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Sample records for low-intensity pulsed ultrasound

  1. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound in dentofacial tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Eiji; Kuroda, Shingo; Horiuchi, Shinya; Tabata, Akira; El-Bialy, Tarek

    2015-04-01

    Oral and maxillofacial diseases affect millions of people worldwide and hence tissue engineering can be considered an interesting and clinically relevant approach to regenerate orofacial tissues after being affected by different diseases. Among several innovations for tissue regeneration, low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) has been used extensively in medicine as a therapeutic, operative, and diagnostic tool. LIPUS is accepted to promote bone fracture repair and regeneration. Furthermore, the effect of LIPUS on soft tissues regeneration has been paid much attention, and many studies have performed to evaluate the potential use of LIPUS to tissue engineering soft tissues. The present article provides an overview about the status of LIPUS stimulation as a tool to be used to enhance regeneration/tissue engineering. This review consists of five parts. Part 1 is a brief introduction of the acoustic description of LIPUS and mechanical action. In Part 2, biological problems in dentofacial tissue engineering are proposed. Part 3 explores biologic mechanisms of LIPUS to cells and tissues in living body. In Part 4, the effectiveness of LIPUS on cell metabolism and tissue regeneration in dentistry are summarized. Finally, Part 5 relates the possibility of clinical application of LIPUS in orthodontics. The present review brings out better understanding of the bioeffect of LIPUS therapy on orofacial tissues which is essential to the successful integration of management remedies for tissue regeneration/engineering. To develop an evidence-based approach to clinical management and treatment of orofacial degenerative diseases using LIPUS, we would like to be in full pursuit of LIPUS biotherapy. Still, there are many challenges for this relatively new strategy, but the up to date achievements using it promises to go far beyond the present possibilities.

  2. [Contribution of low-intensity pulsed ultrasounds to bone regeneration].

    PubMed

    Gleizal, A; Lavandier, B; Paris, M; Béra, J-C

    2011-09-01

    A maxillo-facial surgeon manages patients with bone defects due to trauma, malformations or of iatrogenic origin. The surgical management has potentially deleterious effects and its cost for society is increasing. Hence, it is crucial to develop techniques stimulating bone growth, stimulating the regeneration of a fracture or filling bone deficit. Ultrasounds (US), vibrations of the same nature as sound but with frequencies above the highest audible frequency for men (above 20 kHz), are used in many fields, particularly in medicine, usually at frequencies of around 0.5 to 5 MHz (million cycles per second). Their biological effects are not fully understood yet, but it is well known that US have effects on organic tissues when their mechanical energy is converted into thermic energy. These effects induce vasodilation and modification of membrane permeability. Several publications present the benefit of US for the stimulation of bone regeneration after a fracture. We present an overview of current knowledge on the effect of pulsed ultrasound on craniofacial bone regeneration, with study results conducted within Inserm unit U1032 in Lyon, the current reference lab on this issue. PMID:21820690

  3. Efficacy of pulsed low-intensity ultrasound in wound healing: a single-case design.

    PubMed

    Selkowitz, David M; Cameron, Michelle H; Mainzer, Aleah; Wolfe, Ron

    2002-04-01

    Therapeutic ultrasound is used clinically to enhance healing of pressure ulcers. Limited clinical research is available and no consensus exists regarding the efficacy of ultrasound for treating pressure ulcers, particularly full-thickness pressure ulcers, in the elderly. To assess the efficacy of pulsed low-intensity ultrasound on wound healing, a double-blind, single-case, baseline-AB study was conducted. The participant, a patient in a skilled nursing facility, was a 75-year-old woman with a Stage III pressure ulcer over the coccyx. Pulsed low-intensity ultrasound was compared to placebo ultrasound. After the 1-week baseline period, each ultrasound treatment was administered 5 days a week for two consecutive weeks. Throughout the baseline and ultrasound treatment periods, the patient additionally received the standard wound care treatment program at the facility. The rate of wound surface area reduction was used as the measure of wound healing. Healing was significantly faster (P = 0.001) during the pulsed low-intensity ultrasound period (34.0 mm2/day) compared to the placebo ultrasound period (12.6 mm2/day), but was significantly faster (P = 0.001) during the baseline period (50.8 mm2/day) compared to the pulsed low-intensity ultrasound period. Healing in this patient was faster than rates noted in the literature under similar conditions. The precise effect of either ultrasound intervention in this study could not be determined. Neither pulsed low-intensity ultrasound nor placebo ultrasound likely had an appreciable effect on healing of this patient's pressure ulcer beyond that of the standard-care protocol.

  4. Effects of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound on wound healing in corneas of dogs following keratoplasty.

    PubMed

    Vicenti, F A M; Laus, J L; Costa Neto, J M; Talieri, I C; Campos, C F; Jorge, A T; Ferreira, A L; Fantinatti, A P

    2003-09-01

    The effects of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound on wound healing were evaluated at the graft-cornea transition in dogs following lamellar keratoplasty using tunica vaginalis preserved in 98% glycerin. Twenty-one dogs were subdivided into three groups of seven animals. The first group (W/US) received daily treatment of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (20 mW/cm2) for 15 min for the first 10 days post surgery. The second group (N/US) was submitted to the same procedure but with the ultrasound apparatus turned off. The third group, the control (CO), underwent the surgical procedure only. The animals were clinically evaluated during the initial (1-15 days), intermediate (16-30 days) and late (31-120 days) postoperative period. The corneas were evaluated by light microscopy at 1, 3, 7, 15, 30, 60 and 120 days after surgery. Clinically, there were no differences which would promote an advantage to any of the treatments. Light microscopy, however, revealed more extensive vascularization and more advanced wound healing in the W/US group, as well as a tendency towards early graft incorporation. Based on the present results, low-intensity pulsed ultrasound shows advantages, especially in situations where trophic support is a mandatory condition, facilitating better graft incorporation and rapid recovery of stromal organization.

  5. Clinical applications of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound and its potential role in urology.

    PubMed

    Xin, Zhongcheng; Lin, Guiting; Lei, Hongen; Lue, Tom F; Guo, Yinglu

    2016-04-01

    Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) is a form of ultrasound that delivered at a much lower intensity (<3 W/cm(2)) than traditional ultrasound energy and output in the mode of pulse wave, and it is typically used for therapeutic purpose in rehabilitation medicine. LIPUS has minimal thermal effects due to its low intensity and pulsed output mode, and its non-thermal effects which is normally claimed to induce therapeutic changes in tissues attract most researchers' attentions. LIPUS have been demonstrated to have a rage of biological effects on tissues, including promoting bone-fracture healing, accelerating soft-tissue regeneration, inhibiting inflammatory responses and so on. Recent studies showed that biological effects of LIPUS in healing morbid body tissues may be mainly associated with the upregulation of cell proliferation through activation of integrin receptors and Rho/ROCK/Src/ERK signaling pathway, and with promoting multilineage differentiation of mesenchyme stem/progenitor cell lines through ROCK-Cot/Tpl2-MEK-ERK signaling pathway. Hopefully, LIPUS may become an effective clinical procedure for the treatment of urological diseases, such as chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS), erectile dysfunction (ED), and stress urinary incontinence (SUI) in the field of urology. It still needs an intense effort for basic-science and clinical investigators to explore the biomedical applications of ultrasound.

  6. Clinical applications of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound and its potential role in urology

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Guiting; Lei, Hongen; Lue, Tom F.; Guo, Yinglu

    2016-01-01

    Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) is a form of ultrasound that delivered at a much lower intensity (<3 W/cm2) than traditional ultrasound energy and output in the mode of pulse wave, and it is typically used for therapeutic purpose in rehabilitation medicine. LIPUS has minimal thermal effects due to its low intensity and pulsed output mode, and its non-thermal effects which is normally claimed to induce therapeutic changes in tissues attract most researchers’ attentions. LIPUS have been demonstrated to have a rage of biological effects on tissues, including promoting bone-fracture healing, accelerating soft-tissue regeneration, inhibiting inflammatory responses and so on. Recent studies showed that biological effects of LIPUS in healing morbid body tissues may be mainly associated with the upregulation of cell proliferation through activation of integrin receptors and Rho/ROCK/Src/ERK signaling pathway, and with promoting multilineage differentiation of mesenchyme stem/progenitor cell lines through ROCK-Cot/Tpl2-MEK-ERK signaling pathway. Hopefully, LIPUS may become an effective clinical procedure for the treatment of urological diseases, such as chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS), erectile dysfunction (ED), and stress urinary incontinence (SUI) in the field of urology. It still needs an intense effort for basic-science and clinical investigators to explore the biomedical applications of ultrasound. PMID:27141455

  7. Pulsed low-intensity ultrasound increases proliferation and extracelluar matrix production by human dermal fibroblasts in three-dimensional culture

    PubMed Central

    Bohari, Siti PM; Grover, Liam M; Hukins, David WL

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of pulsed low-intensity ultrasound on cell proliferation, collagen production and glycosaminoglycan deposition by human dermal fibroblasts encapsulated in alginate. Hoechst 33258 assay for cell number, hydroxyproline assay for collagen content, dimethylmethylene blue assay for glycosaminoglycan content and scanning electron microscopy were performed on the encapsulated cells treated with pulsed low-intensity ultrasound and a control group that remained untreated. Pulsed low-intensity ultrasound showed a significant effect on cell proliferation and collagen deposition but no consistent pattern for glycosaminoglycan content. Alcian blue staining showed that glycosaminoglycans were deposited around the cells in both treated and control groups. These results suggest that pulsed low-intensity ultrasound alone shows a positive effect on cell proliferation and collagen deposition even without growth factor supplements. PMID:26668710

  8. AB101. Therapeutic effect of low intensity pulsed ultrasound in stress urinary incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Bicheng; Lei, Hongen; Guan, Ruili; Li, Huixi; Xin, Zhongcheng

    2016-01-01

    Objective Stress urinary incontinence, a major type of urinary incontinence, increases with age and is often developed after partum injury. Low intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) has been investigated in the treatment of many diseases showing its ability of restoring soft tissue injury. We investigated the therapeutic effect of low intensity pulsed ultrasound in stress urinary incontinence. Methods Thirty-two Sprague Dawley rats in SUI group underwent vaginal distension (VD) and bilateral ovariectomy mimicking partum injury. Eight rats served as mock operation control. Eight rats each in SUI group was treated with low-dosage LESW (0.03 mJ/mm2), medium-dosage LESW (0.06 mJ/mm2), or high-dosage LESW (0.09 mJ/mm2). The rest eight rats served as none-treatment group. For functional study, leak point pressure test (LPP) was performed 2 weeks after the last LESW. Masson trichrome staining was performed to validate the pathological changes. Results The LPP was restored in medium-dosage LESW and high-dosage LESW groups, but not in low-dosage LESW group. More robust striated muscle regeneration was found in these two groups comparing with the none-treatment group. Conclusions LIPUS ameliorate the symptom of SUI via activating striated muscle regeneration.

  9. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound treatment improved the rate of autograft peripheral nerve regeneration in rat

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Wenli; Wang, Yuexiang; Tang, Jie; Peng, Jiang; Wang, Yu; Guo, Quanyi; Guo, Zhiyuan; Li, Pan; Xiao, Bo; Zhang, Jinxing

    2016-01-01

    Low intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) has been widely used in clinic for the treatment of repairing pseudarthrosis, bone fractures and of healing in various soft tissues. Some reports indicated that LIPUS accelerated peripheral nerve regeneration including Schwann cells (SCs) and injured nerves. But little is known about its appropriate intensities on autograft nerves. This study was to investigate which intensity of LIPUS improved the regeneration of gold standard postsurgical nerves in experimental rat model. Sprague-Dawley rats were made into 10 mm right side sciatic nerve reversed autologous nerve transplantation and randomly treated with 250 mW/cm2, 500 mW/cm2 or 750 mW/cm2 LIPUS for 2–12 weeks after operation. Functional and pathological results showed that LIPUS of 250 mW/cm2 significantly induced faster rate of axonal regeneration. This suggested that autograft nerve regeneration was improved. PMID:27102358

  10. Low intensity-pulsed ultrasound induced apoptosis of human hepatocellular carcinoma cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Shi, Mingfang; Liu, Bangzhong; Liu, Guanghua; Wang, Ping; Yang, Mingzhen; Li, Yun; Zhou, Jian

    2016-01-01

    The present study was conducted to determine whether low intensity-pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) could induce apoptosis of human hepatocellular carcinoma cells, SMMC-7721, and to define the mechanism of ultrasound-induced apoptosis, in vitro. MTT assay was used to measure cell proliferation. Apoptosis was investigated by multiple methods such as flow cytometry, DNA fragmentation, Ca(2+) mobilizations, pro- and anti-apoptotic protein expression, and light as well as ultramicroscopic morphology. The results provide evidence that LIPUS induced a dose-dependent effect on cell viability and apoptosis of SMMC-7721 cells. Specifically, exposure of cells to >0.5 W/cm(2) intensity significantly increased cell apoptosis, caused shifts in cell cycle phase, and induced structural changes. Ultrasound significantly increased intracellular Ca(2+) concentrations and modulated expression of caspase-3, Bcl-2 and Bax. The findings suggest that this novel technology can be used to induce SMMC-7721 apoptosis via the Ca(2+)/mitochondrial pathway and could potentially be of clinical use for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (SMMC-7721 cell line) and other cancers.

  11. Preliminary Study on the Efficacy of Low Intensity Pulsed ultrasound for Osteoporosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamanaka, Makoto; Koji, Akiyama; Tokita, Akihumi; Ishijima, Muneaki; Nozawa, Masahiko; Kurosawa, Hisashi

    2005-03-01

    Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) has recently been shown to accelerate long bone fracture healing, but its effect on osteoporosis is not clear. The aim of this study is to investigate whether bone mineral density (BMD) of distal one-third radius of older woman is influenced with LIPUS. Six Japanese women who were outpatients at our hospital were recruited in this study and ranged from seventy to seventy-four years of age. In this study LIPUS exposed unilateral distal one-third of the radius for 20 min/once, 3 times and over every week for six months. The contralateral side was not exposed. The intensity of ultrasound was 30 mW/cm2 spatial-average temporal-average. Bone status was assessed by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry at baseline and 3 and 6 months later. Medication for osteoporosis were not changed. A significant increases in BMD at the treatment site were found in 3 women without alendronate and menatetrenone medication (averaged 4.5%). No significant differences were found in women on these medications. No remarkable changes were found away from the treatment site. These results suggest the possibility of effectiveness of LIPUS applied to a local area of osteoporosis and that pharmacological intervention is capable of influencing the effect of LIPUS for osteoporosis.

  12. Suppressing bubble shielding effect in shock wave lithotripsy by low intensity pulsed ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jen-Chieh; Zhou, Yufeng

    2015-01-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) has been used as an effective modality to fragment kidney calculi. Because of the bubble shielding effect in the pre-focal region, the acoustic energy delivered to the focus is reduced. Low pulse repetition frequency (PRF) will be applied to dissolve these bubbles for better stone comminution efficiency. In this study, low intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) beam was aligned perpendicular to the axis of a shock wave (SW) lithotripter at its focus. The light transmission was used to evaluate the compressive wave and cavitation induced by SWs without or with a combination of LIPUS for continuous sonication. It is found that bubble shielding effect becomes dominated with the SW exposure and has a greater significant effect on cavitation than compressive wave. Using the combined wave scheme, the improvement began at the 5th pulse and gradually increased. Suppression effect on bubble shielding is independent on the trigger delay, but increases with the acoustic intensity and pulse duration of LIPUS. The peak negative and integral area of light transmission signal, which present the compressive wave and cavitation respectively, using our strategy at PRF of 1 Hz are comparable to those using SW alone at PRF of 0.1 Hz. In addition, high-speed photography confirmed the bubble activities in both free field and close to a stone surface. Bubble motion in response to the acoustic radiation force by LIPUS was found to be the major mechanism of suppressing bubble shielding effect. There is a 2.6-fold increase in stone fragmentation efficiency after 1000 SWs at PRF of 1 Hz in combination with LIPUS. In summary, combination of SWs and LIPUS is an effective way of suppressing bubble shielding effect and, subsequently, improving cavitation at the focus for a better outcome.

  13. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound therapy: a potential strategy to stimulate tendon-bone junction healing.

    PubMed

    Ying, Zhi-min; Lin, Tiao; Yan, Shi-gui

    2012-12-01

    Incorporation of a tendon graft within the bone tunnel represents a challenging clinical problem. Successful anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction requires solid healing of the tendon graft in the bone tunnel. Enhancement of graft healing to bone is important to facilitate early aggressive rehabilitation and a rapid return to pre-injury activity levels. No convenient, effective or inexpensive procedures exist to enhance tendon-bone (T-B) healing after surgery. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) improves local blood perfusion and angiogenesis, stimulates cartilage maturation, enhances differentiation and proliferation of osteoblasts, and motivates osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), and therefore, appears to be a potential non-invasive tool for T-B healing in early stage of rehabilitation of ACL reconstruction. It is conceivable that LIPUS could be used to stimulate T-B tunnel healing in the home, with the aim of accelerating rehabilitation and an earlier return to normal activities in the near future. The purpose of this review is to demonstrate how LIPUS stimulates T-B healing at the cellular and molecular levels, describe studies in animal models, and provide a future direction for research.

  14. Clinical and immunohistopathological aspects of venous ulcers treatment by Low-Intensity Pulsed Ultrasound (LIPUS).

    PubMed

    de Ávila Santana, Luísiane; Alves, José Marcos; Andrade, Thiago Antônio Moretti; Kajiwara, João Kazuyuki; Garcia, Sérgio Britto; Gomes, Fernanda Guzzo; Frade, Marco Andrey Cipriani

    2013-04-01

    The immunological mechanisms that are triggered by Low-Intensity Pulsed Ultrasound (LIPUS) in wound healing are unknown. In the present study, experimental groups were used to assess the treatment of chronic venous ulcers with 30mW/cm(2) SATA peripheral LIPUS three times per week compared to a daily treatment of 1% silver sulfadiazine (SDZ). The ulcers of the SDZ group (n=7) (G1) and LIPUS group (n=9) (G2) were photographed five times three months, and the images were analyzed using ImageJ software to quantify the total area (S), fibrin/sphacel area (yellow) and granulation area (red). The healing process was evaluated by the wound healing rate (WHR), granulation tissue rate (GTR) and fibrin/sphacel tissue rate (FTR). The ulcers were biopsied on days 1 and 45 and stained for collagen fiber quantification (picrosirius) and CD68(+) protein and VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) expression using HRP-streptavidin (horseradish peroxidase-streptavidin). On day 90, G2 had a mean 41% decrease in the ulcer area, while no decrease was observed in G1 (p<0.05). An increased tendency toward positive labeling of collagen fibers and VEGF (p>0.05) was observed in G2 compared to G1, and the number of CD68(+) cells was greater in G2 than in G1 (p<0.05). LIPUS presents superior activity compared to SDZ in stimulating the inflammatory and proliferative (angiogenesis and collagenesis, respectively) phases of chronic venous wound healing.

  15. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound accelerates tooth movement via activation of the BMP-2 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Xue, Hui; Zheng, Jun; Cui, Ziping; Bai, Xiufeng; Li, Gang; Zhang, Caidi; He, Sanhu; Li, Weihong; Lajud, Shayanne A; Duan, Yinzhong; Zhou, Hong

    2013-01-01

    The present study was designed to determine the underlying mechanism of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) induced alveolar bone remodeling and the role of BMP-2 expression in a rat orthodontic tooth movement model. Orthodontic appliances were placed between the homonymy upper first molars and the upper central incisors in rats under general anesthesia, followed by daily 20-min LIPUS or sham LIPUS treatment beginning at day 0. Tooth movement distances and molecular changes were evaluated at each observation point. In vitro and in vivo studies were conducted to detect HGF (Hepatocyte growth factor)/Runx2/BMP-2 signaling pathways and receptor activator of NFκB ligand (RANKL) expression by quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR), Western blot and immunohistochemistry. At day 3, LIPUS had no effect on the rat orthodontic tooth movement distance and BMP-2-induced alveolar bone remodeling. However, beginning at day 5 and for the following time points, LIPUS significantly increased orthodontic tooth movement distance and BMP-2 signaling pathway and RANKL expression compared with the control group. The qRT-PCR and Western blot data in vitro and in vivo to study BMP-2 expression were consistent with the immunohistochemistry observations. The present study demonstrates that LIPUS promotes alveolar bone remodeling by stimulating the HGF/Runx2/BMP-2 signaling pathway and RANKL expression in a rat orthodontic tooth movement model, and LIPUS increased BMP-2 expression via Runx2 regulation.

  16. Effect of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound on orthodontically induced root resorption in beagle dogs.

    PubMed

    Al-Daghreer, Saleh; Doschak, Michael; Sloan, Alastair J; Major, Paul W; Heo, Giseon; Scurtescu, Cristian; Tsui, Ying Y; El-Bialy, Tarek

    2014-06-01

    We investigated the effect of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) on orthodontically induced inflammatory root resorption in vivo. Ten beagle dogs were treated with an orthodontic appliance to move the mandibular fourth premolars bodily. The orthodontic movement was carried out for 4 wk with a continuous force of 1 N/side; using a split-mouth model, LIPUS was applied daily for 20 min. Fourth premolar and surrounding periodontal tissue were evaluated with micro-computed tomography and hematoxylin and eosin and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining. We calculated the number, volume and distribution of root resorption lacunae and their percentage relative to total root volume, orthodontic tooth movement and periodontal ligament space. There was no significant difference in orthodontic tooth movement between the two sides. LIPUS significantly reduced the number of orthodontically induced inflammatory root resorption initiation areas by 71%, reduced their total volume by 68% and reduced their volume relative to the affected root total volume by 70%. LIPUS induced the formation of a precementum layer, thicker cementum and reparative cellular cementum.

  17. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound accelerates nerve regeneration following inferior alveolar nerve transection in rats.

    PubMed

    Sato, Mai; Motoyoshi, Mitsuru; Shinoda, Masamichi; Iwata, Koichi; Shimizu, Noriyoshi

    2016-06-01

    Inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) injury, which is frequently caused by orofacial surgery or trauma, induces sensory loss in orofacial regions innervated by the IAN. However, no effective treatment for orofacial sensory loss currently exists. We determined whether sensory loss in facial skin above the mental foramen following IAN transection was recovered by exposure of the transected IAN to low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS). Inferior alveolar nerve transection (IANX) was performed in 7-wk-old male Sprague-Dawley rats. On day 7 after IANX, the effect of daily LIPUS (from day 0) on the transected IAN, in terms of sensitivity to mechanical stimulation of the facial skin above the mental foramen, was examined. Moreover, the number of trigeminal ganglion (TG) neurons innervating the facial skin above the mental foramen of rats with IANX treated daily with LIPUS was counted using the retrograde neurotracing technique. Daily exposure of the transected IAN to LIPUS significantly promoted recovery of the head-withdrawal threshold in response to mechanical stimulation of the facial skin above the mental foramen, and the number of TG neurons innervating the facial skin above mental foramen was significantly increased in rats with IANX treated daily with LIPUS compared with sham or LIPUS-unexposed rats. Daily treatment of stumps of the transected IAN with LIPUS facilitated morphological and functional regeneration, suggesting that LIPUS is an effective and novel therapy for IAN injury. PMID:27058986

  18. Non-invasive low-intensity pulsed ultrasound accelerates bone healing in the rabbit.

    PubMed

    Pilla, A A; Mont, M A; Nasser, P R; Khan, S A; Figueiredo, M; Kaufman, J J; Siffert, R S

    1990-01-01

    The effect of ultrasound (US) on the rate of fibula osteotomy healing in 139 mature New Zealand white rabbits was assessed in this study. Bilateral midshaft fibular osteotomies were made using a 1-mm Gigli saw. US was noninvasively applied to one limb for 20 minutes daily, while the contralateral limb served as a control. A 2.5-cm PZT transducer was applied to both limbs, with the treated limb receiving a 200-microseconds burst of 1.5-MHz sine waves repeated at 1.0 kHz. The incident intensity was approximately 30 mW/cm2. Animals were killed at intervals between 14 and 28 days. Maximum strength increases (significant to p less than or equal to 0.01) ranged from 40 to 85% from postoperative day 14 to 23. On day 28, no significant difference in ultimate strength was noted. From day 17 through day 28, all US-treated fractures were as strong as intact bones (p less than or equal to 0.005). On the other hand, the ultimate strength of the control osteotomies attained intact values only by day 28. These results indicate that biomechanical healing is accelerated by a factor of nearly 1.7. This occurs with an overall acceleration of the healing curve in this fresh fracture model. If noninvasive low-intensity pulsed sine wave ultrasound can significantly accelerate bone repair in clinical application with an in-home treatment of 20 minutes daily, then US may be a useful adjunct for fracture care with a concomitant impact on patient morbidity.

  19. Modification of Osteoarthritis in the Guinea Pig with Pulsed Low-Intensity Ultrasound Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Gurkan, Ilksen; Ranganathan, Archana; Yang, Xu; Horton, Walter E.; Todman, Martin; Huckle, James; Pleshko, Nancy; Spencer, Richard G.

    2010-01-01

    Objective The Hartley guinea pig develops articular cartilage degeneration similar to that seen in idiopathic human osteoarthritis. We investigated whether the application of pulsed low-intensity ultrasound (PLIUS) to the Hartley guinea pig joint would prevent or attenuate the progression of this degenerative process. Methods Treatment of male Hartley guinea pigs was initiated at the onset of degeneration (8 weeks of age) to assess the ability of PLIUS to prevent osteoarthritis, or at a later age (12 months) to assess the degree to which PLIUS acted to attenuate the progression of established disease. PLIUS (30 mW/cm2) was applied to stifle joints for 20 minutes per day over periods ranging from three to ten months, with contralateral limbs serving as controls. Joint cartilage histology was graded according to a modified Mankin scale to evaluate treatment effect. Immunohistochemical staining for IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra), MMP-3, MMP-13, and TGF-β1 was performed on the cartilage to evaluate patterns of expression of these proteins. Results PLIUS did not fully prevent cartilage degeneration in the prevention groups, but diminished the severity of the disease, with the treated joints showing markedly decreased surface irregularities and a much smaller degree of loss of matrix staining as compared to controls. PLIUS also attenuated disease progression in the groups with established disease, although to a somewhat lesser extent as compared to the prevention groups. Immunohistochemical staining demonstrated a markedly decreased degree of TGF-β1 production in the PLIUS-treated joints. This indicates less active endogenous repair, consistent with the marked reduction in cartilage degradation. Conclusions PLIUS exhibits the ability to attenuate the progression of cartilage degeneration in an animal model of idiopathic human OA. The effect was greater in the treatment of early, rather than established, degeneration. PMID:20175971

  20. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound regulates proliferation and differentiation of osteoblasts through osteocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Lei; Yang, Zheng; Zhang, Hai; Chen, Wenchuan; Chen, Mengshi; Zhu, Zhimin

    2012-02-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CM from LIPUS-stimulated osteocytes inhibits proliferation of osteoblasts. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CM from LIPUS-stimulated osteocytes enhances differentiation of osteoblasts. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LIPUS stimulates MLO-Y4 cells to secrete PGE{sub 2} and NO. -- Abstract: Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) has been used as a safe and effective modality to enhance fracture healing. As the most abundant cells in bone, osteocytes orchestrate biological activities of effector cells via direct cell-to-cell contacts and by soluble factors. In this study, we have used the osteocytic MLO-Y4 cells to study the effects of conditioned medium from LIPUS-stimulated MLO-Y4 cells on proliferation and differentiation of osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells. Conditioned media from LIPUS-stimulated MLO-Y4 cells (LIPUS-Osteocyte-CM) were collected and added on MC3T3-E1 cell cultures. MC3T3-E1 cells cultured in LIPUS-Osteocyte-CM demonstrated a significant inhibition of proliferation and an increased alkaline phosphatase activity. The results of PGE{sub 2} and NO assay showed that LIPUS could enhance PGE{sub 2} and NO secretion from MLO-Y4 cells at all time points within 24 h after LIPUS stimulation. We conclude that LIPUS regulates proliferation and differentiation of osteoblasts through osteocytes in vitro. Increased secretion of PGE{sub 2} from osteocytes may play a role in this effect.

  1. Does Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound treatment repair articular cartilage injury? A rabbit model study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) regiment has been used to treat fractures with non-union and to promote bone union in general. The effect of LIPUS on articular cartilage metabolism has been characterized. Yet, the effect of LIPUS to repair articular cartilage injury remains unclear in vivo. Methods We designed a study to investigate the effect of LIPUS on articular cartilage repairing in a rabbit severe cartilage injury model. Eighteen rabbits were divided into three groups: Sham-operated group, operated group without-LIPUS-treatment, operated group with-LIPUS-treatment (a daily 20-minute treatment for 3 months). Full-thickness cartilage defects were surgically created on the right side distal femoral condyle without intending to penetrate into the subchondral bone, which mimicked severe chondral injury. MR images for experimental joints, morphology grading scale, and histopathological Mankin score were evaluated. Results The preliminary results showed that the operated groups with-LIPUS-treatment and without-LIPUS-treatment had significantly higher Mankin score and morphological grading scale compared with the sham-operated group. However, there was no significant difference between the with-LIPUS-treatment and without-LIPUS-treatment groups. Cartilage defects filled with proliferative tissue were observed in the with-LIPUS-treatment group grossly and under MR images, however which presented less up-take under Alcian blue stain. Furthermore, no new deposition of type II collagen or proliferation of chondrocyte was observed over the cartilage defect after LIPUS treatment. Conclusion LIPUS has no significant therapeutic potential in treating severe articular cartilage injury in our animal study. PMID:24507771

  2. Clinical and immunohistopathological aspects of venous ulcers treatment by Low-Intensity Pulsed Ultrasound (LIPUS).

    PubMed

    de Ávila Santana, Luísiane; Alves, José Marcos; Andrade, Thiago Antônio Moretti; Kajiwara, João Kazuyuki; Garcia, Sérgio Britto; Gomes, Fernanda Guzzo; Frade, Marco Andrey Cipriani

    2013-04-01

    The immunological mechanisms that are triggered by Low-Intensity Pulsed Ultrasound (LIPUS) in wound healing are unknown. In the present study, experimental groups were used to assess the treatment of chronic venous ulcers with 30mW/cm(2) SATA peripheral LIPUS three times per week compared to a daily treatment of 1% silver sulfadiazine (SDZ). The ulcers of the SDZ group (n=7) (G1) and LIPUS group (n=9) (G2) were photographed five times three months, and the images were analyzed using ImageJ software to quantify the total area (S), fibrin/sphacel area (yellow) and granulation area (red). The healing process was evaluated by the wound healing rate (WHR), granulation tissue rate (GTR) and fibrin/sphacel tissue rate (FTR). The ulcers were biopsied on days 1 and 45 and stained for collagen fiber quantification (picrosirius) and CD68(+) protein and VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) expression using HRP-streptavidin (horseradish peroxidase-streptavidin). On day 90, G2 had a mean 41% decrease in the ulcer area, while no decrease was observed in G1 (p<0.05). An increased tendency toward positive labeling of collagen fibers and VEGF (p>0.05) was observed in G2 compared to G1, and the number of CD68(+) cells was greater in G2 than in G1 (p<0.05). LIPUS presents superior activity compared to SDZ in stimulating the inflammatory and proliferative (angiogenesis and collagenesis, respectively) phases of chronic venous wound healing. PMID:23294989

  3. Effect of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound on l929 fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Franco de Oliveira, Rodrigo; Pires Oliveira, Deise A. A.; Soares, Cristina Pacheco

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Ultrasound has proven to be an important therapeutic resource regarding musculoskeletal disease and is routinely used in physical therapy and medicine both therapeutically and diagnostically. The aim of the present study was to analyse the effects with different ultrasound intensities in order to establish the ideal radiation level in cell cultures. Material and methods Fibroblast cell cultures were divided into five groups: group I – control (did not receive irradiation); group II – 0.2 W/cm2 in pulsed mode at 10% (1 : 9 duty cycle); group III – 0.6 W/cm2 in pulsed mode at 10% (1 : 9 duty cycle); group IV – 0.2 W/cm2 in pulsed mode at 20% (2 : 8 duty cycle); and group V – 0.6 W/cm2 in pulsed mode at 20% (2 : 8 duty cycle). Each group was irradiated with 24-h intervals, observing the following post-irradiation incubation times: 24, 48, 72 and 96 h; after 24 h of each irradiation, cultures were analysed using the MTT method. Results Analysis of the results following ultrasound irradiation demonstrated that the effect of ultrasound with 0.6 W/cm2 in pulsed mode at 10% (1 : 9 duty cycle) was statistically significant in relation to ultrasonic irradiation in pulsed mode at 20% (2 : 8 duty cycle) (p < 0.05). Conclusions According to parameters used in the irradiation of cultivated fibroblasts, the pulse mode regime and the control of intensity are of fundamental importance for the optimal use of therapeutic ultrasound. Furthermore, low and medium intensities decreased cell damage, which establishes that acoustic pulsed energy induces the proliferation of fibroblast cells. PMID:22291760

  4. Effect of a Low-Intensity Pulsed Ultrasound Device, SX-1001, on Clinical Symptoms in Buerger Disease With Limb Ischemia.

    PubMed

    Higashi, Yukihito; Azuma, Nobuyoshi; Takeishi, Yasuchika; Minamino, Tohru; Kihara, Yasuki; Node, Koichi; Sata, Masataka; Fukumoto, Yoshihiro; Origasa, Hideki; Matsuo, Hiroshi; Naritomi, Hiroaki; Fujita, Masatoshi; Shimizu, Wataru

    2015-01-01

    Buerger disease is a rare disease of unknown etiology and cannot be treated by bypass surgery or percutaneous re-endovascularization. Although the need for effective limb ischemia prevention strategies is increasingly being recognized, effective preventative strategies are insufficient. The aim of this study using a new pulsed ultrasound device, SX-1001, is to determine whether treatment using SX-1001 can mitigate rest pain and improve blood supply to ischemic legs in patients with Buerger disease. This study is a multicenter, double-blinded, parallel randomized clinical trial testing the efficacy and safety of SX-1001. Treatment using SX-1001 is expected to result in reduction of the visual analog scale score for pain in Buerger disease patients who have Fontaine stage III. A total of 44 patients from 20 hospitals in Japan will be enrolled. The primary endpoint of the trial is a change in rest pain intensity on the visual analog scale score from baseline to 24 weeks. This trial will be the first to show the safety and efficacy of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound using SX-1001 for clinical symptoms in patients with Buerger disease. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound may be a new therapy for limb ischemia. Ethical approval has been obtained from each of the participating institutes. Study findings will be disseminated through peer-reviewed journals and at scientific conferences.This study is registered at UMIN Clinical Trial Registry (UMIN000014757).

  5. Low intensity pulsed ultrasound increases the mechanical properties of the healing tissues at bone-tendon junction.

    PubMed

    Lu, Min-Hua; Zheng, Yong-Ping; Huang, Qing-Hua; Lu, Hong-Bin; Qin, Ling

    2009-01-01

    The re-establishment of bone-tendon junction (BTJ) tissues is involved in many trauma and reconstructive surgeries. A direct BTJ repair requires a long period of immobilization which may be associated with a postoperative weak knee. In this study, we investigated if low-intensity pulsed ultrasound treatment increases the material properties of healing tissues at bone-tendon junction (BTJ) after partial patellectomy using rabbit models. Standard partial patellectomy was conducted on one knee of twenty four rabbits which were randomly divided into an ultrasound group and a control group. The bony changes of BTJ complexes around the BTJ healing interface were measured by anteroposterior x-ray radiographs; then the volumetric bone-mineral density (BMD) of the new bone was assessed using a peripheral computed tomography scanner (pQCT). The stiffness of patellar cartilage, fibrocartilage at the healing interface and the tendon were measured in situ using a novel noncontact ultrasound water jet indentation system. Not only significantly more newly formed bone at the BTJ healing interface but also increased stiffness of the junction tissues were found in the ultrasound group compared with the controls at week 18. In addition, the ultrasound group also showed significantly 44% higher BMD at week 6 than controls.

  6. Effects and Mechanisms of Low-Intensity Pulsed Ultrasound for Chronic Prostatitis and Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Guiting; Reed-Maldonado, Amanda B.; Lin, Maofan; Xin, Zhongcheng; Lue, Tom F.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic Prostatitis/Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome (CP/CPPS) is one of the most common urologic diseases, and no curative treatments have been identified. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) has been successfully used in promoting tissue healing, inhibiting inflammation and pain, differentiating stem cells, and stimulating nerve regeneration/muscle regeneration, as well as enhancing angiogenesis. Very recently, LIPUS has been proven an effective approach for CP/CPPS. This review summarizes the possible mechanisms responsible for the therapeutic effect of LIPUS for CP/CPPS. To search publications relevant to the topics of this review, the search engine for life sciences of Entrez was used. We reviewed the available evidence from 1954 through 2015 concerning LIPUS for CP/CPPS. According to the literature, both transrectal and transperineal approaches of LIPUS are effective for CP/CPPS. PMID:27376284

  7. A Focused Low-Intensity Pulsed Ultrasound (FLIPUS) System for Cell Stimulation: Physical and Biological Proof of Principle.

    PubMed

    Puts, Regina; Ruschke, Karen; Ambrosi, Thomas H; Kadow-Romacker, Anke; Knaus, Petra; Jenderka, Klaus-Vitold; Raum, Kay

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative ultrasound (QUS) is a promising technique for bone tissue evaluation. Highly focused transducers used for QUS also have the capability to be applied for tissue-regenerative purposes and can provide spatially limited deposition of acoustic energy. We describe a focused low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (FLIPUS) system, which has been developed for the stimulation of cell monolayers in the defocused far field of the transducer through the bottom of the well plate. Tissue culture well plates, carrying the cells, were incubated in a special chamber, immersed in a temperature-controlled water tank. A stimulation frequency of 3.6 MHz provided an optimal sound transmission through the polystyrene well plate. The ultrasound was pulsed for 20 min daily at 100-Hz repetition frequency with 27.8% duty cycle. The calibrated output intensity corresponded to I(SATA) = 44.5 ± 7.1 mW/cm2, which is comparable to the most frequently reported nominal output levels in LIPUS studies. No temperature change by the ultrasound exposure was observed in the well plate. The system was used to stimulate rat mesenchymal stem cells (rMSCs). The applied intensity had no apoptotic effect and enhanced the expression of osteogenic markers, i.e., osteopontin (OPN), collagen 1 (Col-1), the osteoblast-specific transcription factor-Runx-2 and E11 protein, an early osteocyte marker, in stimulated cells on day 5. The proposed FLIPUS setup opens new perspectives for the evaluation of the mechanistic effects of LIPUS. PMID:26552085

  8. High-Frequency, Low-Intensity Pulsed Ultrasound Enhances Alveolar Bone Healing of Extraction Sockets in Rats: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Kang, Kyung Lhi; Kim, Eun-Cheol; Park, Joon Bong; Heo, Jung Sun; Choi, Yumi

    2016-02-01

    Most studies of the beneficial effects of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) on bone healing have used frequencies between 1.0 and 1.5 MHz. However, after consideration of ultrasound wave characteristics and depth of target tissue, higher-frequency LIPUS may have been more effective on superficially positioned alveolar bone. We investigated this hypothesis by applying LIPUS (frequency, 3.0 MHz; intensity, 30 mW/cm(2)) on shaved right cheeks over alveolar bones of tooth extraction sockets in rats for 10 min/d for 2 wk after tooth extraction; the control group (left cheek of the same rats) did not receive LIPUS treatment. Compared with the control group, the LIPUS group manifested more new bone growth inside the sockets on histomorphometric analysis (maximal difference = 2.5-fold on the seventh day after extraction) and higher expressions of osteogenesis-related mRNAs and proteins than the control group did. These findings indicate that 3.0-MHz LIPUS could enhance alveolar bone formation and calcification in rats.

  9. Low intensity pulse ultrasound stimulate chondrocytes growth in a 3-D alginate scaffold through improved porosity and permeability.

    PubMed

    Guo, Gepu; Lu, Lu; Ji, Hongfei; Ma, Yong; Dong, Rui; Tu, Juan; Guo, Xiasheng; Qiu, Yuanyuan; Wu, Junru; Zhang, Dong

    2015-04-01

    A 3-D scaffold culture system has been used to promote in producing functional chondrocytes for repairing damaged cartilage. In the present study, the low intensity pulse ultrasound (LIPUS) (P(-)=0, 0.055, 0.085 and 0.11 MPa) was applied to improve the porosity and permeability of a 3-D alginate scaffold which was beneficial for the nutrition supply and metabolism during cell growth in 3-D alginate scaffold. The porosity and permeability of the scaffold was quantitatively analyzed based on scanning electron microscopy examination and fluorescence image observation. The results suggest that, for the scaffold exposed to LIPUS, its porosity and permeability could be significantly enhanced by the increasing LIPUS amplitude, which might be induced by the microstreaming shear stress generated by ultrasound-driven microbubble oscillations. Furthermore, the assessments of cell proliferation and collagen II expression confirmed that chondrocytes growth could be effectively promoted in 3-D alginate scaffolds treated by LIPUS, because of the improved scaffold porosity and permeability might benefit cell growth space and nutrition supply. It should also be noticed that appropriate LIPUS driving parameters should be adapted to achieve optimized chondrocytes culture effect in 3-D alginate scaffold. PMID:25543661

  10. Controllable permeability of blood-brain barrier and reduced brain injury through low-intensity pulsed ultrasound stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Sin-Luo; Liu, Shing-Hwa; Yang, Feng-Yi

    2015-01-01

    It has been shown that the blood-brain barrier (BBB) can be locally disrupted by focused ultrasound (FUS) in the presence of microbubbles (MB) while sustaining little damage to the brain tissue. Thus, the safety issue associated with FUS-induced BBB disruption (BBBD) needs to be investigated for future clinical applications. This study demonstrated the neuroprotective effects induced by low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) against brain injury in the sonicated brain. Rats subjected to a BBB disruption injury received LIPUS exposure for 5 min after FUS/MB application. Measurements of BBB permeability, brain water content, and histological analysis were then carried out to evaluate the effects of LIPUS. The permeability and time window of FUS-induced BBBD can be effectively modulated with LIPUS. LIPUS also significantly reduced brain edema, neuronal death, and apoptosis in the sonicated brain. Our results show that brain injury in the FUS-induced BBBD model could be ameliorated by LIPUS and that LIPUS may be proposed as a novel treatment modality for controllable release of drugs into the brain. PMID:26517350

  11. The potential of pulsed low intensity ultrasound to stimulate chondrocytes matrix synthesis in agarose and monolayer cultures.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, Natalie M; Grainger, James; Bader, Dan L; Knight, Martin M

    2010-12-01

    Pulsed low intensity ultrasound (PLIUS) has been used successfully for bone fracture repair and has therefore been suggested for cartilage regeneration. However, previous in vitro studies with chondrocytes show conflicting results as to the effect of PLIUS on the elaboration of extracellular matrix. This study tests the hypothesis that PLIUS, applied for 20 min/day, stimulates the synthesis of sulphated glycosaminoglycan (sGAG) by adult bovine articular chondrocytes cultured in either monolayer or agarose constructs. For both culture models, PLIUS at either 30 or 100 mW/cm(2) intensity had no net effect on the total sGAG content. Although PLIUS at 100 mW/cm(2) did induce a 20% increase in sGAG content at day 2 of culture in agarose, this response was lost by day 5. Intensities of 200 and 300 mW/cm(2) resulted in cell death probably due to heating from the ultrasound transducers. The lack of a sustained up-regulation of sGAG synthesis may reflect the suggestion that PLIUS only induces a stimulatory effect in the presence of a tissue injury response. These results suggest that PLIUS has a limited potential to provide an effective method of stimulating matrix production as part of a tissue engineering strategy for cartilage repair. PMID:20938751

  12. Improved Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell Osteogenesis in 3D Bioprinted Tissue Scaffolds with Low Intensity Pulsed Ultrasound Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xuan; Castro, Nathan J.; Zhu, Wei; Cui, Haitao; Aliabouzar, Mitra; Sarkar, Kausik; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2016-01-01

    3D printing and ultrasound techniques are showing great promise in the evolution of human musculoskeletal tissue repair and regeneration medicine. The uniqueness of the present study was to combine low intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) and advanced 3D printing techniques to synergistically improve growth and osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). Specifically, polyethylene glycol diacrylate bioinks containing cell adhesive Arginine-Glycine-Aspartic acid-Serene (RGDS) peptide and/or nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite (nHA) were used to fabricate 3D scaffolds with different geometric patterns via novel table-top stereolithography 3D printer. The resultant scaffolds provide a highly porous and interconnected 3D environment to support cell proliferation. Scaffolds with small square pores were determined to be the optimal geometric pattern for MSC attachment and growth. The optimal LIPUS working parameters were determined to be 1.5 MHz, 20% duty cycle with 150 mW/cm2 intensity. Results demonstrated that RGDS peptide and nHA containing 3D printed scaffolds under LIPUS treatment can greatly promote MSC proliferation, alkaline phosphatase activity, calcium deposition and total protein content. These results illustrate the effectiveness of the combination of LIPUS and biomimetic 3D printing scaffolds as a valuable combinatorial tool for improved MSC function, thus make them promising for future clinical and various regenerative medicine application. PMID:27597635

  13. Improved Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell Osteogenesis in 3D Bioprinted Tissue Scaffolds with Low Intensity Pulsed Ultrasound Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xuan; Castro, Nathan J; Zhu, Wei; Cui, Haitao; Aliabouzar, Mitra; Sarkar, Kausik; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2016-01-01

    3D printing and ultrasound techniques are showing great promise in the evolution of human musculoskeletal tissue repair and regeneration medicine. The uniqueness of the present study was to combine low intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) and advanced 3D printing techniques to synergistically improve growth and osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). Specifically, polyethylene glycol diacrylate bioinks containing cell adhesive Arginine-Glycine-Aspartic acid-Serene (RGDS) peptide and/or nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite (nHA) were used to fabricate 3D scaffolds with different geometric patterns via novel table-top stereolithography 3D printer. The resultant scaffolds provide a highly porous and interconnected 3D environment to support cell proliferation. Scaffolds with small square pores were determined to be the optimal geometric pattern for MSC attachment and growth. The optimal LIPUS working parameters were determined to be 1.5 MHz, 20% duty cycle with 150 mW/cm(2) intensity. Results demonstrated that RGDS peptide and nHA containing 3D printed scaffolds under LIPUS treatment can greatly promote MSC proliferation, alkaline phosphatase activity, calcium deposition and total protein content. These results illustrate the effectiveness of the combination of LIPUS and biomimetic 3D printing scaffolds as a valuable combinatorial tool for improved MSC function, thus make them promising for future clinical and various regenerative medicine application. PMID:27597635

  14. Low intensity pulse ultrasound stimulate chondrocytes growth in a 3-D alginate scaffold through improved porosity and permeability.

    PubMed

    Guo, Gepu; Lu, Lu; Ji, Hongfei; Ma, Yong; Dong, Rui; Tu, Juan; Guo, Xiasheng; Qiu, Yuanyuan; Wu, Junru; Zhang, Dong

    2015-04-01

    A 3-D scaffold culture system has been used to promote in producing functional chondrocytes for repairing damaged cartilage. In the present study, the low intensity pulse ultrasound (LIPUS) (P(-)=0, 0.055, 0.085 and 0.11 MPa) was applied to improve the porosity and permeability of a 3-D alginate scaffold which was beneficial for the nutrition supply and metabolism during cell growth in 3-D alginate scaffold. The porosity and permeability of the scaffold was quantitatively analyzed based on scanning electron microscopy examination and fluorescence image observation. The results suggest that, for the scaffold exposed to LIPUS, its porosity and permeability could be significantly enhanced by the increasing LIPUS amplitude, which might be induced by the microstreaming shear stress generated by ultrasound-driven microbubble oscillations. Furthermore, the assessments of cell proliferation and collagen II expression confirmed that chondrocytes growth could be effectively promoted in 3-D alginate scaffolds treated by LIPUS, because of the improved scaffold porosity and permeability might benefit cell growth space and nutrition supply. It should also be noticed that appropriate LIPUS driving parameters should be adapted to achieve optimized chondrocytes culture effect in 3-D alginate scaffold.

  15. Improved Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell Osteogenesis in 3D Bioprinted Tissue Scaffolds with Low Intensity Pulsed Ultrasound Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xuan; Castro, Nathan J; Zhu, Wei; Cui, Haitao; Aliabouzar, Mitra; Sarkar, Kausik; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2016-09-06

    3D printing and ultrasound techniques are showing great promise in the evolution of human musculoskeletal tissue repair and regeneration medicine. The uniqueness of the present study was to combine low intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) and advanced 3D printing techniques to synergistically improve growth and osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). Specifically, polyethylene glycol diacrylate bioinks containing cell adhesive Arginine-Glycine-Aspartic acid-Serene (RGDS) peptide and/or nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite (nHA) were used to fabricate 3D scaffolds with different geometric patterns via novel table-top stereolithography 3D printer. The resultant scaffolds provide a highly porous and interconnected 3D environment to support cell proliferation. Scaffolds with small square pores were determined to be the optimal geometric pattern for MSC attachment and growth. The optimal LIPUS working parameters were determined to be 1.5 MHz, 20% duty cycle with 150 mW/cm(2) intensity. Results demonstrated that RGDS peptide and nHA containing 3D printed scaffolds under LIPUS treatment can greatly promote MSC proliferation, alkaline phosphatase activity, calcium deposition and total protein content. These results illustrate the effectiveness of the combination of LIPUS and biomimetic 3D printing scaffolds as a valuable combinatorial tool for improved MSC function, thus make them promising for future clinical and various regenerative medicine application.

  16. Enhanced gene transfection using calcium phosphate co-precipitates and low-intensity pulsed ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Mariame A; Ahmed, Iman S; Campbell, Paul; Kondo, Takashi

    2012-11-20

    The capability to controllably disrupt the cell membrane by ultrasound (US), thus facilitating entry of exogenous species, has now reached a state of some maturity. However, a compelling question asks whether there is a residual role for US in enhancing transfection: that is, once the genetic material has been delivered to the cytosol, can US assist in its transport into the nucleus? The present experiment was designed with a view to addressing this question. As such, our experimental setup discriminates between: (i) the precursor cell membrane permealization step, and (ii) any subsequent intracellular trafficking into the nucleus. In this study, calcium phosphate co-precipitates (CaP) were used to internalize plasmid DNA encoding for luciferase (pDNA-Luc) (>90%) in HeLa cells. After 2h incubation with the CaP-pDNA-Luc, cells were washed and insonated for varying durations. The results showed that US can indeed enhance the intracellular trafficking of previously internalized genes when longer insonation periods are implemented, culminating with an increased probability for successful nuclear localization, as inferred from an enhanced luciferase expression. Moreover, the results suggest that the intracellular role of US might be mediated through a pathway that appears not to be limited to destabilizing the endosomal vesicles. The study thus provides new information regarding the intracellular effects of US, and in effect represents a new modality combining US and CaP carriers for improved efficiency in gene delivery.

  17. Effects of Low-intensity Pulsed Ultrasound and Cryotherapy on Recovery of Joint Function and C-reactive Protein Levels in Patients after Total Knee Replacement Surgery.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jeong Il; Kim, Yong-Nam; Choi, Hyun

    2014-07-01

    [Purpose] We investigated the effect of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound and cryotherapy on joint function recovery and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels of patients with total knee replacement. [Subjects] Forty-six patients with total knee replacement were recruited and allocated to either low-intensity pulsed ultrasound therapy (n=15), cryotherapy (n=15), or a combination of both (n=16). Therapy was administered once a day, 5 times a week for 3 weeks. To determine functional joint recovery and reduction of inflammation, changes in the Korean Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (K-WOMAC), range of motion (ROM), and CRP were assessed postsurgically and four times over a 3-week period. Using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), homogeneity tests were performed based on participants' general characteristics. To recognize changes in time-variant K-WOMAC, ROM, and CRP values between groups, repeated measures ANOVA was performed, and Tukey's test was used for post-test analysis. Values at α=0.05 were considered significant. [Results] We found a difference between groups and times, and the group that received the combined therapies showed greater changes in outcomes than the group that received low-intensity pulsed ultrasound therapy alone. [Conclusion] Applying both low-intensity pulsed ultrasound and cryotherapy can relieve inflammation and enhance joint function in patients who undergo total knee replacement.

  18. Effects of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound on healing of mandibular bone defects: an experimental study in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Bronoosh, P; Tanideh, N; Noorafshan, A; Andisheh Tadbir, A; Aalipanah, M; Kamali, F; Abbasnia, K; Koohi-Hosseinabadi, O

    2015-02-01

    Research evidence suggests that low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPU) produces significant osteoinductive effects, accelerating the healing of bone defects. The authors investigated the effects of LIPU on mandibular bone defects in a rabbit model. Fifty-six adult Dutch rabbits were divided randomly into control, LIPU-1 (1MHz), and LIPU-3 (3MHz) groups. A mandibular defect was created in all rabbits. The effect of LIPU on mandibular defects was assessed by frequency (1 or 3MHz) and timing (2 and 4 weeks). Bone mineral density (BMD) was measured and stereology and histology performed; results were compared at the end of 2 and 4 weeks. LIPU-3 resulted in significantly higher bone formation compared to the control group at the end of week 4 on histological assessment (P=0.008). BMD was significantly higher at 4 weeks than at 2 weeks (P=0.03). LIPU-3 increased the numerical density of osteoblasts and osteocytes at the end of week 4 (P=0.05 and P=0.001, respectively). The results of this study are in favour of using LIPU 3MHz to accelerate mandibular bone healing. However, this study suggests that a frequency of 3MHz and the longer application of LIPU 3MHz for 4 weeks can only promote 8% mandibular bone healing in rabbits. Therefore, the use of LIPU has no really convincing, consistent clinical effects on maxillofacial bone healing.

  19. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound produced an increase of osteogenic genes expression during the process of bone healing in rats.

    PubMed

    Fávaro-Pípi, Elaine; Bossini, Paulo; de Oliveira, Poliani; Ribeiro, Juliana Uema; Tim, Carla; Parizotto, Nivaldo A; Alves, Jose Marcos; Ribeiro, Daniel Araki; Selistre de Araújo, Heloísa Sobreiro; Renno, Ana Claudia Muniz

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this study was to measure the temporal expression of osteogenic genes during the process of bone healing in low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) treated bone defects by means of histopathologic and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis. Animals were randomly distributed into two groups (n = 30): control group (bone defect without treatment) and LIPUS treated (bone defect treated with LIPUS). On days 7, 13 and 25 postinjury, 10 rats per group were sacrificed. Rats were treated with a 30 mW/cm(2) LIPUS. The results pointed out intense new bone formation surrounded by highly vascularized connective tissue presenting a slight osteogenic activity, with primary bone deposition was observed in the group exposed to LIPUS in the intermediary (13 days) and late stages of repair (25 days) in the treated animals. In addition, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) showed an upregulation of bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4), osteocalcin and Runx2 genes 7 days after the surgery. In the intermediary period, there was no increase in the expression. The expression of alkaline phosphatase, BMP4 and Runx2 was significantly increased at the last period. Our results indicate that LIPUS therapy improves bone repair in rats and upregulated osteogenic genes, mainly at the late stages of recovery. PMID:20950932

  20. Protective effects of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound on aluminum-induced cerebral damage in Alzheimer's disease rat model.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wei-Ting; Chen, Ran-Chou; Lu, Wen-Wei; Liu, Shing-Hwa; Yang, Feng-Yi

    2015-04-15

    The protein expressions of neurotrophic factors can be enhanced by low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) stimulation in the brain. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the protective effect of LIPUS stimulation against aluminum-induced cerebral damage in Alzheimer's disease rat model. LIPUS was administered 7 days before each aluminum chloride (AlCl3) administration, and concomitantly given with AlCl3 daily for a period of 6 weeks. Neurotrophic factors in hippocampus were measured by western blot analysis. Behavioral changes in the Morris water maze and elevated plus maze were examined in rats after administration of AlCl3. Various biochemical analyses were performed to evaluate the extent of brain damages. LIPUS is capable of prompting levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in rat brain. AlCl3 administration resulted in a significant increase in the aluminum concentration, acetylcholinesterase activity and beta-amyloid (Aβ) deposition in AlCl3 treated rats. LIPUS stimulation significantly attenuated aluminum concentration, acetylcholinesterase activity, Aβ deposition and karyopyknosis in AlCl3 treated rats. Furthermore, LIPUS significantly improved memory retention in AlCl3-induced memory impairment. These experimental results indicate that LIPUS has neuroprotective effects against AlCl3-induced cerebral damages and cognitive dysfunction.

  1. Effect of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound on biocompatibility and cellular uptake of chitosan-tripolyphosphate nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Junyi; Liu, Gaojun; Qin, Yi-Xian; Meng, Yizhi

    2014-01-01

    Using low molecular weight chitosan nanoparticles (CNPs) prepared by an ionic gelation method, the authors report the effect of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (US) on cell viability and nanoparticle uptake in cultured murine preosteoblasts. Particle size and zeta potential are measured using dynamic light scattering, and cell viability is evaluated using the of [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium, inner salt; MTS] assay. Results show that 30 min delivery of CNPs at 0.5 mg/mL is able to prevent loss of cell viability due to either serum starvation or subsequent exposure to US (1 W/cm2 or 2 W/cm2, up to 1 min). Additionally, flow cytometry data suggest that there is a close association between cellular membrane integrity and the presence of CNPs when US at 2 W/cm2 is administered. PMID:25280857

  2. Effect of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) on mandibular condyle growth in rats analyzed with micro-CT.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Kyozo; Motoyoshi, Mitsuru; Horinuki, Eri; Arai, Yoshinori; Shimizu, Noriyoshi

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the effects of a bite-jumping appliance combined with low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) stimulation on the mandibular condyle of growing rats using micro CT (mCT) and histological examinations. Twelve Wistar rats were divided into three groups of four individuals each: Group 1 was an untreated control group, Group 2 received bite-jumping appliances, and Group 3 received bite-jumping appliances and LIPUS stimulation (15 min/day, 2 weeks) to the temporomandibular region. We measured the length and three-dimensional bone volume of each rat's mandibular condyle using mCT. The condylar cartilage was observed after the rats had been sacrificed. There was no significant difference in condylar sagittal width among the groups. The bite-jumping appliance combined with LIPUS stimulation increased the condylar major axis, mandibular sagittal length and condylar bone volume to a greater degree than use of the bite-jumping appliance alone. Histological examination demonstrated hypertrophy of the condylar cartilage layers, the fibrous layer and hypertrophic cell layer of the rats treated with bite-jumping appliances combined with LIPUS stimulation in comparison to rats treated with bite-jumping appliances alone. (J Oral Sci 58, 415-422, 2016). PMID:27665982

  3. Treatment of ununited femoral neck fractures in young adults using low-intensity pulsed ultrasound: Report of 2 cases

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Yang; Niikura, Takahiro; Iwakura, Takashi; Kuroda, Ryosuke; Kurosaka, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Delayed union and non-union of displaced femoral neck fractures remains a difficult clinical problem for orthopaedic surgeons. In the physiologically young patient, every effort should be made to preserve the native hip joint. We present two cases of ununited femoral neck fractures in young adults who were successfully treated with low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) and showed satisfactory results. Presentation of case 1 A 41-year-old woman was involved in a motor vehicle crash and was diagnosed with displaced femoral neck fracture. Eleven months after internal fixation, a computed tomography (CT) scan revealed the presence of non-union of the femoral neck. LIPUS treatment was therefore initiated. After eight months, the fracture was completely consolidated. Presentation of case 2 A 39-year-old man was involved in a cycling accident and was diagnosed with displaced femoral neck fracture. Thirteen weeks after internal fixation, a CT scan revealed delayed union of the femoral neck. LIPUS treatment was therefore initiated. After six months, the fracture was completely consolidated. Conclusion We suggest use of LIPUS as a possible treatment approach for delayed union and non-union of displaced femoral neck fractures in young patients before considering further surgical intervention. PMID:26942332

  4. Protective effects of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound on aluminum-induced cerebral damage in Alzheimer's disease rat model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Wei-Ting; Chen, Ran-Chou; Lu, Wen-Wei; Liu, Shing-Hwa; Yang, Feng-Yi

    2015-04-01

    The protein expressions of neurotrophic factors can be enhanced by low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) stimulation in the brain. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the protective effect of LIPUS stimulation against aluminum-induced cerebral damage in Alzheimer's disease rat model. LIPUS was administered 7 days before each aluminum chloride (AlCl3) administration, and concomitantly given with AlCl3 daily for a period of 6 weeks. Neurotrophic factors in hippocampus were measured by western blot analysis. Behavioral changes in the Morris water maze and elevated plus maze were examined in rats after administration of AlCl3. Various biochemical analyses were performed to evaluate the extent of brain damages. LIPUS is capable of prompting levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in rat brain. AlCl3 administration resulted in a significant increase in the aluminum concentration, acetylcholinesterase activity and beta-amyloid (Aβ) deposition in AlCl3 treated rats. LIPUS stimulation significantly attenuated aluminum concentration, acetylcholinesterase activity, Aβ deposition and karyopyknosis in AlCl3 treated rats. Furthermore, LIPUS significantly improved memory retention in AlCl3-induced memory impairment. These experimental results indicate that LIPUS has neuroprotective effects against AlCl3-induced cerebral damages and cognitive dysfunction.

  5. 11. Bactericidal Activity of Photocatalytic TiO2 Excited by Low Intensity Pulsed Ultrasound (LIPUS): An In Vitro Study.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Chieko; Koseki, Hironobu

    2016-08-01

    Photocatalysis with anatase-type titanium dioxide (TiO2) under ultraviolet has a well-recognized bactericidal effect. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the photocatalytic bactericidal effects of TiO2 on Staphylococcus epidermidis (ATCC35984) caused by Low Intensity Pulsed Ultrasound (LIPUS) associated with bio-implant-related infections. The photocatalytic properties of the TiO2 films were confirmed by the degradation of an aqueous solution of methylene blue. The disks were seeded with cultured Staphylococcus epidermidis and irradiated by LIPUS. The bactericidal effect of the TiO2 films was evaluated by counting the surviving colonies. The viability of the bacteria on the photocatalytic TiO2 film coated titanium was suppressed significantly to 63% after 2 hours of LIPUS treatment (P < 0.05). The photocatalytic bactericidal effect of TiO2 under LIPUS is useful for sterilizing the contaminated and infected surfaces of metal bio-implants. PMID:27441772

  6. Effects of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound on new trabecular bone during bone-tendon junction healing in a rabbit model: a synchrotron radiation micro-CT study.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hongbin; Zheng, Cheng; Wang, Zhanwen; Chen, Can; Chen, Huabin; Hu, Jianzhong

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the effects of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound on bone regeneration during the bone-tendon junction healing process and to explore the application of synchrotron radiation micro computed tomography in three dimensional visualization of the bone-tendon junction to evaluate the microarchitecture of new trabecular bone. Twenty four mature New Zealand rabbits underwent partial patellectomy to establish a bone-tendon junction injury model at the patella-patellar tendon complex. Animals were then divided into low-intensity pulsed ultrasound treatment (20 min/day, 7 times/week) and placebo control groups, and were euthanized at week 8 and 16 postoperatively (n = 6 for each group and time point). The patella-patellar tendon specimens were harvested for radiographic, histological and synchrotron radiation micro computed tomography detection. The area of the newly formed bone in the ultrasound group was significantly greater than that of control group at postoperative week 8 and 16. The high resolution three dimensional visualization images of the bone-tendon junction were acquired by synchrotron radiation micro computed tomography. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound treatment promoted dense and irregular woven bone formation at week 8 with greater bone volume fraction, number and thickness of new trabecular bone but with lower separation. At week 16, ultrasound group specimens contained mature lamellar bone with higher bone volume fraction and thicker trabeculae than that of control group; however, there was no significant difference in separation and number of the new trabecular bone. This study confirms that low-intensity pulsed ultrasound treatment is able to promote bone formation and remodeling of new trabecular bone during the bone-tendon junction healing process in a rabbit model, and the synchrotron radiation micro computed tomography could be applied for three dimensional visualization to quantitatively evaluate the

  7. Effects of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound on new trabecular bone during bone-tendon junction healing in a rabbit model: a synchrotron radiation micro-CT study.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hongbin; Zheng, Cheng; Wang, Zhanwen; Chen, Can; Chen, Huabin; Hu, Jianzhong

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the effects of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound on bone regeneration during the bone-tendon junction healing process and to explore the application of synchrotron radiation micro computed tomography in three dimensional visualization of the bone-tendon junction to evaluate the microarchitecture of new trabecular bone. Twenty four mature New Zealand rabbits underwent partial patellectomy to establish a bone-tendon junction injury model at the patella-patellar tendon complex. Animals were then divided into low-intensity pulsed ultrasound treatment (20 min/day, 7 times/week) and placebo control groups, and were euthanized at week 8 and 16 postoperatively (n = 6 for each group and time point). The patella-patellar tendon specimens were harvested for radiographic, histological and synchrotron radiation micro computed tomography detection. The area of the newly formed bone in the ultrasound group was significantly greater than that of control group at postoperative week 8 and 16. The high resolution three dimensional visualization images of the bone-tendon junction were acquired by synchrotron radiation micro computed tomography. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound treatment promoted dense and irregular woven bone formation at week 8 with greater bone volume fraction, number and thickness of new trabecular bone but with lower separation. At week 16, ultrasound group specimens contained mature lamellar bone with higher bone volume fraction and thicker trabeculae than that of control group; however, there was no significant difference in separation and number of the new trabecular bone. This study confirms that low-intensity pulsed ultrasound treatment is able to promote bone formation and remodeling of new trabecular bone during the bone-tendon junction healing process in a rabbit model, and the synchrotron radiation micro computed tomography could be applied for three dimensional visualization to quantitatively evaluate the

  8. Low-Intensity Pulsed Ultrasound Induces Angiogenesis and Ameliorates Left Ventricular Dysfunction in a Porcine Model of Chronic Myocardial Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Hanawa, Kenichiro; Ito, Kenta; Aizawa, Kentaro; Shindo, Tomohiko; Nishimiya, Kensuke; Hasebe, Yuhi; Tuburaya, Ryuji; Hasegawa, Hideyuki; Yasuda, Satoshi; Kanai, Hiroshi; Shimokawa, Hiroaki

    2014-01-01

    Background Although a significant progress has been made in the management of ischemic heart disease (IHD), the number of severe IHD patients is increasing. Thus, it is crucial to develop new, non-invasive therapeutic strategies. In the present study, we aimed to develop low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) therapy for the treatment of IHD. Methods and Results We first confirmed that in cultured human endothelial cells, LIPUS significantly up-regulated mRNA expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) with a peak at 32-cycle (P<0.05). Then, we examined the in vivo effects of LIPUS in a porcine model of chronic myocardial ischemia with reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) (n = 28). The heart was treated with either sham (n = 14) or LIPUS (32-cycle with 193 mW/cm2 for 20 min, n = 14) at 3 different short axis levels. Four weeks after the treatment, LVEF was significantly improved in the LIPUS group (46±4 to 57±5%, P<0.05) without any adverse effects, whereas it remained unchanged in the sham group (46±5 to 47±6%, P = 0.33). Capillary density in the ischemic region was significantly increased in the LIPUS group compared with the control group (1084±175 vs. 858±151/mm2, P<0.05). Regional myocardial blood flow was also significantly improved in the LIPUS group (0.78±0.2 to 1.39±0.4 ml/min/g, P<0.05), but not in the control group (0.84±0.3 to 0.97±0.4 ml/min/g). Western blot analysis showed that VEGF, eNOS and bFGF were all significantly up-regulated only in the LIPUS group. Conclusions These results suggest that the LIPUS therapy is promising as a new, non-invasive therapy for IHD. PMID:25111309

  9. Overview of non-invasive factors (low level laser and low intensity pulsed ultrasound) accelerating tooth movement during orthodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Jawad, Mohammed Mahmood; Husein, Adam; Alam, Mohammad Khursheed; Hassan, Rozita; Shaari, Rumaizi

    2014-01-01

    The need for orthodontic treatment is increasing all the time. As the treatment is time consuming ranging from a year to several years, any method of reducing the period of treatment and increasing the quality of the tissue will be beneficial to patients. The use of non-invasive techniques such as low level laser therapy and low intensity pulsed ultasound in accelerating orthodontic tooth movement are promising. Thus, this overview study will help to generate more understanding about the background information and the possible applications of them in daily orthodontics, depending on previous literature searching for reviews and original research articles.

  10. Re-evaluation of low intensity pulsed ultrasound in treatment of tibial fractures (TRUST): randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Bhandari, Mohit; Einhorn, Thomas A; Schemitsch, Emil; Heckman, James D; Tornetta, Paul; Leung, Kwok-Sui; Heels-Ansdell, Diane; Makosso-Kallyth, Sun; Della Rocca, Gregory J; Jones, Clifford B; Guyatt, Gordon H

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine whether low intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS), compared with sham treatment, accelerates functional recovery and radiographic healing in patients with operatively managed tibial fractures. Design A concealed, randomized, blinded, sham controlled clinical trial with a parallel group design of 501 patients, enrolled between October 2008 and September 2012, and followed for one year. Setting 43 North American academic trauma centers. Participants Skeletally mature men or women with an open or closed tibial fracture amenable to intramedullary nail fixation. Exclusions comprised pilon fractures, tibial shaft fractures that extended into the joint and required reduction, pathological fractures, bilateral tibial fractures, segmental fractures, spiral fractures >7.5 cm in length, concomitant injuries that were likely to impair function for at least as long as the patient’s tibial fracture, and tibial fractures that showed <25% cortical contact and >1 cm gap after surgical fixation. 3105 consecutive patients who underwent intramedullary nailing for tibial fracture were assessed, 599 were eligible and 501 provided informed consent and were enrolled. Interventions Patients were allocated centrally to self administer daily LIPUS (n=250) or use a sham device (n=251) until their tibial fracture showed radiographic healing or until one year after intramedullary fixation. Main outcome measures Primary registry specified outcome was time to radiographic healing within one year of fixation; secondary outcome was rate of non-union. Additional protocol specified outcomes included short form-36 (SF-36) physical component summary (PCS) scores, return to work, return to household activities, return to ≥80% of function before injury, return to leisure activities, time to full weight bearing, scores on the health utilities index (mark 3), and adverse events related to the device. Results SF-36 PCS data were acquired from 481/501 (96%) patients, for whom

  11. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound induces apoptosis in osteoclasts: Fish scales are a suitable model for the analysis of bone metabolism by ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Nobuo; Hanmoto, Taizo; Yano, Sachiko; Furusawa, Yukihiro; Ikegame, Mika; Tabuchi, Yoshiaki; Kondo, Takashi; Kitamura, Kei-ichiro; Endo, Masato; Yamamoto, Toshio; Sekiguchi, Toshio; Urata, Makoto; Mikuni-Takagaki, Yuko; Hattori, Atsuhiko

    2016-05-01

    Using fish scales in which osteoclasts and osteoblasts coexist on the calcified bone matrix, we examined the effects of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) on both osteoclasts and osteoblasts. At 3h of incubation after LIPUS treatment, osteoclastic markers such as tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) and cathepsin K mRNA expressions decreased significantly while mRNA expressions of osteoblastic markers, osteocalcin, distal-less homeobox 5, runt-related transcription factor 2a, and runt-related transcription factor 2b, increased significantly. At 6 and 18h of incubation, however, both osteoclastic and osteoblastic marker mRNA expression did not change at least present conditions. Using GeneChip analysis of zebrafish scales treated with LIPUS, we found that cell death-related genes were upregulated with LIPUS treatment. Real-time PCR analysis indicated that the expression of apoptosis-related genes also increased significantly. To confirm the involvement of apoptosis in osteoclasts with LIPUS, osteoclasts were induced by autotransplanting scales in goldfish. Thereafter, the DNA fragmentation associated with apoptosis was detected in osteoclasts using the TUNEL (TdT-mediated dUTP nick end labeling) method. The multi-nuclei of TRAP-stained osteoclasts in the scales were labeled with TUNEL. TUNEL staining showed that the number of apoptotic osteoclasts in goldfish scales was significantly elevated by treatment with LIPUS at 3h of incubation. Thus, we are the first to demonstrate that LIPUS directly functions to osteoclasts and to conclude that LIPUS directly causes apoptosis in osteoclasts shortly after exposure. PMID:26850473

  12. Comparative study of the effects of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound and low-level laser therapy on bone defects in tibias of rats.

    PubMed

    Fávaro-Pípi, Elaine; Feitosa, Suellen Maurin; Ribeiro, Daniel Araki; Bossini, Paulo; Oliveira, Poliani; Parizotto, Nivaldo A; Renno, Ana Claudia Muniz

    2010-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate and to compare the effects of low intensity ultra-sound (LIPUS) and low-level laser therapy (LLLT) during the process of bone healing by means of histopathological and morphometric analysis. The animals were randomly distributed into three groups of 30 animals each: the control group (bone defect without treatment); the laser-treated group: (bone defect treated with laser), and the LIPUS-treated (bone defect treated with ultrasound). Each group was further divided into three different subgroups (n = 10) and on days 7, 13, and 25 post-injury, rats were killed with an intra-peritoneal injection of general anesthetic. The rats were treated with a 30-mW/cm(2) low-intensity pulsed ultrasound and a 830-nm laser at 50 J/cm(2). The results showed intense new bone formation surrounded by highly vascularized connective tissue presenting a slight osteogenic activity, with primary bone deposition being observed in the group exposed to laser in the intermediary (13 days) and late stages of repair (25 days). This was confirmed by morphometric analysis in which significant statistical differences (p < 0.05) were noticed when compared to the control. No remarkable differences were noticed in the specimens treated with ultrasound with regard to the amount of newly formed bone in comparison to the control group. Taken together, our results indicate that laser therapy improves bone repair in rats as depicted by histopathological and morphometric analysis, mainly at the late stages of recovery. Moreover, it seems that this therapy was more effective than US to accelerate bone healing. PMID:20521077

  13. Enhancement of Cell Ingrowth, Proliferation, and Early Differentiation in a Three-Dimensional Silicon Carbide Scaffold Using Low-Intensity Pulsed Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Liangjun

    2015-01-01

    Concerns over the use of autografts or allografts have necessitated the development of biomaterials for bone regeneration. Various studies have been performed to optimize the cultivation of osteogenic cells using osteoconductive porous scaffolds. The aim of this study was to evaluate the osteogenic efficiency of bone cell ingrowth, proliferation, and early differentiation in a silicon carbide (SiC) porous ceramic scaffold promoted with low-intensity pulsed ultrasound. MC3T3-E1 mouse preosteoblasts were seeded onto scaffolds and cultured for 4 and 7 days with daily of 20-min ultrasound treatment. The cells were evaluated for cell attachment, morphology, viability, ingrowth depth, volumetric proliferation, and early differentiation. After 4 and 7 days of culture and ultrasound exposure, the cell density was higher in the ultrasound-treated group compared with the sham-treated group on SiC scaffolds. The cell ingrowth depths inside the SiC scaffolds were 149.2±27.3 μm at 1 day, 310.1±12.6 μm for the ultrasound-treated group and 248.0±19.7 μm for the sham control at 4 days, and 359.6±18.5 μm for the ultrasound-treated group and 280.0±17.7 μm for the sham control at 7 days. They were significantly increased, that is, 25% (p=0.0029) and 28% (p=0.0008) increase, respectively, with ultrasound radiation force as compared with those in sham control at 4 and 7 days postseeding. The dsDNA contents were 583.5±19.1 ng/scaffold at 1 day, 2749.9±99.9 ng/scaffold for the ultrasound-treated group and 2514.9±114.7 ng/scaffold for the sham control at 4 days, and 3582.3±325.3 ng/scaffold for the ultrasound-treated group and 2825.7±134.3 ng/scaffold for the sham control at 7 days. There was a significant difference in the dsDNA content between the ultrasound- and sham-treated groups at 4 and 7 days. The ultrasound-treated group with the SiC construct showed a 9% (p=0.00029) and 27% (p=0.00017) increase in the average dsDNA content at 4 and 7 days over

  14. In vitro effects of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound stimulation on the osteogenic differentiation of human alveolar bone-derived mesenchymal stem cells for tooth tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Lim, Kitaek; Kim, Jangho; Seonwoo, Hoon; Park, Soo Hyun; Choung, Pill-Hoon; Chung, Jong Hoon

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasound stimulation produces significant multifunctional effects that are directly relevant to alveolar bone formation, which is necessary for periodontal healing and regeneration. We focused to find out effects of specific duty cycles and the percentage of time that ultrasound is being generated over one on/off pulse period, under ultrasound stimulation. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound ((LIPUS) 1 MHz) with duty cycles of 20% and 50% was used in this study, and human alveolar bone-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hABMSCs) were treated with an intensity of 50 mW/cm(2) and exposure time of 10 min/day. hABMSCs exposed at duty cycles of 20% and 50% had similar cell viability (O.D.), which was higher (*P < 0.05) than that of control cells. The alkaline phosphatase (ALP) was significantly enhanced at 1 week with LIPUS treatment in osteogenic cultures as compared to control. Gene expressions showed significantly higher expression levels of CD29, CD44, COL1, and OCN in the hABMSCs under LIPUS treatment when compared to control after two weeks of treatment. The effects were partially controlled by LIPUS treatment, indicating that modulation of osteogenesis in hABMSCs was related to the specific stimulation. Furthermore, mineralized nodule formation was markedly increased after LIPUS treatment than that seen in untreated cells. Through simple staining methods such as Alizarin red and von Kossa staining, calcium deposits generated their highest levels at about 3 weeks. These results suggest that LIPUS could enhance the cell viability and osteogenic differentiation of hABMSCs, and could be part of effective treatment methods for clinical applications.

