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Sample records for low-lying vector resonances

  1. Lineshape of {psi}(3770) and low-lying vector charmonium resonance parameters in e{sup +}e{sup -{yields}}DD

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Yuanjiang; Zhao Qiang

    2010-02-01

    We investigate the DD production in e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilations near threshold in an effective Lagrangian approach. This shows that the lineshape of the cross section near threshold is sensitive to the contributions from {psi}{sup '}, though it is below the DD threshold. The recent experimental data from the BES and Belle collaborations allow us to determine the {psi}{sup '}DD coupling constant, which appears to be consistent with other theoretical studies. As a consequence, the {psi}{sup '}-{psi}(3770) mixing parameter can be extracted around the {psi}(3770) mass region. Resonance parameters for {psi}(3770), X(3900), {psi}(4040), and {psi}(4160) are also investigated. The X(3900) appears as an enhancement at around 3.9 GeV in the Belle data. In addition to treating it as a resonance, we also study the mechanism through which the enhancement is produced by the DD*+c.c. open channel effects. Our result shows that such a possibility cannot be eliminated.

  2. Contribution of low-lying vector resonances to polarization observables in B{sub d}{sup 0}{yields}K{sup *0}e{sup +}e{sup -} decay

    SciTech Connect

    Korchin, Alexander Yu.; Kovalchuk, Vladimir A.

    2010-08-01

    The branching ratio and other observables for the rare flavor-changing neutral current decay B{sub d}{sup 0}{yields}K{sup *0}({yields}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +})e{sup +}e{sup -} are studied below the cc threshold. The total amplitude for this decay includes the term coming from the standard model effective Hamiltonian and the term generated by the processes B{sub d}{sup 0}{yields}K{sup *0}({yields}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +})V with intermediate low-lying vector resonances V={rho}(770), {omega}(782), {phi}(1020) decaying into the e{sup +}e{sup -} pair. The resonance contribution to the branching ratio, polarization fractions of the K{sup *} meson, and coefficients in the angular distribution is calculated. The influence of the resonances on the integrated observables in the region of electron-positron invariant mass up to 1 GeV is studied in view of the planned measurements of the photon polarization at the LHCb.

  3. Low-lying resonances and relativistic screening in Big Bang nucleosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Famiano, M. A.; Balantekin, A. B.; Kajino, T.

    2016-04-01

    We explore effects of the screening due to the relativistic electron-positron plasma and presence of resonances in the secondary reactions leading to A =7 nuclei during the Big Bang nucleosynthesis. In particular, we investigate and examine possible low-lying resonances in the 7Be (3He,γ ) 10C reaction and examine the resultant destruction of 7Be for various resonance locations and strengths. While a resonance in the 10C compound nucleus is thought to have negligible effects we explore the possibility of an enhancement from plasma screening that may adjust the final 7Be abundance. We find the effects of relativistic screening and possible low-lying resonances to be relatively small in the standard Early Universe models.

  4. {sup 10}Li low-lying resonances populated by one-neutron transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Cavallaro, M. Agodi, C.; Carbone, D.; Cunsolo, A.; De Napoli, M.; Cappuzzello, F.; Bondì, M.; Davids, B.; Galinski, N.; Ruiz, C.; Davinson, T.; Sanetullaev, A.; Foti, A.; Kanungo, R.; Lenske, H.; Orrigo, S. E. A.

    2015-10-15

    The {sup 9}Li + {sup 2}H → {sup 10}Li + {sup 1}H one-neutron transfer reaction has been performed at 100 MeV incident energy at TRIUMF using a {sup 9}Li beam delivered by the ISAC-II facility. A setup based on double-sided silicon strip detectors has been used in order to detect and identify the outgoing {sup 9}Li produced by the {sup 10}Li breakup at forward angles and the recoil protons emitted at backward angles. The {sup 10}Li low-lying resonances, whose energies, widths and configurations are still unclear, have been populated with significant statistics.

  5. Observation of low-lying resonances in the quasicontinuum of 195,196Pt and enhanced astrophysical reaction rates

    DOE PAGES

    Giacoppo, F.; Bello Garrote, F. L.; Eriksen, T. K.; Görgen, A.; Guttormsen, M.; Hagen, T. W.; Larsen, A. C.; Kheswa, B. V.; Klintefjord, M.; Koehler, P. E.; et al

    2015-05-28

    An excess of strength on the low-energy tail of the giant dipole resonance recently has been observed in the γ-decay from the quasicontinuum of 195,196Pt. The nature of this phenomenon is not yet fully investigated. If this feature is present also in the γ-ray strength of the neutron-rich isotopes, it can affect the neutron-capture reactions involved in the formation of heavy-elements in stellar nucleosynthesis. The experimental level density and γ-ray strength function of 195,196Pt are presented together with preliminary calculations of the corresponding neutron-capture cross sections.

  6. Observation of low-lying resonances in the quasicontinuum of 195,196Pt and enhanced astrophysical reaction rates

    SciTech Connect

    Giacoppo, F.; Bello Garrote, F. L.; Eriksen, T. K.; Görgen, A.; Guttormsen, M.; Hagen, T. W.; Larsen, A. C.; Kheswa, B. V.; Klintefjord, M.; Koehler, P. E.; Moretto, L. G.; Nyhus, H. T.; Renstrøm, T.; Sahin, E.; Siem, S.; Tornyi, T. G.; Schwengner, R.; Zuber, K.

    2015-05-28

    An excess of strength on the low-energy tail of the giant dipole resonance recently has been observed in the γ-decay from the quasicontinuum of 195,196Pt. The nature of this phenomenon is not yet fully investigated. If this feature is present also in the γ-ray strength of the neutron-rich isotopes, it can affect the neutron-capture reactions involved in the formation of heavy-elements in stellar nucleosynthesis. The experimental level density and γ-ray strength function of 195,196Pt are presented together with preliminary calculations of the corresponding neutron-capture cross sections.

  7. Systematic study of the fragmentation of low-lying dipole strength in odd-A rare earth nuclei investigated in nuclear resonance fluorescence experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nord, A.; Schiller, A.; Eckert, T.; Beck, O.; Besserer, J.; von Brentano, P.; Fischer, R.; Herzberg, R.-D.; Jäger, D.; Kneissl, U.; Margraf, J.; Maser, H.; Pietralla, N.; Pitz, H. H.; Rittner, M.; Zilges, A.

    1996-11-01

    Nuclear resonance fluorescence experiments were performed on the rare earth nuclei 155Gd and 159Tb to study the fragmentation of the M1 scissors mode in odd deformed nuclei and to establish a kind of systematics. Using the bremsstrahlung photon beam of the Stuttgart Dynamitron (end point energy 4.1 MeV) and high resolution Ge-γ spectrometers detailed information was obtained on excitation energies, decay widths, transition probabilities, and branching ratios. The results are compared to those observed recently for the neighboring odd nuclei 161,163Dy and 157Gd. Whereas in the odd Dy isotopes the dipole strength is rather concentrated, both Gd isotopes show a strong fragmentation of the strength into about 25 (155Gd) and 90 transitions (157Gd) in the energy range 2-4 MeV. The nucleus 159Tb linking the odd Dy and Gd isotopes exhibits an intermediate strength fragmentation. In general the observed total strength in the odd nuclei is reduced by a factor of 2-3 as compared to their neighboring even-even isotopes. The different fragmentation behavior of the dipole strengths in the odd Dy and Gd isotopes is unexplained up to now.

  8. Vector resonances and electromagnetic nucleon structure

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Williams; Siegfried Krewald; Kevin Linen

    1995-02-01

    Motivated by new, precise magnetic proton form factor data in the timelike region, a hybrid vector meson dominance (hVMD) formalism is employed to investigate the significance of excited vector meson resonances on electromagnetic nucleon structure. We find that the rho (1700), omega (1600), and two previously unobserved states are required to reproduce the local structure seen in the new LEAR data just above the pp-bar threshold. We also investigate sensitivity to the phi meson. The model dependence of our result is tested by introducing an alternative model which couples the isoscalar vector meson states to a hypothetical vector glueball resonance. We obtain nearly identical results from both models, except for GnE(q2) in the spacelike region which is very sensitive to the glueball mass and the effective phi NN coupling.

  9. A numerical study of vector resonant relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocsis, Bence; Tremaine, Scott

    2015-04-01

    Stars bound to a supermassive black hole interact gravitationally. Persistent torques acting between stellar orbits lead to a rapid resonant relaxation of the orbital orientation vectors (`vector' resonant relaxation) and slower relaxation of the eccentricities (`scalar' resonant relaxation), both at rates much faster than two-body or non-resonant relaxation. We describe a new parallel symplectic integrator, N-RING, which follows the dynamical evolution of a cluster of N stars through vector resonant relaxation, by averaging the pairwise interactions over the orbital period and periapsis precession time-scale. We use N-RING to follow the evolution of clusters containing over 104 stars for tens of relaxation times. Among other results, we find that the evolution is dominated by torques among stars with radially overlapping orbits, and that resonant relaxation can be modelled as a random walk of the orbit normals on the sphere, with angular step size ranging from ˜0.5-1 rad. The relaxation rate in a cluster with a fixed number of stars is proportional to the root mean square (rms) mass of the stars. The rms torque generated by the cluster stars is reduced below the torque between Kepler orbits due to apsidal precession and declines weakly with the eccentricity of the perturbed orbit. However, since the angular momentum of an orbit also decreases with eccentricity, the relaxation rate is approximately eccentricity-independent for e ≲ 0.7 and grows rapidly with eccentricity for e ≳ 0.8. We quantify the relaxation using the autocorrelation function of the spherical multipole moments; this decays exponentially and the e-folding time may be identified with the vector resonant relaxation time-scale.

  10. Low-lying excitations in 72Ni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, A. I.; Benzoni, G.; Watanabe, H.; Nishimura, S.; Browne, F.; Daido, R.; Doornenbal, P.; Fang, Y.; Lorusso, G.; Patel, Z.; Rice, S.; Sinclair, L.; Söderström, P.-A.; Sumikama, T.; Wu, J.; Xu, Z. Y.; Yagi, A.; Yokoyama, R.; Baba, H.; Avigo, R.; Bello Garrote, F. L.; Blasi, N.; Bracco, A.; Camera, F.; Ceruti, S.; Crespi, F. C. L.; de Angelis, G.; Delattre, M.-C.; Dombradi, Zs.; Gottardo, A.; Isobe, T.; Kojouharov, I.; Kurz, N.; Kuti, I.; Matsui, K.; Melon, B.; Mengoni, D.; Miyazaki, T.; Modamio-Hoyborg, V.; Momiyama, S.; Napoli, D. R.; Niikura, M.; Orlandi, R.; Sakurai, H.; Sahin, E.; Sohler, D.; Shaffner, H.; Taniuchi, R.; Taprogge, J.; Vajta, Zs.; Valiente-Dobón, J. J.; Wieland, O.; Yalcinkaya, M.

    2016-03-01

    Low-lying excited states in 72Ni have been investigated in an in-flight fission experiment at the RIBF facility of the RIKEN Nishina Center. The combination of the state-of-the-art BigRIPS and EURICA setups has allowed for a very accurate study of the β decay from 72Co to 72Ni, and has provided first experimental information on the decay sequence 72Fe→72Co→72Ni and on the delayed neutron-emission branch 73Co→72Ni . Accordingly, we report nearly 60 previously unobserved γ transitions which deexcite 21 new levels in 72Ni. Evidence for the location of the so-sought-after (42+) ,(62+) , and (81+) seniority states is provided. As well, the existence of a low-spin β -decaying isomer in odd-odd neutron-rich Co isotopes is confirmed for mass A =72 . The new experimental information is compared to simple shell-model calculations including only neutron excitations across the f p g shells. It is shown that, in general, the calculations reproduce well the observed states.

  11. Low-lying excitations of polydiacetylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Race, A.; Barford, W.; Bursill, R. J.

    2001-07-01

    The Pariser-Parr-Pople Hamiltonian is used to calculate and identify the nature of the low-lying vertical transition energies of polydiacetylene. The model is solved using the density matrix renormalization group method for a fixed acetylenic geometry for chains of up to 102 atoms. The nonlinear optical properties of polydiacetylene are considered, which are determined by the third-order susceptibility. The experimental 1Bu data of Giesa and Schultz are used as the geometric model for the calculation. For short chains, the calculated E(1Bu) agrees with the experimental value, within solvation effects (~0.3 eV). The charge gap is used to characterize bound and unbound states. The nBu state is above the charge gap and hence a continuum state; the 1Bu, 2Ag, and mAg states are not and hence are bound excitons. For large chain lengths, the nBu state tends towards the charge gap as expected, strongly suggesting that the nBu state is the conduction band edge. The conduction band edge for polydiacetylene is agreed in the literature to be ~3.0 eV. Accounting for the strong polarization effects of the medium and polaron formation gives our calculated E∞(nBu)~3.6 eV, with an exciton binding energy of ~1.0 eV. The 2Ag state is found to be above the 1Bu state, which does not agree with relaxed transition experimental data. However, this could be resolved by including explicit lattice relaxation in the Pariser-Parr-Pople-Peierls model. Particle-hole separation data further suggest that the 1Bu, 2Ag, and mAg states are bound excitons, and that the nBu is an unbound exciton.

  12. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance -- Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Three Axis Vector Magnetometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulatowicz, Michael; Clark, Philip; Griffith, Robert; Larsen, Michael; Mirijanian, James

    2012-06-01

    The Northrop Grumman Corporation is leveraging the technology developed for the Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope (NMRG) to build a combined Electron Paramagnetic Resonance -- Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (EPR-NMR) magnetometer. The EPR-NMR approach provides a high bandwidth and high sensitivity simultaneous measurement of all three vector components of the magnetic field averaged over the small volume of the sensor's one vapor cell. This poster will describe the history, operational principles, and design basics of the EPR-NMR magnetometer including an overview of the NSD designs developed and demonstrated to date. General performance results will also be presented.

  13. Measurement of Low-Lying States in {sup 40}Sc

    SciTech Connect

    V. Y. Hansper; A. E. Champagne; C. Iliadis; S. E. Hale; D. C. Powell

    1999-12-31

    In explosive hydrogen burning nucleosynthesis material is processed via the proton capture sequence {sup 39}Ca(p,{gamma}){sup 40}Sc(p,{gamma}){sup 41}Ti. It has been predicted that the isotope {sup 39}Ca represents a waiting point for a continuous reaction flow. Therefore, its reaction rate is of interest. The {sup 39}Ca(p,{gamma}){sup 40}Sc reaction rate is determined by three resonances corresponding to the 2nd, 3rd and 4th excited states of {sup 40}Sc. Improved nuclear structure information of the low-lying levels of {sup 40}Sc is necessary to reduce uncertainties in the reaction rate of {sup 39}Ca(p,{gamma}){sup 40}Sc. Results from a current measurement of {sup 40}Ca({sup 3}He,t){sup 40}Sc at TUNL indicate that the 4th excited state is a doublet and further investigation is warranted.

  14. Measurement of Low-lying states in {sup 40}Sc

    SciTech Connect

    Hansper, V. Y.; Champagne, A. E.; Iliadis, C.; Hale, S. E.; Powell, D. C.

    1999-11-16

    In explosive hydrogen burning nucleosynthesis material is processed via the proton capture sequence {sup 39}Ca(p,{gamma}){sup 40}Sc(p,{gamma}){sup 41}Ti. It has been predicted that the isotope {sup 39}Ca represents a waiting point for a continuous reaction flow. Therefore, its reaction rate is of interest. The {sup 39}Ca(p,{gamma}){sup 40}Sc reaction rate is determined by three resonances corresponding to the 2nd, 3rd and 4th excited states of {sup 40}Sc. Improved nuclear structure information of the low-lying levels of {sup 40}Sc is necessary to reduce uncertainties in the reaction rate of {sup 39}Ca(p,{gamma}){sup 40}Sc. Results from a current measurement of {sup 40}Ca({sup 3}He,t){sup 40}Sc at TUNL indicate that the 4th excited state is a doublet and further investigation is warranted.

  15. On the low-lying states of TiC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, C. W., Jr.; Siegbahn, P. E. M.

    1984-01-01

    The ground and low-lying excited states of TiC are investigated using a CASSCF-externally contracted CI approach. The calculations yield a 3Sigma(+) ground state, but the 1Sigma(+) state is only 780/cm higher and cannot be ruled out. The low-lying states have some triple bond character. The nature of the bonding and origin of the states are discussed.

  16. Extracting Low-Lying Lambda Resonances Using Correlation Matrix Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Menadue, Benjamin J.; Kamleh, Waseem; Leinweber, Derek B.; Mahbub, M. S.

    2011-05-24

    The lowest-lying negative-parity state of the Lambda is investigated in (2+1)-flavour full-QCD on the PACS-CS configurations made available through the ILDG. We show that a variational analysis using multiple source and sink smearings can extract a state lying lower than that obtained by using a standard fixed smeared source and sink operator alone.

  17. Testing resonating vector strength: Auditory system, electric fish, and noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leo van Hemmen, J.; Longtin, André; Vollmayr, Andreas N.

    2011-12-01

    Quite often a response to some input with a specific frequency ν○ can be described through a sequence of discrete events. Here, we study the synchrony vector, whose length stands for the vector strength, and in doing so focus on neuronal response in terms of spike times. The latter are supposed to be given by experiment. Instead of singling out the stimulus frequency ν○ we study the synchrony vector as a function of the real frequency variable ν. Its length turns out to be a resonating vector strength in that it shows clear maxima in the neighborhood of ν○ and multiples thereof, hence, allowing an easy way of determining response frequencies. We study this "resonating" vector strength for two concrete but rather different cases, viz., a specific midbrain neuron in the auditory system of cat and a primary detector neuron belonging to the electric sense of the wave-type electric fish Apteronotus leptorhynchus. We show that the resonating vector strength always performs a clear resonance correlated with the phase locking that it quantifies. We analyze the influence of noise and demonstrate how well the resonance associated with maximal vector strength indicates the dominant stimulus frequency. Furthermore, we exhibit how one can obtain a specific phase associated with, for instance, a delay in auditory analysis.

  18. Vector resonances and electromagnetic nucleon structure

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, R.A.; Krewald, S.; Linen, K. )

    1995-02-01

    Motivated by new, precise magnetic proton form factor data in the timelike reigon, a hybrid vector meson dominance (hVMD) formalism is employed to investigate the significance of excited vector meson rsonances on electromagnetic nucleon structure. We find that the [rho](1700), [omega](1600), and two previously unobserved states are required to reproduce the local structure seen in the new LEAR data just above the [ital p[bar p

  19. Properties of low-lying heavy-light mesons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, Anthony; Eichten, Estia; El-Khadra, Aida X.; Flynn, Jonathan M.; Hill, Brian R.; Thacker, Hank

    1993-03-01

    We present preliminary results for fB and masses of low-lying heavy-light mesons in the static limit. Calculations were performed in the quenched approximation using multistate smearing functions generated from a Hamiltonian for a spinless relativistic quark. The 2 S-1 S and 1 P-1 S mass splitting are measured. Using the 1 P-1 S charmonium splitting to set the overall scale, the ground state decay constant fB, is 319 ± 11 (stat) MeV.

  20. Transition properties of low-lying states in atomic indium

    SciTech Connect

    Sahoo, B. K.; Das, B. P.

    2011-07-15

    We present here the results of our relativistic many-body calculations of various properties of the first six low-lying excited states of indium. The calculations were performed using the relativistic coupled-cluster method in the framework of the singles, doubles, and partial triples approximation. The lifetime of the [4p{sup 6}]5s{sup 2}5p{sub 3/2} state in this atom is determined. Our results could be used to shed light on the reliability of the lifetime measurements of the excited states of atomic indium that we have considered in the present work.

  1. Spectroscopic study of low-lying {sup 16}N levels

    SciTech Connect

    Bardayan, D. W.; Nesaraja, C. D.; Pain, S. D.; Smith, M. S.; O'Malley, P. D.; Cizewski, J. A.; Hatarik, R.; Peters, W. A.; Blackmon, J. C.; Chae, K. Y.; Jones, K. L.; Moazen, B. H.; Paulauskas, S.; Pittman, S. T.; Schmitt, K. T.; Chipps, K. A.; Kozub, R. L.; Shriner, J. F. Jr.; Matei, C.

    2008-11-15

    The magnitude of the {sup 15}N(n,{gamma}){sup 16}N reaction rate in asymptotic giant branch stars depends directly on the neutron spectroscopic factors of low-lying {sup 16}N levels. A new study of the {sup 15}N(d,p){sup 16}N reaction is reported populating the ground and first three excited states in {sup 16}N. The measured spectroscopic factors are near unity as expected from shell model calculations, resolving a long-standing discrepancy with earlier measurements that had never been confirmed or understood. Updated {sup 15}N(n,{gamma}){sup 16}N reaction rates are presented.

  2. Low-lying Level Structure of 150Nd

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, A.; Prados-Estévez, F. M.; Yates, S. W.; Choudry, S. N.; Crider, B. P.; Kumar, A.; McEllistrem, M. T.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Orce, J. N.; Mynk, M. G.; Peters, E. E.; Garrett, P. E.; Kulp, W. D.; Wood, J. L.

    2011-10-01

    To address the issue of whether the 150Nd nucleus represents an example of a phase transition in the shape degree of freedom or a complex example of shape coexistence, its level structure, up to about 2 MeV excitation and 6 ℏ, has been explored via the (n ,n' γ) reaction at the University of Kentucky accelerator facility. Level lifetimes, in the sub-picosecond regime, were extracted with a Doppler-shift attenuation analysis. A significant extension of the level scheme was possible, and the observed low-lying level structure of 150Nd indicates a close resemblance to its neighboring 152Sm isotone. Results from the ongoing analysis will be presented. This material is based on work supported by the U.S. National Science Foundation under Grant No. PHY-0956310.

  3. Small spectroscopic factors of low-lying positive parity states in 31Mg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imai, Nobu; Mukai, Momo; Cederkall, Joakim; Aghai, Hossein; Golubev, Pavel; Johansson, Haakan; Kahl, Daid; Kurcewics, Jan; Teranishi, Takashi; Watanabe, Yutaka

    2014-09-01

    The single particle structures of even-odd nuclei around the so-called ``island of inversion'' would give us the direct evidence of such a shell evolution in this region. We measured the proton resonance elastic scattering on 30Mg re-accelerated upto 2.92 MeV/nucleon by REX-ISOLDE to study the isobarig analog resonances (IARs) of the low-lying bound states in 31Mg. The proton resonance elastic scattering is a complementary method of (d,p) reaction. We observed three resonances which can be regarded as the IARs of 31Mg. The proton widths of the first two resonances give a rise to the spectroscopic factors for the two positive parity states in 31Mg which were found to be strongly quenched compared to those for the 35S and 37Ar. Comparison with a modern shell model calculation suggests that the degrees of the ν(2p-2h) configuration in 30Mg would be less than considered. The single particle structures of even-odd nuclei around the so-called ``island of inversion'' would give us the direct evidence of such a shell evolution in this region. We measured the proton resonance elastic scattering on 30Mg re-accelerated upto 2.92 MeV/nucleon by REX-ISOLDE to study the isobarig analog resonances (IARs) of the low-lying bound states in 31Mg. The proton resonance elastic scattering is a complementary method of (d,p) reaction. We observed three resonances which can be regarded as the IARs of 31Mg. The proton widths of the first two resonances give a rise to the spectroscopic factors for the two positive parity states in 31Mg which were found to be strongly quenched compared to those for the 35S and 37Ar. Comparison with a modern shell model calculation suggests that the degrees of the ν(2p-2h) configuration in 30Mg would be less than considered. The present work was supported by a Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (20244306, 23740215) by Japan Society Promotion of Science and by grants from the Swedish Research Council and the Royal Physiographical Society in Lund.

  4. Low-lying dipole excitations in the heavy, odd-mass nucleus 181Ta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolpert, A.; Beck, O.; Belic, D.; Besserer, J.; von Brentano, P.; Eckert, T.; Fransen, C.; Herzberg, R.-D.; Kneissl, U.; Margraf, J.; Maser, H.; Nord, A.; Pietralla, N.; Pitz, H. H.

    1998-08-01

    The strength distribution of low-lying dipole excitations in the heavy odd-mass nucleus 181Ta was studied in nuclear resonance fluorescence experiments performed at the bremsstrahlung beam of the Stuttgart 4.3 MV Dynamitron accelerator. To increase the detection sensitivity in the whole range of excitation energies between 1.8 and 4 MeV two measurements were carried out at different bremsstrahlung end-point energies of 2.7 and 4.1 MeV using two large-volume HPGe detectors of a relative efficiency of 100%. Detailed information on excitation energies, decay widths, transition probabilities, and branching ratios of 37 new low-lying states in the energy range 1.8-3.5 MeV have been obtained. The observed dipole strength is rather fragmented, apart from a strong excitation at 2.297 MeV. The total strength in the investigated range of excitation energies (1.8-4 MeV) is reduced by a factor of ~3.5 as compared to the neighboring even-even nucleus 180Hf.

  5. Low-lying isomeric levels in 75Cu

    SciTech Connect

    Daugas, J. M.; Faul, T.; Grawe, H.; Pfutzner, M.; Grzywacz, R.; Lewitowicz, M.; Achouri, N. L.; Bentida, R.; Beraud, R.; Borcea, C.; Bingham, C. R.; Catford, W.; Emsallem, A.; De France, G.; Grzywacz, K. L.; Lemmon, R.; Lopez Jimenez, M. J.; de Oliveira Santos, F.; Regan, P. H.; Rykaczewski, Krzysztof Piotr; Sauvestre, J. E.; Sawicka, M.; Stanoiu, M.; Sieja, K.; Nowacki, F.

    2010-01-01

    Isomeric low-lying states were identified and investigated in the 75Cu nucleus. Two states at 61.8(5)- and 128.3(7)-keV excitation energies with half-lives of 370(40)- and 170(15)-ns were assigned as 75m1Cu and 75m2Cu, respectively. The measured half-lives combined with the recent spin assignment of the ground state allow one to deduce tentatively spin and parity of the two isomers and the dominant multipolarities of the isomeric transitions with respect to the systematics of the Cu isotopes. Shell-model calculations using an up-to-date effective interaction reproduce the evolution of the 1/2 , 3/2 , and 5/2 states for the neutron-rich odd-mass Cu isotopes when filling the g9/2. The results indicate a significant change in the nuclear structure in this region, where a single-particle 5/2 state coexists with more and more collective 3/2 and 1/2 levels at low excitation energies.

  6. Low-lying isomeric levels in {sup 75}Cu

    SciTech Connect

    Daugas, J. M.; Faul, T.; Sauvestre, J. E.; Grawe, H.; Pfuetzner, M.; Sawicka, M.; Grzywacz, R.; Lewitowicz, M.; France, G. de; Lopez Jimenez, M. J.; Oliveira Santos, F. de; Baiborodin, D.; Bentida, R.; Beraud, R.; Emsallem, A.; Bingham, C. R.; Grzywacz, K. L.

    2010-03-15

    Isomeric low-lying states were identified and investigated in the {sup 75}Cu nucleus. Two states at 61.8(5)- and 128.3(7)-keV excitation energies with half-lives of 370(40)- and 170(15)-ns were assigned as {sup 75m1}Cu and {sup 75m2}Cu, respectively. The measured half-lives combined with the recent spin assignment of the ground state allow one to deduce tentatively spin and parity of the two isomers and the dominant multipolarities of the isomeric transitions with respect to the systematics of the Cu isotopes. Shell-model calculations using an up-to-date effective interaction reproduce the evolution of the 1/2{sup -}, 3/2{sup -}, and 5/2{sup -} states for the neutron-rich odd-mass Cu isotopes when filling the nug{sub 9/2}. The results indicate a significant change in the nuclear structure in this region, where a single-particle 5/2{sup -} state coexists with more and more collective 3/2{sup -} and 1/2{sup -} levels at low excitation energies.

  7. Low-lying excitations in a strongly interacting Fermi gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vale, Christopher; Hoinka, Sascha; Dyke, Paul; Lingham, Marcus

    2016-05-01

    We present measurements of the low-lying excitation spectrum of a strongly interacting Fermi gas across the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) to Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) crossover using Bragg spectroscopy. By focussing the Bragg lasers onto the central volume of the cloud we can probe atoms at near-uniform density allowing measurement of the homogeneous density-density response function. The Bragg wavevector is set to be approximately half of the Fermi wavevector to probe the collective response. Below the superfluid transition temperature the Bragg spectra dominated by the Bogoliubov-Anderson phonon mode. Single particle excitations become visible at energies greater than twice the pairing gap. As interactions are tuned from the BCS to BEC regime the phonon and single particle modes separate apart and both the pairing gap and speed of sound can be directly read off in certain regions of the crossover. Single particle pair-breaking excitations become heavily suppressed as interactions are tuned from the BCS to BEC regimes.

  8. Vector and scalar charmonium resonances with lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, C. B.; Leskovec, Luka; Mohler, Daniel; Prelovsek, Sasa

    2015-09-15

    We perform an exploratory lattice QCD simulation of DD¯ scattering, aimed at determining the masses as well as the decay widths of charmonium resonances above open charm threshold. Neglecting coupling to other channels, the resulting phase shift for DD¯ scattering in p-wave yields the well-known vector resonance ψ(3770). For mπ = 156 MeV, the extracted resonance mass and the decay width agree with experiment within large statistical uncertainty. The scalar charmonium resonances present a puzzle, since only the ground state Χc0(1P) is well understood, while there is no commonly accepted candidate for its first excitation. We simulate DD¯ scattering in s-wave in order to shed light on this puzzle. The resulting phase shift supports the existence of a yet-unobserved narrow resonance with a mass slightly below 4 GeV. A scenario with this narrow resonance and a pole at Χc0(1P) agrees with the energy-dependence of our phase shift. In addition, further lattice QCD simulations and experimental efforts are needed to resolve the puzzle of the excited scalar charmonia.

  9. Vector and scalar charmonium resonances with lattice QCD

    DOE PAGES

    Lang, C. B.; Leskovec, Luka; Mohler, Daniel; Prelovsek, Sasa

    2015-09-15

    We perform an exploratory lattice QCD simulation of DD¯ scattering, aimed at determining the masses as well as the decay widths of charmonium resonances above open charm threshold. Neglecting coupling to other channels, the resulting phase shift for DD¯ scattering in p-wave yields the well-known vector resonance ψ(3770). For mπ = 156 MeV, the extracted resonance mass and the decay width agree with experiment within large statistical uncertainty. The scalar charmonium resonances present a puzzle, since only the ground state Χc0(1P) is well understood, while there is no commonly accepted candidate for its first excitation. We simulate DD¯ scattering inmore » s-wave in order to shed light on this puzzle. The resulting phase shift supports the existence of a yet-unobserved narrow resonance with a mass slightly below 4 GeV. A scenario with this narrow resonance and a pole at Χc0(1P) agrees with the energy-dependence of our phase shift. In addition, further lattice QCD simulations and experimental efforts are needed to resolve the puzzle of the excited scalar charmonia.« less

  10. Fragmentation of low-lying dipole strength in the odd-mass nucleus 133Cs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besserer, J.; Beck, O.; von Brentano, P.; Eckert, T.; Herzberg, R.-D.; Jäger, D.; Kneissl, U.; Margraf, J.; Maser, H.; Nord, A.; Pietralla, N.; Pitz, H. H.; Zilges, A.

    1997-09-01

    The fragmentation of low-lying dipole strength in the odd-mass nucleus 133Cs has been investigated in nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) experiments performed at the bremsstrahlung beam of the Stuttgart Dynamitron accelerator at an end-point energy of 4.1 MeV. In the excitation energy range 2.3 - 3.7 MeV in total 22 new dipole excitations were observed. From the high-resolution γ-ray spectra measured by three high-efficiency Ge detectors the reduced excitation probabilities B(E1)↑ or B(M1)↑ were deduced. The fragmentation and absolute total strengths of the detected dipole excitations are compared with results for the neighboring even-even, γ-soft nucleus 134Ba, where both, rather strong scissors mode-like M1 and two-phonon E1 excitations are known from recent NRF experiments.

  11. Is Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy Beneficial for Sphincter Preservation in Low-Lying Rectal Cancer Patients?

    PubMed Central

    Park, In Ja; Yu, Chang Sik; Lim, Seok-Byung; Lee, Jong Lyul; Kim, Chan Wook; Yoon, Yong Sik; Park, Seong Ho; Kim, Jin Cheon

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The present study explored the benefit of preoperative chemoradiotherapy (PCRT) for sphincter preservation in locally advanced low-lying rectal cancer patients who underwent stapled anastomosis, especially in those with deep and narrow pelvises determined by magnetic resonance imaging. Patients with locally advanced low-lying rectal cancer (≤5 cm from the anal verge) who underwent stapled anastomosis were included. Patients were categorized into two groups (PCRT+ vs. PCRT–) according to PCRT application. Patients in the PCRT+ group were matched to those in the PCRT– group according to potential confounding factors (age, gender, clinical stage, and body mass index) for sphincter preservation. Sphincter preservation, permanent stoma, and anastomosis-related complications were compared between the groups. Pelvic magnetic resonance imaging was used to measure 12 dimensions representing pelvic cavity depth and width with which deep and narrow pelvis was defined. The impact of PCRT on sphincter preservation and permanent stoma in pelvic dimensions defined as deep and narrow pelvis was evaluated, and factors associated with sphincter preservation and permanent stoma were analyzed. One hundred sixty-six patients were one-to-one matched between the PCRT+ and PCRT− groups. Overall, sphincter-saving surgery was performed in 66.3% and the rates were not different between the 2 groups. Anastomotic complications and permanent stoma occurred nonsignificantly more frequently in the PCRT+ group. PCRT was not associated with higher rate of sphincter preservation in all pelvic dimensions defined as deep and narrow pelvis, while PCRT was related to higher rate of permanent stoma in shorter transverse diameter and interspinous distance. On logistic regression analysis, PCRT was not shown to influence both sphincter preservation and permanent stoma, while longer transverse diameter and interspinous distance were associated with lower rate of permanent stoma. PCRT had

  12. The H2+ molecular ion: Low-lying states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivares-Pilón, Horacio; Turbiner, Alexander V.

    2016-10-01

    Matching for a wavefunction the WKB expansion at large distances and Taylor expansion at small distances leads to a compact, few-parametric uniform approximation found in Turbiner and Olivares-Pilon (2011). The ten low-lying eigenstates of H2+ of the quantum numbers (n , m , Λ , ±) with n = m = 0 at Λ = 0 , 1 , 2, with n = 1, m = 0 and n = 0, m = 1 at Λ = 0 of both parities are explored for all interproton distances R. For all these states this approximation provides the relative accuracy ≲ 10-5 (not less than 5 s.d.) locally, for any real coordinate x in eigenfunctions, when for total energy E(R) it gives 10-11 s.d. for R ∈ [ 0 , 50 ] a.u. Corrections to the approximation are evaluated in the specially-designed, convergent perturbation theory. Separation constants are found with not less than 8 s.d. The oscillator strength for the electric dipole transitions E 1 is calculated with not less than 6 s.d. A dramatic dip in the E 1 oscillator strength f 1 sσg - 3 pσu at R ∼Req is observed. The magnetic dipole and electric quadrupole transitions are calculated for the first time with not less than 6 s.d. in oscillator strength. For two lowest states (0 , 0 , 0 , ±) (or, equivalently, 1 sσg and 2 pσu states) the potential curves are checked and confirmed in the Lagrange mesh method within 12 s.d. Based on them the Energy Gap between 1 sσg and 2 pσu potential curves is approximated with modified Pade Re-R [ Pade(8 / 7) ] (R) with not less than 4-5 figures at R ∈ [ 0 , 40 ] a.u. Sum of potential curves E1sσg +E2pσu is approximated by Pade 1 / R [ Pade(5 / 8) ] (R) in R ∈ [ 0 , 40 ] a.u. with not less than 3-4 figures.

  13. Resonance energy transfer: The unified theory via vector spherical harmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grinter, Roger; Jones, Garth A.

    2016-08-01

    In this work, we derive the well-established expression for the quantum amplitude associated with the resonance energy transfer (RET) process between a pair of molecules that are beyond wavefunction overlap. The novelty of this work is that the field of the mediating photon is described in terms of a spherical wave rather than a plane wave. The angular components of the field are constructed in terms of vector spherical harmonics while Hankel functions are used to define the radial component. This approach alleviates the problem of having to select physically correct solution from non-physical solutions, which seems to be inherent in plane wave derivations. The spherical coordinate system allows one to easily decompose the photon's fields into longitudinal and transverse components and offers a natural way to analyse near-, intermediate-, and far-zone RET within the context of the relative orientation of the transition dipole moments for the two molecules.

  14. Resonance energy transfer: The unified theory via vector spherical harmonics.

    PubMed

    Grinter, Roger; Jones, Garth A

    2016-08-21

    In this work, we derive the well-established expression for the quantum amplitude associated with the resonance energy transfer (RET) process between a pair of molecules that are beyond wavefunction overlap. The novelty of this work is that the field of the mediating photon is described in terms of a spherical wave rather than a plane wave. The angular components of the field are constructed in terms of vector spherical harmonics while Hankel functions are used to define the radial component. This approach alleviates the problem of having to select physically correct solution from non-physical solutions, which seems to be inherent in plane wave derivations. The spherical coordinate system allows one to easily decompose the photon's fields into longitudinal and transverse components and offers a natural way to analyse near-, intermediate-, and far-zone RET within the context of the relative orientation of the transition dipole moments for the two molecules. PMID:27544087

  15. Two-photon excitation of low-lying electronic quadrupole states in atomic clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Nesterenko, V. O.; Reinhard, P.-G.; Halfmann, T.; Pavlov, L. I.

    2006-02-15

    A simple scheme of population and detection of low-lying electronic quadrupole modes in free small deformed metal clusters is proposed. The scheme is analyzed in terms of the time-dependent local density approximation calculations. As a test case, the deformed cluster Na{sub 11}{sup +} is considered. Long-living quadrupole oscillations are generated via resonant two-photon (two-dipole) excitation and then detected through the appearance of satellites in the photoelectron spectra generated by a probe pulse. Femtosecond pump and probe pulses with intensities I=2x10{sup 10}-2x10{sup 11} W/cm{sup 2} and pulse duration T=200-500 fs are found to be optimal. The modes of interest are dominated by a single electron-hole pair and so their energies, being combined with the photoelectron data for hole states, allow us to gather full mean-field spectra of valence electrons near the Fermi energy. Besides, the scheme allows us to estimate the lifetime of electron-hole pairs and hence the relaxation time of electronic energy into ionic heat.

  16. Theoretical study of the low-lying electronic spectrum of C 22+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogreve, H.

    1996-01-01

    Electronic states associated with the low-lying Born-Oppenheimer spectrum and crucial for the stability and experimental observability of the doubly positively charged carbon system C 22+ are studied by ab initio methods. This includes computation of potential energy curves and transition moments by multireference configuration interaction methods, and an investigation of the corresponding vibrational resonance levels and lifetimes. By analogy with the electronic ground state X3limit∑g- of the isoelectronic neutral molecule B 2, the lowest potential energy curve of C 22+ that supports quasibound vibronic motion belongs to the state 1 3limit∑g-. In case of C 22+, however, this state is destabilized by a crossing with the repulsive potential energy curve of 1 3Πu, and the induced electronic transitions represent the major decay channel of C22+ (1 3limit∑g-) . Also the quintet state 1 5limit∑g- is quasibound; whereas most of its vibronic levels are practically stable against dissociative tunneling interactions with other electronic states furnish the principal decay mechanism for 1 5∑ u-. Additional bonding and stability propertie of C 22+ are exposed by monitoring the behaviour of potential energy curves while rising the nuclear charge from the neutral to the doubly positively charged situation.

  17. Low-lying states of valence-hole nuclei in the 208Pb region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, H.; Shen, J. J.; Zhao, Y. M.; Arima, A.

    2011-04-01

    Systematic calculations of low-lying states for Ir, Pt, Au, Hg and Tl isotopes with neutron numbers between 120 and 125 have been performed within the framework of the SDG-pair approximation of the shell model. We employ a monopole and quadrupole pairing plus quadrupole-quadrupole-type interaction with optimized parameters, which are assumed to be constants for nuclei with the same proton number or neutron number. We calculate binding energies of the ground states, low energy level schemes, electric quadrupole and magnetic dipole moments, and E2 transition rates. Our results are reasonably consistent with the available experimental data as well as previous theoretical studies, in particular, for low-lying yrast states. We also demonstrate that low-lying states of nuclei studied here are usually well represented by very simple configurations in collective nucleon-pair basis.

  18. Energies and Electric Dipole Transitions for Low-Lying Levels of Protactinium IV and Uranium V

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ürer, Güldem; Özdemir, Leyla

    2012-02-01

    We have reported a relativistic multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock (MCDF) study on low-lying level structures of protactinium IV (Z =91) and uranium V (Z =92) ions. Excitation energies and electric dipole (E1) transition parameters (wavelengths, oscillator strengths, and transition rates) for these low-lying levels have been given. We have also investigated the influence of the transverse Breit and quantum electrodynamic (QED) contributions besides correlation effects on the level structure. A comparison has been made with a few available data for these ions in the literature.

  19. Effects of tensor correlations on low-lying collective states in finite nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Cao Ligang; Sagawa, H.; Colo, G.

    2011-03-15

    We present a systematic analysis of the effects induced by tensor correlations on low-lying collective states of magic nuclei, by using the fully self-consistent random phase approximation (RPA) model with Skyrme interactions. The role of the tensor correlations is analyzed in detail in the case of quadrupole (2{sup +}) and octupole (3{sup -}) low-lying collective states in {sup 208}Pb. The example of {sup 40}Ca is also discussed, as well as the case of magnetic dipole states (1{sup +}).

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging the velocity vector components of fluid flow.

    PubMed

    Feinberg, D A; Crooks, L E; Sheldon, P; Hoenninger, J; Watts, J; Arakawa, M

    1985-12-01

    Encoding the precession phase angle of proton nuclei for Fourier analysis has produced accurate measurement of fluid velocity vector components by MRI. A pair of identical gradient pulses separated in time by exactly 1/2 TE, are used to linearly encode the phase of flow velocity vector components without changing the phase of stationary nuclei. Two-dimensional Fourier transformation of signals gave velocity density images of laminar flow in angled tubes which were in agreement with the laws of vector addition. These velocity profile images provide a quantitative method for the investigation of fluid dynamics and hemodynamics. PMID:3880097

  1. Quadrupole lattice resonances in plasmonic crystal excited by cylindrical vector beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Kyosuke; Nomura, Kensuke; Yamamoto, Takeaki; Omura, Tatsuya; Sasaki, Keiji

    2016-10-01

    We report a scheme to exploit low radiative loss plasmonic resonance by combining a dark (subradiant) mode and a lattice resonance. We theoretically demonstrate that such dark-mode lattice resonances in periodic arrays of nanodisks or plasmonic crystals can be excited by vertically incident light beams. We investigate the excitation of lattice resonances in a finite sized, square-lattice plasmonic crystal by two types of cylindrical vector beams and a linearly polarized Gaussian beam. Quadrupole lattice resonances are excited by all three beams, and the largest peak intensity is obtained by using a specific type of cylindrical vector beam. Because of their lower radiative losses with many hotspots, the quadrupole lattice resonances in plasmonic crystal may pave the way for photonic research and applications that require strong light-matter interactions.

  2. Quadrupole lattice resonances in plasmonic crystal excited by cylindrical vector beams

    PubMed Central

    Sakai, Kyosuke; Nomura, Kensuke; Yamamoto, Takeaki; Omura, Tatsuya; Sasaki, Keiji

    2016-01-01

    We report a scheme to exploit low radiative loss plasmonic resonance by combining a dark (subradiant) mode and a lattice resonance. We theoretically demonstrate that such dark-mode lattice resonances in periodic arrays of nanodisks or plasmonic crystals can be excited by vertically incident light beams. We investigate the excitation of lattice resonances in a finite sized, square-lattice plasmonic crystal by two types of cylindrical vector beams and a linearly polarized Gaussian beam. Quadrupole lattice resonances are excited by all three beams, and the largest peak intensity is obtained by using a specific type of cylindrical vector beam. Because of their lower radiative losses with many hotspots, the quadrupole lattice resonances in plasmonic crystal may pave the way for photonic research and applications that require strong light-matter interactions. PMID:27734923

  3. Nature of low-lying electric dipole resonance excitations in 74Ge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negi, D.; Wiedeking, M.; Lanza, E. G.; Litvinova, E.; Vitturi, A.; Bark, R. A.; Bernstein, L. A.; Bleuel, D. L.; Bvumbi, S.; Bucher, T. D.; Daub, B. H.; Dinoko, T. S.; Easton, J. L.; Görgen, A.; Guttormsen, M.; Jones, P.; Kheswa, B. V.; Khumalo, N. A.; Larsen, A. C.; Lawrie, E. A.; Lawrie, J. J.; Majola, S. N. T.; Masiteng, L. P.; Nchodu, M. R.; Ndayishimye, J.; Newman, R. T.; Noncolela, S. P.; Orce, J. N.; Papka, P.; Pellegri, L.; Renstrøm, T.; Roux, D. G.; Schwengner, R.; Shirinda, O.; Siem, S.

    2016-08-01

    Isospin properties of dipole excitations in 74Ge are investigated using the (α ,α'γ ) reaction and compared to (γ ,γ' ) data. The results indicate that the dipole excitations in the energy region of 6 to 9 MeV adhere to the scenario of the recently found splitting of the region of dipole excitations into two separated parts: one at low energy, being populated by both isoscalar and isovector probes, and the other at high energy, excited only by the electromagnetic probe. Relativistic quasiparticle time blocking approximation (RQTBA) calculations show a reduction in the isoscalar E 1 strength with an increase in excitation energy, which is consistent with the measurement.

  4. Low-lying structure of neutron-rich Zn and Ga isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, H.; Fu, G. J.; Zhao, Y. M.; Arima, A.

    2011-09-01

    Low-lying states of even-even Zn and odd-mass Ga nuclei with neutron numbers between 42 and 50 have been calculated within the framework of the SDG-pair approximation of the nuclear shell model. We employ a monopole and quadrupole pairing plus quadrupole-quadrupole interaction with optimized parameters, which are assumed to be constants for nuclei with the same proton number or neutron number. We calculate low-lying level schemes, electric quadrupole and magnetic dipole moments, and E2 and M1 transition rates. Reasonable agreement is achieved between the calculated results and experimental data. Dominant configurations in the ground states of odd-mass Ga nuclei are discussed in terms of pair correlations. The weak-coupling picture for some states of odd-mass Ga nuclei is studied.

  5. Low-lying structure of neutron-rich Zn and Ga isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, H.; Fu, G. J.; Arima, A.; Zhao, Y. M.

    2011-09-15

    Low-lying states of even-even Zn and odd-mass Ga nuclei with neutron numbers between 42 and 50 have been calculated within the framework of the SDG-pair approximation of the nuclear shell model. We employ a monopole and quadrupole pairing plus quadrupole-quadrupole interaction with optimized parameters, which are assumed to be constants for nuclei with the same proton number or neutron number. We calculate low-lying level schemes, electric quadrupole and magnetic dipole moments, and E2 and M1 transition rates. Reasonable agreement is achieved between the calculated results and experimental data. Dominant configurations in the ground states of odd-mass Ga nuclei are discussed in terms of pair correlations. The weak-coupling picture for some states of odd-mass Ga nuclei is studied.

  6. Calculations of energy levels and lifetimes of low-lying states of barium and radium

    SciTech Connect

    Dzuba, V. A.; Ginges, J. S. M.

    2006-03-15

    We use the configuration-interaction method and many-body perturbation theory to perform accurate calculations of energy levels, transition amplitudes, and lifetimes of low-lying states of barium and radium. Calculations for radium are needed for the planning of measurements of parity- and time-invariance-violating effects which are strongly enhanced in this atom. Calculations for barium are used to control the accuracy of the calculations.

  7. Energy spectrum of the low-lying gluon excitations in the Coulomb gauge

    SciTech Connect

    Szczepaniak, Adam P.; Krupinski, Pawel

    2006-06-01

    We compute the energy spectrum of low-lying gluonic excitations in the presence of static quark-antiquark sources using Coulomb gauge and the quasiparticle representation. Within the valence sector of the Fock space we reproduce both, the overall normalization and the ordering of the spin-parity multiplets. We discus how the interactions induced by the nonabelian Coulomb kernel are central in to fine structure of the spectrum.

  8. Scalar Resonance at 750 GeV as Composite of Heavy Vector-Like Fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Wei; Zheng, Han-Qing

    2016-08-01

    We study a model of scalars which includes both the SM Higgs and a scalar singlet as composites of heavy vector-like fermions. The vector-like fermions are bounded by the super-strong four-fermion interactions. The scalar singlet decays to SM vector bosons through loop of heavy vector-like fermions. We show that the surprisingly large production cross section of di-photon events at 750 GeV resonance and the odd decay properties can all be explained. This model serves as a good model for both SM Higgs and a scalar resonance at 750 GeV. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC) under Grant Nos. 11135009, 11375065 and 10925522

  9. Spectroscopic Properties and Potential Energy Curves of Low-lying electronic States of RuC

    SciTech Connect

    Balasubramanian, K; Guo, R

    2003-12-22

    The RuC molecule has been a challenging species due to the open-shell nature of Ru resulting in a large number of low-lying electronic states. We have carried out state-of-the-art calculations using the complete active space multi-configuration self-consistent field (CASSCF) followed by multireference configuration interaction (MRCI) methods that included up 18 million configurations, in conjunction with relativistic effects. We have computed 29 low-lying electronic states of RuC with different spin multiplicities and spatial symmetries with energy separations less than 38 000 cm{sup -1}. We find two very closely low-lying electronic states for RuC, viz., {sup 1}{Sigma}{sup +} and {sup 3}{Delta} with the {sup 1}{Sigma}{sup +} being stabilized at higher levels of theory. Our computed spectroscopic constants and dipole moments are in good agreement with experiment although we have reported more electronic states than those that have been observed experimentally. Our computations reveal a strongly bound X{sup 1}{Sigma}{sup +} state with a large dipole moment and an energetically close {sup 3}{Delta} state with a smaller dipole moment. Overall our computed spectroscopic constants of the excited states with energy separations less than 18000 cm{sup -1} agree quite well with those of the corresponding observed states.

  10. STS-31 Discovery, OV-103, rockets through low-lying clouds after KSC liftoff

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    STS-31 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, rides above the firey glow of the solid rocket boosters (SRBs) and space shuttle main engines (SSMEs) and a long trail of exhaust as it heads toward Earth orbit. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Launch Complex (LC) Pad 39B is covered in an exhaust cloud moments after the liftoff of OV-103 at 8:33:51.0492 am (Eastern Daylight Time (EDT)). The exhaust plume pierces the low-lying clouds as OV-103 soars into the clear skies above. A nearby waterway appears in the foreground.

  11. Low-Lying Dirac Eigenmodes, Topological Charge Fluctuations and the Instanton Liquid Model

    SciTech Connect

    I. Horvath; S.J. Dong; T. Draper; F.X. Lee; H.B. Thacker; J.B. Zhang

    2002-05-01

    The local structure of low-lying eigenmodes of the overlap Dirac operator is studied. It is found that these modes cannot be described as linear combinations of 't Hooft ''would-be'' zeromodes associated with instanton excitations that underly the Instanton Liquid Model. This implies that the instanton liquid scenario for spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking in QCD is not accurate. More generally, our data suggests that the vacuum fluctuations of topological charge are not effectively dominated by localized lumps of unit charge with which the topological ''would-be'' zeromodes could be associated.

  12. Low-lying dipole excitations in the odd-proton, midshell nucleus 103Rh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stedile, F.; Fill, E.; Belic, D.; von Brentano, P.; Fransen, C.; Gade, A.; Kneissl, U.; Kohstall, C.; Linnemann, A.; Matschinsky, P.; Nord, A.; Pietralla, N.; Pitz, H. H.; Scheck, M.; Werner, V.

    2001-02-01

    Low-lying dipole excitations in the odd-proton, midshell nucleus 103Rh were investigated in photon scattering experiments at the Stuttgart Dynamitron facility using bremsstrahlung beams with end point energies of 4.1 and 2.4 MeV. In total, 106 excited levels, most of them unknown so far, could be observed in the excitation energy range from 1.2 to 4.0 MeV. In addition to 106 transitions to the ground state (Jπ0=1/2-), 20 transitions to the low-lying Jπ=3/2- level at 295 keV and 10 transitions to the Jπ=5/2- state at 357 keV were detected. For 20 photoexcited levels spins could be suggested from the measured angular distribution data. The reduced ground-state transition strengths summed up in the energy range 2-4 MeV amount to ΣgΓred0=(16.3+/-1.9) meV/MeV3 corresponding, under the assumption of an electric character for all excitations, to a total excitation strength of ΣB(E1)↑=(15.6+/-1.8)×10-3 e2 fm2. The fragmentation of the dipole strength and the decay branchings of the photoexcited levels are discussed. The observed feedings of the 295 and 357 keV levels result in a population inversion, the precondition for a possible γ-ray laser.

  13. Low-lying {Lambda} baryons with spin 1/2 in two-flavor lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Toru T.; Oka, Makoto

    2010-02-01

    Low-lying {Lambda} baryons with spin 1/2 are analyzed in full (unquenched) lattice QCD. We construct 2x2 cross correlators from flavor SU(3) octet and singlet baryon operators, and diagonalize them so as to extract information of two low-lying states for each parity. The two-flavor CP-PACS gauge configurations are used, which are generated in the renormalization-group improved gauge action and the O(a)-improved quark action. Three different {beta}'s, {beta}=1.80, 1.95, and 2.10, are employed, whose corresponding lattice spacings are a=0.2150, 0.1555, and 0.1076 fm. For each cutoff, we use four hopping parameters, ({kappa}{sub val},{kappa}{sub sea}), which correspond to the pion masses ranging about from 500 MeV to 1.1 GeV. Results indicate that there are two negative-parity {Lambda} states nearly degenerate at around 1.6 GeV, while no state as low as {Lambda}(1405) is observed. By decomposing the flavor components of each state, we find that the lowest (1st-excited) negative-parity state is dominated by flavor-singlet (flavor-octet) component. We also discuss meson-baryon components of each state, which has drawn considerable attention in the context of multiquark pictures of {Lambda}(1405).

  14. An ab initio study of the low-lying electronic states of S3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Kirk A.; Lyons, James R.; Francisco, Joseph S.

    2006-08-01

    Accurate calculations of the low-lying singlet and triplet electronic states of thiozone, S3, have been carried out using large multireference configuration interaction wave functions. Cuts of the full potential energy surfaces along the stretching and bending coordinates have been presented, together with the vertical excitation spectra. The strong experimentally observed absorption around 395nm is assigned to the 1B21 state, which correlates to ground state products. Absorption at wavelengths shorter than 260nm is predicted to lead to singlet excited state products, S2 (aΔg1)+S(D1). The spectroscopic properties of the XΣg -3, aΔg1, and bΣg +1 electronic states of the S2 radical have also been accurately characterized in this work. The investigations of the low-lying electronic states were accompanied by accurate ground state coupled cluster calculations of the thermochemistry of both S2 and S3 using large correlation consistent basis sets with corrections for core-valence correlation, scalar relativity, and atomic spin-orbit effects. Resulting values for D0(S2+S) and ∑D0 for S3 are predicted to be 61.3 and 162.7kcal/mol, respectively, with conservative uncertainties of ±1kcal/mol. Analogous calculations predict the C2v-D3h (open-cyclic) isomerization energy of S3 to be 4.4±0.5kcal/mol.

  15. Ozone absorption spectroscopy in search of low-lying electronic states

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, S. M.; Mauersberger, K.

    1995-01-01

    A spectrometer capable of detecting ozone absorption features 9 orders of magnitude weaker than the Hartley band has been employed to investigate the molecule's near-infrared absorption spectrum. At this sensitivity a wealth of information on the low-lying electronically excited states often believed to play a role in atmospheric chemistry is available in the form of vibrational and rotational structure. We have analyzed these spectra using a combination of digital filtering and isotope substitution and find evidence for three electronically excited states below 1.5 eV. The lowest of these states is metastable, bound by approximately 0.1 eV and probably the (3)A2 rather than the (3)B2 state. Its adiabatic electronic energy is 1.24 +/- 0.01 eV, slightly above the dissociation energy of the ground state. Two higher states, at 1.29 +/- 0.03 and 1.48 +/- 0.03 eV are identified as the (3)B2 and the (3)B1, respectively. Combined with other recent theoretical and experimental data on the low-lying electronic states of ozone, these results imply that these are, in fact, the lowest three excited states; that is, there are no electronically excited states of ozone lying below the energy of O(3P) + O2((3)Sigma(-), v = 0). Some of the implications for atmospheric chemistry are considered.

  16. On the nature of an emergent symmetry in QCD with low-lying Dirac modes removed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Thomas D.

    2016-02-01

    Remarkable symmetry properties appear to arise in lattice calculations of correlation functions in which the lowest-lying eigenmodes of the Dirac operator in quark propagators are removed by hand. The Banks-Casher relation ties the chiral condensate to the density of low-lying modes; thus, it is plausible that removal of such modes could lead to a regime where spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking does not occur. Surprising, a pattern of identical correlation functions was observed that is larger than can be explained by a restoration of chiral symmetry. This suggests that a larger symmetry—one that is not present in the QCD Lagrangian—emerges when these modes are removed. Previously it was argued that this emergent symmetry was SU(4). However, when the low-lying modes are removed, the correlation functions of sources in the SU(4) 15-plet of spin-1 mesons appear to coincide with the correlation function of the SU(4) singlet. A natural explanation for this is an emergent symmetry larger than SU(4). In this work, it is shown that there exists no continuous symmetry whose generators in the field theory are spatial integrals of local operators that can account for the full pattern of identical correlation functions unless the apparent coincidence of the singlet channel with the 15-plet is accidental.

  17. Low-Lying Structure of (50)Ar and the N=32 Subshell Closure.

    PubMed

    Steppenbeck, D; Takeuchi, S; Aoi, N; Doornenbal, P; Matsushita, M; Wang, H; Utsuno, Y; Baba, H; Go, S; Lee, J; Matsui, K; Michimasa, S; Motobayashi, T; Nishimura, D; Otsuka, T; Sakurai, H; Shiga, Y; Shimizu, N; Söderström, P-A; Sumikama, T; Taniuchi, R; Valiente-Dobón, J J; Yoneda, K

    2015-06-26

    The low-lying structure of the neutron-rich nucleus (50)Ar has been investigated at the Radioactive Isotope Beam Factory using in-beam γ-ray spectroscopy with (9)Be((54)Ca,(50)Ar+γ)X, (9)Be((55)Sc,(50)Ar+γ)X, and (9)Be((56)Ti,(50)Ar+γ)X multinucleon removal reactions at ∼220  MeV/u. A γ-ray peak at 1178(18) keV is reported and assigned as the transition from the first 2(+) state to the 0(+) ground state. A weaker, tentative line at 1582(38) keV is suggested as the 4(1)(+)→2(1)(+) transition. The experimental results are compared to large-scale shell-model calculations performed in the sdpf model space using the SDPF-MU effective interaction with modifications based on recent experimental data for exotic calcium and potassium isotopes. The modified Hamiltonian provides a satisfactory description of the new experimental results for (50)Ar and, more generally, reproduces the energy systematics of low-lying states in neutron-rich Ar isotopes rather well. The shell-model calculations indicate that the N=32 subshell gap in (50)Ar is similar in magnitude to those in (52)Ca and (54)Ti and, notably, predict an N=34 subshell closure in (52)Ar that is larger than the one recently reported in (54)Ca.

  18. Structure studies of low-lying O/sup plus/ states in the deformed rare-earth region

    SciTech Connect

    Shihab-Eldin, A.A.; Rasmussen, J.O.; Stoyer, M.

    1988-11-01

    To better understand the structure of the low lying O/sup +/ states of even-even nuclides in the deformed rare-earth region, we have carried out calculations to generate the wavefunctions, energies and pair transfer rates from/to these states within a framework of exact diagonalization of the residual pairing and n-p forces. First we carried out exact diagonalization for the neutron and proton systems separately, using as a basis space the 126 vector space of four/five pairs within nine appropriate deformed Nilsson orbitals. For the pairing force we included both monopole and quadrupole terms. Next, we used the lowest eight eigenfunctions from both the neutron and the proton systems to generate a new basis space composed of the 64 possible neutron-proton product vectors. The n-p force was approximated by a quadrupole-quadrupole force term which was then diagonalized within the new basis space. The resulting wave functions were used to calculate the neutron pair transfer strength from and to the various low O/sup +/ states below 3 MeV in the even-even Gd, Dy and Er isotopes. Furthermore, for the case where the deformation parameters do not change appreciably between the pair of nuclides involved in the pair transfer reaction, reasonable global agreement was obtained for the measured (t,p) and (p,t) pair transfer reaction strengths both to the ground and excited states O/sup +/ states accessible in these isotopes. The observed enhancement of (t,p) pair transfer strength to excited states in some of these isotopes was reproduced by the calculation. The enhancement is due to subshell gap and large relative pair transfer amplitude for an orbital near the Fermi surface. 24 refs., 7 figs.

