Science.gov

Sample records for low-enthalpy mineral waters

  1. The chemistry and isotopic composition of waters in the low-enthalpy geothermal system of Cimino-Vico Volcanic District, Italy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Battistel, Maria; Hurwitz, Shaul; Evans, William; Barbieri, Maurizio

    2017-01-01

    Geothermal energy exploration is based in part on interpretation of the chemistry, temperature, and discharge rate of thermal springs. Here we present the major element chemistry and the δD, δ18O, 87Sr/86Sr and δ11B isotopic ratio of groundwater from the low-enthalpy geothermal system near the city of Viterbo in the Cimino-Vico volcanic district of west-Central Italy. The geothermal system hosts many thermal springs and gas vents, but the resource is still unexploited. Water chemistry is controlled by mixing between low salinity,HCO3-rich fresh waters (<24.2°C) flowing in shallow volcanic rocks and SO4-rich thermal waters (25.3°C to 62.2°C) ascending from deep, high permeability Mesozoic limestones. The (equivalent) SO4/Cl (0.01–0.02), Na/Cl (2.82–5.83) and B/Cl ratios (0.02–0.38) of thermal waters differs from the ratios in other geothermal systems from Central Italy, probably implying a lack of hydraulic continuity across the region. The δ18O (−6.6‰ to −5.9‰) and δD (−40.60‰ to −36.30‰) isotopic composition of spring water suggest that the recharge area for the geothermal system is the summit region of Mount Cimino. The strontium isotope ratios (87Sr/86Sr) of thermal waters (0.70797–0.70805) are consistent with dissolution of the Mesozoic evaporite-carbonate units that constitute the reservoir, and the ratios of cold fresh waters mainly reflect shallow circulation through the volcanic cover and some minor admixture (<10%) of thermal water as well. The boron isotopic composition (δ11B) of fresh waters (−5.00 and 6.12‰) is similar to that of the volcanic cover, but the δ11B of thermal waters (−8.37‰ to −4.12‰) is a mismatch for the Mesozoic reservoir rocks and instead reflects dissolution of secondary boron minerals during fluid ascent through flysch units that overlie the reservoir. A slow and tortuous ascent enhances extraction of boron but also promotes conductive cooling, partially masking the heat present in the

  2. The chemistry and isotopic composition of waters in the low-enthalpy geothermal system of Cimino-Vico Volcanic District, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battistel, Maria; Hurwitz, Shaul; Evans, William C.; Barbieri, Maurizio

    2016-12-01

    Geothermal energy exploration is based in part on interpretation of the chemistry, temperature, and discharge rate of thermal springs. Here we present the major element chemistry and the δD, δ18O, 87Sr/86Sr and δ11B isotopic ratio of groundwater from the low-enthalpy geothermal system near the city of Viterbo in the Cimino-Vico volcanic district of west-Central Italy. The geothermal system hosts many thermal springs and gas vents, but the resource is still unexploited. Water chemistry is controlled by mixing between low salinity,HCO3-rich fresh waters (< 24.2 °C) flowing in shallow volcanic rocks and SO4-rich thermal waters (25.3 °C to 62.2 °C) ascending from deep, high permeability Mesozoic limestones. The (equivalent) SO4/Cl (0.01-0.02), Na/Cl (2.82-5.83) and B/Cl ratios (0.02-0.38) of thermal waters differs from the ratios in other geothermal systems from Central Italy, probably implying a lack of hydraulic continuity across the region. The δ18O (- 6.6‰ to - 5.9‰) and δD (- 40.60‰ to - 36.30‰) isotopic composition of spring water suggest that the recharge area for the geothermal system is the summit region of Mount Cimino. The strontium isotope ratios (87Sr/86Sr) of thermal waters (0.70797-0.70805) are consistent with dissolution of the Mesozoic evaporite-carbonate units that constitute the reservoir, and the ratios of cold fresh waters mainly reflect shallow circulation through the volcanic cover and some minor admixture (< 10%) of thermal water as well. The boron isotopic composition (δ11B) of fresh waters (- 5.00 and 6.12‰) is similar to that of the volcanic cover, but the δ11B of thermal waters (- 8.37‰ to - 4.12‰) is a mismatch for the Mesozoic reservoir rocks and instead reflects dissolution of secondary boron minerals during fluid ascent through flysch units that overlie the reservoir. A slow and tortuous ascent enhances extraction of boron but also promotes conductive cooling, partially masking the heat present in the reservoir

  3. Application of selected geothermometers to exploration of low-enthalpy thermal water: the Sudetic Geothermal Region in Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, Porowski; Jan, Dowgiałło

    2009-10-01

    The most important intakes of thermal waters within the Sudetic Geothermal Region occur in three separate hydrogeothermal systems: (1) Lądek, (2) Duszniki and (3) Cieplice. All these waters are of meteoric origin and circulate in crystalline rocks to different depths. Their outflow temperatures are between less than 20°C and to about 87°C. To evaluate the geothermal fields in the light of their prospectiveness, to further exploration of thermal energy resources, we took an effort to apply selected isotopic and chemical geothermometers to assess the maximum possible temperatures, which may be found in the reservoirs. The only chemical geothermometers which give a reliable range of reservoir temperatures are SiO2 (chalcedony), Na-Ka-Ca and partly Na-K ones. The oxygen isotopic geothermometer in the SO4-H2O system gives a real range of estimated reservoir temperatures only for deeply circulating waters in the Cieplice area. On the other hand, in the case of CO2 rich waters in the Duszniki area, where outflow temperatures do not exceed 30°C, application of chemical or isotopic temperature indicators always leads to erroneous results due to the lack of equilibrium in the thermodynamic system of water-rock interaction.

  4. Low-Enthalpy Geothermal Potential of the Czech Republic with Particular Focus on Waters of Metalliferous Mining Districts in Crystalline Structures of the Bohemian Massif

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stibitz, M.; Jirakova, H.; Frydrych, V.

    2012-04-01

    Nowadays, numerous underground mines in the Czech Republic are mostly left to spontaneous natural flooding with water. These huges volumes and favourable water temperature represent promissing source of thermal energy. The primary temperature of the mine waters is given by the rock massif temeprature, i.e. by the heat flux which is in the moldanubikum region around 50 - 60 mWm-2 (Michálek et al., 2007). Higher heat flux has been observed in several mountainous regions throughout the country. The real water temperature results form the depth of mines, geothermal gradient and the water circulation in the mine. Temperature measurements suggest a distinct temperature depth stratification. Several metalliferous mining districts in Crystalline Structures with the water outflow exceeding 1 Ls-1 have been subject of investigation. The temperature was not the only determining factoras it is relatively stable in mines all year round. The data on yield, temperatures, etc. prepared for further mathematical modeling were primarily measured in uranium and oremines in Příbram mining district, Jáchymov, Zlaté Hory and Rožná. Water of about 18°C and radioactivity make favourable condition for the Jáchymov spa purposes. The average yield reaches 20 Ls-1. The entire outflow for the Jáchymov mines before its decommissioning reached 136 Ls-1.The entire heat capacity of mine waters is supposed to be around 1.150 kW. Severa l galleries in Zlaté Hory region could be used for thermal purposes. The yield around 60 Ls-1 and temeperature around 7°C was observed in the main drainage gallery. Measurements were accompanied by chemical analysis of water having both a huge pH range from 3 to 9 and huge mineralization range from 135 to 6 500 mgL-1. The Rožná and Příbram conditions are quite similar with the outflow from 20 - 45 Ls-1 and temperatures from 11 - 18°C. Possible temperature decrease originates from the fact that colder shallow groundwater will inflow into mine spaces

  5. Geophysical techniques for low enthalpy geothermal exploration in New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soengkono, Supri; Bromley, Chris; Reeves, Robert; Bennie, Stewart; Graham, Duncan

    2013-05-01

    Shallow warm water resources associated with low enthalpy geothermal systems are often difficult to explore using geophysical techniques, mainly because the warm water creates an insufficient physical change from the host rocks to be easily detectable. In addition, often the system also has a limited or narrow size. However, appropriate use of geophysical techniques can still help the exploration and further investigation of low enthalpy geothermal resources. We present case studies on the use of geophysical techniques for shallow warm water explorations over a variety of settings in New Zealand (mostly in the North Island) with variable degrees of success. A simple and direct method for the exploration of warm water systems is shallow temperature measurements. In some New Zealand examples, measurements of near surface temperatures helped to trace the extent of deeper thermal water. The gravity method was utilised as a structural technique for the exploration of some warm water systems in New Zealand. Our case studies show the technique can be useful in identifying basement depths and tracing fault systems associated with the occurrence of hot springs. Direct current (DC) ground resistivity measurements using a variety of electrode arrays have been the most common method for the exploration of low enthalpy geothermal resources in New Zealand. The technique can be used to detect the extent of shallow warm waters that are more electrically conductive than the surrounding cold groundwater. Ground resistivity investigations using the electromagnetic (EM) techniques of audio magnetotellurics (AMT or shallow MT), controlled source audio magnetotellurics (CSAMT) and transient electromagnetic (TEM) methods have also been used. Highly conductive clays of thermal or sedimentary origin often limit the penetration depth of the resistivity techniques and can create some interpretation difficulties. Interpretation of resistivity anomalies needs to be treated in a site specific

  6. Multicomponent geothermometry applied to a medium-low enthalpy carbonate-evaporite geothermal reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battistel, Maria; Barbieri, Maurizio; Hurwitz, Shaul; Eavans, William; Chiodini, Giovanni

    2014-05-01

    In order to improve the knowledge of the thermal state of medium to low-enthalpy thermal systems hosted in carbonate-evaporite rocks, a mineral-solution equilibrium model was compared to other theoretical geothermoters. We use the GeoT code (Spycher et al., 2014) which calculates reservoir temperatures based on a statistical evaluation of mineral saturation indices. The calculations were applied to study the medium and low enthalpy geothermal systems in the Tyrrhenian-Apennine area (central Italy). The study area is mainly characterized by Paleozoic metamorphic basement and a Mesozoic carbonate-evaporite sequence overlain by Oligocene-Mid Miocene flysch formations and Quaternary volcanic complexes associated with crustal extension in the Tyrrhenian area. A regional aquifer is hosted in the carbonate-evaporate formations, and smaller aquifers are hosted in the volcanic rocks. For reservoir temperature calculations the chemical composition of 58 springs and wells with a temperature between 22° and 65°C was taken into account. The waters are classified as Ca-HCO3 waters with low TDS, Ca-SO4 waters with high TDS and few HCO3-NaK type waters. The calculated reservoir temperatures of the medium-low enthalpy hydrothermal systems in Tyrrhenian-Apennine area range between 40 and 100°C. As expected, cation geothermometers provide unrealistic values of equilibrium temperature. Calculations based on the chalcedony geothermeter provide more realistic temperatures than the quartz geothermometers because silica solubility at temperatures <180°C is controlled by amorphous silica or chalcedony. GeoT simulation results show that all the considered mineral phases are either near saturation or oversaturated and the equilibrium temperatures range between 48° and 116°C. The statistical approach of "best clustering minerals", used in this model, solves the problems related to cation or single component geothermometers. For these cases, multicomponent geothermometry coupled with

  7. Water, mineral waters and health.

    PubMed

    Petraccia, Luisa; Liberati, Giovanna; Masciullo, Stefano Giuseppe; Grassi, Marcello; Fraioli, Antonio

    2006-06-01

    The authors focus on water resources and the use of mineral waters in human nutrition, especially in the different stages of life, in physical activity and in the presence of some morbid conditions. Mineral water is characterized by its purity at source, its content in minerals, trace elements and other constituents, its conservation and its healing properties recognized by the Ministry of Health after clinical and pharmacological trials. Based on total salt content in grams after evaporation of 1l mineral water dried at 180 degrees C (dry residues), mineral waters can be classified as: waters with a very low mineral content, waters low in mineral content, waters with a medium mineral content, and strongly mineralized waters. Based on ion composition mineral waters can be classified as: bicarbonate waters, sulfate waters, sodium chloride or saltwater, sulfuric waters. Based on biological activity mineral waters can be classified as: diuretic waters, cathartic waters, waters with antiphlogistic properties. Instructions for use, doses, and current regulations are included.

  8. Study of Shallow Low-Enthalpy Geothermal Resources Using Integrated Geophysical Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Giorgi, Lara; Leucci, Giovanni

    2015-02-01

    The paper is focused on low enthalpy geothermal exploration performed in south Italy and provides an integrated presentation of geological, hydrogeological, and geophysical surveys carried out in the area of municipality of Lecce. Geological and hydrogeological models were performed using the stratigraphical data from 51 wells. A ground-water flow (direction and velocity) model was obtained. Using the same wells data, the ground-water annual temperature was modeled. Furthermore, the ground surface temperature records from ten meteorological stations were studied. This allowed us to obtain a model related to the variations of the temperature at different depths in the subsoil. Integrated geophysical surveys were carried out in order to explore the low-enthalpy geothermal fluids and to evaluate the results of the model. Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) and self-potential (SP) methods were used. The results obtained upon integrating the geophysical data with the models show a low-enthalpy geothermal resource constituted by a shallow ground-water system.

  9. Study of Shallow Low-Enthalpy Geothermal Resources Using Integrated Geophysical Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giorgi, Lara De; Leucci, Giovanni

    2015-02-01

    The paper is focused on low enthalpy geothermal exploration performed in south Italy and provides an integrated presentation of geological, hydrogeological, and geophysical surveys carried out in the area of municipality of Lecce. Geological and hydrogeological models were performed using the stratigraphical data from 51 wells. A ground-water flow (direction and velocity) model was obtained. Using the same wells data, the ground-water annual temperature was modeled. Furthermore, the ground surface temperature records from ten meteorological stations were studied. This allowed us to obtain a model related to the variations of the temperature at different depths in the subsoil. Integrated geophysical surveys were carried out in order to explore the low-enthalpy geothermal fluids and to evaluate the results of the model. Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) and self-potential (SP) methods were used. The results obtained upon integrating the geophysical data with the models show a low-enthalpy geothermal resource constituted by a shallow ground-water system

  10. Geothermal Exploration in Oman: Potential of low-enthalpy Reservoirs for Cooling Purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winterleitner, G.; Schütz, F.; Huenges, E.

    2016-12-01

    Thermally driven cooling is a strong option for the energy system in the sun-belt on Earth, for example on the Arabian Peninsula. The energy for a sustainable cold supply can be developed from geothermal sources. An efficient absorption chiller nominally requires water of at least 90°C. The potential of low-enthalpy geothermal reservoirs in Oman is analyzed in the framework of the interdisciplinary "GeoSolCool" project. The identification of a geothermal reservoir requires knowledge about the temperature distribution with depth and the hydraulic properties of the subsurface, notably permeability and the associated transmissibility. So far very little is known about the lateral and vertical temperature distribution in Oman particularly for the study area which is located near Muscat and part of a Cenozoic foreland basin. Rolandone et al. (2013) determined moderate temperature gradients ranging between 16-42 mKm-1 in south and north Oman. New continuous temperature measurements in several wells, scattered over the study area, will give a more detailed understanding of the temperature pattern, depth of the geothermal target and heat transport processes. An advective component, in an otherwise conduction dominated geothermal play system, is likely due to topography and density driven flow. The occurrence of hot springs along a fault structure separating sedimentary rocks of the foreland basin from an ophiolite complex indicates this and constitutes a potential target for low-enthalpy exploitation. Outcrop samples of the sedimentary succession were taken for petrophysical characterization. These first results highlight the potential of low-enthalpy geothermal reservoirs in the area, which has the potential to contribute to a renewable energy mix in Oman and subsequently on the Arabian Peninsula. Rolandone, F., Lucazeau, F., Leroy, S., Mareschal, J.-C., Jorand, R., Goutorbe, B., and H. Bouquerel 2013, New heat flow measurements in Oman and the thermal state of the

  11. Thermal investigation in S. Pedro do Sul low enthalpy geothermal field (Portugal)

    SciTech Connect

    Correia, A.; Ramalho, E.C.; Lourenco, M.C.; Cruz, J.F. ||

    1997-12-31

    The S. Pedro Sul thermal springs are one of the most important low enthalpy geothermal areas in mainland Portugal. The water temperature at emergence points can reach values as high as 67{degrees}C with water flows of 10 l/s. Based on silica geothermometry, the regional heat flow density is estimated as 170 m W/m{sup 2}, and the heat production of the S. Pedro do Sul granite, that crops out in the region where the thermal springs are located, is about 11 {mu}W/m{sup 3}. These values allow an estimate that the depth of the geothermal reservoir is about 2,000 metres. The geothermal reservoir is fed by meteoric water that is heated to temperatures of about 130{degrees}C at 2,000 metres depth. Then, the heated water flows to the surface through the Termas fault, mixing with colder water at shallow depths.

  12. Stable isotope studies of some low enthalpy geothermal systems in Kenya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tole, Mwakio P.

    Oxygen and hydrogen isotope compositions of some low enthalpy geothermal systems in Kenya have been determined. Plots on δ 18O versus δD diagrams show that the compositions do not deviate appreciably from local meteoric water values. This would indicate that local meteoric waters are heated at depth and rise to the surface without much interaction with the country rocks. This is interpreted to be the case for the geothermal systems at Majimoto and Narosura, which have salinities of less than 350 ppm TDS and calculated reservoir temperatures of less than 110°C. The geothermal systems at Kapedo and Homa mountain which have high salinities (> 2 000 ppm TDS) and relatively higher calculated reservoir temperatures (> 150° C) are interpreted to have been operating for long periods of time, such that the rocks through which the present day geothermal waters are circulating have attained isotopic equilibrium with local meteoric waters.

  13. Mineral and water nutrition.

    PubMed

    Beede, D K

    1991-07-01

    In providing minerals to dairy cattle it is important to distinguish between dietary requirements and feeding recommendations. The requirement is the absolute amount of an element needed to meet the animal's metabolic needs for maintenance, growth, pregnancy, and lactation divided by the coefficient of absorption; this is estimated by the factorial method. Actual estimates of requirements for lactating dairy cattle have been determined for Ca and P. The major difficulties in relying on the requirement estimate are that dry matter intake varies and the true absorption coefficient of the mixture of feeds in the ration generally is unknown. Therefore, feeding recommendations, based on feeding graded concentrations of an element, often offer more applicable information. With the exception of Ca and P, the current feeding recommendations for the other macrominerals, Mg, Na, K, Cl and S, have resulted from feeding trials. With certain environmental and physiologic situations the feeding recommendations may vary. For example, during heat stress the dietary K recommendation for the lactating cow should be higher than in cool weather because of increased sweating and decreased feed intake. Another example may be that the source of supplemental Mg may affect what dietary inclusion rate will yield optimal performance and should be recommended. An important consideration in dairy ration formulation in the future will address the interrelationships of the various macrominerals. There is accumulating evidence that shows that different concentrations of Na, Cl, and K may interrelate and affect lactational performance. Many times the naturally occurring concentrations of one or more of these elements may have to be associated with varying concentrations of the others in order to optimize animal performance and health. Much experimentation likely will examine these interrelationships in the future. Supplementation of trace elements in diets of dairy cattle is common practice. This

  14. [Mineral water as a cure].

    PubMed

    Nocco, Priska Binz

    2008-01-01

    The treatment of diseases with mineral spring water belongs to the oldest medical therapies. The "remedy" mineral water is therefore of importance also within the pharmacy. The present pharmacy historical work examines the impact of the use of mineral waters, as well as of their dried components, as therapeutic agents in the 19th and early 20th centuries, i.e. from approx. 1810 to 1930, as well as the contributions given by pharmacists in the development and analysis of mineral water springs. Beside these aspects, the aim here is also to describe the role played by pharmacists in the production of artificial mineral water as well as in the sale and wholesale of natural and artificial mineral water. In the first part of this work the situation in Switzerland and its surrounding countries, such as Germany, France, Italy and Austria, is discussed. The second part contains a case-study of the particular situation in the Canton Tessin. It is known from the scientific literature published at that time that information on mineral water was frequently reported. Starting from the beginning of the 19th century the number of such publications increased tremendously. The major part of them were publications in scientific journals or contributions to medical and pharmaceutical manuals and reference books. In particular the spa-related literature, such as spa-guides, was of growing interest to a broad public. The inclusion of monographs into the Swiss, the Cantonal as well the foreign pharmacopoeias granted a legal frame for the mineral waters and their dried components. These works are of major importance from a pharmacy historical standpoint and represent a unique proof of historical evidence of the old medicinal drug heritage. The most frequently used therapies based on mineral waters were drinking and bath cures. Several diseases, particularly those of a chronic character, were treated with mineral waters. The positive influence of these cures on the recovery of the patients

  15. Mineral/Water Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    An x-ray fluorescence spectrometer developed for the Viking Landers by Martin Marietta was modified for geological exploration, water quality monitoring, and aircraft engine maintenance. The aerospace system was highly miniaturized and used very little power. It irradiates the sample causing it to emit x-rays at various energies, then measures the energy levels for sample composition analysis. It was used in oceanographic applications and modified to identify element concentrations in ore samples, on site. The instrument can also analyze the chemical content of water, and detect the sudden development of excessive engine wear.

  16. [Legal aspects of mineral waters].

    PubMed

    Callipo, C

    1976-01-01

    The Author takes up the subject of the report in order to carry out a comprehensive legal recognition of the mineral water regulations in Italy and emphasizes that in this field the results of scientific conclusions, or rather of the various scientific branches (medical hydrology, microbiology, chemics, hydrogeology, medical clinics, pharmacology, etc.) supply a cognitive support to the legislator and the substantial contents to the legal standards. He therefore illustrates the two main outlines of the rules, i.e. the hygienic sanitary one and the mineral one: such lay-out is subsequently related to the implementation of the Regions on one hand and to the enforcement of CEE-rules on the other. This has led to the fact that the hygienic-sanitary legislation was confirmed to the State while the mineral one was transferred to the Regions. After having shown up contrasts and expressed the necessity of clearness and uniformity of rules and criteria, the Author connects these requirements mainly with the implementation of hygienic-sanitary surveillance and consequently with the evaluation of the banal bacterical contents under the point of view of merit--i.e. the rules should include the probative results of science--as well as from a point of view of coordinated allotments of competence by the various organisms.

  17. Case studies for utilizing groundwater-source and low-enthalpy geothermal resources in Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, K.-H.; Shin, J.; Lee, K.-K.; Lee, T. J.

    2012-04-01

    As one of the top 10 oil-consuming countries in the world, Korea recently has had a great interest in extending the ways to utilize renewable energy. In this regard, geothermal energy resource is attracting more concerns from both of the government and the research field. Korea has neither active volcanic sites nor areas with abnormally higher heat flow. In spite of these natural conditions, many efforts have been exerted to utilize geothermal energy. Here, we introduce two case studies of using groundwater-source geothermal energy with relatively low-enthalpy: One is a riverbank filtration facility, which has been using some of its riverbank filtrate water for the indoor air-conditioning. The other is the first EGS plant planning site, where a few fault-related artesian wells reaching 70C were discovered lately. Numerical simulations to predict the temperature evolution of the two sites, which is dominated by several hydrogeologic factors, were carried out and compared. Simulation of temperature profile of riverbank filtrate water using HydroGeoSphere shows that the primary factor in determining filtrate water temperature is the pumping rate. It also shows that maintaining the facility operation with present pumping rate for the next 30 years will not cause any significant change of water temperature. However, following the new plan of the facility to install additional 37 wells with 6 times higher pumping rate than the current rate might cause about 2C decrease in filtrate water temperature in 10 years after the extension. Simulation for the temperature evolution in a faulted geothermal reservoir in EGS planning site under the supposed injection-extraction operating conditions were carried out using TOUGH2. A MINC model including a hydraulic discontinuity, which reflected the analysis from several geophysical explorations, was generated. Temperature distribution calculated from the simulation shows a rise of relatively hot geothermal water along the fault plane

  18. Geochemical study of the Sakalol-Harralol geothermal field (Republic of Djibouti): Evidences of a low enthalpy aquifer between Manda-Inakir and Asal rift settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awaleh, Mohamed Osman; Boschetti, Tiziano; Soubaneh, Youssouf Djibril; Baudron, Paul; Kawalieh, Ali Dirir; Dabar, Omar Assowe; Ahmed, Moussa Mahdi; Ahmed, Samaleh Idriss; Daoud, Mohamed Ahmed; Egueh, Nima Moussa; Mohamed, Jalludin

    2017-02-01

    Eighty-six sodium bicarbonate to sodium chloride hot springs and four water wells in the Tadjourah Region of Djibouti were investigated for major, minor (B, Br, F, Sr, Li) chemistry and isotope composition of water and dissolved components (87Sr/86Sr, 11B/10B, 13C/12C and 14C of DIC, 34S/32S and 18O/16O of sulfate). The deep saline Na-Cl reservoir at 143 °C shows affinity with the shallow geothermal water from the "active" Asal rift. Asal water is a diluted and recycled seawater component with the major cation composition obliterated by equilibration with Stratoid basalt. Locally, the deep reservoir is differentiated in term of recharge, and re-equilibration with rocks and mixing. In particular, two spring groups reveal contributions from evaporites typical of the "passive" graben setting of the Afar. A model on 34S/32S and 18O/16O demonstrates the isotope imprint of magmatic SO2 disproportionation on dissolved and solid sulfate, whose values probably persists in a sedimentary environment without trace of seawater. On the other hand a seawater signature, modified by mixing and secondary fractionation effects, is partially maintained according to the boron isotope composition (up to + 27.4‰). Temperature estimation in low-enthalpy geothermal reservoirs is notoriously difficult, especially where mixing with fluids of differing genesis and/or conduction cooling take place. From a geothermometric point of view, the multi-method approach followed in this study (up-to-date theoretical and thermodynamic equations, ad-hoc silica geothermometers inferred from local rocks, checking of the results on a 18Oαsulfate-water vs. temperature diagram) provides some insights and perspectives on how to tackle the problem. Table S2. Sampling locations, T, pH, EC, TDS and hydrochemical types of the sampled waters. Table S3. Chemical analyses of thermal and cold waters from Sakalaol-Haralol geothermal field. Table S4. Mineral saturation indices of SHGF hot springs waters calculated

  19. Mineral constituents in water and their significance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dover, T.B.

    1950-01-01

    Pure water does not exist in nature. Because water is a powerful solvent, every drop of rain water carries dissolved or suspended material - dust, pollen, and smoke, as well as the atmospheric gases, oxygen, nitrogen and carbon dioxide. When rain falls, the water running over the rocks and percolating through the soil gathers more and more mineral matter in solution. As the uses to which a water supply may be put depend primarily on its mineral content, information concerning the chemical characteristics of water is of importance to each of us. (available as photostat copy only)

  20. Water-Signature Mineral Found by Spirit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This spectrum, taken by the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit's Moessbauer spectrometer, shows the presence of an iron-bearing mineral called goethite in a rock called 'Clovis' in the 'Columbia Hills' of Mars. Goethite contains water in the form of hydroxyl as a part of its structure. By identifying this mineral, the examination of Clovis produced strong evidence for past water activity in the area that Spirit is exploring.

  1. Water-Signature Mineral Found by Spirit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This spectrum, taken by the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit's Moessbauer spectrometer, shows the presence of an iron-bearing mineral called goethite in a rock called 'Clovis' in the 'Columbia Hills' of Mars. Goethite contains water in the form of hydroxyl as a part of its structure. By identifying this mineral, the examination of Clovis produced strong evidence for past water activity in the area that Spirit is exploring.

  2. Sulphurous Mineral Waters: New Applications for Health

    PubMed Central

    Carbajo, Jose Manuel

    2017-01-01

    Sulphurous mineral waters have been traditionally used in medical hydrology as treatment for skin, respiratory, and musculoskeletal disorders. However, driven by recent intense research efforts, topical treatments are starting to show benefits for pulmonary hypertension, arterial hypertension, atherosclerosis, ischemia-reperfusion injury, heart failure, peptic ulcer, and acute and chronic inflammatory diseases. The beneficial effects of sulphurous mineral waters, sulphurous mud, or peloids made from sulphurous mineral water have been attributed to the presence of sulphur mainly in the form of hydrogen sulphide. This form is largely available in conditions of low pH when oxygen concentrations are also low. In the organism, small amounts of hydrogen sulphide are produced by some cells where they have numerous biological signalling functions. While high levels of hydrogen sulphide are extremely toxic, enzymes in the body are capable of detoxifying it by oxidation to harmless sulphate. Hence, low levels of hydrogen sulphide may be tolerated indefinitely. In this paper, we review the chemistry and actions of hydrogen sulphide in sulphurous mineral waters and its natural role in body physiology. This is followed by an update of available data on the impacts of exogenous hydrogen sulphide on the skin and internal cells and organs including new therapeutic possibilities of sulphurous mineral waters and their peloids. PMID:28484507

  3. Natural mineral waters: chemical characteristics and health effects

    PubMed Central

    Quattrini, Sara; Pampaloni, Barbara; Brandi, Maria Luisa

    2016-01-01

    Summary Water contributes significantly to health and a daily intake of 1.5 to 2 liters of water should be guaranteed, because a good hydration is essential to maintain the body water equilibrium, although needs may vary among people. However, worldwide population is far from the Recommended Allowance for water intake. Among the waters for human uses, there are ‘waters (treated or not), intended for drinking, used for the food and beverages preparation or for other domestic purposes’ and natural mineral waters, that are ‘originated from an aquifer or underground reservoir, spring from one or more natural or bore sources and have specific hygienic features and, eventually, healthy properties’. According to the European Legislation (2009/54/EC Directive), physical and chemical characterization is used to make a classification of the different mineral waters, basing on the analysis of main parameters. Mineral composition enables to classify natural mineral waters as bicarbonate mineral waters, sulphate mineral waters, chloride mineral waters, calcic mineral waters, magnesiac mineral waters, fluorurate mineral waters, ferrous mineral waters and sodium-rich mineral waters. Although the concerns about bottled mineral waters (due to plasticizers and endocrine disruptors), many are the health effects of natural mineral waters and several studies explored their properties and their role in different physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:28228777

  4. Microbiological characteristics of natural mineral water.

    PubMed

    Schmidt-Lorenz, W

    1976-01-01

    Natural, non-carbonated mineral water is, like every other natural water from a spring, never sterile. However, the microbial level is always very low. But after its bottling, the level rises rapidly and numbers of more than 10,000 to 100,000/ml can be reached. In principle 2 groups of bacteria of very different origin and properties can be found in the microbial flora of the bottled, non-carbonated mineral water. Allochthonous bacteria will get into the water by contamination from the containers, closures, air or the bottling machines. They are mostly transitory as they cannot grow in a substrate with an extremely low nutritive level and die off more or less rapidly. From the hygienic point of view the permanently contaminating flora with Pseudomonas aeruginosa as main representative is more serious. These special gram-negative bacteria are oligocarbotolerant and can therefore multiply in the mineral water of extremely low nutrient level after a certain adaptation. Their effective bacteriological control is possible by colony counting with incubation at +37 degrees C but only just after bottling. The autochthonous microbial flora consists of psychrotrophic and of distinctly oligocarbophilic, mainly gram-negative bacteria such as Achromobacter, Flavobacteria, Pseudomonas as well as gram-positive Arthrobacter-species. According to indirect experiences, this autochthonous microbial flora must be growing in the open system of the underground source and renew itself constantly. The bottling of the natural spring water implies a drastic environmental change from this open system into a closed one. Then the bacteria start multiplying more or less rapidly like in a batch culture. Main reason for this is the extension of the inners surface of the system. The multiplication of bacteria after bottling of a mineral water of extremely low nutrient level therefore is an entirely normal biological process. For this reason, limits of the aerobic colony count at +20 degrees C

  5. Microcoulometric measurement of water in minerals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cremer, M.; Elsheimer, H.N.; Escher, E.E.

    1972-01-01

    A DuPont Moisture Analyzer is used in a microcoulometric method for determining water in minerals. Certain modifications, which include the heating of the sample outside the instrument, protect the system from acid gases and insure the conversion of all hydrogen to water vapor. Moisture analyzer data are compared to concurrent data obtained by a modified Penfield method. In general, there is a positive bias of from 0.1 to 0.2% in the moisture analyzer results and a similarity of bias in minerals of the same kind. Inhomogeneity, sample size, and moisture pick-up are invoked to explain deviations. The method is particularly applicable to small samples. ?? 1972.

  6. Sodium-bicarbonated mineral water decreases aldosterone levels without affecting urinary excretion of bone minerals.

    PubMed

    Schoppen, Stefanie; Pérez-Granados, Ana M; Carbajal, Angeles; Sarriá, Beatriz; Navas-Carretero, Santiago; Pilar Vaquero, M

    2008-06-01

    AIM To assess in healthy postmenopausal women the influence of consuming sodium-bicarbonated mineral water on postprandial evolution of serum aldosterone and urinary electrolyte excretion. Eighteen postmenopausal women consumed 500 ml of two sodium-bicarbonated mineral waters (sodium-bicarbonated mineral water 1 and sodium-bicarbonated mineral water 2) and a low-mineral water with a standard meal. Postprandial blood samples were taken at 60, 120, 240, 360 and 420 min and aldosterone concentrations were measured. Postprandial urinary minerals were determined. Urinary and total mineral excretion and urinary mineral concentrations did not differ except for sodium concentration, which was significantly higher with sodium-bicarbonated mineral water 1 than with low-mineral water (P = 0.005). There was a time effect (P = 0.003) on the aldosterone concentration. At 120 min, aldosterone concentrations were lower with sodium-bicarbonated mineral water 1 (P = 0.021) and sodium-bicarbonated mineral water 2 (P = 0.030) compared with low-mineral water. Drinking a sodium-rich bicarbonated mineral water with a meal increases urinary sodium concentration excretion without changes in the excretion of potassium and bone minerals.

  7. Quality assessment of Romanian bottled mineral water and tap water.

    PubMed

    M Carstea, Elfrida; Levei, Erika A; Hoaghia, Maria-Alexandra; Savastru, Roxana

    2016-09-01

    This study reports the evaluation of bottled mineral water characteristics using fluorescence spectroscopy (synchronous fluorescence scans and emission spectra) and physico-chemical analyses. Samples from 14 still mineral water brands were compared to 11 tap waters collected from two Romanian cities. Correlation and factor analyses were undertaken to understand the relationships between the individual components. The concentration of major and minor ions showed great variation between the bottled mineral water samples highlighting the diversity of the water intakes, while in the case of tap water the chemical composition was relatively similar for samples collected in the same city. Fluorescence data showed that the mineral water contained low quantities of organic matter. The humic fraction was dominant in all samples, while the microbial fraction was low in most samples. Synchronous fluorescence scans provided more information, regarding the composition of organic matter, compared to emission spectra. The study evidenced the correlation between fluorescence parameters and major elements and highlighted the potential of using fluorescence for qualitative evaluation of the bottled mineral water quality, as a screening method before undertaking complex analyses.

  8. [Mineral waters from several Brazilian natural sources].

    PubMed

    Rebelo, M A; Araujo, N C

    1999-01-01

    To divulge information on the chemical composition and physical-chemical features of some mineral waters from Brazilian natural sources that will be of useful protocol investigation and patient advice. The survey was based on bottle labels of non-gaseous mineral waters commercially available in the city of Rio de Janeiro. The íon concentration of each mineral was calculated from the salt content. 36 springs were enralled from different states of the country. The pH (25 degrees C), 4.1 to 9.3, varied on dependence of the source and it was linearey correlated with the cations calcium, magnesium and sodium and the anion bicarbonate. It was atributed to high alkalinity (about 70% of bicarbonate in the molecula-gram) of these salts. The calcium (0.3 to 42 mg/l), magnesium (0.0 to 18 mg/l) and bicarbonate (4 to 228 mg/l) contents are relatively low. The mineral content of the Brazilian springs enrolled in this survey is low; about 70% of the sources having calcium and magnesium less than 10 mg/l and 1.0 mg/l, respectively, similar to local tap water.

  9. Natural mineral waters, curative-medical waters and their protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fricke, M.

    1993-10-01

    In Europe different types of water are marketed, each strictly defined by EC Directive 80/777 (Natural Mineral Water, Spring and Table Water) or 80/778 (Drinking Water). In Germany, an additional type of water is common in the market: curative/medical water. Product quality and safety, registration as medicine, and pharmaceutical control are defined by the German Federal Medicine Act. A medical water is treated as any other medicine and may be sold only in pharmacies. The use of any water in Germany is controlled and strictly regulated by the Federal Water Act (Fricke 1981). The following requirements are set by the act: (1) No water use without a permit, which is limited in time and quantity. (2) No single or juristic person may own water. (3) Water resources of public interest and their recharge areas are to be protected by the definition of water protection zones. (Natural mineral water is not of public interest and therefore is not required to be protected by the definition of water protection zones, although it represents a market value of more than US2 billion. Medical water is of public interest). The definition of water protection zones impacts private property rights and has to be handled carefully. In order to protect water resources, sometimes the economic basis of a traditional industrial and/or agricultural infrastructure is destroyed. The concerns and needs all citizens, including industry, must be considered in analyzing the adequacy of water protection zones.

  10. [Hygienic evaluation of mineralizing lime substances for correction of mineral composition of low-mineral drinking water].

    PubMed

    Rakhmanin, Iu A; Filippova, A V; Mikhaĭlova, R I; Beliaeva, N N; Lamentova, T G; Kumpan, N B; Fel'dt, E G

    1990-08-01

    4 out of 6 mineralizing lime materials that were studied have been recommended for the practical application with the aim to correct the mineral composition of drinking low-mineralized water. The possibility to predict the biological properties of multicomponent mineralizing materials has been established on the basis of results of analysis of their chemical composition.

  11. An efficient computational model for deep low-enthalpy geothermal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeid, Sanaz; Al-Khoury, Rafid; Barends, Frans

    2013-02-01

    In this paper, a computationally efficient finite element model for transient heat and fluid flow in a deep low-enthalpy geothermal system is formulated. Emphasis is placed on coupling between the involved wellbores and a soil mass, represented by a geothermal reservoir and a surrounding soil. The finite element package COMSOL is utilized as a framework for implementing the model. Two main aspects have contributed to the computational efficiency and accuracy: the wellbore model, and the 1D-2D coupling of COMSOL. In the first aspect, heat flow in the wellbore is modelled as pseudo three-dimensional conductive-convective, using a one-dimensional element. In this model, thermal interactions between the wellbore components are included in the mathematical model, alleviating the need for typical 3D spatial discretization, and thus reducing the mesh size significantly. In the second aspect, heat flow in the soil mass is coupled to the heat flow in the wellbores, giving accurate description of heat loss and gain along the pathway of the injected and produced fluid. Heat flow in the geothermal reservoir, and due to dependency of fluid density and viscosity on temperature, is simulated as two-dimensional fully saturated nonlinear conductive-convective, whereas in the surrounding soil, heat flow is simulated as linear conductive. Numerical and parametric examples describing the computational capabilities of the model and its suitability for utilization in engineering practice are presented.

  12. Microbiological safety of natural mineral water.

    PubMed

    Leclerc, Henri; Moreau, Annick

    2002-06-01

    Natural mineral water originates from groundwater, an oligotrophic ecosystem where the level of organic matter is low and of a very limited bioavailability. The bacterial populations that evolve in these ecosystems are heterotrophic and in starvation-survival state resulting from an insufficient amount of nutrients; for this reason they enter a viable but non-culturable state. After bottling, the number of viable counts increases rapidly, attaining 10(4)-10(5) colony-forming units ml(-1) within 3-7 days. These bacterial communities, identified by culture or with specific probes, are primarily aerobic, saprophytic, Gram-negative rods. Groundwater sources for natural mineral waters are selected such that they are not vulnerable to fecal contamination. Ecological data, especially the diversity and physiological properties of bacterial communities, are essential together with epidemiological studies in order to perform a risk analysis for natural mineral waters. On a continuing basis, the management of microbial risks has to rely on assessment of the heterotrophic plate count and, more specially, on detection of marker organisms, i.e. the classic fecal contamination indicators that have to be absent, and vulnerability indicators for which the occurrence should be as low as possible. It is also recommended to search regularly, but not routinely, for viral and protozoan pathogens.

  13. Mineral water or tap water? An endless debate.

    PubMed

    De Giglio, O; Quaranta, A; Lovero, G; Caggiano, G; Montagna, M T

    2015-01-01

    The consumption of mineral water has been increasing because of the frequent and unjustified reports of the water supply contamination. However some authors have shown that bottled waters are not always better than tap water. Mineral waters are more palatable for organoleptic characteristic because, being pure at source, they do not undergo disinfection treatments and are sometimes enriched with CO2. In fact, they are characterized by their microbial facies subject to changes during the production cycle which can contribute to their contamination. It is necessary to provide people with the tools necessary to operate a critical choice of the type of water to be consumed not exclusively for their organoleptic characteristics or marketing strategies.

  14. [The determination of molecular sulphur in Matsesta mineral water and its analog Novonukutskaya mineral water].

    PubMed

    Khutorianskiĭ, V A; Smirnov, A I; Matveev, D A

    2014-01-01

    The method of microcolumn reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography (rp-HPLC) was employed to determine the content of elemental sulphur in mineral waters. The study envisaged the analysis of the samples of sulphide-containing mineral waters Novonukutskaya and Matsesta obtained by the solid phase extraction technique. Based on these data, the authors discuss the origin and the circulation of sulphur in the hydrogen sulphide sources. The elution conditions selected in this study ensured the high-resolution separation of the octasulphur peak from the peaks of allotropic components of the extract whereas the two-wave detection technique allowed to identify the peaks of molecular sulphur.

  15. Hydrogeochemical tracing of mineral water in Jingyu County, Northeast China.

    PubMed

    Yan, Baizhong; Xiao, Changlai; Liang, Xiujuan; Wu, Shili

    2016-02-01

    The east Jilin Province in China, Jingyu County has been explored as a potential for enriching mineral water. In order to assess the water quality and quantity, it is of crucial importance to investigate the origin of the mineral water and its flow paths. In this study, eighteen mineral springs were sampled in May and September of 2012, May and September of 2013, and May 2014 and the environment, evolvement, and reaction mechanism of mineral water formation were analysed by hydrochemical data analysis, geochemical modelling and multivariate statistical analysis. The results showed that the investigated mineral water was rich in calcium, magnesium, potassium, sodium, bicarbonate, chloride, sulphate, fluoride, nitrate, total iron, silicate, and strontium, and mineral water ages ranged from 11.0 to more than 61.0 years. The U-shape contours of the mineral ages indicate a local and discrete recharge. The mineral compositions of the rocks were olivine, potassium feldspar, pyroxene, albite, and anorthite and were under-saturated in the mineral water. The origin of mineral water was from the hydrolysis of basalt minerals under a neutral to slightly alkaline and CO2-rich environment.

  16. 43 CFR 3594.5 - Minerals soluble in water; brines; minerals taken in solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Minerals soluble in water; brines; minerals taken in solution. 3594.5 Section 3594.5 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) SOLID...

  17. 43 CFR 3594.5 - Minerals soluble in water; brines; minerals taken in solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Minerals soluble in water; brines; minerals taken in solution. 3594.5 Section 3594.5 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) SOLID...

  18. 43 CFR 3594.5 - Minerals soluble in water; brines; minerals taken in solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Minerals soluble in water; brines; minerals taken in solution. 3594.5 Section 3594.5 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) SOLID...

  19. 43 CFR 3594.5 - Minerals soluble in water; brines; minerals taken in solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Minerals soluble in water; brines; minerals taken in solution. 3594.5 Section 3594.5 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) SOLID...

  20. IRETHERM: Research and Exploration Challenges in Assessing Ireland's Deep Low-Enthalpy Geothermal Energy Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, A. G.; Muller, M. R.; Fullea, J.; Vozar, J.; Blake, S.; Delhaye, R.; Farrell, T.; Yeomans, C.; Loewer, M.; Reay, D.

    2012-12-01

    IRETHERM (www.iretherm.ie) is a new, academic-government-industry, collaborative research project, funded by Science Foundation Ireland, with the overarching objective of developing a holistic understanding of Ireland's low-enthalpy geothermal energy potential through integrated modelling of new and existing geophysical and geological data. A regional south-to-north trend in surface heat-flow is mapped across Ireland, ~40 to >80 mWm-2, but the source of the heat variation (whether crustal and/or lithospheric-mantle in origin) is unknown. With the exception of Permo-Triassic basins in Northern Ireland, hosting geothermal aquifers of promising but currently poorly-defined potential, rocks with high primary porosity have not been identified elsewhere. Whether any major Irish shear zones/faults might host a geothermal aquifer at depth is also unknown, although clusters of warm-springs in the vicinity of two major shear zones are promising. Our paper discusses the approaches and strategies that IRETHERM has adopted to meet the challenges of exploring for unknown deep geothermal resources (either hydrothermal aquifers or hot, dry rock) starting from a limited knowledge-base. IRETHERM's objectives over a four-year period are to: (i) Develop multi-parameter geophysical modelling and interpretation software tools that will enhance our ability to explore for and assess deep aquifers and granitic intrusions. (ii) Model and understand temperature variations in the upper-crust. Firstly, by building a 3-D model of crustal heat-production based on geochemical analysis of surface, borehole and mid- to lower-crustal xenolith samples. Secondly, by modelling, using a fully self-consistent 3-D approach, observed surface heat-flow variation as a function of variation in the structure and thermal properties of the crust and lithosphere, additionally constrained by surface elevation, geoid, gravity, seismic and magnetotelluric (MT) data. (iii) Test a strategic set of eight "type

  1. IRETHERM: Research and Exploration Challenges in Assessing Ireland's Deep Low-Enthalpy Geothermal Energy Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, M. R.; Jones, A. G.; Fullea, J.; Yeomans, C. M.; Loewer, M.; Reay, D.

    2012-04-01

    IRETHERM (www.iretherm.ie) is a new academic-government-industry collaborative research project, funded by Science Foundation Ireland, initiated in 2011, with the overarching objective of developing a holistic understanding of Ireland's low-enthalpy geothermal energy potential through integrated modelling of new and existing geophysical and geological data. All historic geothermal energy research that took place in the 1980s focused on Ireland's three major exposed radiogenic granite intrusions. These granites were found to be characterised by elevated radiogenic heat production (2-7µW/m3) and surface heat-flow (65-85mW/m2), but impetus in assessing their potential stalled at the end of the oil-crisis and remains poorly defined. The accuracy of predictions of temperatures in the depth range of 3000-6000m is limited by the sparse, clustered database provided by relatively shallow industry boreholes - only two boreholes drilled to date exceed 2,500m. While a significant regional trend in surface heat-flow is purported from these borehole data, from ~40mW/m2 in the south of Ireland to >80mW/m2 in the north with thermal gradients in the range 8-32°C/km, the source of the heat variation (whether crustal and/or lithospheric-mantle in origin) is unknown. Except for Permo-Triassic basins in Northern Ireland, which host known geothermal aquifers of promising but currently poorly defined potential, sedimentary rocks with high primary porosity have not been identified elsewhere. Whether any of the shear zones and faults that traverse the country might host geothermal aquifers at depth is also unknown, although the occurrence of warm-spring clusters close to two major fault zones is promising. Our paper discusses the approaches and strategies that IRETHERM has adopted to meet the challenges of exploring for unknown deep geothermal resources (either aquifers or hot, dry rock) starting from a limited knowledge-base. The objectives of the project over a four-year period are to

  2. Molecular Typing of Aeromonas Isolates in Natural Mineral Waters

    PubMed Central

    Villari, P.; Crispino, M.; Montuori, P.; Boccia, S.

    2003-01-01

    A total of 103 isolates of Aeromonas spp. were obtained over a 3-year period from a natural mineral water and from surface streams located within the boundaries of the watershed of the natural mineral water wells and were typed by macrorestriction analysis of genomic DNA with XbaI and by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. All Aeromonas caviae isolates from the natural mineral water belonged to the same clone, and an analogous clonal identity was found among Aeromonas hydrophila isolates. These two clones expressed no hemolytic or cytotoxic activities. Aeromonas isolates from surface waters showed high molecular heterogeneity and were not related to the clones found in the natural mineral water. The presence of aeromonads chronically found in the natural mineral water was a likely consequence of a localized development of a biofilm, with no exogenous contamination of the aquifer. Molecular fingerprinting of drinking water isolates is a useful tool in explaining possible reasons for bacterial occurrences. PMID:12514065

  3. Stable isotopic composition of bottled mineral waters from Romania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bădăluţă, Carmen; Nagavciuc, Viorica; Perșoiu, Aurel

    2015-04-01

    Romania has a high potential of mineral waters resources, featuring one of the largest mineral resources at European and global level. In the last decade, due to increased in consumption of bottled water, numerous brands have appeared on the market, with equally numerous and variable sources of provenance. In this study we have analyzed the isotopic composition of bottled mineral waters from Romania in order to determine their source and authenticity. We have analysed 32 carbonated and 24 non-carbonated mineral waters from Romania. and the results were analysed in comparison with stable isotope data from precipitation and river waters. Generally, the isotopic values of the mineral waters follow those in precipitation; however, differences occur in former volcanic regions (due to deep circulation of meteoric waters and increased exchange with host rock and volcanic CO2), as well as in mountainous regions, where high-altitude recharge occurs.

  4. Alkaline mineral water lowers bone resorption even in calcium sufficiency: alkaline mineral water and bone metabolism.

    PubMed

    Wynn, Emma; Krieg, Marc-Antoine; Aeschlimann, Jean-Marc; Burckhardt, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Dietary acid charge enhances bone loss. Bicarbonate or alkali diet decreases bone resorption in humans. We compared the effect of an alkaline mineral water, rich in bicarbonate, with that of an acid one, rich in calcium only, on bone markers, in young women with a normal calcium intake. This study compared water A (per litre: 520 mg Ca, 291 mg HCO(3)(-), 1160 mg SO(4)(-), Potential Renal Acid load (PRAL) +9.2 mEq) with water B (per litre: 547 mg Ca, 2172 mg HCO(3)(-), 9 mg SO(4)(-), PRAL -11.2 mEq). 30 female dieticians aged 26.3 yrs (SD 7.3) were randomized into two groups, followed an identical weighed, balanced diet (965 mg Ca) and drank 1.5 l/d of the assigned water. Changes in blood and urine electrolytes, C-telopeptides (CTX), urinary pH and bicarbonate, and serum PTH were measured after 2 and 4 weeks. The two groups were not different at baseline, and showed a similar increase in urinary calcium excretion. Urinary pH and bicarbonate excretion increased with water B, but not with water A. PTH (p=0.022) and S-CTX (p=0.023) decreased with water B but not with water A. In calcium sufficiency, the acid calcium-rich water had no effect on bone resorption, while the alkaline water rich in bicarbonate led to a significant decrease of PTH and of S-CTX.

  5. Evaluation of minerals content of drinking water in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Azlan, Azrina; Khoo, Hock Eng; Idris, Mohd Aizat; Ismail, Amin; Razman, Muhammad Rizal

    2012-01-01

    The drinking and mineral water samples obtained from different geographical locations had concentrations of the selected minerals lower than the standard limits, except for manganese, arsenic, and fluoride. The concentrations of manganese and arsenic in two mineral water samples were slightly higher than the standard international recommended limits. One mineral water sample had a fluoride concentration higher than the standard limits, whereas manganese was not detected in nine drinking and mineral water samples. Most of the selected minerals found in the tap water samples were below the international standard limits, except for iron and manganese. The concentrations of iron and manganese in the tap water samples were higher than the standard limits, which were obtained from one and three of the studied locations, respectively. The potable water obtained from various manufacturers and locations in Peninsular Malaysia is safe for consumption, as the minerals concentrations were below the standard limits prescribed by the Malaysian Food Regulations of 1985. The data obtained may also provide important information related to daily intake of these minerals from drinking water.

  6. The mineral content of tap water in United States households

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The composition of tap water contributes to dietary intake of minerals. The USDA’s Nutrient Data Laboratory (NDL) conducted a study of the mineral content of residential tap water, to generate current data for the USDA National Nutrient Database. Sodium, potassium, calcium, magnesium, iron, copper...

  7. Microbiological monitoring of mineral water commercialized in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Pontara, André Venturini; de Oliveira, Christianne Dezuani Dias; Barbosa, Amir Horiquini; dos Santos, Rafael Aparecido; Pires, Regina Helena; Martins, Carlos Henrique Gomes

    2011-01-01

    The quality of mineral water commercialized in Brazil regarding the microbial content was analyzed and the results were compared with the standards established by the current legislation. Results demonstrated there was no bacterial contamination, but several types of fungi were found. Therefore, bottled mineral water could be considered a possible route for the transmission of filamentous fungi and yeasts. PMID:24031667

  8. Evaluation of Minerals Content of Drinking Water in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Azlan, Azrina; Khoo, Hock Eng; Idris, Mohd Aizat; Ismail, Amin; Razman, Muhammad Rizal

    2012-01-01

    The drinking and mineral water samples obtained from different geographical locations had concentrations of the selected minerals lower than the standard limits, except for manganese, arsenic, and fluoride. The concentrations of manganese and arsenic in two mineral water samples were slightly higher than the standard international recommended limits. One mineral water sample had a fluoride concentration higher than the standard limits, whereas manganese was not detected in nine drinking and mineral water samples. Most of the selected minerals found in the tap water samples were below the international standard limits, except for iron and manganese. The concentrations of iron and manganese in the tap water samples were higher than the standard limits, which were obtained from one and three of the studied locations, respectively. The potable water obtained from various manufacturers and locations in Peninsular Malaysia is safe for consumption, as the minerals concentrations were below the standard limits prescribed by the Malaysian Food Regulations of 1985. The data obtained may also provide important information related to daily intake of these minerals from drinking water. PMID:22649292

  9. Variation of 66 elements in European bottled mineral waters.

    PubMed

    Misund, A; Frengstad, B; Siewers, U; Reimann, C

    1999-12-15

    Fifty-six bottled mineral waters bought at random all over Europe were analysed for 66 chemical elements by ICP-AES, ICP-MS and IC-techniques. Results show that there is a wide spread in the chemical composition of mineral waters. The EEC drinking water safeguard values for chemical constituents do not apply to mineral water, although mineral water is increasingly used for general drinking water purposes. Only 15 of the randomly selected 56 mineral waters would fulfil the drinking water regulations for all parameters where action levels are defined. Differences in chemical composition observed between countries or regions are due to geological environment and to different taste or local regulations of what is mineral water. There are indications that element concentrations for some unwanted constituents (e.g. Pb) are higher in waters sold in glass bottles than in those in plastic bottles. Some elements show a clear regional dependency. Studying the large natural variation in concentration for many of the 66 studied elements it becomes clear that we know little about the natural variation of element concentration in water and the health effects of most elements in drinking water.

  10. Some physicochemical aspects of water-soluble mineral flotation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhijian; Wang, Xuming; Liu, Haining; Zhang, Huifang; Miller, Jan D

    2016-09-01

    Some physicochemical aspects of water-soluble mineral flotation including hydration phenomena, associations and interactions between collectors, air bubbles, and water-soluble mineral particles are presented. Flotation carried out in saturated salt solutions, and a wide range of collector concentrations for effective flotation of different salts are two basic aspects of water-soluble mineral flotation. Hydration of salt ions, mineral particle surfaces, collector molecules or ions, and collector aggregates play an important role in water-soluble mineral flotation. The adsorption of collectors onto bubble surfaces is suggested to be the precondition for the association of mineral particles with bubbles. The association of collectors with water-soluble minerals is a complicated process, which may include the adsorption of collector molecules or ions onto such surfaces, and/or the attachment of collector precipitates or crystals onto the mineral surfaces. The interactions between the collectors and the minerals include electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions, hydrogen bonding, and specific interactions, with electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions being the common mechanisms. For the association of ionic collectors with minerals with an opposite charge, electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions could have a synergistic effect, with the hydrophobic interactions between the hydrophobic groups of the previously associated collectors and the hydrophobic groups of oncoming collectors being an important attractive force. Association between solid particles and air bubbles is the key to froth flotation, which is affected by hydrophobicity of the mineral particle surfaces, surface charges of mineral particles and bubbles, mineral particle size and shape, temperature, bubble size, etc. The use of a collector together with a frother and the use of mixed surfactants as collectors are suggested to improve flotation.

  11. Syndepositional shallow-water precipitation of glauconitic minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chafetz, H. S.; Reid, A.

    2000-10-01

    Numerous studies have demonstrated that glauconitic minerals predominantly form in water depths of mid-shelf to upper slope in modern oceans. These areas tend to have slow sedimentation rates, another commonly cited requisite for glauconitic mineral precipitation. Cambro-Ordovician strata from the southwestern US are rich in glauconitic minerals. Stratigraphic, sedimentological, and petrographic constraints indicate that the glauconitic minerals are autochthonous. In marked contrast to the modern environments of deposition, these Cambro-Ordovician strata formed under very shallow-water to tidal-flat conditions. The trough cross-stratified deposits of the most glauconitic mineral-rich accumulations (glaucarenites) indicate a high energy environment and probably a normal to high rate of sedimentation. The presence of fibroradiated rims of glauconitic minerals on glauconitic mineral pellets, echinoderm fragments, and quartz grains demonstrates that the Cambro-Ordovician glauconitic minerals precipitated on or in close proximity to the sea floor and prior to calcite precipitation. Consequently, glauconitic minerals must have formed under markedly different conditions in the lower Paleozoic than they do today. Thus, the occurrence of glauconitic minerals in the rock record cannot be used a priori as an environmental indicator of either mid-shelf and deeper water and/or a slow rate of sedimentation.

  12. The Link between Fluid Flow, Structure and Hydrothermal Inputs in Central Chile: An Interdisciplinary Approach for Low-Enthalpy Andean Hydrogeothermal Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arancibia, G.; Daniele, L.; Navarro, L.; Astudillo, F.; Vázquez, M.; Morata, D.

    2014-12-01

    The interaction between fault zones and hydrogeological domains are an open challenge and require the understanding of the complex relationship between structure, fluid flow and hydrothermal transport and processes. Faults stimulate hydraulic conductivity when acting as conduit, but it can also be a barrier by mineral precipitation and comminution. Structural heterogeneity of fractured lithology induces a flow partition within the aquifer system creating preferential flows paths and some fracture connectivity. We propose an interdisciplinary approach from hydrogeological and structural point of view, in a low-enthalpy aquifer system in the central valley of Central Chile, where several low-temperature thermal springs are spatially related to regional long-lived fault zone (Pocuro Fault Zone). Pocuro Fault zone is a kilometric NS-striking steeply dipping fault zone, with at least 50 km long. Metric wide fault core includes gouge and cataclastic rocks, whereas decametric damage zone consists of intensely fractured and hydrothermal altered Meso-Cenozoic volcanic and volcaniclastic host rocks, crossed by centimetric to milimetric subvertical NE-striking veins. Preliminary results of vein infill clays minerals and zeolites from damage zone, suggest P-T conditions interpreted as an exhumed fossil high-temperature (120º-230ºC) geothermal system. Currently, only low-temperature thermal springs are discharging with different geochemical patterns (bicarbonate to chlorine and sulphate dominant ions) and a homogeneous temperature range (20º-25ºC). This is an interesting study case, to better understand the permeability evolution of geothermal system and the link between internal fault architecture, hydrogeology and hydrothermal inputs.

  13. Mineral concentrations in bottled water products: implications for Canadians' mineral intakes.

    PubMed

    Bertinato, Jesse; Taylor, Jessica

    2013-01-01

    The popularity of bottled water products (BWPs) is growing in Canada. Concentrations of minerals with important implications for health were compared in different types of BWPs. One sample of each brand and type of plain BWP (purified, remineralized, spring, mineral, and artesian), flavoured BWP, and nutrient-enriched BWP sold in major stores in Ottawa, Ontario, was purchased to allow determination of mineral concentrations by flame atomic absorption or emission spectroscopy. A total of 124 BWPs representing 37 brands were analyzed. In general, spring and mineral water contained higher amounts of magnesium and calcium than did purified, remineralized, artesian, flavoured, or nutrient-enriched water. Most plain BWPs contained little sodium and potassium, whereas 15% to 35% of flavoured and nutrient-enriched products had considerably higher concentrations. Only magnesium and calcium concentrations were highly correlated (r=0.76, p<0.001). Calculation of the percentage of Dietary Reference Intakes that could be supplied by each product revealed that, if they are consumed habitually, many products can contribute substantially to recommended intakes of these minerals. Mineral concentrations in most types of BWP varied, but distinct differences between types of products were identified. Consumers should be aware of the mineral content of BWPs because some could influence intakes of certain minerals significantly.

  14. Ground Thermal Diffusivity Calculation by Direct Soil Temperature Measurement. Application to very Low Enthalpy Geothermal Energy Systems.

    PubMed

    Andújar Márquez, José Manuel; Martínez Bohórquez, Miguel Ángel; Gómez Melgar, Sergio

    2016-02-29

    This paper presents a methodology and instrumentation system for the indirect measurement of the thermal diffusivity of a soil at a given depth from measuring its temperature at that depth. The development has been carried out considering its application to the design and sizing of very low enthalpy geothermal energy (VLEGE) systems, but it can has many other applications, for example in construction, agriculture or biology. The methodology is simple and inexpensive because it can take advantage of the prescriptive geotechnical drilling prior to the construction of a house or building, to take at the same time temperature measurements that will allow get the actual temperature and ground thermal diffusivity to the depth of interest. The methodology and developed system have been tested and used in the design of a VLEGE facility for a chalet with basement at the outskirts of Huelva (a city in the southwest of Spain). Experimental results validate the proposed approach.

  15. Ground Thermal Diffusivity Calculation by Direct Soil Temperature Measurement. Application to very Low Enthalpy Geothermal Energy Systems

    PubMed Central

    Andújar Márquez, José Manuel; Martínez Bohórquez, Miguel Ángel; Gómez Melgar, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a methodology and instrumentation system for the indirect measurement of the thermal diffusivity of a soil at a given depth from measuring its temperature at that depth. The development has been carried out considering its application to the design and sizing of very low enthalpy geothermal energy (VLEGE) systems, but it can has many other applications, for example in construction, agriculture or biology. The methodology is simple and inexpensive because it can take advantage of the prescriptive geotechnical drilling prior to the construction of a house or building, to take at the same time temperature measurements that will allow get the actual temperature and ground thermal diffusivity to the depth of interest. The methodology and developed system have been tested and used in the design of a VLEGE facility for a chalet with basement at the outskirts of Huelva (a city in the southwest of Spain). Experimental results validate the proposed approach. PMID:26938534

  16. Capacitive Detection of Low-Enthalpy, Higher-Order Phase Transitions in Synthetic and Natural Composition Lipid Membranes.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Graham J; Heberle, Frederick A; Seinfeld, Jason S; Katsaras, John; Collier, C Patrick; Sarles, Stephen A

    2017-09-26

    In-plane lipid organization and phase separation in natural membranes play key roles in regulating many cellular processes. Highly cooperative, first-order phase transitions in model membranes consisting of few lipid components are well understood and readily detectable via calorimetry, densitometry, and fluorescence. However, far less is known about natural membranes containing numerous lipid species and high concentrations of cholesterol, for which thermotropic transitions are undetectable by the above-mentioned techniques. We demonstrate that membrane capacitance is highly sensitive to low-enthalpy thermotropic transitions taking place in complex lipid membranes. Specifically, we measured the electrical capacitance as a function of temperature for droplet interface bilayer model membranes of increasing compositional complexity, namely, (a) a single lipid species, (b) domain-forming ternary mixtures, and (c) natural brain total lipid extract (bTLE). We observed that, for single-species lipid bilayers and some ternary compositions, capacitance exhibited an abrupt, temperature-dependent change that coincided with the transition detected by other techniques. In addition, capacitance measurements revealed transitions in mixed-lipid membranes that were not detected by the other techniques. Most notably, capacitance measurements of bTLE bilayers indicated a transition at ∼38 °C not seen with any other method. Likewise, capacitance measurements detected transitions in some well-studied ternary mixtures that, while known to yield coexisting lipid phases, are not detected with calorimetry or densitometry. These results indicate that capacitance is exquisitely sensitive to low-enthalpy membrane transitions because of its sensitivity to changes in bilayer thickness that occur when lipids and excess solvent undergo subtle rearrangements near a phase transition. Our findings also suggest that heterogeneity confers stability to natural membranes that function near

  17. Distribution of Water in Nominally Anhydrous Minerals during Metamorphic Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Lankvelt, A.; Seaman, S. J.; Williams, M. L.

    2014-12-01

    Nominally anhydrous minerals are a reservoir for water in otherwise dry rocks. This water may play a role in facilitating metamorphic reactions and enhancing deformation. In this study, we examined orthopyroxene-bearing granites from the Athabasca Granulite terrane in northern Saskatchewan. These rocks intruded the lower crust (pressures of 1 GPa) at circa 2.6 Ga at temperatures of > 900 ºC and were subsequently metamorphosed at granulite facies conditions (700 ºC and 1 GPa) in the Paleoproterozoic (Williams et al., 2000). One of the primary reactions recorded by these rocks is locally known as the "Mary" reaction and involves the anhydrous reaction: orthopyroxene + Ca-plagioclase = clinopyroxene + garnet + Na-plagioclase. Measurements of water concentrations in both product and reactant assemblages were performed using a Bruker Vertex 70 Fourier transform infrared spectrometer and revealed that there is a slight excess of water in product minerals over reactant minerals. There are two possible explanations for this. The first is that water was derived from an external source, possibly hydrous, likely contemporaneous, mafic dikes. This interpretation is supported by higher concentrations of K, which is essentially absent from the reactant minerals, in the Na-rich rims of plagioclase. However, only modest amounts of external fluids could have been introduced, or amphiboles would have been stabilized at the expense of clinopyroxene (Moore & Carmichael, 1998). An alternative interpretation is that slightly more water-rich minerals reacted more readily, releasing water that was then incorporated into their products, whereas the water-poorer minerals failed to react. Support for this interpretation comes from very low water concentrations in orthopyroxene and plagioclase from an unreacted and undeformed sample. This interpretation suggests that water in anhydrous minerals may catalyze metamorphic reactions, and a lack of water may be critical for preserving metastable

  18. Minerals leached into drinking water from rubber stoppers

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, B.W.; Beal, T.S. )

    1991-06-01

    Drinking water and its delivery system are potential sources of variation in animal research. Concern arose that rubber stoppers used to cork water bottles might be a source of some nutritionally required minerals which could leach into drinking water. Six types of stoppers, each having different compositions, were cleaned with stainless-steel sipper tubes inserted into them and attached to polypropylene bottles filled with either deionized water (pH 4.5) or acidified-deionized water (pH 2.5). After six days of contact, water levels of copper, magnesium, iron, manganese, zinc, chromium, and selenium were determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy. Additionally, three of the stopper types were analyzed for mineral content. Minerals were present in both stoppers and drinking water. Acidified-deionized water generally leached minerals from the stoppers than did deionized water. The black stopper which is commonly used in animal facilities contained and leached measurable levels of some minerals, but it still can be recommended for typical animal husbandry uses, although other types of stoppers would be more suitable for specific nutritional and toxicologic studies.

  19. Evaluation of the Aggressiveness of Slovak Mineral Water Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrablíková, Dana; Porubská, Diana; Fendeková, Miriam; Božíková, Jarmila; Kókaiová, Denisa

    2014-07-01

    The aggressive properties of natural waters arise due to their specific physical properties and chemical composition. The latest analyses of certified natural and healing mineral water sources according to Act No. 538/2005 were used for the evaluation. A total of 53 sources in 26 localities were evaluated; they comprised 25 sources of bottled natural mineral and healing waters and 28 sources of natural healing waters in 9 spas. The aggressiveness of the water against concrete was weak (17 sources), medium (17 sources), or none (19 sources). The aggressiveness was mostly caused by low pH values and/or increased SO42- content. Their corrosiveness to metal was mostly very high. The results showed that the disintegration of concrete building constructions, well casings and pipelines could occur in most of the evaluated localities in the case of mineral water contacting them. Therefore, preventive measures are necessary.

  20. Fluorescence spectra of mineral oil-water intermixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Liping; Xu, Xiaoxuan; Xu, Jingjun; Xia, Daying; Shi, Jinshan

    2005-02-01

    Using highly pure water disposed by Milli-Qlabo purifying system of United States as background water, employing RF540 fluorescence spectrometer and selecting fourteen wavelengths as excitation wavelengths, this paper measured and analyzed excitation spectra and fluorescence spectra of oil-water intermixtures with different concentrations from eight domestic mineral crude oils, seven imported mineral crude oils and eight mineral product oils. Experiment results show that: all of these oils can emit fluorescence in broad range of excitation spectra, but the fluorescence quantum efficiency is different; optimal excitation wavelength is 254nm, while more effective excitation wavelength is 360nm, and the corresponding optimal fluorescence detection wavelengths are 360nm and 460nm; with the increment of concentration, relative intensities of fluorescence also increase linearly, which shows that they have obvious positive correlation and the correlation coefficient is above 0.9. Thus using fluorescence method to directly measure the content of mineral crude oil and product oil in water is feasible. Based on the experimental work, combining transfer characteristic of optical fiber, the ranges of optimal excitation wavelength and detection wavelength of mineral oil in water are confirmed, which founds for the on-line fluorescence measurement with optical fiber of micro-content of mineral oil in water.

  1. Regional Geophysical Reconnaissance for Low Enthalpy Geothermal Resources in NE Alberta, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poureslami Ardakani, E.; Schmitt, D.; Bown, T.; Chan, J.; Idowu, S.; Majorowicz, J. A.; Unsworth, M. J.; van der Baan, M.; Bauer, K.; Moeck, I.; Pussak, M.; Weides, S.

    2011-12-01

    As part of the Helmholtz-Alberta Initiative (HAI), a major initial goal is to undertake a critical study of the potential for Engineered Geothermal Systems (EGS) as a source of thermal energy in northern Alberta. The geology of this area consists to first order as westward thickening wedge of Cretaceous siliclastics overlying Devonian carbonates and evaporites all of which lies upon the metamorphic Canadian Shield craton. Generally, the north eastern of Alberta is characterized by low geothermal gradients (near 20 mK/m) and temperatures; and deep drilling to as much as 4-5 km into the craton will be necessary to obtain requisite conditions (i.e. 80-100 C water at the source). Consequently, at this early stage it is important to search for zones with the greatest potential; and in the context of EGS this can mean finding greater fracture permeability through pre-existing faults and joint systems. State of stress information is also being considered as this will be an important constraint on fluid flow in such fractured systems. Current studies are integrating reprocessed legacy industrial and LITHOPROBE seismic reflection profiles, high-resolution aeromagnetic and gravity surveys, and existing borehole and core data are used to develop regional geophysical and geological models of Northern Alberta. Particular areas will focus on structural and tectonic linkages between the sedimentary basin and the underlying craton that are possibly related to, for example, Devonian reef complexes, extensive karsting, or evaporite collapse.

