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Sample records for low-energy ri beams

  1. Study on astrophysical reactions using low-energy RI beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Hidetoshi

    2009-10-01

    In recent years, low-energy RI beams can be produced in a good intensity and they have been used for studying many astrophysical reactions. One of the facilities producing low-energy RI beams is CRIB (CNS Radio-Isotope Beam separator) [1,2], an RI-beam separator of Center for Nuclear Study, University of Tokyo. Taking CRIB as an example, recent improvements on the RI-beam production and experimental results on astrophysical studies are presented. Several experimental approaches have been taken for the studies on astrophysical reactions.The feature of each method are discussed based on real measurements performed at CRIB. One is the direct method, applied for measurements of reactions such as (α,p) [3]. Another is the measurement of proton/alpha resonance scattering using the thick target method in inverse kinematics, by which we can obtain information on the resonances relevant in astrophysical reactions [4,5]. A recent fruitful result was from a measurement of proton resonance scattering using a ^7Be beam [5]. The energy level structure of ^8B, revealed by the experiment, is especially of interest as it is related with the ^7Be(p,γ) ^8B reaction, responsible for the production of ^8B neutrinos in the sun. We successfully determined parameters of resonances in ^8B below 6.7 MeV, which may affect the ^7Be(p,γ)^8B reaction rate at the solar temparature. Indirect methods, such as ANC and the Trojan Horse Method, were also used in some of the measurements.[4pt] [1] S. Kubono et al., Eur. Phys. J. A13 (2002) 217.[0pt] [2] Y. Yanagisawa et al., Nucl. Instrum. Meth. Phys. Res., Sect. A 539 (2005) 74.[0pt] [3] M. Notani et al., Nucl. Phys. A 764 (2004) 113c.[0pt] [4] T. Teranishi et al., Phys. Lett. B 650 (2007) 129.[0pt] [5] H. Yamaguchi et al., Phys. Lett. B 672 (2009) 230.

  2. Nuclear Astrophysics and Structure Studies Using Low-energy RI Beams at CRIB

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaguchi, H.; Hashimoto, T.; Hayakawa, S.; Binh, D. N.; Kahl, D.; Kubono, S.

    2010-05-12

    CRIB (CNS Radioactive Ion Beam separator) is a low-energy RI beam separator at the Center for Nuclear Study (CNS) of the University of Tokyo. Using the RI beams at CRIB, Many measurements on proton and alpha resonance scatterings, (alpha,p) reactions, and others were peformed in recent years, mainly for studying astrophysical reactions and exotic nuclear structure. Among them, the results on the {sup 7}Be+p and {sup 7}Li+alpha resonance scatterings are presented.

  3. Studies on Nuclear Astrophysics and Exotic Structure at the Low-Energy RI Beam Facility CRIB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, H.; Kahl, D.; Hayakawa, S.; Sakaguchi, Y.; Nakao, T.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Hashimoto, T.; Teranishi, T.; Kubono, S.; Cherubini, S.; Mazzocco, M.; Signorini, C.; Gulino, M.; Di Pietro, A.; Figuera, P.; La Cognata, M.; Lattuada, M.; Spitaleri, C.; Torresi, D.; Lee, P. S.; Lee, C. S.; Komatsubara, T.; Iwasa, N.; Okoda, Y.; Pierroutsakou, D.; Parascandolo, C.; La Commara, M.; Strano, E.; Boiano, C.; Boiano, A.; Manea, C.; Sánchez-Benítez, A. M.; Miyatake, H.; Watanabe, Y. X.; Ishiyama, H.; Jeong, S. C.; Imai, N.; Hirayama, Y.; Kimura, S.; Mukai, M.; Kim, Y. H.; Lin, C. J.; Jia, H. M.; Yan, L.; Yang, Y. Y.; Kawabata, T.; Kwon, Y. K.; Binh, D. N.; Khiem, L. H.; Duy, N. N.

    Studies on nuclear astrophysics, resonant structure, and nuclear reaction are going on at CRIB (CNS Radioactive Ion Beam separator), a low-energy RI beam separator operated by Center for Nuclear Study (CNS), the University of Tokyo. Two major methods used at CRIB to study nuclear reactions of astrophysical relevance are the resonant scattering, and direct measurements of (α,p) reactions using a thick-gas target. Several experiments for decay measurements and reaction mechanism are also performed using low-energy RI beams at CRIB. Some of the results from recent experiments at CRIB are discussed.

  4. Alpha-induced reaction studies using low-energy RI beams at CRIB

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaguchi, H.; Kahl, D.; Hu, J.; Kubono, S.; Hayakawa, S.; Hashimoto, T.

    2012-11-12

    CRIB (CNS Radioactive Ion Beam separator) is a low-energy RI beam separator at the Center for Nuclear Study (CNS) of the University of Tokyo. Studies on proton and alpha resonance scatterings, ({alpha}, p) reactions, and other types of measurements ({beta}-decay lifetimes etc.) have been performed using RI beams at CRIB, motivated by interests on astrophysical reactions and exotic nuclear structure. Among the studies at CRIB, the measurement of {sup 7}Li+{alpha}/{sup 7}Be+{alpha} resonant scatterings are presented.

  5. Nuclear Astrophysics Programs with Low-Energy RI Beams at CRIB

    SciTech Connect

    Kubono, S.; Binh, Dam N.; Hayakawa, S.; Hashimoto, T.; Kahl, D. M.; Yamaguchi, H.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Teranishi, T.; Iwasa, N.; Komatsubara, T.; Kato, S.; Khiem, Le H.

    2010-04-30

    Nuclear astrophysics activities with CNS RI beam separator (CRIB) are reported together with the present status of the CRIB facility which is supported by the AVF upgrade project for the total development of the low-energy RIB facility. The activities include direct and indirect measurements of stellar reactions especially relevant to explosive burning processes such as nova and supernovae. Some recent results are discussed together with a scope of the facility.

  6. Nuclear Astrophysical studies using low-energy RI beams at CRIB

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaguchi, H.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Hayakawa, S.; Binh, D. N.; Kahl, D.; Kurihara, Y.; Kubono, S.; Niikura, M.; Teranishi, T.; He, J. J.; Kwon, Y. K.; Nishimura, S.; Togano, Y.; Iwasa, N.; Khiem, L. H.

    2009-05-04

    CRIB (CNS Radioactive Ion Beam separator) is a low-energy RI beam separator at the Center for Nuclear Study (CNS) of the University of Tokyo, used for various studies covering nuclear-astrophysical topics. An application of the RI beam at CRIB for the astrophysical studies is a new measurement of the proton resonance scattering on {sup 7}Be. The measurement was performed up to the excitation energy of 6.8 MeV, ans the excitation function above 3.5 MeV was successfully measured for the first time, providing important information about the reaction rate of {sup 7}Be(p,{gamma}){sup 8}B, which is the key reaction in the solar {sup 8}B neutrino production. A preliminary result of the {sup 7}Be+p experiment is presented.

  7. Experimental Studies of Light-Ion Nuclear Reactions Using Low-Energy RI Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, H.; Kahl, D.; Hayakawa, S.; Sakaguchi, Y.; Abe, K.; Shimuzu, H.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Hashimoto, T.; Cherubini, S.; Gulino, M.; Spitaleri, C.; Rapisarda, G. G.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Romano, S.; Kubono, S.; Iwasa, N.; Teranishi, T.; Kawabata, T.; Kwon, Y. K.; Binh, D. N.; Khiem, L. H.; Duy, N. N.; Kato, S.; Komatsubara, T.; Coc, A.; de Sereville, N.; Hammache, F.; Kiss, G.; Bishop, S.

    CRIB (CNS Radio-Isotope Beam separator) is a low-energy RI beam separator of Center for Nuclear Study (CNS), the University of Tokyo. Studies on nuclear astrophysics, nuclear structure, and other interests have been performed using the RI beams at CRIB, forming international collaborations. A striking method to study astrophyiscal reactions involving radioactive nuclei is the thick-target method in inverse kinematics. Several astrophysical alpha-induced reactions have been be studied with that method at CRIB. A recent example is on the α resonant scattering with a radioactive 7Be beam. This study is related to the astrophysical 7Be(α , γ ) reactions, important at hot p-p chain and ν p-process in supernovae. There have been measurements based on several indirect methods, such as the asymptotic normalization coefficient (ANC) and Trojan horse method (THM). The first THM measurement using an RI beam has been performed at CRIB, to study the 18F(p, α )15O reaction at astrophysical energies via the three body reaction 2H(18F, α 15O)n. The 18F(p, α )15O reaction rate is crucial to understand the 511-keV γ -ray production in nova explosion phenomena, and we successfully evaluated the reaction cross section at novae temperature and below experimentally for the first time.

  8. Studying astrophysical reactions with low-energy RI beams at CRIB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, H.; Kahl, D.; Hayakawa, S.; Sakaguchi, Y.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Hashimoto, T.; Cherubini, S.; Gulino, M.; Spitaleri, C.; Rapisarda, G. G.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Romano, S.; Kubono, S.; Iwasa, N.; Teranishi, T.; Kawabata, T.; Kwon, Y. K.; Binh, D. N.; Khiem, L. H.; Duy, N. N.; Kato, S.; Komatsubara, T.; Coc, A.; De Sereville, N.; Hammache, F.; Kiss, G.; Bishop, S.

    2016-05-01

    Studies on nuclear astrophysics, nuclear structure, and other interests have been performed using the radioactive-isotope (RI) beams at the low-energy RI beam separator CRIB, operated by Center for Nuclear Study (CNS), the University of Tokyo. A typical measurement performed at CRIB is the elastic resonant scattering with the inverse kinematics. One recent experiment was on the α resonant scattering with 7Li and 7Be beams. This study is related to the astrophysical 7Li/7Be(α,γ) reactions, important at hot p-p chain and νp-process in supernovae. There have also been measurements based on other experimental methods. The first THM measurement using an RI beam has been performed at CRIB, to study the 18F(p, α)15O reaction at astrophysical energies via the three body reaction 2H(18F, α15O)n. The 18F(p, α) 15O reaction rate is crucial to understand the 511-keV γ-ray production in nova explosion phenomena, and we successfully evaluated the reaction cross section at novae temperature and below experimentally for the first time.

  9. A gas circulation and purification system for gas-cell-based low-energy RI-beam production

    SciTech Connect

    Sonoda, T.; Wada, M.; Katayama, I.; Kojima, T. M.; Reponen, M.; Tsubota, T.

    2016-06-15

    A gas circulation and purification system was developed at the RIKEN Radioactive Isotope Beam Factory that can be used for gas-cell-based low-energy RI-beam production. A high-flow-rate gas cell filled with one atmosphere of buffer gas (argon or helium) is used for the deceleration and thermalization of high-energy RI-beams. The exhausted buffer gas is efficiently collected using a compact dry pump and returned to the gas cell with a recovery efficiency of >97%. The buffer gas is efficiently purified using two gas purifiers as well as collision cleaning, which eliminates impurities in the gas. An impurity level of one part per billion is achieved with this method.

  10. A gas circulation and purification system for gas-cell-based low-energy RI-beam production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonoda, T.; Tsubota, T.; Wada, M.; Katayama, I.; Kojima, T. M.; Reponen, M.

    2016-06-01

    A gas circulation and purification system was developed at the RIKEN Radioactive Isotope Beam Factory that can be used for gas-cell-based low-energy RI-beam production. A high-flow-rate gas cell filled with one atmosphere of buffer gas (argon or helium) is used for the deceleration and thermalization of high-energy RI-beams. The exhausted buffer gas is efficiently collected using a compact dry pump and returned to the gas cell with a recovery efficiency of >97%. The buffer gas is efficiently purified using two gas purifiers as well as collision cleaning, which eliminates impurities in the gas. An impurity level of one part per billion is achieved with this method.

  11. Low-energy RI beam technology and nuclear clusters in the explosive pp-chain breakout process

    SciTech Connect

    Kubono, S.; Yamaguchi, H.; Kahl, D. M.; Ohshiro, Y.; Watanabe, S.; Yamazaki, N.; Teranishi, T.; Yanagisawa, Y.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Kase, M.; Hayakawa, S.; Kwon, Y. K.; Hashimoto, T.; Fukuda, Y.; He, J. J.; Goto, A.; Muto, H.

    2014-05-09

    The lecture includes two parts: One is a discussion on the technology for developing RIB beam facility based on the in-flight method and relevant experimental technology. The second part is a discussion on experimental efforts for studying the breakout process from the pp-chain region based on recent works with low energy RI beams. The discussion of the second part specifically covers the problem of the vp-process in type II supernovae in terms of alpha cluster nature for the reactions.

  12. Low energy antiproton beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klapisch, R.

    1992-04-01

    It was the invention of stochastic cooling by S. Van Meer that has allowed antiproton beams to become a powerful tool for the physicist. As a byproduct of the high energy proton-antiproton collider, a versatile low-energy facility, LEAR has been operating at CERN since 1984. The facility and its characteristics will be described as well as examples of its use for studying fundamental properties of the antiproton and for topics in atomic, nuclear and particle Physics.

  13. Intense low energy positron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Lynn, K.G.; Jacobsen, F.M.

    1993-12-31

    Intense positron beams are under development or being considered at several laboratories. Already today a few accelerator based high intensity, low brightness e{sup +} beams exist producing of the order of 10{sup 8} {minus} 10{sup 9} e{sup +}/sec. Several laboratories are aiming at high intensity, high brightness e{sup +} beams with intensities greater than 10{sup 9} e{sup +}/sec and current densities of the order of 10{sup 13} {minus} 10{sup 14} e{sup +} sec{sup {minus}} {sup 1}cm{sup {minus}2}. Intense e{sup +} beams can be realized in two ways (or in a combination thereof) either through a development of more efficient B{sup +} moderators or by increasing the available activity of B{sup +} particles. In this review we shall mainly concentrate on the latter approach. In atomic physics the main trust for these developments is to be able to measure differential and high energy cross-sections in e{sup +} collisions with atoms and molecules. Within solid state physics high intensity, high brightness e{sup +} beams are in demand in areas such as the re-emission e{sup +} microscope, two dimensional angular correlation of annihilation radiation, low energy e{sup +} diffraction and other fields. Intense e{sup +} beams are also important for the development of positronium beams, as well as exotic experiments such as Bose condensation and Ps liquid studies.

  14. Overview of the activities at the low-energy beam separator CRIB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, H.; Kahl, D.; Hayakawa, S.; Yang, L.; Sakaguchi, Y.; Abe, K.; Shimizu, H.; CRIB Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    CRIB (CNS Radio-Isotope Beam separator) is a low-energy RI beam separator of Center for Nuclear Study (CNS), the University of Tokyo. Studies on nuclear astrophysics, nuclear structure, and other interests have been performed using the RI beams at CRIB, forming international collaborations. Measurements of proton and α resonant scatterings have been performed at CRIB for many nuclides using RI beams. Projects to study astrophysical reactions with direct and indirect methods are also in progress.

  15. RHIC low energy beam loss projections

    SciTech Connect

    Satogata,T.

    2009-08-01

    For RHIC low-energy operations, we plan to collide Au beams with energies of E = 2:5-10 GeV/u in RHIC. Beams are injected into collision optics, and RHIC runs as a storage ring with no acceleration. At these low energies, observed beam lifetimes are minutes, with measured beam lifetimes of 3.5 min (fast) and 50 min (slow) at E=4.6 GeV/u in the March 2008 test run. With these lifetimes we can operate RHIC as a storage ring to produce reasonable integrated luminosity. This note estimates beam losses and collimator/dump energy deposition in normal injection modes of low energy operation. The main question is whether a normal injection run is feasible for an FY10 10-15 week operations run from a radiation safety perspective. A peripheral question is whether continuous injection operations is feasible from a radiation safety perspective. In continuous injection mode, we fill both rings, then continuously extract and reinject the oldest bunches that have suffered the most beam loss to increase the overall integrated luminosity. We expect to gain a factor of 2-3 in integrated luminosity from continuous injection at lowest energies if implemented[1]. Continuous injection is feasible by FY11 from an engineering perspective given enough effort, but the required extra safety controls and hardware dose risk make it unappealing for the projected luminosity improvement. Low-energy electron cooling will reduce beam losses by at least an order of magnitude vs normal low-energy operations, but low energy cooling is only feasible in the FY13 timescale and therefore beyond the scope of this note. For normal injection low energy estimates we assume the following: (1) RHIC beam total energies are E=2.5-10 GeV/u. (Continuous injection mode is probably unnecessary above total energies of E=7-8 GeV/u.); (2) RHIC operates only as a storage ring, with no acceleration; (3) 110 bunches of about 0.5-1.0 x 10{sup 9} initial bunch intensities (50-100% injection efficiency, likely conservative

  16. Low energy beam transport system developments

    SciTech Connect

    Dudnikov, V.; Han, B.; Stockli, M.; Welton, R.; Dudnikova, G.

    2015-04-08

    For high brightness beam production it is important to preserve the brightness in the low energy beam transport system (LEBT) used to transport and match the ion beams to the next stage of acceleration, usually an RFQ. While electrostatic focusing can be problematic for high current beam transport, reliable electrostatic LEBT operation has been demonstrated with H{sup −} beams up to 60 mA. Now, however, it is commonly accepted that an optimal LEBT for high current accelerator applications consists of focusing solenoids with space charge compensation. Two-solenoid LEBTs are successfully used for high current (>100 mA) proton beam transport. Preservation of low emittances (~0.15 π mm-mrad) requires the addition of a heavy gas (Xe, Kr), which causes ~5% of proton loss in a 1 m long LEBT. Similar Xe densities would be required to preserve low emittances of H{sup −} beams, but such gas densities cause unacceptably high H{sup −} beam losses. A short LEBT with only one short solenoid, movable for RFQ matching, can be used for reduced negative ion stripping. A strong electrostatic-focusing LEBT has been successfully adopted for transport of high current H{sup −} beams in the SNS Front End. Some modifications of such electrostatic LEBTs are expected to improve the reliable transport of intense positive and negative ion beams without greatly degrading their low emittances. We concentrate on processes that determine the beam brightness degradation and on their prevention. Proposed improvements to the SNS electrostatic LEBT are discussed.

  17. Low-energy radioactive ion beam production of 22Mg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duy, N. N.; Kubono, S.; Yamaguchi, H.; Kahl, D.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Teranishi, T.; Iwasa, N.; Kwon, Y. K.; Khiem, L. H.; Kim, Y. H.; Song, J. S.; Hu, J.; Ayyad, Y.

    2013-09-01

    The 22Mg nucleus plays an important role in nuclear astrophysics, specially in the 22Mg(α,p)25Al and proton capture 22Mg(p,γ)23Al reactions. It is believed that 22Mg is a waiting point in the αp-process of nucleosynthesis in novae. We proposed a direct measurement of the 22Mg+α resonance reaction in inverse kinematics using a radioactive ion (RI) beam. A 22Mg beam of 3.73 MeV/u was produced at CRIB (Center for Nuclear Study (CNS) low-energy RI Beam) facility of the University of Tokyo located at RIKEN (Japan) in 2011. In this paper we present the results about the production of the 22Mg beam used for the direct measurement of the scattering reaction 22Mg(α,α)22Mg, and the stellar reaction 22Mg(α,p)25Al in the energy region concerning an astrophysical temperature of T9=1-3 GK.

  18. Low energy beam transport for HIDIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meusel, O.; Pozimski, J.; Jakob, A.; Lakatos, A.

    2001-05-01

    Low energy beam transport (LEBT) for a heavy ion inertial fusion (HIDIF, I. Hofmann and G. Plass, Report of the European Study Group on Heavy Ion Driven Inertial Fusion for the Period 1995-1998) facility suffers from high space charge forces and high ion mass. Space charge compensation reduces the necessary focusing force of the lenses and the radius of the beam in the LEBT, and therefrom the emittance growth due to aberrations and self fields is reduced. Gabor lenses (D. Gabor, Nature 160 (1947)) providing a stable space charge cloud for focusing and combine strong cylinder symmetric focusing with partly space charge compensation and low emittance growth. A high tolerance against source noise and current fluctuations and reduced investment costs could be other possible advantages. The proof of principle has already been demonstrated (J.A. Palkovic, Measurements on a Gabor lens for Neutralizing and Focusing a 30 keV Proton beam, University of Wisconsin, Madison, 1989; J. Pozimski, P. Groß, R. Dölling and T. Weis, First experimental studies of a Gabor plasma-lens in Frankfurt, Proceedings of the 3rd EPAC Conference, Berlin, 1992). To broaden the experiences and to investigate the realisation of a LEBT concept for the HIDIF injector an experimental program using two Gabor lenses for independent variation of beam radius and envelope angel at RFQ injection was started. Therefrom the first experimental results using a double Gabor lens (DGPL) LEBT system for transporting an high perveance Xe + beam are presented and the results of numerical simulations are shown.

  19. SAMURAI spectrometer for RI beam experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, T.; Chiga, N.; Isobe, T.; Kondo, Y.; Kubo, T.; Kusaka, K.; Motobayashi, T.; Nakamura, T.; Ohnishi, J.; Okuno, H.; Otsu, H.; Sako, T.; Sato, H.; Shimizu, Y.; Sekiguchi, K.; Takahashi, K.; Tanaka, R.; Yoneda, K.

    2013-12-01

    A large-acceptance multiparticle spectrometer SAMURAI has been constructed at the RIKEN RI Beam Factory (RIBF) for RI beam experiments. It was designed primarily for kinematically complete experiments such as the invariant-mass spectroscopy of particle-unbound states in exotic nuclei, by detecting heavy fragments and projectile-rapidity nucleons in coincidence. The system consists of a superconducting dipole magnet, beam line detectors, heavy fragment detectors, neutron detectors, and proton detectors. The SAMURAI spectrometer was commissioned in March 2012, and a rigidity resolution of about 1/1500 was obtained for RI beams up to 2.4 GeV/c.

  20. A new low-energy radioactive beam line for nuclear astrophysics studies in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, J. J.; Xu, S. W.; Ma, P.; Wang, J. S.; Yang, Y. Y.; Ma, J. B.; Zhang, L. Y.; Li, L.; Yu, X. Q.; Jin, S. L.; Hu, J.; Kubono, S.; Chen, S. Z.; Zhang, N. T.; Liu, M. L.; Lei, X. G.; Sun, Z. Y.; Zhang, Y. H.; Zhou, X. H.; Xu, H. S.; Xiao, G. Q.

    2012-07-01

    A gas-target system has been newly developed and installed at a Radioactive Ion Beam Line in Lanzhou (RIBLL), which makes RIBLL capable of delivering intense, low-energy RIBs for nuclear astrophysics studies. A 1.7×104-pps intensity 22Na RI beam has been achieved in a commissioning run. With further improvements, a 105-pps intensity of some RI beams with mass A<30 (close to the line of β-stability) can be expected in the near future. Some detection equipment including Germanium and Silicon arrays (or balls) available (or to be constructed) at IMP are briefly introduced. A new low-energy radioactive beam line in China is now ready for nuclear astrophysics studies.

  1. Beam lifetime and limitations during low-energy RHIC operation

    SciTech Connect

    Fedotov, A.V.; Bai, M.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Fischer, W.; Kayran, D.; Montag, C.; Satogata, T.; Tepikian, S.; Wang, G.

    2011-03-28

    The low-energy physics program at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), motivated by a search for the QCD phase transition critical point, requires operation at low energies. At these energies, large nonlinear magnetic field errors and large beam sizes produce low beam lifetimes. A variety of beam dynamics effects such as Intrabeam Scattering (IBS), space charge and beam-beam forces also contribute. All these effects are important to understand beam lifetime limitations in RHIC at low energies. During the low-energy RHIC physics run in May-June 2010 at beam {gamma} = 6.1 and {gamma} = 4.1, gold beam lifetimes were measured for various values of space-charge tune shifts, transverse acceptance limitation by collimators, synchrotron tunes and RF voltage. This paper summarizes our observations and initial findings.

  2. Electron-beam-driven RI separator for SCRIT (ERIS) at RIKEN RI beam factory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnishi, T.; Ichikawa, S.; Koizumi, K.; Kurita, K.; Miyashita, Y.; Ogawara, R.; Tamaki, S.; Togasaki, M.; Wakasugi, M.

    2013-12-01

    We constructed a radioactive isotope (RI) separator named ERIS (electron-beam-driven RI separator for SCRIT) for the SCRIT (Self-Confinement RI Target) electron scattering facility at RIKEN RI Beam Factory (RIBF). In ERIS, production rate of fission products in the photofission of uranium is estimated to be 2.2 ×1011 fissions/s with 30 g of uranium and a 1-kW electron beam. During the commissioning of ERIS, the mass resolution and overall efficiency, including ionization, extraction, and transmission, were found to be 1660 and 21%, respectively, using natural xenon gas. The preparation of uranium carbide (UC2) RI production targets is described from which a 132Sn beam was successfully separated in our first attempt at RI production.

  3. RI-induced reaction studies by new energy-degrading beam line, OEDO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michimasa, Shin'ichiro

    2014-09-01

    The RI beam factory (RIBF) has expanded variety of accessible nuclei, and provides very intense RI beams. However, the beams are energy range of above 100 MeV/u, and are not necessarily suitable to some kinds of nuclear reactions. Therefore, deceleration of intense RI beams from RIBF open potentially new scientific opportunities to access various states in exotic nuclei by using characteristics probes, such as transfer reactions at several ten MeV/u and fusion reactions at several MeV/u. For energy degrading of nuclear beams, the degrader is generally used. This method easily controls beam energy, while multiple scattering effect and energy straggling in the material broaden the beam spot size at the downstream foci. Therefore, a key issue for reaction measurements is achievement of ion transport to reduce the beam emittance at the secondary target. For this purpose, CNS has set up OEDO (Optimized Energy Degrading Optics for RI beam) project for production of high-quality low energy RI beams. The OEDO beam line scheme is planned to be achieved by re-arrangement of magnets of the high-resolution beam line, where the SHARAQ spectrometer is useful as a spectrograph for low-energy reaction spectroscopy. In this presentation, I will discuss scientific opportunities in the OEDO beam line and the SHARAQ spectrometer.

  4. Compact measurement station for low energy proton beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yildiz, H.; Ozbey, A.; Oz, S.; Yasatekin, B.; Turemen, G.; Ogur, S.; Sunar, E.; Aydin, Y. O.; Dimov, V. A.; Unel, G.; Alacakir, A.

    2017-02-01

    A compact, remote controlled, cost efficient diagnostic station has been developed to measure the charge, the profile and the emittance for low energy proton beams. It has been installed and tested in the proton beam line of the Project Prometheus at SANAEM of the Turkish Atomic Energy Authority.

  5. Low energy ion beam dynamics of NANOGAN ECR ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sarvesh; Mandal, A.

    2016-04-01

    A new low energy ion beam facility (LEIBF) has been developed for providing the mass analyzed highly charged intense ion beams of energy ranging from a few tens of keV to a few MeV for atomic, molecular and materials sciences research. The new facility consists of an all permanent magnet 10 GHz electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source (NANOGAN) installed on a high voltage platform (400 kV) which provides large currents of multiply charged ion beams. Higher emittance at low energy of intense ion beam puts a tremendous challenge to the beam optical design of this facility. The beam line consists of mainly the electrostatic quadrupoles, an accelerating section, analyzing cum switching magnet and suitable beam diagnostics including vacuum components. The accelerated ion beam is analyzed for a particular mass to charge (m/q) ratio as well as guided to three different lines along 75°, 90° and 105° using a large acceptance analyzing cum switching magnet. The details of transverse beam optics to all the beam lines with TRANSPORT and GICOSY beam optics codes are being described. Field computation code, OPERA 3D has been utilized to design the magnets and electrostatic quadrupoles. A theoretical estimation of emittance for optimized geometry of ion source is given so as to form the basis of beam optics calculations. The method of quadrupole scan of the beam is used to characterize the emittance of the final beam on the target. The measured beam emittance increases with m/q ratios of various ion beams similar to the trend observed theoretically.

  6. Study on electron beam in a low energy plasma focus

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Muhammad Zubair; Ling, Yap Seong; San, Wong Chiow

    2014-03-05

    Electron beam emission was investigated in a low energy plasma focus device (2.2 kJ) using copper hollow anode. Faraday cup was used to estimate the energy of the electron beam. XR100CR X-ray spectrometer was used to explore the impact of the electron beam on the target observed from top-on and side-on position. Experiments were carried out at optimized pressure of argon gas. The impact of electron beam is exceptionally notable with two different approaches using lead target inside hollow anode in our plasma focus device.

  7. Low energy beam line at the AGOR facility

    SciTech Connect

    Toprek, Dragan; Formanoy, Iwo; Brandenburg, Sytze

    2005-01-01

    The origin of the low transmission through the low energy beam line between the electron cyclotron resonance source and the AGOR cyclotron has been investigated. Measurements of beam size and emittance, determined with the ''varying quadrupole method,'' are compared with calculations including fringe fields up to third order with the code COSY INFINITY. Calculations and measurements qualitatively agree; the calculations exhibit the large beam losses observed. On the basis of the calculations new settings have been determined, resulting in a significant increase of the transmission. To achieve full transmission a complete redesign of the beam line, in particular of the bending magnets, is needed.

  8. Beam dynamics limits for low-energy RHIC operation

    SciTech Connect

    Fedotov,A.V.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Chang, X.; Kayran, D.; Litvinenko, V.N.; Pozdeyev, E.; Satogata, T.

    2008-08-25

    There is a strong interest in low-energy RHIC operations in the single-beam total energy range of 2.5-25 GeV/nucleon [1-3]. Collisions in this energy range, much of which is below nominal RHIC injection energy, will help to answer one of the key questions in the field of QCD about the existence and location of a critical point on the QCD phase diagram [4]. There have been several short test runs during 2006-2008 RHIC operations to evaluate RHIC operational challenges at these low energies [5]. Beam lifetimes observed during the test runs were limited by machine nonlinearities. This performance limit can be improved with sufficient machine tuning. The next luminosity limitation comes from transverse and longitudinal Intra-beam Scattering (IBS), and ultimately from the space-charge limit. Here we summarize dynamic effects limiting beam lifetime and possible improvement with electron cooling.

  9. Pin diode calibration - beam overlap monitoring for low energy cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Drees, A.; Montag, C.; Thieberger, P.

    2015-09-30

    We were trying to address the question whether or not the Pin Diodes, currently installed approximately 1 meter downstream of the RHIC primary collimators, are suitable to monitor a recombination signal from the future RHIC low energy cooling section. A maximized recombination signal, with the Au+78 ions being lost on the collimator, will indicate optimal Au-electron beam overlap as well as velocity matching of the electron beam in the cooling section.

  10. Negative ions as a source of low energy neutral beams

    SciTech Connect

    Fink, J.H.

    1980-01-01

    Little consideration has been given to the impact of recent developments in negative ion source technology on the design of low energy neutral beam injectors. However, negative ion sources of improved operating efficiency, higher gas efficiency, and smaller beam divergence will lead to neutral deuterium injectors, operating at less than 100 keV, with better operating efficiencies and more compact layouts than can be obtained from positive ion systems.

  11. MEIC Proton Beam Formation with a Low Energy Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yuhong

    2015-09-01

    The MEIC proton and ion beams are generated, accumulated, accelerated and cooled in a new green-field ion injector complex designed specifically to support its high luminosity goal. This injector consists of sources, a linac and a small booster ring. In this paper we explore feasibility of a short ion linac that injects low-energy protons and ions into the booster ring.

  12. Linac4 low energy beam measurements with negative hydrogen ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scrivens, R.; Bellodi, G.; Crettiez, O.; Dimov, V.; Gerard, D.; Granemann Souza, E.; Guida, R.; Hansen, J.; Lallement, J.-B.; Lettry, J.; Lombardi, A.; Midttun, Ø.; Pasquino, C.; Raich, U.; Riffaud, B.; Roncarolo, F.; Valerio-Lizarraga, C. A.; Wallner, J.; Yarmohammadi Satri, M.; Zickler, T.

    2014-02-01

    Linac4, a 160 MeV normal-conducting H- linear accelerator, is the first step in the upgrade of the beam intensity available from the LHC proton injectors at CERN. The Linac4 Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) line from the pulsed 2 MHz RF driven ion source, to the 352 MHz RFQ (Radiofrequency Quadrupole) has been built and installed at a test stand, and has been used to transport and match to the RFQ a pulsed 14 mA H- beam at 45 keV. A temporary slit-and-grid emittance measurement system has been put in place to characterize the beam delivered to the RFQ. In this paper a description of the LEBT and its beam diagnostics is given, and the results of beam emittance measurements and beam transmission measurements through the RFQ are compared with the expectation from simulations.

  13. Linac4 low energy beam measurements with negative hydrogen ions

    SciTech Connect

    Scrivens, R. Bellodi, G.; Crettiez, O.; Dimov, V.; Gerard, D.; Granemann Souza, E.; Guida, R.; Hansen, J.; Lallement, J.-B.; Lettry, J.; Lombardi, A.; Midttun, Ø.; Pasquino, C.; Raich, U.; Riffaud, B.; Roncarolo, F.; Valerio-Lizarraga, C. A.; Wallner, J.; Yarmohammadi Satri, M.; Zickler, T.

    2014-02-15

    Linac4, a 160 MeV normal-conducting H{sup −} linear accelerator, is the first step in the upgrade of the beam intensity available from the LHC proton injectors at CERN. The Linac4 Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) line from the pulsed 2 MHz RF driven ion source, to the 352 MHz RFQ (Radiofrequency Quadrupole) has been built and installed at a test stand, and has been used to transport and match to the RFQ a pulsed 14 mA H{sup −} beam at 45 keV. A temporary slit-and-grid emittance measurement system has been put in place to characterize the beam delivered to the RFQ. In this paper a description of the LEBT and its beam diagnostics is given, and the results of beam emittance measurements and beam transmission measurements through the RFQ are compared with the expectation from simulations.

  14. Supernova physics with a low-energy beta-beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jachowicz, Natalie; McLaughlin, Gail

    Core-collapse supernova neutrino-spectra are of interest not only for understanding the deep inte- rior of astrophysical explosions, but also for understanding the synthesis of many elements made primarily in this environment. A new type of neutrino beam, the beta-beam, is now under discus- sion as a next generation neutrino experiment. A low-energy version of this beam has been pro- posed for a number of astrophysical applications. The energy range of these low-energy neutrinos is the same as that of supernova neutrinos. We present a theoretical discussion of the importance of low-energy beta-beams for improving our interpretation of a future galactic supernova signal. We present a novel method, where fitting synthetic spectra, constructed by taking linear combina- tions of beta-beam spectra, to the original supernova-neutrino spectra reproduces the folded dif- ferential cross sections very accurately. Comparing the response in a terrestrial detector to these synthetic responses provides a direct way to determine the main parameters of the supernova- neutrino energy-distribution.

  15. Surface modification using low energy ground state ion beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, Ara (Inventor); Hecht, Michael H. (Inventor); Orient, Otto J. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A method of effecting modifications at the surfaces of materials using low energy ion beams of known quantum state, purity, flux, and energy is presented. The ion beam is obtained by bombarding ion-generating molecules with electrons which are also at low energy. The electrons used to bombard the ion generating molecules are separated from the ions thus obtained and the ion beam is directed at the material surface to be modified. Depending on the type of ion generating molecules used, different ions can be obtained for different types of surface modifications such as oxidation and diamond film formation. One area of application is in the manufacture of semiconductor devices from semiconductor wafers.

  16. A compact low-energy electron beam irradiator.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sun Oh; Kim, Min; Lee, Byung Cheol; Jeong, Young Uk; Cha, In-su; Choi, Jeong-sik

    2002-05-01

    A new compact low-energy electron beam irradiator has been developed. The irradiator generates an electron beam to the air with energy variable from 35 to 80 keV and with a maximum current of 1 mA. The irradiation area is 30 x 30 mm2. A special irradiation port is developed for this low-energy irradiator. The electron beam is generated from a thermionic LaB6 cathode in vacuum. The beam is extracted to the air through a havar foil window. The thickness of the window is 4.8 microm, it is vacuum-tightly connected to the window to support by an indium wire. A controlled bow geometry of the window helps the thin window withstand the vacuum pressure. Cold air generated from a vortex tube cools down both the window and its support in order to prevent the window from melting down, due to beam energy dissipated in the foil. We found that about 60% of the beam current is extracted to the air at 80 keV.

  17. Characteristics of ultra-low-energy Cs + ion beam bombardments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhanping; Hoshi, Takahiro; Oiwa, Retsu

    2003-01-01

    Shallow arsenic implants and extra-thin film (SiON) are routinely analyzed by modern SIMS under ultra-low-energy Cs + ion beam bombardment, either at oblique (<60°) or glancing (˜80°) incident angle [J. Surf. Anal. 6 (3) (1999) A-3; in: A. Benninghoven, et al. (Eds.), Proceedings of the SIMS XII, Elsevier, Amsterdam, 1999, p. 549]. This article investigates the basic aspects of ultra-low-energy Cs + ion beam bombardment using a delta-doped boron sample (four layers, 5.3 nm per cycle), such as useful yield, depth resolution and changes in sputter rate in the near surface region. Our results indicated that there is a magic incidence angle (˜70°) at which the depth resolution is very poor, and at glancing (˜80°) incident angle the best depth resolution is observed.

  18. Si etching with reactive neutral beams of very low energy

    SciTech Connect

    Hara, Yasuhiro; Hamagaki, Manabu; Mise, Takaya; Iwata, Naotaka; Hara, Tamio

    2014-12-14

    A Si etching process has been investigated with reactive neutral beams (NBs) extracted using a low acceleration voltage of less than 100 V from CF{sub 4} and Ar mixed plasmas. The etched Si profile shows that the etching process is predominantly anisotropic. The reactive NB has a constant Si etching rate in the acceleration voltage range from 20 V to 80 V. It is considered that low-energy NBs can trigger Si etching because F radicals adsorb onto the Si surface and weaken Si–Si bonds. The etching rate per unit beam flux is 33 times higher than that with Ar NB. These results show that the low-energy reactive NB is useful for damage-free high speed Si etching.

  19. Radiochromic film dosimetry of a low energy proton beam.

    PubMed

    Piermattei, A; Miceli, R; Azario, L; Fidanzio, A; delle Canne, S; De Angelis, C; Onori, S; Pacilio, M; Petetti, E; Raffaele, L; Sabini, M G

    2000-07-01

    In this work some dosimetric characteristics of MD-55-2 GafChromic films were studied in a low energy proton beam (21.5 MeV) directly in a water phantom. The nonlinearity of the optical density was quantified by a factor P(lin). A correction factor P(en), that accounts for optical density dependence on the energy, was empirically determined. The effects of detector thickness in depth dose measurements and of the film orientation with respect to beam direction were investigated. The results show that the MD-55-2 films provide dose measurements with the films positioned perpendicularly to the proton beam. A dosimetric formalizm is proposed to determine the dose to water at depth d, with films oriented perpendicularly to the beam axis. This formalism uses a calibration factor of the radiochromic film determined directly on the proton beam at a reference depth in water, and the P(lin) factor, that takes into account the nonlinearity of the calibration curve and the P(en) factor that, in turn takes into account the change of proton beam energy in water. The MD-55-2 films with their high spatial resolution and the quasiwater equivalent material are attractive, positioned perpendicularly along the beam axis, for the absolute dose determination of very small beam sizes and modulated proton beams.

  20. Low energy electron magnetometer using a monoenergetic electron beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.; Wood, G. M.; Rayborn, G. H.; White, F. A. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A low energy electron beam magnetometer utilizes near-monoenergetic electrons thereby reducing errors due to electron energy spread and electron nonuniform angular distribution. In a first embodiment, atoms in an atomic beam of an inert gas are excited to a Rydberg state and then electrons of near zero energy are detached from the Rydberg atoms. The near zero energy electrons are then accelerated by an electric field V(acc) to form the electron beam. In a second embodiment, a filament emits electrons into an electrostatic analyzer which selects electrons at a predetermined energy level within a very narrow range. These selected electrons make up the electron beam that is subjected to the magnetic field being measured.

  1. Low energy, high power hydrogen neutral beam for plasma heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deichuli, P.; Davydenko, V.; Ivanov, A.; Korepanov, S.; Mishagin, V.; Smirnov, A.; Sorokin, A.; Stupishin, N.

    2015-11-01

    A high power, relatively low energy neutral beam injector was developed to upgrade of the neutral beam system of the gas dynamic trap device and C2-U experiment. The ion source of the injector produces a proton beam with the particle energy of 15 keV, current of up to 175 A, and pulse duration of a few milliseconds. The plasma emitter of the ion source is produced by superimposing highly ionized plasma jets from an array of four arc-discharge plasma generators. A multipole magnetic field produced with permanent magnets at the periphery of the plasma box is used to increase the efficiency and improve the uniformity of the plasma emitter. Multi-slit grids with 48% transparency are fabricated from bronze plates, which are spherically shaped to provide geometrical beam focusing. The focal length of the Ion Optical System (IOS) is 3.5 m and the initial beam diameter is 34 cm. The IOS geometry and grid potentials were optimized numerically to ensure accurate beam formation. The measured angular divergences of the beam are ±0.01 rad parallel to the slits and ±0.03 rad in the transverse direction.

  2. Low energy, high power hydrogen neutral beam for plasma heating

    SciTech Connect

    Deichuli, P.; Davydenko, V.; Ivanov, A. Mishagin, V.; Sorokin, A.; Stupishin, N.; Korepanov, S.; Smirnov, A.

    2015-11-15

    A high power, relatively low energy neutral beam injector was developed to upgrade of the neutral beam system of the gas dynamic trap device and C2-U experiment. The ion source of the injector produces a proton beam with the particle energy of 15 keV, current of up to 175 A, and pulse duration of a few milliseconds. The plasma emitter of the ion source is produced by superimposing highly ionized plasma jets from an array of four arc-discharge plasma generators. A multipole magnetic field produced with permanent magnets at the periphery of the plasma box is used to increase the efficiency and improve the uniformity of the plasma emitter. Multi-slit grids with 48% transparency are fabricated from bronze plates, which are spherically shaped to provide geometrical beam focusing. The focal length of the Ion Optical System (IOS) is 3.5 m and the initial beam diameter is 34 cm. The IOS geometry and grid potentials were optimized numerically to ensure accurate beam formation. The measured angular divergences of the beam are ±0.01 rad parallel to the slits and ±0.03 rad in the transverse direction.

  3. Low energy, high power hydrogen neutral beam for plasma heating.

    PubMed

    Deichuli, P; Davydenko, V; Ivanov, A; Korepanov, S; Mishagin, V; Smirnov, A; Sorokin, A; Stupishin, N

    2015-11-01

    A high power, relatively low energy neutral beam injector was developed to upgrade of the neutral beam system of the gas dynamic trap device and C2-U experiment. The ion source of the injector produces a proton beam with the particle energy of 15 keV, current of up to 175 A, and pulse duration of a few milliseconds. The plasma emitter of the ion source is produced by superimposing highly ionized plasma jets from an array of four arc-discharge plasma generators. A multipole magnetic field produced with permanent magnets at the periphery of the plasma box is used to increase the efficiency and improve the uniformity of the plasma emitter. Multi-slit grids with 48% transparency are fabricated from bronze plates, which are spherically shaped to provide geometrical beam focusing. The focal length of the Ion Optical System (IOS) is 3.5 m and the initial beam diameter is 34 cm. The IOS geometry and grid potentials were optimized numerically to ensure accurate beam formation. The measured angular divergences of the beam are ±0.01 rad parallel to the slits and ±0.03 rad in the transverse direction.

  4. ECR Based Low Energy Ion Beam Facility at VECC, Kolkata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taki, G. S.; Chakraborty, D. K.; Ghosh, Subhash; Majhi, S.; Pal, Gautam; Mallik, C.; Bhandari, R. K.; Krishna, J. B. M.; Dey, K.; Sinha, A. K.

    2012-11-01

    A low energy heavy ion irradiation/implantation facility has been developed at VECC, Kolkata for materials science and atomic physics research, utilizing indigenously developed 6.4 GHz ECR ion source. The facility provides high charge state ion beams of N, O, Ne, Ar, S, Kr, Xe, Fe, Ti, Hf etc. up to a few micro amperes to an energy of 10 keV per charge state.The beam energy can be further enhanced by floating the target at a negative potential (up to 25 kV). The ion beam is focused to a spot of about 2 mm diameter on the target using a set of glaser lenses. A x-y scanner is used to scan the beam over a target area of 10 mm x 10 mm to obtain uniform implantation. The recently commissioned multi facility sample chamber has provision for mounting multiple samples on indigenously developed disposable beam viewers for insitu beam viewing during implantation. The ionization chamber of ECR source is mainly pumped by ECR plasma. An additional pumping speed has been provided through extraction hole and pumping slots to obtain low base pressure. In the ion source, base pressure of 1x10-7 Torr in injector stage and ~5x10-8 Torr in extraction chamber have been routinely obtained. The ultra-high vacuum multi facility experimental chamber is generally kept at ~ 1x10-7 Torr during implantation on the targets. This facility is a unique tool for studying fundamental and technologically important problems of materials science and atomic physics research. High ion flux available from this machine is suitable for generating high defect densities i.e. high value of displacement-per-atom (dpa). Recently this facility has been used for studies like "Tunability of dielectric constant of conducting polymer Polyaniline (PANI) by low energy Ar9+ irradiation" and "Fe10+ implantation in ZnO for synthesis of dilute magnetic semiconductor".

  5. A compact, versatile low-energy electron beam ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Zschornack, G.; König, J.; Schmidt, M.; Thorn, A.

    2014-02-15

    A new compact Electron Beam Ion Source, the Dresden EBIT-LE, is introduced as an ion source working at low electron beam energies. The EBIT-LE operates at an electron energy ranging from 100 eV to some keV and can easily be modified to an EBIT also working at higher electron beam energies of up to 15 keV. We show that, depending on the electron beam energy, electron beam currents from a few mA in the low-energy regime up to about 40 mA in the high-energy regime are possible. Technical solutions as well as first experimental results of the EBIT-LE are presented. In ion extraction experiments, a stable production of low and intermediate charged ions at electron beam energies below 2 keV is demonstrated. Furthermore, X-ray spectroscopy measurements confirm the possibility of using the machine as a source of X-rays from ions excited at low electron energies.

  6. A compact, versatile low-energy electron beam ion source.

    PubMed

    Zschornack, G; König, J; Schmidt, M; Thorn, A

    2014-02-01

    A new compact Electron Beam Ion Source, the Dresden EBIT-LE, is introduced as an ion source working at low electron beam energies. The EBIT-LE operates at an electron energy ranging from 100 eV to some keV and can easily be modified to an EBIT also working at higher electron beam energies of up to 15 keV. We show that, depending on the electron beam energy, electron beam currents from a few mA in the low-energy regime up to about 40 mA in the high-energy regime are possible. Technical solutions as well as first experimental results of the EBIT-LE are presented. In ion extraction experiments, a stable production of low and intermediate charged ions at electron beam energies below 2 keV is demonstrated. Furthermore, X-ray spectroscopy measurements confirm the possibility of using the machine as a source of X-rays from ions excited at low electron energies.

  7. Cryogenic gas target system for intense RI beam productions in nuclear astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakabayashi, Y.; Yamaguchi, H.; Hayakawa, S.; Kurihara, Y.; Amadio, G.; Fujikawa, H.; Binh, D. N.; He, J. J.; Kim, A.; Kubono, S.

    2008-05-01

    A cryogenic gas target system was newly developed to produce intense RI beams at the low-energy in-flight radio-isotope beam separator (CRIB) of the University of Tokyo. The main features of the cryogenic gas target system are the direct cooling of the target cell by a liquid N2 finger and the circulation of the target gas that goes through the liquid N2 tank. Hydrogen gas was cooled down to 85-90 K by liquid nitrogen and used as a secondary beam production target which has a thickness of 2.3 mg/cm2 at the gas pressure of 760 Torr. Intense RI beams, such as a 7Be beam of 2×108 particles per second, were successfully produced using the target.

  8. Cryogenic gas target system for intense RI beam productions in nuclear astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Wakabayashi, Y.; Yamaguchi, H.; Hayakawa, S.; Kurihara, Y.; Amadio, G.; Fujikawa, H.; Kubono, S.; Binh, D. N.; He, J. J.; Kim, A.

    2008-05-21

    A cryogenic gas target system was newly developed to produce intense RI beams at the low-energy in-flight radio-isotope beam separator (CRIB) of the University of Tokyo. The main features of the cryogenic gas target system are the direct cooling of the target cell by a liquid N{sub 2} finger and the circulation of the target gas that goes through the liquid N{sub 2} tank. Hydrogen gas was cooled down to 85-90 K by liquid nitrogen and used as a secondary beam production target which has a thickness of 2.3 mg/cm{sup 2} at the gas pressure of 760 Torr. Intense RI beams, such as a {sup 7}Be beam of 2x10{sup 8} particles per second, were successfully produced using the target.

  9. Beam simulation studies of ECR beam extraction and low energy beam transport for FRIB

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Haitao Pozdeyev, Eduard; Lund, Steven M.; Machicoane, Guillaume; Wu, Xiaoyu; Morgan, Glenn

    2016-02-15

    To meet the beam power requirements of 400 kW at the fragmentation target for facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB), simultaneous acceleration of two-charge states should be used for heavier ions. These intense multi-charged ion beams will be produced by a 28 GHz electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source at a high voltage of 35 kV. After extraction, the ion beam will be pre-accelerated to 12 keV/u with a 50 kV platform, transported down to an achromatic charge state selection (CSS) system followed by a vertical transport line, and then injected into a radio frequency quadrupole accelerator. The TRACK code developed at ANL is used to perform the simulations of the ECR beam extraction and low energy beam transport for FRIB. In this study, we include the magnetic field of ECR ion source into simulations. Different initial beam conditions as well as different space charge neutralization levels are tested for the ECR beamline. The beam loss in CSS system and the corresponding protective measures are discussed. The detailed results about the beam dynamic simulation and beam loss in CSS system will be presented in this paper.

  10. Beam simulation studies of ECR beam extraction and low energy beam transport for FRIB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Haitao; Pozdeyev, Eduard; Lund, Steven M.; Machicoane, Guillaume; Wu, Xiaoyu; Morgan, Glenn

    2016-02-01

    To meet the beam power requirements of 400 kW at the fragmentation target for facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB), simultaneous acceleration of two-charge states should be used for heavier ions. These intense multi-charged ion beams will be produced by a 28 GHz electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source at a high voltage of 35 kV. After extraction, the ion beam will be pre-accelerated to 12 keV/u with a 50 kV platform, transported down to an achromatic charge state selection (CSS) system followed by a vertical transport line, and then injected into a radio frequency quadrupole accelerator. The TRACK code developed at ANL is used to perform the simulations of the ECR beam extraction and low energy beam transport for FRIB. In this study, we include the magnetic field of ECR ion source into simulations. Different initial beam conditions as well as different space charge neutralization levels are tested for the ECR beamline. The beam loss in CSS system and the corresponding protective measures are discussed. The detailed results about the beam dynamic simulation and beam loss in CSS system will be presented in this paper.

  11. Secondary Electron Generation by Low Energy Ion Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Joy, David Charles; Lin, Yinghong; Meyer III, Harry M; Demers, Hendrix; Newbury, Dale

    2006-01-01

    Low energy ion beams are being increasingly viewed as an alternative to, or even as areplacement for, low voltage SEMs. The beam interaction volumes in both cases are comparable in their size and their proximity to the sample surface, and both can produce high quality secondary electron images. However, although a cursory comparison of ion generated SE (iSE) and electron generated SE (eSE) images of the same area of a sample shows micrographs that can look very similar this is misleading because the nature of the iSE and eSE images are quite distinct. More experimental data and additional analysis of the beam interactions is therefore required if images are to be properly nterpreted.The yield de of eSE, rises rapidly with incident beam energy E reaching a maximum value which is typically in the range 1.5-2 and occurs at an energy of a few hundred eV before then falling away as about 1/E.. In the case of ion beam irradiation the kinetic production of iSE commences at a particle velocity of about 107cm/sec 30eV for He, (3keV for Ar) producing a yield di of iSE which rises almost linearly with the accelerating voltage and reaches typical values of 1.5 - 2.5 for energies of the order of 20- 30kV. Thus while at low energies the eSE and iSE yields are comparable in magnitude, at higher energies the iSE yield is an order of magnitude or more larger. The iSE yield will eventually each a maximum value and then begin to fall when once the interaction volume lies mostly below the escape depth of the SE. Both eSE and iSE yields also display a marked - although apparently chaotic - dependence on the atomic number of the target (Z2) and, in the ion case, on the atomic number of the ion (Z1) itself. In the electron case the minima in the SE yield versus Z2 plot correspond to shell filling but there is presently insufficient evidence to confirm if the same is true for the ion SE case. Because the stopping powers of ion and electrons, and hence their range in a given material, are

  12. Low-energy Coulomb excitation of Sr,9896 beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clément, E.; Zielińska, M.; Péru, S.; Goutte, H.; Hilaire, S.; Görgen, A.; Korten, W.; Doherty, D. T.; Bastin, B.; Bauer, C.; Blazhev, A.; Bree, N.; Bruyneel, B.; Butler, P. A.; Butterworth, J.; Cederkäll, J.; Delahaye, P.; Dijon, A.; Ekström, A.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fransen, C.; Georgiev, G.; Gernhäuser, R.; Hess, H.; Iwanicki, J.; Jenkins, D. G.; Larsen, A. C.; Ljungvall, J.; Lutter, R.; Marley, P.; Moschner, K.; Napiorkowski, P. J.; Pakarinen, J.; Petts, A.; Reiter, P.; Renstrøm, T.; Seidlitz, M.; Siebeck, B.; Siem, S.; Sotty, C.; Srebrny, J.; Stefanescu, I.; Tveten, G. M.; Van de Walle, J.; Vermeulen, M.; Voulot, D.; Warr, N.; Wenander, F.; Wiens, A.; De Witte, H.; Wrzosek-Lipska, K.

    2016-11-01

    The structure of neutron-rich Sr,9896 nuclei was investigated by low-energy safe Coulomb excitation of radioactive beams at the REX-ISOLDE facility, CERN, with the MINIBALL spectrometer. A rich set of transitional and diagonal E 2 matrix elements, including those for non-yrast structures, has been extracted from the differential Coulomb-excitation cross sections. The results support the scenario of a shape transition at N =60 , giving rise to the coexistence of a highly deformed prolate and a spherical configuration in 98Sr, and are compared to predictions from several theoretical calculations. The experimental data suggest a significant contribution of the triaxal degree of freedom in the ground state of both isotopes. In addition, experimental information on low-lying states in 98Rb has been obtained.

  13. Construction of the SCRIT electron scattering facility at the RIKEN RI Beam Factory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakasugi, M.; Ohnishi, T.; Wang, S.; Miyashita, Y.; Adachi, T.; Amagai, T.; Enokizono, A.; Enomoto, A.; Haraguchi, Y.; Hara, M.; Hori, T.; Ichikawa, S.; Kikuchi, T.; Kitazawa, R.; Koizumi, K.; Kurita, K.; Miyamoto, T.; Ogawara, R.; Shimakura, Y.; Takehara, H.; Tamae, T.; Tamaki, S.; Togasaki, M.; Yamaguchi, T.; Yanagi, K.; Suda, T.

    2013-12-01

    The SCRIT electron scattering facility, aiming at electron scattering off short-lived unstable nuclei, has been constructed at the RIKEN RI Beam Factory. This facility consists of a racetrack microtron (RTM), an electron storage ring (SR2) equipped with the SCRIT system, and a low-energy RI separator (ERIS). SCRIT (self-confining radioactive isotope ion targeting) is a novel technique to form internal targets in an electron storage ring. Experiments for evaluating performance of the SCRIT system have been carried out using the stable 133Cs1+ beam and the 132Xe1+ beam supplied from ERIS. Target ions were successfully trapped in the SCRIT system with 90% efficiency at a 250 mA electron beam current, and luminosity exceeding 1026/(cm2 s) was maintained for more than 1 s. Electrons elastically scattered from the target ions were successfully measured. Applicability of the SCRIT system to electron scattering for unstable nuclei has been established in experiments.

  14. Low energy ion beam assisted growth of metal multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quan, Junjie

    energy, ion species, ion fluence, and ion incidence angle has been investigated during low energy ion assisted vapor deposition of Cu/Co mutilayers. Key mechanisms of atomic reconstruction in the low energy regime have been identified and investigated in detail using a molecular statics method. By changing the ion energy or modifying the time lag between metal and ion deposition, these simulations identified three different approaches for controlling the atomic assembly of multilayer: (i) simultaneous, (ii) modulated energy and (iii) sequential ion assistance. Each has been shown capable of enabling significant interfacial structure control during the growth of metallic multilayers. A biased target ion beam deposition (BTIBD) system was designed and constructed to provide growth environments similar to those that resulted in the best simulated film structures. The BTIBD system has been successfully employed to deposit a variety of multilayers. Experimental investigations of low energy ion assisted growth of a representative spin valve (Ta/NiFe/Co/Cu/Co/FeMn/Cu) multilayer and a model Ta/Cu film indicate significantly improved interfacial structures when oblique, low energy, argon ion assistance was used. These results are fully consistent with the simulations and confirm that a BTIBD approach to multilayer deposition results in substantially improved films compared to those synthesized by traditional ion beam assisted deposition approaches where less effective control of atomic self assembly is possible.

  15. Low-energy beam transport studies supporting the spallation neutron source 1-MW beam operationa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, B. X.; Kalvas, T.; Tarvainen, O.; Welton, R. F.; Murray, S. N.; Pennisi, T. R.; Santana, M.; Stockli, M. P.

    2012-02-01

    The H- injector consisting of a cesium enhanced RF-driven ion source and a 2-lens electrostatic low-energy beam transport (LEBT) system supports the spallation neutron source 1 MW beam operation with ˜38 mA beam current in the linac at 60 Hz with a pulse length of up to ˜1.0 ms. In this work, two important issues associated with the low-energy beam transport are discussed: (1) inconsistent dependence of the post-radio frequency quadrupole accelerator beam current on the ion source tilt angle and (2) high power beam losses on the LEBT electrodes under some off-nominal conditions compromising their reliability.

  16. ZeroDegree spectrometer at RIKEN RI Beam Factory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubo, Toshiyuki; Ohnishi, Tetsuya; Takeda, Hiroyuki; Fukuda, Naoki; Kameda, Daisuke; Kusaka, Kensuke; Yoshida, Atsushi; Yoshida, Koichi; Ohtake, Masao; Inabe, Naohito; Yanagisawa, Yoshiyuki; Tanaka, Kanenobu

    2009-10-01

    At RI Beam Factory (RIBF) [1] at RIKEN Nishina Center, a variety of fast rare isotope (RI) beams are produced using the BigRIPS in-flight separator [2] for studies of exotic nuclei. The beam line following BigRIPS is designed to work as a forward spectrometer named ZeroDegree, so that it can be used for reaction studies with RI beams. The ZeroDegree spectrometer consists of two dipoles and six superconducting quadrupole triplets, of which designs are essentially the same as those of BigRIPS. It analyzes and indentifies projectile reaction residues, often in coincidence with gamma rays, and can be operated in different optics modes, depending on experimental requirements. The ZeroDegree spectrometer has recently been commissioned and used for a series of full-dress RI-beam experiments. Overview and status of the ZeroDegree spectrometer will be reported.[4pt] [1] Y. Yano: Nucl. Instr. and Meth. B 261 (2007) 1009. [0pt] [2] T. Kubo: Nucl. Instr. and Meth. B 204 (2003) 97 and T. Ohnishi et al.: J. Phys. Soc. Japan, 77 (2008) 083201.

  17. H{sup -} beam transport experiments in a solenoid low energy beam transport

    SciTech Connect

    Gabor, C.; Back, J. J.; Faircloth, D. C.; Lawrie, S. R.; Letchford, A. P.; Izaola, Z.

    2012-02-15

    The Front End Test Stand (FETS) is located at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory and aims for a high current, fast chopped 3 MeV H{sup -} ion beam suitable for future high power proton accelerators like ISIS upgrade. The main components of the front end are the Penning ion source, a low energy beam transport line, an radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) and a medium energy beam transport (MEBT) providing also a chopper section and rebuncher. FETS is in the stage of commissioning its low energy beam transport (LEBT) line consisting of three solenoids. The LEBT has to transport an H{sup -} high current beam (up to 60 mA) at 65 keV. This is the injection energy of the beam into the RFQ. The main diagnostics are slit-slit emittance scanners for each transversal plane. For optimizing the matching to the RFQ, experiments have been performed with a variety of solenoid settings to better understand the actual beam transport. Occasionally, source parameters such as extractor slit width and beam energy were varied as well. The paper also discusses simulations based on these measurements.

  18. A Feasibility Study of 50 nm Resolution with Low Energy Electron Beam Proximity Projection Lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshizawa, Masaki; Savas, T. A.

    2002-01-01

    Patterns of 50 nm lines and spaces were demonstrated by low energy electron beam proximity lithography using 47-nm-thick poly methyl methacrylate (PMMA) and stencil masks fabricated by achromatic interference lithography (AIL). The result indicates the validity of the resolution analysis previously reported and the resolution capabilities of low energy electron beam proximity projection lithography (LEEPL) as a 50 nm node technology.

  19. Low energy beam transport for facility for rare isotope beams driver linear particle accelerator.

    PubMed

    Sun, L T; Leitner, D; Machicoane, G; Pozdeyev, E; Smirnov, V; Vorozhtsov, S B; Winklehner, D; Zhao, Q

    2012-02-01

    The driver linac for the facility for rare isotope beams (FRIB) will provide a wide range of primary ion beams for nuclear physics research. The linac will be capable of accelerating a uranium beam to an energy of up to 200 Mev∕u and delivering it to a fragmentation target with a maximum power of 400 kW. Stable ion beams will be produced by a high performance electron cyclotron resonance ion source operating at 28 GHz. The ion source will be located on a high voltage platform to reach an initial beam energy of 12 keV∕u. After extraction, the ion beam will be transported vertically down to the linac tunnel in a low energy beam transport (LEBT) system and injected into a radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) operating at a frequency of 80.5 MHz. To meet the beam power requirements, simultaneous acceleration of two-charge states will be used for heavier ions (≥Xe). This paper presents the layout of the FRIB LEBT and the beam dynamics in the LEBT. In particular, simulation and design of the beam line section before charge state selection will be detailed. The need to use an achromatic design for the charge state selection system and the advantage of an ion beam collimation system to limit the emittance of the beam injected into the RFQ will be discussed in this paper.

  20. Beam dynamics simulations of post low energy beam transport section in RAON heavy ion accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Hyunchang Jang, Ji-Ho; Jang, Hyojae; Hong, In-Seok

    2016-02-15

    RAON (Rare isotope Accelerator Of Newness) heavy ion accelerator of the rare isotope science project in Daejeon, Korea, has been designed to accelerate multiple-charge-state beams to be used for various science programs. In the RAON accelerator, the rare isotope beams which are generated by an isotope separation on-line system with a wide range of nuclei and charges will be transported through the post Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) section to the Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ). In order to transport many kinds of rare isotope beams stably to the RFQ, the post LEBT should be devised to satisfy the requirement of the RFQ at the end of post LEBT, simultaneously with the twiss parameters small. We will present the recent lattice design of the post LEBT in the RAON accelerator and the results of the beam dynamics simulations from it. In addition, the error analysis and correction in the post LEBT will be also described.