  15. Comparative study of the effects of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound and low-level laser therapy on injured muscle repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renno, Ana Claudia Muniz; Toma, Renata Luri; Feitosa, Suellen Maurin; Fernandes, Kelly; de Oliveira, Poliani; Parizotto, N.; Ribeiro, Daniel Araki

    2011-03-01

    Muscle tissue is one of the most frequently affected by injury, whether during sports activities, or work activities. In this context, biochemical and biophysical resources have been studied to minimize the time of muscle regeneration. Among these, low intensity pulsed ultrasound (US) and low level laser therapy (LLLT) may be highlighted. Despite a series of evidences about the positive effects of these resources in the process of tissue regeneration, the cellular and morphological changes triggered by LLLT and U.S. are still largely unknown. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of US and LLLT on muscle repair after cryolesion by means of histopathological analysis and immunohistochemistry for COX-2. A total of thirty five male Wistar rats were randomly distributed into 4 groups: intact control group; injured control group: muscle injured animals without any treatment; laser treated group: muscle injured animals treated with 830 nm laser and ultra-sound treated group: muscle injured animals treated with US. The treatments started 24 hours post-surgery and were performed during 6 sessions. The animals exposed to lasertherapy pointed out minor degenerative changes of muscle tissue. In the same way, exposure to ultrasound was able to reduce tissue injuries induced by cryolesion, but less intense than laser therapy. Strong COX-2 positive cells were found in rats submitted to cryolesion only, whereas COX-2 immunoexpression was lower in laser treated or ultrasound treated groups. In summary, this study reveals that both lasertherapy and ultrasound have positive effects on muscle repair in rats.

  16. Low intensity ultrasound stimulates osteoblast migration at different frequencies.

    PubMed

    Man, Jennifer; Shelton, Richard M; Cooper, Paul R; Landini, Gabriel; Scheven, Ben A

    2012-09-01

    This study investigated the effects of different frequencies of low intensity ultrasound on osteoblast migration using an in vitro scratch-wound healing assay. Mouse calvarial-derived MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts in culture were exposed to continuous 45 kHz ultrasound (25 mW/cm(2)) or pulsed 1 MHz ultrasound (250 mW/cm(2)) for 30 min followed by 2 days' culture. Ultrasound treatment with either kHz or MHz output similarly and significantly increased cell numbers after 2 days in culture compared with untreated control cultures. In the scratch-wound healing assay the presence of the cell proliferation inhibitor mitomycin C (MMC) did not influence scratch-wound closure in control cultures indicating that cell migration was responsible for the in vitro wound healing. Application of ultrasound significantly stimulated wound closure. MMC did not affect kHz-stimulated in vitro wound healing; however, MMC reduced in part the scratch-wound closure rate in MHz-treated cultures suggesting that enhanced cell proliferation as well as migration was involved in the healing promoted by MHz ultrasound. In conclusion, both continuous kHz and pulsed MHz ultrasound promoted osteoblastic migration; however, subtle differences were apparent in the manner the different ultrasound regimens enhanced in vitro scratch-wound healing.

  17. Does pulsed low intensity ultrasound allow early return to normal activities when treating stress fractures? A review of one tarsal navicular and eight tibial stress fractures.

    PubMed

    Brand, J C; Brindle, T; Nyland, J; Caborn, D N; Johnson, D L

    1999-01-01

    We sought to evaluate the efficacy of daily pulsed low intensity ultrasound (LIUS) with early return to activities for the treatment of lower extremity stress fractures. Eight patients (2 males, 6 females) with radiographic and bone scan confirmed tibial stress fractures participated in this study. Additionally, a case report of a tarsal navicular stress fracture is described. All patients except one were involved in athletics. Prior to the study, subjects completed a 5 question, 10 cm visual analog scale (VAS) regarding pain level (10 = extreme pain, 1 = no pain) and were assessed for functional performance. Subjects received 20-minute LIUS treatments 5 times a week for 4 weeks. Subjects maintained all functional activities during the treatment period. Seven patients with posterior-medial stress fractures participated without a brace. Subjects were re-tested after 4 weeks of treatment. Mann-Whitney U tests (VAS data) and paired t-tests (functional tests) assessed statistical significance (p<0.05). Although the intensity of practice was diminished in some instances, no time off from competitive sports was prescribed for the patients with the tibial stress fractures. The patient with the anterior tibial stress fracture underwent tibial intramedullary nailing at the conclusion of a season of play. In this uncontrolled experience, treatment of tibial stress fractures with daily pulsed LIUS was effective in pain relief and early return to vigorous activity without bracing for the patients with posterior-medial stress fractures.

  18. Effects of Low-Intensity Pulsed Ultrasound on Orthodontic Tooth Movement and Orthodontically Induced Inflammatory Root Resorption in Ovariectomized Osteoporotic Rats.

    PubMed

    Dahhas, Feras Y; El-Bialy, Tarek; Afify, Ahmed R; Hassan, Ali H

    2016-03-01

    This study investigated the effects of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) on orthodontic tooth movement (OTM) and orthodontically induced inflammatory root resorption (OIRR) in ovariectomized osteoporotic rats. Forty-eight 28-d-old female Wistar rats were divided into ovariectomized and intact groups. In both groups, animals were left untreated; treated with 50 g mesially directed orthodontic force on the maxillary first molars using nickel-titanium closed-coil springs for 28 d; or treated with the same orthodontic protocol along with a 20-min LIPUS application on alternate days for 28 d. Extent of OTM and amount of OIRR of mesial roots were measured on three-dimensionally reconstructed micro-computed tomography images. Ovariectomy increased OIRR (p < 0.05). LIPUS reduced root volumetric loss regardless of ovariectomy status (p < 0.05); only ovariectomized animals had decreased OTM (p < 0.05). LIPUS normalizes OTM and attenuates OIRR in ovariectomized osteoporotic rats. It may therefore be beneficial in women with postmenopausal osteoporosis.

  19. Combined application of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound and functional electrical stimulation accelerates bone-tendon junction healing in a rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jianzhong; Qu, Jin; Xu, Daqi; Zhang, Tao; Qin, Ling; Lu, Hongbin

    2014-02-01

    The objective of this study was to elucidate the combined use of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) and functional electrical stimulation (FES) on patella-patellar tendon (PPT) junction healing using a partial patellectomy model in rabbits. LIPUS was delivered continuously starting day 3 postoperative until week 6. FES was applied on quadriceps muscles to induce tensile force to the repaired PPT junction 5 days per week for 6 weeks since week 7 postoperatively. Forty rabbits with partial patellectomy were randomly divided into four groups: control, LIPUS alone, FES alone, and LIPUS + FES groups. At week 12, the PPT complexes were harvested for histology, radiographs, peripheral quantitative computed tomography, and biomechanical testing. There was better remodeling of newly formed bone and fibrocartilage zone in the three treatment groups compared with the control group. LIPUS and/or FES treatments significantly increased the area and bone mineral content of new bone. The failure load and ultimate strength of PPT complex were also highly improved in the three treatment groups. More new bone formed and higher tensile properties were showed in the LIPUS + FES group compared with the LIPUS or FES alone groups. Early LIPUS treatment and later FES treatment showed the additive effects of accelerating PPT junction healing.

  20. Effects of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound on integrin-FAK-PI3K/Akt mechanochemical transduction in rabbit osteoarthritis chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Kai; Xia, Peng; Lin, Qiang; Shen, Shihao; Gao, Mingxia; Ren, Shasha; Li, Xueping

    2014-07-01

    The effect of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) on extracellular matrix (ECM) production via modulation of the integrin/focal adhesion kinase (FAK)/phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathway has been investigated in previous studies in normal chondrocytes, but not in osteoarthritis (OA). Therefore, we investigated the LIPUS-induced integrin β1/FAK/PI3K/Akt mechanochemical transduction pathway in a single study in rabbit OA chondrocytes. Normal and OA chondrocytes were exposed to LIPUS, and mRNA and protein expression of cartilage, metalloproteinases and integrin-FAK-PI3K/Akt signal pathway-related genes was determined by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting, respectively. Compared with levels in normal chondrocytes, expression levels of ECM-related genes were significantly lower in OA chondrocytes and those of metalloproteinase-related genes were significantly higher. In addition, integrin β1 gene expression and the phosphorylation of FAK, PI3K and Akt were significantly higher in OA chondrocytes. The expression of all tested genes was significantly increased except for that of metalloproteinase, which was significantly decreased in the LIPUS-treated OA group compared to the untreated OA group. LIPUS may affect the integrin-FAK-PI3K/Akt mechanochemical transduction pathway and alter ECM production by OA chondrocytes. Our findings will aid the future development of a treatment or even cure for OA.

  1. Efficacy of focused low-intensity pulsed ultrasound therapy for the management of knee osteoarthritis: a randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Lang; Wang, Yan; Chen, Jinyun; Chen, Wenzhi

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of focused low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (FLIPUS) therapy on the functional and health status of patients with knee osteoarthritis (KOA). A total of 106 subjects with bilateral KOA were randomized sequentially into two groups. Group I received FLIPUS + diclofenac sodium, and group II received sham FLIPUS + diclofenac sodium. The therapeutic effects of the interventions were evaluated by measuring changes in VAS pain, the WOMAC scores, and the LI scores after 10 days of treatment as well as changes in LI and VAS at follow-up, 4 and 12 weeks later. In addition, changes in the range of motion, ambulation speed, and the SF-36 in each group were recorded after 10 days of treatment. Compared with those in group II, patients in group Ishowed significant improvements in VAS, WOMAC, LI, ambulation speed, and most items in the SF-36 after 10 days of treatment. In addition, patients in group I showed significant improvements in LI and VAS at follow-up. There were no FLIPUS-related adverse events during and after the interventions. In conclusion, FLIPUS is a safe and effective treatment modality for relieving pain and improving the functions and quality of life of patients with KOA. PMID:27748432

  2. Effect of Nonviral Plasmid Delivered Basic Fibroblast Growth Factor and Low Intensity Pulsed Ultrasound on Mandibular Condylar Growth: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Uludağ, Hasan

    2014-01-01

    Objective. Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) is an important regulator of tissue growth. Previous studies have shown that low intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) stimulates bone growth. The objective of this study was to evaluate the possible synergetic effect of LIPUS and local injection of nonviral bFGF plasmid DNA (pDNA) on mandibular growth in rats. Design. Groups were control, blank pDNA, bFGF pDNA, LIPUS, and bFGF pDNA + LIPUS. Treatments were performed for 28 days. Significant increase was observed in mandibular height and condylar length in LIPUS groups. MicroCT analysis showed significant increase in bone volume fraction in bFGF pDNA + LIPUS group. Histomorphometric analysis showed increased cell count and condylar proliferative and hypertrophic layers widths in bFGF pDNA group. Results. Current study showed increased mandibular condylar growth in either bFGF pDNA or LIPUS groups compared to the combined group that showed only increased bone volume fraction. Conclusion. It appears that there is an additive effect of bFGF + LIPUS on the mandibular growth. PMID:24967367

  3. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound accelerated bone-tendon junction healing through regulation of vascular endothelial growth factor expression and cartilage formation.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hongbin; Qin, Ling; Cheung, Winghoi; Lee, Kwongman; Wong, Wannar; Leung, Kwoksui

    2008-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to use our established partial patellectomy rabbit model to study the effects of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) on patella-patellar tendon (PPT) junction repair through hypothesized pathways including regulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and chondrogenesis. Standard partial patellectomy was conducted in sixty-four 18 wk-old rabbits that were subsequently divided into LIPUS and control group. The PPT complex was harvested at week 2, 4, 8 and 16 postoperatively (n = 8 for each time point) for preparation of sagittal sections that were evaluated for angiogenesis by analyzing VEGF expression and chondrogenesis. Results showed differences in the pattern of VEGF expression between LIPUS and control groups during the entire healing process, i.e., significant differences in the average percentage of VEGF expression found in between the LIPUS and the control groups. At postoperative week 4, the chondrocytes and osteoblasts in woven bone expressed significantly more VEGF in the LIPUS group than that in the control group (35.6% +/- 7.0% versus 28.0% +/- 4.6%, p < 0.05). Compared with the control group, the development of cartilaginous metaplasia was found more advanced in the scar tissue next to the articular cartilage of the remaining patella in the LIPUS group that was expressed with VEGF in the chondrocytes (38.8% +/- 12.3%). However, the specimens in the control group just showed the similar cartilaginous metaplasia region until postoperative week 8. Histomorphometry revealed thicker fibrocartilage zone and larger cartilaginous metaplasia field at PPT healing interface in LIPUS group compared with those of the control group at week 8 and 16. In conclusion, this was the first quantitative study to demonstrate that LIPUS improved B-T junction healing through regulation of VEGF expression in early healing phase and subsequent chondrogenesis.

  4. Low intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) influences the multilineage differentiation of mesenchymal stem and progenitor cell lines through ROCK-Cot/Tpl2-MEK-ERK signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Kusuyama, Joji; Bandow, Kenjiro; Shamoto, Mitsuo; Kakimoto, Kyoko; Ohnishi, Tomokazu; Matsuguchi, Tetsuya

    2014-04-11

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are pluripotent cells that can differentiate into multilineage cell types, including adipocytes and osteoblasts. Mechanical stimulus is one of the crucial factors in regulating MSC differentiation. However, it remains unknown how mechanical stimulus affects the balance between adipogenesis and osteogenesis. Low intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) therapy is a clinical application of mechanical stimulus and facilitates bone fracture healing. Here, we applied LIPUS to adipogenic progenitor cell and MSC lines to analyze how multilineage cell differentiation was affected. We found that LIPUS suppressed adipogenic differentiation of both cell types, represented by impaired lipid droplet appearance and decreased gene expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ2 (Pparg2) and fatty acid-binding protein 4 (Fabp4). LIPUS also down-regulated the phosphorylation level of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ2 protein, inhibiting its transcriptional activity. In contrast, LIPUS promoted osteogenic differentiation of the MSC line, characterized by increased cell calcification as well as inductions of runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2) and Osteocalcin mRNAs. LIPUS induced phosphorylation of cancer Osaka thyroid oncogene/tumor progression locus 2 (Cot/Tpl2) kinase, which was essential for the phosphorylation of mitogen-activated kinase kinase 1 (MEK1) and p44/p42 extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs). Notably, effects of LIPUS on both adipogenesis and osteogenesis were prevented by a Cot/Tpl2-specific inhibitor. Furthermore, effects of LIPUS on MSC differentiation as well as Cot/Tpl2 phosphorylation were attenuated by the inhibition of Rho-associated kinase. Taken together, these results indicate that mechanical stimulus with LIPUS suppresses adipogenesis and promotes osteogenesis of MSCs through Rho-associated kinase-Cot/Tpl2-MEK-ERK signaling pathway. PMID:24550383

  5. Combined Use of Low Intensity Pulsed Ultrasound and rhBMP-2 to Enhance Bone Formation in a Rat Model of Critical-Size Defect

    PubMed Central

    Angle, Siddhesh R.; Sena, Kotaro; Sumner, Dale R.; Virkus, Walter W.; Virdi, Amarjit S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Bone repair is regulated by biological factors and the local mechanical environment. We hypothesize that the combined use of low intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) and recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) will synergistically or additively enhance bone regeneration in a model simulating the more difficult scenarios in orthopedic traumatology. Methods Femoral defects in rats were replaced with absorbable collagen sponges carrying rhBMP-2 (0, 1.2, 6 or 12μg; n=30). Each group was divided equally to receive daily treatment of either LIPUS or sham stimulation. At 4 weeks new bone formation was assessed using quantitative (radiography and microcomputed tomography), qualitative (histology) and functional (biomechanical) endpoints. Results LIPUS with 1.2μg of rhBMP-2 significantly improved the radiographic healing as compared to its sham control starting as early as 2 weeks. Quantitatively, the use of LIPUS with 6μg of rhBMP-2 significantly increased the bone volume. However, using LIPUS with 12μg of rhBMP-2 indicated a reduction in callus size, without compromising the bone volume, which was also observable histologically, showing organized lamellar bone and repopulated marrow in the original defect region. Histologically, 1.2μg of rhBMP-2 alone showed the presence of uncalcified cartilage in the defect which was reduced with LIPUS treatment. Biomechanically, LIPUS treatment significantly increased the peak torsion and stiffness in the 6μg and 12μg rhBMP-2 group. Conclusion LIPUS enhances rhBMP-2 induced bone formation at lower doses (1.2μg and 6μg) and callus maturation at 12μg dose delivered on ACS for bone repair in a rat critical-sized femoral segmental defect. PMID:24464096

  6. Sonosensitive theranostic liposomes for preclinical in vivo MRI-guided visualization of doxorubicin release stimulated by pulsed low intensity non-focused ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Rizzitelli, S; Giustetto, P; Cutrin, J C; Delli Castelli, D; Boffa, C; Ruzza, M; Menchise, V; Molinari, F; Aime, S; Terreno, E

    2015-03-28

    The main goal of this study was to assess the theranostic performance of a nanomedicine able to generate MRI contrast as a response to the release from liposomes of the antitumor drug Doxorubicin triggered by the local exposure to pulsed low intensity non focused ultrasounds (pLINFU). In vitro experiments showed that Gadoteridol was an excellent imaging agent for probing the release of Doxorubicin following pLINFU stimulation. On this basis, the theranostic system was investigated in vivo on a syngeneic murine model of TS/A breast cancer. MRI offered an excellent guidance for monitoring the pLINFU-stimulated release of the drug. Moreover, it provided: i) an in vivo proof of the effective release of the liposomal content, and ii) a confirmation of the therapeutic benefits of the overall protocol. Ex vivo fluorescence microscopy indicated that the good therapeutic outcome was originated from a better diffusion of the drug in the tumor following the pLINFU stimulus. Very interestingly, the broad diffusion of the drug in the tumor stroma appeared to be mediated by the presence of the liposomes themselves. The results of this study highlighted either the great potential of US-based stimuli to safely trigger the release of a drug from its nanocarrier or the associated significant therapeutic improvement. Finally, MRI demonstrated to be a valuable technique to support chemotherapy and monitoring the outcome. Furthermore, in this specific case, the theranostic agent developed has a high clinical translatability because the MRI agent utilized is already approved for human use. PMID:25626083

  7. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound accelerates rat femoral fracture healing by acting on the various cellular reactions in the fracture callus.

    PubMed

    Azuma, Y; Ito, M; Harada, Y; Takagi, H; Ohta, T; Jingushi, S

    2001-04-01

    Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) has been shown to accelerate fracture healing in both animal models and clinical trials, but the mechanism of action remains unclear. In fracture healing, various consecutive cellular reactions occurred until repair. We investigated whether the advanced effects of LIPUS depended on the duration and timing of LIPUS treatment in a rat closed femoral fracture model to determine the target of LIPUS in the healing process. Sixty-nine Long-Evans male rats that have bilateral closed femoral fractures were used. The right femur was exposed to LIPUS (30 mW/cm2 spatial and temporal average [SATA], for 20 minutes/day), and the left femur was used as a control. Rats were divided into four groups according to timing and duration of treatment (Ph-1, days 1-8; Ph-2, days 9-16; Ph-3, days 17-24; throughout [T], days 1-24 after the fracture). Animals were killed on day 25. After radiographs and microfocus X-ray computed tomography (muCT) tomograms were taken, the hard callus area (HCA), bone mineral content (BMC) at the fracture site, and mechanical torsion properties were measured, and histological analysis was conducted. Interestingly, the maximum torque of the LIPUS-treated femur was significantly greater than that of the controls in all groups without any changes in HCA and BMC. The multiviewing of three-dimensional (3D) muCT reconstructions and histology supported our findings that the partial LIPUS treatment time was able to accelerate healing, but longer treatment was more effective. These results suggest that LIPUS acts on some cellular reactions involved in each phase of the healing process such as inflammatory reaction, angiogenesis, chondrogenesis, intramembranous ossification, endochondral ossification, and bone remodeling.

  8. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound treatment as an alternative to vascular bone graft surgery for a 5-year-long ulnar non-union in a patient with haemochromatosis.

    PubMed

    Povlsen, Sebastian Daniel; Povlsen, Bo

    2015-11-03

    We present the case of a 75-year-old woman with haemochromatosis who developed a 5-year-long right ulnar non-union after a shortening osteotomy to correct a malunited Colles' fracture. Standard surgical treatment for ulnar non-unions was attempted on 19 March 2008 and again on 20 April 2009, but the non-union persisted on 8 May 2012, as confirmed by CT scan. Vascular bone grafting and refixation was then considered, but the patient declined this extensive operation, instead choosing to try non-invasive low-intensity pulsed ultrasound treatment with an Exogen device. Just 4 months later, complete union as confirmed by CT scan was achieved. This is the first case demonstrating the efficacy of ultrasound treatment for long-standing non-unions resistant to surgery in patients with haemochromatosis, a disorder where iron deposition can provide suboptimal circumstances for bone healing. Our finding suggests that low-intensity pulsed ultrasound devices could be used as a first-line treatment for stable non-unions instead of revision surgery.

  9. A REVIEW OF LOW-INTENSITY ULTRASOUND FOR CANCER THERAPY

    PubMed Central

    WOOD, ANDREW K. W.; SEHGAL, CHANDRA M.

    2015-01-01

    The literature describing the use of low-intensity ultrasound in four major areas of cancer therapy was reviewed - sonodynamic therapy, ultrasound mediated chemotherapy, ultrasound mediated gene delivery and antivascular ultrasound therapy. Each technique consistently resulted in the death of cancer cells and the bioeffects of ultrasound were primarily attributed to thermal actions and inertial cavitation. In each therapeutic modality, theranostic contrast agents composed of microbubbles played a role in both therapy and vascular imaging. The development of these agents is important as it establishes a therapeutic-diagnostic platform which can monitor the success of anti-cancer therapy. Little attention, however, has been given to either the direct assessment of the underlying mechanisms of the observed bioeffects or to the viability of these therapies in naturally occurring cancers in larger mammals; if such investigations provided encouraging data there could be a prompt application of a therapy technique in treating cancer patients. PMID:25728459

  10. Activation of microbubbles by low-intensity pulsed ultrasound enhances the cytotoxicity of curcumin involving apoptosis induction and cell motility inhibition in human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Yixiang; Wang, Pan; Chen, Xiyang; Hu, Jianmin; Liu, Yichen; Wang, Xiaobing; Liu, Quanhong

    2016-11-01

    Ultrasound and microbubbles-mediated drug delivery has become a promising strategy to promote drug delivery and its therapeutic efficacy. The aim of this research was to assess the effects of microbubbles (MBs)-combined low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LPUS) on the delivery and cytotoxicity of curcumin (Cur) to human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells. Under the experimental condition, MBs raised the level of acoustic cavitation and enhanced plasma membrane permeability; and cellular uptake of Cur was notably improved by LPUS-MBs treatment, aggravating Cur-induced MDA-MB-231 cells death. The combined treatment markedly caused more obvious changes of cell morphology, F-actin cytoskeleton damage and cell migration inhibition. Our results demonstrated that combination of MBs and LPUS may be an efficient strategy for improving anti-tumor effect of Cur, suggesting a potential effective method for antineoplastic therapy. PMID:27245953

  11. Activation of microbubbles by low-intensity pulsed ultrasound enhances the cytotoxicity of curcumin involving apoptosis induction and cell motility inhibition in human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Yixiang; Wang, Pan; Chen, Xiyang; Hu, Jianmin; Liu, Yichen; Wang, Xiaobing; Liu, Quanhong

    2016-11-01

    Ultrasound and microbubbles-mediated drug delivery has become a promising strategy to promote drug delivery and its therapeutic efficacy. The aim of this research was to assess the effects of microbubbles (MBs)-combined low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LPUS) on the delivery and cytotoxicity of curcumin (Cur) to human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells. Under the experimental condition, MBs raised the level of acoustic cavitation and enhanced plasma membrane permeability; and cellular uptake of Cur was notably improved by LPUS-MBs treatment, aggravating Cur-induced MDA-MB-231 cells death. The combined treatment markedly caused more obvious changes of cell morphology, F-actin cytoskeleton damage and cell migration inhibition. Our results demonstrated that combination of MBs and LPUS may be an efficient strategy for improving anti-tumor effect of Cur, suggesting a potential effective method for antineoplastic therapy.

  12. Sound Packing DNA: packing open circular DNA with low-intensity ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Donghee; Jung, Bong-Kwang; Park, Hyunjin; Lee, Hyungbeen; Lee, Gyudo; Park, Jingam; Shin, Unchul; Won, Jong Ho; Jo, Yong Jun; Chang, Jin Woo; Lee, Sangwoo; Yoon, Daesung; Seo, Jongbum; Kim, Chul-Woo

    2015-04-01

    Supercoiling DNA (folding DNA into a more compact molecule) from open circular forms requires significant bending energy. The double helix is coiled into a higher order helix form; thus it occupies a smaller footprint. Compact packing of DNA is essential to improve the efficiency of gene delivery, which has broad implications in biology and pharmaceutical research. Here we show that low-intensity pulsed ultrasound can pack open circular DNA into supercoil form. Plasmid DNA subjected to 5.4 mW/cm2 intensity ultrasound showed significant (p-values <0.001) supercoiling compared to DNA without exposure to ultrasound. Radiation force induced from ultrasound and dragging force from the fluid are believed to be the main factors that cause supercoiling. This study provides the first evidence to show that low-intensity ultrasound can directly alter DNA topology. We anticipate our results to be a starting point for improved non-viral gene delivery.

  13. Applying low-intensity pulsed ultrasounds (LIPUS) to a zoledronate-associated atypical femoral shaft fracture without cessation of zoledronate therapy for 3 years follow up: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Arakawa, Shoutaro; Saito, Mitsuru; Kubota, Makoto; Suzuki, Hidehiko; Tsuchida, Shigeki; Hashimoto, Kurando; Marumo, Keishi

    2015-01-01

    Summary Reports are increasing regarding atypical femoral fractures (AFFs) caused by minor trauma in patients using bisphosphonates (BPs) for long periods. Patients with malignant skeletal metastases potentially are at greater risk for these AFFs, especially considering the high dose and the duration of treatment with BPs. We evaluated a case of atypical femoral shaft fracture treated with an intramedullary nail in a patient treated for five years with zoledronate who had breast cancer with metastases to bone. Although bone union was achieved without cessation of zoledronate therapy by applying low-intensity pulsed ultrasounds (LIPUS), the remodeling phase of the fracture healing process was delayed. For BPs-associated AFFs, LIPUS is an alternative to parathyroid hormone (PTH) analogs such as teriparatide that are contraindicated in patients with malignant skeletal metastases. LIPUS is an effective treatment for fracture healing and may avoid the necessity to discontinue BP therapy. PMID:26811711

  14. Improvement of activated sludge bacteria growth by low intensity ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Y. X.; Ding, J. Y.; Gao, J. L.

    2016-08-01

    Influence of low intensity ultrasound (US) on growth rate of bacteria separated from aerobic activated sludge was studied. In order to reveal the optimal ultrasonic conditions,specific oxygen uptake rate (SOUR) of activated sludge was first detected and results showed that the maximum SOUR was obtained (increased by 40%) at US intensity of 3 Wcm-2 and irradiation time of 10min. Under the optimal conditions, 2 species of bacteria isolated from activated sludge were sonicated and then cultivated for 36h, and increment of 6% and 10% of growth rate were detected for the 2 species of bacteria, respectively, indicating US irradiation of suitable parameters effectively improved activated sludge bacteria growth.

  15. A Review on Brain Stimulation Using Low Intensity Focused Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Rezayat, Ehsan; Toostani, Iman Ghodrati

    2016-01-01

    Brain stimulation techniques are important in both basic and clinical studies. Majority of well-known brain stimulating techniques have low spatial resolution or entail invasive processes. Low intensity focused ultrasound (LIFU) seems to be a proper candidate for dealing with such deficiencies. This review recapitulates studies which explored the effects of LIFU on brain structures and its function, in both research and clinical areas. Although the mechanism of LIFU action is still unclear, its different effects from molecular level up to behavioral level can be explored in animal and human brain. It can also be coupled with brain imaging assessments in future research. PMID:27563411

  16. Low Intensity Ultrasound Mediated Liposomal Doxorubicin Delivery Using Polymer Microbubbles.

    PubMed

    Yu, Francois T H; Chen, Xucai; Wang, Jianjun; Qin, Bin; Villanueva, Flordeliza S

    2016-01-01

    Cardiotoxicity is the major dose-limiting factor in the chemotherapeutic use of doxorubicin (Dox). A delivery vehicle that can be triggered to release its payload in the tumoral microvasculature but not in healthy tissue would help improve the therapeutic window of the drug. Delivery strategies combining liposomal encapsulated Dox (LDox), microbubbles (MBs), and ultrasound (US) have been shown to improve therapeutic efficacy of LDox, but much remains to be known about the mechanisms and the US conditions that maximize cytotoxicity using this approach. In this study, we compared different US pulses in terms of drug release and acute toxicity. Drug uptake and proliferation rates using low-intensity US were measured in squamous cell carcinoma cells exposed to LDox conjugated to or coinjected with polymer MBs. The aims of this study were: (1) to compare the effects of low- and high-pressure US on Dox release kinetics; (2) to evaluate whether conjugating the liposome to the MB surface (DoxLPX) is an important factor for drug release and cytotoxicity; and (3) to determine which US parameters most inhibit cell proliferation and whether this inhibition is mediated by drug release or the MB/US interaction with cells. Low-pressure US (170 kPa) at high duty cycle (stable cavitation) released up to ∼ 70% of the encapsulated Dox from the DoxLPX, thus improving Dox bioavailability and cellular uptake and leading to a significant reduction in cell proliferation at 48 h. Flow cytometry showed that US generating stable oscillations of DoxLPX significantly increased cellular Dox uptake at 4 h after US exposure compared to LDox. Drug uptake was correlated with cytotoxicity at 48 h. Our results demonstrate that Dox-containing liposomes conjugated to polymer MBs can be triggered to release ∼ 70% of their payload using noninertial US. Following release, Dox became bioavailable to the cells and induced significantly higher cytotoxicity compared to nonreleased encapsulated drug. Our

  17. A review of low-intensity focused ultrasound pulsation.

    PubMed

    Bystritsky, Alexander; Korb, Alex S; Douglas, Pamela K; Cohen, Mark S; Melega, William P; Mulgaonkar, Amit P; DeSalles, Antonio; Min, Byoung-Kyong; Yoo, Seung-Schik

    2011-07-01

    With the recent approval by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) of Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) for Parkinson's Disease, dystonia and obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) for epilepsy and depression, and repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) for the treatment of depression, neuromodulation has become increasingly relevant to clinical research. However, these techniques have significant drawbacks (eg, lack of special specificity and depth for the rTMS, and invasiveness and cumbersome maintenance for DBS). This article reviews the background, rationale, and pilot studies to date, using a new brain stimulation method-low-intensity focused ultrasound pulsation (LIFUP). The ability of ultrasound to be focused noninvasively through the skull anywhere within the brain, together with concurrent imaging (ie, functional magnetic resonance imaging [fMRI]) techniques, may create a role for research and clinical use of LIFUP. This technique is still in preclinical testing and needs to be assessed thoroughly before being advanced to clinical trials. In this study, we review over 50 years of research data on the use of focused ultrasound (FUS) in neuronal tissue and live brain, and propose novel applications of this noninvasive neuromodulation method.

  18. Intramuscular Heating Characteristics of Multihour Low-Intensity Therapeutic Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Rigby, Justin H.; Taggart, Rebecca M.; Stratton, Kelly L.; Lewis, George K.; Draper, David O.

    2015-01-01

    Context The heating characteristics of a stationary device delivering sustained acoustic medicine with low-intensity therapeutic ultrasound (LITUS) are unknown. Objective To measure intramuscular (IM) heating produced by a LITUS device developed for long-duration treatment of musculoskeletal injuries. Design Controlled laboratory study. Setting University research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants A total of 26 healthy volunteers (16 men, 10 women; age = 23.0 ± 2.1 years, height = 1.74 ± 0.09 m, mass = 73.48 ± 14.65 kg). Intervention(s) Participants were assigned randomly to receive active (n = 20) or placebo (n = 6) LITUS at a frequency of 3 MHz and an energy intensity of 0.132 W/cm2 continuously for 3 hours with a single transducer or dual transducers on the triceps surae muscle. We measured IM temperature using thermocouples inserted at 1.5- and 3-cm depths into muscle. Temperatures were recorded throughout treatment and 30 minutes posttreatment. Main Outcome Measure(s) We used 2-sample t tests to determine the heating curve of the LITUS treatment and differences in final temperatures between depth and number of transducers. Results A mild IM temperature increase of 1°C was reached 10 ± 5 minutes into the treatment, and a more vigorous temperature increase of 4°C was reached 80 ± 10 minutes into the treatment. The maximal steady-state IM temperatures produced during the final 60 minutes of treatment at the 1.5-cm depth were 4.42°C ± 0.08°C and 3.92°C ± 0.06°C using 1 and 2 transducers, respectively. At the 3.0-cm depth, the maximal steady-state IM temperatures during the final 60 minutes of treatment were 3.05°C ± 0.09°C and 3.17°C ± 0.05°C using 1 and 2 transducers, respectively. We observed a difference between the temperatures measured at each depth (t78 = −2.45, P = .02), but the number of transducers used to generate heating was not different (t78 = 1.79, P = .08). Conclusions The LITUS device elicited tissue heating equivalent

  19. The effect of low-intensity therapeutic ultrasound in induced fracture of rat tibiae

    PubMed Central

    Fontes-Pereira, Aldo José; Teixeira, Renato da Costa; de Oliveira, Antônio Jorge Barbosa; Pontes, Roberto Waldesmand Farias; de Barros, Rui Sérgio Monteiro; Negrão, José Nazareno Cunha

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To analyze the possible effects of low-intensity ultrasound on induced tibia fracture of rats in a dose commonly used in physical therapy treatments. METHODS: Twenty male Wistar rats were divided into two groups with 10 animals each. In the ultrasound group (USG), the animals were submitted to bone fracture and treatment with therapeutic ultrasound (TUS). Ultrasonic parameters are: frequency of 1.0 MHz, intensity of 0.2 W/cm2, pulsed mode at 20%, applied in stationary form during 10 minutes on the fracture region, for five weeks. The control group (CG) was submitted to bone fracture but not treated with ultrasound. RESULTS: The radiographies showed better consolidation in USG compared to CG. The statistical tests for alkaline phosphatase and serum calcium did not show significant difference between groups. CONCLUSION: According to this study, TUS, applied with these parameters (not commonly used for bone therapy) accelerates bone healing, confirmed by radiography, yet the biochemical analysis was not conclusive. One reason for this inconsistency may have been some inadequacy of the biochemical protocol, currently under investigation. Level of Evidence II, Prospective comparative study. PMID:24453637

  20. Stimulation of bone cell differentiation by low-intensity ultrasound--a histomorphometric in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Korstjens, C M; Nolte, P A; Burger, E H; Albers, G H R; Semeins, C M; Aartman, I H A; Goei, S W; Klein-Nulend, J

    2004-05-01

    Several investigations have established a stimulatory effect of low-intensity ultrasound treatment on osteogenesis and fracture healing. The objective of this study was to examine whether the stimulatory effect of low-intensity ultrasound results in increased bone cell activity and/or proliferation. Twenty-four paired triplets of metatarsal bone rudiments of twelve 17-days-old fetal mice were dissected and divided into two groups. One group of bone rudiments was treated with pulsating low-intensity ultrasound (30 mW/cm(2); 1.5 MHz) for 20 min/day for a period of 3 or 6 days. The other group served as controls. After culture, the metatarsal bone rudiments were prepared for computer aided light microscopy. The following histomorphometric parameters were determined: length, width and volume of the calcified cartilage and of the bone collar, and cell number. GLM analysis demonstrated that bone collar volume and calcified cartilage percentage were significantly higher in the ultrasound-stimulated rudiments compared to untreated controls. Further, the calcified cartilage volume bordering the hypertrophic zone was significantly higher than in the center of the bone rudiment. Ultrasound treatment did not change the number of the cells. These results suggest that the stimulatory effect of low-intensity ultrasound on endochondral ossification is likely due to stimulation of bone cell differentiation and calcified matrix production, but not to changed cell proliferation.

  1. A prototype stimulator system for noninvasive Low Intensity Focused Ultrasound delivery.

    PubMed

    Mulgaonkar, Amit P; Singh, Rahul S; Babakhanian, Meghedi; Culjat, Martin O; Grundfest, Warren S; Gorgulho, Alessandra; Lacan, Goran; De Salles, Antonio A F; Bystritsky, Alexander; Melega, William P

    2012-01-01

    A prototype Low Intensity Focused Ultrasound (LIFU) stimulator system was developed to evaluate non-invasive neuromodulation in a large animal model. We conducted a feasibility study on a Göttingen minipig, demonstrating reversible, targeted transcranial neuromodulation. The hypothalamus of the minipig was repeatedly stimulated with LIFU which evoked temporally correlated increases in both heart rate and blood pressure.

  2. Low Intensity Uniform Ultrasound Accelerates Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Cellulose Plant Matter

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The work reported here is based on acceleration of enzymatic hydrolysis of plant biomass substrate by introduction of low intensity, uniform ultrasound field into a reaction chamber (bio-reactor). This method may serve as an improvement of rates in the hydrolysis of cellulosic materials to sugars, ...

  3. The Safety of Using High Frequency, Low Intensity Ultrasound to Enhance Thrombolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Soltani, Azita

    2006-05-08

    The EKOS Ultrasound Infusion Systems (EKOS Corporation, Bothell, WA) use high frequency, low intensity ultrasound to accelerate thrombolysis by enhancing clot permeability and lytic drug penetration into thrombus. These systems are designed to provide efficacious catheter-directed treatment for the management of stroke, peripheral arterial occlusion and deep vein thrombosis. The in vitro and in vivo results of investigating the stability of therapeutic and diagnostic compounds used in combination with EKOS devices, the potential for adverse biological effects and the clot fragmentation confirmed the safety of EKOS ultrasound infusion systems in thrombolysis treatment.

  4. The Safety of Using High Frequency, Low Intensity Ultrasound to Enhance Thrombolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soltani, Azita

    2006-05-01

    The EKOS Ultrasound Infusion Systems (EKOS Corporation, Bothell, WA) use high frequency, low intensity ultrasound to accelerate thrombolysis by enhancing clot permeability and lytic drug penetration into thrombus. These systems are designed to provide efficacious catheter-directed treatment for the management of stroke, peripheral arterial occlusion and deep vein thrombosis. The in vitro and in vivo results of investigating the stability of therapeutic and diagnostic compounds used in combination with EKOS devices, the potential for adverse biological effects and the clot fragmentation confirmed the safety of EKOS ultrasound infusion systems in thrombolysis treatment.

  5. Simulation of Low-Intensity Ultrasound Propagating in a Beagle Dog Dentoalveolar Structure to Investigate the Relations between Ultrasonic Parameters and Cementum Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Vafaeian, Behzad; Al-Daghreer, Saleh; El-Rich, Marwan; Adeeb, Samer; El-Bialy, Tarek

    2015-08-01

    The therapeutic effect of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound on orthodontically induced inflammatory root resorption is believed to be brought about through mechanical signals induced by the low-intensity pulsed ultrasound. However, the stimulatory mechanism triggering dental cell response has not been clearly identified yet. The aim of this study was to evaluate possible relations between the amounts of new cementum regeneration and ultrasonic parameters such as pressure amplitude and time-averaged energy density. We used the finite-element method to simulate the previously published experiment on ultrasonic wave propagation in the dentoalveolar structure of beagle dogs. Qualitative relations between the thickness of the regenerated cementum in the experiment and the ultrasonic parameters were observed. Our results indicated that the areas of the root surface with greater ultrasonic pressure were associated with larger amounts of cementum regeneration. However, the establishment of reliable quantitative correlations between ultrasound parameters and cementum regeneration requires more experimental data and simulations. PMID:25957755

  6. Enhancement of ANAMMOX activity by low-intensity ultrasound irradiation at ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jin-Jin; Chen, Hui; Zhang, Jue; Ji, Yu-Xin; Liu, Qi-Zhen; Jin, Ren-Cun

    2013-08-01

    This paper aims to investigate the enhancement effect of low intensity intermittent ultrasound irradiation on the efficiency of anaerobic ammonium oxidation (ANAMMOX) process at ambient temperature. With intermittently irradiated (ultrasound intensity of 0.19 w/cm(2), exposure time of 0.2 min), the reactor (RU) had a nitrogen removal rate (NRR) of 5.49 kgTN/m(3)/d at 14.8°C, while the NRR was 1.53 kgTN/m(3)/d in the control reactor (RC). At the end of operation, the contents of polysaccharide, protein, TTC-dehydrogenase and VSS were 6.82 mg/mgVSS, 26.79 mg/mgVSS, 0.58 mgTF/L/H and 10.11 gVSS/L in RU, higher than the levels in the RC. These results demonstrated that it is possible to achieve stable and highly efficient operation in an ANAMMOX reactor at low ambient temperature by implementation of ultrasonication.

  7. In vitro cell system for studying molecular mechanisms of action associated with low intensity focused ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babakhanian, Meghedi; Fan, Richard E.; Mulgaonkar, Amit P.; Singh, Rahul; Culjat, Martin O.; Danesh, Shahab M.; Toro, Ligia; Grundfest, Warren; Melega, William P.

    2012-03-01

    Low intensity focused ultrasound (LIFU) is now being considered as a noninvasive brain therapy for clinical applications. We maintain that LIFU can efficiently deliver energy from outside the skull to target specific brain regions, effecting localized neuromodulation. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms that drive this LIFU-induced neuromodulation are not well-defined due, in part, to our lack of understanding of how particular sets of LIFU delivery parameters affect the outcome. To efficiently conduct multiple sweeps of different parameters and determine their effects, we have developed an in-vitro system to study the effects of LIFU on different types of cells grown in culture. Presently, we are evaluating how LIFU affects the ionic flux that may underlie neuronal excitation and inhibition observed in-vivo. The results of our in-vitro studies will provide a rationale for selection of optimal LIFU parameter to be used in subsequent in-vivo applications. Thus, a prototype ultrasound cell assay system has been developed to conduct these studies, and is described in this work.

  8. Biomolecular Effects of Low-Intensity Ultrasound: Apoptosis, Sonotransfection, and Gene Expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feril, Loreto B.; Kondo, Takashi; Tabuchi, Yoshiaki; Ogawa, Ryohei; Zhao, Qing-Li; Nozaki, Tetsuo; Yoshida, Toru; Kudo, Nobuki; Tachibana, Katsuro

    2007-07-01

    Biological effects of low-intensity ultrasound (US) focusing on US-induced programmed cell death (apoptosis), regulation of gene expression, and US-mediated gene transfection (sonotransfection) are reviewed. Studies have shown that US can induce apoptosis and that certain conditions can provide an optimal apoptosis induction. Sonotransfection of different cell lines in vitro and target tissues in vivo have been reported. Several genes can also be up-regulated or down-regulated by sonication. As to the potential therapeutic applications, apoptosis induction by US may induce direct and fast ways of treating tumor or cancer tissues. Systemic or local sonotransfection might also be a safe and effective gene therapy method in effecting the cure of local and systemic disorders. Gene regulation of target cells may be utilized in modifying cellular response to a treatment, such as increasing the sensitivity of diseased cells while making normal cells resistant to the side effects of the treatment. In addition, gene regulation by US may also play an important part in the enhanced healing of damaged tissues.

  9. Structural and permeability sensitivity of cells to low intensity ultrasound: Infrared and fluorescence evidence in vitro.

    PubMed

    Domenici, Fabio; Giliberti, Claudia; Bedini, Angelico; Palomba, Raffaele; Udroiu, Ion; Di Giambattista, Lucia; Pozzi, Deleana; Morrone, Stefania; Bordi, Federico; Congiu Castellano, Agostina

    2014-04-01

    This work is focused on the in vitro study of the effects induced by medical ultrasound (US) in murine fibroblast cells (NIH-3T3) at a low-intensity of exposure (spatial peak temporal average intensity Ita<0.1Wcm(-2)). Conventional 1MHz and 3MHz US devices of therapeutic relevance were employed with varying intensity and exposure time parameters. In this framework, upon cells exposure to US, structural changes at the molecular level were evaluated by infrared spectroscopy; alterations in plasma membrane permeability were monitored in terms of uptake efficiency of small cell-impermeable model drug molecules, as measured by fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. The results were related to the cell viability and combined with the statistical PCA analysis, confirming that NIH-3T3 cells are sensitive to therapeutic US, mainly at 1MHz, with time-dependent increases in both efficiency of uptake, recovery of wild-type membrane permeability, and the size of molecules entering 3T3. On the contrary, the exposures from US equipment at 3MHz show uptakes comparable with untreated samples.

  10. Linear alkyl benzene sulphonate (LAS) degradation by immobilized Pseudomonas aeruginosa under low intensity ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Lijun, Xiang; Bochu, Wang; Zhimin, Li; Chuanren, Duan; Qinghong, Wang; Liu, Liu

    2005-01-15

    We studied the LAS degradation of immobilized Pseudomonas aeruginosa with low-intensity ultrasonic and the influence of original LAS concentration, pH, rotary velocity and different conditions of low-intensity ultrasonic irradiation on the degradation of LAS. In our experiment, the degradation rate of LAS was the main index. We found that low-intensity ultrasonic irradiation could improve the metabolism of microorganism cells and promote the LAS biodegradation of immobilized cells. In the experiment, 50 mg/l LAS were used to simulate wastewater, and low-intensity ultrasonic was considered. We found the influence was obvious, and the optimal degradation rate was acquired when the conditions of ultrasonic were frequency 24 kHz, power 8 W, stimulation time 5 s, intermissive time 30 s, and total time 10 min. The LAS degradation rate of immobilized cells with ultrasonic were respectively 40% and 9.5% higher than that of the suspending cells and immobilized cells without irradiation.

  11. Sustained acoustic medicine: a novel long duration approach to biomodulation utilizing low intensity therapeutic ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langer, Matthew D.; Lewis, George K.

    2015-05-01

    Therapeutic ultrasound is an established technique for biomodulation used by physical therapists. Typically it is used to deliver energy locally for the purpose of altering tissue plasticity and increasing local circulation. Access to ultrasound therapy has been limited by equipment and logistic requirements, which has reduced the overall efficacy of the therapy. Ultrasound miniaturization allows for development of portable, wearable, self-applied ultrasound devices that sidestep these limitations. Additionally, research has shown that the timescale of acoustic stimulation matters, and directly affects the quality of result. This paper describes a novel, long duration approach to therapeutic ultrasound and reviews the current data available for a variety of musculoskeletal conditions.

  12. Design of a Thermoacoustic Sensor for Low Intensity Ultrasound Measurements Based on an Artificial Neural Network.

    PubMed

    Xing, Jida; Chen, Jie

    2015-01-01

    In therapeutic ultrasound applications, accurate ultrasound output intensities are crucial because the physiological effects of therapeutic ultrasound are very sensitive to the intensity and duration of these applications. Although radiation force balance is a benchmark technique for measuring ultrasound intensity and power, it is costly, difficult to operate, and compromised by noise vibration. To overcome these limitations, the development of a low-cost, easy to operate, and vibration-resistant alternative device is necessary for rapid ultrasound intensity measurement. Therefore, we proposed and validated a novel two-layer thermoacoustic sensor using an artificial neural network technique to accurately measure low ultrasound intensities between 30 and 120 mW/cm2. The first layer of the sensor design is a cylindrical absorber made of plexiglass, followed by a second layer composed of polyurethane rubber with a high attenuation coefficient to absorb extra ultrasound energy. The sensor determined ultrasound intensities according to a temperature elevation induced by heat converted from incident acoustic energy. Compared with our previous one-layer sensor design, the new two-layer sensor enhanced the ultrasound absorption efficiency to provide more rapid and reliable measurements. Using a three-dimensional model in the K-wave toolbox, our simulation of the ultrasound propagation process demonstrated that the two-layer design is more efficient than the single layer design. We also integrated an artificial neural network algorithm to compensate for the large measurement offset. After obtaining multiple parameters of the sensor characteristics through calibration, the artificial neural network is built to correct temperature drifts and increase the reliability of our thermoacoustic measurements through iterative training about ten seconds. The performance of the artificial neural network method was validated through a series of experiments. Compared to our previous

  13. Design of a Thermoacoustic Sensor for Low Intensity Ultrasound Measurements Based on an Artificial Neural Network.

    PubMed

    Xing, Jida; Chen, Jie

    2015-06-23

    In therapeutic ultrasound applications, accurate ultrasound output intensities are crucial because the physiological effects of therapeutic ultrasound are very sensitive to the intensity and duration of these applications. Although radiation force balance is a benchmark technique for measuring ultrasound intensity and power, it is costly, difficult to operate, and compromised by noise vibration. To overcome these limitations, the development of a low-cost, easy to operate, and vibration-resistant alternative device is necessary for rapid ultrasound intensity measurement. Therefore, we proposed and validated a novel two-layer thermoacoustic sensor using an artificial neural network technique to accurately measure low ultrasound intensities between 30 and 120 mW/cm2. The first layer of the sensor design is a cylindrical absorber made of plexiglass, followed by a second layer composed of polyurethane rubber with a high attenuation coefficient to absorb extra ultrasound energy. The sensor determined ultrasound intensities according to a temperature elevation induced by heat converted from incident acoustic energy. Compared with our previous one-layer sensor design, the new two-layer sensor enhanced the ultrasound absorption efficiency to provide more rapid and reliable measurements. Using a three-dimensional model in the K-wave toolbox, our simulation of the ultrasound propagation process demonstrated that the two-layer design is more efficient than the single layer design. We also integrated an artificial neural network algorithm to compensate for the large measurement offset. After obtaining multiple parameters of the sensor characteristics through calibration, the artificial neural network is built to correct temperature drifts and increase the reliability of our thermoacoustic measurements through iterative training about ten seconds. The performance of the artificial neural network method was validated through a series of experiments. Compared to our previous

  14. Chronic exposure to pulsed low-intensity microwaves is carcinogenic and tumorogenic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundquist, Marjorie

    2004-03-01

    To study health effects of lifetime exposure to low-intensity pulsed radiation >890 MHz, one controlled laboratory study of SPF* rats[1-3] and two of mice[4,5] were conducted, but only one[4] reported that its data showed an association between irradiation and cancer; reports of the other two studies minimized or denied such association. Critical review of these identified data evaluation errors; their correction enables a conclusion of microwave carcinogenicity from each study (the rat study also shows an association with endocrine-system primary malignancies and with a benign tumor of the adrenal medulla), enhancing the credibility of an epidemiological study[6] reporting a brain cancer risk for users of both analog and digital cellular phones. [1] J. Raloff. Science News 126(7):103(1984). [2] K. R. Foster & A. W. Guy. Sci Am 255(3):32-39(1986). [3] C.-K. Chou et al. Bioelectromagnetics 13:469-496(1992). [4] M. H. Repacholi et al. Radiat Res 147:631-640(1990)SPF\\. [5] T. D. Utteridge et al. Radiat Res 158:357-364(2002)non-SPF\\. [6] L. Hardell et al. Int J Oncol 22:399-407(2003). * SPF = specific-pathogen-free

  15. Influence of the anisotropic mechanical properties of the skull in low-intensity focused ultrasound towards neuromodulation of the brain.

    PubMed

    Metwally, Mohamed K; Han, Hee-Sok; Jeon, Hyun Jae; Khang, Gon; Kim, Tae-Seong

    2013-01-01

    Lately, neuromodulation of the brain is considered one of the promising applications of ultrasound technology in which low-intensity focused ultrasound (LIFU) is used noninvasively to excite or inhibit neuronal activity. In LIFU, one of critical barriers in the propagation of ultrasound wave is the skull, which is known to be highly anisotropic mechanically: this affects the ultrasound focusing, thereby neuromodulation effects. This study aims to investigate the influence of the anisotropic properties of the skull on the LIFU via finite element head models incorporating the anisotropic properties of the skull. We have examined the pressure and stress distributions within the head in LIFU. Our results show that though most of the pressure that reaches to the brain is due to the longitudinal wave propagation through the skull, the normal stress in the transverse direction of the wave propagation has the main role to control the pressure profile inside the brain more than the shear stress. The results also show that the anisotropic properties of skull contribute in broadening the focal zone in comparison to that of the isotropic skull.

  16. Ultrasound with low intensity assisted the synthesis of nanocrystalline TiO2 without calcination.

    PubMed

    Ghows, Narjes; Entezari, Mohamad H

    2010-06-01

    A novel method has been developed for the preparation of nano-sized TiO(2) with anatase phase. Nanoparticles with diameter about 6 nm were prepared at a relatively low temperature (75 degrees C) and short time. The synthesis was carried out by the hydrolysis of titanium tetra-isopropoxide (TTIP) in the presence of water, ethanol, and dispersant under ultrasonic irradiation (500 kHz) at low intensity. The results show that variables such as water/ethanol ratio, irradiation time, and temperature have a great influence on the particle size and crystalline phases of TiO(2) nanoparticles. Characterization of the product was carried out by different techniques such as powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and UV-vis spectroscopy. PMID:20382553

  17. Low-intensity continuous ultrasound triggers effective bisphosphonate anticancer activity in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tardoski, Sophie; Ngo, Jacqueline; Gineyts, Evelyne; Roux, Jean-Paul; Clézardin, Philippe; Melodelima, David

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound (US) is a non-ionizing pressure wave that can produce mechanical and thermal effects. Bisphosphonates have demonstrated clinical utility in bone metastases treatment. Preclinical studies suggest that bisphosphonates have anticancer activity. However, bisphosphonates exhibit a high affinity for bone mineral, which reduces their bioavailibity for tumor cells. Ultrasound has been shown to be effective for drug delivery but in interaction with gas bubbles or encapsulated drugs. We examined the effects of a clinically relevant dose of bisphosphonate zoledronate (ZOL) in combination with US. In a bone metastasis model, mice treated with ZOL+US had osteolytic lesions that were 58% smaller than those of ZOL-treated animals as well as a reduced skeletal tumor burden. In a model of primary tumors, ZOL+US treatment reduced by 42% the tumor volume, compared with ZOL-treated animals. Using a fluorescent bisphosphonate, we demonstrated that US forced the release of bisphosphonate from the bone surface, enabling a continuous impregnation of the bone marrow. Additionally, US forced the penetration of ZOL within tumors, as demonstrated by the intratumoral accumulation of unprenylated Rap1A, a surrogate marker of ZOL antitumor activity. Our findings made US a promising modality to trigger bisphosphonate anticancer activity in bone metastases and in primary tumors. PMID:26578234

  18. Low-intensity continuous ultrasound triggers effective bisphosphonate anticancer activity in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Tardoski, Sophie; Ngo, Jacqueline; Gineyts, Evelyne; Roux, Jean-Paul; Clézardin, Philippe; Melodelima, David

    2015-11-18

    Ultrasound (US) is a non-ionizing pressure wave that can produce mechanical and thermal effects. Bisphosphonates have demonstrated clinical utility in bone metastases treatment. Preclinical studies suggest that bisphosphonates have anticancer activity. However, bisphosphonates exhibit a high affinity for bone mineral, which reduces their bioavailability for tumor cells. Ultrasound has been shown to be effective for drug delivery but in interaction with gas bubbles or encapsulated drugs. We examined the effects of a clinically relevant dose of bisphosphonate zoledronate (ZOL) in combination with US. In a bone metastasis model, mice treated with ZOL+US had osteolytic lesions that were 58% smaller than those of ZOL-treated animals as well as a reduced skeletal tumor burden. In a model of primary tumors, ZOL+US treatment reduced by 42% the tumor volume, compared with ZOL-treated animals. Using a fluorescent bisphosphonate, we demonstrated that US forced the release of bisphosphonate from the bone surface, enabling a continuous impregnation of the bone marrow. Additionally, US forced the penetration of ZOL within tumors, as demonstrated by the intratumoral accumulation of unprenylated Rap1A, a surrogate marker of ZOL antitumor activity. Our findings made US a promising modality to trigger bisphosphonate anticancer activity in bone metastases and in primary tumors.

  19. Low-intensity continuous ultrasound triggers effective bisphosphonate anticancer activity in breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tardoski, Sophie; Ngo, Jacqueline; Gineyts, Evelyne; Roux, Jean-Paul; Clézardin, Philippe; Melodelima, David

    2015-11-01

    Ultrasound (US) is a non-ionizing pressure wave that can produce mechanical and thermal effects. Bisphosphonates have demonstrated clinical utility in bone metastases treatment. Preclinical studies suggest that bisphosphonates have anticancer activity. However, bisphosphonates exhibit a high affinity for bone mineral, which reduces their bioavailibity for tumor cells. Ultrasound has been shown to be effective for drug delivery but in interaction with gas bubbles or encapsulated drugs. We examined the effects of a clinically relevant dose of bisphosphonate zoledronate (ZOL) in combination with US. In a bone metastasis model, mice treated with ZOL+US had osteolytic lesions that were 58% smaller than those of ZOL-treated animals as well as a reduced skeletal tumor burden. In a model of primary tumors, ZOL+US treatment reduced by 42% the tumor volume, compared with ZOL-treated animals. Using a fluorescent bisphosphonate, we demonstrated that US forced the release of bisphosphonate from the bone surface, enabling a continuous impregnation of the bone marrow. Additionally, US forced the penetration of ZOL within tumors, as demonstrated by the intratumoral accumulation of unprenylated Rap1A, a surrogate marker of ZOL antitumor activity. Our findings made US a promising modality to trigger bisphosphonate anticancer activity in bone metastases and in primary tumors.

  20. Effect of transosseous application of low-intensity ultrasound at the tendon graft-bone interface healing: gene expression and histological analysis in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Papatheodorou, Loukia K; Malizos, Konstantinos N; Poultsides, Lazaros A; Hantes, Michael E; Grafanaki, Katerina; Giannouli, Stamatina; Ioannou, Maria G; Koukoulis, Georgios K; Protopappas, Vasilios C; Fotiadis, Dimitrios I; Stathopoulos, Constantinos

    2009-04-01

    The present study investigates the effect of transosseous low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LiUS) on the healing at tendon graft-bone interface, in molecular and histological level. The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) in both knees of 52 New Zealand White rabbits was excised and replaced with the long digital extensor. A custom-made ultrasound transducer was implanted onto the medial tibial condyle, adjacent to the surface of the bone tunnel at both knees of the rabbits. The LiUS-treated right knees received 200-mus bursts of 1 MHz sine waves at a pulse repetition rate of 1 kHz and with 30 mW/cm(2) spatial-average temporal-average intensity for 20 min daily (study group), while the left knee received no LiUS (control group). Thirty-six rabbits were used to perform semiquantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis from both study and control groups for transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1), biglycan and collagen I. RT-PCR products showed statistically significant upregulation of biglycan and collagen I gene expression in the study group, while TGF-beta1 gene expression exhibited a bimodal profile. Histological examination performed in 16 rabbits from both groups supported the findings of the molecular analysis, indicating a faster healing rate and a more efficient ligamentization process after ultrasound treatment. These findings suggest that transosseous application of LiUS enhances the healing rate of the tendon graft-bone interface, possibly by affecting the expression levels of genes significant for the tendon to bone healing process.

  1. Low-intensity ultrasound enhances the anticancer activity of cetuximab in human head and neck cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Masui, Takashi; Ota, Ichiro; Kanno, Masatoshi; Yane, Katsunari; Hosoi, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    The potential clinical use of ultrasound in inducing cell apoptosis and enhancing the effects of anticancer drugs in the treatment of cancers has previously been investigated. In this study, the combined effects of low-intensity ultrasound (LIU) and cetuximab, an anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) antibody, on cell killing and induction of apoptosis in HSC-3 and HSC-4 head and neck cancer cells, and its mechanisms were investigated. Experiments were divided into 4 groups: non-treated (CNTRL), cetuximab-treated (CETU), ultrasound-treated (UST) and the combination of cetuximab and US-treated (COMB). Cell viability was assessed by trypan blue staining assay and induction of apoptosis was detected by fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-Annexin V and propidium iodide (PI) staining assay at 24 h after cetuximab and/or US treatment. To elucidate the effect of cetuximab and US on EGFR signaling and apoptosis in head and neck cancer cells after the treatments, the expression of EGFR, phospho-EGFR, and the activation of caspase-3 were evaluated with western blotting. More cell killing features were evident in the COMB group in HSC-3 and HSC-4 cells compared with the other groups. No differences in EGFR expression among the CETU, UST and COMB groups was observed, while the expression of phospho-EGFR in the CETU group was downregulated compared with that in the CNTRL group. Phospho-EGFR expression was much more downregulated in the COMB group compared with that in the other groups. In addition, the activation of caspase-3 in the UST group was upregulated compared with that in the CNTRL group. Caspase-3 activation was much more upregulated in the COMB group than that in the other groups. These data indicated that LIU was able to enhance the anticancer effect of cetuximab in HSC-3 and HSC-4 head and neck cancer cells.

  2. Mechanism of rat osteosarcoma cell apoptosis induced by a combination of low-intensity ultrasound and 5-aminolevulinic acid in vitro.

    PubMed

    Li, Y N; Zhou, Q; Yang, B; Hu, Z; Wang, J H; Li, Q S; Cao, W W

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the killing effect of low-intensity ultrasound combined with 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) on the rat osteosarcoma cell line UMR-106. Logarithmic-phase UMR-106 cells were divided into a control group, ultrasound group and 5-ALA group. The cell apoptotic rate, production of reactive oxygen species, and the change in mitochondrial membrane potential were analyzed by flow cytometry; ultrastructural changes were observed by transmission electron microscopy. Using low-intensity ultrasound at 1.0 MHz and 2.0 W/cm(2) plus 5-ALA at a concentration of 2 mM, the apoptotic rate of the sonodynamic therapy group was 27.2 ± 3.4% which was significantly higher than that of the control group, ultrasound group, and 5-ALA group (P < 0.05). The production of reactive oxygen species was 32.6 ± 2.2% and the decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential was 39.5 ± 2.5%. The 33342 staining showed nuclear condensation and fragmentation in the ultrasound group and 5-ALA group. Structural changes in the cell membrane, mitochondria, Golgi apparatus, and other organelles observed by transmission electron microscopy included formation of apoptotic bodies. The killing effect of low-intensity ultrasound combined with 5-ALA on UMR-106 cells was significant. Cell apoptosis played a vital role in the killing effect, and the mitochondria pathway contributed to the apoptosis of UMR-106 cells. PMID:26345893

  3. Effect of low-intensity focused ultrasound on the middle ear in a mouse model of acute otitis media.

    PubMed

    Noda, Kanako; Hirano, Takashi; Noda, Kenji; Kodama, Satoru; Ichimiya, Issei; Suzuki, Masashi

    2013-03-01

    We hypothesized that low-intensity focused ultrasound (LIFU) increases vessel permeability and antibacterial drug activity in the mouse middle ear. We determined appropriate settings by applying LIFU to mouse ears with the external auditory canal filled with normal saline and performed histologic and immunohistologic examination. Acute otitis media was induced in mice with nontypable Haemophilus influenzae, and they were given ampicillin (50, 10, or 2 mg/kg) intraperitoneally once daily for 3 days with or without LIFU (1.0 W/cm(2), 20% duty cycle, 30 s). In the LIFU(+) groups receiving the 2- and 10-mg/kg doses, viable bacteria counts, number of inflammatory cells and IL-1β and TNF-α levels in middle ear effusion were significantly lower than in the LIFU(-) groups on the same doses. Severity of AOM also tended to be reduced more in the LIFU(+) groups than in the LIFU(-) groups. LIFU application with antibiotics may be effective for middle ear infection. PMID:23312959

  4. Effect of low-intensity focused ultrasound on the middle ear in a mouse model of acute otitis media.

    PubMed

    Noda, Kanako; Hirano, Takashi; Noda, Kenji; Kodama, Satoru; Ichimiya, Issei; Suzuki, Masashi

    2013-03-01

    We hypothesized that low-intensity focused ultrasound (LIFU) increases vessel permeability and antibacterial drug activity in the mouse middle ear. We determined appropriate settings by applying LIFU to mouse ears with the external auditory canal filled with normal saline and performed histologic and immunohistologic examination. Acute otitis media was induced in mice with nontypable Haemophilus influenzae, and they were given ampicillin (50, 10, or 2 mg/kg) intraperitoneally once daily for 3 days with or without LIFU (1.0 W/cm(2), 20% duty cycle, 30 s). In the LIFU(+) groups receiving the 2- and 10-mg/kg doses, viable bacteria counts, number of inflammatory cells and IL-1β and TNF-α levels in middle ear effusion were significantly lower than in the LIFU(-) groups on the same doses. Severity of AOM also tended to be reduced more in the LIFU(+) groups than in the LIFU(-) groups. LIFU application with antibiotics may be effective for middle ear infection.

  5. [Enhancement effect of low intensity ultrasound on biological wastewater treatment system in low temperature and design of application on biological wastewater treatment].

    PubMed

    Liu, Hong; Yan, Yi-Xin

    2008-03-01

    This work aims to study the enhancement effects of low intensity ultrasound on biological wastewater treatment in low temperature. The activated sludge was irradiated by ultrasound with intensity of 0.3 W cm(-2) for 10 minutes, and then simulated SBR process in 4 degrees C. Oxygen uptake rate (OUR), dehydrogenase activity (DHA) and COD were determined to indicate the changes of sludge activity and the removal rate of organic matter after the ultrasonic irradiation in low temperature. Results showed that after ultrasonic enhancement, the sludge activity could be increased by 30%, and COD removal rate could keep the usual level as in the room temperature. Furthermore, the enhancement effect of ultrasonic irradiation was more significant in the low temperature than that in the room temperature. This paper also took the typical municipal wastewater secondary treatment technology and SBR technology as examples to illustrate the design and operation of the enhancement of biological wastewater treatment using low intensity ultrasound.

  6. Tumour cell membrane poration and ablation by pulsed low-intensity electric field with carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lijun; Liu, Dun; Zhou, Ru; Wang, Zhigang; Cuschieri, Alfred

    2015-03-26

    Electroporation is a physical method to increase permeabilization of cell membrane by electrical pulses. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can potentially act like "lighting rods" or exhibit direct physical force on cell membrane under alternating electromagnetic fields thus reducing the required field strength. A cell poration/ablation system was built for exploring these effects of CNTs in which two-electrode sets were constructed and two perpendicular electric fields could be generated sequentially. By applying this system to breast cancer cells in the presence of multi-walled CNTs (MWCNTs), the effective pulse amplitude was reduced to 50 V/cm (main field)/15 V/cm (alignment field) at the optimized pulse frequency (5 Hz) of 500 pulses. Under these conditions instant cell membrane permeabilization was increased to 38.62%, 2.77-fold higher than that without CNTs. Moreover, we also observed irreversible electroporation occurred under these conditions, such that only 39.23% of the cells were viable 24 h post treatment, in contrast to 87.01% cell viability without presence of CNTs. These results indicate that CNT-enhanced electroporation has the potential for tumour cell ablation by significantly lower electric fields than that in conventional electroporation therapy thus avoiding potential risks associated with the use of high intensity electric pulses.

  7. Effects of low-intensity pulsed electromagnetic fields on the early development of sea urchins

    SciTech Connect

    Falugi, C.; Grattarola, M.; Prestipino, G.

    1987-06-01

    The effects of weak electromagnetic signals on the early development of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus have been studied. The duration and repetition of the pulses were similar to those used for bone healing in clinical practice. A sequence of pulses, applied for a time ranging from 2 to 4 h, accelerates the cleavages of sea urchin embryo cells. This effect can be quantitatively assessed by determining the time shifts induced by the applied electromagnetic field on the completion of the first and second cleavages in a population of fertilized eggs. The exposed embryos were allowed to develop up to the pluteus stage, showing no abnormalities.

  8. Efficacy of pulsed low-intensity electric neuromuscular stimulation in reducing pain and disability in patients with myofascial syndrome.

    PubMed

    Iodice, P; Lessiani, G; Franzone, G; Pezzulo, G

    2016-01-01

    Myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) is characterized by chronic pain in multiple myofascial trigger points and fascial constrictions. In recent years, the scientific literature has recognized the need to include the patient with MPS in a multidimensional rehabilitation project. At the moment, the most widely recognized therapeutic methods for the treatment of myofascial syndrome include the stretch and spray pressure massage. Microcurrent electric neuromuscular stimulation was proposed in pain management for its effects on normalizing bioelectricity of cells and for its sub-sensory application. In this study, we tested the efficacy of low-intensity pulsed electric neuromuscular stimulus (PENS) on pain in patients with MPS of cervical spine muscles. We carried out a prospective-analytic longitudinal study at an outpatient clinic during two weeks. Forty subjects (mean age 42±13 years) were divided into two groups: treatment (TrGr, n=20) and control group (CtrlGr, n=20). Visual-analog scale (VAS) values, concerning the spontaneous and movement-related pain in the cervical-dorsal region at baseline (T0) and at the end of the study (T1), showed a reduction from 7 to 3.81 (p < 0.001) in TrGr. In the CtrlGr, VAS was reduced from 8.2 to 7.2 (n.s.). Moreover, the pressure pain threshold at T0 was 2.1 vs 4.2 at T1 (p < 0.001) in TrG. In the CtrlGR we observed no significant changes. Modulated low-intensity PENS is an innovative therapy permitting to act on the transmission of pain and on the restoration of tissue homeostasis. It seems to affect the transmission of pain through the stimulation of A-beta fibers. The above results show that low-intensity PENS can be considered as an effective treatment to reduce pain and disability in patients with MPS.

  9. Efficacy of pulsed low-intensity electric neuromuscular stimulation in reducing pain and disability in patients with myofascial syndrome.

    PubMed

    Iodice, P; Lessiani, G; Franzone, G; Pezzulo, G

    2016-01-01

    Myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) is characterized by chronic pain in multiple myofascial trigger points and fascial constrictions. In recent years, the scientific literature has recognized the need to include the patient with MPS in a multidimensional rehabilitation project. At the moment, the most widely recognized therapeutic methods for the treatment of myofascial syndrome include the stretch and spray pressure massage. Microcurrent electric neuromuscular stimulation was proposed in pain management for its effects on normalizing bioelectricity of cells and for its sub-sensory application. In this study, we tested the efficacy of low-intensity pulsed electric neuromuscular stimulus (PENS) on pain in patients with MPS of cervical spine muscles. We carried out a prospective-analytic longitudinal study at an outpatient clinic during two weeks. Forty subjects (mean age 42±13 years) were divided into two groups: treatment (TrGr, n=20) and control group (CtrlGr, n=20). Visual-analog scale (VAS) values, concerning the spontaneous and movement-related pain in the cervical-dorsal region at baseline (T0) and at the end of the study (T1), showed a reduction from 7 to 3.81 (p < 0.001) in TrGr. In the CtrlGr, VAS was reduced from 8.2 to 7.2 (n.s.). Moreover, the pressure pain threshold at T0 was 2.1 vs 4.2 at T1 (p < 0.001) in TrG. In the CtrlGR we observed no significant changes. Modulated low-intensity PENS is an innovative therapy permitting to act on the transmission of pain and on the restoration of tissue homeostasis. It seems to affect the transmission of pain through the stimulation of A-beta fibers. The above results show that low-intensity PENS can be considered as an effective treatment to reduce pain and disability in patients with MPS. PMID:27358158

  10. Generation of the ultrabroad bandwidth with keV by three-color low intense mid-infrared inhomogeneous pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Liqiang; Liu, Hang

    2016-07-01

    We numerically investigate the high-order harmonic generation and the isolated attosecond pulse generation from the coherent superposition initial state of He+ ion by using the three-color low intense mid-infrared laser field. It is found that by properly controlling the delay times and the carrier envelope phases of the three-color mid-infrared pulse, the harmonic cutoff has been extended, and the harmonic modulations can be controlled. Further, with the introduction of the inhomogeneous parameter of the three-color field, the harmonic cutoff can be further enhanced. As a result, a supercontinuum with the bandwidth of 1773 eV can be obtained. Moreover, we found the harmonic yield is almost 4-6 orders of magnitude higher than that generated from the single initial state case. Classical and the quantum time-frequency analyses have been shown to explain the harmonic emission process. Finally, by properly superposing the harmonics, a series of wavelength-tunable sub-32as X-ray pulses can be obtained, which are almost 4-6 orders of magnitude improvement in comparison with the single ground initial state case.

  11. Enhancement of osteogenic differentiation and proliferation in human mesenchymal stem cells by a modified low intensity ultrasound stimulation under simulated microgravity.

    PubMed

    Uddin, Sardar M Z; Qin, Yi-Xian

    2013-01-01

    Adult stem cells can differentiate into multiple lineages depending on their exposure to differing biochemical and biomechanical inductive factors. Lack of mechanical signals due to disuse can inhibit osteogenesis and induce adipogenesis of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Long-term bed rest due to both brain/spinal cord injury and space travel can lead to disuse osteoporosis that is in part caused by a reduced number of osteoblasts. Thus, it is essential to provide proper mechanical stimulation for cellular viability and osteogenesis, particularly under disuse conditions. The objective of this study was to examine the effects of low intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) on the osteogenic differentiation of adipose-derived human stem cells (Ad-hMSC) in simulated microgravity conditions. Cells were cultured in a 1D clinostat to simulate microgravity (SMG) and treated with LIPUS at 30mW/cm(2) for 20 min/day. It was hypothesized that the application of LIPUS to SMG cultures would restore osteogenesis in Ad-hMSCs. The results showed significant increases in ALP, OSX, RANKL, RUNX2, and decreases in OPG in LIPUS treated SMG cultures of Ad-MSC compared to non-treated cultures. LIPUS also restored OSX, RUNX2 and RANKL expression in osteoblast cells. SMG significantly reduced ALP positive cells by 70% (p<0.01) and ALP activity by 22% (p<0.01), while LIPUS treatment restored ALP positive cell number and activity to equivalence with normal gravity controls. Extracellular matrix collagen and mineralization was assessed by Sirius red and Alizarin red staining, respectively. SMG cultures showed little or no collagen or mineralization, but LIPUS treatment restored collagen content to 50% (p<0.001) and mineralization by 45% (p<0.001) in LIPUS treated-SMG cultures relative to SMG-only cultures. The data suggest that LIPUS treatment can restore normal osteogenic differentiation of MSCs from disuse by daily short duration stimulation.