  2. Comparison of the Mineral Content of Tap Water and Bottled Waters

    PubMed Central

    Azoulay, Arik; Garzon, Philippe; Eisenberg, Mark J

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Because of growing concern that constituents of drinking water may have adverse health effects, consumption of tap water in North America has decreased and consumption of bottled water has increased. Our objectives were to 1) determine whether North American tap water contains clinically important levels of calcium (Ca2+), magnesium (Mg2+), and sodium (Na+) and 2) determine whether differences in mineral content of tap water and commercially available bottled waters are clinically important. DESIGN We obtained mineral analysis reports from municipal water authorities of 21 major North American cities. Mineral content of tap water was compared with published data regarding commercially available bottled waters and with dietary reference intakes (DRIs). MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS Mineral levels varied among tap water sources in North America and among bottled waters. European bottled waters generally contained higher mineral levels than North American tap water sources and North American bottled waters. For half of the tap water sources we examined, adults may fulfill between 8% and 16% of their Ca2+ DRI and between 6% and 31% of their Mg2+ DRI by drinking 2 liters per day. One liter of most moderate mineralization European bottled waters contained between 20% and 58% of the Ca2+ DRI and between 16% and 41% of the Mg2+ DRI in adults. High mineralization bottled waters often contained up to half of the maximum recommended daily intake of Na+. CONCLUSION Drinking water sources available to North Americans may contain high levels of Ca2+, Mg2+, and Na+ and may provide clinically important portions of the recommended dietary intake of these minerals. Physicians should encourage patients to check the mineral content of their drinking water, whether tap or bottled, and choose water most appropriate for their needs. PMID:11318912

  3. Ground-water conditions in Whisky Flat, Mineral County, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eakin, T.E.; Robinson, T.W.

    1950-01-01

    As a part of the State-wide cooperative program between the Office of the State Engineer of Nevada and the U.S. Geological Survey, the Ground Water Branch of the Geological Survey made a reconnaissance study of ground-water conditions in Whisky Flat, Mineral County, Nevada.

  4. Water molecules in clay minerals: Thermodynamic functions and hydration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gailhanou, Helène; Amouric, Marc; Olives, Juan; Rogez, Jacques; van Miltenburg, J. C.; van der Berg, G. J. K.; de Weireld, G.; Gaucher, E.; Blanc, P.

    2010-05-01

    Thermodynamic functions and adsorption of water molecules are very important properties for clay minerals. Smectite MX-80 and mixed-layer illite-smectite ISCz-1 were selected. They were first carefully characterized (HRTEM with EDX analysis), revealing original results. Then, the thermodynamic properties of water in clay were obtained by (i) comparison of the thermodynamic properties of anhydrous and hydrated minerals, between 0 and 350 K (adiabatic calorimetry, solution isothermal calorimetry), and (ii) water vapor adsorption isotherms, between 300 and 380 K (magnetic suspension thermobalance). Solution isothermal calorimetry is used to determine the enthalpies of formation of the minerals (1 bar and 298 K). Comparison of the results, for the anhydrous and the hydrated minerals, leads to the enthalpies of hydration at 298 K. Adiabatic calorimetry measurements give the heat capacities of the minerals from 5 to 350 K. Entropies, enthalpies of formation and Gibbs free energies of formation, for the anhydrous and the hydrated minerals, and then, entropies of hydration, enthalpies of hydration and Gibbs free energies of hydration, between 0 and 350 K, are finally obtained. Comparison of two close hydration states leads to the entropy, the enthalpy and the Gibbs free energy of the adsorption reaction: H2O free - H2O adsorbed. The Cp(T) curve, for the heat capacity of water in clay - i.e., the difference between the heat capacities of the hydrated and the anhydrous minerals -, shows that water in clay is a glass at low temperature, undergoes one or two continuous glass transitions between 150 and 270 K, and behaves as free liquid water above 273 K. The two glass transitions might correspond to two types of water molecules: (i) first adsorbed water molecules, bound to the interlayer cations of the clay mineral; (ii) last adsorbed water molecules, not bound to the interlayer cations. In addition, water vapor adsorption isotherms are obtained from 298 to 378 K (magnetic

  5. A Study on the Microbiological Status of Mineral Drinking Water

    PubMed Central

    Aditi, Faria Y.; Rahman, Shafkat S.; Hossain, Md. M.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Water-borne diseases constitute a major health burden in Bangladesh. The objective of this study was to assess the overall quality of mineral water samples that obtained from different shops of Dhaka city. Material and Methods: To achieve the above-mentioned objective, methods of heterotrophic plate count (HPC) and total coliform count (TCC) were applied. Moreover, isolated colony from mineral water samples were characterized by using biochemical and antimicrobial susceptibility tests. Results: Different water samples showed different HPC ranged from 1.0×10 to 8.00×102. Antimicrobial sensitivity test of some selected bacteria viz S. intermedius, S. aureus, S. felis and S. Saccharolyticus were performed. It was observed that Staphylococcus spp. isolates were susceptible to erythromycin, tetracycline, norfloxacin and ciprofloxacin. Furthermore, a few Staphylococcus spp. isolates were intermediate resistant to penicillin and oxacillin. However, most of the Staphylococcus spp. isolates were resistant to cefixime. Conclusion: The results indicate that mineral water serves as a reservoir of various bacteria and that people in Dhaka city, who are the consumers of these water, might get diseases. This study emphasizes the need for elaborated microbiological examinations of mineral drinking water commonly used in Dhaka city. PMID:28603564

  6. Mineralization of sparsely water-soluble polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in a water table fluctuation zone

    SciTech Connect

    Holman, H.Y.N.; Tsang, Y.W.; Holman, W.R.

    1999-06-01

    The mineralization potential of sparsely water-soluble polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) within a highly diesel-contaminated water table fluctuation zone (WTFZ) was investigated using core-scale column microcosms. Experimental conditions mimicked overall seasonal changes in water and oxygen content at the site. During the first aerobic winter, PAH mineralization rates in the freshly contaminated soil were fastest for contaminant [{sup 14}C]-naphthalene which was the least hydrophobic and most water-soluble. Lowering the water table nearly doubled the mineralization rates of all [{sup 14}C]PAHs studied. During the oxygen-poor summer, all mineralization rates were insignificant and failed to respond to water table changes. Neither a return to water-saturated aerobic (winter) conditions nor lowering the water table under aerobic conditions induced detectable mineralization of [{sup 14}C]-naphthalene, but lowering the water table did markedly hasten the still slow mineralization of [{sup 14}C]phenanthrene and [{sup 14}C]anthracene. The time-dependent mineralization behavior and its response to water table fluctuations were explicable in terms of microbial responses to the changing oxygen content and depleting mineral nutrients.

  7. The bacteriological quality of bottled natural mineral waters.

    PubMed

    Hunter, P R; Burge, S H

    1987-10-01

    Fifty-eight bottles of natural mineral water, taken from the point of sale, were bacteriologically examined. No coliforms or Aeromonas sp. were isolated from any sample. High total bacterial counts were found particularly in the still waters. Most of the organisms isolated in the total counts were Gram-negative rods, but Gram-positive organisms were also isolated. Gram-positive cocci were further identified, some of which were known human commensals suggesting contamination of the waters prior to bottling.

  8. [Hyperhydration with low mineral Rocchetta water after extracorporeal lithotripsy].

    PubMed

    Valli, P P; Cesaroni, M; Mearini, L; Rociola, W; Cervelli, B; Porena, M

    2000-04-01

    Both prophylaxis and stone-free status after ESWL are most important goals in treating urinary stone disease, because his high social cost. In order to this situation, we matched two homogeneous groups of patients that underwent ESWL because renal stones: during a one year follow-up with several US controls, daily 1.5 litres of low mineral content water was drank by I group patients; vice versa, daily 3 litres (1st ten days) and afterwards 2 litres of Rocchetta low mineral content water was drank by II group patients. This last kind of approach led to a significant improvement in stone fragments elimination time, in inferior calix stone cure and in stone recurrences rate. So we conclude that hyperhydration using right low mineral content water, is a simple and cheap way to improve both treatment and prophylaxis of urinary stones.

  9. Modeling CO2-Water-Mineral Wettability and Mineralization for Carbon Geosequestration.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yunfeng; Tsuji, Shinya; Jia, Jihui; Tsuji, Takeshi; Matsuoka, Toshifumi

    2017-07-18

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) capture and storage (CCS) is an important climate change mitigation option along with improved energy efficiency, renewable energy, and nuclear energy. CO2 geosequestration, that is, to store CO2 under the subsurface of Earth, is feasible because the world's sedimentary basins have high capacity and are often located in the same region of the world as emission sources. How CO2 interacts with the connate water and minerals is the focus of this Account. There are four trapping mechanisms that keep CO2 in the pores of subsurface rocks: (1) structural trapping, (2) residual trapping, (3) dissolution trapping, and (4) mineral trapping. The first two are dominated by capillary action, where wettability controls CO2 and water two-phase flow in porous media. We review state-of-the-art studies on CO2/water/mineral wettability, which was found to depend on pressure and temperature conditions, salt concentration in aqueous solutions, mineral surface chemistry, and geometry. We then review some recent advances in mineral trapping. First, we show that it is possible to reproduce the CO2/water/mineral wettability at a wide range of pressures using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. As the pressure increases, CO2 gas transforms into a supercritical fluid or liquid at ∼7.4 MPa depending on the environmental temperature. This transition leads to a substantial decrease of the interfacial tension between CO2 and reservoir brine (or pure water). However, the wettability of CO2/water/rock systems depends on the type of rock surface. Recently, we investigated the contact angle of CO2/water/silica systems with two different silica surfaces using MD simulations. We found that contact angle increased with pressure for the hydrophobic (siloxane) surface while it was almost constant for the hydrophilic (silanol) surface, in excellent agreement with experimental observations. Furthermore, we found that the CO2 thin films at the CO2-hydrophilic silica and CO2-H2O

  10. Drug resistant bacteria in non carbonated mineral waters.

    PubMed

    Massa, S; Petruccioli, M; Fanelli, M; Gori, L

    1995-11-01

    The presence of antibiotic resistant bacteria was revealed among bacteria isolated from non carbonated mineral waters bottled in plastic (PVC) and in glass containers. Heterotrophic plate count values ranged between < 10 and 4.3 x 10(3) and between < 10 and 1.2 x 10(4) colony forming units/ml for the waters bottled in PVC and glass, respectively. The greatest resistance to a single antibiotic, 39.1% of 320 isolates from mineral waters, was found for nalidixic acid. Resistance to the other antibiotics was as follows: ampicillin (26.2%), bacitracin (19.7%), cotrimoxazole (18.7%), streptomycin (15.0%), tetracycline (14.4%), gentamycin (11.6%), chloramphenicol and rifampin (9.7%). The strains resistant to two or more antibiotics (multiple antibiotic resistant, MAR) provided 51% of the total isolates. Identification of 127 MAR strains showed that in the mineral waters gram-positive cocci dominated. The second, third and fourth group of identified MAR phenotypes were, in order to importance, gram-negative non-fermentative rods, gram-positive rods and gram-negative fermentative rods. The importance of the antibiotic resistant bacteria in mineral water is discussed.

  11. Thin Water and Ice Films at Mineral Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeşilbaş, Merve; Boily, Jean-François

    2016-04-01

    Mineral-water and ice interactions play important roles in atmospheric cloud formation. They also affect soil biogeochemistry as well as outer-space processes. In this study, thin water and ice films formed on minerals of varied bulk and surface structure, shape, size and surface roughness were probed by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and by Dynamic Vapor Adsorption (DVA). Measurements on several types of iron (oxyhydr)oxides, phyllosilicates, orthosilicates, tectosilicates as well as Arizona Test Dust (ATD) and Icelandic volcanic ash constrained our understanding of the molecular-level nature of mineral surface-water and ice interactions. DVA experiments showed that particle size is the key feature controlling water loadings at 25 ° C. Under this condition, nano-sized particles stabilized the equivalence of no more than ˜6 monolayers of water at the near saturation of water vapor while sub-micron sized particles stabilized several thousand layers. This result can be explained by the greater ability of larger sized particles at driving water condensation reactions. Cryogenic FTIR measurements at -10 and -50 ° C revealed that most minerals acquired the thin ice films with similar hydrogen bonding environments as those formed at room temperature.[1,2] These thin ice films have weaker hydrogen bond environments than hexagonal ice (νOH ≈ 3130 cm-1), a result seen by FTIR through predominant O-H stretching modes at νOH ≈ 3408-3425 cm-1. The water bending region (˜1630 cm-1) also reveals that most thin ice films are rather supercooled forms of water. Only the materials with greatest levels of heterogeneity, namely ATD and volcanic ash, stabilized solid forms of water reminiscent to hexagonal ice. This work thus constrains further our understanding of how interfacial ice is stabilized at mineral surfaces, and opens possibilities for future studies focused on atmospheric gas uptake on mineral- water and ice admixtures. [1] Song, X. and Boily, J

  12. Water in Nominally Anhydrous Minerals from Nakhlites and Shergottites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peslier, Anne H.

    2013-01-01

    Estimating the amount of water in the interior of terrestrial planets has tremendous implications on our understanding of solar nebula evolution, planet formation and geological history, and extraterrestrial volcanism. Mars has been a recent focus of such enquiry with complementary datasets from spacecrafts, rovers and martian meteorite studies. In planetary interiors, water can be dissolved in fluids or melts and hydrous phases, but can also be locked as protons attached to structural oxygen in lattice defects in nominally anhydrous minerals (NAM) such as olivine, pyroxene, or feldspar [1-3]. Measuring water in Martian meteorite NAM is challenging because the minerals are fragile and riddled with fractures from impact processes that makes them break apart during sample processing. Moreover, curing the sample in epoxy causes problems for the two main water analysis techniques, Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR) and secondary ionization mass spectrometry (SIMS). Measurements to date have resulted in a heated debate on how much water the mantle of Mars contains. SIMS studies of NAM [4], amphiboles [5], and apatites [6-8] from Martian meteorites report finding enough water in these phases to infer that the martian mantle is as hydrous as that of the Earth. On the other hand, a SIMS study of glass in olivine melt inclusions from shergottites concludes that the Martian mantle is much drier [9]. The latter interpretation is also supported by the fact that most martian hydrous minerals generally have the relevant sites filled with Cl and F instead of H [10,11]. As for experimental results, martian basalt compositions can be reproduced using water as well as Cl in the parent melts [12,13]. Here FTIR is used to measure water in martian meteorite minerals in order to constrain the origin of the distribution of water in martian meteorite phases.

  13. [Mineral oil drinking water pollution accident in Slavonski Brod, Croatia].

    PubMed

    Medverec Knežević, Zvonimira; Nadih, Martina; Josipović, Renata; Grgić, Ivanka; Cvitković, Ante

    2011-12-01

    On 21 September 2008, heavy oil penetrated the drinking water supply in Slavonski Brod, Croatia. The accident was caused by the damage of heat exchange units in hot water supply. The system was polluted until the beginning of November, when the pipeline was treated with BIS O 2700 detergent and rinsed with water. Meanwhile, water samples were taken for chemical analysis using spectrometric and titrimetric methods and for microbiological analysis using membrane filtration and total plate count. Mineral oils were determined with infrared spectroscopy. Of the 192 samples taken for mineral oil analysis, 55 were above the maximally allowed concentration (MAC). Five samples were taken for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH), benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene analysis (BTEX), but none was above MAC. Epidemiologists conducted a survey about health symptoms among the residents affected by the accident. Thirty-six complained of symptoms such as diarrhoea, stomach cramps, vomiting, rash, eye burning, chills, and gastric disorders.This is the first reported case of drinking water pollution with mineral oil in Slavonski Brod and the accident has raised a number of issues, starting from poor water supply maintenance to glitches in the management of emergencies such as this.

  14. Mineralizing urban net-zero water treatment: Phase II field ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Net-zero water (NZW) systems, or water management systems achieving high recycling rates and low residuals generation so as to avoid water import and export, can also conserve energy used to heat and convey water, while economically restoring local eco-hydrology. However, design and operating experience are extremely limited. The objective of this paper is to present the results of the second phase of operation of an advanced oxidation-based NZW pilot system designed, constructed, and operated for a period of two years, serving an occupied four-person apartment. System water was monitored, either continuously or thrice daily, for routine water quality parameters, minerals, and MicroTox® in-vitro toxicity, and intermittently for somatic and male-specific coliphage, adenovirus, Cryptosporidium, Giardia, emerging organic constituents (non-quantitative), and the Florida drinking water standards. All 115 drinking water standards with the exception of bromate were met in this phase. Neither virus nor protozoa were detected in the treated water, with the exception of measurement of adenovirus genome copies attributed to accumulation of inactive genetic material in hydraulic dead zones. Chemical oxygen demand was mineralized to 90% in treatment. Total dissolved solids were maintained at ∼500 mg/L at steady state, partially through aerated aluminum electrocoagulation. Bromate accumulation is projected to be controlled by aluminum electrocoagulation with separate dispo

  15. Numerical modeling and strontium isotopic signal to assess the arsenic distribution in a low-enthalpy hydrothermal system: the case study of Viterbo geothermal area (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battistel, M.; Barbieri, M.

    2013-12-01

    Several studies on the groundwater geochemistry of the hydrothermal area west of Viterbo, highlight the presence of arsenic and other trace elements. The groundwater of Viterbo area was used as source of drinking water by about 150,000 local inhabitants, until 2010, when it was prohibited the use by EU due to the high level of arsenic. The hydrogeological setting highlights the presence of a shallow volcanic aquifer (composed by alkaline-potassic volcanics), characterized by fresh waters, limited at its base by the semiconfining marly-calcareous-arenaceous complex and low-permeability clays. To the west of Viterbo, vertical upflows of hot waters (with a temperature between 50 and 64°C), are due to the locally uplifted of evaporitic reservoir, the reduced thickness of the semiconfining layer and the high local geothermal gradient. Current study is focused on news geochemical approaches to defining the conditions which control arsenic mobility in groundwater in the low- enthalpy thermal area of Viterbo, related to the interaction between the volcanic aquifer and the geothermal reservoir. In addition to determinate chemical components and chemical-physical properties (T, pH, electrical conductivity) the study provided the isotopic values of 87Sr/86Sr of Viterbo geothermal area. Geochemical modelling is conducted using Phreeqc. The program monitors the significant species and calculates equilibrium concentrations and the pCO2 at desired temperatures. Investigations were undertaken in the area exhibiting thermal manifestations and in the immediate surroundings. On the basis of major ions and temperature, it is possible to subdivide the waters sampled into three main groups: the thermal waters with a sulphate -alkaline-earth facies, the fresh waters with a biocarbonate-alkaline facies, and a group of mixing waters with a undefined facies. The values of strontium isotopic ratio 87Sr/86Sr marks out the different circuits of groundwater. Values lower than 0.70800 are

  16. Criticality of Water: Aligning Water and Mineral Resources Assessment.

    PubMed

    Sonderegger, Thomas; Pfister, Stephan; Hellweg, Stefanie

    2015-10-20

    The concept of criticality has been used to assess whether a resource may become a limiting factor to economic activities. It has been primarily applied to nonrenewable resources, in particular to metals. However, renewable resources such as water may also be overused and become a limiting factor. In this paper, we therefore developed a water criticality method that allows for a new, user-oriented assessment of water availability and accessibility. Comparability of criticality across resources is desirable, which is why the presented adaptation of the criticality approach to water is based on a metal criticality method, whose basic structure is maintained. With respect to the necessary adaptations to the water context, a transparent water criticality framework is proposed that may pave the way for future integrated criticality assessment of metals, water, and other resources. Water criticality scores were calculated for 159 countries subdivided into 512 geographic units for the year 2000. Results allow for a detailed analysis of criticality profiles, revealing locally specific characteristics of water criticality. This is useful for the screening of sites and their related water criticality, for indication of water related problems and possible mitigation options and water policies, and for future water scenario analysis.

  17. Kinetic theory of oxygen isotopic exchange between minerals and water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Criss, R.E.; Gregory, R.T.; Taylor, H.P.

    1987-01-01

    Kinetic and mass conservation equations are used to describe oxygen isotopic exchange between minerals and water in "closed" and open hydrothermal systems. In cases where n coexisting mineral phases having different reaction rates are present, the exchange process is described by a system of n + 1 simultaneous differential equations consisting of n pseudo first-order rate equations and a conservation of mass equation. The simultaneous solutions to these equations generate curved exchange trajectories on ??-?? plots. Families of such trajectories generated under conditions allowing for different fluid mole fractions, different fluid isotopic compositions, or different fluid flow rates are connected by positive-sloped isochronous lines. These isochrons reproduce the effects observed in hydrothermally exchanged mineral pairs including 1) steep positive slopes, 2) common reversals in the measured fractionation factors (??), and 3) measured fractionations that are highly variable over short distances where no thermal gradient can be geologically demonstrated. ?? 1987.

  18. The bacteriological quality of bottled natural mineral waters.

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, P. R.; Burge, S. H.

    1987-01-01

    Fifty-eight bottles of natural mineral water, taken from the point of sale, were bacteriologically examined. No coliforms or Aeromonas sp. were isolated from any sample. High total bacterial counts were found particularly in the still waters. Most of the organisms isolated in the total counts were Gram-negative rods, but Gram-positive organisms were also isolated. Gram-positive cocci were further identified, some of which were known human commensals suggesting contamination of the waters prior to bottling. PMID:3678404

  19. Cholera in Portugal, 1974. II. Transmission by bottled mineral water.

    PubMed

    Blake, P A; Rosenberg, M L; Florencia, J; Costa, J B; do Prado Quintino, L; Gangarosa, E J

    1977-04-01

    During a cholera epidemic, Vibrio cholerae was isolated from two springs which supplied mineral water to a spa and to a commercial water bottling plant. Epidemiologic investigation found that cholera attack rates were 10-fold greater among visitors to the spa than among non-visitors. A subsequent matched-pair case-control study which excluded persons who had visted the spa showed that a history of consumption of the bottled non-carbonated water was significantly more common among bacteriologically confirmed cholera cases than among paired controls.

  20. Understanding hydrothermal circulation patterns at a low-enthalpy thermal spring using audio-magnetotelluric data: A case study from Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, Sarah; Henry, Tiernan; Muller, Mark R.; Jones, Alan G.; Moore, John Paul; Murray, John; Campanyà, Joan; Vozar, Jan; Walsh, John; Rath, Volker

    2016-09-01

    re-circulation of meteoric waters within this structurally controlled hydrothermal circulation system. This paper illustrates how AMT may be useful in a multi-disciplinary investigation of an intermediate-depth (100-1000 m), low-enthalpy, geothermal target, and shows how the different strands of inquiry from a multi-disciplinary investigation may be woven together to gain a deeper understanding of a complex hydrothermal system.

  1. Minerals

    MedlinePlus

    Minerals are important for your body to stay healthy. Your body uses minerals for many different jobs, including keeping your bones, muscles, heart, and brain working properly. Minerals are also important for making enzymes and hormones. ...

  2. Diversity of Bacteria Growing in Natural Mineral Water after Bottling

    PubMed Central

    Loy, Alexander; Beisker, Wolfgang; Meier, Harald

    2005-01-01

    Bacterial growth occurs in noncarbonated natural mineral waters a few days after filling and storage at room temperature, a phenomenon known for more than 40 years. Using the full-cycle rRNA approach, we monitored the development of the planktonic bacterial community in a noncarbonated natural mineral water after bottling. Seven 16S rRNA gene libraries, comprising 108 clones in total, were constructed from water samples taken at various days after bottling and from two different bottle sizes. Sequence analyses identified 11 operational taxonomic units (OTUs), all but one affiliated with the betaproteobacterial order Burkholderiales (6 OTUs) or the class Alphaproteobacteria (4 OTUs). Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was applied in combination with DAPI (4′,6′-diamidino-2-phenylindole) staining, viability staining, and microscopic counting to quantitatively monitor changes in bacterial community composition. A growth curve similar to that of a bacterium grown in a batch culture was recorded. In contrast to the current perception that Gammaproteobacteria are the most important bacterial components of natural mineral water in bottles, Betaproteobacteria dominated the growing bacterial community and accounted for 80 to 98% of all bacteria detected by FISH in the late-exponential and stationary-growth phases. Using previously published and newly designed genus-specific probes, members of the betaproteobacterial genera Hydrogenophaga, Aquabacterium, and Polaromonas were found to constitute a significant proportion of the bacterial flora (21 to 86% of all bacteria detected by FISH). For the first time, key genera responsible for bacterial growth in a natural mineral water were identified by applying molecular cultivation-independent techniques. PMID:16000770

  3. Diversity of bacteria growing in natural mineral water after bottling.

    PubMed

    Loy, Alexander; Beisker, Wolfgang; Meier, Harald

    2005-07-01

    Bacterial growth occurs in noncarbonated natural mineral waters a few days after filling and storage at room temperature, a phenomenon known for more than 40 years. Using the full-cycle rRNA approach, we monitored the development of the planktonic bacterial community in a noncarbonated natural mineral water after bottling. Seven 16S rRNA gene libraries, comprising 108 clones in total, were constructed from water samples taken at various days after bottling and from two different bottle sizes. Sequence analyses identified 11 operational taxonomic units (OTUs), all but one affiliated with the betaproteobacterial order Burkholderiales (6 OTUs) or the class Alphaproteobacteria (4 OTUs). Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was applied in combination with DAPI (4',6'-diamidino-2-phenylindole) staining, viability staining, and microscopic counting to quantitatively monitor changes in bacterial community composition. A growth curve similar to that of a bacterium grown in a batch culture was recorded. In contrast to the current perception that Gammaproteobacteria are the most important bacterial components of natural mineral water in bottles, Betaproteobacteria dominated the growing bacterial community and accounted for 80 to 98% of all bacteria detected by FISH in the late-exponential and stationary-growth phases. Using previously published and newly designed genus-specific probes, members of the betaproteobacterial genera Hydrogenophaga, Aquabacterium, and Polaromonas were found to constitute a significant proportion of the bacterial flora (21 to 86% of all bacteria detected by FISH). For the first time, key genera responsible for bacterial growth in a natural mineral water were identified by applying molecular cultivation-independent techniques.

  4. Prevalence and Genetic Diversity of Enterococcus faecalis Isolates from Mineral Water and Spring Water in China

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Lei; Wu, Qingping; Zhang, Jumei; Guo, Weipeng; Chen, Moutong; Xue, Liang; Wang, Juan; Ma, Lianying

    2017-01-01

    Enterococcus faecalis is an important opportunistic pathogen which is frequently detected in mineral water and spring water for human consumption and causes human urinary tract infections, endocarditis and neonatal sepsis. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence, virulence genes, antimicrobial resistance and genetic diversity of E. faecalis from mineral water and spring water in China. Of 314 water samples collected from January 2013 to January 2014, 48 samples (15.3%) were contaminated E. faecalis. The highest contamination rate occurred in activated carbon filtered water of spring water (34.5%), followed by source water of spring water (32.3%) and source water of mineral water (6.4%). The virulence gene test of 58 E. faecalis isolates showed that the detection rates of asa1, ace, cylA, gelE and hyl were 79.3, 39.7, 0, 100, 0%, respectively. All 58 E. faecalis isolates were not resistant to 12 kinds of antibiotics (penicillin, ampicillin, linezolid, quinupristin/dalfopristin, vancomycin, gentamicin, streptomycin, ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, norfloxacin, nitrofurantoin, and tetracycline). Enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus-PCR classified 58 isolates and three reference strains into nine clusters with a similarity of 75%. This study is the first to investigate the prevalence of E. faecalis in mineral water and spring water in China. The results of this study suggested that spring water could be potential vehicles for transmission of E. faecalis. PMID:28670302

  5. Kinetics of mineralization of phenols in lake water.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, S H; Alexander, M

    1986-01-01

    The kinetics of mineralization of phenol and p-nitrophenol in lake water was determined at concentrations from 200 pg/ml to 5 micrograms/ml. The mineralization data were fit by nonlinear regression to equations for 14 kinetic models that describe patterns of biodegradation by nongrowing cells or by microorganisms growing on either the test chemical or other organic substrates. The kinetics od mineralization of phenol in water samples collected in July was best described by first-order models for 0.5 ng of phenol per ml; by Monod-without-growth, logistic, and logarithmic models for 1.0 and 2.0 ng/ml and 5.0 ng/ml to 1.0 micrograms/ml, respectively, if it is assumed that the mineralizing population uses phenol as the sole carbon source for growth; by models (for phenol at concentrations of 2.0 ng/ml to 1.0 micrograms/ml) that assume that the phenol-mineralizing populations do not grow or grow logarithmically or logistically on uncharacterized carbon compounds but metabolize the phenol when present at levels below and above Km, respectively, for that compound; and by a logarithmic model at 5.0 micrograms/ml. Under the test conditions, usually less than 10% of the phenol C that was metabolized was incorporated into microbial cells or retained by other particulate material in the water at substrate concentrations of 10 ng/ml or less, and the percentage increased at higher substrate concentrations.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3755316

  6. A microbiological study of bottled mineral water marketed in Ludhiana.

    PubMed

    Lal, M; Kaur, H

    2006-01-01

    The microbiological quality of bottled mineral water marketed in Ludhiana was examined, Twenty three brands were analyzed for presumptive coliform count by multiple tube tests, and E. coli count was confirmed by Eijkman test. Bacterial and fungal loads were tested by membrane filtration test. Out of 23 only one sample (4.4%) showed the presumptive coliform count to be 460 most probable number (MPN)l 1 00ml,and 1 was found to be positive when tested by Eijkman test for Ecoli. In the membrane filtration test three samples (13%) showed more than two types of bacteria. Different types of bacteria isolated included Bacillus sp (19/23). Pseudomonas spp (13123), Ecoli, Klebsiella sp and S.albus one each Fungi was isolated from five of twenty three. (22%) samples. Only one brand of mineral water was unfit for human consumption. The rest of the samples were contaminated with non pathogenic flora.

  7. The sensitivity of production temperatures and thermal recharge of low-enthalpy geothermal reservoirs to the thermal conductivity of the confining beds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erbs Poulsen, Søren; Balling, Niels; Bom Nielsen, Søren

    2013-04-01

    The exploration and exploitation of low-enthalpy geothermal energy has increased globally within recent decades in the pursuit of sustainable, low carbon emission energy sources. In 2009 funding was dedicated to a national multi-disciplinary research project with the aim of quantifying the thermal properties and temperature distributions of geothermal reservoirs in Denmark and to develop models for utilisation. The Danish subsurface encompasses low-enthalpy geothermal reservoirs of Triassic, Jurassic, and Cretaceous age with formation temperatures between 40° C and 80° C. In previous literature it is shown that the ratio between the circulation rate in doublet well configurations and the vertical thermal conductivity of confining rocks significantly influences the temporal development in production temperatures in low-enthalpy geothermal reservoirs. We analyse the thermal interplay between a reservoir which is utilised by an injection- and production well, and its confining beds in four conceptual reservoir systems, inspired by the low-enthalpy reservoirs found in Denmark. The analysis is based on state-of-the-art high resolution finite element modelling. Three of the four conceptual reservoirs represent different geological settings in which the confining beds of the reservoir have different thermal conductivities. In the first case, no heat is conducted across the boundaries of the reservoir, which serves merely as a reference. In the three remaining cases, the matrix thermal conductivity of the confining beds is set equal to 1.5, 3 and 4.5 W/m/K. In one additional case study, the anisotropy of the thermal conductivity of the confining beds is increased from 1 (isotropic) to 1.7 (horizontal conductivity is set equal to 1.5 W/m/K). For the considered reservoirs, we calculate the ratio between the accumulated energy that can be attributed conductive heat flow from the confining beds to the reservoir and the accumulated extracted energy from the pumping well

  8. Iron bacteria of the genus Siderocapsa in mineral waters.

    PubMed

    Svorcová, L

    1975-01-01

    The occurrence of iron bacteria in mineral waters has been under study. It could be shown that Siderocapsa caronata Redlinger 1931 and S. treubii Molisch 1909 are synonymous, as well as S. eusphaera Skuja 1948 and S. major Molisch 1909, and S. botryoides Berger 1949 and S. monoica 1922. Two new species, S. hexagonata and S. quadrata, have been described. A simplified key for determining the species of the genus Sideracapsa is presented.

  9. Water in the Martian Crust Locked in Hydrated Minerals: A Significant Planetary Reservoir of Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mustard, J. F.

    2017-10-01

    Calculations for a reservoir of water locked in hydrated minerals is estimated to range from a low of < 20 m global equivalent layer to approximately 1 km for the high end. This is sufficient to strongly impact surface geomorphic processes.

  10. Occurrences of Mineralized Waters and Mineral Springs in Kysuce and Their Meaning for Geotourism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemiec, Dominik; Marschalko, Marian; Duraj, Miloš; Yilmaz, Işik

    2016-10-01

    Kysuce is a region situated in north-western Slovakia and it borders the Czech Republic on the west and Poland on the north. From the geological point of view, the locality is mainly formed by Tertiary flysch formation. This composition together with the relief of this location created very suitable conditions for occurrences of numerous mineral springs which can be found in this region. The increased concentration of mineral contents in the waters which find their expression not only through taste but also through their typical odour held the interest of local inhabitants already in the past centuries. Currently, they are frequently visited not only by inhabitants of the region but also by visitors to Kysuce. From the geotourism point of view, this region offers more interesting geological phenomena. Some of them, such as a crude oil seep in Korna or occurrences of sandstone and agglomerate stone balls, rank among world unique.

  11. Determination of parathion, aldicarb, and thiobencarb in tap water and bottled mineral water in Mashhad, Iran.

    PubMed

    Rezaee, Ramin; Hassanzadeh-Khayyat, Mohammad; Mehri, Fereshteh; Khashyarmanesh, Zahra; Moallemzadeh, Hamideh; Karimi, Gholamreza

    2012-04-01

    Water is a necessity for life. Currently, because of different contaminations in tap water, most people prefer using bottled mineral waters. Pesticides (e.g., organophophorous, carbamates, etc.) are among the most dangerous chemicals that may be found in drinking waters, which can cause long- and short-term complications. Because all people consume at least 2 L of water per day, water-quality monitoring is vital. In this study, we determined the concentration of three pesticides (aldicarb, parathion, and thiobencarb) in 13 tap-water samples collected from 13 different urban areas and 10 samples of bottled mineral water in Mashhad, a major city in northeast Iran. Samples were analyzed by gas chromatography coupled with a pulsed flame photometric detector after solid-phase extraction. Results showed that 2 of 13 tap-water samples and 2 of 10 bottled mineral water trademarks were contaminated either by parathion or by thiobencarb or both, with concentrations ranging between 0.6 and 0.8 ppb. According to the defined guideline values, determined concentrations of pesticides are below the permissible World Health Organization level for these toxic agents, and it is considered that drinking these tap waters and bottled mineral waters are safe for human consumption.

  12. Predicted mineral intake utilizing both water and forage analysis varies by source and location of livestock water in Eastern Montana

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Livestock water can play an important role in contributing to mineral intake of cows grazing rangelands. Mineral analysis of both forage and water is needed to accurately assess mineral intake compared to animal requirements. Therefore, 93 pasture and water source combinations were sampled in May ...

  13. Bacterial flora in bottled uncarbonated mineral drinking water.

    PubMed

    González, C; Gutiérrez, C; Grande, T

    1987-12-01

    A quantitative study of bacterial populations in mineral water was carried out. Samples were stored at 6 and 20 degrees C, and the colony counts were determined on tryptone agar plates incubated at 22 and 37 degrees C. Samples were collected from the spring source in sterile glass flasks and from the bottling factory in conventional plastic and glass containers. In both cases, the initial population (10(1)-10(2) cfu/mL water) increased to 10(5)-10(6) cfu/mL after 3 days storage as determined from plate counts incubated at 22 degrees C. The levels reached by this population were similar to those of samples of mineral water obtained at the market stage. Results from plate counts incubated at 37 degrees C showed that populations in samples collected at the bottling factory reached 10(2)-10(3) cfu/mL. No growth was observed in water collected from spring source. Bacterial multiplication was not stopped even when water was stored at 6 degrees C. Caulobacter was the genus found most frequently in both types of samples, followed by Sphaerotilus-Leptothrix. Acinetobacter calcoaceticus and Pseudomonas fluorescens were frequently found in only two springs, and Pseudomonas putida, Arthrobacter, Aeromonas hydrophilia, and Corynebacterium were isolated less frequently. Janthinobacterium was recovered only once from a single spring. A giant bacterium closely resembling Hyphomicrobium and a budding one similar to Pasteuria were recovered from all samples of a single spring and from some of the commercial samples.

  14. Radium Adsorption to Iron Bearing Minerals in Variable Salinity Waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, M.; Kocar, B. D.

    2014-12-01

    Radium is a common, naturally occurring radioactive metal found in many subsurface environments. Radium isotopes are a product of natural uranium and thorium decay, and are particularly abundant within groundwaters where minimal flux leads to accumulation within porewaters. Radium has been used as a natural tracer to estimate submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) [1], where the ratios of various radium isotopes are used to estimate total groundwater flux to and from the ocean [2]. Further, it represents a substantial hazard in waste water produced after hydraulic fracturing for natural gas extraction [3], resulting in a significant risk of environmental release and increased cost for water treatment or disposal. Adsorption to mineral surfaces represents a primary pathway of radium retention within subsurface environments. For SGD studies, it is important to understand adsorption processes to correctly estimate GW fluxes, while in hydraulic fracturing, radium adsorption to aquifer solids will mediate the activities of radium within produced water. While some studies of radium adsorption to various minerals have been performed [4], there is a limited understanding of the surface chemistry of radium adsorption, particularly to iron-bearing minerals such as pyrite, goethite and ferrihydrite. Accordingly, we present the results of sorption experiments of radium to a suite of iron-bearing minerals representative of those found within deep saline and near-surface (freshwater) aquifers, and evaluate impacts of varying salinity solutions through the use of artificial groundwater, seawater, and shale formation brine. Further, we explore the impacts of pyrite oxidation and ferrihydrite transformation to other iron-bearing secondary minerals on the retention of radium. This work lays the groundwork for further study of radium use as a tracer for SGD, as well as understanding mechanisms of radium retention and release from deep aquifer materials following hydraulic fracturing

  15. [Comparative study of the short-term effect of mineral water on calcium metabolism].

    PubMed

    Vezzoli, Giuseppe; Arcidiacono, Teresa; Puzzovio, Maria; Mora, Stefano

    2010-01-01

    Mineral water may be a useful means to achieve optimal dietary calcium intake, but the effect of different mineral waters on calcium metabolism is unknown. We therefore evaluated calcium excretion in 24-hour urine in 10 healthy individuals (5 women and 5 men) after two weeks of drinking at least 1500 mL/day of mineral water with a low electrolyte content or 1500 mL/day of mineral water rich in calcium and bicarbonate but with a different sodium content. The low-sodium water Sangemini was one of these two mineral waters. Calcium excretion did not significantly increase after intake of the Sangemini mineral water in comparison with the baseline period of low-electrolyte mineral water intake. Conversely, the calcium excretion increased significantly after intake of the second mineral water. The plasma concentration of C-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen and the urinary phosphate excretion decreased after intake of the second mineral water in comparison with the baseline period, whereas they did not decrease after intake of Sangemini water. Therefore, phosphate excretion was higher after drinking Sangemini water than the other studied mineral water. Drinking Sangemini water may have a slight effect on calcium excretion and may not inhibit bone turnover in the short term. The lesser effect of Sangemini water on calcium excretion could be useful in the treatment of osteoporosis.

  16. [The balneotherapeutic components of sulfide-containing mineral waters].

    PubMed

    Khutoryansky, V A; Gorshkov, A G

    2015-01-01

    It has been suggested in an early study that sulfanes may serve as a source of sulfur contained in hydrogen sulfide sources. We have performed derivatization of sulfanes, known to be present in the "Novonukutskaya" mineral water. The presence of polysulfanes in balneotherapeutic sulfide waters was confirmed by the HPLC-UV and chromato-mass spectrometric techniques. Derivatization of inorganic polysulfides was achieved by using the reaction with methyl iodide. It was shown that polysulfanes contained in the examined samples were metastable and disintegrated into So and H2S. Almost all molecular zero-valent sulfur was present in the form of S8. The application of HPLC allowed to determine the equilibrium concentration of molecular sulfur. The presence of the above compounds in therapeutic sulfide waters raises the question of the mechanism of their curative action. The authors hypothesize that it may be related to the high therapeutic potency of the substances obtained by steam distillation from the "Novonukutskaya" mineral water.

  17. Nicotine occurrence in bottled mineral water: analysis of 10 brands of water in Spain.

    PubMed

    González Alonso, S; Valcárcel, Y; Montero, J C; Catalá, M

    2012-02-01

    The presence of pharmaceuticals in surface and drinking water has been evidenced in numerous studies. Despite representing one of the most common consumption sources, to the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the presence of pharmaceutical compounds in bottled mineral water. Pollution of these sources not only could pose a serious human health risk, but would also warn about the quality of the water in our aquifers, a vital and vulnerable source of water, essential for the future water supply. Fifty eight pharmaceutically active compounds (PhACs) belonging to the 12 main therapeutic groups were analyzed in 10 bottled mineral water brands produced in Spain. Nicotine was detected in concentrations ranging from 7ngL(-1) to 15ngL(-1) in 5 of 10 bottled mineral waters. Despite the low nicotine concentration measured, the presence of this compound in bottled water still raises concern. Health risk assessment researchers have postulated that the risk to adult healthy humans from oral intake of nicotine at low levels is negligible. However, no studies have been conducted to assess the human health risk of vulnerable populations such as pregnant women and newborns. This population is the target of advertising on the purity and quality characteristics of bottled mineral water. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Water Footprint in Nitrate Vulnerable Zones: Mineral vs. Organic Fertilization.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellanos Serrano, María Teresa; Requejo Mariscal, María Isabel; Villena Gordo, Raquel; Cartagena Causapé, María Carmen; Arce Martínez, Augusto; Ribas Elcorobarrutia, Francisco; María Tarquis Alfonso, Ana

    2017-04-01

    In intensive agriculture, it is necessary to apply irrigation and fertilizers to increase the crop yield. An optimization of water and N application is necessary. An excess of irrigation implies nitrates washing which would contribute to the contamination of the groundwater. An excess of N, besides affecting the yield and fruit quality, causes serious environmental problems. Nitrate vulnerable zones (NVZs) are areas designated as being at risk from agricultural nitrate pollution. They include around 16% of land in Spain and in Castilla-La Mancha, the area studied, represents 45% of the total land. In several zones, the N content of the groundwater could be approximately 140 mg L-1, or even higher [1]. The input of nitrogen fertilizers (mineral or organic), applied with a poor management, could be increased considerably the pollution risks. The water footprint (WF) is as indicator for the total volume of direct and indirect freshwater used, consumed and/or polluted [2]. The WF includes both consumptive water use: blue water (volume of surface and groundwater consumed) and green water (rainwater consumed)). A third element is the water required to assimilate pollution (grey water) [2]. Under semiarid conditions with low irrigation water quality, green WF is zero because the effective rainfall is negligible. Blue WF includes: i) extra consumption or irrigation water that the farmer has to apply to compensate the fail of uniformity on discharge of drips, ii) percolation out of control or salts leaching, which depends on the salt tolerance of the crop, soil and quality of irrigation water, to ensure the fruit yield. In the NVZs, the major concern is grey WF, because the irrigation and nitrogen dose have to be adjusted to the crop needs in order to minimize nitrate pollution. This study focus on the assessment of mineral and organic fertilization on WF in a fertirrigated melon crop under semiarid conditions with a low water quality. During successive years, a melon crop

  19. Effect of fluid intake on skin physiology: distinct differences between drinking mineral water and tap water.

    PubMed

    Williams, S; Krueger, N; Davids, M; Kraus, D; Kerscher, M

    2007-04-01

    It is generally stated that drinking plenty of water has a positive influence on skin condition. However, there is no published scientific study that has investigated this matter. The aim of our exploratory 'before-after' study was to evaluate the in vivo influence of drinking more than 2 L of mineral water or ordinary tap water per day on skin physiology. Ninety-three healthy subjects were included in our prospective study. After an initial run-in phase of 2 weeks to monitor individual drinking habits, subjects had to drink 2.25 L day(-1) of either mineral water (n = 53) or tap water (n = 40) for 4 weeks. Bioengineering in vivo measurements on the volar forearm included sonographic evaluation of skin thickness and density, determination of skin surface pH, assessment of skin surface morphology, and measurement of finger circumference. Eighty-six subjects completed the study. In the mineral water group measurements revealed a statistically significant decrease in skin density. Skin thickness increased slightly, albeit not at a statistically significant level. However, when separately analysing those individuals from the mineral water group, who had routinely drunken comparably little before the start of the study, their skin thickness increased at a statistically significant level. Skin surface pH remained almost unchanged in the physiologically optimal range. In the tap water group, skin density increased significantly, while skin thickness decreased significantly. Skin surface pH decreased at a statistically significant level. While in the mineral water group finger circumference decreased significantly, measurements in the tap water group revealed a statistically significant increase. Objective skin surface morphology did not change in any group. In summary, drinking more than 2 L of water per day can have a significant impact on skin physiology. The exact effects within the skin seem to differ depending on the nature of the water ingested. Randomized

  20. Mineral carbonation in water-unsaturated porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, A. L.; Dipple, G. M.; Mayer, K. U.; Power, I. M.

    2014-12-01

    Ultramafic mine tailings have an untapped capacity to sequester CO2 directly from air or CO2-rich gas streams via carbonation of tailings minerals [1]. The CO2 sequestration capacity of these sites could be exploited simply by increasing the supply of CO2 into tailings, such as through circulation of air or flue gas from mine site power plants [1,2]. Mine tailings storage facilities typically have heterogeneously distributed pore water [1], affecting both the reactive capacity of the porous medium and the exposure of reactive phases to CO2 [3]. We examine the physical reaction processes that govern carbonation efficiency in variably saturated porous media using meter-scale column experiments containing the tailings mineral, brucite [Mg(OH)2], that were supplied with 10% CO2 gas streams. The experiments were instrumented with water content and gas phase CO2 sensors to track changes in water saturation and CO2concentration with time. The precipitation of hydrated Mg-carbonates as rinds encasing brucite particles resulted in passivation of brucite surfaces and an abrupt shut down of the reaction prior to completion. Moreover, the extent of reaction was further limited at low water saturation due to the lack of water available to form hydrated Mg-carbonates, which incorporate water into their crystal structures. Reactive transport modeling using MIN3P-DUSTY [4] revealed that the instantaneous reaction rate was not strongly affected by water saturation, but the reactive capacity was reduced significantly. Surface passivation and water-limited reaction resulted in a highly non-geometric evolution of reactive surface area. The extent of reaction was also limited at high water content because viscous fingering of the gas streams injected at the base of the columns resulted in narrow zones of highly carbonated material, but left a large proportion of brucite unreacted. The implication is that carbonation efficiency in mine tailings could be maximized by targeting an

  1. Geochemistry of surface-waters in mineralized and non-mineralized areas of the Yukon-Tanana Uplands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, B.; Wanty, R.B.; Vohden, J.

    2005-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and Alaska Department of Natural Resources (ADNR) are continuing investigations on element mobility in mineralized and non-mineralized areas of the Yukon-Tanana Upland in east-central Alaska. The chemistry of stream water is evaluated in the context of regional bedrock geology and geologic structure. Sampling sites were located in the Big Delta B2 quadrangle, which includes the mineralized areas of the Pogo claim block. The area is typified by steep, subarctic-alpine, boreal forest catchment basins. Samples were collected from catchments that either cross structural features and lithologic contacts, or are underlain by a single lithology. Waters are generally dilute (< 213 mg/L TDS), and are classified as Ca2+ and Mg2+-HCO3- to Ca2+ and Mg2+-SO42- waters. Gneissic lithologies are more SO42- dominated than the intrusive units. The major-ion chemistry of the waters reflects a rock-dominated aqueous system. Trace-element concentrations in water are generally low; however, As and Sb are detected near mineralized areas but in most cases rapidly attenuated downstream and processes other than simple dilution are controlling the concentrations of these trace elements. There is a tendency toward increasing SO42- concentrations downstream in waters both proximal and distal to mineralized areas. More work is necessary to determine what proportion of the increase in SO42- could be derived from the oxidation of sulfide minerals as opposed to water influenced by the underlying gneissic units.

  2. Discharge, water temperature, and water quality of Warm Mineral Springs, Sarasota County, Florida: A retrospective analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Metz, Patricia A.

    2016-09-27

    Warm Mineral Springs, located in southern Sarasota County, Florida, is a warm, highly mineralized, inland spring. Since 1946, a bathing spa has been in operation at the spring, attracting vacationers and health enthusiasts. During the winter months, the warm water attracts manatees to the adjoining spring run and provides vital habitat for these mammals. Well-preserved late Pleistocene to early Holocene-age human and animal bones, artifacts, and plant remains have been found in and around the spring, and indicate the surrounding sinkhole formed more than 12,000 years ago. The spring is a multiuse resource of hydrologic importance, ecological and archeological significance, and economic value to the community.The pool of Warm Mineral Springs has a circular shape that reflects its origin as a sinkhole. The pool measures about 240 feet in diameter at the surface and has a maximum depth of about 205 feet. The sinkhole developed in the sand, clay, and dolostone of the Arcadia Formation of the Miocene-age to Oligocene-age Hawthorn Group. Underlying the Hawthorn Group are Oligocene-age to Eocene-age limestones and dolostones, including the Suwannee Limestone, Ocala Limestone, and Avon Park Formation. Mineralized groundwater, under artesian pressure in the underlying aquifers, fills the remnant sink, and the overflow discharges into Warm Mineral Springs Creek, to Salt Creek, and subsequently into the Myakka River. Aquifers described in the vicinity of Warm Mineral Springs include the surficial aquifer system, the intermediate aquifer system within the Hawthorn Group, and the Upper Floridan aquifer in the Suwannee Limestone, Ocala Limestone, and Avon Park Formation. The Hawthorn Group acts as an upper confining unit of the Upper Floridan aquifer.Groundwater flow paths are inferred from the configuration of the potentiometric surface of the Upper Floridan aquifer for September 2010. Groundwater flow models indicate the downward flow of water into the Upper Floridan aquifer

  3. The Mineral Content of U.S. Drinking and Municipal Water

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Objective: The mineral composition of tap water may contribute significant amounts of some minerals to dietary intake. The USDA’s Nutrient Data Laboratory (NDL) conducted a study of the mineral content of residential tap water, to generate new current data for the USDA National Nutrient Database. ...

  4. Precise determination of water exchanges on a mineral surface

    SciTech Connect

    Stack, Andrew G.; Borreguero, Jose M.; Prisk, Timothy R.; Mamontov, Eugene; Wang, Hsiu-Wen

    2016-10-03

    Solvent exchanges on solid surfaces and dissolved ions are a fundamental property important for understanding chemical reactions, but the rates of fast exchanges are poorly constrained. In this paper, we probed the diffusional motions of water adsorbed onto nanoparticles of the mineral barite (BaSO4) using quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QENS) and classical molecular dynamics (MD) to reveal the complex dynamics of water exchange along mineral surfaces. QENS data as a function of temperature and momentum transfer (Q) were fit using scattering functions derived from MD trajectories. The simulations reproduce the dynamics measured in the experiments at ambient temperatures, but as temperature is lowered the simulations overestimate slower motions. Decomposition of the MD-computed QENS intensity into contributions from adsorbed and unbound water shows that the majority of the signal arises from adsorbed species, although the dynamics of unbound water cannot be dismissed. The mean residence times of water on each of the four surface sites present on the barite {001} were calculated using MD: at room temperature the low barium site is 194 ps, whereas the high barium site contains two distributions of motions at 84 and 2.5 ps. These contrast to 13 ps residence time on both sulfate sites, with an additional surface diffusion exchange of 66 ps. Surface exchanges are similar to those of the aqueous ions calculated using the same force field: Baaq2+ is 208 ps and SO4aq2- is 5.8 ps. Finally, this work demonstrates how MD can be a reliable method to deconvolute solvent exchange reactions when quantitatively validated by QENS measurements.

  5. Precise determination of water exchanges on a mineral surface

    DOE PAGES

    Stack, Andrew G.; Borreguero, Jose M.; Prisk, Timothy R.; ...

    2016-10-03

    Solvent exchanges on solid surfaces and dissolved ions are a fundamental property important for understanding chemical reactions, but the rates of fast exchanges are poorly constrained. In this paper, we probed the diffusional motions of water adsorbed onto nanoparticles of the mineral barite (BaSO4) using quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QENS) and classical molecular dynamics (MD) to reveal the complex dynamics of water exchange along mineral surfaces. QENS data as a function of temperature and momentum transfer (Q) were fit using scattering functions derived from MD trajectories. The simulations reproduce the dynamics measured in the experiments at ambient temperatures, but as temperaturemore » is lowered the simulations overestimate slower motions. Decomposition of the MD-computed QENS intensity into contributions from adsorbed and unbound water shows that the majority of the signal arises from adsorbed species, although the dynamics of unbound water cannot be dismissed. The mean residence times of water on each of the four surface sites present on the barite {001} were calculated using MD: at room temperature the low barium site is 194 ps, whereas the high barium site contains two distributions of motions at 84 and 2.5 ps. These contrast to 13 ps residence time on both sulfate sites, with an additional surface diffusion exchange of 66 ps. Surface exchanges are similar to those of the aqueous ions calculated using the same force field: Baaq2+ is 208 ps and SO4aq2- is 5.8 ps. Finally, this work demonstrates how MD can be a reliable method to deconvolute solvent exchange reactions when quantitatively validated by QENS measurements.« less

  6. Precise determination of water exchanges on a mineral surface

    SciTech Connect

    Stack, Andrew G.; Borreguero, Jose M.; Prisk, Timothy R.; Mamontov, Eugene; Wang, Hsiu-Wen

    2016-10-03

    Solvent exchanges on solid surfaces and dissolved ions are a fundamental property important for understanding chemical reactions, but the rates of fast exchanges are poorly constrained. In this paper, we probed the diffusional motions of water adsorbed onto nanoparticles of the mineral barite (BaSO4) using quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QENS) and classical molecular dynamics (MD) to reveal the complex dynamics of water exchange along mineral surfaces. QENS data as a function of temperature and momentum transfer (Q) were fit using scattering functions derived from MD trajectories. The simulations reproduce the dynamics measured in the experiments at ambient temperatures, but as temperature is lowered the simulations overestimate slower motions. Decomposition of the MD-computed QENS intensity into contributions from adsorbed and unbound water shows that the majority of the signal arises from adsorbed species, although the dynamics of unbound water cannot be dismissed. The mean residence times of water on each of the four surface sites present on the barite {001} were calculated using MD: at room temperature the low barium site is 194 ps, whereas the high barium site contains two distributions of motions at 84 and 2.5 ps. These contrast to 13 ps residence time on both sulfate sites, with an additional surface diffusion exchange of 66 ps. Surface exchanges are similar to those of the aqueous ions calculated using the same force field: Baaq2+ is 208 ps and SO4aq2- is 5.8 ps. Finally, this work demonstrates how MD can be a reliable method to deconvolute solvent exchange reactions when quantitatively validated by QENS measurements.

  7. [Biotests for mineral waters with natural and recombinant luminescent microorganisms].

    PubMed

    Deriabin, D G; Aleshina, E S

    2008-01-01

    We have developed methods of biotesting mineral waters involving use of natural or recombinant luminescent strains with elimination of the effect of salt concentration and pH. To overcome the adverse effect of high salt concentrations, disguising the action of chemical pollutants, a special method of mineral water sample preparation is proposed. In this method, the marine luminescent bacterium Photobacterium phosphoreum (Microbiosensor B17 677f) is used as a test object. Samples to be analyzed are supplemented with NaCl depending on their natural salt concentration to adjust it to 3 g/l. Another approach, more universal and efficient, involves pH adjustment in the samples to 7.5. This value is suitable for application of both Microbiosensor B17 677f and the recombinant Escherichia coli strain harboring the cloned lux operon of P. leiognathi (Ecolum 9). It has been shown that this treatment, retaining the natural luminescence level of the bacterial biosensors, allows bioluminescent detection of exogenous pollutants added to the samples, including benzene and Cr(VI).

  8. Iron oxide mineral-water interface reactions studied by AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Hawley, M.E.; Rogers, P.S.Z.

    1994-07-01

    Natural iron mineral surfaces have been examined in air by atomic force (AFM) and scanning tunneling (STM) microscopies. A number of different surface features were found to be characteristic of the native surface. Even surfaces freshly exposed by crushing larger crystals were found to have a pebbly surface texture caused by the presence of thin coatings of what might be surface precipitates. This finding is interpreted as evidence for previous exposure to water, probably through an extensive network of microfractures. Surface reactions on the goethite crystals were studied by AFM at size resolutions ranging from microns to atomic resolution before, during, and after reaction with distilled water and 0.lN HCl. Immediate and extensive surface reconfiguration occurred on contact with water. In one case, after equilibration with water for 3 days, surface reprecipitation, etching and pitting were observed. Atomic resolution images taken under water were found to be disordered. The result of surface reaction was generally to increase the surface area substantially through the extension of surface platelet arrays, present prior to reaction. This work is being done in support of the site characterization project at Yucca Mountain.

  9. Survival of allochthonous bacteria in still mineral water bottled in polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and glass.

    PubMed

    Moreira, L; Agostinho, P; Morais, P V; da Costa, M S

    1994-09-01

    The mortality of Escherichia coli, Enterobacter cloacae, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, based on the culturability of these bacteria, was assessed in non-carbonated mineral water, bottled in polyvinyl chloride (PVC) containing the indigenous flora, sterile mineral water bottled in PVC, sterile mineral water in glass containers, and sterile tap water in glass containers. There was a general decrease in the culturability of these organisms in the four test waters, except that Ps. aeruginosa grew in sterile tap water. Escherichia coli and Kl. pneumoniae had the highest mortality rates under the conditions tested, while Ent. cloacae had a very low and constant mortality rate that would have resulted in the persistence of this organism in mineral water for a long period of time. After a sharp initial decrease in culturability, Ps. aeruginosa also had a very low mortality rate in mineral water bottled in PVC.

  10. Oxygen isotope fractionation between hydroxide minerals and water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yong-Fei

    The modified increment method has been applied to the calculation of oxygen isotope fractionation factors for hydroxide minerals. The results suggest the following sequence of 18O-enrichment in the common hydroxides: limonite > gibbsite > goethite > brucite > diaspore. The hydroxides are significantly enriched in 18O relative to the corresponding oxides. The sequence of 18O-enrichment in the hydroxides and oxides of trivalent cations is as follows: M(OH)3 > MO(OH) > M2O3. There are also considerable fractionations within the polymorphos of Al(OH)3. The internally consistent fractionation factors for hydroxide-water systems are obtained for the temperature range of 0 to 1200 °C, which are comparable with the data derived from synthesis experiments and natural samples at surficial temperatures. Temperature dependence of oxygen isotope fractionations between goethite, gibbsite, boehmite and diaspore and water are significant enough for the purpose of geothermometry. Thus the hydroxide-water pairs hold great promise of serving as reliable paleothermometers in surficial geological environments.

  11. Sulphurous mineral water oral therapy: effects on erythrocyte metabolism.

    PubMed

    Albertini, Maria Cristina; Teodori, Laura; Accorsi, Augusto; Soukri, Abdelaziz; Campanella, Luigi; Baldoni, Francesco; Dachà, Marina

    2008-10-01

    The ingestion of water containing hydrogen sulphide (H(2)S) is common in spring sulphurous mineral water (SMW) therapy. We hypothesized that observed detrimental effects are related to the alteration of erythrocytes metabolism caused by H(2)S. To verify our hypothesis, we treated 20 healthy volunteers with SMW and evidenced an increase of methemoglobin concentration, an inhibition of both erythrocyte glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) activities. To investigate the mechanism of H(2)S effect on GAPDH activity, an in vitro study was performed by incubating both erythrocytes from 12 healthy volunteers and purified GAPDH with buffered [(35)S]-H(2)S labelled sulphurous water. The interaction between H(2)S and NAD(+)(H), was also investigated. The results indicate that a direct reaction between GAPDH and H(2)S does not occur and the observed decrease of GAPDH activity is to ascribe to the reaction between H(2)S and NAD(+)(H). This may lead to GAPDH inhibition by two ways, namely (i) cellular NAD(+)(H) reduced availability and (ii) catalytic site blockage. In conclusion, our results show that among the detrimental effects of SMW administration are erythrocyte GAPDH and G6PDH activity inhibition and increased methemoglobin concentration. A mechanism to explain the occurrence of these biochemical events is also proposed.

  12. IMMOBILIZATION OF HEAVY METALS IN SOILS AND WATER BY A MANGANESE MINERAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    A synthesized Mn mineral used in study on adsorption of heavy metals from water has shown a great adsorption capability for Pb, Cu, Cd, Co, Ni and Zn on this mineral over a pH range from 2 to 8. The retention of Pb on this mineral was as high as 10% of its weight. Application of ...

  13. Evaluation of Water-Mineral Interaction Using Microfluidic Tests with Thin Sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Y. S.; Ryu, J. H.; Koh, Y. K.; Jo, H. Y.

    2014-12-01

    For the geological disposal of radioactive wastes, geological settings and groundwater conditions are significantly important because of their effects on a radionuclide migration. One of the preferred host rocks for the radioactive waste disposal is crystalline rock. Fractures in crystalline rocks are main fluid pathways. Groundwater reacts with fracture filling minerals in fracture zones, resulting in physicochemical changes in the minerals and groundwater. In this study, fracture filling mineral-groundwater interactions were investigated by conducting microfluidic tests using thin sections at various conditions (i.e., fluid chemistry and flow rate). Groundwater and rock core samples collected from the KAERI Underground Research Tunnel (KURT) located in the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) were used in this study. Dominant bedrock is two-mica granite, which contains both biotite and muscovite. Secondary minerals (e.g., chlorite, calcite and clay minerals) occur in fracture and alteration zones. In nature, water-mineral interactions generally take long time. Microfluidic tests were conducted to simulate water-mineral interactions in shorter time with smaller scale. Thin sections of fracture filling minerals, minerals from alteration zones, and natural and synthetic groundwater samples were used for the microfluidic tests. Results showed that water-mineral interactions at various conditions caused changes in groundwater chemistry, dissolution of minerals, precipitation of secondary minerals, and formation of colloids, which can affect radionuclide migration. In addition, the fluid chemistry and flow rate affected characteristics of water-rock interactions.

  14. The effect of mineral bond strength and adsorbed water on fault gouge frictional strength

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morrow, C.A.; Moore, Diane E.; Lockner, D.A.

    2000-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that the tendency of many fault gouge minerals to take on adsorbed or interlayer water may strongly influence their frictional strength. To test this hypothesis, triaxial sliding experiments were conducted on 15 different single-mineral gouges with various water-adsorbing affinities. Vacuum dried samples were sheared at 100 MPa, then saturated with water and sheared farther to compare dry and wet strengths. The coefficients of friction, μ, for the dry sheet-structure minerals (0.2-0.8), were related to mineral bond strength, and dropped 20-60% with the addition of water. For non-adsorbing minerals (μ = 0.6-0.8), the strength remained unchanged after saturation. These results confirm that the ability of minerals to adsorb various amounts of water is related to their relative frictional strengths, and may explain the anomalously low strength of certain natural fault gouges.

  15. Survey of strontium in mineral waters sold in Japan: relations of strontium to other minerals and evaluation of mineral water as a possible dietary source of strontium.

    PubMed

    Usuda, Kan; Kono, Koichi; Dote, Tomotaro; Watanabe, Misuzu; Shimizu, Hiroyasu; Kawasaki, Takashi; Hayashi, Satsuki; Nakasuji, Kazuo; Fujimoto, Keiichi; Lu, Bo

    2006-07-01

    The concentrations of strontium, calcium, and magnesium in 33 brands of natural mineral waters commercially available in Japan were determined by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry. The geometric mean values were 94.4 microg/L for strontium, 19.1 mg/L for calcium, and 2.82 mg/L for magnesium. Wide confidence intervals of 1.96-4539 microg/L for strontium, 0.865-421 mg/L for calcium, and 0.064-123 mg/L for magnesium were observed. The significant linear relationships among the three elements over a wide distribution range suggest that the synchronized variations of these elements are regulated by the natural ecosystem and not from accidental contamination from human activities or exceptionally high natural sources. Using the results of multiple linear regression analysis, the strontium concentration can be predicted by that of calcium with the appropriate power function. The results of this study suggest that mineral water can be an important nutritional source of strontium. As trace elements imbalance is often found in older patients with chronic renal failure, we propose that close attention of trace elements intake from trendy foods or beverages is necessary to prevent this hidden problem of a rapidly aging society.

  16. [Influence of the ozonation on the elimination of arsenic from natural mineral water intended for bottling].

    PubMed

    Drobnik, Michał; Latour, Teresa

    2006-01-01

    Mineral water--hydrogen carbonat-calcium naturally sparkling water--containing arsenic in concentration above 0.01 mg/dm3 was ozonated. There was experimentally determined the optimal ozonation parameters: ozone dose, a duration of the process and of the contact between ozone and water, concentration of dissolved ozon in water. There was, moreover, determined an exceeding of ozone residual permissible in the obligatory regulations for bottled mineral waters.

  17. Deep ocean mineral water accelerates recovery from physical fatigue

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Deep oceans have been suggested as a possible site where the origin of life occurred. Along with this theoretical lineage, experiments using components from deep ocean water to recreate life is underway. Here, we propose that if terrestrial organisms indeed evolved from deep oceans, supply of deep ocean mineral water (DOM) to humans, as a land creature, may replenish loss of molecular complexity associated with evolutionary sea-to-land migration. Methods We conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover human study to evaluate the effect of DOM, taken from a depth of 662 meters off the coast of Hualien, Taiwan, on time of recovery from a fatiguing exercise conducted at 30°C. Results The fatiguing exercise protocol caused a protracted reduction in aerobic power (reduced VO2max) for 48 h. However, DOM supplementation resulted in complete recovery of aerobic power within 4 h (P < 0.05). Muscle power was also elevated above placebo levels within 24 h of recovery (P < 0.05). Increased circulating creatine kinase (CK) and myoglobin, indicatives of exercise-induced muscle damage, were completely eliminated by DOM (P < 0.05) in parallel with attenuated oxidative damage (P < 0.05). Conclusion Our results provide compelling evidence that DOM contains soluble elements, which can increase human recovery following an exhaustive physical challenge. PMID:23402436

  18. Deep ocean mineral water accelerates recovery from physical fatigue.

    PubMed

    Hou, Chien-Wen; Tsai, Yung-Shen; Jean, Wei-Horng; Chen, Chung-Yu; Ivy, John L; Huang, Chih-Yang; Kuo, Chia-Hua

    2013-02-12

    Deep oceans have been suggested as a possible site where the origin of life occurred. Along with this theoretical lineage, experiments using components from deep ocean water to recreate life is underway. Here, we propose that if terrestrial organisms indeed evolved from deep oceans, supply of deep ocean mineral water (DOM) to humans, as a land creature, may replenish loss of molecular complexity associated with evolutionary sea-to-land migration. We conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover human study to evaluate the effect of DOM, taken from a depth of 662 meters off the coast of Hualien, Taiwan, on time of recovery from a fatiguing exercise conducted at 30°C. The fatiguing exercise protocol caused a protracted reduction in aerobic power (reduced VO2max) for 48 h. However, DOM supplementation resulted in complete recovery of aerobic power within 4 h (P < 0.05). Muscle power was also elevated above placebo levels within 24 h of recovery (P < 0.05). Increased circulating creatine kinase (CK) and myoglobin, indicatives of exercise-induced muscle damage, were completely eliminated by DOM (P < 0.05) in parallel with attenuated oxidative damage (P < 0.05). Our results provide compelling evidence that DOM contains soluble elements, which can increase human recovery following an exhaustive physical challenge.

  19. Hydrolysis of organic esters at the mineral/water interface

    SciTech Connect

    Torrents, A.

    1992-01-01

    Organic esters are widely used as insecticides and are part of many commercial products and industrial processes. When these compounds are released into the environment, they contaminate natural resources. To assess their fate and transport it is important to explore degradation and retainment processes. Numerous previous studies have studied the role of adsorption in lowering pollutant concentration and retarding pollutant migration into soils. However, adsorption at the mineral/water interface also affects the mechanisms of degradation and reaction rates. This dissertation research focuses on the ability of metal oxides to catalyze ester hydrolysis and a reaction mechanism is proposed. Furthermore, the authors studied the role of natural occurring adsorbates on the reaction rates. The oxides used in this study are amorphous silica (SiO[sub 2]), [gamma]-aluminum oxide (Al[sub 2]O[sub 3]), anatase (TiO[sub 2]), and geothite (FeOOH). These either occur naturally, or are similar to naturally occurring surfaces. The capability of such oxides to catalyze ester hydrolysis was studied in batch reactors. The organic compounds investigated were carboxylic acid esters and organophosphate pesticides. The hydrolysis of several esters was catalyzed by the presence of oxide suspensions; the extent of catalysis was dependent on the ester structure, the metal oxide, and solution composition. Results suggest that catalysis for carboxylate esters occurs via a surface chelate formation between the carbonyl oxygen, a second donor group of the ester and the surface metal. The presence of organic co-solvents appears to diminish the catalytic effect. Inhibition of surface catalysis was also observed from specific adsorption of naturally occurring ions onto the oxide surface. Natural organic matter was also observed to influence surface catalysis. This research suggests that mineral surfaces may have a role in abiotic transformations of organic pollutants.

  20. Investigation of mineral waters and soft drinks in relation to dental erosion.

    PubMed

    Parry, J; Shaw, L; Arnaud, M J; Smith, A J

    2001-08-01

    A range of still and sparkling mineral waters were assessed for their erosive potential together with comparator soft drinks using in vitro dissolution assays with extracted human teeth and powdered hydroxyapatite. Dissolution levels with all of the mineral waters were very low and for several still waters were undetectable. Sparkling mineral waters showed slightly greater dissolution than still waters, but levels remained low and were of the order of one hundred times less than the comparator soft drinks. De-gassing of a sparkling mineral water reduced its dissolution, but the total levels were still relatively low suggesting that carbonation of drinks may not be an important factor per se in respect of erosive potential. The complex and heterogeneous mineral compositions of mineral waters could influence the dissolution equilibrium of apatite in enamel and controlled addition of several ions to ultrapure deionized water was investigated. Calcium ions led to the greatest reduction in hydroxyapatite dissolution, but their effects were moderated by other ions including magnesium and sulphate. Thus, mineral waters appear to offer a safe alternative to more erosive acidic beverages and their complex mineral ion compositions may positively influence any dissolution processes at the tooth surface.

  1. Molecular dynamics simulations of water, solution, and clay mineral-water systems (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, K.