  1. Phase Rotation of Muon Beams for Producing Intense Low-Energy Muon Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Neuffer, D.; Bao, Y.; Hansen, G.

    2016-01-01

    Low-energy muon beams are useful for rare decay searches, which provide access to new physics that cannot be addressed at high-energy colliders. However, muons are produced within a broad energy spread unmatched to the low-energy required. In this paper we outline a phase rotation method to significantly increase the intensity of low-energy muons. The muons are produced from a short pulsed proton driver, and develop a time-momentum correlation in a drift space following production. A series of rf cavities is used to bunch the muons and phase-energy rotate the bunches to a momentum of around 100 MeV/c. Then another group of rf cavities is used to decelerate the muon bunches to low-energy. This obtains ~0.1 muon per 8 GeV proton, which is significantly higher than currently planned Mu2e experiments, and would enable a next generation of rare decay searches, and other intense muon beam applications.

  2. Designing of the low energy beam lines with achromatic condition in the RAON accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Hyunchang; Jang, Ji-Ho; Jeon, Dong-O.

    2017-01-01

    The RAON accelerator has been built to create and accelerate stable heavy-ion beams and rare isotope beams. The stable heavy-ion beams are generated by the superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source and accelerated by the low energy superconducting linac SCL1. The beams accelerated by the SCL1 are re-accelerated by the high energy superconducting linac SCL2 for the generation of rare isotope beams by using the in-flight fragmentation system or are put to use in the low energy experimental halls, which include the neutron science facility and the KOrea Broad acceptance Recoil spectrometer and Apparatus after having passed through the low energy beam lines which have long deflecting sections. At the end of each beam line in the low energy experimental halls, the beams should meet the targets of the two facilities with the specific requirements satisfied. Namely, if the beam is to be sent safely and accurately to the targets and simultaneously, satisfy the requirements, an achromatic lattice design needs to be applied in each beam line. In this paper, we will present the lattice design of the low energy beam lines and describe the results of the beam dynamics simulations. In addition, the correction of the beam orbit, which is distorted by machine imperfections, will be discussed.

  3. Construction of rare-RI ring at RIKEN RI Beam Factory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Y.; Wakasugi, M.; Uesaka, T.; Ozawa, A.; Abe, Y.; Fujinawa, T.; Kase, M.; Komiyama, M.; Kubo, T.; Kumagai, K.; Maie, T.; Nagae, D.; Ohnishi, J.; Suzaki, F.; Tokuchi, A.; Watanabe, Y.; Yoshida, K.; Yamada, K.; Yamaguchi, T.; Yamasawa, H.; Yanagisawa, Y.; Zenihiro, J.; Yano, Y.

    2013-12-01

    An isochronous mass spectroscopy system using a newly constructed storage ring named the “rare-RI ring” is expected to be implemented at the RIKEN Nishina Center to determine the masses of short-lived rare nuclei including those in the r-process region with a relative precision of the order of 10-6 even for only one particle. In an isochronous storage ring, the mass is determined by measuring the revolution time of each nucleus. Our rare-RI ring consists of six magnetic sectors, and each sector consists of four bending magnets. To precisely optimize the isochronous conditions of the circulating particles for large acceptance, we install ten trim coils to half of the bending magnets. A fast-response and fast-charging kicker system enables selective and efficient injection of the produced rare nuclei into the ring one by one, along with facilitating efficient extraction of the circulating particles for time-of-flight measurement. Construction of the rare-RI ring was begun in the middle of the fiscal year 2012 at the RIKEN RI Beam Factory, and the ring is expected to be fully functional by 2015.

  4. Spin-Isospin responses via charge exchange reactions of RI beams at SHARAQ

    SciTech Connect

    Shimoura, Susumu

    2012-11-12

    Nuclear spectroscopy via direct reactions of RI beams is discussed focusing on characteristics of charge-exchange reactions of RI beams. Recent experiments using the SHARAQ spectrometer at the RIBF are presented, where isovector spin monopole and spin-non-flip monopole responses are studied by charge exchange reaction of RI beams. Some experimental plans and perspectives are also presented.

  5. Transport of intense ion beams and space charge compensation issues in low energy beam lines (invited).

    PubMed

    Chauvin, N; Delferrière, O; Duperrier, R; Gobin, R; Nghiem, P A P; Uriot, D

    2012-02-01

    Over the last few years, the interest of the international scientific community for high power accelerators in the megawatt range has been increasing. For such machines, the ion source has to deliver a beam intensity that ranges from several tens up to a hundred of mA. One of the major challenges is to extract and transport the beam while minimizing the emittance growth and optimizing its injection into the radio frequency quadrupole. Consequently, it is crucial to perform precise simulations and cautious design of the low energy beam transport (LEBT) line. In particular, the beam dynamics calculations have to take into account not only the space charge effects but also the space charge compensation of the beam induced by ionization of the residual gas. The physical phenomena occurring in a high intensity LEBT and their possible effects on the beam are presented, with a particular emphasis on space charge compensation. Then, beam transport issues in different kind of LEBTs are briefly reviewed. The SOLMAXP particle-in-cell code dedicated to the modeling of the transport of charge particles under a space charge compensation regime is described. Finally, beam dynamics simulations results obtained with SOLMAXP are presented in the case of international fusion materials irradiation facility injector.

  6. Design study of low-energy beam transport for multi-charge beams at RAON

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahng, Jungbae; Qiang, Ji; Kim, Eun-San

    2015-12-01

    The Rare isotope Accelerator Of Newness (RAON) at the Rare Isotope Science Project (RISP) is being designed to simultaneously accelerate beams with multiple charge states. It includes a driver superconducting (SC) linac for producing 200 MeV/u and 400 kW continuous wave (CW) heavy ion beams from protons to uranium. The RAON consists of a few electron cyclotron resonance ion sources, a low-energy beam transport (LEBT) system, a CW 81.25 MHz, 500 keV/u radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator, a medium-energy beam transport system, the SC linac, and a charge-stripper system. The LEBT system for the RISP accelerator facility consists of a high-voltage platform, two 90° dipoles, a multi-harmonic buncher (MHB), solenoids, electrostatic quadrupoles, a velocity equalizer, and a diagnostic system. The ECR ion sources are located on a high-voltage platform to reach an initial beam energy of 10 keV/u. After extraction, the ion beam is transported through the LEBT system to the RFQ accelerator. The generated charge states are selected by an achromatic bending system and then bunched by the MHB in the LEBT system. The MHB is used to achieve a small longitudinal emittance in the RFQ by generating a sawtooth wave with three harmonics. In this paper, we present the results and issues of the beam dynamics of the LEBT system.

  7. Scheme for Low Energy Beam Transport with a Non-Neutralized Section

    SciTech Connect

    Shemyakin, A.; Prost, L.

    2015-04-23

    A typical Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) design relies on dynamics with nearly complete beam space charge neutralization over the entire length of the LEBT. This paper argues that, for a beam with modest perveance and uniform current density distribution when generated at the source, a downstream portion of the LEBT can be un-neutralized without significant emittance growth.

  8. Precision shape modification of nanodevices with a low-energy electron beam

    DOEpatents

    Zettl, Alex; Yuzvinsky, Thomas David; Fennimore, Adam

    2010-03-09

    Methods of shape modifying a nanodevice by contacting it with a low-energy focused electron beam are disclosed here. In one embodiment, a nanodevice may be permanently reformed to a different geometry through an application of a deforming force and a low-energy focused electron beam. With the addition of an assist gas, material may be removed from the nanodevice through application of the low-energy focused electron beam. The independent methods of shape modification and material removal may be used either individually or simultaneously. Precision cuts with accuracies as high as 10 nm may be achieved through the use of precision low-energy Scanning Electron Microscope scan beams. These methods may be used in an automated system to produce nanodevices of very precise dimensions. These methods may be used to produce nanodevices of carbon-based, silicon-based, or other compositions by varying the assist gas.

  9. Status of the PXIE Low Energy Beam Transport Line

    SciTech Connect

    Prost, Lionel; Andrews, Richard; Chen, Alex; Hanna, Bruce; Scarpine, Victor; Shemyakin, Alexander; Steimel, Jim; D'Arcy, Richard

    2014-07-01

    A CW-compatible, pulsed H- superconducting RF linac (a.k.a. PIP-II) is envisaged as a possible path for upgrading Fermilab’s injection complex [1]. To validate the concept of the front-end of such machine, a test accelerator (a.k.a. PXIE) [2] is under construction. The warm part of this accelerator comprises a 10 mA DC, 30 keV H- ion source, a 2m-long LEBT, a 2.1 MeV CW RFQ, and a MEBT that feeds the first cryomodule. In addition to operating in the nominal CW mode, the LEBT should be able to produce a pulsed beam for both PXIE commissioning and modelling of the front-end nominal operation in the pulsed mode. Concurrently, it needs to provide effective means of inhibiting beam as part of the overall machine protection system. A peculiar feature of the present LEBT design is the capability of using the ~1m-long section immediately preceding the RFQ in two regimes of beam transport dynamics: neutralized and space charge dominated. This paper introduces the PXIE LEBT, reports on the status of the ion source and LEBT installation, and presents the first beam measurements.

  10. Suppression of Divergence of Low Energy Ion Beams by Space Charge Neutralization with Low Energy Electrons Emitted from Field Emitter Arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Ishikawa, Junzo; Gotoh, Yasuhito; Taguchi, Shuhei; Nicolaescu, Dan; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Kimoto, Tsunenobu; Takeuchi, Mitsuaki; Sakai, Shigeki

    2011-01-07

    Suppression of divergence of low energy neon ion beam was experimentally demonstrated by neutralizing the space charge of ion beam with low energy electrons emitted from silicon field emitter arrays (Si-FEAs). Treatment of the FEAs with trifluoromethane plasma realized surface carbonization which was efficient to elongate the lifetime of the FEA and to improve the electron energy distribution. Together with the improvement of the performance of Si-FEA, we have developed a novel electron deceleration system to produce low energy electrons. A low energy neon ion beam was produced and the beam property was investigated with and without the electron supply from surface carbonized Si-FEA (Si:C-FEA). As a result, the divergence of the neon ion beam was largely suppressed with presence of the electrons.

  11. Extraction design and low energy beam transport optimization of space charge dominated multispecies ion beam sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delferrière, O.; De Menezes, D.

    2004-05-01

    In all accelerator projects, the low energy part of the accelerator has to be carefully optimized to match the beam characteristic requirements of the higher energy parts. Since 1994 with the beginning of the Injector of Protons for High Intensity (IPHI) project and Source of Light Ions with High Intensities (SILHI) electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source development at CEA/Saclay, we are using a set of two-dimensional (2D) codes for extraction system optimization (AXCEL, OPERA-2D) and beam transport (MULTIPART). The 95 keV SILHI extraction system optimization has largely increased the extracted current, and improved the beam line transmission. From these good results, a 130 mA D+ extraction system for the International Fusion Material Irradiation Facility project has been designed in the same way as SILHI one. We are also now involved in the SPIRAL 2 project for the building of a 40 keV D+ ECR ion source, continuously tunable from 0.1 to 5 mA, for which a special four-electrode extraction system has been studied. In this article we will describe the 2D design process and present the different extraction geometries and beam characteristics. Simulation results of SILHI H+ beam emittance will be compared with experimental measurements.

  12. Production of low energy spread ion beams with multicusp sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Y., Lee; Perkins, L. T.; Gough, R. A.; Hoffmann, M.; Kunkel, W. B.; N. Leung, K.; Sarstedt, M.; Vujic, J.; Weber, M.; Williams, M. D.

    1996-02-01

    The use of multicusp sources to generate ion beams with narrow energy spread has been investigated. It is found that the presence of a magnetic filter can reduce the longitudinal energy spread significantly. This is achieved by creating a uniform plasma potential distribution in the discharge chamber region, eliminating ion production in the extraction chamber and in the sheath of the exit aperture and by minimizing the probability of charge exchange processes in the extraction chamber. An energy spread as low as 1 eV has been measured.

  13. Space charge compensation in the Linac4 low energy beam transport line with negative hydrogen ions.

    PubMed

    Valerio-Lizarraga, Cristhian A; Lallement, Jean-Baptiste; Leon-Monzon, Ildefonso; Lettry, Jacques; Midttun, Øystein; Scrivens, Richard

    2014-02-01

    The space charge effect of low energy, unbunched ion beams can be compensated by the trapping of ions or electrons into the beam potential. This has been studied for the 45 keV negative hydrogen ion beam in the CERN Linac4 Low Energy Beam Transport using the package IBSimu [T. Kalvas et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 81, 02B703 (2010)], which allows the space charge calculation of the particle trajectories. The results of the beam simulations will be compared to emittance measurements of an H(-) beam at the CERN Linac4 3 MeV test stand, where the injection of hydrogen gas directly into the beam transport region has been used to modify the space charge compensation degree.

  14. Space charge compensation in the Linac4 low energy beam transport line with negative hydrogen ions

    SciTech Connect

    Valerio-Lizarraga, Cristhian A.; Lallement, Jean-Baptiste; Lettry, Jacques; Scrivens, Richard; Leon-Monzon, Ildefonso; Midttun, Øystein

    2014-02-15

    The space charge effect of low energy, unbunched ion beams can be compensated by the trapping of ions or electrons into the beam potential. This has been studied for the 45 keV negative hydrogen ion beam in the CERN Linac4 Low Energy Beam Transport using the package IBSimu [T. Kalvas et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 81, 02B703 (2010)], which allows the space charge calculation of the particle trajectories. The results of the beam simulations will be compared to emittance measurements of an H{sup −} beam at the CERN Linac4 3 MeV test stand, where the injection of hydrogen gas directly into the beam transport region has been used to modify the space charge compensation degree.

  15. Selected List of Low Energy Beam Transport Facilities for Light-Ion, High-Intensity Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Prost, L. R.

    2016-02-17

    This paper presents a list of Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) facilities for light-ion, high-intensity accelerators. It was put together to facilitate comparisons with the PXIE LEBT design choices. A short discussion regarding the importance of the beam perveance in the choice of the transport scheme follows.

  16. Scintillating screens sensitivity and resolution studies for low energy, low intensity beam diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Harasimowicz, Janusz; Cosentino, Luigi; Finocchiaro, Paolo; Pappalardo, Alfio; Welsch, Carsten P

    2010-10-01

    In order to investigate the limits of scintillating screens for beam profile monitoring in the ultra-low energy, ultra-low intensity regime, CsI:Tl, YAG:Ce, and a Tb glass-based scintillating fiber optic plate (SFOP) were tested. The screens response to 200 and 50 keV proton beams with intensities ranging from a few picoampere down to the subfemtoampere region was examined. In the following paper, the sensitivity and resolution studies are presented in detail for CsI:Tl and the SFOP, the two most sensitive screens. In addition, a possible use of scintillators for ultra-low energy antiproton beam monitoring is discussed.

  17. Scintillating screens sensitivity and resolution studies for low energy, low intensity beam diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Harasimowicz, Janusz; Welsch, Carsten P.; Cosentino, Luigi; Finocchiaro, Paolo; Pappalardo, Alfio

    2010-10-15

    In order to investigate the limits of scintillating screens for beam profile monitoring in the ultra-low energy, ultra-low intensity regime, CsI:Tl, YAG:Ce, and a Tb glass-based scintillating fiber optic plate (SFOP) were tested. The screens response to 200 and 50 keV proton beams with intensities ranging from a few picoampere down to the subfemtoampere region was examined. In the following paper, the sensitivity and resolution studies are presented in detail for CsI:Tl and the SFOP, the two most sensitive screens. In addition, a possible use of scintillators for ultra-low energy antiproton beam monitoring is discussed.

  18. Beam chopper For the Low-Energy Undulator Test Line (LEUTL) in the APS

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Y.; Wang, J.; Milton, S.; Teng, L.

    1997-08-01

    The low-energy undulator test line (LEUTL) is being built and will be tested with a short beam pulse from an rf gun in the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at the Argonne National Laboratory. In the LEUTL a beam chopper is used after the rf gun to deflect the unwanted beam to a beam dump. The beam chopper consists of a permanent magnet and an electric deflector that can compensate for the magnetic deflection. A 30-kV pulsed power supply is used for the electric deflector. The chopper subsystem was assembled and tested for beamline installation. The electrical and beam properties of the chopper assembly are presented.

  19. Microwave Chip-Based Beam Splitter for Low-Energy Guided Electrons.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Jakob; Thomas, Sebastian; Weber, Philipp; Hommelhoff, Peter

    2015-06-26

    We present a novel beam splitter for low-energy electrons using a micro-structured guiding potential created above the surface of a planar microwave chip. Beam splitting arises from smoothly transforming the transverse guiding potential for an electron beam from a single-well harmonic confinement into a double well, thereby generating two separated output beams with 5 mm lateral spacing. Efficient beam splitting is observed for electron kinetic energies up to 3 eV, in excellent agreement with particle tracking simulations. We discuss prospects of this novel beam splitter approach for electron-based quantum matter-wave optics experiments.

  20. Surface modification of structural materials by low-energy high-current pulsed electron beam treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Panin, A. V. E-mail: kms@ms.tsc.ru; Kazachenok, M. S. E-mail: kms@ms.tsc.ru; Sinyakova, E. A.; Borodovitsina, O. M.; Ivanov, Yu. F.; Leontieva-Smirnova, M. V.

    2014-11-14

    Microstructure formation in surface layers of pure titanium and ferritic-martensitic steel subjected to electron beam treatment is studied. It is shown that low energy high-current pulsed electron beam irradiation leads to the martensite structure within the surface layer of pure titanium. Contrary, the columnar ferrite grains grow during solidification of ferritic-martensitic steel. The effect of electron beam energy density on the surface morphology and microstructure of the irradiated metals is demonstrated.

  1. Modulator considerations for beam chopping in the low energy beam transport at the SSC Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, D.; Pappas, G.

    1991-06-01

    Beam chopping in the low energy transport line at the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory is accomplished using an electrostatic deflection system. LINAC requirements dictate the design of two modulators operating at 10 Hz with rise and fall times (as measured from approximately 10--99%) of {approximately}100 ns. Design of the first pulser, normally at 10 kV and pulsed to ground potential, utilizes a transformer-coupled diode-clamped solid state circuit to achieve the 2--35 {mu}s pulse width range required. The second pulser, which pulses from ground to approximately 7 kV, relies on a series vacuum tube circuit. The current designs, as well as recent test results and other circuit topologies considered, will be presented. 6 refs.

  2. Low-energy run of Fermilab Electron Cooler's beam generation system

    SciTech Connect

    Prost, Lionel; Shemyakin, Alexander; Fedotov, Alexei; Kewisch, Jorg; /Brookhaven

    2010-08-01

    As a part of a feasibility study of using the Fermilab Electron Cooler for a low-energy Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) run at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), the cooler operation at 1.6 MeV electron beam energy was tested in a short beam line configuration. The main result of the study is that the cooler beam generation system is suitable for BNL needs. In a striking difference with running 4.3 MeV beam, no unprovoked beam recirculation interruptions were observed.

  3. Radiological concerns in operation of intense low-energy deuteron beams.

    PubMed

    Weissman, Leo; Berkovits, Dan; Grof, Yair; Ben-Dov, Yair

    2008-12-01

    A 40-keV, 5-mA DC deuteron beam was operated at the SARAF with the purpose of characterizing the ion source and the low-energy beam transport system. We used this opportunity to address radiological concern of operating an intense deuteron beam. Fast and thermal neutrons produced via the D(d,n) reaction were measured in the vicinity of the components intercepting the beam using various methods. We found that the neutron yield from implantation of a deuteron beam in a graphite matrix is of the order of 2 x 10(6) n s(-1) mA(-1) into 4pi.

  4. Non-Gaussian beam dynamics in low energy antiproton storage rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resta-López, J.; Hunt, J. R.; Welsch, C. P.

    2016-10-01

    In low energy antiproton facilities, where electron cooling is fundamental, the cooling forces together with heating phenomena causing emittance blow-up, such as Intra Beam Scattering (IBS), result in highly non-Gaussian beam distributions. In these cases, a precise simulation of IBS effects is essential to realistically evaluate the long term beam evolution, taking into account the non-Gaussian characteristics of the beam. Here, we analyse the beam dynamics in the Extra Low ENergy Antiproton ring (ELENA), which is a new small synchrotron currently being constructed at CERN to decelerate antiprotons to energies as low as 100 keV. Simulations are performed using the code BETACOOL, comparing different models of IBS.

  5. Radiation protection system at the RIKEN RI beam factory.

    PubMed

    Uwamino, Y; Fujita, S; Sakamoto, H; Ito, S; Fukunishi, N; Yabutani, T; Yamano, T; Fukumura, A

    2005-01-01

    The RIKEN RI (radioactive isotope) Beam Factory is scheduled to commence operations in 2006, and its maximum energy will be 400 MeV u(-1) for ions lighter than Ar and 350 MeV u(-1) for uranium. The beam intensity will be 1 pmicroA (6 x 10(12) particles s(-1)) for any element at the goal. For the hands-on-maintenance and the rational shield thickness of the building, the beam loss must be controlled with several kinds of monitors. Three types of radiation monitors will be installed. The first one consists of a neutron dose equivalent monitor and an ionisation chamber, which are commercially available area monitors. The second one is a conventional hand-held dose equivalent monitor wherein the logarithmic signal is read by a programmable logic controller based on the radiation safety interlock system (HIS). The third one is a simple plastic scintillator called a beam loss monitor. All the monitors have threshold levels for alarm and beam stop, and HIS reads all these signals.

  6. The production of low-energy neutral oxygen beams by grazing-incidence neutralization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albridge, R. G.; Haglund, R. F.; Tolk, N. H.; Daech, A. F.

    1987-01-01

    The Vanderbilt University neutral oxygen facility produces beams of low-energy neutral oxygen atoms by means of grazing-incidence collisions between ion beams and metal surfaces. Residual ions are reflected by applied electric fields. This method can utilize initial ion beams of either O(+) or O2(+) since a very large percentage of molecular oxygen ions are dissociated when they undergo grazing-incidence neutralization. The method of neutralization is applicable to low-energy beams and to all ions. Particular emphasis is on O and N2 beams for simulation of the low Earth orbit space environment. Since the beam is a pure O-neutral beam and since measurements of the interaction of the beam with solid surfaces are made spectroscopically, absolute reaction rates can be determined. The technique permits the beams to be used in conjunction with electron and photon irradiation for studies of synergistic effects. Comparisons of optical spectra of Kapton excited by 2.5-keV O, O(+), and O2(+) show significant differences. Optical spectra of Kapton excited by neutral oxygen beams of less than 1 keV have been recorded.

  7. Studies of slow-positron production using low-energy primary electron beams.

    SciTech Connect

    Lessner, E.

    1999-04-20

    Slow-positron beams produced from negative-work-function solid-state moderators have found numerous applications in condensed matter physics. There are potential advantages in using low-energy primary electron beams for positron production, including reduced radiation damage to single-crystal moderators and reduced activation of nearby components. We present numerical calculations of positron yields and other beam parameters for various target-moderator configurations using the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA) [1] and Advanced Photon Source (APS) [2] electron linacs [3] as examples of sources for the primary electron beams. The status of experiments at these facilities is reviewed.

  8. Topography evolution mechanism on fused silica during low-energy ion beam sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Völlner, J.; Ziberi, B.; Frost, F.; Rauschenbach, B.

    2011-02-01

    In this study, the topography evolution of fused silica surfaces during low-energy ion beam erosion has been investigated depending on the ion incidence angle and with focus on the importance of the initial surface topography. Ripple prepattern, also prepared by ion beam erosion, that exhibits an anisotropic surface with adjustable surface amplitudes and gradients was utilized. Based on experimental results that confirm smoothing and patterning behavior, gradient-dependent sputtering is identified being the dominant topography evolution mechanism.

  9. Low-energy neutrino-nucleus interactions and beta-beam neutrino

    SciTech Connect

    Jachowicz, N.; Pandey, V.

    2015-05-15

    We present an overview of neutrino-nucleus scattering at low energies with cross sections obtained within a continuum random phase approximation (CRPA) formalism. We highlight potential applications of beta-beam neutrino experiments for neutrino astrophysics. Our calculations are compared with MiniBooNe data at intermediate energies.

  10. PIP-II Injector Test’s Low Energy Beam Transport: Commissioning and Selected Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Shemyakin, A.; Alvarez, M.; Andrews, R.; Carneiro, J.-P.; Chen, A.; Hanna, B.; Prost, L.; Scarpine, V.; D'Arcy, R.; Wiesner, C.

    2016-09-16

    The PIP2IT test accelerator is under construction at Fermilab. Its ion source and Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) in its initial (straight) configuration have been commissioned to full specification parameters. This paper introduces the LEBT design and summarizes the outcome of the commissioning activities.

  11. Parasitic production of slow RI-beam from a projectile fragment separator by ion guide Laser Ion Source (PALIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonoda, Tetsu

    2009-10-01

    The projectile fragment separator BigRIPS of RIBF at RIKEN provides a wide variety of short-lived radioactive isotope (RI) ions without restrictions on their lifetime or chemical properties. A universal slow RI-beam facility (SLOWRI) to decelerate the beams from BigRIPS using an RF-carpet ion guide has been proposed as a principal facility of RIBF. However, beam time at such a modern accelerator facility is always limited and operational costs are high. We therefore propose an additional scheme as a complementary option to SLOWRI to drastically enhance the usability of such an expensive facility. In BigRIPS, a single primary beam produces thousands of isotopes but only one isotope is used for an experiment while the other >99.99% of isotopes are simply dumped in the slits or elsewhere in the fragment separator. We plan to locate a compact gas cell with 1 bar Ar at the slits. The thermalized ions in the cell will be quickly neutralized and transported to the exit by gas flow and resonantly re-ionized by lasers. Such low energy RI-beams will always be provided without any restriction to the main experiment. It will allow us to run parasitic experiments for precision atomic or decay spectroscopy, mass measurements. Furthermore, the resonance ionization in the cell itself can be used for high-sensitive laser spectroscopy, which will expand our knowledge of the ground state property of unstable nuclei.

  12. A new beam loss detector for low-energy proton and heavy-ion accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhengzheng; Crisp, Jenna; Russo, Tom; Webber, Robert; Zhang, Yan

    2014-12-01

    The Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) to be constructed at Michigan State University shall deliver a continuous, 400 kW heavy ion beam to the isotope production target. This beam is capable of inflicting serious damage on accelerator components, e.g. superconducting RF accelerating cavities. A Beam Loss Monitoring (BLM) System is essential for detecting beam loss with sufficient sensitivity and promptness to inform the machine protection system (MPS) and operations personnel of impending dangerous losses. Radiation transport simulations reveal shortcomings in the use of ionization chambers for the detection of beam losses in low-energy, heavy-ion accelerators. Radiation cross-talk effects due to the folded geometry of the FRIB LINAC pose further complications to locating specific points of beam loss. We propose a newly developed device, named the Loss Monitor Ring (LMR1

  13. An electron cyclotron resonance ion source based low energy ion beam platform

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, L. T.; Shang, Y.; Ma, B. H.; Zhang, X. Z.; Feng, Y. C.; Li, X. X.; Wang, H.; Guo, X. H.; Song, M. T.; Zhao, H. Y.; Zhang, Z. M.; Zhao, H. W.; Xie, D. Z.

    2008-02-15

    To satisfy the requirements of surface and atomic physics study in the field of low energy multiple charge state ion incident experiments, a low energy (10 eV/q-20 keV/q) ion beam platform is under design at IMP. A simple test bench has been set up to test the ion beam deceleration systems. Considering virtues such as structure simplicity, easy handling, compactness, cost saving, etc., an all-permanent magnet ECRIS LAPECR1 [Lanzhou all-permanent magnet electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source No. 1] working at 14.5 GHz has been adopted to produce intense medium and low charge state ion beams. LAPECR1 source has already been ignited. Some intense low charge state ion beams have been produced on it, but the first test also reveals that many problems are existing on the ion beam transmission line. The ion beam transmission mismatches result in the depressed performance of LAPECR1, which will be discussed in this paper. To obtain ultralow energy ion beam, after being analyzed by a double-focusing analyzer magnet, the selected ion beam will be further decelerated by two afocal deceleration lens systems, which is still under design. This design has taken into consideration both ions slowing down and also ion beam focusing. In this paper, the conceptual design of deceleration system will be discussed.

  14. An ion beam deceleration lens for ultra-low-energy ion bombardment of naked DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thopan, P.; Prakrajang, K.; Thongkumkoon, P.; Suwannakachorn, D.; Yu, L. D.

    2013-07-01

    Study of low-energy ion bombardment effect on biological living materials is of significance. High-energy ion beam irradiation of biological materials such as organs and cells has no doubt biological effects. However, ion energy deposition in the ion-bombarded materials dominantly occurs in the low-energy range. To investigate effects from very-low-energy ion bombardment on biological materials, an ion beam deceleration lens is necessary for uniform ion energy lower than keV. A deceleration lens was designed and constructed based on study of the beam optics using the SIMION program. The lens consisted of six electrodes, able to focus and decelerate primary ion beam, with the last one being a long tube to obtain a parallel uniform exiting beam. The deceleration lens was installed to our 30-kV bioengineering-specialized ion beam line. The final decelerated-ion energy was measured using a simple electrostatic field to bend the beam to range from 10 eV to 1 keV controlled by the lens parameters and the primary beam condition. In a preliminary test, nitrogen ion beam at 60 eV decelerated from a primary 20-keV beam bombarded naked plasmid DNA. The original DNA supercoiled form was found to change to relaxed and linear forms, indicating single or double strand breaks. The study demonstrated that the ion bombardment with energy as low as several-tens eV was possible to break DNA strands and thus potential to cause genetic modification of biological cells.

  15. Ultra-low-energy (<10 eV/u) ion beam bombardment effect on naked DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thopan, P.; Thongkumkoon, P.; Prakrajang, K.; Suwannakachorn, D.; Yu, L. D.

    2014-05-01

    Since ion energy deposition in the ion-bombarded materials dominantly occurs in the low-energy range, it is very interesting to know effects from ultra-low-energy ion interaction with DNA for understanding ion-beam-induced genetic mutation. Tens-keV Ar- and N-ion beams were decelerated to ultra-low energy ranging from 20 to 100 eV, or only a few to 10 eV/u, to bombard naked plasmid DNA. The bombarded DNA was analyzed using gel electrophoresis for DNA form changes. The original DNA supercoiled form was found to change to relaxed and linear forms, indicating single or double strand breaks after bombarded by tens-eV ion beam. N-ion beam was found more effective in inducing DNA change and mutation than Ar-ion beam. The study demonstrated that the ion bombardment with energy as low as several-tens eV was able to break DNA strands and thus potentially to cause genetic modification of biological cells. The experimental results were discussed in terms of direct atomic collision between the ions and DNA atoms.

  16. Low-Energy Plasma Focus Device as an Electron Beam Source

    PubMed Central

    Seong Ling, Yap; Naresh Kumar, Nitturi; Lian Kuang, Lim; Chiow San, Wong

    2014-01-01

    A low-energy plasma focus device was used as an electron beam source. A technique was developed to simultaneously measure the electron beam intensity and energy. The system was operated in Argon filling at an optimum pressure of 1.7 mbar. A Faraday cup was used together with an array of filtered PIN diodes. The beam-target X-rays were registered through X-ray spectrometry. Copper and lead line radiations were registered upon usage as targets. The maximum electron beam charge and density were estimated to be 0.31 μC and 13.5 × 1016/m3, respectively. The average energy of the electron beam was 500 keV. The high flux of the electron beam can be potentially applicable in material sciences. PMID:25544952

  17. Low-energy plasma focus device as an electron beam source.

    PubMed

    Khan, Muhammad Zubair; Ling, Yap Seong; Yaqoob, Ibrar; Kumar, Nitturi Naresh; Kuang, Lim Lian; San, Wong Chiow

    2014-01-01

    A low-energy plasma focus device was used as an electron beam source. A technique was developed to simultaneously measure the electron beam intensity and energy. The system was operated in Argon filling at an optimum pressure of 1.7 mbar. A Faraday cup was used together with an array of filtered PIN diodes. The beam-target X-rays were registered through X-ray spectrometry. Copper and lead line radiations were registered upon usage as targets. The maximum electron beam charge and density were estimated to be 0.31 μC and 13.5 × 10(16)/m(3), respectively. The average energy of the electron beam was 500 keV. The high flux of the electron beam can be potentially applicable in material sciences.

  18. Simulation and measurement of the electrostatic beam kicker in the low-energy undulator test line.

    SciTech Connect

    Waldschmidt, G. J.

    1998-10-27

    An electrostatic kicker has been constructed for use in the Low-Energy Undulator Test Line (LEUTL) at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). The function of the kicker is to limit the amount of beam current to be accelerated by the APS linac. Two electrodes within the kicker create an electric field that adjusts the trajectory of the beam. This paper will explore the static fields that are set up between the offset electrode plates and determine the reaction of the beam to this field. The kicker was numerically simulated using the electromagnetic solver package MAFIA [1].

  19. Performance Studies of the Vibration Wire Monitor on the Test Stand with Low Energy Electron Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okabe, Kota; Yoshimoto, Masahiro; Kinsho, Michikazu

    In the high intensity proton accelerator as the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) accelerators, serious radiation and residual dose is induced by a small beam loss such a beam halo. Therefore, diagnostics of the beam halo formation is one of the most important issues to control the beam loss. For the beam halo monitor, the vibration wire monitor (VWM) has a potential for investigating the beam halo and weak beam scanning. The VWM has a wide dynamic range, high resolution and the VWM is not susceptible to secondary electrons and electric noises. We have studied the VWM features as a new beam-halo monitor on the test stand with low energy electron gun. The frequency shift of the irradiated vibration wire was confirmed about wire material and the electron beam profile measured by using the VWM was consistent with the results of the Faraday cup measurement. Also we calculated a temperature distribution on the vibration wire which is irradiated by the electron beam with the numerical simulation. The simulations have been fairly successful in reproducing the transient of the irradiated vibration wire frequency measured by test stand experiments. In this paper, we will report a result of performance evaluation for the VWM on the test stands and discuss the VWM for beam halo diagnostic

  20. A feasibility study of beam-chopping at low energy for LANSCE

    SciTech Connect

    Tai-Sen Wang; Channell, P.J.; Mottershead, C.T.

    1996-10-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). If a beam-chopping system could be developed for the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility low-energy beam line, there would be potential to operate the Los Alamos Neutron Scattering Center (LANSCE) at much higher power and duty factor and enable such operation with a radio-frequency quadrapole (RFQ) injector. This would greatly extend the capability of the facility. To accommodate LANSCE operation in the new configuration, a chopped beam must be created in the low-energy transport line before the RFQ. Chopping in this region has never been demonstrated and constitutes the major uncertainty of the proposal and determines the critical path for project completion. This study produces a better understanding of the physics involved in chopping an H-beam in a dilute plasma background, and in transporting a chopped H-beam through a neutralized or partially neutralized plasma channel, as well as an estimate for the optimum neutralization strategy for the beam chopping and transport between the ion source and the RFQ.

  1. High-flux source of low-energy neutral beams using reflection of ions from metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuthbertson, John W.; Motley, Robert W.; Langer, William D.

    1992-01-01

    Reflection of low-energy ions from surfaces can be applied as a method of producing high-flux beams of low-energy neutral particles, and is an important effect in several areas of plasma technology, such as in the edge region of fusion devices. We have developed a beam source based on acceleration and reflection of ions from a magnetically confined coaxial RF plasma source. The beam provides a large enough flux to allow the energy distribution of the reflected neutrals to be measured despite the inefficiency of detection, by means of an electrostatic cylindrical mirror analyzer coupled with a quadrupole mass spectrometer. Energy distributions have been measured for oxygen, nitrogen, and inert gas ions incident with from 15 to 70 eV reflected from amorphous metal surfaces of several compositions. For ions of lighter atomic mass than the reflecting metal, reflected beams have peaked energy distributions; beams with the peak at 4-32 eV have been measured. The energy and mass dependences of the energy distributions as well as measurements of absolute flux, and angular distribution and divergence are reported. Applications of the neutral beams produced are described.

  2. High-flux source of low-energy neutral beams using reflection of ions from metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuthbertson, John W.; Motley, Robert W.; Langer, William D.

    1992-01-01

    Reflection of low-energy ions from surfaces can be applied as a method of producing high-flux beams of low-energy neutral particles, and is an important effect in several areas of plasma technology, such as in the edge region of fusion devices. We have developed a beam source based on acceleration and reflection of ions from a magnetically confined coaxial RF plasma source. The beam provides a large enough flux to allow the energy distribution of the reflected neutrals to be measured despite the inefficiency of detection, by means of an electrostatic cylindrical mirror analyzer coupled with a quadrupole mass spectrometer. Energy distributions have been measured for oxygen, nitrogen, and inert gas ions incident with from 15 to 70 eV reflected from amorphous metal surfaces of several compositions. For ions of lighter atomic mass than the reflecting metal, reflected beams have peaked energy distributions; beams with the peak at 4-32 eV have been measured. The energy and mass dependences of the energy distributions as well as measurements of absolute flux, and angular distribution and divergence are reported. Applications of the neutral beams produced are described.

  3. High beam current shut-off systems in the APS linac and low energy transfer line

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X.; Knott, M.; Lumpkin, A.

    1994-11-01

    Two independent high beam current shut-off current monitoring systems (BESOCM) have been installed in the APS linac and the low energy transport line to provide personnel safety protection in the event of acceleration of excessive beam currents. Beam current is monitored by a fast current transformer (FCT) and fully redundant supervisory circuits connected to the Access Control Interlock System (ACIS) for beam intensity related shutdowns of the linac. One FCT is located at the end of the positron linac and the other in the low energy transport line, which directs beam to the positron accumulator ring (PAR). To ensure a high degree of reliability, both systems employ a continuous self-checking function, which injects a test pulse to a single-turn test winding after each ``real`` beam pulse to verify that the system is fully functional. The system is designed to be fail-safe for all possible system faults, such as loss of power, open or shorted signal or test cables, loss of external trigger, malfunction of gated integrator, etc. The system has been successfully commissioned and is now a reliable part of the total ACIS.

  4. High beam current shut-off systems in the APS linac and low energy transfer line

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X.; Knott, M.; Lumpkin, A.

    1995-05-05

    Two independent high beam current shut-off current monitoring systems (BESOCM) have been installed in the APS linac and the low energy transport line to provide personnel safety protection in the event of acceleration of excessive beam currents. Beam current is monitored by a fast current transformer (FCT) and fully redundant supervisory circuits connected to the Access Control Interlock System (ACIS) for beam intensity related shutdowns of the linac. One FCT is located at the end of the positron linac and the other in the low energy transport line, which directs beam to the positron accumulator ring (PAR). To ensure a high degree of reliability, both systems employ a continuous self-checking function, which injects a test pulse to a single-turn test winding after each ``real`` beam pulse to verify that the system is fully functional. The system is designed to be fail-safe for all possible system faults, such as loss of power, open or shorted signal or test cables, loss of external trigger, malfunction of gated integrator, etc. The system has been successfully commissioned and is now a reliable part of the total ACIS. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  5. Studies on low energy beam transport for high intensity high charged ions at IMP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Y.; Sun, L. T.; Hu, Q.; Cao, Y.; Lu, W.; Feng, Y. C.; Fang, X.; Zhang, X. Z.; Zhao, H. W.; Xie, D. Z.

    2014-02-01

    Superconducting Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source with Advanced design in Lanzhou (SECRAL) is an advanced fully superconducting ECR ion source at IMP designed to be operational at the microwave frequency of 18-24 GHz. The existing SECRAL beam transmission line is composed of a solenoid lens and a 110° analyzing magnet. Simulations of particle tracking with 3D space charge effect and realistic 3D magnetic fields through the line were performed using particle-in-cell code. The results of the beam dynamics show that such a low energy beam is very sensitive to the space charge effect and significantly suffers from the second-order aberration of the analyzing magnet resulting in large emittance. However, the second-order aberration could be reduced by adding compensating sextupole components in the beam line. On this basis, a new 110° analyzing magnet with relatively larger acceptance and smaller aberration is designed and will be used in the design of low energy beam transport line for a new superconducting ECR ion source SECRAL-II. The features of the analyzer and the corresponding beam trajectory calculation will be detailed and discussed in this paper.

  6. Studies on low energy beam transport for high intensity high charged ions at IMP

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Y. Lu, W.; Fang, X.; Sun, L. T.; Hu, Q.; Cao, Y.; Feng, Y. C.; Zhang, X. Z.; Zhao, H. W.; Xie, D. Z.

    2014-02-15

    Superconducting Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source with Advanced design in Lanzhou (SECRAL) is an advanced fully superconducting ECR ion source at IMP designed to be operational at the microwave frequency of 18–24 GHz. The existing SECRAL beam transmission line is composed of a solenoid lens and a 110° analyzing magnet. Simulations of particle tracking with 3D space charge effect and realistic 3D magnetic fields through the line were performed using particle-in-cell code. The results of the beam dynamics show that such a low energy beam is very sensitive to the space charge effect and significantly suffers from the second-order aberration of the analyzing magnet resulting in large emittance. However, the second-order aberration could be reduced by adding compensating sextupole components in the beam line. On this basis, a new 110° analyzing magnet with relatively larger acceptance and smaller aberration is designed and will be used in the design of low energy beam transport line for a new superconducting ECR ion source SECRAL-II. The features of the analyzer and the corresponding beam trajectory calculation will be detailed and discussed in this paper.

  7. Low-energy ion beam-based deposition of gallium nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Vasquez, M. R.; Wada, M.

    2016-02-15

    An ion source with a remote plasma chamber excited by a 13.56 MHz radio frequency power was used for low-energy broad ion beam extraction. Optical emission spectral analyses showed the sputtering and postionization of a liquid gallium (Ga) target placed in a chamber separated from the source bombarded by argon (Ar) plasma guided by a bent magnetic field. In addition, an E × B probe successfully showed the extraction of low-energy Ga and Ar ion beams using a dual-electrode extractor configuration. By introducing dilute amounts of nitrogen gas into the system, formation of thin Ga-based films on a silicon substrate was demonstrated as determined from X-ray diffraction and X-ray reflectivity studies.

  8. Low-energy ion beam-based deposition of gallium nitride.

    PubMed

    Vasquez, M R; Wada, M

    2016-02-01

    An ion source with a remote plasma chamber excited by a 13.56 MHz radio frequency power was used for low-energy broad ion beam extraction. Optical emission spectral analyses showed the sputtering and postionization of a liquid gallium (Ga) target placed in a chamber separated from the source bombarded by argon (Ar) plasma guided by a bent magnetic field. In addition, an E × B probe successfully showed the extraction of low-energy Ga and Ar ion beams using a dual-electrode extractor configuration. By introducing dilute amounts of nitrogen gas into the system, formation of thin Ga-based films on a silicon substrate was demonstrated as determined from X-ray diffraction and X-ray reflectivity studies.

  9. Low-energy ion beam-based deposition of gallium nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasquez, M. R.; Wada, M.

    2016-02-01

    An ion source with a remote plasma chamber excited by a 13.56 MHz radio frequency power was used for low-energy broad ion beam extraction. Optical emission spectral analyses showed the sputtering and postionization of a liquid gallium (Ga) target placed in a chamber separated from the source bombarded by argon (Ar) plasma guided by a bent magnetic field. In addition, an E × B probe successfully showed the extraction of low-energy Ga and Ar ion beams using a dual-electrode extractor configuration. By introducing dilute amounts of nitrogen gas into the system, formation of thin Ga-based films on a silicon substrate was demonstrated as determined from X-ray diffraction and X-ray reflectivity studies.

  10. Role of low-energy neutral N2 beam-surface interactions leading to spacecraft glow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Alan V.; Albridge, Royal G.; Qi, Jining; Riehl-Chudoba, Manfred; Sun, Chang-Nian; Wang, P. W.; Tolk, Norman H.

    1990-01-01

    Measurements of the optical spectra of surfaces undergoing bombardment by N2 and N2(+) in an ultrahigh vacuum environment provide information related to the origin of spacecraft flow and erosion. This work is complementary to other measurements, in which O and O(+) beams are utilized. These efforts are part of a broad program whose goal is the understanding of interactions between surfaces and low-energy charged and neutral particles.

  11. A very low energy compact electron beam ion trap for spectroscopic research in Shanghai.

    PubMed

    Xiao, J; Fei, Z; Yang, Y; Jin, X; Lu, D; Shen, Y; Liljeby, L; Hutton, R; Zou, Y

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, a new compact low energy electron beam ion trap, SH-PermEBIT, is reported. This electron beam ion trap (EBIT) can operate in the electron energy range of 60-5000 eV, with a current density of up to 100 A/cm(2). The low energy limit of this machine sets the record among the reported works so far. The magnetic field in the central drift tube region of this EBIT is around 0.5 T, produced by permanent magnets and soft iron. The design of this EBIT allows adjustment of the electron gun's axial position in the fringe field of the central magnetic field. This turned out to be very important for optimizing the magnetic field in the region of the electron gun and particularly important for low electron beam energy operation, since the magnetic field strength is not tunable with permanent magnets. In this work, transmission of the electron beam as well as the upper limit of the electron beam width under several conditions are measured. Spectral results from test operation of this EBIT at the electron energies of 60, 315, 2800, and 4100 eV are also reported.

  12. A very low energy compact electron beam ion trap for spectroscopic research in Shanghai

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, J.; Fei, Z.; Yang, Y.; Jin, X.; Lu, D.; Shen, Y.; Liljeby, L.; Hutton, R.; Zou, Y.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, a new compact low energy electron beam ion trap, SH-PermEBIT, is reported. This electron beam ion trap (EBIT) can operate in the electron energy range of 60-5000 eV, with a current density of up to 100 A/cm2. The low energy limit of this machine sets the record among the reported works so far. The magnetic field in the central drift tube region of this EBIT is around 0.5 T, produced by permanent magnets and soft iron. The design of this EBIT allows adjustment of the electron gun's axial position in the fringe field of the central magnetic field. This turned out to be very important for optimizing the magnetic field in the region of the electron gun and particularly important for low electron beam energy operation, since the magnetic field strength is not tunable with permanent magnets. In this work, transmission of the electron beam as well as the upper limit of the electron beam width under several conditions are measured. Spectral results from test operation of this EBIT at the electron energies of 60, 315, 2800, and 4100 eV are also reported.

  13. A very low energy compact electron beam ion trap for spectroscopic research in Shanghai

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, J.; Fei, Z.; Yang, Y.; Jin, X.; Lu, D.; Shen, Y.; Hutton, R.; Zou, Y.; Liljeby, L.

    2012-01-15

    In this paper, a new compact low energy electron beam ion trap, SH-PermEBIT, is reported. This electron beam ion trap (EBIT) can operate in the electron energy range of 60-5000 eV, with a current density of up to 100 A/cm{sup 2}. The low energy limit of this machine sets the record among the reported works so far. The magnetic field in the central drift tube region of this EBIT is around 0.5 T, produced by permanent magnets and soft iron. The design of this EBIT allows adjustment of the electron gun's axial position in the fringe field of the central magnetic field. This turned out to be very important for optimizing the magnetic field in the region of the electron gun and particularly important for low electron beam energy operation, since the magnetic field strength is not tunable with permanent magnets. In this work, transmission of the electron beam as well as the upper limit of the electron beam width under several conditions are measured. Spectral results from test operation of this EBIT at the electron energies of 60, 315, 2800, and 4100 eV are also reported.

  14. Extraction characteristics of a low-energy ion beam system with a remote plasma chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Vasquez, M. R.; Wada, M.

    2016-02-15

    Low-energy argon beams were extracted from a dual-chamber ion source system. The first chamber is a quartz cylinder where dense inductively coupled plasmas were produced using 13.56 MHz radio frequency (rf) power. The discharge was driven into an adjacent chamber which acts as a reservoir for ion beam extraction using a dual-electrode extractor configuration. Extraction of ions from the second chamber with energies in the 100 eV range was achieved while minimizing fluctuations induced by the rf signal. A custom-built retarding potential analyzer was used to analyze the effectiveness of ion beam transport using the remote plasma chamber. Well-defined beams were extracted between 60 and 100 V extraction potentials at 50–100 W rf powers. An increase in rf power resulted in an increase in average ion energy, increase in ion current density while the energy spread remains constant.

  15. Design of the low energy beam transport line between CARIBU and the EBIS charge breeder

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, A.; Ostroumov, P. N.; Barcikowski, A.; Dickerson, C.; Kondrashev, S. A.; Mustapha, B.; Savard, G.

    2015-01-09

    An Electron Beam Ion Source Charge Breeder (EBIS-CB) has been developed to breed radioactive beams from the CAlifornium Rare Isotope Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) facility at ATLAS. The EBIS-CB will replace the existing ECR charge breeder to increase the intensity and improve the purity of reaccelerated radioactive ion beams. The EBIS-CB is in the final stage of off-line commissioning. Currently, we are developing a low energy beam transport (LEBT) system to transfer CARIBU beams to the EBIS-CB. As was originally planned, an RFQ cooler-buncher will precede the EBIS-CB. Recently, it was decided to include a multi-reflection time-of-flight (MR-TOF) mass-spectrometer following the RFQ. MR-TOF is a relatively new technology used to purify beams with a mass-resolving power up to 3×10{sup 5} as was demonstrated in experiments at CERN/ISOLDE. Very high purity singly-charged radioactive ion beams will be injected into the EBIS for charge breeding and due to its inherent properties, the EBIS-CB will maintain the purity of the charge bred beams. Possible contamination of residual gas ions will be greatly suppressed by achieving ultra-high vacuum in the EBIS trap. This paper will present and discuss the design of the LEBT and the overall integration of the EBIS-CB into ATLAS.

  16. Design of the low energy beam transport line between CARIBU and the EBIS charge breeder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, A.; Ostroumov, P. N.; Barcikowski, A.; Dickerson, C.; Kondrashev, S. A.; Mustapha, B.; Savard, G.

    2015-01-01

    An Electron Beam Ion Source Charge Breeder (EBIS-CB) has been developed to breed radioactive beams from the CAlifornium Rare Isotope Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) facility at ATLAS. The EBIS-CB will replace the existing ECR charge breeder to increase the intensity and improve the purity of reaccelerated radioactive ion beams. The EBIS-CB is in the final stage of off-line commissioning. Currently, we are developing a low energy beam transport (LEBT) system to transfer CARIBU beams to the EBIS-CB. As was originally planned, an RFQ cooler-buncher will precede the EBIS-CB. Recently, it was decided to include a multi-reflection time-of-flight (MR-TOF) mass-spectrometer following the RFQ. MR-TOF is a relatively new technology used to purify beams with a mass-resolving power up to 3×105 as was demonstrated in experiments at CERN/ISOLDE. Very high purity singly-charged radioactive ion beams will be injected into the EBIS for charge breeding and due to its inherent properties, the EBIS-CB will maintain the purity of the charge bred beams. Possible contamination of residual gas ions will be greatly suppressed by achieving ultra-high vacuum in the EBIS trap. This paper will present and discuss the design of the LEBT and the overall integration of the EBIS-CB into ATLAS.

  17. Modeling of megavoltage and low energy focused x-ray beams using MCNP5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbas, Hassan

    In this thesis 6 and 18 MV photon beams for a Varian linear accelerator were simulated using a general purpose Monte Carlo code MCNP5 (Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code). The potential of MCNP5 is explored to calculate the dose in high dose gradient regions. In addition, MCNP5 was used to model another geometry, low energy focused x ray beams created with polycapillary optics, to explore their potential to provide a different skin-sparing technique for radiation therapy. Modeling was benchmarked by adjusting electron beam energy and diameter to match calculations with ionization chamber (with 0.125 cm3 sensitive volume) measurements of percent depth doses (PDDs) beyond d max and cross dose profiles at dmax and 10 cm depths for 5x5, 10x10 and 30x30 cm2 field sizes. For comparison in the buildup region, the MCNP5 voxel was reduced to 1 mm, with extrapolation to find surface dose. In this region a plane parallel chamber (with 0.055 cm3 sensitive volume) was used to measure PDDs at 0, 2 and 4 mm depths for the three field sizes, using the Khan over-response correction. Calculations and cylindrical chamber measurements for PDDs beyond d max agree within 2% for all field sizes and energies. Dose profiles agree within 2% in the flat region and within 10% in the penumbra region for all field sizes and energies. In the buildup region, the maximum deviation between MCNP5 calculations and the plane parallel PDD measurements at 18 MV is 3.8% for 30x30 cm2 at 2 mm depth. The deviation is within 3% for all other field sizes and depths for both beam energies. For 18 MV, the extrapolation of the MCNP5 PDD overestimates the surface dose for the 30x30 cm2 field size, and is within 4.6% for all other field sizes at both beam energies. A focused beam obtained with polycapillary optics was simulated using MCNP5. Low energy focused x ray beams could be used to irradiate the tumors inside soft tissue within 5 cm of the surface. A better skin sparring compared to megavoltage photon

  18. Direct nanopatterning of polymer/silver nanoblocks under low energy electron beam irradiation.

    PubMed

    El Mel, Abdel-Aziz; Stephant, Nicolas; Gautier, Romain

    2016-10-06

    In this communication, we report on the growth, direct writing and nanopatterning of polymer/silver nanoblocks under low energy electron beam irradiation using a scanning electron microscope. The nanoblocks are produced by placing a droplet of an ethylene glycol solution containing silver nitrate and polyvinylpyrrolidone diluted in ethanol directly on a hot substrate heated up to 150 °C. Upon complete evaporation of the droplet, nanospheres, nano- and micro-triangles and nanoblocks made of silver-containing polymers, form over the substrate surface. Considering the nanoblocks as a model system, we demonstrate that such nanostructures are extremely sensitive to the e-beam extracted from the source of a scanning electron microscope operating at low acceleration voltages (between 5 and 7 kV). This sensitivity allows us to efficiently create various nanopatterns (e.g. arrays of holes, oblique slits and nanotrenches) in the material under e-beam irradiation. In addition to the possibility of writing, the nanoblocks revealed a self-healing ability allowing them to recover a relatively smooth surface after etching. Thanks to these properties, such nanomaterials can be used as a support for data writing and erasing on the nanoscale under low energy electron beam irradiation.

  19. Performance of ion surfing rf-carpets for RI beam gas catcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arai, Fumiya; Ito, Yuta; Katayama, Ichirou; Schury, Peter; Sonoda, Tetsu; Wada, Michiharu; Wollnik, Hermann

    2014-09-01

    High-energy RI beams produced in-flight by fragmentation or fission are used in ion trap-based precision experiments after being stopped in a gas catcher. The stopped ions can be extracted from the gas catcher as a low energy ion beam. In order to transport and extract ions quickly and efficiently, an rf-carpet (RFC) method utilizing a dc potential gradient has been the standard technique. However, such a method is restricted by the transport time to longer half-life isotopes due to the maximum dc gradient that can be supported before electric discharges occur in the gas catcher. To avoid that limitation, a hybrid technique wherein the dc gradient is replaced by a traveling potential wave was proposed, called ``ion surfing''. Recently, we have demonstrated ion extraction using a circular RFC under low and intermediate pressures. For the first time we demonstrated the ion extraction using an rf-carpet in high-pressure He gas. An efficiency of nearly 100% was obtained at 200 mbar He gas pressure for K+ ions.

  20. Neutralization of space charge on high-current low-energy ion beam by low-energy electrons supplied from silicon based field emitter arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Gotoh, Yasuhito; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Taguchi, Shuhei; Ikeda, Keita; Kitagawa, Takayuki; Ishikawa, Junzo; Sakai, Shigeki

    2012-11-06

    Neutralization of space charge on a high-current and low-energy ion beam was attempted to reduce the divergence with an aid of low-energy electrons supplied from silicon based field emitter arrays (Si-FEAs). An argon ion beam with the energy of 500 eV and the current of 0.25 mA was produced by a microwave ion source. The initial beam divergence and the emittance were measured at the entrance of the analysis chamber in order to estimate the intrinsic factors for beam divergence. The current density distribution of the beam after transport of 730 mm was measured by a movable Faraday cup, with and without electron supply from Si-FEAs. A similar experiment was performed with tungsten filaments as an electron source. The results indicated that the electron supply from FEA had almost the same effect as the thermionic filament, and it was confirmed that both electron sources can neutralize the ion beam.

  1. A pepper-pot emittance meter for low-energy heavy-ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Kremers, H. R.; Beijers, J. P. M.; Brandenburg, S.

    2013-02-15

    A novel emittance meter has been developed to measure the four-dimensional, transverse phase-space distribution of a low-energy ion beam using the pepper-pot technique. A characteristic feature of this instrument is that the pepper-pot plate, which has a linear array of holes in the vertical direction, is scanned horizontally through the ion beam. This has the advantage that the emittance can also be measured at locations along the beam line where the beam has a large horizontal divergence. A set of multi-channel plates, scintillation screen, and ccd camera is used as a position-sensitive ion detector allowing a large range of beam intensities that can be handled. This paper describes the design, construction, and operation of the instrument as well as the data analysis used to reconstruct the four-dimensional phase-space distribution of an ion beam. Measurements on a 15 keV He{sup +} beam are used as an example.

  2. Emittance and Energy Measurements of Low-Energy Electron Beam Using Optical Transition Radiation Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, Fumito; Iijima, Hokuto; Dobashi, Katsuhiro; Imai, Takayuki; Ueda, Toru; Watanabe, Takahiro; Uesaka, Mitsuru

    2005-03-01

    Emittance and energy of an electron beam in the range of 8 to 22 MeV were measured via optical transition radiation (OTR) techniques. The beam divergence effect on observations of the far-field OTR image at low energies was studied by means of numerical analysis. The numerical analysis indicates that if the beam divergence is under 1.5 mrad, a simultaneous single-shot measurement of emittance and energy is possible. The results of the single-shot experiment agree with independent measurements conducted using the quadrupole scan method and an electron spectrometer. The experiments were performed with an S-band linac at the Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, The University of Tokyo (UTNL).

  3. Precision Neutrino Oscillation Measurements using Simultaneous High-Power, Low-Energy Project-X Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Bishai, M.; Diwan, M.; Kettell, S.; Stewart, J.; Viren, B.; Worcester, E.; Tschirhart, R.; Whitehead, L.

    2013-07-02

    The first phase of the long-baseline neutrino experiment, LBNE10, will use a broadband, high-energy neutrino beam with a 10-kt liquid argon TPC at 1300 km to study neutrino oscillation. In this paper, we describe potential upgrades to LBNE10 that use Project X to produce high-intensity, low-energy neutrino beams. Simultaneous, high-power operation of 8- and 60-GeV beams with a 200-kt water Cerenkov detector would provide sensitivity to nu_mu to nu_e oscillations at the second oscillation maximum. We find that with ten years of data, it would be possible to measure sin2(2theta_13) with precision comparable to that expected from reactor antineutrino disappearance and to measure the value of the CP phase, delta_CP, with an uncertainty of (5-10) degrees. This document is submitted for inclusion in Snowmass 2013.

  4. Quantitative low-energy ion beam characterization by beam profiling and imaging via scintillation screens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Germer, S.; Pietag, F.; Polak, J.; Arnold, T.

    2016-11-01

    This study presents the imaging and characterization of low-current ion beams in the neutralized state monitored via single crystal YAG:Ce (Y3Al5O12) scintillators. To validate the presented beam diagnostic tool, Faraday cup measurements and test etchings were performed. Argon ions with a typical energy of 1.0 keV were emitted from an inductively coupled radio-frequency (13.56 MHz) ion beam source with total currents of some mA. Different beam properties, such as, lateral ion current density, beam divergence angle, and current density in pulsed ion beams have been studied to obtain information about the spatial beam profile and the material removal rate distribution. We observed excellent imaging properties with the scintillation screen and achieved a detailed characterization of the neutralized ion beam. A strong correlation between the scintillator light output, the ion current density, and the material removal rate could be observed.

  5. A modified broad beam ion source for low-energy hydrogen implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otte, K.; Schindler, A.; Bigl, F.; Schlemm, H.

    1998-03-01

    A modified broad beam ion source for low-energy hydrogen ion implantation of semiconductors is described. Based on a Kaufman type ion source two different solutions are presented: (a) an ion source with an extraction system consisting of two molybdenum grids with a low gas flow conductance reworked for hydrogen operation, and (b) a ten-grid mass separating ion beam system which enables the mass selection of H+, H2+, and H3+. The ion energy could be set in the range of 200-500 eV with a current density reaching from 1 to 100 μA/cm2. It is shown that at higher pressure the main ion created in the ion source is H3+ due to ion-molecule processes, whereas at lower pressure only H2+ and H+ are produced. Special consideration is given to the ion beam analysis of the two grid ion source operating in the 10-3 mbar range allowing to explain the different peak structures by the potential distribution across the ion source and different charge transfer processes. In addition, the analysis reveals neutral and ionized collision products in the ion beam. The ten-grid mass separating ion source could be operated in the 10-4 mbar range resulting in a nearly collision free ion beam which permits the generation of a mass separated hydrogen ion beam.

  6. Charge neutralized low energy beam transport at Brookhaven 200 MeV linac

    SciTech Connect

    Raparia, D. Alessi, J.; Atoian, G.; Zelenski, A.

    2016-02-15

    The H{sup −} magnetron source provides about 100 mA H{sup −} beam to be match into the radio-frequency quadrupole accelerator. As H{sup −} beam traverses through low energy transport, it ionizes the residual gas and electrons are repelled and positive ions are trapped in the beam, due to negative potential of the beam, providing charge neutralization for the H{sup −} beam. The neutralization time for the critical density depends upon the background gas and its pressure. Critical density for xenon gas at 35 keV is about 43 times smaller than that of hydrogen and stripping cross section is only 5 times than that of hydrogen gas. We are using xenon gas to reduce neutralization time and to improve transmission through the 200 MeV linac. We are also using pulse nitrogen gas to improve transmission and stability of polarized H{sup −} beam from optically pumped polarized ion source.

  7. Overview of Alternative Bunching and Current-shaping Techniques for Low-Energy Electron Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Piot, Philippe

    2015-12-01

    Techniques to bunch or shape an electron beam at low energies (E <15 MeV) have important implications toward the realization of table-top radiation sources [1] or to the design of compact multi-user free-electron lasers[2]. This paper provides an overview of alternative methods recently developed including techniques such as wakefield-based bunching, space-charge-driven microbunching via wave-breaking [3], ab-initio shaping of the electron-emission process [4], and phase space exchangers. Practical applications of some of these methods to foreseen free-electron-laser configurations are also briefly discussed [5].

  8. Extended bulk defects induced by low-energy ions during partially ionized beam deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, W.I.; Wong, J.; Borrego, J.M.; Lu, T.

    1988-08-15

    The study of possible defects generated by low-energy ions during partially ionized beam (PIB) depositions was performed. No defects were observed when acceleration voltage was set lower than 1 kV. Surprisingly, several deep levels were detected up to the depth of 4000 A in the 3-kV sample. However, these levels can be annealed out at a relatively low temperature of 400 /sup 0/C. It is concluded in this study that, by properly choosing the ion energy range, PIB deposition will not cause severe damage to the substrate and can be a viable technique for growing heterostructures.