  19. Low-lying dipole excitations in vibrational nuclei: The Cd isotopic chain studied in photon scattering experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohstall, C.; Belic, D.; von Brentano, P.; Fransen, C.; Gade, A.; Herzberg, R.-D.; Jolie, J.; Kneissl, U.; Linnemann, A.; Nord, A.; Pietralla, N.; Pitz, H. H.; Scheck, M.; Stedile, F.; Werner, V.; Yates, S. W.

    2005-09-01

    High-resolution nuclear resonance fluorescence experiments (NRF) were performed on 110,111,112,114,116Cd at the bremsstrahlung facility of the 4.3-MV Dynamitron accelerator in Stuttgart to study the low-lying dipole strength distributions in these vibrational nuclei. Numerous excited states, most of them previously unknown, were observed in the excitation energy range up to 4 MeV. Detailed spectroscopic information has been obtained on excitation energies, spins, decay widths, decay branchings, and transition probabilities. For states in the even-even isotopes 110,112,114,116Cd, parities could be assigned from linear polarization measurements. Together with our previous results for 108,112,113,114Cd from NRF studies without polarization measurements, systematics was established for the dipole strength distributions of the stable nuclei within the Cd isotopic chain. The results are discussed with respect to the systematics of E1 two-phonon excitations and mixed-symmetry states in even-even nuclei near the Z=50 shell closure and the fragmentation of these excitation modes in the odd-mass Cd isotopes.

  20. Spin Resonances for Stored Deuteron Beams in COSY. Vector Polarization. Tracking with Spink

    SciTech Connect

    Luccio,A.; Lehrach, A.

    2008-04-01

    Results of measurements of vector and tensor polarization of a deuteron beam in the storage ring COSY have been published by the SPIN{at}COSY collaboration. In this experiment a RF Dipole was used that produced spin flip. The strength of the RFD-induced depolarizing resonance was calculated from the amount of spin flipping and the results shown in the figures of the cited paper. In this note we present the simulation of the experimental data (vector polarization) with the spin tracking code Spink.

  1. Search for a vector glueball by a scan of the J/ψ resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, J. Z.; Bardon, O.; Blum, I.; Breakstone, A.; Burnett, T.; Chen, G. P.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J.; Chen, S. M.; Chen, Y.; Chen, Y. B.; Chen, Y. Q.; Cheng, B. S.; Cowan, R. F.; Cui, X. Z.; Ding, H. L.; Du, Z. Z.; Dunwoodie, W.; Fan, X. L.; Fang, J.; Fero, M.; Gao, C. S.; Gao, M. L.; Gao, S. Q.; Gratton, P.; Gu, J. H.; Gu, S. D.; Gu, W. X.; Gu, Y. F.; Guo, Y. N.; Han, S. W.; Han, Y.; Harris, F. A.; Hatanaka, M.; He, J.; He, M.; Hitlin, D. G.; Hu, G. Y.; Hu, T.; Hu, X. Q.; Huang, D. Q.; Huang, Y. Z.; Izen, J. M.; Jia, Q. P.; Jiang, C. H.; Jin, S.; Jin, Y.; Jones, L.; Kang, S. H.; Ke, Z. J.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, B. K.; Kong, D.; Lai, Y. F.; Lan, H. B.; Lang, P. F.; Lankford, A.; Li, F.; Li, J.; Li, P. Q.; Li, Q.; Li, R. B.; Li, W.; Li, W. D.; Li, W. G.; Li, X. H.; Li, X. N.; Lin, S. Z.; Liu, H. M.; Liu, J.; Liu, J. H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, R. G.; Liu, Y.; Liu, Z. A.; Lou, X. C.; Lowery, B.; Lu, J. G.; Luo, S. Q.; Luo, Y.; Ma, A. M.; Ma, E. C.; Ma, J. M.; Mao, H. S.; Mao, Z. P.; Malchow, R.; Mandelkern, M.; Meng, X. C.; Ni, H. L.; Nie, J.; Olsen, S. L.; Oyang, J.; Paluselli, D.; Pan, L. J.; Panetta, J.; Porter, F.; Prabhakar, E.; Qi, N. D.; Que, Y. K.; Quigley, J.; Rong, G.; Schernau, M.; Schmid, B.; Schultz, J.; Shao, Y. Y.; Shen, B. W.; Shen, D. L.; Shen, H.; Shen, X. Y.; Sheng, H. Y.; Shi, H. Z.; Shi, X. R.; Smith, A.; Soderstrom, E.; Song, X. F.; Standifird, J.; Stoker, D.; Sun, F.; Sun, H. S.; Sun, S. J.; Synodinos, J.; Tan, Y. P.; Tang, S. Q.; Toki, W.; Tong, G. L.; Torrence, E.; Wang, F.; Wang, L. S.; Wang, L. Z.; Wang, M.; Wang, P.; Wang, P. L.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T. J.; Wang, Y. Y.; Wei, C. L.; Whittaker, S.; Wilson, R.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Xi, D. M.; Xia, X. M.; Xie, P. P.; Xiong, W. J.; Xu, D. Z.; Xu, R. S.; Xu, Z. Q.; Xue, S. T.; Yamamoto, R.; Yan, J.; Yan, W. G.; Yang, C. M.; Yang, C. Y.; Yang, J.; Yang, W.; Ye, M. H.; Ye, S. W.; Ye, S. Z.; Young, K.; Yu, C. S.; Yu, C. X.; Yu, Z. Q.; Yuan, C. Z.; Zhang, B. Y.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, D. H.; Zhang, H. L.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, J. W.; Zhang, L. S.; Zhang, S. Q.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y. Y.; Zhao, D. X.; Zhao, H. W.; Zhao, J. W.; Zhao, M.; Zhao, P. D.; Zhao, W. R.; Zheng, J. P.; Zheng, L. S.; Zheng, Z. P.; Zhou, G. P.; Zhou, H. S.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, X. F.; Zhou, Y. H.; Zhu, Q. M.; Zhu, Y. C.; Zhu, Y. S.; Zhuang, B. A.; Zioulas, G.

    1996-07-01

    The cross section for e+e--->ρπ has been measured by the BES detector at BEPC at center-of-mass energies covering a 40 MeV interval spanning the J/ψ resonance. The data are used to search for the vector gluonium state hypothesized by Brodsky, Lepage, and Tuan as an explanation of the ρπ puzzle in charmonium physics. The shape of the ρπ cross section is compatible with that of the total hadronic cross section. No distortions indicating the presence of a vector glueball are seen.

  2. Semirelativistic potential model for low-lying three-gluon glueballs

    SciTech Connect

    Mathieu, Vincent; Semay, Claude; Silvestre-Brac, Bernard

    2006-09-01

    The three-gluon glueball states are studied with the generalization of a semirelativistic potential model giving good results for two-gluon glueballs. The Hamiltonian depends only on 3 parameters fixed on two-gluon glueball spectra: the strong coupling constant, the string tension, and a gluon size which removes singularities in the potential. The Casimir scaling determines the structure of the confinement. Low-lying J{sup PC} states are computed and compared with recent lattice calculations. A good agreement is found for 1{sup --} and 3{sup --} states, but our model predicts a 2{sup --} state much higher in energy than the lattice result. The 0{sup -+} mass is also computed.

  3. Microscopic structure of low-lying states in {sup 188,190,192}Os

    SciTech Connect

    Lo Iudice, N.; Sushkov, A. V.

    2008-11-15

    The phonon and quasiparticle structure of the low-lying states in {sup 188,190,192}Os is investigated within the microscopic quasiparticle-phonon model. An overall agreement with the data is obtained for energies and transitions. The properties of the 0{sup +} states are found to be correlated with the evolution of the nuclear shape toward the {gamma}-soft region. Special attention is devoted at the 4{sub 3}{sup +} state. This state is found to be composed of a large double-{gamma} phonon component coexisting with an even larger one-phonon hexadecapole piece. Such a mixed phonon structure explains the observed, apparently contradictory, properties of the 4{sub 3}{sup +} states in Os isotopes.

  4. Spectroscopy of low-lying states in neutron-deficient astatine and francium nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Jakobsson, U. Cederwall, B.; Uusitalo, J.; Auranen, K.; Badran, H.; Cox, D. M.; Grahn, T.; Greenlees, P. T.; Julin, R.; Juutinen, S.; Herzáň, A.; Konki, J.; Leino, M.; Mallaburn, M.; Pakarinen, J.; Papadakis, P.; Partanen, J.; Rahkila, P.; Sandzelius, M.; Sarén, J.; and others

    2015-10-15

    Low-lying states in neutron-deficient astatine and francium nuclei have been studied by means of in-beam and delayed spectroscopy. The 13/2{sup +} state has been observed in francium nuclei with a similar down-sloping trend as in neighbouring astatine and bismuth isotopes, as a function of decreasing neutron number. A systematic trend can also now be seen for the 1/2{sup +} state both in astatine and francium nuclei, where the level energy decreases steeply as a function of neutron number when moving further away from the neutron shell closure. This trend is very similar between astatine nuclei and their francium isotones. Moreover, shape coexistence has been observed between the 13/2{sup +} state and the spherical 9/2{sup −} ground state in {sup 203}Fr and {sup 205}Fr.

  5. Spectroscopy of low-lying states in neutron-deficient astatine and francium nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakobsson, U.; Uusitalo, J.; Auranen, K.; Badran, H.; Cederwall, B.; Cox, D. M.; Grahn, T.; Greenlees, P. T.; Julin, R.; Juutinen, S.; HerzáÅ, A.; Konki, J.; Leino, M.; Mallaburn, M.; Pakarinen, J.; Papadakis, P.; Partanen, J.; Rahkila, P.; Sandzelius, M.; Sarén, J.; Scholey, C.; Sorri, J.; Stolze, S.

    2015-10-01

    Low-lying states in neutron-deficient astatine and francium nuclei have been studied by means of in-beam and delayed spectroscopy. The 13/2+ state has been observed in francium nuclei with a similar down-sloping trend as in neighbouring astatine and bismuth isotopes, as a function of decreasing neutron number. A systematic trend can also now be seen for the 1/2+ state both in astatine and francium nuclei, where the level energy decreases steeply as a function of neutron number when moving further away from the neutron shell closure. This trend is very similar between astatine nuclei and their francium isotones. Moreover, shape coexistence has been observed between the 13/2+ state and the spherical 9/2- ground state in 203Fr and 205Fr.

  6. Low Lying Spin Excitation in the Spin Ice Ho2Ti2O7

    SciTech Connect

    Ehlers, Georg; Mamontov, Eugene; Zamponi, Michaela M; Gardner, Jason S

    2010-01-01

    The high flux and low background of the new backscattering spectrometer at the SNS combine to produce an excellent signal to noise ratio, allowing us to investigate a low lying weak excitation never seen before in the spin ice, Ho{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7}. This non-dispersive excitation has been observed at E = 26.3 {mu}eV below 100 K but is resolution limited only below {approx}65 K. It is indifferent to magnetic fields below {mu}{sub 0}H = 4.5 T, at 1.6 K. These characteristics help us to identify the excitation as due to the nuclear spin system.

  7. RDDS lifetime measurements of low-lying superdeformed states in {sup 194}Hg

    SciTech Connect

    Kuehn, R.; Dewald, A.; Kruecken, R.

    1996-12-31

    The lifetimes of three low-lying states in the superdeformed (SD) yrast band of {sup 194}Hg were measured by the recoil-distance Doppler-shift method. The deduced transition quadrupole moments, Q{sub t}, equal those extracted from a DSAM measurement for the high-lying states of the band corroborate the assumption that the decay out of SD bands does not strongly affect the structure of the corresponding states. By a simple mixing-model the decay can be described assuming a very small admixture of normal-deformed (ND) states to the decaying SD states. The deduced ND mixing amplitudes for the yrast SD bands in {sup 192,194}Hg and {sup 194}Pb are presented along with average transition quadrupole moments for the lower parts of the excited SD bands.

  8. Vector resonances in weak-boson-fusion at future pp colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan, Kirtimaan; Vignaroli, Natascia

    2015-10-01

    We present a first estimate of the reach of future pp colliders, the 14 TeV LHC and a futuristic 100 TeV pp collider, on a vector resonance, specifically a W', produced via weak-boson-fusion, and decaying dominantly into tb. The analysis is motivated by Composite Higgs, Randall-Sundrum and Little Higgs scenarios, which predict the existence of vector resonances with a large coupling to W and Z longitudinal bosons. In particular, in composite Higgs models with partial compositeness, the standard Drell-Yan production channel is suppressed at large coupling while the weak-boson-fusion is enhanced and could thus provide a unique opportunity to directly test the large coupling regime of the theory. We outline a search strategy for the W' in the weak-boson-fusion channel and present the reach of future colliders on the W' mass vs coupling parameter space.

  9. Photon scattering experiments off 176Hf and the systematics of low-lying dipole modes in the stable even-even Hf isotopes 176,178,180Hf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheck, M.; Belic, D.; von Brentano, P.; Carroll, J. J.; Fransen, C.; Gade, A.; von Garrel, H.; Kneissl, U.; Kohstall, C.; Linnemann, A.; Pietralla, N.; Pitz, H. H.; Stedile, F.; Toman, R.; Werner, V.

    2003-06-01

    The low-lying dipole strength distribution in the rare isotope 176Hf was studied in nuclear resonance fluorescence experiments performed at the Stuttgart Dynamitron facility using bremsstrahlung beams with end- point energies of 4.1 and 2.4 MeV. In total, about 55 excited spin-1 states, unknown so far, were observed in the excitation energy range up to 4 MeV. Detailed spectroscopic information has been obtained on excitation energies, spins, decay widths, decay branchings, and transition probabilities. Ascribing a positive parity to all observed K=1 states, the detected total B(M1)↑ strength in the energy range of the scissors mode amounts to 2.56(6) μ2N, nearly as much as for well-deformed midshell rare-earth nuclei. The total strength is higher than in the heavier Hf isotopes 178,180Hf, but fits well into the systematics. The observed low-lying ΔK=0 transitions (with probable E1 character) lie in the energy range around 2 MeV, as expected from the systematics. The excitation probabilities correspond to values which are characteristic for nuclei in the transitional region from deformed rotors to more γ-soft nuclei.

  10. Low-lying electronic states of CuN calculated by MRCI method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shu-Dong; Liu, Chao

    2016-10-01

    The high accuracy ab initio calculation method of multi-reference configuration interaction (MRCI) is used to compute the low-lying eight electronic states of CuN. The potential energy curves (PECs) of the X3Σ-, 13Π, 23Σ-, 13Δ, 11Δ, 11Σ-, 11Π, and 5Σ- in a range of R = 0.1 nm-0.5 nm are obtained and they are goodly asymptotes to the Cu(2Sg) + N(4Su) and Cu(2Sg) + N(2Du) dissociation limits. All the possible vibrational levels, rotational constants, and spectral constants for the six bound states of X3Σ-, 13Π, 23Σ-, 11Δ, 11Σ-, and 11Π are obtained by solving the radial Schrödinger equation of nuclear motion with the Le Roy provided Level8.0 program. Also the transition dipole moments from the ground state X3Σ- to the excited states 13Π and 23Σ- are calculated and the result indicates that the 23Σ--X3Σ- transition has a much higher transition dipole moment than the 13Π-X3Σ- transition even though the 13Π state is much lower in energy than the 23Σ- state.

  11. Process-based model predictions of hurricane induced morphodynamic change on low-lying barrier islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Plant, Nathaniel G.; Thompson, David M.; Elias, Edwin; Wang, Ping; Rosati, Julie D.; Roberts, Tiffany M.

    2011-01-01

    Using Delft3D, a Chandeleur Island model was constructed to examine the sediment-transport patterns and morphodynamic change caused by Hurricane Katrina and similar storm events. The model setup included a coarse Gulf of Mexico domain and a nested finer-resolution Chandeleur Island domain. The finer-resolution domain resolved morphodynamic processes driven by storms and tides. A sensitivity analysis of the simulated morphodynamic response was performed to investigate the effects of variations in surge levels. The Chandeleur morphodynamic model reproduced several important features that matched observed morphodynamic changes. A simulation of bathymetric change driven by storm surge alone (no waves) along the central portion of the Chandeleur Islands showed (1) a general landward retreat and lowering of the island chain and (2) multiple breaches that increased the degree of island dissection. The locations of many of the breaches correspond with the low-lying or narrow sections of the initial bathymetry. The major part of the morphological change occurred prior to the peak of the surge when overtopping of the islands produced a strong water-level gradient and induced significant flow velocities.

  12. Numerical simulation of a low-lying barrier island's morphological response to Hurricane Katrina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lindemer, C.A.; Plant, N.G.; Puleo, J.A.; Thompson, D.M.; Wamsley, T.V.

    2010-01-01

    Tropical cyclones that enter or form in the Gulf of Mexico generate storm surge and large waves that impact low-lying coastlines along the Gulf Coast. The Chandeleur Islands, located 161. km east of New Orleans, Louisiana, have endured numerous hurricanes that have passed nearby. Hurricane Katrina (landfall near Waveland MS, 29 Aug 2005) caused dramatic changes to the island elevation and shape. In this paper the predictability of hurricane-induced barrier island erosion and accretion is evaluated using a coupled hydrodynamic and morphodynamic model known as XBeach. Pre- and post-storm island topography was surveyed with an airborne lidar system. Numerical simulations utilized realistic surge and wave conditions determined from larger-scale hydrodynamic models. Simulations included model sensitivity tests with varying grid size and temporal resolutions. Model-predicted bathymetry/topography and post-storm survey data both showed similar patterns of island erosion, such as increased dissection by channels. However, the model under predicted the magnitude of erosion. Potential causes for under prediction include (1) errors in the initial conditions (the initial bathymetry/topography was measured three years prior to Katrina), (2) errors in the forcing conditions (a result of our omission of storms prior to Katrina and/or errors in Katrina storm conditions), and/or (3) physical processes that were omitted from the model (e.g., inclusion of sediment variations and bio-physical processes). ?? 2010.

  13. Low-Lying S-States of Two-Electron Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Md. Abdul

    2014-04-01

    The energies of the low-lying bound S-states of some two-electron systems (treating them as three-body systems) like negatively charged hydrogen, neutral helium, positively charged-lithium, beryllium, carbon, oxygen, neon, argon and negatively charged muonium and exotic positronium ions have been calculated employing hyperspherical harmonics expansion method. The matrix elements of two-body interactions involve Raynal-Revai coefficients which are particularly essential for the numerical solution of three-body Schrődinger equation when the two-body potentials are other from Coulomb or harmonic. The technique has been applied for to two-electron ions 1H- (Z = 1) to 40Ar16+ (Z = 18), negatively charged-muonium Mu- and exotic positronium ion Ps-(e + e - e -) considering purely Coulomb interaction. The available computer facility restricted reliable calculations up to 28 partial waves (i.e. K m = 28) and energies for higher K m have been obtained by applying an extrapolation scheme suggested by Schneider.

  14. Low-Lying Levels in 147Nd in the Decay of 147Pr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Michihiro; Taniguchi, Akihiro; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Kawade, Kiyoshi; Ruan, Jian-Zhi; Tamai, Tadaharu; Kawase, Yoichi; Okano, Kotoyuki

    1993-01-01

    The level structure of 147Nd has been studied from the decay of 147Pr. The radioactive sources of 147Pr were separated from the fission products of 235U using the on-line isotope-separator KUR-ISOL and chemical separation techniques. A decay scheme has been constructed involving 93 γ-rays and a newly observed 1261.1 keV level. The half-lives of 49.9, 127.8 and 214.6 keV levels were determined to be 1.0± 0.3 ns, 0.4± 0.1 ns and 4.53± 0.06 ns, respectively. Conversion coefficients of 15 transitions were determined. The parities for the levels at 49.9, 127.8, 214.6, 314.7 and 463.5 keV are deduced to be odd. Spins and parities for the 769.3 and 792.6 keV levels are deduced to be 3/2+. The properties of transition probabilities between the low-lying triplet hole states are similar to that of three particle states in the N{=}85 isotones.

  15. Impulsive thermal x-ray emission from a low-lying coronal loop

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Siming; Li, Youping; Fletcher, Lyndsay

    2013-06-01

    Understanding the relationship among different emission components plays an essential role in the study of particle acceleration and energy conversion in solar flares. In flares where gradual and impulsive emission components can be readily identified, the impulsive emission has been attributed to non-thermal particles. We carry out detailed analysis of Hα and X-ray observations of a GOES class B microflare loop on the solar disk. The impulsive hard X-ray emission, however, is found to be consistent with a hot, quasi-thermal origin, and there is little evidence of emission from chromospheric footpoints, which challenges conventional models of flares and reveals a class of microflares associated with dense loops. Hα observations indicate that the loop lies very low in the solar corona or even in the chromosphere and both emission and absorption materials evolve during the flare. The enhanced Hα emission may very well originate from the photosphere when the low-lying flare loop heats up the underlying chromosphere and reduces the corresponding Hα opacity. These observations may be compared with detailed modeling of flare loops with the internal kink instability, where the mode remains confined in space without apparent change in the global field shape, to uncover the underlying physical processes and to probe the structure of solar atmosphere.

  16. Potential energy curves for the ground and low-lying excited states of CuAg

    SciTech Connect

    Alizadeh, Davood; Shayesteh, Alireza E-mail: ashayesteh@ut.ac.ir; Jamshidi, Zahra E-mail: ashayesteh@ut.ac.ir

    2014-10-21

    The ground and low-lying excited states of heteronuclear diatomic CuAg are examined by multi-reference configuration interaction (MRCI) method. Relativistic effects were treated and probed in two steps. Scalar terms were considered using the spin-free DKH Hamiltonian as a priori and spin-orbit coupling was calculated perturbatively via the spin-orbit terms of the Breit-Pauli Hamiltonian based on MRCI wavefunctions. Potential energy curves of the spin-free states and their corresponding Ω components correlating with the separated atom limits {sup 2}S(Cu) + {sup 2}S(Ag) and {sup 2}D(Cu) + {sup 2}S(Ag) are obtained. The results are in fine agreement with the experimental measurements and tentative conclusions for the ion-pair B0{sup +} state are confirmed by our theoretical calculations. Illustrative results are presented to reveal the relative importance and magnitude of the scalar and spin-orbit effects on the spectroscopic properties of this molecule. Time dependent density functional theory calculations, using the LDA, BLYP, B3LYP, and SAOP functionals have been carried out for CuAg and the accuracy of TD-DFT has been compared with ab initio results.

  17. Low-lying electronic states of LiF molecule with inner electrons correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Ming-jie; Huang, Duo-hui; Yang, Jun-sheng; Cao, Qi-long; Jin, Cheng-guo; Wang, Fan-hou

    2015-06-01

    The potential energy curves and dipole moments of the low-lying electronic states of LiF molecule are performed by using highly accurate multi-reference configuration interaction with Awcv5z basis sets. 1s, the inner shell of Li is considered as the closed orbit, which is used to characterise the spectroscopic properties of a manifold of singlet and triplet states. 16 electronic states correlate with two lowest dissociation channels Li(2S)+F(2P) and Li(2P)+F(2P) are investigated. Spectroscopic parameters of the ground state X1Σ+ have been evaluated and critically compared with the available experimental values and the other theoretical data. However, spectroscopic parameters of 13Π, 11Δ, 11Σ-, 11Π, 13Σ+, 23Σ+, 13Δ, 13Σ-, 23Π, 21Π, 33Π, 31Π and 33Σ+ states are studied for the first time. These 13 excited states have shallow potential wells, and the dispersion coefficients of these excited states are predicted. In additional, oscillator strengths of excited states at equilibrium distances are also predicted.

  18. Structure and spectroscopic properties of low-lying states of the HOC(O)O radical.

    PubMed

    Linguerri, Roberto; Puzzarini, Cristina; Francisco, Joseph S

    2016-02-28

    The HOC(O)O radical is a product of the reaction of HOCO radicals with oxygen atoms. The present study provides theoretical prediction of critical spectroscopic features of this radical that should aid in its experimental characterization. Energies, structures, rotational constants, and harmonic frequencies are presented for the ground and two low-lying excited electronic states of HOC(O)O. The energies for the Ã(2)A″←X̃(2)A' and B̃(2)A'←X̃(2)A' electronic transitions are reported. The band origin of the B̃←X̃ transition of HOC(O)O is predicted to occur in the near infrared region of the spectrum at around 1.5 eV and it is suggested to be the most promising one for observing this radical spectroscopically. The structural and spectroscopic similarities between HOC(O)O and the isoelectronic radical FC(O)O are discussed. The abundance of experimental data on the FC(O)O radical should guide the spectroscopic characterization of HOC(O)O and serve as a benchmark for the structural and spectroscopic parameters obtained from theory.

  19. Low-lying stepwise paths for ethylene 1,3-dipolar cycloadditions: A DFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavitha, K.; Venuvanalingam, P.

    Ethylene reacts with 1,3-dipoles such as diazomethane, nitrile oxide, and nitrone to give a single adduct and the potential energy surfaces of these reactions were completely surveyed with Density Functional Theory at the B3LYP/6-31G(d) level; B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p), QCISD/6-31G(d) level calculations were performed for comparison. These reactions were found to have one concerted and four stepwise paths and all of them were thoroughly examined. Calculations show that anti and syn approaches in the stepwise paths merge at one point in the potential energy surface and the stepwise processes (i.e., through syn transition states) are low-lying and concerted paths that are in close competition with them. A closer examination of the computed barriers of the reactions of ethylene with the above dipoles, cyclopentadiene, 1,3-butadiene, and allyl anion reveals that there is a mechanistic cross-over from concerted to stepwise path. While the neutral cycloaddition partners prefer a concerted path, the charged partners strongly favor a stepwise path. The dipoles have both concerted and stepwise (syn) paths in close competition. Such a mechanistic cross-over has been induced by the polar influence of the charged species and this change-over in mechanism could not be observed with allene cycloadditions with the same set of partners because allene is strongly biased towards the stepwise mechanism.

  20. Theoretical studies of the low-lying states of ScO, ScS, VO, and VS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R.

    1986-01-01

    Bonding in the low-lying states of ScO, ScS, VO, and VS is theoretically studied. Excellent agreement is obtained with experimental spectroscopic constants for the low-lying states of ScO and VO. The results for VS and ScS show that the bonding in the oxides and sulfides is similar, but that the smaller electronegativity in S leads to a smaller ionic component in the bonding. The computed D0 of the sulfides are about 86 percent of the corresponding oxides, and the low-lying excited states are lower in the sulfides than in the corresponding oxides. The CPF method is shown to be an accurate and cost-effective method for obtaining reliable spectroscopic constants for these systems.

  1. Theoretical spectroscopic constants for the low-lying states of the oxides and sulfides of Mo and Tc

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langhoff, Stephen R.; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Pettersson, Lars G. M.; Siegbahn, Per E. M.

    1989-01-01

    Spectroscopic results were determined for the ground and low-lying states of the oxides and sulfides of Mo and Tc, using the single-reference-based modified coupled pair functional method of Ahlrichs et al. (1985) and Chong et al. (1986) and the multireference-based state-averaged CASSCF/MRCI method. Spectroscopic constants, dipole moments, Mulliken populations, and radiative lifetimes were calculated for selected low-lying states of these molecular systems. The spectroscopy of the MoS and TcS molecules was found to be quite analogous to the corresponding oxides.

  2. Fourier Transform Emission Spectroscopy of the Low-Lying Electronic States of NbN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ram, R. S.; Bernath, P. F.

    2000-06-01

    The high-resolution spectrum of NbN has been investigated in emission in the 3000-15 000 cm-1 region using a Fourier transform spectrometer. The bands were excited in a microwave discharge through a mixture of NbCl5 vapor, ∼5 mTorr of N2, and 3 Torr of He. Numerous bands observed in the near-infrared region have been classified into the following transitions: f1Φ-c1Γ, e1Π-a1Δ, C3Π0+-A3Σ-1, C3Π0--A3Σ-1, C3Π1-a1Δ, C3Π1-A3Σ-0, d1Σ+-A3Σ-0, and d1Σ+-b1Σ+. These observations are consistent with the energy level diagram provided by laser excitation and emission spectroscopy [Y. Azuma, G. Huang, M. P. J. Lyne, A. J. Merer, and V. I. Srdanov, J. Chem. Phys. 100, 4138-4155 (1993)]. The missing d1Σ+ state has been observed for the first time and its spectroscopic parameters are consistent with the theoretical predictions of S. R. Langhoff and W. Bauschlicher, Jr. [J. Mol. Spectrosc. 143, 169-179 (1990)]. Rotational analysis of a number of bands has been obtained and improved spectroscopic parameters have been extracted for the low-lying electronic states. The observation of several vibrational bands with v = 1 has enabled us to determine the vibrational intervals and equilibrium bond lengths for the A3Σ-0, a1Δ, b1Σ+, d1Σ+, and C3Π1 states.

  3. Vector leptoquarks and the 750 GeV diphoton resonance at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Christopher W.

    2016-06-01

    The ATLAS and CMS Collaborations recently presented evidence of a resonance decaying to pairs of photons around 750 GeV. In addition, the BaBar, Belle, and LHCb Collaborations have evidence of lepton non-universality in the semileptonic decays of B mesons. In this work, we make a first step towards a unified explanation of these anomalies. Specifically, we extend the Standard Model by including vector leptoquarks and a scalar singlet that couples linearly to pairs of the leptoquarks. We find there is parameter space that gives the correct cross section for a putative 750 GeV resonance decaying to photons that is consistent with unitarity, measurements of the properties of the 125 GeV Higgs boson, and direct searches for resonances in other channels. In addition, we also show that constraints can be derived on any Beyond the Standard Model explanation of the 750 GeV resonance where the only new particles are scalars, which are strong enough to rule out certain types of models entirely.

  4. Extrapolation methods for obtaining low-lying eigenvalues of a large-dimensional shell model Hamiltonian matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshinaga, N.; Arima, A.

    2010-04-15

    We propose some new, efficient, and practical extrapolation methods to obtain a few low-lying eigenenergies of a large-dimensional Hamiltonian matrix in the nuclear shell model. We obtain those energies at the desired accuracy by extrapolation after diagonalizing small-dimensional submatrices of the sorted Hamiltonian matrix.

  5. Novel triaxial structure in low-lying states of neutron-rich nuclei around A ≈100

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, J.; Yao, J. M.; Fu, Y.; Wang, Z. H.; Li, Z. P.; Long, W. H.

    2016-05-01

    Background: In recent years, the study of triaxiality in the low-lying states of atomic nuclei with transition character or shape coexistence has been of great interest. Previous studies indicate that the neutron-rich nuclei in the A ˜100 mass region with Z ˜40 ,N ˜60 serve as good grounds for examining the role of triaxiality in nuclear low-lying states. Purpose: The aim of this work is to provide a microscopic study of low-lying states for nuclei in the A ˜100 mass regions and to examine in detail the role of triaxiality in the shape-coexistence phenomena and the variation of shape with the isospin and spin values at the beyond mean-field level. Method: The starting point of our method is a set of relativistic mean-field plus BCS wave functions generated with a constraint on triaxial deformations (β ,γ ) . The excitation energies and electric multipole transition strengths of low-lying states are calculated by solving a five-dimensional collective Hamiltonian (5DCH) with parameters determined by the mean-field wave functions. Results: The low-lying states of Mo isotopes and of N =60 isotones in the A ˜100 mass region are calculated. The results indicate that triaxiality is essential to reproduce the data of excitation energies and electric quadrupole transition strengths in low-lying states and plays an important role in the shape evolution as a function of nucleon number. However, the decrease of nuclear collectivity with the increase of angular momentum in neutron-rich Mo isotopes has not been reproduced. Conclusions: The evolution of nuclear collectivity in the low-lying states of neutron-rich nuclei in the A ˜100 mass region as a function of nucleon number is governed by the novel triaxial structure. However, the mechanism that governs the variation of nuclear shape with spin in Mo isotopes remains unclear and deserves further investigation by taking into account the effects other than the collective motions.

  6. Sea Level Rise Enhanced Halocarbon Production in Low-lying Coastal Ecosystem in the Southeastern US

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chow, A. T.; Conner, W.; Williams, T.; Song, B.

    2010-12-01

    Saltwater tides bring high concentrations of chloride and bromide inland where it mixes with terrestrial humic substances from surrounding forested watersheds and ferric/ferrous ions from shallow groundwater. With all the essential precursors (i.e., chloride, bromide, and humic substances) and catalysts (ferric/ferrous ions with sunlight), low-lying coastal ecosystems could be a hotspot for halocarbon formation. Fluctuating water levels and salinity due to the tidal cycle alter both redox reactions and water chemistry, influencing the formation and fate of halocarbons. A controlled study was conducted to confirm the abiotic formation of trihalomethanes (THMs) by the photo-Fenton reaction and the effects of the precursors on their formation. Four THM species, including chloroform (CHCl3), bromodichloromethane (CHBrCl2), dibromochloromethane (CHBr2Cl), and bromoform (CHBr3), were examined. Sets of aqueous solutions were prepared using filtered Waccamaw River samples and synthesized NaCl / NaBr, and Fe2(SO4)3 and H2O2 solutions. Solutions were enclosed in quartz tubes and exposed for 7 days to natural sunlight. Although total THM formation increased with DOC concentration, the reactivity of C in forming THM was relatively consistent across DOC concentrations, with an average of 2.6 nmol-THM mmol-C-1. The reactivity in forming THMs through the photo-Fenton reaction was significantly lower than that in chlorinated water. Reactivity generally ranged from 3-20 mmol-THM mol-C-1. The differences in reactivity suggested that greater yield of THMs could be produced under the right reaction condition. In particular, the study showed that bromide increases the reactivity of DOC in forming THMs and enhances the formation of brominated THMs. The bromine substitution factor in the NaCl treatment ranged from 19 to 24% but increased to 43 and 46% when NaBr was added. Results suggest that increased salinity and bromide concentration in saltwater-impacted coastal ecosystems could

  7. Taming the low-lying electronic states of FeH.

    PubMed

    DeYonker, Nathan J; Allen, Wesley D

    2012-12-21

    The low-lying electronic states (X (4)Δ, A (4)Π, a (6)Δ, b (6)Π) of the iron monohydride radical, which are especially troublesome for electronic structure theory, have been successfully described using a focal point analysis (FPA) approach that conjoined a correlation-consistent family of basis sets up to aug-cc-pwCV5Z-DK with high-order coupled cluster theory through hextuple (CCSDTQPH) excitations. Adiabatic excitation energies (T(0)) and spectroscopic constants (r(e), r(0), B(e), B(0), D(e), ω(e), v(0), α(e), ω(e)x(e)) were extrapolated to the valence complete basis set Douglas-Kroll (DK) aug-cc-pwCV∞Z-DK CCSDT level of theory, and additional treatments accounted for higher-order valence electron correlation, core correlation, spin-orbit coupling, and the diagonal Born-Oppenheimer correction. The purely ab initio FPA approach yields the following T(0) results (in eV) for the lowest spin-orbit components of each electronic state: 0 (X (4)Δ) < 0.132 (A (4)Π) < 0.190 (a (6)Δ) < 0.444 (b (6)Π). The computed anharmonic fundamental vibrational frequencies (v(0)) for the (4,6)Δ electronic states are within 3 cm(-1) of experiment and provide reliable predictions for the (4,6)Π states. With the cc-pVDZ basis set, even CCSDTQPH energies give an incorrect ground state of FeH, highlighting the importance of combining high-order electron correlation treatments with robust basis sets when studying transition-metal radicals. The FPA computations provide D(0) = 1.86 eV (42.9 kcal mol(-1)) for the 0 K dissociation energy of FeH and Δ(f)H(298) (∘) [FeH((g))] = 107.7 kcal mol(-1) for the enthalpy of formation at room temperature. Despite sizable multireference character in the quartet states, high-order single-reference coupled cluster computations improve the spectroscopic parameters over previous multireference theoretical studies; for example, the X (4)Δ → A (4)Π and a (6)Δ → b (6)Π transition energies are reproduced to 0

  8. Taming the low-lying electronic states of FeH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeYonker, Nathan J.; Allen, Wesley D.

    2012-12-01

    The low-lying electronic states (X 4Δ, A 4Π, a 6Δ, b 6Π) of the iron monohydride radical, which are especially troublesome for electronic structure theory, have been successfully described using a focal point analysis (FPA) approach that conjoined a correlation-consistent family of basis sets up to aug-cc-pwCV5Z-DK with high-order coupled cluster theory through hextuple (CCSDTQPH) excitations. Adiabatic excitation energies (T0) and spectroscopic constants (re, r0, Be, B0, overline De, ωe, v0, αe, ωexe) were extrapolated to the valence complete basis set Douglas-Kroll (DK) aug-cc-pwCV∞Z-DK CCSDT level of theory, and additional treatments accounted for higher-order valence electron correlation, core correlation, spin-orbit coupling, and the diagonal Born-Oppenheimer correction. The purely ab initio FPA approach yields the following T0 results (in eV) for the lowest spin-orbit components of each electronic state: 0 (X 4Δ) < 0.132 (A 4Π) < 0.190 (a 6Δ) < 0.444 (b 6Π). The computed anharmonic fundamental vibrational frequencies (v0) for the 4,6Δ electronic states are within 3 cm-1 of experiment and provide reliable predictions for the 4,6Π states. With the cc-pVDZ basis set, even CCSDTQPH energies give an incorrect ground state of FeH, highlighting the importance of combining high-order electron correlation treatments with robust basis sets when studying transition-metal radicals. The FPA computations provide D0 = 1.86 eV (42.9 kcal mol-1) for the 0 K dissociation energy of FeH and Δ _f H_{298}° [FeH(g)] = 107.7 kcal mol-1 for the enthalpy of formation at room temperature. Despite sizable multireference character in the quartet states, high-order single-reference coupled cluster computations improve the spectroscopic parameters over previous multireference theoretical studies; for example, the X 4Δ → A 4Π and a 6Δ → b 6Π transition energies are reproduced to 0.012 and 0.002 eV, respectively, while the error for the problematic X 4Δ → a 6

  9. Quenched Spectroscopic Factors for Low-Lying Positive Parity States in 31Mg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imai, N.; Mukai, M.; Cederkäll, J.; Aghai, H.; Golubev, P.; Johansson, H. T.; Kahl, D.; Teranishi, T.; Watanabe, Y. X.

    The excitation function of the proton resonance elastic scattering with a 30Mg beam of 2.92 MeV/nucleon was measured around 0 degrees in the laboratory frame. Three resonances corresponding to high excited states in 31Al were successfully observed. They correspond to the isobaric analog resonances of the first three bound states in 31Mg, which is considered to be located at the border of the island of inversion. An R-matrix analysis on the excitation function revealed that the spectroscopic factors for the first two positive parity resonances were quenched compared to those for other N=19 nuclei, 35S and 37Al, clearly indicating that the shell structure changes between 30Mg and 31Mg.

  10. Resonant frequency of the silicon micro-structure of MEMS vector hydrophone in fluid-structure interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guojun; Zhao, Peng; Zhang, Wendong

    2015-04-01

    The MEMS vector hydrophone developed by the North University of China has advantages of high Signal to Noise Ratio, ease of array integration, etc. However, the resonance frequency of the MEMS device in the liquid is different from that in the air due to the fluid-structure interaction (FSI). Based on the theory of Fluid-Solid Coupling, a generalized distributed mass attached on the micro-structure has been found, which results in the resonance frequency of the microstructure in the liquid being lower than that in the air. Then, an FSI simulation was conducted by ANSYS software. Finally, the hydrophone was measured by using a shaking table and a vector hydrophone calibration system respectively. Results show that, due to the FSI, the resonance frequency of the MEMS devices of the bionic vector hydrophone in the liquid declines approximately 30% compared to the case in the air.

  11. The water budget of a coastal low-lying wetland area at the German Baltic Coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bronstert, Axel; Graeff, Thomas; Selle, Benny; Salzmann, Thomas; Franck, Christian; Miegel, Konrad

    2016-04-01

    that despite low slope, sandy soils and forest vegetation, the catchment's hydrology is dominated by quick discharge components, for which the near-surface groundwater and the reaction for open water surfaces are the main cause. The seasonality of the area's discharge is characterized by the formation of quick discharge components mainly during the winter half-year, and by the retention effect of the lowland/fen. This retention is especially high in summer, when the surface and ground water levels have decreased due to high evaporation rates and the discharge out of the area may cease. The magnitude of the area's outflow thus generally depends on the catchment's water level. Due to the possible backlog of surface water caused by high water levels of the Baltic Sea, the direction of flow may reverse episodically. In the subareas between the trenches of the lowland, vertical exchange processes from precipitation and evaporation dominate. The lateral sub-surface interaction from/to the Baltic Sea is rather small due to the particular low local subsurface hydraulic conductivity and the very small hydraulic gradient. In summary, it can be said that this coastal low-lying wetland in the restoration phase shows rather heterogeneous hydrological processes and water balance. Characteristic are the high relevance of the subsurface processes and a strong seasonal variation, i.e. very low discharge rates in summer (except for summer convective rain storms) and considerable discharge rates in winter. The anthropogenic interventions in those coastal areas during the last two centuries have changed their water balance exceedingly. The interaction with the Baltic Sea via groundwater exchange under the dunes is very small.

  12. Observation of a low-lying neutron-unbound state in 19C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thoennessen, M.; Mosby, S.; Badger, N. S.; Baumann, T.; Bazin, D.; Bennett, M.; Brown, J.; Christian, G.; DeYoung, P. A.; Finck, J. E.; Gardner, M.; Hook, E. A.; Luther, B.; Meyer, D. A.; Mosby, M.; Rogers, W. F.; Smith, J. K.; Spyrou, A.; Strongman, M. J.

    2013-08-01

    Proton removal reactions from a secondary 22N beam were utilized to populate unbound states in neutron-rich carbon isotopes. Neutrons were measured with the Modular Neutron Array (MoNA) in coincidence with carbon fragments. A resonance with a decay energy of 76(14) keV was observed in the system C18+n corresponding to a state in 19C at an excitation energy of 653(95) keV. This resonance could correspond to the first 5/2+ state which was recently speculated to be unbound in order to describe 1n and 2n removal cross section measurements from 20C.

  13. Low-lying excited states in armchair polyacene within Pariser-Parr-Pople model: A density matrix renormalization group study

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Mousumi

    2014-03-28

    We studied the nature of the ground state and low-lying excited states of armchair polyacene oligomers (Polyphenanthrene) within long-range Pariser-Parr-Pople model Hamiltonian with up to 14 monomers using symmetrized density matrix renormalization group technique. The ground state of all armchair polyacenes studied is found to be singlet. The results show that lowest singlet dipole allowed excited state has higher energy for armchair polyacenes as compared to linear fused polyacenes. Moreover, unlike linear fused polyacenes, the lowest singlet excited state of these oligomers is always found to lie below the lowest dipole forbidden two-photon state indicating that these armchair polyacene oligomers strongly fluoresce. The calculations of low-lying excitations on singly and triply electron doped armchair polyacene oligomers show a low energy band with strong transition dipole moment that coupled to charge conductivity. This implies armchair polyacene posses novel field-effect transistor properties.

  14. Impact of the electron environment on the lifetime of the {sup 229}Th{sup m} low-lying isomer

    SciTech Connect

    Karpeshin, F. F.; Trzhaskovskaya, M. B.

    2007-11-15

    The question of the lifetime of the {sup 229}Th{sup m} low-lying isomer is considered in light of current experimental research. A strong effect of the electron shell on lifetime is demonstrated, depending on the energy of the isomer. Calculations are performed within the framework of the multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock method. The calculated lifetime ranges from around 1 min down to 10{sup -5} s. Prospects for further experimental research of the isomer are discussed.

  15. Resonating Vector Strength: How to Find Periodicity in a Time Sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Hemmen, J. Leo

    2013-03-01

    For a given periodic stimulus with angular frequency ω∘ = 2 π /T∘ we find responses as events at times {t1 ,t2 , ... ,tn } located on the real axis R. How periodic are they? And do they repeat in ``some'' sense in accordance with the stimulus period T∘? The question and the answer are at least as old as a classical paper of von Mises dating back to 1918. The key idea is simply this. We map the events tj onto the unit circle or torus through tj |-> exp (iωtj) and consider their center of gravity, ρ (ω) , a complex number in the unit disk. Its absolute value | ρ (ω∘) | with ω : =ω∘ is what von Mises studied and is now called the vector strength. We prove that the nearer | ρ (ω∘) | is to 1 the more periodic the events tj are w.r.t. T∘. Furthermore, we also show why it is useful to study ρ (ω) as a function of ω so as to obtain a `resonating' vector strength, an idea strongly deviating from the classical characteristic function. Work done in collaboration with A.N. Vollmayr. Partially supported by BCCN-Munich.

  16. Low-lying E1 and M1 strengths in the deformed nucleus 160Gd

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrichs, H.; Häger, D.; von Brentano, P.; Heil, R. D.; Herzberg, R.-D.; Kneissl, U.; Margraf, J.; Müller, G.; Pitz, H. H.; Schlitt, B.; Schumacher, M.; Wesselborg, C.; Zilges, A.

    1994-01-01

    Measurements of the linear polarization of resonantly scattered photons have been used for model-independent parity determinations in nuclear resonance fluorescence experiments. The experiments have been performed at the bremsstrahlung facility of the Stuttgart Dynamitron accelerator. The use of two different Compton polarimeters, a five Ge-detector arrangement and a sectored single-crystal Ge-polarimeter enabled the parity assignments. Positive parities were established for a cluster of states near 3.3 MeV (M1 transitions) to be ascribed to the so-called scissors mode. In addition an enhanced electric dipole excitation near 2.5 MeV (2471 keV, B(E1) ↑ = 3.0 ± 0.4 × 10 -3e2fm 2) has been observed as in the neighbouring isotopes 162Dy and 150Nd. These 1 - states systematically exhibit an uncommon decay branching hinting at K-mixing.

  17. Hybrid RGSA and Support Vector Machine Framework for Three-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Brain Tumor Classification

    PubMed Central

    Rajesh Sharma, R.; Marikkannu, P.

    2015-01-01

    A novel hybrid approach for the identification of brain regions using magnetic resonance images accountable for brain tumor is presented in this paper. Classification of medical images is substantial in both clinical and research areas. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) modality outperforms towards diagnosing brain abnormalities like brain tumor, multiple sclerosis, hemorrhage, and many more. The primary objective of this work is to propose a three-dimensional (3D) novel brain tumor classification model using MRI images with both micro- and macroscale textures designed to differentiate the MRI of brain under two classes of lesion, benign and malignant. The design approach was initially preprocessed using 3D Gaussian filter. Based on VOI (volume of interest) of the image, features were extracted using 3D volumetric Square Centroid Lines Gray Level Distribution Method (SCLGM) along with 3D run length and cooccurrence matrix. The optimal features are selected using the proposed refined gravitational search algorithm (RGSA). Support vector machines, over backpropagation network, and k-nearest neighbor are used to evaluate the goodness of classifier approach. The preliminary evaluation of the system is performed using 320 real-time brain MRI images. The system is trained and tested by using a leave-one-case-out method. The performance of the classifier is tested using the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.986 (±002). The experimental results demonstrate the systematic and efficient feature extraction and feature selection algorithm to the performance of state-of-the-art feature classification methods. PMID:26509188

  18. Nucleon electromagnetic form factors and electroexcitation of low lying nucleon resonances in a light-front relativistic quark model

    SciTech Connect

    Aznauryan Inna, Burkert Volker

    2012-05-01

    We utilize a light-front relativistic quark model (LF RQM) to predict the 3q core contribution to the electroexcitation amplitudes for the {Delta}(1232)P{sub 33}, N(1440)P{sub 11}, N(1520)D{sub 13}, and N(1535)S{sub 11} up to Q{sup 2} = 12 GeV{sup 2}. The parameters of the model have been specified via description of the nucleon electromagnetic form factors in the approach that combines 3q and pion-cloud contributions in the LF dynamics.

  19. Low-lying isomeric state in {sup 80}Ga from the {beta}{sup -} decay of {sup 80}Zn

    SciTech Connect

    LicA, R.; Marginean, N.; Ghita, D.G.; and others

    2012-10-20

    A new level scheme was constructed for {sup 80}Ga which is significantly different from the one previously reported. The excitation energy of a new low-lying state recently reported in [2] was identified at 22.4 keV. Properties of the level scheme suggest that the ground state has spin J = 6 and the first excited state has spin J = 3. The spin assignments are in agreement with laser spectroscopy values previously measured. Our work provides the first evidence for the J = 6 being the ground state.

  20. Primary transitions between the yrast superdeformed band and low-lying normal deformed states in {sup 194}Pb

    SciTech Connect

    Hauschild, K.; Bernstein, L.A.; Becker, J.A.

    1996-12-31

    The observation of one-step `primary` gamma-ray transitions directly linking the superdeformed (SD) states to the normal deformed (ND) low-lying states of known excitation energies (E{sub x}), spins and parities (J{sup {pi}}) is crucial to determining the E{sub x} and J{sup {pi}} of the SD states. With this knowledge one can begin to address some of the outstanding problems associated with SD nuclei, such as the identical band issue, and one can also place more stringent restrictions on theoretical calculations which predict SD states and their properties. Brinkman, et al., used the early implementation of the GAMMASPHERE spectrometer array (32 detectors) and proposed a single, candidate {gamma} ray linking the {sup 194}Pb yrast SD band to the low-lying ND states in {sup 194}Pb. Using 55 detectors in the GAMMASPHERE array Khoo, et al., observed multiple links between the yrast SD band in {sup 194}Hg and the low-lying level scheme and conclusively determined E{sub x} and J of the yrast SD states. Here the authors report on an experiment in which Gammasphere with 88 detectors was used and the E{sub x} and J{sup {pi}} values of the yrast SD states in {sup 194}Pb were uniquely determined. Twelve one-step linking transitions between the yrast SD band and low-lying states in {sup 194}Pb have been identified, including the transition proposed by Brinkman. These transitions have been placed in the level scheme of {sup 194}Pb using coincidence relationships and agreements between the energies of the primary transitions and the energy differences in level spacings. Furthermore, measurements of angular asymmetries have yielded the multipolarities of the primaries which have allowed J{sup {pi}} assignments of the {sup 194}Pb SD states to be unambiguously determined for the first time without a priori assumptions about the character of SD bands. A study performed in parallel to this work using the EUROGAM-II array reports similar, but somewhat less extensive, results.

  1. Low-lying spectra of {sup 9}{Lambda}Be and {sup 9}Be within three-cluster model

    SciTech Connect

    Filikhin, I.; Suslov, V. M.; Vlahovic, B.

    2011-10-24

    An {alpha}-cluster model is applied to study the low-lying spectra of the {sup 9}{Lambda}Be and {sup 9}Be nuclei. The {alpha}{alpha}{Lambda} and {alpha}{alpha}n three-body problems are numerically solved by the Faddeev equations in configuration space using phenomenological pair potentials with spin-orbital {alpha}{Lambda} and {alpha}n interactions taken into account. For the {sup 9}{Lambda}Be hypernucleus we found a set of the potentials that reproduces the experimental data for the ground state (1/2 {sup +}) binding energy and excitation energy of the 5/2{sup +} and 3/2 {sup +} states, simultaneously. The LS coupling scheme is used for partial wave analysis. The total orbital momentum is fixed for each energy level. Under this assumption we calculated the {sup 9}Be spectrum within {alpha}{alpha}n model. The experiential data are well reproduced by the model, when a new classification for low-lying levels of {sup 9}Be as members of spin-flip doublets is applied.

  2. Electronic structure of vanadium and chromium carbide cations, VC+ and CrC+. Ground and low-lying states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerkines, Ioannis S. K.; Mavridis, Aristides

    2004-01-01

    The ground and low-lying states of the monopositive vanadium and chromium carbides, VC+ and CrC+ have been studied by multireference methods and quantitative basis sets. Potential energy curves for 17 (VC+) and 19 (CrC+) states have been fully calculated. A variety of binding modes is revealed in the low-lying spectrum of the two molecular cations, often accompanied with an electronic charge transfer from the metal cation towards carbon. Two states compete for the ground state identity in both systems. One state comprises two π and ½σ bonds (similarly to ScC+ and TiC+), while the other state forms a genuine triple bond. After a rather intricate analysis including core electron effects, scalar relativity and curve shifts, the formal ground states of VC+ and CrC+ are found to be of 3Δ and 2Δ symmetry, with estimated energy differences from the competing 1Σ+ and 4Σ- states of 1-3 and 3-7 kcal/mol, respectively. At the highest level of theory including core/valence correlation and one-electron relativistic effects, the calculated ground-state binding energies are in satisfactory agreement with available experimental values.

  3. Algebraic approach to the structure of the low-lying states in A ≈100 Ru isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kisyov, S.; Bucurescu, D.; Jolie, J.; Lalkovski, S.

    2016-04-01

    The structure of the low-lying states in the odd- and even-mass A ≈100 Ru isotopes is studied in the framework of two algebraic models. The even-mass Ru nuclei are first described within the interacting boson model 1 (IBM-1). The output of these calculations was then used to calculate the odd-A isotopes within the interacting boson-fermion model 1 (IBFM-1), where a coupling of the odd neutron to the even-even core is considered. The level energies and transition probabilities calculated in the present work are tested against the experimental data. One-nucleon transfer spectroscopic factors as well as electromagnetic moments were also calculated for the odd-A Ru and compared to the experimental values. The transitional character of the isotopes is studied. Most of the low-lying positive-parity states in the odd-A Ru nuclei below 2 MeV are interpreted on the basis of ν d5 /2 and ν g7 /2 configurations. The role of the ν s1 /2 orbital in the nuclear structure of the odd-mass Ru nuclei at low energies is also studied. The negative-parity states are interpreted as ν h11 /2 excitations coupled to the core. The evolution of the IBM-1 and IBFM-1 parameters is discussed.

  4. An investigation into low-lying electronic states of HCS{sub 2} via threshold photoelectron imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, Zhengbo; Cong, Ran; Liu, Zhiling; Xie, Hua; Tang, Zichao E-mail: fanhj@dicp.ac.cn; Fan, Hongjun E-mail: fanhj@dicp.ac.cn

    2014-06-07

    Low-energy photoelectron imaging spectra of HCS{sub 2}{sup −} are reported for the first time. Vibrationally resolved photodetachment transitions from the ground state of HCS{sub 2}{sup −} to the ground state and low-lying excited states of HCS{sub 2} are observed. Combined with the ab intio calculations and Franck-Condon simulations, well-resolved vibrational spectra demonstrate definitive evidence for the resolution of the ground-state and excited states of HCS{sub 2} radical in the gaseous phase. The ground state and two low-lying excited states of HCS{sub 2} radical are assigned as {sup 2}B{sub 2}, {sup 2}A{sub 2}, and {sup 2}A{sub 1} states, respectively. The adiabatic electron affinity is determined to be 2.910 ± 0.007 eV. And the term energies of the excited states, T{sub 0} = 0.451 ± 0.009 eV and 0.553 ± 0.009 eV, are directly measured from the experimental data, respectively. Angular filtering photoelectron spectra are carried out to assist in the spectral band assignment.

  5. Low-lying excited states and nonradiative processes of 9-methyl-2-aminopurine

    SciTech Connect

    Trachsel, Maria A.; Lobsiger, Simon; Schär, Tobias; Leutwyler, Samuel

    2014-01-28

    The UV spectrum of the adenine analogue 9-methyl-2-aminopurine (9M-2AP) is investigated with one- and two-color resonant two-photon ionization spectroscopy at 0.3 and 0.05 cm{sup −1} resolution in a supersonic jet. The electronic origin at 32 252 cm{sup −1} exhibits methyl torsional subbands that originate from the 0A{sub 1}{sup ′′} (l = 0) and 1E{sup ″} (l = ±1) torsional levels. These and further torsional bands that appear up to 0{sub 0}{sup 0}+230 cm{sup −1} allow to fit the threefold (V{sub 3}) barriers of the torsional potentials as |V{sub 3}{sup ′′}|=50 cm{sup −1} in the S{sub 0} and |V{sub 3}{sup ′}|=126 cm{sup −1} in the S{sub 1} state. Using the B3LYP density functional and correlated approximate second-order coupled cluster CC2 methods, the methyl orientation is calculated to be symmetric relative to the 2AP plane in both states, with barriers of V{sub 3}{sup ′′}=20 cm{sup −1} and V{sub 3}{sup ′}=115 cm{sup −1}. The 0{sub 0}{sup 0} rotational band contour is 75% in-plane (a/b) polarized, characteristic for a dominantly long-axis {sup 1}ππ{sup *} excitation. The residual 25% c-axis polarization may indicate coupling of the {sup 1}ππ{sup *} to the close-lying {sup 1}nπ{sup *} state, calculated at 4.00 and 4.01 eV with the CC2 method. However, the CC2 calculated {sup 1}nπ oscillator strength is only 6% of that of the {sup 1}ππ{sup *} transition. The {sup 1}ππ{sup *} vibronic spectrum is very complex, showing about 40 bands within the lowest 500 cm{sup −1}. The methyl torsion and the low-frequency out-of-plane ν{sub 1}{sup ′} and ν{sub 2}{sup ′} vibrations are strongly coupled in the {sup 1}ππ{sup *} state. This gives rise to many torsion-vibration combination bands built on out-of-plane fundamentals, which are without precedence in the {sup 1}ππ{sup *} spectrum of 9H-2-aminopurine [S. Lobsiger, R. K. Sinha, M. Trachsel, and S. Leutwyler, J. Chem. Phys. 134, 114307 (2011)]. From the Lorentzian

  6. Theoretical spectroscopy study of the low-lying electronic states of UX and UX+, X = F and Cl

    DOE PAGES

    Bross, David H.; Peterson, Kirk A.

    2015-11-13

    Spectroscopic constants (Te, re, B0, ωe, ωexe) have been calculated for the low-lying electronic states of UF, UF+, UCl, and UCl+ using complete active space 2nd-order perturbation theory (CASPT2), with a series of correlation consistent basis sets. The latter included those based on both pseudopotential (PP) and all-electron Douglas-Kroll-Hess (DK) Hamiltonians for the U atom. Spin orbit effects were included a posteri using the state interacting method using both PP and Breit Pauli (BP) operators, as well as from exact two-component (X2C) methods for U+ and UF+. Complete basis set (CBS) limits were obtained by extrapolation where possible and themore » PP and BP calculations were compared at their respective CBS limits. The PP-based method was shown to be reliable in calculating spectroscopic constants, in particular when using the state interacting method with CASPT2 energies (SO-CASPT2). The two component calculations were limited by computational resources and could not include electron correlation from the nominally closed shell 6s and 6p orbitals of U. UF and UCl were both calculated to have Ω=9/2 ground states. The first excited state of UCl was calculated to be an Ω=7/2 state at 78 cm-1 as opposed to the same state at 435 cm-1 in UF, and the other low-lying states of UCl showed a similar compression relative to UF. Likewise UF+ and UCl+ both have Ω=4 ground states and the manifold of low-lying excited Ω = 3, 2, 1, 0 states were energetically closer together in UCl+ than in UF+, ranging up to 776 cm-1 in UF+ and only 438 cm-1 in UCl+. As in previous research, the final PP-based SO-CASPT2 results for UF+ and UF agree well with experiment, and are expected to be predictive for UCl and UCl+, which are reported here for the first time.« less

  7. Theoretical spectroscopy study of the low-lying electronic states of UX and UX{sup +}, X = F and Cl

    SciTech Connect

    Bross, David H.; Peterson, Kirk A.

    2015-11-14

    Spectroscopic constants (T{sub e}, r{sub e}, B{sub 0}, ω{sub e}, and ω{sub e}x{sub e}) have been calculated for the low-lying electronic states of UF, UF{sup +}, UCl, and UCl{sup +} using complete active space 2nd-order perturbation theory (CASPT2), with a series of correlation consistent basis sets. The latter included those based on both pseudopotential (PP) and all-electron Douglas-Kroll-Hess Hamiltonians for the U atom. Spin orbit (SO) effects were included a posteriori using the state interacting method using both PP and Breit Pauli (BP) operators, as well as from exact two-component methods for U{sup +} and UF{sup +}. Complete basis set (CBS) limits were obtained by extrapolation where possible and the PP and BP calculations were compared at their respective CBS limits. The PP-based method was shown to be reliable in calculating spectroscopic constants, in particular when using the state interacting method with CASPT2 energies (SO-CASPT2). The two component calculations were limited by computational resources and could not include electron correlation from the nominally closed shell 6s and 6p orbitals of U. UF and UCl were both calculated to have Ω = 9/2 ground states. The first excited state of UCl was calculated to be an Ω = 7/2 state at 78 cm{sup −1} as opposed to the same state at 435 cm{sup −1} in UF, and the other low-lying states of UCl showed a similar compression relative to UF. Likewise, UF{sup +} and UCl{sup +} both have Ω = 4 ground states and the manifold of low-lying excited Ω = 3, 2, 1, 0 states was energetically closer together in UCl{sup +} than in UF{sup +}, ranging up to 776 cm{sup −1} in UF{sup +} and only 438 cm{sup −1} in UCl{sup +}. As in previous studies, the final PP-based SO-CASPT2 results for UF{sup +} and UF agree well with experiment and are expected to be predictive for UCl and UCl{sup +}, which are reported here for the first time.