    2009-12-01

    Clays and clay minerals together with zeolites are major mineral components in the earth's surface environment. These minerals interact with the atmosphere, natural water, inorganic and organic components in soils, etc. Physicochemical processes in the surface region are generally complex and difficult to understand because of the complicated "molecular" structures and the ambient conditions under wet circumstances. We have investigated the structure and physical/dynamical properties of the mineral-gas/liquid systems by means of molecular simulation methods; molecular dynamics and Metropolis Monte Carlo methods. Swelling of smectite and adsorption of inorganic molecules in clay minerals and zeolites, etc. were simulated and analyzed on the basis of the atomic and molecular processes. We have developed atomic and molecular interaction models of inorganic systems. The models compose of electrostatic, short range repulsive, van der Waals and covalent (radial and angular) terms with respect to all the elements appeared in the mineral-water systems. All of our molecular dynamics simulations (MD) were performed with full degree of freedom of atom motions. Using the model for H2O molecule, the structure and physical properties such as density, diffusion coefficients, etc. of ice polymorphs and water are well reproduced. Alkaliharide aqueous solutions and gas hydrates and their (hydrophobic) solutions are also reasonably simulated. Clay mineral-water interactions are particularly important to understand the mechanical and chemical processes in the environments, in order to develop nano-composite materials, and to use clays in engineering applications. Absorption and swelling are the most remarkable properties of clay minerals, specially smectite. We have investigate these properties by means of molecular simulation methods using various clay minerals-water/solution systems. The swelling curves, the relation between humidity and the basal spacings, were reproduced

  2. Water-related minerals in Aureum Chaos, Mars.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sowe, Mariam; Wendt, Lorenz; Kneissl, Thomas; McGuire, Patrick C.; Neukum, Gerhard

    2010-05-01

    Collapsed plateau material, chaotic terrain, and Interior Layered Deposits (ILDs) characterize Aureum Chaos that is located east of Valles Marineris. As elsewhere on Mars, spectrometers on Mars Express (MEX-OMEGA), Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO-CRISM) and Mars Global Surveyor (MGS-TES) detected water-related minerals (hydrated sulfates, hematite) in association with ILDs. We studied the hydrated minerals by utilizing MRO-CRISM data and co-aligned MEX-HRSC, MRO-HiRISE and MRO-CTX data since their extent indicates where water was present in the past. Hydrated sulfates (mono- and polyhydrated sulfate) crop out below a spectrally neutral cap rock, whereas monohydrated sulfate underlies polyhydrated sulfate (PHS, e.g. epsomite MgSO4 x 7H2O). PHS is detected at elevations below -3600m, monohydrated sulfate (kieserite MgSO4 x H2O) below -4100m, and phyllosilicate below -4000m. In some regions, weathered PHS (e.g. debris fans on scarps) to some extent covers monohydrated sulfate exposures. These regions have a massive, high-albedo texture which otherwise is observed in outcrops that show a monohydrated sulfate signature. Phyllosilicate is present below sulfates or occurs as windblown material but is not associated with ILDs. Ferric oxide is found in both, bedrock and loose material down slope of sulfates. Local thicknesses of hydrated sulfate were determined to 50m on average, in contrast, phyllosilicate-rich knobs are 20m thick on average. The fact that ILDs are mainly buried by mantling deposits and show an abundant cap rock, overlying most of the sulfate-rich ILDs, may explain why sulfates were not found in all CRISM observations. However, the hydrated area as shown by CRISM is ~70km². Since ILDs are heavily eroded and hardly show impact craters on their surfaces, their indicated impact-cratering ages appear very young (Late Amazonian) and hence do not correspond to their formation ages. In order to define the age of the ILDs, we measured impact-cratering ages of

  3. An Intervention with Mineral Water Decreases Cardiometabolic Risk Biomarkers. A Crossover, Randomised, Controlled Trial with Two Mineral Waters in Moderately Hypercholesterolaemic Adults.

    PubMed

    Toxqui, Laura; Vaquero, M Pilar

    2016-06-28

    Water intake is essential for health maintenance and disease prevention. The effects of an intervention with two mineral waters, sodium-bicarbonated mineral water (BW) or control mineral water low in mineral content (CW), on cardiometabolic risk biomarkers were studied. In a randomised-controlled crossover-trial, sixty-four moderately hypercholesterolaemic adults were randomly assigned to consume 1 L/day of either BW (sodium, 1 g/L; bicarbonate, 2 g/L) or CW with the main meals for eight weeks, separated by an eight-week washout period. Blood lipids, lipid oxidation, glucose, insulin, aldosterone, urine pH, urinary electrolytes, blood pressure, body weight, fluid intake, energy, and nutrients from total diet and beverages were determined. Total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and glucose decreased (p < 0.01), oxidised LDL tended to decrease (p = 0.073), and apolipoprotein B increased during the intervention, without water type effect. Energy and carbohydrates from beverages decreased since soft drinks and fruit juice consumptions decreased throughout the trial. BW increased urinary pH (p = 0.006) and reduced calcium/creatinine excretion (p = 0.011). Urinary potassium/creatinine decreased with both waters. Consumption of 1 L/day of mineral water with the main meals reduces cardiometabolic risk biomarkers, likely to be attributed to a replacement of soft drinks by water. In addition, BW does not affect blood pressure and exerts a moderate alkalizing effect in the body.

  4. An Intervention with Mineral Water Decreases Cardiometabolic Risk Biomarkers. A Crossover, Randomised, Controlled Trial with Two Mineral Waters in Moderately Hypercholesterolaemic Adults

    PubMed Central

    Toxqui, Laura; Vaquero, M. Pilar

    2016-01-01

    Water intake is essential for health maintenance and disease prevention. The effects of an intervention with two mineral waters, sodium-bicarbonated mineral water (BW) or control mineral water low in mineral content (CW), on cardiometabolic risk biomarkers were studied. In a randomised-controlled crossover-trial, sixty-four moderately hypercholesterolaemic adults were randomly assigned to consume 1 L/day of either BW (sodium, 1 g/L; bicarbonate, 2 g/L) or CW with the main meals for eight weeks, separated by an eight-week washout period. Blood lipids, lipid oxidation, glucose, insulin, aldosterone, urine pH, urinary electrolytes, blood pressure, body weight, fluid intake, energy, and nutrients from total diet and beverages were determined. Total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and glucose decreased (p < 0.01), oxidised LDL tended to decrease (p = 0.073), and apolipoprotein B increased during the intervention, without water type effect. Energy and carbohydrates from beverages decreased since soft drinks and fruit juice consumptions decreased throughout the trial. BW increased urinary pH (p = 0.006) and reduced calcium/creatinine excretion (p = 0.011). Urinary potassium/creatinine decreased with both waters. Consumption of 1 L/day of mineral water with the main meals reduces cardiometabolic risk biomarkers, likely to be attributed to a replacement of soft drinks by water. In addition, BW does not affect blood pressure and exerts a moderate alkalizing effect in the body. PMID:27367723

  5. Mineralizing urban net-zero water treatment: Field experience for energy-positive water management.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tingting; Englehardt, James D

    2016-12-01

    An urban net-zero water treatment system, designed for energy-positive water management, 100% recycle of comingled black/grey water to drinking water standards, and mineralization of hormones and other organics, without production of concentrate, was constructed and operated for two years, serving an occupied four-bedroom, four-bath university residence hall apartment. The system comprised septic tank, denitrifying membrane bioreactor (MBR), iron-mediated aeration (IMA) reactor, vacuum ultrafilter, and peroxone or UV/H2O2 advanced oxidation, with 14% rainwater make-up and concomitant discharge of 14% of treated water (ultimately for reuse in irrigation). Chemical oxygen demand was reduced to 12.9 ± 3.7 mg/L by MBR and further decreased to below the detection limit (<0.7 mg/L) by IMA and advanced oxidation treatment. The process produced a mineral water meeting 115 of 115 Florida drinking water standards that, after 10 months of recycle operation with ∼14% rainwater make-up, had a total dissolved solids of ∼500 mg/L, pH 7.8 ± 0.4, turbidity 0.12 ± 0.06 NTU, and NO3-N concentration 3.0 ± 1.0 mg/L. None of 97 hormones, personal care products, and pharmaceuticals analyzed were detected in the product water. For a typical single-home system with full occupancy, sludge pumping is projected on a 12-24 month cycle. Operational aspects, including disinfection requirements, pH evolution through the process, mineral control, advanced oxidation by-products, and applicability of point-of-use filters, are discussed. A distributed, peroxone-based NZW management system is projected to save more energy than is consumed in treatment, due largely to retention of wastewater thermal energy. Recommendations regarding design and operation are offered.

  6. Water-bearing minerals on mars: source of observed mid-latitude water?

    SciTech Connect

    Bish, D. L.; Carey, J. W.; Fialips, C. I.

    2003-01-01

    The Odyssey spacecraft documented the existence of heterogeneously distributed hydrogen at martian mid-latitudes, suggesting that large areas of the near-equatorial highlands contain near-surface deposits of 'chemically and/or physically bound H20 and/or OH' in amounts up to 3 .8% equivalent H20. Shallow occurrences of water ice are not stable near the martian equator, making the hydrogen deposits at these latitudes somewhat enigmatic. Clay minerals and zeolites have both been proposed as possible water-bearing constituents on Mars, and both are common terrestrial alteration products of hydrovolcanic basaltic ashes and palagonitic material comparable to those that may be widespread on Mars. Smectites within martian meteorites, attributed to hydrous alteration on Mars rather than on Earth, provide direct evidence of clay minerals from Mars. In addition, new thermal emission spectrometer (TES) data provide good evidence for unspecified zeolites in martian surface dust [6] . The nature of the hydrogen-containing material observed in the equatorial martian regolith is of particular importance to the question of whether hydrous minerals have formed in the past on Mars. Also, whether these minerals exist in a hydrated (i .e., containing H2O molecules in their structures) or dehydrated state is a crucial question . The existence of hydrous minerals is also important in connection with their possible role in affecting the diurnal variation of the martian atmosphere, in their potential role in unraveling the paleohydrology and paleobiology of Mars, and in their possible use as a water resource to support exploration of the martian mid-latitudes.

  7. Links between climate change, water-table depth, and water chemistry in a mineralized mountain watershed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Manning, Andrew H.; Verplanck, Philip L.; Caine, Jonathan S.; Todd, Andrew S.

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that climate change is causing rising solute concentrations in mountain lakes and streams. These changes may be more pronounced in mineralized watersheds due to the sensitivity of sulfide weathering to changes in subsurface oxygen transport. Specific causal mechanisms linking climate change and accelerated weathering rates have been proposed, but in general remain entirely hypothetical. For mineralized watersheds, a favored hypothesis is that falling water tables caused by declining recharge rates allow an increasing volume of sulfide-bearing rock to become exposed to air, thus oxygen. Here, we test the hypothesis that falling water tables are the primary cause of an increase in metals and SO4 (100-400%) observed since 1980 in the Upper Snake River (USR), Colorado. The USR drains an alpine watershed geologically and climatologically representative of many others in mineralized areas of the western U.S. Hydrologic and chemical data collected from 2005 to 2011 in a deep monitoring well (WP1) at the top of the USR watershed are utilized. During this period, both water table depths and groundwater SO4 concentrations have generally increased in the well. A numerical model was constructed using TOUGHREACT that simulates pyrite oxidation near WP1, including groundwater flow and oxygen transport in both saturated and unsaturated zones. The modeling suggests that a falling water table could produce an increase in metals and SO4 of a magnitude similar to that observed in the USR (up to 300%). Future water table declines may produce limited increases in sulfide weathering high in the watershed because of the water table dropping below the depth of oxygen penetration, but may continue to enhance sulfide weathering lower in the watershed where water tables are shallower. Advective air (oxygen) transport in the unsaturated zone caused by seasonally variable recharge and associated water table fluctuations was found to have little influence on pyrite

  8. Particle Size Controls on Water Adsorption and Condensation Regimes at Mineral Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeşilbaş, Merve; Boily, Jean-François

    2016-08-01

    Atmospheric water vapour interacting with hydrophilic mineral surfaces can produce water films of various thicknesses and structures. In this work we show that mineral particle size controls water loadings achieved by water vapour deposition on 21 contrasting mineral samples exposed to atmospheres of up to ~16 Torr water (70% relative humidity at 25 °C). Submicrometer-sized particles hosted up to ~5 monolayers of water, while micrometer-sized particles up to several thousand monolayers. All films exhibited vibrational spectroscopic signals akin to liquid water, yet with a disrupted network of hydrogen bonds. Water adsorption isotherms were predicted using models (1- or 2- term Freundlich and Do-Do models) describing an adsorption and a condensation regime, respectively pertaining to the binding of water onto mineral surfaces and water film growth by water-water interactions. The Hygroscopic Growth Theory could also account for the particle size dependence on condensable water loadings under the premise that larger particles have a greater propensity of exhibiting of surface regions and interparticle spacings facilitating water condensation reactions. Our work should impact our ability to predict water film formation at mineral surfaces of contrasting particle sizes, and should thus contribute to our understanding of water adsorption and condensation reactions occuring in nature.

  9. Particle Size Controls on Water Adsorption and Condensation Regimes at Mineral Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Yeşilbaş, Merve; Boily, Jean-François

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric water vapour interacting with hydrophilic mineral surfaces can produce water films of various thicknesses and structures. In this work we show that mineral particle size controls water loadings achieved by water vapour deposition on 21 contrasting mineral samples exposed to atmospheres of up to ~16 Torr water (70% relative humidity at 25 °C). Submicrometer-sized particles hosted up to ~5 monolayers of water, while micrometer-sized particles up to several thousand monolayers. All films exhibited vibrational spectroscopic signals akin to liquid water, yet with a disrupted network of hydrogen bonds. Water adsorption isotherms were predicted using models (1- or 2- term Freundlich and Do-Do models) describing an adsorption and a condensation regime, respectively pertaining to the binding of water onto mineral surfaces and water film growth by water-water interactions. The Hygroscopic Growth Theory could also account for the particle size dependence on condensable water loadings under the premise that larger particles have a greater propensity of exhibiting of surface regions and interparticle spacings facilitating water condensation reactions. Our work should impact our ability to predict water film formation at mineral surfaces of contrasting particle sizes, and should thus contribute to our understanding of water adsorption and condensation reactions occuring in nature. PMID:27561325

  10. [Legal requirements, quality criteria, therapeutic interest and dietetics of mineral waters: study of the case of the natural mineral water of Evian].

    PubMed

    de Preneuf, J M

    1984-01-01

    The considerable increase in mineral water sales as a daily drink reflects more or less the continued confidence in spa treatments, and this has caused the Public Authorities to set up very strict regulations in this field. We explain the main provisions of these regulations, compare mineral water with ordinary drinking water and complete this report with a study on the representative case of Evian Mineral water since it is the most exported water in the world. We emphasize the key points regarding the origin of the water which must be very well protected, its mineralization leading to its part played in dietetics and daily consumption, its use in spas and the research on its therapeutic effects, its bottling and the controls enabling its original high quality to be maintained. The conclusion reviews the motivations for the mineral water consumer: taste, quality, favorable effects on health. These motivations linked together have a varying importance according to the persons or situations involved. They result in precise requirements to be met by the producing companies in three fields: quality, advertising, credibility and scientific research.

  11. Determination of water in NIST reference material for mineral oils

    PubMed

    Cedergren; Nordmark

    2000-07-15

    The accuracy of the reference concentrations of moisture in electrical insulating oil RM 8506 and lubricating oil RM 8507 (both of mineral type) and specified by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) as containing 39.7 and 76.8 ppm (w/w) water, respectively, has recently been the subject of debate in this journal. To shed some further light on this controversy, we report in this correspondence results for these oils obtained by two additional methods, one based on specially designed reagents for diaphragm-free Karl Fischer (KF) coulometry and the other based on the concept of stripping at elevated temperature/continuous KF coulometry. A positive interference effect was shown to take place for RM 8506 when the direct coulometric method was used. If the results are corrected for this, the values including six different procedures varied in the range 13.5-15.6 ppm (w/w). For RM 8507, all values were between 42.5 and 47.2 ppm (w/w), which means that the values recommended by NIST for both reference oils using volumetric titration are about twice as high as those obtained with the other techniques. A possible explanation for this discrepancy is presented.

  12. Substitutional Doping for Aluminosilicate Mineral and Superior Water Splitting Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yi; Fu, Liangjie; Shu, Zhan; Yang, Huaming; Tang, Aidong; Jiang, Tao

    2017-07-01

    Substitutional doping is a strategy in which atomic impurities are optionally added to a host material to promote its properties, while the geometric and electronic structure evolution of natural nanoclay mineral upon substitutional metal doping is still ambiguous. This paper first designed an efficient lanthanum (La) doping strategy for nanotubular clay (halloysite nanotube, HNT) through the dynamic equilibrium of a substitutional atom in the presence of saturated AlCl3 solution, and systematic characterization of the samples was performed. Further density functional theory (DFT) calculations were carried out to reveal the geometric and electronic structure evolution upon metal doping, as well as to verify the atom-level effect of the La doping. The CdS loading and its corresponding water splitting performance could demonstrate the effect of La doping. CdS nanoparticles (11 wt.%) were uniformly deposited on the surface of La-doped halloysite nanotube (La-HNT) with the average size of 5 nm, and the notable photocatalytic hydrogen evolution rate of CdS/La-HNT reached up to 47.5 μmol/h. The results could provide a new strategy for metal ion doping and constructive insight into the substitutional doping mechanism.

  13. Do rock fragments participate to plant water and mineral nutrition?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korboulewsky, Nathalie; Tétégan, Marion; Besnault, Adeline; Cousin, Isabelle

    2010-05-01

    Rock fragments modify soil properties, and can be a potential reservoir of water. Besides, recent studies showed that this coarse soil fraction is chemically active, release nutrients, and could therefore be involved in biogeochemical nutrient cycles. However, these studies carried out on rock fragments, crushed pebbles or mineral particles do not answer the question whether the coarse soil fraction has significant nutritive functions. Only a couple of studies were conducted on plants, one on grass and the other on coniferous seedlings. This present work attempted to assess if pebbles may act as water and nutrient sources for poplar saplings, a deciduous species. Remoulded soils were set up in 5 L-pots with three percentages of pebbles: 0, 20, and 40% in volume. We used, as substrate either fine earth or sand (quartz), and as rock fragments either calcareous or inert pebbles (quartz). Additional modalities were settled with sand mixed with 20 and 40% pebbles enriched with nutrients. Both fine earth and calcareous pebbles were collected from the Ap horizon of a calcareous lacustrine limestone silty soil located in the central region of France. After cleaning, all pebbles were mixed to reach a bulk density in pots of 1.1 g/cm3 for the fine earth and 1.5 g/cm3 for the sand. Ten replicates were settled per modality, and one cutting of Populus robusta was planted in each. The experiment was conducted under controlled conditions. All pots were saturated at the beginning of the experiment, then irrigated by capillarity and controlled to maintain a moderate water stress. Growth and evapotranspiration were followed regularly, while water stress status was measured by stomatal conductivity every day during two drying periods of 10 days. After three months, plants were collected, separated in below- and above-ground parts for biomass and cation analysis (Ca, Mg, K). Results showed that pebbles can participate to plant nutrition, but no reduction of water stress was observed

  14. Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenk, Hans-Rudolf; Bulakh, Andrei

    2004-06-01

    This introduction to mineralogy for undergraduate and graduate students in geology and materials science has been designed for a semester course. Covering all aspects of mineralogy in an integrated way, it links mineral properties with broader geological processes, and conveys their economic importance throughout the text. Handy reference tables and a glossary of terms make this study an indispensable guide for the next generation of mineralogy students.

  15. [Pay attention to the human health risk of drinking low mineral water].

    PubMed

    Shu, Weiqun

    2015-10-01

    The consumption of low mineral drinking water has been increasing around the world with the shortage of water resources and the development of advanced water treatment technologies. Evidences from systematic document reviews, ecological epidemiological observations, and experimental drinking water intervention studies indicate that lack of minerals in drinking water may cause direct or indirect harm to human health, among which, the associations of magnesium in water with cardiovascular disease, as well as calcium in water with osteoporosis, are well proved by sufficient evidence. This article points out that it is urgent to pay more attention to the issues about establishment of health risk evaluation system on susceptible consuming population, establishment of lab evaluation system on water quality and health effect for non-traditional drinking water, and program of safety mineralization for demineralized or desalinated water and so on.

  16. Perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) in mineral water and tap water.

    PubMed

    Gellrich, Vanessa; Brunn, Hubertus; Stahl, Thorsten

    2013-01-01

    The aims of the present study were to determine PFAS (perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl substances) concentrations in various sources of water intended for human consumption, use these data to calculate the possible uptake via water as well as to estimate the water related health risk to consumers. A total of 177 water samples (119 mineral waters, 26 tap water samples, 18 spring water samples and 14 raw (untreated) water samples) were analyzed using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry for the presence of 10 or 19 PFASs, respectively. PFAS concentrations above the limit of detection of 1 ng/L were found in 52% of all samples. Short-chain PFASs with less than 8 carbon atoms were responsible for 58% of the total PFAS contamination. The highest concentration (sum of PFASs) of 42.7 ng/L was detected in tap water. The calculated maximum uptake of both components for which a tolerable daily intake (TDI) level exists were 0.17 ng/kg bodyweight/day for PFOS (perfluorooctane sulfonic acid) and 0.21 ng/kg bodyweight/day for PFOA (perfluorooctane carboxylic acid). In regard to the model calculations made here (TDI for adults and for infants), the uptake of PFOS and PFOA via consumption of water can be considered negligible. Supplemental materials are available for this article. Go to the publisher's online edition of Journal of Environmental Science and Health, Part A to view the supplemental file.

  17. Sulphate-bicarbonate mineral waters in the treatment of biliary and digestive tract diseases.

    PubMed

    Fraioli, A; Menunni, G; Petraccia, L; Fontana, M; Nocchi, S; Grassi, M

    2010-01-01

    The authors point out the therapeutic properties of sulphate-bicarbonate mineral waters. After summarizing the general mechanism of action of mineral waters, the main indications of such waters in thermal treatment are examined including: biliary sand, biliary dyskinesia, functional dyspepsia, irritable colon, chronic primitive constipation. The dysfunctions of biliary and digestive tracts are growing, mainly in the affluent world, because of the increase for stress, dietary habits, modern life style. Now they affect from 2,4% of general population to 7% of men and 20% of women, according to different studies. Mineral waters can improve symptoms and care some physiopathological underlying mechanisms. Authors stress the efficacy of sulphate-bicarbonate mineral waters in the therapy of biliary dyskinesias, namely gallbladder hypokinesia and Oddi's sphincter spasm, caused by their content in SO4 = anion and Mg++ cation and related effects on paracrine-endocrine gastrointestinal system. In addition, they report the effects of sulphate-bicarbonate mineral waters in the lithogenic bile (sand bile), because of their diluting and washing activity. Among the sulphate-bicarbonate mineral waters, the Authors outline the well-documented therapeutic activity of Acqua Santa and Fucoli of Chianciano Terme. Acqua Santa has stimulating effect on cholecystis's motility, as proved by controlled clinical trials. Finally, the therapeutic use of sulphate-bicarbonate mineral water is discussed in functional dyspepsia, chronic primitive constipation and irritable bowel syndrome.

  18. Multi-disciplinary study for the exploration of deep low enthalpy geothermal reservoirs, Neuchâtel, Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauri, G.; Abdelfettah, Y.; Negro, F.; Schill, E.; Vuataz, F.

    2011-12-01

    different DEM resolution ranging from a very high resolution (0.5 m pixel in the vicinity of each station) toward a lower resolution (25 m for the distal areas as far as 110 km away from each station). The bathymetry of the Lake of Neuchâtel (218 km2) has been used to correct gravity effects from the large volume of water along the Lake shore of Neuchâtel. The combination of 3D geological models with a high resolution gravity survey allows to better constrain the geometry of the Triassic formation, just above the detachment layer, as well to quantify the karstic processes, which could affect the three deep aquifers.

  19. Natural mineral bottled waters available on the Polish market as a source of minerals for the consumers. Part 1. Calcium and magnesium.

    PubMed

    Gątarska, Anna; Tońska, Elżbieta; Ciborska, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    Natural mineral waters may be an essential source of calcium, magnesium and other minerals. In bottled waters, minerals occur in an ionized form which is very well digestible. However, the concentration of minerals in underground waters (which constitute the material for the production of bottled waters) varies. In view of the above, the type of water consumed is essential. The aim of the study was to estimate the calcium and magnesium contents in products available on the market and to evaluate calcium and magnesium consumption with natural mineral water by different consumer groups with an assumed volume of the consumed product. These represented forty different brands of natural mineral available waters on Polish market. These waters were produced in Poland or other European countries. Among the studied products, about 30% of the waters were imported from Lithuania, Latvia, Czech Republic, France, Italy and Germany. The content of calcium and magnesium in mineral waters was determined using flame atomic absorption spectrometry in an acetylene-air flame. Further determinations were carried out using atomic absorption spectrometer--ICE 3000 SERIES-THERMO-England, equipped with a GLITE data station, background correction (a deuterium lamp) as well as other cathode lamps. Over half of the analysed natural mineral waters were medium-mineralized. The natural mineral waters available on the market can be characterized by a varied content of calcium and magnesium and a high degree of product mineralization does not guarantee significant amounts of these components. Among the natural mineral waters available on the market, only a few feature the optimum calcium-magnesium proportion (2:1). Considering the mineralization degree of the studied products, it can be stated that the largest percentage of products with significant calcium and magnesium contents can be found in the high-mineralized water group. For some natural mineral waters, the consumption of 1 litre daily may

  20. Multi-Generational Drinking of Bottled Low Mineral Water Impairs Bone Quality in Female Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Hui; Wang, Lingqiao; Wang, Dahua; Luo, Jiaohua; Zhang, Liang; Huang, Yujing; Chen, Ji-an; Shu, Weiqun

    2015-01-01

    Background Because of reproductions and hormone changes, females are more sensitive to bone mineral loss during their lifetime. Bottled water has become more popular in recent years, and a large number of products are low mineral water. However, research on the effects of drinking bottled low mineral water on bone health is sparse. Objective To elucidate the skeletal effects of multi-generational bottled water drinking in female rats. Methods Rats continuously drank tap water (TW), bottled natural water (bNW), bottled mineralized water (bMW), or bottled purified water (bPW) for three generations. Results The maximum deflection, elastic deflection, and ultimate strain of the femoral diaphysis in the bNW, bMW, and bPW groups and the fracture strain in the bNW and bMW groups were significantly decreased. The tibiae calcium levels in both the bNW and bPW groups were significantly lower than that in the TW group. The tibiae and teeth magnesium levels in both the bNW and bPW groups were significantly lower than those in the TW group. The collagen turnover markers PICP (in both bNW and bPW groups) were significantly lower than that in the TW group. In all three low mineral water groups, the 1,25-dihydroxy-vitamin D levels were significantly lower than those in the TW group. Conclusion Long-term drinking of low mineral water may disturb bone metabolism and biochemical properties and therefore weaken biomechanical bone properties in females. Drinking tap water, which contains adequate minerals, was found to be better for bone health. To our knowledge, this is the first report on drinking bottled low mineral water and female bone quality on three generation model. PMID:25803851

  1. Multi-generational drinking of bottled low mineral water impairs bone quality in female rats.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Zhiqun; Tan, Yao; Zeng, Hui; Wang, Lingqiao; Wang, Dahua; Luo, Jiaohua; Zhang, Liang; Huang, Yujing; Chen, Ji-an; Shu, Weiqun

    2015-01-01

    Because of reproductions and hormone changes, females are more sensitive to bone mineral loss during their lifetime. Bottled water has become more popular in recent years, and a large number of products are low mineral water. However, research on the effects of drinking bottled low mineral water on bone health is sparse. To elucidate the skeletal effects of multi-generational bottled water drinking in female rats. Rats continuously drank tap water (TW), bottled natural water (bNW), bottled mineralized water (bMW), or bottled purified water (bPW) for three generations. The maximum deflection, elastic deflection, and ultimate strain of the femoral diaphysis in the bNW, bMW, and bPW groups and the fracture strain in the bNW and bMW groups were significantly decreased. The tibiae calcium levels in both the bNW and bPW groups were significantly lower than that in the TW group. The tibiae and teeth magnesium levels in both the bNW and bPW groups were significantly lower than those in the TW group. The collagen turnover markers PICP (in both bNW and bPW groups) were significantly lower than that in the TW group. In all three low mineral water groups, the 1,25-dihydroxy-vitamin D levels were significantly lower than those in the TW group. Long-term drinking of low mineral water may disturb bone metabolism and biochemical properties and therefore weaken biomechanical bone properties in females. Drinking tap water, which contains adequate minerals, was found to be better for bone health. To our knowledge, this is the first report on drinking bottled low mineral water and female bone quality on three generation model.

  2. Mineralization of biogenic materials in the water masses of the South Atlantic Ocean. II: Stoichiometric ratios and mineralization rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Álvarez-Salgado, X. A.; Álvarez, M.; Brea, S.; Mèmery, L.; Messias, M. J.

    2014-04-01

    The variability of nitrate (N), phosphate (P), silicate (Si) and Apparent Oxygen Utilization (AOU) due to water mass mixing was objectively separated from the variability due to mineralization of biogenic materials in the western and eastern South Atlantic Ocean on basis of the constrained Optimum MultiParameter (OMP) analysis implemented in the companion manuscript. Using a consensus linear regression model, AOU/N/P/Si mineralization ratios and the corresponding oxygen utilisation rates (OURs) were obtained for the realm of each water mass defined after the OMP analysis. Combining these results with a stoichiometric model, the organic carbon to nitrogen (C/N) ratios and the biochemical composition (carbohydrates + lipids, proteins and phosphorus compounds) of the mineralized material, were derived. The vertical variability of the AOU/N, AOU/P and AOU/C mineralization ratios pointed to a significant fractionation during the mineralization of sinking organic matter. This fractionation was confirmed by preferential consumption of organic phosphorous compounds and proteins in shallower levels, which produced an increase of the C/N ratio of the mineralised materials of 0.5 ± 0.2 mol C mol N-1 every 1000 dbar. OURs in the twilight zone decreased quadratically with the C/N molar ratio of the mineralised material and exponentially with pressure (p, in 103 dbar) according to the following regression equation: Ln (OUR) = 6.2(±1.2) - 2.0(±0.7) * Ln (C/N) - 0.6(±0.2) * p (r2 = 0.87, p < 0.006, n = 8). This variability in the rates and stoichiometric ratios of the biogenic material mineralization compromises our capacity to predict the ocean biogeochemistry response to global change, including the CO2 uptake and storage and the corresponding feedback mechanisms.

  3. Water in Nominally Anhydrous Deep Crustal Minerals: Facilitators of Deformation and Partial Melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seaman, S. J.; Williams, M. L.; Koteas, G. C.

    2010-12-01

    Igneous rocks of the lowest crust are commonly dominated by anhydrous minerals such as plagioclase feldspar, alkali feldspar, and quartz. Hydrous minerals such as muscovite, biotite, and hornblende can facilitate melting through dehydration melting reactions. Eutectic melting is aided by the relatively high ambient temperature of the lowermost crust and by the tendency of partial melts of mantle rocks to heat the lower crust both as a result of underplating and by intrusion into the lower crust. Free water is the most typical flux for lowering the eutectic temperature of the crystalline rocks of the lowermost crust, and subduction is the most commonly cited mechanism for delivering water to this setting. However, water in nominally anhydrous minerals such as quartz and feldspar is an additional flux for partial melting of granitoid source rocks. Water occurs both in structural sites in the host minerals and in fluid inclusions. Although water occurs in low concentrations (300-5000 ppm is typical), the abundance of these minerals in granitoids makes the effect of the water significant in terms of slightly lowering the solidus and initiating partial melting. 500 ppm water in minerals that make up large volumes of crustal rocks (alkali feldspar, plagioclase feldspar, quartz) would lower the dry solidus of granite by 24oC at 1 GPa and, because of the small bulk distribution coefficient likely for water in these minerals, would produce a near-solidus melt with XH20 = 0.248, corresponding to 8.3 weight percent water in the partial melt. Water that is trapped in a single phase is not an effective flux. It is likely that deformation of lower crustal minerals by dislocation creep mobilizes water from mineral interiors and transporting it to sites of cotectic or eutectic mineral assemblages. Water in mineral structures is likely to weaken nominally anhydrous minerals, making them susceptible to deformation by dislocation creep. The positive feedback between structural

  4. Hydrogenous mineral neoformations in Tomsk water intake facility from underground sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutova, E.; Vologdina, I.; Pokrovsky, D.; Nalivaiko, N.; Kuzevanov, K.; Pokrovsky, V.

    2016-03-01

    The article considers study outcomes of hydrogenous mineral neoformations precipitated on deferrization filters of Tomsk water intake facility from underground sources. Compositionally, these precipitations are colloform and polymineral including ferrous, carbonate and aluminosilicate mineral phases. Ferrous phase predominates and embraces ferric hydroxides (ferrihydrate, goethite, hematite and lepidocrocite) and ferrous hydrophosphates (vivianite, strengite, strunzite and rockbridgeit). Carbonate and aluminosilicate minerals are calcite and kaolinite-group, respectively.

  5. Mineral concentrations in diets, water, and milk and their value in estimating on-farm excretion of manure minerals in lactating dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Castillo, A R; St-Pierre, N R; Silva del Rio, N; Weiss, W P

    2013-05-01

    Thirty-nine commercial dairies in Merced County, California were enrolled in the present study to (1) compare lactating cow mineral intakes (via drinking water and total mixed ration) to the National Research Council (NRC) requirements, (2) evaluate the association between dietary concentrations of minerals with and without drinking water and adjusted for mineral concentrations in milk, and (3) compare 4 different methods to estimate excretion of minerals using either assays or estimations of milk mineral outputs and total daily mineral intake per cow with or without minerals coming from drinking water. Dairies were selected to represent a range of herd milk yields and a range of water mineral contents. Samples of total mixed ration, drinking water, and bulk tank milk were taken on 2 different days, 3 to 7d apart in each farm. Across-farm medians and percentile distributions were used to analyze results. The herd median milk yield interquartile ranged (10th to 90th percentile) from less than 25 to more than 39 kg/d and the concentration of total solids in water interquartile ranged from less than 200 to more than 1,490 mg/L. Including drinking water minerals in the diets increased dietary concentrations by <4% for all minerals except for Na and Cl, which increased by 9.3 and 6.5%, respectively. Concentrations of P and K in milk were essentially the same as the NRC value to estimate lactation requirements. However, NRC milk values of Ca, Cl, and Zn were 10 to 20% greater than dairy farm values; and Na, Cu, Fe, and Mn were no less than 36% below NRC values. Estimated excretion of minerals via manure varied substantially across farms. Farms in the 10th percentile did have 2 to 3 times less estimated mineral excretions than those in the 90th percentile (depending on the mineral). Although including water minerals increased excretion of most minerals, the actual median effect of Ca, Mg, S, Cu, Fe, and Mn was less than 5%, and about 8% for Na and Cl. Replacing assayed

  6. Behavior of enteroaggregative Escherichia coli in bottled spring and mineral water.

    PubMed

    Vasudevan, Pradeep; Annamalai, Thirunavukkarasu; Sartori, Luigi; Hoagland, Thomas; Venkitanarayanan, Kumar

    2003-03-01

    The ability of enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) to survive in bottled mineral and spring water at common storage temperatures was investigated. Filtered mineral and spring waters were inoculated with EAEC (ca. 10(4) CFU/ml) and stored at 4, 10, and 23 degrees C. Water samples were analyzed every 3 days for viable EAEC by plating on tryptic soy agar plates over 60 days of storage. EAEC survived for the duration of the study in both mineral and spring waters. EAEC survival levels were significantly higher (P < 0.01) at 23 and 10 degrees C than at 4 degrees C. Furthermore, EAEC survival levels were significantly higher (P < 0.01) in mineral water than in spring water at 4 and 10 degrees C. The results of this study indicate that EAEC can survive in bottled mineral and spring waters for long periods of storage at 4, 10, and 23 degrees C. The ability of EAEC to survive in bottled water indicates that the source water for bottling industries must be kept free of contamination. Furthermore, the refrigeration of bottled water is recommended to minimize the growth of EAEC in water.

  7. Cavitation pitting and erosion of Al 6061-T6 in mineral oil and water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, B. C. S.; Buckley, D. H.

    1983-01-01

    The authors are currently carrying out a study of the cavitation erosion of different bearing metals and alloys in mineral oils were studied. The variations of weight loss, the pit diameter and depth due to cavitation erosion on Al 6061-T6 in mineral oil and water are presented.

  8. Training of panellists for the sensory control of bottled natural mineral water in connection with water chemical properties.

    PubMed

    Rey-Salgueiro, Ledicia; Gosálbez-García, Aitana; Pérez-Lamela, Concepción; Simal-Gándara, Jesús; Falqué-López, Elena

    2013-11-01

    As bottled mineral water market is increasing in the world (especially in emergent and developed countries), the development of a simple protocol to train a panel to evaluate sensory properties would be a useful tool for natural drinking water industry. A sensory protocol was developed to evaluate bottled natural mineral water (17 still and 10 carbonated trademarks). The tasting questionnaire included 13 attributes for still water plus overall impression and they were sorted by: colour hues, transparency and brightness, odour/aroma and taste/flavour/texture and 2 more for carbonated waters (bubbles and effervescence). The training lasted two months with, at least, 10 sessions, was adequate to evaluate bottled natural mineral water. To confirm the efficiency of the sensory training procedure two sensory groups formed the whole panel. One trained panel (6 persons) and one professional panel (6 sommeliers) and both participated simultaneously in the water tasting evaluation of 3 sample lots. Similar average scores obtained from trained and professional judges, with the same water trademarks, confirmed the usefulness of the training protocol. The differences obtained for trained panel in the first lot confirm the necessity to train always before a sensory procedure. A sensory water wheel is proposed to guide the training in bottled mineral water used for drinking, in connection with their chemical mineral content. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Adsorption of Dextrin at Mineral/Water Interface

    PubMed

    Raju; Holmgren; Forsling

    1997-09-15

    The adsorption mechanism of dextrin on aqueous minerals such as fluorite, apatite, galena, magnetite, gamma-alumina, and graphite was studied by adsorption experiments, zeta potential measurements, and FT-IR studies. Depending on the nature of the mineral surface, dextrin was found to interact in three different ways viz. by chemisorption, physisorption, or hydrophobic-hydrophobic interaction. The adsorption density of dextrin was found to be pH dependent. Maximum adsorption of dextrin was obtained around the pH at which the mineral surface is highly hydroxylated. The mechanism of dextrin interaction with the surface metal hydroxy sites, ( identical withMeOH), was found to proceed via chemical complexation. A linear relationship was observed between the adsorption density of dextrin and the pH of maximum surface hydroxylation. Zeta potential measurements have indicated the possibility of dextrin adsorption by electrostatic interaction under the conditions where mineral surface and dextrin are oppositely charged. Furthermore dextrin was found to adsorb on hydrophobic minerals such as graphite by hydrophobic-hydrophobic interaction. However, the magnitude of adsorption by electrostatic and hydrophobic interaction was found to be very marginal compared to that of chemical complexation. Copyright 1997 Academic Press. Copyright 1997Academic Press

  10. [Development of salt concentrates for mineralization of recycled water aboard the space station].

    PubMed

    Skliar, E F; Amiragov, M S; Bobe, L S; Gavrilov, L I; Kurochkin, M G; Solntseva, D P; Krasnov, M S; Skuratov, V M

    2006-01-01

    Recycled water can be brought up to the potable grade by adding minimal quantities of three soluble concentrates with the maximal content of inorganic salts. The authors present results of 3-year storage of potable water mineralized with makeup concentrates and analysis of potable water prepared with the use of the salt concentrates stored over this period of time. A water mineralization unit has been designed based on the principle of cyclic duty to produce physiologically healthy potable water with a preset salt content.

  11. [Fundamental study on effect of high-mineral drinking water for osteogenesis in calciprivia ovariectomized rats].

    PubMed

    Ogata, Fumihiko; Nagai, Noriaki; Ito, Yoshimasa; Kawasaki, Naohito

    2014-01-01

    Since osteoporosis is a major public health problem in Japan, it is important to clarify the effect of high-mineral drinking water consumption on osteogenesis. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the relationship between high-mineral drinking water consumption and osteogenesis in ovariectomized rats that received a low-calcium diet and purified water (PW group) or a low-calcium diet and high-mineral drinking water (CR group). High-mineral drinking water affected the rats' body weight. After 3 months, the bone density of the CR group was higher than that of the PW group (p<0.05). Furthermore, the CR group showed a decrease in the amount of calcium in the bones after 3 months. These results suggest that high-mineral drinking water contributes to the maintenance of bone density and not to the amount of calcium in bone. On the other hand, serum alkaline phosphatase levels in the PW group at 3 months were higher than those in the CR group, which indicates that the blood concentration of calcium in the CR group was maintained. Moreover, the amount of magnesium in the bones and the blood concentration of magnesium in the CR group after 3 months were higher than the corresponding values in the PW group. These results suggest that consumption of high-mineral drinking water could be beneficial for osteogenesis (i.e., for maintaining bone quantity).

  12. Anomalies in mineralization of low concentrations of organic compounds in lake water and sewage.

    PubMed Central

    Hoover, D G; Borgonovi, G E; Jones, S H; Alexander, M

    1986-01-01

    The rates of mineralization of nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA), 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), p-nitrophenol, aniline, and isopropyl N-phenylcarbamate (IPC) at one or more concentrations ranging from 100 pg/ml to 1.0 microgram/ml were proportional to chemical concentrations in samples of three lakes. The rates at 100 pg of NTA, 2,4-D, p-nitrophenol, and aniline per ml in samples of one or more lakes were less than predicted, assuming the rates were linearly related to the concentration. Neither NTA nor 2,4-dichlorophenol at 2.0 ng/ml was mineralized in some lake waters, but higher levels of the two chemicals were converted to CO2 in samples of the same waters. In samples from two lakes, little or no mineralization of IPC or 2,4-D occurred at 1.0 microgram/ml, but 10 ng/ml or lower levels of the herbicides were mineralized. The mineralization in sewage of 1.0 microgram of NTA per ml was biphasic; about 20% of the substrate was mineralized in 20 h, and mineralization was only reinitiated after a period of 130 h. The biphasic transformation was not a result of the accumulation of organic products, and it was still evident if protozoan activity was inhibited. NTA also underwent a biphasic mineralization in lake waters, and the biphasic pattern was not altered by additions of growth factors and inorganic nutrients. From 40 to 60% of the carbon of aniline added to lake water at levels of 100 pg/ml to 1.0 microgram/ml was mineralized, but more than 90% of the carbon of NTA, 2,4-D, or p-nitrophenol added to lake water at 10 ng/ml or 1.0 microgram/ml was mineralized.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3954341

  13. Harnessing Water and Resources from Clay Minerals on Mars and Planetary Bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, J. L.

    2017-02-01

    Clay minerals provide a source of water, metals, and cations that can be harvested to provide resources for human exploration on Mars, asteroids, etc. Planning how to access these resources from clays could be a vital component of human exploration.

  14. Real-time QEXAFS spectroscopy measures rapid precipitate formation at the mineral-water interface.

    PubMed

    Siebecker, Matthew; Li, Wei; Khalid, Syed; Sparks, Donald

    2014-09-19

    Reactions at the mineral-water interface are central to numerous geochemical processes and have consequences at local, regional and global scales. They are also important in materials science research. Kinetics greatly influences mineral-water interface reactions; however, there are few kinetic data in real-time and at the molecular scale. Here we report real-time data illustrating the rapid formation of nickel aluminium-layered double hydroxide precipitates at the mineral-water interface in a flow environment in as little as 31-40 min. Layered double hydroxides have a variety of applications in environmental remediation and materials science. The real-time data shown here enhance our fundamental understanding of the kinetics of mineral-water interface processes, such as adsorption, dissolution and precipitation, by illustrating their rapid and simultaneous occurrence in a dynamic environment. Both precipitation and adsorption can occur on the same rapid timescale.

  15. Cavitation pitting and erosion of aluminum 6061-T6 in mineral oil water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, B. C. S.; Buckley, D. H.

    1983-01-01

    Cavitation erosion studies of aluminum 6061-T6 in mineral oil and in ordinary tap water are presented. The maximum erosion rate (MDPR, or mean depth of penetration rate) in mineral oil was about four times that in water. The MDPR in mineral oil decreased continuously with time, but the MDPR in water remained approximately constant. The cavitation pits in mineral oil were of smaller diameter and depth than the pits in water. Treating the pits as spherical segments, we computed the radius r of the sphere. The logarithm of h/a, where h is the pit depth and 2a is the top width of the pit, was linear when plotted against the logarithm of 2r/h - 1.

  16. Hydrogeochemical characterization of thermal and mineral waters of Muǧla (SW Turkey)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avşar, Özgür; Kurtuluş, Bedri; Kaçaro&gcaron, Fikret; lu; Kuşcu, Gonca; Gürsu, Semih

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study is preparation of the inventory of thermal and mineral waters of Muǧla province. For that purpose, fifty three samples were collected from a total of nineteen sites with the purpose of characterizing the chemical and physical properties of Muǧla thermal and mineral waters. Of these, nine of them are geothermal (well head temperature>20 °C), and ten are mineral water sites. The geothermal waters are generally located near the sea coast, while mineral waters are generally located inland. Geothermal waters are generally Na-Cl type which is an indication of sea water mixing. Mineral waters are generally Ca-HCO3 type. NO3 concentrations are generally less than 10 ppm and boron concentrations have a maximum value of 6 ppm. According to the stable isotope results, the origin of the sampled waters in Muǧla province is meteoric. Reservoir temperatures of geothermal fields are estimated between 30 and 130 °C by geothermometry calculations.

  17. Mineral paragenesis in the talc-water experimental hydrothermal system.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Whitney, G.; Eberl, D.D.

    1982-01-01

    The talc-like gel was treated between 300o and 550oC at 1 kbar for 7, 30, 50, 120 and 200 days. The trends suggest that stevensite and/or corrensite are the stable minerals at <450oC. At 500o- 550oC, talc is stable.-K.A.R.

  18. [Fluoride content of bottled natural mineral waters in Spain and prevention of dental caries].

    PubMed

    Maraver, Francisco; Vitoria, Isidro; Almerich-Silla, José Manuel; Armijo, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the concentration of fluoride in natural mineral waters marketed in Spain in order to prevent tooth decay without the risk of causing dental fluorosis Descriptive and cross-sectional study during 2012. Natural mineral waters marketed in Spain. Three bottles with different bottling dates of 109 natural mineral waters (97 Spanish and 12 imported brands). Determination of fluoride by ion chromatography Median fluoride concentrations of the natural mineral waters bottled in Spain was 0.22 (range 0.00-4.16; interquartile range:0.37). Most samples (61 brands, 62%) contained less than 0.3mg/L. There are 19 Spanish brands with more than 0.6 mg/L. The median level in imported brands was 0.35 (range 0.10-1.21; interquartile range: 0.23). Only 28 of the 109 brands examined (25.6%) specified the fluoride content on the label. Good correlation was observed between the concentrations indicated and those determined. Fluoride concentrations in natural mineral waters showed high variation. Given the growing consumption of natural mineral waters in Spain, this type of information is important to make proper use of fluoride in the primary prevention of dental caries. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Carbonate-mineral/water interactions in sulfide-rich mine tailings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al, Tom A.; Martin, Chris J.; Blowes, David W.

    2000-12-01

    The chemical composition and mineralogy of coatings on carbonate minerals from mine tailings have been studied using aqueous geochemical methods, Time-of-Flight Laser-Ionization Mass Spectrometry (TOF-LIMS) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). The goal is to study major and trace element partitioning between the aqueous and solid phase, and to infer mechanisms that control the concentrations of elements in the pore water of sulfide-rich mine tailings. Pore-water samples and carbonate-mineral grains were collected from four geochemically distinct zones within the tailings. Oxidation of sulfide minerals near the surface results in a large range in pore-water pH (3.85 to 6.98) and aqueous concentrations of metals and sulfate. With increasing depth in the tailings, mineral-water interactions lead to increasing pH, and decreasing concentrations of metals and sulfate. Calculated mineral saturation indices, trends in the abundance of Ca, Fe, Mg and Mn in TOF-LIMS profiles through the secondary coatings, and electron diffraction patterns obtained from the coatings, suggest that precipitation/dissolution of jarosite-group minerals, gypsum, goethite, akaganéite, amorphous Fe oxyhydroxides and siderite control the aqueous Ca, Fe, Na, K and SO 4 concentrations. The occurrence of secondary coatings on primary minerals is widespread, and reactions with the secondary minerals, rather than the primary mineral substrate, probably represent the principal controls on trace-element distributions in the pore water. The data indicate that adsorption, surface-complexation and co-precipitation reactions are important controls on the concentrations of trace elements in the pore water. The occurrence of siderite coatings on the surface of ankerite grains suggests that Fe-bearing dolomite-structure carbonate minerals dissolve incongruently. This corroborates inferences made by previous workers that solubility differences between calcite and siderite lead to calcite dissolution and

  20. [Impact of the mineral composition of drinking water on children's health].

    PubMed

    Rylova, N V

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the effect of highly mineralized drinking water on children's health. To reveal a relationship of children's health to the chemical composition of portable water, two Kazan districts differing in the conditions of water supply and the mineral composition of the water were selected. A total of 833 schoolchildren aged 7-9 years underwent a questionnaire survey and their objective status was examined. Special methods were used to determine the urinary content of trace elements, such as copper, zinc, cadmium, and gross elements, such as calcium and magnesium, by performing atomic absorption spectrophotometry on an AAS-SA 10 MP apparatus.

  1. Microbiological quality of carbonated and non-carbonated mineral water stored at different temperatures.

    PubMed

    Korzeniewska, Ewa; Filipkowska, Zofia; Domeradzka, Sylwia; Włodkowski, Kamil

    2005-01-01

    The microbiological quality of five brands of carbonated and non-carbonated mineral water sold in Poland was studied. The study was carried out on the survival of heterotrophic bacteria at 22 and 37 degrees C (pour plate technique) in the samples of mineral waters stored at 4 and 22 degrees C. The one hundred ten bottles (twenty two bottles of each of the five brands) of carbonated and uncarbonated mineral waters with different levels of dissolved solids and organic content were chosen to microorganisms study. Ten bottles of mineral water were studied initially. Fifty bottles were stored at 4 degrees C, the other fifty were kept at 22 degrees C. The haemolysing bacteria in 1 cm3; E. coli, P. aeruginosa and A. hydrophila in 250 cm3 of mineral water were unidentifiable. Total viable count of heterotrophic bacteria at 22 and 37 degrees C in 1 cm3 of mineral water was the highest respectively for brand T and for brands T and M; the lowest for brand Z. Initially, approximately 29% of 110 water samples (respectively 4% of carbonated and 55% of uncarbonated) had bacterial counts greater than Ministry of Health's standards, notwithstanding the number of water samples which doesn't perform requirements grew up to 47% (respectively 36% of carbonated and 58% of uncarbonated) when the time of TVC 37 and 22 degrees C incubation was elongated from 1 and 3 days to 3 and 14 days respectively. The temperature of storage was inessential for the numbers of studied microorganisms. The most important factors were the brand, time of storage and the carbonating or non-carbonating of water. The highest numbers of the bacteria analysed were detected in non-carbonating water, irrespective of the water brand and temperature of storage.

  2. Authigenic Mineralization of Silicates at the Organic-water Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEvoy, B.; Wallace, A. F.

    2015-12-01

    It is relatively common for some fraction of organic material to be preserved in the sedimentary rock record as disseminated molecular fragments. The survival of wholly coherent tissues from primarily soft-bodied organisms is far more unusual. However, the literature is now well- populated with spectacular examples of soft-tissue preservation ranging from a 2,600 year old human brain to the tissues of the Ediacaran biota that have survived ~600 million years. Some of the most exceptional examples of soft tissue preservation are from the Proterozoic-Cambrian transition, however, nearly all modes of fossil preservation during this time are debated. Clay mineral templates have been implicated as playing a role in several types of soft tissue preservation, including Burgess Shale and Beecher's Trilobite-type preservation, and more recently, Bitter Springs-type silicification. Yet, there is still much debate over whether these clay mineral coatings form during early stage burial and diagenesis, or later stage metamorphism. This research addresses this question by using in situ fluid cell Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) to investigate the nucleation and growth of silicate minerals on model biological surfaces. Herein we present preliminary results on the deposition of hydrous magnesium silicates on self-assembled monolayers (-OH, -COOH, -CH3, and -H2PO3 terminated surfaces) at ambient conditions.

  3. Mineral-water reactions in metamorphism and volcanism

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnes, I.

    1985-01-01

    Low-temperature (120??C and less) metamorphism of graywacke, granite and andesite yields zeolites and precursor gels by reaction with fresh water but low-greenschist facies by reaction with salt (sea)water. ?? 1985.

  4. Geochemistry and origins of mineralized waters in the Floridan aquifer system, northeastern Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Phelps, G.G.

    2001-01-01

    Increases in chloride concentration have been observed in water from numerous wells tapping the Floridan aquifer system in northeastern Florida. Although most increases have been in the eastern part of Duval County, Florida, no spatial pattern in elevated chloride concentrations is discernible. Possible sources of the mineralized water include modern seawater intrusion; unflushed Miocene-to-Pleistocene-age seawater or connate water in aquifer sediments; or mineralized water from deeper zones of the aquifer system or from formations beneath the Floridan aquifer system. The purpose of this study was to document the chemical and isotopic characteristics of water samples from various aquifer zones, and from geochemical and hydrogeologic data, to infer the source of the increased mineralization. Water samples were collected from 53 wells in northeastern Florida during 1997-1999. Wells tapped various zones of the aquifer including: the Fernandina permeable zone (FPZ), the upper zone of the Lower Floridan aquifer (UZLF), the Upper Floridan aquifer (UFA), and both the UFA and the UZLF. Water samples were analyzed for major ions and trace constituents and for isotopes of carbon, oxygen, hydrogen, sulfur, strontium, chlorine, and boron. Samples of rock from the aquifer were analyzed for isotopes of oxygen, carbon, and strontium. In general, water from various aquifer zones cannot be differentiated based on chemistry, except for water from FPZ wells. Major-ion concentrations vary as much within the upper zone of the Lower Floridan aquifer and the Upper Floridan aquifer as between these two zones. Simple models of mixing between fresh ground water and either modern seawater or water from the FPZ as a mineralized end member show that many water samples from the UZLF aquifer and the UFA are enriched in bicarbonate, calcium, magnesium, sulfate, fluoride, and silica and are depleted in sodium and potassium (as compared to concentrations predicted by simple mixing). Chemical mass

  5. Water geochemistry of the Lucero Uplift, New Mexico: geothermal investigation of low-temperature mineralized fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Goff, F.; McCormick, T.; Gardner, J.N.; Trujillo, P.E.; Counce, D.; Vidale, R.; Charles, R.

    1983-04-01

    A detailed geochemical investigation of 27 waters of the Lucero uplift, central New Mexico, was performed to determine if the fluids originate from a high-temperature geothermal system along the Rio Grande rift. Two types of mineralized water issue from the Lucero region: a relatively saline (high-Cl, high-SO/sub 4/) type and a relatively dilute (low-Cl, high-SO/sub 4/) type. Emergence temperatures of both types range from 12 to 26/sup 0/C. Chemical data and thermodynamic and geothermometer calculations all indicate that both water types are in equilibrium with carbonate and evaporite minerals found in local Colorado Plateau rocks at surface temperatures or slightly higher. Stable isotope data do not indicate high-temperature rock-water interaction. Although evidence is seen for mixing between mineralized waters and dilute surface waters, no evidence for mixing of a deep hot fluid and surface waters is seen. Dilute mineral waters, which issue from a large area of Chinle Formation on the west side of the Lucero uplift, may be useful for low-temperature geothermal applications with appropriate design of equipment. Saline mineral waters, which leak from a zone of faulted and folded rocks along the Comanche fault zone, do not appear to have much, if any, geothermal potential due to their low-temperature, restricted distribution, and high concentration of dissolved solids. No evidence that saline mineral waters are associated with Quaternary faults of the Rio Grande rift or Quaternary basaltic volcanism within the immediate area is seen.

  6. Concentrations of selected trace elements in mineral and spring bottled waters on the Serbian market.

    PubMed

    Ristić, M; Popović, I; Pocajt, V; Antanasijević, D; Perić-Grujić, A

    2011-01-01

    Eight selected trace elements, which are generally included in regulations, were analyzed in 23 types of bottled waters. Ten mineral and seven spring bottled waters were from the Serbian market and six mineral bottled waters were obtained in different EU countries. For the purpose of comparison, selected tap waters were also analyzed. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was used for the analysis of trace elements (arsenic, cadmium, copper, manganese, nickel, lead and antimony). Results were compared with the Serbian regulations for bottled water, EU regulations and guideline values set by the World Health Organization for drinking water. With few exceptions, the trace element levels of most bottled waters were below the guideline values. However, a higher content of antimony was observed in waters from polyethylene terephthalate (PET) containers, indicating a potential leaching of this element from the plastic packaging.

  7. [Effects of mineral water TIB-2 on metabolic processes in urolithiasis patients].

    PubMed

    Dzeranov, N K; Beshliev, D A; Golovanov, S A; Kon'kova, T A

    2000-01-01

    Natural low-mineralized hydrocarbonate-calcium-magnesium mineral water (total mineralization 2 g/l) in bottles has been examined for therapeutic effects on metabolism in urolithiasis patients. The complex of biochemical blood and urine indices indicative of the renal function and concentration of lithogenic components was studied in 52 patients (age 23-68 years, 23 males and 29 females). Ten of them had nephrostoma. All the patients have undergone extracorporeal lithotripsy or other operations for renal or ureteric calculi. In nephrostoma patients urine samples were obtained both from nephrostoma and urinary bladder. The tests were made before the treatment and on the treatment day 3-5 and 10-12. TIB-2 mineral water was taken 3 times a day in a dose 200 ml 30-45 minutes before meal. The data were statistically processed. From the data obtained it was concluded that mineral water TIB-2 normalizes azotemia and clearance of endogenic creatinine, plasma values of calcium and uric acid, enhances urinary elimination of uric acid and calcium oxalate microcrystals that is TIB-2 improves metabolism of lithogenic substances and ions. Indications to drinking mineral water TIB-2 for urological patients are formulated.

  8. A nearly water-saturated mantle transition zone inferred from mineral viscosity

    PubMed Central

    Fei, Hongzhan; Yamazaki, Daisuke; Sakurai, Moe; Miyajima, Nobuyoshi; Ohfuji, Hiroaki; Katsura, Tomoo; Yamamoto, Takafumi

    2017-01-01

    An open question for solid-earth scientists is the amount of water in Earth’s interior. The uppermost mantle and lower mantle contain little water because their dominant minerals, olivine and bridgmanite, have limited water storage capacity. In contrast, the mantle transition zone (MTZ) at a depth of 410 to 660 km is considered to be a potential water reservoir because its dominant minerals, wadsleyite and ringwoodite, can contain large amounts of water [up to 3 weight % (wt %)]. However, the actual amount of water in the MTZ is unknown. Given that water incorporated into mantle minerals can lower their viscosity, we evaluate the water content of the MTZ by measuring dislocation mobility, a property that is inversely proportional to viscosity, as a function of temperature and water content in ringwoodite and bridgmanite. We find that dislocation mobility in bridgmanite is faster by two orders of magnitude than in anhydrous ringwoodite but 1.5 orders of magnitude slower than in water-saturated ringwoodite. To fit the observed mantle viscosity profiles, ringwoodite in the MTZ should contain 1 to 2 wt % water. The MTZ should thus be nearly water-saturated globally. PMID:28630912

  9. [Studies on the bottles of mineral water and the foreign plastic like substances].

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Y; Sugita, T; Watanabe, Y; Takano, T; Itakura, T; Ikegawa, T; Yamada, T

    1997-01-01

    The containers of mineral water and the foreign plastic substances which were found in the mineral water were investigated. Most of plastic bottles were made of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) and the caps were made of polypropylene (PP), polyethylene (PE) or aluminum. PE liners were attached to some caps. Most of the foreign plastic substances were PET while others were PE, PP, Teflon and rubber. Some bottles had a scratch on the top inside. The origin of most PET fragments was presumed to be scraped off the bottles by the lowering of the injection nozzle during the water filling process. The sources of the other substances were also determined.

  10. Mineral content of sorghum genotypes and the influence of water stress.

    PubMed

    Paiva, Caroline Liboreiro; Queiroz, Valéria Aparecida Vieira; Simeone, Maria Lúcia Ferreira; Schaffert, Robert Eugene; de Oliveira, Antônio Carlos; da Silva, Camila Santana

    2017-01-01

    Sorghum is a source of several minerals whose content may vary depending on the genotype and the production environment. The objective of this study was to screen sorghum genotypes for mineral content and to investigate the effect of water stress on it. A large variability was observed in the mineral content of 100 sorghum genotypes grown in environments without (WoWS) and with water stress (WthWS). The water stress decreased Mn, P, Mg and S contents in 100, 96, 93 and 56% of genotypes, respectively. The genotypes and other factors seemed to have more impact than water stress on K, Ca, Cu, Fe and Zn levels. In 100 sorghum genotypes, 2 were classified as excellent sources of Fe and 25 of Zn, in both environments. The best two genotypes to Fe content were SC21 and SC655 and to Zn were SC320 and SHAN-QUI-RED which showed great potential for use in biofortification.

  11. Natural radioactivity in bottled mineral and thermal spring waters of Turkey.

    PubMed

    Taskin, Halim; Asliyuksek, Hizir; Bozkurt, Ahmet; Kam, Erol

    2013-12-01

    Radiological assessment of bottled mineral waters and thermal spring waters collected from various natural sources in Turkey was carried out using gross alpha and gross beta counting techniques. For 40 samples of bottled mineral water, the mean gross alpha activity concentration was determined to be 164 mBq l(-1) (min.:7 mBq l(-1); max.: 3042 mBq l(-1)), whereas the gross beta activity concentration was found to be 555 mBq l(-1) (min.: 21 mBq l(-1); max.: 4845 mBq l(-1)). For 24 samples of thermal spring water, the mean gross alpha activity concentration was obtained to be 663 mBq l(-1) (min.: 18 mBq l(-1); max.: 3070 mBq l(-1)). The gross beta activity concentration for these samples, on the other hand, was determined to be 3314 mBq l(-1) (min.: 79 mBq l(-1); max.: 17955 mBq l(-1)). These values lead to the average annual effective doses of 313 µSv for mineral waters and 1805 µSv for thermal spa waters, which are found to be higher than those recommended for drinking waters by the World Health Organization. It should be noted, however, that one will get less dose from mineral waters since the daily consumption is much lower than 2 l that these calculations assume.

  12. Water Storage and Related Physical Characteristics of Four Mineral Soils in North Central Minnesota

    Treesearch

    E. S. Verry

    1969-01-01

    Soil water storage in a 7.5 foot profile varied nearly 100 percent (7.9 to 15.5 inches) among four mineral soils ranging from a sand to sandy loam. Bulk density, size fractions, and four water retention values are tabulated for each horizon.

  13. The spectral reflectance of water-mineral mixtures at low temperatures. [observed on natural satellites and other solar system objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, R. N.

    1981-01-01

    Laboratory reflectance spectra in the 0.325-2.5 micron region of bound water, water-mineral mixtures, mineral grains on frost, and frost on minerals are presented. The materials used in this study are montmorillonite, kaolinite, beryl, Mauna Kea red cinder, and black charcoal. It is found that the wavelengths of bound water and bound OH absorptions do not shift appreciably with temperature and can be detected when large amounts of free water ice are present. The decrease in the visible reflectance seen in many planetary reflectance spectra containing strong water ice absorptions can be explained by water-mineral mixtures, mineral grains on frost, or frost on mineral grains. Mineral grains on frost are detectable in very small quantities (fractional areal coverage less than approximately 0.005) depending on the mineral reflectance features, while it takes a thick layer of frost (greater than approximately 1 mm) to mask a mineral below 1.4 microns, again depending on the mineral reflectance. Frost on a very dark surface (albedo about 6%) is easily seen; however, a dark mineral mixed with water could completely mask the water absorptions (shortward of 2.5 microns).

  14. Potential mineralization of four herbicides in a ground water--fed wetland area.

    PubMed

    Larsen, L; Jørgensen, C; Aamand, J

    2001-01-01

    Herbicides may leach from agricultural fields into ground water feeding adjacent wetlands. However, only little is known of the fate of herbicides in wetland areas. The purpose of the study was to examine the potential of a riparian fen to mineralize herbides that could leach from an adjacent catchment area. Slurries were prepared from sediment and ground water collected from different parts of a wetland representing different redox conditions. The slurries were amended with O2, NO3-, SO4(2-), and CO2, or CO2 alone as electron acceptors to simulate the in situ conditions and their ability to mineralize the herbides mecoprop, metsulfuron-methyl, isoproturon and atrazine. In addition, the abundance of bacteria able to utilize O2, NO3-, SO4(2-) + CO2, and CO2 as electron acceptors was investigated along with the O2-reducing and methanogenic potential of the sediment. The recalcitrance to bacterial degradation depended on both the type of herbicide and the redox conditions pertaining. Mecoprop was the most readily degraded herbicide, with 36% of [ring-U-14C]mecoprop being mineralized to 14CO2 under aerobic conditions after 473 d. In comparison, approximately 29% of [phenyl-U-14C]metsulfuron-methyl and 16% of [ring-U-14C]isoproturon mineralized in aerobic slurries during the same period. Surprisingly, 8 to 13% of mecoprop also mineralized under anaerobic conditions. Neither metsulfuron-methyl nor isoproturon were mineralized under anaerobic conditions and atrazine was not mineralized under any of the redox conditions examined. The present study is the first to report mineralization of meco-prop in ground water in a wetland area, and the first to report mineralization of a phenoxyalcanoic acid herbicide under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions.

  15. Water in the formation of biogenic minerals: peeling away the hydration layers.

    PubMed

    Dorvee, Jason R; Veis, Arthur

    2013-08-01

    Minerals of biogenic origin form and crystallize from aqueous environments at ambient temperatures and pressures. The in vivo environment either intracellular or intercellular, contains many components that modulate both the activity of the ions which associate to form the mineral, as well as the activity and structure of the crowded water. Most of the studies about the mechanism of mineralization, that is, the detailed pathways by which the mineral ions proceed from solution to crystal state, have been carried out in relatively dilute solutions and clean solutions. These studies have considered both thermodynamic and kinetic controls. Most have not considered the water itself. Is the water a passive bystander, or is it intimately a participant in the mineral ion densification reaction? A wide range of experiments show that the mineralization pathways proceed through a series of densification stages with intermediates, such as a "dense liquid" phase and the prenucleation clusters that form within it. This is in contrast to the idea of a single step phase transition, but consistent with the Gibbs concept of discontinuous phase transitions from supersaturated mother liquor to crystal. Further changes in the water structure at every surface and interface during densification guides the free energy trajectory leading to the crystalline state. In vertebrates, mineralization takes place in a hydrated collagen matrix, thus water must be considered as a direct participant. Although different in detail, the crystallization of calcium phosphates, as apatite, and calcium carbonates, as calcite, are mechanistically identical from the viewpoint of water. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Microbiological safety of bottled mineral water in patients susceptible to infections.

    PubMed

    Oie, Shigeharu; Matsuzaka, Yuuki; Kiyonaga, Hiroko; Maeda, Kumiko; Kamiya, Akira

    2008-08-01

    We evaluated the microbiological safety of bottled mineral water products commercially available in Japan. Of 10 bottled mineral water products manufactured in Japan, no bacteria or fungi were detected in 9 (90%), but 1 (10%) contained 1.8x10(3) colony-forming units (cfu)/mL. Of 12 bottled mineral water products manufactured in the EU, 11 (91.7%) contained 23-3.5x10(4) cfu/mL. On the other hand, of 5 bottled mineral water products manufactured in North America, 2 (40%) contained 2.3x10(2)-2.5x10(3) cfu/mL. The detected microorganisms were glucose-nonfermentative Gram-negative bacilli such as Brevundimonas vesicularis, Moraxella spp., and Burkholderia cepacia, but Pseudomonas aeruginosa was not detected in any product. For immunocompromised host patients being managed in ultra-clean rooms, the examined bottled mineral water products manufactured in Japan, except 1, were microbiologically safe.

  17. Adsorption mechanisms of microcystin variant conformations at water-mineral interfaces: A molecular modeling investigation.

    PubMed

    Pochodylo, Amy L; Aoki, Thalia G; Aristilde, Ludmilla

    2016-10-15

    Microcystins (MCs) are potent toxins released during cyanobacterial blooms. Clay minerals are implicated in trapping MCs within soil particles in surface waters and sediments. In the absence of molecular characterization, the relevance of previously proposed adsorption mechanisms is lacking. Towards obtaining this characterization, we conducted Monte Carlo simulations combined with molecular dynamics relaxation of two MC variants, MC-leucine-arginine (MC-LR) and MC-leucine-alanine (MC-LA), adsorbed on hydrated montmorillonite with different electrolytes. The resulting adsorbate structures revealed how MC conformations and aqueous conditions dictate binding interactions at the mineral surface. Electrostatic coupling between the arginine residue and a carboxylate in MC-LR excluded the participation of arginine in mediating adsorption on montmorillonite in a NaCl solution. However, in a CaCl2 solution, the complexation of Ca by two carboxylate moieties in MC-LR changed the MC conformation, which allowed arginine to mediate electrostatic interaction with the mineral. By contrast, due to the lack of arginine in MC-LA, complexation of Ca by only one carboxylate in MC-LA was required to favor Ca-bridging interaction with the mineral. Multiple water-bridged H-bonding interactions were also important in anchoring MCs at the mineral surface. Our modeling results offer molecular insights into the structural and chemical factors that can control the fate of MCs at water-mineral interfaces.

  18. From urban municipalities to polar bioremediation: the characterisation and contribution of biogenic minerals for water treatment.

    PubMed

    Freidman, Benjamin L; Northcott, Kathy A; Thiel, Peta; Gras, Sally L; Snape, Ian; Stevens, Geoff W; Mumford, Kathryn A

    2017-06-01

    Minerals of biological origin have shown significant potential for the separation of contaminants from water worldwide. This study details the contribution of biologically derived minerals to water treatment operations, with a focus on filtration media from urban municipalities and remote cold regions. The results support biofilm-embedded iron and manganese to be the building blocks of biogenic mineral development on activated carbon and nutrient-amended zeolites. The presence of similar iron and manganese oxidising bacterial species across all filter media supports the analogous morphologies of biogenic minerals between sites and suggests that biological water treatment processes may be feasible across a range of climates. This is the first time the stages of biogenic mineral formation have been aligned with comprehensive imaging of the biofilm community and bacterial identification; especially with respect to cold regions. Where biogenic mineral formation occurs on filter media, the potential exists for enhanced adsorption for a range of organic and inorganic contaminants and improved longevity of filter media beyond the adsorption or exchange capacities of the raw material.

  19. [Effects of water content on redox potential and carbon mineralization of wetland sediments].