  12. Enhancement of osteogenic differentiation and proliferation in human mesenchymal stem cells by a modified low intensity ultrasound stimulation under simulated microgravity.

    PubMed

    Uddin, Sardar M Z; Qin, Yi-Xian

    2013-01-01

    Adult stem cells can differentiate into multiple lineages depending on their exposure to differing biochemical and biomechanical inductive factors. Lack of mechanical signals due to disuse can inhibit osteogenesis and induce adipogenesis of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Long-term bed rest due to both brain/spinal cord injury and space travel can lead to disuse osteoporosis that is in part caused by a reduced number of osteoblasts. Thus, it is essential to provide proper mechanical stimulation for cellular viability and osteogenesis, particularly under disuse conditions. The objective of this study was to examine the effects of low intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) on the osteogenic differentiation of adipose-derived human stem cells (Ad-hMSC) in simulated microgravity conditions. Cells were cultured in a 1D clinostat to simulate microgravity (SMG) and treated with LIPUS at 30mW/cm(2) for 20 min/day. It was hypothesized that the application of LIPUS to SMG cultures would restore osteogenesis in Ad-hMSCs. The results showed significant increases in ALP, OSX, RANKL, RUNX2, and decreases in OPG in LIPUS treated SMG cultures of Ad-MSC compared to non-treated cultures. LIPUS also restored OSX, RUNX2 and RANKL expression in osteoblast cells. SMG significantly reduced ALP positive cells by 70% (p<0.01) and ALP activity by 22% (p<0.01), while LIPUS treatment restored ALP positive cell number and activity to equivalence with normal gravity controls. Extracellular matrix collagen and mineralization was assessed by Sirius red and Alizarin red staining, respectively. SMG cultures showed little or no collagen or mineralization, but LIPUS treatment restored collagen content to 50% (p<0.001) and mineralization by 45% (p<0.001) in LIPUS treated-SMG cultures relative to SMG-only cultures. The data suggest that LIPUS treatment can restore normal osteogenic differentiation of MSCs from disuse by daily short duration stimulation. PMID:24069248

  13. Passive imaging with pulsed ultrasound insonations.

    PubMed

    Haworth, Kevin J; Mast, T Douglas; Radhakrishnan, Kirthi; Burgess, Mark T; Kopechek, Jonathan A; Huang, Shao-Ling; McPherson, David D; Holland, Christy K

    2012-07-01

    Previously, passive cavitation imaging has been described in the context of continuous-wave high-intensity focused ultrasound thermal ablation. However, the technique has potential use as a feedback mechanism for pulsed-wave therapies, such as ultrasound-mediated drug delivery. In this paper, results of experiments and simulations are reported to demonstrate the feasibility of passive cavitation imaging using pulsed ultrasound insonations and how the images depend on pulsed ultrasound parameters. The passive cavitation images were formed from channel data that was beamformed in the frequency domain. Experiments were performed in an invitro flow phantom with an experimental echo contrast agent, echogenic liposomes, as cavitation nuclei. It was found that the pulse duration and envelope have minimal impact on the image resolution achieved. The passive cavitation image amplitude scales linearly with the cavitation emission energy. Cavitation images for both stable and inertial cavitation can be obtained from the same received data set.

  14. CO2 bubbling-based 'Nanobomb' System for Targetedly Suppressing Panc-1 Pancreatic Tumor via Low Intensity Ultrasound-activated Inertial Cavitation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kun; Xu, Huixiong; Chen, Hangrong; Jia, Xiaoqing; Zheng, Shuguang; Cai, Xiaojun; Wang, Ronghui; Mou, Juan; Zheng, Yuanyi; Shi, Jianlin

    2015-01-01

    Noninvasive and targeted physical treatment is still desirable especially for those cancerous patients. Herein, we develop a new physical treatment protocol by employing CO2 bubbling-based 'nanobomb' system consisting of low-intensity ultrasound (1.0 W/cm(2)) and a well-constructed pH/temperature dual-responsive CO2 release system. Depending on the temperature elevation caused by exogenous low-intensity therapeutic ultrasound irradiation and the low pH caused by the endogenous acidic-environment around/within tumor, dual-responsive CO2 release system can quickly release CO2 bubbles, and afterwards, the generated CO2 bubbles waves will timely explode before dissolution due to triggering by therapeutic ultrasound waves. Related bio-effects (e.g., cavitation, mechanical, shock waves, etc) caused by CO2 bubbles' explosion effectively induce instant necrosis of panc-1 cells and blood vessel destruction within panc-1 tumor, and consequently inhibit the growth of panc-1 solid tumor, simultaneously minimizing the side effects to normal organs. This new physiotherapy employing CO2 bubbling-based 'nanobomb' system promises significant potentials in targetedly suppressing tumors, especially for those highly deadly cancers.

  15. CO2 bubbling-based 'Nanobomb' System for Targetedly Suppressing Panc-1 Pancreatic Tumor via Low Intensity Ultrasound-activated Inertial Cavitation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kun; Xu, Huixiong; Chen, Hangrong; Jia, Xiaoqing; Zheng, Shuguang; Cai, Xiaojun; Wang, Ronghui; Mou, Juan; Zheng, Yuanyi; Shi, Jianlin

    2015-01-01

    Noninvasive and targeted physical treatment is still desirable especially for those cancerous patients. Herein, we develop a new physical treatment protocol by employing CO2 bubbling-based 'nanobomb' system consisting of low-intensity ultrasound (1.0 W/cm2) and a well-constructed pH/temperature dual-responsive CO2 release system. Depending on the temperature elevation caused by exogenous low-intensity therapeutic ultrasound irradiation and the low pH caused by the endogenous acidic-environment around/within tumor, dual-responsive CO2 release system can quickly release CO2 bubbles, and afterwards, the generated CO2 bubbles waves will timely explode before dissolution due to triggering by therapeutic ultrasound waves. Related bio-effects (e.g., cavitation, mechanical, shock waves, etc) caused by CO2 bubbles' explosion effectively induce instant necrosis of panc-1 cells and blood vessel destruction within panc-1 tumor, and consequently inhibit the growth of panc-1 solid tumor, simultaneously minimizing the side effects to normal organs. This new physiotherapy employing CO2 bubbling-based 'nanobomb' system promises significant potentials in targetedly suppressing tumors, especially for those highly deadly cancers. PMID:26379793

  16. Yeast cell inactivation related to local heating induced by low-intensity electric fields with long-duration pulses.

    PubMed

    Guyot, Stéphane; Ferret, Eric; Boehm, Jean-Baptiste; Gervais, Patrick

    2007-01-25

    The effects of electric field (EF) treatments on Saccharomyces cerevisiae viability were investigated using a PG200 electroporator (Hoefer Scientific Instrument, San Fransisco, CA, USA) with specific attention to induced thermal effects on cell death. Lethal electric fields (1.5 kV cm(-1) for 5 s) were shown to cause heat variations in the cell suspension medium (water+glycerol), while corresponding classical thermal treatments at equivalent temperatures had no effect on the cells viability. Variations of the electrical conductivity of the intra- and extracellular matrix caused by ions and solutes transfer across the membrane were shown to be involved in the observed heating. The results permitted to build a theoretical model for the temperature variations induced by electric fields. Using this model and the electrical conductivity of the different media, a plausible explanation of the cell death induced by low-intensity electric fields with long-duration pulses has been proposed. Indeed, cell mortality could in part be caused by direct and indirect effects of electric fields. Direct effects are related to well known electromechanical phenomena, whereas indirect effects are related to secondary thermal stress caused by plasma membrane thermoporation. This thermoporation was attributed to electrical conductivity variations and the corresponding intracellular heating.

  17. Low-Frequency Low-Intensity Ultrasounds Do Not Influence the Survival and Immune Functions of Cultured Keratinocytes and Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Scarponi, Claudia; Nasorri, Francesca; Pavani, Francesca; Madonna, Stefania; Sestito, Rosanna; Simonacci, Marco; De Pità, Ornella; Cavani, Andrea; Albanesi, Cristina

    2009-01-01

    Low-frequency ultrasounds (US) are used to enhance drug transdermal transport. Although this phenomenon has been extensively analyzed, information on US effects on the single skin cell components is limited. Here, we investigated the possible effects of low-frequency US on viability and immune functions of cultured human keratinocytes and dendritic cells (DC), skin cells involved in the regulation of many immune-mediated dermatoses. We demonstrated that US, employed at low-frequency (42 KHz) and low-intensity (0.15 W/cm2) values known to enhance drug and water transdermal transport, did not affect extracellular-signal-regulated-kinase (ERK)1/2 activation, cell viability, or expression of adhesion molecules in cultured keratinocytes. Moreover, US at these work frequency and intensity did not influence the keratinocyte expression and release of immunomodulatory molecules. Similarly, cultured DC treated with low-frequency low-intensity US were viable, and did not show an altered membrane phenotype, cytokine profile, nor antigen presentation ability. However, intensity enhancement of low-frequency US to 5 W/cm2 determined an increase of the apoptotic rate of both keratinocytes and DC as well as keratinocyte CXCL8 release and ERK1/2 activation, and DC CD40 expression. Our study sustains the employment of low-frequency and low-intensity US for treatment of those immune skin disorders, where keratinocytes and DC have a pathogenetic role. PMID:20145702

  18. Pulse Compression Techniques for Laser Generated Ultrasound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anastasi, R. F.; Madaras, E. I.

    1999-01-01

    Laser generated ultrasound for nondestructive evaluation has an optical power density limit due to rapid high heating that causes material damage. This damage threshold limits the generated ultrasound amplitude, which impacts nondestructive evaluation inspection capability. To increase ultrasound signal levels and improve the ultrasound signal-to-noise ratio without exceeding laser power limitations, it is possible to use pulse compression techniques. The approach illustrated here uses a 150mW laser-diode modulated with a pseudo-random sequence and signal correlation. Results demonstrate the successful generation of ultrasonic bulk waves in aluminum and graphite-epoxy composite materials using a modulated low-power laser diode and illustrate ultrasound bandwidth control.

  19. Pulsed ultrasound expands the extracellular and perivascular spaces of the brain.

    PubMed

    Hersh, David S; Nguyen, Ben A; Dancy, Jimena G; Adapa, Arjun R; Winkles, Jeffrey A; Woodworth, Graeme F; Kim, Anthony J; Frenkel, Victor

    2016-09-01

    Diffusion within the extracellular and perivascular spaces of the brain plays an important role in biological processes, therapeutic delivery, and clearance mechanisms within the central nervous system. Recently, ultrasound has been used to enhance the dispersion of locally administered molecules and particles within the brain, but ultrasound-mediated effects on the brain parenchyma remain poorly understood. We combined an electron microscopy-based ultrastructural analysis with high-resolution tracking of non-adhesive nanoparticles in order to probe changes in the extracellular and perivascular spaces of the brain following a non-destructive pulsed ultrasound regimen known to alter diffusivity in other tissues. Freshly obtained rat brain neocortical slices underwent sham treatment or pulsed, low intensity ultrasound for 5min at 1MHz. Transmission electron microscopy revealed intact cells and blood vessels and evidence of enlarged spaces, particularly adjacent to blood vessels, in ultrasound-treated brain slices. Additionally, ultrasound significantly increased the diffusion rate of 100nm, 200nm, and 500nm nanoparticles that were injected into the brain slices, while 2000nm particles were unaffected. In ultrasound-treated slices, 91.6% of the 100nm particles, 20.7% of the 200nm particles, 13.8% of the 500nm particles, and 0% of the 2000nm particles exhibited diffusive motion. Thus, pulsed ultrasound can have meaningful structural effects on the brain extracellular and perivascular spaces without evidence of tissue disruption. PMID:27369449

  20. Optimization of low-frequency low-intensity ultrasound-mediated microvessel disruption on prostate cancer xenografts in nude mice using an orthogonal experimental design

    PubMed Central

    YANG, YU; BAI, WENKUN; CHEN, YINI; LIN, YANDUAN; HU, BING

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to provide a complete exploration of the effect of sound intensity, frequency, duty cycle, microbubble volume and irradiation time on low-frequency low-intensity ultrasound (US)-mediated microvessel disruption, and to identify an optimal combination of the five factors that maximize the blockage effect. An orthogonal experimental design approach was used. Enhanced US imaging and acoustic quantification were performed to assess tumor blood perfusion. In the confirmatory test, in addition to acoustic quantification, the specimens of the tumor were stained with hematoxylin and eosin and observed using light microscopy. The results revealed that sound intensity, frequency, duty cycle, microbubble volume and irradiation time had a significant effect on the average peak intensity (API). The extent of the impact of the variables on the API was in the following order: Sound intensity; frequency; duty cycle; microbubble volume; and irradiation time. The optimum conditions were found to be as follows: Sound intensity, 1.00 W/cm2; frequency, 20 Hz; duty cycle, 40%; microbubble volume, 0.20 ml; and irradiation time, 3 min. In the confirmatory test, the API was 19.97±2.66 immediately subsequent to treatment, and histological examination revealed signs of tumor blood vessel injury in the optimum parameter combination group. In conclusion, the Taguchi L18 (3)6 orthogonal array design was successfully applied for determining the optimal parameter combination of API following treatment. Under the optimum orthogonal design condition, a minimum API of 19.97±2.66 subsequent to low-frequency and low-intensity mediated blood perfusion blockage was obtained. PMID:26722279

  1. Large-scale magnetic field generation by asymmetric laser-pulse interactions with a plasma in low-intensity regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopal, K.; Gupta, D. N.; Kim, Y. K.; Hur, M. S.; Suk, H.

    2016-03-01

    We propose a way to enhance the strength of self-generated magnetic field from laser-plasma interactions by incorporating the combined role of pulse asymmetricity and plasma inhomogeneity. The pulse asymmetry combined with the plasma inhomogeneity contributes for strong nonlinear current within the pulse body; consequently, a stronger magnetic field can be produced. The nature of self-generated magnetic field is "Quasistatic" that means the self-generated magnetic field varies on the time scale of the period of laser radiation. Our results show that the magnetic-field generated by a temporally asymmetric laser pulse is many-folds higher than the magnetic-field generated by a symmetric laser pulse in plasmas. The present study predicts the generation of magnetic field of the order of 15 T for the laser intensity of ˜ 10 14 cm-2. Our study might be applicable to improve the accelerated bunch quality in laser wakefield acceleration mechanism.

  2. Low frequency and low intensity pulsed electromagnetic field exerts its antiinflammatory effect through restoration of plasma membrane calcium ATPase activity.

    PubMed

    Selvam, Ramasamy; Ganesan, Kalaivani; Narayana Raju, K V S; Gangadharan, Akkalayi Chandrapuram; Manohar, Bhakthavatchalam Murali; Puvanakrishnan, Rengarajulu

    2007-06-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disorder affecting 1% of the population worldwide. Pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) has a number of well-documented physiological effects on cells and tissues including antiinflammatory effect. This study aims to explore the antiinflammatory effect of PEMF and its possible mechanism of action in amelioration of adjuvant induced arthritis (AIA). Arthritis was induced by a single intradermal injection of heat killed Mycobacterium tuberculosis at a concentration of 500 microg in 0.1 ml of paraffin oil into the right hind paw of rats. The arthritic animals showed a biphasic response regarding changes in the paw edema volume. During the chronic phase of the disease, arthritic animals showed an elevated level of lipid peroxides and depletion of antioxidant enzymes with significant radiological and histological changes. Besides, plasma membrane Ca(2+) ATPase (PMCA) activity was inhibited while intracellular Ca(2+) level as well as prostaglandin E(2) levels was noticed to be elevated in blood lymphocytes of arthritic rats. Exposure of arthritic rats to PEMF at 5 Hzx4 microT x 90 min, produced significant antiexudative effect resulting in the restoration of the altered parameters. The antiinflammatory effect could be partially mediated through the stabilizing action of PEMF on membranes as reflected by the restoration of PMCA and intracellular Ca(2+) levels in blood lymphocytes subsequently inhibiting PGE(2) biosynthesis. The results of this study indicated that PEMF could be developed as a potential therapy for RA in human beings.

  3. Numerical Simulation of Pre-formed Plasma Generated by Low Intensity Pre-Pulse Before Main Heating Laser in Fast-Ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunahara, Atsushi; Hongbo, Cai; Johzaki, Tomoyuki; Nagatomo, Hideo; Mima, Kunioki

    2009-11-01

    We investigated the plasma expansion of the inner surface of the cone used for the fast-ignition scheme of the inertial confinement fusion (ICF). LFEX laser [1] in Osaka University is high intense and short pulse laser system, which has 10^19W/cm^2 to 10^20W/cm^2, and ps pulse duration. However, it has also low intense pre-pulse with the contrast ranging from 10^5 to 10^8. It is high enough to ablate the inner surface of the cone wall used for fast ignition target. We developed the two-dimensional simulation code (Star-2D) [2], and simulate plasma expansion of the inner surface of the cone. We will discuss our simulation results, and also effects of the pre-plasma expansion on fast electron production. On the other hand, our code has been applied to simulate the laser-produced plasmas for Extreme-Ultraviolet research, and its accuracy has been tested with various experiments. We will also discuss the accuracy of our simulations. [4pt] [1] H. Azechi et at., in EPS. [0pt] [2] A. Sunahara et al., Journal of Physics: Conference Series 112(2008) 042048-1-4.

  4. Pulmonary Capillary Hemorrhage Induced by Fixed-Beam Pulsed Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Miller, Douglas L; Dou, Chunyan; Raghavendran, Krishnan

    2015-08-01

    The induction of pulmonary capillary hemorrhage (PCH) by pulsed ultrasound was discovered 25 y ago, but early research used fixed-beam systems rather than actual diagnostic ultrasound machines. In this study, results of exposure of rats to fixed-beam focused ultrasound for 5 min at 1.5 and 7.5 MHz were compared with recent research on diagnostic ultrasound. One exposure condition at each frequency used 10-μs pulses delivered at 25-ms intervals. Three conditions involved Gaussian modulation of the pulse amplitudes at 25-ms intervals to simulate diagnostic scanning: 7.5 MHz with 0.3- and 1.5-μs pulses at 100- and 500-μs pulse repetition periods, respectively, and 1.5 MHz with 1.7-μs pulses at 500-μs repetition periods. Four groups were tested for each condition to assess PCH areas at different exposure levels and to determine occurrence thresholds. The conditions with identical pulse timing resulted in smaller PCH areas for the smaller 7.5-MHz beam, but both had thresholds of 0.69-0.75 MPa in situ peak rarefactional pressure amplitude. The Gaussian modulation conditions for both 7.5 MHz with 0.3-μs pulses and 1.5 MHz with 1.7-μs pulses had thresholds of 1.12-1.20 MPa peak rarefactional pressure amplitude, although the relatively long 1.5-μs pulses at 7.5 MHz yielded a threshold of 0.75 MPa. The fixed-beam pulsed ultrasound exposures produced lower thresholds than diagnostic ultrasound. There was no clear tendency for thresholds to increase with increasing ultrasonic frequency when pulse timing conditions were similar.

  5. Ultrasound vibrometry using orthogonal- frequency-based vibration pulses.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yi; Yao, Aiping; Chen, Shigao; Urban, Matthew W; Lin, Haoming; Chen, Xin; Guo, Yanrong; Chen, Ke; Wang, Tianfu; Chen, Siping

    2013-11-01

    New vibration pulses are developed for shear wave generation in a tissue region with preferred spectral distributions for ultrasound vibrometry applications. The primary objective of this work is to increase the frequency range of detectable harmonics of the shear wave. The secondary objective is to reduce the required peak intensity of transmitted pulses that induce the vibrations and shear waves. Unlike the periodic binary vibration pulses, the new vibration pulses have multiple pulses in one fundamental period of the vibration. The pulses are generated from an orthogonal-frequency wave composed of several sinusoidal signals, the amplitudes of which increase with frequency to compensate for higher loss at higher frequency in tissues. The new method has been evaluated by studying the shear wave propagation in in vitro chicken and swine liver. The experimental results show that the new vibration pulses significantly increase tissue vibration with a reduced peak ultrasound intensity, compared with the binary vibration pulses.

  6. Thresholds for cavitation produced in water by pulsed ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Atchley, A A; Frizzell, L A; Apfel, R E; Holland, C K; Madanshetty, S; Roy, R A

    1988-09-01

    The threshold for transient cavitation produced in water by pulsed ultrasound was measured as a function of pulse duration and pulse repetition frequency at both 0.98 and 2.30 MHz. The cavitation events were detected with a passive acoustic technique which relies upon the scattering of the irradiation field by the bubble clouds associated with the events. The results indicate that the threshold is independent of pulse duration and acoustic frequency for pulses longer than approximately 10 acoustic cycles. The threshold increases for shorter pulses. The cavitation events are likely to be associated with bubble clouds rather than single bubbles.

  7. Maintenance of membrane integrity and increase of taxanes production in hazel (Corylus avellana L.) cells induced by low-intensity ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Safari, Masoumeh; Ghanati, Faezeh; Hajnoruzi, Abazar; Rezaei, Ayatollah; Abdolmaleki, Parviz; Mokhtari-Dizaji, Manigeh

    2012-06-01

    Suspension-cultured hazel cells were ultrasonicated at power densities of 4 and 455 mW for 4-40 min. Both treatments stimulated the production of major taxanes: Taxol, 10-deacetylbaccatin, and baccatin III. The highest amounts of these taxanes (0.46, 0.26, and 0.07 mg/l, respectively) were obtained at 8 and 20 min of the treatment at 455 mW. Ultrasound had no adverse effects on cell viability, growth, or membrane integrity. Increased release of taxanes by ultrasound resulted not from increased membrane permeability but more likely from stimulation of taxanes biosynthesis.

  8. Short-term effect of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound on an ex-vivo 3-d tooth culture.

    PubMed

    Al-Daghreer, Saleh; Doschak, Michael; Sloan, Alastair J; Major, Paul W; Heo, Giseon; Scurtescu, Cristian; Tsui, Ying Y; El-Bialy, Tarek

    2013-06-01

    We investigated the short-term effect of LIPUS on human dentin-pulp complex in vitro. We collected sixty-three premolars from patients who needed the extraction. The premolars were sectioned transversely into 600-μm-thick slices, and then divided into five groups according to LIPUS application time (control, 5, 10, 15 and 20 min). LIPUS transducer produced an incident intensity of 30 mW/cm(2). After 24 h, tissue was harvested for histomorphometrical analysis and RT-PCR (Genes of interest: Collagen I, DMP1, DSPP, TGF β1, RANKL and OPG). Histomorphometric analysis showed no significant difference among the five groups in the odontoblast count and predentin thickness. RT-PCR demonstrated no expression of TGF β1, low amounts of DSPP, a twofold increase in collagen I expression in the 5- and 10-minute LIPUS groups and a threefold increase in DMP1 expression in the 10-minute LIPUS group. LIPUS application was stimulatory to the dentin-pulp complex in vitro and increased the expression of collagen I and DMP1.

  9. COMPARATIVE STUDY OF THE EFFECTS OF LOW-LEVEL LASER AND LOW-INTENSITY ULTRASOUND ASSOCIATED WITH BIOSILICATE® ON THE PROCESS OF BONE REPAIR IN THE RAT TIBIA

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Poliani de; Fernandes, Kelly Rosseti; Sperandio, Evandro Fornias; Pastor, Fabio Alexandre Casarin; Nonaka, Keico Okino; Parizotto, Nivaldo Antonio; Renno, Ana Claudia Muniz

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Verify the effects of the association between Biosilicate® and ultrasound and, Biosilicate® and laser in bone consolidation process of rats, through the biomechanical and histological analysis. Methods: Forthy male rats were used. The animals were randomized into four groups (n=10): control group fracture no treated (CGF); group treated with Biosilicate® (BG); group treated with Biosilicate® and laser (BLG); group treated with Biosilicate® and ultrasound (BUG). Results: The biomechanical analysis showed no significant difference among any groups after 14 days post-surgery. In the morphometric analysis, the control group showed moderate presence of new formed bone tissue inside the defects areas and the Biosilicate® group showed similar results. Despite those facts, the biomaterial osteogenic potential was demonstrated by the great amount of cells and bone tissue around the particles. Curiously, the Biosilicate® plus laser or ultrasound groups showed lower amounts of bone tissue deposition when compared with control fracture and Biosilicate® groups. Conclusion: The data from this study can conclude that Biosilicate® was able to accelerate and optimized the bone consolidation, through the modulation of the inflammatory process and the stimulation of new bone formation. However, when resources were associated, there are no positive results. PMID:27027088

  10. Pulse sequences for uniform perfluorocarbon droplet vaporization and ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Puett, C; Sheeran, P S; Rojas, J D; Dayton, P A

    2014-09-01

    Phase-change contrast agents (PCCAs) consist of liquid perfluorocarbon droplets that can be vaporized into gas-filled microbubbles by pulsed ultrasound waves at diagnostic pressures and frequencies. These activatable contrast agents provide benefits of longer circulating times and smaller sizes relative to conventional microbubble contrast agents. However, optimizing ultrasound-induced activation of these agents requires coordinated pulse sequences not found on current clinical systems, in order to both initiate droplet vaporization and image the resulting microbubble population. Specifically, the activation process must provide a spatially uniform distribution of microbubbles and needs to occur quickly enough to image the vaporized agents before they migrate out of the imaging field of view. The development and evaluation of protocols for PCCA-enhanced ultrasound imaging using a commercial array transducer are described. The developed pulse sequences consist of three states: (1) initial imaging at sub-activation pressures, (2) activating droplets within a selected region of interest, and (3) imaging the resulting microbubbles. Bubble clouds produced by the vaporization of decafluorobutane and octafluoropropane droplets were characterized as a function of focused pulse parameters and acoustic field location. Pulse sequences were designed to manipulate the geometries of discrete microbubble clouds using electronic steering, and cloud spacing was tailored to build a uniform vaporization field. The complete pulse sequence was demonstrated in the water bath and then in vivo in a rodent kidney. The resulting contrast provided a significant increase (>15 dB) in signal intensity.

  11. Enhanced therapeutic anti-inflammatory effect of betamethasone upon topical administration with low frequency, low intensity (20 kHz, 100 mW/cm2) ultrasound exposure on carrageenan-induced arthritis in mice model

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Gadi; Natsheh, Hiba; Sunny, Youhan; Bawiec, Christopher R.; Touitou, Elka; Lerman, Melissa A.; Lazarovici, Philip; Lewin, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to investigate whether low frequency, low intensity (LFLI, 20 kHz, <100 mW/cm2, spatial-peak, temporal-peak) ultrasound (US), delivered by a light-weight (<100g), tether-free, fully wearable, battery powered applicator is capable of reducing inflammation in a mouse model of Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA). The therapeutic, acute, anti-inflammatory effect was estimated by the relative swelling induced in mice hind limb paws. In an independent, indirect approach, the inflammation was bio-imaged by measuring glycolytic activity with near infrared labeled 2-deoxy-glucose (2DG). The outcome of the experiments indicated that the combination of US exposure with topical application of 0.1% w/w betamethasone gel, exhibited statistically significant (p<0.05) enhanced anti-inflammatory properties in comparison with the drug or US treatment alone. The present study underscores the potential benefits of LFLI US assisted drug delivery. However, the proof of concept presented indicates the need for additional experiments to systematically evaluate and optimize the potential of, and the conditions for, safe, LFLI ultrasound promoted non-invasive drug delivery. PMID:26003010

  12. Why Are Short Pulses More Efficient in Tissue Erosion Using Pulsed Cavitational Ultrasound Therapy (Histotripsy)?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tzu-Yin; Maxwell, Adam D.; Park, Simone; Xu, Zhen; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Cain, Charles A.

    2010-03-01

    Histotripsy produces mechanical tissue fractionation through controlled cavitation. The histotripsy induced tissue erosion is more efficient with shorter (i.e., 3-6 cycles) rather than longer (i.e. 24 cycles) pulses. In this study, we investigated the reasons behind this observation by studying dynamics of the cavitating bubble clouds and individual bubbles during and after a therapy pulse. Bubble clouds were generated at a gel-water interface using 5 to 30-cycle 1 MHz pulses at P-/P+>19/125-MPa pressure and 1-kHz pulse repetition frequency. The evolution of the overall bubble cloud and individual bubbles were studied using high speed photography. Results show that: 1) within the first 10-15 cycles, the overall cloud grew to its maximum size; the individual bubbles underwent violent expansion and collapse, and grew in size with each cycle of ultrasound; 2) between the 15th cycle and the end of the pulse, the overall cloud size did not change even if further cycles of ultrasound were delivered; the individual bubbles no longer underwent violent collapse; 3) after the pulse, the overall cloud gradually dissolved; the individual bubbles may coalesce into larger bubbles for 0-40 μs, and then gradually dissolved. These observations suggest that violent growth and collapse of individual bubbles occur within the first few cycles of ultrasound pulse most often. This may explain why extremely short pulses are more energy efficient in histotripsy-induced tissue erosion.

  13. Using light scattering to measure the response of individual ultrasound contrast microbubbles subjected to pulsed ultrasound in vitro.

    PubMed

    Guan, Jingfeng; Matula, Thomas J

    2004-11-01

    Light scattering was used to measure the radial pulsations of individual ultrasound contrast microbubbles subjected to pulsed ultrasound. Highly diluted Optison or Sonazoid microbubbles were injected into either a water bath or an aqueous solution containing small quantities of xanthan gum. Individual microbubbles were insonified by ultrasound pulses from either a commercial diagnostic ultrasound machine or a single element transducer. The instantaneous response curves of the microbubbles were measured. Linear and nonlinear microbubble oscillations were observed. Good agreement was obtained by fitting a bubble dynamics model to the data. The pulse-to-pulse evolution of individual microbubbles was investigated, the results of which suggest that the shell can be semipermeable, and possibly weaken with subsequent pulses. There is a high potential that light scattering can be used to optimize diagnostic ultrasound techniques, understand microbubble evolution, and obtain specific information about shell parameters. PMID:15603131

  14. The disruption of tissue structure using high intensity pulsed ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fowlkes, J. Brian; Parsons, Jessica E.; Xu, Zhen; Cooper, Michol; Tran, Binh C.; Hall, Timothy L.; Roberts, William W.; Cain, Charles A.

    2005-04-01

    Recent investigations of pulsed ultrasound at high acoustic intensities have revealed a regime in which significant breakdown of tissue structure can be achieved. This therapeutic modality, which might be termed histotripsy, is dependent on the presence of highly active cavitation evidenced by significant temporal fluctuations in acoustic backscatter. In the presence of tissue interfaces, erosion can result yielding, for example, well-defined perforations potentially useful in creating temporary shunts for the treatment of hypoplastic left heart syndrome. When applied in bulk tissue, the process results in a near emulsification with little structural integrity remaining or chance of cellular survival. In each case, the process is dependent on acoustic parameters of the field to not only produce damage for a given pulse but also to sustain the cavitation nuclei population for subsequent pulses. Fluctuations in acoustic backscatter indicate both initiation and extinction of the appropriate cavitation activity during application of therapeutic ultrasound, which leads to a potential feedback mechanism to minimize acoustic exposure. This presentation will discuss the observed tissue damage as affected by acoustic parameters and the ability to monitor the presence of cavitation activity expected to be responsible for these effects. [Work supported by NIH grants RO1 RR14450.

  15. Use of Ultrasound Pulses Combined with Definity for Targeted Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDannold, Nathan; Vykhodtseva, Natalia; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2007-05-01

    We have developed a method to combine an ultrasound contrast agent (USCA) with low-intensity focused ultrasound pulses combined to produce temporary blood-brain barrier disruption (BBBD), a potential non-invasive means for targeted drug delivery in the brain. All of our previous work used the USCA Optison. The purpose of this work was to test the feasibility of using the USCA Definity for BBBD. Thirty-six non-overlapping locations were sonicated through a craniotomy in experiments in the brains of nine rabbits (4 locations per rabbit; US frequency: 0.69MHz, burst: 10ms, PRF: 1Hz, duration: 20s; pressure amplitude: 0.2-1.5 MPa). Eleven locations were sonicated using Optison at 0.5 MPa. For both agents, the probability for BBBD was estimated to be 50% at 0.4 MPa using probit regression. In histology, small isolated areas of extravasated erythrocytes were observed in some locations. At 0.8 MPa and above, this extravasation was sometimes accompanied by tiny (dimensions of 100 μm or less) regions of damaged brain parenchyma. The magnitude of the BBBD was larger with Optison than with Definity at 0.5 MPa (P=0.04), and more areas with extravasated erythrocytes were observed (P=0.03). We conclude that BBBD is possible using Definity for the dosage of USCA and the acoustic parameters tested in this study. While the probability for BBBD as a function of pressure amplitude and the type of acute tissue effects was similar to findings with Optison, under these experimental conditions, Optison produced a larger effect.

  16. Stable Support Recovery of Stream of Pulses With Application to Ultrasound Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendory, Tamir; Bar-Zion, Avinoam; Adam, Dan; Dekel, Shai; Feuer, Arie

    2016-07-01

    This paper considers the problem of estimating the delays of a weighted superposition of pulses, called stream of pulses, in a noisy environment. We show that the delays can be estimated using a tractable convex optimization problem with a localization error proportional to the square root of the noise level. Furthermore, all false detections produced by the algorithm have small amplitudes. Numerical and in-vitro ultrasound experiments corroborate the theoretical results and demonstrate their applicability for the ultrasound imaging signal processing.

  17. Study of the onset of the acoustic streaming in parallel plate resonators with pulse ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Castro, Angelica; Hoyos, Mauricio

    2016-03-01

    In a previous study, we introduced pulse mode ultrasound as a new method for reducing and controlling the acoustic streaming in parallel plate resonators (Hoyos and Castro, 2013). Here, by modifying other parameters such as the resonator geometry and the particle size, we have found a threshold for particle manipulation with ultrasonic standing waves in confined resonators without the influence of the acoustic streaming. We demonstrate that pulse mode ultrasound open the possibility of manipulating particles smaller than 1 μm size.

  18. Inertial cavitation initiated by polytetrafluoroethylene nanoparticles under pulsed ultrasound stimulation.

    PubMed

    Jin, Qiaofeng; Kang, Shih-Tsung; Chang, Yuan-Chih; Zheng, Hairong; Yeh, Chih-Kuang

    2016-09-01

    Nanoscale gas bubbles residing on a macroscale hydrophobic surface have a surprising long lifetime (on the order of days) and can serve as cavitation nuclei for initiating inertial cavitation (IC). Whether interfacial nanobubbles (NBs) reside on the infinite surface of a hydrophobic nanoparticle (NP) and could serve as cavitation nuclei is unknown, but this would be very meaningful for the development of sonosensitive NPs. To address this problem, we investigated the IC activity of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) NPs, which are regarded as benchmark superhydrophobic NPs due to their low surface energy caused by the presence of fluorocarbon. Both a passive cavitation detection system and terephthalic dosimetry was applied to quantify the intensity of IC. The IC intensities of the suspension with PTFE NPs were 10.30 and 48.41 times stronger than those of deionized water for peak negative pressures of 2 and 5MPa, respectively. However, the IC activities were nearly completely inhibited when the suspension was degassed or ethanol was used to suspend PTFE NPs, and they were recovered when suspended in saturated water, which may indicates the presence of interfacial NBs on PTFE NPs surfaces. Importantly, these PTFE NPs could sustainably initiate IC for excitation by a sequence of at least 6000 pulses, whereas lipid microbubbles were completely depleted after the application of no more than 50 pulses under the same conditions. The terephthalic dosimetry has shown that much higher hydroxyl yields were achieved when PTFE NPs were present as cavitation nuclei when using ultrasound parameters that otherwise did not produce significant amounts of free radicals. These results show that superhydrophobic NPs may be an outstanding candidate for use in IC-related applications. PMID:27150739

  19. All-optical pulse-echo ultrasound probe for intravascular imaging (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colchester, Richard J.; Noimark, Sacha; Mosse, Charles A.; Zhang, Edward Z.; Beard, Paul C.; Parkin, Ivan P.; Papakonstantinou, Ioannis; Desjardins, Adrien E.

    2016-02-01

    High frequency ultrasound probes such as intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) and intracardiac echocardiography (ICE) catheters can be invaluable for guiding minimally invasive medical procedures in cardiology such as coronary stent placement and ablation. With current-generation ultrasound probes, ultrasound is generated and received electrically. The complexities involved with fabricating these electrical probes can result in high costs that limit their clinical applicability. Additionally, it can be challenging to achieve wide transmission bandwidths and adequate wideband reception sensitivity with small piezoelectric elements. Optical methods for transmitting and receiving ultrasound are emerging as alternatives to their electrical counterparts. They offer several distinguishing advantages, including the potential to generate and detect the broadband ultrasound fields (tens of MHz) required for high resolution imaging. In this study, we developed a miniature, side-looking, pulse-echo ultrasound probe for intravascular imaging, with fibre-optic transmission and reception. The axial resolution was better than 70 microns, and the imaging depth in tissue was greater than 1 cm. Ultrasound transmission was performed by photoacoustic excitation of a carbon nanotube/polydimethylsiloxane composite material; ultrasound reception, with a fibre-optic Fabry-Perot cavity. Ex vivo tissue studies, which included healthy swine tissue and diseased human tissue, demonstrated the strong potential of this technique. To our knowledge, this is the first study to achieve an all-optical pulse-echo ultrasound probe for intravascular imaging. The potential for performing all-optical B-mode imaging (2D and 3D) with virtual arrays of transmit/receive elements, and hybrid imaging with pulse-echo ultrasound and photoacoustic sensing are discussed.

  20. Enhanced pulsed magneto-motive ultrasound imaging using superparamagnetic nanoclusters

    PubMed Central

    Mehrmohammadi, M; Yoon, KY; Qu, M; Johnston, KP; Emelianov, SY

    2011-01-01

    Recently, pulsed magneto-motive ultrasound (pMMUS) imaging augmented with ultra-small magnetic nanoparticles has been introduced as a tool capable of imaging events at molecular and cellular levels. The sensitivity of a pMMUS system depends on several parameters, including the size, geometry and magnetic properties of the nanoparticles. Under the same magnetic field, larger magnetic nanostructures experience a stronger magnetic force and produce larger displacement, thus improving the sensitivity and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of pMMUS imaging. Unfortunately, large magnetic iron-oxide nanoparticles are typically ferromagnetic and thus are very difficult to stabilize against colloidal aggregation. In the current study we demonstrate improvement of pMMUS image quality by using large size superparamagnetic nanoclusters characterized by strong magnetization per particle. Water-soluble magnetic nanoclusters of two sizes (15 and 55 nm average size) were synthesized from 3 nm iron precursors in the presence of citrate capping ligand. The size distribution of synthesized nanoclusters and individual nanoparticles was characterized using dynamic light scattering (DLS) analysis and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Tissue mimicking phantoms containing single nanoparticles and two sizes of nanoclusters were imaged using a custom-built pMMUS imaging system. While the magnetic properties of citrate-coated nanoclusters are identical to those of superparamagnetic nanoparticles, the magneto-motive signal detected from nanoclusters is larger, i.e. the same magnetic field produced larger magnetically induced displacement. Therefore, our study demonstrates that clusters of superparamagnetic nanoparticles result in pMMUS images with higher contrast and SNR. PMID:21157009

  1. 5. Accelerated Fracture Healing Targeting Periosteal Cells: Possibility of Combined Therapy of Low-Intensity Pulsed Ultrasound (LIPUS), Bone Graft, and Growth Factor (bFGF).

    PubMed

    Uchida, Kentaro; Urabe, Ken; Naruse, Koji; Mikuni-Takagaki, Yuko; Inoue, Gen; Takaso, Masashi

    2016-08-01

    We have studied the mechanism of fracture healing, and the effect of LIPUS, bone graft and growth factor on accelerating fracture healing. We present here the results of our research. To examine callus formation cells in fracture healing, we made marrow GFP chimera mice and a fracture model of marrow mesenchymal stem cell GFP chimera mice. It was demonstrated that periosteal cells were essential for callus formation. We focused on periosteal cells and examined the effect of LIPUS. In an in vitro experiment using a cultured part of the femur, LIPUS promoted ossification of the periosteal tissue. Further, LIPUS accelerated VEGF expression in the experiment using the femoral fracture model of mice. From these results, it was suggested that activation of periosteal cells might play a role in the fracture healing mechanism of LIPUS. Next, we discussed the possibility of combined therapy of LIPUS, bone graft and growth factor. Therapy involving the topical administration of bFGF using a controlled release system and bone graft could promote callus formation. In addition, LIPUS was able to promote membranaceous ossification after the bone graft. It was suggested that combined therapy of LIPUS, bone graft and bFGF could be a new option for treating fractures. PMID:27441766

  2. MHz-ultrasound generation by chirped femtosecond laser pulses from gold nano-colloidal suspensions.

    PubMed

    Masim, Frances Camille P; Hsu, Wei-Hung; Tsai, Chih-Hung; Liu, Hao-Li; Porta, Matteo; Nguyen, Mai Thanh; Yonezawa, Tetsu; Balčytis, Armandas; Wang, Xuewen; Juodkazis, Saulius; Hatanaka, Koji

    2016-07-25

    Strong absorption of femtosecond laser pulses in Au nano-colloidal suspensions was used to generate coherent ultrasound signals at 1-20 MHz frequency range. The most efficient ultrasound generation was observed at negative chirp values and was proportional to the pulse duration. Maximization of a dimensionless factor A ≡ αc0tp defined as the ratio of pulse duration tp and the time required for sound at speed c0 to cross the optical energy deposition length (an inverse of the absorption coefficient α) given by 1/(αc0). Chirp controlled pulse duration allows effective enhancement of ultrasound generation at higher frequencies (shorter wavelengths) and is promising for a high spatial resolution acoustic imaging. PMID:27464156

  3. GPU simulation of nonlinear propagation of dual band ultrasound pulse complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Kvam, Johannes Angelsen, Bjørn A. J.; Elster, Anne C.

    2015-10-28

    In a new method of ultrasound imaging, called SURF imaging, dual band pulse complexes composed of overlapping low frequency (LF) and high frequency (HF) pulses are transmitted, where the frequency ratio LF:HF ∼ 1 : 20, and the relative bandwidth of both pulses are ∼ 50 − 70%. The LF pulse length is hence ∼ 20 times the HF pulse length. The LF pulse is used to nonlinearly manipulate the material elasticity observed by the co-propagating HF pulse. This produces nonlinear interaction effects that give more information on the propagation of the pulse complex. Due to the large difference in frequency and pulse length between the LF and the HF pulses, we have developed a dual level simulation where the LF pulse propagation is first simulated independent of the HF pulse, using a temporal sampling frequency matched to the LF pulse. A separate equation for the HF pulse is developed, where the the presimulated LF pulse modifies the propagation velocity. The equations are adapted to parallel processing in a GPU, where nonlinear simulations of a typical HF beam of 10 MHz down to 40 mm is done in ∼ 2 secs in a standard GPU. This simulation is hence very useful for studying the manipulation effect of the LF pulse on the HF pulse.

  4. Alternate pulses of ultrasound and electricity enhanced electrochemical process for p-nitrophenol degradation.

    PubMed

    Xie, Fengchun; Xu, Yun; Xia, Kunyuan; Jia, Caixia; Zhang, Pin

    2016-01-01

    A novel alternated ultrasonic and electric pulse enhanced electrochemical process was developed and used for investigating its effectiveness on the degradation of p-nitrophenol (PNP) in an aqueous solution. The impacts of pulse mode, pH, cell voltage, supporting electrolyte concentration, ultrasonic power and the initial concentration of PNP on the performance of PNP degradation were evaluated. Possible pathway of PNP degradation in this system was proposed based on the intermediates identified by GC-MS. Experimental results showed that 94.1% of PNP could be removed at 2h in the dual-pulse ultrasound enhanced electrochemical (dual-pulse US-EC) process at mild operating conditions (i.e., pulse mode of electrochemical pulse time (TEC)=50 ms and ultrasonic pulse time (T US)=100 ms, initial pH of 3.0, cell voltage of 10 V, Na2SO4 concentration of 0.05 M, ultrasonic powder of 48.8 W and initial concentration of PNP of 100mg/L), compared with 89.0%, 58.9%, 2.4% in simultaneous ultrasound enhanced electrochemical (US-EC) process, pulsed electrochemical (EC) process and pulsed ultrasound (US), respectively. Moreover, energy used in the dual-pulse US-EC process was reduced by 50.4% as compared to the US-EC process. The degradation of PNP in the pulsed EC process, US-EC process and dual-pulse process followed pseudo-first-order kinetics. Therefore, the dual-pulse US-EC process was found to be a more effective technique for the degradation of PNP and would have a promising application in wastewater treatment.

  5. Alternate pulses of ultrasound and electricity enhanced electrochemical process for p-nitrophenol degradation.

    PubMed

    Xie, Fengchun; Xu, Yun; Xia, Kunyuan; Jia, Caixia; Zhang, Pin

    2016-01-01

    A novel alternated ultrasonic and electric pulse enhanced electrochemical process was developed and used for investigating its effectiveness on the degradation of p-nitrophenol (PNP) in an aqueous solution. The impacts of pulse mode, pH, cell voltage, supporting electrolyte concentration, ultrasonic power and the initial concentration of PNP on the performance of PNP degradation were evaluated. Possible pathway of PNP degradation in this system was proposed based on the intermediates identified by GC-MS. Experimental results showed that 94.1% of PNP could be removed at 2h in the dual-pulse ultrasound enhanced electrochemical (dual-pulse US-EC) process at mild operating conditions (i.e., pulse mode of electrochemical pulse time (TEC)=50 ms and ultrasonic pulse time (T US)=100 ms, initial pH of 3.0, cell voltage of 10 V, Na2SO4 concentration of 0.05 M, ultrasonic powder of 48.8 W and initial concentration of PNP of 100mg/L), compared with 89.0%, 58.9%, 2.4% in simultaneous ultrasound enhanced electrochemical (US-EC) process, pulsed electrochemical (EC) process and pulsed ultrasound (US), respectively. Moreover, energy used in the dual-pulse US-EC process was reduced by 50.4% as compared to the US-EC process. The degradation of PNP in the pulsed EC process, US-EC process and dual-pulse process followed pseudo-first-order kinetics. Therefore, the dual-pulse US-EC process was found to be a more effective technique for the degradation of PNP and would have a promising application in wastewater treatment. PMID:26384900

  6. Comparison of Thresholds for Pulmonary Capillary Hemorrhage Induced by Pulsed-wave and B-mode Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Douglas L.; Dou, Chunyan; Raghavendran, Krishnan

    2016-01-01

    Pulsed ultrasound was found to induce pulmonary capillary hemorrhage (PCH) in mice about 25 years ago but remains a poorly understood risk factor for pulmonary diagnostic ultrasound. In early research using laboratory fixed beam ultrasound, thresholds for PCH had frequency variation from 1–4 MHz similar to the Mechanical Index. In recent research, thresholds for B mode diagnostic ultrasound from 1.5–12 MHz had little dependence on frequency. To compare the diagnostic ultrasound method to laboratory pulsed exposure, thresholds for fixed beam ultrasound were determined using comparable methods at 1.5 and 7.5 MHz. PCH thresholds were lower for simple fixed-beam pulse modes than for B mode and in approximate agreement with early research. However, for comparable timing parameters, PCH thresholds had little dependence on ultrasonic frequency. These findings suggest that the MI may not be directly useful as a dosimetric parameter for safety guidance in pulmonary ultrasound. PMID:26819648

  7. Understanding ultrasound induced sonoporation: definitions and underlying mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Lentacker, I; De Cock, I; Deckers, R; De Smedt, S C; Moonen, C T W

    2014-06-01

    In the past two decades, research has underlined the potential of ultrasound and microbubbles to enhance drug delivery. However, there is less consensus on the biophysical and biological mechanisms leading to this enhanced delivery. Sonoporation, i.e. the formation of temporary pores in the cell membrane, as well as enhanced endocytosis is reported. Because of the variety of ultrasound settings used and corresponding microbubble behavior, a clear overview is missing. Therefore, in this review, the mechanisms contributing to sonoporation are categorized according to three ultrasound settings: i) low intensity ultrasound leading to stable cavitation of microbubbles, ii) high intensity ultrasound leading to inertial cavitation with microbubble collapse, and iii) ultrasound application in the absence of microbubbles. Using low intensity ultrasound, the endocytotic uptake of several drugs could be stimulated, while short but intense ultrasound pulses can be applied to induce pore formation and the direct cytoplasmic uptake of drugs. Ultrasound intensities may be adapted to create pore sizes correlating with drug size. Small molecules are able to diffuse passively through small pores created by low intensity ultrasound treatment. However, delivery of larger drugs such as nanoparticles and gene complexes, will require higher ultrasound intensities in order to allow direct cytoplasmic entry.

  8. Investigating natural organic carbon removal and structural alteration induced by pulsed ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Al-Juboori, Raed A; Yusaf, Talal; Aravinthan, Vasantha; Bowtell, Leslie

    2016-01-15

    The application of pulsed ultrasound for DOC removal from natural water samples has been thoroughly investigated in this work. Natural water samples were treated with ultrasound at power levels of 48 and 84 W with treatment times of 5 and 15 min. Chemical fractionation was conducted for both untreated and treated samples to clearly identify the change in DOC structure caused by ultrasonic treatments. Statistical analyses applying 2(3) factorial design were performed to study the behaviour of the response (i.e. DOC removal) under different operating conditions. Overall, ultrasonic treatments resulted in DOC removal of 7-15% depending on the applied operating conditions. The treated water had high microbial loading that interfered with DOC removal due primarily to the release of microbial products when exposed to ultrasound. Pulse ultrasound was found to be more effective than the continuous mode for DOC removal at the same effective power level. A regression model was developed and tested for DOC removal prediction. The model was adequate in predicting DOC removal with a maximum deviation from the experimental data of <11%. Pulsed ultrasound at low power levels and short treatment times was found to be the most energy efficient treatment for DOC removal. PMID:26473704

  9. Ultrasound treatment of nonunion of the hook of the hamate in sports activities.

    PubMed

    Fujioka, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Juichi; Yoshiya, Shinichi; Tsunoda, Masaya; Fujita, Kenji; Matsui, Nobuzo; Makino, Takeshi; Kurosaka, Masahiro

    2004-03-01

    Two cases of nonunion of the hook of the hamate were treated with low-intensity pulsed ultrasound. The patients were baseball players and had been injured as a result of hitting repeatedly. Nonunion was detected on computed tomography (CT) and was exposed to ultrasound for 20 min a day for 4 months. In both cases pain at the hypothenar eminence disappeared, and bone union was confirmed on CT at the end of the ultrasound treatment. PMID:14504721

  10. Ultrasound treatment of nonunion of the hook of the hamate in sports activities.

    PubMed

    Fujioka, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Juichi; Yoshiya, Shinichi; Tsunoda, Masaya; Fujita, Kenji; Matsui, Nobuzo; Makino, Takeshi; Kurosaka, Masahiro

    2004-03-01

    Two cases of nonunion of the hook of the hamate were treated with low-intensity pulsed ultrasound. The patients were baseball players and had been injured as a result of hitting repeatedly. Nonunion was detected on computed tomography (CT) and was exposed to ultrasound for 20 min a day for 4 months. In both cases pain at the hypothenar eminence disappeared, and bone union was confirmed on CT at the end of the ultrasound treatment.

  11. Pulsed-ultrasound tagging of light in living tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lev, Aner; Rubanov, E.; Pomerantz, Ami; Sfez, Bruno G.

    2004-07-01

    Ultrasound can be used in order to locally modulate, or tag, light in a turbid medium. This tagging process is made possible due to the extreme sensitivity of laser speckle distribution to minute changes within the medium. This hybrid technique presents several advantages compared to all-optical tomographic techniques, in that the image resolution is fixed by the ultrasound focus diameter. To our best knowledge, only in vitro experiments have been performed, either on tissue-like phantoms or meat. However a strong difference exists between these sample and living tissues. In living tissues, different kind of liquids flow through the capillaries, strongly reducing the sspeckle autocorrelation time. We have performed experiments on both mice and humans, showing that the autocorrelation time is much shorter than what was previously thought. We show however that it is possible to obtain signal with acceptable signal to noise ratio down to a few cm depth. We will also discuss the origin and characteristics of the speckle noise.

  12. Surfactant shedding and gas diffusion during pulsed ultrasound through a microbubble contrast agent suspension.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Jean-Pierre; Stride, Eleanor; Ovenden, Nicholas

    2013-08-01

    Interest in coated microbubbles as agents for therapeutic and quantitative imaging applications in biomedical ultrasound has increased the need for their accurate theoretical characterization. Effects such as gas diffusion, variation in the properties of the coating and the resulting changes in bubble behavior under repeated exposure to ultrasound pulses are, however, still not well understood. In this study, a revised equation for microbubble motion is proposed that includes the effects of gas diffusion, as well as adsorption, desorption and shedding of a surfactant from the bubble surface. This is incorporated into a nonlinear wave propagation model to account for these additional time dependent effects in the response of microbubble populations. The results from the model indicate there can be significant changes in both bubble behavior and the propagated pulse over time. This is in agreement with existing experimental data but is not predicted by existing propagation models. The analysis indicates that changes in bubble dynamics are dominated by surfactant shedding on the timescale of a diagnostic ultrasound pulse and gas diffusion over the timescale of the pulse repetition frequency. The implications of these results for the development of more accurate algorithms for quantitative imaging and for therapeutic applications are discussed.

  13. Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    Ultrasound is a type of imaging. It uses high-frequency sound waves to look at organs and ... liver, and other organs. During pregnancy, doctors use ultrasound to view the fetus. Unlike x-rays, ultrasound ...

  14. Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    Ultrasound is a useful procedure for monitoring the baby's development in the uterus. Ultrasound uses inaudible sound waves to produce a two- ... sound waves and appear dark or black. An ultrasound can supply vital information about a mother's pregnancy ...

  15. Pulsed Radiofrequency Ablation Under Ultrasound Guidance for Huge Neuroma

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Il; Lee, Chang Hee; Kim, Se Hun; Kim, Jin Sun; Yoo, Byoung Woo

    2014-01-01

    Amputation neuroma can cause very serious, intractable pain. Many treatment modalities are suggested for painful neuroma. Pharmacologic treatment shows a limited effect on eliminating the pain, and surgical treatment has a high recurrence rate. We applied pulsed radiofrequency treatment at the neuroma stalk under ultrasonography guidance. The long-term outcome was very successful, prompting us to report this case. PMID:25031817

  16. Effect of pulsed and continuous therapeutic ultrasound on healthy skeletal muscle in rats.

    PubMed

    Vásquez, Bélgica; Navarrete, Javiera; Farfán, Emilio; Cantín, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound therapy is used to treat injuries in joints, nerves and tendons. Part of the radiation generated is absorbed by nearby undamaged tissues, such as muscles. The aim was to evaluate histomorphological changes in the healthy gastrocnemius muscle in rats irradiated with continuous ultrasound (CUS) and pulsed ultrasound (PUS). Healthy adult rats were used, separated into two groups: CUS and PUS. Both were irradiated in the gastrocnemius muscle for 10 days: the CUS group in continuous mode (3 MHz, 1.0 W/cm(2), 1 min/session) and the PUS group in pulsed mode (3 MHz, 1.0 W/cm(2), 100 Hz, 50% duty cycle, 1 min/session). The contralateral muscles were used as a control. Their histological characteristics were analyzed, and the area and perimeter of the muscle fibers were measured. The connective tissue showed no histological changes. The area of muscle fibers of the irradiated groups was significantly greater (CUS 1325.2 ± 182.1 μm(2), p=0.0278 and PUS 1019.4 ± 125.3 μm(2), p=0.0398) than the control, and the CUS area was greater than the PUS (p=0.0383). The perimeter of muscle fibers showed significant differences between the irradiated groups (CUS 148 ± 11.12 μm, p=0.0178 and PUS 129.3 ± 8.83 μm, p=0.0236) compared to the control, as well as differences between CUS and PUS (p=0.0319). The application of ultrasound on healthy muscle produces hypertrophy of the muscle fibers, greater when continuous mode is used. It is advisable to apply pulsed, focused ultrasound therapies with sound heads sufficient for the tissue or zone to be treated, thereby reducing the risk of altering the adjacent healthy tissue.

  17. Effect of pulsed and continuous therapeutic ultrasound on healthy skeletal muscle in rats

    PubMed Central

    Vásquez, Bélgica; Navarrete, Javiera; Farfán, Emilio; Cantín, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound therapy is used to treat injuries in joints, nerves and tendons. Part of the radiation generated is absorbed by nearby undamaged tissues, such as muscles. The aim was to evaluate histomorphological changes in the healthy gastrocnemius muscle in rats irradiated with continuous ultrasound (CUS) and pulsed ultrasound (PUS). Healthy adult rats were used, separated into two groups: CUS and PUS. Both were irradiated in the gastrocnemius muscle for 10 days: the CUS group in continuous mode (3 MHz, 1.0 W/cm2, 1 min/session) and the PUS group in pulsed mode (3 MHz, 1.0 W/cm2, 100 Hz, 50% duty cycle, 1 min/session). The contralateral muscles were used as a control. Their histological characteristics were analyzed, and the area and perimeter of the muscle fibers were measured. The connective tissue showed no histological changes. The area of muscle fibers of the irradiated groups was significantly greater (CUS 1325.2±182.1 μm2, p=0.0278 and PUS 1019.4±125.3 μm2, p=0.0398) than the control, and the CUS area was greater than the PUS (p=0.0383). The perimeter of muscle fibers showed significant differences between the irradiated groups (CUS 148±11.12 μm, p=0.0178 and PUS 129.3±8.83 μm, p=0.0236) compared to the control, as well as differences between CUS and PUS (p=0.0319). The application of ultrasound on healthy muscle produces hypertrophy of the muscle fibers, greater when continuous mode is used. It is advisable to apply pulsed, focused ultrasound therapies with sound heads sufficient for the tissue or zone to be treated, thereby reducing the risk of altering the adjacent healthy tissue. PMID:24551303

  18. Low intensity infrared laser induces filamentation in Escherichia coli cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonseca, A. S.; Presta, G. A.; Geller, M.; Paoli, F.

    2011-10-01

    Low intensity continuous wave and pulsed emission modes laser is used in treating many diseases and the resulting biostimulative effect on tissues has been described, yet the photobiological basis is not well understood. The aim of this wok was to evaluate, using bacterial filamentation assay, effects of laser on Escherichia coli cultures in exponential and stationary growth phase. E. coli cultures, proficient and deficient on DNA repair, in exponential and stationary growth phase, were exposed to low intensity infrared laser, aliquots were spread onto microscopic slides, stained by Gram method, visualized by optical microscopy, photographed and percentage of bacterial filamentation were determined. Low intensity infrared laser with therapeutic fluencies and different emission modes can induce bacterial filamentation in cultures of E. coli wild type, fpg/ mutM, endonuclease III and exonuclease III mutants in exponential and stationary growth phase. This study showed induction of bacterial, filamentation in E. coli cultures expose to low intensity infrared laser and attention to laser therapy protocols, which should take into account fluencies, wavelengths, tissue conditions, and genetic characteristics of cells before beginning treatment.

  19. Sister chromatid exchanges in mouse after exposure to pulse-wave ultrasound in utero.

    PubMed

    Shintaku, Y; Takabayashi, T; Sasaki, H; Ozawa, N; Yajima, A

    1993-06-01

    The induction of sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs) was investigated in mice after a ten min exposure, in vivo, to 2 MHz focused, pulse-wave ultrasound with a pulse repetition rate of 1000 Hz, pulse duration of 10 microseconds. The bone marrow cells of the pregnant female mice and the fetal liver cells were analyzed. The cell cycle specific metaphase patterns were additionally evaluated. In the bone marrow cells, the mean frequencies of SCEs were 2.77 in control, 3.56 in the cells exposed to ultrasound at 586.2 mW/cm2 (spatial average temporal average, SATA); in the fetal liver cells, 2.64 in control, 3.84 in the cells exposed. The frequencies of SCEs significantly were increased by the treatment. Faster cell kinetics was observed in fetal liver cells than bone marrow cells of pregnant female. But there was no cell-growth inhibitory effect of ultrasound on both bone marrow and fetal liver cells. In fetal liver cells, the critical acoustic power was 160.0-278.9 mW/cm2 (SATA).

  20. Probability of cavitation for single ultrasound pulses applied to tissues and tissue-mimicking materials

    PubMed Central

    Maxwell, Adam D.; Cain, Charles A.; Hall, Timothy L.; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Xu, Zhen

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the negative pressure values at which inertial cavitation consistently occurs in response to a single, 2-cycle, focused ultrasound pulse were measured in several media relevant to cavitation-based ultrasound therapy. The pulse was focused into a chamber containing one of the media, which included liquids, tissue-mimicking materials, and ex-vivo canine tissue. Focal waveforms were measured by two separate techniques using a fiber-optic hydrophone. Inertial cavitation was identified by high-speed photography in optically transparent media and an acoustic passive cavitation detector. The probability of cavitation (Pcav) for a single pulse as a function of peak negative pressure (p−) followed a sigmoid curve, with the probability approaching 1 when the pressure amplitude was sufficient. The statistical threshold (defined as Pcav = 0.5) was between p− = 26.0–30.0 MPa in all samples with a high water content, but varied between p− = 13.7 to > 36 MPa for other media. A model for radial cavitation bubble dynamics was employed to evaluate the behavior of cavitation nuclei at these pressure levels. A single bubble nucleus with an inertial cavitation threshold of p− = 28.2 MPa was estimated to have a 2.5 nm radius in distilled water. These data may be valuable for cavitation-based ultrasound therapy to predict the likelihood of cavitation at different pressure levels and dimensions of cavitation-induced lesions in tissue. PMID:23380152

  1. In vivo pulsed magneto-motive ultrasound imaging using high-performance magnetoactive contrast nanoagents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehrmohammadi, Mohammad; Shin, Tae-Hyun; Qu, Min; Kruizinga, Pieter; Truby, Ryan L.; Lee, Jae-Hyun; Cheon, Jinwoo; Emelianov, Stanislav Y.

    2013-10-01

    Previously, pulsed magneto-motive ultrasound (pMMUS) imaging has been introduced as a contrast-agent-assisted ultrasound-based imaging modality capable of visualizing biological events at the cellular and molecular level. In pMMUS imaging, a high intensity pulsed magnetic field is used to excite cells or tissue labeled with magnetic nanoparticles. Then, ultrasound (US) imaging is used to monitor the mechanical response of the tissue to an externally applied magnetic field (i.e., tissue displacement). Signal to noise ratio (SNR) in pMMUS imaging can be improved by using superparamagnetic nanoparticles with larger saturation magnetization. Metal-doped magnetic nanoparticles with enhanced tunable nanomagnetism are suitable candidates to improve the SNR and, therefore, sensitivity of pMMUS imaging, which is essential for in vivo pMMUS imaging. In this study, we demonstrate the capability of pMMUS imaging to identify the presence and distribution of zinc-doped iron oxide nanoparticles in live nude mice bearing A431 (human epithelial carcinoma) xenograft tumors.Previously, pulsed magneto-motive ultrasound (pMMUS) imaging has been introduced as a contrast-agent-assisted ultrasound-based imaging modality capable of visualizing biological events at the cellular and molecular level. In pMMUS imaging, a high intensity pulsed magnetic field is used to excite cells or tissue labeled with magnetic nanoparticles. Then, ultrasound (US) imaging is used to monitor the mechanical response of the tissue to an externally applied magnetic field (i.e., tissue displacement). Signal to noise ratio (SNR) in pMMUS imaging can be improved by using superparamagnetic nanoparticles with larger saturation magnetization. Metal-doped magnetic nanoparticles with enhanced tunable nanomagnetism are suitable candidates to improve the SNR and, therefore, sensitivity of pMMUS imaging, which is essential for in vivo pMMUS imaging. In this study, we demonstrate the capability of pMMUS imaging to identify

  2. Ultrasound-modulated optical imaging using a photorefractive interferometer and a powerful long pulse laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousseau, Guy; Blouin, Alain; Monchalin, Jean-Pierre

    2009-02-01

    Ultrasound-modulated optical imaging is an emerging biodiagnostic technique which provides the optical spectroscopic signature and the spatial localization of an optically absorbing object embedded in a strongly scattering medium. The transverse resolution of the technique is determined by the lateral extent of ultrasound beam focal zone while the axial resolution is obtained by using short ultrasound pulses. The practical application of this technique is presently limited by its poor sensitivity. Moreover, any method to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio must satisfy the biomedical safety limits. In this paper, we propose to use a pulsed single-frequency laser source to raise the optical peak power applied to the scattering medium and to collect more ultrasonically tagged photons. Such a laser source allows illuminating the tissues mainly during the transit time of the ultrasonic wave. A single-frequency Nd:YAG laser emitting 500-μs pulses with a peak power superior to 100 W was used. Tagged photons were detected with a GaAs photorefractive interferometer characterized by a large optical etendue. When pumped by high intensity laser pulses, such an interferometer provides the fast response time essential to obtain an apparatus insensitive to the speckle decorrelation encountered in biomedical applications. Consequently, the combination of a large-etendue photorefractive interferometer with a high-power pulsed laser could allow obtaining both the sensitivity and the fast response time necessary for biomedical applications. Measurements performed in 30- and 60-mm thick optical phantoms made of titanium dioxide particles dispersed in sunflower oil are presented. Results obtained in 30- and 60-mm thick chicken breast samples are also reported.

  3. Evolution of bubble clouds induced by pulsed cavitational ultrasound therapy - histotripsy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhen; Raghavan, M; Hall, T L; Mycek, M-A; Fowlkes, J B

    2008-05-01

    Mechanical tissue fractionation can be achieved using successive, high-intensity ultrasound pulses in a process termed histotripsy. Histotripsy has many potential clinical applications where noninvasive tissue removal is desired. The primary mechanism for histotripsy is believed to be cavitation. Using fast-gated imaging, this paper studies the evolution of a cavitating bubble cloud induced by a histotripsy pulse (10 and 14 cycles) at peak negative pressures exceeding 21MPa. Bubble clouds are generated inside a gelatin phantom and at a tissue-water interface, representing two situations encountered clinically. In both environments, the imaging results show that the bubble clouds share the same evolutionary trend. The bubble cloud and individual bubbles in the cloud were generated by the first cycle of the pulse, grew with each cycle during the pulse, and continued to grow and collapsed several hundred microseconds after the pulse. For example, the bubbles started under 10 microm, grew to 50 microm during the pulse, and continued to grow 100 microm after the pulse. The results also suggest that the bubble clouds generated in the two environments differ in growth and collapse duration, void fraction, shape, and size. This study furthers our understanding of the dynamics of bubble clouds induced by histotripsy.

  4. Pulsed high intensity focused ultrasound mediated nanoparticle delivery: Mechanisms and efficacy in murine muscle

    PubMed Central

    O’Neill, Brian E.; Vo, Howard; Angstadt, Mary; Li, King P. C.; Quinn, Tim; Frenkel, Victor

    2009-01-01

    High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is generally thought to interact with biological tissues in two ways: hyperthermia (heat) and acoustic cavitation. Pulsed mode HIFU has recently been demonstrated to increase the efficacy of a variety of drug therapies. Generally, it is presumed that the treatment acts to temporarily increase the permeability of the tissue to the therapeutic agent, however, the precise mechanism remains in dispute. In this paper, we present evidence precluding hyperthermia as a principal mechanism for enhancing delivery, using a quantitative analysis of systemically administered fluorescent nanoparticles delivered to muscle in the flanks of mice. Comparisons were carried out on the degree of enhancement between an equivalent heat treatment, delivered without ultrasound, and that of the pulsed-HIFU itself. In the murine calf muscle, pulsed-HIFU treatment resulted in a significant increase in distribution of 200 nm particles (p<0.016, N=6), while the equivalent thermal dose showed no significant increase. Additional studies using this tissue/agent model also demonstrated that the pulsed HIFU enhancing effects persist for more than 24 hours, which is longer than that of hyperthermia and acoustic cavitation, and offers the possibility of a novel third mechanism for mediating delivery. PMID:19081668

  5. Can pulsed ultrasound increase tissue damage during ischemia? A study of the effects of ultrasound on infarcted and non-infarcted myocardium in anesthetized pigs

    PubMed Central

    Olivecrona, Göran K; Härdig, Bjarne Madsen; Roijer, Anders; Block, Mattias; Grins, Edgars; Persson, Hans W; Johansson, Leif; Olsson, Bertil

    2005-01-01

    Background The same mechanisms by which ultrasound enhances thrombolysis are described in connection with non-beneficial effects of ultrasound. The present safety study was therefore designed to explore effects of beneficial ultrasound characteristics on the infarcted and non-infarcted myocardium. Methods In an open chest porcine model (n = 17), myocardial infarction was induced by ligating a coronary diagonal branch. Pulsed ultrasound of frequency 1 MHz and intensity 0.1 W/cm2 (ISATA) was applied during one hour to both infarcted and non-infarcted myocardial tissue. These ultrasound characteristics are similar to those used in studies of ultrasound enhanced thrombolysis. Using blinded assessment technique, myocardial damage was rated according to histopathological criteria. Results Infarcted myocardium exhibited a significant increase in damage score compared to non-infarcted myocardium: 6.2 ± 2.0 vs. 4.3 ± 1.5 (mean ± standard deviation), (p = 0.004). In the infarcted myocardium, ultrasound exposure yielded a further significant increase of damage scores: 8.1 ± 1.7 vs. 6.2 ± 2.0 (p = 0.027). Conclusion Our results suggest an instantaneous additive effect on the ischemic damage in myocardial tissue when exposed to ultrasound of stated characteristics. The ultimate damage degree remains to be clarified. PMID:15831106

  6. Adaptive Light Modulation for Improved Resolution and Efficiency in All-Optical Pulse-Echo Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Alles, Erwin J; Colchester, Richard J; Desjardins, Adrien E

    2016-01-01

    In biomedical all-optical pulse-echo ultrasound systems, ultrasound is generated with the photoacoustic effect by illuminating an optically absorbing structure with a temporally modulated light source. Nanosecond range laser pulses are typically used, which can yield bandwidths exceeding 100 MHz. However, acoustical attenuation within tissue or nonuniformities in the detector or source power spectra result in energy loss at the affected frequencies and in a reduced overall system efficiency. In this work, a laser diode is used to generate linear and nonlinear chirp optical modulations that are extended to microsecond time scales, with bandwidths constrained to the system sensitivity. Compared to those obtained using a 2-ns pulsed laser, pulse-echo images of a phantom obtained using linear chirp excitation exhibit similar axial resolution (99 versus 92 μm, respectively) and signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) (10.3 versus 9.6 dB). In addition, the axial point spread function (PSF) exhibits lower sidelobe levels in the case of chirp modulation. Using nonlinear (time-stretched) chirp excitations, where the nonlinearity is computed from measurements of the spectral sensitivity of the system, the power spectrum of the imaging system was flattened and its bandwidth broadened. Consequently, the PSF has a narrower axial extent and still lower sidelobe levels. Pulse-echo images acquired with time-stretched chirps as optical modulation have higher axial resolution (64 μm) than those obtained with linear chirps, at the expense of a lower SNR (6.8 dB). Using a linear or time-stretched chirp, the conversion efficiency from optical power to acoustical pressure improved by a factor of 70 or 61, respectively, compared to that obtained with pulsed excitation. PMID:26552084

  7. Adaptive Light Modulation for Improved Resolution and Efficiency in All-Optical Pulse-Echo Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Alles, Erwin J; Colchester, Richard J; Desjardins, Adrien E

    2016-01-01

    In biomedical all-optical pulse-echo ultrasound systems, ultrasound is generated with the photoacoustic effect by illuminating an optically absorbing structure with a temporally modulated light source. Nanosecond range laser pulses are typically used, which can yield bandwidths exceeding 100 MHz. However, acoustical attenuation within tissue or nonuniformities in the detector or source power spectra result in energy loss at the affected frequencies and in a reduced overall system efficiency. In this work, a laser diode is used to generate linear and nonlinear chirp optical modulations that are extended to microsecond time scales, with bandwidths constrained to the system sensitivity. Compared to those obtained using a 2-ns pulsed laser, pulse-echo images of a phantom obtained using linear chirp excitation exhibit similar axial resolution (99 versus 92 μm, respectively) and signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) (10.3 versus 9.6 dB). In addition, the axial point spread function (PSF) exhibits lower sidelobe levels in the case of chirp modulation. Using nonlinear (time-stretched) chirp excitations, where the nonlinearity is computed from measurements of the spectral sensitivity of the system, the power spectrum of the imaging system was flattened and its bandwidth broadened. Consequently, the PSF has a narrower axial extent and still lower sidelobe levels. Pulse-echo images acquired with time-stretched chirps as optical modulation have higher axial resolution (64 μm) than those obtained with linear chirps, at the expense of a lower SNR (6.8 dB). Using a linear or time-stretched chirp, the conversion efficiency from optical power to acoustical pressure improved by a factor of 70 or 61, respectively, compared to that obtained with pulsed excitation.

  8. Photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging using dual contrast perfluorocarbon nanodroplets triggered by laser pulses at 1064 nm

    PubMed Central

    Hannah, Alexander S.; VanderLaan, Donald; Chen, Yun-Sheng; Emelianov, Stanislav Y.

    2014-01-01

    Recently, a dual photoacoustic and ultrasound contrast agent—named photoacoustic nanodroplet—has been introduced. Photoacoustic nanodroplets consist of a perfluorocarbon core, surfactant shell, and encapsulated photoabsorber. Upon pulsed laser irradiation the perfluorocarbon converts to gas, inducing a photoacoustic signal from vaporization and subsequent ultrasound contrast from the resulting gas microbubbles. In this work we synthesize nanodroplets which encapsulate gold nanorods with a peak absorption near 1064 nm. Such nanodroplets are optimal for extended photoacoustic imaging depth and contrast, safety and system cost. We characterized the nanodroplets for optical absorption, image contrast and vaporization threshold. We then imaged the particles in an ex vivo porcine tissue sample, reporting contrast enhancement in a biological environment. These 1064 nm triggerable photoacoustic nanodroplets are a robust biomedical tool to enhance image contrast at clinically relevant depths. PMID:25401018

  9. Biodiesel production from soybean oil deodorizer distillate enhanced by counter-current pulsed ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xiulian; You, Qinghong; Ma, Haile; Dai, Chunhua; Zhang, Henan; Li, Kexin; Li, Yunliang

    2015-03-01

    Biodiesel production from soybean oil deodorizer distillate enhanced by counter-current pulsed ultrasound was studied. Effect of static probe ultrasonic enhanced transesterification (SPUE) and counter-current probe ultrasonic enhanced transesterification (CCPUE) on the biodiesel conversion were compared. The results indicated that CCPUE was a better method for enhancing transesterification. The working conditions of CCPUE were studied by single-factor experiment design and the results showed that the optimal conditions were: initial temperature 25 °C, methanol to triglyceride molar ratio 10:1, flow rate 200 mL/min, catalyst content 1.8%, ultrasound working on-time 4 s, off-time 2 s, total working time 50 min. Under these conditions, the average biodiesel conversion of three experiments was 96.1%.

  10. Biodiesel production from soybean oil deodorizer distillate enhanced by counter-current pulsed ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xiulian; You, Qinghong; Ma, Haile; Dai, Chunhua; Zhang, Henan; Li, Kexin; Li, Yunliang

    2015-03-01

    Biodiesel production from soybean oil deodorizer distillate enhanced by counter-current pulsed ultrasound was studied. Effect of static probe ultrasonic enhanced transesterification (SPUE) and counter-current probe ultrasonic enhanced transesterification (CCPUE) on the biodiesel conversion were compared. The results indicated that CCPUE was a better method for enhancing transesterification. The working conditions of CCPUE were studied by single-factor experiment design and the results showed that the optimal conditions were: initial temperature 25 °C, methanol to triglyceride molar ratio 10:1, flow rate 200 mL/min, catalyst content 1.8%, ultrasound working on-time 4 s, off-time 2 s, total working time 50 min. Under these conditions, the average biodiesel conversion of three experiments was 96.1%. PMID:25199445

  11. Photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging using dual contrast perfluorocarbon nanodroplets triggered by laser pulses at 1064 nm.