  9. Transferring Gus gene into intact rice cells by low energy ion beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zengliang, Yu; Jianbo, Yang; Yuejin, Wu; Beijiu, Cheng; Jianjun, He; Yuping, Huo

    1993-06-01

    A new technique of transferring genes by low energy ion beam has been reported in this paper. The Gus and CAT (chloramphenicol acetyltransferase) genes, as "foreign" genetic materials, were introduced into the suspension cells and ripe embryos or rice by implantation of 20-30 keV Ar + at doses ranging from 1 × 10 15 to 4 × 10 15 ions/cm 2. The activities of CAT and Gus were detected in the cells and embryos after several weeks. The results indicate that the transfer was a success.

  10. Generation of a pulsed low-energy electron beam using the channel spark device

    SciTech Connect

    Elgarhy, M. A. I. Hassaballa, S. E.; Rashed, U. M.; ElSabbagh, M. M.; Saudy, A. H.; Soliman, H. M.

    2015-12-15

    For the generation of low-energy electron beam, the design and characteristics of channel spark discharge (CSD) operating at a low voltage are presented in this paper. The discharge voltage, discharge current, X-ray emissions, and electron beam current were experimentally determined. The effects of the applied voltage, working gas pressure, and external capacitance on the CSD and beam parameters were measured. At an applied voltage of 11 kV, an oxygen gas pressure of 25 mTorr, and an external capacitance of 16.45 nF, the maximum measured current was 900 A. The discharge current increased with the increase in the pressure and capacitance, while its periodic time decreased with the increase in the pressure. Two types of the discharge were identified and recorded: the hollow cathode discharge and the conduction discharge. A Faraday cup was used to measure the beam current. The maximum measured beam current was 120 A, and the beam signal exhibited two peaks. The increase in both the external capacitance and the applied discharge voltage increased the maximum electron beam current. The electron-beam pulse time decreased with the increase in the gas pressure at a constant voltage and increased with the decrease in the applied discharge voltage. At an applied voltage of 11 kV and an oxygen gas pressure of 15 mTorr, the maximum beam energy was 2.8 keV. The X-ray signal intensity decreased with the increase in the gas pressure and increased with the increase in the capacitance.

  11. Generation of a pulsed low-energy electron beam using the channel spark device.

    PubMed

    Elgarhy, M A I; Hassaballa, S E; Rashed, U M; ElSabbagh, M M; Soliman, H M; Saudy, A H

    2015-12-01

    For the generation of low-energy electron beam, the design and characteristics of channel spark discharge (CSD) operating at a low voltage are presented in this paper. The discharge voltage, discharge current, X-ray emissions, and electron beam current were experimentally determined. The effects of the applied voltage, working gas pressure, and external capacitance on the CSD and beam parameters were measured. At an applied voltage of 11 kV, an oxygen gas pressure of 25 mTorr, and an external capacitance of 16.45 nF, the maximum measured current was 900 A. The discharge current increased with the increase in the pressure and capacitance, while its periodic time decreased with the increase in the pressure. Two types of the discharge were identified and recorded: the hollow cathode discharge and the conduction discharge. A Faraday cup was used to measure the beam current. The maximum measured beam current was 120 A, and the beam signal exhibited two peaks. The increase in both the external capacitance and the applied discharge voltage increased the maximum electron beam current. The electron-beam pulse time decreased with the increase in the gas pressure at a constant voltage and increased with the decrease in the applied discharge voltage. At an applied voltage of 11 kV and an oxygen gas pressure of 15 mTorr, the maximum beam energy was 2.8 keV. The X-ray signal intensity decreased with the increase in the gas pressure and increased with the increase in the capacitance.

  12. Transport of intense proton beam in the presence of subdominant species in a low energy beam transport system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babu, P. Sing; Goswami, A.; Pandit, V. S.

    2016-04-01

    The dynamics of space-charge-dominated low energy proton beam in the presence of H2+ and H3+ beams has been studied in a solenoid based transport system using particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation method. Multispecies envelope equation and random search technique have been used to transport and match the primary beam considering two options. The PIC simulation shows the formation of hollow distribution of H2+ and H3+ beams around the proton beam in the first case where the waist of the proton beam is formed in between the solenoids and it is absent in the second case where the beam size is kept large in between the solenoids. Separation of hollow distribution appears more distinct as the proton fraction is increased and is almost independent of the combination of H2+ and H3+ beams for a given proton fraction. This effect helps to reject the unwanted species more effectively. The evolution of rms size and emittance of the proton beam has been studied in the presence of a circular aperture using KV and Gaussian distributions for the species in both the cases.

  13. Dosimetric properties of radiophotoluminescent glass detector in low-energy photon beams.

    PubMed

    Kadoya, Noriyuki; Shimomura, Kouhei; Kitou, Satoshi; Shiota, Yasuo; Fujita, Yukio; Dobashi, Suguru; Takeda, Ken; Jingu, Keiichi; Matsushita, Haruo; Namito, Yoshihito; Ban, Syuichi; Koyama, Syuji; Tabushi, Katsuyoshi

    2012-10-01

    A radiophotoluminescent glass rod dosimeter (RGD) has recently become commercially available. It is being increasingly used for dosimetry in radiotherapy to measure the absorbed dose including scattered low-energy photons on the body surface of a patient and for postal dosimetry audit. In this article, the dosimetric properties of the RGD, including energy dependence of the dose response, reproducibly, variation in data obtained by the RGD for each energy, and angular dependence in low-energy photons, are discussed. An RGD (GD-301, Asahi Techno Glass Corporation, Shizuoka, Japan) was irradiated with monochromatic low-energy photon beams generated by synchrotron radiation at Photon Factory, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK). The size of GD-301 was 1.5 mm in diameter and 8.5 mm in length and the active dose readout volume being 1 mm diameter and 0.6 mm depth located 0.7 mm from the end of the detector. The energy dependence of the dose response and reproducibility and variation were investigated for RGDs irradiated with a plastic holder and those irradiated without the plastic holder. Response of the RGD was obtained by not only conventional single field irradiation but also bilateral irradiation. Angular dependence of the RGD was measured in the range of 0°-90° for 13, 17, 40, and 80 keV photon beams by conventional single field irradiation. The dose responses had a peak at around 40 keV. For the energy range of less than 25 keV, all dose response curves steeply decreased in comparison with the ratio of mass energy absorption coefficient of the RGD to that of air. As for the reproducibility and variation in data obtained by the RGD, the coefficient of variance increased with decrease in photon energy. Furthermore, the variation for bilateral irradiation was less than that for single field irradiation. Regarding angular dependence of the RGD, for energies of 13 and 17 keV, the response decreased with increase in the irradiation angle, and the

  14. Improved design of proton source and low energy beam transport line for European Spallation Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neri, L.; Celona, L.; Gammino, S.; Mascali, D.; Castro, G.; Torrisi, G.; Cheymol, B.; Ponton, A.; Galatà, A.; Patti, G.; Gozzo, A.; Lega, L.; Ciavola, G.

    2014-02-01

    The design update of the European Spallation Source (ESS) accelerator is almost complete and the construction of the prototype of the microwave discharge ion source able to provide a proton beam current larger than 70 mA to the 3.6 MeV Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) started. The source named PS-ESS (Proton Source for ESS) was designed with a flexible magnetic system and an extraction system able to merge conservative solutions with significant advances. The ESS injector has taken advantage of recent theoretical updates and new plasma diagnostics tools developed at INFN-LNS (Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare). The design strategy considers the PS-ESS and the low energy beam transport line as a whole, where the proton beam behaves like an almost neutralized non-thermalized plasma. Innovative solutions have been used as hereinafter described. Thermo-mechanical optimization has been performed to withstand the chopped beam and the misaligned focused beam over the RFQ input collimator; the results are reported here.

  15. Improved design of proton source and low energy beam transport line for European Spallation Source

    SciTech Connect

    Neri, L. Celona, L.; Gammino, S.; Mascali, D.; Castro, G.; Ciavola, G.; Torrisi, G.; Cheymol, B.; Ponton, A.; Galatà, A.; Patti, G.; Gozzo, A.; Lega, L.

    2014-02-15

    The design update of the European Spallation Source (ESS) accelerator is almost complete and the construction of the prototype of the microwave discharge ion source able to provide a proton beam current larger than 70 mA to the 3.6 MeV Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) started. The source named PS-ESS (Proton Source for ESS) was designed with a flexible magnetic system and an extraction system able to merge conservative solutions with significant advances. The ESS injector has taken advantage of recent theoretical updates and new plasma diagnostics tools developed at INFN-LNS (Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare). The design strategy considers the PS-ESS and the low energy beam transport line as a whole, where the proton beam behaves like an almost neutralized non-thermalized plasma. Innovative solutions have been used as hereinafter described. Thermo-mechanical optimization has been performed to withstand the chopped beam and the misaligned focused beam over the RFQ input collimator; the results are reported here.

  16. Improved design of proton source and low energy beam transport line for European Spallation Source.

    PubMed

    Neri, L; Celona, L; Gammino, S; Mascali, D; Castro, G; Torrisi, G; Cheymol, B; Ponton, A; Galatà, A; Patti, G; Gozzo, A; Lega, L; Ciavola, G

    2014-02-01

    The design update of the European Spallation Source (ESS) accelerator is almost complete and the construction of the prototype of the microwave discharge ion source able to provide a proton beam current larger than 70 mA to the 3.6 MeV Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) started. The source named PS-ESS (Proton Source for ESS) was designed with a flexible magnetic system and an extraction system able to merge conservative solutions with significant advances. The ESS injector has taken advantage of recent theoretical updates and new plasma diagnostics tools developed at INFN-LNS (Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare). The design strategy considers the PS-ESS and the low energy beam transport line as a whole, where the proton beam behaves like an almost neutralized non-thermalized plasma. Innovative solutions have been used as hereinafter described. Thermo-mechanical optimization has been performed to withstand the chopped beam and the misaligned focused beam over the RFQ input collimator; the results are reported here.

  17. Present and future experiments using bright low-energy positron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hugenschmidt, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    Bright slow positron beams enable not only experiments with drastically reduced measurement time and improved signal-to-noise ratio but also the realization of novel experimental techniques. In solid state physics and materials science positron beams are usually applied for the depth dependent analysis of vacancy-like defects and their chemical surrounding using positron lifetime and (coincident) Doppler broadening spectroscopy. For surface studies, annihilation induced Auger-electron spectroscopy allows the analysis of the elemental composition in the topmost atomic layer, and the atomic positions at the surface can be determined by positron diffraction with outstanding accuracy. In fundamental research low-energy positron beams are used for the production of e.g. cold positronium or positronium negative ions. All the aforementioned experiments benefit from the high intensity of present positron beam facilities. In this paper, we scrutinize the technical constraints limiting the achievable positron intensity and the available kinetic energy at the sample position. Current efforts and future developments towards the generation of high intensity spin-polarized slow positron beams paving the way for new positron experiments are discussed.

  18. Low energy proton beam induces tumor cell apoptosis through reactive oxygen species and activation of caspases

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kheun Byeol; Lee, Jong-Soo; Park, Jin-Woo; Huh, Tae-Lin

    2008-01-01

    Proton beam is useful to target tumor tissue sparing normal cells by allowing precise dose only into tumor cells. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which proton beam induces tumor cell death are still undefined. We irradiated three different tumor cells (LLC, HepG2, and Molt-4) with low energy proton beam (35 MeV) with spread out Bragg peak (SOBP) in vitro, and investigated cell death by MTT or CCK-8 assay at 24 h after irradiation. LLC and HepG2 cells were sensitive to proton beam at over 10 Gy to induce apoptosis whereas Molt-4 showed rather low sensitivity. Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values for the death rate relative to γ-ray were ranged from 1.1 to 2.3 in LLC and HepG2 but from 0.3 to 0.7 in Molt-4 at 11 d after irradiation by colony formation assay. The typical apoptotic nuclear DNA morphological pattern was observed by staining with 4'-6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI). Tiny fragmented DNA was observed in HepG2 but not in Molt-4 by the treatment of proton in apoptotic DNA fragment assay. By FACS analysis after stained with FITC-Annexin-V, early as well as median apoptotic fractions were clearly increased by proton treatment. Proton beam-irradiated tumor cells induced a cleavage of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) and procaspases-3 and -9. Activity of caspases was highly enhanced after proton beam irradiation. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) were significantly increased and N-acetyl cysteine pretreatment restored the apoptotic cell death induced by proton beam. Furthermore, p38 and JNK but not ERK were activated by proton and dominant negative mutants of p38 and JNK revived proton-induced apoptosis, suggesting that p38 and JNK pathway may be activated through ROS to activate apoptosis. In conclusion, our data clearly showed that single treatment of low energy proton beam with SOBP increased ROS and induced cell death of solid tumor cells (LLC and HepG2) in an apoptotic cell death program by the induction of caspases

  19. Reconstructing supernova-neutrino spectra using low-energy beta beams.

    PubMed

    Jachowicz, N; McLaughlin, G C

    2006-05-05

    Neutrinos are the principal messengers reaching us from the center of a supernova. Terrestrial neutrino telescopes can provide precious information about the processes in the core of the star. But the information that a neutrino detector can supply is restricted by the fact that little experimental data on the neutrino-nucleus cross sections exist and by the uncertainties in theoretical calculations. In this Letter, we propose a novel procedure that determines the response of a target nucleus in a supernova-neutrino detector, by using low-energy beta beams. We show that fitting "synthetic" spectra, constructed by taking linear combinations of beta-beam spectra, to the original supernova-neutrino spectra reproduces the folded differential cross sections very accurately. Comparing the response in a detector to these synthetic responses provides a direct way to determine the main parameters of the supernova-neutrino energy distribution.

  20. Beam dynamics performances and applications of a low-energy electron-beam magnetic bunch compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokop, C. R.; Piot, P.; Carlsten, B. E.; Church, M.

    2013-08-01

    Many front-end applications of electron linear accelerators rely on the production of temporally compressed bunches. The shortening of electron bunches is often realized with magnetic bunch compressors located in high-energy sections of accelerators. Magnetic compression is subject to collective effects including space charge and self interaction via coherent synchrotron radiation. In this paper we explore the application of magnetic compression to low-energy (˜40 MeV), high-charge (nC) electron bunches with low normalized transverse emittances (<5 μm).

  1. The water equivalence of solid phantoms for low energy photon beams

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, Robin; Kuncic, Zdenka; Baldock, Clive

    2010-08-15

    Purpose: To compare and evaluate the dosimetric water equivalence of several commonly used solid phantoms for low energy photon beams. Methods: A total of ten different solid phantom materials was used in the study. The PENELOPE Monte Carlo code was used to calculate depth doses and beam profiles in all the phantom materials as well as the dose to a small water voxel at the surface of the solid phantom. These doses were compared to the corresponding doses calculated in a water phantom. The primary photon beams used ranged in energy from 50 to 280 kVp. Results: A number of phantom materials had excellent agreement in dose compared to water for all the x-ray beam energies studied. RMI457 Solid Water, Virtual Water, PAGAT, A150, and Plastic Water DT all had depth doses that agreed with those in water to within 2%. For these same phantom materials, the dose changes in the water voxel at the surface of the solid phantom were within 2%, except for A150, which agreed to within 2.7%. By comparison, the largest differences in depth doses occurred for Plastic Water (-21.7%) and polystyrene (17.6%) for the 50 kVp energy photon beam and 8 cm diameter field size. Plastic Water gave the largest difference in the normalized beam profiles with differences of up to 3.5% as compared to water. Surface dose changes, due to the presence of the solid phantom acting as the backscatter material, were found to be up to 9.1% for polystyrene with significant differences also found for Plastic Water, PMMA, and RW3 phantoms. Conclusions: The following solid phantoms can be considered water equivalent and are recommended for relative dosimetry of low energy photon beams: A150, PAGAT, Plastic Water DT, RMI457 Solid Water, and Virtual Water. However, the following solid phantoms give significant differences, compared to water, in depth doses, profiles, and/or in surface doses due to backscatter changes: Plastic Water, PMMA, polystyrene, PRESAGE, and RW3.

  2. Nonlinear and long-term beam dynamics in low energy storage rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papash, A. I.; Smirnov, A. V.; Welsch, C. P.

    2013-06-01

    Electrostatic storage rings operate at very low energies in the keV range and have proven to be invaluable tools for atomic and molecular physics. Because of the mass independence of electric rigidity, these machines are able to store a wide range of different particles, from light ions to heavy singly charged biomolecules, opening up unique research opportunities. However, earlier measurements have shown strong limitations in maximum beam intensity, fast decay of the stored ion current, and reduced beam lifetime. The nature of these effects has not been fully understood and an improved understanding of the physical processes influencing beam motion and stability in such rings is needed. In this paper, a comprehensive study into nonlinear and long-term beam dynamics studies is presented on the examples of a number of existing and planned electrostatic storage rings using the BETACOOL, OPERA-3D, and MAD-X simulation software. A detailed investigation into ion kinetics, under consideration of effects from electron cooling and multiple scattering of the beam on a supersonic gas jet target, is carried out and yields a consistent explanation of the physical effects in a whole class of storage rings. The lifetime, equilibrium momentum spread, and equilibrium lateral spread during collisions with the target are estimated. In addition, the results from experiments at the Test Storage Ring, where a low-intensity beam of CF+ ions at 93keV/u has been shrunk to extremely small dimensions, are reproduced. Based on these simulations, the conditions for stable ring operation with an extremely low-emittance beam are presented. Finally, results from studies into the interaction of 3-30 keV ions with a gas jet target are summarized.

  3. Recent performance of the SNS H- ion source and low-energy beam transport system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockli, Martin P.; Ewald, K. D.; Han, B. X.; Murray, S. N.; Pennisi, T. R.; Piller, C.; Santana, M.; Tang, J.; Welton, R.

    2014-02-01

    Recent measurements of the H- beam current show that SNS is injecting about 55 mA into the RFQ compared to ˜45 mA in 2010. Since 2010, the H- beam exiting the RFQ dropped from ˜40 mA to ˜34 mA, which is sufficient for 1 MW of beam power. To minimize the impact of the RFQ degradation, the service cycle of the best performing source was extended to 6 weeks. The only degradation is fluctuations in the electron dump voltage towards the end of some service cycles, a problem that is being investigated. Very recently, the RFQ was retuned, which partly restored its transmission. In addition, the electrostatic low-energy beam transport system was reengineered to double its heat sinking and equipped with a thermocouple that monitors the temperature of the ground electrode between the two Einzel lenses. The recorded data show that emissions from the source at high voltage dominate the heat load. Emissions from the partly Cs-covered first lens cause the temperature to peak several hours after starting up. On rare occasions, the temperature can also peak due to corona discharges between the center ground electrode and one of the lenses.

  4. Recent performance of the SNS H(-) ion source and low-energy beam transport system.

    PubMed

    Stockli, Martin P; Ewald, K D; Han, B X; Murray, S N; Pennisi, T R; Piller, C; Santana, M; Tang, J; Welton, R

    2014-02-01

    Recent measurements of the H(-) beam current show that SNS is injecting about 55 mA into the RFQ compared to ∼45 mA in 2010. Since 2010, the H(-) beam exiting the RFQ dropped from ∼40 mA to ∼34 mA, which is sufficient for 1 MW of beam power. To minimize the impact of the RFQ degradation, the service cycle of the best performing source was extended to 6 weeks. The only degradation is fluctuations in the electron dump voltage towards the end of some service cycles, a problem that is being investigated. Very recently, the RFQ was retuned, which partly restored its transmission. In addition, the electrostatic low-energy beam transport system was reengineered to double its heat sinking and equipped with a thermocouple that monitors the temperature of the ground electrode between the two Einzel lenses. The recorded data show that emissions from the source at high voltage dominate the heat load. Emissions from the partly Cs-covered first lens cause the temperature to peak several hours after starting up. On rare occasions, the temperature can also peak due to corona discharges between the center ground electrode and one of the lenses.

  5. Recent Performance of the SNS H- ion source and low-energy beam transport system

    SciTech Connect

    Stockli, Martin P; Ewald, Kerry D; Han, Baoxi; Murray Jr, S N; Pennisi, Terry R; Piller, Chip; Santana, Manuel; Tang, Johnny Y; Welton, Robert F

    2014-01-01

    Recent measurements of the H beam current show that SNS is injecting about 55 mA into the RFQ compared to 45 mA in 2010. Since 2010, the H beam exiting the RFQ dropped from 40 mA to 34 mA, which is sufficient for 1 MW of beam power. To minimize the impact of the RFQ degradation, the service cycle of the best performing source was extended to 6 weeks. The only degradation is fluctuations in the electron dump voltage towards the end of some service cycles, a problem that is being investigated. Very recently, the RFQ was retuned, which partly restored its transmission. In addition, the electrostatic low-energy beam transport system was reengineered to double its heat sinking and equipped with a thermocouple that monitors the temperature of the ground electrode between the two Einzel lenses. The recorded data show that emissions from the source at high voltage dominate the heat load. Emissions from the partly Cs-covered first lens cause the temperature to peak several hours after starting up. On rare occasions, the temperature can also peak due to corona discharges between the center ground electrode and one of the lenses.

  6. Graphene treatment using a very low energy Ar+ ion beam for residue removal.

    PubMed

    Min, Kyoung Seok; Kim, Ki Seok; Kim, Kyoung Nam; Mishra, Anurag; Yeom, Geun Young

    2014-12-01

    The effect of Ar+ ion energy on the removal of the polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) residue remaining on the chemical vapor deposited (CVD) graphene surface without damaging the graphene surface was investigated. Stable and low energy Ar+ ion beams having a mono-energetic energy distribution with a peak energy of 7.5 eV or 11.5 eV could be formed by using a two-grid magnetically enhanced ICP ion gun with and without the application of 25 Gauss axial magnetic field, respectively, while controlling the Ar gas flow rate. When the CVD graphene treatment was performed with the Ar+ ions having the ion energy peak at 7.5 eV (with the magnetic field) and 11.5 eV (without the magnetic field), the blue shift of Raman G peak from p-type doped to intrinsic graphene indicating the removal of residue on the graphene surface could be observed for both conditions, however, the graphene treated at 11.5 eV (without the magnetic field) showed the increase of the defect while that treated at 7.5 eV (with the magnetic field) showed no significant change of the defect. It is believed that, for the treatment of CVD graphene, possibly due to the low binding energy area such as grain boundaries and domains in the CVD graphene, low energy ions with less than the energy of 10 eV is required not to damage the graphene surface, and a magnetically enhanced ICP ion gun which can provide stable and low energy Ar+ ions with a mono-energetic ion energy distribution with a peak of 7.5 eV can be applicable to the residue removal on the graphene surface.

  7. Characterization of hydrogen binding to tungsten and beryllium surfaces using low energy ion beam analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolasinski, Robert; Whaley, Josh

    2015-11-01

    In this study, we use low energy ion beam analysis to determine how hydrogen interacts with tungsten and beryllium surfaces. The goal of this work is to provide insight into processes that contribute to recycling from plasma-facing surfaces in magnetic fusion devices. Here we have applied low energy ion scattering (LEIS) to enable detection of adsorbed hydrogen at sub-monolayer resolution and to provide isotopic sensitivity. We probe the surfaces of interest with He + and Ne + at energies less than 5 keV to determine the structure and composition of the first few atomic layers. This approach enables us to examine how hydrogen surface concentrations evolve in real time, providing insight into adsorption kinetics. In addition, we have developed a means of determining the hydrogen binding configuration at different temperatures by exploiting mechanisms of ion channeling along surfaces. Using these methods, we have been able to identify hydrogen binding configurations for the W(100) +H, W(110) +H, and Be(0001) +H adsorption systems. We also report on our efforts to more accurately and efficiently model atomic collisions during scattering, key steps needed to extract structural information from LEIS signals. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. DOE's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  8. Destructive and constructive routes to prepare nanostructures on surfaces by low-energy ion beam sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauschenbach, Bernd; Frost, Frank

    2016-10-01

    Various approaches for the preparation of nanostructures with dimension on macroscopic areas are known. In contrast to cost-intensive top-down lithographic techniques, various bottom-up methods based on ion beam technologies to form large arrays of nanostructured surfaces are well established. In principle, it can be distinguished between two routes at the preparation of nanostructures by low-energy ion bombardment sputtering. The destructive route is characterized that under certain conditions, given by the self-organization processes, the ion beam induced erosion process can lead to the formation of e.g. well-ordered Si nanostructures like dots or ripples on the surface. Using a constructive route, i.e. glancing angle deposition by ion beam sputtering, sculptured thin films consisting of various nanostructures of several shapes, such as inclined and vertical columns, screws, and spirals, were deposited on Si substrates. It will be shown that morphology, shape, and diameter of the structures are influenced and can thus be controlled by adjusting various deposition parameters, including substrate temperature and ratio of substrate rotational speed to film deposition rate.

  9. Nanopatterning of optical surfaces during low-energy ion beam sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Wenlin; Dai, Yifan; Xie, Xuhui

    2014-06-01

    Ion beam figuring (IBF) provides a highly deterministic method for high-precision optical surface fabrication, whereas ion-induced microscopic morphology evolution would occur on surfaces. Consequently, the fabrication specification for surface smoothness must be seriously considered during the IBF process. In this work, low-energy ion nanopatterning of our frequently used optical material surfaces is investigated to discuss the manufacturability of an ultrasmooth surface. The research results indicate that ion beam sputtering (IBS) can directly smooth some amorphous or amorphizable material surfaces, such as fused silica, Si, and ULE under appropriate processing conditions. However, for IBS of a Zerodur surface, preferential sputtering together with curvature-dependent sputtering overcome ion-induced smoothing mechanisms, leading to the granular nanopatterns' formation and the coarsening of the surface. Furthermore, the material property difference at microscopic scales and the continuous impurity incorporation would affect the ion beam smoothing of optical surfaces. Overall, IBS can be used as a promising technique for ultrasmooth surface fabrication, which strongly depends on processing conditions and material characters.

  10. Evaluation of low energy electron beam dose application by means of a portable optical device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reitzig, Manuela; Winkler, Martin; Härtling, Thomas; Röder, Olaf; Opitz, Jörg

    2014-11-01

    We present our recent development concerning the evaluation of a low energy dose application to electron beam responding materials with a simple portable optical device. Electron beam irradiation is a promising option to sterilize sensitive and high performance products or surfaces at a low temperature and without moisture. Especially in the fields of the food industry and medicine, regulations regarding sterility are increasingly tightened. Because of this, a secure proof for electron-beam-assisted sterilization is required. However, no nondestructive and in situ method exists up until now. Our approach to provide a secure proof of sterilization is to place a suitable marker material based on rare-earth-doped phosphors inside or on the top of the packaging material of the respective product. Upon electron irradiation the marker material changes its luminescence properties as a function of the applied energy dose. We verified the energy dependence by means of time-resolved measurements of the luminescence decay of an upconversion phosphor with a portable optical device. In our experimental realization, short laser pulses in the near-infrared range are triggered by a microcontrol unit (MCU) and excite the marker material. The light emitted by the marker is collected in the range between 400 and 1100 nm via a silicon photodiode, processed by the MCU, and analyzed in a Labview program via a single-exponential fit. As a main result, we observe an increasing reduction of the luminescence lifetime with higher dose applications.

  11. Correlation measurements in nuclear {beta}-decay using traps and polarized low energy beams

    SciTech Connect

    Naviliat-Cuncic, Oscar

    2013-05-06

    Precision measurements in nuclear {beta}-decay provide sensitive means to test discrete symmetries in the weak interaction and to determine some of the fundamental constants in semi-leptonic decays, like the coupling of the lightest quarks to charged weak bosons. The main motivation of such measurements is to find deviations from Standard Model predictions as possible indications of new physics. In this contribution I will focus on two topics related to precision measurements in nuclear {beta}-decay: i) the determination of the V{sub ud} element of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa quark mixing matrix from nuclear mirror transitions and ii) the search for exotic scalar or tensor contributions from {beta}{nu} angular correlations. The purpose is to underline the role being played by experimental techniques based on the confinement of radioactive species with atom and ion traps as well as the plans to use low energy polarized beams.

  12. Development of a low-energy radioactive ion beam facility for the MARA separator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadakis, Philippos; Moore, Iain; Pohjalainen, Ilkka; Sarén, Jan; Uusitalo, Juha

    2016-12-01

    A low-energy radioactive ion beam facility for the production and study of nuclei produced close to the proton drip line is under development at the Accelerator Laboratory of the University of Jyväskylä, Finland. The facility will take advantage of the mass selectivity of the recently commissioned MARA vacuum-mode mass separator. The ions selected by MARA will be stopped and thermalised in a small-volume gas cell prior to extraction and further mass separation. The gas cell design allows for resonance laser ionisation/spectroscopy both in-gas-cell and in-gas-jet. The facility will include experimental setups allowing ion counting, mass measurement and decay spectroscopy.

  13. Tailoring interfacial exchange coupling with low-energy ion beam bombardment: Tuning the interface roughness

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, K.-W.; Shueh, C.; Huang, H.-R.; Hsu, H.-F.; Mirza, M.; Lierop, J. van

    2012-03-19

    By ascertaining NiO surface roughness in a Ni{sub 80}Fe{sub 20}/NiO film system, we were able to correlate the effects of altered interface roughness from low-energy ion-beam bombardment of the NiO layer and the different thermal instabilities in the NiO nanocrystallites. From experiment and by modelling the temperature dependence of the exchange bias field and coercivity, we have found that reducing the interface roughness and changing the interface texture from an irregular to striped conformation enhanced the exchange coupling strength. Our results were in good agreement with recent simulations using the domain state model that incorporated interface mixing.

  14. Cluster-assembled Tb-Fe nanostructured films produced by low energy cluster beam deposition.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shifeng; Bi, Feng; Wan, Jian-Guo; Han, Min; Song, Fengqi; Liu, Jun-Ming; Wang, Guanghou

    2007-07-04

    Cluster-assembled Tb-Fe nanostructured films were prepared by the low energy cluster beam deposition method. The microstructure, magnetization and magnetostriction were investigated for the films. It is shown that the film is assembled by monodisperse spherical nanoparticles with average diameter of ∼30 nm which are distributed uniformly. The cluster-assembled Tb-Fe nanostructured films exhibit good magnetization and possess giant magnetostriction with saturation value of ∼1060 × 10(-6), much higher than that of the common Tb-Fe films. The origin of good magnetization and giant magnetostriction for the cluster-assembled Tb-Fe nanostructured film was discussed. The present work opens a new avenue to produce the nanostructured magnetostrictive alloy in application of a nano-electro-mechanical system.

  15. Fluorocarbon thin-film deposition on polymer surfaces from low-energy polyatomic ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijesundara, Muthu Bandage Jayathilaka

    Low energy polyatomic ion deposition is attractive for selective surface modification of advanced materials. Surface modification by fluorocarbon (FC) thin film deposition is widely used for many technological applications. Thus, polymer surface modification by FC thin film deposition was carried out using mass-separated low energy FC ion beams. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy and air/water contact angles were employed to examine how the FC film chemistry, morphology, and long term stability depend on incident ion structure, kinetic energy, and fluence. Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to support experimental data. 25--100 eV CF3+ and C3F 5+ ion deposition on polystyrene (PS) surface was examined. CF3+ and C3F5+ each formed a distribution of different FC functional groups on PS in amounts dependent upon the incident ion energy, structure, and fluence. Both ions deposited mostly intact upon the surface at 25 eV. The total fluorine and fluorinated carbon content were increased with ion energy. The fluorination efficiency was higher for the larger ion. The simulations revealed that the fragmentation behavior depends on the incident ion structure and its energy. The simulations also confirmed that FC ions only penetrated a few angstroms into the surface. The compositional changes of 25--100 eV CF3+ and C3F5+ ion-modified PS surfaces were examined after being exposed to atmosphere for four and eight weeks. The FC films oxidized in atmospheric conditions. Oxygen incorporation into the ion-modified surfaces increased with ion energy due to higher surface bond breakage and active site formation at high collision energy. Overall, the aging process of these ion-deposited films appeared similar to that of plasma-deposited films. Mass-selected 50 eV C3F5+ ion deposition was employed to create chemical gradient thin films on polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) by variation of the ion fluence across the substrate surface. The surface chemistry

  16. Monte Carlo dose calculation improvements for low energy electron beams using eMC.

    PubMed

    Fix, Michael K; Frei, Daniel; Volken, Werner; Neuenschwander, Hans; Born, Ernst J; Manser, Peter

    2010-08-21

    The electron Monte Carlo (eMC) dose calculation algorithm in Eclipse (Varian Medical Systems) is based on the macro MC method and is able to predict dose distributions for high energy electron beams with high accuracy. However, there are limitations for low energy electron beams. This work aims to improve the accuracy of the dose calculation using eMC for 4 and 6 MeV electron beams of Varian linear accelerators. Improvements implemented into the eMC include (1) improved determination of the initial electron energy spectrum by increased resolution of mono-energetic depth dose curves used during beam configuration; (2) inclusion of all the scrapers of the applicator in the beam model; (3) reduction of the maximum size of the sphere to be selected within the macro MC transport when the energy of the incident electron is below certain thresholds. The impact of these changes in eMC is investigated by comparing calculated dose distributions for 4 and 6 MeV electron beams at source to surface distance (SSD) of 100 and 110 cm with applicators ranging from 6 x 6 to 25 x 25 cm(2) of a Varian Clinac 2300C/D with the corresponding measurements. Dose differences between calculated and measured absolute depth dose curves are reduced from 6% to less than 1.5% for both energies and all applicators considered at SSD of 100 cm. Using the original eMC implementation, absolute dose profiles at depths of 1 cm, d(max) and R50 in water lead to dose differences of up to 8% for applicators larger than 15 x 15 cm(2) at SSD 100 cm. Those differences are now reduced to less than 2% for all dose profiles investigated when the improved version of eMC is used. At SSD of 110 cm the dose difference for the original eMC version is even more pronounced and can be larger than 10%. Those differences are reduced to within 2% or 2 mm with the improved version of eMC. In this work several enhancements were made in the eMC algorithm leading to significant improvements in the accuracy of the dose

  17. A Monochromatic, Aberration-Corrected, Dual-Beam Low Energy Electron Microscope

    PubMed Central

    Mankos, Marian; Shadman, Khashayar

    2013-01-01

    The monochromatic, aberration-corrected, dual-beam low energy electron microscope (MAD-LEEM) is a novel instrument aimed at imaging of nanostructures and surfaces at sub-nanometer resolution that includes a monochromator, aberration corrector and dual beam illumination. The monochromator reduces the energy spread of the illuminating electron beam, which significantly improves spectroscopic and spatial resolution. The aberration corrector utilizes an electron mirror with negative aberrations that can be used to compensate the aberrations of the LEEM objective lens for a range of electron energies. Dual flood illumination eliminates charging generated when a conventional LEEM is used to image insulating specimens. MAD-LEEM is designed for the purpose of imaging biological and insulating specimens, which are difficult to image with conventional LEEM, Low-Voltage SEM, and TEM instruments. The MAD-LEEM instrument can also be used as a general purpose LEEM with significantly improved resolution. The low impact energy of the electrons is critical for avoiding beam damage, as high energy electrons with keV kinetic energies used in SEMs and TEMs cause irreversible change to many specimens, in particular biological materials. A potential application for MAD-LEEM is in DNA sequencing, which demands imaging techniques that enable DNA sequencing at high resolution and speed, and at low cost. The key advantages of the MAD-LEEM approach for this application are the low electron impact energies, the long read lengths, and the absence of heavy-atom DNA labeling. Image contrast simulations of the detectability of individual nucleotides in a DNA strand have been developed in order to refine the optics blur and DNA base contrast requirements for this application. PMID:23582636

  18. Model of convection mass transfer in titanium alloy at low energy high current electron beam action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarychev, V. D.; Granovskii, A. Yu; Nevskii, S. A.; Konovalov, S. V.; Gromov, V. E.

    2017-01-01

    The convection mixing model is proposed for low-energy high-current electron beam treatment of titanium alloys, pre-processed by heterogeneous plasma flows generated via explosion of carbon tape and powder TiB2. The model is based on the assumption vortices in the molten layer are formed due to the treatment by concentrated energy flows. These vortices evolve as the result of thermocapillary convection, arising because of the temperature gradient. The calculation of temperature gradient and penetration depth required solution of the heat problem with taking into account the surface evaporation. However, instead of the direct heat source the boundary conditions in phase transitions were changed in the thermal conductivity equation, assuming the evaporated material takes part in the heat exchange. The data on the penetration depth and temperature distribution are used for the thermocapillary model. The thermocapillary model embraces Navier-Stocks and convection heat transfer equations, as well as the boundary conditions with the outflow of evaporated material included. The solution of these equations by finite elements methods pointed at formation of a multi-vortices structure when electron-beam treatment and its expansion over new zones of material. As the result, strengthening particles are found at the depth exceeding manifold their penetration depth in terms of the diffusion mechanism.

  19. Effect of low energy ion beam irradiation on wettability of narra ( Pterocarpus indicus) wood chips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, Henry J.; Monasterial, Jonathan Lee C.; Blantocas, Gene Q.

    2006-01-01

    Narra (Pterocarpus indicus) wood chips were irradiated with positive hydrogen ions H+ and H2+ to make them hydrophobic. The ions were produced and extracted from a gas discharge ion source. The extracted beam current ranges from 0.01 to 0.07 μA for discharge currents of 1.0-4.0 mA, discharge potential between 600 V and 1000 V. The chips, positioned at 70 mm downstream from the ion source, were processed for different time periods and discharge currents. The wettability was characterized by the contact angle of the liquid droplet with respect to the wood surface. Surface modifications were assessed with by measurements of the water contact angle. Tests indicate retarded absorption characteristics for ion-irradiated samples compared to controlled samples. The longest absorptive inhibition were exhibited by samples irradiated for 30 min, at discharge current of 1.0 mA, 720 eV ion energy and 0 V extraction potential. Scanning electron micrographs reveal the difference in morphologies of treated and untreated samples. The results prove that low energy beams of hydrogen from a gas discharge ion source are suitable in transforming surfaces of wood chips to be water resistant.

  20. Enhanced supercapacitance behaviour of low energy ion beam reduced graphene oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hareesh, K.; Shateesh, B.; Williams, J. F.; Asokan, K.; Phase, D. M.; Priya Madhuri, K.; Haram, S. K.; Dhole, S. D.

    2017-06-01

    This work reports the reduction of graphene oxide (GO) by low energy ions viz. 100 keV H+, 350 keV N+ and 200 keV Ar+ ions with fluences ranging from 5  ×  1013 to 1  ×  1015 ions cm-2. The x-ray diffractogram peak of GO decreased with increase in fluence and a broad peak around 25° appeared corresponding to reduced graphene oxide (rGO). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic results showed the decrease in intensity of oxygen functional groups of GO confirming the reduction of GO which is further corroborated by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopic results. The ratio of D to G band increased with increase in fluence indicating the increase in disorder and formation of a large number of small sp2 domains. The work function was increased for low energy ion beam irradiated GO suggesting the storage of more charges. The irradiated GO showed enhanced supercapacitance behaviour with specific capacitance of rGO of 180, 195 and 202 F g-1 (scan rate 100 mV s-1) at a fluence 1  ×  1015 ions cm-2 for H+, N+ and Ar+ ions respectively. During irradiation, the ions might have deposited energy through electronic and nuclear energy loss results in the removal of oxygen functional groups from GO and enhancement in supercapacitance performance of rGO. It is also observed that GO irradiated by Ar ions showed more specific capacitance due to larger electronic energy loss than that of other ions.

  1. Poster — Thur Eve — 22: A water calorimeter for low-energy particle beams

    SciTech Connect

    Renaud, J; Sarfehnia, A; Seuntjens, J; Rossomme, S; Vynckier, S

    2014-08-15

    In this work, the feasibility of absolute dose to water measurements in low-energy electron beams using a water calorimeter specifically developed for shallow measurements is established. The calorimeter design consists of a cylindrical glass vessel encased in a block of expanded polystyrene. The vessel has a front window thickness of 1.1 mm, a 4 cm radius, and is 2.5 cm in depth. The vessel-block assembly sits inside a thermally-insulated box and is air-cooled to an operating temperature of 4 °C. Radiation-induced thermal gradients were simulated in a geometric model of the calorimeter using a finite element analysis software package. 52 absorbed dose to water measurements were performed in a 6 and 8 MeV electron beam (z{sub max} of 1.32 and 1.76 cm, respectively) for 60 seconds at a repetition rate of 400 MU/min and an SSD of 120 cm. Within the vessel, the depth of measurement was set to 1.08 cm relative to the inner front window. The average measured dose to water was 59.6 ± 0.2 cGy/100 MU (6 MeV), and 63.7 ± 0.3 cGy/100 MU (8 MeV). The associated heat transfer corrections were determined to be 1.026 ± 0.003 and 1.017 ± 0.004 for the 6 and 8 MeV beams, respectively. The most significant source of uncertainty in this study was the repeatability (type A, 0.42%). It is expected that performing fewer consecutive measurements under higher dose rate conditions will improve the stability of the thermal background, thereby improving the repeatability and reducing the overall standard uncertainty.

  2. Optical transition radiation used in the diagnostic of low energy and low current electron beams in particle accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, T. F.; Bonini, A. L.; Lima, R. R.; Maidana, N. L.; Malafronte, A. A.; Pascholati, P. R.; Vanin, V. R.; Martins, M. N.

    2012-09-01

    Optical transition radiation (OTR) plays an important role in beam diagnostics for high energy particle accelerators. Its linear intensity with beam current is a great advantage as compared to fluorescent screens, which are subject to saturation. Moreover, the measurement of the angular distribution of the emitted radiation enables the determination of many beam parameters in a single observation point. However, few works deals with the application of OTR to monitor low energy beams. In this work we describe the design of an OTR based beam monitor used to measure the transverse beam charge distribution of the 1.9-MeV electron beam of the linac injector of the IFUSP microtron using a standard vision machine camera. The average beam current in pulsed operation mode is of the order of tens of nano-Amps. Low energy and low beam current make OTR observation difficult. To improve sensitivity, the beam incidence angle on the target was chosen to maximize the photon flux in the camera field-of-view. Measurements that assess OTR observation (linearity with beam current, polarization, and spectrum shape) are presented, as well as a typical 1.9-MeV electron beam charge distribution obtained from OTR. Some aspects of emittance measurement using this device are also discussed.

  3. Optical transition radiation used in the diagnostic of low energy and low current electron beams in particle accelerators.

    PubMed

    Silva, T F; Bonini, A L; Lima, R R; Maidana, N L; Malafronte, A A; Pascholati, P R; Vanin, V R; Martins, M N

    2012-09-01

    Optical transition radiation (OTR) plays an important role in beam diagnostics for high energy particle accelerators. Its linear intensity with beam current is a great advantage as compared to fluorescent screens, which are subject to saturation. Moreover, the measurement of the angular distribution of the emitted radiation enables the determination of many beam parameters in a single observation point. However, few works deals with the application of OTR to monitor low energy beams. In this work we describe the design of an OTR based beam monitor used to measure the transverse beam charge distribution of the 1.9-MeV electron beam of the linac injector of the IFUSP microtron using a standard vision machine camera. The average beam current in pulsed operation mode is of the order of tens of nano-Amps. Low energy and low beam current make OTR observation difficult. To improve sensitivity, the beam incidence angle on the target was chosen to maximize the photon flux in the camera field-of-view. Measurements that assess OTR observation (linearity with beam current, polarization, and spectrum shape) are presented, as well as a typical 1.9-MeV electron beam charge distribution obtained from OTR. Some aspects of emittance measurement using this device are also discussed.

  4. Production of drip-line nuclei at RIKEN RI Beam Factory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Atsumi

    2014-09-01

    Production cross-sections and secondary-beam yields of very neutron rich nuclei near neutron drip-line at 200--250 MeV/u have been investigated at RIKEN RI Beam Factory (RIBF). RIBF is the next generation RI beam facility, which can produce a variety of exotic nuclei with high intensity. The measurement of production yields of 19B, 22C, which are located on the neutron drip-line, and neighboring isotopes was made on the occasion of the Coulomb and nuclear breakup experiments of these halo nuclei at SAMURAI (Superconducting Analyzer for MUlti-particle from RAdioIsotope beams) facility at RIBF. We used 345 MeV/u 48Ca beam as primary beam, which impinged on 30 mm-thick Be target, to obtain secondary beams by projectile fragmentation. The projectile fragments were then separated through Superconducting RI beam separator BigRIPS, and were identified by measuring time of flight (TOF), energy loss (ΔE), and magnetic rigidity (Bρ) by the standard detectors at 2nd stage of BigRIPS. We thus obtained production cross-sections and yields of carbon and boron isotopes. The production cross-sections and yields extracted were compared with the simulation code LISE using EPAX. We discuss these results and comparisons in this poster presentation.

  5. RI beam facility project at RIKEN and physics programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueno, H.

    2008-08-01

    In the Radioactive-Isotope Beam Factory (RIBF) project in RIKEN, intense primary beams can be provided at the energies E = 350-400MeV over the whole range of atomic number in the cascade-cyclotron acceleration scheme, for which three cyclotrons, fRC, IRC, and SRC, have been newly constructed. The project proceeds through two phases. In the phase-I program, the superconducting in-flight radioactive-isotope beam separator BigRIPS and the following ZeroDegree spectrometer have been installed as well as the three cyclotrons. In the commissioning, after the successful extraction of a 238U beam from SRC at E = 345 A MeV in the cascade-acceleration scheme, radioactive-isotope beams were produced and isotope-separated with BigRIPS as designed. The RIBF project is fully capitalized in the phase-II program, in which the construction of several experimental key devices has been proposed. The upgrade of the former fragment separator RIPS is also included there. It allow for a scheme to use intense primary beams at the intermediate energy E = 115 A MeV with RIPS. Remarkably, the produced radioactive-isotope beams at this energy can be spin-polarized taking the advantage of the fragmentation-induced spin orientation phenomena.

  6. MO-A-213AB-01: Potential for Focused Low Energy X-Ray Beam for Therapy.

    PubMed

    Abbas, H; Mahato, D; Satti, J; MacDonald, C

    2012-06-01

    Megavoltage photon beams are typically used for therapy because of their skin sparing effect. However, a focused low-energy x-ray beam would also be skin sparing, and would have a higher dose concentration at the focal spot. Such a beam can be produced with polycapillary optics. MCNP5 was used to model dose profiles for a scanned focused beam, using measured beam parameters. The potential of low energy focused x-ray beams for radiation therapy was assessed. A polycapillary optic was used to focus the x-ray beam from a tungsten source. The optic was characterized and measurements were performed at 50 KV. PMMA blocks of varying thicknesses were placed between optic and the focal spot to observe any variation in the focusing of the beam after passing through the tissue-equivalent material. The measured energy spectrum was used to model the focused beam in MCNP5. A source card (SDEF) in MCNP5 was used to simulate the converging x-ray beam. Dose calculations were performed inside a breast tissue phantom. The measured focal spot size for the polycapillary optic was 0.2 mm with a depth of field of 5 mm. Focusing was found to remain unchanged through 40 mm of phantom thickness. The calculated depth dose curve inside the breast tissue showed a dose peak several centimeters below the skin with a sharp dose fall off around the focus. The percent dose falls below 10% within 5 mm of the focus. Rotating the optic during scanning preserves the skin-sparing effect of the focused beam. Low energy focused x-ray beams could be used to irradiate tumors inside soft tissue within 5 cm of the surface. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  7. Experimental Observations of Nuclear Activity in Deuterated Materials Subjected to a Low-Energy Photon Beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M.; Benyo, Theresa L.; Pines, Vladimir; Pines, Marianna; Forsley, Lawrence P.; Westmeyer, Paul A.; Chait, Arnon; Becks, Michael D.; Martin, Richard E.; Hendricks, Robert C.; hide

    2017-01-01

    Exposure of highly deuterated materials to a low-energy (nom. 2 MeV) photon beam resulted in nuclear activity of both the parent metals of hafnium and erbium and a witness material (molybdenum) mixed with the reactants. Gamma spectral analysis of all deuterated materials, ErD2.8+C36D74+Mo and HfD2+C36D74+Mo, showed that nuclear processes had occurred as shown by unique gamma signatures. For the deuterated erbium specimens, posttest gamma spectra showed evidence of radioisotopes of erbium ((163)Er and (171)Er) and of molybdenum ((99)Mo and (101)Mo) and by beta decay, technetium (99mTc and 101Tc). For the deuterated hafnium specimens, posttest gamma spectra showed evidence of radioisotopes of hafnium (180mHf and 181Hf) and molybdenum ((99)Mo and (101)Mo), and by beta decay, technetium ((99m)Tc and (101)Tc). In contrast, when either the hydrogenated or non-gas-loaded erbium or hafnium materials were exposed to the gamma flux, the gamma spectra revealed no new isotopes. Neutron activation materials showed evidence of thermal and epithermal neutrons. CR-39 solid-state nuclear track detectors showed evidence of fast neutrons with energies between 1.4 and 2.5 MeV and several instances of triple tracks, indicating (is) greater than 10 MeV neutrons. Further study is required to determine the mechanism causing the nuclear activity.

  8. Mechanisms for Orientation in Low Energy Ion Beam Assisted TiAlN Thin Film Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliotta, Paul V.

    The effects of off-normal ionized vapor bombardment on the orientation and structure of off-normal sputter deposited TiAlN thin films has been investigated with the goal of better understanding the mechanistic pathways in ion beam assisted thin film growth for better control of film properties during deposition. The effects of incident angle for ion bombardment has been investigated as a potential variable during deposition and a comprehensive comparison to current theories of thin film orientation development has been made. It is shown that for low levels of ion energies and rates, films develop (220) orientation with a near amorphous zone 1 (Z1) morphology for low ion incident angles. As the rates and energies of ions increases, (111) orientation and fibrous transition zone (ZT) morphology develops. It is also seen that as the angle of ion bombardment increases the threshold level for rates and energies of ions to cause (111) orientation and ZT morphologies is reduced. This change in orientation and morphology has been shown to change in-situ according to the level of ion bombardment making this transition a potential tool for developing microstructures within thin films. Commonly accepted theories of thin film orientation have been investigated with respect to the development of (111) orientation for low energy ion beam assisted deposition including surface energy reduction, thermal influences, strain energy reduction, ion channeling, and ion damage anisotropy though such mechanisms were not successful in describing the development of (111) orientation. Atomic subplantation, generally regarded as a mechanism for bond formation in diamond-like carbon films, has also been investigated as a potential mechanism for orientation development. By treating the interaction of ions with the depositing film as a collision between ion and surface atom, the transition from (220) to (111) orientation is found to occur when the average energy transferred per atom normal to the

  9. Characterization of a Gafchromic film for the two-dimensional profile measurement of low-energy heavy-ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuri, Yosuke; Narumi, Kazumasa; Yuyama, Takahiro

    2016-08-01

    The feasibility of the transverse intensity distribution measurement of low-energy (keV/u range) heavy-ion beams using radiochromic films is experimentally explored. We employ a Gafchromic radiochromic film, HD-V2, whose active layer is not laminated by a surface-protection layer. The coloration response of films irradiated with several ion beams is characterized in terms of optical density (OD) by reading the films with a general-purpose scanner. To explore the energy dependence of the film response widely, the kinetic energy of the beams is varied from 1.5 keV/u to 27 MeV/u. We have found that the coloration of HD-V2 films is induced by irradiation with low-energy ion beams of the order of 10 keV/u. The range of the beams is considerably shorter than the thickness of the film's active layer. The dependence of OD response on ion species is also discussed. We demonstrate that the Gafchromic film used here is useful for measuring the intensity distribution of such low-energy ion beams.

  10. Superconducting Ring Cyclotron for Riken RI Beam Factory in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuno, H.; Dantsuka, T.; Yamada, K.; Kase, M.; Maie, T.; Kamigaito, O.

    2010-04-01

    Since 1997, RIKEN Nishina Center has been constructing the Radioactive Isotope Beam Factory (RIBF) and succeeded in beam commissioning of its accelerator complex at the end of 2006. The world's first superconducting ring cyclotron (SRC) is the final booster in the RIBF accelerator complex which is able to accelerate all-element heavy ions to a speed of about 70% of the velocity of light. The ring cyclotron consists of 6 major superconducting sector magnets with a maximum field of 3.8 T. The total stored energy is 235 MJ, and its overall sizes are 19 m diameter, 8 m height and 8,300 tons. The magnet system assembly was completed in August 2005, and successfully reached the maximum field in November 2005. The first beam was extracted at the end of 2006 and the first uranium beam was extracted in March 2007. However operation of the helium refrigerator was not satisfactory although the commissioning of SRC was successful. Operation was stopped every two month due to degradation of its cooling power. In February 2008 the reason of the degradation was revealed to be oil contamination. Operation of the cryogenic system was restarted from August 2008 after hard task to clean up the helium refrigerator and to add oil separators to the compressor. After restoration long-term steady operation to keep the magnet superconducting continued for about 8 months with no sign of degradation of cooling capacity.

  11. RAPD and SSR Polymorphisms in Mutant Lines of Transgenic Wheat Mediated by Low Energy Ion Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tiegu; Huang, Qunce; Feng, Weisen

    2007-10-01

    Two types of markers-random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and simple sequence repeat DNA (SSR)-have been used to characterize the genetic diversity among nine mutant lines of transgenic wheat intermediated by low energy ion beam and their four receptor cultivars. The objectives of this study were to analyze RAPD-based and SSR-based genetic variance among transgenic wheat lines and with their receptors, and to find specific genetic markers of special traits of transgenic wheat lines. 170 RAPD primers were amplified to 733 fragments in all the experimental materials. There were 121 polymorphic fragments out of the 733 fragments with a ratio of polymorphic fragments of 16.5%. 29 SSR primer pairs were amplified to 83 fragments in all the experiment materials. There were 57 polymorphic fragments out of the 83 fragments with a ratio of polymorphic fragments of 68.7%. The dendrograms were prepared based on a genetic distance matrix using the UPGMA (Unweighted Pair-group Method with Arithmetic averaging) algorithm, which corresponded well to the results of the wheat pedigree analysis and separated the 13 genotypes into four groups. Association analysis between RAPD and SSR markers with the special traits of transgenic wheat mutant lines discovered that three RAPD markers, s1, opt-16, and f14, were significantly associated with the muticate trait, while three SSR markers, Rht8 (Xgwm261), Rht-B1b, and Rht-D1b, highly associated with the dwarf trait. These markers will be useful for marker-assistant breeding and can be used as candidate markers for further gene mapping and cloning.

  12. High current density ion beam obtained by a transition to a highly focused state in extremely low-energy region.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Y; Kiyama, S; Fujiwara, Y; Koguchi, H; Sakakita, H

    2015-11-01

    A high current density (≈3 mA/cm(2)) hydrogen ion beam source operating in an extremely low-energy region (E(ib) ≈ 150-200 eV) has been realized by using a transition to a highly focused state, where the beam is extracted from the ion source chamber through three concave electrodes with nominal focal lengths of ≈350 mm. The transition occurs when the beam energy exceeds a threshold value between 145 and 170 eV. Low-level hysteresis is observed in the transition when E(ib) is being reduced. The radial profiles of the ion beam current density and the low temperature ion current density can be obtained separately using a Faraday cup with a grid in front. The measured profiles confirm that more than a half of the extracted beam ions reaches the target plate with a good focusing profile with a full width at half maximum of ≈3 cm. Estimation of the particle balances in beam ions, the slow ions, and the electrons indicates the possibility that the secondary electron emission from the target plate and electron impact ionization of hydrogen may play roles as particle sources in this extremely low-energy beam after the compensation of beam ion space charge.

  13. High current density ion beam obtained by a transition to a highly focused state in extremely low-energy region

    SciTech Connect

    Hirano, Y. E-mail: hirano.yoichi@phys.cst.nihon-u.ac.jp; Kiyama, S.; Koguchi, H.; Fujiwara, Y.; Sakakita, H.

    2015-11-15

    A high current density (≈3 mA/cm{sup 2}) hydrogen ion beam source operating in an extremely low-energy region (E{sub ib} ≈ 150–200 eV) has been realized by using a transition to a highly focused state, where the beam is extracted from the ion source chamber through three concave electrodes with nominal focal lengths of ≈350 mm. The transition occurs when the beam energy exceeds a threshold value between 145 and 170 eV. Low-level hysteresis is observed in the transition when E{sub ib} is being reduced. The radial profiles of the ion beam current density and the low temperature ion current density can be obtained separately using a Faraday cup with a grid in front. The measured profiles confirm that more than a half of the extracted beam ions reaches the target plate with a good focusing profile with a full width at half maximum of ≈3 cm. Estimation of the particle balances in beam ions, the slow ions, and the electrons indicates the possibility that the secondary electron emission from the target plate and electron impact ionization of hydrogen may play roles as particle sources in this extremely low-energy beam after the compensation of beam ion space charge.

  14. Simulation studies of the beam cooling process in presence of heating effects in the Extra Low ENergy Antiproton ring (ELENA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resta-López, J.; Hunt, J. R.; Karamyshev, O.; Welsch, C. P.

    2015-05-01

    The Extra Low ENergy Antiproton ring (ELENA) is a small synchrotron equipped with an electron cooler, which is currently being constructed at CERN to further decelerate antiprotons from the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) from 5.3 MeV to energies as low as 100 keV. At such low energies it is very important to carefully take contributions from electron cooling and beam heating mechanisms (e.g. on the residual gas and intrabeam scattering) into account. Detailed investigations into the ion kinetics under consideration of effects from electron cooling and heating sources have been carried out, and the equilibrium phase space dimensions of the beam have been computed, based on numerical simulations using the code BETACOOL. The goal is to provide a consistent explanation of the different physical effects acting on the beam in ELENA.

  15. Common features of particle beams and x-rays generated in a low energy dense plasma focus device

    SciTech Connect

    Behbahani, R. A.; Xiao, C.

    2015-02-15

    Features of energetic charged particle beams and x-ray emission in a low energy (1–2 kJ) plasma focus (DPF) device are described and the possible mechanism are explained based on circuit analyses and energy balance in the DPF system. In particular, the resistance and the voltage across the plasma column are estimated to explain the mechanisms of the generation of particle beams and hard x-ray. The analysis shows that the total inductance of a DPF might have played a role for enhancement of the particle beams and x-ray emissions during the phase of anomalous resistance.

  16. Simulation studies for operating electron beam ion trap at very low energy for disentangling edge plasma spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Jin Xuelong; Fei Zejie; Xiao Jun; Lu Di; Hutton, Roger; Zou Yaming

    2012-07-15

    Electron beam ion traps (EBITs) are very useful tools for disentanglement studies of atomic processes in plasmas. In order to assist studies on edge plasma spectroscopic diagnostics, a very low energy EBIT, SH-PermEBIT, has been set up at the Shanghai EBIT lab. In this work, simulation studies for factors which hinder an EBIT to operate at very low electron energies were made based on the Tricomp (Field Precision) codes. Longitudinal, transversal, and total kinetic energy distributions were analyzed for all the electron trajectories. Influences from the electron current and electron energy on the energy depression caused by the space charge are discussed. The simulation results show that although the energy depression is most serious along the center of the electron beam, the electrons in the outer part of the beam are more likely to be lost when an EBIT is running at very low energy. Using the simulation results to guide us, we successfully managed to reach the minimum electron beam energy of 60 eV with a beam transmission above 57% for the SH-PermEBIT. Ar and W spectra were measured from the SH-PermEBIT at the apparent electron beam energies (read from the voltage difference between the electron gun cathode and the central drift tube) of 60 eV and 1200 eV, respectively. The spectra are shown in this paper.

  17. Optical and chemical behaviors of CR-39 and Makrofol plastics under low-energy electron beam irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Saftawy, Ashraf Ali; Abd El Aal, Saad Ahmed; Hassan, Nabil Mohamed; Abdelrahman, Moustafa Mohamed

    2016-07-01

    In this study, CR-39 and Makrofol plastic nuclear track detectors were irradiated with low-energy electron beams to study the effect of the induced changes on their optical and chemical properties. Surface chemical changes were recorded by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, which showed successive degradation and crosslinking for CR-39 and decomposition for Makrofol. The optical band gap was determined by UV-vis spectroscopy. Also, the parameters of carbon cluster formation and disordering (Urbach’s energy) occurring on plastic surfaces were examined. The intrinsic viscosity changes were investigated as well. As a result, low-energy electron beams were found to be useful for the control of many properties of the surfaces of the investigated detectors.

  18. A Sensitivity Enhanced MWCNT/PDMS Tactile Sensor Using Micropillars and Low Energy Ar+ Ion Beam Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Syed Azkar Ul; Jung, Youngdo; Kim, Seonggi; Jung, Cho-Long; Oh, Sunjong; Kim, Junhee; Lim, Hyuneui

    2016-01-01

    High sensitive flexible and wearable devices which can detect delicate touches have attracted considerable attentions from researchers for various promising applications. This research was aimed at enhancing the sensitivity of a MWCNT/PDMS piezoresistive tactile sensor through modification of its surface texture in the form of micropillars on MWCNT/PDMS film and subsequent low energy Ar+ ion beam treatment of the micropillars. The introduction of straight micropillars on the MWCNT/PDMS surface increased the sensitivity under gentle touch. Low energy ion beam treatment was performed to induce a stiff layer on the exposed surface of the micropillar structured MWCNT/PDMS film. The low energy ion bombardment stabilized the electrical properties of the MWCNT/PDMS surface and tuned the curvature of micropillars according to the treatment conditions. The straight micropillars which were treated by Ar+ ion with an incident angle of 0° demonstrated the enhanced sensitivity under normal pressure and the curved micropillars which were treated with Ar+ ion with an incident angle of 60° differentiated the direction of an applied shear pressure. The ion beam treatment on micropillar structured MWCNT/PDMS tactile sensors can thus be applied to reliable sensing under gentle touch with directional discrimination. PMID:26771616

  19. The LEM Experiment:. Measurement of Low Energy Spectrum at J-PARC On-Axis Neutrino Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaji, H.

    2013-03-01

    The LEM experiment measures the flux of J-PARC neutrino beam. We newly constructed the neutrino monitor, LEM, and installed at the J-PARC ND280 hall. We measure neutrino flux in the low energy part of on-axis direction. This part of the neutrino beam cannot be measured by any of T2K detectors. Therefore we can help further understandings of the J-PARC neutrino flux. The detailed design of detector is shown. In addition, the status of construction and installation at the ND280 hall is reported.

  20. Research of transportation efficiency of low-energy high- current electron beam in plasma channel in external magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vagin, E. S.; Grigoriev, V. P.

    2015-11-01

    Effective high current (5-20 kA) and low energy (tens of keV) electrons beam transportation is possible only with almost complete charging neutralization. It is also necessary to use quite high current neutralization for elimination beam self-pinching effect. The research is based on the self-consistent mathematical model that takes into account beam and plasma particles dynamic, current and charge neutralization of electron beam and examines the transportation of electron beam into a chamber with low-pressure plasma in magnetic field. A numerical study was conducted using particle in cell (PIC) method. The study was performed with various system parameters: rise time and magnitude of the beam current, gas pressure and plasma density and geometry of the system. Regularities of local virtual cathode field generated by the beam in the plasma channel, as well as ranges of parameters that let transportation beam with minimal losses, depending on the external magnetic field were determined through a series of numerical studies. In addition, the assessment of the impact of the plasma ion mobility during the transition period and during steady beam was performed.

  1. SIMULATION OF A WIDE-BAND LOW-ENERGY NEUTRINO BEAM FOR VERY LONG BASELINE NEUTRINO OSCILLATION EXPERIMENTS.

    SciTech Connect

    BISHAI, M.; HEIM, J.; LEWIS, C.; MARINO, A.D.; VIREN, B.; YUMICEVA, F.