    PubMed

    Yang, Gai-ren; Tong, Cheng-li; Xiao, He-ai; Wu, Jin-shui

    2009-08-15

    To better understand the effect of soil water contents on redox potential (Eh), and their impacts on C mineralization in natural wetland, sediment samples from 3 types of wetlands (fen, humus marsh and marshy meadow) in the San-jiang Plate region of North China were incubated (25 degrees C) for 155 d under a range of reducing and oxidizing conditions by controlling water contents (varied from 24% to 232% of water holding capacity) (WHC). CO2-C evolved during incubation was measured at different time intervals. Results showed that Eh of sediments decreased significantly as water content increased from 24% WHC (lighted moisturized) to about 100% WHC, then decreased slightly as water content increased further to a level of submersed (about 2 cm water-depths). The accumulative amount of CO2-C evolved from the sediments indicated that the optimum water contents for mineralization of organic C are 32%, 48% and 76%-100% WHC for sediments of fen, humus marsh, and marshy meadow, respectively. The relationship between mineralization rates and redox potentials (Eh) were well fitted with second order parabola equations (p < 0.05). Mineralization rates and accumulative amount of organic C displayed a positive correlation with Eh up to 300 mV. However, a significant negative correlation was observed when Eh increased above 300 mV. Results demonstrated that low redox potential is the controlling factor of carbon accumulation of wetland in San-jiang Plate region.

  20. Calibration of Mineralization Degree for Dynamic Pure-water Measurement in Horizontal Oil-water Two-phase Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Weihang; Li, Lei; Kong, Lingfu; Liu, Xingbin

    2016-08-01

    In order to solve the problem of dynamic pure-water electrical conductivity measurement in the process of calculating water content of oil-water two-phase flow of production profile logging in horizontal wells, a six-group local-conductance probe (SGLCP) is proposed to measure dynamic pure-water electrical conductivity in horizontal oil-water two-phase flow. The structures of conductance sensors which include the SGLCP and ring-shaped conductance probe (RSCP) are analyzed by using the finite-element method (FEM). In the process of simulation, the electric field distribution generated by the SGLCP and RSCP are investigated, and the responses of the measuring electrodes are calculated under the different values of the water resistivity. The static experiments of the SGLCP and RSCP under different mineralization degrees in horizontal oil-water two-phase flow are carried out. Results of simulation and experiments demonstrate a nice linearity between the SGLCP and RSCP under different mineralization degrees. The SGLCP has also a good adaptability to stratified flow, stratified flow with mixing at the interface and dispersion of oil in water and water flow. The validity and feasibility of pure-water electrical conductivity measurement with the designed SGLCP under different mineralization degrees are verified by experimental results.

  1. Therapeutic Effects and Immunomodulation of Suanbo Mineral Water Therapy in a Murine Model of Atopic Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yoon Jung; Lee, Hye Jin; Lee, Do Hyun; Woo, So Youn; Lee, Kyung Ho; Yun, Seong Taek; Kim, Jong Moon; Kim, Hong Jig

    2013-01-01

    Background Balneotherapy is widely used as an alternative treatment modality for AD. Although the clinical benefit of some mineral waters has been established, their mechanisms of action in alleviating AD are only partly understood. Objective The clinical modification and immunomodulatory or anti-inflammatory effects of mineral water from the Suanbo hot springs on the differentiation and cytokine production of Th1, Th2, and regulatory T cells (Treg) were investigated using spleen, skin tissue, and serum from NC/Nga mice. Methods The therapeutic effects of bathing in mineral water in a Dermatophagoides farinae body extract ointment (Dfb ointment)-induced AD mouse model were assessed by measuring the modified Scoring atopic dermatitis (SCORAD) index scores, transepidermal water loss (TEWL), histological and immunohistochemical changes of the skin lesion, serum levels of interferon (IFN)-γ, interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5 and immunoglobulin E, mRNA expression of IFN-γ, IL-4 and IL-5 of dorsal skin, and helper T cell differentiation in the spleen. Results Bathing in mineral water significantly reduced the modified SCORAD index scores, TEWL, epidermal hyperplasia, and inflammatory cell infiltration. IL-4 production and Th2 cell differentiation showed a decreasing tendency with mineral water bathing, but the Th1 cells did not. On the contrary, differentiation to Treg cells was promoted with mineral water bathing. Conclusion Balneotherapy not only has anti-inflammatory activity, but also shows positive effects on cutaneous barrier homeostasis. These results suggest that the favorable effects of balneotherapy may be mediated by modifying the Th2 response, and possibly in part by inducing Treg cell differentiation. PMID:24371394

  2. Mineral-Coated Polymer Membranes with Superhydrophilicity and Underwater Superoleophobicity for Effective Oil/Water Separation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Peng-Cheng; Xu, Zhi-Kang

    2013-01-01

    Oil-polluted water is a worldwide problem due to the increasing industrial oily wastewater and the frequent oil spill accidents. Here, we report a novel kind of superhydrophilic hybrid membranes for effective oil/water separation. They were prepared by depositing CaCO3-based mineral coating on PAA-grafted polypropylene microfiltration membranes. The rigid mineral-coating traps abundant water in aqueous environment and forms a robust hydrated layer on the membrane pore surface, thus endowing the membranes with underwater superoleophobicity. Under the drive of either gravity or external pressure, the hybrid membranes separate a range of oil/water mixtures effectively with high water flux (>2000 L m−2 h−1), perfect oil/water separation efficiency (>99%), high oil breakthrough pressure (>140 kPa) and low oil fouling. The oil/water mixtures include not only free mixtures but also oil-in-water emulsions. Therefore, the mineral-coated membrane enables an efficient and energy-saving separation for various oil/water mixtures, showing attractive potential for practical oil/water separation. PMID:24072204

  3. Mineral-coated polymer membranes with superhydrophilicity and underwater superoleophobicity for effective oil/water separation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Peng-Cheng; Xu, Zhi-Kang

    2013-09-27

    Oil-polluted water is a worldwide problem due to the increasing industrial oily wastewater and the frequent oil spill accidents. Here, we report a novel kind of superhydrophilic hybrid membranes for effective oil/water separation. They were prepared by depositing CaCO3-based mineral coating on PAA-grafted polypropylene microfiltration membranes. The rigid mineral-coating traps abundant water in aqueous environment and forms a robust hydrated layer on the membrane pore surface, thus endowing the membranes with underwater superoleophobicity. Under the drive of either gravity or external pressure, the hybrid membranes separate a range of oil/water mixtures effectively with high water flux (>2000 L m(-2) h(-1)), perfect oil/water separation efficiency (>99%), high oil breakthrough pressure (>140 kPa) and low oil fouling. The oil/water mixtures include not only free mixtures but also oil-in-water emulsions. Therefore, the mineral-coated membrane enables an efficient and energy-saving separation for various oil/water mixtures, showing attractive potential for practical oil/water separation.

  4. Study of mineral water resources from the Eastern Carpathians using stable isotopes.

    PubMed

    Magdas, Dana A; Cuna, Stela M; Berdea, Petre; Balas, Gabriela; Cuna, Cornel; Dordai, Edina; Falub, Mihaela C

    2009-08-30

    The Eastern Carpathians contain many mineral water springs that feed famous Romanian health resorts such as Borsec, Biborteni and Vatra Dornei. These waters have been used for their different therapeutic effects. In this work, mineral and spring waters from these Romanian regions were investigated by means of chemical and isotopic (deltaD and delta(18)O) analyses in order to understand the recharge mechanisms and also to determine their origins. Most of the investigated springs are of meteoric origin, having the average deuterium content of the local meteoric water. The higher (18)O content with respect to the Meteoric Water Line (MWL) indicated an exchange reaction with crystalline igneous rocks at depth and with other rocks that the water encounters on its journey back to the surface. 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Influence of mineral weathering reactions on the chemical composition of soil water, springs, and ground water, Catoctin Mountains, Maryland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Katz, B.G.

    1989-01-01

    During 1983 and 1984, wet precipitation was primarily a solution of dilute sulphuric acid, whereas calcium and bicarbonate were the major ions in springs and ground water in two small watersheds with a deciduous forest cover in central Maryland. Dominant ions in soil water were calcium, magnesium, and sulphate. The relative importance of mineral weathering reactions on the chemical composition of these subsurface waters was compared to the contribution from wet precipitation, biological processes, and road deicing salts. -from Author

  6. A target-oriented magnetotelluric inversion approach for characterizing the low enthalpy Groß Schönebeck geothermal reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz, G.; Ritter, O.; Moeck, I.

    2010-12-01

    Electrical conductivity is a key parameter for the exploration and characterization of geothermal reservoirs as hot mineralized formation water of active geothermal areas usually exhibits significantly higher conductivity than the surrounding host rock. Here we present results of a magnetotelluric (MT) exploration experiment carried out in the vicinity of the Groß Schönebeck geothermal test site in Northern Germany, where a doublet system of two 4.3-km deep boreholes was drilled to establish an in situ laboratory to investigate the potential for geothermal energy production. Classical 2-D smooth inversion of the MT data, recorded along two profiles, reveals a shallow conductive structure in good agreement with information from regional geology and seismic images. However, at the northernmost part of the profiles, the conductivity models reveal deep-reaching conductive structures, which appear uncorrelated with existing (geophysical or geological) data. Incorporating information from seismics as independent constraints for MT inversions allows us to examine the model space rigorously but target oriented. Employing so-called tear-zone inversions we can effectively derive an alternative class of models, which are consistent with the MT observations but also with the other data sets. We speculate that the zones of high conductivity imaged at reservoir depth are related areas of reduced thickness of the overlaying evapourite layer. The enhanced conductivity can be explained by a higher fracture density in anhydritic layers and/or generally lower resistivity of the pore fluid.

  7. Effect of inorganic nutrients on the acclimation period preceding mineralization of organic chemicals in lake water

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, S.H.; Alexander, M.

    1988-12-01

    The addition of phosphate, nitrate, or sulfate (each at 10 mM) decreased the acclimation period for the mineralization of low concentrations of p-nitrophenol (PNP) in lake water. Added phosphate shortened the acclimation period for biodegradation of 2 ng to 2 micrograms of PNP per ml in various lake water samples and of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetate at 100 ng/ml. Added P enhanced the rate of growth of PNP-mineralizing microorganisms in waters containing 200 ng or 2 micrograms of PNP per ml. We suggest that the effect of P on the acclimation period results from an increase in the growth rate of the initially small population of microorganisms able to mineralize the synthetic chemicals.

  8. Trace metal contamination of mineral spring water in an historical mining area in regional Victoria, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Rachael; Dowling, Kim

    2013-11-01

    Significant global consumption of spring and mineral water is fuelled by perceived therapeutic and medicinal qualities, cultural habits and taste. The Central Victorian Mineral Springs Region, Australia comprises approximately 100 naturally effervescent, cold, high CO2 content springs with distinctive tastes linked to a specific spring or pump. The area has a rich settlement history. It was first settled by miners in the 1840s closely followed by the first commercial operations of a health resort 1895. The landscape is clearly affected by gold mining with geographically proximal mine waste, mullock heaps or tailings. Repeated mineral springs sampling since 1985 has revealed elevated arsenic concentrations. In 1985 an arsenic concentration five times the current Australian Drinking Water Guideline was recorded at a popular tourist spring site. Recent sampling and analyses have confirmed elevated levels of heavy metals/metalloids, with higher concentrations occurring during periods of low rainfall. Despite the elevated levels, mineral water source points remain accessible to the public with some springs actively promoting the therapeutic benefits of the waters. In light of our analysis, the risk to consumers (some of whom are likely to be negatively health-affected or health-compromised) needs to be considered with a view to appropriate and verified analyses made available to the public.

  9. Minerals, phenolic compounds, and antioxidant capacity of citrus peel extract by hot water.

    PubMed

    Xu, G H; Chen, J C; Liu, D H; Zhang, Y H; Jiang, P; Ye, X Q

    2008-01-01

    Some dried citrus peels, more familiar as chenpi in China, have been widely used in traditional Chinese medicines from ancient times. This paper reports the efficiency of infusion cooking on extracting minerals and phenolic compounds (flavanone glycosides [FGs], polymethoxylated flavones [PMFs], and phenolic acids), and also antioxidant activity of hot water extract of citrus peels. Peels of 2 citrus varieties, namely, Satsuma mandarin (C. unshiu Marc.) and Ponkan (C. poonensis Hort. ex Tanaka), which belong to C. reticulata, were selected. As a result, hot water extraction was efficient in extracting phenolic acids and some minerals. As for citrus flavonoids, narirutin, nobiletin, and tangeretin were easier to extract than hesperidin. The result of antioxidant capacity assays indicated that for citrus peels, hot water extract had almost the same capacity as the methanol extract. We suggested that Ponkan was more suitable as the source of chenpi, since its hot water extract had much higher content of phenolic acids, FGs and PMFs, and higher antioxidant capacity than those of Satsuma mandarin. Generally, to raise the extraction temperature or to prolong the time could not yield higher content of phenolic compounds and stronger antioxidant capacity, though the content of minerals increased to some extent. Furthermore, a 2nd-time extraction seemed necessary since considerable minerals and phenolic compounds could be obtained by doing so. Finally, we suggested that 2 times extraction at 100 degrees C for 30 min was proper to extract the minerals and phenolic compounds in chenpi.

  10. Diversity of the heterotrophic microbial populations for distinguishing natural mineral waters.

    PubMed

    Casanovas-Massana, Arnau; Blanch, Anicet R

    2012-02-01

    In the recent years the consumption of natural mineral waters has risen all over the world, becoming a usual alternative for tap water and other beverages. Natural mineral waters are complex environments containing a high diversity of autochthonous microbiota. The identification and characterization of this indigenous microbiota may help to detect changes occurring in the different steps of the bottling process and take preventive measures before the bottled water arrives to the consumer. The aims of this study were to describe the bacterial heterotrophic populations in natural mineral waters with a cultivation-dependent method and determine whether their autochthonous microbiota were specific enough to be clearly distinguished from that of other natural mineral waters with a phenotypic-based method. For this purpose, water from three independent Spanish springs was sampled in two seasons (winter and summer) and heterotrophic aerobic bacterial strains were isolated at two temperatures (22 ± 2°C and 36 ± 2°C) on R2A agar. Isolates were phenotyped biochemically with Php-48 plates (Bactus AB, Sweden), and the indexes of diversity and similarity between populations were calculated. The 16S rRNA gene of the most representative strains of each biochemical cluster was sequenced for its identification. Finally, a ten-fold cross-validation method was assayed for the identification of the origin of a natural mineral water when phenotyping a set of isolates. High levels of diversity were found at all sites. One of the sources was found to present less diversity due to a confirmed contamination with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The study of the similarities showed that growing temperatures and seasons caused significant differences in structures and composition at the sources. In addition, several bacterial species were isolated and identified, some of them rarely isolated in natural mineral waters, revealing the complexity and lack of knowledge of these ecosystems

  11. Influence of the consumption pattern of magnesium from magnesium-rich mineral water on magnesium bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Sabatier, Magalie; Grandvuillemin, Antoine; Kastenmayer, Peter; Aeschliman, Jean-Marc; Bouisset, Florilène; Arnaud, Maurice J; Dumoulin, Gilles; Berthelot, Alain

    2011-08-01

    It is generally considered that the absorption of Mg is inversely related to the ingested dose. The objective of the present study was to determine if the mode of administration (bolus v. consumption throughout the day) could influence Mg bioavailability from Mg-rich natural mineral water comparing the same nutritional Mg amount (126 mg). Using a 2 d cross-over design, twelve healthy men were asked to drink 1·5 litres Mg-rich mineral water either as 2 × 750 ml or 7 × 212 ml throughout the day. Two stable isotopes ((25)Mg and (26)Mg) were used to label the water in order to distinguish both regimens. Fractional apparent Mg absorption was determined by faecal monitoring and Mg retention was determined by measuring urinary excretion of Mg isotopes. Higher Mg absorption (50·7 (SD 12·7) v. 32·4 (SD 8·1) %; P = 0·0007) and retention (47·5 (SD 12·9) v. 29·0 (SD 7·5) %; P = 0·0008) from Mg-rich mineral water were observed when it was consumed in seven servings compared with larger servings. Thus, regular water consumption throughout the day is an effective way to increase Mg bioavailability from Mg-rich mineral water.

  12. Erosion of aluminum 6061-T6 under cavitation attack in mineral oil and water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, B. C. S.; Buckley, D. H.

    1985-01-01

    Studies of the erosion of aluminum 6061-T6 under cavitation attack in distilled water, ordinary tap water and a viscous mineral oil are presented. The mean depth of penetration for the mineral oil was about 40 percent of that for water at the end of a 40 min test. The mean depth of penetration and its rate did not differ significantly for distilled and tap water. The mean depth of penetration rate for both distilled and tap water increased to a maximum and then decreased with test duration, while that for mineral oil had a maximum during the initial period. The ratio h/2a of the pit depth h to the pit diameter 2a varied from 0.04 to 0.13 in water and from 0.06 to 0.20 in mineral oil. Scanning electron microscopy indicates that the pits are initially formed over the grain boundaries and precipitates while the surface grains are deformed under cavitation attack.

  13. Erosion of aluminum 6061-T6 under cavitation attack in mineral oil and water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, B. C. S.; Buckley, D. H.

    1985-01-01

    Studies of the erosion of aluminum 6061-T6 under cavitation attack in distilled water, ordinary tap water and a viscous mineral oil are presented. The mean depth of penetration for the mineral oil was about 40 percent of that for water at the end of a 40 min test. The mean depth of penetration and its rate did not differ significantly for distilled and tap water. The mean depth of penetration rate for both distilled and tap water increased to a maximum and then decreased with test duration, while that for mineral oil had a maximum during the initial period. The ratio h/2a of the pit depth h to the pit diameter 2a varied from 0.04 to 0.13 in water and from 0.06 to 0.20 in mineral oil. Scanning electron microscopy indicates that the pits are initially formed over the grain boundaries and precipitates while the surface grains are deformed under cavitation attack.

  14. Survival of Escherichia coli and Aeromonas hydrophila in non-carbonated mineral water.

    PubMed

    Korzeniewska, Ewa; Filipkowska, Zofia; Zarnoch, Dagny; Tworus, Katarzyna

    2005-01-01

    The study was carried out on the survival of Escherichia coli and Aeromonas hydrophila in samples of mineral waters. Enumeration of the bacteria was performed by spread inoculation of samples (0.1 cm3) over the surface of selected media in Petri plates. Twenty bottles (four bottles of each of the five brands) of non-carbonated mineral waters with different levels of dissolved solids and organic content were chosen to study every strain. Ten bottles were stored at 4 degrees C, the other ten were kept at 22 degrees C. Half of the samples of mineral water was filtered, the remaining water was unfiltered. The resulting growth curves depended on the time of storage. The number of E. coli increased during the first two weeks (except the seventh day) and decreased during the next days. E. coli was detected in 70% of samples of water after 182 days. The number of A. hydrophila decreased during the first three days, increased on the seventh day and decreased during the next days. A. hydrophila was detected in 15% of the samples of water after 182 days. The temperature of storage was inessential for growth. The most important factors were the brand and the filtering or unfiltering of water. The highest numbers of the bacteria analysed were detected in filtered water, irrespective of the water brand and temperature of storage.

  15. Norwalk-like virus sequences in mineral waters: one-year monitoring of three brands.

    PubMed

    Beuret, Christian; Kohler, Dorothe; Baumgartner, Andreas; Lüthi, Thomas M

    2002-04-01

    In a recent study, RNA with nucleotide sequeces specific for "Norwalk-like viruses" (NLV) was detected in 11 different brands of European mineral waters. To clarify this finding, a 1-year monitoring study was conducted. Samples of three European brands of mineral water without gas were monitored weekly by reverse transcriptase PCR using generic and genogroup-specific oligonucleotides. Additional analyses were performed to investigate a possible correlation between NLV sequence contamination and mineral water lot numbers, the long-term stability (persistence) of NLV sequences in mineral water, and the level of contamination. NLV sequences were detected in 53 of 159 samples analyzed (33%) and belonged entirely to genogroup II. Although all NLV strains identified were closely related, three mineral water brand-specific clusters could be identified for both primer systems by sequencing. Analyses of second samples from lots previously shown to be positive for NLV sequences gave corresponding results in 45 of 53 cases (85%) (within a six-pack). NLV persistence was tested by analyzing 10 positive samples after 6 and 12 months of storage in darkness at room temperature. After 6 months, all samples remained positive; after 12 months, 9 of 10 samples were still positive for NLV sequences. No NLV sequences could be detected by analysis of 0.1-liter aliquots of 53 samples shown to be positive by testing of 1-liter volumes. Based on this fact and a test sensitivity of approximately 10 viral units, levels of contamination in positive mineral water samples were estimated to be in the range of 10 to 100 genomic equivalents per liter.

  16. Norwalk-Like Virus Sequences in Mineral Waters: One-Year Monitoring of Three Brands

    PubMed Central

    Beuret, Christian; Kohler, Dorothe; Baumgartner, Andreas; Lüthi, Thomas M.

    2002-01-01

    In a recent study, RNA with nucleotide sequeces specific for “Norwalk-like viruses” (NLV) was detected in 11 different brands of European mineral waters. To clarify this finding, a 1-year monitoring study was conducted. Samples of three European brands of mineral water without gas were monitored weekly by reverse transcriptase PCR using generic and genogroup-specific oligonucleotides. Additional analyses were performed to investigate a possible correlation between NLV sequence contamination and mineral water lot numbers, the long-term stability (persistence) of NLV sequences in mineral water, and the level of contamination. NLV sequences were detected in 53 of 159 samples analyzed (33%) and belonged entirely to genogroup II. Although all NLV strains identified were closely related, three mineral water brand-specific clusters could be identified for both primer systems by sequencing. Analyses of second samples from lots previously shown to be positive for NLV sequences gave corresponding results in 45 of 53 cases (85%) (within a six-pack). NLV persistence was tested by analyzing 10 positive samples after 6 and 12 months of storage in darkness at room temperature. After 6 months, all samples remained positive; after 12 months, 9 of 10 samples were still positive for NLV sequences. No NLV sequences could be detected by analysis of 0.1-liter aliquots of 53 samples shown to be positive by testing of 1-liter volumes. Based on this fact and a test sensitivity of approximately 10 viral units, levels of contamination in positive mineral water samples were estimated to be in the range of 10 to 100 genomic equivalents per liter. PMID:11916714

  17. Crystallographic controls on the frictional behavior of dry and water-saturated sheet structure minerals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, Diane E.; Lockner, D.A.

    2004-01-01

    We compare the frictional strengths of 17 sheet structure mineral powders, measured under dry and water-saturated conditions, to identify the factors that cause many of them to be relatively weak. The dry coefficient of friction ?? ranges upward from 0.2 for graphite, leveling off at 0.8 for margarite, clintonite, gibbsite, kaolinite, and lizardite. The values of ?? (dry) correlate directly with calculated (001) interlayer bond strengths of the minerals. This correlation occurs because shear becomes localized along boundary and Riedel shears and the platy minerals in them rotate into alignment with the shear planes. For those gouges with ?? (dry) < 0.8, shear occurs by breaking the interlayer bonds to form new cleavage surfaces. Where ?? (dry) = 0.8, consistent with Byerlee's law, the interlayer bonds are sufficiently strong that other frictional processes dominate. The transition in dry friction mechanisms corresponds to calculated surface energies of 2-3 J/m2. Adding water causes ?? to decrease for every mineral tested except graphite. If the minerals are separated into groups with similar crystal structures, ?? (wet) increases with increasing interlayer bond strength within each group. This relationship also holds for the swelling clay montmorillonite, whose water-saturated strength is consistent with the strengths of nonswelling clays of similar crystal structure. Water in the saturated gouges forms thin, structured films between the plate surfaces. The polar water molecules are bonded to the plate surfaces in proportion to the mineral's surface energy, and ?? (wet) reflects the stresses required to shear through the water films. Copyright 2004 by the American Geophysical Union.

  18. High-calcium mineral water as a calcium supplementing measure for post-thyroidectomy hypocalcemia.

    PubMed

    Coiro, V; Zanardi, G; Saccani Jotti, G; Rubino, P; Manfredi, G; Chiodera, P

    2008-03-01

    The aim of this study was to test the possibility of enhancing blood calcium levels in totally thyroidectomized patients by supplementation with 1 L/d carbonate-bicarbonate-high-calcium mineral water. This study enrolled 95 outpatients, totally thyroidectomized four months earlier, and hence treated with oral calcium and vitamin-D. At recruitment, ionized blood calcium was either below (Group A; N. 55) or above (Group B; N. 40, randomly divided in Group B1 [N. 20] and Group B2 [N.20]) the lower limit of the normal range (1.12 mmol/L). For one month, Group A was treated with 1 L/d high-calcium (483 mg/L) mineral water and continued the usual therapy with Ca and vitamin-D. In contrast, Group B1 and Group B2 substituted their Ca and vitamin-D therapy with 1 L/d high-calcium mineral water (Group B1) or 1 L/d of placebo mineral water (Ca:80 mg/L) (Group B2). After one month, a significant 7.5% increase in blood ionized-calcium levels was observed in Group A, no change in Group B1 and a significant drop below normality in Group B2 (Group B2 vs Group B1, P<0.001). Thereafter, 1 L/d of the high-calcium mineral water, given to Group B2 instead of placebo for an additional month, significantly enhanced ionized-calcium levels above the lower limit of normality (Group B2 vs Group B1, NS). These experiments show that calcium supplementation as 1 L/d of a high-calcium mineral water may efficaciously enhance blood calcium levels in thyroidectomized patients. This complementary treatment might at least in part contribute to the prevention and/or treatment of hypocalcemia and substitute vitamin-D and calcium therapies after thyroidectomy.

  19. Evidence for influence of mineral weathering on stream water sulphate in Vermont and New Hampshire (USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, S. W.; Mayer, B.; Mitchell, M. J.

    2004-06-01

    Mass balance studies in forested catchments in the northeastern USA show that S losses via streamwater SO42- exceed measured atmospheric S inputs. Possible sources of the excess S loss include underestimated dry deposition, mineralization of organic S in soils, desorption of soil sulphate, oxidation of recently formed sulphides and mineral weathering. Evaluating the relative contribution of these sources and processes to SO42- export is important to our understanding of S cycling as well as to policy makers in their evaluation of the efficacy of S emission controls. In order to evaluate the potential for mineral weathering contributions to SO42- export, we measured concentration and isotopic composition (34S and δ18O) of SO42- in stream water, and concentration and δ34S values of four S fractions in bedrock and soil parent material in catchments of varying geological composition. Geological substrates with low S concentrations were represented by catchments underlain by quartzite and granite, whereas geological substrates with high S concentrations were represented by catchments underlain by sulphidic slate, schist and metavolcanic rocks. Catchments with S-poor bedrock had stream-water SO42- concentrations <100 μeq L-1 and isotopic values consistent with those of atmospheric SO42- that had been cycled through the organic soil pool. Catchments with S-rich bedrock had stream-water SO42- concentrations ranging from 56 to 229 μeq L-1. Isotopic values deviated from those of SO42- in atmospheric deposition, clearly indicating a mineral weathering source in some cases, whereas in others spatial variability of mineral δ34S values precluded the isotopic detection of a weathering contribution. These results, along with evidence suggesting formation of secondary sulphate minerals in bedrock weathering rinds, indicate that mineral weathering may be an important source of S in the surface waters of some forested catchments in the northeastern USA.

  20. Geochemical Composition of Surface Water in the Mineralized Lom Basin, East Cameroon: Natural and Anthropogenic Sources.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mimba, M. E.; Ohba, T.; Nguemhe Fils, S. C.; Wirmvem, M. J.

    2016-12-01

    Thousands of people in East Cameroon depend on surface water for consumption and domestic purposes. The Lom basin, north of the region, is heavily mineralized especially in gold owing to its regional geological setting. Although research has been done regarding the rock type, age, formation history and reconnaissance gold surveys, surface water investigation in the area has received limited attention. Thus, this study appraises the first regional hydrogeochemical program for environmental assessment of the mineralized Lom basin. Fifty-two representative stream water samples were collected under base flow conditions and analysed for major cations (Ca2+, Mg2+, Na+, K+ ), major anions (HCO3-, F-, Cl-, NO2-, NO3-, Br-, PO43-, SO42- ) and stable isotopes (δD and δ18O). Calcium and HCO3- were the dominant ions. The chemical facies were CaHCO3 and NaHCO3 indicating surface water draining igneous/metamorphic rocks in hot and humid equatorial climate, resulting in the discordant dissolution of primary silicate minerals. From the isotopic evaluation, the stream water is of meteoric origin, shows negligible evaporation effect and has a common recharge source. The major ion geochemistry demonstrated the potential to discriminate between natural and anthropogenic origins. Distribution trends of Ca2+, Mg2+, Na+, K+, HCO3- and SO42- showed a correlation with the lithology and the occurrence of sulphide minerals associated with hydrothermal gold mineralization in the area. The distribution patterns of NO3- and Cl- reflect pollution from settlement. Overall, the chemistry of stream water in the Lom basin is mainly controlled by rock weathering compared to anthropogenic influence. Surface water quality is easily influenced by anthropogenic activities, and stream sediment collects effectively trace metals resulting from such activities. Hence, geochemical mapping incorporating stream water and stream sediment is of considerable value in future investigations within the Lom basin.

  1. Interaction between Bisphosphonates and Mineral Water: Study of Oral Risedronate Absorption in Rats.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Akihisa; Akagi, Yuuki; Shimomura, Hitoshi; Aoyama, Takao

    2016-01-01

    Bisphosphonates are antiosteoporotic agents prescribed for patients with osteoporosis. Drug package inserts for bisphosphonate supplements indicate that their bioavailability is reduced by high levels of metal cations (Ca(2+), Mg(2+), etc.). However, standards for these cations in water used for taking risedronate have not been defined. Here, we examined the effect of calcium and magnesium in mineral waters on the bioavailability of the third-generation bisphosphonate, risedronate, following oral administration in rats. As risedronate is unchanged and eliminated renally, risedronate absorption was estimated from the amount excreted in the urine. Risedronate was dissolved in mineral water samples and administered orally at 0.35 mg/kg. Urine samples were collected for 24 h after dosing. Risedronate was extracted from urine using ion-pair solid-phase cartridges and quantified by HPLC with UV detection (262 nm). Cumulative recovery of risedronate was calculated from the amount excreted in the urine. The 24-h recovery of risedronate from evian® (0.32±0.02% [mean±standard deviation (S.D.)], n=4) and Contrex(®) (0.22±0.05%) mineral waters was significantly lower than that from tap water (0.47±0.04%, p<0.01). Absorption of risedronate in calcium chloride and magnesium chloride aqueous solutions of the same hardness (822 mg/L) was 54% (0.27±0.04%) and 12% (0.51±0.08%) lower, respectively, compared with ultrapure water; suggesting that absorption of risedronate declines as the calcium concentration of mineral waters increases. Consumption of mineral waters containing high levels of calcium (80 mg/L or above), such as evian® and Contrex(®), is therefore not recommended when taking risedronate.

  2. [Thiamine metabolism in experimental hepatitis and the intake of Naftusia mineral water].

    PubMed

    Leus, N F

    1986-01-01

    The level and metabolism of vitamin B1 and its coenzymic form were studied in the tissues and subcellular structures of the internal organs of white rats with experimental toxic hepatitis, receiving mineral water naphtusya. It was found that naphtusya given per os stimulated the metabolism of thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP), enhanced its concentration in the hepatic tissue and intestinal mucosa, producing a stabilizing effect on the TPP activity. It is concluded that the mineral water naphtusya can be used for enteral correction of vitamin balance in hepatitis patients.

  3. Several properties offilament fibers made from recycled bottles of mineral water using melt spinning method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muslim, Ikhwanul; Mardiyati; Basuki, Arif

    2016-01-01

    Waste mineral water bottles made of PET called post-consumer POSTC-PET packaging with recycling code no. 1 can be made into another material other than the bottle by using a mechanical recycling process. In this experiment carried waste recycling process bottled mineral water bottles of PET into filament fibres with the aid of a melt spinning. From the resulting experimental filament fibres diameter of 14-15 microns, obtained the draw ratio is 1/46, 573,5 - 699,8 MPa tensile strength, modulus of elasticity of 2,01 - 2,45GPa, moisture regain of 2,84. Keywords. PET; Bottle; Fiber; Melt; Spinning; Drawing.

  4. In vitro inhibition of sperm motility by some local mineral water drinks.

    PubMed

    Oyelola, O O; Ayangade, S O; Amole, F

    1987-10-01

    The effect of eight common local mineral water drinks in Ile-Ife, Nigeria (seven cola and one lemon-based) on sperm motility in vitro was carried out. There was no significant difference in the pH values of all the drinks, the pH ranged between 2.30-2.50. After one minute, Pepsi-Cola had the least inhibitory effect on sperm motility, Bitter-lemon had the strongest effect, while the other brands had varying effects between the two extremes. The percentage motility inhibition by the mineral water drinks is also a function of the initial total sperm count in the semen.

  5. Innovative Approaches to Teaching Packaging Design Using the Example of Mineral Water Supply Chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lestyánszka Škůrková, Katarína; Bajor, Peter; Trafela, Sabrina

    2013-12-01

    Designing the packaging of a product has many critical factors. In our paper, we present some of them on the example of a simple product: mineral water. In spite of the fact that today not only products, but also supply chains are competing with each other, designers sometimes pay little attention to considering the packaging system not only from the customer and the producer side, but for warehousing and transportation as well. We cover a lot of "what can go wrong" scenarios on the example of mineral water packaging for the purpose of defining the critical points in the supply chain.

  6. Effects of drain-fill cycling on chlorpyrifos mineralization in wetland sediment-water microcosms.

    PubMed

    Gebremariam, Seyoum Yami; Beutel, Marc W

    2010-03-01

    Constructed treatment wetlands are efficient at retaining a range of pesticides, however the ultimate fate of many of these compound is not well understood. This study evaluated the effect of drain-fill cycling on the mineralization of chlorpyrifos, a commonly used organophosphate insecticide, in wetland sediment-water microcosms. Monitoring of the fate of (14)C ring-labeled chlorpyrifos showed that drain-fill cycling resulted in significantly lower mineralization rates relative to permanently flooded conditions. The reduction in mineralization was linked to enhanced partitioning of the pesticide to the sediment phase, which could potentially inhibit chlorpyrifos hydrolysis and mineralization. Over the nearly two-month experiment, less than 2.5% of the added compound was mineralized. While rates of mineralization in this experiment were higher than those reported for other soils and sediments, their low magnitude underscores how persistent chlorpyrifos and its metabolites are in aquatic environments, and suggests that management strategies and ecological risk assessment should focus more on ultimate mineralization rather than the simple disappearance of the parent compound.

  7. Effect of Water on the Surface Composition of Irradiated Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dukes, C. A.; Baragiola, R. A.

    2010-03-01

    Sections of olivine and augite exposed to 10^17 Ar cm-2 ion irradiation and then rinsed in water or exposed to a humid enviornment show up to 60% depletion of surface cations. This has implications for sample return and curation.

  8. Minerals in drinking water: impacts on taste and importance to consumer health.

    PubMed

    Whelton, A J; Dietrich, A M; Burlingame, G A; Schechs, M; Duncan, S E

    2007-01-01

    More than 100 years of research has focused on removing acute and chronic health threats to produce safe drinking water, but limited research has focused the consequences of removing minerals that affect drinking water taste and health. This paper covers the human sense of taste, typical variations in drinking water taste, comparisons of global taste standards, the role of water chemistry and future research needs for understanding consumer preference. Results of several consumer tap and bottled water acceptability investigations conducted by the authors are presented.

  9. Floating bioplato for purification of waste quarry waters from mineral nitrogen compounds in the Arctic.

    PubMed

    Evdokimova, Galina A; Ivanova, Lyubov A; Mozgova, Natalia P; Myazin, Vladimir A; Fokina, Nadezhda V

    2016-08-23

    A bioplato was organized at Kirovogorskiy pond-settling of OLKON Company (the city of Olenegorsk, in Murmansk region) to reduce the content of nitrogen mineral compounds in water which come into the pond with the quarry waters after blasting operations using nitrogen compounds. The assortment of aboriginal plants was selected, a method of fixing and growing them on the water surface was developed, and observations of their vegetation were carried out. The dynamics of nitrogen compounds was determined in the laboratory and with full-scale tests. The coverage area pond by plants for the effective reduction of mineral nitrogen compounds was calculated. The use of floating bioplato helped to reduce content of ammonium and nitrite to maximum permissible levels or even lower in pond water. Also there was a tendency towards reduction of nitrate concentrations in water. The developmental technology can be used in any climatic zone with a specific assortment of plants-ameliorants.

  10. Mineral Identification as an Indicator of Water and Geochemical History on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, J. L.

    2000-07-01

    Mineral identification on Mars is an essential aspect of basic geological science that will provide information about the climate and geochemical history of the planet and provide clues about the existence and extent of past water bodies or systems on Mars. Remote spectral data from orbiters, landers and rovers are the primary source of information about the surface mineralogy on Mars. Chemical and magnetic data also constrain the types or abundance of minerals present. The most successful mineral identification procedures will include data from a combination of spectral regions, as well as chemical and magnetic data. Other techniques, such as Moessbauer spectroscopy and thermal analysis (DTA, DSC, TGA), have been suggested for in situ measurements on the Martian surface; these analyses in combination with spectral and chemical data would enable even more precise identification of the types or classes of minerals present on Mars.

  11. Unique CO2-saturated mineral waters of the Mukhen deposit (Khabarovsk Krai): Composition and genesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharitonova, N. A.; Shvartsev, S. L.; Lepokurova, O. E.; Chelnokov, G. A.

    2017-08-01

    The results of studies of the ion-salt, gas, and isotopic compositions of unique CO2-saturated cold mineral waters from the Mukhen deposit, as well as the results of calculation of equilibrium in the water-rock system, are presented. Taking these data and the geological structure of the territory into account, it was shown that the source of water solutions is atmospheric precipitates and the source of CO2 is buried rocks that undergo metamorphism. The long-term interaction in the water-rock-CO2 system has provided uniquely high salinity to these waters. The scale formation of secondary minerals (clays of different composition and Ca and Mg carbonates) in the system determined HCO3-Na and an atypical isotopic composition of the waters. The concept developed has established that CO2-saturated mineral waters are formed as a result of migration of CO2 from the deeper crustal zones through the zones of tectonic faults and the subsequent chemical interaction with infiltration waters, rather than because of magmatic or volcanic activity.

  12. Chemical and isotopic composition of water from thermal springs and mineral springs of Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mariner, R.H.; Presser, T.S.; Evans, William C.

    1982-01-01

    Water from thermal springs of Washington range in chemical composition from dilute NaHC03, to moderately saline C02-charged NaHC03-Cl waters. St. Martin 's Hot Spring which discharges a slightly saline NaCl water, is the notable exception. Mineral springs generally discharge a moderately saline C02-charged NaHC03-Cl water. The dilute Na-HC03 waters are generally associated with granite. The warm to hot waters charged with C02 issue on or near the large stratovolcanoes and many of the mineral springs also occur near the large volcanoes. The dilute waters have oxygen isotopic compositions which indicate relatively little water-rock exchange. The C02-charged waters are usually more enriched in oxygen-18 due to more extensive water-rock reaction. Carbon-13 in the C02-charged thermal waters is more depleted (-10 to -12 permil) than in the cold C02-charged soda springs (-2 to -8 permil) which are also scattered throughout the Cascades. The hot and cold C02-charged waters are supersaturated with respect to CaC03, but only the hot springs are actively depositing CaC03. Baker, Gamma, Sulphur , and Ohanapecosh seem to be associated with thermal aquifers of more than 100C. (USGS)

  13. Survival of human pathogenic bacteria in different types of natural mineral water.

    PubMed

    Serrano, Concepción; Romero, Margarita; Alou, Luis; Sevillano, David; Corvillo, Iluminada; Armijo, Francisco; Maraver, Francisco

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the survival of human pathogens (Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) in five natural mineral waters (NMWs) with different properties and mineralization levels. Five NMWs from four Spanish spas with different dry residue at 110 °C were used: A = 76,935 mg/L; B = 1,827 mg/L; C = 808.4 mg/L; D = 283.8 mg/L; and E = 170.4 mg/L. An initial inoculum of 1 × 10(6) colony forming units (cfu)/mL was used for survival studies. Distilled water, chlorinated tap water and Mueller-Hinton broth were used as controls. Colony counts in all different waters were lower than those achieved with Mueller-Hinton broth over all incubation periods. A direct effect between the bacterial survival and the level of mineralization water was observed. The NMW E with low mineralization level along with the radioactive properties showed the highest antibacterial activity among all NMWs.

  14. Water-soluble organophosphorus reagents for mineralization of heavy metals.

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, K. L.

    1999-02-26

    In this report, we have described the principal stages of a two-step process for the in-situ stabilization of actinide ions in the environment. The combination of cation exchange and mineralization appears likely to provide a long-term solution to environments contaminated with heavy metals. Relying on a naturally occurring sequestering agent has obvious potential advantages from a regulatory standpoint. There are additional aspects of this technology requiring further elucidation, including the demonstration of the effect of these treatment protocols on the geohydrology of soil columns, further examination of the influence of humates and other colloidal species on cation uptake, and microbiological studies of phytate hydrolysis. We have learned during the course of this investigation that phytic acid is potentially available in large quantities. In the US alone, phytic acid is produced at an annual rate of several hundred thousand metric tons as a byproduct of fermentation processes (11). This material presently is not isolated for use. Instead, most of the insoluble phyate (as phytin) is being recycled along with the other solid fermentation residues for animal feed. This material is in fact considered undesirable in animal feed. The details of possible separation processes for phytate from these residues would have to be worked out before this untapped resource would be available for application to heavy metal sequestration. The results described emphasize the behavior of actinide and trivalent lanthanide metal ions, as these species are of primary interest to the Department of Energy for the cleanup of the former nuclear weapons production complex. While the specific demonstration includes this limited selection of metal ions, the technique should be readily applicable to any class of metal ions that form insoluble phosphate compounds under appropriate conditions. Further, though this demonstration has been conducted in the pH 5-8 range, it is conceivable that

  15. Mars Gully: No Mineral Trace of Liquid Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    This image of the Centauri-Hellas Montes region was taken by the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) at 2107 UTC (4:07 p.m. EST) on Jan. 9, 2007, near 38.41 degrees south latitude, 96.81 degrees east longitude. CRISM's image was taken in 544 colors covering 0.36-3.92 micrometers, and shows features as small as 20 meters (66 feet) across. The region covered is slightly wider than 10 kilometers (6.2 miles) at its narrowest point.

    Narrow gullies found on hills and crater walls in many mid-latitude regions of Mars have been interpreted previously as cut by geologically 'recent' running water, meaning water that flowed on Mars long after impact cratering, tectonic forces, volcanism or other processes created the underlying landforms. Some gullies even eroded into sand dunes, which would date their formation at thousands to millions of years ago, or less. In fact, Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) images showed two of the gullies have bright deposits near their downslope ends - but those deposits were absent in images taken just a few years earlier. The bright deposits must have formed within the period 1999-2004.

    Has there been running water on Mars so recently? To address that question, CRISM and MRO's other instruments observed the bright gully deposits. CRISM's objective was to determine if the bright deposits contained salts left behind from water evaporating into Mars' thin air. The high-resolution imager's (HiRISE's) objective was to determine if the small-scale morphology was consistent with formation by running water.

    This CRISM image of a bright gully deposit was constructed by showing 2.53, 1.50, and 1.08 micrometer light in the red, green, and blue image planes. CRISM can just resolve the deposits (highlighted by arrows in the inset), which are only a few tens of meters (about 150 feet) across. The spectrum of the deposits barely differs from that of the surrounding material, and is just a little brighter. This difference

  16. Mars Gully: No Mineral Trace of Liquid Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    This image of the Centauri-Hellas Montes region was taken by the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) at 2107 UTC (4:07 p.m. EST) on Jan. 9, 2007, near 38.41 degrees south latitude, 96.81 degrees east longitude. CRISM's image was taken in 544 colors covering 0.36-3.92 micrometers, and shows features as small as 20 meters (66 feet) across. The region covered is slightly wider than 10 kilometers (6.2 miles) at its narrowest point.

    Narrow gullies found on hills and crater walls in many mid-latitude regions of Mars have been interpreted previously as cut by geologically 'recent' running water, meaning water that flowed on Mars long after impact cratering, tectonic forces, volcanism or other processes created the underlying landforms. Some gullies even eroded into sand dunes, which would date their formation at thousands to millions of years ago, or less. In fact, Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) images showed two of the gullies have bright deposits near their downslope ends - but those deposits were absent in images taken just a few years earlier. The bright deposits must have formed within the period 1999-2004.

    Has there been running water on Mars so recently? To address that question, CRISM and MRO's other instruments observed the bright gully deposits. CRISM's objective was to determine if the bright deposits contained salts left behind from water evaporating into Mars' thin air. The high-resolution imager's (HiRISE's) objective was to determine if the small-scale morphology was consistent with formation by running water.

    This CRISM image of a bright gully deposit was constructed by showing 2.53, 1.50, and 1.08 micrometer light in the red, green, and blue image planes. CRISM can just resolve the deposits (highlighted by arrows in the inset), which are only a few tens of meters (about 150 feet) across. The spectrum of the deposits barely differs from that of the surrounding material, and is just a little brighter. This difference

  17. Extraction of reusable water from a mineral mining process

    SciTech Connect

    Gleim, W.K.

    1982-01-19

    A method for the treatment of an aqueous effluent slime derived from a tar sand extraction process is disclosed. The effluent slime ph is adjusted to an acidic ph and treated with an anionic surface active agent to create flocculation of solid asphaltic material entrained within the slime. A solvent solution comprising chlorinated hydrocarbon and a solvent therefor is added so that upon centrifuging of the treated slime three physical layers of material comprising (1) water; (2) asphaltics in the solvent solution and (3) clay are formed.

  18. [Laboratories "Produits Scientia" and mineral waters from Pougues and Carabana].

    PubMed

    Raynal, Cécile; Lefebvre, Thierry

    2011-10-01

    In the end of XIXth century, the french "Compagnie des eaux minérales de Pougues-les-Eaux" begins to exploit the spanish natural purgativ water of Carabaña. In the same way, Edouard Jéramec, director of the french compagny, decides to associate to his firm the best medicine to fight against rickets and tuberculosis. He joins the new medical theory wich recommends to give more calcium to tubercular patients, called "méthode de recalcification du Dr Ferrier". Then, with the chemist Emile Perraudin, he creates the pharmaceutical laboratory named "Produits Scientia". One of their famous patents medicines will be the "Tricalcine".

  19. Electromembrane recycling of highly mineralized alkaline blowdown water from evaporative water treatment plants at thermal power stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chichirova, N. D.; Chichirov, A. A.; Lyapin, A. I.; Minibaev, A. I.; Silov, I. Yu.; Tolmachev, L. I.

    2016-12-01

    Thermal power stations (TPS) are the main source of highly mineralized effluents affecting the environment. An analysis of their water systems demonstrates that alkaline effluents prevail at TPSs. Extraction of an alkali from highly mineralized effluents can make the recycling of effluents economically feasible. A method is proposed of electromembrane recycling of liquid alkaline highly mineralized wastes from TPSs. The process includes electromembrane apparatuses of two types, namely, a diffusion dialysis extractor (DDE) intended for extraction of the alkali from a highly mineralized solution having a complex composition and an electrodialysis concentrator for increasing the concentration of the extracted solution to a value suitable for use in water treatment plants at TPSs. For implementation of the first process (i.e. the extraction of alkali from alkaline-salt solution) various membranes from various manufacturers were studied: CM-PAD and AM-PAD (Ralex, Czechia), MK-40, MA-40, MA-41, MA-414, and MB-2 (OOO OKhK "Shchekinoazot", Russia), AR103-QDF and CR61-CMP (Ionies Inc., USA). The experiments demonstrate that the acceptable degree of separation of the alkali and the salt is achieved in a pair of cation-exchange membranes with the efficiency of separation being higher without an electric field. The highest efficiency was attained with Russian-made membranes (MK-40, OOO OKhK "Shchekinoazot"). A full scale experiment on recycling of highly-mineralized blowdown water from the evaporating water treatment system at the Kazan cogeneration power station No. 3 (TETs-3) was performed in a pilot unit consisting of two electromembrane apparatuses made by UAB "Membraninės Technologijos LT". In the experiments every ton of blowdown water yielded 0.1 t of concentrated alkaline solution with an alkali content of up to 4 wt % and 0.9 t of the softened salt solution suitable for the reuse in the TPS cycle. The power rate is 6 kWh / ton of blowdown water.

  20. Sugar and inorganic anions content in mineral and spring water-based beverages.

    PubMed

    Bilek, Maciej; Matłok, Natalia; Kaniuczak, Janina; Gorzelany, Józef

    2014-01-01

    Carbonated and non-carbonated beverages manufactured based on mineral and spring waters have been present at the Polish market shortly, and their production and sales are regularly growing. The products have become commonly known as flavoured waters. The aim of the work was to identify and assess the content of carbohydrates used for sweetening mineral and spring water-based beverages and to estimate a concentration of inorganic anions. The study was undertaken for 15 mineral and spring water-based beverages subject to an analysis contents of fructose, glucose and sucrose with the high-performance liquid chromatography method with ELSD detection) and chlorides, nitrates and sulphates contents using the ion chromatography method. A chromatographic analysis has confirmed the total contents of sugar declared by the manufacturers. The carbohydrates identified included fructose, glucose and sucrose (added sugar). Chlorides and sulphates were found in the content of all the analysed beverages while nitrates were not determined in only one of the 15 examined beverages. Mass consumption of mineral and spring water-based beverages should be considered as an important source of sugar and their excessive consumption may be disadvantageous for human health. A consumer should be informed by a manufacturer about a daily dose of sugar in a portion of a drink in per cents, and the easiest way to do it is to provide GDA marks on the label. Mineral and spring water-based beverages do not pose threats to consumer health in terms of their contents of inorganic ions: chlorides, nitrates and sulphates.

  1. Water in the Earth's Mantle: Mineral-specific IR Absorption Coefficients and Radiative Thermal Conductivities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, S. M.

    2015-12-01

    Minor and trace element chemistry, phase relations, rheology, thermal structure and the role of volatiles and their abundance in the deep Earth mantle are still far from fully explored, but fundamental to understanding the processes involved in Earth formation and evolution. Theory and high pressure experiments imply a significant water storage capacity of nominally anhydrous minerals, such as majoritic garnet, olivine, wadsleyite and ringwoodite, composing the Earth's upper mantle and transition zone to a depth of 660 km. Studying the effect of water incorporation on chemical and physical mineral properties is of importance, because the presence of trace amounts of water, incorporated as OH through charge-coupled chemical substitutions into such nominally anhydrous high-pressure silicates, notably influences phase relations, melting behavior, conductivity, elasticity, viscosity and rheology. Knowledge of absolute water contents in nominally anhydrous minerals is essential for modeling the Earth's interior water cycle. One of the most common and sensitive tools for water quantification is IR spectroscopy for which mineral-specific absorption coefficients are required. Such calibration constants can be derived from hydrogen concentrations determined by independent techniques, such as secondary ion mass spectrometry, Raman spectroscopy or proton-proton(pp)-scattering. Here, analytical advances and mineral-specific IR absorption coefficients for the quantification of H2O in major phases of the Earth's mantle will be discussed. Furthermore, new data from optical absorption measurements in resistively heated diamond-anvil cells at high pressures and temperatures up to 1000 K will be presented. Experiments were performed on synthetic single-crystals of olivine, ringwoodite, majoritic garnet, and Al-bearing phase D with varying iron, aluminum and OH contents to calculate radiative thermal conductivities and study their contribution to heat transfer in the Earth's interior

  2. Helicobacter pylori in bottled mineral water: genotyping and antimicrobial resistance properties.

    PubMed

    Ranjbar, Reza; Khamesipour, Faham; Jonaidi-Jafari, Nematollah; Rahimi, Ebrahim

    2016-03-12

    Up to now, fecal-oral and oral-oral are the most commonly known routes for transmission of H. pylori, therefore, contaminated water can play an important role in transmission of H. pylori to humans. Genotyping using virulence markers of H. pylori is one of the best approaches to study the correlations between H. pylori isolates from different samples. The present research was carried out to study the vacA, cagA, cagE, oipA, iceA and babA2 genotyping and antimicrobial resistance properties of H. pylori isolated from the bottled mineral water samples of Iran. Of 450 samples studied, 8 samples (1.77%) were contaminated with H. pylori. Brand C of bottled mineral water had the highest prevalence of H. pylori (3.63%). The bottled mineral water samples of July month had the highest levels of H. pylori-contamination (50%). H. pylori strains had the highest levels of resistance against metronidazole (62.5%), erythromycin (62.5%), clarithromycin (62.5%), amoxicillin (62.5%) and trimethoprim (62.5%). Totally, 12.5% of strains were resistant to more than 6 antibiotics. VvacAs1a (100%), vacAm1a (87.5%), cagA (62.5%), iceA1 (62.5%), oipA (25%), babA2 (25%) and cagE (37.5%) were the most commonly detected genotypes. M1as1a (62.5%), m1as2 (37.5%), m2s2 (37.5%) and S1a/cagA+/IceA2/oipA-/babA2-/cagE- (50%) were the most commonly detected combined genotypes. Contaminated bottled mineral water maybe the sources of virulent and resistant strains H. pylori. Careful monitoring of bottled mineral water production may reduce the risk of H. pylori transmission into the human population.

  3. Discrimination of fish oil and mineral oil slicks on sea water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mac Dowall, J.

    1969-01-01

    Fish oil and mineral oil slicks on sea water can be discriminated by their different spreading characteristics and by their reflectivities and color variations over a range of wavelengths. Reflectivities of oil and oil films are determined using a duel beam reflectance apparatus.

  4. [Radioprotective effect of drinking sulfate mineral water on spermatogenesis in offspring of irradiated male rats].

    PubMed

    Korolev, Iu N; Geniatulina, M S; Nikulina, L A; Kurilo, L F

    2003-01-01

    Histological and electron-microscopic studies of a radioprotective action of drinking sulphate mineral water (SMW) on spermatogenesis of irradiated male rats' progeny have found that SMW used before radiation (2 Gy) and 10 days after it is able to reduce postradiation sequelae in the progeny (2-5 month and 1.5 year old rats) testes.

  5. Possible antioxidant role of SPA therapy with chlorine-sulphur-bicarbonate mineral water.

    PubMed

    Costantino, M; Giuberti, G; Caraglia, M; Lombardi, A; Misso, G; Abbruzzese, A; Ciani, F; Lampa, E

    2009-02-01

    The aim of our research was to analyze the antioxidant role and efficacy of thermal or salus per aquam (spa) therapy with chlorine-sulphur-bicarbonate mineral water. The study has been performed on 30 rats. The animals were randomized in three groups, each of them composed by ten animals, denominated A, B and C. The A group was the control group and was not subjected to any specific treatment (placebo); the B group has been treated with a standard cycle of hydropinics treatment with mineral water of Therme of Stabia in Castellammare (Naples, Italy) denominated STABIA; the C group was treated with a standard cycle of hydropinic treatment with mineral water of Therme of Stabia in Castellammare (Naples, Italy) denominated SULFUREA. After two weeks of treatment all the rats were sacrificed and blood was collected for the plasmatic determination of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The results demonstrated a significant (P < 0.05) reduction of ROS in B (374 Carr. U. +/-73) and C group (399 carr. U. +/-62) treated with mineral waters if compared with control group (571 + 69 Carr. U.). In conclusion this study suggests a possible antioxidant effect of chlorine-sulphur-bicarbonate spa hydropinic treatment with a consequent suitable intestinal physiology, with reduction of the functional and organic modifications that can lead to pathological disorders of the gastroenteric diseases in whose pathogenesis the oxidative stress can develop an important role.

  6. STIMULATION OF FUNDULUS BY HYDROCHLORIC AND FATTY ACIDS IN FRESH WATER, AND BY FATTY ACIDS, MINERAL ACIDS, AND THE SODIUM SALTS OF MINERAL ACIDS IN SEA WATER

    PubMed Central

    Allison, J. B.; Cole, William H.

    1934-01-01

    1. Fundulus heteroclitus was found to be a reliable experimental animal for studies on chemical stimulation in either fresh or sea water. 2. The response of Fundulus to hydrochloric, acetic, propionic, butyric, valeric, and caproic acids was determined in fresh water, while the same acids plus sulfuric and nitric, as well as the sodium salts of the mineral acids, were tested in sea water. 3. Stimulation of Fundulus by hydrochloric acid in fresh water is correlated with the effective hydrogen ion concentration. Stimulation by the n-aliphatic acids in the same environment is correlated with two factors, the effective hydrogen ion concentration and the potential of the non-polar group in the molecule. However, as the number of CH2 groups increases the stimulating effect increases by smaller and smaller amounts, approaching a maximum value. 4. Stimulation of Fundulus by hydrochloric, sulfuric, and nitric acids in sea water is correlated with the forces of primary valence which in turn are correlated with the change in hydrogen ion concentration of the sea water. The n-aliphatic acids increase in stimulating efficiency in sea water as the length of the carbon chain increases, but a limiting value is not reached as soon as in fresh water. 5. Only a slight difference in stimulation by hydrochloric acid is found in sea water and in fresh water. However, there is a significant difference in stimulation by the fatty acids in fresh and in sea water, which is partly explained by the different buffering capacities of the two media. It is to be noted that in the same environment two different fish, Fundulus and Eupomotis, give different results, while the same fish (Fundulus) in two different environments responds similarly to mineral acids but differently to fatty acids. These results illustrate that stimulation is a function of the interaction between environment and receptors, and that each is important in determining the response. 6. Stimulation by sodium chloride, nitrate

  7. Mineralization of 2,4,6-Trinitrotoleune (TNT) in Coastal Waters and Sediments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-21

    water and sediment and an increase in heterotrophic activity by the natural assemblage, which was attributed to TNT additions. Exposure of soil...DAT into the natural microbial assemblage. In general, the bacterial mineralizations rates were similar, or an order of magnitude faster, than those...light and unfiltered water was greater than the sum of the two rates (103 ug L-1 d-1), suggesting either that the prescnce of active phytoplankton

  8. Bottled aqua incognita: microbiota assembly and dissolved organic matter diversity in natural mineral waters.

    PubMed

    Lesaulnier, Celine C; Herbold, Craig W; Pelikan, Claus; Berry, David; Gérard, Cédric; Le Coz, Xavier; Gagnot, Sophie; Niggemann, Jutta; Dittmar, Thorsten; Singer, Gabriel A; Loy, Alexander

    2017-09-22

    Non-carbonated natural mineral waters contain microorganisms that regularly grow after bottling despite low concentrations of dissolved organic matter (DOM). Yet, the compositions of bottled water microbiota and organic substrates that fuel microbial activity, and how both change after bottling, are still largely unknown. We performed a multifaceted analysis of microbiota and DOM diversity in 12 natural mineral waters from six European countries. 16S rRNA gene-based analyses showed that less than 10 species-level operational taxonomic units (OTUs) dominated the bacterial communities in the water phase and associated with the bottle wall after a short phase of post-bottling growth. Members of the betaproteobacterial genera Curvibacter, Aquabacterium, and Polaromonas (Comamonadaceae) grew in most waters and represent ubiquitous, mesophilic, heterotrophic aerobes in bottled waters. Ultrahigh-resolution mass spectrometry of DOM in bottled waters and their corresponding source waters identified thousands of molecular formulae characteristic of mostly refractory, soil-derived DOM. The bottle environment, including source water physicochemistry, selected for growth of a similar low-diversity microbiota across various bottled waters. Relative abundance changes of hundreds of multi-carbon molecules were related to growth of less than ten abundant OTUs. We thus speculate that individual bacteria cope with oligotrophic conditions by simultaneously consuming diverse DOM molecules.

  9. Climatic and landscape controls on water transit times and silicate mineral weathering in the critical zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zapata-Rios, Xavier; McIntosh, Jennifer; Rademacher, Laura; Troch, Peter A.; Brooks, Paul D.; Rasmussen, Craig; Chorover, Jon

    2015-08-01

    The critical zone (CZ) can be conceptualized as an open system reactor that is continually transforming energy and water fluxes into an internal structural organization and dissipative products. In this study, we test a controlling factor on water transit times (WTT) and mineral weathering called Effective Energy and Mass Transfer (EEMT). We hypothesize that EEMT, quantified based on local climatic variables, can effectively predict WTT within—and mineral weathering products from—the CZ. This study tests whether EEMT or static landscape characteristics are good predictors of WTT, aqueous phase solutes, and silicate weathering products. Our study site is located around Redondo Peak, a rhyolitic volcanic resurgent dome, in northern New Mexico. At Redondo Peak, springs drain slopes along an energy gradient created by differences in terrain aspect. This investigation uses major solute concentrations, the calculated mineral mass undergoing dissolution, and the age tracer tritium and relates them quantitatively to EEMT and landscape characteristics. We found significant correlations between EEMT, WTT, and mineral weathering products. Significant correlations were observed between dissolved weathering products (Na+ and DIC), 3H concentrations, and maximum EEMT. In contrast, landscape characteristics such as contributing area of spring, slope gradient, elevation, and flow path length were not as effective predictive variables of WTT, solute concentrations, and mineral weathering products. These results highlight the interrelationship between landscape, hydrological, and biogeochemical processes and suggest that basic climatic data embodied in EEMT can be used to scale hydrological and hydrochemical responses in other sites.

  10. Homogenous VUV advanced oxidation process for enhanced degradation and mineralization of antibiotics in contaminated water.

    PubMed

    Pourakbar, Mojtaba; Moussavi, Gholamreza; Shekoohiyan, Sakine

    2016-03-01

    This study was aimed to evaluate the degradation and mineralization of amoxicillin(AMX), using VUV advanced process. The effect of pH, AMX initial concentration, presence of water ingredients, the effect of HRT, and mineralization level by VUV process were taken into consideration. In order to make a direct comparison, the test was also performed by UVC radiation. The results show that the degradation of AMX was following the first-order kinetic. It was found that direct photolysis by UVC was able to degrade 50mg/L of AMX in 50min,while it was 3min for VUV process. It was also found that the removal efficiency by VUV process was directly influenced by pH of the solution, and higher removal rates were achieved at high pH values.The results show that 10mg/L of AMX was completely degraded and mineralized within 50s and 100s, respectively, indicating that the AMX was completely destructed into non-hazardous materials. Operating the photoreactor in contentious-flow mode revealed that 10mg/L AMX was completely degraded and mineralized at HRT values of 120s and 300s. it was concluded that the VUV advanced process was an efficient and viable technique for degradation and mineralization of contaminated water by antibiotics.

  11. Formation of water-soluble metal cyanide complexes from solid minerals by Pseudomonas plecoglossicida.

    PubMed

    Faramarzi, Mohammad A; Brandl, Helmut

    2006-06-01

    A few Pseudomonas species are able to form hydrocyanic acid (HCN), particularly when grown under glycine-rich conditions. In the presence of metals, cyanide can form water-soluble metal complexes of high chemical stability. We studied the possibility to mobilize metals as cyanide complexes from solid minerals using HCN-forming microorganisms. Pseudomonas plecoglossicida was cultivated in the presence of copper- and nickel-containing solid minerals. On powdered elemental nickel, fast HCN generation within the first 12 h of incubation was observed and water-soluble tetracyanaonickelate was formed. Cuprite, tenorite, chrysocolla, malachite, bornite, turquoise, millerite, pentlandite as well as shredded electronic scrap was also subjected to a biological treatment. Maximum concentrations of cyanide-complexed copper corresponded to a solubilization of 42% and 27% when P. plecoglossicida was grown in the presence of cuprite or tenorite, respectively. Crystal system, metal oxidation state and mineral hydrophobicity might have a significant influence on metal mobilization. However, it was not possible to allocate metal mobilization to a single mineral property. Cyanide-complexed gold was detected during growth on manually cut circuit boards. Maximum dicyanoaurate concentration corresponded to a 68.5% dissolution of the total gold added. These findings represent a novel type of microbial mobilization of nickel and copper from solid minerals based on the ability of certain microbes to form HCN.

  12. Urban net-zero water treatment and mineralization: experiments, modeling and design.

    PubMed

    Englehardt, James D; Wu, Tingting; Tchobanoglous, George

    2013-09-01

    Water and wastewater treatment and conveyance account for approximately 4% of US electric consumption, with 80% used for conveyance. Net zero water (NZW) buildings would alleviate demands for a portion of this energy, for water, and for the treatment of drinking water for pesticides and toxic chemical releases in source water. However, domestic wastewater contains nitrogen loads much greater than urban/suburban ecosystems can typically absorb. The purpose of this work was to identify a first design of a denitrifying urban NZW treatment process, operating at ambient temperature and pressure and circum-neutral pH, and providing mineralization of pharmaceuticals (not easily regulated in terms of environmental half-life), based on laboratory tests and mass balance and kinetic modeling. The proposed treatment process is comprised of membrane bioreactor, iron-mediated aeration (IMA, reported previously), vacuum ultrafiltration, and peroxone advanced oxidation, with minor rainwater make-up and H2O2 disinfection residual. Similar to biological systems, minerals accumulate subject to precipitative removal by IMA, salt-free treatment, and minor dilution. Based on laboratory and modeling results, the system can produce potable water with moderate mineral content from commingled domestic wastewater and 10-20% rainwater make-up, under ambient conditions at individual buildings, while denitrifying and reducing chemical oxygen demand to below detection (<3 mg/L). While economics appear competitive, further development and study of steady-state concentrations and sludge management options are needed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. [Combined effect of musically-modulated electrical current and mineral drinking water from Khadyzhensky spring in experimental atherosclerosis].

    PubMed

    Zubkova, S M; Varakina, N I; Mikhaĭlik, L V; Bobkova, A S; Chabanenko, S S

    2002-01-01

    Male rats with experimental atherosclerosis drank mineral water (Khadyzhensky spring) and were exposed to music-modulated electric current. This combined treatment showed synergism of physical (current) and balneological (mineral water) factors providing lipolytic, antioxidant, stress-limiting and antiinflammatory intravascular effects and recovery of microcirculatory processes.

  14. Investigating water adsorption onto natural mineral dust particles: Linking DRIFTS experiments and BET theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Nitesh; Romanias, Manolis N.; Riffault, Veronique; Thevenet, Frederic

    2017-08-01

    The adsorption of water molecules on natural mineral dusts was investigated employing in situ Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Fourier Transform Spectroscopy (DRIFTS). The natural dust samples originated from North and West Africa, Saudi Arabia and Gobi desert regions. Furthermore, the hygroscopicity of commercially available Arizona Test Dusts (ATDs) and Icelandic volcanic ash were examined. N2 sorption measurements, X-ray fluorescence and diffraction (XRF and XRD), as well as Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) analyses were performed to determine the physicochemical properties of the particles. The water adsorption experiments were conducted in an optical cell, at room temperature under the relative humidity (RH) range of 1.9-95%. Results were simulated using a modified three-parameter Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) equation. Water monolayer (ML) was formed in the RH range of 15-25%, while additional water layers were formed at higher RH. Besides, the standard adsorption enthalpies of water onto natural mineral dust samples were determined. A thorough comparison of two commercially available ATD samples indicated that size distribution and/or porosity should play a key role in particle hygroscopicity. Regarding the natural mineral particles, Ca/Si ratios, and to a lesser extent Al/Si, Na/Si, Mg/Si ratios, were found to impact the minimum RH level required for water monolayer formation. These results suggest that the hygroscopic properties of investigated African dusts are quite similar over the whole investigated RH range. Furthermore, one of the major conclusions is that under most atmospheric relative humidity conditions, natural mineral samples are always covered with at least one layer of adsorbed water.

  15. Molecular statics calculations for iron oxide and oxyhydroxide minerals: Toward a flexible model of the reactive mineral-water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rustad, James R.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Hay, Benjamin P.

    1996-05-01

    Molecular statics calculations are used to model the major FeOOH polymorphs and hematite. The potentials were taken from a previous investigation of Fe(III) in aqueous solutions which involved the extrapolation of the gas-phase Fe(III)-OH 2 potential energy surface to the solvated hexaaqua complex. Using this model for the solid phases, lattice parameters for goethite, akaganeite, lepidocrocite, and hematite are generally within 4% of experiment. Internal energies (at 0 K) were computed for each structure; lepidocrocite is energetically the most stable polymorph, followed by akaganeite, with goethite being the least stable. While the model exhibits some variances with experiment, it performs remarkably well, despite the challenging constraint of being consistent with a dissociating molecular dynamics model for water in its gas, aqueous, and solid phases. Because of this consistency, the model allows qualitative theoretical treatment of previously unapproachable problems in mineral-water interface geochemistry. We apply the model to identify surface species on the solvated (110) surface of goethite.

  16. Geochemistry of summit fumarole vapors and flanking thermal/mineral waters at Popocatepetl Volcano, Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Werner, C.; Goff, F.; Janik, C.J.

    1997-06-01

    Popocatepetl Volcano is potentially devastating to populations living in the greater Mexico City area. Systematic monitoring of fumarole gases and flanking thermal/mineral springs began in early 1994 after increased fumarolic and seismic activity were noticed in 1991. These investigations had two major objectives: (1) to determine if changes in magmatic conditions beneath Popocatepetl might be reflected by chemical changes in fumarolic discharges and (2) to determine if thermal/mineral spring waters in the vicinity of Popocatepetl are geochemically related to or influences by the magmatic system. This report summarizes results from these two discrete studies.

  17. Natural mineral bottled waters available on the Polish market as a source of minerals for the consumers. Part 2: The intake of sodium and potassium.

    PubMed

    Gątarska, Anna; Ciborska, Joanna; Tońska, Elżbieta

    Natural mineral waters are purchased and consumed according to consumer preferences and possible recommendations. The choice of appropriate water should take into account not only the general level of mineralization but also the content of individual components, including electrolytes such as sodium and potassium. Sodium is necessary to ensure the proper physiological functions of the body. It is defined as a health risk factor only when its excessive intake occurs. Potassium acts antagonistically towards sodium and calcium ions, contributes to a reduction of the volume of extracellular fluids and at the same time reduces muscle tension and permeability of cell membranes. The demand for sodium and potassium is of particular importance in people expending significant physical effort, where an increased electrolyte supply is recommended. The aim of the study was to estimate the content of sodium and potassium in natural mineral waters available in the Polish market and to evaluate the intake of those components with the commercially available mineral waters by different groups of consumers at the assumed volume of their consumption. The research material consisted of natural mineral waters of forty various brands available on the Polish market. The examined products were either produced in Poland or originated in other European countries. Among the products under examination, about 30% of the waters were imported from Lithuania, Latvia, the Czech Republic, France, Italy and Germany. A sample for analyses consisted of two package units of the examined water from different production lots. Samples for research were collected at random. The study was conducted with the same samples in in which calcium and magnesium content was determined, which was the subject of the first part of the study. The content of sodium and potassium was determined using the emission technique (acetylene-air flame), with the use of atomic absorption spectrometer – ICE 3000 SERIES – THERMO

  18. [The hepatotropic action of sodium chloride and hydrocarbonate mineral water containing humic acids (an experimental study)].

