)/cm(3) to 6x10(5)/cm(3), electron temperatures from 0.1 to 1.7 eV, and plasma potentials from 0.5 to 8 V depending on varying input microwave power and neutral gas flow. For the range of input microwave power explored (350-600 W), the energy density of the plasma remains constant because of an inverse relationship between density and temperature. This relationship allows a wide range of Debye lengths (0.3-8.4 cm) to be investigated, which is ideal for simulating the ionospheric plasma sheaths we explore.

  4. Low energy neutral atom imaging techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Funsten, H.O. McComas, D.J.; Scime, E.E.

    1993-01-01

    The potential scientific return from low energy neutral atom (LENA) imaging of the magnetosphere is extraordinary. The technical challenges of LENA detection include (1) removal of LENAs from the tremendous ambient UV without losing information of their incident trajectories, (2) quantification of their trajectories, and (3) obtaining high sensitivity measurements. Two techniques that have been proposed for this purpose are based on fundamentally different atomic interaction mechanisms between LENAs and a solid: LENA transmission through an ultrathin foil and LENA reflection from a solid surface. Both of these methods provide LENA ionization (for subsequent removal from the UV by electrostatic deflection) and secondary electron emission (for start pulse generation for time-of-flight and/or coincidence). We present a comparative study of the transmission and reflection techniques based on differences in atomic interactions with solids and surfaces. We show that transmission methods yield an order of magnitude greater secondary electron emission than reflection methods. Transmission methods are shown to be sufficient for LENA energies of approximately 1 keV to greater than 30 keV. Reflection methods using low work function surfaces could be employed for LENA ionization for energies less than several keV.

  5. Studies in Low-Energy Nuclear Science

    SciTech Connect

    Brune, Carl R; Grimes, Steven M

    2006-03-30

    This report presents a summary of research projects in the area of low energy nuclear reactions and structure, carried out between 1 January 2003 and 31 December 2005 and supported by U.S. DOE grant number DE-FG03-03NA00074. Cross sections measured with high resolution have been subjected to an Ericson theory analysis to infer information about the nuclear level density. Other measurements were made of the spectral shape of particles produced in evaporation processes; these also yield level density information. A major project was the development of a new Hauser-Feshbach code for analyzing such spectra. Other measurements produced information on the spectra of gamma rays emitted in reactions on heavy nuclei and gave a means of refining our understanding of gamma-ray strength functions. Finally,reactions on light nuclei were studied and subjected to an R-matrix analysis. Cross sections fora network of nuclear reactions proceedingthrough a given compound nucleus shouldgreatly constrain the family of allowed parameters. Modifications to the formalism andcomputer code are also discussed.

  6. Optimal Low Energy Earth-Moon Transfers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griesemer, Paul Ricord; Ocampo, Cesar; Cooley, D. S.

    2010-01-01

    The optimality of a low-energy Earth-Moon transfer is examined for the first time using primer vector theory. An optimal control problem is formed with the following free variables: the location, time, and magnitude of the transfer insertion burn, and the transfer time. A constraint is placed on the initial state of the spacecraft to bind it to a given initial orbit around a first body, and on the final state of the spacecraft to limit its Keplerian energy with respect to a second body. Optimal transfers in the system are shown to meet certain conditions placed on the primer vector and its time derivative. A two point boundary value problem containing these necessary conditions is created for use in targeting optimal transfers. The two point boundary value problem is then applied to the ballistic lunar capture problem, and an optimal trajectory is shown. Additionally, the ballistic lunar capture trajectory is examined to determine whether one or more additional impulses may improve on the cost of the transfer.

  7. Oscillations of very low energy atmospheric neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Peres, Orlando L. G.; Smirnov, A. Yu.

    2009-06-01

    There are several new features in the production, oscillations, and detection of the atmospheric neutrinos of low energies E < or approx. 100 MeV. The flavor ratio r of muon to electron neutrino fluxes is substantially smaller than 2 and decreases with energy, a significant part of events is due to the decay of invisible muons at rest, etc. Oscillations in a two-layer medium (atmosphere-Earth) should be taken into account. We derive analytical and semianalytical expressions for the oscillation probabilities of these 'sub-sub-GeV' neutrinos. The energy spectra of the e-like events in water Cherenkov detectors are computed, and the dependence of the spectra on the 2-3 mixing angle {theta}{sub 23}, the 1-3 mixing, and the CP-violation phase are studied. We find that variations of {theta}{sub 23} in the presently allowed region change the number of e-like events by about 15%-20% as well as lead to distortion of the energy spectrum. The 1-3 mixing and CP violation can lead to {approx}10% effects. Detailed study of the sub-sub-GeV neutrinos will be possible in future megaton-scale detectors.

  8. RHIC low-energy challenges and plans

    SciTech Connect

    Satogata,T.; Ahrens, L.; Bai, M.; Brennan, J.M.; Bruno, D.; Butler, J.; Drees, A.; Fedotov, A.; Fischer, W.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Jappe, W.; Lee, R.C.; MacKay, W.W.; Malitsky, N.; Marr, G.; Michnoff, R.; Oerter, B.; Pozdeyev, E.; Roser, T.; Schoefer, V.; Severino, F.; Smith, K.; Tepikian, S.; Tsoupas, N.

    2009-06-08

    Future Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) runs, including a portion of FY10 heavy ion operations, will explore collisions at center of mass energies of 5-50 GeV/n (GeV/nucleon). Operations at these energies is motivated by the search for a possible QCD phase transition critical point. The lowest end of this energy range is nearly a factor of four below the nominal RHIC injection center of mass energy {radical}s = 19.6 GeV/n. There are several operational challenges in the RHIC low-energy regime, including harmonic number changes, small longitudinal acceptance, lowered magnet field quality, nonlinear orbit control, and luminosity monitoring. We report on the experience with these challenges during beam tests with gold beams in March 2008. This includes first operations at {radical}s = 9.18 GeV/n, first beam experience at {radical}s = 5 GeV/n, and luminosity projections for near-term operations.

  9. Low Energy Electron Impact Excitation of Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ralphs, Kevin; Serna, Gabriela; Hargreaves, Leigh R.; Khakoo, Murtadha A.; Winstead, Carl; McKoy, B. Vincent

    2011-10-01

    We present normalized absolute differential and integral cross-section measurements for the low energy electron impact excitation of the lowest dissociative 3B1, 1B1,3A1 and 1A1 states of H2O. The DCS were taken at incident energies of 9 eV, 10 eV, 12 eV, 15 eV and 20 eV and scattering angles of 15° to 130° and normalized to the elastic electron scattering measurements of. The DCS were obtained after a sophisticated unfolding of the electron energy loss spectrum of water using photoabsorption data in the literature as investigated by Thorn et al.. Our measurements extend those of to near-threshold energies. We find both important agreements and differences between our DCS and those of. Comparison to our theory (multi-channel Schwinger) and that of earlier work will also be presented. Funded by an NSF grant # RUI-PHY 0968874.

  10. Decomposition of methionine by low energy electrons.

    PubMed

    Kopyra, Janina; Szamrej, Iwona; Abdoul-Carime, Hassan; Farizon, Bernadette; Farizon, Michel

    2012-06-14

    In this work, we present the results from low energy (<12 eV) electron impact on isolated methionine, Met. We show that dissociative electron attachment is the operative mechanism for the sulfur content amino-acid fragmentation. The two most dominant fragments are attributed to the (Met-H)(-) and (C(4)NOH(5))(-) ions that are formed at energy below 2 eV. The formation of the latter anion is accompanied by the loss of neutral counterparts, which are most likely a water molecule and highly toxic methanethiol, CH(3)SH. Further fragments are associated with the damage at the sulfur end of the amino acid, producing the methyl sulfide anion CH(3)S(-) or sulfur containing neutrals. In the context of radiation induced damage to biological material at the nano-scale level, the present interest of methionine arises from the implication of the molecule in biological processes (e.g., S-adenosyl methionine for the stimulation of DNA methyltransferase reactions or protein synthesis).

  11. Low-energy electron collisions with biomolecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winstead, Carl; McKoy, Vincent

    2012-11-01

    We report recent progress in applying the Schwinger multichannel computational method to the interactions of slow electrons with biomolecules. Calculations on constituents of DNA, including nucleobases, phosphate esters, and models of the backbone sugar, have provided insight into the nature of the low-energy shape resonances, and thereby into possible sites and mechanisms for electron attachment that may lead to strand-breaking. At the same time, more approximate calculations on larger assemblies such as nucleosides and deoxyadenosine monophosphate indicate how the resonance properties of the subunits will or will not persist in DNA itself. We are pursuing a similar strategy for another major class of biomolecules, the proteins, by beginning with fixed-nuclei studies of the constituent amino acids; here we present preliminary results for the simplest amino acid, glycine. We also describe efforts directed at an improved understanding electron collisions with alcohols, which, in addition to basic scientific interest, may prove useful in the modeling of ignition and combustion within biofuel-powered engines.

  12. Trace metal content in aspirin and women's cosmetics via proton induced x-ray emission (PIXE)

    SciTech Connect

    Hichwa, B.P.; Pun, D.D.; Wang, D.

    1981-04-01

    A multielemental analysis to determine the trace metal content of generic and name-brand aspirins and name-brand lipsticks was done via proton induced x-ray (PIXE) measurements. The Hope College PIXE system is described as well as the target preparation methods. The trace metal content of twelve brands of aspirin and aspirin substitutes and fourteen brands of lipstick are reported. Detection limits for most elements are in the range of 100 parts per billion (ppb) to 10 parts per million (ppm).

  13. In situ variations of carrier decay and proton induced luminescence characteristics in polycrystalline CdS

    SciTech Connect

    Gaubas, E. Ceponis, T.; Jasiunas, A.; Kalesinskas, V.; Meskauskaite, D.; Pavlov, J.; Tamulaitis, G.; Tekorius, A.; Brytavskyi, I.; Kovalevskij, V.; Remeikis, V.

    2014-06-28

    Evolution of the microwave-probed photoconductivity transients and of the proton induced luminescence has simultaneously been examined in polycrystalline CdS layers evaporated in vacuum during exposure to a 1.6 MeV proton beam. The decrease of the intensity of luminescence peaked at 510 and 709 nm wavelengths and of values of the effective carrier lifetime has been correlated in dependence of proton irradiation fluence. The defect introduction rate has been evaluated by the comparative analysis of the laser and proton beam induced luminescence. The difference of a carrier pair generation mechanism inherent for light and for a proton beam has been revealed.

  14. Variation in proton-induced upsets rates from large solar flares using an improved SEU model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Normand, Eugene; Stapor, William J.

    1990-12-01

    Proton integral flux measurements during solar energetic particle (SEP) events, from the CPME instrument onboard the IMP-8 satellite, and the proton detector on the GOES-7 satellite, are utilized to calculate proton-induced single-event upset (SEU). An improved two-parameter SEU cross section model is used for three RAM devices. The log of the 239 actual RAM upsets on the TDRS-1 satellite during the October 19, 1989 SEP event allowed a comparison between the recorded number of upsets/chip per day and those predicted based on the GOES-7 data, the two-parameter model, and the shielding distribution curve.

  15. Low-energy photon spectroscopy data in support of ASTM method development

    SciTech Connect

    Dry, D. E.; Boone, S.

    2002-01-01

    The Isotope and Nuclear Chemistry (C-INC) Radioassay Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has been in operation since 1948 to measure fission-product and actinide activities from the U.S. weapons testing program. Since the cessation of testing in 1992, the facility has remained in continuous operation by analyzing samples for environmental, bioassay and research projects. In addition to the many gamma spectroscopy systems, two independent planar germanium detectors are employed for measurement of x-rays and low-energy gsunma rays. 'These counters were used to collect data of select isotopes to support the development of a new ASTM standard, 'Standard Practice for High-Resolution Low-Energy Photon Spectrometry of Water'. This standard is being developed by ASTM Subcommittee D19.04 as a tool for measurement of low-energy gamma-rays and x-rays fiom approximately 4 keV to 150 keV. This work describes empirical counting results obtained fkom traceable sources covering the energy range of interest. Specifically, the isotopes used were 5%i, 55Fe, Am, I, Cd, and 57C0 which provide a range of 5.9 to 136 keV. Mixed nuclide sources were also counted for the purpose of providing data for coincidence summing effects. All data is presented in hardcopy and accompanying electronic form.

  16. Low energy x-ray spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Woodruff, W.R.

    1981-06-05

    A subkilovolt spectrometer has been produced to permit high-energy-resolution, time-dependent x-ray intensity measurements. The diffracting element is a curved mica (d = 9.95A) crystal. To preclude higher order (n > 1) diffractions, a carbon x-ray mirror that reflects only photons with energies less than approx. 1.1 keV is utilized ahead of the diffracting element. The nominal energy range of interest is 800 to 900 eV. The diffracted photons are detected by a gold-surface photoelectric diode designed to have a very good frequency response, and whose current is recorded on an oscilloscope. A thin, aluminium light barrier is placed between the diffracting crystal and the photoelectric diode detector to keep any uv generated on or scattered by the crystal from illuminating the detector. High spectral energy resolution is provided by many photocathodes between 8- and 50-eV wide placed serially along the diffracted x-ray beam at the detector position. The spectrometer was calibrated for energy and energy dispersion using the Ni L..cap alpha../sub 1/ /sub 2/ lines produced in the LLNL IONAC accelerator and in third order using a molybdenum target x-ray tube. For the latter calibration the carbon mirror was replaced by one surfaced with rhodium to raise the cut-off energy to about 3 keV. The carbon mirror reflection dependence on energy was measured using one of our Henke x-ray sources. The curved mica crystal diffraction efficiency was measured on our Low-Energy x-ray (LEX) machine. The spectrometer performs well although some changes in the way the x-ray mirror is held are desirable. 16 figures.

  17. Low energy beam transport system developments

    SciTech Connect

    Dudnikov, V.; Han, B.; Stockli, M.; Welton, R.; Dudnikova, G.

    2015-04-08

    For high brightness beam production it is important to preserve the brightness in the low energy beam transport system (LEBT) used to transport and match the ion beams to the next stage of acceleration, usually an RFQ. While electrostatic focusing can be problematic for high current beam transport, reliable electrostatic LEBT operation has been demonstrated with H{sup −} beams up to 60 mA. Now, however, it is commonly accepted that an optimal LEBT for high current accelerator applications consists of focusing solenoids with space charge compensation. Two-solenoid LEBTs are successfully used for high current (>100 mA) proton beam transport. Preservation of low emittances (~0.15 π mm-mrad) requires the addition of a heavy gas (Xe, Kr), which causes ~5% of proton loss in a 1 m long LEBT. Similar Xe densities would be required to preserve low emittances of H{sup −} beams, but such gas densities cause unacceptably high H{sup −} beam losses. A short LEBT with only one short solenoid, movable for RFQ matching, can be used for reduced negative ion stripping. A strong electrostatic-focusing LEBT has been successfully adopted for transport of high current H{sup −} beams in the SNS Front End. Some modifications of such electrostatic LEBTs are expected to improve the reliable transport of intense positive and negative ion beams without greatly degrading their low emittances. We concentrate on processes that determine the beam brightness degradation and on their prevention. Proposed improvements to the SNS electrostatic LEBT are discussed.

  18. Low energy beam transport for HIDIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meusel, O.; Pozimski, J.; Jakob, A.; Lakatos, A.

    2001-05-01

    Low energy beam transport (LEBT) for a heavy ion inertial fusion (HIDIF, I. Hofmann and G. Plass, Report of the European Study Group on Heavy Ion Driven Inertial Fusion for the Period 1995-1998) facility suffers from high space charge forces and high ion mass. Space charge compensation reduces the necessary focusing force of the lenses and the radius of the beam in the LEBT, and therefrom the emittance growth due to aberrations and self fields is reduced. Gabor lenses (D. Gabor, Nature 160 (1947)) providing a stable space charge cloud for focusing and combine strong cylinder symmetric focusing with partly space charge compensation and low emittance growth. A high tolerance against source noise and current fluctuations and reduced investment costs could be other possible advantages. The proof of principle has already been demonstrated (J.A. Palkovic, Measurements on a Gabor lens for Neutralizing and Focusing a 30 keV Proton beam, University of Wisconsin, Madison, 1989; J. Pozimski, P. Groß, R. Dölling and T. Weis, First experimental studies of a Gabor plasma-lens in Frankfurt, Proceedings of the 3rd EPAC Conference, Berlin, 1992). To broaden the experiences and to investigate the realisation of a LEBT concept for the HIDIF injector an experimental program using two Gabor lenses for independent variation of beam radius and envelope angel at RFQ injection was started. Therefrom the first experimental results using a double Gabor lens (DGPL) LEBT system for transporting an high perveance Xe + beam are presented and the results of numerical simulations are shown.

  19. Fission gas detection system

    DOEpatents

    Colburn, Richard P.

    1985-01-01

    A device for collecting fission gas released by a failed fuel rod which device uses a filter to pass coolant but which filter blocks fission gas bubbles which cannot pass through the filter due to the surface tension of the bubble.

  20. Fission Xenon on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathew, K. J.; Marti, K.; Marty, B.

    2002-01-01

    Fission Xe components due to Pu-244 decay in the early history of Mars have been identified in nakhlites; as in the case of ALH84001 and Chassigny the fission gas was assimilated into indigenous solar-type Xe. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  1. Geometry of membrane fission.

    PubMed

    Frolov, Vadim A; Escalada, Artur; Akimov, Sergey A; Shnyrova, Anna V

    2015-01-01

    Cellular membranes define the functional geometry of intracellular space. Formation of new membrane compartments and maintenance of complex organelles require division and disconnection of cellular membranes, a process termed membrane fission. Peripheral membrane proteins generally control membrane remodeling during fission. Local membrane stresses, reflecting molecular geometry of membrane-interacting parts of these proteins, sum up to produce the key membrane geometries of fission: the saddle-shaped neck and hour-glass hemifission intermediate. Here, we review the fundamental principles behind the translation of molecular geometry into membrane shape and topology during fission. We emphasize the central role the membrane insertion of specialized protein domains plays in orchestrating fission in vitro and in cells. We further compare individual to synergistic action of the membrane insertion during fission mediated by individual protein species, proteins complexes or membrane domains. Finally, we describe how local geometry of fission intermediates defines the functional design of the protein complexes catalyzing fission of cellular membranes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The Fission Barrier Landscape

    SciTech Connect

    Phair, L.; Moretto, L. G.

    2008-04-17

    Fission excitation functions have been measured for a chain of neighboring compound nuclei from {sup 207}Po to {sup 212}Po. We present a new analysis which provides a determination of the fission barriers and ground state shell effects with nearly spectroscopic accuracy. The accuracy achieved in this analysis may lead to a future detailed exploration of the saddle mass surface and its spectroscopy.

  3. First measurement of proton-induced low-momentum dielectron radiation off cold nuclear matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    HADES Collaboration; Agakishiev, G.; Balanda, A.; Belver, D.; Belyaev, A.; Berger-Chen, J. C.; Blanco, A.; Böhmer, M.; Boyard, J. L.; Cabanelas, P.; Chernenko, S.; Dybczak, A.; Epple, E.; Fabbietti, L.; Fateev, O.; Finocchiaro, P.; Fonte, P.; Friese, J.; Fröhlich, I.; Galatyuk, T.; Garzón, J. A.; Gernhäuser, R.; Göbel, K.; Golubeva, M.; González-Díaz, D.; Guber, F.; Gumberidze, M.; Heinz, T.; Hennino, T.; Holzmann, R.; Ierusalimov, A.; Iori, I.; Ivashkin, A.; Jurkovic, M.; Kämpfer, B.; Karavicheva, T.; Koenig, I.; Koenig, W.; Kolb, B. W.; Kornakov, G.; Kotte, R.; Krása, A.; Krizek, F.; Krücken, R.; Kuc, H.; Kühn, W.; Kugler, A.; Kurepin, A.; Ladygin, V.; Lalik, R.; Lang, S.; Lapidus, K.; Lebedev, A.; Liu, T.; Lopes, L.; Lorenz, M.; Maier, L.; Mangiarotti, A.; Markert, J.; Metag, V.; Michalska, B.; Michel, J.; Mishra, D.; Müntz, C.; Naumann, L.; Pachmayer, Y. C.; Palka, M.; Parpottas, Y.; Pechenov, V.; Pechenova, O.; Pietraszko, J.; Przygoda, W.; Ramstein, B.; Reshetin, A.; Rustamov, A.; Sadovsky, A.; Salabura, P.; Schmah, A.; Schwab, E.; Siebenson, J.; Sobolev, Yu. G.; Spataro, S.; Spruck, B.; Ströbele, H.; Stroth, J.; Sturm, C.; Tarantola, A.; Teilab, K.; Tlusty, P.; Traxler, M.; Trebacz, R.; Tsertos, H.; Vasiliev, T.; Wagner, V.; Weber, M.; Wendisch, C.; Wüstenfeld, J.; Yurevich, S.; Zanevsky, Y.

    2012-09-01

    We present data on dielectron emission in proton induced reactions on a Nb target at 3.5 GeV kinetic beam energy measured with HADES installed at GSI. The data represent the first high statistics measurement of proton-induced dielectron radiation from cold nuclear matter in a kinematic regime, where strong medium effects are expected. Combined with the good mass resolution of 2%, it is the first measurement sensitive to changes of the spectral functions of vector mesons, as predicted by models for hadrons at rest or small relative momenta. Comparing the e+e- invariant mass spectra to elementary p + p data, we observe for e+e- momenta Pee<0.8 GeV/c a strong modification of the shape of the spectrum, which we attribute to an additional ρ-like contribution and a decrease of ω yield. These opposite trends are tentatively interpreted as a strong coupling of the ρ meson to baryonic resonances and an absorption of the ω meson, which are two aspects of in-medium modification of vector mesons.

  4. Influence of microhydration on the structures and proton-induced charge transfer in RNA intermediates.

    PubMed

    Bacchus-Montabonel, M C; Calvo, F

    2016-11-01

    Solvation effects are of major interest in the context of radiation damage, due to their potential applications in cancer therapy. Reliable modeling of the solvent is, however, quite challenging, and numerous studies have been devoted to isolated biomolecules and stepwise-hydrated molecules in which the amount of solvent is controlled one molecule at a time. The influence of stepwise hydration on radiation damage is investigated here using the example of proton-induced charge transfer in two biomolecular targets. Uracil has been widely investigated both experimentally and theoretically in this context, and 2-aminooxazole was recently shown to be a potentially important intermediate in prebiotic chemistry. Focusing here on doubly hydrated biomolecules, stable structures and infrared spectra were obtained by combining the results of molecular dynamics simulations with those of quantum chemistry calculations performed at the density-functional theory level with the double hybrid M06-2X functional. The charge-transfer cross-sections upon proton impact were obtained from ab initio molecular calculations and after applying a semi-classical approach to investigate the collision. Our results suggest a significant relationship between the detailed hydration structure and the efficacy of proton-induced charge transfer, highlighting the competing roles of inter- and intramolecular hydrogen bonding.

  5. Fission and Properties of Neutron-Rich Nuclei - Proceedings of the Second International Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, J. H.; Phillips, W. R.; Carter, H. K.

    Long Range Alpha Emission Probabilities in the Thermal and Resonance for 239Pu * Spectroscopy of Selected Fission Fragments * Gamma-Ray Spectra of Individual Fission Products * Gamma Spectroscopy of the Transfermium Nucleus Nobelium-254 * Summary of the Yield Values from Fast Fission of 233U Measured of Studsvik * Decay Studies of Neutron-Rich Isotopes Produced in Proton-Induced Fission of Actinides * Understanding of the Fission Process From the Deformation Properties of Fissioning Nuclei * Heavy Clusterization in 252Cf: An Application of the U(3) Selection Rule * Synthesis of Superheavy Elements with Three-Dimensional Fluctuation-Dissipation Dynamical Model * Asymmetric Fission Along Nuclear Lattice Planes * Experimental Study of Correlations Between Fission Neutron Multiplicity, Mass and Kinetic Energy of Fission Fragments From Spontaneous Fission of 252Cf, 244Cm and 248Cm * Super- and Hyper-Deformed Isomeric States and Long-Lived Superheavy Elements * Systematic Investigation of the Neutron Induced Fission Reaction 235, 238U and 237Np below 6 MeV * Studying Iso-chains with RNBs * Cold Fission Studies with Large Detector Arrays * Single-Particle States in Transcurium Nuclei * Shell Effects and Fission of Superheavy Nuclei at Low Excitation Energies * Experiments on the Synthesis of Superheavy Nuclei in 48Ca-Induced Reactions * GSI Experiments on the Synthesis of Superheavy Elements - Results and Plans for the Future * Spectroscopy of Refractory Fission Products at IGISOL * Ternary Fission Induced by Polarized Neutrons * Neutron Decay of Ternary Particles in Spontaneous Fission of 252Cf * New Fission Modes * Alpha Clustering and Ternary Fission * Interplay of Fusion and Fission Dynamics * Applications of the Hartree Bogoliubov Model to Nuclei with Large Isospin Values * Structure of Neutron-Rich Pd Isotopes * Systematic Studies of Fission Saddle-Point Shapes and Their Relation to the Maxima of the Fission-Fragment Mass and Kinetic-Energy Distributions * Limits of

  6. Biomodal spontaneous fission

    SciTech Connect

    Hulet, E.K. )

    1989-09-26

    Investigations of mass and kinetic-energy distributions from spontaneous fission have been extended in recent years to an isotope of element 104 and, for half-lives, to an isotope of element 108. The results have been surprising in that spontaneous fission half-lives have turned out to be much longer than expected and mass and kinetic- energy distributions were found to abruptly shift away from those of the lighter actinides, showing two modes of fission. These new developments have caused a re-evaluation of our understanding of the fission process, bringing an even deeper appreciation of the role played by nuclear shell effects upon spontaneous fission properties. 16 refs., 10 figs.

  7. Fission Measurements with Dance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jandel, M.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Fowler, M. M.; Bond, E. M.; Chadwick, M. B.; Clement, R. R.; Couture, A.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Haight, R. C.; Keksis, A. L.; Reifarth, R.; Rundberg, R. S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Wouters, J. M.; Agvaanluvsan, U.; Dashdorj, D.; Macri, R. A.; Parker, W. E.; Wilk, P. A.; Wu, C. Y.; Becker, J. A.; Angell, C. T.; Tonchev, A. P.; Baker, J. D.

    2008-08-01

    Neutron capture cross section measurements on actinides are complicated by the presence of neutron-induced fission. An efficient fission tagging detector used in coincidence with the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) provides a powerful tool in undertaking simultaneous measurements of (n,γ) and (n,f) cross sections. Preliminary results on 235U(n,γ) and (n,f) and 242mAm(n,f) cross sections measured with DANCE and a custom fission-tagging parallel plate avalanche counter (PPAC) are presented. Additional measurements of γ-ray cluster multiplicity distributions for neutron-induced fission of 235U and 242mAm and spontaneous fission of 252Cf are shown, as well as γ-ray energy and average γ-ray energy distributions.

  8. Low-energy electron collisions with thiophene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Costa, R. F.; Varella, M. T. do N.; Lima, M. A. P.; Bettega, M. H. F.

    2013-05-01

    We report on elastic integral, momentum transfer, and differential cross sections for collisions of low-energy electrons with thiophene molecules. The scattering calculations presented here used the Schwinger multichannel method and were carried out in the static-exchange and static-exchange plus polarization approximations for energies ranging from 0.5 eV to 6 eV. We found shape resonances related to the formation of two long-lived π* anion states. These resonant structures are centered at the energies of 1.00 eV (2.85 eV) and 2.82 eV (5.00 eV) in the static-exchange plus polarization (static-exchange) approximation and belong to the B1 and A2 symmetries of the C2v point group, respectively. Our results also suggest the existence of a σ* shape resonance in the B2 symmetry with a strong d-wave character, located at around 2.78 eV (5.50 eV) as obtained in the static-exchange plus polarization (static-exchange) calculation. It is worth to mention that the results obtained at the static-exchange plus polarization level of approximation for the two π* resonances are in good agreement with the electron transmission spectroscopy results of 1.15 eV and 2.63 eV measured by Modelli and Burrow [J. Phys. Chem. A 108, 5721 (2004), 10.1021/jp048759a]. The existence of the σ* shape resonance is in agreement with the observations of Dezarnaud-Dandiney et al. [J. Phys. B 31, L497 (1998), 10.1088/0953-4075/31/11/004] based on the electron transmission spectra of dimethyl(poly)sulphides. A comparison among the resonances of thiophene with those of pyrrole and furan is also performed and, altogether, the resonance spectra obtained for these molecules point out that electron attachment to π* molecular orbitals is a general feature displayed by these five-membered heterocyclic compounds.

  9. Low-energy electron collisions with thiophene.

    PubMed

    da Costa, R F; Varella, M T do N; Lima, M A P; Bettega, M H F

    2013-05-21

    We report on elastic integral, momentum transfer, and differential cross sections for collisions of low-energy electrons with thiophene molecules. The scattering calculations presented here used the Schwinger multichannel method and were carried out in the static-exchange and static-exchange plus polarization approximations for energies ranging from 0.5 eV to 6 eV. We found shape resonances related to the formation of two long-lived π∗ anion states. These resonant structures are centered at the energies of 1.00 eV (2.85 eV) and 2.82 eV (5.00 eV) in the static-exchange plus polarization (static-exchange) approximation and belong to the B1 and A2 symmetries of the C2v point group, respectively. Our results also suggest the existence of a σ∗ shape resonance in the B2 symmetry with a strong d-wave character, located at around 2.78 eV (5.50 eV) as obtained in the static-exchange plus polarization (static-exchange) calculation. It is worth to mention that the results obtained at the static-exchange plus polarization level of approximation for the two π∗ resonances are in good agreement with the electron transmission spectroscopy results of 1.15 eV and 2.63 eV measured by Modelli and Burrow [J. Phys. Chem. A 108, 5721 (2004)]. The existence of the σ∗ shape resonance is in agreement with the observations of Dezarnaud-Dandiney et al. [J. Phys. B 31, L497 (1998)] based on the electron transmission spectra of dimethyl(poly)sulphides. A comparison among the resonances of thiophene with those of pyrrole and furan is also performed and, altogether, the resonance spectra obtained for these molecules point out that electron attachment to π∗ molecular orbitals is a general feature displayed by these five-membered heterocyclic compounds.

  10. Fission Product Gamma-Ray Line Pairs Sensitive to Fissile Material and Neutron Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Marrs, R E; Norman, E B; Burke, J T; Macri, R A; Shugart, H A; Browne, E; Smith, A R

    2007-11-15

    The beta-delayed gamma-ray spectra from the fission of {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, and {sup 239}Pu by thermal and near-14-MeV neutrons have been measured for delay times ranging from 1 minute to 14 hours. Spectra at all delay times contain sets of prominent gamma-ray lines with intensity ratios that identify the fissile material and distinguish between fission induced by low-energy or high-energy neutrons.

  11. Nuclear data evaluation of long-lived fission products: Microscopic vs. phenomenological optical potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minato, Futoshi; Iwamoto, Osamu; Minomo, Kosho; Ogata, Kazuyuki; Iwamoto, Nobuyuki; Kunieda, Satoshi; Furutachi, Naoya

    2017-09-01

    Neutron-nucleus cross sections calculated by macroscopic potentials are compared with a microscopic one to study the performance for long-lived fission products. The macroscopic potentials show a good agreement with the microscopic one at higher energies, where neutron experimental data are scarce. Besides it, analyses of differential elastic cross sections at low energies also suggest that the macroscopic potentials are still effective and applicable enough for the long-lived fission products.

  12. Interaction between Low Energy Ions and the Complicated Organism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zeng-liang

    1999-12-01

    Low energy ions exist widely in natural world, but people pay a little attention on the interaction between low energy ions and matter, it is even more out of the question of studying on the relation of low energy ions and the complicated organism. The discovery of bioeffect induced by ion implantation has, however, opened a new branch in the field of ion beam application in life sciences. This paper reports recent advances in research on the role of low energy ions in chemical synthesis of the biomolecules and application in genetic modification.

  13. Low-Energy Ballistic Transfers to Lunar Halo Orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Jeffrey S.

    2009-01-01

    Recent lunar missions have begun to take advantage of the benefits of low-energy ballistic transfers between the Earth and the Moon rather than implementing conventional Hohmann-like lunar transfers. Both Artemis and GRAIL plan to implement low-energy lunar transfers in the next few years. This paper explores the characteristics and potential applications of many different families of low-energy ballistic lunar transfers. The transfers presented here begin from a wide variety of different orbits at the Earth and follow several different distinct pathways to the Moon. This paper characterizes these pathways to identify desirable low-energy lunar transfers for future lunar missions.

  14. Low-Energy Ballistic Transfers to Lunar Halo Orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Jeffrey S.

    2009-01-01

    Recent lunar missions have begun to take advantage of the benefits of low-energy ballistic transfers between the Earth and the Moon rather than implementing conventional Hohmann-like lunar transfers. Both Artemis and GRAIL plan to implement low-energy lunar transfers in the next few years. This paper explores the characteristics and potential applications of many different families of low-energy ballistic lunar transfers. The transfers presented here begin from a wide variety of different orbits at the Earth and follow several different distinct pathways to the Moon. This paper characterizes these pathways to identify desirable low-energy lunar transfers for future lunar missions.

  15. Development of a Low-energy Trigger for VERITAS

    SciTech Connect

    Kildea, J.

    2008-12-24

    During the 2007/2008 observing season a low-energy trigger configuration was developed and tested for VERITAS. The configuration makes uses of the small ({approx}35 m) baseline between two of the VERITAS telescopes and employs a much lower discriminator threshold and tighter coincidence window compared to the standard VERITAS trigger. Five hours of Crab Nebula ON/OFF observations were obtained in low-energy mode and were used to test new low-energy analysis algorithms. We present some details of the VERITAS low-energy trigger and the associated data analysis.

  16. Nuclear fission of Fm isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Asano, T.; Wada, T.; Ohta, M.; Chiba, S.

    2010-06-01

    Multi-modal fission has been systematically investigated for the series of isotopes of Fm and Cf. The multi-dimensional Langevin-type stochastic differential equation is used for the dynamical calculation. The primary fission mode changes from mass-asymmetric fission to mass-symmetric fission with the increase of neutron numbers for both Fm and Cf cases.

  17. Undergraduate Measurements For Fission Reactor Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, S. F.; Kersting, L. J.; Lueck, C. J.; McDonough, P.; Crider, B. P.; McEllistrem, M. T.; Peters, E. E.; Vanhoy, J. R.

    2011-06-01

    Undergraduate students at the University of Dallas (UD) have investigated elastic and inelastic neutron scattering cross sections on structural materials important for criticality considerations in nuclear fission processes. Neutrons scattered off of 23Na and NatFe were detected using neutron time-of-flight techniques at the University of Kentucky Low-Energy Nuclear Accelerator Facility. These measurements are part of an effort to increase the efficiency of power generation from existing fission reactors in the US and in the design of new fission systems. Students have learned the basics of how to operate the Model CN Van de Graaff generator at the laboratory, setup detectors and electronics, use data acquisition systems, and they are currently analyzing the angular dependence of the scattered neutrons for incident neutron energies of 3.57 and 3.80 MeV. Most students participating in the project will use the research experience as the material for their undergraduate research thesis required for all Bachelor of Science students at the University of Dallas. The first student projects on this topic were completed during the summer of 2010; an overview of student participation in this investigation and their preliminary results will be presented.

  18. Undergraduate Measurements For Fission Reactor Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hicks, S. F.; Kersting, L. J.; Lueck, C. J.; McDonough, P.; Crider, B. P.; McEllistrem, M. T.; Peters, E. E.; Vanhoy, J. R.

    2011-06-01

    Undergraduate students at the University of Dallas (UD) have investigated elastic and inelastic neutron scattering cross sections on structural materials important for criticality considerations in nuclear fission processes. Neutrons scattered off of {sup 23}Na and {sup Nat}Fe were detected using neutron time-of-flight techniques at the University of Kentucky Low-Energy Nuclear Accelerator Facility. These measurements are part of an effort to increase the efficiency of power generation from existing fission reactors in the US and in the design of new fission systems. Students have learned the basics of how to operate the Model CN Van de Graaff generator at the laboratory, setup detectors and electronics, use data acquisition systems, and they are currently analyzing the angular dependence of the scattered neutrons for incident neutron energies of 3.57 and 3.80 MeV. Most students participating in the project will use the research experience as the material for their undergraduate research thesis required for all Bachelor of Science students at the University of Dallas. The first student projects on this topic were completed during the summer of 2010; an overview of student participation in this investigation and their preliminary results will be presented.

  19. Fission Systems for Mars Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houts, Michael G.; Kim, T.; Dorney, D. J.; Swint, Marion Shayne

    2012-01-01

    Fission systems are used extensively on earth, and 34 such systems have flown in space. The energy density of fission is over 10 million times that of chemical reactions, giving fission the potential to eliminate energy density constraints for many space missions. Potential safety and operational concerns with fission systems are well understood, and strategies exist for affordably developing such systems. By enabling a power-rich environment and highly efficient propulsion, fission systems could enable affordable, sustainable exploration of Mars.

  20. Standardization of proton-induced x-ray emission technique for analysis of thick samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Shad; Zeb, Johar; Ahad, Abdul; Ahmad, Ishfaq; Haneef, M.; Akbar, Jehan

    2015-09-01

    This paper describes the standardization of the proton-induced x-ray emission (PIXE) technique for finding the elemental composition of thick samples. For the standardization, three different samples of standard reference materials (SRMs) were analyzed using this technique and the data were compared with the already known data of these certified SRMs. These samples were selected in order to cover the maximum range of elements in the periodic table. Each sample was irradiated for three different values of collected beam charges at three different times. A proton beam of 2.57 MeV obtained using 5UDH-II Pelletron accelerator was used for excitation of x-rays from the sample. The acquired experimental data were analyzed using the GUPIXWIN software. The results show that the SRM data and the data obtained using the PIXE technique are in good agreement.