  8. Theoretical spectroscopy study of the low-lying electronic states of UX and UX(+), X = F and Cl.

    PubMed

    Bross, David H; Peterson, Kirk A

    2015-11-14

    Spectroscopic constants (Te, re, B0, ωe, and ωexe) have been calculated for the low-lying electronic states of UF, UF(+), UCl, and UCl(+) using complete active space 2nd-order perturbation theory (CASPT2), with a series of correlation consistent basis sets. The latter included those based on both pseudopotential (PP) and all-electron Douglas-Kroll-Hess Hamiltonians for the U atom. Spin orbit (SO) effects were included a posteriori using the state interacting method using both PP and Breit Pauli (BP) operators, as well as from exact two-component methods for U(+) and UF(+). Complete basis set (CBS) limits were obtained by extrapolation where possible and the PP and BP calculations were compared at their respective CBS limits. The PP-based method was shown to be reliable in calculating spectroscopic constants, in particular when using the state interacting method with CASPT2 energies (SO-CASPT2). The two component calculations were limited by computational resources and could not include electron correlation from the nominally closed shell 6s and 6p orbitals of U. UF and UCl were both calculated to have Ω = 9/2 ground states. The first excited state of UCl was calculated to be an Ω = 7/2 state at 78 cm(-1) as opposed to the same state at 435 cm(-1) in UF, and the other low-lying states of UCl showed a similar compression relative to UF. Likewise, UF(+) and UCl(+) both have Ω = 4 ground states and the manifold of low-lying excited Ω = 3, 2, 1, 0 states was energetically closer together in UCl(+) than in UF(+), ranging up to 776 cm(-1) in UF(+) and only 438 cm(-1) in UCl(+). As in previous studies, the final PP-based SO-CASPT2 results for UF(+) and UF agree well with experiment and are expected to be predictive for UCl and UCl(+), which are reported here for the first time.

  9. Theoretical spectroscopy study of the low-lying electronic states of UX and UX+, X = F and Cl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bross, David H.; Peterson, Kirk A.

    2015-11-01

    Spectroscopic constants (Te, re, B0, ωe, and ωexe) have been calculated for the low-lying electronic states of UF, UF+, UCl, and UCl+ using complete active space 2nd-order perturbation theory (CASPT2), with a series of correlation consistent basis sets. The latter included those based on both pseudopotential (PP) and all-electron Douglas-Kroll-Hess Hamiltonians for the U atom. Spin orbit (SO) effects were included a posteriori using the state interacting method using both PP and Breit Pauli (BP) operators, as well as from exact two-component methods for U+ and UF+. Complete basis set (CBS) limits were obtained by extrapolation where possible and the PP and BP calculations were compared at their respective CBS limits. The PP-based method was shown to be reliable in calculating spectroscopic constants, in particular when using the state interacting method with CASPT2 energies (SO-CASPT2). The two component calculations were limited by computational resources and could not include electron correlation from the nominally closed shell 6s and 6p orbitals of U. UF and UCl were both calculated to have Ω = 9/2 ground states. The first excited state of UCl was calculated to be an Ω = 7/2 state at 78 cm-1 as opposed to the same state at 435 cm-1 in UF, and the other low-lying states of UCl showed a similar compression relative to UF. Likewise, UF+ and UCl+ both have Ω = 4 ground states and the manifold of low-lying excited Ω = 3, 2, 1, 0 states was energetically closer together in UCl+ than in UF+, ranging up to 776 cm-1 in UF+ and only 438 cm-1 in UCl+. As in previous studies, the final PP-based SO-CASPT2 results for UF+ and UF agree well with experiment and are expected to be predictive for UCl and UCl+, which are reported here for the first time.

  10. Electronic structure and rovibrational calculation of the low-lying states of the RbYb molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tohme, S. N.; Korek, M.

    2013-01-01

    Complete Active Space Self Consistent Field (CASSCF) method with Multi Reference Configuration Interaction (MRCI) calculations is used to investigate the potential energy curves of the low-lying 29 electronic states in the representation 2s+1Λ(+/-) of the RbYb molecule (single and double excitations with Davidson corrections). The harmonic frequency ωe, the internuclear distance Re and the electronic energy with respect to the ground state Te have been calculated. The eigenvalues Ev, the rotational constant Bv, and the abscissas of the turning points Rmin and Rmax have been investigated using the canonical functions approach. The comparison between the values of the present work and those available in the literature for several states shows a very good agreement. Twenty-six new states have been studied here for the first time.

  11. The GSAM software: A global search algorithm of minima exploration for the investigation of low lying isomers of clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Marchal, Rémi; Carbonnière, Philippe; Pouchan, Claude

    2015-01-22

    The study of atomic clusters has become an increasingly active area of research in the recent years because of the fundamental interest in studying a completely new area that can bridge the gap between atomic and solid state physics. Due to their specific properties, such compounds are of great interest in the field of nanotechnology [1,2]. Here, we would present our GSAM algorithm based on a DFT exploration of the PES to find the low lying isomers of such compounds. This algorithm includes the generation of an intial set of structure from which the most relevant are selected. Moreover, an optimization process, called raking optimization, able to discard step by step all the non physically reasonnable configurations have been implemented to reduce the computational cost of this algorithm. Structural properties of Ga{sub n}Asm clusters will be presented as an illustration of the method.

  12. Ab initio potential energy surfaces of HCS+: A study of the ground and the low-lying excited electronic states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Rajwant; Dhilip Kumar, T. J.

    2016-11-01

    Three dimensional ab initio potential energy surfaces (PESs) have been computed for the ground state and low-lying excited states of HCS+ molecular ion using the internally contracted multi-reference (single and double) configuration interaction and augmented correlation consistent polarized valence quadruple zeta (aug-cc-pVQZ) basis sets. Ground state global PES is analyzed as dissociation of molecular ion into H + CS+. The ground state PES (H + CS+) has been fitted by the inverse power series expansion function. The anisotropy of the surface has been analyzed in terms of the multipolar expansion coefficients for the rigid-rotor surface. The surface will be useful for detailed understanding of collision dynamics in terms of ro-vibrational cross sections and rate coefficients.

  13. gamma-ray spectroscopic study of calcium-48,49 and scandium-50 focusing on low lying octupole vibration excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPherson, David M.

    An inverse kinematic proton scattering experiment was performed at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL) using the GRETINA-S800 detector system in conjunction with the Ursinus College liquid hydrogen target. gamma-ray yields from the experiment were determined using geant4 simulations, generating state population cross sections. These cross sections were used to extract the delta_3 deformation length for the low-lying octupole vibration excitations in Ca-48,49 using the coupled channels analysis code fresco. Particle-core coupling in Ca-49 was studied in comparison to Ca-48 through determination of the neutron and proton deformation lengths. The total inverse kinematic proton scattering deformation lengths were evaluated for the low-lying octupole vibration excitations in Ca-48,49 to be delta_3(Ca-48, 3. -_1) = 1.0(2)fm,delta_3(Ca-49, 9/2. +_1) = 1.2(1)fm, delta_3 (Ca-49, 9/2. +_1) = 1.5(2)fm, delta_3(Ca-49,5/2. +_1) = 1.1(1)fm. Proton and neutron deformation lengths for two of theseoctupole states were also determined to be delta_p(Ca-48, 3. -_1) = 0.9(1)fm,delta_p (Ca-49, 9/2. +_1) = 1.0(1)fm, delta_n(Ca-48, 3. -_1) = 1.1(3)fm, anddelta_n(Ca-49, 9/2. +_1) = 1.3(3)fm. Additionally, the ratios of the neutronto proton transition matrix elements were also determined for these two states to be M_n/M_p(Ca-48, 3. -_1) = 1.7(6) and M_n/M_p(Ca-49, 9/2. +_1) = 2.0(5).Statistically, the derived values for these two nuclei are nearly identical.

  14. Rotational Spectroscopy as a Tool to Investigate Interactions Between Vibrational Polyads in Symmetric Top Molecules: Low-Lying States v_8 ≤ 2 OF Methyl Cyanide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Holger S. P.; Ordu, Matthias H.; Lewen, Frank; Brown, Linda; Drouin, Brian; Pearson, John; Sung, Keeyoon; Kleiner, Isabelle; Sams, Robert

    2015-06-01

    Rotational and rovibrational spectra of methyl cyanide were recorded to analyze interactions in low-lying vibrational states and to construct line lists for radio astronomical observations as well as for infrared spectroscopic investigations of planetary atmospheres. The rotational spectra cover large portions of the 36-1627~GHz region. In the infrared (IR), a spectrum was recorded for this study in the region of 2ν_8 around 717~cm-1 with assignments covering 684-765~cm-1. Additional spectra in the ν _8 region were used to validate the analysis. Using ν _8 data as well as spectroscopic parameters for v_4 = 1, v_7 = 1, and v_8 = 3 from previous studies, we analyzed rotational data involving v = 0, v_8 = 1, and v_8 = 2 up to high J and K quantum numbers. We analyzed a strong Δ v_8 = ± 1, Δ K = 0, Δ l = ±3 Fermi resonance between v_8 = 1-1 and v_8 = 2+2 at K = 14 and obtained preliminary results for two further Fermi resonances between v_8 = 2 and 3. We also found resonant Δ v_8 = ± 1, Δ K = ∓ 2, Δ l = ± 1 interactions between v_8 = 1 and 2 and present the first detailed analysis of such a resonance between v_8 = 0 and 1. We discuss the impact of this analysis on the v_8 = 1 and 2 as well as on the axial v = 0 parameters and compare selected CH_3CN parameters with those of CH_3CCH and CH_3NC. We evaluated transition dipole moments of ν _8, 2ν _8 - ν _8, and 2ν _8 for remote sensing in the IR. Part of this work was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. M. Koivusaari et al., J. Mol. Spectrosc. 152 (1992) 377-388. A.-M. Tolonen et al., J. Mol. Spectrosc. 160 (1993) 554-565.

  15. A quantitative evaluation method of flood risks in low-lying areas associated with increase of heavy rainfall in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minakawa, H.; Masumoto, T.

    2012-12-01

    An increase in flood risk, especially in low-lying areas, is predicted as a consequence of global climate change or other causes. Immediate measures such as strengthening of drainage capacity are needed to minimize the damage caused by more-frequent flooding. Typically, drainage pump capacities of in paddy areas are planned by using a result of drainage analysis with design rainfall (e.g. 3-day rainfall amount with a 10-year return period). However, the result depends on a hyetograph of input rainfall even if a total amount of rainfall is equal, and the flood risk may be different with rainfall patterns. Therefore, it is important to assume various patterns of heavy rainfall for flood risk assessment. On the other hand, a rainfall synthesis simulation is useful to generate many patterns of rainfall data for flood studies. We previously proposed a rainfall simulation method called diurnal rainfall pattern generator which can generate short-time step rainfall and internal pattern of them. This study discusses a quantitative evaluation method for detecting a relationship between flood damage risk and heavy rainfall scale by using the diurnal rainfall pattern generator. In addition, we also approached an estimation of flood damage which focused on rice yield. Our study area was in the Kaga three-lagoon basin in Ishikawa Prefecture, Japan. There are two lagoons in the study area, and the low-lying paddy areas extend over about 4,000 ha in the lower reaches of the basin. First, we developed a drainage analysis model that incorporates kinematic and diffusive runoff models for calculating water level on channels and paddies. Next, the heavy rainfall data for drainage analysis were generated. Here, the 3-day rainfalls amounts with 9 kinds of different return periods (2-, 3-, 5-, 8-, 10-, 15-, 50-, 100-, and 200-year) were derived, and three hundred hyetograph patterns were generated for each rainfall amount by using the diurnal rainfall pattern generator. Finally, all data

  16. Nucleosynthesis of 92Nb and the relevance of the low-lying isomer at 135.5 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohr, Peter

    2016-06-01

    Background: Because of its half-life of about 35 million years, 92Nb is considered as a chronometer for nucleosynthesis events prior to the birth of our sun. The abundance of 92Nb in the early solar system can be derived from meteoritic data. It has to be compared to theoretical estimates for the production of 92Nb to determine the time between the last nucleosynthesis event before the formation of the early solar system. Purpose: The influence of a low-lying short-lived isomer on the nucleosynthesis of 92Nb is analyzed. The thermal coupling between the ground state and the isomer via so-called intermediate states affects the production and survival of 92Nb. Method: The properties of the lowest intermediate state in 92Nb are known from experiment. From the lifetime of the intermediate state and from its decay branchings, the transition rate from the ground state to the isomer and the effective half-life of 92Nb are calculated as functions of the temperature. Results: The coupling between the ground state and the isomer is strong. This leads to thermalization of ground state and isomer in the nucleosynthesis of 92Nb in any explosive production scenario and almost 100% survival of 92Nb in its ground state. However, the strong coupling leads to a temperature-dependent effective half-life of 92Nb which makes the 92Nb survival very sensitive to temperatures as low as about 8 keV, thus turning 92Nb at least partly into a thermometer. Conclusions: The low-lying isomer in 92Nb does not affect the production of 92Nb in explosive scenarios. In retrospect this validates all previous studies where the isomer was not taken into account. However, the dramatic reduction of the effective half-life at temperatures below 10 keV may affect the survival of 92Nb after its synthesis in supernovae, which are the most likely astrophysical sites for the nucleosynthesis of 92Nb.

  17. Geometries and electronic structures of the ground and low-lying excited states of FeCO: An ab initio study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirano, Tsuneo; Okuda, Rei; Nagashima, Umpei; Jensen, Per

    2012-12-01

    FeCO is a molecule of astrophysical interest. We report here theoretical calculations of its geometrical parameters, electronic structures, and molecular constants (such as dipole moment and spin-orbit coupling constant) in the electronic ground state tilde{X}3Σ - and the low-lying triplet and quintet excited states. The calculations were made at the MR-SDCI+Q_DK3/[5ZP ANO-RCC (Fe, C, O)] and MR-AQCC_DK3/[5ZP ANO-RCC (Fe, C, O)] levels of theory. A multi-reference calculation was required to describe correctly the wavefunctions of all states studied. For all triplet states, the σ-donation through the 10σ molecular orbital (MO) as well as the π-back-donation through the 4π MO are observed, and the dipole moment vector points from O toward Fe as expected. However, in the excited quintet states 5Π, 5Φ, and 5Δ, the almost negligible contribution of Fe 4s to the 10σ MO makes the dipole moment vector point from Fe toward O, i.e., in the same direction as in CO. In the tilde{X}3Σ - state, the electron provided by the σ-donation through the 10σ MO is shared between the Fe atom and the C end of the CO residue to form a coordinate-covalent Fe-C bond. In the tilde{a}5Σ - state (the high-spin counterpart of tilde{X}3Σ -), the σ-donation through the 10σ MO is not significant and so the Fe-C bond is rather ionic. The π-back-donation through the 4π MO is found to be of comparable importance in the two electronic states; it has a slightly larger magnitude in the tilde{X}3Σ - state. The difference in the molecular properties of the low-spin tilde{X}3Σ - and the high-spin tilde{a}5Σ - states can be understood in terms of the dynamical electron correlation effects.

  18. Ab initio calculations of the electronic structure of the low-lying states for the ultracold LiYb molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tohme, Samir N.; Korek, Mahmoud; Awad, Ramadan

    2015-03-01

    Ab initio techniques have been applied to investigate the electronic structure of the LiYb molecule. The potential energy curves have been computed in the Born-Oppenheimer approximation for the ground and 29 low-lying doublet and quartet excited electronic states. Complete active space self-consistent field, multi-reference configuration interaction, and Rayleigh Schrödinger perturbation theory to second order calculations have been utilized to investigate these states. The spectroscopic constants, ωe, Re, Be, …, and the static dipole moment, μ, have been investigated by using the two different techniques of calculation with five different types of basis. The eigenvalues, Ev, the rotational constant, Bv, the centrifugal distortion constant, Dv, and the abscissas of the turning points, Rmin and Rmax, have been calculated by using the canonical functions approach. The comparison between the values of the present work, calculated by different techniques, and those available in the literature for several electronic states shows a very good agreement. Twenty-one new electronic states have been studied here for the first time.

  19. Operational flood control of a low-lying delta system using large time step Model Predictive Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Xin; van Overloop, Peter-Jules; Negenborn, Rudy R.; van de Giesen, Nick

    2015-01-01

    The safety of low-lying deltas is threatened not only by riverine flooding but by storm-induced coastal flooding as well. For the purpose of flood control, these deltas are mostly protected in a man-made environment, where dikes, dams and other adjustable infrastructures, such as gates, barriers and pumps are widely constructed. Instead of always reinforcing and heightening these structures, it is worth considering making the most of the existing infrastructure to reduce the damage and manage the delta in an operational and overall way. In this study, an advanced real-time control approach, Model Predictive Control, is proposed to operate these structures in the Dutch delta system (the Rhine-Meuse delta). The application covers non-linearity in the dynamic behavior of the water system and the structures. To deal with the non-linearity, a linearization scheme is applied which directly uses the gate height instead of the structure flow as the control variable. Given the fact that MPC needs to compute control actions in real-time, we address issues regarding computational time. A new large time step scheme is proposed in order to save computation time, in which different control variables can have different control time steps. Simulation experiments demonstrate that Model Predictive Control with the large time step setting is able to control a delta system better and much more efficiently than the conventional operational schemes.

  20. Computational simulation and interpretation of the low-lying excited electronic states and electronic spectrum of thioanisole.

    PubMed

    Li, Shaohong L; Xu, Xuefei; Truhlar, Donald G

    2015-08-21

    Three singlet states, namely a closed-shell ground state and two excited states with (1)ππ* and (1)nσ* character, have been suggested to be responsible for the radiationless decay or photochemical reaction of photoexcited thioanisole. The correct interpretation of the electronic spectrum is critical for understanding the character of these low-lying excited states, but the experimental spectrum is yet to be fully interpreted. In the work reported here, we investigated the nature of those three states and a fourth singlet state of thioanisole using electronic structure calculations by multireference perturbation theory, by completely-renormalized equation-of-motion coupled cluster theory with single and double excitations and noniterative inclusion of connected triples (CR-EOM-CCSD(T)), and by linear-response time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT). We clarified the assignment of the electronic spectrum by simulating it using a normal-mode sampling approach combined with TDDFT in the Tamm-Dancoff approximation (TDA). The understanding of the electronic states and of the accuracy of the electronic structure methods lays the foundation of our future work of constructing potential energy surfaces. PMID:26088195

  1. Ab initio calculations of the electronic structure of the low-lying states for the ultracold LiYb molecule

    SciTech Connect

    Tohme, Samir N.; Korek, Mahmoud E-mail: fkorek@yahoo.com; Awad, Ramadan

    2015-03-21

    Ab initio techniques have been applied to investigate the electronic structure of the LiYb molecule. The potential energy curves have been computed in the Born–Oppenheimer approximation for the ground and 29 low-lying doublet and quartet excited electronic states. Complete active space self-consistent field, multi-reference configuration interaction, and Rayleigh Schrödinger perturbation theory to second order calculations have been utilized to investigate these states. The spectroscopic constants, ω{sub e}, R{sub e}, B{sub e}, …, and the static dipole moment, μ, have been investigated by using the two different techniques of calculation with five different types of basis. The eigenvalues, E{sub v}, the rotational constant, B{sub v}, the centrifugal distortion constant, D{sub v}, and the abscissas of the turning points, R{sub min} and R{sub max}, have been calculated by using the canonical functions approach. The comparison between the values of the present work, calculated by different techniques, and those available in the literature for several electronic states shows a very good agreement. Twenty-one new electronic states have been studied here for the first time.

  2. Ab initio calculations of the electronic structure of the low-lying states for the ultracold LiYb molecule.

    PubMed

    Tohme, Samir N; Korek, Mahmoud; Awad, Ramadan

    2015-03-21

    Ab initio techniques have been applied to investigate the electronic structure of the LiYb molecule. The potential energy curves have been computed in the Born-Oppenheimer approximation for the ground and 29 low-lying doublet and quartet excited electronic states. Complete active space self-consistent field, multi-reference configuration interaction, and Rayleigh Schrödinger perturbation theory to second order calculations have been utilized to investigate these states. The spectroscopic constants, ωe, Re, Be, …, and the static dipole moment, μ, have been investigated by using the two different techniques of calculation with five different types of basis. The eigenvalues, Ev, the rotational constant, Bv, the centrifugal distortion constant, Dv, and the abscissas of the turning points, Rmin and Rmax, have been calculated by using the canonical functions approach. The comparison between the values of the present work, calculated by different techniques, and those available in the literature for several electronic states shows a very good agreement. Twenty-one new electronic states have been studied here for the first time. PMID:25796254

  3. Communication: MULTIMODE calculations of low-lying vibrational states of NO3 using an adiabatic potential energy surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homayoon, Zahra; Bowman, Joel M.

    2014-10-01

    A semi-global, permutationally invariant potential energy surface for NO3 is constructed from a subset of roughly 5000 Multi-State CASPT2 calculations (MS-CAS(17e,13o)PT2/aug-cc-pVTZ) reported by Morokuma and co-workers [H. Xiao, S. Maeda, and K. Morokuma, J. Chem. Theory Comput. 8, 2600 (2012)]. The PES, with empirical adjustments to modify the energies of two fundamentals and a hot-band transition, is used in full-dimensional vibrational self-consistent field/virtual state configuration interaction calculations using the code MULTIMODE. Vibrational energies and assignments are given for the fundamentals and low-lying combination states, including two that have been the focus of some controversy. Energies of a number of overtone and combinations are shown to be in good agreement with experiment and previous calculations using a model vibronic Hamiltonian [C. S. Simmons, T. Ichino, and J. F. Stanton, J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 3, 1946 (2012)]. Notably, the fundamental v3 is calculated to be at 1099 cm-1 in accord with the prediction from the vibronic analysis, although roughly 30 cm-1 higher. The state at 1493 cm-1 is assigned as v3 + v4, which is also in agreement with the vibronic analysis and some experiments. Vibrational energies for 15NO3 are also presented and these are also in good agreement with experiment.

  4. Saltwater contamination in the managed low-lying farmland of the Venice coast, Italy: An assessment of vulnerability.

    PubMed

    Da Lio, Cristina; Carol, Eleonora; Kruse, Eduardo; Teatini, Pietro; Tosi, Luigi

    2015-11-15

    The original morphology and hydrogeology of many low-lying coastlands worldwide have been significantly modified over the last century through river diversion, embankment built-up, and large-scale land reclamation projects. This led to a progressive shifting of the groundwater-surficial water exchanges from naturally to anthropogenically driven. In this human-influenced hydrologic landscape, the saltwater contamination usually jeopardizes the soil productivity. In the coastland south of Venice (Italy), several well log measurements, chemical and isotope analyses have been performed over the last decade to characterize the occurrence of the salt contamination. The processing of this huge dataset highlights a permanent variously-shaped saline contamination up to 20km inland, with different conditions in relation with the various geomorphological features of the area. The results point out the important role of the land reclamation in shaping the present-day salt contamination and reveal the contribution of precipitation, river discharge, lagoon and sea water to the shallow groundwater in the various coastal sectors. Moreover, an original vulnerability map to salt contamination in relation to the farmland productivity has been developed taking into account the electrical conductivity of the upper aquifer in the worst condition, the ground elevation, and the distance from salt and fresh surface water sources. Finally, the study allows highlighting the limit of traditional investigations in monitoring saltwater contamination at the regional scale in managed Holocene coastal environments. Possible improvements are outlined.

  5. Low-lying E1,M1, and E2 strength distributions in Xe124,126,128,129,130,131,132,134,136: Systematic photon scattering experiments in the mass region of a nuclear shape or phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Garrel, H.; Brentano, P. Von; Fransen, C.; Friessner, G.; Hollmann, N.; Jolie, J.; Käppeler, F.; Käubler, L.; Kneissl, U.; Kohstall, C.; Kostov, L.; Linnemann, A.; Mücher, D.; Pietralla, N.; Pitz, H. H.; Rusev, G.; Scheck, M.; Schilling, K. D.; Scholl, C.; Schwengner, R.; Stedile, F.; Walter, S.; Werner, V.; Wisshak, K.

    2006-05-01

    Systematic nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) experiments on all nine stable (seven even-even and two odd-mass) Xe isotopes have been performed at the bremsstrahlung facility of the 4.3-MV Stuttgart Dynamitron accelerator. For the first time thin-walled, high-pressure gas targets (about 70 bar) with highly enriched target material were used in NRF experiments. Precise excitation energies, transition strengths, spins, and decay branching ratios were obtained for numerous states, most of them previously unknown. The systematics of the observed E1 two-phonon excitations (2+⊗3-) and M1 excitations to 1+ mixed-symmetry states in the even-even isotopes are discussed with respect to the new critical point symmetry E(5). The fragmentation of these fundamental dipole excitation modes in the odd-mass isotopes Xe129,131 is shown and discussed. In the even-even nuclei several low-lying E2 excitations were observed.

  6. Search for global-minimum geometries of medium-sized germanium clusters. II. Motif-based low-lying clusters Ge21-Ge29

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, S.; Zeng, X. C.

    2006-05-01

    We performed a constrained search for the geometries of low-lying neutral germanium clusters GeN in the size range of 21⩽N⩽29. The basin-hopping global optimization method is employed for the search. The potential-energy surface is computed based on the plane-wave pseudopotential density functional theory. A new series of low-lying clusters is found on the basis of several generic structural motifs identified previously for silicon clusters [S. Yoo and X. C. Zeng, J. Chem. Phys. 124, 054304 (2006)] as well as for smaller-sized germanium clusters [S. Bulusu et al., J. Chem. Phys. 122, 164305 (2005)]. Among the generic motifs examined, we found that two motifs stand out in producing most low-lying clusters, namely, the six/nine motif, a puckered-hexagonal-ring Ge6 unit attached to a tricapped trigonal prism Ge9, and the six/ten motif, a puckered-hexagonal-ring Ge6 unit attached to a bicapped antiprism Ge10. The low-lying clusters obtained are all prolate in shape and their energies are appreciably lower than the near-spherical low-energy clusters. This result is consistent with the ion-mobility measurement in that medium-sized germanium clusters detected are all prolate in shape until the size N ˜65.

  7. Theoretical Study on Vibronic Interactions and Photophysics of Low-Lying Excited Electronic States of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samala, Nagaprasad Reddy; Mahapatra, S.

    2014-06-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), in particular, their radical cation (PAH^+), have long been postulated to be the important molecular species in connection with the spectroscopic observations in the interstellar medium. Motivated by numerous important observations by stellar as well as laboratory spectroscopists, we undertook detailed quantum mechanical studies of the structure and dynamics of electronically excited PAH^+ in an attempt to establish possible synergism with the recorded data In this study, we focus on the quantum chemistry and dynamics of the doublet ground (X) and low-lying excited (A, B and C) electronic states of the radical cation of tetracene (Tn), pentacene (Pn), and hexacene (Hn) molecule. This study is aimed to unravel photostability, spectroscopy, and time-dependent dynamics of their excited electronic states. In order to proceed with the theoretical investigations, we construct suitable multistate and multimode Hamiltonian for these systems with the aid of extensive ab initio calculations of their electronic energy surfaces. The diabatic coupling surfaces are derived from the calculated adiabatic electronic energies. First principles nuclear dynamics calculations are then carried out employing the constructed Hamiltonians and with the aid of time-independent and time-dependent quantum mechanical methods. We compared our theoretical results with available photoelectron spectroscopy, zero kinetic energy photoelectron (ZEKE) spectroscopy and matrix isolation spectroscopy (MIS) results. A peak at 8650 Å in the B state spectrum of Tn^+ is in good agreement with the DIB at 8648 Å observed by Salama et al. Similarly in Pn^+, a peak at 8350 Å can be correlated to the DIB at 8321 Å observed by Salama et al. J. Zhang et al., J. Chem. Phys., 128,104301 (2008).; F. Salama, Origins of Life Evol. Biosphere, 28, 349 (1998).; F. Salama et al., Planet. Space Sci., 43, 1165 (1995).; F. Salama et al., Astrophys. J., 526, 265 (1999).; J

  8. Coastline evolution of Portuguese low-lying sandy coast in the last 50 years: an integrated approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponte Lira, Cristina; Nobre Silva, Ana; Taborda, Rui; Freire de Andrade, Cesar

    2016-06-01

    Regional/national-scale information on coastline rates of change and trends is extremely valuable, but these studies are scarce. A widely accepted standardized methodology for analysing long-term coastline change has been difficult to achieve, but it is essential to conduct an integrated and holistic approach to coastline evolution and hence support coastal management actions. Additionally, databases providing knowledge on coastline evolution are of key importance to support both coastal management experts and users.The main objective of this work is to present the first systematic, national-scale and consistent long-term coastline evolution data of Portuguese mainland low-lying sandy coasts.The methodology used quantifies coastline evolution using a unique and robust coastline indicator (the foredune toe), which is independent of short-term changes.The dataset presented comprises (1) two polyline sets, mapping the 1958 and 2010 sandy beach-dune system coastline, both optimized for working at 1 : 50 000 scale or smaller; (2) one polyline set representing long-term change rates between 1958 and 2010, each estimated at 250 m; and (3) a table with minimum, maximum and mean of evolution rates for sandy beach-dune system coastline. All science data produced here are openly accessible at https://doi.pangaea.de/10.1594/PANGAEA.859136 and can be used in other studies.Results show beach erosion as the dominant trend, with a mean change rate of -0.24 ± 0.01 m year-1 for all mainland Portuguese beach-dune systems. Although erosion is dominant, this evolution is variable in signal and magnitude in different coastal sediment cells and also within each cell. The most relevant beach erosion issues were found in the coastal stretches of Espinho-Torreira and Costa Nova-Praia de Mira, Cova da Gala-Leirosa, and Cova do Vapor-Costa da Caparica. The coastal segments Minho River-Nazaré and Costa da Caparica

  9. Electronic spectra and excited state dynamics of pentafluorophenol: Effects of low-lying πσ{sup ∗} states

    SciTech Connect

    Karmakar, Shreetama; Mukhopadhyay, Deb Pratim; Chakraborty, Tapas

    2015-05-14

    Multiple fluorine atom substitution effect on photophysics of an aromatic chromophore has been investigated using phenol as the reference system. It has been noticed that the discrete vibronic structure of the S{sub 1}←S{sub 0} absorption system of phenol vapor is completely washed out for pentafluorophenol (PFP), and the latter also shows very large Stokes shift in the fluorescence spectrum. For excitations beyond S{sub 1} origin, the emission yield of PFP is reduced sharply with increase in excess vibronic energy. However, in a collisional environment like liquid hydrocarbon, the underlying dynamical process that drives the non-radiative decay is hindered drastically. Electronic structure theory predicts a number of low-lying dark electronic states of πσ{sup ∗} character in the vicinity of the lowest valence ππ{sup ∗} state of this molecule. Tentatively, we have attributed the excitation energy dependent non-radiative decay of the molecule observed only in the gas phase to an interplay between the lowest ππ{sup ∗} and a nearby dissociative πσ{sup ∗} state. Measurements in different liquids reveal that some of the dark excited states light up with appreciable intensity only in protic liquids like methanol and water due to hydrogen bonding between solute and solvents. Electronic structure theory methods indeed predict that for PFP-(H{sub 2}O){sub n} clusters (n = 1-11), intensities of a number of πσ{sup ∗} states are enhanced with increase in cluster size. In contrast with emitting behavior of the molecule in the gas phase and solutions of nonpolar and polar aprotic liquids, the fluorescence is completely switched off in polar protic liquids. This behavior is a chemically significant manifestation of perfluoro effect, because a very opposite effect occurs in the case of unsubstituted phenol for which fluorescence yield undergoes a very large enhancement in protic liquids. Several dynamical mechanisms have been suggested to interpret the

  10. Observation of Pseudoscalar and Axial Vector Resonances in pi- p -> K+ K- pi0 n at 18 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    G.S. Adams; T. Adams; Z. Bar-Yam; J.M. Bishop; V.A. Bodyagin; D.S. Brown; N.M. Cason; S.U. Chung; J.P. Cummings; K. Danyo; A.I. Demianov; S. Denisov; V. Dorofeev; J.P. Dowd; P. Eugenio; X.L. Fan; A.M. Gribushin; R.W. Hackenburg; M. Hayek; J. Hu; E.I. Ivanov; D. Joffe; I. Kachaev; W. Kern; E. King; O.L. Kodolova; V.L. Korotkikh; M.A. Kostin; Joachim Kuhn; V. Lipaev; J.M. Losecco; M. Lu; J.J. Manak; J. Napolitano; M. Nozar; C. Olchanski; A.I. Ostrovidov; T.K. Pedlar; A. Popov; D. Ryabchikov; A.H. Sanjari; L.I. Sarycheva; K.K. Seth; N. Shenhav; X. Shen; W.D. Shephard; N.B. Sinev; D.L. Stienike; S.A. Taegar; D.R. Thompson; A. Tomaradze; I.N. Vardanyan; D.P. Weygand; D. White; H.J. Willutzki; A.A. Yershov

    2001-09-01

    The number of pseudoscalar mesons in the mass range from 1400 to 1500 MeV/c{sup 2} has been a subject of considerable interest for many years, with several experiments having presented evidence for two closely spaced states. A new measurement of the reaction {pi}{sup -} p {yields} K{sup +} K{sup -} {pi}{sup 0}n has been made at a beam energy of 18 GeV. A partial wave analysis of the K{sup +} K{sup -} {pi}{sup 0} system shows evidence for three pseudoscalar resonances, {eta}(1295), {eta}(1416), and {eta}(1485), as well as two axial vectors, f{sub 1}(1285), and f{sub 1}(1420). Their observed masses, widths and decay properties are reported. No signal was observed for C(1480), an I{sub G} J{sup PC} = 1{sup +} 1{sup --} state previously reported in {phi}{pi}{sup 0} decay.

  11. Sub-terahertz spectroscopy of magnetic resonance in BiFeO3 using a vector network analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caspers, Christian; Gandhi, Varun P.; Magrez, Arnaud; de Rijk, Emile; Ansermet, Jean-Philippe

    2016-06-01

    Detection of sub-THz spin cycloid resonances (SCRs) of stoichiometric BiFeO3 (BFO) was demonstrated using a vector network analyzer. Continuous wave absorption spectroscopy is possible, thanks to heterodyning and electronic sweep control using frequency extenders for frequencies from 480 to 760 GHz. High frequency resolution reveals SCR absorption peaks with a frequency precision in the ppm regime. Three distinct SCR features of BFO were observed and identified as Ψ1 and Φ2 modes, which are out-of-plane and in-plane modes of the spin cycloid, respectively. A spin reorientation transition at 200 K is evident in the frequency vs temperature study. The global minimum in linewidth for both Ψ modes at 140 K is ascribed to the critical slowing down of spin fluctuations.

  12. Production rates of strange vector mesons at the Z{sup 0} resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Dima, M.O.

    1997-05-01

    This dissertation presents a study of strange vector meson production, {open_quotes}leading particle{close_quotes} effect and a first direct measurement of the strangeness suppression parameter in hadronic decays of the neutral electroweak boson, Z{sup 0}. The measurements were performed in e{sup +}e{sup -} collisions at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) with the SLC Large Detector (SLD) experiment. A new generation particle ID system, the SLD Cerenkov Ring Imaging Detector (CRID) is used to discriminate kaons from pions, enabling the reconstruction of the vector mesons over a wide momentum range. The inclusive production rates of {phi} and K*{sup 0} and the differential rates versus momentum were measured and are compared with those of other experiments and theoretical predictions. The high longitudinal polarisation of the SLC electron beam is used in conjunction with the electroweak quark production asymmetries to separate quark jets from antiquark jets. K*{sup 0} production is studied separately in these samples, and the results show evidence for the {open_quotes}leading particle{close_quotes} effect. The difference between K*{sup 0} production rates at high momentum in quark and antiquark jets yields a first direct measurement of strangeness suppression in jet fragmentation.

  13. Electromagnetic mass splittings of the low lying hadrons and quark masses from 2+1 flavor lattice QCD+QED

    SciTech Connect

    Blum, Tom; Zhou Ran; Doi, Takumi; Hayakawa, Masashi; Izubuchi, Taku; Uno, Shunpei; Yamada, Norikazu

    2010-11-01

    Results computed in lattice QCD+QED are presented for the electromagnetic mass splittings of the low-lying hadrons. These are used to determine the renormalized, nondegenerate, light quark masses. It is found that m{sub u}{sup MS}=2.24(10)(34), m{sub d}{sup MS}=4.65(15)(32), and m{sub s}{sup MS}=97.6(2.9)(5.5) MeV at the renormalization scale 2 GeV, where the first error is statistical and the second systematic. We find the lowest-order electromagnetic splitting (m{sub {pi}{sup +}}-m{sub {pi}{sup 0}}){sub QED}=3.38(23) MeV, the splittings including next-to-leading order, (m{sub {pi}{sup +}}-m{sub {pi}{sup 0}}){sub QED}=4.50(23) MeV, (m{sub K{sup +}}-m{sub K{sup 0}}){sub QED}=1.87(10) MeV, and the m{sub u}{ne}m{sub d} contribution to the kaon mass difference, (m{sub K{sup +}}-m{sub K{sup 0}}){sub (m{sub u}-m{sub d})}=-5.840(96) MeV. All errors are statistical only, and the next-to-leading-order pion splitting is only approximate in that it does not contain all next-to-leading-order contributions. We also computed the proton-neutron mass difference, including for the first time, QED interactions in a realistic 2+1 flavor calculation. We find (m{sub p}-m{sub n}){sub QED}=0.383(68) MeV, (m{sub p}-m{sub n}){sub (m{sub u}-m{sub d})}=-2.51(14) MeV (statistical errors only), and the total m{sub p}-m{sub n}=-2.13(16)(70) MeV, where the first error is statistical, and the second, part of the systematic error. The calculations are carried out on QCD ensembles generated by the RBC and UKQCD collaborations, using domain wall fermions and the Iwasaki gauge action (gauge coupling {beta}=2.13 and lattice cutoff a{sup -1}{approx_equal}1.78 GeV). We use two lattice sizes, 16{sup 3} and 24{sup 3} ((1.8 fm){sup 3} and (2.7 fm){sup 3}), to address finite-volume effects. Noncompact QED is treated in the quenched approximation. The valence pseudoscalar meson masses in our study cover a range of about 250 to 700 MeV, though we use only those up to about 400 MeV to quote final results. We

  14. The Blackwater NWR inundation model. Rising sea level on a low-lying coast: land use planning for wetlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Larsen, Curt; Clark, Inga; Guntenspergen, Glenn; Cahoon, Don; Caruso, Vincent; Hupp, Cliff; Yanosky, Tom

    2004-01-01

    shallow water surfaces has solved this problem. Our team has developed a detailed LIDAR map of the BNWR area at a 30 centimeter (ca. 1 ft) contour interval (figure 2). The new map allows us to identify the present marsh vegetation zones and to predict the location and area of future zones on a decade-by- decade basis over the next century at increments of sea level rise on the order of 3 cm/decade (ca. 1 inch). We have developed two scenarios for the model. The first is a steady-state model that uses the historic rate of sea level rise of 3.1 mm/yr to predict marsh areas. The second is a 'global warming' scenario utilizing a conservative IPCC model with an exponentially-increasing rate of sea level rise. Under either scenario, the BNWR is progressively inundated with an expanding core of open water. Although their positions change in the future, the areas of intertidal marsh as well as those of the critical high marsh remain fairly constant until the year 2050. Beyond that time, the low-lying land surface is overtopped by rising sea level and the area is dominated by open water. Our model suggests that wetland habitat in the Blackwater area might be maintained and sustained through a combination of public and private preservation efforts through easements in combination with judicious Federal land acquisition into the predicted areas of suitable marsh formation - but for only the next 50 years. Beyond that time much of this area will become open water.

  15. An Approach to Assessing Flood Risk in Low-lying Paddy Areas of Japan considering Economic Damage on Rice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minakawa, H.; Masumoto, T.

    2013-12-01

    constructed in a rice paddy plot, which consisted of two zones, one in which the rice was cultivated as usual with normal water levels, and a flood zone, which was used for submerging rice plants. The flood zone, which was designed to reproduce actual flood disaster conditions in paddy fields, can be filled with water to a depth of 0.3, 0.6 or 0.9 m above ground level, and is divided into two plots, a clean water part and a turbid water part. Thus, the experimental conditions can vary according to 1) the development stage of rice, 2) complete or incomplete submersion, 3) clean or turbid water, and 4) duration of submergence. Finally, the reduction scales were formulated by using the resultant data and it was found that rice is most sensitive to damage during the development stage. Flood risk was evaluated by using calculated water level on each paddy. Here, the averaged duration of inundation to a depth of more than 0.3 m was used as the criteria for flood occurrence. The results indicated that the duration increased with larger heavy rainfall amounts. Furthermore, the damage to rice was predicted to increase especially in low-lying paddy fields. Mitigation measures, such as revising drainage planning and/or changing design standards for the capacity of drainage pumps may be necessary in the future.

  16. Exploring the nature of low-lying excited-states in molecular crystals from many-body perturbation theory beyond the Tamm-Dancoff Approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rangel, Tonatiuh; Sharifzadeh, Sahar; Rinn, Andre; da Jornada, Felipe H.; Shao, Meiyue; Witte, Gregor; Yang, Chao; Louie, Steven G.; Chatterjee, Sangaam; Kronik, Leeor; Neaton, Jeffrey B.

    Organic semiconductors have attracted attention due to their potential for optoelectronics and novel phenomena, such as singlet fission. Here, we use many-body perturbation theory to simulate neutral excitations in acene and perylene crystals. By diagonalizing the full Bethe-Salpether (BSE) Hamiltonian beyond the Tamm Dancoff approximation (TDA), we find that both low-lying excitation energies and oscillator strengths are in improved agreement with experiments relative to the TDA. We characterize the low-lying excitons, focusing in the degree of charge-transfer and spatial delocalization, connecting their relevance to singlet fission. For perylene, we find overall good agreement with absorption measurements, and we see evidence for the formation of an ``exciton-polariton'' band in β-perylene. This work is supported by the DOE.

  17. Microscopic study of low-lying spectra of Λ hypernuclei based on a beyond-mean-field approach with a covariant energy density functional

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, H.; Hagino, K.; Yao, J. M.; Motoba, T.

    2015-06-01

    We present a detailed formalism of the microscopic particle-rotor model for hypernuclear low-lying states based on a covariant density functional theory. In this method, the hypernuclear states are constructed by coupling a hyperon to low-lying states of the core nucleus, which are described by the generator coordinate method (GCM) with the particle number and angular momentum projections. We apply this method to study in detail the low-lying spectrum of C13Λ and Ne21Λ hypernuclei. We also briefly discuss the structure of Sm155Λ as an example of heavy deformed hypernuclei. It is shown that the low-lying excitation spectra with positive-parity states of the hypernuclei, which are dominated by Λ hyperon in the s orbital coupled to the core states, are similar to that for the corresponding core states, while the electric quadrupole transition strength, B (E 2 ) , from the 21+ state to the ground state is reduced according to the mass number of the hypernuclei. Our study indicates that the energy splitting between the first 1 /2- and 3 /2- hypernuclear states is generally small for all the hypernuclei which we study. However, their configurations depend much on the properties of a core nucleus, in particular on the sign of deformation parameter. That is, the first 1 /2- and 3 /2- states in Λ13C are dominated by a single configuration with Λ particle in the p -wave orbits and thus provide good candidates for a study of the Λ spin-orbit splitting. On the other hand, those states in the other hypernuclei exhibit a large configuration mixing and thus their energy difference cannot be interpreted as the spin-orbit splitting for the p orbits.

  18. A potential-energy surface study of the 2A1 and low-lying dissociative states of the methoxy radical

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackels, C. F.

    1985-01-01

    Accurate, ab initio quantum chemical techniques are applied in the present study of low lying bound and dissociative states of the methoxy radical at C3nu conformations, using a double zeta quality basis set that is augmented with polarization and diffuse functions. Excitation energy estimates are obtained for vertical excitation, vertical deexcitation, and system origin. The rate of methoxy photolysis is estimated to be too small to warrant its inclusion in atmospheric models.

  19. Systematics of low-lying E1 and M1 excitations in heavy nuclei from photon scattering experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitz, H. H.; Bauwens, F.; Belic, D.; Bryssinck, J.; von Brentano, P.; Fransen, C.; De Frenne, D.; Govor, L.; Herzberg, R.-D.; Jacobs, E.; Kneissl, U.; Kohstall, C.; Linnemann, A.; Maser, H.; Matschinsky, P.; Nord, A.; Pietralla, N.; Ponomarev, V. Yu.; Scheck, M.; Stedile, F.; Werner, V.

    2000-07-01

    The results of systematic nuclear resonance fluorescence experiments on heavy deformed and spherical nuclei at the bremsstrahlung facility of the Stuttgart Dynamitron accelerator are reported. The investigation of the fragmentation of the orbital M1 scissors mode in deformed odd-mass nuclei has been continued with high-precision measurements on 166Ho and 163Dy, revealing a lot of weak excitations distributed over the energy range 1.5-4 MeV. The investigation of the (2+⊗3-) two-phonon excitations in the Sn isotopic chain shows a very harmonic coupling of the phonons. The results for both, the even-even and the odd-mass Sn isotopes are in good agreement with QPM calculations.

  20. Combined excitation of an optically detected magnetic resonance in nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond for precision measurement of the components of a magnetic field vector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vershovskii, A. K.; Dmitriev, A. K.

    2015-11-01

    We used synchronous radio-frequency excitation of three components of a hyperfine resonance line in the scheme of the vector sensor of a magnetic field based on optically detected magnetic resonance in the nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond crystal. As a result, for the first time, the sensitivity of order 1.5 nT Hz-1/2 in the frequency range of 0-100 Hz was reached in the crystal with a volume of 0.01 mm3 glued to the end of an optical fiber.

  1. Jet-cooled laser-induced dispersed fluorescence spectroscopy of NiC: Observation of low-lying Ω = 0+ state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukund, Sheo; Yarlagadda, Suresh; Bhattacharyya, Soumen; Nakhate, S. G.

    2014-01-01

    Laser-induced dispersed fluorescence spectra of 58Ni12C molecules, produced in a free-jet apparatus, have been studied. A new low-lying Ω = 0+ state has been observed at Te = 5178 (6) cm-1. Based on previous ab initio calculations this state is plausibly assigned as 0+ spin-orbit component of the first excited Π state. The term energies of vibrational levels up to v = 10 for X1Σ+ ground and v = 3 for Ω = 0+ states have been determined. The harmonic and anharmonic wavenumbers respectively equal to 833 (4) and 6.7 (13) cm-1 for Ω = 0+ state have been measured.

  2. Low-lying dipole response in the stable {sup 40,48}Ca nuclei within the second random-phase approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Gambacurta, D.; Grasso, M.; Catara, F.

    2012-10-20

    The low-lying dipole strength distributions of {sup 40}CaCa and {sup 48}Ca, in the energy region between 5 and 10 MeV, are studied within the second random phase approximation (RPA) with Skyrme interaction. Standard RPA models do not usually predict any presence of strength in this energy region, while experimentally a significant amount of strength is found. The inclusion of the 2 particle -2 hole configurations allows to obtain a description in a rather good agreement with the experimental data. The properties of the most collective state are analyzed in terms of its 1 particle -1 hole nature and its transition densities.

  3. Structure of Low-Lying Excited States of Guanine in DNA and Solution: Combined Molecular Mechanics and High-Level Coupled Cluster Studies

    DOE PAGES

    Kowalski, Karol; Valiev, Marat

    2007-01-01

    High-level ab-initio equation-of-motion coupled-cluster methods with singles, doubles, and noniterative triples are used, in conjunction with the combined quantum mechanical molecular mechanics approach, to investigate the structure of low-lying excited states of the guanine base in DNA and solvated environments. Our results indicate that while the excitation energy of the first excited state is barely changed compared to its gas-phase counterpart, the excitation energy of the second excited state is blue-shifted by 0.24 eV.

  4. Rotational spectroscopy as a tool to investigate interactions between vibrational polyads in symmetric top molecules: Low-lying states v(8) <= 2 of methyl cyanide, CH3CN

    SciTech Connect

    Muller, H. S.; Brown, Linda R.; Drouin, B. J.; Pearson, J. C.; Kleiner, Isabelle; Sams, Robert L.; Sung, Keeyoon; Ordu, Matthias H.; Lewen, Frank

    2015-06-01

    Rotational and rovibrational spectra of methyl cyanide were recorded to analyze interactions in low-lying vibrational states and to construct line lists for radio astronomical observations as well as for infrared spectroscopic investigations of planetary atmospheres. The rotational spectra cover large portions of the 36-1627 GHz region. In the infrared (IR), a spectrum was recorded for this study in the region of 2v(8) around 717 cm(-1) with assignments covering 684-765 cm-1. Additional spectra in the vs region were used to validate the analysis.

  5. Microscopic description of ground state magnetic moment and low-lying magnetic dipole excitations in heavy odd-mass 181Ta nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabar, Emre; Yakut, Hakan; Kuliev, Ali Akbar

    2016-07-01

    The ground state magnetic moments and the low-lying magnetic dipole (Ml) transitions from the ground to excited states in heavy deformed odd-mass 181Ta have been microscopically investigated on the basis of the quasiparticle-phonon nuclear model (QPNM). The problem of the spurious state mixing in M1 excitations is overcome by a restoration method allowing a self-consistent determination of the separable effective restoration forces. Due to the self-consistency of the method, these effective forces contain no arbitrary parameters. The results of calculations are compared with the available experimental data, the agreement being reasonably satisfactory.

  6. Octupole correlations in low-lying states of 150Nd and 150Sm and their impact on neutrinoless double-β decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, J. M.; Engel, J.

    2016-07-01

    We present a generator-coordinate calculation, based on a relativistic energy-density functional, of the low-lying spectra in the isotopes 150Nd and 150Sm and of the nuclear matrix element that governs the neutrinoless double-β decay of the first isotope to the second. We carefully examine the impact of octupole correlations on both nuclear structure and the double-β decay matrix element. Octupole correlations turn out to reduce quadrupole collectivity in both nuclei. Shape fluctuations, however, dilute the effects of octupole deformation on the double-β decay matrix element, so that the overall octupole-induced quenching is only about 7 % .

  7. Multiconfiguration Dirac-Hartree-Fock calculations of excitation energies, oscillator strengths, and hyperfine structure constants for low-lying levels of Sm I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Fuyang; Qu, Yizhi; Li, Jiguang; Wang, Jianguo

    2015-11-01

    The multiconfiguration Dirac-Hartree-Fock method was employed to calculate the total and excitation energies, oscillator strengths, and hyperfine structure constants for low-lying levels of Sm i. In the first-order perturbation approximation, we systematically analyzed correlation effects from individual electrons and electron pairs. It was found that the core correlations are of importance for the physical quantities concerned. Based on the analysis, the important configuration state wave functions were selected to constitute atomic state wave functions. By using this computational model, our excitation energies, oscillator strengths, and hyperfine structure constants are in better agreement with experimental values than earlier theoretical works.

  8. Development of a Support Vector Machine - Based Image Analysis System for Focal Liver Lesions Classification in Magnetic Resonance Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatos, I.; Tsantis, S.; Karamesini, M.; Skouroliakou, A.; Kagadis, G.

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: The design and implementation of a computer-based image analysis system employing the support vector machine (SVM) classifier system for the classification of Focal Liver Lesions (FLLs) on routine non-enhanced, T2-weighted Magnetic Resonance (MR) images. Materials and Methods: The study comprised 92 patients; each one of them has undergone MRI performed on a Magnetom Concerto (Siemens). Typical signs on dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI and biopsies were employed towards a three class categorization of the 92 cases: 40-benign FLLs, 25-Hepatocellular Carcinomas (HCC) within Cirrhotic liver parenchyma and 27-liver metastases from Non-Cirrhotic liver. Prior to FLLs classification an automated lesion segmentation algorithm based on Marcov Random Fields was employed in order to acquire each FLL Region of Interest. 42 texture features derived from the gray-level histogram, co-occurrence and run-length matrices and 12 morphological features were obtained from each lesion. Stepwise multi-linear regression analysis was utilized to avoid feature redundancy leading to a feature subset that fed the multiclass SVM classifier designed for lesion classification. SVM System evaluation was performed by means of leave-one-out method and ROC analysis. Results: Maximum accuracy for all three classes (90.0%) was obtained by means of the Radial Basis Kernel Function and three textural features (Inverse- Different-Moment, Sum-Variance and Long-Run-Emphasis) that describe lesion's contrast, variability and shape complexity. Sensitivity values for the three classes were 92.5%, 81.5% and 96.2% respectively, whereas specificity values were 94.2%, 95.3% and 95.5%. The AUC value achieved for the selected subset was 0.89 with 0.81 - 0.94 confidence interval. Conclusion: The proposed SVM system exhibit promising results that could be utilized as a second opinion tool to the radiologist in order to decrease the time/cost of diagnosis and the need for patients to undergo invasive examination.

  9. Low-lying excited states and nonradiative processes of the adenine analogues 7H- and 9H-2-aminopurine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobsiger, Simon; Sinha, Rajeev K.; Trachsel, Maria; Leutwyler, Samuel

    2011-03-01

    We have investigated the UV vibronic spectra and excited-state nonradiative processes of the 7H- and 9H-tautomers of jet-cooled 2-aminopurine (2AP) and of the 9H-2AP-d4 and -d5 isotopomers, using two-color resonant two-photon ionization spectroscopy at 0.3 and 0.045 cm-1 resolution. The S1 ← S0 transition of 7H-2AP was observed for the first time. It lies ˜ 1600 cm-1 below that of 9H-2AP, is ˜1000 times weaker and exhibits only in-plane vibronic excitations. In contrast, the S1 ← S0 spectra of 9H-2AP, 9H-2AP-d4, and 9H-2AP-d5 show numerous low-frequency bands that can be systematically assigned to overtone and combinations of the out-of-plane vibrations ν1', ν2', and ν3'. The intensity of these out-of-plane bands reflects an out-of-plane deformation in the 1ππ*(La) state. Approximate second-order coupled-cluster theory also predicts that 2-aminopurine undergoes a "butterfly" deformation in its lowest 1ππ* state. The rotational contours of the 9H-2AP, 9H-2AP-d4, and 9H-2AP-d5 0^0_0 bands and of eight vibronic bands of 9H-2AP up to 0^0_0+600 cm-1 exhibit 75%-80% in-plane (a/b) polarization, which is characteristic for a 1ππ* excitation. A 20%-25% c-axis (perpendicular) transition dipole moment component may indicate coupling of the 1ππ* bright state to the close-lying 1nπ* dark state. However, no 1nπ* vibronic bands were detected below or up to 500 cm-1 above the 1ππ* 0^0_0 band. Following 1ππ* excitation, 9H-2AP undergoes a rapid nonradiative transition to a lower-lying long-lived state with a lifetime ⩾5μs. The ionization potential of 9H-2AP was measured via the 1ππ* state (IP = 8.020 eV) and the long-lived state (IP > 9.10 eV). The difference shows that the long-lived state lies ⩾1.08 eV below the 1ππ* state. Time-dependent B3LYP calculations predict the 3ππ* (T1) state 1.12 eV below the 1ππ* state, but place the 1nπ* (S1) state close to the 1ππ* state, implying that the long-lived state is the lowest triplet (T1) and not the

  10. Theoretical spectroscopy study of the low-lying electronic states of UX and UX+, X = F and Cl

    SciTech Connect

    Bross, David H.; Peterson, Kirk A.

    2015-11-13

    Spectroscopic constants (Te, re, B0, ωe, ωexe) have been calculated for the low-lying electronic states of UF, UF+, UCl, and UCl+ using complete active space 2nd-order perturbation theory (CASPT2), with a series of correlation consistent basis sets. The latter included those based on both pseudopotential (PP) and all-electron Douglas-Kroll-Hess (DK) Hamiltonians for the U atom. Spin orbit effects were included a posteri using the state interacting method using both PP and Breit Pauli (BP) operators, as well as from exact two-component (X2C) methods for U+ and UF+. Complete basis set (CBS) limits were obtained by extrapolation where possible and the PP and BP calculations were compared at their respective CBS limits. The PP-based method was shown to be reliable in calculating spectroscopic constants, in particular when using the state interacting method with CASPT2 energies (SO-CASPT2). The two component calculations were limited by computational resources and could not include electron correlation from the nominally closed shell 6s and 6p orbitals of U. UF and UCl were both calculated to have Ω=9/2 ground states. The first excited state of UCl was calculated to be an Ω=7/2 state at 78 cm-1 as opposed to the same state at 435 cm-1 in UF, and the other low-lying states of UCl showed a similar compression relative to UF. Likewise UF+ and UCl+ both have Ω=4 ground states and the manifold of low-lying excited Ω = 3, 2, 1, 0 states were energetically closer together in UCl+ than in UF+, ranging up to 776 cm-1 in UF+ and only 438 cm-1 in UCl+. As in previous research, the final PP-based SO-CASPT2 results for UF+ and UF agree well with experiment, and are expected to be predictive for UCl and UCl+, which are reported here for the first time.

  11. Theoretical study of the low-lying excited states of ββ-carotene isomers by a multireference configuration interaction method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerón-Carrasco, José P.; Requena, Alberto; Marian, Christel M.

    2010-07-01

    The combined density functional theory and multireference configuration interaction method (DFT/MRCI) has been employed to explore the ground and low-lying electronically excited states of various β-carotene monocis and dicis isomers. Although the excitation energies are generally somewhat underestimated by DFT/MRCI, the experimental trends are well reproduced and allow an interpretation of the main bands of the UV-Vis spectra. The optically bright signal is correctly assigned to S→S, corresponding to the HOMO → LUMO transition, whereas the so-called cis-band originates mainly from the S→S transition and arises from HOMO-1 → LUMO and HOMO → LUMO+1 excitations. The calculations reveal a correlation between the oscillator strengths of these transitions and the C6-C6' distance thus explaining the effect of the molecular configuration on the shape of the UV-Vis spectra.

  12. Comprehensive theoretical studies on the low-lying electronic states of NiF, NiCl, NiBr, and NiI.

    PubMed

    Zou, Wenli; Liu, Wenjian

    2006-04-21

    The low-lying electronic states of the nickel monohalides, i.e., NiF, NiCl, NiBr, and NiI, are investigated by using multireference second-order perturbation theory with relativistic effects taken into account. For the energetically lowest 11 lambda-S states and 26 omega states there into, the potential energy curves and corresponding spectroscopic constants (vertical and adiabatic excitation energies, equilibrium bond lengths, vibrational frequencies, and rotational constants) are reported. The calculated results are grossly in very good agreement with those solid experimental data. In particular, the ground state of NiI is shown to be different from those of NiF, NiCl, and NiBr, being in line with the recent experimental observation. Detailed analyses are provided on those states that either have not been assigned or have been incorrectly assigned by previous experiments.

  13. Comparison of the AVI, modified SINTACS and GALDIT vulnerability methods under future climate-change scenarios for a shallow low-lying coastal aquifer in southern Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luoma, Samrit; Okkonen, Jarkko; Korkka-Niemi, Kirsti

    2016-09-01

    A shallow unconfined low-lying coastal aquifer in southern Finland surrounded by the Baltic Sea is vulnerable to changes in groundwater recharge, sea-level rise and human activities. Assessment of the intrinsic vulnerability of groundwater under climate scenarios was performed for the aquifer area by utilising the results of a published study on the impacts of climate change on groundwater recharge and sea-level rise on groundwater-seawater interaction. Three intrinsic vulnerability mapping methods, the aquifer vulnerability index (AVI), a modified SINTACS and GALDIT, were applied and compared. According to the results, the degree of groundwater vulnerability is greatly impacted by seasonal variations in groundwater recharge during the year, and also varies depending on the climate-change variability in the long term. The groundwater is potentially highly vulnerable to contamination from sources on the ground surface during high groundwater recharge rates after snowmelt, while a high vulnerability to seawater intrusion could exist when there is a low groundwater recharge rate in dry season. The AVI results suggest that a change in the sea level will have an insignificant impact on groundwater vulnerability compared with the results from the modified SINTACS and GALDIT. The modified SINTACS method could be used as a guideline for the groundwater vulnerability assessment of glacial and deglacial deposits in inland aquifers, and in combination with GALDIT, it could provide a useful tool for assessing groundwater vulnerability to both contamination from sources on the ground surface and to seawater intrusion for shallow unconfined low-lying coastal aquifers under future climate-change conditions.