    PubMed

    Hannah, Alexander S; VanderLaan, Donald; Chen, Yun-Sheng; Emelianov, Stanislav Y

    2014-09-01

    Recently, a dual photoacoustic and ultrasound contrast agent-named photoacoustic nanodroplet-has been introduced. Photoacoustic nanodroplets consist of a perfluorocarbon core, surfactant shell, and encapsulated photoabsorber. Upon pulsed laser irradiation the perfluorocarbon converts to gas, inducing a photoacoustic signal from vaporization and subsequent ultrasound contrast from the resulting gas microbubbles. In this work we synthesize nanodroplets which encapsulate gold nanorods with a peak absorption near 1064 nm. Such nanodroplets are optimal for extended photoacoustic imaging depth and contrast, safety and system cost. We characterized the nanodroplets for optical absorption, image contrast and vaporization threshold. We then imaged the particles in an ex vivo porcine tissue sample, reporting contrast enhancement in a biological environment. These 1064 nm triggerable photoacoustic nanodroplets are a robust biomedical tool to enhance image contrast at clinically relevant depths.

  12. Ultrasound-guided Pulsed Radiofrequency Lesioning of the Phrenic Nerve in a Patient with Intractable Hiccup

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Keum Nae; Park, In Kyung; Suh, Jeong Hun; Leem, Jeong Gill

    2010-01-01

    Persistent and intractable hiccups (with respective durations of more than 48 hours and 1 month) can result in depression, fatigue, impaired sleep, dehydration, weight loss, malnutrition, and aspiration syndromes. The conventional treatments for hiccups are either non-pharmacological, pharmacological or a nerve block treatment. Pulsed radiofrequency lesioning (PRFL) has been proposed for the modulation of the excited nervous system pathway of pain as a safe and nondestructive treatment method. As placement of the electrode in close proximity to the targeted nerve is very important for the success of PRFL, ultrasound appears to be well suited for this technique. A 74-year-old man suffering from intractable hiccups that had developed after a coronary artery bypass graft and had continued for 7 years was referred to our pain clinic. He had not been treated with conventional methods or medications. We performed PRFL of the phrenic nerve guided by ultrasound and the hiccups disappeared. PMID:20830266

  13. Pulse-echo ultrasound transit time spectroscopy: A comparison of experimental measurement and simulation prediction.

    PubMed

    Wille, Marie-Luise; Almualimi, Majdi A; Langton, Christian M

    2016-01-01

    Considering ultrasound propagation through complex composite media as an array of parallel sonic rays, a comparison of computer-simulated prediction with experimental data has previously been reported for transmission mode (where one transducer serves as transmitter, the other as receiver) in a series of 10 acrylic step-wedge samples, immersed in water, exhibiting varying degrees of transit time inhomogeneity. In this study, the same samples were used but in pulse-echo mode, where the same ultrasound transducer served as both transmitter and receiver, detecting both 'primary' (internal sample interface) and 'secondary' (external sample interface) echoes. A transit time spectrum was derived, describing the proportion of sonic rays with a particular transit time. A computer simulation was performed to predict the transit time and amplitude of various echoes created, and compared with experimental data. Applying an amplitude-tolerance analysis, 91.7% ± 3.7% of the simulated data were within ±1 standard deviation of the experimentally measured amplitude-time data. Correlation of predicted and experimental transit time spectra provided coefficients of determination (R(2)%) ranging from 100.0% to 96.8% for the various samples tested. The results acquired from this study provide good evidence for the concept of parallel sonic rays. Furthermore, deconvolution of experimental input and output signals has been shown to provide an effective method to identify echoes otherwise lost due to phase cancellation. Potential applications of pulse-echo ultrasound transit time spectroscopy include improvement of ultrasound image fidelity by improving spatial resolution and reducing phase interference artefacts.

  14. A new method for evaluating the degeneration of articular cartilage using pulse-echo ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Sun, Anyu; Bai, Xiaolong; Ju, Bing-Feng

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents a novel nondestructive ultrasonic technique for measuring the sound speed and acoustic impedance of articular cartilage using the pulsed Vz,t technique. Vz,t data include a series of pulsed ultrasonic echoes collected using different distances between the ultrasonic transducer and the specimen. The 2D Fourier transform is applied to the Vz,t data to reconstruct the 2D reflection spectrum Rθ,ω. To obtain the reflection coefficient of articular cartilage, the Vz,t data from a reference specimen with a well-known reflection coefficient are obtained to eliminate the dependence on the general system transfer function. The ultrasound-derived aggregate modulus (Ha) is computed based on the measured reflection coefficient and the sound speed. In the experiment, 32 cartilage-bone samples were prepared from bovine articular cartilage, and 16 samples were digested using 0.25% trypsin solution. The sound speed and Ha of these cartilage samples were evaluated before and after degeneration. The magnitude of the sound speed decreased with trypsin digestion (from 1663 ± 5.6 m/s to 1613 ± 5.3 m/s). Moreover, the Young's modulus in the corresponding degenerative state was measured and was correlated with the ultrasound-derived aggregate modulus. The ultrasound-derived aggregate modulus was determined to be highly correlated with the Young's modulus (n = 16, r>0.895, p<0.003, Pearson correlation test for each measurement). The results demonstrate the effectiveness of using the proposed method to assess the changes in sound speed and the ultrasound-derived aggregate modulus of cartilage after degeneration. PMID:25832249

  15. Cancer treatment using an optically inert Rose Bengal derivative combined with pulsed focused ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yoo-Shin; Rubio, Valentina; Qi, Jianjun; Xia, Rongmin; Shi, Zheng-Zheng; Peterson, Leif; Tung, Ching-Hsuan; O'Neill, Brian E.

    2012-10-01

    Pulsed high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) produced has been combined with a photo-insensitive Rose Bengal derivative (RB2) to provide a synergistic cytotoxicity requiring the presence of both ultrasonic cavitation and drug. In vitro tests have shown that a short treatment (less than 30 s) of pulsed HIFU with peak negative pressure >7 MPa (˜27 W acoustic power at 1.4 MHz) destroys >95 % of breast cancer cells MDA-MB-231 in suspension with >10 μM of the compound. Neither the pulsed HIFU nor the RB2 compound was found to have any significant impact on the viability of the cells when used alone. Introducing an antioxidant (Nacetylcysteine) reduced the effectiveness of the treatment. In vivo tests using these same cells growing as a xenograft in nu/nu mice were also done. An ultrasound contrast agent (Optison) and lower frequency (1.0 MHz) was used to help initiate cavitation at the tumor site. We were able to demonstrate tumor regression with cavitation alone, however, addition of RB2 compound injected i.v. yielded a substantial synergistic improvement over either cavitation or RB2 injection alone.

  16. Pulsed laser generation of ultrasound in a metal plate between the melting and ablation thresholds

    SciTech Connect

    Every, A. G.; Utegulov, Z. N.; Veres, I. A.

    2015-03-31

    The generation of ultrasound in a metal plate exposed to nanosecond pulsed laser heating, sufficient to cause melting but not ablation, is treated. Consideration is given to the spatial and temporal profiles of the laser pulse, penetration of the laser beam into the sample, the evolution of the melt pool, and thermal conduction in the melt and surrounding solid. The excitation of the ultrasound takes place over a few nanoseconds, and occurs predominantly within the thermal diffusion length of a micron or so beneath the surface. Because of this, the output of the thermal simulations can be represented as axially symmetric transient radial and normal surface force distributions. The epicentral displacement response at the opposite surface to these forces is obtained by two methods, the one based on the elastodynamic Green’s functions for plate geometry determined by the Cagniard generalized ray method, and the other using a finite element numerical method. The two approaches are in very close agreement. Numerical simulations are reported of the epicentral displacement response of a 3.12mm thick tungsten plate irradiated with a 4 ns pulsed laser beam with Gaussian spatial profile, at intensities below and above the melt threshold. Comparison is made between results obtained using available temperature dependent thermophysical data, and room temperature materials constants except near the melting point.

  17. Exploring the use of Low-intensity Ultrasonics as a Tool for Assessing the Salt Content in Pork Meat Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Pérez, J. V.; de Prados, M.; Martínez-Escrivá, G.; González, R.; Mulet, A.; Benedito, J.

    Meat industry demands non-destructive techniques for the control of the salting process to achieve a homogeneous final salt content in salted meat products. The feasibility of using low-intensity ultrasound for characterizing the salting process of pork meat products was evaluated. The ultrasonic velocity (V) and time of flight (TF) were measured by through-transmission and pulse-echo methods, respectively, in salted meat products. Salting involved an increase of the V in meat muscles and a decrease of the time of flight in whole hams. Measuring the V before and after salting, the salt content could be estimated. Moreover, online monitoring of the salting process by computing the TF could be considered a reliable tool for quality control purposes.

  18. Imaging monitored loosening of dense fibrous tissues using high-intensity pulsed ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Chia-Lun; Li, Pai-Chi; Shih, Wen-Pin; Huang, Pei-Shin; Kuo, Po-Ling

    2013-10-01

    Pulsed high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is proposed as a new alternative treatment for contracture of dense fibrous tissue. It is hypothesized that the pulsed-HIFU can release the contracted tissues by attenuating tensile stiffness along the fiber axis, and that the stiffness reduction can be quantitatively monitored by change of B-mode images. Fresh porcine tendons and ligaments were adapted to an ex vivo model and insonated with pulsed-HIFU for durations ranging from 5 to 30 min. The pulse length was 91 µs with a repetition frequency of 500 Hz, and the peak rarefactional pressure was 6.36 MPa. The corresponding average intensities were kept around 1606 W cm-2 for ISPPA and 72.3 W cm-2 for ISPTA. B-mode images of the tissues were acquired before and after pulsed-HIFU exposure, and the changes in speckle intensity and organization were analyzed. The tensile stiffness of the HIFU-exposed tissues along the longitudinal axis was examined using a stretching machine. Histology examinations were performed by optical and transmission electron microscopy. Pulsed-HIFU exposure significantly decreased the tensile stiffness of the ligaments and tendons. The intensity and organization of tissue speckles in the exposed region were also decreased. The speckle changes correlated well with the degree of stiffness alteration. Histology examinations revealed that pulsed-HIFU exposure probably damages tissues via a cavitation-mediated mechanism. Our results suggest that pulsed-HIFU with a low duty factor is a promising tool for developing new treatment strategies for orthopedic disorders.

  19. Ultrasound contrast imaging: influence of scatterer motion in multi-pulse techniques.

    PubMed

    Lin, Fanglue; Cachard, Christian; Mori, Riccardo; Varray, Francois; Guidi, Francesco; Basset, Olivier

    2013-10-01

    In ultrasound contrast imaging, many techniques based on multiple transmissions have been proposed to increase the contrast-to-tissue ratio (CTR). They are generally based on the response of static scatterers inside the imaged region. However, scatterer motion, for example in blood vessels, has an inevitable influence on multi-pulse techniques, which can either enhance or degrade the technique involved. This paper investigates the response of static nonlinear media insonated by multi-pulses with various phase shifts, and the influence of scatterer motion on multi-pulse techniques. Simulations and experimental results from a single bubble and clouds of bubbles show that the phase shift of the echoes backscattered from bubbles is dependent on the transmissions' phase shift, and that the bubble motion influences the efficiency of multi-pulse techniques: fundamental and second-harmonic amplitudes of the processed signal change periodically, exhibiting maximum or minimum values, according to scatterer motion. Furthermore, experimental results based on the second-harmonic inversion (SHI) technique reveal that bubble motion can be taken into account to regulate the pulse repetition frequency (PRF). With the optimal PRF, the CTR of SHI images can be improved by about 12 dB compared with second-harmonic images.

  20. Cost-effective design of a concurrent photoacoustic-ultrasound microscope using single laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wen-Shao; Liu, Wei-Wen; Li, Pai-Chi

    2016-03-01

    A method for concurrent photoacoustic (PA) and ultrasound (US) imaging with single laser pulses was previously demonstrated. An optical-absorbing multilayer film that can generate a US pulse based on the thermoelastic effect is used. With such a film, the generated US can be adjusted so that it does not overlap with the spectrum of the PA signal generated by the light transmitting through the layer. Thus, the US signal and the PA signal can be generated and separated by using a single laser pulse with spectral filtering. In this study, we continue with the same concurrent imaging approach and propose a cost-effective and portable design. The design consists of a pulsed laser diode with the repetition rate up to 25 kHz and energy of 2 μJ/pulse. A multilayer film is employed to generate narrow band US signals under laser excitation for US imaging. With simple spectral filtering, the PA signals and the US signals can be separated. With optical resolution, the system has a theoretical lateral resolution of 2 μm in PA imaging and 200 μm in US imaging. One of the applications of the proposed microscope is for tumor biology, where angiogenesis is an essential topic for understanding tumor growth and tumor metastasis. We will demonstrate performance of the proposed system by imaging vasculature networks.

  1. Characterization of Pulsed High Intensity Focused Ultrasound for Enhanced Drug and Gene Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kam, Anthony W.; Wang, Honghui; Thomasson, David; Farahani, Keyvan; Li, King C. P.

    2006-05-01

    Within a certain range of parameters, pulsed high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) has been shown to increase the delivery of systemically administered drugs and plasmid DNA in tumors in mice. The sonicated tissue is not damaged by light microscopy. The mechanism for the enhanced delivery has not been shown conclusively and can include thermal, cavitational, and non-cavitation mechanical effects. In order to assess the effects of pulsed HIFU in a manner that allows for clinical translation, pulsed HIFU is performed within a magnetic resonance (MR) scanner. In this work, the thermal effect is evaluated with phase-shift MR thermometry in ex vivo chicken muscle. The thermal effect is small at the most common exposure parameters. In the future, non-thermal effects like permeability, diffusion, and elasticity changes will be evaluated with dynamic contrast enhanced MRI, diffusion-weighted MRI, and MR elastography. If changes in permeability, diffusion, and shear modulus are associated with pulsed HIFU enhanced delivery, then these parameters can be used as markers for optimization of pulsed HIFU enhanced delivery.

  2. Therapeutic ultrasound for dental tissue repair.

    PubMed

    Scheven, B A A; Shelton, R M; Cooper, P R; Walmsley, A D; Smith, A J

    2009-10-01

    Dental disease affects human health and the quality of life of millions worldwide. Tooth decay (caries) and diseases of the dental pulp result in loss of tooth vitality and function requiring invasive treatment to restore the tooth to health. "Therapeutic" low intensity pulsed ultrasound has been shown to accelerate bone fracture healing indicating that ultrasound may be used as a tool to facilitate hard tissue regeneration. We have shown recently that low frequency ultrasound is able to exert biological effects on odontoblast-like cells. In this paper, we postulate that low frequency, low intensity ultrasound may stimulate endogenous coronal tooth repair by stimulating dentine formation from existing odontoblasts or by activating dental pulp stem cells to differentiate into new reparative dentine-producing cells. Ultrasound therapy promoting dentine formation and repair may also have the potential benefit of alleviating dentine hypersensitivity by inducing occlusion of dentinal tubules. It is envisaged that therapeutic ultrasound may be used in future to facilitate dental tissue engineering and stem cell therapy applications for dental tissue regeneration. Further research is warranted in this clinically important area and we envisage that novel strategies in dental therapy will be realised that may ultimately lead to the development of novel non-invasive, multifunctional ultrasound devices for dental diagnostics, repair and regeneration.

  3. Pulsed radiofrequency under ultrasound guidance for the tarsal tunnel syndrome: two case reports.

    PubMed

    Chon, Jin Young; Hahn, Yun Jin; Sung, Choon Ho; Jung, Sung Hoon; Moon, Ho Sik

    2014-12-01

    Tarsal tunnel syndrome (TTS) is a compression neuropathy that results from entrapment of the posterior tibial nerve or its branches. TTS may be treated either by conservative measures, including physical therapy, medications, and steroid injections, or by surgical decompression. Despite a variety of treatments, a few cases of TTS will relapse, and many cases of recurrent TTS will require re-operation. Pulsed radiofrequency (PRF) is known to have a number of advantages for pain management, particularly as this technique does not cause neural compromise such as motor weakness. Here, we report a new application of ultrasound-guided PRF in two cases of intractable TTS. Both patients had a long duration of severe foot pain and had been treated with various therapeutic modalities without lasting relief. We applied ultrasound-guided PRF to the affected posterior tibial nerve in each patient, and both had significantly reduced pain intensity scores and analgesic requirements without any complications. Ultrasound-guided PRF for intractable TTS relieved severe foot pain. It may supersede surgery as a reliable treatment for intractable TTS.

  4. Ultrasound-assisted pulse electrodeposition and characterization of Co-W/MWCNTs nanocomposite coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Fenghua; Liu, Cansen; Huang, Ping

    2014-08-01

    Co-W/MWCNTs nanocomposite coatings were synthesized by pulse electrodeposition with help of ultrasound agitation. Effect of agitation techniques of electrolyte on the microstructure and morphology of the nanocomposite coatings were evaluated. The Co-W/MWCNTs composite coating produced by mechanical agitation shows rough surface and has large and poorly dispersed CNT agglomerates in its layer and surface, resulting in this coating displaying low hardness and inferior wear resistance and friction reduction. Ultrasound agitation is much better than mechanical stirring to evenly distribute MWCNTs in the layer and surface of the composite coatings. The nanocomposite coatings produced with ultrasound agitation exhibits smoother surface, higher hardness and better tribological properties than the one produced with mechanical agitation. In addition, the ultrasonic power greatly affects the morphology and properties of the as-prepared composite coatings. As the ultrasonic power of 400 W was applied, a large number of MWCNTs are successfully incorporated and evenly distributed in the as-prepared composite coating, which result in this composite coating exhibiting the highest hardness and the best friction-reducing and anti-wear ability. In general, the differences of the friction and wear behaviors and the corresponding mechanisms of these coatings produced under different conditions are attributed to their different hardness and microstructures.

  5. MATLAB/Simulink Pulse-Echo Ultrasound System Simulator Based on Experimentally Validated Models.

    PubMed

    Kim, Taehoon; Shin, Sangmin; Lee, Hyongmin; Lee, Hyunsook; Kim, Heewon; Shin, Eunhee; Kim, Suhwan

    2016-02-01

    A flexible clinical ultrasound system must operate with different transducers, which have characteristic impulse responses and widely varying impedances. The impulse response determines the shape of the high-voltage pulse that is transmitted and the specifications of the front-end electronics that receive the echo; the impedance determines the specification of the matching network through which the transducer is connected. System-level optimization of these subsystems requires accurate modeling of pulse-echo (two-way) response, which in turn demands a unified simulation of the ultrasonics and electronics. In this paper, this is realized by combining MATLAB/Simulink models of the high-voltage transmitter, the transmission interface, the acoustic subsystem which includes wave propagation and reflection, the receiving interface, and the front-end receiver. To demonstrate the effectiveness of our simulator, the models are experimentally validated by comparing the simulation results with the measured data from a commercial ultrasound system. This simulator could be used to quickly provide system-level feedback for an optimized tuning of electronic design parameters.

  6. ULTRASOUND PULSE-ECHO IMAGING USING THE SPLIT-STEP FOURIER PROPAGATOR

    SciTech Connect

    HUANG, LIANJIE; QUAN, YOULI

    2007-01-31

    Ultrasonic reflection imaging has the potential to produce higher image resolution than transmission tomography, but imaging resolution and quality still need to be further improved for early cancer detection and diagnosis. We present an ultrasound reflection image reconstruction method using the split-step Fourier propagator. It is based on recursive inward continuation of ultrasonic wavefields in the frequency-space and frequency-wavenumber domains. The inward continuation within each extrapolation interval consists of two steps. In the first step, a phase-shift term is applied to the data in the frequency-wavenumber domain for propagation in a reference medium. The second step consists of applying another phase-shift term to data in the frequency-space domain to approximately compensate for ultrasonic scattering effects of heterogeneities within the breast. We use synthetic ultrasound pulse-echo data recorded around a ring for heterogeneous, computer-generated numerical breast phantoms to study the imaging capability of the method. The phantoms are derived from an experimental breast phantom and a sound-speed tomography image of an in-vivo ultrasound breast data collected usi ng a ring array. The heterogeneous sound-speed models used for pulse-echo imaging are obtained using a computationally efficient, first-arrival-time (time-of-flight) transmission tomography method. Our studies demonstrate that reflection image reconstruction using the split-step Fourier propagator with heterogeneous sound-speed models significantly improves image quality and resolution. We also numerically verify the spatial sampling criterion of wavefields for a ring transducer array.

  7. Biological response in vitro of skeletal muscle cells treated with different intensity continuous and pulsed ultrasound fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrunhosa, Viviane M.; Mermelstein, Claudia S.; Costa, Manoel L.; Costa-Felix, Rodrigo P. B.

    2011-02-01

    Therapeutic ultrasound has been used in physiotherapy to accelerate tissue healing. Although the ultrasonic wave is widely used in clinical practice, not much is known about the biological effects of ultrasound on cells and tissues. This study aims to evaluate the biological response of ultrasound in primary cultures of chick myogenic cells. To ensure the metrological reliability of whole measurement process, the ultrasound equipment was calibrated in accordance with IEC 61689:2007. The skeletal muscle cells were divided in four samples. One sample was used as a control group and the others were submitted to different time and intensity and operation mode of ultrasound: 1) 0.5 W/cm2 continuous for 5 minutes, 2) 0.5 W/cm2 pulsed for 5 minutes, 3) 1.0 W/cm2 pulsed for 10 minutes. The samples were analyzed with phase contrast optical microscopy before and after the treatment. The results showed alignment of myogenic cells in the sample treated with 0.5 W/cm2 continuous during 5 minutes when compared with the control group and the other samples. This study is a first step towards a metrological and scientific based protocol to cells and tissues treatment under different ultrasound field exposures.

  8. Characterization of the dynamic activities of a population of microbubbles driven by pulsed ultrasound exposures in sonoporation

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Z.; Chen, D.; Deng, C.X.

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound driven microbubble activities have been exploited to transiently disrupt the cell membrane (sonoporation) for non-viral intracellular drug delivery and gene transfection both in vivo and in vitro. In this study, we investigated the dynamic behaviors of a population of microbubbles subjected to pulsed ultrasound exposures and their impact on adherent cells in terms of intracellular delivery and cell viability. By systematically analyzing the bubble activities at time scales relevant to pulsed ultrasound exposures, we identified two quantification parameters that categorized the diverse bubble activities subjected to various ultrasound conditions into three characteristic behaviors, i.e., stable cavitation/aggregation (Type I), growth/coalescence and translation (Type II), and localized inertial cavitation/collapse (Type III). Correlation of the bubble activities with sonoporation outcome suggested that Type III behavior resulted in intracellular delivery, while Type II behavior caused death of a large number of cells. These results provide useful insights for rational selection of ultrasound parameters to optimize outcomes of sonoporation and other applications that exploit the use of ultrasound-driven bubble activities. PMID:24486236

  9. Histotripsy beyond the “Intrinsic” Cavitation Threshold using Very Short Ultrasound Pulses: “Microtripsy”

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Kuang-Wei; Kim, Yohan; Maxwell, Adam D.; Wang, Tzu-Yin; Hall, Timothy L.; Xu, Zhen; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Cain, Charles A.

    2014-01-01

    Histotripsy produces tissue fractionation through dense energetic bubble clouds generated by short, high-pressure, ultrasound pulses. Conventional histotripsy treatments have used longer pulses from 3 to 10 cycles wherein the lesion-producing bubble cloud generation depends on the pressure-release scattering of very high peak positive shock fronts from previously initiated, sparsely distributed bubbles (the “shock-scattering” mechanism). In our recent work, the peak negative pressure (P−) for generation of dense bubble clouds directly by a single negative half cycle, the “intrinsic threshold,” was measured. In this paper, the dense bubble clouds and resulting lesions (in RBC phantoms and canine tissues) generated by these supra-intrinsic threshold pulses were studied. A 32-element, PZT-8, 500 kHz therapy transducer was used to generate very short (< 2 cycles) histotripsy pulses at a pulse repetition frequency (PRF) of 1 Hz and P− from 24.5 to 80.7 MPa. The results showed that the spatial extent of the histotripsy-induced lesions increased as the applied P− increased, and the sizes of these lesions corresponded well to the estimates of the focal regions above the intrinsic cavitation threshold, at least in the lower pressure regime (P− = 26–35 MPa). The average sizes for the smallest reproducible lesions were approximately 0.9 × 1.7 mm (lateral × axial), significantly smaller than the −6dB beamwidth of the transducer (1.8 × 4.0 mm). These results suggest that, using the intrinsic threshold mechanism, well-confined and microscopic lesions can be precisely generated and their spatial extent can be estimated based on the fraction of the focal region exceeding the intrinsic cavitation threshold. Since the supra-threshold portion of the negative half cycle can be precisely controlled, lesions considerably less than a wavelength are easily produced, hence the term “microtripsy.” PMID:24474132

  10. Impact of preconditioning pulse on lesion formation during high-intensity focused ultrasound histotripsy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jin; Bigelow, Timothy A; Riesberg, Grant M

    2012-11-01

    Therapeutic applications with high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) fall into two classifications-one using thermal effect for coagulation or ablation while generally avoiding cavitation and the other using cavitation-mediated mechanical effects while suppressing heating. Representative of the latter, histotripsy uses HIFU at low duty factor to create energetic bubble clouds inside tissue to liquefy a region and has the advantages in real-time monitoring and lesion fidelity to treatment planning. We explored the impact of a preconditioning/heating pulse on histotripsy lesion formation in porcine muscle samples. During sonication, a targeted square region 9 mm wide (lateral to the focal plane) was scanned in a raster pattern with a step size of 0.75 mm. The 20-s exposure at each treatment location consisted of a 5-s duration preconditioning burst at spatial-peak intensities from 0-1386 W/cm² followed by 5000 tone bursts at high intensity (with spatial-peak pulse-average intensity of 47.34 kW/cm², spatial-peak temporal-average intensity of 284 W/cm², peak compressional pressure of 102 MPa and peak rarefactional pressure of 17 MPa). The temperature increase for all exposures was measured using a thermal imager immediately after each exposure. Lesion volume increased with increasing amplitude of the preconditioning pulse until coagulation was observed, but lesion width/area did not change significantly with the amplitude. In addition, the lesion dimensions became smaller when the global tissue temperature was raised before applying the histotripsy pulsing sequence. Therefore, the benefit of the preconditioning pulse was not caused by global heating.

  11. Histotripsy beyond the intrinsic cavitation threshold using very short ultrasound pulses: microtripsy.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kuang-Wei; Kim, Yohan; Maxwell, Adam D; Wang, Tzu-Yin; Hall, Timothy L; Xu, Zhen; Fowlkes, J Brian; Cain, Charles A

    2014-02-01

    Histotripsy produces tissue fractionation through dense energetic bubble clouds generated by short, high-pressure, ultrasound pulses. Conventional histotripsy treatments have used longer pulses from 3 to 10 cycles, wherein the lesion-producing bubble cloud generation depends on the pressure-release scattering of very high peak positive shock fronts from previously initiated, sparsely distributed bubbles (the shock-scattering mechanism). In our recent work, the peak negative pressure (P-) for generation of dense bubble clouds directly by a single negative half cycle, the intrinsic threshold, was measured. In this paper, the dense bubble clouds and resulting lesions (in red blood cell phantoms and canine tissues) generated by these supra-intrinsic threshold pulses were studied. A 32-element, PZT-8, 500-kHz therapy transducer was used to generate very short (<2 cycles) histotripsy pulses at a pulse repetition frequency (PRF) of 1 Hz and P- from 24.5 to 80.7 MPa. The results showed that the spatial extent of the histotripsy-induced lesions increased as the applied P- increased, and the sizes of these lesions corresponded well to the estimates of the focal regions above the intrinsic cavitation threshold, at least in the lower pressure regime (P- = 26 to 35 MPa). The average sizes for the smallest reproducible lesions were approximately 0.9 × 1.7 mm (lateral × axial), significantly smaller than the -6-dB beamwidth of the transducer (1.8 × 4.0 mm). These results suggest that, using the intrinsic threshold mechanism, well-confined and microscopic lesions can be precisely generated and their spatial extent can be estimated based on the fraction of the focal region exceeding the intrinsic cavitation threshold. Because the supra-threshold portion of the negative half cycle can be precisely controlled, lesions considerably less than a wavelength are easily produced, hence the term microtripsy.

  12. Impact of preconditioning pulse on lesion formation during high-intensity focused ultrasound histotripsy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jin; Bigelow, Timothy A; Riesberg, Grant M

    2012-11-01

    Therapeutic applications with high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) fall into two classifications-one using thermal effect for coagulation or ablation while generally avoiding cavitation and the other using cavitation-mediated mechanical effects while suppressing heating. Representative of the latter, histotripsy uses HIFU at low duty factor to create energetic bubble clouds inside tissue to liquefy a region and has the advantages in real-time monitoring and lesion fidelity to treatment planning. We explored the impact of a preconditioning/heating pulse on histotripsy lesion formation in porcine muscle samples. During sonication, a targeted square region 9 mm wide (lateral to the focal plane) was scanned in a raster pattern with a step size of 0.75 mm. The 20-s exposure at each treatment location consisted of a 5-s duration preconditioning burst at spatial-peak intensities from 0-1386 W/cm² followed by 5000 tone bursts at high intensity (with spatial-peak pulse-average intensity of 47.34 kW/cm², spatial-peak temporal-average intensity of 284 W/cm², peak compressional pressure of 102 MPa and peak rarefactional pressure of 17 MPa). The temperature increase for all exposures was measured using a thermal imager immediately after each exposure. Lesion volume increased with increasing amplitude of the preconditioning pulse until coagulation was observed, but lesion width/area did not change significantly with the amplitude. In addition, the lesion dimensions became smaller when the global tissue temperature was raised before applying the histotripsy pulsing sequence. Therefore, the benefit of the preconditioning pulse was not caused by global heating. PMID:22929656

  13. High speed imaging of bubble clouds generated in pulsed ultrasound cavitational therapy--histotripsy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhen; Raghavan, Mekhala; Hall, Timothy L; Chang, Ching-Wei; Mycek, Mary-Ann; Fowlkes, J Brian; Cain, Charles A

    2007-10-01

    Our recent studies have demonstrated that mechanical fractionation of tissue structure with sharply demarcated boundaries can be achieved using short (< 20 micros), high intensity ultrasound pulses delivered at low duty cycles. We have called this technique histotripsy. Histotripsy has potential clinical applications where noninvasive tissue fractionation and/or tissue removal are desired. The primary mechanism of histotripsy is thought to be acoustic cavitation, which is supported by a temporally changing acoustic backscatter observed during the histotripsy process. In this paper, a fast-gated digital camera was used to image the hypothesized cavitating bubble cloud generated by histotripsy pulses. The bubble cloud was produced at a tissue-water interface and inside an optically transparent gelatin phantom which mimics bulk tissue. The imaging shows the following: (1) Initiation of a temporally changing acoustic backscatter was due to the formation of a bubble cloud; (2) The pressure threshold to generate a bubble cloud was lower at a tissue-fluid interface than inside bulk tissue; and (3) at higher pulse pressure, the bubble cloud lasted longer and grew larger. The results add further support to the hypothesis that the histotripsy process is due to a cavitating bubble cloud and may provide insight into the sharp boundaries of histotripsy lesions.

  14. Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... reflect off body structures. A computer receives the waves and uses them to create a picture. Unlike with an x-ray or CT scan, this test does not use ionizing radiation. The test is done in the ultrasound ...

  15. Convolutional modeling of diffraction effects in pulse-echo ultrasound imaging

    PubMed Central

    Mast, T. Douglas

    2010-01-01

    A model is presented for pulse-echo imaging of three-dimensional, linear, weakly-scattering continuum media by ultrasound array transducers. The model accounts for the diffracted fields of focused array subapertures in both transmit and receive modes, multiple transmit and receive focal zones, frequency-dependent attenuation, and aberration caused by mismatched medium and beamformer sound speeds. For a given medium reflectivity function, computation of a B-scan requires evaluation of a depth-dependent transmit∕receive beam product, followed by two one-dimensional convolutions and a one-dimensional summation. Numerical results obtained using analytic expressions for transmit and receive beams agree favorably with measured B-scan images and speckle statistics. PMID:20815433

  16. Effect of therapeutic pulsed ultrasound on lipoperoxidation and fibrogenesis in an animal model of wound healing.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Tiago P; Gomes, Marcelo; Fraga, Daiane B; Freitas, Luciana S; Rezin, Gislaine T; Santos, Patricia M; Silveira, Paulo C; Paula, Marcos M; Pinho, Ricardo A; Streck, Emilio L

    2010-06-01

    Evidence from the literature has shown that the wound healing process is enhanced by ultrasound therapy. In the present study, we measured thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS; index of lipoperoxidation) and hydroxyproline (index of collagen synthesis) levels in wounds after therapeutic pulsed ultrasound (TPU) treatment. Male Wistar rats were submitted to skin ulceration, and three doses of TPU (0.4, 0.6, and 0.8W/cm(2)) were used. A circular area of skin was removed with a punch biopsy from the medial dorsal region. After TPU for 10 days, TBARS (Draper and Hadley [21]) and hydroxyproline (Woessner [22]) levels were measured in the tissue around the wound. Results showed that TPU improved wound healing, since the wound size was significantly smaller 5 and 10 days after ulceration in groups submitted to this treatment. Moreover, TBARS levels were decreased in the 0.4, 0.6, and 0.8W/cm(2) TPU groups, and hydroxyproline levels were increased in the 0.6 and 0.8W/cm(2) TPU groups. These findings indicate that TPU presents beneficial effects on the wound healing process, probably by speeding up the inflammatory phase and inducing collagen synthesis.

  17. Hybrid-modality ocular imaging using a clinical ultrasound system and nanosecond pulsed laser

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Hoong-Ta; Matham, Murukeshan Vadakke

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Hybrid optical modality imaging is a special type of multimodality imaging significantly used in the recent past in order to harness the strengths of different imaging methods as well as to furnish complementary information beyond that provided by any individual method. We present a hybrid-modality imaging system based on a commercial clinical ultrasound imaging (USI) system using a linear array ultrasound transducer (UST) and a tunable nanosecond pulsed laser as the source. The integrated system uses photoacoustic imaging (PAI) and USI for ocular imaging to provide the complementary absorption and structural information of the eye. In this system, B-mode images from PAI and USI are acquired at 10 Hz and about 40 Hz, respectively. A linear array UST makes the system much faster compared to other ocular imaging systems using a single-element UST to form B-mode images. The results show that the proposed instrumentation is able to incorporate PAI and USI in a single setup. The feasibility and efficiency of this developed probe system was illustrated by using enucleated pig eyes as test samples. It was demonstrated that PAI could successfully capture photoacoustic signals from the iris, anterior lens surface, and posterior pole, while USI could accomplish the mapping of the eye to reveal the structures like the cornea, anterior chamber, lens, iris, and posterior pole. This system and the proposed methodology are expected to enable ocular disease diagnostic applications and can be used as a preclinical imaging system. PMID:26835487

  18. Potential contrast improvement in ultrasound pulse inversion imaging using EMD and EEMD.

    PubMed

    Liao, Ai-Ho; Shen, Che-Chou; Li, Pai-Chi

    2010-01-01

    Ultrasound nonlinear imaging using microbubble-based contrast agents has been widely investigated. Nonetheless, its contrast is often reduced by the nonlinearity of acoustic wave propagation in tissue. In this paper, we explore the use of empirical mode decomposition (EMD) and ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD) in the Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT) for possible contrast improvement. The HHT is designed for analyzing nonlinear and nonstationary data, whereas EMD is a method associated with the HHT that allows decomposition of data into a finite number of intrinsic modes. The hypothesis is that the nonlinear signal from microbubbles and the tissue nonlinear signal can be better differentiated with EMD and EEMD, thus making contrast improvement possible. Specifically, we tested this method on pulse-inversion nonlinear imaging, which is generally regarded as one of the most effective nonlinear imaging methods. The results show that the contrast-to-tissue ratios at the fundamental and second-harmonic frequencies were improved by 10.2 and 4.3 dB, respectively, after EEMD. Nonetheless, image artifacts also appeared, and hence further investigation is needed before EMD and EEMD can be applied in practical applications of ultrasound nonlinear imaging.

  19. Evaluation of the increase in permeability of the blood–brain barrier during tumor progression after pulsed focused ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Feng-Yi; Wang, Hsin-Ell; Lin, Guan-Liang; Lin, Hui-Hsien; Wong, Tai-Tong

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the permeability of the blood–brain barrier after sonication by pulsed high-intensity focused ultrasound and to determine if such an approach increases the tumor:ipsilateral brain permeability ratio. Materials and methods F98 glioma-bearing Fischer 344 rats were injected intravenously with Evans blue with or without blood–tumor barrier disruption induced by transcranial pulsed high-intensity focused ultrasound. Sonication was applied at a frequency of 1 MHz with a 5% duty cycle and a repetition frequency of 1 Hz. The permeability of the blood–brain barrier was assessed by the extravasation of Evans blue. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance images were used to monitor the gadolinium deposition path associated with transcranial pulsed high-intensity focused ultrasound, and the influencing size and location was also investigated. In addition, whole brain histological analysis was performed. The results were compared by two-tailed unpaired t-test. Results The accumulation of Evans blue in brains and the tumor:ipsilateral brain permeability ratio of Evans blue were significantly increased after pulsed high-intensity focused ultrasound exposure. Evans blue injection followed by sonication showed an increase in the tumor:ipsilateral brain ratio of the target tumors (9.14:1) of about 2.23-fold compared with the control tumors (x4.09) on day 6 after tumor implantation. Magnetic resonance images showed that pulsed high-intensity focused ultrasound locally enhances the permeability of the blood–tumor barrier in the glioma-bearing rats. Conclusion This method could allow enhanced synergistic effects with respect to other brain tumor treatment regimens. PMID:22359451

  20. Low intensity laser treatment of nerve injuries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiao-Guang; Liu, Timon Cheng-Yi; Luo, Qing-Ming

    2007-05-01

    The neural regeneration and functional recovery after nerve injuries has long been an important field in neuroscience. Low intensity laser (LIL) irradiation is a novel and useful tool for the treatment of many injuries and disorders. The aim of this study was to assess the role of LIL irradiation in the treatment of peripheral and central nerve injuries. Some animal experiments and clinical investigations have shown beneficial effects of LIL irradiation on neural tissues, but its therapeutic value and efficacy are controversial. Reviewing the data of experimental and clinical studies by using the biological information model of photobiomodulation, we conclude that LIL irradiation in specific parameters can promote the regeneration of injured peripheral and central nerves and LIL therapy is a safe and valuable treatment for superficial peripheral nerve injuries and spinal cord injury. The biological effects of LIL treatment depend largely on laser wavelength, power and dose per site and effective irradiation doses are location-specific.

  1. Dependence of pulsed focused ultrasound induced thrombolysis on duty cycle and cavitation bubble size distribution.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shanshan; Zong, Yujin; Feng, Yi; Liu, Runna; Liu, Xiaodong; Hu, Yaxin; Han, Shimin; Wan, Mingxi

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the relationship between the efficiency of pulsed, focused ultrasound (FUS)-induced thrombolysis, the duty cycle (2.3%, 9%, and 18%) and the size distribution of cavitation bubbles. The efficiency of thrombolysis was evaluated through the degree of mechanical fragmentation, namely the number, mass, and size of clot debris particles. First, we found that the total number and mass of clot debris particles were highest when a duty cycle of 9% was used and that the mean diameter of clot debris particles was smallest. Second, we found that the size distribution of cavitation bubbles was mainly centered around the linear resonance radius (2.5μm) of the emission frequency (1.2MHz) of the FUS transducer when a 9% duty cycle was used, while the majority of cavitation bubbles became smaller or larger than the linear resonance radius when a 2.3% or 18% duty cycle was used. In addition, the inertial cavitation dose from the treatment performed at 9% duty cycle was much higher than the dose obtained with the other two duty cycles. The data presented here suggest that there is an optimal duty cycle at which the thrombolysis efficiency and cavitation activity are strongest. They further indicate that using a pulsed FUS may help control the size distribution of cavitation nuclei within an active size range, which we found to be near the linear resonance radius of the emission frequency of the FUS transducer.

  2. Using pulsed wave ultrasound to evaluate the suitability of hydroxyl radical scavengers in sonochemical systems.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Ruiyang; Diaz-Rivera, David; He, Ziqi; Weavers, Linda K

    2013-05-01

    Hydroxyl radical (()OH) scavengers are commonly used in sonochemistry to probe the site and nature of reaction in aqueous cavitational systems. Using pulsed wave (PW) ultrasound with comparative sonochemistry we evaluated the performance of ()OH scavengers (i.e., formic acid, carbonic acid, terephthalic acid/terephthalate, iodide, methanesulfonate, benzenesulfonate, and acetic acid/acetate) in a sonochemical system to determine which ()OH scavengers react only in bulk solution and which ()OH scavengers interact with cavitation bubbles. The ability of each scavenger to interact with cavitation bubbles was assessed by comparing the pulse enhancement (PE) of 10μM of a probe compound, carbamazepine (CBZ), in the presence and absence of a scavenger. Based on PE results, acetic acid/acetate appears to scavenge ()OH in bulk solution, and not interact with cavitation bubbles. Methanesulfonate acts as reaction promoter, increasing rather than inhibiting the degradation of CBZ. For formic acid, carbonic acid, terephthalic acid/terephthalate, benzenesulfonate, and iodide, the PE was significantly decreased compared to in the absence of the scavenger. These scavengers not only quench ()OH in bulk solution but also affect the cavity interface. The robustness of acetic acid/acetate as a bulk ()OH scavenger was validated for pH values between 3.5 and 8.9 and acetic acid/acetate concentrations from 0.5 to 0.1M.

  3. Study of the inactivation of spoilage microorganisms in apple juice by pulsed light and ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Ferrario, Mariana; Alzamora, Stella Maris; Guerrero, Sandra

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of ultrasound (US) (600 W, 20 kHz and 95.2 μm wave amplitude; 10 or 30 min at 20, 30 or 44 ± 1 °C) and pulsed light (PL) (Xenon lamp; 3 pulses/s; 0.1 m distance; 2.4 J/cm(2)-71.6 J/cm(2); initial temperature 2, 30, 44 ± 1 °C) on the inactivation of Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris ATCC 49025 spores and Saccharomyces cerevisiae KE162 inoculated in commercial (pH: 3.5; 12.5 °Brix) and natural squeezed (pH: 3.4; 11.8 °Brix) apple juices. Inactivation depended on treatment time, temperature, microorganism and matrix. Combination of these technologies led up to 3.0 log cycles of spore reduction in commercial apple juice and 2.0 log cycles in natural juice; while for S. cerevisiae, 6.4 and 5.8 log cycles of reduction were achieved in commercial and natural apple juices, respectively. In natural apple juice, the combination of US + 60 s PL at the highest temperature build-up (56 ± 1 °C) was the most effective treatment for both strains. In commercial apple juice, US did not contribute to further inactivation of spores, but significantly reduced yeast population. Certain combinations of US + PL kept on good microbial stability under refrigerated conditions for 15 days. PMID:25475338

  4. Study of the inactivation of spoilage microorganisms in apple juice by pulsed light and ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Ferrario, Mariana; Alzamora, Stella Maris; Guerrero, Sandra

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of ultrasound (US) (600 W, 20 kHz and 95.2 μm wave amplitude; 10 or 30 min at 20, 30 or 44 ± 1 °C) and pulsed light (PL) (Xenon lamp; 3 pulses/s; 0.1 m distance; 2.4 J/cm(2)-71.6 J/cm(2); initial temperature 2, 30, 44 ± 1 °C) on the inactivation of Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris ATCC 49025 spores and Saccharomyces cerevisiae KE162 inoculated in commercial (pH: 3.5; 12.5 °Brix) and natural squeezed (pH: 3.4; 11.8 °Brix) apple juices. Inactivation depended on treatment time, temperature, microorganism and matrix. Combination of these technologies led up to 3.0 log cycles of spore reduction in commercial apple juice and 2.0 log cycles in natural juice; while for S. cerevisiae, 6.4 and 5.8 log cycles of reduction were achieved in commercial and natural apple juices, respectively. In natural apple juice, the combination of US + 60 s PL at the highest temperature build-up (56 ± 1 °C) was the most effective treatment for both strains. In commercial apple juice, US did not contribute to further inactivation of spores, but significantly reduced yeast population. Certain combinations of US + PL kept on good microbial stability under refrigerated conditions for 15 days.

  5. Design and implementation of a smartphone-based portable ultrasound pulsed-wave Doppler device for blood flow measurement.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chih-Chung; Lee, Po-Yang; Chen, Pay-Yu; Liu, Ting-Yu

    2012-01-01

    Blood flow measurement using Doppler ultrasound has become a useful tool for diagnosing cardiovascular diseases and as a physiological monitor. Recently, pocket-sized ultrasound scanners have been introduced for portable diagnosis. The present paper reports the implementation of a portable ultrasound pulsed-wave (PW) Doppler flowmeter using a smartphone. A 10-MHz ultrasonic surface transducer was designed for the dynamic monitoring of blood flow velocity. The directional baseband Doppler shift signals were obtained using a portable analog circuit system. After hardware processing, the Doppler signals were fed directly to a smartphone for Doppler spectrogram analysis and display in real time. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of the use of this system for medical ultrasound Doppler signal processing. A Couette flow phantom, consisting of two parallel disks with a 2-mm gap, was used to evaluate and calibrate the device. Doppler spectrograms of porcine blood flow were measured using this stand-alone portable device under the pulsatile condition. Subsequently, in vivo portable system verification was performed by measuring the arterial blood flow of a rat and comparing the results with the measurement from a commercial ultrasound duplex scanner. All of the results demonstrated the potential for using a smartphone as a novel embedded system for portable medical ultrasound applications. PMID:22293750

  6. Low intensity laser therapy: the clinical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahn, Fred

    2006-02-01

    Recently, there has been significant improvement in the process of research and application of Low Intensity Laser Therapy (LILT). Despite this positive direction, a wide discrepancy between the research component and clinical understanding of the technology remains. In our efforts to achieve better clinical results and more fully comprehend the mechanisms of interaction between light and cells, further studies are required. The clinical results presented in this paper are extrapolated from a wide range of musculoskeletal problems including degenerative osteoarthritis, repetitive motion injuries, sports injuries, etc. The paper includes three separate clinical studies comprising 151, 286 and 576 consecutive patient discharges at our clinic. Each patient studied received a specific course of treatment that was designed for that individual and was modified on a continuing basis as the healing process advanced. On each visit, clinical status correlation with the duration, dosage and other parameters was carried out. The essentials of the treatment consisted of a three stage approach. This involved a photon stream emanating from a number of specified gallium-aluminum-arsenide diodes; stage one, red light array, stage two consisting of an array of infrared diodes and stage three consisting of the application of an infrared laser diode probe. On average, each of these groups required less than 10 treatments per patient and resulted in a significant improvement / cure rate greater than 90% in all conditions treated. This report clearly demonstrates the benefits of LILT, indicating that it should be more widely adapted in all medical therapeutic settings.

  7. Direct effect of diagnostic ultrasound on genetically interesting molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Ciatti, S.; Domokos, G.; Koevesi-Domokos, S.; Milano, F.

    1981-01-01

    Ultrasound is a non-ionizing radiation and at typical intensities used in diagnostic sonography, macroscopic damage to tissues is negligible. Some recent experiments, however, provided evidence for possible genetic damage caused by relatively low-intensity ultrasound irradiation. Although the implications of such experiments concerning possible genetic damage caused by low intensity ultrasound irradiation are not yet completely understood, the very existence of such results raises an important theoretical question. Is it possible that a non-ionizing radiation can cause significant changes in the structure of a typical DNA molecule. Several mechanisms exist which are responsible for such changes including: (1) structural changes in the molecule due to sound absorption from a high harmonic of the repetition frequency of a pulsed ultrasound radiation; (2) structural changes due to multi-phonon absorption from low harmonics of the repetition frequency; and (3) break-up of the molecule as a consequence of the excitation of collective vibrations. The calculations presented suggest that, should damage to DNA in vitro caused by low-intensity ultrasound be confirmed beyond reasonable doubt, such catastrophic changes in the structure of DNA molecules are more likely to arise as a result of their collective modes rather than from a localizable breakup of some hydrogen bonds. (ERB)

  8. Influence Of Low Intensity Laser Therapy On Diabetic Polyneuropathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Raoof, N. A.; Elnhas, N. G.; Elsayed, I. M.

    2011-09-01

    Diabetic peripheral neuropathy is a consequence of diabetes-mediated impairment of blood flow, and resultant hypoxia of nerves that may develop within 10 years of the onset of diabetes in 40-50% of people with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Low Intensity Laser Therapy (LILT) has been advocated for the treatment of chronic pain disorders as blood flow is an important determinant for pain relief. Comparing the effect of Helium-Neon Laser therapy versus Infrared laser therapy on blood vessels diameter and flow as well as level of sensation for neuropathy. Twenty diabetic patients suffering from neuropathy were enrolled in the study with age 45-55 years. They were assigned randomly into two equal groups in number; Group A underwent an application of He-Neon laser while Group B underwent an application of Infrared laser. Both groups received laser for 2 months. Blood flow velocity, and blood vessel diameter were investigated by using duplex Doppler ultrasound and peripheral neuropathy parameters were investigated by Semmes-Weinstein monofilament assessment. The results revealed that He-Neon laser as well as Infrared laser groups showed significant improvement in blood flow velocity, blood vessel diameter & neuropathy tested parameters after treatment but there was no significance difference between the two types of LILT. LILT is a safe, non-invasive and drug free method for improving blood flow & sensation in patients suffering from diabetic polyneuropathy in addition to preventing one of the most threatening microvascular complications of diabetes.

  9. Indirect Low-Intensity Ultrasonic Stimulation for Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyoungshin; Yip, Michael C.; Chertok, Beata; Kost, Joseph; Kobler, James B.; Langer, Robert; Zeitels, Steven M.

    2010-01-01

    Low-intensity ultrasound (LIUS) treatment has been shown to increase mass transport, which could benefit tissue grafts during the immediate postimplant period, when blood supply to the implanted tissue is suboptimal. In this in vitro study, we investigated effects of LIUS stimulation on dye diffusion, proliferation, metabolism, and tropomyosin expression of muscle cells (C2C12) and on tissue viability and gene expression of human adipose tissue organoids. We found that LIUS increased dye diffusion within adjacent tissue culture wells and caused anisotropic diffusion patterns. This effect was confirmed by a hydrophone measurement resulting in acoustic pressure 150–341 Pa in wells. Cellular studies showed that LIUS significantly increased proliferation, metabolic activity, and expression of tropomyosin. Adipose tissue treated with LIUS showed significantly increased metabolic activity and the cells had similar morphology to normal unilocular adipocytes. Gene analysis showed that tumor necrosis factor-alpha expression (a marker for tissue damage) was significantly lower for stimulated organoids than for control groups. Our data suggests that LIUS could be a useful modality for improving graft survival in vivo. PMID:21350648

  10. Pulsed ultrasound enhances the delivery of nitric oxide from bubble liposomes to ex vivo porcine carotid tissue.

    PubMed

    Sutton, J T; Raymond, J L; Verleye, M C; Pyne-Geithman, G J; Holland, C K

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound-mediated drug delivery is a novel technique for enhancing the penetration of drugs into diseased tissue beds noninvasively. By encapsulating drugs into microsized and nanosized liposomes, the therapeutic can be shielded from degradation within the vasculature until delivery to a target site by ultrasound exposure. Traditional in vitro or ex vivo techniques to quantify this delivery profile include optical approaches, cell culture, and electrophysiology. Here, we demonstrate an approach to characterize the degree of nitric oxide (NO) delivery to porcine carotid tissue by direct measurement of ex vivo vascular tone. An ex vivo perfusion model was adapted to assess ultrasound-mediated delivery of NO. This potent vasodilator was coencapsulated with inert octafluoropropane gas to produce acoustically active bubble liposomes. Porcine carotid arteries were excised post mortem and mounted in a physiologic buffer solution. Vascular tone was assessed in real time by coupling the artery to an isometric force transducer. NO-loaded bubble liposomes were infused into the lumen of the artery, which was exposed to 1 MHz pulsed ultrasound at a peak-to-peak acoustic pressure amplitude of 0.34 MPa. Acoustic cavitation emissions were monitored passively. Changes in vascular tone were measured and compared with control and sham NO bubble liposome exposures. Our results demonstrate that ultrasound-triggered NO release from bubble liposomes induces potent vasorelaxation within porcine carotid arteries (maximal relaxation 31%± 8%), which was significantly stronger than vasorelaxation due to NO release from bubble liposomes in the absence of ultrasound (maximal relaxation 7%± 3%), and comparable with relaxation due to 12 μM sodium nitroprusside infusions (maximal relaxation 32%± 3%). This approach is a valuable mechanistic tool for assessing the extent of drug release and delivery to the vasculature caused by ultrasound.

  11. Heating of tissues in vivo by pulsed focused ultrasound to stimulate enhanced HSP expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kujawska, Tamara; Wójcik, Janusz; Nowicki, Andrzej

    2011-09-01

    The main aim of this work was numerical modeling of temperature fields induced in soft tissues in vivo by pulsed focused ultrasound during neurodegenerative disease treatment and experimental verification of the proposed model for a rat liver. The new therapeutic approach to neurodegenerative diseases consists of stimulation of enhanced expression of the Heat Shock Proteins (HSP) which are responsible for immunity of cells to stress. During therapy the temperature rise in tissues in vivo should not exceed 6 °C above level of the thermal norm (37 °C). First, the 3D acoustic pressure field, and the rate of heat production per unit volume due to that field, were calculated using our 3D numerical solver capable of predicting nonlinear propagation of pulsed high intensity waves generated from circular focused acoustic sources in multilayer configuration of attenuating media. The two-layer configuration of media (water—rat liver) assumed in calculations fairly well approximated both the real anatomic dimensions of rat liver and the geometric scheme of our experimental set-up. A numerical solution of the Pennes bio-heat transfer equation which accounted for the effects of heat diffusion, blood perfusion and metabolism rates, was employed to calculate the temperature fields induced in the rat liver by the ultrasonic beam. The numerical simulation results were verified experimentally using a thermocouple inserted in the liver of a rat under anesthesia at the beam focus. The quantitative analysis of the obtained results enabled estimation of the effects of several acoustic and thermal parameters of the rat liver in vivo on the temperature rise, as well as determination of exposure time for ultrasonic beams with varied acoustic power generated by a 2-MHz circular transducer of 15-mm diameter and 25-mm focal length, in order to avoid the tissue overheating that leads to cells necrosis, which would be unacceptable in neurodegenerative disease treatment.

  12. Investigation of Cellular and Molecular Responses to Pulsed Focused Ultrasound in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Burks, Scott R.; Ziadloo, Ali; Hancock, Hilary A.; Chaudhry, Aneeka; Dean, Dana D.; Lewis, Bobbi K.; Frenkel, Victor; Frank, Joseph A.

    2011-01-01

    Continuous focused ultrasound (cFUS) has been widely used for thermal ablation of tissues, relying on continuous exposures to generate temperatures necessary to induce coagulative necrosis. Pulsed FUS (pFUS) employs non-continuous exposures that lower the rate of energy deposition and allow cooling to occur between pulses, thereby minimizing thermal effects and emphasizing effects created by non-thermal mechanisms of FUS (i.e., acoustic radiation forces and acoustic cavitation). pFUS has shown promise for a variety of applications including drug and nanoparticle delivery; however, little is understood about the effects these exposures have on tissue, especially with regard to cellular pro-homing factors (growth factors, cytokines, and cell adhesion molecules). We examined changes in murine hamstring muscle following pFUS or cFUS and demonstrate that pFUS, unlike cFUS, has little effect on the histological integrity of muscle and does not induce cell death. Infiltration of macrophages was observed 3 and 8 days following pFUS or cFUS exposures. pFUS increased expression of several cytokines (e.g., IL-1α, IL-1β, TNFα, INFγ, MIP-1α, MCP-1, and GMCSF) creating a local cytokine gradient on days 0 and 1 post-pFUS that returns to baseline levels by day 3 post-pFUS. pFUS exposures induced upregulation of other signaling molecules (e.g., VEGF, FGF, PlGF, HGF, and SDF-1α) and cell adhesion molecules (e.g., ICAM-1 and VCAM-1) on muscle vasculature. The observed molecular changes in muscle following pFUS may be utilized to target cellular therapies by increasing homing to areas of pathology. PMID:21931834

  13. A high pulse repetition frequency ultrasound system for the ex vivo measurement of mechanical properties of crystalline lenses with laser-induced microbubbles interrogated by acoustic radiation force.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Sangpil; Aglyamov, Salavat; Karpiouk, Andrei; Emelianov, Stanislav

    2012-08-01

    A high pulse repetition frequency ultrasound system for an ex vivo measurement of mechanical properties of an animal crystalline lens was developed and validated. We measured the bulk displacement of laser-induced microbubbles created at different positions within the lens using nanosecond laser pulses. An impulsive acoustic radiation force was applied to the microbubble, and spatio-temporal measurements of the microbubble displacement were assessed using a custom-made high pulse repetition frequency ultrasound system consisting of two 25 MHz focused ultrasound transducers. One of these transducers was used to emit a train of ultrasound pulses and another transducer was used to receive the ultrasound echoes reflected from the microbubble. The developed system was operating at 1 MHz pulse repetition frequency. Based on the measured motion of the microbubble, Young's moduli of surrounding tissue were reconstructed and the values were compared with those measured using the indentation test. Measured values of Young's moduli of four bovine lenses ranged from 2.6 ± 0.1 to 26 ± 1.4 kPa, and there was good agreement between the two methods. Therefore, our studies, utilizing the high pulse repetition frequency ultrasound system, suggest that the developed approach can be used to assess the mechanical properties of ex vivo crystalline lenses. Furthermore, the potential of the presented approach for in vivo measurements is discussed.

  14. Absence of mutagenic effects of continuous and pulsed ultrasound in cultured (AL) human-hamster hybrid cells.

    PubMed

    Ritenour, E R; Braaton, M; Harrison, G H; Ueno, A; Gadd, M; Manco-Johnson, M; Parker, R; Shih, S; Waldren, C A

    1991-01-01

    Mutagenic effects of continuous and pulsed ultrasound were looked for using an in vitro assay system, the AL hybrid, that is up to 100 times more sensitive for mutagens such as x-rays and neutrons than the assays used previously to evaluate ultrasound. Cells in suspension in rotated plastic test tubes were insonated with continuous wave ultrasound at 1 MHz, ISPTP = 0.62-40 W/cm2 for 0-40 min. Cells attached in the central region of culture flasks received pulsed exposures at fc = 2.5 MHz, PRF = 1 kHz, 2 and 8 cycles per pulse, with p- = 1.2 MPa (ISPTA = 31-180 mW/cm2) for 0-30 min. Although these exposures were cytotoxic (the plating efficiency was decreased to approximately 65% by the highest doses), induction of mutation, if any occurred, was less than would be expected in this test system from 10-30 cGy of x-ray. PMID:1805481

  15. p53 Response to Ultrasound: Preliminary Observations in MCF7 Human Breast Cancer Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, Janis M.; Campbell, Paul A.

    2011-09-01

    Mutated p53 can be found in approximately half of all human cancers. Strategies which seek to restore, or at least exercise a level of external control over, p53 functionality are thus potentially useful as adjuncts to therapy. Here, we report our preliminary measurements in this area, and demonstrate that short-burst pulsed ultrasound can indeed affect p53 activity. Specifically, we have observed that expression of the p53 protein can be regulated in the period immediately following low intensity short pulse (millisecond) ultrasound exposure, and that altered activity levels return to basal levels over a 24 hour period post-insonation.

  16. A feasibility study for measuring accurate tendon displacements using an audio-based Fourier analysis of pulsed-wave Doppler ultrasound signals.

    PubMed

    Stegman, K J; Podhorodeski, R P; Park, E J

    2009-01-01

    The accuracy of Pulsed-Wave Doppler Ultrasound displacement measurements of a slow moving "tendon-like" string was investigated in this study. This was accomplished by estimating string displacements using an audio-based Fourier analysis of a Pulsed-Wave Doppler signal from a commercial ultrasound scanner. Our feasibility study showed that the proposed technique is much more accurate at estimating the actual string displacement in comparison to the scanner's onboard software. Furthermore, this study also shows that a real-time Doppler data acquisition from an ultrasound scanner is possible for the ultimate purpose of real-time biological tendon displacement monitoring.

  17. Treatment of hepatic tumors by thermal versus mechanical effects of pulsed high intensity focused ultrasound in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Song; Zhou, Ping; He, Wei; Liao, Manqiong; Chen, Lili; Ma, C.-M.

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to comparatively assess the thermal versus mechanical effects of pulsed high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment on hepatic tumors in vivo. Forty-five rabbits with hepatic VX2 tumors were randomly separated into three groups (15 animals per group) before HIFU ablation. The total HIFU energy (in situ) of 1250 J was used for each tumor for three groups. In groups I and II, animals were treated with 1 MHz pulsed ultrasound at 1 Hz pulsed repetition frequency (PRF), 0.5 duty cycle (0.5 s on and 0.5 s off) and10 s duration for one spot sonication. For group II, in addition to HIFU treatment, microbubbles (SonoVue, Bracco, Milan, Italy) were injected via vein before sonication acting as a synergist. In group III, animals were treated with 1 MHz pulsed ultrasound at 10 Hz PRF, 0.1 duty cycle (0.1 s on and 0.9 s off) and 10 s duration for one sonication. The total treatment spots were calculated according to the tumor volume. Tumors were examined with contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CECT) immediately prior to and post HIFU treatment. Histopathologic assessment was performed 3 h after treatment. Our study showed that all animals tolerated the HIFU treatment well. Our data showed that mechanical HIFU could lead to controlled injury in rabbit hepatic tumors with different histological changes in comparison to thermal HIFU with or without microbubbles.

  18. Flow rate and duty cycle effects in lysis of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii using high-energy pulsed focused ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Riesberg, Grant; Bigelow, Timothy A; Stessman, Dan J; Spalding, Martin H; Yao, Linxing; Wang, Tong; Xu, Jin

    2014-06-01

    To consider microalgae lipid biofuel as a viable energy source, it is a necessity to maximize algal cell lysis, lipid harvest, and thus biofuel production versus the energy used to lyse the cells. Previous techniques have been to use energy consumptive ultrasound waves in the 10-40 kHz range in a stationary exposure environment. This study evaluated the potential of using 1.1 MHz ultrasound pulses in a new flow through type chamber on Chlamydomonas reinhardtii as a model organism for cell breakage. The ultrasound was generated using a spherically focused transducer with a focal length of 6.34 cm and an active diameter of 6.36 cm driven by 20 cycle sine-wave tone bursts at varied pulse repetition frequencies. First, variations in flow rate were examined at a constant duty cycle of 3.6%. After assessing flow rates, the duty cycle was varied to further explore the dependence on the tone burst parameters. Cell lysis was assessed by quantifying protein and chlorophyll release into the supernatant as well as by lipid extractability. Appropriate flow rates with higher duty cycles led to statistically significant increases in cell lysis relative to controls and other exposure conditions.

  19. Time-resolved flowmetering of gas-liquid two-phase pipe flow by ultrasound pulse Doppler method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murai, Yuichi; Tasaka, Yuji; Takeda, Yasushi

    2012-03-01

    Ultrasound pulse Doppler method is applied for componential volumetric flow rate measurement in multiphase pipe flow consisted of gas and liquid phases. The flowmetering is realized with integration of measured velocity profile over the cross section of the pipe within liquid phase. Spatio-temporal position of interface is detected also with the same ultrasound pulse, which further gives cross sectional void fraction. A series of experimental demonstration was shown by applying this principle of measurement to air-water two-phase flow in a horizontal tube of 40 mm in diameter, of which void fraction ranges from 0 to 90% at superficial velocity from 0 to 15 m/s. The measurement accuracy is verified with a volumetric type flowmeter. We also analyze the accuracy of area integration of liquid velocity distribution for many different patterns of ultrasound measurement lines assigned on the cross section of the tube. The present method is also identified to be pulsation sensor of flow rate that fluctuates with complex gas-liquid interface behavior.

  20. Why Current Doppler Ultrasound Methodology Is Inaccurate in Assessing Cerebral Venous Return: The Alternative of the Ultrasonic Jugular Venous Pulse

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Assessment of cerebral venous return is growing interest for potential application in clinical practice. Doppler ultrasound (DUS) was used as a screening tool. However, three meta-analyses of qualitative DUS protocol demonstrate a big heterogeneity among studies. In an attempt to improve accuracy, several authors alternatively measured the flow rate, based on the product of the time average velocity with the cross-sectional area (CSA). However, also the quantification protocols lacked of the necessary accuracy. The reasons are as follows: (a) automatic measurement of the CSA assimilates the jugular to a circle, while it is elliptical; (b) the use of just a single CSA value in a pulsatile vessel is inaccurate; (c) time average velocity assessment can be applied only in laminar flow. Finally, the tutorial describes alternative ultrasound calculation of flow based on the Womersley method, which takes into account the variation of the jugular CSA overtime. In the near future, it will be possible to synchronize the electrocardiogram with the brain inflow (carotid distension wave) and with the outflow (jugular venous pulse) in order to nicely have a noninvasive ultrasound picture of the brain-heart axis. US jugular venous pulse may have potential use in neurovascular, neurocognitive, neurosensorial, and neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:27006525

  1. Detection of tissue harmonic motion induced by ultrasonic radiation force using pulse-echo ultrasound and Kalman filter.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yi; Chen, Shigao; Tan, Wei; Kinnick, Randall; Greenleaf, James F

    2007-02-01

    A method using pulse echo ultrasound and the Kalman filter is developed for detecting submicron harmonic motion induced by ultrasonic radiation force. The method estimates the amplitude and phase of the motion at desired locations within a tissue region with high sensitivity. The harmonic motion generated by the ultrasound radiation force is expressed as extremely small oscillatory Doppler frequency shifts in the fast time (A-line) of ultrasound echoes, which are difficult to estimate. In slow time (repetitive ultrasound echoes) of the echoes, the motion also is presented as oscillatory phase shifts, from which the amplitude and phase of the harmonic motion can be estimated with the least mean squared error by Kalman filter. This technique can be used to estimate the traveling speed of a harmonic shear wave by tracking its phase changes during propagation. The shear wave propagation speed can be used to solve for the elasticity and viscosity of tissue as reported in our earlier study. Validation and in vitro experiments indicate that the method provides excellent estimations for very small (submicron) harmonic vibrations and has potential for noninvasive and quantitative stiffness measurements of tissues such as artery.

  2. Sonoporation-mediated transduction of siRNA ameliorated experimental arthritis using 3 MHz pulsed ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Hiroaki; Arai, Yuji; Kishida, Tsunao; Shin-Ya, Masaharu; Terauchi, Ryu; Nakagawa, Shuji; Saito, Masazumi; Tsuchida, Shinji; Inoue, Atsuo; Shirai, Toshiharu; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Mazda, Osam; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2014-03-01

    The goal of this feasibility study was to examine whether sonoporation assisted transduction of siRNA could be used to ameliorate arthritis locally. If successful, such approach could provide an alternative treatment for the patients that have or gradually develop adverse response to chemical drugs. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) produced by synovial fibroblasts has an important role in the pathology of rheumatoid arthritis, inducing inflammation and bone destruction. In this study, we injected a mixture of microbubbles and siRNA targeting TNF-α (siTNF) into the articular joints of rats, and transduced siTNF into synovial tissue by exposure to a collimated ultrasound beam, applied through a probe 6mm in diameter with an input frequency of 3.0 MHz, an output intensity of 2.0 W/cm(2) (spatial average temporary peak; SATP), a pulse duty ratio of 50%, and a duration of 1 min. Sonoporation increased skin temperature from 26.8 °C to 27.3 °C, but there were no adverse effect such as burns. The mean level of TNF-α expression in siTNF-treated knee joints was 55% of those in controls. Delivery of siTNF into the knee joints every 3 days (i.e., 7, 10, 13, and 16 days after immunization) by in vivo sonoporation significantly reduced paw swelling on days 20-23 after immunization. Radiographic scores in the siTNF group were 56% of those in the CIA group and 61% of those in the siNeg group. Histological examination showed that the number of TNF-α positive cells was significantly lower in areas of pannus invasion into the ankle joints of siTNF- than of siNeg-treated rats. These results indicate that transduction of siTNF into articular synovium using sonoporation may be an effective local therapy for arthritis. PMID:24291002

  3. Assessment of aortic pulse wave velocity by ultrasound: a feasibility study in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faita, Francesco; Di Lascio, Nicole; Stea, Francesco; Kusmic, Claudia; Sicari, Rosa

    2014-03-01

    Pulse wave velocity (PWV) is considered a surrogate marker of arterial stiffness and could be useful for characterizing cardiovascular disease progression even in mouse models. Aim of this study was to develop an image process algorithm for assessing arterial PWV in mice using ultrasound (US) images only and test it on the evaluation of age-associated differences in abdominal aorta PWV (aaPWV). US scans were obtained from six adult (7 months) and six old (19 months) wild type male mice (strain C57BL6) under gaseous anaesthesia. For each mouse, diameter and flow velocity instantaneous values were achieved from abdominal aorta B-mode and PW-Doppler images; all measurements were obtained using edge detection and contour tracking techniques. Single-beat mean diameter and velocity were calculated and time-aligned, providing the lnD-V loop. aaPWV values were obtained from the slope of the linear part of the loop (the early systolic phase), while relative distension (relD) measurements were calculated from the mean diameter signal. aaPWV values for young mice (3.5±0.52 m/s) were lower than those obtained for older ones (5.12±0.98 m/s) while relD measurements were higher in young (25%±7%) compared with older animals evaluations (15%±3%). All measurements were significantly different between the two groups (P<0.01 both). In conclusion, the proposed image processing technique well discriminate between age groups. Since it provides PWV assessment just from US images, it could represent a simply and useful system for vascular stiffness evaluation at any arterial site in the mouse, even in preclinical small animal models.

  4. Pulsed high-intensity focused ultrasound therapy enhances targeted delivery of cetuximab to colon cancer xenograft model in mice.

    PubMed

    Park, Min Jung; Kim, Young-Sun; Yang, Jehoon; Sun, Woo Chul; Park, Hajan; Chae, Sun Young; Namgung, Mi-Sun; Choi, Kyu-Sil

    2013-02-01

    Our aim was to evaluate whether pulsed high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy enhances the effect of an epidermal growth factor receptor-targeted chemotherapeutic drug, cetuximab, in treating human colon cancer xenografts in a mouse model. Balb/c nude mice with subcutaneous xenografts of HT-29 cells were randomly categorized into control (n = 9), pulsed HIFU alone (n = 10), cetuximab monotherapy (n = 8) or combined pulsed HIFU and cetuximab therapy (n = 9) group. Cetuximab, pulsed HIFU therapy, or both were administered three times per week starting from day 8 after tumor cell injection. Based on tumor growth curves up to 34 days, the combination therapy group showed more suppressed tumor growth than all other groups (p < 0.05). The final relative tumor volumes were 5.4 ± 2.1, 5.2 ± 1.3, 4.8 ± 1.8, and 3.1 ± 0.9 for control, pulsed HIFU alone, cetuximab monotherapy, and combination therapy groups, respectively. In conclusion, pulsed HIFU therapy appears to enhance the anti-tumor effect of epidermal growth factor receptor-targeted cetuximab on human colon cancer xenograft models in mice. PMID:23219035

  5. Low-Power 2-MHz Pulsed-Wave Transcranial Ultrasound Reduces Ischemic Brain Damage in Rats.

    PubMed

    Alexandrov, Andrei V; Barlinn, Kristian; Strong, Roger; Alexandrov, Anne W; Aronowski, Jaroslaw

    2011-09-01

    It is largely unknown whether prolonged insonation with ultrasound impacts the ischemic brain tissue by itself. Our goal was to evaluate safety and the effect of high-frequency ultrasound on infarct volume in rats. Thirty-two Long-Evans rats with permanent middle cerebral and carotid artery occlusions received either 2-MHz ultrasound at two levels of insonation power (128 or 10 mW) or no ultrasound (controls). We measured cerebral hemorrhage, indirect and direct infarct volume as well as edema volume at 24 h. No cerebral hemorrhages were detected in all animals. Exposure to low-power (10 mW) ultrasound resulted in a significantly decreased indirect infarct volume (p = 0.0039), direct infarct volume (p = 0.0031), and brain edema volume (p = 0.01) compared with controls. High-power (128 mW) ultrasound had no significant effects. An additional experiment with India ink showed a greater intravascular penetration of dye into ischemic tissues exposed to low-power ultrasound. Insonation with high-frequency, low-power ultrasound reduces ischemic brain damage in rat. Its effect on edema reduction and possible promotion of microcirculation could be used to facilitate drug and nutrient delivery to ischemic areas.

  6. Low-intensity, stocker-based channel catfish culture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Low-intensity Channel Catfish production is characterized by low stocking rates, low installed aeration capacity, and no automated dissolved oxygen monitoring. Two studies conducted in nine 0.25-acre ponds quantified production characteristics of stocker Channel Catfish stocked for low-intensity foo...

  7. Measurement of coronary flow using high-frequency intravascular ultrasound imaging and pulsed Doppler velocimetry: in vitro feasibility studies.

    PubMed

    Grayburn, P A; Willard, J E; Haagen, D R; Brickner, M E; Alvarez, L G; Eichhorn, E J

    1992-01-01

    The recent development of intravascular ultrasound imaging offers the potential to measure blood flow as the product of vessel cross-sectional area and mean velocity derived from pulsed Doppler velocimetry. To determine the feasibility of this approach for measuring coronary artery flow, we constructed a flow model of the coronary circulation that allowed flow to be varied by adjusting downstream resistance and aortic driving pressure. Assessment of intracoronary flow velocity was accomplished using a commercially available end-mounted pulsed Doppler catheter. Cross-sectional area of the coronary artery was measured using a 20 MHz mechanical imaging transducer mounted on a 4.8 F catheter. The product of mean velocity and cross-sectional area was compared with coronary flow measured by timed collection in a graduated cylinder by linear regression analysis. Excellent correlations were obtained between coronary flow calculated by the ultrasound method and measured coronary flow at both ostial (r = 0.99, standard error of the estimate [SEE] = 13.9 ml/min) and distal (r = 0.98, SEE = 23.0 ml/min) vessel locations under steady flow conditions. During pulsatile flow, calculated and measured coronary flow also correlated well for ostial (r = 0.98, SEE = 12.7 ml/min) and downstream (r = 0.99, SEE = 9.3 ml/min) locations. That the SEE was lower for pulsatile as compared with steady flow may be explained by the blunting of the flow profile across the vessel lumen by the acceleration phase of pulsatile flow. These data establish the feasibility of measuring coronary artery blood flow using intravascular ultrasound imaging and pulsed Doppler techniques. PMID:1531416

  8. Ultrasound-Guided Pulsed Radiofrequency Application via the Pterygopalatine Fossa: A Practical Approach to Treat Refractory Trigeminal Neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Nader, Antoun; Bendok, Bernard R; Prine, Jeremy J; Kendall, Mark C

    2015-01-01

    Although pharmacological therapy is the primary treatment modality for trigeminal neuralgia associated pain, ineffective analgesia and dose limiting side effects often prompt patients to seek alternative pharmacological solutions such as interventional nerve blockade. Blockade of the Gasserian ganglion or its branches is an effective analgesic procedure for trigeminal neuralgia, traditionally performed using fluoroscopy or CT imaging. Ultrasonography allows point of care and real time visualization of needle placement within the surrounding anatomical structures. The use of ultrasonography with pulsed radiofrequency therapy for trigeminal neuralgia has not been reported. Our case is a 66-year-old male suffering from trigeminal neuralgia for 4 years that was refractory to pharmacologic therapy. Neurological examination was normal with no sensory deficit. Imaging showed no vascular compression or mass involving the trigeminal nerve. A diagnostic ultrasound-guided trigeminal nerve block via the pterygopalatine fossa with 4 mL of bupivacaine 0.25% and 4 mg dexamethasone provided immediate pain relief (100%) with sustained analgesia >50% at 2 weeks. Pain relief was not sustained at one month, with return to pretreatment symptoms. A series of injections were performed with similar intermittent analgesic effectiveness. The decision was made that the patient was a suitable candidate for pulsed radiofrequency application in the pterygopalatine fossa. We successfully used an alternative approach through the pterygopalatine fossa to treat trigeminal neuralgia using ultrasound guidance in an office setting. Our case demonstrates the utility of ultrasound-guidance pulsed radiofrequency treatment in the pterygopalatine fossa as a potential alternative to other percutaneous techniques for patients with medical refractory trigeminal neuralgia.