  1. Application of proton-induced X-ray emission technique to gunshot residue analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, P.; Panigrahi, N.; Rao, M.S.; Varier, K.M.; Sen, S.; Mehta, G.K.

    1982-04-01

    The proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) technique was applied to the identification and analysis of gunshot residues. Studies were made of the type of bullet and bullet hole identification, firearm discharge element profiles, the effect of various target backings, and hand swabbings. The discussion of the results reviews the sensitivity of the PIXE technique, its nondestructive nature, and its role in determining the distance from the gun to the victim and identifying the type of bullet used and whether a wound was made by a bullet or not. The high sensitivity of the PIXE technique, which is able to analyze samples as small as 0.1 to 1 ng, and its usefulness for detecting a variety of elements should make it particularly useful in firearms residue investigations.

  2. Neutron- and proton-induced reactions for analysis of bioenvironmental samples

    SciTech Connect

    Spyrou, N.M.; Altaf, W.J.; Khrbish, Y.S. )

    1988-01-01

    The study of the elemental composition of bioenvironmental samples is of continuing interest in a wide variety of medical and environmental investigations, be it as environmental monitors or as indicators of the state of health and disease of an individual or a population. Nuclear activation methods play an important role in these studies as research tools and in certain cases are employed as rapid, routine analytical techniques. Although the authors have been using instrumental neutron activation analysis as the main technique for obtaining information about elemental composition and concentration, they have also developed techniques, for further or complementary analysis, in which proton-induced reactions have been exploited. Two recent studies, in which the composition of human lung tissue and the elemental concentration in plant samples were determined, have been selected as illustrations of the techniques employed.

  3. Technical Scope of Work: Proton Induced Radiation Damage in Crystal Scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Ren-Yuan; Zhang, Liyuan; Yang, Fan; Ramberg, Eric; Nebel, Todd

    2014-03-11

    This is a technical scope of work (TSW) between the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) and the experimenters of California Institute of Technology who have committed to participate in beam tests to be carried out during the 2014 Fermilab Test Beam Facility program. The goal of this investigation is to understand the proton-induced radiation damage in candidate fast crystal scintillators for future HEP experiments. Degradations of the optical and scintillation properties, including emission and transmittance spectra, light output, decay time and light response uniformity, will be measured before and after each step of proton irradiation at Fermilab with a defined fluence. The irradiation will start with a fluence of 1010/cm2 and going up in four steps to 1013/cm2.

  4. Studies of blood lead levels in children by proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE).

    PubMed

    Lal, M; Joseph, D; Choudhury, R K; Bajpai, H N; Gauba, I; Lokeshwar, M R; Wagle, C S

    1991-04-15

    Blood lead levels of children admitted to Sion Hospital, Bombay (India), from the adjoining Dharavi slum areas have been determined by proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE). Blood samples were collected from 36 children with suspected lead poisoning and from 20 control children. The analysis showed that the lead concentration of the patients varied from 0.1 to 6.0 micrograms ml-1. In addition to lead, K, Ca, Fe, Cu, Zn, Se, Br and Rb were also detected simultaneously, of which the concentrations of Fe, Cu, Zn, Se, Rb and Pb were determined. The high blood lead levels of the children from this area may be ascribed to environmental pollution due to heavy vehicular traffic and industrial sources.

  5. Detection of terrestrial fluorine by proton induced gamma emission (PIGE): A rapid quantification for Antarctic meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noll, K.; Döbeli, M.; Krähenbühl, U.; Grambole, D.; Herrmann, F.; Koeberl, C.

    2003-05-01

    The enrichment of fluorine on the surface of Antarctic meteorites is investigated by applying the nuclear reactions 19F(p, )16O or 19F(p, p)19F with the proton induced gamma emission (PIGE) technique, a class of nuclear reaction analysis (NRA). Results for the Antarctic meteorites ALHA77294, TIL 82409, LEW 86015, ALHA77003, and ALH 83108 are presented. Possible sources of terrestrial F are: volcanic exhalation, tephra layers (volcanic glass), continental soil dust, or sea spray. Material from blue-ice dust-band samples also shows concentrations of F that are significantly higher than the bulk concentrations of meteorites. Finally, a quick investigation for Antarctic meteorites by external PIGE is proposed, leading to a F-contamination index that supplements the qualitative ABC-weathering index.

  6. True ternary fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayaraghavan, K. R.; Balasubramaniam, M.; von Oertzen, W.

    2015-04-01

    The study of the ternary fission of nuclei has received new interest recently. It is of general interest for nuclear dynamics, although the process is very rare. In the present work, we discuss the possibilities of true ternary fission (fragment masses A >30 ) in 252Cf for different mass splits. These mass splits are strongly favored in a collinear geometry. Based on the three cluster model (TCM), it is shown that the true ternary fission into fragments with almost equal masses is one of the possible fission modes in 252Cf . For general decays it is shown that the formation of the lightest fragment at the center has the highest probability. Further the formation of tin isotopes and/or other closed shell fragments are favored. For the decay products the presence of closed shell nuclei among the three fragments enhances the decay probabilities.

  7. Fission in a Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Younes, W.

    2016-10-26

    A three-year theory project was undertaken to study the fission process in extreme astrophysical environments, such as the crust of neutron stars. In the first part of the project, the effect of electron screening on the fission process was explored using a microscopic approach. For the first time, these calculations were carried out to the breaking point of the nucleus. In the second part of the project, the population of the fissioning nucleus was calculated within the same microscopic framework. These types of calculations are extremely computer-intensive and have seldom been applied to heavy deformed nuclei, such as fissioning actinides. The results, tools and methodologies produced in this work will be of interest to both the basic-science and nuclear-data communities.

  8. β-delayed fission and α decay of 178Tl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liberati, V.; Andreyev, A. N.; Antalic, S.; Barzakh, A.; Cocolios, T. E.; Elseviers, J.; Fedorov, D.; Fedoseeev, V. N.; Huyse, M.; Joss, D. T.; Kalaninová, Z.; Köster, U.; Lane, J. F. W.; Marsh, B.; Mengoni, D.; Molkanov, P.; Nishio, K.; Page, R. D.; Patronis, N.; Pauwels, D.; Radulov, D.; Seliverstov, M.; Sjödin, M.; Tsekhanovich, I.; Van den Bergh, P.; Van Duppen, P.; Venhart, M.; Veselský, M.

    2013-10-01

    A detailed nuclear-decay spectroscopy study of the neutron-deficient isotope 178Tl has been performed using the highly selective Resonance Ionization Laser Ion Source and ISOLDE mass separator (CERN), which allowed a unique isobarically pure beam of 178Tl to be produced. The first identification of the β-delayed fission of this isotope was made and its probability PβDF(178Tl)=0.15(6)% was determined. An asymmetric fission fragment mass distribution of the daughter isotope 178Hg (populated by the β decay of 178Tl) was deduced based on the measured fission fragment energies. The fine-structure α-decay pattern of 178Tl allowed the low-energy states in the daughter nucleus 174Au to be studied.

  9. Geometric catalysis of membrane fission driven by flexible dynamin rings.

    PubMed

    Shnyrova, Anna V; Bashkirov, Pavel V; Akimov, Sergey A; Pucadyil, Thomas J; Zimmerberg, Joshua; Schmid, Sandra L; Frolov, Vadim A

    2013-03-22

    Biological membrane fission requires protein-driven stress. The guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase) dynamin builds up membrane stress by polymerizing into a helical collar that constricts the neck of budding vesicles. How this curvature stress mediates nonleaky membrane remodeling is actively debated. Using lipid nanotubes as substrates to directly measure geometric intermediates of the fission pathway, we found that GTP hydrolysis limits dynamin polymerization into short, metastable collars that are optimal for fission. Collars as short as two rungs translated radial constriction to reversible hemifission via membrane wedging of the pleckstrin homology domains (PHDs) of dynamin. Modeling revealed that tilting of the PHDs to conform with membrane deformations creates the low-energy pathway for hemifission. This local coordination of dynamin and lipids suggests how membranes can be remodeled in cells.

  10. Microscopic Theory of Fission

    SciTech Connect

    Younes, W.; Gogny, D.

    2008-04-17

    In recent years, the microscopic method has been applied to the notoriously difficult problem of nuclear fission with unprecedented success. In this paper, we discuss some of the achievements and promise of the microscopic method, as embodied in the Hartree-Fock method using the Gogny finite-range effective interaction, and beyond-mean-field extensions to the theory. The nascent program to describe induced fission observables using this approach at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is presented.

  11. What is a low-energy house and who cares?

    SciTech Connect

    Litt, B.R.

    1994-12-01

    Most energy analysts view low-energy houses as good things, yet differ in their expectations of what exactly a low energy house is. There are two intertwining threads to this report. The first is an evaluation of 50 buildings that have been claimed to be low-energy residences, for which monitored energy performance data have been collected. These data represent the preliminary effort in the ongoing update of the Buildings Energy-Use Compilation and Analysis (BECA) data base for new residences. The second thread concerns the definition of a low-energy house. After the elements of a definition are presented, their implications for actors involved in providing housing are identified. Several more tractable definitions are applied to the houses in this compilation. The outcomes illustrate ways in which different interests are served by various definitions. Different definitions can yield very different energy rankings. No single definition of a low-energy house is universally applicable.

  12. The FIDIAS project: Development of a Micromegas TPC for the detection of low-energy heavy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iguaz, Francisco José; Panebianco, Stefano; Axiotis, Michael; Druillole, Frédéric; Fanourakis, George; Geralis, Theodoros; Giomataris, Ioannis; Harissopulos, Sotirios; Lagoyannis, Anastasios; Papaevangelou, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Time Projection Chambers are widely used since many years for tracking and identification of charged particles in high energy physics. We present here a new R&D project, called FIDIAS, meant to investigate the feasibility of a Micromegas TPC for low energy heavy ions detection. In this framework, a TPC prototype based on Micromegas bulk technique has been extensively tested with spontaneous fission source. A deep analysis of the experimental results has been realized leading to a full characterization of the prototype in terms of gain, energy resolution and track reconstruction as a function of three working gas: helium, neon and argon. The encouraging results have also been compared to simulations, showing the Micromegas TPC is a very well suited detector for the detection of heavy ions in nuclear reactions at low energy.

  13. Observation of mass-asymmetric fission of mercury nuclei in heavy ion fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, E.; Hinde, D. J.; Ramachandran, K.; Williams, E.; Dasgupta, M.; Carter, I. P.; Cook, K. J.; Jeung, D. Y.; Luong, D. H.; McNeil, S.; Palshetkar, C. S.; Rafferty, D. C.; Simenel, C.; Wakhle, A.; Khuyagbaatar, J.; Düllmann, Ch. E.; Lommel, B.; Kindler, B.

    2015-06-01

    Background: Mass-asymmetric fission has been observed in low energy fission of 180Hg . Calculations predicted the persistence of asymmetric fission in this region even at excitation energies of 30-40 MeV. Purpose: To investigate fission mass distributions by populating different isotopes of Hg using heavy ion fusion reactions. Methods: Fission fragment mass-angle distributions have been measured for two reactions, 40Ca+142Nd and 13C+182W , populating 182Hg and 195Hg , respectively, using the Heavy Ion Accelerator Facility and CUBE spectrometer at the Australian National University. Measurements were made at beam energies around the capture barrier for the two reactions and mass ratio distributions were obtained using the kinematic reconstruction method. Results: Asymmetric fission has been observed following the population of 182Hg at an excitation energy of 22.8 MeV above the saddle point. A symmetric peaked mass ratio distribution was observed for 195Hg nuclei at a similar excitation energy above the saddle point. Conclusions: Mass-asymmetric fission has been observed in neutron deficient Hg nuclei populated via heavy ion fusion for the first time. The results are consistent with observations from beta-delayed fission measurements and provide a proof-of-principle for expanding experimental studies of the influence of shell effects on the fission processes.

  14. Anomalies in the Charge Yields of Fission Fragments from the ^{238}U(n,f) Reaction.

    PubMed

    Wilson, J N; Lebois, M; Qi, L; Amador-Celdran, P; Bleuel, D; Briz, J A; Carroll, R; Catford, W; De Witte, H; Doherty, D T; Eloirdi, R; Georgiev, G; Gottardo, A; Goasduff, A; Hadyńska-Klęk, K; Hauschild, K; Hess, H; Ingeberg, V; Konstantinopoulos, T; Ljungvall, J; Lopez-Martens, A; Lorusso, G; Lozeva, R; Lutter, R; Marini, P; Matea, I; Materna, T; Mathieu, L; Oberstedt, A; Oberstedt, S; Panebianco, S; Podolyák, Zs; Porta, A; Regan, P H; Reiter, P; Rezynkina, K; Rose, S J; Sahin, E; Seidlitz, M; Serot, O; Shearman, R; Siebeck, B; Siem, S; Smith, A G; Tveten, G M; Verney, D; Warr, N; Zeiser, F; Zielinska, M

    2017-06-02

    Fast-neutron-induced fission of ^{238}U at an energy just above the fission threshold is studied with a novel technique which involves the coupling of a high-efficiency γ-ray spectrometer (MINIBALL) to an inverse-kinematics neutron source (LICORNE) to extract charge yields of fission fragments via γ-γ coincidence spectroscopy. Experimental data and fission models are compared and found to be in reasonable agreement for many nuclei; however, significant discrepancies of up to 600% are observed, particularly for isotopes of Sn and Mo. This indicates that these models significantly overestimate the standard 1 fission mode and suggests that spherical shell effects in the nascent fission fragments are less important for low-energy fast-neutron-induced fission than for thermal neutron-induced fission. This has consequences for understanding and modeling the fission process, for experimental nuclear structure studies of the most neutron-rich nuclei, for future energy applications (e.g., Generation IV reactors which use fast-neutron spectra), and for the reactor antineutrino anomaly.

  15. Anomalies in the Charge Yields of Fission Fragments from the 238U (n ,f ) Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, J. N.; Lebois, M.; Qi, L.; Amador-Celdran, P.; Bleuel, D.; Briz, J. A.; Carroll, R.; Catford, W.; De Witte, H.; Doherty, D. T.; Eloirdi, R.; Georgiev, G.; Gottardo, A.; Goasduff, A.; Hadyńska-Klek, K.; Hauschild, K.; Hess, H.; Ingeberg, V.; Konstantinopoulos, T.; Ljungvall, J.; Lopez-Martens, A.; Lorusso, G.; Lozeva, R.; Lutter, R.; Marini, P.; Matea, I.; Materna, T.; Mathieu, L.; Oberstedt, A.; Oberstedt, S.; Panebianco, S.; Podolyák, Zs.; Porta, A.; Regan, P. H.; Reiter, P.; Rezynkina, K.; Rose, S. J.; Sahin, E.; Seidlitz, M.; Serot, O.; Shearman, R.; Siebeck, B.; Siem, S.; Smith, A. G.; Tveten, G. M.; Verney, D.; Warr, N.; Zeiser, F.; Zielinska, M.

    2017-06-01

    Fast-neutron-induced fission of 238U at an energy just above the fission threshold is studied with a novel technique which involves the coupling of a high-efficiency γ -ray spectrometer (MINIBALL) to an inverse-kinematics neutron source (LICORNE) to extract charge yields of fission fragments via γ -γ coincidence spectroscopy. Experimental data and fission models are compared and found to be in reasonable agreement for many nuclei; however, significant discrepancies of up to 600% are observed, particularly for isotopes of Sn and Mo. This indicates that these models significantly overestimate the standard 1 fission mode and suggests that spherical shell effects in the nascent fission fragments are less important for low-energy fast-neutron-induced fission than for thermal neutron-induced fission. This has consequences for understanding and modeling the fission process, for experimental nuclear structure studies of the most neutron-rich nuclei, for future energy applications (e.g., Generation IV reactors which use fast-neutron spectra), and for the reactor antineutrino anomaly.

  16. Low energy proton beam induces tumor cell apoptosis through reactive oxygen species and activation of caspases

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kheun Byeol; Lee, Jong-Soo; Park, Jin-Woo; Huh, Tae-Lin

    2008-01-01

    Proton beam is useful to target tumor tissue sparing normal cells by allowing precise dose only into tumor cells. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which proton beam induces tumor cell death are still undefined. We irradiated three different tumor cells (LLC, HepG2, and Molt-4) with low energy proton beam (35 MeV) with spread out Bragg peak (SOBP) in vitro, and investigated cell death by MTT or CCK-8 assay at 24 h after irradiation. LLC and HepG2 cells were sensitive to proton beam at over 10 Gy to induce apoptosis whereas Molt-4 showed rather low sensitivity. Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values for the death rate relative to γ-ray were ranged from 1.1 to 2.3 in LLC and HepG2 but from 0.3 to 0.7 in Molt-4 at 11 d after irradiation by colony formation assay. The typical apoptotic nuclear DNA morphological pattern was observed by staining with 4'-6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI). Tiny fragmented DNA was observed in HepG2 but not in Molt-4 by the treatment of proton in apoptotic DNA fragment assay. By FACS analysis after stained with FITC-Annexin-V, early as well as median apoptotic fractions were clearly increased by proton treatment. Proton beam-irradiated tumor cells induced a cleavage of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) and procaspases-3 and -9. Activity of caspases was highly enhanced after proton beam irradiation. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) were significantly increased and N-acetyl cysteine pretreatment restored the apoptotic cell death induced by proton beam. Furthermore, p38 and JNK but not ERK were activated by proton and dominant negative mutants of p38 and JNK revived proton-induced apoptosis, suggesting that p38 and JNK pathway may be activated through ROS to activate apoptosis. In conclusion, our data clearly showed that single treatment of low energy proton beam with SOBP increased ROS and induced cell death of solid tumor cells (LLC and HepG2) in an apoptotic cell death program by the induction of caspases

  17. Parity violation in low-energy neutron-deuteron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Young-Ho; Lazauskas, Rimantas; Gudkov, Vladimir

    2011-01-01

    Parity-violating effects for low-energy elastic neutron deuteron scattering are calculated for Desplanques, Donoghue, and Holstein (DDH) and effective field theory types of weak potentials in a distorted-wave Born approximation, using realistic hadronic strong interaction wave functions, obtained by solving three-body Faddeev equations in configuration space. The resulting relation between physical observables and low-energy constants can be used to fix low-energy constants from experiments. Potential model dependencies of parity-violating effects are discussed.

  18. Parity violation in low-energy neutron-deuteron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Young-Ho; Gudkov, Vladimir; Lazauskas, Rimantas

    2011-01-15

    Parity-violating effects for low-energy elastic neutron deuteron scattering are calculated for Desplanques, Donoghue, and Holstein (DDH) and effective field theory types of weak potentials in a distorted-wave Born approximation, using realistic hadronic strong interaction wave functions, obtained by solving three-body Faddeev equations in configuration space. The resulting relation between physical observables and low-energy constants can be used to fix low-energy constants from experiments. Potential model dependencies of parity-violating effects are discussed.

  19. The Low-Energy Background in XENON1T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Fei; Stein, Alec; Xenon1T Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The XENON1T dark matter direct-detection experiment looks for hypothetical Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs). WIMPs are expected to scatter off xenon nuclei at low energies, so understanding the low-energy background of the detector is crucial. In XENON1T, the background in the WIMP search region is due to radioactive decays stemming from the detector construction materials and impurities in the xenon itself. We show that our predicted low-energy background rate of 10-4events .kg-1 .day-1 .keV-1 matches XENON1T's design goals and is in agreement with the data taken during the commissioning of the detector.

  20. States of low energy on Robertson Walker spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olbermann, Heiner

    2007-10-01

    We construct a new class of physical states of the free Klein Gordon field in Robertson Walker spacetimes. This is done by minimizing the expectation value of smeared stress energy. We get an explicit expression for the state depending on the smearing function. We call it a state of low energy. States of low energy are an improvement of the concept of adiabatic vacua on Robertson Walker spacetimes. The latter are approximations of the former. It is shown that states of low energy are Hadamard states.

  1. Low Energy X-Ray and Electron Interactions within Matter.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-03-01

    0-C3962 HAWAII] UNIV HONOLULU DEPT OF PHYSICS AND AST/RONiOMY FmI SelfLOW ENERGY X-RAY AND ELECTRON INTERACTIONS WITHIN MATTER.1U) 14M a L HEM Ai -79...U UNCLASSIFIED AFMWTI olL E iiEEEEEsoE II,,,,hEEIN Eh~hEhh~hhhmmEEmhEEAhE Xbo R-TE. 8oo194 DV , LOW ENERGY X-RAY AND ELECTRON INTERACTIONS WITHIN...ACCESSION NO 3. RECiPIENT’S CATALOG NUMBER TITLE (and SublIII.) 5. TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERE? LOW ENERGY X-RAY AND ELECTRON INTERACTIONS // Interim A

  2. Determination of Fluorine in Fourteen Microanalytical Geologic Reference Materials using SIMS, EPMA, and Proton Induced Gamma Ray Emission (PIGE) Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guggino, S. N.; Hervig, R. L.

    2010-12-01

    Fluorine (F) is a volatile constituent of magmas and hydrous minerals, and trace amounts of F are incorporated into nominally anhydrous minerals such as olivine and clinopyroxene. Microanalytical techniques are routinely used to measure trace amounts of F at both high sensitivity and high spatial resolution in glasses and crystals. However, there are few well-established F concentrations for the glass standards routinely used in microanalytical laboratories, particularly standards of low silica, basaltic composition. In this study, we determined the F content of fourteen commonly used microanalytical glass standards of basaltic, intermediate, and rhyolitic composition. To serve as calibration standards, five basaltic glasses with ~0.2 to 2.5 wt% F were synthesized and characterized. A natural tholeiite from the East Pacific Rise was mixed with variable amounts of CaF2. The mixture was heated in a 1 atmosphere furnace to 1440 °C at fO2 = NNO for 30 minutes and quenched in water. Portions of the run products were studied by electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). The EPMA used a 15 µm diameter defocused electron beam with a 15 kV accelerating voltage and a 25 nA primary current, a TAP crystal for detecting FKα X-rays, and Biotite 3 as the F standard. The F contents by EPMA agreed with the F added to the basalts after correction for mass loss during melting. The SIMS analyses used a primary beam of 16O- and detection of low-energy negative ions (-5 kV) at a mass resolution that resolved 18OH. Both microanalytical techniques confirmed homogeneity, and the SIMS calibration defined by EPMA shows an excellent linear trend with backgrounds of 2 ppm or less. Analyses of basaltic glass standards based on our synthesized calibration standards gave the following F contents and 2σ errors (ppm): ALV-519 = 83 ± 3; BCR-2G = 359 ± 6; BHVO-2G = 322 ± 15; GSA-1G = 10 ± 1; GSC-1G = 11 ± 1; GSD-1G = 19 ± 2; GSE-1G = 173 ± 1; KL2G (MPI

  3. Modernizing the Fission Basis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonchev, Anton; Henderson, Roger; Schunck, Nicolas; Sroyer, Mark; Vogt, Ramona

    2016-09-01

    In 1939, Niels Bohr and John Wheeler formulated a theory of neutron-induced nuclear fission based on the hypothesis of the compound nucleus. Their theory, the so-called ``Bohr hypothesis,'' is still at the heart of every theoretical fission model today and states that the decay of a compound nucleus for a given excitation energy, spin, and parity is independent of its formation. We propose the first experiment to validate to 1-2% absolute uncertainties the practical consequences of the Bohr hypothesis during induced nuclear fission. We will compare the fission product yields (FPYs) of the same 240Pu compound nucleus produced via two different reactions (i) n+239Pu and (ii) γ+240 Pu. These high-precision FPYs measurements will be extremely beneficial for our fundamental understanding of the nuclear fission process and nuclear reactions from first principles. This work was performed under the auspices of US DOE by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. Funding was provided via the LDRD-ERD-069 project.

  4. Effect of proton irradiation on the normal-state low-energy excitations of Ba (Fe1-xRhx) 2As2 superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moroni, M.; Gozzelino, L.; Ghigo, G.; Tanatar, M. A.; Prozorov, R.; Canfield, P. C.; Carretta, P.

    2017-09-01

    We present a 75As nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and resistivity study of the effect of 5.5 MeV proton irradiation on the optimal electron doped (x =0.068 ) and overdoped (x =0.107 ) Ba (Fe1-xRhx) 2As2 iron based superconductors. While the proton induced defects only mildly suppress the critical temperature and increase residual resistivity in both compositions, sizable broadening of the NMR spectra was observed in all the irradiated samples at low temperature. The effect is significantly stronger in the optimally doped sample where the Curie Weiss temperature dependence of the line width suggests the onset of ferromagnetic correlations coexisting with superconductivity at the nanoscale. 1 /T2 measurements revealed that the energy barrier characterizing the low energy spin fluctuations of these compounds is enhanced upon proton irradiation, suggesting that the defects are likely slowing down the fluctuations between (0 ,π ) and (π ,0) nematic ground states.

  5. Proton-Induced X-Ray Emission Analysis of Crematorium Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Salina; Nadareski, Benjamin; Yoskowitz, Joshua; Labrake, Scott; Vineyard, Michael

    2014-09-01

    There has been considerable debate in recent years about possible mercury emissions from crematoria due to amalgam tooth restorations. We have performed a proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) analysis of aerosol and soil samples taken near the Vale Cemetery Crematorium in Schenectady, NY, to address this concern. The aerosol samples were collected on the roof of the crematorium using a nine-stage, cascade impactor that separates the particulate matter by aerodynamic diameter and deposits it onto thin Kapton foils. The soil samples were collected at several different distances from the crematorium and compressed into pellets with a hydraulic press. The Kapton foils containing the aerosol samples and the soil pellets were bombarded with 2.2-MeV protons from the 1.1-MV tandem Pelletron accelerator in the Union College Ion-Beam Analysis Laboratory. We measured significant concentrations of sulfur, phosphorus, potassium, calcium, and iron, but essentially no mercury in the aerosol samples. The lower limit of detection for airborne mercury in this experiment was approximately 0.2 ng / m3. The PIXE analysis of the soil samples showed the presence of elements commonly found in soil (Si, K, Ca, Ti, Mn, Fe), but no trace of mercury. There has been considerable debate in recent years about possible mercury emissions from crematoria due to amalgam tooth restorations. We have performed a proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) analysis of aerosol and soil samples taken near the Vale Cemetery Crematorium in Schenectady, NY, to address this concern. The aerosol samples were collected on the roof of the crematorium using a nine-stage, cascade impactor that separates the particulate matter by aerodynamic diameter and deposits it onto thin Kapton foils. The soil samples were collected at several different distances from the crematorium and compressed into pellets with a hydraulic press. The Kapton foils containing the aerosol samples and the soil pellets were bombarded with 2.2-Me

  6. Past, present and future low energy antiproton facilities at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartmann, W.; Belochitskii, P.; Breuker, H.; Butin, F.; Carli, C.; Eriksson, T.; Maury, S.; Oelert, W.; Pasinelli, S.; Tranquille, G.

    2014-05-01

    Low energy antiprotons are available for physics experiments at CERN since the 1980s and have been used by a large variety of experiments. The Low Energy Antiproton Ring LEAR has been constructed as a complementary use of antiprotons available at that time for high energy physics and delivered beam to experiments mainly using slow extraction. After completion of LEAR exploitation, the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) was constructed (adaptation of the existing Antiproton Collector, AC) to allow for a simpler low energy antiproton scheme (only one accelerator operated with Antiprotons) with fast extraction well suited for trap experiments. The Extra Low ENergy Antiproton ring ELENA is a small synchrotron presently constructed to further decelerate antiprotons from the AD in a controlled manner, and to reduce emittances with the help of an electron cooler to improve the capture efficiencies of existing experiments and allow for additional ones.

  7. Radial Flux Distribution of Low-Energy Neutrons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higinbotham, J.

    1979-01-01

    Describes an experiment designed to illustrate the basic principle involved in the process of moderation of fast neutrons by water, and the monitoring of the low-energy neutron flux using indium as a probe. (GA)

  8. Biological assessments for the low energy demonstration accelerator, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Cross, S.

    1997-03-01

    This report discusses the biological impact to the area around the Los Alamos National Laboratory of the Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator. In particular the impact to the soils, water quality, vegetation, and wildlife are discussed.

  9. Radial Flux Distribution of Low-Energy Neutrons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higinbotham, J.

    1979-01-01

    Describes an experiment designed to illustrate the basic principle involved in the process of moderation of fast neutrons by water, and the monitoring of the low-energy neutron flux using indium as a probe. (GA)

  10. Beam lifetime and limitations during low-energy RHIC operation

    SciTech Connect

    Fedotov, A.V.; Bai, M.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Fischer, W.; Kayran, D.; Montag, C.; Satogata, T.; Tepikian, S.; Wang, G.

    2011-03-28

    The low-energy physics program at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), motivated by a search for the QCD phase transition critical point, requires operation at low energies. At these energies, large nonlinear magnetic field errors and large beam sizes produce low beam lifetimes. A variety of beam dynamics effects such as Intrabeam Scattering (IBS), space charge and beam-beam forces also contribute. All these effects are important to understand beam lifetime limitations in RHIC at low energies. During the low-energy RHIC physics run in May-June 2010 at beam {gamma} = 6.1 and {gamma} = 4.1, gold beam lifetimes were measured for various values of space-charge tune shifts, transverse acceptance limitation by collimators, synchrotron tunes and RF voltage. This paper summarizes our observations and initial findings.

  11. Evidence for bimodal fission in the heaviest elements

    SciTech Connect

    Hulet, E.K.

    1987-12-10

    We have measured the mass and kinetic-energy partitioning in the spontaneous fission of five heavy nuclides: /sup 258/Fm, /sup 259/Md, /sup 260/Md, /sup 258/No, and /sup 260/(104). Each was produced by heavy-ion reactions with either /sup 248/Cm, /sup 249/Bk, or /sup 254/Es targets. Energies of correlated fragments from the isotopes with millisecond half lives, /sup 258/No and /sup 260/(104), were measured on-line by a special rotating-wheel instrument, while the others were determined off-line after mass separation. All fissioned with mass distributions that were symmetric. Total-kinetic-energy distributions peaked near either 200 or 235 MeV. Surprisingly, because only a single Gaussian energy distribution had been observed previously in actinide fission, these energy distributions were skewed upward or downward from the peak in each case, except for /sup 260/(104), indicating a composite of two energy distributions. We were able to fit accurately two Gaussian curves to the gross energy distributions from the four remaining nuclides. From the multiple TKE distributions and the shapes of the mass distributions, we conclude that there is a low-energy fission component with liquid-drop characteristics which is admixed with a much higher-energy component due to closed fragment shells. We now have further evidence for this conclusion from measurements of the neutron multiplicity in the spontaneous fission of /sup 260/Md.

  12. Evidence for bimodal fission in the heaviest elements

    SciTech Connect

    Hulet, E.K.; Wild, J.F.; Lougheed, R.W.; Dougan, R.J.; Landrum, J.H.; Dougan, A.D.; Schaedel, M.; Hahn, R.L.; Baisden, P.A.; Henderson, C.M.

    1987-08-01

    We have measured the mass and kinetic-energy partitioning in the spontaneous fission of five heavy nuclides: /sup 258/Fm, /sup 259/Md, /sup 260/Md /sup 258/No, and /sup 260/(104). Each was produced by heavy-ion reactions with either /sup 248/Cm, /sup 249/Bk, or /sup 254/Es targets. Energies of correlated fragments from the isotopes with millisecond half lives, /sup 258/No and /sup 260/(104), were measured on-line by a special rotating-wheel instrument, while the others were determined off-line after mass separation. All fissioned with mass distributions that were symmetric. Total-kinetic-energy distributions peaked near either 200 or 235 MeV. Surprisingly, because only a single Gaussian energy distribution had been observed previously in actinide fission, these energy distributions were skewed upward or downward from the peak in each case, except for /sup 260/(104), indicating a composite of two energy distributions. We were able to fit accurately two Gaussian curves to the gross energy distributions from the four remaining nuclides. From the multiple TKE distributions and the shapes of the mass distributions, we conclude that there is a low-energy fission component with liquid-drop characteristics which is admixed with a much higher-energy component due to closed fragment shells. We now have further evidence for this conclusion from measurements of the neutron multiplicity in the spontaneous fission of /sup 260/Md. 25 refs., 9 figs.

  13. Fission Product Library and Resource

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, J. T.; Padgett, S.

    2016-09-29

    Fission product yields can be extracted from an irradiated sample by performing gamma ray spectroscopy on the whole sample post irradiation. There are several pitfalls to avoid when trying to determine a specific isotope's fission product yield.

  14. Low-energy triggering for Hyper-Kamiokande

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dealtry, T.; Barr, G.; Dewhurst, D.; Nicholls, T.; Nova, F.; O’Keeffe, H. M.; Richards, B.; Short, S.; Stewart, T.; Hyper-Kamiokande proto-collaboration

    2017-09-01

    Hyper-Kamiokande is a proposed neutrino physics and proton decay experiment in Japan, due to start operations in 2026. In order to successfully achieve the low-energy (≲10 MeV) physics aims, a dedicated high-efficiency low-energy trigger is required. The test vertices trigger can, for a fixed noise trigger rate, reduce the electron energy trigger threshold by ∼2 MeV, compared with the simple NHITS trigger.

  15. Surface Passivation and Junction Formation Using Low Energy Hydrogen Implants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fonash, S. J.

    1985-01-01

    New applications for high current, low energy hydrogen ion implants on single crystal and polycrystal silicon grain boundaries are discussed. The effects of low energy hydrogen ion beams on crystalline Si surfaces are considered. The effect of these beams on bulk defects in crystalline Si is addressed. Specific applications of H+ implants to crystalline Si processing are discussed. In all of the situations reported on, the hydrogen beams were produced using a high current Kaufman ion source.

  16. Strong flux of low-energy neutrons produced by thunderstorms.

    PubMed

    Gurevich, A V; Antonova, V P; Chubenko, A P; Karashtin, A N; Mitko, G G; Ptitsyn, M O; Ryabov, V A; Shepetov, A L; Shlyugaev, Yu V; Vildanova, L I; Zybin, K P

    2012-03-23

    We report here for the first time about the registration of an extraordinary high flux of low-energy neutrons generated during thunderstorms. The measured neutron count rate enhancements are directly connected with thunderstorm discharges. The low-energy neutron flux value obtained in our work is a challenge for the photonuclear channel of neutron generation in thunderstorm: the estimated value of the needed high-energy γ-ray flux is about 3 orders of magnitude higher than that one observed.

  17. The Trapping of Low-Energy Particles by Interplanetary Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Dayeh, M.; Dwyer, J.; Rassoul, H.; Mason, G.; Mazur, J.; Desai, M.

    2007-12-01

    Using ~0.045-10 MeV/nucleon ion data from ACE/ULEIS, we have found that a substantial number of shock- associated solar energetic particle events (20 events) have significant delays in the arrival of the low-energy component beyond what is expected from the travel time of energetic particles from the sun to the earth at 1 AU. Indeed, for some events, after correcting for the velocity dispersion, the low energy component (E < 0.1 MeV/nucleon) is almost completely absent while the high-energy component (E > 1 MeV/nucleon) has very large enhancements. SEP events with the most dramatic initial depletion of low-energy particles are accompanied by large proton fluxes and have large enhancements of the low-energy particles later, in coincidence with the arrival of the interplanetary shock, a day or two after the start of the event. In addition, these events show Fe/O enhancements during the periods in which the low-energy component is depleted and lower Fe/O values once the shock arrives. These new observations appear to be explained by the trapping of particles with low energy-to-charge (E/Q) ratios in the vicinity of the shock by magnetohydrodynamic waves, possibly generated by high energy protons streaming along the magnetic field lines.

  18. Process for treating fission waste

    DOEpatents

    Rohrmann, Charles A.; Wick, Oswald J.

    1983-01-01

    A method is described for the treatment of fission waste. A glass forming agent, a metal oxide, and a reducing agent are mixed with the fission waste and the mixture is heated. After melting, the mixture separates into a glass phase and a metal phase. The glass phase may be used to safely store the fission waste, while the metal phase contains noble metals recovered from the fission waste.

  19. Fission modelling with FIFRELIN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litaize, Olivier; Serot, Olivier; Berge, Léonie

    2015-12-01

    The nuclear fission process gives rise to the formation of fission fragments and emission of particles (n,γ , e-) . The particle emission from fragments can be prompt and delayed. We present here the methods used in the FIFRELIN code, which simulates the prompt component of the de-excitation process. The methods are based on phenomenological models associated with macroscopic and/or microscopic ingredients. Input data can be provided by experiment as well as by theory. The fission fragment de-excitation can be performed within Weisskopf (uncoupled neutron and gamma emission) or a Hauser-Feshbach (coupled neutron/gamma emission) statistical theory. We usually consider five free parameters that cannot be provided by theory or experiments in order to describe the initial distributions required by the code. In a first step this set of parameters is chosen to reproduce a very limited set of target observables. In a second step we can increase the statistics to predict all other fission observables such as prompt neutron, gamma and conversion electron spectra but also their distributions as a function of any kind of parameters such as, for instance, the neutron, gamma and electron number distributions, the average prompt neutron multiplicity as a function of fission fragment mass, charge or kinetic energy, and so on. Several results related to different fissioning systems are presented in this work. The goal in the next decade will be i) to replace some macroscopic ingredients or phenomenological models by microscopic calculations when available and reliable, ii) to be a support for experimentalists in the design of detection systems or in the prediction of necessary beam time or count rates with associated statistics when measuring fragments and emitted particle in coincidence iii) extend the model to be able to run a calculation when no experimental input data are available, iv) account for multiple chance fission and gamma emission before fission, v) account for the

  20. Uncertainties in nuclear fission data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talou, Patrick; Kawano, Toshihiko; Chadwick, Mark B.; Neudecker, Denise; Rising, Michael E.