    2006-08-01

    We present simulations of a wide-band low-energy neutrino beam for a future very long baseline neutrino oscillation (VLBNO) program using the proton beam from the Main Injector (MI) proton accelerator at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab). The target and horn designs previously developed for Brookhaven Laboratory's Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) VLBNO program are used without modifications. The neutrino flux distributions for various MI proton beam energies and new high-intensity neutrino beam-line designs possible at Fermilab are presented. The beam-line siting and design parameters are chosen to match the requirements of an on-axis beam from Fermilab to one of the two possible sites for the future Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory (DUSEL). A preliminary estimate of the observable event rates and spectra at a detector located in DUSEL for different beam configurations has been performed. Our preliminary conclusions are that a 40-60 GeV 0.5 to 1 MW beam from the Fermilab Main Injector to a DUSEL site has the potential to reach the desired intensity for the next generation of neutrino oscillation experiments. Recent studies indicate that the Fermilab MI can reach a beam power of 0.5 MW at 60 GeV with incremental upgrades to the existing accelerator complex.

  2. Ion energy distribution functions of low energy beams formed by wire extraction electrodes.

    PubMed

    Tokumura, S; Kasuya, T; Vasquez, M; Maeno, S; Wada, M

    2012-02-01

    The two-electrode extractor system made of 0.1 mm diameter tungsten wires separated by 0.7 mm has formed an argon ion beam with 50 V extraction potential. Energy spreads of the extracted beams were typically less than 2 eV when the beam current density was low. The beam intensity rapidly decreased as the distance between the extractor and the beam detector increased, indicating space charge limited transport of the beam. Problems associated with the emittance measurements are also discussed.

  3. Ion energy distribution functions of low energy beams formed by wire extraction electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Tokumura, S.; Kasuya, T.; Vasquez, M. Jr.; Maeno, S.; Wada, M.

    2012-02-15

    The two-electrode extractor system made of 0.1 mm diameter tungsten wires separated by 0.7 mm has formed an argon ion beam with 50 V extraction potential. Energy spreads of the extracted beams were typically less than 2 eV when the beam current density was low. The beam intensity rapidly decreased as the distance between the extractor and the beam detector increased, indicating space charge limited transport of the beam. Problems associated with the emittance measurements are also discussed.

  4. Dosimetry of low energy proton beams for use in spacecraft parts testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. G.

    1975-01-01

    Thermoluminescent Dosimeters tes (TLD) were used to measure proton fluences consisting of 5MeV or lower energies. The results were at variance with the corresponding gamma measurements. The results of experiments on low energy proton dosimetry using LiF-in-teflon microrods (TLD-700 or LiF-7), are presented.

  5. Ion Beam Emission within a Low Energy Focus Plasma (0.1 kJ) Operating with Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Aragi, Gamal M.

    2010-07-01

    An investigation of energetic ion beam emission from a low energy plasma focus (0.1 kJ Mather type) device operating with hydrogen gas is studied. The ion beam emission is investigated using time-integrated and time-resolved detectors. The present plasma focus device is powered by a capacitor bank of 1 μF at 18 kV maximum charging voltage. The correlation of ion beam intensity with filling gas pressure indicates that the beam emission is maximized at the optimum pressure for the focus formation at peak current. Energy of ions is determined with a time-of-flight (TOF) method, taking into account distance from the center electrode to the detection plane.

  6. Research and development of H{sup -} ion source and low energy beam transport for a kaon-neutrino factory

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Q.; Staples, J.; Schenkel, T.; Li, D.; Sy, A.

    2012-02-15

    A baseline H{sup -} ion source and low energy beam transport (LEBT) system have been identified for Project X. The filament-discharge H{sup -} ion source has been fabricated by D-Pace, Inc. and is now in operation at LBNL. The source is capable of delivering over 10 mA of H{sup -} beam in cw operation with normalized 4 rms emittances less than 0.7 {pi} mm mrad. A two-solenoid magnetic lens LEBT system has been design. The design has been validated with simulations of beam transport for 5 mA 30 keV H{sup -} beams using various simulation codes.

  7. Space Charge Correction on Emittance Measurement of Low Energy Electron Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Treado, Colleen J.; /Massachusetts U., Amherst

    2012-09-07

    The goal of any particle accelerator is to optimize the transport of a charged particle beam along a set path by confining the beam to a small region close to the design trajectory and directing it accurately along the beamline. To do so in the simplest fashion, accelerators use a system of magnets that exert approximately linear electromagnetic forces on the charged beam. These electromagnets bend the beam along the desired path, in the case of bending magnets, and constrain the beam to the desired area through alternating focusing and defocusing effects, in the case of quadrupole magnets. We can model the transport of such a beam through transfer matrices representing the actions of the various beamline elements. However, space charge effects, produced from self electric fields within the beam, defocus the beam and must be accounted for in the calculation of beam emittance. We present below the preliminary results of a MATLAB code built to model the transport of a charged particle beam through an accelerator and measure the emittance under the influence of space charge effects. We demonstrate the method of correctly calculating the emittance of a beam under space charge effects using a least square fit to determine the initial properties of the beam given the beam size measured at a specific point after transport.

  8. Beam dynamics in an ultra-low energy storage rings (review of existing facilities and feasibility studies for future experiments)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papash, A. I.; Smirnov, A. V.; Welsch, C. P.

    2014-03-01

    Storage rings operating at ultra-low energies and in particular electrostatic storage rings have proven to be invaluable tools for atomic and molecular physics. Due to the mass independence of the electrostatic rigidity, these machines are able to store a wide range of different particles, from light ions to heavy singly charged bio-molecules. However, earlier measurements showed strong limitations on beam intensity, fast decay of ion current, reduced life time etc. The nature of these effects was not fully understood. Also a large variety of experiments in future generation ultra-low energy storage and decelerator facilities including in-ring collision studies with a reaction microscope require a comprehensive investigation of the physical processes involved into the operation of such rings. In this paper, we present review of non-linear and long term beam dynamics studies on example of the ELISA, AD Recycler, TSR and USR rings using the computer codes BETACOOL, OPERA-3D and MAD-X. The results from simulations were benchmarked against experimental data of beam losses in the ELISA storage ring. We showed that decay of beam intensity in ultra-low energy rings is mainly caused by ion losses on ring aperture due to multiple scattering on residual gas. Beam is lost on ring aperture due to small ring acceptance. Rate of beam losses increases at high intensities because of the intra-beam scattering effect adds to vacuum losses. Detailed investigations into the ion kinetics under consideration of the effects from electron cooling and multiple scattering of the beam on a supersonic gas jet target have been carried out as well. The life time, equilibrium momentum spread and equilibrium lateral spread during collisions with this internal gas jet target were estimated. In addition, the results from experiments at the TSR ring, where low intensity beam of CF+ ions at 93 keV/u has been shrunk to extremely small dimensions have been reproduced. Based on these simulations

  9. Key elements of space charge compensation on a low energy high intensity beam injector

    SciTech Connect

    Peng Shixiang; Lu Pengnan; Ren Haitao; Zhao Jie; Chen Jia; Xu Yuan; Guo Zhiyu; Chen Jia'er; Zhao Hongwei; Sun Liangting

    2013-03-15

    Space charge effect (SCE) along the beam line will decrease beam quality. Space charge compensation (SCC) with extra gas injection is a high-efficiency method to reduce SCE. In this paper, we will report the experimental results on the beam profile, potential distribution, beam emittance, and beam transmission efficiency of a 35 keV/90 mA H{sup +} beam and a 40 keV/10 mA He{sup +} beam compensated by Ar/Kr. The influence of gas type, gas flow, and injection location will be discussed. Emphasis is laid on the consideration of SCC when designing and commissioning a high intensity ion beam injector. Based on measured data, a new definition of space charge compensation degree is proposed.

  10. A transverse emittance and acceptance measurement system in a low-energy beam transport line

    SciTech Connect

    Kashiwagi, H. Miyawaki, N.; Kurashima, S.; Okumura, S.

    2014-02-15

    A transverse beam emittance and acceptance measurement system has been developed to visualize the relationship between the injected beam emittance and the acceptance of a cyclotron. The system is composed of a steering magnet, two pairs of slits to limit the horizontal and vertical phase-space, a beam intensity detector just behind the slits for the emittance measurement, and a beam intensity detector in the cyclotron for the acceptance measurement. The emittance is obtained by scanning the slits and measuring the beam intensity distribution. The acceptance is obtained by measuring the distribution of relative beam transmission by injecting small emittance beams at various positions in a transverse phase-space using the slits. In the acceptance measurement, the beam from an ion source is deflected to the defined region by the slits using the steering magnet so that measurable acceptance area covers a region outside the injection beam emittance. Measurement tests were carried out under the condition of accelerating a beam of {sup 16}O{sup 6+} from 50.2 keV to 160 MeV. The emittance of the injected beam and the acceptance for accelerating and transporting the beam to the entrance of the extraction deflector were successfully measured. The relationship between the emittance and acceptance is visualized by displaying the results in the same phase-plane.

  11. Extraction and low energy beam transport from a surface ion source at the TRIUMF-ISAC facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, A.; Ames, F.; Bricault, P.; Lassen, J.; Laxdal, A.; Mjos, A.

    2016-06-01

    A large fraction of radioactive beams produced and delivered at TRIUMF's isotope separator and accelerator facility, ISAC, are using either a surface ion source or a resonant ionization laser ion source, which share a common design. To characterize the operation of the ion sources, simulations were performed to determine the ion beam optics and beam envelope properties of the extracted beam. Furthermore ion-optics calculations were performed to determine the transmission parameters through the mass separator magnet. Emittances are measured in the ISAC low energy beam line right after the mass separator. The recent addition of a channeltron to the Allison emittance meter scanner now allows us to measure emittances for ion beams with intensities as low as 105 ions/s. This is particularly useful for establishing high resolution, high throughput mass separator tunes for radioactive isotope beams. This paper discusses emittance measurements of low intensity beams, typical emittance scans for the surface ion source and the resonant laser ionized source for different source parameters. The observed results are compared to the simulations and discussed.

  12. Generation of high brightness electron beam by brake-applied velocity bunching with a relatively low energy chirp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ruixuan; He, Zhigang; Li, Biaobin; Zhang, Shancai; Li, Weiwei; Jia, Qika; Wang, Lin

    2017-09-01

    Velocity bunching technique is a tool for compressing electron beams in modern high brightness photoinjector sources, which utilizes the velocity difference introduced by a traveling rf wave at a relatively low energy. It presents peculiar challenges when applied to obtain a beam with a very high current and a low transverse emittance in photoinjectors. The main difficulty is to control the emittance oscillations of the beam during high compression, which can be naturally considered as an extension of the emittance compensation process. In this paper, a brake-applied velocity bunching scheme is proposed, in which the electron bunch is injected into the accelerator with a low gradient at a deceleration phase, like ;a brake is applied;, afterward slips to an acceleration phase. During the entire compression process, the energy chirp induced by the rf field is mostly linear, which retains a symmetric electron beam in the temporal distribution. The key point of the new scheme is a smaller energy chirp at a lower beam energy compared with the normal velocity bunching. Besides, the beam energy chirp before compression is dominated by the linear correlation due to a relatively short laser pulse. With a symmetric bunch compression, the transverse emittance could be compensated even if the compression factor is extremely high. As to our simulation results, the peak current of the compressed beam can be above 1.8 kA for the charge of 800 pC with a good emittance compensation.

  13. A 2.45 GHz electron cyclotron resonance proton ion source and a dual-lens low energy beam transporta)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, W. H.; Ma, H. Y.; Yang, Y.; Wu, Q.; Zhang, X. Z.; Wang, H.; Ma, B. H.; Feng, Y. C.; Fang, X.; Guo, J. W.; Cao, Y.; Li, X. X.; Zhu, Y. H.; Li, J. Y.; Sha, S.; Lu, W.; Lin, S. H.; Guo, X. H.; Zhao, H. Y.; Sun, L. T.; Xie, D. Z.; Peng, S. X.; Liu, Z. W.; Zhao, H. W.

    2012-02-01

    The structure and preliminary commissioning results of a new 2.45 GHz ECR proton ion source and a dual-lens low energy beam transport (LEBT) system are presented in this paper. The main magnetic field of the ion source is provided by a set of permanent magnets with two small electro-solenoid magnets at the injection and the extraction to fine tune the magnetic field for better microwave coupling. A 50 keV pulsed proton beam extracted by a three-electrode mechanism passes through the LEBT system of length of 1183 mm. This LEBT consists of a diagnosis chamber, two Glaser lenses, two steering magnets, and a final beam defining cone. A set of inner permanent magnetic rings is embedded in each of the two Glaser lenses to produce a flatter axial-field to reduce the lens aberrations.

  14. A 2.45 GHz electron cyclotron resonance proton ion source and a dual-lens low energy beam transport

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, W. H.; Ma, H. Y.; Wu, Q.; Zhang, X. Z.; Wang, H.; Ma, B. H.; Feng, Y. C.; Fang, X.; Guo, J. W.; Li, X. X.; Zhu, Y. H.; Li, J. Y.; Guo, X. H.; Zhao, H. Y.; Sun, L. T.; Xie, D. Z.; Liu, Z. W.; Zhao, H. W.; Yang, Y.; Cao, Y.; and others

    2012-02-15

    The structure and preliminary commissioning results of a new 2.45 GHz ECR proton ion source and a dual-lens low energy beam transport (LEBT) system are presented in this paper. The main magnetic field of the ion source is provided by a set of permanent magnets with two small electro-solenoid magnets at the injection and the extraction to fine tune the magnetic field for better microwave coupling. A 50 keV pulsed proton beam extracted by a three-electrode mechanism passes through the LEBT system of length of 1183 mm. This LEBT consists of a diagnosis chamber, two Glaser lenses, two steering magnets, and a final beam defining cone. A set of inner permanent magnetic rings is embedded in each of the two Glaser lenses to produce a flatter axial-field to reduce the lens aberrations.

  15. Characteristics of low-energy ion beams extracted from a wire electrode geometry.

    PubMed

    Vasquez, M; Tokumura, S; Kasuya, T; Maeno, S; Wada, M

    2012-02-01

    Beams of argon ions with energies less than 50 eV were extracted from an ion source through a wire electrode extractor geometry. A retarding potential energy analyzer (RPEA) was constructed in order to characterize the extracted ion beams. The single aperture RPEA was used to determine the ion energy distribution function, the mean ion energy and the ion beam energy spread. The multi-cusp hot cathode ion source was capable of producing a low electron temperature gas discharge to form quiescent plasmas from which ion beam energy as low as 5 eV was realized. At 50 V extraction potential and 0.1 A discharge current, the ion beam current density was around 0.37 mA/cm(2) with an energy spread of 3.6 V or 6.5% of the mean ion energy. The maximum ion beam current density extracted from the source was 0.57 mA/cm(2) for a 50 eV ion beam and 1.78 mA/cm(2) for a 100 eV ion beam.

  16. Low energy highly charged ion beam facility at Inter University Accelerator Centre: Measurement of the plasma potential and ion energy distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Sairam, T. Bhatt, Pragya; Safvan, C. P.; Kumar, Ajit; Kumar, Herendra

    2015-11-15

    A deceleration lens coupled to one of the beam lines of the electron cyclotron resonance based low energy beam facility at Inter University Accelerator Centre is reported. This system is capable of delivering low energy (2.5 eV/q–1 keV/q) highly charged ion beams. The presence of plasma potential hinders the measurements of low energies (<50 eV), therefore, plasma potential measurements have been undertaken using a retarding plate analyzer in unison with the deceleration assembly. The distributions of the ion energies have been obtained and the effect of different source parameters on these distributions is studied.

  17. Interface dosimetry: measurements and Monte Carlo simulations of low-energy photon beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Indra J.; Kassaee, Alireza; Verhaegen, Frank; Moskvin, Vadim P.

    2001-06-01

    A comparison of measured and simulated dose perturbations at high- Z interfaces with Monte Carlo (MC) codes, EGS4, MCNP4B , and PENELOPE, having varied algorithms is presented. The measured dose perturbations strongly depend on the chamber design and are always lower than the MC data. The EGS4 data are closer to the ion chamber values. The other two codes, MCNP4B and PENELOPE, predict relatively higher magnitude. The simulated secondary electron spectra from high- Z interfaces are different but cannot explain the differences in magnitude. It is concluded that MC codes capable of handling low-energy transport and better boundary crossing algorithms are needed for interface effects.

  18. The low energy muon beam profile monitor for the muon g‑2/EDM experiment at J-PARC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razuvaev, G. P.; Bae, S.; Choi, H.; Choi, S.; Ko, H. S.; Kim, B.; Kitamura, R.; Mibe, T.; Otani, M.

    2017-09-01

    The muon g‑2/EDM experiment at J-PARC aims to measure the muon anomalous magnetic moment and electric dipole moment with high precision by utilising an ultracold muon beam. The current muon g‑2 discrepancy between the Standard Model prediction and the experimental value is about 3.5 standard deviations. This experiment requires a development of the muon LINAC to accelerate thermal muons to the 300 MeV/c momentum. Detectors for beam diagnostics play a key role in such an experiment. The beam profile monitoring system has been designed to measure the profile of the low energy muon beam. It was tested during two beam tests in 2016 at the MLF D2 line at J-PARC. The detector was used with positive muons, Mu-(μ+ e‑ e‑), p and H-, e‑ and UV light. The system overview and preliminary results are given. Special attention is paid to the spatial resolution of the beam profile monitor and online monitor software used during data taking.

  19. An ultra-low energy (30-200 eV) ion-atomic beam source for ion-beam-assisted deposition in ultrahigh vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Mach, Jindrich; Kolibal, Miroslav; Sikola, Tomas; Samoril, Tomas; Voborny, Stanislav; Zlamal, Jakub; Spousta, Jiri; Dittrichova, Libuse

    2011-08-15

    The paper describes the design and construction of an ion-atomic beam source with an optimized generation of ions for ion-beam-assisted deposition under ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) conditions. The source combines an effusion cell and an electron impact ion source and produces ion beams with ultra-low energies in the range from 30 eV to 200 eV. Decreasing ion beam energy to hyperthermal values ({approx_equal}10{sup 1} eV) without loosing optimum ionization conditions has been mainly achieved by the incorporation of an ionization chamber with a grid transparent enough for electron and ion beams. In this way the energy and current density of nitrogen ion beams in the order of 10{sup 1} eV and 10{sup 1} nA/cm{sup 2}, respectively, have been achieved. The source is capable of growing ultrathin layers or nanostructures at ultra-low energies with a growth rate of several MLs/h. The ion-atomic beam source will be preferentially applied for the synthesis of GaN under UHV conditions.

  20. The role of low-energy electrons in focused electron beam induced deposition: four case studies of representative precursors.

    PubMed

    Thorman, Rachel M; Kumar T P, Ragesh; Fairbrother, D Howard; Ingólfsson, Oddur

    2015-01-01

    Focused electron beam induced deposition (FEBID) is a single-step, direct-write nanofabrication technique capable of writing three-dimensional metal-containing nanoscale structures on surfaces using electron-induced reactions of organometallic precursors. Currently FEBID is, however, limited in resolution due to deposition outside the area of the primary electron beam and in metal purity due to incomplete precursor decomposition. Both limitations are likely in part caused by reactions of precursor molecules with low-energy (<100 eV) secondary electrons generated by interactions of the primary beam with the substrate. These low-energy electrons are abundant both inside and outside the area of the primary electron beam and are associated with reactions causing incomplete ligand dissociation from FEBID precursors. As it is not possible to directly study the effects of secondary electrons in situ in FEBID, other means must be used to elucidate their role. In this context, gas phase studies can obtain well-resolved information on low-energy electron-induced reactions with FEBID precursors by studying isolated molecules interacting with single electrons of well-defined energy. In contrast, ultra-high vacuum surface studies on adsorbed precursor molecules can provide information on surface speciation and identify species desorbing from a substrate during electron irradiation under conditions more representative of FEBID. Comparing gas phase and surface science studies allows for insight into the primary deposition mechanisms for individual precursors; ideally, this information can be used to design future FEBID precursors and optimize deposition conditions. In this review, we give a summary of different low-energy electron-induced fragmentation processes that can be initiated by the secondary electrons generated in FEBID, specifically, dissociative electron attachment, dissociative ionization, neutral dissociation, and dipolar dissociation, emphasizing the different

  1. The optimization of incident angles of low-energy oxygen ion beams for increasing sputtering rate on silicon samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, T.; Yoshida, N.; Takahashi, M.; Tomita, M.

    2008-12-01

    In order to determine an appropriate incident angle of low-energy (350-eV) oxygen ion beam for achieving the highest sputtering rate without degradation of depth resolution in SIMS analysis, a delta-doped sample was analyzed with incident angles from 0° to 60° without oxygen bleeding. As a result, 45° incidence was found to be the best analytical condition, and it was confirmed that surface roughness did not occur on the sputtered surface at 100-nm depth by using AFM. By applying the optimized incident angle, sputtering rate becomes more than twice as high as that of the normal incident condition.

  2. The role of low-energy electrons in focused electron beam induced deposition: four case studies of representative precursors

    PubMed Central

    Thorman, Rachel M; Kumar T. P., Ragesh; Fairbrother, D Howard

    2015-01-01

    Summary Focused electron beam induced deposition (FEBID) is a single-step, direct-write nanofabrication technique capable of writing three-dimensional metal-containing nanoscale structures on surfaces using electron-induced reactions of organometallic precursors. Currently FEBID is, however, limited in resolution due to deposition outside the area of the primary electron beam and in metal purity due to incomplete precursor decomposition. Both limitations are likely in part caused by reactions of precursor molecules with low-energy (<100 eV) secondary electrons generated by interactions of the primary beam with the substrate. These low-energy electrons are abundant both inside and outside the area of the primary electron beam and are associated with reactions causing incomplete ligand dissociation from FEBID precursors. As it is not possible to directly study the effects of secondary electrons in situ in FEBID, other means must be used to elucidate their role. In this context, gas phase studies can obtain well-resolved information on low-energy electron-induced reactions with FEBID precursors by studying isolated molecules interacting with single electrons of well-defined energy. In contrast, ultra-high vacuum surface studies on adsorbed precursor molecules can provide information on surface speciation and identify species desorbing from a substrate during electron irradiation under conditions more representative of FEBID. Comparing gas phase and surface science studies allows for insight into the primary deposition mechanisms for individual precursors; ideally, this information can be used to design future FEBID precursors and optimize deposition conditions. In this review, we give a summary of different low-energy electron-induced fragmentation processes that can be initiated by the secondary electrons generated in FEBID, specifically, dissociative electron attachment, dissociative ionization, neutral dissociation, and dipolar dissociation, emphasizing the

  3. Studies of defects in the near-surface region and at interfaces using low energy positron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Asoka-Kumar, P.

    1995-11-01

    Positron Annihilation Spectroscopy (PAS) is a powerful probe to study open-volume defects in solids. Its success is due to the propensity of positrons to seek out low-density regions of a solid, such as vacancies and voids, and the emissions of gamma rays from their annihilations that carry information about the local electronic environment. The development of low-energy positron beams allows probing of defects to depths of few microns, and can successfully characterize defects in the near-surface and interface regions of several technologically important systems. This review focuses on recent studies conducted on semiconductor-based systems.

  4. Low energy ion beam induced changes in structural and thermal properties of polycarbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reheem, A. M. Abdel; Atta, A.; Maksoud, M. I. A. Abdel

    2016-10-01

    The aim of the present study is extended for obtaining relation between the collision of ion beam with polycarbonate polymer (PC) and the introduced modification of technological applications. Polycarbonate films are irradiated by a 6 keV argon ion beam extracted from locally design cold cathode ion source with different ion fluences. The films are characterized using X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Mechanical tester, Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA). The increase in ion beam irradiation leads to an increase in the tensile strength and reduction in elongation at break for PC. TGA Analysis shows that the thermal decomposition temperature of irradiated polycarbonate changes with ion fluence. The DSC graphs show improvements in thermal stability with increase in the activation energy after ion beam irradiation. Ion penetration depths and distributions of scattered atoms are calculated using SRIM Monte Carlo simulation programs.

  5. Structured organic materials and devices using low-energy particle beams

    DOEpatents

    Vardeny, Z. Valy; Li, Sergey; Delong, Matthew C.; Jiang, Xiaomei

    2005-09-13

    Organic materials exposed to an electron beam for patterning a substrate (1) to make an optoelectronic organic device which includes a source, a drain, gate dielectric layer (4), and a substrate for emitting light.

  6. Optimization of ultrafast laser generated low-energy ion beams from silicon targets

    SciTech Connect

    Stoian, R.; Mermillod-Blondin, A.; Bulgakova, N.M.; Rosenfeld, A.; Hertel, I.V.; Spyridaki, M.; Koudoumas, E.; Tzanetakis, P.; Fotakis, C.

    2005-09-19

    We demonstrate the possibility to manipulate the kinetic properties of ion beams generated by ultrafast laser ablation of silicon. The versatility in regulating the sub-keV ion flux is achieved by implementing adaptive control of the temporal shape of incident laser pulses. Tunable characteristics for the charged beams are obtained using excitation synchronized with the phase-transformation dynamics, exploiting transitions to volatile fluid states with minimal energetic expenses.

  7. A comparative study on low-energy ion beam and neutralized beam modifications of naked DNA and biological effect on mutation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarapirom, S.; Thongkumkoon, P.; Prakrajang, K.; Anuntalabhochai, S.; Yu, L. D.

    2012-02-01

    DNA conformation change or damage induced by low-energy ion irradiation has been of great interest owing to research developments in ion beam biotechnology and ion beam application in biomedicine. Mechanisms involved in the induction of DNA damage may account for effect from implanting ion charge. In order to check this effect, we used both ion beam and neutralized beam at keV energy to bombard naked DNA. Argon or nitrogen ion beam was generated and extracted from a radiofrequency (RF) ion source and neutralized by microwave-driven plasma in the beam path. Plasmid DNA pGFP samples were irradiated with the ion or neutralized beam in vacuum, followed by gel electrophoresis to observe changes in the DNA conformations. It was revealed that the ion charge played a certain role in inducing DNA conformation change. The subsequent DNA transfer into bacteria Escherichia coli ( E. coli) for mutation analysis indicated that the charged ion beam induced DNA change had high potential in mutation induction while neutralized beam did not. The intrinsic reason was attributed to additional DNA deformation and contortion caused by ion charge exchange effect so that the ion beam induced DNA damage could hardly be completely repaired, whereas the neutralized beam induced DNA change could be more easily recoverable owing to absence of the additional DNA deformation and contortion.

  8. Deposition of silicon oxynitride films by low energy ion beam assisted nitridation at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youroukov, S.; Kitova, S.; Danev, G.

    2008-05-01

    The possibility is studied of growing thin silicon oxynitride films by e-gun evaporation of SiO and SiO2 together with concurrent bombardment with low energy N2+ ions from a cyclotron resonance (ECR) source at room temperature of substrates. The degree of nitridation and oxidation of the films is investigated by means of X-ray spectroscopy. The optical characteristics of the films, their environmental stability and adhesion to different substrates are examined. The results obtained show than the films deposited are transparent. It is found that in the case of SiO evaporation with concurrent N2+ ion bombardment, reactive implantation of nitrogen within the films takes place at room temperature of the substrate with the formation of a new silicon oxynitride compound even at low ion energy (150-200 eV).

  9. Monte Carlo simulation of a collimation system for low-energy beamline of ELI-NP Gamma Beam System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardarelli, P.; Gambaccini, M.; Marziani, M.; Bagli, E.; Petrillo, V.; Bacci, A.; Curatolo, C.; Drebot, I.; Vaccarezza, C.

    2015-07-01

    ELI-nuclear physics (NP) Gamma Beam System (GBS) is an intense and monochromatic gamma beam source based on inverse Compton interaction, currently being built in Bucharest, Romania. The gamma beam produced, with energy ranging from 0.2 to 20 MeV, energy bandwidth 0.5% and flux of about 108photons/s, will be devoted to investigate a broad range of applications such as nuclear physics, astrophysics, material science and life sciences. The radiation produced by an inverse Compton interaction is not intrinsically monochromatic. In fact, the energy of the photons produced is related to the emission angle, therefore the energy bandwidth can be modified adjusting the collimation of the gamma beam. In order to define the optimal layout and evaluate the performance of a collimation system for the ELI-NP-GBS low-energy beamline (0.2-3.5 MeV), a detailed Monte Carlo simulation activity has been carried out. The simulation, using Geant4 and MCNPX codes, included the transport of the gamma beam from the interaction point to the experimental area passing through vacuum pipes, vacuum chambers, collimation system and relative shielding. The effectiveness of the collimation system, in obtaining the required energy distribution and avoiding the contamination due to secondary radiation production, was evaluated. Also, the background radiation generated by collimation and the shielding layout have been studied.

  10. Investigation of the mechanism of impurity assisted nanoripple formation on Si induced by low energy ion beam erosion

    SciTech Connect

    Koyiloth Vayalil, Sarathlal; Gupta, Ajay; Roth, Stephan V.; Ganesan, V.

    2015-01-14

    A detailed mechanism of the nanoripple pattern formation on Si substrates generated by the simultaneous incorporation of pure Fe impurities at low energy (1 keV) ion beam erosion has been studied. To understand and clarify the mechanism of the pattern formation, a comparative analysis of the samples prepared for various ion fluence values using two complimentary methods for nanostructure analysis, atomic force microscopy, and grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering has been done. We observed that phase separation of the metal silicide formed during the erosion does not precede the ripple formation. It rather concurrently develops along with the ripple structure. Our work is able to differentiate among various models existing in the literature and provides an insight into the mechanism of pattern formation under ion beam erosion with impurity incorporation.

  11. An RF driven H{sup {minus}} source and a low energy beam injection system for RFQ operation

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, K.N.; Bachman, D.A.; Chan, C.F.; McDonald, D.S.

    1992-12-31

    An RF driven H{sup {minus}} source has been developed at LBL for use in the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC). To date, an H{sup {minus}} current of {approx}40 mA can be obtained from a 5.6-cm-diam aperture with the source operated at a pressure of about 12 m Torr and 50 kW of RF power. In order to match the accelerated H{sup {minus}} beam into the SSC RFQ, a low-energy H{sup {minus}} injection system has been designed. This injector produces an outgoing H{sup {minus}} beam free of electron contamination, with small radius, large convergent angle and small projectional emittance.

  12. Study of low energy neutron beam formation based on GEANT4 simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avagyan, R.; Avetisyan, R.; Ivanyan, V.; Kerobyan, I.

    2017-07-01

    The possibility of obtaining thermal/epithermal energy neutron beams using external protons from cyclotron C18/18 is studied based on GEANT4 simulations. This study will be the basis of the Beam Shaped Assembly (BSA) development for future Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). Proton induced reactions on 9Be target are considered as a neutron source, and dependence of neutron yield on target thickness is investigated. The problem of reducing the ratio of gamma to neutron yields by inserting a lead sheet after the beryllium target is studied as well. By GEANT4 modeling the optimal thicknesses of 9Be target and lead absorber are determined and the design characteristics of beam shaping assembly, including the materials and thicknesses of reflector and moderator are considered.

  13. Design of low-energy neutron beams for boron neutron capture synovectomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanch, Jacquelyn C.; Shefer, Ruth E.; Binello, E.

    1997-02-01

    A novel application of the 10B(n, (alpha) )7Li nuclear reaction for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis is under development. this application, called Boron Neutron Capture Synovectomy (BNCS), is briefly described here and the differences between BNCS and Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) are discussed in detail. These differences lead to substantially altered demands on neutron beam design for each therapy application. In this paper the considerations for neutron beam design for the treatment of arthritic joints via BNCS are discussed, and comparisons with the design requirements for BNCT are made. This is followed by a description of potential moderator/reflector assemblies that are calculated to produce intense, high- quality neutron beams based on the 7Li(p,n) accelerator- based reactions. Total therapy time and therapeutic ratios are given as a function of both moderator length and boron concentration. Finally, a means of carrying out multi- directional irradiations of arthritic joints is proposed.

  14. Feasibility of a 90° electric sector energy analyzer for low energy ion beam characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Mahinay, C. L. S. Ramos, H. J.; Wada, M.

    2015-02-15

    A simple formula to calculate refocusing by locating the output slit at a specific distance away from the exit of 90° ion deflecting electric sector is given. Numerical analysis is also performed to calculate the ion beam trajectories for different values of the initial angular deviation of the beam. To validate the theory, a compact (90 mm × 5.5 mm × 32 mm) 90° sector ESA is fabricated which can fit through the inner diameter of a conflat 70 vacuum flange. Experimental results show that the dependence of resolution upon the distance between the sector exit and the Faraday cup agrees with the theory. The fabricated 90° sector electrostatic energy analyzer was then used to measure the space resolved ion energy distribution functions of an ion beam with the energy as low as 600 eV.

  15. Laboratory degradation of Kapton in a low energy oxygen ion beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, D. C.

    1983-01-01

    An atomic oxygen ion beam, accelerated from a tunable microwave resonant cavity, was used at Lewis Research Center to bombard samples of the widely used polyimide Kapton. The Kapton experienced degradation and mass loss at high rates, which may be comparable to those found in Space Shuttle operations if the activation energy supplied by the beam enabled surface reactions with the ambient oxygen. The simulation reproduced the directionality (ram-wake dependence) of the degradiation, the change in optical properties of the degraded materials, and the structure seen in scanning electron micrographs of samples returned on the Shuttle Trails with a substituted argon ion beam produced no rapid degradation. Energy Dispersive X-ray Analysis (EDAX) showed significant surface composition changes in all bombarded samples. Mass loss rates and surface composition changes are discussed in terms of the possible oxidation chemistry of the interaction. Finally, the question of how the harmful degradation of materials in low earth orbit can be minimized is addressed.

  16. Laboratory degradation of Kapton in a low energy oxygen ion beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, D. C.

    1984-01-01

    An atomic oxygen ion beam, accelerated from a tunable microwave resonant cavity, was used at Lewis Research Center to bombard samples of the widely used polyimide Kapton. The Kapton experienced degradation and mass loss at high rates, which may be comparable to those found in Space Shuttle operations if the activation energy supplied by the beam enabled surface reactions with the ambient oxygen. The simulation reproduced the directionality (ram-wake dependence) of the degradation, the change in optical properties of the degraded materials, and the structure seen in scanning electron micrographs of samples returned on the Shuttle Trails with a substituted argon ion beam produced no rapid degradation. Energy Dispersive X-ray Analysis (EDAX) showed significant surface composition changes in all bombarded samples. Mass loss rates and surface composition changes are discussed in terms of the possible oxidation chemistry of the interaction. Finally, the question of how the harmful degradation of materials in low Earth orbit can be minimized is addressed.

  17. Feasibility of a 90° electric sector energy analyzer for low energy ion beam characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahinay, C. L. S.; Wada, M.; Ramos, H. J.

    2015-02-01

    A simple formula to calculate refocusing by locating the output slit at a specific distance away from the exit of 90° ion deflecting electric sector is given. Numerical analysis is also performed to calculate the ion beam trajectories for different values of the initial angular deviation of the beam. To validate the theory, a compact (90 mm × 5.5 mm × 32 mm) 90° sector ESA is fabricated which can fit through the inner diameter of a conflat 70 vacuum flange. Experimental results show that the dependence of resolution upon the distance between the sector exit and the Faraday cup agrees with the theory. The fabricated 90° sector electrostatic energy analyzer was then used to measure the space resolved ion energy distribution functions of an ion beam with the energy as low as 600 eV.

  18. MODULATION OF LOW ENERGY BEAM TO GENERATE PREDEFINED BUNCH TRAINS FOR THE NSLS-II TOP-OFF INJECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, G.M.; Cheng, W.X.; Shaftan, T.; Fliller, R.; Heese, R.; Rose, J.

    2011-03-28

    The NSLS II linac will produce a bunch train, 80-150 bunches long with 2 ns bunch spacing. Having the ability to tailor the bunch train can lead to the smaller bunch to bunch charge variation in the storage ring. A stripline is planned to integrate into the linac baseline to achieve this tailoring. The stripline must have a fast field rise and fall time to tailor each bunch. The beam dynamics is minimally affected by including the extra space for the stripline. This paper discusses the linac beam dynamics with stripline, and the optimal design of the stripline. A stripline is to be integrated in the linac to match the storage ring uniform bunch charge requirement, which simplifies the gun pulser electronics and looses the edge uniform requirement. It is located at low energy to lower the stripline power supply requirement and limit the dumped electron radiation. By turning off the stripline, the beam dynamics through linac is comparable with the baseline design. More advanced ideas can be explored. If a DC corrector along with the stripline is used, the core bunch trains gets kick from the stripline while the head and the tail of bunch train just gets a DC kick. The stripline power supply waveform is a single flat top waveform with fast rise and drop and the pulse length is {approx}200 ns long or 100 bunches, which may be easier from the power supply view point. We are also considering the bunch by bunch charge manipulation to match the storage ring uniform bunch charge distribution requirement. By modulating the flat top waveform at 250 MHz with adjustable amplitude, each the bunch center is either at 45 degree or 135 degree. Only the head or tail of the bunch is trimmed out. Although each bunch center deviation from idea center is very different at low energy, it is gradually minimized with beam energy increase.

  19. A Study of Mutation Breeding of High-Yielding Tryptophanase Escherichia coli by Low-Energy N+ Ion Beam Implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Min; Yao, Jianming; Wang, Dongmei

    2009-12-01

    Low energy ion beam has been widely applied in microbe breeding, plant breeding, gene transfer and cell modification. In this study, the Escherichia coli (E.coli) strain producing tryptophanase was irradiated by a low energy nitrogen ion beam with an energy of 10 keV at a fluence of 13 × 1014 N+/cm2 when glycerin at a 15% concentration was used as a protector. The effect on the biomass of E. coli after N+ implantation was analyzed in detail by statistic methods. The screening methods used in this study were proven to be effective. After continuous mutagenicity, a high-yield tryptophanase strain was selected and both its biomass and enzymatic activity were higher than those of the parent strain. The results of scale-up production showed that the biomass could reach wet weight 8.2 g/L and 110 g L-tryptophan could be formed in the volume of the 1l enzymatic reaction system.

  20. Analysis of ROP signaling in the leaf epidermis of mutant tomato with low-energy ion beam.

    PubMed

    Liang, Q X; Cao, G Q; Zhao, S P; Huang, Q C; Ying, F Q; Chen, W

    2015-04-22

    The importance of the ROP small GTPase signaling pathway in the regulation of cellular polarity growth in eukaryotes has been thoroughly studied. In this study, we examined the LeROP small GTPase (related to Arabidopsis thaliana genome LeROP GTPase in tomato) signaling of cell polarity growth in the mutant (M-1) tomato. Interestingly, we detected expansive growth of epidermis cells in M-1, in which the leaves appeared slightly lobed shaped. However, we observed jigsaw puzzle shaped and deeply lobed shaped leaves in wild-type leaf epidermis cells. The t-test showed significant difference (P < 0.05). Based on previous studies of the AtROP gene in Arabidopsis leaf epidermis cells, we hypothesized that the growth of mutant M-1 tomato leaf epidermis cell is related to AtROP gene signal transmission. The results of reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction showed the expression of LeROP2, LeROP4, and LeROP7 in M-1 mutants were stronger than in wild-type cells. At the flowering stage, LeROP2 GTPase showed no expression in wild-type cells, but was expressed in mutant cells. This study revealed a link between the low-energy ion beam and the ROP GTPase signaling pathway in tomato. In addition, the ROP gene changes analyzed suggest a new mechanism for mutations following low-energy ion beam implantation.

  1. Ion-optical studies of BigRIPS separator and ZeroDegree spectrometer at RIKEN RI Beam Factory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Hiroyuki; Kubo, Toshiyuki; Ohnishi, Tetsuya; Fukuda, Naoki; Kameda, Daisuke; Kusaka, Kensuke; Yoshida, Atsushi; Yoshida, Koichi; Ohtake, Masao; Inabe, Naohito; Yanagisawa, Yoshiyuki; Tanaka, Kanenobu; Matsushita, Masafumi

    2009-10-01

    The BigRIPS in-flight separator[1] and the ZeroDegree spectrometer (ZDS) have been commissioned at RIKEN RI Beam Factory (RIBF) recently. Intense radioactive isotope (RI) beams are produced, separated and analyzed by the BigRIPS and the ZDS. Both of them are operated in several optical modes according to experimental conditions. For particle identifications of RI beams, it is essentially important to achieve high resolutions in A/Q ratio because RI beams are produced in several charge states in our energy region especially for heavy RI beams. Ion optical calculation with realistic magnetic field maps is indispensable for our purpose and we use COSY INFINITY[2] for that. Measured field maps are incorporated in the COSY calculations. In 2008, the ZDS was commissioned for the first time in three different modes. Experimental results and comparison with the COSY calculations will be presented in this report. [1]T. Kubo: Nucl. Instr. Meth. B204, 97 (2003). [2]K. Makino, M. Berz: Nucl. Instr. Meth. A558, 346 (2006).

  2. AREAL low energy electron beam applications in life and materials sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsakanov, V. M.; Aroutiounian, R. M.; Amatuni, G. A.; Aloyan, L. R.; Aslanyan, L. G.; Avagyan, V. Sh.; Babayan, N. S.; Buniatyan, V. V.; Dalyan, Y. B.; Davtyan, H. D.; Derdzyan, M. V.; Grigoryan, B. A.; Grigoryan, N. E.; Hakobyan, L. S.; Haroutyunian, S. G.; Harutiunyan, V. V.; Hovhannesyan, K. L.; Khachatryan, V. G.; Martirosyan, N. W.; Melikyan, G. S.; Petrosyan, A. G.; Petrosyan, V. H.; Sahakyan, A. A.; Sahakyan, V. V.; Sargsyan, A. A.; Simonyan, A. S.; Tatikyan, S. Sh.; Tsakanova, G. V.; Tsovyan, E.; Vardanyan, A. S.; Vardanyan, V. V.; Yeremyan, A. S.; Yeritsyan, H. N.; Zanyan, G. S.

    2016-09-01

    The AREAL laser-driven RF gun provides 2-5 MeV energy ultrashort electron pulses for experimental study in life and materials sciences. We report the first experimental results of the AREAL beam application in the study of molecular-genetic effects, silicon-dielectric structures, ferroelectric nanofilms, and single crystals for scintillators.

  3. Making AlN(x) Tunnel Barriers Using a Low-Energy Nitrogen-Ion Beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaul, Anupama; Kleinsasser, Alan; Bumble, Bruce; LeDuc, Henry; Lee, Karen

    2005-01-01

    A technique based on accelerating positive nitrogen ions onto an aluminum layer has been demonstrated to be effective in forming thin (<2 nm thick) layers of aluminum nitride (AlN(x)) for use as tunnel barriers in Nb/Al-AlN(x)/Nb superconductor/insulator/ superconductor (SIS) Josephson junctions. AlN(x) is the present material of choice for tunnel barriers because, to a degree greater than that of any other suitable material, it offers the required combination of low leakage current at high current density and greater thermal stability. While ultra-thin AlN films with good thickness and stoichiometry control are easily formed using techniques such as reactive molecular beam epitaxy and chemical vapor deposition, growth temperatures of 900 C are necessary for the dissociative adsorption of nitrogen from either nitrogen (N2) or ammonia (NH3). These growth temperatures are prohibitively high for the formation of tunnel barriers on Nb films because interfacial reactions at temperatures as low as 200 to 300 C degrade device properties. Heretofore, deposition by reactive sputtering and nitridation of thin Al layers with DC and RF nitrogen plasmas have been successfully used to form AlN barriers in SIS junctions. However, precise control over critical current density Jc has proven to be a challenge, as is attaining adequate process reproducibility from system to system. The present ion-beam technique is an alternative to the plasma or reactive sputtering techniques as it provides a highly controlled arrival of reactive species, independent of the electrical conditions of the substrate or vacuum chamber. Independent and accurate control of parameters such as ion energy, flux, species, and direction promises more precise control of film characteristics such as stoichiometry and thickness than is the case with typical plasma processes. In particular, the background pressure during ion-beam nitride growth is 2 or 3 orders of magnitude lower, minimizing the formation of

  4. Transfer reactions using a low-energy {sup 11}Be beam

    SciTech Connect

    Johansen, Jacob

    2011-10-28

    A series of experiments have been performed to investigate neutron rich beryllium isotopes. Scattering as well as one neutron transfer reactions have been studied using a {sup 11}Be beam on deuteron targets. Bound states of {sup 10,11,12}Be have been studied and reaction cross sections have been calculated. The elastic scattering cross section has shown remarkable structure due to the halo structure of {sup 11}Be.

  5. Considerable knock-on displacement of metal atoms under a low energy electron beam.

    PubMed

    Gu, Hengfei; Li, Geping; Liu, Chengze; Yuan, Fusen; Han, Fuzhou; Zhang, Lifeng; Wu, Songquan

    2017-03-15

    Under electron beam irradiation, knock-on atomic displacement is commonly thought to occur only when the incident electron energy is above the incident-energy threshold of the material in question. However, we report that when exposed to intense electrons at room temperature at a low incident energy of 30 keV, which is far below the theoretically predicted incident-energy threshold of zirconium, Zircaloy-4 (Zr-1.50Sn-0.25Fe-0.15Cr (wt.%)) surfaces can undergo considerable displacement damage. We demonstrate that electron beam irradiation of the bulk Zircaloy-4 surface resulted in a striking radiation effect that nanoscale precipitates within the surface layer gradually emerged and became clearly visible with increasing the irradiation time. Our transmission electron microscope (TEM) observations further reveal that electron beam irradiation of the thin-film Zircaly-4 surface caused the sputtering of surface α-Zr atoms, the nanoscale atomic restructuring in the α-Zr matrix, and the amorphization of precipitates. These results are the first direct evidences suggesting that displacement of metal atoms can be induced by a low incident electron energy below threshold. The presented way to irradiate may be extended to other materials aiming at producing appealing properties for applications in fields of nanotechnology, surface technology, and others.

  6. Closely spaced nanomagnets by dual e-beam exposure for low-energy nanomagnet logic

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, Faisal A.; Csaba, Gyorgy; Butler, Katherine; Bernstein, Gary H.

    2013-05-07

    The effect of nanomagnet spacing on required clock field has been studied by micromagnetic simulation for supermalloy (Ni{sub 79}Fe{sub 16}Mo{sub 5}) dots with dimensions 90 Multiplication-Sign 60 Multiplication-Sign 20 nm{sup 3} and 120 Multiplication-Sign 60 Multiplication-Sign 20 nm{sup 3}. Reduction of the inter-magnet spacing for both dimensions has resulted in reduction of the required clock field in the simulation. A dual e-beam exposure technique has been developed to allow fabrication of ultra dense features using conventional poly(methylmethacrylate) e-beam resist. Nanomagnet logic (NML) datalines of supermalloy dots with {approx}10 nm and {approx}15 nm spacing have been fabricated using dual e-beam exposure with a 3{sigma} overlay accuracy of {approx}4 nm. Fabricated NML datalines have been characterized using magnetic force microscopy for various clock fields. Datalines of both spacing have shown proper NML functionality with a clock field as low as 60 mT.

  7. Recent performance of the SNS H{sup −} ion source and low-energy beam transport system

    SciTech Connect

    Stockli, Martin P. Ewald, K. D.; Han, B. X.; Murray, S. N.; Pennisi, T. R.; Piller, C.; Santana, M.; Tang, J.; Welton, R.

    2014-02-15

    Recent measurements of the H{sup −} beam current show that SNS is injecting about 55 mA into the RFQ compared to ∼45 mA in 2010. Since 2010, the H{sup −} beam exiting the RFQ dropped from ∼40 mA to ∼34 mA, which is sufficient for 1 MW of beam power. To minimize the impact of the RFQ degradation, the service cycle of the best performing source was extended to 6 weeks. The only degradation is fluctuations in the electron dump voltage towards the end of some service cycles, a problem that is being investigated. Very recently, the RFQ was retuned, which partly restored its transmission. In addition, the electrostatic low-energy beam transport system was reengineered to double its heat sinking and equipped with a thermocouple that monitors the temperature of the ground electrode between the two Einzel lenses. The recorded data show that emissions from the source at high voltage dominate the heat load. Emissions from the partly Cs-covered first lens cause the temperature to peak several hours after starting up. On rare occasions, the temperature can also peak due to corona discharges between the center ground electrode and one of the lenses.

  8. Space-charge compensation measurements in electron cyclotron resonance ion source low energy beam transport lines with a retarding field analyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Winklehner, D.; Leitner, D. Cole, D.; Machicoane, G.; Tobos, L.

    2014-02-15

    In this paper we describe the first systematic measurement of beam neutralization (space charge compensation) in the ECR low energy transport line with a retarding field analyzer, which can be used to measure the potential of the beam. Expected trends for the space charge compensation levels such as increase with residual gas pressure, beam current, and beam density could be observed. However, the overall levels of neutralization are consistently low (<60%). The results and the processes involved for neutralizing ion beams are discussed for conditions typical for ECR injector beam lines. The results are compared to a simple theoretical beam plasma model as well as simulations.

  9. Polymer metallization: Low energy ion beam surface modification to improve adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertrand, P.; Lambert, P.; Travaly, Y.

    1997-08-01

    The interface formation between copper and poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) films is studied in situ by Ion Scattering Spectrometry (ISS). Very low metal fluxes (˜ 10 13 atoms/cm 2 s) and hence low deposition rates are obtained by using a Knudsen's effusion cell. This allows to reach very low metal coverages down to the sub-monolayer regime. The results indicate that without surface activation, Cu atoms interact only very weakly with both polymer surfaces. Indeed, the oxygen/carbon ISS intensity ratio remains nearly unaffected by the metal deposition, showing no preferential shadowing effect. Moreover, the ISS polymer signals are still detected after exposure to Cu atom fluences corresponding to several monolayers coverage. Cu diffusion below the polymer surface is evidenced by the presence of an inelastic multiple collision contribution in the ISS spectra. It is observed that 2 keV 3He + ion beam irradiation prior to metallization induces a drastic modification in the interface formation. Ion beam irradiation prevents the metal diffusion into the polymer bulk and leads to an increase of the metal concentration at the surface. In order to explain these results, the surface modifications produced by the ion beam on pristine polymers are studied by ISS and ToF-SIMS. Dehydrogenation and preferential loss of O containing fragments are found. These modifications are associated with the production of radicals leading to the creation of new adsorption sites for the Cu atoms. It is proposed that the reaction between radicals of different macrochains induces a surface crosslinking, that can prevent the diffusion for the deposited metal atoms into the polymer bulk.

  10. Low energy Fe{sup +} beam irradiation to C{sub 60} thin film

    SciTech Connect

    Minezaki, H.; Yoshida, Y.; Oshima, K.; Uchida, T.; Muramatsu, M.; Kitagawa, A.; Asaji, T.; Kato, Y.; Biri, S.

    2012-02-15

    We have developed an electron cyclotron resonance ion source apparatus, which is designed for the production of endohedral fullerene. In this study, we irradiated the Fe{sup +} beam to the C{sub 60} thin film. We changed the experimental condition of the dose and the ion energy. We could observe the Fe + C{sub 60} peak by analysis of the time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The highest intensity of the Fe + C{sub 60} peak was observed at the ion energy of 200 eV. The Fe + C{sub 60} peak intensity tended to become high in the case of long irradiation time and large dose.

  11. Low energy positron beam system for the investigation of 2D and porous materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrysler, M. D.; Chirayath, V. A.; Mcdonald, A. D.; Gladen, R. W.; Fairchild, A. J.; Koymen, A. R.; Weiss, A. H.

    2017-01-01

    An advanced variable energy positron beam (~2 eV to 20 keV) has been designed, tested and utilized for coincidence Doppler broadening (CDB) measurements at the University of Texas at Arlington (UTA). A high efficiency solidified rare gas (Neon) moderator was used for the generation of a slow positron beam. The gamma rays produced as a result of the annihilation of positrons with the sample electrons are measured using a high purity Germanium (HPGe) detector in coincidence with a NaI(Tl) detector. Modifications to the system, currently underway, permits simultaneous measurements utilizing Positron annihilation induced Auger Electron Spectroscopy (PAES) and CDB. The tendency of positrons to become trapped in an image potential well at the surface will allow the new system to be used in measurements of the chemical structure of surfaces, internal or external and interfaces. The system will utilize a time of flight (TOF) technique for electron energy measurements. A 3m flight path from the sample to a micro-channel plate (MCP) in the new system will give it superior energy resolution at higher electron energies as compared to previous TOF systems utilizing shorter flight paths.

  12. Design of the prototype of a beam transport line for handling and selection of low energy laser-driven beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schillaci, F.; Maggiore, M.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Cuttone, G.; Pisciotta, P.; Costa, M.; Rifuggiato, D.; Romano, F.; Scuderi, V.

    2016-11-01

    A first prototype of transport beam-line for laser-driven ion beams to be used for the handling of particles accelerated by high-power laser interacting with solid targets has been realized at INFN. The goal is the production of a controlled and stable beam in terms of energy and angular spread. The beam-line consists of two elements: an Energy Selection System (ESS), already realized and characterized with both conventional and laser-accelerated beams, and a Permanent Magnet Quadrupole system (PMQ) designed, in collaboration with SIGMAPHI (Fr), to improve the ESS performances. In this work a description of the ESS system and some results of its characterization with conventional beams are reported, in order to provide a complete explanation of the acceptance calculation. Then, the matching with the PMQ system is presented and, finally, the results of preliminary simulations with a realistic laser-driven energy spectrum are discussed demonstrating the possibility to provide a good quality beam downstream the systems.

  13. A field-assisted moderator for low-energy positron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beling, C. D.; Simpson, R. I.; Charlton, M.; Jacobsen, F. M.; Griffith, T. C.; Moriarty, P.; Fung, S.

    1987-01-01

    A new positron field-assisted (FA) moderator based on the drift of positrons across a cooled silicon crystal is proposed. Using estimates for both the β + implantation profile and attainable drift velocities, the efficiency of drift to a slow e+ emitting surface is calculated using a diffusion equation which incorporates terms describing positron drift and annihilation. It is conjectured that efficiencies of up to 10% can be achieved. The use of epitaxially grown metallic suicide contacts to facilitate the application of the electric field is described and the consequences of using such contacts are fully discussed. Applications of the FA transmission mode moderator described here to produce timed brightness enhanced beams are briefly discussed.

  14. Convergent-beam low energy electron diffraction (CBLEED) and the measurement of surface dipole layers.

    PubMed

    Spence, J C H; Poon, H C; Saldin, D K

    2004-02-01

    We propose the formation of LEED patterns using a highly convergent beam forming a probe of nanometer dimensions. A reflection rocking curve may then be recorded in many diffraction orders simultaneously. Multiple scattering calculations show that the intensity variations within these rocking curves is as sensitive to the parameters describing the surface dipole layer as conventional I/V scans. However the data may be collected from areas sufficiently small to avoid defects and surface steps, radiation damage controlled by use of low voltages, and the information depth selected by choice of the (constant) voltage. We briefly discuss also the application of this method to oxides and the formation of atomic-resolution scanning images in an idealized instrument in which coherent diffracted LEED orders overlap.

  15. Hybrid systems with Ag nanocrystals and Si nanostructures synthesized by ultra-low-energy ion beam synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrada, M.; Haj Salem, A.; Pecassou, B.; Carles, R.; Ben Assayag, G.

    2017-09-01

    Hybrid systems based on silicon and silver nanocrystals (Si-NCs and Ag-NCs) are of considerable interest in photon conversion solar cells. Due to their plasmonic properties, Ag-NCs strongly increase the photoluminescence emission intensity of Si-NCs located in their vicinity, allowing, in principle, to solve the problem of their low emission yield. In this work, we have elaborated 2D networks of Ag-NCs and amorphous Si nanoparticles in a controlled way by using Ultra-Low-Energy Ion-Beam-Synthesis. In the proposed synthesis scheme, a 2D layer of Si-NCs is first obtained by implanting Si+ ions at ultra low energy (from 1 to 3 keV) in a SiO2 layer with subsequent high temperature thermal annealing. Then, Ag+ ions are implanted in the same matrix at energies between 3 and 10 keV and crystalline Ag-NCs are formed during the implantation step. Several configurations with either 2D arrays or a large band of Ag-NCs have been obtained following the Ag+ implantation energy. Enhancement of the PL emission from Si nanostructures, which is related to the presence of Ag-NCs, has been observed under specific arrangement of the two embedded subsystems. In this type of synthesis, a combination of physical phenomena including ion mixing, implantation damage, point defect, and thermal diffusion has been taken into account in order to explain and thus control the structural and the optical characteristics of the system.

  16. Study of the formalism used to determine the absorbed dose for low-energy x-ray beams.

    PubMed

    Chica, U; Anguiano, M; Lallena, A M

    2008-12-07

    We have studied the procedure commonly recommended by dosimetry protocols for the determination of the absorbed dose in water for low-energy x-rays beams, generated with potentials up to 150 kVp. X-ray beams with different spectra obtained with the XCOMP5R code were transported using the Monte Carlo code PENELOPE in order to calculate backscatter factors and mass-energy absorption coefficients. We have analyzed the uncertainty in the absorbed doses, calculated using the half-value layer to characterize the x-ray beams, due to the uncertainties in both backscatter factors and mass-energy absorption coefficients. We have found that this uncertainty is larger than 5% and can reach values above 11% for some HVL(1) values. The characterization of these doses with the homogeneity coefficient or the generating potential, in addition to the half-value layer is also studied. Using HVL(1) and the kVp, the absorbed dose to water can be reproduced to within 3% for all spectra.

  17. Low energy crossed beam studies of OD+ and D2O+ with C2H4: covalent and electrostatic complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Li; Li, Yue; Cai, Xiaohui; Richards, Elizabeth S.; Farrar, James M.

    2007-09-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations are used in conjunction with low-energy crossed beam studies of the ion-molecule reactions of D2O+ and OD+ with C2H4 to probe collision dynamics, particularly the role that electrostatic and covalent intermediates play. In the D+-transfer reaction initiated with D2O+, an electrostatic complex formed when the transferred species approaches the perpendicular bisector of the C=C bond plays an important role. Observation of C2H4D+ products with excitation in the ν10 stretching mode, in which the bridging D-atom moves along the perpendicular bisector, provides support for this complex. In the OD+ reaction, evidence for the occurrence of reaction on the ground singlet surface following internal conversion comes from the observation of a transient complex living ~100 fs. The DFT calculations show that the rate-limiting step corresponds to ring-opening and H/D exchange initiated in an ethylene oxide species with D+ bound to the oxygen atom. Computed lifetimes are in agreement with experiment. This study provides an example of how high-resolution crossed beam studies in conjunction with quantum chemical calculations, can provide a detailed understanding of collision dynamics in systems of moderate complexity. New experimental developments, including the application of velocity space imaging methods, as well as the production of beams of free radicals, will lead to a greater understanding of energy and angular momentum disposal in systems of chemical relevance.

  18. Low-energy mass-selected ion beam production of fragments produced from hexamethyldisilane for SiC film formation

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshimura, Satoru Sugimoto, Satoshi; Kiuchi, Masato

    2016-03-14

    We have proposed an experimental methodology which makes it possible to deposit silicon carbide (SiC) films on Si substrates with a low-energy mass-selected ion beam system using hexamethyldisilane (HMD) as a gas source. In this study, one of the fragment ions produced from HMD, SiCH{sub 4}{sup +}, was mass-selected. The ion energy was approximately 100 eV. Then, the SiCH{sub 4}{sup +} ions were irradiated to a Si(100) substrate. When the temperature of the Si substrate was set at 800 °C during the ion irradiation, the X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy of the substrate following the completion of ion irradiation experiment demonstrated the occurrence of 3C-SiC deposition.

  19. Measurement of the beam-recoil polarization in low-energy virtual Compton scattering from the proton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doria, L.; Janssens, P.; Achenbach, P.; Ayerbe Gayoso, C.; Baumann, D.; Bensafa, I.; Benali, M.; Beričič, J.; Bernauer, J. C.; Böhm, R.; Bosnar, D.; Correa, L.; D'Hose, N.; Defaÿ, X.; Ding, M.; Distler, M. O.; Fonvieille, H.; Friedrich, J.; Friedrich, J. M.; Laveissière, G.; Makek, M.; Marroncle, J.; Merkel, H.; Mihovilovič, M.; Müller, U.; Nungesser, L.; Pasquini, B.; Pochodzalla, J.; Postavaru, O.; Potokar, M.; Ryckbosch, D.; Sánchez Majos, S.; Schlimme, B. S.; Seimetz, M.; Širca, S.; Tamas, G.; Van de Vyver, R.; Van Hoorebeke, L.; Van Overloop, A.; Walcher, Th.; Weinriefer, M.; A1 Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    Double-polarization observables in the reaction e ⃗p →e'p ⃗'γ have been measured at Q2=0.33 (GeV/c ) 2 . The experiment was performed at the spectrometer setup of the A1 Collaboration using the 855 MeV polarized electron beam provided by the Mainz Microtron (MAMI) and a recoil proton polarimeter. From the double-polarization observables the structure function PLT ⊥ is extracted for the first time, with the value (-15.4 ±3 .3(stat .)-2.4+1.5(syst.)) GeV-2 , using the low-energy theorem for virtual Compton scattering. This structure function provides a hitherto unmeasured linear combination of the generalized polarizabilities of the proton.

  20. Study of pattern transition in nanopatterned Si(100) produced by impurity-assisted low-energy ion-beam erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyiloth Vayalil, Sarathlal; Gupta, Ajay; Roth, Stephan V.

    2017-04-01

    In this work, formation of self-organized Si nanostructures induced by pure Fe incorporation during normal incidence low-energy (1keV) Ar^+ ion bombardment is presented. It has been observed that the incorporation of Fe affects the evolution of the surface topography. The addition of Fe generates pronounced nanopatterns, such as dots, ripples and combinations of dots and ripples. The orientation of the ripple wave vector of the patterns formed is found to be in a direction normal to the Fe flow. The nanoripples with wavelength of the order of 39 nm produced is expected to be the lowest wavelength of the patterns reported on ion-beam-eroded structures under the incorporation of metallic impurities as per our knowledge. From the AFM and GISAXS analysis, it has been confirmed that the ripples formed are asymmetric in nature. The effect of the concentration of the Fe on morphological transition of the patterns has been studied using Rutherford backscattering measurements.

  1. Dependence of low energy ion beam exposure effects in silicon on ion species, exposure history, and material properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, R. J.; Climent, A.; Fonash, S. J.

    1985-03-01

    Several groups have shown that low energy (25-1500 eV) ion bombardment of silicon causes significant surface damage; these disordered layers are hundreds of ángströms deep and are easily characterized by electron spin resonance and Rutherford backscattering techniques. This surface damage also manifests itself as positive charge residing at the metal-semiconductor interface of metal contacts to these layers. Recently we have shown that this damage increases with the inverse of the ion size, if ion energy is kept constant. However, we have demonstrated that impingement by the lightest of ions (H +) can electrically passivate the damage caused by other ions; namely, hydrogen itself causes extensive damage, but it also passivates by tying up dangling bonds. This interaction of hydrogen with the damage caused by other ions is fairly complex. For example, the 0.4 keV hydrogen ions used to completely passivate 1.0 keV Ar + ion damage (as determined by electrical measurements) cause significant disorder and result in electrically active damage, when not preceded by the Ar + impingement. Thus low energy ion beam damage is found to depend on ion size, ion chemical activity, and sample exposure history. In addition, we have also seen significant differences in the annealing behavior of ion damage in float-zoned versus Czochralski-grown silicon. While 1.0 keV Ar + damage of CZ silicon anneals only at 1000°C, damaged FZ silicon anneals nearly completely at 800°C. Such behavior strongly suggests that background oxygen and carbon may play a role in ion beam damage of silicon.