    PubMed

    Verigo, N S; Ulashchik, V S

    2015-01-01

    The present article summarizes the results of experimental studies on the hepatotropic action of native and modified low-mineralized sodium chloride and bicarbonate waters differing in the content of humic acids. It was found that the most beneficial changes after a course of 21 day therapy with the use of such mineral waters for the treatment of experimental hepatitis were observed after the application of the water with a humic acid content of roughly 20 g/dm3. Such treatment resulted in the significant improvement of the liver antitoxic function, intensification of basal metabolism, reduction of the inflammatory processes, normalization of the hepatic enzyme activity, and stimulation of proteinsynthetic function in parallel with positive dynamics of the morphological and histochemical characteristics of the liver.

  19. Does bicarbonated mineral water rich in sodium change insulin sensitivity of postmenopausal women?

    PubMed

    Schoppen, S; Sánchez-Muniz, F J; Pérez-Granados, M; Gómez-Gerique, J A; Sarriá, B; Navas-Carretero, S; Pilar Vaquero, Ma

    2007-01-01

    To study the effects of drinking 0.5 L of two sodium-rich bicarbonated mineral waters (BMW-1 and 2), with a standard meal, on postprandial insulin and glucose changes. And to determine, if the effects vary depending on insulin resistance, measured by homeostasis model assessment (HOMA). In a 3-way randomized crossover study, 18 healthy postmenopausal women consumed two sodium-rich BMWs and a low-mineral water (LMW) with a standard fat-rich meal. Fasting and postprandial blood samples were taken at 30, 60 and 120 min. Serum glucose, insulin, cholesterol and triacylglycerols were determined. Insulin resistance was estimated by HOMA and insulin sensitivity was calculated by quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (QUICKY). Glucose levels did not change. HOMA and QUICKY values were highly inversely correlated (r = -1,000; p < 0.0001). Insulin concentrations showed a significant time effect (p < 0.0001) and a significant water x time interaction (p < 0.021). At 120 min insulin levels with BMW-1 were significantly lower than with LMW (p = 0.022). Postprandial insulin concentrations showed significantly different patterns of mineral water intake depending on HOMA n-tiles (p = 0.016). Results suggests an increase in insulin sensitivity after BMWs consumption. This effect is more marked in the women, who have higher HOMA values. These waters should be considered part of a healthy diet in order to prevent insulin resistance and cardiovascular disease.

  20. Detection of solar wind-produced water in irradiated rims on silicate minerals

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, John P.; Ishii, Hope A.; Gillis-Davis, Jeffrey J.; Ciston, James; Nielsen, Michael H.; Bechtel, Hans A.; Martin, Michael C.

    2014-01-01

    The solar wind (SW), composed of predominantly ∼1-keV H+ ions, produces amorphous rims up to ∼150 nm thick on the surfaces of minerals exposed in space. Silicates with amorphous rims are observed on interplanetary dust particles and on lunar and asteroid soil regolith grains. Implanted H+ may react with oxygen in the minerals to form trace amounts of hydroxyl (−OH) and/or water (H2O). Previous studies have detected hydroxyl in lunar soils, but its chemical state, physical location in the soils, and source(s) are debated. If −OH or H2O is generated in rims on silicate grains, there are important implications for the origins of water in the solar system and other astrophysical environments. By exploiting the high spatial resolution of transmission electron microscopy and valence electron energy-loss spectroscopy, we detect water sealed in vesicles within amorphous rims produced by SW irradiation of silicate mineral grains on the exterior surfaces of interplanetary dust particles. Our findings establish that water is a byproduct of SW space weathering. We conclude, on the basis of the pervasiveness of the SW and silicate materials, that the production of radiolytic SW water on airless bodies is a ubiquitous process throughout the solar system. PMID:24449869

  1. The Consumption of Bicarbonate-Rich Mineral Water Improves Glycemic Control

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Shinnosuke; Goto, Yasuaki; Ito, Kyo; Hayasaka, Shinya; Kurihara, Shigeo; Soga, Tomoyoshi; Tomita, Masaru; Fukuda, Shinji

    2015-01-01

    Hot spring water and natural mineral water have been therapeutically used to prevent or improve various diseases. Specifically, consumption of bicarbonate-rich mineral water (BMW) has been reported to prevent or improve type 2 diabetes (T2D) in humans. However, the molecular mechanisms of the beneficial effects behind mineral water consumption remain unclear. To elucidate the molecular level effects of BMW consumption on glycemic control, blood metabolome analysis and fecal microbiome analysis were applied to the BMW consumption test. During the study, 19 healthy volunteers drank 500 mL of commercially available tap water (TW) or BMW daily. TW consumption periods and BMW consumption periods lasted for a week each and this cycle was repeated twice. Biochemical tests indicated that serum glycoalbumin levels, one of the indexes of glycemic controls, decreased significantly after BMW consumption. Metabolome analysis of blood samples revealed that 19 metabolites including glycolysis-related metabolites and 3 amino acids were significantly different between TW and BMW consumption periods. Additionally, microbiome analysis demonstrated that composition of lean-inducible bacteria was increased after BMW consumption. Our results suggested that consumption of BMW has the possible potential to prevent and/or improve T2D through the alterations of host metabolism and gut microbiota composition. PMID:26798400

  2. The Consumption of Bicarbonate-Rich Mineral Water Improves Glycemic Control.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Shinnosuke; Goto, Yasuaki; Ito, Kyo; Hayasaka, Shinya; Kurihara, Shigeo; Soga, Tomoyoshi; Tomita, Masaru; Fukuda, Shinji

    2015-01-01

    Hot spring water and natural mineral water have been therapeutically used to prevent or improve various diseases. Specifically, consumption of bicarbonate-rich mineral water (BMW) has been reported to prevent or improve type 2 diabetes (T2D) in humans. However, the molecular mechanisms of the beneficial effects behind mineral water consumption remain unclear. To elucidate the molecular level effects of BMW consumption on glycemic control, blood metabolome analysis and fecal microbiome analysis were applied to the BMW consumption test. During the study, 19 healthy volunteers drank 500 mL of commercially available tap water (TW) or BMW daily. TW consumption periods and BMW consumption periods lasted for a week each and this cycle was repeated twice. Biochemical tests indicated that serum glycoalbumin levels, one of the indexes of glycemic controls, decreased significantly after BMW consumption. Metabolome analysis of blood samples revealed that 19 metabolites including glycolysis-related metabolites and 3 amino acids were significantly different between TW and BMW consumption periods. Additionally, microbiome analysis demonstrated that composition of lean-inducible bacteria was increased after BMW consumption. Our results suggested that consumption of BMW has the possible potential to prevent and/or improve T2D through the alterations of host metabolism and gut microbiota composition.

  3. Detection of solar wind-produced water in irradiated rims on silicate minerals.

    PubMed

    Bradley, John P; Ishii, Hope A; Gillis-Davis, Jeffrey J; Ciston, James; Nielsen, Michael H; Bechtel, Hans A; Martin, Michael C

    2014-02-04

    The solar wind (SW), composed of predominantly ∼1-keV H(+) ions, produces amorphous rims up to ∼150 nm thick on the surfaces of minerals exposed in space. Silicates with amorphous rims are observed on interplanetary dust particles and on lunar and asteroid soil regolith grains. Implanted H(+) may react with oxygen in the minerals to form trace amounts of hydroxyl (-OH) and/or water (H2O). Previous studies have detected hydroxyl in lunar soils, but its chemical state, physical location in the soils, and source(s) are debated. If -OH or H2O is generated in rims on silicate grains, there are important implications for the origins of water in the solar system and other astrophysical environments. By exploiting the high spatial resolution of transmission electron microscopy and valence electron energy-loss spectroscopy, we detect water sealed in vesicles within amorphous rims produced by SW irradiation of silicate mineral grains on the exterior surfaces of interplanetary dust particles. Our findings establish that water is a byproduct of SW space weathering. We conclude, on the basis of the pervasiveness of the SW and silicate materials, that the production of radiolytic SW water on airless bodies is a ubiquitous process throughout the solar system.

  4. Bacteriological quality and risk assessment of the imported and domestic bottled mineral water sold in Fiji.

    PubMed

    Zeenat, A; Hatha, A A M; Viola, L; Vipra, K

    2009-12-01

    Considering the popularity of bottled mineral water among indigenous Fijians and tourists alike, a study was carried out to determine the bacteriological quality of different bottled waters. A risk assessment was also carried out. Seventy-five samples of bottled mineral water belonging to three domestic brands and 25 samples of one imported brand were analysed for heterotrophic plate count (HPC) bacteria and faecal coliforms. HPC counts were determined at 22 degrees C and 37 degrees C using R2A medium and a membrane filtration technique was used to determine the faecal coliform (FC) load in 100 ml of water on mFC agar. Between 28 and 68% of the samples of the various domestic brands failed to meet the WHO standard of 100 colony forming units (cfu) per 100 ml at 22 degrees C and 7% of these also tested positive for faecal coliforms. All imported bottled mineral water samples were within WHO standards. A risk assessment of the HPC bacteria was carried out in terms of beta haemolytic activity and antibiotic resistance. More than 50% of the isolates showed beta haemolytic activity and were multi-drug resistant. While the overall quality of the product was generally good, there is a need to enforce stringent quality standards for the domestic bottlers to ensure the safety of consumers.

  5. Comparative assessment of genotoxicity of mineral water packed in polyethylene terephthalate (PET) and glass bottles.

    PubMed

    Ceretti, Elisabetta; Zani, Claudia; Zerbini, Ilaria; Guzzella, Licia; Scaglia, Mauro; Berna, Vanda; Donato, Francesco; Monarca, Silvano; Feretti, Donatella

    2010-03-01

    The potential migration of genotoxic compounds into mineral water stored in polyethylene terephthalate (PET) bottles was evaluated by an integrated chemical/biological approach using short-term toxicity/genotoxicity tests and chemical analysis. Six commercial brands of still and carbonated mineral water bottled in PET and in glass were stored at 40 degrees C for 10 days in a stove according to the standard EEC total migration test (82/711/EEC), or at room temperature in the dark. After treatment, the samples were analysed using gas-chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) to detect volatile and non-volatile compounds, the Microtox test to evaluate potential toxicity of the samples, and three mutagenicity tests -Tradescantia and Allium cepa micronucleus tests and the Comet assay on human leukocytes - to detect their genotoxic activity. GC/MS analysis did not detect phthalates or acetaldehyde in the water samples. The Microtox test found no toxic effects. Mutagenicity tests detected genotoxic properties of some samples in both PET and glass bottles. Statistical analyses showed a positive association between mineral content and mutagenicity (micronuclei in A. cepa and DNA damage in human leukocytes). No clear effect of treatment and PET bottle was found. These results suggest the absence of toxic compounds migrating from PET regardless of time and conditions of storage. In conclusion, bottle material and stove treatment were not associated with the genotoxic properties of the water; the genotoxic effects detected in bottled water may be related to the characteristics of the water (minerals and CO(2) content).

  6. First-principles calculation of H/D isotopic fractionation between hydrous minerals and water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Méheut, Merlin; Lazzeri, Michele; Balan, Etienne; Mauri, Francesco

    2010-07-01

    Hydrogen fractionation laws between selected hydrous minerals (brucite, kaolinite, lizardite, and gibbsite) and perfect water gas have been computed from first-principles quantum-mechanical calculations. The β-factor of each phase was calculated using the harmonic phonon dispersion curves obtained within density functional theory. All the fractionation laws show the same shape, with a minimum between 200 °C (brucite) and 500 °C (gibbsite). At low temperatures, the mineral/liquid water fractionation laws have been obtained using the experimental gas/liquid water fractionation laws. The resulting fractionation laws systematically overestimate measurements by 15‰ at low temperatures to 8‰ at ≈400 °C. Based on this general agreement, all calculated laws were empirically corrected with reference to brucite/water data. These considerations suggest that the experimental or natural calibrations by Xu and Zheng (1999) and Horita et al. (2002) (brucite/water), Gilg and Sheppard (1996) (kaolinite/water), Wenner and Taylor (1973) (lizardite/water), and in some extents Vitali et al. (2001) (gibbsite/water) are representative of equilibrium fractionations. Besides, internal isotopic fractionation of hydrogen between inner-surface and inner hydroxyl groups has been computed for kaolinite and lizardite. The obtained fractionation is large, of opposite sign for the two systems (respectively, -23‰ and +63‰ at 25 °C) and is linear in T-2. Internal fractionation of hydrogen in TO phyllosilicates might thus be used in geothermometry.

  7. Biomimetic mineral self-organization from silica-rich spring waters

    PubMed Central

    García-Ruiz, Juan Manuel; Nakouzi, Elias; Kotopoulou, Electra; Tamborrino, Leonardo; Steinbock, Oliver

    2017-01-01

    Purely inorganic reactions of silica, metal carbonates, and metal hydroxides can produce self-organized complex structures that mimic the texture of biominerals, the morphology of primitive organisms, and that catalyze prebiotic reactions. To date, these fascinating structures have only been synthesized using model solutions. We report that mineral self-assembly can be also obtained from natural alkaline silica-rich water deriving from serpentinization. Specifically, we demonstrate three main types of mineral self-assembly: (i) nanocrystalline biomorphs of barium carbonate and silica, (ii) mesocrystals and crystal aggregates of calcium carbonate with complex biomimetic textures, and (iii) osmosis-driven metal silicate hydrate membranes that form compartmentalized, hollow structures. Our results suggest that silica-induced mineral self-assembly could have been a common phenomenon in alkaline environments of early Earth and Earth-like planets. PMID:28345049

  8. Biomimetic mineral self-organization from silica-rich spring waters.

    PubMed

    García-Ruiz, Juan Manuel; Nakouzi, Elias; Kotopoulou, Electra; Tamborrino, Leonardo; Steinbock, Oliver

    2017-03-01

    Purely inorganic reactions of silica, metal carbonates, and metal hydroxides can produce self-organized complex structures that mimic the texture of biominerals, the morphology of primitive organisms, and that catalyze prebiotic reactions. To date, these fascinating structures have only been synthesized using model solutions. We report that mineral self-assembly can be also obtained from natural alkaline silica-rich water deriving from serpentinization. Specifically, we demonstrate three main types of mineral self-assembly: (i) nanocrystalline biomorphs of barium carbonate and silica, (ii) mesocrystals and crystal aggregates of calcium carbonate with complex biomimetic textures, and (iii) osmosis-driven metal silicate hydrate membranes that form compartmentalized, hollow structures. Our results suggest that silica-induced mineral self-assembly could have been a common phenomenon in alkaline environments of early Earth and Earth-like planets.

  9. Effects of land use on fresh waters: Agriculture, forestry, mineral exploitation, urbanisation

    SciTech Connect

    Solbe, J.F.

    1986-01-01

    This book offers a broad consideration of the effects of land use on fresh waters above and below ground. Experts address a wide range of issues in relation to the four major uses of land. Taken from an international conference held at the University of Stirling in 1985, coverage includes sewerage and waste-water treatment, long-term contamination of aquifers below cities, mineral exploitation, use of water in food production, wood production and more. Remedies and areas requiring further study are outlined.

  10. Predicting consumer preferences for mineral composition of bottled and tap water.

    PubMed

    Platikanov, Stefan; Hernández, Alejandra; González, Susana; Luis Cortina, Jose; Tauler, Roma; Devesa, Ricard

    2017-01-01

    The overall liking for taste of water was correlated with the mineral composition of selected bottled and tap waters. Sixty-nine untrained volunteers assessed and rated twenty-five different commercial bottled and tap waters from. Water samples were physicochemical characterised by analysing conductivity, pH, total dissolved solids (TDS) and major anions and cations: HCO3(-), SO4(2-), Cl(-), NO3(-), Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Na(+), and K(+). Residual chlorine levels were also analysed in the tap water samples. Globally, volunteers preferred waters rich in calcium bicarbonate and sulfate, rather than in sodium chloride. This study also demonstrated that it was possible to accurately predict the overall liking by a Partial Least Squares regression using either all measured physicochemical parameters or a reduced number of them. These results were in agreement with previously published results using trained panellists.

  11. Comparative mineralogy in the Solar system: Water-related minerals and habitability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prieto-Ballesteros, O.; Muñoz-Iglesias, V.; Bonales, L. J.

    2012-09-01

    Life, as we know it, needs liquid water because its unique physical chemical properties. The presence of liquid water in a planetary environment anytime during its geological history may be evidenced studying the present mineralogy. While some minerals incorporate water molecules directly in their structure when crystallize from liquid, some anhydrous need the aqueous environment to be formed primarily or by alteration. Salt hydrates (sulfates, chlorides), clathrate hydrates, hydrated silicates (clays, zeolites) and oxides are some examples of these minerals conspicuous for their interest on Astrobiology. Here we support waterrelated minerals as indicators of planetary habitability and revise their occurrence in the solar system. Investigations of terrestrial analogue materials, both in the laboratory and in situ are needed in order to interpret the data from the space missions properly. Phase stability and physical chemical properties data of the minerals are being obtained and used to infer specific characteristics of the past and the present of potential habitable environments. Water-related minerals have been observed at different solar system objects such as: a) meteorites [1] and asteroids [2]. b) the surface of terrestrial planets like Mars [3, 4, 5]. c) some icy satellites [6, 7, 8, 9]. a) The hydrated mineral inventory in meteorites and asteroid helps to both, infer the origin of Earth's water, and decode the water/organic processes interaction occurring during the earliest times in solar system history. b) Main climatic and geological global changes of Mars have been established by some authors [3] from the abundance of some hydrated species as sulfates or clays. Some detected sulfates, like the jarosite has been used even to indicate the extreme acidity of the aqueous environment from where they were precipitated. Studies on terrestrial extreme environments have shown that if hydrothermal samples are present on Mars, like carbonates, they might be useful

  12. Endocrine disruptors in bottled mineral water: total estrogenic burden and migration from plastic bottles.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Martin; Oehlmann, Jörg

    2009-05-01

    Food consumption is an important route of human exposure to endocrine-disrupting chemicals. So far, this has been demonstrated by exposure modeling or analytical identification of single substances in foodstuff (e.g., phthalates) and human body fluids (e.g., urine and blood). Since the research in this field is focused on few chemicals (and thus missing mixture effects), the overall contamination of edibles with xenohormones is largely unknown. The aim of this study was to assess the integrated estrogenic burden of bottled mineral water as model foodstuff and to characterize the potential sources of the estrogenic contamination. In the present study, we analyzed commercially available mineral water in an in vitro system with the human estrogen receptor alpha and detected estrogenic contamination in 60% of all samples with a maximum activity equivalent to 75.2 ng/l of the natural sex hormone 17beta-estradiol. Furthermore, breeding of the molluskan model Potamopyrgus antipodarum in water bottles made of glass and plastic [polyethylene terephthalate (PET)] resulted in an increased reproductive output of snails cultured in PET bottles. This provides first evidence that substances leaching from plastic food packaging materials act as functional estrogens in vivo. Our results demonstrate a widespread contamination of mineral water with xenoestrogens that partly originates from compounds leaching from the plastic packaging material. These substances possess potent estrogenic activity in vivo in a molluskan sentinel. Overall, the results indicate that a broader range of foodstuff may be contaminated with endocrine disruptors when packed in plastics.

  13. The importance of water transit time and mineral dissolution kinetics for the flux of weathering products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erlandsson, Martin; Bishop, Kevin; Köhler, Stephan; Amvrosiadi, Nino

    2016-04-01

    Soil mineral weathering is one of the major sources of base cations (BC), which play a dual role for a forest ecosystem; they function both as plant nutrients, and for buffering against acidification of catchment runoff. On a long-term basis, the soil weathering rates will determine the highest sustainable forest productivity without causing acidification. It is believed that the hydrologic residence time play a key role in determining weathering rates on a landscape scale. In this study, we investigate the significance of the water transit residence time (WTT) distribution for the transport of base cations to catchment runoff. By modelling hillslope flowpaths with different transit times, using the geochemical computing code PHREEQC, we demonstrate how in-stream dynamics as exemplified by elemental ratios can be explained by mineral dissolution kinetics and equilibria. Specifically, we hypothesize that equilibrium of plagioclase regulates the delivery of base cations and silica to catchment runoff. These patters can be seen in field data from 10 years of sampling from a nested-catchment, where the Na+/BC and the Si/BC-ratios vary systematically with WTT on both a temporal and a spatial scale. This behavior has implications for the total transport of products from mineral dissolution to catchment runoff. As the water entering the stream is a mixture of water with different transit times, the composition of stream water will not only be dependent on the average WTT, but also on the shape of the WTT distribution. For the base cations associated with minerals that becomes supersaturated or with precipitating secondary phases within the range of WTT, i.e. Na+ and K+, the tails of "old water" of the WRT-distribution will not contribute to any extra transport of these elements. Finally, we use the derived relationships to estimate the transport of weathering products from a forested hillslope, given the modelled WRT distribution.

  14. Molecular Dynamics Simulation and Analysis of Interfacial Water at Selected Sulfide Mineral Surfaces under Anaerobic Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Jiaqi; Miller, Jan D.; Dang, Liem X.

    2014-04-10

    In this paper, we report on a molecular dynamics simulation (MDS) study of the behavior of interfacial water at selected sulfide mineral surfaces under anaerobic conditions. The study revealed the interfacial water structure and wetting characteristics of the pyrite (100) surface, galena (100) surface, chalcopyrite (012) surface, sphalerite (110) surface, and molybdenite surfaces (i.e., the face, armchair-edge, and zigzag-edge surfaces), including simulated contact angles, relative number density profiles, water dipole orientations, hydrogen-bonding, and residence times. For force fields of the metal and sulfur atoms in selected sulfide minerals used in the MDS, we used the universal force field (UFF) and another set of force fields optimized by quantum chemical calculations for interactions with interfacial water molecules at selected sulfide mineral surfaces. Simulation results for the structural and dynamic properties of interfacial water molecules indicate the natural hydrophobic character for the selected sulfide mineral surfaces under anaerobic conditions as well as the relatively weak hydrophobicity for the sphalerite (110) surface and two molybdenite edge surfaces. Part of the financial support for this study was provided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) under Basic Science Grant No. DE-FG-03-93ER14315. The Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences, Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES), of the DOE, funded work performed by Liem X. Dang. Battelle operates Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for DOE. The calculations were carried out using computer resources provided by BES. The authors are grateful to Professor Tsun-Mei Chang for valuable discussions.

  15. Dissolved gas composition of groundwater in the natural spa complex "Choygan mineral waters" (East Tuva)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopylova, Y.; Guseva, N.; Shestakova, A.; Khvaschevskaya, A.; Arakchaa, K.

    2014-08-01

    The natural spa complex "Choygan mineral waters", a unique deposit of natural carbon dioxide mineral waters in Siberia, is located in the Eastern Sayan Mountains. There are 33 springs discharge in this area. Spring waters are mainly HCO3-Na-Ca type. TDS varies from 300 mg/L to 2600 mg/L and temperature ranges from 7 °C (in spring 33) to 39 °C (in spring 12), pH varies from 5.9 to 8.3, and the value of the oxidation-reduction potential is from - 170 mV to 236 mV. All studied waters were divided into two groups according to their temperature and geochemical conditions: cold fresh water with oxidizing conditions and warm slightly brackish water with reductive conditions. The gas composition of the studied waters is represented by nitrogen (28-75 vol.%), carbon dioxide (6-65 vol.%), oxygen (7-19 vol.%), radon (4-948 Bq/l). The studied gases differ not only by the content but by the different sources.

  16. Redistribution of soil water by a saprotrophic fungus enhances carbon mineralization.

    PubMed

    Guhr, Alexander; Borken, Werner; Spohn, Marie; Matzner, Egbert

    2015-11-24

    The desiccation of upper soil horizons is a common phenomenon, leading to a decrease in soil microbial activity and mineralization. Recent studies have shown that fungal communities and fungal-based food webs are less sensitive and better adapted to soil desiccation than bacterial-based food webs. One reason for a better fungal adaptation to soil desiccation may be hydraulic redistribution of water by mycelia networks. Here we show that a saprotrophic fungus (Agaricus bisporus) redistributes water from moist (-0.03 MPa) into dry (-9.5 MPa) soil at about 0.3 cm ⋅ min(-1) in single hyphae, resulting in an increase in soil water potential after 72 h. The increase in soil moisture by hydraulic redistribution significantly enhanced carbon mineralization by 2,800% and enzymatic activity by 250-350% in the previously dry soil compartment within 168 h. Our results demonstrate that hydraulic redistribution can partly compensate water deficiency if water is available in other zones of the mycelia network. Hydraulic redistribution is likely one of the mechanisms behind higher drought resistance of soil fungi compared with bacteria. Moreover, hydraulic redistribution by saprotrophic fungi is an underrated pathway of water transport in soils and may lead to a transfer of water to zones of high fungal activity.

  17. [Effects of soil texture and water content on the mineralization of soil organic carbon in paddy soils].

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhong-lin; Wu, Jin-shui; Ge, Ti-da; Tang, Guo-yong; Tong, Cheng-li

    2009-01-01

    To understand how soil texture and water content affect the mineralization of organic C in paddy soil, 3 selected soils (sandy loam, clay loam, and silty clay) were incubated (25 degrees C) with 14 C-labelled rice straw (1.0 g x kg(-1)) at water content varied from 45% to 105% of water holding capacity (WHC). Data indicated that, in the sandy loam and clay loam, the mineralization rate of 14 C-labelled rice straw reached the maximum at 75% WHC, as 53% and 58% of the straw C mineralized in the incubation period of 160 d, whereas in the silty clay, it increased gradually (from 41.8% to 49.0%) as water content increased up to 105% WHC. For all of the three soils, the mineralization rate of soil native organic C reached the maximum at 75% WHC, with 5.8% of the organic C mineralized in the same period for the sandy loam, and 8.0% and 4.8% for the clay loam and silty clay, respectively. As water content increased further, the mineralization rate of native organic C in the three soils significantly declined. The mineralization rate of added rice straw and native organic C in all the three soils, was well fitted with a conic curve. These results suggest that water-logging can decrease the mineralization of organic C in paddy soils.

  18. Mineralization of a Malaysian crude oil by Pseudomonas sp. and Achromabacter sp. isolated from coastal waters

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, J.; Ahmad, M.F.

    1995-12-31

    Regarded as being a potentially effective tool to combat oil pollution, bioremediation involves mineralization, i.e., the conversion of complex hydrocarbons into harmless CO{sub 2} and water by action of microorganisms. Therefore, in achieving optimum effectiveness from the application of these products on crude oil in local environments, the capability of the bacteria to mineralize hydrocarbons was evaluated. The microbial laboratory testing of mineralization on local oil degraders involved, first, isolation of bacteria found at a port located on the west coast of Peninsular Malaysia. Subsequently, these bacteria were identified by means of Biomereux`s API 20E and 20 NE systems and later screened by their growth on a Malaysian crude oil. Selected strains of Pseudomonas sp. and Achromabacter sp. were then exposed individually to a similar crude oil in a mineralization unit and monitored for 16 days for release of CO{sub 2}. Pseudomonas paucimobilis was found to produce more CO{sub 2} than Achromobacter sp. When tested under similar conditions, mixed populations of these two taxa produced more CO{sub 2} than that produced by any individual strain. Effective bioremediation of local crude in Malaysian waters can therefore be achieved from biochemically developed Pseudomonas sp. strains.

  19. [Calcium, magnesium, iron and zinc in drinking water and status biomarkers of these minerals among elder people from Warsaw region].

    PubMed

    Madej, Dawid; Kaluza, Joanna; Antonik, Anna; Brzozowska, Anna; Roszkowski, Wojciech

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the influence of calcium, magnesium, iron and zinc contents in drinking water on chosen parameters of nutritional status of these minerals in 164 elder people, 75-80 age, living in Warsaw region. Blood, hair and saliva were collected to assess the calcium, magnesium, iron and zinc nutritional status, while the samples of drinking water were collected to determine these minerals in water Mineral concentrations in blood, hair saliva and water were assessment using the atomic spectrophotometer absorption method It was showed that contribution of drinking water to calcium, magnesium, iron and zinc intake was: 15%, 4%, 5%, 9%, respectively. The relationship between the contents of these minerals in drinking water and their levels in the blood, hair and saliva had low correlation coefficients. It probably showed that homeostasis was maintained in the human body and other factors such as demographic or lifestyle factors were important.

  20. Acid-base balance and hydration status following consumption of mineral-based alkaline bottled water

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The present study sought to determine whether the consumption of a mineral-rich alkalizing (AK) bottled water could improve both acid-base balance and hydration status in young healthy adults under free-living conditions. The AK water contains a naturally high mineral content along with Alka-PlexLiquid™, a dissolved supplement that increases the mineral content and gives the water an alkalizing pH of 10.0. Methods Thirty-eight subjects were matched by gender and self-reported physical activity (SRPA, hrs/week) and then split into Control (12 women, 7 men; Mean +/- SD: 23 +/- 2 yrs; 7.2 +/- 3.6 hrs/week SRPA) and Experimental (13 women, 6 men; 22 +/- 2 yrs; 6.4 +/- 4.0 hrs/week SRPA) groups. The Control group consumed non-mineralized placebo bottled water over a 4-week period while the Experimental group consumed the placebo water during the 1st and 4th weeks and the AK water during the middle 2-week treatment period. Fingertip blood and 24-hour urine samples were collected three times each week for subsequent measures of blood and urine osmolality and pH, as well as total urine volume. Dependent variables were analyzed using multivariate repeated measures ANOVA with post-hoc focused on evaluating changes over time within Control and Experimental groups (alpha = 0.05). Results There were no significant changes in any of the dependent variables for the Control group. The Experimental group, however, showed significant increases in both the blood and urine pH (6.23 to 7.07 and 7.52 to 7.69, respectively), a decreased blood and increased urine osmolality, and a decreased urine output (2.51 to 2.05 L/day), all during the second week of the treatment period (P < 0.05). Further, these changes reversed for the Experimental group once subjects switched to the placebo water during the 4th week. Conclusions Consumption of AK water was associated with improved acid-base balance (i.e., an alkalization of the blood and urine) and hydration status when consumed under

  1. Natural radioactivity levels in mineral, therapeutic and spring waters in Tunisia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labidi, S.; Mahjoubi, H.; Essafi, F.; Ben Salah, R.

    2010-12-01

    Radioactivity measurements were carried out in 26 groundwater samples from Tunisia. Activity concentrations of uranium were studied by radiochemical separation procedures followed by alpha spectrometry and that for radium isotopes by gamma-ray spectrometry. The results show that, the concentrations in water samples range from 1.2 to 69 mBq/L.1, 1.3 to 153.4 mBq/L, 2.0 to 1630.0 mBq/L and 2.0 to 1032.0 mBq/L for 238U, 234U, 226Ra and 228Ra, respectively. The U and Ra activity concentrations are low and similar to those published for other regions in the world. The natural radioactivity levels in the investigated samples are generally increased from mineral waters through therapeutic to the spring waters. The results show that a correlation between total dissolved solids (TDS) values and the 226Ra concentrations was found to be high indicating that 266Ra has a high affinity towards the majority of mineral elements dissolved in these waters. High correlation coefficients were also observed between 226Ra content and chloride ions for Cl --Na + water types. This can be explained by the fact that radium forms a complex with chloride and in this form is more soluble. The isotopic ratio of 234U/ 238U and 226Ra/ 234U varies in the range from 0.8 to 2.6 and 0.6 to 360.8, respectively, in all investigated waters, which means that there is no radioactive equilibrium between the two members of the 238U series. The fractionation of isotopes of a given element may occur because of preferential leaching of one, or by the direct action of recoil during radioactive decay. The annual effective doses due to ingestion of the mineral waters have been estimated to be well below the 0.1 mSv/y reference dose level.

  2. Measurement of natural radionuclides in Malaysian bottled mineral water and consequent health risk estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Priharti, W.; Samat, S. B.; Yasir, M. S.

    2015-09-25

    The radionuclides of {sup 226}Ra, {sup 232}Th and {sup 40}K were measured in ten mineral water samples, of which from the radioactivity obtained, the ingestion doses for infants, children and adults were calculated and the cancer risk for the adult was estimated. Results showed that the calculated ingestion doses for the three age categories are much lower than the average worldwide ingestion exposure of 0.29 mSv/y and the estimated cancer risk is much lower than the cancer risk of 8.40 × 10{sup −3} (estimated from the total natural radiation dose of 2.40 mSv/y). The present study concludes that the bottled mineral water produced in Malaysia is safe for daily human consumption.

  3. Measurement of natural radionuclides in Malaysian bottled mineral water and consequent health risk estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priharti, W.; Samat, S. B.; Yasir, M. S.

    2015-09-01

    The radionuclides of 226Ra, 232Th and 40K were measured in ten mineral water samples, of which from the radioactivity obtained, the ingestion doses for infants, children and adults were calculated and the cancer risk for the adult was estimated. Results showed that the calculated ingestion doses for the three age categories are much lower than the average worldwide ingestion exposure of 0.29 mSv/y and the estimated cancer risk is much lower than the cancer risk of 8.40 × 10-3 (estimated from the total natural radiation dose of 2.40 mSv/y). The present study concludes that the bottled mineral water produced in Malaysia is safe for daily human consumption.

  4. Hydrogeochemical and stable isotopic investigations on CO2-rich mineral waters from Harghita Mts. (Eastern Carpathians, Romania)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kis, Boglárka-Mercedesz; Baciu, Călin; Kármán, Krisztina; Kékedy-Nagy, Ladislau; Francesco, Italiano

    2013-04-01

    There is a worldwide interest on geothermal, mineral and groundwater as a resource for energy, drinking water supply and therapeutic needs. The increasing trend in replacing tap water with commercial bottled mineral water for drinking purposes has become an economic, hydrogeologic and medical concern in the last decades. Several investigations have been carried out worldwide on different topics related to geothermal and mineral waters, dealing with mineral water quality assessment, origin of geothermal and mineral waters, geochemical processes that influence water chemistry and water-rock interaction In Romania, the Călimani-Gurghiu-Harghita Neogene to Quaternary volcanic chain (Eastern Carpathians) is one of the most important areas from the point of view of CO2-rich mineral waters. These mineral water springs occur within other post-volcanic phenomena like dry CO2 emissions, moffettes, bubbling pools, H2S gas emissions etc. Mineral waters from this area are used for bottling, local spas and drinking purposes for local people. The number of springs, around 2000 according to literature data, shows that there is still a significant unexploited potential for good quality drinking water in this area. Within the youngest segment of the volcanic chain, the Harghita Mts., its volcaniclastic aprons and its boundary with the Transylvanian Basin, we have carried out an investigation on 23 CO2-rich mineral water springs from a hydrogeochemical and stable isotopic point of view. The mineral waters are Ca-Mg-HCO3 to Na-Cl type. Sometimes mixing between the two types can be observed. We have detected a great influence of water-rock interaction on the stable isotopic composition of the mineral waters, shown by isotopic shifts to the heavier oxygen isotope, mixing processes between shallow and deeper aquifers and local thermal anomalies. Acknowledgements: The present work was financially supported by the Romanian National Research Council, Project PN-II-ID-PCE-2011-3-0537 and by

  5. Heterogeneous Reactions of Limonene on Mineral Dust: Impacts of Adsorbed Water and Nitric Acid.

    PubMed

    Lederer, Madeline R; Staniec, Allison R; Coates Fuentes, Zoe L; Van Ry, Daryl A; Hinrichs, Ryan Z

    2016-12-08

    Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs), including the monoterpene limonene, are a major source of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). While gas-phase oxidation initiates the dominant pathway for BVOC conversion to SOA, recent studies have demonstrated that biogenic hydrocarbons can also directly react with acidic droplets. To investigate whether mineral dust may facilitate similar reactive uptake of biogenic hydrocarbons, we studied the heterogeneous reaction of limonene with mineral substrates using condensed-phase infrared spectroscopy and identified the formation of irreversibly adsorbed organic products. For kaolinite, Arizona Test Dust, and silica at 30% relative humidity, GC-MS identified limonene-1,2-diol as the dominant product with total organic surface concentrations on the order of (3-5) × 10(18) molecules m(-2). Experiments with (18)O-labeled water support a mechanism initiated by oxidation of limonene by surface redox sites forming limonene oxide followed by water addition to the epoxide to form limonenediol. Limonene uptake on α-alumina, γ-alumina, and montmorillonite formed additional products in high yield, including carveol, carvone, limonene oxide, and α-terpineol. To model tropospheric processing of mineral aerosol, we also exposed each mineral substrate to gaseous nitric acid prior to limonene uptake and identified similar surface adsorbed products that were formed at rates 2 to 5 times faster than without nitrate coatings. The initial rate of reaction was linearly dependent on gaseous limonene concentration between 5 × 10(12) and 5 × 10(14) molecules cm(-3) (0.22-20.5 ppm) consistent with an Eley-Rideal-type mechanism in which gaseous limonene reacts directly with reactive surface sites. Increasing relative humidity decreased the amount of surface adsorbed products indicating competitive adsorption of surface adsorbed water. Using a laminar flow tube reactor we measured the uptake coefficient for limonene on kaolinite at 25% RH to range

  6. Determination of dimethyl selenide and dimethyl sulphide compounds causing off-flavours in bottled mineral waters.

    PubMed

    Guadayol, Marta; Cortina, Montserrat; Guadayol, Josep M; Caixach, Josep

    2016-04-01

    Sales of bottled drinking water have shown a large growth during the last two decades due to the general belief that this kind of water is healthier, its flavour is better and its consumption risk is lower than that of tap water. Due to the previous points, consumers are more demanding with bottled mineral water, especially when dealing with its organoleptic properties, like taste and odour. This work studies the compounds that can generate obnoxious smells, and that consumers have described like swampy, rotten eggs, sulphurous, cooked vegetable or cabbage. Closed loop stripping analysis (CLSA) has been used as a pre-concentration method for the analysis of off-flavour compounds in water followed by identification and quantification by means of GC-MS. Several bottled water with the aforementioned smells showed the presence of volatile dimethyl selenides and dimethyl sulphides, whose concentrations ranged, respectively, from 4 to 20 ng/L and from 1 to 63 ng/L. The low odour threshold concentrations (OTCs) of both organic selenide and sulphide derivatives prove that several objectionable odours in bottled waters arise from them. Microbial loads inherent to water sources, along with some critical conditions in water processing, could contribute to the formation of these compounds. There are few studies about volatile organic compounds in bottled drinking water and, at the best of our knowledge, this is the first study reporting the presence of dimethyl selenides and dimethyl sulphides causing odour problems in bottled waters. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Concentration of Ra-226 in Malaysian Drinking and Bottled Mineral Water

    SciTech Connect

    Amin, Y. B. Mohd; Jemangin, M. H.; Mahat, R. H.

    2010-07-07

    The concentration of the radionuclide {sup 226}Ra was determined in the drinking water which was taken from various sources. It was found that the concentration varies from non-detectable (ND) to highest value of 0.30 Bq per liter. The concentration was found to be high in mineral water as compare with surface water such as domestic pipe water. Some of these values have exceeded the EPA (Environmental Protection Agency) of America regulations. The activity concentrations obtained are compared with data from other countries. The estimated annual effective doses from drinking the water are determined. The values obtained range from 0.02 mSv to about 0.06 mSv per year.

  8. Concentration of Ra-226 in Malaysian Drinking and Bottled Mineral Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amin, Y. B. Mohd; Jemangin, M. H.; Mahat, R. H.

    2010-07-01

    The concentration of the radionuclide 226Ra was determined in the drinking water which was taken from various sources. It was found that the concentration varies from non-detectable (ND) to highest value of 0.30 Bq per liter. The concentration was found to be high in mineral water as compare with surface water such as domestic pipe water. Some of these values have exceeded the EPA (Environmental Protection Agency) of America regulations. The activity concentrations obtained are compared with data from other countries. The estimated annual effective doses from drinking the water are determined. The values obtained range from 0.02 mSv to about 0.06 mSv per year.

  9. (222)Rn, (220)Rn and other dissolved gases in mineral waters of southeast Brazil.

    PubMed

    Bonotto, Daniel Marcos

    2014-06-01

    This paper describes the natural radioactivity due to (222)Rn and (220)Rn in mineral waters occurring at São Paulo and Minas Gerais states, Brazil, that are extensively used for drinking in public places, bottling and bathing purposes, among other. The measurements of these alpha-emitting radionuclides were also accompanied by the monitoring of temperature and some dissolved gases (O2, CO2 and H2S) in 75 water sources located in 14 municipalities of those states. Eight water sources yielded (220)Rn activity concentration values below the detection limit of 4 mBq/L. On other hand, (222)Rn activity concentration values exceeding the WHO guidance level of 100 Bq/L in drinking-water for public water supplies were found in two springs, named Villela and Dona Beja, whose discharge occurs in areas characterized by the presence of enhanced levels of natural radioelements in rocks. The obtained results were compared with the guidelines of the Brazilian Code of Mineral Waters (BCMW) that was established in 1945 and is still in force in the country. The (222)Rn and (220)Rn activity concentration data allowed perform dose radiation calculations based on the potential alpha energy concentration (PAEC), whose implications for health risk have been also considered in this paper. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. [Criteria for the evaluation of hygienic and microbiologic characteristics of mineral waters].

    PubMed

    Leclerc, H

    1976-01-01

    The appraisement of mineral waters microbial quality is closely depending of their definition: waters endowed with therapeutic properties, strongly mineralised waters, etc. In the beginning mineral water is exceptionally infected by dangerous germs tought it contain a regular load of some saprophytic microorganisms. Indeed, exploitation licences are reserved to geologically perfectly protected strata. On the other hand, there are contaminations which are due, most commonly, to the bottling procedures: packings, work-rooms atmospheres, staff, etc. This being so, evaluation tests must be largely extended with regard to those of feed water. We can distinguish between some bound to perfectly known real risks and some referred to more hypothetical and more suggested dangers. The first ones protect from fecal contaminations (Salmonella, coliforms, fecal Streptococci, sulphite-reducing Clostridium, fecal bacteriophages) and from cutaneous and mucous contaminations (pathogenic Staphylococci, Pseudomonas aeruginosa). They must be supervised with the most extreme severity. The second ones are concerned with saprophytic oligotrophic germs. At the present time, their incidence on public health cannot be discussed on serious foundations. It is the same for amoebae's presence which seems frequent in all kinds of waters. These problems must form the subject of thorough researchers.

  11. Influence of minerals on the taste of bottled and tap water: a chemometric approach.

    PubMed

    Platikanov, Stefan; Garcia, Veronica; Fonseca, Ignacio; Rullán, Elena; Devesa, Ricard; Tauler, Roma

    2013-02-01

    Chemometric analysis was performed on two sets of sensory data obtained from two separate studies. Twenty commercially-available bottled mineral water samples (from the first study) and twenty-five drinking tap and bottled water samples (from the second study) were blind tasted by trained panelists. The panelists expressed their overall liking of the water samples by rating from 0 (worst flavor) to 10 (best flavor). The mean overall score was compared to the physicochemical properties of the samples. Thirteen different physicochemical parameters were considered in both studies and, additionally, residual chlorine levels were assessed in the second study. Principal component analysis performed on the physicochemical parameters and the panelists' mean scores generated models that explain most of the total data variance. Moreover, partial least squares regression of the panelists' sensory evaluations of the physicochemical data helped elucidate the main features underlying the panelists' ratings. The preferred bottled and tap water samples were associated with moderate (relatively to the parameters mean values) contents of total dissolved solids and with relatively high concentrations of HCO₃⁻, SO₄²⁻, Ca²⁺ and Mg²⁺ as well as with relatively high pH values. High concentrations of Na⁺, K⁺ and Cl⁻ were scored low by many of the panelists, while residual chlorine did not affect the ratings, but did enable the panel to distinguish between bottled mineral water and tap water samples. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Methyl t-Butyl Ether Mineralization in Surface-Water Sediment Microcosms under Denitrifying Conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, P.M.; Chapelle, F.H.; Landmeyer, J.E.

    2001-01-01

    Mineralization of [U-14C] methyl t-butyl ether (MTBE) to 14CO2 without accumulation of t-butyl alcohol (TBA) was observed in surface-water sediment microcosms under denitrifying conditions. Methanogenic activity and limited transformation of MTBE to TBA were observed in the absence of denitrification. Results indicate that bed sediment microorganisms can effectively degrade MTBE to nontoxic products under denitrifying conditions.

  13. The prediction of borate mineral equilibria in natural waters: Application to Searles Lake, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felmy, Andrew R.; Weare, John H.

    1986-12-01

    The chemical equilibrium model of HARVIEet al. (1984) has been extended to include borate species. The model is based upon the semi-empirical equations of PITZER (1973) and coworkers and is valid to high ionic strength (≈14 m) and high borate concentration. Excellent agreement with the existing emf, isopiestic and solubility data in the system (Na-K-Ca-Mg-H-Cl-SO4-CO2-B(OH)4-H2O) is obtained. Calculated mineral solubilities are in general within 10% of their experimental values, even at high ionic strengths. The model was applied to the multicomponent, high ionic strength (I ~ 10) and high borate concentration (BT ~ 0.5 m) Searles Lake evaporite deposit. Utilizing the chemical composition of the interstitial brine, the model predicts equilibrium between the brine and only those minerals which are known to be in contact with the brine. These calculations clearly demonstrate the applicability of the model to high ionic strength, high borate concentration natural waters. The model was also utilized to calculate the mineral sequences which should result from evaporation of the major source of water for Searles Lake, the Owens River. The geochemical conditions necessary for the formation of the most recent mud and saline units are examined. The final results indicate that the mineral sequences found in the most recent saline unit in Searles Lake can be produced by evaporation of a water close in composition to present Owens River water, provided primary dolomite formation is delayed and back reaction between the Parting Mud and the Upper Salt is inhibited.

  14. [Bacteriological variations in a medio-mineral water bottled in polyethylene terephthalate containers].

    PubMed

    De Fusco, R; Biscardi, D; Mazzacca, F R

    1989-01-01

    Containers made with PET (Polyethylene-terephthalate) are currently more and more employed in packing industry, particularly for the storage of mineral waters. The increasing utilization of such containers is due to the intrinsic properties of this polymer, which was shown particularly suitable for making bottles devoted to the storage of gassed drinks. The resistance of the PET to high pressure, hits by falls and top-to-down loads indeed makes PET bottles unbreakable; their gas-tightness warrants a good gas maintenance during the storage period; the high transparency of the PET allows a good vision of the contents; the light weight of the bottles and the low temperatures required for their production allow a remarkable saving of energy; lastly PET bottles can easily be recycled. Previous microbiological investigations carried out on several mineral waters bottled in glass bottles and non-PET plastic (i.e. PVC) bottles, had shown higher microbial counts in the water samples stored in plastic bottles. In the present work we have studied the growth rates of the bacterial flora in a sample of non gassed medio-mineral water stored in PET bottles, with respect to a control of the same kind of water, stored in glass bottles. Before using, both PET and glass bottles were washed with 5% Desogen, and sterilized by 100 vol. hydrogen peroxide. After the appropriate sterility checks, the bottles were filled directly from the spring with a non gassed medio-mineral water, and then subdivided into four groups, each consisting of the same number of bottles. A the time of bottling, a bacterial count on such water samples at 20 degrees C and 37 degrees C was performed, in order to establish the "zero" value. One of the two groups of PET bottles, and one of the two groups of glass bottles were stored in the darkness, while the other two groups were stored in the light. Afterwards, one bottle from each group was drawn once a week over one year, in order to measure the bacterial

  15. Fission track studies on some minerals and water of the north-east India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Thoudam Nandababu

    The present work is aimed at the geochronological investigations of the minerals of some granitic rocks and estimation of uranium contents in minerals, rocks and water of some parts of the North-East India with the help of fission track (FT) technique. The study includes FT dating of minerals from granites of four different plutons and from pegmatites of two different regions of Meghalaya, annealing studies of the minerals including the correction of the observed mineral ages and calculation of the cooling and uplift rates of the rocks. Precision on the errors of the mineral ages has also been studied in detail in the present work. The experiment was carried out at the Research laboratories of the Physics and the Geology Departments, Gauhati University, Assam, India during 1981-1984. Experimental results show four different age groups of the minerals which would reflect meaningful geological events in the history of these rocks. Sphenes of the Nartiang and Dawki granites record the highest FT ages ~ 1120 m.y. which may be linked with a major plutonic event. Muscovites of the Nartiang and Jowai pegmatites measure ages ~ 690 m.y. which may correspond to the time of emplacements of these pegmatites. Apatites of the Nartiang granites show FT ages ~ 470 m.y. which falls within the period of Indian Ocean cycle event. But, apatites of the Jowai, Pynursla and Dawki granites record the youngest ages ~ 90 m.y. which lies within the period of extrusion of cretaceous lavas (Sylhet traps). Apatite age of the Nartiang granite and muscovite ages of the Nartiang and Jowai pegmatites were corrected to ~ 510 m.y., ~ 743 m.y. and ~ 741 m.y. respectively by applying the plateau method of age correction. However, insignificant corrections were found in the sphene ages of the Nartiang and Dawki granites and apatite ages of the Jowai and Dawki granites. An interesting finding of the present work is the wide discrepancy between the apatite ages ~ 90 m.y. (Cretaceous) of Jowai, Pynursla

  16. Mineralizing urban net-zero water treatment: Phase II field results and design recommendations.

    PubMed

    Gassie, Lucien W; Englehardt, James D; Wang, Jian; Brinkman, Nichole; Garland, Jay; Gardinali, Piero; Guo, Tianjiao

    2016-11-15

    Net-zero water (NZW) systems, or water management systems achieving high recycling rates and low residuals generation so as to avoid water import and export, can also conserve energy used to heat and convey water, while economically restoring local eco-hydrology. However, design and operating experience are extremely limited. The objective of this paper is to present the results of the second phase of operation of an advanced oxidation-based NZW pilot system designed, constructed, and operated for a period of two years, serving an occupied four-person apartment. System water was monitored, either continuously or thrice daily, for routine water quality parameters, minerals, and MicroTox(®) in-vitro toxicity, and intermittently for somatic and male-specific coliphage, adenovirus, Cryptosporidium, Giardia, emerging organic constituents (non-quantitative), and the Florida drinking water standards. All 115 drinking water standards with the exception of bromate were met in this phase. Neither virus nor protozoa were detected in the treated water, with the exception of measurement of adenovirus genome copies attributed to accumulation of inactive genetic material in hydraulic dead zones. Chemical oxygen demand was mineralized to <0.7 mg/L, and all but six of 1006 emerging organic constituents analyzed were either undetected or removed >90% in treatment. Total dissolved solids were maintained at ∼500 mg/L at steady state, partially through aerated aluminum electrocoagulation. Bromate accumulation is projected to be controlled by aluminum electrocoagulation with separate disposal of backwash water. Further development of such systems and their automated/remote process control systems is recommended. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Efficient artificial mineralization route to decontaminate Arsenic(III) polluted water - the Tooeleite Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malakar, Arindam; Das, Bidisa; Islam, Samirul; Meneghini, Carlo; de Giudici, Giovanni; Merlini, Marco; Kolen'Ko, Yury V.; Iadecola, Antonella; Aquilanti, Giuliana; Acharya, Somobrata; Ray, Sugata

    2016-05-01

    Increasing exposure to arsenic (As) contaminated ground water is a great threat to humanity. Suitable technology for As immobilization and removal from water, especially for As(III) than As(V), is not available yet. However, it is known that As(III) is more toxic than As(V) and most groundwater aquifers, particularly the Gangetic basin in India, is alarmingly contaminated with it. In search of a viable solution here, we took a cue from the natural mineralization of Tooeleite, a mineral containing Fe(III) and As(III)ions, grown under acidic condition, in presence of SO42- ions. Complying to this natural process, we could grow and separate Tooeleite-like templates from Fe(III) and As(III) containing water at overall circumneutral pH and in absence of SO42- ions by using highly polar Zn-only ends of wurtzite ZnS nanorods as insoluble nano-acidic-surfaces. The central idea here is to exploit these insoluble nano-acidic-surfaces (called as INAS in the manuscript) as nucleation centres for Tooeleite growth while keeping the overall pH of the aqueous media neutral. Therefore, we propose a novel method of artificial mineralization of As(III) by mimicking a natural process at nanoscale.

  18. Efficient artificial mineralization route to decontaminate Arsenic(III) polluted water - the Tooeleite Way

    PubMed Central

    Malakar, Arindam; Das, Bidisa; Islam, Samirul; Meneghini, Carlo; De Giudici, Giovanni; Merlini, Marco; Kolen’ko, Yury V.; Iadecola, Antonella; Aquilanti, Giuliana; Acharya, Somobrata; Ray, Sugata

    2016-01-01

    Increasing exposure to arsenic (As) contaminated ground water is a great threat to humanity. Suitable technology for As immobilization and removal from water, especially for As(III) than As(V), is not available yet. However, it is known that As(III) is more toxic than As(V) and most groundwater aquifers, particularly the Gangetic basin in India, is alarmingly contaminated with it. In search of a viable solution here, we took a cue from the natural mineralization of Tooeleite, a mineral containing Fe(III) and As(III)ions, grown under acidic condition, in presence of SO42− ions. Complying to this natural process, we could grow and separate Tooeleite-like templates from Fe(III) and As(III) containing water at overall circumneutral pH and in absence of SO42− ions by using highly polar Zn-only ends of wurtzite ZnS nanorods as insoluble nano-acidic-surfaces. The central idea here is to exploit these insoluble nano-acidic-surfaces (called as INAS in the manuscript) as nucleation centres for Tooeleite growth while keeping the overall pH of the aqueous media neutral. Therefore, we propose a novel method of artificial mineralization of As(III) by mimicking a natural process at nanoscale. PMID:27189251

  19. Linear adsorption of nonionic organic compounds from water onto hydrophilic minerals: Silica and alumina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Su, Y.-H.; Zhu, Y.-G.; Sheng, G.; Chiou, C.T.

    2006-01-01

    To characterize the linear adsorption phenomena in aqueous nonionic organic solute-mineral systems, the adsorption isotherms of some low-molecular- weightnonpolar nonionic solutes (1,2,3-trichlorobenzene, lindane, phenanthrene, and pyrene) and polar nonionic solutes (1,3-dinitrobenzene and 2,4-dinitrotoluene) from single-and binary-solute solutions on hydrophilic silica and alumina were established. Toward this objective, the influences of temperature, ionic strength, and pH on adsorption were also determined. It is found that linear adsorption exhibits low exothermic heats and practically no adsorptive competition. The solute-solid configuration and the adsorptive force consistent with these effects were hypothesized. For nonpolar solutes, the adsorption occurs presumably by London (dispersion) forces onto a water film above the mineral surface. For polar solutes, the adsorption is also assisted by polar-group interactions. The reduced adsorptive forces of solutes with hydrophilic minerals due to physical separation by the water film and the low fractions of the water-film surface covered by solutes offer a theoretical basis for linear solute adsorption, low exothermic heats, and no adsorptive competition. The postulated adsorptive forces are supported by observations that ionic strength or pH poses no effect on the adsorption of nonpolar solutes while it exhibits a significant effect on the uptake of polar solutes. ?? 2006 American Chemical Society.

  20. [Antibacterial nature of medicinal ointments, based on Georgian mineral waters in treatment of generalized periodontitis].

    PubMed

    Gasviani, E N; Chikviladze, D P; Iverieli, M V; Iavich, P A; Mikeladze, M L

    2007-04-01

    The goal of the work was to determine antibacterial nature of the medicinal ointments (N1 - "Achtala"; N2 - "Sairme", N3 - "Tschaltubo", N4 "Amagleba") based on Georgian mineral waters and containing bio-active extracts. The goal of the work was to determine antibacterial nature of the medicinal ointments (N1 - "Achtala"; N2 - "Sairme", N3 - "Tschaltubo", N4 "Amagleba") based on Georgian mineral waters and containing bio-active extracts. The investigation was done in purpose to determine microbial structure of oral cavity of the 80 patients with chronic generalized periodontitis, as a result was confirmed, that microbial structure of these patients was rather heterogeneous and is presented by different aerobe, microaerophil and anaerobe microbial flora. The sensitivity, resistance, of isolated microorganisms, was studied to modern groups of antibiotics. Results of investigations are: high antibacterial activities of ointments, prepared on mineral waters of Georgia. So, it can be recommended for usage in treatment schedule for patients with chronic generalized periodontitis.

  1. Mineral and water content of A. gigas scales determine local micromechanical properties and energy dissipation mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troncoso, Omar P.; Gigos, Florian; Torres, Fernando G.

    2017-03-01

    Arapaima gigas scales are natural laminated composite materials made of individual layers with different degrees of mineralization, accompanied of varying mechanical properties. This natural design provides scales with hardness and flexibility, and can serve as a source of inspiration for the development of new layered composites with a hard surface and flexible base. In this paper, we have carried out cyclic micro-indentation tests on both; the internal and the highly mineralized external surface of air dried and wet scales, in order to assess the variation of their local micromechanical properties with regard to the mineral and water content. The load-penetration (P-h) curves showed that creep takes place throughout the application of a constant force during the micro-indentation tests, confirming the time dependent response of A. gigas scales. A model that accounted for the elastic, plastic and viscous responses of the samples was used to fit the experimental results. The penetration depth during loading and creep, as well as the energy dissipated are dependent on the water content. The used model suggests that the viscous response of the internal layer increases with the water content.

  2. Networking and rheology of concentrated clay suspensions "matured" in mineral medicinal water.

    PubMed

    Aguzzi, Carola; Sánchez-Espejo, Rita; Cerezo, Pilar; Machado, José; Bonferoni, Cristina; Rossi, Silvia; Salcedo, Inmaculada; Viseras, César

    2013-09-10

    This work studied the influence of "maturation" conditions (time and agitation) on aggregation states, gel structure and rheological behaviour of a special kind of pharmaceutical semisolid products made of concentrated clay suspensions in mineral medicinal water. Maturation of the samples was carried out in distilled and sulphated mineral medicinal water, both in static conditions (without agitation) and with manual stirring once a week, during a maximum period of three months. At the measured pH interval (7.5-8.0), three-dimensional band-type networks resulting from face/face contacts were predominant in the laminar (disc-like) clay suspensions, whereas the fibrous (rod-like) particles formed micro-aggregates by van der Waals attractions. The high concentration of solids in the studied systems greatly determined their behaviour. Rod-like sepiolite particles tend to align the major axis in aggregates promoted by low shearing maturation, whereas aggregates of disc-like smectite particles did not have a preferential orientation and their complete swelling required long maturation time, being independent of stirring. Maturation of both kinds of suspensions resulted in improved rheological properties. Laminar clay suspensions became more structured with time, independently from static or dynamic maturation conditions, whereas for fibrous clay periodic agitation was also required. Rheological properties of the studied systems have been related to aggregation states and networking mechanisms, depending on the type of clay minerals constituents. Physical stability of the suspensions was not impaired by the specific composition of the Graena medicinal water.

  3. A compilation of rate parameters of water-mineral interaction kinetics for application to geochemical modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Palandri, James L.; Kharaka, Yousif K.

    2004-01-01

    Geochemical reaction path modeling is useful for rapidly assessing the extent of water-aqueous-gas interactions both in natural systems and in industrial processes. Modeling of some systems, such as those at low temperature with relatively high hydrologic flow rates, or those perturbed by the subsurface injection of industrial waste such as CO2 or H2S, must account for the relatively slow kinetics of mineral-gas-water interactions. We have therefore compiled parameters conforming to a general Arrhenius-type rate equation, for over 70 minerals, including phases from all the major classes of silicates, most carbonates, and many other non-silicates. The compiled dissolution rate constants range from -0.21 log moles m-2 s-1 for halite, to -17.44 log moles m-2 s-1 for kyanite, for conditions far from equilibrium, at 25 ?C, and pH near neutral. These data have been added to a computer code that simulates an infinitely well-stirred batch reactor, allowing computation of mass transfer as a function of time. Actual equilibration rates are expected to be much slower than those predicted by the selected computer code, primarily because actual geochemical processes commonly involve flow through porous or fractured media, wherein the development of concentration gradients in the aqueous phase near mineral surfaces, which results in decreased absolute chemical affinity and slower reaction rates. Further differences between observed and computed reaction rates may occur because of variables beyond the scope of most geochemical simulators, such as variation in grain size, aquifer heterogeneity, preferred fluid flow paths, primary and secondary mineral coatings, and secondary minerals that may lead to decreased porosity and clogged pore throats.

  4. Study on the leaching of phthalates from polyethylene terephthalate bottles into mineral water.

    PubMed

    Keresztes, Szilvia; Tatár, Enikő; Czégény, Zsuzsanna; Záray, Gyula; Mihucz, Victor G

    2013-08-01

    Carbonated and non-carbonated mineral water samples bottled in 0.5-L, 1.5-L and 2.0-L polyethylene terephthalate (PET) containers belonging to three different water brands commercialized in Hungary were studied in order to determine their phthalate content by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Among the six investigated phthalates, diisobutyl phthalate, di-n-butyl-phthalate, benzyl-butyl phthalate and di(2-ethyl-hexyl) phthalate (DEHP) were determined in non-carbonated samples as follows: <3.0 ng L(-1)-0.2 μg L(-1), <6.6 ng L(-1)-0.8 μg L(-1), <6.0 ng L(-1)-0.1 μg L(-1) and <16.0 ng L(-1)-1.7 μg L(-1), respectively. Any of the above-mentioned phthalate esters could be detected in carbonated mineral water samples. DEHP was the most abundant phthalate in the investigated samples. It could be detected after 44 days of storage at 22 °C and its leaching was the most pronounced when samples were stored over 1200 days. Mineral water purchased in PET bottles of 0.5L had the highest phthalate concentrations compared to those obtained for waters of the identical brand bottled in 1.5-L or 2.0-L PET containers due to the higher surface/volume ratio. No clear trend could be established for phthalate leaching when water samples were kept at higher temperatures (max. 60 °C) showing improper storage conditions. Phthalate determination by pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometric measurements in the plastic material as well as in the aqueous phase proved the importance of the quality of PET raw material used for the production of the pre-form (virgin vs. polymer containing recycled PET). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Contribution of tap water to mineral intakes of Canadian preschool children.

    PubMed

    Gibson, R S; Vanderkooy, P S; McLennan, C E; Mercer, N M

    1987-01-01

    Tap water consumption was estimated from 3 day weighed dietary records in 102 Canadian preschool children (4-5 yr of age; 58 males, 44 females). Cold tap water samples were also collected from each child's household (64 hard water households, 38 soft water households) and analyzed for calcium, magnesium, sodium, zinc, copper, and sodium by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Median consumption of tap water consumed alone and tapwater alone plus that used in beverages (ml per day) was 36.5 (range 0-791) and 171.5 (range 0-1036), respectively. Average intakes of macrominerals for males (M) and females (F) from all sources of hard tap water were (mg/day): calcium (M) 16.5, (F) 13.2; magnesium (M) 6.6, (F) 4.5; and sodium (M) 2.3, (F) 2.3. Average intakes of macrominerals from soft water are as follows: calcium (M) 0.1, (F) 0.1; magnesium (M) 0, (F) 0; and sodium (M) 31.0, (F) 24.4. Trace element intakes from tap water were negligible. Hard tap water provided less than 8% of the Canadian Recommended Nutrient Intake (RNI) for magnesium, less than 3% for calcium, and less than 1% for zinc. Mineral contributions of soft tap water to the RNIs were less than 2%.

  6. [Comparative study of several sulfurated mineral water sources from Iasi County].

    PubMed

    Stefanache, Alina; Stan, Cătălina; Caraman, C; Nastase, V; Miftode, Maria

    2005-01-01

    The comparative study aimed the actualization of the analytical panel of some mineral water sources, sulfurated, iso- and hypertonic (existing in Nicolina area, Iaşi county), that is the constant physico-chemical composition, in order to signal the alteration of water's quality. From the performed analysis, along the time and the presented ones, it can be observed than the sources maintain intact, along many decades, the chemical composition and their physical characteristics, and also their therapeutical action, due to the fact they are localised deep underground.

  7. Prevention and Therapy of Type 2 Diabetes—What Is the Potential of Daily Water Intake and Its Mineral Nutrients?

    PubMed Central

    Naumann, Johannes; Biehler, Diana; Lüty, Tania

    2017-01-01

    We aim to present an overview of the possible influence of drinking water in general and mineral water in particular in improving glycemic parameters in persons with or without type 2 diabetes. We performed a literature search that produced 15 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on this topic with mainly small sample sizes. We also discuss relevant observational and animal studies as well as the effects of important supplements in mineral water such as hydrogencarbonate and magnesium. There is low evidence for the positive effects of water or mineral water in improving glycemic parameters in diabetic and non-diabetic persons, and the results are heterogenous, making it difficult to reach an unequivocal conclusion. Meta-analyses of prospective cohort studies and other observational studies, studies with animal models and interventional studies using hydrogencarbonate and magnesium supplements suggest a probable positive effect of drinking water and mineral water in particular on glycemic parameters, supporting the positive results found in some of the RCTs, especially those substituting diet beverages or caloric beverages with water, or those using bicarbonate and magnesium-rich water. Regarding the high prevalence, the associated suffering and the resulting health expenditures of type 2 diabetes, it is imperative to conduct larger and more rigorous trials to answer the question whether drinking water or mineral water can improve glycemic parameters in diabetic and non-diabetic persons. PMID:28829398

  8. Influence of Water Content on the Mechanical Behaviour of Limestone: Role of the Clay Minerals Content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherblanc, F.; Berthonneau, J.; Bromblet, P.; Huon, V.

    2016-06-01

    The mechanical characteristics of various sedimentary stones significantly depend on the water content, where 70 % loss of their mechanical strengths can be observed when saturated by water. Furthermore, the clay fraction has been shown to be a key factor of their hydro-mechanical behaviour since it governs for instance the hydric dilation. This work aims at investigating the correlations between the clay mineral content and the mechanical weakening experienced by limestones when interacting with water. The experimental characterization focuses on five different limestones that exhibit very different micro-structures. For each of them, we present the determination of clay mineral composition, the sorption isotherm curve and the dependences of tensile and compressive strengths on the water content. It emerges from these results that, first, the sorption behaviour is mainly governed by the amount of smectite layers which exhibit the larger specific area and, second, the rate of mechanical strength loss depends linearly on the sorption capacity. Indeed, the clay fraction plays the role of a retardation factor that delays the appearance of capillary bridges as well as the mechanical weakening of stones. However, no correlation was evidenced between the clay content and the amplitude of weakening. Since the mechanisms whereby the strength decreases with water content are not clearly established, these results would help to discriminate between various hypothesis proposed in the literature.

  9. Natural radioactivity of 226Ra and 228Ra in thermal and mineral waters in Croatia.

    PubMed

    Bituh, Tomislav; Marovic, Gordana; Petrinec, Branko; Sencar, Jasminka; Franulovic, Iva

    2009-01-01

    Thermal waters are known as valuable natural resources of a country. They contain certain degree of natural radioactivity attributable to the elements of the uranium and thorium natural decay series. Among these elements, the most radiotoxic and the most important is radium that exists in several isotopic forms (226Ra and 228Ra). The focus of attention was the content of radium in samples of thermal and mineral spring water from several spas in Croatia. These waters are mainly used for medical, bathing and recreational purposes, and some of them are used for drinking. Measured activity concentrations of 226Ra ranged from 87 to 6200 mBq l(-1) which, in some springs, exceed the maximal permissible level of 1 Bq l(-1) for drinking water. Measured activity concentrations of 228Ra ranged from 23 to 3480 mBq l(-1). The study showed that radium content for the investigated thermal and mineral waters is below the levels at which negative consequences would arise due to ingestion.

  10. Toxicological evaluation of commercial mineral water bottled in polyethylene terephthalate: a cytogenetic approach with Allium cepa.

    PubMed

    Evandri, M G; Tucci, P; Bolle, P

    2000-12-01

    The aim of this study was to ascertain the possible toxicological effects of chemicals released into mineral water packaged in polyethylene terephthalate (PET) bottles. Two commercial mineral waters, bottled both in PET and glass and stored under different conditions, were examined using the Allium cepa test. The influence of the water samples on macroscopic (root length, colour and form) and microscopic (root tip mitotic index, chromosome aberrations) parameters was examined. The water samples were analysed after: (A) controlled-condition storage (no direct light exposure and 18 +/- 2 degrees C), (B) storage at 40 degrees C for 10 days, in the dark (migration test in accordance with 82/711/EEC), and (C) exposure to sunlight and varying temperatures (18-38 degrees C, mean temperature 25 +/- 3 degrees C). The two water samples bottled in PET induced cytogenetic aberrations regardless of the storage conditions. These signs of toxicity were evident even only 8 weeks after bottling, which is well within the recommended expiry date. Storage conditions were very important, as is suggested by the finding that chromosomal aberrations were particularly apparent after exposure to direct sunlight. However, as plant systems are not considered as primary screening tools by current international guidelines for mammalian systems, extrapolation of the results from this test system to other systems and, eventually, to human beings should be based on results from a battery of assays covering various metabolic pathways.

  11. Inelastic neutron scattering and molecular simulation of the dynamics of interlayer water in smectite clay minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Cygan, Randall T.; Daemen, Luke L.; Ilgen, Anastasia G.; Krumhansl, James L.; Nenoff, Tina M.

    2015-11-16

    The study of mineral–water interfaces is of great importance to a variety of applications including oil and gas extraction, gas subsurface storage, environmental contaminant treatment, and nuclear waste repositories. Understanding the fundamentals of that interface is key to the success of those applications. Confinement of water in the interlayer of smectite clay minerals provides a unique environment to examine the interactions among water molecules, interlayer cations, and clay mineral surfaces. Smectite minerals are characterized by a relatively low layer charge that allows the clay to swell with increasing water content. Montmorillonite and beidellite varieties of smectite were investigated to compare the impact of the location of layer charge on the interlayer structure and dynamics. Inelastic neutron scattering of hydrated and dehydrated cation-exchanged smectites was used to probe the dynamics of the interlayer water (200–900 cm–1 spectral region) and identify the shift in the librational edge as a function of the interlayer cation. Molecular dynamics simulations of equivalent phases and power spectra, derived from the resulting molecular trajectories, indicate a general shift in the librational behavior with interlayer cation that is generally consistent with the neutron scattering results for the monolayer hydrates. Both neutron scattering and power spectra exhibit librational structures affected by the location of layer charge and by the charge of the interlayer cation. Furthermore, divalent cations (Ba2+ and Mg2+) characterized by large hydration enthalpies typically exhibit multiple broad librational peaks compared to monovalent cations (Cs+ and Na+), which have relatively small hydration enthalpies.

  12. Mineral composition and heavy metal contamination of sediments originating from radium rich formation water.

    PubMed

    Bzowski, Zbigniew; Michalik, Bogusław

    2015-03-01

    Radium rich formation water is often associated with fossil fuels as crude oil, natural gas and hard coal. As a result of fossil fuels exploitation high amount of such water is released into environment. In spite of the high radium content such waters create a serious radiation risk neither to humans nor biota directly. First and foremost due to very high mineralization they are not drinkable at all. But after discharge chemical and physical conditions are substantially changed and sediments which additionally concentrated radium are arising. Due to features of technological processes such phenomenon is very intensive in underground coal mining where huge volume of such water must be pumped into surface in order to keep underground galleries dry. Slightly different situation occurs in oil rigs, but finally also huge volume of so called process water is pumped into environment. Regardless their origin arising sediments often contain activity concentration of radium isotopes exceeding the clearance levels set for naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) (Council Directive, 2013). The analysis of metals and minerals content showed that besides radioactivity such sediments contain high amount of metals geochemically similar to radium as barium, strontium and lead. Correlation analysis proved that main mechanism leading to sediment creation is co-precipitation radium with these metals as a sulfate. The absorption on clay minerals is negligible even when barium is not present in significant quantities. Owing to very low solubility of sulfates radium accumulated in this way should not migrate into environment in the neighborhood of a site where such sediment were deposited.