    2015-03-01

    We review the current status of our knowledge of nuclear fission data, and quantify uncertainties related to each fission observable whenever possible. We also discuss the roles that theory and experiment play in reducing those uncertainties, contributing to the improvement of our fundamental understanding of the nuclear fission process as well as of evaluated nuclear data libraries used in nuclear applications.

  1. Student Experiments in Spontaneous Fission.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becchetti, F. D.; Ying, J. S.

    1981-01-01

    Advanced undergraduate experiments utilizing a commercially available, thin spontaneous fission source are described, including studies of the energy and mass distribution of the fission fragments and their energy and angular correlation. The experiments provide a useful introduction to fission, nuclear mass equations, heavy-ion physics, and…

  2. Student Experiments in Spontaneous Fission.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becchetti, F. D.; Ying, J. S.

    1981-01-01

    Advanced undergraduate experiments utilizing a commercially available, thin spontaneous fission source are described, including studies of the energy and mass distribution of the fission fragments and their energy and angular correlation. The experiments provide a useful introduction to fission, nuclear mass equations, heavy-ion physics, and…

  3. Investigation of proton induced reactions on niobium at low and medium energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ditrói, F.; Hermanne, A.; Corniani, E.; Takács, S.; Tárkányi, F.; Csikai, J.; Shubin, Yu. N.

    2009-10-01

    Niobium is a metal with important technological applications: use as alloying element to increase strength of super alloys, as thin layer for tribological applications, as superconductive material, in high temperature engineering systems, etc. In the frame of a systematic study of activation cross-sections of charged particle induced reactions on structural materials proton induced excitation functions on Nb targets were determined with the aim of applications in accelerator and reactor technology and for thin layer activation (TLA). The charged particle activation cross-sections on this element are also important for yield calculation of medical isotope production ( 88,89Zr, 86,87,88Y) and for dose estimation in PET targetry. As niobium is a monoisotopic element it is an ideal target material to test nuclear reaction theories. We present here the experimental excitation functions of 93Nb(p,x) 90,93mMo, 92m,91m,90Nb, 88,89Zr and 88Y in the energy range 0-37 MeV. The results were compared with the theoretical cross-sections calculated by means of the code ALICE-IPPE, EMPIRE-3, TALYS and with the literature data. The theory reproduces the shape of the measured results well and magnitude is also acceptable. Thick target yields calculated from our fitted cross-section give reliable estimations for production of medically relevant radioisotopes and for dose estimation in accelerator technology.

  4. Proton-induces and x-ray induced fluorescence analysis of scoliotic tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Panessa-Warren, B J; Kraner, H W; Jones, K W; Weiss, L S

    1980-02-01

    Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis is characterized by a curvature or assymetry of the spine which may become progressively more severe, with clinical symptoms appearing just prior to, or during, puberty. The incidence for scoliosis in the age group from 12 to 14 years of age has been reported as high as 8 to 10%, with more than 80% of the cases occurring in females. Although pathologic changes exist in muscles from both sides of the spinal curvature, and no statistically significant side differences have been reported, morphologic changes suggest that the concanve side is the most affected. This paper reports our preliminary data on the elemental composition of individual muscle fibers derived from convex, concave and gluteal scoliotic muscle, and erythrocytes from scoliotic and normal patients, analyzed by proton induced x-ray emission (PIXE) and x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF). A new type of specimen holder was designed for this study which offers low x-ray background, minimal absorption and maintenance of a moist environment around the specimen.

  5. Determination of Se in soil samples using the proton induced X-ray emission technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruvinel, Paulo E.; Flocchini, Robert G.

    1993-04-01

    An alternative method for the direct determination of total Se in soil samples is presented. A large number of trace elements is present in soil at concentration values in the range of part per billion and tenths of parts of million. The most common are the trace elements of Al, Si, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Fe, Cu, Zn, Br, Rb, Mo, Cd and Pb. As for biological samples many of these elements are of great importance for the nutrition of plants, while others are toxic and others have an unknown role. Selenium is an essential micronutrient for humans and animals but it is also known that in certain areas Se deficiency or toxicity has caused endemic disease to livestock and humans through the soil-plant-animal linkage. In this work the suitability of the proton induced X-ray emission (PIXE) technique as a fast and nondestructive technique useful to measure total the Se content in soil samples is demonstrated. To validate the results a comparison of data collected using the conventional atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS) method was performed.

  6. Characterization of lacustrine iron sulfide particles with proton-induced X-ray emission

    SciTech Connect

    Davison, W. ); Grime, G.W. ); Woof, C. )

    1992-12-01

    Black particles, collected by filtration (1.2-[mu] pore size) from the anoxic waters of a soft-water lake, were examined by a scanning proton microprobe which permitted quantitative elemental analysis by proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) and Rutherford backscattering (RBS). There was a uniform distribution of sulfur across the filter, but Fe, and to a lesser extent, Mn, was localized in [approximately]5-[mu]m diameter clusters. Elemental analysis with 1-[mu]m-diameter beams revealed that the Fe clusters were mainly comprised of iron oxides. Iron sulfide material not in the Fe clusters had stoichiometric proportions of Fe[sub 1.0]S[sub 0.60]P[sub 0.60]Ca[sub 0.24]K[sub 0.14]. Although a purely biogenic origin for P, Ca, and K cannot be ruled out, the composition is consistent with the particles originating as authigenic iron oxides which react with sulfide as they sink through the water column. The iron sulfide particles are richer in Cu (4,000 ppm) and Zn (6,000 ppm) than the iron oxides, suggesting that these elements are also concentrated as their insoluble sulfides. The coexistence of iron oxides and sulfides indicates that either the supply of sulfide is limiting or that some iron oxide particles are unreactive. 20 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Yield from Proton-Induced Reaction on Light Element Isotopes in the Hydrogen Plasma Focus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udovičić, V.; Dragić, A.; Banjanac, R.; Joković, D.; Veselinović, N.; Aničin, I.; Savić, M.; Puzović, J.

    2011-12-01

    The high Q-value of some (p,α) fusion reactions is very important in the investigation that can lead to power production with controlled fusion using advanced fuels (hydrogen-lithium-7, hydrogen-boron-11). For this reason, it is crucial to know the rates of these fusion reactions. Unfortunately, in the fusion machines such as plasma focus device, the interaction energy is usually far below the Coulomb barrier. Because of that, direct measurements of the relevant reaction cross sections are practically impossible. A few different indirect approaches have been proposed. In this work the Trojan Horse Method (THM) will be described. On the basis of the results obtained from the THM method and data, which are well-known from our previous work (Banjanac et al. in Radiat Meas 40:483-485, 2005), the reaction rate for proton-induced reaction 7Li(p,α)α produced in the hydrogen plasma focus is calculated. This calculation will be compared with the measurements of α particles production rate using CR-39 detectors.

  8. Anomalies in the Charge Yields of Fission Fragments from the U(n,f)238 Reaction

    DOE PAGES

    Wilson, J. N.; Lebois, M.; Qi, L.; ...

    2017-06-01

    Fast-neutron-induced fission of 238U at an energy just above the fission threshold is studied with a novel technique which involves the coupling of a high-efficiency γ-ray spectrometer (MINIBALL) to an inverse-kinematics neutron source (LICORNE) to extract charge yields of fission fragments via γ-γ coincidence spectroscopy. Experimental data and fission models are compared and found to be in reasonable agreement for many nuclei; however, significant discrepancies of up to 600% are observed, particularly for isotopes of Sn and Mo. This indicates that these models significantly overestimate the standard 1 fission mode and suggests that spherical shell effects in the nascent fissionmore » fragments are less important for low-energy fast-neutron-induced fission than for thermal neutron-induced fission. Finally, this has consequences for understanding and modeling the fission process, for experimental nuclear structure studies of the most neutron-rich nuclei, for future energy applications (e.g., Generation IV reactors which use fast-neutron spectra), and for the reactor antineutrino anomaly.« less

  9. Measurement and Simulation of the Variation in Proton-Induced Energy Deposition in Large Silicon Diode Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howe, Christina L.; Weller, Robert A.; Reed, Robert A.; Sierawski, Brian D.; Marshall, Paul W.; Marshall, Cheryl J.; Mendenhall, Marcus H.; Schrimpf, Ronald D.

    2007-01-01

    The proton induced charge deposition in a well characterized silicon P-i-N focal plane array is analyzed with Monte Carlo based simulations. These simulations include all physical processes, together with pile up, to accurately describe the experimental data. Simulation results reveal important high energy events not easily detected through experiment due to low statistics. The effects of each physical mechanism on the device response is shown for a single proton energy as well as a full proton space flux.

  10. Elastocapillary Instability in Mitochondrial Fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Rodriguez, David; Sart, Sébastien; Babataheri, Avin; Tareste, David; Barakat, Abdul I.; Clanet, Christophe; Husson, Julien

    2015-08-01

    Mitochondria are dynamic cell organelles that constantly undergo fission and fusion events. These dynamical processes, which tightly regulate mitochondrial morphology, are essential for cell physiology. Here we propose an elastocapillary mechanical instability as a mechanism for mitochondrial fission. We experimentally induce mitochondrial fission by rupturing the cell's plasma membrane. We present a stability analysis that successfully explains the observed fission wavelength and the role of mitochondrial morphology in the occurrence of fission events. Our results show that the laws of fluid mechanics can describe mitochondrial morphology and dynamics.

  11. Spontaneous fission properties of sup 258 Fm, sup 259 Md, sup 260 Md, sup 258 No, and sup 260 (104): Bimodal fission

    SciTech Connect

    Hulet, E.K.; Wild, J.F.; Dougan, R.J.; Lougheed, R.W.; Landrum, J.H.; Dougan, A.D.; Baisden, P.A.; Henderson, C.M.; Dupzyk, R.J. ); Hahn, R.L.; and others

    1989-08-01

    We have measured the mass and kinetic-energy distributions from the spontaneous fission of {sup 258}Fm, {sup 258}No, {sup 259}Md, {sup 260}Md, and {sup 260}(104). All are observed to fission with a symmetrical division of mass. The total-kinetic-energy distributions strongly deviated from the Gaussian shape characteristically found in the fission of all other actinides. When the total-kinetic-energy distributions are resolved into two Gaussians, the constituent peaks lie near 200 and 233 MeV. We conclude that both low- and high-energy fission modes occur in four of the five nuclides studied. We call this property bimodal fission.'' Even though both modes are possible in the same nuclide, one generally predominates. We offer an explanation for each mode based on shell structures of the fissioning nucleus and of its fragments. The appearance of both modes of fission in this region of the nuclide chart seems to be a coincidence in that the opportunity to divide into near doubly magic Sn fragments occurs in the same region where the second fission barrier is expected to drop in energy below the ground state of the fissioning nucleus. Appropriate paths on the potential-energy surface of deformation have been found by theorists, but no physical grounds have been advanced that would allow the near equal populations we observe traveling each path. We suggest that this failure to find a reason for somewhat equal branching may be a fundamental flaw of current fission models. Assuming the proposed origins of these modes are correct, we conclude the low-energy, but also mass-symmetrical mode is likely to extend to far heavier nuclei. The high-energy mode will be restricted to a smaller region, a realm of nuclei defined by the proximity of the fragments to the strong neutron and proton shells in {sup 132}Sn.

  12. Membrane fission by protein crowding.

    PubMed

    Snead, Wilton T; Hayden, Carl C; Gadok, Avinash K; Zhao, Chi; Lafer, Eileen M; Rangamani, Padmini; Stachowiak, Jeanne C

    2017-04-18

    Membrane fission, which facilitates compartmentalization of biological processes into discrete, membrane-bound volumes, is essential for cellular life. Proteins with specific structural features including constricting rings, helical scaffolds, and hydrophobic membrane insertions are thought to be the primary drivers of fission. In contrast, here we report a mechanism of fission that is independent of protein structure-steric pressure among membrane-bound proteins. In particular, random collisions among crowded proteins generate substantial pressure, which if unbalanced on the opposite membrane surface can dramatically increase membrane curvature, leading to fission. Using the endocytic protein epsin1 N-terminal homology domain (ENTH), previously thought to drive fission by hydrophobic insertion, our results show that membrane coverage correlates equally with fission regardless of the hydrophobicity of insertions. Specifically, combining FRET-based measurements of membrane coverage with multiple, independent measurements of membrane vesiculation revealed that fission became spontaneous as steric pressure increased. Further, fission efficiency remained equally potent when helices were replaced by synthetic membrane-binding motifs. These data challenge the view that hydrophobic insertions drive membrane fission, suggesting instead that the role of insertions is to anchor proteins strongly to membrane surfaces, amplifying steric pressure. In line with these conclusions, even green fluorescent protein (GFP) was able to drive fission efficiently when bound to the membrane at high coverage. Our conclusions are further strengthened by the finding that intrinsically disordered proteins, which have large hydrodynamic radii yet lack a defined structure, drove fission with substantially greater potency than smaller, structured proteins.

  13. Radioactive beams from Californium fission at the CARIBU facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savard, Guy; Pardo, Richard; Baker, Sam; Davids, Cary; Peterson, Don; Phillips, Don; Vondrasek, Rick; Zabransky, Bruce; Zinkann, Gary

    2009-10-01

    The Californium Rare Ion Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) of the ATLAS superconducting linac facility aims at providing low energy and reaccelerated neutron-rich radioactive beams to address key nuclear physics and astrophysics questions. These beams are obtained from fission fragments of a 1 Ci ^252Cf source, thermalized and collected into a low-energy particle beam by a helium gas catcher, mass analyzed by an isobar separator, and charge breed to higher charge states for acceleration in ATLAS. The method described is fast and universal and short-lived isotope yield scale essentially with Californium fission yields. Expected intensities of reaccelerated beams are up to ˜5x10^5 (10^7 at low energy) far-from-stability ions per second on target. Initial commissioning is being performed with weaker 2.5 and 80 mCi sources. Commissioning results, together with the nuclear physics and astrophysics program that will be pursued with the neutron-rich beams made available, will be presented. Plans for installation of the 1 Ci source will be discussed.

  14. Coulomb effects in low-energy nuclear fragmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John W.; Chun, Sang Y.; Badavi, Francis F.; John, Sarah

    1993-01-01

    Early versions of the Langley nuclear fragmentation code NUCFRAG (and a publicly released version called HZEFRG1) assumed straight-line trajectories throughout the interaction. As a consequence, NUCFRAG and HZEFRG1 give unrealistic cross sections for large mass removal from the projectile and target at low energies. A correction for the distortion of the trajectory by the nuclear Coulomb fields is used to derive fragmentation cross sections. A simple energy-loss term is applied to estimate the energy downshifts that greatly alter the Coulomb trajectory at low energy. The results, which are far more realistic than prior versions of the code, should provide the data base for future transport calculations. The systematic behavior of charge-removal cross sections compares favorably with results from low-energy experiments.

  15. Electric and Magnetic Dipole Strength at Low Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sieja, K.

    2017-08-01

    A low-energy enhancement of radiative strength functions was deduced from recent experiments in several mass regions of nuclei, which is believed to impact considerably the calculated neutron capture rates. In this Letter we investigate the behavior of the low-energy γ -ray strength of the Sc 44 isotope, for the first time taking into account both electric and magnetic dipole contributions obtained coherently in the same theoretical approach. The calculations are performed using the large-scale shell-model framework in a full 1 ℏω s d -p f -g d s model space. Our results corroborate previous theoretical findings for the low-energy enhancement of the M 1 strength but show quite different behavior for the E 1 strength.

  16. The problem of low energy particle measurements in the magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whipple, E. C., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    The accurate measurement of low energy (less than 100 eV) particle properties in the magnetosphere has been difficult, partly because of the low density of such particles, but more particularly because of spacecraft interference effects. Some early examples of how these phenomena have affected particle measurements on an OGO spacecraft are presented. Data obtained with the UCSD particle detectors on ATS-6 are then presented showing how some of these difficulties have been partially overcome. Future measurements of low energy particles in the magnetosphere can be improved by: (1) improving the low energy resolution of detectors; (2) building electrostatically clean spacecraft; (3) controlling spacecraft potential; and (4) using auxiliary measurements, particularly wave data.

  17. EVOLUTION OF THE CRAB NEBULA IN A LOW ENERGY SUPERNOVA

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Haifeng; Chevalier, Roger A. E-mail: rac5x@virginia.edu

    2015-06-20

    The nature of the supernova leading to the Crab Nebula has long been controversial because of the low energy that is present in the observed nebula. One possibility is that there is significant energy in extended fast material around the Crab but searches for such material have not led to detections. An electron capture supernova model can plausibly account for the low energy and the observed abundances in the Crab. Here, we examine the evolution of the Crab pulsar wind nebula inside a freely expanding supernova and find that the observed properties are most consistent with a low energy event. Both the velocity and radius of the shell material, and the amount of gas swept up by the pulsar wind point to a low explosion energy (∼10{sup 50} erg). We do not favor a model in which circumstellar interaction powers the supernova luminosity near maximum light because the required mass would limit the freely expanding ejecta.

  18. Evolution of the Crab Nebula in a Low Energy Supernova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Haifeng; Chevalier, Roger A.

    2015-06-01

    The nature of the supernova leading to the Crab Nebula has long been controversial because of the low energy that is present in the observed nebula. One possibility is that there is significant energy in extended fast material around the Crab but searches for such material have not led to detections. An electron capture supernova model can plausibly account for the low energy and the observed abundances in the Crab. Here, we examine the evolution of the Crab pulsar wind nebula inside a freely expanding supernova and find that the observed properties are most consistent with a low energy event. Both the velocity and radius of the shell material, and the amount of gas swept up by the pulsar wind point to a low explosion energy (∼1050 erg). We do not favor a model in which circumstellar interaction powers the supernova luminosity near maximum light because the required mass would limit the freely expanding ejecta.

  19. Low-energy neutral-current neutrino scattering on nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Tsakstara, V.; Kosmas, T. S.; Wambach, J.

    2011-12-16

    Inelastic cross-sections of neutral current neutrino scattering on the {sup 40}Ar isotope, detector-medium of the ongoing ICARUS experiment, are computed in the context of the quasi-particle random phase approximation by utilizing realistic two-nucleon forces. ICARUS is a multipurpose neutrino physics experiment that includes in its objectives low-energy neutrino detection. The incoming neutrino energy range adopted in our calculations ({epsilon}{sub {nu}}{<=}100 MeV), covers the laboratory low-energy beta-beam-neutrinos and pion-muon stopped neutrino-beams operating or planned to be conducted at future neutron spallation sources. One of the main goals of these neutrino beams is to measure neutrino-nucleus cross sections at low-energies.

  20. Light element production by low energy nuclei from massive stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vangioni-Flam, E.; Casse, M.; Ramaty, R.

    1997-01-01

    The Orion complex is a source of gamma rays attributed to the de-excitation of fast carbon and oxygen nuclei excited through interactions with ambient hydrogen and helium. This has consequences for the production and evolution of light isotopes in the Galaxy, as massive stars appear as prolific sources of C-O rich low energy nuclei. The different stages of massive star evolution are considered in relation to the acceleration of nuclei to moderate energies. It is concluded that the low energy nuclear component originating from massive stars plays a larger role than the usual Galactic cosmic rays in shaping the evolution of Li-6, Be-9, B-10 and B-11, especially in the early Galactic evolution. The enhancement of the B-11/B-10 ratio observed in meteorites and in the interstellar medium is attributed to the interaction of low energy carbon nuclei with ambient H and to a lesser degree, to neutrino spallation.

  1. Low-energy physics of high-temperature superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Emery, V.J. . Physics Dept.); Kivelson, S.A. . Dept. of Physics)

    1992-01-01

    It is argued that the low-energy properties of high temperature superconductors are dominated by the interaction between the mobile holes and a particular class of collective modes, corresponding to local large-amplitude low-energy fluctuations in the hole density. The latter are a consequence of the competition between the effects of long-range Coulomb interactions and the tendency of a low concentration of holes in an antiferromagnet to phase separate. The low-energy behavior of the system is governed by the same fixed point as the two-channel Kondo problem, which accounts for the universality'' of the properties of the cuprate superconductors. Predictions of the optical properties and the spin dynamics are compared with experiment. The pairing resonance of the two Kondo problem gives a mechanism of high temperature superconductivity with an unconventional symmetry of the order parameter.

  2. Low-energy physics of high-temperature superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Emery, V.J.; Kivelson, S.A.

    1992-09-01

    It is argued that the low-energy properties of high temperature superconductors are dominated by the interaction between the mobile holes and a particular class of collective modes, corresponding to local large-amplitude low-energy fluctuations in the hole density. The latter are a consequence of the competition between the effects of long-range Coulomb interactions and the tendency of a low concentration of holes in an antiferromagnet to phase separate. The low-energy behavior of the system is governed by the same fixed point as the two-channel Kondo problem, which accounts for the ``universality`` of the properties of the cuprate superconductors. Predictions of the optical properties and the spin dynamics are compared with experiment. The pairing resonance of the two Kondo problem gives a mechanism of high temperature superconductivity with an unconventional symmetry of the order parameter.

  3. Calculation of astrophysical S factor at low energy levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andic, Halil Ibrahim; Ozer, Okan

    2017-02-01

    Nuclear reactions are very important for the structure, evolution, nucleosynthesis and various observational manifestations of main-sequence stars, white dwarfs and neutron stars. For astrophysical applications, one needs to know value of S-factor for many reactions at low energies. The experimental measurements of cross-sections at such low energies are essentially not easily available since the Coulomb barrier. Theoretical calculations are model dependent, so that nuclear physics uncertainties of calculated S-factor can be substantial. Using the supersymmetric quantum mechanics one can obtain the supersymmetric partner potential that can vary by several orders of magnitude in the energy range of a given reaction in the calculation of S factor. Since the determination of reaction rates requires accurate values of cross sections at very low energies, then in order to eliminate the main part of the energy dependence of these cross sections one makes use of the astrophysical S-factor in Taylor Expansion series about zero-energy.

  4. Spectroscopy of Light Nuclei with Low Energy Nuclear Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombardo, I.; Dell'Aquila, D.; Vigilante, M.

    2016-07-01

    We discuss new results concerning the investigation of the 19F(p,α 0)16O and 10B(p,α 0)7Be reactions at low energies. Both reactions are important for the nuclear spectroscopy of the formed compound nucleus, i.e. 20Ne and 11C respectively, and play a role in nuclear astrophysics. For the 10B(p,α 0)7Be case, a comprehensive analysis of our reaction data and other scattering data points out the possible presence of an unreported state in 11C at Ex ≈ 9.36 MeV. For the 19F(p,α 0)16O case, the study of the low energy angular distributions testifies the role played by low energy resonances in the S-factor, leading to an enhanced reaction rate at stellar energies.

  5. Low energy particle composition. [cosmic rays produced in solar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gloeckler, G.

    1975-01-01

    A review is given of current knowledge of low-energy cosmic ray particles produced in the solar system. It is argued that the notion that the sun alone can accelerate particles in the solar system must be abandoned in light of evidence that Jupiter and earth may be sources of observed low-energy particles. Measurements of the composition and energy spectra of low-energy particles during quiet times are examined, emphasizing the abundance of protons and helium and of anomalous N, O, and Ne. The abundance of heavy particles (B, C, N, O, Ne, Ca and Fe) of unknown origin in the earth magnetosphere is examined. Reported observations of Jovian electrons are discussed and solar particle events with anomalous compositions (He-3 rich events and Fe rich events) are treated in detail. Nuclear abundances of solar particles, emphasizing their temporal and spatial variations are considered together with the nature of nuclear reaction products in solar flares.

  6. Low energy analyzing powers in pion-proton elastic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, R.; Cröni, M.; Bilger, R.; van den Brandt, B.; Breitschopf, J.; Clement, H.; Comfort, J. R.; Denz, H.; Erhardt, A.; Föhl, K.; Friedman, E.; Gräter, J.; Hautle, P.; Hofman, G. J.; Konter, J. A.; Mango, S.; Pätzold, J.; Pavan, M. M.; Wagner, G. J.; von Wrochem, F.

    2004-05-01

    Analyzing powers of pion-proton elastic scattering have been measured at PSI with the Low Energy Pion Spectrometer LEPS and a novel polarized scintillator target. Angular distributions between 40 and 120 deg (c.m.) were taken at 45.2, 51.2, 57.2, 68.5, 77.2, and 87.2 MeV incoming pion kinetic energy for π+p scattering, and at 67.3 and 87.2 MeV for π-p scattering. These new measurements constitute a substantial extension of the polarization data base at low energies. Predictions from phase shift analyses are compared with the experimental results, and deviations are observed at low energies.

  7. Light element production by low energy nuclei from massive stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vangioni-Flam, E.; Casse, M.; Ramaty, R.

    1997-01-01

    The Orion complex is a source of gamma rays attributed to the de-excitation of fast carbon and oxygen nuclei excited through interactions with ambient hydrogen and helium. This has consequences for the production and evolution of light isotopes in the Galaxy, as massive stars appear as prolific sources of C-O rich low energy nuclei. The different stages of massive star evolution are considered in relation to the acceleration of nuclei to moderate energies. It is concluded that the low energy nuclear component originating from massive stars plays a larger role than the usual Galactic cosmic rays in shaping the evolution of Li-6, Be-9, B-10 and B-11, especially in the early Galactic evolution. The enhancement of the B-11/B-10 ratio observed in meteorites and in the interstellar medium is attributed to the interaction of low energy carbon nuclei with ambient H and to a lesser degree, to neutrino spallation.

  8. Low energy impact detection on carbon fiber reinforced materials

    SciTech Connect

    Gros, X.E.

    1995-03-01

    Impact damages, even of small magnitude, affect the mechanical properties of a composite material by reducing its structural integrity. Low energy impacts are not always visible to the naked eye, and they need to be accurately localized for safety and quality reasons. The results of low energy impact detection (0.5--6.0 J) on carbon fiber reinforced materials, carried out with four different NDT techniques--visual, infrared, X-rays, and eddy current--are presented in this paper. Probability of detection (POD) curves are plotted to compare the potential of each technique in regards to carbon fiber reinforced materials. Inspection results have shown that eddy currents are well suited to detect and quantify low energy impacts in carbon fiber composites.

  9. Nondestructive low-energy photon analysis of environmental samples

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, I.L.; Cutshall, N.H.; Olsen, C.R.

    1984-01-01

    Low-energy photons that accompany the decay of alpha- or beta-emitting radionuclides (e.g., /sup 241/Am, /sup 210/Pb, and /sup 238/U-/sup 234/Th) may be used to quantify concentrations of these radionuclides in environmental samples. Previous attempts to quantify these low-energy photons have had limited success because of the uncertainty associated with photon attenuation in samples of variable matrix composition. A method for directly measuring and applying the self-absorption correction factor is presented. Results obtained by this nondestructive technique for counting low-energy photons are in agreement with values obtained from intracalibrated samples using radiochemical separations and alpha or beta analysis. 8 references, 1 figure, 3 tables.

  10. Attosecond Streaking in the Low-Energy Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Ji-Wei; Peng, Liang-You; Xu, Ming-Hui; Gong, Qihuang

    2014-04-01

    The low-energy photonelectron (PEs) ionized by a single attosecond pulse can be controlled by a moderately intense infrared field (IR). The electric field of the IR pulse can drive part of the PEs back to the parent ion and induce multiple rescattering of the electrons. Interesting interference patterns are observed in the photoelectron momentum distributions, which are formed by the rescattered electrons and the directly ionized PEs. By analyzing the interference patterns with a simple semiclassical model, which considers the particular PE trajectories incorporating the rescattering with the core, we demonstrate that the low-energy attosecond streaking offers a promising method of holographic imaging of atomic and molecular potential. In addition, we show that neither strong field approximation (SFA) or Coulomb-Volkov approximation (CVA) is able to reproduce these interesting structures at the low energy region.

  11. IONS (ANURADHA): Ionization states of low energy cosmic rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biswas, S.; Chakraborti, R.; Cowsik, R.; Durgaprasad, N.; Kajarekar, P. J.; Singh, R. K.; Vahia, M. N.; Yadav, J. S.; Dutt, N.; Goswami, J. N.

    1987-01-01

    IONS (ANURADHA), the experimental payload designed specifically to determine the ionization states, flux, composition, energy spectra and arrival directions of low energy (10 to 100 MeV/amu) anomalous cosmic ray ions of helium to iron in near-Earth space, had a highly successful flight and operation Spacelab-3 mission. The experiment combines the accuracy of a highly sensitive CR-39 nuclear track detector with active components included in the payload to achieve the experimental objectives. Post-flight analysis of detector calibration pieces placed within the payload indicated no measurable changes in detector response due to its exposure in spacelab environment. Nuclear tracks produced by alpha-particles, oxygen group and Fe ions in low energy anomalous cosmic rays were identified. It is calculated that the main detector has recorded high quality events of about 10,000 alpha-particles and similar number of oxygen group and heavier ions of low energy cosmic rays.

  12. Study of proton induced reactions on niobium targets up to 70 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ditrói, F.; Takács, S.; Tárkányi, F.; Baba, M.; Corniani, E.; Shubin, Yu. N.

    2008-12-01

    Niobium is a metal with important technological applications: use as alloying element to increase strength of super alloys, as thin layer for tribological applications, as superconductive material, in high temperature engineering systems, etc. In the frame of a systematic study of activation cross-sections of charged particle induced reactions on structural materials proton induced excitation functions on Nb targets were determined with the aim of applications in accelerator and reactor technology and for thin layer activation (TLA). The charged particle activation cross-sections on this element are also important for yield calculation of medical isotope production ( 88,89Zr, 86,87,88Y) and for dose estimation in PET targetry. As Niobium is a monoisotopic element it is an ideal target material to test nuclear reaction theories. We present here the integral excitation functions of 93Nb(p,x) 90,93mMo, 92m,91m,90Nb, 86,88,89Zr, 86,87mg,88Y and 85Sr in the energy range 30-70 MeV, some measured for the first time at this energy range. The results were compared with the theoretical cross-sections calculated by means of the code ALICE-IPPE and with the literature data. The calculations have been carried out without any parameter adjustment. The theory reproduces the shape of the measured results well and magnitude is also acceptable. Thick target yields calculated from our fitted cross-section give reliable estimations for production of medically relevant radioisotopes and for dose estimation in accelerator technology.

  13. Proton-induced X-ray emission analysis - a new tool in quantitative dermatology

    SciTech Connect

    Malmqvist, K.G.; Carlsson, L.E.; Akselsson, K.R.; Forslind, B.

    1983-01-01

    Proton-Induced X-ray Emission analysis (PIXE) constitutes a method for trace element analysis characterized by multielemental capability, detection limits in the low ppm-range and size resolution down towards a micrometre. In applications where the sensitivity of the Electron-Induced X-ray Emission (EIXE) analysis is not sufficient and where a spatial resolution not better than a few micrometres is required, the PIXE technique provides a powerful tool. In this paper properties of the PIXE method are demonstrated by quantitative results from three different samples of dermatological interest. Firstly, mercury results from a longitudinal scan of a single hair strand from a mercury poisoned person are shown. With a spatial resolution of one or a few millimetres very fast scans may be performed on hair strands giving information on time and magnitude of intoxication or other exposures, as well as deficiencies. Secondly, results are given from a radial scan with a beam width of 4 micron on hair from a person exposed to high amounts of iron. The calcium, iron and zinc distributions but not the sulphur and potassium distributions show narrow peaks of concentration (less than 4 micron) about 15 micron from the surface of the hair. Further investigations have to be performed in order to interpret these data. Thirdly, the depth profiles in skin of some elements were measured with a beam width of 10 micron. The results show significant increases in sulphur, calcium and zinc concentrations and significant decreases in phosphorous and potassium concentrations at the skin surface, i.e. in the stratum corneum.

  14. Studies on exotic nuclei by proton-induced direct reaction at GSI and FAIR

    SciTech Connect

    Kiselev, O. A.

    2007-02-26

    The proton-induced direct reactions like elastic, quasi-elastic scattering and knock-out at intermediate energies and inverse kinematics are the most powerful classical methods for obtaining spectroscopic information on the structure of unstable exotic nuclei. Few elastic scattering experiments performed at GSI with the gaseous and liquid hydrogen targets provided the most precise data on a nuclear matter distribution and a halo-core structure of the neutron-rich He and Li isotopes. The measured differential cross sections have been also used for probing density distributions as predicted by various microscopic theories. The comparison of the data with the latest calculations will be shown. The description of the recent experiment with proton-rich 8B and neutron-rich Be isotopes is presented.The experimental conditions at the future facility FAIR will provide unique opportunities for nuclear structure studies on nuclei far off stability, and will allow to reach new regions in the chart of nuclides of high interest for nuclear structure and astrophysics. In particular, predicted luminosity will allow for the investigation of direct reactions with stored and cooled radioactive beams at internal H, He, etc. targets of the storage ring NESR. This technique enables high resolution measurements down to very low momentum transfer and provides a gain in luminosity from accumulation and recirculation of the radioactive beams. In order to explore the experimental conditions for measurements planned at EXL/FAIR setup, a first attempt exploring experimentally the feasibility of its concept has been recently made. A detector setup was installed at the ESR storage ring at GSI, Darmstadt. A 136Xe beam was interacting to an internal hydrogen gas-jet target. The detector setup had all the basic ingredients as foreseen by EXL collaboration. A set of scattering reactions has been studied and the overall performance of the setup demonstrated the feasibility of the EXL experimental

  15. Low-Energy Shockwave Therapy Improves Ischemic Kidney Microcirculation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin; Krier, James D; Amador Carrascal, Carolina; Greenleaf, James F; Ebrahimi, Behzad; Hedayat, Ahmad F; Textor, Stephen C; Lerman, Amir; Lerman, Lilach O

    2016-12-01

    Microvascular rarefaction distal to renal artery stenosis is linked to renal dysfunction and poor outcomes. Low-energy shockwave therapy stimulates angiogenesis, but the effect on the kidney microvasculature is unknown. We hypothesized that low-energy shockwave therapy would restore the microcirculation and alleviate renal dysfunction in renovascular disease. Normal pigs and pigs subjected to 3 weeks of renal artery stenosis were treated with six sessions of low-energy shockwave (biweekly for 3 consecutive weeks) or left untreated. We assessed BP, urinary protein, stenotic renal blood flow, GFR, microvascular structure, and oxygenation in vivo 4 weeks after completion of treatment, and then, we assessed expression of angiogenic factors and mechanotransducers (focal adhesion kinase and β1-integrin) ex vivo A 3-week low-energy shockwave regimen attenuated renovascular hypertension, normalized stenotic kidney microvascular density and oxygenation, stabilized function, and alleviated fibrosis in pigs subjected to renal artery stenosis. These effects associated with elevated renal expression of angiogenic factors and mechanotransducers, particularly in proximal tubular cells. In additional pigs with prolonged (6 weeks) renal artery stenosis, shockwave therapy also decreased BP and improved GFR, microvascular density, and oxygenation in the stenotic kidney. This shockwave regimen did not cause detectable kidney injury in normal pigs. In conclusion, low-energy shockwave therapy improves stenotic kidney function, likely in part by mechanotransduction-mediated expression of angiogenic factors in proximal tubular cells, and it may ameliorate renovascular hypertension. Low-energy shockwave therapy may serve as a novel noninvasive intervention in the management of renovascular disease. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  16. Scattering of low-energy neutrinos on atomic shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babič, Andrej; Šimkovic, Fedor

    2015-10-01

    We present a derivation of the total cross section for inelastic scattering of low-energy solar neutrinos and reactor antineutrinos on bound electrons, resulting in a transition of the electron to an excited state. The atomic-shell structure of various chemical elements is treated in terms of a nonrelativistic approximation. We estimate the interaction rates for modern neutrino detectors, in particular the Borexino and GEMMA experiments. We establish that in these experiments the effect can be safely neglected, but it could be accessible to future large-volume neutrino detectors with low energy threshold.

  17. Scattering of low-energy neutrinos on atomic shells

    SciTech Connect

    Babič, Andrej; Šimkovic, Fedor

    2015-10-28

    We present a derivation of the total cross section for inelastic scattering of low-energy solar neutrinos and reactor antineutrinos on bound electrons, resulting in a transition of the electron to an excited state. The atomic-shell structure of various chemical elements is treated in terms of a nonrelativistic approximation. We estimate the interaction rates for modern neutrino detectors, in particular the Borexino and GEMMA experiments. We establish that in these experiments the effect can be safely neglected, but it could be accessible to future large-volume neutrino detectors with low energy threshold.

  18. Electron polarimetry at low energies in Hall C at JLab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaskell, D.

    2013-11-01

    Although the majority of Jefferson Lab experiments require multi-GeV electron beams, there have been a few opportunities to make electron beam polarization measurements at rather low energies. This proceedings will discuss some of the practical difficulties encountered in performing electron polarimetry via Mo/ller scattering at energies on the order of a few hundred MeV. Prospects for Compton polarimetry at very low energies will also be discussed. While Mo/ller scattering is likely the preferred method for electron polarimetry at energies below 500 MeV, there are certain aspects of the polarimeter and experiment design that must be carefully considered.

  19. Electron polarimetry at low energies in Hall C at JLab

    SciTech Connect

    Gaskell, D.

    2013-11-07

    Although the majority of Jefferson Lab experiments require multi-GeV electron beams, there have been a few opportunities to make electron beam polarization measurements at rather low energies. This proceedings will discuss some of the practical difficulties encountered in performing electron polarimetry via Mo/ller scattering at energies on the order of a few hundred MeV. Prospects for Compton polarimetry at very low energies will also be discussed. While Mo/ller scattering is likely the preferred method for electron polarimetry at energies below 500 MeV, there are certain aspects of the polarimeter and experiment design that must be carefully considered.

  20. Diffuse Galactic low energy gamma ray continuum emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skibo, J. G.; Ramaty, R.