  14. Low-lying intruder and tensor-driven structures in 82As revealed by β decay at a new movable-tape-based experimental setup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etilé, A.; Verney, D.; Arsenyev, N. N.; Bettane, J.; Borzov, I. N.; Cheikh Mhamed, M.; Cuong, P. V.; Delafosse, C.; Didierjean, F.; Gaulard, C.; Van Giai, Nguyen; Goasduff, A.; Ibrahim, F.; Kolos, K.; Lau, C.; Niikura, M.; Roccia, S.; Severyukhin, A. P.; Testov, D.; Tusseau-Nenez, S.; Voronov, V. V.

    2015-06-01

    The β decay of 82Ge Ge was re-investigated using the newly commissioned tape station BEDO at the electron-driven ISOL (isotope separation on line) facility ALTO operated by the Institut de Physique Nucléaire, Orsay. The original motivation of this work was focused on the sudden occurrence in the light N =49 odd-odd isotonic chain of a large number of J ≤1 states (positive or negative parity) in 80Ga by providing a reliable intermediate example, viz., 82As. The extension of the 82As level scheme towards higher energies from the present work has revealed three potential 1+ states above the already known one at 1092 keV. In addition our data allow ruling out the hypothesis that the 843 keV level could be a 1+ state. A detailed analysis of the level scheme using both an empirical core-particle coupling model and a fully microscopic treatment within a Skyrme-QRPA (quasiparticle random-phase approximation) approach using the finite-rank separable approximation was performed. From this analysis two conclusions can be drawn: (i) the presence of a large number of low-lying low-spin negative parity states is due to intruder states stemming from above the N =50 shell closure, and (ii) the sudden increase, from 82As to 80Ga, of the number of low-lying 1+ states and the corresponding Gamow-Teller fragmentation are naturally reproduced by the inclusion of tensor correlations and couplings to 2p-2h excitations.

  15. Mixing of pseudoscalar-baryon and vector-baryon in the JP=1 /2- sector and the N* (1535) and N* (1650) resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garzon, E. J.; Oset, E.

    2015-02-01

    We study the meson-baryon interaction with JP=1 /2- using the hidden-gauge Lagrangians and mixing pseudoscalar meson-baryon with the vector meson-baryon states in a coupled channels scheme with π N ,η N ,K Λ ,K Σ ,ρ N , and π Δ (d wave). We fit the subtraction constants of each channel to the S11 partial wave amplitude of the π N scattering data extracted from the partial wave analysis of the George Washington group. We find two poles that we associate to the N*(1535 ) and the N*(1650 ) resonances, with negative subtraction constants of natural size, and compare the results with empirical determinations of these pole positions. We calculate the branching ratios for the different channels of each resonance and we find a good agreement with the experimental data. The cross section for the π-p →η n scattering is also evaluated and compared with experiment.

  16. First measurement of target and double spin asymmetries for e-vectorp-vector{yields}ep{pi}{sup 0} in the nucleon resonance region above the {delta}(1232)

    SciTech Connect

    Biselli, A. S.; Burkert, V. D.; Avakian, H.; Boiarinov, S.; Bosted, P.; Carman, D. S.; Degtyarenko, P. V.; Deur, A.; Egiyan, H.; Elouadrhiri, L.; Guo, L.; Gyurjyan, V.; Ito, M. M.; Kubarovsky, V.; Laget, J. M.; Mecking, B. A.; Mestayer, M. D.; Niczyporuk, B. B.; Nozar, M.; Sapunenko, V.

    2008-10-15

    The exclusive channel p-vectore-vector,e{sup '}p){pi}{sup 0} was studied in the first and second nucleon resonance regions in the Q{sup 2} range from 0.187 to 0.770 GeV{sup 2} at Jefferson Lab using the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer. Longitudinal target and beam-target asymmetries were extracted over a large range of center-of-mass angles of the {pi}{sup 0} and compared to the unitary isobar model MAID, the dynamic model by Sato and Lee, and the dynamic model DMT. A strong sensitivity to individual models was observed, in particular for the target asymmetry and in the higher invariant mass region. This data set, once included in the global fits of the above models, is expected to place strong constraints on the electrocoupling amplitudes A{sub 1/2} and S{sub 1/2} for the Roper resonance N(1400)P{sub 11} and the N(1535)S{sub 11} and N(1520)D{sub 13} states.

  17. 750 GeV diphoton resonance in a vector-like extension of Hill model at a 100 TeV hadron collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ning; Wang, Wenyu; Zhang, Mengchao; Zheng, Rui

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we study the recent 750 GeV diphoton excess in the Hill model with vector-like fermions. The singlet-like Hill boson is chosen as the 750 GeV diphoton resonance. Such a scalar is mainly produced by gluon fusion via vector-like top and bottom quark loops and decays to diphoton via the vector-like quark and lepton loops. Under the current experimental and theoretical constraints, we find that the mixing angle of the singlet and doublet Higgs bosons lies within |sin 𝜃|≲ 0.03 and the 750 GeV diphoton cross-section can be maximally enhanced to about 6 fb at 13 TeV LHC. Moreover, we find that the Hill boson pair production in jjγγ channel can be probed at 3σ significance if 375GeV < mF < 1500GeV and 1.4 < yF < 3 at a 100 TeV collider with 3000 fb‑1 luminosity.

  18. 750 GeV diphoton resonance in a vector-like extension of Hill model at a 100 TeV hadron collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ning; Wang, Wenyu; Zhang, Mengchao; Zheng, Rui

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we study the recent 750 GeV diphoton excess in the Hill model with vector-like fermions. The singlet-like Hill boson is chosen as the 750 GeV diphoton resonance. Such a scalar is mainly produced by gluon fusion via vector-like top and bottom quark loops and decays to diphoton via the vector-like quark and lepton loops. Under the current experimental and theoretical constraints, we find that the mixing angle of the singlet and doublet Higgs bosons lies within |sin 𝜃|≲ 0.03 and the 750 GeV diphoton cross-section can be maximally enhanced to about 6 fb at 13 TeV LHC. Moreover, we find that the Hill boson pair production in jjγγ channel can be probed at 3σ significance if 375GeV < mF < 1500GeV and 1.4 < yF < 3 at a 100 TeV collider with 3000 fb-1 luminosity.

  19. Application of recent double-hybrid density functionals to low-lying singlet-singlet excitation energies of large organic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meo, F. Di; Trouillas, P.; Adamo, C.; Sancho-García, J. C.

    2013-10-01

    The present work assesses some recently developed double-hybrid density functionals (B2π-PLYP, PBE0-DH, and PBE0-2) using linear-response Tamm-Dancoff Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory. This assessment is achieved against experimentally derived low-lying excitation energies of large organic dyes of recent interest, including some excitations dominated by charge-transfer transitions. Comparisons are made with some of the best-performing methods established from the literature, such as PBE0 or B3LYP hybrid or the recently proposed B2-PLYP and B2GP-PLYP double-hybrid models, to ascertain their quality and robustness on equal footing. The accuracy of parameter-free or empirical forms of double-hybrid functionals is also briefly discussed. Generally speaking, it turns out that double-hybrid expressions always provide more accurate estimates than corresponding hybrid methods. Double-hybrid functionals actually reach averaged accuracies of 0.2 eV, that can be admittedly considered close to any intended accuracy limit within the present theoretical framework.

  20. Effects of low-lying excitations on ground-state energy and energy gap of the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick model in a transverse field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koh, Yang Wei

    2016-04-01

    We present an extensive numerical study of the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick model in a transverse field. Recent numerical studies of quantum spin glasses have focused on exact diagonalization of the full Hamiltonian for small systems (≈20 spins). However, such exact numerical treatments are difficult to apply on larger systems. We propose making an approximation by using only a subspace of the full Hilbert space spanned by low-lying excitations consisting of one-spin-flipped and two-spin-flipped states. The approximation procedure is carried out within the theoretical framework of the Hartree-Fock approximation and configuration interaction. Although not exact, our approach allows us to study larger system sizes comparable to that achievable by state-of-the-art quantum Monte Carlo simulations. We calculate two quantities of interest due to recent advances in quantum annealing, the ground-state energy and the energy gap between the ground and first excited states. For the energy gap, we derive a formula that enables it to be calculated using just the ground-state wave function, thereby circumventing the need to diagonalize the Hamiltonian. We calculate the scalings of the energy gap and the leading correction to the extensive part of the ground-state energy with system size, which are difficult to obtain with current methods.

  1. The out-of-the-delta hypothesis: dense human populations in low-lying river deltas served as agents for the evolution of a deadly pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Boucher, Yan; Orata, Fabini D.; Alam, Munirul

    2015-01-01

    Cholera is a diarrheal disease that has changed the history of mankind, devastating the world with seven pandemics from 1817 to the present day. Although there is little doubt in the causative agent of these pandemics being Vibrio cholerae of the O1 serogroup, where, when, and how this pathogen emerged is not well understood. V. cholerae is a ubiquitous coastal species that likely existed for tens of thousands of years. However, the evolution of a strain capable of causing a large-scale epidemic is likely more recent historically. Here, we propose that the unique human and physical geography of low-lying river deltas made it possible for an environmental bacterium to evolve into a deadly human pathogen. Such areas are often densely populated and salt intrusion in drinking water frequent. As V. cholerae is most abundant in brackish water, its favored environment, it is likely that coastal inhabitants would regularly ingest the bacterium and release it back in the environment. This creates a continuous selection pressure for V. cholerae to adapt to life in the human gut. PMID:26539168

  2. The out-of-the-delta hypothesis: dense human populations in low-lying river deltas served as agents for the evolution of a deadly pathogen.

    PubMed

    Boucher, Yan; Orata, Fabini D; Alam, Munirul

    2015-01-01

    Cholera is a diarrheal disease that has changed the history of mankind, devastating the world with seven pandemics from 1817 to the present day. Although there is little doubt in the causative agent of these pandemics being Vibrio cholerae of the O1 serogroup, where, when, and how this pathogen emerged is not well understood. V. cholerae is a ubiquitous coastal species that likely existed for tens of thousands of years. However, the evolution of a strain capable of causing a large-scale epidemic is likely more recent historically. Here, we propose that the unique human and physical geography of low-lying river deltas made it possible for an environmental bacterium to evolve into a deadly human pathogen. Such areas are often densely populated and salt intrusion in drinking water frequent. As V. cholerae is most abundant in brackish water, its favored environment, it is likely that coastal inhabitants would regularly ingest the bacterium and release it back in the environment. This creates a continuous selection pressure for V. cholerae to adapt to life in the human gut.

  3. Investigating nuclear shell structure in the vicinity of 78Ni: Low-lying excited states in the neutron-rich isotopes Zn,8280

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiga, Y.; Yoneda, K.; Steppenbeck, D.; Aoi, N.; Doornenbal, P.; Lee, J.; Liu, H.; Matsushita, M.; Takeuchi, S.; Wang, H.; Baba, H.; Bednarczyk, P.; Dombradi, Zs.; Fulop, Zs.; Go, S.; Hashimoto, T.; Honma, M.; Ideguchi, E.; Ieki, K.; Kobayashi, K.; Kondo, Y.; Minakata, R.; Motobayashi, T.; Nishimura, D.; Otsuka, T.; Otsu, H.; Sakurai, H.; Shimizu, N.; Sohler, D.; Sun, Y.; Tamii, A.; Tanaka, R.; Tian, Z.; Tsunoda, Y.; Vajta, Zs.; Yamamoto, T.; Yang, X.; Yang, Z.; Ye, Y.; Yokoyama, R.; Zenihiro, J.

    2016-02-01

    The low-lying level structures of nuclei in the vicinity of 78Ni were investigated using in-beam γ -ray spectroscopy to clarify the nature of the nuclear magic numbers Z =28 and N =50 in systems close to the neutron drip line. Nucleon knockout reactions were employed to populate excited states in 80Zn and 82Zn. A candidate for the 41+ level in 80Zn was identified at 1979(30) keV, and the lifetime of this state was estimated to be 136-67+92 ps from a line-shape analysis. Moreover, the energy of the 21+ state in 82Zn is reported to lie at 621(11) keV. The large drop in the 21+ energy at 82Zn indicates the presence of a significant peak in the E (21+) systematics at N =50 . Furthermore, the E (41+) /E (21+) and B (E 2 ;41+→21+) /B (E 2 ;21+→0g.s . +) ratios in 80Zn were deduced to be 1.32 (3 ) and 1 .12-60+80 , respectively. These results imply that 80Zn can be described in terms of two-proton configurations with a 78Ni core and are consistent with a robust N =50 magic number along the Zn isotopic chain. These observations, therefore, indicate a persistent N =50 shell closure in nuclei far from the line of β stability, which in turn suggests a doubly magic structure for 78Ni.

  4. a Quantum Chemical Study of Familiar and Exotic Low-Lying Singlet and Triplet States of CH2, CF2, and Chf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Lu; Woon, D. E.; Dunning, T. H., Jr.

    2010-06-01

    High level MRCI and RCCSD(T) calculations using triple and quadruple zeta quality correlation consistent basis sets were used to study the low-lying singlet and triplet states of CH2, CF2, and CHF. The bonding in carbon was found to be very similar to that of sulfur, where there is also a competition between states that form through normal covalent bonding and recoupled pair bonding. The recoupled pair bonding model was used to investigate these states systematically to see how closely they resemble the behavior of SF2, which has a 1A1 ground state and 3B1 and 3A2 excited states. In addition to accounting for the separations and ordering of the lowest singlet and triplet states of each species, the less-studied 3A2 states of CH2 and CF2 and the 3A^" state of CHF were investigated and compared to gain insight into the underlying reasons for the energetic and bonding differences between these species. Interestingly, the 3A2 state of CH2 is a cyclic structure, the 3A2 state of CF2 is bent but not cyclic (resembling the same state of SF_2), and the analogous minimum structure on the 3A^" surface of CHF is a C---HF complex.

  5. The genetic legacy of aridification: climate cycling fostered lizard diversification in Australian montane refugia and left low-lying deserts genetically depauperate.

    PubMed

    Pepper, Mitzy; Ho, Simon Y W; Fujita, Matthew K; Scott Keogh, J

    2011-12-01

    It is a widely held assumption that populations historically restricted to mountain refugia tend to exhibit high levels of genetic diversity and deep coalescent histories, whereas populations distributed in surrounding low-lying regions tend to be genetically depauperate following recent expansion from refugia. These predicted genetic patterns are based largely on our understanding of glaciation history in Northern Hemisphere systems, yet remain poorly tested in analogous Southern Hemisphere arid systems because few examples in the literature allow the comparison of widespread taxa distributed across mountain and desert biomes. We demonstrate with multiple datasets from Australian geckos that topographically complex mountain regions harbor high nucleotide diversity, up to 18 times higher than that of the surrounding desert lowlands. We further demonstrate that taxa in topographically complex areas have older coalescent histories than those in the geologically younger deserts, and that both ancient and more recent aridification events have contributed to these patterns. Our results show that, despite differences in the details of climate and landscape changes that occurred in the Northern and Southern hemispheres (ice-sheets versus aridification), similar patterns emerge that illustrate the profound influence of the Pleistocene on contemporary genetic structure. PMID:21871574

  6. Light scattering by a thin wire with a surface-plasmon resonance: Bifurcations of the Poynting vector field

    SciTech Connect

    Luk'yanchuk, B. S.; Ternovsky, V.

    2006-06-15

    We analyze the energy flow during the scattering of a plane wave by a small homogeneous cylinder in the vicinity of surface-plasmon resonance, where {epsilon}{sup '}=Re {epsilon}=-1 ({epsilon} stands for permittivity). For the case of small dissipation, {epsilon}{sup ''}=Im {epsilon}<<1, this scattering can strongly deviate from the classical dipole approximation (Rayleigh scattering). In certain specified cases, the Rayleigh scattering is replaced with an anomalous light scattering regardless the wire smallness. The phenomenon is based on interplay of the usual dissipative and radiative damping, where the latter is related to inverse transformation of localized resonant plasmons into scattered light. The anomalous light scattering possesses a variety of unusual features, such as an inverse hierarchy of optical resonances and a complicated near-field structure, which may include optical vortexes, optical whirlpools, and other peculiarities in nanoscale area.

  7. An ab initio investigation of the ground and low-lying singlet and triplet electronic states of XNO{sub 2} and XONO (X = Cl, Br, and I)

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, Kirk A.; Francisco, Joseph S.

    2014-01-28

    A systematic ab initio treatment of the nitryl halides (XNO{sub 2}) and the cis- and trans- conformers of the halide nitrites (XONO), where X = Cl, Br, and I, have been carried out using highly correlated methods with sequences of correlation consistent basis sets. Equilibrium geometries and harmonic frequencies have been accurately calculated in all cases at the explicitly correlated CCSD(T)-F12b level of theory, including the effects of core-valence correlation for the former. Where experimental values are available for the equilibrium structures (ClNO{sub 2} and BrNO{sub 2}), the present calculations are in excellent agreement; however, the X-O distances are slightly too long by about 0.01 Å due to missing multireference effects. Accurate predictions for the iodine species are made for the first time. The vertical electronic excitation spectra have been calculated using equation-of-motion coupled cluster methods for the low-lying singlet states and multireference configuration interaction for both singlet and triplet states. The latter also included the effects of spin-orbit coupling to provide oscillator strengths for the ground state singlet to excited triplet transitions. While for ClNO{sub 2} the transitions to excited singlet states all occur at wavelengths shorter than 310 nm, there is one longer wavelength singlet transition in BrNO{sub 2} and two in the case of INO{sub 2}. The long wavelength tail in the XNO{sub 2} species is predicted to be dominated by transitions to triplet states. In addition to red-shifting from X = Cl to I, the triplet transitions also increase in oscillator strength, becoming comparable to many of the singlet transitions in the case of INO{sub 2}. Hence in particular, the latter species should be very photolabile. Similar trends are observed and reported for the halogen nitrites, many of which for the first time.

  8. Ab initio study on the low-lying excited states of gas-phase PH+ cation including spin-orbit coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xia; Zhang, Xiaomei; Yan, Bing

    2015-05-01

    Ab initio calculations have been performed on the low-lying excited and ground states of PH+. The potential energy curves (PECs) of the Λ-S states were calculated with multi-reference configuration interaction (MRCI) method along with the basis sets at 5-ξ level. In order to improve the PECs, the Davidson(+Q) correction and the Scalar relativistic effect are included. The corresponding spectroscopic constants were determined and good agreements with the available measurement were found. The interactions of the A2Δ-4Π and 12Σ+-4Π by the spin-orbit coupling (SOC) effect were well described by the spin-orbit matrix elements. The SOC effect makes the original 8 Λ-S states split into 15 Ω states. The Ω = 1/2 state generated from the X2Π state is confirmed to the ground Ω state. And the SOC splitting for the X2Π is calculated to be 294 cm-1. The SOC effect has large effect on the PECs of the A2Δ and 12Σ+ states, leading to much more shallow potential wells as well as potential barriers. The analysis of the wavefunction for the Ω states shows that the strong spin-orbit interaction exists near the crossing points of the PECs for the Λ-S states. The transition dipole moments (TDMs) of transitions A2Δ-X2Π and 12Σ--X2Π are evaluated with the MRCI wavefunction. Based on the TDMs along with the calculated Franck-Condon factors, the radiative lifetimes for the selected vibrational levels of A2Δ and 12Σ- states are predicted at the microseconds (μs). Good agreement with the measurement shows that the lowest vibrational level for A2Δ state is almost uninfluenced by the perturbation via the SOC effect.

  9. Theoretical study of solvent effects on the ground and low-lying excited free energy surfaces of a push-pull substituted azobenzene.

    PubMed

    Corchado, Jose C; Sánchez, M Luz; Fdez Galván, Ignacio; Martín, M Elena; Muñoz-Losa, Aurora; Barata-Morgado, Rute; Aguilar, Manuel A

    2014-10-30

    The ground and low-lying excited free energy surfaces of 4-amino-4'-cyano azobenzene, a molecule that has been proposed as building block for chiroptical switches, are studied in gas phase and a variety of solvents (benzene, chloroform, acetone, and water). Solvent effects on the absorption and emission spectra and on the cis-trans thermal and photo isomerizations are analyzed using two levels of calculation: TD-DFT and CASPT2/CASSCF. The solvent effects are introduced using a polarizable continuum model and a QM/MM method, which permits one to highlight the role played by specific interactions. We found that, in gas phase and in agreement with the results found for other azobenzenes, the thermal cis-trans isomerization follows a rotation-assisted inversion mechanism where the inversion angle must reach values close to 180° but where the rotation angle can take almost any value. On the contrary, in polar solvents the mechanism is controlled by the rotation of the CN═NC angle. The change in the mechanism is mainly related to a better solvation of the nitrogen atoms of the azo group in the rotational transition state. The photoisomerization follows a rotational pathway both in gas phase and in polar and nonpolar solvents. The solvent introduces only small modifications in the nπ* free energy surface (S1), but it has a larger effect on the ππ* surface (S2) that, in polar solvents, gets closer to S1. In fact, the S2 band of the absorption spectrum is red-shifted 0.27 eV for the trans isomer and 0.17 eV for the cis. In the emission spectrum the trend is similar: only S2 is appreciably affected by the solvent, but in this case a blue shift is found.

  10. Electron-impact excitation of Ni II. Collision strengths and effective collision strengths for low-lying fine-structure forbidden transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassidy, C. M.; Ramsbottom, C. A.; Scott, M. P.; Burke, P. G.

    2010-04-01

    Context. Considerable demand exists for electron excitation data for ion{Ni}{ii}, since lines from this abundant ion are observed in a wide variety of laboratory and astrophysical spectra. The accurate theoretical determination of these data can present a significant challenge however, due to complications arising from the presence of an open 3d-shell in the description of the target ion. Aims: In this work we present collision strengths and Maxwellian averaged effective collision strengths for the electron-impact excitation of ion{Ni}{ii}. Attention is concentrated on the 153 forbidden fine-structure transitions between the energetically lowest 18 levels of ion{Ni}{ii}. Effective collision strengths have been evaluated at 27 individual electron temperatures ranging from 30-100 000 K. To our knowledge this is the most extensive theoretical collisional study carried out on this ion to date. Methods: The parallel R-matrix package RMATRX II has recently been extended to allow for the inclusion of relativistic effects. This suite of codes has been utilised in the present work in conjunction with PSTGF to evaluate collision strengths and effective collision strengths for all of the low-lying forbidden fine-structure transitions. The following basis configurations were included in the target model - 3d9, 3d84s, 3d84p, 3d74s2 and 3d74s4p - giving rise to a sophisticated 295 jj-level, 1930 coupled channel scattering problem. Results: Comprehensive comparisons are made between the present collisional data and those obtained from earlier theoretical evaluations. While the effective collision strengths agree well for some transitions, significant discrepancies exist for others. Table 2 is only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/513/A55

  11. Isospin Mixing of Quark Cluster Diybaryon Resonances in the Bag Model*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Thomas

    2000-10-01

    Calculations of isospin mixing of dibaryon resonaces composed of color magentic six quark states using the quark cluster bag model are shown to result in a low lying J=2 dibaryon at 1913 MeV. The 1913 MeV resonance can only transition into NN states and a low energy (29-35 MeV) isoscaler meson multiplet, the sigma mesons (J=0,1,2). The J=1 axial-vector meson may already have been discovered at the Rutherford ISIS Facility, detected as a neutrino time anomaly known as the KARMEN particle. The predicted J=0 meson has the long sought after properties of the sigma meson or Higgs particle required for the Chiral Symmetry Breaking partner of the pion and light mass hadron generation. The influence of this predicted isoscaler multiplet in QCD and QFD is interpreted using the effective low energy model of Chiral Perturbation Theory.

  12. The f{sub 0}(1370), f{sub 0}(1710), f{sub 2}(1270), f{sub 2}{sup '}(1525), and K{sub 2}{sup *}(1430) as dynamically generated states from vector meson-vector meson interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Geng, L. S.; Oset, E.; Molina, R.; Martinez Torres, A.; Branz, T.; Guo, F. K.; Dai, L. R.; Sun, B. X.

    2010-12-28

    We report on some recent developments in understanding the nature of the low-lying mesonic resonances f{sub 0}(1370), f{sub 0}(1710), f{sub 2}(1270), f{sub 2}{sup '}(1525), and K{sub 2}*(1430). In particular we show that these five resonances can be dynamically generated from vector meson-vector meson interaction in a coupled-channel unitary approach, which utilizes the phenomenologically very successful hidden-gauge Lagrangians to produce the interaction kernel between two vector mesons, which is then unitarized by the Bethe-Salpeter-equation method. The data on the strong decay branching ratios, total decay widths, and radiative decay widths of these five states, and on related J/{psi} decay processes can all be well described by such an approach. We also make predictions, compare them with the results of earlier studies, and highlight observables that if measured can be used to distinguish different pictures of these resonances.

  13. Geo-statistical modeling to evaluate the socio-economic impacts of households in the context of low-lying areas conversion in Colombo metropolitan region-Sri Lanka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemakumara, GPTS; Rainis, Ruslan

    2015-02-01

    Living in Low-lying areas is a challenging task, but due to the lack of suitable land at affordable prices, thousands of householders have been establishing their own houses on Low-lying areas. Manipulation and conversion of low lying areas have led to an increase in the frequency and severity of micro disasters because the cumulative effect of these settlements is very high. Therefore, it is needed to examine how individual households have been emerging in Low-lying areas. This process is primarily influenced and controlled by Socio-economic factors. In the field survey conducted for this study, 388 householders were interviewed face to face to obtain the primary data. Collected data were applied to the Multivariate binary logistic Model. The Dependent variable of the model was set as Stable Houses and Non-Stable Houses based on the weighted values that were obtained from the field observations. Independent variables of this study are nine key aspects of the socio-economic conditions in these areas. Units of analysis of the study were taken as individual housing plots in the study area. The particular combination of Socio-Economic factors that exerted influence on each housing plot was measured using predicted probability value of logistic model and linked it with GIS land plot's map. Accuracy of Final Model is 86.9 % and probability level of influencing factors given a clear idea about household distribution and status while providing guidance about how the planning authorities should monitor and manage low lying areas, taking into consideration the present housing condition of these areas.

  14. Ab initio MRCI + Q calculations on the low-lying excited states of the MgBr radical including spin-orbit coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Dong-lan; Tan, Bin; Wen, Yu-feng; Zeng, Xue-feng; Xie, An-dong; Yan, Bing

    2016-05-01

    Accurate theoretical calculations on the MgBr radical have been carried out by using the high-level relativistic multireference configuration interaction method with Davidson correction (MRCI + Q) using correlation-consistent Quintuple-ζ quality basis set. The potential energy curves (PECs) of the 14 Λ-S states of MgBr have been computed. In order to improve the PECs, the core-valence correlation, scalar relativistic effect, and spin-orbit coupling effect are taken into account in the computations. The spectroscopic constants of the bound states have been determined from the computed PECs. The results of the ground state X2Σ+ and the first excited state A2Π are in good agreement with those from the available experiments, while spectroscopic constants of the other electronic states are firstly reported. The low-lying ion-pair state B2Σ+ correlated to ion-pair dissociation limit Mg+ (2Sg) + Br- (1Sg) is characterized. The permanent dipole moments (PDMs) of Λ-S states and the R-dependent spin-orbit (SO) matrix elements are computed. The results indicate that the abrupt changes of PDMs and the SO matrix elements are attributed to the changes of the electronic configurations near the avoided crossing point. After taking the SOC effect into account, the 14 Λ-S states split into 30 Ω states, and the SOC splitting for the A2Π is calculated to be 102.58 cm- 1. The SOC effect, leading to the double-well potential of the Ω = (3)1/2 state, is found to be substantial for MgBr. In order to further illustrate the SOC effect and the avoided crossing phenomenon of the PECs, the Λ-S compositions in the Ω state wavefunctions are analyzed in detail. Finally, the transition dipole moments (TDMs) of several transitions from upper Ω states to the ground X2Σ+1/2 state and the corresponding radiative lifetimes have been studied. It is shown that the (1)3/2-X2Σ+1/2 and (2)3/2-X2Σ+1/2 are particularly important to the observed transitions A2Π-X2Σ+ and C2Π-X2Σ+. The

  15. Sample interval modulation for the simultaneous acquisition of displacement vector data in magnetic resonance elastography: theory and application.

    PubMed

    Klatt, Dieter; Yasar, Temel K; Royston, Thomas J; Magin, Richard L

    2013-12-21

    SampLe Interval Modulation-magnetic resonance elastography (SLIM-MRE) is introduced for simultaneously encoding all three displacement projections of a monofrequency vibration into the MR signal phase. In SLIM-MRE, the individual displacement components are observed using different sample intervals. In doing so, the components are modulated with different apparent frequencies in the MR signal phase expressed as a harmonic function of the start time of the motion encoding gradients and can thus be decomposed by applying a Fourier transform to the sampled multidirectional MR phases. In this work, the theoretical foundations of SLIM-MRE are presented and the new idea is implemented using a high field (11.7 T) vertical bore magnetic resonance imaging system on an inhomogeneous agarose gel phantom sample. The local frequency estimation-derived stiffness values were the same within the error margins for both the new SLIM-MRE method and for conventional MRE, while the number of temporally-resolved MRE experiments needed for each study was reduced from three to one. In this work, we present for the first time, monofrequency displacement data along three sensitization directions that were acquired simultaneously and stored in the same k-space.

  16. Low-lying {sup 3}P{sup o} and {sup 3}S{sup e} states of Rb{sup -}, Cs{sup -}, and Fr{sup -}

    SciTech Connect

    Bahrim, C.; Thumm, U.

    2000-02-01

    Our Dirac R-matrix calculations suggest that none of the heavy alkali-metal negative ions, Rb, Cs, and Fr, has an excited bound state. Their lowest excited state appears to be a multiplet of {sup 3}P{sub J}{sup o}-shape resonances, the J=1 component of which was recently observed in photodetachment experiments on Cs{sup -}. We analyze these {sup 3}P{sub J}{sup o} and the {sup 3}S{sup e} excited negative ion states in partial and converged total scattering cross sections for slow electrons with incident kinetic energies below 120 meV. Our results are in excellent agreement with available experimental data. We also propose a new value for the electron affinity of Fr, provide the scattering length for electronic collisions with Rb, Cs, and Fr, and discuss the nuclear charge dependence of relativistic effects in the resonance profiles. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  17. A support vector machine-based method to identify mild cognitive impairment with multi-level characteristics of magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Long, Zhuqing; Jing, Bin; Yan, Huagang; Dong, Jianxin; Liu, Han; Mo, Xiao; Han, Ying; Li, Haiyun

    2016-09-01

    Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) represents a transitional state between normal aging and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Non-invasive diagnostic methods are desirable to identify MCI for early therapeutic interventions. In this study, we proposed a support vector machine (SVM)-based method to discriminate between MCI patients and normal controls (NCs) using multi-level characteristics of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This method adopted a radial basis function (RBF) as the kernel function, and a grid search method to optimize the two parameters of SVM. The calculated characteristics, i.e., the Hurst exponent (HE), amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations (ALFF), regional homogeneity (ReHo) and gray matter density (GMD), were adopted as the classification features. A leave-one-out cross-validation (LOOCV) was used to evaluate the classification performance of the method. Applying the proposed method to the experimental data from 29 MCI patients and 33 healthy subjects, we achieved a classification accuracy of up to 96.77%, with a sensitivity of 93.10% and a specificity of 100%, and the area under the curve (AUC) yielded up to 0.97. Furthermore, the most discriminative features for classification were found to predominantly involve default-mode regions, such as hippocampus (HIP), parahippocampal gyrus (PHG), posterior cingulate gyrus (PCG) and middle frontal gyrus (MFG), and subcortical regions such as lentiform nucleus (LN) and amygdala (AMYG). Therefore, our method is promising in distinguishing MCI patients from NCs and may be useful for the diagnosis of MCI. PMID:27343830

  18. A support vector machine-based method to identify mild cognitive impairment with multi-level characteristics of magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Long, Zhuqing; Jing, Bin; Yan, Huagang; Dong, Jianxin; Liu, Han; Mo, Xiao; Han, Ying; Li, Haiyun

    2016-09-01

    Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) represents a transitional state between normal aging and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Non-invasive diagnostic methods are desirable to identify MCI for early therapeutic interventions. In this study, we proposed a support vector machine (SVM)-based method to discriminate between MCI patients and normal controls (NCs) using multi-level characteristics of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This method adopted a radial basis function (RBF) as the kernel function, and a grid search method to optimize the two parameters of SVM. The calculated characteristics, i.e., the Hurst exponent (HE), amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations (ALFF), regional homogeneity (ReHo) and gray matter density (GMD), were adopted as the classification features. A leave-one-out cross-validation (LOOCV) was used to evaluate the classification performance of the method. Applying the proposed method to the experimental data from 29 MCI patients and 33 healthy subjects, we achieved a classification accuracy of up to 96.77%, with a sensitivity of 93.10% and a specificity of 100%, and the area under the curve (AUC) yielded up to 0.97. Furthermore, the most discriminative features for classification were found to predominantly involve default-mode regions, such as hippocampus (HIP), parahippocampal gyrus (PHG), posterior cingulate gyrus (PCG) and middle frontal gyrus (MFG), and subcortical regions such as lentiform nucleus (LN) and amygdala (AMYG). Therefore, our method is promising in distinguishing MCI patients from NCs and may be useful for the diagnosis of MCI.

  19. Introducing Vectors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roche, John

    1997-01-01

    Suggests an approach to teaching vectors that promotes active learning through challenging questions addressed to the class, as opposed to subtle explanations. Promotes introducing vector graphics with concrete examples, beginning with an explanation of the displacement vector. Also discusses artificial vectors, vector algebra, and unit vectors.…

  20. The origin of unequal bond lengths in the C1B2 state of SO2: Signatures of high-lying potential energy surface crossings in the low-lying vibrational structure

    DOE PAGES

    Park, G. Barratt; Jiang, Jun; Field, Robert W.

    2016-04-14

    Here the C1B2 state of SO2 has a double-minimum potential in the antisymmetric stretch coordinate, such that the minimum energy geometry has nonequivalent SO bond lengths. The asymmetry in the potential energy surface is expressed as a staggering in the energy levels of the v'3 progression. We have recently made the first observation of low-lying levels with odd quanta of v'3, which allows us--in the current work--to characterize the origins of the level staggering. Our work demonstrates the usefulness of low-lying vibrational level structure, where the character of the wavefunctions can be relatively easily understood, to extract information about dynamicallymore » important potential energy surface crossings that occur at much higher energy. The measured staggering pattern is consistent with a vibronic coupling model for the double-minimum, which involves direct coupling to the bound 2 1A1 state and indirect coupling with the repulsive 3 1A1 state. The degree of staggering in the v'3 levels increases with quanta of bending excitation, which is consistent with the approach along the C state potential energy surface to a conical intersection with the 2 1A1 surface at a bond angle of ~145°.« less

  1. The origin of unequal bond lengths in the C ˜ 1B2 state of SO2: Signatures of high-lying potential energy surface crossings in the low-lying vibrational structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, G. Barratt; Jiang, Jun; Field, Robert W.

    2016-04-01

    The C ˜ 1B2 state of SO2 has a double-minimum potential in the antisymmetric stretch coordinate, such that the minimum energy geometry has nonequivalent SO bond lengths. The asymmetry in the potential energy surface is expressed as a staggering in the energy levels of the ν3' progression. We have recently made the first observation of low-lying levels with odd quanta of v3', which allows us—in the current work—to characterize the origins of the level staggering. Our work demonstrates the usefulness of low-lying vibrational level structure, where the character of the wavefunctions can be relatively easily understood, to extract information about dynamically important potential energy surface crossings that occur at much higher energy. The measured staggering pattern is consistent with a vibronic coupling model for the double-minimum, which involves direct coupling to the bound 2 1A1 state and indirect coupling with the repulsive 3 1A1 state. The degree of staggering in the ν3' levels increases with quanta of bending excitation, which is consistent with the approach along the C ˜ state potential energy surface to a conical intersection with the 2 1A1 surface at a bond angle of ˜145°.

  2. The origin of unequal bond lengths in the C̃ (1)B2 state of SO2: Signatures of high-lying potential energy surface crossings in the low-lying vibrational structure.

    PubMed

    Park, G Barratt; Jiang, Jun; Field, Robert W

    2016-04-14

    The C̃ (1)B2 state of SO2 has a double-minimum potential in the antisymmetric stretch coordinate, such that the minimum energy geometry has nonequivalent SO bond lengths. The asymmetry in the potential energy surface is expressed as a staggering in the energy levels of the ν3(') progression. We have recently made the first observation of low-lying levels with odd quanta of v3('), which allows us-in the current work-to characterize the origins of the level staggering. Our work demonstrates the usefulness of low-lying vibrational level structure, where the character of the wavefunctions can be relatively easily understood, to extract information about dynamically important potential energy surface crossings that occur at much higher energy. The measured staggering pattern is consistent with a vibronic coupling model for the double-minimum, which involves direct coupling to the bound 2 (1)A1 state and indirect coupling with the repulsive 3 (1)A1 state. The degree of staggering in the ν3(') levels increases with quanta of bending excitation, which is consistent with the approach along the C̃ state potential energy surface to a conical intersection with the 2 (1)A1 surface at a bond angle of ∼145°.

  3. An improved model electronic Hamiltonian for potential energy surfaces and spin−orbit couplings of low-lying d−d states of [Fe(bpy){sub 3}]{sup 2+}

    SciTech Connect

    Iuchi, Satoru Koga, Nobuaki

    2014-01-14

    With the aim of exploring excited state dynamics, a model electronic Hamiltonian for several low-lying d−d states of [Fe(bpy){sub 3}]{sup 2+} complex [S. Iuchi, J. Chem. Phys. 136, 064519 (2012)] is refined using density-functional theory calculations of singlet, triplet, and quintet states as benchmarks. Spin−orbit coupling elements are also evaluated within the framework of the model Hamiltonian. The accuracy of the developed model Hamiltonian is determined by examining potential energies and spin−orbit couplings at surface crossing regions between different spin states. Insights into the potential energy surfaces around surface crossing regions are also provided through molecular dynamics simulations. The results demonstrate that the constructed model Hamiltonian can be used for studies on the d−d excited state dynamics of [Fe(bpy){sub 3}]{sup 2+}.

  4. Structures and relative stability of medium- and large-sized silicon clusters. VI. Fullerene cage motifs for low-lying clusters Si39, Si40, Si50, Si60, Si70, and Si80

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Soohaeng; Shao, N.; Zeng, X. C.

    2008-03-01

    We performed a constrained search, combined with density-functional theory optimization, of low-energy geometric structures of silicon clusters Si39, Si40, Si50, Si60, Si70, and Si80. We used fullerene cages as structural motifs to construct initial configurations of endohedral fullerene structures. For Si39, we examined six endohedral fullerene structures using all six homolog C34 fullerene isomers as cage motifs. We found that the Si39 constructed based on the C34(Cs:2) cage motif results in a new leading candidate for the lowest-energy structure whose energy is appreciably lower than that of the previously reported leading candidate obtained based on unbiased searches (combined with tight-binding optimization). The C34(Cs:2) cage motif also leads to a new candidate for the lowest-energy structure of Si40 whose energy is notably lower than that of the previously reported leading candidate with outer cage homolog to the C34(C1:1). Low-lying structures of larger silicon clusters Si50 and Si60 are also obtained on the basis of preconstructed endohedral fullerene structures. For Si50, Si60, and Si80, the obtained low-energy structures are all notably lower in energy than the lowest-energy silicon structures obtained based on an unbiased search with the empirical Stillinger-Weber potential of silicon. Additionally, we found that the binding energy per atom (or cohesive energy) increases typically >10meV with addition of every ten Si atoms. This result may be used as an empirical criterion (or the minimal requirement) to identify low-lying silicon clusters with size larger than Si50.

  5. Structures and relative stability of medium- and large-sized silicon clusters. VI. Fullerene cage motifs for low-lying clusters Si(39), Si(40), Si(50), Si(60), Si(70), and Si(80).

    PubMed

    Yoo, Soohaeng; Shao, N; Zeng, X C

    2008-03-14

    We performed a constrained search, combined with density-functional theory optimization, of low-energy geometric structures of silicon clusters Si(39), Si(40), Si(50), Si(60), Si(70), and Si(80). We used fullerene cages as structural motifs to construct initial configurations of endohedral fullerene structures. For Si(39), we examined six endohedral fullerene structures using all six homolog C(34) fullerene isomers as cage motifs. We found that the Si(39) constructed based on the C(34)(C(s):2) cage motif results in a new leading candidate for the lowest-energy structure whose energy is appreciably lower than that of the previously reported leading candidate obtained based on unbiased searches (combined with tight-binding optimization). The C(34)(C(s):2) cage motif also leads to a new candidate for the lowest-energy structure of Si(40) whose energy is notably lower than that of the previously reported leading candidate with outer cage homolog to the C(34)(C(1):1). Low-lying structures of larger silicon clusters Si(50) and Si(60) are also obtained on the basis of preconstructed endohedral fullerene structures. For Si(50), Si(60), and Si(80), the obtained low-energy structures are all notably lower in energy than the lowest-energy silicon structures obtained based on an unbiased search with the empirical Stillinger-Weber potential of silicon. Additionally, we found that the binding energy per atom (or cohesive energy) increases typically >10 meV with addition of every ten Si atoms. This result may be used as an empirical criterion (or the minimal requirement) to identify low-lying silicon clusters with size larger than Si(50).

  6. Low-Lying Energy Isomers and Global Minima of Aqueous Nanoclusters: Structures and Spectroscopic Features of the Pentagonal Dodecahedron (H2O)20 and (H3O)+(H2O)20

    SciTech Connect

    Xantheas, Sotiris S.

    2012-08-01

    We rely on a hierarchy of methods to identify the low-lying isomers for the pentagonal dodecahedron (H2O)20 and the H3O+(H2O)20 clusters. Initial screening of isomers was performed with classical potentials [TIP4P, TTM2-F, TTM2.1-F for (H2O)20 and ASP for H3O+(H2O)20] and the networks obtained with those potentials were subsequently reoptimized at the DFT (B3LYP) and MP2 levels of theory. For the pentagonal dodecahedron (H2O)20 it was found that DFT (B3LYP) and MP2 produced the same global minimum. However, this was not the case for the H3O+(H2O)20 cluster, for which MP2 produced a different network for the global minimum when compared to DFT (B3LYP). All low-lying minima of H3O+(H2O)20 correspond to hydrogen bonding networks having 9 ''free'' OH bonds and the hydronium ion on the surface of the cluster. The fact that DFT (B3LYP) and MP2 produce different results and issues related to the use of a smaller basis set, explains the discrepancy between the current results and the structure previously suggested [Science 304, 1137 (2004)] for the global minimum of the H3O+(H2O)20 cluster. Additionally, the IR spectra of the MP2 global minimum are closer to the experimentally measured ones than the spectra of the previously suggested DFT global minimum. The latter exhibit additional bands in the most red-shifted region of the OH stretching vibrations (corresponding to the ''fingerprint'' of the underlying hydrogen bonding network), which are absent from both the experimental as well as the spectra of the new structure suggested for the global minimum of this cluster.

  7. Analysis of Three Body Resonances in the Complex Scaled Orthogonal Condition Model

    SciTech Connect

    Odsuren, M.; Katō, K.; Aikawa, M.

    2014-06-15

    Although the resonance structures of α+α+n have been studied experimentally and theoretically, it is still necessary to have more accurate and comprehensive understandings of the structure and decay of the low-lying excited states in {sup 9}Be. To perform calculations of an α+α+n system, we investigate five resonant states of α+α subsystem by utilizing different potential parameters and basis functions. In addition, two resonance states of α+n subsystem are computed.

  8. Vector analyzing power measurement of pion scattering from polarized [sup 7]Li in the region of the [Delta][sub 33] resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, R.; Boschitz, E.; Brinkmoeller, B.; Buehler, J.; Ritt, S.; Wessler, M. ); Konter, J.A.; Mango, S.; van den Brandt, B. ); Efimovykh, V.A.; Kovalev, A.I.; Prokofiev, A.N.; Polyakov, V.V. ); Chaumette, P.; Deregel, J.; Durand, G.; Fabre, J. ); Mach, R. ); Tacik, R. )

    1994-01-01

    The inclusive vector analyzing power [ital iT][sub 11] of [pi][sup +][r arrow][sup 7]Li elastic scattering and inelastic scattering to the 0.47 MeV excited state was measured at several angles for [ital T][sub [pi

  9. Generalized resonating valence bond description of cyclobutadiene

    SciTech Connect

    Voter, A.F.; Goddard, W.A. III

    1986-05-28

    The low-lying electronic states of square and rectangular cyclobutadiene (CBD) are calculated by using the generalized resonating valence bond (GRVB) method and compared with the results from Hartree-Fock and configuration interaction wavefunctions. We find that simple valence bond concepts correctly predict the sequence of excited states (including ground-state singlet) and the distortion to a rectangular geometry for the ground state. Contrary to common expectation, we find that the singlet ground state of square CBD has 22 kcal of resonance energy (relative to a single valence bond structure). Thus, CBD is not antiresonant, though it is much less stable than normal conjugated systems.

  10. Seawater-overwash impacts on freshwater-lens water supplies of low-lying oceanic islands: example from Roi-Namur Island, Kwajalein Atoll, Republic of the Marshall Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voss, C. I.; Gingerich, S. B.

    2015-12-01

    Low-lying oceanic islands host thin freshwater lenses subject to long-term aquifer salinization by seawater overwash. The lens is often the sole-source water supply for inhabitants. As maximum elevation for these islands is only a few meters above sea level, overwash can occur during high tides and storm surges. Sea level rise due to climate change will make overwash events even more common. The thin freshwater lenses, a few meters thick, are underlain by seawater, so pumping must be done carefully, often with horizontal skimming wells. Even a small amount of downward seawater infiltration from an overwash event can render the water supply non-potable. Where permeability is high, seawater infiltrates quickly, but seawater that infiltrates lower-permeability zones may remain for many months causing groundwater to remain non-potable, leaving residents without a reliable freshwater source. Initial post-overwash salinization is driven by the higher density of the invading saltwater, which sinks and mixes into the fresher water in potentially-complex patterns determined by: distribution of flooding and post-flood ponding, locations of permeable paths, and the inherently complex flow fields generated when fluid of higher density overlies lower-density fluid. The flow patterns cannot generally be measured or predicted in detail. This study develops basic understanding of overwash salinization processes impacting water supply on low-level islands, using a rare example of a monitored seawater overwash event that occurred in December 2008 at Roi-Namur Island in Kwajalein Atoll, Republic of the Marshall Islands, in which the salinity evolution of well water was measured. Due to typical lack of field data on such islands, a set of plausible alternative simulation-model descriptions of the hydrogeology and overwash event are created for analysis of the monitored salinization and recovery. Despite inability to know the 'true and complete' description of the event and the

  11. Elusive vector glueball

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Mahiko

    2002-05-01

    If the vector glueball {Omicron} exists in the mass range that theory suggests, its resonant production cross section can be detected in e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation only if the decay width is very narrow ({le} a few MeV). Otherwise {Omicron} will be observed only indirectly through its mixing with {psi}{prime}. We propose a few tests of the {Omicron}-{psi}{prime} mixing for future charm factories.

  12. Baryon Spectroscopy and Resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Edwards

    2011-12-01

    A short review of current efforts to determine the highly excited state spectrum of QCD, and in particular baryons, using lattice QCD techniques is presented. The determination of the highly excited spectrum of QCD is a major theoretical and experimental challenge. The experimental investigation of the excited baryon spectrum has been a long-standing element of the hadronic-physics program, an important component of which is the search for so-called 'missing resonances', baryonic states predicted by the quark model based on three constituent quarks but which have not yet been observed experimentally. Should such states not be found, it may indicate that the baryon spectrum can be modeled with fewer effective degrees of freedom, such as in quark-diquark models. In the past decade, there has been an extensive program to collect data on electromagnetic production of one and two mesons at Jefferson Lab, MIT-Bates, LEGS, MAMI, ELSA, and GRAAL. To analyze these data, and thereby refine our knowledge of the baryon spectrum, a variety of physics analysis models have been developed at Bonn, George Washington University, Jefferson Laboratory and Mainz. To provide a theoretical determination and interpretation of the spectrum, ab initio computations within lattice QCD have been used. Historically, the calculation of the masses of the lowest-lying states, for both baryons and mesons, has been a benchmark calculation of this discretized, finite-volume computational approach, where the aim is well-understood control over the various systematic errors that enter into a calculation; for a recent review. However, there is now increasing effort aimed at calculating the excited states of the theory, with several groups presenting investigations of the low-lying excited baryon spectrum, using a variety of discretizations, numbers of quark flavors, interpolating operators, and fitting methodologies. Some aspects of these calculations remain unresolved and are the subject of intense

  13. Significant contribution of As 4 p orbitals to the low-lying electronic structure of the 112-type iron-based superconductor Ca 0.9La 0.1FeAs 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, M. Y.; Liu, Z. T.; Zhou, W.; Yang, H. F.; Shen, D. W.; Li, W.; Jiang, J.; Niu, X. H.; Xie, B. P.; Sun, Y.; Fan, C. C.; Yao, Q.; Liu, J. S.; Shi, Z. X.; Xie, X. M.

    2015-01-01

    We report a systematic polarization-dependent angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy study of the three-dimensional electronic structure of the recently discovered 112-type iron-based superconductor Ca1 -xLaxFeAs2 (x =0.1 ). Besides the commonly reported three holelike and two electronlike bands in iron-based superconductors, we resolve one additional holelike band around the zone center and one more fast-dispersing band near the X point in the vicinity of the Fermi level. By tuning the polarization and the energy of incident photons, we are able to identify the specific orbital character and the kz dependence of all bands. Combining these results with band calculations, we find that As 4 pz and 4 px(4 py) orbitals contribute significantly to the additional three-dimensional holelike band and the narrow band, respectively. Also, there is considerable hybridization between the As 4 pz and Fe 3 d orbitals in the additional holelike band, which suggests strong coupling between the unique arsenic zigzag bond layers and the FeAs layers therein. Our findings provide a comprehensive picture of the orbital character of the low-lying band structure of 112-type iron-based superconductors, which can be a starting point for the further understanding of their unconventional superconductivity.

  14. Assessing the impacts of sea-level rise and precipitation change on the surficial aquifer in the low-lying coastal alluvial plains and barrier islands, east-central Florida (USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Han; Wang, Dingbao; Hagen, Scott C.; Medeiros, Stephen C.; Hall, Carlton R.

    2016-07-01

    A three-dimensional variable-density groundwater flow and salinity transport model is implemented using the SEAWAT code to quantify the spatial variation of water-table depth and salinity of the surficial aquifer in Merritt Island and Cape Canaveral Island in east-central Florida (USA) under steady-state 2010 hydrologic and hydrogeologic conditions. The developed model is referred to as the `reference' model and calibrated against field-measured groundwater levels and a map of land use and land cover. Then, five prediction/projection models are developed based on modification of the boundary conditions of the calibrated `reference' model to quantify climate change impacts under various scenarios of sea-level rise and precipitation change projected to 2050. Model results indicate that west Merritt Island will encounter lowland inundation and saltwater intrusion due to its low elevation and flat topography, while climate change impacts on Cape Canaveral Island and east Merritt Island are not significant. The SEAWAT models developed for this study are useful and effective tools for water resources management, land use planning, and climate-change adaptation decision-making in these and other low-lying coastal alluvial plains and barrier island systems.

  15. Shape resonant features in the photoionization spectra of NO

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, Scott; Dill, Dan; Dehmer, Joseph L.

    1982-01-01

    Calculations of core and valence level photoionization spectra of NO are presented and compared with available experimental data. A low-lying continuum shape resonance is identified in the sigma photoionization channel, which is the analog of similar states found in other first-row diatomic molecules. Both partial cross sections and photoelectron angular distributions are discussed, and the effect of nuclear motion on these observables is treated.

  16. Cloning vector

    DOEpatents

    Guilfoyle, R.A.; Smith, L.M.

    1994-12-27

    A vector comprising a filamentous phage sequence containing a first copy of filamentous phage gene X and other sequences necessary for the phage to propagate is disclosed. The vector also contains a second copy of filamentous phage gene X downstream from a promoter capable of promoting transcription in a bacterial host. In a preferred form of the present invention, the filamentous phage is M13 and the vector additionally includes a restriction endonuclease site located in such a manner as to substantially inactivate the second gene X when a DNA sequence is inserted into the restriction site. 2 figures.

  17. Cloning vector

    DOEpatents

    Guilfoyle, Richard A.; Smith, Lloyd M.

    1994-01-01

    A vector comprising a filamentous phage sequence containing a first copy of filamentous phage gene X and other sequences necessary for the phage to propagate is disclosed. The vector also contains a second copy of filamentous phage gene X downstream from a promoter capable of promoting transcription in a bacterial host. In a preferred form of the present invention, the filamentous phage is M13 and the vector additionally includes a restriction endonuclease site located in such a manner as to substantially inactivate the second gene X when a DNA sequence is inserted into the restriction site.

  18. Vector quantization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, Robert M.

    1989-01-01

    During the past ten years Vector Quantization (VQ) has developed from a theoretical possibility promised by Shannon's source coding theorems into a powerful and competitive technique for speech and image coding and compression at medium to low bit rates. In this survey, the basic ideas behind the design of vector quantizers are sketched and some comments made on the state-of-the-art and current research efforts.

  19. Modeled changes in extreme wave climates in the Pacific Ocean during the 21st century and implications for low-lying U.S. and U.S.-affiliated atoll islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shope, J. B.; Storlazzi, C. D.; Erikson, L. H.; Hegermiller, C.

    2014-12-01

    . As most atoll islets accrete during large wave events, decreasing wave heights during other seasons may inhibit atoll islet accretion such that the low-lying islets may not be able to keep up with projected sea-level rise.

  20. Intramolecular charge transfer in aminobenzonitriles and tetrafluoro counterparts: fluorescence explained by competition between low-lying excited states and radiationless deactivation. Part I: A mechanistic overview of the parent system ABN.

    PubMed

    Segado, Mireia; Gómez, Isabel; Reguero, Mar

    2016-03-01

    Recent theoretical and experimental studies on the Intramolecular Charge Transfer (ICT) reaction of some members of the aminobezonitrile family (ABN) suggest the involvement of a (π-σ*) excited state (called ICT(CN) in this work) in the ICT process and the existence of a partially twisted ICT species that could be responsible for the anomalous fluorescence observed. These suggestions made us to revise our previous study on the photophysics of ABN and dimethyl-ABN (DMABN), based on the analysis of the potential energy surfaces of the low-lying excited states by means of ab initio calculations, using the CASSCF/CASPT2 protocol. We have first focused our attention to ABN. We have found that the (π-σ*) excited state can be in fact an intermediary state in the path to populate the ICT bright state, although its involvement in the process is not very probable. Our results suggest that the ICT most stable species is the twisted ICT(TICT) and that the partially twisted ICT minimum found in previous studies could be an artefact of the computational method. We have also found that radiationless deactivation is a competitive reaction that must be taken into account to explain the fluorescence patterns of these systems. To confirm our theories, we have also studied other systems with a similar architecture but with a very different luminescence behaviour: dimethyl-ABN, and the 2,3,4,5-tetrafluoro derivatives of ABN and DMABN (ABN-4F and DMABN-4F). The extension of the work and the different approaches in the study of the parent system and of the derivatives make the division of the work in two parts advisable. Part I collects the characterization of the minima and reaction paths connecting the critical points of the potential energy surfaces of the states involved in the ICT reaction of ABN. We have obtained, for the first time, the pathways of radiationless deactivation for this compound. We have also computed transition energies from the excited minima, to interpret the

  1. Lentiviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Giry-Laterrière, Marc; Verhoeyen, Els; Salmon, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    Lentiviral vectors have evolved over the last decade as powerful, reliable, and safe tools for stable gene transfer in a wide variety of mammalian cells. Contrary to other vectors derived from oncoretroviruses, they allow for stable gene delivery into most nondividing primary cells. In particular, lentivectors (LVs) derived from HIV-1 have gradually evolved to display many desirable features aimed at increasing both their safety and their versatility. This is why lentiviral vectors are becoming the most useful and promising tools for genetic engineering, to generate cells that can be used for research, diagnosis, and therapy. This chapter describes protocols and guidelines, for production and titration of LVs, which can be implemented in a research laboratory setting, with an emphasis on standardization in order to improve transposability of results between laboratories. We also discuss latest designs in LV technology.

  2. The decay pattern of the Pygmy Dipole Resonance of 140Ce

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löher, B.; Savran, D.; Aumann, T.; Beller, J.; Bhike, M.; Cooper, N.; Derya, V.; Duchêne, M.; Endres, J.; Hennig, A.; Humby, P.; Isaak, J.; Kelley, J. H.; Knörzer, M.; Pietralla, N.; Ponomarev, V. Yu.; Romig, C.; Scheck, M.; Scheit, H.; Silva, J.; Tonchev, A. P.; Tornow, W.; Wamers, F.; Weller, H.; Werner, V.; Zilges, A.

    2016-05-01

    The decay properties of the Pygmy Dipole Resonance (PDR) have been investigated in the semi-magic N = 82 nucleus 140Ce using a novel combination of nuclear resonance fluorescence and γ-γ coincidence techniques. Branching ratios for transitions to low-lying excited states are determined in a direct and model-independent way both for individual excited states and for excitation energy intervals. Comparison of the experimental results to microscopic calculations in the quasi-particle phonon model exhibits an excellent agreement, supporting the observation that the Pygmy Dipole Resonance couples to the ground state as well as to low-lying excited states. A 10% mixing of the PDR and the [21+ × PDR ] is extracted.

  3. Lowest l=0 proton resonance in {sup 26}Si and implications for nucleosynthesis of {sup 26}Al

    SciTech Connect

    Peplowski, P. N.; Baby, L. T.; Wiedenhoever, I.; Diffenderfer, E.; Hoeflich, P.; Rojas, A.; Volya, A.; Dekat, S. E.; Gay, D. L.; Grubor-Urosevic, O.; Kaye, R. A.; Keeley, N.

    2009-03-15

    Using a beam of the radioactive isotope {sup 25}Al, produced with the new RESOLUT facility, we measured the direct (d,n) proton-transfer reaction leading to low-lying proton resonances in {sup 26}Si. We observed the lowest l=0 proton resonance, identified with the 3{sup +} state at 5.914-MeV excitation energy. This result eliminates the largest uncertainty in astrophysical reaction rates involved in the nucleosynthesis of {sup 26}Al.

  4. Contemporary research with nuclear resonance fluorescence at the S-DALINAC

    SciTech Connect

    Zweidinger, M.; Beck, T.; Beller, J.; Gayer, U.; Mertes, L.; Pai, H.; Pietralla, N.; Ries, P.; Romig, C.; Werner, V.

    2015-02-24

    In the last decades many nuclear resonance fluorescence experiments aiming for low-lying dipole excitations were performed at the Darmstadt High Intensity Photon Setup at S-DALINAC facility. On the electric dipole side, quadrupole-octupole coupled states and the Pygmy Dipole Resonance are of particular interest. On the magnetic dipole side, the so-called scissors mode is in the focus of interest. Furthermore, using the method of resonant self absorption, the decay behavior of J{sup π} = 1{sup −} states was investigated in {sup 140}Ce.

  5. Geoacoustic inversion using the vector field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crocker, Steven E.

    The main goal of this project was to study the use of the acoustic vector field, separately or in combination with the scalar field, to estimate the depth dependent geoacoustic properties of the seafloor via non-linear inversion. The study was performed in the context of the Sediment Acoustics Experiment 2004 (SAX04) conducted in the Northern Gulf of Mexico (GOM) where a small number of acoustic vector sensors were deployed in close proximity to the seafloor. A variety of acoustic waveforms were transmitted into the seafloor at normal incidence. The acoustic vector sensors were located both above and beneath the seafloor interface where they measured the acoustic pressure and the acoustic particle acceleration. Motion data provided by the buried vector sensors were affected by a suspension response that was sensitive to the mass properties of the sensor, the sediment density and sediment elasticity (e.g., shear wave speed). The suspension response for the buried vector sensors included a resonance within the analysis band of 0.4 to 2.0 kHz. The suspension resonance represented an unknown complex transfer function between the acoustic vector field in the seabed and data representing that field. Therefore, inverse methods developed for this study were required to 1) estimate dynamic properties of the sensor suspension resonance and 2) account for the associated corruption of vector field data. A method to account for the vector sensor suspense response function was integrated directly into the inversion methods such that vector channel data corruption was reduced and an estimate of the shear wave speed in the sediment was returned. Inversions of real and synthetic data sets indicated that information about sediment shear wave speed was carried by the suspension response of the buried sensors, as opposed to being contained inherently within the acoustic vector field.