  2. Biaxial texturing of inorganic photovoltaic thin films using low energy ion beam irradiation during growth

    SciTech Connect

    Groves, James R; De Paula, Raymond F; Hayes, Garrett H; Li, Joel B; Hammond, Robert H; Salleo, Alberto; Clemens, Bruce M

    2010-05-07

    We describe our efforts to control the grain boundary alignment in polycrystalline thin films of silicon by using a biaxially textured template layer of CaF{sub 2} for photovoltaic device applications. We have chosen CaF{sub 2} as a candidate material due to its close lattice match with silicon and its suitability as an ion beam assisted deposition (mAD) material. We show that the CaF{sub 2} aligns biaxially at a thickness of {approx}10 nm and, with the addition of an epitaxial CaF{sub 2} layer, has an in-plane texture of {approx}15{sup o}. Deposition of a subsequent layer of Si aligns on the template layer with an in-plane texture of 10.8{sup o}. The additional improvement of in-plane texture is similar to the behavior observed in more fully characterized IBAD materials systems. A germanium buffer layer is used to assist in the epitaxial deposition of Si on CaF{sub 2} template layers and single crystal substrates. These experiments confirm that an mAD template can be used to biaxially orient polycrystalline Si.

  3. Low-energy broad-beam photon shielding data for constituents of concrete.

    PubMed

    Ogundare, Folorunso O; Ogundele, Samuel A; Akerele, Olumide O; Balogun, Fatai A

    2012-03-08

    The ability of concrete to attenuate ionizing radiation intensity is assessed using its linear or mass attenuation coefficient. In this work, the broad-beam linear and mass attenuation coefficients of different types of soils and cements used for making concrete were measured at different photon energies (60-1333 keV), nearly spanning the diagnostic photon energy range, using a NaI detector. The mass attenuation coefficients of cement decreased from 0.133 ± 0.002 at 60 keV to 0.047 ± 0.003 at 1332.5 keV. For soils, the mass attenuation coefficient of those collected from the beach was the highest, decreasing from 0.176 ± 0.003 cm²/g at 60 keV to 0.054 ± 0.001 cm²/g at 1332.5 keV. Land soils had the least value, decreasing from 0.124 ± 0.002 cm²/g at 60 keV to 0.044 ± 0.003 cm²/g at 1332.5 keV. Limestone had smaller mass attenuation coefficients than the cement produced using it. The implication of the above is that for making concrete, beach sand should be preferred as the sand component of the concrete. Models of the form μ(L) = A(E) exp[B(E)ρ] and μ(m) = αln(E)+β are proposed for fitting the linear attenuation coefficient and mass attenuation coefficient data, respectively.

  4. High and low energy gamma beam dump designs for the gamma beam delivery system at ELI-NP

    SciTech Connect

    Yasin, Zafar Matei, Catalin; Ur, Calin A.; Mitu, Iani-Octavian; Udup, Emil; Petcu, Cristian

    2016-03-25

    The Extreme Light Infrastructure - Nuclear Physics (ELI-NP) is under construction in Magurele, Bucharest, Romania. The facility will use two 10 PW lasers and a high intensity, narrow bandwidth gamma beam for stand-alone and combined laser-gamma experiments. The accurate estimation of particle doses and their restriction within the limits for both personel and general public is very important in the design phase of any nuclear facility. In the present work, Monte Carlo simulations are performed using FLUKA and MCNPX to design 19.4 and 4 MeV gamma beam dumps along with shielding of experimental areas. Dose rate contour plots from both FLUKA and MCNPX along with numerical values of doses in experimental area E8 of the facility are performed. The calculated doses are within the permissible limits. Furthermore, a reasonable agreement between both codes enhances our confidence in using one or both of them for future calculations in beam dump designs, radiation shielding, radioactive inventory, and other calculations releated to radiation protection. Residual dose rates and residual activity calculations are also performed for high-energy beam dump and their effect is negligible in comparison to contributions from prompt radiation.

  5. High and low energy gamma beam dump designs for the gamma beam delivery system at ELI-NP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasin, Zafar; Matei, Catalin; Ur, Calin A.; Mitu, Iani-Octavian; Udup, Emil; Petcu, Cristian

    2016-03-01

    The Extreme Light Infrastructure - Nuclear Physics (ELI-NP) is under construction in Magurele, Bucharest, Romania. The facility will use two 10 PW lasers and a high intensity, narrow bandwidth gamma beam for stand-alone and combined laser-gamma experiments. The accurate estimation of particle doses and their restriction within the limits for both personel and general public is very important in the design phase of any nuclear facility. In the present work, Monte Carlo simulations are performed using FLUKA and MCNPX to design 19.4 and 4 MeV gamma beam dumps along with shielding of experimental areas. Dose rate contour plots from both FLUKA and MCNPX along with numerical values of doses in experimental area E8 of the facility are performed. The calculated doses are within the permissible limits. Furthermore, a reasonable agreement between both codes enhances our confidence in using one or both of them for future calculations in beam dump designs, radiation shielding, radioactive inventory, and other calculations releated to radiation protection. Residual dose rates and residual activity calculations are also performed for high-energy beam dump and their effect is negligible in comparison to contributions from prompt radiation.

  6. Low energy electron beam irradiation effect on optical properties of nanopillar MQW InGaN/GaN structures

    SciTech Connect

    Yakimov, E. B.; Vergeles, P. S.; Polyakov, A. Y.; Jeon, Dae-Woo; Lee, In-Hwan

    2014-02-21

    The low energy electron beam irradiation (LEEBI) effect on optical properties of planar and nanopillar InGaN/GaN muliple quantum well light emitting structures was studied by the cathodoluminescence (CL) method. On the planar structures LEEBI leads to a formation of new InGaN-related emission bands red shifted in comparison with initial one at small irradiation doses and blue shifted at doses higher than 0.5 C/cm{sup 2}. It was observed that after dry etching used for the nanopillar formation the main InGaN-related emission line moves from 2.92 to 2.98 eV that can be explained by a strain relaxation in the quantum wells. The optical properties of nanopilars start to change under LEEBI at a dose of about one order of magnitude lower than that for planar structures. At high irradiation doses the behavior of both structures under LEEBI is similar. The results obtained were explained by the formation and reconstruction of quantum dots inside the quantum wells due to a point defect generation and redistribution stimulated by the electron beam irradiation.

  7. Design of a high-current low-energy beam transport line for an intense D-T/D-D neutron generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xiaolong; Wang, Junrun; Zhang, Yu; Li, Jianyi; Xia, Li; Zhang, Jie; Ding, Yanyan; Jiang, Bing; Huang, Zhiwu; Ma, Zhanwen; Wei, Zheng; Qian, Xiangping; Xu, Dapeng; Lan, Changlin; Yao, Zeen

    2016-03-01

    An intense D-T/D-D neutron generator is currently being developed at the Lanzhou University. The Cockcroft-Walton accelerator, as a part of the neutron generator, will be used to accelerate and transport the high-current low-energy beam from the duoplasmatron ion source to the rotating target. The design of a high-current low-energy beam transport (LEBT) line and the dynamics simulations of the mixed beam were carried out using the TRACK code. The results illustrate that the designed beam line facilitates smooth transportation of a deuteron beam of 40 mA, and the number of undesired ions can be reduced effectively using two apertures.

  8. Electron stripping processes of H{sup −} ion beam in the 80 kV high voltage extraction column and low energy beam transport line at LANSCE

    SciTech Connect

    Draganic, I. N.

    2016-02-15

    Basic vacuum calculations were performed for various operating conditions of the Los Alamos National Neutron Science H{sup −} Cockcroft-Walton (CW) injector and the Ion Source Test Stand (ISTS). The vacuum pressure was estimated for both the CW and ISTS at five different points: (1) inside the H{sup −} ion source, (2) in front of the Pierce electrode, (3) at the extraction electrode, (4) at the column electrode, and (5) at the ground electrode. A static vacuum analysis of residual gases and the working hydrogen gas was completed for the normal ion source working regime. Gas density and partial pressure were estimated for the injected hydrogen gas. The attenuation of H{sup −} beam current and generation of electron current in the high voltage acceleration columns and low energy beam transport lines were calculated. The interaction of H{sup −} ions on molecular hydrogen (H{sub 2}) is discussed as a dominant collision process in describing electron stripping rates. These results are used to estimate the observed increase in the ratio of electrons to H{sup −} ion beam in the ISTS beam transport line.

  9. Electron stripping processes of H- ion beam in the 80 kV high voltage extraction column and low energy beam transport line at LANSCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Draganic, I. N.

    2016-02-01

    Basic vacuum calculations were performed for various operating conditions of the Los Alamos National Neutron Science H- Cockcroft-Walton (CW) injector and the Ion Source Test Stand (ISTS). The vacuum pressure was estimated for both the CW and ISTS at five different points: (1) inside the H- ion source, (2) in front of the Pierce electrode, (3) at the extraction electrode, (4) at the column electrode, and (5) at the ground electrode. A static vacuum analysis of residual gases and the working hydrogen gas was completed for the normal ion source working regime. Gas density and partial pressure were estimated for the injected hydrogen gas. The attenuation of H- beam current and generation of electron current in the high voltage acceleration columns and low energy beam transport lines were calculated. The interaction of H- ions on molecular hydrogen (H2) is discussed as a dominant collision process in describing electron stripping rates. These results are used to estimate the observed increase in the ratio of electrons to H- ion beam in the ISTS beam transport line.

  10. Formation of nanoripples on amorphous alumina thin films during low-energy ion-beam sputtering: Experiments and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babonneau, D.; Vandenhecke, E.; Camelio, S.

    2017-02-01

    The formation of nanopatterns induced by low-energy (0.5-1.5 keV) Xe+ ion-beam sputtering of amorphous alumina thin films is investigated by atomic force microscopy and grazing incidence small-angle x-ray scattering. The observed dependence of the surface morphology on ion incidence angle, temperature, ion energy, and fluence is compared with the predictions of linear and nonlinear continuum theoretical models. The results show that ion-induced mass redistribution stabilizes the surface at near-normal and very grazing incidence angles, while curvature-dependent erosion governs the formation of periodic nanoripples in the range of incidence angles between 50∘ and 65∘. Surface-confined ion-induced viscous flow is shown to be the dominant relaxation mechanism during erosion. Moreover, pattern evolution with ion fluence (pattern ordering and asymmetry of the ripple profile, in particular) suggests that nonlinear effects that are ignored by the Sigmund's collision cascade theory of sputtering contribute strongly to the observed dynamics of ripple formation.

  11. Emittance improvement of the electron cyclotron resonance high intensity light ion source proton beam by gas injection in the low energy beam transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beauvais, P.-Y.; Ferdinand, R.; Gobin, R.; Lagniel, J. M.; Leroy, P.-A.; Celona, L.; Ciavola, G.; Gammino, S.; Pottin, B.; Sherman, J.

    2000-03-01

    SILHI is the ECR high intensity light ion source studied in France at C.E.A. Saclay. This is the source for the injector of the high intensity proton injector prototype developed by a CNRS-IN2P3 collaboration. 80 mA at 95 keV beams with a rms normalized r-r' emittance lower than 0.3 π mm mrad and a proton fraction better than 85% are currently produced. Recently, it has been found that the injection in the low energy beam transport of a buffer gas had a strong effect on the emittance measured 1 m downstream of the focusing solenoid. By adding several gases (H2, N2, Ar, Kr), improvements as great as a factor of 3 have been observed. The emittance has been measured by means of an r-r' emittance measurement unit equipped with a sampling hole and a wire profile monitor, both moving across the beam. Simultaneously, the space charge compensation factor is measured using a four-grid analyzer unit. In this article all results of these experiments are presented and discussed. A first explanation of the emittance reduction phenomenon and possible consequences on the injector operation is given.

  12. Is low-energy-ion bombardment generated X-ray emission a secondary mutational source to ion-beam-induced genetic mutation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thongkumkoon, P.; Prakrajang, K.; Thopan, P.; Yaopromsiri, C.; Suwannakachorn, D.; Yu, L. D.

    2013-07-01

    Low-energy ion beam biotechnology has achieved tremendous successes in inducing crop mutation and gene transfer. However, mechanisms involved in the related processes are not yet well understood. In ion-beam-induced mutation, ion-bombardment-produced X-ray has been proposed to be one of the secondary mutation sources, but the speculation has not yet been experimentally tested. We carried out this investigation to test whether the low-energy ion-beam-produced X-ray was a source of ion-beam-induced mutation. In the investigation, X-ray emission from 29-keV nitrogen- or argon- ion beam bombarded bacterial Escherichia coli (E. coli) cells held in a metal or plastic sample holder was in situ detected using a highly sensitive X-ray detector. The ion beam bombarded bacterial cells held in different material holders were observed for mutation induction. The results led to a conclusion that secondary X-ray emitted from ion-beam-bombarded biological living materials themselves was not a, or at least a negligible, mutational source, but the ion-beam-induced X-ray emission from the metal that made the sample holder could be a source of mutation.

  13. Fabrication of a TEM sample of ion-irradiated material using focused ion beam microprocessing and low-energy Ar ion milling.

    PubMed

    Jin, Hyung-Ha; Shin, Chansun; Kwon, Junhyun

    2010-01-01

    Cross-section-view TEM samples of ion-irradiated material are successfully fabricated using a focused ion beam (FIB) system and low-energy Ar ion milling. Ga ion-induced damages in FIB processing are reduced remarkably by the means of low-energy Ar ion milling. There are optimized ion milling conditions for the reduction and removal of the secondary artifacts such as defects and ripples. Incident angles and accelerated voltages are especially more important factors on the preservation of a clean surface far from secondary defects and surface roughing due to Ga and Ar ion bombardment.

  14. Enhanced white photoluminescence in silicon-rich oxide/SiO2 superlattices by low-energy ion-beam treatment.

    PubMed

    Shih, Chuan-Feng; Hsiao, Chu-Yun; Su, Kuan-Wei

    2013-07-01

    This study presents the crystalline and luminescence properties of silicon-rich oxide (SRO)/SiO2 superlattices in which the SRO layers were prepared with a low-energy (<60 eV) argon ion-beam treatment. Experimental results evidenced that density of the Si nanocrystals (NCs) in the SRO layer was increased by ion-beam treatment after annealing, increasing the surface roughness. The stoichiometry of the as-prepared SRO layer was unchanged but the phase separation of the annealed SRO layer was enhanced by the ion-beam treatment, yielding visible white photoluminescence from the E' centers and Si NCs.

  15. Electron density profile measurements at a self-focusing ion beam with high current density and low energy extracted through concave electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Fujiwara, Y. Nakamiya, A.; Sakakita, H.; Hirano, Y.; Kiyama, S.; Koguchi, H.

    2014-02-15

    The self-focusing phenomenon has been observed in a high current density and low energy ion beam. In order to study the mechanism of this phenomenon, a special designed double probe to measure the electron density and temperature is installed into the chamber where the high current density ion beam is injected. Electron density profile is successfully measured without the influence of the ion beam components. Estimated electron temperature and density are ∼0.9 eV and ∼8 × 10{sup 8} cm{sup −3} at the center of ion beam cross section, respectively. It was found that a large amount of electrons are spontaneously accumulated in the ion beam line in the case of self-forcing state.

  16. SU-F-19A-06: Experimental Investigation of the Energy Dependence of TLD Sensitivity in Low-Energy Photon Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Z; Nath, R

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To measure the energy dependence of TLD sensitivity in lowenergy photon beams with equivalent mono-energetic energy matching those of 103Pd, 125I and 131Cs brachytherapy sources. Methods: A Pantek DXT 300 x-ray unit (Precision X-ray, Branford, CT), with stable digital voltage control down to 20 kV, was used to establish three lowenergy photon beams with narrow energy spread and equivalent monoenergetic energies matching those of 103Pd, 125I and 131Cs brachytherapy sources. The low-energy x-ray beams and a reference 6 MV photon beam were calibrated according to the AAPM TG-61 and TG-51 protocols, respectively, using a parallel-plate low-energy chamber and a Farmer cylindrical chamber with NIST traceable calibration factors. The dose response of model TLD-100 micro-cubes (1×1×1 mm{sup 3}) in each beam was measured for five different batches of TLDs (each contained approximately 100 TLDs) that have different histories of irradiation and usage. Relative absorbed dose sensitivity was determined as the quotient of the slope of dose response for a beam-of-interest to that of the reference beam. Results: Equivalent mono-energetic photon energies of the low-energy beams established for 103Pd, 125I and 131Cs sources were 20.5, 27.5, and 30.1 keV, respectively. Each beam exhibited narrow spectral spread with energyhomogeneity index close to 90%. The relative absorbed-dose sensitivity was found to vary between different batches of TLD with maximum differences of up to 8%. The mean and standard deviation determined from the five TLD batches was 1.453 ± 0.026, 1.541 ± 0.035 and 1.529 ± 0.051 for the simulated 103P, 125I and 131Cs beams, respectively. Conclusion: Our measured relative absorbed-dose sensitivities are greater than the historically measured value of 1.41. We find that the relative absorbed-dose sensitivity of TLD in the 103P beam is approximately 5% lower than that of 125I and 131Cs beams. Comparison of our results with other studies will be presented.

  17. RNA-seq reveals the downregulated proteins related to photosynthesis in growth-inhibited rice seedlings induced by low-energy N+ beam implantation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Q F; Ya, H Y; Wang, W D; Jiao, Z

    2014-03-26

    Transcriptomic research based on RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) technology is innovative and will provide new opportunities and biological perspectives for the use of ion-beam implantation in plants. Using RNA-seq, transcriptomes of whole rice seedlings generated from seeds implanted with a low-energy N+ beam were analyzed 96 h after planting. We identified 544 transcripts that were differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in the non-growth-inhibited sample implanted by an N+ beam, including 262 upregulated transcripts and 282 downregulated transcripts. Next, 776 transcripts were identified as DEGs in significantly damaged and growth-inhibited rice seedlings induced by N+ beam implantation, including 283 upregulated transcripts and 493 downregulated transcripts. The Gene Ontology (GO) analysis showed that 19 downregulated DEGs in the injured rice seedlings are enriched for the biological process GO term photosynthesis. The Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway analysis also showed that 11 downregulated DEGs related to chlorophyll a/b-binding proteins are statistically significantly enriched in the photosynthesis-antenna protein pathway (Pathwayid: map00196). This result suggested that the downregulated and injured photosynthesis system contributed to the growth inhibition of rice seedlings induced by low-energy N+ beam implantation.

  18. Inspection of small multi-layered plastic tubing during extrusion, using low-energy X-ray beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armentrout, C.; Basinger, T.; Beyer, J.; Colesa, B.; Olsztyn, P.; Smith, K.; Strandberg, C.; Sullivan, D.; Thomson, J.

    1999-02-01

    The automotive industry uses nylon tubing with a thin ETFE (ethylene-tetrafluroethylene) inner layer to carry fuel from the tank to the engine. This fluorocarbon inner barrier layer is important to reduce the migration of hydrocarbons into the environment. Pilot Industries has developed a series of real-time inspection stations for dimensional measurements and flaw detection during the extrusion of this tubing. These stations are named LERA TM (low-energy radioscopic analysis), use a low energy X-ray source, a special high-resolution image converter and intensifier (ICI) stage, image capture hardware, a personal computer, and software that was specially designed to meet this task. Each LERA TM station operates up to 20 h a day, 6 days a week and nearly every week of the year. The tubing walls are 1-2 mm thick and the outer layer is nylon and the inner 0.2 mm thick layer is ethylene-tetrafluroethylene.

  19. Magnetron sputtering system for coatings deposition with activation of working gas mixture by low-energy high-current electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrilov, N. V.; Kamenetskikh, A. S.; Men'shakov, A. I.; Bureyev, O. A.

    2015-11-01

    For the purposes of efficient decomposition and ionization of the gaseous mixtures in a system for coatings deposition using reactive magnetron sputtering, a low-energy (100-200 eV) high-current electron beam is generated by a grid-stabilized plasma electron source. The electron source utilizes both continuous (up to 20 A) and pulse-periodic mode of discharge with a self-heated hollow cathode (10-100 A; 0.2 ms; 10-1000 Hz). The conditions for initiation and stable burning of the high-current pulse discharge are studied along with the stable generation of a low-energy electron beam within the gas pressure range of 0.01 - 1 Pa. It is shown that the use of the electron beam with controllable parameters results in reduction of the threshold values both for the pressure of gaseous mixture and for the fluxes of molecular gases. Using such a beam also provides a wide range (0.1-10) of the flux density ratios of ions and sputtered atoms over the coating surface, enables an increase in the maximum pulse density of ion current from plasma up to 0.1 A, ensures an excellent adhesion, optimizes the coating structure, and imparts improved properties to the superhard nanocomposite coatings of (Ti,Al)N/a-Si3N4 and TiC/-a-C:H. Mass-spectrometric measurements of the beam-generated plasma composition proved to demonstrate a twofold increase in the average concentration of N+ ions in the Ar-N2 plasma generated by the high-current (100 A) pulsed electron beam, as compared to the dc electron beam.

  20. Precisely-controlled fabrication of single ZnO nanoemitter arrays and their possible application in low energy parallel electron beam exposure.

    PubMed

    He, H; She, J C; Huang, Y F; Deng, S Z; Xu, N S

    2012-03-21

    Precisely-controlled fabrication of single ZnO nanoemitter arrays and their possible application in low energy parallel electron beam exposure are reported. A well defined polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) nanohole template was employed for local solution-phase growth of single ZnO nanoemitter arrays. Chlorine plasma etching for surface smoothing and pulsed-laser illumination in nitrogen for nitrogen doping were performed, which can significantly enhance the electron emission and improve the emitter-to-emitter uniformity in performance. Mechanisms responsible for the field emission enhancing effect are proposed. Low voltage (368 V) e-beam exposure was performed by using a ZnO nanoemitter array and a periodical hole pattern (0.72-1.26 μm in diameter) was produced on a thin (25 nm) PMMA. The work demonstrates the feasibility of utilizing single ZnO nano-field emitter arrays for low voltage parallel electron beam lithography.

  1. Erratum: Simulation studies of the beam cooling process in presence of heating effects in the Extra Low ENergy Antiproton ring (ELENA) Erratum: Simulation studies of the beam cooling process in presence of heating effects in the Extra Low ENergy Antiproton ring (ELENA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resta-López, J.; Hunt, J. R.; Karamyshev, O.; Welsch, C. P.

    2015-08-01

    The Extra Low ENergy Antiproton ring (ELENA) is a small synchrotron equipped with an electron cooler, which is currently being constructed at CERN to further decelerate antiprotons from the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) from 5.3 MeV to energies as low as 100 keV . At such low energies it is very important to carefully take contributions from electron cooling and beam heating mechanisms (e.g. on the residual gas and intrabeam scattering) into account. Detailed investigations into the ion kinetics under consideration of effects from electron cooling and heating sources have been carried out, and the equilibrium phase space dimensions of the beam have been computed, based on numerical simulations using the code BETACOOL. The goal is to provide a consistent explanation of the different physical effects acting on the beam in ELENA.

  2. Low-energy ion beam bombardment effect on the plant-cell-envelope mimetic membrane for DNA transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakrajang, K.; Sangwijit, K.; Anuntalabhochai, S.; Wanichapichart, P.; Yu, L. D.

    2012-09-01

    This study is a systematic analysis of the mechanisms involved in ion-beam induced DNA transfer, an important application of ion beam biotechnology. Cellulose membranes were used to mimic the plant cell envelope. Ion beams of argon (Ar) or nitrogen (N) at an energy of 25 keV bombarded the cellulose membranes at fluences ranging from 1015 to 1016 ions/cm2. The damage to the ion-beam-bombarded membranes was characterized using infrared spectroscopy, a micro tensile test and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Chain scission was the dominant radiation damage type in the membrane. DNA diffusion across the membrane was significantly increased after ion beam bombardment. The increase in DNA transfer is therefore attributed to chain scission, which increases the permeability by increasing the number of pores in the membrane.

  3. A Parallel 3d Model for The Multi-Species Low Energy BeamTransport System of the RIA Prototype ECR Ion Source Venus

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, J.; Leitner, D.; Todd, D.

    2005-05-16

    The driver linac of the proposed Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) requires a great variety of high intensity, high charge state ion beams. In order to design and to optimize the low energy beamline optics of the RIA front end,we have developed a new parallel three-dimensional model to simulate the low energy, multi-species ion beam formation and transport from the ECR ion source extraction region to the focal plane of the analyzing magnet. A multisection overlapped computational domain has been used to break the original transport system into a number of each subsystem, macro-particle tracking is used to obtain the charge density distribution in this subdomain. The three-dimensional Poisson equation is solved within the subdomain and particle tracking is repeated until the solution converges. Two new Poisson solvers based on a combination of the spectral method and the multigrid method have been developed to solve the Poisson equation in cylindrical coordinates for the beam extraction region and in the Frenet-Serret coordinates for the bending magnet region. Some test examples and initial applications will also be presented.

  4. Preliminary Studies on Base Substitutions and Repair of DNA Mismatch Damage Stimulated by Low Energy N+ Ion Beam Implantation in Escherichia coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Chuan-xiao; Guo, Jin-hua; Cheng, Bei-jiu; Yu, Zeng-liang

    2003-02-01

    Ever since the low energy N+ ion beam has been accepted that the mutation effects of ionizing radiation are attributed mainly to direct or indirect damage to DNA. Evidences based on naked DNA irradiation in support of a mutation spectrum appears to be consistent, but direct proof of such results in vivo are limited. Using mutS, dam and/or dcm defective Eschericha coli mutator strains, an preliminary experimental system on induction of in vivo mutation spectra of low energy N+ ion beam has been established in this study. It was observed that the mutation rates of rifampicin resistance induced by N+ implantation were quite high, ranging from 9.2 × 10-8 to 4.9 × 10-5 at the dosage of 5.2 × 1014 ions/cm2. Strains all had more than 90-fold higher mutation rate than its spontaneous mutation rate determined by this method. It reveals that base substitutions involve in induction of mutation of low energy nitrogen ion beam implantation. The mutation rates of mutator strains were nearly 500-fold (GM2929), 400-fold (GM5864) and 6-fold larger than that of AB1157. The GM2929 and GM5864 both lose the ability of repair DNA mismatch damage by virtue of both dam and dcm pathways defective (GM2929) or failing to assemble the repair complex (GM5864) respectively. It may explain the both strains had a similar higher mutation rate than GM124 did. It indicated that DNA cytosine methylase might play an important role in mismatch repair of DNA damage induced by N+ implantation. The further related research were also discussed.

  5. Low-energy operation of the Livermore electron beam ion traps: Atomic spectroscopy of Si V, S VII, and Ar IX

    SciTech Connect

    Lepson, J K; Beiersdorfer, P

    2004-01-02

    As part of a project to compile a comprehensive catalog of astrophysically relevant emission lines, we used the low-energy capability of the Lawrence Livermore electron beam ion traps to extend the spectroscopy of neon-like ions and the neighboring charge states to silicon, sulfur, and argon. They present wavelength data of Si V and demonstrate the effect of collisional deexcitation of electric dipole forbidden lines on the 2-3 L-shell spectra of Si V, S VII, and Ar IX.

  6. Increasing the electric strength of vacuum insulation by treating the electrodes with a low-energy, high-current electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Batrakov, A.V.; Nazarov, D.S.; Ozur, G.E.

    1996-12-31

    The paper is devoted to the study of how the irradiation of the electrode surface with a low-energy, high-current electron beam affects the prebreakdown current and the electric strength of the vacuum insulation. This study is an extension of the work whose results were presented at the XVI ISDEIV. Experiments have been performed for 0.1-mm vacuum gaps formed by refractory-metal electrodes and for millimeter vacuum gaps with a pulsed voltage of amplitude 250 kV and duration 30-100 ns.

  7. SU-D-19A-01: Can Farmer-Type Ionization Chambers Be Used to Improve the Accuracy of Low-Energy Electron Beam Reference Dosimetry?

    SciTech Connect

    Muir, B R; McEwen, M R

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the use of cylindrical Farmer-type ionization chambers to improve the accuracy of low-energy electron beam calibration. Historically, these chamber types have not been used in beams with incident energies less than 10 MeV (R{sub 5} {sub 0} < 4.3 cm) because early investigations suggested large (up to 5 %) fluence perturbation factors in these beams, implying that a significant component of uncertainty would be introduced if used for calibration. More recently, the assumptions used to determine perturbation corrections for cylindrical chambers have been questioned. Methods: Measurements are made with cylindrical chambers in Elekta Precise 4, 8 and 18 MeV electron beams. Several chamber types are investigated that employ graphite walls and aluminum electrodes with very similar specifications (NE2571, NE2505/3, FC65-G). Depth-ionization scans are measured in water in the 8 and 18 MeV beams. To reduce uncertainty from chamber positioning, measurements in the 4 MeV beam are made at the reference depth in Virtual Water™. The variability of perturbation factors is quantified by comparing normalized response of various chambers. Results: Normalized ion chamber response varies by less than 0.7 % for similar chambers at average electron energies corresponding to that at the reference depth from 4 or 6 MeV beams. Similarly, normalized measurements made with similar chambers at the reference depth in the 4 MeV beam vary by less than 0.4 %. Absorbed dose calibration coefficients derived from these results are stable within 0.1 % on average over a period of 6 years. Conclusion: These results indicate that the uncertainty associated with differences in fluence perturbations for cylindrical chambers with similar specifications is only 0.2 %. The excellent long-term stability of these chambers in both photon and electron beams suggests that these chambers might offer the best performance for all reference dosimetry applications.

  8. Neutron halo isomers in stable nuclei and their possible application for the production of low energy, pulsed, polarized neutron beams of high intensity and high brilliance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habs, D.; Gross, M.; Thirolf, P. G.; Böni, P.

    2011-05-01

    We propose to search for neutron halo isomers populated via γ-capture in stable nuclei with mass numbers of about A=140-180 or A=40-60, where the 4 s 1/2 or 3 s 1/2 neutron shell model state reaches zero binding energy. These halo nuclei can be produced for the first time with new γ-beams of high intensity and small band width (≤0.1%) achievable via Compton back-scattering off brilliant electron beams, thus offering a promising perspective to selectively populate these isomers with small separation energies of 1 eV to a few keV. Similar to single-neutron halo states for very light, extremely neutron-rich, radioactive nuclei (Hansen et al. in Annu. Rev. Nucl. Part. Sci. 45:591-634, 1995; Tanihata in J. Phys. G., Nucl. Part. Phys. 22:158-198, 1996; Aumann et al. in Phys. Rev. Lett. 84:35, 2000), the low neutron separation energy and short-range nuclear force allow the neutron to tunnel far out into free space much beyond the nuclear core radius. This results in prolonged half-lives of the isomers for the γ-decay back to the ground state in the 100 ps-μs range. Similar to the treatment of photodisintegration of the deuteron, the neutron release from the neutron halo isomer via a second, low-energy, intense photon beam has a known much larger cross section with a typical energy threshold behavior. In the second step, the neutrons can be released as a low-energy, pulsed, polarized neutron beam of high intensity and high brilliance, possibly being much superior to presently existing beams from reactors or spallation neutron sources.

  9. Energy deposition evaluation for ultra-low energy electron beam irradiation systems using calibrated thin radiochromic film and Monte Carlo simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Matsui, S. Mori, Y.; Nonaka, T.; Hattori, T.; Kasamatsu, Y.; Haraguchi, D.; Watanabe, Y.; Uchiyama, K.; Ishikawa, M.

    2016-05-15

    For evaluation of on-site dosimetry and process design in industrial use of ultra-low energy electron beam (ULEB) processes, we evaluate the energy deposition using a thin radiochromic film and a Monte Carlo simulation. The response of film dosimeter was calibrated using a high energy electron beam with an acceleration voltage of 2 MV and alanine dosimeters with uncertainty of 11% at coverage factor 2. Using this response function, the results of absorbed dose measurements for ULEB were evaluated from 10 kGy to 100 kGy as a relative dose. The deviation between the responses of deposit energy on the films and Monte Carlo simulations was within 15%. As far as this limitation, relative dose estimation using thin film dosimeters with response function obtained by high energy electron irradiation and simulation results is effective for ULEB irradiation processes management.

  10. Large diameter permanent-magnets-expanded plasma source for spontaneous generation of low-energy ion beam.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kazunori; Suzuki, Tatsuya; Ando, Akira

    2014-02-01

    Diameter of a permanent-magnets-expanded, radiofrequency (rf) plasma source is enlarged up to ∼13 cm for an application to a space propulsion device and tested with being attached to a diffusion chamber. The source is operated at 13.56 MHz 300 W rf power in low-pressure (40 mPa) argon. Measurement of ion energy distribution functions downstream of the source exit shows generation of a supersonic ion beam of about 20 eV. The detailed radial measurements demonstrate that the diameter and energy of the ion beam corresponds to the source tube diameter and the potential difference between the source and downstream plasmas, and that the radial profile of the beam flux is similar to the plasma density profile in the source cavity.

  11. Beam production of a laser ion source with a rotating hollow cylinder target for low energy positive and negative ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saquilayan, G. Q.; Wada, M.

    2017-08-01

    A laser ion source that utilizes a hollow cylinder target is being developed for the production of positive and negative ions. Continuous operation of the laser ion source is possible through the design of a rotating target. Ion extraction through a grounded circular aperture was tested for positive and negative ions up to 1 kV. Time-of-flight measurements for the mass separation of ions were made by placing a Faraday cup at locations 0 and 15 mm from the beam extraction axis. Signals corresponding to slow and massive ions were detected with mass at least 380 amu. Investigation on the beam profile suggests a geometrical optimization of the beam forming system is necessary.

  12. Large diameter permanent-magnets-expanded plasma source for spontaneous generation of low-energy ion beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Kazunori; Suzuki, Tatsuya; Ando, Akira

    2014-02-01

    Diameter of a permanent-magnets-expanded, radiofrequency (rf) plasma source is enlarged up to ˜13 cm for an application to a space propulsion device and tested with being attached to a diffusion chamber. The source is operated at 13.56 MHz 300 W rf power in low-pressure (40 mPa) argon. Measurement of ion energy distribution functions downstream of the source exit shows generation of a supersonic ion beam of about 20 eV. The detailed radial measurements demonstrate that the diameter and energy of the ion beam corresponds to the source tube diameter and the potential difference between the source and downstream plasmas, and that the radial profile of the beam flux is similar to the plasma density profile in the source cavity.

  13. Chromosomal aberrations in peripheral blood lymphocytes exposed to a mixed beam of low energy neutrons and gamma radiation.

    PubMed

    Wojcik, A; Obe, G; Lisowska, H; Czub, J; Nievaart, V; Moss, R; Huiskamp, R; Sauerwein, W

    2012-09-01

    Cells exposed to thermal neutrons are simultaneously damaged by radiations with high and low linear energy transfer (LET). A question relevant for the assessment of risk of exposure to a mixed beam is whether the biological effect of both radiation types is additive or synergistic. The aim of the present investigation was to calculate whether the high and low LET components of a thermal neutron field interact when damaging cells. Human peripheral blood lymphocytes were exposed to neutrons from the HB11 beam at the Institute for Energy and Transport, Petten, Netherlands, in a 37 °C water phantom at varying depths, where the mix of high and low LET beam components differs. Chromosomal aberrations were analysed and the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values as well as the expected contributions of protons and photons to the aberration yield were calculated based on a dose response of aberrations in lymphocytes exposed to (60)Co gamma radiation. The RBE for 10 dicentrics per 100 cells was 3 for mixed beam and 7.2 for protons. For 20 dicentrics per 100 cells the respective values were 2.4 and 5.8. Within the limitations of the experimental setup the results indicate that for this endpoint there is no synergism between the high and low LET radiations.

  14. Damage and strain in single-layer graphene induced by very-low-energy electron-beam irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Murakami, Katsuhisa; Fujita, Jun-ichi; Kadowaki, Takuya

    2013-01-28

    From the analysis of the ratio of D peak intensity to G peak intensity in Raman spectroscopy, electron beam irradiation with energies of 100 eV was found to induce damage in single-layer graphene. The damage becomes larger with decreasing electron beam energy. Internal strain in graphene induced by damage under irradiation is further evaluated based on G peak shifts. The dose-dependent internal strain was approximately 2.22% cm{sup 2}/mC at 100 eV and 2.65 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -2}% cm{sup 2}/mC at 500 eV. The strain induced by the irradiation showed strong dependence on electron energy.

  15. Lithium fluoride thin film detectors for low-energy proton beam diagnostics by photoluminescence of colour centres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montereali, R. M.; Ampollini, A.; Picardi, L.; Ronsivalle, C.; Bonfigli, F.; Libera, S.; Nichelatti, E.; Piccinini, M.; Vincenti, M. A.

    2017-02-01

    Optically transparent LiF thin films thermally evaporated on glass and Si(100) substrates were used for advanced diagnostics of proton beams of energies from 1.4 to 7 MeV produced by a linear accelerator for protontheraphy under development at ENEA C.R. Frascati. The proton irradiation induces the formation of stable colour centres, among them the aggregate F2 and F3 + optically active defects. After exposure of LiF films grown on glass perpendicularly to the proton beams, their accumulated transversal spatial distributions were carefully measured by reading the latent two-dimensional (2-D) fluorescence images stored in the LiF thin layers by local formation of these broad-band visible light-emitting defects with an optical microscope under blue lamp excitation. Taking advantage from the low thickness of LiF thin films and from the linear behaviour of the integrated F2 and F3 + photoluminescence intensities up to the irradiation fluence of ∼5x1015 p/cm2, placing a cleaved LiF film grown on Si substrate with the cutted edge perpendicular to the proton beam, the 2-D fluorescence image of the film surface could allow to obtain the depth profile of the energy released by protons, which mainly lose their energy at the end of the path.

  16. Electrostatic energy analyzer measurements of low energy zirconium beam parameters in a plasma sputter-type negative ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Malapit, Giovanni M.; Mahinay, Christian Lorenz S.; Poral, Matthew D.; Ramos, Henry J.

    2012-02-15

    A plasma sputter-type negative ion source is utilized to produce and detect negative Zr ions with energies between 150 and 450 eV via a retarding potential-type electrostatic energy analyzer. Traditional and modified semi-cylindrical Faraday cups (FC) inside the analyzer are employed to sample negative Zr ions and measure corresponding ion currents. The traditional FC registered indistinct ion current readings which are attributed to backscattering of ions and secondary electron emissions. The modified Faraday cup with biased repeller guard ring, cut out these signal distortions leaving only ringings as issues which are theoretically compensated by fitting a sigmoidal function into the data. The mean energy and energy spread are calculated using the ion current versus retarding potential data while the beam width values are determined from the data of the transverse measurement of ion current. The most energetic negative Zr ions yield tighter energy spread at 4.11 eV compared to the least energetic negative Zr ions at 4.79 eV. The smallest calculated beam width is 1.04 cm for the negative Zr ions with the highest mean energy indicating a more focused beam in contrast to the less energetic negative Zr ions due to space charge forces.

  17. Electrostatic energy analyzer measurements of low energy zirconium beam parameters in a plasma sputter-type negative ion source.

    PubMed

    Malapit, Giovanni M; Mahinay, Christian Lorenz S; Poral, Matthew D; Ramos, Henry J

    2012-02-01

    A plasma sputter-type negative ion source is utilized to produce and detect negative Zr ions with energies between 150 and 450 eV via a retarding potential-type electrostatic energy analyzer. Traditional and modified semi-cylindrical Faraday cups (FC) inside the analyzer are employed to sample negative Zr ions and measure corresponding ion currents. The traditional FC registered indistinct ion current readings which are attributed to backscattering of ions and secondary electron emissions. The modified Faraday cup with biased repeller guard ring, cut out these signal distortions leaving only ringings as issues which are theoretically compensated by fitting a sigmoidal function into the data. The mean energy and energy spread are calculated using the ion current versus retarding potential data while the beam width values are determined from the data of the transverse measurement of ion current. The most energetic negative Zr ions yield tighter energy spread at 4.11 eV compared to the least energetic negative Zr ions at 4.79 eV. The smallest calculated beam width is 1.04 cm for the negative Zr ions with the highest mean energy indicating a more focused beam in contrast to the less energetic negative Zr ions due to space charge forces.

  18. An Electron Target/cooler for Extremely Low-Energy Ion Beams at the Electrostatic Storage Ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanabe, Tetsumi; Noda, Koji; Watanabe, Ikuo

    2002-12-01

    An electrostatic storage ring for studying atomic and molecular science has been operational at KEK since May, 2000. The ring has a circumference of 8 m and can store light-to-heavy ions with an E/q of up to 30 keV. Light ions are produced with an electron cyclotron resonance ion source, while bio-molecular ions are produced with an electrospray ion source The measured 1/e-lifetimes of stored single-charge ions injected from the electron cyclotron resonance ion source are from 10 to 50 s. On the other hand, ions from the electrospray ion source have lifetimes from 12 to 20 s. These lifetimes are long enough to cool vibrationally excited molecular ions, and their intensities are tolerable for practical use, like atomic collision experiments. In order to study electron-ion collisions, an electron beam target has been designed, which will be installed in a straight section of the ring. The structure of the target is almost the same as an electron cooler consisting of an adiabatically expanded electron beam; the target can also function as an electron cooler for light-mass ions.

  19. Fluence correction factors for graphite calorimetry in a low-energy clinical proton beam: I. Analytical and Monte Carlo simulations.

    PubMed

    Palmans, H; Al-Sulaiti, L; Andreo, P; Shipley, D; Lühr, A; Bassler, N; Martinkovič, J; Dobrovodský, J; Rossomme, S; Thomas, R A S; Kacperek, A

    2013-05-21

    The conversion of absorbed dose-to-graphite in a graphite phantom to absorbed dose-to-water in a water phantom is performed by water to graphite stopping power ratios. If, however, the charged particle fluence is not equal at equivalent depths in graphite and water, a fluence correction factor, kfl, is required as well. This is particularly relevant to the derivation of absorbed dose-to-water, the quantity of interest in radiotherapy, from a measurement of absorbed dose-to-graphite obtained with a graphite calorimeter. In this work, fluence correction factors for the conversion from dose-to-graphite in a graphite phantom to dose-to-water in a water phantom for 60 MeV mono-energetic protons were calculated using an analytical model and five different Monte Carlo codes (Geant4, FLUKA, MCNPX, SHIELD-HIT and McPTRAN.MEDIA). In general the fluence correction factors are found to be close to unity and the analytical and Monte Carlo codes give consistent values when considering the differences in secondary particle transport. When considering only protons the fluence correction factors are unity at the surface and increase with depth by 0.5% to 1.5% depending on the code. When the fluence of all charged particles is considered, the fluence correction factor is about 0.5% lower than unity at shallow depths predominantly due to the contributions from alpha particles and increases to values above unity near the Bragg peak. Fluence correction factors directly derived from the fluence distributions differential in energy at equivalent depths in water and graphite can be described by kfl = 0.9964 + 0.0024·zw-eq with a relative standard uncertainty of 0.2%. Fluence correction factors derived from a ratio of calculated doses at equivalent depths in water and graphite can be described by kfl = 0.9947 + 0.0024·zw-eq with a relative standard uncertainty of 0.3%. These results are of direct relevance to graphite calorimetry in low-energy protons but given that the fluence

  20. Construction of a surface positronium lifetime spectroscopy apparatus with a spin-polarized low energy positron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maekawa, M.; Wada, K.; Miyashita, A.; Kawasuso, A.

    2017-01-01

    We have developed a surface positronium (Ps) lifetime spectrometer. A spin-polarized slow positron beam is generated by a sodium-22 source and a solid krypton moderator and transported to the sample chamber by electrostatic lenses. The incident energy is adjusted by a retarding potential using a deceleration tube. For the lifetime measurement, the start signal is obtained from a secondary-electron detector installed in front of the sample. The stop signal is detected by a scintillation detector for annihilation gamma rays. As a performance test, Ps lifetime measurements were carried out and clear decay curves derived from ortho-Ps self-annihilation were successfully observed. This system might be used for the estimation of the spin polarization at the surface of ferromagnetic materials.

  1. Characterization of a CsI(Tl)-SiPM detector to low energy protons for light dark matter search in a future Beam Dump eXperiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondí, M.; Battaglieri, M.; Carpinelli, M.; Celentano, A.; De Napoli, M.; De Vita, R.; Leonora, E.; Marsicano, L.; Randazzo, N.; Sipala, V.

    2017-03-01

    The silicon Photomutiplier (SiPM) is a successful solid-state light detector. Thanks to its characteristics, especially the high quantum efficiency, comparable to that of PMTs, and the much higher gain compared to APDs, it can play an important role in many physics fields. For example a calorimeter read out by SiPMs is the proposed solution for the detection light dark matter in a future beam dump experiment. Although scintillating crystals coupled to SiPMs are widely used, they have been scarcely characterized as low energy (~ MeV) ion detectors. In the present work we report a study of the light response of a large volume CsI(Tl) crystal, read out by a small area SiPM to low energy protons of different kinetic energies, from 2.5 MeV to 24 MeV . The results of the measurements allowed us to qualify the CsI(Tl)-SiPM solution in an unmeasured energetic regime.

  2. Development of a pepper-pot emittance meter for diagnostics of low-energy multiply charged heavy ion beams extracted from an ECR ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Nagatomo, T. Kase, M.; Kamigaito, O.; Nakagawa, T.; Tzoganis, V.

    2016-02-15

    Several fluorescent materials were tested for use in the imaging screen of a pepper-pot emittance meter that is suitable for investigating the beam dynamics of multiply charged heavy ions extracted from an ECR ion source. SiO{sub 2} (quartz), KBr, Eu-doped CaF{sub 2}, and Tl-doped CsI crystals were first irradiated with 6.52-keV protons to determine the effects of radiation damage on their fluorescence emission properties. For such a low-energy proton beam, only the quartz was found to be a suitable fluorescent material, since the other materials suffered a decay in fluorescence intensity with irradiation time. Subsequently, quartz was irradiated with heavy {sup 12}C{sup 4+}, {sup 16}O{sup 4+}, and {sup 40}Ar{sup 11+} ions, but it was found that the fluorescence intensity decreased too rapidly to measure the emittance of these heavy-ion beams. These results suggest that a different energy loss mechanism occurs for heavier ions and for protons.

  3. Breeding for blast-disease-resistant and high-yield Thai jasmine rice (Oryza sativa L. cv. KDML 105) mutants using low-energy ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahadtanapuk, S.; Teraarusiri, W.; Phanchaisri, B.; Yu, L. D.; Anuntalabhochai, S.

    2013-07-01

    Low-energy ion beam was applied on mutation induction for plant breeding of blast-disease-resistant Thai jasmine rice (Oryza sativa L. cv. KDML 105). Seeds of the wild-type rice were bombarded in vacuum by nitrogen ion beam at energy of 60-80 keV to a beam fluence range of 2 × 1016-2 × 1017 ions/cm2. The ion-bombarded rice seeds were grown in soil for 2 weeks as transplanted rice in plastic pots at 1 seedling/pot. The seedlings were then screened for blast resistance by Pyricularia grisea inoculation with 106 spores/ml concentrations. The blast-resistant rice mutant was planted up to F6 generation with the consistent phenotypic variation. The high percentage of the blast-disease-resistant rice was analyzed with DNA fingerprint. The HAT-RAPD (high annealing temperature-random amplified polymorphic DNA) marker revealed the modified polymorphism fragment presenting in the mutant compared with wild type (KDML 105). The cDNA fingerprints were investigated and the polymorphism fragment was subcloned into pGEM-T easy vector and then sequenced. The sequence of this fragment was compared with those already contained in the database, and the fragment was found to be related to the Spotted leaf protein 11 (Spl11).

  4. Development of a pepper-pot emittance meter for diagnostics of low-energy multiply charged heavy ion beams extracted from an ECR ion source.

    PubMed

    Nagatomo, T; Tzoganis, V; Kase, M; Kamigaito, O; Nakagawa, T

    2016-02-01

    Several fluorescent materials were tested for use in the imaging screen of a pepper-pot emittance meter that is suitable for investigating the beam dynamics of multiply charged heavy ions extracted from an ECR ion source. SiO2 (quartz), KBr, Eu-doped CaF2, and Tl-doped CsI crystals were first irradiated with 6.52-keV protons to determine the effects of radiation damage on their fluorescence emission properties. For such a low-energy proton beam, only the quartz was found to be a suitable fluorescent material, since the other materials suffered a decay in fluorescence intensity with irradiation time. Subsequently, quartz was irradiated with heavy (12)C(4+), (16)O(4+), and (40)Ar(11+) ions, but it was found that the fluorescence intensity decreased too rapidly to measure the emittance of these heavy-ion beams. These results suggest that a different energy loss mechanism occurs for heavier ions and for protons.

  5. Nuclear Science and Applications with the Next Generation of High-Power Lasers and Brilliant Low-Energy Gamma Beams at ELI-NP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gales, S.; ELI-NP Team

    2015-10-01

    The development of high power lasers and the combination of such novel devices with accelerator technology has enlarged the science reach of many research fields, in particular High Energy, Nuclear and Astrophysics as well as societal applications in Material Science, Nuclear Energy and Medicine. The European Strategic Forum for Research Infrastructures (ESFRI) has selected a proposal based on these new premises called "ELI" for Extreme Light Infrastructure. ELI will be built as a network of three complementary pillars at the frontier of laser technologies. The ELI-NP pillar (NP for Nuclear Physics) is under construction near Bucharest (Romania) and will develop a scientific program using two 10 PW class lasers and a Back Compton Scattering High Brilliance and Intense Low Energy Gamma Beam, a marriage of Laser and Accelerator technology at the frontier of knowledge. In the present paper, the technical and scientific status of the project as well as the applications of the gamma source will be discussed.

  6. Real time x-ray studies during nanostructure formation on silicon via low energy ion beam irradiation using ultrathin iron films

    SciTech Connect

    El-Atwani, Osman; Suslova, Anastassiya; Gonderman, Sean; Fowler, Justin; El-Atwani, Mohamad; DeMasi, Alexander; Ludwig, Karl; Paul Allain, Jean

    2012-12-24

    Real time grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering and x-ray fluorescence (XRF) are used to elucidate nanodot formation on silicon surfaces during low energy ion beam irradiation of ultrathin iron-coated silicon substrates. Four surface modification stages were identified: (1) surface roughening due to film erosion, (2) surface smoothing and silicon-iron mixing, (3) structure formation, and (4) structure smoothing. The results conclude that 2.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 15} iron atoms in a 50 nm depth triggers surface nanopatterning with a correlated nanodots distance of 25 nm. Moreover, there is a wide window in time where the surface can have correlated nanostructures even after the removal of all the iron atoms from the sample as confirmed by XRF and ex-situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). In addition, in-situ XPS results indicated silicide formation, which plays a role in the structure formation mechanism.

  7. A new experiment to investigate the origin of optical activity using a low energy positron beam of controlled helicity. [molecular biology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gidley, D. W.; Rich, A.; Van House, J. C.; Zitzewitz, P. W.

    1981-01-01

    Previous experiments undertaken in search of a correlation between the origin of optical activity in biological molecules and the helicity of beta particles emitted in nuclear beta decay have not provided any useful results. A description is presented of an experiment in which a low energy polarized positron beam of controlled helicity interacts with an optically active material to form positronium in vacuum. Advantages of the current study compared to the previous experiments are mainly related to a much greater sensitivity. Initially, it will be possible to detect a helicity-dependent asymmetry in triplet positronium formation of 1 part in 10,000. Improvements to better than 1 part in 100,000 should be attainable.

  8. A new experiment to investigate the origin of optical activity using a low energy positron beam of controlled helicity. [molecular biology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gidley, D. W.; Rich, A.; Van House, J. C.; Zitzewitz, P. W.

    1981-01-01

    Previous experiments undertaken in search of a correlation between the origin of optical activity in biological molecules and the helicity of beta particles emitted in nuclear beta decay have not provided any useful results. A description is presented of an experiment in which a low energy polarized positron beam of controlled helicity interacts with an optically active material to form positronium in vacuum. Advantages of the current study compared to the previous experiments are mainly related to a much greater sensitivity. Initially, it will be possible to detect a helicity-dependent asymmetry in triplet positronium formation of 1 part in 10,000. Improvements to better than 1 part in 100,000 should be attainable.

  9. SIM.RI(I)-K3 comparison of calibration coefficients at radiotherapy level for orthovoltage x-ray beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, M.; McCaffrey, J.; Shen, H.; Saraví, M.; Stefanic, A.; Montaño Ortiz, G.; Carlos, M.; da Silva, C.; Álvarez, J.; Tovar, V.

    2015-01-01

    Air-kerma calibration coefficients were compared at the radiotherapy level for orthovoltage x ray beams in the SIM.RI(I)-K3 comparison for members of the Sistema Interamericano de Metrología (SIM). Five SIM laboratories participated in the comparison: NIST, NRC, ININ, CNEA and LNMRI, the NIST being the pilot laboratory. Results from the comparison are linked to the BIPM.RI(I)-K3 key comparison reference value through the NIST-BIPM comparison made in 2003 and will meet requirements of the Mutual Recognition Arrangement (MRA) to support several CMCs (calibration and measurement capability claims) of the participants. The comparison began in October of 2007 and the measurements were completed in September 2008. The results reveal the degree to which the participating calibration facility can demonstrate proficiency in transferring air-kerma calibrations under the conditions of the said facility at the time of the measurements. The evaluation of the degrees of equivalence was performed as described in the comparison protocol. The comparison of the calibration coefficients for the four chambers is based on the average ratios of the calibration coefficients measured at the NIST and at each participating laboratory. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCRI, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  10. Synthesis of polymer materials by low energy electron beam. IV. EB-polymerized urethane-acrylate, -methacrylate and -acrylamide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Masayuki; Uryu, Toshiyuki

    The structure and properties before and after electron beam (EB) irradiation were investigated using urethane prepolymers with different terminal groups of 2-hydroxyethyl acrylate (HEA), 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) and N-hydroxymethyl acrylamide (HMAAm). The prepolymers were synthesized by reaction of HEA, HEMA and HMAAm with the isocyanate-capped intermediate, which was obtained by reaction of poly(butylene adipate)diol (PBAD) with 4,4'-diphenylmethane diisocyanate. The resulting urethane-acrylate (UA-251M), -methacrylate (UMA-251M) and -acrylamide (UNAA-251M) had the crystallinity arising from PBAD moieties, and UA-251M and UMA-251M had higher crystallinity than UNAA-251M. IR results indicated that UNAA-251M was larger in the fraction of free NH stretching absorption than UA-251M and UMA-251M regardless of the number of NH group per a molecule. Accordingly, it was assumed that the difference in crystallinity was attributed to the polarity of terminal group. Hence, the rate of gel formation for UA-251M and UMA-251M was higher than that of UNAA-251M. The crystallinity based on PBAD of the prepolymers was remained also after EB irradiation. Spherulitic texture was observed on the EB-polymerized gel film surfaces for UA-251M and UMA-251M, while it was almost destroyed for UNAA-251M. Mechanical properties of UA-251M and UMA-251M gel films were much superior to those of UNAA-251M gel film according to the phase structure. Especially, UMA-251M gel film represented most excellent mechanical properties. Schematic models of the phase structure for UA-251M, UMA-251M and UNAA-251M were suggested from all experimental results.

  11. A study on the longitudinal momentum modulation of low energy heavy ion beam bunches with time-resolved beam profile measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xingguang; Yoshimoto, Takashi

    2017-10-01

    The longitudinal momentum modulation can be studied with time-resolved beam profiles measured at a region where an appropriate value of the dispersion function exists. In this paper, momentum modulation of two different beam lengths and their mechanisms are discussed. The modulation for a four-millisecond beam comes from beam loading effects at the extraction region of an Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Source (ECRIS) and the post-acceleration column after the ECRIS. In the case of a four-microsecond beam bunch, it comes from the transitional chopping process of the Einzel Lens Chopper. These results obtained confirmed the usefulness and effectiveness of the time-resolved profile measurement in studying the longitudinal momentum modulation.

  12. Status of Beam Line Detectors for the BigRIPS Fragment Separator at RIKEN RI Beam Factory: Issues on High Rates and Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Yuki; Fukuda, Naoki; Takeda, Hiroyuki; Kameda, Daisuke; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Shimizu, Yohei; Ahn, DeukSoon; Murai, Daichi; Inabe, Naohito; Shimaoka, Takehiro; Tsubota, Masakatsu; Kaneko, Junichi H.; Chayahara, Akiyoshi; Umezawa, Hitoshi; Shikata, Shinichi; Kumagai, Hidekazu; Murakami, Hiroyuki; Sato, Hiromi; Yoshida, Koichi; Kubo, Toshiyuki

    A multiple sampling ionization chamber (MUSIC) and parallel-plate avalanche counters (PPACs) were installed within the superconducting in-flight separator, named BigRIPS, at the RIKEN Nishina Center for particle identification of RI beams. The MUSIC detector showed negligible charge collection inefficiency from recombination of electrons and ions, up to a 99-kcps incidence rate for high-energy heavy ions. For the PPAC detectors, the electrical discharge durability for incident heavy ions was improved by changing the electrode material. Finally, we designed a single crystal diamond detector, which is under development for TOF measurements of high-energy heavy ions, that has a very fast response time (pulse width <1 ns).

  13. Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) surface functionalization by low-energy ion-beam irradiation under a reactive O2 environment and its effect on the PEEK/copper adhesives.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sehyun; Lee, Ki-Jun; Seo, Yongsok

    2004-01-06

    A low-energy Ar+ ion beam was used to modify the surface of a polyetheretherketone (PEEK) film. The modification reaction proceeded with or without oxygen gas injected during the irradiation. The surface functional groups of the modified PEEK were confirmed with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy as increasing various oxygen-containing functional groups. The concentration of the functional groups varied rapidly with the irradiation time, reached a maximum value, and then slowly decreased. The surface morphology of PEEK was substantially changed by ion-beam irradiation. Surface smoothening occurred so that the surface roughness reached almost constant value after some irradiation time. The incorporation of functional groups on the PEEK surface and the surface topology change had opposite effects on the adhesion strength between PEEK and copper. Dominance of the former was evident because the lap-shear strength initially increased with the irradiation. The special surface features significantly enhanced the adhesion strength between the evaporated copper layer and the modified PEEK surface. However, the decrease in the surface roughness with a long time irradiation implies a decrease in adhesion strength due to a smaller contact area, and the shear strength due to topology change also slowly decreased after a long time irradiation.

  14. Key Comparison APMP.RI(I)-K2 of air kerma standards for the CCRI reference radiation qualities for low-energy x-rays, including a supplementary comparison for the ISO 4037 narrow spectrum series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, T.; Saito, N.; Bero, M.; Butler, D.; Mahant, A. K.; Meghzifene, A.; Chu, C. H.; Kadni, T. B.; Jinjie, WU; Soodprasert, T.

    2014-01-01

    An indirect comparison was performed between nine national standards for air kerma for the CCRI radiation qualities from 10 kV to 50 kV (APMP.RI(I)-K2) and for the ISO 4037 narrow spectrum series (15 kV and 40 kV). Among the nine institutes that participated in the comparison, seven institutes were APMP member laboratories. Three commercially available thin window parallel plate ionization chambers were used as transfer instruments and circulated among the participants. The pilot laboratory, the NMIJ/AIST, served also as the link to the corresponding BIPM.RI(I)-K2 comparison. The results show general agreement within the combined uncertainties, although certain results for Nuclear Malaysia, the BARC and the OAP show larger differences. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCRI, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  15. P13, the EMBL macromolecular crystallography beamline at the low-emittance PETRA III ring for high- and low-energy phasing with variable beam focusing.

    PubMed

    Cianci, Michele; Bourenkov, Gleb; Pompidor, Guillaume; Karpics, Ivars; Kallio, Johanna; Bento, Isabel; Roessle, Manfred; Cipriani, Florent; Fiedler, Stefan; Schneider, Thomas R

    2017-01-01

    The macromolecular crystallography P13 beamline is part of the European Molecular Biology Laboratory Integrated Facility for Structural Biology at PETRA III (DESY, Hamburg, Germany) and has been in user operation since mid-2013. P13 is tunable across the energy range from 4 to 17.5 keV to support crystallographic data acquisition exploiting a wide range of elemental absorption edges for experimental phase determination. An adaptive Kirkpatrick-Baez focusing system provides an X-ray beam with a high photon flux and tunable focus size to adapt to diverse experimental situations. Data collections at energies as low as 4 keV (λ = 3.1 Å) are possible due to a beamline design minimizing background and maximizing photon flux particularly at low energy (up to 10(11) photons s(-1) at 4 keV), a custom calibration of the PILATUS 6M-F detector for use at low energies, and the availability of a helium path. At high energies, the high photon flux (5.4 × 10(11) photons s(-1) at 17.5 keV) combined with a large area detector mounted on a 2θ arm allows data collection to sub-atomic resolution (0.55 Å). A peak flux of about 8.0 × 10(12) photons s(-1) is reached at 11 keV. Automated sample mounting is available by means of the robotic sample changer `MARVIN' with a dewar capacity of 160 samples. In close proximity to the beamline, laboratories have been set up for sample preparation and characterization; a laboratory specifically equipped for on-site heavy atom derivatization with a library of more than 150 compounds is available to beamline users.

  16. P13, the EMBL macromolecular crystallography beamline at the low-emittance PETRA III ring for high- and low-energy phasing with variable beam focusing

    PubMed Central

    Cianci, Michele; Bourenkov, Gleb; Pompidor, Guillaume; Karpics, Ivars; Kallio, Johanna; Bento, Isabel; Roessle, Manfred; Cipriani, Florent; Fiedler, Stefan; Schneider, Thomas R.

    2017-01-01

    The macromolecular crystallography P13 beamline is part of the European Molecular Biology Laboratory Integrated Facility for Structural Biology at PETRA III (DESY, Hamburg, Germany) and has been in user operation since mid-2013. P13 is tunable across the energy range from 4 to 17.5 keV to support crystallographic data acquisition exploiting a wide range of elemental absorption edges for experimental phase determination. An adaptive Kirk­patrick–Baez focusing system provides an X-ray beam with a high photon flux and tunable focus size to adapt to diverse experimental situations. Data collections at energies as low as 4 keV (λ = 3.1 Å) are possible due to a beamline design minimizing background and maximizing photon flux particularly at low energy (up to 1011 photons s−1 at 4 keV), a custom calibration of the PILATUS 6M-F detector for use at low energies, and the availability of a helium path. At high energies, the high photon flux (5.4 × 1011 photons s−1 at 17.5 keV) combined with a large area detector mounted on a 2θ arm allows data collection to sub-atomic resolution (0.55 Å). A peak flux of about 8.0 × 1012 photons s−1 is reached at 11 keV. Automated sample mounting is available by means of the robotic sample changer ‘MARVIN’ with a dewar capacity of 160 samples. In close proximity to the beamline, laboratories have been set up for sample preparation and characterization; a laboratory specifically equipped for on-site heavy atom derivatization with a library of more than 150 compounds is available to beamline users. PMID:28009574

  17. Atomic Oxygen (ATOX) simulation of Teflon FEP and Kapton H surfaces using a high intensity, low energy, mass selected, ion beam facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vered, R.; Grossman, E.; Lempert, G. D.; Lifshitz, Y.