  9. A low-cost gate for ultrasound pulse-echo studies.

    PubMed

    Langrill, L N; Goldstein, A

    1980-01-01

    Selective gating of ultrasounds echoes usually requires an expensive piece of electronics, a stepless gate. This note presents a simple circuit utilizing low-cost components which is easily built, and gives satisfactory performance as a gate for the study of individual ultrasound echoes. The gate has been measured to have a transmission loss of - 2 dB and an isolation of - 50dB.

  10. Solving the speckle decorrelation challenge in acousto-optic sensing using tandem nanosecond pulses within the ultrasound period.

    PubMed

    Resink, Steffen; Hondebrink, Erwin; Steenbergen, Wiendelt

    2014-11-15

    We present a novel acousto-optic (AO) method, based on a nanosecond laser system, which will enable us to obtain AO signals in liquid turbid media. By diverting part of the light in a delay line, we inject tandem pulses with 27 ns separation. The change of the speckle pattern, caused by the ultrasound phase shift, reduces the speckle contrast of the integrated speckle pattern captured in a single camera frame. With these tandem pulses, we were able to perform AO on a 2 cm liquid turbid medium in transmission mode. We show the raw signal and a spatial AO scan of a homogenous water-intralipid sample. This approach is potentially capable of AO probing in vivo, since the acquisition time (of approximately 40 ns) is four orders of magnitude less than the typical time scales of speckle decorrelation found in vivo. The method may eventually enable us to obtain fluence compensated photoacoustic signals generated by the same laser. PMID:25490500

  11. Performance assessment of Pulse Wave Imaging using conventional ultrasound in canine aortas ex vivo and normal human arteries in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ronny X.; Qaqish, William; Konofagou, Elisa. E.

    2015-01-01

    The propagation behavior of the arterial pulse wave may provide valuable diagnostic information for cardiovascular pathology. Pulse Wave Imaging (PWI) is a noninvasive, ultrasound imaging-based technique capable of mapping multiple wall motion waveforms along a short arterial segment over a single cardiac cycle, allowing for the regional pulse wave velocity (PWV) and propagation uniformity to be evaluated. The purpose of this study was to improve the clinical utility of PWI using a conventional ultrasound system. The tradeoff between PWI spatial and temporal resolution was evaluated using an ex vivo canine aorta (n = 2) setup to assess the effects of varying image acquisition and signal processing parameters on the measurement of the PWV and the pulse wave propagation uniformity r2. PWI was also performed on the carotid arteries and abdominal aortas of 10 healthy volunteers (24.8 ± 3.3 y.o.) to determine the waveform tracking feature that would yield the most precise PWV measurements and highest r2 values in vivo. The ex vivo results indicated that the highest precision for measuring PWVs ~ 2.5 – 3.5 m/s was achieved using 24–48 scan lines within a 38 mm image plane width (i.e. 0.63 – 1.26 lines/mm). The in vivo results indicated that tracking the 50% upstroke of the waveform would consistently yield the most precise PWV measurements and minimize the error in the propagation uniformity measurement. Such findings may help establish the optimal image acquisition and signal processing parameters that may improve the reliability of PWI as a clinical measurement tool. PMID:26640603

  12. Ultrasound physics.

    PubMed

    Shriki, Jesse

    2014-01-01

    Bedside ultrasound has become an important modality for obtaining critical information in the acute care of patients. It is important to understand the physics of ultrasound in order to perform and interpret images at the bedside. The physics of both continuous wave and pulsed wave sound underlies diagnostic ultrasound. The instrumentation, including transducers and image processing, is important in the acquisition of appropriate sonographic images. Understanding how these concepts interplay with each other enables practitioners to obtain the best possible images.

  13. Simultaneous Real-time Monitoring of Thermal and Mechanical Tissue Responses to Pulsed HIFU Using Pulse-Echo Ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dalong; Ebbini, Emad S.

    2009-04-01

    Pulsed HIFU beams are being increasingly used in a number of therapeutic applications, including thermal therapy, drug and gene delivery, and hemostasis. This wide range of applications is based on a range of HIFU-tissue interactions from purely thermal to purely mechanical to produce the desired therapeutic effects. We have developed a real-time system for monitoring tissue displacements in response to pulsed HIFU beams at high PRFs. The imaging component of the system comprises an FPGA-based signal processing unit for real-time filtering of M-mode pulse-echo data followed by real-time speckle tracking for tissue displacements before, during, and after exposure to pulsed HIFU. The latter can be used in evaluating temperature and/or viscoelastic response to the applied HIFU beam. The high acquisition rate of the M-mode system, together with the real-time displacement tracking are necessary for simultaneous estimation and separation of the thermal and viscoelastic tissue responses. In addition, the system provides a real-time link to MATLAB-based nonlinear spectral estimation routines for cavitation detection. The system has been tested in vitro bovine heart tissue and the results show that the displacement tracking captures the full dynamics of tissue displacements for the full range of HIFU exposures of interest.

  14. Continuous and pulsed ultrasound-assisted extractions of antioxidants from pomegranate peel

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is a great demand for developing efficient extraction methods in order to reduce extraction time and increase the yield and activity of functional antioxidants. The yields, activities, and extraction kinetics of antioxidants from dry peel of pomegranate marc were studied using ultrasound assis...

  15. Continuous and pulsed ultrasound-assisted extractions of antioxidants from pomegranate peel

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is a great demand for developing efficient extraction methods in order to reduce extraction time and increase the yield and activity of functional antioxidants. The yields, activities, and extraction kinetics of antioxidants from dry peel of pomegranate marc were studied using ultrasound-assis...

  16. Precision control of lesions by high-intensity focused ultrasound cavitation-based histotripsy through varying pulse duration.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jin; Bigelow, Timothy A; Nagaraju, Ravindra

    2013-07-01

    The goal of this experimental study was to explore the feasibility of acquiring controllable precision through varying pulse duration for lesions generated by cavitation-based histotripsy. Histotripsy uses high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) at low duty factor to create energetic bubble clouds inside tissue to liquefy a region. It uses cavitation-mediated mechanical effects while minimizing heating, and has the advantages of real-time monitoring and lesion fidelity to treatment planning. In our study, histotripsy was applied to three groups of tissue-mimicking agar samples of different stiffnesses (29.4 ± 5.3, 44.8 ± 5.9, and 66.4 ± 7.1 kPa). B-mode imaging was used first to quantify bubble cluster dimensions in both water and agar. Then, a 4.5-mm-wide square (lateral to the focal plane) was scanned in a raster pattern with a step size of 0.75 mm in agar histotripsy experiments to estimate equivalent bubble cluster dimensions based on the histotripsyinduced damage. The 15-s exposure at each treatment location comprised 5000 sine-wave tone bursts at a spatial-peak pulseaverage intensity of 41.1 kW/cm2, with peak compressional and rarefactional pressures of 102 and 17 MPa, respectively. The results showed that bubble cluster width and length increased with pulse duration and decreased with agar stiffness. Therefore, a significant improvement in histotripsy precision could be achieved by reducing the pulse duration.

  17. Effect of non-acoustic parameters on heterogeneous sonoporation mediated by single-pulse ultrasound and microbubbles.

    PubMed

    Qin, Peng; Xu, Lin; Han, Tao; Du, Lianfang; Yu, Alfred C H

    2016-07-01

    Sonoporation-transient plasma membrane perforation elicited by the interaction of ultrasound waves with microbubbles--has shown great potential for drug delivery and gene therapy. However, the heterogeneity of sonoporation introduces complexities and challenges in the realization of controllable and predictable drug delivery. The aim of this investigation was to understand how non-acoustic parameters (bubble related and bubble-cell interaction parameters) affect sonoporation. Using a customized ultrasound-exposure and fluorescence-imaging platform, we observed sonoporation dynamics at the single-cell level and quantified exogenous molecular uptake levels to characterize the degree of sonoporation. Sonovue microbubbles were introduced to passively regulate microbubble-to-cell distance and number, and bubble size. 1 MHz ultrasound with 10-cycle pulse duration and 0.6 MPa peak negative pressure were applied to trigger the inertial collapse of microbubbles. Our data revealed the impact of non-acoustic parameters on the heterogeneity of sonoporation. (i) The localized collapse of relatively small bubbles (diameter, D<5.5 μm) led to predictable sonoporation, the degree of which depended on the bubble-to-cell distance (d). No sonoporation was observed when d/D>1, whereas reversible sonoporation occurred when d/D<1. (ii) Large bubbles (D>5.5 μm) exhibited translational movement over large distances, resulting in unpredictable sonoporation. Translation towards the cell surface led to variable reversible sonoporation or irreversible sonoporation, and translation away from the cell caused either no or reversible sonoporation. (iii) The number of bubbles correlated positively with the degree of sonoporation when D<5.5 μm and d/D<1. Localized collapse of two to three bubbles mainly resulted in reversible sonoporation, whereas irreversible sonoporation was more likely following the collapse of four or more bubbles. These findings offer useful insight into the relationship

  18. Pulsed high intensity focused ultrasound (pHIFU) enhances delivery of doxorubicin in a preclinical model of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tong; Wang, Yak-Nam; Khokhlova, Tatiana D.; D’Andrea, Samantha; Starr, Frank; Chen, Hong; McCune, Jeannine S.; Risler, Linda J.; Mashadi-Hossein, Afshin; Hwang, Joo Ha

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is characterized by extensive stromal desmoplasia which decreases blood perfusion and impedes chemotherapy delivery. Breaking the stromal barrier could both increase perfusion and permeabilize the tumor, enhancing chemotherapy penetration. Mechanical disruption of the stroma can be achieved using ultrasound-induced bubble activity – cavitation. Cavitation is also known to result in microstreaming and could have the added benefit of actively enhancing diffusion into the tumors. Here, we report the ability to enhance chemotherapeutic drug doxorubicin (Dox) penetration using ultrasound-induced cavitation in a genetically engineered mouse model (KPC mouse) of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. To induce localized inertial cavitation in pancreatic tumors, pulsed high intensity focused ultrasound (pHIFU) was used either during or before doxorubicin administration to elucidate the mechanisms of enhanced drug delivery (active versus passive drug diffusion). For both types, the pHIFU exposures which were associated with high cavitation activity resulted in disruption of the highly fibrotic stromal matrix and enhanced the normalized Dox concentration by up to 4.5 fold compared to controls. Furthermore, normalized Dox concentration was associated with the cavitation metrics (p < 0.01), indicating that high and sustained cavitation results in increased chemotherapy penetration. No significant difference between the outcomes of the two types, i.e., Dox infusion during or after pHIFU treatment, was observed, suggesting that passive diffusion into previously permeabilized tissue is the major mechanism for the increase in drug concentration. Together, the data indicate that pHIFU treatment of pancreatic tumors when resulting in high and sustained cavitation can efficiently enhance chemotherapy delivery to pancreatic tumors. PMID:26216548

  19. Ultrasound-guided pulsed radiofrequency ablation of the genital branch of the genitofemoral nerve for treatment of intractable orchalgia

    PubMed Central

    Terkawi, Abdullah Sulieman; Romdhane, Kamel

    2014-01-01

    Chronic orchalgia is a frustrating clinical problem for both the patient and the physician. We present a 17-year-old boy with a bilateral idiopathic chronic intractable orchalgia with failed conservative treatment. For 2 years, he suffered from severe attacks of scrotal pain that affected his daily activities and caused frequent absence from school. Ultrasound-guided pulsed radiofrequency ablation (PRF) of the genital branches of the genitofemoral nerve performed after local anesthetic nerve block confirmed the diagnosis and yielded 6 weeks of symptom relief. Seven-month follow-up revealed complete satisfactory analgesia. The use of PRF is an effective and non-invasive approach to treat intractable chronic orchalgia. PMID:24843352

  20. Directivity patterns and pulse profiles of ultrasound emitted by laser action on interface between transparent and opaque solids: Analytical theory

    SciTech Connect

    Nikitin, Sergey M. E-mail: vitali.goussev@univ-lemans.fr; Tournat, Vincent; Chigarev, Nikolay; Castagnede, Bernard; Gusev, Vitalyi E-mail: vitali.goussev@univ-lemans.fr; Bulou, Alain; Zerr, Andreas

    2014-01-28

    The analytical theory for the directivity patterns of ultrasounds emitted from laser-irradiated interface between two isotropic solids is developed. It is valid for arbitrary combinations of transparent and opaque materials. The directivity patterns are derived both in two-dimensional and in three-dimensional geometries, by accounting for the specific features of the sound generation by the photo-induced mechanical stresses distributed in the volume, essential in the laser ultrasonics. In particular, the theory accounts for the contribution to the emitted propagating acoustic fields from the converted by the interface evanescent photo-generated compression-dilatation waves. The precise analytical solutions for the profiles of longitudinal and shear acoustic pulses emitted in different directions are proposed. The developed theory can be applied for dimensional scaling, optimization, and interpretation of the high-pressure laser ultrasonics experiments in diamond anvil cell.

  1. Accuracy of velocity and shear rate measurements using pulsed Doppler ultrasound: a comparison of signal analysis techniques.

    PubMed

    Markou, C P; Ku, D N

    1991-01-01

    An experimental investigation was instituted to evaluate the performance of Doppler ultrasound signal processing techniques for measuring fluid velocity under well-defined flow conditions using a 10-MHz multigated pulsed ultrasound instrument. Conditions of fully developed flow in a rigid, circular tube were varied over a Reynolds number range between 500 and 8000. The velocity across the tube was determined using analog and digital zero crossing detectors and three digital spectrum estimators. Determination of the Doppler frequency from analog or digital zero crossing detectors gave accurate velocity values for laminar and moderately turbulent flow away from the wall (0.969 less than or equal to r less than or equal to 0.986). Three digital spectrum estimators, Fast Fourier Transform, Burg autoregressive method, and minimum variance method, were slightly more accurate than the zero crossing detector (0.984 less than or equal to r less than or equal to 0.994), especially at points close to the walls and with higher levels of turbulence. Steep velocity gradients and transit-time-effects from high velocities produced significantly larger errors in velocity measurement. Wall shear rate estimates were most precise when calculated using the position of the wall and two velocity points. The calculated wall shears were within 20%-30% of theoretically predicted values. PMID:1808798

  2. Targeted Long-Term Venous Occlusion Using Pulsed High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Combined with a Pro-Inflammatory Agent

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yufeng; Zia, Jasmine; Warren, Cinderella; Starr, Frank L.; Brayman, Andrew A.; Crum, Lawrence A.; Hwang, Joo Ha

    2015-01-01

    Esophageal and gastric varices are associated with significant morbidity and mortality for cirrhotic patients. The current modalities available for treating bleeding esophageal and gastric varices, namely endoscopic band ligation and sclerotherapy, require frequent sessions to obtain effective thrombosis and are associated with significant adverse effects. A more effective therapy that results in long-term vascular occlusion has the potential to improve patient outcomes. In this study, we investigated a new potential method for inducing long-term vascular occlusion by targeting segments of a rabbit’s auricular vein in vivo with low duty cycle, high peak rarefaction pressure (9 MPa) pulsed high-intensity focused ultrasound in the presence of intravenously administered ultrasound microbubbles followed by local injection of fibrinogen and a pro-inflammatory agent (ethanol, cyanoacrylate or morrhuate sodium). The novel method introduced in this study resulted in acute and long-term complete vascular occlusions when injecting a pro-inflammatory agent with fibrinogen. Future investigation and translational studies are needed to assess its clinical applicability. PMID:21821352

  3. MR-guided pulsed high intensity focused ultrasound enhancement of docetaxel combined with radiotherapy for prostate cancer treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Zhaomei; Ma, C.-M.; Chen, Xiaoming; Cvetkovic, Dusica; Pollack, Alan; Chen, Lili

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of the enhancement of docetaxel by pulsed focused ultrasound (pFUS) in combination with radiotherapy (RT) for treatment of prostate cancer in vivo. LNCaP cells were grown in the prostates of male nude mice. When the tumors reached a designated volume by MRI, tumor bearing mice were randomly divided into seven groups (n = 5): (1) pFUS alone; (2) RT alone; (3) docetaxel alone; (4) docetaxel + pFUS (5) docetaxel + RT (6) docetaxel + pFUS + RT, and (7) control. MR-guided pFUS treatment was performed using a focused ultrasound treatment system (InSightec ExAblate 2000) with a 1.5T GE MR scanner. Animals were treated once with pFUS, docetaxel, RT or their combinations. Docetaxel was given by i.v. injection at 5 mg kg-1 before pFUS. RT was given 2 Gy after pFUS. Animals were euthanized 4 weeks after treatment. Tumor volumes were measured on MRI at 1 and 4 weeks post-treatment. Results showed that triple combination therapies of docetaxel, pFUS and RT provided the most significant tumor growth inhibition among all groups, which may have potential for the treatment of prostate cancer due to an improved therapeutic ratio.

  4. The leicester Doppler phantom--a digital electronic phantom for ultrasound pulsed Doppler system testing.

    PubMed

    Gittins, John; Martin, Kevin

    2010-04-01

    Doppler flow and string phantoms have been used to assess the performance of ultrasound Doppler systems in terms of parameters such as sensitivity, velocity accuracy and sample volume registration. However, because of the nature of their construction, they cannot challenge the accuracy and repeatability of modern digital ultrasound systems or give objective measures of system performance. Electronic Doppler phantoms are able to make use of electronically generated test signals, which may be controlled precisely in terms of frequency, amplitude and timing. The Leicester Electronic Doppler Phantom uses modern digital signal processing methods and field programmable gate array technology to overcome some of the limitations of previously described electronic phantoms. In its present form, it is able to give quantitative graphical assessments of frequency response and range gate characteristics, as well as measures of dynamic range and velocity measurement accuracy. The use of direct acoustic coupling eliminates uncertainties caused by Doppler beam effects, such as intrinsic spectral broadening, but prevents their evaluation.

  5. CONTRAST-ENHANCED INTRAVASCULAR ULTRASOUND PULSE SEQUENCES FOR BANDWIDTH-LIMITED TRANSDUCERS

    PubMed Central

    Maresca, David; Renaud, Guillaume; van Soest, Gijs; Li, Xiang; Zhou, Qifa; Shung, K. Kirk; de Jong, Nico; van der Steen, Antonius F. W.

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate two methods for vasa vasorum imaging using contrast-enhanced intravascular ultrasound, which can be performed using commercial catheters. Plaque neovascularization was recognized as an independent marker of coronary artery plaque vulnerability. IVUS-based methods to image the microvessels available to date require high bandwidth (−6 dB relative frequency bandwidth >70%), which are not routinely available commercially. We explored the potential of ultraharmonic imaging and chirp reversal imaging for vasa vasorum imaging. In vitro recordings were performed on a tissue-mimicking phantom using a commercial ultrasound contrast agent and a transducer with a center frequency of 34 MHz and a −6 dB relative bandwidth of 56%. Acoustic peak pressures <500 kPa were used. A tissue-mimicking phantom with channels down to 200 μm in diameter was successfully imaged by the two contrast detection sequences while the smallest channel stayed invisible in conventional intravascular ultrasound images. Ultraharmonic imaging provided the best contrast agent detection. PMID:23384459

  6. Analysis of ultrasound pulse-echo images for characterization of muscle disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leeman, Sidney; Heckmatt, John Z.

    1996-04-01

    This study aims to extract quantifiable indices characterizing ultrasound propagation and scattering in skeletal muscle, from data acquired using a real-time linear array scanner in a paediatric muscle clinic, in order to establish early diagnosis of Duchenne muscular dystrophy in young children, as well as to chart the progressive severity of the disease. Approximately 40 patients with gait disorders, aged between 1 and 11 years, were scanned with a real-time linear array ultrasound scanner, at 5 MHz. A control group consisted of approximately 50 boys, in the same age range, with no evidence or history of muscle disease. Results show that ultrasound quantitative methods can provide a tight clustering of normal data, and also provide a basis for charting the degree of change in diseased muscle. The most significant (quantitative) parameters derive from the frequency of the attenuation and the muscle echogenicity. The approach provides a discrimination method that is more sensitive than visual assessment of the corresponding image by even an experienced observer. There are also indications that the need for traumatic muscle biopsy may be obviated in some cases.

  7. Low-Intensity channel catfish culture re-visited

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) farmers can use a variety of management strategies to produce the larger-sized fish that processing plants increasingly seek. A low-intensity production strategy based on low stocking and aeration rates can be used to produce larger channel catfish. Stocker catf...

  8. Inertial cavitation in theranostic nanoemulsions with simultaneous pulsed laser and low frequency ultrasound excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnal, Bastien; Wei, Chen-Wei; Xia, Jinjun; Pelivanov, Ivan M.; Lombardo, Michael; Perez, Camilo; Matula, Thomas J.; Pozzo, Danilo; O'Donnell, Matthew

    2014-03-01

    Ultrasound-induced inertial cavitation is a mechanical process used for site-localized therapies such as non-invasive surgery. Initiating cavitation in tissue requires very high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) and low-frequencies. Hence, some applications like thrombolysis require targeted contrast agents to reduce peak intensities and the potential for secondary effects. A new type of theranostic nanoemulsion has been developed as a combined ultrasound (US)/photoacoustic(PA) agent for molecular imaging and therapy. It includes a nanoscale emulsion core encapsulated with a layer of gold nanospheres at the water/ oil interface. Its optical absorption exhibits a spectrum broadened up to 1100 nm, opening the possibility that 1064 nm light can excite cavitation nuclei. If optically-excited nuclei are produced at the same time that a low-frequency US wave is at peak negative pressure, then highly localized therapies based on acoustic cavitation may be enabled at very low US pressures. We have demonstrated this concept using a low-cost, low energy, portable 1064 nm fiber laser in conjunction with a 1.24 MHz US transducer for simultaneous laser/US excitation of nanoemulsions. Active cavitation detection from backscattered signals indicated that cavitation can be initiated at very low acoustic pressures (less than 1 MPa) when laser excitation coincides with the rarefaction phase of the acoustic wave, and that no cavitation is produced when light is delivered during the compressive phase. US can sustain cavitation activity during long acoustic bursts and stimulate diffusion of the emulsion, thus increasing treatment speed. An in vitro clot model has been used to demonstrate combined US and laser excitation of the nanoemulsion for efficient thrombolysis.

  9. Control of broadband optically generated ultrasound pulses using binary amplitude holograms.

    PubMed

    Brown, Michael D; Jaros, Jiri; Cox, Ben T; Treeby, Bradley E

    2016-04-01

    In this work, the use of binary amplitude holography is investigated as a mechanism to focus broadband acoustic pulses generated by high peak-power pulsed lasers. Two algorithms are described for the calculation of the binary holograms; one using ray-tracing, and one using an optimization based on direct binary search. It is shown using numerical simulations that when a binary amplitude hologram is excited by a train of laser pulses at its design frequency, the acoustic field can be focused at a pre-determined distribution of points, including single and multiple focal points, and line and square foci. The numerical results are validated by acoustic field measurements from binary amplitude holograms, excited by a high peak-power laser. PMID:27106311

  10. DNA fragmentation and nuclear phenotype in tendons exposed to low-intensity infrared laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Paoli, Flavia; Ramos Cerqueira, Larissa; Martins Ramos, Mayara; Campos, Vera M.; Ferreira-Machado, Samara C.; Geller, Mauro; de Souza da Fonseca, Adenilson

    2015-03-01

    Clinical protocols are recommended in device guidelines outlined for treating many diseases on empirical basis. However, effects of low-intensity infrared lasers at fluences used in clinical protocols on DNA are controversial. Excitation of endogenous chromophores in tissues and free radicals generation could be described as a consequence of laser used. DNA lesions induced by free radicals cause changes in DNA structure, chromatin organization, ploidy degrees and cell death. In this work, we investigated whether low-intensity infrared laser therapy could alter the fibroblasts nuclei characteristics and induce DNA fragmentation. Tendons of Wistar rats were exposed to low-intensity infrared laser (830 nm), at different fluences (1, 5 and 10 J/cm2), in continuous wave (power output of 10mW, power density of 79.6 mW/cm2). Different frequencies were analyzed for the higher fluence (10 J/cm2), at pulsed emission mode (2.5, 250 and 2500 Hz), with the laser source at surface of skin. Geometric, densitometric and textural parameters obtained for Feulgen-stained nuclei by image analysis were used to define nuclear phenotypes. Significant differences were observed on the nuclear phenotype of tendons after exposure to laser, as well as, high cell death percentages was observed for all fluences and frequencies analyzed here, exception 1 J/cm2 fluence. Our results indicate that low-intensity infrared laser can alter geometric, densitometric and textural parameters in tendon fibroblasts nuclei. Laser can also induce DNA fragmentation, chromatin lost and consequently cell death, using fluences, frequencies and emission modes took out from clinical protocols.

  11. Effect of hydrodynamic cavitation in the tissue erosion by pulsed high-intensity focused ultrasound (pHIFU)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yufeng; Gao, Xiaobin Wilson

    2016-09-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is emerging as an effective therapeutic modality in clinics. Besides the thermal ablation, tissue disintegration is also possible because of the interaction between the distorted HIFU bursts and either bubble cloud or boiling bubble. Hydrodynamic cavitation is another type of cavitation and has been employed widely in industry, but its role in mechanical erosion to tissue is not clearly known. In this study, the bubble dynamics immediately after the termination of HIFU exposure in the transparent gel phantom was captured by high-speed photography, from which the bubble displacement towards the transducer and the changes of bubble size was quantitatively determined. The characteristics of hydrodynamic cavitation due to the release of the acoustic radiation force and relaxation of compressed surrounding medium were found to associate with the number of pulses delivered and HIFU parameters (i.e. pulse duration and pulse repetition frequency). Because of the initial big bubble (~1 mm), large bubble expansion (up to 1.76 folds), and quick bubble motion (up to ~1 m s-1) hydrodynamic cavitation is significant after HIFU exposure and may lead to mechanical erosion. The shielding effect of residual tiny bubbles would reduce the acoustic energy delivered to the pre-existing bubble at the focus and, subsequently, the hydrodynamic cavitation effect. Tadpole shape of mechanical erosion in ex vivo porcine kidney samples was similar to the contour of bubble dynamics in the gel. Liquefied tissue was observed to emit towards the transducer through the punctured tissue after HIFU exposure in the sonography. In summary, the release of HIFU exposure-induced hydrodynamic cavitation produces significant bubble expansion and motion, which may be another important mechanism of tissue erosion. Understanding its mechanism and optimizing the outcome would broaden and enhance HIFU applications.

  12. Effect of hydrodynamic cavitation in the tissue erosion by pulsed high-intensity focused ultrasound (pHIFU)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yufeng; Gao, Xiaobin Wilson

    2016-09-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is emerging as an effective therapeutic modality in clinics. Besides the thermal ablation, tissue disintegration is also possible because of the interaction between the distorted HIFU bursts and either bubble cloud or boiling bubble. Hydrodynamic cavitation is another type of cavitation and has been employed widely in industry, but its role in mechanical erosion to tissue is not clearly known. In this study, the bubble dynamics immediately after the termination of HIFU exposure in the transparent gel phantom was captured by high-speed photography, from which the bubble displacement towards the transducer and the changes of bubble size was quantitatively determined. The characteristics of hydrodynamic cavitation due to the release of the acoustic radiation force and relaxation of compressed surrounding medium were found to associate with the number of pulses delivered and HIFU parameters (i.e. pulse duration and pulse repetition frequency). Because of the initial big bubble (~1 mm), large bubble expansion (up to 1.76 folds), and quick bubble motion (up to ~1 m s‑1) hydrodynamic cavitation is significant after HIFU exposure and may lead to mechanical erosion. The shielding effect of residual tiny bubbles would reduce the acoustic energy delivered to the pre-existing bubble at the focus and, subsequently, the hydrodynamic cavitation effect. Tadpole shape of mechanical erosion in ex vivo porcine kidney samples was similar to the contour of bubble dynamics in the gel. Liquefied tissue was observed to emit towards the transducer through the punctured tissue after HIFU exposure in the sonography. In summary, the release of HIFU exposure-induced hydrodynamic cavitation produces significant bubble expansion and motion, which may be another important mechanism of tissue erosion. Understanding its mechanism and optimizing the outcome would broaden and enhance HIFU applications.

  13. Ultrasound pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    Pregnancy sonogram; Obstetric ultrasonography; Obstetric sonogram; Ultrasound - pregnancy; IUGR - ultrasound; Intrauterine growth - ultrasound; Polyhydramnios - ultrasound; Oligohydramnios - ultrasound; Placenta previa - ultrasound; Multiple ...

  14. The low intensity X-ray imaging scope /Lixiscope/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yin, L. I.; Trombka, J. I.; Seltzer, S. M.; Webber, R. L.; Farr, M. R.; Rennie, J.

    1978-01-01

    A fully portable, small-format X-ray imaging system, Lixiscope (low intensity X-ray imaging scope) is described. In the prototype, which has been built to demonstrate the feasibility of the Lixiscope concept, only well-developed and available components have been used. Consideration is given to the principles of operation of the device, some of its performance characteristics as well as possible dental, medical and industrial applications.

  15. Advances in endonasal low intensity laser irradiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Jian-Ling; Liu, Timon C.; Liu, Jiang; Cui, Li-Ping; Liu, Song-hao

    2005-07-01

    Endonasal low intensity laser therapy (ELILT) began in China in 1998. Now in China it is widely applied to treat hyperlipidemia and brain diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, insomnia, poststroke depression, intractable headache, ache in head or face, cerebral thrombosis, acute ischemic cerebrovascular disease, migraine, brain lesion and mild cognitive impairment. There are four pathways mediating EILILT, Yangming channel, autonomic nervous systems and blood cells. Two unhealth acupoints of Yangming channal inside nose might mediate the one as is low intensity laser acupuncture. Unbalance autonomic nervous systems might be modulated. Blood cells might mediate the one as is intravascular low intensity laser therapy. These three pathways are integrated in ELILT so that serum amyloid β protein, malformation rate of erythrocyte, CCK-8, the level of viscosity at lower shear rates and hematocrit, or serum lipid might decrease, and melanin production/SOD activity or β endorphin might increase after ELILT treatment. These results indicate ELILT might work, but it need to be verified by randomized placebo-controlled trial.

  16. Reduction in mechanical allodynia in complex regional pain syndrome patients with ultrasound-guided pulsed radiofrequency treatment of the superficial peroneal nerve

    PubMed Central

    Chae, Won Soek; Kim, Sang Hyun; Cho, Sung Hwan; Lee, Mi Sun

    2016-01-01

    The superficial peroneal nerve is vulnerable to damage from ankle sprain injuries and fractures as well as surgery to this region. And it is also one of the most commonly involved nerves in complex regional pain syndrome type II in the foot and ankle region. We report two cases of ultrasound-guided pulsed radiofrequency treatment of superficial peroneal nerve for reduction of allodynia in CRPS patients. PMID:27738506

  17. Three-dimensional noninvasive ultrasound Joule heat tomography based on the acousto-electric effect using unipolar pulses: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Yang, Renhuan; Li, Xu; Song, Aiguo; He, Bin; Yan, Ruqiang

    2012-11-21

    Electrical properties of biological tissues are highly sensitive to their physiological and pathological status. Thus it is of importance to image electrical properties of biological tissues. However, spatial resolution of conventional electrical impedance tomography (EIT) is generally poor. Recently, hybrid imaging modalities combining electric conductivity contrast and ultrasonic resolution based on the acousto-electric effect has attracted considerable attention. In this study, we propose a novel three-dimensional (3D) noninvasive ultrasound Joule heat tomography (UJHT) approach based on the acousto-electric effect using unipolar ultrasound pulses. As the Joule heat density distribution is highly dependent on the conductivity distribution, an accurate and high-resolution mapping of the Joule heat density distribution is expected to give important information that is closely related to the conductivity contrast. The advantages of the proposed ultrasound Joule heat tomography using unipolar pulses include its simple inverse solution, better performance than UJHT using common bipolar pulses and its independence of a priori knowledge of the conductivity distribution of the imaging object. Computer simulation results show that using the proposed method, it is feasible to perform a high spatial resolution Joule heat imaging in an inhomogeneous conductive media. Application of this technique on tumor scanning is also investigated by a series of computer simulations. PMID:23123757

  18. Assessing the application and downstream effects of pulsed mode ultrasound as a pre-treatment for alum coagulation.

    PubMed

    Al-Juboori, Raed A; Aravinthan, Vasantha; Yusaf, Talal; Bowtell, Leslie

    2016-07-01

    The application of pulsed mode ultrasound (PMU) as a pre-treatment for alum coagulation was investigated at various alum dosages and pH levels. The effects of the treatments on turbidity and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) removal and residual Al were evaluated. Response surface methodology (RSM) was utilized to optimize the operating conditions of the applied treatments. The results showed that PMU pre-treatment increased turbidity and DOC removal percentages from maximum of 96.6% and 43% to 98.8% and 52%, respectively. It also helped decrease the minimum residual Al from 0.100 to 0.094 ppm. The multiple response optimization was carried out using the desirability function. A desirability value of >0.97 estimated respective turbidity removal, DOC removal and Al residual of 89.24%, 45.66% and ∼ 0.1 ppm for coagulation (control) and 90.61%, >55% and ∼ 0 for coagulation preceded by PMU. These figures were validated via confirmatory experiments. PMU pre-treatment increased total coliform removal from 80% to >98% and decreased trihalomethane formation potential (THMFP) from 250 to 200 ppb CH3Cl. Additionally, PMU application prior to coagulation improved the settleability of sludge due to the degassing effects. The results of this study confirms that PMU pre-treatment can significantly improve coagulation performance. PMID:26964919

  19. Measurement of the cavitation pattern by two non-intrusive techniques: laser imaging and ultrasound pulsed echography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felici, Alberto; Di Felice, Fabio; Pereira, Francisco A.

    2013-03-01

    We propose the use of ultrasound pulsed echography (UPE) for the mapping of the leading edge cavitation pattern, in view of its application to full-scale measurements on propeller blades aboard a ship in actual service. Measurements are done on a two-dimensional NACA16009 hydrofoil, and a comparison is performed against a well-tested technique based on laser light scattering imaging. On a reference solid surface, the mean location of the surface is recovered within ±0.5 % of the foil maximum thickness, against ±0.1 % for the imaging technique. In terms of uncertainty, UPE displays error levels four to six times higher with respect to the reference imaging data. In presence of cavitation, the UPE approach tends to overestimate the thickness dimension of the vapor volume as a result of its sensitivity to noise scattering from wall reverberation and from particles in the bulk fluid. However, the overall performance is highly satisfactory for a potential use in a full-scale context, and specific improvements are suggested to fulfill this long-term goal.

  20. The pulsed Doppler ultrasound flowmeter: experimental evaluation of velocity accuracy and range resolution.

    PubMed

    Griffith, J M; McLeod, F D; Leroy, A F

    1977-01-01

    Accurate quantitation of blood flow patterns, particularly in the physiological state, is important to the successful study of several problems in biomedical research. The pulsed Doppler ultrasonic flowmeter offers promise of overcoming some of the difficulties present in other methods. This flowmeter can be either implantable or noninvasive. Although a number of papers describe important design criteria, the design or selection of a Doppler system for a given task remains a complex matter involving many compromises based on theoretical considerations and very limited data. Experimental data from well-defined flows are needed to help identify those areas in which ultrasonic flowmeters can be most useful. This paper defines and evaluates two important parameters for the pulsed Doppler ultrasonic flowmeter by comparing experimental results with those predicted theorectically. The first parameter is velocity accuracy; the second parameter is range resolution. Findings show that centerline flow velocities in circular tubes can be estimated to within a few percent of the correct value, and that a 1.5-mm range resolution can be realized with the system tested.

  1. Photoacoustic measurement for glucose solution concentration based on tunable pulsed laser induced ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Zhong; Liu, Guodong; Huang, Zhen; Zhao, Dengji

    2012-12-01

    Noninvasive measurement of blood glucose concentration (BGC) has become a research hotspot. BGC measurement based on photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) was employed to detect the photoacoustic (PA) signal of blood glucose due to the advantages of avoiding the disturbance of optical scattering. In this paper, a set of custom-built BGC measurement system based on tunable optical parametric oscillator (OPO) pulsed laser and ultrasonic transducer was established to test the PA response effect of the glucose solution. In the experiments, we successfully acquired the time resolved PA signals of distilled water and glucose aqueous solution, and the PA peak-to-peak values(PPV) were gotten under the condition of excitated pulsed laser with changed wavelength from 1340nm to 2200nm by increasing interval of 10nm, the optimal characteristic wavelengths of distilled water and glucose solution were determined. Finally, to get the concentration prediction error, we used the linear fitting of ordinary least square (OLS) algorithm to fit the PPV of 1510nm, and we got the predicted concentration error was about 0.69mmol/L via the fitted linear equation. So, this system and scheme have some values in the research of noninvasive BGC measurement.

  2. Young adults’ performance in a low intensity weight loss campaign

    PubMed Central

    LaRose, Jessica Gokee; Leahey, Tricia M.; Weinberg, Brad M.; Kumar, Rajiv; Wing, Rena R.

    2013-01-01

    Young adults (YA) are underrepresented in behavioral weight loss programs and achieve poorer outcomes than older adults (OA). There has been a call to develop programs specifically targeting this age group. This study examined the performance of YA enrolled in a low intensity, team-based weight loss campaign and compared their outcomes to OA to determine the utility of such an approach for weight loss in this population. Shape Up Rhode Island 2009 was a 12-week online team-based weight loss and exercise competition (N=6795, 81% female, 94% White, age=44.7±11.2, BMI=29.4±5.9). YA was defined as 18–35 years and OA as >35 years; YA and OA were compared on enrollment, retention, weight loss and change in steps. A total of 1562 YA enrolled and 715 completed the program. Fewer YA completed compared with OA (46% vs. 62%, p<.001). However, among completers, YA achieved greater percent weight loss (−4.5±4.0% vs. −3.8±3.2%) and greater daily step change (+1578.2±3877.2 vs. +1342.2±3645.7) than OA (p’s<.001). Further, more YA completers achieved a ≥5% weight loss (40% vs. 29%, p<.001). Findings were consistent in the overweight/obese subsample, and using ≤25 years of age as the cut off for YA. Weight losses among YA in this low-intensity weight loss campaign were quite promising, with over 700 YA completing the program and on average achieving a 4.5% weight loss. Indeed, the potential public health impact of such an approach is substantial; future efforts to develop programs for this age group may benefit from using a low intensity, team-based approach. PMID:22318313

  3. Fetal Echocardiography and Pulsed-wave Doppler Ultrasound in a Rabbit Model of Intrauterine Growth Restriction

    PubMed Central

    Hodges, Ryan; Endo, Masayuki; La Gerche, Andre; Eixarch, Elisenda; DeKoninck, Philip; Ferferieva, Vessilina; D'hooge, Jan; Wallace, Euan M.; Deprest, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Fetal intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) results in abnormal cardiac function that is apparent antenatally due to advances in fetoplacental Doppler ultrasound and fetal echocardiography. Increasingly, these imaging modalities are being employed clinically to examine cardiac function and assess wellbeing in utero, thereby guiding timing of birth decisions. Here, we used a rabbit model of IUGR that allows analysis of cardiac function in a clinically relevant way. Using isoflurane induced anesthesia, IUGR is surgically created at gestational age day 25 by performing a laparotomy, exposing the bicornuate uterus and then ligating 40-50% of uteroplacental vessels supplying each gestational sac in a single uterine horn. The other horn in the rabbit bicornuate uterus serves as internal control fetuses. Then, after recovery at gestational age day 30 (full term), the same rabbit undergoes examination of fetal cardiac function. Anesthesia is induced with ketamine and xylazine intramuscularly, then maintained by a continuous intravenous infusion of ketamine and xylazine to minimize iatrogenic effects on fetal cardiac function. A repeat laparotomy is performed to expose each gestational sac and a microultrasound examination (VisualSonics VEVO 2100) of fetal cardiac function is performed. Placental insufficiency is evident by a raised pulsatility index or an absent or reversed end diastolic flow of the umbilical artery Doppler waveform. The ductus venosus and middle cerebral artery Doppler is then examined. Fetal echocardiography is performed by recording B mode, M mode and flow velocity waveforms in lateral and apical views. Offline calculations determine standard M-mode cardiac variables, tricuspid and mitral annular plane systolic excursion, speckle tracking and strain analysis, modified myocardial performance index and vascular flow velocity waveforms of interest. This small animal model of IUGR therefore affords examination of in utero cardiac function that is

  4. Elastic modulus in young diabetic patients (ultrasound measurements of pulse wave velocity).

    PubMed

    Stella, A; Gessaroli, M; Cifiello, B I; Salardi, S; Reggiani, A; Cacciari, E; D'Addato, M

    1984-11-01

    Aim of this study is to confirm the validity of non-invasive evaluation with Doppler C.W. in the study of arterial diseases and in the identification of pre-clinical arterial lesions. We studied twenty-eight children suffering from diabetes mellitus, and dependent on insulin and a control group composed of twenty-eight healthy persons. All subjects were studied using the methodology of the transit time for the determination of the elastic modulus of the lower limb arterial wall and results were analysed according to a statistical method. Although the groups were small, an increase in pulse wave velocity was noted in diabetic children and a significative correlation was found between the elastic modulus and duration of diabetes.

  5. Detection of cracks in metal sheets using pulsed laser generated ultrasound and EMAT detection.

    PubMed

    Dixon, S; Burrows, S E; Dutton, B; Fan, Y

    2011-01-01

    A pulsed Nd:YAG laser with an approximately Gaussian beam shape is directed onto the surface of an aluminium sheet at an energy density below which damage by laser ablation occurs, generating Lamb waves in the sheet. The laser beam is raster scanned across the surface of the sample. The Lamb waves travel radially outwards from the generation point and are detected some distance away by an electromagnetic acoustic transducer with sensitivity to in-plane displacements of the sheet. A number of static EMATs are located around the edges of the sheet, some distance from the generation point. The presence of a crack-like defect on the sheet can be detected by either a sudden change in the ultrasonic waveform or by an enhancement in the frequency content of the waveform when the laser beam illuminates directly onto the crack.

  6. Pulsed counter-current ultrasound-assisted extraction and characterization of polysaccharides from Boletus edulis.

    PubMed

    You, Qinghong; Yin, Xiulian; Ji, Chaowen

    2014-01-30

    Four methods for extracting polysaccharides from Boletus edulis, namely, hot-water extraction, ultrasonic clearer extraction, static probe ultrasonic extraction, and pulsed counter-current probe ultrasonic extraction (CCPUE), were studied. Results showed that CCPUE has the highest extraction efficiency among the methods studied. Under optimal CCPUE conditions, a B. edulis polysaccharide (BEP) yield of 8.21% was obtained. Three purified fractions, BEP-I, BEP-II, and BEP-III, were obtained through sequential purification by DEAE-52 and Sephadex G-75 chromatography. The average molecular weights of BEP-I, BEP-II, and BEP-III were 10,278, 23,761, and 42,736 Da, respectively. The polysaccharides were mainly composed of xylose, mannose, galactose, and glucose; of these, mannose contents were the highest. The antioxidant activities of the BEPs were further investigated by measurement of their ability to scavenge DPPH and hydroxyl radicals as well as their reducing power. The results indicated that the BEPs have good antioxidant activity. PMID:24299786

  7. Exploration and Practice in Photoacoustic Measurement for Glucose Concentration Based on Tunable Pulsed Laser Induced Ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Zhong; Liu, Guodong; Huang, Zhen; Zhao, Dengji; Xiong, Zhihua

    2015-07-01

    In this article, a tunable pulsed laser induced photoacoustic measurement setup of monitoring glucose concentration was established in the forward mode. In experiments, the time-resolved photoacoustic signal of glucose aqueous solution with different concentrations of 0-300 mg/dl were captured and averaged 512 times, and the photoacoustic peak-to-peak values were recorded using the wavelength scan in NIR region of 1300-2300 nm. The optimal characteristic wavelengths of glucose were determined via the difference spectral and the first derivative spectral algorithm, and correction models between peak-to-peak values of optimal wavelengths and concentration gradients were established using multivariate linear regression algorithm. Experimental results demonstrated that the profile and logarithm shape of time-resolved photoacoustic signal for glucose solutions were in good agreement with photoacoustic theories. The prediction effect of optimal wavelength of 1510 nm was best, its root-mean-square errors of correction and prediction were 12.14 and 8.45 mg/dl, respectively, the correlation coefficient reached 0.9856.

  8. [Experimental justification of possible mechanisms of action of low intensity electromagnetic radiation (EMR) on animals' behavior].

    PubMed

    Pavlov, L N; Dubrovik, B V; Zhavoronkov, l P; Glushakova, V S

    2012-01-01

    Effects of EMR on the behavior of Wistar rats (196 males, 180-240 g of mass) under the conflict of opposed motivations: strong positive, drinking, motivation, and strong negative, pain, motivation were studied. The animals were exposed to low intensity EMR (40 microW/cm2) produced by two independent sources, 475 MHz (Albatross) with two orthogonal E vectors, and synchronization of rhythm modulation in the range of electroencephalography (EEG) frequency. The effect on behavior was observed during 10 min: 1) following the 5-minute exposure to EMR and 2) during the 10-minute exposure. Low intensity EMR of the above mentioned parameters and pulse modulation of 4, 8, 10 and 13 Hz was found to inhibit development of phobia to pain, increase the number of punishable contacts. It testifies to the existence of a weak anxiolytic effect which is similar to the effect of tranquilizers. If animals were exposed to EMR following administration of phenazepam, the radiation was shown to produce potentiation of the anxiolytic effect ofphenazepam. Effect of phenazepam is associated with activation ofbenzdiazipine receptors in the structure ofGABA-ergic receptor complex, which regulates neural membrane chloride channel conductance. We can suggest that anxiolytic and neurodepressive effects of EMR are realized to some extent at the level of ionophore and regulatory receptor complexes.

  9. Computed Ultrasound Tomography in Echo mode (CUTE) of speed of sound for diagnosis and for aberration correction in pulse-echo sonography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeger, Michael; Held, Gerrit; Preisser, Stefan; Peeters, Sara; Grünig, Michael; Frenz, Martin

    2014-03-01

    Sound speed as a diagnostic marker for various diseases of human tissue has been of interest for a while. Up to now, mostly transmission ultrasound computed tomography (UCT) was able to detect spatially resolved sound speed, and its promise as a diagnostic tool has been demonstrated. However, UCT is limited to acoustically transparent samples such as the breast. We present a novel technique where spatially resolved detection of sound speed can be achieved using conventional pulse-echo equipment in reflection mode. For this purpose, pulse-echo images are acquired under various transmit beam directions and a two-dimensional map of the sound speed is reconstructed from the changing phase of local echoes using a direct reconstruction method. Phantom results demonstrate that a high spatial resolution (1 mm) and contrast (0.5 % of average sound speed) can be achieved suitable for diagnostic purposes. In comparison to previous reflection-mode based methods, CUTE works also in a situation with only diffuse echoes, and its direct reconstruction algorithm enables real-time application. This makes it suitable as an addition to conventional clinical ultrasound where it has the potential to benefit diagnosis in a multimodal approach. In addition, knowledge of the spatial distribution of sound speed allows full aberration correction and thus improved spatial resolution and contrast of conventional B-mode ultrasound.

  10. Basic studies on intravascular low-intensity laser therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Timon Cheng-Yi; Duan, Rui; Wang, Shuang-Xi; Liu, Jiang; Cui, Li-Ping; Jin, Hua; Liu, Song-Hao

    2006-09-01

    Intravascular low intensity laser therapy (ILILT) was originally put forward in USA in 1982, but popularized in Russia in 1980s and in China in 1990s, respectively. A randomized placebo-controlled study has shown ILILT clinical efficacy in patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis. As Chinese therapeutic applications of ILILT were the most widely in the world, its basic research, such as intracellular signal transduction research, blood research in vitro, animal blood research in vivo, human blood research in vivo and traditional Chinese medicine research, was also very progressive in China. Its basic studies will be reviewed in terms of the biological information model of photobiomodulation in this paper. ILILT might work in view of its basic studies, but the further randomized placebo-controlled trial and the further safety research should be done.

  11. Effects of microstructure and water on the electrical potentials in bone induced by ultrasound irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuneda, H.; Matsukawa, S.; Takayanagi, S.; Matsukawa, M.; Mizuno, K.; Yanagitani, T.

    2015-02-16

    The healing mechanism of bone fractures by low intensity pulse ultrasound is yet to be fully understood. There have been many discussions regarding how the high frequency dynamic stress can stimulate numerous cell types through various pathways. As one possible initial process of this mechanism, we focus on the piezoelectricity of bone and demonstrate that bone can generate electrical potentials by ultrasound irradiation in the MHz range. We have fabricated ultrasonic bone transducers using bovine cortical bone as the piezoelectric device. The ultrasonically induced electrical potentials in the transducers change as a function of time during immersed ultrasonic pulse measurements and become stable when the bone is fully wet. In addition, the magnitude of the induced electrical potentials changes owing to the microstructure in the cortical bone. The potentials of transducers with haversian structure bone are higher than those of plexiform structure bone, which informs about the effects of bone microstructure on the piezoelectricity.

  12. Acceleration of the Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Cotton Waste Celluloses by Low Intensity Uniform Ultrasound Field

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The cost-competitive production of bio-ethanol and other biofuels is currently impeded, mostly by high cost and low efficiency of enzymatic hydrolysis of feedstock biomass and especially plant celluloses. Despite substantial reduction in the cost of production of cellulolytic enzymes in recent times...

  13. Low-intensity treadmill exercise promotes rat dorsal wound healing.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wu; Liu, Guo-hui; Yang, Shu-hua; Mi, Bo-bin; Ye, Shu-nan

    2016-02-01

    In order to investigate the promoting effect of low-intensity treadmill exercise on rat dorsal wound healing and the mechanism, 20 Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into two groups: exercise group (Ex) and non-exercise group (non-ex). The rats in Ex group were given treadmill exercise for one month, and those in non-ex group raised on the same conditions without treadmill exercise. Both groups received dorsal wound operation with free access to food and water. By two-week continuous observation and recording of the wound area, the healing rate was analyzed. The blood sample was collected at day 14 post-operation via cardiac puncture for determination of the number of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) by flow cytometry, and the concentrations of relevant cytokines such as basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were measured by ELISA. The skin tissue around the wound was dissected to observe the vascular density under the microscope after HE staining, to detect the mRNA level of VEGFR2 and angiopoietin-1 (Ang-1) receptor using RT-qPCR, and protein expression of a-smooth muscle actin (αSMA) and type III collagen (ColIII) using Western blotting. It was found that the wound area in Ex group was smaller at the same time point than in non-ex group. The number of circulating EPCs was greater and the concentrations of vasoactive factors such as VEGF, eNOS and bFGF were higher in Ex group than in non-ex group. HE staining displayed a higher vessel density in Ex group than in non-ex group. Moreover, the mRNA expression of VEGFR2 and Ang-1 detected in the wound tissue in Ex group was higher than in non-ex group. Meanwhile, the protein expression of αSMA and ColIII was more abundant in Ex group than in non-ex group. Conclusively, the above results demonstrate Ex rats had a higher wound healing rate, suggesting low-intensity treadmill exercise accelerates wound healing. The present

  14. Influence of Diffraction Effects on the Result of Measuring the Absorption Coefficient of Ultrasound in Weakly Absorbing Liquids by the Pulse Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shatsky, A. V.

    2016-07-01

    We consider the problem of the influence of diffraction effects on the result of measuring the absorption coefficient of ultrasound in weakly absorbing liquids by the pulse method. Diffraction attenuation of an ultrasonic signal in a measuring cell using solid-state delay lines is calculated. It is shown that the use of delay lines of the ultrasonic signal leads to a considerable distortion of the measured absorption coefficient in the low-frequency range from the true value and can either overestimate or underestimate the results.

  15. Low Intensity Laser Therapy Applied in the Healing of Wounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahn, Fred; Matthews, Jeffrey

    2009-06-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the outcomes of Low Intensity Laser Therapy (LILT) on wound healing for patients presenting with pain, compromised neurological and physical function and tissue damage associated with vascular/diabetic ulcerations of the lower extremity. Methods: A retrospective case review of six patients treated with LILT (GaAlAs SLD, 660 nm, 750 mW, 3.6 J/cm2; GaAlAs SLD, 840 nm, 1,500 mW, 6.48 J/cm2; GaAlAs laser, 830 nm, 75 mW, 270 J/cm2) was conducted of clinical features including pain, measured by visual analogue scale (VAS), motor function, measured by range of motion (ROM) and visual outcome, measured by wound dimensions for six patients (n = 6; 5 males, 1 female; age = 67.83 years). Results: Significant progress with regard to alleviation of pain (ΔVAS = -5), improvements in motor function (ΔROM = +40%), epithelialization (wound closure rate = 3%/week) and complete wound closure was achieved. No recurrence of pathology at least one month post cessation of therapy was evident (x¯% reduction in wound area = 100%). Conclusions: LILT achieved consistent, effective and clear endpoints, was cost effective, created no adverse effects and ultimately led to the salvage of extremities.

  16. Psychological effects of low intensity conflict (LIC) operations

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhury, Suprakash; Goel, D.S.; Singh, Harcharan

    2006-01-01

    Background: A burgeoning clinical and empirical literature has provided incontrovertible evidence that combat operations exact a heavy toll in terms of human suffering not only on combatants but also military support personnel. Though the Indian army is engaged in low intensity conflict (LIC) operations for over five decades, the psychological effects of LIC deployment on soldiers have not been adequately studied. Aims: To evaluate the psychological effects of deployment in LIC operations on service personnel. Methods: Five hundred and sixty-eight servicemen engaged in LIC operations and equal number of age- and rank-matched personnel in adjoining peace areas were evaluated with a self-made questionnaire, General Health Questionnaire (GHQ), Carroll Rating Scale for Depression (CRSD), State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), Michigan Alcoholism Screening Test (MAST), Impact of Events Scale (IES), Perceived Stress Questionnaire (PSQ), Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory (MFI), Hindi PEN inventory, Satisfaction With Life Scale (SWLS) and Locus Of Control (LOC) scale. Results: Respondents from LIC area had significantly higher scores on CRSD, MAST, GHQ, IES, and general fatigue, physical fatigue, and mental fatigue subscale of the MFI in comparison to those located in other areas. Significantly higher number of respondents from highly active LIC and with more than one-year service in LIC scored above cut-off levels on CRSD, MAST and GHQ. Conclusions: The psychological status of troops was directly related both to the duration of stay and the nature of LIC area. PMID:20703341

  17. PV technology for low intensity, low temperature (LILT) applications

    SciTech Connect

    Stella, P.M.; Pool, F.S.; Nicolet, M.A.; Iles, P.A.

    1994-12-31

    As a result of the recent NASA emphasis on smaller, lower cost space missions, PV is now being considered for a number of missions operating at solar distances of 3 AU or greater. In the past, many of these missions would utilize an RTG (radioisotope thermo-electric generator). Historically, silicon solar cell behavior at these distances has been compromised by a number of mechanisms including shunting, non-ohmic back contacts, and the broken knee curve shape. The former two can usually be neglected for modern silicon cells, but the latter has not been eliminated. This problem has been identified with localized diffusion at the top contact/silicon interface which leads to structural changes in the local junction. This is believed to create a resistive metal-semiconductor-like (MSL) interface in parallel with the junction which results in the characteristic forms of the LILT (low intensity, low temperature) broken knee. This paper discusses a TaSiN contact barrier that will prevent the MSL structure in the junction.

  18. Low-intensity nonlinear spectral effects in compton scattering.

    PubMed

    Hartemann, Frederic V; Albert, Félicie; Siders, Craig W; Barty, C P J

    2010-09-24

    Nonlinear effects are known to occur in Compton scattering light sources, when the laser normalized potential A approaches unity. In this Letter, it is shown that nonlinear spectral features can appear at arbitrarily low values of A, if the fractional bandwidth of the laser pulse Δϕ⁻¹ is sufficiently small to satisfy A²Δϕ≃1. A three-dimensional analysis, based on a local plane wave, slow-varying envelope approximation, enables the study of these effects for realistic interactions between an electron beam and a laser pulse, and their influence on high-precision Compton scattering light sources.

  19. Low-Intensity Nonlinear Spectral Effects in Compton Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartemann, Frederic V.; Albert, Félicie; Siders, Craig W.; Barty, C. P. J.

    2010-09-01

    Nonlinear effects are known to occur in Compton scattering light sources, when the laser normalized potential A approaches unity. In this Letter, it is shown that nonlinear spectral features can appear at arbitrarily low values of A, if the fractional bandwidth of the laser pulse Δϕ-1 is sufficiently small to satisfy A2Δϕ≃1. A three-dimensional analysis, based on a local plane wave, slow-varying envelope approximation, enables the study of these effects for realistic interactions between an electron beam and a laser pulse, and their influence on high-precision Compton scattering light sources.

  20. Low-intensity nonlinear spectral effects in compton scattering.

    PubMed

    Hartemann, Frederic V; Albert, Félicie; Siders, Craig W; Barty, C P J

    2010-09-24

    Nonlinear effects are known to occur in Compton scattering light sources, when the laser normalized potential A approaches unity. In this Letter, it is shown that nonlinear spectral features can appear at arbitrarily low values of A, if the fractional bandwidth of the laser pulse Δϕ⁻¹ is sufficiently small to satisfy A²Δϕ≃1. A three-dimensional analysis, based on a local plane wave, slow-varying envelope approximation, enables the study of these effects for realistic interactions between an electron beam and a laser pulse, and their influence on high-precision Compton scattering light sources. PMID:21230757

  1. Effect of therapeutic ultrasound on folliculogenesis, angiogenesis and apoptosis after heterotopic mouse ovarian transplantation.

    PubMed

    Abtahi, N S; Eimani, H; Vosough, A; Shahverdi, Ab; Fathi, R; Hayati, N; Nasiri, N

    2014-07-01

    One of the challenges in ovarian transplantation is ischemia-reperfusion damage. When transitional tissue faces an acute and critical condition in terms of blood supply (immediately after organ transplantation), treatment with low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) seems to be very beneficial. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of ultrasound therapy on heterotopic transplanted mouse ovarian tissue. Adult female Naval Medical Research Institute mice were divided into three groups. In the experimental groups, the transplanted ovary was exposed 5 min daily to ultrasound with an intensity of 0.3 W/cm(2), frequency of 3 MHz and pulse mode of 1:4. The grafted ovaries were assessed with the usual histology and immunohistochemistry techniques. Results indicate that more CD31 angiogenic factor was expressed in irradiated animals than in control animals, and ultrasound therapy resulted in better follicular preservation, especially after 14 d. In conclusion, therapeutic ultrasound may accelerate and increase re-angiogenesis and can help to promote ovarian follicular growth.

  2. Assessing Low-Intensity Relationships in Complex Networks.

    PubMed

    Spitz, Andreas; Gimmler, Anna; Stoeck, Thorsten; Zweig, Katharina Anna; Horvát, Emőke-Ágnes

    2016-01-01

    Many large network data sets are noisy and contain links representing low-intensity relationships that are difficult to differentiate from random interactions. This is especially relevant for high-throughput data from systems biology, large-scale ecological data, but also for Web 2.0 data on human interactions. In these networks with missing and spurious links, it is possible to refine the data based on the principle of structural similarity, which assesses the shared neighborhood of two nodes. By using similarity measures to globally rank all possible links and choosing the top-ranked pairs, true links can be validated, missing links inferred, and spurious observations removed. While many similarity measures have been proposed to this end, there is no general consensus on which one to use. In this article, we first contribute a set of benchmarks for complex networks from three different settings (e-commerce, systems biology, and social networks) and thus enable a quantitative performance analysis of classic node similarity measures. Based on this, we then propose a new methodology for link assessment called z* that assesses the statistical significance of the number of their common neighbors by comparison with the expected value in a suitably chosen random graph model and which is a consistently top-performing algorithm for all benchmarks. In addition to a global ranking of links, we also use this method to identify the most similar neighbors of each single node in a local ranking, thereby showing the versatility of the method in two distinct scenarios and augmenting its applicability. Finally, we perform an exploratory analysis on an oceanographic plankton data set and find that the distribution of microbes follows similar biogeographic rules as those of macroorganisms, a result that rejects the global dispersal hypothesis for microbes.

  3. Assessing Low-Intensity Relationships in Complex Networks.

    PubMed

    Spitz, Andreas; Gimmler, Anna; Stoeck, Thorsten; Zweig, Katharina Anna; Horvát, Emőke-Ágnes

    2016-01-01

    Many large network data sets are noisy and contain links representing low-intensity relationships that are difficult to differentiate from random interactions. This is especially relevant for high-throughput data from systems biology, large-scale ecological data, but also for Web 2.0 data on human interactions. In these networks with missing and spurious links, it is possible to refine the data based on the principle of structural similarity, which assesses the shared neighborhood of two nodes. By using similarity measures to globally rank all possible links and choosing the top-ranked pairs, true links can be validated, missing links inferred, and spurious observations removed. While many similarity measures have been proposed to this end, there is no general consensus on which one to use. In this article, we first contribute a set of benchmarks for complex networks from three different settings (e-commerce, systems biology, and social networks) and thus enable a quantitative performance analysis of classic node similarity measures. Based on this, we then propose a new methodology for link assessment called z* that assesses the statistical significance of the number of their common neighbors by comparison with the expected value in a suitably chosen random graph model and which is a consistently top-performing algorithm for all benchmarks. In addition to a global ranking of links, we also use this method to identify the most similar neighbors of each single node in a local ranking, thereby showing the versatility of the method in two distinct scenarios and augmenting its applicability. Finally, we perform an exploratory analysis on an oceanographic plankton data set and find that the distribution of microbes follows similar biogeographic rules as those of macroorganisms, a result that rejects the global dispersal hypothesis for microbes. PMID:27096435

  4. Assessing Low-Intensity Relationships in Complex Networks

    PubMed Central

    Spitz, Andreas; Gimmler, Anna; Stoeck, Thorsten; Zweig, Katharina Anna; Horvát, Emőke-Ágnes

    2016-01-01

    Many large network data sets are noisy and contain links representing low-intensity relationships that are difficult to differentiate from random interactions. This is especially relevant for high-throughput data from systems biology, large-scale ecological data, but also for Web 2.0 data on human interactions. In these networks with missing and spurious links, it is possible to refine the data based on the principle of structural similarity, which assesses the shared neighborhood of two nodes. By using similarity measures to globally rank all possible links and choosing the top-ranked pairs, true links can be validated, missing links inferred, and spurious observations removed. While many similarity measures have been proposed to this end, there is no general consensus on which one to use. In this article, we first contribute a set of benchmarks for complex networks from three different settings (e-commerce, systems biology, and social networks) and thus enable a quantitative performance analysis of classic node similarity measures. Based on this, we then propose a new methodology for link assessment called z* that assesses the statistical significance of the number of their common neighbors by comparison with the expected value in a suitably chosen random graph model and which is a consistently top-performing algorithm for all benchmarks. In addition to a global ranking of links, we also use this method to identify the most similar neighbors of each single node in a local ranking, thereby showing the versatility of the method in two distinct scenarios and augmenting its applicability. Finally, we perform an exploratory analysis on an oceanographic plankton data set and find that the distribution of microbes follows similar biogeographic rules as those of macroorganisms, a result that rejects the global dispersal hypothesis for microbes. PMID:27096435

  5. Pulse

    MedlinePlus

    ... resting for at least 10 minutes. Take the exercise heart rate while you are exercising. ... pulse rate can help determine if the patient's heart is pumping. ... rate gives information about your fitness level and health.

  6. Low intensity laser therapy accelerates muscle regeneration in aged rats

    PubMed Central

    Vatansever, Fatma; Rodrigues, Natalia C.; Assis, Livia L.; Peviani, Sabrina S.; Durigan, Joao L.; Moreira, Fernando M.A.; Hamblin, Michael R.; Parizotto, Nivaldo A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Elderly people suffer from skeletal muscle disorders that undermine their daily activity and quality of life; some of these problems can be listed as but not limited to: sarcopenia, changes in central and peripheral nervous system, blood hypoperfusion, regenerative changes contributing to atrophy, and muscle weakness. Determination, proliferation and differentiation of satellite cells in the regenerative process are regulated by specific transcription factors, known as myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs). In the elderly, the activation of MRFs is inefficient which hampers the regenerative process. Recent studies found that low intensity laser therapy (LILT) has a stimulatory effect in the muscle regeneration process. However, the effects of this therapy when associated with aging are still unknown. Objective This study aimed to evaluate the effects of LILT (λ=830 nm) on the tibialis anterior (TA) muscle of aged rats. Subjects and methods The total of 56 male Wistar rats formed two population sets: old and young, with 28 animals in each set. Each of these sets were randomly divided into four groups of young rats (3 months of age) with n=7 per group and four groups of aged rats (10 months of age) with n=7 per group. These groups were submitted to cryoinjury + laser irradiation, cryoinjury only, laser irradiation only and the control group (no cryoinjury/no laser irradiation). The laser treatment was performed for 5 consecutive days. The first laser application was done 24 h after the injury (on day 2) and on the seventh day, the TA muscle was dissected and removed under anesthesia. After this the animals were euthanized. Histological analyses with toluidine blue as well as hematoxylin-eosin staining (for counting the blood capillaries) were performed for the lesion areas. In addition, MyoD and VEGF mRNA was assessed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Results The results showed significant elevation (p<0.05) in MyoD and VEGF genes expression levels

  7. Generation and Quantitative Analysis of Pulsed Low Frequency Ultrasound to Determine the Sonic Sensitivity of Untreated and Treated Neoplastic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Trendowski, Matthew; Christen, Timothy D.; Zoino, Joseph N.; Acquafondata, Christopher; Fondy, Thomas P.

    2015-01-01

    Low frequency ultrasound in the 20 to 60 kHz range is a novel physical modality by which to induce selective cell lysis and death in neoplastic cells. In addition, this method can be used in combination with specialized agents known as sonosensitizers to increase the extent of preferential damage exerted by ultrasound against neoplastic cells, an approach referred to as sonodynamic therapy (SDT). The methodology for generating and applying low frequency ultrasound in a preclinical in vitro setting is presented to demonstrate that reproducible cell destruction can be attained in order to examine and compare the effects of sonication on neoplastic and normal cells. This offers a means by which to reliably sonicate neoplastic cells at a level of consistency required for preclinical therapeutic assessment. In addition, the effects of cholesterol-depleting and cytoskeletal-directed agents on potentiating ultrasonic sensitivity in neoplastic cells are discussed in order to elaborate on mechanisms of action conducive to sonochemotherapeutic approaches. PMID:26274053

  8. Study on cavitation behavior during high-intensity focused ultrasound exposure by using optical and ultrasonic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taguchi, Kei; Takagi, Ryo; Yasuda, Jun; Yoshizawa, Shin; Umemura, Shin-ichiro

    2016-07-01

    Cavitation bubbles are known to enhance the heating effect of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU). In our previous study, the use of a “triggered HIFU” sequence consisting of a high-intensity pulse and a relatively low-intensity burst was proposed as an effective method to utilize the effect of cavitation bubbles. However, the duration of each component in the sequence has not been optimized. In this study, optical imaging was carried out to observe the behavior of cavitation bubbles in a gel phantom during the triggered HIFU exposure. Ultrasound imaging using the pulse inversion method was also conducted to detect the behavior of the bubbles. The results suggest that the oscillation of cavitation bubbles become inactive as the duration of HIFU burst exposure increases to the order of 10 ms. It was also suggested that ultrasonic imaging has potential use for detecting a change in the oscillation of cavitation bubbles for optimizing a triggered HIFU sequence.

  9. An ultrasound tomography system with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) moldings for coupling: in vivo results for 3-D pulse-echo imaging of the female breast.

    PubMed

    Koch, Andreas; Stiller, Florian; Lerch, Reinhard; Ermert, Helmut

    2015-02-01

    Full-angle spatial compounding (FASC) is a concept for pulse-echo imaging using an ultrasound tomography (UST) system. With FASC, resolution is increased and speckles are suppressed by averaging pulse-echo data from 360°. In vivo investigations have already shown a great potential for 2-D FASC in the female breast as well as for finger-joint imaging. However, providing a small number of images of parallel cross-sectional planes with enhanced image quality is not sufficient for diagnosis. Therefore, volume data (3-D) is needed. For this purpose, we further developed our UST add-on system to automatically rotate a motorized array (3-D probe) around the object of investigation. Full integration of external motor and ultrasound electronics control in a custom-made program allows acquisition of 3-D pulse-echo RF datasets within 10 min. In case of breast cancer imaging, this concept also enables imaging of near-thorax tissue regions which cannot be achieved by 2-D FASC. Furthermore, moldings made of polyvinyl alcohol hydrogel (PVA-H) have been developed as a new acoustic coupling concept. It has a great potential to replace the water bath technique in UST, which is a critical concept with respect to clinical investigations. In this contribution, we present in vivo results for 3-D FASC applied to imaging a female breast which has been placed in a PVA-H molding during data acquisition. An algorithm is described to compensate time-of-flight and consider refraction at the water-PVA-H molding and molding-tissue interfaces. Therefore, the mean speed of sound (SOS) for the breast tissue is estimated with an image-based method. Our results show that the PVA-H molding concept is applicable and feasible and delivers good results. 3-D FASC is superior to 2-D FASC and provides 3-D volume data at increased image quality.

  10. Effects of acoustic streaming from moderate-intensity pulsed ultrasound for enhancing biofilm mitigation effectiveness of drug-loaded liposomes.

    PubMed

    Ma, Dong; Green, Adam M; Willsey, Graham G; Marshall, Jeffrey S; Wargo, Matthew J; Wu, Junru

    2015-08-01

    Because biofilms have resistance to antibiotics, their control using minimum amounts of chemicals and energy becomes a critical issue particularly for resource-constrained long-term space and deep-sea explorations. This preliminary study investigates how ultrasound promoting penetration of antibiotic-loaded liposomes into alginate-based bacterial biofilms, resulting in enhanced bacterial (Ralstonia insidiosa) killing. Nano-sized liposomes are used as a delivery vehicle for the antibiotic gentamicin. Alginate-based synthetic biofilms, which are widely acknowledged as biofilm phantoms, filled with liposome solution are formed at the bottoms of six-well Petri dishes and exposed to ultrasound (frequency = 2.25 MHz, 10% duty cycle, and spatially and temporally averaged intensity ISAPA = 4.4 W/cm(2)). Gentamicin is released from liposomes after they are lysed using detergent solution (0.05% sodium dodecyl sulfate, 1.0% Triton X-100) and incubated for 20 min. The alginate biofilm is dissolved and diluted, counting of colony-forming units shows about 80% of the bacteria are killed. It has also been shown the liposome-capture density by the alginate film increases linearly with the ultrasound intensity up to ISAPA = 6.2 W/cm(2) reaching approximately threefold that without ultrasound. Measurement by using particle-image velocimetry has demonstrated the acoustic streaming with modification by thermal convection controls the enhancement of the liposome capture rate.

  11. High frame rate and high line density ultrasound imaging for local pulse wave velocity estimation using motion matching: A feasibility study on vessel phantoms.

    PubMed

    Li, Fubing; He, Qiong; Huang, Chengwu; Liu, Ke; Shao, Jinhua; Luo, Jianwen

    2016-04-01

    Pulse wave imaging (PWI) is an ultrasound-based method to visualize the propagation of pulse wave and to quantitatively estimate regional pulse wave velocity (PWV) of the arteries within the imaging field of view (FOV). To guarantee the reliability of PWV measurement, high frame rate imaging is required, which can be achieved by reducing the line density of ultrasound imaging or transmitting plane wave at the expense of spatial resolution and/or signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). In this study, a composite, full-view imaging method using motion matching was proposed with both high temporal and spatial resolution. Ultrasound radiofrequency (RF) data of 4 sub-sectors, each with 34 beams, including a common beam, were acquired successively to achieve a frame rate of ∼507 Hz at an imaging depth of 35 mm. The acceleration profiles of the vessel wall estimated from the common beam were used to reconstruct the full-view (38-mm width, 128-beam) image sequence. The feasibility of mapping local PWV variation along the artery using PWI technique was preliminarily validated on both homogeneous and inhomogeneous polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) cryogel vessel phantoms. Regional PWVs for the three homogeneous phantoms measured by the proposed method were in accordance with the sparse imaging method (38-mm width, 32-beam) and plane wave imaging method. Local PWV was estimated using the above-mentioned three methods on 3 inhomogeneous phantoms, and good agreement was obtained in both the softer (1.91±0.24 m/s, 1.97±0.27 m/s and 1.78±0.28 m/s) and the stiffer region (4.17±0.46 m/s, 3.99±0.53 m/s and 4.27±0.49 m/s) of the phantoms. In addition to the improved spatial resolution, higher precision of local PWV estimation in low SNR circumstances was also obtained by the proposed method as compared with the sparse imaging method. The proposed method might be helpful in disease detections through mapping the local PWV of the vascular wall. PMID:26773791

  12. High frame rate and high line density ultrasound imaging for local pulse wave velocity estimation using motion matching: A feasibility study on vessel phantoms.

    PubMed

    Li, Fubing; He, Qiong; Huang, Chengwu; Liu, Ke; Shao, Jinhua; Luo, Jianwen

    2016-04-01

    Pulse wave imaging (PWI) is an ultrasound-based method to visualize the propagation of pulse wave and to quantitatively estimate regional pulse wave velocity (PWV) of the arteries within the imaging field of view (FOV). To guarantee the reliability of PWV measurement, high frame rate imaging is required, which can be achieved by reducing the line density of ultrasound imaging or transmitting plane wave at the expense of spatial resolution and/or signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). In this study, a composite, full-view imaging method using motion matching was proposed with both high temporal and spatial resolution. Ultrasound radiofrequency (RF) data of 4 sub-sectors, each with 34 beams, including a common beam, were acquired successively to achieve a frame rate of ∼507 Hz at an imaging depth of 35 mm. The acceleration profiles of the vessel wall estimated from the common beam were used to reconstruct the full-view (38-mm width, 128-beam) image sequence. The feasibility of mapping local PWV variation along the artery using PWI technique was preliminarily validated on both homogeneous and inhomogeneous polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) cryogel vessel phantoms. Regional PWVs for the three homogeneous phantoms measured by the proposed method were in accordance with the sparse imaging method (38-mm width, 32-beam) and plane wave imaging method. Local PWV was estimated using the above-mentioned three methods on 3 inhomogeneous phantoms, and good agreement was obtained in both the softer (1.91±0.24 m/s, 1.97±0.27 m/s and 1.78±0.28 m/s) and the stiffer region (4.17±0.46 m/s, 3.99±0.53 m/s and 4.27±0.49 m/s) of the phantoms. In addition to the improved spatial resolution, higher precision of local PWV estimation in low SNR circumstances was also obtained by the proposed method as compared with the sparse imaging method. The proposed method might be helpful in disease detections through mapping the local PWV of the vascular wall.