  6. On the nature of the Dipole Pygmy Resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Lanza, E. G.; Vitturi, A.; Andres, M. V.; Catara, F.; Gambacurta, D.

    2011-10-28

    The nature of the low-lying dipole states in neutron-rich nuclei, often associated to the Pygmy Dipole Resonance, has been investigated. This has been done by describing them within the Hartree-Fock plus RPA formalism. The analysis shows that they are not of collective nature although many particle-hole configurations participate to their formation. Taking advantage of their strong isospin mixing one can envisage combined reaction processes involving the Coulomb and different mixtures of isoscalar and isovector nuclear interactions in order to provide more hints to unveil the characteristic features of these states.

  7. Toward a Global Model of Low-Lying Vibrational States of CH_3CN: the v_4 = 1 State at 920 cm-1 and its Interactions with Nearby States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Holger S. P.; Drouin, B. J.; Pearson, J. C.; Brown, L. R.; Kleiner, I.; Sams, R. L.

    2010-06-01

    Methyl cyanide, CH_3CN, is an important interstellar molecule, in particular in hot and dense molecular cores, and it may play a role in the atmospheres of planets or of Titan. Therefore, we have recorded extensive rotational and rovibrational spectra up to ˜ 1.6 THz and ˜ 1500 cm-1, respectively. The present investigation extends our analysis of states with v_8 ≤ 2 at vibrational energies below 740 cm-1 and takes into consideration findings from an analysis of the ν _4 band and the higher-lying ν _7 (at ˜1042 cm-1) and 3ν _8 ^1 (at ˜1078 cm-1) bands. The rotational data extend to J = 87 and K = 15, infrared assignments currently extend to 55 and 12, respectively. Parameters affecting only v_7 = 1 or v_8 = 3 as well as some additional interaction parameters were kept fixed to values from (b). The largest perturbations of v_4 = 1 are caused by a Δ k = 0, Δ l = 3 interaction with v_8 = 3 at K = 8. Despite the inclusion of the interaction parameter and a centrifugal distortion correction, residuals amount to more than 200 MHz very close to the resonance. Removal of these residuals probably requires explicit inclusion of v_8 = 3 data. Several additional perturbations exist at lower as well as higher K with v_8 = 2, v_7 = 1 and v_8 = 3. Higher values of K are difficult to reproduce in spite of an extensive set of distortion parameters which, at highest orders, have rather large magnitudes, possibly indicating unaccounted interactions which would probably occur with states even higher than v_8 = 3. H. S. P. Müller et al., contribution WG03, presented at the 62nd International Symposium on Molecular Spectroscopy, June 18-22, 2007, Columbus, Ohio, USA. A.-M. Tolonen et al., J. Mol. Spectrosc. 160 (1993) 554-565.

  8. Resonances and resonance widths

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, T.

    1986-05-01

    Two-dimensional betatron resonances are much more important than their simple one-dimensional counterparts and exhibit a strong dependence on the betatron phase advance per cell. A practical definition of ''width'' is expanded upon in order to display these relations in tables. A primarily pedagogical introduction is given to explain the tables, and also to encourage a wider capability for deriving resonance behavior and wider use of ''designer'' resonances.

  9. Rotations with Rodrigues' Vector

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pina, E.

    2011-01-01

    The rotational dynamics was studied from the point of view of Rodrigues' vector. This vector is defined here by its connection with other forms of parametrization of the rotation matrix. The rotation matrix was expressed in terms of this vector. The angular velocity was computed using the components of Rodrigues' vector as coordinates. It appears…

  10. Resonant spectra of quadrupolar anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fossez, K.; Mao, Xingze; Nazarewicz, W.; Michel, N.; Garrett, W. R.; Płoszajczak, M.

    2016-09-01

    In quadrupole-bound anions, an extra electron is attached at a sufficiently large quadrupole moment of a neutral molecule, which is lacking a permanent dipole moment. The nature of the bound states and low-lying resonances of such anions is of interest for understanding the threshold behavior of open quantum systems in general. In this work, we investigate the properties of quadrupolar anions as halo systems, the formation of rotational bands, and the transition from a subcritical to supercritical electric quadrupole moment. We solve the electron-plus-rotor problem using a nonadiabatic coupled-channel formalism by employing the Berggren ensemble, which explicitly contains bound states, narrow resonances, and the scattering continuum. The rotor is treated as a linear triad of point charges with zero monopole and dipole moments and nonzero quadrupole moment. We demonstrate that binding energies and radii of quadrupolar anions strictly follow the scaling laws for two-body halo systems. Contrary to the case of dipolar anions, ground-state band of quadrupolar anions smoothly extend into the continuum, and many rotational bands could be identified above the detachment threshold. We study the evolution of a bound state of an anion as it dives into the continuum at a critical quadrupole moment and we show that the associated critical exponent is α =2 . Everything considered, quadrupolar anions represent a perfect laboratory for the studies of marginally bound open quantum systems.

  11. Stable negative ions and shape resonances in a series of organic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallup, G. A.

    2013-09-01

    We report on the theoretical determination of low-lying shape resonances in a selected set of seven molecules. The finite element discrete model method is used and the absolute differences between calculated and experimental values, where known, are ⪅0.15 eV for the resonances lowest in energy. Difficulties expected with the higher calculated values are discussed. This article reports results for ortho-benzyne, benzene, naphthalene, anthracene, styrene, formamide, and acetamide. Comparisons are made with a few other calculations, again where available.

  12. Carbon monoxide dissociative attachment and resonant dissociation by electron-impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laporta, V.; Tennyson, J.; Celiberto, R.

    2016-02-01

    Low-energy dissociative electron attachment and resonant electron impact dissociation of CO molecule are considered. Ro-vibrationally resolved cross sections and rate coefficients for both the processes are calculated using an ab-initio model based on the low-lying \\text{X}{{}2}\\Pi resonance of CO-. Final results show that the cross sections increases very rapidly as a function of the ro-vibrational level; these cross sections should be useful for understanding kinetic dissociation of CO in strongly non-equilibrium plasmas.

  13. Integrated optic vector-matrix multiplier

    DOEpatents

    Watts, Michael R.

    2011-09-27

    A vector-matrix multiplier is disclosed which uses N different wavelengths of light that are modulated with amplitudes representing elements of an N.times.1 vector and combined to form an input wavelength-division multiplexed (WDM) light stream. The input WDM light stream is split into N streamlets from which each wavelength of the light is individually coupled out and modulated for a second time using an input signal representing elements of an M.times.N matrix, and is then coupled into an output waveguide for each streamlet to form an output WDM light stream which is detected to generate a product of the vector and matrix. The vector-matrix multiplier can be formed as an integrated optical circuit using either waveguide amplitude modulators or ring resonator amplitude modulators.

  14. Understanding Singular Vectors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, David; Botteron, Cynthia

    2013-01-01

    matrix yields a surprisingly simple, heuristical approximation to its singular vectors. There are correspondingly good approximations to the singular values. Such rules of thumb provide an intuitive interpretation of the singular vectors that helps explain why the SVD is so…

  15. Optically induced parametric magnetic resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez, Ricardo; Knappe, Svenja; Kitching, John

    2011-05-01

    Optically pumped vector magnetometers based on zero-field resonances have reached very high sensitivities by operating at high atomic densities where dephasing due to spin-exchange collisions can be suppressed. Simplified setups, with just one laser beam have measured magnetic fields from the human brain and heart. A key feature in these magnetometers is the introduction of an rf magnetic field along the measurement axis to generate a parametric resonance. Lock-in detection of the transmitted light, at an odd harmonic of the modulation frequency, allows the reduction of the low frequency noise and generates a resonance with dispersive shape. Here we study a zero-field vector magnetometer where the parametric resonances are induced by the vector AC stark-shift of light. This approach does not produce any external magnetic field that could disturb the reading of other magnetometers in the vicinity and could provide an alternative in applications where an applied AC-field cannot be used. We have characterized the vector AC stark-shift effect of light on Rb atoms contained in a micromachined vapor cell with buffer gas. We have obtained parametric resonances induced by modulation of the light-shift. We also analyze the detunings and intensities of the light-shift beam that maintain the magnetometer within the spin-exchange relaxation-free regime.

  16. < VAP > Green function in the resonance region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirigliano, V.; Ecker, G.; Eidemüller, M.; Pich, A.; Portolés, J.

    2004-08-01

    We analyze the < VAP > three-point function of vector, axial-vector and pseudoscalar currents. In the spirit of large NC, a resonance dominated Green function is confronted with the leading high-energy behaviour from the operator product expansion. The matching is shown to be fully compatible with a chiral resonance Lagrangian and it allows to determine some of the chiral low-energy constants of O (p6).

  17. Conformational landscape and low lying excited states of imatinib.

    PubMed

    Vinţeler, Emil; Stan, Nicoleta-Florina; Luchian, Raluca; Căinap, Călin; Ramalho, João P Prates; Chiş, Vasile

    2015-04-01

    The conformational changes of imatinib (IMT) are crucial for understanding the ligand-receptor interaction and its mechanism of action [Agofonov et al. (2014) Nature Struct Mol Biol 21:848-853]. Therefore, here we investigated the free energy conformational landscape of the free IMT base, aiming to describe the three-dimensional structures and energetic stability of its conformers. Forty-five unique conformers, within an energy window of 4.8 kcal mol(-1) were identified by a conformational search in gas-phase, at the B3LYP/6-31G(d) theoretical level. Among these, the 20 most stable, as well as 4 conformers resulting from optimization of experimental structures found in the two known polymorphs of IMT and in the c-Abl complex were further refined using the 6-31+G(d,p) basis set and the polarizable continuum solvation model. The most stable conformers in gas-phase and water exhibit a V-shaped structure. The major difference between the most stable free conformers and the bioactive conformers consists in the relative orientation of the pyrimidine-pyridine groups responsible for hydrogen bonding interactions in the ATP-binding pocket. The ratio of mole fractions corresponding to the two known (α and β) polymorphic forms of IMT was estimated from the calculated thermochemical data, in quantitative agreement with the existing experimental data related to their solubility. The electronic absorption spectrum of this compound was investigated in water and explained based on the theoretical TD-DFT results, considering the Boltzmann population-averaged computed data at CAM-B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) level of theory for the nine most stable conformers. PMID:25764326

  18. Scattering of low lying states in the black hole atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giribet, Gaston

    2016-07-01

    We investigate finite α' effects in string theory on a black hole background. By explicitly computing tree-level scattering amplitudes, we confirm a duality between seemingly different states recently conjectured by Giveon, Itzhaki, and Kutasov. We verify that the relevant 3-point functions factorize in such a way that the duality between oscillator and winding states becomes manifest. This leads us to determine the precise normalization of the dual vertex operators, and confirms at the level of the interacting theory the identification of states suggested by the analysis of the spectrum. This result implies a duality between two seemingly distinct mechanisms driving the violation of the string winding number in the black hole atmosphere.

  19. Radiative Decays of Low-Lying Excited-State Hyperons

    SciTech Connect

    Simon Taylor

    2000-05-01

    The quark wave-functions of the lower-lying excited-state hyperons Lambda(1405), Sigma(1385), and Lambda(1520) are not well understood. For example, the Lambda(1405) may not be a regular three-quark state but a {bar K}N molecule. Several competing models have been proposed, but none have been convincingly eliminated. Measuring radiative decays provides a means of discriminating between the models. The radiative branching of ratios are predicted to be small ({approx}1%), but the radiative widths vary by factors of 2-10 from model to model. The existing experimental data is sparse and inconsistent; moreover, the radiative decay of the Sigma(1385) has never been observed before (except for one event). These lower-lying excited state hypersons were produced in a tagged photon-beam experiment in the CLAS detector at TJNAF in the reaction gamma p {yields} K{sup +} Y* for photon energies from threshold to 2.4 GeV. The radiative branching ration for the Sigma{sup 0}(1385) relative to the Sigma{sup 0}(1385) {yields} Lambda pi{sup 0} channel was measured to be 0.021 {+-} 0.008{sub -0.007}{sup +0.004}, corresponding to a partial width of 640 {+-} 270{sub -220}{sup +130} keV.

  20. Variational upper bounds for low-lying states of lithium

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, L. M.; Qiao, H. X.; Yan, Z.-C.; Drake, G. W. F.

    2011-03-15

    We present improved calculations of variational energy eigenvalues for the 1s{sup 2}2s {sup 2}S, 1s{sup 2}3s {sup 2}S, and 1s{sup 2}2p {sup 2}P states of lithium using basis sets with up to 30 224 terms in Hylleraas coordinates. The nonrelativistic energies for infinite nuclear mass are -7.478 060 323 910 143 7(45) a.u. for 1s{sup 2}2s {sup 2}S, -7.354 098 421 444 316 4(32) a.u. for 1s{sup 2}3s {sup 2}S, and -7.410 156 532 651 6(5) a.u. for 1s{sup 2}2p {sup 2}P, which represent the most accurate variational upper bounds to date. An important advantage of the basis sets with multiple distance scales is their exceptional numerical stability.

  1. Xanadu Is Old, Rugged And Low-lying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Charles; Kirk, R. L.; Stofan, E.; Stiles, B.; Zebker, H.; Ostro, S.; Radebaugh, J.; Lorenz, R. D.; Callahan, P.; Wall, S.

    2007-10-01

    Xanadu was the first surface feature discovered on Titan. It is anomalously bright in the IR, and is also radar bright with unusual physical properties. Xanadu is continent size ( 4000 km wide) with a sharp boundary to the west against the dark dunes of Shangri-La, and less distinct boundaries in other areas. Because of its size and reflectivity it had been proposed that Xanadu is an elevated continent. But it is not. A new topography-from-SAR technique shows that along the T13 Radar swath which completely transects Xanadu, the average topographic elevation is indistinguishable from that of the surrounding terrain. There are many mountains with peaks locally rising up to 1-2 km, but the average elevation of the T13 pass is 200 m +/- 300 m lower than the radius of Titan. The highest point is near the swath center. Photogeologic interpretation suggests that Xanadu slopes to the south; three major river systems begin in the north and flow southward. The lack of significant average elevation means that it is not necessary to create models to explain how Xanadu is dynamically supported. Its eroded-looking terrain, large number of possible eroded impact craters, dune encroachment on its western edge, and apparent detached patches of similar material near its margins all suggest that Xanadu is a relict terrain, currently being disaggregated. The only sign of current activity is the river channels. We speculate that Xanadu was originally a landform of higher elevation (2 km higher if the mountain tops are remnants of an original surface) that has been modified by erosion and/or isostatic adjustment. If the observed river systems have eroded and removed the putative higher terrain there may be significant sediment deposits in the central or southern parts of Xanadu, and/or this material may have been redistributed by winds.

  2. The low-lying electronic states of SiO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W.

    2016-08-01

    The singlet states of SiO that correlate with ground state atoms have been studied. The computed spectroscopic constants are in good agreement with experiment. The lifetime of the E state has been calculated to be 10.9 ns; this is larger than the results of previous computations and is in excellent agreement with the experimental value of 10.5 ± 1.1 ns. The lifetime of the A state is about three times larger than found in experiment. We suggest that absorption from the X state to the (2)1 Π state is responsible for the unidentified lines in the experiment of Hormes et al.

  3. Low-lying levels in /sup 148/Pm

    SciTech Connect

    Norman, E.B.; Lesko, K.T.; Champagne, A.E.

    1988-02-01

    The /sup 149/Sm(d,/sup 3/He) reaction has been used to populate levels in /sup 148/Pm. Nineteen new excited states have been observed below 1 MeV excitation energy in /sup 148/Pm. The possible astrophysical implications of these results are discussed.

  4. Rhotrix Vector Spaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aminu, Abdulhadi

    2010-01-01

    By rhotrix we understand an object that lies in some way between (n x n)-dimensional matrices and (2n - 1) x (2n - 1)-dimensional matrices. Representation of vectors in rhotrices is different from the representation of vectors in matrices. A number of vector spaces in matrices and their properties are known. On the other hand, little seems to be…

  5. Collider Signal I :. Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tait, Tim M. P.

    2010-08-01

    These TASI lectures were part of the summer school in 2008 and cover the collider signal associated with resonances in models of physics beyond the Standard Model. I begin with a review of the Z boson, one of the best-studied resonances in particle physics, and review how the Breit-Wigner form of the propagator emerges in perturbation theory and discuss the narrow width approximation. I review how the LEP and SLAC experiments could use the kinematics of Z events to learn about fermion couplings to the Z. I then make a brief survey of models of physics beyond the Standard Model which predict resonances, and discuss some of the LHC observables which we can use to discover and identify the nature of the BSM physics. I finish up with a discussion of the linear moose that one can use for an effective theory description of a massive color octet vector particle.

  6. Pairing resonances and the continuum spectroscopy of 10Li

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orrigo, S. E. A.; Lenske, H.

    2009-06-01

    Pairing across the particle emission threshold and the properties of corresponding quasiparticle strength functions are discussed in an extended mean-field approach. This particular type of dynamical correlations gives rise to a unique class of sharp low-lying resonances close to the particle emission threshold. Spectral functions for particle and hole states are discussed. They are explored theoretically by single-nucleon transfer reactions, populating the low energy continuum with respect to a core nucleus. The cross sections of the reaction d(9Li, 10Li)p at Tlab = 2.36 AMeV, recently measured at REX-ISOLDE, are well reproduced by our calculations including a pairing resonance in the 3 /2- partial wave of purely coupled channels nature.

  7. An above-barrier narrow resonance in 15F

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Grancey, F.; Mercenne, A.; de Oliveira Santos, F.; Davinson, T.; Sorlin, O.; Angélique, J. C.; Assié, M.; Berthoumieux, E.; Borcea, R.; Buta, A.; Celikovic, I.; Chudoba, V.; Daugas, J. M.; Dumitru, G.; Fadil, M.; Grévy, S.; Kiener, J.; Lefebvre-Schuhl, A.; Michel, N.; Mrazek, J.; Negoita, F.; Okołowicz, J.; Pantelica, D.; Pellegriti, M. G.; Perrot, L.; Płoszajczak, M.; Randisi, G.; Ray, I.; Roig, O.; Rotaru, F.; Saint Laurent, M. G.; Smirnova, N.; Stanoiu, M.; Stefan, I.; Stodel, C.; Subotic, K.; Tatischeff, V.; Thomas, J. C.; Ujić, P.; Wolski, R.

    2016-07-01

    Intense and purified radioactive beam of post-accelerated 14O was used to study the low-lying states in the unbound 15F nucleus. Exploiting resonant elastic scattering in inverse kinematics with a thick target, the second excited state, a resonance at ER = 4.757 (6) (10) MeV with a width of Γ = 36 (5) (14) keV was measured for the first time with high precision. The structure of this narrow above-barrier state in a nucleus located two neutrons beyond the proton drip line was investigated using the Gamow Shell Model in the coupled channel representation with a 12C core and three valence protons. It is found that it is an almost pure wave function of two quasi-bound protons in the 2s1/2 shell.

  8. High-spin molecular resonances in 12C + 12C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uegaki, E.; Abe, Y.

    2016-05-01

    Resonances observed in the 12C + 12C collisions are studied with a molecular model. At high spins J = 10-18, a stable dinuclear configuration is found to be an equator-equator touching one. Firstly, normal modes have been solved around the equilibrium, with spin J and K-quantum number being specified for rotation of the whole system. Secondly, with respect to large centrifugal energy, Coriolis coupling has been diagonalized among low-lying 11 states of normal-mode excitations, which brings K-mixing. The analyses of decay widths and excitation functions have been done. The molecular ground state exhibits alignments of the orbital angular momentum and the 12C spins, while some of the molecular excited states exhibit disalignments with small widths. Those results are surprisingly in good agreement with the experiments, which will light up a new physical picture of the highspin 12C + 12C resonances.

  9. Tensor A{sub yy} and vector A{sub y} analyzing powers in the {sup 1}H(d, d')X and {sup 12}C(d, d')X reactions at initial deuteron momenta of 9 GeV/c in the region of baryonic resonance excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Ladygin, V. P. Azhgirey, L. S.; Afanasiev, S. V.; Arkhipov, V. V.; Bondarev, V. K.; Borzounov, Yu. T.; Filipov, G.; Golovanov, L. B.; Isupov, A. Yu.; Ivanov, V. I.; Kartamyshev, A. A.; Kashirin, V. A.; Khrenov, A. N.; Kolesnikov, V. I.; Kuznetsov, V. A.; Ladygina, N. B.; Litvinenko, A. G.; Reznikov, S. G.; Rukoyatkin, P. A.; Semenov, A. Yu.

    2006-05-15

    The angular dependence of the tensor A{sub yy} and vector A{sub y} analyzing powers in the inelastic scattering of deuterons with a momentum of 9.0 GeV/c on hydrogen and carbon has been measured. The range of measurements corresponds to the baryonic resonance excitation with masses of {approx}2.2-2.6 GeV/c{sup 2}. The A{sub yy} data, being in good agreement with the previous results, demonstrate an approximate t scaling up to -1.5 (GeV/c){sup 2}. The large values of A{sub y} show a significant role of the spin-dependent part of the elementary amplitude of the NN {sup {yields}} NN* reaction. The results of the experiment are compared with model predictions of the plane-wave impulse approximation.

  10. Index Sets and Vectorization

    SciTech Connect

    Keasler, J A

    2012-03-27

    Vectorization is data parallelism (SIMD, SIMT, etc.) - extension of ISA enabling the same instruction to be performed on multiple data items simultaeously. Many/most CPUs support vectorization in some form. Vectorization is difficult to enable, but can yield large efficiency gains. Extra programmer effort is required because: (1) not all algorithms can be vectorized (regular algorithm structure and fine-grain parallelism must be used); (2) most CPUs have data alignment restrictions for load/store operations (obey or risk incorrect code); (3) special directives are often needed to enable vectorization; and (4) vector instructions are architecture-specific. Vectorization is the best way to optimize for power and performance due to reduced clock cycles. When data is organized properly, a vector load instruction (i.e. movaps) can replace 'normal' load instructions (i.e. movsd). Vector operations can potentially have a smaller footprint in the instruction cache when fewer instructions need to be executed. Hybrid index sets insulate users from architecture specific details. We have applied hybrid index sets to achieve optimal vectorization. We can extend this concept to handle other programming models.

  11. Retroviral vector production.

    PubMed

    Miller, A Dusty

    2014-01-01

    In this unit, the basic protocol generates stable cell lines that produce retroviral vectors that carry selectable markers. Also included are an alternate protocol that applies when the retroviral vector does not carry a selectable marker, and another alternate protocol for rapidly generating retroviral vector preparations by transient transfection. A support protocol describes construction of the retroviral vectors. The methods for generating virus from retroviral vector plasmids rely on the use of packaging cells that synthesize all of the retroviral proteins but do not produce replication-competent virus. Additional protocols detail plasmid transfection, virus titration, assay for replication-competent virus, and histochemical staining to detect transfer of a vector encoding alkaline phosphatase.

  12. Vectorization of a Treecode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makino, Junichiro

    1990-03-01

    Vectorized algorithms for the force calculation and tree construction in the Barnes-Hut tree algorithm are described. The basic idea for the vectorization of the force calculation is to vectorize the tree traversal across particles, so that all particles in the system traverse the tree simultaneously. The tree construction algorithm also makes use of the fact that particles can be treated in parallel. Thus these algorithms take advantage of the internal parallelism in the N-body system and the tree algorithm most effectively. As a natural result, these algorithms can be used on a wide range of vector/parallel architectures, including current supercomputers and highly parallel architectures such as the Connection Machine. The vectorized code runs about five times faster than the non-vector code on a Cyber 205 for an N-body system with N = 8192.

  13. Support vector tracking.

    PubMed

    Avidan, Shai

    2004-08-01

    Support Vector Tracking (SVT) integrates the Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifier into an optic-flow-based tracker. Instead of minimizing an intensity difference function between successive frames, SVT maximizes the SVM classification score. To account for large motions between successive frames, we build pyramids from the support vectors and use a coarse-to-fine approach in the classification stage. We show results of using SVT for vehicle tracking in image sequences.

  14. Vectorized Monte Carlo

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, F.B.

    1981-01-01

    Examination of the global algorithms and local kernels of conventional general-purpose Monte Carlo codes shows that multigroup Monte Carlo methods have sufficient structure to permit efficient vectorization. A structured multigroup Monte Carlo algorithm for vector computers is developed in which many particle events are treated at once on a cell-by-cell basis. Vectorization of kernels for tracking and variance reduction is described, and a new method for discrete sampling is developed to facilitate the vectorization of collision analysis. To demonstrate the potential of the new method, a vectorized Monte Carlo code for multigroup radiation transport analysis was developed. This code incorporates many features of conventional general-purpose production codes, including general geometry, splitting and Russian roulette, survival biasing, variance estimation via batching, a number of cutoffs, and generalized tallies of collision, tracklength, and surface crossing estimators with response functions. Predictions of vectorized performance characteristics for the CYBER-205 were made using emulated coding and a dynamic model of vector instruction timing. Computation rates were examined for a variety of test problems to determine sensitivities to batch size and vector lengths. Significant speedups are predicted for even a few hundred particles per batch, and asymptotic speedups by about 40 over equivalent Amdahl 470V/8 scalar codes arepredicted for a few thousand particles per batch. The principal conclusion is that vectorization of a general-purpose multigroup Monte Carlo code is well worth the significant effort required for stylized coding and major algorithmic changes.

  15. Pygmy dipole resonances as a manifestation of the structure of the neutron-rich nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsoneva, N.; Lenske, H.; Stoyanov, Ch.

    2004-02-01

    Dipole excitations in neutron-rich nuclei below the neutron threshold are investigated. The method is based on Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (HFB) and Quasiparticle-Phonon Model (QPM) theory. Of our special interest are the properties of the low-lying 1 -Pygmy Resonance and the two-phonon quadrupole-octupole 1 - states in Sn-isotopes including exploratory investigations for the experimentally unknown mass regions. In particular we investigate the evolution of the dipole strength function with the neutron excess. The use of HFB mean-field potentials and s.p. energies is found to provide a reliable extrapolation into the region off stability.

  16. Vector processing unit

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, L.C.; Tjon-Pian-Gi, D.C.; Tucker, S.G.; Zajac, M.W.

    1988-12-13

    This patent describes a data processing system comprising: memory means for storing instruction words of operands; a central processing unit (CPU) connected to the memory means for fetching and decoding instructions and controlling execution of instructions, including transfer of operands to and from the memory means, the control of execution of instructions is effected by a CPU clock and microprogram control means connected to the CPU clock for generating periodic execution control signals in synchronism with the CPU clock; vector processing means tightly coupled to the CPU for effecting data processing on vector data; and interconnection means, connecting the CPU and the vector processing means, including operand transfer lines for transfer of vector data between the CPU and the vector processing means, control lines, status lines for signalling conditions of the vector processor means to the CPU, and a vector timing signal line connected to one of the execution control signals from the microprogram control means, whereby the vector processing means receives periodic execution control signals at the clock rate and is synchronized with the CPU clock on a clock pulse by clock pulse basis during execution of instructions.

  17. Vector generator scan converter

    DOEpatents

    Moore, J.M.; Leighton, J.F.

    1988-02-05

    High printing speeds for graphics data are achieved with a laser printer by transmitting compressed graphics data from a main processor over an I/O channel to a vector generator scan converter which reconstructs a full graphics image for input to the laser printer through a raster data input port. The vector generator scan converter includes a microprocessor with associated microcode memory containing a microcode instruction set, a working memory for storing compressed data, vector generator hardware for drawing a full graphic image from vector parameters calculated by the microprocessor, image buffer memory for storing the reconstructed graphics image and an output scanner for reading the graphics image data and inputting the data to the printer. The vector generator scan converter eliminates the bottleneck created by the I/O channel for transmitting graphics data from the main processor to the laser printer, and increases printer speed up to thirty fold. 7 figs.

  18. Vector generator scan converter

    DOEpatents

    Moore, James M.; Leighton, James F.

    1990-01-01

    High printing speeds for graphics data are achieved with a laser printer by transmitting compressed graphics data from a main processor over an I/O (input/output) channel to a vector generator scan converter which reconstructs a full graphics image for input to the laser printer through a raster data input port. The vector generator scan converter includes a microprocessor with associated microcode memory containing a microcode instruction set, a working memory for storing compressed data, vector generator hardward for drawing a full graphic image from vector parameters calculated by the microprocessor, image buffer memory for storing the reconstructed graphics image and an output scanner for reading the graphics image data and inputting the data to the printer. The vector generator scan converter eliminates the bottleneck created by the I/O channel for transmitting graphics data from the main processor to the laser printer, and increases printer speed up to thirty fold.

  19. Vector theories in cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Esposito-Farese, Gilles; Pitrou, Cyril; Uzan, Jean-Philippe

    2010-03-15

    This article provides a general study of the Hamiltonian stability and the hyperbolicity of vector field models involving both a general function of the Faraday tensor and its dual, f(F{sup 2},FF-tilde), as well as a Proca potential for the vector field, V(A{sup 2}). In particular it is demonstrated that theories involving only f(F{sup 2}) do not satisfy the hyperbolicity conditions. It is then shown that in this class of models, the cosmological dynamics always dilutes the vector field. In the case of a nonminimal coupling to gravity, it is established that theories involving Rf(A{sup 2}) or Rf(F{sup 2}) are generically pathologic. To finish, we exhibit a model where the vector field is not diluted during the cosmological evolution, because of a nonminimal vector field-curvature coupling which maintains second-order field equations. The relevance of such models for cosmology is discussed.

  20. Vector generator scan converter

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, J.M.; Leighton, J.F.

    1990-04-17

    This patent describes high printing speeds for graphics data that are achieved with a laser printer by transmitting compressed graphics data from a main processor over an I/O (input/output) channel to a vector generator scan converter which reconstructs a full graphics image for input to the laser printer through a raster data input port. The vector generator scan converter includes a microprocessor with associated microcode memory containing a microcode instruction set, a working memory for storing compressed data, vector generator hardware for drawing a full graphic image from vector parameters calculated by the microprocessor, image buffer memory for storing the reconstructed graphics image and an output scanner for reading the graphics image data and inputting the data to the printer. The vector generator scan converter eliminates the bottleneck created by the I/O channel for transmitting graphics data from the main processor to the laser printer, and increases printer speed up to thirty fold.

  1. Line Integral of a Vector.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balabanian, Norman

    This programed booklet is designed for the engineering student who understands and can use vector and unit vector notation, components of a vector, parallel law of vector addition, and the dot product of two vectors. Content begins with work done by a force in moving a body a certain distance along some path. For each of the examples and problem…

  2. Polycistronic viral vectors.

    PubMed

    de Felipe, P

    2002-09-01

    Traditionally, vectors for gene transfer/therapy experiments were mono- or bicistronic. In the latter case, vectors express the gene of interest coupled with a marker gene. An increasing demand for more complex polycistronic vectors has arisen in recent years to obtain complex gene transfer/therapy effects. In particular, this demand is stimulated by the hope of a more powerful effect from combined gene therapy than from single gene therapy in a process whose parallels lie in the multi-drug combined therapies for cancer or AIDS. In the 1980's we had only splicing signals and internal promoters to construct such vectors: now a new set of biotechnological tools enables us to design new and more reliable bicistronic and polycistronic vectors. This article focuses on the description and comparison of the strategies for co-expression of two genes in bicistronic vectors, from the oldest to the more recently described: internal promoters, splicing, reinitiation, IRES, self-processing peptides (e.g. foot-and-mouth disease virus 2A), proteolytic cleavable sites (e.g. fusagen) and fusion of genes. I propose a classification of these strategies based upon either the use of multiple transcripts (with transcriptional mechanisms), or single transcripts (using translational/post-translational mechanisms). I also examine the different attempts to utilize these strategies in the construction of polycistronic vectors and the main problems encountered. Several potential uses of these polycistronic vectors, both in basic research and in therapy-focused applications, are discussed. The importance of the study of viral gene expression strategies and the need to transfer this knowledge to vector design is highlighted.

  3. Fractal vector optical fields.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yue; Gao, Xu-Zhen; Cai, Meng-Qiang; Zhang, Guan-Lin; Li, Yongnan; Tu, Chenghou; Wang, Hui-Tian

    2016-07-15

    We introduce the concept of a fractal, which provides an alternative approach for flexibly engineering the optical fields and their focal fields. We propose, design, and create a new family of optical fields-fractal vector optical fields, which build a bridge between the fractal and vector optical fields. The fractal vector optical fields have polarization states exhibiting fractal geometry, and may also involve the phase and/or amplitude simultaneously. The results reveal that the focal fields exhibit self-similarity, and the hierarchy of the fractal has the "weeding" role. The fractal can be used to engineer the focal field. PMID:27420485

  4. Vector pulsing soliton of self-induced transparency in waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamashvili, G. T.

    2015-01-01

    A theory of an optical resonance vector pulsing soliton in waveguide is developed. A thin transition layer containing semiconductor quantum dots forms the boundary between the waveguide and one of the connected media. Analytical and numerical solutions for the optical vector pulsing soliton in waveguide are obtained. The vector pulsing soliton in the presence of excitonic and bi-excitonic excitations is compared with the soliton for waveguide TM-modes with parameters that can be used in modern optical experiments. It is shown that these nonlinear waves have significantly different parameters and shapes.

  5. Interpolation of vector fields from human cardiac DT-MRI.

    PubMed

    Yang, F; Zhu, Y M; Rapacchi, S; Luo, J H; Robini, M; Croisille, P

    2011-03-01

    There has recently been increased interest in developing tensor data processing methods for the new medical imaging modality referred to as diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DT-MRI). This paper proposes a method for interpolating the primary vector fields from human cardiac DT-MRI, with the particularity of achieving interpolation and denoising simultaneously. The method consists of localizing the noise-corrupted vectors using the local statistical properties of vector fields, removing the noise-corrupted vectors and reconstructing them by using the thin plate spline (TPS) model, and finally applying global TPS interpolation to increase the resolution in the spatial domain. Experiments on 17 human hearts show that the proposed method allows us to obtain higher resolution while reducing noise, preserving details and improving direction coherence (DC) of vector fields as well as fiber tracking. Moreover, the proposed method perfectly reconstructs azimuth and elevation angle maps. PMID:21317482

  6. Bloch vector projection noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Li-Jun; Bacon, A. M.; Zhao, H.-Z.; Thomas, J. E.

    1994-01-01

    In the optical measurement of the Bloch vector components describing a system of N two-level atoms, the quantum fluctuations in these components are coupled into the measuring optical field. This paper develops the quantum theory of optical measurement of Bloch vector projection noise. The preparation and probing of coherence in an effective two-level system consisting of the two ground states in an atomic three-level lambda-scheme are analyzed.

  7. Poynting-vector filter

    SciTech Connect

    Carrigan, Charles R.

    2011-08-02

    A determination is made of frequency components associated with a particular bearing or location resulting from sources emitting electromagnetic-wave energy for which a Poynting-Vector can be defined. The broadband frequency components associated with a specific direction or location of interest are isolated from other components in the power spectrum that are not associated with the direction or location of interest. The collection of pointing vectors can be used to characterize the source.

  8. Optical resonator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taghavi-Larigani, Shervin (Inventor); Vanzyl, Jakob J. (Inventor); Yariv, Amnon (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The invention discloses a semi-ring Fabry-Perot (SRFP) optical resonator structure comprising a medium including an edge forming a reflective facet and a waveguide within the medium, the waveguide having opposing ends formed by the reflective facet. The performance of the SRFP resonator can be further enhanced by including a Mach-Zehnder interferometer in the waveguide on one side of the gain medium. The optical resonator can be employed in a variety of optical devices. Laser structures using at least one SRFP resonator are disclosed where the resonators are disposed on opposite sides of a gain medium. Other laser structures employing one or more resonators on one side of a gain region are also disclosed.

  9. Double resonance rotational spectroscopy of CH2D+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Töpfer, Matthias; Jusko, Pavol; Schlemmer, Stephan; Asvany, Oskar

    2016-09-01

    Context. Deuterated forms of CH are thought to be responsible for deuterium enrichment in lukewarm astronomical environments. There is no unambiguous detection of CH2D+ in space to date. Aims: Four submillimetre rotational lines of CH2D+ are documented in the literature. Our aim is to present a complete dataset of highly resolved rotational lines, including millimetre (mm) lines needed for a potential detection. Methods: We used a low-temperature ion trap and applied a novel IR-mm-wave double resonance method to measure the rotational lines of CH2D+. Results: We measured 21 low-lying (J ≤ 4) rotational transitions of CH2D+ between 23 GHz and 1.1 THz with accuracies close to 2 ppb.

  10. Syngeneic AAV pseudo-vectors potentiates full vector transduction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An excessive amount of empty capsids are generated during regular AAV vector production process. These pseudo-vectors often remain in final vectors used for animal studies or clinical trials. The potential effects of these pseudo-vectors on AAV transduction have been a major concern. In the current ...

  11. Stochastic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gammaitoni, Luca; Hänggi, Peter; Jung, Peter; Marchesoni, Fabio

    1998-01-01

    Over the last two decades, stochastic resonance has continuously attracted considerable attention. The term is given to a phenomenon that is manifest in nonlinear systems whereby generally feeble input information (such as a weak signal) can be be amplified and optimized by the assistance of noise. The effect requires three basic ingredients: (i) an energetic activation barrier or, more generally, a form of threshold; (ii) a weak coherent input (such as a periodic signal); (iii) a source of noise that is inherent in the system, or that adds to the coherent input. Given these features, the response of the system undergoes resonance-like behavior as a function of the noise level; hence the name stochastic resonance. The underlying mechanism is fairly simple and robust. As a consequence, stochastic resonance has been observed in a large variety of systems, including bistable ring lasers, semiconductor devices, chemical reactions, and mechanoreceptor cells in the tail fan of a crayfish. In this paper, the authors report, interpret, and extend much of the current understanding of the theory and physics of stochastic resonance. They introduce the readers to the basic features of stochastic resonance and its recent history. Definitions of the characteristic quantities that are important to quantify stochastic resonance, together with the most important tools necessary to actually compute those quantities, are presented. The essence of classical stochastic resonance theory is presented, and important applications of stochastic resonance in nonlinear optics, solid state devices, and neurophysiology are described and put into context with stochastic resonance theory. More elaborate and recent developments of stochastic resonance theory are discussed, ranging from fundamental quantum properties-being important at low temperatures-over spatiotemporal aspects in spatially distributed systems, to realizations in chaotic maps. In conclusion the authors summarize the achievements

  12. Vector and Axial Vector Pion Form Factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitz, Michael; PEN Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    Radiative pion decay π+ -->e+ νγ (RPD) provides critical input to chiral perturbation theory (χPT). Aside from the uninteresting ``inner bremsstrahlung'' contribution from QED, the RPD rate contains ``structure dependent'' terms given by FV and FA, the vector and axial-vector pion form factors, respectively. The two appear in the decay rate in combinations FV -FA and FV +FA , i.e., in the so-called SD- and SD+ terms, respectively. The latter has been measured to high precision by the PIBETA collaboration. We report on the analysis of new data, measured by the PEN collaboration in runs between 2008 and 2010 at the Paul Scherrer Institute, Switzerland. We particularly focus on the possibility of improvement in the determination of the SD- term. Precise determinations of FV and FA test the validity of the CVC hypothesis, provide numerical input for the l9 +l10 terms in the χPT lagrangian, and constrain potential non-(V - A) terms, such as a possible tensor term FT. NSF grants PHY-0970013, 1307328, and others.

  13. Bunyavirus-vector interactions.

    PubMed

    Beaty, B J; Bishop, D H

    1988-06-01

    Recent advances in the genetics and molecular biology of bunyaviruses have been applied to understanding bunyavirus-vector interactions. Such approaches have revealed which virus gene and gene products are important in establishing infections in vectors and in transmission of viruses. However, much more information is required to understand the molecular mechanisms of persistent infections of vectors which are lifelong but apparently exert no untoward effect. In fact, it seems remarkable that LAC viral antigen can be detected in almost every cell in an ovarian follicle, yet no untoward effect on fecundity and no teratology is seen. Similarly the lifelong infection of the vector would seem to provide ample opportunity for bunyavirus evolution by genetic drift and, under the appropriate circumstances, by segment reassortment. The potential for bunyavirus evolution by segment reassortment in vectors certainly exists. For example the Group C viruses in a small forest in Brazil seem to constitute a gene pool, with the 6 viruses related alternately by HI/NT and CF reactions, which assay respectively M RNA and S RNA gene products (Casals and Whitman, 1960; Shope and Causey, 1962). Direct evidence for naturally occurring reassortant bunyaviruses has also been obtained. Oligonucleotide fingerprint analyses of field isolates of LAC virus and members of the Patois serogroup of bunyaviruses have demonstrated that reassortment does occur in nature (El Said et al., 1979; Klimas et al., 1981; Ushijima et al., 1981). Determination of the genotypic frequencies of viruses selected by the biological interactions of viruses and vectors after dual infection and segment reassortment is an important issue. Should a virus result that efficiently interacts with alternate vector species, the virus could be expressed in different circumstances with serious epidemiologic consequences. Dual infection of vectors with different viruses is not unlikely, because many bunyaviruses are sympatric in

  14. Gamma Emission Spectra from Neutron Resonances in 234,236,238U Measured Using the Dance Detector at Lansce

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullmann, J. L.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A. J.; Haight, R. C.; Jandel, M.; Kawano, T.; Keksis, A. L.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Rundberg, R. S.; Vieira, D. J.; Wouters, J. M.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Wu, C. Y.; Becker, J. A.; Chyzh, A.; Baramsai, B.; Mitchell, G. E.; Krticka, M.

    2013-03-01

    An accurate knowledge of the radiative strength function and level density is needed to calculate of neutron-capture cross sections. An additional constraint on these quantities is provided by measurements of γ-ray emission spectra following capture. We present γ-emission spectra from several neutron resonances in 234,236,238U, measured using the DANCE detector at LANSCE. The measurements are compared to preliminary calculations of the cascade. It is observed that the generalized Lorentzian form of the E1 strength function cannot reproduce the shape of the emission spectra, but a better description is made by adding low-lying M1 Lorentzian strength.

  15. All-optical vector atomic magnetometer.

    PubMed

    Patton, B; Zhivun, E; Hovde, D C; Budker, D

    2014-07-01

    We demonstrate an all-optical magnetometer capable of measuring the magnitude and direction of a magnetic field using nonlinear magneto-optical rotation in cesium vapor. Vector capability is added by effective modulation of the field along orthogonal axes and subsequent demodulation of the magnetic-resonance frequency. This modulation is provided by the ac Stark shift induced by circularly polarized laser beams. The sensor exhibits a demonstrated rms noise floor of ∼65  fT/√[Hz] in measurement of the field magnitude and 0.5  mrad/√[Hz] in the field direction; elimination of technical noise would improve these sensitivities to 12  fT/√[Hz] and 10  μrad/√[Hz], respectively. Applications for this all-optical vector magnetometer would include magnetically sensitive fundamental physics experiments, such as the search for a permanent electric dipole moment of the neutron. PMID:25032923

  16. All-Optical Vector Atomic Magnetometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patton, B.; Zhivun, E.; Hovde, D. C.; Budker, D.

    2014-07-01

    We demonstrate an all-optical magnetometer capable of measuring the magnitude and direction of a magnetic field using nonlinear magneto-optical rotation in cesium vapor. Vector capability is added by effective modulation of the field along orthogonal axes and subsequent demodulation of the magnetic-resonance frequency. This modulation is provided by the ac Stark shift induced by circularly polarized laser beams. The sensor exhibits a demonstrated rms noise floor of ˜65 fT/√Hz in measurement of the field magnitude and 0.5 mrad /√Hz in the field direction; elimination of technical noise would improve these sensitivities to 12 fT /√Hz and 10 μrad /√Hz , respectively. Applications for this all-optical vector magnetometer would include magnetically sensitive fundamental physics experiments, such as the search for a permanent electric dipole moment of the neutron.

  17. All-optical vector atomic magnetometer.

    PubMed

    Patton, B; Zhivun, E; Hovde, D C; Budker, D

    2014-07-01

    We demonstrate an all-optical magnetometer capable of measuring the magnitude and direction of a magnetic field using nonlinear magneto-optical rotation in cesium vapor. Vector capability is added by effective modulation of the field along orthogonal axes and subsequent demodulation of the magnetic-resonance frequency. This modulation is provided by the ac Stark shift induced by circularly polarized laser beams. The sensor exhibits a demonstrated rms noise floor of ∼65  fT/√[Hz] in measurement of the field magnitude and 0.5  mrad/√[Hz] in the field direction; elimination of technical noise would improve these sensitivities to 12  fT/√[Hz] and 10  μrad/√[Hz], respectively. Applications for this all-optical vector magnetometer would include magnetically sensitive fundamental physics experiments, such as the search for a permanent electric dipole moment of the neutron.

  18. Vector financial rogue waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zhenya

    2011-11-01

    The coupled nonlinear volatility and option pricing model presented recently by Ivancevic is investigated, which generates a leverage effect, i.e., stock volatility is (negatively) correlated to stock returns, and can be regarded as a coupled nonlinear wave alternative of the Black-Scholes option pricing model. In this Letter, we analytically propose vector financial rogue waves of the coupled nonlinear volatility and option pricing model without an embedded w-learning. Moreover, we exhibit their dynamical behaviors for chosen different parameters. The vector financial rogue wave (rogon) solutions may be used to describe the possible physical mechanisms for the rogue wave phenomena and to further excite the possibility of relative researches and potential applications of vector rogue waves in the financial markets and other related fields.

  19. Vectorized garbage collection

    SciTech Connect

    Appel, A.W.; Bendiksen, A.

    1988-01-01

    Garbage collection can be done in vector mode on supercomputers like the Cray-2 and the Cyber 205. Both copying collection and mark-and-sweep can be expressed as breadth-first searches in which the queue can be processed in parallel. The authors have designed a copying garbage collector whose inner loop works entirely in vector mode. The only significant limitation of the algorithm is that if the size of the records is not constant, the implementation becomes much more complicated. The authors give performance measurements of the algorithm as implemented for Lisp CONS cells on the Cyber 205. Vector-mode garbage collection performs up to 9 times faster than scalar-mode collection.

  20. Bunyavirus-Vector Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Horne, Kate McElroy; Vanlandingham, Dana L.

    2014-01-01

    The Bunyaviridae family is comprised of more than 350 viruses, of which many within the Hantavirus, Orthobunyavirus, Nairovirus, Tospovirus, and Phlebovirus genera are significant human or agricultural pathogens. The viruses within the Orthobunyavirus, Nairovirus, and Phlebovirus genera are transmitted by hematophagous arthropods, such as mosquitoes, midges, flies, and ticks, and their associated arthropods not only serve as vectors but also as virus reservoirs in many cases. This review presents an overview of several important emerging or re-emerging bunyaviruses and describes what is known about bunyavirus-vector interactions based on epidemiological, ultrastructural, and genetic studies of members of this virus family. PMID:25402172

  1. Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence off 54Cr: The Onset of the Pygmy Dipole Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ries, P. C.; Beck, T.; Beller, J.; Krishichayan; Gayer, U.; Isaak, J.; Löher, B.; Mertes, L.; Pai, H.; Pietralla, N.; Romig, C.; Savran, D.; Schilling, M.; Tornow, W.; Werner, V.; Zweidinger, M.

    2016-06-01

    Low-lying electric and magnetic dipole excitations (E1 and M1) below the neutron separation threshold, particularly the Pygmy Dipole Resonance (PDR), have drawn considerable attention in the last years. So far, mostly moderately heavy nuclei in the mass regions around A = 90 and A = 140 were examined with respect to the PDR. In the present work, the systematics of the PDR have been extended by measuring excitation strengths and parity quantum numbers of J = 1 states in lighter nuclei near A = 50 in order to gather information on the onset of the PDR. The nuclei 50,52,54Cr and 48,50Ti were examined via bremsstrahlung produced at the DArmstadt Superconducting electron Linear Accelerator (S-DALINAC) with photon energies up to 9.7 MeV with the method of nuclear resonance fluorescence. Numerous excited states were observed, many of which for the first time. The parity quantum numbers of these states have been determined at the High Intensity Gamma-ray Source (HIγS) of the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory in Durham, NC, USA. Informations to the methods and the experimental setups will be provided and the results on 54Cr achieved will be discussed with respect to the onset of the PDR.

  2. Support vector machines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garay, Michael J.; Mazzoni, Dominic; Davies, Roger; Wagstaff, Kiri

    2004-01-01

    Support Vector Machines (SVMs) are a type of supervised learning algorith,, other examples of which are Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs), Decision Trees, and Naive Bayesian Classifiers. Supervised learning algorithms are used to classify objects labled by a 'supervisor' - typically a human 'expert.'.

  3. Vector potential methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hafez, M.

    1989-01-01

    Vector potential and related methods, for the simulation of both inviscid and viscous flows over aerodynamic configurations, are briefly reviewed. The advantages and disadvantages of several formulations are discussed and alternate strategies are recommended. Scalar potential, modified potential, alternate formulations of Euler equations, least-squares formulation, variational principles, iterative techniques and related methods, and viscous flow simulation are discussed.

  4. Killing vectors and anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Krisch, J. P.; Glass, E. N.

    2009-08-15

    We consider an action that can generate fluids with three unequal stresses for metrics with a spacelike Killing vector. The parameters in the action are directly related to the stress anisotropies. The field equations following from the action are applied to an anisotropic cosmological expansion and an extension of the Gott-Hiscock cosmic string.

  5. Production of lentiviral vectors

    PubMed Central

    Merten, Otto-Wilhelm; Hebben, Matthias; Bovolenta, Chiara

    2016-01-01

    Lentiviral vectors (LV) have seen considerably increase in use as gene therapy vectors for the treatment of acquired and inherited diseases. This review presents the state of the art of the production of these vectors with particular emphasis on their large-scale production for clinical purposes. In contrast to oncoretroviral vectors, which are produced using stable producer cell lines, clinical-grade LV are in most of the cases produced by transient transfection of 293 or 293T cells grown in cell factories. However, more recent developments, also, tend to use hollow fiber reactor, suspension culture processes, and the implementation of stable producer cell lines. As is customary for the biotech industry, rather sophisticated downstream processing protocols have been established to remove any undesirable process-derived contaminant, such as plasmid or host cell DNA or host cell proteins. This review compares published large-scale production and purification processes of LV and presents their process performances. Furthermore, developments in the domain of stable cell lines and their way to the use of production vehicles of clinical material will be presented. PMID:27110581

  6. Gene transfer vector

    SciTech Connect

    Puhler, A.; Simon, R.

    1987-08-11

    A Tn-Mob vector is described comprising: (a) A replicon functional E. coli; and (b) A Tn-Mob element comprising a transposon containing (i) a functional selection marker, and (ii) a Mob-site and oriT located in a region of the transposon that is not essential to transposability.

  7. Redshifts and Killing vectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, Alex; Schucking, Engelbert; Surowitz, Eugene J.

    2006-11-01

    Current approaches to physics stress the importance of conservation laws due to spacetime and internal symmetries. In special and general relativity the generators of these symmetries are known as Killing vectors. We use them for the rigorous determination of gravitational and cosmological redshifts.

  8. Vector-borne diseases.

    PubMed

    Gubler, D J

    2009-08-01

    Vector-borne diseases have been the scourge of man and animals since the beginning of time. Historically, these are the diseases that caused the great plagues such as the 'Black Death' in Europe in the 14th Century and the epidemics of yellow fever that plagued the development of the New World. Others, such as Nagana, contributed to the lack of development in Africa for many years. At the turn of the 20th Century, vector-borne diseases were among the most serious public and animal health problems in the world. For the most part, these diseases were controlled by the middle of the 20th Century through the application of knowledge about their natural history along with the judicious use of DDT (dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane) and other residual insecticides to interrupt the transmission cycle between arthropod and vertebrate host. However, this success initiated a period of complacency in the 1960s and 1970s, which resulted in the redirection of resources away from prevention and control of vector-borne diseases. The 1970s was also a time in which there were major changes to public health policy. Global trends, combined with changes in animal husbandry, urbanisation, modern transportation and globalisation, have resulted in a global re-emergence of epidemic vector-borne diseases affecting both humans and animals over the past 30 years. PMID:20128467

  9. Vector-borne diseases.

    PubMed

    Gubler, D J

    2009-08-01

    Vector-borne diseases have been the scourge of man and animals since the beginning of time. Historically, these are the diseases that caused the great plagues such as the 'Black Death' in Europe in the 14th Century and the epidemics of yellow fever that plagued the development of the New World. Others, such as Nagana, contributed to the lack of development in Africa for many years. At the turn of the 20th Century, vector-borne diseases were among the most serious public and animal health problems in the world. For the most part, these diseases were controlled by the middle of the 20th Century through the application of knowledge about their natural history along with the judicious use of DDT (dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane) and other residual insecticides to interrupt the transmission cycle between arthropod and vertebrate host. However, this success initiated a period of complacency in the 1960s and 1970s, which resulted in the redirection of resources away from prevention and control of vector-borne diseases. The 1970s was also a time in which there were major changes to public health policy. Global trends, combined with changes in animal husbandry, urbanisation, modern transportation and globalisation, have resulted in a global re-emergence of epidemic vector-borne diseases affecting both humans and animals over the past 30 years.

  10. Singular Vectors' Subtle Secrets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, David; Lachance, Michael; Remski, Joan

    2011-01-01

    Social scientists use adjacency tables to discover influence networks within and among groups. Building on work by Moler and Morrison, we use ordered pairs from the components of the first and second singular vectors of adjacency matrices as tools to distinguish these groups and to identify particularly strong or weak individuals.

  11. Photoproduction of exotic baryon resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karliner, Marek; Rosner, Jonathan L.

    2016-01-01

    We point out that the new exotic resonances recently reported by LHCb in the J / ψ p channel are excellent candidates for photoproduction off a proton target. This test is crucial to confirming the resonant nature of such states, as opposed to their being kinematical effects. We specialize to an interpretation of the heavier narrow state as a molecule composed of Σc and Dbar*, and estimate its production cross section using vector dominance. The relevant photon energies and fluxes are well within the capabilities of the GlueX and CLAS12 detectors at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLAB). A corresponding calculation is also performed for photoproduction of an analogous resonance which is predicted to exist in the ϒp channel.

  12. On a simple way to calculate electronic resonances for polyatomic molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Horáček, J.; Paidarová, I.; Čurík, R.

    2015-11-14

    We propose a simple method for calculation of low-lying shape electronic resonances of polyatomic molecules. The method introduces a perturbation potential and requires only routine bound-state type calculations in the real domain of energies. Such a calculation is accessible by most of the free or commercial quantum chemistry software. The presented method is based on the analytical continuation in a coupling constant model, but unlike its previous variants, we experience a very stable and robust behavior for higher-order extrapolation functions. Moreover, the present approach is independent of the correlation treatment used in quantum many-electron computations and therefore we are able to apply Coupled Clusters (CCSD-T) level of the correlation model. We demonstrate these properties on determination of the resonance position and width of the {sup 2}Π{sub u} temporary negative ion state of diacetylene using CCSD-T level of theory.

  13. Resonance saturation of the chiral couplings at next-to-leading order in 1/N{sub C}

    SciTech Connect

    Rosell, Ignasi; Ruiz-Femenia, Pedro; Sanz-Cillero, Juan Jose

    2009-04-01

    The precision obtainable in phenomenological applications of chiral perturbation theory is currently limited by our lack of knowledge on the low-energy constants (LECs). The assumption that the most important contributions to the LECs come from the dynamics of the low-lying resonances, often referred to as the resonance saturation hypothesis, has stimulated the use of large-N{sub C} resonance Lagrangians in order to obtain explicit values for the LECs. We study the validity of the resonance saturation assumption at the next-to-leading order in the 1/N{sub C} expansion within the framework of resonance chiral theory. We find that, by imposing QCD short-distance constraints, the chiral couplings can be written in terms of the resonance masses and couplings and do not depend explicitly on the coefficients of the chiral operators in the Goldstone boson sector of resonance chiral theory. As we argue, this is the counterpart formulation of the resonance saturation statement in the context of the resonance Lagrangian. Going beyond leading order in the 1/N{sub C} counting allows us to keep full control of the renormalization scale dependence of the LEC estimates.

  14. [Vector control and malaria control].

    PubMed

    Carnevale, P; Mouchet, J

    1990-01-01

    Vector control is an integral part of malaria control. Limiting parasite transmission vector control must be considered as one of the main preventive measure. Indeed it prevents transmission of Plasmodium from man to vector and from vector to man. But vector control must be adapted to local situation to be efficient and feasible. Targets of vector control can be larval and/or adults stages. In both cases 3 main methods are currently available: physical (source reduction), chemical (insecticides) and biological tolls. Antilarval control is useful only in some particular circumstances (unstable malaria, island, oasis...) Antiadult control is mainly based upon house-spraying while pyrethroid treated bed nets is advocated regarding efficiency, simple technique and cheap price. Vector control measures could seem restricted but can be very efficient if political will is added to a right choice of adapted measures, a good training of involved personal and a large information of the population concerned with vector control.

  15. On the RHS description of resonances and virtual states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadella, M.

    1984-08-01

    We discuss the role of the M≂ller wave operators in a rigged Hilbert space (RHS) model for resonances. We also construct a new RHS of analytic functions valid for the description of resonances and virtual states. These become generalized state vectors in a general physically realizable representation.

  16. Pygmy and giant dipole resonances in the nitrogen isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hai-Liang; Dong, Bao-Guo; Yan, Yu-Liang; Zhang, Huan-Qiao; Yuan, Da-Qing; Zhu, Shen-Yun; Zhang, Xi-Zhen

    2016-01-01

    The configuration-interaction shell model with the WBP10 effective interaction has been used to investigate the pygmy and giant dipole resonances in the nitrogen isotopes. Large enhancement of low-lying dipole strength, i.e., pygmy dipole resonances (PDRs), is predicted in the neutron-rich 17,18,19,20N. The nature of the PDRs is analyzed via the transition densities and transition matrix elements. It turns out these PDRs involve a larger amount of excitations between the 2 s 1 d and loosely bound 1 f 2 p shells. Combining with the transition densities, it is concluded that the PDRs in 17,18,19,20N are collective and due to the oscillation between the excess neutrons and the isospin saturated core. The isospin dependence of energy splitting and sum rule of isospin doublets is discussed. The theoretical energy splitting of isospin doublets can significantly deviate from the systematic values when nucleus is far away from the β -stability line. The ratios of T< and T> energy-weighted sum rule (EWSR) are consistently larger than the systematic values, and it is noticed that the calculated EWSR ratio over the systematic ratio increases with increasing isospin almost linearly. We also calculated the photoabsorption cross sections for the nitrogen isotopes. We proposed the normalization factors for 0 -1 ℏ ω and 2 -3 ℏ ω calculations. After the normalization, the shell model has well reproduced the experimental photoabsorption cross sections in N,1514, especially the detailed structure of resonances.

  17. Vector soliton fission.

    PubMed

    Lu, F; Lin, Q; Knox, W H; Agrawal, Govind P

    2004-10-29

    We investigate the vectorial nature of soliton fission in an isotropic nonlinear medium both theoretically and experimentally. As a specific example, we show that supercontinuum generation in a tapered fiber is extremely sensitive to the input state of polarization. Multiple vector solitons generated through soliton fission exhibit different states of elliptical polarization while emitting nonsolitonic radiation with complicated polarization features. Experiments performed with a tapered fiber agree with our theoretical description.

  18. Vector Magnetograph Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chipman, Russell A.

    1996-01-01

    This report covers work performed during the period of November 1994 through March 1996 on the design of a Space-borne Solar Vector Magnetograph. This work has been performed as part of a design team under the supervision of Dr. Mona Hagyard and Dr. Alan Gary of the Space Science Laboratory. Many tasks were performed and this report documents the results from some of those tasks, each contained in the corresponding appendix. Appendices are organized in chronological order.

  19. Parallel collective resonances in arrays of gold nanorods.

    PubMed

    Vitrey, Alan; Aigouy, Lionel; Prieto, Patricia; García-Martín, José Miguel; González, María U

    2014-01-01

    In this work we discuss the excitation of parallel collective resonances in arrays of gold nanoparticles. Parallel collective resonances result from the coupling of the nanoparticles localized surface plasmons with diffraction orders traveling in the direction parallel to the polarization vector. While they provide field enhancement and delocalization as the standard collective resonances, our results suggest that parallel resonances could exhibit greater tolerance to index asymmetry in the environment surrounding the arrays. The near- and far-field properties of these resonances are analyzed, both experimentally and numerically. PMID:24645987

  20. Parallel collective resonances in arrays of gold nanorods.

    PubMed

    Vitrey, Alan; Aigouy, Lionel; Prieto, Patricia; García-Martín, José Miguel; González, María U

    2014-01-01

    In this work we discuss the excitation of parallel collective resonances in arrays of gold nanoparticles. Parallel collective resonances result from the coupling of the nanoparticles localized surface plasmons with diffraction orders traveling in the direction parallel to the polarization vector. While they provide field enhancement and delocalization as the standard collective resonances, our results suggest that parallel resonances could exhibit greater tolerance to index asymmetry in the environment surrounding the arrays. The near- and far-field properties of these resonances are analyzed, both experimentally and numerically.