    1994-01-01

    A high intensity (greater than 10(exp 15) ions/sq cm) low energy (down to 5 eV) mass selected ion beam (MSIB) facility was used to study the effects of ATOX on two polymers commonly used for space applications (Kapton H and Teflon FEP). The polymers were exposed to O(+) and Ne(+) fluences on 10(exp 15) - 10(exp 19) ions/sq cm, using 30eV ions. A variety of analytical methods were used to analyze the eroded surfaces including: (1) atomic force microscopy (AFM) for morphology measurements; (2) total mass loss measurements using a microbalance; (3) surface chemical composition using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and (4) residual gas analysis (RGA) of the released gases during bombardment. The relative significance of the collisional and chemical degradation processes was evaluated by comparing the effects of Ne(+) and O(+) bombardment. For 30 eV ions it was found that the Kapton is eroded via chemical mechanisms while Teflon FEP is eroded via collisional mechanisms. AFM analysis was found very powerful in revealing the evolution of the damage from its initial atomic scale (roughness of approx. 1 nm) to its final microscopic scale (roughness greater than 1 micron). Both the surface morphology and the average roughness of the bombarded surfaces (averaged over 1 micron x 1 micron images by the system's computer) were determined for each sample. For 30 eV a non linear increase of the Kapton roughness with the O(+) fluence was discovered (a slow increase rate for fluences phi less than 5 x 10(exp 17) O(+)/sq cm, and a rapid increase rate for phi greater than 5 x 10(exp 17) O(+)/sq cm). Comparative studies on the same materials exposed to RF and DC oxygen plasmas indicate that the specific details of the erosion depend on the simulation facility emphasizing the advantages of the ion beam facility.

  18. Atomic Oxygen (ATOX) simulation of Teflon FEP and Kapton H surfaces using a high intensity, low energy, mass selected, ion beam facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vered, R.; Grossman, E.; Lempert, G. D.; Lifshitz, Y.

    1994-11-01

    A high intensity (greater than 10(exp 15) ions/sq cm) low energy (down to 5 eV) mass selected ion beam (MSIB) facility was used to study the effects of ATOX on two polymers commonly used for space applications (Kapton H and Teflon FEP). The polymers were exposed to O(+) and Ne(+) fluences on 10(exp 15) - 10(exp 19) ions/sq cm, using 30eV ions. A variety of analytical methods were used to analyze the eroded surfaces including: (1) atomic force microscopy (AFM) for morphology measurements; (2) total mass loss measurements using a microbalance; (3) surface chemical composition using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and (4) residual gas analysis (RGA) of the released gases during bombardment. The relative significance of the collisional and chemical degradation processes was evaluated by comparing the effects of Ne(+) and O(+) bombardment. For 30 eV ions it was found that the Kapton is eroded via chemical mechanisms while Teflon FEP is eroded via collisional mechanisms. AFM analysis was found very powerful in revealing the evolution of the damage from its initial atomic scale (roughness of approx. 1 nm) to its final microscopic scale (roughness greater than 1 micron). Both the surface morphology and the average roughness of the bombarded surfaces (averaged over 1 micron x 1 micron images by the system's computer) were determined for each sample. For 30 eV a non linear increase of the Kapton roughness with the O(+) fluence was discovered (a slow increase rate for fluences phi less than 5 x 10(exp 17) O(+)/sq cm, and a rapid increase rate for phi greater than 5 x 10(exp 17) O(+)/sq cm). Comparative studies on the same materials exposed to RF and DC oxygen plasmas indicate that the specific details of the erosion depend on the simulation facility emphasizing the advantages of the ion beam facility.

  19. Nuclear Science and Applications with the Next Generation of High-Power Lasers and Brilliant Low-Energy Gamma Beams at ELI-NP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gales, S.

    The development of high power lasers and the combination of such novel devices with accelerator technology has enlarged the science reach of many research fields, in particular Particle and Nuclear Physics, Astrophysics as well as societal applications in Material Science, Nuclear Energy and Medicine. The European Strategic Forum for Research Infrastructures (ESFRI) has selected a proposal based on these new premises called "ELI" for Extreme Light Infrastructure. ELI will be built as a network of three complementary pillars at the frontier of laser technologies. The ELI-NP pillar (NP for Nuclear Physics) is under construction near Bucharest (Romania) and will develop a scientific program using two 10 PW lasers and a Compton back-scattering high-brilliance and intense low-energy gamma beam, a marriage of laser and accelerator technology at the frontier of knowledge. In the present paper, the technical description of the facility, the present status of the project as well as the science, applications and future perspectives will be discussed.

  20. Nuclear Science and Applications with the Next Generation of High-Power Lasers and Brilliant Low-Energy Gamma Beams at ELI-NP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gales, S.

    2015-11-01

    The development of high-power lasers and the combination of such novel devices with accelerator technology has enlarged the science reach of many research fields, in particular high-energy nuclear physics and astrophysics, as well as societal applications in material science, nuclear energy and medicine. The European Strategic Forum for Research Infrastructures (ESFRI) has selected a proposal based on these new premises called "ELI" for Extreme Light Infrastructure. ELI will be built as a network of three complementary pillars at the frontier of laser technologies. The ELI-NP pillar (NP for nuclear physics) is under construction near Bucharest (Romania) and will develop a scientific program using two 10-PW lasers and a Compton back-scattering high-brilliance and intense low-energy gamma beam, a marriage of laser and accelerator technology at the frontier of knowledge. In the present paper, the technical description of the facility, the present status of the project as well as the science, applications and future perspectives will be discussed.

  1. Tailoring medium energy proton beam to induce low energy nuclear reactions in ⁸⁶SrCl₂ for production of PET radioisotope ⁸⁶Y.

    PubMed

    Medvedev, Dmitri G; Mausner, Leonard F; Pile, Philip

    2015-07-01

    This paper reports results of experiments at Brookhaven Linac Isotope Producer (BLIP) aiming to investigate effective production of positron emitting radioisotope (86)Y by the low energy (86)Sr(p,n) reaction. BLIP is a facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory designed for the proton irradiation of the targets for isotope production at high and intermediate proton energies. The proton beam is delivered by the Linear Accelerator (LINAC) whose incident energy is tunable from 200 to 66 MeV in approximately 21 MeV increments. The array was designed to ensure energy degradation from 66 MeV down to less than 20 MeV. Aluminum slabs were used to degrade the proton energy down to the required range. The production yield of (86)Y (1.2+/-0.1 mCi (44.4+/-3.7) MBq/μAh) and ratio of radioisotopic impurities was determined by assaying an aliquot of the irradiated (86)SrCl2 solution by gamma spectroscopy. The analysis of energy dependence of the (86)Y production yield and the ratios of radioisotopic impurities has been used to adjust degrader thickness. Experimental data showed substantial discrepancies in actual energy propagation compared to energy loss calculations.

  2. Formation of microcraters and hierarchically-organized surface structures in TiNi shape memory alloy irradiated with a low-energy, high-current electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Meisner, L. L. Meisner, S. N.; Markov, A. B. Ozur, G. E. Yakovlev, E. V.; Rotshtein, V. P.; Gudimova, E. Yu.

    2015-10-27

    The regularities of surface cratering in TiNi alloy irradiated with a low-energy, high-current electron beam (LEHCEB) in dependence on energy density and number of pulses are studied. LEHCEB processing of TiNi samples was carried out using RITM-SP facility. Energy density E{sub s} was varied from 1 to 5 J/cm{sup 2}, pulse duration was 2.5–3.0 μs, the number of pulses n = 1–128. The dominant role of non-metallic inclusions [mainly, TiC(O)] in the nucleation of microcraters was found. It was revealed that at small number of pulses (n = 2), an increase in energy density leads both to increasing average diameter and density of microcraters. An increase in the number of pulses leads to a monotonic decrease in density of microcraters, and, therefore, that of the proportion of the area occupied by microcraters, as well as a decrease in the surface roughness. The multiple LEHCEB melting of TiNi alloy in crater-free modes enables to form quasi-periodical, hierarchically-organized microsized surface structures.

  3. Analysis of a Partial Male-Sterile Mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana Isolated from a Low-Energy Argon Ion Beam Mutagenized Pool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Min; Bian, Po; Wu, Yuejin; Yu, Zengliang

    2008-04-01

    A screen for Arabidopsis fertility mutants, mutagenized by low-energy argon ion beam, yielded two partial male-sterile mutants tc243-1 and tc243-2 which have similar phenotypes. tc243-2 was investigated in detail. The segregation ratio of the mutant phenotypes in the M2 pools suggested that mutation behaved as single Mendelian recessive mutations. tc243 showed a series of mutant phenotypes, among which partial male-sterile was its striking mutant characteristic. Phenotype analysis indicates that there are four factors leading to male sterility. a. Floral organs normally develop inside the closed bud, but the anther filaments do not elongate sufficiently to position the locules above the stigma at anthesis. b. The anther locules do not dehisce at the time of flower opening (although limited dehiscence occurs later). c. Pollens of mutant plants develop into several types of pollens at the trinucleated stage, as determined by staining with DAPI (4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole), which shows a variable size, shape and number of nucleus. d. The viability of pollens is lower than that of the wild type on the germination test in vivo and vitro.

  4. Cubic chemically ordered FeRh and FeCo nanomagnets prepared by mass-selected low-energy cluster-beam deposition: a comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Robert, Anthony; Hillion, Arnaud; Khadra, Ghassan; Blanc, Nils; Le Roy, Damien; Tournus, Florent; Albin, Clement; Boisron, Olivier; Tamion, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Near the point of equiatomic composition, both FeRh and FeCo bulk alloys exhibit a CsCl-type (B2) chemically ordered phase that is related to specific magnetic properties, namely a metamagnetic anti-ferromagnetic/ferromagnetic transition near room temperature for FeRh and a huge magnetic moment for the FeCo soft alloy. In this paper, we present the magnetic and structural properties of nanoparticles of less than 5 nm diameter embedded in an inert carbon matrix prepared by mass-selected low-energy cluster-beam deposition technique. We obtained a CsCl-type (B2) chemically ordered phase for annealed nanoalloys. Using different experimental measurements, we show how decreasing the size affects the magnetic properties. FeRh nanoparticles keep the ferromagnetic order at low temperature due to surface relaxation affecting the cell parameter. In the case of FeCo clusters, the environment drastically affects the intrinsic properties of this system by reducing the magnetization in comparison to the bulk. PMID:28144534

  5. Simple model of bulk and surface excitation effects to inelastic scattering in low-energy electron beam irradiation of multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Kyriakou, Ioanna; Emfietzoglou, Dimitris; Garcia-Molina, Rafael; Abril, Isabel; Kostarelos, Kostas

    2011-09-01

    The effect of bulk and surface excitations to inelastic scattering in low-energy electron beam irradiation of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) is studied using the dielectric formalism. Calculations are based on a semiempirical dielectric response function for MWCNTs determined by means of a many-pole plasmon model with parameters adjusted to available experimental spectroscopic data under theoretical sum-rule constrains. Finite-size effects are considered in the context of electron gas theory via a boundary correction term in the plasmon dispersion relations, thus, allowing a more realistic extrapolation of the electronic excitation spectrum over the whole energy-momentum plane. Energy-loss differential and total inelastic scattering cross sections as a function of electron energy and distance from the surface, valid over the energy range {approx}50-30,000 eV, are calculated with the individual contribution of bulk and surface excitations separated and analyzed for the case of normally incident and escaping electrons. The sensitivity of the results to the various approximations for the spatial dispersion of the electronic excitations is quantified. Surface excitations are shown to have a strong influence upon the shape and intensity of the energy-loss differential cross section in the near surface region whereas the general notion of a spatially invariant inelastic mean free path inside the material is found to be of good approximation.

  6. Evolution of nanostructured single-phase CoSb3 thin films by low-energy ion beam induced mixing and their thermoelectric performance.

    PubMed

    Bala, Manju; Gupta, Srashti; Srivastava, Sanjeev K; Amrithapandian, Sankarakumar; Tripathi, Tripurari S; Tripathi, Surya K; Dong, Chung-Li; Chen, Chi-Liang; Avasthi, Devesh K; Asokan, Kandasami

    2017-09-04

    Skutterudites are emerging as potential candidates that show high efficiency and thus provide an ideal platform for research. The properties of nanostructured films of skutterudites are different from those of the corresponding bulk. The present study reports the evolution of nanostructured single-phase CoSb3 fabricated by using low-energy ion irradiation of Co/Sb bilayer films and subsequent annealing at an optimized temperature and their Seebeck coefficients (S). The effects of ion beam parameters with annealing on the phase evolution and nanostructure modifications were studied. An increase in Xe(+) ion fluence resulted in complete mixing of Co/Sb on postannealing forming flower-like nanostructures of single phase CoSb3. The temperature-dependent electrical resistivity (ρ) increases with the ion fluence because of defect creation which further increases on postannealing due to surface nanostructuring. The S of these films of CoSb3 is found to be higher and this is attributed to the formation of a uniform layer of nanostructured CoSb3 alloy thin film. The S and Hall coefficients of all these films are negative implying that they are n-type semiconductors.

  7. Effect of enhanced UV-B radiation and low-energy N⁺ ion beam radiation on the response of photosynthesis, antioxidant enzymes, and lipid peroxidation in rice (Oryza sativa) seedlings.

    PubMed

    Li, Linyu; Huang, Qunce; Zhang, Shuyin; Zhao, Shuaipeng

    2013-10-01

    To understand the effect of enhanced UV-B radiation and low-energy N(+) ion beam radiation on the response of photosynthesis, antioxidant enzymes, and lipid peroxidation in rice seedlings, Oryza sativa was exposed to three different doses of low-energy N(+) ion beam and enhanced UV-B alone and in combination. Enhanced UV-B caused a marked decline in some photosynthetic parameters (net photosynthetic rate, transpiration rate, and stomatal conductance) and photosynthetic pigments, whereas it induced an increase in hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) accumulation, the rate of superoxide radical production, and the content of malondialdehyde (MDA). Enhanced UV-B also induced an increase in the activity of antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase [SOD], peroxidase (POD), and catalase [CAT]) and some nonenzymatic antioxidants such as proline. Under the combined treatment of enhanced UV-B and low-energy N(+) ion beam at the dose of 3.0 × 10(17) N(+) cm(-2), the activity of antioxidant compounds (SOD, POD, CAT, proline, and glutathione), photosynthetic pigments, and some photosynthetic parameters (net photosynthetic rate, transpiration rate, and stomatal conductance) increased significantly; however, the MDA content, H2O2 accumulation, and rate of superoxide radical production showed a remarkable decrease compared with the enhanced UV-B treatment alone. These results implied that the appropriate dose of low-energy N(+) ion beam treatment may alleviate the damage caused by the enhanced UV-B radiation on rice.

  8. Effects of low energy E-beam irradiation on graphene and graphene field effect transistors and raman metrology of graphene on split gate test structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Gayathri S.

    2011-12-01

    Apart from its compelling performance in conventional nanoelectronic device geometries, graphene is an appropriate candidate to study certain interesting phenomenon (e.g. the Veselago lens effect) predicted on the basis of its linear electron dispersion relation. A key requirement for the observation of such phenomenon in graphene and for its use in conventional field-effect transistor (FET) devices is the need to minimize defects such as consisting of -- or resulting from -- adsorbates and lattice non-uniformities, and reduce deleterious substrate effects. Consequently the investigation of the origin and interaction of defects in the graphene lattice is essential to improve and tailor graphene-based device performance. In this thesis, optical spectroscopic studies on the influence of low-energy electron irradiation on adsorbate-induced defectivity and doping for substrate supported and suspended graphene were carried out along with spectroscopic and transport measurements on graphene FETs. A comparative investigation of the effects of single-step versus multi-step, low-energy electron irradiation (500 eV) on suspended, substrate supported graphene and on graphene FETs is reported. E-beam irradiation (single-step and multi-step) of substrate-supported graphene resulted in an increase in the Raman ID/IG ratio largely from hydrogenation due to radiolysis of the interfacial water layer between the graphene and the SiO2 substrate and from irradiated surface adsorbates. GFETs subjected to single and multi-step irradiation showed n-doping from CNP (charge neutrality point) shift of ˜ -8 and ˜ -16 V respectively. Correlation of this data with Raman analysis of suspended and supported graphene samples implied a strong role of the substrate and irradiation sequence in determining the level of doping. A correspondingly higher reduction in mobility per incident electron was also observed for GFETs subjected to multi-step irradiation compared to single step, in line with

  9. A low energy electron magnetometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.; Wood, G. M., Jr.; Rayborn, G. H.; White, F. A.

    1979-01-01

    The concept of a highly sensitive magnetometer based on the deflection of low energy electron beams in magnetic fields is analyzed. Because of its extremely low mass and consequently high e/m ratio, a low energy electron is easily deflected in a magnetic field, thus providing a basis for very low field measurement. Calculations for a specific instrument design indicate that a low energy electron magnetometer (LEEM) can measure magnetic fields as low as 1000 nT. The anticipated performance of LEEM is compared with that of the existing high resolution magnetometers in selected applications. The fast response time of LEEM makes it especially attractive as a potential instrument for magnetic signature analysis in large engineering systems.

  10. Improving the energy response of external beam therapy (EBT) GafChromic{sup TM} dosimetry films at low energies (≤100 keV)

    SciTech Connect

    Bekerat, H. Devic, S.; DeBlois, F.; Singh, K.; Sarfehnia, A.; Seuntjens, J.; Shih, Shelley; Yu, Xiang; Lewis, D.

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Purpose of this work is to investigate the effects of varying the active layer composition of external beam therapy (EBT) GafChromic{sup TM} films on the energy dependence of the film, as well as try to develop a new prototype with more uniform energy response at low photon energies (⩽100 keV). Methods: First, the overall energy response (S{sub AD,} {sub W}(Q)) of different commercial EBT type film models that represent the three different generations produced to date, i.e., EBT, EBT2, and EBT3, was investigated. Pieces of each film model were irradiated to a fixed dose of 2 Gy to water for a wide range of beam qualities and the corresponding S{sub AD,} {sub W}(Q) was measured using a flatbed document scanner. Furthermore, the DOSRZnrc Monte Carlo code was used to determine the absorbed dose to water energy dependence of the film, f(Q). Moreover, the intrinsic energy dependence, k{sub bq}(Q), for each film model was evaluated using the corresponding S{sub AD,} {sub W}(Q) and f(Q). In the second part of this study, the authors investigated the effects of changing the chemical composition of the active layer on S{sub AD,} {sub W}(Q). Finally, based on these results, the film manufacturer fabricated several film prototypes and the authors evaluated their S{sub AD,} {sub W}(Q). Results: The commercial EBT film model shows an under response at all energies below 100 keV reaching 39% ± 4% at about 20 keV. The commercial EBT2 and EBT3 film models show an under response of about 27% ± 4% at 20 keV and an over response of about 16% ± 4% at 40 keV.S{sub AD,} {sub W}(Q) of the three commercial film models at low energies show strong correlation with the corresponding f{sup −1}(Q) curves. The commercial EBT3 model with 4% Cl in the active layer shows under response of 22% ± 4% at 20 keV and 6% ± 4% at about 40 keV. However, increasing the mass percent of chlorine makes the film more hygroscopic which may affect the stability of the film's readout. The

  11. Improving the energy response of external beam therapy (EBT) GafChromic{sup TM} dosimetry films at low energies (≤100 keV)

    SciTech Connect

    Bekerat, H. Devic, S.; DeBlois, F.; Singh, K.; Sarfehnia, A.; Seuntjens, J.; Shih, Shelley; Yu, Xiang; Lewis, D.

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Purpose of this work is to investigate the effects of varying the active layer composition of external beam therapy (EBT) GafChromic{sup TM} films on the energy dependence of the film, as well as try to develop a new prototype with more uniform energy response at low photon energies (⩽100 keV). Methods: First, the overall energy response (S{sub AD,} {sub W}(Q)) of different commercial EBT type film models that represent the three different generations produced to date, i.e., EBT, EBT2, and EBT3, was investigated. Pieces of each film model were irradiated to a fixed dose of 2 Gy to water for a wide range of beam qualities and the corresponding S{sub AD,} {sub W}(Q) was measured using a flatbed document scanner. Furthermore, the DOSRZnrc Monte Carlo code was used to determine the absorbed dose to water energy dependence of the film, f(Q). Moreover, the intrinsic energy dependence, k{sub bq}(Q), for each film model was evaluated using the corresponding S{sub AD,} {sub W}(Q) and f(Q). In the second part of this study, the authors investigated the effects of changing the chemical composition of the active layer on S{sub AD,} {sub W}(Q). Finally, based on these results, the film manufacturer fabricated several film prototypes and the authors evaluated their S{sub AD,} {sub W}(Q). Results: The commercial EBT film model shows an under response at all energies below 100 keV reaching 39% ± 4% at about 20 keV. The commercial EBT2 and EBT3 film models show an under response of about 27% ± 4% at 20 keV and an over response of about 16% ± 4% at 40 keV.S{sub AD,} {sub W}(Q) of the three commercial film models at low energies show strong correlation with the corresponding f{sup −1}(Q) curves. The commercial EBT3 model with 4% Cl in the active layer shows under response of 22% ± 4% at 20 keV and 6% ± 4% at about 40 keV. However, increasing the mass percent of chlorine makes the film more hygroscopic which may affect the stability of the film's readout. The

  12. SU-E-T-537: Comparison of Intra-Operative Soft X-Rays to Low Energy Electron Beams for Treatment of Superficial Lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Chinsky, B; Diak, A; Gros, S; Sethi

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Superficial soft x-ray applicators have recently been designed for use with existing intra-operative radiotherapy systems. These applicators may be used in treating superficial lesions which are conventionally treated with electron beams. The purpose of this abstract is to compare dose distributions of an intra-operative 50kV x-ray unit with low energy electrons for the treatment of superficial lesions. Methods: Dosimetric parameters for 1 and 3-cm diameter Intrabeam superficial x-ray applicators were measured with EBT3 Gafchromic film in a solid water phantom. Depth dose distributions and profiles (d=2, 5, 10 and 15mm) were obtained by prescribing a dose of 400cGy at 5mm depth below the phantom surface. Corresponding dose profiles for 6-MeV electrons were acquired from a Varian Clinac 21EX at 100 SSD. H and D calibration curves were generated for each modality for 0-800cGy. Results: Dose coverage, penumbra, dose uniformity, surface dose, and dose fall-off were examined. Compared to electrons, Intrabeam lateral dose coverage at 5mm depth was 70% larger with a much sharper (1/4) penumbra. Electron isodose levels bulged with depth, whereas Intrabeam isodose levels exhibited a convex cone shape. The Intrabeam dose profiles demonstrated horns in the dose distribution up to a 5mm depth and an exponential dose fall-off. Relative surface dose was higher for the Intrabeam applicators. Treatment times were comparable for both modalities. Conclusions: The very small penumbra of Intrabeam at shallow depths could be useful in treating superficial lesions adjacent to critical structures. The exponential dose fall-off of Intrabeam makes it appealing in the sparing of structures beyond the lesion. However, for lesions past a depth of 5mm, electrons would be desirable as they penetrate farther and provide skin sparing. Intrabeam may be preferable for sites that are difficult to treat with electrons due to mechanical and physical limitations.

  13. On the existence of low-energy photons (<150 keV) in the unflattened x-ray beam from an ordinary radiotherapeutic target in a medical linear accelerator.

    PubMed

    Tsechanski, A; Krutman, Y; Faermann, S

    2005-12-07

    Low-energy photons (<150 keV) are essential for obtaining high quality x-ray radiographs. These photons are usually produced in the accelerator target, but are effectively absorbed by the flattening filter and, at least partially, by the target itself. Experimental proof is presented for the existence of low-energy photons in the unflattened x-ray beam produced by a 6 MeV electron beam normally incident on the thinner of the two existing ports of the all-Cu radiotherapeutic target of a Clinac 18 (Varian Associates) linear accelerator. A number of one-shot absorption measurements were carried out with 12 foils of Pb absorbers with thicknesses varying from 0.25 to 3 mm in steps of 0.25 mm arranged symmetrically around the central axis on a 7.2 cm radius circumference. A Kodak ECL film-screen-cassette combination was used as a detector in the absorption measurements, in which optical density was measured as a function of the thickness of the Pb absorbers. Two sets of absorption measurements were carried out: the first one with the Clinac 18 6 MV unflattened beam and the second one with the Clinac 600C 6 MV therapeutic counterpart beam. There is a striking difference between the two sets: the optical density versus Pb-absorber thickness curve shows a sharp increase in optical density at small absorber thicknesses in the case of the unflattened 6 MV x-ray beam as compared with a gently sloping dependence in the case of the 6 MV therapeutic beam. A semi-quantitative assessment of the low-energy photon contribution to the whole optical density/contrast is presented. A 0.85 mm thick Pb absorber intercepting the 6 MV unflattened x-ray beam eliminates almost totally the sharp peak in the optical density curve at small Pb-absorber thicknesses. This constitutes additional evidence for the existence of low-energy photons (<150 keV) in the unflattened 6 MV beam from the Cu therapeutic target.

  14. Numerical Analysis of the Measurement of Near-Beam Electron Cloud Density in Field-Free Region at KEK B-Factory Low-Energy Ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Puneet; Fukuma, Hitoshi; Kanazawa, Ken-ichi; Suetsugu, Yusuke

    2010-11-01

    A large number of electrons in the so-called electron cloud are accumulated in beam chambers in positron storage rings. These electrons interact with the beam and can make the beam unstable. The density information of the electron cloud near the beam is therefore fundamental for studying beam instability and mitigation techniques related to the electron cloud. Recently, a method to measure the density of the electron cloud near the beam has been proposed by Kanazawa et al. The method enables the measurement of high-energy electrons selectively using a retarding field analyzer located on a chamber wall, noting that the electrons near the beam receive a strong kick by the beam. They calculated the density of the electron cloud simply assuming that the electrons that receive a kick are stationary. We examined the measurement technique in detail using a new computer code developed by us. The analysis showed that the volume near the beam occupied by the detected electrons, i.e., the observed volume, was strongly deformed owing to the horizontal velocity of the electrons; nevertheless this volume calculated assuming that the stationary electrons can still be used for calculating the density of the electron cloud in their measurement conditions.

  15. Low energy supersymmetry phenomenology

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, H.; Chen, C.H.; Bartl, A.

    1995-03-01

    The authors summarize the current status and future prospects for low energy (weak scale) supersymmetry. In particular, they evaluate the capabilities of various e{sup +}e{sup {minus}}, p{anti p} and pp colliders to discover evidence for supersymmetric particles. Furthermore, assuming supersymmetry is discovered, they discuss capabilities of future facilities to disentangle the anticipated spectrum of superparticles, and, via precision measurements, to test mass and coupling parameters for comparison with various theoretical expectations. They comment upon the complementarity of proposed hadron and e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} machines for a comprehensive study of low energy supersymmetry.

  16. Low energy supersymmetry phenomenology

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, H.; Chen, C.H.; Bartl, A.; Feng, J.; Fujii, K.; Gunion, J.; Kamon, T.; Lopez, J.L.; Kao, C.

    1995-04-01

    The authors summarize the current status and future prospects for low energy (weak scale) supersymmetry. In particular, they evaluate the capabilities of various e{sup +}e{sup {minus}}, p{bar p} and pp colliders to discover evidence for supersymmetric particles. Furthermore, assuming supersymmetry is discovered, they discuss capabilities of future facilities to disentangle the anticipated spectrum of super-particles, and, via precision measurements, to test mass and coupling parameters for comparison with various theoretical expectations. The authors then comment upon the complementarity of proposed hadron and e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} machines for a comprehensive study of low energy supersymmetry.

  17. On the possibility of generating low-energy positrons on accelerators of electrons with a beam energy of a few MeV and on terawatt lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorlova, D. A.; Nedorezov, V. G.; Ivanov, K. A.; Savel'ev, A. B.; Turinge, A. A.; Tsymbalov, I. N.

    2017-06-01

    Based on the numerical simulations, we estimate the possibility of generating positrons by low-energy electrons (below 10 MeV) produced by electron accelerators and femtosecond lasers. A review of experimental work reported in the literature is presented. The simulation is carried out using the GEANT-4 software package for the particular conditions of a possible experiment at the terawatt femtosecond laser facility of the International Laser Centre at the Moscow State University and the LUE-8 MeV linear electron accelerator at the Institute for Nuclear Research, Russian Academy of Sciences.

  18. LOW ENERGY COUNTING CHAMBERS

    DOEpatents

    Hayes, P.M.

    1960-02-16

    A beta particle counter adapted to use an end window made of polyethylene terephthalate was designed. The extreme thinness of the film results in a correspondingly high transmission of incident low-energy beta particles by the window. As a consequence, the counting efficiency of the present counter is over 40% greater than counters using conventional mica end windows.

  19. Low-energy SiC2H6+ and SiC3H9+ ion beam productions by the mass-selection of fragments produced from hexamethyldisilane for SiC film formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimura, Satoru; Sugimoto, Satoshi; Murai, Kensuke; Kiuchi, Masato

    2016-12-01

    We have been attempting to produce low-energy ion beams from fragments produced through the decomposition of hexamethyldisilane (HMD) for silicon carbide (SiC) film formations. We mass-selected SiC2H6+ and SiC3H9+ ions from fragments produced from HMD, and finally produced low-energy SiC2H6+ and SiC3H9+ ion beams. The ion energy was approximately 100 eV. Then, the ion beams were irradiated to Si(100) substrates. The temperature of the Si substrate was 800°C during the ion irradiation. The X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy of the substrates obtained following SiC2H6+ ion irradiation demonstrated the occurrence of 3C-SiC deposition. On the other hand, the film deposited by the irradiation of SiC3H9+ ions included diamond-like carbon in addition to 3C-SiC.

  20. Development of a low-energy and high-current pulsed neutral beam injector with a washer-gun plasma source for high-beta plasma experiments.

    PubMed

    Ii, Toru; Gi, Keii; Umezawa, Toshiyuki; Asai, Tomohiko; Inomoto, Michiaki; Ono, Yasushi

    2012-08-01

    We have developed a novel and economical neutral-beam injection system by employing a washer-gun plasma source. It provides a low-cost and maintenance-free ion beam, thus eliminating the need for the filaments and water-cooling systems employed conventionally. In our primary experiments, the washer gun produced a source plasma with an electron temperature of approximately 5 eV and an electron density of 5 × 10(17) m(-3), i.e., conditions suitable for ion-beam extraction. The dependence of the extracted beam current on the acceleration voltage is consistent with space-charge current limitation, because the observed current density is almost proportional to the 3/2 power of the acceleration voltage below approximately 8 kV. By optimizing plasma formation, we successfully achieved beam extraction of up to 40 A at 15 kV and a pulse length in excess of 0.25 ms. Its low-voltage and high-current pulsed-beam properties enable us to apply this high-power neutral beam injection into a high-beta compact torus plasma characterized by a low magnetic field.

  1. Prize for Industrial Applications of Physics Talk: Low energy spread Ion source for focused ion beam systems-Search for the holy grail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Bill

    2011-03-01

    In this talk I will cover my personal experiences as a serial entrepreneur and founder of a succession of focused ion beam companies (1). Ion Beam Technology, which developed a 200kv (FIB) direct ion implanter (2). Micrion, where the FIB found a market in circuit edit and mask repair, which eventually merged with FEI corporation. and (3). ALIS Corporation which develop the Orion system, the first commercially successful sub-nanometer helium ion microscope, that was ultimately acquired by Carl Zeiss corporation. I will share this adventure beginning with my experiences in the early days of ion beam implantation and e-beam lithography which lead up to the final breakthrough understanding of the mechanisms that govern the successful creation and operation of a single atom ion source.

  2. Low energy ionizing collisions between N2 and CO beam molecules and CO, N2, NO, CH4, and CO2 target molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Utterback, N. G.; Van Zyl, B.

    1978-01-01

    Absolute total negative charge production cross sections for N2 + CO, CO + N2, CO + CO, N2 + NO, N2 + CH4, and N2 + CO2 collisions are reported, and a simple model of collisions is discussed. The cross sections were measured to within about 1 eV of their thresholds. Specific reaction channels were investigated by referring to mass spectrometric identification of the product ions scattered in the forward direction, and these product ion identifications were used to explain characteristic structures in the total charge production cross sections in the near-threshold regions. The extent of the importance of dissociative ionization and 'simple' ionization in the studied collisions at low energy is considered, and charge transfer cross sections for (CO)+ + CO, CO(+) + CH4, and N2(+) + CH4 are presented.

  3. Low energy ionizing collisions between N2 and CO beam molecules and CO, N2, NO, CH4, and CO2 target molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Utterback, N. G.; Van Zyl, B.

    1978-01-01

    Absolute total negative charge production cross sections for N2 + CO, CO + N2, CO + CO, N2 + NO, N2 + CH4, and N2 + CO2 collisions are reported, and a simple model of collisions is discussed. The cross sections were measured to within about 1 eV of their thresholds. Specific reaction channels were investigated by referring to mass spectrometric identification of the product ions scattered in the forward direction, and these product ion identifications were used to explain characteristic structures in the total charge production cross sections in the near-threshold regions. The extent of the importance of dissociative ionization and 'simple' ionization in the studied collisions at low energy is considered, and charge transfer cross sections for (CO)+ + CO, CO(+) + CH4, and N2(+) + CH4 are presented.

  4. Parameter optimization for Doppler laser cooling of a low-energy heavy ion beam at the storage ring S-LSR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osaki, Kazuya; Okamoto, Hiromi

    2014-05-01

    S-LSR is a compact ion storage ring constructed at Kyoto University several years ago. The ring is equipped with a Doppler laser cooling system aimed at beam crystallization. Bearing in mind hardware limitations in S-LSR, we try to find an optimum set of primary experimental parameters for the production of an ultracold heavy ion beam. Systematic molecular dynamics simulations are carried out for this purpose. It is concluded that the detuning and spot size of the cooling laser should be chosen around -42 MHz and 1.5 mm, respectively, for the most efficient cooling of 40 keV ^{24}Mg^+ beams in S-LSR. Under the optimum conditions, the use of the resonant coupling method followed by radio-frequency field ramping enables us to reach an extremely low beam temperature on the order of 0.1 K in the transverse degrees of freedom. The longitudinal degree of freedom can be cooled to close to the Doppler limit; i.e., to the mK range. We also numerically demonstrate that it is possible to establish a stable, long one-dimensionally ordered state of ions.

  5. Study of diffusion influence on plasma channel while transporting a low-energy high intensity electron beam in the low pressure gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zvigintsev, I. L.; Grigoriev, V. P.

    2017-05-01

    This work studies the mathematical model of plasma channel. We consider the beam current in the range of 100-400 A and the external magnetic field in the range of 100-1500 G. It is shown that plasma channel expands under the influence of diffusion. The channel expansion is inversely proportional to the external magnetic field magnitude.

  6. Low-energy neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludhova, Livia

    2016-05-01

    There exist several kinds of sources emitting neutrinos in the MeV energy range. These low-energy neutrinos from different sources can be often detected by the same multipurpose detectors. The status-of-art of the field of solar neutrinos, geoneutrinos, and the search for sterile neutrino with artificial neutrino sources is provided here; other neutrino sources, as for example reactor or high-energy neutrinos, are described elsewhere. For each of these three fields, the present-day motivation and open questions, as well as the latest experimental results and future perspectives are discussed.

  7. Low energy p p physics

    SciTech Connect

    Amsler, C.; Crowe, K. . Inst. fuer Physik; Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA )

    1989-02-01

    A detailed investigation of proton-antiproton interactions at low energy has become feasible with the commissioning of the LEAR facility in 1983. We shall shortly review the status of {bar p}p annihilation at rest and the physics motivations for second generation experiments with the Crystal Barrel detector. This type of detector would be adequate for the study of both Kp and {bar p}p interactions on an extracted beam of the KAON Factory. We shall conclude with a few remarks on the physics opportunities with {bar p}'s at the KAON Factory which, in our opinion, will not be covered by the present LEAR facility. 11 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Observation of a variable sub-THz radiation driven by a low energy electron beam from a thermionic rf electron gun

    DOE PAGES

    Smirnov, A. V.; Agustsson, R.; Berg, W. J.; ...

    2015-09-29

    We report observations of an intense sub-THz radiation extracted from a ~3 MeV electron beam with a flat transverse profile propagating between two parallel oversized copper gratings with side openings. Low-loss radiation outcoupling is accomplished using a horn antenna and a miniature permanent magnet separating sub-THz and electron beams. A tabletop experiment utilizes a radio frequency thermionic electron gun delivering a thousand momentum-chirped microbunches per macropulse and an alpha-magnet with a movable beam scraper producing sub-mm microbunches. The radiated energy of tens of micro-Joules per radio frequency macropulse is demonstrated. The frequency of the radiation peak was generated and tunedmore » across two frequency ranges: (476–584) GHz with 7% instantaneous spectrum bandwidth, and (311–334) GHz with 38% instantaneous bandwidth. In this study, the prototype setup features a robust compact source of variable frequency, narrow bandwidth sub-THz pulses.« less

  9. Optimization of L-lactic Acid Production of Rhizopus Oryzae Mutant RLC41-6 by Ion Beam Implantation at Low-Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiuhong; Ge, Chunmei; Yao, Jianming; Pan, Renrui; Yu, Zengliang

    2005-10-01

    In order to obtain an industrial strain with a higher L(+)-lactic acid yield, the strain Rhizopus oryzae RF3608 was mutated by means of nitrogen ion beam implantation and the mutant strain RLC41-6 was isolated. Under optimal conditions the yield of L(+)-lactic acid produced in a shake-flask reached 133 g/L-137 g/L after 36 h cultivation, indicating that the conversion rate based on glucose was as high as 88%-91% and the productivity was 3.75 g/L.h. It was almost a 115% increase in lactic acid production compared with the original strain RF3608.

  10. Temperature distribution in a sample with second-phase microinclusions during irradiation by a low-energy high-current pulsed electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepel', D. A.; Markov, A. B.

    2017-02-01

    Using the methods of numerical integration, a temperature field has been calculated that arose in the surface layer of titanium nickelide target with NiTi2 intermetallic inclusions during irradiation by a lowenergy high-current electron beam with a duration of the order of a microsecond. The calculated temperature field has been compared with that obtained previously for a target of stainless steel 316L containing MnS inclusions. It has been found that, as in the case of stainless steel, the regions of inclusions are overheated. However, the temperature increase for NiTi2 (12 K) is significantly lower than in the case of stainless steel 316L (283 K). The dynamics of melting of these systems are also considerably different.

  11. Simultaneous Counter-Ion Co-Deposition a Technique Enabling Matrix Isolation Spectroscopy Studies Using Low-Energy Beams of Mass-Selected Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, Ryan M.; Moore, David T.

    2014-06-01

    Matrix isolation spectroscopy was first developed in Pimentel's group during the 1950's to facilitate spectroscopic studies of transient species. Cryogenic matrices of condensed rare gases provide an inert chemical environment with facile energy dissipation and are transparent at all wavelengths longer than vacuum UV, making them ideal for studying labile and reactive species such as radicals, weakly bound complexes, and ions. Since frozen rare gases are poor electrolytes, studies of ions require near-equal populations of anions and cations in order to stabilize the number densities required for spectroscopic experiments. Many techniques for generation of ions for using in matrix isolation studies satisfy this criterion intrinsically, however when ion beams generated in external sources are deposited, the counter-ions typically arise via secondary processes that are at best loosely controlled. It has long been recognized that it would be desirable to stabilize deposition of mass-selected ions generated in an external source using simultaneous co-deposition of a beam of counter-ions, however previous attempts to achieve this have been reported as unsuccessful. The Moore group at Lehigh has demonstrated successful experiments of this type, using mass-selected anions generated from a metal cluster source, co-deposited with a balanced current of cations generated in a separate electron ionization source. This talk will focus on the details of the technique, and present some results from proof-of-concept studies on anionic copper carbonyl complexes formed in argon matrices following co-deposition of Cu- with Ar+ or Kr+. Funding support from NSF CAREER Award CHE-0955637 is gratefully acknowledged. Whittle et al., J. Chem. Phys. 22, p.1943 (1954); Becker et al., J. Chem. Phys. 25, p.224 (1956). Godbout et al., J. Chem. Phys. 96, p.2892 (1996). Sabo et al., Appl. Spectrosc. 45, p. 535 (1991).

  12. Surface Passivation and Junction Formation Using Low Energy Hydrogen Implants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fonash, S. J.

    1985-01-01

    New applications for high current, low energy hydrogen ion implants on single crystal and polycrystal silicon grain boundaries are discussed. The effects of low energy hydrogen ion beams on crystalline Si surfaces are considered. The effect of these beams on bulk defects in crystalline Si is addressed. Specific applications of H+ implants to crystalline Si processing are discussed. In all of the situations reported on, the hydrogen beams were produced using a high current Kaufman ion source.

  13. Combined dose and geometry correction (DMG) for low energy multi electron beam lithography (5kV): application to the 16nm node

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Luc; Manakli, Serdar; Bayle, Sebastien; Belledent, Jérôme; Soulan, Sebastien; Wiedemann, Pablo; Farah, Abdi; Schiavone, Patrick

    2012-03-01

    Lithography faces today many challenges to meet the ITRS road-map. 193nm is still today the only existing industrial option to address high volume production for the 22nm node. Nevertheless to achieve such a resolution, double exposure is mandatory for critical level patterning. EUV lithography is still challenged by the availability of high power source and mask defectivity and suffers from a high cost of ownership perspective. Its introduction is now not foreseen before 2015. Parallel to these mask-based technologies, maskless lithography regularly makes significant progress in terms of potential and maturity. The massively parallel e-beam solution appears as a real candidate for high volume manufacturing. Several industrial projects are under development, one in the US, with the KLA REBL project and two in Europe driven by IMS Nanofabrication (Austria; MAPPER (The Netherlands). Among the developments to be performed to secure the takeoff of the multi-beam technology, the availability of a rapid and robust data treatment solution will be one of the major challenges. Within this data preparation flow, advanced proximity effect corrections must be implemented to address the 16nm node and below. This paper will detail this process and compare correction strategies in terms of robustness and accuracy. It will be based on results obtained using a MAPPER tool within the IMAGINE program driven by CEA-LETI, in Grenoble, France. All proximity effects corrections and the dithering step were performed using the software platform Inscale® from Aselta Nanographics. One important advantage of Inscale® is the ability to combine both model based dose and geometry adjustment to accurately pattern critical features. The paper will focus on the advantage of combining those two corrections at the 16nm node instead of using only geometry corrections. Thanks to the simulation capability of Inscale®, pattern fidelity and correction robustness will be evaluated and compared between

  14. A study on the effect of low energy ion beam irradiation on Au/TiO2 system for its application in photoelectrochemical splitting of water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Anuradha; Srivastav, Anupam; Sharma, Dipika; Banerjee, Anamika; Sharma, Shailja; Satsangi, Vibha Rani; Shrivastav, Rohit; Avasthi, Devesh Kumar; Dass, Sahab

    2016-07-01

    Nanostructured TiO2 thin films were deposited on indium tin oxide (ITO) substrate via sol-gel technique and were modified by plasmonic Au layer. The plasmonic Au modified TiO2 (Au/TiO2) thin films were then irradiated with 500 keV Ar2+ ion beam at different ion fluences viz. 1 × 1016, 3 × 1016 and 1 × 1017 to study the effect of nuclear energy deposition on the morphology, crystallinity, band gap, surface plasmon resonance (SPR) peak exhibited by Au particles and photoelectrochemical properties of the system. Prepared thin films were characterized by X-ray diffractometry (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) measurements and UV-visible spectroscopy. The photoelectrochemical measurements revealed that both Au/TiO2 and Au/TiO2 thin film irradiated at 1 × 1016 fluence exhibits enhanced photoelectrochemical response in comparison to pristine TiO2. The film irradiated at 1 × 1016 fluence offered maximum applied bias photon-to-current efficiency (ABPE) and shows 6 times increment in photocurrent density which was attributed to more negative flat band potential, maximum decrease in band gap, high open circuit voltage (Voc) and reduced charge transfer resistance.

  15. Mass Measurement with Rare-RI Rin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozawa, Akira

    2014-09-01

    Mass measurement with Rare-RI Ring in RIKEN RI Beam Factory (RIBF) will be presented. The main purpose of Rare-RI Ring is to measure the mass for very neutron-rich nuclei, the production rate of which is very small (rare RI) and the life-time of which is predicted to be very short (less than 10 ms). In Rare-RI Ring, mass measurements will be performed based on isochronous mass spectrometry. There are two innovative apparatus in Rare-RI Ring: individual injection, which can realize the injection of 200 A MeV rare RI one-by-one, and a cyclotron-like storage ring, which allows high isochronous magnetic fields with large angular and momentum acceptances (~1%). By these apparatus, we will achieve a 10-6 mass resolution, and will be able to access rare RI, the production rate of which is down to 1 event/day/pnA in RIBF. Construction of Rare-RI Ring has started from the 2012 fiscal year. Construction of the storage ring itself was almost completed. In this fiscal year, we succeeded to store alphas from 241Am source and to check the production of isochronous fields in the storage ring. In this talk, present status of Rare-RI Ring and the possible mass measurement there will be presented.

  16. Low energy ballasted flotation.

    PubMed

    Jarvis, P; Buckingham, P; Holden, B; Jefferson, B

    2009-08-01

    A novel process which involves the replacement or supplementation of bubbles in the dissolved air flotation process with low density beads is presented. The work comprised a series of bench-scale flotation trials treating three commonly encountered algal species (Microcystis, Melosira and Chlorella) that were removed in a flotation cell configured as either: conventional dissolved air flotation (DAF); ballasted flotation using low density 70 microm glass beads with a density of 100 kg m(-3); or a hybrid process of ballasted flotation combined with conventional DAF. Results indicated that the bead only system was capable of achieving better residual turbidity than standard DAF at bead concentrations of 500 mg L(-1). Addition of beads in combination with standard DAF reduced turbidity further to even lower residual turbidity levels. Algae removal was improved when glass beads were dosed, but removal was dependent on algal species. Microcystis was removed by 97% for bead only systems and this removal did not change significantly with the addition of air bubbles. Melosira was the next best removed algae with bead only dosed systems giving similar removals to that achieved by standard DAF using a 10% air recycle ratio (81 and 76% removal respectively). Chlorella was the least well removed algae by bead only systems (63% removal). However, removal was rapidly improved to 86% by the addition of air bubbles using only a 2% recycle ratio. Energy estimations suggested that at least a 50% energy reduction could be achieved using the process offering a potential route for future development of low energy separation processes for algae removal.

  17. Erosion of a-C:D Thin Films by Low Energy D+, D2+, and D3+ Ion Beam Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Fred W; Harris, Peter R; Zhang, Hengda; Jacob, W.; Schwarz-Selinger, T.; Von Toussaint, U.

    2011-01-01

    We report measurements of total C sputtering yields for room temperature a-C:D thin films irrradiated by equal velocity D{sup +}, D{sub 2}{sup +}, and D{sub 3}{sup +} beams in the energy range 30-200 eV/D. The C sputtering yields were deduced from crater volumes determined from 2-D ellipsometry scans, the known thin film C density, and the measured total number of incident D particles during the beam exposures. While our results for incident D{sub 3}{sup +} ions are in good agreement with mass loss measurements for D{sub 3}{sup +}, our results for D{sub 2}{sup +} and D{sup +} incident ions fall systematically below the D{sub 3}{sup +} results, indicating a significant molecular size effect. A molecular size effect has been previously found for CD{sub 4} production during low energy impact of same velocity D{sup +}, D{sub 2}{sup +}, and D{sub 3}{sup +} ions incident on ATJ graphite, which, however, was smaller in magnitude. The ellipsometry-based total C sputtering yields are compared with recently deduced total C production yields based on a mass spectroscopy approach.

  18. PHYSICS WITH ULTRA-LOW ENERGY ANTIPROTONS

    SciTech Connect

    M. HOLZSCHEITER

    2001-02-01

    In this report the author describes the current status of the antiproton deceleration (AD) facility at CERN, and highlights the physics program with ultra-low energy antiproton at this installation. He also comments on future possibilities provided higher intensity antiproton beams become available at Fermilab, and review possibilities for initial experiments using direct degrading of high energy antiprotons in material has been developed and proven at CERN.

  19. Study on low-energy positron polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schälicke, A.; Alexander, G.; Dollan, R.; Laihem, K.; Lohse, T.; Riemann, S.; Starovoitov, P.; Ushakov, A.

    2007-12-01

    A polarised positron source has been proposed for the design of the international linear collider (ILC). In order to optimise the positron beam, a measurement of its degree of polarisation close to the positron creation point is desired. In this contribution, methods for determining the positron polarisation at low energies are reviewed. A newly developed polarisation extension to GEANT4 will provide the basis for further polarimeter investigations.

  20. Low Energy Accelerator Facility Upgrade and test

    SciTech Connect

    Alford, K.; Chemerisov, S.; Gromov, R.; Hafenrichter, L.; Jonah, C. D.; Tafoya, R.; Wesolowski, K.; Brown, D.; Forknall, S.; Gardner, James; Macrillo, Dave; Zulpo, A.

    2015-01-01

    The Low Energy Accelerator Facility (LEAF) contains a low-energy linac with high average beam power, which was designed and built in the late 1960’s primarily for radiation-chemistry experiments. The maximum beam energy in that configuration was 21 MeV. Although, the installation is old, it is still reliable. The accelerator was repurposed for development of accelerator-based technologies for the production of 99Mo with funding provided by the National Nuclear Security Administration’s Office of Material Management and Minimization (M3 ). An extensive scientific program on the production of radioactive isotopes demanded an upgrade of the accelerator to fit the experimental requirements. Several possible LEAF upgrades were proposed to increase the electron beam energy. The final design proposed the replacement of the old accelerating structures with new ones. In 2011-2012, the new structures were manufactured, installed, and tested with the beam energy up to 50 MeV and average beam power up to 20 kW. LEAF now is an attractive installation for performing research into medical isotope production.

  1. Interaction between Low Energy Ions and the Complicated Organism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zeng-liang

    1999-12-01

    Low energy ions exist widely in natural world, but people pay a little attention on the interaction between low energy ions and matter, it is even more out of the question of studying on the relation of low energy ions and the complicated organism. The discovery of bioeffect induced by ion implantation has, however, opened a new branch in the field of ion beam application in life sciences. This paper reports recent advances in research on the role of low energy ions in chemical synthesis of the biomolecules and application in genetic modification.

  2. Molecular Beam Studies of Low Energy Reactions.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-03-31

    COMPLETING PORN . REPORT NUMBER 1 2. GOVT ACCESSION NO. S. RECIPIENT’S CATALOG NUMBER A D A Oaq J- 4. TITLE (And Subtitle) . TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED...Gatlinburg, Tenn . in 1981. 2+ c) Studies were made of the charge transfer reaction Ar + Ar 4 2+ Ar + Ar at relative energies from 2 to 1000 eV. Reasons for

  3. Acetone, butanol, and ethanol production from cane molasses using Clostridium beijerinckii mutant obtained by combined low-energy ion beam implantation and N-methyl-N-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine induction.

    PubMed

    Li, Han-guang; Luo, Wei; Gu, Qiu-ya; Wang, Qiang; Hu, Wen-jun; Yu, Xiao-bin

    2013-06-01

    In order to obtain mutant strains showing higher solvent tolerance and butanol production than those of wild-type strains, the butanol-producing strain Clostridium beijerinckii L175 was subjected to mutagenesis using a combined method of low-energy ion beam implantation and N-methyl-N-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine induction. With this effort, mutant strain MUT3 was isolated. When it was used for butanol fermentation in P2 medium, the production of butanol was 15.8±0.7 g/L 46% higher than the wild-type strain. Furthermore, after optimization of butanol production from cane molasses with MUT3, the maximum butanol production of 14.9±0.5 g/L were obtained in crew-capped bottles. When ABE production by MUT3 was carried out in a bioreactor, the production of butanol and total solvent were 15.1±0.8 g/L and 22.1±0.9 g/L, respectively. The remarkable butanol production and solvent tolerance of MUT3 make it promising for butanol production from cane molasses.

  4. Low-Energy Sputtering Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, P. K.; Shutthanandan, V.

    1999-01-01

    An experimental study is described to measure low-energy (less than 600 eV) sputtering yields of molybdenum with xenon ions using Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) and secondary neutral mass spectroscopy (SNMS). An ion gun was used to generate the ion beam. The ion current density at the target surface was approximately 30 (micro)A/sq cm. For RBS measurements, the sputtered material was collected on a thin aluminum strip which was mounted on a semi-circular collector plate. The target was bombarded with 200 and 500 eV xenon ions at normal incidence. The differential sputtering yields were measured using the RBS method with 1 MeV helium ions. The differential yields were fitted with a cosine fitting function and integrated with respect to the solid angle to provide the total sputtering yields. The sputtering yields obtained using the RBS method are in reasonable agreement with those measured by other researchers using different techniques. For the SNMS measurements, 150 to 600 eV xenon ions were used at 50deg angle of incidence. The SNMS spectra were converted to sputtering yields for perpendicular incidence by normalizing SNMS spectral data at 500 eV with the yield measured by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. Sputtering yields as well as the shape of the yield-energy curve obtained in this manner are in reasonable agreement with those measured by other researchers using different techniques. Sputtering yields calculated by using two semi-spherical formulations agree reasonably well with measured data. The isotopic composition of secondary ions were measured by bombarding copper with xenon ions at energies ranging from 100 eV to 1.5 keV. The secondary ion flux was found to be enriched in heavy isotopes at low incident ion energies. The heavy isotope enrichment was observed to decrease with increasing impact energy. Beyond 700 eV, light isotopes were sputtered preferentially with the enrichment remaining nearly constant.

  5. Low energy cyclotron for radiocarbon dating

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, J.J.

    1985-01-01

    The author built and tested a low energy cyclotron for radiocarbon dating similar to a conventional mass spectrometer. These tests clearly show that with the addition of a conventional ion source, the low energy cyclotron can perform the extremely high sensitivity /sup 14/C measurements that are now done at accelerator facilities. The author found that no significant background is present when the cyclotron is tuned to accelerate /sup 14/C negative ions and the transmission efficiency is adequate to perform radiocarbon dating on milligram samples of carbon. The internal ion source used did not produce sufficient current to detect /sup 14/C directly at modern concentrations. The author shows how a conventional carbon negative ion source located outside the cyclotron magnet, would produce sufficient beam and provide for quick sample changing to make radiocarbon dating milligram samples with a modest laboratory instrument feasible.

  6. Low-energy neutrino factory design

    SciTech Connect

    Ankenbrandt, C.; Bogacz, S.A.; Bross, A.; Geer, S.; Johnstone, C.; Neuffer, D.; Popovic, M.; /Fermilab

    2009-07-01

    The design of a low-energy (4 GeV) neutrino factory (NF) is described, along with its expected performance. The neutrino factory uses a high-energy proton beam to produce charged pions. The {pi}{sup {+-}} decay to produce muons ({mu}{sup {+-}}), which are collected, accelerated, and stored in a ring with long straight sections. Muons decaying in the straight sections produce neutrino beams. The scheme is based on previous designs for higher energy neutrino factories, but has an improved bunching and phase rotation system, and new acceleration, storage ring, and detector schemes tailored to the needs of the lower energy facility. Our simulations suggest that the NF scheme we describe can produce neutrino beams generated by {approx} 1.4 x 10{sup 21} {mu}{sup +} per year decaying in a long straight section of the storage ring, and a similar number of {mu}{sup -} decays.

  7. Spin polarized low-energy positron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, V. N.; Samarin, S. N.; Sudarshan, K.; Pravica, L.; Guagliardo, P.; Williams, J. F.

    2015-06-01

    This paper presents an investigation of spin polarization of positrons from a source based on the decay of 22Na isotopes. Positrons are moderated by transmission through a tungsten film and electrostatically focussed and transported through a 90 deg deflector to produce a slow positron beam with polarization vector normal to the linear momentum. The polarization of the beam was determined to be about 10% by comparison with polarized electron scattering asymmetries from a thin Fe film on W(110) at 10-10 Torr. Low energy electron emission from Fe layer on W(100) surfaces under positron impact is explored. It is shown that the intensity asymmetry of the electron emission as a function of the incident positron energy can be used to estimate the polarization of the positron beam. Also several materials with long mean free paths for spin relaxation are considered as possible moderators with increased polarization of the emergent positrons.

  8. In situ investigation of the surface silvering of late Roman coins by combined use of high energy broad-beam and low energy micro-beam X-ray fluorescence techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, F. P.; Garraffo, S.; Pappalardo, L.; Rizzo, F.

    2012-07-01

    The compositional analysis of archeological metals performed with the X-ray Fluorescence technique (XRF) provides information on the ancient technology. One of the most interesting case-study concerns the techniques used by Romans for silvering the surface of coins. Different metallurgical processes have been suggested in previous studies. Recently the investigation has been addressed to the mercury-silvering and to its possible use in the mass-production of coins minted during the late period (after 294 AD). In the present paper the non-destructive investigation of the silvering process used for manufacturing the Roman nummi - the important typology of coin introduced by Diocletian in his monetary reform - is approached by the combined use of the standard X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) and the low energy micro-X-Ray Fluorescence (LE-μXRF) portable methods. The research was focused on the systematic determination of the mercury presence in a large number of samples and on its correlation with silver in the surface of the coins. 1041 Roman nummi belonging to the Misurata Treasure were analyzed in situ, at the Leptis Magna Museum (Al Khums, Libya). The treasure, composed of about 108 thousand silvered coins, gives the unique opportunity to study the Roman coinage in a wide interval of time (about 40 years in the period 294-333 AD) and in almost all the imperial mints operating in the Roman world.

  9. RHIC CHALLENGES FOR LOW ENERGY OPERATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    SATOGATA,T.; BRENNAN, J.M.; DREES, A.; FEDOTOV, A.; ROSER, T.; TSOUPAS, N.

    2007-06-25

    There is significant interest in RHIC heavy ion collisions at {radical}s =5-50 GeV/u, motivated by a search for the QCD phase transition critical point. The lowest energies are well below the nominal RHIC gold injection {radical}s = 19.6 GeV/u. There are several challenges that face RHIC operations in this regime, including longitudinal acceptance, magnet field quality, lattice control, and luminosity monitoring. We report on the status of work to address these challenges, including results from beam tests of low energy RHIC operations with protons and gold.

  10. RHIC low energy tests and initial operations

    SciTech Connect

    Satogata,T.; Ahrens, L.; Bai, M.; Brennan, J.M.; Bruno, D.; Butler, J.; Drees, A.; Fedotov, A.; Fischer, W.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Jappe, W.; Lee, R.C.; Mackay, W.W.; Malitsky, N.; Marr, G.; Michnoff, R.; Oerter, B.; Pozdeyev, E.; Roser, T.; Severino, F.; Smith, K.; Tepikian, S.; Tsoupas, N.

    2009-05-04

    Future Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) runs, including a portion of FY10 heavy ion operations, will explore collisions at center of mass energies of 5-50 GeV/n (GeV/nucleon). Operations at these energies is motivated by a search for the QCD phase transition critical point. The lowest end of this energy range is nearly a factor of four below the nominal RHIC injection center of mass energy of {radical} s = 20.8 GeV/n. There are several operational challenges in the RHIC low-energy regime, including harmonic number changes, small longitudinal acceptance, lowered magnet field quality, nonlinear orbit control, and luminosity monitoring. We report on the experience with some of these challenges during beam tests with gold in March 2008, including first RHIC operations at {radical}s = 9.18 GeV/n and first beam experience at {radical}s = 5 GeV/n.

  11. Low Energy Ion-Molecule Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    James M. Farrar

    2004-05-01

    This objective of this project is to study the dynamics of the interactions of low energy ions important in combustion with small molecules in the gas phase and with liquid hydrocarbon surfaces. The first of these topics is a long-standing project in our laboratory devoted to probing the key features of potential energy surfaces that control chemical reactivity. The project provides detailed information on the utilization of specific forms of incident energy, the role of preferred reagent geometries, and the disposal of total reaction energy into product degrees of freedom. We employ crossed molecular beam methods under single collision conditions, at collision energies from below one eV to several eV, to probe potential surfaces over a broad range of distances and interaction energies. These studies allow us to test and validate dynamical models describing chemical reactivity. Measurements of energy and angular distributions of the reaction products with vibrational state resolution provide the key data for these studies. We employ the crossed beam low energy mass spectrometry methods that we have developed over the last several years.

  12. Low Energy Schools in Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heffernan, Martin

    2004-01-01

    Out of a commitment to reducing carbon dioxide emissions, Ireland's Department of Education and Science has designed and constructed two low energy schools, in Tullamore, County Offaly, and Raheen, County Laois. With energy use in buildings responsible for approximately 55% of the CO[subscript 2] released into the atmosphere and a major…

  13. Low Energy Schools in Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heffernan, Martin

    2004-01-01

    Out of a commitment to reducing carbon dioxide emissions, Ireland's Department of Education and Science has designed and constructed two low energy schools, in Tullamore, County Offaly, and Raheen, County Laois. With energy use in buildings responsible for approximately 55% of the CO[subscript 2] released into the atmosphere and a major…

  14. A low energy positron accumulator for the plasma confinement in a compact magnetic mirror trap

    SciTech Connect

    Higaki, Hiroyuki Kaga, Chikato; Nagayasu, Katsushi; Okamoto, Hiromi; Nagata, Yugo; Kanai, Yasuyuki; Yamazaki, Yasunori

    2015-06-29

    A low energy positron accumulator was constructed at RIKEN for the purpose of confining an electron-positron plasma. The use of 5 mCi {sup 22}Na RI source with a standard solid Ne moderator and N{sub 2} buffer gas cooling resulted in a low energy positron yield of ∼ 3 × 10{sup 5} e+/s. So far, 2 × 10{sup 6} positrons have been accumulated in 120s.

  15. Low-energy neutral-current neutrino scattering on nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Tsakstara, V.; Kosmas, T. S.; Wambach, J.

    2011-12-16

    Inelastic cross-sections of neutral current neutrino scattering on the {sup 40}Ar isotope, detector-medium of the ongoing ICARUS experiment, are computed in the context of the quasi-particle random phase approximation by utilizing realistic two-nucleon forces. ICARUS is a multipurpose neutrino physics experiment that includes in its objectives low-energy neutrino detection. The incoming neutrino energy range adopted in our calculations ({epsilon}{sub {nu}}{<=}100 MeV), covers the laboratory low-energy beta-beam-neutrinos and pion-muon stopped neutrino-beams operating or planned to be conducted at future neutron spallation sources. One of the main goals of these neutrino beams is to measure neutrino-nucleus cross sections at low-energies.