  13. Stimulation of Bone Repair with Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Padilla, Frédéric; Puts, Regina; Vico, Laurence; Guignandon, Alain; Raum, Kay

    2016-01-01

    This chapter reviews the different options available for the use of ultrasound in the enhancement of fracture healing or in the reactivation of a failed healing process: LIPUS, shock waves and ultrasound-mediated delivery of bioactive molecules, such as growth factors or plasmids. The main emphasis is on LIPUS, or Low Intensity Pulsed Ultrasound, the most widespread and studied technique. LIPUS has pronounced bioeffects on tissue regeneration, while employing intensities within a diagnostic range. The biological response to LIPUS is complex as the response of numerous cell types to this stimulus involves several pathways. Known to-date mechanotransduction pathways involved in cell responses include MAPK and other kinases signaling pathways, gap-junctional intercellular communication, up-regulation and clustering of integrins, involvement of the COX-2/PGE2 and iNOS/NO pathways, and activation of the ATI mechanoreceptor. Mechanisms at the origin of LIPUS biological effects remain intriguing, and analysis is hampered by the diversity of experimental systems used in-vitro. Data point to clear evidence that bioeffects can be modulated by direct and indirect mechanical effects, like acoustic radiation force, acoustic streaming, propagation of surface waves, heat, fluid-flow induced circulation and redistribution of nutrients, oxygen and signaling molecules. One of the future engineering challenge is therefore the design of dedicated experimental set-ups allowing control of these different mechanical phenomena, and to relate them to biological responses. Then, the derivation of an 'acoustic dose' and the cross-calibration of the different experimental systems will be possible. Despite this imperfect knowledge of LIPUS biophysics, the clinical evidence, although most often of low quality, speaks in favor of the clinical use of LIPUS, when the economics of nonunion and the absence of toxicity of this ultrasound technology are taken into account. PMID:26486349

  14. Design and testing of low intensity laser biostimulator

    PubMed Central

    Valchinov, Emil S; Pallikarakis, Nicolas E

    2005-01-01

    Background The non-invasive nature of laser biostimulation has made lasers an attractive alternative in Medical Acupuncture at the last 25 years. However, there is still an uncertainty as to whether they work or their effect is just placebo. Although a plethora of scientific papers published about the topic showing positive clinical results, there is still a lack of objective scientific proofs about the biostimulation effect of lasers in Medical Acupuncture. The objective of this work was to design and build a low cost portable laser device for stimulation of acupuncture points, considered here as small localized biosources (SLB), without stimulating any sensory nerves via shock or heat and to find out a suitable method for objectively evaluating its stimulating effect. The design is aimed for studying SLB potentials provoked by laser stimulus, in search for objective proofs of the biostimulation effect of lasers used in Medical Acupuncture. Methods The proposed biostimulator features two operational modes: program mode and stimulation mode and two output polarization modes: linearly and circularly polarized laser emission. In program mode, different user-defined stimulation protocols can be created and memorized. The laser output can be either continuous or pulse modulated. Each stimulation session consists of a pre-defined number of successive continuous or square pulse modulated sequences of laser emission. The variable parameters of the laser output are: average output power, pulse width, pulse period, and continuous or pulsed sequence duration and repetition period. In stimulation mode the stimulus is automatically applied according to the pre-programmed protocol. The laser source is 30 mW AlGaInP laser diode with an emission wavelength of 685 nm, driven by a highly integrated driver. The optical system designed for beam collimation and polarization change uses single collimating lens with large numerical aperture, linear polarizer and a quarter

  15. Integrated processing of contrast pulse sequencing ultrasound imaging for enhanced active contrast of hollow gas filled silica nanoshells and microshells.

    PubMed

    Ta, Casey N; Liberman, Alexander; Paul Martinez, H; Barback, Christopher V; Mattrey, Robert F; Blair, Sarah L; Trogler, William C; Kummel, Andrew C; Wu, Zhe

    2012-03-01

    In recent years, there have been increasing developments in the field of contrast-enhanced ultrasound both in the creation of new contrast agents and in imaging modalities. These contrast agents have been employed to study tumor vasculature in order to improve cancer detection and diagnosis. An in vivo study is presented of ultrasound imaging of gas filled hollow silica microshells and nanoshells which have been delivered intraperitoneally to an IGROV-1 tumor bearing mouse. In contrast to microbubbles, this formulation of microshells provided strong ultrasound imaging signals by shell disruption and release of gas. Imaging of the microshells in an animal model was facilitated by novel image processing. Although the particle signal could be identified by eye under live imaging, high background obfuscated the particle signal in still images and near the borders of the tumor with live images. Image processing techniques were developed that employed the transient nature of the particle signal to selectively filter out the background signal. By applying image registration, high-pass, median, threshold, and motion filtering, a short video clip of the particle signal was compressed into a single image, thereby resolving the silica shells within the tumor. © 2012 American Vacuum Society.

  16. VASCULAR LESIONS AND S-THROMBOMODULIN CONCENTRATIONS FROM AURICULAR ARTERIES OF RABBITS INFUSED WITH MICROBUBBLE CONTRAST AGENT AND EXPOSED TO PULSED ULTRASOUND

    PubMed Central

    Zachary, James F.; Blue, James P.; Miller, Rita J.; O’Brien, William D.

    2007-01-01

    Arterial injury resulting from the interaction of contrast agent (CA) with ultrasound (US) was studied in rabbit auricular arteries and assessed by histopathologic evaluation and s-thrombomodulin concentrations. Three sites on each artery were exposed (2.8 MHz, 5-min exposure duration, 10-Hz pulse repetition frequency, 1.4-μs pulse duration) using one of three in situ peak rarefactional pressures (0.85, 3.9 or 9.5 MPa). Saline, saline/CA, and saline/US infusion groups (n = 28) did not have histopathologic damage. The saline/CA/US infusion group (n = 10) at exposure conditions below the FDA mechanical index limit of 1.9 did not have histopathologic damage, whereas the saline/CA/US infusion group (n = 9) at exposure conditions above the FDA limit did have damage (5 of 9 arteries). Lesions were characteristic of acute coagulative necrosis. Mean s-thrombomodulin concentrations, a marker for endothelial cell injury, were highest in rabbits exposed to US at 0.85 and 3.9 MPa, suggesting that vascular injury may be physiological and not accompanied by irreversible cellular injury. PMID:17112964

  17. Reflecting on mirror mechanisms: motor resonance effects during action observation only present with low-intensity transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Loporto, Michela; Holmes, Paul S; Wright, David J; McAllister, Craig J

    2013-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) studies indicate that the observation of other people's actions influences the excitability of the observer's motor system. Motor evoked potential (MEP) amplitudes typically increase in muscles which would be active during the execution of the observed action. This 'motor resonance' effect is thought to result from activity in mirror neuron regions, which enhance the excitability of the primary motor cortex (M1) via cortico-cortical pathways. The importance of TMS intensity has not yet been recognised in this area of research. Low-intensity TMS predominately activates corticospinal neurons indirectly, whereas high-intensity TMS can directly activate corticospinal axons. This indicates that motor resonance effects should be more prominent when using low-intensity TMS. A related issue is that TMS is typically applied over a single optimal scalp position (OSP) to simultaneously elicit MEPs from several muscles. Whether this confounds results, due to differences in the manner that TMS activates spatially separate cortical representations, has not yet been explored. In the current study, MEP amplitudes, resulting from single-pulse TMS applied over M1, were recorded from the first dorsal interosseous (FDI) and abductor digiti minimi (ADM) muscles during the observation of simple finger abductions. We tested if the TMS intensity (110% vs. 130% resting motor threshold) or stimulating position (FDI-OSP vs. ADM-OSP) influenced the magnitude of the motor resonance effects. Results showed that the MEP facilitation recorded in the FDI muscle during the observation of index-finger abductions was only detected using low-intensity TMS. In contrast, changes in the OSP had a negligible effect on the presence of motor resonance effects in either the FDI or ADM muscles. These findings support the hypothesis that MN activity enhances M1 excitability via cortico-cortical pathways and highlight a methodological framework by which the neural

  18. [Adaptation reactions of rat blood exposed to low intensity electromagnetic radiation].

    PubMed

    Krylov, V N; Deriugina, A V

    2010-06-01

    It is carried out research of action low-intensive electromagnetic radiations--low-intensive laser radiation and radiations of the highest frequency on normal animals and at modelling the stress-reaction, caused by introduction of adrenaline. Absence of effects of system of blood is noted at action low-intensive electromagnetic radiations on normal an organism and them correction action on alteration an organism, shown in restoration of the broken parameters--leukocyte the blood count, electrophoretic mobility of erythrocytes and phospholipide's structure of their membranes.

  19. AXAF low intensity-low temperature (LILT) testing of the development verification test (DVT) solar panel

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, D.; Edge, T.; Willowby, D.

    1998-07-01

    The planned orbit of the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF) spacecraft will subject the spacecraft to both short (less than 30 minutes for solar and less than 2 hours for lunar) and long earth eclipses and lunar eclipses with combined conjunctive duration of up to 3 to 4 hours. Lack of proper Electrical Power System (EPS) conditioning prior to eclipse may cause loss of mission. To avoid this problem, for short eclipses, it is necessary to off-point the solar array prior to or at the beginning of the eclipse to reduce the battery state of charge. This yields less overcharge during the high charge currents at sun entry. For long lunar eclipses, solar array pointing and load scheduling must be tailored for the profile of the eclipse. The battery state of charge, loads, and solar array current-voltage (I-V) characteristic curves must be known or predictable to maintain the bus voltage within acceptable range. To address engineering concerns about the electrical performance of the AXAF solar array under penumbral Low Intensity and Low Temperature (LILT) conditions, Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) engineers undertook special testing of the AXAF Development Verification Test (DVT) solar panel in September-November 1997. In the test the DVT test panel was installed in a thermal vacuum chamber with a large view window with a mechanical flapper door. The DVT test panel was flash tested with a Large Area Pulsed Solar Simulator (LAPSS) at various fractional sun intensities and panel (solar cell) temperatures. The testing was unique with regards to the large size of the test article and type of testing performed. The test setup and results will be presented.

  20. Treatment experience of pulsed radiofrequency under ultrasound guided to the trapezius muscle at myofascial pain syndrome -a case report-.

    PubMed

    Park, Chung Hoon; Lee, Yoon Woo; Kim, Yong Chan; Moon, Joo Hwa; Choi, Jong Bum

    2012-01-01

    Trigger point injection treatment is an effective and widely applied treatment for myofascial pain syndrome. The trapezius muscle frequently causes myofascial pain in neck area. We herein report a case in which direct pulsed radiofrequency (RF) treatment was applied to the trapezius muscle. We observed that the RF treatment produced continuous pain relief when the effective duration of trigger point injection was temporary in myofascial pain.

  1. Treatment Experience of Pulsed Radiofrequency Under Ultrasound Guided to the Trapezius Muscle at Myofascial Pain Syndrome -A Case Report-

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chung Hoon; Lee, Yoon Woo; Kim, Yong Chan; Moon, Joo Hwa

    2012-01-01

    Trigger point injection treatment is an effective and widely applied treatment for myofascial pain syndrome. The trapezius muscle frequently causes myofascial pain in neck area. We herein report a case in which direct pulsed radiofrequency (RF) treatment was applied to the trapezius muscle. We observed that the RF treatment produced continuous pain relief when the effective duration of trigger point injection was temporary in myofascial pain. PMID:22259718

  2. The hypoalgesic effects of low-intensity infrared laser therapy: a study on 555 cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tam, Giuseppe

    2004-09-01

    Objective: Low energy lasers are widely used to treat a variety of musculoskeletal conditions. The aim of this clinical study is to determine the action of the IR diode laser 904 nm pulsed on pain reduction therapy. Summary Background Data: With respect to pain, has been shown the Low power density laser increases the endorphin synthesis in the dorsal posterior horn of the spinal cord stopping the production of bradykinin and serotonin. Besides laser causes local vasodilatation of the capillaries and an improved circulation of drainage liquids in interstitial space causing an analgesic effect. Additionally, laser interferes in the cytochines (TNF-α, interleukin-1 and interleukin-6) that drive inflammation in the arthritis and are secreted from CD4 e T cells. Methods: Treatment was carried out on 555 cases and 525 patients (322 women and 203 men) in the period between 1987 and 2002. The patients, whose age ranged from 25 to 70, with a mean age of 45 years, were suffering from rheumatic, degenerative and traumatic pathologies. The majority of the patients had been seen by orthopaedists and rheumatologists and had undergone x-ray, ultrasound scanning, Tac, RM examination. All patients had received drug-based treatment and/or physiotherapy with poor results. Two thirds were experiencing acute symptomatic pain, while the others presented a chronic pathology with recurrent crises. We used a pulsed IR diode laser, GaAs 904 nm, maximum power 60 W, frequency impulse 1300 Hz, pulsed duration 200 nanoseconds; peak power per pulse 27W; maximal energy density: 9J/cm2; total number of Joules per treatment session: 10-75J/cm2, chronic 12-90J/cm2. Average number of applications: 12; maximum number of applications: 20. Results: In the evaluation of the results the following parameters have been considered: disappearance of spontaneous and induced pain (Likert scale, Rolland Morris disability scale, dynamometer). The pathologies treated were osteoarthritis in general, epicondylitis

  3. Optimization of pulsed ultrasound-assisted technique for extraction of phenolics from pomegranate peel of Malas variety: Punicalagin and hydroxybenzoic acids.

    PubMed

    Kazemi, Milad; Karim, Roselina; Mirhosseini, Hamed; Abdul Hamid, Azizah

    2016-09-01

    Pomegranate peel is a rich source of phenolic compounds (such as punicalagin and hydroxybenzoic acids). However, the content of such bioactive compounds in the peel extract can be affected by extraction type and condition. It was hypothesized that the optimization of a pulsed ultrasound-assisted extraction (PUAE) technique could result in the pomegranate peel extract with higher yield and antioxidant activity. The main goal was to optimize PUAE condition resulting in the highest yield and antioxidant activity as well as the highest contents of punicalagin and hydroxybenzoic acids. The operation at the intensity level of 105W/cm(2) and duty cycle of 50% for a short time (10min) had a high efficiency for extraction of phenolics from pomegranate peel. The application of such short extraction can save the energy and cost of the production. Punicalagin and ellagic acid were the most predominant phenolic compounds quantified in the pomegranate peel extract (PPE) from Malas variety. PPE contained a minor content of gallic acid. PMID:27041311

  4. Phonotaxis in flying crickets. I. Attraction to the calling song and avoidance of bat-like ultrasound are discrete behaviors.

    PubMed

    Nolen, T G; Hoy, R R

    1986-10-01

    The steering responses of three species of field crickets, Teleogryllus oceanicus, T. commodus, and Gryllus bimaculatus, were characterized during tethered flight using single tone-pulses (rather than model calling song) presented at carrier frequencies from 3-100 kHz. This range of frequencies encompasses the natural songs of crickets (4-20 kHz, Fig. 1) as well as the echolocation cries of insectivorous bats (12-100 kHz). The single-pulse stimulus paradigm was necessary to assess the aversive nature of high carrier frequencies without introducing complications due to the attractive properties of repeated pulse stimuli such as model calling songs. Unlike the natural calling song, single tone-pulses were not attractive and did not elicit positive phonotactic steering even when presented at the calling song carrier frequency (Figs. 2, 3, and 9). In addition to temporal pattern, phonotactic steering was sensitive to carrier frequency as well as sound intensity. Three discrete flight steering behaviors positive phonotaxis, negative phonotaxis and evasion, were elicited by appropriate combinations of frequency, temporal pattern and sound intensity (Fig. 12). Positive phonotactic steering required a model calling song temporal pattern, was tuned to 5 kHz and was restricted to frequencies below 9 kHz. Negative phonotactic steering, similar to the 'early warning' bat-avoidance behavior of moths, was produced by low intensity (55 dB SPL) tone-pulses at frequencies between 12 and 100 kHz (Figs. 2, 3, and 9). In contrast to model calling song, single tone-pulses of high intensity 5-10 kHz elicited negative phonotactic steering; low intensity ultrasound (20-100 kHz) produced only negative phonotactic steering, regardless of pulse repetition pattern. 'Evasive', side-to-side steering, similar to the 'last-chance' bat-evasion behavior of moths was produced in response to high intensity (greater than 90 dB) ultrasound (20-100 kHz). Since the demonstration of negative phonotactic

  5. Medical Imaging with Ultrasound: Some Basic Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gosling, R.

    1989-01-01

    Discussed are medical applications of ultrasound. The physics of the wave nature of ultrasound including its propagation and production, return by the body, spatial and contrast resolution, attenuation, image formation using pulsed echo ultrasound techniques, measurement of velocity and duplex scanning are described. (YP)

  6. Intravascular ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    IVUS; Ultrasound - coronary artery; Endovascular ultrasound; Intravascular echocardiography ... A tiny ultrasound wand is attached to the top of a thin tube. This tube is called a catheter. The catheter ...

  7. Duplex ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    Vascular ultrasound; Peripheral vascular ultrasound ... Deane CR, Goss DE. Peripheral arteries and veins. In: Allan PL, Baxter GM, Weston MJ, eds. Allan & Baxter: Clinical Ultrasound . 3rd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier ...

  8. Prostate Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  9. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  10. Hip Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  11. Ultrasound -- Vascular

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  12. Musculoskeletal Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  13. Ultrasound - Scrotum

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  14. Low intensity infrared laser effects on Escherichia coli cultures and plasmid DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonseca, A. S.; Teixeira, A. F.; Presta, G. A.; Geller, M.; Valença, S. S.; Paoli, F.

    2012-10-01

    Biostimulative effect of low intensity laser in tissues has been described on a photobiological basis and clinical protocols are recommended for treatment of various diseases. The aim of this work was to evaluate effects of laser exposure on the survival of Escherichia coli cultures and plasmid topological forms. Escherichia coli cultures and plasmids were exposed to infrared laser to study bacterial survival and electrophoretic profile, respectively. Data indicate low intensity infrared laser: (i) had no effect on E. coli wild type, endonuclease IV, exonuclease III, formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase/MutM protein and endonuclease III deficient cultures, but decreased the survival of E. coli UvrA protein deficient cultures; (ii) there was no alteration in the electrophoretic profile of plasmids. Exposure to low intensity infrared laser decreases survival of Escherichia coli cultures deficient in nucleotide excision repair of DNA and this effect could depend on fluences, wavelength and tissues conditions.

  15. Recurrent exercise-induced rhabdomyolysis due to low intensity fitness exercise in a healthy young patient

    PubMed Central

    Karre, Premnath Reddy; Gujral, Jeetinder

    2011-01-01

    Rhabdomyolysis is an uncommon but life threatening condition that develops due to breakdown of muscle and release of intracellular components into the circulation. A 24-year-old man otherwise healthy was admitted to our hospital because of muscle aches and weakness as well as cola coloured urine developed 3 days after carrying out the low intensity exercise. Diagnosis of rhabdomyolysis was made with creatine kinase (CK) levels of 214 356 U/l. He was treated for a similar condition at age 21. A muscle biopsy was done and the findings were normal. Rhabdomyolysis can develop with low intensity exercise; thus, it be considered in healthy young people. Young people with recurrent rhabdomyolysis due to low intensity exercise, in the absence of obvious medical and physical causes, should be evaluated further to rule out uncommon metabolic diseases. Our case demonstrates that complications especially renal failure in patients with rhabdomyolysis do not correspond to CK levels. PMID:22700603

  16. [Degranulation of skin mast cells caused by high frequency electromagnetic irradiation of low intensity].

    PubMed

    Popov, V I; Rogachevskiĭ, V V; Gapeev, A B; Khramov, R N; Fesenko, E E

    2001-01-01

    It was shown by light and electron microscopy that local exposure of the projection of the MC-8 lao-gun acupuncture point in rat pad to low-intensity (0.05 mW/cm2) extremely high-frequency (42.0 GHz) electromagnetic radiation caused a degranulation of derma mast cells. It was suggested that the response of skin mast cells is an important amplifying mechanism in the chain of events leading to a systemic response of the organism to low-intensity electromagnetic radiation.

  17. [Application of low-intensity and ultrahigh frequency electromagnetic radiation in modern pediatric practice].

    PubMed

    Azov, N A; Azova, E A

    2009-01-01

    The use of an Amfit-0,2/10-01 apparatus generating low-intensity ultrahigh frequency (UHF) electromagnetic radiation improved efficiency of therapy of sick children. This treatment allowed to reduce the frequency of intake of anesthetics in the post-operative period, correct metabolic disorders in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus, reduce severity of diabetic nephropathy and polyneuropathy, prevent formation of fresh foci of lipoid necrobiosis. The results of the study indicate that the use of low-intensity UHF electromagnetic radiation may be recommended for more extensive introduction into practical clinical work of pediatric endocrinologists and surgeons.

  18. Nucleotide excision repair pathway assessment in DNA exposed to low-intensity red and infrared lasers.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, A S; Campos, V M A; Magalhães, L A G; Paoli, F

    2015-10-01

    Low-intensity lasers are used for prevention and management of oral mucositis induced by anticancer therapy, but the effectiveness of treatment depends on the genetic characteristics of affected cells. This study evaluated the survival and induction of filamentation of Escherichia coli cells deficient in the nucleotide excision repair pathway, and the action of T4endonuclease V on plasmid DNA exposed to low-intensity red and near-infrared laser light. Cultures of wild-type (strain AB1157) E. coli and strain AB1886 (deficient in uvrA protein) were exposed to red (660 nm) and infrared (808 nm) lasers at various fluences, powers and emission modes to study bacterial survival and filamentation. Also, plasmid DNA was exposed to laser light to study DNA lesions produced in vitro by T4endonuclease V. Low-intensity lasers:i) had no effect on survival of wild-type E. coli but decreased the survival of uvrA protein-deficient cells,ii) induced bacterial filamentation, iii) did not alter the electrophoretic profile of plasmids in agarose gels, andiv) did not alter the electrophoretic profile of plasmids incubated with T4 endonuclease V. These results increase our understanding of the effects of laser light on cells with various genetic characteristics, such as xeroderma pigmentosum cells deficient in nucleotide excision pathway activity in patients with mucositis treated by low-intensity lasers. PMID:26445337

  19. Low-intensity red and infrared laser effects at high fluences on Escherichia coli cultures.

    PubMed

    Barboza, L L; Campos, V M A; Magalhães, L A G; Paoli, F; Fonseca, A S

    2015-10-01

    Semiconductor laser devices are readily available and practical radiation sources providing wavelength tenability and high monochromaticity. Low-intensity red and near-infrared lasers are considered safe for use in clinical applications. However, adverse effects can occur via free radical generation, and the biological effects of these lasers from unusually high fluences or high doses have not yet been evaluated. Here, we evaluated the survival, filamentation induction and morphology of Escherichia coli cells deficient in repair of oxidative DNA lesions when exposed to low-intensity red and infrared lasers at unusually high fluences. Cultures of wild-type (AB1157), endonuclease III-deficient (JW1625-1), and endonuclease IV-deficient (JW2146-1) E. coli, in exponential and stationary growth phases, were exposed to red and infrared lasers (0, 250, 500, and 1000 J/cm2) to evaluate their survival rates, filamentation phenotype induction and cell morphologies. The results showed that low-intensity red and infrared lasers at high fluences are lethal, induce a filamentation phenotype, and alter the morphology of the E. coli cells. Low-intensity red and infrared lasers have potential to induce adverse effects on cells, whether used at unusually high fluences, or at high doses. Hence, there is a need to reinforce the importance of accurate dosimetry in therapeutic protocols. PMID:26445339

  20. On the mechanisms of interaction of low-intensity millimeter waves with biological objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betskii, O. V.

    1994-01-01

    The interaction of low-intensity millimeter-band electromagnetic waves with biological objects is examined. These waves are widely used in medical practice as a means of physiotherapy for the treatment of various human disorders. Principal attention is given to the mechanisms through which millimeter waves act on the human organism.

  1. Developmental Change in Fetal Response to Repeated Low-Intensity Sound

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morokuma, Seiichi; Doria, Valentina; Ierullo, Antonio; Kinukawa, Naoko; Fukushima, Kotaro; Nakano, Hitoo; Arulkumaran, Sabaratnam; Papageorghiou, Aris T.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate developmental changes in heart rate response to repeated low-intensity (85 dB) sound stimulation in fetuses between 32 and 37 weeks of gestation. We measured amplitude changes in heart rate as our index of fetal response. At 35 to 37 weeks of gestation, the majority of fetuses showed a deceleratory response…

  2. Low-intensity infrared lasers alter actin gene expression in skin and muscle tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonseca, A. S.; Mencalha, A. L.; Campos, V. M. A.; Ferreira-Machado, S. C.; Peregrino, A. A. F.; Magalhães, L. A. G.; Geller, M.; Paoli, F.

    2013-02-01

    The biostimulative effect of low-intensity lasers is the basis for treatment of diseases in soft tissues. However, data about the influence of biostimulative lasers on gene expression are still scarce. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effects of low-intensity infrared lasers on the expression of actin mRNA in skin and muscle tissue. Skin and muscle tissue of Wistar rats was exposed to low-intensity infrared laser radiation at different fluences and frequencies. One and 24 hours after laser exposure, tissue samples were withdrawn for total RNA extraction, cDNA synthesis and evaluation of actin gene expression by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The data obtained show that laser radiation alters the expression of actin mRNA differently in skin and muscle tissue of Wistar rats depending of the fluence, frequency and time after exposure. The results could be useful for laser dosimetry, as well as to justify the therapeutic protocols for treatment of diseases of skin and muscle tissues based on low-intensity infrared laser radiation.

  3. Low-intensity red and infrared laser effects at high fluences on Escherichia coli cultures

    PubMed Central

    Barboza, L.L.; Campos, V.M.A.; Magalhães, L.A.G.; Paoli, F.; Fonseca, A.S.

    2015-01-01

    Semiconductor laser devices are readily available and practical radiation sources providing wavelength tenability and high monochromaticity. Low-intensity red and near-infrared lasers are considered safe for use in clinical applications. However, adverse effects can occur via free radical generation, and the biological effects of these lasers from unusually high fluences or high doses have not yet been evaluated. Here, we evaluated the survival, filamentation induction and morphology of Escherichia coli cells deficient in repair of oxidative DNA lesions when exposed to low-intensity red and infrared lasers at unusually high fluences. Cultures of wild-type (AB1157), endonuclease III-deficient (JW1625-1), and endonuclease IV-deficient (JW2146-1) E. coli, in exponential and stationary growth phases, were exposed to red and infrared lasers (0, 250, 500, and 1000 J/cm2) to evaluate their survival rates, filamentation phenotype induction and cell morphologies. The results showed that low-intensity red and infrared lasers at high fluences are lethal, induce a filamentation phenotype, and alter the morphology of the E. coli cells. Low-intensity red and infrared lasers have potential to induce adverse effects on cells, whether used at unusually high fluences, or at high doses. Hence, there is a need to reinforce the importance of accurate dosimetry in therapeutic protocols. PMID:26445339

  4. Study finds low-intensity therapy for Burkitt lymphoma highly effective

    Cancer.gov

    Adult patients with a type of cancer known as Burkitt lymphoma had excellent long-term survival rates—upwards of 90 percent—following treatment with low-intensity chemotherapy regimens, according to a new clinical trial finding. Burkitt lymphoma is the mo

  5. Low-intensity red and infrared laser effects at high fluences on Escherichia coli cultures.

    PubMed

    Barboza, L L; Campos, V M A; Magalhães, L A G; Paoli, F; Fonseca, A S

    2015-10-01

    Semiconductor laser devices are readily available and practical radiation sources providing wavelength tenability and high monochromaticity. Low-intensity red and near-infrared lasers are considered safe for use in clinical applications. However, adverse effects can occur via free radical generation, and the biological effects of these lasers from unusually high fluences or high doses have not yet been evaluated. Here, we evaluated the survival, filamentation induction and morphology of Escherichia coli cells deficient in repair of oxidative DNA lesions when exposed to low-intensity red and infrared lasers at unusually high fluences. Cultures of wild-type (AB1157), endonuclease III-deficient (JW1625-1), and endonuclease IV-deficient (JW2146-1) E. coli, in exponential and stationary growth phases, were exposed to red and infrared lasers (0, 250, 500, and 1000 J/cm2) to evaluate their survival rates, filamentation phenotype induction and cell morphologies. The results showed that low-intensity red and infrared lasers at high fluences are lethal, induce a filamentation phenotype, and alter the morphology of the E. coli cells. Low-intensity red and infrared lasers have potential to induce adverse effects on cells, whether used at unusually high fluences, or at high doses. Hence, there is a need to reinforce the importance of accurate dosimetry in therapeutic protocols.

  6. Nucleotide excision repair pathway assessment in DNA exposed to low-intensity red and infrared lasers.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, A S; Campos, V M A; Magalhães, L A G; Paoli, F

    2015-10-01

    Low-intensity lasers are used for prevention and management of oral mucositis induced by anticancer therapy, but the effectiveness of treatment depends on the genetic characteristics of affected cells. This study evaluated the survival and induction of filamentation of Escherichia coli cells deficient in the nucleotide excision repair pathway, and the action of T4endonuclease V on plasmid DNA exposed to low-intensity red and near-infrared laser light. Cultures of wild-type (strain AB1157) E. coli and strain AB1886 (deficient in uvrA protein) were exposed to red (660 nm) and infrared (808 nm) lasers at various fluences, powers and emission modes to study bacterial survival and filamentation. Also, plasmid DNA was exposed to laser light to study DNA lesions produced in vitro by T4endonuclease V. Low-intensity lasers:i) had no effect on survival of wild-type E. coli but decreased the survival of uvrA protein-deficient cells,ii) induced bacterial filamentation, iii) did not alter the electrophoretic profile of plasmids in agarose gels, andiv) did not alter the electrophoretic profile of plasmids incubated with T4 endonuclease V. These results increase our understanding of the effects of laser light on cells with various genetic characteristics, such as xeroderma pigmentosum cells deficient in nucleotide excision pathway activity in patients with mucositis treated by low-intensity lasers.

  7. Low-intensity infrared laser radiation influence on the tumor growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheida, A. A.; Efimova, E. G.

    2005-08-01

    Infrared laser radiation of low intensity in exposition dose of 25-35 mJicm2 does not cause progress the tumor process. Moreover, disturbing the blood flow in the tumor due to changing synthesis of norepinephrine and histamine this radiation contributes to the damage of the tumor tissue accompanied by the beginning of adaptation reaction in the organism.

  8. Acceleration of the Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Corn Stover and Sugar Cane Bagasse Celluloses by Low Intensity Uniform Ultrasound

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The cost-competitive production of bio-ethanol and other biofuels is currently impeded, mostly by high cost and low efficiency of enzymatic hydrolysis of feedstock biomass and especially plant celluloses. Despite substantial reduction in the cost of production of cellulolytic enzymes in recent times...

  9. Acceleration of Enzymatic conversion of Agricultural Waste Biomass into Bio-fuels by Low Intensity Uniform Ultrasound Field

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    One of the most critical stages of conversion of agricultural waste biomass into biofuels employs hydrolysis reactions between highly specific enzymes and matching substrates (e.g. corn stover cellulose with cellulase) that produce soluble sugars, which then could be converted into ethanol. Despite ...

  10. Salivary Cortisol Responses and Perceived Exertion during High Intensity and Low Intensity Bouts of Resistance Exercise

    PubMed Central

    McGuigan, Michael R.; Egan, Alison D.; Foster, Carl

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure the salivary cortisol response to different intensities of resistance exercise. In addition, we wanted to determine the reliability of the session rating of perceived exertion (RPE) scale to monitor resistance exercise intensity. Subjects (8 men, 9 women) completed 2 trials of acute resistance training bouts in a counterbalanced design. The high intensity resistance exercise protocol consisted of six, ten-repetition sets using 75% of one repetition maximum (RM) on a Smith machine squat and bench press exercise (12 sets total). The low intensity resistance exercise protocol consisted of three, ten-repetition sets at 30% of 1RM of the same exercises as the high intensity protocol. Both exercise bouts were performed with 2 minutes of rest between each exercise and sessions were repeated to test reliability of the measures. The order of the exercise bouts was randomized with least 72 hours between each session. Saliva samples were obtained immediately before, immediately after and 30 mins following each resistance exercise bout. RPE measures were obtained using Borg’s CR-10 scale following each set. Also, the session RPE for the entire exercise session was obtained 30 minutes following completion of the session. There was a significant 97% increase in the level of salivary cortisol immediately following the high intensity exercise session (P<0.05). There was also a significant difference in salivary cortisol of 145% between the low intensity and high intensity exercise session immediately post-exercise (P<0.05). The low intensity exercise did not result in any significant changes in cortisol levels. There was also a significant difference between the session RPE values for the different intensity levels (high intensity 7.1 vs. low intensity 1.9) (P<0.05). The intraclass correlation coefficient for the session RPE measure was 0.95. It was concluded that the session RPE method is a valid and reliable method of quantifying

  11. Low-intensity eccentric contractions attenuate muscle damage induced by subsequent maximal eccentric exercise of the knee extensors in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Chen, Trevor C; Tseng, Wei-Chin; Huang, Guan-Ling; Chen, Hsin-Lian; Tseng, Kou-Wei; Nosaka, Kazunori

    2013-04-01

    This study investigated whether low-intensity eccentric contractions of the knee extensors would attenuate the magnitude of muscle damage induced by maximal eccentric exercise of the same muscle performed 7 days later using elderly individuals. Healthy older men (66.4 ± 4.6 years) were assigned to control or experimental (Exp) group (n = 13 per group). The control group performed six sets of ten maximal eccentric contractions (MaxECC) of the knee extensors of non-dominant leg. The Exp group performed six sets of ten low-intensity eccentric contractions of the knee extensors on a leg extension machine by lowering a weight of 10 % maximal voluntary isometric knee extension strength (10 %ECC) 7 days prior to MaxECC. Changes in maximal voluntary isokinetic concentric torque (MVC-CON), angle at peak torque, range of motion (ROM), upper thigh circumference, muscle soreness, plasma creatine kinase activity and myoglobin (Mb) concentration and B-mode ultrasound echo-intensity before and for 5 days after MaxECC were compared between groups by a mixed factor ANOVA. No significant changes in any variables were observed following 10 %ECC. Following MaxECC, all variables changed significantly, and changes in all variables except for angle at peak torque were significantly different between groups. MVC-CON and ROM decreased smaller and recovered faster (P < 0.05) for Exp than control group, and changes in other variables were smaller (P < 0.05) for Exp group compared with control group. These results suggest that preconditioning knee extensor muscles with low-intensity eccentric contractions was effective for attenuating muscle damage induced by subsequent MaxECC of the knee extensors for elderly individuals.

  12. Cell-stimulation therapy of lateral epicondylitis with frequency-modulated low-intensity electric current.

    PubMed

    Aliyev, R M; Geiger, G

    2012-03-01

    In addition to the routine therapy, the patients with lateral epicondylitis included into experimental group were subjected to a 12-week cell-stimulation therapy with low-intensity frequency-modulated electric current. The control group received the same routine therapy and sham stimulation (the therapeutic apparatus was not energized). The efficiency of this microcurrent therapy was estimated by comparing medical indices before therapy and at the end of a 12-week therapeutic course using a 10-point pain severity numeric rating scale (NRS) and Roles-Maudsley pain score. The study revealed high therapeutic efficiency of cell-stimulation with low-intensity electric current resulting probably from up-regulation of intracellular transmitters, interleukins, and prostaglandins playing the key role in the regulation of inflammation.

  13. [The application of low-intensity electromagnetic radiation under immobilization stress conditions (an experimental study)].

    PubMed

    Korolev, Iu N; Bobrovnitskiĭ, I P; Nikoulina, L A; Mikhaĭlik, L V; Geniatulina, M S; Bobkova, A S

    2014-01-01

    The experiments carried out on outbred male white rats with the use of optical, electron-microscopic, biochemical, and radioimmunological methods have demonstrated that the application of low-intensity electromagnetic radiation (LI-EMR) with a flow density of 1 mcW/cm2 and a frequency of around 1,000 MHz both in the primary prophylaxis regime and as the therapeuticpreventive modality arrested the development of post-stress disorders in the rat testicles, liver, and thymus; moreover, it promoted activation of the adaptive, preventive, and compensatory processes. The data obtained provide a rationale for the application of low-intensity electromagnetic radiation to protect the organism from negative effects of stressful factors.

  14. Application of low-intensity laser in the treatment of Herpes simplex recidivans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uzunov, Tzonko T.; Uzunov, T.; Grozdanova, R.

    2004-06-01

    We made our aim to investigate the effect of the low intensive laser with λ=630 nm in the visible red spectrum of light at Herpes simplex treatment. For this purpose we carried out a clinical research upon 62 persons with Herpes simplex lesions which have been divided into two groups of 31 persons. At the first group the effect of laser with power density 100 mW/cm2 +/- 5 mW/cm2 and time of exposure 3 min. on field was traced out. At the second group the low intensive laser with the same characteristics has been used but in combination with the patent medicine Granofurin H as a photosensibilizer. The clinical approbations of this method showed high therapeutical effectiveness. The obtained results showed that at both groups there is an expressed anaesthetic, anti-inflammatory and regeneration stimulating effect and at the second group with the use of Granofurin H the reconvalescent period is shorter.

  15. Recovery of damaged skeletal muscle in mdx mice through low-intensity endurance exercise.

    PubMed

    Frinchi, M; Macaluso, F; Licciardi, A; Perciavalle, V; Coco, M; Belluardo, N; Morici, G; Mudò, G

    2014-01-01

    The lack of dystrophin in mdx mice leads to cycles of muscle degeneration and regeneration processes. Various strategies have been proposed in order to reduce the muscle-wasting component of muscular dystrophy, including implementation of an exercise programme. The aim of this study was to examine how low-intensity endurance exercise affects the degeneration-regeneration process in dystrophic muscle of male mdx mice. Mice were subjected to low-intensity endurance exercise by running on a motorized Rota-Rod for 5 days/week for 6 weeks. Histomorphological analysis showed a significant reduction of measured inflammatory-necrotic areas in both gastrocnemius and quadriceps muscle of exercised mdx mice as compared to matched sedentary mdx mice. The degenerative-regenerative process was also evaluated by examining the protein levels of connexin 39 (Cx39), a specific gene expressed in injured muscles. Cx39 was not detected in sedentary wild type mice, whereas it was found markedly increased in sedentary mdx mice, revealing active muscle degeneration-regeneration process. These Cx39 protein levels were significantly reduced in muscles of mdx mice exercised for 30 and 40 days, revealing together with histomorphological analysis a strong reduction of degeneration process in mice subjected to low-intensity endurance exercise. Muscles of exercised mdx mice did not show significant changes in force and fatigue resistance as compared to sedentary mdx mice. Overall in this study we found that specific low-intensity endurance exercise induces a beneficial effect probably by reducing the degeneration of dystrophic muscle.

  16. Effect of low-intensity infrared and millimeter radiation on higher plants' biopotentials.

    PubMed

    Mironova, E A; Romanovskii, Y M

    2001-01-01

    This article studies the effect of local low-intensity electromagnetic radiation on the bioelectric responses of plants. In our investigation, we used thirty-three wavelengths in the visible and infrared spectrurm regions as well as three wavelengths in the millimeter spectrum region. As a result, we obtained the bioelectric responses of plants to electromagnetic radiation not only in the absorption region of cellular pigments (such as chlorophyll, flavin, and phytochrome) but also in the absorption region of water molecules.

  17. Low-intensity resistance training attenuates dexamethasone-induced atrophy in the flexor hallucis longus muscle.

    PubMed

    Macedo, Anderson G; Krug, André L O; Herrera, Naiara A; Zago, Anderson S; Rush, James W E; Amaral, Sandra L

    2014-09-01

    This study investigated the potential protective effect of low-intensity resistance training (RT) against dexamethasone (DEX) treatment induced muscle atrophy. Rats underwent either an 8 week period of ladder climbing RT or remained sedentary. During the last 10 days of the exercise protocol, animals were submitted to a DEX treatment or a control saline injection. Muscle weights were assessed and levels of AKT, mTOR, FOXO3a, Atrogin-1 and MuRF-1 proteins were analyzed in flexor hallucis longus (FHL), tibialis anterior (TA), and soleus muscles. DEX induced blood glucose increase (+46%), body weight reduction (-19%) and atrophy in FHL (-28%) and TA (-21%) muscles, which was associated with a decrease in AKT and an increase in MuRF-1 proteins levels. Low-intensity RT prevented the blood glucose increase, attenuated the FHL atrophy effects of DEX, and was associated with increased mTOR and reductions in Atrogin-1 and MuRF-1 in FHL. In contrast, TA muscle atrophy and signaling proteins were not affected by RT. These are the first data to demonstrate that low-intensity ladder-climbing RT specifically mitigates the FHL atrophy, which is the main muscle recruited during the training activity, while not preventing atrophy in other limb muscle not as heavily recruited. The recruitment-dependent prevention of atrophy by low intensity RT likely occurs by a combination of attenuated muscle protein degradation signals and enhanced muscle protein synthesis signals including mTOR, Atrogin-1 and MuRF-1.

  18. Low-intensity red and infrared lasers on XPA and XPC gene expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonseca, A. S.; Magalhães, L. A. G.; Mencalha, A. L.; Ferreira-Machado, S. C.; Geller, M.; Paoli, F.

    2014-09-01

    Laser devices emit monochromatic, coherent, and highly collimated intense beams of light that are useful for a number of biomedical applications. However, for low-intensity lasers, possible adverse effects of laser light on DNA are still controversial. In this work, the expression of XPA and XPC genes in skin and muscle tissue exposed to low-intensity red and infrared lasers was evaluated. Skin and muscle tissue of Wistar rats were exposed to low-intensity red and infrared lasers at different fluences in continuous mode emission. Skin and muscle tissue samples were withdrawn for total RNA extraction, cDNA synthesis, and evaluation of actin gene expression by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Data obtained show that laser radiation alters the expression of XPA and XPC mRNA differently in skin and muscle tissue of Wistar rats, depending on physical (fluence and wavelength) and biological (tissue) parameters. Laser light could modify expression of genes related to the nucleotide excision repair pathway at fluences and wavelengths used in clinical protocols.

  19. Effects of low-intensity laser therapy over mini-implants success rate in pigs.

    PubMed

    Garcez, Aguinaldo S; Suzuki, Selly Sayuri; Martinez, Elisabeth Ferreira; Iemini, Mylene Garcez; Suzuki, Hideo

    2015-02-01

    The success rate of miniscrews when used as temporary orthodontic anchorage is relatively high, but some factors could affect its clinical success such as inflammation around the miniscrew. Low-intensity laser therapy has been widely used for biostimulation of tissue and wound healing specially for its anti-inflammatory effects. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of low-intensity laser therapy over the miniscrew success rate. Five Landrace's pigs received 50 miniscrews on the buccal side of the mandible and on the palate of the maxilla. All the miniscrews were immediately loaded with 250 gf. The laser group were irradiated with a 780-nm diode laser with 70 mWs for 1 min (dose = 34 J/cm(2)); the contralateral side was used as the control group. The miniscrews were photographed and analyzed clinically every week to determine their stability and presence of local inflammation. After 3 weeks, histological analysis and fluorescent microscopy were performed to compare the laser and the control side. Clinical results showed a success rate of 60% for the control group and 80% for the laser-treated group. The histological analysis and fluorescent microscopy demonstrated that the laser group had less inflammatory cells than the control group and the bone neoformation around the miniscrew was more intense. Low-intensity laser therapy increased the success rate of orthodontic miniscrews, probably due to anti-inflammatory effect and bone stimulation. PMID:23929562

  20. The effects of a low-intensity red laser on bacterial growth, filamentation and plasmid DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roos, C.; Santos, J. N.; Guimarães, O. R.; Geller, M.; Paoli, F.; Fonseca, A. S.

    2013-07-01

    Exposure of nonphotosynthesizing microorganisms to light could increase cell division in cultures, a phenomenon denominated as biostimulation. However, data concerning the importance of the genetic characteristics of cells on this effect are as yet scarce. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effects of a low-intensity red laser on the growth, filamentation and plasmids in Escherichia coli cells proficient and deficient in DNA repair. E. coli cultures were exposed to a laser (658 nm, 10 mW, 1 and 8 J cm-2) to study bacterial growth and filamentation. Also, bacterial cultures hosting pBSK plasmids were exposed to the laser to study DNA topological forms from the electrophoretic profile in agarose gels. Data indicate the low-intensity red laser: (i) had no effect on the growth of E. coli wild type and exonuclease III deficient cells; (ii) induced bacterial filamentation, (iii) led to no alteration in the electrophoretic profile of plasmids from exonuclease III deficient cells, but plasmids from wild type cells were altered. A low-intensity red laser at the low fluences used in phototherapy has no effect on growth, but induces filamentation and alters the topological forms of plasmid DNA in E. coli cultures depending on the DNA repair mechanisms.

  1. Low intensity infrared laser affects expression of oxidative DNA repair genes in mitochondria and nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonseca, A. S.; Magalhães, L. A. G.; Mencalha, A. L.; Geller, M.; Paoli, F.

    2014-11-01

    Practical properties and physical characteristics of low intensity lasers have made possible their application to treat soft tissue diseases. Excitation of intracellular chromophores by red and infrared radiation at low energy fluences with increase of mitochondrial metabolism is the basis of the biostimulation effect but free radicals can be produced. DNA lesions induced by free radicals are repaired by the base excision repair pathway. In this work, we evaluate the expression of POLγ and APEX2 genes related to repair of mitochondrial and nuclear DNA, respectively. Skin and muscle tissue of Wistar rats were exposed to low intensity infrared laser at different fluences. One hour and 24 hours after laser exposure, tissue samples were withdrawn for total RNA extraction, cDNA synthesis, and evaluation of POLγ and APEX2 mRNA expression by real time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Skin and muscle tissue of Wistar rats exposed to laser radiation show different expression of POLγ and APEX2 mRNA depending of the fluence and time after exposure. Our study suggests that a low intensity infrared laser affects expression of genes involved in repair of oxidative lesions in mitochondrial and nuclear DNA.

  2. Low intensity microwave radiation induced oxidative stress, inflammatory response and DNA damage in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Megha, Kanu; Deshmukh, Pravin Suryakantrao; Banerjee, Basu Dev; Tripathi, Ashok Kumar; Ahmed, Rafat; Abegaonkar, Mahesh Pandurang

    2015-12-01

    Over the past decade people have been constantly exposed to microwave radiation mainly from wireless communication devices used in day to day life. Therefore, the concerns over potential adverse effects of microwave radiation on human health are increasing. Until now no study has been proposed to investigate the underlying causes of genotoxic effects induced by low intensity microwave exposure. Thus, the present study was undertaken to determine the influence of low intensity microwave radiation on oxidative stress, inflammatory response and DNA damage in rat brain. The study was carried out on 24 male Fischer 344 rats, randomly divided into four groups (n=6 in each group): group I consisted of sham exposed (control) rats, group II-IV consisted of rats exposed to microwave radiation at frequencies 900, 1800 and 2450 MHz, specific absorption rates (SARs) 0.59, 0.58 and 0.66 mW/kg, respectively in gigahertz transverse electromagnetic (GTEM) cell for 60 days (2h/day, 5 days/week). Rats were sacrificed and decapitated to isolate hippocampus at the end of the exposure duration. Low intensity microwave exposure resulted in a frequency dependent significant increase in oxidative stress markers viz. malondialdehyde (MDA), protein carbonyl (PCO) and catalase (CAT) in microwave exposed groups in comparison to sham exposed group (p<0.05). Whereas, levels of reduced glutathione (GSH) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were found significantly decreased in microwave exposed groups (p<0.05). A significant increase in levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-2, IL-6, TNF-α, and IFN-γ) was observed in microwave exposed animal (p<0.05). Furthermore, significant DNA damage was also observed in microwave exposed groups as compared to their corresponding values in sham exposed group (p<0.05). In conclusion, the present study suggests that low intensity microwave radiation induces oxidative stress, inflammatory response and DNA damage in brain by exerting a frequency dependent effect

  3. Children, Learning and Chronic Natural Disasters: How Does the Government of Dominica Address Education during Low-Intensity Hurricanes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Serrant, Ted Donaldson

    2013-01-01

    By the time today's Grade K students graduate high school in the Commonwealth of Dominica, they will have experienced five major and many low-intensity hurricanes (LIH). Between August and November each year, each hurricane, major or low-intensity, represents a major threat to their safety and schooling. This mixed-method case study investigated…

  4. Ultrasound stimulation increases proliferation of MC3T3-E1 preosteoblast-like cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Mechanical stimulation of bone increases bone mass and fracture healing, at least in part, through increases in proliferation of osteoblasts and osteoprogenitor cells. Researchers have previously performed in vitro studies of ultrasound-induced osteoblast proliferation but mostly used fixed ultrasound settings and have reported widely varying and inconclusive results. Here we critically investigated the effects of the excitation parameters of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) stimulation on proliferation of MC3T3-E1 preosteoblastic cells in monolayer cultures. Methods We used a custom-designed ultrasound exposure system to vary the key ultrasound parameters—intensity, frequency and excitation duration. MC3T3-E1 cells were seeded in 12-well cell culture plates. Unless otherwise specified, treated cells, in groups of three, were excited twice for 10 min with an interval of 24 h in between after cell seeding. Proliferation rates of these cells were determined using BrdU and MTS assays 24 h after the last LIPUS excitation. All data are presented as the mean ± standard error. The statistical significance was determined using Student's two-sample two-tailed t tests. Results Using discrete LIPUS intensities ranging from 1 to 500 mW/cm2 (SATA, spatial average-temporal average), we found that approximately 75 mW/cm2 produced the greatest increase in osteoblast proliferation. Ultrasound exposures at higher intensity (approximately 465 mW/cm2) significantly reduced proliferation in MC3T3-E1 cells, suggesting that high-intensity pulsed ultrasound may increase apoptosis or loss of adhesion in these cells. Variation in LIPUS frequency from 0.5 MHz to 5 MHz indicated that osteoblast proliferation rate was not frequency dependent. We found no difference in the increase in proliferation rate if LIPUS was applied for 30 min/day or 10 min/day, indicating a habituation response. Conclusion This study concludes that a short-term stimulation with optimum intensity

  5. Thyroid ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Vikas; Bano, Shahina

    2013-01-01

    Thyroid ultrasonography has established itself as a popular and useful tool in the evaluation and management of thyroid disorders. Advanced ultrasound techniques in thyroid imaging have not only fascinated the radiologists but also attracted the surgeons and endocrinologists who are using these techniques in their daily clinical and operative practice. This review provides an overview of indications for ultrasound in various thyroid diseases, describes characteristic ultrasound findings in these diseases, and illustrates major diagnostic pitfalls of thyroid ultrasound. PMID:23776892

  6. Hybrid use of combined and sequential delivery of growth factors and ultrasound stimulation in porous multilayer composite scaffolds to promote both vascularization and bone formation in bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Yan, Haoran; Liu, Xia; Zhu, Minghua; Luo, Guilin; Sun, Tao; Peng, Qiang; Zeng, Yi; Chen, Taijun; Wang, Yingying; Liu, Keliang; Feng, Bo; Weng, Jie; Wang, Jianxin

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a multilayer coating technology would be adopted to prepare a porous composite scaffold and the growth factor release and ultrasound techniques were introduced into bone tissue engineering to finally solve the problems of vascularization and bone formation in the scaffold whilst the designed multilayer composite with gradient degradation characteristics in the space was used to match the new bone growth process better. The results of animal experiments showed that the use of low intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) combined with growth factors demonstrated excellent capabilities and advantages in both vascularization and new bone formation in bone tissue engineering. The degradation of the used scaffold materials could match new bone formation very well. The results also showed that only RGD-promoted cell adhesion was insufficient to satisfy the needs of new bone formation while growth factors and LIPUS stimulation were the key factors in new bone formation.

  7. Sex difference in substrate oxidation during low-intensity isometric exercise in young adults.

    PubMed

    Sarafian, Delphine; Schutz, Yves; Montani, Jean-Pierre; Dulloo, Abdul G; Miles-Chan, Jennifer L

    2016-09-01

    Low-intensity physical activity is increasingly promoted as an alternative to sedentary behavior. However, much research to date has focused on moderate- to vigorous-intensity physical activity, and in particular dynamic work, with the effect of low-intensity isometric exercise (<4 METs) on substrate utilization yet to be explored. Here we investigate the effects of such exercise on respiratory quotient (RQ) and determine the extent of intra- and inter-individual variability in response. Energy expenditure, RQ, and substrate oxidation were measured by ventilated-hood indirect calorimetry at rest and in response to standardized, intermittent, low-level isometric leg-press exercises at 5 loads (+5, +10, +15, +20, +25 kg) in 26 healthy, young adults. Nine participants repeated the experiment on 3 separate days to assess within-subject, between-day variability. There was no significant difference in energy cost and heart rate responses to low-intensity isometric exercise (<2 METs) between men and women. However, a sex difference was apparent in terms of substrate oxidation - with men increasing both fat and carbohydrate oxidation, and women only increasing fat oxidation while maintaining carbohydrate oxidation at baseline, resting levels. This sex difference was repeatable and persisted when substrate oxidation was adjusted for differences in body weight or body composition. Individual variability in RQ was relatively low, with both intra- and inter-individual coefficients of variation in the range of 3%-6% in both sexes. These results suggest that women preferentially increase fat oxidation during low-level isometric exercise. Whether such physical activity could be incorporated into treatment/prevention strategies aimed at optimizing fat oxidation in women warrants further investigation.

  8. The effects of low-intensity laser irradiation on the fatigue induced by dysfunction of mitochondria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiao-Yang; Liu, Timon C.; Duan, Rui; Liu, Xiao-Guang

    2003-12-01

    Exercise-induced fatigue has long been an important field in sports medicine. The electron leak of mitochondrial respiratory chain during the ATP synthesis integrated with proton leak and O-.2 can decrease the efficiency of ATP synthesis in mitochondria. And the exercise-induced fatigue occur followed by the decrease of performance. If the dysfunction of mitochondria can be avoided, the fatigue during the exercise may be delayed and the performance may be enhanced. Indeed there are some kind of materials can partially prevent the decrease of ATP synthesis efficiency in mitochondria. But the side effects and safety of these materials is still needed to be studied. Low intensity laser can improve the mitochondria function. It is reasonable to consider that low intensity laser therapy may become the new and more effective way to delay or elimination the fatigue induced by dysfunction of mitochondria. Because the effect of laser irradiation may not be controlled exactly when study in vivo, we use electrical stimulation of C2C12 muscle cells in culture to define the effect of low intensity laser on the dysfunction of mitochondria, and to define the optimal laser intensity to prevent the decrease of ATP synthesis efficiency. Our study use the C2C12 muscle cells in culture to define some of the mechanisms involved in the contractile-induced changes of mitochondrial function firstly in sports medicine and may suggest a useful study way to other researchers. We also give a new way to delay or eliminating the fatigue induced by dysfunction of mitochondria without side effect.

  9. Sex difference in substrate oxidation during low-intensity isometric exercise in young adults.

    PubMed

    Sarafian, Delphine; Schutz, Yves; Montani, Jean-Pierre; Dulloo, Abdul G; Miles-Chan, Jennifer L

    2016-09-01

    Low-intensity physical activity is increasingly promoted as an alternative to sedentary behavior. However, much research to date has focused on moderate- to vigorous-intensity physical activity, and in particular dynamic work, with the effect of low-intensity isometric exercise (<4 METs) on substrate utilization yet to be explored. Here we investigate the effects of such exercise on respiratory quotient (RQ) and determine the extent of intra- and inter-individual variability in response. Energy expenditure, RQ, and substrate oxidation were measured by ventilated-hood indirect calorimetry at rest and in response to standardized, intermittent, low-level isometric leg-press exercises at 5 loads (+5, +10, +15, +20, +25 kg) in 26 healthy, young adults. Nine participants repeated the experiment on 3 separate days to assess within-subject, between-day variability. There was no significant difference in energy cost and heart rate responses to low-intensity isometric exercise (<2 METs) between men and women. However, a sex difference was apparent in terms of substrate oxidation - with men increasing both fat and carbohydrate oxidation, and women only increasing fat oxidation while maintaining carbohydrate oxidation at baseline, resting levels. This sex difference was repeatable and persisted when substrate oxidation was adjusted for differences in body weight or body composition. Individual variability in RQ was relatively low, with both intra- and inter-individual coefficients of variation in the range of 3%-6% in both sexes. These results suggest that women preferentially increase fat oxidation during low-level isometric exercise. Whether such physical activity could be incorporated into treatment/prevention strategies aimed at optimizing fat oxidation in women warrants further investigation. PMID:27540628

  10. Untreated runoff quality from roof and road surfaces in a low intensity rainfall climate.

    PubMed

    Charters, Frances J; Cochrane, Thomas A; O'Sullivan, Aisling D

    2016-04-15

    Sediment and heavy metals in stormwater runoff are key pollutants of urban waterways, and their presence in stormwater is driven by climatic factors such as rainfall intensity. This study describes the total suspended solids (TSS) and heavy metal concentrations found in runoff from four different urban surfaces within a residential/institutional catchment, in a climate where rainfall is typically of low intensity (<5.1mm·h(-1)). The results were compared to untreated runoff quality from a compilation of international studies. The road runoff had the highest TSS concentrations, while copper and galvanized roof runoff had the highest copper and zinc concentrations, respectively. Pollutant concentrations were found to be significantly different between surfaces; quantification and prediction of pollutant contributions from urban surfaces should thus take account of the different surface materials, instead of being aggregated into more generalized categories such as land use. The TSS and heavy metal concentrations were found to be at the low to medium end of ranges observed internationally, except for total copper and zinc concentrations generated by dissolution of copper and galvanized roofing material respectively; these concentrations were at least as high as those reported internationally. TSS wash-off from the roofs was seen to be a source-limited process, where all available TSS is washed off during the rain event despite the low intensity rainfall, whereas both road TSS and heavy metals wash-off from roof and road surfaces appeared to all be transport-limited and therefore some carryover of pollutants occurs between rain events. A first flush effect was seen from most surfaces for TSS, but not for heavy metals. This study demonstrates that in low intensity rainfall climates, quantification of untreated runoff quality from key individual surface types in a catchment are needed to enable development of targeted and appropriately sized stormwater treatment systems

  11. Low-intensity infrared laser effects on zymosan-induced articular inflammatory response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Januária dos Anjos, Lúcia Mara; da Fonseca, Adenilson d. S.; Gameiro, Jacy; de Paoli, Flávia

    2015-03-01

    Low-level therapy laser is a phototherapy treatment that involves the application of low power light in the red or infrared wavelengths in various diseases such as arthritis. In this work, we investigated whether low-intensity infrared laser therapy could cause death by caspase-6 apoptosis or DNA damage pathways in cartilage cells after zymosaninduced articular inflammatory process. Inflammatory process was induced in C57BL/6 mouse by intra-articular injection of zymosan into rear tibio-tarsal joints. Thirty animals were divided in five groups: (I) control, (II) laser, (III) zymosan-induced, (IV) zymosan-induced + laser and (V). Laser exposure was performed after zymosan administration with low-intensity infrared laser (830 nm), power 10 mW, fluence 3.0 J/cm2 at continuous mode emission, in five doses. Twenty-four hours after last irradiation, the animals were sacrificed and the right joints fixed and demineralized. Morphological analysis was observed by hematoxylin and eosin stain, pro-apoptotic (caspase-6) was analyzed by immunocytochemistry and DNA fragmentation was performed by TUNEL assay in articular cartilage cells. Inflammatory process was observed in connective tissue near to articular cartilage, in IV and V groups, indicating zymosan effect. This process was decreased in both groups after laser treatment and dexamethasone. Although groups III and IV presented higher caspase-6 and DNA fragmentation percentages, statistical differences were not observed when compared to groups I and II. Our results suggest that therapies based on low-intensity infrared lasers could reduce inflammatory process and could not cause death by caspase-6 apoptosis or DNA damage pathways in cartilage cells after zymosan-induced articular inflammatory process.

  12. Untreated runoff quality from roof and road surfaces in a low intensity rainfall climate.

    PubMed

    Charters, Frances J; Cochrane, Thomas A; O'Sullivan, Aisling D

    2016-04-15

    Sediment and heavy metals in stormwater runoff are key pollutants of urban waterways, and their presence in stormwater is driven by climatic factors such as rainfall intensity. This study describes the total suspended solids (TSS) and heavy metal concentrations found in runoff from four different urban surfaces within a residential/institutional catchment, in a climate where rainfall is typically of low intensity (<5.1mm·h(-1)). The results were compared to untreated runoff quality from a compilation of international studies. The road runoff had the highest TSS concentrations, while copper and galvanized roof runoff had the highest copper and zinc concentrations, respectively. Pollutant concentrations were found to be significantly different between surfaces; quantification and prediction of pollutant contributions from urban surfaces should thus take account of the different surface materials, instead of being aggregated into more generalized categories such as land use. The TSS and heavy metal concentrations were found to be at the low to medium end of ranges observed internationally, except for total copper and zinc concentrations generated by dissolution of copper and galvanized roofing material respectively; these concentrations were at least as high as those reported internationally. TSS wash-off from the roofs was seen to be a source-limited process, where all available TSS is washed off during the rain event despite the low intensity rainfall, whereas both road TSS and heavy metals wash-off from roof and road surfaces appeared to all be transport-limited and therefore some carryover of pollutants occurs between rain events. A first flush effect was seen from most surfaces for TSS, but not for heavy metals. This study demonstrates that in low intensity rainfall climates, quantification of untreated runoff quality from key individual surface types in a catchment are needed to enable development of targeted and appropriately sized stormwater treatment systems.

  13. Photochemical mechanisms of biological action of low-intensity laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klebanov, Gennady I.; Poltanov, Evgeny A.

    2004-08-01

    Low-intensity laser irradiation (LILI) is effectively used in clinical practice but the mechanisms of its stimulating action are still far from being understood completely and considered in the scientific literature only hypothetically. The main effects of LILI proved both in clinics and in experiments are bactericidal effect, vasodilatation, improved microcirculation, formation and growth of new microvessels, acceleration of wound healing, relieving of pain syndrome. We put forward a free radical conception underlying these effects. In this paper the experimental evidences of this conception is considered.

  14. Scintillating screens sensitivity and resolution studies for low energy, low intensity beam diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Harasimowicz, Janusz; Cosentino, Luigi; Finocchiaro, Paolo; Pappalardo, Alfio; Welsch, Carsten P

    2010-10-01

    In order to investigate the limits of scintillating screens for beam profile monitoring in the ultra-low energy, ultra-low intensity regime, CsI:Tl, YAG:Ce, and a Tb glass-based scintillating fiber optic plate (SFOP) were tested. The screens response to 200 and 50 keV proton beams with intensities ranging from a few picoampere down to the subfemtoampere region was examined. In the following paper, the sensitivity and resolution studies are presented in detail for CsI:Tl and the SFOP, the two most sensitive screens. In addition, a possible use of scintillators for ultra-low energy antiproton beam monitoring is discussed.

  15. Results of using low-intensity laser radiation for plumbum intoxication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dejneka, S. Y.

    1999-11-01

    We have studied the noninvasive effect of low-intensive laser impulse radiation in the infrared spectrum region on the liver projection site in experimental lead intoxication achieved by means of intragastric administration of Pb acetate to albino rats over a period of 30 days in a dose of 30 mg/kg. We determined a number of indices in laboratory animals which characterized the state of the nervous system, immune system, muscular performance efficiency. We have also investigated the hematologic indices and the blood and urinary delta-aminolevulinic acid content as well as the plumbum levels in the blood, urine and the animals' inner organs.

  16. Ultrasound Enhancement of Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Cellulose Plant Matter

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The work reported here is based on acceleration of enzymatic hydrolysis of plant biomass substrate by introduction of low intensity, uniform ultrasound field into a reaction chamber (bio-reactor). This method may serve as improvement of rates in the hydrolysis of cellulosic materials to sugars, whi...

  17. Cognitive impairment and neurogenotoxic effects in rats exposed to low-intensity microwave radiation.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Pravin Suryakantrao; Nasare, Namita; Megha, Kanu; Banerjee, Basu Dev; Ahmed, Rafat Sultana; Singh, Digvijay; Abegaonkar, Mahesh Pandurang; Tripathi, Ashok Kumar; Mediratta, Pramod Kumari

    2015-01-01

    The health hazard of microwave radiation (MWR) has become a recent subject of interest as a result of the enormous increase in mobile phone usage. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of chronic low-intensity microwave exposure on cognitive function, heat shock protein 70 (HSP70), and DNA damage in rat brain. Experiments were performed on male Fischer rats exposed to MWR for 180 days at 3 different frequencies, namely, 900, 1800 MHz, and 2450 MHz. Animals were divided into 4 groups: group I: sham exposed; group II: exposed to MWR at 900 MHz, specific absorption rate (SAR) 5.953 × 10(-4) W/kg; group III: exposed to 1800 MHz, SAR 5.835 × 10(-4) W/kg; and group IV: exposed to 2450 MHz, SAR 6.672 × 10(-4) W/kg. All the rats were tested for cognitive function at the end of the exposure period and were subsequently sacrificed to collect brain. Level of HSP70 was estimated by enzyme-linked immunotarget assay and DNA damage was assessed using alkaline comet assay in all the groups. The results showed declined cognitive function, elevated HSP70 level, and DNA damage in the brain of microwave-exposed animals. The results indicated that, chronic low-intensity microwave exposure in the frequency range of 900 to 2450 MHz may cause hazardous effects on the brain. PMID:25749756

  18. Low-intensity laser therapy to treat dentin hypersensitivity: comparative clinical study using different light doses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lizarelli, Rosane F. Z.; Mazzetto, Marcello O.; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.

    2001-04-01

    Dentin hypersensitivity is the most common patient's complain related to pain. In fact, this is a challenge to treat specially if conventional techniques are used. The possibility to treat pain through a low intensity laser gives us an opportunity to solve this important clinical problem without promote a discomfort to patient. The main point here is not if this kind of treatment is anti- inflammatory to pulp and/or biostimulatory to production of irregular secondary dentin. The most important point here is to understand how much energy is necessary to reach conditions where to tooth become insensible to external stimulus. Our double-blinded study compared a group without laser (Placebo) with five other groups where different doses at 660 nm low intensity laser were employed. The final conclusion is that for 660 nm laser therapy, the doses from 0.13 to 2.0 J/cm2 were more efficiency than the others. The follow up care in this study was of 45 days.

  19. Cardiorespiratory alterations induced by low-intensity exercise performed in water or on land.

    PubMed

    Ayme, Karine; Rossi, Pascal; Gavarry, Olivier; Chaumet, Guillaume; Boussuges, Alain

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the cardiorespiratory alterations induced by a low-intensity exercise performed on land or in water. Sixteen healthy subjects were investigated. The exercise consisted of a 1-h period of ergocycling at 35%-40% of peak oxygen uptake. Investigations were performed at rest and 45 min after the beginning of the exercises. Hemodynamic changes were studied by Doppler-echocardiography. Gas exchanges were continuously monitored by an oxygen gas analyzer. Blood samples were taken successively at baseline, within the last minutes of the exercise bout, and during recovery to measure total protein concentration and natriuretic peptides. Cardiovascular parameters were not significantly different during exercise performed on land or in water. As a result of an accelerated breathing frequency, ventilation output was significantly greater in water. Biological changes included a decrease in total protein concentration and an increase in natriuretic peptides in water. During low-intensity exercise, ventilatory alterations favoured increasing the work of breathing while in the water when compared with the same exercise performed on land. Hemodynamic changes were similar in the 2 conditions. Furthermore, biological findings suggest that the fluid transfer from intravascular sector toward interstitial sector could be facilitated in water.

  20. Outcomes and utilization of a low intensity workplace weight loss program.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Kelly M; Lovejoy, Jennifer C; Lange, Jane M; Hapgood, Jenny E; Zbikowski, Susan M

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is related to high health care costs and lost productivity in the workplace. Employers are increasingly sponsoring weight loss and wellness programs to ameliorate these costs. We evaluated weight loss outcomes, treatment utilization, and health behavior change in a low intensity phone- and web-based, employer-sponsored weight loss program. The intervention included three proactive counseling phone calls with a registered dietician and a behavioral health coach as well as a comprehensive website. At six months, one third of those who responded to the follow-up survey had lost a clinically significant amount of weight (≥5% of body weight). Clinically significant weight loss was predicted by the use of both the counseling calls and the website. When examining specific features of the web site, the weight tracking tool was the most predictive of weight loss. Health behavior changes such as eating more fruits and vegetables, increasing physical activity, and reducing stress were all predictive of clinically significant weight loss. Although limited by the low follow-up rate, this evaluation suggests that even low intensity weight loss programs can lead to clinical weight loss for a significant number of participants.

  1. Outcomes and Utilization of a Low Intensity Workplace Weight Loss Program

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, Kelly M.; Lovejoy, Jennifer C.; Lange, Jane M.; Hapgood, Jenny E.; Zbikowski, Susan M.

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is related to high health care costs and lost productivity in the workplace. Employers are increasingly sponsoring weight loss and wellness programs to ameliorate these costs. We evaluated weight loss outcomes, treatment utilization, and health behavior change in a low intensity phone- and web-based, employer-sponsored weight loss program. The intervention included three proactive counseling phone calls with a registered dietician and a behavioral health coach as well as a comprehensive website. At six months, one third of those who responded to the follow-up survey had lost a clinically significant amount of weight (≥5% of body weight). Clinically significant weight loss was predicted by the use of both the counseling calls and the website. When examining specific features of the web site, the weight tracking tool was the most predictive of weight loss. Health behavior changes such as eating more fruits and vegetables, increasing physical activity, and reducing stress were all predictive of clinically significant weight loss. Although limited by the low follow-up rate, this evaluation suggests that even low intensity weight loss programs can lead to clinical weight loss for a significant number of participants. PMID:24688791

  2. A constrained, total-variation minimization algorithm for low-intensity x-ray CT

    SciTech Connect

    Sidky, Emil Y.; Duchin, Yuval; Pan, Xiaochuan; Ullberg, Christer

    2011-05-15

    Purpose: The authors developed an iterative image-reconstruction algorithm for application to low-intensity computed tomography projection data, which is based on constrained, total-variation (TV) minimization. The algorithm design focuses on recovering structure on length scales comparable to a detector bin width. Methods: Recovering the resolution on the scale of a detector bin requires that pixel size be much smaller than the bin width. The resulting image array contains many more pixels than data, and this undersampling is overcome with a combination of Fourier upsampling of each projection and the use of constrained, TV minimization, as suggested by compressive sensing. The presented pseudocode for solving constrained, TV minimization is designed to yield an accurate solution to this optimization problem within 100 iterations. Results: The proposed image-reconstruction algorithm is applied to a low-intensity scan of a rabbit with a thin wire to test the resolution. The proposed algorithm is compared to filtered backprojection (FBP). Conclusions: The algorithm may have some advantage over FBP in that the resulting noise level is lowered at equivalent contrast levels of the wire.

  3. Blood Volume Changes Induced By Low-Intensity Intradialytic Exercise in Long-Term Hemodialysis Patients.

    PubMed

    Ookawara, Susumu; Miyazawa, Haruhisa; Ito, Kiyonori; Ueda, Yuichiro; Kaku, Yoshio; Hirai, Keiji; Hoshino, Taro; Mori, Honami; Yoshida, Izumi; Morishita, Yoshiyuki; Tabei, Kaoru

    2016-01-01

    Intradialytic exercise-induced blood volume (BV) reduction may cause intradialytic hypotension in hemodialysis (HD) patients. However, BV recovery time after intradialytic exercise remains unknown. Hemodialysis patients were recruited, and their relative BV change (%ΔBV) were measured with intradialytic exercise (n = 12). After confirming the linearity of %ΔBV for 30 min, patients exercised using a stationary cycle in the supine position. The target exercise intensity was a 10% increase in heart rate (HR), corresponding to relatively low-intensity exercise. Baseline %ΔBV (assumed baseline) were calculated for the 30 min before exercise using linear regression analysis. The mean intradialytic exercise start and end times after HD initiation were 93.0 ± 8.4 and 116.4 ± 8.3 min, respectively, a mean exercise duration of 23.5 ± 2.6 min. Percentage change in blood volume declined rapidly upon exercise initiation and gradually increased above the assumed baseline throughout HD. At the end of HD, %ΔBV in the exercise group was significantly higher than the assumed baseline (measured - assumed baseline %ΔBV: 2.17 ± 0.62%; p = 0.02). Intradialytic exercise with low intensity in the supine position attenuated ultrafiltration-induced BV reduction at the end of HD. Therefore, intradialytic exercise may prevent intradialytic hypotension during later HD, although its intensity was relatively low level. PMID:26720736

  4. Enhancement of invertase production by Aspergillus niger OZ-3 using low-intensity static magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Taskin, Mesut; Esim, Nevzat; Genisel, Mucip; Ortucu, Serkan; Hasenekoglu, Ismet; Canli, Ozden; Erdal, Serkan

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of low-intensity static magnetic fields (SMFs) on invertase activity and growth on different newly identified molds. The most positive effect of SMFs on invertase activity and growth was observed for Aspergillus niger OZ-3. The submerged production of invertase was performed with the spores obtained at the different exposure times (120, 144, 168, and 196 hr) and magnetic field intensities (0.45, 3, 5, 7, and 9 mT). The normal magnetic field of the laboratory was assayed as 0.45 mT (control). Optimization of magnetic field intensity and exposure time significantly increased biomass production and invertase activity compared to 0.45 mT. The maximum invertase activity (51.14 U/mL) and biomass concentration (4.36 g/L) were achieved with the spores obtained at the 144 hr exposure time and 5 mT magnetic field intensity. The effect of low-intensity static magnetic fields (SMFs) on invertase activities of molds was investigated for the first time in the present study. As an additional contribution, a new hyper-invertase-producing mold strain was isolated.

  5. Outcomes and utilization of a low intensity workplace weight loss program.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Kelly M; Lovejoy, Jennifer C; Lange, Jane M; Hapgood, Jenny E; Zbikowski, Susan M

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is related to high health care costs and lost productivity in the workplace. Employers are increasingly sponsoring weight loss and wellness programs to ameliorate these costs. We evaluated weight loss outcomes, treatment utilization, and health behavior change in a low intensity phone- and web-based, employer-sponsored weight loss program. The intervention included three proactive counseling phone calls with a registered dietician and a behavioral health coach as well as a comprehensive website. At six months, one third of those who responded to the follow-up survey had lost a clinically significant amount of weight (≥5% of body weight). Clinically significant weight loss was predicted by the use of both the counseling calls and the website. When examining specific features of the web site, the weight tracking tool was the most predictive of weight loss. Health behavior changes such as eating more fruits and vegetables, increasing physical activity, and reducing stress were all predictive of clinically significant weight loss. Although limited by the low follow-up rate, this evaluation suggests that even low intensity weight loss programs can lead to clinical weight loss for a significant number of participants. PMID:24688791

  6. Low-intensity electrical muscle stimulation induces significant increases in muscle strength and cardiorespiratory fitness.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Toshiaki; Kamada, Hiroyuki; Tamaki, Akira; Moritani, Toshio

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of low-intensity exercise training using belt electrode skeletal muscle electrical stimulation on muscle strength and cardiorespiratory fitness in healthy subjects. Nineteen healthy subjects were allocated into control or intervention groups; in both groups the participants kept regular physical activity while the intervention group underwent 30 min B-SES training at 3-4 METs for four weeks. Knee extensor muscle strength and cardiorespiratory endurance during incremental exercise test were measured at baseline and after four weeks for all participants. The relative change of knee extensor muscle strength in the intervention group was significantly higher than control group (p < .05). Also, oxygen uptake at ventilator threshold and peak oxygen uptake during incremental exercise test significantly increased in the intervention group when compared with control group (p < .05). This study showed that prolonged low-intensity B-SES training resulted in significant increases in muscle strength and cardiorespiratory fitness in healthy subjects. Our present work suggested that B-SES training could assist patients who might have difficulty performing adequate voluntary exercise because of excessive obesity, orthopaedic problems and chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. An intervention study conducted for such patients is strongly recommended.