  13. Inelastic neutron scattering and molecular simulation of the dynamics of interlayer water in smectite clay minerals

    DOE PAGES

    Cygan, Randall T.; Daemen, Luke L.; Ilgen, Anastasia G.; ...

    2015-11-16

    The study of mineral–water interfaces is of great importance to a variety of applications including oil and gas extraction, gas subsurface storage, environmental contaminant treatment, and nuclear waste repositories. Understanding the fundamentals of that interface is key to the success of those applications. Confinement of water in the interlayer of smectite clay minerals provides a unique environment to examine the interactions among water molecules, interlayer cations, and clay mineral surfaces. Smectite minerals are characterized by a relatively low layer charge that allows the clay to swell with increasing water content. Montmorillonite and beidellite varieties of smectite were investigated to comparemore » the impact of the location of layer charge on the interlayer structure and dynamics. Inelastic neutron scattering of hydrated and dehydrated cation-exchanged smectites was used to probe the dynamics of the interlayer water (200–900 cm–1 spectral region) and identify the shift in the librational edge as a function of the interlayer cation. Molecular dynamics simulations of equivalent phases and power spectra, derived from the resulting molecular trajectories, indicate a general shift in the librational behavior with interlayer cation that is generally consistent with the neutron scattering results for the monolayer hydrates. Both neutron scattering and power spectra exhibit librational structures affected by the location of layer charge and by the charge of the interlayer cation. Furthermore, divalent cations (Ba2+ and Mg2+) characterized by large hydration enthalpies typically exhibit multiple broad librational peaks compared to monovalent cations (Cs+ and Na+), which have relatively small hydration enthalpies.« less

  14. Water of Hydration Dynamics in Minerals Gypsum and Bassanite: Ultrafast 2D IR Spectroscopy of Rocks.

    PubMed

    Yan, Chang; Nishida, Jun; Yuan, Rongfeng; Fayer, Michael D

    2016-08-03

    Water of hydration plays an important role in minerals, determining their crystal structures and physical properties. Here ultrafast nonlinear infrared (IR) techniques, two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) and polarization selective pump-probe (PSPP) spectroscopies, were used to measure the dynamics and disorder of water of hydration in two minerals, gypsum (CaSO4·2H2O) and bassanite (CaSO4·0.5H2O). 2D IR spectra revealed that water arrangement in freshly precipitated gypsum contained a small amount of inhomogeneity. Following annealing at 348 K, water molecules became highly ordered; the 2D IR spectrum became homogeneously broadened (motional narrowed). PSPP measurements observed only inertial orientational relaxation. In contrast, water in bassanite's tubular channels is dynamically disordered. 2D IR spectra showed a significant amount of inhomogeneous broadening caused by a range of water configurations. At 298 K, water dynamics cause spectral diffusion that sampled a portion of the inhomogeneous line width on the time scale of ∼30 ps, while the rest of inhomogeneity is static on the time scale of the measurements. At higher temperature, the dynamics become faster. Spectral diffusion accelerates, and a portion of the lower temperature spectral diffusion became motionally narrowed. At sufficiently high temperature, all of the dynamics that produced spectral diffusion at lower temperatures became motionally narrowed, and only homogeneous broadening and static inhomogeneity were observed. Water angular motions in bassanite exhibit temperature-dependent diffusive orientational relaxation in a restricted cone of angles. The experiments were made possible by eliminating the vast amount of scattered light produced by the granulated powder samples using phase cycling methods.

  15. Mineralogy and geochemistry of efflorescent minerals on mine tailings and their potential impact on water chemistry.

    PubMed

    Grover, B P C; Johnson, R H; Billing, D G; Weiersbye, I M G; Tutu, H

    2016-04-01

    In the gold mining Witwatersrand Basin of South Africa, efflorescent mineral crusts are a common occurrence on and nearby tailings dumps during the dry season. The crusts are readily soluble and generate acidic, metal- and sulphate-rich solutions on dissolution. In this study, the metal content of efflorescent crusts at an abandoned gold mine tailings dump was used to characterise surface and groundwater discharges from the site. Geochemical modelling of the pH of the solution resulting from the dissolution of the crusts was used to better understand the crusts' potential impact on water chemistry. The study involved two approaches: (i) conducting leaching experiments on oxidised and unoxidised tailings using artificial rainwater and dilute sulphuric acid and correlating the composition of crusts to these leachates and (ii) modelling the dissolution of the crusts in order to gain insight into their mineralogy and their potential impact on receiving waters. The findings suggested that there were two chemically distinct discharges from the site, namely an aluminium- and magnesium-rich surface water plume and an iron-rich groundwater plume. The first plume was observed to originate from the oxidised tailings following leaching with rainwater while the second plume originated from the underlying unoxidised tailings with leaching by sulphuric acid. Both groups of minerals forming from the respective plumes were found to significantly lower the pH of the receiving water with simulations of their dissolution found to be within 0.2 pH units of experimental values. It was observed that metals in a low abundance within the crust (for example, iron) had a stronger influence on the pH of the resulting solutions than metals in a greater abundance (aluminium or magnesium). Techniques such as powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) and in situ mineral determination techniques such as remote sensing can effectively determine the dominant mineralogy. However, the minerals or metals

  16. Molecular dynamics simulation of water at mineral surfaces: Structure, dynamics, energetics and hydrogen bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalinichev, A. G.; Wang, J.; Kirkpatrick, R.

    2006-05-01

    Fundamental molecular-level understanding of the properties of aqueous mineral interfaces is of great importance for many geochemical and environmental systems. Interaction between water and mineral surfaces substantially affects the properties of both phases, including the reactivity and functionality of the substrate surface, and the structure, dynamics, and energetics of the near surface aqueous phase. Experimental studies of interfacial water structure and dynamics using surface-sensitive techniques such as sum-frequency vibrational spectroscopy or X-ray and neutron reflectivity are not always possible for many practically important substrates, and their results often require interpretation concerning the atomistic mechanisms responsible for the observed behavior. Molecular computer simulations can provide new insight into the underlying molecular- level relationships between the inorganic substrate structure and composition and the structure, ordering, and dynamics of interfacial water. We have performed a series of molecular dynamics (MD) computer simulations of aqueous interfaces with several silicates (quartz, muscovite, and talc) and hydroxides (brucite, portlandite, gibbsite, Ca/Al and Mg/Al double hydroxides) to quantify the effects of the substrate mineral structure and composition on the structural, transport, and thermodynamic properties of water on these mineral surfaces. Due to the prevalent effects of the development of well-interconnected H-bonding networks across the mineral- water interfaces, all the hydroxide surfaces (including a fully hydroxylated quartz surface) show very similar H2O density profiles perpendicular to the interface. However, the predominant orientations of the interfacial H2O molecules and their detailed 2-dimensional near-surface structure and dynamics parallel to the interface are quite different reflecting the differences in the substrate structural charge distribution and the density and orientations of the surface OH

  17. Ultrasound with mineral water or aqua gel to reduce pain and improve the WOMAC of knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Abdalbary, Sahar Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Aims: Osteoarthritis is the most degenerative joint disease. The aim was to investigate the effects of ultrasound using mineral water or aqua sonic gel on severity of knee pain, measured by the visual analog scale and the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC). Materials and methods: Thirty women with bilateral osteoarthritis of the knee were assigned to two groups: ultrasound with mineral water (group 1, n = 15) or with aqua sonic gel (group 2, n = 15). Both groups underwent 4 weeks intervention, three per week. The participants were assessed using the visual analog scale and the WOMAC. Tests were performed before and after interventions. Results: Both groups had significantly reduced pain and improved WOMAC compared with preintervention values. Discussion: The ultrasound with mineral water group had more pronounced improvement at p-value < 0.001. Conclusion: Ultrasound with mineral water is preferable in treatment of knee OA. PMID:28031953

  18. Effects of mineral content of bovine drinking water: does iron content affect milk quality?

    PubMed

    Mann, G R; Duncan, S E; Knowlton, K F; Dietrich, A D; O'Keefe, S F

    2013-01-01

    The composition of water given to dairy cattle is often ignored, yet water is a very important nutrient and plays a major role in milk synthesis. The objective of this study was to study effects of elevated levels of iron in bovine drinking water on milk quality. Ferrous lactate treatments corresponding to 0, 2, 5, and 12.5mg/kg drinking water concentrations were delivered through the abomasum at 10 L/d to 4 lactating dairy cows over 4 periods (1 wk infusion/period) in a Latin square design. On d 6 of infusion, milk was collected, processed (homogenized, pasteurized), and analyzed. Mineral content (Fe, Cu, P, Ca) was measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Oxidative stability of whole processed milk was measured by the thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) assay for malondialdehyde (MDA) and sensory analysis (triangle test) within 72 h of processing and after 7d of storage (4°C). Significant sensory differences between processed milks from cows receiving iron and the control infusion were observed. No differences in TBARS (1.46±0.04 mg of MDA/kg) or mineral content (0.22±0.01 mg/kg Fe) were observed. A 2-way interaction (iron treatment by cow) for Ca, Cu, and Fe concentrations was seen. While iron added directly to milk causes changes in oxidation of milk, high levels of iron given to cattle have subtle effects that initially may not be obvious.

  19. Minerals consumption by Acetobacter xylinum on cultivation medium on coconut water

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Denise Milleo; Prestes, Rosilene Aparecida; da Fonseca, Adriel Ferreira; Woiciechowski, Adenise L.; Wosiacki, Gilvan

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this work is to verifying the consume of the minerals K, Na, Fe, Mg, P, S-SO4−2, B, N Total Kjedahl (NTK), NO3−-N, and NH4+-N in the production of bacterial cellulose by Acetobacter xylinum, according to the medium and the manner of cultivation. The fermentative process was in ripe and green coconut water. K and Na were determined by flame emission photometry, Mg and Fe by atomic absorption spectrophotometry, P by molecular absorption spectrophotometry, S-SO4−2 by barium sulphate turbidimetry, B by Azomethin-H method, NTK by Kjeldahl method, N-NO3− and N-NH4+ by vapor distillation with magnesium oxide and Devarda’s alloy, respectively. In Fermentation of ripe coconut water there were higher consumption of K (69%), Fe (84,3%), P (97,4%), S-SO2−2 (64,9%), B (56,1%), N-NO3− (94,7%) and N-NH4+ (95,2%), whereas coconut water of green fruit the most consumed ions were Na (94,5%), Mg (67,7%) and NTK (56,6%). The cultivation under agitation showed higher mineral consumption. The higher bacterial cellulose production, 6 g.L−1, was verified in the coconut water fermentative in ripe fruit, added KH2PO4, FeSO4 and NaH2PO4 kept under agitation. PMID:24159306

  20. [Physicochemical quality of drinking water in Southern Algeria: study of excess mineral salts].

    PubMed

    Djellouli, H M; Taleb, S; Harrache-Chettouh, D; Djaroud, S

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the physicochemical composition of water intended for human consumption in several regions of Southern Algeria. Excess minerals in drinking water, including magnesium, calcium, sulfates and fluorides play a fundamental role in the prevention of urinary calculi, which are formed mainly from calcium oxalate. The ever-increasingly prevalence of this disorder and its recurrence make it a real public health problem in Algeria. The most elementary preventive treatment, recommended to all subjects with lithiasis, is to drink 2 to 3 L water distributed throughout the (24-hour) day. This study began by conducting a physicochemical analysis of the principal components of water from several sources. We will subsequently test it to examine the effects of its mineral salts on the crystallization kinetics of the principal component of calculi (calcium oxalate). The results indicate that 77.5 % of the samples had magnesium concentrations ([Mg 2+] > 50 mg/L), 95 % were sulfated, with sulfate ion concentrations exceeding the standard recommended by WHO ([SO4 2-] > 250 mg/L). Moreover, 57.5 % had excess fluoride levels, [F-] > 1.5 mg/L, and 65 % excessive calcium concentrations, with Ca 2+ > 150 mg/L.

  1. Trace elements and heavy metals in mineral and bottled drinking waters on the Iranian market.

    PubMed

    Hadiani, Mohammad Rasoul; Dezfooli-Manesh, Shirin; Shoeibi, Shahram; Ziarati, Parisa; Mousavi Khaneghah, Amin

    2015-01-01

    A survey of Iranian waters, sampled from 2010 to 2013, is presented. A total of 128 water samples from 42 different brands of bottled mineral and drinking water were collected and analysed for contamination levels of lead (Pb), cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), arsenic (As) and mercury (Hg). Determinations were performed using a graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometer for Pb, Cd and Cu, a hydride vapour generation as well as an Arsenator digital kit (Wagtech WTD, Tyne and Wear, UK) for As and a direct mercury analyser for Hg. Arsenic concentration in six bottled gaseous mineral samples was higher than the related limit. Regardless of these, mean concentrations of Pb, Cd, Cu, As and Hg in all types of water samples were 4.50 ± 0.49, 1.08 ± 0.09, 16.11 ± 2.77, 5.80 ± 1.63 and 0.52 ± 0.03 µg L⁻¹, respectively. Values obtained for analysed heavy metals in all samples were permissible according to the limits of national and international standards.

  2. The Geysers-Clear Lake area, California: thermal waters, mineralization, volcanism, and geothermal potential

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Donnelly-Nolan, J. M.; Burns, M.G.; Goff, F.E.; Peters, E.K.; Thompson, J.M.

    1993-01-01

    Manifestations of a major thermal anomaly in the Geysers-Clear Lake area of northern California include the late Pliocene to Holocene Clear Lake Volcanics, The Geysers geothermal field, abundant thermal springs, and epithermal mercury and gold mineralization. The epithermal mineralization and thermal springs typically occur along high-angle faults within the broad San Andreas transform fault system that forms the western boundary of the North American plate in this area. The young volcanic rocks overlie Mesozoic marine rocks of the Great Valley sequence which have been thrust above the coeval Franciscan Complex and penecontemporaneously dropped back down along low-angle detachment faults. Geothermal power production has peaked at The Geysers and pressure declines indicate significant depletion of the fluid resource. It is proposed that recently discovered, isotopically shifted steam in the northwest Geysers area indicates the presence not of deep connate water but rather of boiled-down, boron-rich Franciscan evolved meteoric water. This water is likely to be present in limited quantities and will not provide a significant hot water resource for geothermal power production at The Geysers field or from the main Clear Lake volcanic field. -from Authors

  3. Minerals consumption by Acetobacter xylinum on cultivation medium on coconut water.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Denise Milleo; Prestes, Rosilene Aparecida; da Fonseca, Adriel Ferreira; Woiciechowski, Adenise L; Wosiacki, Gilvan

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this work is to verifying the consume of the minerals K, Na, Fe, Mg, P, S-SO4 (-2), B, N Total Kjedahl (NTK), NO3 (-)-N, and NH4 (+)-N in the production of bacterial cellulose by Acetobacter xylinum, according to the medium and the manner of cultivation. The fermentative process was in ripe and green coconut water. K and Na were determined by flame emission photometry, Mg and Fe by atomic absorption spectrophotometry, P by molecular absorption spectrophotometry, S-SO4 (-2) by barium sulphate turbidimetry, B by Azomethin-H method, NTK by Kjeldahl method, N-NO3 (-) and N-NH4 (+) by vapor distillation with magnesium oxide and Devarda's alloy, respectively. In Fermentation of ripe coconut water there were higher consumption of K (69%), Fe (84,3%), P (97,4%), S-SO2 (-2) (64,9%), B (56,1%), N-NO3 (-) (94,7%) and N-NH4 (+) (95,2%), whereas coconut water of green fruit the most consumed ions were Na (94,5%), Mg (67,7%) and NTK (56,6%). The cultivation under agitation showed higher mineral consumption. The higher bacterial cellulose production, 6 g.L(-1), was verified in the coconut water fermentative in ripe fruit, added KH2PO4, FeSO4 and NaH2PO4 kept under agitation.

  4. Mineral Dissolution and Precipitation due to Carbon Dioxide-Water-Rock Interactions: The Significance of Accessory Minerals in Carbonate Reservoirs (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaszuba, J. P.; Marcon, V.; Chopping, C.

    2013-12-01

    Accessory minerals in carbonate reservoirs, and in the caprocks that seal these reservoirs, can provide insight into multiphase fluid (CO2 + H2O)-rock interactions and the behavior of CO2 that resides in these water-rock systems. Our program integrates field data, hydrothermal experiments, and geochemical modeling to evaluate CO2-water-rock reactions and processes in a variety of carbonate reservoirs in the Rocky Mountain region of the US. These studies provide insights into a wide range of geologic environments, including natural CO2 reservoirs, geologic carbon sequestration, engineered geothermal systems, enhanced oil and gas recovery, and unconventional hydrocarbon resources. One suite of experiments evaluates the Madison Limestone on the Moxa Arch, Southwest Wyoming, a sulfur-rich natural CO2 reservoir. Mineral textures and geochemical features developed in the experiments suggest that carbonate minerals which constitute the natural reservoir will initially dissolve in response to emplacement of CO2. Euhedral, bladed anhydrite concomitantly precipitates in response to injected CO2. Analogous anhydrite is observed in drill core, suggesting that secondary anhydrite in the natural reservoir may be related to emplacement of CO2 into the Madison Limestone. Carbonate minerals ultimately re-precipitate, and anhydrite dissolves, as the rock buffers the acidity and reasserts geochemical control. Another suite of experiments emulates injection of CO2 for enhanced oil recovery in the Desert Creek Limestone (Paradox Formation), Paradox Basin, Southeast Utah. Euhedral iron oxyhydroxides (hematite) precipitate at pH 4.5 to 5 and low Eh (approximately -0.1 V) as a consequence of water-rock reaction. Injection of CO2 decreases pH to approximately 3.5 and increases Eh by approximately 0.1 V, yielding secondary mineralization of euhedral pyrite instead of iron oxyhydroxides. Carbonate minerals also dissolve and ultimately re-precipitate, as determined by experiments in the

  5. Water Treatment by Magnetic Field Increases Bone Mineral Density of Rats.

    PubMed

    Balieiro Neto, Geraldo; Engracia Filho, Jair Rodini; de Oliveira, Bruna Rezende Silva Martins; Coelho, Cássia Maria Molinaro; de Souza, Lilian Francisco Arantes; Louzada, Mario Jefferson Quirino

    2017-08-11

    Water treatment using a magnetic field is an attractive but controversial issue with regard to its effects on human health. This study aimed to investigate the effects of water treatment using a magnetic field on the bone mineral density (BMD), bone mineral content (BMC), bone area (BA), bone resistance (BR), blood gas analysis, blood viscosity, and blood biochemical profile of rats. Forty-eight Wistar rats were divided into 2 groups: control (n = 24) and magnetic water-treated (n = 24). Each of these groups was subdivided into 3 groups to evaluate 3 consumption periods (15, 30, and 45 d). The animals were kept in metabolic cages throughout the experiment. A completely randomized design distributed to a 2 × 3 factorial arrangement was used. No significant difference was found in the water intake, dry matter intake, BA, or femoral head resistance between the groups. However, higher anion gap and lower CHCO3 were found in the arterial blood of the magnetic water-treated group. There was significant interaction between the water consumption period and the BR, BMD, and BMC. With 15 d of consumption, there was no difference in the BMC and BR. With 30 d of consumption, the BR (midshaft), BMD, and BMC showed increases; the increases were greater with 45 d of consumption. In adulthood, every month of the animal is approximately equivalent to 2.5 human years. The consumption of water treated by magnetic field for 45 d provided an effective way to improve BMD, BMC and BR in rats. Copyright © 2017 The International Society for Clinical Densitometry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Influences of pH and CO2 on the formation of Metasilicate mineral water in Changbai Mountain, Northeast China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Baizhong; Xiao, Changlai; Liang, Xiujuan; Wu, Shili

    2017-07-01

    Mineral dissolution reactions actively participate in controlling the composition of mineral water. In this study, water soluble, acidic-alkaline and carbonated solution experiments were designed, and mineral reaction mechanisms were researched using chemical kinetics and the minimum free-energy method. The results showed that the release of metasilicate was controlled by pH, CO2, and rock characteristics. In the water soluble experiment, the release process of metasilicate in powdered rocks reached equilibrium after 40 days, while metasilicate in solid rocks took 170 days. The release process of metasilicate in solid rocks satisfied an asymptotic model, while in powdered rocks it accorded with the Stanford reaction kinetic model. In the acidic-alkaline experiment, metasilicate was released earlier under acidic conditions (2.46 < pH < 7) than under alkaline conditions (7 < pH < 10.61). The release process of metasilicate under acidic conditions reached equilibrium in 40 days, compared with 60 days for alkaline conditions. The addition of CO2 to the water solution was beneficial to the formation of metasilicate. Under neutral pH conditions, the reaction barely occurred. Under alkaline conditions, metasilicate was produced by the hydrolysis of metasilicate minerals. Under acidic and additional CO2 conditions, metasilicate formation was mainly via the reaction of H+, CO2, and metasilicate minerals. From these results, we concluded that the metasilicate mineral water from the Changbai Mountains, Jingyu County, is generated by a combination of the hydrolysis of metasilicate minerals and the reaction of H+, CO2, and metasilicate minerals. These results can contribute to a better development and protection of the mineral water resources in the Changbai Mountains.

  7. Modifications of biological effects of drinking mineral waters in Pyatigorsk resort

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reps, Valentina; Efimenko, Natalia; Abramtsova, Anna; Kozlova, Victoria; Sagradyan, Gayne; Tovbushenko, Tatiana; Kotova, Margarita

    2017-04-01

    A variety of types of drinking mineral waters (MW) of Pyatigorsk Deposit (PD) is explained by its structural style and hydrogeological conditions. In resort conditions the most widely used mineral waters are acidulated and carbonate chloride sodium hydrocarbonate MW. It has been shown earlier that natural MW have a high biological exposure potential on exchange processes both in norm and during pathological metabolic changes [1, 2]. We have studied some modification options of the composition of natural drinking mineral waters (MW) in Pyatigorsk resort to increase their rehabilitation potential. In the experiment on 110 male-rats of Wistar line there have been examined some biological effects of a course drinking intake (21 days) of natural MW from the spring that has sulphate-hydrocarbonate-chloride calcium-sodic composition with ferrum elevated level (3-5 mg/dm3), mineralization of 5,0-5,2 g/dm3, CO2 1,3-2,2 g/dm3, daily flow of 10-86 m3/day, temperature from 14 to 370C at the wellhead and MW modified by nanoparticles (NP) of Se (0,04 mg/kg, d - 35 nm) and Ag nanoparticles (0,001 mg/kg, d - 30 nm). One of the mechanisms of selenium influence on carbohydrate metabolism is the regulation of blood glucose level and its utilization by tissues. After the course by the studied MW type there has been noticed Ca-ATPase level reduction in liver against the background of insulin downregulation and glycemia elevation in blood serum of the rats [1]. There has been also observed glucagon retrogression in the blood of the labolatory animals after the treatment course by natural MW in 3 times (p<0,001) and after the course by MW in combination with Se nanoparticles in 1,5 times (p<0,01) in comparison with the control (fresh water). At the same time glucose level authentically increased only after the course by natural MW - 4,8 (4,6-5 ‰) mmol/l in comparison with the control - 4 (4 - 4,4 ‰) mmol/l. Insulin concentration did not change with the animals after the watering

  8. Maxwell-Wagner relaxation in common minerals and a desert soil at low water contents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arcone, Steven A.; Boitnott, Ginger E.

    2012-06-01

    Penetration of 100- to 1000-MHz ground-penetrating radar (GPR) signals is virtually non-existent in arid and desert soils despite their low water content and moderate conductivity, the latter of which cannot explain the loss. Under the hypothesis that strong dielectric relaxation supplements DC conductivity to cause high intrinsic attenuation rates, we compared the complex permittivity of a desert soil sample with that of controlled samples of quartz, feldspars, calcite, coarse and crystallite gypsum, kaolinite and montmorillonite. The soil had 80% quartz, 10% feldspars and 10% gypsum by weight, with the latter composed of crystallites and crustations. All samples had 4-7% volumetric water content. We measured permittivity most accurately from 1.6 MHz to 4 GHz with Fourier Transform time domain reflectometry, and used grain sizes less than 53 μm. All samples show low-frequency dispersion with the soil, gypsum crystallites and montmorillonite having the strongest below 100 MHz, the highest attenuation rates, and conductivity values unable to account for these rates. The soil rate exceeded 100 dB m- 1 by 1 GHz. Through modeling we find that a broadened relaxation centered from 2 to 16 MHz sufficiently supplements losses caused by conductivity and free water relaxation to account for loss rates in all our samples, and accounts for low-frequency dispersion below 1 GHz. We interpret the relaxation to be of the Maxwell-Wagner (MW) type because of the 2- to 16-MHz values, relaxation broadening, the lack of salt, clay and magnetic minerals, and insufficient surface area to support adsorbed water. The likely MW dipolar soil inclusions within the predominantly quartz matrix were gypsum particles coated with water containing ions dissolved from the gypsum, and the conducting water layers themselves. The inclusions for the monomineralic soils were likely ionized partially or completely water-filled interstices, and partially filled galleries for the montmorillonite. The low

  9. Water Solubility in Lower Mantle Minerals and the Role of Peridotite and Basalt in Water Storage in the Lower Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litasov, K.; Ohtani, E.

    2002-12-01

    Recent experimental and theoretical studies suggest water plays a key role in the geodynamics of the Earth's interior. Experimental data on water solubility in minerals of the Earth's mantle suggest that upper mantle, transition zone and lower mantle could have different potential to store water. Transition zone should be an important water reservoir due to significant water solubility in wadsleyite and ringwoodite (Mg,Fe)2SiO4. However, water storage capacity of lower mantle is still very controversial. Meade et al. (1994) reported results of in situ FTIR measurement of water solubility in MgSiO3-perovskite and suggest water content of 60 ppm. Bolfan-Casanova et al. (2000; 2002) showed absence of water (<1 ppm H2O) in MgSiO3-perovskite and 20 ppm H2O in magnesiowustite. In the contrary Murakami et al., 2002 measured 0.1-0.4 wt% H2O in peridotite-related Al-Fe-Mg-perovskite, 0.3-0.4 wt% H2O in Ca-perovskite and about 0.2 wt% H2O in magnesiowustite. Recently, we obtained data on phase relation in hydrous MORB at 20-26 GPa (Litasov and Ohtani, 2002) and found, that stability field of Al-Fe-Mg-perovskite shifts to the lower pressure. This fact suggests that these perovskites of exotic Fe-rich composition may also accommodate water. Our new FTIR data on water solubility in lower mantle minerals at 25 GPa and 1200-1600°C suggest water content in pure MgSiO3-perovskite is <90 ppm (bands at 3397, 3423, 3448, and 3482 cm-1). Water content in Al-Fe-Mg-perovskite (Al2O3=13-17 wt%; Mg#=58-61) observed in MORB is <100 ppm (bands at 3397 and 3423 cm-1). Water content in Al-Fe-Mg-perovskite (Al2O3=5-6 wt.%; Mg#=88-90) observed in peridotite is 1400-1800 ppm (band at 3397 cm-1). Water content in magnesiowustite (Mg0.8Fe0.2O) is 20-60 ppm (band at 3320 cm-1). Therefore, we confirmed that peridotite-related Mg-perovskite is a major water reservoir in the lower mantle; however role of Ca-perovskite and magnesiowustite is not clear. Using data on water solubility in Mg

  10. Sodium-rich carbonated natural mineral water ingestion and blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Santos, Alejandro; Martins, Maria João; Guimarães, João Tiago; Severo, Milton; Azevedo, Isabel

    2010-02-01

    There is a strong positive correlation between sodium chloride intake and hypertension. In industrialized countries the ingestion of carbonated and non-carbonated mineral water is an important source of calorie-free fluids. The mineral content of these waters varies greatly, with many brands containing high levels of sodium. However, some mineral waters contain greater amounts of bicarbonate instead of chloride as the anion associated with the sodium cation. This is relevant because it is well established that the effect of sodium on blood pressure depends on the corresponding anion. Additionally the pressor effect of sodium bicarbonate is much lower than that of equivalent amounts of sodium chloride. The aim of our work was to evaluate the effect of ingesting a sodium-rich carbonated mineral water (Agua das Pedras) on blood pressure values in normotensive individuals. This crossover, non-blinded study evaluated 17 individuals (9 female and 8 male), aged 24-53 years, median body mass index (BMI) < 23, randomly allocated in two groups, ingesting 500 ml/day of Agua das Pedras or Agua Vitalis. Each arm of the study lasted 7 weeks, with 6 weeks of washout between them. Twenty-four hour urinary samples were collected at the beginning and end of each arm to determine pH and sodium and potassium excretion. Blood pressure and body weight were measured weekly throughout the study. A mixed-effects model was used to compare groups (p < 0.05). The Wilcoxon test was used to analyze electrolyte excretion. No differences were observed in blood pressure values between treatments or from baseline values. We found a positive correlation between BMI and blood pressure. The daily ingestion of 500 ml of Agua das Pedras had no effect on blood pressure. A study by Schorr and co-workers found that the ingestion of bicarbonate-rich water (1.5 l/day) had hypotensive effects in an elderly population. However, these results should be verified in hypertensive subjects, who are more likely to

  11. Subsurface water and clay mineral formation during the early history of Mars.

    PubMed

    Ehlmann, Bethany L; Mustard, John F; Murchie, Scott L; Bibring, Jean-Pierre; Meunier, Alain; Fraeman, Abigail A; Langevin, Yves

    2011-11-02

    Clay minerals, recently discovered to be widespread in Mars's Noachian terrains, indicate long-duration interaction between water and rock over 3.7 billion years ago. Analysis of how they formed should indicate what environmental conditions prevailed on early Mars. If clays formed near the surface by weathering, as is common on Earth, their presence would indicate past surface conditions warmer and wetter than at present. However, available data instead indicate substantial Martian clay formation by hydrothermal groundwater circulation and a Noachian rock record dominated by evidence of subsurface waters. Cold, arid conditions with only transient surface water may have characterized Mars's surface for over 4 billion years, since the early-Noachian period, and the longest-duration aqueous, potentially habitable environments may have been in the subsurface.

  12. [Qualitative and quantitative significance of the microbial flora in natural mineral waters during their bottling].

    PubMed

    Biffi Gentili, G; Belli, A

    1976-01-01

    On the basis of data reported in literature concerning the saprophytic bacterial flora of natural mineral waters bottled in glass or in PVC containers and in view of the results obtained during their own investigations, the AA. consider it impossible to establish a limit to the charge of bacterial flora in agar at 20 degrees C and believe that any possible proposal concerning rules limiting the bacterial charge at 37 degrees C requires more detailed study and preliminary controls. In any case, they propose to apply the strictest vigilance in excluding the presence of any sign whatever of fecal contamination or of potentially pathogenic bacterial types (f.i. P. aeruginosa) in all water samples; they also suggest to require that the performance of comparative tests be extended to the stages preceding bottling. Current experimental investigations reveal that the multiplying process seems to be accelerated and more protracted in time in waters bottled in PVC containers than in those kept in glass containers.

  13. Hydrogen and oxygen isotope exchange reactions between clay minerals and water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Neil, J.R.; Kharaka, Y.K.

    1976-01-01

    The extent of hydrogen and oxygen isotope exchange between clay minerals and water has been measured in the temperature range 100-350?? for bomb runs of up to almost 2 years. Hydrogen isotope exchange between water and the clays was demonstrable at 100??. Exchange rates were 3-5 times greater for montmorillonite than for kaolinite or illite and this is attributed to the presence of interlayer water in the montmorillonite structure. Negligible oxygen isotope exchange occurred at these low temperatures. The great disparity in D and O18 exchange rates observed in every experiment demonstrates that hydrogen isotope exchange occurred by a mechanism of proton exchange independent of the slower process of O18 exchange. At 350?? kaolinite reacted to form pyrophyllite and diaspore. This was accompanied by essentially complete D exchange but minor O18 exchange and implies that intact structural units in the pyrophyllite were inherited from the kaolinite precursor. ?? 1976.

  14. Radium isotopes in the Polish Outer Carpathian mineral waters of various chemical composition.

    PubMed

    Chau, Nguyen Dinh; Lucyna, Rajchel; Jakub, Nowak; Paweł, Jodłowski

    2012-10-01

    The paper presents the activity concentrations of radium isotopes ((226)Ra, (228)Ra) and chemical compositions of above 70 mineral water samples collected from several dozens of springs and boreholes localized in the Polish Outer Carpathians. The activity concentrations of both radium isotopes clearly increase with the increase of water TDS, but decrease when the SO(4)(2-) content increases. These concentrations vary in the broad interval from a few to near 1000 mBq/L. The coefficient of the linear correlation between concentrations of these isotopes amounts to 0.85, and the activity ratio (226)Ra/(228)Ra is >1 for chloride-sodium waters, being ≈1 for hydrogen-carbonate and <1 for the sulfate ones. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The importance of hygienic practices during the collection and bottling of mineral water.

    PubMed

    Windle-Taylor, E

    1976-01-01

    Natural water suitable for direct bottling must be clear, colourless, and free from objectionable taste and odour. The mineral content must be limited in amount, otherwise the water would come within the medicinal water category. There should be no detectable organic matter present and the water must be of the highest bacteriological quality -- virtually sterile - and should remain in this condition during the collection and bottling processes. In order to achieve and maintain this high quality, the gathering grounds of the source must be protected from pollution; the construction of the well or spring must be such as to prevent external contamination, as also should be the collecting and bottling apparatus. Personnel employed in the factory should wear protective clothing and be regularly checked as to their freedom from waterborne infectious diseases. Control of the water as to its hygienic quality should be by regular and frequent analysis of samples of the water and the air at various points in the process and in the factory. A new problem that has arisen and has to be faced in this situation is the risk of contamination by certain materials in contact with the water that may contain substances that encourage the growth of saprophytic bacteria which would contaminate by the production of taste, odour, discolouration, cloudiness and definite evidence of microbial growth. It is emphasized that the extent of this new problem is not yet delineated and that methods of laboratory control and safeguards against such happenings are still evolving.

  16. Submarine weathering of silicate minerals and the extent of pore water freshening at active continental margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholz, Florian; Hensen, Christian; Schmidt, Mark; Geersen, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    In order to investigate how submarine weathering processes may affect the water balance of sediments at convergent plate margins, six sediment cores were retrieved off Central Chile at water depth between ˜800 and 4000 m. The sediment solid phase was analyzed for its major element composition and the pore fluids were analyzed for dissolved sulfate, sulfide, total alkalinity, major cations, chloride, bromide, iodide, hydrocarbons as well as the carbon isotopic composition of methane. Because of negligible weathering on land, surface sediments off Central Chile are rich in reactive silicate minerals and have a bulk composition similar to volcanic rocks in the adjacent Andes. Deep-sourced fluxes of alkalinity, cations and chloride indicate that silicate minerals are subject to weathering in the forearc during burial. Comparison of deep-sourced signals with data from nearby Ocean Drilling Program Sites reveals two different types of weathering processes: In shallow (tens of meters), methanic sediments of slope basins with high organic carbon burial rates, reactive silicate minerals undergo incongruent dissolution through reaction with CO2 from methanogenesis. At greater burial depth (hundreds of meters), silicate weathering is dominated by authigenic smectite formation. This process is accompanied by uptake of water into the clay interlayers thus leading to elevated salinities in the surrounding pore water. Deep-seated smectite formation is more widespread than shallow silicate dissolution, as it is independent from the availability of CO2 from methanogenesis. Although solute transport is not focused enough to form cold seeps in the proper sense, tectonically induced, diffuse fluid flow transfers the deep-seated signal of smectite formation into the shallow sediments. The temperature-controlled conversion of smectite to illite is considered the most important dehydration process in marine forearc environments (depth of kilometers). However, in agreement with other

  17. Climate-change-driven deterioration of water quality in a mineralized watershed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Todd, Andrew; Manning, Andrew H.; Verplanck, Philip L.; Crouch, Caitlin; McKnight, Diane M.; Dunham, Ryan

    2012-01-01

    A unique 30-year streamwater chemistry data set from a mineralized alpine watershed with naturally acidic, metal-rich water displays dissolved concentrations of Zn and other metals of ecological concern increasing by 100–400% (400–2000 μg/L) during low-flow months, when metal concentrations are highest. SO4 and other major ions show similar increases. A lack of natural or anthropogenic land disturbances in the watershed during the study period suggests that climate change is the underlying cause. Local mean annual and mean summer air temperatures have increased at a rate of 0.2–1.2 °C/decade since the 1980s. Other climatic and hydrologic indices, including stream discharge during low-flow months, do not display statistically significant trends. Consideration of potential specific causal mechanisms driven by rising temperatures suggests that melting of permafrost and falling water tables (from decreased recharge) are probable explanations for the increasing concentrations. The prospect of future widespread increases in dissolved solutes from mineralized watersheds is concerning given likely negative impacts on downstream ecosystems and water resources, and complications created for the establishment of attainable remediation objectives at mine sites.

  18. Remote pulsed laser Raman spectroscopy system for detecting water, ice, and hydrous minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Christopher S.; Abedin, M. Nurul; Sharma, Shiv K.; Misra, Anupam K.; Ismail, Syed; Singh, Upendra N.; Refaat, Tamer F.; Elsayed-Ali, Hani E.; Sandford, Steve P.

    2006-08-01

    For exploration of planetary surfaces, detection of water and ice is of great interest in supporting existence of life on other planets. Therefore, a remote Raman spectroscopy system was demonstrated at NASA Langley Research Center in collaboration with the University of Hawaii for detecting ice-water and hydrous minerals on planetary surfaces. In this study, a 532 nm pulsed laser is utilized as an excitation source to allow detection in high background radiation conditions. The Raman scattered signal is collected by a 4-inch telescope positioned in front of a spectrograph. The Raman spectrum is analyzed using a spectrograph equipped with a holographic super notch filter to eliminate Rayleigh scattering, and a holographic transmission grating that simultaneously disperses two spectral tracks onto the detector for higher spectral range. To view the spectrum, the spectrograph is coupled to an intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD), which allows detection of very weak Stokes line. The ICCD is operated in gated mode to further suppress effects from background radiation and long-lived fluorescence. The sample is placed at 5.6 m from the telescope, and the laser is mounted on the telescope in a coaxial geometry to achieve maximum performance. The system was calibrated using the spectral lines of a Neon lamp source. To evaluate the system, Raman standard samples such as calcite, naphthalene, acetone, and isopropyl alcohol were analyzed. The Raman evaluation technique was used to analyze water, ice and other hydrous minerals and results from these species are presented.

  19. Analysis of phthalate migration from plastic containers to packaged cooking oil and mineral water.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qian; Yin, Xueyan; Wang, Min; Wang, Haifeng; Zhang, Niping; Shen, Yanyan; Xu, Shi; Zhang, Ling; Gu, Zhongze

    2010-11-10

    The migration of phthalates (PAEs), a class of typical environmental estrogen contaminants in food, from food packaging to packaged food attracts more and more attention worldwide. Many factors will affect the migration processes. The purpose of this study was to evaluate PAE migration from plastic containers to cooking oil and mineral water packed in authentic commercial packaging and stored under various conditions (different storage temperatures, contact times, and storage states (static or dynamic state)) and to identify a potential relationship between the amount and type of PAEs migrated and the lipophilic character of the food matrix. The samples were analyzed by a novel method of liquid chromatography combined with solid-phase extraction by an electrospun nylon 6 nanofibers mat, with PAE detection limits of 0.001 μg/L in mineral water and 0.020 μg/L in cooking oil, respectively. The results demonstrated that the cooking oil was a more suitable medium for the migration of PAEs from packages into foodstuffs than mineral water. Scilicet, the migration potential of the PAEs into foodstuffs, depends on the lipophilic characteristics of the food matrix. The results also demonstrated that migrations were more significant at higher temperature, longer contact time, and higher dynamic frequency; thus, the migration tests should be evaluated with consideration of different storage temperatures and contact times. Mathematical models with good logarithmic relationships were established to demonstrate the relationship between the PAE migration and food/packaging contact time for different storage temperatures. These established mathematical models would be expected to become a set of practical tools for the prediction of PAE migration.

  20. Studies on the spermiostatic actions of some local mineral water drinks.

    PubMed

    Oyelola, O O; Thomas, K D; Amole, F

    1990-03-01

    Caffeine and the trace metals iron (Fe), copper (Cu), chromium (Cr), magnesium (Mg), calcium (Ca), zinc (Zn), lead (Pb), silver (Ag) and mercury (Hg) were determined in six locally purchased mineral water drinks in Ile-Ife, Nigeria in a bid to determine the constituents in the drinks which may be responsible for their observed in vitro spermiostatic actions. There was no association between the caffeine and the trace metals content of the drinks and their in vitro inhibition of sperm motility. Some other possible factors are also discussed.

  1. Does plant uptake or low soil mineral-N production limit mineral-N losses to surface waters and groundwater from soils under grass in summer?

    PubMed

    Bhatti, Ambreen; McClean, Colin J; Cresser, Malcolm S

    2013-07-01

    Summer minima and autumn/winter maxima in nitrate concentrations in rivers are reputedly due to high plant uptake of nitrate from soils in summer. A novel alternative hypothesis is tested here for soils under grass. By summer, residual readily mineralizable plant litter from the previous autumn/winter is negligible and fresh litter input low. Consequently little mineral-N is produced in the soil. Water-soluble and KCl-extractable mineral N in fresh soils and soils incubated outdoors for 7 days have been monitored over 12 months for soil transects at two permanent grassland sites near York, UK, using 6 replicates throughout. Vegetation-free soil is shown to produce very limited mineral-N in summer, despite the warm, moist conditions. Litter accumulates in autumn/winter and initially its high C:N ratio favours N accumulation in the soil. It is also shown that mineral-N generated monthly in situ in soil substantially exceeds the monthly mineral-N inputs via wet deposition at the sites.

  2. Elaboration of new ceramic microfiltration membranes from mineral coal fly ash applied to waste water treatment.

    PubMed

    Jedidi, Ilyes; Saïdi, Sami; Khemakhem, Sabeur; Larbot, André; Elloumi-Ammar, Najwa; Fourati, Amine; Charfi, Aboulhassan; Salah, Abdelhamid Ben; Amar, Raja Ben

    2009-12-15

    This work aims to develop a new mineral porous tubular membrane based on mineral coal fly ash. Finely ground mineral coal powder was calcinated at 700 degrees C for about 3 h. The elaboration of the mesoporous layer was performed by the slip-casting method using a suspension made of the mixture of fly-ash powder, water and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). The obtained membrane was submitted to a thermal treatment which consists in drying at room temperature for 24 h then a sintering at 800 degrees C. SEM photographs indicated that the membrane surface was homogeneous and did not present any macrodefects (cracks, etc...). The average pore diameter of the active layer was 0.25 microm and the thickness was around 20 microm. The membrane permeability was 475 l/h m(2) bar. This membrane was applied to the treatment of the dying effluents generated by the washing baths in the textile industry. The performances in term of permeate flux and efficiency were determined and compared to those obtained using a commercial alumina microfiltration membrane. Almost the same stabilised permeate flux was obtained (about 100 l h(-1)m(-2)). The quality of permeate was almost the same with the two membranes: the COD and color removal was 75% and 90% respectively.

  3. Can hydrous minerals account for the observed mid-latitude water on Mars?

    SciTech Connect

    Bish, D. L.; Vaniman, D. T.; Fialips, C. I.; Carey, J. W.; Feldman, W. C.

    2003-01-01

    Great interest was generated with the discovery by the Odyssey spacecraft OC heterogeneously distributed hydrogcn at martian mid-latitudes, suggesting that large areas of the near-equatorial highlands contain near-surface deposits of 'chemically and/or physically bound 1120 and/or OH' in amounts up to 3.8% equivalent H20. More recent interpretations of the Odyssey data using new calibrations suggest that some near-equatorial areas, such as Arabia Terra, contain up to 8.5f I .3% water-equivalent hydrogen. Such shallow occurrences (minerals and zeolites, have been proposed as possible M20-bearing constituents on Mars, and both groups of minerals are common terrestrial alteration products of hydrovolcanic basaltic ashes and palagonitic material comparable io those that may be widespread on Mars. Smectites within martian meteorites, attributed to hydrous alteration on Mars rather than on Earth, provide direct evidence of clay minerals from Mars. In addition, new thermal emission spectrometer (TES) data provide evidence for unspecified zeolites in martian surface dust, and concluded that spectral deconvolution of MGS TES and Mariner 9 IRIS data is consistent with the presence of zeolite in the martian surface dust.

  4. Correction methods of medicinal properties of mineral waters in Pyatigorsk resort

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reps, Valentina; Potapov, Evgeniy; Abramtsova, Anna; Kotova, Margarita

    2016-04-01

    Mineral Water (MW) of Pyatigorsk deposit (PD) is united in five genetic groups (operational stocks of 2809,8 m3/day): carbonic and hydrosulphuric, carbonic, carbonic chloride-hydrocarbonate sodium (salt and alkaline), radonic low carbonate, nitrogen-carbonic terms. A variety of MW types is explained by peculiarities of geological structure and hydrogeological conditions of PD. Here on the sites of the development of deep semi-ring splits there are overflows and a mixture of various complexes. Unloading of deep water strikes happens not only on the earth surface in the form of springs but also at the depth in its edging crumbling rocks of Palaeocene and quarternary deposits. As a result of mixture processes of water and its subsequent metamorphization, various types of mineral water of this deposit are formed. Pyatigorsk resort is in a special protected ecologo-resort region which mode allows to keep stability of structure and ecological purity of MW. Nevertheless, MW variability, compositional differences and MW mineralization determining the level of its biological effect demand studying of action mechanisms of both natural MW, and possibility of its modification for range expansion of rehabilitation action. There have been examined biological effects of the course drinking reception In experiment on 80 rats males of the Wistar line biological effects of the course drinking reception of two MW types: "Krasnoarmeyskaya new" (MW1) of sulphate-hydrocarbonate-chloride calcium-sodium structure with the raised contents of iron (3-5 mg/dm3), mineralization of 5,0-5,2 g/dm3, CO2 of 1,3-2,2 g/dm3, daily flow of 10-86 m3/day, temperature from 14 to 370C on the mouth of the well and spring №2 (MW2) low sulphate, low carbonate sulphate-hydrocarbonate-chloride calcium-sodium, mineralization of 5,0 g/l, CO2 of 0,7 g/dm3, H2 of S 0,01 g/dm3. There has been shown an ability of the drinking course MW1 to influence on endocrine and metabolic continium - cortisol level increased

  5. Trace Element Speciation and Distribution Study at Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Biofilm/Mineral/Water Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelabert, A.; Wang, Y.; Gescher, J.; Ha, J.; Cordova, C. D.; Singer, D. M.; Spormann, A. M.; Trainor, T. P.; Eng, P. J.; Brown, G. E.

    2006-12-01

    Fe- and Al-(oxyhydr)oxides are among the most reactive mineral surfaces contacted by surface and ground waters, and thus they constitute important sorbents for heavy metal and metalloid ions. As microbial biofilms may be present as coatings on these minerals, they are likely to induce major changes in surface charges and sorption capacities for metal(loid) ions compared to biofilm-free mineral surfaces. In addition, the micro- environments in biofilms can be quite different from those in bulk solutions, which can enhance (or inhibit) metal adsorption on mineral surfaces and produce biominerals that are not predicted by equilibrium thermodynamics based on the bulk solution values. In order to provide a more quantitative understanding of these effects, we have carried out a study of the interaction of Zn(II), Pb(II), and As(V) with Shewanella oneidensis (wild type, EPS-deficient mutant, and ppx- and ppk-deficient mutants) grown on highly polished and oriented single crystal surfaces of α-Al2O3 (1-102) and α-Fe2O3 (0001). This gram-negative bacterium commonly found in soil and sediments can use a wide range of electron donors and terminal electron acceptors including Fe(III) and Mn(IV) oxides under anaerobic conditions. In-situ ATR-FTIR analyses and potentiometric titrations of S. oneidensis biofilm collected from a glass bead-filled column inoculated with S. oneidensis were conducted in order to determine the nature of functional groups present on the bacterial surfaces, to quantify the site densities and protonation constants for these groups, and to determine the electrostatic parameters for S. oneidensis surfaces. GI-XAFS analyses performed on BL 11-2 at SSRL, together with macroscopic metal adsorption experiments as a function of pH (2 to 6.5), metal concentration (10-3 to 10-7 M), and ionic strength (10-1 to 10-3 M), were used to determine ion speciation and local coordination environments in the biofilm and to develop a surface complexation model describing

  6. Ion adsorption-induced wetting transition in oil-water-mineral systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavalli, Andrea; Bera, Bijoyendra; van den Ende, Dirk; Mugele, Frieder

    2015-11-01

    The relative wettability of a rock substrate to oil and water is a central issue in many technological applications, especially in the field of enhanced oil recovery. We here consider a salty water droplet deposited on a mica substrate inside an oil bath. By adding specific ions to the water phase, a wetting transition can be induced. The water solution completely wet the mica substrate if it only contains monovalent cations (K+, Na+) . However, when divalent (Ca2+ , Mg2+) cations are added to the water phase, a finite contact angle (around 10o) can be observed. We explain this phenomenon in the scope of a Poisson-Boltzmann model. The absorption of divalent ions at the mica interface generates a positive surface charge, and induces an attractive interaction to the negatively charged oil-water interface, which triggers the transition. We also observe that different cations can be arranged in an Hofmeister-like sequence, based on their effectiveness in changing the wettability of the mineral substrate. Finally, we show that adding small amounts of a polar surfactant to the oil phase synergistically enhances the wetting transition.

  7. Root Suberin Forms an Extracellular Barrier That Affects Water Relations and Mineral Nutrition in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Baxter, Ivan; Hosmani, Prashant S.; Rus, Ana; Lahner, Brett; Borevitz, Justin O.; Muthukumar, Balasubramaniam; Mickelbart, Michael V.; Schreiber, Lukas; Franke, Rochus B.; Salt, David E.

    2009-01-01

    Though central to our understanding of how roots perform their vital function of scavenging water and solutes from the soil, no direct genetic evidence currently exists to support the foundational model that suberin acts to form a chemical barrier limiting the extracellular, or apoplastic, transport of water and solutes in plant roots. Using the newly characterized enhanced suberin1 (esb1) mutant, we established a connection in Arabidopsis thaliana between suberin in the root and both water movement through the plant and solute accumulation in the shoot. Esb1 mutants, characterized by increased root suberin, were found to have reduced day time transpiration rates and increased water-use efficiency during their vegetative growth period. Furthermore, these changes in suberin and water transport were associated with decreases in the accumulation of Ca, Mn, and Zn and increases in the accumulation of Na, S, K, As, Se, and Mo in the shoot. Here, we present direct genetic evidence establishing that suberin in the roots plays a critical role in controlling both water and mineral ion uptake and transport to the leaves. The changes observed in the elemental accumulation in leaves are also interpreted as evidence that a significant component of the radial root transport of Ca, Mn, and Zn occurs in the apoplast. PMID:19461889

  8. Low water contents in diamond mineral inclusions: Proto-genetic origin in a dry cratonic lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Lawrence A.; Logvinova, Alla M.; Howarth, Geoffrey H.; Liu, Yang; Peslier, Anne H.; Rossman, George R.; Guan, Yunbin; Chen, Yang; Sobolev, Nikolay V.

    2016-01-01

    The mantle is the major reservoir of Earth's water, hosted within Nominally Anhydrous Minerals (NAMs) (e.g., Bell and Rossman, 1992; Peslier et al., 2010; Peslier, 2010; Nestola and Smyth, 2015), in the form of hydrogen bonded to the silicate's structural oxygen. From whence cometh this water? Is the water in these minerals representative of the Earth's primitive upper mantle or did it come from melting events linked to crustal formation or to more recent metasomatic/re-fertilization events? During diamond formation, NAMs are encapsulated at hundreds of kilometers depth within the mantle, thereby possibly shielding and preserving their pristine water contents from re-equilibrating with fluids and melts percolating through the lithospheric mantle. Here we show that the NAMs included in diamonds from six locales on the Siberian Craton contain measurable and variable H2O concentrations from 2 to 34 parts per million by weight (ppmw) in olivine, 7 to 276 ppmw in clinopyroxene, and 11-17 ppmw in garnets. Our results suggest that if the inclusions were in equilibrium with the diamond-forming fluid, the water fugacity would have been unrealistically low. Instead, we consider the H2O contents of the inclusions, shielded by diamonds, as pristine representatives of the residual mantle prior to encapsulation, and indicative of a protogenetic origin for the inclusions. Hydrogen diffusion in the diamond does not appear to have modified these values significantly. The H2O contents of NAMs in mantle xenoliths may represent some later metasomatic event(s), and are not always representative of most of the continental lithospheric mantle. Results from the present study also support the conclusions of Peslier et al. (2010) and Novella et al. (2015) that the dry nature of the SCLM of a craton may provide stabilization of its thickened continental roots.

  9. Variability of mineral intakes from drinking water: a possible explanation for the controversy over the relationship of water quality to cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Gillies, M E; Paulin, H V

    1983-03-01

    The assumption that people using the same water supply have similar intakes of minerals from drinking water is examined. Duplicate samples of all water drunk during a 24 hour period, including that boiled for beverage preparation, were collected by 109 adult subjects. The results showed that there may be more than a tenfold variation in the amount of water people drink daily. In addition it was found that the mineral concentrations in the 24 hour samples can vary markedly from those in water collected from the source or supply or from household taps which are the usual sampling points for epidemiological studies. The convention of using total hardness as an indicator of mineral intakes from hard and soft water is questioned.

  10. Influence of Seasonal and Geochemical Changes on the Geomicrobiology of an Iron Carbonate Mineral Water Spring

    PubMed Central

    Hegler, Florian; Lösekann-Behrens, Tina; Hanselmann, Kurt; Behrens, Sebastian

    2012-01-01

    Fuschna Spring in the Swiss Alps (Engadin region) is a bicarbonate iron(II)-rich, pH-neutral mineral water spring that is dominated visually by dark green microbial mats at the side of the flow channel and orange iron(III) (oxyhydr)oxides in the flow channel. Gradients of O2, dissolved iron(II), and bicarbonate establish in the water. Our goals were to identify the dominating biogeochemical processes and to determine to which extent changing geochemical conditions along the flow path and seasonal changes influence mineral identity, crystallinity, and microbial diversity. Geochemical analysis showed microoxic water at the spring outlet which became fully oxygenated within 2.3 m downstream. X-ray diffraction and Mössbauer spectroscopy revealed calcite (CaCO3) and ferrihydrite [Fe(OH)3] to be the dominant minerals which increased in crystallinity with increasing distance from the spring outlet. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis banding pattern cluster analysis revealed that the microbial community composition shifted mainly with seasons and to a lesser extent along the flow path. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis showed that microbial communities differ between the flow channel and the flanking microbial mat. Microbial community analysis in combination with most-probable-number analyses and quantitative PCR (qPCR) showed that the mat was dominated by cyanobacteria and the channel was dominated by microaerophilic Fe(II) oxidizers (1.97 × 107 ± 4.36 × 106 16S rRNA gene copies g−1 using Gallionella-specific qPCR primers), while high numbers of Fe(III) reducers (109 cells/g) were identified in both the mat and the flow channel. Phototrophic and nitrate-reducing Fe(II) oxidizers were present as well, although in lower numbers (103 to 104 cells/g). In summary, our data suggest that mainly seasonal changes caused microbial community shifts, while geochemical gradients along the flow path influenced mineral crystallinity. PMID:22865064

  11. Community water fluoridation, bone mineral density, and fractures: prospective study of effects in older women

    PubMed Central

    Phipps, Kathy R; Orwoll, Eric S; Mason, Jill D; Cauley, Jane A

    2000-01-01

    Objective To determine whether fluoridation influences bone mineral density and fractures in older women. Design Multicentre prospective study on risk factors for osteoporosis and fractures. Setting Four community based centres in the United States. Participants 9704 ambulatory women without bilateral hip replacements enrolled during 1986-8; 7129 provided information on exposure to fluoride. Main outcome measures Bone mineral density of the lumbar spine, proximal femur, radius, and calcaneus plus incident fractures (fractures that occurred during the study) of vertebrae, hip, wrist, and humerus. Results Women were classified as exposed or not exposed or having unknown exposure to fluoride for each year from 1950 to 1994. Outcomes were compared in women with continuous exposure to fluoridated water for the past 20 years (n=3218) and women with no exposure during the past 20 years (n=2563). In women with continuous exposure mean bone mineral density was 2.6% higher at the femoral neck (0.017 g/cm2, P<0.001), 2.5% higher at the lumbar spine (0.022 g/cm2, P<0.001), and 1.9% lower at the distal radius (0.007 g/cm2, P=0.002). In women with continuous exposure the multivariable adjusted risk of hip fracture was slightly reduced (risk ratio 0.69, 95% confidence interval 0.50 to 0.96, P=0.028) as was the risk of vertebral fracture (0.73, 0.55 to 0.97, P=0.033). There was a non-significant trend toward an increased risk of wrist fracture (1.32, 1.00 to 1.71, P=0.051) and no difference in risk of humerus fracture (0.85, 0.58 to 1.23, P=0.378). Conclusions Long term exposure to fluoridated drinking water does not increase the risk of fracture. PMID:11021862

  12. Peroxone mineralization of chemical oxygen demand for direct potable water reuse: Kinetics and process control.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tingting; Englehardt, James D

    2015-04-15

    Mineralization of organics in secondary effluent by the peroxone process was studied at a direct potable water reuse research treatment system serving an occupied four-bedroom, four bath university residence hall apartment. Organic concentrations were measured as chemical oxygen demand (COD) and kinetic runs were monitored at varying O3/H2O2 dosages and ratios. COD degradation could be accurately described as the parallel pseudo-1st order decay of rapidly and slowly-oxidizable fractions, and effluent COD was reduced to below the detection limit (<0.7 mg/L). At dosages ≥4.6 mg L(-1) h(-1), an O3/H2O2 mass ratio of 3.4-3.8, and initial COD <20 mg/L, a simple first order decay was indicated for both single-passed treated wastewater and recycled mineral water, and a relationship is proposed and demonstrated to estimate the pseudo-first order rate constant for design purposes. At this O3/H2O2 mass ratio, ORP and dissolved ozone were found to be useful process control indicators for monitoring COD mineralization in secondary effluent. Moreover, an average second order rate constant for OH oxidation of secondary effluent organics (measured as MCOD) was found to be 1.24 × 10(7) ± 0.64 × 10(7) M(-1) S(-1). The electric energy demand of the peroxone process is estimated at 1.73-2.49 kW h electric energy for removal of one log COD in 1 m(3) secondary effluent, comparable to the energy required for desalination of medium strength seawater. Advantages/disadvantages of the two processes for municipal wastewater reuse are discussed.

  13. Analysis of the interaction between autochthonous bacteria and packaging material in PVC-bottled mineral water.

    PubMed

    Guerzoni, M E; Lanciotti, R; Sinigaglia, M; Gardini, F

    1994-06-01

    A study with about 10,000 bottles produced by a mineral water company was undertaken in order to identify the causal agent of an off-odour occurrence in the bottled water. Some physiological attributes of the dominant species over an 8-month period, as well as their interaction with packaging material, were investigated. Pseudomonas maltophilia, P. acidovorans, Acinetobacter calcoaceticus var. lowffi, frequently associated with bottles having an off-odour, seemed to play a decisive role in the phenomenon due to their elevated lipolytic activity, their cell hydrophobicity and adhesivity to the PVC walls. Their ability to attack the sodium polysulfide included in the ultramarine blue dye present in PVC, transforming it to H2S was investigated.

  14. Ocular injuries caused by metal caps of carbonated mineral water bottles.

    PubMed

    Erdurman, Fazıl Cüneyt; Ceylan, Osman Melih; Hürmeriç, Volkan; Pellumbi, Alfrida; Durukan, Ali Hakan; Sobacı, Güngör

    2013-05-01

    Bottles containing carbonated drinks are potentially hazardous to the eye. In this study, we aimed to document the clinical characteristics and visual outcomes in a series of patients with ocular injury from flying metal caps of carbonated mineral water bottles. Retrospective review of ocular injuries due to metal caps of carbonated mineral water bottles. Sixteen eyes of sixteen patients were included in the study. All of the patients were male, with a mean age of 24 years. Ten of the patients had a history of using improper tools for bottle cap removal. The left eye was involved in twelve cases and the right eye in four cases. All patients had contusion-type closed-globe injury. Varying degrees of hyphema were observed in all patients, and vitreous hemorrhage was present in four. The visual acuity at the last follow-up was 20/20 in 15 of the patients. The use of a bottle cap opener is essential for preventing ocular damage from pressed metal caps of carbonated drinks. In addition to popularising the use of screw cap bottles, warning labels that alert consumers about the possibility of eye injury should be placed on carbonated drinks with pressed metal caps.

  15. [Neurotensin liberation during the consumption of mineral water from Bad Mergentheimer Karlsquelle].

    PubMed

    Eberhardt, G; Dersidan, A; Nustede, R; Schafmayer, A

    1991-09-01

    The contraction of the gallbladder mainly mediated by CCK after oral administration of pharmacological doses of magnesium sulfate is familiar. The same applies to the cholekinetic action of courses of sulfatic mineral water treatment. It was demonstrated in 12 patients in a controlled study that besides other known secretions of gastrointestinal hormones, there is also a significant rise of the plasma level of neurotensin when Bad Mergentheimer Karlsquelle mineral water containing sulfate (3.7 g SO4/l) is drunk on an empty stomach (300 ml, 26 degrees C). This was significantly greater (basal values 6.8 +/- 4.1 pg/ml and a maximum of 15.7 +/- 8.1 pg/ml after 40 min) than in a control group consisting of the same patients who had drunk tapwater. Whereas the involvement of the neuropeptide neurotensin in the regulation of the exocrine functions of the pancreas has been established, its effect in the regulation of gallbladder contraction is probably of rather minor significance compared to CCK.

  16. Geochemical and isotopic investigations on the thermal and mineral underground waters from the Republic of Moldova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nisi, Barbara; Bogdevich, Oleg; Vaselli, Orlando; Nicoara, Igor; Tassi, Franco; Culighin, Elena; Mogorici, Cristina; Jeleapov, Victor; Mussi, Mario

    2017-04-01

    Republic of Moldova (RM) has a large spectrum of underground mineral waters (16 reservoirs) of eight principal aquifers, most of which affected by contaminants originated by natural sources and anthropogenic activities. Inorganic natural tracers and stable isotopes are useful tools to fingerprint the water source and solutes, respectively. The aim of this investigation was to determine the geochemical and isotopic features of the most important thermo- and mineral waters from RM to trace their flow pathways and evaluate the presence of deep fluid sources discharging from fault systems, developed in response to the structural setting of the area. To the best of our knowledge, no systematic geochemical investigations were previously carried out in this area. RM has an area of 33,840 km2 and lies within the East European Precambrian Platform, two structural and/or stratigraphic layers, which are distinguishable in basement and sedimentary cover in the northern and central part of country. The basement rocks include granites, gneisses and gabbros. The sedimentary cover, overlying the crystalline basement, is almost undeformed and consists of Upper Proterozoic, Mesozoic and Cenozoic rocks. The geological structure is like a matrix formed from different layers of rocks consisting of permeable and impermeable strata. The deep aquifers are situated down to 1,000 m depth from the bottom to the top: Vendian (Ediocariam) and crystalline basement rocks, Silurian crystalline limestone, Cretaceous limestone, Baden-Sarmatian limestone and clay-sand deposits, middle Sarmatian limestone and clay-sand layers. Other younger aquifers were not investigated. In this framework, 54 samples from the most important underground reservoirs of RM were collected and analyzed for major, trace species and dissolved gases. An inventory of isotopic (18O/16O and 2H/1H ratios in water and 13C/12C in dissolved CO2) features (including tritium units in selected samples) was also provided. By a

  17. Uranium in stream and mineral water of the Federal Republic of Germany.

    PubMed

    Birke, Manfred; Rauch, Uwe; Lorenz, Hans

    2009-12-01

    The concentration of uranium was determined in 944 samples from stream water by the inductively coupled plasma quadrupole mass spectrometry (ICP-QMS) method and represented on a color-shaded contour map. Uranium concentrations in surface water were determined to be between 0.007 μg/l and 43.7 μg/l with median of 0.33 μg/l. The regional distribution of uranium is influenced primarily by lithological and anthropogenic factors. In Mecklenburg, northern Brandenburg, and eastern Schleswig-Holstein, elevated uranium concentrations coincide with the extent of the last Weichselian ice sheet. The maximum concentrations are observed in the surface waters of the old mining districts in the western part of the Ore Mountains and in eastern Thuringia. Elevated concentrations are found in areas of agriculturally used loess soils. These concentrations correlate with the use of phosphate fertilizers. There is a zone of elevated concentrations up to 10.0 μg U/l in the Keuper Sandstone area south of the Thuringian Forest and from northwest of Stuttgart as far as Coburg. The distribution of elevated values in mineral water shows a clear correlation with the elevated values in surface water and the geology of those locations. Bunter and Keuper strata are the most important uranium source.

  18. Common and specific responses to availability of mineral nutrients and water

    PubMed Central

    Kudoyarova, Guzel R.; Dodd, Ian C.; Veselov, Dmitry S.; Rothwell, Shane A.; Yu. Veselov, Stanislav

    2015-01-01

    Changes in resource (mineral nutrients and water) availability, due to their heterogeneous distribution in space and time, affect plant development. Plants need to sense these changes to optimize growth and biomass allocation by integrating root and shoot growth. Since a limited supply of water or nutrients can elicit similar physiological responses (the relative activation of root growth at the expense of shoot growth), similar underlying mechanisms may affect perception and acquisition of either nutrients or water. This review compares root and shoot responses to availability of different macronutrients and water. Attention is given to the roles of root-to-shoot signalling and shoot-to-root signalling, with regard to coordinating changes in root and shoot growth and development. Involvement of plant hormones in regulating physiological responses such as stomatal and hydraulic conductance is revealed by measuring the effects of resource availability on phytohormone concentrations in roots and shoots, and their flow between roots and shoots in xylem and phloem saps. More specific evidence can be obtained by measuring the physiological responses of genotypes with altered hormone responses or concentrations. We discuss the similarity and diversity of changes in shoot growth, allocation to root growth, and root architecture under changes in water, nitrate, and phosphorus availability, and the possible involvement of abscisic acid, indole-acetic acid, and cytokinin in their regulation. A better understanding of these mechanisms may contribute to better crop management for efficient use of these resources and to selecting crops for improved performance under suboptimal soil conditions. PMID:25697793

  19. Characterization of the bacterial flora in mineral waters in upstreaming fluids of deep igneous rock aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, C.; Mau, M.; SchlöMann, M.; Heinicke, J.; Koch, U.

    2007-03-01

    The bacterial community of the mineral spring Wettinquelle in the Vogtland/NW Bohemian region (German-Czech border) was characterized by sequence analysis of amplified small subunit ribosomal RNA genes. The acidulous spring water consists mostly of old groundwater from deep aquifers, which is mixed with 15-20% young water from upper groundwater horizons. The spring water contains high concentrations of iron, Ca2+ and SO42- ions. A remarkable attribute is the high radon activity of 27 kBq L-1 water. Free escaping spring gas consists mainly of CO2 originating from the mantle, N2 (1.2%) and traces of other gases, like methane and helium. Close relatives of Gallionella ferruginea, a micro-aerobic oxidizer of ferrous iron, contributed most to the clone library. Clones with sequences related to Thiobacillus aquaesulis, members of the Sulfuricurvum-cluster and members of several branches of the OP11 group were present in significantly lower numbers but still with some microdiversity. These bacterial groups, which contributed strongly to the clone library and have known physiology, obviously depend on the oxygen in the younger water and reduced compounds from the below.

  20. The maximum water storage capacities in nominally anhydrous minerals in the mantle transition zone and lower mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, T.; Yurimoto, H.

    2012-12-01

    Water is the most important volatile component in the Earth, and affects the physicochemical properties of mantle minerals, e.g. density, elastic property, electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity, rheological property, melting temperature, melt composition, element partitioning, etc. So many high pressure experiments have been conducted so far to determine the effect of water on mantle minerals. To clarify the maximum water storage capacity in nominally anhydrous mantle minerals in the mantle transition zone and lower mantle is an important issue to discuss the possibility of the existence of water reservoir in the Earth mantle. So we have been clarifying the maximum water storage capacity in mantle minerals using MA-8 type (KAWAI-type) high pressure apparatus and SIMS (secondary ion mass spectroscopy). Upper mantle mineral, olivine can contain ~0.9 wt% H2O in the condition just above 410 km discontinuity in maximum (e.g. Chen et al., 2002; Smyth et al., 2006). On the other hand, mantle transition zone mineral, wadsleyite and ringwoodite can contain significant amount (about 2-3 wt.%) of H2O (e.g. Inoue et al., 1995, 1998, 2010; Kawamoto et al., 1996; Ohtani et al., 2000). But the lower mantle mineral, perovskite can not contain significant amount of H2O, less than ~0.1 wt% (e.g. Murakami et al., 2002; Inoue et al., 2010). In addition, garnet and stishovite also can not contain significant amount of H2O (e.g. Katayama et al., 2003; Mookherjee and Karato, 2010; Litasov et al., 2007). On the other hand, the water storage capacities of mantle minerals are supposed to be significantly coupled with Al by a substitution with Mg2+, Si4+ or Mg2+ + Si4+, because Al3+ is the trivalent cation, and H+ is the monovalent cation. To clarify the degree of the substitution, the water contents and the chemical compositions of Al-bearing minerals in the mantle transition zone and the lower mantle were also determined in the Al-bearing systems with H2O. We will introduce the

  1. Mineral-Water Interface Processes Affecting Uranium Fate in Contaminated Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catalano, J. G.