  16. A novel approach to microbial breeding--low-energy ion implantation.

    PubMed

    Gu, Shao-Bin; Li, Shi-Chang; Feng, Hui-Yun; Wu, Ying; Yu, Zeng-Liang

    2008-02-01

    Low-energy ions exist widely in the natural world. People had neglected the interaction between low-energy ions and material; it was even more out of the question to study the relation of low-energy ions and the complicated organism until the biological effects of low-energy ion implantation were discovered in 1989. Nowadays, the value of low-energy ion beam implantation, as a new breeding way, has drawn extensive attention of biologists and breeding experts. In this review, the understanding and utilization of microbial breeding by low-energy ion beam irradiation is summarized, including the characteristics of an ion beam bioengineering facility, present status of the technology of low-energy ions for microbial breeding, and new insights into microbial biotechnology.

  17. Electron polarimetry at low energies in Hall C at JLab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaskell, D.

    2013-11-01

    Although the majority of Jefferson Lab experiments require multi-GeV electron beams, there have been a few opportunities to make electron beam polarization measurements at rather low energies. This proceedings will discuss some of the practical difficulties encountered in performing electron polarimetry via Mo/ller scattering at energies on the order of a few hundred MeV. Prospects for Compton polarimetry at very low energies will also be discussed. While Mo/ller scattering is likely the preferred method for electron polarimetry at energies below 500 MeV, there are certain aspects of the polarimeter and experiment design that must be carefully considered.

  18. Electron polarimetry at low energies in Hall C at JLab

    SciTech Connect

    Gaskell, D.

    2013-11-07

    Although the majority of Jefferson Lab experiments require multi-GeV electron beams, there have been a few opportunities to make electron beam polarization measurements at rather low energies. This proceedings will discuss some of the practical difficulties encountered in performing electron polarimetry via Mo/ller scattering at energies on the order of a few hundred MeV. Prospects for Compton polarimetry at very low energies will also be discussed. While Mo/ller scattering is likely the preferred method for electron polarimetry at energies below 500 MeV, there are certain aspects of the polarimeter and experiment design that must be carefully considered.

  19. The low energy signaling network

    PubMed Central

    Tomé, Filipa; Nägele, Thomas; Adamo, Mattia; Garg, Abhroop; Marco-llorca, Carles; Nukarinen, Ella; Pedrotti, Lorenzo; Peviani, Alessia; Simeunovic, Andrea; Tatkiewicz, Anna; Tomar, Monika; Gamm, Magdalena

    2014-01-01

    Stress impacts negatively on plant growth and crop productivity, caicultural production worldwide. Throughout their life, plants are often confronted with multiple types of stress that affect overall cellular energy status and activate energy-saving responses. The resulting low energy syndrome (LES) includes transcriptional, translational, and metabolic reprogramming and is essential for stress adaptation. The conserved kinases sucrose-non-fermenting-1-related protein kinase-1 (SnRK1) and target of rapamycin (TOR) play central roles in the regulation of LES in response to stress conditions, affecting cellular processes and leading to growth arrest and metabolic reprogramming. We review the current understanding of how TOR and SnRK1 are involved in regulating the response of plants to low energy conditions. The central role in the regulation of cellular processes, the reprogramming of metabolism, and the phenotypic consequences of these two kinases will be discussed in light of current knowledge and potential future developments. PMID:25101105

  20. The Low Energy Neutrino Factory

    SciTech Connect

    Bross, Alan; Geer, Steve; Ellis, Malcolm; Fernandez Martinez, Enrique; Li, Tracey; Pascoli, Silvia; Mena, Olga

    2010-03-30

    We show that a low energy neutrino factory with a baseline of 1300 km and muon energy of 4.5 GeV has an excellent physics reach. The results of our optimisation studies demonstrate that such a setup can have remarkable sensitivity to theta{sub 13} and delta for sin{sup 2}(2theta{sub 13})>10{sup -4}, and to the mass hierarchy for sin{sup 2}(2theta{sub 13})>10{sup -3}. We also illustrate the power of the unique combination of golden and platinum channels accessible to the low energy neutrino factory. We have considered both a 20 kton totally active scintillating detector and a 100 kton liquid argon detector as possible detector technologies, finding that a liquid argon detector with very good background rejection can produce sensitivity to theta{sub 13} and delta with that of the International Design Study neutrino factory.

  1. Review of Low Energy Neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergados, J. D.

    2007-04-01

    Some issues regarding low energy neutrinos are reviewed. We focus on three aspects i)We show that by employing very low energy (a few keV) electron neutrinos, neutrino disappearance oscillations can be investigated by detecting recoiling electrons with low threshold spherical gaseous TPC's. In such an experiment, which is sensitive to the small mixing angle θ13, the novel feature is that the oscillation length is so small that the full oscillation takes place inside the detector. Thus one can determine accurately all the oscillation parameters and, in particular, measure or set a good limit on θ13. ii) Low threshold gaseous TPC detectors can also be used in detecting nuclear recoils by exploiting the neutral current interaction. Thus these robust and stable detectors can be employed in supernova neutrino detection. iii) The lepton violating neutrinoless double decay is investigated focusing on how the absolute neutrino mass can be extracted from the data.

  2. ELECTRON COOLING SIMULATIONS FOR LOW-ENERGY RHIC OPERATION.

    SciTech Connect

    FEDOTOV,A.V.; BEN-ZVI, I.; CHANG, X.; KAYRAN, D.; SATOGATA, T.

    2007-09-10

    Recently, a strong interest emerged in running the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at low beam total energies of 2.5-25 GeV/nucleon, substantially lower than the nominal beam total energy of 100 GeV/nucleon. Collisions in this low energy range are motivated by one of the key questions of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) about the existence and location of critical point on the QCD phase diagram. Applying electron cooling directly at these low energies in RHIC would result in significant luminosity increase and long beam stores for physics. Without direct cooling in RHIC at these low energies, beam lifetime and store times are very short, limited by strong transverse and longitudinal intrabeam scattering (IBS). In addition, for the lowest energies of the proposed energy scan, the longitudinal emittance of ions injected from the AGS into RHIC may be too big to fit into the RHIC RF bucket. An improvement in the longitudinal emittance of the ion beam can be provided by an electron cooling system at the AGS injection energy. Simulations of electron cooling both for direct cooling at low energies in RHIC and for injection energy cooling in the AGS were performed and are summarized in this report.

  3. Study of the NLC Linac Optics Compatible with a Low Energy Scenario

    SciTech Connect

    Nosochkov, Yuri

    2002-02-27

    We explore the NLC linac optics compatible with a low energy scenario where initially only part of the full linac is installed. Optics modification suitable for a low energy beam running and upgrade to the nominal energy is discussed. Linac parameters and beam tolerances in the modified lattice are compared to the nominal design.

  4. Past, present and future low energy antiproton facilities at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartmann, W.; Belochitskii, P.; Breuker, H.; Butin, F.; Carli, C.; Eriksson, T.; Maury, S.; Oelert, W.; Pasinelli, S.; Tranquille, G.

    2014-05-01

    Low energy antiprotons are available for physics experiments at CERN since the 1980s and have been used by a large variety of experiments. The Low Energy Antiproton Ring LEAR has been constructed as a complementary use of antiprotons available at that time for high energy physics and delivered beam to experiments mainly using slow extraction. After completion of LEAR exploitation, the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) was constructed (adaptation of the existing Antiproton Collector, AC) to allow for a simpler low energy antiproton scheme (only one accelerator operated with Antiprotons) with fast extraction well suited for trap experiments. The Extra Low ENergy Antiproton ring ELENA is a small synchrotron presently constructed to further decelerate antiprotons from the AD in a controlled manner, and to reduce emittances with the help of an electron cooler to improve the capture efficiencies of existing experiments and allow for additional ones.

  5. Low energy cyclotron for radiocarbon dating

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, J.J.

    1984-12-01

    The measurement of naturally occurring radioisotopes whose half lives are less than a few hundred million years but more than a few years provides information about the temporal behavior of geologic and climatic processes, the temporal history of meteoritic bodies as well as the production mechanisms of these radioisotopes. A new extremely sensitive technique for measuring these radioisotopes at tandem Van de Graaff and cyclotron facilities has been very successful though the high cost and limited availability have been discouraging. We have built and tested a low energy cyclotron for radiocarbon dating similar in size to a conventional mass spectrometer. These tests clearly show that with the addition of a conventional ion source, the low energy cyclotron can perform the extremely high sensitivity /sup 14/C measurements that are now done at accelerator facilities. We found that no significant background is present when the cyclotron is tuned to accelerate /sup 14/C negative ions and the transmission efficiency is adequate to perform radiocarbon dating on milligram samples of carbon. The internal ion source used did not produce sufficient current to detect /sup 14/C directly at modern concentrations. We show how a conventional carbon negative ion source, located outside the cyclotron magnet, would produce sufficient beam and provide for quick sampling to make radiocarbon dating milligram samples with a modest laboratory instrument feasible.

  6. RHIC low-energy challenges and plans

    SciTech Connect

    Satogata,T.; Ahrens, L.; Bai, M.; Brennan, J.M.; Bruno, D.; Butler, J.; Drees, A.; Fedotov, A.; Fischer, W.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Jappe, W.; Lee, R.C.; MacKay, W.W.; Malitsky, N.; Marr, G.; Michnoff, R.; Oerter, B.; Pozdeyev, E.; Roser, T.; Schoefer, V.; Severino, F.; Smith, K.; Tepikian, S.; Tsoupas, N.

    2009-06-08

    Future Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) runs, including a portion of FY10 heavy ion operations, will explore collisions at center of mass energies of 5-50 GeV/n (GeV/nucleon). Operations at these energies is motivated by the search for a possible QCD phase transition critical point. The lowest end of this energy range is nearly a factor of four below the nominal RHIC injection center of mass energy {radical}s = 19.6 GeV/n. There are several operational challenges in the RHIC low-energy regime, including harmonic number changes, small longitudinal acceptance, lowered magnet field quality, nonlinear orbit control, and luminosity monitoring. We report on the experience with these challenges during beam tests with gold beams in March 2008. This includes first operations at {radical}s = 9.18 GeV/n, first beam experience at {radical}s = 5 GeV/n, and luminosity projections for near-term operations.

  7. Low energy neutrons from sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahluwalia, H. S.

    1975-01-01

    Arguments are presented in support of an earlier suggestion that low-energy neutrons are likely to be more commonly produced in the solar atmosphere. It appears that protons with an energy not exceeding 100 MeV are more significant, especially those with an energy of about 10 MeV. It is also clear that in addition to the light elements C, N, O, and Ne, due attention should be paid to elements such as Mg, Si, S, Fe, etc., and their isotopes, even if they are not so abundant.-

  8. Low energy ion-molecule reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Farrar, J.M.

    1993-12-01

    This project is concerned with elucidating the dynamics of elementary ion-molecule reactions at collision energies near and below 1 eV. From measurements of the angular and energy distributions of the reaction products, one can infer intimathe details about the nature of collisions leading to chemical reaction, the geometries and lifetimes of intermediate complexes that govern the reaction dynamics, and the collision energy dependence of these dynamical features. The author employs crossed-beam low energy mass spectrometry technology developed over the last several years, with the focus of current research on proton transfer and hydrogen atom transfer reactions of te O{sup {minus}} ion with species such as HF, H{sub 2}O, and NH{sub 3}.

  9. Low-energy neutral-atom spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Voss, D.E.; Cohen, S.A.

    1982-04-01

    The design, calibration, and performance of a low energy neutral atom spectrometer are described. Time-of-flight analysis is used to measure the energy spectrum of charge-exchange deuterium atoms emitted from the PLT tokamak plasma in the energy range from 20 to 1000 eV. The neutral outflux is gated on a 1 ..mu..sec time scale by a slotted rotating chopper disc, supported against gravity in vacuum by magnetic levitation, and is detected by secondary electron emission from a Cu-Be plate. The energy dependent detection efficiency has been measured in particle beam experiments and on the tokamak so that the diagnostic is absolutely calibrated, allowing quantitative particle fluxes to be determined with 200 ..mu..sec time resolution. In addition to its present application as a plasma diagnostic, the instrument is capable of making a wide variety of measurements relevant to atomic and surface physics.

  10. Fusion reactions at low energy

    SciTech Connect

    Beckerman, M.

    1985-01-01

    Fusion measurement methods at low energies are briefly described, and experimental and theoretical fusion cross sections for /sup 58/Ni + /sup 58/Ni, /sup 58/Ni + /sup 64/Ni and /sup 64/Ni + /sup 64/Ni reactions are discussed. It is shown that quantal tunneling calculations do not describe the near- and sub-barrier behavior of the fusion data. Instead, the WKB predictions fall progressively further blow the experimental results as the energy is lowered. At far subbarrier energies the measured cross sections exceed the WKB predictions by more than three orders of magnitude. The unexpectedly strong dependence of the fusion probability upon the nuclear valence structure is illustrated and discussed. The relationship of channel coupling and quantal tunneling is discussed. In conclusion, it was established that atomic nuclei fuse far more readily at low energies that would be expected from quantal tunneling considerations alone. It was found that the behavior of the cross sections for fusion depends strongly upon the valence structure of the collision partners. This structural dependence extends from light 1p-shell systems to systems involving nearly 200 nucleons. These new phenomena may be viewed as characterizing the tunneling of a quantal system with many degrees of freedom. The failure of standard tunneling models may be understood as resulting from the ability of the dinuclear system to tunnel into the classically forbidden region by means of couplings to intrinsic degrees of freedom. 38 refs. (WHK)

  11. Low-energy electron potentiometry.

    PubMed

    Jobst, Johannes; Kautz, Jaap; Mytiliniou, Maria; Tromp, Rudolf M; van der Molen, Sense Jan

    2017-10-01

    In a lot of systems, charge transport is governed by local features rather than being a global property as suggested by extracting a single resistance value. Consequently, techniques that resolve local structure in the electronic potential are crucial for a detailed understanding of electronic transport in realistic devices. Recently, we have introduced a new potentiometry method based on low-energy electron microscopy (LEEM) that utilizes characteristic features in the reflectivity spectra of layered materials [1]. Performing potentiometry experiments in LEEM has the advantage of being fast, offering a large field of view and the option to zoom in and out easily, and of being non-invasive compared to scanning-probe methods. However, not all materials show clear features in their reflectivity spectra. Here we, therefore, focus on a different version of low-energy electron potentiometry (LEEP) that uses the mirror mode transition, i.e. the drop in electron reflectivity around zero electron landing energy when they start to interact with the sample rather than being reflected in front of it. This transition is universal and sensitive to the local electrostatic surface potential (either workfunction or applied potential). It can consequently be used to perform LEEP experiments on a broader range of material compared to the method described in Ref[1]. We provide a detailed description of the experimental setup and demonstrate LEEP on workfunction-related intrinsic potential variations on the Si(111) surface and for a metal-semiconductor-metal junction with external bias applied. In the latter, we visualize the Schottky effect at the metal-semiconductor interface. Finally, we compare how robust the two LEEP techniques discussed above are against image distortions due to sample inhomogeneities or contamination. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Potential for luminosity improvement for low-energy RHIC operation

    SciTech Connect

    Fedotov A. V.

    2012-05-20

    At the Brookhaven National Laboratory, a physics program, motivated by the search of the QCD phase transition critical point, requires operation of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) with heavy ions at very low beam energies corresponding to 2.5-20 GeV/n. Several physics runs were already successfully performed at these low energies. However, the luminosity is very low at lowest energies of interest (< 10 GeV/n) limited by the intra-beam scattering and space-charge, as well as by machine nonlinearities. At these low energies, electron cooling could be very effective in counteracting luminosity degradation due to the IBS, while it is less effective against other limitations. Overall potential luminosity improvement for low-energy RHIC operation from cooling is summarized for various energies, taking into account all these limitations as well as beam lifetime measured during the low-energy RHIC runs. We also explore a possibility of further luminosity improvement under the space-charge limitation.

  13. Low-Energy Proton Testing Methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellish, Jonathan A.; Marshall, Paul W.; Heidel, David F.; Schwank, James R.; Shaneyfelt, Marty R.; Xapsos, M.A.; Ladbury, Raymond L.; LaBel, Kenneth A.; Berg, Melanie; Kim, Hak S.; Phan, Anthony; Friendlich, M.R.; Rodbell, Kenneth P.; Hakey, Mark C.; Dodd, Paul E.; Reed, Robert A.; Weller, Robert A.; Mendenhall, Marcus H.; Sierawski, B.D.

    2009-01-01

    Use of low-energy protons and high-energy light ions is becoming necessary to investigate current-generation SEU thresholds. Systematic errors can dominate measurements made with low-energy protons. Range and energy straggling contribute to systematic error. Low-energy proton testing is not a step-and-repeat process. Low-energy protons and high-energy light ions can be used to measure SEU cross section of single sensitive features; important for simulation.

  14. Low-energy nuclear reactions in crystal structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagulya, A. V.; Dalkarov, O. D.; Negodaev, M. A.; Rusetskii, A. S.

    2017-09-01

    Results of studying low-energy nuclear reactions at the HELIS facility (LPI) are presented. Investigations of yields from DD reactions in deuterated crystal structures at deuteron energies of 10 to 25 keV show a considerable enhancement effect. It is shown that exposure of the deuterated targets to the H+ (proton) and Ne+ beams with energies from 10 to 25 keV and an X-ray beam with the energy of 20 to 30 keV stimulates DD reaction yields. For the CVD diamond target, it is shown that its orientation with respect to the deuteron beam affects the neutron yield. The D+ beam is shown to cause much higher heat release in the TiDx target than the H+ and Ne+ beams, and this heat release depends on the deuterium concentration in the target and the current density of the deuteron beam.

  15. Method and apparatus for generating low energy nuclear particles

    DOEpatents

    Powell, J.R.; Reich, M.; Ludewig, H.; Todosow, M.

    1999-02-09

    A particle accelerator generates an input particle beam having an initial energy level above a threshold for generating secondary nuclear particles. A thin target is rotated in the path of the input beam for undergoing nuclear reactions to generate the secondary particles and correspondingly decrease energy of the input beam to about the threshold. The target produces low energy secondary particles and is effectively cooled by radiation and conduction. A neutron scatterer and a neutron filter are also used for preferentially degrading the secondary particles into a lower energy range if desired. 18 figs.

  16. Method and apparatus for generating low energy nuclear particles

    DOEpatents

    Powell, James R.; Reich, Morris; Ludewig, Hans; Todosow, Michael

    1999-02-09

    A particle accelerator (12) generates an input particle beam having an initial energy level above a threshold for generating secondary nuclear particles. A thin target (14) is rotated in the path of the input beam for undergoing nuclear reactions to generate the secondary particles and correspondingly decrease energy of the input beam to about the threshold. The target (14) produces low energy secondary particles and is effectively cooled by radiation and conduction. A neutron scatterer (44) and a neutron filter (42) are also used for preferentially degrading the secondary particles into a lower energy range if desired.

  17. Beam-energy dependence and updated test of the Trojan-horse nucleus invariance via a measurement of the 2H(d ,p )3H reaction at low energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chengbo; Wen, Qungang; Tumino, A.; Fu, Yuanyong; Zhou, Jing; Zhou, Shuhua; Meng, Qiuying; Spitaleri, C.; Pizzone, R. G.; Lamia, L.

    2017-03-01

    The 2H(d ,p )3H bare nucleus astrophysical S (E ) factor has been measured indirectly at energies from about 500 keV down to several keV by means of the Trojan-horse method applied to the 2H(6Li,p t )4He quasifree reaction induced at 11 MeV. The obtained results are compared with direct data as well as with previous indirect investigation of the same binary reactions. It shows that the precision of S (E ) data in the low-energy range extracted via the same Trojan-horse nuclei [6Li=(d ⊕α )] becomes better when the incident energy of the virtual binary process decreases from high value down to the lower Gamow energy range, which near the zero-quasi-free-energy point. The very good agreement between data extracted from different Trojan-horse nuclei [6Li=(d ⊕α ) vs 3He=(d ⊕p )] gives a strong updated test for the independence of the binary indirect cross section on the chosen Trojan-horse nucleus at low energies.

  18. Rare-RI ring for mass measurements at RIBF

    SciTech Connect

    Ozawa, Akira

    2014-05-02

    The rare-RI (radioactive isotope) ring at the RIKEN RI Beam Factory is described. The main purpose of the rare-RI ring is to measure the mass of short-lived rare RI. In the rare-RI ring, the mass is determined by measuring the revolution time of each nucleus based on isochronous mass spectrometry. The rare-RI ring consists of six magnetic sectors, and each sector consists of four dipole magnets. To precisely optimize the isochronous conditions of the circulating particles for large acceptance, we install 10 trim coils to half of the dipole magnets. Individual injection system enables efficient injection of the produced rare RI into the ring one by one. With facilitating efficient extraction of the circulating particles, time-of-flight measurements can be performed to the each rare RI. Construction of the rare-RI ring was begun in the middle of the fiscal year 2012, and the ring is expected to be fully functional by 2015, when we can start the mass measurements for unknown masses.

  19. Rare-RI ring for mass measurements at RIBF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozawa, Akira

    2014-05-01

    The rare-RI (radioactive isotope) ring at the RIKEN RI Beam Factory is described. The main purpose of the rare-RI ring is to measure the mass of short-lived rare RI. In the rare-RI ring, the mass is determined by measuring the revolution time of each nucleus based on isochronous mass spectrometry. The rare-RI ring consists of six magnetic sectors, and each sector consists of four dipole magnets. To precisely optimize the isochronous conditions of the circulating particles for large acceptance, we install 10 trim coils to half of the dipole magnets. Individual injection system enables efficient injection of the produced rare RI into the ring one by one. With facilitating efficient extraction of the circulating particles, time-of-flight measurements can be performed to the each rare RI. Construction of the rare-RI ring was begun in the middle of the fiscal year 2012, and the ring is expected to be fully functional by 2015, when we can start the mass measurements for unknown masses.

  20. Low energy neutral atom imaging

    SciTech Connect

    McComas, D.J.; Funsten, H.O.; Gosling, J.T.; Moore, K.R.; Thomsen, M.F.

    1992-01-01

    Energetic neutral atom (ENA) and low energy neutral atom (LENA) imaging of space plasmas are emerging new technology which promises to revolutionize the way we view and understand large scale space plasma phenomena and dynamics. ENAs and LENAs are produced in the magnetosphere by charge exchange between energetic and plasma ions and cold geocoronal neutrals. While imaging techniques have been previously developed for observing ENAs, with energies above several tens of keV, most of the ions found in the terrestrial magnetosphere have lower energies. We recently suggested that LENAs could be imaged by first converting the neutrals to ions and then electrostatically analyzing them to reject the UV background. In this paper we extend this work to examine in detail the sensor elements needed to make an LENA imager. These elements are (1) a biased collimator to remove the ambient plasma ions and electrons and set the azimuthal field-of-view; (2) a charge modifier to convert a portion of the incident LENAs to ions; (3) an electrostatic analyzer to reject UV light and set the energy passband; and (4) a coincidence detector to measure converted LENAs while rejecting noise and penetrating radiation. We also examine the issue of LENA imager sensitivity and describe ways of optimizing sensitivity in the various sensor components. Finally, we demonstrate in detail how these general considerations are implemented by describing one relatively straightforward design based on a hemispherical electrostatic analyzer.

  1. Comparison of air kerma measurements for tungsten anode based mammography x-ray beam qualities (EURAMET.RI(I)-S4.1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Csete, I.; Büermann, L.; Gomola, I.

    2016-01-01

    A comparison of the air kerma standards for x-radiation qualities used in mammography was performed between the PTB and the IAEA. Two reference-class ionization chamber types Radcal RC6M and Magna A650 of the IAEA and tungsten anode based beam qualities with Mo and Al external filtrations (W+Mo, W+Al) established at both laboratories were selected for the comparison. The calibration coefficients, NK_air, were determined for the transfer chambers at the PTB in May 2015 and before and after this at the IAEA Dosimetry Laboratory. The results show good agreement, to be well within the 0.55 % standard uncertainty of the comparison. Correction factors to determine NK_air for these beam qualities based on calibration in RQR-M mammography beam qualities, established according to the IEC 61267 standard, were also calculated for the Radcal RC6M, 10X5-6M, and Magna A650 types of chambers. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCRI, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  2. The Marshall Space Flight Center Low-Energy Ion Facility: A preliminary report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biddle, A. P.; Reynolds, J. W.; Chisholm, W. L., Jr.; Hunt, R. D.

    1983-01-01

    The Low-Energy Ion Facility (LEIF) is designed for laboratory research of low-energy ion beams similar to those present in the magnetosphere. In addition, it provides the ability to develop and calibrate low-energy, less than 50 eV, plasma instrumentation over its full range of energy, mass, flux, and arrival angle. The current status of this evolving resource is described. It also provides necessary information to allow users to utilize it most efficiently.

  3. Response of plastic scintillators to low-energy photons.

    PubMed

    Peralta, Luis; Rêgo, Florbela

    2014-08-21

    Diagnostic radiology typically uses x-ray beams between 25 and 150 kVp. Plastic scintillation detectors (PSDs) are potentially successful candidates as field dosimeters but careful selection of the scintillator is crucial. It has been demonstrated that they can suffer from energy dependence in the low-energy region, an undesirable dosimeter characteristic. This dependence is partially due to the nonlinear light yield of the scintillator to the low-energy electrons set in motion by the photon beam. In this work, PSDs made of PMMA, PVT or polystyrene were studied for the x-ray beam range 25 to 100 kVp. For each kVp data has been acquired for additional aluminium filtrations of 0.5, 1.0, 2.0 and 4.0 mm. Absolute dose in the point of measurement was obtained with an ionization chamber calibrated to dose in water. From the collected data, detector sensitivities were obtained as function of the beam kVp and additional filtration. Using Monte Carlo simulations relative scintillator sensitivities were computed. For some of the scintillators these sensitivities show strong energy-dependence for beam average energy below 35 keV for each additional filtration but fair constancy above. One of the scintillators (BC-404) has smaller energy-dependence at low photon average energy and could be considered a candidate for applications (like mammography) where beam energy has small span.

  4. Towards Low Energy Atrial Defibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Philip; Kodoth, Vivek; McEneaney, David; Rodrigues, Paola; Velasquez, Jose; Waterman, Niall; Escalona, Omar

    2015-01-01

    transcutaneous power transfer and sensing of ICI during cardioversion are evidenced as key to the advancement of low-energy atrial defibrillation. PMID:26404298

  5. Towards Low Energy Atrial Defibrillation.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Philip; Kodoth, Vivek; McEneaney, David; Rodrigues, Paola; Velasquez, Jose; Waterman, Niall; Escalona, Omar

    2015-09-03

    transcutaneous power transfer and sensing of ICI during cardioversion are evidenced as key to the advancement of low-energy atrial defibrillation.

  6. Key comparison BIPM.RI(I)-K6 of the standards for absorbed dose to water at 10 g cm-2 of the NMIJ, Japan and the BIPM in accelerator photon beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picard, S.; Burns, D. T.; Roger, P.; Shimizu, M.; Morishita, Y.; Kato, M.; Tanaka, T.; Kurosawa, T.; Saito, N.

    2016-01-01

    A comparison of the dosimetry for accelerator photon beams was carried out between the National Metrology Institute of Japan (NMIJ) and the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM) from 9 to 23 April 2015. The comparison was based on the determination of absorbed dose to water at 10 g cm-2 for three radiation qualities at the NMIJ. The results, reported as ratios of the NMIJ and the BIPM evaluations (and with the combined standard uncertainties given in parentheses), are 0.9966 (47) at 6 MV, 0.9965 (60) at 10 MV and 0.9953 (50) at 15 MV. This result is the eighth in the on-going BIPM.RI(I)-K6 series of comparisons. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCRI, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  7. Key comparison BIPM.RI(I)-K6 of the standards for absorbed dose to water at 10 g cm-2 of the NPL, United Kingdom and the BIPM in accelerator photon beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picard, S.; Burns, D. T.; Roger, P.; Duane, S.; Bass, G. A.; Manning, J. W.; Shipley, D. R.

    2015-01-01

    A comparison of the dosimetry for accelerator photon beams was carried out between the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) and the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM) from 23 September to 7 October 2014. The comparison was based on the determination of absorbed dose to water at 10 g cm-2 for three radiation qualities at the NPL. The results, reported as ratios of the NPL and the BIPM evaluations (and with the combined standard uncertainties given in parentheses), are 1.0000(62) at 6 MV, 0.9999(70) at 10 MV and 0.9993(80) at 25 MV. This result is the seventh in the on-going BIPM.RI(I)-K6 series of comparisons. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCRI, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  8. Key comparison BIPM.RI(I)-K6 of the standards for absorbed dose to water at 5 g cm-2 and 7 g cm-2 of the NPL, United Kingdom and the BIPM in accelerator photon beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picard, S.; Burns, D. T.; Roger, P.; Duane, S.; Bass, G. A.; Manning, J. W.; Shipley, D. R.

    2015-01-01

    A comparison of the dosimetry for accelerator photon beams was carried out between the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) and the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM) in two periods from September to November 2013. The comparison was based on the determination of absorbed dose to water for three radiation qualities at the NPL. The results, reported as ratios of the NPL and the BIPM evaluations (and with the combined standard uncertainties given in parentheses), are 0.9973(62) at 6 MV, 0.9995(66) at 10 MV and 0.9957(81) at 25 MV. This result is the sixth in the on-going BIPM.RI(I)-K6 series of comparisons. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCRI, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  9. Low energy ion distribution around the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Y.; Yokota, S.; Tanaka, T.; Asamura, K.; Nishino, M. N.; Yamamoto, T.; Tsunakawa, H.

    2009-04-01

    More than a year has passed since MAP-PACE onboard KAGUYA (SELENE) started continuous observation of the low energy charged particles around the Moon from 100km-altitude polar orbit. MAP (MAgnetic field and Plasma experiment) was developed for the comprehensive measurement of the magnetic field and three-dimensional plasma around the Moon. MAP consists of MAP-LMAG (Lunar MAGnetometer) and MAP-PACE (Plasma energy Angle and Composition Experiment). MAP-PACE consists of 4 sensors: ESA (Electron Spectrum Analyzer)-S1, ESA-S2, IMA (Ion Mass Analyzer), and IEA (Ion Energy Analyzer). Since each sensor has hemispherical field of view, two electron sensors and two ion sensors that are installed on the spacecraft panels opposite to each other can make full 3-dimensional measurements of low energy electrons and ions. One of the ion sensors IMA is an energy mass spectrometer. IMA measures mass identified ion energy spectra that have never been obtained at 100km altitude around the Moon. Low energy charged particles around the Moon were vigorously observed by Moon orbiting satellites and plasma instrumentation placed on the lunar surface in 1960s and 1970s. Though there were some satellites that explored the Moon afterwards, most of them were dedicated to the global mapping of the lunar surface. There has been almost no new information about the low energy charged particles around the Moon except the low energy electron measurement by Lunar Prospector, the lunar wake plasma data obtained by WIND during its Moon fly-by, and reports on remote detection of the lunar ions, lunar electrons and ULF waves generated by electron beams around the lunar wake. The newly observed data show characteristic ion distributions around the Moon. Besides the solar wind, MAP-PACE-IMA discovered four clearly distinguishable ion distributions: 1) Solar wind ions reflected/scattered at the lunar surface, 2) Solar wind ions reflected by magnetic anomalies on the lunar surface, 3) Ions that are

  10. Gamma Putty dosimetric studies in electron beam

    PubMed Central

    Gloi, Aime M.

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, lead has been used for field shaping in megavoltage electron beams in radiation therapy. In this study, we analyze the dosimetric parameters of a nontoxic, high atomic number (Z = 83), bismuth-loaded material called Gamma Putty that is malleable and can be easily molded to any desired shape. First, we placed an ionization chamber at different depths in a solid water phantom under a Gamma Putty shield of thickness (t = 0, 3, 5, 10, 15, 20, and 25 mm, respectively) and measured the ionizing radiation on the central axis (CAX) for electron beam ranging in energies from 6 to 20 MeV. Next, we investigated the relationship between the relative ionization (RI) measured at a fixed depth for several Gamma Putty shield at different cutout diameters ranging from 2 to 5 cm for various beam energies and derived an exponential fitting equation for clinical purposes. The dose profiles along the CAX show that bremsstrahlung dominates for Gamma Putty thickness >15 mm. For high-energy beams (12–20 MeV) and all Gamma Putty thicknesses up to 25 mm, RI below 5% could not be achieved due to the strong bremsstrahlung component. However, Gamma Putty is a very suitable material for reducing the transmission factor below 5% and protecting underlying normal tissues for low-energy electron beams (6–9 MeV). PMID:27651563

  11. Low energy x-ray spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Woodruff, W.R.

    1981-06-05

    A subkilovolt spectrometer has been produced to permit high-energy-resolution, time-dependent x-ray intensity measurements. The diffracting element is a curved mica (d = 9.95A) crystal. To preclude higher order (n > 1) diffractions, a carbon x-ray mirror that reflects only photons with energies less than approx. 1.1 keV is utilized ahead of the diffracting element. The nominal energy range of interest is 800 to 900 eV. The diffracted photons are detected by a gold-surface photoelectric diode designed to have a very good frequency response, and whose current is recorded on an oscilloscope. A thin, aluminium light barrier is placed between the diffracting crystal and the photoelectric diode detector to keep any uv generated on or scattered by the crystal from illuminating the detector. High spectral energy resolution is provided by many photocathodes between 8- and 50-eV wide placed serially along the diffracted x-ray beam at the detector position. The spectrometer was calibrated for energy and energy dispersion using the Ni L..cap alpha../sub 1/ /sub 2/ lines produced in the LLNL IONAC accelerator and in third order using a molybdenum target x-ray tube. For the latter calibration the carbon mirror was replaced by one surfaced with rhodium to raise the cut-off energy to about 3 keV. The carbon mirror reflection dependence on energy was measured using one of our Henke x-ray sources. The curved mica crystal diffraction efficiency was measured on our Low-Energy x-ray (LEX) machine. The spectrometer performs well although some changes in the way the x-ray mirror is held are desirable. 16 figures.

  12. Detectors for low energy electron cooling in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Carlier, F. S.

    2016-02-15

    Low energy operation of RHIC is of particular interest to study the location of a possible critical point in the QCD phase diagram. The performance of RHIC at energies equal to or lower than 10 GV/nucleon is limited by nonlinearities, Intra-BeamScattering (IBS) processes and space-charge effects. To successfully address the luminosity and ion store lifetime limitations imposed by IBS the method of electron cooling has been envisaged. During electron cooling processes electrons are injected along with the ion beam at the nominal ion bunch velocities. The velocity spread of the ion beam is reduced in all planes through Coulomb interactions between the cold electron beam and the ion beam. The electron cooling system proposed for RHIC will be the first of its kind to use bunched beams for the delivery of the electron bunches, and will therefore be accompanied by the necessary challenges. The designed electron cooler will be located in IP2. The electron bunches will be accelerated by a linac before being injected along side the ion beams. Thirty consecutive electron bunches will be injected to overlap with a single ion bunch. They will first cool the yellow beam before being extracted turned by 180-degrees and reinjected into the blue beam for cooling. As such, both the yellow and blue beams will be cooled by the same ion bunches. This will pose considerable challenges to ensure proper electron beam quality to cool the second ion beam. Furthermore, no ondulator will be used in the electron cooler so radiative recombination between the ions and the electrons will occur.

  13. Electron cooling for low-energy RHIC program

    SciTech Connect

    Fedotov, A.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Chang, X.; Kayran, D.; Litvinenko, V.N.; Pendzick, A.; Satogata, T.

    2009-08-31

    Electron cooling was proposed to increase luminosity of the RHIC collider for heavy ion beam energies below 10 GeV/nucleon. Providing collisions at such energies, termed RHIC 'low-energy' operation, will help to answer one of the key questions in the field of QCD about existence and location of critical point on the QCD phase diagram. The electron cooling system should deliver electron beam of required good quality over energies of 0.9-5 MeV. Several approaches to provide such cooling were considered. The baseline approach was chosen and design work started. Here we describe the main features of the cooling system and its expected performance. We have started design work on a low-energy RHIC electron cooler which will operate with kinetic electron energy range 0.86-2.8 (4.9) MeV. Several approaches to an electron cooling system in this energy range are being investigated. At present, our preferred scheme is to transfer the Fermilab Pelletron to BNL after Tevatron shutdown, and to use it for DC non-magnetized cooling in RHIC. Such electron cooling system can significantly increase RHIC luminosities at low-energy operation.

  14. Solar-assisted low energy dwellings

    SciTech Connect

    Esbensen, T V

    1980-02-01

    The Zero Energy House Group was formed as a subproject of the CCMS Solar Energy Pilot Study in 1974 by seven participating countries experimenting with solar-assisted low-energy dwellings for temperate and northern European climatic conditions. A Zero Energy House is one in which solar energy is used to meet the reduced energy needs of buildings incorporating various thermal energy conservation features. This final report of the Zero Energy House Group includes brief descriptions of 13 major low-energy dwellings in the participating CCMS countries. An overall assessment of the state-of-the-art in solar-assisted low-energy dwellings is also included.

  15. Single track nanodosimetry of low energy electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bantsar, A.; Grosswendt, B.; Pszona, S.; Kula, J.

    2009-02-01

    Auger-electron-emitting radionuclides (for instance, 125I) with a predominant energy spectrum below 3 keV are an active area of research towards the clinical application of radiopharmaceuticals. Hence, the necessity for an adequate description of the effects of radiation by low-energy electrons on nanometric biological targets seems to be unquestionable. Experimental nanodosimetry for low-energy electrons has been accomplished with a device named JET COUNTER. The present paper describes, for the first time, nanodosimetric experiments in nanometer-sized cavities of nitrogen using low energy electrons ranging from 100 eV to 2 keV.

  16. Low energy ghosts and the Jeans' instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gümrükçüoǧlu, A. Emir; Mukohyama, Shinji; Sotiriou, Thomas P.

    2016-09-01

    We show that a massless canonical scalar field minimally coupled to general relativity can become a tachyonic ghost at low energies around a background in which the scalar's gradient is spacelike. By performing a canonical transformation we demonstrate that this low energy ghost can be recast, at the level of the action, in a form of a fluid that undergoes a Jeans-like instability affecting only modes with large wavelength. This illustrates that low energy tachyonic ghosts do not lead to a catastrophic quantum vacuum instability, unlike the usual high-energy ghost degrees of freedom.

  17. Status of the Frankfurt low energy electrostatic storage ring (FLSR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, F.; Kruppi, T.; Müller, J.; Dörner, R.; Schmidt, L. Ph H.; Schmidt-Böcking, H.; Stiebing, K. E.

    2015-11-01

    Frankfurt low-energy storage ring (FLSR) is an electrostatic storage ring for low-energy ions up to q · 80 keV (q being the ion charge state) at Institut für Kernphysik der Goethe-Universität, Frankfurt am Main, Germany. It has especially been designed to provide a basis for experiments on the dynamics of ionic and molecular collisions in complete kinematics, as well as for high precision and time resolved laser spectroscopy. The ring has ‘racetrack’ geometry with a circumference of 14.23 m. It comprises four experimental/diagnostic sections with regions of enhanced ion density (interaction regions). First beam has successfully been stored in FLSR in summer 2013. Since then the performance of the ring has continuously been improved and an electron target for experiments on dissociative recombination has been installed in one of the experimental sections.

  18. Imaging of magnetospheric dynamics using low energy neutral atom detection

    SciTech Connect

    Funsten, H.O.; McComas, D.J.; Moore, K.R.; Scime, E.E.

    1993-05-01

    Recent advances in low energy neutral atom (LENA) detection technology show that magnetospheric imaging is achievable with 4{sub o}{times}4{sub o} resolution and can distinguish numerous features of the magnetosphere. A critical factor in detecting low energy neutrals is their removal from the ambient UV background. One technique to accomplish this is by ionizing the neutrals by their transmission through an untrathin charge modification foil and subsequent electrostatic deflection. In this type of instrument, the driving factor for resolution and sensitivity is scattering in the foil and the ionization probability of transiting neutrals. We describe results of a prototype LENA imager using a collimated beam of 10 key H. Additionally, we illustrate model results of anticipated LENA images of the magnetosphere based on the Rice Convection Model and show that plasma variations resulting from geomagnetic storm disturbances can be observed using a LENA imager.

  19. Imaging of magnetospheric dynamics using low energy neutral atom detection

    SciTech Connect

    Funsten, H.O.; McComas, D.J.; Moore, K.R.; Scime, E.E.

    1993-01-01

    Recent advances in low energy neutral atom (LENA) detection technology show that magnetospheric imaging is achievable with 4[sub o][times]4[sub o] resolution and can distinguish numerous features of the magnetosphere. A critical factor in detecting low energy neutrals is their removal from the ambient UV background. One technique to accomplish this is by ionizing the neutrals by their transmission through an untrathin charge modification foil and subsequent electrostatic deflection. In this type of instrument, the driving factor for resolution and sensitivity is scattering in the foil and the ionization probability of transiting neutrals. We describe results of a prototype LENA imager using a collimated beam of 10 key H. Additionally, we illustrate model results of anticipated LENA images of the magnetosphere based on the Rice Convection Model and show that plasma variations resulting from geomagnetic storm disturbances can be observed using a LENA imager.

  20. Low Dose, Low Energy 3d Image Guidance during Radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, C. J.; Marchant, T.; Amer, A.; Sharrock, P.; Price, P.; Burton, D.

    2006-04-01

    Patient kilo-voltage X-ray cone beam volumetric imaging for radiotherapy was first demonstrated on an Elekta Synergy mega-voltage X-ray linear accelerator. Subsequently low dose, reduced profile reconstruction imaging was shown to be practical for 3D geometric setup registration to pre-treatment planning images without compromising registration accuracy. Reconstruction from X-ray profiles gathered between treatment beam deliveries was also introduced. The innovation of zonal cone beam imaging promises significantly reduced doses to patients and improved soft tissue contrast in the tumour target zone. These developments coincided with the first dynamic 3D monitoring of continuous body topology changes in patients, at the moment of irradiation, using a laser interferometer. They signal the arrival of low dose, low energy 3D image guidance during radiotherapy itself.

  1. Low-Energy Charged Particle Instrument Assembly

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-12-03

    This image shows the low-energy charged particle instrument before it was installed on one of NASA Voyager spacecraft in 1977. The instrument includes a stepper motor that turns the platform on which the sensors are mounted.

  2. Present status of Rare-RI Ring facility at RIBF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    T Yamaguchithe Rare-RI Ring Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    A new storage ring facility called the Rare-RI Ring is currently under preparation at the RI Beam Factory (RIBF) in RIKEN. The storage ring is dedicated to the single-ion precision mass spectrometry of neutron-rich exotic nuclei. The masses are essential to elucidate the evolution of the nuclear shell structure far from the β stability and to determine the pathway of astrophysical nucleosynthesis. Such exotic nuclei are provided by the large-acceptance superconducting fragment separator, BigRIPS, at the RIBF accelerator complex. The experimental principle of the Rare-RI Ring mass measurements is based on isochronous mass spectrometry combined with the individual injection technique. This novel technique enables exotic species of interest to be produced randomly, in time to be sequentially stored in the storage ring. The Rare-RI Ring facility realizes the most efficient measurements for rare isotopes. An overview of the project is presented, along with its present status.

  3. Investigation of the Performance of Various CVD Diamond Crystal Qualities for the Measurement of Radiation Doses from a Low Energy Mammography X-Ray Beam, Compared with MC Code (PENELOPE) Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakari, Y. I.; Mavunda, R. D.; Nam, T. L.; Keddy, R. J.

    The tissue equivalence of diamond allows for accurate radiation dose determination without large corrections for different attenuation values in biological tissue, but its low Z value limits this advantage however to the lower energy photons such as for example in Mammography X-ray beams. This paper assays the performance of nine Chemical Vapour Deposition (CVD) diamonds for use as radiation sensing material. The specimens fabricated in wafer form are classified as detector grade, optical grade and single crystals. It is well known that the presence of defects in diamonds, including CVD specimens, not only dictates but also affects the responds of diamond to radiation in different ways. In this investigation, tools such as electron spin resonance (ESR), thermoluminescence (TL) Raman spectroscopy and ultra violet (UV) spectroscopy were used to probe each of the samples. The linearity, sensitivity and other characteristics of the detector to photon interaction was analyzed, and from the I-V characteristics. The diamonds categorized into four each, of the so called Detector and Optical grades, and a single crystal CVD were exposed to low X-ray peak voltage range (22 to 27 KVp) with a trans-crystal polarizing fields of 0.4 kV.cm-1, 0.66 kV.cm-1 and 0.8 kV.cm-1. The presentation discusses the presence of defects identifiable by the techniques used and correlates the radiation performance of the three types of crystals to their presence. The choice of a wafer as either a spectrometer or as X-ray dosimeter within the selected energy range was made. The analyses was validated with Monte-Carlo code (PENELOPE)

  4. Simulations of low energy e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} particle backgrounds

    SciTech Connect

    Ronan, M.T.

    1993-08-01

    A progress report on simulations of low-energy e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} backgrounds from the beam-beam interaction at future linear colliders is given. Characteristics of the primary particles and detailed calculations of the backgrounds fron backscattering into the detector volume are presented.

  5. First experimental research in low energy proton radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Tao; Yang, Guo-Jun; Li, Yi-Ding; Long, Ji-Dong; He, Xiao-Zhong; Zhang, Xiao-Ding; Jiang, Xiao-Guo; Ma, Chao-Fan; Zhao, Liang-Chao; Yang, Xing-Lin; Zhang, Zhuo; Wang, Yuan; Pang, Jian; Li, Hong; Li, Wei-Feng; Zhou, Fu-Xin; Shi, Jin-Shui; Zhang, Kai-Zhi; Li, Jin; Zhang, Lin-Wen; Deng, Jian-Jun

    2014-08-01

    Proton radiography is a new scatheless diagnostic tool providing a potential development direction for advanced hydrotesting. Recently a low energy proton radiography system has been developed at the Chinese Academy of Engineering Phyiscs (CAEP). This system has been designed to use an 11 MeV proton beam to radiograph thin static objects. This system consists of a proton cyclotron coupled to an imaging beamline, which is the first domestic beamline dedicated to proton radiography experiments. Via some demonstration experiments, the radiography system is confirmed to provide clear pictures with spatial resolution ~100 μm within 40 mm field-of-view.

  6. High field – low energy muon ionization cooling channel

    DOE PAGES

    Sayed, Hisham Kamal; Palmer, Robert B.; Neuffer, David

    2015-09-04

    Muon beams are generated with large transverse and longitudinal emittances. In order to achieve the low emittances required by a muon collider, within the short lifetime of the muons, ionization cooling is required. Cooling schemes have been developed to reduce the muon beam 6D emittances to ≈ 300 μm–rad in transverse and ≈ 1–1.5 mm in longitudinal dimensions. The transverse emittance has to be further reduced to ≈ 50–25 μm–rad with an upper limit on the longitudinal emittance of ≈ 76 mm in order to meet the high-energy muon collider luminosity requirements. Earlier studies of the transverse cooling of lowmore » energy muon beams in high field magnets showed a promising performance, but did not include transverse or longitudinal matching between the stages. In this study we present the first complete design of the high field-low energy ionization cooling channel with transverse and longitudinal matching. The channel design was based on strong focusing solenoids with fields of 25–30 T and low momentum muon beam starting at 135 MeV/c and gradually decreasing. The cooling channel design presented here is the first to reach ≈ 50 micron scale emittance beam. As a result, we present the channel’s optimized design parameters including the focusing solenoid fields, absorber parameters and the transverse and longitudinal matching.« less

  7. Materials and neutronic research at the Low Energy Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baxter, David V.

    2016-04-01

    In the decade since the Low Energy Neutron Source (LENS) at Indiana University Center for Exploration of Energy and Matter (CEEM) produced its first neutrons, the facility has made important contributions to the international neutron scattering community. LENS employs a 13MeV proton beam at up to 4kW beam power onto one of two Be targets to produce neutrons for research in fields ranging from radiation effects in electronics to studies of the structure of fluids confined in nanoporous materials. The neutron source design at the heart of LENS facilitates relatively rapid hands-on access to most of its components which provides a foundation for a research program in experimental neutronics and affords numerous opportunities for novel educational experiences. We describe in some detail a number of the unique capabilities of this facility.

  8. Molecular ion sources for low energy semiconductor ion implantation (invited).

    PubMed

    Hershcovitch, A; Gushenets, V I; Seleznev, D N; Bugaev, A S; Dugin, S; Oks, E M; Kulevoy, T V; Alexeyenko, O; Kozlov, A; Kropachev, G N; Kuibeda, R P; Minaev, S; Vizir, A; Yushkov, G Yu

    2016-02-01

    Smaller semiconductors require shallow, low energy ion implantation, resulting space charge effects, which reduced beam currents and production rates. To increase production rates, molecular ions are used. Boron and phosphorous (or arsenic) implantation is needed for P-type and N-type semiconductors, respectively. Carborane, which is the most stable molecular boron ion leaves unacceptable carbon residue on extraction grids. A self-cleaning carborane acid compound (C4H12B10O4) was synthesized and utilized in the ITEP Bernas ion source resulting in large carborane ion output, without carbon residue. Pure gaseous processes are desired to enable rapid switch among ion species. Molecular phosphorous was generated by introducing phosphine in dissociators via 4PH3 = P4 + 6H2; generated molecular phosphorous in a pure gaseous process was then injected into the HCEI Calutron-Bernas ion source, from which P4(+) ion beams were extracted. Results from devices and some additional concepts are described.

  9. Molecular ion sources for low energy semiconductor ion implantation (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hershcovitch, A.; Gushenets, V. I.; Seleznev, D. N.; Bugaev, A. S.; Dugin, S.; Oks, E. M.; Kulevoy, T. V.; Alexeyenko, O.; Kozlov, A.; Kropachev, G. N.; Kuibeda, R. P.; Minaev, S.; Vizir, A.; Yushkov, G. Yu.

    2016-02-01

    Smaller semiconductors require shallow, low energy ion implantation, resulting space charge effects, which reduced beam currents and production rates. To increase production rates, molecular ions are used. Boron and phosphorous (or arsenic) implantation is needed for P-type and N-type semiconductors, respectively. Carborane, which is the most stable molecular boron ion leaves unacceptable carbon residue on extraction grids. A self-cleaning carborane acid compound (C4H12B10O4) was synthesized and utilized in the ITEP Bernas ion source resulting in large carborane ion output, without carbon residue. Pure gaseous processes are desired to enable rapid switch among ion species. Molecular phosphorous was generated by introducing phosphine in dissociators via 4PH3 = P4 + 6H2; generated molecular phosphorous in a pure gaseous process was then injected into the HCEI Calutron-Bernas ion source, from which P4+ ion beams were extracted. Results from devices and some additional concepts are described.

  10. High and Low Energy Particle Beams Interactions with Solids.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-01-01

    1985). Laser Ablation of Organic Polymers: Microscopic Models for Photochemical and Thermal Processes, B. J. Garrison and R. Srinivasan, Journal of...746-748 (1985). Partial support from NSF. Cluster Desorbed, Ejected and Ablated from Solid Surfaces B. J. Garrison, Symposium of Atomic and Surface...Interaction of Silane /Phosphine/Silicon System, B. S. Meyerson and M. L. Yu, J. Electroche. Soc. 131, 2366 (1984). Partial IBM support. The Origin of Oxidation

  11. Nanopatterning of mica surface under low energy ion beam sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Metya, A.; Ghose, D.; Mollick, S. A.; Majumdar, A.

    2012-04-01

    Irradiation of crystalline muscovite mica samples by 500 eV Ar{sup +} ions at different incident angles can induce significant surface morphological variations. A periodic ripple pattern of nano-dimensions forms in the angle window 47 deg. -70 deg. . On the other hand, tilted conical protrusions develop on the surface at grazing incidence angles around 80 deg. . From the derivative of the topographic images the distribution of the side-facet slopes in the ion incidence plane are measured, which is found to be strongly related to the pattern morphology. Additionally, it has been shown that, for the ripple structures, the base angles can be tuned by changing the ion fluence. An asymmetric sawtooth profile of the ripples obtained at low fluence is transformed to a symmetrical triangular profile at high fluence. As the slopes are found to be small, the pattern formation is not provoked by the gradient-dependent erosion mechanism rather it is the general effect of the curvature-dependent sputtering phenomena.

  12. Formation of a high intensity low energy positron string

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donets, E. D.; Donets, E. E.; Syresin, E. M.; Itahashi, T.; Dubinov, A. E.

    2004-05-01

    The possibility of a high intensity low energy positron beam production is discussed. The proposed Positron String Trap (PST) is based on the principles and technology of the Electron String Ion Source (ESIS) developed in JINR during the last decade. A linear version of ESIS has been used successfully for the production of intense highly charged ion beams of various elements. Now the Tubular Electron String Ion Source (TESIS) concept is under study and this opens really new promising possibilities in physics and technology. In this report, we discuss the application of the tubular-type trap for the storage of positrons cooled to the cryogenic temperatures of 0.05 meV. It is intended that the positron flux at the energy of 1-5 eV, produced by the external source, is injected into the Tubular Positron Trap which has a similar construction as the TESIS. Then the low energy positrons are captured in the PST Penning trap and are cooled down because of their synchrotron radiation in the strong (5-10 T) applied magnetic field. It is expected that the proposed PST should permit storing and cooling to cryogenic temperature of up to 5×109 positrons. The accumulated cooled positrons can be used further for various physics applications, for example, antihydrogen production.

  13. Low energy strong electroweak sector with decoupling

    SciTech Connect

    Casalbuoni, R.; Dominici, D. |; Deandrea, A.; Gatto, R.; De Curtis, S.; Grazzini, M. |

    1996-05-01

    We discuss possible symmetries of effective theories describing spinless and spin-1 bosons, mainly to concentrate on an intriguing phenomenological possibility: that of a hardly noticeable strong electroweak sector at relatively low energies. Specifically, a model with both vector and axial vector strong interacting bosons may possess a discrete symmetry imposing degeneracy of the two sets of bosons (degenerate BESS model). In such a case its effects at low energies become almost invisible and the model easily passes all low energy precision tests. The reason lies essentially in the fact that the model automatically satisfies decoupling, contrary to models with only vectors. For large mass of the degenerate spin-one bosons the model becomes identical at the classical level to the standard model taken in the limit of infinite Higgs boson mass. For these reasons we have thought it worthwhile to fully develop the model, together with its possible generalizations, and to study the expected phenomenology. For instance, just because of its invisibility at low energy, it is conceivable that degenerate BESS has low mass spin-one states and gives quite visible signals at existing or forthcoming accelerators. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  14. What is a low-energy house?

    SciTech Connect

    Litt, B.R.; Meier, A.K.

    1994-08-01

    Traditionally, a ``low-energy`` house has been one that used little energy for space heating. But space heating typically accounts for less than half of the energy used by new US homes, and for low heating energy homes, space heating is often the third largest end use, behind water heating and appliances, and sometimes behind cooling. Low space heat alone cannot identify a low-energy house. To better understand the determinants of a low-energy house, we collected data on housing characteristics, incremental costs, and energy measurements from energy-efficient houses around the world and in a range of climates. We compare the energy required to provide thermal comfort as well as water heating, and other appliances. We do not have a single definition of a low-energy house, but through comparisons of actual buildings, we show how different definitions and quantitative indicators fail. In comparing the energy use of whole houses, weather normalization can be important, but for cases in which heating or cooling energy is surpassed by other end uses, other normalization methods must be used.

  15. The Simbol-X Low Energy Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Lechner, Peter

    2009-05-11

    For the Low Energy Detector of Simbol-X a new type of active pixel sensor based on the integrated amplifier DEPFET has been developed. This concept combines large area, scalable pixel size, low noise, and ultra-fast readout. Flight representative prototypes have been processed with a performance matching the Simbol-X specifications and demonstrating the technology readiness.

  16. The Simbol-X Low Energy Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lechner, Peter

    2009-05-01

    For the Low Energy Detector of Simbol-X a new type of active pixel sensor based on the integrated amplifier DEPFET has been developed. This concept combines large area, scalable pixel size, low noise, and ultra-fast readout. Flight representative prototypes have been processed with a performance matching the Simbol-X specifications and demonstrating the technology readiness.

  17. Parity violation in low-energy

    SciTech Connect

    Martin Savage

    2001-12-01

    Parity violation in low-energy nuclear observables is included in the pionless effective field theory. The model-independent relation between the parity-violating asymmetry in polarized np -> d gamma and the non-nucleon part of the deuteron anapole moment is discussed. The asymmetry in np -> d gamma computed with KSW power-counting, and recently criticized by Desplanques, is discussed.

  18. Studies in Low-Energy Nuclear Science

    SciTech Connect

    Carl R. Brune; Steven M. Grimes

    2010-01-13

    This report presents a summary of research projects in the area of low energy nuclear reactions and structure, carried out between March 1, 2006 and October 31, 2009 which were supported by U.S. DOE grant number DE-FG52-06NA26187.

  19. Superspace duality in low-energy superstrings

    SciTech Connect

    Siegel, W. )

    1993-09-15

    We extend spacetime duality to superspace, including fermions in the low-energy limits of superstrings. The tangent space is a curved, extended superspace. The geometry is based on an enlarged coordinate space where the vanishing of the d'Alembertian is as fundamental as the vanishing of the curl of a gradient.

  20. Mechanical engineering of a 75-keV proton injector for the Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Hansborough, L.D.; Hodgkins, D.J.; Meyer, E.A.; Schneider, J.D.; Sherman, J.D.; Stevens, R.R. Jr.; Zaugg, T.J.

    1997-10-01

    A dc injector capable of 75-keV, 110-mA proton beam operation is under development for the Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LEDA) project at Los Alamos. The injector uses a dc microwave proton source which has demonstrated 98% beam availability while operating at design parameters. A high-voltage isolation transformer is avoided by locating all ion source power supplies and controls at ground potential. The low-energy beam transport system (LEBT) uses two solenoid focusing and two steering magnets for beam matching and centroid control at the RFQ matchpoint. This paper will discuss proton source microwave window design, H{sub 2} gas flow control, vacuum considerations, LEBT design, and an iris for beam current control.

  1. PIC Simulations in Low Energy Part of PIP-II Proton Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Romanov, Gennady

    2014-07-01

    The front end of PIP-II linac is composed of a 30 keV ion source, low energy beam transport line (LEBT), 2.1 MeV radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ), and medium energy beam transport line (MEBT). This configuration is currently being assembled at Fermilab to support a complete systems test. The front end represents the primary technical risk with PIP-II, and so this step will validate the concept and demonstrate that the hardware can meet the specified requirements. SC accelerating cavities right after MEBT require high quality and well defined beam after RFQ to avoid excessive particle losses. In this paper we will present recent progress of beam dynamic study, using CST PIC simulation code, to investigate partial neutralization effect in LEBT, halo and tail formation in RFQ, total emittance growth and beam losses along low energy part of the linac.

  2. 76 FR 50770 - Submission for Review: Financial Resources Questionnaire (RI 34-1, RI 34-17, and RI 34-18) and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-16

    ... MANAGEMENT Submission for Review: Financial Resources Questionnaire (RI 34- 1, RI 34-17, and RI 34-18) and Notice of Amount Due Because of Annuity Overpayment (RI 34-3, RI 34-19, and RI 34-20) AGENCY: U.S. Office... Resources Questionnaire (RI 34-1), Financial Resources Questionnaire--Federal Employees' Group...

  3. Electron Polarimetry at Low Energies in Hall C at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Gaskell, David J.

    2013-11-01

    Although the majority of Jefferson Lab experiments require multi-GeV electron beams, there have been a few opportunities to make electron beam polarization measurements at rather low energies. This proceedings will discuss some of the practical difficulties encountered in performing electron polarimetry via Mo/ller scattering at energies on the order of a few hundred MeV. Prospects for Compton polarimetry at very low energies will also be discussed. While Mo/ller scattering is likely the preferred method for electron polarimetry at energies below 500 MeV, there are certain aspects of the polarimeter and experiment design that must be carefully considered.

  4. Low-Energy Polymeric Phases of Alanates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huan, Tran Doan; Amsler, Maximilian; Marques, Miguel A. L.; Botti, Silvana; Willand, Alexander; Goedecker, Stefan

    2013-03-01

    Low-energy structures of alanates are currently known to be described by patterns of isolated, nearly ideal tetrahedral [AlH4] anions and metal cations. We discover that the novel polymeric motif recently proposed for LiAlH4 plays a dominant role in a series of alanates, including LiAlH4, NaAlH4, KAlH4, Mg(AlH4)2, Ca(AlH4)2, and Sr(AlH4)2. In particular, most of the low-energy structures discovered for the whole series are characterized by networks of corner-sharing [AlH6] octahedra, forming wires and/or planes throughout the materials. Finally, for Mg(AlH4)2 and Sr(AlH4)2, we identify two polymeric phases to be lowest in energy at low temperatures.

  5. Unitarization and low-energy scattering data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magalhães, P. C.; Robilotta, M. R.

    2014-07-01

    A procedure based on the well-known K-matrix formalism is presented, which makes patterns in inelastic regions of low-energy scattering data considerably more transparent. It relies on the use of an empirical kernel, obtained by eliminating elastic loops from the experimental amplitude. This allows structures associated with resonances, such as locations, widths, and heights, to become visible with the naked eye. The method is illustrated with a study of the P-wave Kπ amplitude.

  6. Physics with ultra-low energy antiprotons

    SciTech Connect

    Holtkamp, D.B.; Holzscheiter, M.H.; Hughes, R.J. )

    1989-01-01

    The experimental observation that all forms of matter experience the same gravitational acceleration is embodied in the weak equivalence principle of gravitational physics. However no experiment has tested this principle for particles of antimatter such as the antiproton or the antihydrogen atom. Clearly the question of whether antimatter is in compliance with weak equivalence is a fundamental experimental issue, which can best be addressed at an ultra-low energy antiproton facility. This paper addresses the issue. 20 refs.

  7. Experimental Measurement of Low Energy Neutrino Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Scholberg, Kate

    2011-11-23

    Neutrino interactions in the few to few tens of MeV range are of importance for several physics topics, including solar, supernova and reactor neutrinos, as well as future proposed oscillation and Standard Model test experiments. Although interaction cross-sections for some simple targets are well understood, very little experimental data exist for interactions with nuclei. This talk will discuss the motivation for measuring low energy neutrino interactions, the state of knowledge, and possible future strategies.

  8. Low energy {bar p} physics at FNAL

    SciTech Connect

    Hsueh, S.Y.

    1992-12-01

    The charmonium formation experiment is the only low energy {bar p} experiment at FNAL. This paper describes the performance of the Fermilab {bar p} Accumulator during fixed target run for the experiment and the planned upgrades. We also discuss the proposal for the direct CP violation search in {bar p} + p {yields} {bar {Lambda}} + {Lambda} {yields} {bar p}{pi}{sup +} + p{pi}{sup {minus}}.

  9. Low-energy sterile neutrinos: Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palazzo, Antonio

    2013-04-01

    Several experimental anomalies seem to point towards the existence of light sterile neutrinos. We focus on the low-energy anomalous results (the so-called gallium and reactor anomalies), which indicate a non-zero admixture U of the electron neutrino with a fourth (mostly) sterile mass eigenstate ν4. We point out that solar sector data, in combination with the precision measurement of θ13, provide the constraint |<0.041 (90% C.L.), independent of the reactor flux determinations.