  1. Laser Resonator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harper, L. L. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    An optical resonator cavity configuration has a unitary mirror with oppositely directed convex and concave reflective surfaces disposed into one fold and concertedly reversing both ends of a beam propagating from a laser rod disposed between two total internal reflection prisms. The optical components are rigidly positioned with perpendicularly crossed virtual rooflines by a compact optical bed. The rooflines of the internal reflection prisms, are arranged perpendicularly to the axis of the laser beam and to the optical axes of the optical resonator components.

  2. Resonance conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebusco, P.

    2005-11-01

    Non-linear parametric resonances occur frequently in nature. Here we summarize how they can be studied by means of perturbative methods. We show in particular how resonances can affect the motion of a test particle orbiting in the vicinity of a compact object. These mathematical toy-models find application in explaining the structure of the observed kHz Quasi-Periodic Oscillations: we show which aspects of the reality naturally enter in the theory, and which one still remain a puzzle.

  3. Vector representation of tourmaline compositions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burt, Donald M.

    1989-01-01

    The vector method for representing mineral compositions of amphibole and mica groups is applied to the tourmaline group. Consideration is given to the methods for drawing the relevant vector diagrams, relating the exchange vectors to one another, and contouring the diagrams for constant values of Na, Ca, Li, Fe, Mg, Al, Si, and OH. The method is used to depict a wide range of possible tourmaline end-member compositions and solid solutions, starting from a single point. In addition to vector depictions of multicomponent natural tourmalines, vectors are presented for simpler systems such as (Na,Al)-tourmalines, alkali-free tourmalines, and elbaites.

  4. Vector ecology of equine piroplasmosis.

    PubMed

    Scoles, Glen A; Ueti, Massaro W

    2015-01-01

    Equine piroplasmosis is a disease of Equidae, including horses, donkeys, mules, and zebras, caused by either of two protozoan parasites, Theileria equi or Babesia caballi. These parasites are biologically transmitted between hosts via tick vectors, and although they have inherent differences they are categorized together because they cause similar pathology and have similar morphologies, life cycles, and vector relationships. To complete their life cycle, these parasites must undergo a complex series of developmental events, including sexual-stage development in their tick vectors. Consequently, ticks are the definitive hosts as well as vectors for these parasites, and the vector relationship is restricted to a few competent tick species. Because the vector relationship is critical to the epidemiology of these parasites, we highlight current knowledge of the vector ecology of these tick-borne equine pathogens, emphasizing tick transmissibility and potential control strategies to prevent their spread.

  5. Autostereogram resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leavey, Sean; Rae, Katherine; Murray, Adam; Courtial, Johannes

    2012-09-01

    Autostereograms, or "Magic Eye" pictures, are repeating patterns designed to give the illusion of depth. Here we discuss optical resonators that create light patterns which, when viewed from a suitable position by a monocular observer, are autostereograms of the three-dimensional shape of one of the mirror surfaces.

  6. Excitation and photon decay of giant multipole resonances - the role and future of medium-energy heavy ions

    SciTech Connect

    Bertrand, F.E.; Beene, J.R.; Horen, D.J.

    1988-01-01

    Inelastic scattering of medium energy heavy ions provides very large cross sections and peak-to-continuum ratios for excitation of giant resonances. For energies above about 50 MeV/nucleon, giant resonances are excited primarily through Coulomb excitation, which is indifferent to isospin, thus providing a good probe for the study of isovector giant resonances. The extremely large cross sections available from heavy ion excitation permit the study of rare decay modes of the photon decay of giant resonances following excitation by 22 and 84 MeV/nucleon /sup 17/O projectiles. The singles results at 84 MeV/nucleon yield peak cross sections for the isoscalar giant quadrupole resonance and the isovector giant dipole resonance of approximately 0.8 and 3 barns/sr, respectively. Data on the ground state decay of the isoscalar giant quadrupole and isovector giant dipole resonances are presented and compared with calculations. Decays to low-lying excited states are also discussed. Preliminary results from an experiment to isolate the /sup 208/Pb isovector quadrupole resonance using its gamma decay are presented.

  7. Thrust vectoring systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, H. J.; Schnelker, D.; Ward, J. W.; Dulgeroff, C.; Vahrenkamp, R.

    1972-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and testing of thrust vectorable ion optical systems capable of controlling the thrust direction from both 5- and 30-cm diameter ion thrusters is described. Both systems are capable of greater than 10 deg thrust deflection in any azimuthal direction. The 5-cm system is electrostatic and hence has a short response time and minimal power consumption. It has recently been tested for more than 7500 hours on an operational thruster. The 30-cm system is mechanical, has a response time of the order of 1 min, and consumes less than 0.3% of the total system input power at full deflection angle.

  8. Vector potential photoelectron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Browning, R.

    2011-10-15

    A new class of electron microscope has been developed for the chemical microanalysis of a wide range of real world samples using photoelectron spectroscopy. Highly structured, three-dimensional samples, such as fiber mats and fracture surfaces can be imaged, as well as insulators and magnetic materials. The new microscope uses the vector potential field from a solenoid magnet as a spatial reference for imaging. A prototype instrument has demonstrated imaging of uncoated silk, magnetic steel wool, and micron-sized single strand tungsten wires.

  9. Plasmonic fiber-optic vector magnetometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhaochuan; Guo, Tuan; Zhang, Xuejun; Xu, Jian; Xie, Wenping; Nie, Ming; Wu, Qiang; Guan, Bai-Ou; Albert, Jacques

    2016-03-01

    A compact fiber-optic vector magnetometer based on directional scattering between polarized plasmon waves and ferro-magnetic nanoparticles is demonstrated. The sensor configuration reported in this work uses a short section of tilted fiber Bragg grating (TFBG) coated with a nanometer scale gold film and packaged with a magnetic fluid (Fe3O4) inside a capillary. The transmission spectrum of the sensor provides a fine comb of narrowband resonances that overlap with a broader absorption of the surface plasmon resonance (SPR). The wavelength of the SPR attenuation in transmission shows high sensitivity to slight perturbations by magnetic fields, due to the strong directional scattering between the SPR attenuated cladding modes and the magnetic fluid near the fiber surface. Both the orientation (2 nm/deg) and the intensity (1.8 nm/mT) of magnetic fields can be determined unambiguously from the TFBG spectrum. Temperature cross sensitivity can be referenced out by monitoring the wavelength of the core mode resonance simultaneously.

  10. Vibration resistant quartz crystal resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldfrank, B.; Warner, A.

    1982-11-01

    The principal objectives of this investigation were to provide doubly rotated quartz crystal resonators that exhibit low "g' sensitivity on the order of 1 superscript 10 per "g', and fast warm-up on the order of 1 superscript 9 in three minutes. Effects of changes in the mounting orientation have been investigated with respect to the magnitude of the acceleration sensitivity vector, for 0 angles of 21.95, 23.75 and 25.00, using 5 MHz/5th overtone plano-convex and bi-convex quartz crystal blanks. The mounting technique was three-point thermo-compression bonding; the mounts were 90 degrees apart. A new thermo-compression bonding ribbon was evaluated and instituted. 5 MHz and 10 MHz, third overtone crystals and 20 MHz fifth overtone crystals were measured for the magnitude of the acceleration sensitivity vector. Improved methods of X-ray orientation were also investigated.

  11. Resonant behavior of dielectric objects (electrostatic resonances).

    PubMed

    Fredkin, D R; Mayergoyz, I D

    2003-12-19

    Resonant behavior of dielectric objects occurs at certain frequencies for which the object permittivity is negative and the free-space wavelength is large in comparison with the object dimensions. Unique physical features of these resonances are studied and a novel technique for the calculation of resonance values of permittivity, and hence resonance frequencies, is proposed. Scale invariance of resonance frequencies, unusually strong orthogonality properties of resonance modes, and a two-dimensional phenomenon of "twin" spectra are reported. The paper concludes with brief discussions of optical controllability of these resonances in semiconductor nanoparticles and a plausible, electrostatic resonance based, mechanism for nucleation and formation of ball lightning.

  12. Resonant behavior of dielectric objects (electrostatic resonances).

    PubMed

    Fredkin, D R; Mayergoyz, I D

    2003-12-19

    Resonant behavior of dielectric objects occurs at certain frequencies for which the object permittivity is negative and the free-space wavelength is large in comparison with the object dimensions. Unique physical features of these resonances are studied and a novel technique for the calculation of resonance values of permittivity, and hence resonance frequencies, is proposed. Scale invariance of resonance frequencies, unusually strong orthogonality properties of resonance modes, and a two-dimensional phenomenon of "twin" spectra are reported. The paper concludes with brief discussions of optical controllability of these resonances in semiconductor nanoparticles and a plausible, electrostatic resonance based, mechanism for nucleation and formation of ball lightning. PMID:14754117

  13. Hyperbolic-symmetry vector fields.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xu-Zhen; Pan, Yue; Cai, Meng-Qiang; Li, Yongnan; Tu, Chenghou; Wang, Hui-Tian

    2015-12-14

    We present and construct a new kind of orthogonal coordinate system, hyperbolic coordinate system. We present and design a new kind of local linearly polarized vector fields, which is defined as the hyperbolic-symmetry vector fields because the points with the same polarization form a series of hyperbolae. We experimentally demonstrate the generation of such a kind of hyperbolic-symmetry vector optical fields. In particular, we also study the modified hyperbolic-symmetry vector optical fields with the twofold and fourfold symmetric states of polarization when introducing the mirror symmetry. The tight focusing behaviors of these vector fields are also investigated. In addition, we also fabricate micro-structures on the K9 glass surfaces by several tightly focused (modified) hyperbolic-symmetry vector fields patterns, which demonstrate that the simulated tightly focused fields are in good agreement with the fabricated micro-structures.

  14. Covariant Lyapunov vectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginelli, Francesco; Chaté, Hugues; Livi, Roberto; Politi, Antonio

    2013-06-01

    Recent years have witnessed a growing interest in covariant Lyapunov vectors (CLVs) which span local intrinsic directions in the phase space of chaotic systems. Here, we review the basic results of ergodic theory, with a specific reference to the implications of Oseledets’ theorem for the properties of the CLVs. We then present a detailed description of a ‘dynamical’ algorithm to compute the CLVs and show that it generically converges exponentially in time. We also discuss its numerical performance and compare it with other algorithms presented in the literature. We finally illustrate how CLVs can be used to quantify deviations from hyperbolicity with reference to a dissipative system (a chain of Hénon maps) and a Hamiltonian model (a Fermi-Pasta-Ulam chain). This article is part of a special issue of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical devoted to ‘Lyapunov analysis: from dynamical systems theory to applications’.

  15. Solar imaging vector magnetograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canfield, Richard C.

    1993-01-01

    This report describes an instrument which has been constructed at the University of Hawaii to make observations of the magnetic field in solar active regions. Detailed knowledge of active region magnetic structures is crucial to understanding many solar phenomena, because the magnetic field both defines the morphology of structures seen in the solar atmosphere and is the apparent energy source for solar flares. The new vector magnetograph was conceived in response to a perceived discrepancy between the capabilities of X ray imaging telescopes to be operating during the current solar maximum and those of existing magnetographs. There were no space-based magnetographs planned for this period; the existing ground-based instruments variously suffered from lack of sensitivity, poor time resolution, inadequate spatial resolution or unreliable sites. Yet the studies of flares and their relationship to the solar corona planned for the 1991-1994 maximum absolutely required high quality vector magnetic field measurements. By 'vector' measurements we mean that the observation attempts to deduce the complete strength and direction of the field at the measurement site, rather than just the line of sight component as obtained by a traditional longitudinal magnetograph. Knowledge of the vector field permits one to calculate photospheric electric currents, which might play a part in heating the corona, and to calculate energy stored in coronal magnetic fields as the result of such currents. Information about the strength and direction of magnetic fields in the solar atmosphere can be obtained in a number of ways, but quantitative data is best obtained by observing Zeeman-effect polarization in solar spectral lines. The technique requires measuring the complete state of polarization at one or more wavelengths within a magnetically sensitive line of the solar spectrum. This measurement must be done for each independent spatial point for which one wants magnetic field data. All the

  16. Computing (Un)stable Manifolds with Validated Error Bounds: Non-resonant and Resonant Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Berg, Jan Bouwe; Mireles James, Jason D.; Reinhardt, Christian

    2016-08-01

    We develop techniques for computing the (un)stable manifold at a hyperbolic equilibrium of an analytic vector field. Our approach is based on the so-called parametrization method for invariant manifolds. A feature of this approach is that it leads to a posteriori analysis of truncation errors which, when combined with careful management of round off errors, yields a mathematically rigorous enclosure of the manifold. The main novelty of the present work is that, by conjugating the dynamics on the manifold to a polynomial rather than a linear vector field, the computer-assisted analysis is successful even in the case when the eigenvalues fail to satisfy non-resonance conditions. This generically occurs in parametrized families of vector fields. As an example, we use the method as a crucial ingredient in a computational existence proof of a connecting orbit in an amplitude equation related to a pattern formation model that features eigenvalue resonances.

  17. Round Randomized Learning Vector Quantization for Brain Tumor Imaging.

    PubMed

    Sheikh Abdullah, Siti Norul Huda; Bohani, Farah Aqilah; Nayef, Baher H; Sahran, Shahnorbanun; Al Akash, Omar; Iqbal Hussain, Rizuana; Ismail, Fuad

    2016-01-01

    Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) classification into normal and abnormal is a critical and challenging task. Owing to that, several medical imaging classification techniques have been devised in which Learning Vector Quantization (LVQ) is amongst the potential. The main goal of this paper is to enhance the performance of LVQ technique in order to gain higher accuracy detection for brain tumor in MRIs. The classical way of selecting the winner code vector in LVQ is to measure the distance between the input vector and the codebook vectors using Euclidean distance function. In order to improve the winner selection technique, round off function is employed along with the Euclidean distance function. Moreover, in competitive learning classifiers, the fitting model is highly dependent on the class distribution. Therefore this paper proposed a multiresampling technique for which better class distribution can be achieved. This multiresampling is executed by using random selection via preclassification. The test data sample used are the brain tumor magnetic resonance images collected from Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Center and UCI benchmark data sets. Comparative studies showed that the proposed methods with promising results are LVQ1, Multipass LVQ, Hierarchical LVQ, Multilayer Perceptron, and Radial Basis Function. PMID:27516807

  18. Round Randomized Learning Vector Quantization for Brain Tumor Imaging

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) classification into normal and abnormal is a critical and challenging task. Owing to that, several medical imaging classification techniques have been devised in which Learning Vector Quantization (LVQ) is amongst the potential. The main goal of this paper is to enhance the performance of LVQ technique in order to gain higher accuracy detection for brain tumor in MRIs. The classical way of selecting the winner code vector in LVQ is to measure the distance between the input vector and the codebook vectors using Euclidean distance function. In order to improve the winner selection technique, round off function is employed along with the Euclidean distance function. Moreover, in competitive learning classifiers, the fitting model is highly dependent on the class distribution. Therefore this paper proposed a multiresampling technique for which better class distribution can be achieved. This multiresampling is executed by using random selection via preclassification. The test data sample used are the brain tumor magnetic resonance images collected from Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Center and UCI benchmark data sets. Comparative studies showed that the proposed methods with promising results are LVQ1, Multipass LVQ, Hierarchical LVQ, Multilayer Perceptron, and Radial Basis Function. PMID:27516807

  19. If It's Resonance, What is Resonating?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerber, Robert C.

    2006-01-01

    The phenomenon under the name "resonance," which, is based on the mathematical analogy between mechanical resonance and the behavior of wave functions in quantum mechanical exchange phenomena was described. The resonating system does not have a structure intermediate between those involved in the resonance, but instead a structure which is further…

  20. GPU Accelerated Vector Median Filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aras, Rifat; Shen, Yuzhong

    2011-01-01

    Noise reduction is an important step for most image processing tasks. For three channel color images, a widely used technique is vector median filter in which color values of pixels are treated as 3-component vectors. Vector median filters are computationally expensive; for a window size of n x n, each of the n(sup 2) vectors has to be compared with other n(sup 2) - 1 vectors in distances. General purpose computation on graphics processing units (GPUs) is the paradigm of utilizing high-performance many-core GPU architectures for computation tasks that are normally handled by CPUs. In this work. NVIDIA's Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) paradigm is used to accelerate vector median filtering. which has to the best of our knowledge never been done before. The performance of GPU accelerated vector median filter is compared to that of the CPU and MPI-based versions for different image and window sizes, Initial findings of the study showed 100x improvement of performance of vector median filter implementation on GPUs over CPU implementations and further speed-up is expected after more extensive optimizations of the GPU algorithm .

  1. Bubble vector in automatic merging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pamidi, P. R.; Butler, T. G.

    1987-01-01

    It is shown that it is within the capability of the DMAP language to build a set of vectors that can grow incrementally to be applied automatically and economically within a DMAP loop that serves to append sub-matrices that are generated within a loop to a core matrix. The method of constructing such vectors is explained.

  2. Vectors on the Basketball Court

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergman, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    An Idea Bank published in the April/May 2009 issue of "The Science Teacher" describes an experiential physics lesson on vectors and vector addition (Brown 2009). Like its football predecessor, the basketball-based investigation presented in this Idea Bank addresses National Science Education Standards Content B, Physical Science, 9-12 (NRC 1996)…

  3. Rice Reoviruses in Insect Vectors.

    PubMed

    Wei, Taiyun; Li, Yi

    2016-08-01

    Rice reoviruses, transmitted by leafhopper or planthopper vectors in a persistent propagative manner, seriously threaten the stability of rice production in Asia. Understanding the mechanisms that enable viral transmission by insect vectors is a key to controlling these viral diseases. This review describes current understanding of replication cycles of rice reoviruses in vector cell lines, transmission barriers, and molecular determinants of vector competence and persistent infection. Despite recent breakthroughs, such as the discoveries of actin-based tubule motility exploited by viruses to overcome transmission barriers and mutually beneficial relationships between viruses and bacterial symbionts, there are still many gaps in our knowledge of transmission mechanisms. Advances in genome sequencing, reverse genetics systems, and molecular technologies will help to address these problems. Investigating the multiple interaction systems among the virus, insect vector, insect symbiont, and plant during natural infection in the field is a central topic for future research on rice reoviruses. PMID:27296147

  4. A neural support vector machine.

    PubMed

    Jändel, Magnus

    2010-06-01

    Support vector machines are state-of-the-art pattern recognition algorithms that are well founded in optimization and generalization theory but not obviously applicable to the brain. This paper presents Bio-SVM, a biologically feasible support vector machine. An unstable associative memory oscillates between support vectors and interacts with a feed-forward classification pathway. Kernel neurons blend support vectors and sensory input. Downstream temporal integration generates the classification. Instant learning of surprising events and off-line tuning of support vector weights trains the system. Emotion-based learning, forgetting trivia, sleep and brain oscillations are phenomena that agree with the Bio-SVM model. A mapping to the olfactory system is suggested.

  5. Formation of silicon monoxide by radiative association: the impact of resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forrey, Robert C.; Babb, James F.; Stancil, Phillip C.; McLaughlin, Brendan M.

    2016-09-01

    Detailed quantum chemistry calculations within the multireference configuration interaction approximation with the Davidson correction are presented using an aug-cc-pV6Z basis set, for the potential energy curves and transition dipole moments between low lying molecular states of singlet spin symmetry for the SiO molecule. The high quality molecular data are used to obtain radiative association cross sections and rate coefficients for collisions between ground state Si and O atoms. Quantal calculations are compared with semiclassical results. Using a quantum kinetic theory of radiative association in which quasibound levels are assumed to be in local thermodynamic equilibrium, we find that resonances play an important role in enhancing the rate coefficients at low temperatures by several orders of magnitude from that predicted by standard quantum scattering formulations. These new molecular formation rates may have important implications for applications in astrophysics.

  6. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging of Arnold-Chiari type I malformation with hydromyelia

    SciTech Connect

    DeLaPaz, R.L.; Brady, T.J.; Buonanno, F.S.; New, P.F.; Kistler, J.P.; McGinnis, B.D.; Pykett, I.L.; Taveras, J.M.

    1983-02-01

    Saturation recovery nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) images and metrizamide computed tomography (CT) scans were obtained in an adult patient with a clinical history suggestive of syringomyelia. Both NMR and CT studies showed low lying cerebellar tonsils. The CT study demonstrated central cavitation of the spinal cord from the midthoracic to midcervical levels but could not exclude an intramedullary soft tissue mass at the cervico-medullary junction. The NMR images in transverse, coronal, and sagittal planes demonstrated extension of an enlarged central spinal cord cerebrospinal fluid space to the cervico-medullary junction. This was felt to be strong evidence for exclusion of an intramedullary soft tissue mass and in favor of a diagnosis of Arnold-Chiari Type I malformation with hydromyelia. The noninvasive nature of spinal cord and cervico-medullary junction evaluation with NMR is emphasized.

  7. Formation of SiO by radiative association: the impact of resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forrey, Robert C.; McLaughlin, Brendan M.; Babb, James F.; Stancil, Phillip C.

    2016-05-01

    Detailed quantum chemistry calculations within the MRCI+Q approximation are presented using an aug-cc-pV6Z (AV6Z) basis set, for the potential energy curves and transition dipole moments between low lying molecular states of singlet spin symmetry for the SiO molecule. The high quality molecular data are used to obtain radiative association cross sections and rate coefficients for collisions between ground state Si and O atoms. Quantal methods are used and compared with semiclassical results. We find that the resonance features present in the quantum mechanical cross sections play a significant role, enhancing the rate coefficients at low temperatures by several orders of magnitude. These new molecular formation rates will therefore have important implications for applications in astrophysics. Supported by NSF and NASA.

  8. Resonant electron attachment to polar aromatic molecules: consequences for their chemistry in the interstellar medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carelli, Fabio; Satta, Mauro; Gianturco, Franco A.

    2013-11-01

    In this paper we present and discuss the results obtained from ab-initio quantum scattering calculations of the response from neutral aromatic species like C6H5 (phenyl) and C6H4 (benzyne, ortho isomer) to low-energy electron collisions. Our main purpose is to investigate the possible mechanisms that can lead to the final formation of their stable negative ions under astrophysical conditions, by linking low-lying metastable anionic states to bound anionic states. Quantum chemical calculations were also employed to confirm the features of the metastable resonant states found by the scattering calculations, while the role of the permanent dipole moments of both systems on the scattering behaviour for near-threshold electrons is also analysed in some detail. The possible energy redistribution paths for stabilizing both anionic species under ISM conditions are discussed in the conclusions.

  9. Vector Network Analysis

    1997-10-20

    Vector network analyzers are a convenient way to measure scattering parameters of a variety of microwave devices. However, these instruments, unlike oscilloscopes for example, require a relatively high degree of user knowledge and expertise. Due to the complexity of the instrument and of the calibration process, there are many ways in which an incorrect measurement may be produced. The Microwave Project, which is part of Sandia National Laboratories Primary Standards Laboratory, routinely uses check standardsmore » to verify that the network analyzer is operating properly. In the past, these measurements were recorded manually and, sometimes, interpretation of the results was problematic. To aid our measurement assurance process, a software program was developed to automatically measure a check standard and compare the new measurements with an historical database of measurements of the same device. The program acquires new measurement data from selected check standards, plots the new data against the mean and standard deviation of prior data for the same check standard, and updates the database files for the check standard. The program is entirely menu-driven requiring little additional work by the user.« less

  10. Convert Acoustic Resonances to Orbital Angular Momentum.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xue; Li, Yong; Liang, Bin; Cheng, Jian-Chun; Zhang, Likun

    2016-07-15

    We use acoustic resonances in a planar layer of half-wavelength thickness to twist wave vectors of an in-coming plane wave into a spiral phase dislocation of an outgoing vortex beam with orbital angular momentum (OAM). The mechanism is numerically and experimentally demonstrated by producing an airborne Bessel-like vortex beam. Our acoustic resonance-based OAM production differs from existing means for OAM production by enormous phased spiral sources or by elaborate spiral profiles. Our study can advance the capability of generating phase dislocated wave fields for further applications of acoustic OAM.

  11. Convert Acoustic Resonances to Orbital Angular Momentum.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xue; Li, Yong; Liang, Bin; Cheng, Jian-Chun; Zhang, Likun

    2016-07-15

    We use acoustic resonances in a planar layer of half-wavelength thickness to twist wave vectors of an in-coming plane wave into a spiral phase dislocation of an outgoing vortex beam with orbital angular momentum (OAM). The mechanism is numerically and experimentally demonstrated by producing an airborne Bessel-like vortex beam. Our acoustic resonance-based OAM production differs from existing means for OAM production by enormous phased spiral sources or by elaborate spiral profiles. Our study can advance the capability of generating phase dislocated wave fields for further applications of acoustic OAM. PMID:27472113

  12. Asymmetric vector mesons produced in nuclear collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dremin, I. M.; Nechitailo, V. A.

    2016-09-01

    It is argued that the experimentally observed phenomenon of asymmetric shapes of vector mesons produced in nuclear media during high-energy nucleus-nucleus collisions can be explained as Fano-Feshbach resonances. It has been observed that the mass distributions of lepton pairs created at meson decays decline from the traditional Breit-Wigner shape with some excess in the low-mass wing of the resonance. It is clear that the whole phenomenon is related to some interaction with the nuclear medium. Moreover, it can be further described in quantum mechanics as the interference of direct and continuum states in the Fano-Feshbach effect. To reveal the nature of the interaction it is proposed to use a phenomenological model of the additional contribution due to Cherenkov gluons. They can be created because of the excess of the refractivity index over 1 just in the low-mass wing as required by the classical Cherenkov treatment. In quantum mechanics, this requirement is related to the positive real part of the interaction amplitude in this wing. The corresponding parameters are found from the comparison with ρ-meson data and admit reasonable explanation.

  13. Chikungunya Virus–Vector Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Coffey, Lark L.; Failloux, Anna-Bella; Weaver, Scott C.

    2014-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a mosquito-borne alphavirus that causes chikungunya fever, a severe, debilitating disease that often produces chronic arthralgia. Since 2004, CHIKV has emerged in Africa, Indian Ocean islands, Asia, Europe, and the Americas, causing millions of human infections. Central to understanding CHIKV emergence is knowledge of the natural ecology of transmission and vector infection dynamics. This review presents current understanding of CHIKV infection dynamics in mosquito vectors and its relationship to human disease emergence. The following topics are reviewed: CHIKV infection and vector life history traits including transmission cycles, genetic origins, distribution, emergence and spread, dispersal, vector competence, vector immunity and microbial interactions, and co-infection by CHIKV and other arboviruses. The genetics of vector susceptibility and host range changes, population heterogeneity and selection for the fittest viral genomes, dual host cycling and its impact on CHIKV adaptation, viral bottlenecks and intrahost diversity, and adaptive constraints on CHIKV evolution are also discussed. The potential for CHIKV re-emergence and expansion into new areas and prospects for prevention via vector control are also briefly reviewed. PMID:25421891

  14. Instantons, chiral dynamics, and hadronic resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Cristoforetti, M.; Faccioli, P.; Traini, M.

    2007-03-01

    We use the interacting instanton liquid model (IILM) as a tool to study the role played by the chiral interactions in the lowest-lying vector and axial-vector meson resonances. We find that narrow a{sub 1} and {rho} meson resonances can be generated by instanton-induced chiral forces, even in the absence of confinement. In the IILM, these hadrons are found to have masses only about 30% larger than the experimental value and small width < or approx. 10-50 MeV. This result suggests that chiral interactions are very important in these systems and provide most of their mass. We explore the decaying patterns of the {rho} meson, in the absence of confinement. We argue that, in our model where only chiral forces are switched on, this meson decays dissociating into its quark-antiquark constituents.

  15. Application of Gaussian moment method to a gene autoregulation model of rational vector field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Yan-Mei; Chen, Xi

    2016-07-01

    We take a lambda expression autoregulation model driven by multiplicative and additive noises as example to extend the Gaussian moment method from nonlinear stochastic systems of polynomial vector field to noisy biochemical systems of rational polynomial vector field. As a direct application of the extended method, we also disclose the phenomenon of stochastic resonance. It is found that the transcription rate can inhibit the stochastic resonant effect, but the degradation rate may enhance the phenomenon. These observations should be helpful in understanding the functional role of noise in gene autoregulation.

  16. Successive refinement lattice vector quantization.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Debargha; Mitra, Sanjit K

    2002-01-01

    Lattice Vector quantization (LVQ) solves the complexity problem of LBG based vector quantizers, yielding very general codebooks. However, a single stage LVQ, when applied to high resolution quantization of a vector, may result in very large and unwieldy indices, making it unsuitable for applications requiring successive refinement. The goal of this work is to develop a unified framework for progressive uniform quantization of vectors without having to sacrifice the mean- squared-error advantage of lattice quantization. A successive refinement uniform vector quantization methodology is developed, where the codebooks in successive stages are all lattice codebooks, each in the shape of the Voronoi regions of the lattice at the previous stage. Such Voronoi shaped geometric lattice codebooks are named Voronoi lattice VQs (VLVQ). Measures of efficiency of successive refinement are developed based on the entropy of the indices transmitted by the VLVQs. Additionally, a constructive method for asymptotically optimal uniform quantization is developed using tree-structured subset VLVQs in conjunction with entropy coding. The methodology developed here essentially yields the optimal vector counterpart of scalar "bitplane-wise" refinement. Unfortunately it is not as trivial to implement as in the scalar case. Furthermore, the benefits of asymptotic optimality in tree-structured subset VLVQs remain elusive in practical nonasymptotic situations. Nevertheless, because scalar bitplane- wise refinement is extensively used in modern wavelet image coders, we have applied the VLVQ techniques to successively refine vectors of wavelet coefficients in the vector set-partitioning (VSPIHT) framework. The results are compared against SPIHT and the previous successive approximation wavelet vector quantization (SA-W-VQ) results of Sampson, da Silva and Ghanbari.

  17. Vector and Axial-Vector Structures of the Θ+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyun-Chul; Ledwig, Tim; Goeke, Klaus

    We present in this talk recent results of the vector and axial-vector transitions of the nucleon to the pentaquark baryon Θ+, based on the SU(3) chiral quark-soliton model. The results are summarized as follows: K*NΘ vector and tensor coupling constants turn out to be gK*NΘ ≃ 0.81 and fK*NΘ ≃ 0.84, respectively, and the KNΘ axial-vector coupling constant to be g*A ˜= 0.05. As a result, the total decay width for Θ+ → NK becomes very small: ΓΘ→NK ≃ 0.71 MeV, which is consistent with the DIANA result ΓΘ→NK = 0.36 ± 0.11 MeV.

  18. Colliders and brane vector phenomenology

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, T. E.; Love, S. T.; Xiong, C.; Nitta, Muneto; Veldhuis, T. ter

    2008-12-01

    Brane world oscillations manifest themselves as massive vector gauge fields. Their coupling to the standard model is deduced using the method of nonlinear realizations of the spontaneously broken higher dimensional space-time symmetries. Brane vectors are stable and weakly interacting and therefore escape particle detectors unnoticed. LEP and Tevatron data on the production of a single photon in conjunction with missing energy are used to delineate experimentally excluded regions of brane vector parameter space. The additional region of parameter space accessible to the LHC as well as a future lepton linear collider is also determined by means of this process.

  19. Initial conditions for vector inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Chiba, Takeshi

    2008-08-15

    Recently, a model of inflation using non-minimally coupled massive vector fields has been proposed. For a particular choice of non-minimal coupling parameter and for a flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker model, the model is reduced to the model of chaotic inflation with massive scalar field. We study the effect of non-zero curvature of the universe on the onset of vector inflation. We find that in a curved universe the dynamics of vector inflation can be different from the dynamics of chaotic inflation, and the fraction of the initial conditions leading to inflationary solutions is reduced as compared with the chaotic inflation case.

  20. New Insight into the Pygmy Dipole Resonance in Stable Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Neumann-Cosel, P. von

    2008-11-11

    Two examples of recent work on the structure of low-energy electric dipole modes are presented. The first part discusses the systematics of the pygmy dipole resonance (PDR) in stable tin isotopes deduced from high-resolution ({gamma},{gamma}') experiments. These help to distinguish between microscopic QRPA calculations based on either a relativistic or a nonrelativistic mean-field description, predicting significantly different properties of the PDR. The second part presents attempts to unravel the structure of dipoles modes at energies below the giant dipole resonance (GDR) in {sup 208}Pb with a high-resolution measurement of the (p-vector,p-vector') reaction under 0 deg.

  1. Experiments with Helmholtz Resonators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    Presents experiments that use Helmholtz resonators and have been designed for a sophomore-level course in oscillations and waves. Discusses the theory of the Helmholtz resonator and resonance curves. (JRH)

  2. Experiments With Magnetic Vector Potential

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skinner, J. W.

    1975-01-01

    Describes the experimental apparatus and method for the study of magnetic vector potential (MVP). Includes a discussion of inherent errors in the calculations involved, precision of the results, and further applications of MVP. (GS)

  3. Electromagnetic structure of vector mesons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamuščín, C.; Dubnička, S.; Dubničková, A. Z.

    2014-11-01

    Electromagnetic structure of the complete nonet of vector mesons (ρ0, ρ+, ρ-, ω, ϕ, K*0, K*+, K¯*0, K*-) is investigated in the framework of the Unitary and Analytic model and insufficient experimental information on it is discussed.

  4. Polynomial interpretation of multipole vectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, Gabriel; Weeks, Jeff

    2004-09-01

    Copi, Huterer, Starkman, and Schwarz introduced multipole vectors in a tensor context and used them to demonstrate that the first-year Wilkinson microwave anisotropy probe (WMAP) quadrupole and octopole planes align at roughly the 99.9% confidence level. In the present article, the language of polynomials provides a new and independent derivation of the multipole vector concept. Bézout’s theorem supports an elementary proof that the multipole vectors exist and are unique (up to rescaling). The constructive nature of the proof leads to a fast, practical algorithm for computing multipole vectors. We illustrate the algorithm by finding exact solutions for some simple toy examples and numerical solutions for the first-year WMAP quadrupole and octopole. We then apply our algorithm to Monte Carlo skies to independently reconfirm the estimate that the WMAP quadrupole and octopole planes align at the 99.9% level.

  5. Brief history of vector Doppler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunmire, Barbrina; Beach, Kirk W.

    2001-05-01

    Since the development of the directional Doppler by McLeod in 1967, methods of acquiring, analyzing, and displaying blood velocity information have been under constant exploration. These efforts are motivated by a variety of interest and objectives including, to: a) simplify clinical examination, examiner training, and study interpretation, b) provide more hemodynamic information, and c) reduce examination variability and improve accuracy. The vector Doppler technique has been proposed as one potential avenue to achieve these objects. Vector Doppler systems are those that determine the true 2D or 3D blood flow velocity by combining multiple independent velocity component measurements. Most instruments can be divided into two broad categories: 1) cross-beam and 2) time-domain. This paper provides a brief synopsis of the progression of vector Doppler techniques, from its onset in 1970 to present, as well as possible avenues for future work. This is not intended to be a comprehensive review of all vector Doppler systems.

  6. Unsupervised learning of binary vectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Copelli Lopes da Silva, Mauro

    In this thesis, unsupervised learning of binary vectors from data is studied using methods from Statistical Mechanics of disordered systems. In the model, data vectors are distributed according to a single symmetry-breaking direction. The aim of unsupervised learning is to provide a good approximation to this direction. The difference with respect to previous studies is the knowledge that this preferential direction has binary components. It is shown that sampling from the posterior distribution (Gibbs learning) leads, for general smooth distributions, to an exponentially fast approach to perfect learning in the asymptotic limit of large number of examples. If the distribution is non-smooth, then first order phase transitions to perfect learning are expected. In the limit of poor performance, a second order phase transition ("retarded learning") is predicted to occur if the data distribution is not biased. Using concepts from Bayesian inference, the center of mass of the Gibbs ensemble is shown to have maximal average (Bayes-optimal) performance. This upper bound for continuous vectors is extended to a discrete space, resulting in the clipped center of mass of the Gibbs ensemble having maximal average performance among the binary vectors. To calculate the performance of this best binary vector, the geometric properties of the center of mass of binary vectors are studied. The surprising result is found that the center of mass of infinite binary vectors which obey some simple constraints, is again a binary vector. When disorder is taken into account in the calculation, however, a vector with continuous components is obtained. The performance of the best binary vector is calculated and shown to always lie above that of Gibbs learning and below the Bayes-optimal performance. Making use of a variational approach under the replica symmetric ansatz, an optimal potential is constructed in the limits of zero temperature and mutual overlap 1. Minimization of this potential

  7. Regenerative feedback resonant circuit

    DOEpatents

    Jones, A. Mark; Kelly, James F.; McCloy, John S.; McMakin, Douglas L.

    2014-09-02

    A regenerative feedback resonant circuit for measuring a transient response in a loop is disclosed. The circuit includes an amplifier for generating a signal in the loop. The circuit further includes a resonator having a resonant cavity and a material located within the cavity. The signal sent into the resonator produces a resonant frequency. A variation of the resonant frequency due to perturbations in electromagnetic properties of the material is measured.

  8. Effective Masses of Vector Polarons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foell, Charles; Clougherty, Dennis

    2006-03-01

    We consider the vector polarons of a one-dimensional model of an electron in a doubly (or nearly) degenerate band that couples to two elastic distortions, as described previously by Clougherty and Foell [1]. A variational approach is used to analytically and numerically calculate effective masses of the three types of vector polarons. [1] D. P. Clougherty and C. A. Foell, Phys. Rev. B 70, 052301 (2004).

  9. Axisymmetric Coanda-assisted vectoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Dustin; Smith, Barton L.

    2009-01-01

    An experimental demonstration of a jet vectoring technique used in our novel spray method called Coanda-assisted Spray Manipulation (CSM) is presented. CSM makes use of the Coanda effect on axisymmetric geometries through the interaction of two jets: a primary jet and a control jet. The primary jet has larger volume flow rate but generally a smaller momentum flux than the control jet. The primary jet flows through the center of a rounded collar. The control jet is parallel to the primary and is adjacent to the convex collar. The Reynolds number range for the primary jet at the exit plane was between 20,000 and 80,000. The flow was in the incompressible Mach number range (Mach < 0.3). The control jet attaches to the convex wall and vectors according to known Coanda effect principles, entraining and vectoring the primary jet, resulting in controllable r - θ directional spraying. Several annular control slots and collar radii were tested over a range of momentum flux ratios to determine the effects of these variables on the vectored jet angle and spreading. Two and Three-component Particle Image Velocimetry systems were used to determine the vectoring angle and the profile of the combined jet in each experiment. The experiments show that the control slot and expansion radius, along with the momentum ratios of the two jets predominantly affected the vectoring angle and profile of the combined jets.

  10. Vectoring of parallel synthetic jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berk, Tim; Ganapathisubramani, Bharathram; Gomit, Guillaume

    2015-11-01

    A pair of parallel synthetic jets can be vectored by applying a phase difference between the two driving signals. The resulting jet can be merged or bifurcated and either vectored towards the actuator leading in phase or the actuator lagging in phase. In the present study, the influence of phase difference and Strouhal number on the vectoring behaviour is examined experimentally. Phase-locked vorticity fields, measured using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV), are used to track vortex pairs. The physical mechanisms that explain the diversity in vectoring behaviour are observed based on the vortex trajectories. For a fixed phase difference, the vectoring behaviour is shown to be primarily influenced by pinch-off time of vortex rings generated by the synthetic jets. Beyond a certain formation number, the pinch-off timescale becomes invariant. In this region, the vectoring behaviour is determined by the distance between subsequent vortex rings. We acknowledge the financial support from the European Research Council (ERC grant agreement no. 277472).

  11. Sustained expression from DNA vectors.

    PubMed

    Wong, Suet Ping; Argyros, Orestis; Harbottle, Richard P

    2015-01-01

    DNA vectors have the potential to become powerful medical tools for treatment of human disease. The human body has, however, developed a range of defensive strategies to detect and silence foreign or misplaced DNA, which is more typically encountered during infection or chromosomal damage. A clinically relevant human gene therapy vector must overcome or avoid these protections whilst delivering sustained levels of therapeutic gene product without compromising the vitality of the recipient host. Many non-viral DNA vectors trigger these defense mechanisms and are subsequently destroyed or rendered silent. Thus, without modification or considered design, the clinical utility of a typical DNA vector is fundamentally limited due to the transient nature of its transgene expression. The development of safe and persistently expressing DNA vectors is a crucial prerequisite for its successful clinical application and subsequently remains, therefore, one of the main strategic tasks of non-viral gene therapy research. In this chapter we will describe our current understanding of the mechanisms that can destroy or silence DNA vectors and discuss strategies, which have been utilized to improve their sustenance and the level and duration of their transgene expression.

  12. Di-photon resonance and Dark Matter as heavy pions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redi, Michele; Strumia, Alessandro; Tesi, Andrea; Vigiani, Elena

    2016-05-01

    We analyse confining gauge theories where the 750 GeV di-photon resonance is a composite techni-pion that undergoes anomalous decays into SM vectors. These scenarios naturally contain accidentally stable techni-pions Dark Matter candidates. The di-photon resonance can acquire a larger width by decaying into Dark Matter through the CP-violating θ-term of the new gauge theory reproducing the cosmological Dark Matter density as a thermal relic.

  13. Are Bred Vectors The Same As Lyapunov Vectors?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalnay, E.; Corazza, M.; Cai, M.

    Regional loss of predictability is an indication of the instability of the underlying flow, where small errors in the initial conditions (or imperfections in the model) grow to large amplitudes in finite times. The stability properties of evolving flows have been studied using Lyapunov vectors (e.g., Alligood et al, 1996, Ott, 1993, Kalnay, 2002), singular vectors (e.g., Lorenz, 1965, Farrell, 1988, Molteni and Palmer, 1993), and, more recently, with bred vectors (e.g., Szunyogh et al, 1997, Cai et al, 2001). Bred vectors (BVs) are, by construction, closely related to Lyapunov vectors (LVs). In fact, after an infinitely long breeding time, and with the use of infinitesimal ampli- tudes, bred vectors are identical to leading Lyapunov vectors. In practical applications, however, bred vectors are different from Lyapunov vectors in two important ways: a) bred vectors are never globally orthogonalized and are intrinsically local in space and time, and b) they are finite-amplitude, finite-time vectors. These two differences are very significant in a dynamical system whose size is very large. For example, the at- mosphere is large enough to have "room" for several synoptic scale instabilities (e.g., storms) to develop independently in different regions (say, North America and Aus- tralia), and it is complex enough to have several different possible types of instabilities (such as barotropic, baroclinic, convective, and even Brownian motion). Bred vectors share some of their properties with leading LVs (Corazza et al, 2001a, 2001b, Toth and Kalnay, 1993, 1997, Cai et al, 2001). For example, 1) Bred vectors are independent of the norm used to define the size of the perturba- tion. Corazza et al. (2001) showed that bred vectors obtained using a potential enstro- phy norm were indistinguishable from bred vectors obtained using a streamfunction squared norm, in contrast with singular vectors. 2) Bred vectors are independent of the length of the rescaling period as long as the

  14. Black holes with vector hair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Zhong-Ying

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we consider Einstein gravity coupled to a vector field, either minimally or non-minimally, together with a vector potential of the type V = 2{Λ}_0+1/2{m}^2{A}^2 + {γ}_4{A}^4 . For a simpler non-minimally coupled theory with Λ0 = m = γ4 = 0, we obtain both extremal and non-extremal black hole solutions that are asymptotic to Minkowski space-times. We study the global properties of the solutions and derive the first law of thermodynamics using Wald formalism. We find that the thermodynamical first law of the extremal black holes is modified by a one form associated with the vector field. In particular, due to the existence of the non-minimal coupling, the vector forms thermodynamic conjugates with the graviton mode and partly contributes to the one form modifying the first law. For a minimally coupled theory with Λ0 ≠ 0, we also obtain one class of asymptotically flat extremal black hole solutions in general dimensions. This is possible because the parameters ( m 2 , γ4) take certain values such that V = 0. In particular, we find that the vector also forms thermodynamic conjugates with the graviton mode and contributes to the corresponding first law, although the non-minimal coupling has been turned off. Thus all the extremal black hole solutions that we obtain provide highly non-trivial examples how the first law of thermodynamics can be modified by a either minimally or non-minimally coupled vector field. We also study Gauss-Bonnet gravity non-minimally coupled to a vector and obtain asymptotically flat black holes and Lifshitz black holes.

  15. VectorBase: a home for invertebrate vectors of human pathogens.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Daniel; Arensburger, Peter; Atkinson, Peter; Besansky, Nora J; Bruggner, Robert V; Butler, Ryan; Campbell, Kathryn S; Christophides, George K; Christley, Scott; Dialynas, Emmanuel; Emmert, David; Hammond, Martin; Hill, Catherine A; Kennedy, Ryan C; Lobo, Neil F; MacCallum, M Robert; Madey, Greg; Megy, Karine; Redmond, Seth; Russo, Susan; Severson, David W; Stinson, Eric O; Topalis, Pantelis; Zdobnov, Evgeny M; Birney, Ewan; Gelbart, William M; Kafatos, Fotis C; Louis, Christos; Collins, Frank H

    2007-01-01

    VectorBase (http://www.vectorbase.org/) is a web-accessible data repository for information about invertebrate vectors of human pathogens. VectorBase annotates and maintains vector genomes providing an integrated resource for the research community. Currently, VectorBase contains genome information for two organisms: Anopheles gambiae, a vector for the Plasmodium protozoan agent causing malaria, and Aedes aegypti, a vector for the flaviviral agents causing Yellow fever and Dengue fever.

  16. A diphoton resonance from bulk RS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Csáki, Csaba; Randall, Lisa

    2016-07-01

    Recent LHC data hinted at a 750 GeV mass resonance that decays into two photons. A significant feature of this resonance is that its decays to any other Standard Model particles would be too low to be detected so far. Such a state has a compelling explanation in terms of a scalar or a pseudoscalar that is strongly coupled to vector states charged under the Standard Model gauge groups. Such a scenario is readily accommodated in bulk RS with a scalar localized in the bulk away from but close to the Higgs. Turning this around, we argue that a good way to find the elusive bulk RS model might be the search for a resonance with prominent couplings to gauge bosons.

  17. The biological control of disease vectors.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Kenichi W; Amarasekare, Priyanga

    2012-09-21

    Vector-borne diseases are common in nature and can have a large impact on humans, livestock and crops. Biological control of vectors using natural enemies or competitors can reduce vector density and hence disease transmission. However, the indirect interactions inherent in host-vector disease systems make it difficult to use traditional pest control theory to guide biological control of disease vectors. This necessitates a conceptual framework that explicitly considers a range of indirect interactions between the host-vector disease system and the vector's biological control agent. Here we conduct a comparative analysis of the efficacy of different types of biological control agents in controlling vector-borne diseases. We report three key findings. First, highly efficient predators and parasitoids of the vector prove to be effective biological control agents, but highly virulent pathogens of the vector also require a high transmission rate to be effective. Second, biocontrol agents can successfully reduce long-term host disease incidence even though they may fail to reduce long-term vector densities. Third, inundating a host-vector disease system with a natural enemy of the vector has little or no effect on reducing disease incidence, but inundating the system with a competitor of the vector has a large effect on reducing disease incidence. The comparative framework yields predictions that are useful in developing biological control strategies for vector-borne diseases. We discuss how these predictions can inform ongoing biological control efforts for host-vector disease systems.

  18. Learning with LOGO: Logo and Vectors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lough, Tom; Tipps, Steve

    1986-01-01

    This is the first of a two-part series on the general concept of vector space. Provides tool procedures to allow investigation of vector properties, vector addition and subtraction, and X and Y components. Lists several sources of additional vector ideas. (JM)

  19. Vector Encoding in Biochemical Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potter, Garrett; Sun, Bo

    Encoding of environmental cues via biochemical signaling pathways is of vital importance in the transmission of information for cells in a network. The current literature assumes a single cell state is used to encode information, however, recent research suggests the optimal strategy utilizes a vector of cell states sampled at various time points. To elucidate the optimal sampling strategy for vector encoding, we take an information theoretic approach and determine the mutual information of the calcium signaling dynamics obtained from fibroblast cells perturbed with different concentrations of ATP. Specifically, we analyze the sampling strategies under the cases of fixed and non-fixed vector dimension as well as the efficiency of these strategies. Our results show that sampling with greater frequency is optimal in the case of non-fixed vector dimension but that, in general, a lower sampling frequency is best from both a fixed vector dimension and efficiency standpoint. Further, we find the use of a simple modified Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process as a model qualitatively captures many of our experimental results suggesting that sampling in biochemical networks is based on a few basic components.

  20. A generalized nonlocal vector calculus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alali, Bacim; Liu, Kuo; Gunzburger, Max

    2015-10-01

    A nonlocal vector calculus was introduced in Du et al. (Math Model Meth Appl Sci 23:493-540, 2013) that has proved useful for the analysis of the peridynamics model of nonlocal mechanics and nonlocal diffusion models. A formulation is developed that provides a more general setting for the nonlocal vector calculus that is independent of particular nonlocal models. It is shown that general nonlocal calculus operators are integral operators with specific integral kernels. General nonlocal calculus properties are developed, including nonlocal integration by parts formula and Green's identities. The nonlocal vector calculus introduced in Du et al. (Math Model Meth Appl Sci 23:493-540, 2013) is shown to be recoverable from the general formulation as a special example. This special nonlocal vector calculus is used to reformulate the peridynamics equation of motion in terms of the nonlocal gradient operator and its adjoint. A new example of nonlocal vector calculus operators is introduced, which shows the potential use of the general formulation for general nonlocal models.

  1. Generalized Selection Weighted Vector Filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukac, Rastislav; Plataniotis, Konstantinos N.; Smolka, Bogdan; Venetsanopoulos, Anastasios N.

    2004-12-01

    This paper introduces a class of nonlinear multichannel filters capable of removing impulsive noise in color images. The here-proposed generalized selection weighted vector filter class constitutes a powerful filtering framework for multichannel signal processing. Previously defined multichannel filters such as vector median filter, basic vector directional filter, directional-distance filter, weighted vector median filters, and weighted vector directional filters are treated from a global viewpoint using the proposed framework. Robust order-statistic concepts and increased degree of freedom in filter design make the proposed method attractive for a variety of applications. Introduced multichannel sigmoidal adaptation of the filter parameters and its modifications allow to accommodate the filter parameters to varying signal and noise statistics. Simulation studies reported in this paper indicate that the proposed filter class is computationally attractive, yields excellent performance, and is able to preserve fine details and color information while efficiently suppressing impulsive noise. This paper is an extended version of the paper by Lukac et al. presented at the 2003 IEEE-EURASIP Workshop on Nonlinear Signal and Image Processing (NSIP '03) in Grado, Italy.

  2. Vectors for cancer gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J; Russell, S J

    1996-09-01

    Many viral and non-viral vector systems have now been developed for gene therapy applications. In this article, the pros and cons of these vector systems are discussed in relation to the different cancer gene therapy strategies. The protocols used in cancer gene therapy can be broadly divided into six categories including gene transfer to explanted cells for use as cell-based cancer vaccines; gene transfer to a small number of tumour cells in situ to achieve a vaccine effect; gene transfer to vascular endothelial cells (VECs) lining the blood vessels of the tumour to interfere with tumour angiogenesis; gene transfer to T lymphocytes to enhance their antitumour effector capability; gene transfer to haemopoietic stem cells (HSCs) to enhance their resistance to cytotoxic drugs and gene transfer to a large number of tumour cells in situ to achieve nonimmune tumour reduction with or without bystander effect. Each of the six strategies makes unique demands on the vector system and these are discussed with reference to currently available vectors. Aspects of vector biology that are in need of further development are discussed in some detail. The final section points to the potential use of replicating viruses as delivery vehicles for efficient in vivo gene transfer to disseminated cancers.

  3. Magnetoacoustic resonance in magnetoelectric bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippov, D. A.; Bichurin, M. I.; Petrov, V. M.; Srinivasan, G.

    2004-03-01

    Layered composites of ferrite and ferroelectric single crystal thin films are of interest for studies on magnetoelectric interactions [1,2]. Such interactions result in unique and novel effects that are absent in single phase materials. For example, in a single crystal composite it is possible to control the ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) parameters for the ferrite by means of hypersonic oscillations induced in the ferroelectric phase. The absorption of acoustic oscillations by the ferrite results in variation in FMR line shape and power absorbed. One anticipates resonance absorption of elastic waves when the frequency of elastic waves coincides with the precession frequency of magnetization vector. This work is concerned with the nature of FMR under the influence of acoustic oscillations with the same frequency as FMR. Bilayers of ferrite and piezoelectric single crystals are considered. Hypersonic waves induced in the piezoelectric phase transmit acoustic power into ferrite due to mechanical connectivity between the phases. That transmission depends strongly on interface coupling [3]. We estimate the resulting variations in ferromagnetic resonance line shape. Estimates of magnetoelectric effect at magnetoacoustic resonance are also given. In addition, dependence of absorption of acoustic power on sample dimensions and compliances, electric and magnetic susceptibilities, piezoelectric and magnetostriction coefficients is discussed. The theory provided here is important for an understanding of interface coupling and the nature of magnetoelastic interactions in the composites. 1. M. I. Bichurin and V. M. Petrov, Zh. Tekh. Fiz. 58, 2277 (1988) [Sov. Phys. Tech. Phys. 33, 1389 (1988)]. 2. M.I. Bichurin, I. A. Kornev, V. M. Petrov, A. S. Tatarenko, Yu. V. Kiliba, and G. Srinivasan. Phys. Rev. B 64, 094409 (2001). 3. M. I. Bichurin, V. M. Petrov, and G. Srinivasan, J. Appl. Phys. 92, 7681 (2002). This work was supported by grants from the Russian Ministry of Education (

  4. Gauge Theories of Vector Particles

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Glashow, S. L.; Gell-Mann, M.

    1961-04-24

    The possibility of generalizing the Yang-Mills trick is examined. Thus we seek theories of vector bosons invariant under continuous groups of coordinate-dependent linear transformations. All such theories may be expressed as superpositions of certain "simple" theories; we show that each "simple theory is associated with a simple Lie algebra. We may introduce mass terms for the vector bosons at the price of destroying the gauge-invariance for coordinate-dependent gauge functions. The theories corresponding to three particular simple Lie algebras - those which admit precisely two commuting quantum numbers - are examined in some detail as examples. One of them might play a role in the physics of the strong interactions if there is an underlying super-symmetry, transcending charge independence, that is badly broken. The intermediate vector boson theory of weak interactions is discussed also. The so-called "schizon" model cannot be made to conform to the requirements of partial gauge-invariance.

  5. Extrapolation methods for vector sequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, David A.; Ford, William F.; Sidi, Avram

    1987-01-01

    This paper derives, describes, and compares five extrapolation methods for accelerating convergence of vector sequences or transforming divergent vector sequences to convergent ones. These methods are the scalar epsilon algorithm (SEA), vector epsilon algorithm (VEA), topological epsilon algorithm (TEA), minimal polynomial extrapolation (MPE), and reduced rank extrapolation (RRE). MPE and RRE are first derived and proven to give the exact solution for the right 'essential degree' k. Then, Brezinski's (1975) generalization of the Shanks-Schmidt transform is presented; the generalized form leads from systems of equations to TEA. The necessary connections are then made with SEA and VEA. The algorithms are extended to the nonlinear case by cycling, the error analysis for MPE and VEA is sketched, and the theoretical support for quadratic convergence is discussed. Strategies for practical implementation of the methods are considered.

  6. Cavity- and waveguide-resonators in electron paramagnetic resonance, nuclear magnetic resonance, and magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Webb, Andrew

    2014-11-01

    Cavity resonators are widely used in electron paramagnetic resonance, very high field magnetic resonance microimaging and also in high field human imaging. The basic principles and designs of different forms of cavity resonators including rectangular, cylindrical, re-entrant, cavity magnetrons, toroidal cavities and dielectric resonators are reviewed. Applications in EPR and MRI are summarized, and finally the topic of traveling wave MRI using the magnet bore as a waveguide is discussed.

  7. Helper-Dependent Adenoviral Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Rosewell, Amanda; Vetrini, Francesco; Ng, Philip

    2012-01-01

    Helper-dependent adenoviral vectors are devoid of all viral coding sequences, possess a large cloning capacity, and can efficiently transduce a wide variety of cell types from various species independent of the cell cycle to mediate long-term transgene expression without chronic toxicity. These non-integrating vectors hold tremendous potential for a variety of gene transfer and gene therapy applications. Here, we review the production technologies, applications, obstacles to clinical translation and their potential resolutions, and the future challenges and unanswered questions regarding this promising gene transfer technology. PMID:24533227

  8. Requirements for airborne vector gravimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarz, K. P.; Colombo, O.; Hein, G.; Knickmeyer, E. T.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of airborne vector gravimetry is the determination of the full gravity disturbance vector along the aircraft trajectory. The paper briefly outlines the concept of this method using a combination of inertial and GPS-satellite data. The accuracy requirements for users in geodesy and solid earth geophysics, oceanography and exploration geophysics are then specified. Using these requirements, accuracy specifications for the GPS subsystem and the INS subsystem are developed. The integration of the subsystems and the problems connected with it are briefly discussed and operational methods are indicated that might reduce some of the stringent accuracy requirements.

  9. Anisotropic inflation from vector impurity

    SciTech Connect

    Kanno, Sugumi; Kimura, Masashi; Soda, Jiro; Yokoyama, Shuichiro E-mail: mkimura@sci.osaka-cu.ac.jp E-mail: shu@a.phys.nagoya-u.ac.jp

    2008-08-15

    We study an inflationary scenario with a vector impurity. We show that the universe undergoes anisotropic inflationary expansion due to a preferred direction determined by the vector. Using the slow roll approximation, we find a formula for determining the anisotropy of the inflationary universe. We discuss possible observable predictions of this scenario. In particular, it is stressed that primordial gravitational waves can be induced from curvature perturbations. Hence, even in low scale inflation, a sizable amount of primordial gravitational waves may be produced during inflation.

  10. Complexity of vector spin glasses.

    PubMed

    Yeo, J; Moore, M A

    2004-08-13

    We study the annealed complexity of the m-vector spin glasses in the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick limit. The eigenvalue spectrum of the Hessian matrix of the Thouless-Anderson-Palmer free energy is found to consist of a continuous band of positive eigenvalues in addition to an isolated eigenvalue and (m-1) null eigenvalues due to rotational invariance. Rather surprisingly, the band does not extend to zero at any finite temperature. The isolated eigenvalue becomes zero in the thermodynamic limit, as in the Ising case (m=1), indicating that the same supersymmetry breaking recently found in Ising spin glasses occurs in vector spin glasses.

  11. Acoustic resonance spectroscopy for the advanced undergraduate laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco-Villafañe, J. A.; Flores-Olmedo, E.; Báez, G.; Gandarilla-Carrillo, O.; Méndez-Sánchez, R. A.

    2012-11-01

    We present a simple experiment that allows advanced undergraduates to learn the principles and applications of spectroscopy. The technique, known as acoustic resonance spectroscopy, is applied to study a vibrating rod. The setup includes electromagnetic-acoustic transducers, an audio amplifier and a vector network analyzer. Typical results of compressional, torsional and bending waves are analyzed and compared with analytical results.

  12. Extracting partial decay rates of helium from complex rotation: autoionizing resonances of the one-dimensional configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, Klaus; Lugan, Pierre; Jörder, Felix; Heitz, Nicolai; Schmidt, Maximilian; Bouri, Celsus; Rodriguez, Alberto; Buchleitner, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Partial autoionization rates of doubly excited one-dimensional helium in the collinear Zee and eZe configuration are obtained by means of the complex rotation method. The approach presented here relies on a projection of back-rotated resonance wave functions onto singly ionized H{{e}+} channel wave functions and the computation of the corresponding particle fluxes. In spite of the long-range nature of the Coulomb potential between the electrons and the nucleus, an asymptotic region where the fluxes are stationary is clearly observed. Low-lying doubly excited states are found to decay predomintantly into the nearest single-ionization continuum. This approach paves the way for a systematic analysis of the decay rates observed in higher-dimensional models, and of the role of electronic correlations and atomic structure in recent photoionization experiments.

  13. Vector plotting as an indication of the approach to flutter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broadbent, E. G.