    1993-01-01

    We investigate the origin of diffuse low-energy Galactic gamma-ray continuum down to about 30 keV. We calculate gamma-ray emission via bremsstrahlung and inverse Compton scattering by propagating an unbroken electron power law injection spectrum and employing a Galactic emmissivity model derived from COSB observations. To maintain the low energy electron population capable of producing the observed continuum via bremsstrahlung, a total power input of 4 x 10 exp 41 erg/s is required. This exceeds the total power supplied to the nuclear cosmic rays by about an order of magnitude.

  1. Extended optical model for fission

    DOE PAGES

    Sin, M.; Capote, R.; Herman, M. W.; ...

    2016-03-07

    A comprehensive formalism to calculate fission cross sections based on the extension of the optical model for fission is presented. It can be used for description of nuclear reactions on actinides featuring multi-humped fission barriers with partial absorption in the wells and direct transmission through discrete and continuum fission channels. The formalism describes the gross fluctuations observed in the fission probability due to vibrational resonances, and can be easily implemented in existing statistical reaction model codes. The extended optical model for fission is applied for neutron induced fission cross-section calculations on 234,235,238U and 239Pu targets. A triple-humped fission barrier ismore » used for 234,235U(n,f), while a double-humped fission barrier is used for 238U(n,f) and 239Pu(n,f) reactions as predicted by theoretical barrier calculations. The impact of partial damping of class-II/III states, and of direct transmission through discrete and continuum fission channels, is shown to be critical for a proper description of the measured fission cross sections for 234,235,238U(n,f) reactions. The 239Pu(n,f) reaction can be calculated in the complete damping approximation. Calculated cross sections for 235,238U(n,f) and 239Pu(n,f) reactions agree within 3% with the corresponding cross sections derived within the Neutron Standards least-squares fit of available experimental data. Lastly, the extended optical model for fission can be used for both theoretical fission studies and nuclear data evaluation.« less

  2. Extended optical model for fission

    SciTech Connect

    Sin, M.; Capote, R.; Herman, M. W.; Trkov, A.

    2016-03-07

    A comprehensive formalism to calculate fission cross sections based on the extension of the optical model for fission is presented. It can be used for description of nuclear reactions on actinides featuring multi-humped fission barriers with partial absorption in the wells and direct transmission through discrete and continuum fission channels. The formalism describes the gross fluctuations observed in the fission probability due to vibrational resonances, and can be easily implemented in existing statistical reaction model codes. The extended optical model for fission is applied for neutron induced fission cross-section calculations on 234,235,238U and 239Pu targets. A triple-humped fission barrier is used for 234,235U(n,f), while a double-humped fission barrier is used for 238U(n,f) and 239Pu(n,f) reactions as predicted by theoretical barrier calculations. The impact of partial damping of class-II/III states, and of direct transmission through discrete and continuum fission channels, is shown to be critical for a proper description of the measured fission cross sections for 234,235,238U(n,f) reactions. The 239Pu(n,f) reaction can be calculated in the complete damping approximation. Calculated cross sections for 235,238U(n,f) and 239Pu(n,f) reactions agree within 3% with the corresponding cross sections derived within the Neutron Standards least-squares fit of available experimental data. Lastly, the extended optical model for fission can be used for both theoretical fission studies and nuclear data evaluation.

  3. Extended optical model for fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sin, M.; Capote, R.; Herman, M. W.; Trkov, A.

    2016-03-01

    A comprehensive formalism to calculate fission cross sections based on the extension of the optical model for fission is presented. It can be used for description of nuclear reactions on actinides featuring multi-humped fission barriers with partial absorption in the wells and direct transmission through discrete and continuum fission channels. The formalism describes the gross fluctuations observed in the fission probability due to vibrational resonances, and can be easily implemented in existing statistical reaction model codes. The extended optical model for fission is applied for neutron induced fission cross-section calculations on 234,235,238U and 239Pu targets. A triple-humped fission barrier is used for U,235234(n ,f ) , while a double-humped fission barrier is used for 238U(n ,f ) and 239Pu(n ,f ) reactions as predicted by theoretical barrier calculations. The impact of partial damping of class-II/III states, and of direct transmission through discrete and continuum fission channels, is shown to be critical for a proper description of the measured fission cross sections for 234,235,238U(n ,f ) reactions. The 239Pu(n ,f ) reaction can be calculated in the complete damping approximation. Calculated cross sections for U,238235(n ,f ) and 239Pu(n ,f ) reactions agree within 3% with the corresponding cross sections derived within the Neutron Standards least-squares fit of available experimental data. The extended optical model for fission can be used for both theoretical fission studies and nuclear data evaluation.

  4. Correlation of Intermediate Energy Proton- and Neutron-Induced Fission Cross Sections in the Lead-Bismuth Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, Andrey N.; Eismont, Vilen P.; Filatov, Nikolay P.; Kirillov, Sergey N.; Blomgren, Jan; Condé, Henri; Olsson, Nils; Duijvestijn, Marieke; Koning, Arjan

    2005-05-01

    Neutron- and proton-induced fission cross-sections of the lead isotopes 204,206-208Pb and 205Tl in the intermediate energy region have been measured at the Svedberg Laboratory in Uppsala, Sweden. Average fissilities of the composite nuclei and the dependence on the nucleon energy and the parameter Z2/A were determined. On this basis, the correlation between the proton- and neutron-induced fission cross sections has been established in the atomic mass region A ˜ 200 and for nucleon energies above 50 MeV, where shell effects do not play a very significant role. The correlation is discussed in the frame of results from calculations by the code TALYS.

  5. Fission-induced plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harries, W. L.; Shiu, Y. J.

    1979-01-01

    The possibility of creating a plasma from fission fragments, and to utilize the energy of the particles to create population inversion that would lead to laser action is investigated. An investigation was made of various laser materials which could be used for nuclear-pumped lasing. The most likely candidate for a fissioning material in the gaseous form is uranium hexafluoride - UF6, and experiments were performed to investigate materials that would be compatible with it. One of the central problems in understanding a fission-induced plasma is to obtain a model of the electron behavior, and some preliminary calculations are presented. In particular, the rates of various processes are discussed. A simple intuitive model of the electron energy distribution function is also shown. The results were useful for considering a mathematical model of a nuclear-pumped laser. Next a theoretical model of a (3)He-Ar nuclear-pumped laser is presented. The theory showed good qualitative agreement with the experimental results.

  6. Study of Intrabeam Scattering in Low Energy Electron Rings

    SciTech Connect

    Venturini, Marco

    2002-08-08

    The paper contains a study of intrabeam scattering in a low energy electron storage ring to be used as part of a Compton back-scattering x-ray source. We discuss time evolution of emittance and dependence of IBS growth rates on lattice parameters.

  7. Low-energy plasma observations at synchronous orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lennartsson, W.; Reasoner, D. L.

    1978-01-01

    The University of California at San Diego Auroral Particles Experiment on the ATS 6 satellite in synchronous orbit has detected a low-energy plasma population which is separate and distinct from both the ring current and the plasma sheet populations. The density and temperature of this low-energy population are highly variable, with temperatures in the range kT = 1-30 eV and densities ranging from less than 1 per cu cm to more than 10 per cu cm. The occurrence of a dense low-energy plasma is most likely in the afternoon and dusk local time sectors, whereas n greater than 1 per cu cm is seen in the local night sector only during magnetically quiet periods. These observations suggest that this plasma is the outer zone of the plasmasphere. During magnetically active periods this low-energy plasma is often observed flowing sunward. In the dusk sector, strong sunward plasma flow is often observed for 1-2 hours prior to the onset of a substorm-associated particle injection.

  8. Nuclear phenomena in low-energy nuclear reaction research.

    PubMed

    Krivit, Steven B

    2013-09-01

    This is a comment on Storms E (2010) Status of Cold Fusion, Naturwissenschaften 97:861-881. This comment provides the following remarks to other nuclear phenomena observed in low-energy nuclear reactions aside from helium-4 make significant contributions to the overall energy balance; and normal hydrogen, not just heavy hydrogen, produces excess heat.

  9. Nuclear phenomena in low-energy nuclear reaction research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krivit, Steven B.

    2013-09-01

    This is a comment on Storms (Naturwissenschaften 97:861-881, 2010) Status of Cold Fusion, Naturwissenschaften, 97:861-881. This comment provides the following corrections: other nuclear phenomena observed in low-energy nuclear reactions aside from helium-4 make significant contributions to the overall energy balance; and normal hydrogen, not just heavy hydrogen, produces excess heat.

  10. Physics overview of the Fermilab Low Energy Antiproton Facility Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Chanowitz, M.S.

    1986-05-01

    A physics overview is presented of the Fermilab workshop to consider a possible high flux, low energy antiproton facility that would use cooled antiprotons from the accumulator ring of the Tevatron collider. Two examples illustrate the power of each a facility to produce narrow states at high rates. Physics topics to which such a facility may be applied are reviewed.

  11. HEAO-1 analysis of Low Energy Detectors (LED)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nousek, John A.

    1992-01-01

    The activities at Penn State University are described. During the period Oct. 1990 to Dec. 1991 work on HEAO-1 analysis of the Low Energy Detectors (LED) concentrated on using the improved detector spectral simulation model and fitting diffuse x-ray background spectral data. Spectral fitting results, x-ray point sources, and diffuse x-ray sources are described.

  12. Low Energy Transfer Reactions With {sup 11}Be

    SciTech Connect

    Johansen, Jacob

    2009-08-26

    The low-energy transfer reaction {sup 11}Be(d,p){sup 12}Be gives us the opportunity to investigate single particle excitations in {sup 12}Be. The breaking of the magic number N = 8 for {sup 12}Be can be studied by comparing spectroscopic data with theoretical predictions.

  13. Enhanced production of low energy electrons by alpha particle impact

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hong-Keun; Titze, Jasmin; Schöffler, Markus; Trinter, Florian; Waitz, Markus; Voigtsberger, Jörg; Sann, Hendrik; Meckel, Moritz; Stuck, Christian; Lenz, Ute; Odenweller, Matthias; Neumann, Nadine; Schössler, Sven; Ullmann-Pfleger, Klaus; Ulrich, Birte; Fraga, Rui Costa; Petridis, Nikos; Metz, Daniel; Jung, Annika; Grisenti, Robert; Czasch, Achim; Jagutzki, Ottmar; Schmidt, Lothar; Jahnke, Till; Schmidt-Böcking, Horst; Dörner, Reinhard

    2011-01-01

    Radiation damage to living tissue stems not only from primary ionizing particles but to a substantial fraction from the dissociative attachment of secondary electrons with energies below the ionization threshold. We show that the emission yield of those low energy electrons increases dramatically in ion–atom collisions depending on whether or not the target atoms are isolated or embedded in an environment. Only when the atom that has been ionized and excited by the primary particle impact is in immediate proximity of another atom is a fragmentation route known as interatomic Coulombic decay (ICD) enabled. This leads to the emission of a low energy electron. Over the past decade ICD was explored in several experiments following photoionization. Most recent results show its observation even in water clusters. Here we show the quantitative role of ICD for the production of low energy electrons by ion impact, thus approaching a scenario closer to that of radiation damage by alpha particles: We choose ion energies on the maximum of the Bragg peak where energy is most efficiently deposited in tissue. We compare the electron production after colliding He+ ions on isolated Ne atoms and on Ne dimers (Ne2). In the latter case the Ne atom impacted is surrounded by a most simple environment already opening ICD as a deexcitation channel. As a consequence, we find a dramatically enhanced low energy electron yield. The results suggest that ICD may have a significant influence on cell survival after exposure to ionizing radiation. PMID:21730184

  14. Low energy particle spectrometer for 3-axis stabilized spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Y.

    2013-11-01

    Most of the recent satellite-borne instrumentation for low energy charged particle measurement adopts tophat type electrostatic analyzers. Since the top-hat type electrostatic analyzers have wide field of view of 2π radian with uniform transmission characteristics, they are suitable for low energy charged particle measurement by spin-stabilized spacecraft. However, 3-axis stabilized spacecraft is favored in most of the planetary missions due to the affinity with imaging instruments. Therefore, for the future planetary plasma observations, it is quite important to develop lightweight, low-power consumption and compact low energy charged particle analyzers for 3-axis stabilized spacecraft. In order to realize 3-D field of view on 3-axis stabilized spacecraft under limited resources, ASKY-ESA (All SKY-ElectroStaitc Analyzer) was developed. ASKY-ESA consists of FOV (Field Of View) scanning deflectors at the entrance and spherical/toroidal electrostatic deflectors inside. The FOV is electrically scanned between +/-45 degrees around the center of the FOV, which is 45 degrees inclined from the axis of symmetry. Since ASKY-ESA has hemi-spherical field of view, three-dimensional space is covered by two ASKY-ESAs installed on spacecraft panels opposite to each other. ASKY-ESA is also suitable for low energy charged particle measurement on a surface of airless heavenly bodies, for example, the Moon, Martian satellite Phobos, and numerous small objects/asteroids.

  15. Mirrored low-energy channel for the MiniXRD

    SciTech Connect

    Dutra, Eric; MacNeil, Lawrence; Raphaelian, Mark; Compton, Steve; Jacoby, Barry

    2015-10-08

    X-ray Diodes (XRDs) are currently used for spectroscopic measurements, measuring X-ray flux, and estimating spectral shape of the VUV to soft X-ray spectrum. A niche exists for an inexpensive, robust X-ray diode that can be used for experiments in hostile environments on multiple platforms, including explosively driven experiments that have the potential for destroying the diode during the experiment. A multiple channel stacked filtered array was developed with a small field of view where a wider parallel array could not be used, but filtered channels for energies lower than 1000 eV were too fragile to deploy under normal conditions. To achieve both the robustness and the required low-energy detection ability, the researchers designed a small low-energy mirrored channel with a spectral sensitivity from 30 to 1000 eV. The stacked MiniXRD X-ray diode system design incorporates the mirrored low-energy channel on the front of the stacked filtered channels to allow the system to work within a small field of view. We will present results that demonstrate this is a promising solution for low-energy spectrum measurements.

  16. String-Loop Effect in Low-Energy Effective Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saadat, H.; Tanabchi, B. P.; Saadat, A. M.

    2010-05-01

    In this short article we are going to obtain the equations of motion from the low-energy effective action in the string cosmology. In the first time we consider the string-loop effect in the dilaton gravity and obtain the equations of motion, and obtain solution of them under some assumption for the specific potential.

  17. MEIC Proton Beam Formation with a Low Energy Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yuhong

    2015-09-01

    The MEIC proton and ion beams are generated, accumulated, accelerated and cooled in a new green-field ion injector complex designed specifically to support its high luminosity goal. This injector consists of sources, a linac and a small booster ring. In this paper we explore feasibility of a short ion linac that injects low-energy protons and ions into the booster ring.

  18. Enhanced production of low energy electrons by alpha particle impact.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hong-Keun; Titze, Jasmin; Schöffler, Markus; Trinter, Florian; Waitz, Markus; Voigtsberger, Jörg; Sann, Hendrik; Meckel, Moritz; Stuck, Christian; Lenz, Ute; Odenweller, Matthias; Neumann, Nadine; Schössler, Sven; Ullmann-Pfleger, Klaus; Ulrich, Birte; Fraga, Rui Costa; Petridis, Nikos; Metz, Daniel; Jung, Annika; Grisenti, Robert; Czasch, Achim; Jagutzki, Ottmar; Schmidt, Lothar; Jahnke, Till; Schmidt-Böcking, Horst; Dörner, Reinhard

    2011-07-19

    Radiation damage to living tissue stems not only from primary ionizing particles but to a substantial fraction from the dissociative attachment of secondary electrons with energies below the ionization threshold. We show that the emission yield of those low energy electrons increases dramatically in ion-atom collisions depending on whether or not the target atoms are isolated or embedded in an environment. Only when the atom that has been ionized and excited by the primary particle impact is in immediate proximity of another atom is a fragmentation route known as interatomic Coulombic decay (ICD) enabled. This leads to the emission of a low energy electron. Over the past decade ICD was explored in several experiments following photoionization. Most recent results show its observation even in water clusters. Here we show the quantitative role of ICD for the production of low energy electrons by ion impact, thus approaching a scenario closer to that of radiation damage by alpha particles: We choose ion energies on the maximum of the Bragg peak where energy is most efficiently deposited in tissue. We compare the electron production after colliding He(+) ions on isolated Ne atoms and on Ne dimers (Ne(2)). In the latter case the Ne atom impacted is surrounded by a most simple environment already opening ICD as a deexcitation channel. As a consequence, we find a dramatically enhanced low energy electron yield. The results suggest that ICD may have a significant influence on cell survival after exposure to ionizing radiation.

  19. Low energy physics and properties of extra space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, Sergey G.

    2013-02-01

    The mechanism of low energy physics formation in the framework of multidimensional gravity is discussed. It is shown that a wide set of parameters of a primary theory could lead to the observable Universe. Quantum fluctuations of extra space metric and its consequent classical evolution play an important role in this process.

  20. ELECTRON COOLING SIMULATIONS FOR LOW-ENERGY RHIC OPERATION.

    SciTech Connect

    FEDOTOV,A.V.; BEN-ZVI, I.; CHANG, X.; KAYRAN, D.; SATOGATA, T.

    2007-09-10

    Recently, a strong interest emerged in running the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at low beam total energies of 2.5-25 GeV/nucleon, substantially lower than the nominal beam total energy of 100 GeV/nucleon. Collisions in this low energy range are motivated by one of the key questions of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) about the existence and location of critical point on the QCD phase diagram. Applying electron cooling directly at these low energies in RHIC would result in significant luminosity increase and long beam stores for physics. Without direct cooling in RHIC at these low energies, beam lifetime and store times are very short, limited by strong transverse and longitudinal intrabeam scattering (IBS). In addition, for the lowest energies of the proposed energy scan, the longitudinal emittance of ions injected from the AGS into RHIC may be too big to fit into the RHIC RF bucket. An improvement in the longitudinal emittance of the ion beam can be provided by an electron cooling system at the AGS injection energy. Simulations of electron cooling both for direct cooling at low energies in RHIC and for injection energy cooling in the AGS were performed and are summarized in this report.

  1. Compact measurement station for low energy proton beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yildiz, H.; Ozbey, A.; Oz, S.; Yasatekin, B.; Turemen, G.; Ogur, S.; Sunar, E.; Aydin, Y. O.; Dimov, V. A.; Unel, G.; Alacakir, A.

    2017-02-01

    A compact, remote controlled, cost efficient diagnostic station has been developed to measure the charge, the profile and the emittance for low energy proton beams. It has been installed and tested in the proton beam line of the Project Prometheus at SANAEM of the Turkish Atomic Energy Authority.

  2. Low-energy plasma observations at synchronous orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lennartsson, W.; Reasoner, D. L.

    1978-01-01

    The University of California at San Diego Auroral Particles Experiment on the ATS 6 satellite in synchronous orbit has detected a low-energy plasma population which is separate and distinct from both the ring current and the plasma sheet populations. The density and temperature of this low-energy population are highly variable, with temperatures in the range kT = 1-30 eV and densities ranging from less than 1 per cu cm to more than 10 per cu cm. The occurrence of a dense low-energy plasma is most likely in the afternoon and dusk local time sectors, whereas n greater than 1 per cu cm is seen in the local night sector only during magnetically quiet periods. These observations suggest that this plasma is the outer zone of the plasmasphere. During magnetically active periods this low-energy plasma is often observed flowing sunward. In the dusk sector, strong sunward plasma flow is often observed for 1-2 hours prior to the onset of a substorm-associated particle injection.

  3. Effective low-energy theory for superconducting topological insulators.

    PubMed

    Hao, Lei; Lee, Ting-Kuo

    2015-03-18

    Candidate pairings of superconducting topological insulators support interesting surface Andreev bound states (SABSs) known as Majorana fermions. As these materials are described by a two-orbital Bernevig-Hughes-Zhang type model, a general understanding of the low-energy physics such as the possible kinds of SABSs are difficult. By virtue of an analogy between a topological insulator and a time reversal invariant topological superconductor, we propose a simple and intuitive method of constructing the low-energy effective models for superconducting topological insulators like CuxBi2Se3. Depending on the value of the chemical potential and for experimentally relevant model parameters, the low-energy properties of these superconductors are shown to be determined by one copy or two copies of single-orbital effective models. If the effective pairing potential shows sign reversal upon reflection by the surface, one Kramers' pair or two Kramers' pairs of SABSs are expected to appear. Explicit analytical calculations in terms of the effective low energy model reproduce the dispersions of the numerically confirmed two pairs of SABSs for a commonly studied pairing.

  4. Potential for luminosity improvement for low-energy RHIC operation

    SciTech Connect

    Fedotov A. V.

    2012-05-20

    At the Brookhaven National Laboratory, a physics program, motivated by the search of the QCD phase transition critical point, requires operation of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) with heavy ions at very low beam energies corresponding to 2.5-20 GeV/n. Several physics runs were already successfully performed at these low energies. However, the luminosity is very low at lowest energies of interest (< 10 GeV/n) limited by the intra-beam scattering and space-charge, as well as by machine nonlinearities. At these low energies, electron cooling could be very effective in counteracting luminosity degradation due to the IBS, while it is less effective against other limitations. Overall potential luminosity improvement for low-energy RHIC operation from cooling is summarized for various energies, taking into account all these limitations as well as beam lifetime measured during the low-energy RHIC runs. We also explore a possibility of further luminosity improvement under the space-charge limitation.

  5. Low Energy Defibrillation in Human Cardiac Tissue: A Simulation Study

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Stuart W.; Plank, Gernot; Biktasheva, Irina V.; Biktashev, Vadim N.

    2009-01-01

    We aim to assess the effectiveness of feedback-controlled resonant drift pacing as a method for low energy defibrillation. Antitachycardia pacing is the only low energy defibrillation approach to have gained clinical significance, but it is still suboptimal. Low energy defibrillation would avoid adverse side effects associated with high voltage shocks and allow the application of implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) therapy, in cases where such therapy is not tolerated today. We present results of computer simulations of a bidomain model of cardiac tissue with human atrial ionic kinetics. Reentry was initiated and low energy shocks were applied with the same period as the reentry, using feedback to maintain resonance. We demonstrate that such stimulation can move the core of reentrant patterns, in the direction that depends on the location of the electrodes and the time delay in the feedback. Termination of reentry is achieved with shock strength one-order-of-magnitude weaker than in conventional single-shock defibrillation. We conclude that resonant drift pacing can terminate reentry at a fraction of the shock strength currently used for defibrillation and can potentially work where antitachycardia pacing fails, due to the feedback mechanisms. Success depends on a number of details that these numerical simulations have uncovered. PMID:19217854

  6. Singlet exciton fission-sensitized infrared quantum dot solar cells.

    PubMed

    Ehrler, Bruno; Wilson, Mark W B; Rao, Akshay; Friend, Richard H; Greenham, Neil C

    2012-02-08

    We demonstrate an organic/inorganic hybrid photovoltaic device architecture that uses singlet exciton fission to permit the collection of two electrons per absorbed high-energy photon while simultaneously harvesting low-energy photons. In this solar cell, infrared photons are absorbed using lead sulfide (PbS) nanocrystals. Visible photons are absorbed in pentacene to create singlet excitons, which undergo rapid exciton fission to produce pairs of triplets. Crucially, we identify that these triplet excitons can be ionized at an organic/inorganic heterointerface. We report internal quantum efficiencies exceeding 50% and power conversion efficiencies approaching 1%. These findings suggest an alternative route to circumvent the Shockley-Queisser limit on the power conversion efficiency of single-junction solar cells.

  7. Compact multiwire proportional counters for the detection of fission fragments

    SciTech Connect

    Jhingan, Akhil; Sugathan, P.; Golda, K. S.; Singh, R. P.; Varughese, T.; Singh, Hardev; Behera, B. R.; Mandal, S. K.

    2009-12-15

    Two large area multistep position sensitive (two dimensional) multiwire proportional counters have been developed for experiments involving study of fission dynamics using general purpose scattering chamber facility at IUAC. Both detectors have an active area of 20x10 cm{sup 2} and provide position signals in horizontal (X) and vertical (Y) planes, timing signal for time of flight measurements and energy signal giving the differential energy loss in the active volume. The design features are optimized for the detection of low energy heavy ions at very low gas pressures. Special care was taken in setting up the readout electronics, constant fraction discriminators for position signals in particular, to get optimum position and timing resolutions along with high count rate handling capability of low energy heavy ions. A custom made charge sensitive preamplifier, having lower gain and shorter decay time, has been developed for extracting the differential energy loss signal. The position and time resolutions of the detectors were determined to be 1.1 mm full width at half maximum (FWHM) and 1.7 ns FWHM, respectively. The detector could handle heavy ion count rates exceeding 20 kHz without any breakdown. Time of flight signal in combination with differential energy loss signal gives a clean separation of fission fragments from projectile and target like particles. The timing and position signals of the detectors are used for fission coincidence measurements and subsequent extraction of their mass, angular, and total kinetic energy distributions. This article describes systematic study of these fission counters in terms of efficiency, time resolution, count rate handling capability, position resolution, and the readout electronics. The detector has been operated with both five electrode geometry and four electrode geometry, and a comparison has been made in their performances.

  8. The SPIDER fission fragment spectrometer for fission product yield measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Meierbachtol, K.; Tovesson, F.; Shields, D.; Arnold, C.; Blakeley, R.; Bredeweg, T.; Devlin, M.; Hecht, A. A.; Heffern, L. E.; Jorgenson, J.; Laptev, A.; Mader, D.; O׳Donnell, J. M.; Sierk, A.; White, M.

    2015-04-01

    We developed the SPectrometer for Ion DEtermination in fission Research (SPIDER) for measuring mass yield distributions of fission products from spontaneous and neutron-induced fission. The 2E–2v method of measuring the kinetic energy (E) and velocity (v) of both outgoing fission products has been utilized, with the goal of measuring the mass of the fission products with an average resolution of 1 atomic mass unit (amu). Moreover, the SPIDER instrument, consisting of detector components for time-of-flight, trajectory, and energy measurements, has been assembled and tested using 229Th and 252Cf radioactive decay sources. For commissioning, the fully assembled system measured fission products from spontaneous fission of 252Cf. Individual measurement resolutions were met for time-of-flight (250 ps FWHM), spacial resolution (2 mm FHWM), and energy (92 keV FWHM for 8.376 MeV). Finally, these mass yield results measured from 252Cf spontaneous fission products are reported from an E–v measurement.

  9. The SPIDER fission fragment spectrometer for fission product yield measurements

    DOE PAGES

    Meierbachtol, K.; Tovesson, F.; Shields, D.; ...

    2015-04-01

    We developed the SPectrometer for Ion DEtermination in fission Research (SPIDER) for measuring mass yield distributions of fission products from spontaneous and neutron-induced fission. The 2E–2v method of measuring the kinetic energy (E) and velocity (v) of both outgoing fission products has been utilized, with the goal of measuring the mass of the fission products with an average resolution of 1 atomic mass unit (amu). Moreover, the SPIDER instrument, consisting of detector components for time-of-flight, trajectory, and energy measurements, has been assembled and tested using 229Th and 252Cf radioactive decay sources. For commissioning, the fully assembled system measured fission productsmore » from spontaneous fission of 252Cf. Individual measurement resolutions were met for time-of-flight (250 ps FWHM), spacial resolution (2 mm FHWM), and energy (92 keV FWHM for 8.376 MeV). Finally, these mass yield results measured from 252Cf spontaneous fission products are reported from an E–v measurement.« less

  10. Measurement of Fission Product Yields from Fast-Neutron Fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, C. W.; Bond, E. M.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Fowler, M. M.; Moody, W. A.; Rusev, G.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Becker, J. A.; Henderson, R.; Kenneally, J.; Macri, R.; McNabb, D.; Ryan, C.; Sheets, S.; Stoyer, M. A.; Tonchev, A. P.; Bhatia, C.; Bhike, M.; Fallin, B.; Gooden, M. E.; Howell, C. R.; Kelley, J. H.; Tornow, W.

    2014-09-01

    One of the aims of the Stockpile Stewardship Program is a reduction of the uncertainties on fission data used for analyzing nuclear test data [1,2]. Fission products such as 147Nd are convenient for determining fission yields because of their relatively high yield per fission (about 2%) and long half-life (10.98 days). A scientific program for measuring fission product yields from 235U,238U and 239Pu targets as a function of bombarding neutron energy (0.1 to 15 MeV) is currently underway using monoenergetic neutron beams produced at the 10 MV Tandem Accelerator at TUNL. Dual-fission chambers are used to determine the rate of fission in targets during activation. Activated targets are counted in highly shielded HPGe detectors over a period of several weeks to identify decaying fission products. To date, data have been collected at neutron bombarding energies 4.6, 9.0, 14.5 and 14.8 MeV. Experimental methods and data reduction techniques are discussed, and some preliminary results are presented.

  11. Validation of GEANT4 simulations for 62,63Zn yield estimation in proton induced reactions of natural copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rostampour, Malihe; Sadeghi, Mahdi; Aboudzadeh, Mohammadreza; Hamidi, Saeid; Hosseini, Seyedeh Fatemeh

    2017-03-01

    A useful approach to optimize of radioisotope production is the use of Monte Carlo simulations prior to experimentation. In this paper, the GEANT4 code was employed to calculate the saturation yields of 62,63Zn from proton-induced reactions of natural copper, enriched 63Cu and 65Cu. In addition, the saturation yields of the investigated radio-nuclides were calculated using the stopping power from the SRIM-2013 and reported experimental data for cross sections. The simulated saturation yields were compared with experimental values. Good agreement between the experimental and corresponding simulated data demonstrated that GEANT4 provides a suitable tool for radionuclide simulation production using proton irradiation.

  12. Investigation of coulomb and pairing effects using new developed empirical formulas for proton-induced reaction cross sections

    SciTech Connect

    Tel, E. Aydin, E. G.; Aydin, A.; Kaplan, A.; Boeluekdemir, M. H.; Okuducu, S.

    2010-03-15

    We have investigated Coulomb and pairing effects by using new empirical formulas including the new coefficients for (p, {alpha}) at 17.9 MeV, (p, np) at 22.3 MeV, and (p, n{alpha}) at 24.8 and 28.5 MeV energies. A new formula is obtained by adjusting Levkovskii's original asymmetry parameter formula and also Tel et al. formula for proton-induced reactions. The new coefficients by using least-squares fitting method for the reactions are determined. In addition, the findings of the present study are compared with the available experimental data.

  13. Proton-induced polonium production in massive lead bismuth target irradiated by 660 MeV protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polanski, Aleksander; Petrochenkov, Sergey; Pohorecki, Wladyslaw

    2006-06-01

    The paper presents study of polonium production in bismuth foils placed in lead target. Proton-induced production of residual nuclei 206Po, 207Po, 208Po, 209Po, 210Po in 209Bi foils placed in lead target irradiated by 660 MeV protons was calculated. A comparison with calculated spatial distribution of polonium production using an MCNPX code and experimental results has been performed. The results of calculation will be useful for design of target of Subcritical Assembly in Dubna (SAD).

  14. Uncovering Special Nuclear Materials by Low-energy Nuclear Reaction Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, P. B.; Erickson, A. S.; Mayer, M.; Nattress, J.; Jovanovic, I.

    2016-04-01

    Weapons-grade uranium and plutonium could be used as nuclear explosives with extreme destructive potential. The problem of their detection, especially in standard cargo containers during transit, has been described as “searching for a needle in a haystack” because of the inherently low rate of spontaneous emission of characteristic penetrating radiation and the ease of its shielding. Currently, the only practical approach for uncovering well-shielded special nuclear materials is by use of active interrogation using an external radiation source. However, the similarity of these materials to shielding and the required radiation doses that may exceed regulatory limits prevent this method from being widely used in practice. We introduce a low-dose active detection technique, referred to as low-energy nuclear reaction imaging, which exploits the physics of interactions of multi-MeV monoenergetic photons and neutrons to simultaneously measure the material’s areal density and effective atomic number, while confirming the presence of fissionable materials by observing the beta-delayed neutron emission. For the first time, we demonstrate identification and imaging of uranium with this novel technique using a simple yet robust source, setting the stage for its wide adoption in security applications.

  15. Low-energy Coulomb excitation of neutron-rich zinc isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Walle, J.; Aksouh, F.; Behrens, T.; Bildstein, V.; Blazhev, A.; Cederkäll, J.; Clément, E.; Cocolios, T. E.; Davinson, T.; Delahaye, P.; Eberth, J.; Ekström, A.; Fedorov, D. V.; Fedosseev, V. N.; Fraile, L. M.; Franchoo, S.; Gernhauser, R.; Georgiev, G.; Habs, D.; Heyde, K.; Huber, G.; Huyse, M.; Ibrahim, F.; Ivanov, O.; Iwanicki, J.; Jolie, J.; Kester, O.; Köster, U.; Kröll, T.; Krücken, R.; Lauer, M.; Lisetskiy, A. F.; Lutter, R.; Marsh, B. A.; Mayet, P.; Niedermaier, O.; Pantea, M.; Raabe, R.; Reiter, P.; Sawicka, M.; Scheit, H.; Schrieder, G.; Schwalm, D.; Seliverstov, M. D.; Sieber, T.; Sletten, G.; Smirnova, N.; Stanoiu, M.; Stefanescu, I.; Thomas, J.-C.; Valiente-Dobón, J. J.; Duppen, P. Van; Verney, D.; Voulot, D.; Warr, N.; Weisshaar, D.; Wenander, F.; Wolf, B. H.; Zielińska, M.

    2009-01-01

    At the radioactive ion beam facility REX-ISOLDE, neutron-rich zinc isotopes were investigated using low-energy Coulomb excitation. These experiments have resulted in B(E2,21+→01+) values in Zn74-80, B(E2,41+→21+) values in Zn74,76 and the determination of the energy of the first excited 21+ states in Zn78,80. The zinc isotopes were produced by high-energy proton- (A=74,76,80) and neutron- (A=78) induced fission of U238, combined with selective laser ionization and mass separation. The isobaric beam was postaccelerated by the REX linear accelerator and Coulomb excitation was induced on a thin secondary target, which was surrounded by the MINIBALL germanium detector array. In this work, it is shown how the selective laser ionization can be used to deal with the considerable isobaric beam contamination and how a reliable normalization of the experiment can be achieved. The results for zinc isotopes and the N=50 isotones are compared to collective model predictions and state-of-the-art large-scale shell-model calculations, including a recent empirical residual interaction constructed to describe the present experimental data up to 2004 in this region of the nuclear chart.

  16. Uncovering Special Nuclear Materials by Low-energy Nuclear Reaction Imaging.

    PubMed

    Rose, P B; Erickson, A S; Mayer, M; Nattress, J; Jovanovic, I

    2016-04-18

    Weapons-grade uranium and plutonium could be used as nuclear explosives with extreme destructive potential. The problem of their detection, especially in standard cargo containers during transit, has been described as "searching for a needle in a haystack" because of the inherently low rate of spontaneous emission of characteristic penetrating radiation and the ease of its shielding. Currently, the only practical approach for uncovering well-shielded special nuclear materials is by use of active interrogation using an external radiation source. However, the similarity of these materials to shielding and the required radiation doses that may exceed regulatory limits prevent this method from being widely used in practice. We introduce a low-dose active detection technique, referred to as low-energy nuclear reaction imaging, which exploits the physics of interactions of multi-MeV monoenergetic photons and neutrons to simultaneously measure the material's areal density and effective atomic number, while confirming the presence of fissionable materials by observing the beta-delayed neutron emission. For the first time, we demonstrate identification and imaging of uranium with this novel technique using a simple yet robust source, setting the stage for its wide adoption in security applications.

  17. Uncovering Special Nuclear Materials by Low-energy Nuclear Reaction Imaging

    DOE PAGES

    Rose, P. B.; Erickson, A. S.; Mayer, M.; ...

    2016-04-18

    Weapons-grade uranium and plutonium could be used as nuclear explosives with extreme destructive potential. The problem of their detection, especially in standard cargo containers during transit, has been described as “searching for a needle in a haystack” because of the inherently low rate of spontaneous emission of characteristic penetrating radiation and the ease of its shielding. Currently, the only practical approach for uncovering well-shielded special nuclear materials is by use of active interrogation using an external radiation source. However, the similarity of these materials to shielding and the required radiation doses that may exceed regulatory limits prevent this method frommore » being widely used in practice. We introduce a low-dose active detection technique, referred to as low-energy nuclear reaction imaging, which exploits the physics of interactions of multi-MeV monoenergetic photons and neutrons to simultaneously measure the material’s areal density and effective atomic number, while confirming the presence of fissionable materials by observing the beta-delayed neutron emission. For the first time, we demonstrate identification and imaging of uranium with this novel technique using a simple yet robust source, setting the stage for its wide adoption in security applications.« less

  18. Uncovering Special Nuclear Materials by Low-energy Nuclear Reaction Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, P. B.; Erickson, A. S.; Mayer, M.; Nattress, J.; Jovanovic, I.

    2016-04-18

    Weapons-grade uranium and plutonium could be used as nuclear explosives with extreme destructive potential. The problem of their detection, especially in standard cargo containers during transit, has been described as “searching for a needle in a haystack” because of the inherently low rate of spontaneous emission of characteristic penetrating radiation and the ease of its shielding. Currently, the only practical approach for uncovering well-shielded special nuclear materials is by use of active interrogation using an external radiation source. However, the similarity of these materials to shielding and the required radiation doses that may exceed regulatory limits prevent this method from being widely used in practice. We introduce a low-dose active detection technique, referred to as low-energy nuclear reaction imaging, which exploits the physics of interactions of multi-MeV monoenergetic photons and neutrons to simultaneously measure the material’s areal density and effective atomic number, while confirming the presence of fissionable materials by observing the beta-delayed neutron emission. For the first time, we demonstrate identification and imaging of uranium with this novel technique using a simple yet robust source, setting the stage for its wide adoption in security applications.