    2011-12-01

    Widespread uranium contamination of soil, sediments, and groundwater systems has resulted from mining activities, nuclear weapon production, and energy generation. The fate and transport of uranium in such systems is strongly affected by geochemical processes occurring at mineral-water interfaces. I will present a summary of the mineral-water interface processes found to affect uranium fate in example contaminated sediments at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford sites and in related model systems. Processes occurring under oxic conditions will be the primary focus of this talk as under these conditions uranium is most mobile and thus presents the greatest hazard. Three dominant solid-phase uranium species are observed in contaminated soil and sediments at the Hanford site: uranyl silicates, uranyl phosphates, and uranyl adsorbed to clays and iron oxides. In deep sediments, uranyl silicates are found in microfractures in feldspar grains, likely because slow diffusion in such fractures maintains a high silicate activity. Such silicates are also found in waste-impacted shallow sediments and soil; waste fluids or evaporative processes may have generated the silicate activity needed to produce such phases. Uranyl phosphates are less abundant, occurring primarily in shallow sediments exposed to P-bearing waste fluids. However, remediation approaches under consideration may produce substantial quantities of uranyl phosphates in the future. Adsorbed uranyl is dispersed throughout contaminated soils and shallow sediments and likely has the greatest potential for remobilization. Analogue studies show that precipitation of uranyl phosphates is rapid when such phases are supersaturated and that both homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation may occur. Specific adsorption of uranyl to minerals is strongly affected by the presence of complexation anions. Carbonate suppresses uranyl adsorption but also forms uranyl-carbonate ternary surface complexes. At conditions below

  2. Thermoelasticity, Water Partitioning, and Equations of State of Lower Mantle Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townsend, Joshua Paul

    How is water distributed in the Earth, and how might it be detected from seismic obser- vations? Recent geochemical, geodynamic, and astrophysical results suggest that the Earth may contain significantly more water than exists on its surface. Yet, how water might be distributed between lower mantle minerals is poorly understood. This dissertation encompasses three projects that explore the properties of materials under lower mantle pressures and temperatures. In the first study I used density functional theory (DFT) calculations to investigate the effects of water on the elastic properties of bridgmanite (brg), and postperovskite (ppv), at pressures of the lowermost mantle (called D''). The results indicate that the reduction in elastic moduli in D'' is expected to be approximately 1%, and 3%, per weight % water, for the bulk and shear moduli, respectively. In the second study I used DFT and ab-initio lattice dynamics to study the distribution of water between brg and ppv with aluminum-bearing and aluminum-free hydrogen defects. The results indicate that aluminous ppv may be a host for primordial water in D'' as suggested by recent geochemical measurements, and the presence of Al-bearing hydrous ppv reduces the adiabatic bulk sound velocity contrast across the brg-ppv phase transition, and increases the radial velocity gradient. Together, these two projects indicate that ppv may be a host for primordial water in the D'' region and suggest that the state of hydration of the lowermost mantle may potentially be inferred through correlated regions of low impedance contrast and high velocity gradients. In the third study I describe a computer program, GEOST, designed to help researchers re- fine accurate equations of state (EOS) from experimental measurements of pressure, volume, and temperature.

  3. Growth Performance, Mineral Digestibility, and Blood Characteristics of Ostriches Receiving Drinking Water Supplemented with Varying Levels of Chelated Trace Mineral Complex.

    PubMed

    Seyfori, Hossein; Ghasemi, Hossein Ali; Hajkhodadadi, Iman; Nazaran, Mohammad Hassan; Hafizi, Maryam

    2017-08-11

    The effects of water supplementation of chelated trace minerals (CTM, which is named Bonzaplex designed with chelate compounds technology) on growth performance, apparent total tract digestibility (ATTD) of minerals, and some blood metabolites, TM, and antioxidant enzyme values in African ostriches were investigated from 8 to 12 months of age. A total of 20 8-month-old ostriches (five birds in five replicate pens) was randomly allocated into one of the following four treatments: (1) control (basal diet + tap water), (2) low CTM (basal diet +100 mg/bird/day CTM powder in tap water), (3) medium CTM (basal diet +1 g/bird/day CTM powder in tap water), and (4) high CTM (basal diet +2 g/bird/day CTM powder in tap water). Compared with control, medium CTM improved (P < 0.05) daily weight gain and ATTD of phosphorous, zinc, and copper in 12-month-old ostriches. Furthermore, the feed conversion ratio was lower, and ATTD of magnesium was higher in the medium- and high-CTM groups than that in the control group (P < 0.05). At the end of the trial, ostriches receiving high-CTM treatment exhibited the lower (P < 0.05) serum triglyceride and very low-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations and higher copper levels compared to those of the control treatment. Supplementation of higher amounts of CTM (medium and high CTM) also increased the activity of serum superoxide dismutase (P < 0.05). No differences were detected for other blood parameters including glucose, total protein, albumin, cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, iron, magnesium, and glutathione peroxidase values. In conclusion, supplementation of CTM at the level of 1 g/bird/day to the drinking water can be recommended for improving growth performance, mineral absorption, and antioxidant status of ostriches fed diets containing the recommended levels of inorganic TM.

  4. Assessment of CO2-Induced Geochemical Changes in Soil/Mineral-Water Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, H. Y.; Choi, H. J.

    2016-12-01

    Although the storage of CO2 in deep geological formations is considered the most promising sequestration path, there is still a risk that it may leak into the atmosphere. To ensure the secure operation of CO2 storage sites, thus, it is necessary to implement CO2 leakage monitoring systems. Furthermore, the leakage may alter geochemical properties of overlying geological units to have adverse environmental consequences. By elucidating geochemical changes due to CO2 leakage, it is possible to develop effective CO2 monitoring techniques and predict the influence of CO2 leakage. A series of batch experiments were conducted to simulate CO2-induced geochemical changes in soil/mineral-water systems. Soil samples, obtained from Eumseong basin in Eumseong-gun, Chungcheongbuk-do, were dried for 6 hours at 60° and then divided into two size fractions: < 106 and 106-212 mm. Minerals including mica/illite, vermiculite, and feldspar were purchased and purified if necessary. Prior to batch experiments, soils and minerals were characterized for surface area, mineralogy, elemental composition, carbon and nitrogen contents, pH buffering capacity, and metal extractability. Batch experiments were initiated by reacting 100% CO2 atmosphere with aqueous suspensions of 120 g soils or 50 g minerals in 3,000 mL of 10 mM CsClO4 at room temperature. In parallel, the batches having the same soil/mineral compositions were run under the ambient air as controls. To prevent microbial activities, all batches were sterilized with 0.03% HCHO. To track geochemical changes, pH and electrical conductivity were monitored. Also, while solutions were regularly sampled and analyzed for trace metals as well as main cations and anions, solid phases were sampled to observe changes in mineralogical compositions. Geochemical changes in both solution and solid phases during the initial 6 month reaction will be presented. Acknowledgement: The "R&D Project on Environmental Management of Geologic CO2 Storage" from

  5. Transient Phase of Ice Observed by Sum Frequency Generation at the Water/Mineral Interface During Freezing.

    PubMed

    Lovering, Kaitlin A; Bertram, Allan K; Chou, Keng C

    2017-02-16

    We observed a transient noncentrosymmetric phase of ice at water/mineral interfaces during freezing, which enhanced the intensity of the IR-visible sum frequency generation intensity by up to 20-fold. The lifetime of the transient phase was several minutes. Since the most stable form of ice, hexagonal and cubic ice, are centrosymmetric, our study suggests the transient existence of stacking-disordered ice during the freezing process at water/mineral interfaces. Stacking-disordered ice, which has only been observed in bulk ice at temperatures lower than -20 °C, is a random mixture of layers of hexagonal ice and cubic ice. However, the transient phase at the ice/mineral interface was observed at temperatures as high as -1 °C. It suggests that the mineral surface may play a role in promoting and stabilizing the formation of stacking-disordered ice at the interface.

  6. Arsenic removal from water using natural iron mineral-quartz sand columns.

    PubMed

    Guo, Huaming; Stüben, Doris; Berner, Zolt

    2007-05-15

    The study has investigated the feasibility of using siderite-coated quartz sand and/or hematite-coated quartz sand columns for removing As from water. Arsenic-spiked tap water and synthetic As solution with As concentrations from 200 to 500 mug/L were used for the experiments. Since three coating methods employed to prepare siderite-coated quartz sand and hematite-coated quartz sand had no significant impact on As adsorption in batch tests, the column fillings were produced by means of the simplest one involving mechanically mixing the Fe mineral with quartz sand. Fixed bed tests show that the combination of siderite-coated quartz sand and hematite-coated quartz sand greatly promoted the column performance in removing As and the presence of As(III) in the influent improved the removal efficiency of the column. The relatively low capacity in treating As-spiked tap water arose from the suppression of FeCO(3) dissolution in the presence of high HCO(3)(-) concentration (333 mg/L), which consequently limited the formation of fresh Fe(III) oxides. However, the H(2)O(2)-conditioning greatly increased As adsorption capacity of the column for remediating As-spiked tap water. The Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) test shows that the spent adsorbents were not hazardous and could be safely disposed of to landfill.

  7. Radium and (40)K in Algerian bottled mineral waters and consequent doses.

    PubMed

    Seghour, A; Seghour, F Z

    2009-01-01

    Concentrations of (226)Ra, (228)Ra and (40)K in the five most popular Algerian bottled mineral waters have been found to be 13.9 to 148.9 mBq l(-1), 7.2 to 52.9 mBq l(-1) and <0.07 to 2.19 Bq l(-1), respectively. Ratios of (226)Ra to (228)Ra activities ranged from 1.0 to 13.66 with a mean of 5.62. The annual effective doses due to ingestion of these waters have been estimated for three age categories (infants, children and adults) using the measured activities of these radionuclides and assuming the World Health Organisation's default water intake rate. Annual doses for children and adults have been found to be well below the 0.1 mSv y(-1) reference dose level, whereas for the most vulnerable group the annual effective dose from all the waters exceeds the reference value and contributes 12% to the mean annual dose from natural exposure.

  8. Sealing ability of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) combined with distilled water, chlorhexidine, and doxycycline.

    PubMed

    Arruda, Roberta A A; Cunha, Rodrigo S; Miguita, Kenner B; Silveira, Cláudia F M; De Martin, Alexandre S; Pinheiro, Sérgio L; Rocha, Daniel G P; Bueno, Carlos E S

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the sealing ability of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA Bio) combined with different mixing agents (distilled water, chlorhexidine, doxycycline), used as an apical root-end filling material. Forty-two extracted human teeth were divided into three groups (n = 12); six teeth were used as controls. Root-ends were resected at 90 degrees, 3 mm from the apex. Root-end cavities were prepared using ultrasonic tips and filled with MTA Bio plus distilled water, 2% chlorhexidine solution, or 10% doxycycline solution. Apical sealing was assessed by microleakage of 50% silver nitrate solution. Roots were longitudinally sectioned in a buccolingual plane and analyzed using an operating microscope (20× magnification). Depth of dye leakage into the dentinal walls was measured in millimeters. Results were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey's test (P = 0.05). MTA Bio plus distilled water showed significantly higher mean leakage results (1.06 mm) when compared with MTA Bio plus doxycycline (0.61 mm), and higher, although not significant, results when compared with MTA Bio plus chlorhexidine (0.79 mm). In conclusion, replacing distilled water with two biologically active mixing agents (doxycycline and chlorhexidine) did not alter the sealing properties of MTABio. The antimicrobial properties of these combinations should be further investigated.

  9. Effects of Sulphate-Sulphide Mineral Water “Mlječanica” in Patients with Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Erceg-Rukavina, Tatjana; Stefanovski, Mihajlo

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Arterial hypertension is the main independent risk factor for cardiovascular (CV) disease and death. It affects development and course of cerebrovascular insult (CVI) and chronic kidney disease (CKD). Balneotherapy with sulphide baths was administered to patients having stage I hypertension (BP values 140-159/90-99), with no arrhythmia or pronounced coronary disease. Baths also had advantage in patients having hypertension joined with obesity, diabetes, microangiopathy, and atherosclerosis of peripheral arteries. Goal: Determine the effects of sulphate-sulphide mineral baths on stage I hypertension after 10 days therapy. Materials and methods: Patients having stage I hypertension were sent to “Mlječanica” Institute for rehabilitation. All subjects were treated with kinesitherapy and electrotherapy, while experimental group (n=30) was also treated with 20 minute baths, daily, for period of 10 days. Results: In experimental group BP level lowered in average 10 mmHg after 10-day therapy, and change was evident even after only 5 days. Conclusion: Sulphate-sulphide mineral water “Mlječanica” caused significant (p<0.05) lowering of arterial BP level after 10 days of therapy in patients who had stage I hypertension. PMID:25685078

  10. Application of mineral bed materials during fast pyrolysis of rice husk to improve water-soluble organics production.

    PubMed

    Li, R; Zhong, Z P; Jin, B S; Zheng, A J

    2012-09-01

    Fast pyrolysis of rice husk was performed in a spout-fluid bed to produce water-soluble organics. The effects of mineral bed materials (red brick, calcite, limestone, and dolomite) on yield and quality of organics were evaluated with the help of principal component analysis (PCA). Compared to quartz sand, red brick, limestone, and dolomite increased the yield of the water-soluble organics by 6-55% and the heating value by 16-19%. The relative content of acetic acid was reduced by 23-43% with calcite, limestone and dolomite when compared with quartz sand. The results from PCA showed all minerals enhanced the ring-opening reactions of cellulose into furans and carbonyl compounds rather than into monomeric sugars. Moreover, calcite, limestone, and dolomite displayed the ability to catalyze the degradation of heavy compounds and the demethoxylation reaction of guaiacols into phenols. Minerals, especially limestone and dolomite, were beneficial to the production of water-soluble organics.

  11. Preliminary bounds on the water composition and secondary mineral development that may influence the near-field environment

    SciTech Connect

    Whitbeck, M.; Glassley, W.

    1998-02-01

    The evolution of the water chemistry and secondary mineral development in the vicinity of the near-field of a potential Yucca Mountain high level nuclear waste repository will be controlled by temperature, and interaction of water with rock over time. This report describes initial bounds on water composition and secondary mineral development, as a function of time, temperature, and rock type (devitrified, welded tuff and vitrophyre). The code EQ3/6 was used in the calculations, with explicit use of transition state theory models for mineral dissolution rates for the framework minerals of the tuff. Simulations were run for time durations sufficient to achieve steady state conditions. Uncertainty in the calculations, due to uncertainty in the measured dissolution rates, was considered by comparing results in simulations in which rates were varied within the range of known uncertainties for dissolution rate constants. The results demonstrate that the steady state mineralogy and water compositions are relatively insensitive to the rock unit modeled, which is consistent with the fact that the compositions of the rock units in the vicinity if the potential repository are similar, and will tend toward similar thermodynamic free energy minima, for similar rock:water ratios. Significant differences are observed, however, for large differences in rock: water ratios. The rates at which this end point condition are approached are a function of the rate parameters used, and can vary by orders of magnitude.

  12. Study of the bacterial flora of a non-carbonated natural mineral water.

    PubMed

    Mavridou, A

    1992-10-01

    Natural mineral water from a UK spring was monitored at various stages after it was pumped from the ground, through to bottling and during shelf life before consumption. Samples were collected in commercial PVC bottles, in PVC bottles previously sterilized and hand-filled and in glass bottles. The bacterial flora was counted on plate count agar (PCA) and on PCA diluted 10 times (PCA/10). The predominant bacteria were identified to genus level. Growth rates and nutrient types of isolates were determined by the nutrient-tolerance test (NT). The plate counts at the pre-bottling stage were low. During storage larger numbers of bacteria grew in glass than PVC bottles; the largest number grew in PVC bottles filled by hand. Most of the pigmented bacteria isolated were oligocarbotolerant.

  13. Enumeration and characterization of bacteria in mineral water by improved direct viable count method.

    PubMed

    Guyard, S; Mary, P; Defives, C; Hornez, J P

    1999-05-01

    Fifteen strains from two emergent mineral waters were isolated and tentatively identified with API 20NE and BIOLOG GN systems. These strains were screened for their sensitivities to seven replication-inhibiting antibiotics of the (fluoro)quinolone group (nalidixic and pipemidic acid, flumequine, norfloxacin, ofloxacin, pefloxacin and ciprofloxacin). It was shown that the direct viable count (DVC) procedure could be improved by using certain antibiotic cocktails, which were active against the isolates. Geometric bacterial features were successfully determined with image analysis and adapted software (ICONIX, Perfect Image). Elongations were significant and allowed rapid discrimination of antibiotic inhibited and non-inhibited strains. Particular isolates in a mixed culture were characterized and enumerated after only 14 h exposure with the appropriate antibiotic cocktail. This method can also be applied to other communities, such as mixed cultures in bio-fermentors or in food with known microflora.

  14. Use of charge-selective membranes for electrodialytic desalination of mineralized drainage collector waters

    SciTech Connect

    Grebenyuk, V.D.; Veisov, B.K.; Chebotareva, R.D.; Braude, K.P.; Nefedova, G.Z.

    1986-10-10

    The purpose of this work was to examine the possibility of desalination, without preliminary softening, of drainage collector waters of a medium degree mineralization, represented by a simulated solution of the same cation composition, with the use of single-charge-selective membranes. A cation-exchange membrane obtained by modification of the commercial MK-100 membrane with ethylenediamine (6), was used for this purpose. The modification was effected by treatment of the chlorosulfonated matrix with aqueous ethylenediamine solution at room temperature. The matrix, aminated on one side was then treated with concentrated NaOH solution to convert unreacted sulfonyl chloride groups into sulfo. The capacity of the modified MK-100M membrane for sulfo groups was 1.8 meq/g. The possibility of obtaining highly concentrated brines was examined at the same time.

  15. Geologic and mineral and water resources investigations in western Colorado, using Skylab EREP data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, K. (Principal Investigator); Prost, G. L.; Knepper, D. H.; Sawatzky, D. L.; Huntley, D.; Weimer, R. J.

    1975-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Skylab photographs are superior to ERTS images for photogeologic interpretation, primarily because of improved resolution. Lithologic contacts can be detected consistently better on Skylab S190A photos than on ERTS images. Color photos are best; red and green band photos are somewhat better than color-infrared photos; infrared band photos are worst. All major geologic structures can be recognized on Skylab imagery. Large folds, even those with very gentle flexures, can be mapped accurately and with confidence. Bedding attitudes of only a few degrees are recognized; vertical exaggeration factor is about 2.5X. Mineral deposits in central Colorado may be indicated on Skylab photos by lineaments and color anomalies, but positive identification of these features is not possible. S190A stereo color photography is adequate for defining drainage divides that in turn define the boundaries and distribution of ground water recharge and discharge areas within a basin.

  16. Spectrofluorimetric determination of trace amounts of beryllium in mineral water and human's hair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Chongqiu; He, Fang

    2003-04-01

    A new fluorescent reagent, 2-hydroxy-1-naphthaldehydene-8-aminoquinoline (HNAAQ), was synthesized. The fluorescent reaction of this reagent with beryllium was also studied. Based on this chelation, a highly sensitive spectrofluorimetric method was developed for determination of trace amounts of beryllium at pH 9.2. Under these conditions, the Be-HNAAQ complex has excitation and emission maxima at 410 and 450 nm, respectively. The linear range of the method is from 0 to 35 μg l -1 and detection limit is 0.099 μg l -1 of beryllium. Interference of other ions was studied. It is necessary to remove the interfering cations through concealing by EDTA and extraction separation techniques. The selectivity of the method can be increased remarkably. The procedure can be easily performed and affords good precision and accuracy. This method has been successfully applied to the determination of beryllium in mineral water and human's hair.

  17. Alterations in the major heterotrophic bacterial populations isolated from a still bottled mineral water.

    PubMed

    Morais, P V; da Costa, M S

    1990-11-01

    The heterotrophic bacterial population of a bottled mineral water stored in returnable glass bottles and in polyvinyl chloride (PVC) bottles at room temperature was studied over 9-12 months. The plate counts in R2A medium incubated at 22 degrees and 37 degrees C were low initially, increasing to 10(4)-10(5) cfu/ml within a few days of bottling. The number of bacteria recovered at 22 degrees C from PVC bottles was fairly constant during the storage period, but the population isolated at 37 degrees C decreased markedly after storage for 1 year. The major components of the population were Pseudomonas strains, one of which was identified as Pseudomonas vesicularis. Major changes took place during storage; two groups of bacteria (B and C) were dominant initially, but during the latter period of storage other groups (F, G and H) increased in number.

  18. Questa Baseline and Pre-Mining Ground-Water Quality Investigation. 13. Mineral Microscopy and Chemistry of Mined and Unmined Porphyry Molybdenum Mineralization Along the Red River, New Mexico: Implications for Ground- and Surface-Water Quality

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Plumlee, Geoff; Lowers, Heather; Ludington, Steve; Koenig, Alan; Briggs, Paul

    2005-01-01

    This report is one in a series presenting results of an interdisciplinary U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) study of ground-water quality in the lower Red River watershed prior to open-pit and underground molybdenite mining at Molycorp's Questa mine. The stretch of the Red River watershed that extends from just upstream of the town of Red River to just above the town of Questa includes several mineralized areas in addition to the one mined by Molycorp. Natural erosion and weathering of pyrite-rich rocks in the mineralized areas has created a series of erosional scars along this stretch of the Red River that contribute acidic waters, as well as mineralized alluvial material and sediments, to the river. The overall goal of the USGS study is to infer the pre-mining ground-water quality at the Molycorp mine site. An integrated geologic, hydrologic, and geochemical model for ground water in the mineralized but unmined Straight Creek drainage is being used as an analogue for the geologic, geochemical, and hydrologic conditions that influenced ground-water quality and quantity at the mine site prior to mining. This report summarizes results of reconnaissance mineralogical and chemical characterization studies of rock samples collected from the various scars and the Molycorp open pit, and of drill cuttings or drill core from bedrock beneath the scars and adjacent debris fans.

  19. Bioremediating Oil Spills in Nutrient Poor Ocean Waters Using Fertilized Clay Mineral Flakes: Some Experimental Constraints

    PubMed Central

    Warr, Laurence N.; Friese, André; Schwarz, Florian; Schauer, Frieder; Portier, Ralph J.; Basirico, Laura M.; Olson, Gregory M.

    2013-01-01

    Much oil spill research has focused on fertilizing hydrocarbon oxidising bacteria, but a primary limitation is the rapid dilution of additives in open waters. A new technique is presented for bioremediation by adding nutrient amendments to the oil spill using thin filmed minerals comprised largely of Fullers Earth clay. Together with adsorbed N and P fertilizers, filming additives, and organoclay, clay flakes can be engineered to float on seawater, attach to the oil, and slowly release contained nutrients. Our laboratory experiments of microbial activity on weathered source oil from the Deepwater Horizon spill in the Gulf of Mexico show fertilized clay treatment significantly enhanced bacterial respiration and consumption of alkanes compared to untreated oil-in-water conditions and reacted faster than straight fertilization. Whereas a major portion (up to 98%) of the alkane content was removed during the 1 month period of experimentation by fertilized clay flake interaction; the reduced concentration of polyaromatic hydrocarbons was not significantly different from the non-clay bearing samples. Such clay flake treatment could offer a way to more effectively apply the fertilizer to the spill in open nutrient poor waters and thus significantly reduce the extent and duration of marine oil spills, but this method is not expected to impact hydrocarbon toxicity. PMID:23864952

  20. Inorganic arsenic speciation in natural mineral drinking waters by flow-through anodic stripping chronopotentiometry.

    PubMed

    Jedryczko, Dominika; Pohl, Pawel; Welna, Maja

    2016-04-01

    A simple and inexpensive method for chemical speciation of inorganic As in natural mineral drinking waters by using anodic stripping chronopotentiometry (ASCP) in an electrochemical flow-through cell with an Au wire as the working electrode was described in the present work. The presented method is an attractive alternative to laborious and time-consuming procedures requiring pre-separation of various forms of As before their detection by other flow-through and non flow-through stripping methods. The limits of detection were found to be 0.42 µg L(-1) for As(III) and 0.55 µg L(-1) for As(V), obtained at the deposition potentials of -350 mV and -1600 mV, respectively. The accuracy of the method was assessed by the spiking-and-recovery experiments for particular water samples and the recoveries found, being in range from 99% to 105% for As(III) and from 104% to 106% for As(V), respectively, were quantitative. The proposed method was successfully applied to speciation analysis of inorganic As in water samples with a high content of Cu.

  1. Flow cytometric determination of bacterial populations in bottled natural mineral waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beisker, Wolfgang; Meier, H.

    1998-04-01

    In order to enhance the quality and safety of bottled natural mineral waters, new methodologies besides classical bacteriology have been evaluated. Multi laser flow cytometry has been used to identify bacterial populations based on their DNA content, physiological activity and phylogeny from in situ hybridization with rRNA targeted DNA probes. Due to the low content of organic material in these waters, the bacterial population are under conditions (low ribosome content, low activity, etc.) which makes it hard to detect them flow cytometrically. The numbers of bacteria are in the range between 1000 and 100,000 per ml (for uncarbonated waters). Filtration techniques to enrich the bacterial population have been developed in combination with specific staining and hybridization protocols. First results on some selected brands show, that most bacteria belong to the beta subclass of proteobacteria. If the DNA containing cells (DAPI staining) are counted as 100%, 84% could be stained with a eubacteria probe. From these 84% 68% belong to the beta subclass, 8.2% to the alpha and 0.3% to the gamma subclass of roteobacteria. 8.5% could be identified as cytophaga flexibacter. By optimizing DNA staining with cyanine dyes and enhancing the sensitivity of light scatter detection, the detection limit could be considerably lowered.

  2. Microbial diversity and dynamics of a groundwater and a still bottled natural mineral water.

    PubMed

    França, Luís; Lopéz-Lopéz, Arantxa; Rosselló-Móra, Ramon; da Costa, Milton S

    2015-03-01

    The microbial abundance and diversity at source, after bottling and through 6 months of storage of a commercial still natural mineral water were assessed by culture-dependent and culture-independent methods. The results revealed clear shifts of the dominant communities present in the three different stages. The borehole waters displayed low cell densities that increased 1.5-fold upon bottling and storage, reaching a maximum (6.2 × 10(8)  cells l(-1) ) within 15 days after bottling, but experienced a significant decrease in diversity. In all cases, communities were largely dominated by Bacteria. The culturable heterotrophic community was characterized by recovering 3626 isolates, which were primarily affiliated with the Alphaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria. This study indicates that bottling and storage induce quantitative and qualitative changes in the microbial assemblages that seem to be similar as revealed by the two sample batches collected on 2 consecutive years. To our knowledge, this is the first study combining culture-independent with culture-dependent methods, and repeated tests to reveal the microbial dynamics occurring from source to stored bottled water. © 2014 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Acanthamoeba T4, T5 and T11 isolated from mineral water bottles in southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Maschio, Vinicius José; Chies, Fernanda; Carlesso, Ana Maris; Carvalho, Amanda; Rosa, Sayonara Peixoto; Van Der Sand, Sueli Teresinha; Rott, Marilise Brittes

    2015-01-01

    Acanthamoeba is a protist potential pathogen, capable of causing a blinding keratitis in contact lens wearers and disseminated infection, leading to granulomatous amebic encephalitis in immunocompromised individuals. This amoeba is a ubiquitous organism that has been isolated from various domestic water systems, such as cooling towers and hospital water networks. The objective of this work was to investigate the presence of Acanthamoeba in mineral water bottles marketed in Porto Alegre, southern Brazil. Positive samples were further classified at the genotype level after sequencing the ASA.S1 region of 18S rDNA gene. Six of the eight isolates belonged to T5 genotype, one to T4 genotype, and one was T11. Several genotypes have been reported worldwide as causative of pathologies in humans, including genotypes T4, T5 and T11. Overall, the widespread distribution of potentially pathogenic Acanthamoeba strains in the studied source demands more awareness within the public and health professionals, because this pathogen is emerging as a risk for human health worldwide.

  4. Bioremediating oil spills in nutrient poor ocean waters using fertilized clay mineral flakes: some experimental constraints.

    PubMed

    Warr, Laurence N; Friese, André; Schwarz, Florian; Schauer, Frieder; Portier, Ralph J; Basirico, Laura M; Olson, Gregory M

    2013-01-01

    Much oil spill research has focused on fertilizing hydrocarbon oxidising bacteria, but a primary limitation is the rapid dilution of additives in open waters. A new technique is presented for bioremediation by adding nutrient amendments to the oil spill using thin filmed minerals comprised largely of Fullers Earth clay. Together with adsorbed N and P fertilizers, filming additives, and organoclay, clay flakes can be engineered to float on seawater, attach to the oil, and slowly release contained nutrients. Our laboratory experiments of microbial activity on weathered source oil from the Deepwater Horizon spill in the Gulf of Mexico show fertilized clay treatment significantly enhanced bacterial respiration and consumption of alkanes compared to untreated oil-in-water conditions and reacted faster than straight fertilization. Whereas a major portion (up to 98%) of the alkane content was removed during the 1 month period of experimentation by fertilized clay flake interaction; the reduced concentration of polyaromatic hydrocarbons was not significantly different from the non-clay bearing samples. Such clay flake treatment could offer a way to more effectively apply the fertilizer to the spill in open nutrient poor waters and thus significantly reduce the extent and duration of marine oil spills, but this method is not expected to impact hydrocarbon toxicity.

  5. Removal of cyanobacteria and microcystin by natural plant-mineral combinations in eutrophic waters.

    PubMed

    Kim, Baik-Ho; Lee, Ju-Hwan; Hwang, Soon-Jin

    2013-02-01

    The removal or mitigation of cyanobacterial bloom and cyanotoxins is a necessity to ensure safe drinking water and recreational water. As a feasible agent to control cyanobacterial bloom, a novel plant-mineral composite (PMC) was developed and optimized through laboratory and field testing over the past 3 years. Based on previous studies, we treated cyanobacterial bloom water (mainly Microcystis and Synechocystis) with 0.05 mg/L PMC at the small eutrophic reservoir; 2 h later, we collected samples and analyzed them in the laboratory. The intra-cellular (c-MC) and dissolved microcystin-LR (d-MC) were measured using an ELISA method. The PMC exhibited a remarkable removal of both c-MC (47.3 %) and d-MC (95.8 %) within 2 days. In addition, notable decreases (on average, 78 % of the control) in the chlorophyll-a, suspended solids, total phosphorus and biochemical oxygen demand values, in zooplankton and in the phytoplankton density (83.9 %) were verified after 48 h. These results indicate that the PMC is more effective in controlling d-MC than c-MC, suggesting a possible method to mitigate such hazardous chemicals as agrochemicals and endocrine disrupters in aquatic ecosystems.

  6. Competition between trees and grasses for both soil water and mineral nitrogen in dry savannas.

    PubMed

    Donzelli, D; De Michele, C; Scholes, R J

    2013-09-07

    The co-existence of trees and grasses in savannas in general can be the result of processes involving competition for resources (e.g. water and nutrients) or differential response to disturbances such as fire, animals and human activities; or a combination of both broad mechanisms. In moist savannas, the tree-grass coexistence is mainly attributed to of disturbances, while in dry savannas, limiting resources are considered the principal mechanism of co-existence. Virtually all theoretical explorations of tree-grass dynamics in dry savannas consider only competition for soil water. Here we investigate whether coexistence could result from a balanced competition for two resources, namely soil water and mineral nitrogen. We introduce a simple dynamical resource-competition model for trees and grasses. We consider two alternative hypotheses: (1) trees are the superior competitors for nitrogen while grasses are superior competitors for water, and (2) vice-versa. We study the model properties under the two hypotheses and test each hypothesis against data from 132 dry savannas in Africa using Kendall's test of independence. We find that Hypothesis 1 gets much more support than Hypothesis 2, and more support than the null hypothesis that neither is operative. We further consider gradients of rainfall and nitrogen availability and find that the Hypothesis 1 model reproduces the observed patterns in nature. We do not consider our results to definitively show that tree-grass coexistence in dry savannas is due to balanced competition for water and nitrogen, but show that this mechanism is a possibility, which cannot be a priori excluded and should thus be considered along with the more traditional explanations.

  7. Common and specific responses to availability of mineral nutrients and water.

    PubMed

    Kudoyarova, Guzel R; Dodd, Ian C; Veselov, Dmitry S; Rothwell, Shane A; Veselov, Stanislav Yu

    2015-04-01

    Changes in resource (mineral nutrients and water) availability, due to their heterogeneous distribution in space and time, affect plant development. Plants need to sense these changes to optimize growth and biomass allocation by integrating root and shoot growth. Since a limited supply of water or nutrients can elicit similar physiological responses (the relative activation of root growth at the expense of shoot growth), similar underlying mechanisms may affect perception and acquisition of either nutrients or water. This review compares root and shoot responses to availability of different macronutrients and water. Attention is given to the roles of root-to-shoot signalling and shoot-to-root signalling, with regard to coordinating changes in root and shoot growth and development. Involvement of plant hormones in regulating physiological responses such as stomatal and hydraulic conductance is revealed by measuring the effects of resource availability on phytohormone concentrations in roots and shoots, and their flow between roots and shoots in xylem and phloem saps. More specific evidence can be obtained by measuring the physiological responses of genotypes with altered hormone responses or concentrations. We discuss the similarity and diversity of changes in shoot growth, allocation to root growth, and root architecture under changes in water, nitrate, and phosphorus availability, and the possible involvement of abscisic acid, indole-acetic acid, and cytokinin in their regulation. A better understanding of these mechanisms may contribute to better crop management for efficient use of these resources and to selecting crops for improved performance under suboptimal soil conditions. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Effect of a high bicarbonate mineral water on fasting and postprandial lipemia in moderately hypercholesterolemic subjects: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Zair, Yassine; Kasbi-Chadli, Fatima; Housez, Beatrice; Pichelin, Mathieu; Cazaubiel, Murielle; Raoux, François; Ouguerram, Khadija

    2013-07-18

    During postprandial state, TG concentration is increasing and HDL cholesterol decreasing, leading to a transitory pro-atherosclerotic profile. Previous studies have reported that bicarbonate water improve postprandial lipemia. The objective of this study was to analyze the effect of a strongly bicarbonated mineral water on lipoprotein levels during fasting and postprandial state. A controlled, randomised, double-blind cross-over design was conducted in 12 moderately hypercholesterolemic subjects after a daily ingestion of 1.25 L of mineral (SY) or low mineral water during eight weeks separated by a one week wash-out period. Blood samples were collected in first visit to the hospital (V1) before water consumption (referent or SY) and in a second visit (V2) after eight week water consumption period. The effect of the consumed water was studied in fasting and in postprandial state during ingestion of a meal and 0.5 L of water. Comparison of data between V1 and V2 after SY consumption showed a significant decrease in triglyceridemia (23%), VLDL TG (31%) and tendency to a decrease of VLDL cholesterol (p = 0.066) at fasting state. Whatever the consumed water during postprandial state, the measurement of total areas under curves did not show a significant difference. No difference was observed between SY and referent water consumption for measured parameters at fasting and postprandial state. When subjects consumed SY we showed a decrease of their basal TG and VLDLTG. The unexpected absence of effect of high mineralized water on postprandial lipemia, probably related to experimental conditions, is discussed in the discussion section.

  9. Deep mineral water accelerates recovery after dehydrating aerobic exercise: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The effect of deep mineral water (DMW) with moderate mineralization on the recovery of physical performance after prolonged dehydrating aerobic exercise in the heat was studied in nine healthy, physically active (VO2max = 45.8 ± 8.4 mL kg−1 min−1) women aged 24.0 ± 3.7 years. Methods We conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover human study to evaluate the effect of ingestion of natural mineral water extracted from a depth of 689 m on recovery from prolonged fatiguing aerobic running conducted at 30°C. Results Mean body weight decreased by 2.6–2.8% following dehydrating exercise. VO2max was 9% higher after 4 h of recovery after rehydrating with DMW compared with plain water. Leg muscle power recovered better during the slow phase of recovery and was significantly higher after 48 h of recovery after rehydrating with DMW compared with plain water. Conclusions DMW with moderate mineralization was more effective in inducing recovery of aerobic capacity and leg muscle power compared with plain water following prolonged dehydrating aerobic running exercise. PMID:25002835

  10. Opportunistic pathogens and elements of the resistome that are common in bottled mineral water support the need for continuous surveillance.

    PubMed

    Falcone-Dias, Maria Fernanda; Centrón, Daniela; Pavan, Fernando; Moura, Adriana Candido da Silva; Naveca, Felipe Gomes; de Souza, Victor Costa; Farache Filho, Adalberto; Leite, Clarice Queico Fujimura

    2015-01-01

    Several differences concerning bacterial species, opportunistic pathogens, elements of the resistome as well as variations concerning the CFU/mL counts were identified in some of the five most marketed bottled mineral water from Araraquara city, São Paulo, Brazil. Two out of five brands tested were confirmed as potential source of opportunistic pathogens, including Mycobacterium gordonae, Ralstonia picketti and Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc). A total of one hundred and six isolates were recovered from four of these bottled mineral water brands. Betaproteobacteria was predominant followed by Alphaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria and Firmicutes. Ninety percent of the bacteria isolated demonstrated resistance to seventeen of the nineteen antimicrobials tested. These antimicrobials included eight different classes, including 3rd and 4th generation cephalosporins, carbapenems and fluoroquinolones. Multidrug resistant bacteria were detected for fifty-nine percent of isolates in three water brands at counts up to 103 CFU/ml. Of major concern, the two bottled mineral water harboring opportunistic pathogens were also source of elements of the resistome that could be directly transferred to humans. All these differences found among brands highlight the need for continuous bacteriological surveillance of bottled mineral water.

  11. Effects of salinity and the extent of water on supercritical CO2-induced phlogopite dissolution and secondary mineral formation.

    PubMed

    Shao, Hongbo; Ray, Jessica R; Jun, Young-Shin

    2011-02-15

    To ensure the viability of geologic CO2 sequestration (GCS), we need a holistic understanding of reactions at supercritical CO2 (scCO2)-saline water-rock interfaces and the environmental factors affecting these interactions. This research investigated the effects of salinity and the extent of water on the dissolution and surface morphological changes of phlogopite [KMg2.87Si3.07Al1.23O10(F,OH)2], a model clay mineral in potential GCS sites. Salinity enhanced the dissolution of phlogopite and affected the location, shape, size, and phase of secondary minerals. In low salinity solutions, nanoscale particles of secondary minerals formed much faster, and there were more nanoparticles than in high salinity solutions. The effect of water extent was investigated by comparing scCO2-H2O(g)-phlogopite and scCO2-H2O(l)-phlogopite interactions. Experimental results suggested that the presence of a thin water film adsorbed on the phlogopite surface caused the formation of dissolution pits and a surface coating of secondary mineral phases that could change the physical properties of rocks. These results provide new information for understanding reactions at scCO2-saline water-rock interfaces in deep saline aquifers and will help design secure and environmentally sustainable CO2 sequestration projects.

  12. Opportunistic Pathogens and Elements of the Resistome that Are Common in Bottled Mineral Water Support the Need for Continuous Surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Falcone-Dias, Maria Fernanda; Centrón, Daniela; Pavan, Fernando; Moura, Adriana Candido da Silva; Naveca, Felipe Gomes; de Souza, Victor Costa; Farache Filho, Adalberto; Leite, Clarice Queico Fujimura

    2015-01-01

    Several differences concerning bacterial species, opportunistic pathogens, elements of the resistome as well as variations concerning the CFU/mL counts were identified in some of the five most marketed bottled mineral water from Araraquara city, São Paulo, Brazil. Two out of five brands tested were confirmed as potential source of opportunistic pathogens, including Mycobacterium gordonae, Ralstonia picketti and Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc). A total of one hundred and six isolates were recovered from four of these bottled mineral water brands. Betaproteobacteria was predominant followed by Alphaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria and Firmicutes. Ninety percent of the bacteria isolated demonstrated resistance to seventeen of the nineteen antimicrobials tested. These antimicrobials included eight different classes, including 3rd and 4th generation cephalosporins, carbapenems and fluoroquinolones. Multidrug resistant bacteria were detected for fifty-nine percent of isolates in three water brands at counts up to 103 CFU/ml. Of major concern, the two bottled mineral water harboring opportunistic pathogens were also source of elements of the resistome that could be directly transferred to humans. All these differences found among brands highlight the need for continuous bacteriological surveillance of bottled mineral water. PMID:25803794

  13. Adsorption of Dissolved Gases (CH4, CO2, H2, Noble Gases) by Water-Saturated Smectite Clay Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourg, I. C.; Gadikota, G.; Dazas, B.

    2016-12-01

    Adsorption of dissolved gases by water-saturated clay minerals plays important roles in a range of fields. For example, gas adsorption in on clay minerals may significantly impact the formation of CH4 hydrates in fine-grained sediments, the behavior of CH4 in shale, CO2 leakage across caprocks of geologic CO2 sequestration sites, H2 leakage across engineered clay barriers of high-level radioactive waste repositories, and noble gas geochemistry reconstructions of hydrocarbon migration in the subsurface. Despite its importance, the adsorption of gases on clay minerals remains poorly understood. For example, some studies have suggested that clay surfaces promote the formation of CH4 hydrates, whereas others indicate that clay surfaces inhibit the formation of CH4 hydrates. Here, we present molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the adsorption of a range of gases (CH4, CO2, H2, noble gases) on clay mineral surfaces. Our results indicate that the affinity of dissolved gases for clay mineral surfaces has a non-monotone dependence on the hydrated radius of the gas molecules. This non-monotone dependence arises from a combination of two effects: the polar nature of certain gas molecules (in particular, CO2) and the templating of interfacial water structure by the clay basal surface, which results in the presence of interfacial water "cages" of optimal size for intermediate-size gas molecules (such as Ne or Ar).

  14. Low enthalpy geothermal project in Zambia

    SciTech Connect

    Dominco, E.; Liguori, P.E.

    1986-01-01

    A project financed by the Italian Ministry of Foreign Affairs (MAE), implements the installation of two organic Rankine cycle (ORC) turbogenerators in remote, rural areas of Zambia. The Italian Government grant amounts to 2,000,000 US dollars. The Government of Zambia will bear all costs of the Zambian counterpart and will provide the low voltage transmission line and distribution grid.

  15. Wine Valley Inn: A mineral water spa in Calistoga, California. Geothermal-energy-system conceptual design and economic feasibility

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-10-26

    The purpose of this study is to determine the engineering and economic feasibility for utilizing geothermal energy for air conditioning and service water heating at the Wine Valley Inn, a mineral water spa in Calistoga, California. The study evaluates heating, ventilating, air conditioning and water heating systems suitable for direct heat geothermal application. Due to the excellent geothermal temperatures available at this site, the mechanics and economics of a geothermally powered chilled water cooling system are evaluated. The Wine Valley Inn has the resource potential to have one of the few totally geothermal powered air conditioning and water heating systems in the world. This total concept is completely developed. A water plan was prepared to determine the quantity of water required for fresh water well development based on the special requirements of the project. An economic evaluation of the system is included to justify the added capital investment needed to build the geothermally powered mineral spa. Energy payback calculations are presented. A thermal cascade system is proposed to direct the geothermal water through the energy system to first power the chiller, then the space heating system, domestic hot water, the two spas and finally to heat the swimming pool. The Energy Management strategy required to automatically control this cascade process using industrial quality micro-processor equipment is described. Energy Management controls are selected to keep equipment sizing at a minimum, pump only the amount of geothermal water needed and be self balancing.

  16. An inelastic incoherent neutron scattering study of water in small-pored zeolites and other water-bearing minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Line, Christina M. B.; Kearley, G. J.

    2000-05-01

    Inelastic neutron scattering spectra of the zeolites natrolite Na2Al2Si3O10 2H2O, wairakite CaAl2Si4O12 2H2O, scolecite CaAl2Si3O10 3H2O, and bikitaite Li2Al2Si4O12. 2H2O, together with the sheet silicate apophyllite KCa4Si8O20(F, OH) 8H2O, are shown here. We show clear trends across these minerals, illustrating the relative influence of hydrogen bonding and cation bonding. For some of these spectra, the bands are clearly separated, permitting a discussion of their assignments. In particular, we can identify librational bands (L) or librational edge (LE) and translational (cation-water stretch) bands (C), and by elimination can tentatively assign bands as hydrogen-bond stretch bands (H), as follows (frequencies given in meV): Natrolite: 13,18 (C) 26 (H), 64,68,87 (L); Apophyllite 17,26 (C), 35 (H) 64,79,98 (L); Scolecite 10 (C), 22,29,36,41 (H), 46 (LE); Wairakite 12 (C), 30 (LE); Bikitaite 13 (C), 22 (H), 34 (LE), 70(L). The results are compared with those for ice and are explained in terms of the nearest-neighbor environment of the water molecule.

  17. Migration of antimony from polyethylene terephthalate used in mineral water bottles.

    PubMed

    Carneado, S; Hernández-Nataren, E; López-Sánchez, J F; Sahuquillo, A

    2015-01-01

    The influence of storage time and temperature on Sb migration from PET bottles into mineral water was studied in short-term tests lasting up to 15 days and long-term studies lasting up to 220 days. Samples purchased were stored in three different coloured bottles: clear (CL), light blue (LB) and dark blue (DB). Sb migration was assayed by HG-AFS for total determination and HPLC-ICP-MS for speciation analysis. Migration studies showed that waters stored at 4 and 20 °C were not subject to Sb migration. At 40 °C there was a significant increase in Sb concentration, although the maximum limit established by the European Union (5.0 μgL(-)(1)) was not exceeded, whereas at 60 °C samples were subject to considerable Sb migration after 30 days of storage. In this case, the maximum limit established by the European Union was exceeded and both Sb (V) and Sb (III) were detected.

  18. Separation and preconcentration of aluminum in parenteral solutions and bottled mineral water using different analytical techniques.

    PubMed

    Kazi, Tasneem G; Khan, Sumaira; Baig, Jameel A; Kolachi, Nida F; Afridi, Hassan I; Kandhro, Ghulam A; Kumar, Sham; Shah, Abdul Q

    2009-12-30

    A new method is reported for the separation of aluminum ions [Al(III)] from interfering elements in parenteral and pharmaceutical solutions (PS) and bottled mineral water (BMW) samples, through solid-phase extraction with 2-methyl-8-hydroxyquinoline (quinaldine) adsorbed onto activated silica gel. While the enrichment step of separated Al(III) was carried out by cloud point extraction (CPE) using 8-hydroxyquinoline as complexing reagent, the resulted complex was entrapped in a non-ionic surfactant octylphenoxypolyethoxyethanol (Triton X-114). The enriched Al(III) in sample solutions were determined by spectrofluorometry (SPF) at lambda(excitation) 370 nm and lambda(emission) 510 nm, and flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) for comparative purpose. The variables affecting the complexation and extraction steps were studied and optimized. The validity of methodology was checked with certified reference material of water and standard addition method. The enrichment factor and detection limit of Al(III) for the preconcentration of 50 ml of PS and BMW were found to be 100 and 0.25 microg/L, respectively. The proposed method has been applied for the determination of trace amount of Al(III) in PS and BMW samples with satisfactory results. In PS the levels of Al(III) are above than permissible limit (25 microg/L).

  19. Determination of lithium in mineral water samples by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zawisza, Beata; Sitko, Rafał

    2011-10-01

    A method is shown for the determination of trace amounts of lithium by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRF) in natural mineral waters with various therapeutic effects originating in Poland. The method is an expansion of X-ray fluorescence spectrometry applications to the determination of a very light element. The direct determination of lithium by XRF is practically impossible due to the extremely low fluorescence yield and long-wavelength characteristic radiation of such a light element. The lithium is determined via iron after precipitation with stoichiometric potassium lithium periodatoferrate(III) complex. The solution obtained after dissolving the complex was pipetted onto Mylar foil for XRF analysis. As little as 1 μg Li may be determined with this method. Accurate lithium determinations can be obtained using simple calibration samples requiring only pipetting Fe solution in the range 8.0-28.0 μg onto the Mylar foil. The prepared samples are thin, which allows the errors resulting from self-absorption or matrix effects to be neglected. Our studies give essential information about the quality of the analyzed waters. © 2011 Society for Applied Spectroscopy

  20. Advancing Water Quality Monitoring and Hydrologic Optics Studies for Inland Waters through An Individual Particle Analysis Technique in Characterizing Suspended Mineral Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, F.

    2016-02-01

    Light attenuation by suspended particles in aquatic systems is an important physical process regulating underwater light field (important to primary production) and water clarity (thus water quality), as well as the magnitudes and the spectral features of remote-sensing reflectance. Mineral (or inorganic) particles are a key component of the optical regimes of inland waters because of their higher refractive indices as compared with algal and detrital particles, and generally much higher concentrations than in open oceans. A unique individual particle analysis (IPA) technique (scanning electron microscopy interfaced with automated image and X-ray analyses) has been used to provide detailed characterizations (size, shape, and composition) of individual mineral particles collected from diverse freshwater systems in North America, including the Great Lakes and the Finger Lakes of New York. A summary metric, the projected area concentrations of mineral particles, has been demonstrated to strongly regulate some critical water quality parameters, such as turbidity, Secchi depth, and particulate phosphorus concentrations. In addition, IPA results can be used as inputs for theoretical calculations of optical coefficients (e.g., absorption, scattering, and backscattering) of the mineral particle populations (i.e., the inherent optical properties, IOPs). Here we present some highlights from our water quality and optics studies supported by this IPA technique: (1) demonstration of the regulating effects of mineral area concentrations on common water quality metrics, (2) partitioning of the bulk particulate IOPs into contributing components (e.g., algal particles, calcite, clay minerals), (3) pursuit of optical modeling (particulate scattering and backscattering) closure with bulk measurements (promising results documented), (4) development of bio-optical models parameterized on particulate organic carbon content for an inland lake, and (5) advancement of remote

  1. Measuring water adsorption on mineral surfaces in air, CO2, and supercritical CO2 with a quartz-crystal microbalance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryan, C. R.; Wells, R. K.; Burton, P. D.; Heath, J. E.; Dewers, T. A.; Wang, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Carbon sequestration via underground storage in geologic formations is a proposed approach for reducing industrial CO2 emissions. However, current models for carbon injection and long-term storage of supercritical CO2 (scCO2) do not consider the development and stability of adsorbed water films at the scCO2-hydrophilic mineral interface. The thickness and properties of the water films control the surface tension and wettability of the mineral surface, and on the core scale, affect rock permeability, saturation, and capillary properties. The film thickness is strongly dependent upon the activity of water in the supercritical fluid, which will change as initially anhydrous scCO2 absorbs water from formation brine. As described in a companion paper by the coauthors, the thickness of the adsorbed water layer is controlled by the disjoining pressure; structural and van der Waals components dominate at low water activity, while electrostatic forces become more important with increasing film thickness (higher water activities). As scCO2 water activity and water layer thickness increase, concomitant changes in mineral surface properties and reservoir/caprock hydrologic properties will affect the mobility of the aqueous phase and of scCO2. Moreover, the development of a water layer may be critical to mineral dissolution reactions in scCO2. Here, we describe the use of a quartz-crystal microbalance (QCM) to monitor adsorption of water by mineral surfaces. QCMs utilize a piezoelectrically-stimulated quartz wafer to measure adsorbed or deposited mass via changes in vibrational frequency. When used to measure the mass of adsorbed liquid films, the frequency response of the crystal must be corrected for the viscoelastic, rather than elastic, response of the adsorbed layer. Results are presented for adsorption to silica in N2 and CO2 at one bar, and in scCO2. Additional data are presented for water uptake by clays deposited on a QCM wafer. In this case, water uptake occurs by the

  2. A comparison of pre- and post-remediation water quality, Mineral Creek, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Runkel, R.L.; Bencala, K.E.; Kimball, B.A.; Walton-Day, K.; Verplanck, P.L.

    2009-01-01

    Pre- and post-remediation data sets are used herein to assess the effectiveness of remedial measures implemented in the headwaters of the Mineral Creek watershed, where contamination from hard rock mining has led to elevated metal concentrations and acidic pH. Collection of pre- and post-remediation data sets generally followed the synoptic mass balance approach, in which numerous stream and inflow locations are sampled for the constituents of interest and estimates of streamflow are determined by tracer dilution. The comparison of pre- and post-remediation data sets is confounded by hydrologic effects and the effects of temporal variation. Hydrologic effects arise due to the relatively wet conditions that preceded the collection of pre-remediation data, and the relatively dry conditions associated with the post-remediation data set. This difference leads to a dilution effect in the upper part of the study reach, where pre-remediation concentrations were diluted by rainfall, and a source area effect in the lower part of the study reach, where a smaller portion of the watershed may have been contributing constituent mass during the drier post-remediation period. A second confounding factor, temporal variability, violates the steady-state assumption that underlies the synoptic mass balance approach, leading to false identification of constituent sources and sinks. Despite these complications, remedial actions completed in the Mineral Creek headwaters appear to have led to improvements in stream water quality, as post-remediation profiles of instream load are consistently lower than the pre-remediation profiles over the entire study reach for six of the eight constituents considered (aluminium, arsenic, cadmium, copper, iron, and zinc). Concentrations of aluminium, cadmium, copper, lead, and zinc remain above chronic aquatic-life standards, however, and additional remedial actions may be needed. Future implementations of the synoptic mass balance approach should be

  3. [Comparative studies on the course of microbial flora in natural mineral waters bottled in glass, PVC and laminated polyethylene].

    PubMed

    De Felip, G; Toti, L; Iannicelli, P

    1976-01-01

    The Authors report the results of comparative investigations carried out on some mineral waters bottled in various containers (laminated polyethylene, glass, PVC). The microbic charges vary in relation to the kind of container and resulted to be lower in the case of containers made of polyethylene.

  4. Profiling contents of water-soluble metabolites and mineral nutrients to evaluate the effects of pesticides and organic and chemical fertilizers on tomato fruit quality.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Masami; Ohta, Yuko; Licang, Sun; Motoyama, Naoki; Kikuchi, Jun

    2015-02-15

    In this study, the contents of water-soluble metabolites and mineral nutrients were measured in tomatoes cultured using organic and chemical fertilizers, with or without pesticides. Mineral nutrients and water-soluble metabolites were determined by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry and (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry, respectively, and results were analysed by principal components analysis (PCA). The mineral nutrient and water-soluble metabolite profiles differed between organic and chemical fertilizer applications, which accounted for 88.0% and 55.4%, respectively, of the variation. (1)H-(13)C-hetero-nuclear single quantum coherence experiments identified aliphatic protons that contributed to the discrimination of PCA. Pesticide application had little effect on mineral nutrient content (except Fe and P), but affected the correlation between mineral nutrients and metabolites. Differences in the content of mineral nutrients and water-soluble metabolites resulting from different fertilizer and pesticide applications probably affect tomato quality.

  5. Areal extent of a plume of mineralized water from a flowing artesian well in Dade County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waller, Bradley G.

    1982-01-01

    A flowing artesian well that taps the Floridan aquifer at Chekika Hammock State Park is contaminating the overlying Biscayne aquifer with saline water. The plume of mineralized water extends approximately 7 miles southeast of the well and ranges in width from 1 to 2 miles. The areal extent of contamination in the primary plume is approximately 12 square miles. The principal ions contaminating the Biscayne aquifer are chloride, sodium, and sulfate. (USGS)

  6. Contact angles at the water-air interface of hydrocarbon-contaminated soils and clay minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sofinskaya, O. A.; Kosterin, A. V.; Kosterina, E. A.

    2016-12-01

    Contact angles at the water-air interface have been measured for triturated preparations of clays and soils in order to assess changes in their hydrophobic properties under the effect of oil hydrocarbons. Tasks have been to determine the dynamics of contact angle under soil wetting conditions and to reveal the effect of chemical removal of organic matter from soils on the hydrophilicity of preparations. The potentialities of static and dynamic drop tests for assessing the hydrophilic-hydrophobic properties of soils have been estimated. Clays (kaolinite, gumbrine, and argillite) have been investigated, as well as plow horizons of soils from the Republic of Tatarstan: heavy loamy leached chernozem, medium loamy dark gray forest soil, and light loamy soddy-calcareous soil. The soils have been contaminated with raw oil and kerosene at rates of 0.1-3 wt %. In the uncontaminated and contaminated chernozem, capillary water capacity has been maintained for 250 days. The contact angles have been found to depend on the degree of dispersion of powdered preparation, the main type of clay minerals in the soil, the presence and amount of oxidation-resistant soil organic matter, and the soil-water contact time. Characteristic parameters of mathematical models for drop behavior on triturated preparations have been calculated. Contamination with hydrocarbons has resulted in a reliable increase in the contact angles of soil preparations. The hydrophobization of soil surface in chernozem is more active than in soils poorer in organic matter. The complete restoration of the hydrophilic properties of soils after hydrocarbon contamination is due to the oxidation of easily oxidizable organic matter at the low content of humus, or to wetting during several months in the absence of the mazut fraction.

  7. Geochemical rate processes at mineral-water interfaces: Linking molecular-scale surface properties to macroscopic observables

    SciTech Connect

    Higgins, Steven R.

    2013-03-31

    The project emphasis at WSU is on the understanding of the principal influences on surface chemistry, morphology, and kinetics of reactions of minerals in aqueous solutions. This emphasis, in the last project period has guided our efforts to the study of morphological relaxation in response to solution perturbations as well as to develop a methodology for creating on-demand etch pits for the purposes of generating specific step orientations on calcite surfaces. In the response of any mineral-water interface to changes in environmental conditions, dissolution and mineralization rates undergo rapid changes because the reaction rates at step edges are governed directly by these conditions. Our previous investigations of mineral dissolution have revealed that the topographic relaxation time under near equilibrium conditions can be much longer than the characteristic times of experimental investigations. The investigations described below are directed towards evaluating the effects of sample history, miscut and pretreatment on the observed dissolution behavior of our target mineral-water interface systems. In addition, we have developed a simple method for generating on-demand etch pits for the purposes of studying kinetically unstable step orientations.

  8. The composition of coexisting jarosite-group minerals and water from the Richmond mine, Iron Mountain, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jamieson, H.E.; Robinson, C.; Alpers, C.N.; Nordstrom, D.K.; Poustovetov, A.; Lowers, H.A.

    2005-01-01

    Jarosite-group minerals accumulate in the form of stalactites and fine-grained mud on massive pyrite in the D drift of the Richmond mine, Iron Mountain, California. Water samples were collected by placing beakers under the dripping stalactites and by extracting pore water from the mud using a centrifuge. The water is rich in Fe3+ and SO42-, with a pH of approximately 2.1, which is significantly higher than the extremely acidic waters found elsewhere in the mine. Electron-microprobe analysis and X-ray mapping indicate that the small crystals (<10 ??m in diameter) are compositionally zoned with respect to Na and K, and include hydronium jarosite corresponding to the formula (H3O)0.6K0.3 Na0.1Fe3+3 (SO4)2(OH)6. The proton-microprobe analyses indicate that the jarosite-group minerals contain significant amounts of As, Pb and Zn, and minor levels of Bi, Rb, Sb, Se, Sn and Sr. Speciation modeling indicates that the drip waters are supersaturated with respect to jarosite-group minerals. The expected range in composition of jarosite-group solid-solution in equilibrium with the pore water extracted from the mud was found to be consistent with the observed range in composition.

  9. Mathematic modeling of complex aquifer: Evian Natural Mineral Water case study considering lumped and distributed models.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henriot, abel; Blavoux, bernard; Travi, yves; Lachassagne, patrick; Beon, olivier; Dewandel, benoit; Ladouche, bernard

    2013-04-01

    The Evian Natural Mineral Water (NMW) aquifer is a highly heterogeneous Quaternary glacial deposits complex composed of three main units, from bottom to top: - The "Inferior Complex" mainly composed of basal and impermeable till lying on the Alpine rocks. It outcrops only at the higher altitudes but is known in depth through drilled holes. - The "Gavot Plateau Complex" is an interstratified complex of mainly basal and lateral till up to 400 m thick. It outcrops at heights above approximately 850 m a.m.s.l. and up to 1200 m a.m.s.l. over a 30 km² area. It is the main recharge area known for the hydromineral system. - The "Terminal Complex" from which the Evian NMW is emerging at 410 m a.m.s.l. It is composed of sand and gravel Kame terraces that allow water to flow from the deep "Gavot Plateau Complex" permeable layers to the "Terminal Complex". A thick and impermeable terminal till caps and seals the system. Aquifer is then confined at its downstream area. Because of heterogeneity and complexity of this hydrosystem, distributed modeling tools are difficult to implement at the whole system scale: important hypothesis would have to be made about geometry, hydraulic properties, boundary conditions for example and extrapolation would lead with no doubt to unacceptable errors. Consequently a modeling strategy is being developed and leads also to improve the conceptual model of the hydrosystem. Lumped models mainly based on tritium time series allow the whole hydrosystem to be modeled combining in series: an exponential model (superficial aquifers of the "Gavot Plateau Complex"), a dispersive model (Gavot Plateau interstratified complex) and a piston flow model (sand and gravel from the Kame terraces) respectively 8, 60 and 2.5 years of mean transit time. These models provide insight on the governing parameters for the whole mineral aquifer. They help improving the current conceptual model and are to be improved with other environmental tracers such as CFC, SF6. A

  10. The impact of post-exercise hydration with deep-ocean mineral water on rehydration and exercise performance.

    PubMed

    Keen, Douglas A; Constantopoulos, Eleni; Konhilas, John P

    2016-01-01

    Dehydration caused by prolonged exercise impairs thermoregulation, endurance and exercise performance. Evidence from animal and human studies validates the potential of desalinated deep-ocean mineral water to positively impact physiological and pathophysiological conditions. Here, we hypothesize that deep-ocean mineral water drawn from a depth of 915 m off the Kona, HI coast enhances recovery of hydration and exercise performance following a dehydrating exercise protocol compared to mountain spring water and a carbohydrate-based sports drink. Subjects (n = 8) were exposed to an exercise-dehydration protocol (stationary biking) under warm conditions (30 °C) to achieve a body mass loss of 3 % (93.4 ± 21.7 total exercise time). During the post-exercise recovery period, subjects received deep-ocean mineral water (Kona), mountain spring water (Spring) or a carbohydrate-based sports drink (Sports) at a volume (in L) equivalent to body mass loss (in Kg). Salivary samples were collected at regular intervals during exercise and post-exercise rehydration. Additionally, each participant performed peak torque knee extension as a measure of lower body muscle performance. Subjects who received Kona during the rehydrating period showed a significantly more rapid return to pre-exercise (baseline) hydration state, measured as the rate of decline in peak to baseline salivary osmolality, compared to Sports and Spring groups. In addition, subjects demonstrated significantly improved recovery of lower body muscle performance following rehydration with Kona versus Sports or Spring groups. Deep-ocean mineral water shows promise as an optimal rehydrating source over spring water and/or sports drink.

  11. Influence of changing water sources and mineral chemistry on the everglades ecosystem

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCormick, P.V.; Harvey, J.W.; Crawford, E.S.

    2011-01-01

    Human influences during the previous century increased mineral inputs to the Florida Everglades by changing the sources and chemistry of surface inflows. Biogeochemical responses to this enrichment include changes in the availability of key limiting nutrients such as P, the potential for increased turnover of nutrient pools due to accelerated plant decomposition, and increased rates of mercury methylation associated with sulfate enrichment. Mineral enrichment has also been linked to the loss of sensitive macrophyte species, although dominant Everglades species appear tolerant of a broad range of mineral chemistry. Shifts in periphyton community composition and function provide an especially sensitive indicator of mineral enrichment. Understanding the influence of mineral chemistry on Everglades processes and biota may improve predictions of ecosystem responses to ongoing hydrologic restoration efforts and provide guidelines for protecting remaining mineral-poor areas of this peatland. Copyright ?? 2011 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

  12. Water quality improvement by natural plant-mineral composites and field temperatures of a eutrophic lake in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Jung-Hwan, Byung; Kim, Ha-Kyung; Mun, Sun-Ki; Kim, Baik-Ho

    2014-09-01

    To improve the water quality of Shingal Reservoir, a eutrophic lake in South Korea, field tests were performed to assess the influence of water temperature on water quality improvement (WQI) ability of domestic plant-mineral composites (PMCs). Interestingly, Cyanobacterium was found to be dominant even in low-temperature seasons, especially winter leading to more effective for diatom growth. Factors such as phytoplankton, biological oxygen demand (BOD) and phosphorous showed high WQI over 70% at 20 degrees C, but declined to 40% at temperatures above 25 degrees C. WQI for Cyanobacteria decreased with increasing water temperature, whereas for diatoms WQI was 90% regardless of water temperature. Additionally, bacterial density and total nitrogen showed very low WQI without water temperature. Collectively, the results indicate that high water temperature decreased WQI ability of a PMC to control phytoplankton (Microcystis aeruginosa) and increased their ability to control diatoms.

  13. In situ mid-infrared spectroscopic titration of forsterite with water in supercritical CO2: Dependence of mineral carbonation on quantitative water speciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loring, J. S.; Thompson, C. J.; Wang, Z.; Schaef, H. T.; Martin, P.; Qafoku, O.; Felmy, A. R.; Rosso, K. M.

    2011-12-01

    Geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide holds promise for helping mitigate CO2 emissions generated from the burning of fossil fuels. Supercritical CO2 (scCO2) plumes containing variable water concentrations (wet scCO2) will displace aqueous solution and dominate the pore space adjacent to caprocks. It is important to understand possible mineral reactions with wet scCO2 to better predict long-term caprock integrity. We introduce novel in situ instrumentation that enables quantitative titrations of reactant minerals with water in scCO2 at temperatures and pressures relevant to target geologic reservoirs. The system includes both transmission and attenuated total reflection mid-infrared optics. Transmission infrared spectroscopy is used to measure concentrations of water dissolved in the scCO2, adsorbed on mineral surfaces, and incorporated into precipitated carbonates. Single-reflection attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy is used to monitor water adsorption, mineral dissolution, and carbonate precipitation reactions. Results are presented for the infrared spectroscopic titration of forsterite (Mg2SiO4), a model divalent metal silicate, with water in scCO2 at 100 bar and at both 50 and 75°C. The spectral data demonstrate that the quantitative speciation of water as either dissolved or adsorbed is important for understanding the types, growth rates, and amounts of carbonate precipitates formed. Relationships between dissolved/adsorbed water, water concentrations, and the role of liquid-like adsorbed water are discussed. Our results unify previous in situ studies from our laboratory based on infrared spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction.

  14. Herminiimonas fonticola gen. nov., sp. nov., a Betaproteobacterium isolated from a source of bottled mineral water.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Chantal; Rainey, Fred A; Nobre, M Fernanda; Pinhal, Isabel; Folhas, Fátima; da Costa, Milton S

    2005-09-01

    Several yellowish-pigmented bacteria with an optimum growth temperature of about 30 degrees C, were recovered from the source (borehole) of bottled mineral water in the Serra da Estrela in Eastern Portugal. Phylogenetic analyses of the 16S rRNA gene sequence of strains S-94T , S-97, S-99 and S-92 indicated that these organisms represent a new species of the Betaproteobacteria that is not closely related to any other known species. The major fatty acids of the strains are 16:1 omega7c and 16:0. Ubiquinone 8 is the major respiratory quinone. The new isolates are strictly organotrophic and aerobic. The new strains only assimilated organic acids, glycine and alanine. Casamino acids and a mixture of all natural amino acids are not used as sole carbon and nitrogen sources; these are used as nitrogen source in the presence of organic acids. On the basis of the phylogenetic analyses, physiological and biochemical characteristics, we are of the opinion that strains S-94T, S-97, S-99 and S-92 represent a new species of a novel genus for which we propose the name Herminiimonas fonticola gen. nov., sp. nov.

  15. [Development and Applicability of Analytical Methods for Quantifying Cyanide and Bromic Acid in Mineral Waters].

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Yusaku; Kataoka, Yohei; Sano, Yuki; Takizawa, Kazuhiro; Watanabe, Takahiro; Teshima, Reiko

    2015-01-01

    We developed and evaluated methods of quantifying cyanide (cyanide ion and cyanogen chloride) and bromic acid in mineral waters (MW). After performance evaluation, recovery studies were performed on 110 kinds of MW products to examine the applicability of the methods. The approximate proportion of the MW samples, in which the recovery rate of these anionic compounds was within 90 to 110%, was 95% in the cyanide ion and bromic acid analysis and 45% in the cyanogen chloride analysis. We observed low rates of recovery of cyanogen chloride from some MW products with pH values around neutral. To increase the recovery rate, we propose adding phosphoric acid buffer to adjust the pH of these MW samples. The retention times for bromic acid in some MW products differed from that in standard solution. We concluded that carbonic acid influences the retention times. It may be necessary to to exclude carbon dioxide from the MW samples by degassing to synchronize the retention times of bromic acid in the MW samples and the standard solution.

  16. Antibiotic resistance and antibacterial activity in heterotrophic bacteria of mineral water origin.

    PubMed

    Messi, Patrizia; Guerrieri, Elisa; Bondi, Moreno

    2005-06-15

    Antibiotic resistance and antibacterial activity were determined on heterotrophic bacteria isolated from mineral waters. Of the 120 isolates Pseudomonas spp. (55.8%) was the predominant group followed by Acinetobacter spp. (14.17%), Flavobacterium spp. (10.83%), Achromobacter spp. (10%), Burkholderia cepacia (3.3%), Agrobacterium/radiobacter (2.5%), Moraxella spp. (1.7%), Aeromonas hydrophila (1.7%). Over 80% of the isolates were resistant to one or more antibiotics and the highest resistance was found for chloramphenicol, ampicillin, colistin and sulfamethizole (60%, 55%, 50% and 47.5%, respectively). Strains with multiple antibiotic resistance (MAR) represented 55% of isolates and the most resistant organism belonged to the genus Pseudomonas. Of 40 randomly selected strains, 27 (67.5%) had antibacterial activity towards one or more indicators. This activity, found in a high percentage in the genus Pseudomonas (92%), emerged mainly against closely related microorganisms. Several producers were active also against Escherichia coli, Salmonella, Listeria monocytogenes and Staphylococcus aureus. Forty-six percent of the isolates harboured 1 to 5 plasmids with molecular weights ranging from 2.1 to 41.5 MDa.

  17. Sensory evaluation and electronic tongue for sensing flavored mineral water taste attributes.

    PubMed

    Sipos, László; Gere, Attila; Szöllősi, Dániel; Kovács, Zoltán; Kókai, Zoltán; Fekete, András

    2013-10-01

    In this article a trained sensory panel evaluated 6 flavored mineral water samples. The samples consisted of 3 different brands, each with 2 flavors (pear-lemon grass and josta berry). The applied sensory method was profile analysis. Our aim was to analyze the sensory profiles and to investigate the similarities between the sensitivity of the trained human panel and an electronic tongue device. Another objective was to demonstrate the possibilities for the prediction of sensory attributes from electronic tongue measurements using a multivariate statistical method (Partial Least Squares regression [PLS]). The results showed that the products manufactured under different brand name but with the same aromas had very similar sensory profiles. The panel performance evaluation showed that it is appropriate (discrimination ability, repeatability, and panel consensus) to compare the panel's results with the results of the electronic tongue. The samples can be discriminated by the electronic tongue and an accurate classification model can be built. Principal Component Analysis BiPlot diagrams showed that Brand A and B were similar because the manufacturers use the same aroma brands for their products. It can be concluded that Brand C was quite different compared to the other samples independently of the aroma content. Based on the electronic tongue results good prediction models can be obtained with high correlation coefficient (r(2) > 0.81) and low prediction error (RMSEP < 13.71 on the scale of the sensory evaluation from 0 to 100).

  18. In situ observations of nanoparticle early development kinetics at mineral-water interfaces.

    SciTech Connect

    Jun, Y. S.; Lee, B.; Waychunas, G. A.