    1975-01-01

    A binary flexure-torsion analysis was made to check theoretically a method for predicting flutter which depends on plotting vectorially the amplitudes of response relative to the exciting force and extracting the relevant damping rate. The results of this calculation are given in graphs both of the vector plots themselves and of the estimated damping rate against forward speed. The estimated damping rates are compared with calculated values. The method has the advantage that in a flight flutter test damping can be estimated from continuous excitation records: the method is an extension of the Kennedy and Pancu technique used in ground resonance testing.

  14. Primer vector theory and applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jezewski, D. J.

    1975-01-01

    A method developed to compute two-body, optimal, N-impulse trajectories was presented. The necessary conditions established define the gradient structure of the primer vector and its derivative for any set of boundary conditions and any number of impulses. Inequality constraints, a conjugate gradient iterator technique, and the use of a penalty function were also discussed.

  15. Interframe vector wavelet coding technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wus, John P.; Li, Weiping

    1997-01-01

    Wavelet coding is often used to divide an image into multi- resolution wavelet coefficients which are quantized and coded. By 'vectorizing' scalar wavelet coding and combining this with vector quantization (VQ), vector wavelet coding (VWC) can be implemented. Using a finite number of states, finite-state vector quantization (FSVQ) takes advantage of the similarity between frames by incorporating memory into the video coding system. Lattice VQ eliminates the potential mismatch that could occur using pre-trained VQ codebooks. It also eliminates the need for codebook storage in the VQ process, thereby creating a more robust coding system. Therefore, by using the VWC coding method in conjunction with the FSVQ system and lattice VQ, the formulation of a high quality very low bit rate coding systems is proposed. A coding system using a simple FSVQ system where the current state is determined by the previous channel symbol only is developed. To achieve a higher degree of compression, a tree-like FSVQ system is implemented. The groupings are done in this tree-like structure from the lower subbands to the higher subbands in order to exploit the nature of subband analysis in terms of the parent-child relationship. Class A and Class B video sequences from the MPEG-IV testing evaluations are used in the evaluation of this coding method.

  16. [Vector control, perspectives and realities].

    PubMed

    Carnevale, P

    1995-01-01

    In the WHO Global Strategy for Malaria Control, selective and sustainable vector control is one of the measures to be implemented to complement case management and for the control of epidemics. Vector control can be targeted against larvae and adults, but two elements must be recognized: -vector control measures must be selected according to the existing eco-epidemiological diversity, which has to be well understood before embarking upon any extensive action; -efficient tools are currently available, both for large scale and household use. House spraying is still the method of choice for epidemic control but must be carefully considered and used selectively in endemic countries for various well known reasons. The promotion of personal protection measures for malaria prevention is advocated because insecticide-impregnated mosquito nets and other materials have proved to be effective in different situations. Implementation, sustainability and large scale use of impregnated nets implies a strong community participation supported by well motivated community health workers, the availability of suitable materials (insecticide, mosquito nets), intersectorial collaboration at all levels, well trained health workers from central to the most peripheral level and appropriate educational messages (Knowledge, Attitude and Practices) adapted and elaborated after surveys. It has to be kept in mind that the evaluation of the impact of vector control activities will be made in epidemiological terms such as the reduction of malaria morbidity and mortality.

  17. Hydrogen as an energy vector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powers, W. D.

    1975-01-01

    The feasibility of utilizing hydrogen as an energy vector is considered, with special attention given to means of hydrogen production. The state-of-the-art in thermochemical processes is reviewed, and criteria for the technical and economic feasibility of large-scale thermochemical water splitting processes are presented. The production of hydrogen from coal and from photolysis of water is discussed.

  18. Transcriptomics and disease vector control.

    PubMed

    Vontas, John; Ranson, Hilary; Alphey, Luke

    2010-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing can be used to compare transcriptomes under different conditions. A study in BMC Genomics applies this approach to investigating the effects of exposure to a range of xenobiotics on changes in gene expression in the larvae of Aedes aegypti, the mosquito vector of dengue fever.

  19. Vector ecology of equine piroplasmosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Equine piroplasmosis (EP) is a disease of equidae including horses, donkeys, mules and zebras caused by either of two protozoan parasites, Theileria equi or Babesia caballi. These parasites are biologically transmitted between hosts via tick-vectors and although they have inherent differences, they ...

  20. Portfolio Analysis for Vector Calculus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Samuel R.

    2015-01-01

    Classic stock portfolio analysis provides an applied context for Lagrange multipliers that undergraduate students appreciate. Although modern methods of portfolio analysis are beyond the scope of vector calculus, classic methods reinforce the utility of this material. This paper discusses how to introduce classic stock portfolio analysis in a…

  1. Extraction of polarization observables in vector-meson photoproduction using a polarized target at CLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, P.

    2016-05-01

    Baryon spectroscopy is an indispensable tool for investigating the nature of strong interaction within baryons. The study of vector-meson photoproduction is expected to improve our understanding of the properties of known baryon resonances and also immensely aid in discovering new higher-mass resonances. Polarization observables, in addition to unpolarized cross sections, are required to identify the contributing resonances to these reactions with minimal ambiguities. Preliminary results from the FROST experiment on beam-polarization observables in γ →p →→p ω as well as γ →p →→p π+π- using a linearly-polarized beam and a transversely-polarized FROzen Spin butanol Target will be presented. The latter reaction will provide important information on N* to (broad) ρ vector-meson decay modes, which is difficult to extract directly from the data.

  2. Integral resonator gyroscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shcheglov, Kirill V. (Inventor); Challoner, A. Dorian (Inventor); Hayworth, Ken J. (Inventor); Wiberg, Dean V. (Inventor); Yee, Karl Y. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    The present invention discloses an inertial sensor having an integral resonator. A typical sensor comprises a planar mechanical resonator for sensing motion of the inertial sensor and a case for housing the resonator. The resonator and a wall of the case are defined through an etching process. A typical method of producing the resonator includes etching a baseplate, bonding a wafer to the etched baseplate, through etching the wafer to form a planar mechanical resonator and the wall of the case and bonding an end cap wafer to the wall to complete the case.

  3. Resonance of relativistic electrons with electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves

    DOE PAGES

    Denton, R. E.; Jordanova, V. K.; Bortnik, J.

    2015-06-29

    Relativistic electrons have been thought to more easily resonate with electromagnetic ion cyclotron EMIC waves if the total density is large. We show that, for a particular EMIC mode, this dependence is weak due to the dependence of the wave frequency and wave vector on the density. A significant increase in relativistic electron minimum resonant energy might occur for the H band EMIC mode only for small density, but no changes in parameters significantly decrease the minimum resonant energy from a nominal value. The minimum resonant energy depends most strongly on the thermal velocity associated with the field line motionmore » of the hot ring current protons that drive the instability. High density due to a plasmasphere or plasmaspheric plume could possibly lead to lower minimum resonance energy by causing the He band EMIC mode to be dominant. We demonstrate these points using parameters from a ring current simulation.« less

  4. Resonance of relativistic electrons with electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves

    SciTech Connect

    Denton, R. E.; Jordanova, V. K.; Bortnik, J.

    2015-06-29

    Relativistic electrons have been thought to more easily resonate with electromagnetic ion cyclotron EMIC waves if the total density is large. We show that, for a particular EMIC mode, this dependence is weak due to the dependence of the wave frequency and wave vector on the density. A significant increase in relativistic electron minimum resonant energy might occur for the H band EMIC mode only for small density, but no changes in parameters significantly decrease the minimum resonant energy from a nominal value. The minimum resonant energy depends most strongly on the thermal velocity associated with the field line motion of the hot ring current protons that drive the instability. High density due to a plasmasphere or plasmaspheric plume could possibly lead to lower minimum resonance energy by causing the He band EMIC mode to be dominant. We demonstrate these points using parameters from a ring current simulation.

  5. Resonance in cylindrical-rectangular and wraparound microstrip structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ali, Sami M.; Kong, Jin AU; Habashy, Tarek M.; Kiang, Jean-Fu

    1989-01-01

    A rigorous analysis of the resonance frequency problem of both the cylindrical-rectangular and the wraparound microstrip structure is presented. The problem is formulated in terms of a set of vector integral equations. Using Galerkin's method to solve the integral equations, the complex resonance frequencies are studied with sinusoidal basis functions which incorporate the edge singularity. The complex resonance frequencies are computed using a perturbation approach. Modes suitable for resonator or antenna applications are investigated. The edge singularity of the patch current is shown to have no significant effect on the accuracy of the results. It is shown that the HE10 modes of the cylindrical-rectangular and wraparound patches are more appropriate for resonator applications. The HE01 and TE01 modes of the cylindrical-rectangular and wraparound patches, respectively, are efficient radiating modes.

  6. DC-magnetic field vector measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, R.

    1981-01-01

    A magnetometer experiment was designed to determine the local magnetic field by measuring the total of the Earth's magnetic field and that of an unknown spacecraft. The measured field vector components are available to all onboard experiments via the Spacelab command and data management system. The experiment consists of two parts, an electronic box and the magnetic field sensor. The sensor includes three independent measuring flux-gate magnetometers, each measuring one component. The physical background is the nonlinearity of the B-H curve of a ferrite material. Two coils wound around a ferrite rod are necessary. One of them, a tank coil, pumps the ferrite rod at approximately 20 kilohertz. As a consequence of the nonlinearity, many harmonics can be produced. The second coil (i.e., the detection coil) resonates to the first harmonic. If an unknown dc or low-frequency magnetic field exists, the amplitude of the first harmonic is a measure for the unknown magnetic field. The voltages detected by the sensors are to be digitized and transferred to the command and data management system.

  7. Scalar-vector quantization of medical images.

    PubMed

    Mohsenian, N; Shahri, H; Nasrabadi, N M

    1996-01-01

    A new coding scheme based on the scalar-vector quantizer (SVQ) is developed for compression of medical images. The SVQ is a fixed rate encoder and its rate-distortion performance is close to that of optimal entropy-constrained scalar quantizers (ECSQs) for memoryless sources. The use of a fixed-rate quantizer is expected to eliminate some of the complexity of using variable-length scalar quantizers. When transmission of images over noisy channels is considered, our coding scheme does not suffer from error propagation that is typical of coding schemes using variable-length codes. For a set of magnetic resonance (MR) images, coding results obtained from SVQ and ECSQ at low bit rates are indistinguishable. Furthermore, our encoded images are perceptually indistinguishable from the original when displayed on a monitor. This makes our SVQ-based coder an attractive compression scheme for picture archiving and communication systems (PACS). PACS are currently under study for use in an all-digital radiology environment in hospitals, where reliable transmission, storage, and high fidelity reconstruction of images are desired. PMID:18285124

  8. Threshold enhancement of diphoton resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bharucha, Aoife; Djouadi, Abdelhak; Goudelis, Andreas

    2016-10-01

    We revisit a mechanism to enhance the decay width of (pseudo-)scalar resonances to photon pairs when the process is mediated by loops of charged fermions produced near threshold. Motivated by the recent LHC data, indicating the presence of an excess in the diphoton spectrum at approximately 750 GeV, we illustrate this threshold enhancement mechanism in the case of a 750 GeV pseudoscalar boson A with a two-photon decay mediated by a charged and uncolored fermion having a mass at the 1/2MA threshold and a small decay width, < 1 MeV. The implications of such a threshold enhancement are discussed in two explicit scenarios: i) the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model in which the A state is produced via the top quark mediated gluon fusion process and decays into photons predominantly through loops of charginos with masses close to 1/2MA and ii) a two Higgs doublet model in which A is again produced by gluon fusion but decays into photons through loops of vector-like charged heavy leptons. In both these scenarios, while the mass of the charged fermion has to be adjusted to be extremely close to half of the A resonance mass, the small total widths are naturally obtained if only suppressed three-body decay channels occur. Finally, the implications of some of these scenarios for dark matter are discussed.

  9. Neutron resonance averaging

    SciTech Connect

    Chrien, R.E.

    1986-10-01

    The principles of resonance averaging as applied to neutron capture reactions are described. Several illustrations of resonance averaging to problems of nuclear structure and the distribution of radiative strength in nuclei are provided. 30 refs., 12 figs.

  10. Nanomechanical resonance detector

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, Jeffrey C; Zettl, Alexander K

    2013-10-29

    An embodiment of a nanomechanical frequency detector includes a support structure and a plurality of elongated nanostructures coupled to the support structure. Each of the elongated nanostructures has a particular resonant frequency. The plurality of elongated nanostructures has a range of resonant frequencies. An embodiment of a method of identifying an object includes introducing the object to the nanomechanical resonance detector. A resonant response by at least one of the elongated nanostructures of the nanomechanical resonance detector indicates a vibrational mode of the object. An embodiment of a method of identifying a molecular species of the present invention includes introducing the molecular species to the nanomechanical resonance detector. A resonant response by at least one of the elongated nanostructures of the nanomechanical resonance detector indicates a vibrational mode of the molecular species.

  11. Present status of vectorized Monte Carlo

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, F.B.

    1987-01-01

    Monte Carlo applications have traditionally been limited by the large amounts of computer time required to produce acceptably small statistical uncertainties, so the immediate benefit of vectorization is an increase in either the number of jobs completed or the number of particles processed per job, typically by one order of magnitude or more. This results directly in improved engineering design analyses, since Monte Carlo methods are used as standards for correcting more approximate methods. The relatively small number of vectorized programs is a consequence of the newness of vectorized Monte Carlo, the difficulties of nonportability, and the very large development effort required to rewrite or restructure Monte Carlo codes for vectorization. Based on the successful efforts to date, it may be concluded that Monte Carlo vectorization will spread to increasing numbers of codes and applications. The possibility of multitasking provides even further motivation for vectorizing Monte Carlo, since the step from vector to multitasked vector is relatively straightforward.

  12. Symbolic Vector Analysis in Plasma Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, H.; Rewoldt, G.; Tang, W.M.

    1997-10-01

    Many problems in plasma physics involve substantial amounts of analytical vector calculation. The complexity usually originates from both the vector operations themselves and the choice of underlying coordinate system. A computer algebra package for symbolic vector analysis in general coordinate systems, GeneralVectorAnalysis (GVA), is developed using Mathematica. The modern viewpoint for 3D vector calculus, differential forms on 3-manifolds, is adopted to unify and systematize the vector calculus operations in general coordinate systems. This package will benefit physicists and applied mathematicians in their research where complicated vector analysis is required. It will not only save a huge amount of human brain-power and dramatically improve accuracy, but this package will also be an intelligent tool to assist researchers in finding the right approaches to their problems. Several applications of this symbolic vector analysis package to plasma physics are also given.

  13. Symbolic Vector Analysis in Plasma Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, H.; Tang, W.M.; Rewoldt, G.

    1997-10-09

    Many problems in plasma physics involve substantial amounts of analytical vector calculation. The complexity usually originates from both the vector operations themselves and the choice of underlying coordinate system. A computer algebra package for symbolic vector analysis in general coordinate systems, General Vector Analysis (GVA), is developed using Mathematica. The modern viewpoint for 3D vector calculus, differential forms on 3-manifolds, is adopted to unify and systematize the vector calculus operations in general coordinate systems. This package will benefit physicists and applied mathematicians in their research where complicated vector analysis is required. It will not only save a huge amount of human brain-power and dramatically improve accuracy, but this package will also be an intelligent tool to assist researchers in finding the right approaches to their problems. Several applications of this symbolic vector analysis package to plasma physics are also given.

  14. Advances in lentiviral vectors: a patent review.

    PubMed

    Picanco-Castro, Virginia; de Sousa Russo-Carbolante, Elisa Maria; Tadeu Covas, Dimas

    2012-08-01

    Lentiviral vectors are at the forefront of gene delivery systems for research and clinical applications. These vectors have the ability to efficiently transduce nondividing and dividing cells, to insert large genetic segment in the host chromatin, and to sustain stable long-term transgene expression. Most of lentiviral vectors systems in use are derived from HIV-1. Numerous modifications in the basic HIV structure have been made to ensure safety and to promote efficiency to vectors. Lentiviral vectors can be pseudotyped with distinct viral envelopes that influence vector tropism and transduction efficiency. Moreover, these vectors can be used to reprogram cells and generate induced pluripotent stem cells. This review aims to show the patents that resulted in improved safety and efficacy of lentiviral vector with important implications for clinical trials.

  15. An Inexpensive Resonance Demonstration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dukes, Phillip

    2005-01-01

    The phenomenon of resonance is applicable to almost every branch of physics. Without resonance, there wouldn't be televisions or stereos, or even swings on the playground. However, resonance also has undesirable side effects such as irritating noises in the car and the catastrophic events such as helicopters flying apart. In this article, the…

  16. Vector computer memory bank contention

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, D. H.

    1985-01-01

    A number of vector supercomputers feature very large memories. Unfortunately the large capacity memory chips that are used in these computers are much slower than the fast central processing unit (CPU) circuitry. As a result, memory bank reservation times (in CPU ticks) are much longer than on previous generations of computers. A consequence of these long reservation times is that memory bank contention is sharply increased, resulting in significantly lowered performance rates. The phenomenon of memory bank contention in vector computers is analyzed using both a Markov chain model and a Monte Carlo simulation program. The results of this analysis indicate that future generations of supercomputers must either employ much faster memory chips or else feature very large numbers of independent memory banks.

  17. Vector computer memory bank contention

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, David H.

    1987-01-01

    A number of vector supercomputers feature very large memories. Unfortunately the large capacity memory chips that are used in these computers are much slower than the fast central processing unit (CPU) circuitry. As a result, memory bank reservation times (in CPU ticks) are much longer than on previous generations of computers. A consequence of these long reservation times is that memory bank contention is sharply increased, resulting in significantly lowered performance rates. The phenomenon of memory bank contention in vector computers is analyzed using both a Markov chain model and a Monte Carlo simulation program. The results of this analysis indicate that future generations of supercomputers must either employ much faster memory chips or else feature very large numbers of independent memory banks.

  18. Medium Modification of Vector Mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Chaden Djalali, Michael Paolone, Dennis Weygand, Michael H. Wood, Rakhsha Nasseripour

    2011-03-01

    The theory of the strong interaction, Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), has been remarkably successful in describing high-energy and short-distance-scale experiments involving quarks and gluons. However, applying QCD to low energy and large-distance scale experiments has been a major challenge. Various QCD-inspired models predict a partial restoration of chiral symmetry in nuclear matter with modifications of the properties of hadrons from their free-space values. Measurable changes such as a shift in mass and/or a change of width are predicted at normal nuclear density. Photoproduction of vector mesons off nuclei have been performed at different laboratories. The properties of the ρ, ω and φ mesons are investigated either directly by measuring their mass spectra or indirectly through transparency ratios. The latest results regarding medium modifications of the vector mesons in the nuclear medium will be discussed.

  19. Lentiviral vectors in cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Oldham, Robyn Aa; Berinstein, Elliot M; Medin, Jeffrey A

    2015-01-01

    Basic science advances in cancer immunotherapy have resulted in various treatments that have recently shown success in the clinic. Many of these therapies require the insertion of genes into cells to directly kill them or to redirect the host's cells to induce potent immune responses. Other analogous therapies work by modifying effector cells for improved targeting and enhanced killing of tumor cells. Initial studies done using γ-retroviruses were promising, but safety concerns centered on the potential for insertional mutagenesis have highlighted the desire to develop other options for gene delivery. Lentiviral vectors (LVs) have been identified as potentially more effective and safer alternative delivery vehicles. LVs are now in use in clinical trials for many different types of inherited and acquired disorders, including cancer. This review will discuss current knowledge of LVs and the applications of this viral vector-based delivery vehicle to cancer immunotherapy.

  20. Gene targeting with retroviral vectors

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, J.; Bernstein, A. )

    1989-04-01

    The authors have designed and constructed integration-defective retroviral vectors to explore their potential for gene targeting in mammalian cells. Two nonoverlapping deletion mutants of the bacterial neomycin resistance (neo) gene were used to detect homologous recombination events between viral and chromosomal sequences. Stable neo gene correction events were selected at a frequency of approximately 1 G418/sup r/ cell per 3 x 10/sup 6/ infected cells. Analysis of the functional neo gene in independent targeted cell clones indicated that unintegrated retroviral linear DNA recombined with the target by gene conversion for variable distances into regions of nonhomology. In addition, transient neo gene correction events which were associated with the complete loss of the chromosomal target sequences were observed. These results demonstrated that retroviral vectors can recombine with homologous chromosomal sequences in rodent and human cells.

  1. Benchmarking the IBM 3090 with Vector Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Brickner, R.G.; Wasserman, H.J.; Hayes, A.H.; Moore, J.W.

    1986-01-01

    The IBM 3090 with Vector Facility is an extremely interesting machine because it combines very good scaler performance with enhanced vector and multitasking performance. For many IBM installations with a large scientific workload, the 3090/vector/MTF combination may be an ideal means of increasing throughput at minimum cost. However, neither the vector nor multitasking capabilities are sufficiently developed to make the 3090 competitive with our current worker machines for our large-scale scientific codes.

  2. M1 transitions between low-lying states in the sdg-IBM-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casperson, Robert; Werner, Volker

    2006-10-01

    The interplay between collective and single-particle degrees of freedom for nuclei in the A=90 region have recently been under investigation. In Molybdenum and Ruthenium nuclei, collective symmetric and mixed-symmetric structures have been identified, while in Zirconium, underlying shell-structure plays an enhanced role. Collective symmetric structures appear when protons and neutrons are in phase, whereas mixed-symmetric structures occur when they are not. The one-phonon 2^+ mixed-symmetric state was identified from strong M1 transitions to the 2^+1 state. Similar transitions were observed between higher-spin states, and are predicted by the shell model. These phenomena will be investigated within the sdg Interacting Boson Model 2 in order to obtain a better understanding about the structure of the states involved, and results from first model calculations will be presented. Work supported by US DOE under grant number DE-FG02-91ER-40609.

  3. Spectroscopic and theoretical studies of the low-lying states of BaO{sup +}

    SciTech Connect

    Bartlett, Joshua H.; VanGundy, Robert A.; Heaven, Michael C.

    2015-07-28

    The BaO{sup +} cation is of interest from the perspectives of electronic structure and the potential for cooling to ultra-cold temperatures. Spectroscopic data for the ion have been obtained using a two-color photoionization technique. The ionization energy for BaO was found to be 6.8123(3) eV. The ground state of BaO{sup +} was identified as X{sup 2}Σ{sup +}, and both vibrational and rotational constants were determined. Vibrationally resolved spectra were recorded for A{sup 2}Π, the first electronically excited state. These data yielded the term energy, vibrational frequency, and the spin-orbit interaction constant. Relativistic electronic structure calculations were carried out using multi-reference configuration interaction (MRCI), coupled cluster and density functional theory methods. Transition moments for the pure vibrational and A{sup 2}Π-X{sup 2}Σ{sup +} transitions were predicted using the MRCI method.

  4. Repetitive ERTS-1 observations of surface water variability along rivers and low-lying areas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rango, A.; Salomonson, V. V.

    1973-01-01

    The Earth Resources Technology Satellite, ERTS-1, provides an 18 day repetitive coverage capability and observations in the 0.8-1.1 micron spectral region where the contrast between water and adjacent surfaces is relatively large. Using these capabilities, observations in Virginia, Iowa, Missouri, and California have been acquired showing distinct patterns of flooding. Repetitive views of these areas before and after flooding have been examined, and flood mapping was performed. Sloughs in California can be seen to expand in terms of the area covered by standing water as time extends from summer to autumn. The results indicate that ERTS-1 imagery can be a valuable adjunct to conventional and aircraft survey methods for ascertaining the amount of area covered by water or affected by flooding.

  5. Low-lying levels in the nuclei151Nd and155Sm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katajanheimo, R.; Jäderholm, R.; Siivola, A.; Tuurnala, T.; Hammarén, E.; Liukkonen, E.

    1984-10-01

    Decay properties of excited states in the151Nd and155Sm nuclei produced by 10 MeV douterons have been investigated with in-beam gamma-gamma-coincidence equipment during bombardment of the150Nd and154Sm targets. The results largely confirm the data obtained earlier for these nuclei. The ( d, p γ) reaction channel favors population of odd-parity low-spin levels, whose energies follow the rule of regular band structure for well-deformed nuclei. The level schemes are interpreted with calculations using an axial particle-rotor model with a Woods-Saxon potential.

  6. Low-lying excitations in the odd-odd nucleus154Eu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katajanheimo, R.; Jäderholm, R.; Siivola, A.; Julin, R.; Liukkonen, E.

    1988-03-01

    The doubly odd nucleus154Eu was produced during in-beam bombardments of a154Sm target with3He and deuteron beams at 27 and 10 MeV. The resulting gamma-rays were investigated using prompt and delayed gamma-gamma-coincidence equipment. The half-life of the isomeric 2+ level was determined as 2.2±0.1 μs. The partial level scheme, including numerous previously unidentified excitations, can be divided into two separate groups of levels. The results provide evidence for the existence of a very regular ground band and two rather regular K=3 level structures, whose configurations are closely related to it. In addition, several rotational sequences built on the band heads with other K values have been deduced. Our interpretation of the level scheme disagrees with the previous conclusion that the N=91 nucleus154Eu might have a stable deformation only in its ground state configuration.

  7. Probing ground and low-lying excited states for HIO2 isomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Souza, Gabriel L. C.; Brown, Alex

    2014-12-01

    We present a computational study on HIO2 molecules. Ground state properties such as equilibrium structures, relative energetics, vibrational frequencies, and infrared intensities were obtained for all the isomers at the coupled-cluster with single and double excitations as well as perturbative inclusion of triples (CCSD(T)) level of theory with the aug-cc-pVTZ-PP basis set and ECP-28-PP effective core potential for iodine and the aug-cc-pVTZ basis set for hydrogen and oxygen atoms. The HOIO structure is confirmed as the lowest energy isomer. The relative energies are shown to be HOIO < HOOI < HI(O)O. The HO(O)I isomer is only stable at the density functional theory (DFT) level of theory. The transition states determined show interconversion of the isomers is possible. In order to facilitate future experimental identification, vibrational frequencies are also determined for all corresponding deuterated species. Vertical excitation energies for the three lowest-lying singlet and triplet excited states were determined using the configuration interaction singles, time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT)/B3LYP, TD-DFT/G96PW91, and equation of motion-CCSD approaches with the LANL2DZ basis set plus effective core potential for iodine and the aug-cc-pVTZ basis set for hydrogen and oxygen atoms. It is shown that HOIO and HOOI isomers have excited states accessible at solar wavelengths (<4.0 eV) but these states have very small oscillator strengths (<2 × 10-3).

  8. Probing ground and low-lying excited states for HIO2 isomers.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Gabriel L C; Brown, Alex

    2014-12-21

    We present a computational study on HIO2 molecules. Ground state properties such as equilibrium structures, relative energetics, vibrational frequencies, and infrared intensities were obtained for all the isomers at the coupled-cluster with single and double excitations as well as perturbative inclusion of triples (CCSD(T)) level of theory with the aug-cc-pVTZ-PP basis set and ECP-28-PP effective core potential for iodine and the aug-cc-pVTZ basis set for hydrogen and oxygen atoms. The HOIO structure is confirmed as the lowest energy isomer. The relative energies are shown to be HOIO < HOOI < HI(O)O. The HO(O)I isomer is only stable at the density functional theory (DFT) level of theory. The transition states determined show interconversion of the isomers is possible. In order to facilitate future experimental identification, vibrational frequencies are also determined for all corresponding deuterated species. Vertical excitation energies for the three lowest-lying singlet and triplet excited states were determined using the configuration interaction singles, time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT)/B3LYP, TD-DFT/G96PW91, and equation of motion-CCSD approaches with the LANL2DZ basis set plus effective core potential for iodine and the aug-cc-pVTZ basis set for hydrogen and oxygen atoms. It is shown that HOIO and HOOI isomers have excited states accessible at solar wavelengths (<4.0 eV) but these states have very small oscillator strengths (<2 × 10(-3)). PMID:25527931

  9. State of Louisiana - Highlighting Low-Lying Areas Derived from USGS Digital Elevation Data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kosovich, John J.

    2008-01-01

    In support of U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) disaster preparedness efforts, this map depicts a color shaded relief representation highlighting the State of Louisiana and depicts the surrounding areas using muted elevation colors. The first 30 feet of relief above mean sea level are displayed as brightly colored 5-foot elevation bands, which highlight low-elevation areas at a coarse spatial resolution. Areas below sea level typically are surrounded by levees or some other type of flood-control structures. Standard USGS National Elevation Dataset (NED) 1 arc-second (nominally 30-meter) digital elevation model (DEM) data are the basis for the map, which is designed to be used at a broad scale and for informational purposes only. The NED data are a mixture of data and were derived from the original 1:24,000-scale USGS topographic map bare-earth contours, which were converted into gridded quadrangle-based DEM tiles at a constant post spacing (grid cell size) of either 30 meters (data before the mid-1990s) or 10 meters (mid-1990s and later data). These individual-quadrangle DEMs were then converted to spherical coordinates (latitude/longitude decimal degrees) and edge-matched to ensure seamlessness. Approximately one-half of the area shown on this map has DEM source data at a 30-meter resolution, with the remaining half consisting of mostly 10-meter contour-derived DEM data and some small areas of higher-resolution LIght Detection And Ranging (LIDAR) data along parts of the coastline. Areas below sea level typically are surrounded by levees or some other type of flood-control structures. State and parish boundary, hydrography, city, and road layers were modified from USGS National Atlas data downloaded in 2003. The NED data were downloaded in 2007.

  10. Gulf of Mexico Region - Highlighting Low-Lying Areas Derived from USGS Digital Elevation Data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kosovich, John J.

    2008-01-01

    In support of U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) disaster preparedness efforts, this map depicts a color shaded relief representation of the area surrounding the Gulf of Mexico. The first 30 feet of relief above mean sea level are displayed as brightly colored 5-foot elevation bands, which highlight low-elevation areas at a coarse spatial resolution. Standard USGS National Elevation Dataset (NED) 1 arc-second (nominally 30-meter) digital elevation model (DEM) data are the basis for the map, which is designed to be used at a broad scale and for informational purposes only. The NED data were derived from the original 1:24,000-scale USGS topographic map bare-earth contours, which were converted into gridded quadrangle-based DEM tiles at a constant post spacing (grid cell size) of either 30 meters (data before the mid-1990s data) or 10 meters (mid-1990s and later data). These individual-quadrangle DEMs were then converted to spherical coordinates (latitude/longitude decimal degrees) and edge-matched to ensure seamlessness. Approximately one-half of the area shown on this map has DEM source data at a 30-meter resolution, with the remaining half consisting of 10-meter contour-derived DEM data or higher-resolution LIDAR data. Areas below sea level typically are surrounded by levees or some other type of flood-control structures. State and county boundary, hydrography, city, and road layers were modified from USGS National Atlas data downloaded in 2003. The NED data were downloaded in 2005.

  11. On the low lying spectrum of the magnetic Schrödinger operator with kagome periodicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerdelhué, Philippe; Royo-Letelier, Jimena

    2014-12-01

    In a semi-classical regime, we study a periodic magnetic Schrödinger operator in ℝ2. This is inspired by recent experiments on artificial magnetism with ultra cold atoms in optical lattices, and by the new interest for the operator on the hexagonal lattice describing the behavior of an electron in a graphene sheet. We first review some results for the square (Harper), triangular and hexagonal lattices. Then, we study the case when the periodicity is given by the kagome lattice considered by Hou. Following the techniques introduced by Helffer-Sjöstrand and Carlsson, we reduce this problem to the study of a discrete operator on ℓ2(ℤ2;ℂ3) and a pseudo-differential operator on L2(ℝ;ℂ3), which keep the symmetries of the kagome lattice. We estimate the coefficients of these operators in the case of a weak constant magnetic field. Plotting the spectrum for rational values of the magnetic flux divided by 2πh where h is the semi-classical parameter, we obtain a picture similar to Hofstadter's butterfly. We study the properties of this picture and prove the symmetries of the spectrum and the existence of flat bands, which do not occur in the case of the three previous models.

  12. Probing ground and low-lying excited states for HIO{sub 2} isomers

    SciTech Connect

    Souza, Gabriel L. C. de; Brown, Alex

    2014-12-21

    We present a computational study on HIO{sub 2} molecules. Ground state properties such as equilibrium structures, relative energetics, vibrational frequencies, and infrared intensities were obtained for all the isomers at the coupled-cluster with single and double excitations as well as perturbative inclusion of triples (CCSD(T)) level of theory with the aug-cc-pVTZ-PP basis set and ECP-28-PP effective core potential for iodine and the aug-cc-pVTZ basis set for hydrogen and oxygen atoms. The HOIO structure is confirmed as the lowest energy isomer. The relative energies are shown to be HOIO < HOOI < HI(O)O. The HO(O)I isomer is only stable at the density functional theory (DFT) level of theory. The transition states determined show interconversion of the isomers is possible. In order to facilitate future experimental identification, vibrational frequencies are also determined for all corresponding deuterated species. Vertical excitation energies for the three lowest-lying singlet and triplet excited states were determined using the configuration interaction singles, time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT)/B3LYP, TD-DFT/G96PW91, and equation of motion-CCSD approaches with the LANL2DZ basis set plus effective core potential for iodine and the aug-cc-pVTZ basis set for hydrogen and oxygen atoms. It is shown that HOIO and HOOI isomers have excited states accessible at solar wavelengths (<4.0 eV) but these states have very small oscillator strengths (<2 × 10{sup −3})

  13. Index theorem and universality properties of the low-lying eigenvalues of improved staggered quarks.

    PubMed

    Follana, E; Hart, A; Davies, C T H

    2004-12-10

    We study various improved staggered quark Dirac operators on quenched gluon backgrounds in lattice QCD generated using a Symanzik-improved gluon action. We find a clear separation of the spectrum into would-be zero modes and others. The number of would-be zero modes depends on the topological charge as expected from the index theorem, and their chirality expectation value is large ( approximately 0.7). The remaining modes have low chirality and show clear signs of clustering into quartets and approaching the random matrix theory predictions for all topological charge sectors. We conclude that improvement of the fermionic and gauge actions moves the staggered quarks closer to the continuum limit where they respond correctly to QCD topology.

  14. Theoretical study of the low-lying electronic states of the RbCs+ molecular ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korek, M.; Allouche, A. R.

    2001-09-01

    The potential energy has been calculated over a wide range of internuclear distance for the 64 lowest molecular states of symmetry 2Σ+, 2Π, 2Δ, and Ω = ½, 3/2, 3/2 of the molecular ion RbCs+. This calculation has been done by using an ab initio method based on non-empirical pseudopotentials and parametrized l-dependent polarization potentials. We used Gaussian basis sets for both atoms and the spin-orbit effect has been taken into account through a non-empirical spin-orbit pseudopotential. For the four bound states (1) 2Σ+, (1) 2Π, (1) Ω = ½ and (1) Ω = 3/2 the main spectroscopic constants ωe, Be, and De have been derived. By replacing the rovibrational differential Schrödinger equation by a Volterra integral equation the wavefunction is given by Ψ = ∑i = 01{aifi}, where the coefficients ai are obtained from the boundary conditions of the wavefunction and fi are two well defined canonical functions. Using these functions the eigenvalues Ev, the rotational constants Bv and the centrifugal distortion constants Dv have been calculated for the four considered bound states up to v = 121 as well as the dipole moment functions and oscillator strengths for transitions between (1) 2Σ+ and (1) 2Π. No comparison of these values with other results is yet possible because they are given here for the first time. Extensive tables of energy values versus internuclear distance and the values of Ev, Bv and Dv are displayed at the following address: http://lasim.univ-lyon1.fr/allouche/rbcsplus

  15. Structure of low-lying states in 140Sm studied by Coulomb excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klintefjord, M.; Hadyńska-KlÈ©k, K.; Görgen, A.; Bauer, C.; Bello Garrote, F. L.; Bönig, S.; Bounthong, B.; Damyanova, A.; Delaroche, J.-P.; Fedosseev, V.; Fink, D. A.; Giacoppo, F.; Girod, M.; Hoff, P.; Imai, N.; Korten, W.; Larsen, A.-C.; Libert, J.; Lutter, R.; Marsh, B. A.; Molkanov, P. L.; Naïdja, H.; Napiorkowski, P.; Nowacki, F.; Pakarinen, J.; Rapisarda, E.; Reiter, P.; Renstrøm, T.; Rothe, S.; Seliverstov, M. D.; Siebeck, B.; Siem, S.; Srebrny, J.; Stora, T.; Thöle, P.; Tornyi, T. G.; Tveten, G. M.; Van Duppen, P.; Vermeulen, M. J.; Voulot, D.; Warr, N.; Wenander, F.; De Witte, H.; Zielińska, M.

    2016-05-01

    The electromagnetic structure of 140Sm was studied in a low-energy Coulomb excitation experiment with a radioactive ion beam from the REX-ISOLDE facility at CERN. The 2+ and 4+ states of the ground-state band and a second 2+ state were populated by multistep excitation. The analysis of the differential Coulomb excitation cross sections yielded reduced transition probabilities between all observed states and the spectroscopic quadrupole moment for the 21+ state. The experimental results are compared to large-scale shell model calculations and beyond-mean-field calculations based on the Gogny D1S interaction with a five-dimensional collective Hamiltonian formalism. Simpler geometric and algebraic models are also employed to interpret the experimental data. The results indicate that 140Sm shows considerable γ softness, but in contrast to earlier speculation no signs of shape coexistence at low excitation energy. This work sheds more light on the onset of deformation and collectivity in this mass region.

  16. Spectroscopic and theoretical studies of the low-lying states of BaO+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartlett, Joshua H.; VanGundy, Robert A.; Heaven, Michael C.

    2015-07-01

    The BaO+ cation is of interest from the perspectives of electronic structure and the potential for cooling to ultra-cold temperatures. Spectroscopic data for the ion have been obtained using a two-color photoionization technique. The ionization energy for BaO was found to be 6.8123(3) eV. The ground state of BaO+ was identified as X2Σ+, and both vibrational and rotational constants were determined. Vibrationally resolved spectra were recorded for A2Π, the first electronically excited state. These data yielded the term energy, vibrational frequency, and the spin-orbit interaction constant. Relativistic electronic structure calculations were carried out using multi-reference configuration interaction (MRCI), coupled cluster and density functional theory methods. Transition moments for the pure vibrational and A2Π-X2Σ+ transitions were predicted using the MRCI method.

  17. Extensive theoretical studies on the low-lying electronic states of BBr+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Xianghong; Shu, Huabing; Zhu, Zunlue; Chen, Qian

    2016-04-01

    The potential energy curves (PECs) of two lowest dissociation channels of BBr+ have been thoroughly investigated using the internally contracted multireference configuration interaction method with Davidson correction and relativistic correction. All PECs are extrapolated to complete basis set limit. Several quasibound excited states caused by avoided crossings are found. Based on the PECs, the spectroscopic parameters of bound and quasibound states are obtained. The transition dipole moments and radiative lifetimes are predicted for all possible transitions. Finally, the spin-orbit coupling matrix elements are computed using the states interaction approach with the full Breit-Pauli Hamiltonian to analyze the interactions in PECs crossing regions. We propose that the 22Σ+-X2Σ+ and 22Π-X2Σ+ transitions which cannot be observed in experiments are attributed to the intricate couplings among 12Π, 22Π, 22Σ+, 14Σ+, 14Δ, 14Σ-, 12Δ and 12Σ- states.

  18. Relativistic MR-MP energy levels: Low-lying states in the Mg isoelectronic sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santana, Juan A.

    2016-09-01

    The relativistic Multi-Reference Møller-Plesset (MR-MP) many-body perturbation theory was applied to calculate the energies of all excited states within the 3s3p, 3p2, 3s3d, 3p3d and 3d2 configurations for every ion of the Mg isoelectronic sequence (Z = 12 - 100). The results are compared with previous calculations and available experimental data. The MR-MP excitation energies agree with experiment typically within 100 ppm over a wide range of Z, particularly for mid- and high-range Z. Experimental data for highly charged ions in this isoelectronic sequence are limited and the complete and accurate dataset presented here is expected to ease the identification process upon measurements.

  19. Intra-arc sedimentation in a low-lying marginal arc, Eocene Clarno Formation, central Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    White, J.D.L.; Robinson, P.T. . Centre for Marine Geology)

    1993-04-01

    The largely Eocene Clarno Formation consists of andesitic volcaniclastic rocks interstratified with clayey paludal sediments and lava flows, and cut locally by irregular hypabyssal stocks, dikes and sills. Lateral lithofacies variations are pronounced, and intrusive and extrusive volcanic rocks appear haphazardly emplaced throughout the formation. A range of sedimentary environments is represented, including near-vent flow and breccia accumulations, bouldery high-gradient braided streams, and relatively low-gradient sandy-tuff braidplains associated with paludal deposits. The authors infer that the coarse-grained volcaniclastic rocks of the Clarno Formation accumulated largely in volcanic flank and apron settings. The stratigraphy of the formation indicates that it was formed in sedimentary lowlands into which many small volcanoes erupted; only a few, scattered remnants of large central vent volcanoes are known. The absence of systematic variation across the unit's large outcrop belt argues against the derivation of the succession from a line of volcanoes beyond the reaches of the present outcrop. The authors infer that the arc was composed of small to medium-sized volcanoes arranged non-systematically over a broad area. The sedimentary succession most probably accumulated in a series of shallow intra-arc depressions formed by crustal stretching and diffuse block rotation driven by oblique subduction during the Eocene.

  20. State of Texas - Highlighting Low-Lying Areas Derived from USGS Digital Elevation Data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kosovich, John J.

    2008-01-01

    In support of U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) disaster preparedness efforts, this map depicts a color shaded relief representation of Texas and a grayscale relief of the surrounding areas. The first 30 feet of relief above mean sea level are displayed as brightly colored 5-foot elevation bands, which highlight low-elevation areas at a coarse spatial resolution. Standard USGS National Elevation Dataset (NED) 1 arc-second (nominally 30-meter) digital elevation model (DEM) data are the basis for the map, which is designed to be used at a broad scale and for informational purposes only. The NED data were derived from the original 1:24,000-scale USGS topographic map bare-earth contours, which were converted into gridded quadrangle-based DEM tiles at a constant post spacing (grid cell size) of either 30 meters (data before the mid-1990s) or 10 meters (mid-1990s and later data). These individual-quadrangle DEMs were then converted to spherical coordinates (latitude/longitude decimal degrees) and edge-matched to ensure seamlessness. The NED source data for this map consists of a mixture of 30-meter- and 10-meter-resolution DEMs. State and county boundary, hydrography, city, and road layers were modified from USGS National Atlas data downloaded in 2003. The NED data were downloaded in 2002. Shaded relief over Mexico was obtained from the USGS National Atlas.

  1. From Low-Lying Roofs to Towering Spires: Toward a Heideggerian Understanding of Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ream, Todd C.; Ream, Tyler W.

    2005-01-01

    This article explores the significance that environments play in terms of the learning process. In the United States, the legacy of John Dewey's intellectual efforts left a theoretical understanding that views the architectural composition of learning environments as instrumental mediums which house the educational process. This understanding of…

  2. Low lying electric dipole excitations in nuclei of the rare earth region

    SciTech Connect

    von Brentano, P.; Zilges, A.; Herzberg, R.D.; Zamfir, N.V.; Kneissl, U.; Heil, R.D.; Pitz, H.H.; Wesselborg, C.

    1992-10-01

    From many experiments with low energy photon scattering on deformed rare earth nuclei we have obtained detailed information about the distribution of electric dipole strength below 4 MeV. Apart from some weaker transitions between 2 and 4 MeV we observed one, and sometimes two, very strong El-groundstate transitions around 1.5 MeV in all examined nuclei. They arise from the de-excitation of the bandheads of the (J{sup {pi}},K)=(l{sup {minus}},0) and (J{sup {pi}},K)=(l{sup {minus}},1) octupole vibrational bands. It is shown that the decay branching ratios and the absolute transition strengths of these states can be reproduced rather well with an improved T(El)-operator in the sdf-Interacting Boson Model. Another class of octupole states has been investigated in the region of the semimagic nucleus {sup 142}Nd. Here a quintuplet of collective excitations around 3.5 MeV is expected due to the coupling of the 3{minus}-octupole vibration with the 2+-quadrupole vibration. We performed photon scattering experiments on the odd A neighboring nucleus {sup 141}Pr and found first evidence for the existence of 3{sup {minus}}{circle_times}2+{circle_times}particle-states.

  3. Low lying electric dipole excitations in nuclei of the rare earth region

    SciTech Connect

    von Brentano, P.; Zilges, A.; Herzberg, R.D. . Inst. fuer Kernphysik); Zamfir, N.V. ); Kneissl, U.; Heil, R.D.; Pitz, H.H. . Inst. fuer Strahlenphysik); Wesselborg, C. . Inst. fuer Kernphysik)

    1992-01-01

    From many experiments with low energy photon scattering on deformed rare earth nuclei we have obtained detailed information about the distribution of electric dipole strength below 4 MeV. Apart from some weaker transitions between 2 and 4 MeV we observed one, and sometimes two, very strong El-groundstate transitions around 1.5 MeV in all examined nuclei. They arise from the de-excitation of the bandheads of the (J[sup [pi

  4. Microscopic study of low-lying yrast spectra in 100429108 Mo isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawhney, Neeru; Bharti, Arun; Khosa, S. K.

    2002-10-01

    Variation-after-projection (VAP) calculations in conjunction with Hartree-Bogoliubov (HB) ansatz have been carried out for A=100-108 molybdenum (Mo) isotopes. In this framework, the yrast spectra with J_{max}(pi) ≥ 10(+) , B(E2) transition probabilities, quadrupole (bt_2) and hexadecapole (bt_4) deformation parameters, moment of inertia (I) and square of cranking frequency (om(2)) for even-even Mo isotopes have been obtained. The results of the calculation give an indication that it is important to include the hexadecapole-hexadecapole component of the two-body interaction for obtaining various nuclear structure quantities in these Mo isotopes.

  5. Some aspects of the stalling of modern low-lying monoplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soule, Hartley A; GOUGH MELVIN N

    1938-01-01

    The factors affecting the stalling characteristics of modern airplanes are briefly discussed. The effect of present-day design trends is shown and means for improving the stalling characteristics of future airplanes are indicated.

  6. Low-lying magnetic excitations, magnetic irreversibility and approach-to-saturation in nanocrystalline Ni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venu Prakash, M. Pavan; Mathew, S. P.; Kaul, S. N.

    2013-06-01

    We demonstrate that the thermal demagnetization at temperatures T ≤ 350 K in pulse electrodeposited nanocrystalline (nc-) Ni samples with average grain size d = 10 nm and d = 20 nm is due to spin waves, spin-wave modes soften as d reduces, the interfacial/grain boundary magnetocrystalline anisotropy plays a crucial role in causing magnetic irreversibility at fields H ≤ 2 kOe and in governing the approach-to-saturation of magnetization in nc-Ni.

  7. Spectroscopic calculations of the low-lying structure in exotic Os and W isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Nomura, K.; Otsuka, T.; Rodriguez-Guzman, R.; Sarriguren, P.; Robledo, L. M.; Regan, P. H.; Stevenson, P. D.; Podolyak, Zs.

    2011-05-15

    Structural evolution in neutron-rich Os and W isotopes is investigated in terms of the interacting boson model (IBM) Hamiltonian determined by (constrained) Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov calculations with the Gogny-D1S energy density functional (EDF). The interaction strengths of the IBM Hamiltonian are produced by mapping the potential energy surface (PES) of the Gogny-EDF with quadrupole degrees of freedom onto the corresponding PES of the IBM system. We examine the prolate-to-oblate shape/phase transition which is predicted to take place in this region as a function of neutron number N within the considered Os and W isotopic chains. The onset of this transition is found to be more rapid compared to the neighboring Pt isotopes. The calculations also allow the prediction of spectroscopic variables (excited state energies and reduced transition probabilities) which are presented for the neutron-rich {sup 192,194,196}W nuclei, for which there is only very limited experimental data available to date.

  8. Spectroscopy of low lying transitions of He confined in a fullerene cage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhuri, Supriya K.; Mukherjee, Prasanta K.; Fricke, Burkhard

    2016-09-01

    Using time dependent coupled Hartree-Fock(TDCHF) theory, we estimate structural properties such as total energy, ionisation potential, static and dynamic polarizabilities, oscillator strengths and transition probabilities for the first three dipolar excitations 1s2:1Se → 1snp:1Po (n = 2,3,4) and quadrupolar excitations 1s2:1Se → 1snd:1De (n = 3,4,5) of a helium atom placed at the centre of a fullerene cage. We estimate these structural properties using the fullerene cage potential based on experimental findings, including both neutral and charged fullerene potentials. Systematics have been observed with respect to the nature of the charge on fullerene compared to neutral species. We highlight interesting behavior of the excited state wavefunctions for the central atom, leading to altered behavioral patterns of the relevant properties.

  9. Observation of a Low-Lying Neutron Unbound State in 25F

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, A. R.; Kasperczyk, M.; Frank, N.; Baumann, T.; Bazin, D.; Brown, B. A.; Brown, J.; Deyoung, P. A.; Finck, J. E.; Gade, A.; Hinnefeld, J.; Howes, R.; Lecouey, J.-L.; Luther, B.; Peters, W. A.; Scheit, H.; Schiller, A.; Thoennessen, M.; Tostevin, J.

    2009-05-01

    A low energy neutron unbound state of ^25F has been observed. The ^25F isotopes were produced by one-proton removal from an 86 MeV/u ^26Ne beam on a Beryllium target at the fast-fragmentation radioactive beam facility of the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory at Michigan State University. The subsequent decay of the ^25F isotopes resulted in ^24F and neutrons that were detected in coincidence. The properties of the charged particles and neutrons were used to reconstruct a decay energy spectrum for ^25F, which was compared to simulations. The simulations include a stripping reaction model, decay energy line-shapes, and, detector resolutions and acceptances. Results and simulation details will be discussed.

  10. Electron impact excitation and assignment of the low-lying electronic states of CO2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, R. I.; Trajmar, S.

    1973-01-01

    Electron scattering spectra of CO2 are reported in the 7 to 10 eV energy-loss range, at energies of 0.2, 0.35, 0.6, 0.7, and 7.0 eV above threshold, and at a scattering angle of 90 deg. Several new distinct overlapping continua with weak, diffuse bands superimposed are observed to lie in this energy-loss range. The experimental spectra are discussed in the light of recent ab initio configuration-interaction calculations of the vertical transition energies of CO2. The experimental spectra are shown to be consistent with the excitation states of CO2.

  11. A study of the low-lying states of CaAr + and CaKr +

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinemann, Christoph; Koch, Wolfram; Partridge, Harry

    1998-04-01

    The spectroscopic constants of the ground 2Σ + states of CaAr + and CaKr + are determined using high quality ab initio methods. The computed binding energies are 789 and 1252 cm -1, respectively, in good agreement with the experimental determination of Pullins, Scurlock, Reddic and Duncan (J. Chem. Phys. 104 (1996) 7518). The much smaller CaKr + binding energy determined by Buthelezi, Bellert, Lewis and Brucat (Chem. Phys. Lett. 246 (1995) 145) is shown to be due to deficiencies in the method used to approximate the binding energy of the excited state.

  12. Ultrasonic Dynamic Vector Stress Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, Joseph S.; Froggatt, Mark

    1992-01-01

    Stress inferred from measurements in specimens rather than in bonded gauges. Ultrasonic dynamic vector stress sensor (UDVSS) measures changes in dynamic directional stress occurring in material or structure at location touched by device when material or structure put under cyclic load. Includes phase-locked loop, synchronous amplifier, and contact probe. Useful among manufacturers of aerospace and automotive structures for stress testing and evaluation of designs.

  13. GAPS IN SUPPORT VECTOR OPTIMIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    STEINWART, INGO; HUSH, DON; SCOVEL, CLINT; LIST, NICOLAS

    2007-01-29

    We show that the stopping criteria used in many support vector machine (SVM) algorithms working on the dual can be interpreted as primal optimality bounds which in turn are known to be important for the statistical analysis of SVMs. To this end we revisit the duality theory underlying the derivation of the dual and show that in many interesting cases primal optimality bounds are the same as known dual optimality bounds.

  14. Quantum mechanics without state vectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinberg, Steven

    2014-10-01

    Because the state vectors of isolated systems can be changed in entangled states by processes in other isolated systems, keeping only the density matrix fixed, it is proposed to give up the description of physical states in terms of ensembles of state vectors with various probabilities, relying only on density matrices. The density matrix is defined here by the formula giving the mean values of physical quantities, which implies the same properties as the usual definition in terms of state vectors and their probabilities. This change in the description of physical states opens up a large variety of new ways that the density matrix may transform under various symmetries, different from the unitary transformations of ordinary quantum mechanics. Such new transformation properties have been explored before, but so far only for the symmetry of time translations into the future, treated as a semigroup. Here, new transformation properties are studied for general symmetry transformations forming groups, not just semigroups. Arguments that such symmetries should act on the density matrix as in ordinary quantum mechanics are presented, but all of these arguments are found to be inconclusive.

  15. MISR Level 3 Cloud Motion Vector

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-07-10

    MISR Level 3 Cloud Motion Vector Level 3 Wednesday, November 7, 2012 ... A new version, F02_0002, of the MISR L3 CMV (Cloud Motion Vector) data product is now available. This new release provides finer ... coverage. These enhancements are the result of reorganizing motion vector information present in the recent Level 2 Cloud product as ...

  16. Visualizing vector field topology in fluid flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helman, James L.; Hesselink, Lambertus

    1991-01-01

    Methods of automating the analysis and display of vector field topology in general and flow topology in particular are discussed. Two-dimensional vector field topology is reviewed as the basis for the examination of topology in three-dimensional separated flows. The use of tangent surfaces and clipping in visualizing vector field topology in fluid flows is addressed.

  17. A drop theorem without vector topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Chi-Wing

    2007-05-01

    Danes' drop theorem is extended to bornological vector spaces. An immediate application is to establish Ekeland-type variational principle and its equivalence, Caristi fixed point theorem, in bornological vector spaces. Meanwhile, since every locally convex space becomes a convex bornological vector space when equipped with the canonical von Neumann bornology, Qiu's generalization of Danes' work to locally convex spaces is recovered.

  18. Purification and Injection of Retroviral Vectors.

    PubMed

    Tashiro, Ayumu; Zhao, Chunmei; Suh, Hoonkyo; Gage, Fred H

    2015-10-01

    Retroviral vectors are powerful tools for genetic manipulation. This protocol discusses the production, purification, and use of replication-deficient retroviral vectors based on Moloney murine leukemia virus and lentivirus. It also describes the injection of a retroviral vector into the dentate gyrus of young adult mice to fluorescently label live murine brain tissue.

  19. Problems with the Method of Correlated Vectors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashton, M.C.; Lee, K.

    2005-01-01

    The method of correlated vectors has been used widely to identify variables that are associated with general intelligence (g). Briefly, this method involves finding the correlation between the vector of intelligence subtests' g-loadings and the vector of those subtests' correlations with the variable in question. We describe two major problems…

  20. Ovenized microelectromechanical system (MEMS) resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Olsson, Roy H; Wojciechowski, Kenneth; Kim, Bongsang

    2014-03-11

    An ovenized micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) resonator including: a substantially thermally isolated mechanical resonator cavity; a mechanical oscillator coupled to the mechanical resonator cavity; and a heating element formed on the mechanical resonator cavity.

  1. Gaussian statistics for palaeomagnetic vectors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Love, J.J.; Constable, C.G.

    2003-01-01

    With the aim of treating the statistics of palaeomagnetic directions and intensities jointly and consistently, we represent the mean and the variance of palaeomagnetic vectors, at a particular site and of a particular polarity, by a probability density function in a Cartesian three-space of orthogonal magnetic-field components consisting of a single (unimoda) non-zero mean, spherically-symmetrical (isotropic) Gaussian function. For palaeomagnetic data of mixed polarities, we consider a bimodal distribution consisting of a pair of such symmetrical Gaussian functions, with equal, but opposite, means and equal variances. For both the Gaussian and bi-Gaussian distributions, and in the spherical three-space of intensity, inclination, and declination, we obtain analytical expressions for the marginal density functions, the cumulative distributions, and the expected values and variances for each spherical coordinate (including the angle with respect to the axis of symmetry of the distributions). The mathematical expressions for the intensity and off-axis angle are closed-form and especially manageable, with the intensity distribution being Rayleigh-Rician. In the limit of small relative vectorial dispersion, the Gaussian (bi-Gaussian) directional distribution approaches a Fisher (Bingham) distribution and the intensity distribution approaches a normal distribution. In the opposite limit of large relative vectorial dispersion, the directional distributions approach a spherically-uniform distribution and the intensity distribution approaches a Maxwell distribution. We quantify biases in estimating the properties of the vector field resulting from the use of simple arithmetic averages, such as estimates of the intensity or the inclination of the mean vector, or the variances of these quantities. With the statistical framework developed here and using the maximum-likelihood method, which gives unbiased estimates in the limit of large data numbers, we demonstrate how to

  2. Electromechanical actuation for thrust vector control applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Mary Ellen

    At present, actuation systems for the Thrust Vector Control (TVC) for launch vehicles are hydraulic systems. The Advanced Launch System (ALS), a joint initiative between NASA and the Air Force, is a launch vehicle that is designed to be cost effective, highly reliable and operationally efficient with a goal of reducing the cost per pound to orbit. As part of this initiative, an electromechanical actuation system is being developed as an attractive alternative to the hydraulic systems used today. NASA-Lewis is developing and demonstrating an Induction Motor Controller Actuation System with a 40 hp peak rating. The controller will integrate 20 kHz resonant link Power Management and Distribution (PMAD) technology and Pulse Population Modulation (PPM) techniques to implement Field Oriented Vector Control (FOVC) of a new advanced induction motor. Through PPM, multiphase variable frequency, variable voltage waveforms can be synthesized from the 20 kHz source. FOVC shows that varying both the voltage and frequency and their ratio (V/F), permits independent control of both torque and speed while operating at maximum efficiency at any point on the torque-speed curve. The driver and the FOVC will be microprocessor controlled. For increased system reliability, a Built-in Test (BITE) capability will be included. This involves introducing testability into the design of a system such that testing is calibrated and exercised during the design, manufacturing, maintenance and prelaunch activities. An actuator will be integrated with the motor controller for performance testing of the EMA TVC system. The design and fabrication of the motor controller is being done by General Dynamics Space Systems Division. The University of Wisconsin-Madison will assist in the design of the advanced induction motor and in the implementation of the FOVC theory. A 75 hp electronically controlled dynamometer will be used to test the motor controller in all four quadrants of operation using flight type

  3. Optical Helmholtz resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevalier, Paul; Bouchon, Patrick; Haïdar, Riad; Pardo, Fabrice

    2014-08-01

    Helmholtz resonators are widely used acoustic components able to select a single frequency. Here, based on an analogy between acoustics and electromagnetism wave equations, we present an electromagnetic 2D Helmholtz resonator made of a metallic slit-box structure. At the resonance, the light is funneled in the λ/800 apertures, and is subsequently absorbed in the cavity. As in acoustics, there is no higher order of resonance, which is an appealing feature for applications such as photodetection or thermal emission. Eventually, we demonstrate that the slit is of capacitive nature while the box behaves inductively. We derive an analytical formula for the resonance wavelength, which does not rely on wave propagation and therefore does not depend on the permittivity of the material filling the box. Besides, in contrast with half-wavelength resonators, the resonance wavelength can be engineered by both the slit aspect ratio and the box area.

  4. Magnetic resonance energy and topological resonance energy.

    PubMed

    Aihara, Jun-Ichi

    2016-04-28

    Ring-current diamagnetism of a polycyclic π-system is closely associated with thermodynamic stability due to the individual circuits. Magnetic resonance energy (MRE), derived from the ring-current diamagnetic susceptibility, was explored in conjunction with graph-theoretically defined topological resonance energy (TRE). For many aromatic molecules, MRE is highly correlative with TRE with a correlation coefficient of 0.996. For all π-systems studied, MRE has the same sign as TRE. The only trouble with MRE may be that some antiaromatic and non-alternant species exhibit unusually large MRE-to-TRE ratios. This kind of difficulty can in principle be overcome by prior geometry-optimisation or by changing spin multiplicity. Apart from the semi-empirical resonance-theory resonance energy, MRE is considered as the first aromatic stabilisation energy (ASE) defined without referring to any hypothetical polyene reference.