  19. Geant4 models for simulation of hadron/ion nuclear interactions at moderate and low energies.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivantchenko, Anton; Ivanchenko, Vladimir; Quesada, Jose-Manuel; Wright, Dennis

    The Geant4 toolkit is intended for Monte Carlo simulation of particle transport in media. It was initially designed for High Energy Physics purposes such as experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. The toolkit offers a set of models allowing effective simulation of cosmic ray interactions with different materials. For moderate and low energy hadron/ion interactions with nuclei there are a number of competitive models: Binary and Bertini intra-nuclear cascade models, quantum molecular dynamic model (QMD), INCL/ABLA cascade model, and Chiral Invariant Phase Space Decay model (CHIPS). We report the status of these models for the recent version of Geant4 (release 9.3, December 2009). The Bertini cascade in-ternal cross sections were upgraded. The native Geant4 precompound and deexcitation models were used in the Binary cascade and QMD. They were significantly improved including emis-sion of light fragments, the Fermi break-up model, the General Evaporation Model (GEM), the multi-fragmentation model, and the fission model. Comparisons between model predictions and data for thin target experiments for neutron, proton, light ions, and isotope production are presented and discussed. The focus of these validations is concentrated on target materials important for space missions.

  20. Uncovering Special Nuclear Materials by Low-energy Nuclear Reaction Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Rose, P. B.; Erickson, A. S.; Mayer, M.; Nattress, J.; Jovanovic, I.

    2016-01-01

    Weapons-grade uranium and plutonium could be used as nuclear explosives with extreme destructive potential. The problem of their detection, especially in standard cargo containers during transit, has been described as “searching for a needle in a haystack” because of the inherently low rate of spontaneous emission of characteristic penetrating radiation and the ease of its shielding. Currently, the only practical approach for uncovering well-shielded special nuclear materials is by use of active interrogation using an external radiation source. However, the similarity of these materials to shielding and the required radiation doses that may exceed regulatory limits prevent this method from being widely used in practice. We introduce a low-dose active detection technique, referred to as low-energy nuclear reaction imaging, which exploits the physics of interactions of multi-MeV monoenergetic photons and neutrons to simultaneously measure the material’s areal density and effective atomic number, while confirming the presence of fissionable materials by observing the beta-delayed neutron emission. For the first time, we demonstrate identification and imaging of uranium with this novel technique using a simple yet robust source, setting the stage for its wide adoption in security applications. PMID:27087555

  1. Fission: The first 50 years

    SciTech Connect

    Vandenbosch, R.

    1989-01-01

    The possibility of fission had been largely unanticipated prior to its discovery in 1938. This process, with its dramatically large energy release and its formation of previously unknown nuclides, immediately captured the imagination of the scientific community. Both theoretical and experimental developments occurred at a rapid pace. I will begin my discussion of fission with the far-reaching paper of Bohr and Wheeler, who in little more than half a year laid out a framework for understanding many features of the fission process. I will then turn to our current understanding of a number of aspects of fission. One of these is the pronounced tendency of many nuclear species to fission asymmetrically. In fact, the discovery of fission was based on the identification of barium isotopes produced in asymmetric fission. The dramatic changes in the preferred mass division and kinetic energy release with the addition of only a few neutrons to the spontaneously fissioning Fermium isotopes will be emphasized. The problem of the dynamics of saddle to scission will be discussed---this is one aspect of fission for which we do not have all the answers. Another dynamical effect to be discussed is the apparent failure of transition state theory at high excitation energies. The role of single particle (shell) effects in enriching the structure if the potential energy surface will be explored. Spontaneously fissioning isomers and intermediate structure resonances will be discussed. The recognition that short-lived fission isomers are superdeformed shape isomers has been followed by the recent observation of superdeformed shape isomers in the rare earth region. 18 refs., 3 figs.

  2. Characteristics of ultra-low-energy Cs + ion beam bombardments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhanping; Hoshi, Takahiro; Oiwa, Retsu

    2003-01-01

    Shallow arsenic implants and extra-thin film (SiON) are routinely analyzed by modern SIMS under ultra-low-energy Cs + ion beam bombardment, either at oblique (<60°) or glancing (˜80°) incident angle [J. Surf. Anal. 6 (3) (1999) A-3; in: A. Benninghoven, et al. (Eds.), Proceedings of the SIMS XII, Elsevier, Amsterdam, 1999, p. 549]. This article investigates the basic aspects of ultra-low-energy Cs + ion beam bombardment using a delta-doped boron sample (four layers, 5.3 nm per cycle), such as useful yield, depth resolution and changes in sputter rate in the near surface region. Our results indicated that there is a magic incidence angle (˜70°) at which the depth resolution is very poor, and at glancing (˜80°) incident angle the best depth resolution is observed.

  3. Three dimensional calculation of flux of low energy atmospheric neutrinos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, H.; Bludman, S. A.

    1985-01-01

    Results of three-dimensional Monte Carlo calculation of low energy flux of atmospheric neutrinos are presented and compared with earlier one-dimensional calculations 1,2 valid at higher neutrino energies. These low energy neutrinos are the atmospheric background in searching for neutrinos from astrophysical sources. Primary cosmic rays produce the neutrino flux peaking at near E sub=40 MeV and neutrino intensity peaking near E sub v=100 MeV. Because such neutrinos typically deviate by 20 approximately 30 from the primary cosmic ray direction, three-dimensional effects are important for the search of atmospheric neutrinos. Nevertheless, the background of these atmospheric neutrinos is negligible for the detection of solar and supernova neutrinos.

  4. Polarimeter for Low Energy X-ray Astrophysical Sources (PLEXAS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, Stephen S.; Pierce, David L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Polarimeter for Low Energy X-ray Astrophysical Sources (PLEXAS) is an astrophysics mission concept for measuring the polarization of X-ray sources at low energies below the C-K band (less than 277 eV). PLEXAS uses the concept of variations in the reflectivity of a multilayered X-ray telescope as a function of the orientation of an X-rays polarization vector with respect to the reflecting surface of the optic. By selecting an appropriate multilayer, and rotating the X-ray telescope while pointing to a source, there will be a modulation in the source intensity, as measured at the focus of the telescope, which is proportional to the degree of polarization in the source.

  5. Steering continuum electron dynamics by low-energy attosecond streaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Ji-Wei; Xiong, Wei-Hao; Xiao, Xiang-Ru; Gong, Qihuang; Peng, Liang-You

    2016-08-01

    A semiclassical model is developed to understand the electronic dynamics in the low-energy attosecond streaking. Under a relatively strong infrared (IR) pulse, the low-energy part of photoelectrons initialized by a single attosecond pulse (SAP) can either rescatter with the ionic core and induce interferences structures in the momentum spectra of the ionized electrons or be recaptured into the Rydberg states. The Coulomb potential plays essential roles in both the electron rescattering and recapturing processes. We find that by changing the time delay between the SAP and the IR pulse, the photoelectrons yield or the population of the Rydberg states can be effectively controlled. The present study demonstrates a fascinating way to steer the electron motion in the continuum.

  6. Surface modification using low energy ground state ion beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, Ara (Inventor); Hecht, Michael H. (Inventor); Orient, Otto J. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A method of effecting modifications at the surfaces of materials using low energy ion beams of known quantum state, purity, flux, and energy is presented. The ion beam is obtained by bombarding ion-generating molecules with electrons which are also at low energy. The electrons used to bombard the ion generating molecules are separated from the ions thus obtained and the ion beam is directed at the material surface to be modified. Depending on the type of ion generating molecules used, different ions can be obtained for different types of surface modifications such as oxidation and diamond film formation. One area of application is in the manufacture of semiconductor devices from semiconductor wafers.

  7. Status of the Frankfurt low energy electrostatic storage ring (FLSR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, F.; Kruppi, T.; Müller, J.; Dörner, R.; Schmidt, L. Ph H.; Schmidt-Böcking, H.; Stiebing, K. E.

    2015-11-01

    Frankfurt low-energy storage ring (FLSR) is an electrostatic storage ring for low-energy ions up to q · 80 keV (q being the ion charge state) at Institut für Kernphysik der Goethe-Universität, Frankfurt am Main, Germany. It has especially been designed to provide a basis for experiments on the dynamics of ionic and molecular collisions in complete kinematics, as well as for high precision and time resolved laser spectroscopy. The ring has ‘racetrack’ geometry with a circumference of 14.23 m. It comprises four experimental/diagnostic sections with regions of enhanced ion density (interaction regions). First beam has successfully been stored in FLSR in summer 2013. Since then the performance of the ring has continuously been improved and an electron target for experiments on dissociative recombination has been installed in one of the experimental sections.

  8. Ionization cooling in a low-energy proton storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Neuffer, David V.; /Fermilab

    2006-03-01

    At the FFAG05 meeting, Mori and Okabe presented a scenario in which the lifetime of protons in a low-energy storage ring ({approx}10 MeV) is extended by energy-loss in a wedge foil, and this enables greater neutron production from the foil. The lifetime extension is due to the cooling effect of this energy loss. We have previously analyzed ionization cooling for muons at optimal cooling energies. The same equations, with appropriate adaptations, can be used to analyze the dynamic situation for proton-material interactions at low energies. In this note we discuss this extension and calculate cooling and heating effects at these very different parameters. The ring could provide a practical application of ionization cooling methods.

  9. Influence of Packing on Low Energy Vibrations of Densified Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carini, Giovanni, Jr.; Carini, Giuseppe; D'Angelo, Giovanna; Tripodo, Gaspare; Di Marco, Gaetano; Vasi, Cirino; Gilioli, Edmondo

    2013-12-01

    A comparative study of Raman scattering and low temperature specific heat capacity has been performed on samples of B2O3, which have been high-pressure quenched to go through different glassy phases having growing density to the crystalline state. It has revealed that the excess volume characterizing the glassy networks favors the formation of specific glassy structural units, the boroxol rings, which produce the boson peak, a broad band of low energy vibrational states. The decrease of boroxol rings with increasing pressure of synthesis is associated with the progressive depression of the excess low energy vibrations until their full disappearance in the crystalline phase, where the rings are missing. These observations prove that the additional soft vibrations in glasses arise from specific units whose formation is made possible by the poor atomic packing of the network.

  10. Beam dynamics limits for low-energy RHIC operation

    SciTech Connect

    Fedotov,A.V.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Chang, X.; Kayran, D.; Litvinenko, V.N.; Pozdeyev, E.; Satogata, T.

    2008-08-25

    There is a strong interest in low-energy RHIC operations in the single-beam total energy range of 2.5-25 GeV/nucleon [1-3]. Collisions in this energy range, much of which is below nominal RHIC injection energy, will help to answer one of the key questions in the field of QCD about the existence and location of a critical point on the QCD phase diagram [4]. There have been several short test runs during 2006-2008 RHIC operations to evaluate RHIC operational challenges at these low energies [5]. Beam lifetimes observed during the test runs were limited by machine nonlinearities. This performance limit can be improved with sufficient machine tuning. The next luminosity limitation comes from transverse and longitudinal Intra-beam Scattering (IBS), and ultimately from the space-charge limit. Here we summarize dynamic effects limiting beam lifetime and possible improvement with electron cooling.

  11. Low-energy dipole modes in unstable nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, T.; Sagawa, H.

    2001-01-01

    Enhancement of electric dipole (E1) strength at low energy is investigated in light neutron and proton drip-line nuclei with halo or skin by large scale shell model calculations. Large E1 strength are found in low excitation energy region below 5 MeV in 11Li, 12Be and 13O. Both the effects of extended halo or skin wave functions and the coherence in the transition amplitudes are important to enhance the E1 strength. The particle (hole)- vibration coupling model is shown to explain the splitting of the low energy E1 strength in 11Li and 13O. Melting of the shell magicity at N=8 and Z=8 is pointed out. Pigmy resonances in oxygen isotopes are also studied. The pigmy strength below E x = 15 MeV are shown to have about 10 % of the Thomas- Reiche-Kuhn (TRK) sum rule and more than 40 % of the cluster sum rule.

  12. Si etching with reactive neutral beams of very low energy

    SciTech Connect

    Hara, Yasuhiro; Hamagaki, Manabu; Mise, Takaya; Iwata, Naotaka; Hara, Tamio

    2014-12-14

    A Si etching process has been investigated with reactive neutral beams (NBs) extracted using a low acceleration voltage of less than 100 V from CF{sub 4} and Ar mixed plasmas. The etched Si profile shows that the etching process is predominantly anisotropic. The reactive NB has a constant Si etching rate in the acceleration voltage range from 20 V to 80 V. It is considered that low-energy NBs can trigger Si etching because F radicals adsorb onto the Si surface and weaken Si–Si bonds. The etching rate per unit beam flux is 33 times higher than that with Ar NB. These results show that the low-energy reactive NB is useful for damage-free high speed Si etching.

  13. Antineutron and antiproton nuclear interactions at very low energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, E.

    2014-05-01

    Experimental annihilation cross sections of antineutrons and antiprotons at very low energies are compared. Features of Coulomb focusing are observed for pbar annihilation on protons. Direct comparisons for heavier targets are not straightforward due to lack of overlap between targets and energies of experimental results for pbar and nbar. Nevertheless, the annihilation cross sections for nbar on nuclei cannot be described by an optical potential that fits well all the available data on pbar interactions with nuclei. Comparisons made with the help of this potential reveal in the nbar data features similar to Coulomb focusing. Direct comparisons between nbar and pbar annihilations at very low energies would be possible when pbar cross sections are measured on the same targets and at the same energies as the available cross sections for nbar. Such measurements may be possible in the foreseeable future.

  14. Low energy overlineKN interaction in nuclear matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waas, T.; Kaiser, N.; Weise, W.

    1996-02-01

    We investigate the low-energy overlineKN interaction in nuclear matter including Pauli blocking, Fermi motion and binding effects. We use a coupled-channel approach based on the Chiral SU(3) Effective Lagrangian which describes all available low energy data of the coupled overlineKN, πΣ, πΛ system. Due to the dynamics of the Λ (1405) resonance we find a strong non-linear density dependence of the K -p scattering amplitude in nuclear matter. The real part of the K -p scattering length changes sign already at a small fraction of nuclear matter density, less than 0.2 po. This may explain the striking behaviour of the K - -nuclear optical potential found in the analysis of kaonic atom data.

  15. Imaging of magnetospheric dynamics using low energy neutral atom detection

    SciTech Connect

    Funsten, H.O.; McComas, D.J.; Moore, K.R.; Scime, E.E.

    1993-05-01

    Recent advances in low energy neutral atom (LENA) detection technology show that magnetospheric imaging is achievable with 4{sub o}{times}4{sub o} resolution and can distinguish numerous features of the magnetosphere. A critical factor in detecting low energy neutrals is their removal from the ambient UV background. One technique to accomplish this is by ionizing the neutrals by their transmission through an untrathin charge modification foil and subsequent electrostatic deflection. In this type of instrument, the driving factor for resolution and sensitivity is scattering in the foil and the ionization probability of transiting neutrals. We describe results of a prototype LENA imager using a collimated beam of 10 key H. Additionally, we illustrate model results of anticipated LENA images of the magnetosphere based on the Rice Convection Model and show that plasma variations resulting from geomagnetic storm disturbances can be observed using a LENA imager.

  16. Imaging of magnetospheric dynamics using low energy neutral atom detection

    SciTech Connect

    Funsten, H.O.; McComas, D.J.; Moore, K.R.; Scime, E.E.

    1993-01-01

    Recent advances in low energy neutral atom (LENA) detection technology show that magnetospheric imaging is achievable with 4[sub o][times]4[sub o] resolution and can distinguish numerous features of the magnetosphere. A critical factor in detecting low energy neutrals is their removal from the ambient UV background. One technique to accomplish this is by ionizing the neutrals by their transmission through an untrathin charge modification foil and subsequent electrostatic deflection. In this type of instrument, the driving factor for resolution and sensitivity is scattering in the foil and the ionization probability of transiting neutrals. We describe results of a prototype LENA imager using a collimated beam of 10 key H. Additionally, we illustrate model results of anticipated LENA images of the magnetosphere based on the Rice Convection Model and show that plasma variations resulting from geomagnetic storm disturbances can be observed using a LENA imager.

  17. Low-energy proton increases associated with interplanetary shock waves.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmeira, R. A. R.; Allum, F. R.; Rao, U. R.

    1971-01-01

    Impulsive increases in the low energy proton flux observed by the Explorer 34 satellite, in very close time association with geomagnetic storm sudden commencements are described. It is shown that these events are of short duration (20-30 min) and occur only during the decay phase of a solar cosmic-ray flare event. The differential energy spectrum and the angular distribution of the direction of arrival of the particles are discussed. Two similar increases observed far away from the earth by the Pioneer 7 and 8 deep-space probes are also presented. These impulsive increases are compared with Energetic Storm Particle events and their similarities and differences are discussed. A model is suggested to explain these increases, based on the sweeping and trapping of low energy cosmic rays of solar origin by the advancing shock front responsible for the sudden commencement detected on the earth.

  18. Selected Papers on Low-Energy Antiprotons and Possible Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Noble, Robert

    1998-09-19

    The only realistic means by which to create a facility at Fermilab to produce large amounts of low energy antiprotons is to use resources which already exist. There is simply too little money and manpower at this point in time to generate new accelerators on a time scale before the turn of the century. Therefore, innovation is required to modify existing equipment to provide the services required by experimenters.

  19. Strangeness-conserving hadronic parity violation at low energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C.-P.

    2007-05-01

    The parity-violating nucleaon interacton is the key to understanding the strangeness-conserving hadronic weak interaction at low energies. In this brief talk, I review the past accomplishement in and current status of this subject, and outline a new joint effort between experiment and theory that that tries to address the potential problems in the past by focusing on parity violation in few-nucleon systems and using the language of effective field theory.

  20. Modern Theories of Low-Energy Astrophysical Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Rocco Schiavilla

    2004-02-01

    We summarize recent ab initio studies of low-energy electroweak reactions of astrophysical interest, relevant for both big bang nucleosynthesis and solar neutrino production. The calculational methods include direct integration for np radiative and pp weak capture, correlated hyperspherical harmonics for reactions of A=3,4 nuclei, and variational Monte Carlo for A=6,7 nuclei. Realistic nucleon-nucleon and three-nucleon interactions and consistent current operators are used as input.

  1. Heavy Meson Production at a Low-Energy Photon Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Asztalos, S

    2004-04-15

    A low-energy {gamma}{gamma} collider has been discussed in the context of a testbed for a {gamma}{gamma} interaction region at the Next Linear Collider(NLC). We consider the production of heavy mesons at such a testbed using Compton-backscattered photons and demonstrate that their production rivals or exceeds those by BELLE, BABAR or LEP where they are produced indirectly via virtual {gamma}{gamma} luminosities.

  2. Unparticle searches through low energy parity violating asymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Ozansoy, K. O.

    2008-11-01

    In this paper, we study the effects of the unparticles on the parity violating asymmetry for the low energy electron-electron scattering, e{sup -}e{sup -}{yields}e{sup -}e{sup -}. Using the data from the E158 experiment at SLAC we extract the limits on the unparticle coupling {lambda}{sub AV}, and on the energy scale {lambda} at 95% C.L. for various values of the scaling dimension d.

  3. Low energy supersymmetry from the heterotic string landscape.

    PubMed

    Lebedev, Oleg; Nilles, Hans-Peter; Raby, Stuart; Ramos-Sánchez, Saúl; Ratz, Michael; Vaudrevange, Patrick K S; Wingerter, Akin

    2007-05-04

    We study possible correlations between properties of the observable and hidden sectors in heterotic string theory. Specifically, we analyze the case of the Z6-II orbifold compactification which produces a significant number of models with the spectrum of the supersymmetric standard model. We find that requiring realistic features does affect the hidden sector such that hidden sector gauge group factors SU(4) and SO(8) are favored. In the context of gaugino condensation, this implies low energy supersymmetry breaking.

  4. Pin diode calibration - beam overlap monitoring for low energy cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Drees, A.; Montag, C.; Thieberger, P.

    2015-09-30

    We were trying to address the question whether or not the Pin Diodes, currently installed approximately 1 meter downstream of the RHIC primary collimators, are suitable to monitor a recombination signal from the future RHIC low energy cooling section. A maximized recombination signal, with the Au+78 ions being lost on the collimator, will indicate optimal Au-electron beam overlap as well as velocity matching of the electron beam in the cooling section.

  5. A study of low-energy type II supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisakov, Sergey M.; Dessart, Luc; Hillier, D. John; Waldman, Roni; Livne, Eli

    2015-08-01

    All stars with an initial mass greater than 8Msun, but not massive enough to encounter the pair-production instability, eventually form a degenerate core and collapse to form a compact object, either a neutron star or a black hole.At the lower mass end, these massive stars die as red-supergiant stars and give rise to Type II supernovae (SNe). The diversity of observed properties of SNe II suggests a range of progenitor mass, radii, but also explosion energy.We have performed a large grid simulations designed to cover this range of progenitor and explosion properties. Using MESA STAR, we compute a set of massive star models (12-30Msun) from the main sequence until core collapse. We then generate explosions with V1D to produce ejecta with a range of explosion energies and yields. Finally, all ejecta are evolved with CMFGEN to generate multi-band light curves and spectra.In this poster, we focus our attention on the properties of low-energy explosions that give rise to low-luminosity Type II Plateau (II-P) SNe. In particular, we present a detailed study of SN 2008bk, but also include other notorious low-energy SNe II-P like 2005cs, emphasising their non-standard properties by comparing to models that match well events like SN 1999em. Such low-energy explosions, characterised by low ejecta expansion rates, are more suitable for reliable spectral line identifications.Based on our models, we discuss the distinct signatures of low-energy explosions in lower and higher mass models. One important goal is to identify whether there is a progenitor-mass bias leading to such events.

  6. Exchange and relaxation effects in low-energy radiationless transitions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, M. H.; Crasemann, B.; Aoyagi, M.; Mark, H.

    1978-01-01

    The effect on low-energy atomic inner-shell Coster-Kronig and super Coster-Kronig transitions that is produced by relaxation and by exchange between the continuum electron and bound electrons was examined and illustrated by specific calculations for transitions that deexcite the 3p vacancy state of Zn. Taking exchange and relaxation into account is found to reduce, but not to eliminate, the discrepancies between theoretical rates and measurements.

  7. Low-energy structures in strong-field ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, I. A.; Nam, Chang Hee; Kim, Kyung Taec

    2016-04-01

    We show that the Gabor transform provides a convenient tool allowing one to study the origin of the low-energy structures (LES) in the process of the strong-field ionization. The classical trajectories associated with the stationary points of the Gabor transform enable us to explicate the role of the forward scattering process in forming LES. Our approach offers a fully quantum mechanical description of LES, which can also be applied for other strong-field processes.

  8. Low energy cosmic ray studies from a lunar base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiedenbeck, Mark E.

    1990-01-01

    Studies of cosmic ray nuclei with energies less than about 7 GeV/nucleon in low earth orbit are hampered by the geomagnetic field. Even in high inclination orbits these effects can be significant. The lunar surface (or lunar orbit) provides an attractive site for carrying out low energy cosmic ray studies which require large detectors. The rationale and requirements for this type of experiment are described.

  9. Negative ions as a source of low energy neutral beams

    SciTech Connect

    Fink, J.H.

    1980-01-01

    Little consideration has been given to the impact of recent developments in negative ion source technology on the design of low energy neutral beam injectors. However, negative ion sources of improved operating efficiency, higher gas efficiency, and smaller beam divergence will lead to neutral deuterium injectors, operating at less than 100 keV, with better operating efficiencies and more compact layouts than can be obtained from positive ion systems.

  10. Full QED+QCD low-energy constants through reweighting.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Tomomi; Blum, Thomas; Hayakawa, Masashi; Izubuchi, Taku; Jung, Chulwoo; Zhou, Ran

    2012-08-17

    The effect of sea quark electromagnetic charge on meson masses is investigated, and first results for full QED+QCD low-energy constants are presented. The electromagnetic charge for sea quarks is incorporated in quenched QED+full QCD lattice simulations by a reweighting method. The reweighting factor, which connects quenched and unquenched QED, is estimated using a stochastic method on 2+1 flavor dynamical domain-wall quark ensembles.

  11. Phase Shifts of p-3He Scattering at Low Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshino, Y.; Limkaisang, V.; Nagata, J.; Yoshino, H.; Matsuda, M.

    2000-01-01

    A method employing single-energy phase-shift analysis of p-3He scattering is developed by using the S matrix in the Matsuda-Watari representation. This method can be applied for analyses in the low-energy region and also in the inelastic region. Phase-shift solutions of p-3He scattering are given at TL = 4.0, 5.5, 6.8, 8.5, 9.5 and 19.48 MeV.

  12. Low energy cosmic ray studies from a lunar base

    SciTech Connect

    Wiedenbeck, M.E. Department of Physics, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL )

    1990-03-15

    Studies of cosmic ray nuclei with energies {approx lt}7 GeV/nucleon in low Earth orbit are hampered by the geomagnetic field. Even in high inclination orbits these effects can be significant. The lunar surface (or lunar orbit) provides an attractive site for carrying out low energy cosmic ray studies which require large detectors. The rationale and requirements for this type of experiment are described.

  13. HgI sub 2 low energy beta particle detector

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, K.S.; Squillante, M.R.; Entine, G. )

    1990-04-01

    This paper reports on a HgI{sub 2} device structure designed and tested which allows HgI{sub 2} to be used to make low energy beta particle detectors. The devices detected tritium beta particles with about a 25% efficiency. In addition, an encapsulation scheme was identified which has the potential to protect the devices while permitting most of the beta particles to reach the active region.

  14. Nuclear suppression at low energy in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Santosh K.; Alam, Jan-e; Mohanty, Payal; Sinha, Bikash

    2010-04-15

    The effects of nonzero baryonic chemical potential on the drag and diffusion coefficients of heavy quarks propagating through a baryon-rich quark-gluon plasma have been studied. The nuclear suppression factor R{sub AA} for nonphotonic single-electron spectra resulting from the semileptonic decays of hadrons containing heavy flavors has been evaluated for low-energy collisions. The effect of nonzero baryonic chemical potential on R{sub AA} is highlighted.

  15. Geant4 Standard and Low Energy electromagnetic libraries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanchenko, Vladimir; Incerti, Sebastien

    2017-04-01

    Geant4 is a Monte Carlo toolkit well established for large scale simulations for high energy physics, medicine, space science and other applications. Electromagnetic (EM) physics libraries are key components of these simulations. In this work we describe the Standard and Low Energy EM libraries available in Geant4 version 10.3 including descriptions of new models and interfaces relevant for dark matter searches and limits of applicability for these models.

  16. Surface conversion techniques for low energy neutral atom imagers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinn, J. M.

    1995-01-01

    This investigation has focused on development of key technology elements for low energy neutral atom imaging. More specifically, we have investigated the conversion of low energy neutral atoms to negatively charged ions upon reflection from specially prepared surfaces. This 'surface conversion' technique appears to offer a unique capability of detecting, and thus imaging, neutral atoms at energies of 0.01 - 1 keV with high enough efficiencies to make practical its application to low energy neutral atom imaging in space. Such imaging offers the opportunity to obtain the first instantaneous global maps of macroscopic plasma features and their temporal variation. Through previous in situ plasma measurements, we have a statistical picture of large scale morphology and local measurements of dynamic processes. However, with in situ techniques it is impossible to characterize or understand many of the global plasma transport and energization processes. A series of global plasma images would greatly advance our understanding of these processes and would provide the context for interpreting previous and future in situ measurements. Fast neutral atoms, created from ions that are neutralized in collisions with exospheric neutrals, offer the means for remotely imaging plasma populations. Energy and mass analysis of these neutrals provides critical information about the source plasma distribution. The flux of neutral atoms available for imaging depends upon a convolution of the ambient plasma distribution with the charge exchange cross section for the background neutral population. Some of the highest signals are at relatively low energies (well below 1 keV). This energy range also includes some of the most important plasma populations to be imaged, for example the base of the cleft ion fountain.

  17. Ternary fission of nuclei into comparable fragments

    SciTech Connect

    Karpeshin, F. F.

    2015-07-15

    The problem of nuclear fission into three comparable fragments is considered. A mechanism of true ternary fission is proposed. In contrast to sequential fission, where the three fragments arise upon two sequential events of binary fission, the mechanism in question relies on a scenario that originally involves fission into three fragments. This mechanism is driven by a hexadecapole deformation of the fissioning nucleus, in contrast to binary fission associated with quadrupole vibrations of the nuclear surface. The fragment-mass ratios are estimated. The dynamics of formation of collinear fragments and their subsequent motion in opposite directions is traced. The calculated probability of true ternary fission complies with observed values.

  18. Colorado School of Mines low energy nuclear physics project

    SciTech Connect

    Cecil, F.E.

    1991-01-02

    A major accomplishment of this project in the past year is the completion of a fairly comprehensive paper describing the survey of radiative capture reactions of protons on light nuclei at low energies. In addition we have completed a preliminary set of measurements of (d,p)/(d,{alpha}) cross section ratios on the charge symmetric nuclei {sup 6}Li and {sup 10}B as a test of the Oppenheimer-Phillips effect. While the {sup 6}Li data remain inconclusive, the {sup 10}B data show solid evidence for the Oppenheimer-Phillips enhancement of the (d,p) reaction relative to the (d,{alpha}) reaction for deuteron bombarding energies below about 100 keV. We have continued our investigation of fusion reaction products from deuterium-metal systems at room temperatures with the startling observation of intense burst of energetic charged particles from deuterium gas loaded thin titaium foils subject to non-equilibrium thermal and electrical conditions. We have completed two projects involving the application of the low energy particle accelerator to material science problems; firstly a study of the transformation of crystalline to amorphous Fe-Zr systems by proton irradiation and secondly the effects of ion bombardment on the critical temperature of YBCO high-temperature superconductors. Finally we have made progress in several instrumentation projects which will be used in some of the up-coming measurements of nuclear cross sections at very low energies.

  19. Supernova physics with a low-energy beta-beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jachowicz, Natalie; McLaughlin, Gail

    Core-collapse supernova neutrino-spectra are of interest not only for understanding the deep inte- rior of astrophysical explosions, but also for understanding the synthesis of many elements made primarily in this environment. A new type of neutrino beam, the beta-beam, is now under discus- sion as a next generation neutrino experiment. A low-energy version of this beam has been pro- posed for a number of astrophysical applications. The energy range of these low-energy neutrinos is the same as that of supernova neutrinos. We present a theoretical discussion of the importance of low-energy beta-beams for improving our interpretation of a future galactic supernova signal. We present a novel method, where fitting synthetic spectra, constructed by taking linear combina- tions of beta-beam spectra, to the original supernova-neutrino spectra reproduces the folded dif- ferential cross sections very accurately. Comparing the response in a terrestrial detector to these synthetic responses provides a direct way to determine the main parameters of the supernova- neutrino energy-distribution.

  20. The MAJORANA Demonstrator Low-Energy Rare Event Search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiseman, Clinton; Majorana Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    The extremely low backgrounds of the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR neutrinoless double beta decay experiment, combined with the excellent energy resolution of its high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors, provide an opportunity for a dark matter search at low energy (<100 keV). The DEMONSTRATOR is in the final stages of construction at the 4850-ft. level of the Sanford Underground Research Facility in Lead, SD. The first detector module, consisting of 16.8 kg of HPGe enriched to 88% 76Ge and 5.7 kg of natural HPGe, took 100.6 live days of commissioning data before going blind on April 14th, 2016, and the second module is nearing completion at the time of this writing. The enriched detectors have particularly low levels of cosmogenic activation from their specialized manufacturing process. These ultra-low background designs are suited to rare event searches at low energies, including light WIMPs (<10 GeV/c2) and solar axions. In this talk an update of the MAJORANA low-energy research program will be presented. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. DOE, Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics, the Particle Astrophysics and Nuclear Physics Programs of the National Science Foundation, and the Sanford Underground Research Facility.

  1. A Low energy neutrino factory for large theta(13)

    SciTech Connect

    Geer, Steve; Mena, Olga; Pascoli, Silvia; /Durham U., IPPP

    2007-01-01

    If the value of {theta}{sub 13} is within the reach of the upcoming generation of long-baseline experiments, T2K and NOvA, they show that a low-energy neutrino factory, with peak energy in the few GeV range, would provide a sensitive tool to explore CP-violation and the neutrino mass hierarchy. They consider baselines with typical length 1000-1500 km. The unique performance of the low energy neutrino factory is due to the rich neutrino oscillation pattern at energies between 1 and 4 GeV at baselines {Omicron}(1000) km. They perform both a semi-analytical study of the sensitivities and a numerical analysis to explore how well this setup can measure {theta}{sub 13}, CP-violation, and determine the type of mass hierarchy and the {theta}{sub 23} quadrant. A low energy neutrino factory provides a powerful tool to resolve ambiguities and make precise parameter determinations, for both large and fairly small values of the mixing parameter {theta}{sub 13}.

  2. Interpretation of low-energy electron-CO2 scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanroose, W.; McCurdy, C. W.; Rescigno, T. N.

    2002-09-01

    Recent ab initio calculations of low-energy electron-CO2 scattering [Rescigno et al., Phys. Rev. A 65, 032716 (2002)] are interpreted using an analytically solvable model. The model, which treats two partial-wave Hamiltonians with different l values coupled by a long-range (d/r2) interaction, is a generalization of similar single-channel models that have previously been used to interpret the low-energy behavior of electron scattering by polar diatomic molecules. The present model is used to track the pole trajectories of both resonances and virtual states, both of which figure prominently in low-energy electron-CO2 scattering, in the plane of complex momentum. The connection between resonant and virtual states is found to display a different topology in the case of a polyatomic molecule than it does in diatomic molecules. In a polyatomic molecule, these states may have a conical intersection and consequently acquire a Berry phase along closed paths in two-dimensional vibrational motion. The analytic behavior of the S matrix is further modified by the presence of a geometry-dependent dipole moment.

  3. Advances in low energy neutral atom imaging techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Scime, E.E.; Funsten, H.O.; McComas, D.J.; Moore, K.R. ); Gruntman, M. . Space Sciences Center)

    1993-01-01

    Recently proposed low energy neutral atom (LENA) imaging techniques use a collisional process to convert the low energy neutrals into ions before detection. At low energies, collisional processes limit the angular resolution and conversion efficiencies of these devices. However, if the intense ultraviolet light background can be suppressed, direct LENA detection is possible. We present results from a series of experiments designed to develop a novel filtering structure based on free-standing transmission gratings. If the grating period is sufficiently small, free standing transmission gratings can be employed to substantially polarize ultraviolet (UV) light in the wavelength range 300 [Angstrom] to 1500 [Angstrom]. If a second grating is placed behind the first grating with its axis of polarization oriented at a right angle to the first's, a substantial attenuation of UV radiation is achievable. ne neutrals will pass through the remaining open area of two gratings and be detected without UV background complications. We have obtained nominal 2000 [Angstrom] period (1000 [Angstrom] bars with 1000 [Angstrom] slits) free standing, gold transmission gratings and measured their UV and atomic transmission characteristics. The geometric factor of a LENA imager based on this technology is comparable to that of other proposed LENA imagers. In addition, this of imager does not distort the neutral trajectories, allowing for high angular resolution.

  4. Low Energy Surface Activation of Zirconia Based Restorations.

    PubMed

    Aboushelib, Moustafa N

    2016-03-01

    To evaluate the influence of low energy surface activation technique on the biaxial flexure strength of zirconia frameworks. Zirconia discs were prepared by cutting CAD/CAM zirconia blocks. Sintered discs were airborne particle abraded using one of the following particles: 30 μm alumina particles, 50 μm alumina particles, or modified round edges 30 μm alumina particles at low pressure. Scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction analysis, surface roughness, and biaxial flexure strength tests were performed (n = 20). Fractured specimens were fractographically analyzed (α = 0.05). Low energy surface activation resulted in 7% monoclinic crystallographic transformation, increasing surface roughness from 0.05 to 0.3 μm and in significant increase in biaxial flexure strength (1718 MPa) compared 30 μm (1064 MPa), 50 μm (1210 MPa), and as-sintered specimens (1150 MPa). Low energy surface activation of zirconia specimens improved the biaxial flexure strength of zirconia frameworks without creation of surface damage. Clinical implications: by controlling particle size and shape of alumina, the flexure strength of zirconia restorations could be increased usinglow pressure particle abrasion.

  5. Electron cooling for low-energy RHIC program

    SciTech Connect

    Fedotov, A.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Chang, X.; Kayran, D.; Litvinenko, V.N.; Pendzick, A.; Satogata, T.

    2009-08-31

    Electron cooling was proposed to increase luminosity of the RHIC collider for heavy ion beam energies below 10 GeV/nucleon. Providing collisions at such energies, termed RHIC 'low-energy' operation, will help to answer one of the key questions in the field of QCD about existence and location of critical point on the QCD phase diagram. The electron cooling system should deliver electron beam of required good quality over energies of 0.9-5 MeV. Several approaches to provide such cooling were considered. The baseline approach was chosen and design work started. Here we describe the main features of the cooling system and its expected performance. We have started design work on a low-energy RHIC electron cooler which will operate with kinetic electron energy range 0.86-2.8 (4.9) MeV. Several approaches to an electron cooling system in this energy range are being investigated. At present, our preferred scheme is to transfer the Fermilab Pelletron to BNL after Tevatron shutdown, and to use it for DC non-magnetized cooling in RHIC. Such electron cooling system can significantly increase RHIC luminosities at low-energy operation.

  6. Saturation of low-energy antiproton annihilation on nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gal, A.; Friedman, E.; Batty, C. J.