  10. Targeting Low-Energy Ballistic Lunar Transfers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Jeffrey S.

    2010-01-01

    Numerous low-energy ballistic transfers exist between the Earth and Moon that require less fuel than conventional transfers, but require three or more months of transfer time. An entirely ballistic lunar transfer departs the Earth from a particular declination at some time in order to arrive at the Moon at a given time along a desirable approach. Maneuvers may be added to the trajectory in order to adjust the Earth departure to meet mission requirements. In this paper, we characterize the (Delta)V cost required to adjust a low-energy ballistic lunar transfer such that a spacecraft may depart the Earth at a desirable declination, e.g., 28.5(white bullet), on a designated date. This study identifies the optimal locations to place one or two maneuvers along a transfer to minimize the (Delta)V cost of the transfer. One practical application of this study is to characterize the launch period for a mission that aims to launch from a particular launch site, such as Cape Canaveral, Florida, and arrive at a particular orbit at the Moon on a given date using a three-month low-energy transfer.

  11. Targeting Low-Energy Ballistic Lunar Transfers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Jeffrey S.

    2010-01-01

    Numerous low-energy ballistic transfers exist between the Earth and Moon that require less fuel than conventional transfers, but require three or more months of transfer time. An entirely ballistic lunar transfer departs the Earth from a particular declination at some time in order to arrive at the Moon at a given time along a desirable approach. Maneuvers may be added to the trajectory in order to adjust the Earth departure to meet mission requirements. In this paper, we characterize the (Delta)V cost required to adjust a low-energy ballistic lunar transfer such that a spacecraft may depart the Earth at a desirable declination, e.g., 28.5(white bullet), on a designated date. This study identifies the optimal locations to place one or two maneuvers along a transfer to minimize the (Delta)V cost of the transfer. One practical application of this study is to characterize the launch period for a mission that aims to launch from a particular launch site, such as Cape Canaveral, Florida, and arrive at a particular orbit at the Moon on a given date using a three-month low-energy transfer.

  12. Low energy intake plus low energy expenditure (low energy flux), not energy surfeit, predicts future body fat gain12

    PubMed Central

    Yokum, Sonja; Stice, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Background: There is a paucity of studies that have prospectively tested the energy surfeit theory of obesity with the use of objectively estimated energy intake and energy expenditure in humans. An alternative theory is that homeostatic regulation of body weight is more effective when energy intake and expenditure are both high (high energy flux), implying that low energy flux should predict weight gain. Objective: We aimed to examine the predictive relations of energy balance and energy flux to future weight gain and tested whether results were replicable in 2 independent samples. Design: Adolescents (n = 154) and college-aged women (n = 75) underwent 2-wk objective doubly labeled water, resting metabolic rate, and percentage of body fat measures at baseline. Percentage of body fat was measured annually for 3 y of follow-up for the adolescent sample and for 2 y of follow-up for the young adult sample. Results: Low energy flux, but not energy surfeit, predicted future increases in body fat in both studies. Furthermore, high energy flux appeared to prevent fat gain in part because it was associated with a higher resting metabolic rate. Conclusion: Counter to the energy surfeit model of obesity, results suggest that increasing energy expenditure may be more effective for reducing body fat than caloric restriction, which is currently the treatment of choice for obesity. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT02084836. PMID:27169833

  13. Low energy intake plus low energy expenditure (low energy flux), not energy surfeit, predicts future body fat gain.

    PubMed

    Hume, David John; Yokum, Sonja; Stice, Eric

    2016-06-01

    There is a paucity of studies that have prospectively tested the energy surfeit theory of obesity with the use of objectively estimated energy intake and energy expenditure in humans. An alternative theory is that homeostatic regulation of body weight is more effective when energy intake and expenditure are both high (high energy flux), implying that low energy flux should predict weight gain. We aimed to examine the predictive relations of energy balance and energy flux to future weight gain and tested whether results were replicable in 2 independent samples. Adolescents (n = 154) and college-aged women (n = 75) underwent 2-wk objective doubly labeled water, resting metabolic rate, and percentage of body fat measures at baseline. Percentage of body fat was measured annually for 3 y of follow-up for the adolescent sample and for 2 y of follow-up for the young adult sample. Low energy flux, but not energy surfeit, predicted future increases in body fat in both studies. Furthermore, high energy flux appeared to prevent fat gain in part because it was associated with a higher resting metabolic rate. Counter to the energy surfeit model of obesity, results suggest that increasing energy expenditure may be more effective for reducing body fat than caloric restriction, which is currently the treatment of choice for obesity. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT02084836. © 2016 American Society for Nutrition.

  14. Materials for Low-Energy Neutron Radiation Shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singleterry, Robert C., Jr.; Thibeault, Sheila A.

    2000-01-01

    Various candidate aircraft and spacecraft materials were analyzed and compared in a low-energy neutron environment using the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) transport code with an energy range up to 20 MeV. Some candidate materials have been tested in particle beams, and others seemed reasonable to analyze in this manner before deciding to test them. The two metal alloys analyzed are actual materials being designed into or used in aircraft and spacecraft today. This analysis shows that hydrogen-bearing materials have the best shielding characteristics over the metal alloys. It also shows that neutrons above 1 MeV are reflected out of the face of the slab better by larger quantities of carbon in the material. If a low-energy absorber is added to the material, fewer neutrons are transmitted through the material. Future analyses should focus on combinations of scatterers and absorbers to optimize these reaction channels and on the higher energy neutron component (above 50 MeV).

  15. Low Energy Laser Biostimulation: New Prospects For Medical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castel, John C.; Abergel, R. Patrick; Willner, Robert E.; Baumann, James G.

    1987-03-01

    The therapeutic benefits of light-energy is not a new concept to the modern world. Documented applications from ancient times tell of the therapeutic effects of ordinary sun-light to treat such common ailments as painful body joints, wounds, compound fractures and tetanus. The discovery of laser light in the 1960's, opened up new prospects for the medical use of light. Laser light differs from other forms of electromagnetic spectrum in that a single wavelength rather than a spectrum of wavelengths is emitted. Since the early 1970's, low-energy laser radiation has been reported to enhance wound healing rates, reduce edema, and relieve musculoskeletal pain. There is no detectable thermal effect of this laser on the tissue being treated. The effects are considered to occur as a result of photochemical, non thermal effects of the laser beam. Photons are absorbed by the tissue being treated and, in turn, produce positive therapeutic effects such as reduction of pain and edema. Pre-clinical and clinical evaluations are, presently, underway to document the safety and efficacy of low energy laser therapy, which represents a significant advance in the non-invasive treatment of pain.

  16. DISCO: a low-energy multipurpose beamline at synchrotron SOLEIL.

    PubMed

    Giuliani, Alexandre; Jamme, Frédéric; Rouam, Valérie; Wien, Frank; Giorgetta, Jean-Luc; Lagarde, Bruno; Chubar, Oleg; Bac, Stéphane; Yao, Isabelle; Rey, Solène; Herbeaux, Christian; Marlats, Jean-Louis; Zerbib, Daniel; Polack, François; Réfrégiers, Matthieu

    2009-11-01

    DISCO, a novel low-energy beamline covering the spectrum range from the VUV to the visible, has received its first photons at the French synchrotron SOLEIL. In this article the DISCO design and concept of three experimental stations serving research communities in biology and chemistry are described. Emphasis has been put on high flux generation and preservation of polarization at variable energy resolutions. The three experiments include a completely new approach for microscopy and atmospheric pressure experiments as well as a ;classical' synchrotron radiation circular dichroism station. Preliminary tests of the optical design and technical concept have been made. Theoretical predictions of the beam have been compared with the first images produced by the first photons originating from the large-aperture bending-magnet source. Results are also reported concerning the cold finger used to absorb hard X-ray radiation in the central part of the synchrotron beam and to avoid heavy thermal load on the following optics. Wavelength selection using monochromators with different gratings for each experimental set-up as well as beam propagation and conditioning throughout the optical system are detailed. First photons comply very well with the theoretical calculations.

  17. A Very Low Energy Electrostatic Analyzer,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-12-31

    SCIENTFI C-1 AFGL-TR-80-0023 NL... mlllEllilllE EIIIIIIIIIEEI IIIIIIIIIw SAFGL-T -0023 LEYE " - A VERY LOW ENERGY ELECTROSTATIC ANALYZER ROBERT E. LA...probably be per- formed for less than $200,000 in a period of about one year. ~1 -3t - i L..i. Cr L- 4 z iu 0 . SI ’ a D, Io rl 7 I a ZcrT a- / Clio) ~ ’ r~ !- 2 ’I - L~J~ ~AIo -~ C arLC) T IA1

  18. Low energy source for seismic operation

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, P.N.

    1980-09-23

    A lightweight, mobile, low-energy seismic source comprises an industrial shotgun, having a solid projectile combined with a base structure to support the gun in a substantially vertical position, slightly above the surface of the earth. The muzzle velocity of the projectile is sufficiently high that it can provide up to 9,000 foot pounds of energy impacting on the earth, which is comparable to that of some of the larger weight drop machines. Wheels or carrying bars can be provided for manual transport of the source.

  19. The Low-Energy Telescopes on EXIST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsey, Brian; Kaaret, P.; Jernigan, J. G.; Remillard, R. A.; Rothschild, R.; Hong, J.; Grindlay, J. E.

    2007-05-01

    The low-energy telescopes on EXIST are a coded aperture system that will continually image the 5-30 keV sky with 1' angular resolution and 12" source localization accuracy. The good source localization accuracy is essential to uniquely identify counterparts to obscured AGN and gamma-ray bursts. A total detector area of about one square meter with 200 micron square pixel is required. We are evaluating two silicon-based technologies capable of achieving the required performance: active pixel sensors with integrated DEPFET readout, and fully pixellated hybrid sensors with CMOS readout multiplexers optimized for X-ray detection.

  20. The Low-Energy Telescopes on EXIST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsey, Brian; Kaaret, Philip E.; Jernigan, J. G.; Remillard, R. A.; Rothschild, R. E.; Hong, J.; Grindlay, J. E.

    2006-12-01

    The low-energy telescopes on EXIST are a coded aperture system that will continually image the 5-30 keV sky with 1' angular resolution and 12" source localization accuracy. The good source localization accuracy is essential to uniquely identify counterparts to obscured AGN and gamma-ray bursts. A total detector area of about one square meter with 200 micron square pixel is required. We are evaluating two silicon-based technologies capable of achieving the required performance: active pixel sensors with integrated DEPFET readout, and fully pixellated hybrid sensors with CMOS readout multiplexers optimized for X-ray detection.

  1. FLSR - The Frankfurt low energy storage ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stiebing, K. E.; Alexandrov, V.; Dörner, R.; Enz, S.; Kazarinov, N. Yu.; Kruppi, T.; Schempp, A.; Schmidt Böcking, H.; Völp, M.; Ziel, P.; Dworak, M.; Dilfer, W.

    2010-02-01

    An electrostatic storage ring for low-energy ions with a design energy of 50 keV is presently being set up at the Institut für Kernphysik der Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main, Germany (IKF). This new device will provide a basis for new experiments on the dynamics of ionic and molecular collisions, as well as for high precision and time resolved laser spectroscopy. In this article, the design parameters of this instrument are reported.

  2. Optimization of design parameters of low-energy buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vala, Jiří; Jarošová, Petra

    2017-07-01

    Evaluation of temperature development and related consumption of energy required for heating, air-conditioning, etc. in low-energy buildings requires the proper physical analysis, covering heat conduction, convection and radiation, including beam and diffusive components of solar radiation, on all building parts and interfaces. The system approach and the Fourier multiplicative decomposition together with the finite element technique offers the possibility of inexpensive and robust numerical and computational analysis of corresponding direct problems, as well as of the optimization ones with several design variables, using the Nelder-Mead simplex method. The practical example demonstrates the correlation between such numerical simulations and the time series of measurements of energy consumption on a small family house in Ostrov u Macochy (35 km northern from Brno).

  3. HIGH INTENSITY LOW-ENERGY POSITRON SOURCE AT JEFFERSON

    SciTech Connect

    Serkan Golge, Bogdan Wojtsekhowski, Branislav Vlahovic

    2012-07-01

    We present a novel concept of a low-energy e{sup +} source with projected intensity on the order of 10{sup 10} slow e{sup +}/s. The key components of this concept are a continuous wave e{sup -} beam, a rotating positron-production target, a synchronized raster/anti-raster, a transport channel, and extraction of e{sup +} into a field-free area through a magnetic plug for moderation in a cryogenic solid. Components were designed in the framework of GEANT4-based (G4beamline) Monte Carlo simulation and TOSCA magnetic field calculation codes. Experimental data to demonstrate the effectiveness of the magnetic plug is presented.

  4. ULTRA-LOW-ENERGY HIGH-CURRENT ION SOURCE

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre; Yushkov, Georgy Yu.; Baldwin, David A.

    2009-11-20

    The technical objective of the project was to develop an ultra-low-energy, high-intensity ion source (ULEHIIS) for materials processing in high-technology fields including semiconductors, micro-magnetics and optics/opto-electronics. In its primary application, this ion source can be incorporated into the 4Wave thin-film deposition technique called biased target ion-beam deposition (BTIBD), which is a deposition technique based on sputtering (without magnetic field, i.e., not the typical magnetron sputtering). It is a technological challenge because the laws of space charge limited current (Child-Langmuir) set strict limits of how much current can be extracted from a reservoir of ions, such as a suitable discharge plasma. The solution to the problem was an innovative dual-discharge system without the use of extraction grids.

  5. Low-energy antinucleon-nucleus interaction revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, E.

    2015-08-01

    Annihilation cross sections of antiprotons and antineutrons on the proton between 50 and 400 MeV/c show Coulomb focusing below 200 MeV/c and almost no charge-dependence above 200 MeV/c. Similar comparisons for heavier targets are not possible for lack of overlap between nuclear targets studied with and beams. Interpolating between -nucleus annihilation cross sections with the help of an optical potential to compare with -nucleus annihilation cross sections reveal unexpected features of Coulomb interactions in the latter. Direct comparisons between -nucleus and -nucleus annihilations at very low energies could be possible if cross sections are measured on the same targets and at the same energies as the available cross sections for . Such measurements may be feasible in the foreseeable future.

  6. Performance monitoring of low energy house, Macclesfield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephen, F. R.

    1980-01-01

    The monitoring of the energy balance of a very well insulated low-energy house in Macclesfield, England is discussed. The house is an existing dwelling which had been converted into a low-energy-requiring house by the reduction of heat loss through a high level of thermal insulation and the collection of solar energy by a water cascade solar panel with warm water storage. Measurements of house temperatures, radiation, off-peak electricity consumption and hot water and heating using were performed from January to August, 1978 and reveal that the house used less than 22,000 kWh electricity during that period, compared to 55,000 kWh expected if the house had been constructed to average insulation levels. Solar energy is found to contribute only 2% of house energy requirements, with the use of a heat pump combined with the solar panel leading to greater efficiency and thus utilization. In addition, the large thermal mass and good insulation are found to improve comfort by reducing temperature fluctuations, and the ventilation and low-temperature water return system employed provided satisfactory results.

  7. Low energy neutrinos in Super-Kamiokande

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekiya, Hiroyuki

    2016-05-01

    Super-Kamiokande (SK), a 50 kton water Cherenkov detector, observes 8B solar neutrinos via neutrino-electron elastic scattering. The analysis threshold was successfully lowered to 3.5 MeV (recoil electron kinetic energy) in SK-IV. To date SK has observed solar neutrinos for 18 years. An analysis regarding possible correlations between the solar neutrino flux and the 11 year solar activity cycle is shown. With large statistics, SK searches for distortions of the solar neutrino energy spectrum caused by the MSW resonance in the core of the sun. SK also searches for a day/night solar neutrino flux asymmetry induced by the matter in the Earth. The Super-Kamiokande Gd (SK-Gd) project is the upgrade of the SK detector via the addition of water-soluble gadolinium (Gd) salt. This modification will enable it to efficiently identify low energy anti-neutrinos. SK-Gd will pursue low energy physics currently inaccessible to SK due to backgrounds. The most important will be the world’s first observation of the diffuse supernova neutrino background. The main R&D program towards SK-Gd is EG ADS: a 200 ton, fully instrumented tank built in a new cavern in the Kamioka mine.

  8. Low-Energy Polymeric Phases of Alanates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Huan; Amsler, Maximilian; Marques, Miguel; Botti, Silvana; Willand, Alexander; Goedecker, Stefan

    2013-03-01

    Low-energy structures of alanates are currently known to be described by patterns of isolated, nearly ideal tetrahedral [AlH4] anions and metal cations. We discover that the novel polymeric motif recently proposed for LiAlH4 plays a dominant role in a series of alanates, including LiAlH4, NaAlH4, KAlH4, Mg(AlH4)2, Ca(AlH4)2 and Sr(AlH4)2. In particular, most of the low-energy structures discovered for the whole series are characterized by networks of corner-sharing [AlH6] octahedra, forming wires and/or planes throughout the materials. Finally, for Mg(AlH4)2 and Sr(AlH4)2, we identify two polymeric phases to be lowest in energy at low temperatures. Work supported by Swiss NSF. Computational resources were provided by the Swiss National Supercomputing Center (CSCS) in Lugano.

  9. Low energy antiproton possibilities at BNL

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.Y.; Lowenstein, D.I.

    1987-01-01

    Antinuclear physics in the energy range of 0 to 20 GeV has long been a mainstay of the high energy physics program at BNL. The emphasis of the experimental program in the last couple of years has however moved to other areas as new facilities in the world have come on line. The initiatives stimulated by the USAF has caused a renewed interest in the low energy capabilities at BNL, which are still very competitive and considerable for the production of low energy antiprotons. A synopsis is given of the present BNL accelerator plans and the near term possibilities for a high yield antiproton production experiment. This paper does not address the longer term facility possibilities of producing ''large'' amounts of antimatter. Parenthetically, even though several aspects of the program are of little interest for this audience, such as the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and the Stretcher, it is important to understand their parameters and impact upon various possible antinucleon initiatives at BNL.

  10. Large Regular QCD Coupling at Low Energy?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirkov, Dmitry V.

    2008-10-01

    The issue is the expediency of the QCD notions' use in the low energy region down to the confinement scale, and, in particular, the efficacy of the QCD invariant coupling {bar α }s (Q2 ) with a minimal analytic modification in this domain. To this goal, we overview a quite recent progress in application of the ghost-free Analytic Perturbative Theory approach (with no adjustable parameters) for QCD in the region below 1 GeV. Among them the Bethe-Salpeter analysis of the meson spectra and spin-dependent (polarization) Bjorken sum rule. The impression is that there is a chance for theoretically consistent and numerically correlated description of hadronic events from the Z0 till few hundred MeV scale by combination of analytic pQCD and some explicit non-perturbative contribution in the spirit of duality. This is an invitation to practitioner community for a more courageous use of ghost-free models for data analysis in the low energy region.

  11. Low energy high pressure miniature screw valve

    DOEpatents

    Fischer, Gary J.; Spletzer, Barry L.

    2006-12-12

    A low energy high pressure screw valve having a valve body having an upper portion and a lower portion, said lower portion of said valve body defining an inlet flow passage and an outlet flow passage traversing said valve body to a valve seat, said upper portion of said valve body defining a cavity at said valve seat, a diaphragm restricting flow between said upper portion of said valve body and said lower portion, said diaphragm capable of engaging said valve seat to restrict fluid communication between said inlet passage and said outlet passage, a plunger within said cavity supporting said diaphragm, said plunger being capable of engaging said diaphragm with said valve seat at said inlet and outlet fluid passages, said plunger being in point contact with a drive screw having threads engaged with opposing threads within said upper portion of said valve body such engagement allowing motion of said drive screw within said valve body.

  12. Low-energy pion-nucleon scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbs, W.R.; Ai, L.; Kaufmann, W.B.

    1998-02-01

    An analysis of low-energy charged pion-nucleon data from recent {pi}{sup {plus_minus}}p experiments is presented. From the scattering lengths and the Goldberger-Miyazawa-Oehme (GMO) sum rule we find a value of the pion-nucleon coupling constant of f{sup 2}=0.0756{plus_minus}0.0007. We also find, contrary to most previous analyses, that the scattering volumes for the P{sub 31} and P{sub 13} partial waves are equal, within errors, corresponding to a symmetry found in the Hamiltonian of many theories. For the potential models used, the amplitudes are extrapolated into the subthreshold region to estimate the value of the {Sigma} term. Off-shell amplitudes are also provided. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  13. Low-energy dynamics of gravitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torma, Tibor

    The present status of theories of quantum gravity are reviewed from the low energy point of view. String theory relates classical black-hole type solutions of Einstein- like equations (e.g. axidilaton gravity) to the string vacuum. Several such solutions are proposed and their properties are investigated, including their behavior under supersymmetry transformations. A general feature of all possible quantum theories of gravitation is that they lead to a field theory description at low (as compared to the Planck mass) energies. The theoretical consistency, uniqueness and consequences of such an effective theory are investigated. I show that a power counting theorem allows for the momentum expansion that defines the effective theory even in the presence of large masses. I also show that graviton-graviton scattering is free of potential infrared and collinear divergencies that plague perturbative discussions of Yang-Mills theories.

  14. Low energy consumption spintronics using multiferroic heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Trassin, Morgan

    2016-01-27

    We review the recent progress in the field of multiferroic magnetoelectric heterostructures. The lack of single phase multiferroic candidates exhibiting simultaneously strong and coupled magnetic and ferroelectric orders led to an increased effort into the development of artificial multiferroic heterostructures in which these orders are combined by assembling different materials. The magnetoelectric coupling emerging from the created interface between the ferroelectric and ferromagnetic layers can result in electrically tunable magnetic transition temperature, magnetic anisotropy or magnetization reversal. The full potential of low energy consumption magnetic based devices for spintronics lies in our understanding of the magnetoelectric coupling at the scale of the ferroic domains. Although the thin film synthesis progresses resulted into the complete control of ferroic domain ordering using epitaxial strain, the local observation of magnetoelectric coupling remains challenging. The ability to imprint ferroelectric domains into ferromagnets and to manipulate those solely using electric fields suggests new technological advances for spintronics such as magnetoelectric memories or memristors.

  15. Low-energy irradiation effects in cellulose

    SciTech Connect

    Polvi, Jussi; Nordlund, Kai

    2014-01-14

    Using molecular dynamics simulations, we determined the threshold energy for creating defects as a function of the incident angle for all carbon and oxygen atoms in the cellulose monomer. Our analysis shows that the damage threshold energy is strongly dependent on the initial recoil direction and on average slightly higher for oxygen atoms than for carbon atoms in cellulose chain. We also performed cumulative bombardment simulations mimicking low-energy electron irradiation (such as TEM imaging) on cellulose. Analyzing the results, we found that formation of free molecules and broken glucose rings were the most common forms of damage, whereas cross-linking and chain scission were less common. Pre-existing damage was found to increase the probability of cross-linking.

  16. Low-energy pion-nucleon scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbs, W. R.; Ai, Li; Kaufmann, W. B.

    1998-02-01

    An analysis of low-energy charged pion-nucleon data from recent π+/-p experiments is presented. From the scattering lengths and the Goldberger-Miyazawa-Oehme (GMO) sum rule we find a value of the pion-nucleon coupling constant of f2=0.0756+/-0.0007. We also find, contrary to most previous analyses, that the scattering volumes for the P31 and P13 partial waves are equal, within errors, corresponding to a symmetry found in the Hamiltonian of many theories. For the potential models used, the amplitudes are extrapolated into the subthreshold region to estimate the value of the Σ term. Off-shell amplitudes are also provided.

  17. Bluetooth Low Energy Mesh Networks: A Survey.

    PubMed

    Darroudi, Seyed Mahdi; Gomez, Carles

    2017-06-22

    Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) has gained significant momentum. However, the original design of BLE focused on star topology networking, which limits network coverage range and precludes end-to-end path diversity. In contrast, other competing technologies overcome such constraints by supporting the mesh network topology. For these reasons, academia, industry, and standards development organizations have been designing solutions to enable BLE mesh networks. Nevertheless, the literature lacks a consolidated view on this emerging area. This paper comprehensively surveys state of the art BLE mesh networking. We first provide a taxonomy of BLE mesh network solutions. We then review the solutions, describing the variety of approaches that leverage existing BLE functionality to enable BLE mesh networks. We identify crucial aspects of BLE mesh network solutions and discuss their advantages and drawbacks. Finally, we highlight currently open issues.

  18. Low energy dislocation structures in epitaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Der Merwe, Jan H.; Woltersdorf, J.; Jesser, W. A.

    1986-01-01

    The principle of minimum energy was applied to epitaxial interfaces to show the interrelationship beteen misfit, overgrowth thickness and misfit dislocation spacing. The low energy dislocation configurations were presented for selected interfacial geometries. A review of the interfacial energy calculations was made and a critical assessment of the agreement between theory and experiment was presented. Modes of misfit accommodation were presented with emphasis on the distinction between kinetic effects and equilibrium conditions. Two-dimensional and three-dimensional overgrowths were treated together with interdiffusion-modified interfaces, and several models of interfacial structure were treated including the classical and the current models. The paper is concluded by indicating areas of needed investigation into interfacial structure.

  19. Low energy wearable body-sensor-network.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Hoi-Jun; Cho, Namjun; Yoo, Jerald

    2009-01-01

    Wearable body sensor network (WBSN) is realized with wireless and wireline techniques. Body channel communication (BCC), which uses the human body as a signal transmission medium, can reduce energy consumption of a wireless on-body transceiver to less than 0.5nJ/b. The 3 pulse-based transceivers for BCC are reviewed in this paper, and their interference issues are discussed. To enhance BCC robustness, an adaptive frequency hopping scheme is applied. Fabric Area Network (FAN) is introduced with a low energy inductive coupling transceiver and a fault-tolerant switch to realize intra- and inter-layer WBSN at once. Unique wearable environment issues and the adaptation technique to overcome those issues are discussed.

  20. Bluetooth Low Energy Mesh Networks: A Survey

    PubMed Central

    Darroudi, Seyed Mahdi; Gomez, Carles

    2017-01-01

    Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) has gained significant momentum. However, the original design of BLE focused on star topology networking, which limits network coverage range and precludes end-to-end path diversity. In contrast, other competing technologies overcome such constraints by supporting the mesh network topology. For these reasons, academia, industry, and standards development organizations have been designing solutions to enable BLE mesh networks. Nevertheless, the literature lacks a consolidated view on this emerging area. This paper comprehensively surveys state of the art BLE mesh networking. We first provide a taxonomy of BLE mesh network solutions. We then review the solutions, describing the variety of approaches that leverage existing BLE functionality to enable BLE mesh networks. We identify crucial aspects of BLE mesh network solutions and discuss their advantages and drawbacks. Finally, we highlight currently open issues. PMID:28640183

  1. Low-energy electron scattering by pyrazine

    SciTech Connect

    Winstead, Carl; McKoy, Vincent

    2007-07-15

    We report cross sections for low-energy elastic electron collisions with the diazabenzene molecule pyrazine, obtained from first-principles calculations. The integral elastic cross section exhibits three sharp peaks that are nominally shape resonances associated with trapping in the vacant {pi}* molecular orbitals. Although the two lowest-energy resonances do in fact prove to be nearly pure single-channel shape resonances, the third contains a considerable admixture of core-excited character, and accounting for this channel coupling effect is essential to obtaining an accurate resonance energy. Such resonant channel coupling has implications for electron interactions with the DNA bases, especially the pyrimidine bases for which pyrazine is a close analog. In the absence of data on pyrazine itself, we compare our elastic differential cross section to measurements on benzene and find close agreement.

  2. Microdosimetry of low-energy electrons.

    PubMed

    Liamsuwan, Thiansin; Emfietzoglou, Dimitris; Uehara, Shuzo; Nikjoo, Hooshang

    2012-12-01

    To investigate differences in energy depositions and microdosimetric parameters of low-energy electrons in liquid and gaseous water using Monte Carlo track structure simulations. KURBUC-liq (Kyushu University and Radiobiology Unit Code for liquid water) was used for simulating electron tracks in liquid water. The inelastic scattering cross sections of liquid water were obtained from the dielectric response model of Emfietzoglou et al. (Radiation Research 2005;164:202-211). Frequencies of energy deposited in nanometre-size cylindrical targets per unit absorbed dose and associated lineal energies were calculated for 100-5000 eV monoenergetic electrons and the electron spectrum of carbon K edge X-rays. The results for liquid water were compared with those for water vapour. Regardless of electron energy, there is a limit how much energy electron tracks can deposit in a target. Phase effects on the frequencies of energy depositions are largely visible for the targets with diameters and heights smaller than 30 nm. For the target of 2.3 nm by 2.3 nm (similar to dimension of DNA segments), the calculated frequency- and dose-mean lineal energies for liquid water are up to 40% smaller than those for water vapour. The corresponding difference is less than 12% for the targets with diameters ≥ 30 nm. Condensed-phase effects are non-negligible for microdosimetry of low-energy electrons for targets with sizes smaller than a few tens of nanometres, similar to dimensions of DNA molecular structures and nucleosomes.

  3. Low energy demonstration accelerator technical area 53

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    As part of the Department of Energy`s (DOE) need to maintain the capability of producing tritium in support of its historic and near-term stewardship of the nation`s nuclear weapons stockpile, the agency has recently completed a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Tritium Supply and Recycling. The resulting Record of Decision (ROD) determined that over the next three years the DOE would follow a dual-track acquisition strategy that assures tritium production for the nuclear weapon stockpile in a rapid, cost effective, and safe manner. Under this strategy the DOE will further investigate and compare two options for producing tritium: (1) purchase of an existing commercial light-water reactor or irradiation services with an option to purchase the reactor for conversion to a defense facility; and (2) design, build, and test critical components of a system for accelerator production of tritium (APT). The final decision to select the primary production option will be made by the Secretary of Energy in the October 1998 time frame. The alternative not chosen as the primary production method, if feasible, would be developed as a back-up tritium supply source. This Environmental Assessment (EA) analyzes the potential environmental effects that would be expected to occur if the DOE were to design, build, and test critical prototypical components of the accelerator system for tritium production, specifically the front-end low-energy section of the accelerator, at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LEDA) would be incrementally developed and tested in five separate stages over the next seven years. The following issues were evaluated for the proposed action: utility demands, air, human health, environmental restoration, waste management, transportation, water, threatened and endangered species, wetlands, cultural resources, and environmental justice.

  4. Low energy AMS of americium and curium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christl, Marcus; Dai, Xiongxin; Lachner, Johannes; Kramer-Tremblay, Sheila; Synal, Hans-Arno

    2014-07-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) has evolved over the past years as one of the most sensitive, selective, and robust techniques for actinide analyses. While analyses of U and Pu isotopes have already become routine at the ETH Zurich 0.5 MV AMS system "Tandy", there is an increasing demand for highly sensitive analyses of the higher actinides such as Am and Cm for bioassay applications and beyond. In order to extend the actinide capabilities of the compact ETH Zurich AMS system and to develop new, more sensitive bioassay routines, a pilot study was carried out. The aim was to investigate and document the performance and the potential background of Am and Cm analyses with low energy AMS. Our results show that 241Am and Cm isotopes can be determined relative to a 243Am tracer if samples and AMS standards are prepared identically with regard to the matrix elements, in which the sample is dispersed. In this first test, detection limits for Cm and Am isotopes are all in the sub-femtogram range and even below 100 ag for Cm isotopes. In a systematic background study in the mass range of the Cm isotopes, two formerly unknown metastable triply charged Th molecules were found on amu(244) and amu(248). The presence of such a background is not a principal problem for AMS if the stripper pressure is increased accordingly. Based on our first results, we conclude that ultra-trace analyses of Am and Cm isotopes for bioassay are very well possible with low energy AMS.

  5. The Low Energy Effective Area of the Chandra Low Energy Transmission Grating Spectrograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pease, D.; Drake, J. J.; Johnson, C. O.; Kashya, V.; Ratzlaff, P. W.; Wargelin, B. J.; Brinkman, A. C.; Kaastra, J. S.; vanderMeer, R.; Paerels, F. B.

    2000-01-01

    The Chandra X-ray Observatory was successfully launched on July 23, 1999, and subsequently began an intensive calibration phase. We present the preliminary results from the in-flight calibration of the low energy response of the High Resolution Camera spectroscopic readout (HRC-S) combined with the Low Energy Transmission Grating (LETG) aboard Chandra. These instruments comprise the Low Energy Transmission Grating Spectrograph (LETGS). For this calibration study, we employ a pure hydrogen non-LTE white dwarf emission model (T = 25000 K and log g = 9.0) for comparison with the Chandra observations of Sirius B. The pre-flight calibration of the LETGS effective area only covered wavelengths shortward of 44 A (E less than 277 eV). Our Sirius B analysis shows that the HRC-S quantum efficiency (QE) model assumed for longer wavelengths leads to an overestimate of the effective area by an average factor of about 1.6. We derive a correction to the low energy HRC-S QE model to match the predicted and observed Sirius B spectra over the wavelength range of 44-185 A. We make an independent test of our results by the comparison of a Chandra LETGS observation of HZ 43 with pure hydrogen model atmosphere predictions and find good agreement.

  6. The Exploitation of Low-Energy Electrons in Cancer Treatment.

    PubMed

    Rezaee, Mohammad; Hill, Richard P; Jaffray, David A

    2017-08-01

    Given the distinct characteristics of low-energy electrons (LEEs), particularly at energies less than 30 eV, they can be applied to a wide range of therapeutic modalities to improve cancer treatment. LEEs have been shown to efficiently produce complex molecular damage resulting in substantial cellular toxicities. Since LEEs are produced in copious amounts from high-energy radiation beam, including photons, protons and ions; the control of LEE distribution can potentially enhance the therapeutic radio of such beams. LEEs can play a substantial role in the synergistic effect between radiation and chemotherapy, particularly halogenated and platinum-based anticancer drugs. Radiosensitizing entities containing atoms of high atomic number such as gold nanoparticles can be a source of LEE production if high-energy radiation interacts with them. This can provide a high local density of LEEs in a cell and produce cellular toxicity. Auger-electron-emitting radionuclides also create a high number of LEEs in each decay, which can induce lethal damage in a cell. Exploitation of LEEs in cancer treatment, however, faces a few challenges, such as dosimetry of LEEs and selective delivery of radiosensitizing and chemotherapeutic molecules close to cellular targets. This review first discusses the rationale for utilizing LEEs in cancer treatment by explaining their mechanism of action, describes theoretical and experimental studies at the molecular and cellular levels, then discusses strategies for achieving modification of the distribution and effectiveness of LEEs in cancerous tissue and their associated clinical benefit.

  7. Molecular ion sources for low energy semiconductor ion implantation (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Hershcovitch, A.; Gushenets, V. I.; Bugaev, A. S.; Oks, E. M.; Vizir, A.; Yushkov, G. Yu.; Seleznev, D. N.; Kulevoy, T. V.; Kozlov, A.; Kropachev, G. N.; Kuibeda, R. P.; Minaev, S.; Dugin, S.; Alexeyenko, O.

    2016-02-15

    Smaller semiconductors require shallow, low energy ion implantation, resulting space charge effects, which reduced beam currents and production rates. To increase production rates, molecular ions are used. Boron and phosphorous (or arsenic) implantation is needed for P-type and N-type semiconductors, respectively. Carborane, which is the most stable molecular boron ion leaves unacceptable carbon residue on extraction grids. A self-cleaning carborane acid compound (C{sub 4}H{sub 12}B{sub 10}O{sub 4}) was synthesized and utilized in the ITEP Bernas ion source resulting in large carborane ion output, without carbon residue. Pure gaseous processes are desired to enable rapid switch among ion species. Molecular phosphorous was generated by introducing phosphine in dissociators via 4PH{sub 3} = P{sub 4} + 6H{sub 2}; generated molecular phosphorous in a pure gaseous process was then injected into the HCEI Calutron-Bernas ion source, from which P{sub 4}{sup +} ion beams were extracted. Results from devices and some additional concepts are described.

  8. Potential for luminosity improvement for low-energy RHIC operation with long bunches

    SciTech Connect

    Fedotov, A.; Blaskiewicz, M.

    2012-02-10

    Electron cooling was proposed to increase luminosity of the RHIC collider for heavy ion beams at low energies. Luminosity decreases as the square of bunch intensity due to the beam loss from the RF bucket as a result of the longitudinal intra beam scattering (IBS), as well as due to the transverse emittance growth because of the transverse IBS. Both transverse and longitudinal IBS can be counteracted with electron cooling. This would allow one to keep the initial peak luminosity close to constant throughout the store essentially without the beam loss. In addition, the phase-space density of the hadron beams can be further increased by providing stronger electron cooling. Unfortunately, the defining limitation for low energies in RHIC is expected to be the space charge. Here we explore an idea of additional improvement in luminosity, on top of the one coming from just IBS compensation and longer stores, which may be expected if one can operate with longer bunches at the space-charge limit in a collider. This approach together with electron cooling may result in about 10-fold improvement in total luminosity for low-energy RHIC program.

  9. Location of Low-Energy Charged Particle Instrument

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-12-03

    This graphic shows the NASA Voyager 1 spacecraft and the location of its low-energy charged particle instrument. A labeled close-up of the low-energy charged particle instrument appears as the inset image.

  10. Gridless retarding potential analyzer for use in very-low-energy charged particle detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shyn, T. W.; Sharp, W. E.; Hays, P. B.

    1976-01-01

    The theory of the hyperbolic retarding potential analyzer in the electrostatic mode is developed in detail and verified in the laboratory. A monoenergetic electron beam is used for the laboratory investigation. The analyzer (acronym HARP) has advantages over other conventional electrostatic analyzers; among them are less contact potential influence and high throughput because of the symmetry shape of the analyzer. The most useful application of the HARP is in detecting low-energy charged particles. A sample of low-energy particle data obtained in the earth's ionosphere is given.

  11. Gridless retarding potential analyzer for use in very-low-energy charged particle detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shyn, T. W.; Sharp, W. E.; Hays, P. B.

    1976-01-01

    The theory of the hyperbolic retarding potential analyzer in the electrostatic mode is developed in detail and verified in the laboratory. A monoenergetic electron beam is used for the laboratory investigation. The analyzer (acronym HARP) has advantages over other conventional electrostatic analyzers; among them are less contact potential influence and high throughput because of the symmetry shape of the analyzer. The most useful application of the HARP is in detecting low-energy charged particles. A sample of low-energy particle data obtained in the earth's ionosphere is given.

  12. Several methods and apparatus of low-energy laser therapy in veterinary practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svirin, Vaytcheslav N.; Rogatkin, Dmitrii A.; Barybin, Vitalii F.

    1998-12-01

    During same years various medical effect of low-energy laser therapy in veterinary were tested. We established that the laser low-energy therapy can be very effective for treatment such animal's diseases as mastitis and demodekose when certain combinations of laser beam parameters are used. This combinations were taken as the principle of a number of laser veterinary apparatus, which we started to produce at `POLUS'. It is our series of apparatus `VEGA-MB' and `VETLAS-3', which is real used today for dogs and cows treatment in Russia.

  13. 21 CFR 878.4410 - Low energy ultrasound wound cleaner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Low energy ultrasound wound cleaner. 878.4410... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4410 Low energy ultrasound wound cleaner. (a) Identification. A low energy ultrasound wound cleaner is a device that...

  14. 21 CFR 878.4410 - Low energy ultrasound wound cleaner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Low energy ultrasound wound cleaner. 878.4410... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4410 Low energy ultrasound wound cleaner. (a) Identification. A low energy ultrasound wound cleaner is a device that...

  15. 21 CFR 878.4410 - Low energy ultrasound wound cleaner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Low energy ultrasound wound cleaner. 878.4410... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4410 Low energy ultrasound wound cleaner. (a) Identification. A low energy ultrasound wound cleaner is a device that...

  16. 21 CFR 878.4410 - Low energy ultrasound wound cleaner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Low energy ultrasound wound cleaner. 878.4410... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4410 Low energy ultrasound wound cleaner. (a) Identification. A low energy ultrasound wound cleaner is a device that...

  17. 21 CFR 878.4410 - Low energy ultrasound wound cleaner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Low energy ultrasound wound cleaner. 878.4410... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4410 Low energy ultrasound wound cleaner. (a) Identification. A low energy ultrasound wound cleaner is a device that...

  18. Low energy excitations of the neutron star core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, Sanjay

    2017-01-01

    I will summarize recent work on low energy excitations in cold dense matter and its implications for thermal and transport properties, and seismology of neutron stars. I argue that a low energy Lagrangian with a handful of low energy constants (LECs) provides an adequate framework for calculations. The LECs can be related to the equation of state of dense matter at zero temperature.

  19. A systematic characterization of the low-energy photon response of plastic scintillation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boivin, Jonathan; Beddar, Sam; Bonde, Chris; Schmidt, Daniel; Culberson, Wesley; Guillemette, Maxime; Beaulieu, Luc

    2016-08-01

    To characterize the low energy behavior of scintillating materials used in plastic scintillation detectors (PSDs), 3 PSDs were developed using polystyrene-based scintillating materials emitting in different wavelengths. These detectors were exposed to National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)-matched low-energy beams ranging from 20 kVp to 250 kVp, and to 137Cs and 60Co beams. The dose in polystyrene was compared to the dose in air measured by NIST-calibrated ionization chambers at the same location. Analysis of every beam quality spectrum was used to extract the beam parameters and the effective mass energy-absorption coefficient. Monte Carlo simulations were also performed to calculate the energy absorbed in the scintillators’ volume. The scintillators’ expected response was then compared to the experimental measurements and an energy-dependent correction factor was identified to account for low-energy quenching in the scintillators. The empirical Birks model was then compared to these values to verify its validity for low-energy electrons. The clear optical fiber response was below 0.2% of the scintillator’s light for x-ray beams, indicating that a negligible amount of fluorescence contamination was produced. However, for higher-energy beams (137Cs and 60Co), the scintillators’ response was corrected for the Cerenkov stem effect. The scintillators’ response increased by a factor of approximately 4 from a 20 kVp to a 60Co beam. The decrease in sensitivity from ionization quenching reached a local minimum of about 11%+/- 1% between 40 keV and 60 keV x-ray beam mean energy, but dropped by 20% for very low-energy (13 keV) beams. The Birks model may be used to fit the experimental data, but it must take into account the energy dependence of the kB quenching parameter. A detailed comprehension of intrinsic scintillator response is essential for proper calibration of PSD dosimeters for radiology.

  20. Low-energy electron scattering from cyanamide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kedong; Guo, Shuangcheng; Meng, Ju; Huang, Xiaotian; Wang, Yongfeng

    2016-09-01

    The low-energy electron collisions with cyanamide molecule are investigated by using the UK molecular R -matrix codes for electron energies ranging from 0.01 eV to 10 eV. Three models including static-exchange, static-exchange plus polarization, and close-coupling (CC) approximations are employed to reveal the dynamic interaction. Elastic (integrated and differential), momentum-transfer, and excitation cross sections from the ground state to the three low-lying electron excited states have been presented. Two shape resonances, two core-excited resonances, and two Feshbach resonances are detected in the CC approximation. The role of active space in the target and scattering problem including the resonances is discussed. The precise resonance parameters are found to be sensitive to the treatment of polarization effects employed. These resonances may be responsible for the fragments observed in a recent experiment of the dissociative electron attachments to cyanamide. Since the cyanamide molecule has a large permanent dipole moment, a Born closure procedure is used to account for the contribution of partial waves higher than l =4 to obtain converged cross sections.

  1. Low Energy Electron Scattering from Fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, M. Cristina A.

    2012-06-01

    We report an investigation of processes that occur during the ignition of the plasma and its consequences in post-discharge time for an internal combustion engine, in order to find the appropriate parameters to be used in cars that operate with lean mixtures air-fuel. The relevance of this theme has attracted much attention, and has been one of the subjects of collaboration between experimental and theoretical groups in the USA and Brazil. We have produced some basic information necessary to modeling spark ignition in alcohol- fuelled engines. Total cross sections of electron scattering by methanol and ethanol molecules were obtained, using the linear transmission method based on the Beer-Lambert law to first approximation. Measurements and calculations of differential cross sections for low-energy (rotationally unresolved) electron scattering were also obtained, for scattering angles of 5 --130 . The measurements were taken using the relative flow method with an aperture source, and calculations using two different implementations of the Schwinger multichannel method, one that takes all electrons into account and is adapted for parallel computers, and another that uses pseudopotentials and considers only the valence electrons. Additionally to these, computer simulation studies of electronic discharge in mixtures of ethanol were performed, using a Zero-Dimensional Plasma Kinetic solver. Previous reported models for combustion of ethanol and cross sections data for momentum transfer of electron collisions with ethanol were used. The time evolutions of the main species densities are reported and the ignition time delay discussed.

  2. Low Energy Electron Scattering from Fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, M. C. A.; Silva, D. G. M.; Bettega, M. H. F.; da Costa, R. F.; Lima, M. A. P.; Khakoo, M. A.; Winstead, C.; McKoy, V.

    2012-11-01

    In order to understand and optimize processes occurring during the ignition of plasma and its consequences in post-discharge for an internal combustion engine, especially considering the spark plug, we have produced in this work some basic information necessary to modeling spark ignition in alcohol- fuelled engines. Total cross sections of electron scattering by methanol and ethanol molecules in the energy range from 60 to 500 eV are reported, using the linear transmission method based on the Beer-Lambert law to first approximation. Aditionally to that, measurements and calculations of differential cross sections for elastic low-energy (rotationally unresolved) electron scattering were also discussed, for impact energies of 1, 2, 5, 10, 15, 20, 30, 50, and 100 eV and for scattering angles of 5°-130°. The measurements were obtained using the relative flow method with an aperture source, and calculations using two different implementations of the Schwinger multichannel method, one that takes all electrons into account and is adapted for parallel computers, and another that uses pseudopotentials and considers only the valence electrons.

  3. Discrete R symmetries and low energy supersymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Dine, Michael; Kehayias, John

    2010-09-01

    If nature exhibits low energy supersymmetry, discrete (non-Z{sub 2}) R symmetries may well play an important role. In this paper, we explore such symmetries. We generalize gaugino condensation, constructing large classes of models which are classically scale invariant, and which spontaneously break discrete R symmetries (but not supersymmetry). The order parameters for the breaking include chiral singlets. These simplify the construction of models with metastable dynamical supersymmetry breaking. We explain that in gauge mediation, the problem of the cosmological constant makes ''retrofitting'' particularly natural--almost imperative. We describe new classes of models, with interesting scales for supersymmetry breaking, and which allow simple solutions of the {mu} problem. We argue that models exhibiting such R symmetries can readily solve not only the problem of dimension four operators and proton decay, but also dimension five operators. On the other hand, in theories of ''gravity mediation,'' the breaking of an R symmetry is typically of order M{sub p}; R parity is required to suppress dimension four B and L violating operators, and dimension five operators remain problematic.

  4. Shadowing in low-energy photonuclear reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Swapan

    2017-09-01

    The photonuclear reaction in the multi-GeV region occurs because of the electromagnetic and hadronic interactions. The latter originates due to the hadronic fluctuation, i.e., vector meson, of the photon. The total cross section of the reaction is shadowed because of the vector meson-nucleus (hadronic) interaction. To estimate it quantitatively, the cross section of the photonuclear reaction was calculated in the low energy region (˜1 -3 GeV) using the simple vector-meson dominance (SVMD) model, i.e., the low-lying vector mesons (ρ0, ω , and ϕ mesons) were considered. The nuclear shadowing is reinvestigated using the generalized vector meson (GVMD) model, where the higher ρ meson effective state (ρ' meson) is taken into account along with the low-lying vector mesons. Using the GVMD model, the total cross section of the photonuclear reaction are calculated in the above mentioned energy region. The calculated results are compared with the measured spectra.

  5. Low energy CMOS for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panwar, Ramesh; Alkalaj, Leon

    1992-01-01

    The current focus of NASA's space flight programs reflects a new thrust towards smaller, less costly, and more frequent space missions, when compared to missions such as Galileo, Magellan, or Cassini. Recently, the concept of a microspacecraft was proposed. In this concept, a small, compact spacecraft that weighs tens of kilograms performs focused scientific objectives such as imaging. Similarly, a Mars Lander micro-rover project is under study that will allow miniature robots weighing less than seven kilograms to explore the Martian surface. To bring the microspacecraft and microrover ideas to fruition, one will have to leverage compact 3D multi-chip module-based multiprocessors (MCM) technologies. Low energy CMOS will become increasingly important because of the thermodynamic considerations in cooling compact 3D MCM implementations and also from considerations of the power budget for space applications. In this paper, we show how the operating voltage is related to the threshold voltage of the CMOS transistors for accomplishing a task in VLSI with minimal energy. We also derive expressions for the noise margins at the optimal operating point. We then look at a low voltage CMOS (LVCMOS) technology developed at Stanford University which improves the power consumption over conventional CMOS by a couple of orders of magnitude and consider the suitability of the technology for space applications by characterizing its SEU immunity.

  6. Low energy stable plasma calibration facility.

    PubMed

    Frederick-Frost, K M; Lynch, K A

    2007-07-01

    We have designed and fabricated a low energy plasma calibration facility for testing and calibration of rocket-borne charged-particle detectors and for the investigation of plasma sheath formation in an environment with ionospheric plasma energies, densities, and Debye lengths. We describe the vacuum system and associated plasma source, which was modified from a Naval Research Laboratory design [Bowles et al. Rev. Sci. Instrum. 67, 455 (1996)]. Mechanical and electrical modifications to this cylindrical microwave resonant source are outlined together with a different method of operating the magnetron that achieves a stable discharge. This facility produces unmagnetized plasmas with densities from 1x10(3)/cm(3) to 6x10(5)/cm(3), electron temperatures from 0.1 to 1.7 eV, and plasma potentials from 0.5 to 8 V depending on varying input microwave power and neutral gas flow. For the range of input microwave power explored (350-600 W), the energy density of the plasma remains constant because of an inverse relationship between density and temperature. This relationship allows a wide range of Debye lengths (0.3-8.4 cm) to be investigated, which is ideal for simulating the ionospheric plasma sheaths we explore.

  7. Low energy neutral atom imaging techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Funsten, H.O. McComas, D.J.; Scime, E.E.

    1993-01-01

    The potential scientific return from low energy neutral atom (LENA) imaging of the magnetosphere is extraordinary. The technical challenges of LENA detection include (1) removal of LENAs from the tremendous ambient UV without losing information of their incident trajectories, (2) quantification of their trajectories, and (3) obtaining high sensitivity measurements. Two techniques that have been proposed for this purpose are based on fundamentally different atomic interaction mechanisms between LENAs and a solid: LENA transmission through an ultrathin foil and LENA reflection from a solid surface. Both of these methods provide LENA ionization (for subsequent removal from the UV by electrostatic deflection) and secondary electron emission (for start pulse generation for time-of-flight and/or coincidence). We present a comparative study of the transmission and reflection techniques based on differences in atomic interactions with solids and surfaces. We show that transmission methods yield an order of magnitude greater secondary electron emission than reflection methods. Transmission methods are shown to be sufficient for LENA energies of approximately 1 keV to greater than 30 keV. Reflection methods using low work function surfaces could be employed for LENA ionization for energies less than several keV.

  8. Studies in Low-Energy Nuclear Science

    SciTech Connect

    Brune, Carl R; Grimes, Steven M

    2006-03-30

    This report presents a summary of research projects in the area of low energy nuclear reactions and structure, carried out between 1 January 2003 and 31 December 2005 and supported by U.S. DOE grant number DE-FG03-03NA00074. Cross sections measured with high resolution have been subjected to an Ericson theory analysis to infer information about the nuclear level density. Other measurements were made of the spectral shape of particles produced in evaporation processes; these also yield level density information. A major project was the development of a new Hauser-Feshbach code for analyzing such spectra. Other measurements produced information on the spectra of gamma rays emitted in reactions on heavy nuclei and gave a means of refining our understanding of gamma-ray strength functions. Finally,reactions on light nuclei were studied and subjected to an R-matrix analysis. Cross sections fora network of nuclear reactions proceedingthrough a given compound nucleus shouldgreatly constrain the family of allowed parameters. Modifications to the formalism andcomputer code are also discussed.

  9. Optimal Low Energy Earth-Moon Transfers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griesemer, Paul Ricord; Ocampo, Cesar; Cooley, D. S.

    2010-01-01

    The optimality of a low-energy Earth-Moon transfer is examined for the first time using primer vector theory. An optimal control problem is formed with the following free variables: the location, time, and magnitude of the transfer insertion burn, and the transfer time. A constraint is placed on the initial state of the spacecraft to bind it to a given initial orbit around a first body, and on the final state of the spacecraft to limit its Keplerian energy with respect to a second body. Optimal transfers in the system are shown to meet certain conditions placed on the primer vector and its time derivative. A two point boundary value problem containing these necessary conditions is created for use in targeting optimal transfers. The two point boundary value problem is then applied to the ballistic lunar capture problem, and an optimal trajectory is shown. Additionally, the ballistic lunar capture trajectory is examined to determine whether one or more additional impulses may improve on the cost of the transfer.

  10. Oscillations of very low energy atmospheric neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Peres, Orlando L. G.; Smirnov, A. Yu.

    2009-06-01

    There are several new features in the production, oscillations, and detection of the atmospheric neutrinos of low energies E < or approx. 100 MeV. The flavor ratio r of muon to electron neutrino fluxes is substantially smaller than 2 and decreases with energy, a significant part of events is due to the decay of invisible muons at rest, etc. Oscillations in a two-layer medium (atmosphere-Earth) should be taken into account. We derive analytical and semianalytical expressions for the oscillation probabilities of these 'sub-sub-GeV' neutrinos. The energy spectra of the e-like events in water Cherenkov detectors are computed, and the dependence of the spectra on the 2-3 mixing angle {theta}{sub 23}, the 1-3 mixing, and the CP-violation phase are studied. We find that variations of {theta}{sub 23} in the presently allowed region change the number of e-like events by about 15%-20% as well as lead to distortion of the energy spectrum. The 1-3 mixing and CP violation can lead to {approx}10% effects. Detailed study of the sub-sub-GeV neutrinos will be possible in future megaton-scale detectors.

  11. Low Energy Electron Impact Excitation of Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ralphs, Kevin; Serna, Gabriela; Hargreaves, Leigh R.; Khakoo, Murtadha A.; Winstead, Carl; McKoy, B. Vincent

    2011-10-01

    We present normalized absolute differential and integral cross-section measurements for the low energy electron impact excitation of the lowest dissociative 3B1, 1B1,3A1 and 1A1 states of H2O. The DCS were taken at incident energies of 9 eV, 10 eV, 12 eV, 15 eV and 20 eV and scattering angles of 15° to 130° and normalized to the elastic electron scattering measurements of. The DCS were obtained after a sophisticated unfolding of the electron energy loss spectrum of water using photoabsorption data in the literature as investigated by Thorn et al.. Our measurements extend those of to near-threshold energies. We find both important agreements and differences between our DCS and those of. Comparison to our theory (multi-channel Schwinger) and that of earlier work will also be presented. Funded by an NSF grant # RUI-PHY 0968874.

  12. Decomposition of methionine by low energy electrons.

    PubMed

    Kopyra, Janina; Szamrej, Iwona; Abdoul-Carime, Hassan; Farizon, Bernadette; Farizon, Michel

    2012-06-14

    In this work, we present the results from low energy (<12 eV) electron impact on isolated methionine, Met. We show that dissociative electron attachment is the operative mechanism for the sulfur content amino-acid fragmentation. The two most dominant fragments are attributed to the (Met-H)(-) and (C(4)NOH(5))(-) ions that are formed at energy below 2 eV. The formation of the latter anion is accompanied by the loss of neutral counterparts, which are most likely a water molecule and highly toxic methanethiol, CH(3)SH. Further fragments are associated with the damage at the sulfur end of the amino acid, producing the methyl sulfide anion CH(3)S(-) or sulfur containing neutrals. In the context of radiation induced damage to biological material at the nano-scale level, the present interest of methionine arises from the implication of the molecule in biological processes (e.g., S-adenosyl methionine for the stimulation of DNA methyltransferase reactions or protein synthesis).

  13. Low-energy electron collisions with biomolecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winstead, Carl; McKoy, Vincent

    2012-11-01

    We report recent progress in applying the Schwinger multichannel computational method to the interactions of slow electrons with biomolecules. Calculations on constituents of DNA, including nucleobases, phosphate esters, and models of the backbone sugar, have provided insight into the nature of the low-energy shape resonances, and thereby into possible sites and mechanisms for electron attachment that may lead to strand-breaking. At the same time, more approximate calculations on larger assemblies such as nucleosides and deoxyadenosine monophosphate indicate how the resonance properties of the subunits will or will not persist in DNA itself. We are pursuing a similar strategy for another major class of biomolecules, the proteins, by beginning with fixed-nuclei studies of the constituent amino acids; here we present preliminary results for the simplest amino acid, glycine. We also describe efforts directed at an improved understanding electron collisions with alcohols, which, in addition to basic scientific interest, may prove useful in the modeling of ignition and combustion within biofuel-powered engines.

  14. Evaluation of Exposure From a Low Energy X-Ray Device Using Thermoluminescent Dosimeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, David L.; Harris, William S., Jr.

    1997-01-01

    The exposure from an electron beam welding device was evaluated using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs). The device generated low energy X-rays which the current dose equivalent conversion algorithm was not designed to evaluate making it necessary to obtain additional information relating to TLD operation at the photon energies encountered with the device. This was accomplished by performing irradiations at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) using low energy X-ray techniques. The resulting data was used to determine TLD badge response for low energy X-rays and to establish the relationship between TLD element response and the dose equivalent at specific depths in tissue for these photon energies. The new energy/dose equivalent calibration data was used to calculate the shallow and eye dose equivalent of badges exposed to the device.

  15. Summary talk: Experiments at low energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leifels, Yvonne

    2016-01-01

    In heavy-ion collisions at beam energies √sNN between 1 and 150A GeV highest baryonic densities are reached at rather moderate temperatures. By varying the beam energy and the system size a broad range of the QCD phase diagram is scanned where several interesting phenomena are predicted by theoretical models. Apart from possible phase transitions and existence of a critical point in this regime, the production of strangeness and the interaction of strange particles with the surrounding hot and dense nuclear medium constitutes a prominent probe not only to address the underlying reaction mechanisms and production processes but in particular to constrain densities and temperatures reached in the course of the collision. Recent results on heavy-ion collisions in this beam energy regime obtained by various experimental collaborations are summarized, with special emphasis on strangeness production, rare probes, and critical phenomena. The importance of data on elementary reactions (i.e., pp, p+nucleus, and π+nucleus) as a bench mark for theoretical models and their relevance for understanding the underlying mechanisms of heavy-ion collisions are being discussed. Several interesting observables have been presented in various contributions, which give further motivation for the construction of high-rate experiments at new accelerator facilities.

  16. Low Energy Inelastic Atomic and Molecular Collisions.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-04-15

    oemey A 17 mca mem ewa) atomic collisions deuterium molecular Collisions hydrogen argon .. excitation C argon Ions Ion beams LU & AinVIACt~ re- o sed a...1981). The intent of this work., described in our proposal, was toI obtain sufficient resolution of phosphorus, sulfur and argon L-x rays under single...collision, there are other intense VUV lines as well: the dominant ones observed in the 500-1100 A range were emission from the 2p excitation of neutral He

  17. Charge-equilibrium and radiation of low-energy cosmic rays passing through interstellar medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rule, D. W.; Omidvar, K.

    1977-01-01

    The charge equilibrium and radiation of an oxygen and an iron beam in the MeV per nucleon energy range, representing a typical beam of low-energy cosmic rays passing through the interstellar medium, is considered. Electron loss of the beam has been taken into account by means of the First Born approximation allowing for the target atom to remain unexcited, or to be excited to all possible states. Electron capture cross sections have been calculated by means of the scaled Oppenheimer-Brinkman-Kramers approximation, taking into account all atomic shells of the target atoms. Radiation of the beam due to electron capture into the excited states of the ion, collisional excitation and collisional inner-shell ionization of the ions has been considered. Effective X-ray production cross sections and multiplicities for the most energetic X-ray lines emitted by the Fe and O beams have been calculated.

  18. Design of the Proposed Low Energy Ion Collider Ring at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Nissen, Edward W.; Lin, Fanglei; Morozov, Vasiliy; Zhang, Yuhong

    2013-06-01

    The polarized Medium energy Electron-Ion Collider (MEIC) envisioned at Jefferson Lab will cover a range of center-of-mass energies up to 65 GeV. The present MEIC design could also allow the accommodation of low energy electron-ion collisions (LEIC) for additional science reach. This paper presents the first design of the low energy ion collider ring which is converted from the large ion booster of MEIC. It can reach up to 25 GeV energy for protons and equivalent ion energies of the same magnetic rigidity. An interaction region and an electron cooler designed for MEIC are integrated into the low energy collider ring, in addition to other required new elements including crab cavities and ion spin rotators, for later reuse in MEIC itself. A pair of vertical chicanes which brings the low energy ion beams to the plane of the electron ring and back to the low energy ion ring are also part of the design.

  19. FAT: Fully Automated TiRiFiC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamphuis, P.; Józsa, G. I. G.; Oh, S.-. H.; Spekkens, K.; Urbancic, N.; Serra, P.; Koribalski, B. S.; Dettmar, R.-J.

    2015-07-01

    FAT (Fully Automated TiRiFiC) is an automated procedure that fits tilted-ring models to Hi data cubes of individual, well-resolved galaxies. The method builds on the 3D Tilted Ring Fitting Code (TiRiFiC, ascl:1208.008). FAT accurately models the kinematics and the morphologies of galaxies with an extent of eight beams across the major axis in the inclination range 20°-90° without the need for priors such as disc inclination. FAT's performance allows us to model the gas kinematics of many thousands of well-resolved galaxies, which is essential for future HI surveys, with the Square Kilometre Array and its pathfinders.

  20. Low-energy electron collisions with thiophene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Costa, R. F.; Varella, M. T. do N.; Lima, M. A. P.; Bettega, M. H. F.

    2013-05-01

    We report on elastic integral, momentum transfer, and differential cross sections for collisions of low-energy electrons with thiophene molecules. The scattering calculations presented here used the Schwinger multichannel method and were carried out in the static-exchange and static-exchange plus polarization approximations for energies ranging from 0.5 eV to 6 eV. We found shape resonances related to the formation of two long-lived π* anion states. These resonant structures are centered at the energies of 1.00 eV (2.85 eV) and 2.82 eV (5.00 eV) in the static-exchange plus polarization (static-exchange) approximation and belong to the B1 and A2 symmetries of the C2v point group, respectively. Our results also suggest the existence of a σ* shape resonance in the B2 symmetry with a strong d-wave character, located at around 2.78 eV (5.50 eV) as obtained in the static-exchange plus polarization (static-exchange) calculation. It is worth to mention that the results obtained at the static-exchange plus polarization level of approximation for the two π* resonances are in good agreement with the electron transmission spectroscopy results of 1.15 eV and 2.63 eV measured by Modelli and Burrow [J. Phys. Chem. A 108, 5721 (2004), 10.1021/jp048759a]. The existence of the σ* shape resonance is in agreement with the observations of Dezarnaud-Dandiney et al. [J. Phys. B 31, L497 (1998), 10.1088/0953-4075/31/11/004] based on the electron transmission spectra of dimethyl(poly)sulphides. A comparison among the resonances of thiophene with those of pyrrole and furan is also performed and, altogether, the resonance spectra obtained for these molecules point out that electron attachment to π* molecular orbitals is a general feature displayed by these five-membered heterocyclic compounds.