  7. Cognitive impairment and neurogenotoxic effects in rats exposed to low-intensity microwave radiation.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Pravin Suryakantrao; Nasare, Namita; Megha, Kanu; Banerjee, Basu Dev; Ahmed, Rafat Sultana; Singh, Digvijay; Abegaonkar, Mahesh Pandurang; Tripathi, Ashok Kumar; Mediratta, Pramod Kumari

    2015-01-01

    The health hazard of microwave radiation (MWR) has become a recent subject of interest as a result of the enormous increase in mobile phone usage. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of chronic low-intensity microwave exposure on cognitive function, heat shock protein 70 (HSP70), and DNA damage in rat brain. Experiments were performed on male Fischer rats exposed to MWR for 180 days at 3 different frequencies, namely, 900, 1800 MHz, and 2450 MHz. Animals were divided into 4 groups: group I: sham exposed; group II: exposed to MWR at 900 MHz, specific absorption rate (SAR) 5.953 × 10(-4) W/kg; group III: exposed to 1800 MHz, SAR 5.835 × 10(-4) W/kg; and group IV: exposed to 2450 MHz, SAR 6.672 × 10(-4) W/kg. All the rats were tested for cognitive function at the end of the exposure period and were subsequently sacrificed to collect brain. Level of HSP70 was estimated by enzyme-linked immunotarget assay and DNA damage was assessed using alkaline comet assay in all the groups. The results showed declined cognitive function, elevated HSP70 level, and DNA damage in the brain of microwave-exposed animals. The results indicated that, chronic low-intensity microwave exposure in the frequency range of 900 to 2450 MHz may cause hazardous effects on the brain.

  8. [Novel dianostics and therapeutics with ultrasound technologies and nanotechnologies].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Ryo; Oda, Yusuke; Omata, Daiki; Sawaguchi, Yoshikazu; Negishi, Yoichi; Maruyama, Kazuo

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasound is a good tool for theranostics due to have multi-potency both of diagnostics with sonography and therapeutics with high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU). In addition, microbubbles and nanobubbles are utilized as not only contrast imaging agent but also enhancer of drug and gene delivery by combination of ultrasound. Recently, we developed novel liposomal nanobubbles (Bubble liposomes) which were containing perfluoropropane. Bubble liposomes induced jet stream by low intensity ultrasound exposure and resulted in enhancing permeability of cell membrane. This phenomenon has been utilized as driving force for drug and gene delivery. On the other hand, the combination of Bubble liposomes and high intensity ultrasound induces strong jet stream and increase temperature. This condition can directly damage to tumor cells, we are applying this for cancer therapy. Therefore, their combination has potency for various cancer therapies such as gene therapy, immunotherapy and hyperthermia. In this review, we discuss about cancer therapy by the combination of Bubble liposomes and ultrasound.

  9. Focused Ultrasound and Lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Teiichiro; Yoshizawa, Shin; Koizumi, Norihiro; Mitsuishi, Mamoru; Matsumoto, Yoichiro

    2016-01-01

    Shock wave lithotripsy has generally been a first choice for kidney stone removal. The shock wave lithotripter uses an order of microsecond pulse durations and up to a 100 MPa pressure spike triggered at approximately 0.5-2 Hz to fragment kidney stones through mechanical mechanisms. One important mechanism is cavitation. We proposed an alternative type of lithotripsy method that maximizes cavitation activity to disintegrate kidney stones using high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU). Here we outline the method according to the previously published literature (Matsumoto et al., Dynamics of bubble cloud in focused ultrasound. Proceedings of the second international symposium on therapeutic ultrasound, pp 290-299, 2002; Ikeda et al., Ultrasound Med Biol 32:1383-1397, 2006; Yoshizawa et al., Med Biol Eng Comput 47:851-860, 2009; Koizumi et al., A control framework for the non-invasive ultrasound the ragnostic system. Proceedings of 2009 IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robotics and Systems (IROS), pp 4511-4516, 2009; Koizumi et al., IEEE Trans Robot 25:522-538, 2009). Cavitation activity is highly unpredictable; thus, a precise control system is needed. The proposed method comprises three steps of control in kidney stone treatment. The first step is control of localized high pressure fluctuation on the stone. The second step is monitoring of cavitation activity and giving feedback on the optimized ultrasound conditions. The third step is stone tracking and precise ultrasound focusing on the stone. For the high pressure control we designed a two-frequency wave (cavitation control (C-C) waveform); a high frequency ultrasound pulse (1-4 MHz) to create a cavitation cloud, and a low frequency trailing pulse (0.5 MHz) following the high frequency pulse to force the cloud into collapse. High speed photography showed cavitation collapse on a kidney stone and shock wave emission from the cloud. We also conducted in-vitro erosion tests of model and natural

  10. Focused Ultrasound and Lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Teiichiro; Yoshizawa, Shin; Koizumi, Norihiro; Mitsuishi, Mamoru; Matsumoto, Yoichiro

    2016-01-01

    Shock wave lithotripsy has generally been a first choice for kidney stone removal. The shock wave lithotripter uses an order of microsecond pulse durations and up to a 100 MPa pressure spike triggered at approximately 0.5-2 Hz to fragment kidney stones through mechanical mechanisms. One important mechanism is cavitation. We proposed an alternative type of lithotripsy method that maximizes cavitation activity to disintegrate kidney stones using high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU). Here we outline the method according to the previously published literature (Matsumoto et al., Dynamics of bubble cloud in focused ultrasound. Proceedings of the second international symposium on therapeutic ultrasound, pp 290-299, 2002; Ikeda et al., Ultrasound Med Biol 32:1383-1397, 2006; Yoshizawa et al., Med Biol Eng Comput 47:851-860, 2009; Koizumi et al., A control framework for the non-invasive ultrasound the ragnostic system. Proceedings of 2009 IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robotics and Systems (IROS), pp 4511-4516, 2009; Koizumi et al., IEEE Trans Robot 25:522-538, 2009). Cavitation activity is highly unpredictable; thus, a precise control system is needed. The proposed method comprises three steps of control in kidney stone treatment. The first step is control of localized high pressure fluctuation on the stone. The second step is monitoring of cavitation activity and giving feedback on the optimized ultrasound conditions. The third step is stone tracking and precise ultrasound focusing on the stone. For the high pressure control we designed a two-frequency wave (cavitation control (C-C) waveform); a high frequency ultrasound pulse (1-4 MHz) to create a cavitation cloud, and a low frequency trailing pulse (0.5 MHz) following the high frequency pulse to force the cloud into collapse. High speed photography showed cavitation collapse on a kidney stone and shock wave emission from the cloud. We also conducted in-vitro erosion tests of model and natural

  11. Reduction of pain thresholds in fibromyalgia after very low-intensity magnetic stimulation: A double-blinded, randomized placebo-controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Maestú, Ceferino; Blanco, Manuel; Nevado, Angel; Romero, Julia; Rodríguez-Rubio, Patricia; Galindo, Javier; Lorite, Juan Bautista; de las Morenas, Francisco; Fernández-Argüelles, Pedro

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Exposure to electromagnetic fields has been reported to have analgesic and antinociceptive effects in several organisms. OBJECTIVE: To test the effect of very low-intensity transcranial magnetic stimulation on symptoms associated with fibromyalgia syndrome. METHODS: A double-blinded, placebo-controlled clinical trial was performed in the Sagrado Corazón Hospital, Seville, Spain. Female fibromyalgia patients (22 to 50 years of age) were randomly assigned to either a stimulation group or a sham group. The stimulation group (n=28) was stimulated using 8 Hz pulsed magnetic fields of very low intensity, while the sham group (n=26) underwent the same protocol without stimulation. Pressure pain thresholds before and after stimulation were determined using an algometer during the eight consecutive weekly sessions of the trial. In addition, blood serotonin levels were measured and patients completed questionnaires to monitor symptom evolution. RESULTS: A repeated-measures ANOVA indicated statistically significant improvement in the stimulation group compared with the control group with respect to somatosensory pain thresholds, ability to perform daily activities, perceived chronic pain and sleep quality. While improvement in pain thresholds was apparent after the first stimulation session, improvement in the other three measures occurred after the sixth week. No significant between-group differences were observed in scores of depression, fatigue, severity of headaches or serotonin levels. No adverse side effects were reported in any of the patients. CONCLUSIONS: Very low-intensity magnetic stimulation may represent a safe and effective treatment for chronic pain and other symptoms associated with fibromyalgia. PMID:24308025

  12. Impact of a low intensity controlled-fire in some chemical soil properties.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Murillo, Juan F.; Hueso-González, Paloma; Aranda-Gómez, Francisco; Damián Ruiz-Sinoga, José

    2014-05-01

    Some changes in chemical soil properties can be observed after fires of low intensities. pH and electric conductivity tend to increase, while C/N ratio decrease. In the case of organic matter, the content can increase due to the massive incorporation of necromass including, especially, plants and roots. The aim of this study is to assess the impact of low intensity and controlled fire in some soil properties in field conditions. El Pinarillo experimental area is located in South of Spain. Two set of closed plots were installed (24 m2: 12 m length x 2 m width). One of them was remained as control with the original vegetation cover (Mediterranean matorral: Rosmarinus officinalis, Cistus clusii, Lavandula stoechas, Chamaeropos humilis, Thymus baetica), and the other one was burnt in a controlled-fire in 2011. Weather conditions and water content of vegetation influenced in the intensity of fire (low). After the controlled-fire, soil surface sample (0-5 cm) were taken in both set of plots (B, burnt soil samples; C, control soil samples). Some soil chemical properties were analysed: organic matter content (OM), C/N ratio, pH and electrical conductivity (EC). Some changes were observed in B corroborating a controlled-fire of low intensity. pH remained equal after fire (B: pH=7.7±0.11; C: pH=7.7±0.04). An increment was obtained in the case of EC (B: EC=0.45 mScm-1±0.08 mScm-1; C: EC=0.35 mScm-1±0.07 mScm-1) and OM (B: OM=8.7%±3.8%; C: pH=7.3%±1.5%). Finally, C/N ratio decreased after fire respect to the control and initial conditions (B: C/N=39.0±14.6; C: C/N =46.5±10.2).

  13. Supraspinal fatigue impedes recovery from a low-intensity sustained contraction in old adults.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Tejin; Schlinder-Delap, Bonnie; Keller, Manda L; Hunter, Sandra K

    2012-03-01

    This study determined the contribution of supraspinal fatigue and contractile properties to the age difference in neuromuscular fatigue during and recovery from a low-intensity sustained contraction. Cortical stimulation was used to evoke measures of voluntary activation and muscle relaxation during and after a contraction sustained at 20% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) until task failure with elbow flexor muscles in 14 young adults (20.9 ± 3.6 yr, 7 men) and 14 old adults (71.6 ± 5.4 yr, 7 men). Old adults exhibited a longer time to task failure than the young adults (23.8 ± 9.0 vs. 11.5 ± 3.9 min, respectively, P < 0.001). The time to failure was associated with initial peak rates of relaxation of muscle fibers and pressor response (P < 0.05). Increments in torque (superimposed twitch; SIT) generated by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) during brief MVCs, increased during the fatiguing contraction (P < 0.001) and then decreased during recovery (P = 0.02). The increase in the SIT was greater for the old adults than the young adults during the fatiguing contraction and recovery (P < 0.05). Recovery of MVC torque was less for old than young adults at 10 min post-fatiguing contraction (75.1 ± 8.7 vs. 83.6 ± 7.8% of control MVC, respectively, P = 0.01) and was associated with the recovery of the SIT (r = -0.59, r(2) = 0.35, P < 0.001). Motor evoked potential (MEP) amplitude and the silent period elicited during the fatiguing contraction increased less for old adults than young adults (P < 0.05). The greater fatigue resistance with age during a low-intensity sustained contraction was attributable to mechanisms located within the muscle. Recovery of maximal strength after the low-intensity fatiguing contraction however, was impeded more for old adults than young because of greater supraspinal fatigue. Recovery of strength could be an important variable to consider in exercise prescription of old populations.

  14. Noninvasive pulsed focused ultrasound allows spatiotemporal control of targeted homing for multiple stem cell types in murine skeletal muscle and the magnitude of cell homing can be increased through repeated applications

    PubMed Central

    Burks, Scott R.; Ziadloo, Ali; Kim, Saejeong J.; Nguyen, Ben A.; Frank, Joseph A.

    2013-01-01

    Stem cells are promising therapeutics for cardiovascular diseases and intravenous injection is the most desirable route of administration clinically. Subsequent homing of exogenous stem cells to pathological loci is frequently required for therapeutic efficacy and is mediated by chemo attractants (cell adhesion molecules, cytokines, and growth factors). Homing processes are inefficient and depend on short-lived pathological inflammation that limits the window of opportunity for cell injections. Noninvasive pulsed focused ultrasound (plus), which emphasizes mechanical ultrasound-tissue interactions, can be precisely targeted in the body and is a promising approach to target and maximize stem cell delivery by stimulating chemo attractant expression in plus-treated tissue prior to cell infusions. We demonstrate that plus is nondestructive to marine skeletal muscle tissue (no necrosis, hemorrhage, or muscle stem cell activation) and initiates a largely M2-type macrophage response. We also demonstrate local up regulation of chemo attractants in plus-treated skeletal muscle leads to enhance homing, permeability, and retention of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) and human endothelial precursor cells (EPC). Furthermore, the magnitude of MSC or EPC homing was increased when plus treatments and cell infusions were repeated daily. This study demonstrates that plus defines transient “molecular zip codes” of elevated chemo attractants in targeted muscle tissue, which effectively provides spatiotemporal control and tenability of the homing process for multiple stem cell types. plus is a clinically-translatable modality that may ultimately improve homing efficiency and flexibility of cell therapies for cardiovascular diseases. PMID:23922277

  15. Low-intensity UV effects on optical constants of PMMA film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashidian, M.; Dorranian, D.

    2014-04-01

    Effects of low-intensity UV treatment on the optical constants of red BS dye-doped polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) film including refractive index, extinction coefficient, real and imaginary parts of dielectric constant, band gap energy, Urbach energy, and refractive index dispersion parameters are measured and calculated. Changes in optical constants mainly occurred in the UV-VIS range. Red BS dye, which is used as a UV absorber impurity in PMMA films, generated another energy band gap which was increased by UV treatment. Although some of the optical constants of PMMA are not changed noticeably by the treatment in this low range of UV radiation, our results confirm that polymeric changes such as chain scission and depolymerization can directly affect the optical constants of PMMA.

  16. Review of studies on modulating enzyme activity by low intensity electromagnetic radiation.

    PubMed

    Vojisavljevic, Vuk; Pirogova, Elena; Cosic, Irena

    2010-01-01

    This paper is a compilation of our findings on non-thermal effects of electromagnetic radiation (EMR) at the molecular level. The outcomes of our studies revealed that that enzymes' activity can be modulated by external electromagnetic fields (EMFs) of selected frequencies. Here, we discuss the possibility of modulating protein activity using visible and infrared light based on the concepts of protein activation outlined in the resonant recognition model (RRM), and by low intensity microwaves. The theoretical basis behind the RRM model expounds a potential interaction mechanism between electromagnetic radiation and proteins as well as protein-protein interactions. Possibility of modulating protein activity by external EMR is experimentally validated by irradiation of the L-lactate Dehydrogenase enzyme.

  17. Ultraviolet light attenuates vasospasm development: low-intensity 325-nm illumination in animal model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morimoto, Yuji; Nakai, Kanji; Arai, Tsunenori; Shima, Katsuji; Kikuchi, Makoto

    1999-06-01

    We studied whether prophylactic low-intensity ultraviolet light (UV) irradiation reduces development of delayed cerebral vasospasm in rabbit model. Eleven rabbits had carotid angiography and placement of silicon sheaths around the right common carotid artery (CCA). Just before the placement, CCAs of 6 in the 11 animals were adventitiously exposed to UV (10 mJ/mm2) emitted from a helium-cadmium laser (wavelength equals 325 nm). Sheaths were filled with autologous blood in all of 11 animals. Vasospasm developed 24 to 48 hours (Day 2) later. The CCA luminal diameter without UV irradiation was 77% of the Day 0 state. The prophylactic laser treatment reduced the development of vasospasm, 90% of the Day 0 state. Histological examination of the treated CCA revealed extended smooth muscle cells. There was no endothelial damage. These results suggest that UV is effective for prophylaxis of cerebral vasospasm.

  18. Low-intensity laser irradiation use for oral and lip precancer treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunin, Anatoly A.; Podolskaya, Elana E.; Stepanov, Nicolay N.; Petrov, Anatoly; Erina, Stanislava V.; Pankova, Svetlana N.

    1996-09-01

    Precancer and background diseases of the oral mucosa and lips, such as lichen planus, chronic ulcers and fissures, meteorological heilit, lupus erythematosus, after radiation heilit were treated by low-intensity laser irradiation. Laser therapy of the over-mentioned diseases was combined with medicinal treatment. All the patients were selected and treated in the limits of dispensary system. THe choice of diagnostic methods were made according to each concrete nosological form. A great attention was paid to the goal- directly sanitation of the oral cavity and treatment of attended internal diseases. The etiological factors were revealed and statistically analyzed. The results received during our researches demonstrated high effectiveness of laser irradiation combined with medicinal therapy in the treatment of oral mucosa and lips precancer diseases.

  19. Treatment of acute pancreatitis with mexidol and low-intensity laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parzyan, G. R.; Geinits, A. V.

    2001-04-01

    This article presents the results of treatment of 54 patients with acute pancreatitis. The patients were divided into two groups according to the method of treatment. The control group (26 patients) received a conventional therapy, whereas the experimental group (28 patients) received mexidol in combination with the intravenous laser irradiation of blood. Clinical and laboratory tests confirmed a high efficiency of the combined therapy based on the administration of mexidol antioxidant and low-intensity (lambda) equals 0.63 micrometers diode laser irradiation of blood. This therapeutic technique produced an influence on the basic pathogenetic mechanisms of acute pancreatitis. The application of this method of treatment improved the course and prognosis of acute pancreatitis.

  20. High-power and low-intensity noise laser at 1064  nm.

    PubMed

    Guiraud, Germain; Traynor, Nicholas; Santarelli, Giorgio

    2016-09-01

    We have developed a single-frequency, narrow-linewidth (Δν<50  kHz) laser operating at 1064 nm with a high output power (50 W). The laser is based on an ytterbium-doped fiber master oscillator power amplifier architecture with an output beam at the diffraction limit. An output power of 50 W is obtained with two amplification stages using a 50 mW diode laser seeder. We have carefully studied the relative intensity noise at each amplification stage. The detrimental effect due to stimulated Brillouin scattering on residual amplitude noise has been observed on the high-power booster stage. After careful optimization, this laser exhibits low intensity noise with a RMS value equal to 0.012% (1 kHz/10 MHz) at 50 W. PMID:27607967

  1. Solar cell design for avoiding LILT degradation. [low intensity, low temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stella, P. M.; Ctorry, G. T.

    1987-01-01

    Growing concerns about radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) performance potential, cost, safety, and availability have renewed interest in utilizing photovoltaic energy conversion for future JPL interplanetary missions such as the Mariner Mark II set. Although lightweight solar array technology has advanced to the point where it would appear to provide an alternative power source, anomalous silicon cell curve shape degradation at conditions of low intensity and low temperature (LILT) severely restricts photovoltaic applications for missions beyond 3 AU solar distance. In order to extend photovoltaic applications to distances of 5 AU, ways to minimize the deleterious impact of LILT cell degradation were investigated. These investigations have ranged from consideration of individual cell selection for LILT behavior to the examination of methods for reducing or eliminating cell LILT degradation by modifying the cell processing. Use of a partial oxide barrier between the cell n+ contacts and the silicon has been shown to reduce significantly both the occurrence and magnitude of the LILT degradation.

  2. Low Intensity Physical Exercise Attenuates Cardiac Remodeling and Myocardial Oxidative Stress and Dysfunction in Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Gimenes, C.; Gimenes, R.; Rosa, C. M.; Xavier, N. P.; Campos, D. H. S.; Fernandes, A. A. H.; Cezar, M. D. M.; Guirado, G. N.; Cicogna, A. C.; Takamoto, A. H. R.; Okoshi, M. P.; Okoshi, K.

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of a low intensity aerobic exercise protocol on cardiac remodeling and myocardial function in diabetic rats. Wistar rats were assigned into four groups: sedentary control (C-Sed), exercised control (C-Ex), sedentary diabetes (DM-Sed), and exercised diabetes (DM-Ex). Diabetes was induced by intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin. Rats exercised for 9 weeks in treadmill at 11 m/min, 18 min/day. Myocardial function was evaluated in left ventricular (LV) papillary muscles and oxidative stress in LV tissue. Statistical analysis was given by ANOVA or Kruskal-Wallis. Echocardiogram showed diabetic groups with higher LV diastolic diameter-to-body weight ratio and lower posterior wall shortening velocity than controls. Left atrium diameter was lower in DM-Ex than DM-Sed (C-Sed: 5.73 ± 0.49; C-Ex: 5.67 ± 0.53; DM-Sed: 6.41 ± 0.54; DM-Ex: 5.81 ± 0.50 mm; P < 0.05 DM-Sed vs C-Sed and DM-Ex). Papillary muscle function was depressed in DM-Sed compared to C-Sed. Exercise attenuated this change in DM-Ex. Lipid hydroperoxide concentration was higher in DM-Sed than C-Sed and DM-Ex. Catalase and superoxide dismutase activities were lower in diabetics than controls and higher in DM-Ex than DM-Sed. Glutathione peroxidase activity was lower in DM-Sed than C-Sed and DM-Ex. Conclusion. Low intensity exercise attenuates left atrium dilation and myocardial oxidative stress and dysfunction in type 1 diabetic rats. PMID:26509175

  3. Low-intensity daily walking activity is associated with hippocampal volume in older adults.

    PubMed

    Varma, Vijay R; Chuang, Yi-Fang; Harris, Gregory C; Tan, Erwin J; Carlson, Michelle C

    2015-05-01

    Hippocampal atrophy is associated with memory impairment and dementia and serves as a key biomarker in the preclinical stages of Alzheimer's disease. Physical activity, one of the most promising behavioral interventions to prevent or delay cognitive decline, has been shown to be associated with hippocampal volume; specifically increased aerobic activity and fitness may have a positive effect on the size of the hippocampus. The majority of older adults, however, are sedentary and have difficulty initiating and maintaining exercise programs. A modestly more active lifestyle may nonetheless be beneficial. This study explored whether greater objectively measured daily walking activity was associated with larger hippocampal volume. We additionally explored whether greater low-intensity walking activity, which may be related to leisure-time physical, functional, and social activities, was associated with larger hippocampal volume independent of exercise and higher-intensity walking activity. Segmentation of hippocampal volumes was performed using Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Brain's Software Library (FSL), and daily walking activity was assessed using a step activity monitor on 92, nondemented, older adult participants. After controlling for age, education, body mass index, cardiovascular disease risk factors, and the Mini Mental State Exam, we found that a greater amount, duration, and frequency of total daily walking activity were each associated with larger hippocampal volume among older women, but not among men. These relationships were specific to hippocampal volume, compared with the thalamus, used as a control brain region, and remained significant for low-intensity walking activity, independent of moderate- to vigorous-intensity activity and self-reported exercise. This is the first study, to our knowledge, to explore the relationship between objectively measured daily walking activity and hippocampal volume in an older adult population. Findings

  4. Low-intensity daily walking activity is associated with hippocampal volume in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Varma, Vijay R.; Chuang, Yi-fang; Harris, Gregory C.; Tan, Erwin J.; Carlson, Michelle C.

    2014-01-01

    Hippocampal atrophy is associated with memory impairment and dementia and serves as a key biomarker in the preclinical stages of Alzheimer's disease. Physical activity, one of the most promising behavioral interventions to prevent or delay cognitive decline, has been shown to be associated with hippocampal volume; specifically increased aerobic activity and fitness may have a positive effect on the size of the hippocampus. The majority of older adults, however, are sedentary and have difficulty initiating and maintaining exercise programs. A modestly more active lifestyle may nonetheless be beneficial. This study explored whether greater objectively measured daily walking activity was associated with larger hippocampal volume. We additionally explored whether greater low-intensity walking activity, which may be related to leisure-time physical, functional, and social activities, was associated with larger hippocampal volume independent of exercise and higher-intensity walking activity. Segmentation of hippocampal volumes was performed using FMRIB's Software Library (FSL) and daily walking activity was assessed using a step activity monitor (SAM) on 92, non-demented, older adult participants. After controlling for age, education, body mass index (BMI), cardiovascular disease risk factors, and the Mini Mental State Exam (MMSE), we found that a greater amount, duration, and frequency of total daily walking activity were each associated with larger hippocampal volume among older women, but not men. These relationships were specific to hippocampal volume, compared to the thalamus, used as a control brain region, and remained significant for low-intensity walking activity, independent of moderate- to vigorous-intensity activity and self-reported exercise. This is the first study, to our knowledge, to explore the relationship between objectively measured daily walking activity and hippocampal volume in an older adult sample. Findings suggest the importance of better

  5. Fatigue and pain in human jaw muscles during a sustained, low-intensity clenching task.

    PubMed

    Svensson, P; Burgaard, A; Schlosser, S

    2001-08-01

    Fatigue, pain and changes in the electromyographic (EMG) activity of the jaw-closing muscles are well documented during short, high-intensity tooth-clenching tasks but less so during sustained, low-intensity tasks. In this study, 11 healthy men clenched on a bite-force meter for 60 min at 10% of the maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) and scored the intensity of fatigue and pain on separate 10 cm visual analogue scales (VAS). Surface EMG activity from the masseter and anterior temporalis muscles was recorded in 10 s epochs every 5 min throughout the task. Pressure-pain thresholds (PPTs) in the jaw-closing muscles, unassisted maximum jaw opening and MVC were determined before and after the task. All participants reported an increasing sensation of fatigue in the jaw-closing muscles during the task (mean+/-SD: peak VAS=7.5+/-2.0 cm) but all were able to maintain the required force. Most (7/11) also reported a painful sensation (peak VAS=2.7+/-2.8 cm). The jaw-opening capacity (59.5+/-7.4 vs. 58.3+/-6.5 mm, P=0.031) and the MVC (777+/-73 vs. 652+/-115 N,P=0.002) were slightly, but significantly, decreased immediately after the task whereas the PPTs remained unchanged (ANOVA: P=0.612). The mean frequency of the EMG activity decreased in all muscles during the task (95.7 vs. 46.6 Hz;P<0.001), and the root mean squares increased (53.2 vs. 154 microV, P<0.001). The changes in EMG activity were more strongly correlated with the sensation of fatigue than pain. These findings demonstrate that a sustained, low-intensity clenching task can induce subjective and electrophysiological indications of fatigue.

  6. LED flicker pulsing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Mark A.; Cote, Paul J.

    2001-08-01

    There is need to replace hazardous radioluminescent light sources with a means of illumination that is environmentally friendly. This paper describes an electronic source that was developed as a potential candidate to replace low intensity tritium in a military system. It employs an LED for illumination and a 3-volt coin cell battery as a power source. This new light source is electronically invisible, requires minimal maintenance, and provides the lowest practical illumination to preclude detection by optical means. The low intensity requires that the LED be driven at DC current levels resulting in poor luminous efficiency. Therefore, in an effort to maximize battery life, the LED is pulsed into a more optically efficient mode of operation. However, conventional pulsing techniques are not employed because of concerns the electronics could be identified by conspicuous power spectral density (PSD) components in the electromagnetic spectrum generated by a pulsed LED. Therefore, flicker noise concepts have been employed to efficiently drive the LED while generating a virtually undetectable spectral signature. Although ideally the pulse durations, magnitudes, and spacings should be random, a significant reduction in conspicuous PSD components can be achieved when imposing practical constraints. The dominant components of the power spectrum are significantly reduced using fixed pulse durations and magnitudes while varying only the pulse spacing. The mean duty cycle is set to provide the same effective illumination as DC operation while generating a PSD normally associated with natural phenomena.

  7. [The problem of participation of different brain regions in the reactions to the low-intensity magnetic and electromagnetic field exposure].

    PubMed

    Luk'ianova, S N; Merkulov, A V

    2012-01-01

    Experimental analysis of the integral and pulsed bioelectric activity of the rabbit's various brain regions shows an ambiguous extent of their participation in the central nervous system reactions to low-intensity magnetic and electromagnetic fields with different parameters and conditions of exposure. This difference is determined not only by the location of brain structures in the head or by the field intensity, but, above all, by its functional state, which is reflected in the background. Artificial changes in the functioning of the original structures (administration of caffeine or adrenaline) altered the extent of their participation in the brain reaction, according to the drug action mechanism. The presence and severity of response depended on the structure and the biological significance of the impact, which is largely determined by the mode and conditions of exposure. Changing these parameters influenced the participation of the brain in its reaction in accordance with the adaptive response of the organism.

  8. Investigation of rat bone fracture healing using pulsed 1.5 MHz, 30 mW/cm(2) burst ultrasound--axial distance dependency.

    PubMed

    Fung, Chak-Hei; Cheung, Wing-Hoi; Pounder, Neill M; de Ana, F Javier; Harrison, Andrew; Leung, Kwok-Sui

    2014-03-01

    This study investigated the effect of LIPUS on fracture healing when fractures were exposed to ultrasound at three axial distances: z=0 mm, 60 mm, and 130 mm. We applied LIPUS to rat fracture at these three axial distances mimicking the exposure condition of human fractures at different depths under the soft tissue. Measurement of LIPUS shows pressure variations in near field (nearby transducer); uniform profile was found beyond it (far field). We asked whether different positions of the fracture within the ultrasound field cause inconsistent biological effect during the healing process. Closed femoral fractured Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into control, near-field (0mm), mid-near field (60 mm) or far-field (130 mm) groups. Daily LIPUS treatment (plane, but apodized source, see details in the text; 2.2 cm in diameter; 1.5 MHz sine waves repeating at 1 kHz PRF; spatial average temporal average intensity, ISATA=30 mW/cm(2)) was given to fracture site at the three axial distances. Weekly radiographs and endpoint microCT, histomorphometry, and mechanical tests were performed. The results showed that the 130 mm group had the highest tissue mineral density; and significantly higher mechanical properties than control at week 4. The 60 mm and 0 mm groups had significantly higher (i.e. p<0.05) woven bone percentage than control group in radiological, microCT and histomorphometry measurements. In general, LIPUS at far field augmented callus mineralization and mechanical properties; while near field and mid-near field enhanced woven bone formation. Our results indicated the therapeutic effect of LIPUS is dependent on the axial distance of the ultrasound beam. Therefore, the depth of fracture under the soft tissue affects the biological effect of LIPUS. Clinicians have to be aware of the fracture depth when LIPUS is applied transcutaneously.

  9. Investigation of rat bone fracture healing using pulsed 1.5 MHz, 30 mW/cm(2) burst ultrasound--axial distance dependency.

    PubMed

    Fung, Chak-Hei; Cheung, Wing-Hoi; Pounder, Neill M; de Ana, F Javier; Harrison, Andrew; Leung, Kwok-Sui

    2014-03-01

    This study investigated the effect of LIPUS on fracture healing when fractures were exposed to ultrasound at three axial distances: z=0 mm, 60 mm, and 130 mm. We applied LIPUS to rat fracture at these three axial distances mimicking the exposure condition of human fractures at different depths under the soft tissue. Measurement of LIPUS shows pressure variations in near field (nearby transducer); uniform profile was found beyond it (far field). We asked whether different positions of the fracture within the ultrasound field cause inconsistent biological effect during the healing process. Closed femoral fractured Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into control, near-field (0mm), mid-near field (60 mm) or far-field (130 mm) groups. Daily LIPUS treatment (plane, but apodized source, see details in the text; 2.2 cm in diameter; 1.5 MHz sine waves repeating at 1 kHz PRF; spatial average temporal average intensity, ISATA=30 mW/cm(2)) was given to fracture site at the three axial distances. Weekly radiographs and endpoint microCT, histomorphometry, and mechanical tests were performed. The results showed that the 130 mm group had the highest tissue mineral density; and significantly higher mechanical properties than control at week 4. The 60 mm and 0 mm groups had significantly higher (i.e. p<0.05) woven bone percentage than control group in radiological, microCT and histomorphometry measurements. In general, LIPUS at far field augmented callus mineralization and mechanical properties; while near field and mid-near field enhanced woven bone formation. Our results indicated the therapeutic effect of LIPUS is dependent on the axial distance of the ultrasound beam. Therefore, the depth of fracture under the soft tissue affects the biological effect of LIPUS. Clinicians have to be aware of the fracture depth when LIPUS is applied transcutaneously. PMID:24239510

  10. Application of ultrasound in periodontics: Part I

    PubMed Central

    Bains, Vive K.; Mohan, Ranjana; Bains, Rhythm

    2008-01-01

    Ultrasonic is a branch of acoustics concerned with sound vibrations in frequency ranges above audible level. Ultrasound uses the transmission and reflection of acoustic energy. A pulse is propagated and its reflection is received, both by the transducer. For clinical purposes ultrasound is generated by transducers, which converts electrical energy into ultrasonic waves. This is usually achieved by magnetostriction or piezoelectricity. Primary effects of ultrasound are thermal, mechanical (cavitation and microstreaming), and chemical (sonochemicals). Knowledge of the basic and other secondary effects of ultrasound is essential for the development of techniques of application. PMID:20142941

  11. Frequent, Low-Intensity Fire Increases Tree Defense To Bark Beetles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hood, S.; Sala, A.

    2013-12-01

    Wildfire and bark beetles are the two largest disturbance agents in North American conifer forests and have interacted for millennia to drive forest composition, structure, and ecological processes. Recent widespread mortality in western coniferous forests due to bark beetle outbreaks have been attributed in part to increasing temperatures and drought associated with global climate change. In fire-dependent forests, fire exclusion has also led to uncharacteristically dense forests which are also thought to be more susceptible to bark beetle outbreaks due to increased drought stress in individual trees. These mortality events have spurred strong interest in the interaction of fire and bark beetles in driving forest dynamics under a changing climate. However, a fact that has not received adequate attention is whether fire exclusion in fire-dependent forests decreases allocation to tree defense, thereby making contemporary forests more prone to bark beetle outbreaks, regardless of climate and stand structure. Fire is known to increase constitutive resin production in many tree species, yet the impact of frequent fire on expression of better defended tree phenotypes has never been examined. We hypothesized that frequent, low-intensity fire increases tree resistance to bark beetle attack through systemic induced resistance. Using a combination of sampling in natural stands for which we had long-term fire history data and an experimental block design of four thinning and burning treatments, we examined the influence of fire and water stress on tree defense to determine if frequent fire increases tree defense and the degree to which water stress modulates this response. We used axial resin ducts as the measure of defense, as this is where resin is both stored and manufactured in Pinaceae. Resin duct production and density has also been shown to be a better indicator of mortality from bark beetle attacks than tree growth. Resin duct density increased after fire at all

  12. [Therapies by focused ultrasound].

    PubMed

    Grenier, N; Trillaud, H; Palussière, J; Mougenot, C; Quesson, B; Denis De Senneville, B; Moonen, C

    2007-11-01

    Many techniques of thermotherapy have emerged over the last several years in the field of oncology using different types of physical agents, including ultrasound. Only ultrasound can target deep seated lesions non-invasively without need for percutaneous probe insertion. Depending on their utilization, it is possible to select either thermal effects, in a continuous mode, at low temperature (allowing thermo-induced biological effects) or at high temperature (allowing thermoablation), or mechanical effects, in a pulsed mode, at low energy level (allowing biological effects) or at high energy levels (histotripsy). Thermoablation by focused ultrasound is now developing fast for applications in many organs. It gained a well defined role for the treatment of prostatic cancer and uterine leiomyoma but needs to be better evaluated in other organs such as the breast. Treatment of abdominal tumors must still be considered as experimental as long as problems related to acoustic interfaces (produced by ribs and gas) and movement correction are not resolved. Biological applications of focused ultrasound are currently being explored and have a great long term potential.

  13. Basic Principles of Ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Teresa M.

    Ultrasound has been used in medicine for at least 50 years. Its current importance can be judged by the fact that, of all the various kinds of diagnostic images produced in the world, 1 in 4 is an ultrasound scan. Ultrasound energy is exactly like sound energy, it is a variation in the pressure within a medium. The only difference is that the rate of variation of pressure, the frequency of the wave, is too rapid for humans to hear. Medical ultrasound lies within a frequency range of 30 kHz to 500 MHz. Generally, the lower frequencies (30 kHz to 3 MHz) are for therapeutic purposes, the higher ones (2 to 40 MHz) are for diagnosis (imaging and Doppler), the very highest (50 to 500 MHz) are for microscopic images. For diagnostic purposes two main techniques are employed; the pulse-echo method is used to create images of tissue distribution; the Doppler effect is used to assess tissue movement and blood flow.

  14. Overcoming biological barriers with ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakkar, Dhaval; Gupta, Roohi; Mohan, Praveena; Monson, Kenneth; Rapoport, Natalya

    2012-10-01

    Effect of ultrasound on the permeability of blood vessels and cell membranes to macromolecules and nanodroplets was investigated using mouse carotid arteries and tumor cells. Model macromolecular drug, FITC-dextran with molecular weight of 70,000 Da was used in experiments with carotid arteries. The effect of unfocused 1-MHz ultrasound and and perfluoro-15-crown-5-ether nanodroplets stabilized with the poly(ethylene oxide)-co-poly(D, L-lactide) block copolymer shells was studied. In cell culture experiments, ovarian carcinoma cells and Doxorubicin (DOX) loaded poly(ethylene oxide)-co-polycaprolactone nanodroplets were used. The data showed that the application of ultrasound resulted in permeabilization of all biological barriers tested. Under the action of ultrasound, not only FITC-dextran but also nanodroplets effectively penetrated through the arterial wall; the effect of continuous wave ultrasound was stronger than that of pulsed ultrasound. In cell culture experiments, ultrasound triggered DOX penetration into cell nuclei, presumably due to releasing the drug from the carrier. Detailed mechanisms of the observed effects require further study.

  15. Mechanisms of soil aggregate failure by rapid increase in internal gas pressure during low-intensity burns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jian, M.; Ghezzehei, T. A.; Berli, M.

    2015-12-01

    The incidence of low-intensity natural and managed fire is on the rise, especially in the arid and semi-arid parts of the U.S. Southwest. Yet, there is little understanding of the ramifications of such burns on soil characteristics and their associated ecological processes. In particular, effects of low-intensity fires on soil structure have generally been ignored because such fires have little effect on soil organic matter. Recently, we showed that soil aggregates subjected to rapid low-intensity heating (<200°C) deteriorate more than aggregates subjected to the same temperature but at slow heating rate. We hypothesized that rapid heating rate results in high internal gas pressure due to vaporization of pore water that exerts disruptive mechanical stress that exceeds the internal strength of the aggregates. Here, we present in situ measurements of gas pressure of aggregates subjected to low-intensity burns. We compared a wide range of aggregate wetness and temperature levels. In addition, we report direct visualization of aggregate breakdown during rapid gas expansion using dynamic environment scanning electron microscopy. Our observation to date show that the interior gas pressure of moist aggregates rise rapidly to 1.5-4kPa, whereas the pressure inside dry aggregates remain unchanged during rapid heating. These observations show that weakly aggregated soils of arid and semi-arid regions are very vulnerable to low-intensity burns.

  16. Delayed stimulatory effect of low-intensity shockwaves on human periosteal cells.

    PubMed

    Tam, Kam-Fai; Cheung, Wing-Hoi; Lee, Kwong-Man; Qin, Ling; Leung, Kwok-Sui

    2005-09-01

    We investigated the effect of shockwaves on cells explanted from normal human periosteum to study the potential mechanisms of their responses and to determine suitable treatment settings. The cells were subjected to one shockwave treatment with systematic combinations of energy intensities (range, 0.05-0.5 mJ/mm) and number of shocks (range, 500-2000) whereas control cells received no treatment. The immediate effect on cell viability and the long-lasting effect on proliferation, viable cell number at Day 18, and mineralization at Day 35 were assessed. We observed an immediate dose-dependent destructive effect of shockwaves. Energy intensity and number of shocks contributed equally to viability. Total energy dose (intensity x number of shocks) was a better reference for determining the shockwave effect. We also found a long-term stimulatory effect on proliferation, viable cell number, and calcium deposition of human periosteal cells. At the same total energy dose, low-intensity shockwaves with more shocks (0.12 mJ/mm at 1250 shocks) were more favorable for enhancing cellular activities than high-intensity waves with fewer shocks (0.5 mJ/mm at 300 shocks). These findings document some of the biochemical changes of periosteal cells during shockwave treatments.

  17. Penile low-intensity shock wave therapy: a promising novel modality for erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Abu-Ghanem, Yasmin; Kitrey, Noam D; Gruenwald, Ilan; Appel, Boaz; Vardi, Yoram

    2014-05-01

    Penile extracorporeal low-intensity shock wave therapy (LIST) to the penis has recently emerged as a novel and promising modality in the treatment of erectile dysfunction (ED). LIST has angiogenic properties and stimulates neovascularization. If applied to the corpora cavernosa, LIST can improve penile blood flow and endothelial function. In a series of clinical trials, including randomized double-blind sham-controlled studies, LIST has been shown to have a substantial effect on penile hemodynamics and erectile function in patients with vasculogenic ED. LIST is effective in patients who are responsive to phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors (PDE5i) and can also convert PDE5i nonresponders to responders. The response to LIST wanes gradually over time, and after 2 years, about half of the patients maintain their function. Extensive research is needed to understand the effect of LIST on erectile tissue, to modify the treatment protocol to maximize its outcomes, and to identify the patients who will benefit the most from this treatment.

  18. Ash production and dispersal from sustained low-intensity Mono-Inyo eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, Benjamin A.; Manga, Michael; Andrews, Benjamin

    2016-08-01

    Recent rhyolitic volcanism has demonstrated that prolonged low-intensity ash venting may accompany effusive dome formation. We examine the possibility and some consequences of episodes of extended, weak ash venting at the rhyolitic Mono-Inyo chain in Eastern California. We describe ash-filled cracks within one of the youngest domes, Panum Crater, which provide a textural record of ash venting during dome effusion. We use synchrotron-based X-ray computed tomography to characterize the particles in these tuffisites. Particle sizes in well-sorted tuffisite layers agree well with grain size distributions observed during weak ash venting at Soufrière Hills Volcano, Montserrat, and yield approximate upper and lower bounds on gas velocity and mass flux during the formation of those layers. We simulate ash dispersal with Ash3d to assess the consequences of long-lived Mono-Inyo ash venting for ash deposition and the accompanying volcanic hazards. Our results highlight the sensitivity of large-scale outcomes of volcanic eruptions to small-scale processes.

  19. Low Intensity Laser Therapy (LILT) Versus Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation On Microcirculation In Diabetic Neuropathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battecha, Kadria H.; Atya, Azza M.

    2011-09-01

    Reduced microcirculation is a morbid element of neuropathy and one of the most common complications of uncontrolled diabetes. Many physical modalities have gained a considerable attention for enhancing cutaneous microcirculation in diabetic patients and prevent its serious complications. Accordingly, the present study was conducted to compare between the effect of low intensity laser therapy (LILT) and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) on microcirculation in diabetic neuropathy. Thirty diabetic polyneuropathic patients ranged in age from 45-60 years participated in this study. They were randomly divided into two groups of equal number; patients in group (A) received LILT on plantar surface of foot with a dose of 3 J/cm2 and wavelength (904 nm), while those in group (B) received TENS on lower leg for 30 minutes with frequency (2 HZ). Treatment was conducted 3 times/week for 6 weeks. The cutaneous microcirculation was evaluated by Laser Doppler flowmetry at the baseline and at the end of treatment. Results revealed that group (A) showed statistically significant increase in the cutaneous microcirculation compared with group (B). So, it was concluded that LILT has to be more efficient than TENS in increasing cutaneous microcirculation in patients with diabetic neuropathy.

  20. Human Response to Low-Intensity Sonic Booms Heard Indoors and Outdoors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Brenda M.; Klos, Jacob; Buehrle, Ralph D.; McCurdy, David A.; Haering, Edward A., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    Test subjects seated inside and outside a house were exposed to low-intensity N-wave sonic booms during a 3-week test period in June 2006- The house was instrumented to measure the booms both inside and out. F-18 aircraft were flown to achieve a variety of boom overpressures from approximately .1 to .6 psf During four test days, seventy-seven test subjects heard the booms while seated inside and outside the house. Using the Magnitude Estimation methodology and artificial reference sounds ; the subjects rated the annoyance of the booms. Since the same subjects heard similar booms both inside and outside the house, comparative ratings of indoor and outdoor annoyance were obtained. For a given metric level, indoor subjects gave higher annoyance scores than outdoor subjects. For a given boom; annoyance scores inside were on average the same as those outside. In a post-test questionnaire, the majority of subjects rated the indoor booms as more annoying than the outdoor ones. These results are discussed in this paper.

  1. Diabetic distal symmetric polyneuropathy: effect of low-intensity laser therapy.

    PubMed

    Khamseh, Mohammad Ebrahim; Kazemikho, Nooshafarin; Aghili, Rokhsareh; Forough, Bijan; Lajevardi, Marjan; Hashem Dabaghian, Fataneh; Goushegir, Ashrafeddin; Malek, Mojtaba

    2011-11-01

    Low-intensity laser therapy (LILT) has been considered as a treatment modality in diabetic distal symmetric polyneuropathy (DSP). The aim of this study is to determine the effectiveness of LILT on DSP. We examined 107 subjects with type 2 diabetes for detection of DSP using the Michigan Neuropathy Screening Instrument (MNSI). Seventeen subjects were eligible to be enrolled in the study. Nerve conduction studies (NCS) were performed in all eligible subjects as an objective method to confirm neuropathy. The participants received LILT three times a week for ten sessions. NCSs were reevaluated after completion of the treatment. The absolute changes in NCS parameters were considered to establish the effectiveness of the treatment. Baseline demographics were similar in all participants. The mean differences of NCV parameters were considered for comparison. At the end of the study, the subjects showed a significant increase in neural potential amplitudes (p < 0.05). This study clearly demonstrated a significant positive effect of LILT on improvement of nerve conduction velocity on diabetic distal symmetric polyneuropathy (DSP). This finding supports the therapeutic potential of LILT in DSP. PMID:21853320

  2. Design of a compact Faraday cup for low energy, low intensity ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantero, E. D.; Sosa, A.; Andreazza, W.; Bravin, E.; Lanaia, D.; Voulot, D.; Welsch, C. P.

    2016-01-01

    Beam intensity is one of the key parameters in particle accelerators, in particular during machine commissioning, but also during operation for experiments. At low beam energies and low intensities a number of challenges arise in its measurement as commonly used non-invasive devices are no longer sensitive enough. It then becomes necessary to stop the beam in order to measure its absolute intensity. A very compact Faraday cup for determining ion beam currents from a few nanoamperes down to picoamperes for the HIE-ISOLDE post-accelerator at CERN has been designed, built and tested with beam. It has a large aperture diameter of 30 mm and a total length of only 16 mm, making it one of the most compact designs ever used. In this paper we present the different steps that were involved in the design and optimization of this device, including beam tests with two early prototypes and the final monitor. We also present an analysis of the losses caused by secondary particle emission for different repelling electrode voltages and beam energies. Finally, we show that results obtained from an analytical model for electron loss probability combined with Monte Carlo simulations of particles trajectories provide a very good agreement with experimental data.

  3. Physical basis of adverse and therapeutic effects of low intensity microwave radiation.

    PubMed

    Hyland, G J

    2008-05-01

    A physical basis of adverse and therapeutic effects of low intensity microwave radiation is presented based on the concept of oscillatory similitude between the frequency of an external microwave field (together with any lower frequency modulations thereof) and those of certain endogenous dipolar coherent excitations allied to aliveness, which play the role of 'tuned circuits' via which a living organism is electromagnetically sensitised in a non-linear way to external fields too weak to be able to cause heating. From this perspective, an external electromagnetic field affects a living system not as a toxin but rather by perturbing its endogenous electromagnetic activity. The possibility of adverse perturbation is illustrated by reference to the microwave fields used in mobile telecommunications whose signals interfere in a non-thermal way with biofunctionality--in particular, undermining the efficacy of processes that would otherwise afford natural protection against the development of pathology. Therapeutic modalities of microwave exposure, on the other hand, are illustrated using the example of microwave resonance therapy--which can be considered as an electromagnetic version of acupuncture, and as an example of 'quantum medicine'--whose normalising effect on a wide range of pathologies is striking, and which affords a novel alternative to conventional pharmacological interventions.

  4. Low-intensity cycling affects the muscle activation pattern of consequent countermovement jumps.

    PubMed

    Marquez, Gonzalo J; Mon, Javier; Acero, Rafael M; Sanchez, Jose A; Fernandez-del-Olmo, Miguel

    2009-08-01

    Players (eg, basketball, soccer, and football) often use a static bicycle during a game to maintain warming. However, the effectiveness of this procedure has not been addressed in the literature. Thus, it remains unknown whether low-intensity cycling movement can affect explosive movement performance. In this study, 10 male subjects performed countermovement jumps before and after a 15-minutes cycling bout at 35% of their maximal power output. Three sessions were tested for 3 different cadences of cycling: freely chosen cadence, 20% lower than freely chosen cadence (FCC-20%), and 20% higher than freely chosen cadence (FCC+20%). Jump height, kinematics, and electromyogram were recorded simultaneously during the countermovement jumps. The results showed a significant decreasing in the height of countermovement jump after cycling at freely chosen cadence and FCC-20% (p = 0.03 and p = 0.04, respectively), but not for FCC+20% cadences. The electromyographic parameters suggest that changes in the countermovement jump after cycling can be attributed to alteration of the pattern of activation and may be modulated by the preceding cycling cadence. Our study indicates that to avoid a possible negative effect of the cycling in the subsequent explosive movements, a cadence 20% higher than the preferred cadence must be used.

  5. Sensory receptor diversity establishes a peripheral population code for stimulus duration at low intensities.

    PubMed

    Lyons-Warren, Ariel M; Hollmann, Michael; Carlson, Bruce A

    2012-08-01

    Peripheral filtering is a fundamental mechanism for establishing frequency tuning in sensory systems. By contrast, detection of temporal features, such as duration, is generally thought to result from temporal coding in the periphery, followed by an analysis of peripheral response times within the central nervous system. We investigated how peripheral filtering properties affect the coding of stimulus duration in the electrosensory system of mormyrid fishes using behavioral and electrophysiological measures of duration tuning. We recorded from individual knollenorgans, the electrosensory receptors that mediate communication, and found correlated variation in frequency tuning and duration tuning, as predicted by a simple circuit model. In response to relatively high intensity stimuli, knollenorgans responded reliably with fixed latency spikes, consistent with a temporal code for stimulus duration. At near-threshold intensities, however, both the reliability and the temporal precision of responses decreased. Evoked potential recordings from the midbrain, as well as behavioral responses to electrosensory stimulation, revealed changes in sensitivity across the range of durations associated with the greatest variability in receptor sensitivity. Further, this range overlapped with the natural range of variation in species-specific communication signals, suggesting that peripheral duration tuning affects the coding of behaviorally relevant stimuli. We measured knollenorgan, midbrain and behavioral responses to natural communication signals and found that each of them were duration dependent. We conclude that at relatively low intensities for which temporal coding is ineffective, diversity among sensory receptors establishes a population code, in which duration is reflected in the population of responding knollenorgans.

  6. Low intensity peripheral muscle conditioning improves exercise tolerance and breathlessness in COPD.

    PubMed

    Clark, C J; Cochrane, L; Mackay, E

    1996-12-01

    This randomized, controlled study investigated the physiological effects of a specially designed 12 week programme of isolated conditioning of peripheral skeletal muscle groups. The programme required minimal infrastructure in order to allow continued rehabilitation at home after familiarization within hospital. Forty eight patients, aged 40-72 yrs with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (mean (SD) forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) 61 (27)% of predicted normal) were randomly allocated into training (n = 32) and control (n = 16) groups. Physiological assessments were performed before and after the 12 week study period, and included peripheral muscle endurance and strength, whole body endurance, maximal exercise capacity (maximum oxygen consumption (V'O2,max)) and lung function. The training group showed significant improvement in a variety of measures of upper and lower peripheral muscle performance, with no additional breathlessness. Whole body endurance measured by free arm treadmill walking increased by 6,372 (3,932-8,812) 3 (p < 0.001). Symptom-limited maximal V'O2 was unchanged. However, the training group showed a reduction in ventilatory equivalents for oxygen and carbon dioxide, both at peak exercise and at equivalent work rate (Wmax). In summary, low intensity isolated peripheral muscle conditioning is well-tolerated, simple and easy to perform at home. The various physiological benefits should enable patients across the range of severity of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease to improve daily functioning. PMID:8980974

  7. [Low-intensity helium-neon laser in the treatment of patients after endonasal dacryocystorhinostomy].

    PubMed

    Beloglazov, V G; At'kova, E L; Nurieva, S M; Khvedelidze, E P

    2004-01-01

    Described in the paper is an efficiency study of using, postoperatively, the low-intensity helium-neon laser (LIHNL) in patients with obstruction of the lacrimal tracts. Eighty patients were examined after endonasal dacryocystorhinostomy. They were shared between 2 groups with respect to a postoperative course: group 1--experimental, 40 patients, and group 2--control, 40 patients. The experimental patients received, apart from the traditional postoperative therapy, a course of LIHNL therapy. The controls received only the traditional postoperative treatment. The efficiency of postoperative treatment was evaluated by clinical, instrumental and laboratory examination methods. The study denoted that the use of LIHNL in the early postoperative period after endonasal dacryocystorhinostomy had a pronounced anti-inflammatory effect, speeded up the wound healing, prevented the growth of granulation tissues and the merging of the shaped lacrimal-sac fistula with the nasal cavity. LIHNL contributed to a complete recovery of the functional activity of the nasal mucous tunic. Thus, the LIHNL therapy essentially facilitates the postoperative management of patients, cuts the rehabilitation period and enhances the treatment results. PMID:15529529

  8. Reaction of cells to local, regional, and general low-intensive laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baibekov, Iskander M.; Kasymov, A. S.; Musaev, Erkin S.; Vorojeikin, V. M.; Artikov, S. N.

    1993-07-01

    Local influence of low intensive laser irradiation (LILI) of Helium-Neon (HNL), Copper vapor (CVL), Nitrogen (UVL) and Arsenic Gallium (AGL) lasers cause stimulation of processes of physiological and reparative regeneration in intact skin, and mucous membrane of stomach and duodenum, dermatome wounds and gastroduodenal ulcers. Structural bases of these effects are the acceleration of cell proliferation and differentiation and also the activation of intracellular structures and intensification of cell secretion. Regional influence of the pointed types of LILI on hepar in cirrhosis and hepatitis causes decreasing of the inflammatory and cirrhotic changes. After endo- and exo-vascular laser irradiations of blood the decreasing of the number of pathological forms of erythrocytes and the increasing of their catalase activity, are indicated. General (total) laser irradiation of the organism--laser shower, increases the bone marrow cells proliferation, especially myeloid series. It is accompanied with acceleration of their differentiation and migration in circulation. It was revealed, that HNL to a considerable extent influences the epithelial cells and CVL the connective tissue cells. UVL increases the amount of microorganisms on cell surfaces (membrane bound microorganisms). Regional irradiation of the LILI causes both direct and indirect influence of cells. Structural changes of bone marrow cells and gut mucous membrane cells indicate intersystemic interaction.

  9. [Low-intensity helium-neon laser in the treatment of patients after endonasal dacryocystorhinostomy].

    PubMed

    Beloglazov, V G; At'kova, E L; Nurieva, S M; Khvedelidze, E P

    2004-01-01

    Described in the paper is an efficiency study of using, postoperatively, the low-intensity helium-neon laser (LIHNL) in patients with obstruction of the lacrimal tracts. Eighty patients were examined after endonasal dacryocystorhinostomy. They were shared between 2 groups with respect to a postoperative course: group 1--experimental, 40 patients, and group 2--control, 40 patients. The experimental patients received, apart from the traditional postoperative therapy, a course of LIHNL therapy. The controls received only the traditional postoperative treatment. The efficiency of postoperative treatment was evaluated by clinical, instrumental and laboratory examination methods. The study denoted that the use of LIHNL in the early postoperative period after endonasal dacryocystorhinostomy had a pronounced anti-inflammatory effect, speeded up the wound healing, prevented the growth of granulation tissues and the merging of the shaped lacrimal-sac fistula with the nasal cavity. LIHNL contributed to a complete recovery of the functional activity of the nasal mucous tunic. Thus, the LIHNL therapy essentially facilitates the postoperative management of patients, cuts the rehabilitation period and enhances the treatment results.

  10. Radioprotective Action of Low-Intensity Light into the Red Absorption Band of Endogenous Molecular Oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, A. V.; Mashalov, A. A.; Zakharov, S. D.

    2016-08-01

    Application of ionizing radiation in oncology (radiation therapy) is a widespread way to eliminate malignant tumors. Normal tissues are inevitable included in any radiation field, and their reliable protection is actual till now. All attempts to solve the problem are based on search of effective radioprotectors, i.e. chemical compounds of various classes, which should be entered into the patient. To date about 50,000 compounds with some radioprotection properties had been tested, but the most effective of them have been simultaneously the most toxic. Here the preliminary results of researches devoted to development of an optical technique on basis of the light-oxygen effect for the protection of women with breast cancer from side effects of the radiation therapy are presented. A low intensity emission of the semiconductor laser in a red spectral interval was used to excite a very small quantity of endogenous molecular oxygen in O2(1Δg) state. It is shown, that application of the method at occurrence of earliest signs of radiation injury allows notably reducing dangerous breaks in radiation therapy course.

  11. Low-intensity vibration improves angiogenesis and wound healing in diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Weinheimer-Haus, Eileen M; Judex, Stefan; Ennis, William J; Koh, Timothy J

    2014-01-01

    Chronic wounds represent a significant health problem, especially in diabetic patients. In the current study, we investigated a novel therapeutic approach to wound healing--whole body low-intensity vibration (LIV). LIV is anabolic for bone, by stimulating the release of growth factors, and modulating stem cell proliferation and differentiation. We hypothesized that LIV improves the delayed wound healing in diabetic mice by promoting a pro-healing wound environment. Diabetic db/db mice received excisional cutaneous wounds and were subjected to LIV (0.4 g at 45 Hz) for 30 min/d or a non-vibrated sham treatment (controls). Wound tissue was collected at 7 and 15 d post-wounding and wound healing, angiogenesis, growth factor levels and wound cell phenotypes were assessed. LIV increased angiogenesis and granulation tissue formation at day 7, and accelerated wound closure and re-epithelialization over days 7 and 15. LIV also reduced neutrophil accumulation and increased macrophage accumulation. In addition, LIV increased expression of pro-healing growth factors and chemokines (insulin-like growth factor-1, vascular endothelial growth factor and monocyte chemotactic protein-1) in wounds. Despite no evidence of a change in the phenotype of CD11b+ macrophages in wounds, LIV resulted in trends towards a less inflammatory phenotype in the CD11b- cells. Our findings indicate that LIV may exert beneficial effects on wound healing by enhancing angiogenesis and granulation tissue formation, and these changes are associated with increases in pro-angiogenic growth factors.

  12. Biochemical responses of isolated lung CSCs after application of low intensity laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrahamse, Heidi; Crous, Anine

    2016-03-01

    Studies have shown that using high fluences of Low Intensity Laser Irradiation (HF-LILI) produce apoptotic effects on normal and neoplastic cells. This study aimed to determine whether HF-LILI induce cell death in lung CSCs. Lung CSCs were isolated using the stem cell marker CD 133, characterized using flow cytometry, and applied in experiments which included treatment with LILI at wavelengths of 636, 825 and 1060 nm with fluences ranging from 5 J/cm2 to 40 J/cm2. Viability and proliferation studies, using Alamar blue assay and adenosine triphosphate luminescence (ATP), indicated an increase when treating lung CSCs with low fluences of 5 - 20 J/cm2 and a decrease in viability and proliferation as well as an increase in apoptosis when applying a fluence of 40 J/cm2 indicated by flow cytometry using Annexin V and propidium iodide (PI) dyes. Results indicate that LILI, when treating lung CSCs, can induce either a bio-stimulatory or bio-inhibitory effect depending on the wavelength and fluence used. This study indicated successful apoptotic induction of lung CSCs. Future experiments should be able to conclude the exact mechanism behind HF-LILI, which can be used in the targeted treatments of CSC elimination, implementing HF-LILI in the same manner as PDT in the absence of a photosensitizer.

  13. Nanomaterials and synergistic low intensity direct current (LIDC) stimulation technology for orthopaedic implantable medical devices

    PubMed Central

    Samberg, Meghan E.; Cohen, Paul H.; Wysk, Richard A.; Monteiro-Riviere, Nancy A.

    2012-01-01

    Nanomaterials play a significant role in biomedical research and applications due to their unique biological, mechanical, and electrical properties. In recent years, they have been utilised to improve the functionality and reliability of a wide range of implantable medical devices ranging from well-established orthopaedic residual hardware devices (e.g. hip implants) that can repair defects in skeletal systems to emerging tissue engineering scaffolds that can repair or replace organ functions. This review summarizes the applications and efficacies of these nanomaterials that include synthetic or naturally occurring metals, polymers, ceramics, and composites in orthopaedic implants, the largest market segment of implantable medical devices. The importance of synergistic engineering techniques that can augment or enhance the performance of nanomaterial applications in orthopaedic implants is also discussed,, the focus being on a low intensity direct electric current (LIDC) stimulation technology to promote the long-term antibacterial efficacy of oligodynamic metal-based surfaces by ionization, while potentially accelerating tissue growth and osseointegration. While many nanomaterials have clearly demonstrated their ability to provide more effective implantable medical surfaces, further decisive investigations are necessary before they can translate into medically safe and commercially viable clinical applications. The paper concludes with a discussion about some of the critical impending issues with the application of nanomaterials-based technologies in implantable medical devices, and potential directions to address these. PMID:23335493

  14. Profiling of genes central to human mitochondrial energy metabolism following low intensity laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houreld, Nicolette N.; Masha, Roland; Abrahamse, Heidi

    2012-09-01

    Background: Wound healing involves three overlapping phases: inflammation, granulation and tissue remodelling. If this process is disrupted, delayed wound healing ensues, a common complication seen in diabetic patients. Low intensity laser irradiation (LILI) has been found to promote healing in such patients. However, the exact mechanisms of action are poorly understood. Purpose: This study aimed to profile the expression of key genes involved in mitochondrial respiration. Materials and Methods: Diabetic wounded fibroblast cells were exposed to a wavelength of 660 nm and a fluence of 5 J/cm2 and incubated for 30 min. Total RNA was isolated and 1 μg reverse transcribed into cDNA which was used for real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) array analysis. The array contained genes important for each of the mitochondrial complexes involved in the electron transport chain (ETC). Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) levels were also determined post-irradiation by ATP luminescence. Results: Genes involved in complex IV (cytochrome c oxidase), COX6B2 and COX6C, and PPA1 which is involved in complex V (ATP synthase) were significantly up-regulated. There was a significant increase in ATP levels in diabetic wounded cells post-irradiation. Discussion and Conclusion: LILI stimulates the ETC at a transcriptional level, resulting in an increase in ATP. This study helps understand the mechanisms of LILI in diabetic wound healing, and gives information on activation of genes in response to LILI.

  15. A Low Cost Compact 512 Channel Therapeutic Ultrasound System For Transcutaneous Ultrasound Surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Tim; Cain, Charles

    2006-05-01

    A low cost 512 channel therapeutic ultrasound system was designed and tested with a 2D array transducer. The system was optimized for high energy, low duty cycle pulsing applications (cavitation mediated therapy), but is also folly compatible with continuous wave applications. The effective steering range was measured to be 40 mm FWHM over a 3D volume. Well defined volumes of liver tissue were disrupted with high energy cavitation generating ultrasound pulses in ex-vivo liver experiments.

  16. Combined Low-Intensity Exercise and Ascorbic Acid Attenuates Kainic Acid-Induced Seizure and Oxidative Stress in Mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee-Jae; Song, Wook; Jin, Eun Hee; Kim, Jongkyu; Chun, Yoonseok; An, Eung Nam; Park, Sok

    2016-05-01

    Physical exercise and vitamins such as ascorbic acid (ASC) have been recognized as an effective strategy in neuroprotection and neurorehabilitatioin. However, there is a need to find an efficient treatment regimen that includes ASC and low-intensity exercise to diminish the risk of overtraining and nutritional treatment by attenuating oxidative stress. In the present study, we investigated the combined effect of low-intensity physical exercise (EX) and ASC on kainic acid (KA)-induced seizure activity and oxidative stress in mice. The mice were randomly assigned into groups as follows: "KA only" (n = 11), "ASC + KA" (n = 11), "Ex + KA" (n = 11), "ASC + Ex + KA" (n = 11). In the present study, low intensity of swimming training period lasted 8 weeks and consisted of 30-min sessions daily (three times per week) without tail weighting. Although no preventive effect of low-intensity exercise or ASC on KA seizure occurrence was evident, there was a decrease of seizure activity, seizure development (latency to first seizures), and mortality in "ASC + Ex + KA" compared to "ASC + KA", "Ex + KA", and "KA only" group. In addition, a preventive synergistic coordination of low-intensity exercise and ASC was evident in glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase activity compared to separate treatment. These results suggest that low-intensity exercise and ASC treatment have preventive effects on seizure activity and development with alternation of oxidative status. PMID:26646003

  17. Ultrasound - Breast

    MedlinePlus

    ... discharge) and to characterize potential abnormalities seen on mammography or breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Ultrasound imaging ... supply in breast lesions . Supplemental Breast Cancer Screening Mammography is the only screening tool for breast cancer ...

  18. Thyroid ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... Performed Ultrasound is a painless method that uses sound waves to create images of the inside of the ... neck to help with the transmission of the sound waves. Next, the technician moves a wand, called a ...

  19. Abdominal Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... collects the sounds that bounce back and a computer then uses those sound waves to create an ... Ultrasound scanners consist of a console containing a computer and electronics, a video display screen and a ...

  20. Obstetrical Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... collects the sounds that bounce back and a computer then uses those sound waves to create an ... Ultrasound scanners consist of a console containing a computer and electronics, a video display screen and a ...

  1. [Interventional ultrasound].

    PubMed

    Blázquez Sánchez, N; Fernández Canedo, I; Valdés Vilches, L; de Troya Martín, M

    2015-11-01

    High-frequency ultrasound has become increasingly used in dermatology. This technique is accessible, non-invasive, and rapid and provides information in real time. Consequently, it has become of great diagnostic value in dermatology. However, high-frequency ultrasound also has a promising future as a complementary technique in interventional diagnostic procedures, even though its application in this field has been little studied by dermatologists. PMID:26895944

  2. Effects of low intensity radiofrequency electromagnetic fields on electrical activity in rat hippocampal slices.

    PubMed

    Tattersall, J E; Scott, I R; Wood, S J; Nettell, J J; Bevir, M K; Wang, Z; Somasiri, N P; Chen, X

    2001-06-15

    Slices of rat hippocampus were exposed to 700 MHz continuous wave radiofrequency (RF) fields (25.2-71.0 V m(-1), 5-15 min exposure) in a stripline waveguide. At low field intensities, the predominant effect on the electrically evoked field potential in CA1 was a potentiation of the amplitude of the population spike by up to 20%, but higher intensity fields could produce either increases or decreases of up to 120 and 80%, respectively, in the amplitude of the population spike. To eliminate the possibility of RF-induced artefacts due to the metal stimulating electrode, the effect of RF exposure on spontaneous epileptiform activity induced in CA3 by 4-aminopyridine (50-100 microM) was investigated. Exposure to RF fields (50.0 V m(-1)) reduced or abolished epileptiform bursting in 36% of slices tested. The maximum field intensity used in these experiments, 71.0 V m(-1), was calculated to produce a specific absorption rate (SAR) of between 0.0016 and 0.0044 W kg(-1) in the slices. Measurements with a Luxtron fibreoptic probe confirmed that there was no detectable temperature change (+/- 0.1 degrees C) during a 15 min exposure to this field intensity. Furthermore, imposed temperature changes of up to 1 degrees C failed to mimic the effects of RF exposure. These results suggest that low-intensity RF fields can modulate the excitability of hippocampal tissue in vitro in the absence of gross thermal effects. The changes in excitability may be consistent with reported behavioural effects of RF fields.

  3. Low-intensity laser radiation in complex treatment of inflammatory diseases of parodontium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolova, Irina A.; Erina, Stanislava V.

    1995-04-01

    The problem of complex treatment of inflammatory disease of parodontium has become very acute and actual at the moment. The diseases of inflammatory nature are considered to be the most vital issues of the day. The state of the local immune system of oral cavity plays the most important role in the complicated mechanism of inflammatory process development in the tissues of parodontium. Recently physical factors have become predominant in the system of complex therapy of parodontitis. The application of low-intense laser radiation (LLR) is considered to be the most important and up-to-date method in the preventive dentistry. There were 60 patients of average damage rate suffering from chronic generalizing parodontitis at the age of 25 up to 55 under observation. The major goal of examination was to get the objective results of the following methods' application: parodontium index (Russel, 1956), hygiene index (Fyodorov, Volodkina, 1971), Bacterioscopy of dental-gingival pockets content, simple and broadened stomatoscopy (Kunin, 1970), SIgA level determination in mixed saliva (Manchini et all, 1965) and R-protein level in gingival blood (Kulberg, 1990). All the patients were split into 2 groups. The first group (30 patients) has undergone the laser therapy course while the second group of 30 patients couldn't get it (LLR). Despite the kind of therapy they have undergone, all the patients have got the local anti-inflammatory medicamental therapy. The results of clinical observations have proved the fact that laser therapy application makes it possible to shorten the course of treatment in 1.5 times. The shifts of oral cavity local resistance take place in case of chronic generalizing parodontitis. The direct immunostimulating effect could be observed as a result of LLR- therapy application. The close connection of both anti-inflammatory medicamental and LLR-therapy has proved the possibility of purposeful local immune status correction in case of parodontitis.

  4. Safety and efficacy of low intensity shockwave (LISW) treatment in patients with erectile dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Ruffo, A.; Capece, M.; Prezioso, D.; Romeo, G.; Illiano, E.; Romis, L.; Lauro, G. Di; Iacono, F.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The primary goal in the management strategy of a patient with ED would be to determine its etiology and cure it when possible, and not just to treat the symptoms alone. One of the new therapeutic strategies is the use of low intensity extracorporeal shockwave (LISW) therapy. The mechanism of shockwave therapy is not completely clear. It is suggested that LISW induces neovascularization and improvement of cavernosal arterial flow which can lead to an improvement of erectile function by releasing NO, VEGF and PCNA. Materials and Methods: 31 patients between February and June 2013 with mild to severe ED and non-Phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors responders were enrolled. Patients underwent four weekly treatment sessions. During each session 3600 shocks at 0.09mJ/ mm2 were given, 900 shocks at each anatomical area (right and left corpus cavernosum, right and left crus). Improvement of the erectile function was evaluated using the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF-EF), the Sexual Encounter Profile (SEP) diaries (SEP-Questions 2 and 3) and Global Assessment Questions (GAQ-Q1 and GAQ-Q2). Results: At 3-month follow-up IIEF-EF scores improved from 16.54±6.35 at baseline to 21.03±6.38. Patients answering ‘yes’ to the SEP-Q2 elevated from 61% to 89% and from 32% to 62% in the SEP-Q3. A statistically significant improvement was reported to the Global Assessment Questions (GAQ-Q1 and GAQ-Q2). Conclusion: In conclusion, we can affirm that LISW is a confirmed therapeutic approach to erectile dysfunction that definitely needs more long-term trials to be clarified and further verified. PMID:26689523

  5. Low Intensity Low Temperature (LILT) Measurements and Coefficients on New Photovoltaic Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheiman, David A.; Jenkins, Phillip P.; Brinker, David J.; Appelbaum, Joseph

    1995-01-01

    Past NASA missions to Mars, Jupiter and the outer planets were powered by radioisotope thermal generators (RTGs). Although these devices proved to be reliable, their high cost and highly toxic radioactive heat source has made them far less desirable for future planetary missions. This has resulted in a renewed search for alternate energy sources, some of them being photovoltaics (PV) and thermophotovoltaics (TPV). Both of these alternate energy sources convert light/thermal energy directly into electricity. In order to create a viable PV data base for planetary mission planners and cell designers, we have compiled low intensity low temperature (LILT) I-V data on single junction and multi-junction high efficiency solar cells. The cells tested here represent the latest photovoltaic technology. Using this LILT data to calculate Short Circuit Current (I(sub sc)), Open Circuit Voltage (V(sub os)), and Fill Factor (FF) as a function of temperature and intensity, an accurate prediction of cell performance under the AM0 spectrum can be determined. When combined with QUantum efficiency at Low Temperature (QULT) data, one can further enhance the data by adding spectral variations to the measurements. This paper presents an overview of LILT measurements and is only intended to be used as a guideline for material selection and performance predictions. As single junction and multi-junction cell technologies emerge, new test data must be collected. Cell materials included are Si, GaAs/Ge, GaInP/GaAs/GaAs, InP, InGaAs/InP, InP/InGaAs/InP, and GaInP. Temperatures range down to as low as -180 C and intensities range from 1 sun down to 0.02 suns. The coefficients presented in this paper represent experimental results and are intended to provide the user with approximate numbers.

  6. Response of antibiotics and resistance genes to high-intensity and low-intensity manure management.

    PubMed

    Storteboom, Heather N; Kim, Sung-Chul; Doesken, Kathy C; Carlson, Kenneth H; Davis, Jessica G; Pruden, Amy

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the response of antibiotics and antibiotic resistance genes (ARG) to manure management. A pilot field study was conducted using horse manure containing no antibiotics, into which chlortetracycline (CTC), tylosin (TYL), and monensin (MON) were spiked and compared to unspiked controls. Subsequently, a large-scale field study was conducted comparing manure from a dairy with minimal use of antibiotics and a feedlot with regular subtherapeutic use of antibiotics. The manures were subjected to high-intensity management (HIM) (amending, watering, and turning) and low-intensity management (LIM) (no amending, watering, or turning) and were monitored for antibiotic concentrations and levels of tetracycline ARG [tet(W) and tet(O)] using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. All three antibiotics in the pilot study dissipated more rapidly in HIM manure, with half-lives ranging from 4 to 15 d, compared to LIM manure, with half-lives ranging from 8 to 30 d. Levels of tet(W) were significantly higher after 141 d of treatment, but levels of tet(O) were significantly lower in all treatments. In the large-scale study, the feedlot manure had higher initial concentrations than the dairy manure of tetracycline (TC), oxytetracycline (OTC), and CTC as well as tet(W) and tet(O). Tetracycline and OTC dissipated more rapidly in HIM manure, with half-lives ranging from 6 to 15 d, compared to LIM manure, with half-lives ranging from 7 to 31 d. After 6 mo of treatment, tet(W) and tet(O) decreased significantly in feedlot manure, whereas dairy manure required only 4 mo of treatment for similar results.

  7. Low-intensity agricultural landscapes in Transylvania support high butterfly diversity: implications for conservation.