    2000-10-01

    Recent measurements of very low-energy (pL<100 MeV//c) /p¯ annihilation on light nuclei reveal apparent suppression of annihilation upon increasing the atomic charge /Z and mass number /A. Using /p¯-nucleus optical potentials Vopt, fitted to /p¯-atom energy-shifts and -widths, we resolve this suppression as due to the strong effective repulsion produced by the very absorptive Vopt. The low-energy /p¯-nucleus wavefunction is kept substantially outside the nuclear surface and the resulting reaction cross section saturates as function of the strength of ImVopt. This feature, for /E>0, parallels the recent prediction, for /E<0, that the level widths of /p¯ atoms saturate and, hence, that /p¯ deeply bound atomic states are relatively narrow. Antiproton annihilation cross sections are calculated at pL=57 MeV//c across the periodic table, and their dependence on /Z and /A is classified and discussed with respect to the Coulomb focussing effect at very low energies.

  7. Low energy description of quantum gravity and complementarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Yasunori; Varela, Jaime; Weinberg, Sean J.

    2014-06-01

    We consider a framework in which low energy dynamics of quantum gravity is described preserving locality, and yet taking into account the effects that are not captured by the naive global spacetime picture, e.g. those associated with black hole complementarity. Our framework employs a "special relativistic" description of gravity; specifically, gravity is treated as a force measured by the observer tied to the coordinate system associated with a freely falling local Lorentz frame. We identify, in simple cases, regions of spacetime in which low energy local descriptions are applicable as viewed from the freely falling frame; in particular, we identify a surface called the gravitational observer horizon on which the local proper acceleration measured in the observer's coordinates becomes the cutoff (string) scale. This allows for separating between the "low-energy" local physics and "trans-Planckian" intrinsically quantum gravitational (stringy) physics, and allows for developing physical pictures of the origins of various effects. We explore the structure of the Hilbert space in which the proposed scheme is realized in a simple manner, and classify its elements according to certain horizons they possess. We also discuss implications of our framework on the firewall problem. We conjecture that the complementarity picture may persist due to properties of trans-Planckian physics.

  8. TREATMENT OF FISSION PRODUCT WASTE

    DOEpatents

    Huff, J.B.

    1959-07-28

    A pyrogenic method of separating nuclear reactor waste solutions containing aluminum and fission products as buring petroleum coke in an underground retort, collecting the easily volatile gases resulting as the first fraction, he uminum chloride as the second fraction, permitting the coke bed to cool and ll contain all the longest lived radioactive fission products in greatly reduced volume.

  9. Membrane biology: fission behind BARs.

    PubMed

    Haucke, Volker

    2012-06-05

    Membrane bending is accomplished in part by amphipathic helix insertion into the bilayer and the assembly of BAR domain scaffolds preparing the membrane for fission. Two recent studies highlight the roles of amphipathic helices and BAR scaffolds in membrane fission and establish the structural basis of membrane bending by the N-BAR protein endophilin.

  10. Fission fragment driven neutron source

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Lowell G.; Young, Robert C.; Brugger, Robert M.

    1976-01-01

    Fissionable uranium formed into a foil is bombarded with thermal neutrons in the presence of deuterium-tritium gas. The resulting fission fragments impart energy to accelerate deuterium and tritium particles which in turn provide approximately 14 MeV neutrons by the reactions t(d,n).sup.4 He and d(t,n).sup.4 He.

  11. Low-energy electron-induced reactions in condensed matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arumainayagam, Christopher R.; Lee, Hsiao-Lu; Nelson, Rachel B.; Haines, David R.; Gunawardane, Richard P.

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this review is to discuss post-irradiation analysis of low-energy (≤50 eV) electron-induced processes in nanoscale thin films. Because electron-induced surface reactions in monolayer adsorbates have been extensively reviewed, we will instead focus on low-energy electron-induced reactions in multilayer adsorbates. The latter studies, involving nanoscale thin films, serve to elucidate the pivotal role that the low-energy electron-induced reactions play in high-energy radiation-induced chemical reactions in condensed matter. Although electron-stimulated desorption (ESD) experiments conducted during irradiation have yielded vital information relevant to primary or initial electron-induced processes, we wish to demonstrate in this review that analyzing the products following low-energy electron irradiation can provide new insights into radiation chemistry. This review presents studies of electron-induced reactions in nanoscale films of molecular species such as oxygen, nitrogen trifluoride, water, alkanes, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids, nitriles, halocarbons, alkane and phenyl thiols, thiophenes, ferrocene, amino acids, nucleotides, and DNA using post-irradiation techniques such as temperature-programmed desorption (TPD), reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), high-resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS), gel electrophoresis, and microarray fluorescence. Post-irradiation temperature-programmed desorption, in particular, has been shown to be useful in identifying labile radiolysis products as demonstrated by the first identification of methoxymethanol as a reaction product of methanol radiolysis. Results of post-irradiation studies have been used not only to identify radiolysis products, but also to determine the dynamics of electron-induced reactions. For example, studies of the radiolysis yield as a function of incident electron energy have shown that dissociative

  12. Nuclear Fission Research at IRMM

    SciTech Connect

    Hambsch, Franz-Josef

    2005-05-24

    The Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM) will celebrate its 45th anniversary in 2005. With its 150-MeV Geel Electron Linear Accelerator (GELINA) and 7-MV Van de Graaff accelerator as multi-purpose neutron sources, it served the nuclear physics community for this period.The research in the field of nuclear fission was focused in recent years on both the measurement and calculation of fission cross sections, and the measurement of fission fragment properties.Fission cross sections were determined for 233Pa and 234U; the fission process was studied in the resolved resonance region of 239Pu(n,f) and for 251Cf(nth,f). These measurements derive their interest from accelerator driven systems, the thorium fuel cycle, high temperature reactors, safety issues of current reactors, and basic physics. The measurements are supported by several modeling efforts that aim at improving model codes and nuclear data evaluation.

  13. A low energy threshold scintillation detector for X and low energy gamma rays at the Fréjus underground laboratory.

    PubMed

    Miramonti, L

    2001-10-01

    A low energy threshold scintillation detector for X and low energy gamma rays has been built in the Fréjus underground laboratory in order to investigate radioactive contaminations at very low energies down to about 5 keV. The main features and capabilities are described here.

  14. Spontaneous fission properties of superheavy elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heßberger, F. P.

    2017-04-01

    Spontaneous fission properties of transuranium isotopes are reviewed. Specific emphasis was laid on brief historical overviews of theoretical descriptions and experimental determination of basic properties as spontaneous fission half-lives, fission barriers, or total kinetic energy release in fission. Experimental spontaneous fission half-lives are compared with the results of recent theoretical predictions. Hindrance factors for spontaneous fission of odd-mass nuclei are discussed in context with the configuration (spin, parity) of the fissioning states and the change in energy of single particle levels at deformation. Kinetic energy release and mass distributions are discussed in the context of different fission modes, as symmetric and asymmetric or fission from elongated or compact shapes of the nascent fission fragments. An overview of recent fission barrier calculations of superheavy elements on the basis of macroscopic-microscopic models or self-consistent calculations is given, and the results are compared for selected examples.

  15. Fifty years with nuclear fission

    SciTech Connect

    Behrens, J.W.; Carlson, A.D. )

    1989-01-01

    The news of the discovery of nuclear fission, by Otto Hahn and Fritz Strassmann in Germany, was brought to the United States by Niels Bohr in January 1939. Since its discovery, the United States, and the world for that matter, has never been the same. It therefore seemed appropriate to acknowledge the fifieth anniversary of its discovery by holding a topical meeting entitled, Fifty Years with Nuclear Fission,'' in the United States during the year 1989. The objective of the meeting was to bring together pioneers of the nuclear industry and other scientists and engineers to report on reminiscences of the past and on the more recent development in fission science and technology. The conference highlighted the early pioneers of the nuclear industry by dedicated a full day (April 26), consisting of two plenary sessions, at the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) in Washington, DC. More recent developments in fission science and technology in addition to historical reflections were topics for two fully days of sessions (April 27 and 28) at the main site of the NIST in Gaithersburg, Maryland. The wide range of topics covered in this Volume 1 by this topical meeting included plenary invited, and contributed sessions entitled: Preclude to the First Chain Reaction -- 1932 to 1942; Early Fission Research -- Nuclear Structure and Spontaneous Fission; 50 Years of Fission, Science, and Technology; Nuclear Reactors, Secure Energy for the Future; Reactors 1; Fission Science 1; Safeguards and Space Applications; Fission Data; Nuclear Fission -- Its Various Aspects; Theory and Experiments in Support of Theory; Reactors and Safeguards; and General Research, Instrumentation, and By-Product. The individual papers have been cataloged separately.

  16. Developing effective rockfall protection barriers for low energy impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mentani, Alessio; Giacomini, Anna; Buzzi, Olivier; Govoni, Laura; Gottardi, Guido; Fityus, Stephen

    2016-04-01

    Recently, important progresses have been made towards the development of high capacity rockfall barriers (100 kJ - 8000 kJ). The interest of researchers and practitioners is now turning to the development of fences of minor capacity, whose use becomes essential in areas where rockfall events generally have low intensity and the use of high capacity barriers would be accompanied by excessive costs and high environmental impact. Low energy barriers can also provide a cost-effective solution even in areas where high energies events are expected. Results of full-scale tests are vital to any investigation on the behaviour of these structures. An experimental set-up has been developed at The University of Newcastle (AUS), to investigate the response of low energy rockfall barrier prototypes to low energy impacts. The Australian territory, and in particular New South Wales, is in fact characterised by rockfall events of low-to-medium intensity (50 kJ - 500 kJ) and the need of protection structures working within such energy range, is particularly felt [1]. The experiments involved the impact of a test block onto three spans, low energy barrier prototypes, made of steel structural posts, fully fixed at the base, side cables and a steel meshwork constituted by a double twist hexagonal wire net [2]. Test data enabled the development, calibration and assessment of FE models [3], on which non-linear and dynamic analyses have been performed addressing the effect of the block size. Results have shown that the response of the structure is strongly governed by the net. Data from tests conducted on the sole net and on the entire barrier showed in fact a similar trend, different to what typically observed for high capacity barriers, whose behaviour is also led by the presence of uphill cables and brakes. In particular, the numerical analyses have demonstrated a dependence of the net performance on the block size. In particular, a loss of capacity in the order of 50% occurred as the

  17. STARS/LiBerACE: Segmented silicon and high-purity germanium detector arrays for low-energy nuclear reaction and structure studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesher, S. R.; Phair, L.; Bernstein, L. A.; Bleuel, D. L.; Burke, J. T.; Church, J. A.; Fallon, P.; Gibelin, J.; Scielzo, N. D.; Wiedeking, M.

    2010-09-01

    The Silicon Telescope Array for Reaction Studies (STARS) consists of large-area annular double-sided silicon detectors for charged-particle identification. The Livermore Berkeley Array for Collaborative Experiments (LiBerACE) is an array of six Compton-suppressed high-purity germanium Clover detectors for efficient detection of γ-rays. These detector arrays are versatile tools for studies of neutron-induced reaction cross-sections, fission, light neutron-rich nuclei, and other low-energy nuclear physics topics through transfer, fusion, incomplete-fusion, and inelastic-scattering reactions. The STARS and LiBerACE arrays and typical experimental configurations are described in detail.

  18. Measurements of the neutron-induced fission cross section of sup 242 Cm and sup 238 Pu by lead slowing down time spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, B.

    1987-01-01

    The neutron-induced fission cross section of {sup 242}Cm and {sup 238}Pu have been measured from 0.1 eV to 100 keV energy range using the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute's Gaerttner Laboratory Electron Linac as a pulsed neutron source and the Rensselaer Intense Neutron Spectrometer (RINS) system to obtain an adequate ratio of the neutron-induced fission signal to that due to spontaneous fission background. A special fission chamber design employing multiple pairs of hemispherical electrodes coupled with fast electronics ({approx}nsec rise-time) combine to suppress the alpha pileup effects. The fission cross section of {sup 242}Cm and {sup 238}Pu reported in this thesis were obtained from simultaneous measurements on {sup 235}U, {sup 238}Pu and {sup 242}Cm, and these data were normalized to the resolution-broadened ENDF/B-V {sup 235} U fission cross section. The fission areas and the widths for the resolved low-energy resonances of {sup 242}Cm and {sup 238}Pu were determined. The resolution-broadened ENDF/B-V {sup 238}Pu fission data are generally in poor agreement with the measured fission data and a new evaluation on {sup 238}Pu has been recommended. The measured fission cross section of {sup 242}Cm cannot be compared because no evaluation or measurement on this nuclide is available in the energy region of the present measurements.

  19. Low-energy lunar transfers using spatial transit orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Yuan; Shan, Jinjun

    2014-03-01

    This paper is concerned with natural and artificial low-energy lunar transfers in three-dimensional space. The main contribution of this paper is that the limitations of the planar manifold assumption, which is adopted in previous low-energy orbit design methods, are avoided by describing the transfer orbits with more realistic spatial transit and non-transit orbits. To start, the limitations of the previous design methods for the low-energy trajectories are highlighted, and the boundaries of the spatial transit orbits, which can enter into or escape from the potential well near the Moon through the L1 or L2 bottleneck regions of the zero velocity surface, are defined on a Poincaré section by using the necessary and sufficient condition of transition. Next, by considering the dominant gravity bodies in different orbit segments the motion near the Moon is analyzed in the Earth-Moon circular restricted three-body problem (CR3BP). For natural celestial bodies, the statistical characteristics of the lunar collision trajectories are studied. For the artificial celestial bodies, the investigation is focused on the achievable range of inclination and height of the low lunar orbit (LLO). Then, the motion between the Earth and the Moon is studied in the Earth-Moon based Sun-perturbed bicircular four-body problem (B4BP). For natural and artificial celestial bodies, the Earth-origin trajectories and the trajectories from the low Earth orbits are analyzed. Compared to the current planar manifold based design methods, the technique introduced in this paper can evaluate the lunar transfer orbits more accurately. Also, some lunar transfer trajectories which do not exist in the manifold based models can be found, and the heights and inclinations of the parking orbits around the Earth and the Moon can also be analyzed.

  20. Low Energy Electrons in the Mars Plasma Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Link, Richard

    2001-01-01

    The ionosphere of Mars is rather poorly understood. The only direct measurements were performed by the Viking 1 and 2 landers in 1976, both of which carried a Retarding Potential Analyzer. The RPA was designed to measure ion properties during the descent, although electron fluxes were estimated from changes in the ion currents. Using these derived low-energy electron fluxes, Mantas and Hanson studied the photoelectron and the solar wind electron interactions with the atmosphere and ionosphere of Mars. Unanswered questions remain regarding the origin of the low-energy electron fluxes in the vicinity of the Mars plasma boundary. Crider, in an analysis of Mars Global Surveyor Magnetometer/Electron Reflectometer measurements, has attributed the formation of the magnetic pile-up boundary to electron impact ionization of exospheric neutral species by solar wind electrons. However, the role of photoelectrons escaping from the lower ionosphere was not determined. In the proposed work, we will examine the role of solar wind and ionospheric photoelectrons in producing ionization in the upper ionosphere of Mars. Low-energy (< 4 keV) electrons will be modeled using the two-stream electron transport code of Link. The code models both external (solar wind) and internal (photoelectron) sources of ionization, and accounts for Auger electron production. The code will be used to analyze Mars Global Surveyor measurements of solar wind and photoelectrons down to altitudes below 200 km in the Mars ionosphere, in order to determine the relative roles of solar wind and escaping photoelectrons in maintaining plasma densities in the region of the Mars plasma boundary.

  1. Low-energy tetrahedral polymorphs of carbon, silicon, and germanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mujica, Andrés; Pickard, Chris J.; Needs, Richard J.

    2015-06-01

    Searches for low-energy tetrahedral polymorphs of carbon and silicon have been performed using density functional theory computations and the ab initio random structure searching approach. Several of the hypothetical phases obtained in our searches have enthalpies that are lower or comparable to those of other polymorphs of group 14 elements that have either been experimentally synthesized or recently proposed as the structure of unknown phases obtained in experiments, and should thus be considered as particularly interesting candidates. A structure of P b a m symmetry with 24 atoms in the unit cell was found to be a low-energy, low-density metastable polymorph in carbon, silicon, and germanium. In silicon, P b a m is found to have a direct band gap at the zone center with an estimated value of 1.4 eV, which suggests applications as a photovoltaic material. We have also found a low-energy chiral framework structure of P 41212 symmetry with 20 atoms per cell containing fivefold spirals of atoms, whose projected topology is that of the so-called Cairo-type two-dimensional pentagonal tiling. We suggest that P 41212 is a likely candidate for the structure of the unknown phase XIII of silicon. We discuss P b a m and P 41212 in detail, contrasting their energetics and structures with those of other group 14 elements, particularly the recently proposed P 42/n c m structure, for which we also provide a detailed interpretation as a network of tilted diamondlike tetrahedra.

  2. Fifty years with nuclear fission

    SciTech Connect

    Behrens, J.W.; Carlson, A.D. )

    1989-01-01

    The news of the discovery of nucler fission, by Otto Hahn and Fritz Strassmann in Germany, was brought to the United States by Niels Bohr in January 1939. Since its discovery, the United States, and the world for that matter, has never been the same. It therefore seemed appropriate to acknowledge the fiftieth anniversary of its discovery by holding a topical meeting entitled, Fifty years with nuclear fission,'' in the United States during the year 1989. The objective of the meeting was to bring together pioneers of the nuclear industry and other scientists and engineers to report on reminiscences of the past and on the more recent developments in fission science and technology. The conference highlighted the early pioneers of the nuclear industry by dedicating a full day (April 26), consisting of two plenary sessions, at the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) in Washington, DC. More recent developments in fission science and technology in addition to historical reflections were topics for two full days of sessions (April 27 and 28) at the main sites of the NIST in Gaithersburg, Maryland. The wide range of topics covered by Volume 2 of this topical meeting included plenary invited, and contributed sessions entitled, Nuclear fission -- a prospective; reactors II; fission science II; medical and industrial applications by by-products; reactors and safeguards; general research, instrumentation, and by-products; and fission data, astrophysics, and space applications. The individual papers have been cataloged separately.

  3. Tagging radon daughters in low-energy scintillation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarty, Kevin B.

    2011-12-01

    One problematic source of background in scintillator-based low-energy solar neutrino experiments such as Borexino is the presence of radon gas and its daughters. The mean lifetime of the α-emitter 214Po in the radon chain is sufficiently short, 0.24 ms, that its decay, together with that immediately preceding of 214Bi, is easily recognized as a “coincidence event.” This fact, combined with the capability of α/β pulse-shape discrimination, makes it possible to tag decays of 222Rn and its first four daughters via a likelihood-based method.

  4. Low-Energy Hot Plasma and Particles in Saturn's Magnetosphere.

    PubMed

    Krimigis, S M; Armstrong, T P; Axford, W I; Bostrom, C O; Gloeckler, G; Keath, E P; Lanzerotti, L J; Carbary, J F; Hamilton, D C; Roelof, E C

    1982-01-29

    The low-energy charged particle instrument on Voyager 2 measured low-energy electrons and ions (energies greater, similar 22 and greater, similar 28 kiloelectron volts, respectively) in Saturn's magnetosphere. The magnetosphere structure and particle population were modified from those observed during the Voyager 1 encounter in November 1980 but in a manner consistent with the same global morphology. Major results include the following. (i) A region containing an extremely hot ( approximately 30 to 50 kiloelectron volts) plasma was identified and extends from the orbit of Tethys outward past the orbit of Rhea. (ii) The low-energy ion mantle found by Voyager 1 to extend approximately 7 Saturn radii inside the dayside magnetosphere was again observed on Voyager 2, but it was considerably hotter ( approximately 30 kiloelectron volts), and there was an indication of a cooler ( < 20 kiloelectron volts) ion mantle on the nightside. (iii) At energies greater, similar 200 kiloelectron volts per nucleon, H(1), H(2), and H(3) (molecular hydrogen), helium, carbon, and oxygen are important constituents in the Saturnian magnetosphere. The presence of both H(2) and H(3) suggests that the Saturnian ionosphere feeds plasma into the magnetosphere, but relative abundances of the energetic helium, carbon, and oxygen ions are consistent with a solar wind origin. (iv) Low-energy ( approximately 22 to approximately 60 kiloelectron volts) electron flux enhancements observed between the L shells of Rhea and Tethys by Voyager 2 on the dayside were absent during the Voyager 1 encounter. (v) Persistent asymmetric pitch-angle distributions of electrons of 60 to 200 kiloelectron volts occur in the outer magnetosphere in conjunction with the hot ion plasma torus. (vi) The spacecraft passed within approximately 1.1 degrees in longitude of the Tethys flux tube outbound and observed it to be empty of energetic ions and electrons; the microsignature of Enceladus inbound was also observed. (vii

  5. Method and apparatus for generating low energy nuclear particles

    DOEpatents

    Powell, J.R.; Reich, M.; Ludewig, H.; Todosow, M.

    1999-02-09

    A particle accelerator generates an input particle beam having an initial energy level above a threshold for generating secondary nuclear particles. A thin target is rotated in the path of the input beam for undergoing nuclear reactions to generate the secondary particles and correspondingly decrease energy of the input beam to about the threshold. The target produces low energy secondary particles and is effectively cooled by radiation and conduction. A neutron scatterer and a neutron filter are also used for preferentially degrading the secondary particles into a lower energy range if desired. 18 figs.

  6. Method and apparatus for generating low energy nuclear particles

    DOEpatents

    Powell, James R.; Reich, Morris; Ludewig, Hans; Todosow, Michael

    1999-02-09

    A particle accelerator (12) generates an input particle beam having an initial energy level above a threshold for generating secondary nuclear particles. A thin target (14) is rotated in the path of the input beam for undergoing nuclear reactions to generate the secondary particles and correspondingly decrease energy of the input beam to about the threshold. The target (14) produces low energy secondary particles and is effectively cooled by radiation and conduction. A neutron scatterer (44) and a neutron filter (42) are also used for preferentially degrading the secondary particles into a lower energy range if desired.

  7. First experimental research in low energy proton radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Tao; Yang, Guo-Jun; Li, Yi-Ding; Long, Ji-Dong; He, Xiao-Zhong; Zhang, Xiao-Ding; Jiang, Xiao-Guo; Ma, Chao-Fan; Zhao, Liang-Chao; Yang, Xing-Lin; Zhang, Zhuo; Wang, Yuan; Pang, Jian; Li, Hong; Li, Wei-Feng; Zhou, Fu-Xin; Shi, Jin-Shui; Zhang, Kai-Zhi; Li, Jin; Zhang, Lin-Wen; Deng, Jian-Jun

    2014-08-01

    Proton radiography is a new scatheless diagnostic tool providing a potential development direction for advanced hydrotesting. Recently a low energy proton radiography system has been developed at the Chinese Academy of Engineering Phyiscs (CAEP). This system has been designed to use an 11 MeV proton beam to radiograph thin static objects. This system consists of a proton cyclotron coupled to an imaging beamline, which is the first domestic beamline dedicated to proton radiography experiments. Via some demonstration experiments, the radiography system is confirmed to provide clear pictures with spatial resolution ~100 μm within 40 mm field-of-view.

  8. Study on electron beam in a low energy plasma focus

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Muhammad Zubair; Ling, Yap Seong; San, Wong Chiow

    2014-03-05

    Electron beam emission was investigated in a low energy plasma focus device (2.2 kJ) using copper hollow anode. Faraday cup was used to estimate the energy of the electron beam. XR100CR X-ray spectrometer was used to explore the impact of the electron beam on the target observed from top-on and side-on position. Experiments were carried out at optimized pressure of argon gas. The impact of electron beam is exceptionally notable with two different approaches using lead target inside hollow anode in our plasma focus device.

  9. Low energy sputtering of cobalt by cesium ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handoo, A.; Ray, Pradosh K.

    1989-01-01

    An experimental facility to investigate low energy (less than 500 eV) sputtering of metal surfaces with ions produced by an ion gun is described. Results are reported on the sputtering yield of cobalt by cesium ions in the 100 to 500 eV energy range at a pressure of 1 times 10(exp -6) Torr. The target was electroplated on a copper substrate. The sputtered atoms were collected on a cobalt foil surrounding the target. Co-57 was used as a tracer to determine the sputtering yield.

  10. Wavelet modulation: An alternative modulation with low energy consumption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chafii, Marwa; Palicot, Jacques; Gribonval, Rémi

    2017-02-01

    This paper presents wavelet modulation, based on the discrete wavelet transform, as an alternative modulation with low energy consumption. The transmitted signal has low envelope variations, which induces a good efficiency for the power amplifier. Wavelet modulation is analyzed and compared for different wavelet families with orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) in terms of peak-to-average power ratio (PAPR), power spectral density (PSD) properties, and the impact of the power amplifier on the spectral regrowth. The performance in terms of bit error rate and complexity of implementation are also evaluated, and several trade-offs are characterized. xml:lang="fr"

  11. Modelling low energy electron interactions for biomedical uses of radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuss, M.; Muñoz, A.; Oller, J. C.; Blanco, F.; Limão-Vieira, P.; Huerga, C.; Téllez, M.; Hubin-Fraskin, M. J.; Nixon, K.; Brunger, M.; García, G.

    2009-11-01

    Current radiation based medical applications in the field of radiotherapy, radio-diagnostic and radiation protection require modelling single particle interactions at the molecular level. Due to their relevance in radiation damage to biological systems, special attention should be paid to include the effect of low energy secondary electrons. In this study we present a single track simulation procedure for photons and electrons which is based on reliable experimental and theoretical cross section data and the energy loss distribution functions derived from our experiments. The effect of including secondary electron interactions in this model will be discussed.

  12. Development of multichannel low-energy neutron spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Arikawa, Y. Nagai, T.; Abe, Y.; Kojima, S.; Sakata, S.; Inoue, H.; Utsugi, M.; Iwasa, Y.; Sarukura, N.; Nakai, M.; Shiraga, H.; Fujioka, S.; Azechi, H.; Murata, T.

    2014-11-15

    A multichannel low-energy neutron spectrometer for down-scattered neutron (DSN) measurements in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments has been developed. Our compact-size 256-channel lithium-glass-scintillator-based spectrometer has been implemented and tested in ICF experiments with the GEKKO XII laser. We have performed time calibration of the 256-channel analog-to-digital convertor system used for DSN measurements via X-ray pulse signals. We have clearly observed the DD-primary fusion neutron signal and have successfully studied the detector's impulse response. Our detector is soon to be implemented in future ICF experiments.

  13. States of low energy in homogeneous and inhomogeneous expanding spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Them, Kolja; Brum, Marcos

    2013-12-01

    We construct states on the algebra of the Klein-Gordon field that minimize the energy density in homogeneous and in inhomogeneous spacetimes, both with compact Cauchy hypersurfaces. The energy density is measured by geodesic observers and smeared over a spacelike slab of spacetime, entirely containing a Cauchy hypersurface and extended in time. We further show that these states are Hadamard states. The present construction generalizes the construction of states of low energy in Robertson-Walker spacetimes presented by Olbermann (2007 Class. Quantum Grav. 24 5011).

  14. Low Energy Lorentz Violation from Modified Dispersion at High Energies.

    PubMed

    Husain, Viqar; Louko, Jorma

    2016-02-12

    Many quantum theories of gravity propose Lorentz-violating dispersion relations of the form ω=|k|f(|k|/M⋆), with recovery of approximate Lorentz invariance at energy scales much below M⋆. We show that a quantum field with this dispersion predicts drastic low energy Lorentz violation in atoms modeled as Unruh-DeWitt detectors, for any f that dips below unity somewhere. As an example, we show that polymer quantization motivated by loop quantum gravity predicts such Lorentz violation below current ion collider rapidities.

  15. Development of multichannel low-energy neutron spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Arikawa, Y; Nagai, T; Abe, Y; Kojima, S; Sakata, S; Inoue, H; Utsugi, M; Iwasa, Y; Murata, T; Sarukura, N; Nakai, M; Shiraga, H; Fujioka, S; Azechi, H

    2014-11-01

    A multichannel low-energy neutron spectrometer for down-scattered neutron (DSN) measurements in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments has been developed. Our compact-size 256-channel lithium-glass-scintillator-based spectrometer has been implemented and tested in ICF experiments with the GEKKO XII laser. We have performed time calibration of the 256-channel analog-to-digital convertor system used for DSN measurements via X-ray pulse signals. We have clearly observed the DD-primary fusion neutron signal and have successfully studied the detector's impulse response. Our detector is soon to be implemented in future ICF experiments.

  16. Validation of GPUMCD for low-energy brachytherapy seed dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Hissoiny, Sami; Ozell, Benoit; Despres, Philippe; Carrier, Jean-Francois

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: To validate GPUMCD, a new package for fast Monte Carlo dose calculations based on the GPU (graphics processing unit), as a tool for low-energy single seed brachytherapy dosimetry for specific seed models. As the currently accepted method of dose calculation in low-energy brachytherapy computations relies on severe approximations, a Monte Carlo based approach would result in more accurate dose calculations, taking in to consideration the patient anatomy as well as interseed attenuation. The first step is to evaluate the capability of GPUMCD to reproduce low-energy, single source, brachytherapy calculations which could ultimately result in fast and accurate, Monte Carlo based, brachytherapy dose calculations for routine planning. Methods: A mixed geometry engine was integrated to GPUMCD capable of handling parametric as well as voxelized geometries. In order to evaluate GPUMCD for brachytherapy calculations, several dosimetry parameters were computed and compared to values found in the literature. These parameters, defined by the AAPM Task-Group No. 43, are the radial dose function, the 2D anisotropy function, and the dose rate constant. These three parameters were computed for two different brachytherapy sources: the Amersham OncoSeed 6711 and the Imagyn IsoStar IS-12501. Results: GPUMCD was shown to yield dosimetric parameters similar to those found in the literature. It reproduces radial dose functions to within 1.25% for both sources in the 0.5< r <10 cm range. The 2D anisotropy function was found to be within 3% at r = 5 cm and within 4% at r = 1 cm. The dose rate constants obtained were within the range of other values reported in the literature.Conclusion: GPUMCD was shown to be able to reproduce various TG-43 parameters for two different low-energy brachytherapy sources found in the literature. The next step is to test GPUMCD as a fast clinical Monte Carlo brachytherapy dose calculations with multiple seeds and patient geometry, potentially providing

  17. Low Energy Solar and Galactic Cosmic Rays at 1 AU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casolino, Marco

    2002-08-01

    In this work we present some of the recent results obtained with the satellite missions NINA-1 and NINA-2 and the experiments on board MIR space station Sileye-1 and 2. The aim is the study of the low energy (10 MeV - 2 GeV) cosmic ray component and different periods of the solar cycle and during Solar Energetic Particle events. Other items of physics include the measurement of the secondary cosmic ray component, produced in the interaction with the upper layers of Earth's atmosphere and the evaluation of the absorbed and equivalent doses inside MIR.

  18. Low Energy Solar and Galactic Cosmic Rays at 1 AU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casolino, Marco

    In this work we present some of the recent results obtained with the satellite missions NINA-1 and NINA-2 and the experiments on board MIR space station Sileye-1 and 2. The aim is the study of the low energy (10 MeV - 2 GeV) cosmic ray component and different periods of the solar cycle and during Solar Energetic Particle events. Other items of physics include the measurement of the secondary cosmic ray component, produced in the interaction with the upper layers of Earth's atmosphere and the evaluation of the absorbed and equivalent doses inside MIR.

  19. Low energy process of producing gasoline-ethanol mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Kyle, B.G.

    1981-10-27

    Gasoline-ethanol mixtures useable as motor fuel are produced by a relatively low energy process comprising interrelated distillation and extraction steps. In the first step, aqueous ethanol, such as an ethanol fermentation beer, is subjected to fractional distillation to produce a distillate of at least 75 weight percent ethanol, which is then subjected to extraction with gasoline under conditions producing an extract containing the desired amount of ethanol, such as 8 to 14% by weight. The aqueous phase raffinate from the extraction is returned to the fractionation column for redistillation.

  20. Low-energy scattering of electrons and positrons in liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schrader, D. M.

    1990-01-01

    The scattering of low energy electrons and positrons is described for the liquid phase and compared and contrasted with that for the gas phase. Similarities as well as differences are noted. The loci of scattering sites, called spurs in the liquid phase, are considered in detail. In particular, their temporal and spatial evolution is considered from the point of view of scattering. Two emphases are made: one upon the stochastic calculation of the distribution of distances required for slowing down to thermal velocities, and the other upon the calculation of cross sections for energy loss by means of quantum mechanics.

  1. The Compton-Getting effect for low energy particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ipavich, F. M.

    1974-01-01

    It was found that the traditional first-order Compton-Getting effect, which relates particle distributions as observed in two frames of reference moving with constant relative velocity, is inadequate for the description of low energy particles (less than a few hundred keV/nucleon) in the solar system. An exact procedure is given for recovering both isotropic and anisotropic distributions in the solar wind frame from observations made in a spacecraft frame. The method was illustrated by analyzing a particle event observed on IPM-7.

  2. Measuring leptonic CP violation by low energy neutrino oscillation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minakata, H.; Nunokawa, H.

    2000-12-01

    We uncover an interesting phenomenon that neutrino flavor transformation in slowly varying matter density imitates almost exactly that of vacuum neutrino oscillation under suitably chosen experimental parameters. It allows us to have relatively large CP violating measure ΔP≡P(νμ-->νe)- P(ν¯μ-->ν¯e) which is essentially free from matter effect contamination. We utilize this phenomenon to design a low-energy long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment to measure the leptonic CP violating phase.

  3. Elastic and inelastic low-energy electron collisions with pyrazine.

    PubMed

    Mašín, Zdeněk; Gorfinkiel, Jimena D

    2011-10-14

    We present results of ab-initio scattering calculations for electron collisions with pyrazine using the R-matrix method, carried out at various levels of approximation. We confirm the existing experimental and theoretical understanding of the three well-known π∗ shape resonances. In addition, we find numerous core-excited resonances (above 4.8 eV) and identify their most likely parent states. We also present differential cross sections, showing high sensitivity to the scattering model chosen at low energies. We make recommendations regarding the selection of models for scattering calculations with this type of targets. © 2011 American Institute of Physics

  4. Dynamics of Low Energy Electron Attachment to Formic Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Rescigno, Thomas N.; Trevisan, Cynthia S.; Orel, Ann E.

    2006-04-03

    Low-energy electrons (<2 eV) can fragment gas phaseformic acid (HCOOH) molecules through resonant dissociative attachmentprocesses. Recent experiments have shown that the principal reactionproducts of such collisions are formate ions (HCOO-) and hydrogen atoms.Using first-principles electron scattering calculations, we haveidentified the responsible negative ion state as a transient \\pi* anion.Symmetry considerations dictate that the associated dissociation dynamicsare intrinsically polyatomic: a second anion surface, connected to thefirst by a conical intersection, is involved in the dynamics and thetransient anion must necessarily deform to non-planar geometries beforeit can dissociate to the observed stable products.

  5. HgI2 low energy beta particle detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, K. S.; Squillante, M. R.; Entine, G.

    1990-01-01

    An HgI2 device structure was designed and tested which allows HgI2 to be used to make low-energy beta-particle detectors. The devices detected tritium beta particles with an efficiency of about 25 percent. A protective encapsulant has been developed which should protect the devices for up to 20 years and will attenuate only a small fraction of the beta particles. It is noted that the devices hold significant promise to provide a practical alternative to liquid scintillation counters and gas flow-through proportional counters.

  6. Low Energy Charged Particle Measurement by Japanese Lunar Orbiter SELENE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Y.; Yokota, S.; Asamura, K.; Mukai, T.

    2004-12-01

    SELENE (SELenological and Engineering satellite) is a Japanese lunar orbiter that will be launched in 2006. The main purpose of this satellite is to study the origin and evolution of the moon by means of global mapping of element abundances, mineralogical composition, and surface geographical mapping from 100km altitude. PACE (Plasma energy Angle and Composition Experiment) is one of the scientific instruments onboard the SELENE satellite. PACE consists of 4 sensors: ESA (Electron Spectrum Analyzer)-S1, ESA-S2, IMA (Ion Mass Analyzer), and IEA (Ion Energy Analyzer). ESA-S1 and S2 measure three-dimensional distribution function of low energy electrons below 17keV. ESA basically employs a method of a top hat electrostatic analyzer with angular scanning deflectors at the entrance and toroidal electrodes inside. IMA and IEA measure the three-dimensional distribution function of low energy ions below 28keV/q. IMA has an ability to discriminate the ion mass with high mass resolution. IMA consists of an energy analyzer that is basically the same as ESA and an LEF (Linear Electric Field) TOF (Time Of Flight) ion mass analyzer. IEA consists of only an energy analyzer that is the same as the energy analyzer of IMA. Each sensor has hemi-spherical field of view (FOV). With two pairs of sensors ESA-S1 & IMA, and ESA-S2 & IEA, which are installed on the +Z and -Z surface of the spacecraft, three-dimensional distribution function of low energy electrons and ions are observed. The scientific objectives of PACE are 1) to measure the ions sputtered from the lunar surface and the lunar atmosphere, 2) to measure the magnetic anomaly on the lunar surface using two ESAs and a magnetometer onboard SELENE simultaneously as an electron reflectometer, 3) to resolve the moon - solar wind interaction, 4) to resolve the moon - Earth's magnetosphere interaction, and 5) to observe the Earth's magnetotail. Sputtered ions from the lunar surface will be measured for the first time. Recently, ground

  7. Low-energy K- optical potentials: deep or shallow?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieplý, A.; Friedman, E.; Gal, A.; Mareš, J.

    2001-12-01

    The K- optical potential in the nuclear medium is evaluated self consistently from a free-space K-Nt matrix constructed within a coupled-channel chiral approach. The fit of model parameters gives a good description of the low-energy data plus the available K- atomic data. The resulting optical potential is relatively `shallow' in contradiction to the potentials obtained from phenomenological analysis. The calculated (Kstop-,π) hypernuclear production rates are very sensitive to the details of kaonic bound state wave function. The (Kstop-,π) reaction could thus serve as a suitable tool to distinguish between shallow and deep K- optical potentials.