  5. Rates, Polarizations, and Asymmetries in Charmless Vector-Vector B Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Boutigny, D; Gaillard, J-M; Hicheur, A; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Robbe, P; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Palano, A; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Schaffer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu. G; Kral, J F; Kukartsev, G; LeClerc, C; Levi, M E; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Romosan, A; Ronan, M T; Shelkov, V G; Telnov, A V; Wenzel, W A; Harrison, T J; Hawkes, C M; Knowles, D J; Penny, R C; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Deppermann, T; Goetzen, K; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schmuecker, H; Barlow, N R; Bhimji, W; Boyd, J T; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Mackay, C; Wilson, F F; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Kyberd, P; McKemey, A K; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Chao, M; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; McMahon, S; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hadavand, H K; Wright, Doug

    2003-03-11

    With a sample of approximately 89 million B{bar B} pairs collected with the BABAR detector, they measure branching fractions, determine the degree of longitudinal polarization, and search for direct CP violation in the decays B{sup 0} {yields} {phi}K*{sup 0} and B{sup +} {yields} {phi}K*{sup +}. They perform a search for other charmless vector-vector B decays involving {rho} and K*(892) resonances and observe the decays B{sup +} {yields} {rho}{sup 0} K*{sup +} and B{sup +} {yields} {rho}{sup 0}{rho}{sup +}. The branching fractions are measured to be {Beta}({phi}K*{sup 0}) = (11.1{sub -1.2}{sup +1.3} {+-} 1.1) x 10{sup -6}, {Beta}({phi}K*{sup +}) = (12.1{sub -1.9}{sup +2.1} {+-} 1.5) x 10{sup -6}, {Beta}({rho}{sup 0} K*{sup +}) = (7.7{sub -2.0}{sup +2.1} {+-} 1.4) x 10{sup -6}, and {Beta}({rho}{sup 0}{rho}{sup +}) = (9.9{sub -2.5}{sup +2.6} {+-} 2.5) x 10{sup -6}. The longitudinal polarization fractions are measured to be {Lambda}{sub L}/{Lambda}({phi}K*{sup 0}) = 0.65 {+-} 0.07 {+-} 0.04 and {Lambda}{sub L}/{Lambda}({phi}K*{sup +}) = 0.46 {+-} 0.12 {+-} 0.05. They measure the charge asymmetries: {Alpha}{sub CP}({phi}K*{sup 0}) = +0.04 {+-} 0.12 {+-} 0.02 and {Alpha}{sub CP}({phi}K*{sup +}) = +0.16 {+-} 0.17 {+-} 0.04.

  6. Scalar mesons in a linear sigma model with (axial-)vector mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Parganlija, D.; Kovacs, P.; Wolf, Gy.; Giacosa, F.; Rischke, D. H.

    2013-03-25

    The structure of the scalar mesons has been a subject of debate for many decades. In this work we look for qq states among the physical resonances using an extended Linear Sigma Model that contains scalar, pseudoscalar, vector, and axial-vector mesons both in the non-strange and strange sectors. We perform global fits of meson masses, decay widths and amplitudes in order to ascertain whether the scalar qq states are below or above 1 GeV. We find the scalar states above 1 GeV to be preferred as qq states.

  7. Proton resonance spectroscopy. Quarterly technical progress report, December 1992--November 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Shriner, J.F. Jr.

    1995-11-01

    Work on chaos in the low-lying levels of nuclei has continued on several fronts. The major effort has been study of the {sup 29}Si(p,{gamma}) reaction with the goal of establishing a complete level scheme for {sup 30}P and analyzing the eigenvalue fluctuations for evidence of chaos. These measurements are in progress, and the current status is described. A related topic is the search for different signatures of chaos which do not require the extremely high degree of completeness and purity necessary for eigenvalue analyses; those efforts are discussed in Sections 2 and 3. The possibility of studying both parity violation and time-reversal invariance violation with charged particle resonances has been explored by performing calculations using experimentally measured resonance parameters. Large enhancements are indeed available; the results are discussed in Sections 4 and 5. Preparations for an experimental study of parity violation using these techniques are ongoing. An undergraduate project searching for experimental evidence of a parity dependence of level density is discussed in Section 6. A number of improvements to the operation of the TUNL KN accelerator have been implemented in the past three years. These are described in Section 7.

  8. Structural and dynamical properties of chlorinated hydrocarbons studied with resonant inelastic x-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohinc, R.; Žitnik, M.; Bučar, K.; Kavčič, M.; Carniato, S.; Journel, L.; Guillemin, R.; Marchenko, T.; Kawerk, E.; Simon, M.; Cao, W.

    2016-04-01

    We present a theoretical and experimental study of resonant inelastic x-ray scattering on a large group of chlorinated hydrocarbons: CH3Cl, CH2Cl2, CHCl3, CCl4, CH3CH2Cl, ClCH2CH2Cl, CH3CHCl2, CH3CCl3, C2H2Cl2-iso, C2H2Cl2-cis, C2H2Cl2-trans, and C6H5Cl. Differences in structural and dynamical properties of the molecules generated by diverse chemical environments are observed in the measured Cl(Kα) spectral maps as well as in the Cl(K) total fluorescence yield spectra. The energy position, relative intensity, and the width of the Franck-Condon distribution of low-lying σ∗ and π∗ resonances are extracted by a fitting procedure taking into account the experimental broadening. The theoretical values obtained with the transition potential and Δ Kohn-Sham methods are in good agreement with the experimental parameters indicating subtle differences due to variations in the molecular structure.

  9. Direct proton decay from the Gamow-Teller resonance in {sup 208}Bi

    SciTech Connect

    Akimune, H.; Daito, I.; Fujita, Y.; Fujiwara, M.; Greenfield, M.B.; Harakeh, M.N.; Inomata, T.; Jaenecke, J.; Katori, K.; Nakayama, S.; Sakai, H.; Sakemi, Y.; Tanaka, M.; Yosoi, M. ||||||||

    1995-08-01

    Spin-isospin excitations in {sup 208}Bi have been investigated using the {sup 208}Pb ({sup 3}He,{ital t}){sup 208}Bi reaction at near {theta}{approx}0{degree} at {ital E}({sup 3}He)=450 MeV. The microscopic structure of the Gamow-Teller resonance (GTR), the isobaric analog state (IAS), and the spin-flip dipole ({Delta}{ital L}=1) resonance (SDR) in {sup 208}Bi has been studied by observing their direct proton decays to the low-lying neutron-hole states in {sup 207}Pb. Decay protons were measured at backward angles in coincidence with tritons detected at and near 0{degree}. The total branching ratio for proton decay from the GTR is determined to be only 4.9{plus_minus}1.3%. The total branching ratio for proton decay from the SDR amounts to 14.1{plus_minus}4.2%. The deduced total widths as well as the total and partial proton escape widths of the GRR and IAS are found to be in reasonable agreement with recent theoretical estimates obtained in the framework of the continuum Tamm-Dancoff approximation.

  10. N13+p elastic resonance scattering via a thick-target method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y. B.; Wang, B. X.; Qin, X.; Bai, X. X.; Guo, B.; Jiang, C.; Li, Y. J.; Li, Z. H.; Lian, G.; Su, J.; Zeng, S.; Liu, W. P.

    2008-04-01

    The N13+p elastic resonance scattering has been studied in inverse kinematics via a thick-target method. A N13 secondary beam of 47.8±1.5 MeV produced by the H2(C12,N13)n reaction was used to bombard a 9.33 mg/cm2 (CH2)n target. The recoil protons were detected by a ΔE-E silicon counter telescope at θlab=15°. The performance of the setup was checked by C12+p elastic resonance scattering with the same (CH2)n target. The excitation function for the N13(p,p) elastic scattering was obtained in the energy interval of Ec.m.~0.5-3.2 MeV and was analyzed by using a multilevel R-matrix code MULTI7. Several low-lying excited states in O14 were surveyed. Our results confirm a very recent 2- assignment to the 6.8 MeV level and agree with the observation of a new 0- level at 5.7 MeV with a width of 400(45) keV.

  11. Comparative investigation of multiplane thrust vectoring nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Capone, F.; Smereczniak, P.; Spetnagel, D.; Thayer, E.

    1992-01-01

    The inflight aerodynamic performance of multiplane vectoring nozzles is critical to development of advanced aircraft and flight control systems utilizing thrust vectoring. To investigate vectoring nozzle performance, subscale models of two second-generation thrust vectoring nozzle concepts currently under development for advanced fighters were integrated into an axisymmetric test pod. Installed drag and vectoring performance characteristics of both concepts were experimentally determined in wind tunnel testing. CFD analyses were conducted to understand the impact of internal flow turning on thrust vectoring characteristics. Both nozzles exhibited drag comparable with current nonvectoring axisymmetric nozzles. During vectored-thrust operations, forces produced by external flow effects amounted to about 25 percent of the total force measured.

  12. [Intercross cascaded dual-layer resonant sub-wavelength gratings].

    PubMed

    Chen, Yong-li; Zhao, Da-zun

    2009-04-01

    A security grating structure, intercross cascaded dual-layer resonant sub-wavelength grating structure, is presented. It can broaden the resonant wavelength width of resonant sub-wavelength gratings and obtain the better optical variable effect. The full-width-at half-maximum (FWHM) broadening mechanism of security grating structures is analyzed. The FWHM is dependent on the energy coupled into the grating waveguide layer. The grating structure parameters are optimized and designed. The resonance performance and grating fabrication tolerances are also studied numerically using the vector diffraction theory (the rigorous coupled wave theory). Simulation results indicate that the value of the spectral resonant peak for the security grating structure is not decreased as the incident angle increases or decreases and the maximum FWHM of different depth of grating grooves is about seven times that of the basic resonant grating structure. The resonant dual grating waveguide structure is a kind of security grating configuration with the potential to achieve higher industry application value and its resonance performance is not sensitive to manufacture errors. PMID:19626922

  13. Nonviral Vectors for Gene Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baoum, Abdulgader Ahmed

    2011-12-01

    The development of nonviral vectors for safe and efficient gene delivery has been gaining considerable attention recently. An ideal nonviral vector must protect the gene against degradation by nuclease in the extracellular matrix, internalize the plasma membrane, escape from the endosomal compartment, unpackage the gene at some point and have no detrimental effects. In comparison to viruses, nonviral vectors are relatively easy to synthesize, less immunogenic, low in cost, and have no limitation in the size of a gene that can be delivered. Significant progress has been made in the basic science and applications of various nonviral gene delivery vectors; however, the majority of nonviral approaches are still inefficient and often toxic. To this end, two nonviral gene delivery systems using either biodegradable poly(D,L-lactide- co-glycolide) (PLG) nanoparticles or cell penetrating peptide (CPP) complexes have been designed and studied using A549 human lung epithelial cells. PLG nanoparticles were optimized for gene delivery by varying particle surface chemistry using different coating materials that adsorb to the particle surface during formation. A variety of cationic coating materials were studied and compared to more conventional surfactants used for PLG nanoparticle fabrication. Nanoparticles (˜200 nm) efficiently encapsulated plasmids encoding for luciferase (80-90%) and slowly released the same for two weeks. After a delay, moderate levels of gene expression appeared at day 5 for certain positively charged PLG particles and gene expression was maintained for at least two weeks. In contrast, gene expression mediated by polyethyleneimine (PEI) ended at day 5. PLG particles were also significantly less cytotoxic than PEI suggesting the use of these vehicles for localized, sustained gene delivery to the pulmonary epithelium. On the other hand, a more simple method to synthesize 50-200 nm complexes capable of high transfection efficiency or high gene knockdown was

  14. Quantum Electrodynamics for Vector Mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Djukanovic, Dalibor; Schindler, Matthias R.; Scherer, Stefan; Gegelia, Jambul

    2005-07-01

    Quantum electrodynamics for {rho} mesons is considered. It is shown that, at the tree level, the value of the gyromagnetic ratio of the {rho}{sup +} is fixed to 2 in a self-consistent effective quantum field theory. Further, the mixing parameter of the photon and the neutral vector meson is equal to the ratio of electromagnetic and strong couplings, leading to the mass difference M{sub {rho}}{sub {sup 0}}-M{sub {rho}}{sub {sup {+-}}}{approx}1 MeV at tree order.

  15. Jet vectoring through nozzle asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roh, Chris; Rosakis, Alexandros; Gharib, Morteza

    2015-11-01

    Previously, we explored the functionality of a tri-leaflet anal valve of a dragonfly larva. We saw that the dragonfly larva is capable of controlling the three leaflets independently to asymmetrically open the nozzle. Such control resulted in vectoring of the jet in various directions. To further understand the effect of asymmetric nozzle orifice, we tested jet flow through circular asymmetric nozzles. We report the relationship between nozzle asymmetry and redirecting of the jet at various Reynolds numbers. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. CBET-1511414; additional support by the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship under Grant No. DGE-1144469.

  16. Properties of Vector Preisach Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahler, Gary R.; Patel, Umesh D.; Torre, Edward Della

    2004-01-01

    This paper discusses rotational anisotropy and rotational accommodation of magnetic particle tape. These effects have a performance impact during the reading and writing of the recording process. We introduce the reduced vector model as the basis for the computations. Rotational magnetization models must accurately compute the anisotropic characteristics of ellipsoidally magnetizable media. An ellipticity factor is derived for these media that computes the two-dimensional magnetization trajectory for all applied fields. An orientation correction must be applied to the computed rotational magnetization. For isotropic materials, an orientation correction has been developed and presented. For anisotropic materials, an orientation correction is introduced.

  17. Vector spaces, invariance, and camouflage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arsenault, Henri H.; Garcia-Martinez, Pascuala

    2004-12-01

    We present a method based on an orthonormal vector space basis representation to detect camouflaged targets in natural environments. Because the method is intensity invariant we detect camouflage targets independently of the illumination conditions. The detection technique does not require knowing the exact camouflage pattern, but only the class of patterns (foliage, netting, woods...). We used nonlinear filtering based on the calculation of several correlations. Moreover, the nonlinearity of the filtering process allows a high discrimination against false targets. Several experiments confirm the target detectability where strong camouflage might delude even human viewers.

  18. Excitonic surface lattice resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humphrey, A. D.; Gentile, M. J.; Barnes, W. L.

    2016-08-01

    Electromagnetic resonances are important in controlling light at the nanoscale. The most studied such resonance is the surface plasmon resonance that is associated with metallic nanostructures. Here we explore an alternative resonance, the surface exciton-polariton resonance, one based on excitonic molecular materials. Our study is based on analytical and numerical modelling. We show that periodic arrays of suitable molecular nanoparticles may support surface lattice resonances that arise as a result of coherent interactions between the particles. Our results demonstrate that excitonic molecular materials are an interesting alternative to metals for nanophotonics; they offer the prospect of both fabrication based on supramolecular chemistry and optical functionality arising from the way the properties of such materials may be controlled with light.

  19. Acoustic Levitator Maintains Resonance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, M. B.; Gaspar, M. S.

    1986-01-01

    Transducer loading characteristics allow resonance tracked at high temperature. Acoustic-levitation chamber length automatically adjusted to maintain resonance at constant acoustic frequency as temperature changes. Developed for containerless processing of materials at high temperatures, system does not rely on microphones as resonance sensors, since microphones are difficult to fabricate for use at temperatures above 500 degrees C. Instead, system uses acoustic transducer itself as sensor.

  20. Large mode radius resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Michael R.

    1987-01-01

    Resonator configurations permitting operation with large mode radius while maintaining good transverse mode discrimination are considered. Stable resonators incorporating an intracavity telescope and unstable resonator geometries utilizing an output coupler with a Gaussian reflectivity profile are shown to enable large radius single mode laser operation. Results of heterodyne studies of pulsed CO2 lasers with large (11mm e sup-2 radius) fundamental mode sizes are presented demonstrating minimal frequency sweeping in accordance with the theory of laser-induced medium perturbations.

  1. Volumetric Acoustic Vector Intensity Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klos, Jacob

    2006-01-01

    A new measurement tool capable of imaging the acoustic intensity vector throughout a large volume is discussed. This tool consists of an array of fifty microphones that form a spherical surface of radius 0.2m. A simultaneous measurement of the pressure field across all the microphones provides time-domain near-field holograms. Near-field acoustical holography is used to convert the measured pressure into a volumetric vector intensity field as a function of frequency on a grid of points ranging from the center of the spherical surface to a radius of 0.4m. The volumetric intensity is displayed on three-dimensional plots that are used to locate noise sources outside the volume. There is no restriction on the type of noise source that can be studied. The sphere is mobile and can be moved from location to location to hunt for unidentified noise sources. An experiment inside a Boeing 757 aircraft in flight successfully tested the ability of the array to locate low-noise-excited sources on the fuselage. Reference transducers located on suspected noise source locations can also be used to increase the ability of this device to separate and identify multiple noise sources at a given frequency by using the theory of partial field decomposition. The frequency range of operation is 0 to 1400Hz. This device is ideal for the study of noise sources in commercial and military transportation vehicles in air, on land and underwater.

  2. Vector computer memory bank contention

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, D.H.

    1987-03-01

    A number of recent vector supercomputer designs have featured main memories with very large capacities, and presumably even larger memories are planned for future generations. While the memory chips used in these computers can store much larger amounts of data than before, their operation speeds are rather slow when compared to the significantly faster CPU (central processing unit) circuitry in new supercomputer designs. A consequence of this speed disparity between CPU's and main memory is that memory access times and memory bank reservation times (as measured in CPU ticks) are sharply increased from previous generations. While it has been recognized that these longer memory operation times will reduce scalar performance, it has not been generally realized that vector performance could suffer as well, due to a sharp increase in memory bank contention. This paper examines this phenomenon using both a Markov chain mathematical model and a Monte Carlo simulation program. The potential for performance reduction is described and techniques for ameliorating this reduction are proposed.

  3. Genetics of Mosquito Vector Competence

    PubMed Central

    Beerntsen, Brenda T.; James, Anthony A.; Christensen, Bruce M.

    2000-01-01

    Mosquito-borne diseases are responsible for significant human morbidity and mortality throughout the world. Efforts to control mosquito-borne diseases have been impeded, in part, by the development of drug-resistant parasites, insecticide-resistant mosquitoes, and environmental concerns over the application of insecticides. Therefore, there is a need to develop novel disease control strategies that can complement or replace existing control methods. One such strategy is to generate pathogen-resistant mosquitoes from those that are susceptible. To this end, efforts have focused on isolating and characterizing genes that influence mosquito vector competence. It has been known for over 70 years that there is a genetic basis for the susceptibility of mosquitoes to parasites, but until the advent of powerful molecular biological tools and protocols, it was difficult to assess the interactions of pathogens with their host tissues within the mosquito at a molecular level. Moreover, it has been only recently that the molecular mechanisms responsible for pathogen destruction, such as melanotic encapsulation and immune peptide production, have been investigated. The molecular characterization of genes that influence vector competence is becoming routine, and with the development of the Sindbis virus transducing system, potential antipathogen genes now can be introduced into the mosquito and their effect on parasite development can be assessed in vivo. With the recent successes in the field of mosquito germ line transformation, it seems likely that the generation of a pathogen-resistant mosquito population from a susceptible population soon will become a reality. PMID:10704476

  4. Measuring Shell Resonances of Spherical Acoustic Resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truong, D.; Sparasci, F.; Foltête, E.; Ouisse, M.; Pitre, L.

    2011-01-01

    Coupling between the gas and shell is a concern in the experiment used at LNE-CNAM to determine the Boltzmann constant k B by an acoustic method. As the walls of real resonators are not perfectly rigid, some perturbations occur in the frequency range of the acoustic resonances measured within helium gas contained in the cavity. As a contribution for a better understanding of this phenomenon, an experiment to measure the shell modes of the spherical resonators is in use in this laboratory. A work in progress to assess these modes using a hammer blow method together with modal analysis is reported here. The study is carried out with an air-filled, copper-walled, half-liter quasi-spherical resonator in the frequency range from 1 Hz to 20 kHz. Results show that the shell modes expand into multiple resonances of similar modal shape, including the "breathing" mode. The observations reported in other studies of shell perturbations at other frequencies than the breathing frequency are confirmed.

  5. On open electromagnetic resonators: relation between interferometers and resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Manenkov, Aleksandr A; Bykov, Vladimir P; Kuleshov, N V

    2010-05-26

    The physical difference between the concepts 'Fabry-Perot interferometer' and 'open resonator' is discussed. It is shown that the use of the term 'Fabry-Perot resonator' for open laser resonators is incorrect both from the historical viewpoint and from the viewpoint of the physical meaning of the processes occurring in these resonators. (laser beams and resonators)

  6. Attenuated Vesicular Stomatitis Viruses as Vaccine Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Anjeanette; Buonocore, Linda; Price, Ryan; Forman, John; Rose, John K.

    1999-01-01

    We showed previously that a single intranasal vaccination of mice with a recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) expressing an influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) protein provided complete protection from lethal challenge with influenza virus (A. Roberts, E. Kretzschmar, A. S. Perkins, J. Forman, R. Price, L. Buonocore, Y. Kawaoka, and J. K. Rose, J. Virol. 72:4704–4711, 1998). Because some pathogenesis was associated with the vector itself, in the present study we generated new VSV vectors expressing HA which are completely attenuated for pathogenesis in the mouse model. The first vector has a truncation of the cytoplasmic domain of the VSV G protein and expresses influenza virus HA (CT1-HA). This nonpathogenic vector provides complete protection from lethal influenza virus challenge after intranasal administration. A second vector with VSV G deleted and expressing HA (ΔG-HA) is also protective and nonpathogenic and has the advantage of not inducing neutralizing antibodies to the vector itself. PMID:10196265

  7. Higgs mass and unified gauge coupling in the NMSSM with vector matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbieri, Riccardo; Buttazzo, Dario; Hall, Lawrence J.; Marzocca, David

    2016-07-01

    We consider the NMSSM extended to include one vector-like family of quarks and leptons. If (some of) these vector-like matter particles, as the Higgs doublets, have Yukawa couplings to the singlet S that exceed unity at about the same scale Λ ≲ 103 TeV, this gives the order 40% enhancement of the tree level Higgs boson mass required in the MSSM to reach 125 GeV. It is conceivable that the Yukawa couplings to the singlet S, although naively blowing up close to Λ, will not spoil gauge coupling unification. In such a case the unified coupling α X could be interestingly led to a value not far from unity, thus providing a possible explanation for the number of generations. The characteristic signal is an enhanced resonant production of neutral spin zero particles at LHC, that could even explain the putative diphoton resonance hinted by the recent LHC data at 750 GeV.

  8. High-quality-factor photonic crystal ring resonator.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Zeng, Cheng; Li, Danping; Gao, Ge; Huang, Zengzhi; Yu, Jinzhong; Xia, Jinsong

    2014-03-01

    A design for enhancing the quality (Q) factor of a photonic crystal ring resonator (PCRR) is introduced. The highest Q factor based on simulations is 121,000. The analysis of momentum space distributions of the electric field profile for PCRR resonance shows that a high Q factor of a PCRR is attributed to the reduction of tangential k-vector component inside the leaky region. A high Q factor of 75,200 is experimentally demonstrated for a modified PCRR on a silicon-on-insulator wafer. The high-Q-factor PCRR demonstrated here will be beneficial for channel drop filters, lasers, sensors, and other applications. PMID:24690727

  9. Note on the newly observed Y (4220 ) resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faccini, R.; Filaci, G.; Guerrieri, A. L.; Pilloni, A.; Polosa, A. D.

    2015-06-01

    The BES III Collaboration has recently observed a vector resonance in the χc 0ω channel, at a mass of about 4220 MeV, named Y (4220 ). Hints of a similar structure appear in the hcπ+π- channel. We find that the two observations are likely due to the same state, which we identify with one of the expected diquark-antidiquark resonances with orbital quantum number L =1 . This assignment fulfills heavy quark spin conservation. The measured branching ratio of the Y (4220 ) into χc 0ω and hcπ+π- is compatible with the prediction for such a tetraquark state.

  10. Hadronic decays of the tau lepton : {tau}- {yields} ({pi}{pi}{pi})- {nu}{tau} within Resonance Chiral Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez Dumm, D.; Pich, A.; Portoles, J.

    2006-01-12

    {tau} decays into hadrons foresee the study of the hadronization of vector and axial-vector QCD currents, yielding relevant information on the dynamics of the resonances entering into the processes. We analyse {tau} {yields} {pi}{pi}{pi}{nu}{tau} decays within the framework of the Resonance Chiral Theory, comparing this theoretical scheme with the experimental data, namely ALEPH spectral function and branching ratio. Hence we get values for the mass and on-shell width of the a 1 (1260) resonance, and provide the structure functions that have been measured by OPAL and CLEO-II.

  11. Gateway vectors for transformation of cereals.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Mansour; Inzé, Dirk; Van Lijsebettens, Mieke; Hilson, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Until now, the availability of vectors for transgenic research in cereal crops has been rather limited. We present a novel collection of Agrobacterium tumefaciens binary T-DNA vectors compatible with Gateway recombinational cloning that facilitate the modular assembly of genes of interest together with new regulatory sequences, such as strong constitutive or endosperm-specific Brachypodium distachyon promoters. This resource aims at streamlining the creation of vectors and transgenes designed to explore gene functions in vital monocotyledonous crops.

  12. Progress in the Calculation of Nucleon Transition form Factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichmann, Gernot

    2016-10-01

    We give a brief account of the Dyson-Schwinger and Faddeev-equation approach and its application to nucleon resonances and their transition form factors. We compare the three-body with the quark-diquark approach and present a quark-diquark calculation for the low-lying nucleon resonances including scalar, axialvector, pseudoscalar and vector diquarks. We also discuss the timelike structure of transition form factors and highlight the advantages of form factors over helicity amplitudes.

  13. Progress in the Calculation of Nucleon Transition form Factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichmann, Gernot

    2016-06-01

    We give a brief account of the Dyson-Schwinger and Faddeev-equation approach and its application to nucleon resonances and their transition form factors. We compare the three-body with the quark-diquark approach and present a quark-diquark calculation for the low-lying nucleon resonances including scalar, axialvector, pseudoscalar and vector diquarks. We also discuss the timelike structure of transition form factors and highlight the advantages of form factors over helicity amplitudes.

  14. (New hosts and vectors for genome cloning)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-02-28

    The main goal of our project has been to develop new bacterial hosts and vectors for cloning human DNA in the bacterium E. coli. Because human DNA is both A+T-rich and highly repetitive, many human sequences are unstable as inserts in vectors that are propagated in bacteria. During the past eight months, we have (1) assessed what fraction of human DNA inserts in cosmid vectors is unstable, (2) developed new host strains that help stabilize unstable sequence features of human DNA, and (3) begun the development of a new generation of cloning vectors that should permit the more stable maintenance and more facile analysis of large human DNA inserts.

  15. Bacteriophage lambda-based expression vectors.

    PubMed

    Christensen, A C

    2001-03-01

    Bacteriophage lambda has been in use as a cloning vector for over 25 years, and has been used extensively as an expression vector. The efficiency of packaging and infection, and the simplicity of plaque screening are advantages of lambda as a cloning vector. A number of ingenious modifications help overcome the disadvantages associated with its mode of growth and its size. Some lambda vectors have been designed to be readily converted into plasmids or phagemids, and there are a variety of promoters and fusions that can be used to drive expression of foreign genes. Screening lambda libraries with antibodies or ligands is a powerful way of identifying novel genes. PMID:11434310

  16. Building mosaics of therapeutic plasmid gene vectors.

    PubMed

    Tolmachov, Oleg E

    2011-12-01

    Plasmids are circular or linear DNA molecules propagated extra-chromosomally in bacteria. Evolution shaped plasmids are inherently mosaic structures with individual functional units represented by distinct segments in the plasmid genome. The patchwork of plasmid genetic modules is a convenient template and a model for the generation of artificial plasmids used as vehicles for gene delivery into human cells. Plasmid gene vectors are an important tool in gene therapy and in basic biomedical research, where these vectors offer efficient transgene expression in many settings in vitro and in vivo. Plasmid vectors can be attached to nuclear directing ligands or transferred by electroporation as naked DNA to deliver the payload genes to the nuclei of the target cells. Transgene expression silencing by plasmid sequences of bacterial origin and immune stimulation by bacterial unmethylated CpG motifs can be avoided by the generation of plasmid-based minimized DNA vectors, such as minicircles. Systems of efficient site-specific integration into human chromosomes and stable episomal maintenance in human cells are being developed for further reduction of the chances for transgene silencing. The successful generation of plasmid vectors is governed by a number of vector design rules, some of which are common to all gene vectors, while others are specific to plasmid vectors. This review is focused both on the guiding principles and on the technical know-how of plasmid gene vector design. PMID:22023476

  17. Optical Haroche and Hanle resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruyten, Wilhelmus M.

    1990-07-01

    It is shown that Haroche and Hanle resonances, known from magnetic resonance, should be observable in an optical resonance experiment in which a narrowband, phase-modulated laser resonantly excites a two-level system. The narrow Haroche resonances should allow the first observation of an optical Bloch-Siegert shift, and may find applications in modulation spectroscopy.

  18. Vector magnetic measurement based on directional scattering between polarized plasmon wave and arrayed nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhaochuan; Guo, Tuan; Liu, Fu; Wu, Qiang; Li, Jie; Cheng, Linghao; Guan, Bai-Ou

    2015-09-01

    A vector magnetic field sensor based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of a 15° tilted fiber Bragg grating (TFBG) and magnetic fluid is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. Both the orientation and the amplitude of the magnetic fields can be determined unambiguously via the wavelength and intensity monitoring of the SPR, which is essentially dominated by the arrayed Fe3O4 nanoparticles over the nanometric-film of fiber surface.

  19. Vector wind profile gust model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adelfang, S. I.

    1981-01-01

    To enable development of a vector wind gust model suitable for orbital flight test operations and trade studies, hypotheses concerning the distributions of gust component variables were verified. Methods for verification of hypotheses that observed gust variables, including gust component magnitude, gust length, u range, and L range, are gamma distributed and presented. Observed gust modulus has been drawn from a bivariate gamma distribution that can be approximated with a Weibull distribution. Zonal and meridional gust components are bivariate gamma distributed. An analytical method for testing for bivariate gamma distributed variables is presented. Two distributions for gust modulus are described and the results of extensive hypothesis testing of one of the distributions are presented. The validity of the gamma distribution for representation of gust component variables is established.

  20. High power thrust vector actuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kittock, M. J.

    1993-06-01

    Modern missile programs are frequently favoring electro-mechanical (EM) thrust vector actuation (TVA) over hydraulic for a variety of reasons. However, actuation system performance requirements are not relaxed for EM systems. Thus the development of EM systems with greater power output is required. The configuration of EM actuator studied consists of a DC brushless motor driving a spur gear train, which drives a ballscrew that converts rotary motion to rectilinear motion. This design produces an actuator with high levels of performance in a compact mechanical package. Design for manufacturability and assembly (DFMA) was part of the design process, resulting in an actuator that can be assembled easily and will operate reliably. This paper will discuss the mechanical details of the resultant actuator and report test results on a prototype derivative.

  1. Vector wind profile gust model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adelfang, S. I.

    1979-01-01

    Work towards establishing a vector wind profile gust model for the Space Transportation System flight operations and trade studies is reported. To date, all the statistical and computational techniques required were established and partially implemented. An analysis of wind profile gust at Cape Kennedy within the theoretical framework is presented. The variability of theoretical and observed gust magnitude with filter type, altitude, and season is described. Various examples are presented which illustrate agreement between theoretical and observed gust percentiles. The preliminary analysis of the gust data indicates a strong variability with altitude, season, and wavelength regime. An extension of the analyses to include conditional distributions of gust magnitude given gust length, distributions of gust modulus, and phase differences between gust components has begun.

  2. Slow deterministic vector rogue waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeyev, S. V.; Kolpakov, S. A.; Mou, Ch.; Jacobsen, G.; Popov, S.; Kalashnikov, V.

    2016-03-01

    For an erbium-doped fiber laser mode-locked by carbon nanotubes, we demonstrate experimentally and theoretically a new type of the vector rogue waves emerging as a result of the chaotic evolution of the trajectories between two orthogonal states of polarization on the Poincare sphere. In terms of fluctuation induced phenomena, by tuning polarization controller for the pump wave and in-cavity polarization controller, we are able to control the Kramers time, i.e. the residence time of the trajectory in vicinity of each orthogonal state of polarization, and so can cause the rare events satisfying rogue wave criteria and having the form of transitions from the state with the long residence time to the state with a short residence time.

  3. The Concept of Resonance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Truhlar, Donald G.

    2007-01-01

    A general example of a delocalization system associated with a higher energy than the localized one, which suggests that it is wrong to consider delocalization as equivalent to resonance stabilization, is presented. The meaning of resonance energy as it appears in valence bond theory is described as the lowering of the calculated ground-state…

  4. Ballistic spin resonance.

    PubMed

    Frolov, S M; Lüscher, S; Yu, W; Ren, Y; Folk, J A; Wegscheider, W

    2009-04-16

    The phenomenon of spin resonance has had far-reaching influence since its discovery 70 years ago. Electron spin resonance driven by high-frequency magnetic fields has enhanced our understanding of quantum mechanics, and finds application in fields as diverse as medicine and quantum information. Spin resonance can also be induced by high-frequency electric fields in materials with a spin-orbit interaction; the oscillation of the electrons creates a momentum-dependent effective magnetic field acting on the electron spin. Here we report electron spin resonance due to a spin-orbit interaction that does not require external driving fields. The effect, which we term ballistic spin resonance, is driven by the free motion of electrons that bounce at frequencies of tens of gigahertz in micrometre-scale channels of a two-dimensional electron gas. This is a frequency range that is experimentally challenging to access in spin resonance, and especially difficult on a chip. The resonance is manifest in electrical measurements of pure spin currents-we see a strong suppression of spin relaxation length when the oscillating spin-orbit field is in resonance with spin precession in a static magnetic field. These findings illustrate how the spin-orbit interaction can be harnessed for spin manipulation in a spintronic circuit, and point the way to gate-tunable coherent spin rotations in ballistic nanostructures without external alternating current fields. PMID:19370029

  5. The resonator handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Jerry D.; Zhou, Shiliang

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to extend resonator theory into the region in which the planar mirror is quite small. Results of the theoretical description are then extended to resonator design and experimental arrangements as discussed in further sections of this work. Finally, a discussion of dielectric measurements for small samples is included as a specific application of this work.

  6. SIMULTANEOUSLY SPARSE SOLUTIONS TO LINEAR INVERSE PROBLEMS WITH MULTIPLE SYSTEM MATRICES AND A SINGLE OBSERVATION VECTOR*

    PubMed Central

    ZELINSKI, ADAM C.; GOYAL, VIVEK K.; ADALSTEINSSON, ELFAR

    2010-01-01

    A problem that arises in slice-selective magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) radio-frequency (RF) excitation pulse design is abstracted as a novel linear inverse problem with a simultaneous sparsity constraint. Multiple unknown signal vectors are to be determined, where each passes through a different system matrix and the results are added to yield a single observation vector. Given the matrices and lone observation, the objective is to find a simultaneously sparse set of unknown vectors that approximately solves the system. We refer to this as the multiple-system single-output (MSSO) simultaneous sparse approximation problem. This manuscript contrasts the MSSO problem with other simultaneous sparsity problems and conducts an initial exploration of algorithms with which to solve it. Greedy algorithms and techniques based on convex relaxation are derived and compared empirically. Experiments involve sparsity pattern recovery in noiseless and noisy settings and MRI RF pulse design. PMID:20445814

  7. Introduction to Vector Field Visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, David; Shen, Han-Wei

    2010-01-01

    Vector field visualization techniques are essential to help us understand the complex dynamics of flow fields. These can be found in a wide range of applications such as study of flows around an aircraft, the blood flow in our heart chambers, ocean circulation models, and severe weather predictions. The vector fields from these various applications can be visually depicted using a number of techniques such as particle traces and advecting textures. In this tutorial, we present several fundamental algorithms in flow visualization including particle integration, particle tracking in time-dependent flows, and seeding strategies. For flows near surfaces, a wide variety of synthetic texture-based algorithms have been developed to depict near-body flow features. The most common approach is based on the Line Integral Convolution (LIC) algorithm. There also exist extensions of LIC to support more flexible texture generations for 3D flow data. This tutorial reviews these algorithms. Tensor fields are found in several real-world applications and also require the aid of visualization to help users understand their data sets. Examples where one can find tensor fields include mechanics to see how material respond to external forces, civil engineering and geomechanics of roads and bridges, and the study of neural pathway via diffusion tensor imaging. This tutorial will provide an overview of the different tensor field visualization techniques, discuss basic tensor decompositions, and go into detail on glyph based methods, deformation based methods, and streamline based methods. Practical examples will be used when presenting the methods; and applications from some case studies will be used as part of the motivation.

  8. Monolithic MACS micro resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmann-Horn, J. A.; Jacquinot, J.-F.; Ginefri, J. C.; Bonhomme, C.; Sakellariou, D.

    2016-10-01

    Magic Angle Coil Spinning (MACS) aids improving the intrinsically low NMR sensitivity of heterogeneous microscopic samples. We report on the design and testing of a new type of monolithic 2D MACS resonators to overcome known limitations of conventional micro coils. The resonators' conductors were printed on dielectric substrate and tuned without utilizing lumped element capacitors. Self-resonance conditions have been computed by a hybrid FEM-MoM technique. Preliminary results reported here indicate robust mechanical stability, reduced eddy currents heating and negligible susceptibility effects. The gain in B1 /√{ P } is in agreement with the NMR sensitivity enhancement according to the principle of reciprocity. A sensitivity enhancement larger than 3 has been achieved in a monolithic micro resonator inside a standard 4 mm rotor at 500 MHz. These 2D resonators could offer higher performance micro-detection and ease of use of heterogeneous microscopic substances such as biomedical samples, microscopic specimens and thin film materials.

  9. Resonant snubber inverter

    DOEpatents

    Lai, Jih-Sheng; Young, Sr., Robert W.; Chen, Daoshen; Scudiere, Matthew B.; Ott, Jr., George W.; White, Clifford P.; McKeever, John W.

    1997-01-01

    A resonant, snubber-based, soft switching, inverter circuit achieves lossless switching during dc-to-ac power conversion and power conditioning with minimum component count and size. Current is supplied to the resonant snubber branches solely by the main inverter switches. Component count and size are reduced by use of a single semiconductor switch in the resonant snubber branches. Component count is also reduced by maximizing the use of stray capacitances of the main switches as parallel resonant capacitors. Resonance charging and discharging of the parallel capacitances allows lossless, zero voltage switching. In one embodiment, circuit component size and count are minimized while achieving lossless, zero voltage switching within a three-phase inverter.

  10. Monolithic MACS micro resonators.

    PubMed

    Lehmann-Horn, J A; Jacquinot, J-F; Ginefri, J C; Bonhomme, C; Sakellariou, D

    2016-10-01

    Magic Angle Coil Spinning (MACS) aids improving the intrinsically low NMR sensitivity of heterogeneous microscopic samples. We report on the design and testing of a new type of monolithic 2D MACS resonators to overcome known limitations of conventional micro coils. The resonators' conductors were printed on dielectric substrate and tuned without utilizing lumped element capacitors. Self-resonance conditions have been computed by a hybrid FEM-MoM technique. Preliminary results reported here indicate robust mechanical stability, reduced eddy currents heating and negligible susceptibility effects. The gain in B1/P is in agreement with the NMR sensitivity enhancement according to the principle of reciprocity. A sensitivity enhancement larger than 3 has been achieved in a monolithic micro resonator inside a standard 4mm rotor at 500MHz. These 2D resonators could offer higher performance micro-detection and ease of use of heterogeneous microscopic substances such as biomedical samples, microscopic specimens and thin film materials. PMID:27544845

  11. Vector Addition: Effect of the Context and Position of the Vectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barniol, Pablo; Zavala, Genaro

    2010-10-01

    In this article we investigate the effect of: 1) the context, and 2) the position of the vectors, on 2D vector addition tasks. We administered a test to 512 students completing introductory physics courses at a private Mexican university. In the first part, we analyze students' responses in three isomorphic problems: displacements, forces, and no physical context. Students were asked to draw two vectors and the vector sum. We analyzed students' procedures detecting the difficulties when drawing the vector addition and proved that the context matters, not only compared to the context-free case but also between the contexts. In the second part, we analyze students' responses with three different arrangements of the sum of two vectors: tail-to-tail, head-to-tail and separated vectors. We compared the frequencies of the errors in the three different positions to deduce students' conceptions in the addition of vectors.

  12. Anisotropic ultrafast dissociation probed by the Doppler effect in resonant photoemission from CF4.

    PubMed

    Ueda, K; Kitajima, M; De Fanis, A; Furuta, T; Shindo, H; Tanaka, H; Okada, K; Feifel, R; Sorensen, S L; Yoshida, H; Senba, Y

    2003-06-13

    The resonant Auger spectrum from the decay of F 1s-excited CF4 is measured. Several lines exhibit a nondispersive kinetic energy as the exciting photon energy is tuned through the resonance region. The F 1s(-1) atomiclike Auger line is split into two components due to the emission of Auger electrons by a fragment in motion, when electron emission is observed along the polarization vector of the light. This Doppler splitting is direct evidence that the core excitation leads to T(d)-->C(3v) symmetry lowering, by elongation of a specific C-F bond preferentially aligned along the polarization vector of the incident photon.

  13. Rotating-frame gradient fields for magnetic resonance imaging and nuclear magnetic resonance in low fields

    DOEpatents

    Bouchard, Louis-Serge; Pines, Alexander; Demas, Vasiliki

    2014-01-21

    A system and method for Fourier encoding a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signal is disclosed. A static magnetic field B.sub.0 is provided along a first direction. An NMR signal from the sample is Fourier encoded by applying a rotating-frame gradient field B.sub.G superimposed on the B.sub.0, where the B.sub.G comprises a vector component rotating in a plane perpendicular to the first direction at an angular frequency .omega.in a laboratory frame. The Fourier-encoded NMR signal is detected.

  14. Magnetic vectoring of magnetically responsive nanoparticles within the murine peritoneum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klostergaard, Jim; Bankson, James; Auzenne, Edmond; Gibson, Don; Yuill, William; Seeney, Charles E.

    2007-04-01

    Magnetically responsive nanoparticles (MNPs) might be candidates for pro-drug formulations for intraperitoneal (i.p.) treatment of ovarian cancer. We conducted feasibility experiments in an i.p. human ovarian carcinoma xenograft model to determine whether MNPs can be effectively vectored within this environment. Our initial results based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) indicate that i.p.-injected ˜15 nm magnetite-based MNPs can in fact migrate toward NdFeB magnets externally juxtaposed to the peritoneal cavity above the xenografts growing in the anterior abdominal wall. MNP localization to the tumor/peri-tumoral environment occurs. Further development of this MNP pro-drug strategy is underway.

  15. Electro- and Photoproduction of Vector Mesons at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Marco Battaglieri

    2002-09-01

    The total and differential cross section for exclusive electro- and photoproduction of vector mesons in the resonance region and above (1.6 < W < 2.9 GeV) was measured at Jefferson Laboratory in a wide kinematic range (0 < Q2 < 4 GeV2 and 0< -t < 5 GeV2). The measurement of the total and differential cross section down to 100 pb/GeV2 with the full kinematic coverage, was possible for the first time thanks to the combination of the 100% duty cycle of CEBAF and the large acceptance of the CLAS detector. The main results from the CLAS Collaboration activity in this field will be presented and discussed.

  16. Resonance Radiation and Excited Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Allan C. G.; Zemansky, Mark W.

    2009-06-01

    1. Introduction; 2. Physical and chemical effects connected with resonance radiation; 3. Absorption lines and measurements of the lifetime of the resonance state; 4. Collision processes involving excited atoms; 5. The polarization of resonance radiation; Appendix; Index.

  17. Resonances at the LHC beyond the Higgs boson: The scalar/tensor case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilian, Wolfgang; Ohl, Thorsten; Reuter, Jürgen; Sekulla, Marco

    2016-02-01

    We study in a bottom-up approach the theoretically consistent description of additional resonances in the electroweak sector beyond the discovered Higgs boson as simplified models. We focus on scalar and tensor resonances. Our formalism is suited for strongly coupled models, but can also be applied to weakly interacting theories. The spurious degrees of freedom of tensor resonances that would lead to bad high-energy behavior are treated using a generalization of the Stückelberg formalism. We calculate scattering amplitudes for vector-boson and Higgs boson pairs. The high-energy region is regulated by the T-matrix unitarization procedure, leading to amplitudes that are well behaved on the whole phase space. We present numerical results for complete partonic processes that involve resonant vector-boson scattering for the current and upcoming runs of LHC.

  18. Error estimation for ORION baseline vector determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. C.

    1980-01-01

    Effects of error sources on Operational Radio Interferometry Observing Network (ORION) baseline vector determination are studied. Partial derivatives of delay observations with respect to each error source are formulated. Covariance analysis is performed to estimate the contribution of each error source to baseline vector error. System design parameters such as antenna sizes, system temperatures and provision for dual frequency operation are discussed.

  19. 40 CFR 240.206 - Vectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Vectors. 240.206 Section 240.206 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES GUIDELINES FOR THE THERMAL PROCESSING OF SOLID WASTES Requirements and Recommended Procedures § 240.206 Vectors....

  20. 40 CFR 240.206 - Vectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Vectors. 240.206 Section 240.206 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES GUIDELINES FOR THE THERMAL PROCESSING OF SOLID WASTES Requirements and Recommended Procedures § 240.206 Vectors....

  1. 40 CFR 240.206 - Vectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Vectors. 240.206 Section 240.206 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES GUIDELINES FOR THE THERMAL PROCESSING OF SOLID WASTES Requirements and Recommended Procedures § 240.206 Vectors....

  2. 40 CFR 240.206 - Vectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Vectors. 240.206 Section 240.206 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES GUIDELINES FOR THE THERMAL PROCESSING OF SOLID WASTES Requirements and Recommended Procedures § 240.206 Vectors....

  3. 40 CFR 240.206 - Vectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Vectors. 240.206 Section 240.206 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES GUIDELINES FOR THE THERMAL PROCESSING OF SOLID WASTES Requirements and Recommended Procedures § 240.206 Vectors....

  4. A vector model for electroweak interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reifler, Frank

    1985-03-01

    In this paper we present a vector model for the electroweak interactions. The Cartan map gives an isomorphism between Dirac bispinors and an isotropic class of Yang-Mills vector fields. The isotropic Yang-Mills vector fields Fk =Ek +iHk with k=1,2,3, satisfy the condition that the matrix of scalar invariants (Fj ṡFk) equals a scalar multiple of the identity matrix. We show that all the bispinor observables commute with the Cartan isomorphism, including all gauge transformations, as well as Lorentz transformations. We derive the Yang-Mills equivalent Dirac equation. As a consequence of the vector model, we obtain a new Lagrangian for electroweak interactions, which is an alternative to the Weinberg-Salam Lagrangian. Moreover, we show that the vector model predicts that the Weinberg angle θw satisfies sin2 θw =0.25, which is close to the measured value of sin2 θw =0.23. The vector model accommodates all the lepton and quark flavors. Furthermore, it predicts the conservation of baryon number and lepton number, as well as electric charge in electroweak interactions. The vector model also gives a new interpretation to antiparticles. In the vector model, an antiparticle is characterized by its opposite baryon number, lepton number, and electric charge; yet both particles and antiparticles propagate forward in time with positive energies.

  5. Application of Vectors to Relative Velocity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tin-Lam, Toh

    2004-01-01

    The topic 'relative velocity' has recently been introduced into the Cambridge Ordinary Level Additional Mathematics syllabus under the application of Vectors. In this note, the results of relative velocity and the 'reduction to rest' technique of teaching relative velocity are derived mathematically from vector algebra, in the hope of providing…

  6. Vector particles tunneling from BTZ black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ge-Rui; Zhou, Shiwei; Huang, Yong-Chang

    2015-11-01

    In this paper we investigate vector particles' Hawking radiation from a Banados-Teitelboim-Zanelli (BTZ) black hole. By applying the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB) approximation and the Hamilton-Jacobi ansatz to the Proca equation, we obtain the tunneling spectrum of vector particles. The expected Hawking temperature is recovered.

  7. Ramond singular vectors and Jack superpolynomials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alarie-Vézina, Ludovic; Desrosiers, Patrick; Mathieu, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    The explicit formula for the superconformal singular vectors in the Neveu-Schwarz sector has been obtained recently, via its symmetric polynomial representation, as a sum of Jack superpolynomials. Here we present the analogous, but slightly more complicated, closed-form expression for the Ramond singular vectors.

  8. A Context Vector Model for Information Retrieval.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Billhardt, Holger; Borrajo, Daniel; Maojo, Victor

    2002-01-01

    Presents an indexing and information retrieval method that, based on the vector space model, incorporates term dependencies and thus obtains semantically richer representations of documents. Highlights include term context vectors; techniques for estimating the dependencies among terms; term weights; experimental results on four text collections;…

  9. Modelling resonant planetary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emel'yanenko, V.

    2012-09-01

    Many discovered multi-planet systems are in meanmotion resonances. The aim of this work is to study dynamical processes leading to the formation of resonant configurations on the basis of a unified model described earlier [1]. The model includes gravitational interactions of planets and migration of planets due to the presence of a gas disc. For the observed systems 24 Sex, HD 37124, HD 73526, HD 82943, HD 128311, HD 160691, Kepler 9, NN Ser with planets moving in the 2:1 resonance, it is shown that the capture in this resonance occurs at very wide ranges of parameters of both type I and type II migration. Conditions of migration leading to the formation of the resonant systems HD 45364 и HD 200964 (3:2 and 4:3, respectively) are obtained. Formation scenarios are studied for the systems HD 102272, HD 108874, HD 181433, HD 202206 with planets in high order resonances. We discuss also how gravitational interactions of planets and planetesimal discs lead to the breakup of resonant configurations and the formation of systems similar to the 47 UMa system.

  10. LABCOM resonator Phase 3

    SciTech Connect

    Keres, L.J.

    1990-11-01

    The purpose of this project was to develop quartz crystal resonator designs, production processes, and test capabilities for 5-MHz, 6.2-MHz, and 10-MHz resonators for Tactical Miniature Crystal Oscillator (TMXO) applications. GE Neutron Devices (GEND) established and demonstrated the capability to produce and test quartz crystal resonators for use in the TMXO developed by the US Army ERADCOM (now LABCOM). The goals in this project were based on the ERADCOM statement of work. The scope of work indicated that the resonator production facilities for this project would not be completely independent, but that they would be supported in part by equipment and processes in place at GEND used in US Department of Energy (DOE) work. In addition, provisions for production test equipment or or eventual technology transfer costs to a commercial supplier were clearly excluded from the scope of work. The demonstrated technical capability of the deep-etched blank design is feasible and practical. It can be manufactured in quantity with reasonable yield, and its performance is readily predictable. The ceramic flatpack is a very strong package with excellent hermeticity. The four-point mount supports the crystal to reasonable shock levels and does not perturb the resonator's natural frequency-temperature behavior. The package can be sealed with excellent yields. The high-temperature, high-vacuum processing developed for the TMXO resonator, including bonding the piezoid to its mount with conductive polyimide adhesive, is consistent with precision resonator fabrication. 1 fig., 6 tabs.

  11. Malaria vector control: from past to future.

    PubMed

    Raghavendra, Kamaraju; Barik, Tapan K; Reddy, B P Niranjan; Sharma, Poonam; Dash, Aditya P

    2011-04-01

    Malaria is one of the most common vector-borne diseases widespread in the tropical and subtropical regions. Despite considerable success of malaria control programs in the past, malaria still continues as a major public health problem in several countries. Vector control is an essential part for reducing malaria transmission and became less effective in recent years, due to many technical and administrative reasons, including poor or no adoption of alternative tools. Of the different strategies available for vector control, the most successful are indoor residual spraying and insecticide-treated nets (ITNs), including long-lasting ITNs and materials. Earlier DDT spray has shown spectacular success in decimating disease vectors but resulted in development of insecticide resistance, and to control the resistant mosquitoes, organophosphates, carbamates, and synthetic pyrethroids were introduced in indoor residual spraying with needed success but subsequently resulted in the development of widespread multiple insecticide resistance in vectors. Vector control in many countries still use insecticides in the absence of viable alternatives. Few developments for vector control, using ovitraps, space spray, biological control agents, etc., were encouraging when used in limited scale. Likewise, recent introduction of safer vector control agents, such as insect growth regulators, biocontrol agents, and natural plant products have yet to gain the needed scale of utility for vector control. Bacterial pesticides are promising and are effective in many countries. Environmental management has shown sufficient promise for vector control and disease management but still needs advocacy for inter-sectoral coordination and sometimes are very work-intensive. The more recent genetic manipulation and sterile insect techniques are under development and consideration for use in routine vector control and for these, standardized procedures and methods are available but need thorough

  12. Resistance to aphid vectors of virus disease.

    PubMed

    Westwood, Jack H; Stevens, Mark

    2010-01-01

    The majority of plant viruses rely on vectors for their transmission and completion of their life cycle. These vectors comprise a diverse range of life forms including insects, nematodes, and fungi with the most common of these being insects. The geographic range of many of these vectors is continually expanding due to climate change. The viruses that they carry are therefore also expanding their range to exploit novel and naïve plant hosts. There are many forms of naturally occurring vector resistance ranging from broad nonhost resistance to more specific types of inducible resistance. Understanding and exploiting the many and varied forms of natural resistance to virus vectors is therefore extremely important for current and future agricultural production systems. To demonstrate the range and extent of these resistance mechanisms, this chapter will primarily focus on aphids to highlight key developments appropriate to plant-insect-virus interactions. PMID:20965074

  13. Vector Diffusion Maps and the Connection Laplacian

    PubMed Central

    Singer, A.; Wu, H.-T.

    2013-01-01

    We introduce vector diffusion maps (VDM), a new mathematical framework for organizing and analyzing massive high-dimensional data sets, images, and shapes. VDM is a mathematical and algorithmic generalization of diffusion maps and other nonlinear dimensionality reduction methods, such as LLE, ISOMAP, and Laplacian eigenmaps. While existing methods are either directly or indirectly related to the heat kernel for functions over the data, VDM is based on the heat kernel for vector fields. VDM provides tools for organizing complex data sets, embedding them in a low-dimensional space, and interpolating and regressing vector fields over the data. In particular, it equips the data with a metric, which we refer to as the vector diffusion distance. In the manifold learning setup, where the data set is distributed on a low-dimensional manifold ℳd embedded in ℝp, we prove the relation between VDM and the connection Laplacian operator for vector fields over the manifold. PMID:24415793

  14. Preparation and quantification of pseudotyped retroviral vector.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hong; Kwon, Young Jik

    2008-01-01

    Retroviral vectors have been widely used for research and clinical trials in gene therapy because of their high transduction efficiency. Retroviruses interact with target cells through their surface molecules (i.e., envelope proteins) and cellular receptors, which limit the susceptibility of target cells to retroviral vectors. Murine leukemia retrovirus (MuLV) pseudotyped with vesicular stomatitis virus G glycoprotein (VSV-G) overcomes the species barrier and is more resistant to mechanical and biochemical inactivation. A cell line producing VSV-G pseudotyped MuLV vector can be established by transfecting 293T cells expressing Gag, Pol, and VSV-G (293 GPG cell line) with a retroviral vector plasmid. Transduction potency of the resulting VSV-G pseudotyped MuLV retroviral supernatant can be quantified by titration, electron microscopy (EM), and the reverse transcriptase (RT) assay. These protocols provide methods to prepare and quantify a pseudotyped retroviral vector with high transduction rates for most types of target cells.

  15. Transductional targeting with recombinant adenovirus vectors.

    PubMed

    Legrand, Valerie; Leissner, Philippe; Winter, Arend; Mehtali, Majid; Lusky, Monika

    2002-09-01

    Replication-deficient adenoviruses are considered as gene delivery vectors for the genetic treatment of a variety of diseases. The ability of such vectors to mediate efficient expression of therapeutic genes in a broad spectrum of dividing and non-dividing cell types constitutes an advantage over alternative gene transfer vectors. However, this broad tissue tropism may also turn disadvantageous when genes encoding potentially harmful proteins (e.g. cytokines, toxic proteins) are expressed in surrounding normal tissues. Therefore, specific restrictions of the viral tropism would represent a significant technological advance towards safer and more efficient gene delivery vectors, in particular for cancer gene therapy applications. In this review, we summarize various strategies used to selectively modify the natural tropism of recombinant adenoviruses. The advantages, limitations and potential impact on gene therapy operations of such modified vectors are discussed. PMID:12189719

  16. Lagrangian geometrical optics of nonadiabatic vector waves and spin particles

    DOE PAGES

    Ruiz, D. E.; Dodin, I. Y.

    2015-07-29

    Linear vector waves, both quantum and classical, experience polarization-driven bending of ray trajectories and polarization dynamics that can be interpreted as the precession of the "wave spin". Here, both phenomena are governed by an effective gauge Hamiltonian vanishing in leading-order geometrical optics. This gauge Hamiltonian can be recognized as a generalization of the Stern-Gerlach Hamiltonian that is commonly known for spin-1/2 quantum particles. The corresponding reduced Lagrangians for continuous nondissipative waves and their geometrical-optics rays are derived from the fundamental wave Lagrangian. The resulting Euler-Lagrange equations can describe simultaneous interactions of N resonant modes, where N is arbitrary, and leadmore » to equations for the wave spin, which happens to be an (N2 - 1)-dimensional spin vector. As a special case, classical equations for a Dirac particle (N = 2) are deduced formally, without introducing additional postulates or interpretations, from the Dirac quantum Lagrangian with the Pauli term. The model reproduces the Bargmann-Michel-Telegdi equations with added Stern-Gerlach force.« less

  17. Lagrangian geometrical optics of nonadiabatic vector waves and spin particles

    SciTech Connect

    Ruiz, D. E.; Dodin, I. Y.

    2015-07-29

    Linear vector waves, both quantum and classical, experience polarization-driven bending of ray trajectories and polarization dynamics that can be interpreted as the precession of the "wave spin". Here, both phenomena are governed by an effective gauge Hamiltonian vanishing in leading-order geometrical optics. This gauge Hamiltonian can be recognized as a generalization of the Stern-Gerlach Hamiltonian that is commonly known for spin-1/2 quantum particles. The corresponding reduced Lagrangians for continuous nondissipative waves and their geometrical-optics rays are derived from the fundamental wave Lagrangian. The resulting Euler-Lagrange equations can describe simultaneous interactions of N resonant modes, where N is arbitrary, and lead to equations for the wave spin, which happens to be an (N2 - 1)-dimensional spin vector. As a special case, classical equations for a Dirac particle (N = 2) are deduced formally, without introducing additional postulates or interpretations, from the Dirac quantum Lagrangian with the Pauli term. The model reproduces the Bargmann-Michel-Telegdi equations with added Stern-Gerlach force.

  18. Lagrangian geometrical optics of nonadiabatic vector waves and spin particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, D. E.; Dodin, I. Y.

    2015-10-01

    Linear vector waves, both quantum and classical, experience polarization-driven bending of ray trajectories and polarization dynamics that can be interpreted as the precession of the "wave spin". Both phenomena are governed by an effective gauge Hamiltonian vanishing in leading-order geometrical optics. This gauge Hamiltonian can be recognized as a generalization of the Stern-Gerlach Hamiltonian that is commonly known for spin-1/2 quantum particles. The corresponding reduced Lagrangians for continuous nondissipative waves and their geometrical-optics rays are derived from the fundamental wave Lagrangian. The resulting Euler-Lagrange equations can describe simultaneous interactions of N resonant modes, where N is arbitrary, and lead to equations for the wave spin, which happens to be an (N2 - 1)-dimensional spin vector. As a special case, classical equations for a Dirac particle (N = 2) are deduced formally, without introducing additional postulates or interpretations, from the Dirac quantum Lagrangian with the Pauli term. The model reproduces the Bargmann-Michel-Telegdi equations with added Stern-Gerlach force.

  19. Tunable multiwalled nanotube resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Zettl, Alex K.; Jensen, Kenneth J.; Girit, Caglar; Mickelson, William E.; Grossman, Jeffrey C.

    2011-03-29

    A tunable nanoscale resonator has potential applications in precise mass, force, position, and frequency measurement. One embodiment of this device consists of a specially prepared multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT) suspended between a metal electrode and a mobile, piezoelectrically controlled contact. By harnessing a unique telescoping ability of MWNTs, one may controllably slide an inner nanotube core from its outer nanotube casing, effectively changing its length and thereby changing the tuning of its resonance frequency. Resonant energy transfer may be used with a nanoresonator to detect molecules at a specific target oscillation frequency, without the use of a chemical label, to provide label-free chemical species detection.

  20. Tunable multiwalled nanotube resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Kenneth J; Girit, Caglar O; Mickelson, William E; Zettl, Alexander K; Grossman, Jeffrey C

    2013-11-05

    A tunable nanoscale resonator has potential applications in precise mass, force, position, and frequency measurement. One embodiment of this device consists of a specially prepared multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT) suspended between a metal electrode and a mobile, piezoelectrically controlled contact. By harnessing a unique telescoping ability of MWNTs, one may controllably slide an inner nanotube core from its outer nanotube casing, effectively changing its length and thereby changing the tuning of its resonance frequency. Resonant energy transfer may be used with a nanoresonator to detect molecules at a specific target oscillation frequency, without the use of a chemical label, to provide label-free chemical species detection.