    PubMed

    Loos, Jacqueline; Dorresteijn, Ine; Hanspach, Jan; Fust, Pascal; Rakosy, László; Fischer, Joern

    2014-01-01

    European farmland biodiversity is declining due to land use changes towards agricultural intensification or abandonment. Some Eastern European farming systems have sustained traditional forms of use, resulting in high levels of biodiversity. However, global markets and international policies now imply rapid and major changes to these systems. To effectively protect farmland biodiversity, understanding landscape features which underpin species diversity is crucial. Focusing on butterflies, we addressed this question for a cultural-historic landscape in Southern Transylvania, Romania. Following a natural experiment, we randomly selected 120 survey sites in farmland, 60 each in grassland and arable land. We surveyed butterfly species richness and abundance by walking transects with four repeats in summer 2012. We analysed species composition using Detrended Correspondence Analysis. We modelled species richness, richness of functional groups, and abundance of selected species in response to topography, woody vegetation cover and heterogeneity at three spatial scales, using generalised linear mixed effects models. Species composition widely overlapped in grassland and arable land. Composition changed along gradients of heterogeneity at local and context scales, and of woody vegetation cover at context and landscape scales. The effect of local heterogeneity on species richness was positive in arable land, but negative in grassland. Plant species richness, and structural and topographic conditions at multiple scales explained species richness, richness of functional groups and species abundances. Our study revealed high conservation value of both grassland and arable land in low-intensity Eastern European farmland. Besides grassland, also heterogeneous arable land provides important habitat for butterflies. While butterfly diversity in arable land benefits from heterogeneity by small-scale structures, grasslands should be protected from fragmentation to provide

  8. Low-Intensity Agricultural Landscapes in Transylvania Support High Butterfly Diversity: Implications for Conservation

    PubMed Central

    Loos, Jacqueline; Dorresteijn, Ine; Hanspach, Jan; Fust, Pascal; Rakosy, László; Fischer, Joern

    2014-01-01

    European farmland biodiversity is declining due to land use changes towards agricultural intensification or abandonment. Some Eastern European farming systems have sustained traditional forms of use, resulting in high levels of biodiversity. However, global markets and international policies now imply rapid and major changes to these systems. To effectively protect farmland biodiversity, understanding landscape features which underpin species diversity is crucial. Focusing on butterflies, we addressed this question for a cultural-historic landscape in Southern Transylvania, Romania. Following a natural experiment, we randomly selected 120 survey sites in farmland, 60 each in grassland and arable land. We surveyed butterfly species richness and abundance by walking transects with four repeats in summer 2012. We analysed species composition using Detrended Correspondence Analysis. We modelled species richness, richness of functional groups, and abundance of selected species in response to topography, woody vegetation cover and heterogeneity at three spatial scales, using generalised linear mixed effects models. Species composition widely overlapped in grassland and arable land. Composition changed along gradients of heterogeneity at local and context scales, and of woody vegetation cover at context and landscape scales. The effect of local heterogeneity on species richness was positive in arable land, but negative in grassland. Plant species richness, and structural and topographic conditions at multiple scales explained species richness, richness of functional groups and species abundances. Our study revealed high conservation value of both grassland and arable land in low-intensity Eastern European farmland. Besides grassland, also heterogeneous arable land provides important habitat for butterflies. While butterfly diversity in arable land benefits from heterogeneity by small-scale structures, grasslands should be protected from fragmentation to provide

  9. Gravel sediment routing from widespread, low-intensity landscape disturbance, Current River basin, Missouri

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jacobson, R.B.; Gran, K.B.

    1999-01-01

    During the last 160 years, land-use changes in the Ozarks have had the potential to cause widespread, low-intensity delivery of excess amounts of gravel-sized sediment to stream channels. Previous studies have indicated that this excess gravel bedload is moving in wave-like forms through Ozarks drainage basins. The longitudinal, areal distribution of gravel bars along 160 km of the Current River, Missouri, was evaluated to determine the relative effects of valley-scale controls, tributary basin characteristics, and lagged sediment transport in creating areas of gravel accumulations. The longitudinal distribution of gravel-bar area shows a broad scale wave-like form with increases in gravel-bar area weakly associated with tributary junctions. Secondary peaks of gravel area with 1.8-4.1 km spacing (disturbance reaches) are superimposed on the broad form. Variations in valley width explain some, but not all, of the short-spacing variation in gravel-bar area. Among variables describing tributary drainage basin morphometry, present-day land use and geologic characteristics, only drainage area and road density relate even weakly to gravel-bar areal inventories. A simple, channel network-based sediment routing model shows that many of the features of the observed longitudinal gravel distribution can be replicated by uniform transport of sediment from widespread disturbances through a channel network. These results indicate that lagged sediment transport may have a dominant effect on the synoptic spatial distribution of gravel in Ozarks streams; present-day land uses are only weakly associated with present-day gravel inventories; and valley-scale characteristics have secondary controls on gravel accumulations in disturbance reaches.

  10. The hematologic effects of low intensity 650 nm laser irradiation on hypercholesterolemia rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hong; Deng, Juan; Tu, Wenjun; Zhang, Lin; Chen, Hongli; Wu, Xiaoguang; Li, Yingxin; Sha, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To test the hematologic effects of low intensity 650 nm laser irradiation on hypercholesterolemia rabbits. Methods: Ten male big-eared rabbits were selected from hypercholesterolemia animal model-making and divided into model group and laser treatment groups. Five normal rabbits were selected as control group. Auricle root irradiation of 650 nm laser 100 mW in 30 min were applied on treatment group twice a day, treatment of 6 days in one week, 20 weeks course of treatment. Changes in blood lipid, microcirculation, rheological properties, and aggregation morphology of erythrocytes were observed every two weeks. Histopathological examination were performed in the end of experiments. Results: After 20 weeks’ treatment, triglyceride (TG), cholesterol (CHO), high density lipoprotein (HDL) and low density lipoprotein (LDL) of serum in hypercholesterolemia groups showed less changes in the first 4 weeks, butdifferent decreasing trends were shownin the next 16 weeks’ therapy. Erythrocytes aggregation of model groups showed rouleau state, while red blood cells in control group showed fine homodisperse, erythrocytes in treatment group performed better dispersion than model groups. Erythrocyte deformation index (DI) and blood flow value showed a statistic improvement in treatment group than control and model group (P<0.01). Value of DI in treatment group decreased after 18 weeks than values before therapy (P<0.01). Varying degrees of Aorta plaque formation was observed for individual difference in model and treatment groups, while no plaque was found in control group. Conclusions: Low energy laser improve microcirculation, rheological properties and blood lipid that might be related with erythrocytes aggregation and deformability. PMID:27347336

  11. Low-intensity noninvasive ventilation: Lower pressure, more exacerbations of chronic respiratory failure

    PubMed Central

    Kadowaki, Toru; Wakabayashi, Kiryo; Kimura, Masahiro; Kobayashi, Kanako; Ikeda, Toshikazu; Yano, Shuichi

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: For patients with chronic respiratory failure (CRF) who are treated with noninvasive positive pressure ventilation (NPPV), a little is known regarding the effects of low-intensity NPPV (LI-NPPV) on the clinical course of CRF and the frequency of adjustments in these patients. OBJECTIVES: This study investigated the effects of LI-NPPV on the clinical course of patients with CRF as compared with patients who were treated with conventional NPPV (C-NPPV) and determined how frequently NPPV was adjusted during therapy. METHODS: Clinical data from 21 patients who received long-term NPPV were retrospectively analyzed. Patients were categorized into two groups based on the level of initial pressure support (PS): C-NPPV group (PS ≥ 10 cm H2O) and LI-NPPV group (PS < 10 cm H2O). RESULTS: Patients in the LI-NPPV group had significantly more exacerbations of CRF (P < 0.05). There was no significant difference in the number of patients who required adjustments of NPPV settings between the two groups. There was no significant difference in PaCO2 levels 1 month after the start of NPPV between the two groups; however, PaCO2 levels were significantly lower after 1 year in the C-group (P < 0.001). Seventy-one percent of LI-NPPV patients and 43% of C-NPPV patients needed NPPV adjustments. CONCLUSIONS: Attention should be paid to CRF patients who are initially administered LI-NPPV; they should be carefully observed because they can develop more exacerbations of CRF than patients undergoing C-NPPV. If possible, higher initial PS should be administered to prevent CRF exacerbations. PMID:27168863

  12. A study of the influence of low intensity laser therapy on painful temporomandibular disorder patients.

    PubMed

    Sattayut, S; Bradley, P

    2012-09-30

    A double-blind clinical trial was conducted on 30 female Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD) patients who had pain as a chief complaint. The patients were randomly allocated into three groups based on Low Intensity Laser (LILT) regimes namely 820 nm Gallium Aluminium Arsenide (GaAlAs) laser at energy densities of 21.4J/cm(2), 107 J/cm(2) and placebo laser. Each patient had three LILT treatments in a week. The pressure pain threshold (PPT) of trigger points in masticatory muscles, unassisted maximum mouth opening without pain (MOSP) and symptom severity index (SSI) were recorded as baseline data and monitored after every treatment. Jaw kinesiology, electromyography (EMG) and pain rating index from McGill pain questionnaire were also recorded as baseline and final results. The analysis of covariance and further analysis showed that the higher energy density laser group had significant increases in PPT and EMG amplitude recorded from voluntary clenching (cEMG) compared with the placebo group at P values 0.0001 and 0.022 respectively. A significantly greater number of patients recovered from myofascial pain and TMJ arthralgia as assessed clinically in the higher energy group compared with the placebo (P value = 0.02 and 0.006 respectively). There was no statistically significant difference in the other parameters of assessment among the groups at a P value 0.05. At a period of 2 to 4 weeks review after LILT, there was an average 52% reduction of pain as assessed by SSI.

  13. Low Intensity Low Temperature (LILT) measurements and coefficients on new photovoltaic structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schelman, David A.; Jenkins, Philip P.; Brinker, David J.; Appelbaum, Joseph

    1995-01-01

    Past NASA missions to Mars, Jupiter, and the outer planets were powered by radioisotope thermal generators (RTG's). Although these devices proved to be reliable, their high cost and highly toxic radioactive heat source has made them far less desirable for future planetary missions. This has resulted in a renewed search for alternate energy sources, some of them being photovoltaic (PV) and thermophotovoltaic (TPV). Both of these alternate energy sources convert light/thermal energy directly into electricity. In order to create a viable PV and TPV data base for planetary mission planners and cell designers, we have compiled low temperature low intensity (LILT) I-V data on single junction and multi-junction high efficiency solar cells. The cells tested here represent the latest photovoltaic technology. Using this LILT data to calculate dI(sub SC)/dT, dV(sub OC)/dT, dFF/dT, and also as a function of intensity, an accurate prediction of cell performance under the AMO spectrum can be determined. When combined with QUantum efficiency at Low Temperature (QULT) data, one can further enhance the data by adding spectral variations to the measurements. This paper presents an overview of LILT measurements and is only intended to be used as a guideline for material selection and performance predictions. As single junction and multi-junction cell technologies emerge, new test data must be collected. Cell materials included are Si, GaAs/Ge, GainP/GaAs/Ge, InP, InGaAs/InP, InP/InGaAs/InP, and GainP. Temperatures range as low as -175 C and intensities range from 1 sun to .02 suns.

  14. Trauma Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Wongwaisayawan, Sirote; Suwannanon, Ruedeekorn; Prachanukool, Thidathit; Sricharoen, Pungkava; Saksobhavivat, Nitima; Kaewlai, Rathachai

    2015-10-01

    Ultrasound plays a pivotal role in the evaluation of acute trauma patients through the use of multi-site scanning encompassing abdominal, cardiothoracic, vascular and skeletal scans. In a high-speed polytrauma setting, because exsanguinations are the primary cause of trauma morbidity and mortality, ultrasound is used for quick and accurate detection of hemorrhages in the pericardial, pleural, and peritoneal cavities during the primary Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) survey. Volume status can be assessed non-invasively with ultrasound of the inferior vena cava (IVC), which is a useful tool in the initial phase and follow-up evaluations. Pneumothorax can also be quickly detected with ultrasound. During the secondary survey and in patients sustaining low-speed or localized trauma, ultrasound can be used to help detect abdominal organ injuries. This is particularly helpful in patients in whom hemoperitoneum is not identified on an initial scan because findings of organ injuries will expedite the next test, often computed tomography (CT). Moreover, ultrasound can assist in detection of fractures easily obscured on radiography, such as rib and sternal fractures.

  15. Low-intensity repetitive magnetic stimulation lowers action potential threshold and increases spike firing in layer 5 pyramidal neurons in vitro.

    PubMed

    Tang, Alexander D; Hong, Ivan; Boddington, Laura J; Garrett, Andrew R; Etherington, Sarah; Reynolds, John N J; Rodger, Jennifer

    2016-10-29

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) has become a popular method of modulating neural plasticity in humans. Clinically, rTMS is delivered at high intensities to modulate neuronal excitability. While the high-intensity magnetic field can be targeted to stimulate specific cortical regions, areas adjacent to the targeted area receive stimulation at a lower intensity and may contribute to the overall plasticity induced by rTMS. We have previously shown that low-intensity rTMS induces molecular and structural plasticity in vivo, but the effects on membrane properties and neural excitability have not been investigated. Here we investigated the acute effect of low-intensity repetitive magnetic stimulation (LI-rMS) on neuronal excitability and potential changes on the passive and active electrophysiological properties of layer 5 pyramidal neurons in vitro. Whole-cell current clamp recordings were made at baseline prior to subthreshold LI-rMS (600 pulses of iTBS, n=9 cells from 7 animals) or sham (n=10 cells from 9 animals), immediately after stimulation, as well as 10 and 20min post-stimulation. Our results show that LI-rMS does not alter passive membrane properties (resting membrane potential and input resistance) but hyperpolarises action potential threshold and increases evoked spike-firing frequency. Increases in spike firing frequency were present throughout the 20min post-stimulation whereas action potential (AP) threshold hyperpolarization was present immediately after stimulation and at 20min post-stimulation. These results provide evidence that LI-rMS alters neuronal excitability of excitatory neurons. We suggest that regions outside the targeted region of high-intensity rTMS are susceptible to neuromodulation and may contribute to rTMS-induced plasticity. PMID:27568058

  16. Cranial Ultrasound/Head Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... collects the sounds that bounce back and a computer then uses those sound waves to create an ... Ultrasound scanners consist of a console containing a computer and electronics, a video display screen and a ...

  17. Effect of low-intensity laser radiation on thermal denaturing of oxyhemoglobin and hemolysis of human erythrocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asimov, M. M.; Asimov, R. M.; Batian, A. N.; Trusevich, M. O.; Rubinova, A. N.

    2013-05-01

    We present the results of studies on the effect of optical radiation on thermal denaturing of oxyhemoglobin and hemolysis of human erythrocytes. We have established that low-intensity laser radiation promotes decreased structural and conformational changes and stabilizes the oxyhemoglobin molecules and erythrocytes against thermal denaturing.

  18. Low-intensity functional electrical stimulation can increase multidirectional trunk stiffness in able-bodied individuals during sitting.

    PubMed

    Vette, Albert H; Wu, Noel; Masani, Kei; Popovic, Milos R

    2015-08-01

    The inability to voluntarily control the trunk musculature is a major problem following spinal cord injury as it can compromise functional independence and produce unwanted secondary complications. Recent developments suggest that neuroprostheses utilizing functional electrical stimulation (FES) may be able to facilitate or restore trunk control during sitting, standing, and other tasks involving postural control. In spite of these efforts, no study to date has used low-intensity FES to increase multidirectional trunk stiffness and damping in an attempt to bolster stability while minimizing muscle fatigue. Therefore, we set out to investigate how multidirectional trunk stiffness changes in response to low-intensity FES of a few selected trunk muscles. Fifteen healthy participants sitting naturally were randomly perturbed in eight horizontal directions. Trunk stiffness and damping during natural and FES-supported sitting conditions were quantified using force and trunk kinematics in combination with two models of a mass-spring-damper system. Our results indicate that low-intensity FES can increase trunk stiffness in healthy individuals, and this specifically for directions associated with the stimulated muscles. In contrast, trunk damping was not found to be altered during FES. The presented results suggest that low-intensity FES is a simple and effective method for increasing trunk stiffness on demand. PMID:26071025

  19. Long lifetime, low intensity light source for use in nighttime viewing of equipment maps and other writings

    DOEpatents

    Frank, Alan M.; Edwards, William R.

    1983-01-01

    A long-lifetime light source with sufficiently low intensity to be used for reading a map or other writing at nighttime, while not obscuring the user's normal night vision. This light source includes a diode electrically connected in series with a small power source and a lens properly positioned to focus at least a portion of the light produced by the diode.

  20. Low-intensity functional electrical stimulation can increase multidirectional trunk stiffness in able-bodied individuals during sitting.

    PubMed

    Vette, Albert H; Wu, Noel; Masani, Kei; Popovic, Milos R

    2015-08-01

    The inability to voluntarily control the trunk musculature is a major problem following spinal cord injury as it can compromise functional independence and produce unwanted secondary complications. Recent developments suggest that neuroprostheses utilizing functional electrical stimulation (FES) may be able to facilitate or restore trunk control during sitting, standing, and other tasks involving postural control. In spite of these efforts, no study to date has used low-intensity FES to increase multidirectional trunk stiffness and damping in an attempt to bolster stability while minimizing muscle fatigue. Therefore, we set out to investigate how multidirectional trunk stiffness changes in response to low-intensity FES of a few selected trunk muscles. Fifteen healthy participants sitting naturally were randomly perturbed in eight horizontal directions. Trunk stiffness and damping during natural and FES-supported sitting conditions were quantified using force and trunk kinematics in combination with two models of a mass-spring-damper system. Our results indicate that low-intensity FES can increase trunk stiffness in healthy individuals, and this specifically for directions associated with the stimulated muscles. In contrast, trunk damping was not found to be altered during FES. The presented results suggest that low-intensity FES is a simple and effective method for increasing trunk stiffness on demand.

  1. Fruit and Vegetable Dietary Behavior in Response to a Low-Intensity Dietary Intervention: The Rural Physician Cancer Prevention Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carcaise-Edinboro, Patricia; McClish, Donna; Kracen, Amanda C.; Bowen, Deborah; Fries, Elizabeth

    2008-01-01

    Context: Increased fruit and vegetable intake can reduce cancer risk. Information from this study contributes to research exploring health disparities in high-risk dietary behavior. Purpose: Changes in fruit and vegetable behavior were evaluated to assess the effects of a low-intensity, physician-endorsed dietary intervention in a rural…

  2. Low Intensity Behavioral Treatment Supplementing Preschool Services for Young Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders and Severe to Mild Intellectual disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters-Scheffer, Nienke; Didden, Robert; Mulders, Monique; Korzilius, Hubert

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of low intensity behavioral treatment (on average 6.5h per week) supplementing preschool services in 3-6-year-old children with autism spectrum disorder and severe to mild intellectual disability. Treatment was implemented in preschools (i.e., daycare centers) and a discrete trial teaching approach was used.…

  3. The Effects of Nandrolone Decanoate Along with Prolonged Low-Intensity Exercise on Susceptibility to Ventricular Arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Binayi, Fateme; Joukar, Siyavash; Najafipour, Hamid; Karimi, Abdolah; Karimi, Ali; Abdollahi, Farzane; Masumi, Yaser

    2016-01-01

    We examined the influence of chronic administration of nandrolone decanoate with low-intensity endurance swimming exercise on susceptibility to lethal ventricular arrhythmias in rat. The animal groups included the control group, exercise group (EX), nandrolone group (Nan), vehicle group (Arach), trained vehicle group (Arach + Ex) and trained nandrolone group (Nan + Ex) that treated for 8 weeks. Then, arrhythmia induction was performed by intravenous infusion of aconitine and electrocardiogram recorded. Then, malondialdehyde (MDA), hydroxyproline (HYP) and glutathione peroxidase of heart tissue were measured. Chronic administration of nandrolone with low-intensity endurance swimming exercise had no significant effect on blood pressure, heart rate and basal ECG parameters except RR interval that showed increase (P < 0.05). Low-intensity exercise could prevent the incremental effect of nandrolone on MDA and HYP significantly. It also increased the heart hypertrophy index (P < 0.05) and reduced the abating effect of nandrolone on animal weighting. Nandrolone along with exercise significantly increased the duration of VF (P < 0.05) and reduced the VF latency (P < 0.05). The findings suggest that chronic co-administration of nandrolone with low-intensity endurance swimming exercise to some extent facilitates the occurrence of ventricular fibrillation in rat. Complementary studies are needed to elucidate the involved mechanisms of this abnormality. PMID:25636207

  4. Effects of low intensity static electromagnetic radiofrequency fields on leiomyosarcoma and smooth muscle cell lines.

    PubMed

    Karkabounas, Spyridon; Havelas, Konstantinos; Kostoula, Olga K; Vezyraki, Patra; Avdikos, Antonios; Binolis, Jayne; Hatziavazis, George; Metsios, Apostolos; Verginadis, Ioannis; Evangelou, Angelos

    2006-01-01

    In this study we investigated the effects of low intensity static radiofrequency electromagnetic field (EMF) causing no thermal effects, on leiomyosarcoma cells (LSC), isolated from tumors of fifteen Wistar rats induced via a 3,4-benzopyrene injection. Electromagnetic resonance frequencies measurements and exposure of cells to static EMF were performed by a device called multi channel dynamic exciter 100 V1 (MCDE). The LSC were exposed to electromagnetic resonance radiofrequencies (ERF) between 10 kHz to 120 kHz, for 45 min. During a 24h period, after the exposure of the LSC to ERF, there was no inhibition of cells proliferation. In contrast, at the end of a 48 h incubation period, LSC proliferation dramatically decreased by more than 98% (P<0.001). At that time, the survived LSC were only 2% of the total cell population exposed to ERF, and under the same culture conditions showed significant decrease of proliferation. These cells were exposed once again to ERF for 45 min (totally 4 sessions of exposure, of 45 min duration each) and tested using a flow cytometer. Experiments as above were repeated five times. It was found that 45% of these double exposed to ERF, LSC (EMF cells) were apoptotic and only a small percentage 2%, underwent mitosis. In order to determinate their metastatic potential, these EMF cells were also counted and tested by an aggregometer for their ability to aggregate platelets and found to maintain this ability., since they showed no difference in platelet aggregation ability compared to the LSC not exposed to ERF (control cells). In conclusion, exposure of LSC to specific ERF, decreases their proliferation rate and induces cell apoptosis. Also, the LSC that survived after exposed to ERF, had a lower proliferation rate compared to the LSC controls (P<0.05) but did not loose their potential for metastases (platelet aggregation ability). The non-malignant SMC were not affected by the EMF exposure (P<0.4). The specific ERF generated from the MCDE

  5. [Fluorescence used to investigate the sensitivity of spinach chloroplast membrane to low intensity electromagnetic radiation].

    PubMed

    Xi, Gang; Yang, Yun-Jing; Lu, Hong

    2009-07-01

    A system for studying biological effect of radio frequency electromagnetic field was developed. The system can form an area where electromagnetic wave with large frequency range is well distributed. The strength of electromagnetic wave was measured easily. Electromagnetic wave in the system did not have effect on environment. The sensitivity of spinach chloroplast membrane to low intensity electromagnetic radiation of 300 MHz under power density of 5 mW x cm(-2) was studied by the spectral analysis method of fluorescence of 8-anilino-1-naphthalene-sulfonic acid (ANS) and the changes in chlorophyll a (Chla) fluorescence parameters of spinach chloroplast membrane. The result showed that the position of spectrum of ANS fluorescence of spinach chloroplast membrane did not change, but the intensity of ANS fluorescence was obviously increased under the action of electromagnetic radiation with power density of 1-5 mW x cm(-2). There was an increase in the intensity of ANS fluorescence with the increase in electromagnetic radiation. The increase of ANS fluorescence of spinach chloroplast membrane showed that low level electromagnetic field induced the decrease in fluidity of chloroplast membrane compared with control experiment. The cause of the change in the fluidity could be related to the polarization of chloroplast membrane under the electromagnetic field. The analysis of Chla fluorescence parameters of spinach chloroplast membrane indicated that low level electromagnetic field of 300 MHz made the fluorescence parameters F0 and F(VI/)F(V) decrease, and F(V)/Fo, Fv/F(m) and deltaF(V)/T increase. It was showed that low level electromagnetic field caused the change of non-active center of photosystem II of spinach chloroplast membrane to active center and the increase in potential active and photochemical efficiency of PSII, and promoted the transmit process of electron in photosynthesis of chloroplast membrane of photosynthesis cell in spinach leaf. The study confirmed

  6. The effect of high versus low intensity heat acclimation on performance and neuromuscular responses.

    PubMed

    Wingfield, Georgia L; Gale, Rachel; Minett, Geoffrey M; Marino, Frank E; Skein, Melissa

    2016-05-01

    This study examined the effect of exercise intensity and duration during 5-day heat acclimation (HA) on cycling performance and neuromuscular responses. 20 recreationally trained males completed a 'baseline' trial followed by 5 consecutive days HA, and a 'post-acclimation' trial. Baseline and post-acclimation trials consisted of maximal voluntary contractions (MVC), a single and repeated countermovement jump protocol, 20km cycling time trial (TT) and 5×6s maximal sprints (SPR). Cycling trials were undertaken in 33.0 ± 0.8°C and 60 ± 3% relative humidity. Core (Tcore), and skin temperatures (Tskin), heart rate (HR), rating of perceived exertion (RPE) and thermal sensation were recorded throughout cycling trials. Participants were assigned to either 30min high-intensity (30HI) or 90min low-intensity (90LI) cohorts for HA, conducted in environmental conditions of 32.0 ± 1.6°C. Percentage change time to complete the 20km TT for the 90LI cohort was significantly improved post-acclimation (-5.9 ± 7.0%; P=0.04) compared to the 30HI cohort (-0.18 ± 3.9%; P<0.05). The 30HI cohort showed greatest improvements in power output (PO) during post-acclimation SPR 1 and 2 compared to 90LI (546 ± 128W and 517 ± 87W, respectively; P<0.02). No differences were evident for MVC within 30HI cohort, however, a reduced performance indicated by % change within the 90LI (P=0.04). Compared to baseline, mean Tcore was reduced post-acclimation within the 30HI cohort (P=0.05) while mean Tcore and HR were significantly reduced within the 90LI cohort (P=0.01 and 0.04, respectively). Greater physiological adaptations and performance improvements were noted within the 90LI cohort compared to the 30HI. However, 30HI did provide some benefit to anaerobic performance including sprint PO and MVC. These findings suggest specifying training duration and intensity during heat acclimation may be useful for specific post-acclimation performance. PMID:27157334

  7. The effect of high versus low intensity heat acclimation on performance and neuromuscular responses.

    PubMed

    Wingfield, Georgia L; Gale, Rachel; Minett, Geoffrey M; Marino, Frank E; Skein, Melissa

    2016-05-01

    This study examined the effect of exercise intensity and duration during 5-day heat acclimation (HA) on cycling performance and neuromuscular responses. 20 recreationally trained males completed a 'baseline' trial followed by 5 consecutive days HA, and a 'post-acclimation' trial. Baseline and post-acclimation trials consisted of maximal voluntary contractions (MVC), a single and repeated countermovement jump protocol, 20km cycling time trial (TT) and 5×6s maximal sprints (SPR). Cycling trials were undertaken in 33.0 ± 0.8°C and 60 ± 3% relative humidity. Core (Tcore), and skin temperatures (Tskin), heart rate (HR), rating of perceived exertion (RPE) and thermal sensation were recorded throughout cycling trials. Participants were assigned to either 30min high-intensity (30HI) or 90min low-intensity (90LI) cohorts for HA, conducted in environmental conditions of 32.0 ± 1.6°C. Percentage change time to complete the 20km TT for the 90LI cohort was significantly improved post-acclimation (-5.9 ± 7.0%; P=0.04) compared to the 30HI cohort (-0.18 ± 3.9%; P<0.05). The 30HI cohort showed greatest improvements in power output (PO) during post-acclimation SPR 1 and 2 compared to 90LI (546 ± 128W and 517 ± 87W, respectively; P<0.02). No differences were evident for MVC within 30HI cohort, however, a reduced performance indicated by % change within the 90LI (P=0.04). Compared to baseline, mean Tcore was reduced post-acclimation within the 30HI cohort (P=0.05) while mean Tcore and HR were significantly reduced within the 90LI cohort (P=0.01 and 0.04, respectively). Greater physiological adaptations and performance improvements were noted within the 90LI cohort compared to the 30HI. However, 30HI did provide some benefit to anaerobic performance including sprint PO and MVC. These findings suggest specifying training duration and intensity during heat acclimation may be useful for specific post-acclimation performance.

  8. Corticomotor control of lumbar multifidus muscles is impaired in chronic low back pain: concurrent evidence from ultrasound imaging and double-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Massé-Alarie, Hugo; Beaulieu, Louis-David; Preuss, Richard; Schneider, Cyril

    2016-04-01

    Chronic low back pain (CLBP) is often associated with impaired control of deep trunk muscles and reorganization of the primary motor areas (M1). Precisely, functional changes of the lumbar multifidus muscles (MF) involved in spine stability may be of special interest in rehabilitation. Therefore, we tested MF corticomotor control using double transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) paradigms for the first time in this muscle and examined its link with MF volitional activation. Eleven individuals with lateralized CLBP and 13 pain-free participants were recruited. Ultrasound imaging enabled measurement of MF volitional isometric contraction in prone lying. TMS of MF M1 area was used to test hemispheric excitability and mechanisms in relation to motor programming, i.e., active motor threshold (AMT), amplitude of motor-evoked potentials and short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI) and facilitation (SICF). In CLBP, SICI level was lower in the left hemisphere and MF volitional contraction was not related to AMT (M1 excitability), conversely to what was observed in the pain-free group. No other between-group difference was detected. These original findings support a plasticity of cortical maps controlling paravertebral muscles and likely including a different motor strategy for the control of MF. Changes of M1 function may thus underlie impaired motor control of lumbopelvic spine and pain persistence in CLBP. PMID:26708518

  9. Low intensity vs. self-guided Internet-delivered psychotherapy for major depression: a multicenter, controlled, randomized study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Major depression will become the second most important cause of disability in 2020. Computerized cognitive-behaviour therapy could be an efficacious and cost-effective option for its treatment. No studies on cost-effectiveness of low intensity vs self-guided psychotherapy has been carried out. The aim of this study is to assess the efficacy of low intensity vs self-guided psychotherapy for major depression in the Spanish health system. Methods The study is made up of 3 phases: 1.- Development of a computerized cognitive-behaviour therapy for depression tailored to Spanish health system. 2.- Multicenter controlled, randomized study: A sample (N=450 patients) with mild/moderate depression recruited in primary care. They should have internet availability at home, not receive any previous psychological treatment, and not suffer from any other severe somatic or psychological disorder. They will be allocated to one of 3 treatments: a) Low intensity Internet-delivered psychotherapy + improved treatment as usual (ITAU) by GP, b) Self-guided Internet-delivered psychotherapy + ITAU or c) ITAU. Patients will be diagnosed with MINI psychiatric interview. Main outcome variable will be Beck Depression Inventory. It will be also administered EuroQol 5D (quality of life) and Client Service Receipt Inventory (consume of health and social services). Patients will be assessed at baseline, 3 and 12 months. An intention to treat and a per protocol analysis will be performed. Discussion The comparisons between low intensity and self-guided are infrequent, and also a comparative economic evaluation between them and compared with usual treatment in primary. The strength of the study is that it is a multicenter, randomized, controlled trial of low intensity and self-guided Internet-delivered psychotherapy for depression in primary care, being the treatment completely integrated in primary care setting. Trial registration Clinical Trials NCT01611818 PMID:23312003

  10. Combined ultrasound-laccase assisted bleaching of cotton.

    PubMed

    Basto, Carlos; Tzanov, Tzanko; Cavaco-Paulo, Artur

    2007-03-01

    This study evaluates the potential of using ultrasound to enhance the bleaching efficiency of laccase enzyme on cotton fabrics. Ultrasound of low intensity (7W) and relatively short reaction time (30 min) seems to act in a synergistic way with the enzyme in the oxidation/removal of the natural colouring matter of cotton. The increased bleaching effect could be attributed to improved diffusion of the enzyme from the liquid phase to the fibres surface and throughout the textile structure. On the other hand inactivation of the laccase occurred increasing the intensity of the ultrasound. However, at the ultrasound power applied in the bleaching experiments the loss of enzyme activity was not significant enough to justify the use stabilizer such as polyvinyl alcohol. Furthermore, the polyvinyl alcohol appears to be a substrate for the laccase.

  11. Pulsed neutron detector

    DOEpatents

    Robertson, deceased, J. Craig; Rowland, Mark S.

    1989-03-21

    A pulsed neutron detector and system for detecting low intensity fast neutron pulses has a body of beryllium adjacent a body of hydrogenous material the latter of which acts as a beta particle detector, scintillator, and moderator. The fast neutrons (defined as having En>1.5 MeV) react in the beryllium and the hydrogenous material to produce larger numbers of slow neutrons than would be generated in the beryllium itself and which in the beryllium generate hellium-6 which decays and yields beta particles. The beta particles reach the hydrogenous material which scintillates to yield light of intensity related to the number of fast neutrons. A photomultiplier adjacent the hydrogenous material (scintillator) senses the light emission from the scintillator. Utilization means, such as a summing device, sums the pulses from the photo-multiplier for monitoring or other purposes.

  12. Effect of ground fire of low intensity on soil organic matter decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blagodatskaya, Evgenia; Zhuravleva, Anna; Myakshina, Tatyana; Blagodatsky, Sergey

    2010-05-01

    Seasonal grassland fires in Russia occupy the greater area and spread quicker than peat-bog or forest fire. During short-term grassland fire of low intensity the vegetation and plant litter are usually burned down, while soil is not affected by high temperatures. Thus, the pyrogenically transformed plant material is the main factor affecting the soil microbial community after the seasonal grassland fire. Input of pyrogenic substrates to soil can alter microbial activity resulting in accelerated turnover of native soil organic matter (SOM), and in carbon losses from soil. Our study aimed to estimate the effect of seasonal grassland fires on microbial communities of soils under forest and meadow using the eco-physiological profiling (Anderson, 2003). The following variables were determined under field and laboratory conditions: 1) dynamics of CO2 evolution (basal respiration); 2) microbial biomass C by glucose-induced respiration; 3) Cmic - to- Corg ratio, 4) metabolic quotient qCO2; 4) specific growth rates of microorganisms by the kinetics of substrate induced respiration. The indirect effect of short-term ground fire on mineralization activity of soil microorganisms was studied in incubation experiments after application of pyrogenically modified plant residues to the soil. Since the values of the variables studied differed from each other in a large scale, they were generalized by the mathematical indices allowing the comparison of different variables at the base of non-dimensional scale. The eco-physiological profiles combining the biological indicators mentioned above allowed the comparison of post-fire and undisturbed soils. The acceleration of basal respiration caused by the fire was observed in soils of both biocenoses at least during two months after the fire. Cumulative increase in CO2 efflux from 5cm soil layer amounted for 5 % (meadow) and for 10 % (forest) of annual CO2 emission. Post-fire effect resulted in total mineralization of grassland floor on

  13. Mechanotransduction of Ultrasound is Frequency Dependent Below the Cavitation Threshold

    PubMed Central

    Louw, Tobias M.; Budhiraja, Gaurav; Viljoen, Hendrik J.; Subramanian, Anuradha

    2013-01-01

    This study provides evidence that low-intensity ultrasound directly affects nuclear processes, and the magnitude of the effect varies with frequency. In particular, we show that the transcriptional induction of first load-inducible genes, which is independent of new protein synthesis, is frequency dependent. Bovine chondrocytes were exposed to low-intensity below the cavitational threshold) ultrasound at 2,5 and 8 MHz. Ultrasound elevated the expression of early response genes c-Fos, c-Jun and c-Myc, maximized at 5 MHz. The phosphorylated ERK inhibitor PD98059 abrogated any increase in c-series gene expression, suggesting that signaling occurs via the MAPPK/ERK pathway. However, phosphorylated ERK levels did not change with ultrasound frequency, indicating that processes downstream of ERK phosphorylation (such as nuclear transport and chromatin reorganization) respond to ultrasound with frequency dependence. A quantitative, biphasic mathematical model based on Biot theory predicted that cytoplasmic and nuclear stress is maximized at 5.2 ± 0.8 MHz for a chondrocyte, confirming experimental measurements. PMID:23562015

  14. Generation of strongly coupled Xe cluster nanoplasmas by low intensive soft x-ray laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Namba, S.; Hasegawa, N.; Kishimoto, M.; Nishikino, M.; Kawachi, T.

    2012-07-11

    A seeding gas jet including Xe clusters was irradiated with a laser-driven plasma soft x-ray laser pulse ({lambda}=13.9 nm, {approx}7 ps, {<=}5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} W/cm{sup 2}), where the laser photon energy is high enough to ionize 4d core electrons. In order to clarify how the innershell ionization followed by the Auger electron emission is affected under the intense laser irradiation, the electron energy distribution was measured. Photoelectron spectra showed that the peak position attributed to 4d hole shifted to lower energy and the spectral width was broadened with increasing cluster size. Moreover, the energy distribution exhibited that a strongly coupled cluster nanoplasma with several eV was generated.

  15. Low intensity dust ion-acoustic shock waves due to dust charge fluctuation in a nonextensive dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Alinejad, H.; Shahmansory, M.

    2012-08-15

    The properties of low intensity dust ion acoustic shock waves are studied in a charge varying dusty plasma with nonextensive electrons. Owing to the departure from the Maxwellian electron distribution to a nonextensive one, the modified electrostatic charging of a spherical dust particle in plasma with ion streaming speed is considered. Based on the weakly nonlinear analysis, a new relationship between the low intensity localized disturbances and nonextensive electrons is derived. It is found that both strength and steepness of shock structures arise as the electrons evolve far from their thermodynamic equilibrium in such plasma with parameter ranges corresponding to Saturn's rings. It is also shown that the ion temperature and population of electrons reduce the possibility of the formation of the shock profile.

  16. Possible molecular effect related to the reception of low-intensity IR radiation: Role of Src-kinase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yachnev, I. L.; Shelykh, T. N.; Podzorova, S. A.; Rogachevskii, I. V.; Krylov, B. V.; Plakhova, V. B.

    2016-06-01

    The patch-clamp technique has been used to demonstrate that low-intensity IR irradiation affects the effective charge of the activation gating system of slow sodium channels in the nociceptive neuron membrane. IR photons are absorbed by ATP molecules bound to Na+,K+-ATPase at their hydrolysis site. Na+,K+-ATPase is a transducer of signal that is further delivered to slow sodium channels and cell genome. It is demonstrated that the irradiation does not modulate the response of a sensory neuron in the presence of PP2, an inhibitor of Src-kinase. The results show that Src-kinase is a series unit involved in the intracellular cascade processes triggered by low-intensity radiation of CO2 laser.

  17. [The effect of low-intensity red and infrared laser radiation on the rat arterial and deoxygenated blood].

    PubMed

    Timoshenko, T E; Dvoretskiĭ, D P

    2010-10-01

    In vitro experiments the effect of low-intensity red or near-infrared laser irradiation on the blood samples (1.5 ml from abdominal aorta of Wistar rats) were studied. The diode laser light (lambda = 650 nm or 808 nm, power density 15.6 mW/cm2, duration 15 min) were used. In some experiments the deoxygenated blood as object for comparison with arterial blood was chosen. Under red laser irradiation we observed a significant increase of average volume of erythrocytes as well as mean amount of free (disaggregated) leukocytes especially in case of the deoxygenated blood. At the same time the concentration of Ca2+ and Na+ were decreased. The effects of infrared laser irradiation on indices mentioned above were not significant. We believe that red low-intensity laser irradiation on the blood is an important factor for theological properties in the field of microcirculation.

  18. Protective action of low-intensity laser radiation relative to the toxic effect of metals (experimental study in vitro)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dejneka, S. Y.

    1997-12-01

    The study of a possible cytotoxic effect of different doses of low-insensitive laser radiation and protective action of low-intensive laser radiation relative to the toxic effect of metals was carried out by means of the alternative method of investigation in vitro on cell cultura Hela. It was established that the investigated doses of low-intensive laser radiation had not produced any toxic effect on cell culture Hela, so the mentioned doses were not cytotoxic. It was revealed that laser radiation reduced the level of the cytotoxic effect of the studied metal salts on the cell culture, and possessed the protective action against the toxic effect of metals. This action has a clear-cut dose- related character.

  19. Low-intensity isometric handgrip exercise has no transient effect on blood pressure in patients with coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Goessler, Karla; Buys, Roselien; Cornelissen, Véronique A

    2016-08-01

    Hypertension is highly prevalent among patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation reduces blood pressure (BP). However, less is known about the transient effect of a single bout of exercise on BP. Isometric handgrip exercise has been proposed as a new nonpharmacologic tool to lower BP. We aimed to investigate the acute effect of isometric handgrip exercise on BP in CAD patients. Twenty-one male CAD patients were included. All patients completed two experimental sessions in random order: one control and one low-intensity isometric handgrip session. BP was measured by means of a 24-hour ambulatory BP monitor preintervention, for 1 hour in the office and subsequently for 24 hours. Our results suggest that isometric handgrip exercise performed at low intensity is safe in patients with CAD but does not induce a transient reduction in BP.

  20. Effect of low-intensity treadmill exercise on behavioural measures and hippocampal parvalbumin immunoreactivity in the rat.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Jason C D; Killcross, A Simon; Jenkins, Trisha A

    2013-11-01

    Exercise has been demonstrated to have positive effects on both the body and brain. The present study aimed to determine the behavioural and morphological consequence of low-intensity running. Rats were exercised on a treadmill for a total of 30 days, 30 min/day. Social interaction, locomotor activity and behaviour on an elevated plus maze were assessed post-treatment. Exercised animals demonstrated more passive interaction and less time not interacting than control animals that were not exercised. Conversely, locomotor and anxiety measures showed no effect of exercise. Analysis of brains demonstrated an increase in expression of parvalbumin immunoreactive neurons in the hippocampus localised to the CA1 and CA2/3 regions. These results demonstrate that low-intensity exercise leads to changes in social behaviour as well as neuroplastic morphological changes within the hippocampus.

  1. Method for Correction of Consequences of Radiation-Induced Heart Disease using Low-Intensity Electromagnetic Emission under Experimental Conditions.

    PubMed

    Bavrina, A P; Monich, V A; Malinovskaya, S L; Yakovleva, E I; Bugrova, M L; Lazukin, V F

    2015-05-01

    Effects of successive exposure to ionizing irradiation and low-intensity broadband red light on electrical activity of the heart and myocardium microstructure were studied in rats. Lowintensity red light corrected some ECG parameters, in particular, it normalized QT and QTc intervals and voltage of R and T waves. Changes in ECG parameters were followed by alterations in microstructure of muscle fi laments in the myocardium of treatment group animals comparing to control group.

  2. Long lifetime, low intensity light source for use in nighttime viewing of equipment maps and other writings

    DOEpatents

    Frank, A.M.; Edwards, W.R.

    1982-03-23

    A long-lifetime light source is discussed with sufficiently low intensity to be used for reading a map or other writing at nightime, while not obscuring the user's normal night vision. This light source includes a diode electrically connected in series with a small power source and a lens properly positioned to focus at least a portion of the light produced by the diode.

  3. Long lifetime, low intensity light source for use in nighttime viewing of equipment maps and other writings

    DOEpatents

    Frank, A.M.; Edwards, W.R.

    1983-10-11

    A long-lifetime light source with sufficiently low intensity to be used for reading a map or other writing at nighttime, while not obscuring the user's normal night vision is disclosed. This light source includes a diode electrically connected in series with a small power source and a lens properly positioned to focus at least a portion of the light produced by the diode. 1 fig.

  4. Measurement uncertainty in pulmonary vascular input impedance and characteristic impedance estimated from pulsed-wave Doppler ultrasound and pressure: clinical studies on 57 pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Tian, Lian; Hunter, Kendall S; Kirby, K Scott; Ivy, D Dunbar; Shandas, Robin

    2010-06-01

    Pulmonary vascular input impedance better characterizes right ventricular (RV) afterload and disease outcomes in pulmonary hypertension compared to the standard clinical diagnostic, pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR). Early efforts to measure impedance were not routine, involving open-chest measurement. Recently, the use of pulsed-wave (PW) Doppler-measured velocity to non-invasively estimate instantaneous flow has made impedance measurement more practical. One critical concern remains with clinical use: the measurement uncertainty, especially since previous studies only incorporated random error. This study utilized data from a large pediatric patient population to comprehensively examine the systematic and random error contributions to the total impedance uncertainty and determined the least error prone methodology to compute impedance from among four different methods. We found that the systematic error contributes greatly to the total uncertainty and that one of the four methods had significantly smaller propagated uncertainty; however, even when this best method is used, the uncertainty can be large for input impedance at high harmonics and for the characteristic impedance modulus. Finally, we found that uncertainty in impedance between normotensive and hypertensive patient groups displays no significant difference. It is concluded that clinical impedance measurement would be most improved by advancements in instrumentation, and the best computation method is proposed for future clinical use of the input impedance.

  5. Supplementary Low-Intensity Aerobic Training Improves Aerobic Capacity and Does Not Affect Psychomotor Performance in Professional Female Ballet Dancers

    PubMed Central

    Smol, Ewelina; Fredyk, Artur

    2012-01-01

    We investigated whether 6-week low-intensity aerobic training program used as a supplement to regular dance practice might improve both the aerobic capacity and psychomotor performance in female ballet dancers. To assess their maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) and anaerobic threshold (AT), the dancers performed a standard graded bicycle ergometer exercise test until volitional exhaustion prior to and after the supplementary training. At both these occasions, the psychomotor performance (assessed as multiple choice reaction time) and number of correct responses to audio-visual stimuli was assessed at rest and immediately after cessation of maximal intensity exercise. The supplementary low-intensity exercise training increased VO2max and markedly shifted AT toward higher absolute workload. Immediately after completion of the graded exercise to volitional exhaustion, the ballerinas’ psychomotor performance remained at the pre-exercise (resting) level. Neither the resting nor the maximal multiple choice reaction time and accuracy of responses were affected by the supplementary aerobic training. The results of this study indicate that addition of low-intensity aerobic training to regular dance practice increases aerobic capacity of ballerinas with no loss of speed and accuracy of their psychomotor reaction. PMID:23485962

  6. Handheld probe integrating laser diode and ultrasound transducer array for ultrasound/photoacoustic dual modality imaging.

    PubMed

    Daoudi, K; van den Berg, P J; Rabot, O; Kohl, A; Tisserand, S; Brands, P; Steenbergen, W

    2014-10-20

    Ultrasound and photoacoustics can be utilized as complementary imaging techniques to improve clinical diagnoses. Photoacoustics provides optical contrast and functional information while ultrasound provides structural and anatomical information. As of yet, photoacoustic imaging uses large and expensive systems, which limits their clinical application and makes the combination costly and impracticable. In this work we present and evaluate a compact and ergonomically designed handheld probe, connected to a portable ultrasound system for inexpensive, real-time dual-modality ultrasound/photoacoustic imaging. The probe integrates an ultrasound transducer array and a highly efficient diode stack laser emitting 130 ns pulses at 805 nm wavelength and a pulse energy of 0.56 mJ, with a high pulse repetition frequency of up to 10 kHz. The diodes are driven by a customized laser driver, which can be triggered externally with a high temporal stability necessary to synchronize the ultrasound detection and laser pulsing. The emitted beam is collimated with cylindrical micro-lenses and shaped using a diffractive optical element, delivering a homogenized rectangular light intensity distribution. The system performance was tested in vitro and in vivo by imaging a human finger joint.

  7. Applications of Doppler ultrasound in clinical vascular disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, R. W.; Hokanson, D. E.; Sumner, D. S.; Strandness, D. E., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Doppler ultrasound has become the most useful and versatile noninvasive technique for objective evaluation of clinical vascular disease. Commercially available continuous-wave instruments provide qualitative and quantitative assessment of venous and arterial disease. Pulsed Doppler ultrasound was developed to provide longitudinal and transverse cross-sectional images of the arterial lumen with a resolution approaching that of conventional X-ray techniques. Application of Doppler ultrasound in venous, peripheral arterial, and cerebrovascular diseases is reviewed.

  8. Ultrasound Annual, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, R.C.; Hill, M.C.

    1984-01-01

    The 1984 edition of Ultrasound Annual explores new applications of ultrasound in speech and swallowing and offers guidelines on the use of ultrasound and nuclear medicine in thyroid and biliary tract disease. Other areas covered include Doppler sonography of the abdomen, intraoperative abdominal ultrasound, sonography of the placenta, ultrasound of the neonatal head and abdomen, and sonographic echo patterns created by fat.

  9. A new laser source for ultrasound generation in composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorraine, Peter W.; Dubois, Marc; Bauco, Anthony S.; Filkins, Robert J.; Drake, T. E.; Yawn, K. R.

    2000-05-01

    Laser ultrasound is proving to be a cost-effective means for inspecting composite components. Ultrasound is typically generated with a pulse of 10.6 micron light from a TEA CO2 laser. In this paper, we report on experimental progress towards a new source laser with improved characteristics.

  10. Corrected High-Frame Rate Anchored Ultrasound with Software Alignment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Amanda L.; Finch, Kenneth B.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To improve lingual ultrasound imaging with the Corrected High Frame Rate Anchored Ultrasound with Software Alignment (CHAUSA; Miller, 2008) method. Method: A production study of the IsiXhosa alveolar click is presented. Articulatory-to-acoustic alignment is demonstrated using a Tri-Modal 3-ms pulse generator. Images from 2 simultaneous…

  11. Evaluation of a pulsed ultrasonic Doppler flowmeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, M. K.

    1973-01-01

    The in vivo application of the pulsed ultrasound Doppler velocity meter (PUDVM) for measuring arterial velocity waveforms is reported. In particular, the performance of the PUDVM is compared with a hot film anemometer of proven accuracy.

  12. Venous Ultrasound (Extremities)

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  13. Eye and orbit ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    Echography - eye orbit; Ultrasound - eye orbit; Ocular ultrasonography; Orbital ultrasonography ... eye is numbed with medicine (anesthetic drops). The ultrasound wand (transducer) is placed against the front surface ...

  14. The Cytotoxic Effects of Low Intensity Visible and Infrared Light on Human Breast Cancer (MCF7) cells.

    PubMed

    Peidaee, P; Almansour, N; Shukla, R; Pirogova, E

    2013-01-01

    A concept of using low intensity light therapy (LILT) as an alternative approach to cancer treatment is at early stages of development; while the therapeutic effects of LILT as a non-invasive treatment modality for localized joint and soft tissue wound healing are widely corroborated. The LEDs-based exposure system was designed and constructed to irradiate the selected cancer and normal cells and evaluate the biological effects induced by light exposures in visible and infrared light range. In this study, human breast cancer (MCF7) cells and human epidermal melanocytes (HEM) cells (control) were exposed to selected far infrared light (3400nm, 3600nm, 3800nm, 3900nm, 4100nm and 4300nm) and visible and near infrared wavelengths (466nm, 585nm, 626nm, 810nm, 850nm and 950nm). The optical intensities of LEDs used for exposures were in the range of 15µW to 30µW. Cellular morphological changes of exposed and sham-exposed cells were evaluated using light microscopy. The cytotoxic effects of these low intensity light exposures on human cancer and normal cell lines were quantitatively determined by Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) cytotoxic activity and PrestoBlue™ cell viability assays. Findings reveal that far-infrared exposures were able to reduce cell viability of MCF7 cells as measured by increased LDH release activity and PrestoBlue™ assays. Further investigation of the effects of light irradiation on different types of cancer cells, study of possible signaling pathways affected by electromagnetic radiation (EMR) and in vivo experimentation are required in order to draw a firm conclusion about the efficacy of low intensity light as an alternative non-invasive cancer treatment.

  15. Optimizing the position resolution of a Z-stack microchannel plate resistive anode detector for low intensity signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiggins, B. B.; Richardson, E.; Siwal, D.; Hudan, S.; deSouza, R. T.

    2015-08-01

    A method for achieving good position resolution of low-intensity electron signals using a microchannel plate resistive anode detector is demonstrated. Electron events at a rate of 7 counts s-1 are detected using a Z-stack microchannel plate. The dependence of position resolution on both the distance and the potential difference between the microchannel plate and resistive anode is investigated. Using standard commercial electronics, a measured position resolution of 170 μm (FWHM) is obtained, which corresponds to an intrinsic resolution of 157 μm (FWHM).

  16. Effect of long term target changes on the neutron yield from a low intensity (d, t) neutron generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalton, A. W.

    1987-12-01

    Experimental and theoretical techniques have been developed to determine the accuracy with which the integrated neutron output from a low-intensity (d, t) neutron source can be measured during a prolonged irradiation. The experiments involved a neutron generator in which a fixed solid titanium-tritium target and an unanalysed beam of deuterium ions was used. The analysis was based on differential and integral measurements of both the deuterium beam current and the energy spectra of the charged particles emitted from the multiple nuclear interactions in the target during beam bombardment. The overlapping signals produced by the latter are interpreted using an iterative analysis developed at the Lucas Heights Laboratories.

  17. Organotellurium-mediated living radical polymerization under photoirradiation by a low-intensity light-emitting diode

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Yasuyuki

    2013-01-01

    Summary A low-intensity (6 W) light-emitting diode (LED) effectively activated an organotellurium chain transfer agent and the dormant species, promoting well-controlled radical polymerization. The use of the LED provided many advantages over the previously reported high-intensity Hg lamp, including high energy efficiency during the polymerization, and easy availability of the low-cost light source. Structurally well-defined poly(methyl methacrylate), poly(methyl acrylate), and polystyrene, with narrow molecular weight distributions, were synthesized under LED irradiation with or without a neutral density filter. PMID:23946861

  18. Optimizing the position resolution of a Z-stack microchannel plate resistive anode detector for low intensity signals

    SciTech Connect

    Wiggins, B. B.; Richardson, E.; Siwal, D.; Hudan, S.; Souza, R. T. de

    2015-08-15

    A method for achieving good position resolution of low-intensity electron signals using a microchannel plate resistive anode detector is demonstrated. Electron events at a rate of 7 counts s{sup −1} are detected using a Z-stack microchannel plate. The dependence of position resolution on both the distance and the potential difference between the microchannel plate and resistive anode is investigated. Using standard commercial electronics, a measured position resolution of 170 μm (FWHM) is obtained, which corresponds to an intrinsic resolution of 157 μm (FWHM)

  19. [The effect of continuous millimeter low-intensity radiation on the Na+ ion transport in the frog skin].

    PubMed

    Kazarinov, K D; Sharov, V S; Putvinskiĭ, A V; Betskiĭ, O V

    1984-01-01

    Many data on the effect of millimeter (MM) radiation of low intensity (of the order of 1 mVt/cm2) on living organisms were accumulated [1]. The specifics of this effect is first of all manifested in frequency--selective (resonance) pattern of the biological system response and the effect of threshold dependence of exposition time and power of MM radiation. To study the mechanism of this effect it seems perspective to investigate the influence of radiation on the membrane transport. The present work investigated the effect of MM radiation on a comparatively simple and well investigated object--isolated frog skin. PMID:6331853

  20. Effect of cell cycle phase on the sensitivity of SAS cells to sonodynamic therapy using low-intensity ultrasound combined with 5-aminolevulinic acid in vitro.

    PubMed

    Li, Nan; Sun, Miao; Wang, Yao; Lv, Yanhong; Hu, Zheng; Cao, Wenwu; Zheng, Jinhua; Jiao, Xiaohui

    2015-08-01

    Sonodynamic therapy (SDT) with 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) can effectively inhibit various types of tumor in vitro and in vivo. However, the association between the efficacy of SDT and the phase of the cell cycle remains to be elucidated. 5-ALA may generate different quantities of sonosensitizer, protoporphyrin IX (PpIX), in different phases of the cell cycle, which may result in differences in sensitivity to 5-ALA-induced SDT. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of the cell cycle on the susceptibility of SAS cells to SDT following synchronization to different cell cycle phases. These results indicates that the rates of cell death and apoptosis of the SAS cells in the S and G2/M phases were significantly higher following SDT, compared with those in the G1-phase cells and unsynchronized cells, with a corresponding increase in PpIX in the S and G2/M cells. In addition, the expression of caspase-3 increased, while that of B-cell lymphoma (Bcl)-2 decreased markedly in theS and G2/M cells following SDT. Cyclin A was also expressed at higher levels in the S and G2/M cells, compared with the G1-phase cells. SDT also caused a significant upregulation of cyclin A in all phases of the cell cycle, however this was most marked in the S and G2/M cells. It was hypothesized that high expression levels of cyclin A in the S and G2/M cells may promote the induction of caspase-3 and reduce the induction of Bcl-2 by SDT and, therefore, enhance apoptosis. Taken together, these data demonstrated that cells in The S and G2/M phases generate more intracellular PpIX, have higher levels of cyclin A and are, therefore, more sensitive to SDT-induced cytotoxicity. These findings indicate the potential novel approach to preventing the onset of cancer by combining cell-cycle regulators with SDT. This sequential combination therapy may be a simple and cost-effective way of enhancing the effects of SDT in clinical settings.

  1. Technical Aspects of Acceleration of Enzymatic Conversion of Corn Stover Biomass into Bio-fuels by Low Intensity, Uniform Ultrasound Field

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    One of the most critical stages of conversion of plant biomass into biofuels employs hydrolysis reactions between highly specific enzymes and matching substrates (e.g. corn stover cellulose with cellulase) that produce soluble sugars, which then could be converted into ethanol. Important benefits of...

  2. Low-intensity lasers, modern filling materials, and bonding systems influence on mineral metabolism of hard dental tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunin, Anatoly A.; Yesaulenko, I. E.; Zoibelmann, M.; Pankova, Svetlana N.; Ippolitov, Yu. A.; Oleinik, Olga I.; Popova, T. A.; Koretskaya, I. V.; Shumilovitch, Bogdan R.; Podolskaya, Elana E.

    2001-10-01

    One of the main reasons of low quality filling is breaking Ca-P balance in hard tissues. Our research was done with the purpose of studying the influence of low intensity lasers, diodic radiation, the newest filling and bonding systems on the processes of mineral metabolism in hard dental tissues while filling a tooth. 250 patients having caries and its compli-cations were examined and treated. Our complex research included: visual and instrumental examination, finding out the level of oral cavity hygiene, acid enamel biopsy, scanning electronic microscopy and X-ray spectrum microanalysis. Filling processes may produce a negative effect on mineral metabolism of hard dental tissues the latter is less pronounced when applying fluoride-containing filling materials with bonding systems. It has also been found that bonding dentin and enamel systems are designed for both a better filling adhesion (i.e. mechanical adhesion) and migration of useful microelements present in them by their sinking into hard dental tissues (i.e. chemical adhesion). Our research showed a positive influence of low intensity laser and diodic beams accompanying the use of modern filling and bonding systems on mineral metabolism of hard dental tissues.

  3. Short-term low-intensity blood flow restricted interval training improves both aerobic fitness and muscle strength.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, M F M; Caputo, F; Corvino, R B; Denadai, B S

    2016-09-01

    The present study aimed to analyze and compare the effects of four different interval-training protocols on aerobic fitness and muscle strength. Thirty-seven subjects (23.8 ± 4 years; 171.7 ± 9.5 cm; 70 ± 11 kg) were assigned to one of four groups: low-intensity interval training with (BFR, n = 10) or without (LOW, n = 7) blood flow restriction, high-intensity interval training (HIT, n = 10), and combined HIT and BFR (BFR + HIT, n = 10, every session performed 50% as BFR and 50% as HIT). Before and after 4 weeks training (3 days a week), the maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max ), maximal power output (Pmax ), onset blood lactate accumulation (OBLA), and muscle strength were measured for all subjects. All training groups were able to improve OBLA (BFR, 16%; HIT, 25%; HIT + BFR, 22%; LOW, 6%), with no difference between groups. However, VO2max and Pmax improved only for BFR (6%, 12%), HIT (9%, 15%) and HIT + BFR (6%, 11%), with no difference between groups. Muscle strength gains were only observed after BFR training (11%). This study demonstrates the advantage of short-term low-intensity interval BFR training as the single mode of training able to simultaneously improve aerobic fitness and muscular strength. PMID:26369387

  4. The effect of low-intensity laser therapy (LILT) on cutaneous wound healing and pain relief in rats.

    PubMed

    Koo, Hyun-Mo; Yong, Min-Sik; Na, Sang-Su

    2015-11-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the impact of low-intensity laser therapy on wound healing and pain control using a rat cutaneous wound model. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-four adult male Sprague-Dawley rats (between 220-240 g, 7 weeks) were used in this study. The rats were anesthetized and a circular fragment of skin was removed from the dorsal region of the back by a punch with an 8-mm diameter. The animals were randomly divided into 6 groups, Groups C 1, C 3, and C 5, control groups, received no laser treatment. Groups T 1, T 3, and T 5 received laser treatment for 20 min per day for 1, 3 and 5 days, respectively. Lumbar spine and dorsal skin were extracted and processed using western blot analysis. [Results] Periodical observation showed increases in NGF expression on the skin, and decreases in c-fos expression by the spinal cord in the treatment groups compared to the control group. [Conclusion] The present findings suggest that low-intensity laser therapy could be used as an effective therapy for wound healing and pain relief, and could be further used as a clinical approach for treating cutaneous wounds. PMID:26696711

  5. Short-term low-intensity blood flow restricted interval training improves both aerobic fitness and muscle strength.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, M F M; Caputo, F; Corvino, R B; Denadai, B S

    2016-09-01

    The present study aimed to analyze and compare the effects of four different interval-training protocols on aerobic fitness and muscle strength. Thirty-seven subjects (23.8 ± 4 years; 171.7 ± 9.5 cm; 70 ± 11 kg) were assigned to one of four groups: low-intensity interval training with (BFR, n = 10) or without (LOW, n = 7) blood flow restriction, high-intensity interval training (HIT, n = 10), and combined HIT and BFR (BFR + HIT, n = 10, every session performed 50% as BFR and 50% as HIT). Before and after 4 weeks training (3 days a week), the maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max ), maximal power output (Pmax ), onset blood lactate accumulation (OBLA), and muscle strength were measured for all subjects. All training groups were able to improve OBLA (BFR, 16%; HIT, 25%; HIT + BFR, 22%; LOW, 6%), with no difference between groups. However, VO2max and Pmax improved only for BFR (6%, 12%), HIT (9%, 15%) and HIT + BFR (6%, 11%), with no difference between groups. Muscle strength gains were only observed after BFR training (11%). This study demonstrates the advantage of short-term low-intensity interval BFR training as the single mode of training able to simultaneously improve aerobic fitness and muscular strength.

  6. Regulatory Effect of Low-Intensity Optical Radiation on Oxygenation of Blood Irradiated In Vivo and Metabolic Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalesskaya, G. A.; Laskina, O. V.

    2016-03-01

    For three series of blood samples, we have studied the effect of therapeutic doses of low-intensity optical radiation (LOR) on oxygenation parameters of blood irradiated in vivo, and also on the levels of some metabolites: lactate, glucose, cholesterol. The quality of blood oxygenation was assessed using three parameters: the partial pressure of oxygen pVO2, the oxygen saturation of hemoglobin SVO2, and the oxygen level in arterial and venous blood, varying under the influence of low-intensity optical radiation due to photodissociation of hemoglobin/ligand complexes. We have established that during photohemotherapy (PHT), including extracorporeal, supravascular, and intravenous blood irradiation, positive changes occur in the oxygenation parameters and the metabolite levels, while after the courses of PHT have been completed, the individual changes in such parameters in individual patients were both positive and negative. The regulatory effect of PHT was apparent in the tendency toward a decrease in high initial values and an increase in low initial values both for the oxygenation parameters and for the metabolites; but at the doses recommended for use, PHT had a regulatory but still not a normalizing effect.

  7. Hippocampal culture stimulus with 4-megahertz ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muratore, Robert; LaManna, Justine K.; Lamprecht, Michael R.; Morrison, Barclay, III

    2012-10-01

    Among current modalities, ultrasound uniquely offers both millisecond and millimeter accuracy in noninvasively stimulating brain tissue. In addition, by sweeping the ultrasound beam within the refractory period of the neuronal tissue, ultrasonic neuromodulation can be adapted to target extended or multiply connected regions with quasi-simultaneity. Towards the development of this safe brain stimulus technique, the response of rat hippocampal cultures to ultrasound was investigated. Hippocampal slices, 0.4-mm thick, were obtained from 8-day old Sprague Dawley rats and cultured for 6 days. The in vitro cultures were exposed to multiple 100-ms 4.04-MHz ultrasound pulses from a 42-mm diameter, 90-mm spherical cap transducer. Peak pressure ranged from 0 through about 77 kPa. Responses in the form of electrical potentials from a sixty channel electrode array were digitized and recorded. The DG and CA1 regions of the hippocampus exhibited similar ultrasonically-evoked field potentials.

  8. Ultrasound tomography of breast tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duric, Nebojsa; Littrup, Peter J.; Holsapple, Earle; Babkin, Alex; Duncan, Robert; Kalinin, Arkady; Pevzner, Roman; Tokarev, Michael

    2003-05-01

    The Karmanos Cancer Institute is developing an ultrasound device for measuring and imaging acoustic parameters of human tissue. This paper discusses the experimental results relating to tomographic reconstructions of phantoms and tissue. The specimens were scanned by the prototype scanner at a frequency of 1.5 MHz using 2 microsecond pulses. The receivers and transmitters were positioned along a ring trajectory having a diameter of 20 cm. The ring plane is translated in the vertical direction allowing for 3-D reconstructions from stacked 2-D planes of data. All ultrasound scans were performed at 10 millimeter slice thickness to generate multiple tomographic images. In a previous SPIE paper we presented preliminary results of ultrasound tomographic reconstruction of formalin-fixed breast tissue. We now present new results from data acquired with the scanner. Images were constructed using both reflection-based and transmission based algorithms. The resulting images demonstrate the ability to detect sub-mm features and to measure acoustic properties such as sound speed. Comparison with conventional ultrasound indicates the potential for better margin definition and acoustic characterization of tissue.

  9. The principles of ultrasound and its application in freezing related processes of food materials: A review.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xinfeng; Zhang, Min; Xu, Baoguo; Adhikari, Benu; Sun, Jincai

    2015-11-01

    Ultrasonic processing is a novel and promising technology in food industry. The propagation of ultrasound in a medium generates various physical and chemical effects and these effects have been harnessed to improve the efficiency of various food processing operations. Ultrasound has also been used in food quality control as diagnostic technology. This article provides an overview of recent developments related to the application of ultrasound in low temperature and closely related processes such as freezing, thawing, freeze concentration and freeze drying. The applications of high intensity ultrasound to improve the efficiency of freezing process, to control the size and size distribution of ice crystals and to improve the quality of frozen foods have been discussed in considerable detail. The use of low intensity ultrasound in monitoring the ice content and to monitor the progress of freezing process has also been highlighted.

  10. Ultrasound annual, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, R.C.; Hill, M.C.

    1986-01-01

    This book provides an analyses of developments in the field of diagnostic ultrasound. Endoscopic ultrasound and ultrasound-guided aspiration of ovarian follicles for in vitro fertilization are addressed. The use of Doppler ultrasound to measure blood flow in obstetrics is also examined.

  11. Ultrasound in Space Medicine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dulchavsky, Scott A.; Sargsyan, A.E.

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the use of ultrasound as a diagnostic tool in microgravity environments. The goals of research in ultrasound usage in space environments are: (1) Determine accuracy of ultrasound in novel clinical conditions. (2) Determine optimal training methodologies, (3) Determine microgravity associated changes and (4) Develop intuitive ultrasound catalog to enhance autonomous medical care. Also uses of Ultrasound technology in terrestrial applications are reviewed.

  12. Low-intensity internet-delivered treatment for generalized anxiety symptoms in routine care: protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Worldwide prevalence of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is considered high; in Europe lifetime prevalence has been estimated at 4.3 to 5.9%. High levels of anxiety disorders have been reported in university students, affecting 25 to 30% of the population. Young adults are some of the most vulnerable for the onset of mental health disorders and any stressors may act as a catalyst for their onset. The absence of resources can often mean that many do not seek treatment. Other factors that impede access to resources include such things as a lack of trained professionals, personal stigma, and waiting lists. Anxiety disorders can be treated successfully; indeed brief forms of cognitive-behavior therapy have been recommended. One potential avenue for research and development is that of delivering low-intensity interventions online for students with GAD. Therefore, the current study seeks to investigate the potential effectiveness for a low-intensity online CBT-based treatment for GAD in a service-based setting; implemented as one step in a stepped-care model. Methods/Design The research is a service-based effectiveness study utilizing a randomized waiting-list controlled design. The active intervention consists of six weekly modules of online CBT. Participants are assigned a supporter who provides weekly post-session feedback on progress and exercises. Participants will complete the GAD-7 as the primary outcome measure. Secondary outcomes include pathological worry, depression and measures of well-being. At three-months follow-up data will be collected using the GAD-7, BDI-II, PSWQ, ED-Q5 and WSAS. Post-session data will be collected on significant in-session events in treatment (HAT). A satisfaction with treatment measure will be administered post-treatment (SAT). Discussion The study will be a contribution to the potential for a low-intensity internet-delivered program implemented in a service-based setting; implemented as one step in a stepped-care model

  13. Modeling of thermal effects in antivascular ultrasound therapy.

    PubMed

    Levenback, Benjamin J; Sehgal, Chandra M; Wood, Andrew K W

    2012-01-01

    Antivascular ultrasound consisting of low-intensity sonication in the presence of circulating microbubbles of an ultrasound contrast agent has been demonstrated to disrupt blood flow in solid cancers. In this study a mathematical framework is described for the microbubble-induced heating that occurs during antivascular ultrasound. Biological tissues are modeled as a continuum of microbubble-filled vasculature, cells, and interstitial fluids with compressibility equal to the sum of the compressibility of each component. The mathematical simulations show that the absorption of ultrasound waves by viscous damping of the microbubble oscillations induced significant local heating of the tissue vasculature. The extent and the rate of temperature increase not only depends on the properties of the microbubbles and the sonication parameters but is also influenced markedly by the blood flow. Slow flow conditions lead to higher tissue temperatures due to a stronger interaction between microbubbles and ultrasound and reduced heat dissipation. Because tumors have slower blood flow than healthy tissue, the microbubble-induced ultrasound antivascular therapy is likely to affect cancerous tissue more extensively than healthy tissue, providing a way to selectively target the vasculature of cancers.

  14. A Simple Technique for Visualizing Ultrasound Fields Without Schlieren Optics.

    PubMed

    Kudo, Nobuki

    2015-07-01

    A simple technique designed for visualization of ultrasound fields without Schlieren optics is introduced. An optical system of direct shadowgraphy with diverging light, which consists of a point light source and a shadow screen, constituted the basic system, but the screen was replaced by focusing optics: a camera that makes a virtual screen at its focus plane. The proposed technique visualizes displacement of light deflected by ultrasound, and the use of focusing optics enables flexible settings of the virtual screen position and optical magnification. Insufficient sensitivity of shadowgraphy was overcome by elimination of non-deflecting light using image subtraction of shadowgrams taken with and without ultrasound exposure. A 1-MHz focused transducer for ultrasound therapy and a 20-MHz miniature transducer for intravascular imaging were used for experiments, and alternate pressure change in short-pulsed ultrasound was visualized, indicating the usefulness of the proposed technique for evaluation of medical ultrasound fields.

  15. [The role of protein kinase SAPK/JNK in cell responses to low-intensity nonionizing radiation].

    PubMed

    Cherenkov, D A; Novoselova, E G; Khrenov, M O; Glushkova, O V; Lunin, S M; Novoselova, T V; Fesenko, E E

    2009-01-01

    The effect of low-intensity lases light (0.2 mW/cm2, 632.8 nm, exposure time 1 min) or centimeter waves (8.15-18 GHz, 1 W/cm2, exposure time 1 h) on PhosphoSAPK/JNK production in mice lymphocytes was investigated. Normal isolated spleen lymphocytes or cells incubated previously with geldanamycin, an inhibitor of heat shock protein 90 (HSP90), were used in the experiments. A significant stimulation of PhosphoSAPK/JNK production in lymphocytes after treatment with laser light or microwaves has been shown in both cell models. It was proposed that the activation of SAPK/JNK signal pathway plays one of the central roles in cellular stress response to low-power nonionizing radiation. PMID:19402537

  16. On the cause of the flat-spot phenomenon observed in silicon solar cells at low temperatures and low intensities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weizer, V. G.; Broder, J. D.; Brandhorst, H. W., Jr.; Forestieri, A. F.

    1982-01-01

    A model is presented that explains the "flat-spot" (FS) power loss phenomenon observed in silicon solar cells operating deep space (low temperature, low intensity) conditions. Evidence is presented suggesting that the effect is due to localized metallurgical interactions between the silicon substrate and the contact metallization. These reactions are shown to result in localized regions in which the PN junction is destroyed and replaced with a metal-semiconductor-like interface. The effects of thermal treatment, crystallographic orientation, junction depth, and metallurization are presented along with a method of preventing the effect through the suppression of vacancy formation at the free surface of the contact metallization. Preliminary data indicating the effectiveness of a TiN diffusion barrier in preventing the effect are also given.

  17. [Antitumor effect of low-intensity extremely high-frequency electromagnetic radiation on a model of solid Ehrlich carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Gapeev, A B; Shved, D M; Mikhaĭlik, E N; Korystov, Iu N; Levitman, M Kh; Shaposhnikova, V V; Sadovnikov, V B; Alekhin, A I; Goncharov, N G; Chemeris, N K

    2009-01-01

    The influence of different exposure regimes of low-intensity extremely high-frequency electromagnetic radiation on the growth rate of solid Ehrlich carcinoma in mice has been studied. It was shown that, at an optimum repetition factor of exposure (20 min daily for five consecutive days after the tumor inoculation), there is a clearly pronounced frequency dependence of the antitumor effect. The analysis of experimental data indicates that the mechanisms of antitumor effects of the radiation may be related to the modification of the immune status of the organism. The results obtained show that extremely high-frequency electromagnetic radiation at a proper selection of exposure regimes can result in distinct and stable antitumor effects.

  18. Changes of microbic associations qualitative contents in caries and its complications with the use of low-intensity laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunin, Anatoly A.; Shumilovitch, Bogdan R.; Stepanov, Nicolay N.

    1996-01-01

    Favorable clinical data at the absence of positive dynamics microbiological research findings in the treatment of caries and their complications give a reason to consider the treatment insufficiently effective and it is necessary to reduce the terms of an additional prophylactic observation and an antirelapse treatment of the disease. That is why researchers all over the world search for new effective methods of influence on the microflora of carious foci. Using the experience of the treatment of 40 patients with caries, 40 patients with chronic pulpitis, and 40 with chronic periodontitis high bactericidal properties of low intensive laser radiation are shown. If after the traditional treatment of foci microflora was inoculated in 62.3% of the cases, after the laser therapy session -- in 26.3% of the cases. The efficiency, ease of handling, and low expenditure of time allow us to recommend this method for a massive use in the treatment of caries and their complications.

  19. In Situ Irradiation and Measurement of Triple Junction Solar Cells at Low Intensity, Low Temperature (LILT) Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, R.D.; Imaizumi, M.; Walters, R.J.; Lorentzen, J.R.; Messenger, S.R.; Tischler, J.G.; Ohshima, T.; Sato, S.; Sharps, P.R.; Fatemi, N.S.

    2008-01-01

    The performance of triple junction InGaP/(In)GaAs/Ge space solar cells was studied following high energy electron irradiation at low temperature. Cell characterization was carried out in situ at the irradiation temperature while using low intensity illumination, and, as such, these conditions reflect those found for deep space, solar powered missions that are far from the sun. Cell characterization consisted of I-V measurements and quantum efficiency measurements. The low temperature irradiations caused substantial degradation that differs in some ways from that seen after room temperature irradiations. The short circuit current degrades more at low temperature while the open circuit voltage degrades more at room temperature. A room temperature anneal after the low temperature irradiation produced a substantial recovery in the degradation. Following irradiation at both temperatures and an extended room temperature anneal, quantum efficiency measurement suggests that the bulk of the remaining damage is in the (In)GaAs sub-cell

  20. Laser Sources for Generation of Ultrasound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, James W.

    1996-01-01

    Two laser systems have been built and used to demonstrate enhancements beyond current technology used for laser-based generation and detection of ultrasound. The first system consisted of ten Nd:YAG laser cavities coupled electronically and optically to permit sequential bursts of up to ten laser pulses directed either at a single point or configured into a phased array of sources. Significant enhancements in overall signal-to-noise ratio for laser ultrasound incorporating this new source system was demonstrated, using it first as a source of narrowband ultrasound and secondly as a phased array source producing large enhanced signal displacements. A second laser system was implemented using ultra fast optical pulses from a Ti:Sapphire laser to study a new method for making laser generated ultrasonic measurements of thin films with thicknesses on the order of hundreds of angstroms. Work by prior investigators showed that such measurements could be made based upon fluctuations in the reflectivity of thin films when they are stressed by an arriving elastic pulse. Research performed using equipment purchased under this program showed that a pulsed interferometric system could be used as well as a piezoreflective detection system to measure pulse arrivals even in thin films with very low piezoreflective coefficients.