  8. Low energy beam line at the AGOR facility

    SciTech Connect

    Toprek, Dragan; Formanoy, Iwo; Brandenburg, Sytze

    2005-01-01

    The origin of the low transmission through the low energy beam line between the electron cyclotron resonance source and the AGOR cyclotron has been investigated. Measurements of beam size and emittance, determined with the ''varying quadrupole method,'' are compared with calculations including fringe fields up to third order with the code COSY INFINITY. Calculations and measurements qualitatively agree; the calculations exhibit the large beam losses observed. On the basis of the calculations new settings have been determined, resulting in a significant increase of the transmission. To achieve full transmission a complete redesign of the beam line, in particular of the bending magnets, is needed.

  9. Targeting Low-Energy Transfers to Low Lunar Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Jeffrey S.; Anderson, Rodney L.

    2011-01-01

    A targeting scheme is presented to build trajectories from a specified Earth parking orbit to a specified low lunar orbit via a low-energy transfer and up to two maneuvers. The total transfer delta V (velocity) is characterized as a function of the Earth parking orbit inclination and the departure date for transfers to each given low lunar orbit. The transfer delta V (velocity) cost is characterized for transfers constructed to low lunar polar orbits with any longitude of ascending node and for transfers that arrive at the Moon at any given time during a month.

  10. Low Energy Continuum and Lattice Effective Field Theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elhatisari, Serdar

    In this thesis we investigate several constraints and their impacts on the short-range potentials in the low-energy limits of quantum mechanics.We also present lattice Monte Carlo calculations using the adiabatic projection method. In the first part we consider the constraints of causality and unitarity for the low-energy interactions of particles. We generalize Wigner's causality bound to the case of non-vanishing partial-wave mixing. Specifically we analyze the system of the low-energy interactions between protons and neutrons. We derive a general theorem that non-vanishing partial-wave mixing cannot be reproduced with zero-range interactions without violating causality or unitarity. We also analyze low-energy scattering for systems with arbitrary short-range interactions plus an attractive 1/ralpha tail for alpha ≥ 2. In particular, we focus on the case of alpha = 6 and we derive the constraints of causality and unitarity also for these systems and find that the van derWaals length scale dominates over parameters characterizing the short-distance physics of the interaction. This separation of scales suggests a separate universality class for physics characterizing interactions with an attractive 1{r6 tail. We argue that a similar universality class exists for any attractive potential 1/ralpha for alpha ≥ 2. In the second part of the thesis we present lattice Monte Carlo calculations of fermion-dimer scattering in the limit of zero-range interactions using the adiabatic projection method. The adiabatic projection method uses a set of initial cluster states and Euclidean time projection to give a systematically improvable description of the low-lying scattering cluster states in a finite volume. We use Luscher's finite-volume relations to determine the s-wave, p-wave, and d-wave phase shifts. For comparison, we also compute exact lattice results using Lanczos iteration and continuum results using the Skorniakov-Ter-Martirosian equation. For our Monte Carlo

  11. Our clinical experience in low-energy laser medical treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antipa, Ciprian; Bruckner, Ion I.; Crangulescu, Nicolae; Moldovan, Corneliu I.; Podoleanu, Adrian G.; Stanciulescu, Viorica; Ionescu, Elena

    1996-05-01

    In clinical research the efficiency of low-energy laser (LEL) therapy remains controversial. We present here some of the most important results of our clinical experience in this field. We summarize our opinions about the LEL effects in rheumatic diseases, in chronic pelvic inflammatory disorders, in the treatment of some dermatological disorders, and in the recovery of the distal forearm nerve from traumatic lesion after surgical suture. We conclude that these results may be important evidence for the real clinical efficiency of the LEL.

  12. Measurement of proton-induced target fragmentation cross sections in carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsushita, K.; Nishio, T.; Tanaka, S.; Tsuneda, M.; Sugiura, A.; Ieki, K.

    2016-02-01

    In proton therapy, positron emitter nuclei are generated via the target nuclear fragmentation reactions between irradiated proton and nuclei constituting a human body. The proton-irradiated volume can be confirmed with measurement of annihilation γ-rays from the generated positron emitter nuclei. To achieve the high accuracy of proton therapy, in vivo dosimetry, i.e., evaluation of the irradiated dose during the treatment is important. To convert the measured activity distribution to irradiated dose, cross-sectional data for positron emitter production is necessary, which is currently insufficient in the treatment area. The purpose of this study is to collect cross-sectional data of 12C (p , pn)11C and 12C (p , p 2 n)10C reactions between the incident proton and carbon nuclei, which are important target nuclear fragmentation reactions, to estimate the range and exposure dose distribution in the patient's body. Using planar-type PET capable of measuring annihilation γ-rays at high positional resolution and thick polyethylene target, we measured cross-sectional data in continuous wide energy range. The cross section of 12C (p , pn)11C is in good agreement with existing experimental data. The cross section of 12C (p , p 2 n)10C is reported for the first data in the low-energy range of 67.6-10.5 MeV near the Bragg peak of proton beam.

  13. Spallation-induced fission reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benlliure, J.; Rodríguez-Sánchez, J. L.

    2017-03-01

    During the last decade spallation-induced fission reactions have received particular attention because of their impact in the design of spallation-neutron sources or radioactive beam facilities, but also in the understanding of the fission process at high excitation energy. In this paper, we review the main progress brought by modern experimental techniques, in particular those based in the inverse kinematic, as well as the achievements in modelling these reactions. We will also address future possibilities for improving the investigation of fission dynamics.

  14. Fission at intermediate nucleon energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo Meo, S.; Mancusi, D.; Massimi, C.; Vannini, G.; Ventura, A.

    2014-07-01

    In the present work Monte Carlo calculations of fission of actinides and pre- actinides induced by protons and neutrons in the energy range from 100 MeV to 1 GeV are carried out by means of a recent version of the Liège Intranuclear Cascade Model, INCL++, coupled with different evaporation-fission codes, in particular GEMINI++ and ABLA07. Fission model parameters are adjusted on experimental (p, f) cross sections and used to predict (n, f) cross sections, in order to provide a theoretical support to the campaign of neutron cross section measurements at the n_TOF facility at CERN.

  15. Low-Energy Nuclear Reactions Resulting as Picometer Interactions with Similarity to K-Shell Electron Capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hora, H.; Miley, G. H.; Li, X. Z.; Kelly, J. C.; Osman, F.

    2006-02-01

    Since the appeal by Brian Josephson at the meeting of the Nobel Laureates July 2004, it seems to be indicated to summarize the following serious, reproducible and confirmed observations on reactions of protons or deuterons incorporated in host metals such as palladium. Some reflections to Rutherford's discovery of nuclear physics, the Cockroft-Oliphant discovery of anomalous low-energy fusion reactions and the chemist Hahn's discovery of fission had to be included. Using gaseous atmosphere or discharges between palladium targets, rather significant results were seen e.g. from the "life after death" heat production of such high values per host atom that only nuclear reactions can be involved. This supports the earlier evaluation of neutron generation in fully reversible experiments with gas discharges hinting that a reasonable screening effect - preferably in the swimming electron layer - may lead to reactions at nuclear distances d of picometers with reaction probability times U of about megaseconds similar to the K-shell capture radioactivity. Further electrolytic experiments led to low-energy nuclear reactions (LENR) where the involvement of pollution could be excluded from the appearance of very seldom rare earth elements. A basically new theory for DD cross-sections is used to confirm the picometer-megasecond reactions of cold fusion. Other theoretical aspects are given from measured heavy element distributions similar to the standard abundance distribution, SAD, in the Universe with consequences on endothermic heavy nuclei generation, magic numbers and to quark-gluon plasmas.

  16. Theoretical Calculation of Prompt Neutron Spectra from Fission of Curium Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohsawa, Takaaki; Tani, Kazuhiro; Kishimoto, Yasufumi

    2003-06-01

    Prompt neutron spectra for Cm-isotopes (242Cm, 243Cm, 244Cm, 245Cm, 246Cm, 248Cm) were calculated on the basis of a modified version of the Madland-Nix model combined with a multimodal fission model. The predicted spectra were found to be in fair agreement with recent data. A slight enhancement of the low-energy component of the spectrum was interpreted in terms of neutron emission during fragment acceleration.

  17. Response of plastic scintillators to low-energy photons.

    PubMed

    Peralta, Luis; Rêgo, Florbela

    2014-08-21

    Diagnostic radiology typically uses x-ray beams between 25 and 150 kVp. Plastic scintillation detectors (PSDs) are potentially successful candidates as field dosimeters but careful selection of the scintillator is crucial. It has been demonstrated that they can suffer from energy dependence in the low-energy region, an undesirable dosimeter characteristic. This dependence is partially due to the nonlinear light yield of the scintillator to the low-energy electrons set in motion by the photon beam. In this work, PSDs made of PMMA, PVT or polystyrene were studied for the x-ray beam range 25 to 100 kVp. For each kVp data has been acquired for additional aluminium filtrations of 0.5, 1.0, 2.0 and 4.0 mm. Absolute dose in the point of measurement was obtained with an ionization chamber calibrated to dose in water. From the collected data, detector sensitivities were obtained as function of the beam kVp and additional filtration. Using Monte Carlo simulations relative scintillator sensitivities were computed. For some of the scintillators these sensitivities show strong energy-dependence for beam average energy below 35 keV for each additional filtration but fair constancy above. One of the scintillators (BC-404) has smaller energy-dependence at low photon average energy and could be considered a candidate for applications (like mammography) where beam energy has small span.

  18. A compact low-energy electron beam irradiator.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sun Oh; Kim, Min; Lee, Byung Cheol; Jeong, Young Uk; Cha, In-su; Choi, Jeong-sik

    2002-05-01

    A new compact low-energy electron beam irradiator has been developed. The irradiator generates an electron beam to the air with energy variable from 35 to 80 keV and with a maximum current of 1 mA. The irradiation area is 30 x 30 mm2. A special irradiation port is developed for this low-energy irradiator. The electron beam is generated from a thermionic LaB6 cathode in vacuum. The beam is extracted to the air through a havar foil window. The thickness of the window is 4.8 microm, it is vacuum-tightly connected to the window to support by an indium wire. A controlled bow geometry of the window helps the thin window withstand the vacuum pressure. Cold air generated from a vortex tube cools down both the window and its support in order to prevent the window from melting down, due to beam energy dissipated in the foil. We found that about 60% of the beam current is extracted to the air at 80 keV.

  19. Cross sections for low-energy inelastic H + Na collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Belyaev, A. K.; Barklem, P. S.; Dickinson, A. S.; Gadea, F. X.

    2010-03-15

    Full quantum-scattering calculations are reported for low-energy near-threshold inelastic collision cross sections for H+Na. The calculations include transitions between all levels up to and including the ionic state (ion-pair production) for collision energies from the threshold up to 10 eV. These results are important for astrophysical modeling of spectra in stellar atmospheres. Results for the 3s-3p excitation are carefully examined using three different quantum chemistry input data sets, and large differences are found near the threshold. The differences are found to be predominantly due to differences in the radial coupling rather than potentials and are also found not to relate to differences in couplings in a simple manner. In fact, of the three input couplings, the two that are most similar give the cross sections with the largest differences. The 3s-3p cross sections show orbiting resonances which have been seen in earlier studies, while Feshbach resonances associated with closed channels were also found to be present in the low-energy cross sections for some transitions.

  20. Low-energy control of electrical turbulence in the heart.

    PubMed

    Luther, Stefan; Fenton, Flavio H; Kornreich, Bruce G; Squires, Amgad; Bittihn, Philip; Hornung, Daniel; Zabel, Markus; Flanders, James; Gladuli, Andrea; Campoy, Luis; Cherry, Elizabeth M; Luther, Gisa; Hasenfuss, Gerd; Krinsky, Valentin I; Pumir, Alain; Gilmour, Robert F; Bodenschatz, Eberhard

    2011-07-13

    Controlling the complex spatio-temporal dynamics underlying life-threatening cardiac arrhythmias such as fibrillation is extremely difficult, because of the nonlinear interaction of excitation waves in a heterogeneous anatomical substrate. In the absence of a better strategy, strong, globally resetting electrical shocks remain the only reliable treatment for cardiac fibrillation. Here we establish the relationship between the response of the tissue to an electric field and the spatial distribution of heterogeneities in the scale-free coronary vascular structure. We show that in response to a pulsed electric field, E, these heterogeneities serve as nucleation sites for the generation of intramural electrical waves with a source density ρ(E) and a characteristic time, τ, for tissue depolarization that obeys the power law τ ∝ E(α). These intramural wave sources permit targeting of electrical turbulence near the cores of the vortices of electrical activity that drive complex fibrillatory dynamics. We show in vitro that simultaneous and direct access to multiple vortex cores results in rapid synchronization of cardiac tissue and therefore, efficient termination of fibrillation. Using this control strategy, we demonstrate low-energy termination of fibrillation in vivo. Our results give new insights into the mechanisms and dynamics underlying the control of spatio-temporal chaos in heterogeneous excitable media and provide new research perspectives towards alternative, life-saving low-energy defibrillation techniques. ©2011 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved

  1. Materials for Low-Energy Neutron Radiation Shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singleterry, Robert C., Jr.; Thibeault, Sheila A.

    2000-01-01

    Various candidate aircraft and spacecraft materials were analyzed and compared in a low-energy neutron environment using the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) transport code with an energy range up to 20 MeV. Some candidate materials have been tested in particle beams, and others seemed reasonable to analyze in this manner before deciding to test them. The two metal alloys analyzed are actual materials being designed into or used in aircraft and spacecraft today. This analysis shows that hydrogen-bearing materials have the best shielding characteristics over the metal alloys. It also shows that neutrons above 1 MeV are reflected out of the face of the slab better by larger quantities of carbon in the material. If a low-energy absorber is added to the material, fewer neutrons are transmitted through the material. Future analyses should focus on combinations of scatterers and absorbers to optimize these reaction channels and on the higher energy neutron component (above 50 MeV).

  2. Passive and low energy research and development: a global view

    SciTech Connect

    Balcomb, J.D.

    1984-01-01

    Passive and low energy applications in buildings have become a topic of worldwide interest within the last few years. It has now been demonstrated very clearly that indoor comfort can be maintained with an expenditure of only 10 to 20% of the energy often required by modern buildings. This is accomplished through a combination of conservation measures to minimize the load, passive use of solar energy for heating, natural cooling, and daylighting. The major research emphasis has been on devising mathematical models to characterize heat flow within buildings, on the validation of these models by comparison with test results, and on the subsequent use of the models to investigate the influence of both design parameters and weather on system performance. Design guidelines have been developed, and simplified methods of analysis have been promulgated. Performance has been monitored in test modules, test buildings, and many residential and commercial buildings. The results both confirm good performance and establish the accuracy of model predictions. A significant change in the research picture has been seen in the last 4 years; whereas the major effort was originally in the United States, research is now being conducted in many countries throughout the world as many people have realized that passive and low energy methods are appropriate in virtually every climate and are well suited to economic, convenient, and reliable building construction and operation.

  3. Development of Low Energy Gap and Fully Regioregular Polythienylenevinylene Derivative

    DOE PAGES

    David, Tanya M. S.; Zhang, Cheng; Sun, Sam-Shajing

    2014-01-01

    Low energy gap and fully regioregular conjugated polymers find its wide use in solar energy conversion applications. This paper will first briefly review this type of polymers and also report synthesis and characterization of a specific example new polymer, a low energy gap, fully regioregular, terminal functionalized, and processable conjugated polymer poly-(3-dodecyloxy-2,5-thienylene vinylene) or PDDTV. The polymer exhibited an optical energy gap of 1.46 eV based on the UV-vis-NIR absorption spectrum. The electrochemically measured highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) level is −4.79 eV, resulting in the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) level of −3.33 eV based on optical energy gap. The polymer wasmore » synthesized via Horner-Emmons condensation and is fairly soluble in common organic solvents such as tetrahydrofuran and chloroform with gentle heating. DSC showed two endothermic peaks at 67°C and 227°C that can be attributed to transitions between crystalline and liquid states. The polymer is thermally stable up to about 300°C. This polymer appears very promising for cost-effective solar cell applications.« less

  4. The low energy plasma in the Jovian magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belcher, J. W.; Bridge, H. S.; Goertz, C. K.

    1980-01-01

    Measurements below 6 keV from the plasma science experiment on the Voyager spacecraft show that positive ions with temperatures as low as 30 eV to several keV are observed to distances at least as great as 40 Jupiter radii in the dayside Jovian magnetosphere. When velocity determinations are possible between 10 and 40 Jupiter radii, the plasma velocity component along the rigid corotation direction is found to be consistently less than the full corotation speed. Positive ion measurements above 28 keV from the low energy charged particle experiment on Voyager demonstrate the existence of positive ions with temperatures of 20-30 keV at all distances greater than 30 Jupiter radii. Taken together, these observations suggest that the low energy plasma population from 30 to at least 40 Jupiter radii frequently contains both a cold and a hot component. A two-component plasma of this nature may indicate different sources, acceleration mechanisms, or time histories for the disparate components. It may also be indicative of a single acceleration mechanism which is highly energy dependent.

  5. Radiative neutralino production in low energy supersymmetric models

    SciTech Connect

    Basu, Rahul; Sharma, Chandradew; Pandita, P. N.

    2008-06-01

    We study the production of the lightest neutralinos in the radiative process e{sup +}e{sup -}{yields}{chi}-tilde{sub 1}{sup 0}{chi}-tilde{sub 1}{sup 0}{gamma} in low energy supersymmetric models for the International Linear Collider energies. This includes the minimal supersymmetric standard model as well as its extension with an additional chiral Higgs singlet superfield, the nonminimal supersymmetric standard model. We compare and contrast the dependence of the signal cross section on the parameters of the neutralino sector of the minimal and nonminimal supersymmetric standard model. We also consider the background to this process coming from the standard model process e{sup +}e{sup -}{yields}{nu}{nu}{gamma}, as well as from the radiative production of the scalar partners of the neutrinos (sneutrinos) e{sup +}e{sup -}{yields}{nu}-tilde{nu}-tilde*{gamma}, which can be a background to the radiative neutralino production when the sneutrinos decay invisibly. In low energy supersymmetric models radiative production of the lightest neutralinos may be the only channel to study supersymmetric partners of the standard model particles at the first stage of a linear collider, since heavier neutralinos, charginos, and sleptons may be too heavy to be pair produced at a e{sup +}e{sup -} machine with {radical}(s)=500 GeV.

  6. Neutrino phenomenology of very low-energy seesaw scenarios

    SciTech Connect

    Gouvea, Andre de; Jenkins, James; Vasudevan, Nirmala

    2007-01-01

    The standard model augmented by the presence of gauge-singlet right-handed neutrinos proves to be an ideal scenario for accommodating nonzero neutrino masses. Among the new parameters of this 'new standard model' are right-handed neutrino Majorana masses M. Theoretical prejudice points to M much larger than the electroweak symmetry breaking scale, but it has recently been emphasized that all M values are technically natural and should be explored. Indeed, M around 1-10 eV can accommodate an elegant oscillation solution to the liquid scintillator neutrino detector (LSND) anomaly, while other M values lead to several observable consequences. We consider the phenomenology of low-energy (M < or approx. 1 keV) seesaw scenarios. By exploring such a framework with three right-handed neutrinos, we can consistently fit all oscillation data--including those from LSND--while partially addressing several astrophysical puzzles, including anomalous pulsar kicks, heavy element nucleosynthesis in supernovae, and the existence of warm dark matter. In order to accomplish all of this, we find that a nonstandard cosmological scenario is required. Finally, low-energy seesaws - regardless of their relation to the LSND anomaly - can also be tested by future tritium beta-decay experiments, neutrinoless double-beta decay searches, and other observables. We estimate the sensitivity of such probes to M.

  7. Very low energy supernovae and their resulting transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovegrove, Elizabeth

    Core-collapse supernovae play a key role in many of astrophysical processes, but the details of how these explosive events work remain elusive. Many questions about the CCSN explosion mechanism and progenitor stars could be answered by either detecting very-low-energy supernovae (VLE SNe) or alternately placing a tight upper bound on their fraction of the CCSN population. However, VLE SNe are by definition dim events. Many VLE SNe result from the failure of the standard CCSN explosion mechanism, meaning that any observable signature must be created by secondary processes either before or during the collapse. In this dissertation I examine alternate means of producing transients in otherwise-failed CCSNe and consider the use of shock breakout flashes to both detect VLE SNe and retrieve progenitor star information. I begin by simulating neutrino-mediated mass loss in CCSNe progenitors to show that a dim, unusual, but still observable transient can be produced. I then simulate shock breakout flashes in VLE SNe for both the purposes of detection as well as extracting information about the exploding star. I discuss particular challenges of modeling shock breakout at low energies and behaviors unique to this regime, in particular the behavior of the spectral temperature. All simulations in this dissertation were done with the CASTRO radiation-hydrodynamic code.

  8. MARLEY: Model of Argon Reaction Low Energy Yields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardiner, Steven; Bilton, Kyle; Grant, Christopher; Pantic, Emilija; Svoboda, Robert

    2015-10-01

    Core-collapse supernovae are sources of tremendous numbers of neutrinos with energies of up to about 50 MeV. In recent years, there has been growing interest in building detectors that are sensitive to supernova neutrinos. Such detectors can provide information about the initial stages of stellar collapse, early warning signals for light emission from supernovae, and opportunities to study neutrino oscillation physics over astronomical distances. In an effort to enable supernova neutrino detection in next-generation experiments like DUNE, the CAPTAIN collaboration plans to make the first direct measurement of cross sections for neutrino interactions on argon in the supernova energy regime. To help predict neutrino event signatures in the CAPTAIN liquid argon time projection chamber (LArTPC), we have developed a first-of-its-kind Monte Carlo event generator called MARLEY (Model of Argon Reaction Low Energy Yields). This generator attempts to model the complicated nuclear structure dependence of low-energy neutrino-nucleus reactions in sufficient detail for use in LArTPC simulations. In this talk we present some preliminary results calculated using MARLEY and discuss how the current version of the generator may be improved and expanded.

  9. Low energy electron point source microscopy: beyond imaging.

    PubMed

    Beyer, André; Gölzhäuser, Armin

    2010-09-01

    Low energy electron point source (LEEPS) microscopy has the capability to record in-line holograms at very high magnifications with a fairly simple set-up. After the holograms are numerically reconstructed, structural features with the size of about 2 nm can be resolved. The achievement of an even higher resolution has been predicted. However, a number of obstacles are known to impede the realization of this goal, for example the presence of electric fields around the imaged object, electrostatic charging or radiation induced processes. This topical review gives an overview of the achievements as well as the difficulties in the efforts to shift the resolution limit of LEEPS microscopy towards the atomic level. A special emphasis is laid on the high sensitivity of low energy electrons to electrical fields, which limits the structural determination of the imaged objects. On the other hand, the investigation of the electrical field around objects of known structure is very useful for other tasks and LEEPS microscopy can be extended beyond the task of imaging. The determination of the electrical resistance of individual nanowires can be achieved by a proper analysis of the corresponding LEEPS micrographs. This conductivity imaging may be a very useful application for LEEPS microscopes.

  10. Nuclear spin isospin responses for low-energy neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ejiri, H.

    2000-11-01

    Nuclear spin isospin responses for low-energy neutrinos of current astroparticle physics interests are briefly reviewed. Neutrinos are key particles for new particle physics beyond the standard electro-weak theory, and sensitive probes for studying stellar evolution and astronuclear processes. Low-energy neutrinos with energies of Eν~=0.1-50MeV have been studied extensively by using nuclei as micro-laboratories. Nuclear weak processes involved are vector and axial-vector weak interactions. Accordingly, nuclear isospin and spin isospin responses for neutrinos are crucial for studying neutrinos through nuclear weak processes. Nuclei show spin isospin responses characteristic of nuclear spin isospin structures. Nuclear spin isospin responses are investigated by relevant electromagnetic and hadronic processes. Subjects discussed include nuclear spin isospin responses for neutrinos and spin isospin giant resonances, hadronic charge-exchange spin-flip and non spin-flip reactions used for studying nuclear spin isospin responses, nuclear responses for neutrinos associated with double beta decays, nuclear spin isospin responses for solar neutrinos, and nuclear responses for supernova and accelerator-based neutrinos.

  11. TOPICAL REVIEW: RBE of low energy electrons and photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikjoo, Hooshang; Lindborg, Lennart

    2010-05-01

    Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) compares the severity of damage induced by a radiation under test at a dose D relative to the reference radiation Dx for the same biological endpoint. RBE is an important parameter in estimation of risk from exposure to ionizing radiation (IR). The present work provides a review of the recently published data and the knowledge of the RBE of low energy electrons and photons. The review presents RBE values derived from experimental data and model calculations including cell inactivation, chromosome aberration, cell transformation, micronuclei formation and induction of double-strand breaks. Biophysical models, including physical features of radiation track, and microdosimetry parameters are presented, analysed and compared with experimental data. The biological effects of low energy electrons and photons are of particular interest in radiation biology as these are strongly absorbed in micrometer and sub-micrometer layers of tissue. RBE values not only depend on the electron and photon energies but also on the irradiation condition, cell type and experimental conditions.

  12. Dynamical black holes in low-energy string theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aniceto, Pedro; Rocha, Jorge V.

    2017-05-01

    We investigate time-dependent spherically symmetric solutions of the four-dimensional Einstein-Maxwell-axion-dilaton system, with the dilaton coupling that occurs in low-energy effective heterotic string theory. A class of dilaton-electrovacuum radiating solutions with a trivial axion, previously found by Güven and Yörük, is re-derived in a simpler manner and its causal structure is clarified. It is shown that such dynamical spacetimes featuring apparent horizons do not possess a regular light-like past null infinity or future null infinity, depending on whether they are radiating or accreting. These solutions are then extended in two ways. First we consider a Vaidya-like generalisation, which introduces a null dust source. Such spacetimes are used to test the status of cosmic censorship in the context of low-energy string theory. We prove that — within this family of solutions — regular black holes cannot evolve into naked singularities by accreting null dust, unless standard energy conditions are violated. Secondly, we employ S-duality to derive new time-dependent dyon solutions with a nontrivial axion turned on. Although they share the same causal structure as their Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton counterparts, these solutions possess both electric and magnetic charges.

  13. Low Energy Charged Particle Measurement by Japanese Lunar Orbiter SELENE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Yu.; Yokota, S.; Asamura, K.; Tanaka, T.; Mukai, T.

    SELenological and ENgineering Explorer (SELENE) is a Japanese lunar orbiter that will be launched in 2007. The main purpose of this satellite is to study the origin and evolution of the Moon by means of global mapping of element abundances, mineralogical composition, and surface geographical mapping from 100 km altitude. Plasma energy Angle and Composition Experiment (PACE) is one of the scientific instruments onboard the SELENE satellite. The scientific objectives of PACE are (1) to measure the ions sputtered from the lunar surface and the lunar atmosphere, (2) to measure the magnetic anomaly on the lunar surface using two electron spectrum analyzers (ESAs) and a magnetometer onboard SELENE simultaneously as an electron reflectometer, (3) to resolve the Moon-solar wind interaction, (4) to resolve the Moon-Earth's magnetosphere interaction, and (5) to observe the Earth's magnetotail. PACE consists of four sensors: ESA-S1, ESA-S2, ion mass analyzer (IMA), and ion energy analyzer (IEA). ESA-S1 and S2 measure the three-dimensional distribution function of low energy electrons below 15 keV, while IMA and IEA measure the three-dimensional distribution function of low energy ions below 28 keV/q.

  14. Study of chirally motivated low-energy K - optical potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieplý, A.; Friedman, E.; Gal, A.; Mareš, J.

    2001-12-01

    The K - optical potential in the nuclear medium is evaluated self consistently from a free-space K -N t matrix constructed within a coupled-channel chiral approach to the low-energy K¯N data. The chiral-model parameters are fitted to a select subset of the low-energy data plus the K - atomic data throughout the periodic table. The resulting attractive K - optical potentials are relatively 'shallow', with central depth of the real part about 55 MeV, for a fairly reasonable reproduction of the atomic data with χ2/ N≈2.2. Relatively 'deep' attractive potentials of depth about 180 MeV, which result in other phenomenological approaches with χ2/ N≈1.5, are ruled out within chirally motivated models. Different physical data input is required to distinguish between shallow and deep K - optical potentials. The (K -stop, π) reaction could provide such a test, with exclusive rates differing by over a factor of three for the two classes of potentials. Finally, forward (K -,p) differential cross sections for the production of relatively narrow deeply bound K -nuclear states are evaluated for deep K - optical potentials, yielding values considerably lower than those estimated before.

  15. The low energy detector of Simbol-X

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lechner, P.; Andricek, L.; Briel, U.; Hasinger, G.; Heinzinger, K.; Herrmann, S.; Huber, H.; Kendziorra, E.; Lauf, T.; Lutz, G.; Richter, R.; Santangelo, A.; Schaller, G.; Schnecke, M.; Schopper, F.; Segneri, G.; Strüder, L.; Treis, J.

    2008-07-01

    Simbol-X is a French-Italian-German hard energy X-ray mission with a projected launch in 2014. Being sensitive in the energy range from 500 eV to 80 keV it will cover the sensitivity gap beyond the energy interval of today's telescopes XMM-Newton and Chandra. Simbol-X will use an imaging telescope of nested Wolter-I mirrors. To provide a focal length of 20 m it will be the first mission of two independent mirror and detector spacecrafts in autonomous formation flight. The detector spacecraft's payload is composed of an imaging silicon low energy detector in front of a pixelated cadmium-telluride hard energy detector. Both have a sensitive area of 8 × 8 cm2 to cover a 12 arcmin field of view and a pixel size of 625 × 625 μm2 adapted to the telescope's resolution of 20 arcsec. The additional LED specifications are: high energy resolution, high quantum efficiency, fast readout and optional window mode, monolithic device with 100 % fill factor and suspension mounting, and operation at warm temperature. To match these requirements the low energy detector is composed of 'active macro pixels', combining the large, scalable area of a Silicon Drift Detector and the low-noise, on-demand readout of an integrated DEPFET amplifier. Flight representative prototypes have been processed at the MPI semiconductor laboratory, and the prototype's measured performance demonstrates the technology readiness.

  16. Low energy charged particles interacting with amorphous solid water layers

    SciTech Connect

    Horowitz, Yonatan; Asscher, Micha

    2012-04-07

    The interaction of charged particles with condensed water films has been studied extensively in recent years due to its importance in biological systems, ecology as well as interstellar processes. We have studied low energy electrons (3-25 eV) and positive argon ions (55 eV) charging effects on amorphous solid water (ASW) and ice films, 120-1080 ML thick, deposited on ruthenium single crystal under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. Charging the ASW films by both electrons and positive argon ions has been measured using a Kelvin probe for contact potential difference (CPD) detection and found to obey plate capacitor physics. The incoming electrons kinetic energy has defined the maximum measurable CPD values by retarding further impinging electrons. L-defects (shallow traps) are suggested to be populated by the penetrating electrons and stabilize them. Low energy electron transmission measurements (currents of 0.4-1.5 {mu}A) have shown that the maximal and stable CPD values were obtained only after a relatively slow change has been completed within the ASW structure. Once the film has been stabilized, the spontaneous discharge was measured over a period of several hours at 103 {+-} 2 K. Finally, UV laser photo-emission study of the charged films has suggested that the negative charges tend to reside primarily at the ASW-vacuum interface, in good agreement with the known behavior of charged water clusters.

  17. Low-energy control of electrical turbulence in the heart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luther, Stefan; Fenton, Flavio H.; Kornreich, Bruce G.; Squires, Amgad; Bittihn, Philip; Hornung, Daniel; Zabel, Markus; Flanders, James; Gladuli, Andrea; Campoy, Luis; Cherry, Elizabeth M.; Luther, Gisa; Hasenfuss, Gerd; Krinsky, Valentin I.; Pumir, Alain; Gilmour, Robert F.; Bodenschatz, Eberhard

    2011-07-01

    Controlling the complex spatio-temporal dynamics underlying life-threatening cardiac arrhythmias such as fibrillation is extremely difficult, because of the nonlinear interaction of excitation waves in a heterogeneous anatomical substrate. In the absence of a better strategy, strong, globally resetting electrical shocks remain the only reliable treatment for cardiac fibrillation. Here we establish the relationship between the response of the tissue to an electric field and the spatial distribution of heterogeneities in the scale-free coronary vascular structure. We show that in response to a pulsed electric field, E, these heterogeneities serve as nucleation sites for the generation of intramural electrical waves with a source density ρ(E) and a characteristic time, τ, for tissue depolarization that obeys the power law τ~Eα. These intramural wave sources permit targeting of electrical turbulence near the cores of the vortices of electrical activity that drive complex fibrillatory dynamics. We show in vitro that simultaneous and direct access to multiple vortex cores results in rapid synchronization of cardiac tissue and therefore, efficient termination of fibrillation. Using this control strategy, we demonstrate low-energy termination of fibrillation in vivo. Our results give new insights into the mechanisms and dynamics underlying the control of spatio-temporal chaos in heterogeneous excitable media and provide new research perspectives towards alternative, life-saving low-energy defibrillation techniques.

  18. Formation of a high intensity low energy positron string

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donets, E. D.; Donets, E. E.; Syresin, E. M.; Itahashi, T.; Dubinov, A. E.

    2004-05-01

    The possibility of a high intensity low energy positron beam production is discussed. The proposed Positron String Trap (PST) is based on the principles and technology of the Electron String Ion Source (ESIS) developed in JINR during the last decade. A linear version of ESIS has been used successfully for the production of intense highly charged ion beams of various elements. Now the Tubular Electron String Ion Source (TESIS) concept is under study and this opens really new promising possibilities in physics and technology. In this report, we discuss the application of the tubular-type trap for the storage of positrons cooled to the cryogenic temperatures of 0.05 meV. It is intended that the positron flux at the energy of 1-5 eV, produced by the external source, is injected into the Tubular Positron Trap which has a similar construction as the TESIS. Then the low energy positrons are captured in the PST Penning trap and are cooled down because of their synchrotron radiation in the strong (5-10 T) applied magnetic field. It is expected that the proposed PST should permit storing and cooling to cryogenic temperature of up to 5×109 positrons. The accumulated cooled positrons can be used further for various physics applications, for example, antihydrogen production.

  19. Low Energy Laser Biostimulation: New Prospects For Medical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castel, John C.; Abergel, R. Patrick; Willner, Robert E.; Baumann, James G.

    1987-03-01

    The therapeutic benefits of light-energy is not a new concept to the modern world. Documented applications from ancient times tell of the therapeutic effects of ordinary sun-light to treat such common ailments as painful body joints, wounds, compound fractures and tetanus. The discovery of laser light in the 1960's, opened up new prospects for the medical use of light. Laser light differs from other forms of electromagnetic spectrum in that a single wavelength rather than a spectrum of wavelengths is emitted. Since the early 1970's, low-energy laser radiation has been reported to enhance wound healing rates, reduce edema, and relieve musculoskeletal pain. There is no detectable thermal effect of this laser on the tissue being treated. The effects are considered to occur as a result of photochemical, non thermal effects of the laser beam. Photons are absorbed by the tissue being treated and, in turn, produce positive therapeutic effects such as reduction of pain and edema. Pre-clinical and clinical evaluations are, presently, underway to document the safety and efficacy of low energy laser therapy, which represents a significant advance in the non-invasive treatment of pain.

  20. Low-Energy Electron Scattering by Sugarcane Lignocellulosic Biomass Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Eliane; Sanchez, Sergio; Bettega, Marcio; Lima, Marco; Varella, Marcio

    2012-06-01

    The use of second generation (SG) bioethanol instead of fossil fuels could be a good strategy to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. However, the efficient production of SG bioethanol has being a challenge to researchers around the world. The main barrier one must overcome is the pretreatment, a very important step in SG bioethanol aimed at breaking down the biomass and facilitates the extraction of sugars from the biomass. Plasma-based treatment, which can generate reactive species, could be an interesting possibility since involves low-cost atmospheric-pressure plasma. In order to offer theoretical support to this technique, the interaction of low-energy electrons from the plasma with biomass is investigated. This study was motived by several works developed by Sanche et al., in which they understood that DNA damage arises from dissociative electron attachment, a mechanism in which electrons are resonantly trapped by DNA subunits. We will present elastic cross sections for low-energy electron scattering by sugarcane biomass molecules, obtained with the Schwinger multichannel method. Our calculations indicate the formation of π* shape resonances in the lignin subunits, while a series of broad and overlapping σ* resonances are found in cellulose and hemicellulose subunits. The presence of π* and σ* resonances could give rise to direct and indirect dissociation pathways in biomass. Then, theoretical resonance energies can be useful to guide the plasma-based pretreatment to break down specific linkages of interest in biomass.

  1. Low Energy Nuclear Structure Modeling: Can It Be Improved?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, Jirina R.

    Since the discovery of the atomic nucleus in 1911 generations of physicists have devoted enormous effort to understand low energy nuclear structure. Properties of nuclei in their ground state, including mass, binding energy and shape, provide vital input to many areas of sub-atomic physics as well as astrophysics and cosmology. Low energy excited states are equally important for understanding nuclear dynamics. Yet, no consensus exists as to what is the best path to a theory which would not only consistently reproduce a wide variety of experimental data but also have enough predictive power to yield credible predictions in areas where data are still missing. In this contribution some of the main obstacles preventing building such a theory are discussed. These include modification of the free nucleon-nucleon force in the nuclear environment and effects of the sub-nucleon (quark) structure of the nucleon. Selected classes of nuclear models, mean-field, shell and ab-initio models are briefly outlined. Finally, suggestions are made for, at least partial, progress that can be achieved with the quark-meson coupling model, as reported in recent publication [1].