    2010-10-08

    The early development of nanoparticles at mineral?water interfaces exerts crucial influences on the sequestration and transport of aqueous toxic species originating from both natural and anthropogenic sources. Homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation often occur simultaneously, making it difficult to sort out whether toxic species are transported as free species, sorbed on nanoparticle surfaces, or trapped between aggregated nanoparticles. Here, using a newly developed X-ray scattering setup, we show how homogeneous nucleation and growth can be quantitatively separated from heterogeneous processes under aqueous conditions in real-time. Under conditions found in acid-mine-drainage (at pH 3.6 and [Fe{sup 3+}] = 10{sup -4} M), heterogeneous nucleation of iron oxide nanoparticles on quartz dominated homogeneous nucleation by a factor of 192 (by particle volume). The smallest heterogeneously formed nanoparticles had radii of 1.7 {+-} 0.5 nm, significantly smaller than the size estimated using classical nucleation theory (CNT). Based on the data, the dominant nucleation and growth mechanisms of iron oxide nanoparticles depending on ionic strength were presented. Our findings have implications for the formation and transport of nanoparticles, and thus toxins, in both environmental and biological systems.

  19. New PVC nitrate-selective electrode: application to vegetables and mineral waters.

    PubMed

    Kong Thoo Lin, P; Araujo, A N; Montenegro, M C B S M; Pérez-Olmos, R

    2005-01-26

    The paper refers the analytical potentialities of the oxa-azamacrocycles as potentiometric ionophores for the construction of electrodes selective to nitrate. Afterward, the membrane selective to nitrate is designed and optimized using a [3.3.3.3]oxazane as an ionophore. The membrane was prepared using dibutylphthalate as a solvent mediator, tetraoctylammonium as a lipophilic membrane additive, and poly(vinyl chloride (PVC) as a polymeric matrix, applied directly onto a conductive graphite/epoxy resin support. The electrodes presented a slope of 60 +/- 0.1 mV log(-1), a low limit of linear response of 4.2 x 10(-6) mol L(-1), a useful lifetime of 1 year, and improved selectivity characteristics when compared with other nitrate electrodes. The good working characteristics of this electrode, constructed without inner-reference solution, made possible its application to the determination of nitrate in different types of vegetables and bottled mineral waters without the use of a conditioning solution. The application of a significant F test proved that the results obtained were similar to those attained by application of the brucine spectrophotometric method adopted as a reference technique. Linear regression analysis also showed good agreement between the results obtained by the proposed method and the reference one.

  20. Microbial composition in microcosms amended with natural and mineral fertilizers under different water regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brad, Traian; Chiriac, Cecilia; Szekeres, Edina; Coman, Cristian; Rudi, Knut; Sandor, Mignon

    2017-04-01

    Twenty microcosm enclosures containing two types of soil (i.e. a rich Chernozemic and a poorer soil) were fertilized with mineral (NPK-complex) and organic (Gülle, manure and a green fertilizer) materials and placed under dry and wet water regimes. After 10, 20 and 30 days of the experiment, soil samples were analyzed for the structure and composition of microbial communities using next generation sequencing techniques (Illumina) and statistical analysis. The differences between bacteria communities in different soil types, and in different fertilization and hydric treatments were analyzed using quantitative phylogenetic distances and the ANOSIM test. The two types of soil especially selected for the structure of microbial communities, while moisture and the type of fertilizer appeared to have a smaller influence on microbial diversity in microcosms. The alpha-diversity indices (species richness, evenness and phylogenetic diversity) had higher values for the poorer soil compared to the rich Chernozemic soil. For both soil types, the highest bacteria diversity values were obtained after fertilization with manure. The microbial communities in the analyzed soils were complex and dominated by sequences belonging to Actinobacteria, Proteobacteria, Acidobacteria and Firmicutes.

  1. Magnetic Mineral diagenesis in changing water environments in the Black Sea since ˜41.6 ka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiabo; Nowaczyk, Norbert; Frank, Ute; Arz, Helge

    2017-04-01

    Magnetic mineral diagenesis plays a key role in the global iron cycle. To understand the authigenic magnetic mineral formation by diagenesis is also fundamentally important for the interpretation of environmental magnetic as well as paleomagnetic signals. Core MSM33-55-1, recovered from the SW Black Sea, was subjected to rock-magnetic and SEM studies. The results demonstrate that four different magnetic mineral assemblages associated to specific water conditions can be observed. Between ˜41.6 ka and ˜19 ka, magnetite and greigite are alternatively in dominance in the sediment. Due to low organic matter input during the late MIS 3 and the last glacial maximum (LGM), oxygenated bottom water in the Black Sea was favourable for preserving detrital magnetite. Greigite in this interval have irregular shapes and assemble in spots, which were formed in a micro environment with limited sulfate availability. Between ˜19 ka and ˜16.5 ka, black layers were deposited as a result of organic matter accumulation induced by productivity blooming and riverine discharge soaring after the LGM. Hence less oxygenated bottom water conditions developed, and more fine grained greigite was formed. After melt-water pulse (MWP) events (˜16.5 ka), both primary productivity and the sea level were continuously rising until ˜8.3 ka, leading to the depletion of oxygen in bottom water. In addition to greigite, pyrite was also formed and gradually in dominance as approaching the Holocene. The influx of salt water masses from the Mediterranean Sea after ˜8.3 ka contributed to the establishment of the anoxic Black Sea, which resulted in the formation of ubiquitous frambiods of pyrite. Additionally, bacterial magnetic minerals are likely present in the sediment younger than ˜8.3 ka as indicated by rock magnetic results. In this paper, four different magnetic mineral assemblages, reflecting gradual changes from an oxic to an anoix Black Sea, were identified, yielding insights into the relation

  2. Geochemistry of thermal/mineral waters in the Clear Lake region, California, and implications for hot dry rock geothermal development

    SciTech Connect

    Goff, F.; Adams, A.I.; Trujillo, P.E.; Counce, D.; Mansfield, J.

    1993-02-01

    Thermal/mineral waters of the Clear Lake region are broadly classified as thermal meteoric and connote types based on chemical and isotopic criteria. Ratios of conservative components such as B/Cl are extremely different among all thermal/mineral waters of the Clear Lake region except for clusters of waters emerging from specific areas such as the Wilbur Springs district and the Agricultural Park area south of Mt. Konocti. In contrast, ratios of conservative components in large, homogeneous geothermal reservoirs are constant. Stable isotope values of Clear Lake region waters show a mixing trend between thermal meteoric and connote end-members. The latter end-member has enriched [delta]D as well as enriched d[sup l8]O, very different from typical high-temperature geothermal reservoir waters. Tritium data and modeling of ages indicate most Clear Lake region waters are 500 to > 10,000 yr., although mixing of old and young components is implied by the data. The age of end-member connate water is probably > 10,000 yr. Subsurface equilibration temperature of most thermal/mineral waters of the Clear Lake region is [le] 150[degrees]C based on chemical geothermometers but it is recognized that Clear Lake region waters are not typical geothermal fluids and that they violate rules of application of many geothermometers. The combined data indicate that no large geothermal reservoir underlies the Clear Lake region and that small localized reservoirs have equilibration temperatures [le] 150[degrees]C (except for Sulphur Bank Mine). Hot dry rock technologies are the best way to commercially exploit the known high temperatures existing beneath the Clear Lake region, particularly within the main Clear Lake volcanic field.

  3. The bacterial flora of non-carbonated, natural mineral water from the springs to reservoir and glass and plastic bottles.

    PubMed

    Bischofberger, T; Cha, S K; Schmitt, R; König, B; Schmidt-Lorenz, W

    1990-08-01

    Quantitative and qualitative determinations of the bacterial flora of non-carbonated natural mineral water at the most important steps during bottling at a large water source yielded the following results: (i) Colony counts (on 1:10 diluted plate count agar, incubated at 20 degrees C for 14 days) for water of the five springs and the mixed water were less than 1 to 4 cfu ml-1. The Gram-negative bacterial flora (n = 50 isolates) showed a very different but constant spring specific species distributions with predominance of either eutrophic fluorescent pseudomonads, oligotrophic non-fluorescent pseudomonads or oligotrophic yellow bacteria. (ii) In the reservoir and immediately after bottling the counts were in the range of 10 cfu ml-1. But nearly 30% of the species of the spring water were no longer detectable and there was a significant increase of Gram-positive bacteria. (iii) After 1 week of storage at 20 degrees C colony counts of more than 10(5) cfu ml-1 were found in plastic bottles, but only about 10(4) cfu ml-1 in glass bottles. Besides, a very distinct change of the composition of the microflora occurred. In glass bottles slow-growing oligotrophic non-fluorescent pseudomonads, yellow bacteria and Acinetobacter predominated. In plastic bottles fast-growing eutrophic and mesotrophic fluorescent pseudomonads, Flexibacter and Acinetobacter were dominating. In mineral water, bottled into thoroughly cleaned glass bottles, colony counts of more than 10(5) cfu ml-1 were found within 4 days. In bottles, cleaned mechanically as usual, the increase was significantly slower with a maximum of only 5 x 10(3) cfu ml-1 after 8 days. The results of inoculation experiments in sterile filtered mineral and distilled water led to the suggestion that the difference between the two types of bottles is caused firstly by an inhibition of growth due to residues of cleaning detergents in the glass bottles. Growth promotion by dissolved organic substances in the plastic bottles only

  4. 3-D Numerical Modeling as a Tool for Managing Mineral Water Extraction from a Complex Groundwater Basin in Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanini, A.; Tanda, M.

    2007-12-01

    The groundwater in Italy plays an important role as drinking water; in fact it covers about the 30% of the national demand (70% in Northern Italy). The mineral water distribution in Italy is an important business with an increasing demand from abroad countries. The mineral water Companies have a great interest in order to increase the water extraction, but for the delicate and complex geology of the subsoil, where such very high quality waters are contained, a particular attention must be paid in order to avoid an excessive lowering of the groundwater reservoirs or great changes in the groundwater flow directions. A big water Company asked our University to set up a numerical model of the groundwater basin, in order to obtain a useful tool which allows to evaluate the strength of the aquifer and to design new extraction wells. The study area is located along Appennini Mountains and it covers a surface of about 18 km2; the topography ranges from 200 to 600 m a.s.l.. In ancient times only a spring with naturally sparkling water was known in the area, but at present the mineral water is extracted from deep pumping wells. The area is characterized by a very complex geology: the subsoil structure is described by a sequence of layers of silt-clay, marl-clay, travertine and alluvial deposit. Different groundwater layers are present and the one with best quality flows in the travertine layer; the natural flow rate seems to be not subjected to seasonal variations. The water age analysis revealed a very old water which means that the mineral aquifers are not directly connected with the meteoric recharge. The Geologists of the Company suggest that the water supply of the mineral aquifers comes from a carbonated unit located in the deep layers of the mountains bordering the spring area. The valley is crossed by a river that does not present connections to the mineral aquifers. Inside the area there are about 30 pumping wells that extract water at different depths. We built a 3

  5. Major and trace element composition of copiapite-group minerals and coexisting water from the Richmond mine, Iron Mountain, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jamieson, H.E.; Robinson, C.; Alpers, C.N.; McCleskey, R.B.; Nordstrom, D.K.; Peterson, Ronald C.

    2005-01-01

    Copiapite-group minerals of the general formula AR4 (SO4)6(OH)2??nH2O, where A is predominantly Mg, Fe2+, or 0.67Al3+, R is predominantly Fe3+, and n is typically 20, are among several secondary hydrous Fe sulfates occurring in the inactive mine workings of the massive sulfide deposit at Iron Mountain, CA, a USEPA Superfund site that produces extremely acidic drainage. Samples of copiapite-group minerals, some with coexisting water, were collected from the Richmond mine. Approximately 200 mL of brownish pore water with a pH of -0.9 were extracted through centrifugation from a 10-L sample of moist copiapite-group minerals taken from pyritic muck piles. The pore water is extremely rich in ferric iron (Fe3+=149 g L-1, FeT=162 g L-1 and has a density of 1.52 g mL-1. The composition of the pore water is interpreted in the context of published phase relations in the Fe2O3- SO3-H2O system and previous work on the chemistry of extremely acid mine waters and associated minerals in the Richmond mine. Two distinct members of the copiapite mineral group were identified in the samples with coexisting water: (1) abundant magnesiocopiapite consisting of platy crystals 10 to 50 ??m and (2) minor aluminocopiapite present as smaller platy crystals that form spheroidal aggregates. The average composition (n=5) of the magnesiocopiapite is (Mg0.90Fe0.172+ Zn0.02Cu0.01)???1.10(Fe3.833+Al0.09)???3.92(SO4) 6.00(OH)1.96??20H2O. Bulk compositions determined by digestion and wet-chemical analysis are consistent with the microanalytical results. These results suggest that magnesiocopiapite is the least soluble member of the copiapite group under the prevailing conditions. Micro-PIXE analysis indicates that the copiapite-group minerals in this sample sequester Zn (average 1420 ppm), with lesser amounts of Cu (average 270 ppm) and As (average 64 ppm). ?? 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Oxygen isotope fractionation effects in soil water via interaction with cations (Mg, Ca, K, Na) adsorbed to phyllosilicate clay minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oerter, Erik; Finstad, Kari; Schaefer, Justin; Goldsmith, Gregory R.; Dawson, Todd; Amundson, Ronald

    2014-07-01

    In isotope-enabled hydrology, soil and vadose zone sediments have been generally considered to be isotopically inert with respect to the water they host. This is inconsistent with knowledge that clay particles possessing an electronegative surface charge and resulting cation exchange capacity (CEC) interact with a wide range of solutes which, in the absence of clays, have been shown to exhibit δ18O isotope effects that vary in relation to the ionic strength of the solutions. To investigate the isotope effects caused by high CEC clays in mineral-water systems, we created a series of monominerallic-water mixtures at gravimetric water contents ranging from 5% to 32%, consisting of pure deionized water of known isotopic composition with homoionic (Mg, Ca, Na, K) montmorillonite. Similar mixtures were also created with quartz to determine the isotope effect of non-, or very minimally-, charged mineral surfaces. The δ18O value of the water in these monominerallic soil analogs was then measured by isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) after direct headspace CO2 equilibration. Mg- and Ca-exchanged homoionic montmorillonite depleted measured δ18O values up to 1.55‰ relative to pure water at 5% water content, declining to 0.49‰ depletion at 30% water content. K-montmorillonite enriched measured δ18O values up to 0.86‰ at 5% water content, declining to 0.11‰ enrichment at 30% water. Na-montmorillonite produces no measureable isotope effect. The isotope effects observed in these experiments may be present in natural, high-clay soils and sediments. These findings have relevance to the interpretation of results of direct CO2-water equilibration approaches to the measurement of the δ18O value of soil water. The adsorbed cation isotope effect may bear consideration in studies of pedogenic carbonate, plant-soil water use and soil-atmosphere interaction. Finally, the observed isotope effects may prove useful as molecular scale probes of the nature of mineral-water

  7. The interaction between decomposition, net N and P mineralization and their mobilization to the surface water in fens.

    PubMed

    Geurts, Jeroen J M; Smolders, Alfons J P; Banach, Artur M; van de Graaf, Jan P M; Roelofs, Jan G M; Lamers, Leon P M

    2010-06-01

    Worldwide, fens and peat lakes that used to be peat-forming systems have become a significant source of C, N and P due to increased peat decomposition. To test the hypothesis that net nutrient mineralization rates may be uncoupled from decomposition rates, we investigated decomposition and net mineralization rates of nutrients in relation to sediment and pore water characteristics. We incubated 28 non-calcareous peat sediments and floating fen soils under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. We also tried to find a simple indicator to estimate the potential nutrient mobilization rates from peat sediments to the water layer by studying their relation with sediment and pore water characteristics in 44 Dutch non-calcareous peat lakes and ditches. Decomposition rates were primarily determined by the organic matter content, and were higher under aerobic conditions. However, highly decomposed peat sediments with low C:P and C:N ratios still showed high net nutrient mineralization rates. At Fe:PO(4) ratios below 1molmol(-1), PO(4) mobilization from the sediment to the water layer was considerable and linearly related to the pore water PO(4) concentration. At higher ratios, there was a strong linear correlation between the Fe:PO(4) ratio and PO(4) mobilization. Hence, measuring Fe and PO(4) in anaerobic sediment pore water provides a powerful tool for a quick assessment of internal PO(4) fluxes. Mobilization of mineral N was largely determined by diffusion. Total sediment Fe:S ratios gave an important indication of the amount of Fe that is available to immobilize PO(4). Pore water Fe concentrations decreased at ratios <1molmol(-1), whereas pore water PO(4) concentrations and PO(4) mobilization to the water layer increased. As PO(4) mobilization rates from the sediment to the water layer contribute to almost half of the total P load in Dutch peat lakes and fens, it is of pivotal importance to examine the magnitude of internal fluxes. Dredging of the nutrient-rich upper

  8. Trace level determination of beryllium in natural and flavored mineral waters after pre-concentration using activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Kılınç, Ersin; Bakırdere, Sezgin; Yaman, Mehmet

    2011-04-01

    The concentrations of beryllium (Be) in natural and flavored mineral water samples were determined by flame atomic absorption spectrophotometer (FAAS) after pre-concentration based on the complexation of Be(+2) with a mixture of acetylacetone (pentane-2,4-dione) plus morin (3,5,7,2',4'-pentaoxyflavone) and adsorption on activated carbon. The adsorbed complex was eluted with 1.5 ml of 2.0 M HNO(3) and evaporated to dryness. After adding 1.5 ml of 2 M HNO(3) and centrifuging, Be in acid solution was determined by FAAS. To remove a number of metals present in water, EDTA was used as a chelating agent. Beryllium in mineral water samples was pre-concentrated by 500-fold, taking 750 ml as initial sample and 1.5 ml as the final volume. The relative standard deviations were sufficiently low for practical purposes and recoveries were up to 85%. Spiking experiments were performed in real samples to establish accuracy and recoveries. The limits of detection and quantification were 0.01 and 0.03 ng ml(-1), respectively. Twenty samples were analyzed for their beryllium content using optimum parameters. The highest concentration of beryllium was found to be 0.94 ± 0.15 ng ml(-1) in a natural mineral water, while beryllium was not detected in five samples.

  9. A sodium-bicarbonated mineral water reduces gallbladder emptying and postprandial lipaemia: a randomised four-way crossover study.

    PubMed

    Toxqui, Laura; Pérez-Granados, Ana M; Blanco-Rojo, Ruth; Vaquero, M Pilar

    2012-08-01

    Sodium-bicarbonated mineral waters are reported to have beneficial digestive and hypocholesterolaemic properties. The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of consumption of a sodium-bicarbonated mineral water (BW) with or without a meal, compared to a low mineral content water as the control water (CW), on postprandial serum triacylglycerols (TAG), cholecystokinin (CCK) and gallbladder volume. The study design was a four-way randomised controlled crossover trial. Healthy adult men and women (>18 and <40 years, TAG <2.82 mmol/L) consumed 0.5 L of CW + standard meal; 0.5 L of BW + standard meal; and 0.5 L of CW without meal or 0.5 L of BW without meal. BW consumed without meal had no significant effect on the study parameters compared to CW. However, BW with meal induced a lower concentration of serum TAG at 30 min (p = 0.01) and 60 min (p = 0.03) postprandial times, lower CCK concentrations at 30 min (p = 0.002), and higher gallbladder volume at 30 min (p = 0.03), 60 min (p = 0.01) and 120 min (p = 0.04). Gallbladder ejection fraction was lower with the BW (p = 0.03), whilst area under the curve and peak contraction amplitude (lowest gallbladder volume) were higher (p = 0.01, p = 0.02, respectively) compared to the CW. Consumption of BW with a meal induces lower levels of CCK and reduces gallbladder emptying and postprandial TAG levels. It is proposed that this sodium-bicarbonated mineral water could be used as part of the habitual diet by the general population in order to reduce cardiovascular risk.

  10. Supplementation of Acqua Lete® (Bicarbonate Calcic Mineral Water) improves hydration status in athletes after short term anaerobic exercise

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Experimental studies suggest that mineral waters with high concentrations of calcium and bicarbonate can impact acid–base balance. The purpose of this study was to test the effect on acid–base balance and specific urine gravity, of a bicarbonate calcic mineral water (Acqua Lete®) compared to a minimally mineralized water. Methods 88 amateur male athletes underwent two experimental trials with a modified Wingate test: the first was carried out without hydration (Control Test, Test C, n = 88); the second was carried out after one week of controlled hydration (Test with hydration, Test H, n = 88), with 1.5 L/day of a very low mineral content water (Group A, n = 44) or 1.5 L/day of Acqua Lete® (Group B, n = 44). Measure of body temperature, bioimpedance analysis, muscular ultrasound, and urinalysis were taken before (t0), immediately after (t1), 5’ (t2), and 30’ (t3) after exercise. Results Hydration results in a decreased core temperature; muscular ultrasound showed increased muscle thickness after exercise related to content of body water. Regarding urinalysis, in test H, we found in both groups after exercise a significant decrease of specific urine gravity with significantly lower levels in Group B. We also found a significant increase of pH in the same Group B. Conclusions In conclusion all the athletes hydrated with Acqua Lete® showed a positive impact on hydration status after anaerobic exercise with significant decrease of specific urine gravity and a positive effect on pH. PMID:22835267

  11. Effects of different irrigation practices using treated wastewater on tomato yields, quality, water productivity, and soil and fruit mineral contents.

    PubMed

    Demir, Azize Dogan; Sahin, Ustun

    2017-09-15

    Wastewater use in agricultural irrigation is becoming a common practice in order to meet the rising water demands in arid and semi-arid regions. The study was conducted to determine the effects of the full (FI), deficit (DI), and partial root-zone drying (PRD) irrigation practices using treated municipal wastewater (TWW) and freshwater (FW) on tomato yield, water use, fruit quality, and soil and fruit heavy metal concentrations. The TWW significantly increased marketable yield compared to the FW, as well as decreased water consumption. Therefore, water use efficiency (WUE) in the TWW was significantly higher than in the FW. Although the DI and the PRD practices caused less yields, these practices significantly increased WUE values due to less irrigation water applied. The water-yield linear relationships were statistically significant. TWW significantly increased titratable acidity and vitamin C contents. Reduced irrigation provided significantly lower titratable acidity, vitamin C, and lycopene contents. TWW increased the surface soil and fruit mineral contents in response to FW. Greater increases were observed under FI, and mineral contents declined with reduction in irrigation water. Heavy metal accumulation in soils was within safe limits. However, Cd and Pb contents in fruits exceeded standard limits given by FAO/WHO. Higher metal pollution index values determined for fruits also indicated that TWW application, especially under FI, might cause health risks in long term.

  12. Mineral Reactions in Shale Gas Reservoirs: Barite Scale Formation from Reusing Produced Water As Hydraulic Fracturing Fluid.

    PubMed

    Paukert Vankeuren, Amelia N; Hakala, J Alexandra; Jarvis, Karl; Moore, Johnathan E

    2017-08-15

    Hydraulic fracturing for gas production is now ubiquitous in shale plays, but relatively little is known about shale-hydraulic fracturing fluid (HFF) reactions within the reservoir. To investigate reactions during the shut-in period of hydraulic fracturing, experiments were conducted flowing different HFFs through fractured Marcellus shale cores at reservoir temperature and pressure (66 °C, 20 MPa) for one week. Results indicate HFFs with hydrochloric acid cause substantial dissolution of carbonate minerals, as expected, increasing effective fracture volume (fracture volume + near-fracture matrix porosity) by 56-65%. HFFs with reused produced water composition cause precipitation of secondary minerals, particularly barite, decreasing effective fracture volume by 1-3%. Barite precipitation occurs despite the presence of antiscalants in experiments with and without shale contact and is driven in part by addition of dissolved sulfate from the decomposition of persulfate breakers in HFF at reservoir conditions. The overall effect of mineral changes on the reservoir has yet to be quantified, but the significant amount of barite scale formed by HFFs with reused produced water composition could reduce effective fracture volume. Further study is required to extrapolate experimental results to reservoir-scale and to explore the effect that mineral changes from HFF interaction with shale might have on gas production.

  13. Mobilities of heavy metals in surface waters: A field study of Mineral Branch, Tri-State Mining District

    SciTech Connect

    Piechowski, M.F.; Carroll, S.A. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1992-01-01

    A field study of the mobilities of heavy metals was done in the Tri-State Mining District near Joplin, Missouri. The processing of ores left many large tailings piles in this region which are predominantly chert, but contain minor amounts of carbonate and sulfide minerals. The residual sphalerite, galena, marcasite, and pyrite readily dissolve when exposed to surface waters, increasing the acidity and concentrations of Pb, Zn, and Cd in the streams of the region. Mineral Branch is a local stream that originates in and flows through a tailings field. Water and sediment (bed and suspended load) samples were collected and analyzed by ICP and XRD methods in order to determine trace and major element concentrations and mineral compositions, respectively. The solids are primarily chert and carbonates, with small amounts of crystalline and amorphous iron hydroxides and oxyhydroxides. Over the two mile study area, pH increases steadily downstream. As the pH rises, the dissolved heavy metal concentrations fall, some by an order of magnitude or more. It was also found that over 99% of the Pb, Zn,and Cd in the system is presents in the solids. Precipitation of carbonates or hydroxides does not adequately explain the concentration changes seen in the system. The adsorption of the metal species onto the carbonates and iron oxyhydroxides of the stream sediments as a function of pH is an additional controlling factor in the Mineral Branch.

  14. CO2 hydrate nucleation kinetics enhanced by an organo-mineral complex formed at the montmorillonite-water interface.

    PubMed

    Kyung, Daeseung; Lim, Hyung-Kyu; Kim, Hyungjun; Lee, Woojin

    2015-01-20

    In this study, we investigated experimentally and computationally the effect of organo-mineral complexes on the nucleation kinetics of CO2 hydrate. These complexes formed via adsorption of zwitter-ionic glycine (Gly-zw) onto the surface of sodium montmorillonite (Na-MMT). The electrostatic attraction between the −NH3(+) group of Gly-zw, and the negatively charged Na-MMT surface, provides the thermodynamic driving force for the organo-mineral complexation. We suggest that the complexation of Gly-zw on the Na-MMT surface accelerates CO2 hydrate nucleation kinetics by increasing the mineral–water interfacial area (thus increasing the number of effective hydrate-nucleation sites), and also by suppressing the thermal fluctuation of solvated Na(+) (a well-known hydrate formation inhibitor) in the vicinity of the mineral surface by coordinating with the −COO(–) groups of Gly-zw. We further confirmed that the local density of hydrate-forming molecules (i.e., reactants of CO2 and water) at the mineral surface (regardless of the presence of Gly-zw) becomes greater than that of bulk phase. This is expected to promote the hydrate nucleation kinetics at the surface. Our study sheds new light on CO2 hydrate nucleation kinetics in heterogeneous marine environments, and could provide knowledge fundamental to successful CO2 sequestration under seabed sediments.

  15. Use of fracture filling mineral assemblages for characterizing water-rock interactions during exhumation of an accretionary complex: An example from the Shimanto Belt, southern Kyushu Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Takuya; Yoshida, Hidekazu; Metcalfe, Richard

    2016-06-01

    Various fracture filling minerals and secondary minerals in fracture walls were formed by fluid-rock interaction during the exhumation of the Palaeogene Shimanto Belt of Kyushu, Japan, which is located in an accretionary complex. Each mineral formed under favourable geological conditions and can be used to estimate the conditions of accretion and formation of the related rock sequences. Petrographic observations, mineralogical and geochemical analyses were made on fracture filling minerals and secondary minerals from boreholes of ca. 140 m depth, drilled in the Shimanto Belt. Results reveal that the secondary minerals were formed in three major stages distinguished by the sequential textural relationships of the minerals and the interpreted environment of mineral formation. Filling mineral assemblages show that the studied rock formation has been subducted to a depth of several km and the temperature reached was ca. 200-300 °C. After the subduction, the rock formation was uplifted and surface acidic water penetrated up to 80 m beneath the present ground surface. The acid water dissolved calcite fracture filling minerals to form the present groundwater flow-paths, which allowed recent wall rock alteration to occur. The results shown here imply that filling mineral assemblages can be an effective tool to evaluate the environmental changes during exhumation of an accretionary complex.

  16. Effect of chemical environment on the dynamics of water confined in calcium silicate minerals: natural and synthetic tobermorite.

    PubMed

    Monasterio, Manuel; Gaitero, Juan J; Manzano, Hegoi; Dolado, Jorge S; Cerveny, Silvina

    2015-05-05

    Confined water in the slit mesopores of the mineral tobermorite provides an excellent model system for analyzing the dynamic properties of water confined in cement-like materials. In this work, we use broadband dielectric spectroscopy (BDS) to analyze the dynamic of water entrapped in this crystalline material. Two samples, one natural and one synthetic, were analyzed, and despite their similar structure, the motion of confined water in their zeolitic cavity displays considerably different behavior. The water dynamics splits into two different behaviors depending on the chemical nature of the otherwise identical structural environment: water molecules located in areas where the primary building units are SiO4 relax slowly compared to water molecules located in cavities built with both AlO4 and SiO4. Compared to water confined in regular porous systems, water restricted in tobermorite is slower, indicating that the mesopore structure induces high disorder in the water structure. A comparison with water confined in the C-S-H gel is also discussed in this work. The strong dynamical changes in water due to the presence of aluminum might have important implications in the chemical transport of ions within hydrated calcium silicates, a process that governs the leaching and chemical degradation of cement.

  17. Validation Study on a Method for Simultaneous Quantification of Elements in Mineral Water and Surveillance of Element Concentrations.

    PubMed

    Kataoka, Yohei; Watanabe, Takahiro; Matsuda, Rieko; Hayashi, Tomoko; Akiyama, Hiroshi; Teshima, Reiko

    2017-01-01

    A validation study was performed on the Japanese official method to determine several elements (B, Cr, Mn, Cu, Zn, As, Se, Cd, Ba, Pb) in mineral water simultaneously using ICP-MS. The trueness, repeatability and reproducibility of the method were estimated to be in the ranges of 95-106, 0.2-1.4 and 0.4-4.2%, respectively. The values of every performance parameter fulfilled the requirements in the guidelines announced by the Ministry of Health, Labour, and Welfare of Japan, and the validity of the method was confirmed. The concentrations of the elements in mineral water products purchased from Japanese markets in 2013 and 2014 were surveyed using the method. All products met the specifications defined in the Japanese Food Sanitation Law. No clear relationship between the element concentrations and the survey year or the producing country was found.

  18. Inactivation effects of UV irradiation and ozone treatment on the yeast and the mold in mineral water.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, M; Masaki, H; Mori, T; Tsuchiya, T; Konuma, H; Hara-Kudo, Y; Takatori, K

    2010-08-01

    In recent years, bottled mineral water has undergone inactivation by methods other than the traditional heat treatment during the production process; there are fewer reports of the effectiveness of these inactivation methods on yeasts and molds in mineral water than on bacteria and protozoan oocysts. In this study, we evaluated the effects of UV irradiation and ozone treatment compared with heat treatment at 85 degrees C on yeast cells and mold spores inoculated into mineral water. A 5-log reduction occurred at a UV radiation dose of 31,433 microJ/cm2 for Saccharomyces cerevisiae and at 588,285 microJ/cm2 for Penicillium pinophilum. The treatment time for 5-log reduction estimated for UV irradiation was about 0.6 min for S. cerevisiae and about 10.7 min for P. pinophilum; at an ozone concentration of 0.1 ppm, it was 1.75 min for S. cerevisiae and 2.70 min for P. pinophilum, and at a concentration of 0.6 ppm, it was 0.32 min for S. cerevisiae and 0.57 min for P. pinophilum. Comparison of the inactivation effects among the three methods showed that UV irradiation and ozone treatment were less effective than heat treatment at 85 degrees C. Thus, when UV irradiation and ozone treatment are used for inactivation of mineral water, it seems that they need to be combined with heat treatment to achieve a definite effect. Yeast cells are more sensitive to all three inactivation methods than are mold spores, and the sensitivity of yeast cells and mold spores to these inactivation methods may vary among genera.

  19. Can Hydrous Minerals Account for the Observed Mid-Latitude Water on Mars?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bish, D. L.; Vaniman, D. T.; Fialips, C.; Carey, J. W.; Feldman, W. C.

    2003-01-01

    Clays, zeolites, and Mg-sulfates are all phases that could potentially retain H2O in martian regolith. The nature of the hydrogen-containing material observed in the equatorial martian regolith is of particular importance to the question of whether hydrous minerals have formed in the past on Mars. Also, whether these minerals exist in a hydrated (i.e., containing H2O molecules in their structures) or dehydrated state is a crucial question. The purpose of this communication is to estimate the possible magnitude of the H2O reservoir constituted by these H2O-bearing minerals. In other words, can minerals containing H2O and/or OH such clays, zeolites, or Mg-sulfates, reasonably be expected to account for the amounts of near-equatorial H2O-equivalent hydrogen recently documented by Mars Odyssey?

  20. Can Hydrous Minerals Account for the Observed Mid-Latitude Water on Mars?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bish, D. L.; Vaniman, D. T.; Fialips, C.; Carey, J. W.; Feldman, W. C.

    2003-01-01

    Clays, zeolites, and Mg-sulfates are all phases that could potentially retain H2O in martian regolith. The nature of the hydrogen-containing material observed in the equatorial martian regolith is of particular importance to the question of whether hydrous minerals have formed in the past on Mars. Also, whether these minerals exist in a hydrated (i.e., containing H2O molecules in their structures) or dehydrated state is a crucial question. The purpose of this communication is to estimate the possible magnitude of the H2O reservoir constituted by these H2O-bearing minerals. In other words, can minerals containing H2O and/or OH such clays, zeolites, or Mg-sulfates, reasonably be expected to account for the amounts of near-equatorial H2O-equivalent hydrogen recently documented by Mars Odyssey?

  1. [Mineral-based alkaline waters' prescription in France: Patients are the key point for both nephrologists and urologists].

    PubMed

    Citarda, Salvatore; Hanf, William; Vrigneaud, Laurence; Bataille, Stanislas; Gosselin, Morgane; Beaume, Julie; Dariane, Charles; Madec, François-Xavier; Larceneux, Fabrice; Fiard, Gaëlle; Bertocchio, Jean-Philippe

    2016-02-01

    Alkali therapy is frequently used during chronic kidney disease and nephrolithiasis: nephrologists and urologists are the key operators. Very few is known about the underlying conditions of such a prescription: the aim of this study was to delineate those determinants. We conducted a prospective survey where French nephrologists and urologists were involved. Responders were without gender distinction and principally nephrologists. Prescription frequency was associated with gender (women), specialty (nephrologists), indications and perceived efficiency. Urologists prescribe more often during nephrolithiasis and nephrologists during chronic kidney disease. Urologists were more expert (by scoring on mineral-based alkaline waters compositions knowledge). By multivariate analysis, prescription frequency is associated with gender (women), indications and perceived efficiency by prescribers, which is itself influenced by feedback from patients. These results could have been influenced by a huge representation of nephrologists but foster physicians to go on listening to feedback from patients, due to a lack of clinical trials on the efficiency of mineral-based alkaline waters in such a field. Finally, physicians' education (especially young nephrologists) on mineral-based alkaline waters should be intensified. Copyright © 2015 Association Société de néphrologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Computer-aided comparison of protein electrophoretic patterns for grouping and identification of heterotrophic bacteria from mineral water.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, A C; Morais, P V; Gomes, C; da Costa, M S

    1996-05-01

    The microflora of a natural mineral water was studied immediately after bottling (T0) and after 7 d storage (T7) during 6 months, and isolates were clustered by SDS-PAGE of whole-cell protein profiles. Isolates from each cluster were further characterized by API 20NE, fatty acid composition and quinone profiles. The numerical analysis of the electrophoregrams of all bacteria isolated from the mineral water formed 15 clusters and five unclustered strains. Except for five minor clusters, all clusters were composed of strains isolated over several months. The numerical analysis of the electrophoregrams of bacteria isolated immediately after bottling formed 15 clusters while after 7 d storage only four of these populations could be isolated, indicating the populations present in the mineral water were stable and that changes occurring after bottling probably resulted from a selection process. Only one unclustered strain was identified simultaneously by all the systems, as Sphingomonas paucimobilis. The monitoring of the aquifer and the bottling system, and the construction of a large database with bacteria of the autochthonous flora allows the detection of alterations in the aquifer by changes in the microflora.

  3. Silicon-rich mineral water as a non-invasive test of the 'aluminum hypothesis' in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Davenward, Samantha; Bentham, Peter; Wright, Jan; Crome, Peter; Job, Deborah; Polwart, Anthony; Exley, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    There has been a plausible link between human exposure to aluminum and Alzheimer's disease for several decades. We contend that the only direct and ethically acceptable experimental test of the 'aluminum hypothesis', which would provide unequivocal data specific to the link, is to test the null hypothesis that a reduction in the body burden of aluminum to its lowest practical limit would have no influence upon the incidence, progression, or severity of Alzheimer's disease. Herein we are testing the hypothesis that silicon-rich mineral waters can be used as non-invasive methods to reduce the body burden of aluminum in individuals with Alzheimer's disease and a control group consisting of their carers and partners. We have shown that drinking up to 1 L of a silicon-rich mineral water each day for 12 weeks facilitated the removal of aluminum via the urine in both patient and control groups without any concomitant affect upon the urinary excretion of the essential metals, iron and copper. We have provided preliminary evidence that over 12 weeks of silicon-rich mineral water therapy the body burden of aluminum fell in individuals with Alzheimer's disease and, concomitantly, cognitive performance showed clinically relevant improvements in at least 3 out of 15 individuals. This is a first step in a much needed rigorous test of the 'aluminum hypothesis of Alzheimer's disease' and a longer term study involving many more individuals is now warranted.

  4. The relationships between two different drinking water fluoride levels, dental fluorosis and bone mineral density of children.

    PubMed

    Grobler, S R; Louw, A J; Chikte, U M E; Rossouw, R J; van W Kotze, T J

    2009-04-03

    This field study included the whole population of children aged 10-15 years (77 from a 0.19 mg/L F area; 89 from a 3.00 mg/L F area), with similar nutritional, dietary habits and similar ethnic and socioeconomic status. The fluoride concentration in the drinking water, the bone mineral content, the bone density and the degree of dental fluorosis were determined. The left radius was measured for bone width, bone mineral content, and bone mineral density. The mean fluorosis score was 1.3 in the low fluoride area and 3,6 in the high fluoride area. More than half the children in the low fluoride area had no fluorosis (scores 0 and 1) while only 5% in the high fluoride area had none. Severe fluorosis (30%) was only observed in the high fluoride area. The Wilcoxon Rank Sum Test indicated that fluorosis levels differed significantly (p < 0.05) between the two areas. No relationships were found between dental fluorosis and bone width or between fluorosis and bone mineral density in the two areas (Spearment Rank correlations). A significant increase in bone width was found with age but no differences amongst and boys and girls. A significant positive correlation was found in the high fluoride area between bone mineral density over age. In the 12-13 and 13-14 year age groups in the high fluoride area, girls had higher bone mineral densities. However, a significant negative correlation (p<0.02) was found for the low fluoride area (0.19 mg/L F) over age.

  5. Carbon mineralization and carbonate preservation in modern cold-water coral reef sediments on the Norwegian shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehrmann, L. M.; Knab, N. J.; Pirlet, H.; Unnithan, V.; Wild, C.; Ferdelman, T. G.

    2009-04-01

    Cold-water coral ecosystems are considered hot-spots of biodiversity and biomass production and may be a regionally important contributor to carbonate production. The impact of these ecosystems on biogeochemical processes and carbonate preservation in associated sediments were studied at Røst Reef and Traenadjupet Reef, two modern (post-glacial) cold-water coral reefs on the Mid-Norwegian shelf. Sulfate and iron reduction as well as carbonate dissolution and precipitation were investigated by combining pore-water geochemical profiles, steady state modeling, as well as solid phase analyses and sulfate reduction rate measurements on gravity cores of up to 3.25 m length. Low extents of sulfate depletion and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) production, combined with sulfate reduction rates not exceeding 3 nmol S cm-3 d-1, suggested that overall anaerobic carbon mineralization in the sediments was low. These data showed that the coral fragment-bearing siliciclastic sediments were effectively decoupled from the productive pelagic ecosystem by the complex reef surface framework. Organic matter being mineralized by sulfate reduction was calculated to consist of 57% carbon bound in CH2O groups and 43% carbon in -CH2- groups. Methane concentrations were below 1 μM, and failed to support the hypothesis of a linkage between the distribution of cold-water coral reefs and the presence of hydrocarbon seepage. Reductive iron oxide dissolution linked to microbial sulfate reduction buffered the pore-water carbonate system and inhibited acid-driven coral skeleton dissolution. A large pool of reactive iron was available leading to the formation of iron sulfide minerals. Constant pore-water Ca2+, Mg2+ and Sr2+ concentrations in most cores and decreasing Ca2+ and Sr2+ concentrations with depth in core 23-18 GC indicated diagenetic carbonate precipitation. This was consistent with the excellent preservation of buried coral fragments.

  6. Carbon mineralization and carbonate preservation in modern cold-water coral reef sediments on the Norwegian shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehrmann, L. M.; Knab, N. J.; Pirlet, H.; Unnithan, V.; Wild, C.; Ferdelman, T. G.

    2008-12-01

    Cold-water coral ecosystems are considered hot-spots of biodiversity and biomass production and may be a regionally important contributor to carbonate production. The impact of these ecosystems on biogeochemical processes and carbonate preservation in associated sediments were studied at Røst Reef and Traenadjupet Reef, two modern (post-glacial) cold-water coral reefs on the Mid-Norwegian shelf. Sulfate and iron reduction as well as carbonate dissolution and precipitation were investigated by combining pore-water geochemical profiles, steady state modeling, as well as solid phase analyses and sulfate reduction rate measurements on gravity cores of up to 3.2 m length. Low extents of sulfate depletion and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) production, combined with sulfate reduction rates not exceeding 3 nmolS cm-3 d-1, suggested that overall anaerobic carbon mineralization in the sediments was low. These data showed that the coral fragment-bearing siliciclastic sediments were effectively decoupled from the productive pelagic ecosystem by the complex reef surface framework. Organic matter being mineralized by sulfate reduction was calculated to consist of 57% carbon bound in -CH2O- groups and 43% carbon in -CH2- groups. Methane concentrations were below 1 μM, and failed to support the hypothesis of a linkage between the distribution of cold-water coral reefs and the presence of hydrocarbon seepage. Iron reduction linked to microbial sulfate reduction buffered the pore-water carbonate system and inhibited acid driven coral skeleton dissolution. A large pool of reactive iron was available leading to the formation of iron sulfide minerals. Constant pore-water Ca2+, Mg2+ and Sr2+ concentrations in most cores and decreasing Ca2+ and Sr2+ concentrations with depth in core 23-18 GC indicated diagenetic carbonate precipitation. This was consistent with the excellent preservation of buried coral fragments.

  7. [Prevention of early post-stress disorders in rat testicles under effect of drinking sulfate mineral water containing zinc and silicium].

    PubMed

    Korolev, Iu N; Nikulina, L A; Geniatulina, M S; Mikhaĭlik, L V; Bobkova, A S

    2011-01-01

    Experiments performed on outbred male rats have demonstrated that consumption of drinking sulfate mineral water containing microelements (zinc and silicium) considerably slows down the development of stress-induced pathological changes in the testicles compared with the action of pure mineral water containing no admixtures. This finding confirms the important role of zinc and silicon in combination with the ion-salt base of mineral water in the enhancement of the efficacy of the adaptive and protective reactions in the testicles during the early post-stress period.

  8. Assessing Water Management of Mining Effluent Using Temporal and Spatial Hydrologic Analyses: The Case of QIT Madagascar Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoagland, N. E.

    2013-12-01

    Associated with the commencement of any water-intensive mining operation is the formation of a set of policies, standards, and sampling protocols that guide the management of all water resources connected to the mining facility, surrounding environment, and affected communities. This study explores the interface between corporate water management and hydrologic methods by evaluating changes in water quality over the course of the mining cycle at QIT Madagascar Minerals (QMM) in Tolagnaro, Madagascar. Sampling and lab research of processed water were conducted following established QMM procedures and then analyzed in conjunction with the complete QMM water quality database. Water quality was analyzed spatially to exhibit how processed water changes as it moves throughout the mining cycle before release into the environment. Graphical representation of the spatial changes in various parameters exhibit deterioration in water quality relative to the source, improvement in quality before being released as effluent, and natural remediation by wetlands before discharge into the Mandromondromotra River. In addition, water quality parameters were evaluated temporally, using data supplied by QMM's Service de l'Eau et Déchets. Yearly and monthly comparisons of hydrological parameters highlight data gaps, the effects of seasonality, and the evolution of water quality monitoring at QMM. Technical evaluation of processed water as it flows through the mining system provides insight into how water monitoring and management can best be adapted at the corporate level to prevent negative impacts on the environment. Water quality data for various parameters from April 2013 at each of the sampling locations. The graphs highlight spatial changes in parameters as water moves from the sources (WD90, Paddock 3), to sites on the mine (500M, Basmin, SCC2), to release points (WMC703, WMC803), to discharge points into the MMM River.

  9. Micron-scale Mineral Heterogeneity as a Controlling Factor for Surfactant Adsorption and Water Imbibition in Fractured Shale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, B. R.; Das, S.

    2016-12-01

    This study presents results from a comprehensive analysis of mixed charge surfactants in altering surface properties and water imbibition in fractured shales. Contact angle and surface tension measurements were used to study the change in wettability of Marcellus shale due to interaction with two commonly used surfactants in hydraulic fracturing completion fluids: cationic octadecyl trimethyl ammonium chloride (OTAC) and anionic ammonium Dodecyl Sulfate (ADS). Contact angle measurements of mixed charge surfactant solutions on Marcellus shale samples demonstrate a synergistic interaction of the cationic and anionic surfactants in modifying shale wettability toward a less water-wet state at surfactant concentrations below critical micelle concentration. The role of mineral heterogeneity as a controlling factor for the adsorption mechanism of mixed surfactants in hydraulically fractured shale reservoirs is explored via a combination of atomic and kelvin probe force microscopy. To further explore the impact of mixed surfactant solutions on water uptake in shale gas reservoirs, neutron imaging was used to quantify the rate of water imbibition in fractured shales exposed to a range of surfactant solutions and total surfactant concentrations. Results indicate that mixed charge surfactant solutions can serve to both reduce surface tension and shift shale wettability toward less water-wet conditions due to interaction with positive and negatively charged mineral surfaces in shales. Both of these effects can lead to enhanced natural gas relative permeability and may be associated with observed gas production trends when hydraulic fracturing fluids contain mixed charge surfactant additives.

  10. Influence of mineral colloids and humic substances on uranium(VI) transport in water-saturated geologic porous media.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing; Cheng, Tao; Wu, Yang

    2014-12-01

    Mineral colloids and humic substances often co-exist in subsurface environment and substantially influence uranium (U) transport. However, the combined effects of mineral colloids and humic substances on U transport are not clear. This study is aimed at quantifying U transport and elucidating geochemical processes that control U transport when both mineral colloids and humic acid (HA) are present. U-spiked solutions/suspensions were injected into water-saturated sand columns, and U and colloid concentrations in column effluent were monitored. We found that HA promoted U transport via (i) formation of aqueous U-HA complexes, and (ii) competition against aqueous U for surface sites on transport media. Illite colloids had no influence on U transport at pH5 in the absence of HA due to low mobility of the colloids. At pH9, U desorbed from mobile illite and the presence of illite decreased U transport. At pH5, high U transport occurred when both illite colloids and HA were present, which was attributed to enhanced U adsorption to illite colloids via formation of ternary illite-HA-U surface complexes, and enhanced illite transport due to HA attachment to illite and transport media. This study demonstrates that the combined effects of mineral colloids and HA on contaminant transport is different from simple addition of the individual effect. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Bioelectro-Fenton: A sustainable integrated process for removal of organic pollutants from water: Application to mineralization of metoprolol.

    PubMed

    Olvera-Vargas, Hugo; Cocerva, Tatiana; Oturan, Nihal; Buisson, Didier; Oturan, Mehmet A

    2016-12-05

    The relevant environmental hazard related to the presence of pharmaceuticals in water sources requires the development of high effective and suitable wastewater treatment technologies. In the present work, a hybrid process coupling electro-Fenton (EF) process and aerobic biological treatment (Bio-EF process) was implemented for the efficient and cost-effective mineralization of beta-blocker metoprolol (MPTL) aqueous solutions. Firstly, operating factors influencing EF process were assessed. MTPL solutions were completely mineralized after 4h-electrolysis under optimal operating conditions and BDD anode demonstrated its oxidation superiority. The absolute rate constant of MTPL oxidation byOH (kMTPL) was determined by the competition kinetics method and found to be (1.72±0.04)×10(9)M(-1)s(-1). A reaction pathway for the mineralization of the drug was proposed based on the identification of oxidation by-products. Secondly, EF process was used as pre-treatment. An increase of BOD5/COD ratio from 0.012 to 0.44 was obtained after 1h EF treatment, along with 47% TOC removal and a significant decrease of toxicity, demonstrating the feasibility of a post-biological treatment. Finally, biological treatment successfully oxidized 43% of the total TOC content. An overall 90% mineralization of MPTL solutions was achieved by the Bio-EF process, demonstrating its potentiality for treating wastewater containing pharmaceutical residues.

  12. Interaction among minerals, organics and water in comets: insights from Antarctic micrometeorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagahara, Hiroko; Noguchi, Takaaki; Yabuta, Hikaru; Itoh, Shoichi; Sakamoto, Naoya; Mitsunari, Takuya; Okubo, Aya; Okazaki, Ryuji; Nakamura, Tomoki; Tachibana, Shogo; Terada, Kentaro; Ebihara, Mitsuru; Imae, Naoya; Kimura, Makoto

    2016-04-01

    supplied from organics or carbon dioxide and/or methane ice. Finally, the assemblage of micrometeorites becomes Mg-saponite, magnetite, and carbonates, of which mineral assemblage and chemical compositions are very similar to those of primitive carbonaceous chondrites. Stages I and II should have taken place at ~0 °C and almost instantaneously, probably in hours to days, in order to prevent total aqueous alteration of silicates. Therefore, most plausible process would be transient heat-ing by an impact. On the other hand, Stage III was at a little higher temperature in order to homogenize Mg and Fe in heterogeneous phyllosilicates and/or lasted for a little longer duration. A possible process may be either by a shock or approaching of cometary bodies to the Sun. However, we should evaluate the temperature and dura-tion very carefully, because the Rosetta mission showed us extremely porous nature of comets. It should be noted that the final products of aqueous reactions shown in the present study are the same as those of primitive carbonaceous chondrites. More compact nature of chondrites and probably higher temperature by short-lived radio-isotopes resulted in pervasive water flow in the bodies and through alteration of silicates into phyllosilicates.

  13. Effects of mineral composition of drinking water on risk for stone formation and bone metabolism in idiopathic calcium nephrolithiasis.

    PubMed

    Marangella, M; Vitale, C; Petrarulo, M; Rovera, L; Dutto, F

    1996-09-01

    1. To assess whether the mineral content of drinking water influences both risk of stone formation and bone metabolism in idiopathic calcium nephrolithiasis, 21 patients were switched from their usual home diets to a 10 mmol calcium, low-oxalate, protein-controlled diet, supplemented with 21 of three different types of mineral water. Drinking water added 1, 6 and 20 mmol of calcium and 0.5, 10 and 50 mmol of bicarbonate respectively to the controlled diet. 2. The three controlled study periods lasted 1 month each and were separated by a 20 day washout interval. Blood and urine chemistries, including intact parathyroid hormone, calcitriol and two markers of bone resorption, were performed at the end of each study period. The stone-forming risk was assessed by calculating urine saturation with calcium oxalate (beta CaOx), calcium phosphate (beta bsh) and uric acid (beta UA). 3. The addition of any mineral water produced the expected increase in urine output and was associated with similar decreases in beta CaOx and beta UA, whereas beta bsh varied marginally. These equal decreases in beta CaOx, however, resulted from peculiar changes in calcium, oxalate and citrate excretion during each study period. The increase in overall calcium intake due to different drinking water induced modest increases in calcium excretion, whereas oxalate excretion tended to decrease. The changes in oxalate excretion during any one study period compared with another were significantly related to those in calcium intake. Citrate excretion was significantly higher with the high-calcium, alkaline water. 4. Parathyroid hormone, calcitriol and markers of bone resorption increased when patients were changed from the high-calcium, alkaline to the low-calcium drinking water. 5. We suggest that overall calcium intake may be tailored by supplying calcium in drinking water. Adverse effects on bone turnover with low-calcium diets can be prevented by giving high-calcium, alkaline drinking water, and the

  14. Identification of Cryptosporidium spp. Oocysts in United Kingdom Noncarbonated Natural Mineral Waters and Drinking Waters by Using a Modified Nested PCR-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism Assay

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, R. A. B.; Campbell, B. M.; Smith, H. V.

    2003-01-01

    We describe a nested PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) method for detecting low densities of Cryptosporidium spp. oocysts in natural mineral waters and drinking waters. Oocysts were recovered from seeded 1-liter volumes of mineral water by filtration through polycarbonate membranes and from drinking waters by filtration, immunomagnetizable separation, and filter entrapment, followed by direct extraction of DNA. The DNA was released from polycarbonate filter-entrapped oocysts by disruption in lysis buffer by using 15 cycles of freeze-thawing (1 min in liquid nitrogen and 1 min at 65°C), followed by proteinase K digestion. Amplicons were readily detected from two to five intact oocysts on ethidium bromide-stained gels. DNA extracted from Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts, C. muris (RN 66), C. baileyi (Belgium strain, LB 19), human-derived C. meleagridis, C. felis (DNA from oocysts isolated from a cat), and C. andersoni was used to demonstrate species identity by PCR-RFLP after simultaneous digestion with the restriction enzymes DraI and VspI. Discrimination between C. andersoni and C. muris isolates was confirmed by a separate, subsequent digestion with DdeI. Of 14 drinking water samples tested, 12 were found to be positive by microscopy, 8 were found to be positive by direct PCR, and 14 were found to be positive by using a nested PCR. The Cryptosporidium species detected in these finished water samples was C. parvum genotype 1. This method consistently and routinely detected >5 oocysts per sample. PMID:12839797

  15. TiO2-promoted mineralization of organic sunscreens in water suspension and sodium dodecyl sulfate micelles.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Andrea; Chrétien, Michelle N; Maretti, Luca; Scaiano, J C

    2003-05-01

    The photostability of the widely used UVB sunscreen agents 2'-ethylhexyl-2-cyano-3-phenylcinnamate (1), 2-hydroxy-4-methoxybenzophenone (2), octyl salicilate (3), and 2'-ethylhexyl-4-methoxycinnamate (4) has been investigated under UVA irradiation in the absence and presence of TiO2, an inorganic filter commonly employed in combination with organic filters in sunscreen preparations. In the absence of TiO2, 1-3 are photostable and 4 undergoes the expected E-Z isomerization; the presence of TiO2 caused mineralization of the organic filters and, surprisingly, the process is noticeably faster in the presence of surfactant than in sunscreen and water suspensions. The results indicate that in water suspension, mineralization is likely to occur on or near the TiO2 particle surface; when the organic sunscreens are segregated in the micelle core, reactive radicals, produced during TiO2-promoted degradation of the micellar system, may participate in sunscreen degradation. In addition, a pre-fluorescent probe for carbon-centered radical detection, 4-(3-hydroxy-2-methyl-4-quinolineoxy)-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl free radical or QT (5), was employed to demonstrate that carbon-centered radicals are evolved during micelle degradation and may participate in the mineralization of sunscreens.

  16. Effect of mineral and organic fertilization on grey water footprint in a fertirrigated crop under semiarid conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellanos Serrano, María Teresa; Requejo Mariscal, María Isabel; Cartagena Causapé, María Carmen; Arce Martínez, Augusto; Ribas Elcorobarrutia, Francisco; Jesús Cabello Cabello, María; María Tarquis Alfonso, Ana

    2016-04-01

    The concept of "water footprint" (WF) was introduced as an indicator for the total volume of direct and indirect freshwater used, consumed and/or polluted [1]. The WF distinguishes between blue water (volume of surface and groundwater consumed), green water (rain-water consumed), and grey water (volume of freshwater that is required to assimilate the load of pollutants based on existing ambient water quality standards). In semiarid scenarios with low water quality, where the irrigation is necessary to maintain production, green WF is zero because the effective rainfall is negligible. As well as blue WF includes: i) extra consumption or irrigation water that the farmer has to apply to compensate the fail of uniformity on discharge of drips, ii) percolation out of control or salts leaching, which depends on the salt tolerance of the crop, soil and quality of irrigation water, to ensure the fruit yield. The major concern is grey WF, because the irrigation and nitrogen dose have to be adjusted to the crop needs in order to minimize nitrate pollution. This study is focused in assessment mineral and organic fertilization on grey WF in a fertirrigated melon crop under semiarid conditions, which is principally cultivated in the centre of Spain declared vulnerable zone to nitrate pollution by applying the Directive 91/676/CEE. During successive years, a melon crop (Cucumis melo L.) was grown under field conditions. Different doses of ammonium nitrate were used as well as compost derived from the wine-distillery industry which is relevant in this area. Acknowledgements: This project has been supported by INIA-RTA04-111-C3 and INIA-RTA2010-00110-C03. Keywords: Water footprint, nitrogen, fertirrigation, inorganic fertilizers, organic amendments, semiarid conditions. [1] Hoekstra, A.Y. 2003. Virtual water trade. Proceedings of the International Expert Meeting on Virtual Water Trade, Delft, The Netherlands, 12-13 December 2002. Value of Water Research Report Series No. 12

  17. Water Quality Evaluation of PET Bottled Water by Mineral Balance in the Northeast Asian Region: A Case Study of South Korea

    PubMed Central

    Houri, Daisuke; Koo, Chung Mo

    2015-01-01

    Background The past few years have seen a demand for drinking water in contemporary society with a focus on safety and taste. Mineral water is now marketed as a popular commercial product and, partly due to health concerns, the production. Methods For the study, a comparison was carried out of water samples from 9 types of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) bottled water sold in South Korea as well as from tap water in the cities of Seoul and Chuncheon. These were compared with samples of Japanese PET bottled water in order to determine shared commonalities and identify individual characteristics. To evaluate water quality objectively, we quantified the elements contained in the water samples. Samples were assessed not with the usual sensory evaluation but with the evaluation approach advocated by Hashimoto et al. which employs the Water Index of Taste and the Water Index of Health. The levels of water quality obtained were compared with the “Prerequisites for Tasty Water” and the “Standards for Tasty Water” devised for city water. Results The PET Bottled water varieties analyzed in this study—Seoksu, Icis, Bong Pyong, Soon Soo 100, Dong Won Saem Mul, GI JANG SOO and DIAMOND—showed the Water Index of Taste ≥ 2.0 and the Water Index of Health ≥ 5.2, which we classified as tasty/healthy water. SamDaSoo and NamiNeral can be classified as tasty water due to their values of the Water Index of Taste ≥ 2.0 and the Water Index of Health < 5.2. Conclusion The South Korean PET bottled water studied here fulfills the “Water Index of Taste,” “Water Index of Health,” “Standard for Tasty Water” and “Prerequisites for Tasty Water” that Japanese people value for city water. We can conclude that bottled water which meets water quality requirements will be considered good-tasting by a majority of people. PMID:26538797

  18. Crystal chemistry of hydroxyl and water in silicate minerals. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Smyth, J.R.

    1998-06-01

    This was a project to investigate the crystal chemistry of OH and H{sub 2}O substitution in silicate minerals by use of X-ray and neutron diffraction methods combined with IR spectroscopy and to interpret and generalize the results using an electrostatic model for these mineral structures. Using these data together with published H position data electrostatic parameters for H sites were calculated from a simple electrostatic model. The data were then used to refine the model for incorporation of H into the wadsleyite structure. This has led to recent work on the synthesis and characterization of hydrous wadsleyites.

  19. Total counts, culturable and viable, and non-culturable microflora of a French mineral water: a case study.

    PubMed

    Defives, C; Guyard, S; Oularé, M M; Mary, P; Hornez, J P

    1999-06-01

    The changes in bacterial counts during the storage of a natural mineral water from a French spring were studied. Samples were taken from the spring and the bottling line. Viable cultivable (VC) bacteria were counted on R2A medium. Total counts, viable and dead bacteria were counted using the LIVE/DEAD Bac Light VIABILITY kit and epifluorescence microscopy. Viable but non-cultivable (VNC) bacteria were estimated by difference between viable and VC counts. Isolates were clustered by phenotype. The microflora in the spring water increased from < 10-3 x 10(5) bacteria ml-1 after 6 d in storage and then stabilized. Mechanical bottling increased the allochthonous bacteria in the water that stabilized at 10(5) bacteria ml-1. Maximal growth is controlled by the low concentration of nutrients in the mineral water and the lysis of dead cells. The allochthonous bacteria came from the aquifer and colonized the filling line. The changes in the VC and VNC populations showed that the bacteria used starvation-survival and entry into the VNC state to adapt to the bottling stress and the enclosed oligotrophic environment.

  20. Atmospheric CH4 oxidation by Arctic permafrost and mineral cryosols as a function of water saturation and temperature.

    PubMed

    Stackhouse, B; Lau, M C Y; Vishnivetskaya, T; Burton, N; Wang, R; Southworth, A; Whyte, L; Onstott, T C

    2017-01-01

    The response of methanotrophic bacteria capable of oxidizing atmospheric CH4 to climate warming is poorly understood, especially for those present in Arctic mineral cryosols. The atmospheric CH4 oxidation rates were measured in microcosms incubated at 4 °C and 10 °C along a 1-m depth profile and over a range of water saturation conditions for mineral cryosols containing type I and type II methanotrophs from Axel Heiberg Island (AHI), Nunavut, Canada. The cryosols exhibited net consumption of ~2 ppmv CH4 under all conditions, including during anaerobic incubations. Methane oxidation rates increased with temperature and decreased with increasing water saturation and depth, exhibiting the highest rates at 10 °C and 33% saturation at 5 cm depth (260 ± 60 pmol CH4 gdw(-1) d(-1) ). Extrapolation of the CH4 oxidation rates to the field yields net CH4 uptake fluxes ranging from 11 to 73 μmol CH4  m(-2) d(-1) , which are comparable to field measurements. Stable isotope mass balance indicates ~50% of the oxidized CH4 is incorporated into the biomass regardless of temperature or saturation. Future atmospheric CH4 uptake rates at AHI with increasing temperatures will be determined by the interplay of increasing CH4 oxidation rates vs. water saturation and the depth to the water table during summer thaw. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Sulfates and Other Hydrated Minerals in Ius Chasma, Valles Marineris and Implications for Water Geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roach, L. H.; Mustard, J. F.; Murchie, S. L.; Milliken, R. E.; Crowley, J. K.; Bishop, J. L.; Arvidson, R. E.

    2008-12-01

    Ius Chasma is a linear trough in western Valles Marineris containing horst and graben structures, multiple landslides, and light-toned floor deposits. Elsewhere is Valles Marineris, sulfate deposits identified by OMEGA and CRISM are restricted to Interior Layered Deposits or nearby autochthonous loose material (Gendrin et al., 2005; Murchie et al., 2007; Murchie et al., in revision). In Ius Chasma, however, sulfates are found in thin floor units in enclosed depressions at the lowest elevations. Kieserite is at the lowest elevation, with polyhydrated sulfate and an unidentified hydrated phase, at higher elevations. Some poorly defined layering is visible on the HiRISE scale, but is not diagnostic. The total exposed thickness of kieserite is 300 m, with a total range in elevation of -4175 to -4475 m. The kieserite deposit is covered in places by pyroxene-bearing dunes. The polyhydrated sulfate outcrops range from -3515 to -4000 m. The unidentified hydrated phase outcrops between -3770 to -4100 m. The polyhydrated sulfate and unidentified hydrated material occur at the same elevations and do not have a clear stratigraphic relationship. Elsewhere in Ius Chasma, the unidentified hydrated material clearly drapes chasma floor units. The unidentified hydrated material is characterized by absorptions near 1.4 and 1.9 μm, and a narrow doublet at 2.21 and 2.27 μm. The deep ~1.9 μm is due to the combination tone of the OH stretch and H2O bend and the ~1.4 μm absorption is due to the 1st overtone of the OH stretch. Sulfates or other minerals with 2 or more water molecules per unit cell in their structure are necessary to account for deep water and hydroxyl absorptions in many spectra we observe. The doublet doesn't match any known sulfate, phyllosilicate, chloride, hydrated silica library spectra. Possibly a mixture of hydrated phases could explain this phase. The 2.21-2.26 μm region is generally convex in sulfates, but gypsum (CaSO4 2H2O ) and jarosite group members (MFe3

  2. Carbonation of Clay Minerals Exposed to scCO2/Water at 200 degrees and 250 degrees C

    SciTech Connect

    Sugama, T.; Ecker, L.; Gill, S.; Butcher, T.; Bour, D.

    2010-11-01

    To clarify the mechanisms of carbonation of clay minerals, such as bentonite, kaolinite, and soft clay, we exposed them to supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2)/water at temperatures of 200 and 250 C and pressures of 1500 and 2000 psi for 72- and 107-hours. Bentonite, comprising three crystalline phases, montmorillonite (MMT), anorthoclase-type albite, and quartz was susceptible to reactions with ionic carbonic acid yielded by the interactions between scCO2 and water, particularly MMT and anorthoclase-type albite phases. For MMT, the cation-exchangeable ions, such as Na+ and Ca2+, present in its basal interplanar space, were replaced by proton, H+, from ionic carbonic acid; thereafter, the cations leaching from MMT directly reacted with CO32- as a counter ion of H+ to form carbonate compounds. Such in-situ carbonation process in basal space caused the shrinkage and breakage of the spacing structure within MMT. In contrast, the wet carbonation of anorthoclase-type albite, categorized as rock minerals, entailed the formation of three amorphous by-products, such as carbonates, kaolinite-like compounds, and silicon dioxide. Together, these two different carbonations caused the disintegration and corruption of bentonite. Kaolinite clay containing the amorphous carbonates and silicon dioxide was inert to wet carbonation. We noted only a gain in weight due to its water uptake, suggesting that kaolinite-like by-products generated by the wet carbonation of rock minerals might remain unchanged even during extended exposure. Soft clay consisting of two crystalline phases, dolomite and silicon dioxide, also was unaltered by wet carbonation, despite the uptake of water.

  3. Self-assembled biomimetic superhydrophobic CaCO3 coating inspired from fouling mineralization in geothermal water.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gong G; Zhu, Li Q; Liu, Hui C; Li, Wei P

    2011-10-18

    Inspired from fouling self-mineralization in geothermal water, a novel biomimetic cactuslike CaCO(3) coating with superhydrophobic features is reported in this letter. The structure, morphologies, and phases of the CaCO(3) coating were characterized by X-ray diffractometry, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and infrared spectrophotometry. After prenucleation treatment, a continuous cactuslike CaCO(3) coating with hierarchical nano- and microstructures was self-assembled on stainless steel surfaces after immersion in simulated geothermal water at 50 °C for 48 h. After being modified with a low-surface-energy monolayer of sodium stearate, the as-prepared coating exhibited superhydrophobic properties with a water contact angle of 158.9° and a sliding angle of 2°. Therefore, this work might open up a new application field of geothermal resources and provide insight into designing multidimensional structures with functional applications, including superhydrophobic surfaces. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  4. Experiment and simulation study on the effects of cement minerals on the water-rock-CO2 interaction during CO2 geological storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, N.; Cheng, J.

    2016-12-01

    The CO2 geological storage is one of the most promising technology to mitigate CO2 emission. The fate of CO2 underground is dramatically affected by the CO2-water-rock interaction, which are mainly dependent on the initial aquifer mineralogy and brine components. The cement minerals are common materials in sandstone reservoir but few attention has been paid for its effects on CO2-water-rock interaction. Five batch reactions, in which 5% cement minerals were assigned to be quartz, calcite, dolomite, chlorite and Ca-montmorillonite, respectively, were conducted to understanding the cement minerals behaviors and its corresponding effects on the matrix minerals alterations during CO2 geological storage. Pure mineral powders were selected to mix and assemble the 'sandstone rock' with different cement components meanwhile keeping the matrix minerals same for each group as 70% quartz, 20% K-feldspar and 5% albite. These `rock' reacted with 750ml deionized water and CO2 under 180° and 18MPa for 15 days, during which the water chemistry evolution and minerals surface micromorphology changes has been monitored. The minerals saturation indexes calculation and phase diagram as well as the kinetic models were made by PHREEQC to uncover the minerals reaction paths. The experiment results indicated that the quartz got less eroded, on the contrary, K-feldspar and albite continuously dissolved to favor the gibbsite and kaolinite precipitations. The carbonates cement minerals quickly dissolved to reach equilibrium with the pH buffered and in turn suppressed the alkali feldspar dissolutions. No carbonates minerals precipitations occurred until the end of reactions for all groups. The simulation results were basically consistent with the experiment record but failed to simulate the non-stoichiometric reactions and the minerals kinetic rates seemed underestimated at the early stage of reactions. The cement minerals significantly dominated the reaction paths during CO2 geological

  5. Mineralizing urban net-zero water treatment: Phase II field results and design recommendations

    EPA Science Inventory

    Net-zero water (NZW) systems, or water management systems achieving high recycling rates and low residuals generation so as to avoid water import and export, can also conserve energy used to heat and convey water, while economically restoring local eco-hydrology. However, design ...

  6. Deficit irrigation and rootstock: their effects on water relations, vegetative development, yield, fruit quality and mineral nutrition of Clemenules mandarin.

    PubMed

    Romero, P; Navarro, J M; Pérez-Pérez, J; García-Sánchez, F; Gómez-Gómez, A; Porras, I; Martinez, V; Botía, P

    2006-12-01

    Differences between rootstocks, 'Cleopatra' mandarin and 'Carrizo' citrange, in soil-plant water relations and the influence of these factors on vigor, crop yield, fruit quality and mineral nutrition were evaluated in field-grown Clemenules mandarin trees irrigated at 100% of potential seasonal evaporation (ET(c)) (control treatment), or irrigated at 100% ET(c), except during Phases I and III of fruit growth and post-harvest when no irrigation was applied (deficit irrigation (DI) treatment), for 3 years. Differences between rootstocks in plant-soil water relations were the primary cause of differences among trees in vegetative development and fruit yield. After 3 years of DI treatment, trees on 'Cleopatra' showed more efficient soil water extraction than trees on 'Carrizo', and maintained a higher plant water status, a higher gas exchange rate during periods of water stress and achieved faster recovery in gas exchange following irrigation after water stress. The DI treatment reduced vegetative development more in trees on 'Carrizo' than in trees on 'Cleopatra'. Cumulative fruit yield decreased more in DI trees on 'Carrizo' (40%) than on 'Cleopatra' (27%). The yield component most affected by DI in 'Cleopatra' was the number of fruit, whereas in 'Carrizo' it depended on the severity of water stress reached in each phase (severe water stress in Phase I affected mainly the number of fruit, whereas it affected fruit size the most in Phase III). In the third year of DI treatment,