  2. Low energy probes of PeV scale sfermions

    SciTech Connect

    Altmannshofer, Wolfgang; Harnik, Roni; Zupan, Jure

    2013-11-27

    We derive bounds on squark and slepton masses in mini-split supersymmetry scenario using low energy experiments. In this setup gauginos are at the TeV scale, while sfermions are heavier by a loop factor. We cover the most sensitive low energy probes including electric dipole moments (EDMs), meson oscillations and charged lepton flavor violation (LFV) transitions. A leading log resummation of the large logs of gluino to sfermion mass ratio is performed. A sensitivity to PeV squark masses is obtained at present from kaon mixing measurements. A number of observables, including neutron EDMs, mu->e transitions and charmed meson mixing, will start probing sfermion masses in the 100 TeV-1000 TeV range with the projected improvements in the experimental sensitivities. We also discuss the implications of our results for a variety of models that address the flavor hierarchy of quarks and leptons. We find that EDM searches will be a robust probe of models in which fermion masses are generated radiatively, while LFV searches remain sensitive to simple-texture based flavor models.

  3. Low energy ion beam assisted growth of metal multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quan, Junjie

    Vapor deposited metal multilayers have attracted a great deal of interest in recent years because they offer extraordinary strength, hardness, heat resistance, and unexpected new properties like high reflectivity and spin-dependent conductivity. The giant magnetoresistance effects discovered in Fe/Cr artificial superstructures in 1988 stimulated a large number of studies on the electronic transport properties of spintronic materials because of their important applications in highly sensitive magnetic sensors, nonvolatile random access memories, and the data storage industry in general. Magnetic multilayers allow exploitation of unique micromagnetic, magnetooptic, and magnetoelectronic phenomena that cannot be realized using conventional materials. For example, if ferromagnetic layers (such as CoFe) with a thicknesses of 5-7 nm are separated by a non-magnetic spacer (such as Cu or AlOx) of an appropriate thickness (1-3 nm), they can exhibit large changes in their electrical resistance when a magnetic field is applied. These changes are caused mainly by spin-dependent conduction electron scattering at magnetic multilayer interfaces. Many experimental and theoretical works have sought to promote a basic understanding of the effect of atomic structure in thin film multilayers upon spin dependent transport. It has been found that interfacial imperfections, such as interfacial roughness and interlayer mixing, dramatically reduce the properties exploited for spintronic applications. A combination of computer modeling and experiments has been used to discover more effective ways to control the interfacial structures of metal multilayers. Earlier atomic simulations had indicated that it is very important to control adatom energy during deposition in order to improve interface properties. Based on these ideas, this dissertation has investigated the effects of low energy ion assistance during metal multilayer deposition. Using molecular dynamics modeling, the effects of ion

  4. The binary fission origin of the moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binder, Alan B.

    1986-01-01

    The major arguments for and against the binary fission model of lunar origin are reviewed. Unresolved problems include: (1) how the protoearth acquired sufficient angular velocity to fission, and (2) how the earth-moon system lost its excess angular momentum after fission. Despite these uncertainties, the compositional similarities between the earth's mantle and the bulk moon suggest that the fission model is worth considering. The proposed sequence of events in the formation of the moon by binary fission is given.

  5. Fission of rotating fermium isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baran, A.; Staszczak, A.

    2014-05-01

    In this paper we discuss the process of fission of even fermium isotopes, on the basis of their rotational states. The nuclear intrinsic vorticity and its coupling to the global rotation of the nucleus are used to simulate the interaction between the rotational motion and the pairing field, and lead to pairing quenching in the case of higher angular momentum states. The rotation leads to a decreasing of the fission barrier heights. The ingredients of the model—ground state fission barriers, pairing correlation energies and the cranking moments of inertia—are obtained within the self-consistent Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov framework using the Skyrme \\text{Sk}{{\\text{M}}^{*}} energy density functional. Fission barriers and half-lives are estimated for spins I up to I = 16ℏ.

  6. Ternary Fission of CF Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermote, S.; Wagemans, C.; Serot, O.; Soldner, T.; Geltenbort, P.; Almahamid, I.; Lukens, W.; Floyd, J.

    2008-04-01

    During the last years, different Cm and Cf isotopes have been studied by our research group in the frame of a systematic investigation of gas emission characteristics in ternary fission. In this paper we report on the energy distribution and the emission probability of 3H, 4He and 6He particles emitted in neutron induced ternary fission of 249Cf and 251Cf. Both measurements were performed at the high flux reactor of the Institute Laue-Langevin (Grenoble, France), using suited ΔE-E telescope detectors, consisting of well-calibrated silicon surface barrier detectors. In this way, the available database can be expanded with new results for Z=98 isotopes, for which the information on neutron induced ternary fission is almost nonexistent. These measurements are important for the systematic investigation of gas emission characteristics in ternary fission.

  7. Advanced Space Fission Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houts, Michael G.; Borowski, Stanley K.

    2010-01-01

    Fission has been considered for in-space propulsion since the 1940s. Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) systems underwent extensive development from 1955-1973, completing 20 full power ground tests and achieving specific impulses nearly twice that of the best chemical propulsion systems. Space fission power systems (which may eventually enable Nuclear Electric Propulsion) have been flown in space by both the United States and the Former Soviet Union. Fission is the most developed and understood of the nuclear propulsion options (e.g. fission, fusion, antimatter, etc.), and fission has enjoyed tremendous terrestrial success for nearly 7 decades. Current space nuclear research and technology efforts are focused on devising and developing first generation systems that are safe, reliable and affordable. For propulsion, the focus is on nuclear thermal rockets that build on technologies and systems developed and tested under the Rover/NERVA and related programs from the Apollo era. NTP Affordability is achieved through use of previously developed fuels and materials, modern analytical techniques and test strategies, and development of a small engine for ground and flight technology demonstration. Initial NTP systems will be capable of achieving an Isp of 900 s at a relatively high thrust-to-weight ratio. The development and use of first generation space fission power and propulsion systems will provide new, game changing capabilities for NASA. In addition, development and use of these systems will provide the foundation for developing extremely advanced power and propulsion systems capable of routinely and affordably accessing any point in the solar system. The energy density of fissile fuel (8 x 10(exp 13) Joules/kg) is more than adequate for enabling extensive exploration and utilization of the solar system. For space fission propulsion systems, the key is converting the virtually unlimited energy of fission into thrust at the desired specific impulse and thrust

  8. Protonation-induced stereoisomerism in nicotine: conformational studies using classical (AMBER) and ab initio (Car-Parrinello) molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Hammond, Philip S; Wu, Yudong; Harris, Rebecca; Minehardt, Todd J; Car, Roberto; Schmitt, Jeffrey D

    2005-01-01

    A variety of biologically active small molecules contain prochiral tertiary amines, which become chiral centers upon protonation. S-nicotine, the prototypical nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonist, produces two diastereomers on protonation. Results, using both classical (AMBER) and ab initio (Car-Parrinello) molecular dynamical studies, illustrate the significant differences in conformational space explored by each diastereomer. As is expected, this phenomenon has an appreciable effect on nicotine's energy hypersurface and leads to differentiation in molecular shape and divergent sampling. Thus, protonation induced isomerism can produce dynamic effects that may influence the behavior of a molecule in its interaction with a target protein. We also examine differences in the conformational dynamics for each diastereomer as quantified by both molecular dynamics methods.

  9. Activation cross-sections of proton induced reactions on vanadium in the 37-65 MeV energy range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ditrói, F.; Tárkányi, F.; Takács, S.; Hermanne, A.

    2016-08-01

    Experimental excitation functions for proton induced reactions on natural vanadium in the 37-65 MeV energy range were measured with the activation method using a stacked foil irradiation technique. By using high resolution gamma spectrometry cross-section data for the production of 51,48Cr, 48V, 48,47,46,44m,44g,43Sc and 43,42K were determined. Comparisons with the earlier published data are presented and results predicted by different theoretical codes (EMPIRE and TALYS) are included. Thick target yields were calculated from a fit to our experimental excitation curves and compared with the earlier experimental yield data. Depth distribution curves to be used for thin layer activation (TLA) are also presented.

  10. Proton induced multilevel storage capability in self-assembled indium-zinc-oxide thin-film transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Li Qiang; Jin Wan, Chang; Qiang Zhu, Li; Wan, Qing

    2013-09-01

    Multilevel memory capability of self-assembled indium-zinc-oxide (IZO) electric-double-layer (EDL) thin-film transistors gated by nanogranular SiO2 proton conducting electrolytes is investigated. More than four distinct memory states are obtained by programming gate voltage. The observed multilevel storage behavior is mainly due to the controlled interfacial electrochemical doping of IZO channel by penetrated protons under programmed gate voltages. In addition, such IZO-based EDL transistor multilevel memory exhibits good characteristics of programming/erasing endurance and data retention. Such oxide-based EDL transistors with proton-induced multilevel memory behavior are interesting for low-cost memory and neuromorphic system applications after further properties and size optimization.

  11. Sample preparation and system calibration for proton-induced X-ray emission analysis of hair from occupationally exposed workers

    SciTech Connect

    Clayton, E.; Wooller, K.K.

    1985-05-01

    Blood and urine collections are commonly used to monitor trace element concentration in the body. Hair may also be used. The concentration of many elements is much higher in hair than in either blood or urine and may provide a ready record of a period of exposure to heavy metals. Proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) has been used to study trace elements in hair. A method of preparing samples by charring hair and mixing with yttrium-spiked graphite has been developed. Thick targets suitable for PIXE analysis are made. The trace elements K, Ca, Tl, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Pb, Br, Rb, and Sr are routinely measured in most samples and Cr, Co, As, Bi, Se, Zr, and Cd can be measured in occupationally exposed workers. Helium backscattering and elastic recoil detection are used to determine the major component H, C, N, O, and S. 23 references, 5 figures, 3 tables.

  12. Comparison of the Proton-Induced Dark Current and Charge Transfer Efficiency Responses of N- and P-Channel CCDs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, Cheryl; Marshall, Paul; Wacynski, Augustyn; Polidan, Elizabeth; Johnson, Scott; Campbell, Art

    2004-01-01

    The proton-induced CTE behavior for the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) p-CCD (being developed for the Supernovae Acceleration Project (SNAP) and Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) n-CCDs were compared using 55Fe, EPER and FPR techniques. CTE performance of the p-CCD is about an order of magnitude better after a 63 MeV fluence of 2.5 x 10(sup 9)/sq cm, which is equivalent to 2.5 years in the shielded HST orbit. Notched n- and p-CCDs yielded factor of two improvement in CTE performance as compared to their un-notched versions. The introduction rate of hot pixels was greater in p-CCD as compared to n-CCD, and also greater in notched than un-notched devices.

  13. N(7)-protonation-induced conformational flipping in hypermodified nucleic acid base N 6-(N-glycylcarbonyl) adenine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tewari, Ravindra

    1995-06-01

    Protonation-induced conformational changes are studied in the hypermodified nucleic acid base N 6-(N-glycylcarbonyl) adenine, gc 6Ade, using the quantum chemical perturbative configuration interaction using localised orbitals method. Protonation at the N(7) position of adenine in gc 6Ade induces reorientation of the N 6 substituent, so as to allow stabilisation through an intramolecular hydrogen bond involving N(7)H and the carbonyl oxygen in the glycylcarbonyl substituent. The relative orientation of the carboxyl group with respect to the carbonyl group in the ureido HNCONH linkage is predicted to be similar to that in unprotonated gc 6Ade. The theoretically preferred proximal conformation of N(7)-protonated gc 6Ade restores the participation of N(6)H and N(1) in the Watson-Crick base pairing similar to that in unmodified adenine. This unique orientation can be significant for altering the reading frame in codon-anticodon interactions.

  14. Fluorine concentrations in bone biopsy samples determined by proton-induced gamma-ray emission and cyclic neutron activation.

    PubMed

    Spyrou, N M; Altaf, W J; Gill, B S; Jeynes, C; Nicolaou, G; Pietra, R; Sabbioni, E; Surian, M

    1990-01-01

    Fluorine concentrations in bone biopsy samples taken from the iliac crest of subjects, divided into four groups depending on the length of dialysis treatment, and aluminium levels in blood and bone pathology, in terms of osteoporosis, were determined by two instrumental methods. Proton-induced gamma-ray emission (PIGE), making use of the resonance reaction of 19F(p, alpha gamma)16O at 872 keV, and cyclic neutron activation analysis (CNAA), using the 19F(n, gamma)20F reaction in a reactor irradiation facility, were employed. Rutherford backscattering (RBS) was used to calculate the volume, and, hence, mass of the sample excited in PIGE by determining the major element composition of the samples in order to express results in terms of concentration. From this preliminary investigation, a relationship is suggested between fluorine concentrations in bone and aluminium levels in the system.

  15. Determination of total fluorine in five coal reference materials by proton-induced gamma-ray emission spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Roelandts, I; Robaye, G; Delbrouck-Habaru, J M; Weber, G

    1996-03-01

    The direct non-destructive proton-induced gamma-ray emission (PIGE) technique with a germanium detector was applied to the determination of total fluorine concentration in five coal reference materials (BCR 40, NIST 1632b, NIST 1635, SARM 20 and USGS CLB-1). Duplicate analyses were made from five randomly selected bottles of each coal. Individual data are presented and some problems (calibration, proton stopping power, effects of sample heating by the proton beam, background estimation) which were encountered during this study are discussed. Sensitivity and reproducibility of the determinations, and homogeneity of the coal samples with respect to fluorine contents by analysis of variance were investigated. The present data are also compared with the few published values for these reference samples, including other PIGE data. The use of synthetic standards and spiked samples in the present study suggested that the PIGE method was more accurate than other techniques.

  16. The Microscopic Theory of Fission

    SciTech Connect

    Younes, W; Gogny, D

    2009-06-09

    Fission-fragment properties have been calculated for thermal neutron-induced fission on a {sup 239}Pu target, using constrained Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov calculations with a finite-range effective interaction. A quantitative criterion based on the interaction energy between the nascent fragments is introduced to define the scission configurations. The validity of this criterion is benchmarked against experimental measurements of the kinetic energies and of multiplicities of neutrons emitted by the fragments.

  17. Tissue modeling schemes in low energy breast brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afsharpour, Hossein; Landry, Guillaume; Reniers, Brigitte; Pignol, Jean-Philippe; Beaulieu, Luc; Verhaegen, Frank

    2011-11-01

    Breast tissue is heterogeneous and is mainly composed of glandular (G) and adipose (A) tissues. The proportion of G versus A varies considerably among the population. The absorbed dose distributions in accelerated partial breast irradiation therapy with low energy photon brachytherapy sources are very sensitive to tissue heterogeneities. Current clinical algorithms use the recommendations of the AAPM TG43 report which approximates the human tissues by unit density water. The aim of this study is to investigate various breast tissue modeling schemes for low energy brachytherapy. A special case of breast permanent seed implant is considered here. Six modeling schemes are considered. Uniform and non-uniform water breast (UWB and NUWB) consider the density but neglect the effect of the composition of tissues. The uniform and the non-uniform G/A breast (UGAB and NUGAB) as well the age-dependent breast (ADB) models consider the effect of the composition. The segmented breast tissue (SBT) method uses a density threshold to distinguish between G and A tissues. The PTV D90 metric is used for the analysis and is based on the dose to water (D90(w,m)). D90(m,m) is also reported for comparison to D90(w,m). The two-month post-implant D90(w,m) averaged over 38 patients is smaller in NUWB than in UWB by about 4.6% on average (ranging from 5% to 13%). Large average differences of G/A breast models with TG43 (17% and 26% in UGAB and NUGAB, respectively) show that the effect of the chemical composition dominates the effect of the density on dose distributions. D90(w,m) is 12% larger in SBT than in TG43 when averaged. These differences can be as low as 4% or as high as 20% when the individual patients are considered. The high sensitivity of dosimetry on the modeling scheme argues in favor of an agreement on a standard tissue modeling approach to be used in low energy breast brachytherapy. SBT appears to generate the most geometrically reliable breast tissue models in this report. This

  18. White paper on nuclear astrophysics and low-energy nuclear physics, Part 2: Low-energy nuclear physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, Joe; Carpenter, Michael P.; Casten, Richard; Elster, Charlotte; Fallon, Paul; Gade, Alexandra; Gross, Carl; Hagen, Gaute; Hayes, Anna C.; Higinbotham, Douglas W.; Howell, Calvin R.; Horowitz, Charles J.; Jones, Kate L.; Kondev, Filip G.; Lapi, Suzanne; Macchiavelli, Augusto; McCutchen, Elizabeth A.; Natowitz, Joe; Nazarewicz, Witold; Papenbrock, Thomas; Reddy, Sanjay; Riley, Mark A.; Savage, Martin J.; Savard, Guy; Sherrill, Bradley M.; Sobotka, Lee G.; Stoyer, Mark A.; Betty Tsang, M.; Vetter, Kai; Wiedenhoever, Ingo; Wuosmaa, Alan H.; Yennello, Sherry

    2017-05-01

    Over the last decade, the Low-Energy Nuclear Physics (LENP) and Nuclear Astrophysics (NAP) communities have increasingly organized themselves in order to take a coherent approach to resolving the challenges they face. As a result, there is a high level of optimism in view of the unprecedented opportunities for substantial progress. In preparation of the 2015 US Nuclear Science Long Range Plan (LRP), the two American Physical Society Division of Nuclear Physics town meetings on LENP and NAP were held jointly on August 21-23, 2014, at Texas A&M, College Station, in Texas. These meetings were co-organized to take advantage of the strong synergy between the two fields. The present White Paper attempts to communicate the sense of great anticipation and enthusiasm that came out of these meetings. A unanimously endorsed set of joint resolutions condensed from the individual recommendations of the two town meetings were agreed upon. The present LENP White Paper discusses the above and summarizes in detail for each of the sub-fields within low-energy nuclear physics, the major accomplishments since the last LRP, the compelling near-term and long-term scientific opportunities plus the resources needed to achieve these goals, along with the scientific impact on, and interdisciplinary connections to, other fields.

  19. Low-energy and very-low energy total cross sections for electron collisions with N2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitajima, Masashi; Kishino, Takaya; Okumura, Takuma; Kobayashi, Naomasa; Sayama, Atsushi; Mori, Yuma; Hosaka, Kouichi; Odagiri, Takeshi; Hoshino, Masamitsu; Tanaka, Hiroshi

    2017-06-01

    Absolute grand total cross sections for electron scattering from N2 are obtained in the energy range from 20 eV down to 5 meV with very narrow electron energy width of 9 meV using the threshold-photoelectron source. Total cross sections obtained in the present study are compared with the previous experimentally obtained results. At the very-low energy region below 50 meV, the present total cross sections are somewhat smaller than those reported by the Aarhus group [S.V. Hoffmann et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 73, 4157 (2002)], which has been the only experimental work that provided the total cross sections in the very-low energy region. The energy positions of the peaks in the total cross sections due to the 2Πg shape resonance are obtained with higher accuracy, due to the improved uncertainty of the energy position in the present measurement compared to the previous works. The resonance structure in the total cross sections due to the Feshbach resonances of N2 at around 11.5 eV are also observed. Analysis of the resonant structure was carried out in order to determine the values of resonance width of Feshbach resonances of N2. Contribution to the Topical Issue: "Atomic and Molecular Data and their Applications", edited by Gordon W.F. Drake, Jung-Sik Yoon, Daiji Kato, Grzegorz Karwasz.

  20. Measurement of U-235 Fission Neutron Spectra Using a Multiple Gamma Coincidence Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Ji Chuncheng; Kegel, G.H.R.; Egan, J.J.; DeSimone, D.J.; Alimeti, A.; Roldan, C.F.; McKittrick, T.M.; Kim, D.-S.; Chen, X.; Tremblay, S.E.

    2005-05-24

    The Los Alamos Model of Madland and Nix predicts the shape of the fission neutron energy spectrum for incident primary neutrons of different energies. Verifications of the model normally are limited to measurements of the fission neutron spectra for energies higher than that of the primary neutrons because the low-energy spectrum is distorted by the admixture of elastically and inelastically scattered neutrons. This situation can be remedied by using a measuring technique that separates fission from scattering events. One solution consists of using a fissile sample so thin that fission fragments can be observed indicating the occurrence of a fission event. A different approach is considered in this paper. It has been established that a fission event is accompanied by the emission of between seven and eight gamma rays, while in a scattering interaction, between zero and two gammas are emitted, so that a gamma multiplicity detector should supply a datum to distinguish a fission event from a scattering event. We proceed as follows: A subnanosecond pulsed and bunched proton beam from the UML Van de Graaff generates nearly mono-energetic neutrons by irradiating a thin metallic lithium target. The neutrons irradiate a 235U sample. Emerging neutron energies are measured with a time-of-flight spectrometer. A set of four BaF2 detectors is located close to the 235U sample. These detectors together with their electronic components identify five different events for each neutron detected, i.e., whether four, three, two, one, or none of the BaF2 detectors received one (or more) gamma rays. We present work, preliminary to the final measurements, involving feasibility considerations based on gamma-ray coincidence measurements with four BaF2 detectors, and the design of a Fission-Scattering Discriminator under construction.

  1. Low energy electron magnetometer using a monoenergetic electron beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.; Wood, G. M.; Rayborn, G. H.; White, F. A. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A low energy electron beam magnetometer utilizes near-monoenergetic electrons thereby reducing errors due to electron energy spread and electron nonuniform angular distribution. In a first embodiment, atoms in an atomic beam of an inert gas are excited to a Rydberg state and then electrons of near zero energy are detached from the Rydberg atoms. The near zero energy electrons are then accelerated by an electric field V(acc) to form the electron beam. In a second embodiment, a filament emits electrons into an electrostatic analyzer which selects electrons at a predetermined energy level within a very narrow range. These selected electrons make up the electron beam that is subjected to the magnetic field being measured.

  2. Status report on the Low Energy Neutron Source for 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baxter, D. V.; Rinckel, T.

    2016-11-01

    The Low Energy Neutron Source at Indiana University first produced cold neutrons in April of 2005. Ten years after first reaching this milestone, the facility has three instruments in operation on its cold target station, and a second target station is devoted to thermal and fast neutron physics offers capabilities in radiation effects research (single-event effects in electronics) and radiography. Key elements in our success over these last ten years have been the diversity of activities we have been able maintain (which often involves using each of our instruments for multiple different activities), the close relationship we have developed with a number of major sources, and the focus we have had on innovation in neutron instrumentation. In this presentation, we will introduce some of the highlights from our most recent activities, provide an update on some of our technical challenges, and describe some of our ideas for the future.

  3. Optimization of design parameters of low-energy buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vala, Jiří; Jarošová, Petra

    2017-07-01

    Evaluation of temperature development and related consumption of energy required for heating, air-conditioning, etc. in low-energy buildings requires the proper physical analysis, covering heat conduction, convection and radiation, including beam and diffusive components of solar radiation, on all building parts and interfaces. The system approach and the Fourier multiplicative decomposition together with the finite element technique offers the possibility of inexpensive and robust numerical and computational analysis of corresponding direct problems, as well as of the optimization ones with several design variables, using the Nelder-Mead simplex method. The practical example demonstrates the correlation between such numerical simulations and the time series of measurements of energy consumption on a small family house in Ostrov u Macochy (35 km northern from Brno).

  4. First evidence of low energy enhancement in Ge isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renstrøm, T.; Nyhus, H.-T.; Utsunomiya, H.; Larsen, A. C.; Siem, S.; Guttormsen, M.; Filipescu, D. M.; Gheorghe, I.; Goriely, S.; Bernstein, L. A.; Bleuel, D. L.; Glodariu, T.; Görgen, A.; Hagen, T. W.; Lui, Y.-W.; Negi, D.; Ruud, I. E.; Şahin, E.; Schwengner, R.; Shima, T.; Takahisa, K.; Tesileanu, O.; Tornyi, T. G.; Tveten, G. M.; Wiedeking, M.

    2015-05-01

    The γ-strength functions and level densities of 73,74Ge have been extracted from particle-γ coincidence data using the Oslo method. In addition the γ-strength function of 74Ge above the neutron separation threshold, Sn = 10.196 MeV has been extracted from photoneutron measurements. When combined, these two experiments give a γ-strength function covering the energy range of ˜1-13 MeV for 74Ge. This thorough investigation of 74Ge is a part of an international campaign to study the previously reported low energy enhancement in this mass region in the γ-strength function from ˜3MeV towards lower γ energies. The obtained data show that both 73,74Ge display an increase in strength at low γ energies.

  5. Elastic positron-cadmium scattering at low energies

    SciTech Connect

    Bromley, M. W. J.; Mitroy, J.

    2010-05-15

    The elastic and annihilation cross sections for positron-cadmium scattering are reported up to the positronium-formation threshold (at 2.2 eV). The low-energy phase shifts for the elastic scattering of positrons from cadmium were derived from the bound and pseudostate energies of a very large basis configuration-interaction calculation of the e{sup +}-Cd system. The s-wave binding energy is estimated to be 126{+-}42 meV, with a scattering length of A{sub scat}=(14.2{+-}2.1)a{sub 0}, while the threshold annihilation parameter, Z{sub eff}, was 93.9{+-}26.5. The p-wave phase shift exhibits a weak shape resonance that results in a peak Z{sub eff} of 91{+-}17 at a collision energy of about 490{+-}50 meV.

  6. The low energy spectra of gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bussard, R. W.; Lamb, F. K.

    1982-01-01

    The implications of observed gamma-ray burst spectra for the physical conditions and geometries of the sources are examined. It is noted that an explanation of the continua in terms of optically thin thermal bremsstrahlung requires a relatively large area but a fairly shallow depth. On the other hand, a spectrum similar to that observed could be produced by rapid flickering of sources with less extreme geometries if each flicker emits a Comptonized thermal spectrum. Either field inhomogeneities or plasma motions are required to interpret the low energy features as cyclotron extinction. An alternative explanation is photoelectric absorption by heavy atoms; this requires a field strength high enough to make one-photon electron positron annihilation possible. Observational tests of these possibilities are proposed

  7. Quantifying Low Energy Proton Damage in Multijunction Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messenger, Scott R.; Burke, Edward A.; Walters, Robert J.; Warner, Jeffrey H.; Summers, Geoffrey P.; Lorentzen, Justin R.; Morton, Thomas L.; Taylor, Steven J.

    2007-01-01

    An analysis of the effects of low energy proton irradiation on the electrical performance of triple junction (3J) InGaP2/GaAs/Ge solar cells is presented. The Monte Carlo ion transport code (SRIM) is used to simulate the damage profile induced in a 3J solar cell under the conditions of typical ground testing and that of the space environment. The results are used to present a quantitative analysis of the defect, and hence damage, distribution induced in the cell active region by the different radiation conditions. The modelling results show that, in the space environment, the solar cell will experience a uniform damage distribution through the active region of the cell. Through an application of the displacement damage dose analysis methodology, the implications of this result on mission performance predictions are investigated.

  8. Quantifying Low Energy Proton Damage in Multijunction Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messenger, S. R.; Burke, E. A.; Lorentzen, J. R.; Walters, R. J.; Warner, J. H.; Summers, G. P.; Taylor, S. J.

    2005-05-01

    An analysis of the effects of low energy proton irradiation on the electrical performance of triple junction (3J) InGaP2/GaAs/Ge solar cells is presented. Monte Carlo modelling (SRIM) is used to simulate the damage profile induced in a 3J solar cell under the conditions of typical ground testing and that of the space environment. The results are used to present a quantitative analysis of the defect, and hence damage, distribution induced in the cell active region by the different radiation conditions. The modelling results show that in the space environment the solar cell will experience a uniform damage distribution. Through an application of the displacement damage dose analysis methodology, the implications of this result on mission performance predictions are investigated.

  9. Space charge effects in the SSC Low Energy Booster

    SciTech Connect

    Machida, S.; Bourianoff, G.; Mahale, N.K.; Mehta, N.; Pilat, F.; Talman, R.; York, R.C.

    1991-05-01

    By means of multi-particle tracking, we explore space charge effects in the Low Energy Booster (LEB) which has a strong requirement for small transverse emittance. Macro-particles are tracked in a self-consistent manner in six dimensional phase space with transverse space charge kicks so that the emittance evolution as well as the particle distribution are simulated as a function of time. Among recent improvements of the code, the longitudinal motion, i.e. synchrotron oscillations as well as acceleration, makes it possible to simulate the capture process of linac microbunches. The code was calibrated by comparing with the experimental results at the Fermilab Booster. Preliminary results of the LEB show slow emittance growth due to the space charge. 5 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Advanced satellite sensors: Low Energy Neutral Atom (LENA) imager

    SciTech Connect

    Funsten, H.O.; McComas, D.J.

    1996-09-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Imaging of low energy neutral atoms (LENDs) created by electron capture by magnetospheric plasma ions from interactions with cold geocoronal neutrals promises to be a revolutionary technique for providing unprecedented information about the global structure and dynamics of the terrestrial magnetosphere. This has significant implications in space weather forecasting, weather-induced satellite upset diagnostics, and revolutionary insights into global magnetospheric physics. The Los Alamos Space and Atmospheric Sciences Group has completed extensive neutral atom simulations and detailed instrument definition, and we designed a proof-of-concept demonstration prototype and have obtained externally- funded programs for full instrument development

  11. Low-energy properties of aperiodic quantum spin chains.

    PubMed

    Vieira, André P

    2005-02-25

    We investigate the low-energy properties of antiferromagnetic quantum XXZ spin chains with couplings following two-letter aperiodic sequences, by an adaptation of the Ma-Dasgupta-Hu renormalization-group method. For a given aperiodic sequence, we argue that, in the easy-plane anisotropy regime, intermediate between the XX and Heisenberg limits, the general scaling form of the thermodynamic properties is essentially given by the exactly known XX behavior, providing a classification of the effects of aperiodicity on XXZ chains. As representative illustrations, we present analytical and numerical results for the low-temperature thermodynamics and the ground-state correlations for couplings following the Fibonacci quasiperiodic structure and a binary Rudin-Shapiro sequence, whose geometrical fluctuations are similar to those induced by randomness.

  12. Low-energy dissociative electron attachment to CF2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chourou, S. T.; Larson, Ã.; Orel, A. E.

    2015-08-01

    We present the results of a theoretical study of dissociative electron attachment (DEA) of low-energy electrons to CF2. We carried out electron scattering calculations using the complex Kohn variational method at the static-exchange and relaxed self-consistent field (SCF) level at the equilibrium geometry and compare our differential cross sections to other results. We then repeated these calculations as a function of the three internal degrees of freedom to obtain the resonance energy surfaces and autoionization widths. We use this data as input to form the Hamiltonian relevant to the nuclear dynamics. The multidimensional wave equation is solved using the multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree (MCTDH) approach within the local approximation.

  13. Five low energy phosphorene allotropes constructed through gene segments recombination

    PubMed Central

    He, Chaoyu; Zhang, ChunXiao; Tang, Chao; Ouyang, Tao; Li, Jin; Zhong, Jianxin

    2017-01-01

    Based on the crystal structures of the previously proposed low energy η-P and θ-P, five new phosphorene allotropes were predicted through gene segments recombination method. These five new phosphorene allotropes are confirmed dynamically stable and energetically more favorable than their parents (η-P and θ-P). Especially, the XX-XX type G1-P is confirmed energetically more favorable than most of all the previously proposed phosphorene allotropes, including black phosphorene and blue phosphorene, which is highly expected to be synthesized in future experiment through vapor deposition or epitaxial growth method like blue β-P. The calculated results also show that such a new promising phosphorene allotrope G1-P is a potential candidate for application in nano-electronics according to its middle band gap of about 1.491 eV from DFT-HSE06 calculation. PMID:28447623

  14. The low energy spectra of gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bussard, R. W.; Lamb, F. K.

    1982-01-01

    The implications of observed gamma-ray burst spectra for the physical conditions and geometries of the sources are examined. It is noted that an explanation of the continua in terms of optically thin thermal bremsstrahlung requires a relatively large area but a fairly shallow depth. On the other hand, a spectrum similar to that observed could be produced by rapid flickering of sources with less extreme geometries if each flicker emits a Comptonized thermal spectrum. Either field inhomogeneities or plasma motions are required to interpret the low energy features as cyclotron extinction. An alternative explanation is photoelectric absorption by heavy atoms; this requires a field strength high enough to make one-photon electron positron annihilation possible. Observational tests of these possibilities are proposed

  15. Materials and neutronic research at the Low Energy Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baxter, David V.

    2016-04-01

    In the decade since the Low Energy Neutron Source (LENS) at Indiana University Center for Exploration of Energy and Matter (CEEM) produced its first neutrons, the facility has made important contributions to the international neutron scattering community. LENS employs a 13MeV proton beam at up to 4kW beam power onto one of two Be targets to produce neutrons for research in fields ranging from radiation effects in electronics to studies of the structure of fluids confined in nanoporous materials. The neutron source design at the heart of LENS facilitates relatively rapid hands-on access to most of its components which provides a foundation for a research program in experimental neutronics and affords numerous opportunities for novel educational experiences. We describe in some detail a number of the unique capabilities of this facility.

  16. Spectroscopy of low energy solar neutrinos by MOON

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazama, R.; Doe, P.; Ejiri, H.; Elliott, S. R.; Engel, J.; Finger, M.; Formaggio, J. A.; Fushimi, K.; Gehman, V.; Gorin, A.; Greenfield, M.; Ichihara, K.; Ikegami, Y.; Ishii, H.; Itahashi, T.; Kavitov, P.; Kekelidze, V.; Kuroda, K.; Kutsalo, V.; Manouilov, I.; Matsuoka, K.; Nakamura, H.; Nomachi, M.; Para, A.; Rielage, K.; Rjazantsev, A.; Robertson, R. G. H.; Shichijo, Y.; Shima, T.; Shimada, Y.; Shirkov, G.; Sissakian, A.; Sugaya, Y.; Titov, A.; Vatulin, V.; Vilches, O. E.; Voronov, V.; Wilkerson, J. F.; Will, D. I.; Yoshida, S.

    2005-01-01

    The MOON (Molybdenum Observatory Of Neutrinos) project aims at high sensitive studies of the double beta (ββ) decays with sensitivity to Majorana ν mass of the order of ˜0.03 eV and the charged-current (CC) neutrino spectroscopy of the major components of the pp and 7Be solar ν's. The present status of MOON for the low energy solar ν experiment is briefly discussed. The inverse β rays from solar-ν captures of 100Mo are measured in delayed coincidence with the subsequent β decay of 100Tc. MOON's exclusive CC value by 7Be solar ν, together with the GNO CC data, will provide the pp solar ν flux with good accuracy.

  17. HIGH INTENSITY LOW-ENERGY POSITRON SOURCE AT JEFFERSON

    SciTech Connect

    Serkan Golge, Bogdan Wojtsekhowski, Branislav Vlahovic

    2012-07-01

    We present a novel concept of a low-energy e{sup +} source with projected intensity on the order of 10{sup 10} slow e{sup +}/s. The key components of this concept are a continuous wave e{sup -} beam, a rotating positron-production target, a synchronized raster/anti-raster, a transport channel, and extraction of e{sup +} into a field-free area through a magnetic plug for moderation in a cryogenic solid. Components were designed in the framework of GEANT4-based (G4beamline) Monte Carlo simulation and TOSCA magnetic field calculation codes. Experimental data to demonstrate the effectiveness of the magnetic plug is presented.

  18. NRV web knowledge base on low-energy nuclear physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpov, A. V.; Denikin, A. S.; Naumenko, M. A.; Alekseev, A. P.; Rachkov, V. A.; Samarin, V. V.; Saiko, V. V.; Zagrebaev, V. I.

    2017-07-01

    The paper describes the principles of organization and operation of the NRV web knowledge base on low-energy nuclear physics (http://nrv.jinr.ru/) which integrates a large amount of digitized experimental data on the properties of nuclei and nuclear reaction cross sections with a wide range of computational programs for modeling of nuclear properties and various processes of nuclear dynamics which work directly in the browser of a remote user. The paper also gives an overview of the current situation in the field of application of network information technologies in nuclear physics. The features of the NRV knowledge base are illustrated in detail on the example of the analysis of nucleon transfer reactions within the distorted wave Born approximation.

  19. Opportunistic Sensor Data Collection with Bluetooth Low Energy

    PubMed Central

    Aguilar, Sergio; Vidal, Rafael; Gomez, Carles

    2017-01-01

    Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) has gained very high momentum, as witnessed by its widespread presence in smartphones, wearables and other consumer electronics devices. This fact can be leveraged to carry out opportunistic sensor data collection (OSDC) in scenarios where a sensor node cannot communicate with infrastructure nodes. In such cases, a mobile entity (e.g., a pedestrian or a vehicle) equipped with a BLE-enabled device can collect the data obtained by the sensor node when both are within direct communication range. In this paper, we characterize, both analytically and experimentally, the performance and trade-offs of BLE as a technology for OSDC, for the two main identified approaches, and considering the impact of its most crucial configuration parameters. Results show that a BLE sensor node running on a coin cell battery can achieve a lifetime beyond one year while transferring around 10 Mbit/day, in realistic OSDC scenarios. PMID:28124987

  20. ULTRA-LOW-ENERGY HIGH-CURRENT ION SOURCE

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre; Yushkov, Georgy Yu.; Baldwin, David A.

    2009-11-20

    The technical objective of the project was to develop an ultra-low-energy, high-intensity ion source (ULEHIIS) for materials processing in high-technology fields including semiconductors, micro-magnetics and optics/opto-electronics. In its primary application, this ion source can be incorporated into the 4Wave thin-film deposition technique called biased target ion-beam deposition (BTIBD), which is a deposition technique based on sputtering (without magnetic field, i.e., not the typical magnetron sputtering). It is a technological challenge because the laws of space charge limited current (Child-Langmuir) set strict limits of how much current can be extracted from a reservoir of ions, such as a suitable discharge plasma. The solution to the problem was an innovative dual-discharge system without the use of extraction grids.